Old Bailey Proceedings, 20th February 1822.
Reference Number: 18220220
Reference Number: f18220220-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, AND Gaol Delivery for the City of London, AND ALSO The Gaol Delivery For the County of Middlesex, HELD AT Justice Hall, in the Old Bailey; ON WEDNESDAY, 20th of FEBRUARY, 1822, and following Days;

Being the Third Session in the Mayoralty of THE RIGHT HON. CHRISTOPHER MAGNAY , LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

Taken in Short-Hand by H. BUCKLER, (BY AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON.)

London:

PRINTED FOR H. BUCKLER, By T. Booth, 31, St. Andrew's Hill, Doctors' Commons; and PUBLISHED BY T. KEYS, CITY LIBRARY, COLEMAN STREET.

1822.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX.

Before the Right Honourable CHRISTOPHER MAGNAY , Esq. LORD MAYOR of the City of London; Sir Robert Graham Knt., one of the Barons of his Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir William Draper Best, Knt., one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir John Richardson , Knt., one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir Richard Carr Glynn, Bart.; John Ansley , Esq.; Sir John Perring , Bart.; Sir Claudius Stephen Hunter, Bart.; Christopher Smith , Esq., and George Bridges , Esq., Aldermen of the said City; Sir John Silvester , Bart., D.C.L., Recorder of the said City; Robert Albion Cox , Esq., Alderman of the said City; Newman Knowlys, Esq., Common Sergeant of the said City, and William St . Julien Arabin, Esq., his Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of the Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

London Jury.

Joshua Ewbank ,

John Collender ,

Charles Williams ,

Edward Neal ,

William Skinner ,

William Brace ,

Thomas Blanshard ,

Thomas Reynolds ,

Edward Gardener ,

William Bell ,

Thomas Kelly ,

William Sherwood .

1st Middlesex Jury.

James Harris ,

Joseph Wassell ,

William Dew ,

Edward Sandwell ,

John Warwick ,

William Day ,

Ebenezer Willingham ,

Alexander Sheriff ,

John Lee Spray,

Charles Smith ,

Adam Young ,

Charles Badaley .

2nd Middlesex Jury.

James Elliott ,

John Bannister ,

Robert Scott ,

William Myers ,

William John Rhodes ,

Edmund Lloyd ,

Allen Billing ,

Thomas Kipling ,

John Milliken ,

Henry Decker Smith ,

John Allison ,

Alexander Ritchie .

SESSIONS HOUSE, OLD BAILEY, FEBRUARY 20, 1822.

MAGNAY, MAYOR. THIRD SESSION.

Reference Number: t18220220-1

326. EDWIN COCHRAN , alias JAMES MORRISON , WILLIAM OSBORNE , alias HENRY CLARE , and JOHN CLARE , were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Maria Kelly , widow , at Harrow, about twelve o'clock in the night of the 15th of January , with intent to steal, and stealing therein, one watch, value 3 l.; one gold chain, value 2 l.; one seal, value 10 s.; five yards of ribbon, value 2 s.; one silver vase and cover, value 20 l.; three ladles, value 6 l.; forty-eight spoons, value 40 l.; twenty-four forks, value 24 l.; one fish-knife, value 3 l.; two inkstands, value 8 l.; one pencil-case, value 2 l.; six candlesticks, value 7 l.; four bottle stands, value 3 l.; one snuff box, value 5 l.; one plated table ring, value 4 l.; one cloal, value 10 s.; two yards of druggett, value 5 s., and one box, value 10 s. , her property.

MR. ALLEY conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM DUCKETT . I am gardener to Mrs. Maria Kelly , a widow, who lives at Harrow-on-the-hill , in Harrow parish; she was in London the early part of January. The female servants and myself were at home on the 15th of January, and went to bed about ten o'clock, leaving the house all fast; I sleep on the first floor. After twelve o'clock, I heard a tapping, and then saw the glare of a candle pass my room door, which was not shut to - I rose up in bed and asked who was there, a man said,

"Never you mind." I got out of bed, and two men met me at the door; one of them had a pistol; they induced me to lay down, and having no arms, I complied - they asked me where the plate was; I said my mistress had got it in town; they then went into my mistress's bed room on the same floor as mine, and broke open some locks; they then went out of that room into the best bed room. I heard them opening the locks there.

Q. Did both the men leave your room - A. No; one of them remained with me, and the other went away; while he was with me, I heard some other person in the house; I heard two persons talking together - one of those who had been in the bed room said to the one who was with me,

"Blow his brains out," this was after I said there was no plate, there was some in the room I heard them go into - I heard them breaking locks open, and while they were doing so, I heard one of them say,

"D - n him, blow his brains out." The two went down stairs; the man still remained with me - one of them called out from the bottom of the stairs,

"Riches," and then the man left me. The key of my room was inside the door when I went to bed; I found it afterwards outside - the man returned to me in about five minutes, he opened the door, looked in, and said,

"Are you all right," I said I was there, he then went away, and my door was then fastened. I got out at the window in about ten minutes, and went to a neighbouring farm-house, and got assistance; I returned to the house and found the front gate open, which I had locked over night. I found the scullery door open, which was fastened the night before, and the glass of the window broken; there was room enough to admit a man through the casement - the scullery leads into the kitchen. I found property laying about, and in the best bed room there was a bundle of wearing apparel packed up.

COURT. Q. Had you any opportunity of seeing them - A. I only got a glimpse of them; the candle was not brought into my room - I heard three speak in the room, and it was a different voice which called out Riches, it was not the same voice which said,

"D - n him, shoot him;" I think there were four voices, I am certain there were three; one spoke in an Irish tone. Cochran had lived with my mistress - I cannot say whether either of the voices were like his. I am sure I made the house fast. One man was taller than the others.

ELIZABETH BOWEN . I am servant to Mrs. Kelly. The gardener alarmed me when he came from the farm-house. I came down stairs, and found a door broken open in the best bed-room, where the plate and other valuable articles were kept; the plate was gone - I went into the cellar where there was a large box containing candles, which was locked and safe when we went to bed; it stood on a wine bin in the cellar - it was broken open, and a good many candles had been used from it. The matches are kept in a cupboard in the kitchen; I found they were burnt all over the lower part of the house, and we found a great deal of candle grease on the carpet by the best bed room door. I left the things in the same state until my mistress saw them.

MARY BOWEN . I am servant to Mrs. Kelly, and was in the house that night. When my mistress went to town she left a watch on the chimney piece in her bed room; I put it in a drawer - a black ribbon, seal, and key were attached to it. I have seen it since. Cochran did not live there with me.

MRS. MARIA KELLY . I am a widow. I was in town at the time of the robbery - I heard of it next morning went home immediately, and found things in great disorder, and my clothes laying on the bed room floor. I had left

some drawers unlocked, and from those drawers the things were taken - there was a very strong closet in the wall of the best bed room, it appeared like a door going into another room; I locked that closet myself when I went to town, and took the key with me. I left plate, and a variety of property there; I found it forced open and the things taken away - I had left a plate box with four dozen table spoons, two dozen silver forks, a silver vase and cover, a fish knife, two silver ink bottles of Bramah's construction, a gold pencil case, and snuff box, they were all gone. My dressing box was also broken open, and from that a gold curb watch-chain was taken, also the silver bottles, and some ribbons were taken. I had had the ribbons since 1809; I had them when I was shipwrecked off the East Indies, and they were valuable to me on that account - I kept them in my dressing box where I was in the habit of frequently seeing them. I think I saw them the day before I went to town - I know them by one being of a particular pattern, and they are stained with sea water. I had left a watch hanging over the chimney piece in my bed room - that was gone, it had a black ribbon, seal, and a key, attached to it - but when I saw it at Bow-street, it had the same seal, and key, and the curb chain attached to it, the ribbon was gone. Cochran lived seven months in my service, and left on the day of the Coronation. The candles were kept in a coal cellar next to the kitchen; the door was pannelled, so as to represent the wall, and when the kitchen door was open, three parts of it would be covered - I think when the kitchen door was open nobody could suppose a door was there. The candle box was on a bin in the cellar. When I was in the country, I kept my money in a chest of drawers in the dining room - when I went to town, I never left it there; I do not know whether Cochran was acquainted with that, he knew I kept it there when at home. The four dozen spoons were worth 24 l.

WILLIAM SCOTT . I am a Bow-street patrol. On the 21st of January, about twelve o'clock, I was going down Chandos-street, towards St. Martin's-lane, and saw Osborne, Cochran, and one Brown - I met Sayers, and we followed them into St. Martin's-lane, and saw Osborne and Cochran go up under the Golden Cross gateway - I laid hold of Osborne, and took him over the way to Mrs. Mountains, into the back parlour; when he got in, he shifted something from his pocket to the floor, he slipped it down inside his trowsers, his hand was in his pocket at the time; I observed him fumbling his hand about, and his watch came out at the bottom of his trowsers on the floor; he stamped his foot on it - I said it will do you no service, I shall take you to justice all the same; he got out of my hold, picked up the watch, and threw it against the fire place - I secured him; upon searching him, I found a gold repeater, a black ribbon, seal, and key, also a belcher silk handkerchief. I was with Sayers when he took the other man. Cochran gave the name of Morrison.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. This was five days after the robbery - A. Yes. I knew nothing of the robbery at the time. The gateway is a very public place. The watch glass was broken.

COURT. Q. Were they talking together - A. I saw Osborne, Cochran, and Brown talking together three or four times that day, which caused my suspicion. Brown was afterwards taken and discharged.

ISAAC SAYER . I am a constable. I assisted in securing the prisoners - I took Cochran. I first saw all three together at the corner of Bedfordbury; Brown and Cochran were walking arm in arm, and Osborne was before them, speaking to them over his shoulder; I took Cochran, Brown immediately ran down to Charing-cross. I took Cochran into Mrs. Mountain's, and searched him; he gave me the name of Morrison - he attempted to escape from me with a great deal of force, while Osborne was being searched; I forced him into the parlour, he immediately jumped on the table, lifted up the window leading into the yard, rolled out, and fell down into the yard, about fifteen feet - I went down and took him again, he walked into the parlour; I searched him, and found a pocket handkerchief, and two keys on him.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. How many men besides were apprehended for this robbery - A.Three others, who were discharged.

WILLIAM SCOTT . One of the keys produced is a pick-lock key. I have been an officer twelve months. I have not tried it to open any thing.

RICHARD MAYBANK . I have been an officer twenty years. I call this a complete skeleton key.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Have you seen Bramah's keys - A. I have seen many of them, but none like these.

ROBERT CHAPMAN . I am an officer of Bow-street. I searched Clare's apartments at No. 3, Middlesex-court, Drury-lane, and found a pistol, not loaded, concealed in a cupboard behind a partition, at the head of the bed. I found the ribbon in a deal chest which was not locked; Clare claimed the ribbon at Bow-street - he said it was given him by a young woman, who was gone to America, three years ago.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Clare was not in custody when you found them - A. No; he was attending the examination of the prisoners, at the time I brought it to the office. Clare was then at the bar - the ribbon was not put in his hand, it laid on the table before the Magistrate; I believe he said he had used part of it to tie up his arm when he was bled.

Q. Did not the Justice ask him,

"Had you any ribbon in your box" - A. I believe it was to that effect, but it laid on the table before him, about four yards from him; he asked to see the ribbon at the last examination, but it was not there then - at the first examination, he said it was given to him. The pistol is rather fowl inside, and does not appear to have been recently used.

MR. ALLEY. Q. When the ribbon was produced at the first examination, had he not a full opportunity of seeing it - A. He had. Both him and Osborne asked to see it at the second examination, but it was not there.

MR. JAMES HARMER . I am solicitor to the prosecutrix. I attended the examination, and heard what Clare said, he was brought to the office, in the middle of the examination of the other prisoners, he was first brought close to the Magistrate's table - Sir R. Birnie produced the ribbon, and asked what account he had to give of those ribbons, which were found in his box, he was within a quarter of a yard of them - he said they were given to him three years ago by a young woman, who was gone to America; Sir R. Birnie then ordered him to be put to the bar with the

other prisoners - I know this was not taken down in writing.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. How often did you attend before this - A. Once; I believe Mr. Price attended, I cannot say he attended professionally for them, but at the next examination Osborne said he had an attorney at the two former examinations, but he had not said a word for them, and it was of no use to have him. I attended three examinations, but there had been others. Sir R. Birnie sent for Clare, and directly he came Sir Richard held the ribbons up, and asked how he came by them, and was told there were three pieces - he said there should be four, and they were given him three years ago, by a young woman who was gone to America, and that he had used one to bind his arm after being bled.

WILLIAM WOODS . I am clerk to the Magistrates of Bow-street, and recollect Clare being examined, I did not take down what he said.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. How many examinations were there - A. Clare was there first on the 7th of February, there had been three examinations before that; I had seen him at one of these examinations, Sir R. Birnie, sent for him, and put a few questions to him, as it was said Osborne lodged with him; but Mr. Birchs's foreman spoke in his favour, and he was suffered to go at large; he was at large several days before he was taken again. I understood Osborne to be some relation of his. Brown and one Woodley were also taken on this charge.

MR. ALLEY. Q. When Clare was let at large the ribbon was not found - A. No. He was questioned on the 4th of February, and taken again on the 7th.

WILLIAM LEE . I am an officer of Bow-street. On the 4th of February, I went with Chapman to Middlesex-court, and found the ribbon which I produce. Clare was being questioned while we were searching his lodging, he was not in custody when we returned. I kept them till he was in custody. The prosecutrix saw them at the office on the 7th.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Who told you where the lodging was - A. I heard him tell the Magisstrate he lived there, and that Osborne lodged at the same place. The ribbon was at the bottom of his box. There was nothing but old worn out clothes there.

WILLIAM SCOTT . I produce the watch found on Osborne.

MRS. KELLY. The watch, seal, key, and chain are mine, the seal has a motto - the ribbon I know perfectly well, there were several small pieces; I can speak to two pieces, one I used to wear buckled round my waist; and here are the buckle holes. I left home on the 26th of December.

MARY BOWEN . I know the watch to be my mistress's; I saw it on the 15th, in the bed-room.

COCHRAN'S Defence. One morning when Osborne was in a public-house, I saw him buy the watch of three men, but I did not know the watch then - they would not let me see it. When we came down St. Martin's-lane, I did not observe that Osborne was in custody - I went up the gateway, and saw the officer with him. The reason I escaped out of window was because I was afraid of being taken for a small debt which I owed.

OSBORNE'S Defence. I was in the public-house this morning, and bought the watch of three young people who called me aside; Cochran came too, and they told me to take him away - I bought the watch for 25 s., and told them they had taken me in and sold me a metal chain for a gold one. I had no conversation with Cochran. I was in St. Martin's-lane, they took me, and as I came out of the gateway, I saw the man I bought it of running up the lane as hard as he could, and the officer collared me then, but not before.

CLARE'S Defence. I have no knowledge of the ribbons, I have no deal box in my room. I went to the office two or three times before I was taken. Scott asked where I lived and worked; I told him, he took my direction down in his book - he left word with Osborne that I could find him when I choosed, at a public-house; I suppose he wanted me to give him money. The prisoner's attorney advised me to go out of the way till they were committed; I said I should not, but went to work as usual till Thursday, though they had searched my room on Monday. I said there were four pieces of ribbon, but there had been seven; I had used three when I was bled - I had not seen them for four months.

WILLIAM SCOTT re-examined. I collared Osborne, and then Brown began to run, but not before, I am positive. I am sure they were all three talking together several times between Chandos-street, and St. Martin's-lane, Clare gave me his right name. I do not recollect his saying where he lived; I made no memorandum of it.

One witness gave Osborne a good character.

GEORGE CROCKFORD . I am apprentice to Mr. Birch, of Queen-street, a coachmaker. Clare worked there two years and a half as painter - he attended business as usual during this investigation. I had given him the pistol to stain the handle for me, about a fortnight before I went to Bow-street - it is in the same condition now.

COCHRAN - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 19.

OSBORNE - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 20.

CLARE - NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Best.

Reference Number: t18220220-2

327. RICHARD BALDWIN and JOHN PAY were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering, the dwelling-house of Edward Hopkins , about six o'clock in the night, of the 24th of January , and stealing, one looking glass, value 50 s. , his property.

EDWARD HOPKINS . I live in the parish of St. John, Westminster . On the 24th of January, this looking glass was in the front parlour; I went out about six o'clock that evening, it was quite dark, and rained - the shutters were open, but the sash was down, and the small blinds were closed.

SARAH LARKIN . On the 24th of January, I was left in the house with the family; Mr. Hopkins went out, and about half-past six o'clock, a person knocked at the door, the servant said somebody gave her information, she alarmed us; I went down to the parlour and missed the looking glass, which hung up opposite the door; I had been in there in the afternoon, the window was down then - there is an area, and rails before the house. I found the window next the door open, the blinds up, and footmarks

on the table, a chair next the window, and on the window seat, and area rails. We found the prisoners next morning at Bow-street, with it.

WILLIAM NICHOLLS . I am a constable. On the 24th of January, about seven o'clock at night, I was with Haradine in Cockspur-street, nearly a mile from Hopkins's house, which is in John-street - I saw the prisoners carrying this glass; they turned out of Cockspur-street, on the ruins leading to Whitcombe-street, we followed them across the ruins - Baldwin then took the glass by himself; Pay stopped and looked back several times, Haradine took him. I took Baldwin with the glass, and asked where he was going with it, he said to a house in Whitcombe-street, I asked what house; he said he had forgotten - that he did not know the number, or person's name, but that Mr. Doe, No. 14, Great Peter-street, Westminster, sent him to carry it. Hopkins claimed the glass next morning. I went and found a Mr. Doe, at No. 14, New Peter-street.

JOSEPH HARADINE. Nicholls's account is correct.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

BALDWIN - GUILTY. Aged 19.

PAY - GUILTY. Aged 18.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s., only, but not of the burglary .

Confined One Year .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18220220-3

328. JOSEPH CLARK was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of James Cook , about six o'clock in the night of the 3d of February , and stealing therein, three sheets, value 6 s.; one table cloth, value 2 s.; one towel, value 6 s., and one piece of baize, value 6 d., his property; one shift, value 2 s., and two petticoats, value 2 s. , the goods of Ann Cook .

JAMES COOK . I live in Keppel-street, Chelsea . On Sunday, the 3d of February, I was at home; and received some information, between six and seven o'clock in the evening; I went to the door, and found the front window open, sufficiently for a person to get in - there is a garden before the window railed round. I had been in the room five minutes before, the window was then shut, but not fastened; some linen which hung on a small horse in the room was gone; it was dark, I had lit my candle about five minutes before; the prisoner was taken before I knew any thing about it.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. If you could see the linen it was light enough to see any one - A. Yes; it was moonlight.

WILLIAM OAKHAM . I live at Yoell, in Surrey. On the 3d of February, I was passing Cook's house, and saw the prisoner standing at the gate - I passed him and saw another man come from the window with the clothes under his arm; they both went away together, I followed them, the other young man threw the things out of his arms, and ran off the prisoner stopped to pick them up, and I secured him and took him to the watch-house - the clothes were carried into the house; it was a few minutes past six o'clock when I first saw them, it was moonlight.

ROBERT WARD . I am a cheesemonger, and live at Chelsea, two doors from Cook's. I saw the prisoner and a boy run across the road from Cook's, Oakham followed, and stopped the prisoner, I went to his assistance; I had seen the other throw the linen into a garden, but some of it fell into the street. I picked most of it up, and carried it to Cook's - I first saw them five yards from Cook's gate, there was very little moonlight, and no daylight, it was nearly dark, and about half-past or a quarter past six o'clock when I left home.

RICHARD MAYBANK . I am an officer. I produce the linen which I received from Ward, who brought the prisoner to the watch-house, about a quarter before seven o'clock.

JAMES COOKE. Ward brought the linen in, I examined it, and afterwards delivered it to Maybank.

ANN COOK . I am the daughter of James Cook . I went out at one o'clock, leaving the linen in the front parlour, hanging on a horse - I came home at seven o'clock in the evening, it was then gone.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Richardson.

Reference Number: t18220220-4

329. JOHN NEGUS was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Stephen Rumbold Lushington , Esq. , about six o'clock in the night of the 27th of January , and stealing therein, two books, value 7 s. , his property.

ROBERT FISHER . I am servant to Stephen Rumbold Lushington , Esq., who lives in Cleveland-square, Westminster . On the 27th of January, I was in the house with Goodwin and some of the servants; the library window was down, but the shutters not put to, nor the sash fastened - my master sent me round to the stable about a quarter before six o'clock; it was getting dark, there was not light enough to see a man's face - I saw a man standing in Cleveland-row, opposite the library window; I believe it to be the prisoner, but there was not sufficient light to swear to him. When I got about two yards from him, he called out,

"Jump out." I looked round, and saw a man jump out of the library window, with two books in his hand, which he threw on the ground - he ran about twelve yards and I followed; he pulled something out of his pocket which he struck me with, and it cut a piece off my hand; the person who called out

"Jump," ran in the same direction; they ran towards the Park. I saw the prisoner in custody in three minutes. I found the books by the window, and more were on the window cill ready to be moved.

DAVID GOODWIN . I am butler to Mr. Lushington. I shut the library window; there is a fastening to it, but it was not fastened, it was shut close down. I saw it about five o'clock. About a quarter before six o'clock, it was up - I was then in the library, but had no light, I saw nothing of the prisoner. Some books laid on the cill which I took off, and shut the window.

JAMES WHEATLEY . I am a patrol. On this evening, I was on duty; and met two men running from Cleveland-row, towards the Park, in a direction from Mr. Lushington's house. I heard the cry of Stop thief! the prisoner had passed me by that time - I told the centinel at the gate to stop him, which he did in my sight; he was delivered over to the sergeant of the guards.

ROBERT CHARLES CHAPMAN. I am a constable. The prisoner was delivered to me by sergeant Morgan, I received the books from Mr. Lushington.

(Books produced and sworn to.)

JOHN GUDGE . I am a patrol. I was coming towards Cleveland-row, and saw two men running from Mr. Lushington's house; the prisoner was the first, there was a cry of Stop thief! and the centinel stopped him.

JOHN READ. I was centry and stopped the prisoner about one hundred yards from the house; only him and another were running, he was the first.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming from King-street, heard the cry, and saw two men running; I followed them, and on getting to the gate, was stopped.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Best.

Reference Number: t18220220-5

330. JAMES BYFORD was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of January , one piece of serge, containing twenty-two yards, value 1 l., and one wrapper, value 3 s. , the goods of Henry Brook and others, his partners, and HENRY RUSHWORTH was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing it to be stolen .

MR. CHARLES WEBB . I am one of the firm of Henry Brook and Co. There are two other partners; our warehouse is in Sambrook-court, Basinghall-street, and communicates with Coleman-street. Both the prisoners were our porters , and Archard was also our porter. On the 25th of January, in the morning, he gave us some information. We are serge factors, and sell for a great many people.

HENRY ARCHARD . I am porter to Messrs. Brook and Co., and have been so nearly seven years. On the 23d of January, I saw Rushworth go away about six o'clock; he had no bundle then, I left the warehouse about seven o'clock, and was in Crooked-lane, and saw him there, as I was going to my uncle's in the Borough. He had something in a wrapper then - I went up and took hold of it, in a jocular way, and said,

"You, Yorkshireman," I pulled it, and he pulled, and I thought he seemed confused. I asked what he was going to do with it, he gave me no answer; I asked him again, and he said

"Home." We walked together, and I asked if he was going to leave it any where in the morning, he said

"Yes," but did not say where. He asked me to have some gin, I said

"No." We then went to my uncle's, the Paviour's Arms, Fishmonger-alley - I asked again what he was going to do with it, he made no answer, put it on the settle, and moved away from it, and I saw by the corner, that it was serge. He owed me 18 s. I told him I would thank him for it, as soon as he could, for I was short; he said he had got the serge out to pay me, and if I would go in the parlour, he would tell me all about it, as he thought I had some suspicion. We went into the parlour, he begged me to say nothing about it. I said it would be the best way to tell me about it, and I would not tell - he left the serge at my uncle's, I put a seal on the bundle. I saw Mr. Webb next morning, and told him all I knew. About eleven o'clock that morning, Rushworth and I went together to Byford, to the front of the warehouse; I asked Byford how he came to take the piece out, he said he did do it, was very sorry, and hoped I would say nothing about it, and said he would get the serge away from my uncle's at dinner time, take it to the dyer's, and they would bring it back with one hundred and fifty returns - they were taken in custody on the following morning. I took the serge from my uncle's on the night of the 24th, after Rushworth left, brought it to my own house, and kept it there till the 26th, then brought it to the warehouse, sealed it, and gave it to the officer.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. The men usually leave at six o'clock - A. Yes; Rushworth passed me as he went out, and wished me good night - he had nothing then; the serge is too large to be concealed - I parted with him that night, and by agreement, went with him to Byford the next morning. I had told my master, and had his approbation for what I was doing - I told Byford it was a bad job, and he said it was. I asked him how he came to get it out, because Rushworth had told me Byford had got it out - he asked if I had said any thing about it, I said

"No;" he said he did do it, and was sorry for it. I did not say they should not be hurt - they were taken in custody half an hour after. I locked the serge in my own room till I sealed it.

WILLIAM DRINKWATER . I am an officer, and produce the serge and wrapper, which Archard delivered to me at Guildhall.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JAMES BISHOP . I am porter to Messrs. Brook and Co. I know the wrapper, I had it on the 23d of January to cover over goods which I carried out. I returned it to the warehouse where the prisoners were employed.

BYFORD - GUILTY . Aged 29.

Transported for Seven Years .

RUSHWORTH - GUILTY . Aged 37.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220220-6

331. WILLIAM RYAN was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of February , one watch, value 5 l.; one seal, value 10 s., and two keys, value 10 s., the goods of Walter Cobham , from his person .

WALTER COBHAM. I am a servant out of employ. On the 4th of February, about twenty minutes after nine o'clock at night, my silver watch was in my fob, with a seal, two keys, and a ribbon. I was going home, along Cow-lane , I was quite sober; on turning the corner, about the middle of the lane, a man came on my right hand, and struck me a violent blow on the stomach, which made me reel, and in a second I missed my watch, which was safe before he struck me - that was not the prisoner, but the prisoner was close to me, and ran off immediately after the man who struck me ran; he did not cry out after the man, but kept running down the lane before me, to prevent my following the man who struck me, and kept jogging across the gutter, and immediately as I lost sight of that man, the prisoner stopped. Nobody else was near me; I seized him, without losing sight of him, the watch has not been found, it cost nine guineas.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Did you cry Stop thief! as soon as you missed your watch - A. Not half a minute after I received the blow the thief ran by me, and then the prisoner ran too - I do not believe he was pursuing the thief; he said he had no objection to my sending for an officer, and stopped quietly with me for a quarter of

an hour till one came. I held him all the while, he gave different accounts of himself.

COURT. Q. Did the prisoner attempt to stop the man when he started - A. No; but kept running across me, right and left, to prevent my getting up to the man, and that made me take him.

WILLIAM SHUTER . I am a constable. I took charge of the prisoner between nine and ten o'clock, and took him to the watch-house. I asked where he had been that evening, he said to one Williams, in Fetter-lane, for some shoemaker's lasts; that he lived in French-alley, Goswell-street, and worked at a large tobacconists in the Minories, for three years, up to the present time. I was taking him to Fetter-lane, he said it was no use to take him, I had better take him to the Compter - I however, took him to the place he described, and enquired, in his hearing, but no such person as Williams was to be found. I then took him to the Minories, and on going along, he said, he had not worked there for eighteen months - I found nobody to give me an answer; he then said he got his living by going into the country with cheese and fruit.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220220-7

332. JONATHAN JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of February , 34 lbs. of cheese, value 17 s. , the goods of Henry Cherrington .

HENRY CHERRINGTON . I am a publican , and keep the Cock, public-house, on Snowhill . On the 9th of February, this cheese was in front of the bar, the prisoner had called for a pint of beer - I saw him leave the house, my daughter called out that he had taken the cheese; we both pursued him, he went up a court, where my daughter took him with it. I went to her assistance, it was a whole cheese. He had paid for his beer - there was a man with him.

SARAH CHERRINGTON . I was in the bar, and saw the prisoner go out with the cheese under his arm; I told my father, and ran after him - I saw him turn down the bill, and lost sight of him; I returned, went up Cock-court, and took him with it, he dropped it on my foot - my father assisted in securing him, there was a court through which he could run round into Cock-court.

Prisoner. Q. How could you see me drop it, as the passage is dark - A. I felt it under his arm, and he dropped it on my feet.

WILLIAM SHUTER . I took him in charge, he refused to give his name or place of residence.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was in the house and had some beer, there was twelve people before the bar, it is impossible she could see me take the cheese; if I had run down the street, I could not be in the court within five yards of the house. She came up and said,

"What are you doing there, you are the man who stole the cheese;" I could certainly get from her if I liked, but I never resisted, being conscious of my innocence - I never touched it.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Publicly Whipped and Discharged.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220220-8

333. ROBERT ROBERTS was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of February , one shew glass, value 5 s., and 4 lbs. of sugared almonds, value 6 s. , the goods of Edmund Wilkins .

EDMUND WILKINS . I am a confectioner , and live in Catharine-street . On Saturday night, about seven o'clock, I lost my shew-glass out of the shop, with about 5 lbs. of sugared almonds in it; it was safe a quarter of an hour before - I did not miss it till the prisoner was brought back with it.

JAMES PRETTY . I am porter to Mr. Wilkins. On Saturday night, about seven o'clock, I was coming up Catharine-street, and saw the prisoner and a boy a little taller than him, going along together with the shew glass; I pursued him, the prisoner had the glass - I brought him back to the shop; his companion ran off - he began crying, and said he could get no work.

THOMAS WILLIS. I am a constable. I was sent for, and took him in charge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I picked the glass up by his door, I did not know it was his.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220220-9

334. MARY HOOKER was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of February , one pair of shoes, value 4 s. 6 d. , the goods of Anthony Smith Johnson .

ANTHONY SMITH JOHNSON . I am a shoemaker , and live in Barbican . On the 9th of February, about three o'clock, I came into the shop, and found the prisoner in custody, and saw the shoes found on her, she appeared distressed.

SARAH GAGE . I live at Mr. Johnson's. The prisoner came in and asked me for a pair of shoes; I shewed her a pair - she wanted better ones, which I shewed her, she approved of them; she said she must get the money from her husband, who was only over at the public-house, I said very well - I looked round, and missed a pair of shoes; there were two others in the shop; I stopped all three - she said she had neither money or pockets, and could not take them; they were found under her clothes. She had an infant.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I suppose I must have taken them in taking the child off the counter.

GUILTY . Aged 38.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220220-10

335. MICHAEL HERRING was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of February , one handkerchief, value 6 d., the goods of a certain man whose name is unknown, from his person .

WILLIAM HODGSON . I am a shoemaker, and live in Holyday-yard, Creed-lane. On Friday the 1st of February, I was near Angel-street, and saw the prisoner with two others about nineteen and sixteen years old - I saw the prisoner lift up the pocket of a gentleman's coat, in St. Martins-le-grand ; he took the handkerchief out, and turned the corner of Angel-street with his companions - I pursued and took him with it in his hand; he called to his

companions, and one of them came back, and gave me a blow on the head, the other ran against me, and broke my hold, and he got away for a few seconds - I knocked his companions down, and laid hold of the prisoner at Butcherhall-lane without losing sight of him; I could not find the gentleman, he had a lady with him. I gave the handkerchief to Taylor.

GUILTY . Aged 13.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220220-11

SECOND DAY. THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 21, 1822.

336. JAMES EATES was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of December , one coat, value 5 s.; one pair of breeches, value 5 s.; one pair of trowsers, value 5 s., and one waistcoat, value 1 s. , the goods of William Noakes .

WILLIAM NOAKES . I am a wine merchant , and live at Kentish Town . On the 23d of December, my clothes were in a drawer in the kitchen; the prisoner had lived servant with me about half a year - I missed them next morning. They were clothes he wore, as my servant ; he left me on the 24th - I paid him his wages, he had the trowsers on then, but not the breeches or waistcoat; he was to find his own clothes, but I had them made for him to wear on a Sunday; he was not to pay me for them, there was no agreement to that effect.

Q. You suffered him to go away with the waistcoat - A. Yes. He refused to give the clothes up when he left, and so I ordered the constable to take him up. The Magistrate refused to interfere.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220220-12

337. JOHN SHANNON was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of May , one coat, value 30 s.; one pair of breeches, value 5 s.; three shawls, value 20 s.; one handkerchief, value 5 s., and two gowns, value 15 s. , the goods of Conner Shaunessy .

The prosecutor did not appear

NOT - GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220220-13

338. ANN BREWSTER was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of January , one crown piece, the property of William Snook , from his person .

WILLIAM SNOOK . I live in Charles-street, Globe-fields, Mile End. About half-past eleven o'clock on Saturday night, the 19th of January, I was coming home from the pay table in Globe-lane, and saw three people over the way, it was very dark; they hailed me, and one said,

"Is that you?" I said,

"Yes, Is that you?" I did not go over to them, but kept walking on, and all in a moment I saw the prisoner at my right side; I said,

"What do you do about at this time of night, you ought to be at home;" she said she had no home, for she had neither fire, nor victuals to eat when she was there; I said,

"I am as poor as you almost"; I put my hand in my pocket, and gave her 6 d., and as I gave it her, I felt her hand in my pocket. I said

"You have robbed me"; I missed a crown piece - I seized her, and took her to the watch-house, and saw the crown piece shaken out of her handkerchief on the floor - I thought her a woman in distress, and not a woman of the town; I have no mark on the crown piece. I also lost 3 s. 6 d.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not go up a dark court with me - A. It is false, I had nothing to do with her.

JAMES STONE . I am a constable. The prisoner was brought to the watch-house by the prosecutor, who gave the same account he has now; she denied having any 5 s. piece about her; I saw her fumbling at her handkerchief while she was being searched - the 5 s. piece dropped from her bosom; I picked it up.

JOHN CHRISTIAN . I was on duty that night - Stone's account is correct. Thinking the prosecutor might have been with her, I asked if she had any 5 s. piece about her, she denied having any thing but a few halfpence - I searched her, and found 3 s. in silver, and 1 s. 9 d., in copper; I saw her hand in her bosom, I moved her handkerchief, and the 5 s. piece dropped on the ground - the prosecutor said he lost 8 s. or 9 s., and there was a 5 s. piece among it.

Prisoner's Defence. It was among my halfpence, I did not know I had it; he took it from my hand. The prosecutor went up a court with me.

GUILTY . Aged 46.

Confined Six Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220220-14

339. WILLIAM PARKINS and FRANCIS HATFIELD were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Daniel Collings , about six o'clock in the night of the 28th of January , and stealing therein, three sheets, value 6 s.; six table cloths, value 6 s.; six petticoats, value 3 s.; one slip, value 6 d.; seven shifts, value 4 s.; eight pillow cases, value 2 s.; three pieces of calico, value 2 s.; seven napkins, value 1 s; nine pieces of linen, value 18 d.; two window curtains, value 6 d.; two neckcloths, value 4 d.; one handkerchief, value 6 d.; one apron, value 3 d., and one piece of muslin, value 1 d. , his goods.

DANIEL COLLINGS . I rent the room over the stables of Mr. Martin, a corn-chandler, at the back of Gower-street , there is only one room, and a hay loft; Martin occupies the stable and coach-house, nobody sleeps there, but his servants go backwards and forwards. On the 20th of January, I went out at dinner time, and returned a quarter before seven o'clock, I am sure it was after six o'clock, it was very dark - I saw a light in the room as I came up to the door; I knocked at the door, supposing my wife was not gone to church; when I knocked a second time, two young men came down and opened the door - I cannot swear to either of them; they rushed out, and both ran away. I had a bundle under my arm, which I threw into the stable, and pursued, they were then turning Francis-street, and running across towards Tottenham-court-road; I cried Stop thief! the prisoners were stopped and brought back to me - I went back and found two bundles of linen tied up and thrown inside the stable door; I go through the stable to my room; I put them on a box in the stable, and saw Cousins take them away. I missed nothing but the property in the bundles.

Q. You lost sight of them; when you caught a glimpse of them how many were running - A. Several were pursuing them.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Is your room door fastened - A. Yes. I go through the stable to it; they were taken two or three hundred yards off. The stable door was unlocked, whether it had been left so or no I cannot say.

MARGARET COLLINGS . I am the wife of the last witness. I left the room about half-past six o'clock in the evening, I came down stairs and went out at the stable door, I turned the key, but cannot be certain that I locked it. I am sure it was asped, and believe I locked it; I left the key at a friend's house opposite - Martin has a key of his own. I returned about eight o'clock; I had left this property in a box, which was not locked.

Cross-examined. Q. Martin has a key - A. Yes; his servants are in and out a dozen times of an evening. I have frequently known them leave the stable door open.

HENRY ETHERINGTON . I was returning from Hampstead-road, on the 20th of January, about seven o'clock, it was quite dark, I had occasion to call in Francis-street, a young man was with me; we had knocked at the door, and heard a loud cry of Stop thief! in Francis-street; two men were then running from the dark part of Francis-street, towards Tottenham-court-road; I pursued one, who passed me, through Francis-street, into Tottenham-court-road, and at the corner of the chapel, I took a crowbar from his hand, as he struck back with it to keep me off; he made off to the other side, but before he could reach there, he was so exhausted, that he stumbled against a stone and fell. I secured him and took him back to Collings - I believe Hatfield to be the man, but I cannot be sure; he very much resembles him. I gave him in the charge of Collings, he was locked in the stable till the officer came - I do not like to swear to him.

THOMAS COOK . On the 20th of January, I was in my own house, in Francis-street, and between half-past six and seven o'clock, I heard the cry of Stop thief! I went to the door and saw men run by, I cannot say how many; I believe the first passed just as I opened the door, and a few yards from my door, I saw Parkins stopped, a scuffle ensued, and I collared him; he picked his hat up, which was off, he walked with me to the stable, where Collings lived, he and several others were there. About three or four minutes after, I saw Attfield, I believe him to be the man. Etherington brought him in, Parkins walked very quietly back with me to the stable, and then said, I had taken the wrong man.

Cross-examined. Q. You cannot say he was the second who ran by - A. No; several people were running.

WILLIAM STANTON . I am a constable. I was sent for to Collings's, the prisoners were given in my charge, they are the two men; I sent to Cousins to assist me, and I searched Parkins, we took them to the watch-house, they were nearly half an hour in the stable - Etherington gave me the crow-bar.

CHARLES COUSINS . I am a watch-house keeper. I was fetched to the stable, and took the prisoners to the watch-house with two bundles and the bar; part of the linen was given up to the prosecutrix before the Magistrate, but I marked it first.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18220220-15

340. WILLIAM M'VILLEY was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Tuck , at St. Martin-in-the-fields, about three o'clock in the afternoon, of the 29th of November, 1820 , (no person being therein), and stealing one trunk, value 7 s.; two shawls, value 2 l.; one cloak, value 10 s.; six cravats, value 5 s.; three shirts, value 9 s.; six pair of stockings, value 5 s.; one pair of breeches, value 7 s.; one waistcoat, value 6 s.; one bonnet, value 10 s.; three gowns, value 30 s.; two petticoats, value 6 s.; four caps, value 10 s.; one pair of shoes, value 4 s.; two counterpanes, value 10 s.; two pair of sheets, value 9 s.; one table cloth, value 10 s.; two tea spoons, value 6 s., and one picture, value 10 s. , his property.

WILLIAM TUCK . I am a greengrocer , and live in Legg-alley, Long-acre, in the parish of St. Martin's-in-the-fields . I know nothing of the prisoner myself - I lost my trunk the latter end of November, or beginning of December, 1820. It was in the one pair back room, I saw it about an hour before it was lost, (between three and five o'clock in the afternoon) - I do not know whether the outer door was latched. The house was let out in tenements, and the landlord did not live in it; I have the first floor, I locked the outer door of my apartment myself that day, and took the key with me - I came home about half-past four o'clock, it was light then, the trunk was gone, I have not seen it since, but have seen a silk shawl in pawn, which was in it. I did not see it for fifteen months after, I have found nothing else; it was worth 2 l., and cost a great deal more - the rest of the property stated in the indictment was in the trunk, and was worth above 10 l.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not say at Union Hall, that you lost it a fortnight before Christmas - A. A fortnight or more, I cannot say the day - It was on a Monday.

MARGARET TUCK . I am the wife of the last witness. I I found the shawl in pawn about a fortnight ago.

WILLIAM TUCK re-examined. When I came home, I found the staple drawn out and the door open, it was fastened by a padlock, which I found hanging on the door; there is one common passage to all the different apartments.

WILLIAM TARRANT . I am servant to Mr. Gray, a pawnbroker in Fleet-street. I have a shawl which was pawned on the 30th of November, 1820. I took it in myself, from a woman whom I believe to be the prisoner's wife - I have frequently seen them together, they addressed each other as man and wife; the prisoner came a short time ago, for an affidavit of his losing the ticket; he said he had lost the duplicate of the shawl, and had sent his wife before to stop it, (she had been to stop it). I did not shew it to him; he spoke of it, as a shawl pawned in the name of Conner - I have the duplicate here; I gave him a printed form of affidavit, which I have since seen in Goff's possession.

GEORGE GOFF . I am a constable of Lambeth. I have a printed form of affidavit, which I got from Barnacle.

WILLIAM BARNACLE . I got this printed affidavit from the prisoner.

WILLIAM TARRANT re-examined. It is the paper I gave the prisoner on his saying the duplicate was lost - he never brought it back.

This printed paper was put in and read, signed by the prisoner, but it was not sworn, it described the shawl as in the duplicate.

WILLIAM TARRANT . I filled this up by his direction, in his presence. I have known him and his wife some time.

(Shawl produced and sworn to).

WILLIAM BARNACLE . I lived last with Mr. Newcombe, of Bloomsbury-square. I know the prisoner, he asked me to pawn a shawl like this, which I refused, this was the latter end of November, 1820; he asked me also to pawn two white gowns, two white petticoats, a dark silk gown, a black silk cloak, and a table cloth; he and his wife asked me to pawn them at the corner of Seacoal-lane, I refused - they then asked me to pawn the shawl, which I refused. I called on the prisoner in Newgate, in December last, when he was imprisoned there; he asked me to do him a favour, I said I would, he said,

"My wife has left me, and gone to live with another man, and she has got a shawl which will hang me; it came out of Legg-alley;" he gave me a note to carry to Mr. Gray, which I did - he told me to go and stop it before his wife got it out, as if she got it she would hang him, as it was one of the shawls taken from Legg-alley. At the time the robbery was committed in Legg-alley, in November, 1820; I was going to have my hair cut at Lumley's, which was the house it was committed at, and the prisoner came out of the house as I went in, with a large trunk on his shoulder; he went towards the bottom of Hart-street, and the next day, the prisoner came to my lodging, in a court in Fleet-street, and asked me to walk out with him, which I did; he took me into a gin shop in Fleet-market, where his wife and another woman were, they had two bundles, and asked me to have some gin with them, which I did, and on leaving the shop, they asked me to pawn the things; I had heard of the robbery, and that was the reason I would not - I did not know these were the things stolen, but was afraid, as they were dangerous characters.

Prisoner. Q. I believe he had the trunk himself. Have you not been to Bow-street, for passing bad money?

The witness being informed that he had a right to refuse answering this question, declined.

COURT. Q. What made you go to him in Newgate - A. He sent for me. I went backwards and forwards to see him till he came out, as he said he was distressed.

WILLIAM TARRANT . The witness, delivered me a note from the prisoner, which I have destroyed, it stated that he had lost the duplicate, and wished to stop the shawl - I believe the signature on the form of affidavit not to be the prisoner's writing. I have seen him write.

GEORGE GOFF . I apprehended the prisoner, he said he bought the shawl of a man named Swiney; afterwards he said he did not buy the shawl, but bought a duplicate of it, and that it was in pledge at Guest's in Fleet-market, with a sheet - I went to Guest's, and searched the books, but could find no account of it.

Prisoner. Q. What information did Barnacle give you - A. He said the shawl came from a crack, I asked how he knew that; he said the prisoner and his wife had quarrelled and the prisoner was afraid his wife would have him hung, and he gave him the affidavit to take care of.

Prisoner's Defence. Barnacle sold the ticket of the shawl to my wife, it was pawned with a shirt, she redeemed it and pawned the shawl. If he knew I robbed the house, why not give information; he owes me money, and has robbed me - I said I would have satisfaction, and then he gave information.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 30.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Best.

Reference Number: t18220220-16

341. JAMES DAVIS , EDWARD DESMAN , JOHN MASCOE , and THOMAS TALBOY were indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house, of John Carpenter , about four o'clock in the afternoon, of the 28th of January , (Jane, his wife, being therein), and stealing, one coat, value 5 s.; two waistcoats, value 2 s.; one gown, value 4 s.; three shirts, value 2 s.; one pair of drawers, value 1 s.; one sheet, value 2 s., and one smock frock, value 1 s. , his property.

ROBERT PINK . I am a plumber and glazier. On the 28th of January, I was at work on the roof of Mr. Parson's house, in the back fields, Westminster; Carpenter's house is about thirty yards off; I was looking over a parapet, and saw Mascoe get in at the front parlour window of Carpenter's house; there was three men then standing by; I saw him give something out, which appeared to be linen - all the three had brown coats on; I could not swear Davis received it, but believe it was him - I saw him give it to another of them; Mascoe gave another bundle out, and all ran away; I went down and ran after them; I ran the contrary way, thinking to meet them - I saw Carpenter pursuing them, and saw him pick up the great coat in Palmer's-village, and in about two minutes, I saw Davis and Desman in custody, in a public-house; I believe them to be the men, for their dress, appearance, and size corresponded. I did not see the other two till last Saturday.

GEORGE MILTON . I am a locksmith. On the 28th of January, I was at work opposite Carpenter's house, and heard an alarm; I ran out, and saw two young men running in a direction from Carpenter's, about one hundred yards off - I pursued, and called Carpenter out; I lost sight of them in turning the corner. One of them had a great coat under his arm, it was neither of the prisoners; I afterwards saw that coat in Carpenter's possession. We went into a public-house, and saw Davis and Desman having a pint of beer, and took them.

Cross-examined by MR. CURWOOD. Q. You said at Bow-street, the man had the coat on - A. No. I do not swear to them.

WILLIAM CARPENTER . I am the son of the prosecutor. I was at work just by the house; Milton called me - I joined him, he took a different direction; I saw nobody till I turned the corner, I then saw two young men running, and a great coat under one of their arms, and in turning the corner of the Bridewell, I lost sight of them; I saw them again on turning the other corner, three or four hundred yards off, they appeared to be the same, and were dressed in the same manner; I saw, what appeared to be the same great coat, on one of them - I cannot say whether it was either of the prisoners; he threw the great coat down,

I picked it up, it was my father's. I saw them in about five minutes, in the Prince of Orange, public-house, drinking a pint of beer; it is six or seven hundred yards from where the coat was thrown down. We were told two persons had gone in there. I cannot positively speak to either of them.

JAMES SHIELDS. I am an officer. I took Davis and Desman into custody.

WILLIAM SCOTT . I assisted Shields in taking Talboy and Mascoe.

JANE CARPENTER . I am the wife of John Carpenter . I was in the house at the time of the robbery. I was alarmed, and went out, the things laid under the window, which was shut half an hour before the alarm. It is a sash window.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Richardson.

Reference Number: t18220220-17

342. MARTHA BETTELLY was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of January , at St. Mary-le-bone, in the dwelling-house of Charles Atwell , one box, value 1 s.; one pencil-case, value 30 s.; one eye glass, value 5 s., and the sum of 45 l., in monies numbered, and six 10 l. Bank notes , his property.

CHARLES ATWELL . I am a bookseller , and live in Brown-street, Bryanstone-square, St. Mary-le-bone . The prisoner was about ten days in my service, I had no character with her, but a recommendation from a Mrs. Harrington, who she had lodged with. On Sunday, the 6th of January, about three o'clock in the afternoon, I went out, leaving her in the house. I have three children, I took two out, leaving her with one - I returned about a quarter past five o'clock, she was not at home, I found the door a-jar. On my knocking, the pressure forced it open, I found the parlour door open also, and on examining it, found the bolt of the lock out, but it had passed beyond the staple. On going into the parlour, my wife went to a chest of drawers, which were not locked, and missed a small red box, in which I kept my cash. On the night before, I had put some cash in this box, there was some there before - there was six 10 l., Bank notes, upwards of forty sovereigns, between 2 l. and 3 l. in silver, also a black leather pocket-book, a gold pencil case, a silver eye-glass, and a variety of papers, of consequence to me. Within five minutes afterwards, the prisoner came to the street door with a key which she had, and with my child in her arms. I immediately told her to walk in the parlour, and told her that my red box had been stolen out of the drawers, during my absence, and I strongly suspected she must know something about it. She fell down on her knees, and protested her innocence, saying, it was impossible she could have behaved so unkindly to such a master and mistress. I told her that was not at all satisfactory to me, and that I should use every means in my power to find it out. I went out to get an officer, but could not - I desired her to go to bed, and sat up all night, to prevent her having any communication with any one out of the house - I said she had better tell the truth. Next morning, I fetched Clemence, the officer, and gave her in charge. I got a search warrant, and searched the apartments of Harrington and Fowler, and found two letters in a box there, which led me among her connexions at Woolwich - she never told me where to find the box. On Thursday, the 10th, I went to Woolwich, to Bowles, he was not at home, I saw his wife, and the prisoner's sister, Mary Bettelly, I enquired about the box and the contents; they said they knew nothing of it. Mr. Bowles brought me the box on Wednesday, the 16th; it contained 87 l. 16 s. 6 d. then, also a pair of scissars, two silver thimbles, which I could not swear to, but I sell such things - I know the scissars to be mine, and know the box perfectly. On Thursday, the 17th, I attended at Marlborough-street, asked to see the prisoner, and asked her if she knew any thing at all of the robbery, she said,

"No, I do not." I then took the box from my pocket, and shewed it her, I said,

"Of course, if you do not know any thing of the robbery, you know nothing of this box, or how I came by it;" she said,

"Oh, yes, I do know of it, I did take it from the drawer, packed it up in a cloth, took it to the coach-office, at Charing-cross, got a direction wrote for it by the bookkeeper, and sent it down to my sister, at Woolwich, to be left at Mrs. Lee's. St. Mary-street." I asked where the remainder of the property was, which was in the box, she said, she had thrown the pocket-book, the gold pencil-case, the silver eye-glass, and all the papers down the privy. I got a man to search the privy, and saw him find the pocket-book and the eye-glass there, about a week after the robbery.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. The drawer was not locked - A. No; she might suspect I kept my money there, I had locked it in my bed-room on Saturday night, and my wife brought it down in the morning.

SARAH ANN LEE . I remember a small box coming to my house, between nine and ten o'clock in the morning of the 7th of January; it was directed to be left at Mrs. Lee's for Mary Bettelly , whom I gave it to a few minutes after.

ROBERT BOWLES . I live at Woolwich, and am the prisoner's uncle, by marriage, her sister Mary lived with me. On the 15th of January, she told me there was a box, which came to Mrs. Lee's, directed for her, and that Mrs. Lee had got it. I went to Mrs. Lee, and Mr. Lee brought it to my house in the afternoon and delivered it into Mary's hands. I took it from her and opened it, there was a key tied to the handle, which was broken, and would not open it; I forced it open, and found the money in it - I took it the next morning to Atwell. She was gay and unsteady, but I never heard any complaint of her dishonesty.

MARY BETTELLY . I am the prisoner's sister. The box came to Mrs. Lee's for me, my uncle opened it; I did not tell my uncle of it directly, for I was a good deal concerned about it.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 20.

Recommended to Mercy, by the Prosecutor and Jury, on account of the temptation laid in her way, and her youth.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18220220-18

343. MARY HARRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of January , six coats, value 3 l.; two pair of overalls, value 5 s.; two whittles, value 12 s.; four pelisses, value 3 l. 13 s.; seventeen gowns, value 5 l.; one skirt, value 10 s.; one teakettle, value 5 s.; one set of fire irons, value 3 s.; one brush, value 1 s.; one pair of bellows, value 2 s.; one feather bed, value 35 s.; four pillows, value 10 s.; seven blankets value 1 l.; six sheets, value 2 l. 16 s.; one coverlid,

value 3 s.; one bedstead, value 16 s.; one fender, value 4 s.; two trunks, value 10 s.; one child's mantle, value 16 s.; one child's robe, value 15 s.; fifteen frocks, value 3 l. 12 s.; eight petticoats, value 16 s.; eight towels, value 6 s.; twenty-nine napkins, value 1 l.; fifteen shirts, value 16 s.; five pillow cases, value 14 s.; two pair of stockings, value 10 s.; two pinafores, value 2 s.; one toothpick case, value 6 d.; one necklace, value 10 s.; one pair of breeches, value 1 l.; one pencil case, value 3 s.; three books, value 7 s.; one muslin dress, value 1 l.; four yards of flannel, value 8 s.; one looking glass, value 14 s.; one table cloth, value 5 s.; one pair of boots, value 1 l.; three caps, value 15 s.; two frills, value 7 s.; four handkerchiefs, value 8 s.; one veil, value 3 s., and one box, value 2 s. , the goods of George Edmund Stolworthy .

HARRIET STOLWORTHY . I am the wife of George Edmund Stolworthy . We formerly lived in a cottage on Portman-green, Edgware-road ; we afterwards left there to live in apartments, in Park-street, near the Regent's Park. The prisoner was our servant at both places; we had not moved our furniture from Portman-green - she had the key of the house. On the 26th of January, I desired her to fetch my little girl from Hampstead; I sent her out about two o'clock, and desired her to meet me at the Regency barracks at eight o'clock, but she did not come, nor did she come home that night. The next morning (Sunday), I suspected something, and got John Frost to go to the cottage, and afterwards went with him myself, about one o'clock in the afternoon, and found the door locked. I had it forced, and the articles stated in the indictment, were gone - the value of the whole property was more than 30 l. We had entirely left the house, and did not mean to return.

JOHN SIMMONDS . I am a labourer, and live in Portman-green. Stolworthy and his wife lived there, and the prisoner was their servant. On Saturday, the 26th of January, about half-past six o'clock in the evening, she came to me and said her mistress had sent me 1 s., to help her move a few goods into a van to take home - I said 1 s. was too little, she said she would give me 18 d., and I helped her move the things. I found the van about a quarter of a mile from the house, the road was so bad it could not get nearer - there was some boxes, trunks and things, she gave me 18 d. and went away with the van.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did you know Stolworthy - A. The prisoner had before sent me on messages for them.

JOHN FROST . I went to Stolworthy's house on Sunday morning, about twelve o'clock, by her desire. When I got near the house, I saw the marks of a wheelbarrow; I did not go into the house, I went back and told Mr. Stolworthy.

JAMES RAMSAY . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Liquorpond-street. The prisoner pawned a pelisse with me, on the 28th of January, about eight o'clock in the evening, in the name of Ann Wright , for 10 s.

EDWARD DYER . I am servant to Mr. Dobree, pawnbroker, in Charlotte-street. I have known the prisoner some time; she pawned a looking glass, on Saturday evening, the 26th of January, in the name of Harris, for 7 s.

JOSEPH ARMSTRONG . I am shopman to Messrs. Betty and Armstrong, pawnbrokers, in Baldwin's-gardens. On the 29th of January, about ten o'clock in the morning, the prisoner pawned a sheet, in the name of Mary Smith , for 4 s.

ROBERT CHAPMAN . I was in company with Frost, in Chiswell-street, on the 29th of January, about twelve at noon, and apprehended the prisoner. I found the duplicate of a pelisse and shirt on her - I asked her where her mistresses property was, she said she knew nothing about it. While Frost was gone into the pawnbroker's, she told me I should find the things in a front garret, at a cook's shop, where she lodged, in Liquorpond-street; she had a padlock key in her pocket which opened the door. I there found a number of things, but I did not know which they were, as she lodged there with another person. I had her brought, to point out the property, and she pointed out the bed, bolster, and several other things, which we brought away.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I have pawned things for them before, and pawned these by her order.

MRS. STOLWORTHY. She was never authorized to pawn them, she has pawned things for us; she lived six months with us, and was to have 6 l. a year, but had only received 10 s.

GUILTY. Aged 34.

Of Stealing only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Richardson.

Reference Number: t18220220-19

344. EDWARD CHIDLEY , HENRY NEWBURY , and HENRY STEVENS were indicted for stealing, on the 19th of January , at St. George, Hanover-square, one silver tea-pot, value 4 l., the goods of Richard Henry Cox , in his dwelling-house .

GEORGE LACKINGTON . I am porter to Messrs. Greenwood and Cox, Army agents . Mr. Richard Henry Cox , lives at No. 8, Grosvenor-place . On the 19th of January, about half-past twelve o'clock, I saw the tea-pot in the servant's hall; I missed it a few minutes after - I had brought it down; I was footman to Mr. Cox, at that time. Shields, the officer, brought the lid of it, in about three quarters of an hour. Maybank produced the rest.

JAMES SHIELDS . I am a constable of Bow-street. About half-past twelve o'clock on Saturday, the 19th of January, I saw Newbury go down Mr. Cox's area steps, the other two prisoners stood a few yards from the area talking together; I knew Stevens and Chidley before - I watched them; saw them running after Newbury, who had come out of the area, and was walking fast towards Five-fields, they got up to him, and all went together across Five-fields; Newbury crossed a ditch, and Stevens threw a small bundle after him, he and Chidley then crossed; I followed them into the Old King's-road - I then went down the New King's-road, still having them in sight, except for a moment. I got them in view again, and in the Old King's-road, Chidley looked towards me; then I saw them all three engaged in putting something under some dirt; I saw Newbury put something white under an old tree, and Chidley kicked some dirt over it, to hide it; I got Wilson to assist, and took Chidley and Newbury - I got hold of Stevens, but he made his escape; I took them back to the tree, under which I found the lid of the teapot.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Newbury was a stranger to you - A. Yes.

Prisoner, CHIDLEY. Q. When did you see me before - A. I frequently saw him lurking about Oxford-street. There was dirt on the lid, but it was not covered. I have seen Stevens about Kelmell-buildings, where he lives.

JOSEPH WILSON . I am clerk to Messrs. Brooks and Co. I assisted Shields in taking Newbury and Chidley; I believe Stevens to be the one who got away, but cannot swear to him - I did not see him do any thing. I saw the lid found under an old tree.

THOMAS DORRINGTON . I am a labourer. I found the tea-pot in a load of rubbish, about five yards from the tree, where the lid was found; it was covered with rubbish, and put in an old handkerchief - I was at work on the rubbish on that day, and was at dinner when it was put there. I took it to the watch-house.

RICHARD MAYBANK . I am an officer. Dorrington delivered the tea-pot to me.

JAMES SHIELDS re-examined. They were only a minute and a half out of my sight, while they were in the Five-fields. I had seen Stevens three or four times before, and am quite sure he was one of them.

JOSEPH DINGLEY . I am thirteen years old. Shields came to my father in Chapel-street, Grosvenor-place, and asked me to go with him; we went down the New King's-road, saw the prisoners, and watched them down the Old King's-road, up to a tree; they were never out of my sight - I saw Newbury put something under the tree, and kick dirt over it; the other two were behind the tree; the tree was close to the rubbish, I saw them do nothing there - the tree was between me and the rubbish, and they were behind the tree three or four minutes before they were taken, and could have put any thing in the rubbish without my seeing them. I saw Newbury and Chidley taken, and am sure Stevens is the other man.

SIMON RAYMENT . I am a watchman. I heard of the robbery two days after it happened, and apprehended Stevens on the 13th of February, between eleven and twelve o'clock at night; he said if he got over it, he would give me a crack for what I had done.

GEORGE LACKINGTON . It is Mr. Cox's property, and is worth 3 l.

NEWBURY'S Defence. I was going along, and the gentlemen collared me, and took some garden mould from me.

One witness gave Newbury a good character.

CHIDLEY - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 19.

NEWBURY - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 15.

STEVENS - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 21.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Best.

Reference Number: t18220220-20

345. JOHN M'LOCHLAN was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of February , one shirt, value 3 s.; one pair of trowsers, value 5 s.; one pair of stockings, value 1 s.; eight yards of figured stuff, value 9 s. 3 d.; one hat, value 8 s., and one pair of mitts, value 1 s., the goods of Thomas Lowrye ; and eleven yards of figured stuff, value 14 s. 3 d.; one jacket, value 10 s. 3 d., and one pair of trowsers, value 5 s. , the goods of William Meguckin .

SECOND COUNT, stating them to belong to William Worthington .

THOMAS LOWRYE . I am a sailor . I came ashore last Saturday, and took my clothes to the King's Arms, public-house, near the Custom-house, and put them in the kitchen, in separate bundles; the prisoner came passenger with us to Belfast, on board the Letitia - he came ashore with us, to shew us the way. Meguckin's bundle was with mine; they contained the property stated in the indictment; he wanted to buy a hat, we went with him to another public-house, leaving our bundles at the King's Arms, public-house; the prisoner asked me to lend him twopence; he went out, and told me to stop there till he returned - we went to the King's Arms, public-house, in half an hour, and our property was gone. On Tuesday, Brown the officer produced them, he had the prisoner in custody; we expected him to return to us.

WILLIAM MEGUCKIN . I am a shipmate of Lowrye's, and came ashore with the prisoner last Saturday; he was to shew us about the place - we left our things at Worthington's, and all went out together, into another public-house, and he went away; we returned in half an hour, and our things were gone. I saw him at the Mansion-house yesterday, in custody.

ELIZA BROWN . I am servant at the King's Arms, public-house. The prosecutors came to the house with the prisoner, and brought their bundles into the kitchen; the prisoner came in about an hour, and said he was going to take the things aboard - I thought they belonged to him, and gave them to him; the prosecutors came in a half an hour for them.

JOHN BROWN . I am a constable. On Saturday night, about half-past seven o'clock, I was called from the Mansion-house, and found the prisoner with two bundles under his arm; he had asked a person to shew him a pawnbrokers - I asked him what he wanted to pawn, he said a red shawl, to pay for his lodging; I asked how he got the bundles; he said he bought them at Liverpool, three weeks ago; whilst talking to him I saw a piece of stuff packed under his waistcoat; I asked how he came by that; he said he bought it in town, but could not tell where. I found out the prosecutors on Tuesday.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. They allowed me to take some of the things to pawn for them. I enquired for a pawnbroker, and was taken.

THOMAS LOWRYE . We only bought the things that night, and never sent him to pawn them.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined Two Months and Publicly Whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220220-21

346. SARAH SHAW was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of February , one spoon, value 10 s. , the goods of William Kingsford .

WILLIAM KINGSFORD . I keep the Swan with Two Necks, Lad-lane . The prisoner chared at my house, and on the 9th of February, the spoon was missed.

JAMES PEACHY . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Goswell-street. On the 9th of February, in the evening, the prisoner came and offered the bowl of a silver table spoon for sale; I questioned her how she came by it; she gave evasive answers - I threatened to send for an officer, and she ran out of the shop, I fetched her back, and at last

she produced the other part of the spoon, which had the Swan with Two Necks on it; she acknowledged having been charring that day,

JOHN SMITH . I took her in charge with the spoon broken; she had three pockets on, containing victuals.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 43.

Confined Six Months .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220220-22

347. CHARLES MARSHALL , alias ANDERSON was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Ezra Gardiner , at St. Sepulchre, about three o'clock in the night of the 17th of January , with intent to steal, and stealing therein, 406 lbs. of tea, value 126 l.; one watch, value 25 s.; one key, value 5 s., and the sum of 12 l., in copper monies numbered , his property.

EZRA GARDINER . I am a grocer , and live in Long-lane, Smithfield, in the parish of St. Sepulchre , and rent the whole house. I went to bed on the 17th of January, about twelve o'clock; my brother was the last person up, but when I went to bed, the outer doors were secured. I had 292 lbs. of black tea, and 114 lbs. of green tea in the stock, at three o'clock in the afternoon, it was in the shop - my silver watch and key hung over the fire place at supper time, I left them there at night. The tea was worth 126 l., and the watch 50 s. - I had 4 l. or 5 l., in loose copper money in the till, I got up a little before seven o'clock in the morning, it was daylight - I had heard no noise in the night, I was the first person that came down. I found the shop door wide open, and a mat against it; no force had been applied, it must have been done with a picklock - the tea was in five chests, three black and two green. On going into the shop, I found the cannisters in disorder, and one of them empty, which was half full when I went to bed. I found the yard door, at the back of the house, had been opened from within, and on going into the yard, I found the yard door, which leads into Three Fox-court, broken open by a crow-bar. I had had it nailed up ever since I had been in the house, it had the marks of a crowbar. I found some person had got over the wall and down on a dust hole, and from there, crept through the iron rails, into my back kitchen window - they could then open the back door of the house, and the shop door. On going into the house again, I found the back parlour had been entered, and from 8 l. to 9 l., in 5 s. papers of copper taken from a desk, which was generally open, the watch also was taken from the same parlour. The prisoner is a strange to me. On going down Three Fox-court, I met a carman, who gave me the till which had been stolen that night, and on going further down the court, I met Okell. The same morning, about eight o'clock, I saw my watch in the possession of Forbes. I saw three bags of tea, of a similar quality to what I lost, and two of the bags are like those in my house, but the tea was not in them in my house; one is a rice bag, and rice was strewed about my shop, and on emptying that bag, I found rice mixed with the tea at the bottom of it - I cannot say whether the kitchen window was secure.

ROBERT ARCHER GARDINER . I am brother of the last witness. I went to bed about half an hour after him, and was the last person up. The back parlour and the shop door were secure, I locked the back parlour door myself; the watch was then safe, the clock struck one, as I got into bed, and I thought I heard the back door go; I listened, a quarter of an hour, heard no more, and went to sleep; my brother awoke me at seven o'clock, and I found the things as he has described.

JOHN FORBES . I am a constable. The prosecutor's house is in the city. About a quarter before one o'clock in the morning, of the 18th, or the night of the 17th of January, I was at the watch-house, in Cow-cross-street; Okell, the patrol, came to the door with another person, with three bags of tea, which Mr. Gardiner afterwards claimed. I went out with two patrols, without their coats, and on entering the pig-market, I saw the prisoner apparently rising up from one of the pens; I went up and seized him, he made a very strong resistance, and said he would not be taken, for he had done nothing - we took him to the watch-house, as we went, I saw him put his left hand towards his pocket; I told Okell to secure his left hand and I laid hold of his right, we confined both his hands, and took him to the watch-house - upon searching him, we found a watch in his left side breast pocket, which Mr. Gardiner claimed, the glass was broken, but the watch was going - I asked him how he came to carry his watch in that pocket, he made no answer, but said it was his own; I asked the maker's name and number, he said he did not know, and that he had no mark on it - he said there was a person who could describe it, and knew it to be his; he did not name the person, nor produce any such person. In his other pocket, I found a drop latch, a common small box key, and a letter addressed to Mr. C. Marshall, No. 10, Lower Hart-street, Covent Garden. I went to that place the next day, and found the latch key opened the door. I locked him up, and between seven and eight o'clock, saw Mr. Gardiner, and asked him to describe the watch, which he did before I produced it.

Cross-examined. Q. How far is the pig-market from the prosecutor's - A. Within one hundred yards - he was up three or four pens.

THOMAS OKELL . I am a patrol. I was going my rounds between three and four o'clock, in Three Fox-court, and saw a carman cleaning his horses, and as he took his horses to water, he perceived three bags in his stable, and told me. I took two, and he brought the other to the watch-house with me; my two weighed above 70 lbs.; they contained tea, which Mr. Gardiner claimed in the morning; the other weighed 29 lbs. In the morning, Mr. Gardiner shewed me his premises, the door leading to Three Fox-court, was forced open; that appeared to be the way they had got in. I went with Forbes to the pens in Smithfield, and saw the prisoner there - Forbes's account is correct. I saw the watch taken from his left hand inside coat pocket.

Cross-examined. Q. How far was the tea found from the pens - A. Near two hundred yards. The stable is not above twenty yards from Gardiner's.

JOHN NEWTON. I am a beadle. Okell brought the tea to the watch-house; it weighed 104 lbs. and a half, with the bags. The prosecutor claimed it.

HENRY TURNPENNY . I belong to the day patrol. On the 18th of January, I was sent for, and examined the

premises, which were in the state represented by the watchman. The yard door was forced open with a crow.

MR. GARDINER. I find a quantity of rice in one of the bags, there is rice and tea mixed with it now.

(Watch produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I had been drinking in Brick-lane, was returning home, up Sun-street, came across Finsbury-square, along Long-lane, and was taken ill in my bowels; I crossed the pig market, and got into the pens; I found something laying there, picked it carefully up, and saw it was a watch - I put it in my coat pocket, remained there a few minutes, and was buttoning my clothes up, when Forbes came and secured me; all the resistance I made was saying I had done nothing, I did not see why I should go to the watch-house; they took me to the watch-house, and being flurried and agitated, I said the watch was mine. I believe Forbes has stated right.

JOHN FORBES re-examined. The watch was in the same state it is now - it was a dry morning; he appeared perfectly sober. I went and examined the pens with a lantern, there was nothing to induce me to suppose he had been there for a necessary occasion; I saw him getting up apparently as if looking round. There was nobody else there.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 19.

Recommended to Mercy, by the Prosecutor and Jury, on account of his youth, and hoping it to be his first offence.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220220-23

THIRD DAY, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 1822.

348. JOHN FOSSETT was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of January , 15 lbs. of beef, value 5 s. the goods of Samuel Summers .

FRANCES SUMMERS . I am the wife of Samuel Summers , a butcher , of Skinner-street, Somer's Town . On Saturday, the 12th of January, between eleven and twelve o'clock at night, I told the men to take the meat in, they each went to the window, and took some in; I saw the prisoner standing outside the window, on the curb, and when their backs were turned, he had a cloth which he covered over the beef, and took it off with the hook; I pursued, he threw it down - I said,

"What have you got there," he said,

"Only a hook;" I found it was two pieces of beef, weighing 15 lbs. I have frequently seen him about the door before.

GUILTY. Aged 14.

Judgment Respited .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220220-24

349. WILLIAM ROBERTSON was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of January , one blanket, value 5 s., the goods of Robert Threadgold , in a lodging-room .

The blanket not being let with the lodging, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220220-25

350. JOHN CONNER was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of January , six bottles, value 6 d., and four quarts of wine, value 1 l. , the goods of John Warren .

MR. EDWARD JENNINGS WARREN. I am the son of John Warren , a wine merchant , who lives in Piccadilly. On the evening, of the 16th of January, about half-past six o'clock, our cart stood at the door, to take away wine; the carman missed some from the cart; I went into Berkley-street , and as I stood there, the man ran across, and collared the prisoner; I assisted in securing him, and heard glass fall from him - I picked up the neck of a bottle, his coat was all wet, and smelt of wine; my father's seal, was on the neck of the bottle, marked

"Warren, Piccadilly." We found nothing on him.

RICHARD HAMMOND . I am servant to Mr. Warren. I was told the cart was robbed - I missed six bottles out of a two dozen basket. I went down Berkley-street, and saw the prisoner at the corner of Berkley-square, coming from the further end of the square; I went up and asked if he saw any body run that way, he said yes, he did; I said

"I think you are the man I want," and collared him; another person was within two yards of him, and ran off. I felt the prisoner had two bottles in his pocket, he pulled one out, and fell down himself, and broke the head of the other in his pocket; they both had my master's seal on them - his pocket was quite wet with wine.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. He was coming towards your master's house - A. Yes. It was about a quarter to seven o'clock - he was walking slowly, close to the rails of the square; he said he saw a person stop in the square, and put the bottles down, and he picked them up.

WILLIAM MEDBURY . I am a constable. The prisoner was given in my charge, with the neck of a bottle - I searched Berkley-square, and found more bottles on the spot he was taken, but none of them with necks, and wine spilt; the prisoner's coat was soaking with red wine - I asked what had become of the six bottles; he said he only had two; he did not say how he came by them.

Prisoner's Defence. I saw a man standing in the square; he saw me coming towards him, and walked away - I picked the bottles up.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220220-26

351. THOMAS BURRELL and MARIA ANGEL were indicted for the wilful murder of James Thayer .

MESSRS. ADOLPHUS and ANDREWS conducted the prosecution.

MARY THAYER . I was the wife of James Thayer , we lived at Kensington. One Monday, in September last, he left home about nine o'clock in the morning - I saw him next day in the hospital; he died on a Thursday, in January. He was quite hearty when he left home.

ROBERT CLARK . I produce a hat, which was found on the first floor landing place of the house, in Charles-street, on the night this happened.

MRS. THAYER. I know this to be the hat my husband wore on that day.

HANNAH PETHICK . In September last, I lived at a house in Charles-street, Drury-lane , kept by Hagerty; the two prisoners lived in the same house, in the two pair of stairs back room; Sarah Brown lived in the two pair front - Hagerty is a bricklayer, and lived in the front parlour,

with his wife; two young women lived in the front room, first floor, whose names I do not know; I lived in the two pair back room with the prisoners. I am an unfortunate woman; Burrell is a pensioner. On this night, I met Thayers in Holborn, opposite Southampton-buildings; he spoke to me, he appeared tipsy - I went with him to my lodging; we had drank one glass of liquor each; we reached my room about half-past ten o'clock; he went into the house willingly with me; I took him to the two pair back room, I saw nobody in our way up stairs; when we got into the room, he asked me to cook him some steaks, and gave me sixpence and three halfpence to get them; I went and brought them to him, I was not gone long; when I returned, he was sitting by the fire, in the same room, he asked if I had any bread, I said No, and he gave me half-a-crown to fetch some; I went down stairs, and then saw Burrell in the passage, leading into the street - I asked if he would fetch me some bread, he said, Yes; I gave him the half-crown, and returned to Thayers, he was then sitting in the same place, by the fire; Burrell brought the loaf up, knocked at the door, and gave me the loaf and no change, he could not see who was in the room; he knew I had somebody with me, because I had told him so, when I asked him to fetch it; I then sent Burrell again to fetch a halfpenny worth of salt, he did not bring it - Thayer was sensible enough to know what he was about; in five minutes after, as Burrell did not bring the salt, I went down stairs across to Mr. Ellliot's, where I had sent him for it, and found him there; I told him not to wait for the salt for the man was out of his mind.

Q. What made you say so - A. Because Thayer began swearing about his change. Burrell came over into the parlour with me, and gave me the change. Mr. and Mrs. Hagerty and Maria Angel were then in the parlour; Burrell had a white jacket on - Hagerty was undressed in bed; I asked Angel if she would take the change up to the man, as I told her I was afraid he would strike me, she went up with it, and came down almost directly, and said the man had struck her, and she had not given him the change, she gave it to Mrs. Hagerty; Burrell was present, he said nothing; then Mrs. Hagerty went up with the change, and returned, saying, she had given the man his change, and that he was going to strike her - Burrell then went up, Hagerty still remained in bed; I do not know whether he was awake, he did not stir. Burrell asked what business the man had to strike Angel, he seemed angry, and went up stairs - I then heard a noise proceeding from the two pair back room, as if they were fighting; I heard the cry of Murder! and heard them scuffling, I cannot say who it was that called Murder! I was still in the parlour with Mrs. Hagerty and Angel, Hagerty was still in bed; Mrs. Hagerty told me to go for the watch, as she was afraid there would be a piece of work; I went, and first met Birke the watchman, and came back to the house; I had been absent five or six minutes, and before I entered the house, I saw Thayer fall from the two pair of stairs window, I saw him as he came down; he fell on his face flat - I stopped to look at him for about three minutes before I went into the parlour; there was a great crowd, and I could not get in; he remained on the ground till he was taken up - I did not see him move or hear him groan. I went into the front parlour, and found Burrell, Angel, and Mrs. Hagerty there - I did not notice the bed; I saw two children in bed by themselves; Hagerty could not have been in bed then without my seeing him, he was not there; I did not notice whether his clothes were there. I asked Burrell how the man got into the two pair front room, he said he (Burrell) had struck the man because he had struck his girl (Angel) and that the man burst the door open, and threw himself out of window; he said nothing more, Angel said nothing. I remained in the parlour about ten minutes, till Furzman took me away to the watch-house. Burrell was sitting on the table very quiet he had his white jacket on, as before. I saw no more of him or Hagerty.

Prisoner, BURRELL. Q. Was Mrs. Hagerty with you when you returned with the watchman - A. No; she and Burrell were in the parlour.

COURT. Q. Does the door of the front room come into the staircase - A. Yes, just by our room. The noise of the scuffle appeared to come from the back room; I heard no noise on the stairs. I heard the cry of Murder! but once, and then went for the watchman. I only saw Thayer falling - I did not see him come out of window.

Prisoner, BURRELL. Q. Was Sarah Brown 's door broken before that night - A. Yes; but whether it had been mended or not, I cannot say. The bottom hinge was broken a week before; it had an asp to it - I believe the padlock was broken.

SARAH BROWN . In September last, I lived at No. 48, Charles-street, in the two pair front room. I left home about a quarter before nine o'clock on that evening, I have only one window to my room, and that I left open - I had no lock to my door, but tied the asp to the staple, with a piece of ribbon. The hinges were sound when I left the room, it had been unnailed before, but was mended by the landlord. I left about half a tub of water under the foot of my bed, quite under the bedstead.

Q. If any people had been scuffling in the room, could they have overturned it with moving the bed - A. No. Mine was a turn-up bedstead, but it was down. I returned soon after eleven o'clock, my bed was in the same place as I had left it. Before I got to the house, I had heard something at the end of Charles-street, and on getting up to the house, I found a great number of people round the door; I went into the parlour, which was Hagerty's room; I saw Mrs. Hagerty and the two prisoners in the parlour, Hagerty was not in bed - I said I heard some man had been thrown out of window, Mrs. Hagerty said,

"Oh my G - d, I am an undone woman, my husband has ran away half undressed, at the alarm of a man being thrown from your window;" I then accused Angel of having opened my door, and taken the man into my room; I said,

"You have taken the man into my room, I suppose on purpose that it should be laid to me;" I said I did not know what I should do, but I thought I had better go down to Furzman, because they might think I knew something about it, and I would go to him to know whether they had told him I was not at home; Burrell said,

"It is nonsense Maria and you having and words; the man ran from Maria's room, burst open your door, and threw himself out of window" - I went to the street door, and then returned to the parlour; the prisoners and Mrs. Hagerty were still there; I said

"They say the man is dead," Burrell said,

"Dead!" I said,

"Yes, so they say,"

Burrell seemed greatly agitated, but said nothing more, he left the room; he had a light jacket on, I had seen him in that dress before; I do not know which part of the house he went to, but I saw him come down stairs into the passage in two or three minutes; he then had a blue close coat, and his hat on, his coat was buttoned up - I cannot say whether he had the jacket on, it was not a working jacket, it was a linen waistcoat with sleeves, a coat might be put over it; his hat was not on when he went up stairs. I went out and never saw the deceased; I returned about a quarter before two o'clock, got a light, and went to my room, and found the door forced from the bottom hinge, the hinge was broken, and the door forced back, part of the wood work was broken, it opens inward, the staple and asp were as I had left it. The water tub was behind the door; there had been a great many people in the room before me. I saw several spots of blood about the room, some by the side of the window ledge, and two or three spots on the ledge - I saw the print of finger marks of blood three steps down the staircase from my door. The water in the tub was dirty dish water, it was empty, and turned up behind the door, about three yards from the bed. I never saw Burrell go out in the street in the light jacket. I am an unfortunate woman.

COURT. Q. Did you know the room Pethick slept in - A. Yes; there is a window to it which leads into the yard; I do not know whether it was open; nobody could get into the yard without going through the passage of the house. There is no carpet to my room - I observed no scratches on the floor. The water was all thrown out of the tub over the floor. I found the bed in the same place as I left it - somebody must have taken the tub from under it, for scuffling about would not overturn it. I did not go to Furzman.

ROBERT CLARK . I am a constable of St. Giles's. About half-past ten o'clock, on the night of the 24th of September, I saw Pethick speaking to Birke the watchman. I followed her down to Charles-street, and Birke went down at a quick pace; in a minute or two, I heard a rattle spring, I went down the street, and found the deceased lying with his head in the kennel; I snatched a candle out of somebody's hand, went up stairs, and on the first floor landing, I saw Bartlett pick up the hat, and on the same landing there were spots of blood from there, up to the two pair of stairs front room window, there was also a mark of blood in the hat, quite fresh - I found the door of the room broken off the hinge, it hung by the top hinge, and pushed inward into the room; the asp was open - I did not notice the wood work. In the centre of the room, between the bedstead and the wainscot, a tub stood with some water in it and some was spilt about a yard from the bed - it struck me there had been some rough work there; I found blood on the cill of the window; I went into the back room on that floor, and found some meat which appeared to have been lately dressed, and a loaf torn all to pieces, the place was in great confusion; I then called out of window to them to take care of the deceased. I searched every room in the house, and did not find a soul; I immediately came down and asked who had brought the man into the house, Pethick was delivered to me. I went to the hospital with the man, returned, and found Furzman there, he took Angel and Mrs. Hagerty into custody. I took Angel to the watch-house, and asked her how she could use the man in that manner, she said she went up to the man for money for the room, that the man went to hit her, and her young man struck him. The spots of blood were quite fresh on the floor, window cill, stairs, and hat. I did not go into the parlour before I went up stairs.

COURT. Q. How high is the window from the floor - A. About three feet, and about twenty-one from the ground - there are no area rails. I think the back room window was shut; I could not get to the window without turning round the end of the bed; it comes down nearly to the window. There are about sixteen stairs in the second flight.

JOHN BIRKE . I am a watchman. I was in Charles-street, on this night. A woman about the size of Pethick, called Watch! I went to a house in Charles-street, and just as I got to the door the man fell from the window on the pavement, on his face and hands. I sprang my rattle, turned the man over, and saw water on his face, and water came from his nose; I saw the two pair front window open; I remained with the man till Clark came and went in - there was a good many people collected in the street; I cannot say that I saw anybody come out of the house as I went up, I saw blood on the stairs; I saw no blood on the first landing, but on about three steps from the second flight, I saw no more blood till I came to the cill of the window; the room door was open - I saw the hat found. The water was spilt about the room.

THOMAS BARTLETT . I am street-keeper of Drury-lane. Clark called me - I went to the house, and saw a woman named Fox, standing at the door with a candle in her hand, Clark took the candle from her, and went up stairs, I followed him; I had seen the deceased laying on his face, in the street; as we went up, I observed spots of blood on the one pair staircase, four or five steps up, and by the door of the front room, of the one pair landing - I picked up the hat produced, I saw a spot or two of blood inside it, and spots of blood on the second flight of stairs; it was fresh then, no person had been up except us; I traced the blood into the middle of the two pair front room, it was in different parts of the room, not in a regular trace. I went to the window after taking the man to the hospital, and saw blood on the cill. A tub of water had been upset, and the room was in great confusion. I went into the back room, there had been some beef steaks cooked, and ready on the table; I noticed nothing more there. We searched the house all over, and could find no person up stairs; on coming down, I saw Mrs. Hagerty at the door, Angel was present, I said,

"Mrs. Hagerty, I insist on your telling me who was the person that brought the man home," she said it was Pethick, who was brought forward, and taken into custody. I took the deceased to the hospital. The table was upset, and the chairs about.

SAMUEL FURZMAN . I am an officer. On the night of the 24th of September, in consequence of information, I went to No. 48, Charles-street, and found Thayer laying on his back; Clark gave Pethick into my custody - I went to the hospital with the man, and after taking Pethick to the watch-house, returned, went into the parlour, and saw Mrs. Hagerty, Angel, and a man sitting on the table. I cannot say who he was, or how he was dressed - I asked Mrs. Hagerty where her husband was, she said,

"Gone to

the hospital with the man." I told her to come up stairs with me; I examined the place, and saw several marks of blood on the stairs, I cannot say whether there was any blood in the two pair back, but there was in the two pair front room, which was in great confusion; the door was off the hinges, and there was a tub in the middle of the room, which appeared to have been upset, and water spilt - some chairs and a table stood in the room. I went to the window ledge, the window was open and a spot or two of blood on it. Mrs. Hagerty afterwards said, in Angel's presence, that Angel had been up stairs with the change to the man, and that he struck her. I then took Mrs. Hagerty and Angel to the watch-house - Angel said she had been up stairs with the change which Pethick gave her, that the man had struck her, and had also attempted to strike Mrs. Hagerty - I have made a diligent search for Hagerty, and travelled many miles, but cannot find him.

COURT. Q. Was the blood in different places, or a regular tract - A. It was in broken patches.

JOHN SCOTT . I am a police officer. I took Burrell into custody, on the 4th of October, at Chelsea College, in the pay-office, in consequence of information I received. I told him I took him on a serious charge, for heaving a man out of window, in Charles-street, Drury-lane. He seemed very much agitated - I think he had a blue coat and yellow buttons on; he said he was innocent of any charge. I said he must go with me, he came along very quietly, and on going up George-street, Chelsea, he said again he was innocent; I said,

"Then why did you abscond, if you are innocent;" he said, his mother wished him, for fear he should be taken. He said he had been in Union-street, Borough, I think he said Star-court. His right eye was tied up with a handkerchief, I said,

"What is the matter with your eye," he said he had some sand thrown into it. I asked him why he should disguise himself; he said, because he should receive his pension unnoticed, he used some other expression, which I do not recollect. I had not handcuffed him at that time, he took the handkerchief off his eye himself, and said,

"Never mind, I will tell the Magistrate all about it" - there was nothing the matter with his eye, I took him to the watch-house.

JOHN SWEATMAN . I am the house-surgeon at the Middlesex hospital. Thayer was brought in on the 24th of September, about eleven or twelve o'clock at night. I saw him immediately, he was insensible; he had an extensive wound on the right hand side of his forehead, by contusion; it would happen by a blow from a blunt instrument, or by a fall - he partly recovered his senses on the following day, when I saw him, at ten o'clock in the morning, but not sufficiently to give me an account of the accident. On the second day, I questioned him; I cannot say whether he apprehended death to be near, he complained of a pain in his head, nothing else at that time - he afterwards complained of a pain in his right hip, and down the thigh. I examined him, and found bruises on the hind and fore part of the thigh, but no wound - the bruises on his hip were treated as slight bruises, the pain in his head subsided in a few days, and when that had almost subsided, he had an attack of the St. Anthony's fire, in his face, that very commonly follows a wound on the head. This went off very soon, returned in about two days, and subsided again. He had an attack shortly afterwards, of an inflamation in his right lung; he had then been in the hospital about ten days, and two or three days after, this was followed by an inflamation in the bowels. St. Anthony's fire naturally follows a wound in the head, and on dissection, the inflamation of the bowels was accounted for, by a fractured bone; the inflamation of the lung, I cannot distinctly relate to the accident; it might be produced by other causes. After being in the hospital three months, he left, was out of the hospital three weeks, and then returned; he was then too far gone to make any complaints, he was sinking under his disorder, and died in a few days. I opened his body, in the presence of Mr. Ogle - I first opened the head; the only diseased appearance there, was an unusual collection of water in the cavities of the brain; there was evidence of the inflamation of the right lung, and there was a scrofulous disease extending through both lungs, and marks of inflamation having existed in the bowels some time before; the right haunch-bone was broken across, the fracture extended across the hip joint, and a sharp piece of the broken bone extended into the cavity of the abdomen; and from this projecting piece, an abscess, containing about a pint of matter, extended six or eight inches along the spine - the hip joint itself was sound, this was the only diseased appearance.

Q. From your knowledge of all his symptoms, to what do you ascribe his death - A. To the fever produced by this abscess, which was occasioned by the confusion of the of the pointed bone projecting out.

Q. He never ceased complaining from the first - A. He was never able to walk without crutches, and then with a great deal of pain - a fall from a two pair of stairs window might occasion the fracture.

MR. OGLE. I am a surgeon. I attended the dissection of the deceased's body, with the last witness; I saw him a few days after his discharge from the hospital, in the parochial infirmary, he always complained of the same injury; Mr. Sweatman's account is very correct. I have nothing to add, except that the proximate cause of the man's death, arose from the quantity of water in the cavity of the brain; inflamation often follows a blow or fall, and the water, I think was produced by inflamation, that is the common case. The blood vessels of the head were fuller than ordinary.

Q. Mr. Sweatman says the abscess might cause his death - A. It assisted, certainly, death was occasioned by the effect of the abscess and water on the head jointly. The blow on the head would produce inflamation, which terminated in an abscess. I have no doubt but the fall from the window produced his death.

BURRELL - GUILTY. Aged 32.

Of Manslaughter only .

Confined One Year .

ANGEL - NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Best.

Reference Number: t18220220-27

352. CHRISTIANA FERRIS was indicted for feloniously assaulting Joseph Bentley , on the 14th of January , on the King's highway, putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, one brooch, value 15 s. , his property.

JOSEPH BENTLEY . I have been a non-commissioned officer . On the 14th of January, about half-past nine

o'clock at night, I was in Hemming's-row, just by Leicester-square , the prisoner and another girl came up on each side, and asked me to go with them, I refused; the prisoner then asked if I would give them something to drink - by that time, I had got nearly in the middle of the row, and when I refused, the prisoner made a jump at my breast, laid hold of my brooch, and tore it from my shirt; she tore my shirt, it was done in an instant. Immediately after the grasp, I received a blow on the left side of my head, I cannot say who from - I turned round, and a gentleman said

"Take care of your watch, Sir." I took hold of my watch-chain, pushed the prisoner away, and I think she fell down - the blow I received knocked my hat off, I picked it up, felt for my brooch, and it was gone; I ran to fetch the watchman, I noticed the prisoner had a scar under her nose I found a watchman in St. Martin's-lane, and told him the girls were coming round a corner into St. Martin's-lane - I seized the prisoner and gave her in charge, I am sure she is the woman, she was secured in three minutes. My brooch was found by Jones; the other girl escaped as soon as the prisoner was seized. On the Sunday following, Jones's father came to me, and said his son had found the brooch, and he had pawned it for 2 s.; the Magistrate ordered it to be delivered to me.

JAMES MACK . I and the watchman, took the prisoner in charge.

WILLIAM JONES . On the 14th of January, about a quarter before ten o'clock at night. I found this brooch about the middle of Hemming's-row, on the pavement; I gave it to my father.

RICHARD JONES . I am a watchman of St. Martin's. The evening after the robbery, my wife informed me my son had found a brooch, he gave it to me, I had some rent to make up, and pawned it - I afterwards redeemed it.

Prisoner's Defence. He pulled us about in a very indelicate manner, he would not go with us; I wanted something for my trouble, he refused, and struck me.

MR. BENTLEY. It is false.

GUILTY. Aged 22.

Of stealing from the person only .

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18220220-28

353. JOHN FLEMING was indicted for feloniously assaulting Benjamin Tanner , on the 9th of February , at St. George in the East, putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, two seals, value 1 l. 1 s. , his property.

BENJAMIN TANNER . I am a floorcloth manufacturer . On the 9th of February, I was in Marmont-street, St. George's in the East , going to my factory, and just as I came to a cross bar in the street, three persons came across from the opposite side, and appeared to wish to go through the posts before me. I stepped back to let them pass, they faced about immediately, and stopped me between the posts, blocking me up between the posts; both put their hands on me, stopped me, and held me while the prisoner laid hold of my seals. I put my hands down and caught the watch, the chain broke, but he got the seals, and the man who was on my right, gave way, for him to go through the posts - he got the seals quite away. I am sure he is the man, it was dark; I turned round, he ran up the middle of the road, calling Stop thief! and kept him in view till he was secured; I have not found them. When I was at the office, I said one turned to the right and the other to the left, the prisoner said,

"If you had caught him who turned to the left, you would have had your seals."

ANDREW WATTS . I deal in garden roots, and live in York-street, Commercial-road. On the night of the 9th of February, I was sitting at the corner of York-street with my roots, heard the cry of Stop thief! and saw three men running in Marmont-street. I stopped the prisoner, who was the only one that crossed the road, and delivered him to the watchman.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 20.

Recommended to Mercy, on account of his youth.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Best.

Reference Number: t18220220-29

354. EDWARD WELLS was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of James Hamilton , about seven o'clock at night, on the 17th of January , and stealing therein, thirty-six combs, value 10 s. , his property.

JAMES HAMILTON . I live in Princes-street, High Holborn , and am a hairdresser . On the 17th of January, I went up stairs, for about ten minutes, and when I came down, I happened to go out at the door, and saw the glass of the window cut or broken; it was quite dark. The hole was large enough to admit a hand and reach the combs - I missed three or four dozen combs, they were in four packages, each containing six. I had seen them safe just before I went up stairs, the glass was not broken then. I named it to some persons, and the next morning, Daniels came and gave me information; the prisoner was taken to Bow-street - I have never recovered my combs.

JOHN DANIELS . I lately worked for Mr. Osborne, horse-dealer, in King's-road. I know the prisoner, I was going through Clare-market, on the Friday morning after the robbery, saw him, and asked if he had been up towards Princes-street the night before, he said,

"No, he had not." A little while after, I saw him with some papers in his hat, doubled up like combs; I immediately went up to Mr. Hamilton's and told his wife I had seen a boy with her combs, as I thought, in his hat - we went with an officer to Clare-market, but could not find him.

JAMES M'CUE. I know the prisoner by name only. On Friday morning, I was with Daniels; I had heard of the robbery, and asked him about it, he said he knew nothing of it. I told him there had been some combs missing. I saw some parcels in his hat, in the shape of combs.

JAMES DILLINGHAM . My mistress is a dressmaker. She sent me to Middle-row, on a Friday morning, and to Portland-place. I went through Clare-market, and saw the prisoner with some papers in his hat, they looked square, like combs; I went with him to Crown-street, he went into a house there, and I waited outside.

JAMES ASHTON . On the 28th of January, I took the prisoner in White Horse-yard. Thirty bad characters surrounded and rescued him, but he was secured - Daniels and M'Cue swore they were his combs before, and the other boy went with him to sell them.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18220220-30

355. ROBERT COCHRANE , CHRISTOPHER ATKINSON , and WILLIAM CORK , were indicted for stealing, on the 12th of January , forty pieces of muslin, containing 200 yards, value 80 l.; fifty pieces of other muslin, containing 400 yards, value 84 l., and one wrapper, value 1 s. , the goods of Thomas Bache .

SECOND COUNT, stating them to belong to Abraham Turner .

THIRD COUNT, stating them to belong to John Lawrence , Charles Jollands, Isaac Lawrence , and Thomas Lightfoot .

MESSRS. ANDREWS and WALFORD conducted the prosecution.

JOHN CORT . I am in the service of Messrs. Alasworth, of Manchester. I packed up some muslin for Abraham Turner , on the 20th of December, at Manchester; they were marked L. J. 9 and 10 - I delivered them to Foxley, the carrier, and took his receipt, which I produce.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. You do not know Turner - A. He is a manufacturer, of Chorley. I know these were his goods.

JOHN FOXLEY . I am a carman to Mr. Bache. I received two bales of goods from Cort, and gave this receipt for them, it is my hand writing. I took charge of the bales, and delivered them at my master's warehouse, at Castle-field, Manchester, they were marked L. J. 9 and 10.

JOHN HAYWOOD . I am shipping clerk to Mr. Thomas Bache , at Manchester. I have the book containing the entry of two bales, L. J. 9 and 10, being shipped by Aldridge's, boat, No. 8, from London, by canal.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Did you see them in the boat - A. No; I saw them weighed within a few yards of the boat.

JOHN ALDRIDGE . I am master of Mr. Bache's boat, No. 8. I received a load in the boat, in December, I brought it safe to London, as they were given to me; I delivered the cargo to Morris, at Paddington wharf. The whole cargo was right.

FRANCIS MORRIS . I am warehouse keeper to Mr. Bache, at Paddington. The boat No. 8, I received on the 28th of December; among other packages, there were two marked L. J. 9 and 10, which were sent the same day to the warehouse in Moor-lane, by Kettel and Cummings; I delivered them as I received them.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. How did you receive them - A. I called the mark over, and checked it.

GEORGE KETTEL . I am a servant to Mr. Bache. On the 28th of December, I took part of a load from Paddington to Moor-lane, there were two bales among it, I do not recollect the marks. We delivered part of the load at different places by the way, and took the rest to Moor-lane.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. You deliver them according to your directions - A. Yes; the book-carrier delivers them.

JOSEPH CUMMINGS . I am guard to the waggon. I recollect on the 28th of December, taking a load of goods with the waggon, from Paddington, to Moor-lane. There were some packages there, I do not recollect the marks or numbers. We delivered part in Moor-lane, to Stephen Haines.

STEPHEN HAYNES . I am in the employ of Mr. Bache, at the warehouse, in Moor-lane. Cochrane was guard to one of the waggons; Atkinson was waggoner; Cork was an in-door porter to Mr. Bache; Cochrane and Atkinson's duty was to carry out goods, and bring them to the warehouse; Cork had access to the warehouse, in Moor-lane. I have a memorandum which was made at Paddington, and brought to me by Cummings, it is an entry of L. J. 9 and 10, (reads)

" Abraham Turner 's order, two packages, L. J. 9 and 10;" Cumming and Kettel delivered it to me with the goods; the two packages L. J. 9 and 10, were delivered me by them, and stowed in our warehouse, in Moor-lane - I checked them off as being delivered. It is my business to take an account of goods coming in and going out. On the 21st of January, we had an order from Lawrence and Jolland's for goods, and found there ought to be such packages in the warehouse - I entered them in the carrier's book for Ansford to take them. No. 10, weighed 2 cwt.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Who wrote this paper - A. One Huggins, he is not here. I saw those very packages, nine or ten days after they were brought. If Ansford had not called them over, I should not have checked them off. The guard delivers goods on the road, but when brought to the warehouse, he has nothing to do with them. The waggoner is under the direction of the guard, to whom the bill is delivered. The goods in Moor-lane, are in my care; I lock up, about eight o'clock, and keep the keys. When we are short of hands, the waggoner is employed in the warehouse. We have watchmen at night, and when I am absent in the day, I have a substitute.

Cross-examined by MR. PLATT. Q. Would Cochrane have to load and unload - A. If he had time; his duty is generally out of doors; he did not guard these goods to Moor-lane.

MR. ANDREWS. Q. When goods are to be taken from Moor-lane, the waggon is brought there - A. Yes; but they generally take from there direct to Paddington - they are generally loaded by Cork, Lord, and Ansford. If they are to be delivered in town, the waggon comes into the warehouse, and the goods are lowered into it - Cork would be one of the persons to do that. Ansford calls them over, and I tick them off, which enables me to say they came into the warehouse.

WILLIAM ANSFORD . I am porter to Mr. Bache, in Moor-lane. On the 28th of December, I remember the goods arriving, I called them over to Haines, who ticked them off; they were put in a loft up one pair of stairs. An order came from Lawrence and Co., on the 21st of January, I looked for the packages, and found No. 9 and 10, were gone. I put them away together.

JOHN CORT re-examined. I find by my book that No. 10, contained eighty-four pieces of muslin, each measuring twenty yards.

SUSAN SMITH . I live in Tenter-street, Little Moorfields, over some stables; I have lately lost my husband, he dealt in wool. I have known Cochrane almost all my life. In December last, he was in Mr. Bache's employ; I had seen Atkinson driving a waggon, with Cochrane in the street, before Christmas - I first knew Cork, six or seven months ago, I then saw him in the street with my husband. I have a servant named Jane Barber . I slept in Wilmot-street, Brunswick-square, on the 9th or 10th of January, at Mr.

Morris's. I had been to the play with Mr. Morris and his wife, and slept there all night; he is no relation of mine, they lodge there. I have a brother named Smith, who is now indicted.

Q. Did you, next morning, take away any goods from there - A. Yes. I went home in a coach, and took them with me - the goods had been in the passage at Morris's house.

Q. When you went to Morris's did you expect any goods to be there - A. No; the goods were lifted into the coach by Morris and my brother. When I got home, I opened them, and found they contained muslins, they were corded up in coarse wrappers - I did not notice whether they had been opened before. There was a mark on the wrapper, in ink, I did not notice the figures or letters. My brother went home with me in the coach; he got out at the end of Old Jewry - I went on in the coach to Tenter-street, with the goods, and put them in my passage; I got home a little past nine o'clock in the morning, and my brother came home in about half an hour. Barber and I helped him to take the goods up stairs, into the sitting room, it was opened there, and contained from sixty to sixty-five pieces of muslin; I left them in the room without packing them up again. About an hour after this, Cochrane came, the girl might be in the room, and if she was, I sent her out - Cochrane said he wanted 73 l. for the muslins; I said I I could not tell what I could give for them, until I saw what they would fetch; my brother, Smith, was present at this conversation. Cochrane said he should send his wife for some for her own use; he went away, leaving the goods, and my brother went out - I did not look at the packages when they were at my house, to see the marks of them. Cochrane's wife came in about an hour or two, and took two fine pieces and another coarse, this was either on a Wednesday or Thursday. Cochrane called again the same day, and said if either of the other two men should call with him, I was to say I was only to give 40 l. for them. On Saturday night Cochrane, came with Atkinson, whom I had seen in his company in the street before, and am sure he is the man; Cochrane said to him,

"These are the goods, and Mrs. Smith is to give 40 l. for them," Atkinson said,

"Very well," they went away; I think my girl let them in that day - they were in the bed-room where the muslin was. Cochrane called in the course of the next week, to know if I had any money, I told him I had not, I had told him his wife had had three pieces, he said, very well - his wife afterwards came, I gave her 8 l. I afterwards told him she had 8 l., he said, very well; he called several times for money, and I paid him 6 l., he and his wife had in all 28 l. at different times - I thought it was 30 l., but it was counted up, and was only 28 l. On the Sunday after, before I was taken to prison, on the Monday, I saw Cork at my house, it was on the 27th of January, Cochrane was with him; we went into the bed-room, Cochrane said,

"Mistress how much money have you paid?" I said 30 l. Cork said,

"That is, right Mistress; I thought Robert was on the shuffle" - my husband's sister was there at the time, but not in the bed-room. Cochrane went away, and Cork stopped and had some ale with my brother, who was at home, but not in the bed-room - Cork called several times at my house, and enquired for my brother, but nothing passed about the goods. My brother lived with me, he was a pawnbroker's servant out of place. I paid 28 l. in all; there was one 5 l. Bank note among it; I pledged some of the goods, (two parcels) at Mr. Sowerby's, Chiswell-street, for 1 l. 10 s., and sent some to be pledged by my servant; I think she only pawned two pieces. I know Mrs. Bowers she pawned some for me. I offered some to a gentleman one morning for sale, I asked him 30 s. a piece for the fine, and 20 s. for the coarse. I know Forster, I told him I had goods to sell, and he said he would send a gentleman to look at them.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Your's is a room over a stable - A. Yes; I have two rooms, one leads to the other. My brother lived with me; I have two beds in one room, and a turn-up one in another - I do not know where my brother is; I did not give him notice to be off - I have not seen him since the morning I was taken to prison - he was to receive no part of the money for them, nor pay any part, he only lifted them in the coach. I was only put to the bar once at the office; I was taken there three times, as a criminal. I did not know that my brother was off when I became a witness. I had no communication with any body. Cochrane shewed Atkinson the goods, and said,

"These are the goods," he said, very well. I do not know whether my servant saw Atkinson.

Cross-examined by MR. PLATT. Q. How much did you raise on the muslins which you pawned - A. I do not know; I gave the officer all the duplicates. I went to the play with Mr. and Mrs. Morris, and next morning, Morris came up, and said George had left a large bundle in the passage, and George came up to me, he said he had them from Cochrane, and he was coming to my house to look at them - it was bulky, I did not know the contents till I got home, I did not conceal it.

Q. Might not conversation in one of your rooms be heard in the other - A. Not without paying particular attention. I told the officers of it directly they came to my house. I was not so much surprised to find muslin in it, as I might have been. I gave Cochrane's wife a 5 l. note, which I had saved for my rent; I mentioned this at Guildhall.

MR. ANDREWS. Q. Did you send the servant out of the room - A. No; she was in the sitting room - I went into the bed room. I have been in custody ever since. I have had no promise that I shall not be prosecuted.

THOMAS MORRIS . I live in Wilmot-street, Brunswick-square. About the 9th or 10th of January, at half-past six o'clock in the morning, some goods were brought to my house, packed in a large parcel, in canvas; it was brought by a waggon which stopped at my door, three men brought it. I did not notice any name on the waggon. I cannot swear either of the prisoners are the men, but I believe Cochrane was one of them; I had seen him before.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. What are you - A. An attorney's clerk. George Smith was one of the persons who left it - I knew him very well, he came to the door with it, I took it in, as it was left by him, it was merely brought into my passage - I had no previous communication about it. Smith asked if I would suffer him to leave it at my house, and I consented - he has absconded.

COURT. Q. Did it require more than one person to bring it in - A. I think two, for it was very heavy. Smith

came at nine o'clock for it, and went away with Mrs. Smith in a coach; I helped to lift it in the coach - it was brought about half-past six o'clock, it was then dark, I was sitting up, writing.

ELIZA ANN SMITH . I am sister-in-law to Mrs. Smith. I have seen the prisoner, Cochrane and Cork before - I have seen Cochrane at Mrs. Smith's once; it was on a Sunday, the day before she was taken up. I saw Cork there the same day in the afternoon, when I went, and Cochrane came while Cork was there.

Cross-examined by MR. PLATT. Q. What time did you go there - A. Between three and four o'clock. I went away, returned, and then Cochrane was there, he did not stop above a minute, he came about six o'clock, went into the parlour, but did not stop - I am the sister of George Smith .

JANE BARBER . I lived servant with Mrs. Smith, in Tenter-street, for six or seven months, till she was taken up; she went to the play on Wednesday evening, and slept out that night, she had slept out twice, the last time was on the Wednesday evening - she came home about nine o'clock in the morning, in a coach. George Smith had slept in the house that Wednesday night; there was a very great parcel in the coach when Mrs. Smith came home, it was taken out and taken up stairs into the bedroom - George Smith , my mistress, and I carried it up, George Smith had got up very early this morning, between five and six o'clock, for a knock came at the door. I went down to answer it, but my light went out; I did not open it, but asked who it was, and a voice, which I took to be Cochrane's, asked if George was at home. I had seen him before, and believed it to be his voice. I called Mr. Smith, went to bed again, and he went out - it was between five and six o'clock. About an hour after the parcel was brought, Cochrane came, the door was open, he went into the parlour, my mistress and George Smith were there; they stopped in the parlour for about an hour. I did not hear what passed, the parcel had been in the bedroom, but was afterwards taken into the parlour, it was in the parlour before Cochrane came. I saw Cochrane go out with George Smith , I did not go into the parlour while they were there. Before the parcel came, I had seen Cork and Cochrane at my mistress's house, the other is quite a stranger to me - I had seen them more than once before the parcel came, I had seen Cochrane four or five times before, and Cork two or three times.

Q. Had you been desired by your mistress to pawn any goods for her - A. Yes; the first thing was some of her wearing apparel, this was before the parcel was brought; after it was brought, I pledged about three pieces of muslin, for 1 l. each - she told me to take them to Mr. Sowerby, at the corner of Finsbury-street, and I pawned them there - I took one parcel to Attenborough's.

Q. Did you know of any woman coming to your mistress - A. I have seen Mrs. Cochrane there, on the morning the goods came; she took away about three pieces of muslin - I do not know Fenton, Christopher Atkinson and Smith were at the house when the goods were there.

Cross-examined by MR. PLATT. Q. When the knock came, you was outside - A. Yes; I did not tell the Magistrate that it was his voice, nor that Mrs. Cochrane took away any muslin, I was not asked. I have seen my mistress three times, I do not think I have talked with her about this - I cannot say whether she has spoken to me about Mrs. Cochrane; I was with her a quarter of an hour each time, and spoke to her to-day for about five minutes - I believe Cochrane was acquainted with my mistress.

MR. ANDREWS. Q. You have seen your mistress in Giltspur-street Compter, three times - A. Yes; I could not hear what Cochrane said to my mistress when he came, I heard talking in the room.

JOHN HORN . In consequence of information I received, I went to Mrs. Smith's house on the 28th of January, and she shewed me some jaconot muslins; I took two patterns of them, which I produce; they were in the front room, there were twenty pieces.

JOHN LACY HAWKINS . I am a marshalman. I went to Mrs. Smith's on the 28th of January, and found a quantity of muslins; Horn cut patterns of two of them - I found nine duplicates of muslins, pawned at different pawnbroker's, in a cash-box, in her parlour, I think it was locked. Mrs. Morris gave me one or two pieces, at her house, in Wilmot-street.

MARY ANN BOWERS . Mrs. Smith employed me to pawn muslin for her two or three times - I pawned them at Matthews's, Attenborough's, and Barker's, (looks at the duplicates), these are what I got for them, it was on the 10th, 12th, and 22d of January - I pawned them in the name of Smith.

THOMAS SOWERBY . (Looks at some duplicates), These are mine; they are dated the 10th and 12th of January. I produce the goods answering to them - I believe Mrs. Smith pawned one of them, they are both pawned in her name - I advanced 2 l. 10 s., and 1 l. on them.

GEORGE ATTENBOROUGH . Here are two duplicates of mine, I produce the goods, they were pledged for 1 l. 5 s. and 2 l. 10 s.; here is another duplicate, of the 19th of January, pawned by Bowers, for 25 s.

THOMAS MATTHEWS . Here is a duplicate of mine, for three pieces of muslin, pawned on the 22d of January, for 2 l. 10 s., by Bowers, in the name of Smith.

- BARKER. Here is a duplicate of mine, for twenty yards of muslin, pawned for 1 l. 0 s. 2 d., in the name of Smith.

ALEXANDER FLEMMING . Here are two duplicates, both dated the 22d of January, for muslin pawned for 2 l. each, in the name of Smith.

JOHN BURD . I am captain of Mr. Bache's boat, the Defiance. About the 21st of January, I met Cochrane, at Paddington, by Pickford's warehouses; he asked me if I had met his waggon, I said, No. He said he thought the waggon had been come, and that he had been into the town, to carry a great deal of money for Mr. Bache; he put his hand to his side-pocket, and shewed me a great quantity of sovereigns, there was a handful of sovereigns.

STEPHEN HAYNES , re-examined. Cochrane had some talk with me about money, about the time the muslin was missed; he came to me and said, he had been extremely fortunate, that he had found a purse, containing a sum of money; I asked how much, he said there was some sovereigns in it. I asked him if there was any bills in it, to lead to a discovery of the owner, he said, Yes; there was a bill; I asked if it was a bill of exchange, he seemed

not to understand me; I asked if it was a Bank of England note, he said it was very much like one, that he found it near the London Docks - I advised him to have it advertized, he said he would look at the papers and see if the owner had advertized it. I cautioned him not to make an extravagant use of it; he said he would not, and that he had handed it over to his wife. About a week or ten days after, we had a further conversation; he said it contained more than he had told me. I asked him what, he said it contained a bill of 10 l., payable at the Bank of England, but not a Bank note, and that it had been out for three or four years, that his brother had taken it, and it was paid without hesitation - he had 32 s. a week.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

COCHRANE'S Defence. I can account for the money. My master sent me to Charing-cross, for twenty-one sovereigns; I often had 30 l. of his money. The money I spoke to Haynes about I found the Sunday before Christmas-day; as I was going to Limehouse. I told him to look in the papers for an advertisement - it was as hard for me to get the goods, as to break from this bar.

Atkinson put in a written defence, denying the charge, and stating that the guard always directed him to deliver the packages.

COCHRANE - GUILTY . Aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

ATKINSON - NOT GUILTY .

CORK - NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220220-31

FOURTH DAY. SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 1822.

356. MARGARET KEYS was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of January , two bridles, value 20 s. , the goods of William Smith .

SAMUEL LOVELL . I am servant to Mr. William Smith , a coach-master , of the Three Cups-inn, Aldersgate-street. His coach changes horses at the Old Swan, public-house, Finchley-common . I came into the stables there, and missed two bridles - I saw the prisoner in the tap-room, between one and two o'clock, she had some gin and beer, this was half an hour before the bridles were missed - I found her about a mile on the road to London, with them. She gave no account of them, but wanted to get away.

THOMAS BRETT . I am a patrol. The prisoner was given into my charge - I found one of the bridles tied up in her apron.

JOHN LAPPAN . I am a patrol. I asked her how she got them, she said she took them out of a stable.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A young man beckoned me into the stable, he would give me no money, I was aggravated, and took them.

GUILTY . Aged 33.

Confined Two Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220220-32

357 WILLIAM ABBOTT was indicted for the wilful murder of Mary Lees .

ANN SMITH . On the 9th of February, I lived in the house kept by the prisoner, at No. 41, George-street, St. Giles's. I knew the deceased, Mary Lees . She first came to live with the prisoner as his wife, about four years ago. On the evening of the 9th of February, between six and seven o'clock, or rather later, she asked me to feel her eye; the prisoner was sitting by the fire, smoking his pipe. I felt her eye - it was very much bruised all down her face. She said, in his presence, that William had done it through her wanting to take some money to the landlord. She said,

"I have got 5 s." I said,

"You had better take it up." She said,

"If I do not go up to-night I cannot go in the morning, for I owe him so much money." The prisoner said,

"I will serve you ten times worse if you do not hold your noise." He then kicked her several times about the legs, and said he would serve me as bad as her. She went out with the 5 s., as I understood, to take it to the landlord, who lives in the neighbourhood. I sat in the room; I was in and out in the course of the evening, until two o'clock, when she returned from paying the landlord. The prisoner asked her for sixpence; she said she had not got it; and, using very bad expressions; he said, if his father and mother came out of their graves, he would kill her that night; he up with one hand, and had a pipe in the other, and he dashed her down, stood with the pipe in his hand, and with all his force, stamped on her belly several times. I said,

"Do'nt, William, do'nt do that." He said, if I offered to pick her up, he would serve me worse than her. I being very ill, dare not get up, for fear he should knock me down. She lay there about a quarter of an hour, and was very stiff; she put out her hand and asked me to pull her up; she got up herself by a chair, and he came from the fire-place, kicked her several times on the legs and hurt his bad leg; and repeated, that if his mother and father came out of their graves he would kick her ten times worse. I asked her to go and have a glass of gin, as she was so ill - she was quite sober. We went to Mr. Peach's in Church-lane, and she called for a quartern of rum; it was not many steps off; three of us drank the rum between us; and when we got back he was sitting by the fire smoking his pipe - he took her by her two arms, dashed her against the bedstead, and said she had been spending his money. She said she would give him a pot of beer if he wanted it, and sent for one for him; after he drank it, she went to Peach's again and had half a pint of beer herself - I went with her - she could not drink it, and I did. I cannot tell what time this was, as there was no clock; I was there till one o'clock in the morning, staying in the room. When we came back from Peach's again, he took her and dashed her against a fender with all his force. I never saw him more severe in his life; and as she lay on the floor, he said, he did not care if his father and mother came from their graves he would kill her that night. She lay on the fender a good while; when she got up, she said something had had burst on her right side, putting her hand to the top of her neck. Morris came in then; I cannot say what time it was, but when I went out for the gin, I met the patrol, and wanted her to give charge of him; she said,

"No, I won't, and I shall not be obliged to any one else who does."

Q. Were you present when any thing passed about her

pockets - A. When she lay on the floor, before she was thrown on the fender; he had taken her by her arms and dashed her on the coals, which lay in the corner of the room by the side of the bed; she lay on her back and fainted; she was quite stiff; I thought she was dead. He cut her pockets off, as she lay there, put them into his coat pocket, and sat down; and then she got up by the chair, as I said before. She said, he has got all my money, and sat down on the chair. I asked her if she would go to bed; she said, yes - and then I put her on the bed, without undressing her; - he took her by her arms and dashed her down on the floor; (this was the time he dashed her on the fender.) After he got her pockets he went out, and then came back again and sat by the fire smoking; she went and sat by him. Mr. Morris came in and fetched her some raw beef to put to her eye. I then went to bed; it was then, I think, between one and two o'clock. She never struck or offered to strike him, or did any thing to him. She called him one very bad name after he struck her. She was a thin woman, and had been very ill; she was tall but not strong.

COURT. Q. Was the prisoner drunk - A. No; he appeared to have been drinking - I slept in the garret.

Q. How came you so long in the room - A. My knee was so bad I could hardly move - I boarded with the prisoner, and only slept up stairs; I am an unfortunate woman - I had no quarrel with the prisoner; I saw him at breakfast, he appeared very severe then.

Prisoner. Q. Will you swear I knocked her down at all - A. Yes. A young man and woman lodge in the back room; four or five people lodge in the house, they were all out at the time.

JURY. Q. When you went to bed, did you leave them sitting by the fire - A. Yes; and she had her eye tied up.

LAVINIA NICHOLLS . I lodge in the one pair front room of this house. Lees, alias Duggan, lived with the prisoner as his wife, in the parlour; nobody else slept in that room - my room is over the prisoner's. On Saturday night, the 9th of February, I had been at home all day, and about seven o'clock, I heard a noise in the parlour where they lived - I went into Long-acre for somesugar; got back very near eight o'clock, and before I got to the door I heard violent screams from the woman - I went into the parlour, and found her and the prisoner there; she was lying down on the floor, on her back - the prisoner was with his left hand leaning on the table, kicking her on the belly; he did it several times with great violence - when I went in, she said,

"Mrs. Nicholls, shelter me from this villain, for he will kill me." I said, he should not ill use her, and got between them - he said, if I interfered, he would serve me the same way - I then desisted, got the woman from the ground, and got her into a chair; she cried out several times, in a low tone, as if she was hurt - she fainted away in the chair - he was sitting down by the fire, and did not help her; he did nothing. Ann Smith came in while she was fainting, which lasted five or six minutes - I gave her water, but she could not take it - when she recovered, I assisted her to a chair, and placed her by the fire; I saw the side of her left eye was very black, and swollen - I had seen him kick her there; he kicked her on the stomach, and on the head - I noticed the blackness, she said, in his presence, he had kicked her there, and that she felt very ill in her inside.

Q. What time was this - A. About eight o'clock when I went in, and I stopped there till about eleven o'clock; I got him quite peaceable, and then went to bed - he went to sleep by the fire, and she went to sleep in her chair, with her head against the wall. I remained awake; she groaned very much when asleep - I left Morris and Smith there. After I got into bed I heard a noise in the prisoner's room; I got up and went in again, and found Smith and Morris there. I believe it was between twelve and one o'clock; they were peaceable - Abbot was sitting by the fire, smoking; I went to bed in five or six minutes, and was not disturbed in the night. About eight o'clock in the morning I went out on an errand; on coming back, I went into Abbott's room, and saw him and Morris there; when I came to the door, I heard him turn from the bedside, and say,

"D - n her eyes, she is dead" - I went to the bed side, and saw her lying on her right side, quite cold; she was dead; he turned away and sat by the fire, and said,

"Well, she is dead, they can only have to bury her." I remained in the room till Bartlett came and took the prisoner away - he did not attempt to get away; I do not think that he knew Bartlett was sent for.

COURT. Q. How long had you lived there - A. Only five days. My husband is sergeant of the 90th regiment, and is at Malta; I am from Manchester, where the regiment had been, and being a stranger in town, I went there to lodge, without knowing what place it was - I came here to get sent to Malta, but was bound over to appear here. The deceased was a tall, thin, spare, delicate woman; she gave no offence to him.

Prisoner. Q. Did we not have tea comfortable that evening - A. I did not see them at tea.

Q. Did you not take a man up stairs, and sleep with him. - A. It is false.

EDWARD MORRISON . I lived at this house, in February, in the back garret. I came home on this night, between twelve and one o'clock; all was quiet then. I went into the parlour to pay my rent. Abbott was asleep by the fire; Lees shewed me her black eye, and said, she had been used very ill. I got a piece of beef, and came back to her; the prisoner was still asleep - I put the beef to her eye; she went out of the room, and I stopped there - she returned in about ten minutes; Abbott was then awake - she sat on a chair, he got up, pulled her off the chair, threw her on the floor, and stamped his foot upon her several times, and kicked her about the body; she lay upon her left side; I do not know on which side he kicked her. I lifted her up, and put her to bed; she remained there a short time, and then he again threw her on the floor, kicked, and stamped his feet on her several times - he used a bad expression, and said, he wished he could kick her more without hurting his leg; I did all I could to hinder him, but he fell on her with such violence, I could not get between them time enough - I then lifted her upon the bed a second time. I never heard her speak again; it might then be between two and three o'clock or later - I had no watch.

Q. Did she, while you were there, give him the least provocation, either by word or action - A. Not the least - when I put her on the bed a second time, something came from her, through his kicking her, as I thought, and he said,

"the **** has **** the bed;" he then dragged her off again, and kicked her - I told him he would kill her;

he said, if he did, he would take her to Brooks's next morning, making use of a bad expression; Brooks is a surgeon, in Gray's-inn-lane, as I understood. The servant girl came into the room, helped me to get her clothes off, and got her into bed a third time - I never heard her speak afterwards; I sat by the fire all night, and about six o'clock in the morning, I heard a ratling noise in her throat - I heard her breathe afterwards; I took the ratling noise to be her sobbing and crying.

Q. What induced you to remain in the room - A. He sat up all night; I remained there, because she asked me to stop there to prevent his beating her. I left the room about a quarter before eight o'clock; I then thought she was asleep. Nicholls was comingin as I was going out; I believing her to be asleep, told her not to disturb her - Nicholls had been in the room before that, went out for something, and then came back again.

COURT. Q. What are you - A. A wheeler. I never had any quarrel with him; I had been there three weeks.

Q. Why did you not call for assistance - A. I prevented him myself, then he was quiet for a short time, and then went at her again. I understood the watch had been called several times before, but she would never give him in charge.

Prisoner. Q. Did not she begin first - A. She did not give him an angry word in my hearing.

EDWARD BYFIELD . I lodged in the back parlour of the prisoner's house. On the Saturday night, about eight o'clock, as I was going out, Lees came to me, and taking my hand, put it to her eye. She came to my room about a quarter past twelve o'clock; she was dressed - she was very much bruised about the eye; she staid with me about ten minutes, and asked for some porter; she was perfectly sober; I was in bed - I had none. After going to sleep, I was disturbed again by a noise from Abbott's room, like somebody falling down - I heard a man's voice say

"Bill, do'nt beat her so, for you will kill her;" I thought it was Morris's voice; this was succeeded by a noise and scuffling again. I did not hear the woman's voice at all. When I got up in the morning, about eight o'clock, I went into Abbott's room, and saw Nicholls at the bed side, the prisoner had the deceased up in his arms; he said

"I am d - d if she is not dead, I am glad of it." I found she was dead, and fetched the constable - Abbott was between drunk and sober, he hardly knew what he was about; Bartlett fetched the doctor, and he came directly.

COURT. Q. When Lees shewed you her eyes, did she appear in liquor - A. No.

JOHN BARTLETT . I am beadle of St. Giles's. I was fetched to George-street, between eight and nine o'clock in the morning, and took the prisoner in custody; he appeared to have been in liquor overnight, and to have been asleep, he seemed quite stupified, he talked quite rational; he went quietly with me; and walked quite straight to the watch-house, which is about three hundred yards from the house.

CLARA JAMES . I was servant to the prisoner - he lived in the front parlour with Mary Lees . Nicholls lived in the house - she came home as near as I can guess, about eight o'clock on Saturday night, she brought no man home with her - I sleep in the one pair; I heard very little of the quarrel, for I was up stairs cleaning the house all day; between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, I came down to my dinner, and in the evening, I saw the prisoner and deceased together; several people was in the room - somebody were always coming in and out; I saw him follow her into the passage, and strike her three times with his fist, she did not strike him again. I went to bed between four and five o'clock in the morning, that was the time I undressed her; Morris lifted her into bed, for the other could not, he had no strength.

Q. What had you been doing from eight o'clock till the time you went to bed - A. Standing at the street door to let the beds, because he would not let me come into the parlour - after putting her to bed, I asked him if I might go and lay down myself, and told him Mary would not be able to get up in the morning, nor him either; he said he would make her get up, for he would drag her out of bed, she should not play her larks with him - I went to bed, and saw no more of him till to-day. I think he had been drinking, he knew what he was about, and spoke very correct. I do not know that the deceased had been drinking.

Prisoner. Q. Do you remember our going to the public-house together - A. No. They were in good humour at breakfast time.

MR. JOHN DAVIS . I am assistant surgeon to the infirmary, for the parish of St. Giles, and St. George. On Sunday morning the 10th of February, between eight and nine o'clock, I went to examine the body of the deceased; I found her laying strait in bed, undressed - she had her shift on, it appeared very wet; I examined the body, and found no external marks of violence, except a contusion extending over the upper and lower eye lid. I examined every part of her person - I saw her again on Tuesday, about one or two o'clock in the afternoon, and attended the opening of her body; the head was first examined, there was a large coagulation of blood, of three or four ounces; It had been formed in consequence of a rupture, of a blood vessel, in the base of the brain - the coagulation was between the dina mater, and the brain - this was sufficient to cause her death, and I believe it to be the immediate cause of her death, I have no doubt of it - the extravasation would arise from being kicked or beat about the body; the treatment described, would be sufficient to cause the rupture. Apoplexy would be produced by such causes - I should think the rupture happened within four or five hours of her death; she did not appear to be at all a person likely to have apoplexy, from natural causes. External appearances of bruises are occasioned by the extravasation of blood, which settles under the skin; it is visible earlier when they are made near the bone, than on any fleshy part - it sometimes appears much earlier, and sometimes much later, but after death, it never appears unless it is produced before.

MR. OGLE. I am surgeon to the Infirmary, and was present at the opening of the deceased's body. I have heard Mr. Davis's account, it is very correct, full, and satisfactory - I agree with his statement in every particular. If discoloration does not appear before death, it does not after.

Q. You have heard acts of violence described, can you account for the absence of all symptoms of external violence - A. Yes; there might be the termination of blood

from the head, as to be the existing cause, without any marks.

Prisoner's Defence. We went out, came home, and sat by the fire; I got smoking, and having three or four glasses, which got into my head; I found she was getting on too, and told her not to drink too much - I went out, returned, and said something to her; there was nobody in the room - she called me names, and hit me twice on the shoulder with something; I turned round, and hit her right in the eye with my flat hand, she said you have given me a nice eye, I said it serves you right, for you always begin with me first; she went out three times, and kept on having gin and rum, and was never further gone in liquor.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 49.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18220220-33

358. DANIEL DAY and WILLIAM ANDREWS were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Sarah Lewis , about eight o'clock at night, on the 10th of February , and stealing therein, three coats, value 3 l. , the goods of William Harland .

WILLIAM HARLAND . I am gardener to Mrs. Sarah Lewis , of Palmer's-green, near Southgate . I sleep in a room over the seed-room - there is a drying-ground between it and the dwelling-house. On Sunday, the 10th of February, about half-past eight o'clock at night, I left every thing safe, and returned to the room about twenty minutes after nine o'clock, and found a pane of glass, broken, the sash screws undone, and the sash was not shut close down; there was a ladder placed so that a man could get up to the window; it was brought from the barn. I found my chest broken open, a great coat, two coates, a nankeen coat, and a pocket-book taken, and a pearl eye-glass. I am sure they were all there at half-past eight o'clock; the window was then shut down and screwed.

THOMAS BEST . I am a patrol of Bow-street. On Monday morning, about two o'clock, I was in East Barnet-lane, about two miles and a half from Mrs. Lewis's. The prisoners came up towards me, with another man; I was standing at the top of the lane. I took one of them, and my partner the other. I said,

"What have you got here?" they both said,

"Working clothes." They threw their bundles down, and a pump, and ran away on my saying I must see what they had got - the third man got away. I took Day - he said,

"You had better let me go." He kept learing over his shoulder; - I said, if he moved an inch, I would run my cutlass through his body. I handcuffed him, I never lost sight of him - I produce the bundles. I think the man who got away had the property. We found a large crow-bar at Andrews's house.

RICHARD CLARKSON . I was with Best on the Monday morning after the robbery; his account is correct; I believe the man who escaped had the bundle - they were all in company - I afterwards went to Andrews's house, to make a search, and found him there. I saw the crow-bar - it might be used in digging gravel; I dug up part of a pump in the garden, which corresponded with what they left behind; the metal of it corresponds in colour. Day had it on his back. I am sure Andrews was one of them; he was two or three minutes in my view. When we took him at his house, he said he had nothing to do with it, and was only walking up the lane behind them. I am sure they were all three together, and two women were with them. They all tried to escape.

DAY'S Defence. The man with the clothes was a good deal before me.

ANDREWS'S Defence. I was walking to Southgate, arm in arm with my wife, and heard a cry of Stop thief! they ran towards town. A man drew a sword, and my wife pulled me back saying,

"Don't go there, for murder will be done;" and in the morning the parties came to my house and took me.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Best.

Reference Number: t18220220-34

359. LUKE FREE was indicted for feloniously assaulting Benjamin Bond , on the King's highway, on the 21st of January , puting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, one watch, value 6 l.; one chain, value 30 s.; one seal, value 5 s., and one key, value 5 s. , his property.

BENJAMIN BOND. On the 21st of January, I was walking home to dinner, about half-past one o'clock. I am lame. I was in Gower's-walk, Whitechapel , and was accosted by a youth, not the prisoner, he looked at me indifferently, as he passed me; my face was towards Rosemary-lane, and his towards Church-lane; when he came abreast of me he rushed upon me with great violence, and snatched my watch from my pocket, with such violence that the outside case came off, and fell on the ground - he got the watch and appendages, and ran off as fast as he could; I cried Stop thief! pretty loud, and at that moment my attention was drawn to the prisoner, who was fifteen or sixteen yards from me; I had seen him before the other man came up, loitering about, and looking towards me. I do not think he was walking when I first saw him; I did not suspect him, and thought he might stop the other, but he did not; but when the man that robbed me came up to the prisoner, there were three of them, and all ran off together. I rather trembled, and was almost overcome; I sat down in a house for a few minutes - he was apprehended the same evening.

JAMES THOMPSON . On the 21st of January, I saw the prisoner standing by our door, in Gower's-walk; I noticed him, and saw another lad come up to him, he was about fourteen years old: he said to the prisoner as he turned the corner

"Now." I looked the other way, and saw another lad, of the same size, standing by the corner, and immediately, as Mr. Bond turned the corner, I saw the lad snatch the watch out of his pocket, and run off by our door. Mr. Bond cried Stop thief! I could not get out of the house to pursue him as the table stood by the door, but directly the lad ran off the prisoner ran to him and hit him on the head. I saw the watch in his hand, with the chain hanging out; the lad directly gathered the chain up in his hand, and all three ran off together. A dog ran out of a cooperage and ran after them - the prisoner beat the dog back twice.

SAMUEL MILLER . I am an officer. On the 21st of January, I met Bond in Lambeth-street, about three minutes walk from Thompson's; he said he had been robbed of his watch - Thompson was with him, also a cooper, who described the persons. I went with Thompson to look for them, and between seven and eight o'clock, I found the prisoner at the Anchor,

public-house, Lower East Smithfield; I took him from the description I received of his hat; I found 9 s. 6 d. in his pocket. He said he knew nothing about it. Next morning Thompson and Bond came to the office - Bond said he had no doubt of his being one of the three.

JAMES THOMPSON . He is the boy the other ran up to.

Prisoner's Defence. Miller told my master not to come and give me a character.

SAMUEL MILLER . It is false.

GUILTY - Aged 17.

Of stealing from the person only

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18220220-35

360. SARAH CHAPMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of January , five handkerchief, value 6 s. , the goods of Joseph Reckless .

WILLIAM WARREN . I am shopman to Joseph Reckless , of Cheapside , hosier . On the 21st of January, between two and three o'clock; the prisoner came in alone, and asked to look at black worsted stockings, at 15 d. per pair. I shewed her some which did not suit her, she bid me 1 s., which I refused; she moved towards the counter, laid hold of some handkerchiefs, and asked the price. I was serving a gentleman, and asked her to wait. I was obliged to go to the back of the shop for stockings for the gentleman, and was detained about five minutes by him. On coming to the front, the prisoner was going away, and directly she left the shop I missed a piece of handkerchief. I went after her, found her about one hundred yards off, and saw them peeping out from under a bundle which she had. I found it was my master's.

GEORGE WATTS . I took charge of her - I found no money on her.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Judgment Respited .

London Jury, before Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220220-36

361. MICHAEL TAYLOR was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of January , two seals, value 3 l. one key, value 30 s., and part of a watch chain, value 30 s., the goods of Sampson Israel , from his person .

SAMPSON ISRAEL. I am an appraiser , and live in Maiden-lane, Covent-Garden. On Sunday evening, the 6th of January, between nine and ten o'clock in the evening, I was in Fleet-street , just at the end of Bridge-street, on the market side, I observed the prisoner and two others coming towards me - I am sure of his person - they made a pause within two or three yards of me; I passed on one side to give them room, they let me pass; I went on five or six steps, turned my head, and saw the same men standing still talking together, and looking towards me - my seals were visible. I quickened my pace, and after going ten or twelve steps; they turned and passed me; I then lost sight of them until I got to Wine Office-court, when I again saw them; they were returning to meet me, and before I could recover from my surprise, one of them (not the prisoner) made a snatch at my watch, my fob was twisted inside, and the chain broke, through the violence of the pull. I attempted to seize the man, when the prisoner and the other got round me; the prisoner put his hands against me, and prevented my following the man with my seals; he ran up Hind-court, and the prisoners followed him; I pursued, and on going up the court I received a kick from one of them, near my groin, which prevented my following for a few seconds; I then followed, but lost sight of them in Gough-square. I ran down a court, leading to Shoe-lane, and rose an alarm; I turned back, came into Fleet-street, went into the court, and saw two men looking for something on the ground; one of them, who was very intent on looking, did not see me, but the others did, and gave a signal; he ran towards Fleet-street, the light reflected on his features, and I identified him; it was the prisoner. I had seen him three times by a good light, and am certain of him; he had prevented my pursuing the thief. I then attempted to seize him, and said,

"Now I have one of you at any rate;" he replied,

"Have you, ***** you, then take that," and gave me a tremendous blow on my back. I had a stick in my hand - I cannot say whether the blow did not come from my stick, by his knocking against me. He ran back up the court. I followed, and from an alarm I gave, a gentleman stopped him; when I came up, he was just rising from the ground, trying to get away. I rose my stick to strike him, and the gentleman; thinking me one of the party, let him go; he was finally secured. I am sure of his being the man. It was a moon-light night, and there was a strong light from the fish shop.

THOMAS MARSH . I am an engraver, and live in Gough-square. About a quarter before ten o'clock at night, I was sitting in my parlour, and heard a cry of Stop thief! I went out, and seized a person at my door, who said,

"There he goes!" In consequence of which, I let him go. I saw a great many people coming and heard somebody had been robbed - I went in again - I have no recollection of his person. Five minutes after I heard the alarm again, I went out, and heard footsteps coming from Hind-court, and made to the corner leading to King's Head-court, and seized a person about the size of the prisoner, who was running up; we wrestled, and were both on the ground, when the prosecutor came up, and said,

"I have got you now," and lifted up his stick. I suspected him, held up my arm to protect myself, and the person escaped from me. I found the prisoner at the watch-house, and believe him to be the man.

Prisoner. Q. Was it possible for him to see me at the bottom of the court? - A. Undoubtedly; the Cheshire-cheese, public-house, was open, and the shell-fish shop.

JOHN BALLARD . The prisoner was brought to the watch-house. I found nothing on him.

Prisoner's Defence. I came down Fleet-street, and turned up the court for a necessary purpose. I found my shoe loose, and stooped to tie it up; and as I rose, the prosecutor collared me, and said,

"I have you, you are the man who robbed me." He struck me across the eye with his stick, and I struck him; he sang out

"Thieves and murder." I ran up the court, and some person laid hold of me. I knew nothing of the robbery. There is no lamp near the court.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220220-37

362. FREDERICK FIXEN was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of January , one handkerchief, value 7 s., the goods of Matthew Bowyer , from his person .

MATTHEW BOWYER . I am a carpet manufacturer , and live in St. Mildred's-court. On the 31st of January, about five minutes past eight o'clock at night, I was in 'Change-alley; I felt something at my pocket, turned round, saw the prisoner with my handkerchief in his hand, and saw him pass it to his companion; I secured him, the other ran off - he denied having taken it.

THOMAS WHISTON . I took him in charge, and found 6 s. on him.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220220-38

363. ANN QUIN was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of February , one pair of shoes, value 4 s., and one pair of stockings, value 2 s. , the goods of Mary Jackson , widow .

MARY JACKSON . I live at Stoke Newington . These things were in my room, the prisoner was sent to board with me by some ladies, until she could be provided for. She was with me seven weeks, she told me somebody wanted to speak to me; I went out, and on returning, she was gone. I saw these things safe the day before; they were found on her feet.

Prisoner. Q. I gave you 3 s. for the shoes, and you gave me the stockings - A. No.

CHARLES HERDSFIELD . I took her in charge on the 6th of February, in Grub-street. Mrs. Jackson claimed the shoes and stockings she wore.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Confined Three Months .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220220-39

364. THOMAS JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of January , one swing looking-glass, value 2 l. 10 s. , the goods of Thomas Hale , (since deceased.)

THOMAS WILLIAMS . I am a lighterman, and live in Upper Thames-street. On the 8th of January, about three o'clock in the afternoon, I was going down Upper Thames-street, and saw the prisoner in company with two others. I saw him first trying a door, they passed on about four doors further, and found a door a-jar - one went in, and the other two waited outside, passing backwards and forwards; their companion came out in a short time without anything - they passed on, I followed, and saw them try another door; they went on till they came to Allhallows church. I met a friend, who joined in watching them - one of them got on a step, and looked into a coach, which was drawn up, and the driver had left. They passed on, we went into a public-house and saw them return to the coach, pass it, then return, and the prisoner left the coach and walked up Suffolk-lane with something; the other two must have been between the coach and the horses. I saw the prisoner had something, followed, and caught him with this swing-glass in his hand. I took him back, and found the coachman coming out of an eating-house, opposite to where the coach stood, he said it was taken out of his coach; the prisoner then resisted and tore my shirt - I kept him fast, and gave him to the officer.

JOHN JONES . I know Mr. Williams. He desired me to watch the men; we went into the public-house, the prisoner was with two others; one of them, (the youngest,) went on the steps, and looked into the coach - the prisoner and another walked up and down, and the man on the steps went back and stood against a post, at the corner of Suffolk-lane. I sent Williams after him, the other two went off towards London-bridge - I saw Williams collar the prisoner with the glass, the coachman claimed it.

HENRY DAVEY . I am the coachman. The glass was in my coach, I brought it from Mr. Thomas Hales , in the Strand. I knew him before, I had put him down at Brick-lane, and was waiting for him; I was to take him up again in an hour, he is now dead.

RICHARD DADY . I am an officer. I saw him struggling with Williams.

Prisoner's Defence. A gentleman in the lane asked me to carry the glass, Mr. Williams came up and said I stole it.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220220-40

365. WILLIAM BATH was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of February , one pint pewter pot, value 9 d. , the goods of Mary Ann Merrett , widow .

MARY ANN MERRETT . I keep a public house in Arrow-alley, Houndsditch . On the 7th of February, about four o'clock, I was called from the bar into the tap-room, and was told a man had stolen a pot. The prisoner was brought in, and I saw it found in his breeches; it had my name and sign on it; the name is now erased. I understand his wife has gone to live with another man, which has affected his mind.

JAMES STONE . I took him in charge. The pot was left at the watch-house with him, and was found thrown through the window into the churchyard, disfigured - I think he is not in his right mind.

NOT GUILTY, being insane .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220220-41

366. DAVID FULSHER was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of January , one handkerchief, value 6 d., the goods of Bernard Constatt , from his person .

BERNARD CONSTATT . I am a chymist , and live in Whitechapel. I was in Cornhill , going home; my handkerchief was in my outside coat pocket, a few minutes before; an officer asked if I had lost any thing, I felt and missed it - he collared the prisoner, who was close to me; and saw it found on him.

JOSEPH PEARMAN . I am a night patrole of the City. I saw the prosecutor near the 'Change, the prisoner was close to him; he put his hand in his right hand coat pocket, and took out a handkerchief - I told the prosecutor. We secured him, and found it in his breeches pocket - he said it was of no use searching, and took it out himself. I found another in his hat.

WILLIAM RHODES . I was with Pearman, and saw the prisoner, in Cornhill, in company with another - they parted; I watched them for ten minutes, and saw them try

several gentlemen's pockets, and whispering together. I saw Pearman take him with the handkerchief.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220220-42

367. MARTHA BROWN , and ELIZA LEWIS , were indicted for stealing, on the 7th of January , one watch, value 1 l.; one chain, value 1 s.; and one key, value 6 d., the goods of James Anderson , from his person .

JAMES ANDERSON . I am an apprentice to a baker, Mr. Henderson, of Old Broad-street. On the 7th of January, about half-past nine o'clock at night, I was opposite St. Peter's-alley, in Gracechurch-street; Lewis came to me, and asked me to go down an alley with her, leading into the market; I refused - I crossed the road, she came with me, and then a tall woman came up, and asked me to go down St. Peter's alley ; I went, it being my way home. Lewis stopped at the top of the alley, and the other went with me, and when we got to the middle, she called Lewis, who came, and they both stood before me - I stopped with them; they began pulling my apron, and talking to me for two or three minutes, and then the tall woman walked off. I was quite sober - Lewis followed her directly; when I got to Cornhill, I missed my watch. A gentleman passed while they were with me, but did not stop - I know my watch was safe when I was in the alley; I ran to find them but they were gone. On Thursday, I saw them together, in Gracechurch-street, between nine and ten o'clock at night; I said nothing to them, but went home - I watched there on Friday night, about the same time, and saw them. I went home again, without speaking to them; I wished to speak to my father about it first, and that is why I did not call the watchman. I saw my father on Sunday; and they were taken on the Monday night - I had two constables with me. I saw my watch, on the Thursday afterwards, in pawn; nothing improper passed between us.

CHARLES STAPLES . I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoners on Monday evening, the 14th in Bishopsgate-street, in company. The prosecutor swore to Lewis, and said he believed Brown to be the other - I found nothing on them; Lewis said, it was a pity she should suffer alone, and that Brown was with her. I found the duplicate of the watch at Brown's lodging, No. 72, Rose-street, Bethnal-green; Lewis said, in her presence, that they were her lodgings.

JOHN RICHARDS . I am a pawnbroker. On the 8th of January the watch was pawned, in the name of Jane Atkins , Well-street, for 16 s.; I believe Brown pawned it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

LEWIS'S Defence. I never touched his watch.

LEWIS GUILTY . Aged 26.

BROWN GUILTY . Aged 33.

Confined for One Year .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220220-43

FIFTH DAY, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 1822.

368. WILLIAM PEGG was indicted for a rape .

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Best.

Reference Number: t18220220-44

369. THOMAS BERRY was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of February , one watch, value 3 l.; one key, value 1 d.; and one seal, value 2 d., the goods of Joseph Hussey , in the dwelling-house of Philip Dignum .

JOSEPH HUSSEY . On Friday the 1st of February, the prisoner was at my house, and breakfasted with me. After breakfast he left my room, and I saw no more of him. On Monday the 4th, after breakfast, I left my watch in my room, and went out; I left it hanging against the wall, it it hung up there on the 1st of February, when he was there. I left my daughter at home, and was sent for about half-past one o'clock, and found the watch was gone. I lodge in the parlour of Mr. Dignum. It cost six guineas - I bought it thirteen years ago, at Bath.

MARY ANN HUSSEY . I am eleven years and a half old. I am the grand-daughter of the last witness; he went out on Monday, and left me alone in the room. The prisoner knocked at the door about one o'clock; I was cleaning myself, thought it was my grandmother, and said I was coming; I opened the door and saw it was him. I said,

"Oh, is that you?" He said,

"Yes." I knew him before, by his having breakfasted with my grandfather. He came in, and asked me to fetch him a pennyworth of tobacco; I said I could not, as the shop was at the end of the next street. I looked at the watch, and saw it was exactly one o'clock - I said,

"I can't, indeed, for my grandmother will be home directly to dinner." He warmed his hands, and said,

"Then will you fetch me half a sheet of paper, and make haste home, for I have seen your mother, and she will break your neck if you don't make haste." I went out and saw him looking out of the window, with his hat on. I ran to the shop, got the paper, and ran home as fast as I could. I found he was gone, and the watch also. I was not gone three minutes. I ran to Clare-market, and told my grandmother. On Saturday night he came again; I would not let him in, as I was alone; he said he wanted my grandmother.

ANN HUSSEY . I am the wife of the first witness - I attend Clare-market - I come home to dinner every day at one o'clock. On this Monday, as I stood in the market, the prisoner passed by me; it was about a quarter past one o'clock. I asked him what he was going in such a hurry for. He said, he had carried a box, and was going home to his lodgings. I asked if he had heard any thing from home - he said No. I saw no more of him till the Saturday after; he did not say he had been to my lodging. A few minutes after the little girl fetched me. On the Saturday following I was standing in the market; he passed by me; I said,

"Is that Berry?" - he said,

"Yes." I told him he was the person I had been looking for. He said,

"Yes, and I have been looking for you - you have been exposing me among my country people, about taking a watch." I got assistance and had him taken into custody. I have known him ten or eleven years - I have not found it.

Prisoner. Q. You asked me to have some beer - A. Yes, I wanted to detain him till I could have him secured.

GUILTY. Aged 22.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Richardson.

Reference Number: t18220220-45

370. JOHN SYMONDS and SARAH SYMONDS were

indicted for stealing, on the 7th of February , one till, value 1 s.; one piece of foreign copper coin, value one farthing, and 2 l. 12 s., in monies numbered, the property of Margaret Hill and John Hill , in their dwelling-house .

JOHN HILL . I live at No. 1, Great White Lion-street, Seven Dials , the house belongs to my sister Margaret Hill, and myself, we keep a shop there. On the 7th of February, about half-past seven o'clock in the evening, I missed my till - I was not in the house at the time; there was between 2 l. and 3 l. in it; I am quite positive there was more than 2 l., it consisted of silver and halfpence, and some farthings, there was one farthing which I remember.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. The house is your mother's - A. The lease is in her name; the rent is paid out of our profits - I may be mistaken in the amount in the till.

MARGARET HILL . I know there was about 3 l. in the till. I had not counted it, but speak merely from the bulk - there was a halfpenny in it, which I knew. We are bakers. The female prisoner brought me something to bake; I went down into the bake-house with it, leaving her alone in the shop. While I was at the oven, I heard a smash, and on coming up stairs, she was gone, and the till too - I thought she was turning out of the door, as I went down.

Cross-examined. Q. They deal with you - A. Yes, and have lived next door four or five months. I was not above a minute gone down to the oven, and heard the till fall while I was down stairs.

WILLIAM COLE . I am a musician. I know the prosecutor's shop. On the night of the robbery, I believe I saw the prisoners come out of the shop; I was about five yards off at the time, he had the till in his hand - I believe him to be the man, I cannot positively swear to it. I saw a woman who had fell down, getting up, she followed him into the house.

Cross-examined. Q. You never saw him before - A. No. He came out, and went quick into the house. Hill's shop gave a good light. If I swore to him, I should not swear false.

MARY BAILEY . I was in the wash-house of my own house, and heard something which appeared to come from the street - I went to look, and when I got to the shop door, I saw Mrs. Hill at her private door; somebody came into the passage at the time, shut the door, and went up stairs. I keep the house the prisoners live in.

Cross-examined. Q. Was it a moment or two after the noise, that somebody came in - A. Yes. I have eight other lodgers - the prisoners occupy the front room, first floor.

THOMAS IRESON . I am the patrol. I produce the till which I found in the cupboard, next to the window, in the one pair front room, in Bailey's house - the prisoners were both there; it was the same evening, about half-past seven o'clock. When we were searching for the halfpence, the woman seized three or four, which we found on the table. I found a pail of dirty water in the cupboard; I said

"The halfpence are here," she said,

"My dear Sir, they are nothing but shells;" Hill said there was about 7 s. worth; I found 7 s. 2 d., and two farthings - Hill said he could swear to one of the farthings. I asked the woman if she called these shells, she said,

"I did not say they were shells, but tea leaves." I saw the constable find nearly 1 l. in silver, on the man, and some silver was found in a drawer.

SAMUEL COLLINGTON . I am a constable. I found 23 s. 6 d., in silver, in the male prisoner's pocket, and 6 s. in a drawer. I also found what they call a jemmy, and phosphorous box, in his clothes drawer - the jemmy is used to break open places. I found the till going up on the second floor; we took them in custody, and found 2 s. 0 1/2 d., in the room afterwards.

JOHN HILL . Here is one farthing, which, to the best of my belief, was in my till, three quarters of an hour before the robbery. The till is mine - I had not a farthing like it in my till, for three weeks before.

MRS. HILL. I swear to the till, and a dumpy halfpenny, which I am certain was in it.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you give the woman any change that day - A. I cannot say - I am sure the halfpenny was in the till, when it was taken.

THOMAS KENDRICK . I am a street keeper. I was present at the search. The man was asked if any one had been in the room, he said No.

SARAH SYMONDS 'S Defence. They searched the cellar; we were down stairs half an hour, and when we came up, my quilt was torn off the bed, and all in confusion; they asked what was in the pail; I said tea leaves, and he found halfpence - I said,

"That is the consequence of leaving the room with no one in it." Several people live in the house. I do not see why they should suspect us.

JOHN SYMONDS 'S Defence. There was a shilling nearly one hundred years old in my room.

THOMAS IRESON re-examined. There was nobody in the room or passage, but the officers; we left the male prisoner in the room, while we went down, and found him there, on coming up; she asked him if any one had been into the room he said No. There is a shilling dated 1758, among the money.

MARY BAILEY . There were several people about the street door, but I do not recollect that any one came in. I desired nobody should be let out, as Mrs. Hill said the thief had come into our passage. I think three or four of my lodgers stood on the stairs.

JOHN HILL . I believe I was the first person that entered the room; we went out, leaving the male prisoner there, and found him still there; he said he had not left the room.

JOHN SYMONDS - GUILTY. Aged 24.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

SARAH SYMONDS - NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Best.

Reference Number: t18220220-46

371. JONAS BARNETT SOLOMON, alias YOUNER BARNETT , and ROBERT GROUT were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Francis Hardwick and William Duncan , about six o'clock in the night of the 23d of December , at St. Lawrence Jewry, with intent to steal, and stealing therein, 1033 pair of gloves, value 77 l.; 1156 pair of stockings, value 460 l.; 138 pair of other stockings, value 27 l.; fifteen yards of net,

value 7 l.; and 192 pair of other stockings, value 9 l. , their property.

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be the dwelling-house of the said William Duncan only.

MR. BOLLAND conducted the prosecution.

JOHN HENRY PEARSON . I am clerk to Francis Hardwick and William Duncan , of Castle-court, Lawrence-lane, in the parish of St. Lawrence Jewry . Mr. William Duncan lives in the house; they are wholesale hosiers . On Saturday, the 22d of December, I left the warehouse, and was sent for about half-past eight o'clock, on Sunday evening, and found the premises had been entered, the drawers in the warehouse emptied, and the property mentioned in the indictment, amounting in value to between 500 l. and 600 l. stolen; it consisted of silk gloves and stockings; a black bag laid on the counter, with a parcel of men's knotted silk hose, of about 100 l. value. I had taken the key of the warehouse with me.

ALICE HAYWOOD . I am servant to Mr. Duncan. On the 23d of December nobody was in the house but myself. I left the house between three and four o'clock. I double-locked the street door, and left all safe; the clerk had the keys of the warehouse; he took them away on Saturday night. I returned at six o'clock, and found the street door locked; but cannot say, whether it was double-locked as I had left it. On going into the passage, I found a black bag containing silk stockings, which was not there when I left the house. The patrol was coming by, and I told him; I stood at the door, and did not leave it. The warehouse door I found wide open, which was shut when I left, and a dark lantern in the warehouse. The constable and patrol searched the place. Mr. Pearson afterwards saw it.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Was it dark when you left home. - A. No; it was day-light for half an hour after.

MR. BOLLAND. Q. Was there a candle in the lantern. - A. Yes; it was burning.

MR. ANDREWS. Q. The warehouse being shut up, they would require a candle in the day-time. - A. Yes.

WILLIAM SMITH . I am an officer of Cheap ward. I went to the house on the servant giving the alarm, and found this bag and dark lantern, with a small bit of candle burning in it, and a key close by it, which I tried to the counting-house door - it opens it, and it appears quite new.

JOHN BRADFIELD . I live in Benjamin-street, Clerkenwell. I have known Grout eight years. I met him in Bishopsgate-street; he offered me a pair of gloves for me to sell to Mrs. Stevens or to her girl; he knew that I knew Stevens; I am always about Bishopsgate; I sold them to Mrs. Stevens for 1 s. worth of liquor; she keeps a liquor-shop. Grout took 6 d. and we had 6 d. worth of liquor between us; this was two days before he was taken up; they were unfinished silk gloves.

DANIEL BENJAMIN LEADBETTER , I am a marshalman. In consequence of information, Bradfield and Mr. Duncan, went to Grout's lodging. I remained in Bishopsgate church-yard; they returned to me there; Bradfield and I then went to Grout's lodging, and on returning found him with Mr. Duncan. I took him; we went into a public-house in Wormwood-street. I asked him if he had given Bradfield two pair of gloves to sell to Stevens; he said he had, and that he found them in a bit of paper in Bishopsgate-street, by the London Tavern. I asked him if he ever had any more, or had seen any more, he said No; there was only one pair. The question was repeated more than once or twice; he gave the same answer. I took him and Bradfield to the justice-room; this was on Wednesday the 2nd of January - I felt his right hand coat pocket and found nothing; as I was going to the left hand coat pocket, he put his hand in it, and said,

"Don't take my money." I watched him draw his hand out, and saw a piece of paper in it. I opened his hand, and took it out; it contained four pair of silk gloves. I believe there was a penny, a halfpenny and a farthing in his pocket. I said,

"How is this! you told me you had only the one pair, that you sold to Stevens." He said,

"The four pair were with the one pair; I found them altogether." I went several times, and to a great many places, to find Solomon, but could not. I went to his neighbourhood, to Grout's, and several public-houses. The paper was not muddy - it was a loose bit of paper - I cannot say what weather it was on the 23d of December.

WILLIAM STEVENS . I keep a wine vault in Bishopsgate-street. I do not know of Bradfield's coming to my house. I saw the gloves in possession of one of our young women. My wife is not here.

WILLIAM BRAND . I am a marshalman. I accompanied Mr. Duncan and Harrison to search Grout's lodgings, in Still-alley, Houndsditch. I searched two rooms on the second floor - the house had no number. Grout's wife came in at the time. In one of the rooms I found a black bag; there was a bed in each room. In the large room backward in which his wife was, I found a black bag containing a quantity of mitts and gloves, all silk. I found the bag in an old broken press-bedstead; and in a box, containing women's clothes, I found a paper, containing more silk gloves, I think about four dozen. In the next room, which is a small front room, communicating by a door from one to the other, and fastened on the large room side (both rooms had doors communicating with the staircase.) I found two black bags, empty; and a pair of half silk stockings, which had been worn. I compared the three bags with the other found in the prisoner's house, they tallied exactly in size, colour, quality, shape, and tape. Grout's wife was taken, I saw her in Grout's company - he acknowledged her as his wife - she was afterwards discharged.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. How did he acknowledge her as his wife - A. He said,

"It is true what I told you to-day, that my wife brought them, and here she is, ask her." The door opening from the small room to the staircase was unfastened; I could go from the large room to the small one.

ROBERT HARRISON . I assisted in the search. I produce the four pair of gloves, also the gloves and mitts found in the large room, and the gloves found in the box, also the bags. I searched for Barnett, without success, at several places. I went with two or three more officers who knew him.

Cross-examined. Q. Do not hatters use those bags - A. I do not know; they are made of black linen.

CATHARINE GROUT . I am the daughter of Grout. I know Solomon; he was my father's lodger, he lodged in

the little front room, for three or four weeks before my father was taken, and then he went away.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Where did you live at the time of this transaction - A. I was servant to Mr. Lazarus, of Cutler-street; I went home three or four times a week for clean things; my father's is the large room, a door leads into the other room, which is fastened on my father's side, with a piece of leather and a nail. Only Solomon lived in the other room - my mother cleaned it, and made his bed. I never saw the bags before.

Q. Where have you come from - A. Brand's house - he told me that he could see my father was innocent, because he was lame; and said it was my duty to come and get my father off.

Q. You do not mind so as you get your father off - A. No; I have no reason to care for Solomon; I am angry with him for getting my father into trouble.

MR. BOLLAND. Q. How does Solomon get to his room - A. There is a door to the staircase.

Q. Did you state what you have to-day, before you went to Brand's - A. Yes, at Guildhall. I have been kept at Brand's for fear I should run away. I was sent to sleep at a person's the night before I was examined. I am near sixteen years old.

THOMAS EVANS . I superintend the prosecutor's manufactory at Nottingham - I have examined the property produced, and have no doubt that it is their manufacture.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Are they in a large way - A. Yes; but they sell nothing in this country; every thing is cased and sent abroad; we pack them ourselves before they are sent out.

J. H. PEARSON re-examined. I have examined this property; here are a pair of half-hose, partly worn; I had seen them on the Friday or Saturday before the robbery - the mitts and gloves are all their's; I had seen them in the course of two months previous; they had been many years in the house; we sell for exportation only, and pack and ship all goods ourselves; there is a private mark on them.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Do you mean to to say you saw that identical pair the day before - A. I saw the dozen of which they formed a part, and opened the paper - we have a mark on them.

Q. Would not that mark be on every pair you have - A. No, only on that dozen, as it was all we had of that quality.

COURT, Q. Must all these goods be taken at one or at different times - A. I should think it would take two hours to remove them; they might take them away at once in three or four bags, each bag would weigh fifty or sixty pounds. They opened six drawers to get them.

ROBERT HESKETH . I am an officer. I searched after Barnett in the neighbourhood of Petticoat-lane, I knew him before; I found him on the 21st of January; I had been looking for him for a fortnight or three weeks. I took him into the George, public-house. Worster was with me, and sat in a box opposite to him - he opened the door, shut me in the box, ran off, and made his escape down Still-alley. I followed him, and was then stopped by his brothers - as he went out at the door, he said,

"Joe," his brother Joe stopped me. I saw him again on the 2d of February, when I was in the Lee Hoy, Mile-end, and took him.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. He was smoking his pipe very quiet, on the 21st of January - A. Yes; he was at the corner of Still-alley, which is a place much frequented by officers. I told him to come into the George, public-house and stop till Worster returned. I said,

"I suppose it is all right, or you would not be standing here," he smiled, and said

"Yes, or I should not be here." This was on the day Grout's wife was discharged.

GROUT'S Defence. I am perfectly innocent of the robbery. My wife brought the things up into our room - I asked what she had there, she said it was a few things belonging to Mrs. Barnard, where she was lodging.

SOLOMON'S Defence. I know nothing whatever of the transaction.

MR. PEARSON, re-examined. The goods were worth 500 l. or 600 l., without those found in the passage - Those found in Still-alley, are not worth above 15 l. or 16 l.

PHILIP SHANNON . I am a baker, and live in Union-place, Tabernacle-row, I have two rooms there. On the 23d of December, between eleven and twelve o'clock, Solomon knocked at my door, and asked me to go to his father, who lives about one hundred yards off, to ask him for a shirt and handkerchief, as he was not on good terms with him. I asked him in and went, and his father gave them to me - he went into my kitchen and washed himself, then went into my bed-room and dressed himself. I asked him to dine with me, which he did; we dined between twelve and one o'clock, and after dinner, had two or three pots of beer - he staid with me till ten o'clock. When he heard the watchman call ten, he said he should be too late, he did not leave me all that time.

MR. BOLLAND. Q. Are you married - A. No; I have no servant.

Q. Who dressed your dinner - A. A young woman in the house, she saw him. Mr. and Mrs. White keep the house, she is not their servant; she washes for me and comes very often - she is not very well, she was here two or three days; I believe she had a pain in her inside, she has been taken so this three days, she once had an inflammation - her name is Margaret Shilletoe .

Q. Where does she live - A. With her sister, I believe.

Q. Where does she live now - A. She is at home at my place - I left her there this morning.

Q. At home at your place - A. Why, to tell you the truth, she lives with me. Mrs. White is in the family way and is not well. I cannot say whether she was at home on this Sunday - I have two rooms on the first floor, there are no other lodgers - I have lived there a year and a half, with Shillitoe; she goes by my name. Her sister did live in Pratt-street, Lambeth, a fortnight ago.

Q. On your oath was Mrs. Shannon or Shillitoe in your house when you left it - A. Yes, this morning she was, I left at nine o'clock, and have not been home since - she is her own doctor, she knows her complaint, and has medicine in the house. I suppose it is nine months since a doctor attended her; she had a very violent pain in her bowels this morning, and said she was very poorly, and had rather not come here - I am sure she is too ill to come; she said,

"A'y'nt you going to the Old Bailey to night?" I said,

"Yes, will you go," she said,

"No, I don't find myself very well; I am very ill still."

Q. You only asked if she should like to come - A. She not being a married woman, did not like the disgrace. I

left her ill this morning - I understand the prisoner lived in Still-alley, I was never there. The last time I saw the prisoner before, was when he was in possession under the Sheriff. I was subpoenned to come here about Wednesday. Shillitoe let the prisoner in.

Four witnesses gave the prisoner, Grout, a good character.

SOLOMON - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 28.

GROUT - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 41.

The Jury and Prosecutor recommended Grout to Mercy, on account of his character, believing him to have been led into it.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220220-47

372. ROBERT WOOLF , and ROBERT REEVES , were indicted for stealing, on the 6th of February , one hat, value 5 s. , the goods of James Hamer .

JAMES HAMER . I am a hatter , and live in West Smithfield . On the 6th of February, my hat was in the shop - I missed it between six and seven o'clock in the evening; one of the prisoners were brought back with it.

FRANCIS KEYS. I am a constable. On the 6th of February, I was in Smithfield, and saw the prisoner walk backwards and forwards by the prosecutor's shop; I saw him pass the door - Reeves put his hand inside the door, and took the hat out, and gave it to Woolf, who had a cap on, which he took off, and on putting it into the hat, put it on his head, when I siezed him with it on his head, Reeves ran off, and the next day, as I was taking Woolf to the Compter, I saw Reeves opposite the Compter - I took him; I knew him before, and am sure of him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

REEVES'S Defence. I am not the person.

WOOLF'S Defence. I never had it.

WOOLF - GUILTY . Aged 14.

REEVES - GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220220-48

SIXTH DAY, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 26.

173. THOMASINA, alias ANN BRETT , was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of February , one dressing-case, value 10 s., the goods of Thomas Lord , senior; one snuffbox, value 10 s.; one shawl, value 5 s., and one scarf, value 5 s. , the goods of Thomas Lord , the younger.

MR. LAW conducted the Prosecution.

Mr. THOMAS LORD , JUN. On the 17th of February, about half-past five o'clock in the afternoon, I desired the servant to go up stairs for my snuff-box. While she was gone, we heard somebody run down stairs, and slam the door to; I went into the passage, and met the servant with my snuffbox in her hand. In consequence of what she said, I went into the street, and overtook the prisoner about one hundred and fifty yards from the house - I recognised her as an old servant of my father's; she had left about a year and a half.

HARRIOT PICKERING . I am the servant. I went up stairs for the snuff-box, and as I entered the room I found it was not on the dressing-table, and on going to the side of the bed, I saw the prisoner standing with her face towards the wall. She gave the snuff-box into my hand, and said

"Take this, and say nothing" - she pushed me aside. There was a bundle near her, she stood close over it; she shut me into the room, and ran down stairs. I cried out Murder! and came down, and told Mr. Lord. I returned to the room, and saw the bundle opened; it contained a pelisse, three dressing gowns, a shawl, scarf, and dressing case. I am sure of her person.

MR. THOMAS LORD re-examined. I accompanied her to the watch-house. I made her no promises; I said,

"If you have any thing about your person, you had better give it up, without undergoing the inconvenience of a search." she said,

"I have not, all that I have taken you will find up by the side of the bed." I asked her how she got into the house; she said,

"I got over the wall on Saturday night, and laid myself in the lumber-room, (which is in the yard,) till four o'clock on Sunday, and then took an opportunity of going into the house, while your dinner was going up, and then laid myself in the coal cellar, where you will find my shoes." I found a pair of shoes there - she had no shoes on. I found the bundle in the room.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 33.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220220-49

374. FRANCIS BAKER , and JOHN WHITING , were indicted for stealing, on the 3d of February , two sheets, value 2 s.; two blankets, value 2 s., and one rug, value 1 s. , the goods of the Overseers of the poor, of the parish of Edmonton ; and THOMAS FISHER was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, knowing them to be stolen .

SECOND COUNT, stating them to belong to Samuel Tisley .

SAMUEL TISLEY . I farm the poor of Edmonton. The prisoners Baker and Whiting, were paupers in the poorhouse. I have the care of the bedclothes - On Sunday, the third of February, I missed the articles stated in the indictment; the prisoners went out to go to church, about two o'clock; about eight o'clock I met them together, in the churchyard, going towards the workhouse. I returned home about ten o'clock, and missed the property, and suspected them; I saw them next morning before the Magistrate, with it.

JOSEPH GIBSON . I am an officer of Edmonton. I took Whiting about a quarter past ten o'clock, that night - I asked what he had done with the bedding from the workhouse; he said he did not know, but Baker had got it. Next morning he said,

"If you will let me out, I will go with you to the ploughed field, where we hid them in the water gutter." I asked where Baker was, he told me, and I went and took him - I went with him to the ploughed field, but could not find the things; he said Baker must have taken them away. I took Baker at Mr. Vaughan's, at Enfield, and asked what he had done with them - he said he had taken them to sleep on, as he had got work, and did not intend to return to the workhouse, and that they were at Thomas Fisher 's, Chase-side; I went there, about twelve o'clock in the day - I found the door locked, and nobody at home; I broke in, and found the property up stairs, under the bed, in the back room, all rolled up

together. Fisher came home; I said he must go with me to Edmonton, and asked him to carry the things, which he did - he is a labouring man, and has a wife; I do not know whether he had lodgers.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOSEPH GIBSON . I heard the prisoners examined, and saw them sign their examination.

(reads)

"T. Baker says, he intended to leave the workhouse, to go to work, and thinking a little bedding would be useful, he got over the fence and took them."

"Whiting says, he was with Baker, and waited for him till he brought them over the wall."

BAKER - GUILTY . Aged 23.

WHITING - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Whipped and Discharged.

FISHER - NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220220-50

375. HENRY ROBINS was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of February , one coat, value 1 l., the goods of Samuel Southgate , in the dwelling house of John Rutland .

SAMUEL SOUTHGATE . I am servant to John Rutland , who is a hackney-man, and lives in Bulstrode-mews, Mary-le-bone . This box coat was in his house, it belongs to Mrs. Reeves, it was under my care - I drove her. It hung across the bannisters of Rutland's house - I came in with the carriage, on the 11th of February, a little past ten o'clock at night. I went home to No. 118, Jermyn-street; I have never seen the coat since.

The Court ruled, that the indictment could not be sustained, as the coat was not Southgate's property, for being in Rutland's house, it was under his care.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220220-51

376. DAVID PHILLIPS was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of January , in the dwelling-house of John Cameron , one writing-desk, value 1 l.; one penknife, value 2 s.,; one pocket-book, value 2 s.; one bunch of keys, value 5 s.; eight sovereigns, and three five pound bank-notes , the property of James Johnstone .

JAMES JOHNSTONE . I live at No. 14, Henrietta-street . I have the front and back parlour there. It is Mr. John Cameron 's house. On Friday, the 25th of January, between two and three o'clock, I left the house; my desk was safe. I returned at ten at night. The property stated in the indictment was in the desk; it was locked, and was in the back parlour. I missed it about nine the following morning; and have found two of the bank-notes, which have a private mark on them; it was G. C. and Co., my agents, and my own initials. I had parted with none of them since I received them. I saw them in the desk when I locked it; the numbers of them were 20789, and 90. I stopped them at the Bank; and on the 8th of February I saw one of them at the Bank. The outer door of the house is always shut.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. Did you recollect the number, or have you since applied to your agents. - A. I have applied since, but I know them without the number. I always put my initials on notes.

BENJAMIN WALWYN . I keep wine vaults at the corner of Compton-street. I have known the prisoner three or four years. I took a 5 l. bank-note of him about three weeks ago. Mr. Johnstone afterwards produced it at Bow-street. I put the prisoner's name on it, and my own initials. I had no other with his name on. I paid it with other money to Messrs. Ransons.

Cross-examined. Q. What business is he. - A. He kept an iron shop, and deals in old clothes.

WILLIAM SEAGRAM ORCHARD . I live in Crown-court, Princess-street, Soho. I changed a five pound for the prisoner on the 2nd of February. He lived exactly opposite me. I put his name on it. - I had no other from him, I paid it to Mr. Beard's servant, of Newport-market.

BENJAMIN MORRIS . I am a constable of Bow-street. I took the prisoner at his own house, No. 21, Crown-court, I searched the house, and found nothing - he said he received the note in Petticoat-lane, in the way of business - he did no recollect from whom.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220220-52

377. RICHARD NAYLOR was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Richard Hanson , about six o'clock in the night of the 8th of February , with intent to steal, and stealing therein, one looking-glass, value 50 s. his property.

RICHARD HANSON . I live in Lower Smith-street, Northampton-square . I am clerk to Messrs. Pickfords; it is a private house; I was out at this time.

ANN HANSON . I am the wife of the last witness; I was at home; the doors and windows were closed; I have one lodger; he was at home; he came in about twenty minutes before six o'clock - the door was shut I am sure. About half-past six o'clock an alarm was given (it was not quite dark,) I ran to the door, and found it was open; the prisoner was brought back; there was day-light enough to distinguish the features of a man; he had the looking-glass, which was nailed to the wall in the front parlour just before; it cost nearly 4 l.; we have had it about three years; he was an entire stranger - I had seen it in the room in the course of the day.

RICHARD HANSON re-examined. I saw the looking-glass safe between five and six o'clock, against the wall. I went out at five minutes past six, and closed the door safe.

CHARLES JOEL KENT . I am an oilman, and live at the corner of Smith-street. I was watching on the spot for ten minutes, seeing the prisoner and another standing outside the door, talking; the door was open; the other person went into the house, and came out three times, without any thing; and the fourth time he brought out the looking-glass, and gave it to the prisoner, who walked off with it. Fleetwood and I collared him about twelve yards off; he immediately dropped it, and it smashed to pieces; he said, if we would forgive him, he would tell who the people were that were with him.

JAMES FLEETWOOD . I live nearly opposite Hanson. I saw four of them about the door. I went to my private door, and saw one of them go in and come out again; and at last the glass was brought out, and given to Naylor. I ran and took him - his companions walked off, and he dropped it.

(Glass frame produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I went into the Northampton-arms, public-house, to have a pint of beer; I drank it; and as I came out of the door, two very respectable persons asked where there was a porter - I said I would carry it for them - they told me to follow them and they would give me a parcel to carry to a coach. They went into the house; I stood at the door and they brought me the glass.

GUILTY . Aged 33.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220220-53

378. MICHAEL GARVIN was indicted for feloniously assaulting Peter Cadet , on the 8th of February , on the King's highway, putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, one handkerchief, value 2 d., and 8 s. , his property.

PETER CADET . I am a seaman ; I get my living about the quays. About sixteen days ago, at nine o'clock at night, I was in Rosemary-lane ; I had just come out of the Blue-Boar, public-house, I had been drinking, but knew what I was about; I was half and half; I had 8 s. rolled up in a handkerchief, which was in my hat. About twenty yards from the house, the prisoner came just behind me, and struck me on the back of the head. He knocked my hat off; I fell down with the blow; he took up my handkerchief, and ran off, leaving the hat behind. I pursued him for about ten minutes, but he got away. I can swear to him; he was taken an hour or an hour and a half after. I saw him next morning at the watch-house, and am sure of him.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not swear at the office that I saw you tie your money in your handkerchief - Yes; I saw him in the house watching me; he then offered me beer; I talked with him there; I did not see him come after me till he struck me. I saw him pick the handkerchief up and run away; there was only one man near me.

ANN LEWES . I live in Rose-court, Blue Anchor-yard. I work at making slops - I was in Rosemary-lane about nine o'clock in the evening, in the Blue Boar, with a young woman, and saw Cadet there and the prisoner; he was looking over at Cadet while he was putting his money in his handkerchief. Cadet was speaking to me; I went out with him; I had been drinking with him; he was going to the Ship and Star; I knew him before; I saw the prisoner walking after us, and about ten or twenty yards from the house he struck Cadet on the head, knocked off his hat, and he fell on his hands. I saw the prisoner take the handkerchief out of his hat, and run off. Cadet pursued him, but he got away - I am sure of his person.

Prisoner. Q. Did you go out before or after the prosecutor - A. I followed him out; he was a little intoxicated - I was quite sober.

THOMAS FULLER . I am a watchman, and was in Rosemary-lane about half-past nine o'clock at night; a person said a black man had been robbed. I found the prisoner at the White Hart and Fountain, Rosemary-lane, about half-past ten o'clock that night; the prosecutor had described him, and said he could swear to him among a thousand. I took him into the White Hart, public-house, he ran towards the prisoner, and smacked his face, and said,

"You d - d thief, give me my money." He denied the charge, and said he never saw him before.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in a public-house - Fuller and this man came in - Fuller pointed to me - he then said,

"That is the man who robbed me."

GUILTY. Aged 32.

Of stealing, but not from the person .

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220220-54

379. JOSEPH HUGGETT was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of February , nine pieces of cordovan leather, value 2 l., the goods of William Geldard , in the dwelling-house of Mark Lorymer .

WILLIAM GELDARD . I am a working currier , and live in Eagle-street, Red Lion-square. These things were stolen from the workshop of Mr. Lorymer's house, in St. Martin's-lane . I have lost leather several times, I have not seen it since.

JAMES LORYMER . I am near eleven years old. My father keeps the house. The prisoner was a patrole in St. Martin's-lane. One night nearly a month ago, the prisoner's daughter came to my father's for me, and took me to her father; he asked me what trade my father was, I said a currier; he said,

"Is it all your father's place," I said,

"Yes, but Mr. Geldard keeps his goods in my father's house;" he said

"You often have a great deal of leather," I said

"Yes sometimes, but the leather which comes in is Mr. Geldard's;" he said

"There are pieces come off the leather," I said

"Yes there are often pieces come off;" he then said

"Could you get some," I said

"No they are not mine, I dare not touch them;" he said

"Can't you get me some, don't you have some given you," I said Yes; he told me to bring some of them up - I took him what my father had given me; they were parings not worth above 2 d., and one night about three weeks ago he came to our place, and rang at the bell, I let him in, and he came to my father's room, on the same floor as Geldard's; he said,

"What a nice comfortable little room you have got," and then began pinching some leather about in my father's shop - he said,

"Whose is this," I said,

"Geldard's" he said,

"Can't I have it," I said,

"No;" he said he must; I said,

"Mr. Huggett, it will be sure to be found out, if you take it;" he said,

"Oh! I will be answerable for it, if it is;" he then wrapped it up in some green baize - he took more than a dozen pieces. I said,

"You had better not take them, they will be missed," he said,

"You little stupied fellow, why don't you hold your tongue;" he then took them, and saw some more pieces hanging up, I said,

"You must not have them," he wrapped them up, and threw them into the gutter, between the two houses, and said he would come for them to-morrow; he went away directly with the cordovan leather.

Q. When did you tell of this - A. I did not tell of it - it was found out a week after. He kept telling me not to tell, and if it was found out, he would settle it. My father had me in the watch-house for a night.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220220-55

380. DEBORAH HUGGETT was indicted for stealing on the 11th of February , one bag, value 1 d.; and 8 lbs. of leather, value 6 s. , the goods of William Geldard .

WILLIAM GELDARD . I know nothing of this case.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You know this boy. - A. Yes; I would not believe him on his oath.

JAMES LORYMER . Her father sent her for the leather. I gave it her one night when she came. She brought a message from her father, who was waiting down stairs. She said he sent her.

NOT GUILTY .

The prisoner was only six years old.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220220-56

381. JAMES DEARLOVE was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of February , the sum of 3 l. 2 s. in monies numbered, the property of James Smellie , in his dwelling-house .

JAMES SMELLIE . I have a shop at Shadwell . My shop-man lives there. I know nothing of the case.

LUKE FOSTER . I am shopman to Mr. Smellie. I have known the prisoner nearly twelve months. On Monday week he and his brother called to see me. I asked him into the parlour while his brother went to fetch some spirits. I left him in the parlour while I went to serve a customer; he went out in about a minute, and did not return. He did not stay to drink the spirits. His brother came back. A sovereign and five half-crowns were on the mantle-piece, in a half-pint measure, with other silver; it was all taken - I had seen it an hour before; nobody but me and Wood had been in the parlour. I went to look for him, and met him the same night very drunk. I gave him in charge.

SUSAN WOOD . I am Mr. Smellie's housekeeper. I put a sovereign and five half-crowns in the measure about three o'clock in the afternoon. I did not see it afterwards.

JOHN MANCE . I am a constable. I searched him, and found four half-crowns and ten shillings. I questioned him about it in the morning; he declined giving any answer.

Prisoner's Defence. I received the money for wages.

JOHN DEARLOVE . I am his uncle. I paid him 2 l.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220220-57

382. JOHN HARRISON and JOHN MASCOE were indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of February , four sheets, value 1 l.; six table-cloths, value 1 l,; twelve towels, value 12 s.; three aprons, value 3 s.; and four handkerchiefs, value 4 s.; the goods of Mary Hobson , widow ; and one shawl, value 1 l.; one pair stays, value 4 s.; one gown, value 4 s.; and three shifts, value 12 s.; the goods of Mary Hobson , in the dwelling-house of Mary Hobson , the elder .

MARY HORSON . I am daughter of Mary Hobson , who is a widow; we live in Stafford's-row, Pimlico . On the 2nd of February, about half-past seven o'clock in the evening, the articles stated in the indictment were in a basket on the first floor; they are worth 2 l. 9 s.; they were stolen, and the basket left. I saw them safe at half-past four o'clock; they were taken at one time - the balcony had been painted that day.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You cannot say they were all taken at once. - A. No; I suppose the thieves entered by the balcony. I was down stairs in the kitchen - the first floor was unoccupied. The things were of no great value.

THOMAS HORATIO FITZGERALD . I am sixteen years old, and live in Isabella-row, about a quarter of a mile from Hobson's. About half-past seven o'clock, on Saturday evening, I saw Harrison, opposite Hobson's house dancing. I passed him - then saw him whistle, and look up towards the balcony - it is a French window. I cannot say whether it was open. I looked up and saw somebody on the balcony with a large white bundle in his hands - it was a young boy, almost as tall as Harrison. The prisoners were two of them. He threw the bundle to three persons who were below. Harrison was close to the house. I think he laid hold of the bundle. I went and called at a sadler's, next door. Before the bundle was thrown out, Mascoe said to me,

"Push on;" and I went to the sadler's - I opened the door, went in, told the apprentice; he came out; and then I saw another bundle thrown from the window - one of the three picked it up - I think it was Harrison. I saw the man get out of the balcony. The apprentice ran to call his master, and when he came out, they were all gone, with the bundles; they all four went up Stafford's-place; we did not follow them. I saw Harrison in custody on the Monday, and was sure of him; and about a week after I saw Mascoe come out of the lock-up place, at Bow-street, and told the officer that he was one of them.

Cross-examined. Q. What are you. - A. I live with my father, who was inspector of gas-lights, and is now promoted. I have known Harrison two years; he is a lamp-lighter. I saw him there for ten minutes, and am positive of him. There was no ladder at the balcony.

HENRY PARRENE . I am apprentice to the sadler, next door to Hobson. Fitzgerald called me out about half-past seven o'clock. I looked up to the balcony, and saw a bundle thrown out - three persons were before the house, another came from the balcony, and all ran off together, leaving nothing behind - they could easily get down by a lamp-iron. I know Mascoe to be one; he stood against my master's railing, and ran off with the others.

JOHN SNOWSELL . I am a constable. I took Harrison on Monday. the 4th of February, at his father's, in Vauxhall-road. He was denied to me, but I found him in bed; and Fitzgerald, who was with me, pointed to a hat in the parlour, and said it was what he wore, and said he was the man who received the bundle. About a week after, Mascoe was at Bow-street on another charge. Harrison was being examined, as Mascoe was brought out of the lock-up place. Fitzgerald said he was with Harrison. - The balcony had been painted that day; and there was fresh paint of the same sort on the back of Harrison's jacket.

JAMES WILLIAMS . I was with Snowsell - his account is correct.

HARRISON's Defence. At the time of the robbery I was in Holland-yard with my father. I fastened my ladder up at eight o'clock, and went home to tea.

T. H. FITZGERALD re-examined. I am sure of him - he wore a round hat, which I had noticed before that night.

HARRISON - GUILTY. Aged 18.

MASCOE - GUILTY. Aged 15.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220220-58

383. GEORGE BRUNSWICK was indicted, for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house, of Charlotte Matthews , spinster , about eight o'clock in the night of the 22d of January , with intent to steal, and stealing therein, one bed, value 10 s.; two pillows, value 3 s.; two blankets, value 5 s.; two hammocks, value 5 s., and two towels, value 6 d. , her property.

CHARLOTTE MATTHEWS . I am single , and rent a room in Spring-street, Shadwell - it is let out in different tenements; the landlord does not live in it. On the 22d of January, between six and seven o'clock in the evening, I locked my room, and went out, returned between seven and eight o'clock, and found the door a-jar; the padlock was wrenched off, and the prisoner alone in the room - the articles stated in the indictment, were tied up in the middle of the room, ready to be carried away; he was a stranger. I called for assistance; he was secured in the room, and some keys, and a long spike nail found in his hat. He threw the nail under the bed, just before the officer came, I heard it fall, but did not see him throw it - I suppose he used it to wrench the padlock off. The property was worth 1 l.

Prisoner. Q. Was I not sitting by the fire - A. No; standing behind the door.

FRANCES SIMPSON . I am an unfortunate girl, and live at No. 39, Spring-street. I go backwards and forwards to the house the prosecutrix lives in. On the 22d of January, I went out with her - I locked the padlock for her, and had the key in my pocket. I returned with her, and found the staple drawn, the door open, and somebody shut it against us; it was forced open, and the prisoner found inside, and the things tied up, they were in their proper places before. It was dark when we went out.

THOMAS AMES . I am a constable. I took him in charge and found six door keys in his hat, and a spike nail in the room - he said he got there by mistake. I found no money on him. The things were tied up, in the middle of the room.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming from the West India Docks, and met this woman, and went home with her, (Here the prisoner's language was exceedingly indelicate) I went away, and said I would call to-morrow-I told my shipmates of it, they laughed at me. Next night, between five and six o'clock, I went and found the door open, and the bundle in the middle of the room. I could not find her all over the house, and sat by the fire, supposing she was moving, when she returned, and said she would swear tomorrow that I broke the door open. I could have robbed her, and gone away if I liked. I found the keys in Farmer-street, and cleaned them to sell. I never saw the nail.

GUILTY. Aged 50.

Of stealing only .

Confined Six Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220220-59

384. DANIEL WITHEY was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Caroline Steitz , widow , at St. Mary-le-bone, about twelve o'clock in the night of the 26th of January , with intent to steal .

JOHN ARTINDALE . I am a journey-man baker, to Caroline Steitz , widow, who lives in Little Mary-le-bone-street, in the parish of St. Mary-le-bone ; she rents the whole house. On Saturday night the 26th of January, from eleven o'clock till a little after twelve, I was sitting in the parlour, the door was on the latch. One of her daughters came in about twenty minutes before twelve o'clock, she opened the door herself - I saw the door after that, and it was closed; nobody came in after her. As I sat in the parlour, one of the daughters got up, and screamed out that there was a man in the shop; I went and found the prisoner opening the street door, he got out and was stopped immediately, without my losing sight of him; he said it was not him. Another man ran out after I got out. I missed nothing.

MARY ANN STEITZ . I am the daughter of Caroline Steitz . I came home about twenty minutes before twelve o'clock, and am sure I closed the door - there were five of us in the parlour, behind the shop. I heard the door open, and shut - I looked round the shop, saw nobody, returned to the parlour, and in five or ten minutes, a lamp which was burning on the counter went suddenly out; I got up to see the cause, and on getting into the shop, I saw a man on his knees behind the counter, his hands were on the counter - I screamed out, and he crawled to the door; I followed and kept him in sight till he was taken, it was the prisoner. Another man in light clothes ran from the house immediately after the prisoner.

JOHN CUNDALE . I live nearly opposite the prosecutrix's at a chandler's-shop; I saw the prisoner and another man come out of the door - the prisoner came out first; I stopped him immediately as he crossed the road; he ran into a public-house. I am sure he came out of the house.

SAMUEL PRENDERGRASS . I received him in charge, and found three duplicates on him.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in the public-house from eight o'clock till between eleven and twelve, and as I came out, this man stopped me, and said

"This is him; you have been in that shop."

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 19.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220220-60

385. EVAN SHURY was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Edward Willard , about twelve o'clock in the night of the 20th of December , and stealing therein two gallons of gin, value 20 s. , his property.

EDWARD WILLARD . I keep the Queen's Head, public-house, Green Arbour-court, St. Luke's . I was informed my house was robbed on the 20th of December, I had fastened it all up secure. About Christmas, I found a deficiency of about two gallons and a half of gin.

WILLIAM THOMPSON . I am a cordwainer. My yard joins Willards's. I went out one morning, about half-past four o'clock, and heard his window thrown up; I said

"Who's there," a man's voice, said,

"What is that to you," a man got out of window - I caught hold of him at the yard door, struggled with him, and then let him go, it being dark. I cannot swear who it was.

JOHN FELL . I am an officer. I took the prisoner in charge, in Whitecross-street, last Tuesday.

JOHN TWEEDY . I am an officer. I searched the prisoner's lodging, and found a parcel of keys, three of which are skeleton ones.

THOMAS VANN . I searched his lodging, and found two skeleton keys, over the cill of the privy door.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220220-61

386. WILLIAM FLASHMAN was indicted for feloniously assaulting William Skinner , on the 15th of February , in a passage near the King's highway, at St. James, Clerkenwell, putting him in fear, and taking from person, and against his will, one watch chain, value 10 l.; two seals, value 6 l., and one key, value 30 s. , his property.

WILLIAM SKINNER . On the 15th of February, about twenty minutes past seven o'clock in the evening, I was walking with Miss Clark, in Crawford-passage, Ray-street, Clerkenwell ; we saw four men standing in the passage - we crossed, and left them on the right; a little higher up there is a passage leading into Coppice-row, and under the archway there, four men drove up against us behind; one man came close to my side, put his hand round my body, and gave a tremendous pull at my watch chain, and got it from me; that was not the prisoner, he was behind - the chain broke, and the man retreated as quick as possible; the other three let him go by, and then followed him, and we followed them; on coming into Crawford-passage again I collared the prisoner, and said,

"You are one of them," he said nothing, but knocked me down; Clark flew at him, and laid hold of his handkerchief, which gave way, and he got off, but was secured - nobody was near us but the four men we had passed; they were all in company together talking. I was pulled round with the force of the pull, and am certain of the prisoner's person. They let the man pass, between them, and then impeded our pursuit. My chain, seals, and key cost 17 l. 11 s.

SARAH CLARK . I was with Mr. Skinner. Four men rushed against us, no others were near; the prisoner came before us, to prevent our pursuing the man who snatched the chain, we followed, and at the bottom of the arch, Skinner collared him, but he knocked him down, and I caught hold of his handkerchief, which gave way. He was taken at the corner of Eyre-street-hill, without my losing sight of him. I am sure he is one of them.

Prisoner. You told the Magistrate, the man who took the watch had a light coat on - A. I believe he had.

THOMAS MARKHAM . I came up at the instant the prisoner was secured. He was struggling with those who stopped him. I did not see Clark till we got to Hatton Garden office, which was in less than five minutes. She spoke positively to him.

DAVID BUTTEUY . On Friday evening the 15th, I saw the prisoner, in company with three others, near Crawford-passage; I afterwards saw him and Skinner struggling together; he knocked Skinner down - I pursued and took him; I had a perfect view of him, and am positive of him; I only lost sight of him in turning the corner; I had seen him in a public-house, with the other three that evening - Clark was pursuing them.

Prisoner. Q. Had either of the three men a light coat on - A. I think not, but cannot speak positively.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been in the public-house most of the afternoon. I left at six o'clock, returned, and three men were sitting there. I came away; and at the corner of the passage heard a bustle, and the prosecutor collared me; I pushed him away, and he was going to strike me again, and I ran away.

Two witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged. 26.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220220-62

387. SOLOMON HOLLOWAY was indicted for a fraud .

MR. BOLLAND conducted the prosecution.

MR. JOHN WATSON . On the 15th of November I was in partnership with Thomas Osborne Stock , Joseph Watson , and Ford Wilson , we are general linen drapers, and furniture printers , and live on Holborn-hill. Before November we carried on business under the firm of Stock, Cooper, and Co.

WILLIAM COOPER . I live with the prosecutors. On the 15th of November, the prisoner came to the shop; I believe him to be the man - Mr. Williams and Mr. Homyer were there; he produced me a brown paper parcel, which appeared to be directed to us; he said, he was not quite clear that it was directed to the right place. I opened it, and found it contained a letter, directed to Stock, Cooper, and Watson. I opened it, and said, there was no doubt but the order was for us, and if he was going further, and would call in a short time, the parcel would be ready for him. He said, Bartlett's waggon went about twelve o'clock at night, that he was going further, and would call - I made up the order; there was thirty six yards of double twilled black sarsenet, at 7 s. 9 d. per yard, seven yards and a half of French cambric, at 14 s. per yard. I went to Mr. Taylor, and satisfied myself before I made it up - he called again that evening, and I gave him the parcel, which he took away.

Prisoner. Q. What day of the month was it - A. On the 15th of November, about five o'clock; he returned in three quarters of an hour. He was dressed in a dark coat - I parted with the goods, believing the order to be from Mrs. Holloway.

THOMAS WILLIAMS . I am servant to Messrs. Watson and Co. I was present when the prisoner came, he brought the parcel, and came for the goods; I noticed his being blind with one eye.

Manor House Establishment, Buckingham, November 13, 1821.

Sirs, - Have the goodness to send a sufficient quantity of your best black silk for five gowns, myself, and four daughters, the latter grown up; likewise, five yards of your best French cambric muslin. As you may not probably remember me dealing with your house, as we generally paid. Mr. Taylor, junior, hatter, of No. 16, Holborn, will satisfy you all particulars. If you can get them by Thursday evening, Mr. P. Bartlett will bring them free of expence. - Sirs, yours obediently,

SARAH HOLLOWAY .

Messrs. Stock, Cooper and Co., Holborn, London.

By favour of Mr. P. Bartlett.

P. S. I think seven yards and a half, for each gown, will be sufficient. Some of the family will be in town the latter end of next month, when the bill will be discharged.

MISS HOLLOWAY. I am daughter of Mrs. Sarah Holloway , of Buckingham. She has been very ill for three months, and has done no business. I know the prisoner, he has not been to our house for a year, nor had any order from the family to get goods. The letter is not the writing of any person in our house. I know Buckinghamwell,

there is a Mr. Bartlett there, but no waggon keeper of that name. I have not seen the prisoner for some years.

MR. FAITHFUL CROFT . I am a solicitor, and live in Chancery-lane. I have known the prisoner for many years, and am perfectly familiar with his writing, and believe this letter to be his. I know Mrs. Holloway, it is not her writing.

JOHN PHILLIP BEVAN . I have known the prisoner six or seven years; I have frequently seen him write; I firmly believe the letter to be his writing.

JAMES AYRES . I am waterman at the George-inn, Snow-hill. I know the prisoner, he went by the name of Bartlett; about the 14th of January, at eight o'clock, he was going out of the yard of the George-inn, and asked me to take two letters for him; he went into the office, and wrote a note - he told me his name was Bartlett, of Buckingham; one letter was to Mr. Taylor, and the other to Mr. Cribb.

Prisoner. I have a witness or two to call.

JEREMIAH SINDEBY . I am a smith, and work for myself, in Crown-court, Temple-bar. I was with the prisoner. on the 15th of November last, at the Flower Pot , public-house, Bishopsgate-street, from five till nine o'clock; it was on a Thursday - I did not know him before, but he was with an acquaintance of mine, who is a schoolmaster, a month or six weeks before, and I went on this night and knew him again; we had some conversation together - he got there before me, and I left him there. We did not join company with any one; he was smoking his pipe - he said he was in the scholastic way.

MR. BOLLAND. Q. What led you to Bishopsgate-street - A. I had some bell-hanging.

Q. Do you mean to swear that he was not out of your company - A. Not that I missed him - he might have gone out; he went out once or twice, but I never missed him long enough to be gone to Holborn. My countryman is usher to a school, near Richmond, and they had very high words about their profession, which makes me recollect him; I gave him my address. A friend of mine called a few days ago, and asked me to come and say what I knew.

WILLIAM COOPER . When he was before the Magistrate he said he could prove he was sixty miles from London.

GUILTY - Aged 34.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220220-63

388. SOLOMON HOLLOWAY was again indicted for a like offence .

DANIEL HOMYER . On the 17th of December, I was assistant in the house of Watson and Co., a person brought me a brown paper parcel. I opened it, it contained two letters; one signed Martha Holloway , and the other Emma Bund . I looked out the goods with Mr. Watson's assistance. I packed up the parcel for Colonel Bund, and delivered it to the porter, to take to the Golden Key, public-house, Fleet-market; I saw Mrs. Holloway's parcel packed; one parcel came to 22 l. 10 s., and the other to 45 l. 16 s.

(Letters read.)

Manor House, Buckingham,

December 14th, 1821.

Sir, - My Mamma desires her compliments to you, and desires me to say the silk pleased very much; but the muslin is not fine enough, which she will bring to London next month. She wishes you to send on next Tuesday, by Mr. Bartlett's waggon, from the Keys, in Fleet Market, furniture sufficient for two large four post bedsteads, with yellow lining; as it is for the rooms appropriated for the Judges, who sleep at our house, during their stay on the Circuit - let it be a very good and fashionable pattern. The furniture we had of you a few years since, wearing very well, my Mamma hopes you will let it be good. Send a piece of muslin finer than the last, and four black silk shawls with broad borders, for myself and sisters, not too expensive; as they are to wear over the silk - Mamma will leave the price and pattern to yourself, so as to correspond with our dresses. We visit London next month, with Colonel Bund, and we will call - Sir your obedient servant,

MARTHA HOLLOWAY .

Mr. Watson, Holborn.

Favored by Mr. John Bartlett .

Myrth Cottage, Padbury Hall, Buckingham,

December 15th, 1821.

Mr. Watson. - My sister of Manor House, sending, I have taken the liberty to ask you to send with her order, the same quantity of black silk and cambric, she had a few weeks since; the cambric I should like finer, and enough bombasin, black, for my housekeeper, and two black silk shawls, as near the pattern the Miss Holloway's have. As we visit London next month, I will leave the Irish and other articles, which Colonel Bund wants, till we see you, as he wishes to choose his silk handkerchiefs. - Your's very respectfully,

EMMA BUND .

Direct, Colonel H . Grafton Bund, Myrth Cottage, &c. Mr. Watson, Linendrapery, Establishment, Holborn.

Obliged by J. Bartlett, Esq.

THOMAS NORTH . I am in the prosecutor's furniture warehouse. I find by the invoice of the 18th of December, that this parcel of goods was put up by me, it amounts to 45 l. 16 s. I delivered it to Godwin with the other parcel to be taken to the Golden Key, public-house - I have since seen part of the furniture and silk in possession of Miller and Hedges.

MR. WATSON. I ordered these goods to be sent in consequence of the letters.

JOSEPH GODWIN . I am porter to Messrs. Watson. On the 18th of December, I received two parcels; one directed to Mrs. Holloway, and the other to Colonel Bund. I took them to the Golden Key, public-house, Fleet-market, and delivered them to landlord Rowland.

- ROWLAND. I keep the Golden Key, public-house. The prisoner came and asked me to take in two parcels which would come directed to go by Bartlett's waggon. He wrote down the direction which would be on them

"Mrs. Holloway, Manor house, Buckingham" and

"Colonel Bund." Godwin brought them the same day, and a person calling himself a porter, called for them - I delivered them to him.

MISS HOLLOWAY. The letter signed Martha Holloway , is not my sister's hand writing; she is lately dead, we live at Manor house, these goods never came - there is no Colonel Bund, at Padbury-hall, we know no such person.

MR. CROFT. I believe both letters to be the prisoner's hand writing.

MR. BEVAN. I believe them to be the prisoner's writing.

WILLIAM MAXWELL . I am assistant to John Reeves, pawnbroker, of Snowhill. I have known the prisoner three months. On the 21st of December, he brought some

sarsenet for sale; he said he was an agent employed by Mr. Stevens. I think he brought forty-one yards, and think it was in two pieces; we gave him 3 s. 6 d. a yard, and sold it for 3 s. 9 d. On the 24th, we bought seven pieces of chintz cotton furniture, twenty-four yards each, a remnant of eight yards, and seven pieces of calico. I think we gave him 1 s. 8 d. a yard for the furniture, and 10 d. a yard for the calico; the whole amounted to 20 l.; we sold part to Mr. Hedges and part to Mr. Miller. On the 14th of January, he came again; I bought three shawls of him, and a remnant of six yards of cambric; we gave him 9 l. 5 s. for that parcel. I believe we sold two of the shawls - I produce the other and the cambric.

Prisoner. Q. Who brought the goods - A. I think you brought some, and a porter the others; they were sent on Stevens's account, the prisoner called in four or five hours for the money, and I paid him. He produced me an invoice - I did not see the name at the top, I saw Watson and Co. on the furniture.

MR. HOMYER. This shawl and remnant of cambric, are part of the order I packed up; I am certain of the cambric, the shawl is of the same description, but the mark is off.

RICHARD MILLER . I live in Mortimer-street, Cavendish-square. I bought four pieces of furniture and lining of Reeve, on the 8th of January - I have part of them here.

Mr. NORTH. Here is one piece; I packed up, and a piece of the lining which I know.

RICHARD WILLIS HEDGES . I bought three pieces of furniture and three of lining, of Reeve on the 15th of January, I have one of each here - I gave ten guineas for them, 1 s. 10 d. for the furniture, and 1 s. for the lining.

MR. NORTH. These are part of the goods I packed up.

Prisoner's Defence. I own receiving the money, as agent. I told him I was only acting as agent, and asked him to allow me something for myself; they said they had a letter from the gentleman who was going to send more, and then they would allow me something.

GUILTY . Aged 34.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220220-64

389. SAMUEL EARL was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of January , 24 lbs. of pork, value 12 s. , the goods of Charles Dean .

CHARLES DEAN . I am a pork and poultry salesman , and live in Newgate-street . On the 19th of January, I lost a side of pork.

ROBERT STRATTON . I live with Mr. Dean. On the 19th of January, the prisoner came and cheapened a side of pork; after a little time, he brought it into the shop and laid it on a board, by the scale - a person told me to take care. He went into the market, and in five minutes, I saw him come in again, put it on his shoulder, and instead of going towards the scale, he came to the door. I said,

"Where are you going with that? you have not bought it," he said,

"If I have not, my master has." I said,

"You have neither bought it or paid for it" - he said he would lay it down, and go and see for his master; I stopped him, and an officer came and took him.

Prisoner's Defence. I had not enough to pay for it, and went to borrow, but my friend was out - I returned, and hung it where I took it from.

ROBERT STRATTON . I believe he was told the price.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220220-65

390. JOHN TAYLOR was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Henry Powell , about five o'clock in the afternoon of the 12th of February (Mary, his wife, and others being therein), and stealing therein, one flute, value 3 l. 3 s. his property.

JOHN HENRY POWELL . I live in Great Bartholomew-close . On Tuesday afternoon, the 12th of February, about four o'clock, I went out, and left my wife, child and nurse at home. The nurse fetched me at a quarter before six o'clock I found the glass of the parlour window broken open; I had left it secure. My flutes were on a board in the window exposed for sale. I found a flute removed from where I left it; it was within reach of a person's hand.

JOHN CARLISLE . I am a city patrol. On the 12th of February, about a quarter before six o'clock, I was coming by, and saw the prisoner in company with two others, lurking about Powell's window. I went back, passed them, and saw the prisoner and another close to the window, and the third opposite, looking about. I got into a door-way, and think he saw me, for he went over to them, and they came away towards me. I collared them both, and took them into a public-house; and found a knife on the prisoner, with putty on the blade. I found a pane of glass partly out, and the flute five or six inches out of the hole. I knocked and told the servant. While they were at the window I heard something fall like glass. One was discharged.

MARY BAILEY . I was nursing Mrs. Powell. Carlisle alarmed me. I had closed the shutters about half-past five o'clock, but did not fasten them - the glass was whole then, and the flute safe. I heard no more.

Prisoner's Defence. I met a young man in Bartholomew-close, and the officer came and took him.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220220-66

391. EDMUND TUCKER , was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of January , 7 lbs. of coffee, value 14 s. the goods of Richard Scrafton Sharpe , and Thomas Sharpe .

MR. RICHARD SCRAFTON SHARP. I am a grocer and tea dealer , in partnership with my brother Thomas Sharp , at No. 56, Fenchurch-street . The prisoner was our shop-man , at a yearly salary; he did not live in the house. On the 31st of January, between eight and nine o'clock, in consequence of suspicions, which we had, while he was gone to breakfast, we weighed a parcel, which I had seen him do up for a friend of his, from whom we had several orders before, and he always took the opportunity of doing them up during the absence of every body. I found the order entered in the order book as 24 lbs. of coffee at one price, and 12 lbs. of another kind, and a loaf of lump sugar; he had called me to see the sugars weighed, which was right; on weighing the coffee there was an excess of 7 lbs - there was 43 lbs. instead of 36 lbs. The invoice was written in

consequence of the order entered by the prisoner, for 36 lbs. The parcel was put into the bag as before, and I went to the Mansion-house and got some officers, and on returning found the order was not to go till one o'clock, as he said his friend, Mr. Charles Tousley, (who he said the order was for,) was after a house in Piccadilly, and he, the prisoner would no longer be responsible for him, but if we went at one o'clock, Tousley would be at home, to pay himself. I desired the officers to return at one o'clock, which they did - Marchmont and Harrison waited a few yards off; I brought them in, and gave the prisoner in charge, while I followed our porter with the goods, keeping him in sight all the way; We watched him into No. 147, Ratcliff-highway; the name of Akers was over the door, in which name the prisoner had given us orders before, and afterwards said Tousley had succeeded him, and begged us to continue to supply Tousley on the same terms - I went into the shop, the same parcel was on the counter, and while I was there, a receipt was given to Sophia Tousley for the money for 36 lbs. I returned, and in consequence of what passed there, said to the prisoner,

"The person you call Tousley is Tucker, and she is your wife;" he did not deny it, but said he had been married since July, 1820 - he was then in custody, and acknowledged having done this two or three times, I said

"You have certainly been defrauding us for a considerable time, for you have been married to this woman whom you call Tousley." he said,

"Four or five times Sir, is the utmost, but I must have time." (by that I understood that he was confused.) He said,

"You may search my premises, and see my books." I said

"Your wife says you have no books" - he said he had a day book and bills; he was taken away; Marchmont and I then went to the house, and found his wife sorting bills, and in a small place, parted from the shop, we found five or six small parcels of sugar, and things.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. He had been some time in your service - A. Nearly four years; I never saw Tousley.

Q. Here are various receipts you have signed for money paid by Tousley - A. Yes; the coffee was ordered in the name of Tousley, the prisoner weighed the coffee first, and when I weighed it I found an excess.

Q. Notwithstanding that, it was delivered, and the money paid - A Yes; my servant had orders to deliver it, and receive the money. I did it to ascertain the fact.

COURT. Q. You say you was paid, was the sum you received equivalent to 43 lbs. - A. No; only 36 lbs. The prisoner always said the goods were for Tousley's order.

JAMES GRIFFIN . I am porter to Mr. Sharp. I took the parcel to a house in Ratcliff Highway, with Akers over the door, it was paid for. I left the goods, and came out, met Mr. Sharp outside; he received the money from me, and went in with an officer; I followed him, and brought the goods back - Mrs. Tousley paid me.

WILLIAM MARCHMONT . I am an officer. I produce the goods; there are three parcels of coffee, two weigh 14 lbs. each, and one 15 lbs.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Confined Six Months .

London Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220220-67

SEVENTH DAY, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 1822.

392. WILLIAM LILL was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of February , one coat, value 10 s. the goods of Samuel Lovat .

MR. WALFORD conducted the prosecution.

ELIZA PRICE . I am housekeeper to Mr. Wetherell, of Stone-buildings, Lincoln's Inn , next door to Mr. Lovat's chambers. On the 7th of February, the prisoner came to me, and inquired for Mr. Priestley, who is porter of the inn. I saw him go into Mr. Lovat's chambers, and come out with a coat under his arm, and as he passed me he said he had seen Priestley; he had no coat when he went in.

THOMAS AKHURST . I am a porter of the inn; Price called me, and I secured the prisoner with the coat.

WILLIAM STORET . I am clerk to Mr. Samuel Lovat , this is his bar coat.

Prisoner's Defence. I went and enquired for Priestley, and as I returned, in Carey-street a boy overtook me with the coat; I bought it of him for 2 s. 6 d.

GUILTY . Aged 42.

Confined Six Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin Esq.

Reference Number: t18220220-68

393. DONALD M'DONALD was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of January , one jacket, value 20 s. the goods of Alexander Ellis .

ALEXANDER ELLIS . I am a slopseller , and live in Rosemary-lane . On the 24th of January, about half-past eight o'clock, the prisoner came and said he wanted a jacket - I shewed him two, neither of which were good enough; he approved of the third, and agreed to give 22 s., and then wanted trowsers to correspond. I asked him to walk into the warehouse, which is up stairs: he said,

"No, bring them to the door;" and while I was turning to fetch them he walked away with the jacket. I ran after him down Dock-street, hurt my foot, and could not follow. I saw him about eleven o'clock, and am sure he is the man.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. You saw him last November - A. I never saw him till January.

Q. Did he not come into your shop in November, and bargain for a jacket, and you kept the money and would not give him the jacket - A. Such a thing never happened; he told the Magistrate so, but I deny it. He said I changed them, that he refused to have them, and I kept the money; and as his vessel sailed the next day he could not prosecute me - but no such thing occurred.

GEORGE MOORE . I am in Mr. Ellis's service; I was outside the door when the prisoner came; he said the jacket would not fit him, then said it would do. I turned round, and in a few minutes saw my master pursuing him. He followed him through all the dark avenues, crying, Stop thief! to the quay where his ship was. I went on board, and said there was a thief, who had stolen a jacket; one and another threatened me, and the captain said if I did not go about my business he would give me in charge. I fetched an officer from Lambeth-street, and then the man was denied.

Cross-examined. Q. You asked him if it was his ship

- A. Yes; and he said,

"Yes;" he pulled the jacket off, and began working with the rest of the men. He did not say the jacket was little enough for his 24 s. I never sat eyes on him before.

COURT. Q. Had he the jacket on when he ran away - A. Yes, and his own under his arm.

WILLIAM JUDGE. I am an officer. Ellis fetched me on board the George, Berwick smack; I found the prisoner down in the forecastle; he asked one of his shipmates where the jacket was; he said it was in the hammock, where I found it. He said he did not steal it, for the man owed him money.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. On the 18th of November, I bought a jacket and trowsers of him for 24 s.; I paid him; he took them up, and wanted 1 s. more. I saw that he had changed them, and I would not have them. He said he would give 5 l. to a lawyer, rather than give me money or clothes. I went to the Magistrate, who asked the man's name; I said I did not know it; and he said it was no use to come without it. I went and got his name, and told the Magistrate I wanted it done quick, as I sailed next day. He said then there would not be time. I have a witness who went to the office with me, but I did not tell him what it was for, because my mates should not call me a fool. When I came back again I went and looked at a jacket, put it on, and said,

"I will keep it for the 24 s. I gave you last voyage."

WALTER STRAUGHAN . I am captain of the George, which sailed on the 24th of November last. The day before it sailed, in consequence of what the prisoner said I advised him to go to the office. He stated this circumstance, but as the vessel sailed he could not proceed.

DONALD HOSSACK . I was on board the George, in November last, and went with the prosecutor to the office the day before we sailed. I waited outside while he went in. I was on board when this Jew came - he asked the prisoner if he belonged to the ship - he said,

"Yes; and I think the jacket is little enough for my 24 s."

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220220-69

394. WILLIAM JOHNSON and CHARLES BYRNE were indicted for stealing, on the 17th of January , two bags, value 15 s., and two pecks of beans, oats, and chaff, mixed together, value 3 s. , the goods of Harvey Coombe , and others, his partners.

SECOND COUNT, stating them to belong to Richard Philps .

MR. WALFORD conducted the prosecution.

THOMAS MILLETT . I am a constable. On the 17th of January, about half-past eight o'clock at night. I was near the Yorkshire Stingo, public-house, New Road ; two of Combe's drays were there; the prisoners stood close to the horses' heads; I knew Byrne before; he took the nose-bags off the fore horse's head, and Johnson took the bag off the shaft-horse. Byrne ran towards Stingo-lane - I followed, and took him with the bag under his arm - Johnson dropped his bag. I picked it up - took Byrne to the watch-house - then went to Johnson's house, in Stingo-lane, and found him under the staircase; the bag contained oats and chaff, mixed.

CHARLES LANE . I am horse-keeper to Messrs. Coombe & Co.; the bags are all their's. Mr. Harvey Coombe is one of the partners.

RICHARD PHILIPS . I am answerable for the bags; I should have to pay 15 s. for them.

JOHNSON - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Three Months , and Whipped .

BYRNE - GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220220-70

395. ROBERT CHRISTMAS was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of February , at St. Dunstan-Stepney, one gelding, price 10 l. , the property of John Winch .

JOHN WINCH . I live at Stratford near Bow. I am a corn-chandler, and coachmaster . On Tuesday week, I ordered my man Clark, to take three horses to Epping Forest; they were all geldings, and were marked two or three days previous, with the West Ham mark - one of them was brought to me by Dickinson, on Thursday evening last; I am sure it was one of mine; it is now at my house - I gave 22 l. for it, in October. It has been ill, but is now getting better, and is worth 10 l.

WILLIAM DICKINSON . I am a patrol of Bow-street. Last Thursday night, I was on duty with Hewitt, another patrol, and in Mile End-road, about eight o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner on the other side of the road, leading a gelding, he had a bridle, but no saddle; I ran over, and asked where he brought the horse from, he said he brought it from the Harrow, at Stratford, and it was given to him there by Robert Lee , to bring to town. I asked where he was going to take it to, he said to a public-house in Whitechaple; he could not tell me the sign, nor what part of Whitechaple it was. I called Hewitt over, and took him - I went down to the Harrow, and enquired for Lee, but could not learn that any such person had been there. Several people said the horse was Winch's - I took it to him, and he claimed it.

MR. WINCH. When the horse was brought to me, I went to the forest, and found the other two there, on the part of the forest near Leightonstone. It had neither clog or chain on.

WILLIAM HEWITT . I only know the same as Dickinson. I took the prisoner to the Harrow, that night, and then brought him to town, took him into Whitechaple, and asked if he could shew me the house he was to take the horse to; he took me to the Duke's Head, Whitechaple-road; there were no stables there. He said the man was to stop there till he brought it. I could not learn that Lee was there.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming from Rumford, and met a man on horseback, and asked him to give me a ride behind him; he told me to take the horse to Whitechaple, have a pint of beer, and wait for him.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 18.

Recommended to Mercy, by the Prosecutor and Jury, on account of his youth, and hoping it was his first offence.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220220-71

396. DANIEL DAY and WILLIAM ANDREWS were indicted for stealing, on the 16th of February , one

fixture (i.e.) one brass pump, value 20 s., the goods of William Bean , and fixed to a building of his .

This offence being committed in Herts, the prisoners were detained to be indicted in that County, but on this indictment were

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220220-72

397. JOSEPH THOMAS was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of February , one cow, price 4 l. , the property of Charles Parish .

CHARLES PARISH . I live at Walthamstow , and had two cows in a field, about one hundred yards from my house, which is fenced round and has a gate - I milked them on Sunday the 17th of February, at half-past six o'clock in the morning, and shut the gate, my boy milked them at night, and next morning at six o'clock, I found one in a field at Hackney - the prisoner was in custody; he is a stranger. I only lost one.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Had she lately calved - A. Yes, on the first of August. I sold her calf in August, at Rumford.

JOSEPH WALLEND . I am a patrol. On Monday morning a little after five o'clock I saw the prisoner just by Clapton pond, driving this cow, another man was with him; I laid hold of the prisoner, and then the other went away. I asked where he came from, and was going with it; he said he came from Mr. Smith of Epping, and he had been sent down to Smith's, by the captain of a ship for it - I think he said the captain's name was Low. The cow was not warm, but unwilling to be driven. Mr. Parish claimed it the same day. He said he was first going to Smithfield, and then to the captain with the cow.

Cross-examined. Q. Two people drove it - A. Yes. I did not ask where he came from, but where he brought the cow from. He appeared like a sailor.

WILLIAM PARISH . I am the prosecutor's son. I saw the cow safe at half past five o'clock on Sunday afternoon and pinned the gate after me. I am sure she is the same.

Cross-examined. Q. Was it not constantly straying - A. Never.

CHARLES WARREN . I was present when the prisoner was stopped. Wallend's account is correct.

Prisoner's Defence. On Sunday morning I went to Walthamstow with this man; he told me he was steward of a ship, and asked me to go on board, and said he would get me a situation, as a carpenter; he took me to Epping as he called it, and left me in a public house, about three o'clock; returned about five o'clock, and took me to the Cock, public house, four miles further; and at eight o'clock he brought me back to the first public house, and about twelve o'clock, took me to his sister's at Walthamstow - I left him there; he overtook me on the road, with the cow and in a quarter of an hour I was stopped - I was fifty yards a head of the cow.

JOSEPH WALLEND , re-examined. The cow was rather violent; he got before to prevent her getting out of the regular track - the other man was coming up behind her.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220220-73

398. JAMES MULLIGAN was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of January , two doors, value 4 s. , the property of David Henderson .

DAVID HENDERSON . I live in New-street, Golden-square. I had some houses under repair in Hopkins-street, Westminster . There were two old doors off their hinges, in the kitchen of No. 13. I did not miss them till I saw one at Webster's.

ELIZA WEBSTER . I keep a coal-shed in Crown-street, St. James's. On Friday night I bought two doors of the prisoner to cut up for fire-wood, for 3 s. 6 d.; he said they were his perquisites. Next morning Henderson claimed them. He came to sell some wood a week afterwards, and was secured.

THOMAS GOOK . I took him in charge; he wished to pay for them.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220220-74

399. MARY BUDD was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of February , one row of beads, value 10 s.; and one child's coat, value 6 s., the goods of James Murphy , from the person of Mary Ann Murphy .

JAMES MURPHY . I live in Denmark-court, Strand . My daughter Mary Ann is seven years old. On the 1st of February, between twelve and two o'clock, I gave her leave to play in the court with her skipping rope; she had a row of beads and a coat on; she came in in a short time without them, crying, and complained of being robbed. She was playing in the court ten or twelve days after, and ran in to me. I went out and called to a man to lay hold of the prisoner. I pursued and took her in Southampton-street, running towards Covent-Garden, and told her she had stolen my child's neck-lace. She denied it, and said, I had no authority to take her, as I was not an officer. I took her back - the child came down, and said she was the girl who had robbed her. She denied it. I sent for Trueman, who was with the child, and she said she was the girl.

ANN TRUEMAN . My father is a shoe-maker, and lives in Denmark-court. I was playing with Murphy; she had a coat on and beads. I saw the prisoner take her down the court, but did not see where she took her to. I saw her again in about two hours, going to look for her coat. I am sure the prisoner is the girl. I have known her some years.

WILLIAM NESBITT . I am street-keeper. I apprehended her.

Prisoner's Defence. I was confined to my bed at the time with a fever.

SUSAN TORFTS . I lodge in the same house as the prisoner. She had a very bad illness, and was not able to go out till after Saturday, 2nd of February. I enquired about her every day.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220220-75

400. THOMAS MERRY was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of February , one sack, value 18 d., and four bushels of malt, value 30 s. , the goods of John Truman Villebois , and others, his partners; and ROBERT

SAMME was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, knowing it to be stolen .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to belong to John Taylor and Joseph Taylor .

TWO OTHER COUNTS, stating it to belong to John Bailey .

MESSRS. BOLLAND and BRODRICK conducted the prosecution.

THOMAS SKITTRELL . I am wharfinger, to Mr. John Bailey , of Stamford-hill. On Thursday, the 11th of February, some pale malt, which had come from Mr. Taylor, of Bishop Stortford, was carted from our wharf, to Messrs. Hanbury's brewhouse; the sacks were marked I. T., and the barge had his name on it. Twenty-six sacks or thirteen quarters, were put into a cart which the prisoner, Merry, drove. I gave him a delivery ticket; it was about six o'clock in the morning, and he had another load of the same quantity between eleven and twelve o'clock.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Was it your duty to see the cart loaded - A. Yes; I assisted in carting, and stood within seven feet of the barge - he loaded his own cart, and did not complain that his number was not right - we count the sacks in the cart.

WILLIAM MOORE . I am servant to Mr. John Bailey of Stamford-hill. I assisted in loading Merry's cart; he had twenty-six sacks each time, and stowed them in the cart himself - we can tell by the bulk how many there are.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you observe him look at his delivery ticket - A. No.

WILLIAM BACK . I am in the service of Mr. John Truman Villebois , there are four other partners. In consequence of information which I had, I went into the loft of the brewhouse, at Spitalfields, and saw the carts come in, about a quarter past three o'clock. Merry drove the third, there were only twelve quarters or twenty-four sacks in his cart - the delivery ticket was for twenty-six.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you know that he drove the third cart - A. I cannot say in what order they came.

THOMAS NEWMAN . I live near Birdcage-walk, Stamford-hill, and know Merry very well. On the 11th of February, between twelve and one o'clock, I saw him draw his horses up by the side of the water trough, at the White Hart, his cart was loaded with full sacks. I saw him take a sack out of his own cart and put it in an enclosed place - another man took a sack out of another cart, and put it in the same place - Merry saw him do it, they were together.

Cross-examined. Q. How came you there - A. I was coming along, and happened to see it. I know nobody at the White Hart, - I told Dibbin of it, only two carts stopped there. Samme is hostler there.

THOMAS DIBBEN . I am storehouse-keeper at Messrs. Trueman and Hanbury's brewhouse. I applied to Armstrong, and between twelve and one o'clock saw Merry drive his cart in with three others, driven by Dearman, Nichols, and Tyler. Merry drove the third, and I believe his was the third that was unloaded. Here is the delivery ticket which he gave me - it is for thirteen quarters, and only twelve came. I went up to Merry, and asked him if he had not some sacks concealed about him. He said,

"I have a sack." I put my hand round him, and felt one under his clothes, marked J. T., which is Taylor's mark. I took Dearman into custody, and while I was so doing, I observed Merry get into his cart, and doing something to the sacks; he came down - I gave him in charge of Armstrong, then got up in the cart, and found an old great coat pressed between the sacks of malt where I had seen him, and in the coat was another sack, marked J. T. I asked if the coat was his - he said it was not; but he supposed some person must have thrown it in the cart. I went with Armstrong to the White Hart, Newington, kept by Chapman, and found young Armstrong there, talking to Samme. Armstrong, Sen., asked him if he had had any malt in there that afternoon, pointing to the storehouse; he said he had not. Armstrong said,

"You must open the door, or I will break it open." Samme then took a key from his pocket, and undid the padlock. We there found two sacks of pale malt, one marked I. T., and a small quantity of pale malt in a third sack, and about two sacks shot in the bin.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you know the carmen. - A. Only by sight. I know Merry's was the third cart - I saw them come in.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You heard Armstrong ask Samme if he had any malt in that day. - A. Yes; we got there about four o'clock in the afternoon.

COURT. Q. Did the malt in the bin appear the same sample as that in the sacks. - A. They did.

JOHN ARMSTRONG . I am an officer. I was at the brew-house, and received charge of Merry, and found a sack round his body. Dibben gave me another. I took some more men in custody, then went to the White Hart, and found my son talking to Samme. I had a search-warrant in my hand - my son said,

"Have you, or is there any malt left here to-day." We then stood close to the storehouse door. I said,

"Open the door, or I'll break it open." He opened it, and I found two sacks, containing malt, near the bin, and a quantity in the bin. I instantly went and brought Chapman the landlord to him, and asked who rented that place of him; he said Samme, and that he paid him 5 s. a week for it.

JOSHUA ARMSTRONG . I am an officer. I went to watch the White Hart, public-house, I got there at two o'clock in the afternoon, and kept my eye on the storehouse till my father came up. I had seen Samme go to the storehouse three times, unlock, and lock it when he came out. When my father came, I went to Samme, and asked him who was the head hostler; he said,

"This is him," pointing to a man close by; but I knew he himself was head hostler, and said to my father,

"This is him" - and said,

"Have you had any malt left here to-day;" he said,

"No." We said. if he did not open the door, we would break it open. He opened it, and we found the malt. The landlord said Samme rented the place.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. He went into the place several times. - A. Yes; and must have seen the sacks.

JAMES CHAPMAN . I keep the White Hart. Samme rented the stables of me, and attended to the horses which came. He had rented the shed where the malt was found two years.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Has he an hostler. - A. He has an assistant at times. I should call the prisoner head hostler.

WILLIAM BACK . I have examined the malt, and compared it with that brought in Merry's waggon; they are the same sample, colour, and quality - the sacks are the same sort.

MERRY'S Defence. I drove my cart to the trough, went in for some beer, and on coming out, the cart was gone.

SAMME'S Defence. I was not there when the malt was left. I went to dinner at half-past twelve and returned at a quarter before two o'clock, and found it there.

JOHN CLARK . I am a baker, and live at Stoke Newington. I was with Samme on the 11th of February, from five minutes pass one till five minutes to two o'clock. I was called up from bringing up the one o'clock dinners, and we went and had a pint of beer together in the tap-room, and saw Armstrong, Jun. pass the window while we were there.

MERRY - GUILTY. Aged 46.

Transported for Seven Years.

SAMME - GUILTY. Aged 28.

Transported for Fourteen Years.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

401. HENRY NICHOLLS was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of February, one quarter of malt, value 3 l. the goods of John Trueman Villebois , and others his partners.

THOMAS SKITTRELL . On the 11th of February I saw the prisoner at Mr. Bailey's warehouse, at Stamford Hill. A quantity of malt had come from Taylor's to be sent to Messrs. Hanbury & Co.'s; sixteen quarters or thirty-two sacks were put in the prisoner's cart, between six and seven o'clock in the morning, and a delivery ticket was given him; he stowed them himself - the sacks were marked I. T.

THOMAS DIBBIN . I am storehouse-keeper to Villebois & Co. I was in the yard when the prisoner came with his cart of malt. I asked if he had any sacks concealed round his body, or if he had seen any malt dropped by the way; he said he had not, he had never stole a grain of malt in his life. His was the first cart that came in. I took him to Armstrong in the lobby; and, after being there a short time, he said he must go up the yard and put the nose-bags on the horses - I went with him. I had taken Dearman and Merry before that, which he knew. Church came up - I told him to point out the man who put the sacks under the manger; he said it was the prisoner; he made no reply. I had taken him about ten minutes after he came into the yard; he was very near the stable-door, and might have gone in many times without my noticing him - the stable-door was ten or twelve yards from the cart.

WILLIAM BACK . I am brewer to the prosecutors - the prisoner's cart came into the yard first - there were but thirty sacks, or fifteen quarters - the delivery ticket was for thirty-two sacks. Church gave me two sacks.

ROBERT CHURCH . I am horse-keeper at the brewhouse. I saw Nicholls come into the stable between one and two o'clock. I saw him take two sacks from under his smockfrock, and put them under one of the mangers - they were tied round his middle. I took them out and gave them to Dibbin in about half an hour.

(Sacks produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was taken directly I stopped my horses.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220220-76

402. WILLIAM DEARMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of February , one quarter of malt, value 3 l. the goods of John Trueman Villebois , and partners.

THOMAS SKITTRELL . The prisoner drove one of the carts to Trueman's - he stowed the load himself, and had twenty-six sacks, and received a delivery ticket.

THOMAS DIBBIN . The prisoner came with his cart loaded with malt. I took him in custody, and received his delivery ticket, and gave it to Back; he had been in the yard five minutes, and had time to go into the stable - he never accounted for the deficiency of two sacks in his cart.

WILLIAM BACK . I saw the malt taken from the prisoner's cart - there was but twenty-four sacks - the ticket was for twenty-six.

ROBERT CLARK . I found two empty malt-sacks under the eighth horse-stall, at half-past four o'clock in the afternoon - they were not there in the morning.

(Sacks produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I drove my horses up the yard, and as I came down they collared me.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220220-77

403. GEORGE TYLER was indicted for stealing, on the the 11th of February , one quarter of malt, value 3 l. the goods of John Trueman Villebois , and others.

THOMAS SKITTRELL . On the 11th of February, the prisoner received, in his cart, thirteen quarters, to deliver to Messrs. Hanbury's; he stowed them himself in the cart, and had a delivery ticket - it was six or seven o'clock in the morning. I am sure he had twenty-six sacks.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Who made out the ticket - A. I gave it him.

WILLIAM BACK . When the prisoner came with his cart he delivered only twenty-four sacks; he put the delivery ticket into the mouth of the last sack - I took him in charge. He said he only had twelve quarters delivered to him - he was two hours in the yard, before he unloaded.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he not say he brought all he received - A. Yes.

WILLIAM MOORE . I am servant to Mr. Bailey. I saw the prisoner's cart stowed; he had twenty-six sacks.

Prisoner's Defence. I delivered all I received.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220220-78

404. ANN SMITH was indicted for feloniously assaulting Ebenezer Cornell , on the 1st of February , on the King's highway, puting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, twenty-seven sovereigns, and four 10 l. Bank notes , his property.

EBENEZER CORNELL . I am a potatoe dealer , and live in Whitecross-street. On the 1st of February, about eight o'clock at night, I was in Bartholomew-lane , going home; I had been drinking rather freely - a woman, who I believe to be the

prisoner, met me, and asked me to go home with her, and while we were conversing together, three or four men came up behind me. I had my hands in my breeches pockets, and they knocked my hands up - one of them said,

"Go along woman, don't you see the good man is in liquor; and don't want to say any thing to you." As soon as I got my hands down, I felt that my money was gone, and exclaimed,

"She has robbed me;" she was gone then, one of them said,

"She is gone that way," and went a few paces to show me; I followed, but saw nothing of her. I lost a bag, with four 10 l. notes, and twenty-seven sovreigns in it; also a sovereign, and about 18 s. from my other breeches pocket. I have found none of it.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You were not sober - A. No; She went away when she was sent. I cannot say whether I was robbed, before or after she went; I had received two of the notes that day, and know the numbers of them.

COURT. Q. When you received them did you make a memorandum of the numbers - A. Yes.

JAMES BROWN . I am a linen draper, and live in the Minories. On the 1st of February, between eight and nine o'clock, a gentleman paid me a 10 l. note, No. 7,378, the prisoner was in his company, and bought the goods. I put my own name on it. This is it.

(Looks at it.)

WILLIAM WALTER WHITE . I am cashier to Messrs. Hankey. I paid away a note of this number and date. I have not got my book here, but a memorandum which I took of it.

GEORGE DYER . I am clerk at the Bank. I produce the note, which was paid in on the 5th of February.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220220-79

405. STEPHEN MARR and THOMAS KING , was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of January , two ducks, value 4 s. , the property of John Bewley .

WILLIAM THOMAS . I am servant to John Bewley , of Newgate-market , a poultry salesman . On the 24th of January, between 6 and 7 o'clock in the morning, I was set to watch, in consequence of suspicion, and saw the prisoners pass the shop together; they came by again, and Marrs took two ducks, and put them under his coat - they were both close together, and walked off. I collared them both at once and saw Marr drop them.

WILLIAM BEDFORD . I saw the prisoners come by twice, and the second time, Marrs took two ducks. Thomas secured them - they were together.

KING'S Defence. I saw this young man taken, and stopped to see what was the matter.

MARRS GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined One Year and Whipped .

KING GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220220-80

406. NICHOLAS BULLOCK was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of February , one handkerchief, value 2 s. the goods of a certain man unknown, from his person .

CHARLES WILLIAM GREEN . I am a painter, and live in Titchfield-street, Soho. On Sunday, the 17th of February, I was on Holborn-hill , and saw the prisoner, with two others, follow a lady and gentleman - the prisoners and another were arm in arm, covering the third, who was behind the lady and gentleman, the third who was less than the prisoner, took the handkerchief a little way out of the gentleman's pocket, then turned back, and presently took it quite out, and gave it to the prisoner, who, I instantly collared, the others went away - I took the handkerchief out of his hand; he scuffled and threw me down on the road, but I still held him, and put him in the watch-house; he said I did not know him, and he hoped I would let him go.

COURT. Q. You have been frequently here as a witness, do you work at your trade - A. I work for gentlemen, as a journeyman.

THOMAS SAUNDERS . I am an officer. The prisoner was brought to the watch-house, with the handkerchief; he said it was near him, and he kicked it, but denied having it in his possession.

Prisoner's Defence. It was dark, I kicked something, picked it up, nobody owned it; I was going to put it in my pocket, when he caught me.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220220-81

407. JAMES HETLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of February , one shawl, value 6 s. , the goods of Charles Humphries .

CHARLES HUMPHRIES . I am a linen draper , and live in Bishopsgate-street . On the 13th of February, between eight and nine o'clock at night, this shawl hung at the door, partly outside. I did not miss it till the prisoner was brought in with it.

FRANCIS KEYS . I am an officer. About half-past eight o'clock at night, I was near Humphries's shop, and saw the prisoner and two others loitering about the shop; two of them pulled at a red shawl, but could not get it down - they went away, and all three returned in company. One of the other two pulled this shawl down, and all ran away up Skinner-street; and the one who pulled it down, gave it to the prisoner. I ran after him, they said,

"Let the prisoner go on Jem." He immediately threw it down, I caught him, and picked it up.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I did it from want.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220220-82

408. WILLIAM HERBERT was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of February , one watch, value 3 l.; one chain, value 6 s.; one seal, value 5 s.; and one key, value 2 d., the goods of John Carr , from his person .

JOHN CARR . I am a lace dealer , and live in Water-street. On the 11th of February, about eight o'clock at night, I was in Fleet-street , and by St. Dunstan's church, the prisoner met me, and instantly snatched the watch out of my fob; he ran up St. Dunstan's-court with it. I gave an alarm, and pursued him, I lost sight of him for a few yards up the passage, then three men stopped me, and began hustling me, to prevent my following him. I kept crying Stop thief! and he was stopped at the end of the passage. The men then left me - I am sure he is the man.

SAMUEL CHARLES FAWCETT . I am a printer. I was coming out of Gough-square, into St. Dunstan's-court, and heard the cry of Stop thief! The passage is very dark,

and goes through a private house. I looked down the court, and it was clear - I saw the prisoner running towards me, and knowing nobody had passed me, I sprang out of the private passage, shut the door, and by that means stopped up the thoroughfare. The prisoner came up, and said,

"Don't stop me, for I am in pursuit of the thief." I said,

"I shall stop you till somebody comes up, and in a few seconds, three men came up, apparently out of breath, and said,

"Where is he?" I said,

"Here he is." They looked round the corners, and kept asking,

"Where is he?" I still said,

"This is him," but they took no notice of me - I thought I had stopped the wrong person, and let him go. He instantly ran towards Fleet-street; the crowd were then coming up the court. The moment I saw him run, I thought he was the man, and called out,

"That is the man," and saw him retaken. Mr. Carr immediately said he was the man.

HENRY TALMAGE . I am an officer. He was given in my charge.

Prisoner. It is of no use saying any thing.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220220-83

409. JOHN LAWRENCE was indicted for stealing. on the 20th of February , one handkerchief, value 4 s., the goods of Owen Edwards , from his person .

OWEN EDWARDS . I live with Messrs. Bowerbanks of Lothbury. On the 20th of February, about seven o'clock in the evening, I was in Fleet-street, near Fetter-lane . A person came up and asked if I had lost my handkerchief - I felt, and missed it, it was a yellow one.

JOHN CARLISLE . I am a night patrol. I was on duty on Ludgate-hill, about seven o'clock, and saw the prisoner and another in company, at the corner of Black Horse-court, Fleet-street. I watched them, and saw the prisoner following a gentleman towards Fleet-market. I then saw Edwards go up Fleet-street, the prisoner, and the other with a wooden leg, followed him, and just before they came to Fetter-lane, the prisoner took the handkerchief out of his pocket. I told Edwards, he returned with me up Fetter-lane after them. I saw them at the end of Black Horse-alley, about ten minutes after, and took the prisoner, I found nothing on him, and am sure he is the boy. I knew him before - the handkerchief appeared yellow.

LEWIS FACHE . I am a constable. I saw him in Fleet-street with a man with a wooden leg, and told Carlisle of it.

Prisoner. I am innocent.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220220-84

410. GEORGE AINGE , JAMES WOODCOCK , and JOHN MEYERS , were indicted for stealing, on the 1st of February , two boots, value 4 s. , the goods of John Russell .

JOHN MARCHANT . I keep a boot and shoe-warehouse in Field-lane, Holborn. On the 1st of February, between five and six o'clock in the evening, the prisoners came into my shop together. Woodcock offered two boots for sale. I saw they were odd, and asked whose they were - he said his father's. I asked him why he did not send fellows - he said they were fellows. I said I suspected he had stolen them. I left them all in custody, and found Russell had lost them.

JOHN RUSSELL . I live on Saffron-hill , and am a boot and shoemaker . On the 1st of February, about five o'clock, Ainge came into the shop alone, to sell two mugs, I did not see the others - I refused to buy them - he went away, and came in again; I sent him about his business. I am sure he did not take them then, they hung near the door and could be taken from outside.

COURT. Q. Do you mean to say you did not see all three of the prisoners about your shop - A. I never saw the other two.

Q. How came you to tell the Magistrate you saw the three prisoners about your shop - A. I did not - I said I would not swear it. I signed the deposition because I believe the officer said it made no difference.

AINGE'S Defence. I went to sell the mugs, this boy asked me to go and sell the boots with him.

AINGE - GUILTY . Aged 15.

Judgment Respited .

WOODCOCK - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Whipped and discharged.

MEYERS - NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220220-85

411. LOUISA ETHERIDGE was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of November , five gowns, value 6 l. 13 s.; five shifts, value 25 s.; eight pair of stockings, value 28 s.; four handkerchiefs, value 22 s.; one frill, value 9 s.; three night-gowns, value 15 s.; two yards of lawn, value 3 s.; one yard of muslin, value 2 s.; three petticoats, value 18 s.; two caps, value 32 s., and one apron, value 1 s. , the goods of Sarah Latchford .

SARAH LATCHFORD . In November, 1820, I lived servant to Mr. Williams, Edmund-place, Aldersgate-street; he was a baker. I employed the prisoner to make my dresses, as I knew her sister. On the 11th of November, 1820, about half-past seven o'clock in the morning, she came to me, and said a man had followed her from my master's house, saying, that he would be a bankrupt in two days, and that my clothes were not safe in the house, and if I would give them to her she would take care of them. I gave her the articles stated in the indictment; - she said she was going to take them to No. 2, Lower Coleman-street, Bunhill-row - I knew she lived there. I went after them two days after, and she had absconded. I never saw them or her till the 19th of this month - I lived at my place seven months - she never came to me - I believe my master was a bankrupt about August.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. She brought you home five dresses the day before - A. One; she had made me five. Her father offered to do all he could to settle it, this was before she was in custody.

ANN BUFFAN . The prisoner and her sister Jane lodged at my house for two or three months, in Little Coleman-street. They left on the 20th of November, 1820, without warning.

JOSEPH GREGORY . I am an officer. On the 19th of February the prosecutrix fetched me to No. 58, Skinner-street, and gave the prisoner in charge.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Confined One Year .

London Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220220-86

THOMAS BALL was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of February , one hat, value 10 s., and a pair of gloves, value 2 s. 6 d. , the goods of Charles Rich .

JAMES END . I keep a chop-house in Coleman-street , opposite Mr. Rich's. I was standing at my door between six and seven o'clock in the evening, and saw the prisoner and a man loitering about Rich's window. I saw the prisoner go into the shop, and come out - I crossed over and took him, with a hat in his hand, and a pair of gloves in it; he said some men persuaded him to do it.

CHARLES RICH . I live opposite End, and am a stationer , I was in the parlour - my hat was on the counter - a boy came in twice on a paltry excuse; the prisoner was soon after brought in with it; he fell on his knees and begged for mercy.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220220-87

412. JAMES FARMER was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of January , one pair of boots, value 36 s., the goods of John Gowen ; and one great coat, value 3 l., the goods of Charles Law , in the dwelling-house of the said John Gowen .

CHARLES LAW . I am clerk to Mr. John Gowen , wine-broker , of Mark-lane . On the 15th of January, between eleven and twelve o'clock, I had been out, and on my return, I found the prisoner in the counting-house. He asked if I would buy any quills; I told him to go about his business; and on his getting down one step of the door, I observed something blue in his basket, I asked what he had got - he made no answer, but was going down another step, I collared and took him back, and found my own great coat and a pair of boots of Mr. Gowen's, which were quite new. I cannot swear to the boots. I had had my coat about a year. I value it at 3 l. He said it was his first offence, and wished to be let go. He had two hundred quills and a large sack at the bottom of his basket.

JOHN ALLINGHAM . I am an officer, and took him in charge.

(Coat produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A young man came up and said,

"How does trade go;" I said,

"Very bad." He said,

"Go and fetch a coat out of that house, and I will give you more than you will get by selling quills all day."

GUILTY. Aged 19.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220220-88

EIGHTH DAY. THURSDAY, FEBUARY 28.

413. WILLIAM RIDLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of February , 10 lbs. of wool, value 5 s.; and one yard of cotton, value 6 d. , the goods of John Rutland .

JAMES TANSLEY . I am in the service of John Rutland , a hackneyman . On the 15th of February, his coach stood under my bed-room window, in the Cross Keys, public-house, New-street, Mary-le-bone-lane . About a quarter before seven o'clock in the morning, I looked, and found the lining cut out, and some of it, with about a sack full of wool stuffing carried away - it was safe the night before.

GEORGE MEAD . I am watchman of Mary-le-bone. On the 15th of February, just before six o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner going up Bulstrode-street, with a bag under his arm, about sixty yards from this coach, and in Wellbeck-street, he put it down by a gentleman's door. I asked what it consisted of; he said,

"A bag with a little wool." I took him to the watch-house with it, and found part of the coach lining under his waistcoat.

RICHARD COATES . I compared the lining with the rest in the coach. I found a phosphorus box and matches on him. The wool appeared to be the same.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I merely picked it up in James-street, Oxford-street.

GUILTY . Aged 36.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220220-89

414. DENNIS BIRD was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of January , three iron bars, value 20 s. , the goods of John Bennett .

DANIEL COOKSEY . I am watchman of Mary-le-bone. On the 16th of January, at eight o'clock at night, I was by the Stratford coffee-house, and met the prisoner seven yards from the door, with three iron bars; I asked what brought him there; he said he had been for a necessary purpose.

JOHN BENNETT . I keep the Stratford coffee-house, Oxford-street . I found the prisoner in charge with the bars, which he had taken from behind my shutters, which stood in a box behind the house - they are mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I came from Newgate-street into Oxford-street. I could get no bed, and went down the archway. I put the bars against the wall, but did not intend to take them.

GUILTY . Aged 42.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220220-90

415. JANE BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of January , two sovereigns, the property of James Stewart , from his person .

JAMES STEWART . I am porter to Messrs. Wilks and Co., and live in Hungerford-market. On the 26th of January, between twelve and one o'clock at night, I met the prisoner at the corner of Skelton-court - she laid hold of my arm, and said she wanted to speak to me, and took me up a court; as I went up the court, I moved two sovereigns from my breeches to my waistcoat pocket. I stood talking to her two or three minutes, and as I left her I missed them - turned round, and directly laid hold of her, and said she had robbed me of two sovereigns; she said she had no such thing, and laughed at me - I said I was certain she had, and called the watchman; he came up, and I laid fast hold of her hand, till she got to the watchouse, and then found one sovereign in her hand, which was clenched; she declared she had no more - the watchman found the other in her

mouth. I had given her 6 d. which was not found on her. I was coming from my club.

WILLIAM ROTTENBURY . I am a watchman. I was on duty, and heard the cry of Watch! the prosecutor came out of Shelton-court, holding the prisoner; he said she had robbed him of two sovereigns, she denied it, and said she had none; he held her hand, till we got her to the watch-house, and then found one in her hand - she said she had no more. I found another in her mouth with 1 s., she said the shilling was her's.

Prisoner's Defence. I met him with his friend, who gave me 1 s., I suppose his friend gave me the sovereigns for I did not know that I had them.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin Esq.

Reference Number: t18220220-91

416. JAMES THATCHER was indicted for stealing on the 8th of January , forty quires of printed paper, value 20 s.; one hundred quires of other printed paper, value 50 s., and 200 lbs. of waste paper, value 4 l. , the goods of John Nichols and John Bowyer Nichols ; and JOHN EATON was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, knowing it to be stolen .

MR. JOHN BOWYER NICHOLS . I am in partnership with my father, whose name is John; we are printers and booksellers , and live in Parliament-street. Thatcher had been in our service, and left about five weeks before this occured.

FREDRICK SMITH. I was in Mr. Nichols service. Five or six weeks before Thatcher was taken up, I suspected him, and told Britten my suspicions, as he had charge of the place, and in about five week I mentioned it to Mr. Nichols. The paper was kept in the back warehouse, in Cannon-row. A week or two before Thatcher was taken up, he told me he had taken paper from the warehouse in Cannon-row - I told Blanshard, and he was taken up. He said he had sold it, but did not say to whom.

WILLIAM BLANSHARD . I was in Mr. Nichols's service About the 15th of January, Thatcher and Smith were quarrelling in the office, and Smith said he would tell something about Thatcher's conduct, that would bring him before a Justice; Thatcher said if any thing burnt in his heart to let it out; he was not in the employ then, he only came to see Smith. In consequence of what Smith told me I informed my employers. Part of the paper was found at Wright's, by the Coburg Theatre, some at Mahon's in Coburg-row, and more at Mahon's in Suffolk-street.

HENRY BRITTEN . I have been in Mr. Nicholls's service five years, last summer. I and Thatcher were employed to sell some imperfect books, for waste paper, they were sold, in the warehouse, to one Murphy, and one day, I said to Thatcher,

"I should like to have the value of that pile of paper," pointing to it; he said,

"I will tell you where you can sell it, without Mr. Nicholls knowing it." Two or three days after, he prevailed on me to take part of the money, which he said he had got for selling some - this was about October; I knew he had taken some away. My share was 18 s. On the Friday before the Saturday, on which we were taken into custody, Thatcher came running to the warehouse, in King-street, I beckoned to him to go out; he said

"The old thief, (meaning Smith) has sold me, but I can bring up as much against him as he can against me pretty well;" I was once going out of this warehouse, with a bundle of paper; I met him, and he told me to go on, for it was all right, and at another time, I was in Cannon-row with him, and he asked me to take a bundle and to help him with his left hand. He then left, and was apprehended next day; he told me where he sold the paper - I do not know Eaton.

JOSEPH MAHON , I am a stationer, and live in Great Suffolk-street, Borough. On the 8th of January, I bought three parcels of waste paper, with a great deal more, of Eaton - he has frequently sold me paper, he dealt in it to a large extent. I gave it my brother, who delivered it to Mr. Wright.

THOMAS MAHON . I received the paper of my brother, and sold it to Mr. Wright. It is about 1 cwt. of printed paper.

WILLIAM WRIGHT . I am a bookseller. I bought the paper of Mahon, in quires, as books wanting plate - I gave a waste price for it; about 1 s. a pound.

EDWARD JOHN HANDLEY . I am officer of Queen-square. I apprehended Thatcher, on the 19th of January, at Granby-place, Lambeth-marsh; we told him it was for robbing Mr. Nichols - he made no reply. On the 21st I went to Eaton's house, and apprehended him; I told him our business; he took a file down, said he had bought the paper of a lad named Thatcher, and produced this receipt for the money. (reads)

"From Mr. Nichols, 68 lbs. at 5 d. per pound, 1 l. 8 s. 4 d. Paid, I. Thatcher." He said he had given a fair price for it. We found two bundles at Wright's, one at Joseph, and two at Thomas Mahon 's.

WILLIAM BLANCHARD . I have seen Thatcher write, and believe the receipt to be his writing.

JOSEPH COOPER . I was with Handley. I have known Eaton twenty-four years; he is a most respectable man, and has an excellent character.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

MR. NICHOLLS. I never gave him authority to sell this paper to Eaton.

THATCHER'S Defence. I went home with Smith, and lost 6 s. I accused him of taking it, and he told Mr. Nicholls this.

THATCHER - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

EATON NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220220-92

417. WILLIAM MAYERS , was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of January , five boards, value 10 s. the goods of Samuel Baxter .

NATHAN DAVEY . I am a gardener to Mr. Samuel Baxter , builder . These boards were at a house in the Quadrant, Regency circus ; they were taken while I was at dinner, and the prisoner was brought back with them in twenty minutes.

JOHN CLEMENCE . I stopped the prisoner at the corner of Air-street, Piccadilly, with these boards on his shoulder, he said a man employed him to carry them to Golden-square, and that the man was standing at the door; I saw a man at the door, dressed like a carpenter.

Prisoner's Defence. I came up to town, to look for work. A man, like a carpenter, stood at the door, and

asked me if I wanted a job; he told me to carry the boards to Golden-square, and he would follow me.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220220-93

418. THOMAS PHILLIPS , was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of February , 30 lbs. of rope, value 8 s. , the goods of Mathew David Easum , and Robert Hayes Easum .

JOHN SKINNER . I am servant to Matthew David Easum , and Robert Hays Easum , of the Commercial-road , rope-makers . On Sunday afternoon, the 10th of February, in consequence of information, my master and I went to the premises, through Stepney Church-yard, and saw the prisoner walking away very leasurely; we detained, and charged him with taking the rope, which he denied.

JOHN JARVIS . I am a cow-keeper. I saw the prisoner in some unfinished houses, adjoining Easum's ground, with the rope in his hand; he put it down behind when he saw me - I saw him throw the rope into the yard of an unfinished house; I picked it up and gave it to Mr. Easum, described the prisoner, and saw him taken - I am sure of him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I had no place to go to.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Recommended to Mercy.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220220-94

419. CATHARINE FITZGERALD and THOMAS REILY were indicted for stealing, on the 3d of February , one ring, value 3 d., one key, value 2 s.; one seal, value 5 s., and the sum of 23 s., in monies numbered , the property of John Line .

JOHN LINE . I am a journeyman tailor , and live in Peartree-street, Goswell-street. On the 12th of February, at night, I had been working in Titchfield-street, till twelve o'clock; then went to a public-house to get paid, and the wind being high, I did not go home. I was perfectly sober - as I came from Hanover-square, I met Fitzgerald, and gave her 6 d. to shew me the way to Holborn. She took me down Charles-street, Drury-lane, as the nearest way to Holborn. I had refused to go home with her. I went to No. 3, Charles-street with her, and stopped in the passage because it rained so hard; I was some time in the passage with her, and found she had taken a sovereign out of my right hand breeches pocket. I asked her to let me out, which she did, and went out herself. I followed her and said,

"You have robbed me of a sovereign and some silver, and if you don't return it, I will charge the watch with you." I was nearly an hour in the passage with her; I did not miss my seal and key till I got to the watch-house, it was fastened to my chain by a split ring.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220220-95

420. THOMAS PRESTON was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of January , one pistol, value 5 s. , the goods of Thomas Clark .

THOMAS CLARK . I keep the Queen's-head, public-house, Knightsbridge . About two years ago, I lent this pistol to my brother.

ELIZA CLARK . I am sister-in-law to Thomas Clark . My husband keeps the King's Arms, at Knightsbridge . On the 5th of January, between seven and eight o'clock in the morning, I missed this pistol from the bar, it was safe at bed-time, the night before. I found the prisoner in custody with it three weeks after - he came into our service, as pot boy, on the 28th of December, and left without notice, a few minutes before the pistol was missed - it was then unloaded.

DANIEL DUTCH . I am an officer. On the 29th of January, I took the prisoner in charge, at the Kentish Arms, public-house, Burton-cresent. He came in begging - I saw something in his pocket, which turned out to be the pistol - he said he found it coming from Chatham, it was loaded with powder and ball.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

ROBERT SOUTHERN . I am a watchman. On the 25th, between seven and eight o'clock, I was on duty in Burton-crescent, and saw the prisoner there, and between eleven and twelve, I was shot at by some person.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220220-96

421. JAMES EDROP was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of August , one watch, value 30 l., the goods of John Middleton , from his person .

JOHN MIDDLETON . I live at No. 73, Paradise-street, Lambeth. On the 15th of August, 1820, about one o'clock in the afternoon, I was in the Strand, opposite Southampton-street , I was stopped by a person who gave a signal, and then was surrounded by fifteen or twenty more. I had a gold watch in my fob, with a gold chain and seals. I endeavoured to get into the British Press office, but they kept shoving me about from one side to the other, some of them crying out,

"The Sheriff." Mr. Sheriff Parkins was passing in his carriage; about that time I felt them pulling at my watch, I resisted, and in the struggle, I could imperfectly distinguish the face of the person who was pulling at it. The watch was buttoned in my fob, they tore my breeches in getting it out; the moment they got it, he gave a signal, and all dispersed in a body. The prisoner has a great similarly in countenance to the one who took it, but I think he is an inch and half shorter.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Your opinion is, that he is not the man. - Q. Not the man who robbed me.

JOSEPH WILFRED PARKINS , ESQ. I was passing in my carriage at this time. On first coming from Bridge-street, I saw a large gang, and kept my eye on them all through the street, and as we came through Temple-Bar, somebody was hustled, and opposite Southampton-street there was an interruption, by carts going along, and there was a considerable noise close to my carriage window. I looked that way, and saw Mr. Middleton hustled by the same gang. An officer had got hold of one of the gang, and was knocked down, and the man rescued - he came very near my window, and I had a full view of his face - he was very well dressed - that was not the prisoner, but he went off in company with the prisoner, as I believe; he came out of the crowd with the man, and accompanied him along the street. I do most certainly think the prisoner is the man. I described him to an officer - I will not swear that he is

the man - I never saw him again till the day His Majesty last went to the House of Lords - he was then taken on this charge.

WILLIAM COLTON . I am a constable of Pancras. I was with Taylor in Bridge-street, and saw a gang of about eighteen - we followed, and watched them through Temple-Bar. I was behind the Sheriff's carriage, and saw Mr. Middleton endeavouring to get into the True Briton Office; he was surrounded, and being hustled by a gang. I called Taylor, and pushed in among them, and collared a man who had Mr. Middleton's pocket-book, and was putting it under his coat - that was not the prisoner - the pocket-book dropped, and I was knocked down; and he got away. I cannot say positively that the prisoner was there at that time. I apprehended the prisoner the last time the King went to the House, from a description given me by Mr. Parkins. I had seen him several times after, but was not ordered to apprehend him before.

JOSEPH COOPER . I was only present at his apprehension.

GEORGE TAYLOR . I am a constable of Clerkenwell. I was in company with Colton, and saw the gang in Bridge-street. I know the prisoner was in the gang there, and in Fleet-street. I do not think I noticed him beyond Temple-bar - I was abreast of Mr. Middleton when he was robbed, but could not distinguish the prisoner then.

MR. PARKINS re-examined. After he was apprehended, and before he went before the Magistrate, he sent a messenger requesting to see me - I went and saw him at a public-house opposite the office. I asked what he had to say - he solicited my consideration for his wife and family. I told him I could have no consideration for them - I must perform my duty, and that I hoped he would prove himself to have been somewhere else on that day - he said he could not.

JURY, to COLTON. Q. When you apprehended him did you recollect his person as being one of the gang - A. Yes; I had known him many years - he was one of the gang.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220220-97

422. GEORGE THORNTON was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of February , one bridle, value 2 s. , the goods of Nathaniel Lawes Hall .

THOMAS ALMOND . I am an officer of Christ church. On the 2d of February, about seven o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner in Fashion-street, carrying a quantity of harness, in company with another - I asked what he had got; he said he did not know, but he was carrying it for the other, who was before him. I told him to call him back - he called,

"Dick," and the man said,

"I know nothing about it," and went on. I took him to the watchhouse, and Hall claimed the bridle, which was part of the property.

NATHANIEL LAWES HALL . I am a master cooper , and live about five minutes walk from Fashion-street . I saw my stable locked up on Friday night at nine o'clock; the bridle was there then. At nine o'clock in the morning I found the staple drawn, and missed this bridle and all my harness.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A poor man asked me to carry it to Whitechapel, for 1 s.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Confined One Year .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220220-98

423. MARY TOOMEY was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of January , the sum of 3 l. 7 s. 1 d., the property of Edward Pheasant , from his person .

EDWARD PHEASANT . I am servant to Mr. Sheath, an oil-merchant. I live at Highgate. On the 30th of January, between one and two o'clock in the morning, I met the prisoner in George-street, St. Giles's. I was inquiring for a lodging, as I was too late to sleep at my friend's in Seven Dials, where I intended. She took me to a house in George-street . I went to bed, and put my clothes in one corner of the room. She sat by the fire smoking, and was going to get something to drink, but the woman would not let her go out. She came back, and blew the candle out. I called for a light - the woman brought one - I put on my clothes - my breeches felt light. I had three sovereigns, and 16 s. 6 d. in my pocket. We left the house together. I then felt and missed my money - she ran away immediately. I am sure she is the woman - I was afraid to make a noise in the house. I have frequently seen her before, and drank with her at public-houses.

COURT. Q. Did you not go into several cook-shops with her - A. Yes; I paid for her supper - we had two pots of porter and a quartern of gin.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220220-99

424. JEREMIAH COLLINS was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of January , one jacket, value 5 s. , the goods of Arthur Price .

ARTHUR PRICE . I am a salesman , and live in the Commercial-road. On the 25th of January, about seven o'clock in the evening, I was standing at my counter at work, and saw the prisoner walk in and lift up the cuff of a jacket, which hung by the wall; he dragged it down in a moment or two, and ran out. I pursued, he threw it back into the shop, and I collared him outside the door.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220220-100

425. MARY UNWIN was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of January , one sheet, value 4 s., the goods of Haman Cordes , in a lodging-room .

JANE CORDES . I am the wife of Haman Cordes; we live in Dock-street, Commercial-road . The prisoner lodged ten or eleven weeks with us, in a furnished room, at 4 s. a week. A man was with her who passed as her husband. On Tuesday, she left without warning - her husband came at night, but she never returned. I missed the sheet on Thursday.

THOMAS SMITH . I am servant to Mr. Latter, pawnbroker, Commercial-road. On the 22d of January, the prisoner pawned the sheet in the name of Ann Unwin .

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I did it with my husband's consent.

GUILTY . Aged 36.

Confined Six Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220220-101

426. JOHN BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of February , one money till, value, 6 d. and 1 l. 16 s. 4 1/2 d. in monies numbered , the property of Joseph Ware .

JOSEPH WARE . I am a cheesemonger , and live in Greek-street, Soho . On the 14th of February, I went out at five o'clock, returned at night, and found my till was stolen - it contained between 20 s. and 30 s., when I left.

JAMES GRIFFITHS . I belong to the Humane Society. I was coming down Greek-street, about half-past seven o'clock, and saw two men at Ware's door, which was shut. I saw the prisoner open it and go in - two more remained watching, he pushed a butter-tray along the counter, and came out, went in again, reached over the counter, and came out with the till; and all three ran away. I followed, he threw it down, and I caught him directly - it contained 36 s. 4 1/2 d.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220220-102

427. NICHOLAS BOWEN , PATRICK DORAN , DENNIS CANE , and JOSEPH UNDERWOOD were indicted for stealing, on the 17th of February , one trowel, value 2 s., the goods of John Key ; and one axe, value 2 s. , the goods of Thomas Marsey .

JOHN KEY . I am a bricklayer . On Saturday night, the 17th of February, I left my tools in a house, in Limehouse-fields , where I was at work. I missed them on Monday morning.

WILLIAM WESTGATE . I am a carpenter. I was at work at this house, and live close by. On Sunday, about half-past four o'clock in the afternoon. I saw the prisoner, Bowen, giving the trowel out of window, to three others who stood there; I secured him in the house, I can only swear to him. Two of them ran away, through a ditch, I pursued, and lost them, and on returning, found the axe in the ditch - nobody could go through the ditch without getting wet.

THOMAS MARSEY . I left this axe in the house.

ROBERT CHRISTIAN . I am an officer. I took Bowen in charge. Westgate described the three boys who ran through the ditch, and about ten o'clock, I took Underwood at his father's house. His father said to him,

"You must take my trowsers off;" he took up his own, and they were wet. I went to Cane's, found him in bed, and his trowsers hanging by the fire to dry - he begged for mercy.

JAMES STONE . I took Doran, on Sunday evening, at his father's - he denied the charge.

UNDERWOOD's Defence. I was only playing with them.

BOWEN - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Whipped and discharged.

CANE - NOT GUILTY .

UNDERWOOD - NOT GUILTY .

DORAN - NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220220-103

428. FREDERICK CLAYTON was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of January , one handkerchief, value 4 s., the goods of William Wilson , from his person .

WILLIAM WILSON . On the 19th of January, about four o'clock, I was in Jermyn-street , and was told my handkerchief was gone. I then missed it from my coat pocket; it was safe when I was in the Haymarket. The prisoner was pointed out to me, and I stopped him at the corner of St. James's-court, and charged him with having my handkerchief. He said he had not got it; I said,

"But you took it;" he said,

"I don't know any thing about it." I took him to the watch-house - it was not found; it was a yellow one.

ASHTON SMITH . I am a carman. I was in Jermyn-street, and saw the prisoner and another young man, following Mr. Wilson for twenty yards - then one of them took a yellow handkerchief out of Mr. Wilson's pocket. I ran across the road, and pointed the prisoner out to Wilson, and the other went off - they were close together, in company.

Prisoner's Defence. I said I knew nothing of it, and was willing to be searched.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220220-104

429. JAMES MITCHELL was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of January , one waistcoat, value 14 s. , the goods of Arthur Price .

ARTHUR PRICE . I am a salesman , and live in the Commercial-road . On the 29th of January, about six o'clock at night, I saw the prisoner standing before my door. I watched him for nearly an hour, outside the house, then got tired, desired a friend to watch, and placed myself in Gloster-street, and in a few minutes, he ran by with the waistcoat - I called Stop thief! he was secured, and dropped it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

RICHARD SKILLARN . I am an officer. I was coming down Gloster-street, and saw Price beckon to a man, and as he crossed, the prisoner ran by. There was a cry of Stop thief! I followed, and just before I took him, the waistcoat was picked up - he said he picked it up at Price's door.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Confined Six Months and Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220220-105

430. JOSEPH HARRIS , was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of January , one handkerchief, value 5 s. the goods of William Grant , from his person .

WILLIAM GRANT . I am messenger to the Board of Control . On the 12th of January, about a quarter before two o'clock, I was opposite Lord Melville's, at Whitehall - Reynolds said,

"You have lost your handkerchief." I found my pocket turned inside out; he pointed the prisoner out - I followed him, and the centinal stopped him. and took the handkerchief out of his pocket.

SAMUEL REYNOLDS . I sell sticks, near Whitehall. I saw the prisoner, in company with another, and kept my eye on them; I saw the handkerchief in the prisoner's right hand - he was close to Mr. Grant. I saw him put it from his

hand, into his left hand pocket; he ran as hard as he could for about forty yards, when the centinal stopped him.

ANDREW LLOYD . I saw him running, and took him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I kicked against the handkerchief, and picked it up. I was mentioning it the other day, and understand Clayton committed the robbery.

GUILTY - Aged 19.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220220-106

431. ANN MALONEY , was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of January , one coat, value 8 s. , the goods of Ann Richardson , widow .

ANN RICHARDSON . I am a widow, I lodged two months at the prisoner's mother's, in Carrier-street, St. Giles's . - I put my coat over the bed I slept in, and missed it at eight o'clock in the morning; it was my childs, who slept with me. I had been out, and left him in bed for half an hour, and on returning, found it in pawn.

FRANCIS PEARCE . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Drury-lane. On the 23d of January, a girl pawned the coat for 5 s.

RICHARD DEAN . I am an officer. On the 23d. of January, about one o'clock, I took the prisoner, and asked if any one had a hand in it besides herself, she said, No; but she was persuaded to take it by Nell, and she pawned it in Drury-lane.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220220-107

432. JOHN ROBERTS , was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of February , one tub, value 1 s., and half a peck of oysters, value 5 s. , the goods of Robert Howe .

HENRY MORGAN . I am a patrol. On the 11th of February, I was on duty in St. John-street , opposite Howe's shop, and saw the prisoner, with two others, walking up and down, and looking into the shop; I waited to watch them and saw them take the tub off the window, and lift it on the prisoner's head - he carried it over to where I was, and I laid hold of him.

JAMES METCALF . I am an officer. I assisted in taking him with the tub.

ROBERT HOWE . I keep an oyster shop. The tub is mine.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Six Months and Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin Esq.

Reference Number: t18220220-108

433. JOHN WHITE was indicted for a fraud .

MESSR. ALLEY and ADOLPHUS, conducted the prosecution.

JOSHUA ALDRON . I am clerk to James and Edward Turner , flannel and baise manufacturers, of Lancashire. They have a warehouse in Love-lane, Aldermanbury; the prisoner called in the early part of July - I had never seen him before. He said, he understood we were manufacturers of flannels, blankets, and woollen goods, and if we could do those articles well for him, he should become a very good customer; he gave me his card, and said he was Colonial purveyor - this card is like the one he gave. (reads)

"J. White, Colonial purveyor, 28, Bow-lane, Cheapside." He said he had obtained the appointment through the interest of the Duke of York, the person who last held the appointment having died, and saved something considerable - he then took from his pocket some papers, among which was a printed letter folded up; he opened it to show me the manner in which his orders came; it was dated Chatham, and signed

"Harris," and addressed to J. White; it was similar to this.

(looking at one.)

This letter was here read, and purported to be a circular, dated from the King's yard, Chatham, and ordering a quantity of articles to be delivered at His Majestys Stores, Chatham, marked Colonial Service.

JOSHUA ALDRON . This was filled up with the quantity of things wanted, it appeared to be an authentic Government order. I observed to him that goods for government orders were generally contracted for - he said this was quite a different thing altogether; that these orders came from the Colonies to his Majesty's depot, Chatham, in too small quantities of each article, to make it worth while for government to contract for them - that they were put together, and sent up to London for him to furnish. He then shewed me an invoice of linen goods, bought of Townsend and Brown, Cheapside; I do not exactly recollect the amount; he said, if he bought any of our goods, he should refer us to them. He then said he had retired from business some years, was unacquainted with woollen goods, and would send a person to look at them; that he had taken the warehouse in Bow-lane, for the purpose of receiving and packing the goods for Chatham - he left, and in a day or two, a person called and looked at the goods, on account of White - he did not select any, but a written order came afterward, signed John White ; in consequence of which, I went to Messrs. Townsend's, and afterwards saw White. I told him of the person who had called, and that I had been to Townsend's, and told them I was referred to them by White, who had ordered goods to the amount of 150 l. or 160 l., and that Mr. Brown said White had been introduced to them by a person, who had before furnished them with a valuable customer, who had told them of his appointment, and they had sent him 300 l. or 400 l. worth of goods, supposing all was right, but that they knew nothing about his property, but relied on the representation they had.

Q. When you saw White, what passed - A. He came to see if I was satisfied with his reference. I said I had been to Townsend's, and told him what passed, but that they could give me no information of his property; he said,

"As to property, it is of no kind of consequence; these goods are sent down to his Majesty's depot, at Chatham. I send my accounts down to Chatham every quarter, they are there examined, and passed in two or three days, and then I receive a bill on Government, which will enable me to pay you, and all my engagements." I considered this a very safe account - I sent him in goods to the amount of 151 l., to Bow-lane, entirely on the representation he made, I sent twenty-two pieces of flannel, eighty pair of blankets, and eighty rugs; they were all the property of Messrs. Turners.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Had you seen Birch, who looked at the goods before you saw White. - A. No. Townsend and Co. are persons of great respectability; their recommendation had weight certainly.

Q. Did it not have such weight as to induce you to trust him. - A. That depends on circumstances. I do not say it would, as they stated he was not a man of property. I should not think him worth credit unless he held the appointment under government. I would not have let him have them, unless I understood from him that he held the appointment - it might have influence, added to his representation - his producing the circular had weight I recommended him to another house for hosiery goods.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did you believe he held the appointment in consequence of what they said. - A. Of course. I suppose they believed he held the appointment. I would not have trusted him from what they said, if it was not in consequence of his having the appointment.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not say it was a maxim with you to trust no person, unless you know where they dealt - A. I do not recollect - it might pass.

MR. ALLEY. Q. After the prisoner had the goods, did you see him. - A. Yes; he acknowledged receiving them, and said the inspectors had found fault with the blankets, and he had been obliged to make some little allowance on them, but in future it would not take place; for he had been to Chatham, and given them a dinner, which cost him 10 l., and they were good friends.

MR. JAMES CHAPMAN . I am chief clerk in the Colonial department, secretary of state's office. The prisoner had no appointment in the Colonial department. If he had an appointment as Colonial-purveyor by the secretary of state, I must have known it. Goods sent to the Colonies are supplied by the Commissariat department. Government appoint no Colonial purveyor.

Cross-examined. Q. Purveyor is merely a dealer. - A. Precisely so. I know no Harris at Chatham. There are no such persons as Colonial purveyors; there are Colonial agents. I know nothing of Government giving bills to Colonial purveyors.

MR. WILLIAM HILL . I am a clerk in the treasury, and agent for Commissariat supplies. I provide great quantities of these sort of articles. I do not furnish them as a tradesman. I have a salary for my services. Every article relating to the Commissariat department are furnished by me. I never heard of a Colonial purveyor. I know of no depot at Chatham for the receipt of goods for His Majesty's Colonial supplies. I do not know the prisoner.

Cross-examined. Q. What are you. - A. Principal clerk in the Commissariat department, and agent for Commissariat supplies. There is no other in the Commissariat department. There are persons who supply other articles to the navy and ordnance.

CAPTAIN CHARLES BENTLEY . I have come from the depot of Chatham. I am staff captain. I never saw the prisoner before this evening. He never supplied goods there. There is no such station, nor such things furnished there, except through the Commissariat department.

Prisoner's Defence. I have been connected with the government twenty years, even under Brook Watson. I have at this moment four contracts. I have a great deal of business at the Horse Guards, and can at all times have a recommendation from his Royal Highness. I am hardly, injuriously, and wickedly dealt by. I gave Townsend and Brown security for what I had of them. I am a Colonial purveyor. Mr. Harris is the only one I had any thing to do with; he is not here.

MR. ALDRED. The goods have never been returned.

GUILTY .

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220220-109

434. JOHN PEACHY was indicted for a misdemeanour . MESSRS. BOLLAND and LAW conducted the prosecution.

MARTHA CONNOP . I am a widow , and keep a stationer's shop in Lombard-street . On the 8th of February, between ten and eleven o'clock in the morning, the prisoner came to the shop for two sheets of post paper, which I gave him - they came to 2 d. - he gave me 1 s. I thought it bad, and shewed it to one of my daughters, who said it was very bad I asked if he had any other money; he said he had no more about him. I gave the shilling to Mary. to take to a neighbour for his opinion, and get it changed if it was good. She returned, and said it was very bad, Smith came in with her, and questioned him, and sent for an officer, to whom I gave the shilling, after marking it. He was taken away, and I then found, behind some reams of paper, where he stood, four bad shillings, in a piece of cloth, three were in separate papers; they appeared the same sort as that he gave me.

MARY CONNOP . I am daughter of the last witness - she gave me the shilling, which I took to a neighbour, Mr. Clark, who returned me the same.

WILLIAM BENJAMIN SMITH . I am a cutler, and live in Lombard-street. I saw Mary Connop in Mr. Clark's shop. I said the shilling was bad, and went back with her - she gave it to her mother, who asked the prisoner if he could change it - he said he had no money to change it with. I asked what he was; he said a painter, and worked for Mr. Howell. The four shillings were given to me by Mrs. Connop - I gave them to Fogg, after marking them. The prisoner had an opportunity of dropping them. I am sure the said he had no more money.

SAMUEL FOGG . I am a marshalman. I received four shillings from Smith, and which I marked and gave to Martin.

JOSEPH MARTIN . I took the prisoner. Mrs. Connop gave me four shillings. I found seven-pence halfpenny in copper in his waistcoat pocket, and in his breeches pocket I found nine good sixpences, and one penny. I asked why he asked for change when he had small change; he said he wanted change. I found two-pennyworth of sticking-plaster, and a new knife, which cost about 6 d., on him.

MR. CALEB EDWARD POWELL . I am assistant to the solicitor of the Mint - the five shillings are all counterfeit, of the same die - and are merely washed.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not know it was a counterfeit. I had received the halfpence for my sister, they were not my own.

GUILTY .

Confined Six Months , and find Sureties .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220220-110

435. THOMAS JOHNSON and JOHN MARRS were indicted for a misdemeanor .

CHARLES JONES . I am a constable. On the 9th of February, about half-past one o'clock, I saw the prisoners in Goswell-street. Johnson took a paper from his pocket,

and gave Marrs something from it. He then left Johnson and went to a woman with cat's-meat, and had some weighed, and tendered her something white - she crossed to two public-houses. I heard her come and say to Marrs,

"It is a bad shilling" - Johnson was then nearer the barrow. I then missed him. Marrs gave her the meat and she returned the shilling. I saw him join Johnson - I met Thompson - when he took Johnson and I took Marrs. I crossed the road and saw Johnson throw two shillings away, in Long-lane, which I picked up.

ELIZA HAINES . I was selling dog's-meat. Two men came up to me, one by the side of my barrow; I weighed them 1 lb. and he gave me a shilling. I went to two public-houses for change; they said it was bad, and I gave it him back.

THOMAS THOMPSON . I am a constable. On the 9th of February I saw the prisoners in Barbican - I took Johnson, and found six shillings, wrapped separately in paper, in his pocket, and two loose ones in a glass.

MR. POWELL. The eight shillings are all counterfeit, of the same die, and have never been in circulation.

JOHNSON's Defence. I went to a fight at Wimbledon, and brought two gentleman to the Bricklayers' Arms in my cart, and they gave me the six shillings.

MARR'S Defence. I never had the shilling. I met Johnson and asked him the way to Holborn, he said he was going that way, and we walked together.

JOHNSON - GUILTY .

MARRS - GUILTY .

Confined for One Year , and find Sureties .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220220-111

NINTH DAY, FRIDAY, MARCH 1.

436. WILLIAM BEENHAM was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of November , one silk dress, value 2 l.; one scarf, value 2 l.; one shawl, value 15 s.; two caps, value 6 s.; one petticoat, value 3 s.; three handkerchiefs, value 10 s.; two pair of stockings, value 3 s.; one table cloth, value 10 s.; one pair of cuffs, value 3 s., and two pair of shoes, value 9 s. , the goods of Mary Timms .

MARY TIMMS . I am house-maid to Mr. Cullen, of No. 10, Berner's-street, Oxford-street. On the 5th of November, about ten o'clock at night, I was going to my situation - I called a coach in Goodge-street, Tottenham Court-road , and went with it to my aunt's, in Russell-place, Fitzroy-square . The prisoner drove it, and put my trunk and two boxes in with a bundle, which contained the articles stated in the indictment, and other things. On arriving at Berner's-street, the footman handed my things out, and I myself went in; and in about half an hour, missed my bundle. I immediately went to the stand I took the coach from, and made enquiry, and next morning, between ten and eleven o'clock, I found the prisoner at his master's in Bulstrode-mews, and asked if he had seen any thing of the bundle I had left in the coach? he said he had not put up the steps of his coach, before a woman and a man accosted him at our door in Berner's-street, with a large box and bundle, and asked him to take them to the Ship, public-house, Charing-cross, and to drive as fast as he could; that the man wanted to ride on the box, but he said he never suffered that, and he must ride with the woman inside - that the man got in the coach, and he drove them to the Ship, and had something to drink with them there, and they went off by the Dulwich, Greenwich, or Woolwich stage. I said I was quite sure he had taken up no fare at our door; he said he did. I said I should certainly take steps to obtain my clothes. When he took me up, I told him I was going to my place - I went to Marlborough-street, they said he ought to leave it in Essex-street, at the expiration of four days. I did not know the number of the coach, but it was a yellow one - I know he took up no fare at our door, for I saw him put up the steps, and heard the coach drive off immediately - I have found some of my property, I had a search warrant.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. You went down in the kitchen, I suppose - A. I stood in the hall, it was dark. He was summoned before the Commissioners of Hackney coaches, six or eight days after, and before Mr. Dyer, and was discharged. I afterwards got a search warrant and found my stockings in his house, and a cap.

Q. Before the warrant was granted, you gave the officer a list of your things, was the cap or stockings included in that list - A. Not the cap, the stockings were - he has surrendered to-day, to take his trial, I did not put everything down in the list.

WILLIAM MAWER . I am a watchman of Berner-street. On the 5th of November, I was on duty, and just before ten o'clock, I saw a hackney coach drive up to No. 10. A young woman got out, and some parcels were taken out. I was about ten yards off - it was a moon-light night - the coachman and the servant had a few words, I could not hear what about; he came from the door, shut up the steps, and drove away immediately into Oxford-street. I saw him nearly to the bottom of the street - he took no person up whatever, if he had, I must have seen him.

Cross-examined. Q. Who handed the things out. - A. I cannot say. I saw him nine or ten doors down the street. I was asked about this next night. I attended at Marlborough-street. Mr. Dyer dismissed the complaint, and sent it to the Hackney-coach office.

WILLIAM WESTCOAT . I am an officer of Marlborough-street. On the 2d of January, I executed a search warrant at the prisoner's lodgings, Avery-row, New Bond-street, and found a pair of stockings and a night-cap.

Cross-examined. Q. His wife claimed the stockings. - A. Yes; and the cap. The prosecutrix described them before she saw them, one as being footed with cotton, and the other all silk, and said she also knew them by the feel.

MARY TIMMS . I know the stockings are mine, for I cut them down a little, and footed them; one with a pair of cotton stockings, and the other with silk, and one has a piece grafted in the toe. I described this before I opened it. I can swear positively to having put them in the bundle myself. The cap I know is mine, I saw my mother make it.

Cross-examined. Q. You would not speak to it when you found it. - A. I said the same as I do now, that I did not make it.

Prisoner's Defence. During the time I was setting this lady down, she only paid half my fare, which caused

a dispute. The footman pushed me from the door. I dropped a shilling, and in picking it up, I saw a woman in the coach, and a man on the step with a box - he wished me to make haste to the Greenwich stage.

GUILTY . Aged 46.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220220-112

437. SARAH WALKER was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of January , one sheet, value 5 s,; two wine glasses, value 1 s.; three cups, value 1 s.; three saucers, value 1 s., and four plates, value 4 s. , the goods of William Skrine .

MR. ANDREWS conducted the prosecution.

MR. WILLIAM SKRINE . My town house is in Portman-street, Portman-square. The prisoner was my cook there - I have two other female servants there. I went into Huntingdonshire in September, and she went with me. On the 5th of January, in consequence of information, I came to town, to the Saracens Head, and there found a box; this led me to Ann Bellas . I took an officer and a search-warrant to her house, in Henrietta-street, Manchester-square, and found two wine glasses, some cups and saucers, and plates which are mine. Bellas was taken into custody, she was never in my service.

HENRY BUCKRIDGE . I am a constable of Mary-le-bone. On the 5th of January, I went to Bellas's, and found this property, and some letters on the mantle-piece, directed to her, which refer to some duplicates, Bellas gave me the duplicates on my asking her about the letters, I found several other duplicates in a tea-chest, one of which was for two plates, pawned at Neats's - I also found a shirt at Stevens's. I went to the prosecutor's house in Huntingdonshire, and found the prisoner there, and said, I had a warrant to apprehend her for felony, and asked for the keys of her box; she refused, but said she would shew me the place, I asked where her letters were, she said she was not such a fool as to keep letters by her, for such a fool as me to look at, and that she burnt them; I said I had found letters at Bellas's, and a parcel directed to Bellas - she said she had sent letters to her, that the housemaid wrote some, and a baker at Stilton the others.

ANN BELLAS . I am a widow. I know the prisoner - I have visited her at Mr. Skrine's in Portman-square; she brought the things produced to my house at different times - she gave them to me as a present. About a month before the family left town, she gave me four plates; I pawned two at Neats'.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You received favours from her for your husband, while he was ill - A. Yes; he died two months ago. She did not bring me honey in the cups, it was in a jelly cup - when she brought the plates, she said they were broken china, one was chipped; we had some wine given us - I did not tell her I wanted glasses to drink it with; I thought she had a right to give me them.

GEORGE PICKETT . I am servant to Messrs. Neat and Son. Bellas pawned two plates for 1 s.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220220-113

438. RICHARD DAVIDSON was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of February , one piece of leather, value 2 s. , the goods of Samuel Jackson .

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

JOSIAH GIBSON . I am servant to Samuel Jackson , a leather seller , who lives in Windmill-street . The prisoner was eight weeks there as porter . On the 11th of February, I found six pair of soles hid in a box in the cellar, covered with something; I told Russell of it, and he saw them, and just after that as the prisoner was going to dinner, we were in the cellar; he put his coat on, and came up; and after he was gone, I went down and found three pair gone - about five o'clock he went out of the cellar, the three pair remained then - he was alone for a few minutes. I went down and missed two pair more - he was then gone to tea. Russell marked the remaining pair, and at eight I left him in the cellar for a few minutes. I then went down, sent him up, and saw the other pair was gone. He was stopped, and the leather found on him in the counting-house, in his bosom; he denied having it, but when it was found, he said it was the first time. Mr. Jackson said it was not, and he then said he had sold a good many pieces to a man named Wright.

JOHN RUSSELL . Gibson's account is correct. I marked the leather.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 35.

Confined Three Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220220-114

439. JAMES WARD was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of January , two pidgeons, value 2 s. , the property of Samuel Gardener .

The indictment not stating them to be tame, and wild pidgeons not being the subject of felony, the Jury found him

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220220-115

440. WILLIAM CARROLL was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of February , one handkerchief, value 2 s., the goods of Henry Malham , from his person .

HENRY MALHAM . I am a draper , and live in Oxford-street. On the 16th of February, about quarter before seven o'clock, I was going up Oxford-street, and crossing the Regent's Circus , I felt my handkerchief going from my pocket, turned round, and saw the prisoner wrapping something in his apron. I took hold of him, and found my handkerchief in his apron. He said he had not got it.

RICHARD COATES . I took him in charge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I saw something laying down, picked it up, and the gentleman said I had his handkerchief.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220220-116

441. DAVID SOLOMON was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of February , one seal, value 15 s.; one key, value 5 s., and one ring, value 1 s., the goods of John Atwood , from his person .

JOHN ATWOOD . I am a Custom-house officer , and live in North-street, City Road. On the 1st of February, at half-past

twelve o'clock at noon, I was passing through Rose-lane, Spitalfields , the prisoner stood with his back against a wall opposite Flower and Dean-street, and two others, a few yards from him. I noticed him particularly before I came up to him, and the moment I got up, he advanced to the end of the curb, and made a snatch at my watch, the ribbon broke, he got the seal and key, and ran up the opposite street - I ran after him, calling. Stop thief! and his companions followed close behind; he turned to the right, and I gave up the pursuit, and went to Worship-street office, described his dress and appearance, and in half an hour I went with the officer to the George, public-house, in George-yard, Whitechapel; two went in the back way, and I and the other at the front; and as I entered, three persons were coming out; neither of them was him; and as I looked round the tap-room, the prisoner was brought in from the back premises, I immediately said,

"That is the man." I could pick him out from 5000, and I think I saw one of the others there.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. How long did the transaction last - A. Not a minute. I saw his face before I got up to him; nobody but him ran before me - he took the first turning to the right.

Q. Have you not said that you have seen a man since so much like him that you could not tell one from the other - A. It is as false as God is true - it is impossible I can be mistaken, I am positive of him.

BARNARD GLEED . Atwood came to Worship-street. Atfield, Garton, and I accompanied him. Garton and he went in at the front, and I and Atfield at the back door. The prosecutors said the man had a brown coat on, and he believed he was a Jew. I went in first - the door is very low - I was obliged to stoop to get in, and nearly passed the prisoner as I was stooping, the place being dark. I have known him many years. I think he said, How do you do, I said.

"How do you do." Atfield caught hold of him, and brought him into the tap-room. He was dressed in a brown coat. We found Garton and the prosecutor in the tap-room, and he said he was the man who robbed him - his description answered to the prisoner.

Cross-examined. He only said he had a brown coat, and was a Jew - A. Yes, that he was shabbily dressed. There is a man about the neighbourhood like the prisoner. I heard no voice outside say, That is the man.

THOMAS GARTON . I was with Gleed. His statement is correct. The prosecutor swore positively to him immediately.

WILLIAM ATFIELD . I was with them, and took him from the description given. If any one outside had said,

"that is the man," I must have heard it.

Prisoner's Defence. When I was coming in, Atfield said I want you, he came in and said,

"Here, I have got him, this is he."

WILLIAM ATFIELD . I said no such thing.

MARGARET PRIOR . I take in needle-work and washing. I was at my door in Flower and Dean-street, and heard the cry of Stop thief! and saw a young lad of short stature, run by my door - he had a light-coloured pepper and salt coat on, and was very much pock-marked. He ran towards the end of Flower and Dean-street - nobody was running before him - the prosecutor was following him about six yards behind, calling Stop thief!

Q. Did you see enough of the lad to say whether it was the prisoner or not - A. It was not I am positive. I saw no more of what passed till half-past one o'clock, when the prosecutor came back with two officers, and I, as well as many more neighbours, hallowed out,

"For God's sake you have got the wrong man;" it was the general cry. I went to Worship-street to tell what I knew about it, but some man said I must not go in.

Q. You took the man who was running before Atwood to be the thief - A. Yes; no other could be.

COURT. Q. He was a young lad - A. Yes; he was not fair nor dark, nor so tall as the prisoner. It is impossible for any one to take the one for the other; he does not resemble him in the slightest degree. The prosecutor came down my street last Sunday afternoon - I was at the door - he asked me to tell him the name of the street; he said then that he had made a grand mistake, as he thought it was Thrall-street, and asked if I recollected his being robbed. I said, very well; but he had got the wrong person. He said he had not; and if he had, he had sworn to him, and must swear to him again.

Q. Perhaps you knew the prisoner - Yes, I have known him as a neighbour for twelve years; he lived in Winfield-street, with his mother and father.

Q. Then he was not near the place at all - A. No one was near except the prosecutor and thief, neither behind or before - Mrs. Myers was also at her door. The lad was a stranger; he was crying out,

"For God's sake don't stop me, I have only broken a window." He ran about a hundred yard up our street, and turned down Cale-street, which is the first turning. I have not seen him since. Mrs. Myers did not go to the office.

JUDA MYERS. I live in Flower and Dean-street, at the the corner of Cale-street, three doors from Prior. I was cleaning my door, and all at once heard a cry of Stop thief! and saw the thief running, and as he passed me he said,

"For God's sake don't stop me, I have only broken a window." He was a shortish chap, high-shouldered, and had a pepper-and-salt coat on. I think it was a dark one. I saw Atwood running after him; nobody else was running either before or behind; the chap turned down Cale-street, went up Thrall-street, and I went in doors. They passed me at half-past twelve o'clock, as near as I can tell; and in about three quarters of an hour I saw the prosecutor pass our street again with two officers; all the neighbours cried out.

"You have got the wrong man." They had the prisoner in charge. I said,

"For God's sake you have got the wrong man, that is not the man you cried Stop thief! after." I did not go to Worship-street.

COURT. Q. Did you know the officers - A. Atfield was one.

Q. Was the man's coat so dark that it might be mistaken for brown - A. I think so; it was a dark pepper-and-salt colour. I should think the man would not come up to the prisoner's ear in height. The prisoner is a much darker man than him, and he was very much pock-marked - the prisoner is a little so; he is quite a different man.

Q. Is it possible for one to be taken for the other - A. It would be a great mistake, for he was quite a different man, he was stout and the prisoner is slim, and he was high-shouldered. I only know the prisoner by seeing him pass our street with his bag of clothes.

SOLOMON JOSEPH. I am a clothes-man, and live in Winfield-street. I know the prisoner very well. I met him in Holborn this day four weeks, by Middle-row. It was on Friday the 1st of February I walked with him from there into Bishopsgate church-yard, talking about business, and when our sabbath came on. We got to the church at one o'clock, and I left him. I looked at Bishopsgate church clock, it was not five minutes under or over one. Flower and Dean-street is half a mile from the church.

COURT. Q. How does he get his living - A. He carries clothes about, and had his bag at this time. He lives with his father in Wentworth-street. I left him at the church.

Q. When were you applied to to give evidence - A. My lodger came home about three or four o'clock, and said this man was fully committed for trial - I was surprised.

Q. Did you want to be home by any particular time - A. No; I always come home between one and two o'clock - our sabbath begins at half-past three in winter, and then it moves to four, and that day it moved to half-past four. I always look at the clock to see how long I am out.

MR. ANDREWS. Q. What was your reason for looking at the clock - A. I always want to know how long I am out. I had something to do in our church that day - he said sabbath began at four o'clock, and I said it was half-past. I do not know yet what he was taken up for. I would not believe my lodger, and so I asked his father what it was for; he said he did not know; and I said he walked with me from Holborn, and left me at one o'clock.

COURT. Q. Did your lodger tell you what time the offence was committed, or what it was for - A. No.

Q. Then how came you to say he was with you at one o'clock - A. That was the time I left him.

THOMAS GARTON . When the prisoner was apprehended Atfield told him he was charged with picking a pocket, at half-past twelve o'clock that day - he said nothing about being with another person at the time.

WILLIAM ATFIELD . I and the prosecutor told him the time in the tap-room - he said nothing about having been with another one.

BARNARD GLEED . He said nothing of having been with Joseph, or any one.

JOHN ATWOOD . I believe I told him it was half-past twelve o'clock. He said not a word of having been in Joseph's company, or with any one else.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220220-117

442. WILLIAM RIDLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of January , 14 lbs. of silk, value 20 l. , the goods of Samuel London Field .

MR. ALLEY conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM SQUIRE . I am in the service of Samuel London Field , of Berkshire; he has a warehouse in Union-street, Bishopsgate. On the 10th of December, I packed up two small bundles of silk, which weighed 13 lbs. 9 ozs. I put a label in each bundle, sewed them in a wrapper, and directed them to

"Mr. S. L. Field, No. 6, Union-street, Bishopsgate," and delivered them to George Bruckston to take to the Bristol Van.

GEORGE BRUCKSTON . On the 10th of December, I took this silk to the turnpike on the Bath road, where the van comes by, and delivered it to Holmes.

JOHN HOLMES . I received the parcel, and gave it to Shelton.

JOSIAH SHELTON . I am a labourer employed by Holmes. I delivered it to the prisoner, who drove the van on the 11th of December.

MOSES JONAS . I am a salesman, and live in Holywell-street, Strand. On Friday morning, the 25th of January, about nine o'clock, the prisoner brought something in a basket, and asked if I would buy it. I opened the basket and wrapper, and found two bundles of silk; I asked how he came by it - he said he found it. I said,

"You should advertise it," and it was my duty to stop it; and said I would send for a constable; he then went away. My son watched him into a public-house, where I sent the constable after him.

JAMES FLETCHER . I took him in charge at the Spotted Dog, public-house, and produced the silk.

WILLIAM SQUIRE . The labels are in it now, in my writing, and here is the mark where the direction was sewed on.

Prisoner. I beg for mercy.

GUILTY . Aged 31.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin Esq.

Reference Number: t18220220-118

443. JOSEPH NEVILL was indicted for stealing, in the 13th of February , two shillings , the monies of John Rigby .

JOHN RIGBY . I am an ironmonger , and live in Shoreditch . The prisoner had been my porter some years. I suspected him, and on the 13th of February, marked five shillings, five sixpences, and two half-crowns, which I left in my till, and left him to mind the shop while I went out. I had agreed for a neighbour to lay out 3 s. After he had been, I went to the till, and found only six shillings marked, four sixpences, and one half-crown marked, and one sixpence not marked. I got an officer, and then said,

"You have robbed me." He denied it.

JAMES CLARK . I went to the shop, and bought one thousand nails, which came to 2 s. 4 d., and gave the prisoner three marked shillings, which the prosecutor gave me; he put it in the drawer, and gave me 8 d. I saw him put them in the drawer.

THOMAS WARTERS . I am an officer. I searched him, and found two marked shillings on him.

JOHN RIGBY . These are the shillings I marked.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. Did he not say his wife worked for your wife, and she paid him these shillings. - A. Yes; she did work for us.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220220-119

444. CHARLES SOUTH was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of January , one pair of boots, value 3 s. , the goods of John Bishop .

JOHN BISHOP . I am a boot and shoemaker , and live in Castle-street, Leicester-square . On the 28th of January, about eight o'clock at night, I saw a pair of ladies boots move, which hung at the door, and all in an instant, missed

them. I went to the door, and found the prisoner in charge with them.

JAMES GRIFFITHS . I belong to the Royal Humane Society. I saw the prisoner by a gin shop, opposite Bishop's; I watched for ten minutes, then went in, and had something to drink, and on coming out, saw him peeping round the next shop, watching me. I went round a different way, and presently saw him at the door, pretending to tie up his stocking; he then snatched the boots down. I took him, he said,

"Me, Sir," and dropped them from under his coat.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined One Year .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220220-120

445. THOMAS COOLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of December , one umbrella, value 4 s. , the goods of John Taylor .

JOHN TAYLOR . I am an umbrella maker , and live in Piccadilly . The latter end of December, about nine o'clock at night, a man snatched an umbrella from my door, and ran away. I had a momentary glance of him, I followed, and two or three men stopped me, and asked what coach I wanted. He got away - I saw an umbrella, five weeks after, like it, but I sold several like it - I think the man was stouter than the prisoner.

ROBERT WILSON . On the 19th of December, between nine and ten o'clock at night, I took the prisoner at the Bedford Arms, public-house, with about sixteen other bad characters; he had this umbrella in his hand, and said he bought it that afternoon in the city - I could not find the owner, and he was discharged.

HENRY BUCKRIDGE . I apprehended him again on the 10th of February; he said,

"I suppose it is about that d - d umbrella." He had been to the office repeatedly to demand it.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220220-121

446. JAMES RIGBY , ROBERT BURGESS , and WILLIAM POMFRETT were indicted for stealing, on the 18th of January , three live tame ducks, price 5 s. , the property of William Dean .

ELIZA DEAN . I am the wife of William Dean . We live at Edmonton , and keep ducks in a pond, by the road, about one hundred yards from the house. I missed them on the 8th of January, they were safe half an hour before. I had seen the prisoners about there an hour and a half before - I saw them again with a bundle in a blue cloth. When we saw them we missed the bundle - we followed, and took them.

MARGARET BAILEY . I live next door to Dean. I saw the prisoners looking at the pond, Pomfrett was throwing stones in the water, but I did not see him take the ducks. About half-past four o'clock, they passed again, and Rigby was tying something in his apron, which I thought was fowls.

JOSEPH GIBSON . I am a constable. I apprehended them and found a quantity of legs and wings of ducks at their lodgings.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220220-122

447. THOMAS BROOKMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of October , two table-cloths, value 5 s.; two books, value 2 s., and two glasses, value 1 s., the goods of John Taylor , in a lodging-room .

JOHN TAYLOR . I keep a public-house , in Mapleton-place, Burton-crescent . I let the prisoner a furnished room nine months ago, at 5 s. a week; he was four months with me, and went out after breakfast, on the 29th of October, saying he would return in five minutes, but never did; he left his room locked. I got it open, and missed the articles stated in the indictment.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not lend me the books - A. I lent him one - he conducted himself well - the things were entirely for his own private use.

HENRY M'DONALD . I am servant to Mr. Britton, a pawnbroker, at Battle-bridge. On the 9th of October, the prisoner pledged a table-cloth in the name of Dennett, Ashby-street.

JOHN TYE . I am servant to Mr. Griffiths, of Somers Town. I have two books pledged by the prisoner, on the 9th of October, in the name of Dennett.

DANIEL DUTCH . I am an officer. I took the prisoner in charge, and found the duplicates referring to these things; also one for a table-cloth, and two glasses, which I got out of pawn in Gray's Inn-lane.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. My friends are too high to call to this place, and others are too low to be of use here. Though placed in this unhappy situation, I have moved in very respectable stations, but from a series of misfortunes I am reduced; still I always conducted myself with propriety to Taylor. Unfortunately I could not pay him, and was obliged to leave, intending shortly to pay him, but was disappointed, and must trust to your mercy.

GUILTY . Aged 42.

Recommended to Mercy, by the Prosecutor and Jury, believing it to be his first offence.

Confined One Month .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220220-123

448. GEORGE DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of February , one bag, value 1 s., and 18 lbs. of coffee, value 2 l. the goods of William Lovitt .

WILLIAM LOVITT . I am a grocer , and live in Shadwell . On the 6th of February, a bag of coffee stood inside the shop, about three quarters of a yard from the door. I missed it between seven and eight o'clock at night, on Wednesday, the 6th of February, and saw it again on the Tuesday following, at Lambeth-street.

THOMAS GOODING . I am an officer. I met the prisoner at Ratcliffe Highway. On the 6th of February, about quarter past seven o'clock, a quarter of a mile from Lovitt's, with this bag tied in a silk handkerchief, under his arm. I asked what he had there; he said,

"Coffee," and that he found it in Dock-hill. I secured him, and found Lovitt out. It was quite clean.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I found it among some ruins on Dock-hill, took it home, and found my wife was gone out to tea, and was going to her when I was stopped.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined One Year .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220220-124

448. JOSIAH DYNAM was indicted for feloniously receiving on the 8th of June , 18 lbs. of silk, value 18 l. , the goods of William Wood , of which Thomas Attemore has been convicted of stealing.

MR. ALLEY conducted the prosecution.

The record of the conviction of Attemore was here put in and read.

WILLIAM WOOD . I am a dyer , and live in Spitalfields. Attemore was tried and convicted of stealing 18 lbs. of my silk; it was worth 18 l. I never found it out.

Prisoner. Q. What inducement did you hold out to Attemore to come against me. - A. None.

THOMAS ATTEMORE . I was tried here in July, and convicted of stealing this silk; I was imprisoned six months. The prisoner keeps a shop in Field-lane, and deals in handkerchiefs and other things - I sold the silk to him, about two hours after I stole it, for three guineas; it was on the 8th of June, between eight and nine o'clock in the morning. Catharine Smith was with me.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Did you know him before - A. Never. Smith took me there, and went in with me, we dealt in the front part of the house; we went into the middle room, which was not very light - I told him the general price was 1 l. for a pound; he said he would give no such money, but would give me three guineas, which I took - he weighed it in three different parcels; I think he made it 11 lbs. 11 ozs., I took his word for it; he gave me 21 s. down and the rest next morning. I spent the 21 s. that night with Smith.

Q. Did you not tell the Magistrate, you sold it to a Jew - A. Yes, and that Dynam was not the man, and then he was dismissed. He promised me 10 l. at Clerkenwell, to tell the Magistrate it was not him. I was not on my oath then - Smith lived on Saffron-hill. I was sober.

CATHARINE SMITH . On the 8th of January, I went with Attemore to the prisoner's house, in Field-lane, to sell a white bundle which he had - I never saw what was in it; I staid outside while he went in; I was rather intoxicated - I know I waited at the door, I did not go in; I saw a man and woman at the door.

Q. Whoever says you went in, and saw the silk weighed tells an untruth - A. Yes.

THOMAS BRANSCOMBE . I am an officer. I went to look for the prisoner in September, he was not at home. He deals in handkerchiefs and clothes.

JOSEPH MARTIN . I am an officer. I have been repeatedly to the prisoner's house after he was indicted, but could never see him till last night.

Cross-examined. Q. He came here last night voluntarily - A. I believe so.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220220-125

449. WILLIAM VAMPLUE was indicted for a libel . MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

MR. WILLIAM PAYNE . I am clerk at the Justice-room, Guildhall. I produce a pamphet left in my custody, annexed to a deposition, on which a warrant was granted by the Magistrate.

ROBERT DUKE I bought this pamphlet at Carlile's shop, in Fleet-street, on the 29th of December, 1821, of the prisoner - I wrote on it before I parted with it, and find that writing on it now.

Q. Did any thing pass between you and the prisoner when you bought it - A. Nothing at all. There were several placards of different description in the shop, one was about two shopmen being arrested from the shop, without their names being known, it was in the window, passengers could see it; there was a crowd collected round the window all day long. The words,

"Temple of Reason" were written in large gilt letters at the back of the shop, and there was a bill in the window, about

"the infamous sentence passed on Miss M. A. Carlile."

Prisoner. Q. By whom were you employed to purchase the pamphlet - A. By one Purton; I have received 1 l. for my attendance at different times, but not for buying this book. I did not describe myself as a yeoman at Guildhall.

Q. When you came to the shop in the morning, I said I had not got a book then, and did you not say,

"I hope you not going to be so stupied as to give over selling them" - A. I never said any thing of the sort - he did say he had not one. I lived in New Cutt, Lambeth, and have been a broker. I have now a little property, which with economy supports me.

COURT. Q. When you first went, he had not got the book - A. No; he told me to call in the evening, and I should have it, I did so and got it.

THOMAS JENNINGS . I am in the office of Mr. Murray, solicitor, John-street, Bedford-row. On the 28th of December, I saw Carlile's shop, and particularly noticed a bill in the window, written in a large hand,

"Two shop-men arrested this afternoon, by the Bridge-street wretches without knowing their names - worse than the Inquisition, and one of the blessings of the late six acts - plenty of volunteers tocombat the vile crew, and the same obnoxious pamphlets may be had in spite of them. - It is a right noble cause, they shall not with all their combined attacks shut up the Temple of Reason. - Oh! thou base gang you will do our cause, no harm but good - this is the mart for sedition and blasphemy."

"That part of the publication charged as libellous, was here read, it was characterized by the most revolting blasphemy, and certain expressions were contained in it, of the most seditious nature, reflecting in very insulting and degrading terms, on His Majesty and every other branch of the Constitution, and finally attempting to excite the people to acts of rebellion.

The prisoner read an exceeding long defence; and read the whole of the pamphlet, from which the libellous matter was extracted - declared the whole to be his own sentiments, and attempted to justify every part.

GUILTY .

Confined Two Years , and to enter into his own recognizance for 500 l. to keep the peace during his Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220220-126

TENTH DAY, SATURDAY, MARCH 2.

450. ANTONIO DECASTA was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of February , one great coat, value 4 s. , the goods of Manuel Reveiro .

MANUEL REVEIRO . (Through an Interpreter.) I am a seaman , on board the Fort William. On the 15th of February, I lodged in Back-lane , in the same room as the prisoner. I missed my coat from my hammock, at eight o'clock, and asked him what had become of it, or who had taken it. He said he did not know, and that two people had laid in the hammock; I said nobody but him had been there, he said,

"Do you mean to say I stole it," I said,

"No, I do not say so, because I did not see you do it." I found it in pawn, returned, and told him he had pawned it, he gave me the duplicate, and I redeemed it - I never gave him leave to pawn it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I lost my money at dominoes, and pawned the coat for 4 s. He wanted me to give him 1 l., I refused, and he went to the Magistrate.

GUILTY .

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Middlesex Jury, (half foreign,) before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220220-127

451. SOPHIA HILSON was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of January , 4 lbs. of pork, value 1 s. 8 d. , the goods of Edmund Stolworthy .

THOMAS WILLIAM BATEMAN . I am shopman to Edmund Stolworthy , cheesemonger , Whitechapel . On the 23d of January, about half-past nine o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came into the shop, with another woman, they were talking together, and while I was serving the other with a quarter of a pound of butter, the prisoner crossed over to the other side of the shop, to look at the pork, and moved a piece from one part of the window, nearer to the door. I then watched her, and kept serving other customers; the other woman talked about buying a piece of pork, and said she thought that piece too large; and while I was serving a customer, I saw the prisoner take a piece of pork, and go out with it. My boy followed, and brought her back into the shop, and said,

"I have caught you at last;" she said, she had not got it, but he pulled it from under her shawl.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Did not the woman ask her to look at the pork - A. Not in my hearing.

JOHN HARDACRE . I am shop-boy to the prosecutor. I was called into the shop; the prisoner looked at a bit of pork, and pulled it nearer the door. I watched her, saw her take it away, and go out of the shop. I went after her, she had got about two yards from the door, I pulled her in, and asked her where the pork was - she denied having any; I said, I was sure she had, and I had caught her at last - I found it under her shawl.

RICHARD ANDERSON . I am a watchman. I was coming by the shop as the boy took her, he called me in, and gave her in charge.

Prisoner. I leave it to my counsel.

ANN MANNING . I went to this shop to buy some pork, and requested the prisoner to give her judgement about a piece; she took it up, and I said I thought it was too heavy, and immediately the boy called the watchman - she stood inside the shop, I was with her; my husband lives in Commercial-road.

COURT. Q. Did you go with her to buy butter. - A. I did; she never left the shop. I could swear that, she might have been as far as the door, but was not out.

Q. Was the pork moved from one part of the window nearer to the door. - A. No.

Q. Did she deny having it. - A. She denied taking it with any bad intent; she said she had got it in her hand to see if I should like it - it was not under her shawl.

THOMAS BATEMAN . She denied having it about her till it was found, and then said she was coming into the shop to have it weighed.

JOHN HARDACRE . She denied having it about her. I took it from under her shawl. She had gone a few yards out of the shop, and turned to the right. She never asked the price.

GUILTY . Aged 39.

Confined One Year .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220220-128

452. MOSES COHEN was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of January , one ridicule, value 5 s.; one knife, value 10 s.; one purse, value 4 s.; four yards of lace, value 4 s.; one pocket handkerchief, value 3 s., and twenty-seven shillings in monies numbered, the property of Lucy Ann Gozard from her person .

MISS LUCY ANN GOZARD . On the 10th of January, about two o'clock in the afternoon, I was in London-fields, Hackney, and had a ridicule in my hand, containing this property, I was coming towards town, and near Exmouth-place , some person came behind, and snatched it out of my hand. I had an opportunity of seeing his face - I turned round, and saw him running down Exmouth-place. I called,

"Stop thief! and was a good deal frightened. I did not see him laid hold of; but a young man who was before me, ran after him. I did not see whether he laid hold him - the prisoner was brought back in a quarter of an hour - my ridicule was produced.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. It was done so quick, you had no opportunity of seeing the person. - A. No; there were four or five examinations, I believe, before the magistrate. I did not understand that it was on account of insufficient evidence.

ROBERT HAYWARD . I am assistant at Mr. Ayres' school, at Hackney. I was in the London-fields, and passed the prosecutrix, about fifty yards towards town; she had a ridicule in her hand, and was going towards town. I heard her call out, Stop thief! and saw a person run from her towards Exmouth-place; he was alone. I pursued and lost sight of him for about two minutes. I saw him come out of a private house, but had not seen him go in. I am sure the person who came out of the house was the same who I had seen running away. I went up and said,

"This is the man." Another person laid hold of him. I picked the ridicule up at his feet, and delivered it to Miss Gozard, who claimed it.

Cross-examined. Q. What distance was he when you first saw him running. - A. About fifty or sixty yards. I had passed both the prisoner and prosecutrix before I particularly remarked him as I passed, and have not a doubt about him. I am sure he is the person who ran from the lady.

RICHARD PERRY . I am a carpenter, and live on Cambridge

Heath. I was at work in Exmouth-place, at an unfinished house, about one hundred yards from the footpath, and heard the cry of Stop thief! The prisoner had got by the house - he was running alone, and the only person I could see. I pursued him, and at the bottom of Exmouth-place, I lost sight of him for a minute or two. Mr. Hayward pointed him out to me, and said,

"This is the man." I found him within twenty or thirty yards of where I lost sight of him. I believe nobody was in sight but the prisoner and Hayward. I saw the ridicule on the step where he stood - Hayward picked it up. I think it impossible for any body to drop it but the prisoner.

Cross-examined. Q. How near was he to it. - A. On the same step, about eighteen inches - it was on the step of a house enclosed with iron rails, and a fore court. I think no one could throw it there but him.

COURT. Q. Did he claim any acquaintance at that house. - No; it was Mr. Grout's house. - The door was shut.

FRANCES SUTTLING . I was servant to Mr. Grout. I cannot speak to the prisoner. A person was taken at our door; that person had knocked at the door. I opened it, and said that I wanted nothing, and shut it directly; he then gave a double knock. I opened it, and he threw down this lady's ridicule, and appeared very much flurried. I picked it up, and threw it out directly, and believe he was taken at the door.

ELIZABETH DOCKLEY . I live with my father in London-lane, London-fields. A person came to the door, and asked if we wanted any oranges; I said no; and he asked then if he might leave them at our house, which he did. I don't know who he was; but when the prisoner was in charge of a constable, he called for his oranges.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220220-129

453. ABRAHAM HOWELL and EDWARD ANDREWS , was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of February , 30 lbs. of lead, value 3 s., the goods of William Alder , and fixed to a building of his .

WILLIAM ALDER . I am a butcher , and live in Exeter-street, Chelsea . I have a stable about 30 yards from my house - I was never on the roof till this lead was stolen - it was the hip. On Sunday the 17th of February I first found it was gone; it was thirty feet long, and weighed about 80 lbs. I saw it on Monday at Bow-street - I compared it with the roof - it appeared to be part of it - the nail-holes fitted. Howell is my next door neighbour, and lived with a cow-keeper - I have seen Andrews about.

ANN JOHNSON . I keep a clothes-shop. On the 16th of February Andrews came to me with 12 lbs. of lead - I bought it of him. I put it on the floor, and on Monday morning the officer took it away. I told the officer where he lived. Alder and the officer took it with some more, which they got somewhere else.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODERICK. Q. You buy lead whoever brings it - A. No - I was not given in custody - I was charged with receiving it - I was not kept in custody, but went home the same day, without being confined. I was not there above two hours. About 20 lbs. more was mixed with it at Bow-street. I gave three halfpence per lb. for it.

FRANCIS HOWELL . I am an officer of Bow-street. The prisoner Howell is my son. I went to Johnson's by his direction. His master and Mr. Alder told him he had better tell all he knew about it; and in consequence of what he said I went and took Johnson in charge, put her in a coach with the prisoner, and took her to Bow-street - she was detained there till eight o'clock at night. I saw Alder fit the lead to the building - the nail-holes corresponded, but it was in small quantities.

Cross-examined. Q. What time did you take the woman - A. At nine o'clock in the morning - she was detained till eight at night. The lead was mixed (after it was fitted,) with some which was hid in Hyde Park.

COURT. Q. What part of the park was it in - A. Under a cluster of trees - my son went and shewed it me - part of that, and part of what was found at Johnson's tallied. I apprehended Andrews on the 17th, and before he was examined told him the charge; he said that was the lead they sold to Johnson on the Saturday night. No inducement was held out to him to say so.

ANDREWS - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Six Months and Whipped .

HOWELL - NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220220-130

454. JAMES HAYDEN was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of February , one scarf, value 7 s. , the goods of John Neat and John Thomas Neat .

GEORGE PICKETT . I am servant to John and John Thomas Neate , pawnbrokers , Duke-street, Manchester-square . On the 2d of February, this scarf was in the window behind the door, and about half-past ten o'clock in the evening, some woman in the shop cried out,

"He is gone." I looked at the window, missed the scarf, went out, but found nobody. I had not seen the prisoner in the shop, but I saw his brother; they live in Barrett's court. On Tuesday, the prisoner came to pawn a coat - I said he had stolen the scarf - he denied it - I said I could take him to a person who had seen him do it - he seemed willing to go. As I took him to Hughes, who said he was the person, I said I would take him to the watch-house - he said if I would not, he would take me to where it was. He took me to Gee's-court, and said he took it about half-past ten o'clock, and hid it under a water-but, and shewed us the place, but it was gone.

ANN HUGHES . I live in Street's-buildings, Mount-street, Grosvenor-square. I was in Neat's shop, and saw the prisoner there - he opened the glass-case behind the door a little way. I said

"You do well to keep the rogues out" - I thought Neat had sent him there. Shortly after I saw him sitting under the glass-case, and heard Rose say

"You sha'nt." He got up and went away.

Frederick Rose , aged 16, was called, but not appearing to to understand the nature of an oath was not examined.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220220-131

999. THOMAS PIKE , was indicted for stealing, on

the 5th of February , 13 lbs. of brass, value 6 s. the goods of George Hart .

MR. WALFORD conducted the prosecution.

GEORGE ELLIS . I am a patrol. On the 15th of February, between seven and eight o'clock at night, I stopped the prisoner at Mile-end-road, and asked what was in his basket - he gave no answer - I took him to a light, and found the brass in it. He said he brought it from his lodgings at Stratford - I found he did lodge there, opposite opposite Hart's.

FRANCIS OLIVER . I am a Miller, in Mr. George Hart 's service; the prisoner was also in his employ till the Saturday before he was taken. I know the brass to be my master's by a notch in it. I have seen it about the mill for two or three years.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. It has been throwing about the place. - A. Yes.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Whipped and discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220220-132

456. ROBERT BAKER was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of January , three tea spoons, value 20 s.; and one tea pot, value 10 s. , the goods of John Vetch .

THOMAS GOODGER . I live in Argyle-street. Mr. John Vetch is a doctor . On the 24th of January, between seven and eight o'clock in the morning, the dustmen were taking out the dust; they gave an alarm that two men had come in at the front door; I went towards the door, saw nobody, and in returning, the prisoner, with another person, opened the parlour door, and came out - I asked what business they had there; they asked if Mr. Johnson lived there. I looked in at the door, and missed the tea pot and two spoons off the breakfast table, and immediately pursued the prisoner, and brought him back; the other had turned the corner of Little Argyle-street. I have not found the property; he said he knew nothing of it - they were safe a quarter of an hour before.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Was the door left open - A. Yes; the parlour door was shut - I am sure the prisoner is one of them; they both stared very hard in my face. The prisoner had a basket, which he dropped in the street; it was never picked up.

COURT. Q. How far from the door did you seize him - A. About thirty or forty yards.

WILLIAM ATKINS . I am a dustman. I was taking dust from the front area, and saw two men at the front door, which was open, they went in; the prisoner was one - I know him perfectly well, he had a basket in his hand; I alarmed Goodger, and saw them come out, and saw him run out - he laid hold of the prisoner. We had been taking dust from the back part of the house.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going by. Two men stood behind the cart - I was walking on; the servant ran after them, and took me - my trade does not require me to carry a basket.

GUILTY . Aged 29.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220220-133

457. SUSAN DEAN , ANN HORNBY , and FRANCIS HORNBY , were indicted for stealing, on the 30th of January , four pair boots, value 1 l., and ten pair of shoes, value 2 l. , the goods of Samuel Miller .

SAMUEL MILLER . I am a boot and shoe maker , and live in New Bond-street.

THOMAS GOOK . I am a constable. Mr. Miller applied to me about the 29th of January, and in consequence of what he said, I went to No. 4, Moor's-yard, St. Martin's Church-yard, and found Ann Hornby on the second floor, and took a pair of boots off her feet, and found eight duplicates of boots and shoes in a small bag in the bureau, which was not locked; she said her sister gave her the boots, but that she knew nothing about the duplicates - one of them was in the name of Hornby, Moor's yard, and another in the name of Mary Hornby . Her mother came into the room; I asked her if any of the duplicates belonged to the prisoner - she said she supposed they belonged to herself. I asked if she had pawned any of Miller's goods; she said No; that she could not read, and they must have been put there by somebody. Glassborow gave me two other pair of shoes and shewed a pair of sattin shoes to Dean, and asked when she took them - she said she took them on the Thursday previous, to go to a dance.

THOMAS GLASSBOROW. I apprehended Frances Hornby and Dean, at Mr. Miller's on Tuesday, the 29th of January; Dean's mother was there, and gave me a pair of black and white sattin shoes. Gook afterwards asked Dean when she took them; she said on the Thursday before.

SAMUEL MILLER . They are mine. Dean, and Frances Hornby were both servants at my house, at this time - I never sold them any.

Cross-examined by MR. WALFORD. Q. How long had Dean lived with you - A. About a year; her mother worked for me - Ann Hornby once lived with me, and used to come to see her mother.

JAMES HAY . I am servant to Stone and Co., pawnbrokers, Oxford-street. I have a pair of new shoes, pawned by Dean, in the name of Hornby, for 2 s., on the 26th of January; she said she brought them for another person.

ASHER HARRIS . I am a pawnbroker, and live in the Strand. I have a pair of women's and child's shoes, pawned on the 4th and 9th of January, by one of the Hornby's, I don't know which.

WILLIAM HARYETT . I am a pawnbroker. I have two pair of boots, pawned by both the Hornby's, on the 21st of January, for 5 s.

THOMAS BURKITT . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Princes-street, Soho. On the 12th of January Hornby's sister pawned two pair of shoes; I have also a pair of boots and shoes, but don't know who brought them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

DEAN - GUILTY . Aged 29.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

ANN HORNBY - GUILTY . Aged 18.

FRANCES HORNBY - GUILTY . Aged 15.

Judgment Respited .

Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220220-134

458. SARAH DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of January , one watch, value 30 s.; two seals, value 1 l.; one key, value 3 s.; one brooch, value 5 s.; one handkerchief, value 1 s., and 10 s. in monies numbered, the property of William Cadman , from his person .

WILLIAM CADMAN . I am a groom , and live in Weymouth-mews . On the 11th of January, about eleven o'clock at night, I was going home, and saw the prisoner in Broad-street; I had known her for two years, as a girl of the town - I took her home to my master's stables, and while I was asleep she ran off with my watch, which she took from my fob. I awoke about half-past six o'clock, and she was gone.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. How long is it since you seduced this girl from her friends, brought her to London, and deserted her - A. I do not know that. I did come to town with her - she did come to town at my solicitation; I gave her money occasionally.

Q. Did she not tell you she had not a shoe to her feet, and you gave her the watch to pawn, to get shoes - A. No; I was never at her lodgings.

Q. Where did you leave her when you brought her to town - A. In Little Shepherd-street, in the street - I met her this night by accident; I gave her no money.

SAMUEL PRENDERGRASS . The prosecutor brought the prisoner to the watch-house, on the 12th of January; she positively denied it - I was going to enter the charge, and she called Cadman aside; he then came to me, and said the property was at her lodgings. She took me to a room in Westminster, where a man and two women were; she said

"Mary, will you go to my room, and bring me something in a silk handkerchief," she refused - one of the men went, and brought her a handkerchief, containing the brooch and watch.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. He gave it me to pawn, to buy clothes, but as he was in liquor I would not pawn it.

WILLIAM CADMAN re-examined. I had been drinking with a friend, for three hours, and had two or three pots of beer. I will not swear that I was sober.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220220-135

459. WILLIAM GOLD and JAMES BRAGG were indicted for stealing, on the 5th of February , one handkerchief, value 3 s., the goods of John Swindell , from his person .

JOHN SWINDELL . I am a wine merchant , and live in King-street, St. James's-square. On the 5th of February, about twelve o'clock, I was standing under the Colonade, Pall Mall , to see His Majesty pass to the House of Lords; I felt my handkerchief safe, and in less than half an hour, a person said it was stolen; I felt and missed it - I looked round, and the prisoners were in custody, and my handkerchief produced. I had observed them near me.

THOMAS GLASSBOROW . I am a constable. I was near the Colonade, with Webb, and saw Mr. Swindell with a gentleman - I saw both the prisoners going backwards and forwards, I watched, and saw them close behind Mr. Swindell, for five minutes; then saw one of them draw a handkerchief from one of the gentlemen's pockets, but could not distinguish which. Bragg got away a few yards; I secured him, and saw Gold drop the handkerchief - Henry took him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

BENJAMIN WEBB . I am watch-house keeper of St. James's. I saw the prisoners close to Mr. Swindell, for four or five minutes; I saw the handkerchief drop from one of them, but cannot say which.

JAMES HENRY . I am a groom out of place. I saw the prisoners standing close behind Swindell - Gold dropped the handkerchief, and I immediately took him. Mason picked it up, and gave it to Glassborow.

BRAGG'S Defence. I had left Gold two minutes. The gentleman said he might have dropped it.

MR. SWINDELL. I said no such thing.

GOLD - GUILTY . Aged 17.

BRAGG - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220220-136

460. ELIZA WILKES was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of February , 3 l. 10 s., in monies numbered, the property of William Reardon , from his person .

WILLIAM REARDON . I am a servant , and live in Grenville-street, Hatton-garden. On the 18th of February, about seven o'clock in the evening. I was in Brick-lane; the prisoner and another girl asked me for something to drink - I went to a house in George-street with them, on the first floor; they asked for money; I pulled a bag containing three sovereigns, and some silver from my breeches pocket, and gave the other 1 s. for liquor; she left and did not return. I gave the prisoner 6 s., and in about five minutes, she called her companion, who did not answer; she went to the door, and ran down stairs - I missed my money, and ran after her; I have not found it - the landlord fetched her back, and detained her. I had been drinking but was sober.

JOHN BARRS . I am a constable. I took her in charge, and only found 6 d. on her - she came voluntarily to the watch-house. Reardon was drunk in the morning.

Prisoner's Defence. He was very tipsy; he would only give me 6 d., and I left him.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220220-137

461. JOHN ANDERSON and SAMUEL SALMON were indicted for stealing, on the 30th of January , 12 lbs. of starch, value 9 s., the goods of Philip Pearse , privately in his shop .

PHILIP PEARSE . I live in Chapel-street, Edgware-road , and am a grocer . I know nothing of the robbery - my servant and wife were serving in the shop.

SAMUEL PRENDERGRASS . I am a constable. On the 30th of January, about six o'clock, I saw the prisoners talking together, in Cato-street; and about nine o'clock, I saw them in John-street, returning in a direction from Pearse's house. Salmon saw me and made off. I went up and took Anderson, and asked what he had under his arm, he said, tea, and was taking it to a friend of his. I took him into a public-house, and found it was starch; he said he would give me no further trouble, and that he had taken it from a grocer's shop at the corner of Chapel-street. He at first said Salmon was not with to him, and then that

he was. I saw Salmon next morning in Cato-street, he saw me, and ran into his father's house, I secured him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

ANDERSON'S Defence. I said I picked it up.

ANDERSON - GUILTY. Aged 19.

Of stealing, but not privately .

Confined Six Months .

SALMON - NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220220-138

462. THOMAS ANDERSON was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of February , one jacket, value 10 s. , the goods of William Peterson .

There being no evidence against the prisoner, except a confession, which was extorted from him, he was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220220-139

463. WILLIAM GOUGH was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of January , one sheet, value 2 s.; one bolster, value 7 s.; and one iron, value 6 d., the goods of Henry Swales , in a lodging-room; and two coats, value 10 s.; four waistcoats, value 4 s.; one razor, value 1 s.; one pair of buckles, value 6 d., and one rug, value 3 s. , the goods of William Cuthbert .

SARAH SWALES . I am the wife of Henry Swales . On the 15th of January, the prisoner took our front garret, furnished, at 4 s. 9 d. a week. Cuthbert had lodged with me before, and his chest was in the room. The prisoner left on the 31st, without notice, and took the key with him. I got the door open and missed these things - Cuthbert's trunk was broken open; he came back the same day, and I had him taken.

WILLIAM CUTHBERT . I lodged in this room, and had left about four months. I found my trunk broken open, and the property gone.

GEORGE BROWN . I am a hair-dresser, and used to shave the prisoner. About five or six weeks ago, he brought a bundle into my shop, and asked me to buy a coat, breeches, and two waistcoats, I refused; and in a day or two, he brought a shirt, and offered a man in my shop some liquor to pawn it; he returned and told him they would not take it in - he took it out, returned, in a few minutes, and said he had sold it, and it was his own.

CORNELIUS QUINLAND . I keep a bottle shop, in Oxford-street - I bought a bolster of the prisoner.

MARY QUINLAND . I bought a pair of buckles and a razor of him for 18 d.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Confined One Year and Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220220-140

464. CHRISTIAN PETER GRANT , JOHN SHAKELTON , and THOMAS WILBRAHAM were indicted for stealing, on the 2d of February , four live tame fowls, price 8 s. , the property of William Hartshorn .

MARY HARTSHORN . I am the wife of William Hartshorn , we live in Dog-row, Bethnal-green . On the 2d of February, at night, I saw my nine fowls at roost in the hen-house, adjoining the stable, which is fenced all round. I missed four of them in the morning, and found them at Worship-street, on Monday. My husband is a cowkeeper . Brant and Wilbraham were in his service, and lodged near us - the yard gate was closed at nine o'clock.

JOHN BARRS . I am a constable. On Saturday night, between seven and eight o'clock, I took the prisoners altogether, in Wentworth-street. Brant had a cock and hen under his arm, and each of the others had a hen - they said a costermonger, who was Brant's brother, gave them them to carry to Petticoat-lane. I took them to him, and then they denied saying so.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GRANT'S Defence. A man asked us to carry them.

GRANT - GUILTY . Aged 15.

SHAKLETON - GUILTY . Aged 13.

WILBRAHAM - GUILTY . Aged 15.

Judgement Respited .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220220-141

465. FREDERICK MYER was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of February , six pieces of iron, value 8 s. , the goods of Samuel Ridge .

SAMUEL RIDGE . I am a brickmaker , and live at Bethnal-green. On the 2d of February, I found the prisoner in custody charged with stealing iron; he pleaded poverty, and I forgave him: and on Monday the watchman took him again for stealing more.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

EDWARD HILL . I am a watchman, at Mr. Pocock's premises, which join Ridge's. Between four and five o'clock in the morning, the prisoner came into my master's garden with this iron. I secured and took him to the watch-house - he said he had been to see a friend down that way.

Prisoner. I was starving.

GUILTY . Aged 35.

Confined One Year , and Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220220-142

466. CHARLES DIXON was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of January , one saw, value 5 s. , the goods of Richard Steel .

RICHARD STEEL . I am a carpenter , and worked for Mr. Painter. On Saturday, the 19th of January, I locked this saw up, in a building, in Regent's-park , where I was at work; and on Monday morning, found the staple drawn, and the saw gone.

JOHN ASTELL . I am a watchman of Mary-le-bone. On Sunday, the 20th of January, about five o'clock in the evening, I stopped the prisoner with this saw buttoned under his coat. I saw him coming out of the building - two other boys were waiting at the corner, who ran away on seeing me.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A boy gave it me.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Two Months and Whipped ,

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220220-143

467. RICHARD DANCE was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of January , one quart pot, value 1 s. 6 d.; and one pint pot, value 1 s., the goods of Richard

Balls ; and one pint pot, value 1 s. , the goods of Thomas Bell .

RICHARD BALLS . I keep the Exmouth Arms, public-house, Exmouth-street, Hampstead . On the 21st of January, the prisoner was brought in with two of my pots.

THOMAS BELL . I keep the Euston Arms, public-house . My man brought the prisoner in with a pot of mine.

RICHARD JOHNSON . I am servant to Mr. Bell. A man gave me information, I stopped the prisoner in Euston-crescent, with a bag with one pot in it, another under it, and one in his pocket. I asked what induced him to steal them; he said he was starving, and what was a poor man to do.

JAMES HARDING . I saw the prisoner with the pots.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

CHARLES READ . I am an officer. I found two pots at his lodging.

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged. 29.

Confined Six Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220220-144

468. WILLIAM HUNT was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of February , one shift, value 1 s.; one shirt, value 1 s., and one napkin, value 6 d. , the goods of William Finley .

MARY FINLEY . I am the wife of William Finley , and live in the East India Company's alms-houses. I hung these things out to dry about eleven o'clock, and missed them about three o'clock, and found them three days after at the office.

JOHN ACOCK . I am a headborough. On the 13th of February, about half-past three o'clock, I stopped the prisoner about half a mile from the alms-houses, with these things concealed under his jacket, wet. They were under his arm, between his jacket and waistcoat.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Confined Three Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220220-145

469. CHARLES FISHER and WILLIAM SHARP were indicted for stealing, on the 1st of February , 4 lbs. of beef, value 1 s. 9 d. , the goods of Charles Baker .

ROBERT DUKE. I am a broker. On the 1st of February, about eight o'clock, I was in Tottenham Court-road, and watched the prisoners together for nearly half an hour, and at last saw them go to Mr. Baker's, Fisher took an old rag from his pocket, and put it over a piece of beef on the stall board, and both ran away with it. I pursued, passed Sharp, and took Fisher with it under his arm.

WILLIAM GREEN . I am a painter and glazier. I was with Duke, and saw Fisher take the beef. I took Sharp. He said he did not know what Fisher was going to do.

CHARLES BAKER . I am a butcher , and live in Tottenham Court-road - they were brought in with this beef, which I had put on the board ten minutes before - they both fell on their knees, and begged forgiveness.

FISHER - GUILTY . Aged 14.

SHARP - GUILTY . Aged 14.

Whipped and Discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220220-146

470. GEORGE EGLEBERT was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of February , three books, value 4 l. , the goods of Jacob Henry Burn .

The prosecutor did not appear.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220220-147

471. JAMES FRANCIS was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of February , three boxes, value 1 s.; five books, value 4 d.; one bottle, value 1 d.; one ink-stand, value 2 d.; one plate, value 3 d., and one tobacco pipe, value 6 d. , the goods of John Pitt .

DAVID EVANS . I live in Chatham-gardens, City-road. On the 3d of February, about eleven o'clock at night, I was called up by a young man; I went out, and found the prisoner in the privy - he lived in the gardens, about sixty yards off; he had no business there. I asked him how he came so near home to do this; he said

"Mr. Evans you won't hurt me, will you." I found the box, some memorandums, and a bottle in his pocket.

THOMAS DUNNING . I am a watchman. Evans called me; I found the prisoner in the privy, and the rest of the property tied up in an apron, which he claimed.

JOHN PITT . I live in Chatham-gardens; the prisoner had no right on my premises; this property was in a summer house, which I locked at eight o'clock that night. I found four squares of glass broken in the window, by which means he could get this.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I found them in the road.

GUILTY Aged 19.

Confined Three Months and Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220220-148

472. ELIZA HEALEY , was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of November , one watch, value 30 s.; two keys, value 6 d., and one ribbon, value 1 d. , the goods of George Anderson .

MARGARET ANDERSON . I am wife of George Anderson , we live in Monmouth-street . On the 1st of February, about two o'clock in the afternoon, this watch hung over the kitchen mantle-piece; the prisoner had bought a gown a week before, and tried it on in the kitchen - it hung there then. On the 1st of November, she came on a frivolous excuse, while I was out; and on returning I missed it. I found it at Philips's.

AARON PHILIPS . I am a general dealer, and live in Blue-cross-street, Leicester-square. I bought the duplicate of a watch of the prisoner, for about 81 d., and redeemed it at Laughton's, in Green-street, for 10 s 2 d.

JOHN HARRIS . I am shopman to Laughton. I have a memorandum of a watch of this description, being pledged on the 1st of November, in the name of Mary Healey ,

Green-street. I cannot recollect that the prisoner pawned it, but she has pawned things.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220220-149

473. JANE JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of December , one shirt, value 7 s., the goods of Charles Day ; and one shirt, value 7 s. , the goods of James Vincent .

SECOND COUNT, stating them to belong to George Hurley .

ANN HURLEY . My husband lives in Devonshire-street, and is a servant . I live in Circus-street, New-road , and take in washing; the prisoner lodged two months with me. On the 13th of December these shirts were in a basket, ready for ironing - I missed them. She left on the 24th - I had supported her, and told her I could do it no longer. She was taken up on another charge, and the duplicates found on her. I had told her they were lost, and she went to the pawnbrokers' to look for them, and said she could not find them.

THOMAS PRITCHARD . I live in Panton-street, with Mr. Temple. On the 12th of November, and 14th of December, the prisoner pawned two shirts.

THOMAS GOOK . I took her in charge; she said one Wickham gave her them to pawn.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

ANN WICKHAM . I have washed for Hurley three years - I never gave the prisoner leave to pawn them.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought them of Wickham - she said they were her husband's - and when there was a disturbance she wished me to go to the pawnbroker's and stop them.

ANN WICKHAM . It is false.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin Esq.

Reference Number: t18220220-150

474. RICHARD PRICE was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of February , one pair of boots, value 7 s. , the goods of Joseph Davis .

SARAH DAVIS . I am the wife of Joseph Davis ; we live in Cable-street, Wellclose-square . On the 1st of February, about half-past eight o'clock at night, the prisoner came into the shop, and asked me to sell him a pair of old shoes. I said, we did not sell old ones. He then asked me to give him a pair. I had two pair of boots in my hand, which I put down. He went out; I went into the parlour and saw him come in and take a pair out of the window, and run out. I called, Stop thief! my husband ran out of the opposite shop and took him. I saw him drop them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I met a Jew, who sent me to ask about old shoes. I came out - then the Jew went in and took these. and threw them at me - I never had them.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Whipped and Discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220220-151

475. JAMES RUTTER was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of January , one hammock, value 1 s.; one jacket, value 1 s.; one coat, value 2 s.; one pair of trowsers, value 1 s., and one frock, value 1 s. , the goods of James Shannon .

JAMES SHANNON . I lodged in Robin Hood-lane, Poplar . The prisoner slept in the same bed. In January I went out at seven o'clock, leaving him in bed. I returned in about an hour, and missed him and my coat. About three weeks after, a man brought him to the house - he said he sold all but the coat, and that he pawned, and shewed us where.

LOWTHER JACKSON . I am a pawnbroker, and live at Limehouse. On the 17th of January the coat was pawned in the name of Eldridge.

JOSEPH COLTMAN . I took him in charge on the 28th of January. He said he took them, and pawned the coat in the name of Eldridge.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Confined Three Months and Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220220-152

476. WILLIAM JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of February , one window-sash, value 20 s. , the goods of James Burton .

SECOND COUNT. stating it to be fixed to a certain building of his.

WILLIAM PHILLIMORE . I lived at No. 121, Regent-street . I had the care of the house for Mr. James Burton . On the 9th of February, in the evening, about half-past five o'clock, I saw the prisoner in the back parlour, and secured him as he was carrying this window sash towards the door - it had been fixed to the window. He said he was carrying it into the next house. I asked which - he said he would shew me - then dropped it and ran off. I overtook him in Beck-street.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A man at the corner asked me to fetch it.

GUILTY . Aged 32.

Confined Six Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220220-153

477. ANN ADAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of February , one watch, value 10 s.; one chain, value 6 d.; one key, value 6 d., and two seals, value 1 s. , the goods of Francis Riches .

FRANCIS RICHES . I am a tailor , and live in Cloth-fair, West Smithfield. On the 29th of January, at twelve o'clock at night, I met the prisoner in Oxford-street, and went home to Burn's-buildings, St. Giles's . I put my watch on the mantlepiece. In about two hours I got up and missed my watch. Two more persons were in the room; I charged the prisoner with it - she denied it. I called the watchman, who took her directly. She still denied it - he felt about her, but could not find it; and as he was taking her to the watch-house I saw him take it out of her right hand; she said she would break it before he should have it; and she did break the glass. I had given her 2 s. - I was sober.

JOHN FRENCH . I am a watchman. I was calling three o'clock, and was called to this place. I found the door fast. I got in, and asked if she had the watch; she denied it twenty times, and said she only had 2 s. which he gave

her. I felt about her - and as I took her to the watch-house I said,

"If you have it, give it up." She said,

"Well then, it is in the room." I said,

"Then come back." She said,

"He sha'nt have it without 5 s." and that she had not got it; and in going through Middle-row I saw her fumbling, and saw Campbell take it out of her hand; she said,

"Well I have broken it for him at any rate."

THOMAS CAMPBELL . I was with French - his account is true.

FRANCIS SUICH . I am a watchman. I opened her hand while Campbell took the watch from her.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. He and another man took me and another woman home. I refused to stop with him for 2 s. and he said he would leave his watch till he brought me 5 s., He afterwards demanded it - I refused it, and he called the watchman.

JOHN FRENCH . She denied having it - she said nothing about his giving it her; but at the watch-house she said,

"Never mind, I have got my story, and he has got his."

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220220-154

477. RICHARD POWERS was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of January , two carpets, value 40 s. , the goods of Robert Emerson and Francis Emerson .

SAMUEL LACK . I am a constable. On the 24th of January, about three o'clock in the afternoon, I saw the prisoner get out of a coach, with two others, at the corner of Prince's-street, Drury-lane, with some goods, and all walked away together. I ordered the coachman to drive me to the office with the goods. I then returned, and went to the Bunch of Grapes, public-house, Drury-lane, took the prisoner, and found these carpets there.

THOMAS AMSDEN . I am an officer. I went with Lack and took the prisoner; and in about an hour and a half, in consequence of information, I returned to the public-house, and found two carpets.

ROBERT EMERSON . I am in partnership with Thomas Emerson . I know nothing of the prisoner.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220220-155

478. WILLIAM WARD was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of February , one basket, value 6 d., and thirty apples, value 1 s. , the goods of Taylor John Green .

PATRICK SMITH . I am a watchman. On the 7th of February, at six o'clock in the morning, I took the prisoner in charge, with this basket of apples, about forty yards from Green's house. I took him to Green, who claimed them.

TAYLOR JOHN GREEN. I am a green-grocer , and live in North-place, Gray's Inn-lane-road . The basket is mine, and stood in the window - nobody could take it without coming into the shop.

Prisoner's Defence. Two men asked me to carry it.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Whipped and Discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220220-156

479. JANE WAKELEY was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of January , seven books, value 5 s. , the goods of George Bower .

These books were let to the prisoner with a furnished lodging, and the indictment not being under the statute she was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220220-157

480. WILLIAM THOMAS was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of February , four planes, value 8 s., and two saws, value 10 s. , the goods of William Irons .

WILLIAM IRONS . I am a carpenter . On the 15th of February, I was working at some houses at Clifton street, Finsbury . I went to breakfast, at eight o'clock, after locking the door, and left my tools there. I returned in twenty minutes, found the back door broken open, and all my tools gone - it has almost ruined me - I have only found two planes.

THOMAS MILLER . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Golden-lane. On Saturday, the 16th of February, the prisoner came and offered a smoothing plane in pawn; I stopped him, and asked how he came by it; he said he bought it with some more, in Chick-lane, three months ago. He wished to be let go. I gave him in charge.

JAMES HANLEY . I am an officer. Miller brought the prisoner to me with the plane. I searched him, and found another plane and several other tools in his pockets; he said he bought the planes six months ago in Chick-lane.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought them that morning in Red Lion-street, Whitechapel.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220220-158

ELEVENTH DAY. MONDAY, MARCH 4.

481. BENJAMIN MARTIN was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of June , one pair of pantaloons, value 7 s.; one shirt, value 2 s.; one waistcoat, value 4 s.; one gown skirt, value 2 s.; one pair of gloves, value 6 d., and one neckcloth, value 6 d. , the goods of James Marshall .

JAMES MARSHALL . I am a labourer , and live in Castle-street, Wellclose-square. Last June I came to town, and took a lodgings in George-yard, Whitechapel . - The prisoner lodged in the same room with me - he was a perfect stranger. I was employed in the East India warehouse. I went out in the morning, and left these things in the room. He never returned; but was apprehended with my shirt on, about three weeks ago.

WILLIAM PEARCE . I am a constable. I was in Union-street, and saw the prosecutor's wife pursuing the prisoner, crying, Stop thief! He was running very fast, I took him; she charged him with the robbery; he denied all knowledge of it. I found a shirt on his back, which the prosecutor claimed - he gave me the name of John Dixon , and said, he never

lodged in the house; he then offered to pay 2 s. a week for the things, and acknowledged it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 35.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220220-159

482. WILLIAM FAULKNER was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of January , eighteen yards of cotton, value 14 s. , the goods of Francis Wragg .

CHARLES PALMER . I am shopman to Francis Wragg , a linen-draper , of Sloane-street . On the 26th of January, between five and six o'clock, I was in the shop, and heard the door open - it had been put to, I saw the prisoner's hand half in and half out of the shop, with this print, which laid on a shelf near the door; I pulled him in with it in his hand - he entirely removed it off the shelf - he begged to be forgiven.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined Three Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220220-160

483. ELIZA HARMER was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of January , one gown, value 4 s.; and one flat iron, value 9 d. , the goods of George Tillier .

JANE TILLIER . I am the wife of George Tillier , we lodge in Marsden-street, Somer's Town - the prisoner lodged in the same room for a fortnight. On the 23rd of January, I missed an iron and a gown, and found them in pawn the same day.

WILLIAM CLULOE . On the 24th of January, I took the prisoner, and told her the charge. She produced two duplicates from her bosom, for the gown and iron, and pleaded poverty.

WILLIAM HARDING . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Skinner-street, Somer's Town. The prisoner pawned the gown and iron, on the 23rd of January.

GUILTY . Aged 29.

Strongly recommended to Mercy. - Judgment Respited .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220220-161

484. WILLIAM EVANS was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of January , one jacket, value, 4 s.; one handkerchief, value 6 d., and 18 s. 3 1/2 d. in monies numbered , the property of Cuthbert Walton .

CUTHBERT WALTON . On the 28th of January, I was a seaman , of the brig Shannon, which laid in the City Canal. I went to bed between eight and nine o'clock, in the forecastle, where my chest was; it contained seven half crowns among other money; the prisoner is a stranger - I heard a noise in the night, and my chest lid falling down, and sang out

"Who is there;" no answer was made. I jumped out of bed, and caught the prisoner going up the hatchway; I held him by the legs, and my shipmates secured him - I gave him to the watchman. I found my jacket on his back, and the handkerchief in the pocket.

JAMES PAUL . I went on board the brig, and found the prisoner there; I found a jacket on his back, with five half-crowns in the pocket, and 6 d. and 3 1/2 d. in his other pocket - he said he had some companions near, and it would be a bad job for us if we detained him. I was obliged to tie his hands and legs.

GUILTY . Aged 29.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220220-162

485. THOMAS GRADY was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of February , one boot, value 5 s. , the goods of John Knight .

JOSEPH ROBINSON . I live with John Knight , a shoe maker , in Orchard-street . On the 5th of February, about half-past six o'clock in the evening, I was in the shop - a pane of glass had been broken before. I saw the prisoner put his hand through, and take a boot - I ran out and seized him, he forced himself away, and escaped; another boy came up, took the boot from him and ran off - I have never seen it since. I informed the watchman, and knew him again when I saw him; I am sure he is the boy.

Prisoner. Q. You have played with me since it happened - A. I have not; I know him by seeing him about; he is a cripple.

SIMON RAYMENT . I am a watchman. Robinson described the prisoner to me; I had met him and another a few minutes before, and saw them passing across the road - they knew me; this was about half-past six in the evening; I could not find him for ten days, and then took him.

Prisoner's Defence. Every thing they have said is false.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220220-163

486. HENRY LAWRENCE was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of January , one coat, value 15 s. , the goods of John Ragan .

JOHN RAGAN . I deal in pigs . On the 14th of January, about five o'clock, I was in Smithfield market , with my cart - I went into the Three Compasses, public-house, for five minutes, leaving the cart at the door. When I came out I missed the coat.

WILLIAM SHEPPERD . On the 14th of January, I saw Ragan's cart at the door, and the prisoner leaning on it, I watched him, and saw him run off with the coat, which he took off the seat; I pursued, and saw a man take him, he threw it down.

JOHN WHITING . I saw him take the coat from the cart, followed, and took him, when he threw it down.

CHARLES CRAWLEY . I heard the cry; the prisoner was running with the coat, and threw it at me, and said,

"Here you ******, take the coat."

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I had come out of the Infirmary that very day, and is it likely I should run away with a coat!

GUILTY . Aged 68.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220220-164

487. JOHN GOLDSMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of January , two silver spoons, value 1 l., and one pair of sugar tongs, value 5 s. , the goods of James Goldsmith .

ELIZABETH GOLDSMITH . I am the wife of James Goldsmith , a butcher , we live in Long-alley, the prisoner is my son; he did not live with us, he was in no employ; he had left us not quite a fortnight ago - he made his father angry one day. and he told him not to come again, but I provided for him.

Q. His father had turned him out of doors - A. He told him not to come again. I missed the things the day before they were found on him - it was on Wednesday the 30th of January; he had been in the shop on Monday; the spoons I know were safe then - I never gave them to him, they were up stairs, and I am sure he was not up stairs, on the Monday, for his father was ill in bed - there never was a better boy till within the last six months; bad company as drawn him into it.

JAMES PHIPPS . I am an officer. On Thursday, the 31st of January, I was with Keys in Barbican, and saw the prisoner with another boy - I followed them to Coppice-row, and took them both in charge. I found the duplicates in the prisoner's shoe on his foot.

SAMUEL CHAPMAN . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Providence-row. I have a pair of table spoons, pawned on the 28th of January, and a pair of sugar tongs, pawned on the 25th - the prisoner pawned the spoons, but the tongs were pawned by one Smith.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I expected to get a place every day, and meant to redeem them.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury.

Judgment Respited .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220220-165

488. EDWARD BATEMAN and JEREMIAH HENLEY were indicted for stealing, on the 3d of January , 69 lbs. of lead, value 8 s. , the goods of John Coppendale .

This Robbery being committed in Essex, the prisoners were on this indictment

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220220-166

489. GEORGE FRY was indicted for embezzlement .

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220220-167

490. JOSEPH BARNETT , THOMAS JOHNSON , and JOHN JONES were indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of February , eight shillings in monies numbered, the property of William Sooley , from his person .

WILLIAM SOOLEY . I am a window-blind maker . On the 3rd of February, about eleven o'clock, I was in the Court-yard, St. James's Palace . - I went with three children to see the guards exercise. I had one child, about fourteen months old, whom I put upon my shoulder to hear the music. I saw the three prisoners standing by me - I was informed I was robbed. I saw a hand come past me. Johnson and Jones stood directly in front of me, and just behind at my right arm, the hand nudged Johnson, and they both went away. Leary then said,

"You are robbed." I took the child off my shoulder, and found my right hand pocket turned inside out - I was going to follow then; but my children crying out, I stopped to take care of them - they were pursued and taken. I saw Barnett taken myself in the Park; he made great resistance, and dodged us - I lost eight shillings. I am positive the three prisoners stood by me.

Prisoner BARNETT. Q. Was there not a great many people there. - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Two were in front. - A. Yes; Johnson moved my child, while the relief was going past.

THOMAS GOOK . I am an officer. On Sunday morning, the 3rd of February, I was at the Palace at the time of the relief. I saw Sooley with a child in his arm, and two by his side. Barnett was close to his left side, and the two prisoners were a little in the rear. Sooley was holding the child up. I watched Barnett, and I suppose he saw me; for he drew back. I then went behind the crowd, so as not to be perceived. I came in sight again, and saw Barnett draw back again, and come on a level with the other two. I then went quite out of sight, and heard an alarm given of a robbery, and immediately missed the prisoners. I went outside the Palace, and met Leary running after them. We ran in different directions, and in three or four minutes came into the Park, and at the gate of Cambridge-house, saw the three prisoners. Leary said, he was sure they were the persons - we ran towards them, and on getting near them, one shot a few yards a-head, and Barnett immediately ran away. I called out,

"It is no use to go, Barnett, for I shall have you." He still continued running - I pursued, calling Stop thief! and told the witness to stop the others. A gentleman caught at Barnett - they reeled over in the road together. I came up and secured them. He put his hand to his coat pocket - a person caught hold of his pocket, and held it till we got to the watch-house. I found two shillings in his coat, and four in his waistcoat. Johnson made considerable resistance when I was going to handcuff him. I lost the prosecutor, but he came to the office next morning.

CORNELIUS LEARY . I was at the Palace. Johnson and Jones stood before the prosecutor, and were looking in his face; they observed me looking at them. I turned my head, and on looking round again, I saw Barnett's hands in Sooley's pockets. He went out of the yard, and the other two followed him. I went to Sooley, told him to examine his pockets, and told him to follow Jones and Johnson out, and perhaps he would get his money. He went out, returned in a few minutes, and asked me to go and shew them to him. I went to the stable-gate, and saw the three prisoners opposite the bridge in the Park. I am sure of their persons. When I got within twenty yards of them, Barnett saw me, and ran off. I followed and he was stopped.

THOMAS GLASSBOROW . I was in the Park with Gook - we followed the prisoners, and met Leary, and nearly opposite to the bridge, he pointed the prisoners out. We went up to them, and I collared Johnson - Henry took Jones.

JAMES HENRY . I was in the Park, and saw the three prisoners. I took Jones.

BARNETT'S Defence. I went to see the soldiers, and was going home, when the officers came running; I ran towards them; they stopped me. I took some notes from

my waistcoat pocket, and put them in my coat pocket, and the shillings went with them.

BARNETT - GUILTY . Aged 18.

JOHNSON - GUILTY . Aged 22.

JONES - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220220-168

491. JOHN BRACE was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of February , one bushel of wheat, value 4 s. , the goods of Daniel Poyser .

DANIEL POYSER . I live at Enfield. The prisoner was a labourer of mine; I discharged him and two others whom I suspected - he begged himself back into my service, and said he would not take any thing for he had suffered enough from being transported before. I desired the patrol to look out for him, and on the 2d of February, they took him with this wheat on his back; I compared it with that in my barn, it corresponded. I have a sample of each.

JOHN WILSON . I am a patrol. On the 3d of February, about half-past twelve o'clock at night, I took the prisoner in the road, about a mile and a half from the prosecutor's, with a bag on his shoulder; I asked what he had got there, he said,

"Nothing," I said he had some corn, he said Yes, he had got wheat, which he bought of Mr. Poyser - we said we should take him back, and if he had bought it it was all right - he said,

"For G - d's sake don't take me before a Magistrate, for I stole it," and he would give us his coat, and any money we liked, to be quiet about it; we refused.

(Wheat produced and sworn to).

Prisoner's Defence. I picked it up.

GUILTY : Aged 48.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220220-169

492. ANN DARBY was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of January , one pillow, value 6 d.; one bolster, value 5 s.; one bed, value 20 s.; and one coat, value 6 s. , the goods of Thomas Goodey .

THOMAS GOODEY . I live in Brook-street, Ratcliffe , and am a smith . The prisoner rents an empty room in my house. On the 27th of January, I went into another room, which I seldom use - found it was unlocked - I missed the articles stated in the indictment. I asked her if she knew any thing of them; she said she had taken the bed into her room to air, and that she had pawned the pillow, bolster, and the coat - her husband lived with her - he knew nothing of it. I found the bed in her room.

HENRY LATTEN . I am a pawnbroker. I have a coat pawned by the prisoner, on the 31st of July.

GEORGE RAVENER . I am a pawnbroker. The prisoner pawned the pillow and bolster with me.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. He gave me the key to clean the room. I intended to redeem them when my husband got work.

GUILTY Aged 37.

Confined Three Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220220-170

493. JOHN HARDCASTLE was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of January , one coat, value 15 s. , the goods of John Chandler .

JOHN CHANDLER . I live at Poplar , and am a labourer . On the 3d of January, I went home, and missed my coat at half-past nine o'clock at night; a strange man had slept in the same room - I left him in bed. Next morning I found it had been pawned, and redeemed again. On the Tuesday following, I saw it hanging up for sale in Ratcliff-highway, and got an officer.

MARY STILES . I live at Poplar. Chandler lodges with me; he lost his coat on the 2d of January - the prisoner slept in the room over night, with him and another man.

NOAH GOULSTON . I am a slopseller, and live in Ratcliff-highway. The prisoner came to me on the 3d of January, with the duplicate of the coat, which was pawned for 6 s., he wanted 3 s. for it - I bought it, and redeemed it. I am sure he is the man; he came again, in about a week, with a duplicate - I detained him; he said he stole the coat.

WILLIAM SOMERS . I took him in charge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 35.

Confined Three Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220220-171

494. WILLIAM MARTIN was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of February , 16 lbs. of pork, value 8 s. , the goods of Robert Bailey .

SUSAN BAILEY . I am the wife of Robert Bailey , a pork-butcher , in Mile-end-road. On the 15th of February, I missed a dish of pork from the window, about eight o'clock in the morning; I had seen it there about five o'clock.

JAMES GIBBS . I am patrol. On Thursday, the 15th of February, between seven and eight o'clock, I was going down the road, toward Stratford, and met the prisoner within twenty yards of the Globe, public house; he passed and looked back - he had a bundle. I turned back and asked what he had got - he said, pork, which he had bought at Stratford, for 3 s. 6 d." I was sure he could not buy it for that - I untied his apron and found the pork; next morning I found the owner - it is pickled.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Whipped and Discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220220-172

495. JOSEPH MEGGS was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of January , 16 lbs. of beef, value 7 s. , the goods of Thomas Harrison .

ANN HARRISON . I am the wife of Thomas Harrison , of Kingsland-road - we keep an eating-house . On the 27th of January, the prisoner came into the shop and asked for some meat, between twelve and one at night. I refused, as seven or eight of them came into the shop together. I missed a flank of beef - I sent for an officer, who found it in the prisoner's house - he lived near us. I knew him before - I saw him draw it off the edge of the counter, and nudge another to take it.

WILLIAM COX . I am an officer. I went to the prisoner's lodging, and told him I came from the prosecutrix, about some beef which she suspected he had stolen. He

said he wished he had some. I found it in the closet - she claimed it. It was cooked.

Prisoner's Defence. I went there for some supper; but how the beef came in my house I do not know.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Confined One Month and Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220220-173

496. JOHN POPE was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of January , one weaver's breast roller, value 4 s. , the goods of William Breyed .

WILLIAM BREYED . I am a willow-square-maker , and live in Shoreditch . About two o'clock in the morning of the 27th of January, I found my workshop had been broken open. I went over and missed some harness - I secured the door for the rest of the day - and about half-past eight o'clock at night it was broken open again, and the roller taken. The prisoner, who had worked seven months for me, did not come till the Monday morning. I told him what had happened, and asked him to sit up on Monday night to watch the place, which he did, and told me next morning he was going to leave his employ, and work at home. He went away - Brown gave me information.

ROBERT BROWN . I am a furrier, between eight and half-past eight o'clock, I saw the prisoner going up the prosecutor's stairs - he came out with the roller under his arm. I knew him before.

WILLIAM GREEN . I am a watchman. About a quarter past ten o'clock at night, I found the roller in Ship-court, against a wall.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The place is so dark you cannot see your hand before you.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220220-174

497. WILLIAM STONE was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of February , two silver spoons, value 12 s.; one candlestick, value 1 l., and one table-cloth, value 10 s. , the goods of Moses Franco .

MOSES FRANCO . I live in Spital-square . I missed these spoons on the last Monday in January. The prisoner was a weekly servant , and lived in the house.

DANIEL GRANT . I met the prisoner in Brick-lane. On last Saturday week, at night, he asked me to pawn a table-cloth; supposing it to be his father's, I went and pawned it for him, at Price's, Wentworth-street. He proposed to sell the ticket; which made me suspect him. I informed my master.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. How long were you in custody, charged with stealing this - A. From Sunday till Friday. I told my master of it before I was in custody.

EMMA GRANT . I am no relation of the last witness. I am servant to the prosecutor. The prisoner came into the house on the last Saturday in January, as errand-boy, and on the Monday I missed two spoons, and on Friday a silver candlestick, and on the Saturday a table-cloth. I went to his mother, to enquire if he had mislaid the table-cloth, I did not suspect he had stolen it. He asked if I meant to make him a thief. I said,

"No; I thought he had mislaid it." She abused me very much, and I ran home and told the officer how he treated me.

- BROOKS. I am servant to Mr. Willis, of Bishopsgate-street. On Monday evening, about half-past eight o'clock, a woman came in to sell a spoon. I suspected it was stolen - it was broken in half, and the cypher filed out. I asked if it belonged to her. she said it did - and then she said it belonged to Mr. Brooks, of Spital-square. I went with her to Spital-square, where she said she got it from. I knocked at the door - she ran off. The spoon was delivered to the officer a few days after.

- BELCHER. I am servant to Mr. Price, Wentworth-street, Whitechapel. On the 2d of February Grant pawned a table-cloth for 6 s. in the name of John Franco .

WILLIAM COX . I am a shoemaker. Grant is my journeyman; he came to me in the evening of the 2d of February and asked me to buy a duplicate - I looked at it and asked where he got it. I detained it, and told Atfield, who took the prisoner.

WILLIAM ATFIELD . I am an officer. Mr. Franco sent for me. The prisoner was brought there by his father. He denied it, and said he thought the butcher's boy was the thief. I received information from Grant, and apprehended the prisoner afterwards, and Grant told him he gave him the table-cloth. He then said he did take the things. I said nothing to make him confess.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. Atfield said

"What use is denying it."

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220220-175

498. CHARLES SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of January , two blankets, value 5 s.; one shawl, value 2 s.; three caps, value 2 s.; one shift, value 2 s.; one towel, value 6 d.; one petticoat, value 2 s.; one bag, value 2 d., and one miniature picture, value 5 s. , the goods of Mary Forsyth .

MARY FORSYTH . I am a widow . I was coming on the coach to London, and gave my luggage to the coachman, and on arriving in town it was missing in the Strand.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. They was no direction on it - A. No.

HENRY LIMPUS . I drove the coach. On Monday, the 28th of January, at four o'clock, I started from Isleworth; Mrs. Forsyth was an inside passenger - she gave me her luggage, and I locked it in the hind boot; it could not drop out. I unlocked it at Charing-cross, it was then safe, and when I came to Southampton-street, there was a cry that the boot was open - I got down, and found the bag was missing. I went back as far as Bedford-street, but could hear nothing of it.

Cross-examined. Q. You cannot say you locked it at Charing-cross - A. I believe I did, but am sure I fastened it.

WILLIAM RICHARDS . I am an officer. On the 28th of January, at ten minutes before six o'clock, I was on duty, walking about, between the theatre and Bedford-street - I saw some people at the corner of a court. Directly I got up the prisoner ran across the road, to the corner of Adam-street, and had got this bundle up against the post, he was surrounded by six or eight people - I went away; I stood behind a coach, and saw the prisoner go away with

two more, with a bundle on his shoulder, the other two were walking on the curb close behind him. At the corner of Salisbury-court, he said to the other two

"Is this it," the others said

"No; d - n you, go on." I then took him, and asked what he had got; he hemmed and ha'd; he said he was going to take it to the coach office, but he did not know what office. It was a greasy night, the bag was not muddy.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I picked it up in the road.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220220-176

499. JAMES M'CARTHY , and FREDERICK WYATT were indicted for stealing, on the 17th of January , one coat, value 1 l.; one pair of breeches, value 4 s., and one waistcoat, value 3 s. , the goods of John Gillart .

ROSANNA GILLART. I am the wife of John Gillart , a butcher , of King-street, Seven Dials. I had a clothes shop in Little St. Andrew-street , in the beginning of June; I then lost the suit of clothes, which hung at the door - I lost the breeches on the Friday, about ten o'clock; on Thursday following I saw the prisoners lurking about - Wyatt made a snatch at a pair of breeches, but could not get them. He said to M'Carty

"D - n me if I don't have that coat." I went out and took him - nothing was stolen that morning.

JOHN WRIGHT . I am beadle of St. Giles's. I was crossing Seven Dials - the prosecutrix gave Wyatt to me; he was crying - he said he had got nothing. I found M'Carthy at his mother's, and have found none of the property.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220220-177

500. ROBERT SWADLER , and THOMAS SMITH , were indicted for stealing, on the 11th of January , 8 lbs. of lead, value 18 d., the goods of Robert Andrew Reynolds , and fixed to a building of his .

THOMAS ANDREW REYNOLDS . I am a cheesemonger. This lead was fixed to a shed, in George-street, Mile-end New-town . I know it was stolen.

THOMAS REYNOLDS . On the 11th of January, I went to see if the premises were all safe - I saw some persons on the tiles; I heard a hammering and called to them to come down - they threw something from the roof and then came down; it was the prisoners - they climbed up by a cart. I searched them, and on Smith found a hammer and a knife. I took them both to the watch-house, and on returning I found the lead had been brought to my house. It was between six and seven o'clock at night; I fitted it to the roof, it corresponded - there was only a small piece found; half a hundred weight was taken the night before. It was part of the lead taken from the roof; the premises belong to Robert Andrew Reynolds .

WILLIAM CLARE . The lead had been thrown off the shed, and fell into my neighbour's yard; I went and picked it up. I took it to Reynolds's.

SWADLER - GUILTY . Aged 15.

DEAN - GUILTY . Aged 15.

Confined Three Months and Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220220-178

501. JOHN BARCLAY was indicted for a libel .

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

MR. WILLIAM PAYNE . I am clerk at the Justice-room, Guildhall. I produce a pamphlet, lodged at Guildhall. In consequence of an information against John Barclay , the warrant was granted on an information sworn to by John Purton , on the 21st of December, by Mr. Alderman Thompson; it was to apprehend a man whose name was unknown, but whose person was well known, and who had refused to disclose his name; and on the 2d of January, he was brought to Guildhall. He gave his name not very reluctantly, Purton delivered the book into my hands.

JOHN PURTON . I am a constable, of Bow-street. I have seen the defendant serving in Carlisle's shop, No. 55, Fleet-street. I bought this pamphlet of him on the 21st of December, (Looking at it.) I saw him next day, selling behind the counter, and asked his name; he said it was a question he had no right to answer, and would not. I afterwards applied for a warrant, and got one, and went to see it executed about a week after. I had been several times to look for him in the mean time, but could never see him there till nine days after. I then went with a City officer, who apprehended him, he was behind the counter.

Cross-examined by MR. HILL. Q. What led you to know Carlile's shop - A. On account of a former conviction on the same week. A gentleman named Sharp applied to me to go there.

Q. Do you know whether he is Honorary Assistant Secretary to the Constitutional Association - A. I have heard so.

Q. You do this for the public good, you do not expect to be paid for it - A. I expect to be paid for my loss of time, I expect him to pay me.

Q. Did you ever see any body else belonging to the Constitutional Association - A. Mr. Murray.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You were constable of Bow-street then, and are now - A. Yes.

(The libel was here put in and read, it was the same work as that produced on the trial of Vamplue (page 213.)

Mr. William addressed the Court and Jury on behalf of the prisoner, and called a witness who gave him a good character, and stated him to have been apprenticed to Mr. Sherwin, a printer.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

The Jury recommended the defendant to mercy, for reasons contained in a paper which they handed to the Court; we believe the principal reason was his having been articled to the printer of

"The Republican."

Confined Six Months , and to enter into his own recognizance for 100 l., to keep the peace for three years then to come.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220220-179

TWELFTH DAY, TUESDAY, MARCH 5.

502. CHARLES O'HARA was indicted for stealing, on 10th of February , six silver spoons, value 15 s. , the goods of Henry Claude Emarot .

HENRY CLAUDE EMAROT . I am a decoration painter .

On the 10th of February, between eight and nine o'clock in the morning, these spoons were lost from a shelf in the front kitchen. I saw them there between six and seven o'clock the preceding evening - the prisoner was brought to me with them in his hand, he laid them on the dresser.

MARY CASTLES . I am servant to Mr. Emarot. On the 10th of February, between eight and nine o'clock, I was cleaning before the door; a person said a man had gone into the house. I went down into the back kitchen, and behind the door, I saw the prisoner - we had a scuffle on the stairs, he struck me a violent blow, which gave me a black eye, and got away. I cried Stop thief! he was taken and brought back directly.

Cross - examined. Q. You do not think he struck you on purpose - A. No; it was in the scuffle.

JAMES BECK . I was three doors from Emarot's, and heard the cry of Stop thief! the prisoner ran by my door, I followed him down Upper Thornaugh-street, collared him, and found six spoons on him. He said

"I acknowledge taking the spoons, and hope you will be merciful."

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Six Months , and Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220220-180

503. LYDIA COUSINS was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of February , one blanket, value 18 d.; one bed-tick, value 6 d.; and one apron, value 6 d. , the goods of Aaron Withers .

ANN WITHERS . I am the wife of Aaron Withers . We live in Tuton-court, Crawford-street, Mary-le-bone . The prisoner lives opposite us. We have been intimate many years. On the 8th of February, I came in and found my husband at home - I went to make the bed, the prisoner came in, and stood talking with us about five minutes - I put on the sheet, looked round for the blanket, and missed these things and her. I had pulled them off the bed just before; I did not see her take any thing - I and my husband were both in the room. My husband is not here; I went over to her, and said she had got my bed clothes; she denied it. I looked about the room, and in the cupboard I found the bed-tick and the apron in the chair she sat in - she was sitting on it. I have not found the blanket. I said I would fetch a constable - she threw the things in the kennel after me.

JANE WITHERS . I was present when the bed-tick was found - she threw them after my mother.

SAMUEL PRENDERGRASS. I apprehended her next morning - she said the prosecutrix brought the things into her room.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. Both she and her daughter live with different men. She brought the things in, and said, she had lost a blanket - I never had any of them.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220220-181

504. BENJAMIN MORTIMORE was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of January , one truss of hay, value 2 s. , the goods of William Newman .

WILLIAM NEWMAN . I am a cow keeper , and live in Russell-street, Bloomsbury . I found the prisoner in custody with this hay. I believe my servant entrusted him with it to feed the cows.

THOMAS JENKS . I stopped the prisoner coming out of the stable with the hay - he said it was Newman's.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220220-182

505. WILLIAM COOKE was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of December , one pair of drawers, value 2 s. , the goods of James Murray .

JAMES MURRAY . I live in Bottle-alley, Bishopsgate-street without . On the 24th of December, I left the prisoner in my bed-room, at a quarter past seven o'clock, when I went to work - he slept in the same room with me. On Sunday night, the 23d of December, I had a coat, waistcoat, and trowsers with a pair of drawers in them, they were all locked up at night in a box; I saw Mrs. Pearce the landlady, lock them up. I came home to breakfast, about eight o'clock, the prisoner was there then in the room - I went to work again, right opposite the alley, and Pearce came over to me; I went up stairs, and missed these things. When the prisoner was taken; the officer asked if I knew him, I said that was the very man - he said the small clothes were not mine. The duplicate was found on him.

ANN PEARCE . I keep two rooms in the house. The patrol brought the prisoner to my door, on the Friday before Christmas-eve; he slept there three nights. Murray's box is small, and my husband locked his things up in my box - the prisoner saw them locked up; he slept in a bed by himself, and went away about nine o'clock in the morning of the robbery, with a bundle which seemed larger a great deal than what he brought with him; he asked me about half-past eight o'clock for a pen, ink, and the number of my house; he then went up stairs for three quarters of an hour, and gave me the key of the room, and said,

"You will be good enough to take in a letter for me on Wednesday, my name is Tom Jones ; I shall not return before that, as I am going to Brighton, to see my brother" - he had the bundle under his arm, and wished me good morning; he held the bundle behind him. I ran up stairs found the box broken open, and the clothes gone. Nobody but him could have done it - he never returned.

DAVID JOHNSON . I am an officer. I was on duty in Mile-end-road, about half-past one o'clock in the morning, of the 11th of February, and seeing the prisoner come up the road, I asked his business - he gave no satisfactory answer; I thought he answered the description of a man suspected of several robberies; and took him. As I took him to Bow-street, Pearce came and said he had broken open her box, and stolen the clothes - I found a tool on him, which corresponded with the marks on the box. I found the duplicate of the drawers on him.

WILLIAM STUBBING . I am servant to Mr. Wadmore. On the 14th of January, the prisoner pawned two shirts, five handkerchiefs, a pair of drawers, and a pair of stockings.

(Property produced and sworn to).

Prisoner's Defence. I bought the drawers in Oxford-street, seven months ago.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220220-183

506. WILLIAM LACY COOPER was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of February , one flute, value 4 s., the goods of William Truelove , from his person .

WILLIAM TRUELOVE . On the 15th of February, about half-past four o'clock in the morning, I was in the Haymarket , seeing the people come out of the masquerade, at the Opera-house - I stood at the Opera-house door; I had a flute in my coat pocket; I felt something at my pocket, turned round, and saw the prisoner with it in his hand; I seized him directly, and somebody immediately took it from him. I have not seen it since.

Prisoner. Q. Did not I shew you both my hands - A. Yes, after he had given it to another man.

EDMUND PEPPER . I am an officer. I was at the Opera-house, and saw the prisoner - the prosecutor said,

"You have got my flute," there was immediately an opening in the crowd, for somebody to get away. The prosecutor said,

"It is no use searching him, he has given it to another man."

Prisoner's Defence. Immediately as he taxed me with it, I shewed them both my hands.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220220-184

507. ELEANOR DONOVAN and MARY ATKINS were indicted for stealing, on the 18th of January , two handkerchiefs, value 6 s. , the goods of Edward Pike .

CHRISTOPHER CLARK . I am shopman to Edward Pike , a linen-draper , of Ratcliff-highway . On the 18th of January, between five and six o'clock in the evening, the prisoners came into the shop together; Atkins looked at some silk handkerchiefs, I shewed her two, she took them up, looked at them, and laid them down, then took up another piece, and laid something over them. Donovan was close to her - she fixed on another pattern, and told me to cut one off, and she would pay 6 d. on it, and call next morning for it. While I was cutting it off, I saw he draw the two from under the piece off the counter, and put them on the floor; she then said to Donovan,

"Look at my boot, and see how it is wearing out;" Donovan immediately stooped down. I knocked at the parlour door, and Chapman came out.

CHARLES CHAPMAN . I am shopman to the prosecutor. Clark knocked at the door, and said he thought Donovan had some handkerchiefs in her apron; she was holding her apron up, and had some tea-cups and saucers in it - I went towards her, and saw her drop the two handkerchiefs out of one side of her apron; Clark picked them up - they were taken in charge immediately.

DONOVAN'S Defence. He has taken a false oath - he never saw me drop it.

ATKIN'S Defence. He swears quite wrong.

DONOVAN - GUILTY . Aged 17.

ATKINS - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220220-185

508. MARY GEARE was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of February , three shillings and three halfpence, the property of Robert Gent , from his person .

ROBERT GENT . I am an occasional coachman . On the 9th of February, I was at Paddington, returning from the stables after twelve o'clock at night; I was quite sober, and in Upper Seymour-street , the prisoner followed me, and insisted on going with me - she followed me about ten yards; I said I would have nothing to do with her; she caught hold of my arm, thrust her hand into my breeches pocket, and took out my money; I said she had robbed me, she denied it - she turned my pocket inside out, I had 3 s. 1 1/2 d., there, it was safe when I left the stable; she denied having any money about her, and used bad language. I called the watchman, and gave her in charge - 4 s. 6 d. in and about 5 d. was found on her.

Prisoner. Q. You gave me 1 s., and wanted it back - A. I did not.

RICHARD BROOKS . I am a watchman. The prosecutor gave charge of her for robbing him of 3 s. 1 1/2 d., I knew her before.

JOSEPH FELLOWS . The prisoner was brought to the watch-house; she denied it - I told her to produce her money, which she did, she said nothing about him giving her money.

Prisoner's Defence. I refused to return the shilling, and he gave charge of me.

MARY HOLT . I live in Carrington-street, Brooks-market. While the prisoner was in the watch-house, the prosecutor said he was agreeable to take 2 s., and have no more to do with it; he said so as he went to the office, Brooks was there, and must have heard it - he said so twice to me.

Q. How came you at the watch-house - A. I went to carry her breakfast; she takes in needle work - I cannot say she is a woman of the town. I told nobody of it but the prisoner.

ROBERT GENT re-examined. On my solemn oath I never had any conversation with this woman at all. I never said a word about taking 2 s.

JOSEPH FELLOWS . I saw the witness at the office, she said nothing to me about this.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Confined One Year .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220220-186

509. BENJAMIN WALDON was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of January , one watch, value 10 s., and one key, value 2 d., the goods of Frederick Lewis , from his person .

FREDERICK LEWIS . On Sunday afternoon, the 13th of January, at half-past five o'clock, I was in Brick-lane , going towards Spitalfields-church, and by the wall of Hanbury's brewhouse, I saw three lads standing with their backs against the wall, and two females opposite them. I passed between the men and the women, and felt a finger at my waistcoat pocket. I immediately said,

"I'll not be robbed, keep your hands off;" a young man rushed before me, and said,

"Do you say I robbed you?" I said, I'll have nothing to say to you." I was going on, and at the corner of Black Eagle-street, somebody behind pushed against me, and shoved me up the street, and one of them violently thrust his hands into my waistcoat pocket, and took out my

watch. I cried Stop thief! he was followed to the end of the street, and somebody said,

"We have got your watch." I found the prisoner in custody, and gave him in charge at the watch-house. I cannot say whether he was one of the men, my sight is very bad.

THOMAS HART . The prisoner was given in my charge with the watch.

WILLIAM RUSHBROOK . I was coming along Brick-lane, between five and six o'clock, and opposite the end of Black Eagle-street, I saw the prosecutor surrounded by three fellows, and from the position they were in, I thought they were robbing him - I was running to the spot, and had got as far as the middle of the road, when all three ran off - the prisoner up the lane, another in the opposite direction, and the third down Black Eagle-street, where he fell down, and I overtook him. He got up and was running off again, I struck him on the head with my umbrella, he then turned from the middle of the street, towards the pavement, when several persons seized him. I saw his hand in a position, as if he had thrown something in the kennel, I picked the watch out, and with several others, took him to the watch-house - it was the prisoner.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I heard the cry and joined in the pursuit for twenty yards, and saw a lad drop something - they collared me and said I was the person who dropped it.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220220-187

510. GEORGE WATSON was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of February , one watch, value 4 l.; one ribbon, value 2 d.; one seal, value 3 s.; two keys, value 2 d., and one compass, value 6 d., the goods of Joseph Merle , from his person .

JOSEPH MERLE . Last Sunday fortnight, at three o'clock in the afternoon, I was in Charles-street, Covent-Garden , going towards the Strand, and just as I got opposite the public-house, where there is a coach stand, the prisoner came towards me, and snatched my watch all at once. I pursued him, and by Vinegar-yard, at the corner of Drury-lane Theatre - he was stopped by Gregory. I had not lost sight of him, and I am sure is the man.

DANIEL GREGORY . I was in Bridges-street. I heard the cry of Stop thief! I saw the prisoner running towards me. I secured him at the corner of Vinegar-yard - he had his hand in his breeches pocket. I put my hand in, and drew out the watch. I took him to the watch-house.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220220-188

511. JOHN WATSON was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of February , one plumb ball, value 3 d.; one plumb line, value 3 d.; one reel, value 6 d.; one mallet, value 18 d., and one plane, value 2 s. , the goods of William Hall .

WILLIAM HALL . I am a carpenter . On the 6th of February, these things were at No. 22, Bryanstone-square . I was working there, and left all the tools there at six o'clock. I returned at day-light, and missed them.

WILLIAM DAY . I am an officer. On Wednesday I went to Lisson-street, where the prisoner was at work, at a carpenter's and found a quantity of tools concealed under shavings. I brought them away, and went to his house and found a quantity of other tools - he had been taken in custody before.

WILLIAM MORRIS . I am a watchman of Montague-place, Bryanstone-square. About half-past six o'clock at night, a private watchman called me - he had got the prisoner by the collar - we took him in charge, and found these tools on him - he wanted to make away with them; he dropped them in a corner of the yard.

ROBERT THOMPSON . I am a private watchman of Bryanstone-square. I took the prisoner about half-past six o'clock, on the 6th of February, getting over the rails of No. 22, with the tools. I asked what business he had there - he said he was going to pack his tools up, as he had a job to do. Next morning he offered me one pound and a half-crown to let him go. Hall claimed the tools.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I got over for a necessary purpose, and saw these things by the gate.

GUILTY . Aged 45.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220220-189

512. HARRIET YARDLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of January , one shirt, value 5 s.; three tablecloths, value 8 s., and two handkerchiefs, value 5 s. , the goods of Robert Peters .

SARAH PETERS . I am the wife of Robert Peters , and am a laundress . We live at No. 20, Collier-street, Pentonville . These things were lost before the 21st of January. The prisoner has been employed by me for about twelve months.

GEORGE TAYLOR . I am a constable. I was sent for to Peters's and took the prisoner. She said she knew nothing about it. I found some duplicates on her for two tablecloths. I took her to the pawnbroker's, and found more property - she said she pawned them.

HENRY MACDONALD . I am shopman to Mr. Britton, a pawnbroker. I have a handkerchief pawned for 1 s. in the name of Smith, on the 3rd of October. The prisoner pawned always in that name.

RICHARD PIKE . I am a pawnbroker. I have a tablecloth pawned by the prisoner. I believe the duplicates found on her is mine.

SAMUEL LOVEDAY . I am a pawnbroker. I have a shawl, two table-cloths, and a handkerchief, which the prisoner pawned.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 37.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220220-190

531. WILLIAM HOY was indicted for stealing on the 17th of January , thirty-six dolls, value 2 l. 11 s., and one basket, value 1 s. , the goods of John Kendall .

JOHN KENDALL . I am a doll-maker , and live at Battle-bridge. The prisoner came to me in distress, and asked if I should have a job, to give him a turn. I gave him several

loads to carry. I sent him to a toy shop with thirty-six dolls; he said he had met a lady, who had ordered him to bring thirty-six dolls to New William-street, Hampstead-road. I said I knew no toy shop there - he said, the lady told him to bring her 2 l. worth of goods. I said he had better take a few more, in case some were not liked and gave him 14 s. 6 d. worth more of dolls, and asked how long he should be gone - he said, an hour an half. I did not see him again till he was apprehended; he never returned with the money, goods, or basket. I sent to William-street - there was no toy shop there. I have not seen them since. I found instead of taking dolls to my customer, he used to sell them in the street.

Prisoner. Q. Did I not sell goods about for you. - A. No.

CATHERINE BROOK . I met the prisoner in Tottenham Court-road, where he was standing selling dolls. I liked them, and was going to take a counter in the Bazaar, which I was to have the first week in January, but could not get it so soon; he brought them. I said I could not take them, but would call on his master - he said, he lived at Battle-bridge. I went there, and found Kendall knew nothing of them.

WILLIAM BRILL . I apprehended the prisoner, at a house in St. Giles's. I found the basket there in a cupboard, in a lower part of the house. He said, let the consequences be what they would, he deserved it; for it was the effects of liquor.

(Basket produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I frequently sold things for him, and paid him.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220220-191

514. WILLIAM GLADMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of February , two yards of canvass, value 1 s., and one sack, value 1 s. , the goods of Benjamin Hull .

ROBERT CHRISTIAN . I am an officer of Mile End. On Sunday morning, at quarter past six o'clock, I saw the prisoner and another lad at the back of Hull's house; the other one got over the rail, and handed something over to the prisoner, who put it in a bag - the other ran off. I secured the prisoner with the bag, containing the sack and canvass.

BENJAMIN HULL . They are mine; I lost them out of my garden on the 22d of February.

Prisoner's Defence. I found them.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220220-192

515. RICHARD HUGHES was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of January , two loaves of bread, value 1 s. 8 d. , the goods of James Tibby .

The prosecutor did not appear.

NOT GUILTY

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220220-193

516. SAMUEL JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of February , one parasol, value 10 s. , the goods of Francis Moore and Thomas Moore .

BENJAMIN MORRIS . I was on duty with Baker in St. Martin's-lane, at half-past seven, on the 19th of February, and met the prisoner with something concealed under his coat. We stopped him, and took a parasol from under his coat, and found it had been stolen from Moores' ten minutes before. I found it had been stolen from Moore's.

WILLIAM BOONE . I am shopman to Francis and Thomas Moore , of St. Martin's-court . On the 19th of February, the parasol was stolen from the shop. I saw it safe half an hour before.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 36.

Confined One Month and Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220220-194

517. MARY MADDEN was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of February , three sovereigns, three crowns pieces, three half-crowns, and one shilling , the monies of John Adams .

JOHN ADAMS . I am a tallow-chandler and oilman , and live in Whitecross-street . The prisoner was my servant ; I missed 2 l. or 3 l. of silver in the course of the week, from my till, and on Friday, the 25th of January, I lost a sovereign; I still kept missing more silver, and sent for a constable, and told him; I did not lose any thing more till the 1st of February, when I lost a sovereign and three crown-pieces - I rather suspected a porter, stopped a day or two, and on the Tuesday night, I sent my foreman and porter out, and then marked a number of half-crowns, shillings, and halfpence, and put them in the till about eleven o'clock at night - I counted the money in the till, and found all right; I locked it and the outer door, went to bed, and about seven o'clock next morning, I went into the shop before any one else, I had kept the key of the shop. I missed 8 s. 6 d., I sent for the constable, and took him into the kitchen, I said

"I am robbed, and wish you to search the servant first;" she instantly said,

"It was me Sir, that robbed you, I am very sorry, pray don't hang me; you will find the money in my box." The constable found in her box 9 l. 5 s.; three sovereigns, and three crown pieces were among it, which I had marked, and the 8 s, 6 d., taken the last time, we found on her person, was three half-crowns, and 1 s. She lived three or four months with me - I had a good character with her; her friends are respectable.

THOMAS BRADFORD . I am an officer, and went on the 6th of February, and searched the prisoner; she burst into tears, and said she had robbed her master, and told me where the money was. I found three half-crowns, and 1 s. on her.

MR. ADAMS. It is the money I marked.

GUILTY Aged 22.

Judgment Respited .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220220-195

518. JOHN PERRY was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of February , one jacket, value 7 s. , the goods of John Kinder Cheese .

CHARLES HUDSON . On the 16th of February, I saw the prisoner in company, with another youth, lurking about Mr. Cheese's shop - I watched them and saw the other take the jacket from the door, and give it to the prisoner, who

put it in his apron; they immediately ran off - I overtook the prisoner; the other escaped.

JOHN KINDER CHEESE . It is mine.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Confined One Month and Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220220-196

519. ROBERT RUE was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of February , one coat, value 2 s. , the goods of Richard Hughes .

RICHARD HUGHES . I was going to Shadwell, with a load of hay, and asked the prisoner the way; my young master was with me - we had unloaded our hay, and were coming home, when the prisoner took my coat out of the cart; a boy told me of it. The officer pursued and took him.

GEORGE. MARTIN . I am servant to Mr. Hart, of Shadwell. I saw the prisoner take the coat out of the cart, and run across the fields. I told the officer, and he pursued, and took. I am sure he is the man.

THOMAS AMOS . I am an officer. I followed him for a quarter of a mile, and overtook him with the coat - he said it was his own.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220220-197

520. MARY SALTER was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of February , one saucepan, value 18 d. the goods of Thomas Joyce .

THOMAS JOYCE . I am a tinman , and live in Whitechapel . On the 12th of February, about seven o'clock in the evening, I was in the shop; a person came in, and said I had lost a saucepan; he pointed the prisoner out - I went, and took her with the saucepan under her shawl. She was a stranger.

JOHN BARTLETT . I received her in charge with it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 41.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220220-198

521. FRANCIS STAFFORD was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of January , one coat, value 18 d.; three shirts, value 6 s.; five pair of stockings, value 15 d.; two handkerchiefs, value 9 d.; one razor, value 3 d.; two pair of gloves, value 18 d.; one shaving-box, value 3 d., and one brush, value 3 d., the goods of John Cockey ; two handkerchiefs, value 1 s.; one hat, value 1 s., and one pair of trowsers, value 1 s. , the goods of Joseph Dennett .

JOHN COCKEY . I am a pensioner in the East India Company's service . On the 26th of January these things were taken out of a box in the room where I lodge, on the second floor, and put in the cellar - the prisoner slept with me. He was a watchman of Marylebone; he came home after twelve o'clock at night. About five in the morning he was hunting for a light to go down into the privy, which is in the cellar; he could not find any, but went down without. Two men awoke in the room, and missed part of their things. I opened my box, and missed my clothes; the other men went down and took him. I found a bundle in the cellar containing all my property.

JOSEPH DENNETT . I live in the same room. I was going to get up in the morning before day-light, and laid the rasp over my head to strike a light with. The prisoner knocked it down, which awoke me. I got up and asked him the time; he said half-past four; but I heard the watchman go half-past five. He said he got up to call a friend, he got a light, and lit my candle; and while he was gone down stairs I looked into my box and missed my trowsers, and my silk handkerchief, which hung on a nail. I found my hat put on the top of his bed, with Oyler's handkerchief and waistcoat. He came up again - I saw him take them and go down with them. We went and took him on the stairs with them in his hand. He said, if we would let him go he would give me my trowsers, and that they were under the cellar stairs. I found them there with Cockey's things.

SAMUEL OYLER . I lodge in this room. The prisoner came to the head of the bed to feel for a candle, and knocked the rasp down. I told my partner to look to his box, as we suspected him before. I found my waistcoat and handkerchief on one corner of the bed, and watched to see whether he would take them. He came up and took them - we went down and secured him - he said Dennel's trowsers were below.

WILLIAM SHEPPARD . I am a constable. He was brought to the watch-house - I found the razor, shaving-box, gloves, and handkerchief on him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent of taking the bundle. I took the other things by mistake.

GUILTY . Aged 31.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220220-199

522. JAMES BENNETT was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of February , one handkerchief, value 2 s., the goods of a man unknown, from his person .

HENRY YATES . I am an officer. On the 14th of February, about noon, I was about two doors from Beaufort-buildings, saw three suspicious characters, and watched them. I saw one of them take a gentleman's handkerchief from his pocket, and give it to the prisoner. I ran across and collared him - he instantly dropped it. I could not overtake the gentleman. Both his companions knocked me down. I could not follow the gentleman.

Prisoner. It is false, I never had it.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Six Months and Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220220-200

523. JOHN EVANS was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of January , one pickaxe, value 5 s.; and one shovel, value 3 s., the goods of Charles Maine , and one shovel, value 3 s., the goods of Isaac Musgrove ; and one shovel, value 2 s. , the goods of Henry Turner .

CHARLES MALNE. I am a labourer , and was working at Ball's-pond . I lost a shovel and pickaxe - I found them on the prisoner's premises, Hudson's-court, Kingsland-road, the next night; my shovel was down the privy.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. Are on sure it was his house - A. Yes, Sir.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

ISAAC MUSGROVE . I lost a shovel from the field - between twelve and one o'clock it was found in the prisoner's house.

HENRY TURNER . I lost my shovel from the field - it was found with the rest.

JAMES WILLIAMS . I let the prisoner this house on the 9th of January.

JOSHUA ARMSTRONG . I went to the house, and found two shovels behind the door, and a pickaxe. I took the prisoner behind some wood in Saunders's-gardens - he said he found them.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220220-201

524. JOHN GLEED was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of February , one necklace, value 3 s., the goods of Roger Dix Moore , from his person .

MARY MOORE . I am the wife of Roger Dix Moore. On the 11th of February my child was in Chequer-alley, St. Luke's , at a little past four o'clock in the afternoon; a little girl, about ten years old, took her out. In about a quarter of an hour after the little girl's mother brought the child back, and said she had lost her necklace. The girl who saw it taken is not here.

JAMES HANDLEY . I am an officer. I went to take the prisoner, searched the room, and found a hat under the table, with the necklace in it, and found the prisoner concealed in a cupboard. He said there was two others in it besides himself.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220220-202

525. JOHN DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of February , one handkerchief, value 2 s., the goods of a man unknown, from his person .

WILLIAM COLTON . I am a constable. On the 1st of February, I was standing at my door, at Battle-bridge, and saw the prisoner go by with others - I followed them along Pentonville, through different streets, across the fields - I called on Jordan, who followed with me, as far as Theobald's-road - there was a show, and a number of people looking at it - a gentleman and lady were looking at it, and all the three stood together close to them. I saw something pass from one of the others to the prisoner, who put it under his apron - he ran off as hard as he could, and I caught him in Bloomsbury-square. I sent Jordan after the gentleman. I took the prisoner, and asked him where the handkerchief was; he said, he had no handkerchief. I took him into a public-house, and found the handkerchief in his breeches. One of the three was a little boy.

WILLIAM JORDAN . Colton called on me to follow three suspicious characters into Little Gray's Inn-lane, where one of them pulled a gentleman's handkerchief half out - they then went on. I saw them attempt several gentlemen's pockets - the show went from Gray's Inn-lane to the King's-road. Colton sent me after the gentleman; he promised to come to the office, but never did. I did not see him take the handkerchief - one of them was quite a child - they saw me, and called out my name, to alarm the others. I am sure the prisoner was one of them; he was covering the boy while he did it.

Prisoner's Defence. It is all false.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220220-203

526. JAMES CORNISH and SAMUEL SPENCER were indicted for stealing, on the 7th of February , four deal ends, value 4 s. , the goods of Francis Pinney .

The prosecutor not being able to identify the property, the prisoners were

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220220-204

527. WILLIAM HOLMES was indicted for a libel

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

WR. WILLIAM PAYNE . I am clerk at the Justice-room, Guildhall. I produce a pamphlet put into my hands, on the 27th of December, by Purton. The defendant was brought to the Hall, as the person which sold it to Purton; he was described in the warrant as a person, whose name was unknown, but whose person was well known.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. When he was brought to the office, did Purton say, that was the man he originally applied for the warrant about - A. He said that was the man who sold him the pamphlet - it was left in my hands to justify the warrant being issued; it was left in my possession before the warrant was granted.

JOHN PURTON . I am a constable, on the Bow-street establishment. On the 26th of December, I bought this pamphlet at Carlisle's shop, in Fleet-street, of the prisoner.

Q. Did you attempt to learn his name - A. I tried to watch him from the shop; I went in and identified him when the warrant was issued - he is the person it was issued against. When I bought the pamphlet he was behind the counter, apparently serving, and behind the counter selling the same work when he was taken; there was a great many people about the shop then, and on the 27th, when I went with Harrison to take him, I did not learn his name till I got to the Justice-room. The book has my name on it, which I wrote on it a few minutes after.

Cross-examined. Q. Are you messenger to the Constitutional Association. - A. I was employed by a gentleman named Sharp, who I have heard is connected with the association - I am not regularly employed by him; I have been employed to go no where but to Carlile's.

Q. Have you been concerned on any other business for Sharp, besides at Carlisle's shop - I have employed persons myself, on account of their determination to sell those books, and myself being known.

Q. Whose determination - A. Why the people of the shop. I have seen placards in the shop to that effect

Q. What was the nature of the placard. - A. That the address to the Reformers of the 24th of June was still to be had.

The libel was here read; it was the same as that produced on Vamplue's trial. Page 213.

Mr. Prendergast addressed the Jury on behalf of the defendandant.

Defendant. When I was arrested, Purton said,

"He is not the man I bought the pamphlet of.

PURTON re-examined. Q. At the time you came into the shop with the officers to arrest this man, did you say to any person, that the defendant was not the man who sold you the pamphlet - A. I deny it.

Defendant. Q. Did you not buy the pamphlet when you came with the warrant - A. I told the officer I would buy a pamphlet of the person I meant, but that was not the book produced.

The Defendant called

SUSAN WRIGHT . I was housekeeper at Mr. Carlile's. When this man was arrested, on the 27th of December, I lived there; I had just come down to prepare dinner for the two men.

Q. What two men - A. The man unknown, and the prisoner - I saw some one open the counter, and assume an authority, which I thought he had no business to do. I opened the door directly, and asked what he wanted; it was near one o'clock - he looked very contemptuously and made no reply. I asked him again what he came for, and he was talking to Purton, the spy.

Q. What do you mean by a spy - A. An informer; persons who go and buy these pamphlets to entrap them; they buy them and pretend that they understand them to be sedititious, and I heard Purton say to the officer,

"That is not the man."

Q. Who did he speak of - A. I suspect by the conversation that passed between them, that the man they wanted was gone away, and that the prisoner was not the man.

Q. Did you ask him whether he wanted that man or not - A. I did say something, but what it was, I cannot recollect.

Q. Did you ever say to him,

"This is not the man who you are going to take away" - A. No.

Q. How came you not to say so - A. I did afterwards.

Q. Be cautious what you say, you did not say

"Do you mean the prisoner is not the man" - A. No, I did not. I heard the officer say to (Rhodes) the prisoner,

"I have got a warrant for you." Purton was in the shop, I directly said,

"If there is a warrant against you, hear it read, and see that it is in your own name" - his name is Joseph Rhodes .

Q. That is the name he went by in your shop - A. I received him by that name when he came from the country - I turned into the little room, and did not see any thing more, but requested the officer to let him stay and dine, which he refused.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. That we may not differ about persons, is that the man, (pointing to him) who you call Purton the spy - A. Yes.

Q. And is that man the officer with whom you had the conversation - A. I cannot say whether that is the person who arrested Rhodes, or the man unknown, he arrested one of them; there were two men arrested that day, within an hour, and I asked both officers to let them stay and dine.

Q. Did you ask the men, or Purton only - A. Oh! of course, I should not ask Purton to dinner, I only asked the officer to let the prisoner dine, the man unknown was arrested afterwards by another officer. I am married, I have lived at Carlile's since Mary Ann Carlile went away, since November, till the shop was closed - I was housekeeper, I am not related to Carlile.

Q. Have you the misfortune to be indicted for selling these pamphlets - A. If you call it a misfortune, Sir, I have, I would rather enjoy my own opinion, of course, and be indicted for it - there are two indictments against me.

Q. Either of them for publishing Pain's works - No answer.

Q. Is it for selling pamphlets, at Carlile's shop - A. Yes; I was shopwoman there for three months, that was in the spring - I left just before November. When the indictment was found against me, I was removed from the shop.

Q. You went away, and returned as housekeeper - A. Yes.

Q. You talk of enjoying your own opinion, have you any belief in the Holy Scriptures - A. I shall not answer that, I do not think it a question I have a right to answer.

COURT. The question is whether you believe the Holy Gospels, on which you have been sworn - A. When I am brought to trial, perhaps I may give my opinion.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Who hired the prisoner and other man to serve in the shop - A. I did not; the prisoner had served there a very few days, I think not a week; the other man had only been there during the time the prisoner went, and the officer came back.

Q. Well but how many days had he been backward and forward - A. That I cannot tell; I have seen placards in the shop - when there is any thing to sell people generally put up placards. I never saw one saying

"This is the mart for blasphemy and sedition;" for I very rarely pressed myself in among the crowd, to see them - I swear I never saw it in the window.

Q. Where did you see it then - A. I saw it in my own hands, though whoever copied that placard out of the window did not copy the inverted comma's.

Q. Do you mean to say the words blasphemy and sedition were not there - A. I mean to say, I cannot say any thing about it; it was given me with many others that were given me for waste paper. The placard I speak of was copied in the newspapers, and I said

"That placard had better be taken down."

Q. I wish you to state again, what took place at the time Purton and the officer came into the shop, telling you I mean to contradict you if you speak untrue, and that you will hear of it in a different shape - now I ask you again, were you in the shop when Purton came in - A. I tell you I was in the little room, and saw the officer open the counter; Purton was with him.

Q. What did the officer say or do to Holmes - A. I have told you.

Q. You must tell me again - A. No I will not.

Q. I say you must - A. I will not.

COURT. If you do not answer questions that are material, the Court will commit you for contempt. If you come forward as a witness, you must answer all fair questions.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. What did the officer say or do to the prisoner when he came behind the counter - A. I told you that when he came behind the counter, I opened the door of the little room, and asked what he wanted, he turned round and made no answer, but said something to Purton, and, by their motions, I thought that they had got the wrong man, and that they wanted another man, who was gone away; then I asked him a second time, and he said to

the man

"I have got a warrant for you." I told him to hear it read, and see that it was in his own name; then I asked him to let him stay and dine.

Q. Did Purton say or do any thing all this time - A. Something passed which I did not understand, for I retired into the little room.

Q. I think I heard you say, Purton said that was not the man - A. Yes; that I did, and they also asked if there was any other woman there besides me; the man unknown was also in the shop.

Q. Was he behind the counter at the time - A. Not at the moment, but he was coming down stairs.

Q. Did you see that man before or after Purton said,

"That is not the man" - A. I think it was before; I cannot say whether he was present. or not.

COURT. Q. On your oath, was not that man, whom you call

"unknown," called by some Christian or Sirname - A. I do not answer that.

Q. You can answer Yes, or No. - A. Then I must answer Yes; I called him by the name he went by, and the prisoner called him by that name also.

Q. Did you advise that person not to give a name. - A. I never advise any thing.

ANTHONY HARRISON . I am a Marshalsman of the City. I went with Purton, on the 27th, to apprehend the prisoner, at Carlile's shop; there was no name in the warrant. Purton was to go into the shop, and if he stopped I was to go in directly; I did - he was buying a book of the prisoner, and pointed to him. I took him; he gave a nod, and I lifted up a flap to stop him going into the room; I told him I had a warrant against him. Purton did not say

"That is not the man." I had two warrants; the lady asked me to let him stop and dine. I said the Magistrate was sitting, and if he was gone he would be locked up till next day - she asked me a good many times to let him stop to dinner, and called the man down whose name is unknown, and then he put his hat on, and came away with me. When that man came down, Purton said

"That is not the man."

Defendant. Q. Did not Purton swear he bought the pamphlet of me the day before, that is the 26th - A. I do not know; I signed my name on the book he bought on the 27th - my name is not on the one produced.

COURT. Q. In consequence of there being no name in your warrant, Purton went to shew you who the man was - A. Yes; he would not give his name at the first examination.

JURY to PURTON. When did you buy the pamphlet produced in Court - A. On the 26th, here is my memorandum on it

"Bought on 26th of December, of a short stout man, at the shop of R. Carlile." I wrote this within a quarter of an hour; before it was out of my possession; I have not written on the one bought on the 27th - there was no man in the shop like him, and I have seen him in the shop before.

GUILTY .

Confined for Two Years , and to enter into his own Recognizance for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220220-205

THIRTEENTH DAY. WEDNESDAY, MARCH 6.

528. DENNIS BRYANT , was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of February , four half-crowns , the property of John Bevill .

SUSAN BEVILL . I am the wife of John Bevill , grocer , of New Gravel-lane . On the 5th of February, between eight and nine o'clock, I was sitting in the parlour, a woman called out that my till was robbed. My daughter and I went into the shop, and found the woman holding the prisoner. he held out his hand with a half-crown and 2 d., which he said a boy had given him, that he had no more, and if we would let him go, he would never come again. I saw three more half-crowns found in his sleeve - he said a boy had given him the 2 d. to come in and rob the till.

HENRIETTA SMITH . I am the daughter of the prosecutrix. I looked in the till half an hour before this happened - I had left four half-crowns there, none had been taken out, my mother's account is correct; he said the half-crown was all he had, that he never came before, and would not come again. I said there ought to be three more, and they were shook out of his sleeve.

ELIZA MOAD . I went to the shop, and saw the prisoner round the counter with his hands in the till. I gave the alarm and stopped him - three half-crowns were shook out of his sleeve.

Prisoner's Defence. They gave me the money to go in.

GUILTY . Aged 9.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220220-206

529. HENRY CAPS and JEREMIAH CALLAHAN were indicted for stealing, on the 17th of February , one watch, value 15 s., the goods of William Hatherton , from his person .

MR. PRENDERGAST conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM HATHERSTON . On Saturday night, the 17th of February, about half-past twelve o'clock, my business caused me to be in Clare-market. I was coming home, and was going into a public-house in Drury-lane , near the burial ground, to get a pint of beer; the two prisoners came towards me, and as Caps passed, he seized my watch-chain, and took it out. I seized him and called to the watch, Callahan came to his assistance, and got him from me. I then seized Callahan, he pulled me across the road, and as I was calling Watch! he called to Caps for assistance, and said,

"Don't go away," Caps, then came and joined him. I was contending with them both, they got off, and my wife and myself called out Watch! the constable came up and rushed among the crowd, and took me into a shop - I was bleeding, I said I should know the man again, and went to look for them in Queen-street, and on coming into Drury-lane, Jones pointed over the way; I saw Caps run over, I said,

"That is the man who robbed me." Callahan was taken the same night in Drury-lane, about one o'clock - I am certain they are the men.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. What are you - A. I buy bread of bakers, and carry it about to sell - I deal with several people. Sir Richard Birnie examined me twice on this business.

Q. Did not Sir Richard Birnie say

"I do not like your story, why not call out that you were robbed, instead of not speaking till the watchman came?" He did, and asked me to bring somebody to confirm my story.

MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. You did not take the witnesses who are now to be examined - A. They went to Marlborough-street by mistake, and when they got to Bow-street, it was too late.

DAVID JONES . On Saturday night, between twelve and one o'clock, I was in Drury lane, and saw the prosecutor holding Callahan, who was striking him; Caps was standing by, they came into the middle of the street, when Caps seized the prosecutor and turned him on one side - the prosecutor kept calling for the watchman all the time. They got on the pavement, and the prosecutor seized Caps again, but they escaped, and went down Stewards rents; I followed them, but not knowing the man was robbed, I turned back. After hearing he was robbed, I went after them, and in Wild-street I saw Caps; he saw me, and went into Little Wild-street, then took to his heels and ran off - I followed him across Queen-street, into Drury-lane, and then turned back; the prosecutor and constable then came up - I pointed him out, and the prosecutor said

"That is one of the men who robbed me."

Cross-examined. Q. What are you - A. A tailor. I did not know the prosecutor, he had cried Watch! but not Stop thief! when the watchman came up, he said,

"I have been robbed of my watch." I said,

"It is odd you should fight with the man so long, and not say you was robbed." Caps ran away as soon as he came.

JOHN ELSWORTH . I am a constable of St. Giles's. About twenty minutes after twelve o'clock, I was going to bed, but heard a violent cry of

"Watch! Watch! I will not let him go;" considering that there was a watchman near, I did not go out immediately; but as the cry continued, I went and found the prosecutor covered with blood - I took him into a baker's shop, he said he had lost his watch. The people were complaining that no watchman was to be found, there ought to have been three near the spot. As soon as I got up, there was a rush down Stewarts-rents; I ran round into Wild-street, and Drury-lane, and just at the corner, the prosecutor ran across, and stopped Caps, who was going towards Broad-court, he said,

"This is the man," I immediately collared him, and said,

"Harry, it is you." The prosecutor said he should know the other man, and Bartlett said he had seen a man with Caps, who he knew; a person fetched us to the corner of Clare-court, where Bartlett took Callahan; he said to Bartlett,

"I'll go with you, you have been a friend to me, if I had taken your advice, I should not have been in this."

Cross-examined. Q. The prosecutor said he was ill used - A. Yes. I asked if he had lost any thing, he said his watch; he was confused. The people thought it was a fight.

THOMAS BARTLETT . I am a street-keeper. I saw Elsworth having Caps in custody - the prosecutor said he was concerned in robbing him of his watch; he described the other man; I said I thought I knew him, and went down Clare-court, and saw Callahan, I secured him, and said,

"Caps is in custody, charged with a robbery, with you;" he said,

"Bartlett if I had taken your advice, and gone home, this would not have happened."

Cross-examined. Q. How far is the burial ground from Broad-court - A. Thirty or forty yards. Callahan was all over dirt. Sir R. Birnie said the prosecutor's wife need not come here.

PHILIP SMITH . I am a patrol. On Sunday morning, I saw the prosecutor turning out of a public-house, in Drury-lane - I heard of this affair, and saw Caps in Broad-court, the prosecutor said,

"That is one of them," he said that he had nothing to do with it.

WILLIAM JACKSON . I am a patten maker, and live in Wych-street. I was coming down Drury-lane, and by the burial ground, I saw the prosecutor and Callahan wrestling, he got away; Caps came between them, and forced them, apart and both ran down the court - I went with the constable after them round Wild-street; he went over the way and collared Caps. I went with them to the watch-house, and saw Callahan standing near Clare-court - I knew him directly, and pointed him out; I had heard the prosecutor calling out,

"Watch! You shall not go;" they were struggling together - Callahan said nothing when he was taken.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you hear him charged with a robbery - A. No. The impression on my mind was that it was a robbery. The prosecutor was holding the man, not fighting with him. Elsworth came up just as the men got away.

CAPS - GUILTY . Aged 18.

CALLAHAN - GUILTY . Aged 26.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220220-207

530. ELIZA BULLARD was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of November , one counterpane, value 10 s.; three pillows, value 9 s.; one pair of blankets, value 7 s.; one pair of sheets, value 4 s.; one pair of candlesticks, value 2 s., and two irons, value 2 s., the goods of Sarah Summers , in a lodging-room .

SARAH SUMMERS . I live in Grenville-street, Somers Town . I got a situation, and let my room furnished to the prisoner, at 4 s. per week; she went in about the 2d of November, and left about the 14th, she paid me part of one week's rent. These things were let with the lodging - I have found a pillow and blanket.

MARY RUBRIDGE . My husband keeps the house. Summers took an empty room of me; she furnished it, and as she was going to service, she let it to the prisoner. She came on the 2d of November, and on the 14th, she left the place - she said she was an ironer.

MARTHA CLEMENCE . The prisoner came to my shop, in November; she said she was distressed, and asked me to buy a duplicate of a pillow - I bought it of her for 3 s. 6 d., she took me to the pawnbroker to see it.

WILLIAM WOBRAND. I live in Phoenix-street, Somers Town. The prisoner asked me to buy a blanket - she said she was distressed, and going into the country, and assured me it was her own. I gave her 7 1/2 d. for it; this was in November.

HENRY M'DONELL. I am a pawnbroker, and live at Battle-bridge. On the 7th of November, the prisoner pawned a pillow for 7 s. On the 15th of November, the prosecutrix claimed it. She pawned other things which were redeemed.

DANIEL DUTCH . I am an officer. I went round to the pawnbrokers, and found the things.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. They were nothing in the room when I took it. The mistress of the house had a key, and could go in when she liked.

GUILTY Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220220-208

531. JAMES PATTERSON was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of January , four loaves of bread, value 3 s. 5 d. , the goods of Silvester Sapsford .

BLAKE PENNY. I am a baker - I had put my basket down in Portman-place , on the 31st of January, about one o'clock, and went a short distance with two loaves - on returning, I saw a number of people, and missed four loaves. It belonged to Silvester Sapsworth .

JOHN WADE . I am an officer. I was in Portman-place, and saw the prisoner take four loaves out of the basket. I stopped him with them.

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220220-209

532. THOMAS WELLS , WILLIAM PHILLIPS , and THOMAS MORLEY were indicted for stealing, on the 10th of February , one handkerchief, value 2 s., the goods of a man unknown, from his person .

WILLIAM COLTON . I am an officer. On Monday evening, the 10th of February, I was coming by a chapel in Barbican, a great many people were coming out, I saw the prisoners following a lady and gentleman. I can speak positively to Phillips - they followed them to Bunhill-row . - I saw something come from the pockets, and sent Keys over to the gentleman to see if he had lost any thing - he missed his handkerchief. I said, if he would return, I thought he could recover it - we ran up Bunhill-row; but they got into Blue Anchor-court, and we lost them. The gentleman said his name was Burrell. I knew Burrell of White Cross-street, and thought that it might be him, but found it was not. Half an hour afterwards, we found the three prisoners, with two others, in a coffee-shop in White Cross-street, and took all five to the watch-house. I could not find the gentleman. I am sure they took a handkerchief from the gentleman. I saw Phillips take it.

FRANCIS KEYS . I was in Chiswell-street, and saw Phillips attempt several gentlemen's pockets. I saw him take this gentleman's handkerchief. I ran and told the gentleman. We afterwards took them in a coffee-shop. The handkerchief was never found.

GEORGE WADDINGTON . I was in Chiswell-street, and took them. I saw nothing of the robbery.

PHILLIPS - GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Life .

WELLS - NOT GUILTY .

MORLEY - NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220220-210

533. MICHEAL READ was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of February , 16 lbs. of beef, value 4 s. , the goods of Thomas Jefferiss .

ELIZA JEFFERISS . I am fourteen years old. My father is a butcher , and lives in East-street, Clerkenwell . I saw the prisoner take the beef off the board, and run off. I am sure he is the man - it was between six and seven o'clock in the evening.

ROBERT JEFFERIES . I am the son of the prosecutor. I was in the parlour - my sister saw the beef taken, and said,

"There is a man has took the beef." I ran out and caught the prisoner at the top of Bath-street - he had not got it then - there was two of them; the other ran off with it - he said he was running after the other.

Prisoner's Defence. I was not near the place.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220220-211

534. JOHN PAINTER was indicted for perjury .

MR. RICHARD BREMLIDGE . I am clerk of the judgments in the Court of Common Pleas, and have a copy of the record of an action, T. C. Shields and H. J. Johns, plaintiffs, and Thomas Russell , defendant.

MR. JOHN WATTS . I am cryer to Lord Chief Justice Dallas. I remember this case being tried, and administering the oath to the defendant. I heard him examined as witness for the plaintiffs.

MR. WILLIAM B. GURNEY , I am a short-hand writer. I attended and took notes on the trial of this cause, and have an examined copy of the defendant's evidence. I examined it word for word.

Q. Just turn to where he speaks of the delivery of the parcel - A. He was asked whether he had a parcel to carry to Russell's warehouse - he said he had three to carry out that day, the 1st of December, 1820; that he received the parcel in question from Mr. West, Sir J. Perring's clerk - that he went to the Swan-with-two-Necks, and delivered the two others, and then went to Russell's office, with the third, the one in question, and got there not much after seven o'clock in the evening - that the first person he saw there was a working man, who loads the waggon, he desired to be served first - laid down the parcel, and came away - and was certain that the parcel he received from West was the same he delivered. He was asked, on cross examination,

"Do you know a person named Nightingale - A. Yes, my Lord. Q. Is he a man with one arm - A. Yes. Q. And very red whiskers - A. Yes." He could not exactly say how long he had known him, not to be intimate with him - he first saw him about three years ago. He is then asked. Q.

"He did not go to the waggon-office with you - A. No. Q. I mean at the time the parcel was delivered by you at Russell's office, was or was not Nightingale there - A. No." Nightingale was then called forward close to the witness, and he was asked,

"Is that Nightingale - A. Yes. Q. Was he or not with you on the 1st of December, when you went to the office - A. He was not. Q. I understand you to swear positively, that he was not at Russell's waggon-office with you - A. He was not." He stated that Nightingale was in the habit of occasionally visiting him at Sir John Perring 's, and taking tea with him. He was asked by Sergeant Pell , on cross examination,

"Q. You did not observe anybody in the office -

A. No. Q. If there had been you must have seen them - A. Yes." He said he observed nobody but the bookkeeper, and two persons at the door. He had before spoken of these two persons having called about a parcel.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. Did you take down the re-examinations, and all the cross-examinations - A. Yes.

Q. Is there nothing in them that will give any explanation - A. No, nothing that I recollect.

- WEST. I am clerk to Sir John Perring - Messrs . Shields & Johns were correspondents of ours; they are bankers at Plymouth Dock - their notes are payable at Sir John Perring 's. On the 1st of December, 1820, I made up a parcel of their notes to be transmitted to Plymouth-Dock. It is usual, on the 1st of every month to return all we have collected in the preceding month. I produce a book which will shew what notes I packed up. The entry is not my own writing. I compared the sums with the entry, but not the numbers. The notes are paid daily, and in the evening they are pinned together and entered in this book, I compared the amounts. I packed up in this parcel 1316 l., and put Sir John Perring 's seal on the parcel, after tying it in cartridge paper, and directed it to Messrs. Shields & Johns, Plymouth-Dock, on the left hand side. I made it up in the morning, put it in the strong box, and I think between half-past four and half-past five, delivered it to Painter, to be delivered at Russell's warehouse.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. Are you certain it was between half-past four and half-past five o'clock - I cannot say positively, it might be something later - it might be near six. I delivered him three parcels.

Q. And after, that he had to go with letters to the post-office - A. It was his duty to deliver letters. I believe he took the letters out with the parcels - it depends on his own arrangements whether he would go to the coach or waggon-office first; his general custom was to take the letters and parcels together - I counted every note.

Q. How long has the defendant been in the banking-house - A. I have been there ten years, and I believe he was there before me. He was entrusted to receive large sums, as receiving clerk, and was scrupulously punctual in his accounts. I always considered him strictly honest.

RICHARD TILLETT . I am clerk at Sir J. Perring's banking house. It is my duty to enter the country notes paid at the counter. I have examined the book, and find entries of different notes of Shields and Co. paid in Nov. 1820. I deliver the notes I receive to Mr. Vile, who delivers them to West - we pin them together, and enter the numbers in this book, and pin them up in parcels. I have here an account of all notes of Shields and Co. received that month; the whole amount is 1316 l.; and I find by the book, that on the 5th of December, 110 l., 130 l., and 50 l. of the same notes were presented and repaid.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. Are the notes given to you, or handed over by another clerk. - A. They are paid by the cashier, who puts them in a drawer - I compare them with the counter book, to see that they agree, and then enter them. I find above 1000 l. of the same notes were repaid before the 15th of December.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Do you know whether all notes issued by Shields and Co. are following numbers, or whether old notes are re-issued. - A. I cannot say. I only took the numbers, not the dates. I do not recollect ever seeing two of the same number.

AMBROSE COCK . I am cashier of Sir John Perring 's. I pay the notes at the counter, and have examined the book produced. I find by my entry of 5th of December, that I paid one lot of notes 110 l., another of 130 l., the numbers of which notes correspond with those put in the parcel. On the 6th of December, I paid 160 l. more of them, and most of the rest come from bankers at the clearing house.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You cannot say from memory whether the notes you paid had been in before. - A. Certainly not; only by examining the book I find the same numbers were paid. I cannot say whether I have met with two notes of the same number.

JOHN CHASE . I am clerk at Russell and Co.'s waggon office, No. 12, Friday-street, and have been so nearly six years. It is my business to receive parcels and book them. On the 1st of December I recollect the defendant coming to the office with a parcel, and knew him before. He came about eight o'clock in the evening - we have no dial in the office, but I say it was near eight o'clock, because we were to have a supper that night at eight o'clock. He had a person with him, whom I afterwards saw at Guildhall - it was Nightingale; he had but one arm, and very red whiskers. I am quite sure he was with him. Painter produced a parcel to me, and paid 1 l. 2 s. 8 d. insurance on it. I locked it up immediately in an iron safe at the top of the warehouse, in the counting-house. I keep the key - there were four or five other valuable parcels there, worth 1400 l. or 1500 l. together. This parcel was insured for 450 l. I put it in the waggon, on Saturday afternoon, about four o'clock. I had kept the key all the time, and took it out of the safe about four o'clock, and locked it with the other valuable parcels in a strong box in the waggon, and saw the goods loaded over it - there was 95 cwt. put over it.

Q. At the time Painter brought it, did any thing pass between you - A. Yes; two persons came into the office nearly at the same time as him, to enquire about a parcel from Bridport; I referred to the weigh-bill and found no such parcel. Painter blamed me for not attending to him first, and asked if I meant to keep him all night; he did not ask for any thing to drink, though he generally did on other occasions, and he used not to appear in a hurry - the waggon left our office, at five o'clock on Sunday morning, the 3d of December - Willis was the waggoner, and Bury the guard; it arrives at Plymouth in about ten days, there was nothing to be delivered till he got to Blandford, where he would arrive on Wednesday the 6th. I never heard any complaint of the loss of the other valuable parcels.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. The parcel was brought about eight o'clock in the evening - A. Yes; on Friday; I did not say, at Guildhall, that it was about seven o'clock; it was between half-past seven and eight - I did not say the key hung on a nail, that was the key of the strong box of the waggon. I did not know either of the two persons who called about the parcel; I never saw them afterwards - there were two people at the door, named Hodder and Maize, and who were examined at Guildhall.

MR. WALFORD. Q. The key of the strong box would be of no use to any body - No; it would take four or five men four or five hours to unload the waggon. I did not leave it till it was loaded.

DANIEL HOLLAND . I have been a porter at Russell's warehouse sixteen or seventeen years, and I recollect the night Painter was there with the parcel; I knew him before - I remember this night, because we had a supper given us; I am sure Nightingale was with him, he has but one arm, and very red whiskers; I stood at the window at the time they were there, and had seen Nightingale before. There was a very bright gas-light in the office, and outside too - they came about half-past seven o'clock.

WILLIAM MAIZE . I was groom to Mr. Russell. I had lived between two or three years there. I knew Paynter, and remember his coming to the office that evening, on account of the supper being given us; he came in with a person, whose name I know to be Nightingale, he had but one arm, and red whiskers.

THOMAS WILLIS . I am waggoner to Messrs. Russell, and drive from London to Blackwater, which is thirty-three miles. I drove on the Sunday morning, and left at Blackwater, on Monday morning, about eight o'clock - nothing was taken out while it was under my care.

ROBERT BURY . I was guard, and travelled with Willis; nothing was taken out while I was with it.

JOHN HOARE . I was waggoner to Messrs. Russell, for ten years. I received the waggon at Blackwater, and drove it eighteen miles, to Wortling - it stops there, to be taken by Frampton, who comes from Andover; nothing was taken from it while under my care. I left it between four and five o'clock on Monday evening.

DANIEL FISHER . I am a horsekeeper, at Worthing, in Mr. Russell's service, and have been so four or five years. I received the waggon, and watched it till about three o'clock in the morning, when Frampton drove it away.

JOHN FRAMPTON . I am a waggoner, in Mr. Russell's service, and have been so twenty-three years. I received the waggon from Fisher, and drove it to Salisbury. I got there at eight o'clock on Tuesday night - nothing was taken out while I was there.

OLIVER VILE . I am clerk at Sir John Perring 's. I receive the notes on the evening of the day; they are brought in, I deliver them to Mr. West, and did so with Shield's notes, in November, 1820. I am sure all the notes paid in November, were locked up, and afterwards delivered to West. I never heard of two notes of the same number and amount - I have been twelve years in the house.

MR. WEST, re-examined. I was present at the trial at Guildhall. This was produced in the defendants presence, as the parcel delivered at Plymouth (looking at it), it was shewn to Painter, the seal on it is not the genuine seal of Sir John Perring ; it resembles it - the P. S. and Co. on it, but I can say it was not made by Sir John Perring 's seal; and the direction on the parcel is not my writing, and it is not the cover which I put the notes in - I do not know whose writing it is.

The parcel produced contained nothing but paper.

JOHN CHASE . To the best of my recollection. this is the parcel delivered to me by Painter.

MR. WILLIAM MACHINSON . I was agent to the plaintiff's attorney, when the case was tried. This is the parcel produced at Guildhall.

Mr. Alley addressed the Jury on behalf of the defendant.

JAMES PITT . I live in New Broad-street, city. On the 1st of December, 1820, my wife was ill. I had been accustomed to leave a person named Nightingale to nurse her, and went to Compton-street, Clerkenwell, after her. I knew John Nightingale by having been to that house three or four times before, for his mother. I consider it to be about six o'clock when I got there, and my motive for thinking so is, I usually take tea at five, which would last about half an hour, and I think it would take half an hour to go there; it is a chandler's shop - Nightingale was in the shop. I staid there about an hour, and left a little after seven.

Q. From the time you went in till you quitted the house had Nightingale been out - A. I did not observe him out, and think if he had gone out his wife must have gone into the shop. I think it quite impossible that he could have gone to Friday-street.

MR. WALFOOD. Q. Did you look at any clock or watch - A. No. I have three children, one living in Whitechapel, one at Cambridge, and one at Sheerness.

Q. At the hulks - A. I am not bound to answer that question. There is no family connexion between me and Nightingale.

MARY LILLY . I know Mr. Pitt, and remember his coming to ask me to attend his father. I do not recollect the day he came; as near as I can guess, about six o'clock in the afternoon. Nightingale, my son, was at home. I had let my apartments the day before, and had been robbed, and went to consult him, whether I should leave the house or continue in it. I do not know what month it was, but I was robbed the day before, which was Thursday. I went there about four o'clock, and staid till the shop was shut up, about ten o'clock.

Q. Was he out of the house all that time. - A. Only in the shop, and at the door, and he went to the public-house to fetch the supper beer.

MR. WALFORD. Q. Were you secured at Guildhall. - A. No; I know my son is to be tried for something, but what I do not know.

MR. ANDREWS. Q. Your name was Nightingale, but you have been married since. - A. Yes.

SARAH NIGHTINGALE . I am the wife of John Nightingale . In December, 1820, I lived in Compton-street, Clerkenwell, and remember Mr. Pitt coming for my mother. On the 1st of December, about six o'clock, my husband was at home; then Pitt staid till about seven o'clock, or a little after. - My husband did not go out that evening, except for the supper beer, and then he went about his coat.

MR. WALFORD. Q. You know your husband is indict - ed A. Yes . I was not at Guildhall.

JURY. Q. What reason have you for recollecting the day Pitts called - A. On account of my mother being robbed on the day before.

JOHN NIGHTINGALE . I am indicted here for perjury. On the 1st of December, 1820, I lived in Compton-street;

my mother came to me on business, and Pitt came that day for her to go to nurse his wife - he came about six o'clock, and staid an hour, or an hour and a half. I was not out of the house, except going to the public-house, till bed time.

MR. WALFORD. Q. How long had you know Pitt - A. About three years. I had visited him at Sir John Perring 's, two or three times before the loss of this parcel, but not since.

JOHN HARE , re-examined. Q. How long did the waggon stay at Worthing, before Frampton took charge of it - A. Four or five hours. Wortling is fifty miles off.

DANIEL FISHER . The waggon arrived at five o'clock at night, and left between two and three o'clock in the morning; it was under my care at the time. I was in the yard all the time.

GUILTY .

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.


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