Old Bailey Proceedings, 24th October 1821.
Reference Number: 18211024
Reference Number: f18211024-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace Oyer and Terminer, AND Gaol Delivery for the City of London, AND ALSO The Gaol Delivery For the County of Middlesex, HELD AT Justice Hall, in the Old Bailey; ON WEDNESDAY, 24th of OCTOBER, 1821, and following Days;

Being the Eighth Session in the Mayoralty of THE RIGHT HON. JOHN THOMAS THORP , LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

Taken in Short-Hand by H. BUCKLER, Basinghall Street, (BY AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON.)

London:

PRINTED FOR H. BUCKLER, By T. Booth, 31, St. Andrew's Hill, Doctor's Commons; and PUBLISHED BY T. KEYS, CITY LIBRARY, COLEMAN STREET .

1821.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX.

Before the Right Honourable JOHN THOMAS THORP , Esq. LORD MAYOR of the City of London; the Right Honourable Sir Charles Abbott , Knt., Lord Chief Justice of his Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir James Allan Park , Knt., one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir Richard Carr Glyn , Bart.; Sir James Shaw , Bart.; Joshua Jonathan Smith , Esq.; Samuel Birch , Esq., and Christopher Smith , Esq., Aldermen of the said City; Sir John Silvester , Bart., D.C.L. Recorder of the said City; Anthony Brown , Esq., and Matthias Prime Lucas , Esq., Aldermen of the said City; Newman Knowlys , Esq., Common Sergeant of the said City, and William St. Julien Arabin , Esq., his Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of the Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

London Jury.

Charles Ruthven ,

Andrew Anderson ,

Milne Pallat ,

Wm. Benjamin Smith ,

Henry Stokes ,

Nathan Eldrid ,

William Coventry ,

John Denny ,

William Wisedale ,

Michael Plimpton ,

John Woolmer ,

Laurence Miles .

1st Middlesex Jury.

William Prior ,

David Thompson ,

John Allen ,

George Walters ,

William Fletcher ,

William Palian ,

William Crawley ,

Thomas Priddle ,

Wm. Thomas Rickett ,

William Bull ,

Thomas Finch ,

William Lovelock .

2nd Middlesex Jury.

Benj. Lloyd Richardson ,

Thomas Hill ,

William Hughes ,

John Ashley ,

William Ebbing ,

William Bell ,

Abel Garroway ,

Samuel Curton ,

James Parsel ,

John Walters ,

John Bradford ,

Robert Ward .

SESSIONS HOUSE, OLD BAILEY, OCTOBER 24, 1821.

THORP, MAYOR. EIGHTH SESSION.

Reference Number: t18211024-1

1272. WILLIAM MAYNARD was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Edward Tedd , Senior , about ten o'clock in the forenoon of the 11th of October (he and others being therein), and stealing, one piece of leather, value 1 d.; one bible, value 6 d.; one medal, value 1 d., and 25 s. in money, his property .

EDWARD TEDD , JUN. I am fourteen years old, and am the son of Edward Tedd , of Gilway-street, Clare-market ; he is a potatoe-dealer . On a Thursday, about ten o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner in the cellar when I came down - he came up to the ground floor, and then went up stairs, he had a little bundle under his arm, tied up in a handkerchief; I never saw him before. I said nothing to him, but went and told my mother that he was about the house all the morning, she was in the shop, which is over the way. My father was in the cellar, with Hall, getting up potatoes, he was not in the cellar when I saw the prisoner there, but when I went and called my mother. I came back to the house, went up stairs, and saw the prisoner in the front bed-room, on the first-floor, with the door a little open, I ran down and called Stop thief! he ran down after me. Hall ran up stairs, from the cellar, and caught him as he came down stairs, he was taken to the watch-house, by an officer, who was sent for. Scott searched him. He had gone out, and come in again, in the course of the morning.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Your father was not at home when you first saw him - A. No. The street door was left open.

SAMUEL HALL . I am servant to Mr. Tedd. I saw the prisoner in the cellar, between ten and eleven o'clock, when I went down with my master, he said, "Good morning," to my master, and went up stairs. My master asked me who he was - I did not know him; about five or ten minutes after I heard Edward call out, I ran up and stopped the prisoner. I saw no bundle. Scott, the officer, took him to the watch-house.

JOHN SCOTT . I am an officer. I went and took charge of him, at Tedd's, and took him to the watch-house. I searched him there, he said it was his first offence, and he hoped I would not collar him, and he would walk quietly with me, which he did. In his right hand breeches pocket, I found a bag with a half-sovereign, 15 s., and a small book, in it. I found a small medal on him, and in his coat pocket, I found a razor, two knives and two keys; he had a chisel in his hand. I took the chisel to the house, and applied it to the front bed-room door, there were marks on the door and door-post which it fitted, the lock was much shattered - the bolt appeared to have been forced back by the chisel; there were marks on a drawer in a chest in the room, which the chisel fitted. I did not examine the lock. A piece was broken out of the drawer.

Cross-examined. Q. He went quietly with you - A. Yes.

CHARLOTTE TEDD . I am the wife of Edward Tedd . I remember my son coming to the shop one Thursday, and saying there was a man in the house - I had locked the bed-room door, and had the key in my pocket. I also locked the drawer. I can swear to the bag, bible, and medal, and the money is the right quantity - I put the half-sovereign in the bag that morning; there was also 15 s. there; the little bible and medal were in another bag, which I had seen in the drawer that morning.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Of Stealing only.

Confined Six Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Ld. Chief Justice Abbott.

Reference Number: t18211024-2

1273. JAMES EDDOWS was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Lucas Bull , at St. Pancras , about nine o'clock in the night of the 18th of October , with intent to steal, and stealing therein four sheets, value 30 s.; five shifts, value 9 s.; seven gowns, value 3 l.; four frocks, value 5 s.; one table-cloth, value 1 s.; four handkerchiefs, value 2 s.; three petticoats, value 4 s.; two pair of stockings, value 2 s.; one cap, value 1 s.; one coat, value 7 s.; one timepiece, value 20 s.; one spoon, value 1 s., and one apron, value 6 d., his property .

LUCAS BULL . I live in Pancras-walk , in the parish of St. Pancras, and am a housekeeper. On Thursday last, about half-past six o'clock in the evening, I went out, leaving nobody in the house. It was not quite dark, but nearly so. I have a family, but my wife was in the country. I locked and bolted both the back and front doors, came out at the front door, and took the key with me. I went to the Duke of Clarence, public-house, and went home at a quarter before eleven o'clock; I put the key in the door, gave it one turn, and found it on the single

lock, but not doubly locked as I left it. I am quite sure I doubly locked it. I found the back door unbolted, and on the latch - I am sure I did not leave it so. I missed a timepiece off the mantle-shelf down stairs. I went up stairs, found four drawers quite empty, and pulled out - they had contained sheets, gowns, and other things, which were all gone.

MARGARET BULL . I am the wife of the last witness. I had left home the night before this happened. I never saw the prisoner before. When I went away I left seven cotton gowns, two pair of sheets, two pair of cotton stockings, four shifts, and other things, all safe - the timepiece was worth 30 s. - I had had it about a year, my father gave it to me - it was an old watch which he had put into a pedestal. I should think all the property was worth 10 l. I lost twelve napkins, my husband's coat, a silver tea-spoon, and some petticoats and frocks.

JAMES ELLIS . I am a constable. About a quarter before twelve o'clock last Thursday night, I and Wright, the patrol, met the prisoner and another man in the New-road, between a quarter and half a mile from the prosecutor's, coming from that way; after they had passed we observed the prisoner had a bundle under his coat, Wright ran and caught hold of him, the other ran off; I asked him what he find in his bundle, he said shirts and sheets that he had from his little brother at the corner of the square (he did not say what square), and he was going to take them to his mother, at Bermondsey - he was not in the road to Bermondsey. I took his hat off, and found a gown and child's frock in it. The other man was taller than the prisoner. He said he did not know the person whom we saw with him - that he was a stranger, and was not with him. I have no doubt of their being together; one of them was singing, and the other as close to him as possible - they nearly touched each other. We took him to the turnpike-gate, and examined the bundle. He had the coat on. I did not find the timepiece.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN WRIGHT . I was with Ellis, and saw the man who ran away. I am sure he was in the prisoner's company, and he had a bundle in his hand. I could not catch him.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 19.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18211024-3

1274. WILLIAM GRADY was indicted for feloniously assaulting Josiah Walden on the King's highway, on the 6th of October , at St. George, Hanover-square , putting him in fear, and taking person, and against his will, one watch, value 12 l.; one seal, value 1 l.; one key, value 5 s., and one piece of ribbon, value 2 d., his property .

JOSIAH WALDEN . On Saturday evening the 6th of October, about a quarter before eight o'clock, I was in James-street, Oxford-market , walking home, the prisoner came up to me under a very large lamp, he looked me in the face, and struck me a violent blow in the chest, with his fist, he then snatched my watch out, and ran away with it, I pursued him down Chandler-street, and saw him go from there up the steps into Grosvenor-market, I there lost sight of him - I saw him in custody within three or four minutes after, two men had taken him. I am confident he is the man. There was a crowd about him, I afterwards saw him at the watch-house, my watch was found by Mrs. Stanfield, I went to her house, and she gave it to me. I have it here, the glass is not broken.

JONATHAN DOPSON . I live in Grosvenor-market. About a quarter before eight o'clock on this night, I heard the alarm of Stop thief! I ran out, and Huntley called Stop thief!, I saw the prisoner coming up the steps into the market towards me, running as fast as he could towards Oxford-street. I seized him by the collar, but he got away. Huntley and I stopped him between us. I saw him pass Stanfield's house, I was close to him then endeavouring to stop him. He is the man.

MARK HUNTLEY . I live at No. 5, Chandler-street. I heard a cry of Stop thief! I ran out and saw the prisoner running down Chandler-street, towards my shop, in a direction from James-street, I did not see Walden, I opened my arms to stop him, but he turned to the left and ran up the steps to Grosvenor-market - we took him in the market. A crowd collected and several people tried to take him from us. I got myself very much hurt indeed in taking him, I had a fall in running after him.

SARAH STANFIELD . I live in Grosvenor-market. I recollect the night the prisoner was taken, I saw him in custody, and had heard the cry of Stop thief! Soon after he was taken I found a watch, on the steps of the next house to mine. He had past my house in running away, and was brought by it in custody. I gave it to Mr. Walden, that produced is the same.

WILLIAM MEDBURY . I am an officer. I searched the prisoner at the watch-house, and found nothing but a little knife on him, next morning as I was taking him to Marlborough-street, I asked him if another lad, named Chitty, was not in it; he said, nobody was with him at the time.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent. I never saw the gentleman before I was taken.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 17.

First Middlesex Jury, before Ld. Chief Justice Abbott.

Reference Number: t18211024-4

1275. ANN NORRIS and MARY PALMER were indicted for feloniously assaulting James Thompson on the 9th of October , at St. Mary, Whitechapel , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, the sum of 3 s. in monies numbered, his property .

JAMES THOMPSON . I am a printer , and live at Cambridge. I came to town last Saturday fortnight, and lodged in Great St. Helens, Bishopsgate-street. On Tuesday the 9th of October, between two and three o'clock in the afternoon, I was in Wentworth-street, Whitechapel , and saw Mary Palmer , she came out of a yard, into Wentworth-street, she had a bonnet on, she met me and appeared in a fright, and said, "For G - d sake, come and help me, there is a person in distress;" or words to that effect. I ran into the yard, she said, up stairs, and I followed her up stairs to the first floor. Norris ran up immediately as I got in, shut the door, and put her back against it, and said, she would have some money for the room - there was a bedstead in the room. She persisted in this for some minutes. I said, I would give her no money; she said, she would be **** but she would have it, I still refused, and at last I said, "What do you want?" she said, she would have 1 s. I

gave her that, and then she said, she would have another; I gave her another, and then she said, she would have four more; I pushed her on one side, rushed down stairs, and Norris called out "Lock the door." When I got down, five more women below seized me, and took some money from me, above 3 s., they tore my breeches pocket and all off, and beat me dreadfully. I kept my hand on my pocket as well as I could, and I got a sovereign from one of them which she had taken, I think I lost eight or ten shillings. They said they would have more money, I gave them some money when they were holding me below, and they said I had given them none, the door was fastened, and they said "Do not let him get to the window;" I cried Murder! for six or seven minutes, and there were about twelve fellows outside who shut the shutters, and left me in the dark, both the prisoners had ran down after me, and assisted in holding me, the door by some means came open, and I got out of the house without my hat, and found twelve or men standing outside, they did not attempt to stop me. I went to Lambeth-street police office immediately, three officers went with me to the place, and saw the two prisoners, and some more, but I was sure of these two - they beat me very much, and Norris said, "Murder him." I said I could swear to those two, for they were up stairs, and I had an opportunity of seeing them. When I went with the officers, there were four or five women there, and about a dozen men still outside; the prisoners were taken into custody. I was perfectly sober. This was between two and three o'clock in the afternoon - I had dined at my brother's in Great St. Helens, and was going to a hair-dresser's in Whitechapel. I had come to town on the Saturday before. I went up to the room, in consequence of the woman making an alarm, and for no improper purpose whatever. The money I gave for the room, was extorted from me through fear of being murdered, and nothing else

Prisoner NORRIS. Q. Are you positive to me - A. Yes. She said she was mistress of the house, and would be paid for the room. I am positive of it, and would say so on my dying bed. I am also as certain of Palmer, as I am of my own existence.

WILLIAM FOSTER . I belong to Lambeth-street office. The prosecutor came to me on Tuesday the 9th of October, about a quarter past three o'clock, he had a hat on then; the Magistrate was just gone, he complained of being robbed - I went with him, and two officers, to Wheeler's-court, George-yard, part of it comes into Wentworth-street, it has three outlets, and is about a quarter of a mile from the office, he pointed out the house, we went in with him, and found five or six women, and I think one man, and five or six men were standing round the house, and some bricklayers at work - I went into the lower room and said, "Be particular, look round and see if you can point out any of these women," they were altogether, I made them stand up, he pointed out the prisoners from among the rest, and said they had robbed him, and told the same story he has now. They said he must be mistaken, for they should not remain in the house, if they had done it. He said, in their presence, at the office, "If you look at one of their hands, you will find I have bit one of their fingers." I examined one of Palmer's fingers, it appeared as if it had been hit or scratched.

Prisoner PALMER. Q. I was outside the door - A. I found her at the door, and told her to go into the parlour The door was open.

NORRIS'S Defence. I was standing in the yard buying a pennyworth of pears, the officers and a man came up, the officer said, go in; the prosecutor said, I was one, and charged me with robbing him of three shillings. I only had a few halfpence in my pocket.

PALMER'S Defence. I was buying a penny worth of pears of the same person. The prosecutor and the officers came up, he said, I had robbed him. He said at the office, that we picked him up in Brick-lane, and said there was a man hanging, and that he had a pair of razors in his pocket, and we intended to take them, to cut his throat.

JAMES THOMPSON . When I got out of the house, Palmer threw my hat out to me, and said "You **** take your hat."

NORRIS - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 21.

PALMER - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 16.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18211024-5

1276. AMEY STEEL and ELIZA DAVIS were indicted for feloniously assaulting John Disbury , on the 18th of September , at Christchurch , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, the sum of 3 l. 10 s., in monies numbered, his property .

JOHN DISBURY . I live at Norton, in Cambridgeshire. I came to town on Thursday, the 18th of September, in a waggon, went to Leadenhall-market, and sold some ducks and fowls, and took about 4 l. there; I had other money about me. When I left the market I had about 20 l. in two purses; one contained eight sovereigns and eight 1 l. country bank notes, and in the other was upwards of 4 l. in silver, that was in my right hand pocket, and the other in my left. I left the market between eight and nine o'clock, and went to Billingsgate, and from there to the Catherine Wheel, Bishopsgate-street, and had a bason of tea and a glass of rum in it. I had had half a pint of beer at five of o'clock. I was then going to Whitechapel; I went up Brick-lane, missed the turning, and got into George-street - I saw Davis, and she asked me to go in with her, she took hold of my hand, and said, "Come along," and took me into a house just by, into a lower room; she asked me for something to drink - another woman came into the house almost immediately after us. I gave Davis 1 s. and she sent this woman to fetch the liquor; she went out for it, and returned with two other women - there was then four women there, when they came I wanted to go, but they insisted on having 1 s., for the room, and bolted me in, I took out my purse of silver, and threw down 1 s., on the floor - Davis tried to snatch it out of my hand, but I got the better of her, and put it into my left hand pocket, at the top of the other purse - they all four surrounded me, and held my back against the table, so that I could not stir, they held my arms, and bent my back over the table, and took my purse away, one of them said, "Have you got it?" another answered in a vulgar manner, that she had got it, and said let him go. I ran out of doors without my hat, they went up stairs, and threw my hat out of window to me, and I got it again.

Q. You say the women held your back, were you struck by any of them - A. Yes, I was beat very sorely about my

forehead by Steel. I am sure she is the woman, while they held me over the table Steel came in, and I think another woman, there was then six of them, she struck me at the time they were getting my purse away, she came in before the question "Have you got it" was asked. When I got out of the house, some people came by, I said I would give them 5 s., to fetch an officer, and I would keep the door the while, I could get no one to go, a boy wanted the money first - I went up the street, and applied to an officer who was not at home - I was sent to Westley who came, we found Steel at the corner of the street, where I had been robbed, she was taken, and told the officer of two more. Davis was taken a fortnight after. My purse contained above 3 l. 10 s.; I went into the house between eleven and twelve o'clock.

Prisoner DAVIS. Q. Can you look me in the face, and swear I am the woman who picked you up - A. On my oath, she took me to the house. I would say so on my dying bed.

WILLIAM WESTLEY . I am an officer. The prosecutor came to me, and complained of being robbed; he appeared perfectly sober; his head was very much bruised on the temple, and the cheek bone, the skin was broken, and it bled. I went with him to find the house, he did not know how to find the place again, we met Steel at the corner of Wentworth-street, he said he was robbed just by there, and pointed to Wentworth-street; we went there, and saw Steel standing at the corner of the street. I told him to be cautious in fixing on any of them, without being sure - I stood at the door of the Two Brewers, public-house, he ran over to her, seized her, and charged her with being the person, I took her - he described Davis to me. I mentioned it to another officer. She was taken a week afterwards. I found nothing on Steel.

STEEL'S Defence. I never saw Davis till she came to prison, nor did I see the prosecutor till he took me.

DAVIS'S Defence. He is swearing my life away innocently, he said he bit me in the arm.

STEEL - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 19.

DAVIS - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 22.

First Middlesex Jury, before Ld. Chief Justice Abbott.

Reference Number: t18211024-6

1277. CATHERINE JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of June , one watch, value 50 s.; one seal, value 3 d.; one tea caddy, value 6 d.; 5 l., in monies numbered, and one 10 l. bank note, the property of Owen Humphries , in his dwelling-house .

OWEN HUMPHRIES . In June last I kept the Golden Harp, public-house, Phoenix-street, Spitalfields - I now live in Winchester-street, London-wall. The prisoner came into my service, at Phoenix-street, about Easter last. On the 30th of March, I left the house. I missed a great deal of property from the house, from time to time, in a trifling way.

GEORGE SMITH . I succeeded Humphries at the house, in Phoenix-street. On the 30th of June, when I took possession of the house, I paid him 23 l., among which was a 10 l., note, I wrote my initials, and the name of the man I took it of, in full length on it.

Cross-examined. Q. When did you endorse it - A. About the 20th of June. The prisoner continued in my service.

OWEN HUMPHRIES , re-examined. I received a 10 l. note from Smith, I wrote his name at length on it, and thought I put it in my pocket, and in the morning I found the two 5 l. notes, which I received at the same time from him, in my pocket, but not the 10 l. I keep my bed-room door locked, I meant to put it in my pocket, with the other two but I am not sure that I did.

Cross-examined. Q. When you received it, you put it all in your pocket - A. Yes, and when I got into my back parlour, I took them out, marked them, and put them in again. I had not been out of the house before I missed it.

BARNARD GLEED . I am an officer, of Worship-street. In consequence of information, I took the prisoner in custody, at Mr. Fuller's, Islington; where she was in service - I asked if she had any pocket on, she said, No; she was going to put her hand down, I found she had one on, and three keys in it, I asked her what keys they were, she said, her aunt's, who lived in Vine-court, Spitalfields. As I brought her along, she said, she was innocent - she then said, the keys were those of her boxes, which were at her aunt's, but that her aunt knew nothing of what she had taken there. After taking her to the office, I went with Mr. and Mrs. Fuller, to Vine-court, Spitalfields - I opened one trunk first with this key, it contained a great quantity of linen; I found a tea caddy, a metal watch, a seal, a glove, a 10 l. note, and 14 l. 6 s. 6 d., in silver, shillings, sixpences, and half-crowns.

(Note produced).

GEORGE SMITH . This is the note; it has "G. S." and "Allen" on it in my writing.

OWEN HUMPHRIES . This is the note Smith paid me on the 30th of June. I lost a great deal of money - I first missed silver, and spoke to Holland, my bar-maid, about it. The tea caddy and watch are mine, I have had it twenty years, I lost it off my mantle piece in the bed-room, before the 30th of June.

Prisoner's Defence. I leave it to my Counsel.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

1278. CATHERINE JONES was again indicted for stealing, on the 2d of October , one glass cloth, value 6 d.; one piece of cloth, value 1 s.; one apron, value 4 d.; five pair of stockings, value 8 s., seven towels, value 2 s.; one shift, value 2 s.; one handkerchief, value 4 s., and 13 l. in monies numbered, the property of George Smith , in his dwelling-house .

GEORGE SMITH . On the 30th of June, I took the Golden Harp, public-house, Phoenix-street . The prisoner was about seven weeks in my service - about the 10th of August before she left, I took 10 l. in copper up stairs, in a bag, and put it in my bed-room cupboard, which was not locked. About four or five days after she left, I was going to pay my brewer, and missed 4 l. out of the bag, I had missed copper and silver before, at different times, but not out of the bag, I have missed one shilling or two at once out of a bowl in my bar, My wife used to make up the copper, in 5 s. papers. I also missed a glass cloth, stockings, and handkerchiefs - we kept the door locked, only she and my wife had access to the room.

BARNARD GLEED . I apprehended the prisoner, and the same key, that I found on her, opened a box, in which I found 6 l. 19 s., in copper, 4 l., was in 5 s. papers, and about 2 l. worth were in a glass-cloth, loose - I found the other articles there.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Of Stealing to the value of 39 s. only.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18211024-7

1279. SAMUEL HAYWARD was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house, of Ann Stebbings , widow , at St. Pancras , about one o'clock in the night of the 15th of September , with intent to steal, and stealing therein, three books, value 15 s.; three gowns, value 10 s.; two cloaks, value 4 s.; two decanters, value 4 s.; one pair of stockings, value 1 s.; one pair of sugar-tongs, value 3 s.; three salt-holders, value 3 s.; one mustard-pot, value 1 s.; eight handkerchiefs, value 14 s.; eleven tablecloths, value 20 s.; two watches, value 15 l.; twelve shifts, value 2 l.; two caps, value 3 s.; one pair of shoes, value 5 s.; one pair of boots, value 10 s.; two umbrellas, value 20 s.; seven spoons, value 30 s.; one shirt, value 3 s., and one pepper-box, value 5 s., her property ; and HENRY JUDD was indicted for feloniously receiving on the same day, at the same parish, one gown, value 3 s.; ten table-cloths, value 18 s.; six handkerchiefs, value 10 s.; two watches, value 15 l.; eleven shifts, value 38 s.; two umbrellas, value 20 s.; seven spoons, value 30 s.; one sheet, value 3 s.; one peepper-box, value 5 s.; two caps, value 3 s.; one pair of shoes, value 5 s., and one pair of boots, value 10 s., part of the goods so, as aforesaid, burglariously stolen, he well knowing them to have been stolen .

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

ANN STEBBINGS . I live at No. 12, Charles-street, Clarendon-square . I am a widow, and keep the house. My family consist of my daughter, and myself, I have no servant, a gentleman lodges with me. On the 15th of September, I went to bed at half-past eleven o'clock, we all three went up to bed together, I had secured all the doors and windows - I am sure I fastened the back parlour window, on the ground floor, the shutter was shut, but not fastened, they were inside shutters, the window was fastened by the catch. I and my daughter slept together. About half-past two o'clock in the morning, I heard the stairs creak, and footsteps going up and down. I went to sleep again, supposing it to be my lodger; I got up, about half-past six o'clock, and when I came down to the first-floor front room, I found the door open, and the back room door also, my bureau was open, and all the drawers pulled out, I went and told my daughter, and then searched, and missed the articles mentioned in the indictment - some of the linen was my daughter's, the books and plate were mine, and a silver watch, was mine, the other, which was gold, is my daughter's; one umbrella, was my lodger's, the other mine, it had an embossed border, the shoes, sheets, scarf, silk-handkerchief, one bombazeen, and a coloured dress, were mine; the other dress, and two handkerchiefs, were my daughter's, and the rest, my lodger's. The books were the History of England, Josephus, and a large family Bible. About seven o'clock that morning the watch-house keeper called; I went to the watch-house between eleven and twelve, and saw part of my property. I had spoken to the prisoner once before, at my door, about seven o'clock, on the night preceding the robbery, which was Saturday, the 15th of September.

WILLIAM HOOPER . I am a watchman; my beat is in Euston-street, Euston-square. On Sunday morning, the 16th of September, just before three o'clock, I heard footsteps of several men - I was on my beat, walking about and saw several men - I followed them about a quarter of a mile, across a brick-field - four or five of them had bundles, which made me suspect them. I overtook Nott, and asked him to assist me - they saw us pursuing them, and mended their pace, and went down Euston-street, towards Tottenham-court-road, crossed the New-road into Upper Thornaugh-street, and were turning down Carmarthen-street; as they turned the corner I secured Hayward - he had a bundle under his arm, wrapped up in a grey cloak; when I seized him, he dropped it, Nott picked it up, and I took him to the watch-house. While I was securing him his hat fell off, in his struggling to get away - he did not make a forcible resistance, only struggled; his hat fell off, another watchman picked it up, and brought it to the watch-house, and I saw a pink dress taken out of it. He was searched in my presence, at the watch-house, and I saw a pair of silver sugar-tongs, a glass salt, silk and a white handkerchief, a pair of silk stockings, and two latch keys taken out of his pockets. I saw Nott pick up a grey cloak bundle, which the prisoner dropped.

Cross-examined. Q. He said he would go quietly with you, and did - A. He wished me to loose him after he had struggled to get away. I kept all the men in view till he was taken. I am positive he was in their company.

WILLIAM NOTT . I am a watchman of Euston-square. I do not know the prosecutrix's house. I assisted Hooper in securing the man, and saw him take the prisoner. I picked up a parcel at the corner of Carmarthen-street, wrapped up in the grey cloak, and produce it; I saw him drop it. Three books, the History of England, Josephus, and a Bible, and a red cloak, were in it.

JOHN SLOMAN . I am a watchman. I saw Hayward - his hat fell off, I picked it up, the pink gown was then in it. I took it to the watch-house.

MRS. STEBBINGS. The red and grey cloaks are mine, I missed them from the bottom drawer in the parlour - the other property is mine. The keys do not belong to my premises.

Cross-examined. Q. How long has your husband been dead - A. Seven years; his name was Stebbings.

HENRY ELKINS . I am a sculptor, I had been acquainted with Hayward about a fortnight before this affair took place. I spent three afternoons with him, and have frequented his house - I have also met him at Maynard's, in Spring-gardens. In consequence of his kindness to me, he mentioned the obligation I was under to him, and said I might do him a kindness in assisting him to move away some goods. We proceeded to the house of Mr. Connelly, the Yorkshire Grey, near Fetter-lane (this was on Friday evening), to meet some others of his acquaintances; they did not come, but on the following evening, Saturday, we went there precisely at half-past nine o'clock, and met four people there besides ourselves; we stopped

about half an hour, and then proceeded to Charlton-street, Somer's Town, they left me at the corner of a public-house for five or ten minutes - Charles-street turns out on the left of Charlton-street - they left me by myself, the rest went somewhere, and returned in about ten minutes, we passed Stebbings's house and crossed a brick-field behind the premises, to a public-house in Euston-street, which is a quarter of a mile off; we staid there till past twelve o'clock,, and then came from there to the field at the back of Stebbings's premises, we staid there for a quarter of an hour, and two of the men who met us at the Yorkshire Grey, took a bundle which they had with them towards the house - one of the men wore a glazed hat. I saw the window broken open by a man named Bill, the one who wore the glazed hat was beneath him; Hayward was with me, about ten yards off, the other men were near us, at the back part of the premises. Bill got in at the window, and let the man with the glazed hat in at the back door - they were in the house about an hour, or an hour and a half. A man was stationed at the door, he took the things, and brought them out, and among the rest there was a book - he kept bringing out things to us - we were at the back of the premises - and one or another disposed of them under our clothes. When they came out something was forgotten, and Hayward said something that was of more consequence, was left behind. Bill and Hayward went into the house, and one of them brought a small bundle out. The property was taken to my lodgings in the New-road, Pancras. Some of the linen was put into an outer cellar there, only two men came there, and they brought the bundle of linen, and an umbrella, nothing else; nothing was said about bringing any more to my house. The other men were waiting a little way off. I went with them part of the way towards town - The bundle of linen was large and heavy, and they were tired of carrying it. The umbrella had an embroidered edge, it was separate from the bundle. We all came away together from my lodging, and turned down the road towards Somer's Town, went up a street without a name, and then through a street leading into Carmarthen-square - the watchman followed us, we went up some other streets, and were dispersed by the watchmen. I went away alone, home to my lodging. I did not see Hayward taken. When I got to my lodging I found Bill, who broke into the house, and a man, who looked like a coachman, that went down into the cellar for the bundle - I was desirous of its being taken away. They said they intended to take it away, and that we should go to Charles-street to get a cross rattler (a coach to take away stolen goods). We went down Tottenham-court-road, Bill shewed me some tea which he had hid. We made our nearest way to Charles-street, Covent-garden, I staid while Bill and the coachman-like looking man went and had some coffee. A man, with his face lacerated, came up and assisted in moving some of the property; Bill went and spoke to the coachman, who was the prisoner, Judd; he called him Bill, and appeared acquainted with him. They went to my lodging with the coach. I was inside the coach. Bill, the coachman-like looking man, the man with the cut face, and another, all rode on the box, and the rest inside. Upon getting to my lodging the bundle and umbrella were taken out, and put into the coach - Judd kept on his box. While they were being put in I saw through the handkerchief that there was linen in the bundle - and an handkerchief and table-cloth fell out they were put back into the bundle. We proceeded, through various turnings, to pass away the time, a roundabout way to Gray's Inn-lane, the end near Holborn; we got there about four o'clock, I should think. We waited in the coach at a court called Fox-court; some conversation passed about trying to avoid the watchmen, Judd heard it, he stood at the door at the time - I do not know that he joined in the conversation. We waited there about a quarter of an hour, people came up and down the court, and the things were taken at different times to the lodging of the man with the cut face, who kept a glass and some gin in his hand, and when any one came by he kept talking about ill-usage, and being left by his companions. They could not get the property out, and proceded down Holborn; Judd proposed to stay on the stand with the property in the coach till seven o'clock, and said he could then dispose of it in Oxford-street; he stood on the stand with the coach, and we all waited at a public-house in view of the coach. My companions wanted to get away from me in the interim, and kept trying to lose me in the street, by going round the stalls in Fleet-market - we did not remain at the public-house all the time; I followed them. When they found I was determined not to lose sight of them, Bill said

"We had better go to the crib at once." We went, they turned the coach round, and it was driven by Southampton-buildings, into Chancery-lane. They all got into the coach, except me - I walked; Judd drove. When they found I was following them they turned a contrary way, and said "We will meet you at seven o'clock this morning, under the Piazza, Covent-garden; "I agreed to that, and went away. I went to the Piazza, but they did not come. I was apprehended at three o'clock that afternoon, and told the watch-house keeper of this.

Cross-examined. Q. How long is it since you have worked at your trade - A. It was three weeks previous to this. I knew Hayward for a fortnight before the robbery. I did not understand this to be a robbery, till I saw the men at work at the window - I then began to suspect something.

Q. You were determined to have your share - A. I was anxious to get away, but was glad to accompany them to pass away the time. I asked what a cross rattler meant, and they told me, and there was a deal of conversation going on at the house we set out from, and there I learnt what a crib meant. I did not know before - I intended to serve Haywood. I meant to return to honest employ, next day, if I could get it.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. You intended first to share in the booty - A. Yes; I was not aware what they took me to the house for. I partly suspected before I saw the window broken open, but such was my opinion of Haywood, for his gentleman-like conduct.

HAYWOOD. I leave my defence to my Counsel.

JUDD'S Defence. I knew nothing of what was in the coach.

HAYWOOD - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 23.

JUDD - NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Ld. Chief Justice Abbott.

Reference Number: t18211024-8

1280. JOHN WALDRON was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of October , one handkerchief, value 3 s., the goods of Thomas Glandfield , from his person .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Life .

Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18211024-9

1281. JOSEPH GRAY was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of September , three books, value 7 l. , the goods of Thomas Keys .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY .

Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1282. JOSEPH GRAY was again indicted for stealing, on the 17th of October , two pair of boots, value 3 l. , the goods of James Hedges .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 42.

Transported for Seven Years .

Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18211024-10

1283. HENRY JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of October , one shirt, value 7 s.; one handkerchief, value 7 s.; two sovereigns, and one 1 l., Bank note , the property of John Marriott .

JOHN MARRIOTT . I lodge in Printer-street, Blackfriars . These things were in my box, in the garret. Ware, Gardner, and the prisoner, lived in the same room, and the prisoner slept with me - I saw them safe on Tuesday morning, the 2d of October, at seven o'clock, when I went to my employ, the sovereigns were wrapped up with the note, in a piece of paper - I left my box locked, I returned at eight o'clock to breakfast, the prisoner was then up stairs, both the others were gone - I came home to dinner between twelve and one o'clock, and went up stairs, the prisoner was gone then. I went to unlock my box, and found it was broken open, and missed a shirt, two sovereigns, and the Bank note; I gave an alarm. At two o'clock in the morning the prisoner came home, I charged him with it, and took him into custody. I found the shirt in Watling-street.

HENRY HOOD . I am an iron merchant, and live in Earl-street, Blackfriars. There are my initials on this 1 l. note, I paid it to Marriott, who worked for me - I saw it the day after the robbery, and knew it to have been in my possession. I cannot swear I paid it to him.

JOSEPH POTTER . I am watch-house keeper of Blackfriars. The prisoner was brought to the watch-house, at two o'clock in the morning, charged with this robbery, I searched him, and in his hat, I found a shirt, I asked what mark was on it, he said, G. R. it was C. S. the prosecutor did not claim it. I found a card, on him, which led me to Mr. Duncan's, Monmouth-street, and there I found a 1 l., note, which Marriott claimed, and mentioned the initials on it before he saw it. I searched the prisoner again, and in his braces, I found 1 l. 15 s. 6 d., in silver.

JOHN DUNCAN . I keep a clothes shop, in Monmouth-street. On the 2d of October at half-past three o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner came in, and bought a pair of trowsers for 4 s. 6 d., he paid me in silver, he bought a pair of stockings, for 2 s., and gave me a 1 l. note, and I gave him 18 s. I had no other 1 l., note by me; about ten o'clock the next morning, Potter came with Marriott - I shewed him the note, the prosecutor said, if it was his, it had "H. Hood" on it. I found it so.

JOHN MARRIOTT . The note is mine.

HENRY HOOD . The initials on the note are mine.

JAMES YOUNG . I am servant to Mr. Chaffers, a pawnbroker, who lives in Watling-street. On the 2d of October, I took a shirt and handkerchief in pawn of the prisoner, for 6 s.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Six Months and Whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18211024-11

1284. THOMAS JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of October , one wrapper, value 5 s., and seventy pair of blankets, value 24 l. 10 s. , the goods of William Francis Green .

HENRY STANTON . I am warehouseman to Mr. W. F. Green, of Bread-street . On the 12th of October, between six and seven o'clock in the evening, Mr. Farrows, who lives next door, came in and gave me information; I immediately missed a bale of blankets, which weighed 2 cwt. and a quarter, it contained seventy pair of blankets, and in St. Paul's churchyard, I got sight of the prisoner, two persons were walking by the side of the cart, and the prisoner was sitting on the bale in the cart, immediately as I turned off the curbstone, the two men ran away - I told the prisoner he had stolen the bale, he said, he had not, but that two gentlemen put it in his cart. The name of " William Hands . No. 15, Twisters-alley, Bunhill-row;" was on the cart. I told him to drive back, he did, and I gave him in charge. I have not seen Hands - the blankets are worth 24 l. 10 s. The bale was inside the passage, some way.

EDWARD WATKINS . I am a warehouseman, and live next door. On Friday the 12th of October, between six o'clock and half-past, I saw an empty small taxed cart between our door and Green's, a few minutes after I went to the door, and saw the cart turning round, two men were behind it, and one driving - the bale was then in it; I suspected something - they went down the street - I informed Stanton, and went with him, we found the cart in St. Paul's churchyard, the two persons left the head of the cart; the prisoner was driving it, we made him drive back.

MR. GREEN. The bale is mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in Smithfield with a horse of my father's for sale, and about half-past five o'clock my father came with two gentlemen, who said, they wanted a horse and cart to go in the City. I got a cart, they got in, and drove to Bread-street, got down at the end of the street, and told me to drive up to the door, they brought the bale out of the warehouse, put it in the cart, and told me to drive on.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18211024-12

1285. ROBERT NICHOLLS , ROBERT SMITH , and JOHN LOCKYER were indicted for stealing, on the 13th of October , one handkerchief, value 5 s., the goods of Edward Pilgrim , from his person .

MR. EDWARD PILGRIM . I have a counting-house in Throgmorton-street . On the 13th of October, about half-past seven o'clock in the evening, my handkerchief was in my coat pocket, I was in Fleet-street , near Bride-lane, and felt a pull at my pocket - I turned round and saw Nicholls concealing something under his coat behind, I charged him with the theft, as I missed my handkerchief, he denied it - while I was speaking to him several strangers surrounded me, and I retired into a stick-shop, the officers came in and asked if I had lost any thing - they had the prisoner in custody - my handkerchief was produced.

GEORGE WALLINGTON . I am an officer of St. Sepulchre. I was coming down the Strand about half-past seven o'clock in the evening, and saw the three prisoners together, I watched them through Temple-bar down Fleet-street, and saw them try several gentlemens' pockets, they did not succeed till they got to Mr. Pilgrim; about four or five doors from the stick-shop, I saw Lockyer draw the handkerchief out of Mr. Pilgrim's pocket, the other two were close to him - I was on the opposite side of the street, I crossed over immediately, and do not know what was done with the handkerchief. I seized Smith and Lockyer, and Keys, who was with me seized Nicholls, and drove him back to where the handkerchief was lying - it was a door or two from the shop.

FRANCIS KEYS . I am an officer. I was with Wallington, and saw the prisoners in the Strand, they were all together in company, - they came into the City, we went on the opposite side of the way, and saw Lockyer attempt several gentlemens' pockets without success - when they came to Mr. Pilgrim, five or six doors from the stick-shop, I saw Lockyer walk sharp after Mr. Pilgrim, and saw him put his hand in his pocket, take out a handkerchief, and immediately throw it behind him - Mr. Pilgrim turned round and spoke to Nicholls, they all kept walking on - I ran over, took Nicholls, and pulled him back to where the handkerchief lay.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

NICHOLLS'S Defence. The gentleman caught hold of me, and said I was concealing his handkerchief - he felt, and found nothing. I do not know the others.

LOCKYER'S Defence. I was thirty yards off, and do not know the other two.

NICHOLLS - GUILTY . Aged 27

SMITH - GUILTY . Aged 32

LOCKYER - GUILTY . Aged 17

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18211024-13

SECOND DAY, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 25.

1286. ANDREW DONNELL was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of October , one watch, value 2 l.; one handkerchief, value 1 s., and eight ounces of tobacco, value 1 s. , the goods of John Grey Willick .

JOHN GREY WILLICK . I am a mariner , and belong to a ship bound for Baltimore. On Sunday, the 14th of October, she lay in the London Docks ; my chest was on board, and these things in it. I went on shore at one o'clock, all was safe then I returned about five, and found the property gone. The prisoner belonged to the ship - I left him on board, and when I returned he was gone ashore. I found him about six o'clock at a public-house in East Smithfield, and asked him if he had taken my things - he said "Get out, you b - r." A girl, who was with him, said he had a silver watch in his pocket - he denied it. Tuffs shewed me the watch.

ROBERT TUFFS . I keep the Blue Anchor, public-house, East Smithfield. On Sunday, the 14th of October, about half-past five o'clock, he came in and had a glass of rum, he said he had no money; I said I must send for an officer if he did not pay me - he then gave me this watch - I have kept it ever since; I shewed it to the prosecutor, in his presence, and he claimed it. I sent him to the watch-house, he then said he did take it out of the prosecutor's chest.

THOMAS HARRISON . I am an officer. I took him into custody with the watch; he acknowledged taking it out of the chest. The prosecutor claimed a handkerchief which I found in his hat. I also found some tobacco in his bosom.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I had the property, but meant no dishonesty.

GUILTY . Aged 32.

Confined One Year .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18211024-14

1287. ISAAC PENN was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of September , one seal, value 12 s.; one ring, value 4 s., and one key, value 8 s., the goods of William Wadsworth , from his person .

WILLIAM WADSWORTH . I am a seamen . On the 22d of September, I was at the bottom of Gold's-hill, Shadwell , looking at the mountebanks - my watch ribbon was cut, and the seals and key taken; I felt a pull at my watch, I had a child in my arms - the prisoner stood close to me; I caught hold of him, and saw the seal and key in his hand, he threw them down, and afterwards shewed me where they were - I picked them up. I am sure he took them.

WILLIAM DOE . I saw the prisoner throw the seal and key down when the prosecutor seized him, I stood just by him - I saw them in his hand as well.

- WHITE. I am an officer. I took charge of him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. It is all false.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18211024-15

1288. THOMAS COOK was indicted for feloniously assaulting John Bird , on the King's highway, on the 24th of September , putting him in fear, taking from his person, and against his will, one watch, value 3 l.; one key, value 2 d., and one ribbon, value 1 d., his property .

MARIA BIRD . I am the wife of John Bird , he is very ill indeed, which is the cause of his absence, he is a plasterer and builder , and lives in Hoxton-town. On Tuesday evening, the 24th of September, we were coming from chapel together, between eight and nine o'clock, and at the

corner of King-street, in Old-street , the prisoner pushed up against my husband, he pushed his elbows into his stomach, which made him shrink, he did not hurt him, he did not cry out, it was all done in a moment - he snatched his watch out, and ran down King-street - it was a silver hunter; only the ribbon hung out - he was opposite a gas light, the watch has not been found; my husband pursued into Hoxton-square, but he got away; the blow did not stagger him.

WILLIAM FAULKNER . I am a constable. On the 27th of September I was coming down Tabernacle-walk, and took the prisoner.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18211024-16

1289. THOMAS COOK was again indicted for stealing, on the 27th of September , one watch, value 3 l.; one chain, value 2 l.; two seals, value 2 l., and one key, value 1 d., the goods of William Franks , from his person .

WILLIAM FRANKS . I live at Hoxton . On the 27th of September, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, I was very near the Tabernacle, and opposite a pawnbroker's-shop there is a small alley, seven or eight young men were by the shop; I was walking briskly, and just as I came up to the corner I observed three who were taller then the rest, the others appeared boys; they stood between the posts, two rushed on me, and in a moment my watch was gone - I saw them coming up, but did not suspect them, they were both close to me - I halloo'd Stop thief! and an officer took the prisoner down the alley, they all ran down there - the prisoner was brought into the pawnbroker's-shop to me, in about ten minutes - I knew him by his waistcoat, which appeared light, he was the nearest to me. I never found my property - I conceive him to be the boy who took it, by his waistcoat, but I am sure he was one of them.

WILLIAM FAULKNER . I heard the cry, and saw the prisoner run fast from Mr. Franks, he had white stockings on, he ran down the alley which is a thoroughfare - I turned back, and caught him at the corner; he was himself calling out Stop thief; I brought him back to the shop, and Mr. Franks said, he was the man who robbed him, and he could swear it. I found nothing on him.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming up the street, and heard the cry - I called out with the rest.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18211024-17

1290. WILLIAM MASON was indicted for feloniously assaulting William Shelfer , on the King's highway, on the 12th of October , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, one seal, value 20 s.; one key, value 6 s., and one ring, value 4 s., his property .

WILLIAM SHELFER . I am servant to Colonel Morris, who lives at Dalston . On the 12th of October, about a quarter before four o'clock in the afternoon, I was coming out of the nursery-ground with a jug of water in my hand, three men came round me, and the one in the middle drew my watch out, they said nothing, but one came on each side, and the one in the middle drew it out, I caught it in my left hand, the man held the seals, and I the watch; we struggled for some moments till the ring broke, at the end of the ribbon next his hand, and he got the ring, seal, and key, which were gold, and worth 30 s., the man who stood on my left hand, struck me on my right cheek, and then ran off among the crowd; there was a bullock bunt; I do not know the prisoner, he was not the middle man - I should know him.

WILLIAM HEWITT . I am a green-grocer, and go round Hackney with a horse and cart. On the 12th of October, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I was right opposite the nursery gate, and saw the prosecutor coming up the yard with a pitcher of water in his hand, a bullock was coming, and about two hundred people following - I saw the prisoner with two more stop, when they saw the prosecutor come up the yard, (they had passed me) I think the prisoner was one of them, I was about ten yards from them, they stopped at the gate, then turned back, one went past the gate, and stood at the post, then two went in front, and one pulled his watch out, the other slipped behind him, and hit him on his right cheek, it was not the man who pulled the watch out, I think the prisoner is the man who struck him - they ran off. I am certain he is one of them.

W. H. HEWITT. I am a patrol of Bow-street. I apprehended the prisoner with eleven others, on the 16th of October.

Prisoner's Defence. It is false, I was not there.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18211024-18

1291. WILLIAM WEEDON was indicted for an unnatural crime .

The prosecutor and witnesses did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18211024-19

1292. EDWARD HILL was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of August , at St. Marylebone , in the dwelling-house of John Morris Bennett , one gold chain, value 5 l.; one pair of ear-rings, value 15 s.; two pair of stockings, value 5 s.; one vinegaret, value 3 s., and nine buttons, value 5 s. his property; and one 5 l. Bank note , the property of Samuel Bennett .

MR. JOHN MORRIS BENNETT . I am a surgeon , and live in New-street, Upper Baker-street, Marylebone , I keep the house. The prisoner was my servant , he was six or seven weeks with me; he slept at his father's; I at first missed some gin and rum, from the cellaret, and brandy from the cellar. About the 6th of September in the morning, I missed a 5 l., note, and afterwards missed a gold neck-chain ten feet and four inches long, two gold ear-rings, two pair of white silk stockings, a silver vinegaret, marked E. A. B. a sovereign, a diamond ring, two common gold rings, and some small gold buttons - I went to Bow-street, Nicholls the officer, and I went to the prisoner's father the next morning, and found some brandy and gin, we searched every part of his house, but found nothing else; I said, he had better confess, and in consequence of what he said, I went to a pawnbroker's in Crawford-street, and found one of the ear-rings; I then went to Rundell and Bridge's, and in consequence of what I heard there, I went to Furber's, in Jewin-street. The prisoner's father came to my house, and gave me 3 l. 17 s., or 18 s., in a purse, in which were three of the gold

buttons, and said, in the prisoner's presence, that he found them in a hole, under the floor, and it was with great difficulty he could reach them, they were put down so far - I saw some more of the gold buttons, (I think six) found on a boy. The vinegaret was brought to my house.

Cross-examined by MR. AIKEN. Q. After his father brought you the things, what did you say to the prisoner - A. I said if he would tell me what he had done with the property, I would not prosecute him. I did not care whether it was recovered or not, as I supposed it to be his first offence. I never told him to go down on his knees, and beg my pardon - I allowed him to go home to his father's after the constable had been to my house, I had not given him in charge; if he had accounted for the property I should not have proceeded.

Q. Did you not agree that if the father made up the difference, you would allow him a little time - A. No; the father asked me, I refused. The prisoner said one Benjamin was concerned in it, but he denied it.

JAMES FURBER . I am a refiner, and live in Jewin-street. I find an entry in my books (looking at it), that on the 1st of September, I bought thirteen penny weights, sixteen grains of gold, for 37 s. 6 d., of a person named Hill, I believe it was part of a twisted gold chain, he brought a card to me, it was a young man, but I cannot speak to his person - I was applied to about a week afterwards, it was then melted. I gave him quite the full value - I I bought one ounce and a half penny weight of silver, of him also, for 4 s. 11 d., I think that was part of a spoon, he had a basket with him - I thought he came from some jeweller.

Cross-examined. Q. You do not recollect the prisoner - A. No.

GEORGE HOWELL . I am an apprentice to Mr. Edward Jenkins , of Crawford-street, a pawnbroker. I know the prisoner and his brother - I think his brother is younger than himself. About a week before this discovery his brother came to our shop, with an ear-ring, and sold it to me for 6 s. 6 d., a few days afterwards, he came again to know if I would buy the fellow, I said, No, unless he brought a note from his father, whom I knew, he is a tailor.

BENJAMIN BENJAMIN . I am a salesman, and live in Crawford-street. I deal in wearing apparel - I am not acquainted with the prisoner, but know his person; he brought me a gold chain on the 27th of August, about a yard long, and wanted to sell it to me, he said, he found it, I said I could buy nothing of the kind, of a little boy like him - it was a gold twisted wire chain; he had bought a pair of breeches of me a week before, and that was the way I knew him.

Cross-examined. Q. How long had you known him - A. He came to me on the 19th of August, I had seen him pass my door very often before, but had not spoken to him till he came about the breeches; he gave me 6 s. for them; he took them home to his father's. I did not buy the chain of him, I only dealt once with him, and that was for the breeches - I never bought any thing of him; I make it a rule never to buy of boys. I never spoke to him till he bought the breeches. I am not under recognizance to answer any charge. I have no doubt of his being the boy.

G. HOWELL re-examined. I saw the vinegaret on the 27th of August, it was brought, I think, on the 8th of August; it was pawned once, taken out, and pawned again - the prisoner's brother brought it one of the times; I do not know which, it was the same brother that brought the ear ring.

JOHN HARGRAVE . I work at a muffin baker's, and live in Homer-street, with my father, who is a porter. I knew the prisoner for about a fortnight before this took place; my first acquaintance was by meeting him in Crawford-street. He asked me if I would go with him, I went with him to Park-street (his father lived in a court opposite our house); I met him again in Crawford-street, two or three days after, and he gave me a pair of white silk stockings - I sold them to a Jew, in the street, for 2 s. 6 d. Before this I took them to Neat's, the pawnbroker's, in Duke-street, to pawn, but he would not take them in - he told me to send my mother; I had told him my mother sent me. I met him again three or four days after, standing by Mr. Jenkins's, the pawnbroker's shop, in Crawford-street. There was something in the window like a star - it was like the ear-ring produced. I said it was a funny thing - he said he had sold it. I did not ask him where he got it till just as he was going away and then he would not tell me. He had a gold chain in his hand on that day, and shewed it to me, it was a twisted chain (Mr. Bennett here produced part of the chain, which was taken off before it was stolen), it was just like this, he had it rolled up in his hand, I could not tell the length, he said, he had given half of it to his father, because his brother told his father, that he had it, and his father was going to beat him, and he gave him half of it not to beat him.

Cross-examined. Q. How came you to tell Neat a different story about the stockings, to what you say to day - A. I said I had them from my mother, which was not true. I swear I had them from the prisoner - the chain was never in my hand, I was not long looking at it, he stood close to me, I saw the piece which was produced, at the office, four or five weeks after I saw the prisoner with the chain; he told me it was a twisted chain. I called it a twisted chain at the office.

MR. FURBER. I think the chain resembled this, and from the price I gave for it, it must have been of this quality. I bought it as a single chain; ten feet and a half of it would be worth much more than 37 s. I did not buy above two feet.

SAMUEL PRENDERGRASS . The prisoner was given in my charge. Howell gave me the ear-ring.

WILLIAM NICHOLLS . I am a constable of Bow-street. I got six buttons from the prisoner's father, No. 1, Hackney-court, and found some spirits there.

Cross-examined. Q. When were you first at the prosecutor's - A. On the 7th; the prisoner was not given in my charge.

MR. BENNETT. The buttons, vinegaret, ring, and earrings are mine, the chain was ten feet four inches when single.

Prisoner's Defence. Benjamin instigated me to rob my master.

B. BENJAMIN. On my oath I did not instigate him to do it; I refused to buy any thing of him.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 17.

Recommended to Mercy on account of his youth.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18211024-20

1293. THOMAS FRENCH was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Ann Sitzler , widow , at St. Luke , about four o'clock in the afternoon of the 17th of October ( Ann Speight and others being therein), and stealing one shawl, value 6 s., her property .

ANN SPEIGHT . I am the daughter of Mrs. Ann Sitzler who lives at No. 14, Noble-street, Goswell-street , St. Luke's; she keeps the house; I and my husband live on the second floor, he is a chinaman. On the 17th of October I was sitting at work on the second floor, and heard the latch of my mother's parlour door lifted up. I listened, and heard it a second time, and a noise like a door being burst open. I immediately went down stairs, and found the street door open, which I had latched about half an hour before, and on turning round I found the parlour door open; I shut the street door, and pushed the parlour door quite open, it was a-jar; I found the prisoner at the top drawer of the bureau, with his hand in it; he turned round, and put on his hat. I asked what he wanted - he made no answer, but attempted to push me away, to get out; I held him by the arm, and called Faulkner, the lodger, who detained him till I went for my mother, who was out; on coming home she examined her drawers, in the prisoner's presence, and missed a shawl from the top drawer - he immediately said it was not out of the house; Faulkner asked him where it was - he pulled off his hat, and tried to throw the shawl out, Faulkner told him to keep it in till the officer came, and when he came he took it out of his hat.

ANN SITZLER . I am the last witness's mother. I was out. I came home and found my shawl in the prisoner's hat - it was quite new, and cost me 6 s.; the parlour door had been burst open; I had locked it. The screw was forced out of the ketch.

JOHN FAULKNER . I lodge in the house, on the first floor, and work in the kitchen. I came up stairs - the witnesses account is correct. A key was found on the prisoner, it belonged to the door of my room, my wife had left it in the door.

SAMUEL SAUNDERS . I am a constable. I took the key from the prisoner's left hand waistcoat pocket. I found the shawl in his hat, and two keys in his coat pocket, one of them has the wards filed out. The lock of the door was forced, the screws were forced out.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 17.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18211024-21

1294. ANN TURNER , MARY ANN SULLIVAN , ELIZA KELLY , and RACHEL SIMMONS , were indicted for feloniously assaulting Lewis Baptiste , on the 23d of October , at St. Mary-le-Strand , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, the sum of 13 s. 6 d. in monies numbered, his property .

LEWIS BAPTISTE . I lodge in John-street, Bedford-row, at Mr. Riley's, the King's Arms, public-house - Mitchell lives with him also; I am a servant , I left my place on the 17th of September. On the 23d of October, I went with Mitchell into the City, and at five o'clock we were going to Drury-lane Theatre, we went to a house (I do not know the name of the place;) when we got inside, the prisoner Sullivan said to Mitchell "I know you," and asked him up stairs - he went up with her, and I went up with Turner; we two were in a room by ourselves - she demanded 4 s., which I gave her; she then asked for another shilling, and I gave it her - about that time Sullivan came into the room, and said she wanted 1 s., and if I did not give it her, she would knock my brains out, and tear my coat off my back - I gave her 1 s.; Turner then demanded another shilling, which I gave her - Simmons then came into the room, saying she was mistress of the house, and asked for 2 s. 6 d. for the room, I said "If you will let me come down stairs to the street door, I will give you what money I have about me" - Then Sullivan and Turner demanded 2 s. 6 d. each, more; I said, "Let me go down, and I will give you all I have" - they would not agree to this, and the two women knocked me down - Simmons was present then; one of the two women laid hold of my neck, by thrusting her fingers into my cravat - I called out Murder! to my friend, he did not come - I heard one of the three say, they would throw me out of the window; one of them put a chair against the door, I asked them to let me go down stairs. In consequence of their violence I gave 14 s. 6 d. to Turner and Sullivan, and they let me go down stairs - Simmons then opened the door and let me out - I do not think she had any of the 14 s. 6 d.; when I got down, I found my friend alone.

Cross-examined by MR. WALFORD. Q. What countryman are you - A. I came from the Isle of France; I have lived with Colonel Fonstein , in Han's-place, and with his father - I left about a month ago, as I was ill; I have got a place now, and am going to the East Indies - I had dined in the City, and I think we had two pints of beer and a glass of rum each at dinner; then we went a little way and had a pint of beer between us - we went to no other public-house, nor had any thing more to drink; I think I was a little in liquor, as I am not accustomed to drink much - I sent my friend to this house to enquire for a young woman whom I knew in France, I had seen her at this house two years before - I did not know what kind of a house it was; I stood at the door, and the girls said the young woman did live there, and they made us go up stairs - she was not a bad girl; Turner said, "Come up stairs, and you will see her," and I went up - I did not promise her any money; I was a quarter of an hour in the room altogether - nothing passed between us, I did not call Sullivan up.

Q. Simmons did not attempt to keep you in the room - A. She let me out when I gave the 2 s. 6 d. and the 14 s. 6 d. - she did not put the chair before the door; I did not want to go for an officer, for fear of my character, but my friend took me to Bow-street - I never sent any message to them that I would go to Gravesend, some people came to me.

COURT. Q. Do you swear you never had any criminal connexion with them - A. I had not.

CHARLES MITCHELL . I am a planter, and lodge with the prosecutor. I went with him to Drury-lane, intending to go to the Theatre; we had dined together in the City, we had two pints of porter between us, and a glass of rum and water - we were going to the Theatre, it wanted a quarter to five o'clock when we got to Drury-lane, we sauntered about and went to several courts; he pointed out a house in Swan-yard, and said, "I knew a young woman, named Mary Ann, who lived there, I wish you

would ask if she is there now, as I am a foreigner," he said he knew her as a lady's maid; I went to the door, which was open, I knocked with my hand against it, and four or five women came up from below; I asked for Mary Ann, they said she did not live there; one of the women said she knew me, I said that was strange, for I had not been in England for eight years; Baytiste stood by the stairs, one of them caught hold of him and went up stairs with him; I went up stairs to follow him, but when I got up, I saw no more of him - I went up to the second story with Sullivan, I said, I thought my friend was there; I had no money, and did not wish to go with her; she said I had better go down stairs and wait till he came, I did so, and sat down in the room on the ground floor; I heard him call me before he came down, he said, "Charles! Charles!" three times; I did not hear a cry of Murder! - when he came down he said he had been robbed; the women were present; there was a good deal of talking, I could not hear what was said; he said he would not leave till he had got his money. I told him he would never get it by waiting there, and went with him to Bow-street.

Cross-examined by MR. AIKIN. Q. What planter are you - A. Of sugar canes. I told Sullivan I had no money, she said my friend would pay her, I said, I knew nothing of that - Baptiste called out to me while I was down stairs, nothing passed about his having no money - I do not know what became of Sullivan, I was down in the parlour, he did not call her up; I heard feet shuffling about - it is a small house, I think if he had called Murder! lustily, I should have heard him; when he came down, he said he had been robbed of 2 l., but on coming out, he found he had a sovereign and two or three shillings left; then he reckoned his money, and said he had given them 13 s. 6 d. in silver, and 13 d. in copper; he said he was robbed, and had given them money, that one demanded 2 s. 6 d., another 3 s. and 1 s. and another 4 s.

Q. When he called out Charles! if you thought he wanted assistance, you would have gone to him - A. I did endeavour, but Kelly was in the parlour, and said, If I tried to go out, she would tear my liver out - I got hold of the door to open it, she prevented me, and said she was in the family way, and would swear her life against me - I said, I was not going to fight with her, and sat down; I was detained in the parlour about five minutes, Baptiste came down soon after he cried for me.

BENJAMIN MORRIS. I am a constable of Bow-street. The prosecutor came to me, I took him to Swan-yard, and found them all (the prisoners) at the house; the last witness pointed out Kelly, and the prosecutor the other three; he said, in their presence, that they had robbed and beat him up stairs.

TURNER'S Defence. Two gentlemen came and asked for Mary Ann, we said she was not there; he said, "You will do the same, let us go up, we went up," he wanted us to do wrong, but we refused.

SULLIVAN'S Defence. We were down at dinner, Mitchell asked if I knew him, he said, "Come up stairs," and offered me 2 s., I said that was too little, he said his friend would pay me; he did as he liked, I went down and he gave me 1 s.; I saw no more of him.

KELLY'S Defence. The gentleman came into the parlour, and being a stranger, I was in care of the parlour; he would pay nobody but the landlady for the room, she went up for it, I remained in the parlour, the man went towards the door, and I said he should not go till his friend came down, if he did, I would tear his coat, he pushed me, I said, "Don't, for I am in the family way."

SIMMONS'S Defence. He sent word that he would pay nobody but me, and I went up.

CHARLES MITCHELL . I did not propose to give Sullivan 2 s., or say my friend would pay for me.

TURNER - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 16.

SULLIVAN - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 16.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury.

KELLY - NOT GUILTY .

SIMMONS - NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18211024-22

1295. REBECCA BISSELL was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of October , six silver spoons, value 25 s., and one pair of sugar tongs, value 5 s. , the goods of William Mills .

ANN MILLS . I am the wife of William Mills , of York-street, Westminster - we keep a broker's shop . The prisoner lived with me as a married woman, I have known her husband above twenty years. In consequence of what my daughter told me, I examined a box of mine, on this day se'night - It was kept in my bed room on the first floor, and not locked, nor was the door locked; she lived on the second floor - I missed this property; I told her somebody had robbed me, she made no answer, but went up stairs, put her bonnet and shawl on, went out, and never returned, her husband still slept there. On Sunday evening, I saw her in Tothill-street, and took her - the constable was with me; I asked why she left her home, she said, through her husband's ill usage - I said that was not the case, but that she left on account of my business, the constable took her to the watch-house; he wished to search her, she gave up some duplicates, one was for a salt spoon, she said, if I would forgive her, she would tell me where they all were - I said, I did not wish to hurt her, if she would make the property good - she directed me to the different pawnbrokers.

HENRY BETTS . I took her, she directed me to Dobree's Charing-cross, Williams's Chapel-street, Archbutand Neat's Westminster Bridge-road, and Scarlet's a refiner, in Long-acre.

JAMES LAWSON . I am servant to Mr. Dobree. I have two spoons, pawned for 5 s., I do not know who by, in the name of Mary Mills , on the 17th of September.

JOHN WILLIAMS . I am a pawnbroker. The prisoner pawned a salt spoon with me, for 1 s.

GEORGE HUSON . I am servant to Mr. Neat, of Bridge-road. I have a silver table spoon, pawned on the 9th of October, by a woman, for 8 s. in the name of Smith.

NATHANEIL SCARLETT . I am a refiner, and live in Long-acre. I bought a pair of sugar tongs, on the 29th of September, I do not know of whom, they were broken.

HENRY POWELL . I am servant to Mrs. Archbut, a pawnbroker in Bridge-road. A woman pawned a tea spoon, on the 2d of October, in the name of Ann Willis , No. 9, Lambeth-walk. I have seen the prisoner before.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner begged for mercy.

GUILTY . Aged 42.

Confined Fourteen Days .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18211024-23

1296. BARBARA HAMMOND was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of September , 9 s. 6 d., in monies numbered , the property of Edward Jones , Senior .

EDWARD JONES . I am the son of Edward Jones , a publican , of Tothill-street, Westminster . The prisoner was our nursery maid for five months. Having missed money from the desk, which we left open, on the 26th of September at night, I left 15 s. 6 d., of marked money in the bowl, in the desk - I was called up at half-past two o'clock in the morning, I went down, and missed 9 s. 6 d., I sent for a constable, went to the prisoner's bed room, forced the door open, and found her in bed, I asked her for the money she had taken out of the desk, she said, she knew nothing of it, and had not got it - the constable found 9 s. 6 d., he said, in her presence, that he found it on the top of her bed.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. How many servants have you - A. Three male, and two female. I had to go through the other female servants' room, to get to her's, the bowl was not used after I marked the money, I marked none before - I put a broad arrow on it.

HENRY TAYLOR . I am servant to Mr. Jones. I sat up on this night, and saw the prisoner enter the bar about half-past two o'clock in the morning, she went to the desk, lifted it up, took out some silver, and also some biscuits out of a basket, then went up to her room - Davis and I jumped up after her, she ran too quick for us, she had a candle, which she blew out when she heard us - I called my master - I saw the constable find 9 s. 6 d., on the top of her bed, in a purse - I had seen my master mark it.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined One Month .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18211024-24

1297. JOHN LANE was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of October , thirteen manuscript books, called ledgers, value 9 s., and one other manuscript book of vouchers, value 1 s. , the goods of our Lord the King .

SECOND COUNT, for stealing fourteen other books.

THIRD COUNT, stating it to be 174 lbs. of waste paper, value 2 l. 10 s.

MR. WALFORD conducted the prosecution.

JOSEPH RYDER . I am a labourer, in the Armoury, in the Tower . On the 13th of October, at seven o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner at the door of the Record-office, he came out with a load on his shoulder, he shut the door, locked it, and put the key in his pocket - I followed him down stairs outside the Tower gate; and there a porter took the load from him, and I followed them both to Mr. Price's of Bishopsgate-street, a cheesemonger - both went in.

THOMAS PRICE . I am a cheesemonger, and live in Bishopsgate-street, City. On the 13th of October, about seven o'clock in the morning, I bought about 36 lbs. of waste paper, of the prisoner, and paid him 18 s. for it - it was books bound up in the shape of ledgers, the covers were torn off; I gave 4 d. a pound for it all - I have bought paper of him before.

ANTHONY HARRISON . On the 13th of October, Mr. Price delivered me 174 lbs. of paper, it was in fourteen books.

MR. JAMES HENRY BAILWIN . I am one of the chief clerks, in the Ordnance-office, in the Tower. The ledgers are under my charge, and are kept in the Record-office; those produced are some of them, they are accounts of the Ordnance-office, and all belong to the King, the prisoner was employed in the Stationery-office, eight months ago.

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 34.

Confined Six Months .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18211024-25

1298. JAMES SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of October , one handkerchief, value 5 s., the goods of Francis Fisher , from his person .

FRANCIS FISHER . I live at Bedford. On the 9th of October, I was in town, and about a quarter before twelve o'clock, I was on Fish-street-hill , my handkerchief was in my coat pocket - I was alone going towards the Borough, and saw the prisoner with four or five others; I suspected something, felt and missed my handkerchief, it was safe five minutes before - I felt it pulled out of my pocket, and saw the prisoner cross the road with it in his hand - I crossed after him, he turned round, saw me, and immediately ran off - I called Stop thief! he was stopped before I lost sight of him, near Thames-street, by two soldiers, one of them threw him down, and I found the handkerchief under him.

GEORGE WELFARE . I am a constable. On Tuesday, the 9th of October, M. Fisher brought the prisoner, and gave him in my charge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18211024-26

1299 MARY WILLIAMS and ANN GORDON were indicted for stealing, on the 2d of October , 3 s., and four sovereigns, the property of Hugh Thorp Kernot , from his person .

HUGH THORP KERNOT . I live in Ball's-court, Huggin-lane, and am a master chimney-sweep . On the 2d of October about half-past eleven o'clock at night, I was coming home through Skinner-street , the two prisoners stood near the Commercial-hall, another women was near them - as I was passing them Gordon caught hold of me; and asked for something to drink, I said, No, and desired her to walk on - she again repeated her request, and included her sister in it; Williams then came up, and took hold of me, I extricated myself from them, and said I would give them nothing - I immediately put my hand in my trowsers pocket, and missed four out of six sovereigns, and some loose silver - they were safe not a moment before. I never intended to stop with them, I followed, laid hold of them, and said, they had robbed me, and if they did not return my money, I would take them to the Compter, - I did take them there, and left them in the lobby, to fetch an officer. I met Pearman, took him there, and as soon as they were taken in, I saw a sovereign laying by

the side of the fire place - only the prisoners, and the turnkey were in the room, 11 s. was found on Gordon, and 9 s. 6 d. on Williams, and in a glove belonging to her, we found a note. All my sovereigns were of George the Fourth's reign, and so was that.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Your money was safe just before - A. Yes. I had my hand in my pocket just before, and felt it - the other woman did not interfere with them, she never came near them - I was perfectly sober. I did not lose so much silver, as I found on them.

JOSEPH PEARMAN . I am one of the night police. I saw Kernot crossing from the Compter, I found the prisoners there, he charged them with robbing him of four sovereigns, and some silver, Gordon said she had dropped a sovereign, I found one by the fire-place, about two yards from where she stood, I found 9 s. 6 d. on her, and 11 s. on Williams; a 10 l. country note was found in Williams's glove.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you know there was a sovereign on the floor - A. She said she dropped one, Williams contradicted her, and said "You have not." Both denied it. Kernot did not appear quite sober, but knew what he was about well enough.

JOHN HENSHAW . I was with Pearman when the prosecutor came for assistance. I saw the sovereign picked up. I found a 10 l. Rye Bank note, in Williams's glove - I think the prosecutor was rather the worse for liquor, but he knew what he was about perfectly well.

JOHN CARLISLE . I am a patrol. When the prosecutor came for an officer, he appeared to have been drinking, but knew what he was about.

WILLIAMS'S Defence. He has sworn false, he said he met two females before us. He insisted on our going with him.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18211024-27

1300. THOMAS RAMSAY and SAMUEL HALL were indicted for feloniously assaulting Ann Finch , on the King's highway, on the 5th of October , putting her in fear, and taking from her person, and against her will, 1 lb. of soap, value 2 s.; half a yard of muslin, value 3 s. 6 d.; one redicule, value 1 d., and 1 s. 6 d. in monies numbered, the property of Samuel Finch .

ANN FINCH . I am the wife of Samuel Finch , who keeps the Black Horse, public-house, Tower-hill . On the 5th of October, about eight o'clock at night, I was coming down Sun-street , with a female; I had a redicule in my hand, containing this property - I was at the Bishopsgate end of the street, a person laid hold of it and pulled, and I pulled also; I resisted, he gave two or three pulls, when the string broke, and he got it away - I only saw one person near, I had no opportunity of seeing his features, and should not know him. He ran down the court leading to Bishopsgate-street, I called Stop thief! I have not seen it since; the prisoners were taken in less than half an hour. I saw them at Bishopsgate-street watch-house, but I cannot speak to either of them; the soap was at the watch-house, I bought it of Mr. Wyatt, in the City-road; there was a small piece of brown, and the rest white; this corresponded with it, and it had the name of the person I bought it of on it.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. You have no knowledge of either of the prisoners - A. No; I only saw one person - I found the prisoners, and another in custody - Wyatt deals largely in soap; I have every reason to believe it was mine, the small piece of brown was given to make up the weight - nothing else was found.

JOHN WYATT . I am a soap dealer, and live in Windsor-place, City-road. On the evening of the 15th October, about seven o'clock or half-past, Finch bought a pound of soap, I served her, there was three squares of Windsor soap, and some other, and a small piece of brown, making up one pound - I went to the Mansion-house next morning, and saw the soap; I thought it was the same at that time, but since I have matched it, I think there may be more like it.

Cross-examined. Q. All the soap you make is marked with your name - A. Yes; I make a great deal.

JOHN FORRESTER . I am a constable. On the 5th of October, at half-past eight o'clock, Hesketh and I were in Bishopsgate-street, and saw the two prisoners, and one Barlett walking together. Were ran over and caught them, not in consequence of any alarm; we took them to the watch-house, and found two cakes of soap on Ramsay, and the rest on Hall.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18211024-28

1301 OWEN CLUTTON was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of September , fourteen ounces of tea, value 2 s. , the goods of the United Company of Merchants, trading to the East Indies .

GABRIEL BOLTER . I am a labourer at the East India Companys' warehouse, in Castle-street, City , The prisoner was employed to cooper the chests of tea , with me in the same cellar - I saw him on the Saturday morning about half-past eight o'clock, he pulled his coat off to go to work, he went to a chest, took some tea out, and put it in some part of his dress, soon after I saw him do it again, I informed the Elder, who found fourteen ounces of tea in his apron pocket, he had two aprons on, and a pocket to each.

JOHN WARD . I am an Excise officer. I found the tea, in the apron pocket of the prisoner.

WILLIAM SMITH . I am an officer. The prisoner was brought to me at Guildhall, when I got him to the Compter I found a bag containing fourteen ounces and a half, in his hat, and five ounces in his breeches pocket, and at his house, I found several such parcels.

THOMAS GLASS . I am the Elder. The tea found at his house, was wrapped in India paper.

GUILTY . Aged 60.

Confined One Year .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18211024-29

1302. JOHN FENNER was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of October , one pair of stockings, value 5 s. , the goods of Anthony Smith Johnson .

JOSEPH PEARMAN . I am a constable. On the 2d of October I saw the prisoner in Barbican , a little after eight o'clock in the evening very busy, at the door and window of Mr. Johnson's, a shoe maker s shop - I saw him go into the shop, snatch at something, and run out; I followed him, and got within twenty yards of him, he was returning back,

and I seized him, and found a pair of shoes under his coat, Mr. Johnson claimed them; he said he picked them up in Smithfield.

ANTHONY SMITH JOHNSON . Pearman brought me the shoes, which I knew to be mine.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I found them by the sheep pens in Smithfield.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Whipped and Discharged .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18211024-30

1303. JAMES KING was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of September , one box coat, value 2 l. , the goods of Samuel Simpson Emerson .

DANIEL FORRESTER . I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner on Sunday, the 30th of September, about half-past two o'clock in the afternoon, at the George livery-stables, Grub-street - I heard a noise in the coach-house, somebody crying Master! I came out and missed a great coat from the coach-house, I had seen it there half an hour before - a woman gave me information; I ran out and secured the prisoner with it under his arm.

SAMUEL SIMPSON EMERSON . I live in Whitechapel-road. The box coat was in my coach-house - it is mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I met a man in Wood-street, he said, he was going out with a horse and cart, and asked me to fetch his coat, I went down the yard, called out "Master! is nobody here" - I came out, saw a person, and said that a man sent me for the coat. The gentleman took it from me.

GUILTY . Aged 37.

Confined Three Months , and Publicly Whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18211024-31

1304. WILLIAM FRANCIS and JOHN MORING were indicted for stealing, on the 23d of October , one umbrella, value 6 s. , the goods of Alexander Bowen Hopkins .

ALEXANDER BOWEN HOPKINS . I keep a jeweller's shop , and live at Aldgate . On the 23d of October, about seven o'clock in the evening, an umbrella hung inside my shop for sale - I was at the back of the shop, and was told it was stolen; I found the prisoners at the watch-house in about five minutes after - I saw it safe five minutes before.

DANIEL FORRESTER . I am a constable. About a quarter past seven o'clock on Tuesday evening, I was going towards Aldgate, and saw Moring and another, who I believe to be Francis, in company together, looking into Mr. Hopkin's shop; I crossed over, they were walking backwards and forwards - in about five minutes, the man who was with Moring, took down the umbrella, and handed it to him; I attempted to seize the person who took it down, but he slipped away, I then seized Moring with it in his hand - Francis was stopped soon after. He was running from the cry.

GEORGE LOCK . I was with Forrester, and saw Francis at the window - I am sure of him; I went a few doors off, and there was a cry of Stop thief! Francis was running as hard as he could - I stopped him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

FRANCIS'S Defence. I never saw it.

MORING'S Defence. I was going home, and they took me.

FRANCIS. - GUILTY . Aged 17.

MORING. - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Six Months , and Publicly Whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18211024-32

1305. JAMES HOPKINS was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of September , nine yards and a quarter of Manchester nankeen, value 9 s. , the goods of Samuel Minton .

SAMUEL MINTON . I am a woollen-draper , and live in the Minories . On Saturday evening, the 22d of September, between seven and eight o'clock, this nankeen was in the window, near the door; my daughter was sitting in the shop, she called out - I ran out, and the prisoner was taken, about twenty yards off, in George-street, in about two minutes.

ANN SCOTT . I live in Rose and Crown-court, Moorfields. On the 22d of September, I was coming up the Minories, and heard the cry of Stop thief! opposite Minton's shop - I saw the prisoner running with something in his hand, down George-street, I followed, saw him stopped, and drop the nankeen out of his apron.

CHARLES THOROUGHGOOD . I am an officer. I stopped the prisoner, and saw the nankeen in his hand, he dropped it - it was picked up, and given to me.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18211024-33

1306. GEORGE GREEN was indicted for embezzlement .

JAMES BAMPTON . I live in Brackley-street, Golden-lane, City , and keep a coal-shed . The prisoner was my servant , employed to carry out coals, and receive the money; Bell was a customer of mine, and owed me 4 s. 3 d. When the prisoner received money, he should give it me immediately. He delivered Bell's coals.

JOHN BELLS . I live in Long-alley, Moorfields. On the 5th of October, I had a sack of coals from the prosecutor's, the prisoner brought it - I paid him 4 s. 3 d., for them; this was Friday afternoon, next night Bampton came to me - I told him I had paid the prisoner for them.

JAMES BAMPTON . When he returned from Bell's, he said he had not paid him, but would if I would call on Monday morning - he never gave me the 4 s. 3 d.,

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Confined Fourteen Days .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18211024-34

THIRD DAY, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 26.

1307. MARY KING and ELIZA JEFFRIES were indicted for stealing, on the 26th of September , ten yards of lace, value 13 s., and one hundred yards of ribbon, value 23 s. , the goods of James Hopkins .

JAMES SMITH . I am shopman to Mr. Hopkins, a linen-draper , who lives in Great Chapel-street, Westminster . On the 26th of September the prisoners came into the shop together, and asked to see some ribbons, I shewed them

four drawers, they bought several small quantities - I then shewed them lace, they both stood together, and bought a quarter of a yard, which came to 4 d., I then shewed them another drawer of ribbons, and I saw King put her hand into the drawer, take out a roll of ribbon, and put it under her shawl, and Jeffries put her hand under her shawl, and received it from her - I heard King whisper to her, "Have you got it?" she said, "Yes;" they paid for what they had, and were going out together, I ran and took hold of Jeffries, and asked what she had under her arm, she said nothing; I lifted up her arm, and took this piece of ribbon, which was concealed under her arm and under her shawl - King went out of the shop as fast as she could. I left Jeffries in the shop, and fetched King back. Mr. Hopkins came down. A basket was found close to where they stood, containing lace and other things, which I had shewn them.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Other women were in the shop - A. There were several customers by. If she had meant to buy it she would not have put it under her shawl; another shopman was there, he did not serve them, nor was he serving lace.

JAMES HOPKINS . I was called down between four and five o'clock, and found the two prisoners in the shop, Smith charged them with stealing ribbons; he produced a piece which he said he found under Jeffries's arm. I asked her what induced her to take it - they made no answer. I then asked if they had any more - they said No. I saw a basket laying at their feet, and asked who it belonged to - King said she knew nothing of it. I sent for a constable. I found three pieces of ribbon and a piece of lace in it, which are mine.

Cross-examined. Q. You do not know it was their basket - A. It stood close at their feet.

KING'S Defence. My sister said the ribbon rolled off the counter, and she picked it up. As to the basket, there was another woman close to us.

JEFFRIES'S Defence. I picked it up, and put it under my arm. My sister knew nothing of it.

KING - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

JEFFRIES - GUILTY . Aged 14.

Fined One Shilling, and Discharged .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18211024-35

1308. DANIEL HURLEY was charged on the Coroner's Inquisition (only), with killing and slaying Charles Harris .

JAMES CROCKWELL . I am an officer. I sent for the prisoner - he surrendered himself to me.

ANN ECLEY . Last Wednesday week I was in company with Charles Harris - We went into the tap-room of the Spread Eagle, public-house, Kingsland-road . I stood by the table, and the prisoner came from the fire-side and hit me twice. Harris was sitting down at the table; the prisoner struck me and Harris struck him, and then the prisoner struck him a violent blow on his breast, just under his heart. The prisoner was dressed as a sailor. Harris fell from the blow, and was picked up by two men who were there. I had a pint pot in my hand with some beer in it, and I struck the prisoner on the head with the pot. Harris and I then went into the bar - the prisoner went out and came in again in a short time. I was sitting down in the bar and he hit me again, and then pushed Harris against the table in the bar. I do not know whether he struck him. The landlord came forward, took him by the shoulder, and made him go out. Harris was in liquor, but was sober enough afterwards. I had lived with Harris above seven years and a half, his health was always very good; he was taken to the hospital two days after. He worked the day after it happened, and next day I took him to the hospital, as he complained that he could not hold himself up to work; he was a shoemaker, and about fifty years old; he died at the workhouse at a quarter past twelve o'clock last Sunday night.

Prisoner. Q. What did you tell Crockwell, the constable about this - A. I told him every thing as I have now.

COURT. Q. Did Harris strike the prisoner before he struck you - A. No. I had no quarrel with the prisoner, he was a stranger.

WILLIAM YARWORTH . I am landlord of the house. I was not present till Harris and the woman came into the bar. Harris's waistcoat was torn, and he had a scratch on his face, he did not appear much in liquor; the woman was a good deal in liquor. When I first saw Hurley he did not appear to have received any injury, except a cut with the pot over the head. I desired him to leave the house; he said was he to stand there and have his brains beat out, without taking his own part. I said I knew nothing about that, and told him to leave, he went to the door and stood with it in his hand a few minutes, and the woman began to abuse him; he said if she went on he would come and give her a slap - she did keep on, and he turned back and struck her and Harris also, and knocked his hat off; he was sitting behind the table, he was not knocked against the table. I then turned the prisoner out, and he went away.

GEORGE CORMACK . I was not in the tap-room at the first beginning; when I went in Hurley and the woman were quarrelling, she was abusing him - he went across to her and gave her a slight slap on the face - this was in the tap-room - Immediately afterwards the deceased struck the prisoner, and in the meantime the woman threw a pint pot at the prisoner's head, and cut his head open; she said she would go and fetch somebody to take the prisoner away - he struck the deceased one or two blows after the woman threw the pot. I did not see Harris. I saw no more; the woman and the deceased went out.

WILLIAM PEGLER . I went in the tap-room with Cormack, he went out before the affair began, and returned again; the woman was singing a song - the prisoner did not approve of it, and said she had been jeering all the evening long - he got up from his seat and told her she had better be quiet - she would not, but used abusive words; he then gave her a slap with his hand - Harris got up and struck him - they had a scuffle together, and the woman threw a pint pot at the prisoner's head. The deceased did not appear to be hurt.

JAMES PARKINSON , ESQ. I am a surgeon. I saw Harris on Saturday last, at the workhouse, he was very ill then, he had been bled at the hospital, and every thing necessary was done. I saw him again on Sunday, between nine and ten o'clock in the morning, he then appeared to be dying, he died that day between one and

two o'clock. Next day I examined his body. I opened it, and found the last two ribs on the left side fractured; the spleen was in a very diseased and altered state. I saw no external marks of violence. On searching I could not discover any thing that leads me to say the fracture was the cause of his death. I am unable to decide what caused it. The rib was broken in the projecting or convex part, but in such a way that it projected externally, the inner part was comparatively smooth, and had not injured the lungs. It being broken outside, proves that the force must have been applied to the point of the ribs, immediately over where the spleen lay. Such a state of spleen is often found without any injury - the appearance of the spleen was that which would arise from cronic diseases, rather than from a blow recently received.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Ld. Chief Justice Abbott.

Reference Number: t18211024-36

1309. WILLIAM JONES was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of James Mitchell , about five o'clock in the morning, on the 23d of October , and stealing therein, two pair of shoes, value 5 s., his property .

JAMES ARNOLD . I live in the dwelling-house of James Mitchell , in the Hackney-road . I generally get up at five o'clock in the morning, my room faces the street on the first floor. Mitchell sleeps in the room over me. At five o'clock on Wednesday morning last, I was getting up, it was dark, if the morning had been fine there would have been a little light, so that I could have seen a person in the street, and have known him. I had no candle - I heard a terrible wrenching at the door or shop window, I looked over the curtain and saw a person with a white apron on, apparently wrenching the door open. Some men were going past, he went away, and came again five or six times. Every time he came I still saw him at work and heard the wrenching. I called up Mitchell - we both dressed, went down to the private door, and opened it softly, and found the shop door open. I called "Come out!" repeatedly, and at last I heard somebody move - I again said "Come out!" the prisoner came out - I collared him, gave him to Mitchell, and fetched a watchman. We found a crow-bar in the shop - I examined the door, found it had been wrenched open, and very much splintered.

JAMES MITCHELL . I keep the house, and am a shoemaker . I examined the shop, after giving the prisoner in charge, and found two pair of shoes taken off the nails where they were at half-past nine o'clock the night before. They were moved about two yards, they were shoes which I had to mend. I gave the crow-bar to the constable. It was not in the shop the night before.

THOMAS STRICKLAND . I am a constable. The prisoner was given in my charge.

Prisoner's Defence. I never had the bar. I saw the door open, a woman said two men had ran away; I went in, and the gentleman came in.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Of stealing only.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Ld. Chief Justice Abbott.

Reference Number: t18211024-37

1310. BENJAMIN ABBOTT was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of September , at Paddington , one mare, price 2 l.; one cart, value 3 l., and one set of harness, value 10 s , the goods of Samuel Martin .

SAMUEL MARTIN . I live with my father at Woolwich. I keep a poney and cart - on Wednesday night, the 12th of September, the prisoner came and spoke to my father about fetching some things from Vauxhall for him; I was in the room, and he said he would start at six o'clock in the morning if I was ready - he came again at half-past seven o'clock the next morning, and we went together in the cart; I merely drove the cart - he took me to Princes-place, Lambeth , and told me to stop; he went up by the circulating library, and said the things were there; then he jumped up in the cart and went on about one hundred yards - he then got out again at the gate of a wheeler's yard, opened it, and told me to drive in; there was a lot of old carts in the yard and a wheeler's-shop - while I was putting on the nose-bag, he took the whip and my cloak out of the cart, and said he would take them to his brother's, for it was not safe to leave them there - he went away with them, returned, and I had just got the nose-bag on; he said he would go and pack up his things, and asked me to go with him - we both went along a street to some house, he knocked at the door, and a gentleman looked out of the window, he went in there a little while, came out again, and said that was an officer belonging to his ship; then he said he had to go to Mr. March's, straw-bonnet shop, in Kennington-cross - we went there, he was in there about ten minutes talking to a man, I stopped out at the door - when he came out we had a pint of beer at a public-house, and he wrote a letter, and gave me a card, and when we came out he said, We both wanted to go to Woolwich, and I had better go to March's with the note to get a box, while he went and packed up his things - I went to March's, and he went another way; I have the note (read) "For Mr. March, straw-bonnet maker, Kennington, September 12, 1821. - Mr. March, please to let the bearer have the box for me to send down. W. E. A.". - When I got to March's, they said they knew nothing of him, that he only came there with an excuse about straw - March's was about a mile from the wheeler's, where I left the cart - I went back there, but my horse and cart were gone, and the prisoner too; Tomkins afterwards shewed me the cart and pony, it was mine; I got the harness from Williams.

JOHN WILLIAMS . I am a harness-maker, and live in the Edgware-road, Paddington. The prisoner came to me with a horse and cart, I think it was on a Thursday, about three o'clock in the afternoon; he was a stranger to me, he drove up to my door and enquired for a pony-saddle, I had none; he said he wanted to sell his harness and cart, for he was going to ride, and not drive; he asked 8 s. 6 d. for the harness, which I agreed to give him, it was as much as I could afford to give - I fitted up a bridle for him to put on the pony, and lent him a strap to buckle on a cloth, and he bought a whip - he went away on the pony, leaving the cart, and said he should be gone about half an hour, he returned in about half an hour, with Tomkins and Kerry, who he sold the cart and pony to, at my door - Martin claimed the harness.

FREDERICK TOMKINS . I live in Virgil's-place, Marylebone. On Thursday, about four o'clock in the afternoon,

I was in the New-road, near Quebec-street, with Kerry, in his cart, and met the prisoner; he was riding on a pony, without a saddle, he called to us and asked if we wanted a pony; I asked the price, he said three guineas, I said, that was too much; he said, he would sell me a cart very cheap, as he knew me (I did not know him), and that if I liked to go and look at it, I could pay him half down, and half in three months - I went with him and looked at the cart at Williams's door, Edgware-road; he asked 3 l. for the cart, I offered him 30 s., he agreed to take it - I was to pay him 1 l. down, and 10 s. to Williams, who he said was a friend of his - I went to get the money, and only had 18 s.; I took Kerry with me to Williams to see me pay for it; I came as far as the Royal Oak, public-house, Circus-street, the prisoner went with me all the way; I paid him there, and he gave me a receipt for 1 l., and said he would call on Sunday for the 2 s., and would forgive me the 10 s. - I then thought it was not all right exactly, I said I do not think it is right; he said, "If you will go with me I will take you to Williams, and he will satisfy you" - I went to Williams with him and asked if he knew him, he said he did not, he took me by the collar, told me to come out, and said he would give me two other references; he took me to Westminster, and told me to stand opposite a shop. I saw him talking to a man - I went over and asked if he knew him, he said No; and then the prisoner ran through the house and down a court at the back; I ran, caught him, and said "If you leave me, I will kill you, I think you have stolen it" - I secured him.

SAMPSON KERRY . Tomkins was in my cart, coming from Billingsgate. Tomkins went to bargain with the prisoner about the cart, I went afterwards to fetch the cart - the prisoner then offered to sell it to me; he said, Williams was about it, but I should have the first offer; he asked 30 s. for it, I said I had not enough money; he said it was of no consequence, he would call on Sunday morning, or I might pay Williams - we went to the Royal Oak, public-house, he wrote me a receipt in part. I paid him 18 s. - we went to Williams's. Tomkins's story is correct.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 23.

First Middlesex Jury before Ld. Chief Justice Abbott.

Reference Number: t18211024-38

1311. NOWELL WILKINSON and JOSEPH MARSDEN were indicted for stealing, on the 28th of September , 1093 lbs. of guinea grain, value 20 l., the goods of James Marsh , Henry Coombe , and John Young , in a certain boat belonging to them, in the port of London , being a port of entry and discharge .

FRANCIS VALENTINE DORNEY . I am a tide-waiter. On the 29th of September, I was on board the John Mensina , which laid off the Tower, on the Middlesex side of the River; I received three casks on board, marked C. Nos. 1, 2, and 3. The prisoner, Wilkinson, delivered them to me out of a boat; he managed the boat, nobody else was in it - he said they contained guinea grain, which is a grain smaller than pepper, of a triangular form - the boat had "Marsh and Co." painted on it; the casks remained on board until the 10th of October, Warmby and I had charge of them; they were never opened while under my care - I went ashore two or three times a-day, and have remained ashore four hours, but was never ashore at night. On the 10th of October, Mr. Albert came on board and enquired for the chests; I knew him to be a searcher of the Customs. They had been stowed away the day before; he ordered me to assist in unheading them, I did so, and found ashes, cinders, and things of no value in them; it was not guinea grain.

CHRISTOPHER WARMBY . I was a tide-waiter on board the vessel. I remember Wilkinson bringing the chests; I and the last witness were never absent from the ship together - the chests were never opened while under my charge; I was present when Albert saw them, they contained rubbish - when Wilkinson brought them, Dorney asked him for a searcher's note, he said it was unnecessary, for it was guinea grain - a searcher's note ought to come with all packages; it contains the number and marks of the goods, and the searcher's name - we were satisfied with his answer, and took it in.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Was the vessel going to sail - A. Yes; for Amsterdam, the crew were on board, it consisted of the captain, his wife, and brother, who was steersman, the cook, and two children - I slept in the hold where the casks were, when one of us was in bed, the other was on deck; it was the first time I was on board for the Customs, and I was strange to the business.

FRANCIS VALENTINE DORNEY re-examined. There is a drawback on guinea grain, I did not know that it required a searcher's note, I expect one with every thing that has a drawback, but thought it was unnecessary with this; I received one about five days after.

JAMES NIGHTINGALE . I work for Mr. Brown, a wharfinger on the river Lea - I saw some stuff like beans, shifted from small bags into sacks at the wharf about three weeks ago - I do not know who did it.

RICHARD WOOD . I am Mr. Brown's man. I saw some stuff shifted - I never saw the prisoners before.

WILLIAM PUGH . I am a carman. I carted five bags from Brown's wharf, and delivered them at a warehouse near the church, in Cannon-street - I never saw the prisoners in the transaction.

(Several other witnesses being called, were not in attendance.)

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18211024-39

1312. JOHN SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of October , one pocket-book, value 1 d., and 21 s. 6 d. in monies numbered, the property of Thomas Hall , from his person .

THOMAS HALL . On Saturday night, the 13th of October, about twelve o'clock, I went into the Coachmaker's Arms, public-house, Long-acre . I was perfectly sober. I called for a glass of gin, took out my pocket-book, and gave half-a-crown, returned my pocket-book to my coat pocket, and as I was taking up the glass to drink, I felt something at my pocket, and saw the prisoner's hand go from my pocket; he opened the door, and I saw the pocket-book in his hand - he ran out, I pursued him down Hanover-street, across a street or two, and saw the watchman lay hold of him in Nottingham-court; he took him to the watch-house - while the watchman was holding him, he thrust his hand into my bosom, and said, my pocket-book was there; the watchman took his hand out, and I found it there - he

must have put it there - it contained a sovereign, 1 s. 6 d. and some memorandums.

MORRIS QUILL . I am the watchman. I seized the prisoner, who was running, the prosecutor was pursuing him, calling Stop thief! and said he had robbed him of his pocket-book; the prisoner thrust his hand into his bosom, and said "Here it is."

Prisoner. Q. Did I not collar the prosecutor - A. No.

ROBERT COOPER . I am a watchman. I saw the prisoner run out of the Coachmaker's Arms, public-house; Hall followed him, calling Stop thief! he ran as fast as he could, he was secured when I came up - Hall was holding the prisoner's hand in his bosom, he then said "Draw your hand out, for if you have put it there, leave it there, you thief."

Prisoner's Defence The house was full of people and girls - I saw him pull his pocket-book out, and put it in his bosom again - I heard the cry and ran; he charged me with it, and I said "It is in your bosom."

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury, before Ld. Chief Justice Abbott.

Reference Number: t18211024-40

1313. JAMES BARRETT and MARGARET BARRETT were indicted for stealing, on the 29th of August , two napkins, value 10 s.; six table-cloths, value 18 s.; eighteen handkerchiefs, value 40 s.; five pillow-cases, value 10 s.; eight sheets, value 40 s.; twenty-three towels, value 23 s.; five night-caps, value 2 s.; six pair of stockings, value 30 s.; four waistcoats, value 20 s.; three shifts, value 8 s.; two pin-cloths, value 1 s.; four books, value 10 s.; one silver ornament, value 10 s.; thirty-two drinking glasses, value 33 s.; eighty-five plates, value 3 l.; twenty-one knives, value 20 s.; twenty-one forks, value 20 s., and five spoons, value 9 s., the goods of Nathan Mayer Rothschild , in his dwelling-house .

MESSRS. ADOLPHUS and BRODRICK conducted the prosecution.

JESSEE ALLARD . I am valet to Nathan Mayer Rothschild , Esq., of Stamford-hill . The female prisoner was his dairy-maid, she had been so about fifteen months, and was in his service when she was apprehended. The male prisoner is her husband - I have seen him at Mr. Rothschild's three or four times, but not for five or six weeks before his apprehension, as I was absent for about a month.

JOHN JOSS . I am a patrol. I searched the prisoners' house in consequence of a warrant; the male prisoner was in custody at the time, but I did not know it. I searched the house three times. The first time I searched nobody was there; I found various articles there the first time, part of which I produce. I have a list of the articles which I brought away. Here are (producing them) five shirts, two silk handkerchiefs, four silver spoons - three tea and one salt spoon - five pillow-cases, five pair of silk stockings, and I found a pair of new silk stockings rolled up in a paper, directed to Mr. Rothschild; and four muslim handkerchiefs, that is all I found on the first search, which was on the 29th of August; the house was shut up then, there are only two rooms, part was found in a trunk in the upper room, and part concealed under the bed; there was three or four bolsters, and six or seven pillows. On removing the bed-clothes there were parcels of property. I saw Barrett at Mr. Bevill's door on the 29th of August, and said, in his hearing that I had found a great quantity of fine linen in his house, which could not, I thought, belong to a man of his description; he pulled out his shirt and said "I always wear fine linen." I went again to the house on the 30th, and found his wife there, Lappan went with me; we went up stairs and she was in the room. Lappan was there before me and let me in. I made further search about the bed; and found eight cut glass rummers. I found in the bed twenty-two towels and napkins, three sheets, five night-caps, two table-cloths, three cambric pocket-handkerchiefs, six muslin neck-handkerchiefs, five pair of silk stockings, and one pair new, in a paper. I am not able to say what was found the first time. The shirts, handkerchiefs, and sheets were found the first day I know, and on the second day I found the napkins and towels. When I came to one particular towel, she said, "That's my own." She then said, "I will give you anything to desist from making further search." I afterwards found four white Marseilles waistcoats, two shifts, three pillowcases, two pin-cloths, a childs's shirt, four volumes of Classic Tales, one with Mr. Rothschild's name in it, and a lady's tortoiseshell writing-desk. Barrett claimed a pair of breeches, gaiters, watch, spoons, and other things which I found at the house, and he wished the key of the house to be given to his daughter. I found a child's coral head there the first time, and some knives and forks.

Cross-examined by MR. CURWOOD. Q. On the 29th you told Barrett you had found shirts finer than he could have - A. Yes, and the next day I found his wife at the house, she was at large.

COURT. Q. When did you find the knives and forks - A. I found twenty-seven knives and forks, on the second day. I made a third search on the 31st, and found twenty-seven China plates, thirteen China saucers, forty-four blue and white plates, and four jugs; the plates were packed in five or six different hampers with hay, and full of glass and China.

JOHN LAPPAN . I am one of the horse patrol of Bow-street. I was with Joss at the second search, I got there before him, and found Mrs. Barrett there - Joss came in a quarter of an hour after, I told Mrs. Barrett, I was come to search the house again; I had been present at the first search; at the second search a variety of articles were found. When we were turning the napkins over, she said one was her own, and on searching further she said, "Pray do not search any more, and I will give you something for yourselves," I was present at the third search, and I made a fourth search on the Saturday, and only found a few small things; some clothes were found, which Barrett claimed, also the keys of the house.

FRANCES PHASACCALI . I am house-maid to Mr. Rothschild. Margaret Barrett lived two years and three months with the family, the man is her husband. In the course of five weeks before the 6th of September, I saw him at the house, I think, four times - I saw him two Sundays in the afternoon, till about ten o'clock at night, and at that time, he bid me good night, and went out of the kitchen to sleep in the house, as I suppose. On Wednesday, the 8th of August, he spent the evening with us, and at half-past one

o'clock in the morning left me in one of the rooms, where I had been sitting, and wished me good night to go to bed, I did not see him again at daylight, Mrs. Barrett, was generally the first person up in the family. I saw the property produced at the office, here are some towels with my master's name on them, they were under my care, and in daily use, the marks have been picked out of some of the things. I often missed things from time to time, but did not mention it, as I thought they might be left at the town house. I kept the linen in a press in my bedroom. The plates were generally kept in a cupboard, not in the dairy.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. Were the prisoners ever left in charge of the house - A. Yes, two winters. I missed none of the linen when we returned.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

ELIZA ANDREWS . I am under nurse-maid to Mr. Rothschild. I have frequently seen the male prisoner there, the last time I saw him was on the 26th of August, in the morning, about eight o'clock, in the kitchen. I know the coral head to belong to the youngest child. I know one of the books, I have seen one like it in the house, it had Master Rothschild's name in it; here is a pair of silk stockings which I know to be Mr. Rothschild's. We had plates of these patterns, and of this description. I only remember Barrett sleeping in the house once, that was on the 8th August.

JAMES HALL . I am footman to Mr. Rothschild. I know the spoons to be his property, we had them about eighteen months - we missed four others - we did not miss them altogether - the knives and forks are the same pattern as Mr. Rothschild's, and were missed at different times - the glasses are the same patterns as my master's, we missed a great many, three or four at a time.

THOMAS BOWEN . I am groom to Mr. Rothschild. On the 19th of August, the morning after a party. I saw Barrett go from the house with a bullrush basket under his arm, it did not appear to be full. I wished him good morning, and he did the same: the basket appeared quite light.

Cross-examined. Q. The children had a party, and there was a good deal of broken victuals - A. Yes.

SUSAN BAILY . I am head nurse to Mr. Rothschild, and can speak to one napkin as my master's property.

JAMES BARRETT 'S Defence. I was never accessary to conveying any property away to my habitation, but am innocently implicated in the charge.

MARGARET BARRETT 'S Defence. My husband knew nothing about it. I had a great deal of the linen from a gentleman who lodged with me at Walthamstow, at one guinea a week, as he could not pay me.

JAMES BARRETT - GUILTY . Aged 52.

Of Stealing to the value of 39 s. only.

Transported for Seven Years .

MARGARET BARRETT - NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Ld. Chief Justice Abbott.

Reference Number: t18211024-41

1314. NOWELL WILKINSON and JOSEPH MARSDEN were again indicted for stealing, on the 7th of October , at St. Leonard, Bromley , 6696 lbs. of nux vomica, value 90 l. the goods of James Marsh , Henry Coombe , and John Young , in a certain boat belonging to them in the Port of London , being a port of entry and discharge .

MR. LAW conducted the prosecution.

JAMES MARSH . I am in partnership with Henry Coombe and John Young , we are lightermen and agents , our counting house is in Tower-street. On the 4th of October I saw Wilkinson, he said a Mr. Cooper would be with me and give me some particulars to enter thirty bales of nux vomica, containing 750 bags. Mr. Cooper brought me certain warrants, and desired me to enter thirty bales of nux vomica by the first vessel to Amsterdam. We entered them at the Custom-house for the York Merchant vessel, laying in the London Docks; we entered them in the usual way, and gave the cocket, bill, and warrants over to Mr. Cooper. When all was done at the Custom-house I gave Wilkinson charge of my lug-boat and tarpaulings, with directions to take in the nux vomica at Bow-creek, which is by the East India Docks, on the Middlesex side of the River; he was to put them on board the York Merchant, then laying in the London Docks, which are five or six miles from Bow-creek. I do not know what occurred afterwards.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. The warrants and cockets were delivered to Cooper to pay the charges - A. Yes. He represented himself as the owner. I was bondsman for the goods, that they should go to Amsterdam. I considered them in my charge, and expected to receive a lighterage on them; Wilkinson was employed by me, I expected to have to pay him. I had employed him several times before, but not constantly, he introduced Cooper to me as a merchant. Cooper entered into a bond as the exporter. It was put on board my boat from the East India Company's warehouse, Bow-creek, and therefore under my care - I gave Wilkinson charge of my boat and tarpauling, as my servant - it was cleared at the Custom-house in my name, as lighterman, and my name was on the boat. I gave Cooper in charge of an officer for a fraud, in conspiring to cheat the Government. I never saw it in any boat myself.

SAMUEL JENNER . I am superintendant of a floor in the East India Company's warehouses. On the 4th of October, I received an order to pack 750 bags of nux vomica in three different lots, and deliver it out of the warehouse for G. Cooper. I was to make thirty bales of the 750 bags. I proceeded to pack it in thirty bales on the 4th of October, it was done under my inspection. I packed it in coarse baggage, twenty-five bags in each bale, and on the 6th of October Wilkinson brought the warrant to me to deliver them. I delivered them into the hands of G. Smith, the wharfinger, to carry to Wilkinson's boat. Each bag weighed from 14 to 18 lbs.

Cross-examined. Q. Was Cooper there - A. I rather think he came to me about them on the 3d, I delivered them on the 6th. I gave the wharfinger the warrants with them, and saw no more of them.

MR. MARSH. The duties were not paid on them, they were to be exported free of duty; if they are consumed at home there is a duty of 2 s. 6 d. a pound - the article itself is not worth above 1 d. a pound.

GEORGE SMITH . I am employed in the East India Company's warehouse, as wharfinger. On the 6th of

October, I received thirty bales of nux vomica from Jenner, and delivered them to Wilkinson, the lighterman, I gave him the same Jenner gave me, and made no alteration in them.

THOMAS BROWN . I keep Bromley wharf. On the 7th of October, I saw Wilkinson with two persons named Marsden (the prisoner and another); they had a boat load of bales, which were taken ashore and put in my warehouse, which is in Middlesex; it is in the Lea-cut, on this side of the River Lea - the bales were unpacked by Wilkinson and the two Marsdens, they took the nux vomica out, and introduced any rubbish which they could get at the place, and sent the nux vomica in sacks to London - Sumner carted it, they were about eighteen hours unpacking it; Marsden's brother had taken my warehouse nearly a month before, and never put any thing in but once before - I do not know what became of the packages.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you see all this going on - A. I was in bed most of the time - Marsden's brother shewed me some papers; he treated the goods as his property.

JAMES NIGHTINGALE . I am servant to Mr. Brown. On the 7th of October, I was at the wharf, and saw the nux vomica shifted from little bags; I do not know who did it - I do not know the prisoners; three persons were shifting it into sacks.

JAMES MORGAN . I am a tide-waiter. On the 9th of October, Wilkinson came to the London Docks on board the York Merchant; he said he had thirty bundles of nux vomica for the ship; the Captain told him to bring it alongside, which he did - the whip was lowered down to get up the bags, it is a rope with a hook - the mate told Wilkinson to hook the bundles, he said

"No, if I do, that will tear the bundles; give me a pair of slings, and I will sling them," which he did, and they were got into the ship - I took an account of them, they were marked C, from No. 4 to 33, and were put down in the main hatchway, and remained there while we were waiting for other goods to take into the hold - I was the officer on board, and booked them as nux vomica, my duty was to watch them - it was impossible they could be meddled with without my knowledge; they were examined in less than an hour after, in consequence of Albert's coming, they proved to be cinders and coal-ashes, and not nux vomica - I saw them all examined; the cinders were small, so that if a book broke a hole in the bag they would fall out; two or three wrappers were round them, but the book is large.

WILLIAM JOHN ALBERT . I am a tide-searcher. I have heard the last witness's account; it is correct.

Cross-examined. Q. If they were exported, there would be no duty - A. No; it was entered for exportation, and if smuggled ashore, the party have the advantage of sale without paying the duty.

THOMAS BROWN re-examined. I do not know how the bales were marked; there were cinders on my premises - they were not to pay me for them.

SAMUEL JENNER . When I delivered the bales, the export mark was C., No. 4 to 33.

WILKINSON'S Defence. The warrant belonged to W. Marsden, who was my employer, Marsh, gave me the cocket. and Marsden gave me the warrants and money to pay the charges - I was under his direction altogether.

MARSDEN'S Defence. I had the command of a small vessel at Limehouse, in the employ of William Marsden . He was the owner of the goods, and employed Cooper, he went down and assisted Wilkinson to land the goods as his property.

THOMAS BROWN re-examined. Lea-cut is private property, and is a canal. My wharf is three-quarters of a mile from the River Thames - Wilkinson had a lug-boat, not a lighter.

SAMUEL THACKER , ESQ. I am solicitor for the Customs. I know Lea-cut is within the Port of London, it is an outlet from the Thames to the River Lea.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you know the situation of Brown's warehouses - A. No; whether they are on the Lea or the Cut, I do not know.

GEORGE COOPER . Mr. William Marsden applied to me to let him have the use of my name, to pass the entry of some nux vomica, as my property - I went to Marsh and Co. to pass the goods; they delivered some papers to me, which I delivered to W. Marsden - I had nothing more to do with them than lending my name, and entering into a bond - Marsden gave me the original warrants to deliver to Marsh.

MR. LAW. Q. For what purpose did you understand your name was to be used - A. He did not say why he wished to use my name - The name

"Cooper," on the document is not my writing.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. Did you understand it to be a smuggling transaction - A. No,

The learned Judge in summing up the case, desired the Jury to say whether they considered the goods as the property of Marsh and Co. or William Marsden ; for if they were the property of William Marsden , the question was, whether, as he was present at the transfer from one sack to the other, the prisoners could be considered as committing felony; though they were defrauding Marsh and Co.; who gave security for their being exported.

The Jury found

WILKINSON - GUILTY .

MARSDEN - GUILTY .

But that the goods were the property of William Marsden .

(This case is reserved for the consideration of the Twelve Judges, on the point stated.)

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18211024-42

1315. HENRY DRUMMOND was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of September , one handkerchief, value 2 s., the goods of James Cadwalader Parker , from his person .

JAMES CADWALADER PARKER . On the 28th of September, between twelve and one o'clock in the day, I was in Wardour-street, Soho , something drew my attention to my pocket, and I missed my handkerchief. I saw the prisoner and another boy in front, and saw the prisoner tucking my handkerchief under his jacket. I collared him, and took it from him. I gave him in charge.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Ld. Chief Justice Abbott.

Reference Number: t18211024-43

1316. WILLIAM SHEEN was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of September , two pounds of wire nails, value 4 sh

one brace shackle, value 6 d.; six iron bolts, value 1 s.; thirty-five iron nuts, value 18 d.; one bar of iron, value 1 s.; three ounces of brads, value 1 s., and six ounces of nails, value 20 d. , the goods of George Adams and William Edridge .

MR. PLATT conducted the prosecution.

GEORGE HOOPER . I superintend the business of George Adams and William Edridge . The prisoner was in their employment - in consequence of suspicion, I went and searched his lodging, on the 19th of September, in Union-court, Westminster - he came home from his dinner, at his usual time; I found property there, which I could not speak to - two officers who were with me, searched him, and found several iron nuts and bolts, in each of his pockets, and watch fob, and a paper of nails in his hat, and inside his waistcoat, we found a bar of iron - I cannot say any of it belonged to my master; we had such things on the premises, and had repeatedly missed them - he begged my pardon, and asked forgiveness; I said I had no power.

ROBERT CHAPMAN . I found a paper at his lodgings, it was wrote on, "Ford's wire nails, with conical heads," the nails found in his hat are not that sort.

GEORGE HOOPER . I know this paper, was in our house.

Prisoner's Defence. One Nunn owed me some money I wanted a pair of bedstead screws - he said he would make them for me, if he had tools, his wife brought me nails, for the sacking of the bedstead. On the 17th of September, I went again, he could not not make the screws, but gave me scraps of iron, to do them myself, as he had no tools, and asked me to lop some nails for him - I took them to Mr. Adams in the morning, to make them, but did not take them out of my pocket, as I thought he would not like it. After breakfast I put them all in my hat, and took them home at dinner time.

THOMAS NUNN . I am a smith and farrier, and live in New Millman-street. Sheen came to me the begining of August. I owed him a little money, and told him I could not pay it; he asked me to make some bedstead screws - I gave him a loose paper of nails, and some small pins for the sacking. About the middle of September, he came and asked if I had made the screws, I said I had been busy, and had no opportunity, and gave him a square piece of iron about a foot long, to make them with, he looked round the shop, and saw six or seven bolts, and about three dozen nuts, and said he thought he could bring nuts for the screws, as he did not work late of an evening, and he thought he could make them near his own home - I said, "What nuts you have to spare, if you will tap them, I will be obliged to you" - he was to tap them with a coarser thread than I had got. The nails produced are very much like what he had of me - I did not give him the brace.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18211024-44

1317. NICHOLAS BULLOCK and WILLIAM MANCHESTER were indicted for stealing, on the 27th of September , one handkerchief, value 6 s., the goods of Alexander Campbell , from his person .

The prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18211024-45

1318. GEORGE PETERKIN was indicted for a fraud .

MR. NORTON conducted the prosecution.

MR. JAMES DAVIS . I am at present vestry-clerk of St. Stephen, Coleman-street. In 1818, I officiated for my father, Mr. Nathaniel Davis (since deceased), he was then vestry-clerk. The weekly pensions, are paid every Friday morning, in the vestry - I attended for my father to ascertain the settlements of the paupers. On the 18th of June, 1818, I had occasion to make an examination of the prisoner, on his applying for relief, and took the examination down (reads) "A single man, carpenter, claims settlement by living with Mr. May, No. 35, London-wall, ink maker, two years and seven months, under a yearly hireling, sleeping in the house all the time - left his service eleven years ago, and went to sea, seven years to Gibralter, and has been about two years in England; never paid above 2 s. a week rent, lived in Nagg's Head-court, and Fox-court, Gray's Inn-lane". I took this statement from his mouth; Mr. Tyrrell, was present at the time. I myself did not relieve him on that occasion. On the 5th of September, 1818, I relieved him with 3 s. in consequence of his representation, on the part of the parish, the churchwardens paid me the money.

MR. WILLIAM TYRRELL . I am the inspector of payements in the City. In June 1818, I acted for Mr. Deputy Paynter, the senior churchwarden, and remember being present with Mr. Davis, when the examination of the prisoner was taken - he said if 15 s. was given him, he could go to Bristol, and should need no further relief - I gave him the 15 s., the parish paid me the money; I have a memorandum in the book, that it was given him to go to Bristol. On the 1st of August, I relieved him with 3 s. 6 d., I gave him 15 s. more on the 12th of September, on the score of the same pretence.

JOHN BRADFIELD . I am assistant overseer of the parish. The first application the prisoner made to me, was in July, 1818, and in November, 1819, I had seen him relieved by the churchwardens - I told him I knew him to be an imposter, he denied it; I examined him, he gave me the same account as described in the examination, that he had lived with Mr. May, London-wall, as a yearly servant, for about sixteen months. I having been a neighbour of May's, knew it to be false - I laid him the money down, and told him to take it, at his peril. He took it.

JOSEPH MAY . I have lived in Black Swan-alley, London-wall, more than thirty years, and am an ink-maker. The prisoner never lived with me, he is quite a stranger, he never was in my house.

THOMAS HENRY HALL . I am a hat manufacturer, and lived at No. 35, London-wall, and so did my father; he went there early in 1805, and continued four years. I never saw the prisoner before this day, he could not have lived there without my knowledge. No Mr. May lived in the neighbourhood. Mr. Oakey, a hat manufacturer, has had his house ever since.

STEPHEN SHORE. I lived at No. 36, London-wall, from the year 1792 to 1819; Mrs. Leader and her daughter kept No. 35, until Mr. Hall took the premises, and after them Mr. Oakey, and since them Mr. Spencer. No May ever lived there.

Prisoner's Defence. I never lived with May; the gentleman

only questioned me once, and necessity obliged me to seek relief.

GUILTY .

Confined Six Months .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18211024-46

1319. PETER JONAS was indicted for a fraud .

MR. ABRAHAM SEWARD . I am churchwarden of Christchurch, Newgate-street; the prisoner applied to me on the 6th of October for relief, and I gave him an order to Sotton's, at Islington, where we farm our poor.

JOHN CLARIDGE . I am overseer of Christchurch. On the 6th of October the prisoner came to me respecting some clothes. I said I could give him none without an order from the churchwarden. He went away, and returned in about an hour, with a written order, as I supposed, from the churchwarden. I produce it. It was signed in Mr. Seward's name. I then gave him an order for a pair of shoes (looks at it), this is it. Since I gave it to him the figure 2 has been substituted. I merely said in it - pair; somebody has put in 2 - (read). Mills afterwards produced this order to me. I immediately sent for an officer, and had him apprehended.

WALTER MILLS . I am a shoemaker, and furnish the parish with shoes; I live in Newgate-street; the prisoner came on the 6th of October with this order from the parish, for two pair of shoes. I fitted him with them, but did not allow him to take them away, suspecting the order. I sent my boy to Claridge. I asked the prisoner where Mr. Claridge lived - he said at No. 16, Warwick-square. He offered to go with the boy to shew him, said the order was perfectly correct, and wanted to take them. He went out with the boy.

MR. A. SEWARD. I live at No. 18, Warwick-lane. The order which bears my name is entirely false.

HENRY HONEY . I took charge of the prisoner.

The prisoner made a long defence, stating himself to have been reduced in circumstances, and complaining of ill-treatment from the overseers.

GUILTY .

Confined One Month .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18211024-47

1320. SAMUEL KENDAL was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of December , one jigger, value 1 s.; one fore-part iron, value 1 s., and one hammer, value 1 s. , the goods of Jeremiah Trencham .

JEREMIAH TRENCHAM . I live in Three Herring-court, Redcross-street , and am a shoemaker . On Wednesday, the 27th of December last, I saw these things on my work bench in the morning, about ten o'clock, when I went out, I returned about six o'clock at night, and missed them from the two pair of stairs room - the prisoner was a shoemaker, and lived in the house, I did not see him afterwards, till last Monday morning. He had left the house the day they were stolen.

ELIZA HARVEY . I live at this house, and am the landlady. On the 27th of December, a little after five o'clock, the prisoner left the lodgings, he owed me 11 s. 3 d., he gave no notice - he never came back, he slept in the same room as Trenchman. He went into that room with a light, at five o'clock, and came down in a few minutes - I went to the door, and saw a bag in his hand, it appeared full. My street door was generally open in the daytime.

GEORGE GRONIN . I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner last Monday, at No. 9, Cradle-court, Redcross-street. I found nothing.

Prisoner's Defence. I left because I owed the money, and took his hammer by mistake.

JEREMIAH TRENCHAM re-examined. He left a hammer of no value behind.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18211024-48

1321. CHARLES CULLINGFORD was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of October , four promissory notes, for payment of, and value 1 l. each , the property of James Rouse .

JAMES ROUSE . I am a labourer , and live in Two Swan-yard, Bishopsgate-street, the prisoner lived with me in the same room, nine or ten weeks. He saw my master, Mr. Booth, pay me these notes - he is the prisoner's uncle; they were country notes, three of Holdsworth bank, and one Yarmouth. He and I were coming up to London together on the 6th of October, and my master asked him to shew me where the notes were payable; he asked me if he should change them for me - I refused, he then said "If you will let me change them, I will meet you at a public-house" - he left me, I was never at the house before, and do not know where it was, I saw him go into the banking-house, in Lombard-street, but did not see him come out, and never saw him again, till last night - he never gave me the money. He said that he had not got it then - the public-house was not above two rods from the Banker's in Lombard-street.

JOHN WOLLEY . I am a watchman. I apprehended the prisoner last night, at the Kentish Arms, public-house, Burton-crescent. Rouse said he had defrauded him of four 1 l. notes, the prisoner acknowledged having them, and said he would make it up, if he would go with him. Rouse refused.

Prisoner's Defence. He persuaded me to change them for him. I could not find him at the public-house.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18211024-49

FOURTH DAY, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 27.

1322. JAMES SAUNDERS was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of October , six live tame fowls, price 7 s. , the property of Robert Austin .

ROBERT AUSTIN . I live at Uxbridge . On the 6th of October I had seven fowls in a hen-house, which is detached from my dwelling-house. Between eleven and twelve o'clock at night I was called up by Grainger, and found the prisoner in custody of Mallam. I had locked the hen house. Grainger shewed me one of my fowls.

JAMES GRAINGER . I live at Uxbridge. I was going home about a quarter past eleven o'clock, and heard a noise of persons breaking something, and on turning round saw the hen-house door open, and two persons coming out, the prisoner was one - he had a parcel in his apron; I

called Mallam, who took him, with me - the other man ran away. I found four fowls in his apron, and one under his arm - they were dead, but warm.

WILLIAM MALLAM . I live at Uxbridge. I took him, he had four fowls in his apron, and one under his arm - they were quite hot.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18211024-50

1323. MARGARET PERRY was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of October , 4 l. 3 s. 6 d., in monies numbered, the property of Daniel Edwards , from his person .

DANIEL EDWARDS . I am a Chelsea pensioner . On the 9th of October, about half-past twelve o'clock, I received four sovereigns, and 6 s. 6 d. I met the prisoner, about a mile and a half on this side of Chelsea, about two o'clock, she walked with me, and got in conversation, we went to a public-house, had a pot of beer; I came out, and sent her to get me a lodging - she said she could get me a very comfortable one. As I went along I felt her hand feeling my pocket; I said "I hope you don't mean to rob me?" she said No. She took me to No. 6, Shire-lane - it was then about nine o'clock - I threw my shoes off, and laid on the bed; I merely went there for a night's lodging. About two o'clock I awoke, and she was gone; she was in the room when I laid down. I was quite sober. I missed all my money from my tobacco box; which I had put on the floor under the bed; she left me sixpence in the tobacco box, and put it in my jacket pocket. I only went to a public-house with her.

Q. Do you swear you were only at one house from two till nine o'clock - A. We did not stay long at any but one. I did not go with her for any improper purpose.

THOMAS PROSSER . I am a patrol. About half-past nine o'clock I was going up Shire-lane, and saw the prisoner go in with the prosecutor. Between one and two she met me in the lane as she was coming out. When the man went in he rolled about, and appeared very drunk. About ten minutes after he came and said he had been robbed. The prisoner was afterwards taken.

JOHN WRIGHT . I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner, and found 10 s. 8 1/2 d. on her.

Prisoner's Defence. We went to several public-houses - he was as drunk as he could be. When we got to the house he would neither pay for the room or give me any thing. I left him before ten o'clock, and met him with other women at twelve.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18211024-51

1324. JOSEPH SOUTH was indicted for that he, on the 28th of August , at St. Marylebone , feloniously did dispose of and put away a certain forged and counterfeited Bank note, for payment of 10 l. setting it forth (No. 13,733, dated 13th February, 1821, signed W. Whiting), with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England , well knowing the same to be forged and counterfeited .

SECOND COUNT the same, only calling it a promissory note for payment of money, instead of a Bank note.

TWO OTHER COUNTS the same, only stating his intent to be to defraud Richard Tucker .

MR. REYNOLDS conducted the prosecution.

JOHN GRIFFIN . I am shopman to Mr. Richard Tucker, of Budge-row, Walbrook , stationer . On the 28th of August last, between four and five o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came to the shop and asked for a ream of elephant paper, I asked the price, he said 30 s.; I asked who for, he said " Isaac Lyons , in the Kent-road" - I said, I understood Lyons's name to be Moses; he said "No, it is Isaac" - we dealt with Moss, or Moses Lyons , in the Kent-road. I told him Lyons never used paper of that price, he said it was to hang in single sheets; this put me off my guard - I went into the counting-house, wrote the bill of parcels in the name of Isaac Lyons , and wrote a receipt. He tendered me a 10 l. note, I said I should write Isaac and Moses Lyons on it; he said, "Very well" - I then asked his own name, he said " Joseph South , paper-hanger" - I then wrote that on the note, gave him a check for 7 l. 5 s., on Sikes and Co., drawn by W. Dennis, a sovereign, and a dollar, the paper being 30 s. He took the paper and left the warehouse, it weighed about thirty-four pounds - I went immediately through the back part of our warehouse into Cloak-lane, and met the prisoner without the paper; I was surprised at meeting him without the paper, I turned round, be endeavoured to shun me, and ran away - I returned to the warehouse, and asked Mr. Tucker to go to Sikes's to stop the check.

Q. How long was it from the time he left your house till Mr. Tucker returned from the banker's - A. The whole transaction did not last above a quarter of an hour or twenty minutes (looks at a note) this is it; it has " Isaac Lyon , Moses Lyon , 28th August, 1821. Joseph South, paper-hanger" on it - I wrote that in his presence, before it went out of my hands.

THOMAS TUCKER . I am the son of Richard Tucker . On the 28th of August, I went to Messrs. Sikes's, to stop payment of the draft; I went immediately, ran all the way, but found it had been paid.

MOSS LYON . I am a paper manufacturer, and live in the Kent-road. I know the prisoner; on the 28th of August, he did not live with me, I had not sent him to Tucker's for any elephant paper; he was in my service for two months about two months before that - I had not seen him since he left me, I never sent him any where with a 10 l. note in my life; I deal with Mr. Tucker, there is no other paper-hanger of my name in the Kent-road, nor any Isaas or Moses Lyon - I have lived there near eighteen months; I have no doubt but that he knew I dealt with Tucker. Tucker was daily sending me goods. I believe while he lived with me Tucker sent some goods in a cart with his name on it - I never sent the prisoner there.

CHARLES DUPLOCK . I am a collector of taxes, in the Kent-road, and have been so ten years. I know no Lyon a paper manufacturer in the Kent-road, but the witness, Moss Lyon - I collect for the whole of the Ward, which is in the parish of St. George, Southwark; Moss Lyon lives in that parish, it is the Old Kent-road, and goes from Kent-street to the Green-man turnpike; the New Kent-road goes from the Elephant and Castle to the Bricklayer's Arms.

MOSS LYON . I know the New Kent-road, there is no

paper-hanger in that road of my name - I know of no such name, I mean surname.

WILLIAM WARD . I am a grocer, and live on Fish-street-hill. The prisoner came to my shop on Monday, the 10th of September, at eight o'clock in the morning, to purchase twelve pounds of 8 s. tea and a loaf of sugar; he said it was for a person named Reily, of Finsbury, and he should pay for it; it was to be packed to go into the country; Mr. Reily was a customer of mine. He tendered me a 10 l. bank note, I took it in my hand, and thought it was forged; I sent it to a neighbour by John Maylard , my shopman, he returned, brought it with him, and said in his presence, that it was forged - I then asked him particularly if he came from Mr. Reily, he said "Yes;" and I thought his story so good, that I believed him, gave him the note again, and sent Maylard with him with the goods to ascertain whether his story was correct - he took part of the goods and Maylard the rest - Reily was a customer of mine.

JOHN MAYLARD . I am shopman to Mr. Ward. On the 10th of September, the prisoner came to the shop, my master sent me with a 10 l. note to Mr. Flint's. I shewed it to his young man in the shop, it was never out of my sight - I brought back the same note, and afterwards went out with the prisoner and the goods towards Finsbury-square, and in the way I asked him several times if Mr. Reily was busy, he said They were not very, at present. Before we got to Finsbury, he wanted to turn down a stable-yard in Little Moorfields, as he said Mr. Reily was down there, and he would go to him; I said I should not allow him, he must go to Mr. Reily's - we went, he was at home, and said in his hearing, that he knew nothing of him, and never sent him - I said, you said you came from Mr. Reily; Mr. Reily then asked him who sent him, he said a gentleman in the street, whose name he did not know - I told him to return the note to Mr. Reily, as he said he had it from him, he said he should not; I said "Have you got the note?" he said "Yes" - I then told him he must go back with me to Mr. Ward, he objected to go; I said if he did not, I would send for an officer, and then he went quietly back to Ward's, who sent for an officer - before the officer came, Mr. Ward searched his pockets but found nothing; I asked what he had done with the note, he said he had thrown it away - the officer found nothing on him.

DANIEL BOGGIS . I am a constable. I was sent for, and searched the prisoner at Ward's, but found nothing - I heard him say he must have lost the note out of his pocket.

JOHN MAYLARD . Before the officer came, he said he threw it away. When he was first asked, he said he must have lost it out of his pocket - Mr. Ward questioned him, and then he said he threw it away - I do not recollect hearing him say any thing to the officer.

MR. WARD. I searched him and found nothing - I asked him what had become of the note, he acknowledged that he had thrown it away; this was before the officer came - Mr. Reily has dealt three or four years with me.

JOHN REILY . I am a sadler, and live in Finsbury-place. The prisoner lived errand-boy with me about four years ago - I dealt with Mr. Ward at that time, I believe - I did not send him to Ward's on the 10th of September for any tea and sugar, nor give him any 10 l. note for any purpose whatever - I might have had occasion to go to a livery stables that day, but not before he was brought - I had not told him he would find me at any livery stables.

THOMAS WARNER . I am a tailor, and live in Grub-street. The prisoner came to my shop, on the 24th of April, and bought a pair of trowsers for 8 s., and tendered me a 1 l. bank note, I called my wife from the back room, and asked him to put his name and address, if he pleased; he wrote on it, I believe he wrote, " Joseph South , No. 11, Great Leonard-street," and after he wrote his address, my wife put her initials on the same note, in his presence - she went for change, and returned saying, in his presence, that the person told her it was not worth a farthing. He had left the shop, and came back in five minutes, and asked for his change, then she told him so, and said, "You must go with me to the person to prove I had it of you." I took him to the shop, and had him taken.

REBECCA WARNER . I am the wife of the last witness, The prisoner came to the shop. I put my initials on the note, (looks at one) this is it, it has R. W. the prisoner had first written on it - I went out with it, brought it back, and told him it was a forgery - he held his hand out for it, and said he would get it changed. I would not give it him.

JOHN STILWELL . I am a patrol of Cripplegate. On the evening of the 24th of April, the prisoner was given in my charge, at Stevens's wine vaults. I heard the charge against him; I asked him after we got out of the shop, where he had taken the note - he said of his master, on the Saturday evening before, Mr. Turnor, a paper-hanger, at the corner of Queen-street, Lincoln's Inn-fields, for wages, and if I would go there with him, he dare say his master would be at home - I went up with him, but Mr. Turnor, was not at home; a woman there said he had worked there, but had not been there for two or three days, (I believe this was on Wednesday evening), she could not tell whether Mr. Turnor had paid him any wages, on the Saturday night or not. I accordingly brought him back to Warner's, he was not at home, and as he said he did receive it from his master, I kept the note and let him go, on his saying he would appear next day at Guildhall, with his master, and bring another note with him; previous to my letting him go, I asked where he lived, and to the best of my recollection, he said, No. 1, Garden-row, Willow-walk, Leonard-street, Shoreditch; I went there next morning, about nine o'clock, found he did live there, but was not at home - I then went to Mr. Turnor's. I attended at Guildhall, at eleven o'clock - I had told him to be there about half-past eleven o'clock, he never came; I was there till half-past twelve or one o'clock. I went in search of him, and found him that night at twelve o'clock, in bed at a public-house in Newgate-market (they let out lodgings to single men). I asked why he did not attend, he said he could not.

AUGUSTUS TURNOR . I am a paper-hanger, and live in Queen-street, Lincoln's Inn-fields. The prisoner had worked for me. On the Friday previous to his being taken up, I had sent him about ten miles out of town, and I supposed him to be continuing at that job when the officer brought him to the house. I had not seen him from the Friday till he was in custody, nor had I given any him 1 l. note on the Saturday before for wages, the party in the country were to pay him as a journeyman. I know he went to the place in the country. I never paid him on account of that job,

but sent another person to do it a fortnight afterwards; he was employed by me last year, a good while, I discharged him in November, not having any employ for him.

WILLIAM WINTER . I keep the Angel and Trumpet, public-house, at Stepney; the prisoner came to my house on the 4th of April, in company with another young man, he ordered pint a of porter, went into the yard, and dined at my house, their reckoning came to 3 s. 8 d.; the maid servant brought me a pound note, I took it directly to the prisoner in the parlour, and told him I could not change it, they both said they had no silver, and asked if I could not get it changed; the prisoner put the note to me and told me to get it changed. I went to Mr. Christian's for change, he gave his opinion on it - it was not out of my sight - he came back with me having it in his hand. I endorsed it with my initials and then Christian said it was forged. I asked the prisoner where he got it? he said of some person in Holborn, who I do not recollect. Christian said he should detain them, he searched them and found above 30 s. in silver, 18 d. on South and the rest on the other man, named Parsons (looks at a note.), this is it; they were taken in custody and afterwards discharged.

ROBERT CHRISTIAN . I am a headborough, and live at Mile End, Old Town. Winter brought me the note, I went back with him to his house, marked it and he did the same (this is it). I found the prisoner and a young man there, I asked who the note belonged to, the prisoner said it was his, and that he had it of his uncle in Holborn, to the best of my recollection, but before the Magistrate he said he did not say he had it of his uncle, but of a person in Holborn. I found 1 s. 6 d. in silver on him, and above 30 s. in silver on Parson's, two new black silk handkerchiefs, and a pair of new yellow gloves. I took them in custody; they were afterwards discharged. After the examination at Shadwell office, I searched them again, and found ten of the 30 s. which Parsons had, on South; this was the same day; they had had some refreshment; Parsons only had 18 s. then. I wrote my name on the note.

THOMAS LONGSDON . I am a grocer, and live in Tabernacle-walk. I know the prisoner, he came to me with a 10 l. note on the 13th of February last, in the evening, and asked if I could give Mr. Bolton change for it; knowing Mr. Bolton to be a paper-hanger, of the City-road, I said Yes, and did it. When I gave him the change he said I might put his own name on it. I knew his name and put it on it. I knew he worked at a paper-hanger's, but did not know him to be in Mr. Bolton's service.

JOHN BOLTON . I am a paper-hanger, and live in the City-road. The prisoner worked for me about six months before last February, as a journeyman, he finally left me at that time. I did not send him with a 10 l. note to Longsdon on the 13th of February. I know Mr. Longsdon as a neighbour, he lives about two hundred yards from me - I do not deal with him. The prisoner behaved very honest while with me - he did not live in my house.

THOMAS GLOVER . I have been an inspector of Bank notes for twenty-seven years (looks at the note uttered to Tucker) - this is forged in every respect, it is neither Bank plate or paper, it purports to be the signature of H. Whiting, there is such a person in the Bank, he is not authorized to sign 10 l. notes. I am well acquainted with his hand-writing, it is not his.

HENRY WHITING . I was originally a signer of 1 l. and 2 l. notes; the signature is not my hand-writing - there is no other person of my name in the Bank.

MR. GLOVER. (Looks at the one uttered the 25th of April.) This is forged in all respects, it is signed J. Lambert; he was a signer of 1 l. notes - this is not his writing - he was not authorized to sign 1 l. notes on the 14th of February, the date of the note (Looks at the other 1 l. note). This is forged in every respect, it is signed G. Gardiner; there was a clerk of that name authorized to sign 1 l. notes, but it is not his writing. The 10 l. note uttered to Longsdon is also forged in every respect. The two 10 l. notes are not both off one plate, one is dated 13th of February, 1821, the other the 10th of February, 1818.

(Note read.)

Prisoner's Defence. I own going to Longsdon to change a 10 l. note for a young man, but did not mention Bolton's name. I gave the change to the young man who sent me, he is now transported, he gave me 4 l. for it. Longsdon sent to my mother's, I went and paid him the 4 l. again. I am quite innocent of it.

THOMAS LONGSDON . I am sure he mentioned Bolton's name.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 16.

Recommended to Mercy.

London Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18211024-52

1325. JOHN SOWERBY was indicted for that he, on the 4th of August , at St. James's, Clerkenwell , feloniously did dispose of and put away a certain forged and counterfeit Bank note, setting it forth (No. 10454, 5 l. dated 13th February, 1821, signed W. Whiting), with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England , he well knowing the same to be forged and counterfeit .

SECOND COUNT the same, only calling the forged instrument a promissory note for the payment of money, instead of a Bank note.

TWO OTHER COUNTS the same, only stating his intent to be to defraud Joseph Wassell .

JUSTINIAN JONES . I am shopman to Mr. Joseph Wassell , pawnbroker , of Pickett-street, Strand . The prisoner came to the shop on the 4th of August, between four and five o'clock in the evening, or later, and brought the duplicate of a watch, pawned in the name of Smith, for 15 s. He came to redeem it, I gave him the watch, he tendered a 5 l. note. I asked if Smith was the name I was to put on the note; he said

"Yes, John Smith ." I asked his direction, he gave me No. 4, Bell-yard, which I wrote on the note in his presence - both his name and address, with the sum I took of him, and my initials. He took the watch, I gave him the change, and he left. (Looks at a note.) This is it, it has my writing on it.

SAMUEL DANN . I occupy No. 4, Bell-yard, and have done so sixteen years. I do not know the prisoner - he did not live at my house on the 4th of August, nor any person of the name of Smith. I have no lodgers but families - no single lodgers, he is no relation to any of them. There is only one No. 4, Bell-yard, my house is four doors out of Fleet-street.

THOMAS STAPLES . I am waiter at the Queen's Arms

Tavern, Newgate-street, kept by John Staples , who is my brother. On the 13th of August between eight and nine o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came and asked for three bottles of Port, and three of white wine. Mrs. Staples went down for it and could not find it, I went down, and when I came up he was still there. He took it away in a basket which I gave to him, and desired him to let me have it again as soon as he could, as I did not know him. He never returned it.

MARY ANN STAPLES . I am the wife of John Staples , who keeps the tavern. I do not recollect the prisoner's person - a boy came to the house - I remember the last witness going down for some bottles of wine, and bringing them up; the boy who came on that occasion paid me for the wine with a 5 l. Bank note. I asked him what name I should put on the note, he said "Mr. Gregson, No. 6, Little Butcher-lane." I asked him if he meant Butcherhall-lane. He said it is all the same. He saw me write on it "Mr. Gregson, No. 6, Butcherhall-lane." (Looks at a note). This is it - I am sure I mentioned Butcher-hall-lane, and he said it was all the same.

Q. Was there any other transaction of this kind with any other boy on that day - A. No. This transaction was with the boy to whom the last witness delivered the basket and bottles. I gave him four sovereign and 3 s. and 4 d. change.

EDWARD PROCTOR . I am a painter and glazier, and live at No. 6, Butcherhall-lane, Newgate-street, it is not called Little Butcher-lane - I know no such place. I have lived at No. 6, for nine years, and at No. 4, for sixteen years next March. I never saw the prisoner till I saw him here. I did not send him to Mr. Staples's, nor ever gave him a 5 l. note - I never had a lodger, and know no Mr. Gregson, or any name like it. There are about twenty houses in the lane. I know all the inhabitants.

DAVID POWELL . I keep the Brittannia, public-house, Nelson-street, Long-lane, Bermondsey. The prisoner came to my house on the 24th of July last, and asked for a pot of beer and half a pint of gin, and also asked me to change a 5 l. note for his brother William. I am sure he said his brother William. I had known the prisoner at this time about a month, by his living in the neighbourhood; he said his brother's surname was Sowerby. I gave him the change - he said his brother worked at Mr. Calow's, Blackfriars-road, a dyer's. (Looks at the note). This is the note I received of him. I wrote "W. Sowerby, Mr. Calow, Blackfriars-road;" and underneath, "Mr. Sowerby, 26, West-street, D. P." He lived at No. 26, West-street. I had served him with beer there, it is just by my house. He took the beer and gin away, and referred me to next door, No. 25, for the pot as his house was at that time shut up. I kept the note in my house a fortnight, and then paid it to my brewers; it was returned to me by them. I had not seen the prisoner from the time he paid it me. I believe he brought the pot back himself, almost immediately, but I did not see him until I saw him at Marlborough-street. I knew his brother by his coming for things - they both lived together.

WILLIAM SOWERBY . I am twenty years old, and work at Mr. Callow's, who is a dyer and calico glazer. I have other brothers, but no brother William - I and the prisoner lived together, my mother had taken a house, and died in about a fortnight after. I am still at Mr. Calow's.

MR. REYNOLDS. My Lord, I merely put this witness in the box, in order that the prisoner if he likes, may ask him any question.

The prisoner declined asking any question.

THOMAS GLOVER . I am an inspector of Bank notes. (looks at that uttered to Jones) this is forged in all respects, the signature H. Whiting, is not his hand writing - the note uttered to Staples, is forged in all respects, nor is it the signature of H. Whiting; there is a person of that name, but he is not authorized to sign 5 l. notes; the other is also forged in every respect, and is signed W. R. West, there is such a cashier authorized to sign notes, The three notes appear to me to be impressed from the same plate, and the names Whiting, appears to be written by the same hand, and that of West, I think is the same writing as the other two.

H. WHITING. I am not authorized to sign 5 l. notes, nor any person of my name - the signature on the two notes are neither of them my hand-writing. West's name appears written by the same hand.

(read).

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 16.

Strongly Recommended to Mercy.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18211024-53

1326. JOHN LYNN was indicted for feloniously assaulting Elizabeth Fox , widow , on the 24th of September , on the King's highway, at St. Mary, Whitechapel , putting her in fear, and taking from her person, and against her will, one minature painting, value 5 l.; three seals, value 2 l.; one ring, value 10 s., and one key, value 10 s., her property .

ELIZABETH FOX. I am a widow, and live in Gloster-terrace, Mile End-road. On the 24th of September, at six o'clock in the evening, I was in Whitechapel - I had been to buy some ribbon, and returning about seven o'clock, the prisoner was standing at the corner of Mr. Mears's, the bell founder, he turned me round, held my arms back, and thrust his head in my bosom - I had the seals of my watch hanging outside, and a minature picture inside my breast, it was fastened to the seals, one part of the chain was round my neck, he got part of it - it required violence to pull them away, he got them, and ran off towards Charlotte-street - I followed him calling, Stop thief! he was taken without my losing sight of him. I gave him in charge.

MOSES JUDA . I was in Whitechapel near Mrs. Fox, I was passing her when I saw the prisoner turn her round, she was walking along - he turned her round, and made a snatch at something, I could not see what; I was about ten yards off - he ran towards me, Mrs. Fox called Stop thief! I did not see any thing fall from him; a gentleman crossed the road, and stopped him, he was taken in custody - I thought the lady picked up part of the chain, as I saw she had part of it in her hand.

Prisoner. Q. Was there any turnings in the street - A. Yes. I am sure he his the person, who I saw turn the prosecutrix round - there was nobody in the street but me and him, till the watchman came up - I did not lose sight of him till he was searched at the watch-house.

JOHN DUNGATE I am a patrol. On the 24th of September, I heard the cry of Stop thief! and saw Juda, and another gentleman holding the prisoner, Mrs. Fox gave him in my charge, and said that is the man who robbed me,

I searched him at the watch-house, but found nothing on him. I did not see him running.

Prisoner's Defence. I was walking up Charlotte-street, heard an alarm, and saw three or four men run across, I went over, two men laid hold of me, and the lady said "You have my property." I said I had not. They immediately searched me, and found nothing.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 20.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18211024-54

1327. WILLIAM MARRS was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of October , at St. Leonard, Shoreditch , ten pieces of printed cotton, value 11 l., the goods of George Lowe , in his dwelling-house .

GEORGE LOWE . I keep a house in the City-road , in the parish of St. Leonard, Shoreditch. On the 17th of October, about five o'clock in the afternoon, I was in the shop, several little boys were playing before the door. In consequence of what one of them told me, I missed a bundle of printed cotton. I went out, and saw the prisoner running away with it - I overtook him about three hundred yards off, and stopped him, I asked where he was taking them to, he said, a man gave them to him - one of my young men came after us, and picked them up; the prisoner had dropped them; it was a dirty evening, and they were all dirty - I took him back to the shop, they were taken from within the shop, not outside the door, about half a foot from it; he must have entered the house to have taken them; he might have reached them with his arm.

JOHN COATS , I am shopman to Mr. Lowe, and followed him - I saw the prisoner drop the cotton, and am sure he is the man; I saw nobody with him, they are my master's, and are worth 23 s. each; there are ten pieces, and were all fastened together - they were all marked by me.

JAMES BANKS HARRADEN . I am a constable, and live next door to the prosecutor. I heard a noise, ran out, and took charge of the prisoner - Coates carried the goods back to the shop.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was in great distress, and had no victuals for two days.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 24.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18211024-55

1328. RICHARD SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of August , two silver forks, value 1 l.; one waiter, value 1 l.; four dishes and covers, value 5 l., and four decanters, value 12 s., the goods of Arabella Watson , spinster , in her dwelling-house .

OLIVE REYNOLDS . I live at Miss Arabella Watson 's, in Upper George-street, Marylebone , she is single. The prisoner was employed occasionly as footman on jobs, he slept in the house every night during the month of July - I had known him before this. Miss Watson went out of town, at the latter end of August, and discharged him, he was in the habit of coming to the house after this and before - I remained in town, and had the charge of every thing; he was discharged as servant when she left, and gave up the numbers of the plate to my mistress, it was put in my charge - I did not meddle with it till three weeks after; when my mistress was coming home, this was in August; I then missed several silver forks and spoons, and asked if he knew the number of the plate - he said No; that my mistress had the inventory, I said I should ask her when she came home - he said I need not be the least alarmed for he had been very much distressed, and had taken away some spoons and forks, and would bring them back again; and on Sunday morning he brought back nine spoons and forks together, and said there were two more forks which he had not brought back as he had been disappointed of some money, and would bring them on Monday morning, with the plated dishes and covers, which had been taken away. He said he had taken them. He did not call till Wednesday, and then said his sister was out of town, or she would advance the money, and he would bring them all back on Friday; he did not come on Friday, and so I had him apprehended, and then some duplicates were found, which led us to miss other things.

JOHN STABLES . I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner at his sister's, at Camberwell, on the 17th of September, and found duplicates for two silver forks, one plated waiter, and two pair of decanters; he said, "I have all the tickets of Miss Watson's property, except one for the plated dishes;" I asked what was become of that, he said he took the dishes without one of the handles, in consequence of which, the pawnbroker did not lend him so much by 1 l., and kept the ticket until he took the handles, and he was then to have another 1 l.; that he could not afterwards get the handles, and did not have the ticket, he said he got 5 l. for them, and was to have had 6 l.

JOHN HUGHES . I am shopman to Mr. Baylis, pawnbroker, of Great Portland-street. On the 28th of August, the prisoner pawned a plated waiter for 1 l. 5 s., it was worth two guineas - on the 1st of September, he brought four plated dishes and covers, and asked for 6 l.; I asked for the handles, he said he had forgotten them, in his hurry, that he was a plate dealer, lived at No. 24. Wardour-street, and his name was Nathaniel Smith - I said I could not take them without the handles, as they were incomplete; he was going to return for them, but said if I would let him have 5 l. (as he had a person waiting for a bill) he would bring them, and have the other 1 l. another day - I found he did not come. I made a duplicate out in the evening. He brought them in a box which had his initials, "N. S." on it. They would cost fifteen guineas; I think them worth 12 l. now - I questioned him a good deal, and apologised for questioning him so. One dish alone is not worth 3 l.

GEORGE HOWELL . I live with Mr. Jenkins, a pawnbroker, in Crawford-street. The decanters were pawned with me in the name of Smith, for 5 s. - I cannot swear to the prisoner, the duplicate found on him, is mine.

HENRY POWELL . I am shopman to Mr. Archbut, a pawnbroker. On the 22d of August, a man, who I believe to be the prisoner, pawned nine silver forks in the name of James Richardson , No. 18, Oxford-street.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I took them, being in distress, but intended to bring them back, but my friends being from town, I could not get the money by the time I promised.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only.

Confined One Year .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18211024-56

1329. CHARLES SANDERSON was indicted for a libel .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY .

And found sureties for his good behaviour for two years .

Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18211024-57

1330. CHARLES NEWMAN and ROBERT HODGEMAN were indicted for stealing on the 12th of October , one handkerchief, value 5 s., the goods of Edmond Ashton , from his person .

EDMOND ASHTON . I am in the service of the Duke of Devonshire . On the 12th of October, between twelve and one o'clock in the day, I was in St. James's-street , and saw a crowd round some houses which had fallen, I went to ask if any body was hurt - I felt something at my pocket, turned round instantly, and saw Newman pass by me further into the crowd, Raymond asked if I had lost any thing - I missed my handkerchief, he pointed out Newman, who was secured, but it was not found - I did not see Hodgeman.

SIMON RAYMOND . I live in New-street, and deliver hand-bills. I went down St. James's-street, and saw the prisoners in company, whom I knew before - they went into the mob, I watched them, they placed themselves direct in the rear - Newman put his right hand into Ashton's left hand coat pocket, and drew out a handkerchief; I said "Holloa, my lads, what are you at;" the prosecutor missed his handkerchief - I saw Newman give it over to Hodgeman, who shoved it under his waistcoat, and slipped through the crowd - I could not get hold of him; I pointed out Newman as the man who took it; he was taken by a soldier, who gave him to a constable; I knew them both perfectly well, and am certain they are the persons. On Tuesday, the 16th, about ten o'clock in the morning, I saw Hodegman go by Charing-cross with a woman; I seized him, and charged him with being concerned with Newman in a robbery; he said, Why did I not take him in St. James's-street, and refused to go with me, he resisted, his girl laid hold of me, and he escaped across the ruins into Cockspur-street - about an hour after, I saw him close to the Duke of Northumberland's, coming towards me; I told him to stop, he ran off towards the Horse-guards, and nearly upset every body who met him - an officer secured him, after some resistance.

JAMES SMITH . I am a constable. I was in St. James's-street; Raymond gave Newman in charge for picking of the prosecutor's pocket.

NEWMAN'S Defence. They swear false; Raymond gets his living by taking up people.

HODGEMAN'S Defence. I can prove I was in Gerrard-street, Soho, from twelve till two o'clock.

HENRY GROSE . I lodge in Garden-row, Blackfriars-road, and am a glass-cutter. I worked with Hodgeman. On Saturday fortnight, the day the houses fell, in St. James's-street, I was with him five minutes before the clock struck twelve, at Mr. Herring's, King-street, Soho, where my shopmates dine - I had not been to St. James's-street, I came out of Gerrard-street, where I work; I heard the clock strike after he came in, it is a wine-vaults - I believe I had some salt beef for dinner, Hodgeman's brother dined with me; we came out to dine at twelve o'clock, because we wanted a job (we usually dine at one o'clock), and did not return till two o'clock, as the porter would not be at the warehouse.

Q. Is the landlord here - A. No; Hodgeman's brother went into the house with me and the other men, Ward, Rodger's, and several others came in at one o'clock - my master's name is Kelly, he works for Sheppard and Co. - we left Ward and Rodgers there; Hodgeman's brother and I came away together, the prisoner had come there to ask if I could tell him of a job, as he knew there was an empty frame at our shop; he came out with us about five minutes after two o'clock.

Q. Do you positively swear he was there from a little before twelve o'clock till past two - A. Yes, my Lord; he was in the house all the time; I called for a pot of beer and some bread and cheese for him.

Q. What day of the week was this - A. Friday or Saturday. His brother told me of this on the week following - I said I would speak what I knew.

EDWARD HODGEMAN . I am the prisoner's brother, and am a glass-cutter; he lived in Lambeth-walk. I cannot say where he lived at the time he was charged with this offence. Last Thursday or Friday fortnight, he was in company with me and Grose, from twelve o'clock till past two, at a house in Macclesfield-street, Newport-market; it joins Gerrard-street - the house is kept by Herring.

Q. How came you to be there so long - A. My master had hurt his eye, and the doctor came to dress it at twelve o'clock, so we could get no work, and went to dinner; he was with us both days; I had some beef steaks and gave him some, and some bread and cheese - I think Grose had salt beef; Grose and I went in together, and he came in directly after, he came to ask my master for a job on both days.

Q. You could have given him an answer on Thursday - A. I could not see my master to give him an answer, We often go to dinner at twelve o'clock; I do not know why we went the other day.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18211024-58

1331. MARY DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of September , one watch, value 4 l.; one chain, value 6 d.; two seals, value 6 d., and 15 s. in monies numbered, the property of Richard Wright , from his person .

RICHARD WRIGHT . I live in Goldsmith-street, Gough-square. On the 18th of September, between eight and ten o'clock at night, I had met the prisoner in Drury-lane, at the corner of the White-horse, public-house, Wellington-court; she asked me to give her something to drink - I went to her apartments, in Charles-street ; I gave her some money to fetch gin; I sat down on the bed and fell asleep immediately, when I awoke, I missed my watch and money from my pocket; I found her in the room, it was about half-past nine o'clock - they were safe when I went into the room; I asked her where my watch and money were, she said she had not got it, but I should find them in possession of a person at the corner of the court - I went out, but found nobody there; I did not return, but the next day my friends went to the house for her, but could never see any thing of the property.

JAMES GILMORE . I am an officer. I apprehended her, but have not found the property - she denied the charge.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18211024-59

1332. WILLIAM WILSON was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of September , six pair of stockings, value 2 l.; six yards of linen, value 6 s.; half a yard of cambric, value 4 s.; one handkerchief, value 4 s., and one shirt, value 1 s., the goods of Richard Collins , from the person of Maria, his wife .

MARIA COLLINS . I am the wife of Richard Collins , a porter , we live in Pitt-street, Bethnal-green. On Saturday, the 22d of September, between nine and ten in the evening, I was walking up Church-street, Bethnal-green , and at end of James-street my bundle was snatched from me; it contained the articles stated in the indictment - Only one person did it. I cannot swear to him. I called out Stop thief! and Murder! He ran down James-street. Woodward told me my bundle was safe, and in five minutes I saw Mrs. Morton with it. I gave information at the watch-house, and on Monday morning I found the prisoner in custody.

JAMES MORTON . I am a silk dyer, and live in James-street, Bethnal-green. Between nine and ten o'clock in the evening of the 22d of September, I was sitting at my door, and heard a cry of thieves and murder from a female voice. I looked out and saw the prisoner running, about six yards off, the prosecutrix was close at his heels - I came up with him - he threw something away as he ran, it appeared to be a bundle. I secured him in a moment - the street was clear - there was nobody but him and the prosecutrix. My wife picked it up.

ELIZA MORTON . I am the wife of the last witness, as he ran out I followed, and saw the prisoner throw the bundle away. I picked it up.

WILLIAM STOKES . I am an officer. The prisoner was delivered into my charge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. She said at the office that it was her master's property.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18211024-60

1333. JAMES MOORE was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of October , 2 lbs. of tea, value 16 s. , the goods of Susan Dobson .

GEORGE NAISH . I am porter to Lady Clemence, of Grosvenor-square . On Sunday, the 5th of October, about ten minutes before ten o'clock in the morning, my fellow-servant came up and gave me information - I looked out of window and saw the prisoner with two others against the rails of the square, I watched and saw him go down the area. I went out of the front door and locked the area gate, he was then inside the house - he came up in a moment, I asked who he wanted - he said Mr. Sidney, Lord Sidney's coachman (Lord Sidney lives next door), I said "You know where Lord Sidney lives, his name is on the door - you came here to steal." He said a gentleman sent him, he could not tell who he was or what he sent him for; he had a parcel under his arm, I do not know what it was. I got a person to mind him while I went round another way, and then he had thrown the parcel in the coal-hole, it contained two pounds of tea, and belonged to Susan Dobson . I only know it is her's from what she said, she is not here.

ANDREW ROBERTS . I took him in charge - he said he found it in the area.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18211024-61

1334. RICHARD RILEY was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of October , 6 lbs. of sugar, value 5 s. , the goods of John Kerrison .

JOHN KERRISON . I am a carman . I sent the prisoner with my waggon to Cope and Co. to take a load of lump sugar from there to the London Docks , their warehouse is in Osborne-street, Whitechapel. He was my carman.

WILLIAM CORLEY . I am foreman to the London Dock Company. I was in the warehouse at the Docks, about half story high, and saw the prisoner with a waggon load of lump sugar unloading it. It was Kerrison's waggon. I saw him take a lump of sugar from the bulk, and attempt to put it under his apron. I immediately turned round and went into the warehouse, it was then four o'clock, at which time we leave work. I desired the men to leave the floor, and assist him to cover the waggon. I then observed something strange in his gait, and sent a man to give information at the gate, and saw a piece of sugar taken from his breeches, and another piece from his jacket pocket, they weighed about 6 lb. I weighed the bulk it was 10 lb. deficient.

ALEXANDER DURHAM . I am gate-keeper at the London Docks. I stopped the prisoner and found two pieces of sugar on him.

ERICK MEYER . I am servant to Mr. Cope. When the the sugar was sent to the Docks it weighed 96 cwt. 2 qrs. 2 lb.

Prisoner's Defence. I was very much in liquor.

GUILTY . Aged 57.

Confined Three Months and Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18211024-62

1335. MARY BURKE was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of September , two pair of stockings, value 3 s. , the goods of James Harris .

ANN HARRIS . I am daughter of James Harris , we keep a hosier's shop in Whitechapel-road . On the 17th of September, between one and two o'clock, the prisoner came into the shop and asked to see a pair of black worsted stockings. I took a pair down from the door and gave them to her, she said she would not have them, but would have a pair out of a bundle; the bundle was reached down and opened - she looked at them a long time, and I saw her slip a pair down on the floor. I stood at her side. After looking at them some time she stooped down and put her hand into her pocket-hole, and drew them up under her clothes into her pocket - the bundle got lose, and I thought she had taken another pair. I said "Do you intend to have a pair?" she then offered me 15 d. for a pair, but I refused them for less than 18 d. She walked to the door. I followed, tapped

her on the shoulder, and said

"Give me the stockings you have taken." She said she had none, and presently put her hand down and dropped them down the same way she had drawn them up; she put them on the counter; and said there is your stockings. She only returned one pair. She was going away, I said, "I rather think you have another pair, and I will send for an officer." She said she had no more. I sent for an officer. We found three pair on her, one of them was ours. She had only 11 1/2 d. in her pocket. We live in Whitechapel-road.

FRANCIS FREEMAN . I took charge of her. She said she had none about her - I searched and found one pair of stockings partly in and partly out of her pocket, and two more pair at the bottom of her pocket. She had 11 1/2 d. only.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I bought them at Tunbridge.

GUILTY . Aged 47.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18211024-63

1336. THOMAS BATTY and JOSEPH PRATT were indicted for stealing, on the 2d of October , one coat, value 12 s. , the goods of John Palmer .

JOHN PALMER . I am servant to Mr. Dolly, a fellmonger, who lives at Old Ford. I was in Whitechapel, going home, my coat was buttoned under the pole of the waggon - I saw it safe near the Salmon and Ball, public-house, Bethnal-green , and missed it about a quarter of a mile further. I had seen the prisoners following the waggon from Mile End to the Salmon and Ball, public-house. They were walking together, sometimes round the waggon, and then on the footpath; they must get under the waggon to get it. I was by the side of the horses. Two gentlemen came by in a chaise, and said they were running away with it. I stopped my horses, went on a bank, and saw Batty three or four hundred yards off, with a coat under his arm. Pratt was two or three paces before him, I followed, Batty dropped the coat into a ditch, and then walked away. I caught hold of him - he said he did it from want. Pratt ran off and was taken in about an hour. I am sure he is the boy.

CHARLES HUDSON . I am an officer. I took the prisoners in charge. Pratt had been stopped.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

BATTY'S Defence. I saw it laying in the road, and picked it up.

BATTY - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

PRATT - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined Six Months and Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18211024-64

FIFTH DAY, MONDAY, OCTOBER 29.

1337 THOMAS DIXON was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of October , six silver spoons, value 30 s. , the goods of Richard Thomas , the elder , and Richard Thomas , the younger .

SECOND COUNT stating them to belong to Richard Thomas , the elder.

MR. RICHARD THOMAS , JUN. I am in partnership with my father, whose name is Richard; we are silversmiths , and live in the Strand . The prisoner was our porter . On Saturday night, the 13th of October, according to custom our spoons were called over, and on Monday I examined a drawer of odd spoons, and missed four table spoons. On the next night (I held no out inducements to him to confess); in consequence of what passed I had the prisoner taken in custody - he directed me to Morrits's, York-street, Westminster, where I found four table and two gravy spoons.

RICHARD REEKS . I live with Mr. Morrit, a pawnbroker, in York-street, On the 3d of October the prisoner pawned two gravy, and on the 10th of October, four table spoons for two guineas.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18211024-65

1338. CHARLES HUNT was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of October , one gown, value 2 s.; one spencer, value 6 d.; one scarf, value 1 s., and one watch, value 20 s. , the goods of Charlotte Goodhall .

CHARLOTTE GOODHALL . I live at Egham-hill . On the 5th of October I went out at six o'clock at night, returned at ten o'clock, and missed this property. I had formerly cohabited with the prisoner for sixteen months, but had not seen him for nine months - We had lived in this house.

Q. He supplied you with clothes - A. Yes, and I participated in his labour. I suppose he came for his own clothes.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18211024-66

1339. WILLIAM SAWYER was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of September , one watch, value 30 s.; two seals, value 1 s., and one key, value 6 d., the goods of Benjamin Ackers , from his person .

BENJAMIN ACKERS . I am a pensioner in the Haberdashers alms-houses . On the 22d of September, about half-past eight o'clock at night. I was walking along Shoreditch , with my hands in my pockets, and crossing Bateman's-row, just as I came on the pavement, the prisoner stepped before me and dodged backwards and forwards - I could not get by, the gas shone right in his face; I observed him particularly, and should know him any where. I felt something touch my thumb in my pocket, and felt my watch go, he immediately started from me - nobody but him was near me. I ran after him immediately - he ran a considerable way before I called Stop thief - I pursued him into the Curtain-road till he was taken, and kept him in sight all the way, except about a minute, as he turned the corner of Bateman's-row, he he was stopped at the corner, I came up, and said

"That man has robbed me of my watch." It was produced to me without the case, and the glass broken.

RICHARD EVERETT . I am a butcher, and live in the Curtain-road. I was at my shop door, opposite Bateman's-row,

I heard the cry of Stop thief! I crossed to the sound, and saw the prisoner running, crying Stop thief! I said "You are the first man, I will stop you." I heard something fall from him, and saw Adams, who was the only person present, pick up the watch, between me and the prisoner.

JAMES ADAMS . I ran out with Everett, and saw the prisoner running, he was foremost. I assisted in taking him. I saw him drop the watch and picked it up.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I had just come from Reading, and met a friend who directed me to the Curtain-road for work; I was going there - some people ran by - I put my leg out to stop them - they passed - I followed, and they took hold of me.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18211024-67

1340. JAMES CLEGHORN was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of October , one ring, value 6 s. , the goods of Thomas Davis .

MARY DAVIS . I am the wife of Thomas Davis , we live in Chapel-place, Crown-street . The prisoner kept company with my daughter, but I never saw him in the house myself. I left the ring on the mantle-piece about eleven o'clock in the morning; my daughter and three children were at home. I missed it on coming home. On the 17th of October I saw the prisoner in Cheapside, I called to him, and he ran away. I cried Stop thief! and he was taken. He said he would bring my daughter to swear I had not lost the ring, but had left it in Newgate-market.

THOMAS DAVIS . On the 10th of October, about four o'clock, my father sent me home, the prisoner came in and asked for my sister; I saw him take the ring off the shelf - he gave me 2 d. and told me not to tell my mother that he had been - he went out and said he would return again. I am sure he took the ring away. My mother came home, and I told her.

Prisoner's Defence. I was never in the house - they have kept the daughter out of the way or she could prove it. She left her ring in Newgate-market. She first charged me with stealing a watch.

MARY DAVIS . I charged him with stealing the duplicate of a watch. I have not kept my daughter away, she has left me since Friday.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18211024-68

1341. WILLIAM WESTON was indicted for that he on the 9th of August , feloniously did sell six silver spoons, having the impression of a forged and counterfeit mark, resembling a certain mark used in pursuance of certain Acts of Parliament, he well knowing the said impression to be forged and counterfeit, with intent to defraud his Majesty of the duty payable thereon .

MESSRS. WALFORD and NORTON conducted the prosecution.

JOHN PRICE . I am apprentice to Mr. Upjohn, watchmaker, St. John-square, Clerkenwell. In August last I went to the prisoner, and personally gave him an order for one dozen tea-spoons for Mr. Upjohn. He brought them home - I received them from his hands, and paid him 1 l. 1 s. 2 d. for the duty and fashion, and gave him old silver for the weight. I unpacked the spoons, weighed them, and delivered them to Thomas Mendham , servant to Mr. King, who had ordered them of us - I delivered them at King's shop in St. John-street.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. When did you receive them - A. On the 31st of August, Mr. Thomas Upjohn and Mr. Whittingham were present when he brought them. I did not open them directly, but put them in the desk, which I locked, and gave Mr. Whittingham the key; I got it from him next day and took them out myself, unpacked and weighed them, then sealed them up and delivered them to Mendham at Mr. King's. I put no mark on them.

Mr. NORTON. Q. Did they come to you in a parcel - A. Yes, and were in the same parcel tied up when I delivered them at Mr. King's. They were in the same parcel, and tied in the same manner when I took them from the desk. The prisoner brought this bill with them.

(Producing it.)

Q. Look at these spoons - A. They were a dozen like these; I cannot say these are the same. I noticed W. W. on them at the time. It is a common pattern.

COURT. Q. When you opened the parcel the next day, did it appear precisely in the same state as when he delivered it into your hands - A. Yes; it had not been opened.

THOMAS MENDHAM . I was in Mr. King's service at this time. He is a linen-draper, and lives in St. John-street; I remember Price bringing me a parcel, which I immediately delivered to Miss Williams. in the state in which I received it; I did not see its contents - about two or three days after, I took a tea-spoon, similar to those produced, to Goldsmith's-hall, and delivered it to Mr. Barrow.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Did you mark it - A. No; I gave him the same which Mr. King gave me.

ELIZA WILLIAMS . I am shopwoman to Mr. King. In August last, Mendham gave me a parcel which I took up stairs to Mrs. King immediately, without opening it - I gave it into her hands, I believe somebody was with her.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Did you deliver more than one parcel to her - A. No.

MARTHA KING . I am the wife of Mr. King. In August last, I received a parcel from Miss Williams, which I opened; it contained tea spoons - I did not count them, but gave them to somebody who placed them on the mantle-piece in our sleeping-room - they were left there loose in the paper; I remember Mr. King seeing them in the room afterwards; I do not know what part of the room they were in then (the nurse slept there) - I believe he saw the same spoons, I never used them, I had others in the house, but they were very different in make and shape, these are fiddle-handles, those produced are like them in shape.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Who did you give the parcel to - A. I believe to the nurse, but really cannot say - they were put on the shelf, and, I believe, afterwards in a drawer.

MR. NORTON. Q. When Mr. King saw them, were they in the same paper - A. Yes; it was untied, I did not

leave the room before he saw them - no other parcel of spoons was brought to me.

FREDERICK KING. I am a linen-draper, and live in St. John-street. I gave Mr. Upjohn's mother an order for a dozen spoons, about August last, I never gave them any other order. When I came home one evening, I saw them on the dining-room mantle-piece, on the first floor - Mrs. King was present, I did not count them, each spoon was enclosed in silver paper, and brown paper round them; those produced resemble them in appearance and shape.

Q. Is this room always called a dining-room - A. They call it a bed-room, the child sleeps in it sometimes.

MRS. KING. The spoons were put on our bed-room mantle-piece, where I and my husband sleep.

MR. KING. They were not there when I saw them, nor afterwards; I never had any like them - I took them off the mantle-piece, looked at them, thought them charged too high, and gave one to Mendham to take to Goldsmith's-hall, to the deputy-warden - I afterwards took five of them from a box and gave them to Mr. Cook - they were only in silver paper then.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. You saw them in the dining-room - Yes; I do not know who put them in the box - I did not attend before the Justice; I went to the solicitor for the prosecution, I did not see one Wintle there; I never heard his name before - I sent the spoons to Goldsmith's-hall, as I thought them not good silver.

MRS. KING. I delivered six of them to Sarah Simcoe , to be sent to Mr. Barrow. I intended only to send five, but not being open, I sent six; the remaining five were put in a small box in the cupboard, I believe I put them there - I saw them in the box, they were in silver paper, but I do not know whether they were in the brown paper. I think the brown paper went to the Hall with the six.

SARAH SIMCOE . I am apprentice to Mrs. King. I do not live there, but only attend in the daytime; on the 6th of September Mrs. King gave me six spoons, which I delivered to Mr. Barrow, at Goldsmith's-hall.

MR. JOHN BARROW . I am deputy-warden of the Goldsmith's Company. On the 5th of September, I received a tea-spoon from Mendham, it is mixed with six others, which I received on the 7th of September from Simcoe, (looks at them) I put the name of King on the bowl of it, but it is rubbed out - I know these to be the same, I consider the stamps on them as not genuine; the Company's engraver can speak to it better than myself, but I believe them to be counterfeit marks; I have been in the assay-office forty-two years.

JOHN COOK . I produce five spoons which I received from King; I have kept them about my person ever since.

MR. BARROW. The stamps on these are forged.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. The stamping is not your department - A. No; Every manufacturer puts his initials on the silver. When there are two of the same name, a stamp is made; they are the same initials, but not the same mark.

Q. Suppose William Weston and William Wilson are manufacturers, how will you distinguish between their marks - A. If the letters are the same size and shape we cannot, but that rests with the person who enters them.

MR. WALFORD. Q. Has each manufacturer a particular mark to denote his particular initials - A. I have seen a great many of the prisoner's manufacture, and have seen no other marked like them. The marks on all his correspond exactly with those now before the Court.

GEORGE MILES . I am inspector and marker of silver plate at Goldsmith's-hall, and have been so thirteen years. Every manufacturer brings a punch with his initials to the hall, and an impression is taken from it on pewter - it has the initial of the Christian and sirname of the manufacturer. The punch is returned to the manufacturer, and an impression taken from it, is kept in charge of the deputy warden, I produce it, that taken from the prisoner punch - the person is dead who took it. The stamp is entered in the Companys book, and signed by the manufacturer at the time, it is taken off, I produce the book; the entry is signed by the prisoner - I have every reason to believe it is his signature, from my knowledge of his writing; the date of the entry is the 18th of September, 1810, and is made by Richard Britain , who is now dead, he also took the impression; this is the Company's book, in which the transaction is entered. I produce a pewter plate with the initials W. W. on it - it corresponds with the entry, and I have the punch, which made the stamp (producing it) the prisoner delivered it to me at his house: he was in the habit of sending plate to the hall to be marked, it always came with this stamp. The spoons are marked with this punch - I have no doubt of it, it has been my business to examine the stamps, for the last thirteen or fourteen years - when they have a new punch, it must be entered a fresh at the hall, and the punch must be different. I find no subsequent entry to this; if plate came with a fresh mark, I should detain it, till the new punch was brought forward - two punches can never be alike. An impression is taken off in the book as well as on pewter - he has used this punch from the date of the entry till now.

Q. When a manufacturer brings an article to the hall, what is done with it - A. It is often delivered to me; it is then weighed, and taken to another office, where it is assayed, and if it is the standard, it is delivered to the stamper, who stamps it with the Company's, and the King's mark, which are a Leopard's head, a Lion passant, and a variable letter for the year, the stamp is made, the King's head is the Government stamp, denoting that the duty is paid - all these stamps are made by one punch. John Smith , engraver to the Company, and Government, made the instrument. The plate is brought with the maker's mark on it.

Q. Are articles brought to be stamped, in a rough or polished state - A. Rough; they are polished afterwards by the maker.

Q. Examine these seven spoons carefully, are the stamps genuine or not - A. I have not the least doubt of there being all forged, and so are those on the five. I speak from my general knowledge of the stamps, it has been my business to inspect them for the last fourteen years.

Q. You and three officers went to the prisoner's house - A. Yes; on the 6th of October, it is in King-street, Islington. Armstrong, Jun. was one of the officers - we found the prisoner at home, I went into the back workshop, and found his two sons at work polishing twelve tea spoons, which I took from them - I found four dozen tea spoons, with genuine marks, and three pair of sugar tongs,

all with the genuine marks on. I produce the tongs, they have not been bent into shape, the stamps on the tongs appear to have been hammered very much since they left the hall.

Q. Can any person procure the appearence of the legitimate stamp, by hammering on this genuine stamp - A. By laying an unstamped piece of plate on in, with a smart stroke, he could get the reverse, and the reverse would be useful to forge a stamp with - it can be done, I have not the least doubt, for I have tried it; I think the sugar tongs bear the appearence of having been so used - they are not polished; the twelve spoons bear every appearence of having been stamped in that way, an instrument made in that way, would make precisely the same mark as on these - the edges are considerable blunter than if made by the original stamp. I have a real tea spoon stamp. I am confident the marks on the spoons, have not been done with a genuine stamp.

Q. Look at these twelve spoons found in the prisoner's workshop - A. The stamps on them are forged, I am certain, and appear to have been made in the way I mention - there is not that impression on them, which there would have been had they been done by the original instrument. They bear the prisoner's initials, marked with his punch. Soft silver would have the same impression as hard.

Q. After the spoons, and tongs were found, did you see the prisoner - A. I did, and asked him for his mark punch; he unlocked his counting-house door, and gave me that which I produce - I asked for his books, he said he kept none; I said from information I had received I was confident he must keep books - he made no answer, I said I hoped he would produce them, or I must direct the officers to make further search; he then gave me these books which I have examined.

Q. Look at the 31st of August, and see if you find an entry of this transaction - A. Yes. (reads) "31st of August, Upjohn, one dozen of fiddle teas." I have examined the book from the 29th of May, to the 1st of October, it appears that in that interval he sold 914 ounces three pennyweights of plate. On the 28th of June there is an entry of three dozen teas, a pair of sugar tongs, and two fiddled gravy spoons, to John Walter , and on the 8th of June, eighteen fiddled teas, thirty ditto, and twelve ditto salt ladles, and on the 6th of July, there is an entry of a sale to Cassell, of two fiddled sauce ladles, and two French ditto.

Q. Now in these three entries, is there an entry of the duties being paid, on the articles - A. On the 6th there is.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. Do you know whether the entries are in his writing - A. I cannot positively swear it, but have every reason to believe it - from my knowledge of his writing. If I received a note in that writing, I should act on it as his.

MR. WALFORD. Q. Is there an entry of the duties being paid - A. On the 6th of July, there is an entry of the duty being paid, and on the 8th of June, to Peachey's goods, twenty-eight ounces eleven pennyweights 2 l. 2 s. 2 d., and on the 31st of August, Upjohn's duty 11 s. 2 s., on the 28th of June, Walter's thirty-nine ounces fifteen penny-weights, duty 2 l. 19 s. 8 d.,

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. The person is dead who kept the book where the punch is entered - A. Yes. I only know the prisoner's punch mark, by looking at the plate and book - we have a general knowledge of the people's marks, I believe the signature in the book to be the prisoner's writing, I have no doubt whatever of it, from my knowledge of his writing, without other circumstances. I found nothing at his house which could make the forged impression - our punches are of steel. The prisoner did not know we were coming to search his house, only his sons were at work.

Q. Did you know Wintle, who was tried here - A. Yes; I did not see him at either of the examinations. The duty is 1 s. 6 d. per ounce; the spoons weigh seven ounces nine pennyweights. The polishing ought not to take away any of the impression, they send them to us as smooth as they possibly can; the polishing does not remove the clear impression, it merely takes off the sharpness; I never said that it was impossible to tell whether the stamp on light spoons was correct. Before the examination, Mr. Barrow asked my opinion on the plate, and I gave it him - I occasionally use a magnifying-glass, I do not think I did on this occasion; I gave my opinion first, and afterwards took my glass to examine them, as it comes so habitual to me.

Q. Did not Barrow say he thought the impressions fair, and you replied that it might be so, but it was difficult to ascertain whether they were forged or not - A. Such conversation never took place, I never thought the stamp on the tongs was forged.

MR. BARROW. I never said to any one that it was nice and difficult to say whether the stamps on the spoons were forged or not.

GEORGE MILES re-examined. Q. You have tried the experiment of getting the reverse of the original stamp - A. I have tried it with silver; a stamp so obtained, would soon be worn out and become blunt, and I should think would not stamp above four or five. If polishing is done skillfully, it will not at all injure the stamp.

Q. Look at this spoon, has it a genuine stamp - A. It has; and is finished. There is scarcely any difference in this impression from when it was made; here are twelve with genuine stamps which are not at all injured in polishing, two of the twelve forged ones appear to have received more injury than the rest - the sharpness is merely taken off.

MR. ALLEY. Q. Then they appear deteriorated - A. The sharpness is off.

Q. Must not an impression taken from the tongs be in all its parts a counterpart of the original, though not so plain - A. Precisely the same mark; those which I say are made from impressions taken from the tongs, are those found in his work-shop, not those indicted on - I have no doubt that those in question are made by silver punches, taken from genuine marks; I cannot possibly be deceived in distinguishing between that and a mark from the genuine stamp; they stand in the same form, but there is a material difference between the impression of this and the Company's steel punch; a silver mark cannot give the same impression as a steel one.

JURY. Q. It is possible that he might make a steel punch instead of a silver one - A. The genuine mark is altogether different; we have no private mark.

MR. WALFORD. Q. Have you yourself taken impressions with silver - A. Yes; and made an impression on other silver with it. I know a silver punch will make an impression, but it is not like our steel one - a person conversant with the marks cannot help distinguishing one from the other, I am certain the marks in question are not made with a steel punch.

MR. ANDREWS. Q. How many persons besides yourself are there in the office - A. Five or six; five of them have been there longer than me.

MR. BARROW. I have assayed seven of the spoons since his apprehension, they are of the proper standard.

JOHN SMITH . I am engraver to the Goldsmith's Company. I engraved the instrument which makes the Hall and Government stamp, and have done so for fourteen years; marks made by a steel punch would be different from any made by silver or any other metal. The marks on the seven spoons are all counterfeit, I should conceive they were never made by a steel punch, but can positively swear they were not made by the instrument I made; the punch is engraved entirely by myself. I never tried how a mark might be made without a steel punch; I am also certain that the other five are not made by the punch which I engraved, and are not the marks of the steel punch used at the Hall.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Are they made with a steel punch - A. They cannot; if it had, it would not be convex, there is a convexity round the Lion, which could not be if it were done with a steel punch, as they are always flat and hard - I cannot say what metal it is made with, but it is not steel. It certainly requires great experience to detect these stamps, I believe I am the most accomplished in this art. I had some conversation with Mr. Lane about the sugar-tongs, I did not express a doubt of the stamps on them being genuine; I took a magnifier to examine them.

Q. Did you not say "It may be so, but they do it with such a nicety, that it is difficult to tell whether the stamp is correct or not" - A. I think those words were used, with reference to the spoons, but not to the tongs.

MR. NORTON. Q. Is it with reference to your being the maker, or your general knowledge, that you think yourself the only likely person able to judge whether they are forged - A. I think myself the only person, as I made it; the opinion I gave of the spoons was, that they were decidedly forged, I never doubted it, I never said it was impossible to judge, for they were done to such a nicety - I expressed no doubt about it to Lane, not of my own opinion.

JOHN WALTERS . I am a pawnbroker. On the 28th of June, I gave the prisoner an order for two pair of gravy spoons; Mr. Miles took one pair away (looks at a pair) they were like these, I had none but what I had of the prisoner - they have W. W. on them.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. Have you often bought of him - A. I never bought gravy-spoons of any one but him; I sold one pair in the shop, I have three shopmen; I am sure I gave Miles the same I had of him.

HENRY PEACHEY . I am a silversmith, and live in Goswell-street. I employed the prisoner to make silver articles for me; I have a bill of parcels dated the 8th of June, for thirty tea-spoons, there are eighteen added to this bill which I had on the 1st of May; I gave Mr. Miles eight of them last Saturday week, they were spoons which I received of the prisoner, but I cannot say when - they have his mark, W. W. on them.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Are you aware this man is being tried for his life - A. Yes; I cannot swear they were part of the forty-eight spoons mentioned in this bill, or that I had them from his hands, but they come to me in consequence of orders I gave him; I never recollect any being brought but by him or his sons, one of whom is grown up - I have dealt five years with him.

MR. NORTON. Q. He has brought you spoons with his own hands - Yes; and they were marked W. W. the same as these.

JAMES ROBERT CASSELL . I am a silversmith, and live in Old-street. I dealt with the prisoner; some spoons were seized at my house last Monday, I have not seen them since.

GEORGE MILES re-examined. The two gravy-spoons have the Leopard's-head, Lion's-head, and date mark, they are forged, and so are eight from Peachey's.

MR. SMITH. The marks on the gravy-spoons are forged, and so are those on the eight tea-spoons; the ground or shield is rose convex above the letters, the convexity could not appear if it was done with the proper stamp, and the shield round the impression is spread. and not a correct oval, but battered in - I think it is a little larger, but striking deep or shallow would have that effect.

Prisoner's Defence. The witness Miles, I am sorry to say, has spoken very wrong; he says I rather refused to give up what he asked for; but the moment they came in I readily shewed them every thing. When I saw them there were five or six of them, they came right into the shop, and fortunate enough for me, had they been half an hour later I should have put the four dozen they sent back into the very state of the three pair of tongs they say I had taken an impression from. Work goes in the rough to the Hall and comes back in various states; sometimes it is almost cut through with the mark, and at other times they are so faint you can hardly see them, and we are obliged to hammer them and take as little off as we possibly can, as we pay duty before it goes, though they make a small allowance. It was never my intention to injure any one. He asked for my books or something - I said my accounts were very short; but such as they were I gave them. I never had but one mark since I have been in business. If there is any thing that bears the appearance of forgery it must be some evil-designed bad person out of doors who has been the cause of it. I am rather in the decline of life, and my faculties rather decline, and for some time past I have not worked myself but left it to my sons.

JURY to MILES. Q. Are the same sized stamps used to all silver - A. They are different sizes, but the same impression. All tea-spoons are marked with the same impression.

NOT GUILTY *.

* There were four other indictments against the prisoner, for similar offences, in which the Learned Counsel declined proceeding.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18211024-69

1342. WILLIAM HARRISON was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of September , five blankets, value 15 s.,

the goods of Richard Atkins ; and one gown, value 2 s., and one apron, value 1 s. , the goods of Catherine Sandeford .

MARY ATKINS . I am the wife of Richard Atkins , who lives in St. Ann's-street, Westminster . The prisoner lodged with us about a week. On the 11th of September I missed five blankets from a room with five beds in it, over where he slept, one off each bed. He came, in at six o'clock, and in consequence of information, I asked him if he had brought back the blankets which he took out. He said he took none. I sent for a constable who took him. I have not found them; nobody but him was in the room that day. He was making matches there.

ANN SMITH . I lodge on the first floor. On the 11th of September, between four and five o'clock in the afternoon, I was looking out of window and saw him going from the house with a large bundle, the outside was a blanket. Mrs. Atkins and I went into the room where he had been making matches, and missed them.

ANN BROOKMAN . On the 11th of September I was in the room where he was making matches and saw him go down stairs, between four and five o'clock, with a large bundle; I saw the corner of a blanket hanging out. He left another bundle in my charge not five minutes before.

CATHERINE SANDEFORD . I lodge with Atkins, and was in this room when the prisoner was there making matches, at nine o'clock in the morning; the blankets were then safe on each bed. I lost a blue gown and apron off one of the beds. He was alone in the room.

HENRY BETTS . I am an officer. I took him in charge, he denied it, but afterwards voluntarily said he sold them to a Jew in the street.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Confined Six Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18211024-70

1343. THOMAS DARBY was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of October , one tea-spoon, value 18 d. the goods of John Owen .

JOHN OWEN . I keep the Crown, public-house, Chiswell-street . On the 9th of October, about half-past eight o'clock at night, the prisoner came in and called for a glass of gin and water; I took him a silver spoon with it, and staid in the house looking after him some time, as I suspected him, then I went out and as I returned I saw him coming out. My brother ran out, and said he had taken a spoon. I collared him - he appeared surprised - I said it was of no use for we had lost ten spoons, and I would not let him go; he then produced it, and begged for mercy. I had marked it before I gave it him; he had left a plated one instead of it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I made a mistake.

GUILTY . Aged 70.

Confined One Year .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18211024-71

1344. GEORGE EVANS was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of October , one cloak, value 1 l. , the goods of William Nevill .

JOSEPH BARRETT . I am shopman to Mr. William Nevill , a linen-draper , who lives in Mile End-road . On the 13th of October, about twelve o'clock, this cloak hung at the door very high, it was outside the shop. A person gave me information - I ran out as far as the fields and saw the prisoner running very hard. I pursued him a quarter of a mile crying Stop thief! and saw him take the cloak from under his coat, spread it open, and throw it down, it was picked up. I pursued - he laid in a ditch twenty yards further on - I secured him. I am sure he is the man who threw it down.

WILLIAM GOODYEAR . I heard the cry of Stop thief! and saw the prisoner run with a bundle, he threw the cloak down; he was three quarters of a mile from Nevill's shop. I picked the cloak up, he could not get over the hedge, so he sat down and was taken.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I saw the cloak on the ground and asked a woman if it was hers? she said No. I took it up and walked away. A man came crying Stop thief! I told him I had picked it up, and he let me go; a mob came round and threw me down.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18211024-72

1345. MARY CARTER was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of September , five frocks, value 2 s. 6 d.; one pair of stockings, value 1 s.; two pinafores, value 3 d.; and two handkerchiefs, value 3 d. , the goods of George Cavalier .

ANN CAVALIER . I am the wife of George Cavalier , who is a weaver , and lives in Spitalfields . The prisoner lodged with an old woman in my garret. On the 21st of September I gave Gargrave these things to wash.

ELIEA GARGRAVE . I am servant to Mr. Cavalier. On the 20th of September, about seven o'clock in the morning, I put these things in a pan of water, and missed them next night.

JOHN WARD . I am a cordwainer, and live in Wheeler-street. The prisoner came and sold me two frocks for 1 s. - I asked whose they were; she said " Kitty Harris 's." In about a quarter of an hour she brought me nine or ten things, frocks, pincloths, and stockings; they were all wet. I sent for a constable who took her.

WILLIAM LICKFORD . I took her in charge with the property.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

CATHERINE PARKER . I am sometimes called Harris. I never gave her the things.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not say they were Harris's.

GUILTY . Aged 55.

Confined Six Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18211024-73

1346. THOMAS FLEET was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of October , one carpet, value 5 l. , the goods of Benjamin Savage .

WILLIAM COLLINS . I am servant to Benjamin Savage , Esq. , of Portman-street, Portman-square . On the 20th of September I saw the prisoner at the corner of Portman-street, and asked him if he knew a man who would beat our carpet. He said he should be glad to do the job for 3 s. I took him to the house, told my mistress, and told him to come for it on Monday morning, which he did, at half-past nine o'clock. He was to bring it back as soon

as he could. He said I should always find him at the watering-house. He never returned it. I found him on the 6th of October at a public-house, at the corner of Quebec-street; before I spoke to him he said "I have not got your carpet." I went to speak to the landlady, and he went away. I saw him a quarter of an hour after at the General Townsend, public-house, in Oxford-street, but said nothing to him. On the 9th I met him again, and said he had stolen the carpet. He said "No I have not, I shall be obliged if you will let me go, I will come back again." I took him to the office.

Prisoner. Q. Why not take me before - A. The third time, as he had two others with him, I was afraid; and at the other times he appeared tipsy, he was sitting down, I wanted to see him standing up, to know him better.

MICHAEL MORRIS . I am an officer. I left my address at the prisoner's lodgings. The servant met him in the street the office is in.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18211024-74

1347. SAMUEL JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of September , one night-stool, value 16 s. , the goods of Richard Smith .

RICHARD SMITH. I am a cabinet-maker , and live in Duke-street, Lincoln's Inn-fields . This night-stool stood three feet inside the shop, on a chair. On the 27th of September, between three and four o'clock, a woman gave me information, I ran into Lincoln's Inn-fields, about two hundred yards off, and saw the prisoner in Castro's custody, with the stool under his arm.

PETER CASTRO . I was at work at Mr. Smith's, I ran out and overtook the prisoner in Lincoln's Inn-fields, about three hundred yards off, with the stool under his arm.

JANE HERBERT . I live next door to Mr. Smith. I saw the prisoner with two other young men opposite my window - one of them stood on the step of the door, took the night-stool, and gave it to the prisoner, who put it under his arm and ran into Lincoln's Inn-fields. They all ran off.

JOSEPH TRYER . I am an officer. I saw it under the prisoner's arm, and took him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18211024-75

1348. STEPHEN HENDLEY and HENRY FOXON were indicted for stealing, on the 7th October , one handkerchief, value 5 s., the goods of a certain man whose name is unknown , from his person .

GEORGE WADDINGTON . I am an officer of St. Sepulchre's. On the 7th of October I was coming down the City-road with Keys, just as Westley's chapel was over. I heard a noise made, which is a signal among thieves. I looked across and saw seven or eight lads running after a gentleman - the prisoners were two of them. I had noticed Hendley two or three times before - he was always at the head of the boys. He tried a gentleman's pocket, the gentleman felt it, and followed them up and down the pavement to watch them. I saw them attempt several pockets, and by Chiswell-street the prisoners parted from the rest, and followed a lady and gentleman down Finsbury-place ; I saw Hendley go up to the gentleman's pocket, and I thought something came from the gentleman's pocket. I saw Foxon receive a handkerchief from Hendley, and put it into his jacket pocket. I went up and took it out of his hand; it was this handkerchief - I am sure it is what they took from the gentleman's pocket, for I did not lose sight of it. They crossed and went down by Lackington's, and each stood up in a different doorway, I took Foxon and Keys took Hendley. I could not find the gentleman, or I should have lost the prisoners.

Q. You could have called out - A. I was afraid of losing them, they had got two or three hundred yards before we took them.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. You could not see what was taken from the pocket - A. Not till I saw the handkerchief go from one to the other. There were a great many people in the street. I am a constable of St. Sepulchre's - I was here two nights ago as a witness. Keys and I had been to Islington.

JOHN KEYS . I am a constable of Clerkenwell. I saw the prisoners, and took Hendley. I did not see the handkerchief taken.

HENDLEY'S Defence. I was crossing the road - this lad took out his handkerchief to use it - I went to a door for a necessary purpose - They came and took me. Foxon said the handkerchief was his own.

FOXON'S Defence. I was using my handkerchief, they took hold of me, and said "What have you got?" and called out "Chio! lay hold of the little one."

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18211024-76

1349. JOHN RAWLINGS was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of October , two pewter pots, value 20 d. , the goods of Richard Ody .

RICHARD TRIBUTE . On the 8th of October, about four o'clock, I was at Ody's, the Red-lion, public-house, Wilson-street, Finsbury-square . The prisoner came in, he came to my box and asked for the newspaper, which I gave him, he kept folding it about, and under his coat I saw a pot; I told the landlord, who came from the bar, and collected the pots; I then saw he had moved the pot on the table by his elbow from under his coat; I said, "Mr. Ody, that is the pot the man had under his coat," he abused me very much, and went out in a passion; I advised Ody to fetch him back, he was brought back, he had a bundle, in which was found another pint pot wrapped in a towel and another in his coat pocket.

RICHARD ODY . I keep the house. Tribute charged the prisoner with concealing a pot under his clothes, he denied it, and abused him; he went out with a bundle, I followed and secured him, six yards off, and found a pot in his bundle, he fell on his knees, and begged for mercy, I said I had lost a great many, he said If I forgave him, he would bring back all - his coat knocked against the bench, and we found another in his pocket.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 55.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18211024-77

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

SIXTH DAY, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 30.

1350. HENRY SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of August , two saws, value 7 s.; one adze, value 2 s.; one plain, value 2 s., the goods of William Chappell ; one saw, value 5 s., the goods of Charles Kemp , and two saws, value 9 s. , the goods of Joseph Davis .

WILLIAM CHAPPELL . I am a carpenter . On the 27th of August, I left my tools in a cottage in Edgware-road , and missed them at six o'clock in the morning, I found the lock broken, and my saw in pawn.

CHARLES KEMP . I lost two saws from the cottage, and found them in pawn.

JOSEPH DAVIS . I lost two saws from the cottage - the prisoner was a stranger.

JOSEPH DOWLING. I was servant to Francis Catton , pawnbroker, Shoreditch. On the 30th of August, the prisoner pawned three saws.

THOMAS MATTHEWS . On the 30th of August, the prisoner pawned two saws with me.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18211024-78

1251. JOHN PRICE was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of October , one calf-skin, value 10 s. , the goods of Edward Mitchell .

JOHN WOOD . I am a currier, and live in Church-street, Bethnal-green. On the 6th of October, about seven o'clock at night, the prisoner came and offered to sell me a calf skin, which was in an unfinished state; I suspected him, as they are never sold so; he said he brought it out of Oxfordshire, and a person in the next street recommended him to me, but he could not tell his name - I detained him.

EDWARD MITCHELL . I am a currier , and live in Shoreditch . I had thirty skins on my counter, I went out, and on returning, missed one - Wood brought it to me. I am sure it is mine.

WILLIAM OLIVE . I am journeyman to Mr. Mitchell. On the 6th of October, about six o'clock in the evening, I put thirty skins on the counter; I had been shaving them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I got it from a man who came from Oxfordshire.

GUILTY . Aged 48.

Confined Six Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18211024-79

1352. JAMES TAYLOR , JASPER COOPER , and ARTHUR TURNER , were indicted for stealing, on the 9th of October , 11 lbs. of cheese, value 5 s. , the goods of Samuel Reynolds .

WILLIAM AXE . I live in Robert-street, Hoxton. On the 9th of October, about six o'clock in the evening, I was at the next door to Reynolds's shop, and saw Cooper and Turner with another, all together for half an hour - I went down Turner-square about a hundred yards off, watched there, and saw all three running away together; one of threw down half a cheese, which I picked up; Taylor then came back, and demanded it of me, I took it back to Reynold's shop - they all three came back and stood by the shop; Reynolds took Taylor and Cooper.

SAMUEL REYNOLDS . I am a cheesemonger , and live at Hoxton . I lost half a cheese by my door-post - I received information, went out, and took Taylor and Cooper - the cheese is mine.

WILLIAM SNOOK . I am an officer. I apprehended Turner last Wednesday; he said he was with them, but was not the boy who took the cheese.

COOPER - GUILTY . Aged 15.

TAYLOR - GUILTY . Aged 14.

Whipped and Discharged .

TURNER - NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18211024-80

1353. CHARLES COCKHAM and THOMAS HARRIS were indicted for stealing, on the 17th of October , one necklace, value 2 s., the goods of Thomas Sydes , from the person of Jane Sydes .

CHARLES PAYNE . I am a shoemaker, and live in St. John-street, Smithfield. On the 17th of October, I was in St. John-square , and saw the prisoners in company together - a boy, about nine years old, had a little girl in his arms, they were looking at Punch - Harris put his hand up to the child's neck, unlocked the necklace, and took it off; I saw it in his hand, they were both close together; I collared Harris, took him out of the crowd, and he dropped it - I took Cockham soon after, he had not run away.

JAMES METCALF . I am an officer. I took charge of the prisoners.

ANN SYDES . My daughter Jane was with her brother; my husband's name is Thomas, she went out with a necklace, and came home without it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

HARRIS'S Defence. I stood by the side of the child, and the gentleman came and took me.

HARRIS - GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Life .

COCKHAM - NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18211024-81

1354. JOHN JACOBS was indicted for feloniously assaulting Ellen the wife of Israel Alderson, on the 18th of October , on the King's highway, at St. Mary, Whitechapel , putting her in fear, and taking from her person, and against her will, one bonnet, value 2 s., and one handkerchief, value 2 s., the property of the said Israel Alderson .

ELLEN ALDERSON . I am the wife of Israel Alderson, who is an extra tide-waiter of the Custom-house . I live in Windmill-court, Rosemary-lane. On the 18th of October, between ten and eleven o'clock at night, I was returning from work, and was going for a bason of soup, to a cook's shop close by, and saw the prisoner plainly by the glass lamp; he struck me a severe blow in the stomach, and used very vulgar expressions and oaths, took my bonnet off my head, a shilling from my hand, and my handkerchief off, which was pinned round my neck - he said nothing to me, he was quite a stranger - I could not cry

out, the blow was so violent, but I ran to the watch-box, which was ten yards from the spot - he continued beating me all the way, had hold of my arm, and almost broke it, he held it so tight - the watchman got him from me with difficulty, my arm has been in a mortified state ever since. The watchman could not manage him, he did not get from him; three more watchmen came and secured him - I have not been well since it happened.

Q. Did the watchman get the bonnet and handkerchief from him - A. No; there was a number of them there, who threatened what they would do if he was not let go - one of them came up, and the bonnet was found in the passage of the house where I live, with the ribbons torn off; I did not see what the prisoner did with it - the blows I received prevented my observing what he did with it - The handkerchief has never been found.

Q. Where did you see the man who came up and threatened what he would do - A. It was a woman; she came up as the watchman was taking him away - I am sure of the prisoner's person.

JOHN FISHER . I am a watchman of Whitechapel, my box is about 300 yards from Alderson's house. On the 18th of October, about half-past eleven o'clock, she came running down crying out Watch! Watch! and the prisoner was running after her - she ran up to me, and said I am in danger of my life, she had neither bonnet or handkerchief on; he ran up to her, and said,

"D - n you, I will kill you;" and hit her two or three times, he caught hold of her arm, and if I had not hindered him, I think he would have broken it - he said "D - n your eyes, I will knock your brains out;" I secured him, he was never out of my sight. She said he had robbed her of a shilling, her bonnet and her handkerchief off her neck - I sprung my rattle, got more assistance, and took him to Whitechapel watch-house, which is about 150 yards off - he was then taken to a more secure place.

Q. Did any persons interfere with you - A. He was so very outrageous, I could only attend to him, it was as much as I could do to hold him; when he was taken to the watch-house, he was obliged to be handcuffed, or he would have torn the place to pieces. Alderson seemed very much frightened, and said she was much hurt - I think the prisoner had been drinking, but he knew well what he was doing.

Prisoner's Defence. I came home at twelve o'clock from Hyde-park corner, where I had been to carry a box, I came into Rosemary-lane, this woman came up, and asked me to go home with her, I said, "No, I do not want you;" she followed me to Red Lion-street, and then sung out for a watchman, and said I took her bonnet away - I said I knew nothing of her bonnet; I told the watchman she wanted me to go home with her. The watchman hauled me about, and struck me over the eye, with a stick - they took me to the watch-house, and tied my hands together. I know nothing of her things.

ELLEN ALDERSON re-examined. He was a perfect stranger to me - I did not ask him to go home with me; I never spoke to him in my life.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 25.

Recommended to Mercy.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18211024-82

1355. THOMAS RUDDELL was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of October , two watches, value 2 l.; one snuffbox, value 2 s.; one pencil case, value 6 d.; one ring, value 2 d., and seven half-crowns, the property of Samuel Jeave , in his dwelling-house .

SARAH JEAVE . I am the wife of Samuel Jeave , we rent a house, No. 2, Whitfield-street, Shoreditch . On the 3d of October, about five or six o'clock at night, I went out of the front parlour into the back, where I sleep, I opened my drawers, and took out a sovereign - I took this property out of a drawer, and put it in a chair, I covered it over with some clothes, then went into the front parlour, and sent my husband out to change the sovereign, he shut the door, and was gone out about ten or twelve minutes, I opened the door, and let him in again - Two days afterwards about eleven o'clock in the morning, I went into the room to put the things away, and missed the bag containing the property - We have no lodgers. The prisoner was the potboy , and used to bring the beer. On the Thursday, I went with the officers, who searched the prisoner's box, at the public-house, and there found a thimble, a ring, and two little padlocks, which I knew to be mine. He had brought a pot of beer to the house between eleven and twelve o'clock.

HENRY COURT . I am a pewterer, and live in George-yard, Old-street. On the 3d of October, about ten o'clock in the morning, Mr. Jeave, and I were sitting in his parlour, and about twelve o'clock, the prisoner brought a pot of beer, I took it of him - he went away as I thought. Jeave and I were in conversation for ten minutes or a quarter of an hour - I was then going into the yard, and passed the bed-room door, saw a shadow, went into the room, and saw the prisoner there, I asked what he was doing - he said he was playing with the parrot - there was one in the room; he went out about his business. I told Jeave, he said he thought him honest, and had no suspicion.

THOMAS GARTON . I am an officer. On the 4th of October, about eight o'clock at night, I took the prisoner in charge at the Robin Hood , public-house, Tabernacle-walk - he said he knew nothing of it; I asked if he had a box, he said he had two, we went up stairs with him, and in the second box was a thimble, a ring, and two padlocks, which the prosecutrix claimed - he said he picked up the thimble in the back room, and the ring and locks he took off the table - but he knew nothing of any thing else.

SARAH JEAVE . This ring and the thimble were in the bag with the watches and money - the padlocks were in a drawer.

Prisoner's Defence. This woman keeps a house of ill-fame, and whenever I went there, she asked if I had any money to treat her with gin, and if I had none, she would persuade me to pawn my clothes. One day she took my handkerchief off my neck, and said she would lend me 6 d. on it, to buy gin, and in the afternoon she said she would lend me another 6 d. on it, if I spent it, and next day, she offered 1 s., 6 d., more if I would spend 6 d.; she gave me 6 d. for the duplicate of a pair of stockings, and said if I could get her duplicates of anything, she would buy them, let them be what they would, and said I could not be without money in such a house as I lived in. As to these things,

I went for my pots at nine o'clock in the morning, she asked if I had any money to toss for gin, I said No. She sent me for a pot of beer, and asked me to drink, and after waiting about five minutes looking at the parrot, she told me to give it some bread, and as I came into passage, I kicked against something and found it was a thimble - the ring and padlocks laid by the side of the drawers; this gentleman came in the passage, and said Hallo! I went into the front room, and stopped five minutes - they asked me to drink.

HENRY COURT re-examined. He went out immediately as I found him in the back room, there are six rooms in the house - nobody but Jeave and his wife live there. I never saw but one gentleman come there, and he went away in ten minutes. I formerly lived with them nine years, there have been men and women, come for half a day - I do not know what they came for; I had no suspicion that they came for improper purposes.

SARAH JEAVE . Women do not frequent my house. A lady and gentleman lodged with me two months ago, they had been two years with me - I have drank porter with the prisoner when he has brought it, but not gin; when he brought beer to the door, he often asked for a drop, and I then said,

"Jem, you may take a drop."

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18211024-83

1356. EDWARD JOHN FRANKLIN was indicted for burglariously breaking, and entering the dwelling-house of Timothy Brown , at St. John, the Evangelist, Westminster , about eight o'clock in the night of the 27th of October , with intent to steal, and stealing therein one clarionet, value 16 s., his property .

TIMOTHY BROWN . I live in Great Smith-street , St. John, the Evangelist, Westminster, and am a carpenter and joiner . I rent the whole house - there are two doors to it; my brother who is a shoemaker, lives with me. On Saturday the 27th of October, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, I was in his shop talking to him, and heard a pane of glass break, ran out, and saw the prisoner at the window, with the clarionet in his hand - it laid in the window just before; he had got it by breaking the window, which was whole just before - it was dark, I saw two others on the opposite side of the way, whom I suspected - when I came up to the prisoner he was not a yard from the window (it is a circular sash, and he broke the pane completely out) - he ran from me - I overtook him about thirty yards off, without losing sight of him - a person laid hold of the lapel of his coat. I believe the prisoner lived in the neighbourhood.

Prisoner. Q. Did you take me with it in my hand - A. No; he dropped half of it, and threw the other half away. I am sure I saw it in his hand at the window, his hand was cut, and bleeding fresh, with breaking the glass.

RICHARD BROWN . I am the prosecutor's brother, and live with him. I heard the window break, and saw my brother run out - I called his wife down to mind the shop, then ran out, and saw the prisoner cross the road, and throw something down - the largest piece of the clarionet, was picked up on that spot, the other piece was found close to the window. It was quite dark.

BENJAMIN TIMBRELL . I am a constable of the parish. Brown fetched me to the shop, he sells second-hand things - the prisoner's right hand was bleeding fresh - the glass was all smashed to pieces; I found a piece of the clarionet in the kennel, by the window.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 17.

Recommended to Mercy.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18211024-84

1357. GEORGE TIMMINGS was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of October , one necklace, value 10 s., the goods of Edward Vernon , from the person of Mary Ann Vernon .

SECOND COUNT. Stating it to belong to James Scott .

MARY ANN WALKER . I am ten years old, and live in Northampton-street, Pancras. On the 17th of October, about one o'clock in the afternoon, I was in Northampton-street , and saw Mary Davis with a little girl, about three years old, named Mary Ann, and a little boy in her arms, I stood behind Mary Ann, she had a coral necklace on, the prisoner got between the child and me, unsnapped the necklace, took it off, and ran away with it - I immediately told Davis, and she went and told a man of it, he was not stopped. I knew the prisoner before, he goes about the streets selling apples. In about six hours after, he was brought to Mrs. Scott's, in Essex-street. I had seen him put it in his waistcoat pocket.

MARY DAVIS . I had the care of Mary Ann Vernon , she is three years old, her father's name is Edward. I was in Northampton-street, and had an infant in my arms besides, she had a coral necklace on with snaps, it was safe a little before one o'clock, Walker spoke to me, and I saw it was gone - she pointed the prisoner out as the person, he got away, I told a man of it, who would not go after him. In the evening he was brought to Scott's, and denied it - he sold apples in the street ; I knew him before. I saw the necklace in his hand when Walker pointed him out.

SARAH SCOTT . I live in Essex-street; my husband's name is James. I had the child and her brother to nurse, they went out with Davis to walk - she had the necklace on then - it has not been found. The prisoner was brought to my house, and denied the charge.

EDWARD FLETCHER . I am a baker. I left word at the prisoner's father's that I wanted him, and between seven and eight o'clock his brother brought him. I took him to Scott's, he denied it.

GUILTY . Aged 12.

Confined Three Months , and Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18211024-85

1358. HENRY HARRIS , RICHARD PENDERGRASS , and MICHAEL ANDERSON , were indicted for stealing, on the 3d October , one necklace, value 3 s., the goods of Peter Wright , from the person of Janet Wright .

PETER WRIGHT . I live in Broad-street, St. Giles's , my child's name is Janet. On the 3d of October, she was playing about in front of the shop, and in about ten minute Shaw brought her in.

JOHN SHAW . I have the care of the Adelphi Theatre. On the 3d of October I was coming down Broad-street, and

saw the child surrounded by the three prisoners - I am sure of them - they pushed the child against a hoard. I was crossing over to see what they were doing, when they all three ran off up Compton-street. The child put her hands up to her face and began crying; and in consequence of what she said I went after them, leaving her in care of a woman. I overtook them all three at the Seven-dials - Anderson slipped away, but was stopped and brought back immediately. The other two said they did not take it, but Anderson did - and he said it was the other two, but they wanted to lay it upon him, because he was the least, and if he attempted to say any other way they would wallop him. A mob collected, and the street-keeper came up. I picked the necklace up in the Green-yard (near the church), where the prisoners had been put. Pendergrass came and said if I would forgive him he would tell me where it was - and that Anderson took it, and threw it in the dirt, where I found it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

THOMAS KENDRICK . I am street-keeper. I caught Anderson and brought him back to the other two. He said it was not him, but them - and they said it was him. I saw the necklace found in the Green-yard, where I had put them.

PENDERGRASS'S Defence. I saw Anderson talking to the child, it had lost its brother, he ran away. I thought he had hurt the child and ran away. He said he had got the necklace - I said I would have nothing to do with it.

HARRIS - GUILTY . Aged 14.

PENDERGRASS - GUILTY . Aged 12.

Whipped and Discharged .

ANDERSON - GUILTY . Aged 10.

Judgment Respited .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18211024-86

1359. SARAH CASTLE was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of August , one sheet, value 3 s. , the goods of Benjamin Samuel .

RACHAEL SAMUEL . I am the wife of Benjamin Samuel , we live in New-street, Tower-hill . The prisoner lodged with us. On the 1st of August I put a sheet in the two pair of stairs back room, and missed it on the 10th. I charged her with it - she denied it. I never saw it in her possession, but found it in pawn. The pawnbroker is not here.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18211024-87

1360. DEBORAH SAUNDERS was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of October , one tea-kettle, value 3 s.; one copper pot, value 2 s.; six spoons, value 1 s. one lock, value 2 d., and one brush, value 2 d. , the goods of Hannah Moore , widow .

HANNAH MOORE . I am a widow, and live in Albemarle-street Clerkenwell . On the 7th of October, at church-time, I was up stairs, Chapman called me down. I found the prisoner in the passage with these things, which she had stolen from the kitchen.

WILLIAM CHAPMAN . I was looking from my second floor window, and saw the prisoner enter Mrs. Moore's house, and when I got down she came out with a bundle in her apron. I said "Those are not your's;" she said they were not. I took her back, and called Mrs. Moore, who claimed them. She begged for mercy.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A woman said she would give me 10 d. to get the things from the passage, as her husband had quarrelled with her. I had had no victuals for three days.

GUILTY . Aged 43.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18211024-88

1361. GEORGE WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of October , two cushions, value 1 l. , the goods of Thomas Wilson .

THOMAS WILSON . I am an auctioneer , and live in Frith-street, Soho. I was making an appraisement at the Rising Sun, public-house, Charles-street, Grosvenor-square . I was in the bar; the prisoner was brought in with the cushions, which were taken from my chaise at the door.

WILLIAM WINDER . I was coming out of the public-house, and saw the prisoner standing behind the prosecutor's chaise. I passed on - looked back, and saw him take a cushion, and put it under his arm, he then took the other. I laid hold of him with them.

JOHN JONES . I took him in custody.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 36.

Judgment Respited .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18211024-89

1362. HENRY WEAVER and SAMUEL YELDHAM were indicted for stealing, on the 15th of October , one bottle, value 2 d., and one quart of mushrooms, value 5 s. , the goods of William Shaw .

The prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18211024-90

1363. ANN ALGAR was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of October , two sheets, value 12 s., and one blanket, value 4 s., the goods of William Offerd , in a lodging-room .

MARY OFFERD . I am the wife of William Offerd , we live in Lizard-street, St. Luke's . On the 12th of October I let the prisoner a second floor room, furnished, at 5 s. per week; and on the 15th, in consequence of information, I looked into the room and missed the sheets and blankets off the bed. I went in the evening and found her in Old-street, and persuaded her to come home. She said she had made away with the sheets and blankets, and gave me the duplicate of a sheet and blanket, another duplicate was found in her room.

WILLIAM BROCKWELL . I am shopman to Mr. Cassell. pawnbroker, Old-street. On the 15th of October the prisoner pawned a sheet for 3 s.

JAMES KIRKWOOD . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Brick-lane. On the 13th of October I took a blanket in pawn for 2 s.

JOHN MATTHEWS . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Whitecross-street. On the 13th of October the prisoner pawned a sheet for 3 s. 6 d.

SAMUEL SAUNDERS . I took her in charge, and found a duplicate on her.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner put in a written defence, stating that she pawned the things being in want of money, but intended to redeem them.

GUILTY . Aged 44.

Confined One Month .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18211024-91

1364. ELIZA WEST was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of September , one shirt, value 12 s.; and one handkerchief, value 2 d., the goods of George Longford , from the person of Sarah Longford .

SARAH LONGFORD . I am the wife of George Longford , a painter ; we live in Orton-street, Clare-market. On the 22d of September I was coming out with oysters on my head and this shirt and handkerchief in a bundle under my arm. The prisoner came up in Clare-street , and asked if she should help me down with the tub of oysters. I said I could do it myself; she then pulled the bundle from under my arm, and said "Don't be frightened, I am not going to run away, I am only going to speak to Old Wright." I turned round and saw her pop up a court with it, and followed, but could not find her. I found the property at Bow-street a week after. I am sure she is the person.

WILLIAM SMITH . I am a constable. I was fetched, and took her in charge in Drury-lane, on the day of the robbery. I found the shirt and handkerchief in possession of a dealer in marine stores, in Short's-gardens.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. She was in the habit of sending me to pawn things. I went to help the tub off her head, she said No; but told me to take the bundle from under her arm and pawn it, or leave it for a shilling till to-morrow. I took it to Turner's - they would not take it in - I took it to Short's-gardens and got 1 s. 3 d. on it, and as I returned I met her husband, who gave me in charge. I once saved her from being run over when she was drunk.

SARAH LONGFORD . I did not know her before. She had offered me assistance one day when I was knocked down. I was quite sober.

MARY CANE . I sell fruit and other things in the street. I came out on Saturday, five weeks before the prisoner was taken, and saw this woman give her the shirt from under her arm, and bid her pawn it, and if she could not pawn it, to get a drop of gin for it, to drink before her husband came down. I afterwards saw her with money in her hand looking for the prosecutrix.

Q. When were you applied to about this - A. She sent for me when she was in prison. I went to her last Monday; she said as I saw the woman give her the shirt, I should come down.

Q. Where were you - A. In Clare-street. The prisoner asked the prosecutrix if she should help her down with her pail of oysters. She told her to take the shirt, she was to bring her the money. She generally stood in Clare-street.

Q. Did she appoint any place for her to bring the money to - A. I did not stop to hear. There is a wine-vaults just by, and I went in to see the time - it was ten o'clock. I wished to know the time as I was going for oysters, and Billingsgate is generally shut at twelve. I live in Little Wild-street. I could not go to Billingsgate as I wanted to bring out my stand, and it was too late.

Q. What ten o'clock too late to go - A. I had not money enough, I went to Drury-lane, and met the prisoner; she said I have got the money for Mrs. so and so. I said "You ought to be ashamed of yourself to be seen in such company;" for I had often seen her tipsy in the street, and the prisoner was quite tipsy. The prisoner lived servant with me when I was in the milk business, and bore a good character.

Q. On your oath has she not been in custody - A. I never heard it.

GUILTY . Aged 42.

Confined One Year .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18211024-92

1365. JAMES SCHOFIELD was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of October , one show-glass, value 5 s., and 2 lbs. of almond cakes, value 3 s. , the goods of Robert Simms .

ANN SIMMS . I am the wife of Robert Simms , a biscuit-baker , we live in Queen-street, Edgware-road . On the 3d of October, about a quarter before eight o'clock at night, the glass of almonds was on the counter, the prisoner came in for a halfpenny worth of nuts; he offered me 6 d., I said I would not give change, he swore, and went out without them - I immediately missed the glass, which was safe five minutes before, it was brought back two days after without the cakes - I knew him by sight before.

ROBERT SIMMS . I was up two pair of stairs, ran out, and described the prisoner to the watchman who directed me to Cato-street - I found the prisoner at the Brazier's Head, public-house, at a quarter before nine o'clock, but could get no one to take him; the constable took him on Friday; the glass was afterwards given to me.

SAMUEL PRENDERGRASS . I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner in James-street, on Friday morning, he denied it; the prosecutrix said he was the person who was in her house - he denied having been there.

ROBERT LORING . I keep a little shop in Cato-street. The prosecutor claimed a show-glass which I bought of a man, it was not the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I was at the Brazier's Head, public-house, and heard of this. The watchman said if the prosecutor gave charge of me, he must take me, but he knew he could not swear to me; he then said he could; the watchman said he knew I was in the house from seven till nine o'clock. Next morning, I went and asked the prosecutrix if I was the lad, she said No; then she said "Wait a little," and called her husband; he said I was the lad - then he said "If I cannot swear to you, my wife shall."

JAMES FIDGETT . I am a watchman, and live in Great James-street, Lisson-green. On the 3d of October, the prosecutor came and said there was a boy in the public-house who he thought had robbed him - I said,

"Are you clear of it," he said No; I then said I could not take him; he said the robbery was done between seven and eight o'clock, I said it could not be, for I saw him in the public-house five minutes before eight o'clock; it is twenty

minutes walk from the house; I do not know how long he had been there.

ROBERT SIMMS . The watchman did not say he saw him there five minutes before eight o'clock. I told him my shop was robbed at a quarter before or after eight, and wanted him to take him, and mentioned his name - he then said he was in the tap-room; this was about a quarter before nine o'clock.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18211024-93

1366. CHARLES EMENY was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of September , 2 lbs. of butter, value 2 s. , the goods of William Tett .

ELEANOR TETT . I am the daughter of William Tett , we live in Homer-street . On Saturday night, the 29th of September, the prisoner came to the shop for a halfpenny worth of pipe-clay, I served him, he said it was not enough, and as he went out, I missed a lump of fresh butter, which I saw on the counter when he came in - I looked out, and saw it in his hand without any paper - I ran and called the people to stop him, he threw it down and ran away. On the 5th of October, the constable brought him to the shop. I am certain of him.

SAMUEL PRENDERGRASS . On the 5th of October, I apprehended the prisoner as he was talking to a prisoner at the office. He denied the charge. Tett said he was the boy who ran away with the butter.

Prisoner's Defence. There was an alarm; I saw the people running, the girl said it was me; I came back to the shop, I had nothing, and they let me go, as she said she did not know me.

ELEANOR TETT . He never came back, he was stopped by a man; I said he was the person, and he made his escape - I saw him throw the butter down.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined Six Months and Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18211024-94

1367. ELIZA BLAKE was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of October , one sheet, value 4 s., the goods of Charlotte Ferguson , in a lodging-room .

CHARLOTTE FERGUSON . I am a widow , and live in Blue-coat-fields, Shadwell . Three weeks ago, last Friday, I let the prisoner a furnished room, and lost a sheet from her room.

JOHN ELLIOT . I am a pawnbroker. On the 4th of October, the prisoner pawned this sheet for 2 s. 2 d.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN CONNELLY . I am a patrol. On the 6th of October, I took the prisoner about twelve yards from Ferguson's house; she said she did it through distress.

Prisoner's Defence. I meant to redeem it if she gave me time - it was a wet night, and I was obliged to take another lodging.

GUILTY . Aged 34.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18211024-95

1368. WALTER NEARY was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of October , two sheets, value 14 s., and one pillowcase, value 1 s. , the goods of Joseph Bushnan .

JANE AESLETT . I am a laundress, and live at Hoxton . I wash for Joseph Bushnan , Esq. ; on Monday, the 7th of October, I had a pair of sheets and a pillow-case to wash, and lost them on the 10th; they laid on a chair in my house - Whiston, the officer brought them to me on Friday - I knew them to be Mr. Bushnan's.

THOMAS WHISTON . I am one of the night patrol. On the 10th of October, a little after two o'clock in the day, I was returning from the Mansion-house, and stopped the prisoner in Lamb's-passage, Chiswell-street, with a bundle - I asked what was in it, he said dirty linen; I asked what sort, he said he did not know, that he had brought it from his sister's, who lived in Whitechapel, and he lived in Grub-street, and had been walking round Hoxton - it contained these things.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18211024-96

1369. CHARLOTTE FLETCHER was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of October , one handkerchief, value 5 s., and one tobacco-box, value 1 s., the goods of John Cook , from his person .

JOHN COOK . I am a saddle and harness-maker , and live at Margate. On the 25th of October, I was in town, and met the prisoner in Wych-street, about three o'clock in the morning - we got into conversation, she said she would shew me where I could get something to drink; I gave her a bason of soup at a coffee-shop, we staid there half an hour. While she was drinking, I fell into a doze for a quarter of an hour, and when I awoke I missed my silk handkerchief from round my neck, and my tobacco-box and another handkerchief from my pocket - I saw her running out, ran after her about three hundred yards, took her, and gave her to the watchman - she ran out as soon as she saw me awake; she said she had none of my property; the watchman found the handkerchief and box - I had drank a little, but was more tired than drunk.

ALEXANDER DALLAS . I am the street-keeper. I was by the New Church in the Strand, and saw the prisoner run down from Newcastle-street, and run across; I followed her, hearing the cry of Watch! the prosecutor took hold of her, and charged her with robbing him of a handkerchief; she denied it, he was not drunk.

JOHN GRAY . I am a watchman. I followed her over the road through the wet, and found the handkerchief in the way she ran, and found the tobacco-box about fifty yards further on.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I took him to a gin-shop, then he wanted coffee, and as I would not take him home, he wanted to ill use me, and I ran away.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18211024-97

1340. JAMES HEADY and GEORGE DRAPER were indicted for stealing, on the 13th of October , the sum of 3 s. 2 d. in monies numbered, the property of Elizabeth Anderson , from her person .

ELIZABETH ANDERSON . I live in Upper Chapman-street;

my father is a watchman in the London Docks. On Saturday, the 13th of October, at half-past eight o'clock in the evening, my mistress had paid me my wages; I was going home, and at the top of Rose-lane, Spitalfields , a little boy asked me to buy a halfpenny worth of pins. I had 3 s. 2 s. in the corner of my shawl, which was round my neck - I was untying it to pay him, and Heady hit me over the hand with a stick, and tried to knock the money out of my hand, but could not; then Draper came and snatched it out of my hand, and tore the end of my shawl off - he ran down the street; they both ran away together with the money, and were apprehended that night. I never saw them before, but am sure they are the boys. My money was a half-crown, six penny pieces, and four halfpence.

THOMAS HART . I am a headborough, I took the prisoners into custody, about a quarter of an hour after the robbery; the girl came crying to me, pointed them out, and said they were the boys. I took Heady, Draper ran into a house. I took him, and he said to another sweep in the house, "Give me the money, and I will give it to the girl." He gave him a half-crown, six penny pieces, and four halfpence. I took them out of his hand.

DRAPER'S Defence. I knocked the money out of her hand by accident, and when I got home I was quite surprised to find it in my hand.

HEADY'S Defence. I saw him running, but did not know what it was about.

HEADY - GUILTY , Aged 19.

DRAPER - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18211024-98

1371. THOMAS BAKER was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of October , 18 lbs. of beef, value 9 s., and 9 lbs. of mutton, value 4 s. 6 d. , the goods of John Adams .

JOHN ADAMS . I am a butcher , and live in Union-street, Middlesex hospital . On the 6th of October, about eleven o'clock in the morning, I sent the prisoner out with 27 lbs. of meat in a tray, to Mr. Allison, of Clare-street - he did not return. I took him next morning, he said it was through being tipsy.

MARY HIGGINS . I am servant to Mr. Allison. I ordered this meat, but it was not delivered.

Prisoner's Defence. I met a friend, got intoxicated, fell asleep, and when I awoke it was gone.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18211024-99

1372. MARY BRADLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of August , one blanket, value 6 s.; two sheets, value 6 s.; one candlestick, value 3 s.; one pair of bellows, value 2 s., and one flat iron, value 1 s. , the goods of Daniel Donovan .

ELIZA DONOVAN . I am the wife of Daniel Donovan , we live in Great Wild-street, Lincoln's Inn-fields. The prisoner lodged about four months at a house of ours, in Seward-street . On the 31st of August, she absconded with the key of the room, she owed me 20 s. for rent - I could never find her till the 5th of October.

MARY SLARK . I was present when the prisoner was apprehended - I pointed her out in Drury-lane.

NICHOLAS MADDEN . The prisoner was given in my charge, she said she had lost the duplicates of the property.

DANIEL DONOVAN . I let her the room, these things were in it, they are now gone, and have not been found.

Prisoner's Defence. I left every thing in the room, as I found it. I left because I owed them money, and they threatened me, that if I did not pay my rent they would charge me with felony - I left my clothes behind.

ELIZA DONOVAN . It is false - she only left two old shoes.

GUILTY . Aged 38.

Confined Six Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18211024-100

1373. CHARLES BARBER and JOHN YOUNG were indicted for stealing, on the 19th of October , one pelisse, value 3 s. , the goods of Samuel Sheffield .

SAMUEL SHEFFIELD . I live at Hadley . On the 19th of October, this pelisse hung inside my shop - I saw it safe at three o'clock, and did not miss it till about four o'clock, when Hurley brought the prisoners back with it.

JAMES HURLEY . I am a constable. On the 19th of October, I was at Hadley, and heard a cry of Stop thief! I pursued, and took Young, who was running.

ISAAC DUFFIELD . I am a gardener at Hadley. About four o'clock I saw the prisoners in company, Young was concealing something under his jacket - I watched and saw him change it from one side to the other, and then he gave it to Barber, and pointed to him to go across the fields with it, he took it, and I followed him across the common, and about ten yards before I got to him he dropped it - I secured him, he said he found it, it was this pelisse; I first saw them about 150 yards from Sheffield's.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

YOUNG'S Defence. I picked it up at the door, and did not know it was his, and being short of money, I took it, and shewed it to Barber.

BARBER'S Defence. He gave it to me.

BARBER - GUILTY . Aged 16.

YOUNG - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Six Months and Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18211024-101

1374. DAVID BEGG was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of October , 9 lbs. of sugar, value 4 s. , the goods of John Cooper .

JOSEPH HARDING . I am a Thames Police officer. On the 24th of October, between six and seven o'clock in the evening, I took the prisoner in charge at Iron gate-stairs, by the water side, with this lump of loaf sugar in a bundle - I asked where he got it; he said he picked it up, and that he belonged to the brig Manley, laying off the Tower, and that a cask had broken - he told me where the master was to be found.

JOHN COOPER . I am master of the brig Manley, which laid off the Tower . We had sugar on board - I found a cask broken, and some taken out; it was crushed, and is not sold in that state here. The prisoner was a mariner on board.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought it of three men on the

beach, and took it to the ship, and was bringing it ashore.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin Esq.

Reference Number: t18211024-102

1375. ALEXANDAN CORMACK was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of October , the sum of 5 l. 1 s., in monies numbered , the property of Edward Cann .

EDWARD CANN . I am carpenter of the brig Cambrian, which laid in the London Docks . The prisoner had worked on board for a fortnight, rigging the vessel - I received six sovereigns, two guineas, and 15 s. 6 d., of the captain, for wages - the prisoner knew I had it, for I asked him to write a letter for me to my friends, saying that I had it. On the 14th, between eleven and twelve o'clock, I went ashore, leaving four sovereigns, and a guinea, locked in my chest; I returned next morning between nine and ten o'clock, opened my chest, and they were gone - I cannot say whether I found it locked, as I opened it in a hurry; the prisoner came on board afterwards, I told him it was evident he must be the man - he coloured up, and denied it; I went ashore to enquire if he had changed any money, returned in half an hour, and he was gone; we could find him nowhere. He was taken in three or four hours.

ROBERT ABRAHAMS . I am an apprentice on board the brig. On Sunday the 14th of October, I went ashore with the prisoner, and left him in the dock - he said he was going out of the dock; I went on board another vessel, returned directly, and met him coming from the vessel, we went to the Three Crowns, public-house, and had a pot of beer - nobody but him was on board. I found two chests removed, which rose my suspicion.

WILLIAM WILSON . I am a Thames Police officer. On the 15th of October, I found the prisoner at the Scotch Arms, public-house, close to the dock, drinking - I told him, I took him for breaking open the carpenter's chest on board the ship, and taking four sovereigns and a guinea, and asked what he had done with the money - he said, he knew nothing of it. As I took him to the office, I asked if he had left a sovereign and guinea in the hands of any body, he said he had not - I asked if he had changed them any where, he said he had not; then I asked if he had left some sovereigns in the hands of the landlady of the St. Andrew tavern - he said he had not, and that he had none to leave with any one - I found 4 s. 6 d., on him. The landlady of the St. Andrew tavern gave me two sovereigns and two shillings. A friend said in his presence, that he would refund the money for him, if he could have his liberty, he said nothing to it; I said I could not take it, he then advised him to say nothing about it.

MARTHA COHEN . I keep the St. Andrew tavern. Between four and five o'clock on Sunday evening, the 14th of October, the prisoner gave me three sovereigns to take care of for him - he afterwards wanted one, I gave him ten shillings.

ELIZA SAUNDERS . My uncle keeps the Three Crowns, public-house. On the 14th of October in the afternoon, the prisoner was at our house, and changed a sovereign.

Prisoner's Defence. The carpenter and I went ashore after dinner, and I did not go on board again till the morning.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin Esq.

Reference Number: t18211024-103

1376. MARIA BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of October , one sovereign, the property of Hugh M'Cormack , from his person .

HUCH M'CORMACK . I am a sailor . On the 11th of October I met the prisoner near New Gravel-lane. I had received 12 l. 13 s. 8 d. two days before, when I was paid off. We went to the Paviors' Arms, public-house, and drank together, and about four o'clock in the afternoon I went to No. 4, Union-court with her - she locked the room door. I laid down and fell asleep - I put my sovereign in my jacket pocket, which hung over a chair. She awoke me between ten and eleven o'clock, said she had been out, and asked me to go up stairs and have some supper. I went up and supped - came down and went to bed; and in the morning I missed my money, she was still with me. I charged her with it - she denied it - then said if she had taken it she had put it somewhere, and would find it in a short time. I met her an hour after, she said she had found it and would keep it.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Were you intoxicated - A. No. I put the sovereign carefully in my jacket pocket - I did not put my jacket on to go up to supper - the door was locked and she had the key the while. I went out to drink with her in the morning.

WILLIAM WILSON . I am an officer. I took her in charge, she said she knew nothing of it. She then took me to her room, and said "You need not search, I have put it where neither you nor any body else will find it, and will not give it up."

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18211024-104

1377. WILLIAM GIBBS was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of October , one basket, value 3 s., and eleven loaves of bread, value 3 s. 8 d. , the goods of Alexander Weddell .

PETER CANNON . I am servant to Mr. Alexander Weddell , a baker of Devonshire-street, Portland-place. On the 11th of October, about twelve o'clock, I left my basket, with eleven loaves, in Holles-street , returned in five minutes, and found the prisoner in custody with it.

ALEXANDER COWIE . I am servant to Mr. Weddell. I stood on the opposite side of the street to watch the basket, to see if any one would touch it, as other bakers had lost bread there. The bread was in two baskets, the prisoner came up alone, and put it out of the large into the small basket, and carried it across Oxford-street. I stopped him.

Prisoner's Defence. I never touched it.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined Six Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18211024-105

SEVENTH DAY, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 31.

1378. SARAH HARTLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of October , one blanket, value 1 s.; one counterpane, value 1 s., and one stove, value 1 s. , the goods of Hannah Everett .

HANNAH EVERETT . I let these things to the prisoner with a furnished lodging.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18211024-106

1379. ROBERT PLUMMER was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of October , one drawer, value 2 s., and one hat, value 2 s. , the goods of John Rice .

JOHN RICE . I live in Wheeler-street, Bethnal-green . On the 1st of October, at five o'clock in the afternoon, I saw these things in my back room window, and missed them about seven o'clock. In consequence of information, I went to the prisoner's mother's, in Wheeler-street, and found them in the cellar. He was not at home, but surrendered himself at the watch-house that night. He must have come into the back yard to take them.

SARAH CHILD . I live in Wheeler-street. On the 9th of October, between six and seven o'clock, I saw the prisoner and another young man, at Rice's window. I saw the prisoner take something out of the window and put it in the other man's hand, he put it in an apron, crossed over, and went into the prisoner's mother's house. I did not stop to see where the prisoner went. I knew him before, and am sure he is the man.

Prisoner. Q. You told the Magistrate you believed it was me - A. I said so because his mother said if any harm came to her boy that revenge was sweet, and she would have blood for blood.

WILLIAM COX . I am a headborough. Rice and I went to his mother's - nobody was at home - the cellar was open, we found the property there. The prisoner came to the watch-house. We could not get Child up without a warrant.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The house is let out, and every one has access to the cellar. I heard I was wanted and went to the constable.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18211024-107

1380. WILLIAM WILSON was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of September , one coat, value 40 s. , the goods of Philip Jacob Heisch .

MR. LAW conducted the prosecution.

GEORGE TOPPING . I am coachman to Mr. Philip Jacob Heisch , who lives at Tottenham . This coat was on the box of the carriage, which stood in the stable-yard; I went into the house, returned, and missed it. I saw it again in a few hours.

JAMES CRAWLEY . I saw the prisoner in company with another person, in Blue Anchor-lane, about a quarter before eight o'clock in the morning; the other had a bundle in a blue apron, they were about three hundred yards from Mr. Heisch's.

WILLIAM BENSON . I am an officer. I was present at the prisoner's examination, saw him put his mark to it, and the Magistrate sign it, (read.) The prisoner says, "I am guilty of taking the coat. I got on the wall, took it off the box, tied it in my apron, joined company with a young man who was with me before, and asked him to carry it; but he said he wanted to go after work."

WILLIAM FLAXMAN . I am gardener to Mr. Baden, of Tottenham. On the 24th of September, about eight o'clock in the morning, I went in pursuit, and met Crawley; we went up the lane and took the prisoner at West-green, with the coat under his arm, and brought him back.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined One Month .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18211024-108

1381. RICHARD VALLER was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of October , one coat, value 20 s. , the goods of George Grist .

GEORGE GRIST . I keep a public-house at Hanworth . On the 8th of October my coat hung in the yard. I missed it about six o'clock in the evening, and found it at Gosling's on the 9th; the prisoner lives about one mile and a half off, and knew my premises.

JAMES CLEMMONS . I was at the bed-room window of the public-house, about five minutes past six o'clock, and saw the prisoner at the back door. I saw him reach at something and put it under his arm; he went up the yard and went away.

HANNAH HURT . I live near the public-house. On the 8th of October, a little after six oclock, I saw a man pass my window with something under his arm. There is no thoroughfare.

JOHN GRIST . I am the prosecutor's brother. I saw the prisoner in the house having some beer, and in about five minutes he passed me by the door, and went to the yard, where the coat was, and in a moment he came out and ran round by the stables, where there is no thoroughfare, to avoid passing me. The coat was then gone, I saw it safe five minutes before.

JOHN GOSLING . I am a pawnbroker, and live at Richmond. On the 9th of October, in the evening, the prisoner pawned the coat in the name of Allen.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18211024-109

1382. HANNAH JONES was indicted for feloniously putting off to John Isaacson , eighteen false and counterfeit shillings, at a lower rate than the same did by their denomination import and were counterfeited for .

MESSRS. ANDREWS and WALFORD conducted the prosecution.

JOHN ISAACSON . I am a rope-maker , and live in Houndsditch. Handley, an officer of St. Luke's, and Mr. Powell employed me to assist in detecting persons selling counterfeit money. I had had dealings with with the prisoner for counterfeit money; she lived at No. 38, Charles-street, Drury-lane , on the first floor; the lower part is occupied

by a barber. On the 23d of October I met Gleed in Fetter-lane, he gave me one shilling, two sixpences, and three pennypieces; I was to go to the prisoner to buy more bad money. I left Gleed and Hanley in Holborn - they followed me - a signal was agreed upon, that if I succeeded I was to go into the barber's shop and get shaved. I went to the prisoner's, I had been there twice before, and told the officers what had passed, On going in I told her I had come for some more shillings - she asked how many I wanted - I told her seven. She went to a place in the room, which she went to an a former occasion; she took them from there, sat down in a chair by the fire, took the poker out and placed the shillings on the hot poker, then put them in a mug of water, put something out of a paper into the mug, and washed them with it; then wiped them with a cloth and gave them to me. I gave her 2 s. 4 d. for seven. I gave her the same money Gleed gave me. I came down and went into the barber's shop. Hanley came in and took from me the same shillings which I had from her.

JAMES HANLEY . I am a constable of St. Luke's. I met Isaacson by appointment in Fetter-lane, on the 23d of October; Gleed and Kennedy were with me. Gleed marked some money at the White Hart, public-house, Fetter-lane, and gave it to him. We followed him to Charles-street, Drury-lane, and saw him go into the house. If he succeeded he was to go into the barber's shop - I saw him in the shop, and went in and found seven counterfeit shillings on him, which I produce. Gleed and Kennedy went up stairs - I took him up stairs with me; he pointed to the prisoner, and said "That is the woman who sold me the money." Gleed searched her and found the marked money on her. He asked her how she came by it? she said she took it of her lodgers. There was only a boy about fourteen years old in the room.

BARNARD GLEED . I went with Hanley, and have heard his account - it is correct. I produce one shilling, two sixpences, and four-pence in halfpence, which I had marked and given to Isaacson. I went up stairs and found the prisoner and a boy in the room. I found the marked money in the prisoner's pocket - she said she had it from one of her lodgers. I saw two men at breakfast in the room an hour after.

JAMES KENNEDY . I found three counterfeit half crowns inside the fender of the prisoner's room, folded up in paper - she stood with her back to the fire. I asked how she came by the money I found on her - she said she had it of one of her lodgers.

MR. CALEB EDWARD POWELL . I am assistant to the solicitors of the Mint, and have been so nearly thirty years. The seven shillings are all counterfeits, have never been in circulation, and are all from the same dye. There is a flaw in the dye - They are base metal - merely washed. The half-crowns are also counterfeits, and merely washed, and all three from the same dye.

Prisoner's Defence. This man came up and asked for Mrs. Kelly. I was getting the men's breakfast, and told him no such person was there; the other man said, "Come here and warm your hands, here is a nice fire." I went down for a pail of water, and left them in the room. When I came up I found this money on the cloth. I supposed my lodger had left it for me to get his dinner. I was blowing the fire - these gentlemen came up and said, "Is not your name Kelly?" I said No; and shewed them my certificate. I knew nothing of the half-crowns - it is done out of spite, because I gave information against one Callagan.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Confined One Year .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18211024-110

1383. THOMAS COLEBY and JAMES JONES were indicted for stealing, on the 18th of September , seven gallons of oil, value 35 s., and two cans, value 8 s. , the goods of William Slark ; and WILLIAM WARNER and GEORGE WARNER were indicted for feloniously receiving the same, knowing them to be stolen .

MR. ALLEY conducted the prosecution.

MR. WILLIAM SLARK . I am in the oil trade , and have a shop in Cockspur-street , of which Mr. Edensor has the management; I attend to the business in the City. In consequence of an annonymous letter which I received, I communicated it to him, and applied to two City officers to be on the watch - Coleby was in my employ at the time, and Jones lived with me at the time of the Coronation.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. How long was Coleby in your service - A. Since May, and about fifteen months in the employ of my father before me.

THOMAS EDENSOR . I manage Mr. Slark's business, in Cockspur-street. Coleby was our porter , I particularly observed his conduct in September last; he came to open the shop about a quarter past six o'clock; I am generally about the shop at the time. We keep our oil in a house in Warwick-street, which communicates with the shop - two or three days before he was apprehended, I saw about four gallons of oil in a can, in a recess in the back warehouse, it was not the place for it, I saw it there on Saturday and Monday night; he was taken on Tuesday - I never spoke to him about it. It was Mr. Slark's can, I put a mark on it when I first found it there. About eight o'clock on the Tuesday morning, the officer brought the same can back to the shop - the four gallons of oil are worth 1 l. 2 s., and the can 4 s.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Your house has an entrance from Cockspur-street, and another from Warwick-street - A. Yes; the oil is kept in the Warwick-street premises. the can was used to carry out oil in - we sometimes leave cans with customers, and have them back when empty - we have a porter and a shopman, besides Coleby - only the shopman was in town at the time; his name is Baker, he absconded on the Tuesday following Coleby's apprehension - I owed him no wages. Neither of them slept on the premises.

Q. On the morning Coleby was taken, did you let him in - A. No; the female servant did, he usually came about six o'clock; I came into the shop at a quarter past seven o'clock - I knew the officers were to be on the watch at six. I found Coleby at his business, when I came down, he was dressed in a light-coloured jacket, which he usually wore; he generally wore a white apron, I cannot say whether he had it on - I looked for the can, it was then gone, I saw it there the night before; Baker generally came after breakfast; I saw him there at eight

o'clock that morning, he sometimes came before breakfast, he was not there when I came down stairs - the officers brought the can about half-past eight o'clock; I had marked my initials on it with a fork - Coleby asked leave to go to breakfast as the clock struck eight, the officer came in at that moment and stopped him - I said nothing to him about the can.

Cross-examined by MR. PRINSEP. Q. Was it Coleby's business to serve out oil to the lamplighters - A. Yes; at times. Jones was an extra man.

MR. ALLEY. Q. Did you see Baker at the shop on the morning Coleby was apprehended - A. Yes; about five or ten minutes; there are houses opposite the back premises, but none in front, the window of my room commands a view of Warwick-street; nobody could pass that way without my seeing them, if I was out of bed.

WILLIAM SHEPPARD . I am a City officer. On the 18th of September, I and Clinton were in attendance in Cockspur-street, at a quarter before six o'clock; I stationed myself behind a hoard where I had a full view of the shop, and at a quarter past six, I saw Coleby unscrewing his master's shutters, and observed him looking towards the piazza of the Opera-house - he nodded his head, as if to call a person, and then beckoned with his fingers; immediately after, the prisoner Jones came up from that direction - I saw Coleby run into the shop and go backwards; Jones was then just within the door, Coleby brought out a can from the back part of the shop, and gave it to Jones, who put it on his left shoulder and went to the Opera-house, under the Piazza, to the corner of Charles-street, turned round, looked about him, and then went up the Haymarket, up Coventry-street, to the door of No. 35, Greek-street, Soho - he put the can off his shoulder and rang the bell, it appeared a private house; I went by before the door was opened, and saw the can standing at the door and another alongside it; I do not know how that came there (Clinton was rather before me), I passed by, took no notice, and in a moment the door was opened (I could not see who by) and shut uncommonly quick - Jones was shut in and took the two cans in; Clinton and I immediately got to the door, he forced it open with his hands, as the bolt had not quite shot, and another door inside the passage was nearly shut before we got to it, they shut it inside, it was only single latched - we opened it, and immediately laid hold of Jones and asked where he brought that can from (the two were in sight) he said he found it under the Piazza; we asked young Warner, who stood by (dressed in his night-gown, without shoes, stockings, or breeches) if he knew him, he said it was "Old Jones." His father hearing the noise, came down, and asked what was the matter - the son said "It was only Old Jones;" and either said That he had got something, or he had got oil, I do not know which - we asked if Jones lodged in the house, the son, in the hearing of the father, said No; and denied knowing him, I believe both denied knowing him, but it was in the father's hearing - he stood naked on the stairs, I had Jones then in custody.

Q. When Warner said he did not know Jones, did you hear the father say any thing - A. I did not hear, I was then taking care of Jones. We took both father and son into custody, and when they had dressed themselves, we took them to Bow-street, and then to St. Martin's watch-house. The cans of oil were put in a house next door to Warner's; we fetched them and took them to Bow-street, both were full of oil; Mr. Edensor saw them at Bow-street. After apprehending them, we went to Slark's and took Coleby.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. You are a City officer - A. I am constable of St. Vedas, Foster-lane. I was first applied to on Friday, and saw Coleby that day, I knew then that he was suspected; I went there with the impression that he was suspected - Mr. Slark's shop is near the end of Sussex-street, I was the width of the street from them.

Q. Had you and Clinton talked about Coleby's dress - A. We talked about his dress as we went along together to wait for them - he had a fustian jacket on, and opened the shop in that dress; I cannot say whether he had an apron on, I think he was described to me as having a white jacket on; I might describe it as white, it was between white and brown - he was in sight four or five minutes, I knew him before - Jones had a blue jacket on.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. At what time in the morning did you see the cans left at the door in Greek-street - A. I suppose better than half-past six o'clock, we entered the house instantly, only young Warner was present when I first went in. There is a fan-light over the street door, it was very light in the passage; and after passing the inside door, there is a light from the staircase; Warner was not a yard from Jones, and the oil stood at Jones's feet, as if he had just set it down. There is but one door to the house, Jones said he found it under the Piazza; it was after that I asked Warner if he knew him, and he said it was "Old Jones" - the father came down after that, and the son said "Here is old Jones, and he has got some oil, or has got something - Clinton asked what room the man lodged in, they said he did not lodge there; Clinton then asked old Warner what room he lodged in, he said, up stairs, and Clinton went up - they denied knowing where Jones lodged; then Warner wanted to go up stairs to dress - they did not at first deny knowing Jones, but denied knowing where he lodged; they afterwards said they did not know him - a man came out of a room on the ground floor, just shewed himself, and asked what noise that was, I do not know what answer was made, he shut the door and went in directly. I believe he was in his shirt - a man, who appeared to be a coachman, came down, and Warner's wife came down, I do not know whether she or her husband came down first, I believe both came down nearly together - I was engaged with Jones and young Warner, and cannot say what passed on the stairs.

MR. ALLEY. Q. Are you sure Coleby is the man - A. Yes; I had seen him three times before, and had been watching him there twice before - I believe the father was on the stairs when the man put his head out to ask about the noise - I had not seen Jones before that morning.

JOHN CLINTON . I am a City officer. On the 18th of September, I accompanied Sheppard to watch this house. We sat down at the corner of Cockspur-street about half-past five o'clock, and about a quarter past six, saw Coleby come from Spring-garden gates, and go to his master's -

he entered the back door in Warwick-street, came out in front in Cockspur-street, took down the bar of the left hand shutter, stood with it on his hand, and nodded his head to beckon to some one, and then beckoned with his hand - I was exactly opposite, not concealed, a coach or cart passed, so that I could not see him for a moment, but when that moved, I saw Jones two or three yards inside the door - I saw him with his right hand receive a can from Coleby and put it on his left shoulder, then walk out of the shop to the Opera Piazza. and at the end of the Piazza, he turned round to look about him - I was then very near him, and took out my watch to avoid suspicion, and set it by St. James's clock, he then went on through different courts and streets, I never lost sight of him till he went to the door of No. 35, Greek-street - he never looked behind, he took the can off his shoulder and put it on the step of the door on the left side, and in a second or so, another man came up with another can and placed that by it, said something to Jones and went off immediately, Sheppard was turning the corner at the time; the house is about three doors from a street, he was behind me - I then spoke to a butcher's boy next door, to avoid suspicion, and in the mean time the door was opened and Jones went in with both cans, and the door was closed immediately; I rushed against it twice, and the second time burst it open and entered a passage with a door to it, which I pushed open, and saw Jones with the cans of oil, one on each side of him, and young Warner naked, all but his bed gown, he attempted to go up stairs, I stopped him, asked Sheppard for a pair of handcuffs which I put on Jones, and asked young Warner if Jones lodged there, and in what room, he said he did not know, he knew nothing of the man - his mother came down undressed, and said "Good God! what is the matter;" he said "I do not know, here is Old Jones" - I asked Jones how he came by the oil, he said he found it in the Haymarket; young Warner wanted his clothes, I said I would go up and fetch them - I followed his mother up into the one pair of stairs front room, and found the bed-clothes down, as if he had just got out; his shoes were by the bed side - the father was in the back room, dressing himself, and rubbing his eyes, which were wet.

Q. Was that the first time you saw him - A. It was, I asked him if he had any oil about the place, he said No; he was very willing that I should search, and his wife opened a box of linen, there was none there - I found none in those two bed-rooms - I came down and asked young Warner to shew me the cellar where he kept his oil, he said "Let me go up stairs and fetch my boots and handkerchief" - I went and got them from the room, he put them on, and then took me to a yard at the back of the house; I said "This is not the place "- I went to the cellar where the oil is kept, he said he had none; I said I would not be trifled with, and down stairs he should go - when I got to the bottom of the kitchen stairs, I spied a door open on the left hand, where there were three very large oil cans, all empty - I said I should look to see if they had any mark to lead to any thing, he said nothing - I then went along a passage under ground, and found a door rather open, and thought I heard a latch go; young Warner was rather before me; I told him to stop, and said"Is there not somebody in that room?" he said "No, nobody at all;" I knocked at the door, and a female answered from within "We are two lone women, and are naked" - I said I only wanted to ask a question, as Warner had deceived me - I could not believe him; she opened the door, pointed to a cellar, and said "That is Mr. Warner's cellar" - Warner said it was locked, but I might break it open; Mrs. Warner brought the key down, and there I found two cans of oil, a funnel, and a quart measure; I came up with Warner, the father was coming down stairs, and I believe he said "For God's sake, what is the matter now;" the son said "Why here is Old Jones got some oil" - he spoke loud, the father told him not to make such a noise; I said we must take them all three to a place of confinement, and asked old Warner which was the best place - he said we had better go to Bow-street at once.

Q. Before you found the oil in the cellar, had the father said there was no oil - A. Yes; while he was rubbing his eyes on the bed, he said he had no oil, and the son denied there being any in the place. We took them to Bow-street, and left the cans of oil next door at the butcher's; they both said they knew nothing of Jones. We fetched the oil and went to Cockspur-street, saw Mr. Edensor, told him I must take his man Coleby, which I did; I did not tell him what I took him for, he never asked what charge I had against him, or what I was going to do with him.

Q. Did you learn where the Warners carried on business - A. Yes, under the Adelphi. I went there the same morning between eleven and twelve o'clock, and found between 400 and 500 gallons of oil, and four immensely large empty cans - three of them had the name of Dare on them at full length. The prosecutor claimed them.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Are you a parish officer - A. I am an extra City officer. Sheppard employed me to assist him - I have been an officer sixteen years. I saw Mr. Slark on Monday, and Coleby also, he was pointed out to me as Mr. Slark's servant, that I should know him again; Sheppard said that was Mr. Slark's servant, and we must watch him - I know nothing about Baker. I cannot say whether Coleby saw me; it was a light morning; Sheppard was with me - he might have seen us both. I do not know whether Sheppard hid himself, I saw him come from near the hoard - I saw Coleby let in at the back door, and come out in front, he had an oil can in his hand when he entered the house - I did not notice his dress. I never said any thing about his jacket, I knew by his dress on Friday, that the same man had come on Monday, that is the only way I have mentioned his dress - I swear to him by his face. When we returned from Greek-street, I went into the shop and took him; I believe he then had something of a smock frock on - there was another young man behind the counter; I did not particularly notice him. I searched Coleby's lodging, and found a quart oil can, marked Dare.

Q. Were you the officer that wanted his wife to give you drink - A. No, she offered to send for some; I did not want to alarm her - I said I only wanted to see if there was any cans, as some were lost - I wanted to look in a cupboard, she asked what I wanted; I said I was looking for the gin bottle. On my oath I did not ask her to send for liquor.

Cross-examined by MR. PRINSEP. Q. When Coleby turned the corner by Spring-gardens, was he alone - A.

Yes. Jones had a blue jacket and apron on, like a lamplighter.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. When you say you spied a door open, you mean you saw it open - A. Yes. I went into the house in less than two minutes - Warner stood a yard or a yard and a half from Jones, they were abreast, I looked through a key hole, and saw there was a stay shop there. The moment I entered the passage I seized and handcuffed Jones - Warner said he did not know whether Jones lodged there or not.

Q. For what you know old Warner was in bed and asleep then - A. I followed the mother up, and found him up and dressing, he had his breeches on, I was not in the house two minutes before I went up - nobody claimed the oil found in the house. I have not paid any money towards this prosecution.

Q. Have you given any money towards it - A. The boy Buchanan said just now, that he was hungry - I gave him sixpence to buy some pudding, he returned me four pence.

JOHN BUCHANAN . I am errand boy to a butcher, next door to Warner's. On the 18th of September, I saw Jones at Warner's, when the officers came - I had seen him go there two or three times a week, for ten weeks before; it was always from twenty minutes to half-past six o'clock in the morning, two men used to come, and bring cans with them - I have seen him come on Saturday afternoon, and receive money. I have seen Warner, sen., and the servant girl, pay it into his hands. On the 18th, I saw the officers go into the house - I stood at the door. Jones brought one can, and another man brought another, which he gave him, and run away.

Cross-examined by MR. PRINSEP. Q. What is Jones - A. I do not know, I only know him by bringing oil; from his dress I suppose him to be a lamplighter - he came on Saturday for money, and sometimes the other man came; Warner did not appear to have any business.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. When you say he brought oil, you mean cans - A. I have seen the girl empty the cans, in the middle of the day; I could not see what was in them when they were brought. I have seen her pay him money, and have seen her master pay him money in her presence.

Q. When you were going to Bow-street did you say to her

"I shall make haste and get my work done. I shall be there at one o'clock, and speak a d - d good word for your master, and will do for him" - A. I never said any thing of the sort.

Q. When you came back did you say, "Well I am come home, he is found guilty, I have done for him" - A. No; I said no such words; nor did I ever say to any body "I'll be d - d if I don't go and give evidence, as it will prove a prime thing for me."

MR. EDENSOR. The cans are our's, and one is that I marked T. E.; the other has "Dare," on it; the prosecutor succeeded him in the business. The oil in the can which I marked, is spermaceti, which is 5 s. 6 d. a gallon; lamplighters do not use sperm, but common oil, at 3 s. a gallon. The cans found at the Adelphi are also marked Dare - we bought all his stock. I know no other oil dealer of his name.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Can you say the three cans found at the Adelphi were ever in Mr. Slark's possession - A. No; I have lived eight years with him; he never lit the Opera House. I do not know whether Dare ever did.

MR. SLARK. I succeeded my father in the business - he bought it of Mr. Dare. I tasted both the oils, it is sperm, and the same sort as that in my house.

Cross-examined. Q. How long ago did your father buy the business - A. Above thirty years. I do not know that Mr. Taylor of the Opera House, bought oil at the house. We occasionally send it out by the porters, who take a full can and bring back an empty one. They are generally bought when they first go out, and changed from time to time.

COLEBY'S Defence. I know nothing of it.

JONES'S Defence. I found it under the Piazza. I frequently worked for Warner, and left it there to find an owner for it.

WARNER, JUN. put in a written defence, which had been intended as a joint defence for himself and father, but the Court thought the evidence not strong enough to call on the father for a defence. It stated, that the three cans found at the Adelphi were not the prosecutor's, Warner, sen. having had them in constant use in his business as a lamplighter for ten years. That he lit the Opera House, and several Theatres in the metropolis; that Warner's, sen. brother occasionally called before any of the family were up, and on this morning the bell rang, and the mother called her son to let his uncle in, he immediately went and opened the door, and Jones, whom they then employed as a lamplighter, came in, followed by the officers, they could not tell what induced him to bring the oil, as it was entirely without their knowledge; that many years ago Mr. Glossop provided oil for the Opera House, and Dare carried on business in Cockspur-street, and he had the oil from Dare for the Opera House; that Warner succeeded Glossop, and as to their denying all knowledge of Jones, he understood the officer to ask, What do you know of this business? and his answer was, "I know nothing of it." The defence then went on to state, that Warner, sen. had lived in repute for twenty-five years, and would not forfeit a good character for such a trifle.

ELIZA RUMP . I live at No. 1, Delap-court, near Queen-square, Westminster, and have kept the house twenty-four years. Coleby married my daughter seven years ago; they have lived with me ever since. After he was taken the officers came to search the house. Clinton said "What have you in the cupboard, you have some bottles." I said there was nothing in them, he was welcome to look. He said "What is there nothing you can give us to drink."

THOMAS WARNER . I am brother to Warner, sen., he lived in Greek-street. I am a lamplighter, and live at No. 7, Vere-street. I was in the habit of going to his house from half-past six to seven o'clock in the morning. I have worked for him these two years; I used to ring at the bell, the lad sometimes let me in. At times I used to take a can of oil with me from the Adelphi to go to work with at Sadler's Wells, and to call him up. I used to light the Sans Pareil and Sadler's Wells Theatres. I used to put the oil down at the door till they took it in.

Q. You used to leave the can at the door - A. Yes. I was afterwards to take it Sadler's Wells Theatre.

MR. ALLEY. Q. Did you carry sperm or common oil - A. Both. We use sperm oil to the patent lamps

at Sadler's Wells Theatre. We buy it at Mr. Enderby's and Mr. Johnson's.

Q. You did not get it from the Adelphi - A. Yes; it is kept there. I left some at Greek-street, because I could not carry it all.

- SARSOM. I am a stay-maker, and keep the house in Greek-street, Warner lodged on the first floor. I have seen his brother bring cans of oil there, or something. On the morning he was taken I heard a noise in the passage, they knocked at my door and asked if I knew Jones. I let all the house out, I had not noticed a ring at the bell.

SARAH HIGGS . I am servant to Warner, and have lived four years with him. I never saw Jones at the house, nor ever saw my master pay him any money, nor did I ever pay him any. I know Buchanan - On the day he went to Bow-street, before he went, he said to me "I shall make haste and get my work done, I shall be there at one o'clock, and shall speak a d - d good word for your master, and will do for him;" and when he returned, he said, "Well, I am come home, he is found guilty, I have done for him."

MR. ALLEY. Q. Has he a wife - A. Yes. I never slept in the house. I used to go there between seven and eight o'clock in the morning. They kept no other servant.

Q. How long have you known young Warner - A. As long as I can remember, I went to school with him. I was going out for some porter, when the boy said this, it was about ten o'clock on Saturday morning. I had never spoken to him before. I saw him again about twelve o'clock when I was cleaning the steps, he tapped me on the shoulder, and said "I am almost done work, I shall be there at one, and will do for him;" and about four o'clock, he saw me at the street door, and said he was come home, and he was found guilty, &c.

Q. These were the only times you ever spoke to him - A. Yes. I did not tell his master nor did I go to Bow-street to tell the Magistrate. I told Mr. Sarsom of it the same day, directly, and told my mistress.

COURT. Q. Did you say any thing in answer to him - A. No. When he spoke to me at twelve o'clock, I said I would tell his master.

- SARSOM. I have heard the girl mention what the butcher's boy had said to her, but I cannot speak to the time.

JOHN CHARD . I am a lamplighter, and knew Buchanan by sight. He met me one morning in Church-street, and said he should be a d - d fool if he did not go and give evidence, as it would be a prime thing for him, he said so on the Saturday, between twelve and one o'clock, as he was out going with meat on his shoulder. I had not spoken to him - he forced his conversation on me - he said he should have a crown a day for it.

COLEBY - GUILTY . Aged 31.

JONES - GUILTY . Aged 57.

Transported for Seven Years .

W. G. WARNER - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

W. WARNER - NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18211024-111

1384. WILLIAM SIMCO was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of October , twenty-eight pieces of tub-heading, value 2 s. 6 d. , the goods of James Beal .

JAMES BEAL. I am a cooper , and live in Cow-cross, the prisoner was my servant ; this tub-heading was in my warehouse in West-street , of which he had the key. On the 19th of October John Burge brought some to me, I went to his cellar and found twenty-seven, which are mine. He was four or five years in my service, and bore a good character. I employed him to clear out a cellar.

JOHN BURGE . I am a cooper, and live on Saffron-hill. On the 19th of October, between twelve and one o'clock, the prisoner brought me five or six tub headings, he said he was clearing out a cellar in Field-lane, and found them. I bought them for sixpence; he said he was going to work again, and if he found any more he would bring them; in the evening he brought about twenty, I gave him a shilling for them. I saw some marks on them and informed Mr. Beal.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I had a cellar to clear out, and being distressed I sold them.

GUILTY . Aged 42.

Confined One Week .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18211024-112

1385. CHARLES STERLING was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of October , one watch, value 30 s.; one chain, value 2 d.; two keys, value 2 d.; one seal, value 2 d., and one hook, value 2 d. , the goods of Mary May .

MARY MAY . I am a widow , and live at Kensington Gravel-pits . On the 24th of October, between ten and eleven o'clock in the morning, I went out and gave the key of the door to the prisoner, who lodged with me, and asked him to get the kettle boiled for tea; my watch was in a drawer - I had left the key in it by mistake. I returned between four and five o'clock, he was in the room, and had tea with me. I missed the watch about five o'clock next night, and told him of it next morning; he said he did not take it.

GEORGE HALL . I am a constable. On the 25th of October I took him in charge, and found a crown piece and four shillings on him; I said I thought it was part of what he had sold or pawned the watch for; he said he knew nothing about it. When he got to the watch-house he said he wanted to speak to Mrs. May. I said I must hear what was said; he said he knew where the watch was. I asked where the duplicate was; he said it was where he worked. He took me to a pile of bricks at the end of Newland-street, Kensington, he moved the bricks and took it out.

SAMUEL WISE . I am an apprentice to a pawnbroker, who lives in Duke-street, Manchester-square. On the 24th of October the prisoner pawned the watch.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I intended to redeem it.

GUILTY . Aged 31.

Confined Six Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18211024-113

1386. JOHN TEMPLE was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of October , 18 lbs. of rope, value 1 s. 6 d. the goods of George Everett .

RICHARD CARTER . I am a Thames Police constable.

On the 3d of October, about seven o'clock at night, I saw the prisoner on Tower-hill with some rope on his shoulder, and asked what he was carrying there? he said it was a barge headfast, that he was watchman to Mr. Drew, a lighterman; and Mr. Drew's foreman gave it him to take to the London Docks. I secured him.

JOHN SHIELDS . I am an officer, and was with Carter. I said I would take him to Mr. Drew's foreman; he then said he took it out of a barge opposite the Custom-house. I asked if he had made the barge fast? he said Yes. I went next morning to Mr. Everett.

GEORGE EVERETT . I am a lighterman , my barge was moored in the Custom-house road , and had a headfast to it. I saw it safe at three o'clock in the afternoon of the 3d October. The rope could not get undone of itself. Next morning I found it adrift two or three hundred yards off, and the headfast gone, it was cut from the barge.

JOHN BOSTOCK . I am foreman to Mr. Drew, I do not know the prisoner, and never gave him a headfast.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 29.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18211024-114

1387. GEORGE CLARK was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of August , one bridle, value 3 s., and two bits, value 2 s. , the goods of Hannah Croft and Thomas Lewis .

JAMES WOOD. I am hostler to Mr. Thomas Lewis , who is in partnership with Hannah Croft , they keep a livery stables , in Whitechapel . About twelve o'clock I saw the prisoner come out of the stable, I thought he was bulky, followed him down the yard, and found the bundle and bits under his waistcoat. He had no business there.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Confined One Month .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18211024-115

1388. JOHN CAVANAUGH and MICHAEL BRIEN were indicted for stealing, on the 5th of October , 64 lbs. of lead, value 10 s. belonging to James Scott , and fixed to his dwelling-house ; and CHARLES FLANAGHAN was indicted for receiving the same, knowing it to be stolen .

JAMES SCOTT . I live in Monmouth-street, the lead was taken from my premises in Maynard-street. I never lived there.

COURT. Then it is not your dwelling-house.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18211024-116

1389. WILLIAM JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of October , one watch, value 30 s.; one chain, value 6 d.; one seal, value 4 s., and one key, value 1 d. , the goods of George Symonds .

GEORGE SYMONDS . I live in Short's-gardens, Drury-lane . On the 11th of October a bill was in my window to let lodgings; the prisoner came between ten and eleven o'clock, and asked for a lodging, my wife called me down; he said he had seen the lodging and approved of it. I said I must have a week's money in advance. He said he had none, but could go to his employer's and get one or two pounds; he wrote his address, I was to go to his master at three o'clock he stopped about the place, I thought it strange; he asked the way to St. Giles's, which I shewed him. He left, and in five minutes I found him sitting in the parlour, my watch then hung over his head. I left him there for two minutes, and then met him at the door, my wife had him by the collar, and said the watch was gone; he denied having it, then gave it me from his pocket.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 36.

Confined One Year .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18211024-117

1390. JOHN CHING was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of October , one shawl, value 5 s., the goods of Jane Harker , from her person .

JANE HARKER . I am servant to Mr. Joseph Hume . On the 10th of October, between nine and ten o'clock, I was in Marylebone-lane , at the corner of Wigmore-street, somebody came behind and snatched my shawl off. I called Stop thief! and saw a man run away with it in his hand. I went up Wigmore-street and it was produced to me. I found the prisoner at the watch-house.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Had you not passed some women - A. I do not know. I cannot say whether the man was like the prisoner.

ROBERT WILDING . I am a watchman, I heard the cry of Stop thief! I ran into Wigmore-street; and saw the prisoner running very fast - sprang my rattle, and about five doors off I saw him throw something white out of his hand - he turned the corner of Wimpole-street, and I stopped him without losing sight of him. Nobody was near him, some people were following behind.

BENJAMIN PURKES . I live in Wigmore-street. I was at my father's door, and heard the cry of Stop thief! and saw the prisoner running, he was the first, and threw something white out of his hand. I kept my eye on him till he was taken; it was a moonlight night. A man picked up the shawl and gave it to Harker.

Cross-examined. Q. You only know that he threw something white away - A. No.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I heard the cry, a man knocked me down, and the watchman took me.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18211024-118

1391. JOSEPH STRUTTON was indicted for stealing, on 17th of September , one handkerchief, value 18 d., the goods of James Cagey , from his person .

HENRY YATES . I belong to the Thames police, and know James Cagey , he is now out of his mind. On the 17th of September, about one o'clock in the day, I was passing Somerset-house , and saw the prisoner in company with a woman, he attempted Mr. Cagey's pocket three or four times, then Mr. Cagey stopped at a book binder's shop, and I saw the prisoner take the handkerchief quite out of his pocket - I immediately collared him, knocked his hat off, and another handkerchief fell out; he made his escape, and run, I took him directly - Mr. Cagey claimed it, and gave evidence before the Magistrate by that name. He

was going to give the handkerchief to a woman, but let it fall - I picked it up.

Prisoner's Defence. I never had it.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin Esq.

Reference Number: t18211024-119

1392. MARY WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of October , one purse, value 2 d., and 1 l. 17 s. 6 d., in monies numbered, the property of John Feaks , from his person .

JOHN FEAKS . I live in Cambridgeshire. On the 25th of October, between one and two o'clock, I was in Brick-lane , the prisoner accosted me - I went up stairs in a house with her, she asked for something to drink; then two women came up - I gave her sixpence to fetch some gin; she kept feeling me about, and took my purse, containing a sovereign and 17 s. 6 d., she put her hand in my pocket, snatched it out, and ran down - I followed, and saw it in her hand; I pursued her down stairs into another room, and was going in, but another woman prevented me - she said if I went up, she would come up again; I went out, came in again, and found two or three woman there - I cannot swear she is the woman.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18211024-120

1393. WILLIAM DOUGLAS was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of October , one pair of stays, value 2 s. , the goods of David Evans .

RICHARD THOMAS . I am an apprentice to Mr. David Evans , a linen-draper , who lives in St. John-street, Clerkenwell . On the 23d of October, four pair of stays hung outside the door - I saw them safe at three o'clock, and missed them at eight o'clock - I found them at Worship-street, two days after.

WM. ELGAR . I am servant to Mr. Peachey, a pawnbroker, in Old-street. On the 23d of October, between six and seven o'clock, the prisoner offered a pair of stays, in pawn - I asked where he got them, he said they were his sister's, and he lived in Old-street; I wanted to send a boy for her, he said he would go himself - I went with him, he turned back, and took another direction, to where he said he lived. I gave him in charge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I bought them in the street.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Fined One Shilling and, Discharged .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18211024-121

EIGHTH DAY, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 1.

1394. CHARLES SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of October , one handkerchief, value 4 s., the goods of Edward Cordley , from his person .

JOHN CHAPMAN . I am a constable of St. Pancras. On the 19th of October, about half-past eight o'clock at night, I was in St. Martin's-court, and saw the prisoner and another, I turned back and watched them into Coventry-street - I saw Mr. Cordley walking, in company with three others. He attended at the watch-house, and at Bow-street, he gave his name Edward Cordley, and he answered to that name. I saw Smith take the handkerchief out of Mr. Cordley's pocket, and throw it to the other man - I had seen the corner of the handkerchief hanging out of his pocket before. I took hold of Smith, and put him into a ham shop - the other ran away with the handkerchief, and in the ham shop, Smith rushed at me with his fist, and knocked me out of the shop - he run down Oxendon-street, the watchman secured him in a dust-hole, in a court, which had no thoroughfare. He had knocked me down on the pavement, and nearly broken my ribs. I knew him before.

JAMES SMITHERS . I am a watchman. I was on duty, and heard the alarm, I saw the prisoner running, and Chapman following him - I pursued, and took him in a dust-hole, in a court, in Oxendon-street. Mr. Cordley attended at the watch-house, and before the Magistrate.

THOMAS GOOK . The prisoner was brought to the watch-house all over dust - Mr. Cordley charged him with stealing his handkerchief; he called himself Edward Cordley , and answered to that name.

Prisoner's Defence. I had my own handkerchief in my hand, and never saw Mr. Cordley's.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18211024-122

1395. THOMAS GIBBONS was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of October , one tea-caddy, value 20 s. , the goods of Charles Hall .

SARAH LOVETT. I am servant to Mr. Hall, who lives in Grosvener-street, West . On the 25th of October, about a quarter before nine o'clock in the morning, I heard a noise of something falling - I went into the kitchen on the ground floor, it opens into a passage; I ran in and saw the prisoner, he run away - I pursued, and gave an alarm, he was taken by the watchman. I found the tea caddy thrown down - I had seen it safe two minutes before in the kitchen window, it could not be seen from the street, no other person but him had been in the kitchen - it could not have fallen off the shelf; I found it about two yards from the window. There is a gate, and a forecourt, before the house.

RICHARD MOUNT . I was in Grosvenor-street, and saw the prisoner coming out of the gate, hearing the alarm, I ran round, and took him - he wanted me to search him. I said somebody else would do that.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was never in the house. I was crossing the fields when they took me - it being dirty I went out of the path.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18211024-123

1396. DANIEL SULLIVAN was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of September , 28 lbs. of lead, value 2 s., the goods of James Findow , and fixed to his dwelling-house .

JAMES FINDOW . I lost some lead from the portico of my door, in the Coal-yard, Drury-lane . It is my own

dwelling-house; I did not miss it before the 24th, and cannot say when I saw it safe.

THOMAS BARTLETT . I am patrol of St. Giles's. On the 21st of September, about eleven o'clock at night, I saw a man about ten yards before me in Cross-lane, Drury-lane, about one hundred yards from the prosecutor's house - he was carrying something on his head; I saw the prisoner a little further on, he came out of Charles-street also, with something on his head, I think they were in company, they both came the same road, in a direction from Findow's - I made towards the prisoner, he turned round on seeing me, and went into the passage of a house in Cross-lane, the door of which was open - he ran with the bundle, I sprang my rattle, and the watchmen came to my assistance - I heard a noise on the staircase, went up, and found the prisoner on the second floor; I asked what he had on his head, he said "Nothing," and that he lived there - some people in the house came out and said, in his presence, they never knew him, I gave him to the watchman - I then went into the yard of the house, and I found he had escaped, he was secured in five minutes - I immediately went back to the yard and found this piece of lead, I know he had lead on his head when I saw him, and this appeared the same sort - I took him before the Magistrate on Monday, and found the prosecutor out on Wednesday, and fitted the lead to his portico; it corresponded exactly every way, and fitted the nail-holes.

JOHN MORRISON . I am a watchman. The prisoner was given into my custody, he got away from me - I pursued, and he was taken in Short's-gardens.

PATRICK CRAWLEY . I am a watchman. I heard the rattle sprung, saw a man run, and followed him into the passage, a woman said he was gone into the cellar; I forced the cellar door open and found him - he had fastened himself in.

JAMES SULLIVAN . I am a watchman. When the prisoner escaped, I went to take hold of him and he struck me - I assisted in securing him in the cellar, which he had entered by getting through the window; I am sure he is the man who escaped.

JAMES FINDOW. I examined the lead, it tallied every way. I lost more than this.

Prisoner's Defence. I quarrelled with my wife, and being drunk, I went to a wrong house.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Six Months and Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18211024-124

1397. THOMAS WOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of August , one piano-forte, value 34 l. , the goods of Samuel Chappel and Francis Tatton Latour .

SAMUEL CHAPPEL . I am in partnership with Francis Tatton Latour . We are music-sellers , and deal in musical instruments , and live in Bond-street . On the 26th of August, 1820, the prisoner came to our shop, he was a stranger; he gave his address as Thomas Wood , Esq., No. 22, Edward-street, Portman-square, and said he wanted a piano-forte for the use of his children or family, and desired a man might be sent to see it properly placed - he hired it at 25 s. a month, he asked the price; the price entered in the book was forty-five guineas, if he should determine to purchase it, but he hired it - I sent Barnet with it the same day; I had the instrument from Wilkinson, the maker, it was No. 1033. I knew the instrument again, I had paid 38 l. 17 s. for it; I never heard of it till a week ago; I sent several times after the prisoner, and heard of him through an examination at Union-hall.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. There was no period appointed for him to keep it - A. No; I keep printed circulars, stating, that if instruments are bought and paid for, within six months, no hire will be charged. Gentlemen frequently buy instruments after hiring them. He never gave me notice that he meant to purchase it. I never saw him after he hired it - he called twice within an hour or two on the day he hired it.

COURT. Q. How long after it was delivered did you cause enquiry to be made - A. Soon after the six months expired. He said nothing about buying it.

WILLIAM BARNET . I was porter to the prosecutors. I have seen the instrument here, I carried it to No. 22, Edward-street, Portman-square, and delivered it to a female servant, I believe, on the 26th of August, and put it in a back room, on the ground floor - I do not know whether any name was on the door, it looked like a gentleman's house.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you know that he is an officer in the Army - A. No.

JOHN ARROW . I am servant to Mr. Foster, of Greek-street, Soho. On the 30th of August, 1820, I paid the prisoner 20 l. for a piano-forte, I produce his receipt, I saw him sign it - the instrument was brought to Mr. Foster's on the same day; we sold it at our sale on the Saturday following for 31 l. 10 s. - the buyer gave the name of Bygrove.

Cross-examined. Q. How many days did you keep it before you got ten guineas profit - A. Three or four. -

(receipt read.)

"London, 30th August, 1820."

Received of Mr. Edward Foster , twenty pounds, for a dwarf cabinet piano-forte, made by Wilkinson, my property.

THOMAS WOOD .

JOHN BYGROVE . I am a music-tuner, and live in Duke's-row, Tavistock-square. I bought a dwarf cabinet pianoforte at Mr. Foster's sale, for 31 l. 10 s.; I did not consider it a bargain, it was delivered at my house, I have had it ever since, it is now here; it was made by Wilkinson - Mr. Chappel claimed it.

MARY FLETCHER . I lived servant with the prisoner, in Edward-street, Portman-square. I was there a week before I saw the piano-forte, it was put in the back parlour; the house was well furnished, and had the appearance of a gentleman's house; his wife hired me, there was only one child, she is seven or eight years old. The prisoner slept in the house sometimes; a man servant came about a fortnight after me, he was not in livery, my master gave him a suit of clothes. The instrument remained in the house about five days, and was then sent away; I believe the house belonged to Mr. Beby - a bill was stuck up to let it while I was there, it was taken down very often and put up again, I cannot say if it was taken down when goods were coming in - I stopped six weeks, and then Mrs. Wood told me she did not want me any more - I did not get my wages.

WILLIAM BEBY . I am the owner of the house, No. 22, Edward-street. I engaged the prisoner's wife to take care of the house, and let it for me; I was to pay her 5 s. a week, I live at Enfield. It was to be let ready furnished - I came to town and saw the prisoner there, he told me once he had let it to the Archbishop of Tuam. I once called when the bill was down. I think he was three months there, and left at the end of August. He was in the King's Bench as a prisoner, I knew that in the first instance, but gave his wife leave to take care of the house - I saw the piano-forte there when I called, he told me it was an article which he had when he was a housekeeper, and he had lately redeemed it by paying 15 l. for it, and offered it me for sale. His wife came to my house the latter end of July.

MR. CHAPPELL. The piano-forte is ours.

By referring to the writ of Haebeas by which the prisoner was brought from the King's Bench, it appeared he was committed there on the 30th of June, 1819.

Prisoner's Defence. It was my full intention to have paid for it, and I can prove I have other property coming to me from Western. I have a gentleman in Court who is willing to enter into contract to pay for it. Mr. James of Western has money of mine, but my accounts are confused - I am willing my wife and myself shall be bound over in any way the Court shall think proper.

JOHN BULL . I am a cheesemonger, and live in Leader-street, Chelsea. The prisoner employed me about eighteen months ago, as agent - he is entitled to two-thirds of an estate, I have part of the money now arising from a house in Ridinghouse-lane. I had 175 l. remitted me in June, 1820, from Mr. James, it was on account of the prisoner's wife and mother, the father died without a will, and Mrs. Blakey administered to her husband's effects - the prisoner's wife had two-thirds of 175 l. I have paid it her and took her receipt.

MR. ANDREWS. Q. How came you to be an agent - A. Mrs. Wood called me in, to pay the money arising from two houses in Ridinghouse-lane; I went with the mother to get the money from the lawyer's in Gray's Inn - I knew the prisoner three years, and served him with coals when he lived in the New Road; but from the time I paid Mrs. Wood the money I have seen neither of them; I paid her the money at a little cottage in the rules of the King's Bench; where they lived together.

Q. Does the daughter play the piano-forte - A. No; I do not know Ranken - I called on Mr. Chappell to propose to pay for the piano-forte a fortnight age, it was after Mr. Wood was at Union-hall - I understood he was an officer in the 3d regiment of foot.

GUILTY .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18211024-125

1398. THOMAS INGRAM and ARNOLD HUNT were indicted for stealing, on the 9th of July , in the dwelling-house of Eliza Upton , widow, commonly called Dowager Lady Temple, one trunk, value 10 s.; three coats, value 8 l.; two waistcoats, value 1 l.; three pair of breeches, value 30 s., and two 10 l. Bank notes, the property of Thomas Baker .

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

THOMAS BAKER . I am under butler to the Dowager Lady Temple, her name is Eliza Upton , she is the widow of the late Lord Temple. On the 9th of July my trunk was at her Ladyship's house, No. 65, Portland-place - it was about three feet long - one person could move it; the property stated in the indictment, and other wearing apparel, and two 10 l. notes, in a pocket-book, were in it. I cannot say whether I had seen the two notes three or four days before, but within that time I saw the pocketbook safe in the trunk, and I saw the trunk safe half an hour before. It was locked, but the key was in it. I missed it about three or four o'clock in the afternoon of the 9th of July. I received the notes at Hammersleys, on the 28th of April, in payment for a draft of Colonel Stephenson 's.

MARMADUKE PYBUS . I am the cashier at Messrs. Hammerleys. On the 28th of April I paid the witness two 10 l. notes, No. 11,268, dated the 19th of March, 1821, and No. 13526, dated 18th of August, 1820, in payment of a check drawn by Colonel Stephenson . I paid it with my own hand.

THOMAS BAKER . I gave notice to the Bank to stop these notes, and on the 14th July I received notice from the Bank; I went there and saw No. 13526, and on the 26th of July I went again, and saw No. 11268. When I heard of the first note, I went to Cooper and Handley, the officers, and afterwards they went to Ingram's house - nothing was found but the notes. I know nothing of the prisoners.

GEORGE DYER . I am a clerk at the Bank, I produce two 10 l. Bank notes No. 11268, which was paid on the 26th of July; and the other No. 13526, on the 13th of July, the last was paid in by Messrs. Williams and Co., and the other by Messrs. Poles, bankers.

GEORGE BALL . I am servant to Mr. Crossley, a cheese-monger, who lives at Holborn-bridge. I took this note of the prisoner Hunt, No. 11268, and saw my master write on it - here is his writing

"Hunt, 15, Pye-street;" he has not put the date. Hunt gave it to me. He bought cheese, which came to a guinea, and took it away with him, - the note was sent to a banker's the same afternoon. I recollect it was the week before the Coronation, for we were talking about it.

JOHN PITTAR . I am servant to my son-in-law, Mr. Crossley. I was present when Hunt paid the note. I took it the same day to Messrs. Williams', the bankers, in Birchin-lane. I know he is the man, I have known him many years.

WILLIAM SPICER . I am a grocer, and live in Bedfordbury. I received a 10 l. Bank note, No. 13526, from Mrs. Thompson - I do not know when; I gave her change for it, and wrote the name of Ingram on it. I paid it to Mr. Pearce, a grocer, in Greek-street, Soho, a few days after, but cannot recollect the day.

ANN THOMPSON . I am Mr. Ingram's housekeeper. I do not know the note. I have often gone for change - I have been to Spicer's a great many times for change. I do not know any person of the name of Thompson besides myself, that comes from Ingram's. Ingram keeps a public-house in Bedfordbury; Hunt was a poor man who came to the house, I have occasionally sent him with a glass of spirits and water into the parlour when I have been in the bar alone - he was not a waiter; he has taken it off

the bar when I have put it there. Spicer always asked me what name he was to put on the notes - I do not remember this particular note.

Q. How many notes do you think you have carried to Spicer's from the beginning of July - A. More than one, two, or three; I dare say I have carried more than one 10 l. note. I do not recollect, as I have carried so many. Whenever Ingram wanted change, he sent me there, and said, Get change for a 5 l. a 10 l. or whatever note it was, as I cannot read. When he received a note from the gentleman he called me to get it changed at Spicer's.

Q. Then he received this note from a gentlemen - A. Yes. I should know the gentleman again if I saw him - I gave Ingram the pen and ink to write on it, but what he wrote, I do not know. There were three or four gentleman, they had their reckoning to pay - they had something to eat and drink; I think they came in the morning. I believe they had some cold meat - it was a long time back.

Q.Was it a year ago - A. I cannot say. Handley and Cooper came to the house afterwards.

COURT. Q. When were they there - A. I cannot tell. They fetched me before the Magistrate. I have taken many 10 l. and 5 l. notes to Spicer's.

Q. Have you within a year, taken more than one - A. Three or four.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Ingram keeps the house - A. Yes. I saw him receive the note from the party; he has taken a wonderful deal of pains, to find them out. A great many notes pass through his hands. I told the Magistrate the same as I tell now.

COURT. Q. Did you tell the Justice that you saw him receive the note - A. I told him as I told you. I cannot swear to the note; I have gone so repeatedly for change.

Q. Will you persist in swearing that you gave the Magistrate the same account as you do now - A. I believe so - I will not be positive.

JOSEPH COOPER . I am an officer of Queen-square. I went to Ingram's house the beginning of September - I told him, I was come to make enquiry about a 10 l. note, which he had sent to be changed at Mr. Spicer's, and asked if he could tell of whom he received it - I said I must know, as the note was a stolen one; he said he did not know whether he could or not, without seeing it - I said he could see it at the Bank; he promised to go, and said he would send us an answer - I told him who I was. Three or four days, or a week elapsed; we went to him, and asked if he could give us any tidings about it - he said No, he could not, that he had been to the Bank, and they laughed at him, and said he came on a fool's errand, and that he had not had a proper account given him which office to go to; I said we gave him the same account as we gave other people who had seen it. I told him to fix a time, and we would go with him - he hesitated some time; I again asked him what day to fix on, he said he did not know what day to fix - I said "Will to-morrow do," he said, "Yes," and at last eleven o'clock was fixed. We went to his house next day, at eleven o'clock, and he was not to be found. Mrs. Thompson was in the bar, and said he was gone out on other business - we left, and told the Magistrate, who issued a summons for him; it was put off until another examination, which was on Saturday, the 20th of September. The depositions of the witnesses were taken in writing, but what the prisoners said was not. Previous to that day, we called on him at his house, and asked if he could give any account of the parties - he said No, he did not know who the parties were, but he had taken it of one Thompson in King-street, and pointed towards King-street, which is near his house. He attended at the office, and said he thought he could find the parties, and was to appear on Monday, the 24th of September, he attended, and the Magistrate asked if he could give any better account - he said No, he had been to No. 20, and 22, King-street, Westminster, and could find no such person as Thompson. The Magistrate committed him to Bridewell - we had a search-warrant, and found a pocket book with a flash note in it at his house.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. He pointed to King-street above, and then said it was King-street, Westminster - A. Yes. He was bailed and appears here to day.

EDWARD JOHN HANDLEY . I was with Cooper, we were always there together - his account is correct. I asked Ingram, why he did not keep his appointment, he said he did not know why he was to interfere in it - it was no business of his. He said at the office, that the name of Thompson on the note, was his writing.

INGRAM'S Defence. I took the note in business, and called Thompson for a pen and ink - the reckoning I think was four shillings, the man asked for change for a 10 l. note - I had not sufficient, and called Thompson; the gentleman gave me the name of "J. Thompson, No. 22, King-street, Westminster." I sent for change, and gave it him.

HUNT'S Defence. About six or seven days before the Coronation, three genteel dressed men came into Ingram's, and called for brandy and water. Ingram was not at home, the bell rang, they asked if I knew who would go to Crossley's, at the bottom of Holborn, and buy a small Cheshire cheese, a gentleman said Hunt will do it - they gave me the note; I went and had a bill of the cheese, and gave them the note, and my name and address - I delivered the cheese to the gentlemen, at the Sun, public-house, which Ingram keeps, and in the afternoon a carrier came, and took the cheese. They gave me three shillings for my trouble.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18211024-126

1399. WILLIAM HICKS was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Lewis Gutheridge , at St. Marylebone , about nine o'clock at night, on the 28th of September , with intent to steal .

JAMES MILLS . I am a tailor, and live in Seymour-place, Marylebone . I rent the shop and parlour, the house belongs to Lewis Gutheridge , he lives in the kitchen - on Friday night, the 28th of September, about a quarter past nine o'clock, my wife and I were in the back parlour, at supper - our shop door was opened, my wife got up to see who came in, and it was a young man; she said

"What do you want?" he said "I have dropped some money down your area, I do not know whether it was silver or halfpence, for I had both in my pocket" - I told her to let him knock at the private door, she said she would go and look for his money - the young man went out of the shop door,

and my wife went down the area with a candle, to look for the money - she was gone in a few minutes - I got up myself to see what was the matter, as I had suspicion - I had no light except what came from the fire; I went to the shop window, listened, and heard some voices outside; the young man was saying "What is that, Ma'am, and what is this, what is that which looks white?" I thought something was going on not right - I waited a moment, and heard the asp of the door wriggle, as if somebody was coming in - in about a moment, the door opened, and a man came walking softly along - I let him pass half across the shop, he appeared to be going very gently into the parlour; I made a dart at him, and collared him, he tried to get from me, but I held him tight on the floor, and sung out for a light; he begged of me to let him get up, I said he should, and in the mean time, my wife came up with a light - I pushed him down and said "What have you come here for, you rascal," he said "I have come to buy a second-hand hat." I said, "You know I don't sell any such thing." I secured him, I am sure the door was shut, and on the latch, it was not left a-jar - his companion ran off when he heard the scuffle in the house - I went to the watch-house with him.

Prisoner. Q. The door was a-jar - A. I am sure it was fastened - the prisoner is not the man who came in first about the money.

CORNELIUS HURLEY . I am a watchman. On the 28th of September, about a quarter past nine o'clock, I heard Watch! called near Seymour-place; I went, and saw a number of people in front of Mill's shop, I went in and found Mills holding the prisoner; he said he came in to rob the shop - I sprung my rattle; the prisoner said he came there to buy a second-hand hat, I asked what money he had to buy it, he said nine pence halfpenny, I found nine pence or nine pence halfpenny on him.

Prisoner's Defence. The door was a-jar, and immediately I got in, he knocked me down and kicked me several times while I was down - I said I will go with you immediately.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 18.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18211024-127

1400. JOHN HOW was indicted for stealing on the 13th of October , eleven coffin inscription plates, value 8 s. 6 d., and two pieces of lead, value 6 d. , the goods of Thomas Goldney and Thomas Green , churchwardens of St. James, Westminster .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be 50 lbs. of lead,

FOUR OTHER COUNTS, stating it to belong to different persons.

BENJAMIN WHITE . I am a watchman of Piccadilly. About eight o'clock on the night of the 13th of October, I saw the prisoner come out of St. James's church-yard , with a bundle under his left arm; he went up George-court, opposite the church, which leads into Vine-street. I saw him again in about twenty minutes come out of the churchyard with another bundle, we took him into custody, and asked him what he had got; he said "Nothing to you, mind your own business;" I said that was my business, he must go with me to the watch-house - he said "No;" and turned back to go into the church-yard again - I collared him, and Sutty assisted in taking him to the watch-house.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Did you see Wyatt, the sexton, that night - A. He came to the watch-house.

THOMAS GOOK . I am the watch-house keeper. Wyatt brought the prisoner in, and took the bundle from under his left arm. I asked what it was, he answered "Nothing"; I asked him two or three times where he got it, he made no answer; the watchman said he had seen another bundle go before that, I asked what he had done with that one, and where he had sold it; he hesitated some time, and said at Forder's, an old iron shop. I asked what was in it, he did not answer, I said, "Was it the same as this bundle," he said "Yes;" he said he sold it for three halfpence per pound, and that there was not quite so much as in this bundle - I ran over to Forder's, and found him in the shop, and two or three people stood round the door talking about the matter - he refused to let me search, as I had no warrant; I went and brought the prisoner over there, and by that time Forder was gone - I examined the scale and counter, there was dust on them similar to what came from these plates; they are coffin-plates, and are dated 1817, 1798, and 1808; there are a great number of them. On the following Thursday, I went into the vault of the church, and in the first vault, I found eleven inscription plates taken off the coffins, three appeared distinctly to be forced off - In another vault, a great many were gone; Messrs. Thomas Green and Thomas Goldney are the churchwardens.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Is the vault under the chancel, or where - A. On the north side of the church. Wyatt, the sexton, came to the watch-house and asked why the prisoner was detained, and said he would answer for his appearance - the prisoner assisted him in the vaults. Some of the coffins are placed one on another, and some are much decayed - the lead weighed fifty-eight pounds and three-quarters.

BENJAMIN LEWIS VULLIAMY . I attended my brother's funeral, in St. James's church. His coffin had a similar plate to one of these on it; he died in infancy, I am executor to my father.

Prisoner's Defence. Wyatt gave me the plates, as he thought them of no value.

GUILTY . Aged 35.

Confined One Year .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18211024-128

1401. JOHN MOORE was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of October , 2 cwt. of lead, value 2 l. 10 s. , the goods of Thomas Underton .

THOMAS UNDERTON . I am a plumber , and live in Old-street Road . On the 22d of October, this lead was securely padlocked and chained in my front court before my house. On the 23d, between eight and nine o'clock in the morning, I saw the padlock lay on the wall, and missed about ten feet of lead; between nine and ten o'clock, Smith came to me - I went and found some of it at the watch-house, Waters said they had some more at the next watch-box - I went there, and saw a piece that exactly fitted that part of the sheet which was left on my premises.

MICHAEL HANLEY . I am a watchman. On the 23d of October, about three o'clock in the morning, I saw the

prisoner and another come out of a gateway leading to Mr. Pass's dye-house. I went towards them, and they walked away, I looked at the prisoner very minutely, he turned down Bateman's-row, and knowing the dye-house had been attempted to be robbed some nights previous, I went and found a piece of lead - I sprung my rattle, and called Stop thief! they had passed the watchman in Bateman's-row - I took the lead to the watch-house, they had left it at the dye-house - Underton's is five or six hundred yards off. In the morning Smith and I found him out.

WILLIAM JONES . I am a watchman in Bateman's-row. About three o'clock, I saw two men run by me on the other side of the way, I pursued as soon as the watchman gave the alarm - I believe the prisoner to be one of them but cannot exactly swear to him; I found a piece of lead twenty yards off, in the way they had ran, against the back of the dye-house - I carried it to the watch-house.

GEORGE SMITH . On the 23d of October, about half-past three o'clock in the morning, Manly brought a piece of lead to the watch-house, we went and found the owner, the other piece was laying at Hollywell watch-house; he claimed that also, we compared it with the other piece, and both matched exactly. He brought a piece which remained on his premises, and both corresponded.

THOMAS WALTERS . About half-past nine o'clock in the morning, I apprehended the prisoner opposite the watch-house, he was lurking about there, I asked if he knew any thing about the lead, he said No; he had been at home all night. I knew him before.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was in bed from nine o'clock till seven in the morning.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18211024-129

1302. JAMES MELTON was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of October , two hats, value 8 s. , the goods of Matthew Henry Crawley .

MATTHEW HENRY CRAWLEY . I am a hatter , and live at Islington . On the 16th of October, about a quarter past eight o'clock in the evening, I went into the parlour adjoining the shop, and heard the screams of my boy - I ran into the shop, found the door open, and my boy gone out; I went out - he said a fellow had run into the shop and took two hats off the shelf. I ran up Park-street, and saw the prisoner turn the corner, running at full speed, I cried Stop thief! - he was stopped - I collared him and brought him back.

THOMAS HONEY . I am eleven years old. I was sitting in the shop - the prisoner came in and took two hats off the shelf, ran out, and threw one into the road - I jumped into the road and picked it up; my master came out and followed him calling Stop thief! a gentleman stopped him. I am sure he is the boy.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18211024-130

1403. JAMES MORRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of September , one cart, value 6 l. the goods of John Moxley .

JOHN MOXLEY . I keep a cow-yard in the Mile End-road . The cart was taken from the cow-yard, I missed it in the morning, and found it in Hackney-road, by the side of the road. One of the shafts of it being broken I was obliged to get another cart to take it away. I saw a man coming across the road, and asked him if the cart belonged to him; he said Yes. It was Williams. I took it home.

WILLIAM WILLIAMS . On the 11th of September, in the morning, the prisoner came to buy a horse of me, I asked him three guineas and a half for it - he offered me three guineas - I refused - he then wanted me trust him till Sunday with it, which I also refused; he said he had a good cart to sell, or he would leave it my hands until he paid me. I went to look at it in Red Cow-lane, and brought it home, we afterwards agreed to change the horse for the cart; and as soon as he got the horse he took it to the horse-boiler's to sell it; the horse-boiler stopped it - he came to me to say I sold it to him. I went and said he bought it of me for a cart; the boiler said he supposed the cart was stolen, and detained the horse while I enquired about it, and when I got home Moxley was looking at the cart. Two or three days after I found the prisoner, and had him secured; he escaped while I fetched an officer.

WILLIAM NICHOLLS . I apprehended the prisoner on the 28th of September, he said he stole the cart.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18211024-131

1404. GEORGE WILSON and CHARLES BROWN were indicted for stealing, on the 23d of September , one saddle, value 2 l.; four bridles, value 2 l., and one horse-cloth, value 6 d. , the goods of William Dickenson .

WILLIAM DICKENSON . My father is a stable-keeper , in Oxford-street . On the night of the 22d of September these things were stolen from the stables.

JOHN DAVIS . I work for Mr. Dickenson, I am a jobbing coachman. These things were in the stable at seven o'clock at night, and were missing next morning.

JOHN MADDAMS . On the morning of the 23d of September, about a quarter past one o'clock, I saw the prisoners coming towards me, when they saw me they crossed over on the other side, I saw one had something carrying, and I followed them into Queen-street - I stopped them and asked what they had got? Wilson had the bundle - he said it was his own property. I said he must go to the watch-house; he said he was only a short distance from his own place and would go home. I called another watchman, who took him. He had a saddle, four bridles, and a horse-cloth.

WILLIAM SELLERS . I am a watchman. When the prisoners were brought to the watch-house I asked who the property belonged to. Wilson said it was his own, and that he brought it from one of the principal coach offices in Oxford-street. Brown said, "No, we have brought it from Piccadilly," and that he lodged with Wilson in Little Queen-street.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILSON'S Defence. I only met Brown in the street.

BROWN'S Defence. I saw this man in Oxford-street,

and told him he had dropped something; the watchman came and took us.

WILSON - GUILTY . Aged 31.

Transported for Seven Years .

BROWN - NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18211024-132

1405. FRANCIS FRANK and WILLIAM SHERWOOD were indicted for stealing, on the 2d of October , one bed, value 5 s.; 10 lbs. of beef, value 4 s., and one dried tongue, value 2 s. , the goods of John Baptist .

WILLIAM GARDNER . I am a watchman of Wapping. On the 2d of October, at one o'clock in the morning, I was on duty by Union-stairs - the prisoners were walking up the street; I went over and stopped them, they were walking together in company, Frank had a bundle containing these things - he said it was his property. The other man ran away.

SAMUEL GOODWIN . I am a watchman. I was on duty at Execution Dock; between twelve and one o'clock at night, the prisoners came ashore there, they had a parcel rolled up with a blanket, and pillow, they were sitting on a bench with the bundle; I asked where they were going, they said to Nightingale-lane. One of the waterman afterwards came up, and asked if I knew them. About twenty-five minutes after, Sherwood returned, I saw him go down to the water side, and asked him where his bed was, and where his brother was, as he had said Frank was his brother-in-law, he said the watchman had stopped, and taken him to the watch-house - I asked why they did not take him, he said, they said they would not take him, because he had not got the bed. I took him to the watch-house.

JOHN BAPTIST . I am steward of the Eclipse , which laid at Wapping - this property was on board the vessel, and is mine; I went ashore on the 2d of October, at six o'clock in the evening, it was then safe - I returned to the ship, and missed them - Sherwood belonged to the ship; I had left him on board. I know nothing of Frank.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

THOMAS DAVIS . I am a waterman. On Saturday night the 2d of October, the prisoners came down to Execution Dock, between eleven and twelve o'clock at night - I took them on board the Eclipse, and one of them said "Stop, I am going ashore with my bed," they both went on board - I waited about ten minutes, and I put them ashore. I believe this to be the bed.

FRANK'S Defence. The other prisoner hired me to carry the bed.

SHERWOOD'S Defence. It is my bed.

SHERWOOD - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Six Months .

FRANK - NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18211024-133

1406. ANN WILSON was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of September , one pewter pot, value 10 d., the goods of Thomas Evenden , one pewter pot, value 10 d., the goods of Eliza Patient , widow , and one pewter pot, value 10 d. , the goods of Thomas Draper .

RICHARD GARDNER . I keep the Manchester Arms, public-house, Adams-street, East. In consequence of information, I followed the prisoner, and found her in the mews - I asked her what she had got, she said nothing; I searched her, and found three pots on her, she asked me to forgive her.

MICHAEL MORRIS . I am an officer. Gardner gave the prisoner in my charge, with the pots. I found the owners out.

THOMAS DRAPER . I keep the Dynevor Arms, public-house, in Oxford-street . Here is a pint pot belonging to me - On the 24th of October, the prisoner had some beer at my house, this pot was in the house then.

ROBERT DAWS . I keep a public-house, in South Audley-street. One pot is mine - the prisoner was often at my house.

THOMAS EVENDEN . One pot is mine. I keep the Lamb and Flag, James-street, Manchester-square .

GUILTY . Aged 48.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18211024-134

1407. JOHN YARWOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of October , one bottle, value 2 d., and one pint and a half of wine, value 4 s. , the goods of George Compton .

GEORGE COMPTON . I keep the Duke of Northumberland, public-house, in Worship-street . On the 18th of October, I engaged the prisoner, to bottle off a hogshead of Sherry - he is a wine cooper , he finished his work, and came up stairs, about seven o'clock in the evening; I took him into the kitchen to pay him, and suspected him - an officer came in, who turned up his apron, and found three bottles of wine, one of old Port with a seal on it, the same as I had in my cellar, and two bottles of Sherry, which I believe to be mine. The officer asked where he got it, he said he stole it from Compton, and thought it no harm.

THOMAS VANN . I am an officer. I found three bottles of wine on the prisoner.

GUILTY . Aged 31.

Confined Three Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18211024-135

1408. WILLIAM HILLS was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of October , one coat, value 16 s. , the goods of Edward Lemm .

WILLIAM HOMMERTON . I am servant to Mr. Edward Lemm , a tailor and salesman , who lives in Monmouth-street. On the 25th of October, about ten o'clock in the morning, he gave me this coat to take to the Red Lion stables, Tottenham Court-road - I left it in care of the hostler, I saw it between eleven and twelve o'clock of the same day, across the prisoner's arm, in Monmouth-street; he and a Jew were bargaining about it - I was not exactly certain that it was my master's, but I believed it to be, and followed them up White Horse-court, and there they stood bargaining for it - I beckoned to my master to come up, he knew it, and asked where he got it, he said it was given to him by a young man - I fetched a constable who took him. The Jew was to have given him 16 s. for it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

HENRY POWELL . I am a hostler, at the Red Lion. Hommerton brought me the coat, about a quarter past ten o'clock - I put it in the saddle room, I went out, returned in half an hour, and it was gone; I cannot say whether I locked the door. The prisoner is a stranger.

EDWARD LEMM . I gave my coat, to my man Hommerton - he called me up, as the Jew was putting it into his bag.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Confined Six Months and Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18211024-136

1409. MARY WRIGHT was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of October , two sheets, value 10 s., the goods of George Turner , in a lodging-room .

HANNAH TURNER . I am the wife of George Turner , of Great Saffron-hill . The prisoner took my lodging three weeks ago last Tuesday; a pair of sheets and other furniture were let with the room. I asked her for the rent, she did not pay it, and was going away; she offered me the key. I went into her room on Friday morning and missed the sheets. I sent for an officer, she produced the duplicate, and said she would redeem them in two or or three weeks. She brought a man there as her husband.

WILLIAM SMITH . I was sent for last Friday. I found the prisoner in the room, she said she pawned them, and gave me the duplicate.

CHARLES PAYNE . I am shopman to Mr. Reeves, a pawnbroker, on Snow-hill. The prisoner pledged the sheets in the name of Wright.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. She asked if her things were all right, I said I had pawned them and would get them out.

GUILTY , Aged 31.

Confined One Year .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18211024-137

1410. OWEN POWERS was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of October , thirty-two planes, value 5 l. , the goods of Richard Warren .

JAMES GIBBS . I am patrol of Whitechapel. I met the prisoner about seven o'clock on Sunday night, the 28th of October, going down Whitechapel-road, he slipped by me - I stopped him, he was carrying a sack. I asked what he had there; he said he did not know, but that a man had just given it him by Mile End turnpike. I found it contained thirty-two planes. I said "Why these are planes;" he said "Yes, they are," and that he did not know the man, nor where he was going to take them. I took him. This was about a mile and a half from Mr. Warren's.

BOYD SILVESTER . I am an officer. I have heard Gibb's account - it is correct.

JAMES MITCHELL . I am foreman to Mr. Richard Warren , who is a carpenter and builder . The planes are all his. I left them on Saturday night at half-past five o'clock, locked up in a house at the back of Stepney Church. I missed them at six o'clock on Monday morning. The shutters were broken open by a crow-bar.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming up Mile End-road, a man gave me the bag to carry, and said he would follow me.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18211024-138

1411. CHARLOTTE BRIGGS was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of October , two pair of stockings, value 3 s.; one coral necklace, value 3 s.; one garnet ring, value 3 s.; one cap, value 5 s.; one pair of trowsers, value 1 s.; one frock, value 1 s.; one shawl, value 2 s.; three napkins, value 1 s., and two yards of lace, value 4 s. , the goods of Kensington Lewis .

MR. DOWLING conducted the prosecution.

MR. KENSINGTON LEWIS, I am a silversmith , and carry on business in New-street, Covent-garden. I have a private residence in George-street, Adelphi . The prisoner entered my service about two years since; she at first had twelve guineas a year, but Mrs. Lewis afterwards rose it to 13 l. She had considerable property entrusted to her care. I took a lodging at Kentish-town for my children, about four months ago, and she had the care of the children there. In consequence of what happened on Sunday morning last, I sent for a constable and had her taken in custody. All the boxes which she called hers were searched. I think there were two. The articles stated in the indictment were found some in each trunk. Mrs. Lewis, Mrs. White, and another servant were present.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. What property was she entrusted with - A. All our wearing apparel and the children's, and articles of plate. The lodgings were left in her care while we went to Paris. I charged another servant with robbing me, they both slept together; her boxes were searched before the prisoner's; the officer opened them with keys which they both produced. While the officers was searching the other woman, the prisoner went down to the privy, we did not suspect her till then.

Q. Was she told that she might go about her business if she said nothing about the money you had in your hands - A. Certainly not.

Q. Did not she say I wish much to go out of such a master's house - A. No. About two years after she came into my service she gave me 20 l. to put in the Saving Bank. She never said she put the property into her box for safety.

MR. DOWLING. Q. At whose suggestion did you charge the other servant with the robbery - A. I accused her because she was only a short time with us, and we had great confidence in the prisoner. She gave up her keys very reluctantly, our suspicion arose from her going to the privy. She at first gave me her money to take care of, I explained to her about the Saving Bank, and put it there for her. I refused to hold it.

MRS. HANNAH LEWIS . I am the wife of the last witness. I was present at the search of the prisoner's boxes. One was at Kentish-town and the other at George-street, both boxes were opened with keys. I there found several articles of mine; a silk shawl, some lace, a child's coral necklace, a garnet ring of mine, a child's frock and trowsers, and two or three napkins. Her box was not the place for the childrens' clothes - I had not given her the things. She left the room at the time of the search, she knew the charge against the other servant, and was in and out of

the room during the search of the other servant's boxes. The first search took place on Saturday night, at Kentish-town, and she was taken in custody on that day; and on Monday the search was made at George-street.

Cross-examined. Q. When the last search was made she was in custody - A. Yes, she gave her keys to the officer. The ring, frock, trowsers, and silk shawl were found at that time. The lace and necklace were found the first time. There were drawers for the children's things. She had complained of missing the necklace before she went to Kentish-town.

MR. DOWLING. Q. How many children had you at Kentish-town - A. Four. She had enquired about the necklace. The lace was given her to sew on a child's cap, she said nine or ten weeks ago, that some one had taken it out of the drawer, and laid it to the landlady's daughter.

JOHN STONE . I am an officer of Bow-street. I was sent for on Saturday night, and on Sunday I took her in custody on suspicion of stealing sovereigns from her master's pocket. I asked her on Sunday morning for her keys; she very reluctantly gave me the key of a drawer which contained the keys of her boxes. I went to Kentish-town, and found the keys in the drawer where she said they were. I found four keys there. I searched her boxes in Mr. and Mrs. Lewis's presence, and found a piece of lace, a necklace, and a ring; and in another box I found eight sovereigns and a tobacco box, a 5 l. note, a guinea, a garnet ring, two pair of stockings, a frock, another necklace, a pair of gloves, three napkins, a lace cap, and a shawl. Her boxes were locked.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Was her fellow-servant there - A. Yes. She gave me the key reluctantly, and said it was the key of a drawer which contained four other keys.

ANN SEATRE . I was the fellow-servant of the prisoner. I do not live with Mr. Lewis now. My boxes were searched, I was present when the prisoner's boxes were searched, and the things found.

Cross-examined. Q. They charged you with this - A. Yes. I had been six weeks in the house. I was not confined. I was never at the house in George-street. I had warning before the search, and was not discharged for dishonesty.

MARY WHITE . I keep the house at Kentish-town. I was present at the search, and saw Stone find the things.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

MRS. LEWIS re-examined. Q. Was it not her duty to send the things to the washerwoman - A. Yes; she was not present when the garnet ring was found.

MR. LEWIS. The garnet ring was missing two years ago. I asked her about it and she said it must have fallen down a crevice.

Prisoner's Defence. My mistress gave me the lace to trim a child's cap, it was taken out of the drawer by some means; I had lost 3 s. 6 d. before that. Mrs. White's servant said she would examine Miss White's drawer, and see if she could find it. The shawl I washed before I went into the country. We knew nothing about going away till Sunday night, and went on Monday, and in packing up, my things got mixed with the childrens. The coral, necklace was my own years before I knew Mrs. Lewis, and the ring and broach were given me by a friend who is dead, two pair of silk stockings are mine, and a pair of pink gloves my mistress gave me. On Saturday night my master asked if I had seen the sovereigns; I said No, he said he had lost two and knew them by a mark. I shewed him my eight, he was satisfied they were not his. After the constable came I never left the room.

MRS. LEWIS. The garnet ring was made for me, I had it two years. I never gave her the shawl or any thing.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin Esq.

Reference Number: t18211024-139

NINTH DAY, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 2,

1412. TITUS BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of October , one live tame fowl, price 2 s. 6 d. , the goods of Edward Newbegin .

EDWARD BLIZARD . I know Mr. Newbegin's house in Hollywell-street . On the 27th of October, I saw four boys about one hundred yards from there, hunting his fowls, one of them caught it by the legs - I do not recollect seeing the prisoner there, he might be there, but I do not think he was one of the four.

EDWARD NEWBEGIN . I saw the prisoner in Brick-lane, a quarter of a mile off with my fowl.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18211024-140

1413. SAMUEL TURNER was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of October , 80 lbs. of lead, value 18 s., belonging to Wildman, Goodwyn , James Hore , Charles Woodbridge , Charles Goodwyn , and William Everett , and fixed to a building of theirs .

The names of the proprietors being incorrectly stated, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18211024-141

1414. JAMES WELSH was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of September , one watch, value 10 s.; one coat, value 5 s., and one pair of shoes, value 2 s., the goods of Neal Moran , from his person .

NEAL MORAN . I am an artificial flower-maker , and live in Greek-street, Soho. On the 9th of September, about one o'clock in the morning, I was locked out of my lodging, and walked the streets till about five o'clock in the morning; my landlady was ill, and I did not like to disturb her. I was walking up George-street, St. Giles's, between five and six o'clock, and a man shoved me off the pavement into the street, he was behind me; I asked why he did so, and he immediately struck me a violent blow over the eye, and knocked me down - I got up and wanted to defend myself; I fell under him on his striking me a second time. The prisoner and another man then came up and supported me, as though they were my friends. I asked them, for their civility in parting us, to come to the Two Brewers, public-house, and I would give them half-a-gallon of beer. I told them I had been locked out of my

lodging, and was drowsy; we went to the public-house, and had two pots of beer, the prisoner said I could go to his house, which was a small distance off, and lay down a little to rest - I went with him to the house, and saw a woman; he ordered her to get a bed ready, and he would have breakfast ready by the time I awoke. The two men stood up, and took off my coat, I put it on a chair and my hat and shoes at the foot of the bed - I then laid down with the rest of my things on; only the two men and the woman were in the room. In about an hour and a half, I found Sullivan (the other man) at my left hand waistcoat pocket, which I had on; I asked why he did so, he said he was only putting the clothes on me - I do not know whether the prisoner was then there. When I got up I missed my coat, hat, and shoes, I found the slider of my watch on the bed, the watch was taken from my fob. I gave the alarm. The prisoner was taken afterwards - I have found none of the property.

GEORGE HEATH . I am a watchman of St. Giles's . I had information against the prisoner, I knew he lived at this house. I saw him several nights, but could not overtake him, he left after this, and I took him on the 11th of October, in a court in St. Giles's - I knew he and Sullivan lived together at the same house.

JOHN HEWSON . I am a watchman. I went to the house after him, but could not find him, except at night, when he was in company with four or five bad characters.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18211024-142

1415. JAMES HARE was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of October , 8 lbs, of copper, value 6 s. , the goods of William Pitcher .

THOMAS MOODY . I am surveyor of the Thames Police. On the 26th of October, I was attending the Session House Clerkenwell, as a witness, and had thirteen sheets of copper there, twelve were in a basket, and one was wrapped up in brown paper, and lay on the basket - it stood near the Grand Jury room; I did not observe the prisoner there, till I saw him with the parcel in his hand - I was two or three yards from him, he was carrying it out of the hall; he took it and put it on a persons knee, who sat in the hall - I took him in custody; he said a boy asked him to bring it to him, it is the property of William Pitcher .

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. This was in the open hall, and a great many people about - A. Yes. He did not conceal it, I do not know the person, whose lap he put it in - I could have taken him if I liked. The prisoner made no resistance.

WILLIAM WILSON . I am an officer. Moody called me, I took the prisoner in charge - he said a little boy desired him to carry them for him; I am sure he said carry it.

Q. You said before the Magistrate, that he said he was asked to remove it - A. He said "Carry it." I said I did not believe him, he then said a man offered him a pot of beer to carry it. I never used the word "Remove," before the Magistrate.

Cross-examined. Q. Was your deposition read to you before you signed it - A. No; the clerk wrote as I spoke. I asked the prisoner to point out the boy, who asked him to carry it - he could not. I have not signed the deposition.

JONATHAN DOWNTON . I am foreman to Mr. Pitcher, a shipbuilder , at Blackwater - I saw the prisoner take a brown paper parcel out of a basket across the hall, and lay it on the lap of another man, who was asleep - I called to Moody who took him.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he attempt to leave the hall - A. The moment I called Moody, he laid it on the lap of the man who was asleep. I think I saw the other man here yesterday.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18211024-143

1416. THOMAS HARDING was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of October , one watch, value 2 l.; one chain, value 2 s.; one seal, value 10 s., and two sovereigns, the property of Samuel Thomas , from his person .

SAMUEL THOMAS . I am coachman to Lady Bolton. I was at Margate , on Monday the 8th of October, and about midnight I had been drinking with a few friends, and was a little in liquor - I met the prisoner, and another man, in the streets, as I was going home; I knew the prisoner before, we had a glass of gin a piece, at the Royal Hotel - I had my watch in my fob, and a sovereign in my pocket, I tied my pocket and fob together, for safety - the other man called himself John Bond ; I said I was going away tomorrow morning at half-past ten o'clock, and did not wish to go to bed, for fear of oversleeping myself - Harding proposed to go and sleep in Mummery's stable, where Bond worked; I told Harding to wake me in the morning, I awoke at five or six o'clock, and they were both gone - the stable was not locked; I missed my watch and money, and went out, and saw Bond dressing a horse; he said he did not know where Harding was - I did not tell him what had happened, I found him in a stable between seven and eight o'clock, and asked him to give me my watch and money, he denied having them - I said I knew he had, he went with me to Bond, and I told him in Bond's presence, that he had stolen my watch and money, he denied it, and Bond said he knew nothing of it. I went to the Magistrates, but they would not give me a warrant till one o'clock and I was obliged to leave at half-past ten o'clock, for London. I apprehended Harding on Saturday, the 13th of October, and going along he said we could have made it up, without all this work - I said if he would give me the watch and seals, I would forgive him, and he might keep the money, and I would give him a 1 l. note besides - he denied having it, but said he knew who had; a woman who he called his wife, brought it to me on the Monday morning.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You let him go, and took him up again - A. Yes. I have only got the watch - I never saw his wife in his presence, she said she was his wife, and he said "My wife will make all good." We went into the stable about three o'clock - I was a little in liquor. I tied a bit of my handkerchief, round my pocket and fob.

MICHAEL MORRIS . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner, and told him it was about the prosecutor's watch, he denied it. I never saw him in possession of it, he was remanded till Thursday, when the prosecutor begged he might be discharged, as the watch was given up to him, and he was discharged - a few days after, the prosecutor

came, and said he was dissatisfied, and the prisoner came, and surrendered himself.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18211024-144

1417. CORNELIOUS FOLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of October , 4 lbs. of bacon, value 18 d. , the goods of Andrew Parsons .

ANDREW PARSONS . I keep a cheesemongers shop , in Bainbridge-street, St. Giles's . About 4 lbs. of bacon was at the door - I saw it safe about three o'clock in the afternoon, and missed it between five and six o'clock. I have never found it.

ELIZA PARSONS . I am the daughter of the prosecutor. On the 19th of October, I saw the prisoner at the door, with a boy, the prisoner took the bacon which was close to the door, I called out. I have not seen the bacon again; he was taken next morning. I did not exactly know him at night, but I did in the morning.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18211024-145

1418. ANN DAVISON was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of October , two handkerchiefs, value 4 s.; one shawl, value 16 s., and one tippet value 10 s., the goods of Leonard Thorn ; and one shift, value 2 s. , the goods of Mary Stephens .

MARY STEPHENS . I live at No. 14, Great Quebec-street , the prisoner lodged with me in the same apartment for about twelve months. She left me on the 6th of October, and took another lodging, we had no quarrel, I had a good opinion of her - after she left, I missed a shift, I cannot tell from where it was taken. On the 8th of October, a duplicate was sent to me of some lace. Leonard Thorn had left some property with me which was locked in two closets, of which Mrs. Thorn had the key - she was in the country.

RICHARD KINGSTON . I am shopman to Mr. Aiker, pawnbroker, of Upper Marylebone-street. I produce a shawl which I took in pawn on the 5th of October, for 16 s., of the prisoner - I am sure of her, she was about ten minutes with me.

Cross-examined. Q. What time was it - A. Evening; there were two or three people in the shop - I believe she had a veil on, which I think was up.

WILLIAM HEWITT . I am an officer, of Marylebone. On the 9th of October, I apprehended the prisoner, at No. 3, Boston-street, Regent's-park - I said I took her for robbing the prosecutrix, who was with me; the prosecutrix produced two handkerchiefs and a shift; the prisoner seemed much affected, but said nothing - a man named Byfield, produced a duplicate of a shawl to me, he said he found it in the box of a young man with whom he was acquainted. she said she had pawned it from distress - the name on the duplicate was Mary Molineux , and the duplicate of a shawl, pawned for 16 s.

Cross-examined. Q. Did Byfield produce it voluntarily - A. Yes.

SARAH THORN . I am the wife of Leonard Thorn . I had a shawl in Mrs. Stevens's front closet, I had the key of it; I saw it on the 22d of September, I left Mr. Stevens's house on the 23d, I speak to it from the appearance.

Cross-examined. Q. There is no mark on it - A. No; nor any of my work on it. It is an uncommon pattern; the prisoner boarded at the house, my husband does not live with me. Mrs. Stevens keeps a boarding-house for ladies, a single woman lodged there besides us - I do not know that the prisoner was distressed.

MRS. STEVENS. I know this to be Mrs. Thorn's shawl, I could tell it from a thousand. The prisoner paid me one guinea per week for the first six months; somebody hired it for her, she was afterwards left destitute and quite forlorn - I did what I could for her, I did not know where she went on leaving me.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18211024-146

1419. JAMES RIVERS was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of October , one live pig, price 25 s. , the goods of Enoch King .

ENOCH KING . I am a pavior and mason , and live in the City-road . I lost my pig out of the sty on the 27th of October, between eight and nine o'clock in the morning. I had seen it about seven o'clock.

JOHN HANDLEY . I am an officer. In consequence of information, last Saturday morning, I watched the prisoner and two other men; Patrick was with me; I first saw them about eight o'clock, and about nine, I saw the prisoner go down Whitecross-street alone, with a tub on his head; he went into a house in Bullock-alley, I followed him in, and asked what he had brought into the house that morning; he said there was nothing brought in; I asked him if something had not been brought in a wheelbarrow, which he denied. I searched the house, and found this pig, he said he had it of his brother, and afterwards he said he bought it in Smithfield for 28 s. While I was questioning him, another man came in with an iron pot in his hand; I took him into custody, he was one of those I had seen with him that morning; I also took the prisoner - the prosecutor claimed the pig, it was alive. I had heard it was taken in in a wheelbarrow.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Do not you know that the prosecutor's son wheeled it in - A. I have heard so; the man brought the pot in to scald the pig.

WILLIAM PATRICK . I and Handley saw the men; we watched them into Goswell-street, they turned up Cowheel-alley, across Golden-lane, into French-alley. I then lost sight of them, returned into Whitecross-street, and saw the prisoner with the tub. Handley's account is correct.

Cross-examined. Q. Who are they - A. One of them was the prosecutor's son. I have heard he has been tried here - the prisoner said he had the pig from his brother-in-law.

ENOCH KING . The pig is mine, and worth 27 s. My son had no business with it, he does not live with me - I saw him about a week before.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined Six Months and Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18211024-147

1420. WILLIAM EATON was indicted for stealing,

on the 16th of September , 6 lbs. of hemp, value 2 s. , the goods of Edward Buckingham .

JOHN BUCKINGHAM . I assist my brother Edward, who is a ropemaker , and lives in White Conduit-fields . The prisoner lived four years on the premises to take care of the property.

JOHN ALLEN . I am a dismounted patrol. I was on the look out on Sunday morning, the 16th of September, between five and six o'clock, with Charlesworth, and met the prisoner coming down White Lion-street with a basket on his back covered with parsley; I asked what he had in his basket, he said "Parsley" - my partner found thirteen banks of hemp under it; he at last said he found it; I found he lived in the rope-walk, White Conduit-fields.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I came across the fields and saw this parcel tied in brown paper. I was going out afterwards, met a person in distress, and said I had got this hemp if he could make a shilling of it, and appointed to meet him at the Angel Inn with it.

GUILTY . Aged 32.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18211024-148

1421. WILLIAM BALL was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of October , one seal skin, value 4 s.; four trunk handles, value 6 d., and one tan leather sheep skin, value 18 d. , the goods of James Wyer .

JAMES WYER . I am a trunk-maker , and live in Noell-street . On Monday the 22d of October, about eight o'clock at night, I went to my workshop, I then left it for about a quarter of an hour; I returned, and just before I came to the shop I saw a man at the shop door, with something under his arm. I went up and asked who he was; he said "It is me;" I said I insist upon knowing what you have under your arm. He made no answer. It was the prisoner who was my servant. I immediately called for a light, which was brought. I insisted on knowing what he had, he pointed down and said, "That is it;" it was the skin which he had under his arm, it then laid at his feet, he had brought it from the workshop. I gave him in charge, went to his lodging, and found one skin, some handles, and other things.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAM MOSS . I took the light down, the prisoner pointed to the skin.

Prisoner's Defence. I kicked my foot against the skin and took it up. Mr. Wyer said "What had you in your hands," I said "Nothing," which was wrong. As to the handles, my wife repairs trunks for him, and they are off old trunks.

GUILTY . Aged 52.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18211024-149

1422. MARY WAGGETT was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of October , one watch, value 1 l.; one seal, value 1 l.; two rings, value 6 d., and one key, value 2 d., the goods of George Olley , from his person .

GEORGE OLLEY . I am a chymist and druggist . On Saturday night, between nine and ten o'clock, I was in Old-street, at the corner of James-street, the prisoner took hold of my arm and asked me to go home with her. I refused - I was foolishly persuaded to go with her to No. 4, James-court . When I had been in the room about four minutes, she said they were waiting for the light, and took the light down - left me in the dark, and in less than a minute I missed my watch. I came down stairs, she was gone; the people below could tell me nothing of it. I went to the Bow-street Office. I never found it. I did not look in the room for it.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18211024-150

1423. CATHARINE M'CARTHY was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of October , one ring, value 5 s. , the goods of Edward Marshall .

GEORGE MARSHALL . I am the son of Edward Marshall , he is a jeweller , and lives in Cannon-street . On the 6th of October the prisoner came to look at some wedding rings. I had seen her before. We watched her and gave her three to look at, and saw her put one under her bonnet. I told her she should not go. She appeared confused, I lifted up her bonnet, and it fell from under her cap.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Fourteen Days .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18211024-151

1324. GEORGE WILLIAM LEWIS and GEORGE MOORE were indicted for stealing, on the 29th of October , one handkerchief, value 2 s. the goods of James Larbalesher , from his person .

JAMES LARBALESHER . On Monday last, between twelve and one o'clock at night, I was at the corner of Hatton-garden , coming home with my wife, several people passed near me, I felt and missed my handkerchief, and saw the prisoner Lewis give it to a woman. I took him and the woman. Moore came up and said, "What have you to do with this woman, she has nothing of yours." I called the watch and took Moore too as an accomplice; he endeavoured to escape, but I pursued and took him. I do not know what became of the woman. I am sure I saw it in Lewis's hand.

BENJAMIN RUSHBROOK . I was parting from a few friends at the corner of Hatton-garden. I heard a bustle, and saw Moore lay hold of the prosecutor, and say "What have you to do with this woman, she has no handkerchief of yours." The prosecutor took him, the woman escaped with the handkerchief.

THOMAS BARTLET . The prisoners were given in my charge.

LEWIS'S Defence. I was out of employ and was distressed, my parents having a large family I did not like to live on them, which caused me to keep late hours. I humbly implore mercy.

MORRIS'S Defence. I got intoxicated and shoved one of these gentlemen, but what else I did I cannot say. I was in the woman's company.

LEWIS - GUILTY . Aged 18.

MORRIS - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18211024-152

1425. HENRY CAMPBELL was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of October , one table, 5 s. the goods of William Davis .

WILLIAM DAVIS . I keep the Crown, public-house, at Bayswater . About half-past eight o'clock on the night, of the 29th of October, an alarm was given, I went out and two ladies said a man had come out of the back of the premises with a table, from my gardens. Two watchmen had stopped the prisoner with it. There must have been two or three of them to get it. I lost two tables.

JOHN BUGBY . I am a patrol of the Uxbridge-road. At half-past eight o'clock, two ladies said a man had taken a table I stopped the prisoner with it on his back, he put it down and ran off, I called Stop thief! and he was secured.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

EDWARD HURCOMBE . I am a patrol. I collared the prisoner five yards from where he put the table down.

Prisoner's Defence. I heard the rattle spring, several men ran by me and I ran also; they charged me with it. Nothing was found on me.

GUILTY . Aged 42.

Judgment Respited .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.


View as XML