Old Bailey Proceedings, 18th July 1821.
Reference Number: 18210718
Reference Number: f18210718-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace Oyer and Terminer, AND Gaol Delivery for the City of London, AND ALSO The Gaol Delivery For the County of Middlesex, HELD AT Justice Hall, in the Old Bailey; ON WEDNESDAY, 18th of JULY, 1821, and following Days;

Being the Sixth Session in the Mayoralty of THE RIGHT HON. JOHN THOMAS THORP , LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

Taken in Short-Hand by H. BUCKLER, Basinghall Street, (BY AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON.)

London:

PRINTED FOR THE EDITOR, By T. Booth, 31, St. Andrew's Hill, Doctor's Commons; and PUBLISHED BY T. KEYS, CITY LIBRARY, COLEMAN STREET .

1821.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX.

Before the Right Honourable JOHN THOMAS THORP , Esq. LORD MAYOR of the City of London; Sir George Sowley Holroyd , Knt. one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir James Burrough , Knt., one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir John Perring , Bart.; Sir James Shaw , Bart.; Sir Charles Flower , Bart.; Sir Claudius Stephen Hunter , Bart.; George Scholey , Esq., Matthew Wood , Esq.; Christopher Smith , Esq., Aldermen of the said City; Sir John Silvester , Bart., D.C.L. Recorder of the said City; Christopher Magnay , Esq.; Robert Albion Cox , Esq., and William Venables , Esq., Aldermen of the said City; Newman Knowlys , Esq., Common Sergeant of the said City, and William St. Julien Arabin , Esq., his Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of the Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

London Jury.

Henry Oertel ,

Benjamin Lion Coxhead ,

Joseph Clarke ,

Stephen Ponder ,

Henry Windle Jackson ,

Robert Harold ,

Benjamin Clark ,

Stephen Curtis ,

Samuel Pope ,

Thomas Beilby ,

George Barnard ,

George Thompson .

1st Middlesex Jury.

Samuel Shelly .

Thomas Hill ,

William Beeson ,

John James Harris ,

Jeremiah Rigby ,

William Sorrell ,

James Cooke ,

William Ashley ,

Richard Wicker ,

Richard Levitt ,

James Fuller ,

Thomas Dunch .

2nd Middlesex Jury

Thomas Lawrie ,

John Hulme ,

Thomas Morehouse ,

William Moxey ,

Edward Stubbs ,

Henry Wellan ,

Andrew Bethune ,

Robert Ghrimes ,

Richard Gray ,

John Fearon ,

John Wells ,

Richard Haynes .

SESSIONS HOUSE, OLD BAILEY, JULY 18, 1821.

THORP, MAYOR. SIXTH SESSION.

Reference Number: t18210718-1

908. JOHN HERRING was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of June , at St. Martin in the Fields , forty yards, of kerseymere, value 18 l., the goods of Joseph Winder , in his dwelling-house .

JAMES WEBBER. I am shopman to Mr. Joseph Winder , who is a mercer , and lives in Little May's-buildings, St. Martin's-lane , in the parish' of St. Martin's in the Fields. The shop, is part of his dwelling-house. On Monday, the 25th of June, about five o'clock in the afternoon, I was in the shop, and saw the prisoner come in, and take off the table a piece of kerseymere, worth 18 l. 2 s. 3 d.; he ran off with it, and I pursued - he dropped it on seeing me following him. I took him without losing sight of him - the kerseymere was picked up, and taken into a neighbour's house, it measured 40 1/4 yards; I saw it again in about ten minutes in my master's possession.

JOSEPH WINDER. About five o'clock in the afternoon of the 25th of June, I heard an alarm, and ran out - I saw my man returning with the prisoner, and found the kerseymere next door. I am to pay 18 l. for it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The boy said he did not know that I was the boy, but he should lose his place if he did not come.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 12.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

Reference Number: t18210718-2

909. SARAH FLETCHER , alias MARY PAYNE , was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of May , at St. Mary, Islington , in the dwelling-house of James Capling , two pocket-books, value 1 s.; eighteen sovereigns; one 7 s. pieces; one 50 l., two 10 l. eight 5 l., and forty-two 1 l. Bank notes, his property .

MARY CAPLING . I am the wife of James Capling , who keeps the Cock, public-house, at Holloway , in the parish of St. Mary, Islington. On Sunday, the 27th of May, about half-past five o'clock in the morning, I examined a box which was in my bed-room, there were 100 l. in Bank of England notes, among which was one of 50 l., also eighteen sovereigns, a 7 s. piece, and some wearing apparel, and at half-past five o'clock on the Monday morning. I found the box had been broken open, and they were all gone; the prisoner had lived with me for about a month, and did so at this time. As soon as my husband came home I told him - The prisoner had been taken up about a disturbance; she was brought home, and my husband gave her in charge for this robbery, suspecting her; she was searched, in my presence, by Read, and accused a young man, a gentleman's servant, with it; he was taken up, but discharged. She said if any body knew where the money was, he did. I have found none of the property.

MARY ANN SMITH . On the 27th of May, I lived at the Cock, and remember the money being missed; I saw the prisoner in her mistress's room between three and four o'clock on the Sunday afternoon (she was servant to Mrs. Hobson, who was there for her health); I went in, she had the box lid open, and directly as I went in she shut it down, turned her back to it, and then picked up a basket, and put it on the top of the box; I asked her what she was looking for - she said for her white apron; I asked her what she had on her arm. (she had an apron there.) She said that was one, and she was looking for the other, to lend to me, as I had greased mine; I said the one she had on would do for me - she said she did not like to see girls without white aprons on of a Sunday afternoon. She went up stairs about ten minutes before I did. I came down again, and she came down after me, almost directly, and went into the bar. I afterwards went up stairs with her to clean herself. She said nothing to me.

EDWARD READ . I am an officer of Hatton-garden, and took charge of the prisoner. When we were at the office I asked her if she knew where the money was; she said she did not know any thing about it, but that a young man, a cousin of her's, who had visited her that afternoon, about four o'clock, asked her if she knew where her mistress's money was, and she told him; that he went up stairs into her mistress's room, with a crow-bar, which he brought with him, opened the box, and took the money out. I think she said it was between four and five o'clock - she said the man's name was William Coulson ; he was in custody at the time, and denied it.

MRS. CAPLING re-examined. Coulson came to my house about half-past two o'clock that afternoon, and asked to speak to her - he called her cousin - he sat in the parlour, had a pint of ale, and remained there till she came down stairs. I do not believe that he was up stairs - they were in the kitchen together. He lives in Cheapside.

MARY ANN SMITH re-examined. I did not see the young man in the house at all - he was not in the room while I was there.

EDWARD READ re-examined. I was present at the examination, and saw her put her mark to this paper after it was read over to her. Nothing was said to induce her to make the statement. The young man was examined, and discharged, in about a fortnight, as nothing could be traced to him - (read) -

The prisoner voluntarily says, Edward Coulson , my cousin, came to me on Sunday afternoon, a fortnight ago, last Sunday, he came into the kitchen, and said he had been asking my master if he might speak to me, he asked me about the money, and where it was - I told him up stairs in the box, and between seven and eight o'clock in the evening he went up with me, and broke it open himself, with an iron instrument, which he had in his pocket; I left him in the room - he came down to me in the kitchen and there told out eighteen sovereigns, and three 1 l. notes, in a black pocket-book, which he gave me, and took the rest himself.

her SARAH X FLETCHER , mark.

Prisoner's Defence. I do not think my mistress ever lost any thing, she is a very suspicious woman; she once said she had lost her husband's shirt, and I saw her take it out of the drawers herself.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 23.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18210718-3

910. JOHN EDWARDS , FRANCIS SUMMERS , and BARNET EMANUEL , were indicted for felonously assaulting. Dickenson Jennings on the King's highway, on the 21st of June , at St. Mary, Whitechapel , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, one watch, value 9 l.; one chain, value 3 l.; one seal, value 30 s.; and one key, value 5 s.; his property .

MESSRS. BRODERCIK and ANDREWS conducted the prosecution.

DICKINSON JENNINGS. I am a commercial broker and live at No. 14 Gastygan-place, Bath-street, City-road. On the 21st June, about seven o'clock in the evening, I was in Brick-lane, Whitechapel , with my child, I observed a crowd before me, and immediately crossed the way to avoid them. I saw a man dancing about with his hat cut in strips, and vandyked round the edge, I followed them nearly a hundred yards, keeping on the opposite side of the way to them, and as I got to the corner of a street, they suddenly darted across, and occupied the whole of the foot pavement, and the greater part of the street; I was hesitating how to avoid them, when they all, at that instant, made a rush on the side the child was, with great violence, and rushed against me, and nearly knocked the child down - they came against me with very great violence.

COURT. Q. Was that the first thing they did - A. Yes; my Lord, and immediately after I felt my watch drawn from my fob, they rushed against me, and drove me back a considerable distance, and I then felt my watch drawn from me. I left the child with a person, and followed - I can positively swear to Summers and Edwards being two of them. Edwards is the man who was dancing about - he was within five or six yards of me; I do not know that he crossed over, or that he ran against me - nor did I observe Summers do any thing; I did not observe him till I went in pursuit of them, he was then within six or eight yards of me when I first saw him, which was immediately after I had been robbed, and he was one of the men who were running away. I followed Summers and some other men for about ten minutes. I observed him the moment I began the pursuit - he ran, and I followed. Reynolds, the constable, joined in the pursuit; we followed them into a court which was no thoroughfare, and there lost sight of them; we crossed Whitechapel, and returned and in about five minutes Reynolds took Summers in Wentworth-street, in a state of exhaustion, from running, and in a violent perspiration. I identified him, and am sure he is the man. I saw Edwards in custody with eight others, at Worship-street, next morning, and am sure of him; I had observed his features particularly, and the curious way his hat was cut. I had not noticed Emanuel in the crowd myself. I have not found my watch - it was safe when they rushed against me.

Cross-examined by MR. CURWOOD. Q. Was not Edwards very drunk - A. I observed him particularly, and do not think he was from the manner in which he acted - when the people pushed him he pushed them again. Several people rushed against me. My watch was gold.

THOMAS REYNOLDS . I am a constable of Christchurch. On the 21st of June I saw the three prisoners in company with twenty or thirty others - I knew them well before. I first saw them about half-past eight o'clock in the evening; Edwards was at their head - they called him the bull. I watched them, and saw Mr. Jennings come by on the opposite side of the way to them; when they got opposite to where he stood they all rushed across the road towards him - Edwards was the first that crossed, but they all crossed together, rushed right on Jennings, and immediately afterwards turned round, and ran away. All the three prisoners ran with the rest, I am sure. I pursued, and saw two of the men had hold of something, and saw the watch-chain between them, this was immediately after they separated from the prosecutor - I do not know what became of it, nor who they were - whether they were the prisoners or not; I came up with Summers, and stopped him, standing at the corner of a street, with two others; before I seized him, he turned round, and asked what was the matter - I said he knew, and pushed him into a house - he resisted, and called others to assist him. I was obliged to handcuff him. I took him to Spitalfields watch-house, Jennings came up, immediately as I stopped him, and said

"That is the man." He made no answer. I went with Lickfold and Barrs in pursuit of the others; we took Emanuel in about half an hour, on the same spot, in Wentworth-street. They were searched, but nothing found on them.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you know Edwards - A. Yes. he had neither shoes, or stockings, on, I am certain, he was not drunk. I have known him but a short time, and never saw him dressed so before, I have known the others, twelve months.

Prisoner EMANUEL. Q. How did you know me before - A. He belongs to a desparate gang.

WILLIAM LICKFOLD . I am an officer. Reynolds brought Summers to the watch-house, and gave me a discription of Emanuel, and in consequence of that description, I

apprehended him in Wentworth-street - we met him. I afterwards went with Barrs, to look for Edwards, into Bell-lane, leading into Cox-square, and found him in bed with his clothes on, about twenty minutes after twelve o'clock, at night, he appeared to be asleep. I pulled the bed clothes off, and said

"Here he is, take him." We told him we wanted him for the robbery that was committed in Brick-lane - he made no reply. I searched the room, and behind the door. I found his hat, which I produce.

JOHN BARRS . I am an officer of Christchurch. About a quarter after six o'clock on the evening of the robbery, I was in a hair-dresser's shop, and saw Edwards, come out of Rose-lane, into Fashion-street. and there make a stand; I believe the hat produced to be the same he wore at that time. I saw a mob after him throwing cabbage leaves at him - I did not see Jennings. I did not know any of the others who were with him, I afterwards went with Lickfold, and we took him.

Q. When Edwards was being taken to the watch-house did he say any thing - A. I told him we wanted him on suspicion of the robbery of a watch in Brick-lane, he said it was hard he should be pulled for it, and that he had none of the swag. I said

"Had you none of the swag?" He said

"No, by God, I had none of it." (It means the stolen goods.) I then said to Lickfold,

"He says he had none of the swag." We took him to the watch-house.

Cross-examined. Q. When you first saw him he had a cap on - A. Yes and no shoes or stockings, nor had he when he was in bed. I wanted to bring him away as he was, but he got a pair of slippers from his mother below.

WILLIAM LICKFOLD re-examined. Barrs account is correct. I did not hear Edwards say it, but Barrs turned round to me, and said

"Bill, he says he had none of the swag." He was not sober when we took him.

EDWARDS'S Defence. I leave to my counsel.

SUMMERS'S Defence. I was at home going to supper, I heard a bustle came out, and in five minutes Reynolds took me. Two of the men who did the robbery are in Clerkenwell now, and another is at the office to day.

EMANUEL'S Defence. I was coming down the street, about eleven o'clock at night, Lickfold said he wanted me for a watch in Brick-lane. I said I knew nothing about it. He knows very well, that I was not able to put one foot before the other, having been under the doctor's hands for a fortnight, with the venereal disease.

ELIZA DEAN . I know Edwards. On the night of the robbery, I was charing at the Arches, public house, Osborne-street, he came in there about four o'clock quite insensible with liquor, his hat was not cut then. Several persons who were there were going to pick his pockets, they took his shoes off, I said it was enough for him to spend his money, without being robbed. He went out tumbling about the street, and a parcel of children followed hooting him.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. Where do you live - A. At the Arches public-house, in Osborne-street. I have known him great while, but not in that neighbourhood. About two years ago, he lived at his mother's, in Bell-lane, Widegate-alley, that is about a quarter of a mile from the Arches. He left at half past four o'clock, I looked at the clock when he went out. The landlord and landlady were in the bar.

ELIZA BRITTEN . I have known Edwards six months, he is a carpenter. I saw him at the Arches, on the day of the robbery, disguised in liquor. I saw him go out and go over to the Compasses, his shoes were off. He had a pair of old slippers on.

JOHN CONNELL . I live in Bell-lane, at the same house as Edwards. On the night he was taken up, he came home between eight and nine, quite intoxicated, he stumbled against my door. I lighted him up stairs, he could hardly stand, he had neither shoes, stockings, or hat on.

JURY to REYNOLDS. Q. Do you know whether the prisoners were acquainted - A. Summers and Emanuel were. I have often seen them together, I do not know that I ever saw Edwards with them. I knew him before.

EDWARDS - NOT GUILTY .

SUMMERS - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 20.

EMANUEL - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 23.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

Reference Number: t18210718-4

911. HENRY BURNHAM . was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Owthwaite , about eight o'clock in the forenoon, on the 11th of June , at St. Mary, Islington (Ann his wife and others being therein), and stealing one writing desk, value 3 l.; his property .

MR. BRODERICK conducted the prosecution.

SAMUEL JERRAM . On the 11th of June, about a quarter after eight o'clock, I was coming from Islington to the City, and observed the prisoner by the side of the New-river loitering about with another person, they were making motions, I suspected them, and watched them for a quarter of an hour. I saw them go to No. 10, Ashley-row, and look through the blinds, they then came back, and then went to another house, a baker came and they did nothing there. I went on the opposite side of the river, and looked through a large tree, I was about a hundred yards off. I could see that they were the same persons I saw before, I saw one of them open the window at No. 4, one of the two got in, I do not know which of them - the window was down before, I saw them lift it up, and one got in and brought out a writing desk, and a bundle, he gave it out of the window to the other, who took them while he got out, an apron was over the desk, they went down to the river, and crossed Canonbury-fields, I followed them at a distance behind, one carried the bundle and the other the desk, they shifted by turns, and went to the Rosemary Branch, I kept them in sight, and followed them to Queen-street, I saw Morgan, and pointed them out to him, I then went for a constable. They then had the desk and bundle. I returned, with a constable, and Morgan took the prisoner - he was one of them.

Cross-examined. Q. Are you quite certain of him - A. Yes; the window was such a distance I could not distinguish which went in, but I am certain of them. The one who stood outside had his back towards me.

JOHN MORGAN . I am a bookseller. I was at the corner of Queen-street, Pitfield-street, Hoxton, the last witness pointed the prisoner and another lad out to me. The prisoner had a bundle, and the other a writing-desk. I followed them into Old-street-road, the prisoner then took the desk and

the other the bundle, they turned down Charlotte-street, I sent the last witness for a constable, and continued to follow them to Willow-walk, where there is a court, leading to several other courts; and I thought I would take one, I said to the prisoner

"What have you got there?" and laid hold of him. He said a writing-desk, which the other offered him 1 s. to carry - the other had ran off. I said, I must take him, he immediately threw the desk in my face, it was covered with an apron. I gave him in charge with the bundle - it was a small one.

JOSEPH SEDGWICK . I took the prisoner in charge, with the desk, and apron, the apron was marked E. B. No. 1,

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN OWTHWAITE . I live at No. 4, Ashley-row , in the parish of St. Mary, Islington. I left home on the Friday before, and left my desk there. It was worth above 3 l.; it could not be got out without their getting in at the window, as it was kept at the back part of the room.

Prisoner's Defence I leave it to my Counsel.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 15. Of stealing in the dwelling-house, but not of breaking and entering.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18210718-5

912. EDWARD BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of June , six shirts, value 20 s., and one gown, value 10 s. , the goods of John Horwood .

CATHERINE HORWOOD . I am the wife of John Horwood ; we live at No. 8, Change-court, Strand . On the 30th of June I was in bed about a quarter before six o'clock in the morning, and heard the window pushed up - it was on the ground floor; the window curtain was drawn aside, and in about two minutes I looked round, and saw six shirts taken off the line, and a gown, which hung near the window. A person putting part of their body in could take them. I heard somebody running away, and about eight o'clock that morning, we found four shirts and the gown.

JOHN BULL . I am a baker, and live in Exeter-street. About a quarter before six o'clock in the morning of the robbery, I saw the prisoner, with another person, standing near the corner of Change-court, about ten yards from Horwood's house, standing under the narrow entrance, and saw the one who is not in custody, take an apron from the prisoner, which he had on, and both went up on tiptoe, towards Horwood's - shortly after I saw them both run down the court with something in the apron - I opened the door, ran out, and made an alarm, but being undressed, I could not pursue them.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Where were you - A. On the first floor, directly opposite the court. I saw the other man there a quarter of an hour before the prisoner joined him; they went up the court about five minutes after he joined him. I knew the other before.

EDWARD FENTON . I live in Southampton-place, Strand. On this day I saw the prisoner running through Southampton-place, with another person - I am sure he is one of them. My house is but three minutes walk from Change-court. They ran down into my cellar, I went down stairs, and saw them; the prisoner's companion asked me if I would allow him to leave the linen in the dust-hole - he was then sorting it. I said it was a very improper place to put linen in - he said it was of no consequence, that he had been out all night, having a lark. The prisoner was then going away, his companion told him to stop, and go and have some coffee first. I then went up stairs to work. I afterwards heard of the robbery, and told Jackson about it - he was in the court. I asked him to mind my door, went down into the cellar, and found the prisoner still there, the other was gone. I found part of the linen in the dust-hole, and part down the privy. The other man had asked leave to go to the privy.

Cross-examined. Q. Is your cellar always open - A. Yes; the prisoner did not speak - he heard the conversation. I should know the other again if I saw him.

EDWARD JACKSON . I live at No. 8, Change-court. I heard a cry of Thieves! and went in pursuit. Fenton brought the prisoner from the cellar. He found two shirts and a gown in the dust-hole, in an apron, which the prisoner claimed. We found some more shirts in the privy.

THOMAS EDWARDS . Jackson gave me the property at Bow-street. I asked the prisoner whom the apron belonged to - he said it was his.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined Three Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

Reference Number: t18210718-6

913. JAMES WAINWRIGHT was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of June , at St. Bride's, one time-piece, value 5 l., the goods of Henry Burn , in his dwelling-house .

ELIZABETH SALTER . My father is a carpenter and builder, and lives in Salisbury-court. I live opposite Mr. Burn, in Salisbury-court, Fleet-street, in the parish of St. Bride's . On the 29th of June, between two and three o'clock, I saw the prisoner walk up and down by Burn's door, two or three times, watched him. I saw him open the door, go in, and come out again in about a minute, with the time-piece under his left arm - I ran over, and told Mr. Burn, he went after him. He crossed over Fleet-street into Shoe-lane.

HENRY BURN . I rent a house in Salisbury-court, in the parish of St. Bride's. I saw the time-piece on the mantle-shelf of the counting-house, on the ground floor, about twelve or one o'clock. Between two and three Salter came in - I was in the one pair front room - she called out that a man had run away with the time-piece, and was gone up Shoe-lane. I pursued, and saw the prisoner in Shoe-lane with it under his arm - he was running as fast as he could. I cried Stop thief! and gained ground on him - he dropped the time-piece in the street; I followed him into a house, where I laid hold of him; he was then dressed quite respectable. I said I was surprised at a man of his appearance doing what he ought not to do. I think he said he was not the man; but I do not exactly know what he said. The time-piece was brought to me half an hour after. I sent for a constable, and gave him in charge. I went into the counting-house, missed the time-piece, and knew that brought back to be mine - it was worth 5 l. - it cost me 10 l.; I have had it eight or nine years; the glass was broken, and the hands were

lost by its falling. He said he had been out of work for some time before.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GEORGE SMITH. I received him in charge, and found 14 s. and some halfpence on him.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 19.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210718-7

914. JOSEPH TILLIER was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of June , one ham, value 14 s. , the goods of Charles Harrison .

CHARLES HARRISON . I am a cheesemonger , and live in Lime-street . On Saturday night, the 16th of June, about half past ten o'clock, I saw the prisoner and another man come down the passage from the market, and saw the prisoner reach his arm in at the window, and take this ham, he was stopped about three yards from the shop, the ham laid close by him, the other was taken.

JOHN JUDDS. I am a patrol. I was on the watch; as Mr. Harrison had lost hams before, and saw the prisoner take this ham from the window, and put it under his apron, Another man came after him, and I took him also, the prisoner dropped it, just before I took him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I was in great distress.

GUILTY . Aged 36.

Confined Three Months and Whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210718-8

915. WILLIAM WILLIS was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of July , one handkerchief, value 18 d., the goods of Richard Walker , from his person .

RICHARD WALKER . I am a chimney sweeper , and live in Queen's-court, Coleman-street. On the 13th of July, about eight o'clock at night, I was standing in Smithfield , talking to a friend; I had used my handkerchief just before, I felt something at my pocket, put my hand down and missed my handkerchief, turned round and saw part of it hanging out of the prisoner's breeches, another person was close by him who went away directly I took the prisoner and gave charge of him.

ROBERT HESKETH . I am a patrol. I was in Smithfield, and saw Walker seize the prisoner and pull the handkerchief from the flap of his breeches.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210718-9

916. EDWARD WILSON was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of May , one iron key, value 6 d. the goods of Edward Clare .

EDWARD CLARE . I live in Hounsditch, my man brought the prisoner into the counting-house, with the key of the stable, which is in Upper Thames-street, he is a stranger.

JOHN ROGERS I am Mr. Clare's carman. He is a flour-factor. I was loading my cart, and saw the prisoner, walking up and down by the stable door, I locked it, and put the key in the cart box, and went over to West-square, Newington , he followed the cart all the way, and as I was unloading there, a lady said he had taken something from the box, I missed the key, which was safe just before, I followed him, and did not overtake him till I got back to the stable and found him sitting down there. I demanded the key and he gave it to me.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Whipped and Discharged .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210718-10

917. RICHARD WILSON was indicted for stealing on the 9th of July , at the Precinct of White-friars , one box value 2 s. three gowns, value 2 l. 17 s. six yards of printed cotton, value 6 s. one shawl, value 15 s. two petticoats, value 2 s. fifteen aprons, value 15 s. ten handkerchiefs value 5 s. twelve pair of stockings, value 14 s. four shifts, value 8 s. one pair of stays, value 2 s. two pair of pockets, value 2 s. and two pair of gloves, value 1 s. the goods of Jemima Ward , in the dwelling house of Thomas Egerton .

JEMIMA WARD . I am now servant to Mr. Bligh of Grosvenor-place. On the 9th of July I lodged on the second floor back room, at Mr. Egerton's, No. 1, Temple-lane, Whitefriars , being out of place. I do not know his Christian name, the room was being painted, and my box containing the articles stated in the indictment, was in the garret, they are worth 6 l. 8 s. and much more. I saw the box locked safe, about four o'clock that afternoon, and about ten at night it was gone. I lived there two months. I found the prisoner at Guildhall, with the trunk, next day - he is a stranger. There are other lodgers in the house.

SARAH HALLAM . I lodge with Mr. Mann on the second floor of Egerton's house. On the 9th of July I saw the prisoner carrying this box down the garret stairs; I asked who he was, he gave no answer; I asked what he wanted and what he was going to do with the box, he made no answer - I sent a little boy down for assistance, he then tried to escape down stairs. I laid hold of him and held him, and gave him in charge of Masters. Egerton lives in the house. It was Wards box.

Prisoner. Q. Was I sober or not - A. He appeared quite sober. When he got to the bottom of the stairs he said a woman, who he met in the street, employed him to take it.

ROBERT MANN . I live with my father at Egerton's. About a quarter before nine I was coming up, and saw the prisoner sitting on the garret stairs, with his arm on Ward's box, I have lived there six months, I never saw him before. Hallam sent me for assistance, he was secured in about a quarter of an hour, Ward was not at home, I saw Masters take him; he said a young woman who he met in the street said she was distressed for rent, and she would give him 6 d. to go up and fetch it for her - he did not say where the woman was - no young woman lived there but Ward.

CHARLES MASTERS . I am a constable and live in Temple-lane. About nine at night I was fetched and took the prisoner, charged with stealing this box. I know Egerton, and am sure his Christian name is Thomas - I collect rates of him; his house is in the precinct of Whitefriars. The prisoner pretended to be drunk, but I believe it was pretence, he did not smell at all of liquor.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I finished my work by twelve

o'clock, and went to a public-house where my fellow-workmen were; about five o'clock I went with a man into the City, found myself the worse for liquor, and said I would go home; I met a woman, who asked me to go and fetch her box, as she was in arrears for rent, and wanted to get away; if I had been sober I should not have gone up. She went up with me, and showed me the box; I put it on my shoulder, and it fell off - I did not touch it again. I told them I was hired by a woman, but they would not go to look for her.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 37.

Strongly recommended to Mercy.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210718-11

918. SARAH SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of July , one gold ring, value 10 s.; one brooch, value 5 s.; two napkins, value 6 s,; five waistcoats, value 10 s.; one counterpane, value 6 s.; two curtains, value 15 s.; one pair of stockings, value 1 s.; one apron, value 1 s., and one shawl, value 5 s. , the goods of Michal Ingerfield.

MARTHA INGERFIELD . I am the wife of Michael Ingerfield ; we live in Castle-street, Fleet-market . These things were in my bed-room; I missed them about two o'clock, on Sunday, the 1st of July - the prisoner was our charwoman , and had left an hour before. She came to char, as usual, and was taken at my house on the Tuesday following, and produced the duplicates. She said she hoped I would be merciful.

WILLIAM BLACKBURN . I am a pawnbroker, and live on Saffron-hill. On the 14th of May the prisoner pawned a pair of stockings; on the 4th of June a curtain, and on the 12th, a waistcoat, in the name of Ann Wright .

JOHN WAGHORN . I am an apprentice to Mr. Cotterill, who is a pawnbroker, and lives in Shoe-lane. I took a brooch in pawn of the prisoner; also an apron, a shawl, and a waistcoat.

CATHERINE WILTHEW . I am servant to Mr. Ingerfield. The prisoner gave me the duplicates, fell on her knees, and begged forgiveness.

JOHN KNOWLES . I am servant to Mr. Flemming, who is a pawnbroker, and lives in Fleet-market. On the 4th of June a woman pawned a ring for 4 s. 6 d.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 46.

Confined Three Months .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210718-12

SECOND DAY, FRIDAY, JULY 20.

919. THOMAS WHITE and MICHAEL MORTON were indicted for stealing, on the 20th of June , one handkerchief, value 5 s., the goods of John Augustus Knipe , from his person .

JOHN AUGUSTUS KNIPE , ESQ. I live at Wimbledon. On the 20th of June I was walking from Newport-street into Lisle-street , a man said I had lost something; I felt, and missed my handkerchief - he told me to follow him, which I did, and saw the prisoners in custody soon after. My handkerchief was produced.

GEORGE STRINGER . I work for Mr. Ricketts, in the Strand. I was passing through Lisle-street, about a quarter before two o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner ran against me. I watched them and saw them go up to Mr. Knipe. White took hold of his coat, and took his handkerchief out. They then crossed the road, and went through Newport-market, together. I lost sight of them for about two minutes, I overtook them in Porter-street. I seized White, and gave him to Mr. Knipe. I took Morton in Lumber-court, he threw the handkerchief down, about three yards before I took him.

OWEN CLUTTON . I am an excise officer. I was at the end of Lisle-street, and saw Mr. Knipe coming towards Lisle-street, and saw White lift the pocket up, and take something out and, give it to Morton, I told Mr. Knipe we pursued and they were taken.

HAMMOND WELLS . I heard the alarm, ran up, and found the prisoners in custody.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

MORTON'S Defence. I came out of No. 10, and was taken.

WHITE - GUILTY . Aged 18.

MORTON - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210718-13

920. ANN WOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of March , sixty knives, value 6 l. and sixty forks, value 6 l. the goods of William Barlow .

MR. ALLEY conducted the prosecution.

ALEXANDER JAMES BURGESS . I am a pawnbroker. On the 26th of June the prisoner brought a dozen of dessert knives and forks to me, I detained them, and gave her in custody. She said her husband dealt in knives.

THOMAS GARTON . Mr. Burgess gave the prisoner in my charge. I asked what she had done with the duplicate of some other knives, she said she said burnt them, and the papers they were wrapped up in, as she took them out of the prosecutor's warehouse.

WILLIAM BARLOW . I am an ironmonger . On the 16th of March, I lost these knives. The prisoner's husband worked for me.

MATTHEW HEATH MOSS . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Chiswell-street. On the 16th of March, these knives and forks were pawned by the prisoner for 4 s.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210718-14

921. THOMAS WELLMAN and MARTHA WELLMAN were indicted for stealing, on the 6th of June , at St. Mary, Islington , in the dwelling-house of George Alexander , one 50 l., one 40 l., one 20 l., one 15 l., and two 10 l. Bank notes, the property of William Ray .

WILLIAM RAY . I live at George Alexander 's house, No. 5, Clark's-place, Islington . He rents the house and lives there. These notes were in a bag, which was locked in a bureau in my bed-room on the second floor - they were in the pigeon hole. I saw them safe on the Monday week before I missed them, which was on the 6th of June,

about nine in the morning. I found four 1 l. notes which they had been rolled in still left - I missed the notes stated in the indictment. The prisoner Martha was at that time an occasional servant in the house, on account of Mrs. Alexander's illness. I do not know that the man was ever there. The bed-room door was always open. The regular servant attended Mrs. Alexander, and the prisoner did the work of the house. The 15 l. note has been stopped at the Bank and delivered to me. I produce it. I took it of Messrs. Smith, Payne and Co. Bankers - it was given me from the Bank on the 19th of June. On missing the notes I had Martha taken up - she denied it, and said her brother was never in the house.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. How many persons lived in the house - A. The apprentice, two servants, Mr. Alexander, and his mother - there are no lodgers. I did not take the number or dates of the notes. Every body in the house went before the Magistrate - I did not charge them with it.

HENRY DENNISON . I am shopman to Mr. Harvey, of High-street, St. Giles's, clothes salesman. The prisoner Thomas, frequently came to buy clothes. On the 16th of June he came, bought a coat and a pair of trowsers which came to 2 l. 16 s., and paid me a 15 l. note - I immediately took it to Mr. Harvey (who was next door) to change, and left it with him, without marking it - it was the same the prisoner gave me.

JOHN HARVEY . On the 16th of June, Dennison brought me a 15 l. note - I did not mark it, but put it in my cash-box, where there was no other 15 l. note, and paid the same on the following Monday to Mr. Smith of Houndsditch.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you two keys to your box - A. Yes; I always keep both myself.

THOMAS SMITH . I keep a clothes shop in Houndsditch. On Monday, the 18th of June, I received a 15 l. note from Mr. Harvey, and sent my servant the same day to Messrs. Poles', my bankers, with it - I am sure I sent the same note, but there might be other 15 l. notes among the money I sent. I endorsed it - (looks at one.) This is it - it has D 985 on it, in my writing. I put that on all notes I receive of him.

Cross-examined. Q. How much did he pay you - A. It was 60 l. I will not say he only paid me one 15 l. note.

THOMAS PARSONS . I am clerk to Messrs. Pole and Co. bankers, Bartholomew-lane. On Monday the 18th of June, Mr. Smith made a payment at our house - I do not know that I received it, but I marked the notes next morning and paid them into the Bank. I opened the enclosure, and marked the notes. (Looks at it.) This is one - it has No. 2, on the back of the Britannia, which denotes that the notes are taken from Mr. Smith. It was part of the payment made by him on that day.

Cross-examined. Q. You have none of your books here - A. No; I examined them a fortnight or three weeks ago. I did not recollect the circumstance till I looked at the book - the entry is made by myself. I do no not know that I received the notes myself. They would pass through several hands before they came to be entered at night; but nobody would open them but the clerk who received them.

COURT. Q. Can you, from seeing No. 2 in your writing on the note, swear that it was received from Smith - A. No, I will not.

SARAH MASON . I live at Mr. Alexander's. I attended Mrs. Alexander. The prisoner lived there at the time the notes were missed. I was never in the room the bureau is in, and knew nothing of it till Mr. Ray complained. Martha cleaned the room and made the bed. I have seen the male prisoner at the house two or three times. They are brother and sister. I saw him at the door talking to her twice within a week before it was missed - I never saw him inside the door, and cannot say whether he came in or not. Mrs. Alexander died, and was buried on the 6th of June - between her death and funeral I was up stairs making my master's bed with the prisoner - she said to me,

"Here is a key, will you have it?" - I said, No, I wanted none but my own - and she threw it out of window. It was small, like a drawer key. I mentioned this to the Justice at the second examination.

Cross-examined. Q. They took you up - A. No; I was not charged with it - I went before the Magistrate as a witness against her - we all went together - I was not confined. I did not remember about the key till the second examination.

JAMES PHIPPS . I am an officer. I received information and went to Hampstead on the 23d of June, after the prisoner Thomas - I did not find him there, but took him off the Chatham stage, at the Bricklayer's Arms public-house, and told him I took him on suspicion of a robbery at Islington. He said he knew nothing of it. Taylor searched him in my presence, and found four 1 l. notes and 10 s. on him - it was returned to him. We took him to Bow-street; he was remanded till seven o'clock, and before seven we took Martha, at her mother's, in Chapel-street, Pentonville - I said I wanted her to go to Bow-street, and asked if she had been there before - she said, Yes - I said I had her brother in custody. I searched her boxes, but found nothing.

WILLIAM RAY re-examined. I marked the note

"Smith and Co." when I took it. That is on it now. I have received other notes from them, but no other 15 l. note within the last year.

GEORGE TAYLOR . On the 25th of June I apprehended the male prisoner. He said,

"I know what you want me for, it is a Bench warrant about Nancy Paul ." I said,

"No, it is on suspicion of a robbery at Islington." I was going to search him. He said, I know what you want: put his hand in his breeches pocket, and pulled out four 1 l. notes, and said,

"Here, take it, it's all I have got, so help me God." I said,

"This will not do, Tom, I want more than this by a good deal" - he said he had no more. I took him to Bow-street, and went and took the woman - she said,

"What, is it again." I said she must go with me -

"Why," said she,

"how many of the notes are traced." I said there was a 15 l. note traced to her brother, and he was in custody - she said she was willing to go.

MARTHA WELLMAN 'S Defence. I was taken a fortnight before and discharged.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210718-15

922. ANDREW TRUMBLE was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of June , one apron, value 6 d.; one coat, value

30 s.; one waistcoat, value 8 s., and one pair of breeches, value 20 s., the good of Francis Wheelhouse , from the person of Sarah, his wife .

SARAH WHEELHOUSE . I am the wife of Francis Wheelhouse ; we live at No. 7, Cobourgh-row, Westminster. On Saturday the 2d of June, about half-past ten or eleven o'clock at night, I was at the corner of Strutton-yard - I was coming from Mr. Williams's, the pawnbrokers, in Broadway, with these clothes, which I had redeemed - I had them wrapped up in an apron under my left arm. At the corner of Strutton-ground the prisoner came up; it was a very fine clear evening, and there was a gas light opposite, and the shops were well lit up - my little girl had hold of my right arm - just as I turned round there was a snatch at my bundle - I turned round and saw the prisoner - he made three or four pulls at it, and at last he gave a sudden jerk which almost pulled me to the ground, and I was forced to let go. I looked very hard at him, and positively swear he is the man - he was alone; I cannot be mistaken. I have never found my things. The watchman was going his round, crying half-past ten. The prisoner put the bundle under his left arm and ran across the road, down Great Peter-street. I followed him close to his heels, crying

"Stop thief!" I saw him go in within three or four doors from the Green Man and Still, public-house; I was afraid to go in; the watchman came up in three minutes, but could not find him. I saw him on the Wednesday following at Queen-square office, and knew him again immediately. He had a black coat, or a very dark one; but he had a different dress on at the office. I described him on Sunday to the officer, Gillmore.

Cross-examined by MR. PLATT. Q. When did it happen - A. Between half past ten and eleven. I did not bring my girl here, as I do not think she properly understands the nature of an oath. I do not know Mary Walters - I never said I could not tell the man if I saw him; he had a dark coat on, dark grey mixt trowsers, and white stockings, and a very small hat on; I clearly saw his features. I have had no particular conversation with Wilks; I told him not to speak to him unless he was certain. I have not told him what evidence to give.

JOHN WILKS . I live at No. 4, Regent-street, Westminster, and work for Mr. Nash, a carpenter in Dover-street, Piccadilly. On the 2d of June, about half-past ten or eleven o'clock at night, I was at the corner of the Bricklayer's Arms, public-house, Strutton-ground; I saw the prisoner follow the woman, (I had seen him once before) she was very near me - I saw him go and snatch a bundle from her left arm. When he took hold of the bundle he pulled it three times and got it from her - I had some medicine in my hand - I saw him run to the corner of Duck-lane; she pursued him. I then went home with the medicine. He had a dark coat, dark mixt trowsers, a coloured handkerchief, and small hat. I told Mrs. Wheelhouse of it that night, and informed Cooper next day. I am certain he is the man.

Cross-examined. Q. How often have you and she talked the matter over - A. Not above once. She heard what I had to say at the office. I had a good view of his trowsers. I have not conversed with her about it particularly.

JOSEPH COOPER . I am an officer. On Sunday, the 3d of June, I was informed of this robbery, and next day the prosecutrix herself told me of it. I took the prisoner in Duck-lane, on Tuesday night, he gave his address, before the Magistrate, to be at Lambeth, I saw him on Saturday, the day of the robbery, about three o'clock in the afternoon, at Knightsbridge, in company with two others, he was then dressed in a pair of grey mixt trowsers, pepper and salt. I do not recollect the colour of his coat. I took him from the description of the prosecutrix and Wilks; he was in company with two others, when I saw him. One of the same men was with him when I took him.

Prisoner. I leave it to my Counsel.

MARY WALTERS . I live in Rochester-row, and get my living by washing. The prisoner told me she did not think she could swear to the man; this was on Sunday, the day after the robbery. She said she could not tell what coat he wore.

COURT. Q. How long have you lived there - A. About three months. I never saw the prisoner. His brother-in-law, found me out last Friday, he did not apply to me before he came to my mistress, Mrs. Gibson, No. 1, Rochester-row, who employs him to carry out linen. I have worked there three months.

Q. Then you have known the brother three months - A. Yes he come there for linen two or three times a week. He lives in Peter-street, he only applied to me last Friday, he subpoened me last Monday night.

Q. When did you hear the prosecutrix say, she should not know the man - A. She came the Sunday after the robbery, and asked if I should know the man - I said, I never saw his face, I had heard her call Stop thief! in the street, and saw a man in a long coat, ran down the street. My sister asked if she should know him, she said she should not. I did not tell my mistress, what she said till last Monday - it was known at our house, the day after the robbery that she had said she did not know him. The prisoner's brother, came to the house frequently. My sister is not here, I told his brother that she heard it.

Q. You say, you saw the robbery, now tell me if you will swear he is not the man - A. He is not the man I saw run - I only saw his back, he had a long coat on. I positively swear he is not the man I saw.

Q. The man you saw commited the robbery - A. I do not know. I saw a man run down Peter-street, I did not see the prosecutrix following him. I heard her call Stop thief! he ran into Duck-lane.

SARAH WHEELHOUSE re-examined. I never told her that I should not know the man. I saw her on the night of the robbery selling matches, by the public-house door, she came up and said

"Is it you that was robbed." I said Yes - she said, she should know the man very well if she saw him, and in consequence of her saying so, I went to her next morning.

MARY WALTERS . I never said so.

JOSEPH LASH COTTON . I keep the Green Man and Still, public-house, Pear-street. I remember the prisoner being in my house on the night of the robbery, before it happened; I do not know the day of the month; it was on Saturday, a month or five weeks ago; he came in about half-past nine o'clock with two others, and called for a pot of beer; I do not recollect his going out, but I heard a cry of

"Stop thief!" in the street. I went to the

bar and heard a piece of work in the street, that a person was robbed of a bundle; and the people who sat there said they were glad they were there, for if they had been out it might be laid to them. I cannot say where the prisoner was then, as our counter is very high; but a minute or two after I saw him talking with them. It was about half-past ten. I cannot say whether he had left the house; I think he was standing up near the spot I saw him in before.

COURT. Q. How far is your house from where the robbery was committed - A. Less than two hundred yards; a person might run there in two minutes. I think he was dressed as he is now; I will not swear it. I do not know when I was asked to come here; it was before last Sessions; my little boy was ill; I did not come; I had no order to come.

WILLIAM BUTTERELL . I am a butcher, and live in Peter-street. I saw the prosecutrix run by my window, after the thief, as I stood in my shop. The prisoner does not answer the description of the man I saw pass - I thought him a taller man.

COURT. Q.Who had the best view of him, the person robbed, or you who only had a glimpse - A. I should think she had. I was not asked to come here till last Monday.

EDMUND WINCH . I keep a lodging-house at No. 17, Duck-lane. On this night I went into the Green Man and Still, public-house, for a pot of beer - it is three doors off, and had returned about a minute, and heard a bustle in the street - I came out, and the prosecutrix said she was robbed of her bundle. I know the prisoner was in the public-house when I went there, smoking with the company. I heard the alarm six or eight minutes after.

COURT. Q. Did you know him before - A. I had seen him six or eight times; I know one of the men who was smoking with him - he cannot attend, as he has got a lamplighter's place at Westminster. I went home and laid my cloth for supper, and in less than ten minutes heard the cry. The prisoner was in the house when she came to the door; he had not been out.

Q. Who applied to you to become a witness - A. A man came last Monday and brought me a paper. I happened to say, I wondered that woman could take such a false oath. I told two or three of the neighbours that he was in the house - I told Cotton, Bowyer, and Mrs. Mason so. I thought if I said much they would have me up, and so I told nobody else. I saw the prosecutrix with the officers on the Sunday looking for the man. Walters pointed her out. I just twigged her face at the public-house door on on the night of the robbery.

WILLIAM EVANS . I saw the prisoner at the Green Man and Still, public-house, on a Saturday night - I think it was four months ago. I had a pint of beer, and Trumble was there drinking. Between ten and eleven o'clock I heard a woman coming down Duck-lane, calling

"Stop thief!" several times - Trumble was then in the tap-room - I had been there above half an hour or more; he was dressed as he is now.

COURT. Q. Where do you live - A. At No. 40, Duck-lane. I only knew him by sight - I have known him four or five years. I sell vegetables. I do not know where he lived. He was facing me in the tap-room; it is a small old room. I saw Winch that day at his own door. I did notice him come in. The prisoner was drinking with two more, who I knew by sight - I have seen them since in the street, A friend of the prisoner's asked me to come here last Sessions. I did not see the prisoner, as I was ill in bed - I mentioned this to the landlord soon after the robbery.

EDMUND WINCH re-examined. I saw the prisoner at my own door on the night of the robbery.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210718-16

923. GEORGE HODGETTS was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of June , 3000 clout nails, value 7 s.; 1000 hob nails, value 18 d., and 1000 clinkers, value 2 s. , the goods of William Ball and Thomas Sharland .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY .

Fined One Shilling and Discharged .

Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210718-17

924. WILLIAM ALLFORD was indicted for embezzlement .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY .

Confined Two Months .

Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210718-18

925. JOHN CROFT was indicted for having in his custody and possession one 1 l. forged Bank note, knowing it to be forged .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY ,

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

926. JOHN CROFT was again indicted for disposing of and putting away a like forged note, with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England .

MR. BOLLAND, on behalf of the Governor and Company of the Bank of England, declined offering any evidence.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210718-19

927. JOHN HAYNES was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of June , seven planes, value 1 l. 13 s.; three drawer-borers, value 5 s., and six chisels, value 2 s. the goods of Edward Jones .

EDWARD JONES . I work for Mr. Stone, of Kirby-street, Hatton-garden. I lost these tools from a shop in Vine-yard, Aldersgate-street , on the 14th of June. I left them them there on the Saturday, at six o'clock in the evening, safe in my chest. About five o'clock in the morning I found the chest broken open. I found them in possession of Warner. The shop was broken open.

JOHN WARNER . I am a hostler, and live in Clark-street, Clerkenwell. I went up Vine-yard, where my master's horses are kept, at half-past five o'clock in the morning, and saw the prisoner buried under the dung - he got up. I found a handkerchief of carpenter's tools in the heap; he said he knew nothing of them, but he came there to sleep. Jones claimed them.

JOHN KIRBY . I am a constable. I received him in charge. On Thursday the 14th of June, about half past one o'clock in the morning, when I was going my rounds, I saw a man under a gateway in Vine-yard, with a bundle - I asked what he had there - he dropped it, then turned round and knocked me down, and ran away. I cannot say who it was; I took the bundle in my hand, and at that moment another man ran across the yard, and we could find him no where. The bundle contained carpenters' tools.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

THOMAS PAYNE . I am a constable, and took the prisoner in charge.

Prisoner's Defence. The robbery was committed at half-past one. I had been to Stepney fair with my master, and got home about eleven o'clock; I never went out again until three o'clock in the morning, and was going home to my lodging. I went up the yard for a necessary purpose, and fell asleep.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210718-20

928. JOSEPH COMPTON was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of June , one basket, value 6 d.; one waistcoat, value 2 s.; three shirts, value 12 s.; nine handkerchiefs, value 15 s.; one night cap, value 6 d., and one wrapper, value 2 d , the goods of Richard Maynard .

SECOND COUNT. Stating them to be the goods of Joseph Rush .

RICHARD POTTER . I live in Queen-court, Great Suffolk-street, and am servant to John Thomas , who is collector of the City toll. On the 9th of June, a little after nine in the evening, I saw Rush driving a cart on Holborn-bridge , and a basket of linen in it. I saw Rush take one basket of linen out, and go in with it to Mr. Buttenshaw's, leaving nobody in care of the cart. I saw the prisoner go and look into the cart, and then followed Rush to see where he went - he returned and took a basket out of the cart, and walked up Holborn-hill, as far as Field-lane. I went after him and asked if he belonged to the cart - he began to cry, and said he was not in his right senses. I brought him back.

JOSEPH RUSH . I had the care of the cart. I had to deliver a basket at Mr. Buttenshaw's. I did not authorize the prisoner to take any thing from the cart, Mr. Maynard lives at No. 6, Snow-hill.

ELIZA OLENBAR . Rush was employed to carry my linen. I sent him with this basket of linen for Mr. Maynard - it contained the articles stated in the indictment.

RICHARD MAYNARD . Olenbar washes for me. The linen is mine.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined One Year and Whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210718-21

929. WILLIAM WILLIS was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of July , one handkerchief, value 2 s. the goods of a person unknown, from his person .

JOHN CLINTON . I am constable of Aldgate. On Saturday afternoon, the 7th of July, about half-past four o'clock, I saw the prisoner at the corner of St. Martin's-le-grand, with a person who I knew. I saw him try a gentleman's pocket there, but he took nothing. I informed the gentleman - he walked with me to the end of Newgate-street. I saw him try upwards of twenty persons' pockets - the other man was still with him, holding an umbrella over his head to cover him. They turned over to St. Sepulchre's church to the bottom of Skinner-street, and both went under the gateway of the George inn, and stood there some minutes. A gentleman's servant, in a blue livery great coat, went by - they instantly followed him, and opposite Ely-place the prisoner stepped forward, opened the pocket, returned to his companion, and followed the servant to Furnival's-inn . The prisoner then stopped again, put his left hand into the pocket, and took out his handkerchief, put it into his left hand breeches pocket, and ran down Holborn as hard as he could. I crossed and stopped him, and took it out of his pocket. I saw him put it in. I do not know who the person was.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined One Year , and Whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210718-22

930. RICHARD FERRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of July , one coat, value 1 s.; one handkerchief, value 2 d.; one cup, value 1 d.; one box, value 2 d., and one pocket-book, value 1 d. the goods of James Seward Cross .

JAMES SEWARD CROSS . I live in Bell-alley, Goswell-street. I was at work at Dowgate-hill on the 12th of July, and missed my coat about two o'clock. I worked in the cellar, and left my coat on the ground-floor - the door was locked. I heard somebody in the house - I went up and found the door open - looked out, saw nobody, but missed my coat - I found it at Guildhall. The handkerchief, cup, and pocket-book, were in the pocket.

ABRAHAM MILES. I am a constable. On the 12th of July, about ten minutes after two in the afternoon, I followed the prisoner from Basing-lane, with another, and took him in King-street - he threw his bag down and ran away. The prisoner was carrying the bag - it was a soot bag, and the coat in it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The coat was given to me.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Six Months , and Publicly Whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210718-23

931. DANIEL WILKINS was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of June , one gown, value 3 s.; one handkerchief, value 2 s.; one shirt, value 13 d.; one shirt, value 1 s., and one night jacket, value 1 s. the goods of George Green .

GEORGE GREEN . I am a bricklayer , and live in Little Carter-lane . On the 19th of June, about a quarter past six o'clock, I was in bed and heard a noise in the next room, on the ground floor - I got up and found two men in the room. My son had gone out at five o'clock. I seized one, who was the prisoner - the other ran away. I found the drawers all open, and the property strewed all about the room. These things were on the floor - they were taken from the drawers - he was putting them into a bag.

LEWIS FACHE . I am a constable. I took charge of the prisoner - he said nothing. I searched him and found twelve keys and a knife on him, and a small crow.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was unfortunate, and bought and sold old clothes. I met one Joseph, at the Blue Boar public-house, Rosemary-lane - he told me to meet him at the foot of London-bridge at six o'clock in the morning, which I did. He took me towards Carter-lane - he went up to this room - returned, and took me up with him. He ran out and the gentleman took me.

GUILTY . Aged 48.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210718-24

932. ISAAC CADOZA was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of June , one cask, value 3 s., and sixty-eight hats, value 9 l. 19 s. the goods of Phineas Isaacs .

PHINEAS ISAACS . I am a hatter and furrier , and live in White-street, Houndsditch . On the 14th of June I employed the prisoner to carry a cask of hats to the Three Cups inn, Aldersgate-street, to go to Gloucester. He delivered it safe; and on the 15th I sent him with another cask, containing 68 hats, to the same place - he never returned. They were directed to David Dyke , Cross, Gloucester, and were worth 10 l. I gave information to the officer, who took him on the Monday following. I never found it.

JOSEPH HYAMS . I took the prisoner in Brick-lane - the moment I spoke to him he shewed fight. I secured him, and charged him with stealing Isaacs hats. He said I was no officer. I produced my staff - he said nothing. I found one hat on his head, which Mr. Isaacs claimed.

JOSEPH WRANGLE . I am book-keeper at the Three Cups inn. The prisoner delivered a chest of hats on the 14th of June - he brought none on the 15th; we received none that day. He came on the 15th, and asked me to let him have the chest back which he brought on the 14th.

SAMUEL DEAN . I work for Mr. Isaacs. My master gave the prisoner a chest on the 14th of June, which he delivered safe. Next day I helped to pack up another, containing sixty-eight hats. I saw about forty of them at the Mansion-house.

THOMAS SOLOMAN . I live at No. 152, Houndsditch. On the 15th of June, between five and six o'clock in the evening, the prisoner (I believe him to be the man) offered forty-two hats for sale, he had them in a bag. I gave him 10 d. each for them; they were new. It is a general price for common felt hats. They were in a rough state - they are very common felt. He was about ten minutes with me. I did not particularly notice him. I asked him who sent him to me - he said he brought them from a person opposite Whitechapel-church, I did not ask the name. I have very little doubt of his being the man.

JOHN LACY HAWKINS . I am a marshalsman. I went with a search-warrant, to Soloman's premises, and found three dozen and a half of hats.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210718-25

THIRD DAY. SATURDAY, JULY 21.

933. THOMAS ATTYMORE was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of June , 11 lbs of silk, value 18 l. the goods of James Jones and William Wood .

MR. ALLEY conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM WOOD . I am in partnership with James Jones , and live in Booth-street, Spitalfields , the prisoner was employed by me. On Wednesday, the 8th of June, he left without notice - we missed 11 pounds 15 ounces of silk, worth above 18 l. About ten days after he was brought from Norwich, I saw him at a public-house, he said he was excessively sorry for what he had done, and that he sold it to a man who lived in Field-lane; and that Catherine Smith waited outside while he went in, and took it. He had been in our service three months.

CATHERINE SMITH . I live in West-street, Smithfield. On the 8th of June I was with the prisoner, he left me by Spitalfields church while he went to his masters' - he came back with a bundle - he asked me if I knew of a fence; which, I have heard, means a person who buys stolen things. I said Yes, I had heard of one, and took him to a man in Field-lane. He took the bundle in there, and came out without it.

WILLIAM TURNER . I am an officer. The prisoner was given in my charge, when he was brought from Norwich. He was cautioned not to say any thing. I heard him say he was very sorry for what he had done; and that he sold the silk to a man in Field-lane.

The prisoner pleaded distress, and begged for mercy.

GUILTY . Aged 35.

Confined Six Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210718-26

934. WILLIAM GIDDON was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of June , one handkerchief, value 5 s., the goods of William Parker , Esq. from his person .

SIMON RAYMOND . I work for Mr. Cook, Soho-square. On the 30th of June, about ten minutes before one o'clock, I was in Piccadilly , and saw the prisoner, in company with two others, near the prosecutor - the prisoner made two attempts to take his handkerchief out before he succeeded - the other two were one on each side of him; at last he drew it with his right hand out of the pocket - I immediately called to Mr. Parker -

"Sir, your pocket has been picked of your handkerchief;" he immediately threw it down, and ran away. I knew him by sight before. He was taken by the prosecutor and brought back; Ryan picked up the handkerchief, gave it to me, and I gave it to the constable. He was not above two minutes out of my sight.

WILLIAM PARKER , ESQ. I am a barrister . I was walking in Piccadilly, Raymond called out that my pocket had been picked; the prisoner ran by me, down the new street, I pursued, brought him back to the spot, and met two men, one of whom (Raymond), had the handkerchief, which I had used two minutes before.

PATRICK RYAN . The prisoner ran by me in Piccadilly,

with the handkerchief - he threw it down, and I picked it up.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. It is my first offence.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210718-27

935. JOHN SUMNER was indicted for the wilful murder of Sarah, his wife .

THOMAS GORAM . I live in Steven's-buildings, Marylebone . In June last, about five or six days before the dead body was found, a complaint was made to me about the water coming into the cellar of the house; I went to find where the water came in, and found it came in at No. 14, where I lived, and where the prisoner and his wife had lived. I found a dead body in the kitchen - I could not see it. I called for a light, and the first thing I saw was one of the heels of her shoes, just above the water; when I moved it, it smelt dreadfully; I pulled the body up against the foot of the stairs - it was the body of a woman, she had a straw bonnet on her head. Brown's brother helped me. I could not tell by the features whose body it was, as I never knew her. The surgeon saw the body.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. When was the body found - A. On the 7th of June; I found it by raking in the water with a clothes prop - the end of it was not pointed. I used it sideways.

MR. GEORGE CHARLES WHITE . I am surgeon of the Marylebone Infirmary. I examined the body of the deceased on Thursday or Friday - I believe it was the day it was found. I went to the house when it was found; it was very putrid. I cannot say how long it had been dead, a long time, undoubtedly. I observed the face, the features were nearly removed, it could not be known by the features. I observed a great loss of substance all round the neck on each side, a great part of the flesh was removed by vermin. I saw no marks that I can swear were marks of violence - it appeared to me that rats had been feeding on it; the wounds were so extensive that a person must bleed to death immediately, but they were caused by vermin.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

Reference Number: t18210718-28

936. JOHN BEASLEY and WILLIAM HAMMOND were indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Pidgeon , about three o'clock in the afternoon of the 4th of July , at Edmonton , (no person being therein) and stealing one coat, value 10 s.; two gowns, value 10 s.; three spoons, value 5 s.; one ring, value, 2 s., and 17 s, in money, his property .

JAMES PIDGEON . I live in Bury-street, Edmonton . On the 4th of July, I left my house at six o'clock in the morning, and left my wife and the boy at home. I returned at ten o'clock at night.

SARAH PIDGEON . I am the wife of the last witness. I went out at a quarter before eight o'clock, and left the boy at home. I returned at half-past two o'clock, and found nobody at home. On opening the door, there was a large piece of iron propped against it. I forced it open and found the kitchen window unbuttoned, it was fastened when I went out. I missed two gowns from my box in the bed room, and a coat and waistcoat, from a chest that was not locked, and three silver tea spoons, (two from my box and one off the shelf) and 17 s. in money from my box.

WILLIAM PIDGEON . I am the son of the prosecutor. On the 4th of July, my mother went out and left me at home. I went out about ten minutes before one o'clock, I locked the door and took the key to my mother. I left the house in the same state, as when she left - nobody came while I was there.

SARAH PIDGEON re-examined. My son brought me the key, I went back and found the house in the state I mentioned. I saw some of my goods a week after before the Magistrate.

JOHN GARRARD . I live with Mr. Stevenson a pawnbroker, in Whitechapel. Beasley pawned two gowns, on the 4th of July, I believe him to be the man but cannot positively swear to him.

HENRY HANCOCK . I live with Robert Peart , a pawnbroker, in Whitechapel, the prisoner Beasley pawned a coat and waistcoat, on the 4th of July, in his own name.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOSEPH GIBSON . I am an officer. I attended before the Magistrate, when the prisoners were examined; Beasley made a voluntary confession, it was read over to him, I witnessed his signature. - (Read).

"The prisoner, John Beasley , being asked what he has to say to the above charge, says - I and my companion came out of London, on Wednesday, the 4th of July, to look for work. We were near the house of James Pidgeon , Bury-street, Edmonton, my companion asked Pidgeon's boy for some bread - he said he had none; he asked him to sell him some gooseberries, which he did not do. I went up the lane, and left my companion behind; he met me again about three-quarters of an hour after, when he brought a bundle - he said he had found it. We went together to Whitechapel, when he opened it - it contained a black coat and two gowns; Hammond took them to Peart's, the pawnbroker's, I do not know what was lent on them, as Hammond only divided a shilling to me. Hammond lives in Gower's-walk, Whitechapel. I have known him some time."

12th July.

The mark X of JOSEPH BEASLEY .

"Beasley since confesses that he opened the window, and got into the house, and took thereout a coat, two gowns, and three spoons, and afterwards pawned the coat and a waistcoat at Peart's. He says he gave the spoons to his mother, Susan Beasley ."

14th July.

JAMES GIBSON re-examined. I took Hammond next day, and asked him if he knew Beasley - he said Yes. I said I was going to take him to Edmonton. He said they opened the window with a knife; that Beasley got in at the window, and he sat in the ditch, and watched; that Beasley brought a bundle to him, and told him he had got a swag; they went on to London, and got into a cart, and gave a man a pot of beer to let them ride. I had told him what I took him for, and said nothing to induce him to confess.

The prisoners made no defence.

BEASLEY. - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 17.

HAMMOND. - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 14.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18210718-29

937. JAMES WHITAKER and JOHN RICHARDS were indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house

of Charlotte French , about three o'clock in the forenoon on the 25th of June (she and others being therein), and stealing therein one clock, value 3 l., and one funnel, value 1 s., her property .

THOMAS HASSELL . I am patrole of St. Sepulchre. On the 25th of June, between two and three o'clock in the morning, (it was day break) I saw the prisoner coming out of the back door of the Red Lettuce, public-house, Frogwell-court, Charter house-lane . I went up to the door which is in a kind of passage, and they rushed back again. One of them had a clock, and Richards had some other things. There was three of them but one escaped. They all had something. When they saw me, Richards threw the funnel at me, the clock was dropped. I called for assistance and laid hold of Richards, he got from me in the scuffle, and threw his coat and handkerchief off. The watchman secured him. I am sure he is the same man. I only lost sight of him on turning the corner. Whitaker got behind me, and passed by me as I was scuffling with Richards - he was secured within fifty yards of the place. I knew him before, and am certain of him. The clock was found just outside the door.

Prisoner RICHARDS. Q. Are you sure I came out of the house - A. Yes, I struck him as he came out.

DANIEL FRENCH . My sister Charlotte keeps the Red Lettuee public-house. I slept there. I was up last on the night before the 25th of June, and fastened the house up; the back door was fastened with a bolt and chain inside - every thing was safe when I went to bed. I was alarmed about half-past two o'clock by the cry of Thieves! I jumped out of bed, and came down stairs, and found the back door open, and the bar window open. I found the back door had been opened by a small instrument, the chain could be unbooked by putting a wire between the door and post. There were marks inside the front door, as if they had tried to get out there; the clock laid in the yard.

Q. Where was the clock before - A. It was nailed up to the wainscot in the tap-room. It was hooked to the wall at the top, and nailed at the bottom with a nail three inches long.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. It was nailed to the timbers of the house - A. Yes.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

CHARLOTTE FRENCH . I keep the public-house . On the 23rd of June, between two and three o'clock, I was alarmed. The property is mine.

RICHARDS'S Defence. I saw the door open, went in to call the landlord, nobody answered; the watchman seized me.

WHITAKER'S Defence. I heard an alarm, ran up and the watchman took me.

The Court ruled that the clock being a fixture could not be a subject of felony under this indictment.

RICHARDS - GUILTY . Aged 21.

WHITAKER - GUILTY . Aged 24.

Of stealing the funnel only.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Halroyd

Reference Number: t18210718-30

938. WILLIAM SPIKESLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of June , one pocket book, value 2 d., and twenty sovereigns, the property of John Stenson , in his dwelling house .

JOHN STENSON . I am a school master , and live in Rupert-street, Haymarket . The prisoner was a scholar . On the 16th of June, I went out. I confined him in the school room alone, for not learning his lesson; I returned in three quarters of an hour; I asked him if any one had been, I found him still in the room - he said No, and I dismissed him instantly. I missed a pocket-book from my desk, containing twenty sovereigns, it was not locked nor had I locked the room door. The school-room does not join the house.

Q.He might have gone out if he liked - A. Yes. I have not recovered it. I did not see him till the Wednesday following, when the constable brought him. He has a father and a brother whom he lives with.

RICHARD HOWARD . I am a constable. I have known the prisoner some years, and his parents - they do not take care of him. I found him down Well-street Mews on the 19th; he had been absent from them three days. I told him next morning that he had taken his master's pocketbook away - he said he had not seen it. I took him home to my house, my wife was talking to him; what she said I do not know - I think she said he had better tell the truth.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18210718-31

939. JOHN SMITH was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Joseph Jacobs , at St. Mary Abbotts, Kensington , about two o'clock at night, on the 25th of June , with intent to steal; and stealing therein, four silver forks, value 4 l.; six spoons, value 75 s.; one pair of sugar tongs, value 25 s.; one cruet-stand, value 2 l.; one flute, value 4 l.; one hat, value 4 s.; one seal, value 1 l.; two table-cloths, value 1 l.; three pair of boots, value 2 l.; one writing-desk, value 3 l., and one snuff-box, value 10 s., his property .

JOSEPH JACOBS. I live at Thistle Grove , in the parish of St. Mary Abbotts, Kensington. On Monday morning, the 25th of June, I was awoke between five and six o'clock, by the nurse. I got up, and found the kitchen-window was forced up by some instrument, and the bolt forced off; a piece of the pannel of the inside window-shutters cut out, by which the parties were enabled to remove the bar, and get in. There were some embers of wood burnt out, laid on the kitchen floor under the window - it was loose wood, like matches; and there was the mark of a lighted candle having been placed against the wainscot. The wood I suppose was burnt there to give them a light - not to set fire to the house. I found a piece of candle on the parlour carpet, not half an inch long. I missed a variety of articles which were all looked up the night before. The kitchen window was safe the night before. This property was all gone.

Cross-examined by Mr. LAW. Q. It was quite light between five and six o'clock - A. Yes.

ANNA STEWART . I was nurse at Mr. Jacobs. I went to bed about twelve o'clock the night before; every thing was then safe - I got up about five o'clock, I did not go down stairs till half-past five o'clock, and then

found the parlour door open, and the house robbed. The front door was open; it was fastened the night before with two bolts and locked. I found the kitchen window pushed up, and a piece cut out of the shutter; the kitchen clock was stopped at the hour of three; it was not down; it went again when I set it going; it had been stopped purposely. The locks of the parlour doors were forced open.

MOSES GAMMON . I am servant to Samuel William Shurry , pawnbroker, in Marylebone-street. On the 25th of June, between twelve and one o'clock, the prisoner pawned a flute for 35 s. I am sure he is the man; the duplicate I gave him was found on him.

JAMES JOHN SMITH . I am a Bow-street officer. I took the prisoner on the 25th of June, at Mr. Lambert's, the Silversmiths, in Coventry-street, about one o'clock in the day - I found the plate stated in the indictment there. I asked him if he had ever sold any plate there before - he said he had, about six weeks previous. I asked whose it was - he said it was his own, and he had it from his father. I then asked him how he came by this which he was offering for sale - he said that was his own property likewise, and that he received it from his mother. I then searched him, and found a snuff-box in his waistcoat pocket, with the prosecutor's name in it; a gold seal, and a small metal seal; and a lock, apparently of a desk, in his breeches pocket, and three duplicates - one for the flute. He said he found them.

JOSEPH JACOBS . The property is all mine. I lost a writing-desk, and the key of it fits this lock. The property is worth above 40 s. The desk was worth 5 l.

WILLIAM RAWLINGS . I am servant to Mr. Lambert. The prisoner offered the spoons and forks for sale, on the 25th of June, between twelve and one o'clock - suspecting him, as he had sold plate six weeks before, we begged him to leave them to ascertain their value. He returned in half an hour - we had an officer ready, who took him. The plate is worth 6 l.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought the property, on the 26th of June, of one Simpson. I had bought household furniture of him two months previous. I left it at this house for sale, as I wanted the money, to go to another sale. I pawned the flute, as I wanted money to go to market. When I went back I was detained - if I had stolen it I should not have returned. I paid for it in the presence of a respectable witness, named Bartholomew.

EDWARD BARTHOLOMEW being called, did not appear.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 28. Of stealing in the dwelling-house, but not of the burglary.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

Reference Number: t18210718-32

940. GEORGE FIELD was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of April , one pair of shoes, value 15 s.; one pair of boots, value 50 s.; one coat, value 30 s.; one waistcoat, value 10 s., and one pair of breeches, value 10 s., the goods of William Hammond ; and two shirts, value 5 s.; three handkerchiefs, value 5 s.; two waistcoats, value 8 s.; one pair breeches, value 8 s.; and two pair of stockings, value 4 s., the goods of James Middlebrook , in the dwelling-house of the said William Hammond .

The prosecutors did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18210718-33

941. MARY SIMPKINS was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of June , one shawl, value 6 s.; one petticoat, value 2 s.; one ridicule, value 2 s.; one string of beads, value 3 s.; one brooch, value 5 s.; three rings, value 6 s.; two pair of gloves, value 1 s.; one handkerchief, value 6 d., and one purse, value 6 d. , the goods of Moses Barnett .

MOSES BARNET . I live at Vauxhall . The prisoner came into my service on Friday, and ran away on the Monday morning, the 11th of June. We missed the articles stated in the indictment. The ribbons were taken off my wife's bonnet - I found her at Tothill-fields fair that day; she had my wife's shift on her back, a bundle of flowers in her bonnet, and a row of beads in her pocket - she gave me information where to find some of the property. We returned to Tothill-fields, to Leonard, and found him in a public-house, with the ridicule, purse, and three rings.

JOHN LEONARD . On the 11th of June I saw the prisoner in Tothill-fields fair - she gave me the ridicule, purse, and rings.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN BREDON . I saw the prisoner at the fair, and saw her give Leonard these things.

GUILTY. Aged 18.

Judgment Respited .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18210718-34

942. LUCY PAYNE was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of June , from the person of James Dix , one brooch, value 12 s.; three 10 l. Bank notes, and one 10 l. promissory note, his property .

JAMES DIX . I am coachman to Mr. Mills, of Bristol. On the 20th of June, about two o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner in Bond-street. We went to a house in Woodstock-court, Oxford-street , and went up stairs. I had pulled my brooch out of my neck handkerchief, and put it in my left-hand breeches pocket, where my notes were. I had four 10 l. Bank of England notes and one Bristol note in my left-hand breeches pocket - I was quite sober. I felt the notes at the bottom of my pocket when I put the brooch in it. I awoke at twenty-five minutes before five o'clock, and she was gone. I found the lining of my breeches pocket torn out, and my property gone - she had left her gloves and stays behind. I found her in White Lion-street, Seven Dials, about five o'clock that morning.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. How came you out so late - A. It was nearly two o'clock when I drove my master from the Opera. They called the prisoner Mrs. Payne. A girl, named Fuller, told me where to find her. I am sure she is the woman - I had seen her before with a woman whom I knew.

GUILTY . Aged 37.

Of stealing, but not from the person.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

Reference Number: t18210718-35

943. CHARLOTTE COLLINS was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of July , one watch, value 30 s. , the goods of William Herring .

WILLIAM HERRING . I live in George-court, Prince's-street.

I met the prisoner about half-past twelve o'clock on Sunday morning, at the corner of Coventry-street, with another girl. We went to a house in Macclesfield-street, had some gin, came out, went down Nassau-street, and left them - they insisted on my going with them; and at the end of Charles-street , while I was taking a pinch of snuff, the prisoner snatched my watch out of my pocket, and ran off - I am sure it was her - the other remained behind. I ran after her, and lost her in George-court. I was not quite sober - I had drank a pot of ale. I saw her next day at her lodging, as I had detained the other, who told us where she lived. I have not recovered it. I am certain of her person - the streets were lit with gas. I positively swear to her. Before she took the watch, she laid hold of the chain, and said

"Oh, he has got a teaser." I was going no where with her.

Prisoner's Defence. He was in liquor - he said he had been drinking all that evening. I have a bad knee, and and cannot run.

JOHN MARSHALL . I went with him and took her. I asked if she was with the prosecutor - she denied it. He said she was, and I took her. She was lame then.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18210718-36

944. HENRY JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of June , one handkerchief, value 4 s., the goods of William Thompson , from his person .

WILLIAM THOMPSON . I am a ship-owner . I was in the Strand , on the 27th of June, in the evening - my son was a little behind me. I heard him call out, turned round, and saw the prisoner run off with a handkerchief in his hand, and my son after him, calling Stop thief! I felt, and missed mine. He was secured. A gentleman brought me my handkerchief after we returned from the police vessel.

WILLIAM THOMPSON, JUN. I was walking about ten yards behind my father, and saw the prisoner take my father's handkerchief out of his pocket - I immediately called out Stop thief! and he ran off; I pursued, and never lost sight of him until he was caught; he was putting it in his pocket.

ROBERT M'CLEARA. I am a Thames Police officer. I heard the cry, saw the prisoner running, and stopped him in the Strand - I took him down Arundel-street. He said,

"Don't say I took the handkerchief." About a dozen came round and rescued him - I pursued, and took him again without losing sight of him. He said again,

"Why did you say I took the handkerchief; don't you say I took it." His left-hand pocket was turned inside out.

WILLIAM NESBITT . I am the street-keeper. I assisted in securing him after he escaped. I did not see him in possession of the handkerchief.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming down the Strand - I heard the cry, and a man stopped me.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Six Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

Reference Number: t18210718-37

945. CATHERINE FLANNAGAN and MARY HART were indicted for stealing, on the 10th of July , at St. Giles, without Cripplegate , fifty-eight yards of lace, value 9 l. , the goods of Joseph Todd , James Morrison , and John Edward Todd .

SECOND COUNT. Stating it to be in the dwelling-house of James Morrison only.

MR. PLATT conducted the prosecution.

HARRIET WATSON . I am shopwoman to Messrs. James Morrison , and John Edward Todd . I know no other partners. I know the prisoners - they came into the shop, which is at No. 105, Fore-street, Cripplegate . Flannagan asked for some Persian, and bought some - I am sure they were together. I cut half a yard, which came to 10 d. She then asked to see some lace. I fetched a box from the top of the shop - they both looked at it, and said it was not the sort they wanted; they wanted it to match. I said it was impossible to match without a pattern - they begged me to fetch another box, saying they knew the pattern. I fetched another box to them - they examined it (I had taken the first box away). I took one piece of lace out to show them, they took it in their hands, and then they took out two or three cards to look at themselves, and kept it sometime in their hands - I watched, and saw one card of lace drop on the lap of Hart, from the hand of Flannagan. Flannagan then took up another card, and said that was the lace she wanted; before they took up this card they put back the cards of lace which they had in their hands, except that which dropped in Hart's lap. Flannagan desired me to cut off three quarters of a yard - I cut it off the last card, it was worth 3 s. 8 d. a yard - I cut it off, put the lid of the box down, and put it away. I then told Mr. Copplestone (a person in the shop) what I had seen; he immediately took hold of Hart, I think, and took her into a room; and Flannagan was taken by another shopman into the room.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. They paid for what they bought - A. I had not made a bill of it, or asked for payment.

MR. DANIEL CORY . I am solicitor for the prosecutors, and know their names are Joseph Todd , James Morrison , and John Edward Todd .

WILLIAM COPPLESTONE . I am shopman to the prosecutors. I went into a private room with the prisoners. I had before charged them with having a card of lace; they denied it. I took Hart by the arm, and took her into a private room, and felt a card of lace under her clothes which covered her arm - she tried to drop it by opening her arm, but I kept her arm close to her side until she got into the private room, and there took three cards of lace from under her arm; they measured about fifty-eight yards. Nothing was found on Flannagan. The house is the dwelling-house of James Morrison (Messrs. Todd do not reside there); it is in the parish of St. Giles, Cripplegate. There are three houses, which are connected together by covered passages.

JACOB BOTFIELD . I am a constable. I took charge of the prisoners, and had the lace from Copplestone. As I was taking them to Newgate next morning, Flannagan said to Hart

"She said the saw us drop the lace, and that will take the capital off."

(Property produced and sworn to.)

FLANNAGAN'S Defence. It is false; I did not drop it.

FLANNAGAN - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 18.

HART - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 16.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutors.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210718-38

946. THOMAS THOMPSON was indicted for feloniously assaulting Joseph William Trust , on the 10th of July , on the King's Highway, at St. Boltolph without Bishopsgate , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, one watch-chain, value 4 l. 4 s.; four seals, value 6 l.; one key, value 1 l., and two rings, value 2 l., his property .

JOSEPH WILLIAM TRUST . I lived at the London Coffee-house, with Sir Watkin Lewes , and now reside there. On the evening of the 10th of July, about half-past nine o'clock, I was walking up Sun-street, Finsbury-square , with a lady; I had a watch in my fob, the chain was visible - it was gold, and worth four guineas; I had four seals, and a gold key worth 20 s., and two gold rings, worth above 40 s. A man came before me, apparently accidentally, I put my came up across myself and the lady, to prevent his coming against us, and he passed us, and just as he got by, the prisoner came up with his hands closed before him, he appeared to come against me accidentally, he unclosed his hands, and got hold of my chain and seals, and made a violent pull at them. I put my hand down to save them, and having a chain round my neck, and fixed to the watch, he did not get them away with that pull, he then gave the chain a twist, and laid hold of me by the collar, and swung me round, and at the same time forced the chain away and ran off. I pursued, and when he got about five yards, (I was close to him) he turned down a very narrow alley, at the end of which there was some steps, and at the bottom of these steps, he turned into another narrow alley on the right, it was only wide enough to admit of one person; and, at the corner, I was in the act of seizing him, when he knocked me down, and said,

"You *** what do you want with me," and ran off immediately along the passage, and while I was raising, and nearly up, four or five of his gang kicked me on the loins, and on my back. I cut at them with my cane, and ran off after the prisoner, who was still in sight, the passage being so narrow, the gang could not get before me without knocking me down. I ran after him, he was turning round a gateway, at the end which led into Sun-street - I was nearly up with him, I there was seizing him, when one of the gang who had knocked me down, seized me, and said,

"You *** what do you want with him, he has nothing of yours." I said,

"You villain, let me alone." I struck him in the face with my cane, which was in my right hand, and with my left arm shoved him away and disengaged myself. I still had sight of the prisoner, and had hardly got under the bar which crossed the gateway, when he got under the bar into Sun-street, I after him, and hallooed out Stop thief! - I had not lost sight of him; he ran on, and got to the end of Sun-street - still in my sight. I was so close to him, as to keep cutting at him with my cane, and occasionally hitting him; he was crying Stop thief! as well as me, and at the end of Sun-street, a coach was passing, (it was at Bishopsgate-street end) which nearly stopped him from crossing Bishopsgate-street; he did however cross the street, and I after him, close by him, and still in sight, and at the end of Union-street, he laid hold of me himself, and said

"You b - y villain, what do you want of me, don't follow me," and then let me go. I followed him, still crying Stop thief! will no one stop a thief; a man then seized him, and appeared in the act of letting him go, when I came up and cut at them both, supposing he was one of the party also - he did let him go. I still ran crying Stop thief!

"You villain, will no one stop you;" he then ran down Union-street towards the church. I pursued, keeping close to him; a man came up and was going to seize him. I heard him say,

"Don't stop me;" he was gone a-head, and the man let him go. I said,

"That is the villain, why don't you stop him;" the prisoner, then turned down another street, I still pursuing and calling out; a quantity of people were round and alongside, down the street, which was Duke-street. I was again in the act of seizing him, when a man seized me by the throat, I fell down, fainted, and lost him for the first time, and he got away.

Q. Can you declare safely on your oath that he is the man - A. I have not the least doubt whatever. I had him in view ten minutes or upwards, and have not the least doubt whatever of him; the chain broke from the watch in consequence of the violence of the pull. The metal chain round my neck kept the watch.

JURY. Q. You did not call Stop thief! till you got down the turning - A. Yes, immediately as he took them. He was not out of my sight till I fainted, except in turning the alley for an instant.

Q. When the gang were kicking you, you lost sight of him - A. Yes, but the passage was so narrow, I could not help seeing him, and there was nobody to be seen before me but him. I am sure I caught sight of the same man again. I saw him at the watch-house five or six minutes after I fainted, and recognised him among a number of people. I was led to the watch-house, in consequence of what the mob said. The constable produced the chain and seals. I claimed them in the prisoner's hearing, and found one seal was gone; one had my initials and crest on. When I said one was gone, the constable said,

"I think I heard him drop something, and I will go and see;" he went and brought in the other seal covered with mud. I was very ill used, and bruised dreadfully. I am bruised now all over my body.

Prisoner. Q. Are you sure I am the man who robbed you - A. I am, I positively swear it, I have no doubt of it.

MARY ANN SMITH . I live in Nicholl-street, Bethnal-green. On the evening of the 10th of July, I was with Mr. Trust about half-past nine o'clock, in Sun-street, nearer Bishopsgate-street than Finsbury-square, a man crossed us, Mr. Trust put up his cane to prevent his coming against us; he passed us, and instantly the prisoner came - the lamps were lit. I am quite sure of him, he came with his hands folded before him, and with his right hand gave Mr. Trust rather a violent blow (it was more a push than a blow) and with his left snatched at his seals, which hung out visible, the snatch turned him round, and he directly ran down a passage.

Q. Did you see whether he did any thing else - A. No, I was alarmed; he ran down a passage, the prosecutor followed him, and so did I a little way down, till I found myself surrounded by five or six men. I then returned, and afterwards saw some persons running out of another gateway, but could not distinguish them.

JOHN JAMES CHAPMAN . I am a plaisterer, and live in Bishopsgate-street. I was coming down Union-street, about half-past nine o'clock at night, on the other side of Bishopsgate-street,

and heard the cry of Stop thief! and saw five persons, three of my side of the way, and two on the other side with the prisoner in the centre; they were running, and all crying Stop thief!

Q. Are you positive he is the person you saw in the centre of the five - A. I am - I stepped into the road and seized him by the collar, because he was in the centre, and pushed him to get him into Bishopsgate-street to the light; the party of five closed in upon me, and I saw no person near me but these five; there was a cry of floor him, serve him out. I was hit over the head and shoulder with fists, I kept still pushing him towards Bishopsgate-street, but they hustled me. I was then struck two or three times with a stick. I could distinguish nobody coming up, and thought it dangerous to persevere, and let go. I met Mr. Trust in Duke-street, he complained of being robbed, and afterwards went to the watch-house, he had a swelling on the hip where he had been kicked; the prisoner was there. I was quite sure he was the man I had hold of in Union-street, and told him so.

JURY. Q. What induced you to fix on him - A. Because I knew all the party. They were running and appeared to be guarding him, and he was a-head of them. I had watched them in the streets before.

WILLIAM MILLER . I am a butcher, and live in Union-street, Spitalfields. On the 10th of July, about nine or ten o'clock at night, I was standing by my door and heard the cry of Stop thief! I saw a man go up Duke-street, which is about a hundred and fifty yards from my door. I went up Steward-street, thinking the party might come that way, and at the bottom of that street I saw the prisoner run by. I have not the least doubt of his being the man. I have seen him about before. I seized him; he was crying out Stop thief!" himself at the time. Directly I caught him he held up his right arm, and called out Charley! Charley! and at that moment, something fell from his hand, I could not see what it was. I thought he had something else in his hand, I forced his hand open and found a gold chain, and three seals, a key, a gold ring, and part of another seal. I took him to the watch-house, and in about twenty minutes, the prosecutor came in. There were six or eight people there. Directly he saw the prisoner he charged him with it, the moment he saw him. I showed him the property, and asked if that was all he had lost. He said part of a seal was missing. I said I heard something drop, and thought I could find it. I went to the spot where I took him, with a light, and in less than two minutes I found the part of the seal, where I thought I had heard him drop something. It corresponds with the part that remained. The prosecutor claimed it, he described it before I went after it. He said it had a white stone in it.

JOHN MILLINGS . I live in Steward-street. On the evening of the robbery I was standing at my door and heard a cry of Stop thief! coming down Duke-street, and Steward-street. I saw a tall man come a-head of the mob down the middle of the street, ten or twelve yards before the rest of the mob. I run and seized him and the moment I did so, a young man came up and said

"That is the man" - he was then pointing to the person whom Miller had seized, I losed him, and directly went to Miller's assistance, and held the prisoner while he wrenched the seals out of his hand; he cried out - Charley, Charley! and, as I thought, wanted them to rescue him; there was five or six of the gang hallooing out

"Rescue him" and using very bad expressions. We took him to the watch-house, I heard nothing drop. I afterwards saw the prosecutor at the watch-house. He complained of being much kicked. I put my hand to his hip and there was a bump as big as my fist; he was in a fainting state. I was obliged to hold him up to support him, he said the prisoner was the man who robbed him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. About half-past nine o'clock, I was walking down Paternoster-row, with another young man named Charley Lewis , we were on the left hand side and heard the cry of Stop thief! and at the corner of Duke-street, we saw the young man running; he threw his hands behind him, and dropped the chain and seals. I picked them up, called Charley to run after the thief with me, and the gentleman took me. I said I am not the man, let me go. He let me go, and run after the man, and caught hold of me again. I said I have a right to keep them to give to the gentleman, to get a trifle, being a poor lad. I would not let them go without force.

WILLIAM MILLER . I know all Sun-street is within the City.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 18.

Recommended to Mercy.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210718-39

FOURTH DAY, MONDAY, JULY 23.

947. THOMAS WOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of May , two decanters, value 3 l. 3 s. , the goods of John Jackson .

ELIZA JACKSON . I am the wife of John Jackson ; we live in Northumberland-street, and have a shop in Henrietta-street, Covent-garden , in the glass trade . On the 18th of May, the prisoner came in and asked the price of cut glass decanters, and said he came from Mrs. Lee of the Stamp Office, Somerset House, and wished to see some, that she saw in the window on Saturday. I did not know Mrs. Lee. He wished to know the price - that he might let Mrs. Lee know. I said three guineas. He whistled, and said that would be too much, and went away. He returned in about half an hour, and said Mrs. Lee wished me to let him take them to shew her. I said I would take or send them myself, in a little time. He said they must come directly, as Mr. Lee was going to leave town, and Mrs. Lee wished him to see them before he left, as she had fixed her mind on them. I took them out of the window, and went towards Somerset house, he went before me. I found him at Somerset house. We went down the area into the door, and partly up a flight of steps, and there he said

"I must take them to my mistress myself," and took the basket from my hand. I waited twenty minutes, or half an hour, but never saw him or the basket again. I could find no Mr. Lee there. On the Saturday, I found there was a Mr. Lee in the Antiquarian Office. On the 15th the prisoner passed my door in

Northumberland-street, I walked behind him to Scotland-yard, and collared him, and said

"You are the man who had my decanters, do not you remember me." He made no answer. I said

"You cannot have forgotten me." He turned round, and twisted himself from me, leaving part of his coat in my hand. I pursued, calling Stop thief! he made a kick at me, I have been lame ever since. I secured him, and am confident he is the man; he put himself in an attitude to strike me, he doubled his fist but missed me.

FRANCES PARBURY . I have part of this shop, and am in the straw way; a few days before the decanters were stolen, the prisoner called at my shop, and enquired for Mr. Mann, whose name is on the door. I said, Mr. Mann was not within, but Mrs. Jackson was, and I would deliver a message to her. On the day the decanters were taken I saw a man pass through into the shop, and thought he appeared like the man, but could not be sure. But I am certain he is the man who called before.

Prisoner's Defence. They are mistaken in my person. I never saw them.

GUILTY . Aged 46.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210718-40

948. HECTOR MUNRO was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of June , two snuff-boxes, value 3 l. the goods of Michael William Troy , in his dwelling-house .

MR. DOWLING conducted the prosecution.

MICHAEL WILLIAM TROY . I am a merchant , and live in George-street, Portman-square . On the 3d of June, I missed two snuff-boxes from my mantle-shelf, one a musical, and the other an agate one; they laid usually on the chimney-piece. I had not seen the prisoner at my house that day, but was informed he had been there under pretence of writing a letter to me - he had lately come from abroad.

MR. AUGUSTUS MANNING , JUN. On Monday the 18th or 19th of June, in consequence of information, I went to the house of a friend, where I understood the prisoner was, and in consequence of what I stated to him, I received from him two duplicates which I delivered to my father. I went to the pawnbrokers with the duplicates with my father, to Flemmings, in Fleet-market, and there found one musical snuff-box.

MR. AUGUSTUS MANNING , SEN. I received a duplicate from the prisoner, on the 25th of June, which I produce; he was apprehended on the 29th of June.

JAMES JOHN SMITH . I am a Bow-street officer. I took the prisoner in custody, and found a pocket-book on him.

MR. MANNING, SEN. Here is the entry in the pocketbook of the prisoner's hand-writing. I have seen him write, and know his hand-writing - I believe this to be his, (reads)

"Mr. Troy, No. 13, George-street, Portman-square." I received that from the prisoner, with the duplicate.

HENRY THREADER. I am servant to Mr. Flemming, a pawnbroker, who lives in Fleet-market. On the 4th of June, a musical snuff-box was pawned with me for 2 l. 10 s. I do not recollect the person; the duplicate produced is that I gave the person - it is a fancy article.

WM. TARRANT. I am shopman to Mr. Gray, a pawnbroker, Fleet-street. On the 4th of June, an agate snuff-box was pawned with me for 10 s. 6 d. in the name of John Munro . I do not know who by, but the duplicate produced is the one I gave him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I throw myself on the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Of Stealing to the value of 39 s. only.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

Reference Number: t18210718-41

949. JOHN WILSON alias PATTISON was indicted for burglariousy breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Alexander Broadfoot , about twelve o'clock at night, on the 20th of July , at St. James, Westminster , with intent to steal, and stealing therein, three silver tea spoons, value 6 s.; one knife, value 6 d., and one thimble, value 6 d., his property .

ANN BROADFOOT . I am the wife of Alexander Broadfoot , who lives in Berwick-street, Soho , in the parish of St. James. On the night of the 19th of July, we shut up the house and went to bed, about twelve o'clock - my husband was out of town. I fastened the door myself, and soon after twelve o'clock, I heard a noise of doors opening, and footsteps about the house, I sat up in my bed, and the noise continued for nearly two hours. I heard the watchman go half-past three o'clock, and heard the bar taken off the stair-case window, I got up in about ten minutes, and opened my bed-room door, and saw a man standing at the back door - it was then light; he endeavoured to escape and got into the area - I spoke to him. He called me very bad names, and said his name was James, when I asked him - he was about five yards from me - it was the prisoner, I am certain - he got out of the area. I heard the parlour window open, and called Watch! he got into the street, and in five or ten minutes, the watchman brought him back with another lad. I found all my tea-spoons strewed about a chair which I had left in a cupboard, my work-box was broken open, and a receipt taken out. I lost three silver spoons from the cupboard; a thimble and pen-knife from a small box near the kitchen drawers. I am sure the silver spoons were in the cupboard the night before - I put them there. All the drawers were opened in the kitchen, and the things strewed about; the fan-light of the area was broken - he must have got through there. When he was brought back he was searched, and my pen-knife and some receipts found on him, and a small lion's head, which an officer, who lodged with me, had given to my little boy - the spoons were not found.

GEORGE SMITH . I live in Broad-street, Golden-square. Last Friday morning, about half-past three o'clock, I was at my master's door, about fifty yards from the prosecutrix, a-sleep, being locked out. I heard the cry of Watch! and saw Mrs. Broadfoot at the window, and saw the prisoner come from the door and go through Bentinck-street. I lost sight of him there - I am sure he is the man.

SAMUEL WILLIAMS . I am a constable. Last Friday morning, about half-past three o'clock, I was coming from Marlborough-street, and saw Smith at his master's door, and woke him. I went on, and saw the prisoner

standing at the corner of Bentick-street - I took no notice of him, and am sure he is the man.

HUGH BYRN . I am a watchman. I was standing near my box, in Poland-street - Smith alarmed me. I saw the prisoner come out of Poland-mews, I went after him, and took him in Lambridge-street, and brought him back to the prosecutrix - she said she could swear he was the man; a pen-knife, silver thimble, and a lion's head were found on him.

Prisoner. Q. Was I running when you saw me - A. No, he was walking smartly.

ROBERT NEEDHAM. I searched the prisoner, and found some papers, a pen-knife, a silver thimble, and a lion's head on him.

MRS. BROADFOOT. They are mine, the receipt is in my husband's writing - they were safe in the box the night before. I lost three spoons which are not found.

Prisoner's Defence. The knife is mine. I was up, looking at the fire-works till half-past two o'clock. I saw a young woman home to Middlesex Hospital, and found these things on the head of some steps - I could have got rid of them if I had knewn they were stolen.

MRS. BROADFOOT re-examined. The fanlight is in the middle of the area - they got through that, and the door of the house was forced open which I had fastened the night before.

JAMES DARVELL . I live in Great Windmill-street. I met the prisoner in the Park, and parted with him at my door about twelve o'clock, he went to see a young woman home.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 22.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18210718-42

950. CHARLES GILBERT was indicted for feloniously assaulting William Moore on the King's high-way, on the 10th of July , at the precinct of St. Catherine , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, the sum of 1 l. 8 s. in monies numbered, his property .

WILLIAM MOORE . I am a shoemaker . I have known the prisoner three or four years - I am a Chelsea Pensioner . On Tuesday, the 10th of July, I first saw the prisoner about seven o'clock in the morning, I was looking out of window, and he asked if I would give him any thing to drink; we went and drank together, and remained together till night - we went to several public-houses, the last public-house was the Black Boy, St. Catherine's. I went out and he followed me - I had been drinking freely, but knew what I was about, and what passed; he made a rush at me, took hold of my right-hand pocket and knocked me down, he struck me on the breast and thrust his hand in my pocket - I am sure he is the man; the blow knocked me down. He took a sovereign, two half-crowns, and three shillings, out of my pocket, and ran away. I had taken all my money out just before, to pay for my beer, and put it in again - I do not know whether he saw me or not; he was a gunsmith when I first knew him - I do not know where he lived. I got up and gave an alarm at the public-house, and next night I told Simmons, the patrol, and on the Monday following, I found him in custody at Lambeth-street; he said, he did not think I should go so far in it, and that he meant to have written to his uncle, to get 2 l. or 3 l. to make it up with me. It was my pension money - I received it on the 9th of July, 4 l. 7 s. 4 3/4 d. I am sure he is the man who robbed me.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not change a sovereign in the morning - A. Yes. I had another still left. I did not say I had only one.

JAMES SYMMONDS . I am a patrol. On Wednesday evening the prosecutor gave me information. I knew the prisoner, and looked out for him. On Sunday morning I took him, and on the Monday morning I heard him tell the prosecutor he did not think he would have gone so far with it, and he would have written to his uncle to get 2 l. or 3 l. to make it up. He said so directly he saw him.

Prisoner's Defence. On Tuesday evening I was sitting at the Black Boy, public-house, this man came and called for a pint of beer, and stopped there drinking till near one o'clock; then went home with a girl. I called him up in the morning, and went round to several public-houses till night. I left him in the house, and did not see him again.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 25.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

Reference Number: t18210718-43

951. JOHN MONTGOMERY was indicted for feloniously assaulting Mary Hart , widow , on the King's highway, on the 12th of June , at St. Marylebone , putting her in fear, and taking from her person, and against her will, two handkerchiefs, value 2 s., and two shillings, her property .

MARY HART . I am a pauper in Marylebone workhouse . On the 12th of June, between nine and ten o'clock at night, I went into the Red Lion, public-house, Kilburn. The prisoner sat there. I staid there about half an hour; then went out, and he followed me towards Paddington. He overtook me, and hustled me off the footpath - he seized me by the right shoulder, dragged me across the turnpike road, threw me down, and swore he would be my bl - dy butcher - he got his right hand across my throat and his left hand in my pocket, where I had 2 s. - he took them out, and took two handkerchiefs off my neck.

Q. He pushed you down - A. Yes, and knelt on me, and held me by the throat. A carriage came by, with a coachman and footman on it - he told them to take no notice of what I said, for I was a woman he had lived with. I never lived with him, nor ever saw him before that night. After the carriage was gone by, he said,

"Now I will be your bl - dy butcher." Two gentlemen came by, on horseback, while he was kneeling on me - he told them not to mind what I said, for I was a wh - re, and had lived with him above ten years. They both came, and one of them almost rode on him before he would get off me. A poor man came by, took me up, and led me to Paddington. The prisoner ran off, towards Kilburn, with the money and handkerchiefs. I saw him next morning; I went to the public-house to look after him, and there he sat with thirty more men - he was in custody. I knew him to be the man - I am sure of him. He took a handkerchief out of his hat and said

"Here is one of your handkerchiefs," and threw it at me. I have not found the other handkerchief.

Prisoner. Q. Did I not go out of the public-house with you - A. I came out, and had not got four yards before he came after me.

Q. Did not you give me leave to take liberties with you on the road - A. No; I am too old for that; I never consented to any thing.

Q. Did you not ask me to go home with you - A. No; I had no home. I am fifty-eight years old next September. When I was in the house he drew my pot off the table twice, and I told him not to meddle with my beer.

Q. Did not a tall man go by in a cart, John Earl , of Kilburn; and heard you insist on my going home with you - A. I am sure nobody but the two gentlemen, and the man who picked me up, and the carriage, passed. I had only left the workhouse at four o'clock that afternoon. He never attempted to take any liberties with me.

JOHN EDMUND WILSON . I was sent for to Kilburn, and took the prisoner in custody, on Wednesday, the 13th of June, at half-past nine o'clock, he was setting in the tap-room at Mr. Batty's, the Red Lion, public-house, at Kilburn. Batty said he had robbed a poor woman the evening before - he said he was very sorry for what he had had done, and that he was a d - d fool. He was very drunk when I took him. One handkerchief dropped from him in the room.

MARY HART . It was one of the handkerchiefs he took from me, and the one he threw to me.

Prisoner's Defence. He came in and took me. I said I had done nothing. I waited while they went to the prosecutrix, she said I was the man. I asked if he wanted me. If I am hung for it, I never had any thing of hers. She gave me leave to take liberties with her, and I wanted to take them.

J. E. WILSON re-examined. He did ask if I wanted him; I said Yes, and should immediately handcuff him. He said, I am d - d if I have them on till you give me more beer. He was drunk.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 28.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18210718-44

952. FREDERICK SIMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of June , 26 yards of Irish linen, value 42 s., the goods of Frederick King , in his dwelling-house .

JOHN LEGGATE . I am shopman to Mr. Frederick King , linen-draper , St. John-street, Smithfield . On Friday morning, the 15th of June, between seven and eight o'clock, I was at the private door, and saw the prisoner go in a direction from the shop door, between three and four yards from the door, walking at a middling pace, with something under his arm. I walked after him, and asked him if he wanted to see Mr. King - he said No, not particularly. I said if he had any thing to leave I would give it to him - he said No, not particularly, he was not at home. While I was talking to him I saw the corner of a piece of Irish cloth under his coat, and charged him with stealing it. He said nothing. I called Garland, and we took it from him, and gave him in charge. It measured twenty-six yards, and worth two guineas.

RICHARD GARLAND . Leggatt called me. I went and held the prisoner while he took the linen from him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I picked it up near the shop.

GUILTY . Aged 35.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only.

Confined Eleven Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

Reference Number: t18210718-45

253. ANN GROVES and ANN SCOTT were indicted for stealing, on the 8th of July , at Ealing , in the dwelling-house of Jonathan Stevens , one 5 l. and five 1 l. Bank notes, the property of Thomas Barnaby .

THOMAS BARNABY . I lodge at Mr. Steven's house, in the parish of Ealing. On the 6th of July I had 42 l. in a pocket-book, in my box, in my bed room. There was a 5 l. and five 1 l. notes, among it. On the 8th I missed the 5 l. and five 1 l. notes, the rest remained. Nobody but me slept in the room. The prisoner Groves, lived in the house, and Scott lived about thirty yards off. On the 11th of July, I had Groves taken before the Magistrate, she then confessed it. It was taken down in writing. I believe she had bad advisers.

CHARLES ATLEE . I am clerk of Ealing parish. I was present before the Magistrate, at the examination of Groves and saw her sign her confession, and the Magistrate also - it was voluntarily.

(Read.)

"The voluntary confession of Ann Groves , who saith, That on Saturday last she entered the bedroom of a Mr. Barnaby, of Ealing, and observing a box in the said room, she tried to open it, and upon turning the box round she observed a hole in the bottom, she took out of it five 1 l. and one 5 l. Bank of England notes; that immediately after taking the notes out of the box, she went to one Mary Ann Scott , of Ealing, and told her that she had got some money, and gave into her hands four pounds (this was on the Saturday morning), Mrs. Scott never enquired where she had got the money, and she left Mrs. Scott's house; that she went to Mrs. Scott, and asked her to go with her and buy her some things, and that they went together to Brentford, and purchased among other things, the following articles. - one bonnet, 9 s. 6 d.; one shawl, 4 s.; one pair of shoes, 4 s. 6 d.; one pair of cotton stocking's 2 s. 8 d.; three shifts, 6 s. 8 d.; and two petticoats, 3 s. 6 d., and Mrs. Scott gave her 2 s. 6 d. On the road to Brentford Mrs. Scott asked her where she got the money - she replied, out of Mr. Barnaby's box - Mrs. Scott said,

"How could you do it." That on the following Monday she again went to Mrs. Scott and then gave into her hands the 5 l. note, and asked her to take one of the notes, and she said she would; that Mr. Scott asked her where she got the notes, when she replied she got them from a Mr. Bowgin, that the conversation ended here, and she then left That on the Monday afternoon she again saw Mr. Scott, and enquired for the note, and Mrs. Scott answered she had pulled it to pieces, and thrown it into the fire.

" ANN GROVES ."

The prisoners made no defence.

GROVES - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 13.

Strongly Recommended to mercy.

SCOTT - NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18210718-46

954. JOHN BRUNSWICK SHEFFIELD was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of June , one book, value 5 s., the goods of Joseph Coxhead , and one book, value 6 s. , the goods of John Sturt .

RICHARD VALE . I am errand-boy to Mr. Joseph Coxhead , who is a bookseller , in High Holborn . On the 22d of June, the prisoner came, and looked at the books outside the window. I saw him take a book down, and put it up again. He then came on the top of the steps, and looked inside, then went back, and took the same book down. I do not think he saw me. He at first put it on

the top of some more books, then took it up and put it under his arm, came into the shop with it, and asked if my master was at home. I said No. He asked if he would be at home in half an hour. I said perhaps he might, and he then walked away, with the book under his arm. I went to the stairs, and called my young master, he turned down Holborn four or five doors. I called Stop thief! he turned round. My young master had got close to him - he came back to the shop, and was asked about the book. He put it down on the bottom of the window, with a bundle of his own on the top of it, and was going away, I caught hold of his arm he then wanted to go in doors, as he was going up the steps, he wrenched from me, and ran across the road. I pursued but lost him.

HENRY COXHEAD. Vale called me down. I went out, he had just turned round, and was standing where I got up to him. He asked if I had got the fellow volume, with the History of England, he kept walking backwards to the shop, and threw his bundle on the books, and a book under it, opened his bundle, and produced two or three other books, and was tying them up. I charged him with stealing a book, and he wanted to go into the shop; when he got on the steps he ran off - I followed, and caught him in a cutler's shop in Theobald's-road.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was looking at a book, saw a person pass whom I knew, went a few yards to speak to him, and they came after me.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Confined Six Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

Reference Number: t18210718-47

955. RICHARD FREEMANTLE was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of June , one bed, value 30 s.; one bolster, value 5 s.; two pillows, value 5 s.; two sheets, value 5 s., and one iron, value 1 s., the goods of William Hatton , in a lodging-room, let by contract, to the prisoner with the lodging aforesaid .

WILLIAM HATTON . I live in York-street . The prisoner and another man, took this lodging of me. Both were to pay for it, and occupied it together.

COURT. Then it is joint letting. This indictment will not do. NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

Reference Number: t18210718-48

956. JAMES MASON was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of July , 11 lbs. of horse-hair, value 14 s. , the goods of William Jay and James Jay .

JAMES JAY . I am in partnership with William Jay , of Broad-street, Golden-square . We are upholsterers . On the 6th of July, Cullen gave me information - I called the prisoner into the counting-house, and asked what he had been guilty of stealing horse-hair for - he said he took it to stuff his sister's child's chair, and it was his first offence - the hair was found in a sack.

MARY CULLEN . I am servant to Mr. Jay. On the 5th of July, at night, as I came in, I saw the prisoner put a sack in the shutter-box in the street. He said it was sacks - I told him it looked very suspicious; that it was very wrong, and might cause suspicion. He said

"I thank you, Mary; it will create suspicion, but I did not think of it." In about ten minutes I found the sack in the shop, and this hair in it. After he had shut up, he took it away; I followed, and made him bring it back. He begged me not to tell my master; but my mind was so hurt I told my master next morning. He went to work as usual, and was taken.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Confined Six Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18210718-49

957. RANDOLPH HOLLEWELL was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of June , one saddle, value 10 s.; one back-band and crupper, value 5 s.; one bridle, value 2 s.; one collar, value 2 s., and two pair of reins, value 4 s. , the goods of Ashton Smith .

ASHTON SMITH . I live in Jermyn-street. The prisoner was occasionally in my employ. On the 15th of June, about three o'clock in the afternoon, I missed this harness from my stable in Apple-tree-yard . I had seen it there the night before. It consisted of the articles stated in the indictment.

RICHARD MUMFIELD . On the 15th of June, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came to my stables, in Hern-yard, Wimpole-street, and left a saddle and collar. He called for them and took them away. I am sure he is the man.

JOHN MARTIN . Between two and three o'clock in the afternoon of the 16th of June. I saw the prisoner with a saddle and collar, coming up Hern-yard. I knew it to be the same I had put upon Mr. Lewis's horses. He is my master. He used to hire it of Smith.

CORNELIUS LOVEGROVE . I am a watchman. I took the prisoner on the night of the 20th of June, concealed in a stable in Hern-yard.

ASHTON SMITH re-examined. I got the harness from a shop in Great St. Andrew-street, Seven Dials. The prisoner told me, at Marlborough-street, about five days after the robbery, that he had stolen it, and that I should find it there.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I was in distress.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Three Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

Reference Number: t18210718-50

958. LOUISA BROWNING was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of June , four sheets, value 24 s.; two pillows, value 7 s.; one bolster, value 8 s.; one quilt, value 5 s.; two blankets, value 8 s.; one candlestick, value 1 s., and two flat irons, value 1 s., the goods of Martha Bunce , widow , in a lodging-room .

MARTHA BUNCE . I am a widow, and live in Earl-street, Manchester-square . I let the prisoner a room in April - these things were let with the room. I did not miss them till she was apprehended.

MARGARET PINSFORD . About three weeks ago I pawned a pillow, a candlestick, two irons, and a blanket, for the prisoner, at Mr. Hall's, in the name of Stewart. I gave her the duplicates. She gave them to me at her lodging.

Cross-examined. Q. How came you there - A. I used to work for her.

THOMAS CLEMENTS . I am an officer. I found the duplicates on the prisoner.

JOHN WHITTAKER . I am shopman to Mr. Hall, of High-street, Marylebone. I have two irons, a blanket, a pillow, and a candlestick, pawned in the name of Stewart.

WILLIAM COX . I live at Mr. Morritt's, a pawnbroker. Here are six of the duplicates found on her which belong to our shop. I have a bolster, a pillow, a quilt, and four sheets; I do not know who pawned them. I know the prisoner by sight.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

MARTHA BUNCE . They are all mine. She acknowledged pawning them, and begged me to stop a week for her to redeem them, but she did not, and I gave her in charge. I had some words with her about them.

Prisoner's Defence. She gave me the second pair of sheets to pawn to redeem the others. She insisted on my leaving the house. I wanted to stop till I had a remittance to redeem the goods.

MARTHA OWEN . After the prisoner was committed, I went to the prosecutrix, she said she did consent to her pawning one pair of sheets.

MARTHA BUNCE . I never agreed to let her pawn them, nor ever told Owen so.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Confined Six Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18210718-51

997. WILLIAM DAWSON was indicted for killing and slaying Dennis Butler .

JOHN HONE. I am a hair-dresser, and live in White Horse-alley, Cow-cross. On the 29th of June I was passing through a field between the light horse stables, Gray's-inn-lane , and Bagnigge Wells , and observed a lad - to the best of my knowledge it was the prisoner; he stood near the back gate of the livery-stables - he came from the livery-stables, presented a carbine across the fields, and discharged it in a straight direction - I stood very near him. He did not appear to be firing at any thing; he appeared firing across the field which has footpaths across it - he took from his pocket (apparently) a cartridge, and discharged the piece again; he appeared to put paper in; he attempted to discharge it, not in the same direction as before, but towards some palings about seventy yards from where he stood - the palings were different heights, none of them were higher than seven feet; I stood very near him; he said nothing; he had some children which he brought out from the place. The paling encloses Mr. Cubitt's premises - he is a builder. In a minute, or a minute and a half, there was a hue and cry, that a man had been shot on the other side of the paling. I went to the spot. In about half an hour I saw a man taken on a shutter. I went into the livery-stables, and saw them bringing a man by on a shutter, in a direction from Cubitt's yard. I stopped at the stables. The prisoner was about four yards from me in the field.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. The prisoner belonged to the light horse livery-stables - A. Yes; he came out merely in play and fired across the field, and afterwards fired towards the paling. I think he could not see whether any one was behind them - he was about 120 yards from where the man fell.

THOMAS EDGAR . I am a student of medicine. I was in the hollow of the field, between the gate of the stables and Bagnigge Wells, about 50 yards from the person who fired - I do not know who it was. When I got in a direct line between him and Bagnigge Wells, he fired, I turned round, and saw him fire the second time, as if he was firing at the paling - two or three people came running to me in about a moment, and asked who had fired the gun - I pointed in the direction he went - he had walked away into the stable-yard - they said a man had been shot; I went towards the place, but the wounded man was taken away. I observed the paling two or three days after, and noticed the marks of a ball having penetrated it, four or five feet from the ground.

Cross-examined. Q. The person who shot went quietly into the stable, not running away - A. No.

WILLIAM PENTON . I am servant to Mr. Cubitt, a builder. Between five and six o'clock in the evening, I was in the yard at this time, close to the man who fell. I should think there were twenty people there. I and the deceased were getting up bricks - the man fell down by my side, and knocked me down almost. I heard the report of a gun. He laid down on the ground; he was wounded in the hip-bone; he was in good health before; some blood came from him; I got assistance, and caught him in my arms; he bled very much. They took him on a shutter to the hospital. I did not see him after.

JURY. Q. Was the deceased in a stooping posture - A. Yes.

RICHARD TURNER . I am clerk to Mr. Cubitt. I saw the man picked up. His name was Dennis Butler - he had worked four years for Mr. Cubit; three or four were holding him. I went to the light horse livery-stables, and afterwards saw the prisoner in the custody of Read. I measured the ground from where the man fell - it was about 70 yards from the paling, and above 60 from there to the stable. We have generally from 25 to 30 men in the yard.

THOMAS FORD . I am a painter. I was working at the light horse livery-stables. I saw the prisoner there about six o'clock, with a carbine, and some children with him, playing; he fired the carbine once in my sight, outside the stables, between them and Bagnigge Wells; he then stood in a direction towards Bagnigge Wells, not towards Cubit's yard, but in a direction from the place. I went inside the gate, and heard the report of the piece again. The prisoner came into the gate, and appeared very unconcerned. Nobody then knew of any mischief being done. He had the carbine in his hand. In four or five minutes the people came running, and said a man was shot - the prisoner was not in my sight then. I am sure he is the boy who fired first. His father is head hostler to the stables - he assists his father, and bears a good character.

Cross-examined. Q. Some children were in his company - A. Yes.

ARCHIBALD MAXFIELD . I am surgeon of St. Bartholomew's hospital. On the 29th of June, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, the wounded man was brought in. He had a deep wound from a bullet, such as

would come from a carbine, in his hip; I could trace it eight inches into the abdomen. He certainly died of that wound; one of his intestines were wounded. He died in the hospital.

WILLIAM READ . I am an officer of Hatton-garden office. On the 29th of June, about half-past six o'clock, I took the prisoner, and charged him with shooting the carbine off, and killing a man with it. He said he was extremely sorry for it, but that he did not see any body when he fired. I think he could not see over the paling, He said he shot down the field first, with nothing in the carbine; but the second time put in a ball cartridge, but did not ram it down, and shot it at the paling, to see if he could hit them, but could see nobody behind them. He seemed very sorry, and gave me the carbine.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210718-52

960. WILLIAM CAIRD was indicted for stealing, on the 20th June , one box, value 3 s.; fifty-five shawls, value 53 l. 17 s.; eleven pieces of handkerchiefs, value 15 l. 10 s.; twelve pieces of muslin, value 7 l., and two shirts, value 5 s. , the goods of Jeremiah Greatorex , John Bradbury , and Benjamin Hardwick Seal .

MR. JEREMIAH GREATOREX . I am in partnership with John Bradbury and Benjamin Hardwick Seal , of King-street, Cheapside . On the 20th of June, about six o'clock in the evening, a box containing this property, was just delivered at our door from Glasgow. A person gave me information - I ran out up Cheapside, and in Bow-lane saw the prisoner with a box on his shoulder. I came up and seized him with it. I secured him - it was opened and contained the articles stated in the indictment. At the time I laid hold of him a person rushed against me, to knock me down, but I kept hold of him.

WILLIAM SMITH . I am a constable. The prisoner was given in my charge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I had left a friend in Lad-lane; a gentleman stopped me at the top of King-street, and asked if I would carry a box for a shilling; I said I could not, as I was going over the water. He said he wanted it taken there, and would fetch it. In about five minutes he brought it, helped it on my shoulder, and told me to cross into Bow-lane.

GUILTY . Aged 34.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210718-53

961. ANN MILES was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of June , three frocks, value 3 s.; three petticoats, value 3 s. 6 d.; four gowns, value 12 s. 6 d.; one iron, value 6 d.; two yards of muslin, value 2 s.; one necklace, value 1 s. 6 d.; one pair of boots, value 3 s. 6 d.; one shirt, value 4 s., and one scarf, value 6 s. , the goods of Isaac Benjamin .

JANE BENJAMIN . I am the wife of Isaac Benjamin ; we live in Stoney-lane, Gravel-lane, Houndsditch . The prisoner chared for me. I missed these things about five weeks after she was with me; as my child was ill I did not look for them before.

SARAH DAVIS . Mrs. Benjamin is my daughter. I lived with her while the child was ill. The prisoner came there to work - we missed a good many things soon after she left. Her husband gave me the duplicates.

WILLIAM BELCHER . I am servant to Mr. Price, a pawnbroker, who lives in Wentworth-street. I have two bed-gowns pawned by a girl. On the 15th of June, the prisoner pawned a piece of muslin, a necklace, a pair of boots, and a shirt.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

DAVID M'COMBIE. I took her in charge, and found fourteen duplicates on her. Mrs. Davis gave me eleven duplicates.

Prisoner's Defence. On Friday I asked her to lend me 2 s. She said she could not, but would lend me any thing to get money on. She lent me a scarf and frock, which I pawned, and gave her the duplicate.

MRS. BENJAMIN. I owed her nothing, and never gave her leave to pawn the things.

GUILTY . Aged 35.

Confined Three Months .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210718-54

962. FRANCIS HOLLAND was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of June , twenty-eight yards of printed cotton, value 30 s. , the goods of William Parnell Tyars .

WILLIAM WATSON TOOKE . I am servant to Mr. William Parnell Tyars , linen-draper , Minories . On the 16th of June, between eight and nine o'clock in the evening, the print hung inside the door; I heard some one snatch it; I ran out, and saw it in the prisoner's possession - I followed, crying Stop thief! He threw it down, and was immediately stopped.

WALTER STONE . The prisoner was given in my charge. I saw Tooke stop him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210718-55

963. MARY DWYER was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of June , 1 1/4 yard of satin, value 5 s. , the goods of David Simpson .

SOPHIA STONE . I am servant to Mr. David Simpson , haberdasher of Bishopsgate-street . On the 23d of June, about four o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner came to the shop, with a child in her arms, and asked the price of some sewing cotton, to sell again. I went to the end of the shop to know the price - several pieces of satin laid on the counter, near where she stood. I returned and told her the price, she gave no answer, but walked out. I missed nothing till the officer brought her back with it, it had our private mark on it - she had asked for none - she begged forgiveness.

ROBERT HESKETH. I stopped the prisoner in Great St. Helens. I had followed her from Mr. Simpson's door, and stopped her in the passage of a public-house, lifted up her shawl and found the satin, and asked where she got it, she said a person in the street gave it to her to sell for her.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I am in great distress, my husband has left me.

GUILTY . Aged 32.

Confined One Year .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210718-56

964. MARY NEAL was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of July , four yards of printed cotton, value 5 s. , the goods of David Farrant .

JAMES BLAKEY . I am servant to David Farrant , linen-draper of Fleet-market . This print hung at the door. I was standing on purpose to watch outside the door, and saw the prisoner walk to the door with another woman, they came up and looked at the print, she took it down and put it under her arm. I pursued her up Stonecutter-street, and overtook her, and was bringing her back, when the woman who was with her, struck me and she got off. I secured the woman and gave her to Lewis - the prisoner was taken last Friday.

SAMUEL LEWIS . I took the prisoner into custody last Friday.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined Three Months .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210718-57

FIFTH DAY, TUESDAY, JULY 24.

965. EDWARD JENNINGS was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of July , from the person of Samuel Moseley , four 1 l. Bank notes, his property .

SAMUEL MOSELEY . I live at Sheppards Park, Yorkshire. I was at the Jolley Hostlers, public-house, Hillingdon , the 2d of July. I had a pocket-book in my left inside pocket, and four 1 l. notes in it; the prisoner sat on my left-hand side next to me, dressed as a soldier . I missed my pocketbook half an hour after he left. I saw him before the Magistrate next day at Uxbridge - it has never been found; as he sat by me I felt him near me, touching my pocket-book, and I gave him more room.

GEORGE GARDNER . I was a soldier at that time, and know the prisoner; he was in the public-house, and sat on the left, next to Mr. Moseley - I saw nothing done. I was in the back parlour, came out and said, eyes right, the prisoner said,

"Yes, I do keep eyes right, I am waiting for a chance, and shall have it presently" - I did not know what he meant. I returned to the parlour, there might be about a dozen people in the room, but nobody so near the prosecutor as the prisoner. When I came out of the room again, he was gone, and about half an hour after the pocket-book was missed - several people were then gone besides the prisoner. I then told what I had heard, he was taken that night, he was quartered at the Castle public-house; he said he was willing to be stripped and searched.

JOHN KIDD . I was serjeant of the Militia, and was quartered at the Jolly Hostlers, public-house. I saw the prisoner sitting on the left of Mr. Moseley - I was in the parlour after that, and went out about a quarter before eight o'clock, and saw the prosecutor sitting there, and the prisoner by him; there might be ten or twelve people in the house. I remained in the room five or six minutes, then left the house, and told Moseley to take care of his property, and give it to the landlord, as he was in bad company - he felt, and found his pocket-book safe then.

MR. MOSELEY. When I got up, my pocket-book was gone, the bottom of my pocket was cut out. The militia were being trained.

Prisoner's Defence. I was with two comrades at the time the property was lost. I offered to go any where with them, knowing myself innocent.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210718-58

966. JAMES M'CARTHY , RICHARD ROWBOTTOM , WILLIAM HARDY , THOMAS LEE , and JAMES JONES were indicted for the wilful murder of William Cogle .

MESSRS. ALLEY and ANDREWS conducted the prosecution.

MARY COGLE . On the 18th of June , between seven and eight o'clock in the afternoon, I and my husband were sitting by the window in my parlour, he was reading the Death of Abel to me; my boy came in doors, and said there was such a row in the street, and should he shut the door. I said "Do," and he did so; I put the window down and looked through the glass, and saw some soldiers beating a man, there were ten or twelve soldiers, our passage door was shut. The man they were beating under the window happened to be one of my lodgers, whom I did not know. I saw this man bend his back (he was very tall) and turn in at the door; the soldiers all followed the poor man in, and my husband and I got up, and the first thing they did was to knock me down. I was so stunned, that I saw no more till I saw my husband laying down on the floor with his hands stretched out, he was bleeding from his head - he could not say a word. I went for a doctor, he was taken away to the hospital. I was with him when he died - he died in four days. The hospital is in St. Margaret's parish, and my house is No. 65, Orchard-street, Westminster . He was not able to speak to me at any time after - he was fifty-two years old.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. What lodgers had you in your house - A. I cannot say. I take in poor people - match makers and that sort. I had seven or eight lodgers; the man they beat had lived two years with us, backward and forward - he is now absent: he was one of Mr. Saunders's shewmen. One of the lodgers had opened the door to see what was the matter.

Q. You was knocked down by the rush of the door against you - A. No; my room door always stands open. I was knocked down in the parlour, with my head against the fire-place. My husband was in another room, facing the parlour, on the other side of the passage - we call that the kitchen, or travellers' room, where the nightly lodgers go. There are three wooden steps which lead up to the street door.

ANN HINTON . On the 18th of June I lived at No. 60, Orchard-street - it was Waterloo day; I believe it was on a Monday. I saw a quantity of people going down to the Almonry, about seven o'clock in the evening, I cannot say how many, but there was a great quantity. I knew none of them. Some had red jackets on and some white; there was a drummer in full regimentals - it was the prisoner M'Carthy; I was looking out of my window, they were

in the Almonry, running all manner of ways. I saw the soldier s come up towards Orchard-street, and then saw Patterson come out of Cogle's, terribly ill-used, and run to the top of Orchard-street, he then came back again, and ran down the Broadway, by the watch-house - he was still being beat - he was then up against the wall, and several soldiers beating him. I saw M'Carthy hit him several times with a sword; I went with him to the hospital. I got between the soldiers, and got him from them. While they were beating him, the drummer, said

"This is the way we did at Waterloo." I did not see what happened at Cogle's.

GEORGE WELLS . I am a private in the 18th regiment of Hussars. On the 18th of June, about half-past seven o'clock in the evening, I was in Dean-street, above fifty people were collected (inhabitants and soldiers together). I could not observe what they were about till they got into the Almonry. I saw the soldiers and the inhabitants quarrelling and fighting together. Some of the inhabitants, met the soldiers on the top of the New-way, a great disturbance took place between them at the time they were moving towards Orchard-street, which is between the top of the New-way and St. Ann's-lane.

Q. Would they have to pass Cagle's house from the New-way to St. Ann's-lane - A. Yes; I went as far as the top of Orchard-street, and stopped just by the public-house there, three or four doors from Cogle's house, but not in sight of it, and saw several of the Queen-square police officers bringing some soldiers back - they were very much cut about the head - they brought them down to the watch-house, and remained there some little time. and then there was another riot between the soldiers and inhabitants, and some of the soldiers were put in the watch-house, they then dispersed, in different directions, peaceably, and I went to my quarters. About half an hour after the people were in a bustle in the street. My quarters are the Hoop and Grapes, Queen-square. I stopped in the Broadway, and remained there during the evening. I saw no more.

Q. From the first of what you saw, until the officers taking the men into custody, did you see any one you knew - A. I saw M'Carthy among the rest, he was in his full dress, with his side-arms hanging by his side, and he had his sword across his two thighs, sheathed - it hung in his belt in the scabbard.

Q. Was M'Carthy in the midst of them, or how - A. He was in different parts with the soldiers; I did not see that he was more officious than any of the others. When I saw him last he came out of Tothill-street, down through the Almonry; there was a number of soldiers and inhabitants with him - he was going in front, and I suppose a hundred soldiers and inhabitants following him. I believe none of the soldiers had side-arms. I saw two or three of the mob with sticks, one with a brown stick, another with a piece of paling; they were carrying them in their hands, going through the mob together.

Q. Were they in the hands of the soldiers, or the inhabitants - A. Both; but the inhabitants dispersed as quick as they could when the riot began again. Sometimes the inhabitants followed the soldiers, and sometimes the soldiers followed the inhabitants. I saw one man struck by a soldier, but I do not know who the soldier was.

Q. Did you see either of the five prisoners in the course of that evening, while the disturbance was going on - A. I saw M'Carthy; I do not recollect any of the others. He was in full dress, with the soldiers - sometimes with the mob, and sometimes not. I heard him speak in Tothill-street, when he was walking in front of the mob, but what he said I could not tell - he appeared to me to be rather intoxicated. He was walking on, with his sword across his thigh. I saw one inhabitant struck by a soldier, on his head, in the New-way - I do not know his name. I do not think I should know the soldier again, he was so disfigured and bloody.

Cross-examined by Mr. BROADRICK. Q. How long do you suppose all this occupied - A. About two hours; a great deal of it was after some of the soldiers were put in the watch-house.

Q.M'Carthy held his sword in his hand sheathed, was it not the best posture he could put it in to prevent any one snatching it from the sheath - A. I should think so.

MARIA TIMBRELL . On the 18th of June, I lived in Orchard-street; Cogle lived at No. 62, in the same street, on the same side of the way; about eight in the evening I was at my door, I heard a noise and went into the middle of the road, and saw a mob of soldiers come up the New-way towards Cogle's, there were eight or nine of them, they were running up the New-way - a man named Rowbottom, in a white jacket, was the first that entered Cogle's house, he had a piece of paling in his hand, that is the man, (pointing him out) I am positive - the others all followed into Cogle's house - I went on the step of my door to move some things which I had there, and went into the middle of the road - in five or ten minutes, in view of Cogle's house, a few people had then collected about the house, some of them were soldiers - I then saw Rowbottom come out of Cogle's house with a piece of paling in his hand - there was a poor man running along the street, and Rowbottom ran after him; the rest of the soldiers came out of Cogle's - I cannot say that I took such notice of any one so much as Rowbottom, because he had a black eye - I know M'Carthy, I saw him standing on the step of Cogle's door, with one foot on the step; this was before Rowbottom came out, he stood on the step with a sword drawn in his hand, waving it backwards and forwards over his head - I do not know what became of him.

Q. When did you see him standing on the step of the door after you removed your things or before - A. Before, and afterwards the soldiers had entered the house, when I returned, he was gone - I saw no more of him.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. You were absent five or ten minutes from when you saw the soldiers enter till you returned - A. Yes.

RICHARD WEBB . I live at No. 12, Orchard-street. Between seven and eight o'clock, I was at home and heard a noise, I went to the corner of the New-way, and saw the soldiers running up New-way - eighteen or twenty of them - they came up into Orchard-street; they had sticks and pieces of wood in their hands - a great number of people stood there, and when the soldiers came up, they all gave way - I returned and went to Cogle's house, and there

they knocked a man down at Cogle's door - I cannot say which was the man who did it - the man got up and was knocked down again; they all rushed into Cogle's house after the man, and then a man in drummer's clothes came up and ran in also - I had seen the drummer coming up the New-way, with the others behind; he entered Cogle's house, he made a stand at the door with a sword in his hand, across his thigh, and then went into the house; it was drawn; a man ran out, and the soldiers after him, and then the drummer came out and stood for a moment, and after looking to his right and then to his left, went after the soldiers who were beating the man - he had his sword drawn in his hand, and ran up the street after the others - I remained at the door; I saw him return afterwards.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. What are you - A. A butcher; my shop is not far from Cogle's and on the opposite side - I think I saw Timbrell at her door - there was a considerable number of persons collected at the top of New-way, the people were all as quiet as possible.

Q. No fighting or expressions against the soldiers - A. Not the least; they were blaming the soldiers among themselves for the manner they acted - I was in the middle of the people at the top of New-way, none of them had any thing in their hands - a young man ran into my shop with something in his hand, he was not a soldier - I was not in my shop half a minute before the soldiers came down Orchard-street - when the soldiers came up we all gave way; the man that was knocked down got up and ran into Cogle's, (I believe he lodged there), and the soldiers followed him - M'Carthy just made a stand at the door, when he came out, but when he went up, he went straight in - I did not see him move his sword over his head, I saw it across his thighs, and he went straight in.

SUSAN PERRING . I live in Orchard-street, just opposite Cogle's; I heard a noise in the Almonry, about five o'clock, it lasted till about eight - I was looking out of my one pair of stairs window at a quarter before eight o'clock, and saw the soldiers enter from the corner of New-way, (which is three doors off) into the street with great fury, with sticks and pieces of paling - I saw a drummer with a sword at Mrs. Cogle's door, but I lost sight of him by the others coming up and beating one of Cogle's lodgers - I saw the soldier go in and come out.

Q. Where was the drummer when you last saw him. - A. On the step of the door - I did not have him in sight a moment, he had a sword drawn in his hand, and was holding it over his head, some of the soldiers ran in and a great many ran another way, that is all I know - I saw all the prisoners there, I know them by their looking up at me while they were in action - the left side of Rowbottom's face was very much beat; I saw them all five before my house, and saw them next morning in custody, and did not know them there exactly in the flurry, but when I went before the jury, I knew them better.

Cross-examined by MR. BROADRICK. Q. Besides the soldiers, did you not see a great many loose characters with shovels, pickaxes and different instruments - A. Yes; they went down into the Almonry, but I did not know what they were at; it was about the same time as I saw the soldiers.

Q. Did you not see Cogle at his door - A. No; I heard him reading the death of Abel, as he read loud - there was very great confusion; every one was obliged to close their houses.

SAMUEL ASHTON . I lived in the same house with Cogle. I was in Orchard-street about eight o'clock, and saw the soldiers coming down the New-way, towards Orchard-street, with sticks and staves in their hands - the people were running before them, and they were running in a brutish manner; I made my way from Cogle's, to get home, and when I got there, some of them had got up to Cogle's house before I got there; a man in a drummer's dress stood in the centre of the lobby, over against the door leading to the kitchen, inside the passage. I went forward, he made a cut at me, but missed me, and cut Mr. Cogle on the side of the head, Cogle fell down by the side of the drawers. I went through the kitchen door into the yard, I got over a railing and got away. I do not know what became of the drummer, I left the door open when I ran in. M'Carthy must have entered before me. I cannot say how many went in before me, nor do I know whether any one but M'Carthy entered before me. I cannot swear to them - I do not know who the drummer was.

Q. You have been mentioning M'Carthy by name, why did you call him so - A. I heard people calling him M'Carthy. I should not know him again, they called the drummer M'Carthy - I cannot point him out.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You saw nobody there at the time - A. As they ran down Orchard-street, they called the drummer M'Carthy, but I do not know that he is the man who struck at me. I was in the Coldstream Guards two years ago. I was in custody on a charge of desertion.

THOMAS CHAPMAN . I am a private in the West Midlesex Militia, and lived at the deceased's house. I was standing at the door between seven and eight in the evening, and saw a great mob come up the street out of the New-way. I observed Rowbottom and M'Carthy among them - I am sure of them, they were about the centre of the mob; they came down towards where I stood. When they came to the door, I heard some of the soldiers, whom I do not know, say,

"These are the very ****, we will let them know this is Waterloo day."

Q. Recollect yourself, did you hear any thing else said - A. No, not to my knowledge. I know M'Carthy and Rowbottom by sight, but was never acquainted with them. I believe Rowbottom said something, but I forget what it was. I saw Rowbottom enter the house, he had a piece of railing with two sharp edges to it, and I believe, one or two followed him. M'Carthy was in his drummers dress, and had a sword - most of the soldiers had sticks. M'Carthy followed into the house with his sword drawn. The kitchen is on the right, and the parlour on the left. I saw Ashton standing in the kitchen, near the door, and saw M'Carthy cut right over his shoulder with his sword, it missed him and cut Cogle on the head. Ashton got out of the way, but M'Carthy made a second blow at the deceased, but whether that blow struck him I cannot say. The first cut produced blood, and as he was falling, M'Carthy struck at him a second time. The soldiers kept rushing in, and I made the best of my way up stairs, and fainted away on the bed. I was cut on the head, and was

ten days under the doctor's hands. I produce the hat I had on - it is cut.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Did you state to the Magistrate all you have now said - A. No, I was not asked to state it. I had been out of Cogle's three or four minutes when the crowd came towards there. I saw none of the disturbance before they came up. I did not state about M'Carthy before the Magistrate, because he was not brought up. I did not mention about Cogle being wounded. I was ordered to attend in the evening, and M'Carthy was not then taken, so I went away. Rowbottom had a black eye and some scratches - he was not much bruised.

MR. ALLEY. Q. When you were examined, was the man dead - A. No, I was obliged to go to Uxbridge with the Militia for twenty-one days, or I should have been taken for a deserter, so I could not attend the next examination. I attended at Queen-square when I returned, but was not examined.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Cogle was dead when you returned - A. Yes.

ELIZA IRVING . I am the wife of John Irving , we live in Orchard-street, on the same side as Cogle. I first saw them coming into the street about twenty minutes before eight o'clock; there was a great many persons indeed, they came with sticks in their hands, beating a man up the narrow part of the street - I did not observe any of their faces, the man they were beating, ran across towards Cogle's; he went up the steps, and the soldiers followed him. I saw him go into the house, three soldiers followed him up the steps, and went in - I went away. I do not know how many more went in - I did not know them. I was in Well's the butcher's shop. I returned to Cogle's in about three minutes - I know none of them but M'Carthy, I have known him many years, but do not know him to be one. I saw a drummer, but did not know it was him, I was so agitated.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. How many persons named M'Carthy do you know in the regiment - A. Two, they are not both drummers.

JAMES JENKINS . I live in St. Ann's-lane, some distance from the Almonry. I lived at the deceased's house twenty-two months. Between seven and eight o'clock in the evening I was standing looking at the soldiers fighting down the Almonry; they came out of the Almonry right up the New-way, into Orchard-street. I told Mrs. Cogle she had better shut her door - it was not shut; I had hardly spoke the words to her, before several soldiers came up; I saw Thomas Lee then, they followed a man into Cogle's house, and beat him about the head, and Lee had a stone in his hand, which he held up to heave at me - I said,

"My dear fellow, don't knock my brains out as you are knocking the rest out;" he then dropped the stone out of his hand. Mrs. Cogle said,

"My dear men, there's nobody want's to hurt you in this house;" Thomas Lee shoved her down and said,

"You d - d infernal old ****, what do you know about it," and pushed her down with both his hands; a man about five feet eight or nine inches high stood there, in the centre of the passage, beating a man over the head; the deceased stood there, with his hands extended up, he never spoke a word to any person whatever; the tall man, after beating the man, whipped his hands round from that man, and struck the deceased, and down he fell; he had a white jacket on, with a blue cape and blue cuffs, and had a stave in his hand. I will not say whether it was the stave of a cask, or part of a fence.

Q. Was Cogle in the kitchen while he was being struck - A. He stood against the kitchen door; they were beating Patterson on the arm, it so stunned him, he ran up and down stairs, and into the street. I escaped also, and saw nothing further pass in the house; I jumped over a fence, and over two walls into another street, and saw Cooper take a man.

Cross-examined by MR. BROADRICK. Q. How long had you been in the streets - A. Not long, three quarters of an hour, I went from my lodging in St. Ann's-street.

Q. Have you drank much to day - A. Not much, about a pint and a half pint of porter, nothing else. I had not a light long coat on, I was dressed as I am now. I had nothing in my hand. I had come out to walk in the Park, came down Queen-street, up Tothill-street, and saw three or four soldiers fighting, I then went into Orchard-street - I was not in the Almonry. I got into Orchard-street, about half-past seven or eight o'clock, and was there about ten minutes. I saw a crowd down in the Almonry, and soldiers fighting there - I was not nearer than seventy fathoms to them.

Q. You are sure Cogle was knocked down by a stave or stick - A. That I cannot say, for he fell almost at the same instant as his wife - there was nine or ten people in the house, and five in the passage.

Q. What is your way of life - A. I am a porter in the Haymarket - I have been a British seaman.

Q. You said you saw Cogle knocked down with a piece of wood - A. I did not see it.

MARY ASHTON . I live in the front parlour of Cogle's house, and remember the party of soldiers coming there; some of them were inside the door before I came out of my room. Mr. Cogle came into my room on the right side of the kitchen where I was, the soldiers were in the room, and he came in after them, to ask what was the matter - I do not know how many there were. Cogle asked what was the matter, but a man in drummer's clothes, with his sword backhanded, in his hand, he knocked me backwards in drawing it - I fell, and he hit Mr. Cogle on the head with the sword, and he fell with the blow, but I cannot tell on what part of the head he hit him - I was not sensible from the blow I received. On recovering, I found Cogle still in the room, and a surgeon dressing his head - the soldiers were all gone, I do not know any of them. Cogle was wounded across his head - I do not know whether the sword was sheathed before he drew it.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. In what room did this happen - A. In the front room, what they call the travellers' room, not in the passage, I saw no one there but the soldiers.

MR. ANDREWS. Q. Is the passage long - A. Yes, I cannot say whether there was any interval between the alarm and the soldiers coming. After I fell I could see nobody.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Had Cogle's head been cut or hurt before - A. Not that I know, he did not appear hurt before. The moment he asked what was the matter, he was struck.

JOSEPH COOPER. I am an officer of Queen-square. I was sent for, and got to the spot soon after eight o'clock, I went near the deceased's house, through the Almonry, up the New-way into Orchard-street, and saw a number of soldiers running; some of them took their way towards St. Ann's-street - Pople and I were at this time first of our party - there was a cry of

"Some of them have run up St. Ann's-street," we hastened there, and the first thing we saw, was the prisoner Hardy standing over a man in the road, striking him; I was at the deceased's house after he received the wounds - I was going to take Hardy, when Jones was given into my custody.

MR. FREDERICK JOHN STEVENS . I am a surgeon in the Westminster Infirmary; the deceased was brought there on Monday, the 18th, between eight and nine o'clock at night - I examined his head, he had a wound over the right eyebrow, about two inches and a half in breadth, from the parts separating - I found the scull fractured, the broken pieces of bone pressed on the brain; he died on the following Friday; the fracture of the scull was the cause of his death.

Cross-examined by MR. BROADRICK. Q. Could you say what had caused the cut - A. I cannot say; any sharp-edged instrument might have done it, a sword would do it.

MR. ANTHONY WHITE . I am one of the surgeons attending Westminster Hospital. I saw the deceased on the 20th of June, in the morning, he was then alive, but died on the Friday following - the fracture certainly caused his death.

The prisoners severally put in exceeding long written defences, denying having entered Cogle's house, and stating the particulars as deposed to in the following evidence in their behalf -

MEREDITH DOLBIN. I am a private in the second battalion of Grenadier Guards. On the 18th of June, about seven in the evening, I was in company with Rowbottom, at the Marquis of Granby public-house; as we were going away towards Tothill-street, we saw some boys playing at marbles - about twenty or thirty people were looking on. Rowbottom was tipsy, he went through the ring of marbles, and happened to kick one of them - one of them called after him,

"What did you kick my marbles for? you b - y lobster, or s - d" - I do not know which, I was three or four yards before Rowbottom - one of the men struck him, I turned back to try to get him away - a man said,

"Do you call yourself a man?" I said,

"Yes;" he struck me on my face directly - I fought him in my own defence, and there was four or five on me at once; they got me down, the man who struck me was in front, and the others behind and on my side - they struck me, and knocked me down four or five times - I fainted away, and do not know what became of me - I was struck by fists, and kicked on my forehead, when I was down; the mark is left now - I do not know what became of Rowbottom, somebody took me away to wash myself.

SARAH TAYLOR . My husband is a labourer, and lives in Jeffery's-buildings, near the Almonry. On the evening of the 18th of June, I was at home, and could see into the Almonry, some persons were there playing at marbles, and ten or twelve others looking at them - I saw two soldiers coming from the bottom of the Almonry, from the Marquis of Granby public-house - I know one of them, it was Rowbottom - I saw him kick the marbles accidentally, and immediately a young man, named Jem Cummings said

"You b - dy lobster, what did you kick them for?" he gave some answer to Cummings, I do not know what it was; Cummings rose off his knee, and struck the soldier violently on the mouth, the soldier tried to strike him again, but was so much in liquor, that he could not, every time he offered to strike him, he fell - a great many people were collected, which caused a confusion, and some of the girls of the Almonry carried the soldier away; he bled very much, and went to the pump to wash himself, as many as thirty persons came up, he was stopping washing his face - Cummings struck him violently on the head, the people said they would murder the b - s; several struck him violently - some kicked him with their feet, and some struck him with their fists - he was knocked into a cellar, I and my nephew dragged him out and took him into my parlour, we found him very much bruised and bleeding; he was in liquor - after being some time with me, he went away - Cumming's friends live in the neighbourhood now, but I have not seen him since that day.

Q. Do you know what made Rowbottom go from your house - A. A crowd of people ran by crying murder, and saying, a man was murdered in Orchard-street; he threw up the window, and out he jumped - I never saw him before that day, he is the man who was in my house - I washed the blood from his face, and saw him for an hour and twenty minutes, and can swear he is the man; he was treated in a very brutal manner, and would have lost his life if I had not interfered.

MR. ALLEY. Q. What way of life are you in - A. I wash and iron; I am married, I did not know the deceased - Rowbottom was at my house from seven o'clock till twenty minutes past eight - I can see the Almonry from my lodging - I have no clock or watch, but my neighbour Davis, has a clock.

Q. Did you go into his house to see the time - A. Yes; because Rowbottom said he was for guard; he jumped out of the window immediately as I told him what o'clock it was, he had asked me the time - he jumped out on hearing the cries of the people - several people were in the room, none of them had watches but Mrs. Davis, and she lives down stairs.

Q. How nigh is your window from the ground - A. It is the ground floor, I had fastened the door that he should not go out to the mob - when I first saw him, he was so drunk he could not return a blow; he was an hour and twenty minutes at my house - I did not attend before the Magistrate, I did not know when the examination took place.

MR. BROADRICK. Q. Did you give him any tea - A. Two cups; he had recovered a great deal with that, and being washed - he was unknown to me before.

THOMAS STEVENS . I am a corporal in the Coldstream Guards. On the evening of the 18th of June, I came by the Almonry about seven o'clock, heard a disturbance there, and saw a soldier with his jacket off, and about twenty more soldiers, and about a hundred persons altogether - I did not know the soldier with his jacket off - Serjeant Child was with me; we dispersed the mob as well as we could - the prisoner, Jones, took the soldier, who

was without a jacket, away; the mob ran, and the soldiers dispersed.

MR. ANDREWS. Q. What is the latest time you saw Jones - A. About half-past seven o'clock.

WILLIAM CHILDS . I am a serjeant in the Coldstream Guards. On the evening of the 18th of June, I was in company with Thomas Stevens ; we came down New Tothill-street - a woman came out and said

"There is a row with some of your men." We went into the Almonry and saw two men, one was in a soldier's dress with his jacket in his hand - I suppose there might be twenty or thirty soldiers together; I was pressing the soldier to put his jacket on and go home - I was followed by the prisoner Jones and another man; Jones assisted me in dispersing the soldiers, he was sober.

SAMUEL CHURCH . I am a corporal in the Coldstream Guards. I was in Tothill-street, on the 18th of June, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, and saw a number of people running towards the Almonry, mostly inhabitants (upwards of a hundred, I dare say), when I got into the Almonry, they had sticks and different weapons; some appeared long walking sticks - they stood in the mob, I saw a soldier down on the stones, and two or three kicking him - I saw the drummer standing in the Almonry; these two were the only soldiers I saw there - I went to the serjeant-major.

MR. ANDREWS. Q. What drummer did you see - A. I do not know his name, but know by his regimentals, that he belonged to the first regiment.

GEORGE WHITE . I am a private in the second battalion of Coldstream Guards. On the evening of Waterloo day, I went through Wright's passage into the Almonry, and saw Dolben and Rowbottom, and several inhabitants fighting; several people were on each of them, perhaps four, five or six on each - another soldier came up and got fighting with another man, the soldier got rather the best of it, and a great many of the inhabitants who stood there said, what a shame it was, and d - n their eyes, the bl - dy lobsters, they would kill them if they did not leave the Almonry; several of them struck the soldiers with their fists, and then more fell on; they said they would go and get some sticks and kill them - they went away and came again in a few minutes with sticks and stones, some of them were broomsticks, some faggots, and some thicker - there were very few soldiers there, I think about five or six; they cut in among the soldiers as hard as they could with these sticks - some of the soldiers ran through Wright's passage, I went out before them; the last two or three that came out, came into Tothill-street; their heads were cut - when the passage was clear, they returned into the Almonry, and the inhabitants threw some sticks out of window to them.

Q. I suppose some inhabitants are friendly to the soldiers, and some not - A. Yes; the mob then ran away, and the soldiers after them, up the Narrow Way, they turned to the left and I to the right - I saw M'Carthy go down Wright's passage with his sword by his side; some soldier, who had received a blow in the eye, came running across to him and wanted to draw the sword out of its sheath, he would not let him have it; he pulled it to himself, and said he should not have it - he drew it out of the sheath and kept it in his hand, saying, that would not do, and he should not have it - the man went away, and M'Carthy sheathed his sword again - I afterwards saw a great many soldiers running up the New-way, and M'Carthy was behind them, running towards the crowd of soldiers; the other people were before him - I suppose the soldiers were running after the chaps who had been kicking up the row - I did not see M'Carthy strike any one or interfere; he was behind the rest of his comrades - I went home and saw no more.

MR. ALLEY. Q. At first Rowbottom and another soldier were fighting with some more people - A. Yes; five or six people at each of them; I suppose he gave as many blows as he could, he did his best - I do not know whether he was drunk.

Q. What time was this - A. Between seven and nine o'clock, it was nearer eight than seven when it began I think.

Q. He could not have been at Mrs. Taylor's from seven o'clock to twenty minutes past eight - A. I do not know the time exactly; I do not carry a watch, and had no occasion to notice the time, I only guess at it.

JAMES FLINN . I live in Peter-street. I have been a soldier, but am discharged. I am a pensioner in the Coldstream Guards. On the 18th of June, about half-past seven o'clock, I was in the Almonry; I observed a quantity of people scattered about there; I saw no soldiers among them. In five minutes time a set of men collected themselves together in a body, with sticks and staves; I heard one man say

"Here goes one, go it!" I looked round and saw the whole mob rush up Jeffrey's-buildings. I pushed on to see what they were at, and saw a soldier knocked down; he was doing nothing; when he was down they beat him with their sticks; they then returned by me and saw another soldier, and knocked him down, and beat him with their sticks; he did nothing, he was only looking on, the same as me; they left him, and ran across the Almonry, and there caught another soldier coming across from Wright's passage, and beat him likewise. He had given them no provocation. A party of soldiers hearing the noise were making into the Almonry, and were met in Wright's passage by the mob, and there they had a severe attack. I suppose there were three or four soldiers. More soldiers came from Dean-street - they had nothing in their hands; the mob had sticks and staves. There was a skirmish between them right through the Almonry - a great mob collected: there was double the number more than the soldiers. I saw the officers come into the Almonry to disperse them. They were fighting at that time. I considered the soldiers in great danger of their lives.

MR. ALLEY. Q.Were you at the deceased's house - A. No; I saw nothing that passed there.

WILLIAM ABRAHAMS . I am in the second battalion of the third regiment of Guards. On the 18th of June, from six till past eight o'clock, I was in the Almonry, and saw a great crowd of persons collected, soldiers and inhabitants, fighting together - the soldiers were without arms and the inhabitants without sticks, at first; I afterwards saw them with sticks, like the backs of chairs. I saw a man come out of a house with a stick, which he took up in both his hands, and knocked one of the men down. A person named Andrews hit a soldier over the left eye. I saw a great many soldiers knocked down - I cannot mention their names. The soldiers ran out by Wright's passage,

and were followed by eighteen or twenty men with large sticks. I knew three of the men very well. It was Andrews, Wells, and Cummings - the soldiers remained out for a minute or two, I thought them in great danger; eight or ten of them laid down in the place at a time.

MR. ALLEY. Q. Were you at the deceased's house - A. No; I saw nothing that passed there.

CHARLES BAILEY . I belong to the third regiment of Guards. I was going home, and heard an alarm in the Almonry, of

"They will kill the soldiers." I went down Wright's-passage to see what was the matter, and as soon as I got down, I got knocked down by a man in a short velvet jacket. There was a great crowd, fighting one among another with sticks. The soldiers went in among them, and the inhabitants knocked them down as fast as they came among them. The soldiers had no sticks. Some women were in the mob, with sticks; a woman pushed me in the passage. There were about six soldiers, or more, there. I saw a drummer in Tothill-street, and in the Almonry afterwards, but did not know who he was, or whether he was the same that I saw in Tothill-street. I went home, returned in half an hour, and saw them putting the soldiers in the watch-house.

Q. Were you hit with any thing else - A. Yes; as soon as I got up, a stone hit me in the back, and knocked me down again, and while down I was hit several times over the arm with a stick, and sadly hurt, for a week or longer. I did nothing to any of them.

HENRY ILLINGWORTH . I am a recruit of the third regiment of Guards. I have been in London three months, and was in Tothill-street on the 18th of June. I heard a great noise of the mob calling after the soldiers, and using them very bad, and throwing great stones at them; they struck them with sticks, and knocked them down - they struck me once. I went back to the recruit-house, returned about seven o'clock into Tothill-street, through a passage out of the Almonry, and into the Marquis of Granby, public-house; and as I returned from there, they were running after soldiers up the Almonry, with great sticks. The mob was much greater than the soldiers. I considered the soldiers in great danger - I saw Bailey knocked down. I know some of those who threw stones.

ELIZA HOLLOWAY . On the 18th of June, about a quarter before eight o'clock, I was with my husband in the Almonry. I saw M'Carthy standing at his mother's door, in the Almonry - about eight persons surrounded him, and strove all in their power to draw his sword; he twisted it round with his belt, and said no one among them should draw it - they all ran away - they threatened him very much, and called him bad names. I saw a great many people in the Almonry, I afterwards saw William Brown striking severely at the soldiers with a stick. I stood by the Almonry - the first man that came out was one Edward Suggen - he struck a soldier with a stick - he was then a watchman, but is now broke. When I saw this, I made to go through Wright's-passage, and was knocked down by the blow of a stick at the back of my head. They took my shawl off, and the ring half-way off my finger. My husband came up, and begged for mercy for my life, and a man struck him on his head, and knocked his cap off (my husband is a soldier), he struck him with the stave of a tub. I soon after recovered, got up, and pulled my husband away - he wished to return, to pick his cap up and my shawl; I would not let him. He was much injured with the blow.

THOMAS EVANS . I am in the Guards, and live in the Almonry. I was in my own room, about two hundred and fifty yards from the Marquis of Granby, Some men were playing at marbles close under my window; two soldiers were passing - whether they kicked the marbles or not I cannot say, but the men said something to the soldiers which I did not hear - the soldiers did not answer. In a short time they spoke again, and one of the soldiers turned back, and asked if they were talking to him - they called him a b - y-backed ******, up with their fists, and knocked him down. He was in liquor, his comrade went to pick him up, and they knocked him down. The men kept kicking and beating the soldiers on the ground - more soldiers same up, and a fight began; the mob increased, and the soldiers drove them out (the soldiers were not armed); they were away about ten minutes, then returned with sticks and staves of casks. I believe there was then only two soldiers in the Almonry - when the mob saw them, They said

"Here is two of the *******, let us start them." One of them ran up the buildings, the other remained. I could not see what the mob did to him, as they were out of my sight. I saw the prisoner Jones afterwards, when they returned from pursuing the one into the buildings - he came through the passage; he was doing nothing. One of the mob struck him with a stick. I saw M'Carthy with the rest of the soldiers, not doing any thing.

ELIZA ROBERTS . I was in the Almonry on the 18th of June, and saw some persons playing at marbles. I saw M'Carthy stripped of his clothes, to fight. I held his sword, cap, and jacket, while he fought; and then went away.

JAMES KERSHAW . I am a private in the Coldstream Guards, and live at No. 60, Orchard-street, within five doors of Cogle's. I was in the Almonry, and saw the people fighting with the soldiers; I stood there about five minutes, and got knocked over the eye and chin; they knocked me down in the mud. I went towards the watch-house, and saw a parcel of people running; they surrounded M'Carthy with great sticks; he drew his sword, or I thought he would have been murdered. I was so frightened I returned home; my house faces down the New-way towards the Almonry; I went up stairs to wash the blood off my face, then went down to a barber's to get my hair cut (he lives just below Cogle's on the opposite side), when my hair was cut I came to the door and saw a parcel of inhabitants running from the New-way along Orchard-street into Cogle's, four or five of the inhabitants ran into Cogle's, and four soldiers after them, none of them had regimentals; if a drummer had ran in I must have seen him. The soldiers came out in about a minute and a half, and were going towards the New-way, and a soldier in a red jacket said

"Right about," then one of the inhabitants went out of Cogle's and went towards Dean-street, the soldier pursued him and knocked him down, the drummer never went, even on the cill of Cogle's door, I went home. I did not see the drummer in the house.

MR. ANDREWS. Q. What time were you at the barber's

- A. It might be half-past seven o'clock, when I came away, the constables were then taking Jones to the watch-house. I then went up stairs, came down in about five minutes, and saw a parcel of inhabitants and some soldiers about the watch-house. Some inhabitants were about Cogle's door.

Q. Did you see any drummer that afternoon - A. Yes, I saw M'Carthy in the Almonry, the last time I saw him was at a baker's shop, next door to Cogle's, about half-past seven o'clock. I could not see what happened there while I was in the barber's.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Do you speak of time as you guess - A. Yes, I cannot speak to a minute or two. I saw the people go into Cogle's after I was shaved; M'Carthy was not among them at all. I stood at the barber's door, and saw them go in and come out.

ELIZA WARNER . On the 18th of June I was at the Three Tuns, public-house, (which is some distance from Ann-street) from half-past six to five minutes before eight o'clock, Hardy was there all the time, drinking with me, we came out together, and stood at the door till five minutes past eight o'clock, he then went into the house again, and I came away; he was perfectly sober.

MARY ANN BULLEN . On the 18th of June I was at the top of Union-court, Orchard-street, and saw a crowd of people and soldiers among them - the crowd were among the soldiers with a great many sticks - the soldiers had nothing in their hands - one of the crowd had a pitchfork, he struck a soldier of the 3d regiment, in full regimentals, across the shoulder, and knocked him down, the man ran into Mrs. Cogle's house, I could see plainly what passed at Cogle's - M'Carthy stood in the street, and I had hold of his arm all the time, when his comrade was struck he rose his sword above his head, but did not strike any one, the crowd then rushed towards Mrs. Cogle's house - M'Carthy did not go in at any time - a crowd of people went in before any soldiers - I had hold of M'Carthy's arm from the time he came up the New-way till he ran down St. Ann's-lane, which was before the soldiers went into Cogle's, I did not see him strike any one, I saw a constable strike him - when the crowd came out, I heard a cry that Cogle was murdered. M'Carthy did not return before they came out.

MR. ANDREWS. Q. What is the time you have been speaking of - A. I cannot say the time, it was between seven and nine o'clock, I had been home, and came out to get something for supper, that must be about eight o'clock - I first saw M'Carthy come up the New-way, there was a great many soldiers among the crowd, when I first saw him his side arms hung in his belt, my husband is in his regiment - I went up to him in Orchard-street - the rest of the soldiers were in the street.

Q. When you took hold of his arm, had any one gone into Cogle's house - A. There was a man in a long tailed coat and smock-frock came out of Cogle's with a stick in his hand, ran down the steps, and began fighting, it was Jenkins. I held M'Carthy at that time, wanting him to come away from the crowd to keep him from them - he left me and ran down St. Ann's-lane, a crowd of people ran down before him - there was a great many people round Cogle's - I stood there till he was taken to the hospital - M'Carthy never returned.

ELEANOR FLYN . My husband is in the second regiment of Guards. On Waterloo-day I had been to wash at the Black Horse, public-house. I live in New Peter-street, as I came home I was in Orchard-street a few minutes before eight o'clock, and saw a great many jackass boys, costermongers, and prigs, as the call them; I went to the White Horse, public-house, and saw a woman holding a soldier indoors. When I was in Orchard-street I saw Cooper taking some soldiers - I saw Suggen with a poker, they were running after the soldiers. I saw M'Carthy come up the New-way, and in Orchard-street, but not near the pavement at all; he was in the middle of the street, and not near Cogle's door. Mrs. Bullen had hold of his arm - I went across - he pulled his hand from her, and ran across St. Ann's-lane, and down Pike-alley. I saw a man come out of Cogle's, with a whitish coat and a stick about the length of his arm - he ran in among the soldiers and struck them; one fell, I believe he was a light infantry man - his foraging cap fell off - the man picked it up, and either put it under his arm, or in his bosom, and ran into Cogle's - he was one of Cogle's lodgers - they have twopenny and threepenny lodgers. Two or three of the soldiers ran towards the door, and into the passage, I believe; and these costermongers ran in after them with sticks, the soldiers had nothing but their fists; the mob were laying on to the soldiers with their sticks, they came out in two or three minutes. M'Carthy had passed the door, and ran down St. Ann's-lane seven minutes before that, and never came into Orchard-street again.

MR. ALLEY. Q. Be cautious, did you attend before the Magistrate - A. They would not suffer the soldiers' witnesses to attend - I did not attend. I had finished work about quarter past seven o'clock, went home, my husband was out, I went to look for him to get the key; I found him in the Almonry about nine o'clock. I have known M'Carthy from the breast, there are two brothers in the same regiment, the prisoner is the man I speak of. I am positive not one soldier had a weapon.

Q. Had not the drummer his cutlass - A. He had his sword, he is not a soldier; I only saw one man in a white jacket, and that was Jones. I know none of the prisoners, except the drummer.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Is the man here who ran out with the stick - A. That is the man (the witness Jenkins).

JOSIAH ASHTON . I am drum-major of the third battalion of the first regiment of Guards. On the evening of the 18th of June I saw M'Carthy when the drum-beat was called over at quarter before nine - he was present, and was calm, collected and sober.

MR. ANDREWS. Q. Where is the roll-call - A. In front of the barrack gate, at Knightsbridge, opposite the Park-wall. I call over the drum-roll, there are two drummers named M'Carthy, I cannot say whether both were there, they belong to the same battalion, but are not alike in person. I always count the men and inspect them, to see if they are sober and capable of duty. I do not call over their names, the barrack is a mile, or a mile and a half from the Almonry.

MR. BROADRICK. Q. He was there about nine o'clock - A. Yes, the drum beat at nine o'clock.

M'CARTHY. - GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined Three Months .

ROWBOTTOM - GUILTY . Aged 22.

Of Manslaughter only.

Confined One Month .

HARDY

LEE

JONES

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

Reference Number: t18210718-59

SIXTH DAY, WEDNESDAY, JULY 25.

961. GEORGE LEE was indicted, for that he, on the 28th of June , at St. James, Clerkenwell , feloniously did dispose of, and put away, a certain forged and counterfeit Bank note, which is as follow - (5 l. No. 10,446, signed W. Whiling), with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England , well knowing the same to be forged and counterfeit .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only calling it a promissory note for payment of money, instead of a Bank note.

TWO OTHER COUNTS, the same, only stating his intent to be to defraud one James M'Farlane .

The prisoner after being strongly urged by the Learned Common Serjeant to take his trial, persisted in pleading GUILTY . - DEATH .

Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

962. GEORGE LEE , was again indicted, for that he on the 28th of June , at St. Mary-le-bow , feloniously did dispose of, and put away, a certain forged and counterfeit Bank note, for the payment of 5 l. (No. 10,449, signed W. Whiting), with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England, well knowing it to be forged and counterfeit .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only calling it a promissory note for payment of money instead of a Bank note.

TWO OTHER COUNTS, the same, only stating his intent to be to defraud one Edward Philips Doudney .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . - DEATH.

Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210718-60

963. JAMES HURST , was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of June , ten pennyweight of gold, value 30 s. , the goods of James Redford .

MR. ANDREWS conducted the prosecution.

JAMES REDFORD . I am a gold-beater , and live in Dean-street, Soho ; the prisoner was my apprentice , he had served three years with me. On the 11th of June, I delivered him two ounces three penny weights of ribbon gold, which was worth about 8 l. 12 s.; it ought to produce about eighty books - his duty was to beat it, to put it in books of twenty-five leaves each; which, with the refuse preserved, ought altogether to produce the same weight - he returned none to me, but left the house on the 20th of June, without any notice, before I got up in the morning - I searched the place where he kept his work, and found four parcels of books tied up in separate papers, and marked with his initials, which is the custom - three of the parcels were marked as twenty books each, but in the sixty books, forty-one of them had no gold leaves in them - the deficiency was fifty-three books out of seventy-five; the deficiency in weight was ten penny-weight.

RICHARD ADAMS . I am in Mr. Redford's service, only I and the prisoner worked there; he kept his work in a drawer, I saw my master examining it; fifty-two books were deficient.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Three Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210718-61

964. MARY STALKER , was indicted, for having feloniously in her custody and possession, one 1 l. forged Bank note, knowing it to be forged .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

965. MARY STALKER , was again indicted for disposing, and putting away, a certain forged Bank note, with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England .

No evidence.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210718-62

966. JOHN SHORTER , was indicted for a Rape .

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18210718-63

967. JOHN PATMORE was indicted, for that he, on the 14th of June , at St. George, Hanover-square , in and upon William Eden , a subject of our Lord the King, feloniously, wilfully, unlawfully, and maliciously, did make an assault, and with a certain sharp instrument, did strike, stab, and cut the said William Eden , in and upon his right side, with intent, in so doing, feloniously, &c. and of his malice aforethought, to kill and murder him .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating his intent to be to disable the said William Eden .

THIRD COUNT, the same, only stating that he with a certain knife did feloniously, unlawfully, and maliciously, stab and cut the said William Eden , in an upon his breast, with intent to do him some grievous bodily harm.

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

GENERAL WILLIAM EDEN . I am a Lieutenant-General in his Majesty's service. The prisoner was eight years and a half in my service; he left me in March, 1814. I have a married sister named Simpson, the prisoner married her servant, while he was in my service. On being married, his wife and him both came into my service, and went down to Plymouth; and about eight months after, they both left my service together; this was in 1814. From that year, to the present time, I have been mostly in England, except last year, when I was abroad; the prisoner's wife returned into my sister's service about two years and a half ago, as near as I can say - I came to London on

the 31st of May, and went to my sister's, and on the 3d of June the prisoner came to the house about four o'clock in the afternoon, and had some conversation with me on the subject of his wife.

Q. After that conversation, did he go away - A. I opened the door, he was ringing at the door very violent, and told him to go away, but he continued to ring the bell. He was in a state of intoxication; I ordered Hamilton the servant to send for a constable, which he did, and he was taken away, I went out of town to the races, and on the 14th of June, I was at my sister's, and about half past ten o'clock in the morning, I was told the prisoner was there - I went into the hall, and saw him, I went up to him, Hamilton, my sister's servant, stood behind, he looked very wild in the face, but was perfectly sober - I said

"What do you want with me," he said,

"You have seduced my wife, and I have proof of it"; I said,

"On my word and honour, it is false, and if you have proof, produce it." I then told him to go away, and was retiring from him, with my face towards him, and when about three paces distance, I saw him with a long butcher's knife in his left hand, in consequence of which, I stood where I was, and put myself in a posture of defence, with my face directly towards him (I am left-handed and so is he); he then rushed at me with the knife with great violence, rose his hand, and thrust the knife into my right breast, about three inches and a half - it rather stunned me, I did not fall; I recovered again before he made a second thrust; he made several more thrusts at me, which I parried with my hands, and got both hands cut; I was cut in one hand, and stabbed in the other - after that, Hamilton came behind, and pinioned him; we then all three closed and fell together - Sir William Eden and another servant came, and he was secured.

COURT. Q. Describe the injury you received - A. I was stabbed in my right breast (here the General shewed his wound), cut on my right hand, and stabbed in the left; the stab in my breast stunned me a little, but I did not suffer from any of my wounds - I laid down on the bed that afternoon, from the loss of blood, but was not at all unwell from it - I lost twenty or thirty ounces of blood. The whole thing did not last more than a minute and a half - after it was over, he said he was sorry for it; I first saw the knife when he was going to attack me.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. He served you in India several years - A. He served eight years and a half altogether. I never saw him from the day he left my service, which was in 1814, till the 3d of June. I gave him a written character in 1816, but did not see him then; I was at Plymouth. He married in 1813, his wife and sister both live with my sister - I reside with my sister now; I cannot speak to the state of his mind for the last six years; he parted with his wife two years and a half ago - I do not know the cause. I heard he called on the 3d of June, I saw him on the 3d, 13th, and 14th; his language was very clear and sensible, on the third he was beastly drunk - when this happened, he was sober, he made no attempt to go away, and expressed great sorrow for what he had done. I used no coarse language to him. I might, or might not, have reproached him as a drunken fellow. I understand he has been out of employ some time.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Was his contrition expressed after he was secured or before - A. After, and when he saw me bleeding. I have the knife - (producing it).

SIR WILLIAM EDEN . I was at my aunt's, Mrs. Simpson's; heard a noise; came out, and found the prosecutor was on the ground, in the hall, struggling with the prisoner, and Hamilton behind, endeavouring to draw Patmore off - they were almost flat on the ground, and the prisoner was pushing forward towards my uncle on the ground. He was on his body. I could not see whether he had any thing in his hands - he was pushing them forwards, making an attack, striking. I took hold of his right arm, and, with the assistance of Hamilton and another servant, pulled him up. My uncle picked the knife off the floor.

Cross-examined. Q. You reside with your aunt - A. I had been there on a visit a few days.

WILLIAM HAMILTON . I am servant to Mr. Simpson. On the 14th of June, the prisoner came to my master's house. I opened the door; he came in, and asked if the General was at home. I said he was. He said he wished to see him. I went into the parlour, and told the General Patmore wished to see him. He desired me to tell him to go about his business, he would not see him. I told the prisoner the General would not see him. He said he wanted an answer, Yes or No. I said, the General's answer was, No, he would not see him. The parlour door was not shut too; our voices could be heard. The General came into the hall; the prisoner immediately accused him of seducing his wife. The General said he knew nothing whatever of his wife. The prisoner said he did. The General said he did not, and that he accused him of a thing he knew nothing at all about, and without any proof. The prisoner said he had plenty of proof. The General desired him to fetch his proof, and immediately on that he rushed at him, and struck him on the right side with his left hand; it was a thrust, or punch. I did not see what he had. I seized him by both arms behind - he repeated the thrust several times, perhaps more than three; and, after a short struggle, we all three fell together. Sir William Eden came out of the parlour, and assisted in getting the prisoner from the General. I did not hear him say any thing after I got him by the arms. When he sat in the hall, after it was over, and the servants were holding him, he said,

"It has come to something at last." When the General got up, he said

"He has stabbed me in three places." He was taken into the front hall, and then said

"It has come to something at last." I did not hear him say he was sorry for it. I fetched a surgeon. The prisoner was taken to Bow-street.

Cross-examined. Q. His wife lived with the General's sister - A. Yes; and his sister too. He came sometimes to see his wife - I remember his coming one Sunday morning; his wife was denied to him several times - she was out of the house. My mistress occupied the General's cottage, at Ham Common , in the summer; the female servants were never taken there but once. The prisoner's wife once went to the lying-in hospital. The General never ordered me to tell the prisoner when he came, that I did not know where his wife was. I remember Patmore coming one Sunday morning after his wife; I told him she had sore eyes, and was gone to the General's cottage,

at Ham Common . It was not true, but she had desired me not to let him know where she was. He said he should go to Ham after her.

Q. Did not his sister come up and say,

"You need not go, it is all a fudge" - A. Not that I know. I believe the sister has a child. I do not know how how old it is.

Q. Did he not say, on more than one occasion, that he had heard reports about his wife, and was determined to see her - A. He has said so, and seen her afterwards. He saw her the day after the Sunday that he enquired for her - she was big with child before she left my mistresses house, and was absent a fortnight or three weeks He never asked if the General had ordered me to prevent his seeing her. I never saw his sister's child - I have seen his wife's.

Q. Who supplied his wife's place while she was absent - A. A woman was hired, and when his wife returned she remained in the service. He never said to me that he wished to see her, to know who put her in that condition.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. At the time your mistress occupied the General's cottage, where was the General - A. I think he was abroad. Patmore's wife went to the lying-in hospital about last December. I think the General left England in June or July. The sister laid-in four or five months ago, to the best of my knowledge; it may be less. I never denied his wife, or said a word about her by the General's order. He never spoke to me about either of the women. Sometimes Patmore's wife herself, and sometimes her sister, told me to deny her, and sometimes my mistress told me not to admit him into the house, as his wife desired not to see him. She never went to Ham till after this affair. I mean after the stabbing. The Sunday morning that the prisoner came was in the same month that she went to the lying-in hospital.

COURT. Q. When he saw his wife were they ever together - A. Sometimes in the kitchen, and sometimes in the hall - he staid with her about an hour, and sometimes more - they were sometimes alone. He has come occasionally for more than twelve months, and sometimes twice a-week. He frequently saw her after she was pregnant, and must have known she was so. I never heard him accuse her of behaving amiss.

HENRY EARL , ESQ. I am a surgeon. I was called in and saw General Eden in his bed-room. He said he had not examined his wound. There was a great deal of blood on the stairs and on his clothes - it appeared to have flowed down to his breeches; he was agitated. A very considerable swelling had taken place round the wound on the right breast - it appeared to have taken an oblique direction towards the breast-bone. I passed my little finger in, and conceive the wound to be between two and three inches deep - It apppeared that a knife had struck on the ribs, and glanced towards the breast-bone. From the direction it took, it appeared to have been inflicted by the left hand. Had it been struck with the right hand it would most probably have been fatal, as it might have struck the heart - had not the rib obstructed, it would have wounded the lungs, which would have been fatal. The wound on his right hand passed across three fingers, and laid bare the joint of the little finger. The other wound was a stab on the opposite wrist, very near the principal artery of the hand, but it was not opened. Generally speaking, the wounds in the hand would not be dangerous - it depended on the state of body.

Cross-examined. Q. The wounds on the hand were probably occasioned by the General endeavouring to get the knife from him - A. They might. I was called in about eleven o'clock, and saw the prisoner sitting on a bench in the hall, and two persons with him. I examined his head, having understood he had a severe would in the head. I spoke to him - he declined answering my questions.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Can you form a calculation of the effusion of blood - A. About two pints had been lost. I compared the knife with the wound - it was capable of inflicting it, and the point appeared to be turned as if by striking on the rib.

GENERAL EDEN re-examined. Q. Have you directly or indirectly had any share in his wife being denied, or in being the cause of it - A. I had not. I was out of England at the time. I never saw his sister till I arrived in England this time. I was absent eleven months the last time. I was never in my sister's house since Patmore's wife lived with her this last time, till I came to England in May last; and while she lived there before I was not there twenty times, and never slept there, and dare say his wife did not see me six times all the while, and that was when she opened the door to me. I never had any intercourse with his wife or sister whatever.

Prisoner. I leave my Defence to my Counsel.

CHARLOTTE LEWIN . My sister is the prisoner's wife. They have been married eight years in August. He came several times to see her, and has seen her. I remember her going to the hospital last year, in the winter. She was cook. I once denied her to him - it was on a week-day. She was then in the house. It was after she was delivered. He was never denied to her before she was put to bed.

THOMAS BARBER . I have lived with the prisoner a good deal, and slept with him. The latter part of the time he was a good deal disturbed in his mind, and appeared agitated at times. I have known him a year and a half - he was in my father's service, who is a salesman in Leadenhall-market. He left in March. He was capable of doing his business, and knew right from wrong.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 40.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18210718-64

968. JOHN COLLETT was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of James Martin Sanderson , about twelve o'clock in the night of the 14th of July , at Sunbury , with intent to steal, and stealing therein, one pair of trowsers, value 2 s.; one waistcoat, value 6 s.; two handkerchiefs, value 8 s.; one pair of shoes, value 3 s., and one pair of stockings, value 1 s., the goods of George Griffin .

MR. ANDREWS conducted the prosecution.

ROBERT SILWOOD . I am servant to Mr. Sanderson, who lives in Sunbury parish. On the 14th of July, I went out at eight o'clock at night, and left Griffin in the house. As I came home between twelve and one o'clock, I found some things laying outside near the window, which was open - I had left it shut. I called my master up, I rung the bell, came back to the cottage, and saw the prisoner getting out of the window, I secured him, he

tried to get from me - he had nothing with him. I said,

"How came you to take these things?" he said I threw them out myself, and wanted to lay it to him. I took him to my master - I knew him before; he worked at the flax mills, at Hownslow.

COURT. Q. Is it a cottage - A. Yes, my master keeps the house.

GEORGE GRIFFIN . I am servant to Mr. Sanderson. I slept in the cottage - he went out about eight o'clock. I went to bed about half-past eleven o'clock, the window was shut, but not fastened - it slides back. I was awoke by Silwood coming home, and found my things removed, which had been hung at the bed-post when I went to bed. I found them in the front court - it was dark when I went to bed.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

MR. JAMES MARTIN SANDERSON . The witnesses are servants of mine, and live in a house of mine adjoining my own, I keep it for them, it is in the parish of Sudbury. Silwood awoke me about half-past twelve o'clock, I found him with the prisoner; he said he had not been in the cottage. Silwood said he had caught him coming out of the window - I know Griffin went to bed at half-past eleven o'clock.

JAMES BOLTON . I am a constable, and took him in charge; he told me he was going to make a shilling or two of the things.

Prisoner. My father ran away from me when I was a child, and my mother is out of her mind.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 17.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18210718-65

969. THOMAS POWELL , alias REGAN , was indicted for that he, at the Session of Gaol Delivery, holden for the County of Middlesex, on the 14th of September, in the 54th year of his late Majesty's reign, was attainted of burglary, but was pardoned on condition of being transported beyond the seas, for the term of his natural life, and that he was ordered to be transported accordingly, and that he on the 19th of June last, at St. James, Clerkenwell , feloniously was at large, without any lawful cause, before the expiration of the said term, for which he had been so ordered to be transported .

The prisoner wished to plead guilty, but the Court thought proper to hear the following evidence.

THOMAS VANN . I produce the certificate of the prisoner's former conviction, which I got from Mr. Shelton, I examined it with the original (read)

JOHN HUTT . I remember the prisoner's former trial for burglary, and am sure he is the man. I apprehended him on this charge.

JOSHUA ARMSTRONG . I apprehended the prisoner, and beg to observe, nobody could behave better than he did, he made no resistance.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 38.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18210718-66

970. JOSEPH JONES was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of James Henley , Sen. about one o'clock in the afternoon of the 6th of July (no person being therein) and stealing therein, one sheet, value 2 s.; one handkerchief, value 6 d.; one time-piece, value 4 s., and one looking glass, value 8 s., the goods of James Henley , Jun .

JAMES HENLEY , Jun. I live with my father at Camden Town . On the 6th of July, I went out about eight o'clock in the morning, and left nobody in the house. I returned about four o'clock, and found the key behind the door, where I generally put it - it was a coach-house, and our rooms are over it; the stair-case leads from the stables up to the rooms. I had locked the stable door, the goods were up in the rooms. I had left the room door unlocked, and not shut, I believe - the stable and coach-house door were locked. I lost the articles stated in the indictment; we found the prisoner next day at the White Hart, public-house, Battle-bridge, fast asleep; Davis took him to the watch-house; he lived with us four months before this, and up to the time, he used to take care of the place; he gave the duplicates to Davis, and said he sold the looking glass to a broker, at the bottom of Old-street, by the turnpike.

JOHN DAVIS . I apprehended him. He gave me the duplicates of the sheet and neck-handkerchief. I then asked what he had done with the rest of the things, he said he sold the glass to French - it was not found. I found the things at the pawnbroker's, he said he pawned them. Henley said,

"How could you be such a villain as to rob us, who have been so kind to you;" he cried and gave up the duplicates.

JAMES HENLEY , Jun. I said nothing to induce him to confess; the glass was old fashioned, and had a mahogany frame.

SARAH FRENCH . I live in Old-street-road, by the turnpike. I bought a looking-glass of the prisoner, it was an old fashioned one, in a mahogany frame. I gave him 4 s. for it, on the 6th of July; he said he had a lark at Easter, and had an execution in his house for 3 l., and must sell his goods before four o'clock.

Prisoner's Defence. Henley does not belong to all the property it is his fathers; they made me promises to confess.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Of stealing, but not in a dwelling-house.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18210718-67

971. GEORGE LABURN was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of June , at St. Pancras , one soup ladle, value 30 s.; ten spoons, value 3 l. 15 s., and one mustard pot, value 1 l., the goods of Bryan Holme , in his dwelling-house .

ELIZA MALLBUTT . I am servant to Mr. Bryan Holme , who lives in Brunswick-square , in the parish of St. Pancras. On the 16th of June, I was in the parlour, and thought I heard a noise in the kitchen; I went down, and saw the boy passing through the front kitchen. I gave an alarm, and followed him, I took a basket from him in the area, it contained the articles stated in the indictment; he got out of the area. Fellows followed and brought him back; he had taken the things out of the cupboard in the back kitchen. I am sure he is the boy - they are worth 6 l.

EDWARD FELLOWS . Mallbutt gave an alarm, I ran and took the prisoner and brought him back to the house, hearing a cry of Stop thief! - nobody else was near the

house; he said he had only broken a square of glass, and he hoped I would let him go - I gave him in charge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's I leave it to the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 15.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18210718-68

972. MARY PALMER and SARAH EVANS were indicted for stealing, on the 15th of June , from the person of Joseph Parsons , three sovereigns, one 1 l. and one 5 l. Bank notes, his property .

JOSEPH PARSONS . I live in Lad-lane. I am out of place. On the 15th of June, at quarter past ten o'clock at night, I met the prisoners together in Whitechapel; they asked me to treat them (I had been drinking, and was not perfectly sober), I went with them to a house up a court in Houndsditch . Evans left me with Palmer. I had my money safe in my breeches pocket, when I was in the room I felt it safe; the three sovereigns were twisted tight in a 1 l. and a 5 l. note. In about quarter of an an hour Palmer went to the door and called Evans, she came; and I saw Palmer put something into her hand, I went to my breeches and missed my money, she then ran away; Evans remained. I followed Palmer to the end of the court and stopped her, but found nothing on her, I have never found it. I took Palmer to the watch-house, and afterwards found Evans there.

Cross-examined by MR. HONE. Q. You had been drinking - A. Yes, I was elevated, but not intoxicated; I had been drinking ale and beer at Blackwall with three friends, I do not know how much I drank. I gave Evans a sovereign to change to pay 2 s. for the room, she gave it to Palmer, I never got it again. I twisted the sovereigns in the notes before I entered the house.

PALMER'S Defence. I saw him with two girls, he took us to a house, and said he only had 1 s. I refused to stop with him, and he gave me in charge.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18210718-69

973. JAMES CALLENDER was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of June , one kettle, value 4 s. , the goods of James Barlow .

JAMES BARLOW . I live in Fore-street, City . On the 20th of June, I was called down stairs and missed this kettle.

JOHN STILLWELL . I am a constable. About eight o'clock, on the night of the 20th of June, I saw the prisoner running with the kettle in Fore-street. I pursued and overtook him in London-wall. He came quietly till we came to Fore-street, and then he struck me several times to get from me, I still held him, he tried several times to knock me through the windows, and I was obliged to knock him down to secure him until assistance came up.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

BARTHOLOMEW WOOD . I assisted in securing him. I never found such a desperate fellow.

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Six Months , and Publicly Whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210718-70

974. GEORGE TAYLOR was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of June , 250 lbs. of mixed metal, value 2 l. 10 s., the goods of William Ayton ; one basket, value 6 d., the goods of William Barrows ; and one coat, value 2 s. , the goods of Michael Redding ; and HARRIET LACK was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, knowing them to have been stolen .

WILLIAM AYTON . I am a pipe-maker , and live in Tottenham-court-road. My manufactory is in Shoreditch . On the 15th of June, I had information that my premises were broken open and robbed. I found it was correct. I missed about 5 cwt. of mixed metal and lead. Next day I went with the officer, and found it at Bridgewater-gardens, at a house. Lack was there. She said she lived there. It is an iron shop - she said it was her shop, and she wanted to know what business we had there. I found some new pewter, which was not mine. She said we had no business to search without a warrant. We found two hundred and fifty lbs. of my metal, covered over with straw, in different places, under the foot of the bed. She said she bought it, and had had it three or four days, and we had no business with it. It was stolen from my premises on the night of the 14th or 15th of June, and this was the 16th. I asked of whom she bought it - she made no reply. I am sure it is mine. We asked her if George Taylor lived there - she said No. She afterwards said he did live there; and in searching we found several of his coats. She said they belonged to Taylor, and not to us. We found a great coat which Redding, my carman , claimed. I went for a cart to take away the metal, and Taylor came up to the door, while I was waiting. Armstrong asked if his name was George Taylor , and if he lived there. He said Yes. I said,

"How came you by this metal." He said he had bought it three or four days, and had had some of it a week. It was being put into the cart at that time.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Lack said she lived in the shop - A. Yes, her bed and clothes were there

WILLIAM BARROWS . I am foreman to Mr. Ayton. On the 15th of June, at six o'clock, when I got up, I found the premises had been broken open - the outer door lock was picked, and above 3 cwt. of metal gone. I went to tell my master. I know Harriet Lack . I went to the house, and saw her in the shop. I found the metal, basket, and coat - the basket was mine, and was safe in the counting-house on the evening of the 14th. There were nineteen ingots of metal, the same as was stolen. The coat belonged to our carman. I went for a cart, and on returning found Taylor there. I know the basket by the handle, which I had mended myself.

MICHAEL REDDING . I am carman to Mr. Ayton. On the 14th of June, I left my coat on the top of a crate of glass, in the warehouse. I returned about six o'clock in the morning, and missed it in the course of the day.

BENJAMIN WILKINSON . I am a City officer. I went to this shop, which is in the City. We found Lack there. I searched, and found nineteen ingots and a piece of one on the floor, with a little straw over them. She said she bought them three or four days before. Taylor came up the street directly after, Vann asked if his name was Taylor - he said Yes, and that lived there, in the shop, and had bought the metal of one Smith, a plumber. Vann

asked what he gave for it - he said he could not answer that. There was only one bed in the shop.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

THOMAS VANN . I am an officer. I went to Bridgewater-gardens with the other officers. We asked Lack if she bought any metal - she said No. We went round the counter. She asked if I had a warrant - I said No. I found the ingots under a table, and some by the fire-place, covered with straw. She then said she bought it three or four days ago or more, but refused to say who from. She said Taylor did not lodge there; and, while we were waiting, Taylor came up, and was passing by, we took him. Armstrong asked if he lived there - he said he had lived there two years, in that room; there was only one bed. The metal was on the counter, Armstrong asked if he knew any thing of it - he said

"Yes, I bought it of a man three or four days ago, or longer;" and that he bought the coat as old rags. I found a mould for casting ingots there - these ingots were three sizes.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you know him before - A. Yes; I heard he lived there, and know the woman did.

"Brown, painter and glazier," is over the door.

JOSHUA ARMSTRONG . I went to the shop and found the ingots, covered with straw. She said she had had it three or four days. I found clothes in the room which they both claimed. I found two keys. Taylor told me to try them to two boxes in the room, which they fitted.

TAYLOR'S Defence. I deal in rags, nails, and such things. I bought this of one White - a man came with him who had the coat on. He brought it in different lots on Friday and Saturday. I gave him 30 s. per cwt. for it, as solder - he gave his name White, No. 2, Whitecross-street. He called the other man Smith. I thought he came honestly by it. The metal I said I had had a week, was pewter.

ARMSTRONG. He said he had the ingots a week. The pewter was not present.

TAYLOR - GUILTY . Aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

LACK - NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210718-71

975. PHILIP DOVE was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of July , one pair of spectacles, value 10 s., the goods of David Farrow , privately in his shop .

ROBERT WILLIAMS . I am shopman to Mr. David Farrow , a salesman , who lives in Fleet-market . On the 20th of July, about half-past three o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner came to the door, and asked to see a pair of spectacles. He came to the counter; I shewed him eight pairs, leaving them all before him. When he tried on the eighth pair, he said they would suit him, and asked the price - I said 12 s. He said that was too much; and, in the meantime, I missed a pair. He went out. I looked to be certain; then followed, and overtook him three doors off, and said he had a pair of spectacles - he appeared confused, but made no answer. Wilcox came up, and said they were in his hand. I then found them up his cuff. Nobody but me was serving in the shop. Mr. Farrow was at the door.

JAMES WILCOX. I am an officer. I saw him come out of the shop with something in his hand. I assisted in securing him, and saw the spectacles taken from under his cuff. I found another pair of spectacles on him, and duplicates for five pairs.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. My handkerchief was on the counter. I did not know I had taken them up with it till. I got out.

GUILTY . Aged 55.

Publicly Whipped and Discharged .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210718-72

SEVENTH DAY, THURSDAY, JULY 26.

976. CHARLES ELLIS was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of June , 3 lbs. eight ounces of tea, value 10 s. , the goods of the East India Dock Company .

MR. BOLLAND conducted the prosecution.

WALTER SALTER . I am Excise gate-keeper at the East India Docks . It is my duty to rub the labourer s down as they leave. The prisoner came up to the gate. I found about a quarter of a pound of tea in his neck handkerchief, rolled up like a pad. I then searched, and found he had a false crown to his hat, under which was some tea. I found about three quarters of a pound in his jacket, and some in his shoes. It weighed three pounds and a half together. He said he picked it up.

JAMES LONG . I was foreman of the labourers on board the ship Astell. The prisoner was one of them, and in the Company's service. It was laden with tea, and several chests were broken open.

WILLIAM THOMAS BARKER . I was employed by the Company to take an account of the cargo of the Astell. Many of the tea chests were broken open. I found three pounds and a half deficient in one chest. It is gunpowder tea, and tallies with that found on the prisoner.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Confined Six Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18210718-73

977. JAMES SWAYNE was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of July , one basket, value 6 d., and one half-sieve of currants, value 2 s., the goods of Joseph Clements , from the person of Eliza Clements .

MR. BOLLAND conducted the prosecution.

ELIZA CLEMENTS . On the 11th of July, I was employed by Joseph Clements , a market-gardener , of Isleworth , in gathering currants. I had a sieve about three parts full, and was kneeling down. I saw the prisoner and another young man come into the garden. I had seen him several times before - they generally came a dozen together, and the prisoner at the head of them. Seeing him coming, I took the basket up, and he took it out of my hands with great violence. I went to take it from him - he said he would murder me if I attempted to take it. He took the currants, basket and all, and both went out of the grounds with it.

JAMES FLETCHER . I went to look for the prisoner, and found him at five o'clock in the afternoon. I found the

basket at the top of the field where they used to come in at.

(Basket produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was at Maidenhead at the time.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18210718-74

978. WILLIAM GILL , was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of November , one coat, value 1 l. , the goods of Samuel Drury .

SAMUEL DRURY . I am a farmer , and live in Gloucestershire. On the 25th of November, I came to town, and met the prisoner at the Ship-tavern, Charing-cross - he went to shew me about town, I gave him a great coat to take care of for me, and in Oxford-road, I went into the Gloucester coach-office ; he said he would wait at the door while I enquired about the coach; I came out in a minute, and he was gone - I found him in custody last Saturday; I have not found the coat, I was four hours with him, and am sure he is the man.

JOHN PHILLIPS . I am porter at the Ship-tavern. The prisoner is the man that went out with Drury, he frequented our house every day, but never after the 25th of November.

Prisoner's Defence. I never was with him.

GUILTY . Aged 51.

Confined One Year .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18210718-75

979. WILLIAM RICHARDS , was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of June , one watch, value 10 s., and one chain, value 2 d. , the goods of William Marshall .

WILLIAM MARSHALL . I am a jobbing gardener , and live at Hampstead . On Friday, the 29th of June, I got up about four o'clock in the morning, and went to work at a gentleman's house, till eleven o'clock; then went into a field to assist at haymaking, and found two men mowing - I mowed there till one o'clock, and while I was mowing, the prisoner came into the field; I knew him before, he lived at Hampstead. At a quarter past one o'clock, I went to lay down to rest by the hedge; I looked at my watch when I left my friends, laid down in the next field, and fell asleep under an oak tree - I had left the prisoner in an adjoining field - I awoke about four o'clock, and missed my watch; Charles Morgan was within ten yards of me, and I accused him of it. On the 3d of July, the prisoner came running after me, and said, there was a d - d piece of work about the watch, that he would shew me the man who had a watch but it was not mine - he pointed out Marriot, who produced a watch, which was mine, he said he bought the duplicate of it of the prisoner on Friday night, the 29th; he did not deny it, and we took him to Bow-street.

JOHN BURKE . I am gardener to Mr. Tollard; his cows broke into the field where Marshall lay, I do not know that it was him, but I saw a man laying asleep, and directly as I went over the hedge into the field, I saw the prisoner (who I had known three years), in the act of drawing the man's watch, leaning over him; he was drawing something from the man's person, nobody was with him at the time - I stood looking on, and could then see it was a watch - he came up to me, and said,

"I have been doing the soldier," (he had a white jacket on),

"he is a hearty fellow, we have been drinking all day at the public-house, and I spent 7 s. 9 d. on him, and we came into the field to have a sleep;" I said,

"You will make him stand some ale for it," as I thought he was playing a joke, he laid down on the grass, and shewed me the watch - I went away, and on Tuesday, heard of the robbery, and informed the prosecutor.

WILLIAM MARRIOT . I am a labourer, at Hampstead. I bought the duplicate of the watch of the prisoner, between eight and nine o'clock at night, on the 29th of June, for 4 s.; it was pawned for 26 s. I redeemed it the next day. The prisoner came up to me and asked if I had any objection to let Marshall see the watch, I shewed it to him, he claimed it - I collared the prisoner, and said he should go to the office.

THOMAS HUNT . I produce the watch.

WILLIAM MARSHALL . The watch is mine; the prisoner paid no score for me.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not take it from Marshall.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Confined Three Months and Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210718-76

980. JOHN JONES was indicted for feloniously killing and slaying William Ellis .

MARGARET DEVON . On the 14th of June , about nine o'clock in the evening, I was charing at the City of London-tavern , Ellis was an extra waiter there, he and Jones had been fighting - I saw Jones strike him, in consequence of a dispute about cutting a joint of meat; they stuggled, and both fell; I ran away into the closet, and only saw one blow - I heard Ellis call Jones a Welsh son at a *** before he struck him - they were on good terms before; Ellis died just a week after.

Cross-examined by MR. WALFORD. Q. Ellis called Jones a bad name - A. Yes; he got up and left the table, Ellis followed him, or it would not have happened.

CHARLOTTE MARY GIBSON . Ellis had lived three years at my house, in Plough-yard, Shoreditch, he came to me the morning after this happened - I assisted him to the London Hospital, he complained of his left side; he continued an out-patient, and died on the Wednesday following, at No. 51, Long-alley, Shoreditch. He said he considered himself dying, and said Jones kicked him when he he was down.

HENRY TWELVETREE . I keep the White-hart public-house, Long-alley. Ellis called on me on the evening of the 14th; he looked very poorly, and said, he was very bad; I had seen him at three o'clock, he then appeared in good health.

JOHN SMITH . I am a surgeon; I bled the deceased on the evening of the transaction - I cannot say whether the blow occasioned his death.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210718-77

981. JOHN READ , was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of June , one flock mattress, value 3 s.; one bedstead, value 2 s.; one carpet, value 1 s., and one glass salt cellar, value 6 d. , the goods of George Applebee .

MR. CURWOOD conducted the prosecution.

GEORGE APPLEBEE . I have a garden and garden-house, in the parish of Clerkenwell . About the 1st of June, I saw these things safe in the summer-house, and missed them on the 2d or 3d; the summer-house was shut up - I found them in the officer's possession. I had written in large letters on the mattress

"Stolen! please to stop it;" with my name and address.

Prisoner. Q. You said at the office, that the summer-house was open - A. I said it was shut, but not locked, the garden gate was locked.

CHARLES MIELL . I am an officer. On the 27th of June, about half past one o'clock, at night, I stopped the prisoner in Hackney-fields, with a basket and seven roots of flowers; he had two chissels, a large clasp knife, with a saw in it, in his hand - I asked where he lived, he said, in Mare-street, Hackney - I said, I would go with him, he then said, he did not live there, but in Cotton-gardens, Hackney-road; that he slept there sometimes - I asked if he had any residence of his own, he said, No. I took him to the watch-house, he said, Mr. Hayford would satisfy me about the flowers - I went to Hayford, who directed me to a little cottage opposite his house, which had a padlock on the door; I there found the articles stated in the indictment, the mattress had the words

"Stolen, pray stop it," on it - he told the Magistrate I had no business to ramshackle his house in that way.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

THOMAS HAYFORD . I live in Cotton-gardens, Shoreditch. The prisoner occupied the house opposite me, for eight or nine weeks before it was searched; I supper with him there.

JOHN BERRIS . I am an officer; I got the key of the house from the prisoner's brother-in-law.

Prisoner's Defence. On the morning of the robbery, I called my nephew up at one o'clock; we went to Spa-fields, I went into the carcase of a house, and found these things, if I had followed my nephew's advice, I should never have touched them - I feel that I did wrong, in not informing Applebee.

GUILTY . Aged 41.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210718-78

981. SAMUEL LEVY was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of June , one bag, value 2 d., and 6 s., in monies numbered, the property of Philip Mayo , from his person .

PHILIP MAYO . I live in Diamond-row, Stepney-green. On the 14th of June, I was at Bow-fair , my wife had hold of my arm; she said my money was gone, and laid hold of the prisoner. I missed my money bag from my pocket, and saw it in his hand, he gave it to a man who stood behind him, and he gave it to a third.

MARY MAYO . I saw the prisoner put his hand between us into my husband's breeches-pocket, which he turned inside out - I secured him.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined Six Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210718-79

982. FRANCIS PETER was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of July , the sum of 16 s. 6 d. in monies numbered, the property of Thomas Lee , from his person .

THOMAS LEE . I am a tailor , and lodge at the King's Arms, public-house, Arundel-street. On the 15th of July, about half-past five o'clock in the morning, I got up and took a walk with the prisoner, Mr. and Mrs. Lambert, and Willis; we went to Mrs. Lambert's house, in Greyhound-court , about half-past seven o'clock, to breakfast; the money was in my breeches pocket. I found myself sleepy, and laid down in the room on the floor, and went to sleep for twenty minutes, and on awaking missed my money. I mentioned it to all the company, and all denied it, and were all searched, but nothing found; the prisoner then said, he had lost his pocket-book, the constable went into the cellar with Mrs. Lambert, and found the pocket-book; he then told the prisoner to pull off his coat, which he did, and as the constable took it from him, he turned it over, and three shillings fell out of the sleeve, and 13 s. 6 d. was found concealed in the coat-facing; he then said Willis gave it to him - Willis denied it. I had told the constable before it was found, that it consisted of nine shillings and three half crowns, and that money was found. I believe two of the half-crowns were the last coinage.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Where did you walk - A. To Tower-hill. Willis and the prisoner were both near me when I laid down. The prisoner left the room very soon after I missed it, for a necessary purpose, and after the search he said he had lost his pocket-book. Willis and the prisoner both lodged at the King's Arms, public-house.

ANN LAMBERT . I lent Lee a pillow to lay on, I awoke him to give him his breakfast, and he said he had lost three half-crowns and nine shillings, the prisoner immediately asked where the privy was and I told him. When he said he had lost his pocket-book, I said I knew he had it when he came in - it was found in the privy. I saw him searched the second time, the constable took his coat tail upwards, and out fell three shillings and in the facing the rest were found - he said Willis gave it him. Willis said,

"When did I give it you?" he said,

"When Mrs. Lambert went down for some milk." I and my husband left Willis and him alone in the room.

JOHN WILLIS . I was in the room when Lambert and his wife were absent, I was blowing the fire. I saw nothing of the money till it was found on the prisoner, in the facing of his coat, he said I gave it him - I deny it.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you ever hear of the two boys and the leg of mutton - A. No.

JOHN LANGFIELD . I am a constable. I was fetched, and searched all the party - I did not notice the prisoner's coat-facings. I found the prisoner's pocket-book close to the privy door. I came up and told him to pull his coat off, he rather hesitated. I turned it over and three shillings fell out, and between the facings I found six shillings and three half-crowns.

The prisoner put in a long written defence, stating that Willis gave him the money, and forced it into his coat collar.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Three Months , and Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210718-80

983. JOHN TURNER was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of June , one basket, value 2 s. , the goods of Robert Bagley .

JOHN WILLIAMS . I am servant to Mr. Robert Bagley , who lives at Fulham. I was going to market with the team, with a number of baskets of vegetables, the officer came up to me at Chelsea , and I missed one - he had the prisoner with it, the rope was cut. He once worked for my master.

RICHARD CUFF . I am an officer. I was in King's-road, and saw the prisoner behind the waggon, with this basket of turnip-raddishes; he would not say what was in it, but said it was his own - Bagley's name is on it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I got tipsey, lost my hat, and found the basket.

GUILTY . Aged 37.

Whipped and Discharged .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210718-81

984. JAMES HAMMOND was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of July , three spoons, value 10 s. , the goods of John Faulkner , Sen .

JOHN FAULKER . I live at Waltham-green ; these spoons were on my sideboard. I came in and found my servant questioning the prisoner how he came into the house. I searched, and found the spoons on him in a basket of willow shavings. I had left the door ajar; he denied having any thing, and ran away while I was searching the basket - he was secured in half an hour. I am sure he is boy.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210718-82

985. JAMES FIELD was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of April , six chairs, value 14 s., and one fixture, (i.e.) one copper, value 10 s., the goods of William Emberick , and fixed to his dwelling-house .

WILLIAM EMBERICK . I am landlord of a house, No. 7, Worship-street . A copper was fixed there, and six chairs were left there. The house was locked up.

JANE MULLINS . I live in the Curtain-road. My husband had left these chairs and copper in care of Emberick; I found the chairs at Anticott's, on the 3d of July; we had left the house on the 25th of March.

ELIZA SCOTT . I live in Worship-street, and knew the prisoner was in the habit of buying chairs, I told him I wanted some, and about the beginning of April, I bought these of him, and sold them to Anticott.

MARY ANTICOTT . I am a broker, and live in Long-alley; I bought six chairs of Scott for 10 s.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I bought them in Petticoat-lane.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210718-83

986. JOHN SHAW was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of June , twenty-five yards of serge, value 30 s. , the goods of William Walford , and others, his partners.

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be the property of William Walford , John Henry , and Henry Cook .

THOMAS ARNOLD . I am servant to Mr. William Walford , a dyer , at Old Ford - he has partners. On the 30th of June, about two o'clock in the afternoon, this serge was missed. I saw it safe in the tenters on the ground, at one o'clock. I went up the alley leading to Bethnal-green, and saw the prisoner laying down in a field, three quarters of a mile off; I went up to him, he rose, I asked how long he had been from Old Ford; he said he had not been there (I had seen him there at eleven o'clock), I told Hunt to look over the bank in the corn, and there we found the serge covered over; nobody was there but him; when I went over to look for it, he ran away.

JOSEPH HUNT . I am servant to the prosecutors. I saw the prisoner at Old Ford, at eleven o'clock, leaning on the bank of the field the serge was in; he must climb over the bank and paling to get it. I went with Arnold and found him laying in the field, and said that is the man I saw leaning on the bank, Arnold asked how long he had been from Old Ford. He said he had not been there that day. I found the serge covered with corn; there was a gap on the bank just by him, I called to Arnold, and he ran off; we followed and took him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. They would not say what they wanted, and I would not go with them. A man with two donkies said he saw a man in his shirt sleeves ran with the bundle.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Confined One Year and Twice Publicly Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210718-84

987. MARY DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of July , two sheets, value 20 s., and one shirt, value 10 s. , the goods of William Granger .

WILLIAM GRANGER . I live in Upper Cleveland-street, Fitzroy-square . I was coming from the public-house, and saw the prisoner, who was a stranger, come out of my door with a bundle; I pursued and took her in Fitzroy-street, and asked if she did not come out of No. 8, Cleeveland-street, she said she had not been near the place; she went back as far as Richardson's-mews, took me down there, and shewed me this property; a man looked over the palings, and said, if I did not let her go he would knock my head off.

ELIZA GRAINGER . I am the prosecutor's daughter. I did not know the prisoner was in the house; these things were in a basket in the back kitchen, ready to be washed. She said she saw the door open, and came down. I had left it open.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was in the passage when they brought them up; I never had them.

GUILTY . Aged 52.

Confined Three Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210718-85

988. WILLIAM REDMAN and JOSEPH KEPPELL were indicted for stealing, on the 30th of June , 20 lbs. of lead, value 4 s., belonging to Thomas Hall , and fixed to his dwelling-house .

THOMAS HALL . I keep the King's Arms, public-house, Bethnal-green ; this lead was stolen from over my bar

window, on the 30th of June; I found the prisoners in custody with it, and fitted it to the place.

WILLIAM WHITE . I am a plumber. I compared the lead, it fitted exactly.

EBENEZER SMITH . I am a watchman. On the 30th of June, about twenty minutes after two, I took the prisoners up as disorderly, in Brick-lane. I found a knife on Keppell, it does not appear to me to have been used in cutting lead. Redman dropped a sort of a scraper in Brick-lane.

THOMAS GARTON . On the 30th of June, Hall came to the office, and complained of his lead being stolen; the prisoners were then under hail for a disturbance; I asked them where they had lived, Keppell said he lived at No. 4, Wheeler-street; and Redman said he lived at No. 10, Old Nicholl-street. I went to No. 10, Old Nicholl-street, and found five pieces of lead in the cellar, under the staircase; two or three females lived there. Redman's parents live in the first floor; the door is left open at all hours. The knife appears to me to have been used in cutting lead.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210718-86

989. EDWARD POWELL , was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of June , one coat, value 8 s. , the goods of Robert Secker .

ROBERT SECKER . I am a pauper in Shoreditch poor-house ; the prisoner lived in the same room. On the 13th of June, about half-past nine o'clock, I missed my coat and a pair of breeches, out of a basket which hung to the ceiling, and found it in pawn.

WILLIAM THIMBLEBY . My father is a pawnbroker, and lives in Old-street-road. On the 13th of June, the prisoner pawned the coat.

BENJAMIN ABEL . I apprehended him; he sent me to a pawnbroker's in Whitechapel, where I found the breeches.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210718-87

990. GEORGE FERGUSON and JOHN WALTER BROWN were indicted for stealing, on the 7th of July , four casks, value 2 l. , the goods of Thomas Champion and Thomas Green .

GEORGE RICHARDSON . I am clerk to Messrs. Thomas Champion and Thomas Green, vinegar-makers , City-road. On Saturday, the 7th of July, four casks were sent from the country, to the Rose-inn, Fleet-market , for us, they were stolen - I found them at the watch-house on Monday.

WILLIAM MILLER . I am a cooper, and live in Gun-street, Old Artillery-ground. I have several times seen the prisoners with casks, and on the 7th of July, about five o'clock in the afternoon, I saw Ferguson by a cooper's shop kept by Samuel Smith , in Red Lion-street, unloading four casks from a waggon. Brown came up in about ten minutes - I got an officer, we went to Smith's and secured the prisoners close by there, and told them we took them for stealing four casks from Fleet-market; Ferguson said, a gentleman gave him 1 s. to bring them.

JOHN MATTHEWS . I am clerk at the Rose-inn, Fleet-market. Four casks were sent from the country for Champion and Green. On Saturday afternoon Brown came and asked for some casks for Champion and Green, I delivered them to him - I knew him before, and asked how long he had lived there, he said, two or three months, and that his father worked there.

JOHN BARVIS . I am a constable. I took the prisoners, and found the casks at Smith's; he ran away when he saw us coming, and has never been seen since.

WILLIAM LICKFIELD . I am an officer. Brown told me he had them from the Rose-inn.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Brown's Defence. A person came to me in Smithfield, and sent me for the casks, and told me if the clerk asked any questions, to say I lived with them.

BROWN - GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined One Year , and Twice Publicly Whipped .

FERGUSON - NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210718-88

994. BENJAMIN HUNT and SUSAN AYRE , was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of July , three sovereigns and eleven shillings, in monies numbered, the property of David Jennings , from his person .

DAVID JENNINGS . I am a labourer , and live at Little Milton, Oxfordshire. On Saturday, the 14th of July, I received 5 l. 9 s. 3 d. pension-money, at Chelsea, and on Sunday, between nine and ten o'clock in the morning, I was in the King's-head public-house, Oxford-street, with a woman, and had lamb chops for breakfast. I then had four sovereigns, and five shillings - the prisoners were there, the woman I was with spoke to them; I treated them all with liquor - the two women said to me,

"Countryman, you are getting fresh, you had better go home to our bed, and have a nap there; you will be as safe as if you were in heaven." We all four went to their lodgings, I was quite sensible, I gave them 1 s. and the prisoners went for some rum, leaving me and the woman in the room - they returned; Hunt said, 2 s. would buy enough meat for the four, he went after the meat, my companion gave him 2 s. to buy it; he returned and said it came to 3 d. more, I said I would pay him; it was to be ready between one and two o'clock - we all came out, I went to a public-house to change one sovereign, and all four had more liquor - we then returned to the room; I saw no more of the woman I had been with - the prisoners remained in the room, and I laid down on the bed, and for safety, put my canvas purse, containing three sovereigns and one shilling, inside my breeches, and I awoke by feeling a grappling about my breeches, and seized Hunt's hand in my breeches, and missed my money - I said,

"It is too bad to rob me, I have treated you with eatables and drinkables" - they both pushed me about the room; the mutton came in from the baker's, I said, I would have some of it, but they bundled me down stairs, and threw my handkerchief after me, and said, I might go to hell - I got into the street, and gave a boy 6 d. to fetch a constable, but he never came back - a man brought two, and they were secured about two yards from the house; Hunt said a woman was spending my money - I have not recovered any of my money.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Did you not

say you did not know who robbed you - A. No; I had the money on entering the room. I slept for an hour.

WILLIAM WARD . I am a constable. I was applied to, and found the prosecutor about a quarter of a mile from where he was robbed; we met the prisoners in New Pye-street, he turned and said

"Here is the man who robbed me, and that is the woman" - I took them to the watch-house, and found 2 s. 6 d. on the woman, and 1 s. on the man.

Cross-examined. Q. Was Jennings sober - A. Yes; he said he was robbed of three sovereigns and eleven shillings - Hunt told me to go after the woman.

HUNT'S Defence. I went to fetch the dinner, and left the women in his company; I left the room before he awoke.

HUNT - GUILTY . Aged 29.

Confined One Year , and Whipped .

AYRE - GUILTY . Aged 29.

Confined Two Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210718-89

992. MICHAEL MAHONY was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of July , one coat, value 3 s., and two waistcoats, value 2 s. , the goods of Thomas Rudman .

THOMAS RUDMAN . I am a butcher . On the 10th of July, I lodged at the Three Pigeons, public-house, Houndsditch . The prisoner's master lived next door. I lost these things from a cupboard, and found them at the office.

JAMES SYMMONDS . I am a patrol. On the 10th of July, between two and three o'clock in the morning, I stopped the prisoner, in Aldgate, with this bundle. He said he had left his master, and brought it from there; then he said a gentleman gave it him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Whipped and Discharged .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18210718-90

993. WILLIAM JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of June , one watch, value 10 s. , from a certain man, whose name is unknown .

MICHAEL HORRIGAN . I am a watchman. On the 18th of June, at five o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner at the Three Compasses, public-house, Drury-lane. He came in with a girl of the town. In consequence of information, I took him, and asked if he had a watch, which was not his own - he said he had none. I found one in his breeches pocket. He then said he would make me suffer for taking him, for he would bring a person who said that he came honestly by it. I asked where the chain and seal were - he said

"Here it is." I put my hand to his breeches pocket, and he struck me.

HUMPHREY DUGGAN . I am a porter at Covent Garden-market. About three o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner scuffling with two others, under the Piazza, fighting (I do not know who they were), and in a few minutes after I saw him with the watch in his hand, with neither ribbon or chain to it; he ran from the two he was scuffling with. I afterwards saw him in a public-house, and told Horrigan.

JOHN KENNET . I am a watchman. I was in the Three Compasses, public-house; Duggan came in, recognized the prisoner, and gave us information.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18210718-91

994. AMOS ALMOND was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of March , three spoons, value 30 s. , the goods of Henry Cater .

JOSEPH TAPPER . I am servant to Captain Henry Cater , who lives in the New-road . The prisoner used to come to see me, and was there in March and April. I missed three table and a dessert spoon, and found them at the pawnbroker's.

THOMAS WADMORE . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Tottenham-court-road. On the 14th of March the prisoner pawned a spoon.

RICHARD KINGSTON . I am servant to Mr. Archer, of Marylebone-street. On the 15th of March the prisoner pawned a spoon.

JOHN TYNE . I live in Ossulston-street, Somers Town. A spoon was pawned with me, I do not know who by.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined Three Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18210718-92

995. JOHN ROBERTS was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of July , one looking-glass, value 30 s. , the goods of Samuel Rowland .

SAMUEL ROWLAND . I live in the Commercial-road . On the 4th of July, about half-past three o'clock, I was in my workshop, and saw the prisoner, in front of my house, in custody. I missed a looking-glass from the door.

MARY SULLIVAN . I saw three men sitting on some steps, opposite Rowland's. The prisoner got up, went into the shop, and brought out the glass. He ran down the street - Wilson brought him back.

EDMUND WILSON . Rowland gave me information. I pursued, and saw the prisoner running with the glass, and secured him with it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Confined Three Months , and Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18210718-93

996. CHARLES GRAHAM was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of June , one knapsack, value 6 d.; three shirts, value 6 s.; one pair of shoes, value 6 d.; one pair of boots, value 2 s.; four brushes, value 1 s.; one knife, value 2 d.; one sovereign, and 8 s. in monies numbered , the property of John Wilson .

JOHN WILSON . I am a soldier . On the 29th of June I left Chelsea, to embark for Leith, I met the prisoner at the Coach and Horses, public-house, Westminster, and dined with him. We were together from eight o'clock in the morning till half-past twelve. I gave him my knapsack to carry - it contained the articles stated in the indictment. About the middle of London-bridge I missed him with it, and saw him at Hampstead three days after - he denied ever having seen me or my property. I searched him and

found my discharge, pension papers, and knife on him, which were in the knapsack.

Prisoner. Q. Were you not drunk - A. No; perfectly sober.

JOHN GRAY . I was at the New George, public-house, Drury-court, and saw the prisoner there, about five o'clock, with a knapsack; he opened it in the tap-room - it contained boots, shirts, and things.

THOMAS ROBERTS . I keep the New George, public-house. On the 29th of June, about five o'clock, the prisoner came in a coach, and asked me to let him put a knapsack in the bar - he did so, and took the things out a few at a time, and made away with them all, except a shirt, waistcoat, and a pair of stockings, which he left in my care.

CHARLES ADAMS . I am an officer. I apprehended him on the 2d of July. He said the truth was best, and that he left the shirt, waistcoat, and stockings, at the New George, public-house.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I looked for the man, but could not find him.

GUILTY . Aged 42.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18210718-94

EIGHTH DAY. FRIDAY, JULY 27.

997. ROSETTA MACKELEKED (now the wife of Peter Harmes ) was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of December, 1819 , one 20 l. Bank note , the property of John Symmonds .

MR. ANDREWS, on behalf of the prosecution, stated, that the only evidence he was in possession of was, that the note was lost in a public-house kept by the prisoner two years ago; and that the note was traced into her hands, in March last. He declined offering any evidence.

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18210718-95

998. JOHN BENJAMIN and EDWARD EDWARDS were indicted for stealing, on the 19th of July , one bag, value 3 d., and 4 s. in monies numbered, the property of George Conrad Strobel , from his person .

THOMAS GOOK . I am an officer. On the day of the coronation I was at the corner of Great George-street and Parliament-street , and saw Edwards close to Mr. Strobel, and in half a minute I saw him push close up, and put his hand down towards his breeches pocket. Benjamin immediately went in front of Mr. Strobel - it might be the effect of the crowd. I immediately saw Edwards's hand come up, with a canvas bag, like the one in question. I said

"Sir, you have been robbed," and collared Edwards, with the bag in his hand. He had no time to walk away. Mr. Strobel said

"Yes; I have lost my bag." The bag was then gone. My assistant laid hold of Benjamin. A person picked the bag up and gave it to me. Mr. Strobel claimed it, but afterwards disowned it - he said his bag had half-a-crown and 3 s. and 6 d. This had two half-crowns and 1 s. and 6 d.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. Jones who picked the bag up, has been convicted of a conspiracy - A. Yes. The bag had a string - Mr. Strobel said his had none.

GEORGE CONRAD STROBEL . I am a leather-dresser , and live at Bermondsey. Gook said I was robbed - I felt and missed my canvas hag from my breeches pocket. Jones produced one - I cannot swear to it. I never observed that mine had strings. I will not swear to it.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18210718-96

999. JAMES TURNER and HENRY HAWKINS were indicted for stealing, on the 6th of July , one 10 l. Bank note, the property of James Cooper , from his person .

JAMES COOPER . I was a gentleman's gardener , and live in Devonshire mews, Portland-place. On Friday the 6th of July, about seven o'clock in the evening, I was looking at a boot-shop, in Middle-row, Holborn; Turner came up and entered into conversation with me; he represented himself as a cattle-dealer from the country. We walked together into Southampton-buildings, went into the Blue Posts, public-house , and had a room to ourselves. In a few moments Hawkins came in, and sat himself down by my side, and called himself a tradesman from the country - he said he had been poorly, and came to London for advice, and was going back next morning. Soon after, in came a third, with a glass of liquor, and sat on the other side of the room. We three were at one table. Hawkins and the third man began laying bets, and in about a minute, the third man said we were all poor fellows - the prisoners appeared angry at that, and asked what he would bet that we could not shew 10 l. a-piece - he said he would bet us each 1 l. Hawkins then asked if I could produce 10 l. - I said I had no money about me, but I had 10 l. at home, and both the prisoners said they had not got it, but could go home and fetch it in the course of two hours. We all went out to fetch our notes, and were to meet directly. I went home and got a 10 l. Bank note, and put the number on a piece of paper. I returned to the Blue Posts, public-house, in about an hour and a quarter, and found them all three in the tap-room. They came into the same room to me. The prisoners shewed their 10 l. notes - I do not know whether they were notes, they only shewed them in their hands. I then produced mine in my hand, and put it in my pocket again. The man said he had lost his bet, but never offered to pay. Hawkins and him betted double or quit with all three of us - I did not understand what it was about; we lost it. A 10 l. note was to be put down to bind the bet. I put my 10 l. note into a hat with theirs, as they proposed it to bind the bet. They sent for a dictionary to decide the bet, and said I had lost it. I said I had only lost the double or quit - I never meant to bet the 10 l. note. I caught hold of the hat, to take my note out - I took a piece of newspaper out of it, which I thought was my note till I opened it. I then asked for my 10 l. note - they said if I gave up the hat I should have the 10 l. I did so - they then all said I should have 5 l., and all run away together. I stopped them all in the passage for a few minutes, to prevent them getting out, and called the landlord - nobody came; a man said he

would fetch a constable, but none came; and seeing I could get no assistance, I ran over to the next public-house for assistance, and, in the meantime, all ran away. I went with a constable, and found the prisoners about two hundred yards off, in a court, and am sure they are the men; the third man was gone.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Have I not seen you here before - A. Never. I had been in the City, to enquire for a situation. I did not intend to gamble - if I had won, I should not have taken it. I did not give them the note to get change. I had received it from Mr. Graves of the Strand. I think I should know the third man if he was dressed as he was then. I asked nobody to get change. I am a Scotchman.

CHARLES DIXON . I belong to the watch-house. On the 6th of July, about seven o'clock in the evening, I was at my second floor window, in Northumberland-court, Southampton-buildings; and heard some boys cry out,

"This is no thoroughfare." In a few minutes, I came down, the prisoners were then at the top of the court, and Ashness had hold of them; Cooper was there - I took them to Hatton-garden, I had one in each hand - Hawkins turned round for a necessary purpose, and I saw a piece of paper drop from him; Alseft picked it up, opened it, and said it was a 10 l. note.

RICHARD ASHNESS . I am a constable. I was at the Grotto, opposite the Blue-posts, public-house, I was called and found Cooper at the corner looking down the buildings after the men, and found the prisoners in Northumberland-court; he said, they were the two who had his 10 l. note - Alseft came up, and we secured them, they said they had won it fairly, I gave them to Dixon, and went after the third man.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he not say he parted with it to get change - A. No; the prisoners said so, but he always denied it, they said one Jones went for change.

SAMUEL ALSEFT . I came up and found Dixon holding the prisoners; Hawkins turned round for a necessary purpose, and was some time there; Dixon said,

"Pick up that," I picked up a 10 l. note, close to him, it must have dropped from him.

WILLIAM READ . I searched the prisoners at the office. On Hawkins I found a pocket-book containing some papers, and a twopenny flash note, I found no money or Bank notes on either of them.

HAWKINS'S Defence. I deny having the note or dropping it; the prosecutor agreed at the first examination that he was with a set of sharps, and had agreed to take 5 l.; and a young man took the note to two houses for change, but could not get it.

TURNER'S Defence. I wish the people to be called from the Blue-posts and Three-tuns public-houses, as I understand the note was offered there for change; I saw Cooper looking at some forged notes which were stuck in a window, he said he was Scotch, I said. I came from Hertfordshire - I was the last that left the house, and did not run away, I fell on my knees, and begged the man to restore the note.

HAWKINS - GUILTY . Aged 43.

TURNER. - GUILTY . Aged 49.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210718-97

1000. JOHN MALPAS and JOHN CARR , were indicted for stealing, on the 22d of April , 60 lbs. of copper, value 30 s., belonging to Andrew John M'Kenzie , and fixed to a building of his .

THOMAS BOOTH . I am clerk to Mr. A. J. M'Kenzie . This copper was fixed to the roof of his store-house, which is in the parish of St. Leonard, Shoreditch . On the 22d of April, I found it stripped off, and the prisoners in custody.

STEPHEN EVANS . On the 22d of April, about one o'clock in the morning, I heard a noise on Mr. M'Kenzie's premises. I went away for a few minutes, returned, and heard it again; I set Anthony to watch, while I fetched more assistance - Palmer went with me to the other end of the premises, and on entering the gateway, I sprung on Malpas, who was kneeling on a piece of copper, in the act of rolling it up, and two or three yards behind, we secured Carr.

Cross-examined by MR. HONE. Q. Carr was not talking to Malpas - A. No.

WILLIAM ANTHONY . I am a watchman. I found Malpas in Booth's custody with a piece of copper rolled up, and another half rolled - I found Carr lying on his belly behind some gravel, and a piece of copper about a foot from him; I found two more pieces of copper on the premises, we took them to the watch-house.

Cross-examined. Q. It is an open yard - A. Yes.

GEORGE PALMER . I saw Carr behind the gravel, lying on his stomach; he was in the act of rising, when we took him - a large piece of copper lay within eighteen inches of him - I found a knife on him.

JOHN MANDER . I am a carpenter. I measured the roof, the copper corresponds with it, and was taken from there.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

CARR'S Defence. I went there for a necessary occasion.

MALPAS'S Defence. I was out late and met Carr, we turned up this gateway, and fell over this stuff.

MALPAS - GUILTY . Aged 18.

CARR - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210718-98

1001. JOSEPH MATTHEWS , was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of July , one handkerchief, value 7 s., the goods of John M'Arthur from his person .

The prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210718-99

1002. BENJAMIN JAUNCEY , was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of July , one purse value 6 d.; one guinea; and one sovereign, the property of John Arscott , from his person .

JOHN ARSCOTT . On the 19th of July, as the procession was returning from the Abbey, I was in Palace-yard , and I felt something at my pocket, looked down, and saw my pocket in the prisoner's hand; he had turned it inside out - I collared him, an officer came and took him, my purse was picked up, and given to me.

THOMAS GOOK . On the day of the coronation, I saw the prisoner and five or six others push into the crowd,

after a gentleman; I saw the prisoner push close up to Mr. Arscott, and turn his pocket clean inside out; a steel purse came out with it - I seized his hand with the purse in it, he dropped it, it was picked up, and given to Arscott, and contained a sovereign and a guinea.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was with my father and three brothers, the crowd pushed me from them, close against this gentleman; a hand came across my breast, and they seized me.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210718-100

1003. JOHN WILSON , was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of July , one handkerchief, value 3 s., the goods of George Maber , from his person .

GEORGE MABER . On the 2d of July, about two o'clock in the afternoon, I was in Chiswell-street , and felt something at my pocket. I turned round, and saw three boys walking nearly close behind me; and saw the prisoner with my handkerchief in his hand, he dropped it - I took him by the arm, and said,

"Give it me, it is mine"; he picked it up and gave it me - I said,

"You took it out of my pocket", he said,

"No, Sir; the boy in grey trowsers gave it me, and I threw it away;" the two other boys walked on - Carlisle took him.

JOHN CARLISLE . I am an officer. I saw the prosecutor having hold of the prisoner, I ran over, he said, his pocket had been picked - the prisoner said,

"I did not take it," and began to cry,

"That boy in grey trowsers took it;" I went forward, and took two boys, one of whom had grey trowsers, they were discharged.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I saw the handkerchief lying down and picked it up.

GUILTY. Aged 13.

Recommended to Mercy. - Judgment Respited .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210718-101

1004. FRANCES ROBINSON was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of July , one cap, value 10 s. , the goods of Frederick Fondling .

MARY FONDLING . I am the wife of Frederick Fondling and live in Old Montague-street . On the 11th of June, I was putting my fruit out of window - the prisoner came by; I asked her in and shewed her this cap, which I was going to put some lace on. I put it in the box and she went away, but returned in ten minutes, and asked me to fetch her something to drink. I called my girl to fetch a quartern of gin; she told me not to send the child, it looked so foolish, but to go myself. I went to the public-house, two doors off, returned, she drank it, and went away in a hurry, and said she would call about two or three o'clock. In about ten minutes I missed the cap; next day I saw her pass and stopped her - she denied it; a gentleman came up, she then called me aside and said she did take it, and gave me an affidavit of it.

JOSEPH TEBBS . I am a pawnbroker. On the 18th June, the prisoner pawned the cap for 3 s.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I pawned it by her desire to get money for drink; she afterwards went with me to get the duplicate altered in her name. After I was in charge, she said, if I could get 20 s. she would set me at liberty.

JOSEPH TEBBS . Nothing of the kind passed.

MARY FONDLING . I never gave it her to pawn, her defence is false.

GUILTY , Aged 39.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210718-102

1005. JOSEPH NIXON and RACHAEL CHAMBERLAIN were indicted for stealing, on the 23d of June , one bed, value 20 s.; one bolster, value 5 s.; two pillows, value 2 s; two sheets, value 5 s.; one counterpane, value 3 s., and two blankets, value 5 s. , the goods of Margaret Craddock , widow .

WILLIAM WIGGINS . On the 23d of June, I took the prisoners in charge at Hoxton, for robbing their lodgings, and from information they gave me I found this property.

CATHARINE HUNT . The prisoners lodged in a room belonging to Mrs. Margaret Craddock , Worcester-street, Bow . On the 18th of June, 1820, all these things were stolen, between the Saturday night and Sunday morning.

ANN NORRIS . I occupied these rooms for four years, until the prisoners took them - I know the property.

MARY LORD . I bought a bed of Chamberlain thirteen months ago, for 32 s. I am sure she is the woman - a man brought it to the door. I also bought a blanket, sheet, bolster, and counterpane of her.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

CHAMBERLAIN'S Defence. Nixon left me before the property was taken.

NIXON - NOT GUILTY .

CHAMBERLAIN - GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years ,

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210718-103

1006. JOHN JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of July , two candlesticks, value 4 s. , the goods of William Backman .

SOPHIA BACKMAN . My husband's name is William Backman , he keeps the Three Sugar Loaves, public-house, St. John's-street, Bethnal-green . On the 5th of July, the prisoner came in to have half a pint of beer; he went backward, and in a quarter of an hour went out. I ran into the kitchen, and missed the candlestick, and overtook him in the street; he gave me one from his pocket. I brought him back, and he took the other out.

(Property produced, and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I was in distress and beg for mercy.

GUILTY . Aged 51.

Confined Three Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210718-104

1007. WILLIAM BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of June , one tea-caddy. value 2 s.; one pair of gloves, value 1 s.; 4 ozs. of chocolate, value 6 d., and one piece of cotton, value 3 d. , the goods of John Gray .

ELIZA GRAY . I am the wife of John Gray , we keep a public-house ; the prisoner and two others were drinking there. I missed a tea chest after they were gone, the prisoner was brought back, and the gloves, cotton, and chocolate found on him which were in the caddy.

WILLIAM SUMMERS . I took him in charge, and found these things in his pocket.

ROBERT BROWN . I am a watchman. I saw the lid of the caddy fall out of the prisoner's pocket, and found the caddy in the river.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined One Month .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210718-105

1009. JOHN PURKIS was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of July , one handkerchief, value 3 s., the goods of James Chadley , from his person .

JAMES CHADLEY . On the 19th of July, I was at the east end of the Serpentine river ; the constable asked if I missed any thing - I felt and missed my handkerchief. I went back with him, and he collared the prisoner and another boy, and took the handkerchief from his pocket.

JAMES METCALF . I am an officer. I saw the prisoner and another following a gentleman; they went into the crowd and followed Chadley, he nudged the boy - they turned back. I went and asked if he lost any thing, he missed his handkerchief. I went and took it out of the prisoner's pocket.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY Aged 18.

Whipped and Discharged .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210718-106

1010. DANIEL CRANE was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of June , one tea chest, value 1 s.; three saucepans, value 2 s.; one pair of bellows, value 1 s.; six dishes, value 18 d.; one frying pan, value 1 s.; one portfolio, value 2 s.; four brushes, value 1 s.; one broom, value 6 d.; one glue pot, value 1 s.; one anvil, value 9 d.; one pair of snuffers, value 6 d.; one snuffers stand, value 2 d.; four candlesticks, value 2 s.; one pepper box, value 2 d.; one salt cellar, value 6 d.; one mustard pot, value 1 s.; one tumbler, value 6 d.; one pair of spurs, value 1 s.; twelve skewers, value 4 d.; one nutmeg grater, value 1 d.; one cullender, value 1 s.; one teapot, value 4 d.; and one dripping pan, value 1 s. ; the goods of Thomas Holt , James Holt , and John Kenworthy .

THOMAS HUGHES . I am clerk to Thomas and James Holt and John Kenworthy , who are canal carriers : a chest, containing these goods, was brought from Liverpool. I saw it put on the waggon at Paddington, to go into the City, on the 13th of June, at half-past seven o'clock.

JOHN DAVIS . I am a Bow-street patrol. On the 13th of June, I and Robinson were near the end of Berner's-street, in Oxford-street . I saw the prisoner close to the tail of the waggon; he looked towards me, and I thought saw me. I passed on, took off my great coat, and followed the waggon, and saw him go to the tail three times; and opposite the end of Monmouth-street, he took the chest out on his back, went a few paces, saw me, and threw it down, and run down Monmouth-street. I hallooed and he was stopped. I took him to the watch-house.

Cross-examined by Mr. HONE. Q. Was it dusk - A. Yes, he knew me before.

GEORGE ROBINSON . I was with Davis, and saw the prisoner following the waggon, and saw him take the chest out, he dropped it nearly at Davis's feet. I took care of it while Davis followed.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210718-107

1011. ROBERT WILSON and JOHN DOUGLAS were indicted for stealing, on the 30th of June , one coat, value 1 l. the goods of Thomas Rhodes .

JOHN HUTT . On the 30th of June, about nine o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoners pass my house at Battle-bridge, one had a basket, and the other a bundle of wood. Taylor came by and said he had been watching them some time. I could not leave my house, but in an hour and a half they all three came back. Wilson and the others separated at the turnpike. Douglas kept on the right side with the basket on his shoulder, it appeared bulky, and ran through the turnpike; and opposite the Belvidere, public-house, he stopped, and Wilson stood opposite. I said,

"What have you got here?" he said,

"Nothing, but a little waste;" I found this coat over some shavings, with his basket. I called after the two, and Wilson was stopped by a carpenter, and brought back to me, he had run off. I found a latch key on him.

SARAH ROGERS . I am servant to Mr. Thomas Rhodes , who lives at Hampstead ; the coat is his, it hung in the hall at half-past nine o'clock; I did not miss it till eleven o'clock, I had incautiously left the door open.

GEORGE TAYLOR . I am a constable. On the 30th of June, I was by Pentonville chapel, the prisoners passed with another in company; Douglas then had the basket under his arm, and the other the bundle of wood; one went on one side of the way, and two on the other, they went up several garden walks to the doors as they went along, I followed them through Battle-bridge, pointed them out to Hutt, and followed them to Euston-street with Colton, I think they saw me; they crossed the brick fields towards Hampstead, and I lost them. I returned over the fields, and when I got to the Belvidere, public-house, they were just taken. I went after the other, but he escaped.

WILLIAM COULTON . I followed the three men, the prisoners are two of them; they sat down at a door for a quarter of an hour, we lost sight of them about two hundred yards from Rhodes' house, they all carried the basket occasionally, and then the wood.

DOUGLAS' Defence. I was going after a situation, and found the basket in the fields at Highgate.

DOUGLAS - GUILTY . Aged 18.

WILSON - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210718-108

1012. JOHN TYLER was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of June , one copper pot, value 2 s. , the goods of Samuel Davis .

SAMUEL DAVIS . I am a publican , and live on Saffron-hill . About the 14th of June, I lost this pot from the wash house, I have seen the prisoner at the house.

ANN DRURY . I keep an old iron shop in Field-lane.

I bought the pot of the prisoner about the 14th of June. I am sure he is the man.

JOHN BARNLEY . On the 26th of June I took the prisoner, he said he knew nothing about it. I said he sold it to Drury; he then acknowledged it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. She only gave me 1 s. 6 d. for it.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Confined Three Months , and Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210718-109

1013. WILLIAM SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of June , one silver watch, value 20 s.; one seal, value 1 s., and one key, value 4 s., the goods of Samuel Thomas , from his person .

SAMUEL HUXTABLE . On the 12th of June, between twelve and one o'clock at night, I apprehended the prisoner at the Green Dragon, Stepney, and charged him with stealing a watch from Samuel Thomas , who is chief mate of the ship Waterloo ; he has sailed. I did not find it on him.

HENRY WICKHAM . I am a boot and shoe maker, and live in White Horse-street, Stepney, On the 12th of June, about twelve o'clock at night, I was standing in Stepney fair , by Samuel Thomas , who was mate of the Waterloo. I saw the prisoner come up, and saw his hand come from Thomas's fob, with the watch in it; he immediately called out,

"I have lost my watch," and collared the prisoner with it; I heard the seals rattle as he passed it to somebody, a scuffle ensued; I drew back, and followed the prisoner and prosecutor to the Green Dragon, where he gave him in charge; he appeared in liquor, and his clothes were much torn. Thomas went before the Magistrate.

JOSEPH STEVENS . I saw a man put his hand across Thomas's breast, and the prisoner draw the watch from his fob. Thomas collared him, and took him to the Green Dragon. He handed the watch to another man.

Prisoner's Defence. It was not found on me.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210718-110

1014. THOMAS PORTER was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of May , three figures, value 14 s.; six lustre branches, value 6 s.; one lamp ornament, value 2 s.; two wine glasses, value 2 s., and one glass tumbler, value 1 s. , the goods of Philip Philips .

PHILIP PHILIPS . I am a glass-man , and live in Old Bond-street ; the prisoner was in my service two years. I was continually being robbed, and discharging my men on account of it, but did not suspect him. On the 5th of May, I discharged five men and the prisoner also. I told him I would give him work to do at home, as I had confidence in him. On Thursday afternoon I was coming through Hanway-yard, and saw his wife in a shop offering figures for sale; I went in and asked how she came by them; she said one of the workmen gave them to her husband. I took her to Marlborough-street, and went to the prisoner's lodging, and asked if he had any property of mine; we searched, and in a drawer found the articles stated in the indictment. I said, "How could you rob me in this way, when I kept every thing shut up?" he said his wife gave them to him out of the store-room; his wife chared at the house.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The figures are my own property, agreeably to an Act of Parliament passed some years ago, as I am the inventor.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210718-111

1015. GEORGE SELF was indicted for a Misdemeanor .

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210718-112

1016. BETSEY STALLARD was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of June , twenty yards of muslin, value 36 s.; one petticoat, value 1 l.; two frills, value 4 s., and one penknife, value 3 s. , the goods of James Green .

The prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210718-113

1017. MICHAEL NEAL was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of July , one shirt, value 2 s. , the goods of John Ensor .

ELIZA ENSOR . I am the wife of John Ensor ; we live in Quaker-street, Spitalfields . On the first of July, while I was out, this shirt was stolen from the back parlour.

WILLIAM COX . I am a headborough. I heard a cry of Stop thief! in Swan-yard, and caught the prisoner - I did not find the shirt on him; Ensor charged him with stealing it, he said, he had sold it, as he could not starve all Sunday, and did not get his wages on Saturday night - I found no money on him.

JOHN ENSOR . On the 1st of July, I was out about three o'clock in the afternoon, and returned about five, and while I was lighting the fire, the prisoner came in and sat down; he had worked four days with me, I had my back to him, as I was blowing the fire, and on turning round, he was gone with the shirt.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Fined One Shilling, and Discharged .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210718-114

1018. PHOEBE ANN M'CARTHY was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of June , one knife, value 10 d., and one sovereign, the property of William Francis , from his person .

WILLIAM FRANCIS . I am a bricklayer , and live at Chelsea. I met the prisoner in Whitecross-street; I was intoxicated, and went home with her, and staid all night. I had a sovereign and a few shillings about me. In the morning we went together to the Bricklayer's Arms, public-house, Whitecross-street , and had a glass of liquor each. I came out, and missed a sovereign, a shilling and the duplicate of my watch. I charged her with it, and took her to the watch-house. I found a shilling put in my purse instead of the sovereign. I had given her two half-crowns - the constable found it on her.

JAMES DIMSDALE . The prisoner was brought to the watch-house. I found several shillings on her.

JAMES ARNOTT . I took her in charge, she gave me the sovereign to go and buy her some liquor. The prosecutor was drunk.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210718-115

1019. JAMES MAIN and HENRY YAMAN were indicted for stealing, on the 21st of June , one time-piece, value 30 s., the goods of Mary Hooper ; and one snuff-box, value 7 s. , the goods of John Harman .

JOHN HARMAN . I am servant to Mr. Hooper, of No. 45, Baker-street, Portman-square . On the 21st of June, I went out, and, at eight o'clock in the morning; found the prisoner in custody. I missed my snuff-box off the mantle-piece in the housekeeper's room - it was safe the night before.

JAMES HENLEY . I am a bottle-dealer, and live in East-street, Manchester-square. On the 21st of June, about half-past seven o'clock in the morning, I was going to No. 46, Baker-street, and saw the prisoners standing between there and No. 45. I went in, and on coming out they still stood there. I went on towards Dorset-street, turned my head round, and saw Main going down the area steps of No. 45. I turned back, and found him coming up, but doing something up in his bosom. I tried to lay hold of him, but he ran back down the area passage, and into a little room in the house. I ran down, and called out

"House!" The cook came, and we secured him coming out of the room - he said he had nothing, and we might search him. I said,

"Perhaps you have nothing now, but I am sure you had something" - he said he had not, he had been to ask for Mrs. James. The cook locked him up, and I went home. Yaman passed me before I took Main. They were close in conversation when Main went down, and on seeing me turn back, ran off. I rather doubt whether Yaman is the other, as I now perceive that he squints.

ELIZA WILTSHIRE . I am cook at the house. I heard Henley call out, and found Main in the room. He said he came for Mrs. James - no such person lived there. I found the time-piece removed from the middle of the mantle-shelf, towards the end, and laid on its side. The snuff-box was found on the ledge of the room over-head. The servants were not up.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

MAIN - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

YAMAN - NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210718-116

1020. JOHN KELLY was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of July , 5 s. in copper monies numbered , the property of Thomas Boyle .

THOMAS BOYLE . I keep a chandler's-shop in Church-street, St. Giles's . On the 18th of July, about eleven o'clock at night, the prisoner came in and bought some things, which he paid for. I saw him take a paper of halfpence, and go out quickly. I followed, and secured him in twenty minutes.

GEORGE BASEY . I am a patrol. I searched him, and found 4 s. 4 1/2 d., all in halfpence, on him. Boyle said if they were his, we should not find a penny among them, which we did not.

Prisoner's Defence. I worked for it.

GUILTY . Aged 33.

Fined One Shilling and discharged .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210718-117

NINTH DAY, SATURDAY, JULY 28.

1021. THOMAS HOWLETT and WILLIAM HART were indicted for stealing 6 lbs. of mutton , the goods of Samuel Summers .

MR. BARRY, on the part of the prosecution, stated, that he could not bring this case home to the prisoners, as a material witness had absconded, and he would call no evidence.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18210718-118

1022. WILLIAM PIPER and WILLIAM MITCHELL were indicted for stealing, on the 13th of July , twelve quarts of ale, value 12 s., and seventeen bottles, value 2 s. , the goods of John Kimptor .

RICHARD CARTER . I am a Thames Police officer. On the 18th of July, about six o'clock in the morning, I was in Rosemary-lane, and saw the prisoners together - Piper appeared bulky, and Mitchell, had a bag; Piper crossed the road, I stopped him, and asked what he was carrying - he said a few bottles of ale, that he was a carter, and had been carting all the day before. I found three bottles of ale in his shirt, and two under his coat.

JOHN SHIELDS . I am an officer. I saw the prisoners in Rosemary-lane - Mitchell had a bag, Piper appeared bulky, and had a great coat on. I took Mitchell, and asked what he had got - he gave no answer. I took him to a public-house and found ten bottles of ale in it. Piper said they had been carting ale, and it was a little they took. We took them to the office.

JOHN KIMPTON . I am a dealer in ale , and live in White-yard, Rosemary-lane . The ale was in a stable there. I had fifteen dozen packed in straw, and in a cask. The stable was locked, but there was a hole above the door large enough to get in. About half-past eight o'clock in the morning of the 15th, I missed eight dozen and nine bottles of ale. I found the prisoners in custody with this, it is of the same description of ale. The Scotch ale is all of the same flavour. I found marks on the bottles which corresponded with those left. Piper's cart stands in my yard. I cannot swear to the bottles.

PIPER - GUILTY . Aged 26.

MITCHELL - GUILTY . Aged 29.

Confined Six Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18210718-119

1023. EDWIN COTTERILL was indicted for stealing on the 18th of June , one handkerchief, value 6 d., and two spencers, value 20 s. , the goods of Sarah Downes , spinster , from the person of Ann Ware .

ANN WARE . I was in the City-road with these gown-bodies

- they were not spencers. The handkerchief belonged to Charlotte Dixon , not to Sarah Downes.

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18210718-120

1024. JAMES HALLIDAY was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of April , one 10 l. Bank note , the property of Thomas Morris .

THOMAS MORRIS . I keep the Crown and Anchor, public-house, St. Pancras . The prisoner was my servant . On the 7th of April, I sent him to get change for a 10 l. note - he never returned. I did not see him again until the 10th of June, when he was in custody.

WILLIAM HARVEY . I live near Mr. Morris. I gave the prisoner change for the note, and produce it.

MR. MORRIS. That is my note.

COURT. He changed the note as his master desired him, but embezzled the change. He did not steal the note. ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18210718-121

1025. JAMES GEARY was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of June , one spade, value 2 s. , the goods of Robert Doe .

ROBERT DOE. I am a gardener , and live in the City-road . This spade stood against the cow-shed door - I saw the prisoner lay hold of it, and go away. I followed him into Old-street, and took him.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210718-122

1026. GEORGE GUTTERIDGE was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of June , two brass chucks, value 2 s., two ring handles, value 6 d., and one brass rod, value 6 d. , the goods of John Henry Price .

JOHN HENRY PRICE . I am a brass-worker , and live at No. 2, Kendall-mews, Gee-street, Manchester-square . On the 20th of June, the prisoner came there, and enquired for a situation. I asked if a pot-boy's place would suit him - he said, Yes, thanked me, and went down stairs. He came up in a few minutes, and said he had a waistcoat to sell, and wanted me to buy it. I refused. He offered it to me for 3 s. Seeing he was so distressed, I gave him a shilling in part of it - he was to come for the rest a little after seven o'clock. When he went away the first time I looked out and saw a suspicious man, with a bundle, waiting outside, which made me suspect the waistcoat was stolen, and I followed them to Gee's-court, where they offered something for sale - this made me suspect something. I lost them. I went to Marlborough-street, and then went home, but missed nothing until towards evening, when we missed these things. I went to the shop in Marylebone-lane, where I saw them go, and asked if they had such things - they said No, but I found the ring-handles. The boy said he bought them with other metal. I asked to see it, and it was my other things.

JOHN HAWKINS . At the time this happened, I lived in Marylebone-lane. My father kept an old-iron shop; the prisoner came with another boy, rather bigger than himself, on the 20th of June, about three o'clock in the afternoon, and brought some old brass, I gave him eight-pence or nine-pence for it, at 5 d. per lb. - it was the articles stated in the indictment; I gave the money to the prisoner, I think.

WILLIAM SELLERS . I am a constable. I took him in charge, he acknowledged taking it.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210718-123

1027. GEORGE ARMSTRONG and JAMES DUNKLEY , were indicted for stealing, on the 16th of June , sixteen bushels of oats, value 30 s., and four sacks, value 6 s. , the goods of Samuel Knight .

MR. DOWLING conducted the prosecution.

SAMUEL KNIGHT . I am a corn-dealer , and live in Oxford-road. On the 16th of June, I had bought one hundred and ninety quarters of pats, of Messrs. Hill and Wheeler, and ordered Mr. Bradbury, the lighterman, to convey them to Mr. Lack's wharf, Millbank; they were put into my sacks, which had my name and address in full length on them.

JAMES BRADBURY . I am a lighterman. I received orders from Mr. Knight, to lighter one hundred and ninety quarters of oats, from the Ann, Captain Hamilton, at Horsleydown. I saw them put in my lighter, and sent my lad Edwards with them to Lack's wharf , on the 15th. The lighter was called

"The Friends."

JOSEPH EDWARDS . I am apprentice to Mr. Bradbury on the 15th of June, I took one hundred and ninety quarters of oats, and left them at Lack's wharf, Millbank, in the lighter. I got there about one o'clock in the afternoon of the 16th of June.

JAMES LACK . I have a wharf at Millbank. On the 16th of June, I received one hundred and ninety quarters of oats in Bradbury's lighter, moored at the piles belonging to the wharf - I saw the oats taken out, some were ordered but, and the rest left in.

Cross-examined by MR. PLATT. Q. Were you present when they arrived - A. No.

JAMES ALLINGHAM . I am a lighterman, and live in Horsleydown. On the morning of the 16th of June, between two and three o'clock, I was near Lack's wharf - I saw a boat rowing away from the wharf; I was two wharfs above his, two or three men were in the boat, I am sure there were two; they had sacks full of something in the boat, they rowed off to a row in the middle of the river, and put the sacks into a coal barge, and cast the coal barge adrift - the tide was running up nearly high water, the barge drifted towards Lambeth - I saw no more of her; I do not know whether the men followed the barge, it was too dark to tell what the sacks contained.

Cross-examined. Q. You were some distance - A. Yes; I was mooring a barge, and could not pursue.

JOHN LAWRENCE . I am a constable of Surry, and live at Lambeth. On the morning of the 16th of June, in consequence of information, I went down to the water side; about ten minutes past three o'clock, rather above Lack's, and saw a barge on the opposite shore, and the prisoner Armstrong, looking off the shore - I went into an alley leading to the water side, and saw four full sacks lying about the middle of the alley, marked,

" Samuel Knight ,

Oxford-street;" one of the sacks was dirty, as if it had been on some coals - Dunkley was on shore, but not close to the alley. I knew them both before. When I went to the sack, Armstrong jumped into the alley, and said, he would lose his bl - y life, before he would leave it there. He took the sacks away from the alley, and put them into and old barge, and then into a boat, Dunkley assisted - one of the sacks, when it was thrown into the boat, broke one of the sculls; I had no assistance, and could not take them then - it was a large boat, what they call a Norway Yaul - I saw the same boat at the Thames police-office, the same evening; I did not see them go away - about half-past five o'clock that morning, I went over to Lack's wharf, and saw four sacks marked similar to those I saw before, the dirty one was there, I can swear to its being the same, and there was a vacancy in the barge where the sacks had been lying, in the forward part of the vessel, the vacancy appeared sufficient to contain the four sacks - about a bushel and a half or two bushels had been spilt out of them at Lambeth.

Cross-examined. Q. This was on the morning of the 16th - A. Yes; and two hours after, I saw the same sacks at the wharf; I did not conceal myself in the alley, Armstrong knew I was a constable, he addressed himself to me when he said,

"He would be d - d if he would leave them there."

WILLIAM SMITH . I am a watchman. On the 16th of June, I was in Fore-street, Lambeth, close to the river side, and saw a bulk of four sacks, laying among a parcel of timber; I felt, and found them to contain some sort of grain - I saw nobody near it, it was then three o'clock - I fetched Lawrence, and told him, I went down directly. I went to call some people up to work, and when I returned Lawrence and Armstrong were in the alley, Dunkley was on shore - I was going down the alley, and Armstrong said,

"You be off, Mr. Billy;" I knew them both before, Dunkley was very near the alley - I saw Armstrong take the sacks out of the alley, and went away.

Cross-examined. Q. Why not stay and arrest Lawrence - A. I thought it of no use; they were stronger than us two, I am 62 years old - I fetched a constable, but it was too late.

WILLIAM COATES . I am a lighterman, and live at Chelsea. On the 16th of June, about four in the morning, I was on the river, and at Lambeth; I observed some men putting some sacks into a boat, about forty yards from me on the Surrey side, the boat was afloat; there were two or three sacks, I did not take particular notice. One of the sculls broke as they threw the sacks in off the craft - they went across the water in the boat - the tide was running down.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you see them break the scull - A. Yes, I heard it break.

Q. If they took the corn from the row at Westminster, would it be shorter for them to go to the Lambeth side first - A. I think so.

JOSEPH HARDING . I am a Thames Police surveyor. On the 16th of June, between four and five o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner coming through London Bridge, on the Surrey side, in a boat alone; there was nothing bulky in the boat, they were going downwards. I followed them to Church-stairs, Rotherbithe; they made their boat fast, and went ashore. I should know the boat again. it had Dunkley's name on it. I knew them both before.

JAMES BRANTRY . I am a Thames Police surveyor. On the 16th of June, in consequence of information, I landed at Lambeth stairs between three and four o'clock in the morning; I was in Fore-street, and looked down one of the alleys, and saw a quantity of loose corn laying in an old barge's head, called the King, and some spilt on shore. I borrowed a sack and gathered it up, it was about a bushel and a half. I searched the craft, and went to Dunkley's back door in my own boat, to see if his boat was stowed there, and found she was not. I then crossed the water, and went to Lack's wharf, and found a punt there belonging to Bradbury, covered with tarpauling, named the Friends, and found the four outer sacks had been taken from the bulk; the sternfast had been cut, to make the barge turn round, so that on coming up the river the vacancy would not be seen. In the fore part of the barge I found four sacks of oats between the bulk, partly in and partly out, they were marked

"Knight, Oxford-street," one of them were very muddy; all the other sacks were perfectly dry; there appeared about two bushels of corn taken out. I produce a sample of the bulk, and of that I found at Lambeth. I found Dunkley's boat at Church-stairs, Rotherhithe, about nine o'clock that morning, and at the bottom of it was some loose oats, I took them away; the boat appeared to have been recently washed. There was a pair of sculls in it, belonging to Dunkley, and one with the name of Thomas Etherell on it; one of Dunkley's sculls was broken about four feet of the blade, it was broken in two parts and tied together with two sack tyers. About eleven o'clock in the morning, I went with Dalby and Blyth to Armstrong's house, close to the Europa, public-house, Rotherhithe, and took the prisoners; I waited at the back of the house - they denied the charge.

Cross-examined. Q. About two bushels appeared to be gone from the four sacks - A. Yes, I found the four sacks at the end of the barge; they must have been brought back, and put in the barge again; I cannot say they were ever taken out. Dunkley's scull appeared to be mended with sack tyers about a foot long, which is the usual length; they appeared the same sort as the sacks were tied with.

DANIEL BLYTH . I am a Thames Police surveyor. Dalby and I went to apprehend the prisoners about eleven o'clock in the morning; we knocked repeatedly at Armstrong's door, they would not let us in, and we entered at the window, passed through the front room, and went into the kitchen; the prisoners came down stairs. Armstrong then said, you bl - y - , what do you want here? They appeared to be going to resist. We secured them; Armstrong asked what he was taken for. I said, on suspicion of stealing four sacks of oats. They denied knowing any thing of it. I asked Armstrong if he had been above bridge that night; he said, yes, he had, and that Green, one of the other officers, had seen him; they said, they had done nothing they were afraid of. I said,

"Then why not let us in when we knocked;" he said,

"You did not give us time to put our things on."

Cross-examined. Q. You found them coming down

stairs - A. Yes, they both put themselves in a posture of defence. We had knocked a dozen times at the door, and stood there a quarter of an hour; they did not answer any of our knocks.

CHARLES GREEN . I am a Thames Police surveyor. On the 16th of June, about half-past two o'clock in the morning, I saw Armstrong laying on the gunnel of a barge, at the back of Dunkley's door, apparently asleep, and I saw Dunkley in his boat, which then laid between the craft and his door, he is a druggerman; I have frequently seen them together.

SAMUEL KNIGHT re-examined. Q. Look at the samples of the bulk, that which was found in the prisoner's boat, and that found in the alley - A. I have been sixteen years in the corn trade; it is impossible to speak to that found in the boat - it being wet and dirty; the other two appear to be samples of the same corn. The four sacks of oats cost me 33 s.

ARMSTRONG - GUILTY . Aged 36.

DUNKLEY - GUILTY . Aged 36.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210718-124

1028. MICHAEL GAVIN was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of June , one watch, value 10 s., the goods of Robert Lawrence , from his person .

The prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210718-125

1029. JOSEPH DAWES was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of June , twenty-two rings, value 5 l. , the goods of Jacob French .

JACOB FRENCH . I am a working jeweller , and live in St. James's-walk, Clerkenwell , the prisoner was my errand boy . On the morning of the 18th June, about ten o'clock, I sent him with twenty-two gold rings to Mr. Hughes, a gold turner; he had lived a fortnight with me - he returned within an hour, went to dinner at one o'clock, and returned at three o'clock - I scolded him. I sent him to the west end of the town with a pair of ear-rings, and he did not return all day. Between nine and ten o'clock at night, I sent for him, he came, and said he had delivered them, but he did not come back, as he found his father tipsy; he went home, and next morning, his mother brought him to beg pardon for him, and desiring me to continue to employ him. I consented, and in consequence of information, I went to Hughes, and had him apprehended. I never sent him for the rings.

WINIFRED HUGHES . I am the wife of James Hughes ; the prisoner gave the twenty-two rings to me to be merled, and came for them about three o'clock in the afternoon, they were not done; he said he must take them away undone, and I delivered them to him; next morning Mr. French came and enquired after them.

JOHN MILLS . I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner; he said he sold the rings to a young man on Clerkenwell-green, for 1 d. and some black jack.

GUILTY . Aged 13.

Confined Six Months and Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210718-126

1030. JOHN BRUMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of July , one hammer, value 2 d.; one chisel, value 2 d.; one vice, value 6 d.; one rivetting stake, value 6 d.; one ink-stand, value 4 d.; one rule, value 1 d., and 2 lbs. of buttons, value 2 s. , the goods of John Miles .

JOHN MILES . I am a pattern maker , and live in Lower West-street . On Sunday, the 1st of July, the prisoner lived in a house adjoining my workshop, the yard communicates with both, the things were safe the night before, and between eight and nine o'clock on Sunday night, I missed them, got an officer, went to the prisoner, and told him, I suspected he had some of my property; he denied it, and said we were welcome to search, and on searching, the officer found the property stated in the indictment; part in the room he was in, and the rest on the stairs.

JAMES MILES . I went and saw the property found.

JOHN BARNLEY . I am a constable. We went to the prisoner's house, and found the property; nobody but him lived in the house - he said he was distressed.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210718-127

1031. WILLIAM BASS was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of July , one purse, value 6 d.; one sovereign, and four sixpences, the property of Thomas Hobcroft , from the person of Mary, his wife .

MARY HOBCROFT . I am the wife of Thomas Holcroft . On the 17th of July, about eight o'clock in the evening, I was at Westminster ; there was a great crowd in Bridge-street , and my purse was taken from my pocket. I felt a hand in my pocket, and was instantly informed I was robbed. I missed my purse containing a sovereign. I followed the officer, who had the prisoner with it.

ROBERT DUKE . I am a constable. On the 17th of July, I saw the prisoner put his hand into four or five women's pockets. I watched him, and at the corner of Bridge-street, saw him put his left hand into Hobcroft's pocket, and hold the pocket up with his right hand, and take out the purse. I told the prosecutrix, and secured him.

CHARLES GREEN . I saw the prisoner put his hand in to several ladies' pockets. I saw him take the purse out of the prosecutrix's pocket, and took it out of his hand.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I picked it up.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210718-128

1032. THOMAS BRITTON was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of July , thirty books, value 3 l. , the goods of Richard Hughes .

RICHARD HUGHES . I am a stationer , and live in Moor-lane . On the 14th of July, I lost these books from my shop - the prisoner was a binder . I found them in his possession - he worked at my house for three months.

EDWARD CALVERT . I am servant to Mr. Flemming, a

pawnbroker, who lives in Newgate-street. I took fourteen books in pawn of the prisoner, on the 2d and 13th of July - he said he dealt in them.

THOMAS VANN . On the 14th of July, I went with Hughes to Matthews's the pawnbroker's, and found a quantity of books; we went to the prisoner's house in Banner-street, where I found the duplicates of them and two books.

DAVID TRAIL . I am servant to Mr. Matthews, who lives in Aldersgate-street. I have ten books pawned for 10 s. 6 d. on the 1st of June, and on the 11th of July, five for 5 s. by the prisoner.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. Distress caused me to do it, I could not get my wages.

GUILTY . Aged 33.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210718-129

1033. SAMUEL ALBINSON was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of July , one shirt, value 2 s.; one pair of shoes, value 2 s.; 1 lb. of tea, value 4 s.; two handkerchiefs, value 6 d., and two pair of stockings, value 3 s. , the goods of Alexander M'Bride .

ALEXANDER M'BRIDE. I am a tailor . On the 4th of July, I was coming from Chelsea, I went into a public-house with two companions; as I came into the tap-room, the prisoner came and sat next to me, and asked if I would buy a shirt. I said I had no objection - he fetched it, it was wrapped up in a linen handkerchief. I gave him 5 s. 6 d. for the shirt, 6 d. for the handkerchief, and 5 s. 6 d. for a pair of shoes. One of my friends went away, we were walking along together, and went into the Rose and Crown, public-house, St. Martin's-lane , for some beer, with him and a friend, and had a pot of beer, we had the articles stated in the indictment in a bundle; he came behind, caught me by the throat, and said,

"You have got my shirt and shoes." I said, I had paid him for them; he said,

"I will have them or your life;" he knocked me down under the table, twisted my bundle from me, and to save myself from being choked, I let go, and he ran off with it - my friend was also knocked down. Next morning, I went to where I bought the things of him, and found him there in his regimentals, I said,

"You are the man who robbed me last night;" he ran off, I followed him to the barracks, and he was secured. My handkerchief and shoes were found in his knapsack. I am positive he is the man.

NICHOLAS COWARD . I was with the prosecutor; we had been to Chelsea, and when we came to a house by the mews gate, the prisoner asked him to buy a pair of shoes, he bought them and a shirt. I saw him pay for that - I left him.

DANIEL BROCK . I was with them, and saw the prisoner said the prosecutor the things - we left there, and a woman was with us; we went into a house in St. Martin's-lane, they knocked the prosecutor down, the prisoner got on him. I rose to his assistance and was knocked down, the soldiers went off with the bundle - the prisoner is the man.

JAMES BUTLER . I am a serjeant in the Guards; the prosecutor informed me of the robbery. I found the shoes and handkerchief in the prisoner's knapsack.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. At Bow-street, he said the landlord was present; he was fetched, and said he never saw me in the house. I got the shoes from the depot in Smithfield.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210718-130

1034. ALEXANDER M'LACHLAND was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of July , one seal, value 10 s. , the goods of Felix Elliman .

FELIX ELLIMAN . The prisoner slept in the same room with me, but did not on the night I lost this seal. On the 18th of July, he came into the room about ten o'clock, and laid hold of my watch, took it down from the window, and hung it up again - at one o'clock, I missed the seal off it, and eleven shillings from my pocket - he had ran away from my master about a week before.

WILLIAM SUMMERS . The prosecutor gave me information, and pointed the prisoner out, I took him; after a long time, he said he pawned the seal at Shadwell.

THOMAS SOAMES . I am a pawnbroker, and live at Shadwell. On the 19th of July, a woman pawned the seal.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I wanted some money to settle with my master.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Confined One Month .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210718-131

1035. JOSEPH EDWARDS and WILLIAM WATTS were indicted for stealing, on the 27th of June , 17 lbs. of lead, value 2 s. , the goods of Arthur French .

BENJAMIN BLABY . I am an officer. On the 27th of June. I met Edwards in Broad-street, with this lead; I followed him to Old Gravel-lane, and asked what he was carrying, he said, it was new lead, which he brought from Mr. Lewis's, and was going to take it to Blackwall, on board the ship, Venus - I found it was old lead. I took him to the office, and asked him who the person was, he said, he did not like to tell, as he would lose his bread; he said, he would send for a friend, and consult him whether he should give him up or not, he sent for a person who keeps a public-house in the neighbourhood, and consulted him, the publican pointed out Watts to me, he is French's servant - I told Mr. French, and set men to watch Watts; he was apprehended - Edwards said, he was the man who gave him the lead, Watts then said, Edwards asked him for a piece, and he gave it him.

WILLIAM FORTY . I corroborate Blaby's account; I apprehended Watts.

HENRY LEGATS . The prisoner sent for me, and said, Watts gave it him.

F. W. DRURY. I am servant to Mr. French - I cannot swear that the lead is his.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210718-132

1036. JOHN BECK , JAMES BIGGS , and HUGH LAMBERT were indicted for stealing, on the 9th of July , one chain, value 1 s., and one seal, value 10 s. , the goods of Thomas Barber .

THOMAS GRENVILL . I am porter to Mr. Ferrell. I I stood at the gate, at the corner of Lamb's Conduit-street , at the corner of a passage, on the 9th of July, about half-past nine o'clock at night, and the three prisoners came up and met Mr. Barber, and snatched his watch, he called,

"Stop thief!" I ran after them, and was tripped up in the passage, they pulled the gate after them, and shut Biggs in with me, I secured him, and am sure the other two were with him - I had been watching them about the neighbourhood for seventeen nights - Beck snatched the watch.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. You were placed there to watch - A. Yes; I was within a yard of Barber - there are gas lights - I am sure they are the men.

ROBERT PITCHER . I was watching several nights at the top of Chapel-street, in consequence of several robberies having been commited - I heard the cry

"Stop thief!" I saw three men run up the court - Grenvill secured both prisoners.

JOHN KNIGHT . I was at the corner of Chapel-street; Beck and Lambert ran by, from the cry of "Stop thief!"

THOMAS BARBER . I was going along Lamb's Conduit-street, with my wife, a man ran up, made a violent tug at my watch, and got the chain and seal - the three prisoners were stopped directly; I cannot swear to any of them.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you not desire the officers to give the prosecution up, as you did not know the men - A. Yes; I am a jeweller , and live in Lamb's Conduit-street.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210718-133

1037. JOHN BECK was again indicted for stealing, on the 8th of July , one watch, value 10 s.; one chain, value 6 d.; two seals, value 10 s., and one key, value 2 d., the goods of William Harrod , from his person .

WILLIAM HARROD. On Sunday, the 8th of July, I was in Portpool-lane , about ten o'clock at night, with my wife and daughter, going down Gray's-inn-lane, home; and four young men were walking behind us - as I put my foot on the step of the door to ring the bell, they passed - one came back, asked if that was No. 26, and took my watch out of my pocket; I said,

"You have got my watch," he ran towards Tash-court, I followed, and caught him, but was knocked down by two of the party, and he got away - I cannot say the prisoner is the man.

ANN HARROD . I was with my father; we stood at the door to be let in; four young lads passed us, and in a few moments, one of them returned, and asked my father if that was No. 26 - my father said,

"He has taken my watch;" he ran across the road, and my father caught him at the end of Tash-court - two of his companions knocked my father down, and all three ran up the court, I pursued, calling

"Stop thief!" and at the top of the court, I saw the prisoner, he asked which way the three ran; I told him all three ran down Tash-court, and he was the fourth, for he was one of the party - he said, "Do you say, Miss, that I took your father's watch?" I said, "You are one of the party." He said, he would go any where with me; he came down to the bottom of the court with me, and I gave him in charge - I am sure he is one of them, he is not the one who took it, but he is one of the four, I am certain.

JOHN DORAN . On Sunday night, about half-past nine o'clock, I heard a cry of "Stop thief!" I went to the door, and the last witness gave the prisoner in my charge for robbing her father - I held him some minutes, she said, he was one of the party but not the man who did it. I let him go. and he ran away; I am sure he is the man I stopped.

JOHN KNIGHT . I took him in custody on the 9th of July.

Prisoner's Defence. I saw five of them run up the street; and went to see what was the matter.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210718-134

1038. DANIEL RYAN was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of June , one watch-chain, value 3 l.; two seals, value 2 l., and one key, value 10 s., the goods of William Barratt , from his person .

WILLIAM BARRATT . On the 7th of June, about ten minutes before ten o'clock at night, I was coming down Liquorpond-street ; there were three young men in company before me; one of them came alongside of me and shoved me on the curb, and the prisoner came up and snatched my watch, and ran away. I ran down Crown-court after him, through Sparrow's-rents, into Portpool-lane. He cried Stop thief! he stopped, turned round, and came towards me - I caught hold of him; he said,

"It is not me, Sir." I am positive of him; he threw my watch away; he had three or four companions.

THOMAS SMITH . I live in Liquorpond-street. I saw the prisoner rob Mr. Barratt, and am sure he is the boy.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210718-135

1039. CHARLOTTE PARKER was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of June , one watch, value 10 s.; one ribbon, value 1 d.; one pair of gloves, value 1 s., and 15 s. 6 d. in monies numbered, the goods of Nathaniel Lewis , from his person .

The prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210718-136

1040. ANN MORGAN and CATHARINE CARROLL were indicted for stealing, on the 9th of July , 17 s. in monies numbered, the property of James Braney , from his person .

The prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210718-137

1041. SUSAN LEATT was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of July , one sheet, value 2 s. , the goods of Francis Barrs .

FRANCIS BARRS . On Sunday, the 8th of July, I heard a noise in my house, and lost this sheet. A few days after the prisoner passed my house. M'Donald pointed the prisoner out.

MARGARET M'DONALD . I was going on an errand, and saw the prisoner go out of the house with a bundle. I told the prosecutrix. It was about seven o'clock in the morning. My mother missed the sheet when she went down stairs, and told Barrs.

GEORGE WILSON . I was sent for, and took her at Barrs' house; and, in going to the office, she said she took it, and cut part of it up for a pinafore for her child, and the rest for a shirt for her brother. I found one on her brother's back, made out of it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined Three Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210718-138

1042. ELEANOR JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of June , one watch, value 1 l., and one seal, value 5 s., the goods of Joseph Seall , from his person .

JOSEPH SEALL . The prisoner lived at my father's house, at Chelsea. I carried a box to town for her - my father told me to carry it as far as St. James's-park, and gave me some money to bring some things from Newport-street. She said as I was going there I could carry it to King-street, Drury-lane. She took me into a public-house, and gave me a glass of gin and some porter - then she took me into another public-house, in Long-acre, and gave me another glass of gin. I had never drank any before, and this was before breakfast. She took me to King-street, Drury-lane , up-stairs to her apartment. I put her box down in the room; I found myself very ill and giddy - she said I had better lay down on the bed. I was very sick indeed, and she told the landlady I was her brother, or I should not stop. I laid down on the bed and fell a-sleep. I had 5 s. in my breeches pocket, and my watch in my fob; and when I awoke, which was between two and three o'clock in the afternoon, I missed my watch from my fob; the 5 s. was safe. I got off the bed, and an old woman in the room said she did not know what became of the watch. I waited till five o'clock expecting her - she did not come. I went home and told my father - he went to look for the watch, and found it in pawn, I am fifteen years old.

Cross-examined by MR. PLATT. Q. You never tasted gin before - A. Never. I was very tipsy; a friend of hers joined us in the street, but my watch was safe when she left us.

CHARLES HANSON . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Drury-lane. I have a watch and gold seal, pawned by the prisoner on the 6th of June, in the name of Pike.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 32.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder

Reference Number: t18210718-139

1043. MARY HOLLOWAY was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of July , 7 lbs. of bacon, value 3 s., and two pigs tongues, value 1 s. , the goods of John Elsworth .

SAMUEL DENNIS . About twelve o'clock, on the 17th of July, the prisoner came into Mr. Elsworth's shop, in Drury-lane , and asked for a quarter of a pound of butter; I weighed it, she went to the opposite counter; she gave me the money for the butter. A gammon of bacon stood there; I saw her shuffling about. She asked for four eggs; I missed the bacon; my master called me into the back room, and as I turned round, I saw her put it into her apron; she went out of the shop; I secured her, an took her to Bow-street.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I asked him to change an egg, he threw it at me, and said he would be revenged, and when I went on that day, he said I had stolen the bacon, but I paid for it.

GUILTY . Aged 46.

Confined Three Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210718-140

1044. THOMAS HAMMOND was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of July , one coat, value 30 s. , the goods of Thomas Thompson .

ELIZA THOMPSON . I am the wife of Thomas Thompson , a tailor . I saw the prisoner come in, and take this coat and go out. I run after him; he dropped it; I took him immediately; he got off, and was stopped again immediately. I am sure he is the person.

PETER PATTERSON . I was standing at my door, I heard the cry, and saw Mrs. Thompson holding the prisoner; he got loose and ran off; I secured him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I never had it.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210718-141

1045. THOMAS BROWN and GEORGE MORRIS were indicted for stealing, on the 27th of June , one necklace, value 12 s.; the goods of Henry Stokes , from the person of Eliza Stokes .

JAMES TOWLER . I am an officer. I was by Sadler's Wells , and saw the prisoners, and three more together. They went one on each side of a servant, who was carrying a child, one put his hand to the child's neck; they saw me, drew back, then went up again. Morris made a snatch at the child's neck, and took the necklace off; they crossed the road; I followed and saw it drop between them.

JOSEPH MEECHER . I was with Towler. I saw Morris put his hand on the child's neck, and draw back; he went up again; took the necklace, and we secured them.

FRANCES KNIGHT . I was carrying the child; Brown pushed against me, and I immediately missed the necklace.

HENRY STINTON . I assisted in securing them, and saw the necklace drop between them.

MRS. STOKES . I am the wife of Henry Stokes . I know the necklace to be my child's, Eliza - she is two years old.

BROWN'S Defence. He was taking us to Hatton-garden, when a lady come by, and picked up the necklace.

BROWN - GUILTY . Aged 15.

MORRIS - GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210718-142

1046. JOHN WARREN was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of June , one hat, value 3 s. , the goods of a man unknown .

JAMES WRIGHT . I was coming home from church with Williams, and met the prisoner on the green at Stepney ; he asked me to walk down Bow-road, when I got there, he said, a man laid drunk in the field, and he had stolen his hat, and afterwards he told me to go and see what clothes he had on. I went and told him, it was a dark green coat, and blue pantaloons. I did not see him take any hat, but he told me so.

RICHARD WILLIAMS . I and Wright were coming from church, and met the prisoner; he said, he exchanged a hat with a man, that he put his own hat down, and took the man's, and that after that, Browning, who was with him, took up his hat and left his own.

JOHN BROWN . The prisoner delivered himself up to me, and said he had stolen a hat.

WILLIAM HARDING . I was with the prisoner in the fields, and saw a man asleep; the prisoner took his hat and left his own; then a chap who was with him, returned and took his, and left his own.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: o18210718-1

Note. WILLIAM BURR and JOSEPH LOOSELEY , who were convicted in February last of Burglary, but upon whom the Judgment of the Court was respited, for the opinion of the Twelve Judges on a point of Law, stated in the Report of their Case (Vide Third Session, page 112), have received Sentence of Death , in consequence of a communication from the Learned Judges, but no decision has been given in Court.


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