Old Bailey Proceedings, 9th January 1822.
Reference Number: 18220109
Reference Number: f18220109-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, AND Gaol Delivery for the City of London, AND ALSO The Gaol Delivery For the County of Middlesex, HELD AT Justice Hall, in the Old Bailey; ON WEDNESDAY, 9th of JANUARY, 1822, and following Days;

Being the Second Session in the Mayoralty of THE RIGHT HON. CHRISTOPHER MAGNAY , LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

Taken in Short-Hand by H. BUCKLER, (BY AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON.)

London:

PRINTED FOR H. BUCKLER, By T. Booth, 31, St. Andrew's Hill, Doctors' Commons; and PUBLISHED BY T. KEYS, CITY LIBRARY, COLEMAN STREET .

1822.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX.

Before the Right Honourable CHRISTOPHER MAGNAY , Esq. LORD MAYOR of the City of London; the Right Honourable Sir Richard Richards, Knt., Lord Chief Baron of his Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir James Allan Park, Knt., and Sir James Burrough , Knt., his Majesty's Justices of the Court of Common Pleas; Sir James Shaw , Bart., J. J. Smith, Esq., Sir Claudius Stephen Hunter, Bart., and Matthew Wood , Esq., Aldermen of the said City; Sir John Silvester , Bart., D.C.L., Recorder of the said City; R. A. Cox, Esq., and Matthias Prime Lucas, Esq., Aldermen of the said City; Newman Knowlys, Esq., Common Sergeant of the said City, and William St . Julien Arabin, Esq., his Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of the Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

London Jury.

Henry Dean ,

George Wright ,

John Evans ,

Thomas Edward Death ,

James Coombe ,

John Crighton ,

Thomas Herbert ,

Thomas Hunt ,

John Elsden ,

John Bishop ,

Isaac Flemming ,

Thomas Stevens .

1st Middlesex Jury.

Daniel Burn ,

John Shaw ,

Dennis Hyde ,

Philip Lewis ,

William Goldsworthy ,

James Smelley ,

Andrew Crookshank ,

Thomas Witticng ,

William Curling ,

David Thomas ,

George M'Intosh,

Edward Balham .

2nd Middlesex Jury.

Richard Pidder ,

Thomas Vesper ,

James Garrick ,

John Cock ,

George Perrin ,

James Wilson ,

William Bradley ,

George Lander ,

Richard Ford ,

Richard Linton ,

James Frost ,

Benjamin Reeve .

SESSIONS HOUSE, OLD BAILEY, JANUARY 9, 1822.

MAGNAY, MAYOR: SECOND SESSION.

Reference Number: t18220109-1

179. WILLIAM HYDE was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of September , two coats, value 30 s., and one pair of trowsers, value 8 s. , the goods of William Kilsbye .

WILLIAM KILSBYE . I live in Windmill-street, John-street. On the 28th of September, I missed these things; I suspected the prisoner, and got an officer, who took him - he once lived waiter at the inn.

FRANCIS KEYS. I am a constable. I was with the prosecutor when the prisoner was taken.

JAMES SWEED . I am a pawnbroker. The prisoner pawned two coats with me on the 28th of September.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Ld. Chief Baron Richards .

Reference Number: t18220109-2

180. JAMES BREWER was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of December , one box, value 2 d.; one caddy-spoon, value 9 d.; one piece of foreign coin, value 9 d., and three sovereigns, the property of William Wood , in his dwelling-house .

ELIZA WOOD . I am the wife of William Wood , who lives at Hammersmith . I am a laundress; the prisoner's mother worked for me, and he used to come for her at night; he came on Saturday, the 22d of December, about eight o'clock, and went away with her about ten o'clock. I missed the money on the Monday morning, from a drawer, in the room where he had been sitting all the time - other people were in and out. I saw it safe in the morning; a certificate of my marriage was taken with the property. I had no suspicion of him, but on New Year's-eve, I saw the caddy-spoon exposed for sale, in Beardwell's window, and had him taken up the next morning. We found him at work at Mr. Bird's, at Hammersmith - I have found nothing else.

JAMES BEARDWELL . I keep a general sale shop, in King-street, Hammersmith. Between the 22d and 26th of December, (I think it was on Christmas-eve,) the prisoner sold me the caddy-spoon; I knew him before, he said he found it on Bird's dust hills, where I knew he was employed in sifting dust; he has lived in the neighbourhood all his life - he brought it in open day.

WILLIAM PHELPS . I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner in Bird's-fields - I asked what he had done with Mrs. Wood's property, he said he did not know what he had done with it. Wood asked what he had done with her small box, he said he did not know, but afterwards said that on the Monday morning he fell over a wall and broke the box to pieces; and that Mrs. Wood's certificate was in his waistcoat or breeches pocket at home. He described the box as being a little French straw one.

MRS. WOOD. It was a French straw box, the spoon is mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked the box up in the walk by Wood's door.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18220109-3

181. JOHN DANIEL was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Bragg , and others, about five o'clock in the night of the 4th of January , with intent to steal .

RICHARD SEYMOUR . I am a cabinet-maker, and live in Long-acre. I rent the premises of the assignees of a bankrupt. On Friday evening last, I left the shop about four o'clock in the afternoon and was called back about five o'clock.

WILLIAM SWEETING . I was porter to Mr. Seymour. On Friday last, I was in the shop about five o'clock or five minutes after, and heard the windows break. I am sure it was five minutes after five, for I looked at the clock, it was dusk. I should have known a man's face at that time, by the light of the day. I ran out and caught his hand in the window.

COURT. This is not breaking and entering at night.

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Ld. Chief Baron Richards .

Reference Number: t18220109-4

182. GEORGE BRYAN was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Samuel Potter , about six o'clock at night, on the 2d of January , at St. Margaret, Westminster, with intent to steal, and stealing therein, two flutes, value 10 s. , his property.

SAMUEL POTTER . I live in King-street, in the parish of St. Margaret, Westminster , and am a musical instrument maker . Last Wednesday, about six o'clock in the evening, I was at tea in the back room, and heard a rumbling. I found the constable at the door with the prisoner in custody; he shewed me two flutes, and said in the prisoner's hearing, that he caught him taking them out of the window. The prisoner pretended to know nothing about

them. I found a pane of the window broken, and pushed in; it had been cracked before, but was close together - the flutes are mine, and were close to the cracked pane; they are worth 10 s. I believe I saw them safe that day.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN LEWIS BATHGATE . I am a constable. I saw the prisoner very close to Potter's window about half-past five o'clock in the evening; it was quite dark, he was looking about on each side. I found him with a flute in his left hand, close to his breast; he was drawing the other out of the window. I seized him and forced him into a grocer's shop - he threw them away, and I picked them up. I informed the prosecutor. I had observed the prisoner lurking about the shop with two others, and heard the window crack, the other two were very near the shop and ran away when I seized the prisoner - they were waiting two doors off, looking at the prisoner; they had both been at the window themselves, which of them broke it, I cannot say.

Prisoner's Defence. At the office, he said a boy with a fustian jacket broke the window. I was coming by and stopped to look at it.

JOHN LEWIS BATHGATE . I said I conceived that the one in the fustian jacket broke the window.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 16.

Recommended to Mercy.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18220109-5

183. EDWARD SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of December , at St. John the Evangelist, Westminster, two coats, value 3 l., the goods of David Horgan , in the dwelling-house of Timothy M'Carty .

DAVID HORGAN . I lodge in Hind-court, Duke-street, Westminster . The prisoner slept in the same house, for nine or ten nights - I missed two coats out of my box, on the night of Tuesday, the 11th of December; I had seen them on Sunday; I found them at the watch-house that night, about eleven o'clock. I locked the box on the Sunday, and found it broken open.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

MARY M'CARTY . I am the wife of Timothy M'Carty. We keep the house, the prisoner lodged there ten nights, he did not pay his rent. I asked him for it on the Monday night; he said he would pay me to-morrow, and when he came in on Tuesday, he put me off till Wednesday night; and on this Tuesday, one of the lodgers were out, and my child was restless - I went to bed, leaving the door a-jar; I heard the street door creak, about twenty minutes after, and said,

"Who's there?" he said,

"It is me Ma'am." I went up stairs, and found the trunk broken open; I ran and fetched Horgan. I found him in custody next day.

ROBERT BEILBY . I am a watchman. On Tuesday night, about a quarter past eleven o'clock, a woman came and said a man was come into her house, in the Almonry - I went and found the prisoner there in bed, he had nothing; the woman gave me a bundle containing two coats, and in consequence of what she said, I asked the prisoner where he got the coats, he said he brought them from his lodgings, in St. Martin's-lane, and that he was a corn-chandler. I took him to the watch-house with the bundle; the prosecutor came and claimed it.

ROBERT GREENHILL . I am the watch-house keeper. Beilby brought the prisoner in with the coats.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing at all about it.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 19.

First Middlesex Jury, before Ld. Chief Baron Richards .

Reference Number: t18220109-6

184. JOSEPH FOWLER was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of December , one hat, value 14 s., and one handkerchief, value 2 s. , the goods of Samuel Jones .

SAMUEL JONES . I live in Castle-street, Whitechapel. On the 14th of December, I went into the Brown Bear, public-house, Bow-street , and had a hat tied up in a handkerchief, also a bag - I put it in the bag. I sat there about an hour, the prisoner took the bag, and slipped it under the bench, he was drinking there; I told him he was after my property, he put it back, and in about five minutes he took the handkerchief and hat, and ran out - I followed him down Bow-street, and saw him give it to somebody who stood by the Harp, public-house, in Russell-street, he went into the house, and I followed; as soon as I spoke to him, he said,

"D - n you, if you shall take me;" he struck me several blows, and ran out; the watchman took him. I was not in liquor.

DONALD VINCENT . I took the prisoner in custody, just by the Harp, public-house; Jones seized him, he used violent language.

Prisoner's Defence. We had three glasses of spirits together. I went to the Harp, public-house, and in a half an hour he came and took me, and said,

"Where is my hat," I said I knew nothing about it, and struck him.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18220109-7

185. LAWRENCE HICKS was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of December , one pint pot, value 15 d. , the goods of Thomas Hunt .

THOMAS HUNT . I keep the St. Andrew, public-house, in George-street, Portman-square . On Sunday, the 16th of December, the prisoner was pointed out to me in the street; I laid hold of him, and asked for my pot, he said he had got none - I shook him, and found it concealed under his arm; I gave him in charge. It was stolen from a door in Charles-street; my customer is not here. He said he was only taking it to get a drink of water.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

SAMUEL PRENDERGRASS . I took the prisoner in charge, and found another pot on him.

Prisoner's Defence. I was distressed, and took it to get some water.

GUILTY . Aged 49.

Confined One Month .

First Middlesex Jury, before Ld. Chief Baron Richards .

Reference Number: t18220109-8

186. ANN MARKS was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of December , two pillows, value 5 s.; one set of fire irons, value 5 s.; one pair of tongs, value 1 s.; one iron, value 1 s.; two cups, value 4 d.; six plates, value 6 d.; one bolster, value 6 d.; one yard of cranky, value 6 d.; one pound of butter, value 14 d., and one pound of pork, value 6 d. , the goods of George Ives .

ANN IVES . I am the wife of George Ives , and live, at Twickenham . We rent several little tenements there, which are furnished; the prisoner lived in one of them. I missed these things at different times, and from different tenements - the butter was taken from my dairy. I occasionally employed her to clear my house up.

SAMUEL ELLIOTT . I am a constable. I went into the prisoner's apartment, and found a pound of butter, and a piece of pork; she said she bought the butter at Wandsworth, and the pork was given her by a friend. I took her to the cage, she refused to let me search the house without a warrant, but next day I took her before a Magistrate, and he ordered her to give me the key - I searched and found two pillows, and a piece of cranky in the bed; I asked her if she would go through Wandsworth. as I brought her to town, and she would not; she said she bought the butter at Mrs. Columbine's, there.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I took the pillows to lay under my head, and told her I had them.

ANN IVES . She never told me she took them.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Confined Six Weeks .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18220109-9

187. CHARLES PRATT and SARAH CREEK were indicted for stealing, on the 9th of December , 48 lbs. of mutton, value 10 s. , the goods of John Standley .

JOHN STANDLEY . I am a butcher , and live at Edmonton . On Sunday morning, the 10th of December, about eight o'clock, I missed the hind quarters of a sheep. I had seen it safe at ten o'clock the night before; the shop was shut at eleven o'clock, it was taken out through the top of the window above the shutters. I went round to the different bakers, and at Wood's I found a small piece of the best part of the loin; I knew it by a false cut I had made in it.

GEORGE WOOD . I am a baker, and live at Edmonton. The prisoner Creek brought the mutton to be baked.

WILLIAM TAYLOR . I am servant to Mr. Standley. I saw the mutton at Wood's, it answered the description of part of what was lost; there was a mark on part of it which I always put, it was a private mark - I can swear it was part of what we lost, I was in the shop all the evening.

THOMAS AUSTIN . I am a constable. I took Creek, on Sunday, the 9th of December, the prisoners live together; she told me it was given to her at the top of the lane, and she did not care where it came from. I saw her sign her examination before the Magistrate (looks at it) this is it (reads)

"Sarah Creek says she took the mutton to Mr. Wood's, and Pratt, who she lives with, brought it home on the 8th of December, between three and four o'clock, in the afternoon, saying, he bought it in London".

PRATT'S Defence. The mutton is mine; I bought it on Saturday near the Basing-house, public-house, for 4 d. per 1 b.

CREEK'S Defence. I told Austin that Pratt brought it home, and said he bought it in town.

THOMAS AUSTIN . She said nothing of the kind.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Ld. Chief Baron Richards .

Reference Number: t18220109-10

188. SAMUEL HOME was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of December , two mares, price 20 l. , the property of David Getting , Esq. ; and WILLIAM SMITH CUTTS was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, knowing them to be stolen .

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM SKINNER . I am servant to Mr. Getting, of Godstone, Surrey . He had two cart mares; I saw them last on Thursday afternoon, the 13th of December, about four o'clock, in the field which was fenced round, and the gate fastened with a with. There were four horses, these two were chestnut cart mares, one was six years old, and the other nine. They had no shoes on then, but had worn shoes for years. I missed them the next morning, and traced them out of the gate, but no further; I have seen them since.

THOMAS PIGGOTT . I am hostler at the Blue Anchor, public-house, near Godstone. On the night before the prosecutor's mares were missed. I saw the prisoner Home at the house about six o'clock in the evening, in company with another (not Cutts), he left at eleven o'clock at night. I believe they only had one pint of beer all the time, neither of them had horses - I do not know what they came for.

COURT. Q. How far is your house from the prosecutor's - A. Three quarters of a mile. They said they were going on to the next town.

MR. DAVID GETTING . I am proprietor of the two mares. On the morning of the 14th, I was informed they were stolen; they are worth 25 l. each. I made the best of my way to London, and in consequence of information which I received, went with Rice, an officer of Union Hall, to several places in Paddington, and enquired if any horse-dealers lived there - we went to No. 8, Canal wharf, Paddington, to two stables, one was locked and the other padlocked; the door of the padlocked stable was partly open. I looked in, and immediately recognized one of my mares, I could see her distinctly, and the other behind it, I thought was mine, but could not see that distinctly. In consequence of information, the officer sent for Cutts, who came; he was known there by the name of Smith, only. I told him I and my man were going to town to buy a cart horse (my man was with me), I asked if he had any thing of that description to sell; he said he had, and opened the stable which we had not looked into - there were four nags, and one horse of rather the cart kind; I said they would not suit - we came out and asked if he had any thing of the cart kind, he said

"No." I then asked if that stable belonged to him, pointing to the one which we had looked into, he said

"Yes." I asked if there was not any cart horse there; he hesitated, and said no, only two colts that had never been shod, and a nag that belonged to a gentleman, and was rather lame. I said I sometimes bought colts, and asked if he could not shew them to me; he hesitated, and appeared conscious of what we were searching for. He unlocked the stable, I went in, and immediately said

"Here is one that will suit me, and here is another, they are both stolen, and are my property." Rice said he belonged to Union Hall, and must take him in charge; he said,

"But you will give me a chance to get my money back, I will go and shew you

the man I received the horses from." I gave the horses in care of my man. It is impossible he could mistake them for colts which had never been shod. He took us to a public-house at Paddington, the other prisoner came to the door; he pointed him out as the man who brought them to him - the officer said he apprehended him for felony; he scarcely said a word. We asked how he brought the horses into town, he gave no answer. Cutts was then very anxious to go home to change his clothes, and asked if we had not done with him - we took him to Union Hall, the Magistrate was not there. Hone was locked up, and Cutts taken to a public-house; a person came in and called him Cutts, before that, we understood his name to be Smith. They were afterwards examined, what they said was not taken down - no promise or threat were held out to them. Cutts said the horses were brought to his stable the night before (this was Saturday) by two strange men, that Home was one of them, that it was late at night, they could not go to a public-house, and they brought them to his stable, engaged it for the night, and brought a truss of hay for them. He said nothing about having bought them. Home said he came from Shropshire. The Magistrate asked what he had been doing lately; he hesitated, and at last said,

"I acknowledge that I stole the horses." The horses appeared to have been brought a considerable distance, they could scarcely walk, their feet were pared down, and could not walk on the road without pain.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. How far is Godstone from town - A. Twenty-three miles. Paddington is about twenty-six miles from Godstone. I was directed to Cutt's stable as a horse dealer. I saw my horses by pulling the door a little open. None of the horses in the other stable were exactly of the cart breed, but one was rather heavy. He did not say they were not his; Home did not deny it. Cutts said

"The men who brought them were entire strangers, I received the horses as if for sale."

JOHN RICE . I am an officer. I went with the prosecutors to several places, we came to No. 8, Wharf, Paddington, and found two stables locked - the one padlocked, was rather loose; I opened it a little, the prosecutors looked in, and knew one of the horses; I enquired whom the stables belonged to, and sent to the prisoner; I accosted him as Smith, and asked if the stable, No. 8, belonged to him, and said a friend of mine was waiting to buy a horse, if he had any for sale; he said he had, and came to the yard, and found the prosecutors there; we first went into a stable, where there were four nags, and one rather a heavy horse, the prosecutor said he wanted a horse that would work immediately; Cutts said that would suit him - the prosecutors declined, we asked if he had any more, he said,

"No, no more mares in the cart way." I pointed to the other door, and said,

"Does this stable belong to you," he said it did; we asked if had anything in the cart way there; he said, No; there was nothing but one nag belonging to a gentleman, and two colts, they had never been shod yet. I asked if he had the key of that stable; he said he had - he hesitated, and at last opened it, the prosecutor went in, and said,

"Here is two that will suit me;" I said,

"It is no use, Mr. Smith, going on any further, those two are stolen; I am an officer, and shall take you on suspicion of being concerned." He was very much embarrassed, and said,

"God bless me, I can shew you the man I had them of; give me an opportunity of getting my money back;" I said I would give him every opportunity I could - they appeared like two cart mares; no one could mistake them for colts never shod. He talked very fast, and took us about three hundred yards, to a public-house, and Home came out, and stood still a moment, he said

"That is the man that brought them to my stable;" I said,

"Young man, I charge you with horse stealing;" he refused saying any thing about them, he only gave me his name, and Cutts gave me his name as William Smith , only. His wife came to him; he wanted to go home and change himself. Some conversation passed, he said

"I may as well tell you," his wife said,

"If you do not, I will;" he then said a man came first of all, and engaged this stable for the mares; I asked who the other man was, he said,

"Oh! Home can tell you," he afterwards said the man's name was Hunter; he did not know where he lived, but it was somewhere by Vauxhall-bridge, and that Hunter was the man he dealt with about them, and it should all come out, if the other man did not tell, but he knew as well as him. I took them to Union Hall, locked Home up, and took Smith to a public-house, a man came in, and addressed him as Cutts. They were examined in the evening, what Hone said was taken in writing, in the minute book, and the final examination was taken on paper. I have not the least doubt of it, the clerk was writing at the time.

MR. GETTING. I applied for a copy of the examination, and stood by the clerk while he copied the deposition, and what the prisoner said was not taken down, for I saw the book, and expressly asked the clerk. I am sure the last examination was not taken down.

JOHN RICE re-examined. I am speaking of the first examination. After the examination I enquired of the prisoner Home, about Hunter; he said the man who was with him, when he took the horses out of the field, he knew nothing of, nor his name, but that that man told him he knew a man in London, who wanted two horses, and persuaded him to take them from Getting's field. He always said he would give me every information he could.

Cross-examined. Q. You enquired for Hunter - A. Yes. I went to Home in prison, and asked if he had seen any of the party who was with him when the horses were stolen, he said No, and if he could tell me where to find the man, he would, and if he came to see him, he would tell somebody. The mares feet appeared to be recently cut down. Cutts walked very slow towards the public-house. I have had information about another man, who has absconded. When Cutts came to Home, he did not say a word about his money.

There being no evidence to prove Home was possessed of the property in the county of Middlesex. the prisoners were

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18220109-11

189. HENRY SIMS was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of December , one watch, value 30 s.; one key, value 1 d., and one ribbon, value 1 d. , the goods of John Crickmay .

JOHN CRICKMAY . On the 27th of December, my watch was in the bed-room, at Mr. Reynold's, Tottenham ; I went to bed there with the prisoner, at one o'clock in the morning, he saw me lay it on the mantle-piece; next morning between seven and eight o'clock I missed it - I said

"I laid my watch here last night, and it is gone," he said I suppose Mr. Reynolds has played a joke with it; nothing more passed till breakfast, we were then altogether in the room, and I asked Mr. Reynolds if he had played a joke with my watch, he said

"No". The prisoner helped me to search the house all over, and then he went out for a walk with Mr. Reyolds, and at dinner time, I insisted on finding it; the prisoner said,

"Do you think I have got it;" I said, I did not know, but as only we slept in the room, and I barred the door, I thought nobody but him could have it - he said if he was suspected he would apply to the Magistrate directly; I charged him with it, he denied it. I recollected he had a gold seal on his own watch, which he had not got at this time - I asked where it was, he said he had lost it. I sent for a constable, he acknowledged having the watch, and took us to a chandler's shop at Tottenham, where it was tied up in a parcel; his seal and key were hung on my watch.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. You knew him before - A. Not before that day; we drank together six or seven hours. I never said I thought he did it out of fun.

COURT. Q. You were merry together, it being Christmas - A. Yes.

JAMES REYNOLDS . The prosecutor and prisoner spent the evening at my house. I became acquainted with the prisoner three or four months ago; I invited him to my house, to introduce him to a watch maker, as a seal engraver; he stopped till half-past twelve o'clock - I said he could have half a bed with my man, and next morning he asked if I had played a lark with his watch. About eleven o'clock, the prisoner enquired for a hairdresser, and half an hour after, he went out to see the floods, I went with him, suspecting him - he said,

"You go to the butcher's, and I will follow you;" he went into the shop, I stood outside, he came out, and said,

"Do not wait, I shall be home soon.

WILLIAM CHARLWOOD . I am a grocer, and live at Tottenham. The prisoner came in on the 26th of December, and asked me for a piece of paper, and a piece of string, which he paid me for, and went out; he returned in a short time, and gave me a parcel to take care of, while he went over the water, and at night, he came with the prosecutor, and asked for it.

WILLIAM GOODMAN . I am a beadle. I was fetched to Mr. Reynolds's; the prisoner took me to Charlwood, and asked for the parcel, and gave it me; the watch was in it, with a chain and seal.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. We were drinking and singing together till past one o'clock, and then went to bed; I took his watch, intending to play him a joke. I was sorry it had gone so far, and told him where it was.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Ld. Chief Baron Richards .

Reference Number: t18220109-12

190. WILLIAM BARRINGTON was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of December , six whips, value 1 l. , the goods of Mark Bailey .

MARK BAILEY . I am a saddler , and live at Cheshunt . On the 21st of December, I lost twelve whips from my shop; I saw them next day, at Tottenham - I had seen them safe a quarter before nine o'clock at night. My house is in the county of Hertford.

WILLIAM GREEN . I stopped the prisoner at the White Hart, public-house, at Ponder's-end, with those whips.

WILLIAM TURNER . I am a constable. I was present when the prisoner was examined, (looks at the examination); this is Mr. Moores writing.

"The prisoner being asked how he came by the whips, says, I got the whips from my aunt's at Barking; being further questioned, says, I got them from a man at Shoreditch; and being further questioned, says, I picked them up by the footpath, by a shop at Waltham-cross, there were seven of them."

MARK BAILEY . My shop is close to the footside at Waltham-cross. The private mark is cut off the whips. I believe them to be mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I went to Waltham-cross, and kicked against these whips.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18220109-13

191. ABRAHAM ALEXANDER was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of January , one reticule, value 30 s.; one purse, value 35 s., and one handkerchief, value 5 s., the goods of Phoebe Church , from her person .

PHOEBE CHURCH . I live at Crabtree-row, Hackney-road. On Friday evening, the 4th of January, at a quarter past six o'clock, I was at the corner of Devonshire-street, Bishopsgate-street , going home; I was holding up my clothes, as it was dirty; the prisoner stopped me, and looked me in the face, several others were round him; the greatest part of my reticule was covered with my clothes. I thought he was going to insult me - I perceived the reticule go from my hand, he ran off, I immediately followed him; he was stopped without my losing sight of him - the reticule was not found, nobody ran away but him; I did not see it in his possession, it was silk velvet, and contained a brown velvet purse, with gold ornaments.

PETER BURRELL . I am beadle of Devonshire-square. I heard a cry of Stop thief! when I was in the square, and observed several people running up at the top of Devonshire-street; they appeared all of the same party, the prisoner was the foremost - I secured him, but found nothing on him; he said he was not the person, that he heard the cry, and was running at the time.

Prisoner's Defence. I saw a boy snatch the lady's reticule, and was running after him; he turned down Cavendish-street, the gentleman took me, I said I was running after the lad.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220109-14

192. DAVID JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of December , twenty-three pair of gloves, value 26 s. , the goods of Robert Plank .

JOSEPH BEASLEY. I am servant to Mr. Robert Plank , a hosier , living at Aldgate . The prisoner brought some

goods to our house, from Messrs. Stock and Co., on the 12th of December, about five o'clock in the afternoon; at that time two dozen and eleven gloves laid on the counter. I missed them in two minutes, and charged him with the theft - he said nothing; I went round the counter, he opened his wrapper, and the gloves fell out. I sent for an officer; he said he could not help it, he did not go to do it - they were tied up in dozens. I am sure they fell out of his wrapper.

JOSEPH STONE . I am a constable. I took charge of the prisoner and gloves, he said they might have got into his wrapper, by his folding it up.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. He missed them, I said they have come off with my wrapper, and here they are.

JOSEPH BRASLEY . They were eighteen inches from where he folded his wrapper, and could not get into it by accident.

GUILTY . Aged 34.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220109-15

193. ROBERT BULL was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of September , two printed books, value 3 s. 6 d. , the goods of Charles Cummings .

CHARLES CUMMINGS . I live in Temple-street, Whitefriars . I lost two books, and found them at Helt's shop, Crown-court, St. Bride's. I had not sold them, they were taken from my shop window which was open - I lost them a few days before.

GEORGE JOHN HELT . I am a bookseller, and live in Crown-court. I bought the two books of the prisoner, he came to the shop several times after, about that time, which was on the 9th of September. He brought three books for sale, and I stopped him.

JOHN JUDSON . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner at Helt's shop, about a month ago; he said he never saw the books in his life.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I never saw them before. Cummings said he had lost them three weeks, and Helt said he bought them three months before.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Confined Six Months and Whipped ,

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220109-16

194. WILLIAM POLTON was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of December , one basket, value 2 d.; four pair of soles, value 4 s., and one cod fish, value 2 s. , the goods of Michael Myers .

MR. MICHAEL MYERS . I am a fishmonger , and live in St. Peter's-alley. The prisoner was my servant ; my clerk informed me he had detected him taking a basket of fish, and that he had ran off. I went after him and took him by the Exchange; he had lived three years with me, but had left me twelve months.

FREDERICK TOWNSEND . I am clerk to Mr. Myers. On the evening of the 26th, I watched the prisoner, and saw him leave the shop with a basket. I went after him over into Bishopsgate-street, and asked where he was going, and what he had got; he made no answer. I brought him back, he said he hoped I would say nothing to Mr. Myers. It contained a cod fish, and four pair of soles; I said I must inform Mr. Myers, he said, then he would send him to gaol, and he must go off. I called Mr. Myers, and we overtook him by the Exchange.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been drinking all day, and did not think of doing it, till it happened. Being boxing-day, I was intoxicated.

GUILTY . Aged 44.

Confined One Month and Whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220109-17

195. EDWARD ROACH was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of January , thirty-nine bottles, value 4 s. , the goods of John Adamson .

JOHN ADAMSON . I am an Auctioneer . I had a sale at No. 2, Sise-lane, Bucklersbury , On Tuesday, about five o'clock in the afternoon, I met the prisoner with a hamper - he is a porter , who attends sales, but not employed by Auctioneers. I asked what he had there, he said an empty hamper - I stopped him, and he said it contained china and glass, and gave me the card of a gentleman to whom he was going; Mr. Parton, Bow church-yard. I said I knew it was false, for Mr. Parton bought nothing of the sort. I took him back to Sise-lane, and found the hamper contained thirty-nine bottles; there were fifty dozen on the premises. He then said he took them to get a drop of beer.

ROBERT WATTS . I took him in charge. he said he took them to get beer.

Prisoner's Defence. One Backett, who had charge of the premises, handed me the bottles to put in the hamper.

GUILTY . Aged 49.

Confined Three Months and Whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220109-18

196. GEORGE BECKWITH was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of January , 3 lbs. of candles, value 2 s., the goods of Ford Hale .

FORD HALE. I am a tallow chandler , and live in Cannon-street . The prisoner was an Excise officer ; I was under his survey. On Sunday, the 6th of January, about a quarter past ten o'clock in the morning, he came to my house. I desired Cox to conceal himself, and watch him; about ten minutes after, I was told he had left the house. I opened the door and called him back, but he would not return - we pursued, and overtook him; we found two mould candles in his hand - Cox said he had 3 lbs. of candles in his pocket. We took him up a court in a cellar, in one of the houses there, and in a copper, we found 3 lbs. of candles. He begged very hard to be let go, and said he would resign his commission and leave the country.

EDWARD COX . I am apprentice to Mr. Hale. The prisoner came on Sunday morning - I concealed myself in the cellar; he had surveyed us four or five months. I saw him come down stairs, and he called out

"Below," he first went to a box and opened the lid, and shut it down again; then went to another box and took out a paper of mould candles, containing 3 lbs. He took a sheet of paper, wrapped them up in two separate wrappers, and put them in his pocket; he then went round the cellar and took two single mould candles, and put them in his pocket - he then went up stairs and I went after him, he had got outside the door.

I called Mr. Hale, we followed him into a court, near St. Swithin's church, which was blocked up; he ran into a cellar there, and I pursued him, he came out of the cellar with two candles in his hand; 3 lbs. were found in a copper-hole in the cellar - he said he had only those two, and hoped Mr. Hale would not send him to a place of confinement. I found the 3 lbs. broken to pieces.

THOMAS COLLINS . I am a watchman, and live in Westley's-court, Salter's-hall, next door to the house he ran into. Mr. Hale requested my assistance; I was going down, and the prisoner came up and pulled two mould candles from his pocket, and said,

"Mr. Hale, I hope you will pardon me." We found 3 lbs. in the cellar.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I humbly leave it to your mercy.

GUILTY . Aged 35.

Confined Two Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220109-19

197. JOHN ALLEN was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of December , one boot, value 10 s. , the goods of Samuel Buckingham .

SAMUEL BUCKINGHAM . I am a boot maker , and live in St. Martin's le-grand . The prisoner was apprenticed to a man who worked for me. On Wednesday, the 12th of December, the boot hung on a nail about a yard from the door, about four o'clock in the afternoon, and between five and six o'clock, it was gone. I found the prisoner at a bootmaker's in Aldersgate-street, offering it for sale, and asked how he got it; he said a sailor gave it him to sell.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Must he come in the shop to take it - A. Yes; Limbey, his master, appeared before the Magistrate, he did not say the prisoner was at home at the time.

WILLIAM BRITAIN . I am a bootmaker, and live in Aldersgate-street. On the 15th of December, the prisoner came to me, and offered a boot for sale, my boy said a shop had been robbed, and I detained him. I sent for the prosecutor, the prisoner said a sailor gave it him to sell.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

MR. ANDREWS on behalf of the prisoner called

WILLIAM LIMBEY . I am a boot-closer, and live in Golden-lane. The prisoner was my apprentice - I was before the Magistrate on the 17th; the prosecutor said the robbery was about dusk, on Wednesday - he was with me from two o'clock till nine that night, working by my side. I know it, because he asked for leave of absence on that day, and I could not grant it, as I had particular work for him. I do not know that I stated this to the Magistrate - I recollected it.

COURT. Q. How came you not to tell the Magistrate so - A. The business was hastily done. I had it ready to speak, but did not - I ought to have mentioned it.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220109-20

SECOND DAY, THURSDAY, JANUARY 10, 1822.

198. ANN TYRRELL and ANN SIMPKINS , were indicted for stealing, on the 10th of December , three gowns, value 9 s.; eight aprons, value 4 s.; three remnants of printed calico, value 4 s.; six petticoats, value 6 s.; three pair of stockings, value 1 s.; three caps, value 6 d.; four shifts, value 4 s.; one dresser-cloth, value 6 d.; two slips of muslin, value 1 d.; two combs, value 3 d.; two handkerchiefs, value 2 d.; one shawl, value 9 d.; two pair of stays, value 1 s., and two bonnets, value 2 s., the goods of Edward Forster , Stephen Lushington , and Peter Martineaux , trustees of the Refuge for the Destitute ; and one gown, value 2 s.; one bag, value 1 d.; two gown bodies, value 2 s.; two yards of muslin, value 1 s.; one pocket-book, value 1 d., and two yards of lace, value 1 s. , the goods of Ann Clements , spinster .

SECOND COUNT, stating them to belong to Joseph Hoskins .

JOSEPH HOSKINS I am superintendant of the Refuge for the Destitute, in the Hackney-road . I live in the house, and have the charge of it; Tyrrell had been there four years, and Simpkins came in on the 4th of August. On the 10th of December, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, they both left the house without notice; and this property was missed. Between eight and nine o'clock the same night, I found them in St. George's-fields, walking in the road - I took a bundle from Tyrrell, and a bag from Simpkins, containing the property belonging to the Institution, they reproached each other. One was employed in washing, and the other as a servant. The bundle contained two shifts, a drawer cloth, three remnants of silk, eight aprons, and two slips of muslin; the bag contained half a yard, and some remnants of muslin, cut up in caps; some bits of lace, a frock, two combs, a gown, two napkins, a pocket, and two gown bodies.

ANN CLEMENTS . I am book-keeper to the Institution. The prisoners left the house on the 10th of December. Here is a pocket and a gown body in the bag, they are mine; they were kept in the counting-house.

ELEANOR CLARK . I am the house-keeper. The prisoners left unknown to me; part of the property was under my care. I know it to belong to the Society.

TYRRELL'S Defence. A young woman named Potter, persuaded me to leave. I was kindly protected there, and if I was permitted to return, I would behave with great propriety.

SIMPKINS'S Defence. I am very sorry for what I have done.

SIMPKINS - GUILTY . Aged 18.

TYRRELL - GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220109-21

199. WILLIAM BARRINGTON was again indicted for stealing, on the 21st of December , one leather strap, value 1 d., and one chain, value 2 s. , the goods of William Green .

(see page 99.)

WILLIAM GREEN . I live at Tottenham. On the 21st of December, I was going up Stamford-hill, and met the prisoner, I asked him how far it was to Edmonton; he said he had been travelling a great while, and had no victuals - that he had a dog, and he wished somebody would give him a shilling for it; when I got to Tottenham , I did so, and chained the dog up - I gave him a supper and

breakfast; he got a job the next morning, and came and asked me to lend him a spade and chopper, to go to work with; I missed the dog at night, with the strap and chain; the strap was cut to pieces - I went after him, and took him at the White Hart, public-house, Ponder's-end, and asked for my dog; he said he was tied up in a stable - I went with him, and got it, my strap and chain were on the dog.

WILLIAM TOWNSEND . I was present when the prisoner was examined, and saw him make his mark; (reads).

"The prisoner says his name is William Barrington , that he lived at Rumford, and brought the dog from Canterbury."

Prisoner's Defence. The dog followed me, I was returning with it when he met me.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined Six Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18220109-22

200. JOHN TYE was indicted for that he, on the 27th of December , at St. James, Clerkenwell, feloniously did forge and counterfeit, a certain Bank note, which is as follows, (No. 10,887, 5 l., dated 20th of August, 1821, signed H. Whiting), with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England ; he well knowing the same to be forged, and counterfeit, against the statute .

SECOND COUNT, for disposing of, and putting away, a like forged Bank note, with a like intent, he knowing the same to be forged.

TWO OTHER COUNTS, the same as the former, only calling the forged instrument a promissory note, for payment of money instead of a Bank note.

MR. SERGEANT BOSANQUET and MR. BOLLAND, conducted the prosecution.

HARRIET GOFF . I am the wife of George Goff , a Police officer. I was employed in December last, by Kinsey, the officer, to meet the prisoner; my husband also attended on different occasions. I was introduced to the prisoner on the evening of the 11th of December, at the door of the Horseshoe, public-house, Goswell-street, (I did not know him before) by a woman, as a person from Kent, who dealt in smuggled goods, and wished to be supplied with notes; they called them screens - she said I wanted 5 l. screens; she called the prisoner Job Jones, he said it was too late to get me any that night; the people were gone to bed, where they were at. He told me to meet him again at six o'clock the next evening, at the same place.

Q. Before you went there next evening, did you see Kinsey - A. I met Kinsey at the Jacob's Wells, public-house; my husband was there, and the woman; I was searched there, they gave me a sovereign - I had no other money, but some silver, which Kinsey gave me to spend; I had no note of any kind. I went to the Horseshoe, public-house, with the woman - when I went in, the prisoner was there, he desired me to wait a-bit, and he went out; I remained there, and in about five or ten minutes he brought me the 5 l. screen; he laid it on the table, wrapped up in a bit of brown paper - I took it up, and laid the sovereign down, and he took it up; he told me the tens were better than the fives; I said if I had any luck with the 5 l., I thought I should take a 10 l.; we parted. I went immediately to the Jacob's Wells, and gave Kinsey the note - I wrote my name and date on it, (looks at a note), this is it, it has

"Bought of Job Jones, 12th December, 1821, at the Horseshoe, public-house, Goswell-street, for 1 l., by me, H. Goff." I saw him again next day, he rather refused to serve me, he said he could not serve me that day; I must come on Thursday, for the man was out of town who supplied him. I went on Thursday the 20th, but he was so busy, I stopped till night; and could not get served - I did not see him doing any thing, but he could not attend to me; there was a great many people there, he appointed to meet me at two o'clock the next day. I went to the Jacob's Wells, Kinsey and my husband were there - I was searched, and received a sovereign, and some silver from Kinsey. I went to the Horseshoe, public-house, where I saw the prisoner; I told him I wanted another 5 l. screen; he went with me down Old-street Road, to the White Horse, public-house, Brick-lane; I waited there while he went to fetch the note, he returned in ten minutes or a quarter of an hour, and brought me a 5 l. note, wrapped up in a bit of a newspaper, and put it into my hand - I looked at it, and gave him the sovereign; we had something to drink, which I paid for; we came back to the Horseshoe, public-house, where I parted with him. I went to the Jacob's Wells, public-house, gave the note to Kinsey, and marked it, (looks at one), this is it; it has

"H. Goff bought this note of Job Jones, at the White Horse, public-house, Brick-lane, 21st December, 1821." Next day, (22d) I went to the Jacob's Wells, public-house, and was searched as before, and received a sovereign and some silver, and went to the Horseshoe, public-house; I went in and looked, and saw the prisoner, he came out - I told him I came for another 5 l. screen, we went together down Seward-street, to the Leopard, public-house, and had a pint of beer - he went out, and I went out, and walked up and down by the house; he went away, and brought a 5 l. note, and gave it to me; I looked at it, and gave him the sovereign - I said if I had any luck with it, I should come and see him again on Monday, or the day after Christmas day. I went and gave the note to Kinsey, after marking it, at the Edingboro' Castle, public-house, (looks at one), this is it; it is marked as the others. I went the day after Christmas day, he was not there - I saw him on Thursday the 27th. Before that, I went to the Jacob's Wells, public-house, and saw Kinsey, my husband, Lawrence an officer, and Welch; I was searched, and Kinsey gave me a sovereign, marked with a K, on the dragon side - I had no note about me; the sovereign was wrapped up in a bit of a lottery bill of Hazard's, and Kinsey kept the other part. I went to the Horseshoe, public-house, and saw the prisoner; I told him I wanted two, I was to ask for two, but only buy one. We went together from there, to the White Horse, public-house, Brick-lane - I walked backwards and forwards before the house while he fetched the notes; he came back to me, and we went into the passage of the house; I told him I had altered my mind, and could take but one - he only had one in a piece of blue paper, which he gave me; I gave him the sovereign which he put in his pocket without looking at it, and in the paper in which I received it; we came along together near to the Pitt's Head, public-house, Old-street

Road, and he was apprehended there, as I gave the officer a signal; it was about three o'clock in the afternoon when he was taken. I went home; (looks at a note), this is the one I received; I have written,

"H. Goff bought this note of Job Jones, at the White Horse, public-house, Brick-lane, for 1 l., 27th December, 1821." I gave it to Kinsey, that evening.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Who introduced you to the prisoner - A. Mary Dowling . Whenever I applied to him, he went away, and returned with them; this is the first time I was ever employed on such business. My husband introduced Dowling to me; she called the prisoner Job Jones, and he answered to that name - she told him my husband dealt largely in bad notes, but we had a bad sort and wanted a better; he said he could supply me with any amount.

MR. SERGEANT BOSANQUET. Q. In what way did you ask him for them - A. I said I wanted to be supplied with them, he said he could supply me to any amount.

JOHN KINSEY . I am a constable, of the Town Hall, Southwark. I have seen Mary Dowling ; in consequence of information which she gave me, I introduced her to Mrs. Goff, and went in company with them to the Jacob's Wells, public-house, Barbican, on the 11th of December. Next day, I went there again, Goff was to buy a 5 l. forged note. I gave her a sovereign; I searched her in the presence of her husband, to see that she had no other money or notes, she had none - she then went towards the Horseshoe, public-house, Goswell-street, with Dowling, Goff and I followed them and saw them go in; they might be there ten minutes or a quarter of an hour, they came out together. We went to the Jacob's Wells, public-house, they followed us, Mrs. Goff gave me a 5 l. note (looks at one) this is it; I signed it at the time,

"12th December, 1821." I met her again on the 21st, at the Jacob's Wells, public-house, and searched her - she was to buy a 5 l. note of Job Jones; I gave her a sovereign, Goff, Lawrence, and I followed her to the Horseshoe, Dowling was not with her; she went into the Horseshoe, and came out alone in a few minutes; we returned to the Jacob's Wells, public-house, where she gave me a 5 l. note; (looks at one) this is it. On the 22d, I saw her again, at the Jacob's Wells, public-house, searched her as before, and gave her another sovereign. Goff and Lawrence, the constable, of Lambeth, were with me. We followed her, and saw her go into the Horseshoe, public-house, she came out in a few minutes in company with the prisoner; they went up Goswell-street, towards Seward-street, and there we lost sight of them - I do not know where they went. I returned to the Horseshoe, public-house. In about half an hour, I saw Mrs. Goff and the prisoner, they parted at the door of the Horseshoe, public-house, the prisoner went in, and Mrs. Goff came on to me; we went to the Edinburgh Castle, public-house, Sweeting's-alley, Cornhill, where she gave me a note, (looks at one), this is it; she wrote on it by my direction, and I put my name 22, 12, 21, on it; I saw her again on the 27th, about two o'clock, at the Jacob's Wells, public-house; Goff, Lawrence, and Welsh, were with me - I searched her, she had no money or note; I gave her a sovereign which I marked with a K, on the dragon side; her husband tore one of Hazard's lottery bills in two, and it was wrapped up in part of it - I kept the other piece; I only gave her one sovereign, which would buy one note; we all followed her, and saw her go into the Horseshoe; she came out in two or three minutes in company with the prisoner; they went up Goswell-street, we were at the Pitt's Head, at the corner of Old-street, Goff was with me; Lawrence, and Welsh, were to follow the prisoner; Mr. Goff, and Lawrence came and gave me information - I saw the prisoner and Mrs. Goff within three yards of the Pitt's Head,; I took him, and took him into the Pitt's Head, handcuffed him, and took him to the Crown, tavern, Clerkenwell, where Lawrence and Goff searched him; Goff said he had found the marked sovereign, and gave it me; I looked at it, and gave it him back; it was wrapped up in part of the lottery bill as before - Lawrence found a 5 l. note on him, I saw him take it from his right hand coat pocket, it appeared to be put in in a careless way; about 4 s. 6 d. in silver, and nine bad shillings wrapped up in paper, were also found on him, there was 3 s. or 4 s. in a row, wrapped in soft paper. Lawrence wrote on the note, and also myself, (looks at one) this is the note; I wrote 27, 12, 21 on it; he was asked how he came by the sovereign, he said he had had it above a fortnight, and took it for some poultry, and that he picked up the counterfeit shillings. I gave Goff the sovereign, and the paper in which it was wrapped; I produce the other part of the bill - I went and found Mrs. Goff at home, in New-street, Lambeth-walk, she gave me a 5 l. note, (looks at one) this is it; we all marked it.

Cross-examined. Q. Goff, his wife, and Dowling, planned the arrangement - A. Yes. I acted on Dowling's information; I have not seen her since the 14th of December, she had two guineas from Mrs. Goff and has absconded. I searched Goff as diligent as if I expected to find something, though I did not - I believe if she had a note concealed about her, I should have found it. The note found on the prisoner was rumpled. Dowling said this man was in the habit of supplying bad notes.

GEORGE GOFF . I am a constable. I attended at the Jacob's Wells, public-house, on the 12th, 21st, 22d, and 27th of December, and was present when the money was delivered to my wife, and saw her go to the Horseshoe, public-house, and saw the prisoner. Kinsey's account is correct. I was present on the 27th, and assisted in taking the prisoner - I searched him at the Crown, tavern, and in his breeches pocket, I found 4 s. 6 d., and two halfpence; and in his coat pocket, I found two papers wrapped up, one contained a sovereign, marked K, it was wrapped in part of a lottery bill; the other paper contained nine counterfeit shillings - I questioned him about the sovereign; he said he had had it about a fortnight, and took it for some poultry; it was the same paper, and the same sovereign that was given to my wife. I asked his name, he said,

"Some people called him John Tye , and some John Tee ." I asked what he called himself; he said,

"He was no scholar, and could not tell; that he lived somewhere near Winfield-street.

Cross-examined. Q. You was present at the search of your wife - A. Yes; it was a diligent search with decency. The sovereign was found in his coat pocket, after he was handcuffed. I knew Dowling by her having business with my brother, who was an officer six or seven years

ago. I met her by chance one evening, and she enquired for my brother, and made this proposal to me - I mentioned it to Kinsey. I found the sovereign in his coat pocket, and the goods silver in his breeches pocket.

MR. SERGEANT BOSANQUET. Q. What did he say about the sovereign - A. I sounded it on the table, and asked how he came by it, he said, he had had it a fortnight.

JOHN KINSEY re-examined. I produce the other half of the bill, it matches with the half, the sovereign was in; here is a pencil mark all down the back, and this is the sovereign, I marked it with a K, with the point of a pin, under the belly of the horse.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you shew him the sovereign - A. It was taken out of the paper in his presence; he said he had had it a fortnight.

JOHN LAWRENCE . I am a constable of Lambeth. I first engaged in this matter, on the 17th of December, I was to go to the Horseshoe, public-house, and see who came in and out, I did so. I have heard the witness's account, I was with him every day after the 17th - I went to the Horseshoe, public-house, every day; on the 17th I saw the prisoner and Mrs. Goff there, she came into the tap-room, looked round, and went out again; the prisoner jumped up and followed her, he returned in five or six minutes; he stopped about twenty minutes, and then somebody came in and spoke to him, and he said to that person,

"D - n me, I have lost earning 24 s." The house is one used by bad characters; there are hostlers and waggoners come there. The account of the officers is all true.

Cross-examined. Q. Were you present when the prisoner was apprehended - A. Yes; he was handcuffed, and taken to the Crown, tavern, Clerkenwell; I found a 5 l. note, in his right hand pocket, and marked it, (looks at it), this is the same - I saw Goff take something out of his pocket, which he said was a sovereign. I was present when a sovereign was given to Mrs. Goff, wrapped in a piece of Hazard's lottery bill; that produced is the same, Kinsey gave it her.

Cross-examined. Q. Where was the 5 l. note - A. In his jacket pocket, every thing but the good silver was there.

THOMAS GLOVER . I am an inspector of Bank notes; I have been so upwards of twenty-seven years; (looks at one note, bought on the 27th), this is forged in all respects; it is signed

"H. Whiting," but is not his hand writing - the others are all forged in every respect; also that found on the prisoner; they all appear from the same plate, and is a plate which has come to my knowledge within the last year.

HENRY WHITING . I am a clerk in the Bank, there is no other of my name - the signature to the note, is not my writing.

(reads).

Prisoner's Defence. The 5 l. note was put in my pocket by some of the officers, I cannot say which; I never put it in.

One witness gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 43.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Ld. Chf. Baron Richards .

Reference Number: t18220109-23

201. WILLIAM RIVERS was indicted for that he, on the 1st of December , at St. James, Clerkenwell , feloniously did dispose of, and put away, a certain forged and counterfeit Bank note, which is as follows, (setting it forth, No. 16,430, 10 l., dated 14th February, 1821, signed J. Robinson), with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England , he well knowing the same to be forged, against the statute .

SECOND COUNT, for feloniously offering to Ralph Wedgwood , a like forged Bank note, with a like intent he knowing the same to be forged.

THIRD AND FOURTH COUNTS the same, only calling the forged instrument a promissory note, for the payment of money, instead of a Bank note.

FOUR OTHER COUNTS the same, only stating the prisoner's intent to be to defraud Ralph Wedgwood .

RALPH WEDGWOOD . I am a stationer , and live at No. 345, Oxford-street. On the 1st of December, the prisoner came to my shop, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, and asked the price of a ream of gilt-edged writ-paper; I shewed him some, he asked the price, I told him 26 s. He asked for some at a lower price, I shewed him some at 24 s. the ream; he said that would do. I then looked out for him half a hundred of pens, at 12 s. a hundred, and asked if he would have a bill, he said Yes, and his name was Scott, No. 44, Bedford-square. I made out a bill for Mr. Scott, No. 44, Bedford-square; he gave me a 10 l. note, I took it, and suspected it; I held it up to the gas, and was satisfied in my mind it was bad. I told him I could not give change, I went out to Mr. White, next door, and shewed it to his shopman, who said he thought it bad; he gave me the same note back. I got the shopman to send for an officer, and I returned to my shop, I had left the prisoner in the care of my wife. Mr. White went with me and one of his partners; two young men came in, there were some persons round the door, but they did not appear to be concerned with the prisoner. I told the prisoner it was a forged note, he said it was not, that it were all right. I told him he should not leave the shop until I had ascertained the truth; Mr. White came in before I sent for the officer, he looked at the note, and said in the hearing of the prisoner, he was of opinion it was forged; he then left the shop. Plank and Wales came in, and the prisoner was searched; the note was examined by several persons, and the two young men looked at it, and White's partner looked at it, returned it me, and I gave it to Plank, after putting my initials upon it; (looking at it), this is the same note, there is R. W. on it.

WILLIAM WHITE . I live next door to Mr. Wedgwood. I went into his shop and saw the prisoner; Mr. Wedgwood shewed me the note, I thought it bad, I returned the same note to him immediately.

SAMUEL PLANK . I am an officer, of Marlborough-street. I went to Mr. Wedgwood's house, and took the prisoner into custody. Wales, a brother officer, was with me; Mr. Wedgwood delivered the note to me (looking at it), this is the same note, I got Mr. Wedgwood to mark it. I asked the prisoner to account how he came possessed of the note, he said he had it of Mr. Scott, No. 44, Bedford-square - that Mr. Scott directed him to go to a stationer's, on the left hand side of Oxford-street, to purchase a ream of gilt paper, and half a hundred of pens, and said his name was William Williams . I took the bill from him - I said I would detain him and ascertain the

whole account. I left him in the care of Wales, and went to No. 44, Bedford-square, which was occupied by a Mr. Ward, whose name was on the door. No person of the name of Scott was in the house; there is a Dr. Scott, who lived in the square, at the corner of Gower-street. I returned to the office, and told the prisoner I could not find any such person as he described - I desired him to write the name and place; he began to write, but being flurried, he desired me to write it, and he would sign it. I wrote down what he desired, and he signed it, (read)

"1st of December, 1821. I received the 10 l. note, this evening, from Mr. Scott, No. 44, Bedford-square; I went there with a pair of shoes for a shoemaker, in Holborn, and Mr. Scott requested me to go to the shop in Oxford-street, and fetch one ream of gilt paper, and half a hundred of pens." I offered to go with him to where he lived, or else to the square, to Mr. Scott, he said,

"All I have told you, is false." I took him to the watch-house; he said he would tell me who he had the note of; that he had it of a man known by the name of John, that they were together at the Horseshoe, public-house, in Goswell-street, that evening - they came out together, and John gave him the 10 l. note. They walked into Oxford-street, and he directed him to go into Mr. Wedgwood's, and buy a ream of paper and half a hundred of pens, and say he came from Mr. Scott, Bedford-square; and that they were to divide the change, if they were successful in passing the note. That the man who gave it him, came into the shop, and Mr. Wedgwood turned him out; and that they lodged together, at No. 1, Bell-alley, Goswell-street, close to the Horseshoe, public-house. Early on Sunday morning, Wales and I went there, and found John in bed, he was examined, and finally discharged.

JOHN WALES . I am an officer of Marlborough-street. I was with Plank, his account is correct in every respect. I saw the prisoner sign the paper, he did it voluntarily - he began to write it himself, but being agitated, he desired Plank to write it, which he did, and read it over to him, he said it was true; and signed his name, W. Williams. We both offered to go to the place he mentioned, he refused to go, and said, what he had said was false, and he would tell the truth.

ALLEN ANSCOMB . I live with Mr. Ward, No. 44, Bedford-square, and have lived there six years. No Scott lived there - I know nothing of the prisoner.

JOSEPH BOWEN . I am a stationer, and live in Oxford-street. The prisoner came to my shop on the 19th of November, about eight o'clock at night, and said he wanted some writing paper - I shewed him some, he agreed to buy a ream, which came to a guinea; he then said he wanted some quills, which I shewed him; he changed his mind, and asked for pens, and bought one hundred at 4 s. He said, making a sign with his hand,

"You will send them round to me, at Mr. Outram's." Dr. Outram's house is in George-street, Hanover-square, just behind me, he lives at the corner house; he pointed towards Dr. Outram's. I made him a bill, it came to 25 s., he was going out; he then turned back and said, he might as well pay for them, as perhaps he should not be at home when they came - he then tendered me a 10 s. note; I found I had not sufficient change by 3 l. I went to different neighbours, who could not change it. I asked Mr. Roberts for change, and gave the same note to him, he went to Mr. Shaw's, next door to get it changed. I stood at Mr. Robert's door, he returned, and gave me ten sovereigns. I went back and found the prisoner in the shop, I could then give him but 8 l. 12 s.; I told him I was still 3 s. short of change; he said

"Never mind, tell the boy to give it to the servant, when you send the goods, and he will give it to me." I said I was much obliged to him, and went to the door with him. He turned towards Dr. Outram's and went away; I sent the goods to Dr. Outram's, half an hour after, with 3 s. wrapped in paper, and in a quarter of an hour after, the Drs. servant returned the goods to me - the prisoner never called for them. About a fortnight after, I heard what had happened at Wedgwood's, I went there, saw the prisoner in the shop, and knew him.

WILLIAM ROBERTS . I keep a feather shop, in Oxford-street. On the 29th of November, the last witness came to me for change for a 10 l. note; I took the same note to Mr. Shaw, next door but one - I saw him write my name on the back, before he gave me change; (looks at one), this is it.

THOMAS SHAW . I live at the Green Man and Still, public-house, Oxford-street. Roberts brought me the note; I gave him change, and wrote on the note in his presence, (looks at one), this is it.

DR. BENJAMIN OUTRAM . I live at the corner house of George-street, Hanover-square. I never saw the prisoner before. Some stationery was sent, I ordered it to be returned. No person named Rivers lived in my house.

JOSEPH CLEMENTSON . I am a silversmith, and live in Angel-street, St. Martin's-le-grand. The prisoner came to my shop, on the 16th of March, 1821, about twelve o'clock; he gave me a written order from Mr. Adams, No. 32, Compton-street, Clerkenwell; he said he came from him; the order was for silver articles, which were looked out - they came to about 14 s., he tendered a 5 l. note; I examined it; he stood at the shop window, which was open. I told him to come into the shop for his change; I marked the note, (looks at one), this is it, it has Adams, Compton-street; I suspected the note, and told him that if two which I had returned to me before were bad, this was a bad one also; he said that was his master's, and where he lived it was written on the order, Adams, No. 32, Compton-street; he said he lived errand boy with him. I sent for an officer; he was searched and a few shillings found on him. I enquired at Compton-street, but no such person was to be found.

WILLIAM COOK . I am an officer of Farringdon Ward. I was fetched to Clementson, and took the prisoner; he said his name was William Cook , I asked how he spelt it, he said Cooke; that his master lived at No. 32, Compton-street, Clerkenwell, and that his name was Adams; I took him to the Compter; then went to Compton-street, and could find no such person there; I returned, and told the prisoner I had been, and no such person had sent him; he then said he was coming along the street, and a gentleman asked him to go to the silversmith's, and get him some things, and he would give him 1 s. or 2 s., for his trouble; he was taken before a Magistrate, and discharged on account of his youth.

JAMES LEE . I live at No. 32, Compton-street, and have lived there six months. On the 16th of March, the prisoner

did not live there; I have seen the prisoner in Goswell-street, but did not know him.

ROBERT WILLIAMS . I am a baker, and live in Windmill-street, Finsbury-square. On the 30th of January, 1821, the prisoner came to my shop, and bought two loaves, and paid me a 1 l. note - I asked where he came from; he said No. 4, Hill-court, Hill-street; he gave the name of Wilson, (looks at one), this is the note; I gave him his change, and I said I must go with him to see if his account was correct, and about half way down the street, on the side the court is on, he crossed over to the other side turned round, and said the woman was gone who gave him the note - I took him back to my house, and gave him in custody; he was afterwards discharged.

WILLIAM CROSSMAN . I live at No. 4, Hill-court, Finsbury. No person named Wilson lived there on the 30th of January.

THOMAS GLOVER . I am an inspector of Bank notes, (looks at the note set forth), this is a forged note; the name James Robinson is not his hand writing; he was authorized to sign 1 l. and 2 l., notes, but not of this amount; he is not a cashier - there is none other of that name; the other 10 l. note is also forged; they are both from one plate - the 5 l. note is forged in every respect, and the 1 l. also. The water mark is an impression on the paper after it was made.

JAMES ROBINSON . I am a signing clerk in the bank. The note is not my signature. I only sign 1 l. and 2 l. notes. (reads).

Prisoner. I beg you will shew mercy, and spare my life.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Recommended to Mercy, by the Jury and the Prosecutor, on account of his youth.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18220109-24

202. JOHN CROOKS was indicted for feloniously cutting, and stabbing Mary Ann Nelson , with a certain sharp instrument, with intent of his malice aforethought to kill and murder her, or do her some grievous bodily harm .

MARY ANN NELSON . On the 3d of December, I saw the prisoner at his lodging, in Tothill-street, Gray's Inn-lane . I was married to him, but he had a wife whom he married before me; my child, which I had by him, had played the truant, and was in the habit of going to him; I went to see for him, and found the child there - the prisoner was there, and his daughter; they were all at dinner.

Q. How did you get in - A. A young woman went up, and said to the child,

"Edward, your mother is come after you;" I immediately went into the room; the young woman went out of the room when I went in - I spoke first, I believe; I asked what business he had to harbour my child from his school; he told me not to come and kick up any riot in his apartment; I said I would not trouble him if he let me and my children alone - he asked if I came to expose him, I said I did; he told me two or three times to go out of his room; I said I would not, till I had an officer to take him up, to bring him to justice - he called me a prostitute; I said,

"I was none, till he made me one." He turned round to his seat, and stooped, but what he got from there, I cannot say. When he first got up, he had been sitting at the dinner table. I do not know any thing that passed afterwards, but we were on the stairs together, and I felt myself stabbed.

Q. When he turned round to his seat what did he do - A. He took something from his seat, but I cannot say what; he came towards me, I ran towards the stairs, and do not recollect any thing that passed afterwards, but I felt myself stabbed, and him over me; I do not know whether I fell, or whether he pushed me - my own children was close to me, and so was his daughter; I said I was stabbed, and the children screamed Murder! Thomas Lee , the landlord's son, came, and rescued me from him, and took a knife from him; I suppose it was him that stabbed me - I was stabbed in my bowels, in two places; I was sent to the hospital. Here are the stays which I wore at the time; there is blood on them, and two holes. When I was on the stairs, I felt myself stabbed, and said I was stabbed.

Q. Before this, there was a pretty loud quarrel between you - A. Yes. I did not strike him, or throw any thing at him; I said I would have him tried for bigamy, and would not go till I had brought him to justice; I stamped and raged a good deal, and refused to leave the room, when he told me - I believe I aggravated him; I was very passionate, and aggravated him as much as I could. I reproached him for having other wives, and told him he wished to bring my two boys up as thieves; he was very passionate as well as I.

THOMAS LEE . I am son-in-law of the prisoner's landlord. The prisoner had lodged about four months at the house; I saw the prosecutrix go up stairs, I never saw her before. I was sitting below; there was a disturbance up in the prisoner's room, like people quarrelling, only a general noise - I heard stamping with feet; I could not tell whether it came from one or more persons; then I heard something like a falling down stairs - I ran up, and saw them laying in the landing, at the bottom of the stairs; I thought they was fighting - I tried to part them, and in doing so, I saw the prisoner had a knife in his hand; I seized his arm, and took it from him, and immediately threw it into the one pair back room, and pushed him up stairs, and told him to govern his passion; I did not know that he had stabbed her - he went up and I followed him; he said,

"What am I to do," I left him, and came down, and heard she was stabbed. I went for an officer, who took him. Nelson appeared in a fright.

WILLIAM READ , JUN. I am an officer. I was sent for, and took him; I found a knife on his seat, which was very bloody. The man in whose room the knife was thrown, told the Magistrate, in the prisoner's hearing, that he came into his room, and fetched the knife. I took his apron off, which had a great deal of blood on it, but the blood did not come from the prosecutrix, as the daughter said she got before him, and was cut herself.

WILLIAM MARKHAM . I am apprentice to Mr. Skinner, an apothecary and man-midwife; he is now at a labour. he dressed the woman's wounds.

The prisoner put in a long written defence, stating, that the prosecutrix had refused to live with him; he had done his best to support her and the children; that he and his former wife parted by mutual consent.

"The boy came to my lodging, and said his mother kept him from school, as he

was ill. She came in and abused me for encouraging him. I thought it a planned thing between them, and told her to leave the room; she threatened me with transportation, and shook her fist at me; her language irritated my blood. I had a knife in my hand, I rose to push her out; my passion got the better of my reason; I have no recollection of inflicting any wounds, and my daughter can testify they were accidental."

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18220109-25

203. WILLIAM REDMAN was indicted for feloniously assaulting Mary Annette Peat , on the 28th of December , on the King's highway, putting her in fear, and taking from her person, and against her will, one spencer, value 5 s.; one skirt, value 10 s., and one handkerchief, value 10 s. ; the goods of John Wollams .

MARY ANNETTE PEAT . I live in the Curtain-road, Shoreditch. On the 28th of December, about a quarter past nine o'clock, I was going down Sun-street, Finsbury ; several young lads stood together, and one of them put his foot out and endeavoured to throw me down, but I passed him without falling. I passed on about ten yards, and received a blow on the side of my head from a person behind; I did not see who struck me. I looked round, instantly, and my bundle was immediately snatched away - it was quite light, it was just under a lamp, I saw his face very distinctly, and remembered seeing his face sometime before; he ran down a court, I cried Stop thief! and pursued, but lost sight of him; another man followed him, and was knocked down on the ground. I went through the court, and then went home - my father and mother came back with me, and met the officer, who said he had got the man and property. The bundle belonged to Mrs. Marshall, who employed Mrs. Wollams, a dressmaker, who gave me the bundle. I cannot say whether the man who struck me took it - the prisoner is the one who took the bundle, I am quite certain of him, I speak to his features.

JOSEPH WILSON . I was coming out of the White Horse, public-house, into Swan-court, and heard the cry of Stop thief! I remained in the court, and saw a bustle go up in the corner, and in a few minutes, three men passed me; they said I was nosing. I told them to go about their business; they used abusive language, and then went off. I called for a light, and went in the corner, where I saw three men go, and in the one pair of stairs room, I saw the property laying in a dish - I did not know either of these men; I gave it to Walton.

JOSEPH WALTON . I am a constable. I received the bundle from Wilson; I was coming home, about half-past nine o'clock, and hearing of the robbery, I left the bundle at a public-house, and went with Wilson to the George, public-house, Angel-alley, and apprehended one Ramsay. I went out and found who had lost the property - in about a quarter of an hour, I took two men near to the George-public-house, by Angel-alley; one of them was the prisoner. As soon as he was brought to the watch-house, the prosecutrix identified him, as the lad who took the bundle out of her hand, she had described his person before this.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I went to get something for supper, the officer came into the public-house and took me out.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Ld. Chf. Baron Richards .

Reference Number: t18220109-26

204. GEORGE ROBERTS was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of December , one watch, value 4 l., one seal value 4 s., and one key, value 6 d., the goods of Mark Reed , from his person .

MARK REED . I am a haberdasher , and live at Aldgate. On Monday night, there was an overdriven ox in the street; I went to the door to prevent the people breaking the window, the prisoner, with several others, came up to the door, saying,

"Take care, here he comes;" the ox was coming. I received a blow on my shoulder, and immediately felt my watch being drawn from my fob. I put my hand down to protect it, it had not got out of my fob; I caught hold of my watch, the prisoner drew it through my hand, by some means or other. I touched the outer case, which came off, and he made his way through the mob with the watch - it was about six o'clock in the evening; I pursued, and as I passed through the gang, I received a blow on my side, which took my breath away, till I got about six houses off. I then cried Stop thief! I was only a few yards from him, keeping my eye on him, and crying Stop thief! He was turning up Black Horse-yard, and was stopped - I never lost sight of him from the time he took the watch, till he was stopped. At the time he was seized, I received another blow on my head - the watch was picked up in the kennel, a few yards from him, I am certain of him.

Prisoner. Q. How could you swear to me - A. He looked me full in the face before he took it.

CHARLES HARRISON . I am a cheesemonger, and live in Lime-street. I was in Aldgate , about six o'clock in the evening, near the Black-horse, public-house, and heard the cry. About three minutes after, I saw the prisoner running down the middle of the road, a gentleman seized him - I heard something rattle on the pavement, and upon looking, saw the watch about four yards from where he was stopped, without the case, the prosecutor claimed it.

WILLIAM BILLETT . I am a tea-dealer, and live in Charlotte-street, Whitechapel. On the 17th of December, I was coming up Hounsditch, and called at the Blue Boar-yard, Aldgate. I heard the cry and ran out, seeing the people running and at the corner of Black Horse-yard, I saw the prisoner seized, and saw him throw the watch out of his right hand, it was picked up.

ROBERT HESKETH . I am a day patrol. I saw some persons knock Mr. Reed down, about a minute before the prisoner was secured; the person who knocked him down was crying Stop thief! I took charge of him, when he was stopped, and the case was given to me.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I heard the cry, and happened to go out of the way, they caught hold of me.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220109-27

205. EDWARD SMITH was indicted for stealing, on

the 13th of December , one shawl, value 1 l. , the goods of Sarah Young .

MR. LAW conducted the prosecution.

SARAH YOUNG . I live at Princes-street, Barbican. On 13th of December, the prisoner came to my house with a note, signed

"M. Allen," requesting me to lend her a shawl to go to Covent Garden Theatre, as her own was gone to be cleaned. I knew Mrs. Allen, he said she was poorly, and they were going out. I gave him the shawl in a handkerchief.

MARY ALLEN . I live in Mount-street, Walworth. I never wrote this letter, or ordered it to be written, nor did I ever send the prisoner for any shawl; he was apprenticed to us, and had served five years and a half, he left us on the 20th of November.

JAMES BASSETT . I live in Wardour-street. On the 14th of December, the prisoner came to our shop, and pawned the shawl for 2 s. 6 d., in the name of John Smith , No. 13, Green-street.

WILLIAM SMITH . I am an officer. Bassett gave me the shawl, and I took the prisoner in charge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I left them, as my eyes would not suit the trade, which was an engraver. I was distressed, which urged me to do the crime.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Three Months and Whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220109-28

206. RICHARD LEACH was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of December , two dead pigs, value 38 s., and one wrapper, value 1 s. ; the goods of Thomas Challis , John Harris , and Stephen Munday .

GEORGE BROWN . I am in the employ of Thomas Challis , John Harris , and Stephen Munday, salesmen , Bell-yard, Warwick-lane . The pigs were consigned to them for sale, and were placed on a block by the bar, inclosed in a wrapper. I saw them between six and seven o'clock and they was missed soon after. I found them at Guildhall, the next day, with the prisoner in custody; there was a label on the outside, directed to Challis and Co.

ISAAC DEBENHAM . I am a porter, in Friday-street. I saw the prisoner watching at the window, and stooping down to the block. I saw him take the pigs from the block in the yard, and bring them into Warwick-lane. I followed him almost into Newgate-street, and asked what he was going to do with them; he said a person employed him to take them to a butcher's in Newgate-street, and was to give him 2 s. I knew there was no butchers in Newgate-street, and took him back to Bush's, the Bell inn, he knew nothing of the prisoner.

WILLIAM BUSH . I keep the Bell inn. I saw the prisoner lurking about the yard. I did not miss the pigs till he was brought back. I knew they were in my place.

HENRY GELL . I took the prisoner in charge.

Prisoner's Defence. A porter gave them to me in Newgate-market, to carry to a butcher's - Debenham swears false.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220109-29

207. BRIDGET CONNER was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of December , three pieces of lace, containing three yards, value 6 s. 6 d. , the goods of Thomas Stevens .

W. W. DRAYTON. I am servant to Mr. Thomas Stevens , a haberdasher , who lives in Aldgate . On the 19th of December, about two o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner came to the shop; she asked for remnants of lace; I shewed her some in a basket - she laid out 1 s. 10 d. in lace. I observed her squeeze about three remnants in her hand - I had put what she bought in paper; as soon as an opportunity offered, I saw her put the three pieces into her pocket; I went round the counter to give her change for 2 s., I had previously sent for an officer - I told her she had taken some property; she said nothing, but sat down on a stool. The officer found one piece of lace, which was not ours; the three pieces were found on the floor.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. I suppose the space between the counter is narrow - A. Yes. I do not know whether she saw me whisper to the person to fetch a constable.

WILLIAM MASON . I was serving in the shop, and saw the prisoner there; Drayton was serving her - I was attending on two ladies; Drayton charged the prisoner with stealing the lace - the officer took her towards the staircase; at the end of the lace counter, I saw her throw some lace behind her, it fell about a yard from me, behind the counter - I called a person to relieve me, and picked it up, she was then up stairs.

Cross-examined. Q. Did she throw it over the counter - A. Yes. The remnants were in a small basket.

DAVID M'COMBIE . I am a constable. I was fetched to the shop; the witness said,

"This woman has got the lace about her," I took her up stairs, and was searching her when Mason came up saying,

"Here is the lace" - as I took her to the Compter, she gave me the slip, and ran across Newgate-market; a man tripped me up, and she nearly got away.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I put my hand in my pocket, he came round, and sent for a constable. Is it feasible if I threw it away, that he should search me?

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Confined Three Months .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220109-30

208. EDMUND SMYTH was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of December , eighteen pair of silk stockings, value 5 l. , the goods of Joseph Todd , James Morrison , and John Edward Todd .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be the property of Joseph Todd , and others, his partners.

MR. LAW conducted the prosecution.

- SADLER. I live in Bishopsgate-street. On the morning of the 1st of December, I came into the shop and found the prisoner there, and some stockings laying on my counter - my young man said, in his presence, he would give 5 s. per pair on them; he said he wished to sell them for 5 s. 6 d. per pair; I questioned him how he came by them - he said his brother was a job man, that he had redeemed them from a pawnbroker; I said if I was satisfied they were his brother's, I would treat with him

for them; I sent my man with him to his brother - they both returned together; my man said the prisoner had said, it was of little use going to his brother, for he was not at home, and that as they were returning he altered his mind, and said I think we had better go; that they turned back, but that he again altered his mind, and said he would come with his brother at twelve o'clock. I sent for an officer; I told the officer to go to Chiswell-street, and bring his brother, he left the shop with the prisoner.

SAMUEL SHEPPARD . I am a constable. I was fetched to Sadler's, and found the prisoner there; I accompanied him to No. 21, Chiswell-street, he enquired for his brother, the man in the shop said he did not know him, and that he had no lodgers; I brought the prisoner out - he said he was very sorry, and would tell the whole of it; I told him to be cautious what he said, as it must be given in evidence; he said, he lived with Messrs. Todd's, of Fore-street, and took them from there. I found twelve duplicates on him, for forty pair of stockings.

PETER YOUNG . I am a warehouseman to Messrs. Joseph Todd , James Morrison , and John Edward Todd , Fore-street. The prisoner was employed in the hosiery department, at a salary of 35 l. a year, he boarded in the house; it was not his business to take out any stockings without directions, I saw him at nine or ten o'clock that morning, with his hat on, going towards the door; he lived three months there.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. With feelings of the deepest regret, I stand here in this unpleasant situation, one act of my life forfeits all claim to respectable society; should your sentence be inflicted with severity, I should be lost to all friends, an awful picture of indiscretion - I wholly depend on your mercy, and my future life shall be my only pledge. My tailor was pressing for money; I had no wages due, and intended to redeem them when I was paid.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Confined One Year .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220109-31

209. AMELIA BLACKETT was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of January , one handkerchief, value 2 d.; one sovereign, and 4 s., in monies numbered, the property of James Adams , from his person .

JAMES ADAMS . On the 1st of January, between eleven and twelve o'clock at night, I saw the prisoner in Newgate-street; I was returning home with a friend, and was rather in liquor; she asked me to give her something to drink, as it was New Year's night; I agreed, and we all three went into a wine-vaults, and had a glass of rum each; I pulled out my money which was tied in a handkerchief - I paid for the liquor, put the money in the handkerchief, and put it into my pocket; we came out, she said she wanted to speak to me - I went up a court with her, and stopped about three minutes; my friend stopped at the end of the court, she came out of the court before me - some girls at the end of the court asked if I had lost my money, I felt and missed it; I had a sovereign, and 5 s. or 6 s. tied in the handkerchief; I had not opened the handkerchief in the court - it was in my right hand breeches pocket; I returned to the wine-vaults; she came in in about three minutes after, I charged her with taking my money, she denied it; I gave her in charge; the handkerchief was found on her. I did not give her any thing.

GEORGE COLLIS . I am a porter, in Newgate-market. I had been drinking with Adams; I was sober, we met the prisoner in Newgate-street, she caught hold of him, and asked for something to drink; we went to the wine-vaults and had a glass of rum each; he pulled some money out in a handkerchief, a sovereign, and 4 s. or 5 s., paid for the liquor, took his change, and tied his money up in the handkerchief, and came out; she wanted to get him into the court, he went up with her - I stood at the end, and in a minute or two the watchman turned them out of the court; she went into Newgate-street as fast as she could walk; two women said they thought he had lost his money, he searched, and missed his handkerchief; I pursued but could not see her - we returned to the wine-vaults; she came in for her pattens, he gave her in charge.

JOHN TONGUE . On the 1st of January, near twelve o'clock, the prisoner was brought to the watch-house, I found the handkerchief in her pocket, loose, and one sovereign, four shillings, and two-pence on her; the prosecutor claimed the handkerchief, and said before he saw it, it was torn at the corner - he gave the same story. He was very little in liquor.

Prisoner's Defence. I went to have something to drink, this man came in, he said he had been drinking with several friends; he had a woman with him; he took me up the court - I returned to the house for my pattens; he came and said he had lost this money, and I must go to the watch-house.

GEORGE COLLIS . He was not with any woman.

GUILTY . Aged 35.

Confined Three Months .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220109-32

THIRD DAY, FRIDAY, JANUARY 11, 1822.

210. THOMAS COXWELL was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of December , three pieces of timber, value 5 s. , the goods of John Fern .

THOMAS FERN . I am the son of John Fern , a builder , who lives at Uxbridge . We had lost timber - I received information, and obtained a search warrant, and searched the prisoner's room at Uxbridge, he is a labourer ; I found him cutting up some timber in the room; he was cutting a piece of fir, for fire wood, it was too good for that purpose; I found two slabs, one under the bed, and one by his side, and another in a chair, his saw and axe lay on the ground.

THOMAS HERNE . I am servant to Mr. Fern. I saw the piece which was found in the prisoner's room, and knew it belonged to my master; there is a white spawn on one piece, and an axe mark which was made in taking the bark off; I had noticed it before it was stolen, I only speak to that piece.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220109-33

211. ROBERT SIMS was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of January , one watch, value 30 s. , the goods of Peter Hedge .

CAROLINE HEDGE . I am the wife of Peter Hedge , of Wilderness-row, Chelsea . I met the prisoner in the street, I knew him before, he asked me about my husband; I invited him to breakfast with me, which he did, and stopped all day, my watch hung over the fire place - I asked him to come again on Christmas morning, which he did, and as he went out of the room, he said he would recompense me when he got his pension. On Saturday last he came to my lodging; I was in bed, he rapped at the door - I dressed myself, and as I went to get a light, I found him coming up stairs - I was lighting the fire, he said

"I want to see the time, but the watch is gone," I said,

"No, it is not," and took it out of a drawer and hung it up; he left me about four o'clock in the afternoon; I missed the watch. About half-past eleven o'clock, I locked the door and went out; the door was not unlocked while I was absent - I returned at three o'clock, and was at home till four o'clock; I had not noticed it all day, as it did not go. I found it on Monday in pawn. He was taken on Sunday night.

ROBERT CHAMPION . I am a constable. I found the prisoner in bed on the Sunday evening, and told him he was charged with stealing a watch from the prosecutor; he pulled his trowsers towards him - I found the duplicate of a watch in them, and took him. The prosecutrix described it before she saw it.

RICHARD ABRAHAM . I am shopman to Messrs. Wise and Page, of Long Acre. On Saturday last, between twelve and two o'clock, the prisoner pawned the watch in the name of Hubbard Chelsea , for 20 s.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Confined Six Months and Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220109-34

212. DANIEL MAHONEY was indicted for the wilful murder of Richard Needs .

MR. ROBERT HANSON. I am a pupil at the London Hospital. I saw the deceased directly he was brought into the hospital, he had a fracture on the scull on the front of the head; we examined him carefully, but did not discover the fracture till two or three days after, but observed a considerable laceration on the head; he did not appear to be under the apprehension of death, a mere fracture in the scull does not always produce death, this fracture was not calculated to produce death - he died early in December, having come in on the 13th of November.

Q. Of what did he die - A. Of an inflammation on the lungs, we opened him, apparently he had been subject to that complaint, but I have no doubt but that the exciting cause of the inflammation was the fracture on the head.

COURT. Q. Will you explain that - A. Many external violences affect the lungs, they had been previously afflicted, without doubt; the fracture was remotely the cause - he would have died of the fracture, had he not died of the inflammation. I say so from the observation I made on opening the body.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Do you mean to say the fracture of the scull, was certainly the cause; for instance, if the fracture was shewn to you, would you say of course, that he must die - A. No; there was a separation of the membrane of the brain when we opened him, which was sufficient to cause his death - he laboured under two diseases, the inflammation caused his death - I cannot say whether it existed before the wound or not. It might have been of much longer standing than the wound.

THOMAS STAGG . I keep the Green Man, public-house, in Castle-street, Whitechapel. I knew the deceased, Richard Needs . On the 12th of November, the prisoner and him were at my house, after twelve o'clock at night. I let the prisoner and three others in; the deceased came in about ten minutes after - he and the prisoner had a few words, the prisoner said

"Dick, don't you remember giving me a slap in the face, when I did not deserve it? the deceased said

"Don't bear malice, forget that," they drank together, and then the prisoner said,

"Dick, look out for yourself, for I shall look out for you." Nothing else passed in my hearing; they left the house directly after, within three minutes of each other; they were not intoxicated - the four who came in had two pots of beer, and Dick drank with them, and he had a companion - I do not know whether he drank.

Cross-examined. Q. Where did the deceased come from - A. From a club; a man came in with him, and three or four followed. Stubbs and Haines were two of them; the prisoner called for the beer, and asked Needs to drink; Needs did not first speak of the quarrel.

Q. Had the quarrel happened at your house - A. Yes; seventeen months before - nobody endeavoured to keep the prisoner in the room to fight, there was no scuffle - I cannot say which went out first.

COURT. Q. Are you sure the beginning of it was the prisoner asking if he remembered giving him a slap - A. Yes; he said,

"Look out for yourself," it was not said in an angry way, he did not explain what he meant. I do not know that. I had seen them together after the quarrel. Needs was a lamplighter, and lived in Essex-street, Whitechapel - the prisoner worked at a gas factory, in Goldston-street, and lived in Castle-street, near Essex-street.

GEORGE STUBBS . I am a bricklayer. I knew Needs. On the 12th of November, I was with him; we came from a club together, we and the patrol Sanson went into the Green Man, public-house, about half past eleven o'clock. When we first went in, I saw three Irishmen standing by the door, with a pot of porter in their hands - one of the three spoke to the deceased, and calling him out, asked him to drink with them. One of the Irishmen said,

"Do you remember a quarrel which ensued," or something of that sort; the deceased said,

"I hope you will think nothing of that," the other said,

"Look out for yourself;" he then left, and I asked one of them to drink. Needs went up stairs, I stopped at the bar door talking, I was in the house three quarters of an hour altogether. I was there a very little time after these words passed. Needs went out before me, I did not see any of them go out.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you see Needs come down? - A. No; there were four or five Englishmen, Needs drank with the prisoner.

JOSEPH HAINES . I am a costermonger. On the night of the 12th of November, I was in Castle-street, Whitechapel, about one o'clock in the morning; and saw the

prisoner in the passage of the Green Man, public-house, with a pot of beer in his hand, drinking with another; the prisoner and Needs had some conversation together, I do not know what it was; the prisoner went out with his partner. Needs went out in about half a minute, alone, I and Francis came out of the public-house together after Needs went out, and saw him about twenty-five yards from us, the prisoner and the other man were before him. We saw Needs fall, and the other two run away - at this time, they were not above two yards from him. We pursued them, and sung out Watch! and Murder! he did not overtake them, and returned to Needs, who was with the watchmen, they held him up as well as they could. I went home with him to Catharine Wheel-alley, he was cut on the side of the head and bled very much, I cut the hair off his head, I got a plaster, put it on, and went away; he was taken to the Hospital the next day.

Cross-examined. Q. You and Francis were the nearest to him when he fell - Yes; it was a moonlight night. When the alarm was made, three or four more came out of the public-house. The prisoner went out first, and Needs after him, he was going the nearest way home - Catharine Wheel-alley, where he lives, is near Essex-street.

JAMES FRANCIS . I am a shoe-maker. I lived in the same house as Need's, No. 24, Catharine Wheel-alley. I was with Hains on the 12th of November in Castle-street, near the Green Man, public-house, in the street, about seven or eight yards from the prisoner; I heard him say,

"Dick come along," a man was with the prisoner. Needs went on following him about forty yards behind in the middle of the street, and they walked by the side of the houses, and when they got to the bottom of the street, I saw Needs fall, the prisoner and his friend were about ten yards from Needs when he fell, and I about twenty yards behind. I ran as hard as I could to have the prisoner and his companion stopped, as they ran off directly; I called, Watch! and Haines called out, Watch and Murder! he was behind me, but did not overtake them, I returned to where the deceased fell, he had been taken away. I saw him at his own house about five minutes after, sitting in a chair between two other men bleeding at the head.

Cross-examined. Q. You lived in the same house - A. Yes; since April, I do not know whether he ever saw Needs; Needs had had a very bad cough for twelve months, but sometimes he was quite hearty.

Q. How came Needs to go out after the prisoner - A. We were all going home; I did not tell him to follow Mahoney; he said,

"Dick come along," they walked about forty yards before he fell.

MR. HARRISON re-examined. He only had one blow, that certainly might be occasioned by a fall on the curb-stone, as well as a blow from a stone.

JOHN PARTRIDGE . I am the night-beadle, of Whitechapel. On the morning of the 13th, about four o'clock, I went to the prisoner's lodgings and took him to the deceased's lodging. I found him in bed, he lived about one hundred and fifty yards from the deceased. I took him into Need's presence, there was five or six persons in the room; I told the deceased to look round to see if he saw the person, he said,

"That is the man" nodding at Mahoney, the prisoner muttered something to this effect;

"If I have thrown it I am sorry for it;" I took him immediately to the watch-house. On Sunday, the 9th of December, I saw Needs about four o'clock in the afternoon, he died between six and seven o'clock that night. I cannot say he was aware that he was dying.

THOMAS YEARLING . I am a watchman. On the night of the 12th of November, I was in Castle-street, Whitechapel. I saw the deceased in the court about twenty minutes before two, and heard a voice say,

"Needs, come this way," Needs went forward, and I followed him about sixteen yards off, and I saw him suddenly fall - I sprang my rattle, I saw nobody before him, it was moonlight and foggy, I noticed nothing before I heard the voice calling him, I heard nothing called out, I returned to the deceased and found him in the hands of a young man who was endeavouring to get him on his feet, he laid on his left side, and his head was cut. I carried him to his own house, returned and found this stone about seven yards from where he fell, this was half or three quarters of an hour after, there was no other stone except a large granite stone, nearly as big as a hat, on the other side of the road.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you a lantern - A. Yes.

COURT. Q. Is there a foot pavement - A. Yes, my Lord; the deceased fell in the kennel nearly in the middle of the street, there is a dust heap between where he fell and the Green Man public-house.

JOAN SANSOM . I am patrol of White-chapel. About half past two o'clock in the morning of the 13th of November this hat was given to me in Catharine Wheel-alley, exactly in the state it is now. I went with Partridge when the deceased and prisoner were together, Partridge said,

"Look round Dick and see if the man is in the room, who threw the stone at you," he rose his head as well as he could, and said,

"That is the man," nodding to Mahoney, we took him to the watch house.

SAMUEL NEEDS . I am brother to the deceased. I know this hat was my brother's; I cannot say that he wore it on the night in question, but he generally wore it.

FREDERICK AGER . I am a surgeon. On the 13th of November, about ten o'clock in the morning, I saw the deceased, he was then considerably recovered, and in a perfectly sensible state - he had a wound on the left side of the head; I cannot say whether it was inflicted by a blunt instrument, or by a fall. I examined it with a probe, but did not discover it to be fractured. I think the wound might be inflicted by the stone produced.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent; I do not know any thing about the man.

THOMAS YEARLING re-examined. The deceased went ten yards before he fell - I heard a voice say

"Needs, come along this way," he fell in less than a minute; he had got a good way beyond the dust heap, if there was a man before him, he must be further from the dust heap.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18220109-35

213. THOMAS STRATFORD was indicted for the wilful murder of Abraham Slade .

MR. HONE conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM JONES . I am a watchman of Mary-le-bone parish. I was in the Edgware-road when the accident

happened. I was coming down the road from John-street, towards Tyburn-turnpike, about half-past nine o'clock, and passed by a gig, which was alongside of the curb-stone on the left; the horse's head was towards Tyburn-gate. A gentleman was standing alongside his horses on the left hand on the near side. I passed by about twenty yards, and heard the smacking of a whip behind, and instantly heard a crash; I turned round, and went to the spot. I saw a coach lying on its side, four or five doors from Queen-street, in the Edgware-road; the horses laid down on their sides. I held my lantern while a gentleman was dragged from under the fore part of the coach; the chaise-horse was running away, and the chaise tumbling to pieces. A woman was picked up, who I knew by seeing her frequently on my beat. The coachman called for help, and turned the coach on the wheels, got his horses up, and led them; it was a dark night. I cannot say who the coachman was. The road was lighted by oil on the side the gig stood, and it was just by a lamp.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. The road was only lit on one side - A. No; the gig almost touched the curb; I suppose the coach occasioned the crash. I found it two yards from where I saw the gig; it laid more over in the road on the right. I did not see the coach before the accident happened.

COURT. Q. Did the man who led the horses take any notice of Mr. Slade - A. No; he led his horses away, and took no notice.

THOMAS ESTE , ESQ. I live at Portland-place. I was in the Edgware-road; there were two women looking at some jewellery in a shop; a person inside came to the door; the women ran from the shop towards Paddington; they were hailed by a coachman on his box, who asked them to come up, using very coarse language at the time. He handed one up on the box, the other got on the roof behind the box; the coachman drove off rather rapidly till he came close to the turnpike, and having cleared the gate, he drove off very rapidly; I heard screams almost immediately after he cleared the gate. I returned to the spot, and saw the woman who had got on the box, fainting on the ground; she was supported by some person. On my asking what had happened, a boy held up the wing of a gig; I then saw a gentleman leaning against the rails, two doors beyond where the women were - he was in great agony, and could scarcely speak. I advised his being taken in doors, and he was taken in. I then saw the body of the gig nearly opposite, at the top of George-street; it was shattered to pieces. The gig-horse was brought back. Just as I was leaving the pavement to ascertain the name on the coach, the coachman drove off full gallop. I do not know him; I think he saw me, and whipped his horses. I could discern the words Notting-hill, on the front pannel, on the near side of the road, coming from Paddington. It was a fine night for the time of the years. If I had been driving to town, I could certainly see any other vehicle on the road with great ease.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. The gig was on the proper side, and the coach going in the direction it did, was on the right side also - A. Yes; he only trotted to the turnpike. I guess that he went faster afterwards by hearing of the chain of the coach, but I did not see it. It may be that the coach came suddenly on the gig, and could not turn, but had it gone at a proper pace, there was space enough to turn, and he might have pulled up - the remains of the gig were two hundred yards from the turnpike. I am certain that he quickened his pace on getting through the turnpike.

WILLIAM GOSLING . I am a bookseller, and live in the Edgware-road. On the 29th of November, about nine o'clock in the evening, I heard a sudden crash opposite my door. I went out, and saw a person standing on the flag, in great agitation; he appeared very much hurt. I picked up a female who was laying on the ground, and in the interval, Mr. Slade was taken into my room. Some persons were lifting the coach on its wheels, but I cannot identify the coachman. I did not see what coach it was; it was not a dark night.

DAVID GRIFFITHS . I am a carpenter, and live in the Edgware-road. I remember this accident, the first thing I saw was the deceased sitting on a chair; the person hurt was brought into the house in which I live - I ascertained that it was Mr. Slade, of Tottenham Court-road; Mr. Bryan, the surgeon's young man came - I saw a coach in the road, I knew it to be the Bayswater, by the colour of the body; Paddington was written on it; I did not look for the word Bayswater, as I only knew one coach of that colour. Mr. Slade left my house in a coach with one of Mr. Bryan's young men. When I saw the coach, it stood between two lamps, about seven yards from each. I do not know who drove.

RICHARD SAUNDERS . I am a wheelwright, and live in the Edgware-road. I remember the accident happening; I heard a noise, and went to my gate, and saw a stage coach. Mr. Slade was standing against the rails; it was a Bayswater coach; the prisoner was leading the horses; I have seen him drive the same coach before, nobody but him was with it. I did not see it go away.

Cross-examined. Q. Then how did he lead the horses - A. He just straightened them, they were fastened to the coach. I saw him drive that coach the day before, and at other times. After he straightened the horses he came up, and said,

"Are the women," or

"Are the ladies hurt."

CAROLINE JOHNSON . I recollect the accident. I know the prisoner, he is a coachman - I was an outside passenger from the Star and Garter, public-house, to Bayswater, he drove the coach - I was on the roof. When he got through the turnpike he stopped the coach to put down a passenger, or to do something to the coach; I did not see any one get out; he got off the coach and gave me the reins to hold, as he was getting up again, I had the reins in my hand, the horses moved, and I dropped them; he got up, and tried to recover the reins but could not - he was on the box when the accident happened; I was so frightened that I held on the coach, and cannot say whether he had the reins or not, he stooped down towards the horses' backs to get them, but whether he did or not, I cannot say; I was thrown off, and fainted away, and saw part of the chaise, after I recovered; the coach was going fast. I was going to Bayswater.

Q. To whom were you going there - A. To no one in particular; it was about nine o'clock. I live in Lisson-street, Paddington.

Cross-examined. Q. Did the horses go on fast - A. Yes; I tried to save myself. The coach was upset before I could see whether he had the reins or not - I let them drop, and the horses plunged forwards directly.

COURT. Q. Had he hold of the reins when the horses first set off in a gallop - A. No; I dropped the reins before he got up, as he was getting up.

RICHARD HACON . I am assistant to a surgeon, and live in Princes-street, Hanover-square. I was in the Edgware-road, and saw Mr. Slade after the accident, at his house in Tottenham Court-road; I also saw him at Mr. Griffiths's house. I did not assist in dressing his wound.

MR. R. C. GRIFFITHS. I am a surgeon, and live in Tottenham Court-road. I knew Mr. Abraham Slade ; I was sent for to him on the 29th of November, at ten o'clock at night - he had a severe injury on the knee, and bruises on the angle of the jaw, back, and loins, occasioned by extensive violence; the effect of that injury, but more particularly the injury of the knee, occasioned his death; it mortified, he died in thirteen days - I attended him with Sir Ashley Cooper, I saw him every day; every thing was done for him that could be. I conceived him to be in danger from the first moment I saw him; I saw death approaching on the Monday, he died on Wednesday. He felt convinced he should not recover from the first, he said from the beginning, and also on the Monday before his death, that he was sure he should die; he always expressed himself as having no hope of recovery.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. He was sometimes better, and sometimes worse - A. Yes.

COURT. Q. When did you hear him say any thing about what happened - A. Soon after it happened; he did not believe himself in the article of death; we had not told him that he was in danger.

DANIEL EDWARD STEVENS . I live in Escott-place. I am clerk to Mr. Young, solicitor, of Poland-street, Hampstead; I knew Mr. Abraham Slade , of Tottenham Court-road. On the 30th of November, I was sent for to him, and saw him in bed; he said,

"I am dreadfully wounded, and do not expect to live, and wish to make my will."

MR. BRODRICK to MR. GRIFFITHS. Q. During the attendance of Sir Ashley Cooper, and yourself, you had great difficulty in keeping up his spirits, I suppose you told him not to be alarmed - A. We encouraged him to hope, and said it was possible and propable that he might recover; this excited his hopes a little, but he never expressed satisfied that he should live; his spirits were not so much depressed; after we gave him hopes, he was certainly not under the apprehension of immediate death.

COURT. Q. Then when he had the conversation with you, it was possible he might recover - A. We had hopes of his recovery till Monday.

The Court considered that there was not sufficient proof of the deceased's conviction of his death, to receive in evidence any declaration made by him.

WILLIAM JONES re-examined. The first thing I heard, was the smacking of a whip behind me, the Tyburn gate was behind me; I believe the smacking came from towards the toll bar; I returned immediately, and saw Mr. Slade taken from under the coach. The crash was not more than two minutes after the smacking of the whip.

GUILTY. Aged 19.

Of Manslaughter only .

Confined One Year .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18220109-36

214. JOHN LANE was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Goddard , at St. Margaret, Westminster, about twelve o'clock at noon, on the 23d of December , (Jane, the wife of John Allen , and others, being therein), and stealing one bag, value 1 d.; and the sum of 18 l. 11 s., in monies numbered, and one 1 l. Bank note , his property.

JOHN GODDARD . I rent a house in Orchard-street, St. Margaret's, Westminster . Jane Allen lodges with me. On Sunday, the 23d of November, my wife and son went to church, and about half-past eleven o'clock, I and my youngest son left home to go to church also. We occupy one room up stairs, and one below. I locked the door of the room where all this property was, and put the key in my pocket. The window is about four feet from the ground. Only one pane at the top opens to admit the air; that was also shut. I do not know whether I left any body in the house. I came home first, about one o'clock, and found the room-door open. A drawer was open, which was shut when I went out. The bolt of the lock stood out. I found an eight-day clock taken off the bracket, but not taken out of the room. The cupboard doors, where I had locked the property, were wide open. I missed twelve sovereigns, one guinea, with the impression nearly worn off, a 1 l. note, 4 l. in silver, and 30 s. in copper. The silver was in one green baize bag, and the gold and note in another; the copper was tied in 5 s. papers, with packthread round them. I alarmed the house - Mrs. Allen came down with several other lodgers. I went with Cooper, the officer, to the Rising Sun, public-house, Bedfordbury, about four o'clock, and waited there; the prisoner came in about a quarter before five; Cooper took him, and found the green bag, which had contained the silver, on him - there were nine sovereigns, the smooth guinea, one 1 l. note, and 4 l. in silver, in it. I knew the guinea and the note - it had my own writing on it;

"Nesbitt, 33, Oxford-street," was on it. The prisoner had lodged with me for two years; we were intimate; his father lodged with me before that time. He had been in my room about nine or ten o'clock on the Saturday night, and at that time, I had three sovereigns and the guinea in a glass on the mantle piece.

JANE ALLEN . I lodged at the prosecutor's. On Sunday the 23d of December I was at home all day with my husband. I went down stairs about eleven o'clock, and was called down again at one. I went at eleven o'clock to make the prisoner's bed, but he was not up; he lodged on the first floor, and is a locksmith. I made his bed at twelve o'clock; he was gone out then. He had locked his door, and put the key under the mat.

JOSEPH COOPER . I am an officer of Queen-square. Goddard came to me; I went with him to the Rising Sun public-house, Bedfordbury; the prisoner came in at a quarter before five o'clock; I took him. On our way to the watch-house, I asked him where he had been since he left

home; he said, in the Park. I asked who he joined in the Park; he said, Nobody. I asked where he had dined; he said, he did not know that he had dined any where. I asked whether he had any more money in his pocket than he could account for; he said, No. Upon searching him, I found a green baize bag, containing nine sovereigns, a smooth guinea, 4 l. in silver, and a 1 l. note; and in his pocket, 17 s. more. I undressed him to search him, and asked if he could account how he got it; he said, Yes. I took him into another room, and then he said he picked it up in the bag in the passage, as he was going out, between eleven and twelve o'clock. I again asked him where he had dined; he at last said he had dined with a man named Johnson, but declined telling me where he lived. I found two keys on him, one of which opens the door of his own room.

EDWARD JOHN HANDLEY . I was with Cooper; I know nothing more.

JOHN GODDARD . Here is my writing on the note. I took it on the 22d of Nesbit. I believe the guinea to be the same.

Prisoner's Defence. I throw myself on the mercy of the Jury.

Two witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 19.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18220109-37

215. JOSEPH CAPPER was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of January , two cut glass decanters, value 24 s.; six tumblers, value 7 s.; five wine glasses, value 5 s.; fourteen cut glass salts, value 30 s.; four salt stands, value 10 s.; two cut glass pepper castors, value 3 s.; two cruets, value 3 s.; six castor tops, value 10 s.; one caddy-bason, value 7 s.; one pickle bottle, value 4 s.; one smelling-bottle, value 1 s.; one china candlestick, value 4 s.; thirteen cups, and three saucers, value 8 s.; eight plates, value 8 s.; one bason, value 1 s.; and two chimney ornaments, value 2 s. , the goods of John Palmer , and Thomas Burnell .

THOMAS BURNELL . I am in partnership with John Palmer ; we are china and glass men , and live in Coleman-street. We had suspicious of the prisoner, and in consequence of information, we went to the house of James Otherly , Upper Charles-street, Goswell-street, with an officer, and found two cut glass decanters, four glass salts and stands, and two cruets, which I knew to be ours - the prisoner was our confidential warehouseman .

JAMES OTHERLY . I am employed by the Gas Company. The property was found at my house, in Mulberry-place, Upper Charles-street; it was brought to me in the space of a year and half, by the prisoner, at different times, he gave them to me. I had known him two years and three quarters, and knew he lived with the prosecutors - he asked if I was married, I said Yes; he said if he thought so, he would make me a present towards housekeeping - he said he was in the habit of having small presents from different manufacturers, who supplied his master.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. What are you - A. A brazier; I work for the Gas Company. I used to attend at the prosecutor's warehouse, four time a week, to burn the air out of the pipes. I was only there a few minutes, and Mr. Burnell was generally there - I was taken up, and immediately said he gave them to me. Mr. Palmer, junior, was examined, and said he sold the prisoner some things which he had brought me - I did not think them stolen.

WILLIAM BRAND . I am a marshalman. I went to Otherly's, on the 1st of January, with Mr. Burnell, and found two quart decanters, six tumblers, five wine glasses, four salts and stands, all cut glass; two cruets, two pair of cups, with silver tops, six china cups and saucers, which the prosecutors claimed - they were on a sideboard. He said the prosecutor's servant brought them there at different times; he gave his account without hesitation, he thought he received some small things from them at a public-house.

Cross-examined. Q. Did not young Mr. Palmer say he sold him some of them - A. He identified some small articles, as having sold them to him - Otherly was kept in custody three or four days.

JOHN FLETCHER LAWSON PALMER . I am book-keeper to Messrs. Burnell and Palmer. I only know that the articles are the property of the prosecutors. I believe them once to have been theirs.

Cross-examined. Q. He had things with your permission - A. He had two vinegar cruets, a mustard pot, two pepper castors, which were found, he had from me, and I sold him two decanters, twelve wine glasses, six tumblers, six goblets, four salts, a wine bason, and chamber pot, and sundry other articles, of which I made no memorandum - he has paid me for part of them.

Q. Then he is charged in your books for them - A. No; I never entered them - the prosecutors were not aware of it; it was an account between me and him, some of them were sold twelve months ago.

COURT. Q. Did you ever tell your masters, that you sold him the things - A. I do not recollect mentioning it. I intended him to pay for them - I did not enter it in any book, and cannot tell what he owed; the decanters produced, are a different sort to those I sold him, they had rings round the necks - I believe I never sold him those, I will not swear it, I positively swear I never sold him the decanters.

MR. ANDREWS. Q. You swear it - A. Yes; these are cut glass - I entered some things on a slip of paper twelve months ago, (producing it) they were sold at three different times within twelve months - I have put no dates to it, I speak from my memory, that they were ring decanters. I have frequently sold things, and not entered them but when I receive the money, I give credit for it - if they are bought on credit, I enter them, but if paid for, I enter the money.

Q. Why not enter Capper's - A. They ought to have been weighed, to ascertain the price, which I had not time to do, it was inconvenient - I cannot say these were ever the prosecutor's property, or if they were, that they were never sold.

COURT. Q. You sold them to him at three different times; do you mean to say, that this memorandum was written at three different times - A. Yes; I kept the memorandum in my desk a long time, and then loose in my pocket - the first entry was made about four months after the second.

ELIZA WATERFIELD . I live in Blue Anchor-yard, Coleman-street,

my husband is foreman at Peckham's livery stables. About three months ago, Capper gave me seven cups and saucers, eight plates, and two chimney ornaments.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you seen Palmer, Jun., with him - A. Yes; but never saw him give him any thing.

MR. BURNELL. I have every reason to believe the china is mine, I swear positively to the glass.

Cross-examined. Q. You know nothing of goods being sold him - A. Not such as these.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220109-38

216. JOHN REDGRAVE was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Edward William Younger , about eight o'clock in the night, on the 25th of December , at St. Stephen, Coleman-street, with intent to steal, and stealing therein, seven hams, value 3 l. 10 s.; two turkeys, value 1 l.; two baskets, value 3 s. 6 d.; one watch, value 1 l.; one pair of sheets, value 15 s.; two coats, value 1 l.; one pair of trowsers, value 10 s.; and 10 s. in copper monies numbered , his property.

EDWARD WILLIAM YOUNGER . I am a cheesemonger , and live in Little Bell-alley, St. Stephen, Coleman-street , and rent the whole house. On the morning of Christmas day, I went out about six o'clock, and left the house locked, and nobody in it. I returned next morning about eleven o'clock, I had left all this property safe, I found the first and second floor broke open, there was no violence used to the front door - I was not the first that came to the house.

FRANCIS LARUE . I am servant to the prosecutor. I went to the house about half-past six o'clock on the morning of the 26th, as usual - I was not there the day before, I found the street door a-jar, and all the flats in which the butter and things were, had been moved from where I left them on the 24th, they were out of their place nobody was in the house, I got a light and lit the gas, I missed two turkeys off the scale beam and some hams, they were safe at twelve o'clock on the night of the 24th. I sent for my master, he came between ten and eleven o'clock.

MR. YOUNGER. Two empty baskets were missed also from the shop - I found the first floor chamber-door broken open, and a secretaire broken open, and all the drawers empty - I missed two coats, worth 20 s., and a pair of sheets, worth 15 s.; the till was emptied of above 10 s. worth of copper, I lost more than seven hams, worth 3 l. 10 s., I gave 10 s. each for the turkeys; a trunk in the parlour was broken open, and the contents emptied on the floor, and the watch taken from it, it was worth 1 l. - I also missed a pair of trowsers, worth 10 s. I saw one of the baskets at Worship-street on the 26th, and can swear to it, the prisoner was then in custody.

THOMAS GARTON . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner at the corner of Chiswell-street, Finsbury-square, at half-past eight o'clock on the night of Christmas-day; he had a basket with two hams in it. I asked how he came by them; he said he brought them from Mr. Simpson's, Royal Exchange; and I believe he said Simpson was a tailor. I asked where he was going to take them; he said to Mrs. Armstrong, No. 29, St. John's-square, Clerkenwell, and that he lived there. I took him to the public-house; I detained him, and sent Bridges to Simpson, and next morning I went to No. 29, St. John's-square. His mother worked there, but did not live there; it is a sash-maker's; Mr. Younger claimed the basket. I found a watch on him, but it was not the prosecutor's. I took him to the watch-house, and sent Bridges back to the public-house, to search the spot where he stood; there were other people in the house, but we had him close under the window, in a corner opposite the bar. I asked where he lived; he then said at No. 10, Aylesbury-street. I found his mother lived there, but not him; he afterwards said he lived on Addle-hill, which I found true.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. How far is the public-house from the watch-house - A. About one hundred and forty yards. He said he lived in John-street; not that he was going to his mother's there; he had a handkerchief over the hams.

SAMUEL BRIDGES . I was with Garton when the prisoner was taken; his account is true in every point. I went back to the public-house, and in the corner where the prisoner stood, I found a crow-bar. I went next morning to Younger's - the place was in great confusion. I matched the crow-bar to the first floor door - it corresponded with both ends of it, and also with the marks on the secretarie. I found the second floor door was burst open by the same instrument - it fitted exactly - and also with a trunk which was broken open.

Cross-examined. Q. This is a common turn-screw - A. It will do for that; it was all over ham-grease, and smell of ham.

CHARLES STAPLES . I live in Little Bell-alley, four hundred yards from Younger's house. On Christmas night, about eight o'clock, I saw the prisoner, I am sure of him, his back was against Mr. Younger's door, he seemed to be looking at the opposite house; I then saw another man about a yard from him - I turned the corner about a dozen yards, and then returned to Younger's door; the prisoner then moved, and nudged the other; they went towards Angel-court - I went with my wife to Southwark-bridge; then returned, thinking something was going on a miss in the neighbourhood. I tried the door of the opposite house, it was safe; I went away, the party was gone - next morning I heard of the robbery; I said I should know one of the men, and hearing a man was in custody, I went to Worship-street, and saw the prisoner at the bar with another man, I knew him immediately, and swear positively to him; I should know the other if I saw him; there was two gas lamps within thirty yards, which both give strong lights - I looked him full in the face; he was looking up at the house, so that I saw his countenance plainly. I am confident of him.

Cross-examined. Q. What time was it - A. About eight o'clock, he had his hat on. One gas light was about twelve yards from him. I am an officer, and have been so seven years.

MR. YOUNGER. The basket is one I left in the house, my initials are on it, in my own writing, and I believe the hams to be mine. I should think it would take one man five journies to take them all.

Prisoner's Defence. The gentleman says another prisoner

was at Worship-street with me, I was at the bar alone. I assure you I was innocently led into it.

Two witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 36.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220109-39

217. CHARLES EVANS was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of January , one bridle, value 15 s. the goods of James Hilton .

JAMES METCALF . I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner about twelve o'clock this morning, with a basket containing a bridle; I had been watching him and another, for two hours - I saw his companion take the bridle, and put it into the prisoner's basket, from Mr. Hilton's shop in St. Martin's-le-grand - the other got away. I took the prisoner about a hundred and fifty yards from the shop.

JAMES HILTON . I am a saddler , and live in St. Martin's-le-grand. Metcalf brought the bridle to my shop; it is mine; I had only finished it half an hour before.

Prisoner's Defence. It dropped at my feet; I saw a man running, and picked it up.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Confined Six Months and Whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220109-40

218. FRANCES SUDDELL was indicted for a misdemeanour .

MR. ANDREWS conducted the prosecution.

MATTHEW GOULD . I am churchwarden of St. Pancras, Soper-lane. On the 14th of December, the prisoner came to me for relief; I knew her by having relieved her before. I asked on what pretence she asked relief; she said she belonged to the parish - I gave her 14 s. as a month's allowance, at 3 s. 6 d., a week. On the 29th, I found I was imposed on.

WILLIAM SHAPLIN . I am master of the workhouse of St. Olave, Hart-street. The prisoner came to me on the 29th of December, saying she was very ill, and must have money, and claimed assistance as one of our parishioners. I took her to the churchwarden; she had a written order into the poor-house; she sat herself down on the step of the door, and said,

"Here I will sit till twelve o'clock tonight, but I will have money - I want money, and I will have it." I took her to Mr. Gould, who gave her in charge. I know that in 1819, she was removed from Whitechapel parish to St. Oalve's, Hart-street; she was a settled inhabitant of that parish. I was present at the Mansion-house when she signed her examination.

(A deposition made by the defendant, in which she swore herself entitled to a settlement in St. Olive's, Hart-street, was here read.)

Prisoner's Defence. I did not know the consequence, or I should not have done it.

GUILTY .

Confined Three Months .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220109-41

219. WILLIAM ROLFE was indicted for a misdemeanour .

MR. LAW conducted the prosecution.

JOHN MERRYMAN . I am a compositor. On the 25th of December I saw the prisoner at the King's Head tap, Old Change. He enquired for Tommy, who was a carman. I said he had been there, and had left, but would return shortly. Previous to his coming there, he passed a base half-crown for a pint of porter. I took it without looking particularly at it. I was in care of the tap; it was quite a new half-crown. I put it in my pocket, supposing it good. Soon after Tommy came; they complained to each other for being kept in waiting; they went into the back parlour, and in consequence of information, I looked at the half-crown, and found it was bad. I had no others but quite old ones - I immediately went into the parlour with it in my hand, and said to the prisoner,

"Why do you come here smashing, you ought to have gone further, as you know I am an officer." Sadler, who is Tommy, declared his innocence. As soon as I entered the room, I saw a quantity of base silver on the table in a paper - I seized it. and dropped the half-crown; there was nothing in the room before they went in - on the table, I found a bag with 5 l. worth of shillings, six pences, and half-crowns, all counterfeit. I took Sadler to the Compter, and found a bad half-crown and a shilling on him in a bag; and on the prisoner, I found a paper of sixpences, with paper round every one, of the same die as those on the table; and the half-crown was the same die as them on the table. There were seventeen sixpences in the paper, and three loose in his pocket.

MR. CALEB EDWARD POWELL . I am an assistant to the solicitor of the Mint. The sixpences are all counterfeit, and of the same die, merely washed, also those in the paper parcel are all counterfeits, there is five dozen shillings, six dozen sixpences, and seventeen half-crowns, the whole of which are counterfeit; the sixpences are of the same die as those found on the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I found them in Bishopsgate-street, shewed them to Sadler, he said they were bad, and we were going to throw them away.

GUILTY .

Confined One Year .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220109-42

220. J. W. THOMPSON , WILLIAM WELMSHURST , AND JOHN WELMSHURST , were separately indicted for misdemeanours .

No prosecutors appeared.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220109-43

FOURTH DAY. SATURDAY, JANUARY 12, 1822.

221. CHARLES NEWMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of December , one coat, value 2 l.; one pair of gloves, value 1 s.; and one handkerchief, value 3 s. , the goods of Launcelot Baugh Allen , Esq.

JOHN NEWCOMBE . I am servant to Launcelot Baugh Allen, Esq., of Dulwich. On the 17th of December I drove his gig to London - I stopped at Morrison's music shop, in Princes-street, Soho . I left the gig about two

minutes at the door in charge of Morrison's son, my master's coat was on the driving seat, hanging over the back; I heard the cry of Stop thief! went to the door, it was gone, and the boy was pursuing somebody; he returned with the coat, the gloves and handkerchief were in the pocket. I saw the prisoner in charge about five minutes after.

THOMAS DUDLEY . I am a brass founder, and live in King-street, Soho. I was passing down King-street, about six o'clock, and heard the cry of Stop thief! the prisoner was turning the corner of Macclesfield-street, running - nobody was before him, I collared him, and asked why he was running; he said, he knew nothing about it, I said he must have heard the cry - while I was talking to him, Morrison's son came up, and said, he had stolen a coat from a gig in Princes-street; he said,

"Bless your soul, I know nothing of it."

WILLIAM MORRISON . I am near fourteen years old. Allen's servant came with the gig and I took care of it, and stood opposite the horse's head; the prisoner came up and pulled the coat off, and ran off with it; I gave an alarm and pursued, Mr. Dudley stopped him, and saw him drop the coat on Ryder's foot, in Gerrard-street; when I came up, I charged him with stealing it, he denied it, I never lost sight of him.

CHARLES RYDER . I am a publican, and live in Oxford-street. I was in Gerrard-street, and saw a man running with a coat on his arm, he went off the pavement and threw it at my feet, I picked it up, two boys were running after him, he turned up Macclesfield-street.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. They have all sworn false, for the boy was at the shop when I was brought back, they told him to swear to me, right or wrong.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220109-44

222. JAMES TUFNEL and THOMAS WILSON were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dweling-house, of Robert Ray , Esq. , at Edmonton , about four o'clock in the night of the 30th of October, and stealing therein, three pair of sheets, value 10 s.; one table cloth, value 5 s.; ten towels, value 10 s.; three flannel petticoats, value 3 s.; one frock, value 1 s.; five cotton stockings, value 1 s.; four pair of stockings, value 8 s.; one pin cloth, value 1 s.; two linen bags, value 3 s.; one folding cloth, value 1 s.; two muslin caps, value 5 s.; one tippet, value 2 s. 6 d.; two cloth great coats, value 40 s.; one other cloth coat, value 40 s.; one cloth waistcoat, value 15 s.; one pair of breeches, value 10 s.; one pair of drawers, value 1 s., and one piece of lace, value 2 s. 6 d., his property; two gowns, value 4 s.; three pair of stockings, value 5 s.; two aprons, value 2 s., and five frills, value 2 s. 6 d., the goods of Ann Harrington ; two handkerchiefs, value 5 s., and one piece of lace, value 2 s., the goods of Elizabeth Read ; four shirts, value 2 l.; six neckcloths, value 12 s.; one waistcoat, value 10 s.; one pair of breeches, value 10 s., and seven pair of stockings, value 12 s. , the goods of John Harland .

MR. BOLLAND conducted the prosecution.

ROBERT RAY , ESQ. I live in the parish of Edmonton. I have a laundry and wash-house, a coal shed, a dairy, and coach-house, within my premises, they are surrounded by a wall, on one side is the fence, on the other is sweet briar, there is then a plantation and iron railing, the premises are fenced all round. On the 31st of October, at six o'clock in the morning, I was apprised of the robbery.

COURT. Q. Can any one get to the place without going through your dwelling-house or getting over the inclosure - A. No, my Lord.

JULIA BRAMHALL . I am nurse at Mr. Ray's. On Tuesday night, the 30th of October, the servants were employed in washing; the things were left, part in the laundry, and part in the wash-house; I was the last person in the laundry and wash-house that night, and locked the door; there is one window in the laundry, and one in the wash-house, they are secured with iron bars - nobody could got in at the window without breaking through the bars. Between five and six o'clock next morning, I was informed of the robbery. I went and found a few towels and small things left. Every thing else was taken, there had been three pair of sheets, and one table cloth in the wash-house, and twelve towels; four flannel petticoats were taken from the laundry, and the other articles stated the indictment.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. When did you leave the laundry - A. At nine o'clock at night - It was hardly light when I went in the morning.

GEORGE MOLE . I am labourer to Mr. Ray. On Wednesday morning, the 30th October, at five o'clock, I went to the premises, it was very dark; I found the lodge-gate open, the passage door, also the wash-house door, the stable door, and the harness-room doors were all open; the wash-house and the harness-room doors were forced open, and the stable door, with the coulter of the plough. I found it near the door, it was in the plough near the hay-stack the night before. I applied it to the marks, and have no doubt but it was the instrument used.

JOHN HARLAND. I am coachman to Mr. Ray. I sleep in the house, I left the stable and harness-room about eight o'clock at night, I locked them and had the keys in my pocket; I left four shirts, six neck-cloths, six pair of cotton stockings, two pair of worsted, one silk handkerchief, one striped waistcoat, and one pair of cord breeches there, which were mine; there was a cloth livery coat and waistcoat of Mr. Ray's, and a pair of blue velveteen breeches, the livery was new. I had not worn it above five or six times, there was a coachman's coat laying on the box of the carriage in the coach-house. I got up about twenty minutes past five o'clock, and found the door forced open with the coulter of a plough, it fitted the marks.

ELIZA BONNER . I knew Deakin. I lived with him in October last - I am not his wife, I lived with him seven years. On the morning of Wednesday, the 31st of October, between six and seven o'clock, some persons came to our house, I and Deakin were in bed, I did not know the persons then, but do now; it was the prisoners, they came with some things, they knocked at the door two or three times; at last I heard them, and awoke Deakin, he went to the door and let them in; we sleep down stairs, they came into the front place where we live, the door was a jar. I laid in bed, and could hear what passed; I heard these men ask Deakin, if he would take these things which they had got; he replied, that he was very much against taking them; they said, he need be in no fear, for all was right,

and straight; he gave consent to take them, and one of them said, they must have some money of him, he gave them a sovereign.

Q. Do you know that he did that - A. Yes; I heard the words pass between them; he then told them to take the things and leave them at the Jolly Butchers, public-house, which was about a mile from Bow-farm, where we lived, and to leave them with the ostler, till Deakin called for them - they then went away. Between breakfast and dinner, Wilson and Tufnel came again to our house, Deakin was not at home when they came in, only myself, Wilson said to me,

"Well, old woman, where is Deakin." I said,

"He is not at home," he was gone to West Green, on his master's business, about some potatoes, he was servant to Mr. - Bow's-farm; he said, he should very much like to have seen him if he had been at home, to know whether he meant to have the other things or not; I said,

"What things is it you have got?" He said,

"Why, I cannot tell you rightly what there is, but, there is a bag full of them, wet and dry together," he said,

"For they will lay in the field and spoil," there was silk stockings; laces and dresses, for all that he saw, he was ******** if he did not take that; Tuffnel was present, and one of them said, that as they stood in the house, they had a great mind to hang the things on the hedge to dry them, as they were so wet; Tufnel joined in the conversation - they both came again next evening, Thursday, Deakin was at home, and all three consulted, how they were to get the things away; they asked Deakin, how he meant to get the things away that were at the Jolly Butchers, they said, they had left one parcel at the Jolly Butchers, and one parcel in the field, in White Hart-lane; he told them he had got them from the Jolly Butchers, and they were in the house; he said, he would get rid of the things that he had got from the Jolly Butchers, first, and then he would tell them more about the others, he said he would get Balaam's cart on Friday morning, and take them down to Mr. Hart, the Jews, at Tottenham - they said, they wanted more money, Deakin said, he did not know how to let them have more till he had got rid of the things, but he gave them 10 s. more that night. He had locked the things in the bed-room before they came. I saw them there in a sack; there was a large blue coat, with three capes, and a great coat, with one cape, both livery coats; one loose-bodied servant's livery coat, a pair of corded breeches, and another plumb-coloured velveteen; two servant's waistcoats with sleeves, and another without, a pair of fustian overalls and jacket, three pair of white stockings, and three very large cambric neck handkerchiefs, they went away - next morning, between eight and nine o'clock, Balaam's son came with the pony and cart, and this sack was put in the cart. Deakin was apprehended on Saturday, and a great number of things taken away which Balaam's cart had brought back on Friday. On the Wednesday after Deakin was taken, Wilson came about eight o'clock in the morning, I said I was but very middling; he asked how Tom was, I said, he was but very middling, considering the place where he was, and very low in spirits, he was then in Newgate. Wilson said,

"More fool he to be low, for I have seen a sufficient person in town on Monday, who said, if he would keep his own counsel and not tell of us, they cannot hurt a hair of his head;" he said, he supposed he must have a Counsellor. I said, Yes, I dare say he must; he said, he would get him one, and that neither me nor my two children should want. Brown, my father-in-law, was sitting at breakfast at the table at that time, and heard him. I have been married to Bonner; I did not see Wilson again till he was before the Magistrate, nor did I see Tufnel.

Cross-examined. Q. Were you here when Deakin was tried - A. No. I first heard of the robbery on the Thursday after it was committed. Deakin is now in Newgate. They came on the morning of the robbery, Deakin was in bed all that night, he came home about eleven o'clock, and was very fuddled - I did not get up when the prisoners came, and did not see them; they came three times before Deakin was apprehended; they came openly in the middle of the day - Tufnel said no one knew him about there, but Wilson said, the men who were working in the road knew him very well.

Q. You are in hopes of saving Deakin's life by your testimony - A. I do not know, I have not been told that it will be of benefit to him. I am twenty-five years old.

JAMES CORDWELL . I am a ostler, at the Three Jolly Butchers, public-house, not quite a mile from Deakin's house. One morning about two months ago; (it was after I heard of Mr. Ray's robbery), I saw two men on the turnpike road - I did not know either of them; I know one of them now, it is that man, Wilson; he had a sack on his shoulder; he asked if I was ostler at the Jolly Butchers, I said, Yes; he asked if my name was James Cordwell , I said, Yes; he asked if I knew Tom Deakin , I said, Yes; he said we have a parcel to leave for him till he calls for it; we had walked on, and were close at home; I said pitch it in this open shed before the door; he said he thought he had better leave it in the stable, it would be more out of the way - Deakin called for it next day, between one and two o'clock, with a horse and open cart, there was potatoes in the cart. I saw Wilson again at my master's house, in the tap-room a few days after - I knew him again, as the man who brought the sack. Deakin was then in custody.

Cross-examined. Q. Many people come to your house - A. Yes. I remember him as the man who brought the sack; I did not speak to him.

THOMAS BALAAM , JUN. My father is a blacksmith, and lives at Bow-farm. He sent me to Deakin's with the horse and cart on a Friday, about two months ago; it was a good while before I heard of the robbery - I went to Deakin's in the morning, and took something in a bag in the cart; he got in with me, we went down White Hart-lane, and I saw both the prisoners in the lane, one was in a field, and the other sitting on the stile; I did not know them before, they did not speak to Deakin; Deakin left me in White Hart-lane, and took the bag, cart and all, and returned with the cart empty - I saw the prisoners again, as we returned lower down the lane; Deakin got out and spoke to them, I do not know what he said; they talked together about five minutes, Deakin went with Wilson up a little bit of a lane, leaving Tufnel, they had nothing with them then, they came back to the cart in a little while, and brought something in a bag. Wilson brought it, and put it in the cart, without either of them saying a word; Tufnel stood ten or

twelve yards from the cart; I drove on; Deakin walked with them behind the cart, in conversation, not far up the lane; then the prisoners went back, and Deakin came on with me. I drove to Deakin's house, the bag was taken out, and carried into his house; Mrs. Deakin was there - I went home.

Cross-examined. Q. You never saw them before - A. No. It was broad day light; I had heard of no robbery then, it was on a Friday a good while ago.

Q. When did you first say you knew those men - A. Before the Magistrate at Edmonton, I believe it was on the 1st of January, I know them by their faces; I noticed them very much, and am sure of them; I never said I was not certain, I never doubted it. I am thirteen years old.

EDWARD BROWN . I live at Palmer's-green. I did not marry Bonner's mother, her mother is my housekeeper. I remember Deakin's being taken up; Bonner was at my house after that, Wilson came there on the Wednesday after Deakin was taken; I was sitting at breakfast, Bonner was there, and a man who is in the country; Wilson said to Bonner,

"How are you," she said,

"I am middling,"

"How is Deakin," said he, she said,

"He is middling according to the place he is in." he said,

"Don't make yourself uneasy about him, for I have been to a good sufficient person in town, and he says they can't hurt a hair of his head if he does but keep his own counsel," I said,

"Then I suppose you are one of the men who got these things," he said,

"Yes," I said,

"You have taken a mortal trouble to get these things, you broke a good many locks," he said,

"Oh, that be d - d, that is all lies, we got them in an out place." I went away, and left them there.

JOSEPH GIBSON . I am a constable. I took Wilson in custody. As we went to prison, he said voluntarily in the office after the examination, that no one could hurt him but the woman, meaning Bonner; he said it was dark, and how could she see him, she had appeared against him. As we came to Newgate, he said,

"I know I shall go into them cells." When Tufnel was in the cage, at Lower Edmonton, he voluntarily said,

"I am the fellow who broke the locks, and I had a good swig at the cream;" he was talking to a person who gave him some beer. I overheard the conversation.

Cross-examined. Q. You were outside the cage - A. Yes. I heard the words distinctly; I never heard him say the woman was a liar, and she would never be believed.

THOMAS AUSTIN . I went with a search warrant to Deakin's house, and found a pair of wet stockings on a line, and a bundle of wet linen, under some sacks in the chamber; I produced them on Deakin's trial; they were given up to Mr. Ray.

JULIA BRAMHALL re-examined. The dairy is near the laundry, there was milk and cream there, the milk was thrown about, and had been taken off the shelf; some cream had been taken off, ready for churning - there is sometimes a dozen pans of cream; I cannot say whether it was disturbed. Here is the property which was produced last Sessions; they are my master's, the marks of some are cut off, and the marks of some stockings are picked out; the mark of the red cotton still remains.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILSON'S Defence. Gibson has sworn false.

TUFNEL'S Defence. There is a witness who saw Wilson at the Angel tap; Deakin and this woman came in with the property they asked him to drink. I wish Austin to be called.

THOMAS AUSTIN re-examined. On the 3d of November, I apprehended Deakin; I was coming along by the Angel, tap; at Edmonton with him and Harland, Deakin was called into the tap, by some person, and asked to drink, but who by, I cannot say. I had no information about the prisoners then.

TUFNEL - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 24.

WILSON - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 35.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18220109-45

223. THOMAS SKEKELTON and ROBERT DAVIS were indicted for feloniously exposing to sale, nine rings, having a forged mark on them, purporting to be the mark used by the Goldsmith's Company .

The prisoners pleaded

GUILTY .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18220109-46

224. THOMAS SKEKELTON , ROBERT DAVIS , and WILLIAM RUSSELL , were indicted for a like offence, with intent to defraud the King .

MR. BOLLAND, on part of the prosecution, declined offering any evidence.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18220109-47

225. HENRY BROWN was indicted, for that he, on the 19th of November , being in the dwelling-house of John Frost , at St. Clement Danes, feloniously did steal, two hundred and fifty rings, value 250 l.; one hundred and twenty lockets, value 200 l.; eight watches, value 40 l.; eighty-one seals, value 90 l.; sixty-four pins, value 10 l.; three broaches, value 34 l.; three crosses, value 10 l.; eight bracelets, value 26 l.; three necklaces, value 25 l.; two pair of ear-rings, value 10 l.; two boxes, value 5 l.; three scent boxes, value 15 l.; two snaps, value 5 l.; five waist clasps, value 30 l.; three pendant bows, value 1 l.; twenty pearls, value 20 l.; twenty emeralds, value 10 l.; twenty rubies, value 10 l.; twenty topazes, value 10 l,. and twenty turquoises, value 1 l., his property; and having committed the said felony, about the hour of twelve o'clock in the night of the same day, the same dwelling-house, burglariously did break, to get out of the same ; and HENRY BROOKS was indicted, for that he, before the said felony, and burglary was committed, to wit, on the same day, feloniously and maliciously, did incite, move, procure, counsel, hire, and command the said Henry Brown , and others to commit the same ; and MOSES LYON , alias ISAAC NATHAN , THOMAS STOKES , alias WILLIAMS , and MARY ANN EATES , were indicted for feloniously receiving the same goods, knowing them to be stolen .

MESSRS. ALLEY and LAW conducted the prosecution.

JOHN FROST . I live in Arundel-street, Strand , and am a working silversmith and jeweller . On the morning of

the 20th of November, I was awoke about twenty minutes after eight o'clock, by my errand boy, the prisoner, H. Brown, coming to my bed-room door, and crying out,

"Master, Master, get up, you have been robbed, and every thing is stripped and turned topsy turvy." He had lived six months with me; I immediately got up, went into the shop, and found the pins of my cabinet punched out; they contained the best part of my property; the pins of the hinges were out; the shop is in the back attic; the cabinet was secured by two bolts and a patent lock, (Braman's.) I had left it perfectly secure at ten o'clock the night before, as I imagined; but on the morning of the 19th, about seven o'clock, I had heard a knocking.

Q. You found the pins punched out, in what state was the lock. - A. There had been an attempt to break open the lock, but they could not; the cabinet contained three hundred rings, lockets, watches, pins, seals, brooches, ear-rings, snuff-boxes, scent boxes, snaps, pearls, emeralds, &c. The whole of the property in the cabinet amounted to about one thousand seven hundred pounds; the whole of it was gone; I found all the drawers of the workshop scattered about, and about 500 l. worth of unfinished work gone, which had been in the drawers; I examined the drawers, they were all unlocked but one, and that one appeared to have been wrenched open by a crow bar; it was the foreman's drawer; Brown was with me when I examined, and found a metal gilt watch; he said,

"Master, here is one of the watches," and cried bitterly; and said, what should he do, for I was ruined; I found three keys laying together in the workshop which did not belong to me, and two or three days after, we found a part of a dark lantern in a cistern, where the men used to wash themselves; my workman, Shepperd, found the other part of the lantern; the parts corresponded together; I found a lamp which I use, in the front parlour, which was not the place for it; I sent Brown to my father, and got assistance from Bow-street; a man who worked for me and had been recommended by Brown to me, stated something about his friends being bad, and we took Brown to Bow-street; he made application there to see me; I saw him, and held out no expectations whatever to him; Davis was present.

JOHN DAVIS . I am an officer. I never held out any threat to Brown, to make him disclose what he did; he was kept in the front office till he went before the Magistrate, and was then locked up. It was the goaler told me the boy wanted to see his master.

JOHN FROST re-examined. I went in with Davis, who said to him,

"I understand you have something to say to your master." Brown then said, that on the 19th of November, he let in Thomas and Brown. I am sure he mentioned those two, and I believe he mentioned Newman; but I cannot be sure; he said he let him in about seven o'clock; and after showing them round the shop where the property lay, and where they would find it, that they went up in the loft over the workshop, and concealed themselves there all day; and that we should find Thomas and Brown at a man named Allen, at Eagle-court, Catharine-street, and that one of the boys lived with Big Eyed Sook, and the other with Poll Lamb; and we should find one on the first floor back, and the other on the second floor front. He stated that he let them in on the day of the robbery; he said nothing more at that time. I asked him who punched the pins out of the cabinet; and he said he did; but did not say how. I have not recovered one article.

Prisoner BROWN. Q. I never said I punched out the pins - A. He did, in Davis's presence.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Did he sleep in the house - A. No. He came about seven o'clock in the morning. He told me of the robbery about twenty minutes before eight.

MR. LAW. Q. What time he came to the premises you cannot say - A. No. One of the servants would let him in. I know Stokes carried on the business of a steel pipe watch key maker; a furnace is not necessary in his business. I have been to his premises, and find he has one which will melt fifty ounces of gold at once.

JOHN BROWN. In November last, I lodged in Mitchell-street, St. Luke's, in the same house as Mary Ann Eates . I know Henry Brown , and a boy named Thomas, and Newman - I am no relation to H. Brown - I knew where he lived. Before the 17th of November, we all had some talk about the robbery of Mr. Frost. I know Brooks; he was with us on Saturday night, the 17th; we were altogether under a gateway, two doors from Frost's. Brown, Thomas, Brooks, and Newman, were together - we agreed to do the robbery, and went under the gateway - we did not get in that night - it had been talked of several times when we had been at the play.

Q. On the night you met, who began to talk of it. - A. We all agreed under the gateway to go in that night. Henry Brown came out after his master had paid him, which was between eight and nine o'clock, and said the robbery could not be done that night, as his master was in the workshop, doing up his books - we all parted, and agreed to meet on Monday, and asked if he would let us in; he said he would. On Monday morning, between five and six o'clock, Thomas, Newman, and I, went to the White Hart, public-house, Swan-yard. Brooks had not come. We went without him, as Brown said we must come directly, and he could not stop. Henry Brown came to us, and said we must come directly - we did not like to go, as Brooks had not come as he agreed on the Saturday, and meet us at the White Hart, Henry Brown went in first to his master's house, and after he had been in some little time, he came and opened the door, we three went in, and took our shoes off, and went up stairs. Brooks did not join us at all. We got up to the workshop at the top of the house. Brown said he would file the edge of the cabinet, which he did, as it should not make a noise when we came to open it. He then shewed us the cock-loft over the shop, where we were to hide - we went in there - we had three keys, and a dark lanthern. Henry Brown came up with some victuals to us; I told him to go to Mr. Allen's, and fetch me the crow-bar. Allen lives at No. 1, Eagle-court; he went and brought it to me - I told him to ask Allen for the victuals, and I suppose he brought the victuals from there. We continued in the loft all day, till between twelve and one one o'clock on Monday night, then got down and got into the workshop - we had a phosphorous box and dark lanthern. We opened all the workmen's drawers that we could; they were not fastened - one drawer on the left hand was

broken open with a crow-bar. Some unfinished rings, a pair of gold watch cases, two gold snuff boxes, lined, and several other unfinished articles, and bits of gold, were taken from the drawers. We then took the cabinet hinges off, as Brown had directed us - they had been filed - we took from there eight gold watches, a few diamonds, a great quantity of rings, ear-rings, rubies, bracelets, and pearls. We left the drawers all scattered about the place, and tied the property up; we put some in our pockets, and some I carried in my hat - each took what he could - when we had got the property, we could not take the dark lantern or the keys; we threw the lantern in the cistern, and put the keys on the work bench - we took the crowbar away with us, and then came down stairs - it was between three and four o'clock. We could not get out, as the street door was double locked, and the key taken out. We opened the parlour window shutters, threw up the sash, and got out that way - we first went into the kitchen, - we went into the Strand, and took a coach, and went to Turnmill-street, Clerkenwell, to Charles Newman 's house. Mary Ann Eates was in bed there - she got up, opened the door, and let us in, and we all went in. Newman called her up. The street door is always open. We had the property with us. Newman said she must get up, because he wanted her. She lit the fire, put the kettle on, and then prepared some tea; and while the kettle was getting ready, we took out the property, and put it on the tea-board, and then put it on the bed. She was in the room at the time.

Q. Was any thing said by either of you - A. She said she should like a pair of pearl ear-rings, and a locket, which would do for the child, to put hair in, and she should like one of the watches, which was done with pearls. We told her where the property came from; we asked her what the things would fetch. She said it would be about eighty pounds a piece. Newman said he must get up, for he wished her to carry these things to a place. We sorted the finished from the unfinished things. Newman put them into a bag. They were to be taken to the prisoner Williams, who called himself Stokes. Newman said they were to be carried there. Eates carried the bag - we all went with her to Stokes's house in a court in Goswell Street; we got there about six o'clock in the morning, and saw him; Newman called him on one side of the room. Stokes, Eates, and him, went out of the house to have something to drink, leaving me and Thomas in Stokes's workshop (he makes, steel pipes for watch keys). He returned in about ten minutes - Eates went away. Stokes's wife was then getting up; she came into the room, and he told her to go down, which she did. Newman then called Stokes aside, and told him he wanted his crucible; Stokes went and cleaned it out to melt the gold. Stokes made a fire and put it on, and we put the unfinished work in, such as watch cases and chains, and all the unfinished work, and melted it. The snuff boxes were given to Stokes, as he said he thought he could sell them, and one he said he would keep; they were made a present of to him, as he said he might sell them, and make a little money of them. Newman gave him two sovereigns for the use of the place to melt the gold, and gave him the two snuff boxes, and two old gold seals. There were only two snuff-boxes; the rest of the property was left at Stokes's. Mrs. Stokes came in, and we gave her a pair of ear-rings, and two finger rings, which she said she should like; we then wanted to know where we should sell the property. Newman called Stokes aside, and left me and Thomas by the fire; this was about two or three o'clock in the afternoon. We had been there all the morning, melting the gold - there was very little fire, and the heat was not sufficient. Newman came to us, and said he would take a coach, and fetch a man to buy the property. We took a coach, and went to Solomon's, Petticoat-lane - I, Newman, and Thomas went. Newman went in at the door, and we waited outside. In about five minutes he came out with Solomon, whom we took back to Stokes's with us in the coach. Stokes came into the room - he, Solomon, and Newman, went aside, and had some conversation together. Solomon said he would not look at the things there; but told us to go to the Rose and Crown, public-house, and he would take them there. We went to the Rose and Crown, public-house, Bunhill-row. Newman told us to go in the parlour, which we did. In about ten minutes Newman and Solomon came, with the property in two bags, as we had left it. Solomon brought it into the room - Newman had some private conversation with Solomon, and told me and Thomas to go into the yard; which we did. There was a window there, so that we could see all over the parlour; and saw the property on the table. Solomon was sorting it; we saw him put it in two bags, and twist it up; and then they called us on. Newman said he had agreed with Solomon about the property. We asked Solomon what he was to give for it. He said 200 l. for the whole - that he had only 100 l. with him, which he paid. He said he would fetch his partner, Isaac Nathan , for the other part of the jewellery, and he would pay the other 100 l. Solomon took the property, and went away; and between four and five o'clock, Nathan came to us in the public-house, said he had seen the property at Isaac Solomon 's house, and had got his half. We had something to drink in the parlour. Nathan told me and Thomas to go in the yard. We looked through the window, and saw him pay the 100 l. to Newman. Newman called us into the parlour - we had something to drink. Nathan said he had paid the 100 l. to Newman, which made up the 200 l. Yates came in, and we had something to drink at the bar - Nathan was gone then. The 100 l. was left in the care of Newman. Solomon came with Nathan, and was present when the 100 l. was paid - he brought Nathan. Nathan then gave me 15 l.; I had more afterwards, in all 30 l. After I received the 15 l., Solomon and Yates were drinking at the bar. Solomon said, the best thing I and Thomas could do, was to go into the country - we said we would - Nathan was gone then. Newman then told us to go to the Cobourg Theatre, and wait there till he came. I saw Brooks on the Friday - he said he heard the robbery had been done, and he expected his regulars, meaning the share of the money. We three gave him five sovereigns each, which made up 15 l. I directed Dawes to Solomon's and Nathan's houses.

Cross-examined by MR. BOLLAND. Q. At what time did you and the others meet in Swan-yard - A. On Monday morning between five and six o'clock; we got to the house about half six; Brown let us in, we saw him about

breakfast time; I sent him for the iron between nine and ten o'clock in the morning, and did not see him after dinner time, which was one o'clock, till he was in custody.

The Court ruled that there was no proof of Brown being a principal in the robbery, and as such, the indictment could not be sustained.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18220109-48

226. MARY DOYLE was indicted for feloniously putting off twenty counterfeit shillings, at a lower rate and value than the same did by their denomination import, and were counterfeited for, (i.e.) for the sum of 6 s. 8 d.

MESSRS. BOLLAND and LAW conducted the prosecution.

JOHN ISAACSON . I am a rope-maker, and live in Leonard-street, Shoreditch. On the 10th of December, about half-past six o'clock in the evening, I met Gleed, Handly, and Patrick, at the Angel, public-house, in Whitechapel; Gleed searched me and King, and found nothing on us; he gave me six shillings, a sixpence, and two-pence, which he marked under the head; we all proceeded to a public-house, in White Lion-street, while King went to the prisoner's lodging, and returned with her; she said,

"I have got what you want;" I had seen her on the Saturday before, and agreed to meet her on the Monday; I came out of the house; she gave me twenty counterfeit shillings in a paper, and held her hand out; I gave her 6 s. 8 d. for them, and put the twenty shillings in my pocket without opening them; she said, she had seen King before, and spoken to him about some half-crowns; and she would get them for me in a moment, if I would stop; Gleed was on the opposite side of the way; he came up and took her in charge; Patrick took the shillings out of my pocket; the prisoner was searched, and the marked money I gave her, found on her.

BARNARD GLEED . I am an officer; the last witness's account is correct; she had some of the marked money which I gave the Isaacson in each hand, I asked her how she came by it; she said, she took it for fruit in the street.

MR. CALEB EDWARD POWELL . I am an assistant to the Solicitor of the Mint, the twenty shillings are all counterfeit of the same die, and have never been in circulation.

Prisoner's Defence. The man who was with him has been imprisoned two years; they came several times to me, I refused to have any thing to do with it; the man came on Saturday night with this parcel, and said this man would call for it at eight o'clock,

GUILTY . Aged 50.

Confined One Year .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18220109-49

227. ROBERT HATCHMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of December , one watch, value 30 s.; two seals, value 1 l.; two keys, value 2 s., and one chain, value 1 s., the goods of Benjamin Bury , in his dwelling-house .

BENJAMIN BURY . On the 24th of December, I was cleaning my first floor window, and coming down the ladder, I saw the prisoner come out of the street door; he looked hard at me twice; I looked through the window and missed my watch from the mantle-piece, and pursued him, crying Stop thief! when I got near him, he threw my watch from his hand; I picked it up, and at the top of York-street, I lost sight of him; one of the neighbours found him in a privy; he was brought back in about three minutes; I am certain he is the man; I saw the watch safe just before; it was worth 3 l.; perhaps I could not get 40 s. for it if I sold it.

BENJAMIN CRUMP . I was coming up, and saw the people running, and found the prisoner in the privy of the Coach and Horses, public-house, I took him back; when I opened the privy door, he asked me what I wanted; I told him if he was an honest man, I did not want him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOSEPH COOPER . I am an officer; the prisoner's examination was not taken down; he said, he did not throw it down, but dropped it in running.

GUILTY. Aged 29.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Confined Six Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18220109-50

228. ROBERT CHRISTOPHER KITT was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of November , at St. George, in the dwelling-house of James Horsford , one box, value 10 s.; the sum of 14 l. 0 s. 6 d., in monies numbered, and one 5 l. Bank note , the property of the said James Horsford and Thomas Gibson Willes .

MR. BOLLAND conducted the prosecution.

THOMAS GIBSON WILLES . I am a surgeon , in partnership with James Horsford ; we live at Ratcliffe-highway . On the 30th of November, about nine o'clock at night, the prisoner came to the surgery, and asked for Mr. James Horsford ; I said he was unwell; he pressed to see him; while he was there I went, to the drawer, where the cash box was, to put some loose silver into the drawer, not into the box; I went upto Mr. Horsford, leaving him alone in the surgery; I was absent about four or five minutes; when I got to the bottom of the stairs, I heard the drawer shut which contained the cash box; I found my servant maid in the surgery, and the prisoner gone; I went to the drawer, and missed the box which contained thirteen sovereigns, a 5 l. note, and 20 s. and 6 d., in silver, which belonged to the partnership account; it was Mr. Horsford's dwelling-house; he pays the rent; I have nothing to do with it; it is in the parish of St. George, Middlesex.

SARAH WHELER . I am servant to Mr. Horsford. I came down into the surgery, and saw a black man there, about nine o'clock; on seeing him I went and shut the shop door, and when I returned, I found the street door open, and the black man gone; I shut the door, went into the surgery, and found the drawer open where the money box was kept. Mr. Willes came down. I shut the drawer before Mr. Willes came into the room.

The prisoner made no defence.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 17.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18220109-51

229. FRANCIS HEYWOOD BROWN was indicted for wilful and corrupt perjury .

No Evidence.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220109-52

230. WILLIAM KENRICK , ESQ was indicted for a libel .

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220109-53

FIFTH DAY, MONDAY, JANUARY 14, 1822.

231. JOSEPH FOLEY , was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of December , one carriage glass, value 3 l. , the goods of Philip Western Wood , Esq.

JOHN ABBOTT . I am coachman to Philip Western Wood, Esq. On the 17th of December, about six o'clock in the evening, I was driving the coach in Russel-square, between Montague, and Bedford-place, the glass was safe in Montague-place; and in Russell-square , I heard the steps falling down - I turned my head and saw two men at the door, taking the glass out; I pulled up, and desired my fellow servant to jump down - he pursued, they ran in different directions. I missed the glass in getting down, I saw them lifting it up.

WILLIAM LEIGHTON . I am footman to Philip Western Wood, Esq. I was on the box with Abbott, he pulled up in Russell-square - I looked round, and saw the prisoner having hold of the carriage-door, the steps were down, another man was with him; I jumped down, they ran off. I followed the prisoner, and never lost sight of him, till the patrol took him; the glass was not found, they ran different ways.

WILLIAM ADAMS . I am a patrol. I stopped the prisoner who was walking, Leighton was close behind, pursuing him - and said,

"Take that man, he has robbed my master's coach of the glass;" the prisoner said,

"I will defy you or any man in England, to say I have the glass."

Prisoner's Defence. I was returning from Brunswick-square, it rained hard, I ran to Montague-place; the rain abated, and I walked leisurely towards the Museum, the patrol said, he wanted me; the footman said,

"I am not certain of you, till the coachman sees you."

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220109-54

232. ELIZA CLEMENTS was indicted for bigamy .

MR. ANDREWS conducted the prosecution.

MARY HIGGINS . I am daughter of Samuel Clements , a hair-dresser , of Mile End. I was present on the 12th of December, 1811, at Stepney church, when the prisoner by the name Eliza Robins , married my father, who is now living. I saw him six weeks ago - they lived together ten months, and have one child; I know she lived with James Townsend four years ago. I saw him and her go to Heston church together, but do not know that they were married.

NATHANIEL HARRIS . I am assistant overseer of Isleworth. I produce a certificate of marriage from Heston parish, of James Townsend to Eliza Clements , spinster, on the 2d of March, 1817 .

MARY HIGGINS re-examined. After the prisoner and Townsend were married, they lived at the Feathers, public-house, Brentford.

MR. GEORGE CLARK . I am a solicitor, and clerk to Brentford parish. The prisoner applied for relief; she has several times told me voluntarily, that she was Clements's wife, and had married Townsend; she named the persons who witnessed the marriage, and directed me to where they lived, but they are not to be found.

Prisoner's Defence. I was from my husband five years and seven months; and did not know but he was dead.

GUILTY . Aged 33.

Confined Six Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220109-55

233. CHARLES FREDERICK SCUTTS was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of October , one book, value 3 s. , the goods of James Lowe .

MR. THOMAS HOLME BOWER . I am an attorney , in partnership with James Lowe . Our office is in Southampton-buildings, this book,

" Hans Chancery Practice ," was his private property, we missed several in the course of the long vacation; this was missed before the 1st of November. The prisoner was a clerk in the office, and had left us about a month. On the 8th of December, I met him, and asked him to return with me, which he did; I asked if he knew William Coombs , or his wife; he said, No, I asked, if he knew a cobler in Breams-buildings; he said, No - I then took him to Coombs, who is the cobler, I asked, in his hearing, if he was the person they bought the book of; Coomb's wife said, she thought he was; he immediately turned to me, and asked for mercy - I said, it was too late.

WILLIAM COOMBS . I am a shoemaker, and live in Bream's-buildings, my wife keeps a book stall. I was present in October, when the prisoner brought Hans Chancery Practice to my wife.

ELIZA COOMBS . I bought this book of the prisoner, and sold it to Mr. Bloxham.

MR. BLOXHAM. I am an attorney, of Lincoln's Inn-fields. I bought the book of Coombs on the 24th of October.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Recommended to Mercy.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220109-56

234. WILLIAM BENTLEY was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Nicholas William Ridley Colbourne , Esq. , on the 1st of January , no person being therein, and stealing two beds, value 6 l.; seven pillows, value 1 l.; one coal scuttle, value 2 s.; one table, value 5 s.; one gown, value 3 s.; one spencer, value 3 s.; two spoons, value 2 d.; four picture frames, value 10 s.; two coats, value 10 s.; one set of fire irons, value 6 s., and one waistcoat value 5 s. , the goods of Edward Lynn .

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

JANE LYNN . I am the wife of Edward Lynn , we live over Mr. Nathaniel William Ridley Colbourne 's stables, whose dwelling-house is in Hill-street , and does not communicate with the stables. We live there as his servants. In January, we were out of town, with our master; this property was in our apartments. I was the last that left town, which was on the 18th of December. I locked

all the rooms, and put the keys in a cupboard, locked the street door, and took the key with me. The bed, pillows, and blankets belonged to Mr. Colbourne, the other things were ours.

ELIZA HOLLIS . I live in Farm-street. My front window looks on Mr. Colbourne's stables; On the 1st of January, about four o'clock, I saw the shutters open, it was moonlight. I gave an alarm, and saw the shutters closed again a little, but saw nobody.

JOSEPH HOLLES . I am the husband of the last witness. In consequence of the alarm, the stable keys were brought to me; I went with Bland and Sedgwick, unlocked the door, and went up stairs, without searching the stable - I had rang the bell and called out before we went in, and nobody answered; I heard a cry of Stop thief! ran down into South Audley-street, overtook Mrs. Bland, went down Dean-street, and found the prisoner in custody of a man who is not here. A skeleton key and two spoons were found on him; the key was tried to the door, but did not open it. Mrs. Bland said,

"That is the man who ran out of the stable, I will swear to him;" he said he was the man who ran out, that he went against the door for a necessary purpose, found it open, and went in. I found the door fast.

MARTHA BLAND . I went to the stable door with Holles, and stood outside while he went up stairs. I saw the prisoner run out of the stable, apparently from behind the door - I ran after him, crying Stop thief! he was secured and brought back; I am sure he is the man, I said

"You are the man who came out of the stable;" he said,

"Yes, I am;" that he was in the stable, but not up stairs - I saw his face plainly.

JOSEPH BLAND . I am the husband of the last witness. I went up stairs, heard the alarm, pursued, and found him in custody - my wife said he was the man.

JOHN JONES . I am a beadle. I searched him and found two tea spoons, and a skeleton key in his pocket - I went to the stables, and found a cupboard broken open; I compared a chissel to the marks, it fitted exactly - the fire irons were tied up.

ELIZA LYNN . The fire irons were in the closet with the tea-spoons, and not tied up, they are mine. I found the chissel in the cupboard, it was not there when I left.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought the spoons in the street; I bought four and gave two away - as to the key, it was made to fit my door, and is not a skeleton.

GUILTY. Aged 28.

Of stealing to the value of 6 s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220109-57

235. JOHN GLEW was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of December , one watch, value 2 l.; two seals, value 10 s.; one key, value 6 d., and one chain, value 6 d., the goods of John Guest , in the dwelling-house of James Flight .

JOHN GUEST . I keep a coal-shed in Union-street, Mary-le-bone ; I rent the lower part of the house of James Flight , who lives in the upper part; the prisoner lived seven weeks with me. On the 6th December, I put my watch in my bed, which was turned up, in the parlour behind the shop; I gave 4 l. for it fourteen years ago; I left him in the house about half-past eleven o'clock, and told him I should return in ten minutes; I returned in five, and saw him bustling about the bed, but did not suspect anything, and about a quarter past four o'clock he asked leave to go to see his father; I gave him leave; when he was gone, I went to the bed, and missed the watch; he did not return; I saw him in Castle-street, on the 26th of December, and asked what he had done with my watch; he said, it was all right, and he would go and shew me where it was, and that the seals were pawned in Whitecross-street; I found them there, but have not found the watch.

RICHARD COATES . I am a constable; the prisoner told me he got a girl to pawn the seals for 7 s. in Whitecross-street, and a strange man to pawn the watch, in Wentworth-street; I found one had been pawned there, and taken out.

LEONARD MATHEWS . My father is a pawnbroker, and lives in Whitecross-street. On the 14th of December a female pawned the seals for 7 s.

THOMAS BELCHER . I am a pawnbroker. On the 8th of December, a watch and key were pawned for 25 s., by a woman, and redeemed.

(Seals produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 18.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Confined Six Months and Whipped ,

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220109-58

236. WILLIAM LYON was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of December , five silver spoons, value 30 s.; four silver forks, value 30 s., the goods of Arabella Watson , spinster , in her dwelling-house .

MISS ARABELLA WATSON . I rent a house, No. 3, Upper George-street, Bryanston-square . I was from home at the time of the robbery. The prisoner was three weeks in my service. I returned in the evening, and found him in custody. He had the key of my plate closet.

WILLIAM BAKER . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Upper George-street. On the 13th of December, about seven o'clock in the evening, the prisoner offered two silver desert forks in pawn; they are worth about 15 s., as old silver. I asked his address; he at first said, No. 6, and then No. 9, Brown-street. I sent my boy to ascertain whether it was correct, and he ran out, leaving the forks behind; I jumped over the counter, and secured him.

WILLIAM CHRISTOPHER JONES . I am a pawnbroker, and live in South-street, Manchester-square. On the 3d of December, I took in three desert spoons, for 9 s.; they are worth 16 s., as old silver. I am sure the prisoner pawned them. I have two silver table spoons of the same pattern and initials, pawned in the same name and address, (No. 40, George-street,) on the 26th of December, which I did not take in - Miss Watson claimed them.

JAMES ROSS . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Paddington-street. I have two silver forks, worth 17 s., pawned the 8th of December, for 7 s., by the prisoner.

THOMAS BLAKE . I am a watchman. I assisted in securing the prisoner.

SAMUEL HILL . The prisoner was brought to the watch-house. I found three duplicates of the property produced,

on him, and the key which unlocked the door of Miss Watson's plate closet.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I leave it entirely to your Lordship.

GUILTY - Aged 42.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220109-59

237. JOHN CRACKER was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of January , one hat, value 1 l.; three pair of trowsers, value 50 s.; one gown, value 10 s.; one bonnet, value 12 s.; one waistcoat, value 2 s.; and two handkerchiefs, value 2 s., the goods of Joseph Solomon , in his dwelling-house .

JOSEPH SOLOMON . I live in Newcastle-street, Whitechapel, and am a skin-dyer . The prisoner was apprenticed to me from the London Society. I never suspected him; but discharged several men in consequence of missing property several times. I received information from Benjamin, on the 2nd of January, on coming home at ten o'clock at night, and found he was in custody.

RACHAEL SOLOMON . I am wife of the last witness; I was out; Benjamin gave me information; I had left the trowsers and hat on the table at a quarter before eight o'clock, when I went out, and on returning, I found the prisoner at a carpet warehouse in Bishopsgate-street with the hat on; it was my husband's.

JOHN BENJAMIN . I am servant to Mr. Solomon. On the 2d of January, in the evening, I and the prisoner were together; he told me to go out and get him some tobacco, and if I did not go, he would give me a lick of the head; I went out to Whitechapel, returned in five minutes, and he was gone; I missed the hat and trowsers from the parlour; I fetched my mistress.

RICHARD LEWIS . I am a carpet-weaver, and work in Bishopsgate-street. On the 2d of January about nine o'clock at night, the prisoner came into the warehouse with a new hat on, and a bundle in his hand; I said,

"What a nice hat you have on;" he said, yes, he had just given a guinea for it; the prosecutor came in, claimed the hat, and told me to secure him; I detained him as he was going out; I told the gate keeper to lock the gate, but they had a scuffle, and he got away, and was secured soon after; I delivered his bundle to Sarah Lee ; he told me he had a pair of trowsers in the bundle, which he gave 15 s. for.

SARAH LEE . I am mistress of the workhouse; Lewis gave me the bundle; I saw it opened; it contained a hat, two pair of trowsers, and a gown; I gave it to M'Combie.

BENJAMIN M'COMBIE. I took the prisoner and bundle in charge; I went to Webster's and got a new bonnet, two pair of trowsers, a handkerchief, and a waistcoat.

JOSHUA WEBSTER . I am a hair-dresser, and live in Widegate-alley. On the 1st or 2d of January the prisoner left these things with me.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The hat is my master's. I know nothing about the bundle; I left because I would not work on Sundays.

GUILTY. Aged. 20.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Confined Six Months , and Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220109-60

238. WILLIAM JONES was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of James Buckland , at St. Margaret, Westminster, about six o'clock at night, on the 20th of December , with intent to steal, and stealing therein, eleven table cloths, value 5 l.; seventeen napkins, value 3 l., and one bag, value 6 d. , the goods of James Green , the elder.

MARY BUCKLAND . I am wife of James Buckland ; we live in Castle-lane, St. Margaret's, Westminster ; we rent the house; I take in washing for Mr. James Green, sen. who keeps an hotel . On Thursday night, the 20th of December, I put eleven table-cloths, and seventeen napkins, in a bag - brought them from Mr. Green's, and left them in my front room, on the ground floor, at half-past five o'clock, the lamps were lit, and it was dark, the window-shutter was bolted, and the street door also; I went up stairs to tea, came down about six o'clock, the street door was still fast, and I missed the bag with its contents; the shutter was wrenched open, and the sash lifted up; I ran out and screamed; a man said somebody had picked something up - I ran, and met a person who gave me five glass cloths, which I had rolled up and put in the top of the bag - a napkin was left on the window, the bag was only twisted round; I found the property at Queen-square - it is worth 8 l.

EDWARD JOHN HANDLEY . I am an officer of Queen-square. On the 20th of December, a little before eight o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner in Tothill-street, about a quarter of a mile from Buckland's with this bag, and the linen in it; another boy was with him, who ran away directly he saw me; I followed the prisoner, and asked what he had on his shoulder, and just as I stopped him, before he made any reply, the prosecutrix's daughter claimed it as her mother's which she had lost; I put him in the watch-house; he said a young man employed him to carry it, who was dressed in blue - there was no young man near.

SAMUEL ERRINGTON . I am servant to James Green, sen.; Buckland washed for him - I knew the linen to be his.

Prisoner's Defence. (Written.) I beg leave to state, I was brought into this unfortunate situation by some designing and experienced practitioner; a man in a blue coat gave me the parcel in York-street, and told me to wait at the corner of Tothill-street, and wait his coming; and while I was waiting for him I was taken, if I had stolen the property, instead of wandering in the street, I should have concealed myself; besides, I was apprehended two hours after the robbery; I was to have 6 d. for my trouble - I beg to offer this circumstance as favourable to the Court and Jury.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 15.

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220109-61

239. GEORGE WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Kirrel Amherst , at St. Marylebone, about two o'clock in the afternoon, on the 11th of January , (Catharine, the wife of William Sinnett , and others, being therein), and stealing therein, one watch, value 20 s. , the goods of the said William Sinnett .

JAMES ALDRIDGE . I am butler to Mr. William Kirrel Amberst, who lives at No. 45, Montague-square, St. Marylebone . On the 11th of January, about two o'clock in

the day, I heard the area door open, which was shut before, it has a pulley; I immediately went into the passage, stood for a moment, and saw the prisoner coming out of the store room, which is within the house in the passage - he was about five yards from me; he ran away, and I after him, and saw him throw the watch from his hand into the cellar as he ran; he then opened the area door and ran up the steps, I followed and caught him at the top of the steps, without losing sight of him; I brought him back, and asked him what he had done with the watch; he said, he had not seen it; I told him he had, for I saw him throw it into the cellar, he said, he knew nothing about it; I went into the cellar, and picked it up in his presence; I saw it safe ten minutes before; it belonged to the housekeeper; Catharine Sinnett and all the family were in the house at the time; the store-room door was open, but the area door and gate are always kept shut - the door leading into the house was shut, I am positive.

Prisoner. Q. Was the watch broken - A. No, but it flew open, and the case came off.

CATHARINE SINNETT . I am wife of William Sinnett ; I am housekeeper to the family; I saw my watch hanging in the housekeeper's room a quarter of an hour before.

MICHAEL MORRIS . I received him in charge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was going about to get work; went down to ask if any chimnies wanted sweeping; I saw nobody, and went up, the butler came up the steps; I asked if any wanted doing - he said,

"Come down;" I went down, and he said, You have got the watch; I said I had not; he found nothing about me; he looked in the cellar and found it and he beat me over the back with a stick.

GUILTY - DEATH Aged 13.

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220109-62

240. JAMES HAWES was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Bass , about six o'clock at night, on the 6th of December , and stealing therein, one coat, value 30 s., the goods of William Lomas ; and four pelisses, value 30 s. , the goods of John Bass .

JAMES BASS . I live in Brewer-street, Golden-square . My coat and pelisse hung in the passage.

ANN WESTWOOD . I live in Margaret-street, Cavendish-square. On the 6th of December, between five and six o'clock, I was by Bass's house, on the same side of the way, two or three steps from his shop door, and saw a man come out of the private door. I cannot exactly say who it was. I have seen the prisoner at the office; but I have seen a man since, so much like him, that I cannot say whether he was the man. It was dark - the man had a bundle under his arm, and the tail of a coat hung out. He went to two persons who were waiting at the corner of the street - he joined them - they walked away together. The one who came out of the house carried the bundle. I returned and told Bass the private door was open. Tegg and I went in pursuit. The one who came out of the house, was dressed in a blue or black coat; one of the others, in a fustian jacket and trowsers, and white apron. We found two men together at the corner of the street, and one of them was putting a great coat on - he had a black coat on. I pointed him out to Tegg, who asked him to give him the coat. He said,

"Oh, dear! you are mistaken." Tegg asked me if that was the person that came out of the house. I said, Yes. I thought him the man at that time He walked away. I do not know what became of the great coat. The same two were with him whom I had seen at the corner; they walked away with him; he turned round to one of them, and said,

"Harry, don't leave me." He still went on with the coat on; the other two ran away, and he struck Tegg several times, before he attempted to take him. He was secured.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. You were merely passing by - Yes; I had not observed whether the street door was open before he came out. I do not now believe the prisoner to be the man, because I have seen another like him.

JAMES TEGG . I am shopman to Mr. Bass. The great coat belonged to William Lomas , and is worth above 30 s. It hung in the passage with the pelisses, by the private door. I cannot say the door was not left open. Westwood alarmed me. I followed with him - and in Golden-square, about ten yards off, I saw a man putting on the great coat; he pointed him out; another person in a fustian jacket, was by his side. I charged the man with having the coat on - he was walking on, and struck me, and ran away. I only saw one of his companions. The man who was putting the coat on, had a dark coat; I think it was blue. He struck me three times, and ran away. I pursued, I followed, crying Stop thief! but could not overtake him - he got away with the coat on. I saw the prisoner on that night at the Sun, public-house, Bedfordbury, and believed him to be the man - I am not positive. I think that it was a taller man.

Q. What is your belief now - A. I think he is not the man.

THOMAS CLEMENCE . I am an officer. Bass and I went to the Sun, public-house, about eleven o'clock, and found the prisoner there. Tegg pointed him out as the man.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220109-63

241. LETITIA WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of December , at St. Marylebone, one watch, value 4 l.; and one shawl, value 2 l., the goods of Mary Wylie , spinster , in her dwelling-house .

MARY WYLIE . I am single; and live in Crawford-street, St. Marylebone . On the 20th of December, a bill was in my window to let my house; the prisoner came about two o'clock to inquire about it, and said a family were coming to see it. I said they could see it any time; she returned at three o'clock, and went into the back parlour, saying she would wait for the lady. She was there about ten minutes. I left her in the room for about five minutes; she came into the passage before I returned, and said she would go to the lady, in Baker-street, and let her know she could see the house directly. I let her out without any suspicion, and immediately went into the parlour; and in a quarter of an hour, missed the watch from the window, worth 4 l.; and a shawl from the sofa, worth 2 l. They were in the room just before she came in; nobody but her could take them. She never returned. I have found neither of them. I found her in custody about a fortnight after.

Prisoner. I leave it to your mercy.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 62.

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220109-64

242. ROBERT ROYAL and WILLIAM KING were indicted for stealing, on the 17th of December , three live tame pigeons, value 2 s. , the property of Samuel Thomas Bateman .

SAMUEL THOMAS BATEMAN . I live in King John-court, Holywell-lane. On the 19th of December, Trevillian offered me two pigeons for sale; I bought them for 3 s. I knew them to be mine at the time. I kept my pigeons in a loft; they fly about. Royal lived about half a mile off.

FREDERICK TREVILLIAN . I live in Austin-street, and deal in pigeons. I bought these two of the prisoners for 2 s. 6 d. I knew them before. Bateman was not certain of their being his, till he went home to see if he missed any.

RICHARD LILLY . After the prisoners were in custody, I saw King; he said a quantity of things were taken, and as Royal had split, he would tell me; and said Royal went up the loft ladder, and brought two down in his bosom, and two in his hand, and gave them over to him.

KING'S Defence. I met Royal, and asked him to go over to look at the pigeons. As we came down Crown-court, we saw these on the wall, and thought they were strays.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220109-65

243. JOHN SWENEY was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of January , one coat, value 2 s. the goods of John Ambrose .

JOHN AMBROSE . I am a carrier . On the 4th of January, between six and seven o'clock at night, my cart stood between Compton-street , and Monmouth-street , with the coat in it. I went into a public-house; returned in five or ten minutes. The prisoner was brought to me with the coat. I had left my sister in care of the cart.

ROBERT CLARK . I am a constable. About six o'clock in the evening, I received information, and secreted myself in Hampshire Hog-yard. I saw the prisoner and two others come up the yard. The patrol called me, and collared the prisoner, who dropped the coat - the other two ran off.

DAVID KNOWLES . I am patrol. I saw the prisoner and another go up the side of the cart; and one of them took something from the cart - they left - and when they got on the pavement, a third man joined them. I followed them up Hampshire Hog-yard - I collared the prisoner, who was carrying the coat - I called Clark, and he dropped it, and struggled to get away, and said it was Tom Well 's coat.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I had been with a friend; and as I returned, a man threw the coat on my shoulder; I thought it was my friend, and said it was his.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220109-66

244. JOHN WOODWARD was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of December , one canvas tilt, value 10 s. , the goods of John Squires .

DAVID FAIRCHILD . I live with John Squires , at East-borne. On the 25th of December, about six o'clock, just as I came on the stones at Whitechapel , I took the horses from my cart, and was absent about ten minutes going to the stable; and on returning, the tilt was stolen. I gave an alarm; and about one o'clock, the officer fetched me to the office.

JOSEPH ADAMS . I am an officer. I was in Wentworth-street on the 25th of December, about a quarter before seven o'clock in the morning. The prisoner passed me with the tilt; I followed, and took him in charge.

JOHN BARNES . I am an officer. I was with Adams. The prisoner said a carman gave it him to carry to a house, and took me to the house, which turned out to be a watchman's of ours; he then said he picked it up in Whitechapel.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I found it in Whitechapel - nobody owned it, and I threw it over my shoulder.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined One Month and Publicly Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220109-67

245. SUSAN LEAKE was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of January , two shirts, value 6 s.; three handkerchiefs, value 2 s.; three pair of stockings, value 2 s.; and one collar, value 6 d., the goods of Thomas Williamson , from the person of Charles Hall .

CHARLES HALL . I am ten years old, and live with my mother, who takes in washing. On the 6th of January, I took a bundle to Mr. Williamson, at the Alfred Hotel , Albemarle-street. I got there about eleven o'clock in the morning; he gave me another bundle for my mother. We live in Gainsford-street, Horsley-down. I I met the prisoner in Clare-market . She said,

"My dear, will you go on an errand for me to the corner, to Mrs. Brown's, my sister." I said I would go for her. She kept on walking with me, and when she got down the street, she met a little girl, and asked her if she had 2 d. to give me to go on the errand. She said she had; and the prisoner said I should have it when I came from her sister's; that I must go up stairs; but I must not carry the bundle, or her sister's husband would think it was some of his clothes, and keep it. She said,

"I will hold your bundle." I said No. She then said,

"Let the boy have his own way, and go with his bundle." I went up two or three stairs of the house; she pointed out, that I was to go to the first landing; she stood outside, as she said she did not want her sister's husband to know she was there. I went up two or three stairs, then the prisoner came behind me, and snatched the bundle away, and said she would hide round the corner. I ran after her, crying Stop thief! and in the market, a gentleman ran and caught the little girl. I am sure the prisoner snatched it from me. She was taken that afternoon. I saw her at the watch-house, and am sure of her.

MARY COOK . I live in Holles-street, Clare-market. On the 6th of January, I found the prisoner in my privy with a bundle, she was a stranger; I asked how she dare come there; she said, she had sent a boy on an errand, and that was his bundle, we pushed her out, and the mob secured her.

JOHN SCOTT . I took her in charge, in Cook's passage; and took the bundle out of her hand.

JOHN COOK . I heard the cry of Stop thief! I saw two girls in our court, and was told one had run into our house. I caught the other girl up one pair of stairs.

THOMAS WILLIAMSON . I am servant at the Alfred club, I gave the boy a bundle, containing this property; they are Mr. Thomas Williamson 's.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220109-68

246. ELIZA BARTON was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of December , seven handkerchiefs, value 10 s.; five waistcoats, value 7 s.; five collars, value 3 s.; and three sovereigns, the goods of John Marchment , from his person .

JOHN MARCHMENT . I am servant to Mr. Copeland. On the 14th of December, I met the prisoner in King-street, Westminster, about half-past twelve o'clock at night; I went with her to my master's stables in Blue Boar-yard, King-street, Westminster . I had three sovereigns in my pocket, and the other things were on the table in my room. I awoke about half-past one o'clock, and she was gone with the money and bundle.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Did you go to her lodgings - A. Yes; in the morning, and there found the bundle, she lives in New-street, Duck-lane; I never saw her before.

HENRY BETTS . I am an officer. On the morning of the 14th, I found the prisoner in bed in her lodgings; I found the bundle between the head of the bedstead and the wall; she said, she was tipsy, and did not know what she had done.

JAMES SPEED . I am watchman. I saw the prisoner and prosecutor together about twelve o'clock, and advised him to go home alone.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 22.

Of stealing, but not from the person .

Confined Three Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220109-69

247. ELLEN ALDERSON was indicted for gross, wilful, and corrupt perjury, on the trial of John Jacobs .

MESSRS. ALLEY and ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

(The Record of the conviction of Jacobs was put in and read.)

MR. THOMAS WATSON . I am clerk to the Learned Recorder. I remember the defendant being sworn on the trial of Jacobs, I have a perfect memory of it.

HENRY BUCKLER . I am short-hand-writer to the Court The defendant was examined as prosecutrix on the trial of Jacobs. I took down her evidence (reads)

"I am the

"wife of Israel Alderson, who is an extra tide waiter at the

"Custom House, and live in Windmill-court, Rosemary-lane.

"On the 18th of October, between ten and eleven

"o'clock at night, nearer eleven, I was returning home

"from work, and as I was going for a bason of soup to a

"cook-shop close by, I saw the prisoner plainly by the gas

"lamp; he struck me a severe blow in the stomach, and

"swore very vulgar expressions and oaths, and took the

"bonnet off my head, 1 s. from my hand, and a silk handkerchief

"off, which was round my neck. Q. Was it

"pinned about your neck - A. Yes. Q. Had you spoken

"to him - A. I had said nothing to him, he was quite a

"stranger to me. Q. Did you cry out - A. I could not;

"the blow was so violent, but I ran to the watch-box,

"which was about ten yards from the spot; the prisoner

"continued beating me, and had hold of me by the arm,

"while the watchman was coming up, he still held my arm,

"and almost broke it, he held me so tight, the watchman

"got him from me with difficulty; my arm has been in a

"mortified state ever since; the watch-man could not

"manage him, three more watchmen came up and secured

"him. Q. Did he get from the watchman - A. No;

"I have not been well since it happened. Q. Did the

"watchman get your bonnet and handkerchief from him

"- A. No; there was a number of them there threatened

"what they would do if he was not let go, one of

"them came up, and the bonnet was found in the passage

"of the house where I live, with the ribbons

"torn off. Q. Did you see what the prisoner did with it

"- A. No; for the blow which I had, prevented me observing

"what he did with it - the handkerchief has never

"been found. Q. Where did you see the man who

"came up and threatened what he would do - A. It

"was a woman, she came up, as the watchman were taking

"him away. I am sure of the prisoner's person."

The prisoner then asked the defendant

"Q. What is your real name - A. Ellen Alderson ."

After then, the prisoner had made his defence, she was reexamined, and deposed, (reads)

"He was a perfect

"stranger to me, I never spoke to him in my life, I never

"asked him to go home with me."

ELEANOR FOLKER . In October last, I lodged in the same house, as the prisoner. I work for a tailor and lodge up two pair of stairs in Windmill-court, Rosemary-lane, she had lodged on the one pair with her husband, the house is let out in lodgings; I remember on Thursday night the 18th of October, she was in my room that evening, from dusk till very near nine o'clock; it was the day Jacobs was taken up, she went out from my place about nine o'clock, and I saw no more of her that evening; she had neither bonnet, shawl, or silk handkerchief on.

COURT. Q. You live on the second floor, might she not go into her own room - A. She borrowed a candle of me, went into her own room, returned the candle to me on the stairs, and went out without shawl, bonnet, or handkerchief on; she had no bason or any thing in her hand, she was very much in liquor indeed, I was quite sober; she came home about eleven o'clock, and called up the stairs to me, and said,

"It is me," I made no answer; she called again, and I said,

"Very well," she had left her door unfastened, I had not asked who was there; I did not see her again that night, she continued to live in the house till the 26th of October; I have not seen her since, till now.

Prisoner. Q. I came into your room; told you I was going on an errand, and asked you to take charge of my room - A. She said, she was going to get a pint of beer; the street door is always open - her husband was on board a ship. I am married, and live with my husband; the prisoner

had lived in the house five or six weeks; I did not know her before.

JAMES M'NIFF . I am a tailor, and live in the front garret, at No. 83, Rosemary-lane. On the 18th of October, from nine o'clock at night, till very near eleven o'clock, I was at the Seven Stars, public-house, Rosemary-lane; I knew Jacobs, by seeing him come there to drink his beer, he was a Prussian. I have since seen him in Newgate; he came to the Seven Stars a little before nine o'clock that night, and was very drunk indeed when he came in - he had a pint of beer and sat down by himself, in the same box as me, and while we sat there the prisoner came in; I am certain of her person; she was very much intoxicated; she took up his pint of porter and drank out of it; he rebuked her; he said,

"You have no right to drink that, without my privilege" - she called him a son of a w***e; he spoke to her again.

COURT. Q. Did he use abusive language - A. No, he was grumbling; I said

"Mr. Jacobs, it is very rude for any one to come and drink your beer, - I should not like it myself;" the prisoner turned round and staggered towards the door, and when she recovered herself, she sat down by the side of Jacobs, and remained there till eleven o'clock - they did not talk together.

Q. What happened near eleven o'clock - A. Jacobs got up, and said, I will go home - he was so much in liquor then, that he staggered up against the door, and was near falling; the prisoner was very tipsy, she said she would go, and in following him to the door, she fell down; I said I would go, and went over and picked her up; Jacobs went out - she followed him, and I followed them.

Q. At any time during this period had the prisoner a bonnet or hat on her head, shawl or handkerchief on her neck, or bason in her hand - A. She had not, I am quite positive of it; Jacobs went on staggering, and she went after him, they went on as far as the Alderman Parson's head, public-house, which is about two hundred yards off in Rosemary-lane; it is the next public-house; she then put her hand round him, laid hold of his hair, and fell down, he tried to disengage himself from her, and owing to her drunkenness, she fell; a parcel of people came by, somebody helped her up; Jacobs went on, and I crossed the way, and left them - it was in my way home - I live at the further end of the lane.

COURT. Q. How do you know this was the night Jacobs was taken up - A. Because I went up stairs and was eating my supper, and heard the call of Watch! I came down and asked a man who was passing, what was the matter - he said, it was a drunken man, named Jacobs, going to the watch-house; I did not go to see him; I had my work to go to in the morning - I did not see Jacobs again.

Q. Had you not the curiosity to go to the watch-house next day - A. No, I went to work at six o'clock; I did not see him till after he was convicted; I did not know it would get to such serious consequences; I did not know where he lived; I worked for Messrs. Gilson and Smith, of Poplar, at the time; I had just come from work, and only drank a pint of beer; Mr. Husband keeps the public-house - I am sure she is the woman, I have known her, by sight, four or five years.

Prisoner. I have not been in this country eighteen months.

Witness. To the best of my knowledge, I have known her four or five years - I am sure it is above eighteen months.

JURY. Q. Did he use any violence to her, previous to her falling - A. No, except to disengage himself from her.

ELIZA ATKINSON . I live in White's-yard, Rosemary-lane, in the two pair front room, and work in a glasshouse, for Mr. Glover. On the night Jacobs was taken, I was at the end of White's-yard, about eleven o'clock, I never saw the prisoner before that, she asked me if there was any public-house open where she could get refreshment; Jacobs was by her; I did not know him; I saw him next day at Lambeth-street office, under examination.

Q. Jacobs was with her - A. Yes, he and the prisoner were standing together at the top of Whites'-yard; they were both very much intoxicated; the prisoner had a blue gown on, and her bosom was all exposed; she had neither shawl, bonnet, or handkerchief on, or bason in her hand. I told her the White Lion, in White Lion-street, was open. Whites'-yard is about twenty-yards from Alderman Parson's head, and more than that from the Seven Stars; she and Jacobs went round White Lion-street, and while they were walking along she called for assistance of the watchman.

Q. Did you see what happened to make her cry - A. No, they had got a little way from me; I went up, and she then gave charge of Jacobs for robbing her of her shawl, bonnet, and one shilling.

COURT. Q. You heard the charge? A. Yes, Jacobs attempted to strike her.

Q. Had he hold of her - A. No, for the watchman knocked him down, then sprang his rattle, and brought more assistance; Jacobs made no resistance; I followed him to Whitechapel watch-house; he was taken from there to Wellclose-square, as they were repairing the watch-house; I was returning home, and two watchmen took me in custody, as the prisoner swore I took the property from Jacobs; the watchman told me she said so, and she swore it at Lambeth-street, next day. When she was giving charge of Jacobs, she said she was a married woman; I said, if she was, she would not be out at that time of night, and an hour after that she gave charge of me.

Q. Then you was not taken in charge as you were returning home - A. Yes, the watchman charged me with receiving the property; I was not taken for an hour after, and was at the watch-house - I had been waiting near Wellclose-square.

Q. If a gentleman meets you, you go home with him. A. I am out at night - I never saw Jacobs before.

COURT. Q. Were you discharged at Lambeth-street A. Yes, I was taken before the Justice - and discharged; I knew nothing about Jacobs' trial; I did not think it would come to such a pitch as it did; Jacobs did not know where I lived - I was not sent for - I knew nothing about Jacobs' trial.

Q. When did you first tell any one what you knew of this business - A. About two days after, several people came to Lambeth-street, and I told them; I was applied to to become a witness on this trial about a month or six weeks after.

Prisoner. I never saw this woman till she was following Jacobs, and came behind him, and took something from him, and the watchman saw her.

Witness. I did not.

MR. JOHN NICHOLSON . I live with my father, who is a silversmith, and lives in Cornhill. On the night of the 18th of October, I was passing the end of Rosemary-lane, it was after eleven o'clock; I saw the prisoner - I do not recognise her features - but from her stature and appearance I believe it to be her; I saw Jacobs and a woman (whom I believe to be her) in contact together; he had hold of her arm, and did not seem inclined to loose it - some words passed between them both, and in about two minutes a watchman crossed over and laid hold of Jacobs, and endeavoured to loosen the woman from Jacobs' hold; he released her for a moment, but she came round towards the watchman and he caught hold of her again; the watchman endeavoured to loosen her again, but finding he could not do it easily he struck the man three or four times over the arm; and in consequence of their struggling several watchmen came to their assistance; I do not recollect the rattles springing; they then endeavoured to get him to the watch-house, which they had great difficulty, and trouble to do - he laid hold of the shutters, and did what he could to prevent them; then one of the watchmen came behind and struck him a violent blow over the head, and knocked him down; both him and the woman were drunk, beyond a doubt - there was never more than a dozen persons collected.

Q. Did any of them use any threat to the woman what they would do, or threaten any violence - A. None whatever, I am positive of it - Jacobs was taken to the watch-house - I left them.

COURT. Q. Did you hear whether the man was charged with any offence - A. As far as I saw, the woman was running about the street saying,

"I will give charge of him," but I did not hear what she charged him with; she had neither bonnet or shawl on - she was brandishing her hands about.

Q. How came you to hear of this matter - A. At the time it occurred, I did not hear the man's name, nor did I hear the trial, but I read the trial in the Sessions Paper; and hearing the man was ordered for execution, I supposed it to be the same party as I had seen; I made enquiry; went to Newgate to see the man, and knew him to be the man; he referred me to his master; when I went to see him I told him what his dress was at the time - it was a slouched hat.

Prisoner. It is false that I was ever in the middle of the street - or said I would give charge of him.

Witness. I am sure of it.

Prisoner's Defence. All I have to say is, that when I was here before I told the truth; when I was at the office all the blunder I made was, the watchman said it did not matter whether I said where I was going, and at the office I said I was going for a pail of water; but before you, my Lord, I told the truth.

The prisoner then handed in a paper complaining that she was prosecuted by a wicked set, who were determined to have her life, that they had come forward at the expence of 3000 l. to prosecute her, and had purchased witnesses against her; that it was a conspiracy against her life; that she considered herself entitled to the name of Alderson, as she lived with Alderson on honourable terms.

JAMES M'NIFF re-examined. She was at the Seven Stars, public-house, two hours - the landlord is not here.

GUILTY .

Confined Six Months and then Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220109-70

SIXTH DAY. TUESDAY, JANUARY 15, 1822.

248. WILLIAM PRICE was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of December , one cloak, value 5 l.; one coat, value 3 l.; and one matt, value 5 s. , the goods of Edmund Wakefield Mead .

JAMES WEBB . I am servant to Edmund Wakefield Mead, who lives at Kensington. On the 26th of December, I went to Tottenham in the chaise, I passed the prisoner in the Kingsland-road, he asked if he might get up and ride, I consented; we stopped at the Bull inn, Tottenham ; I took the things out of the chaise, and he helped me to carry them into the back parlour, this was about four o'clock; I went away for three hours, leaving him in the room. I returned to the Bull inn, about seven o'clock, and found him in the passage; he said, he had been waiting for me an hour; I said, I should be ready in five minutes; he said, he had got one of my great coats, because I should not go off without him, he was an entire stranger to me; I harnessed the horses in five minutes, and when I returned from the stable, he was gone, also both the coats and the matt; next morning, I went to the Bethnal-green, and saw the prisoner going by, and told him he was the man who robbed me last night; he said, he never saw me in his life. I dragged him into a pawnbroker's, and sent for an officer, he then gave up his keys, and Dyer found the property.

Cross-examined by MR. DOWLING. Q. Was he not intoxicated - A. No; I never said, I believed he did not intend to steal them; he never told me where he lived; I had information, which led me to Bethnal-green. When I took him, he said, he would give them up, if I would pardon him.

JAMES DYER . I am a constable. I was sent for to a pawnbroker's shop, and found the prisoner there, he said,

"Mr. Dyer, you know me very well, I am a respectable man in this parish, I know nothing of this concern at all, don't collar me." I said,

"I would not;" I was taking him along the street, he said,

"I will deliver up the keys of my stable, where you will find the coats, and in my house you will find the matt;" he then asked me to let him go, I refused. After locking him up; I went to his house, and found them, as he stated; he at first said, he knew nothing of the prosecutor at all.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I certainly took them, and my reason for denying it was, because I was known in the neighbourhood. I had been waiting for the man a long time, I was elevated in liquor, and what possessed me to

go away with them, I cannot say, I did not intend it; but I got on the coach, and intended to return them.

GUILTY . Aged 35.

Confined One Year .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220109-71

249. WILLIAM GASCOIGN and THOMAS GREEN was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of December , twenty-four live tame pigeons, price 50 s. , the property of James Collins .

MR. ALLEY conducted the prosecution.

MR. JAMES COLLINS . I am a solicitor; I have a country house at Stamford-hill - I had a quantity of pigeons there, there were fan-tails and dragons - those produced, are part of what I lost, there are six pair.

MATTHEW RIPPINGHAM . I am in Mr. Collins's office. On the 11th of December, I heard he had been robbed; I went to the shop of one Bailey, Holywell-street, near Shoreditch turnpike; between eleven and twelve o'clock in the morning, and saw the two prisoners in the shop, they had a small round close basket. I had previously told Bailey, my suspicions, he was to buy the four pigeons that they had brought; I waited in the shop till they were bought, and then examined, and knew them to be Mr. Collins's property. I went out and returned in about half an hour; while I was there with one of the pigeons in my hand, the prisoner came again with the same basket, and a larger one, which was full of pigeons, I think about seven or eight pair, and the smaller one had about four pair, I knew them to be Mr. Collins's. When they came in, I put the one I had into another basket, that they might not suspect; Gascoigne looked at me, and said to Green,

"The gentleman has got one of the pigeons which we brought this morning;" he said to me,

"That is a fine pigeon, it is so tame, it will go about the house." I asked if it was one of his, he said,

"Yes," and pointed to the two baskets which he had brought; I lifted up the lid of the small basket, and saw four of Mr. Collins's pigeons. I got a constable, and asked Gascoigne how he got them; he said, he bought them of a neighbour, who kept pigeons. I said, it was strange, he should buy of one dealer to sell to another, he made no answer; Green said, he knew nothing about them, he only assisted in carrying them.

WILLIAM HAGGIS . I am under gardener to Mr. Collins. On the 10th of December, at seven o'clock at night, I saw the pigeons safe in the house, there was twenty-four in all; next morning, at six o'clock, I found only three, they never fly at night - I know them to be my master's; I found a ladder thrown down in the yard, which was taken from under the hay-stack; it was a wet morning, there were three or four foot-marks by the gate. When they were brought home, they were let loose, and flew into their own place.

BARNARD GLEED . I am an officer. I went to Gascoigne's lodgings, and found a pair of boots very wet and muddy, it was about one o'clock, on the 11th of December, he lives in Hoxton New Town, nearly two miles from the prosecutor's, Green said, he lodged on Saffron-hill, I went to the house, and found a person named Green, but not the prisoner, I could learn nothing about him. Gascoigne said, If I would come to his house at seven o'clock at night, two men would bring some more pigeons and live pigs; I went and stopped till nine o'clock, nobody came to it.

MR. COLLINS. I am certain the pigeons are mine.

- BAILEY. I live in High-street, Shoreditch. I never saw the prisoners till they brought the pigeons; I have the four they brought first, Mr. Rippingham's account is correct.

GREEN'S Defence. I worked for Gascoign, he said, he had bought some pigeons, but must sell them, as his wife would not let him keep them.

GASCOIGN - GUILTY . Aged 35.

Confined Two Years and Publicly Whipped .

GREEN - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined One Year and Publicly Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220109-72

250. JOHN JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of December , one gig harness, value 4 l. , the goods of Stephen Alpe .

SECOND COUNT, sating it to belong to John Osborne .

JOHN OSBORNE . I am hostler at Bennett's stable-yard, Bruton Mews ; Mr. Stephen Alpe kept his gig there. On Friday, the 14th of December, about a quarter-past seven o'clock at night, I saw the harness hanging at the stable-door, and about half-past nine o'clock it was gone. I saw it about a week after at Marlborough-street.

WILLIAM GRAY . I assist in the yard. On Friday, the 14th of December, about a quarter-past seven o'clock at night, I saw the harness hanging up by the door, I missed it about nine o'clock.

WILLIAM ROBINSON . I am a coal dealer, and live in Bird-street, Golden-square; the prisoner came by my shed and asked if I wanted to buy some harness. I looked at it, this was Friday, the 14th of December, between ten and eleven o'clock; I gave him 2 l. for it, I saw him again on the 20th. I was taken into custody, as it was found in my possession, he was quite a stranger - I described his person, he told me he lived in the neighbourhood; I hung it at my door for sale.

JOHN WALES . I am an officer. I went to Robinson and found the harness and collar under the shop; he rather prevaricated; he described the person he bought it of - the prisoner was brought to the watch-house on another charge next morning; I asked if he had sold Robinson a gig harness, he said, he had; and it was last Friday, that he gave him 1 l. for it, that he sold it for another person, and he was to have 5 s. out of the 1 l. for his trouble.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220109-73

251. DANIEL MENDOZA was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of December , one umbrella, value 4 s. the goods of Isaac Levi .

SAMUEL LEVI . I am the son of Isaac Levi , who lives in Mount Gilead, Mile-End-road . On the 18th of December, between three and four o'clock, the umbrella was in the passage; it was taken between five and six o'clock; between those hours, I went into the front parlour, and heard a knock at the door - the servant opened it. I went

into the passage, and saw the prisoner. He took the umbrella down. I pursued and took him, without losing sight of him.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Is the servant here - A. No; she took a letter into the parlour to my father. The lamp in the passage was lit. I never said I should not know him. I am sure I took the man who ran out of the passage.

CHARLES SMITH . I am a patrol. I heard the cry of Stop thief! - I turned round, and made a catch at the prisoner, and drew the umbrella from his arm; he was stopped in three minutes.

Cross-examined. Q. What distance was you from the man - A. I saw him plainly, and am sure he is the man.

Q. You did not go into Newgate to see him - A. I went to see another man, and shook hands with the prisoner; his uncle was with me. When I came out, I saw a woman; but did not tell her I could not speak to the prisoner.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner made no defence.

SOLOMON JACOBS . I am a scrivener; and live in Petticoat-square. I saw Smith at the Sessions-house, Clerkenwell; I heard him tell the prisoner's uncle, that he could not swear to the lad, and must go to Newgate to see him, to be positive.

GUILTY Aged 24.

Confined Three Months , and Publicly Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220109-74

252. WILLIAM MOULDER was indicted for embezzlement .

JOHN HENRY TRIBE . I am in partnership with George Cole , a wine and brandy merchant , and live in South Moulton-street. The prisoner was our clerk or agent; he was authorized to receive money on our account. Each of the clerks have a memorandum book of their own. I produce the prisoner's book, in which he enters at nine o'clock in the morning, the money he has received, and orders taken on the day before. He was an out-door clerk. They enter the money they receive, and pay it to me every morning. On the 29th of July, he has entered in his book the sum of 5 l., to the credit of Nicholas Norman . There is no other entry of money to Norman.

NICHOLAS NORMAN . I keep the Carved Lion, public-house, South-street, Manchester-square. I deal with Cole and Tribe. On the 29th of July, I paid the prisoner 10 l. on their account, and took his receipt. I cannot swear whether it was in notes or money.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220109-75

253. JOHN HARGRAVE was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of December , three yards of kerseymere, value 1 l. , the goods of George Brudenel Wetherill .

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM SWIFT . I used to go on an evening to Mr. Wetherill's house, in Providence-row, to keep the prisoner company; and on the evening of the 1st of December, he asked me to pawn a piece of black kerseymere, which was at his master's, where we were. He told me his master allowed him to pledge these things when he wanted money. I was to ask 11 s. for it; I went to Mr. Attenborough, Sun-street; the prisoner stopped outside the shop - the pawnbroker offered me 8 s. I brought it outside, and told the prisoner; he told me to pledge it for 10 s. I went in again; they sent me to fetch him in. I told him that Attenborough wanted to speak to him, and took him in. He asked him a few questions - the prisoner said it was his cloth, and he bought it at a pawnbroker's. He ran out - and I was detained.

GEORGE BRUDENEL WETHERILL . I am a merchant, and live in Providence-row. The prisoner has been nearly three years in my employ. I never gave him leave to sell or pawn cloth. The keyseymere is mine; it is two yards and a half, cut off a whole piece.

Prisoner. Q. You have authorized me to take things to pawn - A. Never.

RICHARD ATTERBOROUGH . On the 1st of December, Swift came to pawn the kerseymere; I offered him 8 s. - he went out to know if he might take it. I told him to bring the owner in, and he brought in the prisoner, who said it was his, and he lived in Providence-row, with Mr. Wetherill, and that the property was his own - that he bought it of a pawnbroker. He ran out. I detained Swift.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutor has authorized me to pawn things before - my fellow prisoner has been sent to pawn his gold watch. My master went to Brighton for three months, and left me without money. I took the cloth to pay the porter.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220109-76

254. CHARLES STEED was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of September , two yards of woollen cloth, value 15 s. the goods of George Brudenel Wetherill .

JOHN MATTHEWS . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Providence-row. The prisoner pawned a piece of cloth with me on the 10th of November, in the name of John Hargrave , for 24 s.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. You knew him before - A. Yes; he has pawned and redeemed cloth in the name of Hargrave.

MR. WETHERILL. The prisoner was in my employment as porter occasionally, for three years. I never gave him leave to pawn my goods - he never apprised me of any thing of the kind.

Cross-examined. Q. He has a wife and three children - A. Yes. I paid him by the job. He sent me the duplicates, and said he pawned them by Hargrave's direction.

JOHN MANCE . I apprehended the prisoner at Hoxton. I had been looking for him for a month - I asked if he had pawned any cloth; he said he had; but declined saying where. I asked him where Hargrave was. He would not say whether he was at his house or not. I said I was going to his house - he took me there. Hargrave was not there, he asked what I would advise him to do. I said truth went the furthest; he said if he told the truth, he should have a great deal to say.

Prisoner's Defence. What I did was by order of Hargrave.

GUILTY . Aged 46.

Confined One Year .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220109-77

255. CHARLOTTE SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of January , from the person of George Spinks , one purse, value 2 d.; twenty-six sovereigns; one 5 l. and three 1 l. bank notes , his property.

GEORGE SPINKS . I drive the Thetford waggon . On the 2nd of January, I met the prisoner in Whitechapel ; I had seen her in the street twice before; she took me into a dark street, into a room. I sat down a few minutes. I had a purse, containing twenty-six sovereigns, one 5 l. Suffolk, and three 1 l. bank notes - my purse was in my right hand breeches pocket - I felt her pull it out of my pocket; she ran out of the room. I pursued her - she got away. We had only been ten minutes in the room. I was rather in liquor. I described her to the watchmen - and am certain of her.

JOHN BARRS . I am an officer. On the 2nd of January I received information, and went after the prisoner two or three times; but could not find her. I found her on the Saturday night; he pointed her out from three others.

Prisoner's Defence. I never saw him before.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220109-78

256. HENRY SIMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of December , two planes, value 5 s. , the goods of James Kendall .

JAMES KENDALL . I am a carpenter . I was at work on the 14th of December, at an empty house in Trevor-square . I left three planes there at night, and took the key, and went next morning, and missed two planes - I know nothing of the prisoner.

EDWARD JOHN HANDLEY . I am a constable. On the 14th of December, a little before eight o'clock at night, I saw the prisoner in a house in Darlmouth-street, Westminster, kept by Turpin, a dealer in marine stores. I saw him hand some planes across the counter; I went in, and asked if they were his; he said, No. I said I saw him put the iron into his pocket. He said one plane was his. I said it was strange they should have the same name on them - he then admitted they were both his. I took him, after a violent resistance.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You thought he was offering them for sale; but he might be buying them - A. The man in the shop disowned them.

JOSEPH COOPER . I went with Handley; and next morning, in the way to the office, I asked him where he got the planes; he said from Pocock's field, which is now called Trevor square.

KENDALL. I will not swear to them.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin Esq.

Reference Number: t18220109-79

257. ELIZA BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of December , one watch, value 2 l.; four seals, value 8 s.; and two keys, value 1 s., the goods of William Jennings , from his person .

WILLIAM JENNINGS . I am a porter . On the 27th of December, I was at the Horse and Dolphin, public-house, Macclesfield-street , where I lodge. I am subject to fits. The prisoner was there. I was going to the door, and fell into a fit. I had a watch about me; when I came to myself, I missed it. On Saturday morning, I was ill in bed. I came down in the afternoon, and heard her blaming every body in the room for stealing my watch; she accused the landlord and landlady of it. I said I would give 5 l. to any body to get it back. I said if it was not brought back, I would be severe, as it was a family watch. She trembled, and then went to the privy. I suspected her, and went backwards, as soon as she returned. I found my seals in the privy; but have not found the watch. I found her in the tap-room, and held them up and said,

"There are the seals." She said,

"Never mind; I shall only have a twelvemonth and a day." I had her taken; she said then she was innocent; but was an accessary.

EDWARD BRETT . I keep the public-house; the prosecutor lodged with me; he had a fit - the prisoner and several others were surrounding him. When he came to himself, he missed his watch; this was Thursday. On Saturday the prisoner came to the house, she said to me,

"I am accused of taking his watch." I said,

"Nobody accuses you; go about your business." She kept abusing us; and charged Collins with taking the watch, and handing it to me. She came again in the evening, and accused every one in the tap-room of it. She went to the privy; the prosecutor went after her, and found the seals; he then charged her with it; she burst into tears, and said it would only be twelve months and a day.

WILLIAM COULTON . I was with the prosecutor in the house - he fell in a fit - the prisoner was feeling about his person several times.

(Seals produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I never touched him, as true as I am here. Coulton is the man who took it from his pocket.

GUILTY . Aged 33.

Confined One Year .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220109-80

258. WILLIAM INGMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of December , two shoes, value 5 s. , the goods of William Frame ,

JOHN PRESTON . I work for Wm. Frame , shoemaker , of Old Compton-street. These shoes were in the window, the door was open; I was in the back parlour; the prisoner came in, and I saw his hand in the window - I went out, and he was gone; I saw him with the shoes in his hand, he dropped them, I picked them up; he was stopped - I am sure he is the man; he stopped himself after dropping the shoes. Newman took him.

HENRY NEWMAN . I took him in custody. Preston gave me the shoes. He denied it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Six Months and Publicly Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220109-81

259. LEON LEONI was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of December , one padlock, value 3 d., one key, value

2 d., and 12 s 7 d., in monies numbered , the property of Eleanor Hurley , widow .

SARAH HURLEY . I am the daughter of Eleanor Hurley , we live at the corner of Dean-street, Soho , and keep an oil shop . On Wednesday, the 19th of December, at eight o'clock at night, my mother said, the till was stolen - the prisoner is quite a stranger; I went to the door, and a young man pointed the prisoner out, he was laid hold of; I accused him of having the money; I found in his leather apron, 8 s. 4 d., in halfpence, and 3 s. 6 d., in silver, and a padlock, which was in the till with the money - I cannot say how much money was gone from the till, but I knew the padlock; the till was taken too, and brought back after.

ISAAC HUNTINGDON . I am a tailor, and live in Cambden Town. I was passing the prosecutor's house, between six and seven o'clock that night, and saw the prisoner standing outside the door, a boy came out of the shop with a till under his arm, which he gave to him - I followed the prisoner along King-street, to George-yard; I then went to the prosecutrix, then went, and met the prisoner coming out of the other end of the yard into Macclesfield-street; I secured him - the till was found in the yard; he had the money and padlock in his apron. There was nobody in the shop.

JOHN WALES . I was on the spot; I had been watching the prisoner with three others for half an hour, but did not see him at Hurley's.

(Padlock produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined Six Months and Whipped ,

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220109-82

260. WILLIAM OLBERRY was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of December , 12 lbs. of sugar, value 10 s., the goods of Frederick Davis , privately in his shop .

GEORGE MOORE . I am servant to Mr. Frederick Davis , a grocer , who lives in Tothill-street, Westminster . About eight o'clock at night, a person told me a loaf of sugar was stolen. I looked, and missed one from the window, near the door; it could be reached from without - I ran out, and saw the prisoner in Dartmouth-street with it under his arm; he let it fall, I followed him without losing sight of him.

MATTHEW FARMER . I am a watchman. I heard the alarm, the prisoner ran towards me, and dropped something.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A man took the sugar and threw it down; I turned round to tell the constable, and he took me.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined Six Month and Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220109-83

261. WILLIAM WILBRAHAM was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of December , thirty yards of linen, value 30 s., the goods of Thomas Fowke privately in his shop .

THOMAS FOWKE . I am a linen-draper , and live in Tottenham Court-road . On the 11th of December, at eight o'clock, I missed a roll of linen from near the door, inside the shop; it measured between thirty and forty yards - next day the officer brought it.

BENJAMIN KERNEY . I am an officer. On the 11th of December, between seven and eight o'clock, at night, I stopped the prisoner in Wilderness-row, with this roll of sheeting. I asked where he brought it from, he said, from Tottenham Court-road, and was taking it to No. 5, Chequer-alley, Whitecross-street, to one Dales - next morning we took it to Fowke, who claimed it.

JOHN AVERY . I am an officer. I was with Kerney; I went to Chequer-alley, but could find no Dale - he said Dale gave it him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I met a man in Tottenham Court-road, who gave me 9 d. to take it to Goswell-street.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Six Months and Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220109-84

262. ALEXANDER MASON and HENRY SANDFORD were indicted for stealing, on the 5th of January , one hundred and thirty-two plates, value 12 s. the goods of Joseph Shakeshaft .

THOMAS ALMOND . I am a carpenter. I know Joseph Shakeshaft , he lives at the corner of Dorset-street, Spitalfields . On the 5th of January, at half-past five o'clock, I saw the prisoners near there, and watched them. Sandford had two empty baskets; they turned the corner, and in about five minutes, I saw Sandford opposite the shop without the baskets. Mason came out of the shop with a basket, containing eight dozen plates, and was carrying them away. I stopped him, and asked what he was going to do with them - Sandford ran away, he said he was going to carry them round the corner - I took him to the watch-house.

JOHN BARRS . I took Sandford in custody.

JOSEPH SHAKESHAFT . The prisoners were strangers to me; I knew Mason by sight, I had such plates as these, I sold none to them - My boy absconded the same day.

MASON'S Defence. His boy asked me to carry them to Whitechapel.

SANUFORD'S Defence. I was looking at the shop, and this boy got in conversation with me.

MASON - GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

SANDFORD - NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220109-85

263. STEPHEN LUFF was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of December , one penny weight of silver, value 2 s. 6 d. , the goods of William Rowland .

WILLIAM ROWLAND . I am a gold and silver watch-case maker . The prisoner was my errand boy ; I saw him come down from the silver shop and go into the privy, and my brother after him. I went into the silver shop, and in a minute or two, he came up. I asked where he he had been, he said to the privy. I went down to the privy, and found a parcel of silver on the soil; I said I had found the thief, and told him this was not the first time, he said it was.

ROBERT ROWLAND . I am brother to the last witness. I put a piece of silver wire in the silver box, about a quarter

past four o'clock; the prisoner came into the shop - I stood with my back to him; Dawes came in about six o'clock, and asked if I had used the silver; I said I had put it in the box, he said it was not there. I looked, and it was gone. I said

"Stephen, have you seen it," he said No, and in the course of a minute, walked down stairs.

CHARLES DAVIS . I gave the silver to Rowland, his account is correct.

JOHN WIGGINS . I am an officer. I found the silver on the soil.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 12.

Whipped and discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin Esq.

Reference Number: t18220109-86

264. ISAAC AMOR was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of December , one pelisse, value 30 s. , the goods of Eliza Young .

The prosecutrix did not appear.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220109-87

265. RICHARD HARTFIELD was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of December , 5 lbs. of mutton, value 18 s. , the goods of William Miller .

HENRY MILLER . My brother is a butcher , and lives in Union-street, Spitalfields. On the 8th of December between six and seven o'clock in the evening; I was watching his shop, and saw the prisoner pass the door, and take two breasts of mutton off the stall board, wrap it in a cloth, and walk away - I took him.

WM. MILLER. Having been frequently robbed, I set my brother to watch - he brought the prisoner, who said another boy took it and gave it him.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked it of the ground.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Whipped and discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220109-88

266. ANN HOCKLEY was indicted for stealing on the 17th of December , one shift, value 2 s. 6 d. the goods of Thomas Gasson .

ELIZA GASSON . I am wife of Thomas Gasson , a patrol. On the 20th of October I hung the shift in the yard, and missed it; I found it on the 15th of December on Camplin's premises which are at the back of mine; the prisoner lived there; her father lived next door; Camplin's wife claimed it, and said she bought it in Rag-fair, and then the prisoner claimed it.

SARAH TRUEMAN . I live at Tottenham. On the 20th of October the prisoner brought a shift to me to dry for her - I know this to be the same by a stain.

WILLIAM CAMPLIN . The prisoner hung the shift in my yard.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I found it.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220109-89

266. EDWARD FREAK was indicted for stealing on the 3d of December three cocoa nuts, value 9 d. the goods of Samuel Dyke .

SAMUEL DYKE . I am a cocoa nut dealer , and live in Whitechapel . On the 14th of December the prisoner was unloading my cart; I missed six nuts; I took a light and found three concealed under the stair-case; I concealed myself and in about twenty minutes he came up, listened for a moment, then put the three nuts in his apron, and before he got into the street I took them from him.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220109-90

268. LYDIA CHALONER was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of December , one bonnet, value 1 s.; one shawl, value 6 d.; one pair of curtains, value 3 s.; and two brushes, 3 s., the goods of Ann Williams , widow ; one petticoat, value 1 s.; and one gown body, value 1 s. , the goods of Eliza Fisher .

ANN WILLIAMS . I live at Paddington . On the 26th of December, the prisoner was driven by a mob to my door; I took her in, protected her, washed her and gave her a bed; she lived next door, but the people were not at home; she was intoxicated; I went out at seven o'clock in the morning, leaving her there, and returned at seven o'clock at night, and missed the articles stated in the indictment, she was taken in custody on the 29th, with my bonnet, shawl, and gown body.

ELIZA FISHER . I lodged with Williams; I found the prisoner in my bed, and was obliged to sit up. I missed my things at night.

SAMUEL PRENDERGRASS . I am an officer; I took her on another charge, the prisoner came to the office, I claimed the things she wore.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I got in liquor, the boys threw mud at me, I fled for refuge to Williams's; and in the morning my clothes not being dry, I took the liberty of using hers.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220109-91

269. CATHERINE CLARK was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of December , three spoons, value 1 l. , the goods of George Pawley .

GEORGE PAWLEY . I am an officer in his Majesty's service, and live in St. Martin's-lane , the prisoner's daughter is my servant. On the morning of Christmas day, she came to see her, I gave her leave to dine with her - she went out, and said she would return, but did not. Next morning Vann came to me, I looked over my table spoons, and missed three.

THOMAS VANN . I am an officer, I was fetched to Farrow's sale-shop, in White-cross-street, between twelve and and one o'clock on Christmas day, I found the prisoner there, she had offered these spoons for sale; she said her husband lived at 108, High Holborn; I said, I would accompany her to him, when we got to Smithfield, she said she would go no further; I left her in custody, and went alone, and found no such person there, she said, she had a daughter at Mr. Pawley's; I said,

"I dare say that is where you brought the spoons from." she said, it was, and that she sold one at Barker's in Holborn, for 9 s.

JOHN FARROW . I keep a sale shop in Whitecross-street. On Christmas day the prisoner came to sell a table and tea-spoon, I sent for Vanu, his account is correct.

JAMES SWEETMAN . I am servant to Mr. Barker; I bought a spoon of her on the Saturday before Christmas.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 45.

Confined Six Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220109-92

270. JAMES DRINKWATER was indicted for embezzlement .

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220109-93

271. WILLIAM CADMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of December , eleven pewter-pots, value 5 s. the goods of Thomas Purvis ,

THOMAS PURVIS . I keep a public-house in Hackney-road ; the prisoner was brought in with these pots.

WILLIAM BEECH . I am servant to Purvis. On the 15th of December, I saw the prisoner going out at the back-gate, and saw two more round the back way. I ran round and stopped the prisoner, with eleven pots in his arms, the others got away with more; he said, he was led into it, I have seen him at the house before.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was going home when the gentleman tapped me on the shoulder.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years.

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220109-94

272. MARY BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of December , 21 lbs. of bacon, value 3 s. , the goods of James Leck .

JAMES LECK . I keep a chandler's shop , in Shouldam-street . On the 17th of December, about half-past nine o'clock, the prisoner came, and asked for a halfpenny worth of salt; she said the paper was not big enough; I left the shop, my wife called me, and said she had stolen the bacon; my wife held her while I took it from under her shawl - it weighed 10 1/2 lbs.

Prisoner's Defence. I was distressed.

GUILTY . Aged 63.

Confined One Month .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220109-95

273. RICHARD WILLIAM ARTHUR TURTON was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of December , one pair of shoes, value 4 s. , the goods of Jonathan Murray and Thomas Burlton .

JOSEPH HALL . I am shopman to Jonathan Murray and Thomas Burlton , pawnbrokers , East Smithfield . On the 13th of December, about ten o'clock, these shoes hung outside the door - I saw the prisoner come to the window, and stand there two minutes looking through; he then went to the door, cut down a pair of shoes, and walked away; I pursued and took him with them under his jacket, he said,

"You **** let me go, or I will knock you down, he struck me a violent blow on the head; but was secured.

JOHN GLEED . I assisted in securing him, he used coarse language, and threatened to strike Hall.

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220109-96

274. JAMES SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of December , one hammock, value 2 s.; one mattrass, value 2 s.; one pillow, value 6 d.; three blankets, value 3 s.; one rug, value 6 d.; one jacket, value 5 s., one hat, value 6 d., and three pair of trowsers, value 18 d. , the goods of Joseph Ritson .

JOSEPH RITSON . I am a mariner , On the 31st of December, I lodged in Jones-rents's, my things were at the Crown, public-house, kept by Ord; I had left them there for three months, and found them on board the sloop Nancy.

JAMES NICHOLSON . I lodge at Ord's. The prisoner came in one night, and asked me to bring his hammock up to the Scotch Arms, public-house, I did so, he gave them to me.

ELIZA FINLEY . I keep the Scotch Arms, public-house. Nicholson brought the hammock; the prisoner never claimed it that I know.

DANIEL BENSON . The prisoner lodged at the Edinboro' Castle, public-house, with me; he had a hammock at my house, and took it away with him.

ROBERT YOUNG . I am an officer. I went on board the Nancy, on the 2d of January, and found the prisoner there with the hammock, he said he thought it was his own.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I sent my hammock to Ord's, and suppose I must have got this away by mistake.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin Esq.

Reference Number: t18220109-97

275. CHARLES WEST was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of December , one lamp, value 3 l. , the goods of John Brown Bell .

JOHN BROWN BELL . I am a printer , and I live in St. James's-street . This lamp was placed on an iron rail before my door. Between eight and nine o'clock, a man knocked at the door, and gave me information, the lamp was gone.

DANIEL SIMPSON . I was going down St. James's-street, between eight and nine o'clock; I saw the prisoner on a ladder, he took the lamp off the iron, and gave it to another person underneath, who took it up Jeremy-street, the prisoner walked down the street with the ladder, his torch was out, he is a lamplighter. I told the watchman, and then went and told Bell.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. It was dark - A. Yes; I am servant to Messrs. Calvert's, silk mercers. He saw me watching him and went into the road.

HUGH BALDWIN . I am watchman. Simpson pointed the prisoner out to me, I took him with a ladder on his shoulders; he said, he had stolen the lamp, the prisoner said nothing. His burner was out, he pretended to be drunk.

Prisoner. I know nothing of it.

GUILTY .

Confined Three Months and Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220109-98

SEVENTH DAY, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 16, 1822.

276. JOHN BAILEY and WILLIAM FOULKES were indicted for stealing, on the 27th of December , one pair of shoes, value 2 s. , the goods of Sarah Brett .

SARAH BRETT . I am a single woman. In the beginning of December, I was servant to Mr. Sowden, of Wanstead. I left my place on the 27th of December, between six and seven o'clock, and was on the road from Wanstead to London; I went into a public-house, at Stratford, to dry myself - it was a wet evening, I had my box with me, containing my clothes, it was a kind of band-box; I saw three young men and two women in the public-house, in company together; one of the men asked me to drink a little beer, which I did; I stopped there about an hour and a half - they all followed me out, the prisoner Bailey was one, he followed with the rest - one of them asked, if he should carry my box, Bailey was present, I let him carry it, they walked on till they got through Bow-fair-fields, with my box, the women walked with them, they all walked faster than I did - I never saw the box again till it was broken open; Bailey knocked me down in Bow-fields , as I was going across after my box, he was rather behind the others, I fell on my face; I did not know where they had carried it to; he ran off, I called out, and as I was coming out of the field, I saw Harbott, and told him, I had lost my box; I had got about six yards out of the field, when he brought it to me. Soon after two patrols came up.

Did you complain that they had ran away and stolen your box - A. No.

Q. Nor that you had been knocked down - A. No; one of the witnesses brought me my box, it was broken open. I have got every thing but the shoes.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Where did you get the shoes - A. My sister gave them to me, she lives at Leightonstone, I was going from her to Cannon-street-road. I do not believe, that either of the prisoners intended to rob me.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220109-99

277. ABRAHAM BELCHAM was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of December , two lbs. of copper pipe, value 2 s.; and one brass plug, value 4 s. the goods of James Grange .

JAMES GRANGE . I live at Lamb Farm, Kingsland . I missed about a pound and a half of copper pipe, and a brass plug from my premises - they were not fixed to the premises. On the 3d of December, the pipe was produced, and it fitted the plug.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. The prisoner worked many years for you - A. Yes; he was allowed broken glass, but not lead.

GEORGE FRASI. I am an engineer. In consequence of information, I went to Handley's shop, in Goswell-street, and found one piece of copper pipe, and the plug of a cock, which I knew to be my work.

SAMUEL RAYBOLD . I am servant to Mr. Handley, a brass founder. On the 31st of December, the pipe and brass were brought to our shop; I bought it of a man, who is not here, for 5 s 6 d.

JAMES BROOK . I work for Mr. Grange, and have been five years and a half with him; I was in the painting shop, and worked under the prisoner. On the 27th, I missed the brass - I was out, and when I came in, the prisoner, said he had sold the brass; he had asked me to rummage up something to make money of. I said there was nothing but the plug. The money was divided between us. He said the man allowed him one shilling for the plug.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220109-100

278. ELIZA DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of December , seventeen yards of printed cotton, value 10 s. , the goods of David Evans .

DAVID EVANS. I am a linen-draper , and live in St. John-street . The prisoner was brought into my shop with this linen which hung inside the shop.

JOSEPH HUTCHINSON . I am a watchman. On the 20th of December, about a quarter past five o'clock, I was near Evans's shop, and saw the prisoner standing by the side of the window, looking into the shop. I saw her put both her hands up, and snatch something from the shop - I let her go about two doors, then laid hold of her, and found the cotton under her pelisse - she said she had just picked it up. I took her into the shop, she resisted, and dropped it. I picked it up.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

SAMUEL HAYWARD . I am an officer, and took the prisoner in charge.

Prisoner's Defence. I saw it lay by the shop.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220109-101

279. MARY TURNER was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of January , one sovereign, and two half crowns, the property of William Rooney , from his person .

WILLIAM ROONEY . I am a labourer , and come from Bristol. On the 2nd of January, between two and three o'clock in the day, I was in Jews'-row, Chelsea - I am a pensioner. I met the prisoner - I was rather tipsy. She asked me if had got my pension. I said Yes. She told me to come home to her place, and she would take care of me. I went to her room, and sat on the bed. I fell asleep, and felt her hand in my pocket - I got up, and missed my money; she ran into another room - I brought her back, and held her. She struck and scratched me. The constable came in, and found the sovereign and half crown in her stocking.

RICHARD NEWMAN . I am a constable. I was sent for, and searched the prisoner. I found a sovereign and two half-crowns in her stocking - she at first denied having any - then she said he gave it to her.

Prisoner's Defence. He gave me the money to go home with him.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220109-102

280. HENRY HERITAGE and THOMAS SIMONS were indicted for stealing, on the 22d of November , ten sovereigns , the property of Wilkinson Moore .

WILKINSON MOORE. I keep the George and Dragon, public-house, in Buckingham-place, Fitzroy-square . On the 22d of November, between one and two o'clock, the

prisoners were at my house. I knew them before. I saw my son give Heritage ten sovereigns, to get farthings at the Mint. He was occasionally employed by me. Simmons was not with him - he never returned. I found him in custody, about ten days after.

WILLIAM MOORE , JUN. I am the son of the last witness. I gave Hentage ten sovereigns - Simmons was not there. I told him to get 10 l. worth of farthings - he never returned. I met him in the street on the 9th of December, and secured him; he said he had lost part of the money, and was afraid to return. I had delivered them to him in a bag. Simmons was apprehended on the 14th.

WM. THORNTON. On the 22d of December, I saw the prisoners together, between two and three o'clock, in Tottenham-court-road, near Warren-street. They came up to me. Simmons said Heritage had got ten sovereigns, to get farthings for, and asked if I did not consider him a d - d fool if he went. I said he ought to be the best judge himself.

WILLIAM HEWET . I am a constable. The prisoner was given in my charge.

HERITAGE'S Defence. Simmons was going part of the way with me. I lost part of the money, and did not like to return.

HERITAGE - GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined Three Months .

SIMMONS. - NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220109-103

281. DENNIS BIRD was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of December , four pair of stockings, value 4 s.; two yards of flannel, value 4 s.; one handkerchief, value 1 s. 6 d.; one canister, value 3 d.; and one night cap, value 3 d. , the goods of Robert Daniels .

ROBERT DANIELS . I am a coach-smith , and live in James-street, Manchester-square ; I lodge in the back room. The prisoner went home with me on this evening. I met him in North Audley-street - he said he was distressed, and wanted victuals. I took him home with me; I gave him some meat and bread. After tea he said he must go. I then missed my things; he was opening the door. I said,

"Mate, you have got more than your own property." He denied it. I said,

"You have got my night-cap on your head, and a handkerchief of mine." He went down stairs - the people up stairs asked what was the matter. Instead of going out at the door, he he went into the back kitchen - it was dark. I suppose he lost his way.

Q. Why did you not take the cap off - A. I did not like to take the law in my own hands. I was quite sober.

Q. You told the Magistrates you were in liquor - A. I walked home very well.

WILLIAM HANDLEY . I am landlord of the house - I had a few friends at my place, and about six o'clock, the prosecutor, and my lodger, came down, and said he was robbed. The stair-case was dark. I suppose the prisoner missed his way. Daniels said he was gone into the kitchen. I found him behind the door - I took him up. He dropped a tea-canister, and the flannel was found on him. I do not know whether the prisoner was drunk - the prosecutor appeared drunk.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Defence. He was drunk - he took me home. I was going backward, and missed my way.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220109-104

282. JAMES HONEY was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of January , one handkerchief, value 3 s., the goods of Robert Cook , from his person .

ROBERT COOK . On the 3d of January, about half-past eight o'clock at night, I was in Great Queen-street, Lincoln's Inn-fields , just under an archway. I felt a tag at my pocket - turned round, and saw the prisoner dropping my handkerchief - a boy taller than himself was behind him. I seized the prisoner immediately. Coles picked it up.

CHARLES COLES . I was passing by, and picked up the handkerchief. Cook had hold of the prisoner.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

THOMAS MORGAN . I am a watchman. I stopped the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. The gentleman laid hold of me. I saw two boys running - the handkerchief was on the ground.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220109-105

283. JACOB ANDERSON was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of December , one pair of trowsers, value 12 s. , the goods of William Matthew Smellie .

RICHARD CRESSEY . I am shopman to W. M. Smellie. a pawnbroker , of Ratcliff-highway . On the 22d of December, between nine and ten o'clock at night, I was standing in the shop - I heard something snap at the door - I looked out - and saw the prisoner, I ran out, and saw he had got the trowsers from my door. I took them from him, and gave him in charge. They hung on the doorpost, inside.

WILLIAM PAXMAN . I am a watchman. I stopped the prisoner within ten yards of the shop, with the trowsers.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 43.

Confined Three Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220109-106

284. WILLIAM BURGESS , JOHN HAYMAN , and JOHN KELLY were indicted for stealing, on the 31st of December , one bed, value 10 s.; one bolster, value 2 s.; two chairs, value 2 s., and one iron pot, value 2 s. , the goods of John M'Laren .

JOHN M'LAREN. I keep a lodging house in Lawrence-street, St. Giles. On the 1st of January I found a room broken open at another house of mine in Bainbridge-street ; nobody lived in the room; I missed the articles stated in the indictment; the room was stripped. On the 3d of January another room in the same house was broken open, and next day I met Hayman in King-street, Seven-dials, and told him I suspected him - he denied it at first; I took him to the watch-house; he then said he would show me where he lived; he took me to Church-lane, St. Giles's, and there I saw Burgess going in; I told him I

suspected he was concerned with Hayman in stealing my things; he denied it also; as I was certain they was concerned in it I took them to the watch-house; Hayman said if I would speak to him privately he would tell me where the things were; Burgess afterwards told me the same; I said I should make no promises; he told me they had sold them to Kelly, in Bainbridge-street, for 4 s. 6 d. the iron pot, bed, bolster, and chairs, he said he hoped I would excuse him; when we got to Kelly's door he said to him

"I want those things which I sold you" - we found them there.

JOHN CLAYBROOK . On the 4th of January about four o'clock in the afternoon the prosecutor informed me he had been robbed; I took Burgess, who took us to Kelly's, and said he wanted the things he sold him, Kelly said

"I bought them, but you must have them." I took Kelly.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

BURGESS - GUILTY . Aged 20.

HAYMAN - NOT GUILTY .

KELLY - NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220109-107

285. WILLIAM BURGESS , JOHN HAYMAN , and JOHN KELLY were again indicted for stealing on the 3d of January , one bed, value 8 s.; one bolster, value 2 s., two sheets, value 3 s.; one blanket, value 4 s.; one coverlid, value 4 s.; one chair, value 1 s.; and one pair of bellows, value 1 s. the goods of John M'Laren .

JOHN M'LAREN. I suspected the prisoners of the robbery on the 3d of January. On the 4th I met Hayman, and accused him of being one of the party who broke my room open; he denied it; I told him I would take him up if he did not tell me where he lived; he took me to Church-lane where he lodged; I met Kelly in the passage, and said I suspected him also; he denied it; I found nothing in the room; I took them both to the watch-house; Hayman said if I would step on one side he would tell me all about it; I made him no promise; he told me Burgess brought a bed to his lodgings that morning, and that it was placed under his bed, and if I would go with him to the room I should find it; I went back with him, and there it was; he took me to Parker-street, Drury-lane, and there I found a pair of sheets, blanket, a quilt, chairs, and bellows; he said Burgess took them there, I brought them away; the witness was in the room, and said a young man who lived in the room with him, and a person he did not know brought them there.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN CLAYBROOK . M'Laren brought Hayman to me; he took us to Parker-street, into the garret; a man named Rent was in the room - we found a pair of sheets, coverlid, blankets, chair, and bellows there.

JOHN RENT . I am a labourer, and live in Parker-street; the things were brought into the room by Burgess and Allen, my landlord, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening of the 3d of January; Allen rented the room.

BURGESS'S Defence. I met Allen with the bag - he asked me to go to his room.

BURGESS - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Six Months .

HAYMAN - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Three Months .

KELLY - NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220109-108

286. GEORGE INGREY was indicted for stealing on the 7th of January two shawls, value 3 l.; and one scarf, value 30 s. the goods of John Parker , privately in his shop .

GEORGE WHITE . I am shopman to John Parker , who lives at Norton Falgate , and is a linen-draper . On the 7th January, about eight o'clock in the morning, the prisoner accompanied by another man came into the shop, and asked for some calico like that I had shewn him on the Saturday before; he said it was not wide enough; I said I had none wider; he bought one yard, paid 8 d. for it, and then went out; in about a minute I missed two shawls; I went after them down White Lion-street, and across Spital-square, and saw the prisoner in Lamb-street, with the other, and two or three more walking together, they turned down South-street; I came up to them just before they got into the market; and collared the prisoner; he knocked me away; the prisoner then ran across the market, I followed him, but the others hit me several times, and trod on my heels, and kicked my shoes off - I pursued the prisoner calling Stop Thief! he went into Red Lion-street, and I lost sight of him; his coat was picked up in the Fruit Market, and given to me - I am sure he is the man - I think he had come with the other man on the Saturday - he stood by the shawls.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Where were they found - A. In his pocket; I lost sight of him in the Market; I never said I did not think he was the man - he was not above ten minutes in the shop.

ADAM HASELTINE . I was in Spital-fields-market, and am a porter. I heard the witness cry Stop thief! and saw a man in a white coat running, I pursued and just as I turned the corner, I saw him drop his great coat, and ran into the market again; I picked it up and gave it to the boy - I lost sight of him, and in five minutes they said he was taken.

Cross-examined. Q. Had the boy come up - A.He was up before me.

JOHN DAVISON . I saw the boy and a man scuffling together, the man had a long white coat on; the boy cried Stop thief! I ran down South-street, and lost sight of him, as I was running into the market, I saw the coat laying down; there were many people running. The boy came up.

Cross-examined. Q. Did not White say he could not exactly tell whether he was the man - A. I believe he said something of the sort, but am not sure; somebody said so.

THOMAS HART . I took the prisoner in charge; and found the property in the coat pocket.

THOMAS WHITE . It is my master's. The coat is exactly like what the prisoner wore.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220109-109

287. JOHN BUDD and WILLIAM COOK were indicted for stealing, on the 3d of January , one shovel, value 2 s. , the goods of Henry Garvy .

HENRY GARVY . I am a labourer . On the 3d of January, I had this shovel in my cart; I missed it next morning - I had taken a load of rubbish to Camden Town in the afternoon.

THOMAS THOMPSON . I am an officer. On the 3d of January, I was in Holborn, and saw the prisoners together, Garvy was driving his cart; one of the prisoners went behind and took the shovel out; I had been watching them for three-quarters of hour.

FRANCIS KEYS . I was with Thompson, and saw them take the shovel.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

BUDD GUILTY . Aged 17.

COOK GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Three Months , and Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220109-110

288. WILLIAM TIBBS was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of December , one coat, value 18 s. , the goods of John Brookes .

JOHN BROOKS . I am a salesman , and live in High-street. St. Giles's . On the 22d of December, about five o'clock, my coat hung at the door, inside the shop; I heard something torn down, and on going to the door. I found the coat gone - I saw the prisoner running, and pursued him calling Stop thief! and when he got about twelve yards off, he threw the coat down; I pursued him about fifty yards, he was stopped; I secured him with difficulty, he fought desperately to get away; I got him into a public-house, and sent for an officer, and when I got back, I found the coat had been torn down, and part of it left behind. I never lost sight of him.

Prisoner's Defence. I never had it.

GUILTY - Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220109-111

289. MARY ADAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of December , one pewter pot, value 2 s., the goods of William Calvert , and one pewter pot, value 2 s. , the goods of James Procter .

WILLIAM CALVERT . I keep the Plasterer's Arms, public-house, Little Marylebone-street . On the 24th of December, the pot was in my passage, the boy and girl were cleaning them, and the prisoner came in for half a pint of porter, about eleven o'clock in the morning; I served her, and in a few minutes I missed her, she was stopped at another house.

JAMES PROCTER . I keep the Prince of Wales, public-house , Great Barlow-street. I lost a pot, which was found on the prisoner.

FREDERICK GURNEY . I keep the Marquis of Granby, public-house, at the corner of Little and Great Marylebone-street. The prisoner came into my house about half-past eleven o'clock, on the 24th of December, I suspected from her appearance, she had something: I accused her, she denied having anything about her - I found the two quart pots in her pocket; one belonged to Calvert, and the other is Procter's; she had been about my house all the morning, and I was cautioned about her.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. When I get drank I do not know what I do.

GUILTY . Aged 60.

Confined One Year .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220109-112

290. JOHN CARTER was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of January , two boots, value 15 s. , the goods of JOHN MOSS .

JOHN MOSS . I am a shoemaker , and live in Regent Circus, Piccadilly . On the 8th of January, between six and seven o'clock in the evening I went out, leaving my son and daughter in the shop; returned in about twenty-five minutes, and asked my daughter where the boy was, she said a pair of boots were stolen. I ran across Waterloo-place, and saw a mob coming out of Market-street, a gentleman laid hold of the prisoner, saying he was the boy who took the boots.

MONTAGUE MOSS . I am the son of the prosecutor. I am eleven years old. A man came in and asked the price of a pair of shoes, I said from nine to twelve shillings, then the prisoner made a snatch at a pair of boots, and run off with them; I pursued him, crying Stop thief! a gentleman took him, I am sure he is the man.

JOHN POLLARD . I am sixteen years old; I saw the prisoner running with the boots under his arm, he threw them down by me.

JOHN MANN . I am eleven years old; I was going by a butcher's shop, the prisoner ran by with the boots under his arm; there was a cry of Stop thief! and I ran after him; he threw the boots down, a gentleman secured him, he told him he was not the man, for he had just come from his mother's.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming from tea when I was stopped.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220109-113

291. EPHRAIM DIGBY was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of December , four pounds of beef, value 1 s. 6 d. , the goods of Richard Treadaway .

RICHARD TREADAWAY . I am a butcher , and live in Stafford-street . On the night of the 22d of December I was serving in the shop, a little girl said a boy had stolen a piece of beef from the stall-board, I ran out and took the prisoner, with the beef under his arm; he said he found it.

SAMUEL PRENDERGRASS . I took him in charge.

Prisoner's Defence. I found it.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220109-114

292. JAMES BUDGE was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of January , one sovereign , the property of Edward Hughes .

EDWARD HUGHES . I am a gentleman's servant . On the 4th of January, the prisoner applied to me at No. 38, Portland-place ,

as the watchman for his Christmas box; I asked how many watchmen there were on the beat, he said four; I asked if he could change a sovereign, he said No, but he would get it if I liked, I gave him the sovereign, he never returned with it. When he came on watch, at five o'clock, I went to him, and asked him for the change, he said, he had got no change; I said,

"You received my sovereign to get change," he said, he did not, and I was mistaken in him, I said, I was sure it was him; he went and fetched another watchman, and asked, if that was him, I was certain he was not the man; next morning, I went to the watch-house, and told the keeper, he advised me to come at four o'clock, when the watchman met; I went and saw the prisoner, I picked him out as the man, and am certain of him.

JOSEPH BROWN . I am servant to Mr. Hubbard, No. 38, Portland-place, the prisoner rung at the bell, and asked for his Christmas-box, I sent him down the area to the butler; he is very much like the man; I do not think there is any doubt of it.

WILLIAM HEWETT . The prisoner was brought to the office, I took him in change.

Prisoner's Defence. I told him I dare not take my Christmas-box till the 9th or 10th.

GUILTY . Aged 49.

Confined Six Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220109-115

293. JAMES FLEETWOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of December , one live tame duck, price 2 s. , the property of William Kemp .

WILLIAM KEMP . I am a dealer in live poultry , and live in Northumberland-place, Commercial Road . On the afternoon of the 17th of December, about five o'clock, I heard somebody say, a man had stolen a fowl. I went out myself, and found the duck in the road, I caught it, the string of the basket was cut; I followed my boy, who I found had the prisoner; he said, he was in work, and rather than have any bother about it, he would pay for it.

JOHN CUTHBERT . I am servant to Mr. Kemp; I was taking in the baskets, the prisoner was about a yard off with a duck, which he put under his coat, I pursued him, he threw it down, a gentleman stopped him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I never had it.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined One Month .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220109-116

294. SARAH HAINS was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of January , one sovereign , the property of William Greenop .

WILLIAM GREENOP . I am a butcher , and live in Cow Cross . On Monday, the 7th of January, between ten and eleven o'clock, in the morning, I sold some meat to a lady, for which she paid me a sovereign. I put it in my till, the prisoner was in the shop at the time, my attention was called outside the shop to a customer, of whom I took a few half-pence, and on returning inside the shop, I put the half-pence in the till, and missed the sovereign; the prisoner being near the till, when I entered, I charged her with taking it, she denied it - I sent for an officer, and in about an hour she was taken to the watch-house, and searched, the sovereign was not found on her; the officer went home with her, and charged her with swallowing it, and caught her attempting to do it, the watch-house is next door to my house.

GEORGE WADDINGTON . The prosecutor sent for me, I found the prisoner in the shop, I took her to the watch-house with the boy, and searched them both, but could not find it; I suspected the prisoner from her manners, I followed her home, and entered into conversation with her. I said,

"What do you think would be done if it had been found on you" - she said,

"Oh! they could not hurt me, because it was not found on me." I said,

"Perhaps you swallowed it," she said, she could not. I saw it drop from the back part of her mouth into the front; I took no notice and saw her trying to swallow it, I pushed my thumb into her mouth and took it off her tongue.

THOMAS THOMPSON . She told me the boy gave her the sovereign to hold.

Prisoner's Defence. The boy took it from the till, and gave it me.

GUILTY. Aged 13.

Judgment Respited .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220109-117

295. JONATHAN JUGGINS was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of December , one waistcoat, value 2 s., the goods of James Blyth , and two shoes, value 3 s. , the goods of Thomas Stocks .

JAMES BLYTH . I am apprentice to Mr. Blackett, a ship owner. On the 21st of August, I left a suit of clothes, and several other articles at Mr. Lyons, Sermon-lane, Limehouse . On the 22d, I left England, and returned on the 28th of December, and found Lyons was dead; and was informed the prisoner had taken my clothes, he lodged there when I went away, they sent for him, I asked him several questions about the clothes; he said, he had only worn them, and put them back again. Next day I found a waistcoat pawned in his name.

THOMAS STOCKS . I am apprentice to Mr. Blackett, I went to sea with Blyth; I returned on the 7th of December, I had left my clothes at Lyons, I found they were gone; I questioned the prisoner, and he said, he had worn them at Greenwich. I said, if he would tell me what he had done with them, I would not trouble him; we found a waistcoat of Blyth's in pawn, I had him taken; he then said, my shoes were over the way in pawn, I found them there.

JAMES RAVENER . I am a pawnbroker, and live at Ratcliff Cross; I have a waistcoat pawned on the 7th of November, by the prisoner.

JOHN BROWN . I am apprentice to Mr. Latten, pawnbroker, Broad-street, Ratcliff; the prisoner pawned a pair of shoes on the 11th of October.

THOMAS MOODY . I took him in charge, and found the waistcoat in pawn. As I came out of the shop, he said he had pawned a pair of shoes over at Latten's.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was distressed.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Six Month and Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220109-118

297. JOSEPH LORIAN was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of December , one axe, value 5 s.; one saw, value 2 s.; one plane, value 2 s.; two spoke shaves, value 3 s.; eight chisels, value 6 s.; one square, value 6 s.; one pair of compasses, value 6 d.; three hammers, value 2 s.; one screw wrench, value 4 s.; one augur, value 4 s., and one gouge, value 1 s. , the goods of Daniel Armitage .

DANIEL ARMITAGE . I am a wheel-wright , and live at Stepney; I left work a little past nine o'clock, and next morning, I went to the place, a little before five o'clock, and all my tools were gone; I went for an officer. When I returned to the shop, all my mates were gone; I stopped four or five minutes, and then they came in with my tools and the prisoner, I had him taken.

GEORGE BAKER . I am a sailor, the prisoner came to my lodging and slept there, he got up about four o'clock in the morning, and went out, returned in about half an hour, with a bag of tools, and went to bed again. I told Walker, he and his man came in and took him, they claimed the tools.

WILLIAM FOSTER . I was sent for and took him in custody with the tools.

(Property produced and sworn to).

Prisoner's Defence. It is a lodging for all description of characters, the tools were put in my room, to get me in trouble.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220109-119

297. JOHN LORD , (the younger,) was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of January , one watch, value 1 l.; one chain, value 6 d.; one seal, value 3 d.; and one key, value 1 d. , the goods of John Lord , the elder.

JOANNAH LORD. I am the wife of John Lord , of Skinner-street, Somers-town , an oilman . The prisoner is my son. He lived with us. I missed the watch from my bed-room about eight o'clock in the morning of the 10th of January. I asked if he had got his father's watch; he said No. He went out of the room - I followed him, and stopped with him till his father came home; he then searched him, and took it from his trowsers pocket - he said nothing then - he denied it till his father found it.

JOHN LORD . I am an oilman. When I returned home, my wife charged my son with stealing my watch. I told him from what his mother had said, I was convinced he had got it - he denied it. He was in the privy. I found the watch laying upon the seat, and his hand upon it. I did not see him take it out of his pocket. I have seven children - he is the eldest but one.

JOANNAH LORD. It was in his pocket when I went out of the privy, for I could hear the chain rattle.

JAMES SMITH . I took him in charge. I have known the boy five of six years; he lives where there are a great many bad girls - I believe they brought him to this, for he was always a very good boy.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220109-120

298. WILLIAM MOORE and JAMES HODGE were indicted for stealing, on the 25th of December , one copper kettle, value 5 s. , the goods of John Breach .

JOHN BREACH . I am a publican , and live in Earl-street, Manchester-square . On the 7th of December, between three and four o'clock, the prisoners came in together. The tea-kettle was on the fire. They went away about five o'clock. I missed it soon after - I have not found it. One went out a little before the other - they came again into the tap-room in about an hour - I accused them of it, and gave them in charge - there was one person in the tap-room with them. It was safe when the prisoners went away. One of them must have taken it - they drank together, and were in company.

ENOCH HOLLOWAY . I live in Earl-street, Marylebone. I was in the tap-room when the prisoners came in together I went away about four o'clock, leaving them there alone, and the tea-kettle on the fire - I returned about five o'clock, and it was gone.

JOHN CLARK . I went into the tap-room about a quarter past five o'clock; the prisoners were then gone. I went again for some water about half-past five o'clock - it was gone - I had seen it there three quarters of an hour before.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220109-121

299. JOHN PRICE was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of January , one gown, value 3 s.; one sheet, value 5 s.; one frock, value 2 s.; and two aprons, value 1 s. , the goods of Joseph Taylor .

JOSEPH TAYLOR . I keep the Bricklayer's Arms, public-house, Westminster . About a quarter past nine o'clock on the 5th of January, I was in the passage - I saw the prisoner coming along with a bundle under his arm - I said,

"What have you there?" He said,

"I have nothing but what is my own." I stopped him, and found the articles stated in the indictment, which were in the private parlour.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I went to the privy, and met a woman, who asked me to carry them to Orchard-street.

GUILTY . Aged 60.

Confined One Year .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220109-122

300. JOHN CONNER and JOHN SIMMONDS , were indicted for stealing, on the 31st of December , six lbs. of bacon, value 2 s. , the goods of William Dowlman .

FREDERICK KEYS . I am an officer. On the 31st of December, I was with Thompson, and saw the prisoners in company with another, in Holborn - they made several attempts at different doors - we watched them for three quarters of an hour, as far as Mr. Dowlman, in Clare-market . The one who has escaped, took a piece of bacon from the window, and gave it to Conner. Simmonds was standing round the corner, watching. They all ran away - we pursued, and took Conner. He threw it down. I met Simmonds, who said,

"Have you got him, Sir?" I took him.

THOMAS THOMPSON . I was with Keys; his statement is correct - they were all three in company.

WILLIAM DOWLMAN . I am a cheesemonger. The bacon is mine - I was reading the newspaper in the shop when it was taken.

CONNER'S Defence. I was distressed - and when it was given to me, I was taking it home.

SIMMONDS'S Defence. I saw them running away, and waited to see if they were taken.

CONNER - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

SIMMONDS - GUILTY . Aged 14.

Confined One Month , and Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220109-123

301. GEORGE DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of December , one pair of breeches, value 10 s. , the goods of David Jones .

FRANCIS KEYS . On the 23d of December, about three o'clock in the afternoon. I saw the prisoner in High-street, St. Giles's - he went five times up to Jones's shop, and looked at the trowsers - the sixth time he pulled them down, and ran off - I took him with them under his jacket.

JOHN COOPER . I am an officer, and was with Keys - I saw the prisoner take the trowsers from the door - Keys took him.

JAMES HALL . I am apprentice of David Jones , in High-street, St. Giles's, salesman . The prisoner, was brought into the shop with the breeches, which are his.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Confined Three Months and Publicly Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220109-124

302. ROBERT SMITHARME was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of January , nine live tame rabbits, price 20 s. , the property of John Archer .

JOHN ARCHER . I live with Mr. Govey, Mile End-road . I had twenty-seven rabbits. On the 8th of January, I fastened them in the stable, between seven and eight o'clock. I was called up between twelve and one o'clock by the watchman, and found the staple of the door forced out, and nine rabbits gone. We went into the public-house, (the next premises) and found them there - five were covered over with straw - the prisoner was concealed at the corner of the yard. We found another dead, and three running about alive - the five were about a yard from him. He pretended to be asleep - he said there was three men just gone up the lane - he lodged at the Bell and Mackerel, next door.

MICHAEL LUTTRELL . I am a watchman. I found the stable door open - I called Archer - we found the prisoner concealed in the corner of the yard, close to the rabbits.

(Skins produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 39.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin Esq.

Reference Number: t18220109-125

303. ELIZABETH CRUMP was indicted for stealing on the 10th of December , one blanket, value 2 s.; two sheets, value 2 s.; one kettle, value 3 s., and one looking glass, value 1 s., the goods of John Croft , in a lodging room .

CATHARINE TURVEY . I live in Crabtree-row, Hackney. I let the prisoner a furnished room for John Croft , in Gloucester-place, Whitecross-street , on the 1st of December, at 4 s. 6 d. per week; she left on the 7th of December, without paying the rent; I found the key under the door, and the property gone - I found it in pawn.

(Padlock produced and sworn to.)

JOHN MATTHEWS . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Whitecross-street; I have a quilt and tea-kettle, which I took in pawn of the prisoner, on the 8th of December.

JOHN TWEEDY . I apprehended the prisoner in Golden-lane, on the 10th of December, and asked what she had done with the things; she said, she left them all safe; she said, she had no duplicates; I found the duplicates of the property in a bag, by the side door of the room she was in.

WILLIAM BURROWS . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Barbican; I have a sheet which I took in pawn of the prisoner.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Confined Six Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220109-126

304. SAMUEL SALTER was indicted for stealing on the 17th of December , part of a watch chain, value 2 s.; one seal, value 2 s.; one key, value 6 d., and one ring, value 6 d., the goods of John Church , from his person .

MR. JOHN CHURCH . On the 17th of December, between five and six o'clock in the afternoon, I was at the end of Dock-street, East Smithfield , and was hustled by a man who met me, and took my watch, the chain broke; I thought my watch was gone; I pursued him a short way calling Stop thief! and all of a sudden I was knocked down by a violent blow on my head by a person behind; I was taken up in a bleeding state, and carried to a public-house, and the prisoner was brought in custody in two minutes; I could not identify him; I have not seen my chain or seals since.

NATHANIEL NATHAN . I am a slopseller, and live at the corner of Dock-street; I saw Mr. Church pass me; I saw the prisoner and another man walking on very fast, following about ten yards from him; they overtook him opposite my shop; they passed him about half a yard, and then turned and met him full in the face; I saw the other man's hand go as if pulling something from him; (it was under a gas lamp) at that moment the other man ran off; it was done very quick; Mr. Church turned round and called Stop thief! the prisoner ran after him, and made a violent blow at him which knocked him down; I was about fifteen yards from him; I pursued the prisoner calling Stop thief! but nobody would stop him till he fell down, in the middle of Dock-street, and as he was getting up I secured him; he asked me what I wanted of him; I said he was the villain that knocked the gentleman down after he was robbed - he said he was sure I was mistaken - I said I was not, and took him - I am sure he is the man.

BENJAMIN BLABY . I heard the cry of Stop thief! and saw Mr. Church in a very bad state; Nathan brought the prisoner to me - I accused him of knocking Mr. Church down, and he denied it - he said, he saw him knocked down, and went to help him up - he afterwards said, he pursued the man to try to catch him.

Prisoner's Defence. It is false.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220109-127

305. GEORGE SHARKEY and WILLIAM HUTCHINSON , were indicted for stealing, on the 28th of December , one handkerchief, value 5 s. the goods of Robert Cross , from his person .

FRANCIS KEYS . I am an officer. On the 28th of December, about three o'clock, I was with Green, in St. Martin's-court, and saw the prisoners following Mr. Cross as far as the County Fire Office ; I saw Sharkey put his hand into Mr. Cross's coat pocket; Hutchinson was about four yards from him - he got the handkerchief to the top of the pocket; they followed him further, and beckoned to Hutchinson to come up close to him; he then took the handkerchief out and gave it to him; Hutchinson crossed over and saw me - he then threw it down - I took him; Green picked it up; I took him to Marlborough-street, and returned to look for Sharkey; (I took him about half past six) Green ran and called Mr. Cross; Hutchinson began crying.

CHARLES WILLIAM GREEN . I am a painter, and live in Titchfield-street; I was with Keys, and saw the prisoners together following Mr. Cross - and at the Fire Office, Sharkey took the handkerchief a little way out - he afterwards took it quite out, and gave it to Hutchinson; Mr. Cross claimed it - I took Sharkey in the evening in James's-street.

ROBERT CROSS . On the 28th December I was by the County Fire Office, and lost my handkerchief - Green overtook me, and told me what had happened - when Hutchinson was brought up he cried, and begged he might not be prosecuted.

SHARKEY - GUILTY . Aged 13.

Transported for Life .

HUTCHINSON - GUILTY . Aged 13.

Whipped and Discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220109-128

306. WILLIAM SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of December , four rings, value 1 s.; five pins, value 6 d.; six spoons, value 18 d.; four pincushions, value 18 d.; and one bag, value 1 s., the goods of John Hughes , from his person .

JOHN HUGHES . I live in William-street, Lisson-grove I mend umbrellas, and sell trinkets . On the 15th of December, I was coming from Harrow-on-the-hill, with a quantity of umbrellas, and different things. I went into the Coach and Horses, public-house, on the Harrow-road, near Paddington, in the evening; the prisoner was in the house - I had seen him before, I asked if he was out of a situation, and treated him with a pint of beer. When I went to take up my things, I missed a bag. I had drank a little, I do not know what time I left the house, there was no clock there, it was before dusk. I stopped about half an hour and left him in the house - I had got about three quarters of a mile from the public-house, he came behind me, and snatched my bag off an umbrella, which was slung on my shoulder; then came in front of me, and took some rings from a small box which I had. I happened to stumble, and the drawer which the rings were in, fell out.

Q. How came you to stumble - A. The road being dirty, I slipped; I picked up the rings, and was putting them into another drawer, when he took the articles stated in the indictment. I told him to take care, for I would have him in custody if ever I saw him again - he immediately ran away. When I came to the Green Man, public-house, I gave an alarm and described the property to the officer; he was taken next day, and two rings and a bag found - I had been drinking but was sensible.

Prisoner. Q. I picked the things off the ground; I did not take them from you - A. He took them out of my box.

HENRY HUMPHRIES . I am an officer. On Sunday morning, about half-past ten o'clock, the prosecutor came to me, and described the prisoner. I found him at the King's Arms, public-house, Chapel-street. I searched him, in his hat I found the bag, and in his stocking, I found the two rings - I asked what he had done with the spoons, he said he did not know; I asked what he did with the things in the bag, he said he turned them into a ditch, just by where he committed the robbery - I have not found them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I met him in the road, we went and drank together, he came out quite tipsy. I overtook him, he fell into a ditch and his things fell from him - I picked them up and put them in his box.

GUILTY Aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220109-129

307. JAMES SHAW and WILLIAM GOODE were indicted for embezzlement .

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220109-130

308. RICHARD BUFFERY was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of October , 24 lbs. of lead, value 9 s., and one fixture, (i.e.) one brass cock, value 3 s., the goods of George Smith , and being fixed to his dwelling-house .

GEORGE SMITH . I live in Onslow-street, Castle-street . The lead pipe was fixed in the yard at the house. I saw it safe on the 31st of October, at half-past five o'clock, and at six, I was informed it was gone. I have not found it. The prisoner lived in the neighbourhood.

CATHARINE SMITH . I am the wife of the last witness. I heard somebody in the passage, opened the yard door, and the prisoner was going into the yard; my girl asked where he was going, he said to the privy. About twenty minutes after, I was going down stairs, and saw him going out of the passage; I went into the yard and the property was gone.

CATHARINE SMITH , JUN. The prisoner asked me to let him go into the privy, he went, the property was fixed to the privy. After he went out, I missed the cock and lead. Nobody but him could take it; nobody was in the house but my mother.

WILLIAM COULTON . I am an officer. I took him in charge; he said distress drove him to it, and told me he sold the lead and cock in a court in Brook-street, Holborn, for 1 s. 2 d.

Prisoner. I throw myself on the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220109-131

EIGHTH DAY. THURSDAY, JANUARY 17, 1822.

309. MARY SCOTT was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of January , at St. Luke, Chelsea, one watch, value 3 l.; three seals, value 3 l.; three watch keys, value 10 s.; and one ring, value 10 s., the goods of George Watkins , in his dwelling-house .

GEORGE WATKINS . I live at No. 21, George-street, St. Luke, Chelsea . On the 7th of January, at half-past seven o'clock, at night, I saw my watch and keys hanging in my bureau bedstead in the parlour, where I sleep; I rent the house, and let lodgings; a person came and took a a lodging, and the prisoner came while I was out, as his wife. I came home at ten minutes past twelve o'clock, and missed the watch, and inquired for it in a loud voice; two young men slept on the first floor, and the prisoner slept in the same room, I went up and asked the young men what they had done with it, she heard me, and made answer, that the boys were as innocent of the watch as a child unborn; I turned round, and said,

"Then you know something of the watch," she said nothing, and I said, you shall go into custody, she wanted me to search her, but I would not; I went down stairs for a watchman, went up again in two minutes, and she was out of bed, dressing herself; I have not found it, it was worth 3 l. I had it a year and a half, the seals were worth 4 l. Her husband passed by the name of Johnson.

CATHARINE WATKINS . I am wife of the last witness; a man named Johnson came to lodge with us, he was there three nights before this happened; the prisoner came about half-past ten o'clock, on this night for the first time, she sat down by the fire in the room, where the watch was, for an hour; I saw it about half-past eleven o'clock, she and Johnson were then in the room, nobody else - the watch was missed when my husband came home; a knock came at the door about half-past eleven o'clock, I went to see who was there, and left a little boy, (Habitt), sitting in the chair, and while I was standing at the shop-door, Johnson went out at the private door, I have not seen him since; I had no reason to suppose, he was going out - I said, I must go and make my bed, the prisoner then said,

"Please to give me a light, and I will go to bed; and said to the little boy, my husband is gone into the yard, I wish you would tell him to come up." I said, No, your husband is gone out. Habit went down to see for him, for she would have it, that he was in the yard, he came up and said, he was not there; she then began to cry, and said it was, because she did not give him money to send for beer and things - she then asked for a light, and said, she would go to bed, for he would come in in an hour or two - he never returned. She went up to bed crying, and said, he was always serving her in that way. I began to make my bed, my husband knocked at the door, and the watch was missed. I went up stairs, and do not know what passed; she was dressing herself when the watchman came.

Prisoner. Q. When you were at the door, did you not let two lodgers in - A. Yes, they went up to their own room, I gave them a light to go to bed, and when I came in, she asked for a light - they were never in the parlour.

JURY. Q. After the man went out, did you see the watch - A. No, Sir.

GEORGE HABITT . (This witness being questioned, appeared perfectly to understand the nature of an oath.) I am ten years old. I know the prisoner, pointing to her; I remember when the watch was taken, it hung by the wall, on a nail, by the bed side, the prisoner and the man were in the room - the man stood by the parlour door, inside the room. I saw the prisoner take the watch off the bed side, and give it into his hand, and he put it into his pocket - she told him to go away, he went outside the door - Mrs. Watkins was at the shop door at the time. Nobody but me was in the room with them; I went to bed soon after, I do not know the time, but it was late.

Prisoner. Q. While Mrs. Watkins was at the door, did not Johnson get up - A. Yes; I did not ask what o'clock it was.

Q. Did you ever see me move - A. Yes; and took the watch.

CATHERINE WATKINS . The watch hung in the bedstead, there was a clock hung by the parlour door.

JOHN SHELLS . I was one of the boys in bed in the room; Watkins asked us, if we had done any thing with the watch, we said, No; the prisoner heard it, and said, We boys, were as innocent as a child unborn, and so we are - she got out of bed and dressed herself. I lodge there, I have a place at an eating-house, in Pimlico-road.

WILLIAM SHELLS . I was in bed with my brother; I am out of work now, and was so at the time; my parents are servants at some chambers, and maintain me. Watkins's account is correct, the prisoner said, we were as innocent as a child unborn.

Prisoner. Q. You came into the room with an old man, did not the old man charge you with being pursued from Sloane-square with two thieves - A. A drunken man came in, but I heard him say nothing of the sort, there is no truth in it.

RICHARD MAYBANK . I am an officer; about half-past twelve o'clock, Watkins and Habitt brought the prisoner to the watch-house; Habitt said, in her presence, he saw her take it from the bed, and give it to the man.

Prisoner's Defence. I came from the country; I had been to Chelsea two days, and went to my friends who could not keep me; I went to a public-house, Johnson, a man, and woman were there, they made me drink with them; I enquired of them for a lodging, Johnson said he could recommend me to Mr. Watkins; I said I had rather go with a woman - he went out, returned, and said he had mentioned it to Mrs. Watkins, and had said I was a friend of his, and told me not to contradict it; I gave him 6 d. for the bed; he said I could not have one unless he slept with a single man; I went to the house, but never said I was his wife or any thing of the sort; two boys came in soon after. Mrs. Watkins went to answer a knock; Johnson rose and went out at the private door without speaking to me; when she returned, I asked where he was, she said he was gone out; I said he went out at that door, she said,

"Yes, that is the private door;" she went out to fetch liquor for a man and woman, they were drunk, and she put them to bed; I went to bed, fell asleep, and heard the boys saying

"I am innocent." They said a watch was lost; I said I was as innocent as a child unborn.

CATHARINE WATKINS . When my husband came home, Habitt was asleep. I asked him what was done with the watch; he said the woman took it.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 36.

Recommended to Mercy, believing it to be her first offence.

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220109-132

310. CHRISTOPHER SPARHAM and JOHN SPARHAM were indicted for stealing, on the 11th of December , two tureens, value 11 s.; eleven basons, value 8 s.; fourteen dishes, value 19 s.; three decanters, value 11 s.; twenty glasses, value 13 s.; two salt holders, value 4 s.; three cruets, value 3 s.; eight cups and saucers, value 8 s.; one milk pot, value 18 d.; fifty-five plates, value 11 s., and one butter boat, value 6 d. , the goods of Jane Pitt , widow .

SECOND COUNT, stating them to belong to Stephen Pitt , Esq.

MR. ALLEY conducted the prosecution.

ANN TRAVELL . I am house-keeper to Mrs. Jane Pitt , widow, who lives at No. 1, Pitt's-building, Kensington . Her son had lived at No. 4, which is let out ready furnished, and under her care. On the 11th of December, about half-past seven o'clock in the morning, I saw two men standing at the area of No. 4, they appeared to have a bundle; one of them set twelve cheese plates down on the curb. I believe the prisoners to be the men. I called out to know what business they had there, they made no reply, but ran away; I went to No. 4, and found the lock of the pantry door partly forced open, and the articles stated in the indictment, gone. The window was broken open. I saw Christopher in custody at eleven o'clock. I believe them both to be the men.

HENRY EDWARDS . I am servant to Sir Herbert Taylor . I was next door to No. 4, and saw the prisoners; I had seen them three successive mornings, lurking about, and on the 11th of December, I saw one of them inside the area, and one out - they came out about half-past seven o'clock with two bundles. Travell gave an alarm, and they ran on. One of them put the plates down; I pursued, and lost sight of them. I saw Christopher in custody about half-past ten o'clock. I am sure of them both.

JOHN SHUKER . On the morning of the 11th of December, about half-past seven o'clock, I saw the prisoners come from the area of No. 4, Pitt's-place; I knew them both, and pursued them to the bottom of Church-street, and then lost them; they each had a bundle. I saw Christopher about eleven o'clock, and John next day.

GEORGE HULL . I am an officer. I took Christopher about nine o'clock, at the Marquis of Granby, public-house, Kensington, and took John in High-street, about two o'clock the same day.

(Plates produced and sworn to).

JOHN SPARHAM 'S Defence. I was not within five miles of the place; I was lame at the time.

GEORGE HULL . He was lame, but walked very well.

CHRISTOPHER SPARHAM - GUILTY . Aged 21.

JOHN SPARHAM - GUILTY . Aged 26.

Confined Two Years and Twice Publicly Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220109-133

311. THOMAS GREEN and THOMAS PASKIN were indicted for stealing, on the 18th of December , one handkerchief, value 3 s., the goods of Frederick William Crouch , from his person .

FREDERICK WILLIAM CROUCH . I live in Phoenix-terrace, Islington. On the 18th of December, I was in Oxford-road , near Charles-street. I felt somebody close behind touch me. I turned round, and a little boy passed me. I heard a noise, turned round again, and saw the prisoners in custody - I missed my handkerchief, it was found under Green's coat.

WILLIAM BIDGOOD . I am servant to Mr. Galley, a carpenter. I first saw the prisoners in company together, with a little boy seven or eight years old, in Leicester-square, about half-past five o'clock, they were all three together. I followed them all the way to Charles-street, it being in my road home; I saw Mr. Crouch between Wardour and Dean-street. Green and the little boy went on first, the little one attempted to pick Mr. Crouch's pocket. Paskin was behind them, and when they hung back, he pushed them forward. The little boy took the handkerchief out, and held it behind him; Paskin put his hand out to take it, but Green took it and put it in his bosom. I laid hold of him, took it out, and shewed it to Mr. Crouch. Frazier took Paskin, he resisted, and tried to get away - I said, if he did not come along quiet, I would strike him.

GEORGE FRAZIER . I am a carver. I was with Bidgood, and saw the prisoners attempting several gentlemen's pockets. A little boy was with them; I saw Crouch in Oxford-street, the little boy took the handkerchief out, Paskin held his hand out for it, but Green took it. I secured Paskin, he tried to get from me.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

PASKIN'S Defence. I was coming from Mary-le-bonne-street, the little boy took the handkerchief, and threw it at Green - I was not with them.

GREEN - GUILTY . Aged 13.

Confined One Year and Whipped .

PASKIN - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220109-134

312. JOHN CROOKS was indicted for bigamy . (see page, 106.)

MR. PRENDERGAST conducted the prosecution.

REV. MR. WYNN. I am curate of St. George's, Bloomsbury - I produce an examined copy of the register of the marriage of John Crooks to Mary Nelson , by banns, on the 28th of May, 1810 ; it is witnessed by Eliza Sanders and R. Harrison - I do not know the parties.

JANE SANDERS . I live in Clement's-lane, Strand - the prisoner lodged with me as a single man, for three months, and then married, my sister, Mary Nelson ; I was present at the marriage at St. George's, Bloomsbury; she was single, and only seventeen years old - she lived with her father, worked with him as a tailor, and had no money; she afterwards returned to her father - she has had four children by the prisoner, two are living, and supported by the parish - I had no reason to suspect he was married before.

MARY NELSON . I was married to the prisoner, and had been pregnant three or four months, when he left me - he came back six weeks before I was put to bed - he had left me four months, during which time, my father kept me - he left me again, six weeks after the child was born, for three or four months, and made me no allowance; he has left me four or five years, and makes me no allowance - I have 5 s. a week from the parish, and have two boys to keep; the last time he left me, he sent me a letter, which is lost; it stated that I was not his lawful wife, and might accept of the first offer that came - I had heard that before, but had no proof of it - I did not live with him after.

WILLIAM TAYLOR . I produce the register of marriages at St. George's Fields, by which it appears, John Crooks , bachelor, was married to Mary Viney , spinster , by banns, on the 22d of August, 1804; it was witnessed by Thomas Cook and Sarah Harris .

MICHAEL SAUNDERS . I know the prisoner, and am acquainted with his writing - the signature to the register is his - Mary Viney is now living, and is in Court.

WILLIAM READ . I am an officer, of Hatton-garden - the prisoner told me himself he was married to Mary Viney - I told him I heard he had got a great many wives; he said he had, and wrote me a list of them - he said Viney was living.

The prisoner put in a written defence, stating, that his first wife had been convicted of a capital offence, in 1806, and he was informed that conviction made the marriage null and void; and he married Nelson with the consent of his first wife, and that he did his utmost to support her.

GUILTY . Aged 47.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220109-135

313. ROBERT ENGLEBERT was indicted for stealing on the 6th of December , 20 s., in monies numbered , the property of John Elsworth .

JOHN ELSWORTH . I am a cheesemonger , and live in Drury-lane; the prisoner has been my errand boy since July. On the 6th of December, he was going to Kentish Town with a basket of butter, and asked me for 1 l. worth of change to give the customers - I gave him 19 s. 6 d., and sixpence in copper - he never returned. On Saturday afternoon, I found him at his father's - he confessed that he had received the money for the butter - he behaved well before.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220109-136

314. ELIZA WEBB was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of December , one basket, value 6 d.; one shirt collar, value 3 d.; two gowns, value 11 s.; one shirt, value 4 s.; six cups, value 1 s.; six saucers, value 1 s.; two frocks, value 2 s.; two petticoats, value 2 s.; and one sheet, value 5 s. ; the goods of William Vollar .

HANNAH VOLLAR . I am wife of William Vollar ; we live in Shouldham-street, Bryanston-square . On the 13th of October, I went to Brighton, leaving the prisoner in care of the house - I had known her some years; I knew she was an unfortunate woman, but thought her honest; I returned on the 25th of November, and found she had locked up the apartments, and left - I missed the articles stated in the indictment.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. Was she not in partnership with you - A. Yes, as a dress-maker; this is private property, which she had no business with; she got what victuals she wanted of my tradespeople, on our credit, and received money weekly from the lodgers, who left because she stripped their beds - I never gave her leave to pawn anything.

WILLIAM VOLLAR . I left town on the 11th of October, and returned on the 22d of November; I found her gone, and the place stripped; I watched her husband home, and found her out on the 17th of December; she said, she knew she had done wrong, and would pay 5 s. per week out of her husband's labour - the property was worth 15 l., and she ran in debt with my tradespeople.

Cross-examined. Q. What was she to do if she wanted money - A. She could get provision of the tradesmen - I never told her brother that I approved of her conduct.

SOMERVILLE TELFER. I am servant to Mr. Nicholls, pawnbroker, Gray's Inn-lane. On the 12th of December, the prisoner pawned a gown in the name of Thompson.

JOSEPH FISHER . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Paddington-street, Marylebone. I have a gown, some children's things, and two sheets, in the name of Bolland; I know the prisoner pawned the sheets, and I think the other things.

CHARLES JENKINS . On the 24th of October, a shirt was pawned for 4 s., in the name of Evans - but not by the prisoner.

GEORGE MARCH . I am a pawnbroker. I have some china pawned in the name of Smith - but not by her.

CHARLES BROWN . I am an officer - I apprehended the prisoner in Baldwin's-gardens, and found a basket in her room, which Vollar claimed, and found the duplicate of the gown there.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I wish the prosecutrix to produce the duplicates of the things I have pawned for her - her husband could not go into the country till I had pawned the things for 30 s.; I pawned these things for her.

HANNAH VOLLAR . I never sent her to pawn the things.

WILLIAM VOLLER . I never authorised her to pawn any thing - she rose no money for me - I gave her 36 s. to redeem some things.

JOSEPH TURTLE . I am the prisoner's brother. On Thursday, I returned Mr. Vollar fifteen duplicates which the prisoner sent to me - I had tendered them to him before, and he refused them; I went to him, and said, if he did not take them, I should throw them in the street; but before that, (after he returned from Brighton) he told me he approved of her conduct much.

COURT. Q. When was this - A. When I first took him the tickets, he wished her to come forward and have five tickets, which she had left with him. She desired me not to tell him where she was to be found.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Confined for One Year .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220109-137

315. WILLIAM TUCK was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of January , 10 lbs. of beef, value 4 s. , the goods of Susan Bond , widow .

SUSAN BOND. I am a widow, and keep a butcher's shop in Bunhill-row . On the 7th of January, between eight and nine o'clock at night. I saw the prisoner come along, and sweep the beef off the stall in front of the shop. I ran to the door, called out Stop thief! He dropped it about ten yards off - I picked it up, and he was brought back in a few minutes - I am sure of his person.

THOMAS BRADFORD . I am street-keeper, and stood at the end of Featherstone-street, about fifty yards from the shop - I heard the cry - saw the prisoner running, and a man pursuing - I secured him.

STEPHEN LAXTON . I am servant to Mr. Bond. I pursued the prisoner, and found the beef - he must have dropped it.

Prisoner's Defence. I heard the cry, crossed over, and this gentleman took me.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Whipped and Discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220109-138

316. WILLIAM MORRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of December , one book, value 3 s. , the goods of John Wilton .

JOHN WILTON . I am a bookseller , and live in Gray's Inn-passage . I saw the prisoner take this book of the stall-board - I went out, and overtook him with it - he appeared distressed - he has a pension of 9 d. a day.

JOHN PRICE . I took him in charge, and found 3 s. 2 d. on him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 60.

Confined for Three Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220109-139

317. RICHARD JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of January , one pair of boots, value 3 s. 6 d. , the goods of William Clulow .

JOHN CULLIFORD . I am a comb-maker, and live at Somers-town. I am coming by Clulow's shop, in Phillips's-buildings - a cart passed - the prisoner was close behind the driver. I saw him take the hoots from the window, and put them in his bosom - he crossed, and I after him - he threw them away, and ran off; but was caught before I lost sight of him.

WILLIAM CLULOW . The boots are mine. I was out at the time.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Fined One Shilling , and Discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220109-140

318. JAMES SHAW was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of December , twenty-four cups and saucers, value 14 s.; four basons, value 2 s.; two tea-pots, value 3 s.; and two milk-pots, value 1 s. , the goods of Moses Lockett .

MOSES LOCKETT . I live in Bell-street, Marylebone. I delivered these goods to the prisoner, to sell for me. I cannot say whether he sold them or not - he was to bring me back the goods, or money for them.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220109-141

319. JOHN HERRING and JOHN NEWMAN , were indicted for stealing, on the 5th of January , 3 lbs. of beef, value 16 s. , the goods of William Grant .

JOHN HOLCOMBE . I am servant to William Grant , butcher , Plumbtree-street, St. Giles's . On the 5th of January, between twelve and one o'clock in the day, I saw the prisoners by the shop - the beef was on the shopboard - somebody said, it was gone, and pointed to where they were gone. I went round, and met Herring in about five minutes, with the beef. I laid hold of him - then Newman, who was with him, ran away, and was taken in a few days. I am sure he is the boy.

JAMES TAYLOR . I am a beadle. I took Herring - he said Newman gave it him.

JAMES KENDRIC . I am a beadle. I took Newman on Wednesday - he said he did not steal it - he only went with the other boy, and a lady told the butcher, or they should not have been found out.

HERRING - GUILTY . Aged 12.

NEWMAN - GUILTY . Aged 12.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220109-142

320. WILLIAM KILBY and JOHN ABURN . were indicted for stealing, on the 7th of January , 9 lbs. of beef, value 4 s. , the goods of Joseph Whistler .

JOSEPH WHISTLER . I am a butcher , and live in Lower-street, Islington . On the 7th of January, two ribs of beef, weighing nine pounds and a half, hung in my shop - I was called away, and found the prisoners in custody, with it and the book.

RICHARD BECKETT . I am a patrol. About a quarter past nine o'clock at night, I was opposite Whistler's, and saw the prisoners run across the road from his shop - Kilby said to Aburn,

"D - n me, I have got it." They went in different directions. Gregson took Kelby in two minutes, with the beef, and hook in it. He said he found it. I took Aburn on Sunday morning, and am sure of him.

THOMAS GREGSON . I am a patrol. I saw the prisoners come from the shop and took Kelby with the beef and hook.

ABURN'S Defence. He ran by me with it.

KILBY - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined Six Months .

ABURN - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Six Months and Publicly Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220109-143

321. JAMES SMITH and ANN NICHOLLS were indicted for stealing, on the 14th of December , one iron pot, value 1 l.; four saucepans, value 14 s.; two skewers, value 6 d.; one pan, value 1 s.; one shovel, value 2 s.; one tin slice, value 6 d.; one spoon, value 6 d.; one jack fastener, value 6 d.; one can, value 1 s. , the goods of William Phillimore , Esq.

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

EDWARD HANCOCK . I am an officer of Islington. I saw Smith in Farringdon-street, Russell-square, (which leads into the mews behind Mr. Phillimore's house) with a large bundle. I went after him, and asked him what he had there - he said he did not know. I asked whose it was - he said it was not his. I told him that was an evasive answer, and I should take him custody. I found

it contained the articles stated in the indictment - I asked where it came from - he at first said it belonged to his fellow-servant, and then that he brought it from Mr. Phillimore's stables. I took him to the watch-house - then went to Mr. Phillimore's, and saw the coachman in the stable. I searched for the prisoner Nicholls; but could not find her. About five minutes after, I saw her in the house, in a very great perspiration, and very muddy - it was wet weather. I took her into the library, and asked how she became possessed of the property I had taken from Smith - she said she could account for every thing but the iron pot - and that some of them were given to her; which Mrs. Phillimore denied. I took her to No. 5, Coram-place, to Smith's, her brother-in-law, as she called him; but could find no such person. I searched her at the watch-house, and found twenty-six keys, and sixteen sovereigns on her - she said it was a general custom with servants who had been a long time in place, to take care of themselves, and she supposed I saw no harm in it - she then asked if there was no way of getting a friend to bribe me. I desired her to hold her tongue.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. When did you first see her - A. About nine o'clock - I saw Smith at eight o'clock. Mr. Phillimore claimed three or four of the keys, and I found they opened the drawers which he pointed out.

ROBERT HEAP . On the 14th of December, about half-past eight o'clock, I went to Mrs. Phillimore's - Smith had been taken - we went to the stables, and saw the coachman there - went into the house, to look for Nicholls; but was not there - in about ten minutes, I saw her come in at the back door, from the street. She was asked where she had been? she said she had not been out of the house - she was very muddy, wet, and in a dreadful perspiration. She was questioned before Mrs. Phillimore, and said Mrs. Phillimore had given her the things - which Mrs. Phillimore denied. She did not say the iron pot was given to her; she said her brother-in-law, Smith, lived at No. 5, Coram-place. I asked why she said she had not been out - she said she did it to please her mistress. We went to Coram-place; but could not find him. I was present when she was told the bundle was found on Smith. The articles were read over to her - she said every thing but the iron pot was given to her.

JAMES HOBSON . I was coachman to Mr. Phillimore. On the 14th of December, about a quarter before eight o'clock, Smith came to the stable door, and asked leave to speak to the cook - he had no bundle then. I sent her out to him.

RICHARD GUNTHORP . I am footman to Mr. Phillimore. When the officers came to the house, I was in the pantry. Nicholls came and asked me for the key of the area gate - I unlocked it for her; and while I stood there, I was told the officers were in the house. She ran across the road as hard as she could, in the direction for Coram-place, which is not above five minutes walk from the house. I think she returned before she could have gone there.

WILLIAM PHILLIMORE , ESQ. I live in Upper Montagu-street. Nicholls was four years in my service, as cook. The officer produced two bundles of keys, and several separate ones. I told him immediately that one loose one would open the tea-caddy, and the other the library table drawer, where I keep the keys of my cellar. I tried them, and they opened it - and four more on one of the bunches, I believe to be mine. One fitted the library table at my chambers, and the other the celeret. I had lost them about a year.

ABRAHAM DUFFIELD . I am a tinman. I sold this iron pot to Mrs. Phillimore, on the 23d of October; I know it by a flaw - it has never been used, it cost a guinea.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

MRS. PHILLIMORE. I never gave Nicholls the iron pot, or any of the things, or leave to remove them.

SMITH'S Defence. When I came home from work, my sister said my cousin wanted me; I went, she gave me the things, and said she would be out in a moment.

NICHOLLS'S Defence. I was married last April, and bought these things for my own use; Mrs. Phillimore was very short of things, and I used them occasionally for her. I went to my sister, in Coram-place, and asked her to send her husband or brother to me. I gave Smith the things, and told him to wait in Russell-square for me.

PATIENCE SMITH . I am the wife of William Smith , who lives in Coram-place. Nicholls came and told me, to send Smith to her - I sent him; he lodged at Camberwell, but had been a few nights at our house.

NICHOLLS - GUILTY . Aged. 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

SMITH - NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18220109-144

322. JOSEPH LARK was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of December , one coat, value 10 s.; one pair of shoes, value 1 s., and one handkerchief, value 1 d. , the goods of Joseph Evans .

JOSEPH EVANS . I am a carpenter , and lodge in Lower North-street . On the 27th of December, after I was in bed and asleep; the prisoner came to lodge there, he slept in the same bed; my clothes hung on the bed-post - I got up at four o'clock leaving them there, and him asleep; I returned from work in the evening, and the officer shewed them to me.

ELIZA EVANS . I keep the house, the prisoner slept with Evans, he went out at four, and at eight o'clock; when the prisoner went away, I went to see if all was right, and missed Evans's coat and shoes I followed and took the prisoner in Great North-street, and said, he was the man I wanted, he said,

"Is there any thing amiss." I said,

"You come with me;" he said, he must go and speak to his master, I said,

"You have got Evans's coat;" he denied it, and opened his waistcoat to shew me that he had not - I brought him back, and then told him to give it me or I would send for an officer, he denied it, but at last gave it me from under his shirt, he had it on, Evans's shoes were on his feet.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence I am quite innocent.

GUILTY . Aged 36.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220109-145

323. MARY PEPPIN was indicted for stealing, on the

17th of December , one suit of child's clothes, value 10 s.; one gown, value 6 s.; one bed back, value 2 s.; and one shawl, value 3 s. , the goods of Mary Maddox .

There being no evidence against the prisoner, but a confession, which was extorted from her, she was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220109-146

324. ARCHIBALD STRONIC , ARCHIBALD BENSURILLA , and BENJAMIN BOND were indicted for stealing, on the 11th of January , one pig's head, value 2 s. , the goods of Robert Pilkington .

ROBERT DUKE . I am a broker; I followed the three prisoners in company together to three or four shops. I watched them for half an hour, they then went to Pilkington's shop - Bond stood against the door, Bensurilla stood against the window, and Stronic at the corner, watching. Bond bobbed in and out of the shop, and at last took the pigs head from the window, then went to the private door of the house, which is in Bedford-street, Covent Garden; the other two went up and joined him. Stronic put a handkerchief over the head, put it in his jacket, and went away - I followed and overtook him in Covent Garden with it under his jacket. Read took the other two.

CHARLES WILLIAM READ . I was with Duke, his account is correct, I took the other two.

ROBERT PILKINGTON . I am a pork-butcher, and live in Chandos-street; I was out, and as I came home, I met the prisoners in custody with the head, they had taken it from the window, which was shut.

BOND'S Defence. I never had it.

STRONIC - GUILTY . Aged 14.

BOND - GUILTY . Aged 11.

Confined Three Months and Whipped .

BENSURILLA - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220109-147

325. MARY WHITE was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of January , twenty-nine yards of bombazeen, value 30 s. , the goods of Thomas Craig , and John Graham .

JOHN DOYLE . I am shopman to Thomas Craig and John Graham , Oxford-street . On the 5th of January, between two and three o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner came into the shop with another woman, she did not ask for any thing, we were very busy - I saw her take this bombazeen from the counter, put it under her cloak, and go towards the door. I told Mr. Graham, who stopped her, and took it from under her cloak.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 64.

Confined One Year

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.


View as XML