Old Bailey Proceedings, 6th June 1821.
Reference Number: 18210606
Reference Number: f18210606-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace Oyer and Terminer, AND Gaol Delivery for the City of London, AND ALSO The Gaol Delivery For the County of Middlesex, HELD AT Justice Hall, in the Old Bailey; ON WEDNESDAY, 6th of JUNE, 1821, and following Days;

Being the Fifth Session in the Mayoralty of THE RIGHT HON. JOHN THOMAS THORP , LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

Taken in Short-Hand by H. BUCKLER, Basinghall Street, (BY AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON.)

London:

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED, FOR H. BUCKLER, BY T. BOOTH, 31, St. Andrew's Hill, Doctor's Commons.

1821.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX.

Before the Right Honourable JOHN THOMAS THORP , Esq. LORD MAYOR of the City of London; Sir John Bayley , Knt. one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir William Garrow , Knt., one of the Barons of his Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir John Perring , Bart.; Sir William Leighton , Knt.; John Ansley , Esq.; Sir Claudius Stephen Hunter , Bart.; Matthew Wood , Esq.; George Bridges , Esq., Aldermen of the said City; Sir John Silvester , Bart., D.C.L. Recorder of the said City; Christopher Magnay , Esq., and Richard Rothwell Esq., Aldermen of the said City; Newman Knowlys , Esq., Common Sergeant of the said City; William St. Julien Arabin , Esq., his Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of the Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

London Jury.

John Armitage ,

Barnaby Dunn ,

William Jackson ,

William Friend ,

William Lewis ,

Thomas Medhurst ,

John England ,

George Ball ,

Francis Barter ,

James Williams ,

John Dracey ,

Henry Balchin .

1st Middlesex Jury

William Bigley ,

William Skip ,

Benjamin Harper ,

Thomas Thwaites ,

William Hinton ,

Charles Russell ,

John Brant ,

John Milledge ,

William Dowling ,

Ralph Wilcox ,

William Beer ,

William Nott .

2nd Middlesex Jury

Philip Hunt ,

Thomas Newsom ,

Thomas Burgess ,

Samuel Markham ,

Thomas Burgin ,

John Gibbs ,

James Brown ,

Nathaniel Sheath ,

Ephraim Lee ,

Andrew Beaton ,

Thomas Hall ,

Samuel Brown .

3rd Middlesex Jury

George Burtrup ,

Robert Ogle ,

William Nixon ,

James Asque ,

Robert Pite ,

Samuel Belcher ,

John Waterhouse ,

George Plasket ,

James Rattan ,

Samuel M'Carthy ,

John Milton ,

Edward Twelm .

SESSIONS HOUSE, OLD BAILEY, JUNE 6, 1821.

THORP, MAYOR. FIFTH SESSION.

Reference Number: t18210606-1

698. HENRY WILLIAMS was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Bruce , about two o'clock at night, on the 30th of March , at St. Mary Abbotts, Kensington , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein one soup-ladle, value 24 s.; one tea-pot, value 3 l.; one tea-pot stand, value 24 s.; thirteen spoons, value 3 l. 12 s.; one pair of sugar-tongs, value 8 s., and one caddy-ladle, value 8 d., his property .

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

JAMES SPALDING . I am butler to John Bruce , Esq., who lives in Brompton-grove, Kensington ; he is keeper of the State Papers ; letters are directed to him -

" John Bruce , Esq. " On the 30th of March I saw the doors and windows all properly secured, about ten minutes before twelve o'clock at night. The plate was in my custody - I saw it all locked up ten minutes before I went to bed; the articles stated in the indictment were all in one cupboard, except the tea-tongs and caddy-ladle - the soup-ladle was an old fashioned fluted one, and had the crest on it. Next morning I got up about a quarter after seven o'clock, and found the hall door open, and a hole cut in it, large enough for a man to put in his hand and open the door - it was an outer door. I then went to the plate cupboard, found that door forced open, and missed the property stated in the indictment; I have since seen the tea-pot and soup-ladle at Bow-street. I do not know the prisoner. The spoons had the motto,

"Be Trew," on them.

ELIZABETH HOLLAND . At the end of March I was staying at Mr. Bruce's house till he got a housemaid. I got up first, about a quarter before seven o'clock, and found the house as the butler has described.

GEORGE FREDERICK ALLCOCK . I am clerk to Messrs. Merle and Co. refiners, who live in Little Britain. I have bought things of the prisoner at different times. On the 2d of April I bought some table and desert spoons of him - about thirteen spoons altogether; consisting of table, desert, tea, and two salt spoons - they weighed in the whole, seventeen ounces and seven penny weight; they were perfect, and had a crest on them, and the motto,

"Be True." I think the word true was spelt

"trew" - he brought them as old silver, and gave no particular account of them. I asked his name - he said Williams. He has occasionally sold me plate before, but he gave me the name at this time. The spoons were put in our common stock, and sold next day to a dealer; I cannot tell who it was now, as we had several who came that day. A table-spoon generally weighs two ounces, a desert-spoon about an ounce, and a tea-spoon, ten or twelve pennyweight. I bought nothing else of him. I saw him again about the latter end of April, he came in the afternoon with some old spoons for sale; we had received information, and he was detained.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. You have many people come to sell plate - A. Yes; he has sold us plate before. I never doubted his being the man. I paid him 4 l. 3 s. 10 d. for them. I think there were four table and four desert spoons.

SAMUEL KEMP . I am in the employ of Messrs. Merle and Co. and know the prisoner perfectly well. On Wednesday, the 4th of April, I bought a tea-pot stand and soup-ladle of him, and I rather think a caddy ladle at the same time - they weighed twenty-three ounces and sixteen pennyweight; I paid him 5 l. 15 s. for them as old silver - they were put by with our common stock. They had a crest on them, and a motto. The prisoner was detained at our house about the 1st or 2d of May. He had come backwards and forwards to our house, about once a month, for the last twelve months, to sell old plate.

WILLIAM TAYLOR . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner on the 8th of May, at Messrs. Merle and Co.'s and found a pocket-book on him.

GEORGE FREDERICK ALLCOCK re-examined. I know there was a soup-ladle in the house, I sold it to Mr. Foligno. I delivered the tea-pot and stand, and the caddy ladle to Widdowson - they had been about nine days in our house.

ISAAC FOLIGNO . I bought a ladle at Messrs. Merle and Co.'s and sent it the same day to Mr. Salter's, in the Strand, by my brother. I think it was on a Tuesday, about six weeks ago. I should not know it again.

AMADO FOLIGNO . I am brother to the last witness. He gave me a ladle to take to Mr. Salter's, about six weeks ago. I delivered the same to Mr. Salter himself, to sell on commission; there was a crest on it, and, I think, a motto. I should not be able to swear to it.

JOHN SALTER . I am a silversmith, and live in the

Strand. About the 10th or 11th of April, I think on a Tuesday, the ladle was brought - it is in my possession, and has been ever since. I produce it. The moment I took it in my hand I said I was certain it was the same ladle I had repaired for Mr. Bruce, who had applied to me about it, and I could swear to it from the crest and motto. I then sent my nephew, Joseph Widdowson , to Messrs. Merle's, and found some more of Mr. Bruce's plate was there - it was brought to my house. I produce it. It is a tea-pot and stand, which I know to be his - I have occasionally repaired them for him. Here is a caddy ladle which I do not know.

JOSEPH WIDDOWSON . I am Mr. Salter's nephew, and recollect the ladle being brought. I went to Messrs. Merle and Co.'s and got the tea-pot and stand, and caddy ladle - Allcock delivered them to me.

SAMUEL KEMP . They are the tea-pot and stand I bought of the prisoner.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

ROBERT LEMON , ESQ. I am deputy keeper of the State Papers. I know John Bruce . Esq. lives in the parish of St. Mary Abbotts, Kensington.

Prisoner's Defence. I leave it to my Counsel.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 22. Of stealing in a dwelling-house, but not of the burglary.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow .

Reference Number: t18210606-2

699. EDWARD GRIFFITHS was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of February , twenty-four bottles, value 6 s.; five gallons of wine, value 4 l.; two gallons of shrub, value 1 l. and two gallons of cloves, value 1 l., the goods of Thomas Blyth , in his dwelling-house .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to belong to Robert Waithman and James Williams , Esq s.

THOMAS BLYTH . On the 27th of February I lived at the Wheatsheaf, public-house, Tothill-street, Westminster . My affairs were embarrassed in consequence of losing my licence - there was an execution in my house, and a man in possession for the Sheriff. I was in the cellar in the morning, the property stated in the indictment was then safe there; I left home about eight o'clock at night - there were about twenty-five men in the house, who had been customers to me - they had been there the principal part of the afternoon; there was a great noise in the house, but no dancing while I was there. I returned about twelve o'clock at night, found my cellar broken open, and every thing in confusion, all the Port wine gone, and the rest of the property. I knew the prisoner as a customer, he had been in the house several times in the course of that day and evening; I cannot say whether he was there or not when I went out.

ANN ACOME . I am the prosecutor's mother-in-law, and lived at the house; the men were dancing, singing, and making a great noise all the afternoon - there were twenty or more in the house - all men. The taproom was lit with gas, it was put out two or three times, and the room left in total darkness. The cellar door opened into the taproom. I stood in the bar, and saw the cellar door open, I went there, and caught the prisoner coming out of the cellar - he had his hands behind him; I shook him, he dropped a chisel from his hands, and got from me. I went into the cellar, found the bottles all thrown down, and the brandy cask turned over - a two gallon cask, which had contained cloves, was found under a settle in the taproom, facing the cellar door. The men were all in liquor, but they had not been served with sufficient liquor from the bar to make them so. When I seized the prisoner I said,

"You have been in the cellar;" he said,

"That I have not." I said I was sure he had - he got from me, and ran out. I am sure he is the man, I had known him for ten weeks. One might easily go into the cellar, and supply the rest with liquor while they were dancing.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Were many of Blyth's friends in the house - A. Only myself. We found five bottles broken to pieces in the privy.

MARY ANN BROWN . I was servant at the Wheatsheaf. On the 27th of February there was a great noise in the house, twenty or more men were there, dancing and singing - I had known the prisoner about three weeks - he was one of the party. The light was put out two or three times during the evening, by a black man pouring beer into the pipe. I saw the prisoner run out of the house as I came through the passage; I was in and out of the taproom all the evening, and saw what they were served with - it could not have made them intoxicated - they were intoxicated.

JOHN CRONIN . I am an appraiser, and was at the house, in and out, from twelve o'clock in the morning; I observed a great many people in the taproom, somebody sang out

"Now;" they then all jumped up and danced, jumping very high - there was great confusion, and a fight in the skittle-ground. I saw Mrs. Acome lay hold of a man who stood out outside the cellar door, apparently just come out - she wrenched a chisel from his hand - he immediately ran away. Part of the wood by the edge of the cellar door was wrenched away. I observed the taproom in darkness once - the gas was put out. The party only had a few pots of beer, which could not have made them drunk; all the wine was gone from the cellar, and some shrub - the brandy cask was left running. I attempted to detain the prisoner, but he rushed out.

EDWARD FRENCH . I was in possession of this house for the Sheriff. I was in the bar, talking to Mrs. Acome, and saw the cellar door open a little way, soon after it opened wider, and the prisoner came out; I saw him on the cellar side of the door, Mrs. Acome seized him, and called for assistance, I went, saw him throw the chisel away, and picked it up. I found a two gallon keg of cloves running in the taproom, and an iron crow-bar laying by it; the brandy cask in the cellar was running. I know the cellar door was locked when Blyth went out. Nobody served but Mrs. Acome. There was a gallon of beer ordered by a man who had been a publican, and six pots were afterwards served among twenty-five or more people; they were perfectly sober, but at night most of them were in liquor; they must have been supplied with more than they had had from the bar. I am sure the prisoner is the person.

JAMES GILMORE . I am an officer. I was fetched about eight o'clock at night to this house, and found it in great confusion - there was a fight in the skittle-ground - all the party were drunk. I got the people out, examined

the cellar, and found it had been broken open. Mrs. Acome gave me the chisel, which I compared with the marks in the door, by the lock. I saw some chalk on the crow-bar which corresponded with marks on the wall. About a fortnight after I saw the prisoner, about two o'clock in the morning, by the Horse Guards, drinking coffee; he saw me, and ran away, I followed, crying Stop thief, but lost him. He was apprehended about a fortnight after.

GUILTY , Aged 20.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow .

Reference Number: t18210606-3

700. WILLIAM REDDING and JOHN SAXTON were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Barlow , about eleven o'clock at night, on the 25th of March , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein one box, value 10 s.; one bag, value 2 d.; 40 l. in monies numbered, five 10 l., five 5 l., and 100 1 l. Bank notes, his property .

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

JOHN BARLOW . I keep the Two Brewers, public-house, at the corner of Noble-street and Goswell-street - it is a small obscure house, and very badly lighted; the front of the house and the door are in Goswell-street. At the lower part of the house there is a taproom in front, a bar behind, and then a parlour; a person can see from the taproom into the bar and parlour. My bed-room is over the parlour, it has a window looking into Noble-street, ten feet from the ground - there are three small bars to prevent children falling out, but there is room enough for a person to get in. I keep my money in a bureau in the bed-room. I had been ill sometime before, and had never seen the prisoners in my house till I recovered, I then saw them two or three times every day, up to the 25th, except one day, which was the 24th - they were always talking together, generally about horse dealing. My attention was called to them by something that was said to me. I am sure of their persons. On Sunday the 25th, I saw my bed-room between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, the window was then shut down - the door was open. About eleven o'clock at night I was sitting in the parlour, and heard a bag of silver fall on the pavement in Noble-street - my wife had heard something before. About an hour before dark I saw the prisoners pass my door in conversation together.

Q. You heard a bag of silver fall - A. Yes; I went round into Noble-street, but did not see anybody - my wife was in the passage. In consequence of what we heard we went up to the bed-room door, and found it fastened inside. I called the watchman, who broke the door open. I found the window sash forced open, and the drop which secured it, wrenched off, and thrown on the floor. I went to my bureau, and missed a bag, containing 40 l. in silver, and 190 l. in notes, and a cash-box gone; they were mostly 1 l. Bank notes - some 5 l. and some 10 l. I gave information next morning at Hatton Garden, and had placards posted about. I do not know the numbers of the notes. I did not see the prisoners again till the 17th of April, when I saw Saxton in Goswell-street, with another person, I ran down stairs, and followed him to the end of Wilderness-row, he saw me, and ran down Wilderness-row - I lost him in an instant, and upon turning round, I saw Redding, apparently, looking after him; I collared him immediately, and said I detained him on a charge of felony. He said,

"What have I been doing?" I said

"Have you not been in Goswell-street lately?" He denied having been there for three months. I said,

"Why the last time I saw you you had a snuff-coloured coat on, a black handkerchief, and very large whiskers," He said he never had a black handkerchief round his neck in his life. Walters came up, and took him to Old-street watch-house. Upon searching his pockets two skeleton keys, and another key were found. I returned home for an hour and a half, when Saunders fetched me; we went, and saw Redding at the end of Brick-lane, Old-street, with another person. I have since discovered who that person was - they were taken to Old-street watch-house. Redding said,

"This is a do, for the purpose of defrauding your creditors." I had not told him what he was taken for: he was rather obstinate about being secured.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. Redding was taken very near your house, and very near his own - A. It is not far off. I had circulated bills about the robbery; the bills, by mistake, stated it to be the 24th, instead of the 25th. The names of Tunnicliffe and Barlow are over my door - I took the house of them, it has been in that name for years, and I let it remain, as I married Mrs. Tunnicliff's daughter. I have no regular time for paying my distiller.

Q. Do you know Redding's sister-in-law - A. I know her since this affair, she occasionally dealt with me; I had received a 5 l. note from her shortly before I was robbed. I understood from her that the prisoner lived with her at No. 41, Compton-street. I have been and searched there. I have no recollection of his sister's coming to our house the day after the robbery. The servant was sent up stairs before the bag fell, and when it fell my wife, myself, and servant, all went up together.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Do you know that Saxton lived in the neighbourhood - A. I do not. I had had the money about a fortnight. I keep the house now.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. At the time of the robbery, were you in any difficulty - A. Not the least, I could pay 10 l. for every 1 l. I owe. I take about 20 l. a day. Redding's brother was with him when he was apprehended. I did not know the woman was his sister-in-law till after the robbery - she had repeatedly given me the name of Holmes.

AMELIA BARLOW . I am the wife of the last witness. On Sunday night, the 25th of March, I was standing in the back room, about ten o'clock, and heard a crush in the room above, as if something was broken - I sent the servant, named Rebecca Parker , to ascertain what it was: she has left my service, and is not here. I saw the prisoner Saxton come in about the time I sent her up - I knew him before for about three weeks, while my husband was ill, I first saw him the day my husband was confined, he came every day, and Redding was along with him - I was perfectly acquainted with their persons. When the servant came down and spoke to me, my eye was still directed to the door, and I saw Saxton walk out; he had called for a glass of rum, which he sipped two or three times before he went - he paid for it. I went into the

passage, near the parlour, for a bason, and as I waited by the table I heard a bag of silver drop on the ground, apparently, under the window - the stones are rough there. I heard Saxton cry

"Stop!" I knew his voice. I stood still, and heard the shutters unfastening from the wall - they are kept in Noble-street, against the wall; they go upon hinges, and fasten back. I called out to know if any one was putting the shutters to, and was told they were not. I saw through the passage window the prisoner Redding descend by the aid of the iron bars at the window and the shutter, I could not see the iron bars, but I saw him on the shutter, the lappel of his coat caught on the top of the shutter, his side face was towards me, and he appeared holding something. I saw sufficient of him to be certain of his face, his back was towards the shutter. My husband was then dosing in an arm chair, with the infant in his arms. I said I was robbed, took a candle, ran up stairs, and found the door fastened within, that I could not enter; I came down again, and Jane Keys , who now lives with me, went up with me; I do not know when my husband came up, as we were in confusion; the watchman broke the door open, when we found the window up, and the property gone. While the prisoners frequented our house I never knew their names or residence. Saxton was going to say something at the office, but Redding said - Hush!

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Did you go out of the house - A. Yes; the nearest light in Noble-street, is about twenty or thirty yards from the house - they are common lamps, and very dull - it was a very dark night. I was in the passage when I heard the voice, and was looking at the window, which was shut; my husband was in the parlour, which does not look into Noble-street. I saw the cash-box about eleven o'clock in the morning, he sometimes keeps the key, and sometimes I do. When I saw Redding's sister, after his apprehension, I recollected her well; I had known her for years by the name of Cresley, and have changed her notes repeatedly. I did not know she was his sister till after the robbery. I have no doubt of Saxton being the man who came out of the window - I saw his face. He had a blue great coat on, and a white handkerchief. I did not know his name - we called him the horse-dealer. I described them to the officers next morning, and we published a bill with a description of their persons. The cash-box and bag were found empty in the City-road.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. What sort of a passage is this - A. A narrow one; two candles stood on the table, opposite the window, the outside of the window was dark. I did not suspect any robbery at first, but thought a drunken man might have fallen down; I was a yard or two from the window. My late servant now lives in the neighbourhood, and I could have had her here if I liked. On the Thursday before there was upwards of 500 l. there; we take from 25 l. to 50 l. a day.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Had you such a sight, as to be sure it was Redding - A. Quite certain. The other prisoner originally wore a snuff-coloured coat, and sometimes a black handkerchief. I did not bring my servant, being dissatisfied with her, as she was dishonest. We were not behind hand - we pay ready money for every thing.

JANE KEYS . I am cousin to Mrs. Barlow, I live with her; I remember the prisoners, they came to the house regularly every day for about three weeks, once or twice a day; Saxton was generally drest in a snuff-coloured coat, and black silk handkerchief; the other wore a dark long coat. I was serving in the bar, I heard nothing, but about five minutes before the robbery, Saxton came in and had a glass of rum - I served him, he drank it at the bar, and was there four or five minutes. Mrs. Barlow called out from the passage, to know if the girl was shutting the shutters, I said No! and the girl said so too. Mrs. Barlow and I went up and tried the door - it was fast, and we came down. Mr. Barlow was in the parlour, and Rebecca Parker was shutting up the shutters in Noble-street; she was out of doors when Mrs. Barlow called out, shutting up the side shutters in Noble-street, that shutter was not by the passage, but a good deal lower down. I answered my cousin first, as I knew she was not shutting that shutter in the bar window. Mrs. Barlow asked if she was shutting the passage shutter. Parker remained in the house for a week after - we found the room rifled on entering it.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Was she shutting the shutter under the bed-room window, or lower down - A. Lower down, she was shutting the nearest window to Goswell-street. She was examined by the Magistrate once; I think it was at the third examination. She was five yards or more from the passage window.

COURT. Q. Did your cousin say that night, that she had seen any one at the window - A. Yes, and that she knew him.

THOMAS WALTERS . I am an officer. On the 17th of April, I was at Wilderness-row, and saw Barlow having hold of Saxton, I ran and asked if he was an officer, he said, No! I told him I was, and he gave Saxton into my charge; he asked me what he had done, I said I would tell him at the watch-house; as soon as we got there, I asked his name, he said John Saxton , and what did I take him for; I said, on suspicion of breaking into Mr. Barlow's house; he said he had not been into Old-street-road but once for the last three months. I said he was at Barlow's house drinking, he said he believed he was once or twice - I went to search him; Mr. Barlow was present, and said, you have been in my house several times; he said he did not recollect being there more than once or twice. He took off his coat and threw it down, in the pocket I found three keys; I asked what the middle key was, he said it belonged to his room door. I asked where he lived, he paused some time, then said he could not tell the street - I also found a knife in the same pocket. I was present when Redding was brought in by Saunders, and I took his brother who was with him; the prosecutor said,

"That is him," pointing to Redding; Redding said in reply,

"Sir, I am a gentleman, I will make you remember this, I will bring an action against you;" he gave his name as Richards, his brother gave his as Jones, they would not tell where they lived. I asked Redding if he knew Saxton, who was locked up behind - he did not see him, he said he did not, and had not been at Barlow's with him. I sent them to the office in a coach, and took Saxton myself, and asked if he knew Jones or Richards (he had not seen them) he said, No. The Magistrate was

not sitting, and I took them all to another watch-house; they appeared strange to each other, and still gave their names as Jones, Richards, and Saxton. Next day, I went to No. 41, Compton-street, and found some property, which I afterwards returned to Redding's brother.

SAMUEL SAUNDERS . I am an officer. On the morning of the 26th of March, I was informed of this robbery, the prosecutor and his wife described the persons they suspected; the prisoner's height answers the description, but not their dress. I examined the premises, and went in search with the prosecutor several nights and days to look for them; he said he should know them if he saw them; his wife said she saw one of them drinking in the house, and the other descend from the window. On the 17th of April, in consequence of what the prosecutor said, I went to St. Luke's watch-house, and saw Saxton; he asked for pen and ink, and paper, which was given him; the bellman came by for the letters, he gave the paper through the hole, saying, it was too late to send it by post - it was written upon, I produce it (reads)

"Dear James, I am taken on suspicion of the robbery, come to me at Worship-street office." I afterwards went with Barlow and Walters to the corner of Brick-lane, Old-street, Barlow pointed Redding out, and said,

"That is the man." I collared him, and Walters took the other man who was in company with him; I searched him, and found a watch, a handkerchief, and knife; he refused to give his name, and asked what he was charged with, I said with felony; when he got to the watch-house, I told him the charge, he said,

"I suppose the brewer or distiller is bad," Barlow said he owed no one a shilling; he gave the name of William Redding at the office; the other said his name was Jones - I afterwards discovered they were both brothers; he said he knew no such person as Saxton. They all three told the Magistrate they had no residence, they were asked where they slept the night before, Saxton said, at No. 27, King-street, Soho; Jones said, in Carey-street, Deptford, and Richards said, at Shadwell; I enquired at No. 27, King-street, Soho, they knew no such person - it is a respectable house. I examined the premises the morning after the robbery; the bed-room window is about ten feet five inches from the ground, the bars would be an assistance to them, the top of the shutter is three feet from the window, they could stand on it and easily get in.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. The letter has the words,

"the robbery," it was well known of about - A. Yes, there was marks of violence outside the window, the two locks of the secretary had been forced in a similar way.

REDDING'S Defence. I was at home all that night, I knew the house, and never left the neighbourhood.

SAXTON'S Defence. I did not know Redding till I was taken.

JOHN WARMAN . I am a publican. Redding was a customer of mine, he was in my house on the 26th of March, and paid me 13 s., he lives at No. 41, Compton-street; he was about the neighbourhood, I saw him every day till he was apprehended.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18210606-4

701. JOHN JACKSON was indicted for a Rape .

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 53.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow .

Reference Number: t18210606-5

702. JOHN BROOKS was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of May , one handkerchief, value 4 s., the goods of John Start , from his person .

JOHN START . I live at Halstead, Essex, and am a farmer . On the 17th of May, about eleven o'clock in the morning, I was walking by the London Tavern, Bishopsgate-street , and heard a cry of Stop thief! I was told my handkerchief was gone, I missed it; the prisoner was stopped in two or three minutes, and as I came up, I saw the handkerchief fall from him - I am certain it is mine.

JOHN BRINKLEY . I am a ship-caulker, and was in Bishopsgate-street about eleven o'clock in the morning, and saw the prisoner close behind the prosecutor; I saw him pull the handkerchief about half out, he got it out by the second attempt. I was about twenty yards from him, he crossed the road and looked behind, he gave me a kind of a nod, which I understood to mean I was to say nothing about it. I followed and overtook him near the Exchange without losing sight of him - he dropped it when I was within a yard of him.

JOHN DRINKWATER . I took charge of the prisoner.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I picked it up, another man ran away; I put it in my pocket, and ran after him - they said I did it.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210606-6

703. THOMAS JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of May , one snuff box, value 10 s., the goods of Peter Wybrants Broadley from his person .

MR. P. W. BROADLEY. I live in the Borough. On Saturday, May the 5th, between two and three o'clock in the afternoon, I was in Gracechurch-street , I felt a fumbling at my coat pocket, and missed my snuff-box, nobody was near enough to do it but the prisoner; it was safe two minutes before; he passed and crossed the street - I followed, he turned round. I said,

"You rascal, you have got my snuff-box;" he ran, and I after him, crying, Stop thief! he was stopped without being out of my sight - I saw him throw the snuff-box down Mr. Myers, the fishmonger's area.

GEORGE HOLEMAN LEWIS. I am thirteen years old. I was in Mr. Myers's shop, and heard the cry. I went down the area and picked up the snuff-box, and gave it to the prosecutor, the prisoner was stopped - he said he picked it up.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I saw the snuff-box on the ground and picked it up.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210606-7

704. GEORGE CLARK was indicted for stealing, on

the 18th of April , one handkerchief, value 1 s. the goods of Peter Thomas Oakley .

P. T. OAKLEY. I live at the City of London Tavern. On the 18th of April, I was looking at a picture shop at Aldgate , my handkerchief was in my pocket; a person asked if I had lost it, I felt and missed it. I followed the prisoner and saw the handkerchief sticking under his apron - I took it from him - I did not see him at the shop.

WILLIAM PLAISTOW . I was at Aldgate, I heard somebody say, that is him, I went over; the prosecutor wished to let him go - he picked it up.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was passing by the shop, saw it at my feet, and walked on with it in my hand, as nobody claimed it.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210606-8

705. JOHN CASEY was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of May , one handkerchief, value 5 s., the goods of Randolph Groning , from his person .

RANDOLPH GRONING . On the 4th of May, between nine and ten o'clock in the evening, I was coming down Holborn into the City; I felt a fumbling at my pocket, turned round, the prisoner stood behind me, I seized him and desired him to return my handkerchief, which I missed; he looked me in the face, gave me a push and ran off, I pursued across the street, caught him immediately, and saw my handkerchief in his waistcoat, two officers were coming by, I offered them 2 s. 6 d. to follow him - they said, as he had ran into Field-lane, they should be murdered. I gave information, he was taken eight or ten days after; I am quite sure he is the man - I saw my handkerchief in his waistcoat.

THOMAS WELDON . I was on Holborn-hill with Mathews, and saw the prisoner push the gentleman, and then ran away - I knew him before; he went down Field-lane, we did not follow him there. I took the prosecutor's address, and saw the prisoner again on the Saturday week after, and took him - I did not find the handkerchief.

CHARLES MATHEWS . I was on Holborn-hill, the prisoner passed me in company with another man; I was talking to Weldon, and saw him rush against the prosecutor and run across the road into Field-lane, I said it was useless following him.

Prisoner's Defence. I never saw the gentleman in my life.

GUILTY . Aged 36.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210606-9

706. SUSAN CLOSE was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of May , one petticoat, value 3 s., the goods of Martha Greenfield ; one shawl, value 2 s. 6 d.; one petticoat, value 1 s.; one pair of boots, value 1 s. 6 d.; one pair of pockets, value 6 d.; one pair of spectacles, value 6 d.; one cap, value 1 d., and 9 d. in monies numbered , the goods of Eleanor .

MARTHA GREENFIELD . I live in Bull's-yard, Golden-lane , on the ground-floor, and am a widow . I took the prisoner in out of charity, to sleep, on a Saturday night, between twelve and one o'clock: she said she had quarrelled with her husband; she had come to me several times before, Eleanor Hanlon lives with me; the prisoner left in the morning between seven and eight o'clock, and when I was getting up we missed our things; nobody could have taken them but her. I have not found my petticoat.

ELEANOR HANLON . I live in the same room as Greenfield. I got up about seven o'clock, the prisoner was then gone with the things stated in the indictment, which were safe when she was in the room; when she was taken, she had my boots on and a flannel petticoat.

JOHN PAYNE . I am a constable. On the 7th of May, I and Watts were looking after the prisoner; I found her in a privy, I found an old cap in the privy - she took it from me and threw it down the privy - I found the flannel petticoat there also.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I meant to return the things.

GUILTY . Aged 36.

Confined Three Months .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210606-10

707. BENJAMIN FURBER was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of April , one silk handkerchief, value 3 s., the goods of Isaac Pemberton , from his person .

ISAAC PEMBERTON . I live at Birmingham. On the 23d of April, about two o'clock in the afternoon, I was in Christchurch-passage, Newgate-street ; a person asked if I had lost a handkerchief, I felt and missed it, it was safe as I came out of the King Head, public-house, two minutes before; he then pointed out the prisoner, whom I collared and charged with it - he denied it; I pulled open his coat, and found it at the top of the sleeve of the coat - I am positive he is the man.

GEORGE YORK . I am a tin plate-worker. I stood in the court, and saw the prisoner take the handkerchief out of the prosecutor's pocket, and put it in the sleeve of his coat - I pointed him out to Mr. Pemberton, we secured him. I saw the handkerchief taken from him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I picked it up.

GUILTY . Aged 36.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210606-11

708. GEORGE BAKER and JOHN JACOBS were indicted for stealing, on the 21st of May , one watch, value 7 l.; one chain, value 2 l. 15 s.; one seal, value 3 s., and one key, value 2 s., the goods of Isaac Shannon , from his person .

ISAAC SHANNON . I am a merchant , and live in Duke-street, Aldgate. On the 21st of May, about nine o'clock in the evening, I was returning home with my brother; I had occasion to stop at the corner of St. Mary Axe - my brother was a few steps before me. I had a gold watch and some money about me; I was going to join my brother when the prisoner Baker darted on me, took my watch from my pocket and ran off; he came from the other side of the way, there was a very strong gas-light - I am confident he is the person - he got my watch and ran away; I immediately pursued, and was crossed by four other men. I called Stop thief! and my brother went in pursuit. I said

"That is him," pointing to Baker, and they all ran, I followed, and in five minutes I found the prisoners in custody - my brother had my watch; the other four came up about four yards off, I immediately

said,

"Baker is the man who snatched my watch." I cannot speak to either of the other four who crossed me; they detained me, and prevented my following Baker - it was in Bevis Marks.

PHILLIP SHANNON . I was coming home with my brother, and was going through Bevis Marks to Duke-street. I heard him cry, Stop! they turned round, passed him, and ran up Castle-street, and came up to him; he said,

"That's him," pointing to Baker - who was running; three or four more were near him, crossing him, which prevented my brother's coming up to him - I pursued Baker, the others were behind me - I came up with him; Stone, the officer, gave him a blow on the neck - he was stopped by a man tripping him up. Jacobs came up and asked him where he had dinged it, Baker said, into the kennel. I saw Jacobs go to the kennel - I pulled him down, and took the watch out of the kennel and gave it to Stone; the other men were taller than, Jacobs - I cannot say if he was one of the four.

JOSEPH STONE . I am an officer. Between nine and ten in the evening, I heard the cry of Stop thief! at the end of Castle-street; I was in the middle of the road and saw Baker running, I struck him, but did not knock him down - he still ran, a person put his foot out and tripped him up; the prosecutor came up, I took him into a shoemaker's shop, and heard a noise in Houndsditch; I went to the door and saw Jacobs in Shannon's custody - he was given to me in charge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

DAVID M'COMBIE. I was with Stone, heard the cry, and saw Baker running - he was secured. I was afraid of a rescue, and drew my cutlas.

BAKER'S Defence. I heard the cry, and ran with the rest, and was tripped up.

JACOBS'S Defence. (written) I was returning home, saw a mob collected, and crossed over - a gentleman laid hold of me.

BAKER - GUILTY . Aged 19.

JACOBS - GUILTY . Aged 29.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210606-12

SECOND DAY. THURSDAY, JUNE 7.

707. JANE MALCOLM was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of April , two sheets, value 20 s.; one shawl, value 2 s., and seven yards of linen, value 10 s. , the goods of John Cooper .

JOHN COOPER . I am a carpenter , and live in John-street, Berkley-square ; the prisoner lived servant with me four years. On the evening of the 18th of April, I missed a shawl.

JOHN PHILLIPS . On the 18th of April, about half-past eleven o'clock at night, I found the prisoner sitting at a door, with her head on her lap - she had a bundle with her; I said,

"Do not sit here, you will get cold;" she had not got above 100 yards, before a gentleman said something - I went after her, pulled her shawl open, and found a piece of cloth, and a shawl on her back; she accounted for having them in different ways - I took her to the watch-house; next day I found out the prosecutor, who claimed the property.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN FOUCH . I am servant to Mr. Hammon, of Wardour-street; the prisoner pawned the sheets with me, on the the 18th of May - I am certain she is the woman.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in liquor, or I should not have done it.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Confined Three Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210606-13

708. JOHN MILES was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of May , one quart of raw corn spirits, value 2 s. , the goods of Samuel Davey Liptrap and Thomas Smith .

JAMES GOLDIE . I am a brewer to Samuel Davey Liptrap and Thomas Smith , distillers - the prisoner was a labourer there. About four o'clock in the afternoon of the 24th of May, I found him on the top of a spirit cask, with a tin case, in the act of raising it, with about one quart of spirits. I called to know what he was doing, he put the cork in the tin, and threw it from him - it was worth 3 s. - I immediately went down two or three steps, and secured him.

Prisoner's Defence. I was taking it to drink on the premises, not to take it away.

GUILTY . Aged 51.

Confined One Year , and Publicly Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210606-14

709. DAVID ADAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of April , in the dwelling-house of Sir Alexander Croke , five 5 l. and twenty-one 1 l. Bank notes, his property .

SIR ALEXANDER CROKE , KNIGHT . I live in Devonshire-street, Portland-place . I hired the house for three months, and had it entirely to myself and family - it is in the parish of St. Marylebone . I lost 45 l. in Bank notes, on the 25th of April, from a cupboard in the dining-room - I missed them about three o'clock. I had seen them in the course of the morning, the cupboard was unlocked part of the morning - it was locked when I missed them; the prisoner was in my service at the time as footman . I took no account of the notes. I received them from Hamersleys in Pall Mall; I drew a check on them, and sent it by my coachman, James Cordley - the prisoner left that moning without my knowledge. While I was sitting in my room, writing, a gentleman and lady came; the prisoner told me they were up stairs, I went up to them, and left the key in the cupboard. I was not up stairs five minutes, before a knock came at the door three or four times, and on enquiry, it was found the prisoner was gone - he was taken in about three weeks. When the coachman brought the notes, he gave them to the prisoner instead of giving them to me. The prisoner conducted himself with great propriety during the two months he was in my service.

JAMES CORDLEY . I am coachman to Sir Alexander Croke . On the 25th of April, I received at Hamersleys

50 l., and gave the same notes to the prisoner as I received there.

EDWARD HUNT . I am gaoler of Portsmouth. I apprehended the prisoner at Portsmouth, on the 18th of May; I searched him and found two 1 l. notes, a 5 l. note, and 13 s. 6 d. in silver on him. I saw him in the street, and called him by the name of Adams; he said his name was not Adams. I said,

"Why did you leave Sir Alexander Croke ?" he said, I am glad you have taken me, for I have not had a moment's peace since I robbed my master. I asked, where he got the 5 l. note; he said, it was one of the notes he took - it is No. 3449, dated the 17th of March, 1821.

MARMADUKE PYBUS. I am clerk of Messrs. Hamersleys I gave Cordley six 5 l. notes for Sir Allexander Croke's cheque; the rest were paid by another clerk - we only take the numbers of the notes, not the dates; the numbers were 18626; 12758; 5641; 5642; 6225; 3419 - I have no No. 3449. I have no entry of 3449, and cannot speak to the note found on the prisoner; I may have made a mistake in the entry, as it was a busy time.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18210606-15

710. JOHN BLAKENEY was indicted for feloniously assaulting Joseph Foot , on the King's highway, at St. Mary, Whitechapel , on the 25th of May , putting him in fear and taking from his person, and against his will, one watch-chain, value 5 l.; one seal, value 2 l., and one key, value 1 l., his property .

JOSEPH FOOT . I am a silk manufacturer , and live in Church-street, Spitalfields. About half-past eight o'clock on Friday evening. the 25th of May, I was in Brick-lane, Whitechapel , returning home with my wife; the prisoner was coming down the lane apparently intoxicated - he met us - ran against me, and seized my watch-chain; the chain broke, it being twisted - he got the chain, I seized him immediately, as I felt it go; three or four of his accomplices came up, and got me on the ground. I received a very severe blow on the head, and was stunned for a minute; we both fell down together. I still kept my hold, but being overpowered, I let him go; they dragged me along about three yards - the prisoner got up and ran. I lost sight of him, and saw him again on the Monday following.

Q. In your judgment, was his staggering against you the effects of drunkenness, or by design - A. In my opinion it was sham drunkenness - he rose and started away as if he was quite sober, and seized my chain like a sober man - I have no doubt of his being the man, I held him some time; it was a very wet and dull evening - the lamps were not lit, it was not dark enough. I have not recovered my property - I believe the robbery was committed in Whitechapel parish.

JOHN STEWARD . I am a bricklayer, and live in Whitechapel. On Friday evening, about nine o'clock, I was running down Brick-lane very fast, out of the rain, and saw a lady at the corner of the court, in great agitation, crying out, thieves! - I ran into the court, got my feet entangled in an umbrella which stood there open, and saw some people hustling the prosecutor, I saw the prisoner get up and start from them - I am positive he was one of them. As soon as I got disentangled, I followed as fast as I could; he crossed into the narrow part of the court into old Montague-street, turned round very cooly, and said, I wonder which way he is gone - nobody was before him; I never lost sight of him, and am sure he is the man. I laid hold of him, and said,

"You are the man who has committed the robbery or assault;" another came up and said, what are you going to do with that man, I said

"I was going to take him;" he said, d - n your eyes, you shall not take him, and said to the prisoner, give me your stick; the prisoner had a bludgeon about two feet long - I had not seen it before, he had it in his hand, and gave it to the other, who beat me about the head most severely with it; he gave me eight or nine blows. which broke my hold, and both ran away - I followed; they crossed over into Wingfield street; my head bled very fast, indeed the blood ran down into my bosom. I went home, got my head dressed, and called on Lickfield the officer. I have since seen Mr. and Mrs. Foot. I saw the prisoner on the monday evening following at Spitalfields watch-house, and immediately recognized him; he is the man I am confident - I have not the least doubt of it.

WILLIAM LICKFIELD . I am headborough of Christchurch, Middlesex. I apprehended the prisoner on Monday, the 28th, on this charge, Steward having given me information. I found him in George-street, Wentworth-street, standing talking to a young woman at a window; I looked under his hat, went up and said,

"What is your name," he said, John Blakeney ; I said,

"You are the man I want." I did not say what for, as it is a dangerous place; when I got him out of the street, I said, I wanted him for robbing Mr. Foot; he said, he was innocent. I got Mr. Foot, who said he was the man. I fetched Steward, who also said he was the man.

MR. FOOT. Steward has since seen my wife with me, she is the lady who was with me that night.

Prisoner's Defence. (written) I declare myself innocent of the charge against me. I have hitherto maintained a character without suspicion, and as it was almost dark (as the prosecutor allows) when he was assaulted, he is more likely to be mistaken in the person that injured him. than that I should all at once become a character, directly opposite to what I had always been. I was not found in any bad company, but was taken up three days after, standing alone quietly at my own door. I made not the smallest resistance, being conscious of my own innocence.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 21.

Recommended to mercy by the prosecutor, wishing to save his life.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow .

Reference Number: t18210606-16

711. JOSEPH LILLEY was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Henry Ashbee , at St. Marylebone , about one o'clock in the afternoon of the 22d of May , (Frances, his wife, and other persons being therein), stealing therein two table-spoons, value 2 l.: three silver forks, value 3 l.; one tea-pot, value 8 l.; one sugar-bason, value 2 l., and one tea-spoon, value 5 s. , the goods of Anna Maria Hawkshaw , widow .

MARGARET DUFFY . I live with Mrs. Anna Maria Hawkshaw, a widow, who lives at Mr. Ashbee's house in the parish of Marylebone. On Tuesday, the 22d of May, I lost two silver table-spoons, and three silver forks, from the kitchen, the persons had got in by lifting up the window sash; I had shut the window myself about ten

o'clock, and missed the things about half-past one. I found the window wide open - it leads into the area - the area gate was shut, but not locked; the area door was bolted, but the kitchen inner door was open. I was in the back yard at the time, and heard nobody in the house; Mrs. Frances Ashbee , and Mrs. Hawkshaw were in the house at the time. Carter, the constable, brought the prisoner back with the things about a quarter of an hour after I missed them. On missing them, in consequence of what my mistress told me, I ran out, made an alarm, and called Mr. Ashbee to pursue. (looking at the property) The crest of General Hawkshaw is on the spoons and forks; he is now dead - my mistress is his widow.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. You did not see him in the house - A. No; he was a stranger to me.

HENRY ASHBEE . My house is in Taunton-place, Regent's-park , in the parish of St. Marylebone; I live in it. I was coming in backward, and heard the cry of Stop thief! my wife, Frances, was at home, and said the kitchen had been robbed; I ran out instantly, and at the bottom of Globe-place I saw some chaps standing without their hats, they saw me, and ran off; I sent a man after them, and went down a mews, crying stop thief! and saw Carter bringing the prisoner back, I said,

"If you will tell me where the tea-pot and things are gone to, I will forgive you?" He gave me the forks and spoons from his breast; there is a tea-pot, a sugar-bason, and one spoon now missing. We took him back to the house. I said,

"If you will tell where the tea-pot and bason are, I will do all I can for you." He said he did it all himself, and would shew where he threw them. He took us to a garden, and said he threw them over there; we found three latch keys there, but no plate. He said he had no accomplices.

BENJAMIN CARTER. I am an officer I saw the prisoner running, and stopped him; he produced the forks and spoons - they are worth above 4 l.

MARGARET DUFFY re-examined. I missed the teapot and sugar-bason, besides two table spoons, three forks, and a tea-spoon.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 16. Of stealing in a dwelling-house, but not of breaking and entering.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18210606-17

712. JOHN NASH was indicted for feloniously assaulting George Wergman , on the King's highway, on the 25th of May , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, one watch, value 2 l.; one ribbon, value 6 d.; one seal, value 1 l., and two keys, value 2 s., his property .

GEORGE WERGMAN . I am a jeweller , and live in the Wandsworth-road, Clapham. On the 25th of May, about twelve o'clock at night, I was with my wife, turning the corner of King-street, Covent-garden , we had come from a friend's house; just as I came from the Piazza a man came before me, looked me in the face, and snatched my watch. I took up my umbrella, and struck him immediately - another man was close behind me - I collared him, and called Watch! five or six times, but none came; the man whom I collared said he was not the man, and he would go to the watch-house with me; and the other man said he would go too. They both went with me.

Q. Which of them snatched your watch - A. I believe the prisoner, but at the time I could not tell which, he is one of the two, and one of those who went to the watch-house.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. You indicted both parties - A. I did; there was not the slightest resistance; the prisoner is the man I struck, he accompanied me voluntarily; several people were passing, as the Theatre was breaking up - there was a blazing gas lamp close by. I do not speak to him with certainty.

COURT. Q. Are you sure the prisoner is one of the two and the one you struck - A.He is, my Lord. I struck him as the man taking my watch.

MRS. WERGMAN. I was with my husband, and saw the prisoner snatch his watch; I have not the least hesitation about it. After he snatched it Mr. Wergman forced himself from me another man came up immediately, put himself close to him, and he seized him - they went to the watch-house.

Cross-examined. Q. Several people were passing - A. Yes; the prisoner surrendered voluntarily; I saw his face, and saw him do it. I saw him approach, and the other man standing ready to receive it. I was observing to my husband to take care, as I saw him approach.

Prisoner's Defence. I was behind them all the time, with a stick in my hand, coming from the Theatre. When I was charged with it I did not make the least resistance.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow .

Reference Number: t18210606-18

713. WILLIAM WILSON was indicted for that he, at the delivery of the King's gaol of Newgate, holden for the county of Middlesex, at Justice Hall in the Old Bailey, on the 15th of September, in the 59th year of the reign of our late Sovereign Lord George III. the prisoner was tried and convicted on a certain indictment against him for Grand Larceny, and was thereupon ordered to be transported beyond the seas for the term of seven years, and that he, afterwards, to wit, on the 9th of May last, at St. Luke, feloniously was at large, without lawful cause, before the expiration of the said term for which he had been so ordered to be transported .

THOMAS VANN . I am an officer. On the 9th of May I apprehended the prisoner in St. Luke's parish - I was in company with Armstrong and Mance. I produce a certificate of his former conviction, which I got from Mr. Shelton's office, and saw him sign it - (read) - he was searched, but nothing found on him; he made no resistance. I was in Court when he was tried before, and am certain he is the same man, I had known him for years; I had nothing to do with the trial, but recollect it was for stealing some things the property of John Goldsmith .

- it was in September, 1819. He was convicted.

JOHN WOODFIELD . I am captain of the Batavia hospital ship at Sheerness. I receive convicts on board who are in ill health. I took the prisoner on board as a servant, because he bore a good character at the hulks; he was nine months with me, and conducted himself very well all that time. I took him from the Retribution hulk, and employed

him as a personal servant; he went away on the 7th of September, without my knowledge - nobody else went at the same time. He got out of the cabin window, and, I suppose, got ashore by a boat. I am willing to take him back again, as he bore a good character.

JOSHUA ARMSTRONG . I assisted in taking the prisoner, in consequence of an advertizement in the Hue and Cry; he made no resistance, and nothing improper was found on him. We went to look after him for three or four months, to houses where bad characters associate, but could never find him at such places. I hear he has been at work ever since he came back. He had been that morning to see his mother, who was very ill, and near death. As far as I can judge, he had left off his bad associates - I have no doubt of it. He had some silver about him.

JOHN MANCE . I have heard the account of the last witness - it is correct. We could never find the prisoner in bad company; we took him at his mother's - he behaved very well.

Prisoner's Defence. During the time I have been at home I have been at work.

JOHN CRICK . I am a watch-finisher, and live at No. 7, Orchard-street, St. Luke's. I have known the prisoner from the latter end of December; he worked with me from that time till he was apprehended. He came very regularly every day to work, Mondays as well as other days, and earned from 25 s. to 30 s. a week. I have no doubt but he would have continued with me, if he had not been apprehended. He came about seven o'clock every morning, and left about dusk, and sometimes brought his dinner with him. I believe he is single. I have had a dozen or eighteen watches about at times, and never missed any. I did not know him until he came to work for me. I am willing to employ him again, and have work for him now. I have frequently had 70 l. or 80 l. worth of property about, but always found him honest.

BARNARD LEVY . I am a watch maker. I only know the prisoner by his being recommended to me to work, about three months ago; I gave him some to do at home, and he finished it regularly. I was quite satisfied with his honesty, I and trusted him with watch-movements, which are not of much value.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 37.

Strongly recommended to Mercy on account of his good character.

Second Middlesex Jury, before. Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18210606-19

714. WILLIAM SMITH was indicted for feloniously assaulting Philip Jones on the King's highway, on the 23d of May , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, one handkerchief, value 1 s.; one coat, value 4 l., and one piece of silk serge, value 3 s., his property .

PHILIP JONES . I live in Plumbtree-street, Bloomsbury, and am a tailor . On the 23d of May, about eleven o'clock at night, I was going home up White-horse-yard; where I had bought the serge, I was at the corner of Parker-street, Drury-lane , by the gas-light; the prisoner came up, put his hand on my neck, and tripped me up by putting his feet before me - it threw me down; another man was with him, they pulled at my bundle, and said, let go the bundle you ***; they tore the handkerchief and got the coat out, leaving part of the handkerchief in my hand; I called Watch, and Stop thief! - they ran down Parker-street, and we after them; the watchman took the prisoner in Charles-street - I did not see him taken. I had informed the watchman of it in the street, and the next morning, about nine o'clock I found him in custody, and have no doubt whatever of his being one of the men who threw me down - the property is not found - the watchman picked up part of the handkerchief, and I gave him the rest.

JOSEPH TRIMBEY . I am watchman in Parker-street. On the 23d of May, I heard rattles sprung and cry of Stop thief! - I ran towards it, the prisoner was going towards Charles-street - not running; there was nobody else in the street - he came in a direction from the spot. I followed him to the corner of Charles-street, and stopped him - Crawley came up - the prosecutor was not there, and we let him go; he said he lived at No. 49, Charles-street. I afterwards saw the prosecutor, and at two o'clock in the morning we went there, and took the prisoner in bed.

Prisoner. Q. Had I not stood at the corner, for a quarter of an hour - A. No, I followed him to the corner,

PATRICK CRAWLEY . I am a watchman of Drury-lane, my box is ten yards from Parker-street. Between eleven and twelve o'clock, I head a cry, ran out, and saw the prosecutor in the kennel - he said he had been robbed. I saw the backs of two people a great way down Parker-street - I followed them into Cross-lane. Trimbey ran down there, and took the prisoner at the corner of Charles-street; he said,

"Is this one" - I said,

"I do not know - take him;" we took him to the watch-house, could not find the prosecutor, the constable of the night discharged him; we returned into Drury-lane, found the prosecutor, and by his discription, which answered to the prisoner, we went and took him again. I picked up part of the handkerchief within ten yards of where the prosecutor was stopped, and in the way he ran. I will not swear he is one of the two men.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been in town but two or three days, and went to live in Charles-street. I promised to meet a man at the corner of Newton-street; I had been waiting there about a quarter of an hour when the watchman asked, if I had seen any man pass, I said,

"No;" he said, then you are the man, and took me - the watch-house keeper said, Jones was tipsy.

JOSEPH TRIMBEY re-examined. I do not recollect asking if he saw any one passing; Jones was flurried, but quite sober.

PHILLIP JONES re-examined. I had only drank a pint of porter, and was quite sober.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow .

Reference Number: t18210606-20

715. GEORGE TAYLOR was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Henry David Vincent , George Godby , Richard Thompson and Sarah Layton , spinster , at St. James, Westminster , about eight o'clock in the forenoon ( Thomas Hobby Stephens and others being therein) and stealing therein, one watch, value 30 l. their property .

THOMAS HOBY STEPHENS . I live at No. 82, Wardour-street , in the parish of St. James, Westminster. Mr. Thomas Layton is dead - Henry David Vincent , Richard Thompson, Sarah Layton and George Godby are his executors; the business was carried on by Mr. Layton, when he was alive, he died on the 12th of September - he was a pawnbroker and silversmith ; all the executors act, Henry David Vincent carries on the business in the house - I am employed in the shop. Last Monday morning, the 4th of June , I was sweeping the shop, and heard a smash of glass - I ran to the window, and saw a pane of glass broken and an arm through the broken pane. I immediately ran to the door, opened it, and looking up the street, I saw a young man running; I closed the door and pursued, crying Stop thief! - I kept within thirty yards of him till we got to St. Ann's-court, where he turned down - I came up with him, and found him in custody of the three witnesses - it was the prisoner. I saw this watch laying at his foot with the glass out, and the seconds hand knocked off with the fall; I knew the watch directly - it was the property of the executors, it hung about the centre pane, within reach of the arm through the broken pane. I have been in the shop nearly two years - it was there before I came; there was no particular mark, it has no maker's name, I had observed that before it was taken; the ticket was brought to me by one of the witnesses - it is in my handwriting. Mr. Robinson gave it to me; the prisoner was the man I pursued, to the best of my belief. I had no opportunity of seeing his face till I got into the court. It is worth 30 l.; the pane of glass was whole and safe before - I could not observe the face of the person whose arm was through the window.

GEORGE WHITE. I live with Mr. King, a batter, at No. 10, St. Ann's-court. About a quarter before eight o'clock on Monday morning, I was washing the shop out, and heard a cry of Stop thief! - I immediately ran and saw the prisoner running up the court, from Wardour-street, as hard as he could, and stopped him. I saw the watch lay on the ground with the glass out - I did not see or hear him drop it.

SAMUEL RICHARD ROBINSON . I keep a public-house in St. Ann's-court. I heard a cry of Stop thief! I immediately ran out, turned the corner, and White had the prisoner in his possession. I laid hold of his arm, and during that time he let the watch drop, I saw him drop it - it fell on my foot, and the glass came out; I picked it up, and gave it to Stephens - the prisoner was secured. I picked up a paper which I took to the shop, and gave to Dixon. I should know it again - that produced is it.

Prisoner. Q. Did you see it fall from my hand - A. I did.

ROBERT HOWARD. I am a constable, and live in St. Ann's-court. I was in my shop, and heard the cry of Stop thief! ran out and saw the prisoner stopped by White, and Robinson had hold of him. I collared him and saw Stephens coming up, and saw the prisoner drop the watch from his right hand - Robinson picked it up, he said it fell on his foot, it was not bruised - the prisoner said before the magistrate that he did drop it.

THOMAS HOBY STEPHENS re-examined. I had not noticed the watch that morning. We do not move them from the window at night.

Prisoner's Defence. I got up about seven o'clock in the morning to bathe, it was wet, which hindered me. I was walking about, and stood up in Wardour-street- for three quarters of an hour under shelter, and heard a smash at the window as a cart came by. I saw somebody run from the shop, and ran after him.

GEORGE WHITE re-examined. Nobody ran down the street but the prisoner.

SAMUEL RICHARD ROBINSON re-examined. I saw nobody running but him.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 18. Of stealing in a dwelling-house, but not breaking and entering.

Recommended to Mercy .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18210606-21

716. BRIAN M'PHELAN and BRIDGET M'LACHLAN was indicted for feloniously assaulting James Hogarth , on the 10th of April , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, 1 l. 7 s. in monies numbered; one 5 l. and six 1 l. Bank notes, his property .

JAMES HOGARTH . I am a dealer and grocer , and live at Cock-hill, Ratcliffe-highway. On the 10th of April, about ten o'clock at night (I had been collecting money in the City) and was met in Lemon-street by a black woman, and went with her to a house in Wentworth-street , and on entering the room, I saw a man there with a wooden leg, and some beer before him on a table; immediately on entering the room, the two prisoners came in. I said, I wished to go away; the male prisoner M'Phelan stood at the door, and would not let me go out - he stood with his back against the door; a candle was burning on the table, he, with others, insisted on my giving them some money for drink. I said,

"I would go and fetch them what they wanted" - my object was to get out. The man with the wooden leg, said, to M'Lachlan, that I owed him 3 l. (I had never seen him in my life before) she replied, he does, I saw him have it. I said,

"I did not owe him any such money;" on which the other man with the wooden leg collared me, and with the assistance of the black woman, got me down on the floor; then the wooden legged man called out to the female prisoner,

"Bring me a knife;" she stood in the centre of the room, and the male prisoner stood against the door - the black woman and wooden-legged man were on me at the time. I saw her go out of the room for the knife, he called loudly five or six times for it. I could not see whether M'Phelan moved to let her out, as the candle was put out, but in a very little time she returned; I cannot positively say she brought it, but I heard somebody come in, and the knife was brought. I still remained on the floor, struggling the whole time; the wooden-legged man then cut my left-hand pocket off; he then asked the others if he should cut my throat - I do not remember the exact answers, but they signified it was to be done - I think they said, do so, two distinct voices answered - I consider it to be the black woman and female prisoner. I put my hand to my throat, and received three stabs on my right hand, and lost my recollection - I was left for dead; when I came to, I found myself laying on the floor on my back, in the middle of the room; nobody nor any light was there. I searched round the room for the door, found it, and got down the two pair of stairs out of the house, into a kind of square. I found two landing places as I went down, but had not observed that I went up two pair of

stairs. I was not quite sober when I met the woman - I had not drank much. I had been out collecting money most of the day, and was neither sober or badly drunk - I was not acquainted with that part of the town. As soon as I got out, I called Watch! I was then in a stinking ditch opposite the house. A headborough came instantly, and presently another. I had not left the house more than a few yards, and could not mistake it on account of the ditch behind it. I returned into the house with them; the door which I came out of, and which appeared a back door, was open - I had entered by another door; we did not re-enter at the door I came out of, but at the front, and I think that door was open. We went into a room on the ground floor, and found a candle had just been extinguished - part of the fire in the wick was visible and still smoking; we there found the prisoners on the floor, with their clothes on, standing up; the watchman held his lanthorn to their faces. I saw they were the two who came in to me - I gave them in charge, and accompanied them to the watch-house.

Q. At the time your pocket was cut, what did you lose - A. One 5 l. note, and six 1 l. notes, and about 27 s. I have not recovered it. I have not been able to find the wooden-legged man and black woman. The prisoners were dressed exactly the same, as when they entered the room, except that the woman had a coat on over her other clothes, which I had not observed before - I am sure they are the people. I think I met the black woman about ten o'clock - it was two o'clock when I was at the watch-house.

Q. How had so much time been employed - A. It is some way from Lemon-street to Wentworth-street; we must have entered the house at half-past ten o'clock, and I think it was a quarter of an hour before I found myself overpowered, it took about ten minutes to go to the watch-house - I must have laid a considerable time insensible.

Prisoner M'PHELAN. Q. Was I not asleep in bed, with my coat, waistcoat, and shoes off - A. He had his coat on I think, when I saw him - there appeared a bed in the room. The constable of the night detained them at the watch-house. I was in a very serious situation, from the effects of the struggling, and I was kept there, laying on the seat. I was locked in one of the places - there was no charge against me.

JOHN TAIT . I am a watchman. On the 11th of April, about two o'clock in the morning, the prosecutor came and said he had been robbed of 12 l. 7 s. 6 d.; the house not being on my beat, I called Endersbee; he described the people, and knowing a black woman, and wooden-legged man lived at this house - we went there; he could not point the house out at first, we went into two or three. Where he came to me he was about 100 yards off, there is a dirty back yard like a ditch, which leads into a square. I have seen the male prisoner at the house before, but not the female. I do not know what floor the black woman and wooden legged man lived on - it is a public-house in front; there is a backway leading to it. On the first floor we found the prisoners in a room, the candle was just put out - there was a bed laying on the floor, the male prisoner was laying on it with his coat off - there was no bed clothes. On going in, the man sat up, he did not appear to have been a sleep, he spoke as soon as we entered the door; the female was sitting on a coat or blanket, near the window, with all her clothes on. On going up with a light and shewing the prisoners to the prosecutor, he said, they were two that were in the room; my brother went up for the black woman and wooden-legged man, but came down without them. Hogarth was in a very confused state, his neckcloth appeared to have the print of a person's hand, and there were three distinct cuts on the back of his hand - I cannot find the other two.

Prisoner M'PHELAN. Q. I was in bed with my coat, shoes, and hat off - A. His shoes and hat were off - there was a rug and blanket on the bed - it appeared to me that they heard us and laid down.

Prisoner MC. LACHLAN. Q. Was not I laying under the window on the same old clothes - A. She was sitting on a seat, with a coat thrown over her shoulder - her arms were not in it.

THOMAS ENDERSBEE . I am a watchman of Wentworth-street; the house is on my beat, I went there with Tait - his account is correct. I went up stairs and saw the room in a very disturbed state; a chair stood on its back leaning against the wall, on its two hind legs - I know the black woman lived in that room. Hogarth appeared very much confused; his shirt was torn out of the pleats, and there were marks of a hand on his throat.

M'PHELAN'S Defence. I was in bed when they came and took me.

MC. LACHLAN'S Defence. I had some words with my mother, and left her three days before. I went to lodge with this man and his wife, till I could make friends with my mother - he had only a few old clothes for me to lay on.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow .

Reference Number: t18210606-22

717. MARY JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of May , one child's coral, value 20 s.; two gowns, value 10 s.; one shawl, value 4 s.; two spoons, value 20 s., and three forks, value 3 s., the goods of George Walker , in his dwelling-house .

MARY WALKER . I am the wife of George Walker , and live in St. George's-square, Hoxton ; the prisoner lived with my lodgers - she was out of employ, and I engaged her. On Sunday morning, the 6th of May, I missed the child's coral, and asked her what she had done with it? she said she was distressed for money, and had pawned it for 14 s., and that she had taken several other things of mine, but she expected some money, and would then redeem them. My husband fetched the officer, who found several duplicates on her. I do not think they were all stolen at once.

JOHN MANCE . I am an officer. On the 6th of May I searched the prisoner, and found eight duplicates on her.

JOSEPH THIMBLERY , I am a pawnbroker, and live in Old-street-road. The prisoner pawned several things with me. On the 23d of March, a gown, for 2 s. 6 d.; 8th of March, two children's cloth pelisses; 4th of May, a shawl, for 1 s. 6 d.; 12th of April, a frock, for 1 s.; and on the 28th of April, a gown, 2 s. 6 d., in the name of Jones.

JAMES HUNT . I am shopman to Mr. Williamson, who is a pawnbroker. Four of the duplicates found on the prisoner are mine. I have a coat pawned in March, for 5 s.;

18th of April, a flannel petticoat; the 28th of April, a handkerchief and other articles; she also pawned a cap on the 21st of April, for 1 s. 3 d.

JOHN HILL . I live with Mr. Cox, a pawnbroker, in Shoreditch; the prisoner pledged a coral with me for 14 s. in the name of Mary Jones , on the 14th of April.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 48.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only.

Confined One Year .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18210606-23

718. WILLIAM DANBY was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of May , two shirts, value 8 s.; one waistcoat, value 2 s.; one sheet, value 2 s.; one handkerchief, value 6 d.; one pair of stays, value 1 s., one piece of baize, value 6 d., the goods of William Bovey ; and one shirt, value 3 s., and one waistcoat, value 1 s. , the goods of James Young .

RICHARD BRAND . I am a watchman of St. Margaret, Westminster. About twelve o'clock, on the 18th of May, I was on duty by the Abbey, the prisoner passed me with a bundle under his arm, I stopped him - he said he was going to take it to his mother.

GEORGE MILLER . I was constable of the night; the prisoner was brought to the watch-house; he said he had fetched the things for his mother to wash, and she lived at No. 18, Dean-street, and that it contained three shirts, but he did not know what the rest were. On opening the bundle I found them all wet, as if just washed - he got over a wall eight feet high, to get at them.

ANN BOVEY . I am the wife of William Bovey ; we live in Little Chaple-street, Westminster . I shut up at ten o'clock, leaving these things in the yard to dry - in the morning they were all gone. I found them at the watch-house.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

ESTHER YOUNG . I am the wife of James Young . We live in this house; my things were also stolen.

Prisoner's Defence. I was carrying them for a young man to No. 18, Dean-street.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow .

Reference Number: t18210606-24

719. EDWARD COOMBS was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of April , one handkerchief, value 3 s., and one shirt, value 10 s. , the goods of Michael Scully .

MICHAEL SCULLY . I live at Deptford . The prisoner came to me on the 28th of April, he engaged for a week's lodging, and slept there. On the 29th, the next morning, in consequence of information, I went in pursuit of him, and overtook him at Shadwell - I found my handkerchief round his neck. I also lost a shirt, which I have not recovered.

WILLIAM BROWN . I was called up, stopped the prisoner, and took the handkerchief off his neck.

ANN SCULLY . I missed the shirt and handkerchief; the prisoner was gone in the morning; he had asked me to go to Greenwich with him to receive two years pension, and while I was getting ready I missed them, and he was gone. I know the handkerchief, I had hemmed it myself, with ravelings, and the colour is faded in the middle.

- WALKER. I have been a weaveress; this handkerchief is hemmed with sewing silk, and not ravelings - ravelings are much finer.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 48.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18210606-25

720. HARRIET HOLLAND and ELIZA HASSELL were indicted for stealing, on the 11th of May , one watch, value 1 l.; one chain, value 1 s.; one seal, value 6 s., and two keys, value 2 d., the goods of James Moon , from his person .

JAMES MOON . I am a seaman . On the 10th of May, at night, I fell in with the prisoner Holland, and went home with her. I went to bed at half-past ten, or half-past eleven o'clock, put my watch under my head, and fell asleep. I was sober. I awoke about daylight, and missed my watch; she was still alongside of me; I asked for my property, she said I had brought none with me - I missed money besides, and my waistcoat. I got up, and was going for an officer, she called me back, and gave me my waistcoat. I found my watch in pawn,

Prisoner HOLLAND. Q. You gave me the watch to keep till you got some money - A. I did not; I had money, and said I would satisfy her.

JANE SELBY . I live in Shakespeare-walk; my brother keeps a chandler's shop. On Friday night, the 10th of May, about eleven o'clock, the prisoners came to the shop - Holland had the watch - she put it on the counter, and said a sailor, whom she knew before, had come to her house, and had no money; that he told her to leave the watch for victuals, and to pawn it in the morning for 1 l.; she had some bread, butter, and bacon, which came to 6 s. I asked her if she was sure the seaman gave her the watch Hassell said she saw the sailor give Holland the watch. In the morning they both came for the watch, and asked me to advance 1 l. on it - Hassell said she would pawn it. I gave it to Holland, who gave it to Hassell. One of them waited while the other went and pawned it, and brought the money. I changed the 1 l. note, and took my 6 s. She was putting the ticket into her bosom, I said she had better leave it with me, for the sailor - she gave it to me - I gave it to the officer.

JOHN BROWN. I am an officer. About seven o'clock in the morning Moon applied to me. I apprehended the prisoners - they were both in liquor.

DAVID KENNEDY . I am a pawnbroker. Hassell pawned the watch, chain, and seals with me for 1 l. in the name of Dulon.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

HOLLAND'S Defence. He gave me the watch to pawn. till he got money.

HOLLAND - GUILTY . Aged 25.

Of stealing, but not from the person.

Transported for Seven Years .

HASSELL - NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow .

Reference Number: t18210606-26

721. JOSEPH EASTMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of May , one watch, value 30 s. , the goods of William Hallersley .

WILLIAM HALLERSLEY . I live in Medway-street, Horseferry-road . On the 14th of May I lost this watch from over the fire-place; I was not at home, but my wife sent for me about four o'clock, and I missed it; the prisoner lived in the house with his father and mother, for about three-quarters of a year - he never came home after. He was apprehended on the Thursday following.

CHARLES VAUGHAN . I live in St. Martin's-lane, with Mr. Dry. On the 15th of May, about five o'clock in the afternoon, I took a watch in pledge of the prisoner, in the name of Joseph Clayton , No. 5, Cecil-court. I am confident he is the person.

JOHN DAVIS . I am an officer. On the 16th of May, about two o'clock in the morning, the prisoner came to me in the Strand, and said he had been robbed of 15 s. at a brothel in Swan-yard - he described the girls to me. I went with him to the house; I afterwards searched him, but found nothing on him. I searched a boy named Green, who was in his company, and found the duplicate of this watch on him. He said, in the prisoner's hearing, that the prisoner pawned the watch at Dry's, and gave him the duplicate - the prisoner denied it. I was taking him home, by the Magistrate's orders, but he took me to different places; at last he told me Green stole the watch, at Covent Garden, and gave it to him to pawn; he took me to the pawnbroker's. I went to the watch-maker, and found the prosecutor out.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years ,

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18210606-27

722. WILLIAM HUDSON was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of May , one bag, value 18 d.; six vials, value 6 d., and two bottles, value 6 d. , the goods of John Ellis , James Metcalf , and William Langton .

MR. ANDREWS conducted the prosecution.

MR. JOHN ELLIS . I am a druggist , and live in Upper Thames-street, and am in partnership with James Metcalf and William Langton . The prisoner had been in our service seven years, or rather more - he was chiefly employed in packing ; our stock was exposed to the workmen. I received information, and desired that the prisoner should be watched; he went to dinner at one o'clock, on Thursday, the 17th of May, I sent Jones to bring him back; he brought him back, and I had two officers ready - I said,

"William, I suspect you have something of ours about you; you can have no objection to be searched?" He took off his hat, emptied his pockets, and produced the vials and bottles - the vials were in his hat, and the bottles were in his pocket.

HENRY KERRIDGE . I am a ward beadle. I was at Mr. Ellis's house; after the prisoner went out I saw him come back with Jones - he was searched up stairs. Mr. Ellis said he suspected he had some of his property. I said he must be searched, he immediately pulled his hat off, and some small vials were in it, and two quart bottles and a bag were in his pockets. Some time after he acknowledged them to be the prosecutor's property. I think he said he took them for his own use.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q, With the intention to return them - A. He did not say so.

THOMAS HUTCHINSON . I was with the last witness, when the bottles were produced from the prisoner's person, he said they were his masters', that he took the canvas bag for an apron, and begged of his master to forgive him.

COURT. Q. Did he say he took them for temporary use - A. No; there were four small vials and two large ones.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 35.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

723. WILLIM HUDSON was again indicted for stealing, on the 17th of May , six stone bottles, value 6 d.; six quarts of blacking, value 6 s.; six pints of gritts, value 2 s., and one bag, value 9 d. , the goods of John Ellis , James Metcalf , and William Langton .

MR. JAMES ELLIS . I accompanied the officer after the prisoner was brought back, to his lodgings, at Cook's house - the prisoner was left in the care of another officer. We found the property stated in the indictment in a box in his bed-room; he had given us the key of his box before we went. I asked him where he got them - he said he bought them - I said it was impossible he could buy them in that quantity.

Cross-examined. Q. You do not make blacking - A. No, it was Day and Martin's. Our stock is too large to miss property.

THOMAS HUTCHINSON . I went to search at the prisoner's lodgings, with Mr. Ellis. I opened the box with a key the prisoner gave me, found the property, and brought it into his presence. Mr. Ellis asked him how he could think of taking such things - he begged forgiveness.

Cross-examined. Q. In what words did he acknowledge it - A. He said they were his masters' property. I think he would have fell on his knees and begged forgiveness.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 35.

Confined Two Months .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210606-28

724. GEORGE WOODROFF was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of April , 26 lbs. of metal, value 16 s. , the goods of William Devey and Elizabeth Devey .

WILLIAM DEVEY . I am in partnership with Elizabeth Devey ; we are brass-founders , and live in Shoe-lane ; the prisoner was in our employ for about two years and a half. On the 27th of April this metal was given to him to melt; he went into the cellar, and I desired one of the men to watch him, which he did. On the 28th, about breakfast time, he was called back as he went out at the door, and I charged him with having our property about him, and told him to produce it - he pulled the metal from under his frock - it weighed 8 1/2 lbs. and was worth 5 s. He denied having taken any before. I gave him in charge.

THOMAS EDGINTON . I was in the prosecutors' employ. On Saturday, the 28th of April, I called my master down stairs - the prisoner had got to the door, and was called back - my master charged him with it - he then produced this metal. I went down into the cellar, and found another

piece of metal, which corresponds with it. I believe it to be the same that I gave him.

(Property produced, and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Fined One Shilling and discharged .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210606-29

725. ELIZA LAMBERT was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of May , four shirts, value 28 s.; one table-cloth, value 8 s.; two shifts, value 5 s.; one blanket, value 2 s., and three sheets, value 10 s. , the goods of Samuel Butler .

PRISCILLA BUTLER . I am the wife of Samuel Butler , who lives in London-wall ; the prisoner was my servant , and lived four months with me. On the 15th of May, Susan Sivewright came for the linen, and perceiving the bundle small, I asked if they were all - the prisoner answered, Yes, they were. Sivewright went home, and the prisoner went after her. Sivewright came afterwards and gave me information; the prisoner was then out; when she returned. I told her to bring her master's shirts or linen - she brought two shirts. I asked her for the rest - she said the washerwoman had them. I said,

"She has got but one, and I insist on knowing what you have done with the rest." She would not say a word. I sent for an officer; who found twenty-one duplicates on her. She had 8 l. a year.

SUSAN SIVEWRIGHT . I went to Mrs. Butler, on the 15th of May, for the dirty linen; the prisoner brought down only one shirt - after I left, she followed me to my house, and said she had given me less shirts than she ought to have done, but she would bring them next morning, or that night. I told her her mistress had mentioned something about a new shirt - she said she had spilt some ink on it, but she would get it out, and bring it.

JACOB RUSSELL . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Fore-street, Cripplegate. I have one shirt; pawned by the prisoner, for 1 s.; on the 24th of March, one shift, for 2 s. 6 d., and on the 5th of May, one shirt, for 1 s. I have very little doubt of her being the woman. I have another shift, pawned on the 8th of May, for 2 s. 6 d., and one for 9 d. in the name of Ann Lambert ; and a blanket, for 2 s. I think she must be the person, her face is very familiar to me.

THOMAS BROOK . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Whitecross-street. I have a table-cloth, pawned on the 15th of May, about eleven o'clock in the morning, by the prisoner.

JOSEPH BURGIN . I am an officer. I took charge of her, and found twenty-one duplicates on her, some of which related to this property.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Confined Six Months .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210606-30

726. JAMES CLEMENTS was indicted for stealing on the 15th of May , one piece of printed cotton, containing twenty-one yards, value 1 l., and two remnants of printed cotton, value 18 s. , the goods of Richard Clarance .

WILLIAM WOOD . I am porter to Mr. Richard Clarance , who is a bed furniture manufacturer , and lives in the Minories . The prisoner was a stranger.

WALTER STONE . I am an officer. On the 15th of May, about eleven o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner, with another person, going down the Minories; I watched them to the middle of the Minories - the prisoner went into a silversmith's shop - he was in there two or three minutes - his companion waited outside. After he came out I crossed over, and followed the prisoner to Sparrow-corner, opposite Mr. Clarance's; while I waited there I saw him speak to his companion - the prisoner then went into Mr. Clarance's shop, and I saw him take the three pieces of print off the counter, near the door, and come out with them under his arm. I crossed over, he got into the Circus, and I secured him. I took him back to the shop, and Mr. Clarance claimed the property. He resisted, but I kept him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210606-31

727. GEORGE PERRY was indicted for stealing, on 14th of April , nine locks and nine keys, value 9 s. , the goods of James Payne ,

MR. JAMES PAYNE . I am an ironmonger , and live in Foster-lane . About nine o'clock at night, on the 14th of April, the prisoner came in and asked for an iron centre-hook. I took him to the end of the shop, and showed him some - he asked the price, I said two-pence. He said he had not money enough, but he would return in a few minutes. At that time a Captain came in, and I went up stairs with him; I was called down again, and found the robbery had been committed.

WILLIAM PETRE . I am watchman to the Goldsmith's Company. I was on duty, and heard the cry of Stop thief! some people ran to Mr. Payne's, I went in, and the prisoner was given into my charge. I searched him, and found two bed-hooks on him. As I took him to the Compter the people picked up two locks - they said,

"Stop! here are the locks, which he has thrown away."

EDWARD HUBBARD . I am porter to Mr. Payne. The prisoner came into the shop, and while he was being served by the shopman, with a hook and eye, which came to 2 d., I saw him take a brown paper parcel off the counter, and put it under his coat - my master was up stairs then. As he was going out I asked him what he had got - he made no answer. I lifted up his coat, and he ran away. I did not see him drop any thing, as it was dark; the locks were brought back - the paper was found close by them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Six Months , and publicly Whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210606-32

728. JOHN LANE was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of May , one piece of scantling timber, value 10 s. , the goods of John Miller .

JOHN MILLER . I am a carpenter , and live in Upper Thames-street ; my shop is up Brook's-yard; the entrance

to the yard is under a house, where there are bearers for timber.

CHRISTOPHER PURSEY . Miller's shop is by my house. I gave him leave to put timber in my passage. I heard a noise in the passage about a quarter before nine o'clock, looked, and saw the prisoner bring the timber away on his shoulder; I followed him, pointed him out to Miller's son, and he stopped him.

JOHN MILLER , JUN. I went after the prisoner, and saw him on Lamheth-hill, with the timber - I stopped him. He said a man employed him to carry it.

Prisoner's Defence. I met a plasterer, who said he had a piece of timber to carry, and being out of work, I was glad of the job. I took it about forty or fifty yards, when he ran away, and I was stopped.

SIMON CHILDS . I met the prisoner about five o'clock in the morning, and about nine we met a man who asked him if he wanted a job - the prisoner went away with him up towards Cheapside.

GUILTY , Aged 21.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210606-33

729. JOHN WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of May , two saws, value 15 s. , the goods of Henry Gibbons .

HENRY GIBBONS . I am a carpenter , and live in Half-Moon-alley, Bishopsgate-street. I left these saws in a building where I was at work, in Old Swan-lane , at Mr. Alderman Garratt's premises. I went to dinner at twelve o'clock, returned in about three-quarters of an hour, and found the prisoner in custody with them.

MICHAEL DAVIS . I was employed on the premises. I left a boy there while I went backwards; I saw the prisoner talking to the boy, who said he had come down stairs - he went out, I followed, and took the two saws from under his coat.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was starving.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210606-34

730. THOMAS KERSHAW was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of April , ten sixpences , the monies of Jonathan Thomas Heap .

JONATHAN THOMAS HEAP . I live on Fish-street-hill , and am a confectioner . The prisoner came into my shop on the 24th of April (I had seen him three weeks before), and asked for change for a sovereign. I called my servant up, counted 20 s., and said

"Give it to him, and take care how you deliver it." I stood looking through the back parlour window - she gave him the 20 s. - he said to the servant, I want a half-sovereign - she said she had none. He then said the change would not do, and returned her the change - she counted it, and brought it to me - there was only 15 s. I told him it was the second time he had tried to rob me - he had kept ten sixpences back. I sent for a constable, he shifted the ten sixpences out of his sleeve, and said,

"Here is the rest of your change."

Cross-examined by MR. BRODERICK. Q. You kept the sovereign after he returned the change - A. Yes.

COURT. Then you had value for it.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210606-35

THIRD DAY. FRIDAY, JUNE 8.

731. JOHN SCALTON , JOHN SMITH , JANE CARTER , JOHN DART , CHARLES FIELD , GEORGE KEMP , EDWARD SMITH , GEORGE PRICE , GEORGE BAKER , THOMAS STEVENS , JOSEPH SMITH , ELIZA SMITH , RICHARD LYNCH , SARAH READING , SARAH STEWART , SARAH APPLETON , FRANCES GREY , ELIZA PASCOE , CATHARINE TAYLOR , ELIZA EATON , and SARAH JOHNSON , and JOHN LAW were severally and separately indicted for having in their custody and possession, forged Bank notes, knowing them to be forged .

The prisoners severally pleaded GUILTY .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Before Mr. Justice Bayley and Mr. Baron Garrow .

732. The same prisoners were again indicted for disposing of and putting away certain forged Bank notes, with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England .

MR. SERGEANT BOSANQUET on the part of the Governor and Company of the Bank of England, declined offering any evidence.

NOT GUILTY .

Before Mr. Justice Bayley, and Mr. Baron Garrow .

Reference Number: t18210606-36

733. SUSAN HYDE was charged on the Coroner's Inquisition, only, with wilful murder .

MARY TAYLOR . I am the wife of Thomas Taylor . The prisoner lived in our service about a year and a half - she is single. I had no reason to suppose her in the family-way till a week or ten days before this happened, I then told her of it - she denied it. She slept in the front parlour, alone, and we in the back. I cannot hear what passes in her room - there is a wooden partition between us. On the 5th April , I went to bed at half-past nine o'clock; she had eaten a very hearty supper, and appeared very well - I heard nothing in the night. At half-past five o'clock in the morning, I found a child in the privy - I saw it before it was disturbed; its two little legs stuck upright, the other parts were under the soil - it was exactly under the hole.

Q. Was it in such a situation in which it might be, if it fell from any one sitting on the privy - A. I cannot say. It was taken out and examined by Mr. Watkins, Mrs. Bowers, the midwife, first saw it. I asked the prisoner, what she thought of doing such a horrid deed; she made no answer - she was in bed. There were symptoms of her having been delivered in the parlour.

Q. Were they more than what might be there if she had been delivered in the privy, and came to the parlour - A. I cannot say - I have not had a family myself; there

were marks of blood on the floor and bed - they were only marks of blood that might be after delivery.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Were there not also blood marks on the privy - A. There was on the boards where she might have sat. The child appeared to have fallen with its head downward.

MR. WATKINS. I am an apothecary, and have had a good deal of experience in the delivery of women. I was called to attend the prisoner on Friday, the 6th of April, and on Monday, I saw the child - it was a female; there is nothing that enables me to say whether it was born alive or not. It is very common for women to mistake the pains of childbirth, for an inclination to go to the privy; it is rather unlikely that the child should drop from her, but it depends on local circumstances, and the strength of the woman - the case is so seldom, it is not necessary to caution them against it. It is not uncommon for them to swoon away, or go into an unusual sinking at these times, and it is very likely they are not conscious of the moment the delivery takes place. I examined the child for marks of violence - I should have examined it before, but I was well aware there was great uncertainty in distinguishing between a still-born child, and one who died shortly after birth, and thought a surgeon of eminence should see it. I found no marks on it, that I should consider marks of violence; I should think them such as would have occurred by its falling down, or from natural causes. If she was delivered in the room, there would be other marks besides what there was; she might have been delivered in the privy, there was nothing to enable me to say it was born alive, and no more appears than a natural birth might have produced.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. I believe a head presentation is usual at birth - A. Yes, if born while she sat on the privy, it would fall head foremost.

SARAH BOWERS . I am a midwife. I first saw the prisoner about eight o'clock on Friday morning - she said she was delivered in the privy, at one o'clock in the morning. I had a patient myself the other day, who had liked to have dropped her child in the privy - I am in the habit of cautioning them against it sometimes.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18210606-37

734. ALGERON DISNEY was charged on the Coroner's Inquisition, only, with the wilful murder of Ann Bantling .

RICHARD COATES . I am a constable of Marylebone , I was directed by the Magistrate to convey Ann Bantling , to the Infirmary of the parish, on the 2d or 3d of November. I did not know her before - I did not see her later than the 10th.

HARRIET RHODES . I am midwife of Marylebone, Infirmary. On the 16th of November, about three o'clock in the morning, I was first sent for to the deceased; she had then been moved from the sick house to the laying-in ward. I found her in labour - her pains had come on; she did not say she was in labour - she was delivered of a still-born child about a quarter after four o'clock. I left her about six o'clock, she was then perfectly safe with respect to her delivery - I had no apprehension at all of her life. I saw her again about four o'clock that afternoon, and found her much in pain, which is not unusual - I thought them after-pains. I had no apprehension of her being in imminent danger, and did not remain above ten minutes with her - it was only a visit. I saw her again next day, (Friday) between three and four o'clock, and found her very bad, apparently in violent pain; I remained about ten minutes with her - it was only a visit as before. I thought her in danger then, if she was in as much pain as she appeared to be - I did not tell her so, but told the nurse to fetch Mr. Goodyear, a surgeon of the establishment. I did not see her again alive; she died on Sunday morning early. I do not imagine that she thought herself likely soon to die.

SUSAN DAWSON. I am in the service of Mr. Henry Weedon , of No. 3, New Charles-street, Paddington. I knew Ann Bantling , before she went to the workhouse. About three days before she went there, (I think it was in the early part of November) I saw her; she was then walking about, and appeared as usual. I saw her one day after - she was in the workhouse, she came to our house - I had known her a year and a half. The last time I saw her, was, I think, a fortnight before her death - she came into our house.

Q. Do you know any thing of the circumstances of her death, or are you only come to say what you heard - A. Just before the Friday evening that I saw her, she ran out of doors - I stood at the window and saw her; this was on the Friday, as she went to the workhouse on the Monday following. I was listening at our window, and heard her crying very much, and heard the sound of a stick, as if it was striking on a person; she was saying,

"Pray, Sir, don't." I did not see who she was speaking to, but I heard Mr. Disney's voice, very plain. I heard her say, do not, and he said,

"I'll get a stick and knock you to the ground, if you don't open the door in the manner I tell you" - he was before slapping her with his hand, as I thought.

Q. How could you know his voice - A. I have heard him speak many times, and know his voice very well - this continued about three quarters of an hour. He stood scolding and beating her before she ran out - I heard him go from the door; then she ran out, and ran down the street - he went out after her. I did not see him take her, but saw him bring her back - his arms were round her waist, and she was holding to the railings; several people ran after her, and she turned round to them and said,

"Pray don't let me go in with him, for if you do he will kill me" - her nose was bleeding; he said,

"Ann, my dear girl, come in and I will not beat you again, nor hurt you;" he took her in, and then came to our door. I told him I had heard him beat her three nights very shamefully, he said, I was mistaken, for he never touched her, and that her nose bled from her wanting to get away, when he wanted her to go in. I saw her next morning - she shewed me her bruises; she was very much bruised on the temple, and her arms, where he had beat her with a stick. I saw her on Monday before she was taken away by the officers; she then shewed me the marks on her shoulders, neck, and ear; they were very black, and appeared to have been beaten with a whip, and she shewed me the whip.

MR. WILLIAM FREDERICK GOODYEAR . I am apothecary at the Marylebone Infirmary, and am a surgeon. I admitted

the deceased into the Infirmary, on the 4th of November, as a fit patient; she appeared to be labouring under a common cold - she was brought from the Workhouse; I had no idea of her labouring under any thing else. I directed for her as for a common cold - I did not then know she was pregnant. I saw her regularly twice a day, with the rest of the patients, but apprehended nothing particular. On the 16th, I was called up about half-past two o'clock, and found her in labour - I told her of it; she denied positively any knowledge of it, and gave me, as she thought, a sufficient reason. I do not think she would have denied there being a chance of it, but gave me a reason, by which she judged she was not in labour. I sent her over to the laying-in ward - the midwife delivered her that morning, of a still-born child. I saw her in the morning, she was then vomiting, and had a constipated state of bowels, and some degree of fever.

Q. That is not unusual after delivery - A. Yes, but not an unusual state preceeding the disease with which she was afterwards visited. I ordered accordingly for her - she appeared relieved, but afterwards got considerably worse, and next day (Friday) it was discovered, that it had brought on St. Anthony's fire in her left thigh, and the lower part of her belly; this made rapid progress, and towards Saturday evening, it formed several blotches of mortification, and on Sunday she died. I attended her diligently three times a day, and examined her after death with the other surgeons, Messrs. C. and J. Phillips, and Platt, who are eminent men in the profession.

Q. From all you observed during the disease, and after death, what in your opinion was the cause of her death - A. That she died of St. Anthony's fire - it was at that period, an epedemic; we had three or four cases in the house, two of which died - in those cases the patients were not pregnant. I have not the least reason to suppose her death was occasioned by external violence; when I first saw her, she had marks on her posteriors, as if she had been flogged by a birch rod, but that did not appear at all serious - it disappeared; there was an interval of fourteen days, in which she was employed in the needle-room of the workhouse - from the 3d to the 14th she was in the workhouse. When I saw her in the workhouse, she was in an apparent degree of health, but afterwards appeared to have a cold, and was brought into the Infirmary.

Q. On your oath, do you believe the deceased died from natural causes - A. Yes, from St. Anthony's fire. It is possible labour might have aggravated the effect, but I have no reason to attribute her death to external violence, all that dispersed when she had the cold - I believe all the medical gentlemen agreed with me.

MR. JOHN PHILIPS . I am a surgeon. I examined the desceased after her death, with Mr. Goodyear, Mr. Platt, and my son. My opinion is, that her death was caused by the inflammation which seized her legs, and extended to her thigh; there were symptoms of gangreen on her thighs and legs, and mortification, the common process of it, had taken place - that certainly produced her death. I have no reason to attribute it to external violence, or injury to her person.

MR. CHARLES PHILIPS . I assisted my father in examining the deceased, and entirely concur in his opinion. I believe her death to be occasioned by the disease, and not external violence.

MR. PLATT. I assisted in the examination, and entirely concur with the witnesses.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow .

Reference Number: t18210606-38

735. PETER GEORGE PATMORE was indicted for the wilful murder of John Scott .

MR. WALFORD conducted the prosecution.

MR. PETTIGREW, (surgeon) and MR. W. B. MORRIS, his assistant, on being called, were informed by the Court, that if they had attended on the field, knowing a duel was going to take place, for the purpose of giving surgical assistance, should it be necessary, they were liable to a criminal prosecution themselves and that they were therefore at liberty to refuse being examined in this case.

Both gentlemen declined being examined.

DR. GEORGE DARLING . I am a physician, residing in Brunswick-square. I attended the late Mr. Scott.

Q. Before you give any account of the conversation, that may have passed between you, inform us if he believed himself in danger - A. He believed himself in danger, but not dying. He was told his wound was not necessarily mortal - he entertained hopes of recovery, Mr. Guthrie told him he might recover - he was not under immediate apprehension of death. He died from the wound of a bullet in the right side; the ball passed through the body, and lodged under the skin on the other side.

HUGH WATSON . I keep the tavern at Chalk-farm . On the evening of the 16th of February, two gentlemen, whom I did not know, came to my house; they staid there twenty minutes, or more, they went out towards Hampstead-road, in about half an hour an alarm was given. I sent some men to the field to give assistance - Mr. Scott was brought to my house on a door. I knew Mr. Patmore perfectly well; he came with the wounded gentleman, and continued three or four hours, I believe, and attended Mr. Scott very frequently from that time till his death, and appeared very much affected.

Cross-examined by MR. CURWOOD. Q. Did you know Mr. Patmore before - A. I have known him twelve years. I do not know what passed in the field, nor when Mr. Patmore joined Mr. Scott; the first time I saw him was when he came to my house - Dr. Darling attended Mr. Scott.

THOMAS SMITH . I am a carpenter. On the evening of the 16th of February, I was at Mr. Watson's; an alarm was given of a gentleman being wounded - I and Ryan went to assist in bringing him in. On entering the field, I saw four or five gentlemen - I saw Mr. Patmore there; they were standing ten or twelve yards from Mr. Scott, who lay on the ground alone - he was brought to Mr. Watson's on a door. When I got to the field, I was desired to fetch a door, which I did, and the gentlemen assisted him on it, and took him to the house - nothing was said in Mr. Patmore's presence.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18210606-39

736. JOHN JACKSON was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of May , one gold ring, value, 5 s., the goods of Eliza Bird , from her person .

ELIZA BIRD . I live at Little Russell-street, Bloomsbury , and am a widow . On the 3d of May, I was in the passage, going to the door, as the chimney-sweeps were before the door, making a noise. I was going to shut the door, when the prisoner rushed against me and prevented me; he called me his old mistress and other names; he was dressed as a sweep, with black face and clothes - not in ribbons; he wanted to kiss me - I pushed him away; he then asked me to shake hands - I had a gold ring on, he shook hands with me, and drew the ring off. I ran into the street and said,

"That man has got my ring off;" the people who had seen how he behaved to me, went after him. I saw him again at Bow-street the same night, but I could not swear to him. I cannot say he is the man, my sight is so bad; the ring was brought to me next morning by Johnson.

JOHN MATTHEW HARWOOD . I am in the employ of Mr. Eniker, who lives in Carey-street, Lincoln's Inn-fields. I saw the prisoner go up to the prosecutrix, and ask for money - she refused; he got on the step of the door, felt her pockets, and tried to kiss her - she pushed him away; he pretended to shake hands with her, left her, and shut the door after him, and was out of sight when the old lady opened the door and said, she had lost her ring. I described him to the constable, and saw him in custody about seven o'clock. I knew him to be the man, he was not dressed up as the sweeps are, he carried the box; his face was black, and so it was in the evening - I am sure he is the man.

MARY JOHNSON . My husband is a master sweep, we live in Steward's-rents, Drury-lane. We were out on the 1st of May, but not after; the prisoner gave me the ring the same day that the prosecutrix lost it - he said nothing; as soon as he gave it me, he ran away, and I did not see him again till I saw him at Bow-street. I knew him well by sight - I gave the ring to Turner.

JOSEPH TURNER . I am an officer; the last witness brought the ring to me on Friday morning, I have kept it ever since - I have known her three or four years.

JOHN JEWEL . I took the prisoner in Burnham-place.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing of it.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow .

Reference Number: t18210606-40

737. ROBERT WATKIS PIKE was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of April , 3 lbs. of coffee, value 3 s. , the goods of the East India Dock Company .

RICHARD OVER. I am a constable of the East India Docks . Webster delivered the prisoner over to me, with this coffee, which I weighed; he said the dock master ordered him to deliver him to me, and said, in his hearing, that the coffee was drawn from the prisoner's pockets; the prisoner said, he drew the sample to oblige the merchant; he was foreman of a warehouse - it weighed 3 lbs.

BENJAMIN BULPIT . I am a warehouse-keeper; the prisoner was foreman under me on the coffee floor; he has no right to take samples without my orders - I did not order him to take samples; sometimes a sample weighs 2 lbs., and occasionally 3 lbs.; if there are many bags, we take a little out of each, tie them up in paper, and mark the weight outside - that produced was in a handkerchief.

Prisoner. Q. Have you not often authorized me to draw a sample to oblige a merchant, without an excise order - A. I have, but they are never taken out in a handkerchief, or hat; if a merchant's clerk wants coffee, to shew his employers, we allow him to take a 1/4 lb. - it is done under the excise officer's notice, but we ought to have an excise order to draw them.

Q. Did you not authorize me to draw larger samples for my brother - A. His brother is clerk to the owner of the coffee, and I have done such a thing, but never allowed him to draw a regular sample for his brother, without the leave of my superior.

RICHARD OVER re-examined. Webster said that the coffee was secreted in the prisoner's hat, and without paper - the prisoner did not say whom he drew the sample for.

JOSEPH ANSLEY . I am clerk to Meyers and Co. I saw the prisoner at the East India Docks, on the 24th of April. I gave him no orders about samples, I only asked him to get some coffee weighed, which my employers had bought. I was present before the Magistrate on the 28th April. I do not know whether what the prisoner said was taken down - Mr. Langley was the Magistrate; the prisoner heard what I said, and denied it. I said, I gave him no orders for samples; he said, I did - I did not. I wanted no samples of any coffee in the East India Docks.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not in March last, ask me to draw samples of coffee, which were coming by the Providence - A. I do not know.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not say you would call for them if I could get them - A. I said, I would call for weights, but not samples; samples are always delivered in paper by an order - I never asked him to draw me samples without.

CHARLES ELENOR . I am an Excise surveyor. Samples must not be delivered without an Excise order; they generally take about 2 oz. from each package - it may amount to several pounds; we do them up in paper, and make them up in square parcels, and mark them outside. I saw the prisoner stopped by Webster, as he was going out to breakfast, at half-past eight o'clock; he was searched in the office, and nothing found on him, but upon taking off his hat, there was about 3 lbs. of coffee in a handkerchief - he had said he had nothing about him; he said it was samples which he was going to take to some person, he did not say whom - it was not the regular way to carry out samples.

EMANUEL MERCURY . I know the hand-writing of Mr. Langley the Magistrate, this deposition is signed by him, (reads) The prisoner says

"I persist in saying, Mr. Ansley asked me for parcels, and said, if I could not get them that day, I must next morning, and take them to Great Winchester-street."

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18210606-41

738. JOHN JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of April , one scarf, value 20 s., the goods of Frances Yenn , from her person .

FRANCES YENN . I live in Queen-street, Covent-garden. On Sunday, the 29th of April, I was crossing the top of Orchard-street, Westminster , with my sister, about a quarter before nine o'clock; a man came behind me and snatched my scarf from my neck, and ran off with it - it was tied round, I had hold of it, and caught one end. He snatched it from me - I cried Stop thief! and another man stopped me, turned me round, and struck me on the back - my sister pursued him, and he was brought back in about seven minutes; his dress corresponded with the man who took my scarf - I have no doubt of his being the man. When we were at the office, before the examination, he said if I would not prosecute him, he would return it, if he could find it, and make any recompence - when I was before the Magistrate, I said I could not swear to his person, but his dress answered, I do not now speak to his features.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODERICK. Q. It was quite dusk? - A. Yes. I only saw his back - he said he knew nothing about it, not that it was thrown at him.

ELIZA YENN . I was walking with my sister - a man came behind and snatched her scarf, I turned round and pursued him, and never lost sight of him till he was stopped by Davis with the scarf in his hand.

WILLIAM DAVIS . I am a dyer; I heard a female cry Stop thief! and saw the prisoner, with other boys, running with the scarf in his hand; I stopped him, the gang came round, and in the scuffle I could not see what became of the scarf, I collared him two or three hundred yards from the spot, where he ran from; I attended at the office and heard the prosecutrix say to him,

"You took my scarf," he said, I shall not deny it, but will return it, and make you a present to say nothing about it; she said she would not do it.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow .

Reference Number: t18210606-42

739. JAMES MOORE was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of May , one watch, value 20 s. , the goods of Joseph Hatchard .

JOSEPH HATCHARD . I have the care of a Sunday-school , in Chamber-street, Goodman's-fields . The prisoner was a scholar some time back, for nearly seven years, but had left it. I was in the school on Sunday the 20th of May; when I went in, I laid my watch on the desk, as usual; I went into the female department of the school, and on returning, missed it - I had seen the prisoner in the school before I went to the female department, when I returned he was gone; he was brought back in half an hour by some of the teachers, and as he came up the stairs I saw him lay the watch on the stairs, it was worth thirty or forty shillings - I am sure it is mine; he had once been in my shop some time back, but did not suit me; I have a good opinion of his mother.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I beg for mercy.

GUILTY . Aged 12.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18210606-43

740. ISABELLA LEAKE was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of May , three handkerchiefs, value 3 s.; three books, value 1 s., and one spoon, value 6 d. , the goods of William Griffiths .

MARY GRIFFITHS . I am the wife of William Griffiths , a coal dealer , who lives in Air-street, Bethnal-green . I hired the prisoner as servant ten months ago. In consequence of suspicion, I desired her box might be searched by Mason.

WM. MASON. I am an officer. I searched the prisoner's box, in her presence, and found the handkerchief in her bosom, and an apron round her waist, and on her person I found twenty-two keys, and 18 l. 8 s. - I found three books, three handkerchiefs, and an apron in her box.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I took the books to read, and intended to return them; a misunderstanding took place about wages, she then took advantage of the books, and sent for the officer, who found them on the kitchen table. I had put on her old handkerchief and apron as mine were dirty - I have seven children dependent on me.

WM. MASON re-examined. The books were given me by the parish constable, he is not here; I found the handkerchief and money in her box.

WILLIAM GRIFFITHS. I saw the books found, and am certain they were taken out of her box; she at first refused to give the key up. I missed the property, which was safe when she came into my service.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Confined Three Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow.

Reference Number: t18210606-44

741. THOMAS SUTTON was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of May , one copper, value 15 s. , the goods of William Day .

WILLIAM DAY . I am a broker . I had a copper for sale, which stood in front of my place in City-terrace, City-road . On the 9th of May, about five o'clock in the afternoon, I was going home, and met the prisoner coming from my house with it in his hand - I was about one hundred yards from my house - I knew it - I hastened home and enquired if my wife had sold it - I returned and took him in custody.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I met a gentleman who employed me to carry it, it stood about thirty yards in front of the shop. Mr. Day asked what I was going to do with it, I said I was employed to carry it; I shewed him the man, he said

"Never mind him, I will take you." I had been drinking with some friends, which made me out of my mind, having had a fall the least liquor affects me. I beg forgiveness, and will never drink a drop of spirits again.

WM. DAY re-examined. He did not appear in liquor, the copper stood about thirty feet from the front of the shop; the ground is my private property; he said a gentleman gave it him to carry, he had three new coal measures on his back.

GUILTY . Aged 48.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

742. THOMAS SUTTON was again indicted for stealing, on the 9th of May , three coal measures, value 15 s. , the goods of James Beal .

JAMES BEAL . I live in Cow-cross-street, St. Sepulchre's , about three-quarters of a mile from Day's. I lost three coal measures from my shop, on the 9th of May; they were a half-bushel, a peck, and a half-peck - they are worth 15 s. I found them in Harradine's possession.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN BANKS HARRADINE . I am an officer. When I took the prisoner he had these measures - he did not appear to be intoxicated, I found no money on him.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing about it.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18210606-45

743. JOHN PAGE was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of April , two shirts, value 10 s. , the goods of Michael Tynon .

MICHAEL TYNON . I am in the 5th regiment of Dragoon Guards ; the prisoner had been discharged from a regiment of Veterans a few days before. I was billetted at the King's Arms, Westminster . On the 21st of April, he slept in the same room with me. I went out about ten o'clock to parade, and when I returned I missed my shirts - I had seen them an hour before. I found him in ten minutes, with both my shirts on his back, over his own.

RICHARD WILLIAMS . I took the prisoner in charge, and took the shirts off his back.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. He took them from another man.

GUILTY . Aged 36.

Transported for Seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow .

Reference Number: t18210606-46

744. SUSAN JENKINS was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of May , one sheet, value 5 s., and two gowns, value 15 s. , the goods of Robert Towler .

ROBERT TOWLER . I keep the Duchess of York, public-house, Kingsland-road . On the 14th of May, about ten o'clock in the morning, in consequence of what I heard, I went up stairs, and found the prisoner in my bed-room. I never saw her before. She was in the act of holding two of my wife's gowns up. I found a sheet at her feet, which belonged to the room above. The gowns had been a chair in the room she took them from. I saw them there four or five hours before - she had taken them from the chair. I said,

"What are you doing?" She pretended to be drunk.

SARAH TOWLER . I had left my gowns on the chair - I saw them four hours before. I never saw the prisoner before. I assisted the servant in making the bed about four o'clock. I went up when my servant gave the alarm, and saw the prisoner sitting on a chair; I asked her what she did there - she said she should not have been there if she had not been sent, and pretended to be in liquor.

JANE ROBERTS , I saw the prisoner in the room - I did not know her.

JOHN DENNIS . I took her into custody, with the gowns and sheet.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I beg for mercy.

GUILTY . Aged 45.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18210606-47

745. THOMAS BURGOYNE was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of May , 3 s., the property of Deborah Bull , from the person of Charles Bull .

CHARLES BULL . I am fourteen years of age, and am the son of Deborah Bull , a widow . I carry out newspapers , and pay my mother my wages. On the 5th of May, I was coming from work, over Tower-hill , a boy, whom I had seen before, struck me, and I fought him; when I had done the prisoner pretended to take my part, and wipe my face, instead of which I felt him put his hand into my pocket, and take out 3 s. - he ran away as hard as he could. I had 6 s. they were safe after I had done fighting. I followed him down Rosemary-lane, calling Stop thief! and he was stopped. I am sure he is the boy. I did not lose sight of him for a minute.

THOMAS OSBORNE . I am a street keeper. I heard the cry, and saw him stopped; I found 3 s. in his breeches-pocket.

Prisoner's Defence. I had 3 s. 6 d. for mending a pair of shoes. I took this boy's part, and he said I had robbed him.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow .

Reference Number: t18210606-48

746. JAMES FAY was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of May , one shawl, value 10 s., the goods of Sarah White , from her person .

SARAH WHITE . I am a widow , and live in Caroline-street, Camden-town. On the 10th of May I went to Burton-crescent. I am servant to Mr. Levin. I was going home through St. Pancras fields , about nine o'clock, three men met me - they were as close together as they could be. I first saw them about a dozen yards off, coming towards me; they never spoke to me, but made room for me to go between them; the prisoner was on my right-hand side, and the others on my left; one of the two on my left side snatched my shawl off my shoulders, and ran away - the prisoner was behind. I cried out Thieves! he asked me what they had got? I said,

"You know they have got my shawl" He said he would go and fetch it. He had not come up exactly with the others, but when I first saw him, he was abreast of them. I saw no more of him, but the officer came up to me, and I told him of it. He went in pursuit of them, and took the prisoner - I am sure he is one of the three; I charged him with it - he said he was going to Kentish-town to ask for work.

GEORGE WHITEHAIR . I am a constable. I went in pursuit of the men; when I had got about two hundred yards, I saw the prisoner and another person talking together, by some posts, at the corner of Johnson's-street; I asked my brother watchman if he had seen two men run that way - he said No, and these two immediately started, as hard as they could - they must have heard me ask the question. The other man ran, and the prisoner walked fast away - I immediately collared him, and gave him in charge to the watchman. He said he had been to Kentish-town, looking for work; but at the watch-house he said he met the other two at Camden-town, and joined them as they were crossing the fields, not knowing what they were going about; and that he lived in Kennedy-court, Newton-street, Holborn.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not speak to them, but followed them. The watchman took me, and let the other two pass.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18210606-49

747. JOHN M'MAHON was indicted for embezzlement .

MR. WILLIAM WILLATTS . I am an accountant , and live in Parliament-row . I have a variety of debts to collect; the prisoner lived with me as clerk chiefly to write, it was his duty to receive money from persons who came to pay it, on my account. I had to collect 5 l. 10 s. from Colonel Frederick; the prisoner never accounted to me for any money as received from him.

COLONEL FREDERICK. I am Colonel of the Surry militia, I paid the prisoner 5 l. in bank notes, for Mr. Willatts, at the office, I cannot swear he is the person - the man I paid wrote this receipt, in my presence, and gave it to me - I gave him a 5 l. note.

MR. WILLATTS. The receipt is his hand-writing; it is dated the 30th of May - I am certain he never accounted to me for it.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Are you in business alone - A. Yes; my brother lives with me as clerk. I have my cash-book and the prisoner's collecting ledger. it is not entered in his book; he ought to enter money as he received it.

Q. Has it not frequently happened that his receipts of the whole day have been entered in one large sum - A. He accounted to me once a day, he entered particularly every name he received from, and the amount - It never happened to my knowledge, that sums were entered in the gross, without the names - my brother never pointed out a transaction of that sort to me - I never desired the prisoner to give receipts in his name for money which never went through his hands - he never paid me money which was not entered in his book - I give no security for debts.

(The prisoner here put in an exceeding long written defence, stating, that the charge entirely arose from the irregularity in Mr. Willatt's accounts; that he made his accounts up at night from memorandums he made on the cash he took, but cash being taken by Mr. Willatts, occasionally from his cash-box, which left him to remember the particular persons of whom he received the money - that he frequently gave receipts in his name for money that never passed through his hands, and he was frequently obliged to keep cash till next day to recollect who he received a particular sum from; he could prove mistakes had occurred; that Mr. Willatts had, at various times, written for accounts which were paid - he had frequently called at the office since he left.)

MR. WILLATTS re-examined. He came into my service in August, 1819, and left the 20th of September, 1820. I saw him often afterwards. I preferred this charge in March. There have been instances in which I desired him not to enter in his book, money which he received; it was a cheque of 400 l. which I had lent a friend, it being a private transaction. I told him not to enter it.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

748. JOHN M'MAHON was again indicted for the like offence .

CAPTAIN MATTHEW BOYLE . I paid a cheque of 5 l. 0 s. 6 d. at the prosecutor's office, in Paternoster-row. I cannot swear I paid it to the prisoner, but the person I paid it to wrote this receipt and gave it to me (read) the cheque was returned by my bankers, as paid in - I saw but one person in the office.

JAMES BARNES . I am clerk to Messrs. Barclay and Co. On the 1st of September, I paid this draft with five 1 l. notes and 6 d.

WILLIAM WILLATTS . The prisoner was in my service on the 1st of September; his duty was to remain in the counting-house. Captain Boyle owed money to an estate I collected for; the receipt is in the prisoner's hand writing; he never accounted to me for it. I always send my cheques through my bankers.

Cross-examined. Q. Has the prisoner a cash-box in which he puts money - A. Yes; it is an open counting-house; the desks are elevated, it is impossible a cheque can be stolen. I have taken money from his box, but always entered it on a slip of paper which lay in it - I told him to enter on the notes the names of who he received them of, to prevent a loss by forged notes; but his cash-book was to shew who he had it of, and he was to enter it as he received it.

Prisoner. Q. Have not I told you I could not remember the name of a person I received cash from; and you said, keep the cash till you remember - A. It has occurred.

Q. Have you not sent letters to apply for money, when it was paid - A. Persons have called to pay money on the day the letters were sent, before they were delivered.

Prisoner's Defence. After I left, I called on Mr. Willatts, and if I was guilty, it is not likely I should call. I received money when he discharged me, and forgot to pay it, but left it afterwards.

WILLIAM WILLATS re-examined. I remember a small sum being returned, having been kept back by mistake - I did not know of this loss till March.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210606-50

749. MARY ANN BELL was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of January , at Allhallows, Staining , one coat, value 3 l.; one waistcoat, value 10 s.; one watch, value 4 l.; two seals, value 2 l. 10 s.; one key, value 6 d.; two scarfs, value 3 l.; one shawl, value 2 l.; two gowns, value 1 l.; one cloak, value 1 l.; and one pair of gloves, value 1 s., the goods of George Webb , in his dwelling-house .

GEORGE WEBB . I am a butcher , and live at No. 3, Fishmonger's-alley , in the parish of Allhallows, Staining, and rent the whole house; the prisoner was my servant of all work , she had lived five days with me - she left the house without our knowledge; I was sent for, and missed a silver hunting-watch, off the bed-room mantlepiece, (which is the top room) and the rest of the property stated in the indictment. I had not worn my coat after the Sunday.

ELIZA WEBB . I am the wife of George Webb ; the prisoner came into our service on Monday, and left on Saturday about twelve o'clock, without notice; she was the only servant - The business is carried on at Leadenhall-market.

When I missed her, I examined the house; I had seen the watch on Friday morning. On examination, I found a chest of drawers in the bed-room turned round, the back broken open, they had been attempted to be forced in front - it was broken in several places; I missed a coat and scarf from the drawers. I had put the coat in the drawer on Monday, the watch, seals, and key were stolen; another scarf was taken from the parlour; I had told her to put it round the child; they were not new scarfs, the white one was nearly new, and cost me three guineas and a half; that was taken from the drawer, the other was worth 1 l. I missed a shawl from the same drawer, it was worth 4 l. it cost me that, I had it about two years, but had not worn it a great deal.

GEORGE WEBB re-examined. The watch cost me five guineas. I had had it four or five years; the seals were gold one cost me 2 l. 10 s., the other 1 l. 5 s. I had them two years; my coat was worth about 14 s. She came into our service on the 27th of January; she was not apprehended till the 5th of May, we could not find her before.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did you sleep in the top room - A. Yes; and wound the watch up every night,

THOMAS NICHOLS . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Grays Inn-lane. I have a coat, waistcoat, and shawl, which were pawned together on the 27th of January, for 1 l. 12 s. in the name of Ann Smith , Field-lane. The person who took them has left - I do not know who pawned them.

THOMAS WEBB . I am shopman to Mr. Turner, of Bridges-street, Covent-garden. I have a silver watch, a gold key, two gowns, and a scarf, which were all pawned on the 27th of January, in the name of Smith; I advanced 1 l. 3 s. on the watch, and 14 s. on the other things - I do not believe the prisoner pawned them.

Cross-examined. Q. You would not lend more - A. That is the utmost I should sell the watch for, that and 20 per cent interest which is 1 l. 14 s.

JOHN FORRESTER . I am a constable. On the 5th of May I apprehended the prisoner at the Guardian Society's house, Cannon-street-road. I searched, and found nothing on her; I told her I took her for robbing Mr. Webb, with whom she formerly lived; the matron told me, in her presence, where to find the things produced, she said nothing to it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

MRS. WEBB. She left us on the 27th. When I got up in the morning, the drawers were in their proper state.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you find them turned round, or were they put back - A. I found them turned round, and the kitchen poker lying on the carpet. The house is two stories high; our door is kept shut; we have no lodgers; there was nobody in the house but her. A little girl was to go to the house while I went out, but she could not get in, for the prisoner had left the house, with the children in it. I left it at ten o'clock, and returned between one and two o'clock. She might have gone out and returned if she pleased.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 21.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210606-51

750. MARY ANN NEWLAND , and ELIZA CLARK were indicted for stealing, on the 22d of May , thirty-three yards of serge, value 2 l. 2 s. , the goods of Benjamin Allen Stone .

BENJAMIN ALLEN STONE . I am a hosier and glover , and live in Fleet-market . This serge was on the threshhold of the door. I was called from tea and informed a woman had taken it. I went up Eagle-and-child-alley, into Dean-street, Fetter-lane, where I caught sight of the prisoners, close together in company. Newland had something under her shawl; a boy whistled three times, they turned, saw me following them without my hat, they ran and dropped the serge in Fetter-lane; I pursued, and secured them in a court, it not being a thoroughfare. It was chained to the door post.

JOHN CREW . I work for Mr. Sparks in Shoe-lane. I saw the prisoners running up Eagle-and-Child-alley with the serge, they ran by me; I saw Mr. Stone following them, and saw them drop it. I picked it up and took it back; they were secured in Plough-court.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

CLARK'S Defence. I was talking to this woman, a gentleman knocked her down, I turned down the court, and he took me.

NEWLAND - GUILTY . Aged 19.

CLARK - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210606-52

FOURTH DAY. SATURDAY, JUNE 9.

751. ROBERT NICHOLLS was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of April , three bridles, value 2 l., and one pair of reins, value 10 s. , the goods of Benjamin Robinson .

JOHN ROBINSON . I am a harness-maker, and live in Northampton-street, Clerkenwell. I bought three bridles and a pair of reins, of the prisoner, for 13 s., on Tuesday, the 10th of April - another man came with him. I had bought of him before, and knew he had lived at Sadler's Repository, I exposed them at my door for sale, and Benjamin Robinson claimed them on the 12th.

Prisoner. Q. Who received the money - A. I bought them of you. I think I laid the money on the counter - the other man brought them in. I asked the prisoner how he came by them - he said, honestly - that they did belong to Captain Robinson, who had absconded, and his family had them to sell.

BENJAMIN ROBINSON . I keep the Angel stables, St Martin's-le-grand . On Tuesday night, the 10th of April the bridles and reins were stolen. I found them at Robinson's - they are worth three guineas. The prisoner was in the habit of coming to my place with horses from Sadler's.

WILLIAM WAINWRIGHT . I found the bridles at Robinson's house, on Saffron-hill, where he then lived; next day I took the prisoner, and asked him how he came by them - he said he met Harry Hanks in Tottenham-court-road, whom he knew before and he asked him if he knew

where to sell them; that he took them to Robinson's, and received 1 s. for his trouble.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming up Tottenham-court-road, and met a man, who asked where he could sell the things, and said he had them from Captain Robinson. I took him to this shop - it was he that dealt about them, and took the money.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18210606-53

752. JOHN BROWN and JOHN HEROD were indicted for stealing, on the 7th of May , one watch, value 30 s. , the goods of Henry Maynard .

ELIZA MAYNARD . I am the wife Henry Maynard ; the watch hung in the housekeeper's room at Colonel Lowthor 's house, in Wilton-street, Berkely-square . On the 7th of May, about nine o'clock in the morning, I left it there; I returned about eleven, and found the prisoners in custody with it.

CORNELIUS LEARY . On the 7th of May, about eleven o'clock in the morning, I was in Berkeley-square, and saw the prisoners by Colonel Lowther's house; I saw Herod go down the area several times, and come up again - Brown staid there, but went down once. After being satisfied, I pursued them - they had walked away - I took them both in Bond-street. I saw Herod give the other something. I am sure they are the boys. The watch was not found on them; they turned down a passage between Bruton-street and Grosvenor-square, and were then out of my sight, and could there have disposed of it. I cried Stop thief! expecting a man down there would assist me, but he would not. I secured them, and the watch was produced by one of the witnesses.

JAMES WILLIAMS . I was going to Marlborough-street with some persons, and met Leary; I went with him, and found the prisoners in the house - they were given into my charge for stealing the watch - they said nothing.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18210606-54

753. JAMES WEST , WILLIAM BEER , JOHN RICHARDSON , THOMAS RICHARDSON , WILLIAM WILLIAMS , and THOMAS WEBSTER were indicted for feloniously assembling with divers other persons, being armed with divers fire-arms, at Hern, in the County of Kent , in order to assist in the illegal running, landing, and carrying away uncustomed goods, liable to pay duties, which had not been paid or secured .

SECOND COUNT. The same, only stating, that they were aiding and assisting divers other persons, who were assembled in the illegal running, and landing uncustomed goods, &c.

THIRD COUNT. That they on shore, unlawfully did shoot off, and discharge divers blunderbusses, guns, and pistols, loaded with gunpowder, &c. at Sydenham Snow , David North , Thomas Parker , and John Wilson , the said Sydenham Snow, being an officer of His Majesty's Navy, and a deputed officer of His Majesty's Customs , and in the due execution of his duty, under the powers, provisions, and authorities of divers statutes made for the prevention of smuggling, and the said other persons being aiding and assisting him in the execution of his said duty.

SEVERAL OTHER COUNTS varying the manner of laying the charge.

The prosecution was conducted by MR. ATTORNEY GENERAL, MESSRS. JARVIS, REYNOLDS and BOLLAND.

DAVID NORTH . I am quarter-master of his Majesty's ship Severn , I was employed in the blockade service, to prevent smuggling, under Lieutenant James Dilby ; we were stationed abreast of Hern Bay, Kent. On Monday night, the 23d of April, after twelve o'clock, we went on our station - it was the morning of the 24th. I was stationed on the beach, abreast of the town at Hern Bay, Sydenham Snow, was the officer, he was midshipman of the Severn, employed on the same service, and was an officer of His Majesty's Navy, and acted as a deputed officer of the customs. I was under his command that morning, he came to me about a quarter before three o'clock - it was his duty to visit us from one part of the district to the other.

Q. After you saw him, how long had he left before anything happened - A. About three or four minutes; he had gone to the westward, and I eastward, and in about four minutes I heard a discharge of fire arms, and turning round westward, a whole body of musquetry was fired in a direction between him and me - I heard the whistling of the balls, and the balls heaved up the shingles as they were fired.

Q. Was there only one firing - A. More; I retreated towards one of our men, (Wilson,) eastward, and there was a firing from another party. I found such a considereble firing there, that it was impossible for me to get to Wilson; that firing proceeded from another party, not the one that fired first, and I heard them, and I heard a sort of cheer, and cry,

"Kill every *** on the beach;" these cheers proceeded from several persons repeatedly. I found several of them were following me, and firing at me; I heard the whistling of the bullets, and being before two fires, I retreated up the bill or bank, and there remained about half an hour or more till I had an opportunity of going down the beach, when I saw some of our party and joined them they had come to my assistance. I was armed with a pistol and cutlas - I discharged my pistol in the direction the firing came from.

Q. When did you first discharge your pistol - A. At the first beginning, after the first firing - it was after I was fired at, and as I was proceeding towards Wilson, I fired my pistol, and as I went towards him, I loaded my pistol again, (having my cartridge loose in my pocket) and fired it again in the direction of the smugglers. I was fired at repeatedly before I fired the second time. I loaded my pistol again but did not fire it - it was a very dark night; there was a very heavy lightening at intervals, which might make it appear darker.

Q. Had you an opportunity by the light the fire-arms made to see whether many people were assembled - A. Yes, by the flashes of their arms, I could see the number of men. I should think the first party was twenty or more - these was the party to the westward. To the best of my judgment, the party to the eastward was composed of the same number - they were more straggled; there were more continual firing from the eastward, than the west. I do not know what became of them. When I joined my party, I was informed something about Mr. Snow. The bullets

came very near me; they went in different directions; they were fired both above and below me - not in the air, they were fired at me.

JOHN WILSON . I was a seaman on board the Severn. On the 24th of April, I went on duty at twelve o'clock at night; my station was the next to the village of Hern eastward; I was next to North. I saw Mr. Snow first about a quarter before two o'clock - I saw him twice; he passed backward and forward to the men at the next station; and after he had passed me the second time, about a quarter of an hour or better, I heard a pistol fired - the report of the pistol came from behind me, about the village, in the direction Mr. Snow had gone. On hearing the report of the pistol, I fired to give the alarm to the next man - I fired in the air. I then heard a volley fired at the same place, where I heard the first fire - I saw the the flashes very plain. I could not tell how many pieces were fired; they fired at different times, perhaps five or six together; there must have been a great many - above twenty I am certain.

Q. Could you guess from the report, if the fire was from pistols or musquettry - A. Both large and small fire-arms. I immediately loaded my pistol and ran on towards the fire - I had only a pistol and cutlas; the firing was repeated constantly in two directions; I heard the balls whistle past me repeatedly, and the shingles came against my trowsers. I ran as close as I could get to them, about fifty or sixty yards, and then I fired, and they opened a volley upon me. After I discharged my second pistol at them, I endeavoured to get nearer, but found the firing come so close on me, I was obliged to get up under the bank - they were then about fifty yards from me. I heard them sing out several times

"Murder the *** and kill them;" the fire continued about eleven or twelve minutes; they fired right towards where they saw me fire from, as if at me, and the other party fired towards the village. I was joined on the beach by Parker, before the fire had ceased; I then got behind a boat which was turned up, and fired again off the boat's keel at the party - I could see them distinctly when they fired. We went along right up towards the village, where the firing was, and got abreast of the Ship Inn, and saw Norris, the landlord, at the window; he said something to me, in consequence of which, I ran down directly on the beach with Parker, and found Mr. Snow laying on his back; he sung out

"Wilson, I am wounded, I am a dead man." I found him laying extended on his back, with his cutlas near him, and his hat on the other side; the tide was flowing, and the water was over his shoe-tops - if he had not been moved he must have been drowned - the tide was three quarters flooded, it would not have been above three or four feet higher. I observed his mouth had blood on it - it appeared to come from his mouth; two other men came down from the eastward station, and we carried him to the Ship Inn; when he was brought to the Inn, he begged us to send for the parson - one came, and I went out of the room.

THOMAS PARKER . On the 24th of April, I was a seaman of the Severn, and was on duty. I was stationed eastward of Hern Bay; I heard a firing about a quarter before three o'clock, to the best of my recollection; it proceeded from Hern Bay - it was the report of several fire-arms.

COURT to Wilson. Q. The first thing you heard fired was a pistol - A. Yes; I could not guess who it was fired from.

T. PARKER in continuation. The first I heard was several fire arms. I cannot say whether it was pistols or what, I ran towards the firing as fast as I could, but could see no people at all. The firing continued; as I ran along the beach towards the bay, they fired behind the house at me off the green bank. I cannot guess how many people there were on the bank, the pieces fired at me were loaded - the balls came down and cut the shingles up into my face, as I ran along the beach; I did not hear them say any thing. I ran up to Wilson.

Q. Did you afterwards go with him to the Ship - A. Yes; in consequence of information, we went down to the beach and found Mr. Snow laying on his back, with his hat off and his sword laying by his side; the water was flowing up over his ancles.

Q. Dont tell me what he said, but can you say whether he was wounded - A. No; I observed no blood on him.

GEORGE GRIFFITHS . I live at Canterbury. I think I have lived there altogether four years, but have not been constantly there - I am a farmer's labourer; I have done gardening work in my time; I know William Beer , I have known him this eight or nine years; he lived at Littlebourne, about four miles from Canterbury, and works at thatching - I know James West , he lives at Littleborn, and is a thatcher.

Q. I believe your wife's father lives at Littleborn - A. Yes; I was there in April last, several different times, and saw Beer at my wife's father's house - I cannot say how long it was before the 23d; I saw him two or three times out of doors as well as in.

Q. What passed between you - A. It was talked over about smuggling, about working some tubs; he said that he and West and Lawrence had got some tubs coming.

Q. He said that he and some others whom he named had tubs coming - Yes; and I might go and help work them if I liked; I said I should like to go very well. This conversation was at my wife's father's house.

COURT. Q. Did any body hear - A. They heard what we were talking about, but not to understand it; there was too much secrets for them to understand.

Q. Did not he speak loud enough - A. I do not think he did, I saw him again two or three times after, and asked him when he expected the boat to come, he said he did not know when she would come, but he did not think she would come till the next dark.

Q. During this time, did you see West - A. Yes; I saw him after the first conversation with Beer; I saw him passing my wife's father's house, and called to him; I knew him before. Nobody was with him, I asked him when he expected the boat to work, he said he did not know.

Q. How come you to ask that question - A. Beer told me West was concerned in it - West said he did not know, but when the boat worked, he would let me know.

Q. Were you at Littleborn on the 23d of April - A. I was, on Easter Monday; I saw West at eight o'clock in the evening - before that, Edward Homans had called on me, and he and I went to West and found him standing in the road, close by the garden style; he told us he wanted us to meet him, and go down to Grove Ferry , at ten

o'clock, to help work a boat with some tubs; that was all that passed. I started to go, about a quarter of an hour or twenty minutes after that time. Grove Ferry is three or four miles from Littleborn; it is not the direct road to Hern; we went to Grove Ferry , to the public-house there, and the first man I saw was Mr. Epps, the landlord of the house, standing outside the door - Edward Homans and I, and the prisoner Williams went together; Williams had joined us on Littleborn-hill. We then walked on the road, and overtook a man named Belcher, we walked on the road and left him and Belcher behind, and got there about ten minutes before them, and then they joined us, and we went into the public-house and saw Mr. William Epps , Mrs. Epps, her daughter Betsy, and son Edward, and the servant; another man was there; I do not recollect who he was.

Q. Were you joined by any others at Grove Ferry - A. The first that came in after we got there was West and Beer; they came in together, and another man, I think Lawrence, came in with them; two or three more came in after; there were twelve of us assembled in all; I heard West and Beer say there was ten besides themselves, and they two made twelve. We had some pots of table beer, bread and cheese, and cold meat, and stopped there a little more than an hour; we had beer to drink, and no spirits, I saw none served.

Q. Where did you go from thence - A. The party that was there went over the ferry, and proceeded to Hoath - Edward Epps , and I think another older man, was in the boat, and ferried us over. Hoath is two or three miles from Grove Ferry .

Q. In the way to Hoath, had you any conversation - A. I was with William Beer , he was talking about how the men were to be paid, he said it was agreed among the party, that armed men were to have twelve shillings each, and the working men six shillings. We got to Hoath, and when we got to the prisoner John Richardson 's house, which is a smallish one, (a private house,) I saw a party of men standing by the side of the door, and three horses in three carts; they were single-horse carts. We went into the front room of the house - we did not all go in at once, it would not hold us all I should think - I found fifteen or twenty in the room, it was nearly full - I know Stephen and Morris Lawrence , and John Richardson , they were in the room with Underwood and two or three men from Deal - when I entered the room, they had fire-arms, and were serving the arms out to some of the party in the in the room and some ball - some of the arms laid on the table; on the window and on the chairs, they were mostly pistols, I saw one blunderbuss, some guns, and cartridges; S. Lawrence was serving them out.

Q. Were any of the prisoners present when the arms were being served out - A. Yes; all the prisoners were there but Webster - he came in afterwards; Beer took one of the balls that lay in the window and cut it to fit a small pocket pistol - S. Lawrence gave me a pistol, and fourteen rounds of cartridges; all that had pistols had cartridges; I do not know whether they had the same quantity, arms were given to nineteen persons; Lawrence and James West counted them at Hern Bay - there were nineteen with arms, and two men with the carts armed. In addition to the nineteen, There was a third man with the carts, but whether he was armed or no I cannot say; when I first went into the house, John Richardson gave me a small glass of Hollands, and before the arms were quite served out, every man had a glass of gin, the same quantity as I had.

Q. Could you tell how many persons there were at Hoath - A. Sixty; S. Lawrence counted them all, in doors and out; he asked West and Beer how many men they had, they said, ten besides ourselves - I saw them go out of doors to count them, then came in and said there was sixty in all; West and Beer heard them say so, and I should judge there were that number.

Q. About what time did you leave Hoath - A. I should suppose between one and two o'clock. After the liquor was drank, about forty men were despatched before us with the three carts; I went with the other party; West and Beer went with me, I cannot say whether the others did.

Q. Were the forty that went with the carts armed - A. I should suppose five or six of them. All who went with me were armed, there was twelve or fourteen. We went to Hern Bay, and joined the other party, in a field at the back of the bay. We all assembled in the meadow, except the men with the carts; I knew two of the men that were with the carts, Webster was with one, and one John Turner with another; they were both armed; Webster had a pistol when we got in the meadow; the armed men were formed in front of the working party, to tell them which way to go - West and Beer, and the two Lawrences told them on which side to go; we were singled out, there was nineteen of us; ten were to go on the left hand, and nine on the right, and when the boat came on the beach; the working men were to come between us.

Q. You said the carts were at the turnpike gate, did you come through the gate - A. It was open - We remained in the meadows a quarter of an hour or twenty minutes - a Deal man came up and said come along, and we ran down towards him to get over the stile and down the road on the beach. I saw a boat close ashore, and nine of us went to the right, and ten to the left.

Q. Had any body command of the party - A. Yes; James West to the left, and M. Lawrence to the right; Beer was with West, I believe, I saw them going down, and think he went to the left; he was armed with a pistol, when I saw him going down. I was on the right division; I saw Williams, he was armed with a pistol, and I think he was on the left division. Homans was armed with a pistol, I believe he was on the left. J. Richardson was armed, and I think had a short gun, and the other a longer, but I am not certain; I know one of them had a short gun, and the other a long gun - I am certain both were armed.

Q. What happened - A. The first thing that I saw when I got to the public-house. close to the beach, I saw two men standing a little on the right of me; they were not quite close together, and the man who stood next to the company, snapped a pistol twice, it did not go off - he seemed to hold it towards me. There were pistols fired at that time, at the same moment as he snapped his. Where they were fired from, I cannot say.

Q. Whether he snapped before any body fired, you

cannot tell - A. I cannot; just as he snapped his, two pistols, S. Lawrence who had a pistol, and M. Lawrence, who had a brass blunderbuss, both fired in a direct way towards him, they were, I suppose, fifteen or twenty yards from him, I cannot say the distance - on their firing, the same persons advanced towards the working party - I do not know whether he had any thing but a pistol; I did not see him again.

Q. What took place - A. There was a great deal of firing from our party - I think it was only from our party; they kept firing for two or three minutes. The working party at this time were taking tubs from the boat at the water's edge, to the carts. We were not quite close to the beach. Beer told me it was spirits of gin and spirits of brandy - they were put into the carts - the two foremost went away first, and Webster's cart stopped behind, to take up some tubs, which were scattered about; they were all carried away, to the best of my knowledge. Webster is a man who jobs about, carrying coals.

Q. What became of the party - A. I have something else to say - all the tubs I thought were taken away, but I heard West, Beer, and Lawrence say, they had not got all they expected the boat to bring. When they got them safe in the cart, they began to huzza, and cheer; and say,

"All is right." The armed men then assembled round the cart; the two carts went away directly - they were filled. Webster's cart stopped behind for three tubs, which were taken out of the water; the carts went on from Hern, and we went after them, to some distance on the road, and then returned to Littleborn - most of the party went as far as Hern, and then dispersed. West parted from me at Sturry, about five miles from Hern. I saw West the next day, Wednesday, thatching, at Mr. Westbrook's; we were talking about the boats working; he said there were sixty-five tubs worked, and they expected eighty-one to come in all - but they had not got them all; he asked if we wanted any money - Homans was with me; he said, it did not matter just then - he said,

"I have got but little," and pulled out 9 s., and said we might have it between us if we liked. I said, I would have none; he gave Homans 7 s. - this was all that passed then. I saw William Beer on Wednesday night, at my wife's father's; he called at the stile, and said he was going to Sturry. On Wednesday night I saw Webster at Stephen Lawrence 's house, at Cauterbury, and asked him, how he got on; he said, he came into Canterbury with his cart. I asked, if he brought his tubs into Canterbury; he said, he brought twenty-two in his cart into Canterbury. I asked, how he came to risk his cart into Canterbury, at that time of the morning, and said,

"Suppose you fell in with an officer" he said,

"Never mind if there had been but one, no one man would ever take me."

Q. Did you communicate to any person, what you knew of this - A. Yes, to Mr. Stride, an officer, before any body was in custody. I cannot say what day it was - I communicated it two or three times.

COURT. Q. Did you tell Stride before you went, that you were going - A. Yes, two or three weeks before.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. Did you tell him two or three weeks before it happened, that you were to accompany them to Hern Bay - A. No, I told him about the boats working. I knew their pieces were loaded. I could not help their firing, if I had made any resistance, they would have blown my brains out. I fired myself seven or eight times - not more to my knowledge. I know William Sidders , he is my brother-in-law. I do not know that I told him I fired at least eleven times. I saw him that morning when I got home. I have been married twice, my first wife has been dead twelve or fourteen years. I cannot say how long, as I was not living with her when she died. I saw her last at Deal, her name was Eliza Rowley . I have not seen her for thirteen years. I was married at Sandwich, it might be fourteen or sixteen years ago. I cannot tell how long I have been married this second time.

Q. Were you ever in possession of some 5 l. Bank notes - A. That business was since this, it was three weeks or a month ago. Mr. Smith, the officer, who I went with to Hern, told me when I returned, that there was a charge against me; he told me so at the Marquis of Anglesea, public-house - I have passed many notes in my life.

Q. You may answer or not, how long before you was at Bow-street, had you passed the first note, that was supposed to be forged. - The witness declined answering the question.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. When were you first married - A. I do not know. I have only been married twice. I was very young when I first married. I do not know what age I was then or am now. My mother tells me, that my first wife was buried at Deal. My second wife has her certificate to produce - she is here. I think I have been married above twelve years to her.

Q. How many cartridges were delivered to you - A. Fourteen as near as I can tell; I know I had three in my pocket, in the morning, and one in my pistol, and I might have drawn some out of my pocket in loading my pistol. I was about fifteen yards from Mr. Snow when he fell - I did not see him fall, but saw him rush in among the company - I did not see him after. I knew nothing of his falling, only Edward Homans said,

"There is a man fell." It was a finish night, the moon had been up about half an hour - I could see a man fourteen yards off. I gave information to Stride nine or ten days, or a fortnight before the transaction - it was after I saw West and Beer. I could not tell Stride exactly where the boat was going to work.

Q. Do you know a 1 l. note from a 5 l. - A. Yes, and that is all. I do not know all the letters in the alphabet. I know a person is coming up to say I wrote a letter for her - (Mrs. Fuller). I have known her very well for seven or eight years - I can neither read or write.

Q. Are you in custody - A. Not at all, Homans and another are in custody. I have been to see them four or five times, and saw them this morning here.

Q. I am not going to ask if you have been guilty of felony, but have you been in prison - A. Yes, three times; the first time was twelve or thirteen years ago, about some money that a man and I were partners in. The second time was about two years ago, for standing in my own defence, when a farmer suspected I had his things, and stopped my cart on the road. The third time was last summer, that was for a fine for smuggling. I was on board a man of war seven or eight years ago for smuggling,

when I was taken with a pair of tubs on my back. I think they are the only times I was in trouble for smuggling.

Q. Was there not something about some oil once - A. I lent a man money to buy oil, and was taken up because I went out to see it measured. I was confined by the Mayor of Canterbury for two or three days - I was not tried for it.

Q. You saw your father-in-law the morning after this transaction, did you not tell him you, yourself, fired eleven times - A. Not to my knowledge, if I did tell him I do not know it.

Cross-examined by MR. PLATT. Q A. few days after this happened, you went to Mr. Snow's brother - A. Yes, to give information of the matter. I had told the Custom-house officer, it was to be done in the Isle of Thanet. I thought it proper to tell Mr. Snow, on purpose to save people's lives.

Q. Why not go to Stride on the 23d of April - A. If I had, I should not have known where the party were going. I went to the House of Correction to see Smith and Homans - Smith's sister wished me to shew her down to him, and I went.

Q. Did you not talk about this matter - A. Very little - we have not communicated together about it.

MR. ATTORNEY GENERAL. Q. You saw them this morning in the room with other witnesses - A. Yes, I did not know the goods were to be landed at Hern Bay till after we left Hoath; it was eight o'clock on Monday when I knew where they were to be landed; I went to Stride that night; I first knew of the charge about the notes when Smith and I came to London; I had been to London before, and in consequence of my communication, a Bow-street officer was sent with me to Deal, and on my return this charge was made - that was about a fortnight or three weeks after the 23d of April; all the prisoners, except Webster, were in custody when the charge was made - I was examined and discharged.

COURT. Q. Was there any understanding that you were to be discharged because you were to be a witness in this case - A. Not at all.

Q. You fired seven or eight times; did you fire at any body - A. Not at all; I bit the ball out of my cartridge and fired in the air; I made no objection to their taking fire-arms, if I had, they would have had suspicion.

Q. Did you tell Sidders, your brother-in-law, that you fired ball cartridges - A. Not to my recollection; I could not tell him, for I did not.

JAMES SMITH . I am in custody on this charge; I live in the parish of Sturry; I have come from the House of Correction, Cold Bath Fields, and I have been there about six weeks; I was apprehended on the Sunday after this affair; I live three miles and a half from Canterbury; I know Beer, about three weeks before this happened, he came to me at Canterbury, I and a man named Clark were together, he said, he had seen a man from Deal who had some tubs sunk, and if we liked the working for them, we should get three tubs a-piece for our own risk, and take theirs at so much money, we were to give 3 l. a tub for the others; they asked if I would have any part in it, I said I should leave it to the rest, what they did I would, no time or place was mentioned, it was to be done as soon as we could. Eight or nine days afterwards I saw Thomas Richardson , in a wood, where I was at work, he said I was to go home, for the Deal men were to work their tubs that night, he told me to go to Grove Ferry , we went to the sea side, nothing was done that night, Griffiths was not with us that night.

Q. Were you applied to, to go at another time - A. I went on my own account. On Easter Monday Underwood had given me information, and I went to John Richardson , near Hoath, I got there about 12 o'clock; went into the house, and saw several men there, I saw the six prisoners there, and several more, and the two Lawrences, Griffiths, and Edward Homans , and four Deal men, James Graves , John Redsal , James Bovias , and George Moyns , they were the Deal men, and Henry Castle , and Underwood, Benjamin Worstels , Isaac Lawrence , Stephen Lawrence , gave me my cartridge, I had twelve, I had a gun which I carried from my home, I saw them all served with fire-arms, except Webster, I did not see him have any, all the prisoners had them except him, they were mostly large pistols, I saw no cartridges served except to myself, John Richardson had a short gun, I do not know what Thomas Richardson had, Morris Lawrence had a brass blunderbuss, there were about twenty of us armed, I think. We had a glass of gin a-piece to drink, and then set out towards Hern Bay; I cannot say how many there were of us, but I think about sixty, ten or twelve went first across the fields, they were the armed people, I was with them, and so was Griffiths, Homans, and West; we went across the fields, and the rest went another way; the night was darkish, and rather gloomy, there had been no moon at that time.

Q. Did the Richardsons go with your party - A. I do not think they did; there was three one horse carts, I saw them down near the Bay, James Graves , John Turner , and Thomas Webster , were with them; we met them against the turnpike, near Hern Bay, we passed through the turnpike, the gate was open, the carts stopped there, it was better than a quarter of a mile from the beach; we left the carts, and went down and followed close to the Bay, when all the armed men mustered together, and passed down, some on the right side and some on the left, I think there was about ten on each side, I cannot tell exactly, the working party followed between, as we left a space for them, then a boat came a shore, the signal was made by a light, I think it was a dark lanthorn, we went down, and the party began firing directly.

Q. What party began firing - A. The armed party that I was with fired first, they were the right hand party, the other party fired a little, but not much; the two Lawrences and George Richardson were with me, I cannot recollect the names of the others.

Q. Before they fired, had any one else fired at them - A. I do not know whether the blockade men fired first, or whether we did; I fired myself with a gun loaded with ball cartridge; I did not fire at any person; I saw no person when I fired, I fired in the air, I saw several flashes from our party, I saw a pistol flash from the blockade party, I did not hear the report of it, that was after I had fired, I fired but once; Griffiths and Lawrence, and the others, fired several times, Morris Lawrence had a blunderbuss, I do

not know how many times any of them fired, I was close to Griffiths at one time, I cannot say in what direction they fired; the working party came down, and took the tubs out of the boat, and carried them up to the carts, and we followed them, it lasted about ten minutes, sixty-one or sixty-two tubs were worked, I only saw one cart go off, that was the last one.

Q. Did you learn from either of the prisoners, how many tubs were expected - A. Yes, Beer said he expected about eighty; we met the same night in Shelford Wood, nearly six miles from Hern Bay, I met Stephen Lawrence , Underwood, James West , and the two Richardson's, and John Turner came there with his cart, this was about nine o'clock on the evening of the 24th; we then divided the tubs, about forty tubs were divided, and I took seven, and carried them home, I never opened them, but they smelt like Hollands and foreign brandy.

Q. After this, did you see any of them - A. I saw Isaac Lawrence at his own house.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODERICK. Q. You fired in the air to alarm the blockade party - A. Yes, we went armed to defend ourselves, if the blockade men should be too many to overpower us, we were to fire to frighten them, I only fired once, and did not wish to hurt any one; I was not active; I hired two or three men to go, but not to carry arms; I hired Spratt, Gale, and Abbott; I applied to them that night between ten and eleven o'clock; I think I applied to four others before that, I only applied to three to go to Hern Bay that night - part of the cargo is mine.

Q. You are what is called a master smuggler - A. Yes, I never said I was to bear the whole of the blunt; I expected to pay the men; I do not recollect saying I was to stand the blunt, as all the goods were mine; I did not apply to John Shaw to go, nor tell him a party were going, and the armed men were to have 10 s., and the others 4 s., I never changed a word with him in my life about this concern; I did not ask Stannard to go that night, I applied to him to go at another time.

Q. How came you to say you only applied to three - A. I only applied to three that night.

Q. Did you tell them it was no harm, no danger - A. Yes, I told Stannard in the morning he might have had 6 s. and not much trouble, he would not have carried arms. I was taken up on Sunday; I work in the woods as well as smuggle; I do not know the hide in the wood, I know no place where arms or tubs are hid - I was in custody before I gave information, I cannot deny the truth - I come here to save my life - I do not know how many times Griffiths fired - we were all straggling about on the beach; it was dark, we could not tell what each other did; the moon got up while we were in the fields, there was lightening. In all sixty-two tubs were run; I saw two tubs put into the cart - I searched one of the tubs, it was spirits of Hollands.

Cross-examined by MR. DOWLING. Q. How long have you been a smuggler - A. Four years; my share was three tubs - I did not see Griffiths bite his bullets off, I did not bite mine; he did not tell me he had informed a custom-house officer - I have seen Griffiths at the House of Correction, but have had no conversation on this subject with him; I never offered Shaw 1 s. to go - I never saw him at Fudgwick-bridge; I know Cook, a custom-house officer - I never offered Shaw 10 l. to do for him, saying, he was a great eye-sore to me.

Cross-examined by MR. PLATT. Q. You had as good an opportunity of seeing who carried arms as Griffiths - A. The blunderbuss was carried by our party; I saw Morris Lawrence with it in the field; there was light enough to see who carried arms.

Q. If you saw a man shoot in the air, you would have noticed it - A. Not unless I was looking right at him; I saw Griffiths fire, but do not know in what direction - I borrowed my gun of Michael Piggot . I have seen Griffiths in prison, I should think six or seven times, and talked this matter over with him six or seven times or more, for what I know, whenever I saw him, we said a few words about it. I never heard him say he shot the man who fell; Smith the officer, told him yesterday that he shot Mr. Snow, but I believe it was only in fun.

MR. ATTORNEY-GENERAL. Q. What did Smith say - A. He said he understood he shot Mr. Snow, he laughed at it - it was only a joke. I never heard him brag that he had done the job for him.

Q. Have you talked over the particulars of this with Griffiths, or only generally - A. Not particularly; I have not told him any story - we made no agreement, to agree in the same story.

Q. What sort of a night was this - A. A calm night; the moon rose before the tubs were worked; I saw lightening after, but not before. The tubs hold about two gallons and a half, they were slung two together with ropes, as smuggled spirits are - I took one tub to my house, it was seized, and a gun; it was one of the tubs that came from the wood.

COURT. Q. Before you went, did you know you should be armed - A. Yes; I knew before that, people went out with loaded weapons; I do not know how many times Griffiths fired, I did not hear a bullet whistle out of his piece.

EDWARD HOMANS . I live at Littleborn, with my father, and am a labourer. I know the prisoner West; I saw him eight or ten days before the 23d of April, in Littleborn street; he said he should want some men, and would I go along with him, I said Yes. I saw him again on Easter Monday night, he came by my father's pig-stye, and beckoned to me; I went out, he asked if I would go with him, for he was going to try to work the boat, I said, Yes. He asked if I knew whether Williams was at home, I said Yes, he was; he asked me to call him out, I went to the door, he was gone up stairs, he put his head out of window, I called to him; we were to meet down at Grove Ferry . I went and called George Griffiths out to West, before we went; he saw West, he told him he might come at ten o'clock, and we all three went together. I (meaning himself) Griffiths and Williams went to Mr. Epps who keeps a public-house. We saw old Epps there out at the door, we went into the house; Mrs. Epps, Betsy Epps , and the servant were there, we saw the son there afterwards.

Q. Did you meet any person there - A. West and Beer came in, and two or three more, one named Castle and Beer and Webster, I can remember came in, I do not recollect any more. We had some beer there, and some pipes, some had a biscuit and cheese, and West had some meat; Castle had some with him, we stopped there nearly

an hour - we went together, and I think somebody said there was a dozen of us, and I think there was that number. We went over the river in a boat, young Edward Epps and another man ferried us over, he was not a young man; we went to Richardson's, I cannot say what time we got there.

Q. When you got to Richardson's, at Hoath, did you know where the tubs were to be landed - A. No; I saw John and Thomas Richardson , there was a room full, and some out of doors; there was about sixty in all, pistols were given to us there, and cartridge halls; there was some shots given, I had eight ball cartridges, some had more; a pistol was given to me.

Q. Was any thing said what was to be done with the arms - A. The party all agreed among themselves, that if the blockade men ran away, to fire on them, the prisoners heard it, and all agreed to it. We each had a glass of Hollands to drink there, it was a common smallish glass, about half a quartern, then some went one road and some another, I went with West, Williams, and Griffiths; I do not know how many there was of our party, I should think about eight, not more - we went along the road about twenty rods, and then into the fields; I saw three carts by Richardson's - I do not know who was with them - we met the other party down at Hern Bay, at the back of the house, it was the same party that left Richardson's; the prisoners were all there, except Webster - I do not recollect seeing him that night, when we got there, the party was shifted, some to go to the right hand and some to the left; West and W. Williams were with me on the left, the other party went to the right, the other men stopped till the boat came, and then all went down between us. I saw West bring two tubs up from the beach, one in each hand; I was so far off, I could not see the working party; they soon began firing on the right, and we began firing - I cannot say whether our party or the blockade party fired first, I heard pistols go off on the right, and we on the left fired right all along the beach; I did not see any body on the beach, we agreed to run after the men if they ran away, not to shoot them, but to fire over them.

Q. Was it agreed what to do if the blockade men stood, and did not run away - A. I did not hear that mentioned, the firing continued about ten minutes; I saw a man on the beach, laying on his back, right in the middle between our two divisions - I went up to him, I did not think any thing had happened to him myself, I spoke to him and ran away, leaving him there - we all went away and followed the carts - I saw two tubs of gin put into the hind cart by West, the other carts were gone. These were what I saw West take up and put in after - I saw the man laying on the beach; we then went away to Sturry - James West and I came away together, and John Richardson and George Griffiths , they left us at Sturry, and Griffiths, I, and Stephen Lawrence went in and had a pint of beer at Sturry, and then went home.

Q. Did you see West after this - A. Yes, on Wednesday morning, he was thatching at Mr. Pembroke's. I was with Griffiths - we talked things over there, and he gave me 7 s. I did not hear any thing about tubs. Griffiths asked him for money, he said he had but 9 s. in his pocket, and Griffiths said he would wait till another time till he had it all.

Q. What became of the pistol which had been given to you - A. I carried it home, and fired it two or three times after. I put it into the drawers; Smith, the officer, afterwards took it away. I was taken up on the following Sunday, and have been in custody ever since.

Cross-examined by MR. DOWLING. Q. What are you - A. I go with horses, but have not been this year. I have been a bricklayer. I have only worked two boats. I have known Griffiths six years - I had heard he smuggled, but was not with him, except this time, and one other, on the coast below Rickebar - I was not armed then. I was never accused of any thing, but was once before Mr. May, the Magistrate, for not doing justice to my master. Griffiths was on the right side party, I was with mine - the moon was up. I was apprehended in bed, by Smith, and a pistol was found at my house. I was brought to town on the coach, with West, Beer, the two Richardsons, and the last witness. I saw Griffiths at the House of Correction several times; Smith and I were confined in one room together. Griffiths was confined in the same prison for near a week, slept and eat in the same room, and talked together about this business; he came to see us last Wednesday, and talked about the evidence we were to give here. I think I saw him four times - he stopped about half an hour once, and sometimes an hour.

Cross-examined by MR. PLATT. Q. How much money did Griffiths ask for - A. He mentioned no sum. I never charged him with shooting Mr. Snow; I only solicited W. Williams and Griffiths to assist in landing the spirits.

MR. REYNOLDS. Q. Was Griffiths in prison on the same charge as you - A. I expect so; I was there a week or more before he came - he was afterwards discharged.

COURT. Q. When you set off from Littleborn, did you know you was to go armed - A. No; when I found we were I was sorry I was there - we took them to keep the men at bay. I fired once, and fired my pistol off in the field.

THOMAS NORRIS . I keep the Ship Inn, at Hern Bay. On the morning of the 24th of April I was alarmed by the discharge of fire-arms, I got out of bed, looked out of the window, and saw a number of people on the beach, and a boat on the shore - there seemed to be twenty or thirty men; they appeared in motion from the boat up the road, and appeared to be carrying something. I saw no cart or horse - I could not tell what they were carrying - they passed on, and soon after I heard a person mourning on the beach, and heard him say,

"Lord, have mercy on me!" and in the course of a little time four of the men belonging to the preventitive service came into the road; I called to them, and Mr. Sydenham Snow was brought to my house - I knew him before. He was first taken into my bar by four of his men, and then into the parlour; he requested a clergyman to pray with him, and I sent for Mr. Dornford, who came; I also sent for a medical man, and then sent to Whinstaple for another medical man; this was on Tuesday morning - he died at my house about eight o'clock on Friday morning.

JOSEPH GALLOWAY . I am a Surgeon. I was sent for to Hern Bay, to the Ship Inn, and saw Mr. Snow - he was wounded in his right shoulder, and right thigh; the left shoulder was dangerously wounded - I arrived there about seven o'clock in the morning, the clergyman was there then; I did not leave Mr. Snow until his death.

I had some conversation with him about his wounds. Immediately on my arrival, I found the wound in the left shoulder was mortal - he was paralyzed below. I did not apprize him that the wound was mortal; he expressed his apprehension that he should not recover, he said he considered himself in a dying state, and told me he should never recover, before I entered into any conversation with him - I believe he expected he should die, the clergyman had been with him. He stated to me, that in visiting his men, on returning from North, Parker, and Wilson, he desired them to give a good look-out, as he saw a boat near, as he was returning towards Hern Bay, he saw another boat, and desired his men to look-out; that as he had passed his centinels, and got down to Hern Bay, he endeavoured to gain the road, and a party of armed men rushed down on him; he received the small wound in the middle part of his left shoulder, from fire-arms; he attempted to fire his pistols, but they both snapped; he threw his pistols away, and drew his sabre, and while in the act of cutting and slashing, he received the shot in his left shoulder, the lower extremity became paralyzed, and he fell; he knew nothing further of what happened, till the party of armed men came to take the goods from the boat; when that was done, he was taken from the water's edge (his feet being in the water) by part of the blockade men - he mentioned Wilson's being the man who spoke to him, he was carried up to the Ship. He stated, that one of the smugglers stood over him with his legs extended, and said,

"You *** you lay low enough" - he died on Friday morning. I extracted the balls, one from under his right arm-pit - that was a large pistol ball; the other appeared either a slug, or a duck shot - that was in the thigh. I can hardly tell what it was - I produce them. I saw his clothes, the cape of his great coat was partly blown away; his inside blue jacket was very much scorched - the person who shot him must have been very near.

WILLIAM EPPS . I live at Grove Ferry , and keep the Rising Sun, public-house there, and a ferry. On the night of Easter Monday, between nine and ten o'clock, Griffiths came to my house. I cannot say who came with him; I saw him in the tap room with other persons. West was there in the course of the evening, and Castle, and Beer - I do not recollect any others.

Q. Look at the prisoners, did you see any of the others there - A. I do not know; Homans was there. I do not recollect any more. I believe eight or nine were there, and I believe a neighbour or two. I think there was a strange man there, dressed in blue trowsers; the persons remained in my house an hour, more or less, they had beer, and might have had bread and cheese. I did not hear them say where they were going - I sat in a chair by the fire. I recollect Griffiths being opposite to me. I remember their going out. I do not know whether they went together - they were all gone about eleven o'clock. Edward Gibbs put them over the ferry. I have a son named Edward, he was at home - he went out.

Cross-examined by MR. PLATT. Q. You are not quite sure what night they were there - A. I believe it was Easter Monday - I believe it was the night of the fair.

COURT. Q. Do you recollect seeing Castle, Beer, and Griffiths there on any other evening about that time - A. No, my Lord.

EDWARD EPPS . I live with my father at the Rising Sun. I remember the night of Hern Fair - it was Easter Monday; there was six or eight men in my father's house that night. I know George Griffiths , he was among them; West, and William Beer , and both the Richardsons were there, besides a great many people. I know West and Beer - I think they were there.

Q. Is there any of the prisoners at the bar, whose names you have not mentioned, who you know by sight - A. Not that I recollect. I think Homans was there. I have a slight knowledge of Castle - I think he was there. I cannot exactly say how long they stopped - I should think three quarters of an hour, or an hour.

Q. Was a man there called Jemmy - A. Yes, I do not know where he came from. I think they had some beer, and one or two had some bread and cheese. I put some people over the Ferry several times that evening. Gibbs and I attended the Ferry; the house was clear before eleven o'clock - between ten and eleven o'clock, I put some people over.

Q. Did you take over those people with you when Griffiths was in company - A. I cannot say, because it was dark. Griffiths went over I think, but am not confident.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. It was Hern fair - A. Yes, there was a ball up the street, and more people about than usual.

EDWARD GIBBS . I am a ferryman, and live at Grove Ferry . On Easter Monday night, I attended the ferry; Griffiths was at the Grove that night, and so was James West , and Beer - I cannot remember any of the others. I do not know Homans; I know Castle - he was there. I ferried some of the people over that night. I do not know how many; there might be five or six, six or seven. West and Beer, and Griffiths went over. I do not know whether they went over together, as there was a dance, and a great many went over.

Q. When did you see any of them again - A. I cannot say. My boat will carry nearly fifty people; I saw none of them back next morning - to my recollection.

Q. Was Jemmy there - A. Yes, he had blue trowsers, I did not see him go over with them; I left the boat about ten o'clock at night, and attended to it next morning at half-past four; some people came over, I cannot say who they were.

ROBERT STRIDE . I am an excise officer, and live at Canterbury; I know Griffiths.

Q. Did he, previous to the 24th of April, make any communication to you - A. He did. On the 24th, in the evening I received a further communication from him - he was at liberty.

Q. In consequence of that communication, did you cause any of the prisoners to be apprehended - A. No. I searched the houses of Watford, J. Richardson, and J. Smith; I searched J. Smith's on the 25th, and I searched Richard Marshall 's - I found no arms at Smith's.

COURT. Q. Did you go to Watford and Marshall's in consequence of Griffiths' information - A. Yes, my Lord.

JAMES JOHN SMITH . I am an officer. On Monday, the 30th of April, I apprehended all the prisoners except Webster; I took the Richardsons at Sturry, at their own homes; I found two guns in John Richardson 's house, one

short and the other long; Salmon was with me, we found a long gun in the other Richardson's house; we took Homans at Littleborn, and found a pistol at his house; I took West, at Littleborn, about six in the morning, in bed, and found his waistcoat close by the bed, he was dressing himself, and going to put it on, I put my hand in the pocket and found two ball cartridges, and a single ball, in paper, I produce them, I have had them ever since, there are two balls in each cartridge, I should think they would serve for both pistols or guns; Salmon took Beer, and Williams, and he has since taken Webster.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODERICK. Q. One of the guns found at Richardson's, was loaded withsmall shot - A. None of them were loaded, one of them appeared to have been recently discharged, from the blackness of powder about the pan, the other arms were rusty, and had not been fired for some time.

COURT. Q. Not for months - A. Not for years, I should think, I mean the one found at Smith's, the other gun found at Richardson's did not appear to have been fired for some time.

WILLIAM SALMON . I am an officer. I apprehended the men; I produce three guns, and a carbine, or small gun, I found that at John Richardson 's house with this other gun; the small one appeared to have been fired very lately, but now the appearance is gone off, the other gun does not appear to have been fired for some time, I found this one at Thomas Richardson 's, it did not appear to have been recently used; here are two guns we found at Smith's house; one appeared to have been recently fired, not above a day or two, the other did not appear to have been fired for some time, it was rather rusty; I apprehended Webster on the 18th of May, (five of them were taken on the 29th of April) I took Webster in the neighbourhood of Canterbury.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODERICK. Q. You took the short gun from J. Richardson's - A. Yes, the other is a wild-goose gun; Griffiths was with us when we took the men, and saw the guns; Homans and Smith did not see the guns, to my knowledge. They were not produced at the examinations, in my presence.

JAMES JOHN SMITH . The guns having been in my possession since the first examination, on the Monday following, I took them, they were produced, and the three witnesses (the accomplices) saw them.

COURT. Q. When was Griffiths in custody - A. He gave himself up to me on the Friday night, at Canterbury, I had gone there on this business on Wednesday; he was afterwards in Cold Bath Fields, about some forged notes.

SARAH WEBB . My husband's name is William Webb , he is a weaver, and lives at Canterbury; I know Stephen Lawrence , he lives at Canterbury; some pistols were brought to our house, the first parcel was five, they were brought on the Sunday that the prisoners were taken, it was on the morning before I knew they were taken, W. Lawrence brought them, I did not see Stephen Lawrence .

WEST'S Defence. I am innocent of the crime; I do not deny going over the ferry, nor being in the house, and seeing Griffiths there, but knowing him to be a bad man, I thought myself superior to him, and took no notice of him; I was going to the ball up the street - between twelve and one o'clock I came from the Ship, and went behind the meadow, as some boats lay there that I could go nearer home; I crossed the ferry again between twelve and one o'clock, as it was nearer to go home.

BEER'S Defence. I am innocent; West and I were working together, and thought we would go to the ball up the street; we had refreshment at Grove Ferry , and did not stay there to have conversation with any body, went up the street to the ball, and returned between twelve and one o'clock.

WEBSTER'S Defence. The witnesses for the prosecution are mistaken in saying I was at Hern Bay, at the time of the transaction, because I and my wife were at the house of my father-in-law, at Canterbury, sitting up with him on the night of the 23d, till he died on the morning of the 24th, which none but my wife and mother can prove, the latter is too ill to attend; I must therefore rest my defence on the evidence of a neighbour, who knew that my cart was not out that night.

EPPS re-examined. You must cross the ferry to go to the ball - from my house.

WILLIAM SIDDERS . My sister married G. Griffiths; I remember the night Mr. Snow was shot, I think it was on a Monday.

Q. Had Griffiths been with you about the matter - A. He said he expected the boat; I saw him next morning, and asked how he got through the night's work, he said

"Pretty middling, if I take a job in hand, I always get through with it, don't I." He said he had thirteen ball cartridges in his pocket, and fired eleven rounds.

THOMAS SHAW . I live at Sturry, and know James Smith ; on Easter Monday he came to me, and asked me to go with a smuggling party, and assist in clearing a boat of smuggled goods at Hern Bay, and said he would give me 10 s. if I would carry fire-arms, as I had belonged to a man of war, he thought I was quite a sufficient hand, being used to small arms, he said, perhaps he might get two or three men who might not be of so much use; he said, if the boat was not worked, he would give me 4 s., but if she was, he would give me 10 s., he said, I will stand the blunt, as the whole of the goods belong to me, and I am the sole proprietor.

MR. DOWLING. Q. Do you remember any conversation with Smith about a custom house officer, named Cook - A. Yes, we were on Fudgwick Bridge, and Cook passed us, Smith said,

"I'll tell you what, I'll give you 10 l., if you will shoot Mr. Cook" - that he was a d - d eye-sore to him, and a great many more about the place.

MR. ATTORNEY GENERAL. Q. What are you - A. A labouring man; formerly belonging to the sea; this conversation was near four years back.

Q. I suppose you immediately told Cook - A. No; I did not, nor mention it to any Magistrate; I first mentioned it about a fortnight ago, I went down to look at the paper, at the Leopard's Head, public-house, in Sturry, and mentioned it in the public tap-room. The other conversation took place on Easter Monday, between six and eight o'clock in the evening - I stood by a neighbour's house, and he came up to me, and asked me to go there and carry arms; I had seen him regularly once or twice a week for the last two years, met him accidentally as I went to work, and always saw him on the alert, looking out - I refused to go.

Q. You, of course, never went out smuggling - A. Never;

I will not tell a lie; there was one time, about six years back, Smith came and asked me to assist him in moving four tubs of spirits, I said, if it was necessary to help him, I would, but not to take it to any place, he said, he would pay me, I said, I wanted nothing but a little beer; we had not a quarter of a mile to go - we took it out of one hide and put it into another, that was all. I saw him go to the Leopard's Head for men.

JANE FULLER . I can neither read or write; I had occasion to send a letter, and told Griffiths of it, he offered to write, and took pen and paper - I told him the persons name and my business, and he completed the letter and read it to me, it contained what I wanted, and answered my purpose very well, it was sent, and I received a very satisfactory answer. I have known him nine years - I have heard him read a story book, which was very entertaining, there was the names of the fishes of the sea, and animals on the earth; I do not recollect the name of any thing but the rattle-snake.

MR. JARVIS. Q. How long ago was this - A. About nine years; it was at his house in Green parish - Ann Sidders , his present wife, was with him - I frequently called there, as I knew the people, it was one o'clock in the afternoon; he read an hour, or perhaps more, and told me the meaning of the things he read, about beasts, fishes, and creeping things on the earth, he did not read about birds and beasts, only things that crept on the earth; I did not mention this till I heard about this business, three weeks ago. I heard Mr. Lasken, of Grove Ferry , read in the newspaper, that he could neither read or write, and I said I could contradict it; it was three weeks ago tomorrow, Mr. Hawkers and Miss Arman were present. I live at Reculvers, my husband is a labourer, we live near the sea shore, the letter was to go to Sheerness.

Q. How came you at Sturry three weeks ago - A. I was going to Canterbury to market, and went in for refreshment - I do not know either of the prisoners' friends; I sent the answer to the letter to my sister; I have enquired for it she has not got it.

JOHN GABEL . I am a dealer in confectionery, at Canterbury. I know Webster, his stable-yard joins my house, he generally comes to my house every night for a light to do his horse up with - I well remember on Easter Monday, the 23d of April, between nine and ten o'clock, he came to light his candle, as usual, to go to his stable; I believe his horse and cart were there, I know the cart was in the yard; he went to the stable as if to dress his horse, if the cart had left the yard, I must have heard it, as there is a height of about six inches by the curb, which he must go over; I saw no more of him till next morning at twenty minutes before three o'clock - I asked him to call me up, as I was going into the country, and remember perfectly well, that on that morning his father-in-law died.

COURT. Q. When he called you up, did you see his cart in the yard - A. It was to the best of my belief; I did not go to the window to see. It is ten or twelve miles from Canterbury to Hern Bay and back; I believe Hern Bay is eight miles from Canterbury; his father-in law left a widow, she is now in that state that she cannot be moved, Webster's wife is living.

MR. ATTORNEY GENERAL. Q. He called on you on Tuesday morning - A. Yes; it was light enough for me to see the time-piece on my mantle shelf. I travel about the country, and keep a shop at Canterbury, he flung something against my chamber window to awake me, my window looks into the front street, the garret window looks into the yard. I came down stairs, opened the door. I asked him how his father was at the window, he said, he would wait a moment, and I came down.

Q. Where did you go that day - A. Nearly to Deal, I travelled alone, I will not positively say the cart was in the yard in the morning. I went to bed at night about five minutes after ten o'clock; it was nearly twenty minutes before three o'clock that he called me - I could see my time-piece.

COURT. Q. It was very near the full moon, I believe - A. I believe it was the last quarter. Webster's mother's name is Prior.

THOMAS THORP DELASON , ESQ. I am coroner of Kent. I saw Mrs. Prior last week, she was not in a fit state to be moved.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18210606-55

FIFTH DAY. MONDAY, JUNE 11.

754. WILLIAM SCOTT was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of April , one bidet frame, value 12 s. , the goods of William Ward .

WILLIAM WARD . I am a broker , and live in Prince's-street . On the 27th of April, about eight o'clock at night, this bidet frame stood just in front of my shop; I was coming home, and was within twenty yards of my shop, when I heard the cry of Stop thief! I perceived the prisoner standing among the crowd - I took him back, and found the frame at the shop.

CHARLES ELLIS . My father is a carpenter, and lives in Richmond-street, Princes-street; about eight o'clock, I was about thirty yards from the shop, on the same side of the way, and saw the prisoner take the bidet from the door - it was right under the door. I pursued him, crying Stop thief! several people collected, I kept close to him, and saw Ward take him. He dropped it while I was following him.

MARTHA WARD . I am the wife of William Ward . I saw the prisoner take it from the door. I picked it up, and took it back. I am sure it was my husband's property, and is worth 12 s.

Prisoner. I leave it to the mercy of the gentlemen.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Two Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210606-56

755. JOHN BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of May , three saws, value 6 s.; one stock and centre-bit, value 2 s., and one coat, value 5 s., the goods of John Saunders ; two saws, value 4 s., the goods of Roger Edwards ; two saws, value 4 s., the goods of Robert Parsons ; one saw, value 2 s., the goods of William Huggins ; two

saws, value 4 s., the goods of John Rose ; one saw, value 2 s., the goods of James Straughan ; one saw, value 2 s., the goods of John Knight , and one saw, value 2 s. , the goods of James Faircliff .

JOHN SAUNDERS . I am a carpenter . On the 18th of May I lost three saws, a stock, centre-bit, and a coat, from Mr. Knight's shop, where I work. Edwards, Parsons, Rose, Straughan, and Faircliff, all worked at the shop. I left about four o'clock in the afternoon. I returned next morning, and then they were all gone. I found them next day at the Thames Police Office, and the prisoner in custody.

ROGER EDWARDS . I was in Mr. Knight's employment, and left the shop at six o'clock, the tools were them safe; I missed them in the morning, and found them at the office.

ROBERT PARSONS . I left two saws in the shop at half-past six o'clock, and missed them next morning.

JOHN ROSE . I left two saws in the shop at half-past five o'clock, and found them at the office.

JAMES STAUGHAN . I left a saw in the shop at seven o'clock, and found it at the office.

JAMES FAIRCLIFF . I left a saw in the shop, and found it at the office. Mr. Knight lost a saw.

JOHN SHIELDS . I am a Thames Police officer. About half-past five o'clock in the morning of the 18th of May, I stopped the prisoner in the New-road, St. George's in the East, with a bag on his shoulder, containing three saws; I asked him what was in it - he said he did not know, but that a man gave it to him in Whitechapel-road, and he was to follow him towards Tower-hill.

RICHARD CARTER . I am an officer and was with Shields. I found a crow-bar in the prisoner's possession, concealed in the sleeve of his coat.

ROGER EDWARDS re-examined. The shop was not broken open - there is an open way, leading from the yard.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A man asked me to carry it towards Tower-hill, and asked if I had a pocket to put the crow-bar in.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Confined One Year , and Publicly Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210606-57

756. ROBERT HITCHMOUGH was indicted for that he, on the 25th of April , at St. Mary-le-Bow , feloniously did dispose of and put away a certain forged and counterfeit bank note, which is as follows - (setting it forth No. 70,159, dated February the 20th, 1821, signed R. Clough) with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England , he well knowing it to be forged and counterfeit .

SECOND COUNT. The same as the first, only calling it a promissary note for payment of money instead of a Bank note.

TWO OTHER COUNTS the same, only stating his intent to be to defraud Thomas Warner .

MR. SERGEANT BOSANQUET, and MESSRS. REYNOLDS and BOLLAND conducted the prosecution.

THOMAS WARNER . I am a tailor , and live in Grub-street, City . I have seen the prisoner in my shop several times; he came on Tuesday, the 12th of April, I think it was on a Tuesday, but am not certain - I think it was Easter Tuesday.

Q. Are you sure he is the person who was with you on the Tuesday - A. No; I am not certain that he brought the first note; I believe him to be the same, but did not notice him at the time; he came with this note, but I cannot swear to him. The person asked for a black silk waistcoat, which came to 5 s., he tendered me a 1 l. Bank note; I begged of him to write his name and address on it - he did so - I could not read it, as I can neither read nor write. I carried it to Mr. Harrison's shop, over the way, and delivered it to Thomas, the shopman, for change, he wrote on it, and put it into the till. I immediately stepped over the way, gave the person 15 s., and he went away directly.

Q. Now look at the prisoner, and say whether you are enabled to say he came on any day to your shop - A. He did; it was the next day, or the next but one, but I think the next day; he asked for a blue coat, I asked 1 l. for it - he gave me a 1 l. Bank note, I said,

"Please to write your name and address;" he did so. I then carried it to my wife to write on it. She read what he had written, he said that was right; she put her name on it, and put into her pocket. He went away immediately with the coat - he had not got the silk waistcoat on. The evening after we took it we went to No. 8, Baltic-street, Old-street-road, to enquire for the prisoner, but could not find him - there was no such person there - we enquired for Robert Brown . Next morning, about eight o'clock, John Sidwell , the officer went with me in search of him, and met him in Barbican; I siezed him by the collar, and called the officer to my assistance, and said, he was the man we were after; as soon as I seized him, I said

"You are the man I am looking after;" he said,

"Yes, Sir, I am, but for God's sake don't hurt me.

Q. Tell the exact words you said, when you collared him - A. I told the officer, that was the man I wanted to take, for passing the note on me - the prisoner must have heard it. He said,

"I am the man, Sir, but don't hurt me." I do not recollect his saying any thing else. We went with him along Grub-street, and in Grub-street, he gave me a 1 l. note, and I believe his words were

"Put it away." I wrapped it in a handkerchief, and put it in my pocket, went home and took my handkerchief merely to wipe my face, and laid it down on my sideboard, went away and left it there. I went to Guildhall - I was absent about a quarter of an hour, returned and found the handkerchief laying on the same spot, and took the note out of it.

Q. When you put your handkerchief on the sideboard, was your wife there - A. She was in the same room, and remained at home, and was in the same room when I came back for it. I made a cross on it at Guildhall, and gave it to the officer. (looks at one) I cannot swear it is my cross - I gave it to Sidwell in Guildhall.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. You cannot swear the prisoner came the first time - A. No, I believe him to be the same sized man. After he was apprehended, he said, he sold his watch in the street to a stranger for 2 l.; he made the same statement at Guildhall; he gave me the second

note of his own accord. I believe he gave it me that he might not pass it, as he found the others were bad. I shall always think so - he did not resist.

COURT. Q. He did not at all deny being the person who was in your shop - A. He said he was the same. I told him I had been to No. 8, Baltic-street, and I think he said in his flurry, he put down the wrong direction. I did not particularly notice what he said, as I was flurried myself. I did not use him roughly when I collared him.

REBECCA WARNER . I am the wife of the last witness. I have seen the prisoner at my husband's shop; I am not sure whether it was the 25th or the 26th of April, but it was one of those days, and I think on a Wednesday - I had not seen him before. He came for a blue coat my husband asked 23 s., but took 1 l. for it - he paid a 1 l. note for it; my husband asked his name and address. I do not know that he made any particular answer, but wrote on the note. I then took it, and put the two first letters of my name on the Britannia, without taking the note up, (looks at it) this is it - here is my mark. I read the address he put on it, to him; it was

" Robert Brown , No. 8, Baltic-street," he said that was right. In the evening of that day, (I think) I and my husband went there to look for him, but could not find him - he was taken up next morning.

Q. Do you remember your husband coming home, and leaving a handkerchief - A. Not to my knowledge; I remained in the room till my husband came back. I did not meddle with any handkerchief. I remember his bringing the prisoner back; he went out afterwards and returned again, and went to Guildhall. There was nobody else in the house but a little girl, about eight years old. I put no note in the handkerchief, nor any body else - I am certain.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you always put your initials in that place - A. Always, we do not take many notes.

MR. BOLLAND. Q. Did you take any other note from a person, in the name of Brown, Baltic-street - A. No, and I had no other note in the house.

WILLIAM THOMAS . On the 24th of April, I was shopman to Mr. Harrison, Fore-street, cheesemonger, the private door is opposite Warner's house; he came to change a note on the 24th, (looks at one) this is it - I marked it; the direction on the back,

" Robert Brown , No. 8, Baltic-street" was on it, and in a wet state. I put

"Warner, Grub-street, 24-4" on it.

Cross-examined. Q. You had no reason to think it had - A. No.

JOHN STILWELL . I am a constable. On the 26th of April, I went with Warner to Barbican, and saw the prisoner and another lad, standing at the edge of the pavement. Warner went up, slapped him on the shoulder, and said, this is the lad I am looking for. I immediately laid hold of him and took him into custody; Warner asked him, what he had done with the coat that he had bought from him; he said he had got some money in his pocket, and would pay for it if he would let him go.

Q. Did Warner say anything to him before that - A. Not to my recollection; the prisoner said, he sold it for 14 s., and he had some money in his pocket, and if Mr. Warner would let him go, he would pay for it. Warner said, he could not do that. He begged us to let his father know, and said his father lived at No. 8, Bartholomew-square, Old-street, and that his name was Robert Hitchmough , that he lived with his father, and got his living by selling bottles. Warner gave me a note at Guildhall, and marked it in my presence, (looking at one) this is it - I marked my name on it.

Cross-examined. Q. When you came up to him, his back was towards you - A. No, when he saw me, he held his head down. I searched him at Warner's, and found 24 s. in silver on him. Warner was as close to him as me, and heard what passed, I dare say.

COURT. Q.Did you see him give Warner a note - A. No. I believe I stated this conversation before the Magistrate.

THOMAS WARNER re-examined. I heard Stilwell examined; he told the Magistrate what had passed.

ROBERT BENNETT . I live at No. 8, Baltic-street, Old-street-road, I have lived there six years; the prisoner did not live there in April. I never saw him before this morning. No person named Brown lived there - there is only one No. 8.

Cross-examined. Q. Are you in the habit of taking notes - A. Yes, I usually put the initials of the persons I receive them of on them.

CHARLES CHRISTMAS . I am an inspector of the Bank of England, and have been so about seventeen years. (looks at the note, No. 70159) It is forged in all parts, it bears the signature of

"R. Clough;" there was no such signing clerk at the time the note is dated. We had such a signing clerk of 1 l. notes, but at this time, he was a signer of 5 l. notes - it is not his writing; (looks at 70161, uttered on the 24th of April) this is forged in all respects, the same as the other - they are off the same plate, the same paper, the same date and signature, and both indorsed

" Robert Brown , No. 8, Baltic-street." I have no doubt but the indorsements are the same hand-writing; the note found on the prisoner is also forged in every respect. I cannot make out the signature - it is off the same plate, and the same paper, and bears the same character of hand-writing, but the name is not the same.

Cross-examined. Q. Are they forged sufficiently well to impose on an ignorant person - A. They may - they are badly executed. I is not the same sort of wove paper as the Bank use.

ROGER CLOUGH . I was a signing clerk, and am now a cashier. On the 20th of February, 1821, I signed no notes under 5 l. I have signed 1 l. notes for many years, I left off in 1818. The signature on the notes is not mine - there is no other clerk of my name.

(read)

Prisoner's Defence. I went after a situation on the 25th of April, and met a man I knew by sight, but not his name; he asked if I wanted to buy a watch of him, I said,

"I had one to sell which my father made me;" he asked to see it. I asked 2 l. for it - he offered 35 s., I refused, and he said, if I waited half an hour he would get 2 l. - I waited three quarters of an hour; he returned with two notes. I asked his name and address, he said, Robert Brown , and he received it at No. 8, Baltic-street, Old-street. I left him, and in coming home, called at Warner's, and bought a blue coat. I gave him one of the notes - he asked me to put my name on it; my father was

moving, and I did not know where to, so I put the name the gentleman gave me, and next morning I was in Barbican, Warner tapped me on the shoulder, and said, I passed a bad note at his shop; he took me to his house, and asked if I had any notes. I said, I had one, but did not know whether it was bad or no; he said,

"Give it me and I will not hurt you;" he put it in his pocket. I have enquired after the gentleman I took them of - I know him very well by sight, but cannot find out where he lives.

JOHN HITCHMOUGH . I am the prisoner's father. I made him a watch which I could not sell under 3 l., but I let him have it for less than it cost me; he has lived with Mr. Woodcock, and Mr. Saunders. I know he was in want of money - I am a watchman of Pentonville.

THOMAS WARNER . I remember his saying he sold the coat for 14 s.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 17.

Strongly Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury.

London Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18210606-58

757. THOMAS CLARE was indicted, for that he, on the 31st of March , at St. James, Clerkenwell , feloniously did dispose of and put away, a certain forged and counterfeit Bank note, which is as follows - (1 l. No. 84,276, dated February the 14th, signed G. Gaudin) with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England , well knowing it to be forged and counterfeit .

SECOND COUNT, for feloniously offering to John Cox , a like forged and counterfeit bank note, with a like intention, knowing it to be forged and counterfeit.

THIRD AND FOURTH COUNTS. The same, only calling it a promissory note for payment of money instead of a Bank note.

FOUR OTHER COUNTS. The same, only stating his intent to be to defraud the said John Cox .

JOHN COX . I keep a chandler's shop at Stepney Green, Middlesex . On the 31st of March, the prisoner came to my shop about a quarter before nine in the evening, and asked for half a pound of mixed tea, which came to 4 s., he tendered me a 1 l. Bank note, I looked at it by the candle, and surmised it to be bad, and asked if he had any change, he said, he had not, he said something about belonging to a ship; I called my daughter out to ascertain if it was the same signature as the one I took in the morning, she looked at it in my hand, and said it was the same signature, he must have heard it; I wrapped it up in my hand, walked round the counter, locked the door; I sent my daughter out at the side door, for the officer, he came with her, I unlocked the door, let him in, and gave him the note, he supposed it be bad, he kept it in his hand, and walked into the back room with the prisoner, my daughter marked it there, in their presence, Christian then marked it, and kept it, I had kept it in my hand till I gave it to him; I asked the prisoner no questions, but as I was looking at it by the candle, he said, he lived in Cow-lane; I had no more conversation with him.

ROBERT CHRISTIAN . I am headborough of Mile-end, Old-town; I was fetched to Cox, he gave a note into my hands, and said he suspected it to be a bad one, I kept it in my hands, and took the prisoner into the back room, and asked where he got it, he said he had it of a captain who he met with on the 'Change, and as he and the captain were going to the City Canal, he gave him the note, and sent him over for the tea, I searched but found nothing on him; Mr. Cox desired me to mark the note in his presence, and then I marked it (looking at it), this is it, it has my name, and 31st of March on it. and

" Mary Cox , Stepney Green," which she wrote in my presence.

MARY COX . I am the daughter of the prosecutor; I marked this note, the prisoner gave it to my father; I have heard my father's evidence, it is correct.

ELIZA BEVERIDGE . I live at No. 7, John's-row, St. Luke's, City-road, the prisoner's name is Thomas Clare , he came to lodge with me, with his wife, about a month after Christmas day, and lived about two months with me, until he was apprehended, his wife was apprehended at my house, about two months ago, I had seen him at my house on the Saturday morning as his wife was taken on the Tuesday morning.

EDWARD DYER . I keep a stationer's shop in Britannia-place, Commercial-road; on the 30th of March, the prisoner came and bought some books and stationery, which came to seven shillings, he gave me a 1 l. note, I asked his address, (looks at it) this is it, he gave his name as Thomas Johnson , that he belonged to the George, Capt. Adams, and lived at No. 25, High-street, Poplar, at the house of Mrs. Sims; I wrote on the note what he said,

" Thomas Johnson , George, Capt. Adams," on the front, and on the back

"at Mrs. Sims, No. 25, High-street, Poplar," and my name; I am positive this is it, I paid it away two or three days after, and had it returned to me after he was apprehended.

SARAH ANN SLATER . I live at No. 25, High-street, Poplar, and lived there on the 31st of March, I do not know the prisoner, he did not live at my house, I never remember seeing him.

CHARLES CHRISTMAS . I am an inspector of Bank notes, this note, No. 84,276 is forged in all respects, it purports to be signed Gordin, there was such a signing clerk, it is not his hand writing, (looks at No. 73,421) this is also forged in every respect, and off the same plate, and signed A. Consett, it is not his hand writing - they have been creased, but not used much.

GEORGE GORDIN . I am a cashier, the signature to them is not my writing.

(read)

Prisoner's Defence. (Written.) I went to the 'Change, a man came up, and asked if I wanted a situation, and said he wanted a young man, as steward. I agreed to enter on board the George, for 3 l. 10 s. a month - he said, he was going to the ship, and I might go with him, and see where she lay, I did so, we called at the Britannia, he gave me a 1 l. note, and said,

"Go over and buy some writing paper, and two volumes of Don Quixotte," which I did, and gave the address he told me; I gave him the paper, he said, it was the wrong sort, he told me to meet him next morning at a coffee-house, and I did, he gave me several parcels to carry to Stepney-green, then he gave me a 1 l. note, and sent me to buy one pound of tea, as there was none on board, I went in, not knowing the note was bad, an officer came in, I told him my captain was waiting outside for me, he would not believe me, but the officer, seemingly in liquor, insisted on taking charge of me - I thought my captain would come forward; I came home in January, in

the ship Nelson, and was paid ten guineas for wages; I had spent my money, and was seeking for a ship - this is a true statement of the case.

EDWARD DYER re-examined. I am sure he gave his name Thomas Johnson - he described himself as Johnson.

JOHN COX . Christian did not appear in liquor - but conducted himself as a sober man. I heard nothing about his Captain being outside.

ROBERT CHRISTIAN . I was not the least intoxicated, I do not think I had drank any thing all day; he said nothing to me about a captain waiting outside; in our way to the watch-house, I asked what he was, he said, he was a merchants' clerk.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 22.

Recommended to mercy by Mr. DYER.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow .

Reference Number: t18210606-59

758. CHARLOTTE THORNE , was indicted, for that she, on the 14th of April , at St. James, Clerkenwell , feloniously did dispose of, and put away, a certain forged and counterfeit Bank note, which is as follows - (1 l. No. 63,211, dated November the 8th, 1820, signed G. Gordin), with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England , well knowing it to be forged and counterfeit .

SECOND COUNT, for offering a like forged bank note, to William Golburn , with a like intent, knowing it to be forged.

THIRD AND FOURTH COUNTS, the same, only calling it a promissory note for payment of money, instead of a Bank note.

FOUR OTHER COUNTS, the same, only stating her intent to be to defraud William Bealby .

WILLIAM GOLBOURN . I am shopman to Mr. William Bealby , a haberdasher and hosier , who lives at No. 45, Drury-lane . On Saturday, the 14th of April, between eight and ten o'clock at night, the prisoner came in, and bought two pair of stockings, which came to 3 s. 3 d. She offered me a 1 l. Bank note, and said she lived at No. 17, Great Wild-street. I desired her to wait, and I would give her change - I went up stairs to Mr. Bealby, leaving her in the shop, and gave the note into his hands, he came down with it immediately, and enquired where she got it; I do not know whether she gave any answer. Great Wild-street is at the back of Drury-lane - I went and got the constable.

Prisoner. Q. I gave you my direction, No. 53, Charles-street, Drury-lane - A. She did not give that direction to me.

WILLIAM BEALBY . I am a haberdasher, and live in Drury-lane, Goldburn brought me the note up; I went down stairs with it and found the prisoner there; I do not know whether I asked where she got it; I sent my young man for an officer, she was taken to the watch-house; the note was not out of my sight or possession till I marked it (looks at one) this is the note; I have written

"Saturday the 14th of April, 1821, W. B." on it.

Prisoner. Q. I gave you my direction - A. I do not recollect asking where she lived, I did not go to her lodging, I went to two Nos. 17, Great Wild-street, at neither of which was she known.

ELIZABETH NEWELL . On the 14th of April, I occupied No. 17, Great Wild-street; the prisoner did not live there. I never saw her until to-day.

CHARLES ARMSTEAD . My mother-in-law occupies another No. 17. Great Wild-street; I live there also, the prisoner never lived there, I do not know her - there are only two Nos. 17.

JOHN HENRY GOVER . I keep the Falcon, public-house, Princes-street, Soho. On the 21st of March, about seven o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came to my house, for half a pint of rum, my wife served her in my presence, after it was put into her bottle, she tendered a 1 l. note to my wife, in my presence, my wife said she could not give her change, she said, that she lived servant with Mr. Rhymer, of Nassau-street; I immediately asked my wife for the note, and saw it was forged, there is such a person as Rhymer; I got up and asked her positively if she lived servant with Rhymer, she said she did; I said, I thought she was aware of what she was doing, she said she was an ignorant girl, and could not read, I asked if she was willing to go with me to Rhymer's, she agreed to go, and as we went, I again asked where she lived, she said she was an unfortunate girl, and resided in Drury-lane. I went with her to Rhymer's in, Nassau-street, the shopman said they knew nothing of her, she then said, some men gave her a bottle and note to get the rum and change; I took her to the watch-house, she was searched, and nothing found on her - I marked the note, (looks at one) this is it - I attended before the Magistrate, she was committed to Tothill-fields, brought up on the Friday, and discharged.

Prisoner. Q. I did not say I was servant to Rhymer - A. She did, and went with me there, to prove she was his servant.

CHARLES CHRISTMAS . I am an inspector. This is a forged note, in every respect, it purports to be signed George Gordin , but is not his writing, the other is forged in all respects, and comes from the same plate.

GEORGE GORDIN . I am a cashier. The names on the notes are not my writing; there is no other clerk of my name (read).

Prisoner. I wish to have mercy shewn me.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 19.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18210606-60

759. JOHN LAW , was indicted for feloniously having in his custody and possession, certain forged bank notes, knowing them to be forged .

JOSHUA ARMSTRONG . I am an officer. I went with Mance and Vann to the Golden-horse, Rutland-court; I laid hold of the prisoner as he passed the window, I took him into a back room, and asked his name, he said, John Levy , I also asked if he had any notes about him, he said one, and took it out of his fob - I asked if he had any at home, he said, No. I said,

"I know where you live, and shall search; he said,

"Then there is some;" I said,

"How many is there? 40 or 50," he said, about that number. I went and searched his lodgings, in Rutland-court, and in a flour tub, in a bag, I found fifty-eight; and at the bottom of the tub, two more. I shewed them to him, he said,

"Ah! they were in a bag, in the tub, and the other two were at the bottom" - I asked where they came from, he said, he declined answering (looks at them) these are them, I marked them.

JOHN MANCE . I am an officer. Armstrong's account is correct; I found two notes at the bottom of the tub

wrapped in brown paper, and he gave us one from his fob, on returning, and shewing them, to which he said,

"Those were in the bag, and those at the bottom of the tub."

THOMAS VANN . I waited at the public-house with the prisoner, while the others went to search.

CHARLES CHRISTMAS . These notes are all forged; they are off two plates, but both the same description of engraving, and the signatures are the same hand writing.

JAMES VAUTIN . I was a signing clerk. Two of the notes purport it to be signed by me, but are not my writing.

(The prisoner put in an exceeding long written defence, stating, that one Dart, who was convicted, left the parcel at his house, saying, it was very valuable; that he called the next day and took part of the contents away, but the prisoner suspecting all was not right, took one from the parcel to ascertain if they were good, and was apprehended.)

GUILTY . Aged 55.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow .

Reference Number: t18210606-61

760. ELIZABETH WEBSTER , was indicted, for that she, on the 24th of February , at St. James, Clerkenwell , feloniously did dispose of, and put away, a certain forged and counterfeit Bank note, which is as follow - (1 l. No. 17,234, dated January 20, 1821, signed A. Consett), with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England , well knowing the same to be forged and counterfeit .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only calling it a promissory note for payment of money instead of a Bank note.

TWO OTHER COUNTS, the same, only stating, her intent to to defraud one John Poulter .

ELIZA POULTER . I am the wife of John Poulter , who lives at Bromley, in Middlesex , and keeps a chandler's shop there, the prisoner came to the shop some time in the latter end of February, between seven and eight o'clock, on Saturday evening. I am quite sure she is the person, she asked for cheese, sugar, butter, and tea, they came to 4 s. or 4 s. 6 d.; she gave me a 1 l. Bank note, I gave her the change, and apologized for the things not being neatly done up, as I was a young beginner, she said,

"Never mind, I am not going far, I live just below;" I gave the note to my husband directly after she left the shop, it was not out of my possession till then.

JOHN POULTER . The last witness is my wife. On Saturday night, the 24th of February, the prisoner came to the shop, I am sure she is the person, my wife gave the note to me; when she was gone, I marked it (looks at one) this is it. I wrote my name on it, I paid it away to Mr. Roberts, he returned it to me before the 10th of March.

Q. Did you see her on the 10th of March - A. I was called to my door, and saw her go into the Moor's Arms, public-house, next door to me, I knew her directly; I saw her coming out of the house, and laid hold of her, and told her I wanted to speak to her, she said you cannot want me, I said I want you just over at this shop; I took her in, and shut the door, she had a piece of paper in her hand, which she popped into her mouth, and swallowed it; I could not say what it was, I sent for an officer, who took her, he found no note on her.

Prisoner. Q. You saw me put nothing in my mouth - A. I am certain I did, it appeared like a piece of paper.

Prisoner. It was liquorice.

JOHN WEALE . I am an officer. On Saturday, the 10th of March, about eight o'clock at night, I took charge of the prisoner, at Poulter's, but found nothing on her - two children charged her with swallowing something; she did not deny it. She said nothing about liquorice.

Prisoner. The prosecutor put his finger to my mouth, and said I had swallowed it - I said I had not - A. I remember his putting his finger to her mouth.

JOSEPH COLTMAN . I was beadle of the night. I received the prisoner in charge at the watch-house. She made her escape. I am sure she is the person.

RICHARD UNDERWOOD . I keep the Moors Arms, public-house. On Saturday, the 10th of March, the prisoner came to my house for a pint and a half of gin, and tendered me a 1 l. note. I asked her name, she said John - I asked her what? she said Joe. I knew there was no such name in the place, and asked if it was Jones - she said Yes. I put the name on the note, and was going to give her change, but my wife thought I had better not. I returned her the note, and told her to get change at the butcher's or baker's - she went out with it in her hand, and left her bottle.

Prisoner. Q. You told me you only had 15 s. - A. Yes; I could have given her change if I liked.

MARY ANN BROWN . I am the wife of Henry Brown , who keeps a chandler's shop, at Redmond's-row, Mile End. The prisoner came to oar shop on the 31st of March, between eight and nine o'clock in the evening, and asked for some tea, sugar, butter, and cheese. I weighed them all up, and put them on the counter; she then asked for change for a 1 l. note, which she produced. I looked at it, took it to the candle, told her it was bad, and asked whom she had it of - she said she knew whom she had it of. I asked her again, and she said she did not know. I told her she knew it was bad as well I did, and she had tried to pass it on me - she said she did not know it. While this conversation was going on, a man came in, and asked for a small quantity of cheese, which I gave him - he then asked what was the matter, and I told him. He asked her if she knew whom she had it of - she said she did not. He asked her if she was married - she said she was. He said, perhaps she was a poor woman who had a large family, and did not know who she had taken it of, and I had better give her the note, and let her go about her business - I refused. He then left the shop, and went outside. I then heard some muttering outside, and told my husband I wished there was an officer near, for I would have her taken up; he said he would fetch one, at that moment the door opened, and two men came in, one asked for tobacco, the other pretended to be in liquor, fell against the shop door, pushed it wide open, caught her by her two shoulders, and ran out with her. She had left the note in my hands, I took it in the parlour and saw a name on it very much blotted, with the words - and Co. Limehouse, or Wapping, I put it under an image on the shelf, it remained there till the Tuesday following, when I gave it to Christian, went to the office with him, and found her in custody (looks at one) this is it, it is the number 129,76, and there is H. B. on the

back of it, which I saw my husband write when he gave it to Christian.

HENRY BROWN . I am the husband of the last witness; I took a note out of the cupboard, which my wife received of the prisoner, and marked it (looks at one) this is it. I gave it to Christian.

MICHAEL MORRIS . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner on the 3d of April, at No. 7, John-street, City-road.

ELIZA BERRIDGE . The prisoner lived at my house, No. 7, John-street, St. Lukes, for about two months, until she was apprehended, she lived there as Thomas Clear 's wife.

CHARLES CHRISTMAS . I am an inspector of the Bank, this note is forged in every respect, it is signed A. Conset, but is not his writing. Another signed Tabor, is forged in all respects, and is not his signature.

ALEXANDER CONSET , This note is not signed by me, there is no other of my name in the Bank (read).

Prisoner's Defence. I am an unfortunate young woman. I met a gentleman in the City-road, who went home with me, he promised me a 1 l. note, and refused to give it me; I put my hand into his side-pocket, and took out a pocket book, which contained the notes. I was going that way, and called in at these shops.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 20.

Recommended to mercy.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18210606-62

761. ROBERT HOLDING and CHARLES WADE were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Benjamin Croydon , about two o'clock in the night of the 26th of May , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein ninety-six pair of shoes, value 26 l., and fifty-three pair of boots, value 27 l., his property .

BENJAMIN CROYDON . I live in Blackmoor-street, Clare-market , and am a boot and shoemaker . On Saturday, the 25th of May, I went to bed at half-past one o'clock in the morning - the shop was shut up about five minutes after twelve o'clock. I was the last person up, and secured the house myself. I rose about eight o'clock next morning - it was daylight; and found the shop window was nearly stripped of every thing; the till had been tried, but not successfully; boots and shoes were taken from eight different parts of the shop. The window grating was forced up, the persons could then enter, and get through the cellar and up the stairs into the shop, without hindrance. I lost the property stated in the indictment.

Cross-examined by MR. ARCHBOLD. Q. Only two pair of boots were found on the prisoners - A. No.

JAMES ELLIS . I am an officer. I went on Sunday morning to apprehend Holding, I met him and Wade in the street, and asked where they lived - Holding said they had no lodging, and were out of employ. I ascertained they lived at No. 71, Crown-street; we took them there, up stairs, and Holding produced the key of the padlock, which was on the door, and the key of the common lock, and unlocked the door, and there we found the two pair of shoes, a crow-bar, and some skeleton keys.

JOHN FURZEMAN . I am an officer, and accompanied Ellis. I found two pair of shoes, both new, and asked where they got them - they said one pair belonged to each of them, and that they bought them. I found the crowbar, and picklock keys up the chimney - some are skeleton keys - there were thirteen in all.

Cross-examined. Q. You cannot say they belonged to them - A. No. They said they bought the shoes a fortnight before.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

WADE'S Defence. I do not exactly live there. I only know Holding by going backwards and forwards.

THOMAS INGRAM . I know the prisoners. I keep a public-house. I saw them dealing with a man for shoes, a fortnight or three weeks ago.

COURT. Q. You saw them dealing - A. Yes; they were new shoes. I do not know that they bought them - I do not know where they lived.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow .

Reference Number: t18210606-63

762. HARRIET NOON and ISABELLA SMITH were indicted for stealing, on the 28th of May , one shawl, value 4 s. 8 d. , the goods of John Jeremy .

The prisoners pleaded GUILTY .

Transported for Seven Years .

Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210606-64

763. JAMES EDDINGTON was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of April , one promissory note, for payment of and value 62 l. 2 s. , the property of John Williams .

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

JOHN CLARK . I am a currier, and live at St. Ives, Huntingdonshire, I am a customer to the prosecutor. On the 19th of April, I remitted him a draft for 62 l, 2 s. in a letter, addressed to

"Mr. Williams, No. 26, Lime-street;" I received no letter acknowledging the receipt, and wrote a second time, and received this answer by post (producing it - looks at a bill) this is the bill and note - it is payable at Messrs. Grotes'.

THOMAS LYON . I am clerk to Messrs. Barber and Son, bill-brokers, Cornhill. We discounted this bill with two others, for a person giving the name of Eddington. I cannot say whether it was the prisoner or not - we paid it into Sir John Perring 's, our bankers.

JOHN ISHERWOOD . I belong to Messrs. Grote and Prescott's banking house. I paid this bill when due to Messrs. Perrings.

JOHN WILLIAMS . I am a tanner and leather factor , my counting-house is in Lime-street . The prisoner was my clerk for two years and a half; he had the principal care of my place and business, which is very extensive; he was once in the habit (with my permission) of opening my letters, and using my bills in the business. In February last, I told him in future not to open any more letters, or receive money that was not regularly accounted for in the receipt book. I did not alter those directions afterwards (looks at a letter) - this is his writing. (read)

"Mr. Clark, April 27, 1821, Sir, We duly received your remittance, and are sorry you should have the trouble of writing again. I am for J. Williams, James Eddington ."

MR. WILLIAMS (in continuation.) At the time this letter was written, I had no idea of this remittance. On the 26th of April, I complained to the prisoner about a

deficiency in money matters, and he produced this paper to me to sign. I believe I heard of Mr. Clark's remittance next day - I refused to sign the paper.

(read)

MR. EDDINGTON,

26th of April, 1821.

In order to prevent any misunderstanding between us, respecting your opening my letters, and taking bills and cash to your account, and endorsing the said by procuration; be it understood that you have my consent up to this day, provided you enter all cash and bills so received in the waste book at your first convenience, and if you require it Mr. John or William Sunter shall assist you, in case any thing shall have escaped your memory.

MR. WILLIAMS (in continuation). I afterwards received a letter from Mr. Clark, complaining of not having received an acknowlegment of the money, and that was the first I knew of it. I read the letter to the prisoner, and remonstrated with him, and said, I should be ruined; he said, He should make it all right, I should lose nothing by him; he lived on the premises with his family, and had the charge of all the property there - I live at Greenwich.

Q. How long did he remain with you after this - A. I scarcely got sight of him after but once, he went out before I arrived, and returned at night after I was gone, and he absented himself entirely on the 5th of May - his family remained there. Messrs. Sunters, my other clerks, principally kept the books, with the prisoner's assistance, when the prisoner left, the book that passed through his hands, for the cash account was missing - I never consented to his taking this bill out of the letter.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. You had two modes of keeping your accounts, one private and the other public - A. No, I occasionally wanted other assistance than I could procure myself, but the prisoner did not supply my wants - he procured assistance from my own friends.

Q. On your solemn oath, has he not in numerous instances, procured assistance from his own friends - A. I consider them my friends.

Q. Has he not procured for you, bills and acceptances from persons you never knew, to the amount of thousands - A. I most positively deny receiving from him anything but what he effected to bring from a Mr. Harris, and between me and Mr. Harris, I cannot account. I did not know but all the paper he brought, came from Mr. Harris, till lately. He brought me some bills accepted by one Walby, said to be a friend of his - it was some time in March. I never recollect telling him he must get me assistance elsewhere, when Mr. Harris could not accommodate me. If I had Eddington's book, I could tell better what I have received, but without it I cannot.

Q. Here is a book, look at it - A. There are two others. I have no secrets. I had no private transactions with him that I do not wish to be known.

Q. Was not a private account kept of money, he accommodated you with - A. Not to my knowledge; he had the care of the books; he did in some instances procure accommodation for me, that is, he exchanged acceptance with a friend, on my responsibility and not his.

Q. Has he not procured 1800 l. from his own mother, out of which you have paid 500 l. - A. His mother holds my acceptance for that amount, but I never had the money. I gave her the bills about a month or six weeks ago, they are to the amount of 1300 l. I have no doubt but the first money that came into his hands, he paid himself with; he did not say he took the 62 l. to settle the balance - he never made any claim on me. Mr. Carter called on me, and said, If I gave an undertaking for the safety of the prisoner's person, he would attend and make up the books; he offered to settle it by reference - this was a fortnight after his absence.

Q. Have you not desired him to keep an account of what money he procured for you, by his own means, on a separate slip of paper - A. No, he kept account on paper, (looks at a paper) this has my mark on it - No. 8.

Q. Now, looking at that, I ask you, was not 751 l. procured as stated on that paper - A. Yes, but allow me to explain, the prisoner furnished 38 l. 15 s. of it, but I never asked him, the paper is his writing, I put the mark on it when it is sent me to examine, (looks at another paper) it appears by this, that 21 l. was advanced by him; he paid forty guineas for a horse for me, but I will answer for it, he paid himself, so much money went through his hands, that unless I have his books, I cannot answer.

Q. Have you not since you ordered him not to open your letters, frequently told him to open them as heretofore - A. By no means, he procured me assistance from Mr. Wallis, who is a friend of his; I first heard of Wallis at the end of March last.

Q. Look at this bill for 259 l. dated May the 22d, 1820, accepted by Wallis, is not your endorsement on it - A. Yes, it is, but I did not know him in this transaction; Eddington brought it to me as from Harris.

Q. When these slips of paper were brought with others to your counting-house, were they not by your direction put under a stone to conceal them - A. No, they were generally filed; I never burned any accounts, he appeared at the Mansion-House, and Mr. Harmer gave me notice he was ready to meet the charge.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Would you have been glad to have had a settlement from him at any time - A. It was my most anxious wish; he brought all money to me as from Harris, I had a general guarantee for all paper that came from Harris; I am not distressed for money, but able to meet every thing, and have many thousands over; I had an unexpected demand for 1800 l. and Mr. Eddington said, he thought he could get some money from a private friend, and I understand since that he got it from his mother, he had my acceptances, but I never had half the money, the slips of paper are merely accounts sent to me to shew the current entry of the day; the bill received from Mr. Clark was not entered any where, he kept it an entire secret.

COURT. Q. When Mr. Clark wrote for you to acknowledge the receipt of this sum, did you examine the books - A. I did, and asked the prisoner what had become of it, he said, he should account for it, this was on the 25th of April.

Q. Then he did not absent himself - A. His family were in the house, he came home at night; he was in my counting-house on the 27th of April, about four o'clock in the afternoon, but that was merely a look-in, I told him I would not be put off, I did threaten to prosecute him, or to send for a constable.

MR. ALLEY. Q. When did you go before the Lord Mayor - A. On the 5th of May.

Q. Did not the prisoner breakfast with you that morning - A. Yes, he did; I did not take him up; a sheriff's officer arrested him, and said we could not take him out of the sheriff's hands.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210606-65

764. JOSEPH PICKERING was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of April , one sheet, value 5 s., the property of Cornelius Ellis , in a lodging-room .

SECOND COUNT. The same, only not stating it to be in a lodging-room.

CORNELIUS ELLIS . I keep the Star and Horse-shoe, public-house, in Fleet-street , the prisoner slept there occasionally, he came on the 28th of April, about half-past nine at night, and asked for a bed, he was to have a bed in a double bedded room, on the second floor, he went to bed about half-past eleven o'clock, and came down at half-past nine the next morning; he paid eighteen-pence over-night for the bed; I missed a sheet from the bed.

SAMUEL DEW . I am servant at the house; the prisoner came down at half-past nine, and went down the court as quick as he possibly could; he had a bundle in his hand, I followed him to Gough-square, and asked him to come back with me, he did so, the bundle was opened, and the sheet laid at the top of it.

WILLIAM DAVIS . I live next door to Mr. Ellis, I assisted in bringing the prisoner back, and found the sheet in the bundle.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Fined One Shilling, and Discharged .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210606-66

765. EDWARD TUFTS was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of May , one hat, value 12 s. , the goods of Robert Salter .

GEORGE PORTER . I am shopman to Mr. Salter, a hatter , who lives in Cornhill ; on the 7th of May, about twenty minutes past nine at night, I was in the shop, this hat was on the counter, the prisoner came in, and snatched it off and ran away, I pursued and stopped him, without losing sight of him, he threw it away, it was picked up and given to me.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Whipped and Discharged .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210606-67

766. WILLIAM CREED was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of May , one handkerchief, value 1 s. 6 d., the goods of James Warrand , from his person .

JAMES WARRAND . I live at No. 51, Lime-street; on the 27th of May, at ten o'clock, at night, I was between Gray's Inn-lane , and Hatton-garden ; I had my handkerchief five minutes before, I felt my pocket move as if lifted up, and immediately missed my handkerchief, turning round I found the prisoner in custody with it, he denied it at the watch-house.

WILLIAM HENRY KING . I am a constable, the prisoner was brought to the watch-house, he denied it, I said I knew him very well, he then acknowledged it, and said, he was sorry for it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 13.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210606-68

SIXTH DAY. TUESDAY, JUNE 12.

767. MARY BURTONWOOD , was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of April , one watch, value 2 l.; two seals, value 1 l.; one key, value 5 s.; one ring, value 4 s.; and one ribbon, value 6 d., the goods of William Waters , from his person .

WILLIAM WATERS . I live at No. 4, York-street, Blackfriars-road. On the 24th of April, about one o'clock in the morning, I was passing through Temple-bar, towards Westminster, with John Cole ; I was sober, and had spent the evening with some friends, the last place I left was the Dolphin, public-house, in Coleman-street - as we came by the Punch Bowl, public-house, in the Strand , we were met by the prisoner, and two other women, they clasped us round, and I found the prisoner grappling for my watch; I missed it immediately, went after them, and overtook them in Shire-lane, at the Star, public-house. Cole was holding the prisoner in one hand, and my watch in the other, she was given in charge - I had been no where with her.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. Are you married - A. Yes; there were three women - I was not in Shire-lane, she was not above a minute with me, she put her arms round my neck.

JOHN COLE . I was with Waters, we were both quite sober, opposite the Punch Bowl, the prisoner and two other females met us, they clasped us round, and wished us to go with them, we refused, and immediately they withdrew - Waters said his watch was gone, I pursued and overtook them just going through Temple-bar, the prisoner ran up Shire-lane, and in the passage of the Star Hotel I caught her with the watch in her hand, she threw it on the floor, I picked it up, and gave her in custody.

Cross-examined. Q. Did she not say it was done out of fun - A. No; she said she wished the watch and the owner at the devil.

Prisoner's Defence. Several men and women stood together as I passed. I heard a running behind me, I tried to get out of the way - I was knocked down, and as I lay on the ground, I picked the watch up.

GUILTY . Aged 42.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210606-69

768. ROBERT HOLDING and CHARLES WADE , were again indicted (see page 297), for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Brown , at St. Ann, Westminster , about one o'clock in the night of the 29th of May , with intent to steal, and burglariouisly stealing therein, one bag, value 2 d., one piece of

foreign silver coin, value 5 d.; 142 l. in monies numbered; five 10 l., nine 5 l., and seven 1 l. Bank notes, his property .

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

THOMAS BROWN . I am a cheesemonger , and live in Graffton-street, Soho , St. Ann Westminster. On the 29th of May, at night, I saw my house fastened, I have a flap door made partly of wood and iron, that was safe, and my street door was safely locked - I was the last person in the counting-house; but not the last person at the street door, the flap door was safe. I had a considerable sum of money in my counting-house, in notes, gold, silver, and copper - there was 1 l., 5 l., and 10 l., notes, some of all those amounts, but none higher than 10 l. - there was upwards of 100 l. in silver, and about 30 l. in guineas and sovereigns, the halfpence were done up in a 5 s. papers, the paper was not marked - my young man, Charles Brown , did them up. I know one 1 l. note particularly and will swear to having marked it that night, and there was a French 5 d. piece, or demi franc, which I knew - I was awake about four o'clock, it might be that time, but I am not certain, and was out of bed. - I heard nothing then, it was just getting light; I went to bed, and went to sleep, and I heard the servant man get up, about five o'clock, and in consequence of an alarm from him, I went down stairs to the counting-house, I looked through the counting-house door, which is glazed, and there saw the iron chest broken open - I had locked the door, and taken the key up stairs, part of the copper, and all the silver, notes, and gold were deposited in the iron chest. I found them all gone, and the cash-box, which was in the iron chest, lying on the floor - I missed about 300 l. - on examining the premises, I found they had entered by the cellar flap, and from thence to the shop, by a trap door, which leads into the shop, they had broken the door leading from the shop into the counting-house, which I had left locked, and had the key; I then observed the door leading from the shop to the passage, broken open, and an iron till, behind the counter broken open; there was nothing in there that night.

Q. On searching the counting-house, did you observe any thing else - A. A quantity of bills were taken out of the cash-box, and thrown over the floor, I missed none of them. On the table, under the iron chest, I observed a great quantity of tallow dropped.

COURT. Q. If you go to this room before the windows were open, could you see - A. Yes; There is a glass door without a shutter, I can always see there without a candle, by day-light. The drops of tallow appeared as if they were dropped from a candle being held up to see into the chest, they were not there the night before, I found also a piece of candle which was not there the night before, we had none so thin. I got Ellis and Furzeman from Bow-street, we went with a search warrant to Holding's father's house, No. 7, Grafton-street, six doors from my house, it is rather a short street, we found nothing. In consequence of directions we got there, we went to Crown-street, Soho, and in Crown-street, we saw the two prisoners, it was about twelve o'clock in the day, we had been no where but to Holding's father's. Ellis took one, and Furzeman the other - we got a search-warrant, about eleven o'clock, we went to No. 71, Crown-street with the prisoners and saw the person who keeps the bottom part of the house - the officers asked, in their hearing, which was the room the prisoners lived in (I think it was Ellis) she said the front room, two pair; the officers went up with the prisoners, I followed behind, and saw Holding produce two keys and unlock the door himself, it was locked and padlocked; Ellis and Furzeman began to search the room, I stood at the door, and did not take particular notice - I saw Furzeman take a 1 l. note from a pair of trowsers which laid on the bed, I knew the note to be mine, it was in my iron chest the evening before, and I had written on it; I am confident of it. One of the officers then produced a bag from the chair, which was full of money, and was in my iron chest the evening before, there was 20 l. of silver in it. The French piece was produced at Bow-street, it was the same sort as the one I had, and the same date of the year, I know it by that, and its general appearance.

Q. Holding's father lived near you, did he (the prisoner) know your premises - A. I believe years ago, he was in the habit of coming for butter, but I have not seen him there lately. I have frequently seen the prisoners about the house with another person standing at the corners, I only knew them by sight.

Cross-examined by MR. ARCHBOLD. Q. At what time it was done you do not know - A. No; if the chest had been broken after I got up, I should have heard it; I cannot be sure it was four o'clock - my window curtains were down - I drew one up, and saw it was getting light; the watchman was standing opposite, he leaves at five o'clock. There is a sky-light to the counting-house, there would be no occasion for a candle to examine the chest by daylight, any one may search the boxes in it without a candle.

Q. Is your shop quite dark - A. No; there is a light over the door, it is perfectly light in daytime, and so is the cellar; the light comes through the grating; a light would be no help to them by daylight. I sleep on the second floor, nobody sleeps on the first. I thought the money as safe as in the Bank. Mine is two houses thrown into one - there is an inner communication between them.

Q. They must be adepts in house-breaking to do it - A. I had no idea that any one could break the counting-house open without being heard.

Q. A drunken man could not do it - A. No; I think none of my bills were taken, but I do not know what quantity I had. I never saw Holding in my house myself. His father is a bedstead turner, and I believe a respectable man.

COURT. Q. Could you judge by what the flap or doors were broken with - A. By an iron crow-bar; they broke off one of the bolts. If they had been in the house overnight, and broken out, there would not have been those marks.

JOHN LAY . I am servant to Mr. Brown. I came in last at night, and the lad who let me in fastened the door in my presence - he went to bed before me; I was the last person up in the house, the door was not opened again before I went to bed. I got up at half-past five o'clock in the morning, and found the door open, put to, but not latched.

Cross-examined. Q. You did not try the door to see if it was fastened - A. No, but I saw him fasten both bolts.

JAMES ELLIS . I am an officer of Bow-street. On the 30th of May I went with Furzman and Mr. Brown, to Holding's father's; in consequence of what was told us,

we went to Crown-street, and saw both the prisoners in the street, and apprehended them. I took Holding - Wade heard what passed. I asked him where he lodged - he said he had no lodging. I said he must have a lodging somewhere - he said, No, he was out of employment, and lodged where he could. Having had previous information, we took them to No. 71, Crown-street, and saw a person in the shop below; we then went up two of stairs with the prisoners - Mr. Brown followed us - Holding produced two keys, when we came to a door which was locked and padlocked, he unlocked both the locks; I proceeded to search the room, and in a table-drawer I found this canvas bag, containing 100 l. in Bank notes - there were five 10 l., nine 5 l., and five 1 l.; also eighteen sovereigns, two half sovereigns, and eight half crowns. About that time Furzman said something which drew my attention to Wade, who was taking something from his hat. I saw Furzman take from his pockets and hat, some papers of halfpence - there were eight papers. On this Holding took a paper of halfpence out of his pocket, and put it on the table. I then searched Holding, and took from his coat pockets seven other papers of halfpence, and some loose, also 2 s. 6 d. in silver, out of his breeches pocket. I found a hat-box standing under a bedstead turner's bench, and in it a tea-caddy, filled with silver, so that part of it ran into the hat-box, it was so full - there was 69 l. 19 s. 6 d. and a half-franc, in it. Furzman found a crow-bar up the chimney, also one picklock, one skeleton, three or four latch-keys, and seven or eight door keys of different descriptions. I found three small keys, a drawer key, and a latch-keys in another part of the room, and a box with some tools that are used by turners. Holding works at that business. In the course of the day I went to Brown's premises, and next morning took the crow-bar there - the flap of the cellar appeared to be forced by a crow-bar, and this fitted the marks; I fitted it with the marks, they corresponded; I tried both ends, and they corresponded with both ends. I tried the crow-bar with the lock of a door, but will not positively say it fitted. It is a common instrument of house-breaking.

Q. Did you go through the premises where the persons must have been - A. Yes, I could see in the counting-house by day-light without a candle. There are shutters, but a large space above them, whenever it is light out of doors you can see there notwithstanding the shutters - the prisoners gave no account of the property.

Cross-examined. Q. Holding produced the keys of the door of his own accord - A. Yes, without the least hesitation - made no resistance; we searched some time before we found the property - the crow-bar and keys were up the chimney, completely out of sight - there had been no fire lighted there since they were put there, apparently; a kettle stood there and some cinders, apparently fresh burnt - there had been a fire there lately, if these were put there before the fire was lit, the crow-bar would have appeared smokey and sooty - it is an ordinary sized one, but one claw is broader than the other, which I never saw before. I found another crow-bar on the premises, that could not have made the marks on the flap, it might have been used in opening the iron chest, or one of the doors. I never saw one that would make marks like this - it has an extra purchase; they had forced it down under the flap, so that it cut marks with the pressure, both on the flap and the cill of it - and it is fresh broken.

JOHN FURZMAN . I went with Ellis and Brown in search of the prisoners, I met them in Crown-street - I took Wade - we took them to No. 71, Crown-street; Ellis asked Holding where he lived, he said, he had no lodging, that he slept where he could - Wade must have heard it, as he was close to him. Ellis went into the shop and asked the people if these two men lived there - it must have been in Wade's hearing, for I was with him, and Holding must have heard it; a man came out and said,

"Yes, they lived in the two pair of stairs front room;" we proceeded up stairs with them - Mr. Brown followed; Holding produced the keys, unlocked the door, and I locked it inside. I went towards the table, and saw Wade put his hands to his hat as he sat on the bed. I went to him and found four 5 s. papers of halfpence in his hat - he used a very bad expression. I searched him again, and found two more 5 s. papers in each pocket, which made eight, and in his breeches pocket which he had on, I found a 1 l. note; he said,

"Mr. Brown, you need not look at this, it is my property." Brown looked at it, and said he could not swear to it; there was a pair of blue trowsers on a chair close to Wade, before I searched the pockets, I asked whose trowsers they were; Wade said,

"They belong to me," and in the pocket I found a 1 l. note; he said,

"That is mine." I shewed it to Mr. Brown; he said,

"I will swear to that note particularly, for there is my mark, and I took it last night;" it has William Burton on it, in red ink. I went to the table drawers and found a phosphorus box and matches complete, and in the chimney I found the crowbar and keys, about the height of my arm up the chimney - it is a wide chimney, the bricks run up so as to make a shelf, on which they laid; there was no appearance of soot at all on them, but a little under them. I saw Ellis compare the crow with Brown's flap - it fits exactly at both ends.

Cross-examined. Q. You found nothing on Holding - A. I saw him pull a paper of halfpence out of his pocket, and told Ellis to search him, as he (Holding) was going to mix them with what I found - they were all tied up in the same kind of paper.

Q. The phosphorus box is a common one - A. Yes, working men generally use tinder boxes. The brick work in the chimney appeared to be built on purpose to put the things on.

COURT. Q. Could one person do what was done to the house - A. No, two might. I found a rattle in the cupboard of their lodging. I have known them used, to draw the attention of the watchmen to another spot.

Prisoner WADE. Q. Did I say both notes were mine - A. Yes.

JAMES ELLIS . I produce the papers of halfpence in the same condition as when I took them from Holding.

JANE HARRIS . I live at No. 71, Crown-street, Soho, and have lived there ever since the 14th of October last. On the 30th of May, Holding lodged there, and for two or three months before; Wade came backwards and forwards with him - they lived on the second floor; I lodge in the third pair front, over Holding. On the night of the 29th of May, or the 30th, between three and four o'clock, on the Sunday morning,

I heard a noise of persons coming up stairs - it was quite light; I should suppose it was only two persons. I heard them go into the two pair front, they unlocked the door, went in, stopped a little while, then both went out again, at a few minutes past four o'clock. I came down stairs at six o'clock, the door was then locked, and padlocked. I had heard nobody else come up to the door after they went out, we have many lodgers - the street door was never fastened till after this affair.

Cross-examined. Q. Holding lived there with his wife - A. Yes, till within a fortnight of that time, but his wife was not there then.

Q. Did not Wade sleep there after his wife left - A. I have seen him there frequently, but cannot say he slept there. The house was very quiet, and I can swear I heard the feet of two persons, and two went out. I saw the door was locked when I came down, but did not hear them lock it.

CHARLES BROWN . The prosecutor is my brother, I make up the half-pence, and should know my making up again (looks at some of the papers found on Wade) I wrapped them up in such papers as these are, I am sure of this by a dent on the corner of the paper, which I make always as a private mark, to know it again, and here are three more - (looks at those found on Holding) - here is an old halfpenny in one paper, which I remember putting in, and my mark is on the paper, they are not all done up by me, but were all packed in the same paper, which is some sheets of the Antijacobin Review, I can speak to one found on Holding, and two found on Wade, the rest are packed in the same papers, and the pages of the work correspond, it is all the same sheet, there are sixteen pages to the sheet, from 427 to 443 - it is the paper I used in folding them up.

Cross-examined. Q. You never put halfpence in that sort of paper before - A. I believe I have, and paid them away; I remember packing the one with the old halfpenny, on Monday the 28th, and remember the particular place the old halfpenny was put in, on the right side; I do not remember packing an old one before, it is flatted out just like the old one I put in.

THOMAS BROWN . I know this 1 l. note, it was in my iron safe on the night of the robbery, and has my writing on it, in red ink

"Mr. Binion," I received it the evening before the robbery, the 29th, and wrote that on it, and put it in the chest, I knew it the moment I saw it, I know the canvass bag by the mark P S T, it was a sample bag of oats; the French coin has the same appearance and date, I have no doubt of its being mine, I saw it in the cash-box the afternoon before the robbery.

Cross-examined. Q. Before the new coinage those demi-francs were offered as sixpences - A. Yes, it is dated 1808, a great many were coined that year, I got the sample bag from Mark-lane, it was taken out of a drawer where there was a considerable quantity, I do not know what the mark means, I can swear to the bag, I lost above 14 l. in halfpence, one man might carry them.

The prisoners made no defence.

RICHARD BOWERS . I know the prisoners. On the 29th of May, about half-past eight o'clock at night, I met Holding, and remained with him till half-past twelve, at the Black-Lion, in the Vinegar-yard; he drank very freely of gin and water and other liquors, and was insensibly drunk, I am perfectly satisfied of it, I walked with him to the top of Bridges-street, and left him there in company with a male and female, I thought him not capable of conducting himself - neither him or the other prisoner.

Q. What did you say about the other prisoner - A. They were both with me at the public-house, I left them at the top of Bridges-street at half-past twelve.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Where did Holding live - A. In Grafton-street; I do not know where he lived on the 29th of May; I am a licenced hawker, and live in White-Hart-yard, Drury-lane, when I am at home; I have lodged there three years; I did not drink much, as I had a bad hand, and the doctor desired me to abstain from drinking; I believe the landlord's name is Drake; he is not here; I heard he was in trouble in less than thirty-six hours after; I have been in the gallery of this Court before, but in no other way; I have been charged with assaults three or four times.

ANN CLARK . I have known Holding a long while; I called on him on Sunday, the 17th of May, at No. 71, Crown-street; I saw him put his hand in his pocket and take out two-penny pieces - then he pulled out some notes.

COURT. Q. Can you read - A. No, nor write; I know Bank paper, his hand was full of paper money, rolled up; he gave me a note, and asked me to get change, but it was church-time, and the shops were shut.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. What relation are you to his wife - A. I had her from a day old, and brought her up; he worked at his trade, and sold greens; he said, he had no silver, and wanted me to get change; he said nothing about 5 s. papers of halfpence - I never knew him in custody.

HOLDING - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 21.

WADE - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 21.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18210606-70

769. JOHN GOTLOB MATTOKE was indicted for a rape .

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18210606-71

761. WILLIAM COOK , JOHN BEDWELL , and JAMES BRETT , were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Charles Bishop , about eight o'clock, on the night of the 10th of April , and stealing two candlesticks, value 8 l. the goods of Ann Holton .

MR. ALLEY conducted the prosecution.

CHARLES BISHOP . I rent a house, in Bunhill-row . On the evening of the 10th of April, I lost a pair of silver candlesticks, belonging to Ann Holton , my wife's mother; I discovered it about a quarter past eight, it was then too dark to see to read, I had seen them safe about ten minutes before - there were four others, standing on the sideboard with them, it is immediately under the window fronting the street; the window had a Holland blind constantly down, I found the stick of the blind twisted round and a pair of dwarf blinds open, and the window open. I am certain it was shut after eight o'clock, the candlesticks which remained, were in a confused state, and one was broken.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did you leave the window shut - A. It was shut when I was in the room ten minutes before, it was not day-light.

JOHN UPTON . I am a Bow-street patrol. I was in the neighbourhood between eight and nine o'clock on the

night of the robbery, and going up Chequer-alley, I saw a man at the door of a coffee-shop, kept by Hebb, the man looked to his right and then to his left, and as soon as he saw me, ran in, and shut the door - I went in with two other men who were with me, and saw three men together in the front room, I know Cook and Bedwell to be two of them; Bedwell was coming from the kitchen into the front room, with his coat in his hand, the other two were close to him, I asked what he did with his coat off, he said nothing; I found a few halfpence on him, Dickons searched the others - Bedwell appeared flurried, I got a candle and went into the room, he came out of, and looking into a place where they keep the sand and saw-dust, I perceived the two silver candlesticks, the woman of the house in their presence denied all knowledge of them, I then asked if they knew any thing of them, they all three denied all knowledge of them, and while I was making further search, Brett made his escape out of the room, the other two were secured; I apprehended him again on Friday, the first of June.

Cross-examined. Q. What time did you go the coffee-shop - A. About nine o'clock. Cook sat in the front room, and the other on his right hand; only Bedwell came out of the back room.

SAMUEL DICKONS . I was with Upton, and saw the three prisoners there, two were standing up, and some was sitting down, Upton went in first, I followed him, and saw him bring the candlesticks out of the back room, I saw no other man there, I am certain of Brett, he ran away.

ABRAHAM FARROW . I assisted Upton in taking Brett, at No. 9, White Horse-court, White Horse-street On the following morning, I was taking him from the watch-house to the office, and on going up Holborn, we overtook Mrs. Epps, she asked if he would take a little porter, he said, Yes; we went into a public-house, and had a pot of porter, she said,

"I am sorry for you, Brett," he said,

"You are are you, I suppose so." I told him it was a pity he gave himself to keep bad company, he said it was too late now; I asked why - he said he supposed the others had said enough; I asked what he thought he should get for the candlestick, he said,

"I do not know, I only wish we had taken them all;" that he was equally guilty with the rest, and what they suffered, he should wish to suffer likewise.

MARY EPPS . I keep the coffee-shop; the officers came to my house, the prisoners and Harry Wakely were there, they came about half-past nine o'clock, they came in one after the other, and had been there about ten minutes before the officers came; nobody else was there, nor had there been for an hour before, they asked for half a pint of coffee, and all three asked if they might go into my back place to wash their hands, and they all went and washed their hands and had their coats off, and while they were in the act of doing this, the officers came in; two of them were in the front place when they came, Wakely escaped out the back way.

Cross-examined. Q. Four came in they might come in a minute apart - A. Yes; I live close by Mr. Bishop, people can get to the wash-house without going through my house; the prisoners appeared to be gone in the wash-house a very little while - I have not seen Wakely since.

COURT. Q. Do you remember stopping at a public-house in Holborn - A. Yes; Brett said they were all concerned in it, he only mentioned Bedwell's name in my presence, he said Bedwell and he were both alike, and if one suffered, the other ought - I do not think I ever saw Cook with them before, Wakely and Brett came in first together, Cook and Bedwell came in not a minute after - I saw nothing in their hands.

WILLIAM ABEL . I am a lamplighter. I was going by Mr. Bishop's, and saw three young men standing right against his door, I did not know them, they were all in dark clothes, they might or might not be, the prisoners.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

MRS. EPPS. Cook had dark clothes, Bedwell had a white jacket.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18210606-72

771. JOHN CONNELLY , was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of May , one liquor stand, value 1 l.; three decanters, value 1 l.; one set of castors and stand, value 1 l., and one snuff-box, value 7 s., the goods of Joseph Walker , in his dwelling-house .

MR. JOSEPH WALKER . I live at Fulham . On the 7th of May, at half past four o'clock in the afternoon, I lost this property, from the sideboard of the dining room, on the ground floor - mine are French windows, and open down to the ground, and were open; it is in the Fulham-road, the front garden gate was locked; I was up stairs writing, but I heard a noise, went down, looked through the door, and saw the prisoner in the dining room, he took off his apron, spread it on the carpet, and put the things into it; I let him take them out into the garden, and then pursued and collared him, he dropped them in the garden, the liquor stand was worth 3 l. or 4 l., with the decanters; he must have got over the palisades to get into the garden, he could see the things from the road, and that nobody was there.

Cross-examined by Mr. ADOLPHUS. Q. Are they silver or plated - A. Plated; the snuff-box is silver, they are modern.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

ALEXANDER CAIN . Mr. Walker gave the prisoner into my charge with the property.

Prisoner. I leave it to my counsel.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only.

Whipped and Discharged .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18210606-73

772. THOMAS CARTER , was indicted, for that he, on the 17th of May , with a certain pistol loaded with gunpowder and a leaden bullet, feloniously did shoot at John Beeson , with intent of his malice aforethought, to kill and murder him .

THREE OTHER COUNTS, varying the manner of laying the charge.

JOHN BEESON . I live in Cross-street, Hatton-garden . I have known the prisoner twelve months; we had had no words.

Q. On the 17th of May did he shoot at you - A. Yes; I was in the parlour, the servant let in the prisoner; I had an infant child in my arms, she said, I was wanted, I

went out, the prisoner said,

"I want you;" I said,

"Go down to the kitchen Carter, and I will come to you immediately;" he said,

"No, I will stop here." I gave the child to the girl immediately - he said,

"Let us go into the yard." I was walking in the yard, and just as I got out at the back door, the pistol went off.

Q. Could you guess whether it was loaded - A. Yes; I found myself struck on the shoulder, it could not be a bullet, for I was struck in more than one place, it must be shot, or something of that sort, they did not lodge in my flesh; he was quite close to me, when it went off, it made my shoulder black, that was all, it did not injure me in any respect whatever; it was a kind of a horse pistol, I asked what he was about, I do not know his exact words, but I believe he said I had been a great rogue to him, I heard no shot pass me - he had been in my employ about nine months, he dismissed himself; he came and asked for money, I said I could not get it, and he summoned me - I had been arrested and could not pay him, and at this time I owed him 2 l. 17 s. 6 d.; he was most likely in great distress, he was a sober, honest man, I never noticed any thing wrong in his mind, I think he was not above three yards from me.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. He had applied for the money, and said he was distressed - A. He did not say he was distressed, I have been good friends with him since, and forgive him for what he has done.

COURT. Q. Then why prosecute - A. The Magistrate obliged me.

JAMES JONES . I heard the report, and came down stairs, it was not very loud; I found the prisoner standing by the clock, and fetched an officer; since that, I have seen Beeson and him shake hands and forgive each other, and say what had passed should be buried in oblivion - I believe Carter to be an injured man, there could not be much powder in the pistol, or it would have made more noise.

EDWARD READ . I took him in custody, and asked why he did it, he said Beeson was a rogue and deserved it - I produce the pistol.

WILLIAM READ , SEN. I was with my son. The prisoner said he was an injured man, and very much distressed for the money - they shook hands together, and he was going to be discharged, but behaved rather wild, and the Magistrate sent him to prison.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18210606-74

773. THOMAS DRAPER , was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of June , one half-crown, and seven shillings , the property of George Luxton .

SARAH LUXTON . I am the wife of George Luxton , who lives at Gerrard's-hall, Basing-lane . I was in the habit of giving the key to the porter, to light the tap-room fire; and on Sunday, the 3d of June, I missed money; on Tuesday night I marked the money in the till with a cross on the lower part of the head, I marked 18 s. and a half-crown; on Wednesday morning I missed nothing, on Thursday morning, about a quarter past six o'clock, I saw a man go into the tap-room with a candle, I followed, and on getting into the tap-room, the prisoner was in the bar; he had no business there - I said, I did not expect to find him there, he said, he came to drink; I opened the till, which I found unlocked, there was no marks of violence on it; I had left it in it the night before, 1 l. 6 d. all in silver, I took out the silver and said, I want as much of you as will make this up 1 l.; there was only 11 s. left - I missed the half-crown and 7 s., he put his hand in his pocket and gave me them, it was marked, and was mine - I let him go away, he was taken the same evening.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. He was a sober man - A. Very; I had known him three years.

JOSEPH CANT . I am porter to Mr. Ivers. The prisoner assisted me in cleaning boots about the house; I followed Mrs. Luxton to the bar, she asked for the money, he said nothing, but delivered it to her.

ABRAHAM I'ONS. I am a constable. I took the prisoner in the Old Bailey, where he lived, he said he hoped they would forgive him. The money was marked, I had seen it marked.

Prisoner. I was distressed.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Two Months .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210606-75

774. JAMES JOHNSON was indicted for embezzlement .

EDWARD BENSON . I am a hardwareman , and live in Bell's-buildings, Salisbury-square ; the prisoner was in my employ, and entrusted to receive money for me , but was to account to me the moment he received it. He was to enter it in the book immediately on receiving it.

THOMAS NORTZELL . I am a customer of the prosecutor's. I paid the prisoner 18 s., on the 21st of February ; I rather think I gave him a 1 l. note, and he gave me 2 s. I am sure I did one or the other; I paid it to him at my warehouse, in Great New-street, Fetter-lane, and he gave me this receipt - (read).

MR. BENSON. These goods are not entered, nor the money received for them.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. His salary was 25 l. a year - A. Yes; he was very attentive. He has been foolish enough to get married, and has two children.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

775. JAMES JOHNSON was again indicted for a like offence .

THOMAS NORTZELL . I paid the prisoner 1 l. 6 d., on his master's account at my warehouse, and saw him write this receipt. I gave him a 1 l. note.

EDWARD BENSON . The prisoner was entrusted to receive money on my account; he never accounted to me for this money; the goods are entered, and the parties stood indebted for them till I discovered it.

GUILTY . Aged 31.

Recommended to Mercy.

Fined One Shilling and discharged .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210606-76

775. JOHN SMITH was indicted for that he, at the delivery of the King's gaol of Newgate, held at Justice Hall, in the Old Bailey, on the 30th of October, in the 57th year of the reign of George the Third, was convicted of

burglary, and ordered to be hanged by the neck till he should be dead, but that his present Majesty (then Prince Regent), on behalf of his late Majesty, was pleased to extend mercy to him, on condition of his being transported for life, and that on the 6th of June last, at St. Sepulchre's , he was at large, without lawful cause .

JAMES ELLIS . I am a Bow-street officer. I produce the record of the conviction of John Smith . I had it from Mr. Shelton's office, and saw him sign it - (read). I was not present at his trial.

THOMAS WALTERS . I am a constable. I took the prisoner at the Bail Dock door of the Court, as he came out, on the 6th of June. I took him from information I received, as he was coming out of custody; I had taken him on the Tuesday before, in Old-street-road, for a robbery on the 17th of April, at the Two Brewers, public-house, in Goswell-street; the landlord had just seized him. I was not present when he was tried in October, 1816.

SAMUEL FURZMAN . I am a constable. I was present in October, 1816 - the prisoner is the man who was tried, and convicted. I was here when sentence of death was passed on him, and am certain he is the man. I saw him over at the Pitt's Head, last Wednesday, after he came out of the Bail Dock.

JOHN FURZMAN . I was present in October, 1816, when the prisoner was convicted, and saw him when brought to the watch-house on that charge. He is the man.

Prisoner's Defence. He represents me to be a man tried here five years back. The governor of the prison, the principal turnkeys, and captains of all the prison ships, never knew me. He called me Wilson when he first saw me, and when I was before the Magistrate he said my name was Smith. My friends are in Lincolnshire, or they could prove I was with them. The turnkeys know I am not the man.

SAMUEL DAVIS . I am turnkey of Newgate. I do not recollect the person of Smith, and cannot say whether the prisoner is or is not that man. I recollect the prisoner very well as a prisoner on some charge.

SAMUEL FURZMAN re-examined. I was not examined on the trial, but was at the watch-house when he was brought in, and had him in my care all that night, on a charge of burglary at Mr. Judson's.

GEORGE COLE . I am a turnkey of Newgate, and was so in October, 1816. I do not recollect Smith, to say who he is. The prisoner's face is familiar to me, but whether he was tried for that burglary I cannot tell.

JOHN BISHOP . In October, 1816, I was a turnkey. I do not remember Smith, and cannot say whether the prisoner is or is not that man.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210606-77

777. RICHARD MORRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of May , two table-spoons. value 1 l. 1 s. , the goods of Charles Bleaden , Richard Walter , and Stephen Brown Chandler .

JOHN FLOWER . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Shoe-lane. On the 3d of May the prisoner offered two tablespoons in pledge, about four o'clock in the afternoon. On examining them, there appeared some marks erased; I got him into a private room, and asked him how he came by them - he said he was sent to pawn them by a man, who was waiting outside. I asked the man's description - he said he was a tall man, in a blue coat; I looked out, but saw no such person. I stopped him, and told him they were stolen from the London Tavern - he made no reply. They were claimed.

JOHN SAMPSON . I took the prisoner in charge.

MR. RICHARD WALTERS . I am one of the proprietors of the London Tavern . The prisoner was an occasional waiter ; he was there on the 1st of May, waiting. I knew the spoons to be ours. My partners are Charles Bleaden , and Stephen Brown Chandler .

Prisoner. I beg for mercy.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Confined Two Months .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210606-78

778. GEORGE ROBERTS was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of February , one handkerchief, value 5 s., the goods of a person unknown from his person .

JOHN MASON , I am a constable. On Sunday, the 25th of February, about half-past five o'clock in the afternoon, I was on Blackfriars-bridge, and saw the prisoner in company with five other persons, two of whom I knew; I watched them into Crown-court , and saw the prisoner attempt to take a handkerchief several times, from a gentleman's pocket A lady was with the gentleman. I did not know who he was. About the middle of the court I saw him take it quite out - the others were with him; I laid hold of him immediately, but have never seen the gentleman since - I was quite alone. The other four went on as soon as I took the prisoner, and the gentleman got out of my sight. I took him into a fruiterer's shop - he resisted very much; while I was getting my handkerchief from my pocket to tie his hands, he rushed out - I secured him again on the step, and as I took him along he threw the handkerchief down.

Prisoner. Q. Will you swear I took it - A. I do. I asked him if was marked, he said No, and it is marked C. F. 6 I live in Upper Rupert-street.

THOMAS GOOK . I am a constable. About seven o'clock on the evening of the 25th of February, Mason and two gentlemen gave the prisoner into my custody in Pall Mall.

Prisoner's Defence (written). I have had the handkerchief some time. As I came through this court I was shoved into a shop by Mason, and the mistress pushed us out, Several told him to let me alone, and asked him for his authority - he said he had left it at home, and in the scuffle the handkerchief fell from me.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210606-79

779. HENRY MYERS was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of April , one ridicule, value 3 d.; two aprons, value 16 d.; one comb, value 6 d.; one pair of ruffles, value 6 d.; one frill, value 3 d.; one handkerchief, value 3 d.; two napkins, value 4 d.; one yard and a half of ribbon, value 2 s., and 1 s. 1 d. in monies numbered, the property of Mary Wall , from her person .

MARY WALL . I am a widow , and live at Morley, in

Essex. I was in town on the 28th of April, between ten and eleven o'clock at night, I was going from Aldgate to Watling-street, with a bag in my hand, containing the articles stated in the indictment; when I was in Leadenhall-street , a boy snatched my bag out of my hand - I turned round, and pursued, and the watchman caught him immediately. The prisoner is the boy, he had got a very little way.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q, Did you see him take it - A. Nobody else was near me. I saw him running with it.

PETER WALKER . I am a watchman. About ten minutes before ten o'clock I heard a cry of

"Give me my bag, you thief!" I immediately came up, and took the prisoner; I saw him snatch it from her.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined One Year , and Whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210606-80

780. JOHN LEE was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of April , one handkerchief, value 9 d., the goods of Ann Holland , widow ; one gown, value 7 s.; one petticoat, value 4 s.; one shift, value 2 s. 6 d.; four handkerchiefs, value 18 d.; four aprons, value 3 s., and two caps, value 6 d., the goods of Matilda Holland , from the person of the said Ann Holland .

ANN HOLLAND . I live in Worship-street. On the 4th of April, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, I was going along Houndsditch , with a bundle, containing the articles stated in the indictment, which were my daughter Matilda's - the handkerchief was mine. When I got to Fire-ball-court a man came up, and snatched it; I had been ill, and was too weak to resist; I called out till my strength was gone, and followed him half-way up the court - he got out of my sight. I have not seen the things since, nor do I know the man. I saw the prisoner at the Mansion House, two months after.

RALPH CORSTER . I am a tailor, and live in Still-alley, Houndsditch. I saw the prosecutrix - her bundle was then gone. I had a heavy load on my shoulder. She complained of being robbed of a bundle; the man was then gone up the court; I did not pursue. I had seen the prisoner pass me directly before that at the corner of Fire-ball-court, with a bundle. I knew him well before, and am certain of him. I went home, and next morning informed the officer.

Prisoner. Q. Was I running - A. Yes; rather swiftly. I knew where he lived.

DAVID M'COMBIE. I am an officer. On the evening of the 4th of April, between seven and eight o'clock, I was on duty in Houndsditch, and was informed the prosecutrix had been robbed. I went up, and found her quite exhausted. Fire-ball-court is a dangerous place to pursue in. On the 2d of June I was in Castle-street, and heard a cry of Stop thief! towards Bury-street - the prisoner came running towards me, he jumped aside, and was stopped close by Fire-ball-court.

DANIEL FORRESTER . I am a constable. I secured the prisoner on the 2d of June.

GUILTY .

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210606-81

781. ROBERT STUBBS was indicted for a misdemeanour .

MR. ANDREWS conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM LONG GRAVES . I am in the service of Messrs. John and Samuel Burgess , druggists , who live in Bow-lane . On the 5th of January the prisoner came in - he was a stranger to me. He presented an order, as from Ives, Sargon and Mason - this is it (producing it). In consequence of that order I gave him 1 lb. of scarlet lake, value 4 l. 15 s. I delivered it, believing the order to be genuine - (Order read).

MR. JAMES HARGRAVES MANN . I am in partnership with Elizabeth Ives and George Sargon , we are varnish makers, and live in Little Queen-street. The prisoner had been in our service, but was not so on the 5th of January. He was frequently sent to Messrs. Burgess, while with us. He has left us about three years; I never sent him there on the 5th of January; the order was not sent from our house. It is the prisoner's writing, I believe.

Prisoner's Defence. It is not my writing.

GUILTY .

Confined Six Months .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210606-82

SEVENTH DAY. WEDNESDAY, JUNE 13.

782. CHARLES HALL was indicted for stealing on the 17th of May , eight shoes, value 6 s. , the goods of John Crockett .

JOHN CROCKETT . I live at Ealing , and sell second-hand shoes ; I shut up at nine o'clock in the evening, and in the morning I missed some shoes; the constable produced them to me.

JAMES WHITE . Mr. Rutland gave the prisoner into my charge, on the evening of the 17th of May, about ten o'clock; I found eight shoes on him in a parcel.

WILLIAM RUTLAND . I live at Ealing; I took the prisoner into custody, about 400 yards from Crockett's; White found the shoes on him; there were two of them, the other ran away, and the prisoner tried to escape.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I went to the fair to get a job - at the back of the booths I found the bag with the shoes in it.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18210606-83

783. JOHN WHITE was indicted for stealing on the 1st of May , one gown, value 10 s.; two frocks, value 1 l.; two petticoats, value 10 s.; two shifts, value 10 s.; eight handkerchiefs, value 8 s.; and six pair of stockings, value 2 s. ; the goods of Robert Hudson .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY. Aged 16.

Judgment Respited .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18210606-84

784. JAMES SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of April , seventeen pounds of bacon, value 8 s. , the goods of Eliza Palmer and Richard Palmer .

RICHARD PALMER . I am in partnership with Eliza Palmer ; (my mother) on the 21st of April, about nine o'clock at night, I was in the parlour adjoining the shop, I heard the door make a noise - jumped up, and saw the prisoner leaving the shop with the bacon; I followed, I heard him drop it, I called Stop thief! he was stopped; I am certain he is the man, I never lost sight of him. I took him back to the spot where the bacon fell, and asked him how he got his living, he said, what was that to me, he should satisfy the Magistrate.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

THOMAS EAGLES . I am an officer; the prisoner was given in my charge; I only found a few halfpence on him.

Prisoner's Defence. I have been at sea ten years, and was very hungry and distressed.

GUILTY . Aged 33.

Confined One Month .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18210606-85

784. JOHN MORGAN was indicted for stealing on the 3d of May , one waistcoat, value 2 s.; one pair of trowsers, value 2 s.; one gown, value 3 s.; one shirt, value 2 s.; and one handkerchief, value 1 s. , the goods of Robert Wabberly Smith .

CATHERINE SMITH . I am the wife of R. W. Smith, and lodge at King-street, Drury-lane , on the first floor; on the 3d of May, I went out about two o'clock; I thought I locked the door; I shut it, and had the key in my pocket; on returning about four, I found the prisoner coming out of my bed-room; he had a bundle in his hand, I said,

"Young man, what do you want in my bed-room?" he said, let me go, I shut the door, and took it out of his hand, he ran down stairs; I called Stop thief! and he was brought back in a quarter of an hour. I have no doubt of his being the man, the bundle contained all these things, except the waistcoat, which was in his hat.

JOHN HUDSON . I live within two doors of the prosecutrix; I heard the cry of Stop thief! and pursued the prisoner, he appeared to come out of her house; I secured him in Southampton-row.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

THOMAS GOOK . I am an officer; I found five keys on him.

Prisoner's Defence. I hope you will send me out of the country, and I may do better; I was distressed.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18210606-86

785. WILLIAM SHADWICK was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of June , one bullock's heart, value 1 s. 3 d.; three pound of potatoes, value 2 d., and a dish, value 4 d. , the goods of William Hawkins .

WILLIAM HAWKINS . I am a fishmonger ; I was at the Duke of Clarence, public-house, Hackney-road ; I had a bundle containing a bullock's heart, and three pounds of potatoes; I put it on the bench, the prisoner sat on the other side of the table; I turned my head, and missed it, and he was gone out; I went out and took him with it under his arm, two hundred yards off; I gave him in custody.

THOMAS PINNOCK . I am a watchman; I took the prisoner in charge.

(Dish produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was told a man left his bundle behind, I said, I would go and take it to him.

WILLIAM HAWKINS . I was not out till I missed it.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Whipped and Discharged .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210606-87

786. RICHARD LUCK and JOHN QUINTENDEN were indicted for stealing, on the 19th of May , at St. Leonard, Shoreditch , one gelding, price 20 l., and one mare, price 30 l. the property of James Taylor .

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

ROBERT CROUCHER . I am in the service of Mr. James Taylor , who lives, Item, in Kent , about a quarter past four in the afternoon of Friday, the 18th of May, I turned three geldings and a mare into the field, and locked the gate, the fences were entire; I went to the field at half-past four next morning, unfastened the gate, and found it had been taken off its hinges, and hung again on one hinge, I observed a trampling of horses near the gate, I could see they had gone through the gate, the ground was wet, if the trampling had been there the evening before I must have seen it; the grey mare and a brown gelding were gone, the other two were left; I sent to inform my master, and then I went after them; I had attended the gelding two years, and the grey mare one, and should know them again from any others; I came up to London in search of them.

Q. Had you in your mind any persons who were likely to have stolen them - A. Yes, the day before I saw two men pass my house as I sat at dinner, about three o'clock, and as I returned from fastening the horses up at half-past four; I saw the same two men going to the field, about fifty rods from the field, they were both strangers to me, but I hear Luck worked in the neighbourhood; they noticed my dog; they did not stop, but walked on; I came up as far as Eltham; I got tidings of the horses, and went to Bromley; I found the horses at Worship-street, on the Monday following, at Nottage's stables; they were the same; I then went to Clerkenwell Prison, and saw the same two men I had seen about the field; they were among ten or twelve others, I pointed them out as the men, and am certain they are the same two men who were loitering about the field - it was the prisoners.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODERICK. Q. You never saw the persons before - A. No, Quintenden had a smock frock on, and Luck a drab coat; Quintenden had his frock on in prison, but I knew him without that, I had no conversation with them in the road; Groombridge fair was held the day before, it is above four or miles off; I am not quite certain what day the fair is held; it is common for horses to stand about the gate, but I could see where they went out at the end.

JAMES TAYLOR . I am a farmer ; I saw the horses at Nottage's stables, and am sure they are mine - the prisoners are strangers.

THOMAS GREAVES . I work at Mr. Nottage's livery stables, Worship-street; the horses which Mr. Taylor claimed, were brought to the stable by an officer; I had seen them before, between four and five o'clock on Saturday morning, the 19th of May, at Norton-Falgate; Luck was riding the brown horse, and leading the grey mare,

and Quintenden was walking alongside on the foot pavement; I took notice of them; I went to Wellington-street; I was gone half an hour, and returned at a quarter past five; I saw the same persons again in Shoreditch, with the horses, just in the situation I had seen them before; I did not see them speak to each other; Luck rode through the gate, and paid the turnpike; Quintenden stopped a little, then came on, and walked by the side of the horses, as before; the horses were afterwards brought to our stables by the officer; I immediately knew them again.

Cross-examined. Q. Luck managed them entirely - A. Yes, Quintenden walked on the pavement, as any one might; I never saw them before, I was looking at the horses; I took notice of both the prisoners, and am certain of them; I took less notice of the one on the pavement; I cannot be mistaken about either.

WILLIAM ATTFIELD . I am an officer, and assisted in taking the prisoners in to custody. On Saturday, the 19th of May, a little before eleven o'clock; we went to the Basing-house, Kingsland-road, and stopped a few minutes looking about; I looked through the door into the parlour, and saw the prisoners sitting together, nobody else was in the room; we came away; I spoke to the hostler; the two horses in question were in the stable there; I did not then take them, not knowing them to be the men; Gleed and I were outside the door; Garton went into the parlour and Quintenden came out; Garton secured Luck; Quintenden was walking towards Shoreditch church; Garton called to us to take him; we walked sharp after him; he turned round and saw us, and then ran; we followed, calling Stop thief! he was stopped about two hundred yards off, without my losing sight of him; he had a coat on which I produce, it had some white horse hairs on the flaps, which he would have from riding a grey horse; I found a steel on him, and there appears to have been some tinder in the end of his handkerchief; I took him back to the public-house, and told him we took him on suspicion of stealing two horses; Luck was there; I heard no answer made; I went to the stable, and took the horses to Nottage's.

Cross-examined. Q. He had a dark coat on - A. Yes, he was coming out of the tap-room, I think he saw me; I think he had a smock frock on over his coat; I did not take the coat off till I got to the office.

THOMAS GARTON . I am an officer. I went to the Basing-house, and stood at the gate, while Attfield and Gleed went down the yard, I went into the house, and just as I got inside the door, I met Quintenden with a smock frock on - I turned his frock aside, and saw what sort of coat he had on; I said,

"You have brought two horses here this morning," he said,

"No; I did not, the man in the parlour brought them." I jumped into the parlour, saw Luck, and said,

"You have brought two horseshere this morning;" he said,

"Yes, I have" - Gleed came in, I told him to pursue the other, he was brought back in about four minutes. When we got to the yard of the lock-up house, I was going to put them in separate places, Luck said,

"Let us both be together, and we will tell you where we brought the horses from, and who we brought them for;" they both said they brought them from a place between Maidstone and Chatham, but they did not know the name of the place, or the person they belonged to; this was a conversation between them, both spoke - I locked them up together, Quintenden's coat then had a great many grey hairs on it.

Cross-examined. Q. What time was it - A. A little before eleven o'clock in the morning. I told Quintenden my business the moment I saw him; both said they neither knew the parish or place they brought them from; Luck said Quintenden had been with him for a fortnight, they were very anxious to tell their story, and Quintenden said I am sorry for it. I took a pocket-book from his coat pocket, but Luck was wearing it at the time, and had it on when he was apprehended, but Quintenden now has it on at the bar.

BARNARD GLEED . I went to the Basing-house with the witnesses; I went into the house by the back door, I opened the parlour door, Luck had the coat on which Quintenden now wears; Quintenden sat next to him with a smock frock on; I came out and spoke to Garton and Atfield under the gateway, Garton went in, I followed in a moment, he sent me after Quintenden; I went, he walked very slow and I after him, he turned his head, saw me, and ran very fast, on our calling Stop thief! and struck three people who tried to stop him with a large nob stick which he had - he was stopped at the corner of Old-street-road, without my losing sight of him, we brought him into a public-house were Luck was, and took a pocketbook from Luck's coat, which Quintenden now wears; Quintenden said the pocket-book was his, and it contained an account of the payment of his tolls, as driver of the Brighton van; when we got to the lock-up place, Garton was going to lock them up separate, Luck said,

"We came together, and let us be together" - I do not know who spoke first, but one of them said, they took the horse on Friday night, about eleven o'clock, out of a field between Chatham and Maidstone, Luck said, that in the pocketbook, I should find the name of the person they were to take the horses to in London, there was

"Allen, Basing-house, Kingsland-road," in pencil, in the book.

Cross-examined. Q. They were to take them there from Groombridge fair - A. They said nothing about any fair.

JAMES TAYLOR . My field is not between Chatham and Maidstone.

QUINTENDEN'S Defence. I know nothing of it.

LUCK, GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 32.

QUINTENDEN, GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 21.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210606-88

787. ISABELLA WILEY , was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of April , two pounds, four ounces of silk, value 5 l., the goods of James Barton , in his dwelling-house , and SAMUEL HEATLEY was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, knowing it to have been stolen .

MESSRS. ALLEY and LAW, conducted the prosecution.

HENRY DOGGETT . I live in Skinner-street, Bishopsgate-street. I know Heatley, on the 18th of April, he occupied a room in Spicer-street, Middlesex, the house belongs to me; I saw Kennedy search the room he rented of me, he broke a box open, and found a quantity of silk, he is a narrow velvet weaver.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Had he a wife and family - A. No; Wilcy came to the house some weeks

before to enquire for somebody, and I saw her there some months before that - I did not see Heatley on the day the house was searched, I do not live there, but have a workshop there; I had seen him within a week before, I did not see him afterwards till he was apprehended; nobody else lived in his room.

JAMES KENNEDY . I am an officer of Worship-street. On the 19th of April, between two and three o'clock in the afternoon, I searched the room in Spicer-street; Barton, Bright, and Wilson went with me, we found the door locked, I broke it open; and in the first box, I found all this silk.

Cross-examined. Q. You found nothing in the second box - A. Yes; a quantity of black silk.

BARNARD GLEED . In consequence of information, I went with a warrant to Coventry, then to Nuneaton - I found Heatley at the King's-head, public-house, Attleborough; he knew me, I told him I had a warrant to apprehend him, for stealing some silk,; he then said,

"It was about that girl." I said, it was, and that it was about Mr. Barton's silk, he said, he did not know Mr. Barton; and if I would behave properly, he would go with me; I brought him to London, and just as we got by the office door, he said,

"I should like to take a twelve month for this."

Cross-examined. Q. When was this - A. On the 24th of April; I knew him before, he has a wife and family at Nuneaton - Attleborough is one mile from there.

EDWARD BRIGHT . I am a headborough. On the 19th of April, I took the female prisoner; I asked how she meant to dispose of the silk which I found on her, she said, it was her first offence; she then hesitated, and said, she had taken one little parcel before; she afterwards said, she took this silk for the purpose of giving it to a neighbour, who had asked her to get her some - I asked where he resided, she said, she did not know, but she was in the habit of meeting him, at night, in Bishopsgate-street or Sun-street - she lived in a court, in Long-alley, about a mile from Spicer-street.

THOMAS MARTIN . I am gaoler of Worship-street. I was bringing the prisoners to Newgate; they appeared to know each other - as we turned into Smithfield, Heatley said to her,

"You had better give give me that money, for I can take better care of it than you can, you may lose it, and I can send it round to you, as you want it;" Heatley said it was a bad job. They appeared to be acquainted with each other.

MARY MOSS . I know the prisoners perfectly well. I live at the Three Jolly Weavers, public-house, Wheeler-street, Spitalfields; I have seen them nearly every night for the last year, at supper together, at our house.

THOMAS JONES . When Heatley's room was searched, I was outside the house, while the officers were up stairs, and saw Heatley come down the steps of the house, into the street - he turned to the left, then up a turning to the right, and ran away.

Cross-examined. Q. He came down the steps - A. He came out of the passage, down the steps; I did not speak to him - Wiley was not there.

JAMES BARTON . I live in Bacon-street, Bethnal-green . I have every reason to believe this silk to be mine - I have silk corresponding in size, colour, and every thing; I am a trimming-maker , Wiley worked in my factory ; the value of a single piece is 4 s. or 5 s.; I never sell it.

Cross-examined. Q. Hundreds may have this sort - A. Yes; but not corresponding as this does; I lost silk, Heatley never worked for me.

JOSEPH BARTON . I am foreman to my son; and know the silk by the tye, it is certainly my tying; I made it up to give the girls - it is the usual manner of tying.

CHARLES BUSHER . I am a silk dyer. I believe this to be my dying - It is the colours I generally die for Barton.

WILEY'S Defence. I went to clean this young man's place, in the evening, and left a little bit there, but he knew nothing of it.

WILEY - GUILTY . Aged 23.

Of Stealing to the value of 39 s. only.

Confined Six Months .

HEATLEY - GUILTY . Aged 43.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210606-89

788. JOSEPH PERKINS , was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of May , one watch, value 3 l.; one chain, value 1 s., and one key, value 6 d., the goods of James Bowers , in the dwelling-house of Ralph Ebert .

JAMES BOWERS . I am a bricklayer ; and lodge at Hadley, Middlesex , at Ralph Ebert 's house. I have the front room, up stairs; the prisoner lodged in the same room; I lost my watch on the morning of the 31st of May, he had gone out very early in the morning; I missed it from the chair when I got up, it was silver; I have had it ten years, and gave 5 l. for it; it had a steel chain. He never returned, he had lodged there three weeks, and did not say he was going - I found him the same day at High-gate, in custody with the watch.

THOMAS BRETT . I am an officer. About half-past three o'clock in the morning, I was going down Highgate-hill, the prisoner came towards me, in a direction from Hadley; I stopped him, and searched him, and found the watch in his waistcoat pocket - he could not tell the maker's name; I asked where he came from, he said, from Barnet, about three o'clock - I said, that was impossible; and I was sure he had stolen it, and gave him in charge; I found it belonged to Bowers.

JOHN LOPPENT . I took him into custody; he told me he took it off the chair.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. He said, at Bow-street, he had it nine years.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210606-90

789. JOHN RIAN , was indicted, for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Norris , at St. Sepulchre , about five o'clock in the forenoon of the 15th of April , (he and others being therein), and stealing, one hat, value 10 s.; one shirt, value 2 s., and two waistcoats, value 2 s., the goods of Thomas Norris ; and one gown, value 2 s.; one bonnet, value 1 s.; one canvas bag, value 4 d.; thirty-one caps, value 15 s., and thirty-one tippets, value 15 s., the goods of the said William Norris .

WILLIAM NORRIS . At the time of the robbery, I lived at No. 4, Faulkner's-alley, Cow-cross , St. Sepulchre. I rented the house - on the 15th of April, I was on duty at the watch-house; I went home about half-past four o'clock in the morning, I secured the door after me, and went to bed; the house was safe; about a quarter before six o'clock an alarm was given that my ground floor window was open, it was down, and the shutters closed; when I went to bed I am certain, the shutters were not barred; my son was the first person up, he is not here - I went down, and found the articles mentioned in the indictment, gone - my son had put the window down. There was a large box close to the window, it was not locked; a bag of linen was in this box, containing thirty-one caps, and thirty-one tippets, belonging to a Charity school; it was gone - my son Thomas's hat was on the same box - I also missed two waistcoats and a gown off the box; the bonnets were in it, the prisoner was quite a stranger - I received information, and about nine o'clock at night, and went with Thompson to Pentonville, and found the bag, and some of the things in it - I apprehended the prisoner at the Blue-posts, Shoe-lane, about a week after the robbery, and took him to the watch-house.

JOHN ASHLEY . I live in Lamb-court, Clerkenwell, about a quarter of a mile from the prosecutor's. I am a drover; I was going from Smithfield, on Sunday morning, the 15th of April, between four and five o'clock, and saw the prisoner putting some things into a bundle, about a dozen yards from Norris's house; there was a blue gown, a bonnet, and other things which looked white; I walked on, he followed me, and asked if I knew where he could get something to drink, I said, there was a house higher up, he said,

"Do you know any body who will buy these things;" this made me suspect, and I told the watchman - I described him, and saw him in custody afterwards, I know him to be the man.

PETER LAMB . I am a watchman. I was in Penton-street, Pentonville, at a quarter before five o'clock on the 15th of April, I was locking up my box, and saw the prisoner with a bag on his back, I went on, and Ashley came and said,

"That man has stolen property in his bag." I went in pursuit of him; when he saw us coming towards him, he dropped it and came towards me, Ashely picked it up. I laid hold of him, and took him towards the watch-house; he made a blow at Ashley and got away from me. I am sure he is the man, I saw him in St. Sepulchre's watch-house about a week after.

JOHN ASHLEY re-examined. I was by when the watchman took him; he struck at me and another man - I picked up the bag and gave it to Lamb.

THOMAS THOMPSON . I produce the bag which was brought to the watch-house.

MARGARET NORRIS . I am the wife of W. Norris. When I went to bed at twelve o'clock, the window was down, and the shutter closed - not barred. I awoke about five o'clock, and was told of the robbery - my son got down first. I found the window closed, the box stood close under the window, the bag was in it; the caps and tippets were in it when I went to bed - they were worth 31 s. altogether; the gowns and one waistcoat were on the top of the box, and an old hat of my son Thomas's.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I leave it to the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 23.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18210606-91

790. SARAH GILHAM was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of May , at St. Leonard, Shoreditch , one scarf, value 10 s., and one shawl, value 2 l., the goods of John Bonnell and Thomas Rees , in their dwelling-house .

THOMAS REES . I am a linen-draper , and live in Shoreditch , in the parish of St. Leonard, and am in partnership with J. Bonnell, we both live in the house. On Wednesday morning, the 23d of May, about noon, the prisoner was standing at the door, looking at the things. I asked her to walk in, and she did, and enquired for some puse velvet - I found I had none; she then asked to see some silk shawls, I shewed her a variety - she stood at the counter; she made choice of three silk shawls - they were put on the shelf; she then asked to see some muslin, I shewed her some, she told me to cut off five yards, which I did. While I was looking for the muslin, I saw her put her handkerchief over a silk shawl, and put it into her arms, the handkerchief covering it. She then asked to see some stuff, which I shewed her; she desired me to cut nine yards, which I did; she then said she was going further, and would call as she returned, and my young man should carry the things for her to Fleet-street, and her aunt would pay for them. She was going out, I followed her to the door talking about different things; she went as far as the next house. I then told her I wanted to speak to her - I found the shawl in her handkerchief; an officer was sent for, who took a scarf from her pocket, which was on my counter when she came into the shop. I had shewn her a variety of scarfs; the shawl cost me 2 l. to sell again; the scarf cost me 1 l. - I have valued it at 10 s.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Which of you is lesse - A. My partner, the rent is paid by the firm. The handkerchief covered the shawl; she must have known she had it - it is a yard and a quarter square. It could not be a mistake, I saw her do it. The scarf is two yards long and half a yard wide.

BARNARD GLEED . I took her in charge, and found the scarf on her. I know she was the sole support of an aged mother.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 18.

Most strongly Recommended to Mercy.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210606-92

791. THOMAS HALL was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of May , one 1 l. Bank note , the property John Parker .

JOHN PARKER . I am a porter , and live in Cow Cross . On the 29th of April, this note was in the top drawer of the bureau, at my lodging; the prisoner was employed in the stable yard . I saw the note safe five minutes before it was taken. I paid him three 1 l. notes from the drawer, to pay the expences of a barge which he was to take to the country - he could see there was notes there. I left him in the next room - there was five 1 l. notes there. On coming into the room, I missed one. I am certain I only paid him three; I got an officer, he strongly

denied it; the officer searched him and found three on him, and some silver. The officer found the other note under his hat by the stable; the note he stole was with two others in his purse. I had taken the numbers of the three that were left, and know that to be one of them; he said he hoped I would forgive him.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Did you say anything to induce him to confess - A. No, he could see them in the drawer. I intended him to see them, as I suspected him before.

WILLIAM JOHNSON . I am a constable. I found three 1 l. notes in his bag; he denied taking any from the bureau. Parker said, one of the three was the stolen one. I found his hat with the other note - he then begged forgiveness.

THOMAS PARKER . The note No. 34,220 is the one I lost.

GUILTY . Aged 31.

Confined Six Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210606-93

792. WILLIAM BAGLEY was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Mary Jackson , about seven o'clock in the afternoon of the 13th of May , ( Andrew Davidson and others being therein) and stealing therein, one coat, value 10 s., and one handkerchief, value 5 s., her property .

MARY JACKSON . I am a widow , and live in Ogle-street, Marylebone , Andrew Davidson lodges there. I went out on the 15th of May, about six o'clock in the evening, and returned at eight. I live in the one pair back room, and let the rest out - the street door was kept latched. On returning, I found my door was locked, but the window open - it lets into the yard. I believe I had left it closed, and shut it close a quarter of an hour before I went out. I missed a handkerchief and great coat; the prisoner lived in the house, and occupied the kitchen. I saw the things again the same night, concealed under the cieling of the wash-house - they were worth 15 s.

WILLIAM LEAKE . I am a carpenter, and live in Ogle-street. I was informed the prosecutrix was robbed - I went there; the prisoner came home about eight o'clock, and I asked him how he came to take Mrs. Jackson's things - he denied it, but soon after said, I should find them under the bulk in the wash-house; he shewed me where they were; the window was eight or nine feet from the ground. I questioned him about the handkerchief - he denied it at first, but afterwards took me to a house in George-street - he went in and brought it out to me.

ANN THOMPSON . I saw the prisoner come from the window between seven and eight o'clock. I live in the back attick on the opposite side. I could not see whether he had anything - the window was open. I saw him close the window and drop into the yard, it was a damp evening - I am sure he is the man.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner begged for mercy.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Of stealing only.

Confined Two Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210606-94

793. JOHN DAVIS and JOHN KENTON were indicted for stealing, on the 24th of May , one shawl, value 3 s. , the goods of Mary Davis .

The prosecutrix stating her name to be Mary Ann Davey , the prisoners were ACQUITTED .

Third Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18210606-95

794. MARTHA HALE was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of May , one shawl, value 12 s.; one gown, value 8 s., and one petticoat, value 2 s. , the goods of John Marshall .

ANN MARSHALL . I am the wife of John Marshall . I live in Frederick-place, Hampstead-road . On the 10th of May, I lost these things from a chest of drawers in my room; the prisoner assisted in my family , and lived in the house.

WILLIAM DAVIS . I am shopman to Mr. Wadmore, who is a pawnbroker, and lives in Tottenham-court-road. On the 10th of May, the prisoner pawned the articles stated in the indictment with me.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 15.

Judgment Respited .

Third Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18210606-96

EIGHTH DAY. THURSDAY, JUNE 14.

795. LEONARD PESTAL was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of May , one door, value 12 s. , the goods of the West India Dock Company .

The Court ruled, that this Company not being incorporated, the indictment could not be sustained. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18210606-97

796. JOHN ELLIS was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of April , ninety yards of canvas, value 8 l. , the goods of George Faith and William Faith .

WILLIAM FAITH . I am in partnership with George Faith , we are ship-owners and live at Ratcliffe . On the the 19th of May, about nine o'clock in the morning, I missed this canvas. Taylor produced it - I know nothing of the prisoner.

JOHN TAYLOR . I am a watchman. I saw the prisoner come out of the prosecutors premises, with this canvas in a bag, on his shoulder. I asked what it was, he said nothing, but threw it down.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. Two men gave it me to carry.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined Six Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18210606-98

797. MARY PAYNE was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of May , three shifts, value 6 s.; four pair of trowsers, value 8 s.; three pair of stockings, value 4 s., and one napkin, value 2 s. , the goods of Sarah Rainals .

SARAH RAINALS . I live in the Hackney-road ; the

prisoner was my charwoman . I went into the country on the 27th of March, I returned in April, and missed this property out of my chest.

WILLIAM MARSDEN . I am a broker, and am Mrs. Rainal's nephew. I went to the prisoner's lodgings, and found three duplicates.

JAMES FLINT . I live with Mr. Williamson, a pawnbroker at Islington. I have three shifts and a pair of stockings pawned by the prisoner, in the name of Ann Payne .

JOHN HALL . I am a pawnbroker, and live in the Hackney-road. I have a pillow, petticoat, and other things, pawned in the name of Ann Payne - I do not know who by.

JOHN LOWREY . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Kingsland-road. I have a pillow pawned in the name of Ann Payne .

GEORGE HANN. I apprehended the prisoner, and found the duplicates of this property on her.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 29.

Confined Six Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18210606-99

798. THOMAS PARKER was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of May , three coal-sacks, value 3 s. , the goods of Press Granger .

THOMAS LEABROOK . I am clerk to Mr. Press Granger, a coal-merchant , who lives at Limehouse . The prisoner worked for him, and was not allowed to sell the sacks.

JOSEPH GALLOWAY . I am a Thames Police-office. On the 24th of May, about half-past nine o'clock in the morning, I stopped the prisoner about a hundred yards from Granger's Premises, with these sacks on his shoulder. I asked, what he had got, he said He did not know; I said, I was an officer he then said, he came from Mr. Granger's with a parcel of sacks, which he was allowed to sell from the wharf. I took him back, and he threw them down in the street.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

THOMAS CLARK . I am a constable. I saw him bring them out of the wharf gate.

Prisoner's Defence. The men informed me I was allowed to sell them.

GUILTY , Aged 31.

Confined Three Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18210606-100

799. THOMAS BULL was indicted for a robbery on the King's Highway, one Henry Ide , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, one hat, value 5 s., his property .

The prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210606-101

800. SARAH FRY was indicted for feloniously assaulting Benjamin Ansil , on the 30th of May , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, five half crowns and six shillings, his property .

BENJAMIN ANSIL . I am a teacher of the Hebrew and Greek languages , and live with my mother, at No. 4, Duke's-place. On the 30th of May, about half-past nine o'clock at night, I was walking in Whitechapel , a young woman asked me to go home with her - I was quite sober. I went to a house in George-yard with her; there was only a little boy there - she sent him out; we went into the parlour; she asked me to send for some beer, and called the prisoner out of the street to fetch it. I gave her 6 d. to fetch the beer - I am sure she is the woman, and in the mean time I went up stairs with the woman, and paid her what she wanted; the prisoner then came up without the beer, and asked for 1 s. for the room, which I gave her. Soon after, another woman came up, and asked me to pay 1 s. for the room also, but without giving me time to take out the money, the woman I first went with, took me by the neck, and pulled me backwards; the other woman held me by the throat, and stopped my mouth. I pushed towards the window, and found it was too fast down to throw it up; they threw me against the posts of the bedstead, the others stopped my mouth; the prisoner held me and cut my pocket off, with a pocket knife, and cut my finger in doing it. I had five half-crowns and 6 s. in that pocket, after I had paid them. I had 22 s. when I went into the house - I gave her 2 s. They then all three ran away, leaving me in the house. I ran down after them and called for assistance, the watchman came up and took me to the watch-house. I saw the prisoner there two days after, and am sure she is the woman, I picked her out from five or six others; she denied it, and said,

"You never saw me," I said,

"You cut my pocket off;" she then said, She only fetched the beer - she had no light in the room.

JOHN PARTRIDGE . I am an officer. On the 30th of May, about eleven o'clock at night, the prosecutor was brought to the watch-house, by a watchman, and said, he had been robbed and ill used in a house at the back of the George, public-house, George-yard; his hands were bleeding, and his handkerchief torn off his neck; there was a pane of glass fresh broken in the top room of the house, (which is the first floor), and some glass on the ground - I did not know whether it was done with that or not - his fob pocket appeared to have been torn; he said, it was cut with a knife. I went to the house directly, but nobody was there - I told him not to make a noise in the neighbourhood, but to meet me at the watch-house some other evening - he came to the watch-house on the evening of the 1st of June, before ten o'clock - I took him with me into two or three houses by the spot where he was robbed, where there was a quantity of prostitutes - he did not fix on any. I then took him to the watch-house, and went out alone, and brought in four girls; the prisoner was one, he immediately identified her, and said, what part she took in it - I found no knife or money on her; the house is in a very dark situation, I think I could not distinguish a person's features there at half-past nine o'clock without a light.

Prisoner's Defence. The girl called me to fetch the beer, which I did, and went home directly; he told my mother if he had 2 l. he would not appear.

BENJAMIN ANSEL . I saw her mother, I offered nobody not to appear, if they gave me money.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210606-102

801. CHARLES ALDRIDGE , was indicted for feloniously assaulting, Jane Jones , on the 14th of April , on the King's highway, putting her in fear, and taking from her person, and against her will, one shawl, value 6 d., her property .

JANE JONES . I am single , and lodged at No. 52, Seymour-place, Portman-square. I am now cook to Captain Piggott , of Thames Ditton; on the 14th of April, about eleven o'clock at night, I was going home, alone, from my brother's, and in Upper York-street , the prisoner accosted me, and said, it was a fine night, I said, it was; he asked if I was going to town, I said, No; I had not proceeded many steps, before he came and knocked me down, with a blow on my head with his fist; and as I fell, snatched my shawl off my neck, and ran off with it - it took away my senses for a short time; I called Stop thief! as soon as I was able; I saw him run up Circus-street, the watchman came, I told him which way he ran, and followed myself, and while the watchman was looking about in the dark places there, about twenty people were gathered by the cry; the prisoner came up to me, and asked what was the matter; I immediately recognised his voice, looked in his face, and immediately recognised him as the man; the watchman came up; I put my hand on his shoulder, and said,

"this is the man!" he was away from me about ten minutes; I am confident of him; I have not recovered my shawl.

HENRY ROGERS . I am a watchman; my box is in Crown-street, about one hundred yards from where the prosecutor was robbed; I observed a man run from me, in a direction from that spot, with his hat in his hand, he was of the prisoner's height, and ran as fast as he could; I thought there was something wrong, went out of my box, and heard a woman calling in a low voice, Stop him! I sprung my rattle, and went after him, down Circus-street, without waiting for her; a number of people came out, hearing the alarm; I could not see the person; I came back out of a court, the prosecutor stood there with some people; the prisoner came up, she said,

"This is the man who robbed me!" I laid hold of him; the shawl was not found; she was positive to him, and I thought, by his size, that he resembled the man who ran by my box.

SAMUEL PRENDERGRASS . I am a constable. I received him in charge at the watch-house; I told Jones to be very particular; she was positive to him; it was a very fine moonlight night.

Prisoner's Defence. I was crossing Bryanston-square; I heard a cry of Stop thief! went up, and asked what was the matter, she said, a man in a white apron robbed her, and I was the man; the watchman took me.

HENRY ROGERS . I think, I heard her say something about an apron.

Prisoner to JONES. Q. Did you not tell the Magistrate so - A. No, the Magistrate asked, if I said so; I never said any such thing.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210606-103

802. JOHN EDMUND LYNN was indicted for feloniously assaulting Thomas Bowman , on the King's Highway, on the 28th of May , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, one watch, value 2 l. 10 s.; one chain, value 6 d.; and three seals, value 3 s.; his property .

THOMAS BOWMAN . I am a Greenwich pensioner , and live in East-lane, Greenwich. On the 28th of May, between four and five o'clock in the afternoon, I was near Whitechapel ; I was a little affected with liquor, but not insensible; I do not exactly know where I was, but know my watch was in my fob; a person shoved me, and I felt my watch go out immediately; I was not shoved violently, and only saw one person run from me; the prisoner was stopped soon after, and the watch found in an area, about one hundred yards from where I was robbed.

WILLIAM PARTERIDGE . I am a beadle. On the 28th of May, I was with the Overseers gathering the population bills, and in Gower's-row I heard a cry of Stop thief! and saw the prisoner running, others were pursuing him; I saw him cross the road, and drop something into the area; I stopped him about thirty yards from there; Bowman came up in about two minutes, and said, he had lost his watch, he was rather the worse for liquor; I took him and the prosecutor to the area, and there lay the watch, it corresponded with his description of it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

RICHARD BRADLEY . The watch was thrown down my area; I saw Parteridge take the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I was out of place; I heard an alarm, ran, and the beadle laid hold of me; I am totally innocent; he wished to make it up, as he told my friends, if he had another watch, he would not prosecute.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Of stealing from the person only.

Confined Three Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210606-104

803. WILLIAM CLAPPERTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of May , at St. Marylebone , one watch, value 3 l. 10 s.; three seals, value 8 s.; one key, value 1 s.; and one ring, value 3 s.; the goods of William Welch , in the dwelling-house of James Flowers .

WILLIAM WELCH . I am groom to Mr. Douglas, of Twyford-abbey; I bought this watch for four guineas, at Cheltenham, six or seven months ago, there was three gold seals with it, value 8 s.; a gold key, value 1 s.; and a ring, value 3 s.; I was lodging at this time, at the Compasses, in Orchard-street , in the garret, another person slept with me, and the prisoner slept in another bed in the same room; James Flowers is the landlord. On Friday morning, the 4th of May, I went out a little before nine o'clock, and left my watch under my pillow, and left the prisoner alone in the room, in bed; my bedfellow went out with me; I returned in two or three hours, and he was gone, and my watch; I had lodged there three weeks; the prisoner was there before me; I did not see him again till about three weeks after, when he was in custody at Marlborough-street; he never returned to the lodgings, nor had he intimated that he was going to leave.

JOHN WALES . I am an officer of Marlborough-street. I know Flowers' house is in St. Marylebone parish; I received information, and on the 28th of May, I took the prisoner at a public-house, in Charles-street, Manchester-square, on another charge; I took him to the watch-house, and charged him with the robbery, and asked if

he had any duplicates about him; he said, he had not; I found one at the bottom of his pocket; went to the pawnbroker's, and found the watch which Welch claimed.

GEORGE LOWTHER . I am a pawnbroker; and live in Tottenham-court-road. On the 4th of May I took the watch in pawn of the prisoner, for 2 l., in the name of John Lee , I think it was in the morning, and from what passed at the office, I am convinced he is the man.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I declare before God and you, I am innocent of stealing this watch; in the beginning of May, I met a young man whom I knew some time ago, and who used to call on me to procure him a situation when I was in business; by accident I met him on the second or third of May; I had not seen him for two or three years, he said, he had been abroad most of that time, and expected to go again; we talked on different subjects, and he being a trifle in my debt before he left the country, I asked him to lend me two or three pounds; he said, he could not, but would call on me in the evening; I said, I had got a bed for a few nights at the Compasses; he said, he knew the house, and had slept in every room there, a few years ago; I described my room as having two steps to go into it; he said, he knew it; when I returned in the evening, I asked the landlord if a young man had been, he said No; I went to bed, and next morning he came up into my bed room, and sat down on the prosecutor's bed; we conversed together; he said, he was sorry he could not lend me the money, but if I met him in Percy-street, Bedford-square, he would oblige me; he got up, and said he had to go to Pentonville; I said, I would walk with him if he waited while I dressed; he said, he was in a hurry, and wished me good morning; I afterwards went and met him; he said, he was sorry he could not oblige me, but would pawn his watch; I said, I wished for no such thing; he gave it me, and said, he wished me to pawn it, as he wanted money himself, and told me to ask for 4 l., which I did; they would only give me 2 l.; I returned, and gave him the ticket; he gave me 1 l., and the ticket, and said, as he was going to leave England, it would be useless to him; I have lived in great credit; have been in business; and had the honour of serving four Sheriffs of this city,

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 35.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210606-105

804. WILLIAM GOODEN was indicted for stealing, on on the 41th of October, one piece of cloth, containing twenty yards, value 20 l. ; the goods of John Edenborough , Thomas Chittenden , and Thomas Bartlett .

MESSRS. ALLEY AND ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

THOMAS CRUISE . I am porter to Messrs. J. Edenborough, T. Chittenden, and T. Bartlett, who are in the Manchester and woollen line , and live in Queen-street, Cheapside; they have a customer named Harris, a tailor, in Warwick-court, Holborn. On the 30th of August, I took a piece of cloth to him; I never fetched it back, nor did the prisoner order me to fetch it; there are two porters, myself and Blackman.

Cross-examined by MR. BOLLAND. Q. How long has the prisoner been there - A. About four years as town traveller ; his duty was to get orders, which he reported to the house, and they executed them; he lived in Wynyatt-street, Goswell-street.

WILLIAM HARRIS . I am a tailor, and live in Warwick-court. On the 30th of August, I received a piece of cloth from the prosecutors, it was worth twenty or thirty pounds, and on the 14th of October it was delivered to a porter, in consequence of this written order from the prisoner; (producing it) I am not positive that I was present at the delivery; it had been left with me for inspection; it is the custom to return goods if they are not liked.

(Order read.)

14th of October.

Received back a black cloth, No. 13,550.

W. GOODEN.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Do you know the order to be his writing - A. I believe it to be; I have often seen him write; I believe I was present when the cloth was delivered, as I usually deliver them myself; there was no limited time for me to decide on it; it was sent at six and two month's credit.

MR. THOMAS BARTLETT . I am in partnership with Edenborough and Co.; the prisoner was our clerk and salesman; he had no other employment; we sometimes called him our town traveller; his duty was to get what orders he could; his orders should then be entered in the order book; another person would look them out, and deliver them to the porters to take to the customers; he had no control over the goods; when woollen goods are sent out, a week or ten days are generally given before they are decided on; if they are not perfect, an allowance is made, which is called shorts and bracks; (looks at a book) I find this cloth entered to Harris, in the prisoner's handwriting, and on the opposite side is an allowance of half a yard made for shorts and bracks, and the price settled at 14 s. 6 d. per yard, which denoted that the cloth was sold to Mr. Harris; the receipt produced by Mr. Harris is in the prisoner's writing.

Q. Have you at any time before he left your service had any conversation with him respecting any thing - A. Yes, respecting deficiences, and he mentioned, that there was this cloth and two others, which he had converted to his own use; this was on the 26th of April; he had no authority to sell on his own account, nor had he debited himself for it.

Cross-examined by MR. BOLLAND. Q. How long have you been in the firm - A. Twelve months; the prisoner's salary was to be left to our option at the end of the year; he was to be remunerated the same as two other servants, according to the value we set on their services; he did not have a percentage on what he sold, nor guarantee ns twenty percent on bad debt; he has entered the cloth as sold to Harris; the credit has not yet expired.

Q. To what extent has he got orders for you in the course of the year - A. Perhaps 5,000 l.; I do not know but what there were many customers whom we never saw.

Q. This conversation was on the 26th of April; he did not then deliver you a written account of the affairs with the house claiming an account with you - A. He delivered an account the following day; said there was deficiences, and those were the amount of them, he was charged on the day pervious with receiving monies, which he had not accounted for; we had then only discovered a deficiency

of 15 l.; I suspected from his manner there were other deficiences, and asked if there was more, he said yes, and asked if it was 50 l.; he said, yes, and more; I asked if it was 100 l.; he said, yes more; I said, is it 150 l.; he made no reply; he stated, that he had been tempted to it through the persuasion of his brother, to whom he gave the first 50 l. of his deficiency.

Q. Was not your application to him to settle accounts with the house - A. It was to ascertain where, and from whom the deficiency originated; Mr. Edenborough did not press him for security in my presence - I am positive of it.

Q. Are you prepared to swear whether you yourself pressed him for security - A. I have asked if he could give security.

Q. Did he not tell you, he had an acceptance of Mr. Elphics in his pocket, for 215 l., and if you gave him a statement of claims on the house, he would give you that as security - A. He said he had a bill of 215 l. but did not say by whom it was accepted, and said, he would settle our claim, but not that he would give us the bill.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did you propose to settle with him merely as a clerk - A. Certainly.

MR. BOLLAND. Q. Were not instructions given to Messrs. Adams and Tillyard to draw up an agreement in such a manner as that he should not be a partner when you entered the firm - A. He proposed that he should have a per centage on what goods he sold; instructions were given to prepare an agreement to that effect, but Mr. Tillyard stated that it would make him a partner. We had the opinion of counsel, who agreed with Mr. Tillyard, and the prisoner was called into the counting-house, and told distinctly, that that agreement was done away with. We probably might have rewarded him in proportion. It was not agreed to, but left entirely to us.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did he sell goods to old or new customers - A. To both, but mostly to old ones. If the agreement had been entered into, he was to have two and a half per cent.; his deficiency exceeding that amount four times; according to his own account he is 457 l. deficient, and he has received about 130 l. from the firm as wages, as he wanted it. He did not produce Elphic's bill to me, but Mr. Elphic demanded it at the Mansion-house, saying, that the prisoner got it from him wrongfully.

MR. BOLLAND. Q. Do you know Gilbert, of Shoreditch - A. Yes; he is a customer. He observed to me that it was a pity to prosecute him.

Q. Did you not reply, that if you did not prosecute and convict him, he would take all the trade away to another house - A. I think I did.

JAMES BLACKBURN . I am porter to the prosecutors. I did not fetch the cloth from Harris.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

805. WILLIAM GOODEN was again indicted for Embezzlement .

ELIZA POVALL . I am the wife of Alexander Povall , a shoemaker, who lives in Hanway-yard. On the 5th of April the prisoner applied to me for 15 l. due to Messrs. Edenborough and Co. I paid him in 1 l. notes; he gave me an I O U for it; it was my husband's hand-writing; I burnt it.

MR. JOHN EDENBOROUGH . I am in partnership with Thomas Chittenden and Thomas Bartlett ; we live in Queen-street; the prisoner was our servant or town traveller; he collected orders, and received money due to us. Povall was a customer of ours; we lent him 15 l. on the 12th March; I have never been paid that money; I told the prisoner to collect it several times, about a fortnight after I lent it; and when he came into the counting house I have said,

"Povall has not paid that 15 l., he is a regular man, he borrowed it for a week, and it is now a fortnight, I wish you would call for it." He said,

"He is a very good man, I wish to make a more important customer of him, I will notice it, and bring it you shortly." In about another week I spoke again about it; he said I had better give him the I O U, and he would call to-morrow. I asked him after that about it, and he said, he would bring it to-morrow. He never said, he had received it till I charged him with it, which was about the 24th of April; he then changed colour, and said,

"Mr. Bartlett, I will walk a little way with you." He walked out with Mr. Bartlett.

Cross-examined by MR. BOLLAND. Q. He has been four years with you - A. Between three and four. Our firm changed about twelve months ago, and our present servants are subject to a fresh arrangement; the prisoner was to be rewarded at the end of the year according to the value we estimated his services at; before that he had a salary; there never was a specific agreement. He had been about two years and quarter with us. I proposed that he should have 400 l. for that. He was not satisfied, and I said, I will make it 450 l. and call it a year and a half, and gave him 450 l. His sales during the last year may amount to between 5000 l. and 8000 l.

Q. Have you not repeatedly told him if he wanted money, to take it, and charge himself with it, without asking - A. Never.

Q. Refer to your book and say what money he received for you in April - A. I cannot say what he received himself, as sometimes customers called and paid at the house; I believe he did receive some money in April, but I really will not swear that he himself paid me any money in April.

Q. When you called him to account about this, did you not press him for security - A. Certainly not; I never heard a word about security; if he had offered it I would not have accepted it. He paid me nothing on account of Povall; he flatly denied having received it.

COURT. Q. At what time was he to make up his accounts - A. Every day, on coming home, he was to deliver me an account and the money.

MR. THOMAS BARTLETT . The prisoner never accounted to me for this money.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. How much cash did he render to you after the 15th of April - A. The cash transactions are entirely under Mr. Edenborough's direction; he never gave me any money.

Q. When did he meet you about these transactions - A. On the 26th of April. On the 27th he gave me a written account; this 15 l. was among it. He was never told to take money whenever he wanted it, nor was he to lend money to customers without Mr. Edenborough's leave.

Q. Would he not have to lay out money for his expences - A. No. If he met a customer, and took a glass

of ale with him, and mentioned it, we should order it to be paid out of the petty cash.

Q. You told Mr. Gilbert that unless you prosecuted him, your trade would all go to another house - A. Since my last examination I have recollected myself; the substance may be the same. I stated that we were bound to prosecute him for the good of the public; and if he was let at large, he would do us all the injury he could; and that he had abilities to do it. I said he was a most excellent salesman, and so I say now.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did he make any disclosure to you till the 28th of April - A. He did not.

Prisoner's Defence. It was not my intention to say any thing, but I shall not do justice to my character, unless I do - I entered the service in 1817, from a respectable situation; I was to have a per centage on what I did; it did not turn out as I expected, and I found, scarce any thing entered, but what orders I got myself, I was at a great expence in obtaining customers, paying for refreshment, and so on. I represensted my disappointment to Mr. Edenborough, who certainly behaved honourably to me; he told me to go on with my exertions, and I should not be disappointed - we never came to a settlement till last July, I supplied myself with money from my friends. In July, Mr. Edenborough said

"Gooden, here is so and so, your sale is so much;" I said, I should be a considerable loser, if I had no more, as I had incurred a debt of 300 l. with my friends, he said, he could give no more, and I left the service for about ten days, they sent to know my terms, I reduced them to writing; Mr. Edenborough said he could afford me only two per cent; I am certain I have sold 15,000 l. worth of goods, and there was a considerable balance coming to me - I can prove I was in the habit of lending customers money to take up bills with, as they did not like to apply to the principals, not knowing them - my expences have been 10 s. or 15 s. a day, and Mr. Bartlett has been round with me, and paid those expences; his motives were strictly honourable - I cannot call persons to say I have lent them money to take up bills, as it is a delicate thing - I met Mr. Bartlett on this business, and sent him an account of the matter; I was asked if I had received this 15 l., I said, I had, and I was to make out an account and pay it over; they said, they had a particular reason for not making out an account of my commission, and I cannot settle without it - they wanted security for it, but I was not prepared at that moment, and they introduced an officer.

- GILBERT. I am a tailor, and live in Shoreditch. Mr. Bartlett called on me and said, the prisoner was an excellent servant, and if he was not prosecuted, he might be a great injury to their house.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210606-106

806. CHARLES SHILE and CHARLES WHITE , were indicted, for stealing, on the 24th of April , one handkerchief, value 2 s., the goods of Henry Rushmer , from his person .

HENRY RUSHMER . On the 24th of April, about two o'clock in the day, I was at Stepney fair , and lost my pocket-handkerchief from my pocket; Christian produced it to me, he had the prisoners in custody - I did not feel it taken, but it was safe just before.

ROBERT CHRISTIAN . I am a headborough. I was at the fair, and saw the prisoners very close to Rushmer; Shile drew the handkerchief from his pocket, White put his hand out, and was in the act of receiving it, when I seized them both.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

SHILE'S Defence. I never saw it.

SHILE - GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Life .

WHITE - NOT GUILTY .

Third Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18210606-107

807. EDWARD POTTS , was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of May , one cask of pickled herrings, value 3 s. , the goods of Thomas Ames .

THOMAS AMES . I am a fishmonger , and live at Ratcliffe . On the 29th of May, at half-past nine o'clock at night, I missed a cask of herrings, and found them next morning, at the office.

THOMAS HAMILTON . I am an officer. On the 29th of May, between nine and ten o'clock at night, I stopped the prisoner, in Cable-street, about half a mile from Ames's, with this cask, wrapped in his apron; I asked what it was, he said, a cask of her rings, which he was taking to Mrs. Norton's, in White's-yard, and a strange man gave them to him, opposite a shop, below Shadwell office.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Three Months .

Third Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18210606-108

808. WILLIAM NESH , was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of May , two candlesticks, value 10 s.; one snuffer stand, value 2 s., and two pair of snuffers, value 3 s. , the goods of Letitia Stopford .

THOMAS PENNELL . I am servant to Mrs. Letitia Stopford , who lives in Welbeck-street . About two o'clock, in the afternoon, I found the prisoner at the pantry door, with things in his hand, he had come down the area, and took them from the pantry, and had them in a handkerchief; I asked who he wanted, he said, a gentleman named Hanson, and he had a parcel for him, which a person in the street gave him to bring; I said, he did not live there - I heard the candlesticks rattle, and took them from him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A man gave them to me, told me to go down and ask for Hanson, and if he was not there, to bring them up.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

Third Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18210606-109

809. MARY TURNER , was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of May , one sheet, value 3 s.; three handkerchiefs, value 6 s.; two gowns, value 7 s,; two shifts, value 4 s.; four napkins, value 2 s., and one bed-gown, value 1 s. , the goods of James Ullmer .

JAMES ULLMER . I am an attorney's clerk , and live in Ironmonger-row, St. Luke's . The prisoner was employed as nurse by my wife; she came on the 1st of May, I missed

these things on the 22d - I asked her for a yellow silk handkerchief, she said, it was in the mangle - on the 22d, we missed more things, and found them at the pawnbrokers.

TIMOTHY PERRY . I am an apprentice to Mr. Castle, of Old-street. I have two gowns, a petticoat, shift, and a bed-gown, pawned by the prisoner, in the name of Mary Cook .

LEONARD MATTHEWS . My father is a pawnbroker, and lives in Whitecross-street. I have a shirt, handkerchief, and four napkins, pawned by a woman - I cannot swear to the prisoner.

JOHN M'LAUCHLAN. I live with Mr. Peachy, in Goswell-street. I have a mantle, pawned by a woman.

JOSEPH PRINCE . I took her in charge, and found eleven duplicates on her.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN TWEEDY . I went after the prisoner, in Goswell-street, and asked if her name was Turner - she said it was Wood.

Prisoner's Defence. Mrs. Ullmer could never settle with me, and frequently sent me to pawn things unknown to her husband.

JAMES ULLMER . She ran away when I charged her with it - I never authorized her to pawn - my daughter can prove my wife did not.

EMMA ULLMER . I have often heard my mother tell her to go and pawn things, I do not know how long ago, or what they were.

NOT GUILTY .

Third Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18210606-110

819. GEORGE NICHOLSON , was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of April , one jacket, value 3 s.; one pair of trowsers, value 2 s.; and one shirt, value 2 s. , the goods of Antonio Spartiso .

ANTONIO SPARTISO . I am an Italian, and live in Dock-street, Wapping . The prisoner lodged with me for three months - I had bought these clothes for him, but he was not to have them till he got a ship - I went to Gravesend, and on returning, he was gone with them - I found him a fortnight afterwards, on board a ship, at Blackwall, with the jacket and shirt on his back - he was not to have them till he paid me for them - he owed me for lodging, which he was to pay when he returned from his voyage.

ELIZA SPARTISO . I am the wife of the last witness. We take in seamen to lodge; the prisoner was to pay for his clothes when he got a ship, and was not to have them till then, they were kept in the parlour - while I went into the yard, he was gone with them.

MICHAEL MORRIS . I apprehended him on the 25th of May, with the property on him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I could not go to work without clothes, and I was to work to pay him for them.

NOT GUILTY .

Third Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18210606-111

820. CHARLES TURNER , and MARY BUCKLE , were indicted for stealing, on the 2d of May , from the person of John Morgan , two 5 l., and one 1 l. Bank notes, his property .

JOHN MORGAN . I am groom to Mr. Charles Phillips , of Baker-street, Portman-square. On the 2d of May, about eight o'clock at night, I was at the Fortune of War, public-house, Earl-street , with Larner; this money was in my right hand breeches pocket - I had a pot of half-and-half, sat on the settle, and went to sleep about nine o'clock; I was awoke about a quarter past ten o'clock, by Larner, and missed my property - I had owed him 8 s., and when I went to the house, I pulled my money out to pay him - When I went to sleep, the prisoners sat on my right hand, they both remained there when I awoke - I went after Salmon, leaving them in the house; I returned in about half an hour, and found Buckle there - Salmon took her, but found nothing on her.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Where was your friend - A. Standing up in the tap-room, Buckle sat next to me, and Turner next to her; Larner awoke me - I did not quarrel with him - none of us were turned out of the house - Larner was drinking with me, he did not sit down.

DANIEL LARNER . I was fellow-servant with Morgan, but am now out of place. On the 2d of May, about half-past seven o'clock, I went to the Fortune of War, public-house; Morgan sat down and went to sleep, I stood up in the room, and saw Buckle's hand down at his right hand breeches pocket. I awoke him, and asked him to feel his pockets, he felt and said,

"I have lost my money, I have been robbed in this house;" the prisoners were cracking nuts together. Morgan said, if they would give up the money, he would say nothing; Turner said, I was a scoundrel for saying such a thing against a modest woman like her. Morgan went for an officer; I put my foot against the door, and said, Nobody should go out without being searched. Turner insisted on going, and went out - Buckle did not offer to go.

Cross-examined. Q. Were they in house before you - A. I cannot say, for I was rather intoxicated - Morgan was sober. He paid me no money that night, there was some conversation about it before he got to the house; he said he would pay me when he got there. I sat down by the fire-place next to Morgan. The pot-boy and I had a few words about an hour before the robbery. Morgan was in the room then, he was asleep when I was turned out - I was not out ten minutes.

Q. Did Turner run into the street to go away - A. He went towards the street, and came back with another soldier, he was in his regimentals. The prosecutor was asleep when I went out and when I returned.

JOHN GOSNEY . I am servant to James Taylor of Baker-street. I took two 10 l. notes to Atkinson to change on the 2d of May, he gave me two 5 l. and ten 1 l. notes for them - I gave them to my fellow servant Hedford.

WILLIAM JAMES SALMON . I am an officer. Morgan fetched me to the house - I found Butler there; he said, she sat by his side when he lost his money. While I was searching her, Turner came in, and said to her,

"You want to make believe we are both guilty, but keep your counsel and they cannot hurt us;" she said, she knew nothing of the money, and was not out of the house from seven o'clock - I found no notes on Turner.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he mention Turner's name -

A. No, the pot-boy did; three or four people were in the room.

WILLIAM ATKINSON . I am a grocer, and live in Blackman-street, Portman-square. On the 1st of May, I gave Gosney two 5 l. and ten 1 l. notes for two 10 l. notes. I saw the 5 l. note at Bow-street, and knew it.

WILLIAM WESTBROOK . I am goaler of Bow-street. I received information, and found one 5 l. and half of another 5 l. note, at No. 21, Little George-street, Portman-square, in the privy - I do not know who lived there.

WILLIAM HALL . I am pot-boy at the Fortune of War, public-house. The prisoners came in and had a pint of ale; Buckle sat next to Morgan till the robbery was discovered. I then got a candle, and Turner went out; Buckle moved towards the door, I asked if she knew Turner, she said, Yes - she never tried to go.

Cross-examined. Q. When did Turner go - A. Immediately as Morgan said he missed his money - he was absent about ten minutes. I had been quarrelling with Larner, and we fought in the passage - Morgan was asleep then.

JOHN MORGAN . The notes are mine, I know them by a red ink mark.

Cross-examined. Q. What part of the room were you in when you pulled your notes out to pay Larner - A. On the settle.

The prisoner made no defence.

JOSEPH SONTHOUSE . I was at this house. The prosecutor sat with his head on his arms; Buckle sat on his right, and Turner by her. Larner used very bad expressions - I left the house as it did not suit me.

NOT GUILTY .

Third Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18210606-112

NINTH DAY, FRIDAY, JUNE 15.

821. JOHN BRITLOVE was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of April , one silver table-spoon, value 8 s. , the goods of Charles Secondat Baron Montesquieu .

SECOND COUNT stating it to belong to Charles Secondat .

WILLIAM JAMES SALMON . I am patrol of Bow-street. On the 20th of April, about nine o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner at Paddington, and followed him into a pawnbroker's, and saw him offer to pawn a table-spoon for 15 s. - Mr. Ross would not take it in; he said his master, Mr. Gibbons of Marylebone-lane, sent him to pawn it. I followed him out and took him into custody; I asked what he had about him, he denied having anything. I found the spoon in his coat; he then said, he took it from Baron De Montesquieu 's, and took me to the house in Upper Seymour-street - the servant claimed it.

JOSEPH GIBBONS . I am a carpenter; the prisoner was my apprentice ; my house was burnt down, and the Baron gave me leave to be in his; the prisoner came there occasionally, but did not sleep there. I did not send him to pawn the spoon - he has been four years with me.

WILLIAM SHILLETON . I am servant to Charles Baron De Montesquieu ; the prisoner came to the house to see his master. I missed a table-spoon the evening before.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I beg for mercy.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Recommended to mercy by the Baron.

Whipped and Discharged .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18210606-113

822. SAMUEL SALTER was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of April , one coat, value 5 s. , the goods of John Turner .

JOHN TURNER . I live in Tottenham-court-road; this coat was stolen from my cart, which stood in my foundry. I found the prisoner at the office with it in about half an hour.

JOHN O'BRIEN. I am a labourer at the foundry. I saw the prisoner take the coat out of the cart, and ran off with it, and I secured him.

(Property produced, and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Six Months , and Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18210606-114

823. JOHN JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of June , one umbrella, value 3 s. , the goods of James Heap .

CHARLOTTE HEAP . I am the wife of James Heap , an umbrella maker , who lives in Long-alley ; this umbrella hung outside the door. I missed it - it was produced in about an hour.

SERVELL HARVEY. I live opposite Mr. Heap. I saw the prisoner walking backwards and forwards three or four times; he then took the umbrella, and ran round the corner - I ran and told Heap, and saw him in about an hour - I am sure he is the boy.

CHARLES LACEY . I ran and overtook the prisoner in Wilson-street, with the umbrella in his hand.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I picked it up.

GUILTY . Aged 42.

Confined Three Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18210606-115

824. JOSEPH WIGNALL and HARRIET WIGNALL , his wife , was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of February , twenty shirts, value 5 l.; seven pair of trowsers, value 1 l., and sixteen pair of stockings, value 16 s. , the goods of George Hayes .

GEORGE HAYES . I live in Queen-street, Chelsea , my wife is a laundress. The prisoners lodged in our back room, first floor, for about a year, during which time, we were continually losing property, and at last had them apprehended.

CHARLES PADDON . I am servant to Mr. Courtney, a pawnbroker, at Pimlico. I have four shirts, two pair of stockings, and four pair of trowsers, pawned by the prisoners at different times; the man pawned the shirts on the 21st and 28th of April, and the woman the trowsers.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JAMES NOBLE . I am servant to Mr. Kemp, a pawnbroker. I have three shirts pawned on the 22d of November, by the man.

JOSEPH WIGNALL 'S Defence. I was discharged from the army; my poor wife took in washing - she took ill. I could not see her want, and pawned the things, meaning to redeem them. When she got better, I persuaded her to pawn more, which she unwillingly did. I intended to pay when my pension was due.

JOSEPH WIGNALL - GUILTY . Aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

HARRIET WIGNALL - NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18210606-116

825. HENRY JAMES was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of George Byng , Esq. at South Mims , about twelve o'clock in the night of the 13th of May , with intent to steal, and stealing therein, one watch, value 2 l. , the goods of Edward Lloyd .

WILLIAM DUMBLE . I am bailiff to George Byng , Esq. the Member for Middlesex , who lives at South Mims, Edward Lloyd is a labourer in his service. On the 13th of May, about twelve o'clock at night, I was alarmed by the dog barking - I sleep in the house. I got up, looked out of window, saw nothing, and laid down, and in about five minutes, I heard somebody talking to Edward Lloyd , in his room, over the scullery - it is divided from mine by a wooden partition. I called to Lloyd

"Here are the carpenters coming," supposing they had come to call us up; he said,

"Master, it is robbers and thieves." (I could not distinguish by the voices, that it was more than one person) I told him to go down stairs, and I would meet him at the bottom; but while we were going down, they escaped out of the window. On getting down, I found two windows broken open, which I am quite sure were fastened over night, by shutters and a bar across. I found the shutters of one window open, and the glass taken out; a man could then undo the fastening, and enter the house - it was all secure when I went to bed at ten o'clock. I went out, and found they had broken the carpenter's shop open - it is about twelve yards from the house; I found nobody and went to bed again. The prisoner had worked as a carpenter for Mr. Byng two years before, and was acquainted with the place. The house is about 300 yards from Mr. Byng's dwelling-house, and enclosed with it by the park wall - it is all in the farm-yard, and is the farm house. I sleep there as bailiff, merely as his servant - I have no tenancy in it.

EDWARD LLOYD . I am labourer to Mr. Byng, and sleep over the scullery. I went to bed about ten o'clock, and was awoke about twelve, and hallowed out

"Chiltern," who was to come that morning. I found the prisoner holding a stick over my head - I knew him before; my watch hung over my head - it was moon-light, and there are no shutters to the room. I am certain of him, he said,

"Hush," and asked if I had any money, I said, No; another man was with him. When I said, I had no money, the other man said,

"Take and tie him;" the prisoner said,

"No, we won't tie him, he seems to be quiet, we won't touch him." Then they asked me if any body was in the next apartment, I said, No; the other man took a few halfpence out of my waistcoat pocket - my breeches were under my head, they did not feel for them. I saw the prisoner reach his hand over my head, and take my watch; he then said to the other man,

"Do you go down stairs, and tell the others to keep back." I had no conversation with the other man - they both went out, the prisoner following him. Dumble came to me, and we went into the yard, but could not find them. They had taken two panes of glass out, which was entire when we went to bed; they could then undo the fastening - it was a casement window, that must be the way they entered. I had known the prisoner about a year, he lived about half a mile off, and had worked at Mr. Byng's with me. I declare on my oath he is the man. I have never found my watch - it was silver, and it is worth 40 s.

Prisoner. Q. You have not seen me for upwards of two years - A. No; not till that night. I had not seen him for a year together then; he had not lived in the neighbourhood for the last two years. I am certain of him, we were quite intimate together when he worked at Mr. Byng's. The moon was nearly full.

Prisoner. I did not work there above four months - A. No, I saw him at Mr. Byng's, and in the neighbourhood for a year together. They were about four minutes in the room after I awoke. I recollect his voice and features too.

FREDERICK PROPSTRING . I am an officer, and live at Hadley. I heard of this robbery on the 14th of May, and on the 9th of June, I was fetched to Hertford, and found the prisoner in custody there on the 13th I - brought him to Barnet.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent of the charge.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 25.

Recommended to Mercy.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210606-117

826. CORDELIA KNIGHT and MARY WILLIAMS were indicted for stealing, on the 12th of June , 20 yards of silk, value 5 l. the goods of Thomas Craig and John Graham , in their dwelling-house .

SECOND COUNT. The same, only stating it to be the dwelling-house of the said John Graham only.

JAMES SALTHOUSE . I am shopman to Thomas Craig and John Graham , who are silk-mercers , and live in Oxford-street , in the parish of St. Marylebone. Only Mr. Graham lives in the house. On the 12th of June, about a quarter past four o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoners came to the shop together; one of them asked to see some Italian net; they both looked at it and did not like the colour, and wished to see another. I shewed them three more pieces; they would not suit. They then asked to look at some satins; I shewed them two or three - they did not suit. They then asked to see some Persian of the same colour; I shewed them two pieces - they would not do (I had been watching them particularly all the time). They then said, they would look at some white Persian, and bought three-eighths of a yard, which came to 9 d. One of them observed, that was a handsome shawl which one of the men was shewing, and asked the price - I said, two guineas, and shewed them some other shawls. Every thing I had shewn them remained on the counter. I opened one or two shawls out, they thanked me for my trouble, and said, perhaps they would buy another time. I observed Williams hold up the end of the shawl as if to conceal the actions of the other. I took 1 s. for the Persian, and went to the end of the shop for change - I returned

and gave them 3 d. I believe Williams bought the Persian. They then left the shop - I missed nothing, but went after them on suspicion. Williams was following the other out, but had not got out - Knight was just out of the door. I saw my fellow-servant bringing her back, and a piece of silk drop from her (Knight). He said to her

"Stop, I believe you have something which does not belong to you;" and as she returned at the threshold of the door, the silk dropped from under her cloak; there were twenty-five yards of it - it is worth above 5 l. - it cost between 6 l. and 7 l. Williams wished to go, saying, she had nothing to do with it. They both inspected all the goods.

Cross-examined by Mr. LAW. Q. Has Mr. Graham the whole of the house - A. Yes; I found Williams had left her Persian behind, it might have been dropped by accident - I found it in the place where she sat - it is common for people to go shopping together - Knight had a large cloak, which concealed it all, and took it with the roller.

JOHN DOYLY . I am shopman to the prosecutors. I saw the prisoners come in together, (they had been there together the day before), Salthouse was shewing them goods - I saw Knight rolling up the silk, which was about a yard undone - they looked at the goods, and while he was shewing the shawl to Williams, I was watching, and saw Knight take the roll of silk - I left the counter on the opposite side to them, and went towards the door; Knight passed me, and as soon as she got outside the door, I told her I believed she had something which did not belong to her; she said, she had not - I brought her into the shop, and about a yard in the roll of silk, dropped from under her cloak; I picked it up, and she was stopped. Williams was coming out at the moment I laid hold of Knight; she was stopped, and asked what was the matter - I took them both to Marlborough-street, and on our return, found Williams's Persian on the floor.

Q. Describe the way Williams held the shawl up - A. It was unfolded, she held it about the middle, as if to help fold it up; it naturally took Salthouse's view off Knight - the silk cost 5 s. 6 d. per yard.

Cross-examined. Q. What size was the shawl - A. A yard and half wide, and nearly three yards long - it was extended at full length, there was nothing unusual in her manner of holding it - I should have thought nothing of it, had I not suspected them.

THOMAS CLEMENTS . I am a constable. I took the prisoners in charge, and only found a few halfpence on either of them.

JAMES SALTHOUSE . I know the silk to be my master's.

WILLIAMS'S Defence. While I was there, I picked a piece of silk up which fell off the counter, and the gentleman thanked me - I saw some ladies looking at the shawls, and said, one was ugly; he brought them round, and I said, one was handsome, but I wanted none - we did not ask for things, he pressed us to buy - I did not hold up any shawl.

JOHN DOYLY . She did pick up a piece of brown silk which had fallen down.

KNIGHT'S Defence. I deny that it was taken from me or dropped from me - I have four small children.

KNIGHT - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 26.

WILLIAMS - NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210606-118

870. JOSEPH TURNER was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of May , one hammer, value 6 d.; three points, value 2 d.; one chisel, value 1 d.; five cramps, value 1 s., and one file, value 1 s., the goods of William Jenkins ; and twenty-three chisels, value 3 s.; eleven points, value 1 s.; one brush, value 6 d., and one bag, value 6 d., the goods of John Reynolds ; eight chisels, value 3 s.; two points, value 1 s., and two hammers, value 1 s. the goods of Thomas Jenkins ; and nine chisels, value 5 s. , the goods of Thomas Vaughan .

WILLIAM JENKINS . I am a mason , and live in the New-road, St. George's in the East . I lost the articles stated in the indictment, from my yard, and found the prisoner in custody with them; he is a stranger. The yard is fenced in.

JOHN REYNOLDS . I work for Mr. Jenkins; I left my tools in his yard, on the 11th of May, and missed them two days after. The gate was open when I left the yard.

THOMAS JENKINS . I am Jenkins's brother; I left my tools in the yard, on the 11th of May, about seven at night; next morning, on going to work, they were gone.

THOMAS VAUGHAN . I lost nine chisels from the yard.

THOMAS PIERCY . I am a constable of the Thames Police Office. On the 12th of May, between four and five in the morning, I stopped the prisoner on Dock-hill, with a bag; I asked what was in it; he said, his working tools, and that he was a mason, and worked at the London Dock Basin. I took him there; they did not know him; he shewed me the spot where he said he had worked; they said he never worked there. On his way to the office he said he did not steal them, but gave a black man 10 s. for them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Confined Two Months , and Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210606-119

828. ANTONIO DELAMORE , JOSEPH POCOCK , and JAMES HOLLAND , was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of May , 37 lbs. of nails, value 7 s. , the goods of William Parker .

WILLIAM PARKER . I am a carpenter , and live in William-street, Hampstead-road. The nails were left in a building at night, and between four and five o'clock in the morning I missed them.

GEORGE CLUNES . I am serjeant of the night. On the 19th of May, between three and four o'clock in the morning, I heard a noise in a cellar opposite this building; I went down, opened the door, and found the prisoners there. They said they came there to sleep. I secured them; Delamore was very loth to come out, and kept shoving up the shavings there, as if to conceal something; I looked under them, and found a bag and a handkerchief full of new nails, and an apron with some, making three parcels. I took them to the watch-house, and told Mr. Parker.

CHARLES COUSINS . I am watch-house keeper. I locked the prisoners up, and when the nails were brought, I separated Pocock from them; he said he had just come from Reading, and knew nothing about the nails. I then asked Delamore how he came to steal them - he said,

" That boy stole all the nails," (meaning Pocock). Then Pocock said, he did fetch them from the place, and Delamore sent him for them, and he was going to sell them in Gee's-court. I knew Delamore before, and have seen him wear the apron which contained the nails; he had no apron on then.

WILLIAM PARKER . I believe them to be mine.

DELAMORE'S Defence. I was going to Bengal, but was taken ill, and while I was in the hospital my ship sailed; I wanted a place to sleep, and met this boy; he took me to sleep on these shavings; these gentlemen came and took me to the watch-house. I knew nothing about the nails.

POCOCK'S Defence. I had slept there two nights before, and the night before I slept in the house the nails were stolen from. I know nothing of the nails.

HOLLAND'S Defence. I went to sleep there.

DELAMORE - GUILTY . Aged 35.

Confined Two Months , and publicly Whipped .

POCOCK - GUILTY . Aged 18.

HOLLAND - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined Three Months , and publicly Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210606-120

829. JAMES CROSSLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 19th May , one coat, value 30 s. , the property of Benjamin Court .

BENJAMIN COURT . I lodge in Crown-street, Soho , on the second floor; the prisoner slept with me nearly three months. On the morning of the 18th of May I opened my box, my coat was there then, and the prisoner in bed. I left it unlocked, and at eleven o'clock at night returned; he was in bed then. I left at seven o'clock in the morning, he was there then. My landlady fetched me; I missed the coat; he was gone, and was taken about twelve o'clock that morning.

MARIA FERRIS . I keep the house. The prisoner went out at a little after seven o'clock - I went up and missed the coat.

WILLIAM BEARCROFT . I am apprentice to Mr. Wood, of Hyde-street, Bloomsbury. Between seven and eight o'clock in the morning, the prisoner pawned the coat for 12 s.

WATKINS DETHERIDGE. I am an officer - I apprehended him, and took him to the pawnbroker's.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I intended to redeem it.

GUILTY . Aged 35.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210606-121

830. ANN WELCH was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of May , one shirt, value 5 s. , the goods of Charles Choak .

SARAH TEAR . I was servant to Charles Choak . The prisoner succeeded me in my place. I left the shirts in a box under the bed on the 4th of May, when I left. I was fetched next day and one was gone.

JOHN DELLBRIDGE . On the 26th of May the prisoner pawned a shirt.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210606-122

831. JOHN VICKERY was indicted for stealing, on the 26th May , two saws, value 5 s. , the goods of Evan Vaughan .

EVAN VAUGHAN . I am a carpenter . I was working at a building in Medway-street, Westminster . I went away at four o'clock and returned at half past, and my saws were gone. I went to watch a house in Dartmouth-street which I suspected, and in about ten minutes I saw the prisoner coming across Tothill-street, with one in his hand - I laid hold of him and took him to a public-house, he then pulled out the other.

WILLIAM VARNEY . I was with Vaughan and stopped the prisoner.

GUILTY Aged 30.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210606-123

832. MARY DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of May , one shirt, value 5 s.; one handkerchief, value 2 s., and one towel, value 1 s. , the goods of Thomas Gates .

FANNY GATES . I am wife of Thomas Gates , who is a weaver - we lodge in Air-street, Bethnal Green . The prisoner lived a week with me as servant; I gave her the shirt, handkerchief, and towel, to take to the mangle, between nine and ten o'clock in the morning, and about nine o'clock in the evening I sent her for them - she never returned. On the 28th, I met her in Spitalfields market, and told her of it; she said she would go the mangler's with me - I fetched the woman to her - she said, she gave them to her. I found them at the pawnbroker's. She then said, she pawned them and destroyed the duplicate.

MARY HEBDEN . I mangled the things, and returned them to the prisoner about ten o'clock at night. I saw her about three weeks after, and said, I gave them to her. She said, she pawned them.

GEORGE THWAITES . I am servant to George Radnor . On the 5th of May, a shirt was pawned for 3 s. - I believe the prisoner pawned it. Several days after a boy pawned the handkerchief.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I am very sorry for it.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Judgment Respited .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210606-124

833. JAMES FIGETT was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of May , one saw, value 5 s. , the goods of Thomas Hall .

THOMAS HALL . I am a cabinet-maker , and live in Long-alley . On the 28th of May, I left my tools in the workshop which joins the house - next morning, about six o'clock, I missed the saw.

WILLIAM ATTFIELD . I am an officer. On the 29th of May, about eight o'clock in the morning, while I was talking to Mr. Gosling, a pawnbroker in Shoreditch, the prisoner came to pawn this saw - I asked, if it belonged to him - he said, it did; that he, was a cabinet-maker, and had worked some time with it. I detained him. He then said, he picked it up in Finsbury-market that morning, and afterwards that he found it in a cart.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

THOMAS GARTON . I compared his shoes with the footmarks in Hall's garden, they exactly tallied.

Prisoner's Defence. He took another man's shoes of the same size as mine.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined One Year and Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18210606-125

834. CHARLES GODDING , was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of May , one gown, value 30 s.; one handkerchief. value 2 s.; one apron, value 1 s., and one pair of shoes, value 5 s. , the goods of William Watts .

ELIZA WATTS . I am the wife of William Watts , we live in Rose-street, Covent-garden. On the 3d of May, this property was in my stall, at Brook-green fair - I went to bed about half-past three o'clock in the morning, my stall was all closed in - I was awoke by feeling the cold come in; I jumped up, missed the property, and found one side of the stall cut to pieces - I gave the alarm, and in about an hour, the prisoner passed the stall with another, I heard him say,

"That is the stall we prigged." I laid hold of them both, they beat me terribly, and one got away - I kept the prisoner till the officer came. The things were in a dirty white apron.

JAMES HOARE . I was at the fair. I had a stall there - about four o'clock in the morning, a gang of eight lads opened my booth, and asked me to buy this property; it was a gown, apron, and a flannel petticoat - I refused, and the prisoner, who was one of them, took it away - they were in a dirty white apron.

GEORGE RICHMOND . I had a gingerbread stall at the fair; and saw the prisoner at four o'clock in the morning, with a bundle in a white apron under his arm, with seven or eight more; I watched them to Hoare's stall - I am sure he is the boy.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18210606-126

835. ROBERT HESTER , was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of April , one pair of shoes, value 3 s. , the goods of James Corss .

JOHN HUBE . I am shopman to James Corss , slopseller , Shoreditch . On the 30th of April, while I was at tea, I was alarmed, ran out down the next turning, and overtook the prisoner with these shoes in one hand, and an open knife in the other - the shoes hung outside the door.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAM COX . I am an officer. I heard the alarm, and stopped the prisoner in Swan-yard.

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY. Aged 36.

Judgment Respited .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18210606-127

836. WILLIAM INGMAN , was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of May , two sheets, value 6 s., and one cap, value 1 s. , the goods of Ann Hay .

MARY BANDAGE . I am servant to Ann Hay , who lives in Gloucester-place, New-road . On the 2d of May, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I hung these things in the garden to dry, and missed them at nine o'clock - I found them at Marlborough-street, next day.

HENRY BRYON . I am a coachman. I was coming from my stable, behind Gloucester-place, heard a cry of Stop thief! about nine o'clock, and took the prisoner, who was going away quickly, he had the linen with him, and dropped it.

FRANCIS MARLOW . I am a watchman. I was on duty, and took the prisoner in charge with the property.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Six Months , and Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18210606-128

837. RICHARD MEARS , was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of May , one guinea , the property of William Lawson .

ROBERT BUCKNELL . I am apprentice to Mr. William Lawson , of Church-street, Spitalfields. On the 23d of May, he sent me to receive 7 l. 18 s. 6 d., from Mr. Wilcox - I received it, and was returning home, about eight o'clock, and saw the prisoner with my fellow apprentice, and two more boys - Smith, my fellow apprentice, called me over, and asked if I had got the money, I said, Yes; but I was paid all in gold - he asked what gold, I said, seven guineas and a half; he asked me to let him see a guinea, for he never saw one - I gave it to him, and he asked the prisoner to lend him a pin, to match with it, to see if it was gold - he gave him the pin, and asked him to let him see the guinea, he snatched it out of Smith's hands, with the pin, and ran away towards Whitechapel; he brought it back, after running about eighteen yards, and asked the other lads if they would go to regulars - he did not produce the guinea, they said,

"Yes, Yes" and all three ran away - I was going after them, and Smith stopped me, and said, he was sure they would bring it back; I waited half an hour, and they did not, I have never seen it since - I knew him before.

Prisoner's Defence. Smith put it in my hand, to see if it was gold, I turned round in a joke, not intending to keep it, and came back; he said,

"I thought you was going to keep it, you are welcome;" I ran a little way, and dropped it in a puddle, and could not find it.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18210606-129

838. HENRY PINFORD , was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of May , four sheets, value 16 s.; one table cloth, value 5 s.; the goods of Eliza Sandys ; and two sheets, value 8 s. , the goods of John Sprack .

ELIZA SANDYS . I am a laundress , and live in George-street, Portman-square . On the 3d of May, at night, I hung these things in the yard to dry - about four o'clock, next morning the dog barked, I got up, looked out of window and saw the prisoner in the next yard, packing these things up - I screamed out, he got over the wall into the yard of No. 15, and left the clothes in the yard - I went down and called the watchman, who secured him, in the loft of No. 14 - he had neither shoes or stockings; his father lived there - I am sure he is the boy.

MARY ANN SPRACK . I sent two shirts to Sandys's to wash.

JOHN STRATTON . I am a watchman. I found; he prisoner in the loft of No. 14; the shirts were thrown over the wall - he was concealed under the tiles with the trap door shut.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I heard a noise, my father said, somebody was calling out; every thing was then quiet, and he sent me into the loft to get some pots down - Stratton said he saw me throw them over the wall.

JOHN STRATTON . I did not say so.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18210606-130

839. ROBERT ROBERTS , was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of April , one hat, value 4 s. , the goods of Richard Holman .

RICHARD HOLMAN . I live in Crown-street, Finsbury . This hat hung at the door, about eleven o'clock in the morning - Spencer brought the prisoner into the shop with it, he confessed to taking it.

WILLIAM SPENCER . I am an officer. I met the prisoner in Clifford-street, running with the hat; he dropped it as soon as I took hold of him, and said he picked it up - the people said, he took it from a hatter's.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Whipped and Discharged .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18210606-131

840. HENRY SHERWOOD and EDWARD BROWN were indicted for stealing, on the 3d of April , one shovel, value 3 s. ; the goods of John Kelly .

The prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18210606-132

841. JOHN COCKHEAD was indicted for a misdemeanour .

JAMES WOOD . I am a coppersmith , and am in partnership with William, Edmund, and William Pontifex , jun.; our warehouse is in Shoe-lane . On the 24th of April , the prisoner called, and represented himself as coming from Messrs. Pounsett's, of Thames-street, distillers; he said, he was their servant, and brought this written order for a coal-scuttle; I gave him one on the authority of that order; it was worth 20 s.; he took it away; I have never been paid for it; I did not deliver him the kettle, as I did not notice it in the order.

- (Order read).

Messrs. Pontifex and Co. - Please to let the bearer have one coal scuttle for a kitchen, and one oval tea kettle, about four quarts.

H. and W. POUNSETT.

226, Thames-street.

MR. HENRY POUNSETT . I am in partnership with William Pounsett ; we are distillers, and live in Upper Thames-street, the prisoner was in our service in July 1820, but not in April last, and had no authority to order goods on our account; the order is not signed by any one in our house; we did not receive the scuttle.

EDWARD GOLDWIN . I am servant to Messrs. Pontifex. On the 1st of March the prisoner came to our warehouse for an oval four quart tea kettle; he said, he came from Messrs. Pounsett's; I gave it him; it came to 10 s.; next day he came for a three quart copper kettle, worth 8 s.; I delivered them; on the 8th of March he came for a helmet coal scoop, which I delivered him; on the 17th, he came for another helmet coal scoop, the same sort as the last; I asked why they wanted two alike; he said, Mr. Pounsett was going to take one to his country house; I let him have it. He was taken on the 4th of May.

MR. HENRY POUNSETT . I never sent him for any of these things, nor ever received them.

HENRY TURNPENNY . I apprehended the prisoner on the 4th of May, in company with bad characters.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210606-133

842. HENRY GOMPERTZ was indicted for a fraud .

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210606-134

843. MICHAEL SHERARD was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of June , two saws, value 10 s. ; the goods of Asculph Snowden .

ASCULPH SNOWDEN. I am a carpenter , and live in Quaker-street, Spitalfields; I was at work on the 5th of June, in Skinner-street ; went to breakfast at eight o'clock, and returned at half-past, and missed the saws; the prisoner is a carpenter, and lives a few doors from the building; in about an hour and a half I found them in pawn.

GEORGE SNOWDEN . I was working at the building, and saw the prisoner go by and look in at the window, about five minutes before eight.

JOHN HEATH . I am servant to Mr. Gosling, a pawnbroker, who lives in Shoreditch. On the 5th of June, between eight and nine o'clock, the prisoner pawned a saw for 3 s.

WILLIAM FOSTER . I am servant to Mr. Hyam, in Bishopsgate-street. On the 5th of June, between eight and ten o'clock, a tall man, in a dark coat, pawned a saw.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAM ATTFIELD . I apprehended the prisoner at eleven o'clock at night on the 5th of June; he said nothing to the charge; he had a dark coat on; I took him to the pawnbroker, who said, in his presence, that he had pawned it.

GUILTY . Aged 63.

Confined One Year .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210606-135

844. EDWARD BUCKLAND and WILLIAM MARTIN were indicted for stealing, on the 29th of April , two coach-holders, value 7 s. ; the goods of George John Legh .

GEORGE WILLIAMS . I am coachman to Mr. George John Legh , of Lower Brook-street, Grosvenor-square. On the 29th of April, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, before dark, I was returning from Park-street, with the coach; the holders were all right, my horses were walking, and in Hanover-square , I heard some boy call out, and found the prisoners in custody with the holders, Buckland had one in his hat, the other was on the ground, they were unbuckled and taken off the coach.

HENRY VAUGHAN . Mr. Legh's coach passed me in Marylebone-street, Haymarket; I saw the prisoners following it, they got behind, and in Hanover-square I saw them unbuckle the holders, and were leaving the carriage, when I laid hold of Buckland with a holder in his hat, Martin dropped the other, and was secured.

THOMAS JENKINS . I saw Martin get off the carriage at the end of Marylebone-street, and secured him; I did not see him drop the holder, but saw it at his feet.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

BUCKLAND - GUILTY . Aged 14.

MARTIN - GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210606-136

845. WILLIAM DIMOND was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of May , five pounds of lead, value 1 s.; and one fixture (i.e.) one brass cock, value 5 s.; the goods of William Watherston , and fixed to a building of his .

SECOND COUNT. Stating it to be fixed to the building of John Jones , and to belong to him.

WILLIAM WATHERSTON . I live in York-place, St. Margaret's, Westminster . On the 5th of May, about eleven o'clock in the morning, I was sent for, and found the brass cock and lead pipe stolen from the house, it was fixed to the back wall, next to some gardens, and was safe at nine o'clock the night before.

WILLIAM COX . I am a watchman of Vincent-square. About five in the morning, I was coming off my beat, and saw the prisoner and another in a gateway; they appeared watching me; I went round into Little George-street, and met them, and asked the prisoner what he had under his jacket, they immediately ran in different directions, I followed, and took the prisoner without losing sight of him; he dropped this brass cock and lenden pipe; I picked it up and compared it with the rest of the pipe - it matched.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I saw it on the ground, and picked it up.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210606-137

846. JOHN WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of May , four half crowns , the property of Samuel Smith .

MARY ELIZA SMITH . My husband Samuel Smith , keeps the Queen's Head, public-house, St. John's-lane, Smithfield . On the 12th of May, between four and six o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner came in and had a glass of beer in the lobby, drank a little, then put it down, and asked me to change an old shilling for a new one, as he wanted to make a present of it. I drew my till out, found I had none, shut it, and took a bag out of my desk, in which there was six half crowns and some odd silver. I turned the silver out on the counter, and as I was sweeping it back into the bag, I missed four half crowns - it was not out of the bag a minute; nobody but him was near enough to take it; a man came in and stood behind him, but could not reach it. I was pushing the money about, and he pushed it about too, to look for a new shilling, and I suppose slipped them up his arm; if they had dropped I must have heard it. I charged him with taking them, and heard them fall from his right arm into his right-hand coat pocket. I lifted up the hatch, and laid hold of him and the other man, and called for assistance - the other man pushed me on one side and ran out. I held the prisoner fast, and took the four half crowns out of his pocket. He was taken into custody, and said,

"D - n the woman, what does she want more, she has got her half crowns" - he produced no shilling to me.

CHARLES BYCROFT . I am a porter. I was in the taproom - I lodge there. Mrs. Smith called me; I saw the prisoner and her struggling together; she said, he had taken her money. I collared him, and saw her put her hand in his right-hand coat pocket, and bring out some half crowns; he said,

"She had got her money again, and what more did she want." The constable came in.

JAMES METCALF . I am a constable. I took charge of the prisoner in the house, for stealing four half crowns. I searched him at the watch-house, and found one half crown in his left-hand coat pocket, and 6 d. in his waistcoat. I found no money in his right-hand coat pocket, nor any shilling. He said,

"The woman has got her half crowns back, and what more does she want," and that he was a fighting man, and if I did not mind, he would knock me down, and offered me a bottle of gin to settle it.

WILLIAM MORGAN . I am a patrol. I heard Mrs. Smith call out, and ran to her assistance. I found her and the prisoner struggling together, and saw her take some money out of his right-hand coat pocket - I ran for an officer.

Prisoner's Defence. I sold a cow and calf to a gentleman, named John Cordel of Southall; we went into the Blue-coat Boy, public-house; he paid me 17 l. 10 s. for them, he gave me two 10 l. notes; I gave him three 1 l. notes, and he gave four half crowns, and put his name and address on them. I had a 5 l. note of my own, I put his notes in with it, in my memorandum book. I then had 25 l. I parted with him, came down St. John-street, and met a man whom I knew - we went into this house; I had two half crowns before, which made six. I had a glass of gin with a master milkman, and gave the lady a half crown to change - she gave me 2 s., one was very black, I asked her to change it; she pulled out thirty-five or forty shillings - I said, I wanted a newer one; she ran her hand into my pocket, and took four half crowns out, and left one in. When the officer was fetched, he took my pocket-book, and would not open it before a respectable person, but I declare there was 25 l. in it, and when he returned it to me at the watch-house, it was empty. I said,

"Where is my money?" he said, there was none in it. I said,

"You are a pretty fellow to rob me so;" he brought up some shabby fellow, who said he had not opened it. He has robbed me of 25 l., and the man who paid it me, is here to prove it. The master milkman is Smith of Compton-street, Goswell-street.

JAMES METCALF re-examined. I never saw a pocketbook; he had a memorandum book which he threw on the table himself, and took it up himself - I saw no note in it.

WM. MORGAN. I was at the watch-house. He pulled the memorandum book out himself, and threw it on the table. I saw no note whatever; he took it out himself. If an notes had dropped, I must have seen them.

MARY ELIZA SMITH . The man who came, had a glass of gin - neither gin or beer were paid for.

GUILTY , Aged 34.

Transported for Seven Years .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210606-138

TENTH DAY. SATURDAY, JUNE 16.

847. CHARLES WATSON was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of May , twelve tin plates, value 2 s. 6 d. , the goods of Thomas Joyce .

THOMAS JOYCE . I am a tin-plate worker , and live in Whitechapel , the prisoner was my journeyman . On the 15th of May, about one o'clock, I marked some tin plates, and told my apprentice to put them where he said he brought them from; the prisoner was leaving work about eight o'clock, I called him back, and said, he had something which did not belong to him - he denied it, and dropped these plates from under his waistcoat on hearing me send for an officer.

CHARLES YATES . I am apprentice to Mr. Joyce. I found these plates concealed in a cupboard in the cellar. I took them to my master, and then replaced them. I saw the prisoner drop them in the evening.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 57.

Confined Two Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18210606-139

848. MARY SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of May , four sovereigns, the property of John Krinder , from his person .

JOHN KRINDER . I am a sugar baker , and live in King Edward-street. On the 25th of May, I had spent the evening out, and met the prisoner between one and two o'clock in the morning, in Montague-street - I was quite sober; as she passed me she pretended to be drunk, and staggered against me; I laid hold of her to keep her up, and immediately felt her hand in my trowsers pocket, where there was four sovereigns. I said,

"You are going to rob me;" she said, No; I felt and missed them - they were safe half an hour before. I threw her down, and said, she had robbed me, and called Watch! he came, and held her hands while I took three sovereigns out of her right hand, and at the watch-house the other was found in her mouth.

WILLIAM BARON . I am watchman of Montague-street. I heard the cry, went up, and found the prisoner on the ground - Krinder was not holding her; she cried Watch, also. I saw her grasping her hand, and asked what she had got; she said,

"It is my money, watchman." I held her arm, and Krinder took three sovereigns out of her hand. I took her to the watch-house, and Partridge found the other sovereign in her mouth.

JOHN PARTRIDGE . The prisoner was brought to the watch-house, charged with stealing four sovereigns; she denied having anything about her. I found a sovereign in her mouth - Krinder was sober.

Prisoner's Defence. He followed me from Whitechapel-church to my lodging, took me down a court, and put 4 s. in my hand, as I thought - I refused to go there, and he called Watch.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18210606-140

849. RICHARD HARRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of March , from the person of Joseph Carter , four 1 l. Bank notes, his property .

JOSEPH CARTER . I am a coal-whipper , and live at Rotherhithe. On the 27th of March, about a quarter past six in the morning, I was in company with the prisoner, a woman, and one Price - I did not know the prisoner before, I fell in company with him, about a quarter past one in the morning, at the Bunch of Grapes. I paid for a pot of porter for him in the course of the morning, and three for Price, as they had no change. They said, if I went to Whitechapel they could get change - we went to Wentworth-street, and then to the Compasses in Brick-lane - the two men went out for five or ten minutes, leaving me and the woman there - when they returned I wished them to get change. Price said, he thought I could give change - I said, I could not; and to satisfy them, I pulled out what silver I had and four 1 l. notes. The prisoner snatched my notes out of my hand, and run out of the tap-room door, and I after him - Price followed, and tripped me up in the street. I saw Harris running; Price was brought back and taken to the watch-house - he was tried and convicted last Session. I did not see the prisoner till the 7th of May, when he was taken.

Cross-examined by MR ALLEY. Q. Are you married - A. Yes, and have a family. We went to four houses, and drunk nothing but porter. I know nothing about the girl.

JONATHAN JOE . I keep the Compasses. Between six and seven o'clock in the morning the prosecutor came in with Price, the prisoner, and a woman - Price produced a bit of paper, and asked me to give change - I cannot say whether it was a note or not. Price asked me to trust him a pot - I said, No; and they might leave the house. I heard a bustle as I was lighting my fire, and saw the prisoner and another running out. I did not see Carter produce his money, but heard money jink.

JOHN BARRS . I am inspector of the watch. I was in Wentworth-street, and saw the prisoner, Carter, Price, and a woman, before they went into the Compasses. Price and the woman were arm-in-arm. I saw them go in and come out of a coffee-shop - I watched them into the Compasses - the prisoner and Price ran out very fast. I went in, heard every thing quiet, and went away. I searched Price at the watch-house, and found no note on him.

THOMAS GARTON . I am an officer of Worship-street. I apprehended the prisoner.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18210606-141

850. MARY SAMME and THOMAS BALLARD were indicted for stealing, on the 31st of May , one inkstand, value 6 d.; two yards of carpet, value 6 d.; one butter-boat,

value 6 d.; two quarts of wine, value 2 s., and two bottles, value 6 d. , the goods of Joseph Walters .

MR. JOSEPH WALTERS . I live in Duck-lane, Edmonton , and am a silk manufacturer . The prisoner Samme, was my cook - Ballard is a stranger. Having information, I set a watch outside my door to inform me when any one came to the house. On the 30th of May, at ten o'clock at night, the bell rung - I went out, and found Samme running across the yard - I asked where she was going, and what was the matter - she said, it was only a friend come to see her. I went into the servants' sitting-room, by the door where she came from, and found Ballard sitting there in the dark, eating. I told her to bring a light, which she did, and on looking round, I found a bundle on the floor - I asked him what it was - he said, it was given him for Mary - I opened it, and found a dirty shirt, a pair of stockings, and two empty bottles - he said the shirt and stockings came from James (Mr. Stringer's coachman, of Enfield). for Mary, and the bottles he knew nothing of, but they did not come from James - I had them taken into custody. The officer searched Samme's box, but found nothing. Next morning we went to Ballard's premises at Enfield, with a search-warrant - he said he lived there, and his wife and family were there. I found a plated inkstand, a Delft butter-boat, and some pieces of carpet in the room his wife was in. I do not know that I had seen the inkstand for twelve months before; the carpet had been locked in the store-room, and was merely cuttings; I might not have seen them for six or eight months. Samme lived two years with us.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRRICK. Q. She ran from the yard - A. No; from the anti-room into the kitchen - the door opens into the stable-yard. Ballard had come in at the kitchen gate, and the anti-room is close by. Samme had no light in her hand. The shirt and stockings were not mine, but I knew the bottles by the corks - they were empty - the marks were on when it came from the merchant.

Q. Did Mrs. Barnes char at your house - A. Yes, I understand some pieces of carpet were given to her, but not these, they were smaller.

JAMES HERD . I am footman to Mr. Walters. I was stationed to watch, and about ten o'clock at night, I saw Ballard walking backwards and forwards in front of the house (I have seen him there five or six times before) - after watching some time, I saw Samme open the gate and beckon him in. He went in, and I rang the bell as a signal for my master.

Cross-examined. Q. Mr. Stringer's coachman was her brother - A. No, he is an acquaintance - I know she washed his things.

SAMUEL FROST . I am a constable. I was sent for, and took Ballard at the house. I took Samme next morning, and went to Ballard's with a search-warrant, and found some pieces of carpet, a Delft butter-boat, and a plated inkstand. Mr. Walters gave charge of Ballard for secreting himself in his house, to rob it. He said, he did not come to rob.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

SAMME'S Defence. I gave him the butter-boat - the handle was broken off.

BALLARD'S Defence. She gave it to me with some dripping in it.

MARIA MURRELL . I am servant to Mr. Walters. I know Mrs. Walters gave Mrs. Barnes some pieces of carpet - it might be eight or ten months ago, when we were cleaning the house down - they were in the store-room - she said Mrs. Barnes might have them, or we might do as we liked with them. I remember some of these produced were among them (pointing them out).

COURT. Q. Do you mean to swear that that piece was was given to Barnes - A. Yes. I have seen Ballard at the house once or twice - he came about nine o'clock at night - I did not know she supplied him with provisions. I never saw the inkstand in the house - I have been there a year and ten months.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210606-142

851. ROBERT HALL was indicted for offending as a rogue and vagabond a third time, having been before twice convicted .

MR. LAW conducted the prosecution.

MR. WILLIAM STAPLE . I belong to the Clerk of the Peace's office, Westminster; I produce a record of the prisoner's conviction as a rogue and vagabond, before I. E. Conant, Esq. on the 26th of April, 1819, and the record of the Quarter Sessions of the 1st of July, confirming that conviction; he was sentenced to be confined six months.

- (read).

BANKS ROBERT NODDER . I am Governor of Tothill-fields Bridewell, the prisoner was committed on the 26th of April, 1819, till the Sessions, and then remanded for six months.

JOSEPH UNWIN . I come from the clerk of the Peace's office, Middlesex, I produce the record of the conviction of the prisoner as an incorrigible rogue, on the 28th of February, 1820; he was committed to the House of Correction till the Sessions. - (Read) - I also produce the order of the Quarter Sessions confirming the conviction, and ordering him to be imprisoned twelve months, and twice whipped.

MR. JOHN STAFFORD . I know the commitment to be Mr. Birnie's hand-writing - he is a Magistrate of Middlesex.

MR. WILLIAM ATKINS . I am Governor of the House of Correction; the prisoner was committed to my custody on the 15th day of April, and discharged at the expiration of twelve months, and twice whipped.

WILLIAM JEFFERSON . I am an officer. On the 5th of April , between five and six o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner coming up Bedford-street, Covent-garden, with another man; he had a basket on his head; I followed them; one went through the market, and the other through the Piazza; I followed the prisoner up James-street, into Great Queen-street, and just as he crossed Wild-street, his companion came up and whistled, and called out Jem; and immediately ran into Drury-lane, the prisoner looked round, did not see me, and went on with the basket on his head; I laid hold of him in King-street, and asked what he had in it; he said nothing; I said, I must see; I pushed him into a public-house, he threw it down, and caught hold of one end of a crow-bar, which was in it, I had the other end, it is a very powerful one, and would open any door in London, it is on an improved

principle, and has an extra purchase, I found a small screw driver in the basket, two sacks, and some green baize; he said, if they were mine, I might have them - that he had found them; I asked where, he said, in Piccadilly, and was going to Newgate-market; I said, that was not the right way.

THOMAS JONES . I am a constable, and know the prisoner perfectly well; I took him on the first conviction, and was a witness against him; I attended at the second conviction - he is the same man.

Prisoner's Defence. I live at Chelsea; I was going to market, and between St. James's-church and the Haymarket, I found the crow and things, and put them in my basket; I was taken in Holborn; it is a conspiracy against me.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210606-143

852. ROBERT MATTHEWS was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of April , six pennyweights of gold, value 10 s. ; the goods of Thomas Dugard .

FRANCIS DUBOIS . I am a gold and silver refiner, and live in Well-street, Oxford-road. On the 19th of April, about eleven o'clock in the morning, some gold was shown to me, as having been brought by somebody; the prisoner and his mother called about it on a Sunday, seven or eight days after, and said, they come to fetch the money or gold which had been left, the mother claimed it as her's; I told her to leave her address, and if all was right, I would send my foreman with the money; she gave her address, No. 4, Smith-street, Northampton-square; I sent round to the trade, and saw Mr. Dugard a day or two after, he claimed it; I did not see either of them again, till the examination; I had asked the prisoner, where he lived, he said at Morris and Fields, gold chasers, St. John's-lane, I sent to them about it.

THOMAS DUGARD . I am a working jeweller , and live in Red Lion-street ; the prisoner lived with me a fortnight as errand boy ; I was informed of this robbery, and found the prisoner concealed under some steps of a chapel, in St. John's-lane, he had been away all day; I had taken him to Mr. Dubois, to see if they would identify him, they were not at home; I left word that I would send the boy up next morning; he came next morning, I sent him on a message up, and he never returned, and I found him under the steps at eleven o'clock at night; Mr. Dubois examined the gold; I had been to his mother, and told her of it.

WILLIAM ASHWELL . I am employed by Mr. Dugard, and I know the gold to be his, it was weighed out to me about a week before the prisoner was taken up; I know it by a flaw in it; I was drawing it, and it broke, I put it on a tray, on a shelf, over my head, and did not miss it till Mr. Dugard shewed it to me; the prisoner was generally in the factory; I never saw his mother on the premises.

EDWARD READ . I am an officer. On the 25th of April Mr. Dugard gave the prisoner into my charge; he cried very much, and begged forgiveness.

GUILTY . Aged 13.

Whipped and Discharged .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210606-144

853. ROBERT HUNT was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of June , one fixture, viz. one copper, value 5 s.; the goods of William Milne , and fixed to a certain building of his .

WILLIAM MILNE . I am a gardener , and live at Finchley . On Tuesday, the 5th of June, at eight o'clock in the morning, I found this copper was stolen from my wash-house, I had seen it safe at five o'clock the day before, fixed in brick and mortar; some persons had come over the hedge, which was troden down, and there was the mark of a shoe with nails in it; I found it at the White Bear, Hampstead, at twelve o'clock, it fitted the brick work; a bag was found with it, which was also stolen - the prisoner had worked in the neighbourhood a few days before.

JOHN PHILIPS . I am constable of Hampstead. On the 5th of June, about seven o'clock in the morning, I found the prisoner at a Jew's, offering this copper for sale; it was about three miles from Mr. Milne's; he said, he brought it from his own cottage, at Finchley common, which he rented of Mr. Milne; I found his account false; I fitted it to the wash-house.

Prisoner's Defence. I acknowledge the crime, and beg for mercy; I was out of work, and had no food.

GUILTY . Aged 58.

Confined Three Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210606-145

854. MARY PIMLET was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of June , one pelisse, value 5 s.; one handkerchief, value 2 s., and three shifts, value 5 s. , the goods of Philip Elias .

PHILIP ELIAS . I live at No. 53, - street, Spitalfields ; and am a skinner and furrier . On the 4th of June, the prisoner came into my service; I came home from the country unexpectedly, at four o'clock in the morning, I locked the door, and went up stairs, my wife said, the prisoner was in the room, lying with the children, and as I was come home, she sent her to sleep in the kitchen; when I came down in the morning she was gone, and the street door left open - these articles were stolen from the kitchen.

ESTHER ELIAS . When my husband came home, I sent the prisoner down into the kitchen to sleep, next morning I missed these things; I met her next day, with the handkerchief and one of the shifts on her back - she had the duplicate of the pelisse in her pocket.

CHARLES POPLE . I am shopman to Mr. Christie, pawnbroker, Whitechapel. On the 4th of June, the prisoner pawned the pelisse.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210606-146

855. MARY M'GRAHAM was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of May , one gown, value 3 s. ; the goods of John Goodday .

ELIZA GOODDAY . I am wife of John Goodday ; we live in Foster's-buildings, Shoreditch ; I let the prisoner sleep in a bed in my room, as she was distressed; another young woman slept with her; when I got up in the morning, I put my gown inside the bed, and left the room at six o'clock in the morning, to go out ironing; I returned about

ten o'clock at night, I found the gown was gone - the other girl lodges there now.

JAMES FLINT. I live with Mr. Williamson, a pawnbroker, in Shoreditch. On the 19th of May, the prisoner pawned the gown for 3 s.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

ANN COUZENS . I hired the prisoner out of the market; she lived five days with me; she brought me word that her father was run over, and her mother was gone out of her mind in consequence of it; I kept her out of charity. On the 15th of May, she brought me the gown to sell for 5 s.; and said, it was her mother's - I said, I did not want it.

WILLIAM COX . I apprehended her; she said, she knew nothing about it.

Prisoner's Defence. The young woman persuaded me to pawn it - as she had no victuals.

GUILTY. Aged 16.

Judgment Respited .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210606-147

856. MARY KING , was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of June , one bonnet, value 1 s. 6 d., the goods of Edward Salvena , from the person of Magdalen Salvena .

MAGDALEN SALVENA. My husband's name is Edward, he is a carpenter , and lives in George-court, Ratcliffe. On Monday night, at eleven o'clock, I was going home, and saw the prisoner in Commercial-road - she asked me to give her something to drink - I went into a gin-shop, and drank with her; we had half a pint of beer, and as we came out, she snatched my bonnet off, and gave it to another woman, who ran away with it - I called Stop thief! and she was taken.

JAMES STONE . I was constable of the night. The prisoner was brought to the watch-house as disorderly - the prosecutrix, who was in liquor, followed her, and charged her with stealing her bonnet - she denied it.

Prisoner's Defence. She was in liquor, staggering against the wall - there was a dispute with some women - she laid hold of me, and said I stole her bonnet; she came to the watch-house, and swore I should give her a new one.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210606-148

857. WILLIAM ELLIS , was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of May , three 1 l. Bank notes , the property of Edward Ison .

EDWARD ISON . I live at Edmonton. I gave these notes to the prisoner to take care of, and have never seen them since.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210606-149

858. JOHN HENSHAW and JOHN BUTTRESS , were indicted for stealing, on the 16th of April , one jacket, value 7 s.; one pair of breeches, value 1 l.; one round frock, value 1 s.; two handkerchiefs, value 6 d., and one shirt, value 6 d. , the goods of John Maynard .

JOHN MAYNARD . I am servant at the Bird-in-hand, Bromley, near Bow . On Sunday night, the 16th of April, about ten o'clock, I was shutting up the shutters - I had put these things in a bundle, and was going to take them home to Stratford - a young man called me into the parlour to drink with him; I left my bundle in the tap-room, nobody was there then - I came out in a quarter of an hour, and missed it - I ran out, and saw some men on the road, they saw me, and set off running across the fields, and got away - I found the prisoners at Hackney watch-house that night, with the property.

ELIZA TAYLOR . I am servant at this house. On Sunday, the 15th of April, about ten o'clock at night, I saw Buttress in the tap-room; nobody else was there then - Maynard was in the tap-room; I had seen his bundle there - five or six others came in, who I cannot swear to; and in a quarter of an hour I missed his bundle, and told him - I was sure of Buttress, I had seen him on the Sunday before, at the skittle-ground, and then Henshaw was with him - I do not know whether he was in the tap-room or not.

JAMES WILLIS . I am watchman of Hackney. About twelve o'clock on this night, I was asked if I had seen any one pass with a bundle, I said, No; they mentioned Buttress's name as one. I got another watchman, and we went to Buttress's house, at the bottom of Well-street; he was not at home - we went down the street, and there saw Henshaw standing by a post (it was between twelve and one), my mate collared him, and I saw Buttress run away, he was only a few yards from him - I followed, but he got off; and about half-past five o'clock, we found him at his brother-in-law's house, at the bottom of Pound-lane, concealed under two beds. Henshaw took us to a quickset hedge, about twenty yards from where he stood, and shewed us the bundle.

THOMAS ATKINS . I am a watchman. I went with Willis and saw the prisoners at half-past twelve o'clock; Henshaw stood by a post, in Well-street; I took him, a person ran from him, whom Willis pursued. I do not know who it was; I went afterwards, and found Buttress concealed between a mattress and two beds. When I took Henshaw, he said,

"It is the bundles you want, it is a pity they should be lost, I will shew you where they are." He did so.

JOHN BAILEY . I live at Stratford; and am a basket-maker. I know the prisoners by sight, I saw them together about half-past nine o'clock, or near ten at night, at the Three Crowns, public-house, Mile-end. Buttress came in, and asked for his cousin, Henshaw met him in the road; I saw them go into the Bird-in-Hand, public-house, together, and came out in about ten minutes, and go towards Hackney - Henshaw then had a bundle.

JOHN FOLKES . I live at Stratford, and take care of Mr. Howard's horses, he is a chemist - I was with Bailey, taking a walk; Buttress came into the Three Crowns, Henshaw joined him, we walked into the Bird-in-Hand, with them. I saw Henshaw take a bundle out of the tap-room, but did not know whether it was his.

JOHN OLIVER . I live at Bromley, about a quarter of a mile from the Bird-in-Hand. I was drinking with Maynard, in the parlour, and went after the men. Before that I came out of the parlour, and saw seven or eight in the tap-room, the prisoners were two of them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

HENSHAW'S Defence. I was in the field, and saw two young men throw this bundle into the hedge.

BUTTRESS'S Defence. Five or six men rushed out of the house, and I went home quietly.

HENSHAW - GUILTY . Aged 18.

BUTTRESS - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210606-150

859. DANIEL GILBERT , was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of May , two candlesticks, value 1 s. 6 d. , the goods of William Petts .

WILLIAM PETTS I keep the York Minster, public-house, Foley-street . On the 2d of May, the prisoner came into the tap-room, and called for half a pint of beer, which I sent him - I kept my eye on him, missed him, and found he was gone, without drinking his beer; I missed the candlesticks from the wash-house - next morning I found them exposed for sale, at Grote's. He came to my house again on Saturday, and I detained him.

CHARLES GROTE . I live at the corner of Foley-street; the prisoner sold me the candlesticks, about six o'clock that night, for 18 d.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 39.

Whipped and Discharged .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210606-151

860. THOMAS BROWN , was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of May , one pair of boots, value 4 s. , the goods of William Gosling .

JOHN HUBE . I am shopman to Mr. Cross, a salesman, who lives near Gosling's. I stood at the door, saw the prisoner and another walking about - I saw the other man go into the shop; the prisoner stood at the window, then went in himself, came out with something in his apron towards me, I said, he had something not belonging to him - he threw the boots down, we had a scuffle, but I secured him.

JOHN HEATH . I am shopman to Mr. Gosling, a pawnbroker , the boots hung inside the door; the prisoner was stopped with them.

(Property produced, and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded the utmost distress.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Strongly recommended to mercy.

Fined One Shilling, and Discharged .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210606-152

861. ROBERT FOWLER , was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of May , one coral necklace, value 5 s., the goods of James London , from the person of Eliza London , spinster .

ELIZA LONDON . I am not quite eleven years old, and am the daughter of James London . On the 1st of May, I was in Old-street , with my little brother, looking at the chimney-sweeps; this was about half-past seven o'clock - a boy came and snatched my coral necklace off my neck, and ran away - I saw him again on Sunday, the 6th of May, and am sure he is the boy; it was the prisoner - directly he took it, I caught hold of him, and tore his coat; he said, if I did not let go, he would do me an injury, and so I let go - I am sure of him.

JOHN TWEEDY. I am an officer. On Sunday, the 6th of May, I took the prisoner in the City-road, and told him I wanted him on suspicion of stealing the necklace; he said,

"Oh! that is it, is it;" I took him to London's, in Golden-lane, and told the child to look round the room - she did, and said,

"That is the man who took my beads" - he denied it.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in Old-street, and saw her crying, she laid hold of a boy, let him go, and took another, charged him with it, and then caught hold of me.

ELIZA LONDON . I laid hold of nobody but him.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210606-153

862. JOSE DE'SUA , was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of May , one bag, value 1 s.; one pair of boots, value 6 d., and one apron, value 6 d. , the goods of Isaac George Frances .

GEORGE CRAIG . I am a plasterer, and live in the Commercial-road. On the 13th of May, I was at my back window, and could see into Bedford-place; I saw the prisoner carrying a bag of things over five different yards, going from Frances's yard - I saw him trying to open all the kitchen windows, gave an alarm, and he was taken - I found the bag in the yard he ran out of, when I gave the alarm.

JOSEPH SANDERS . I am a watchman. I pursued the prisoner from one yard to the other, and at last caught him.

ISAAC GEORGE FRANCES . I live in Bedford-place . This property was stolen from my wash-house on the 12th of May, at night.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I went there to sleep.

GUILTY . Aged 42.

Whipped , and delivered to the Portuguese Consul.

Third Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18210606-154

863. JOSEPH JAMES was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of June , one coat, value 2 s., and one carpet, value 2 s. , the goods of William Shepherd .

WILLIAM SHEPHERD . I live in Brunswick-street, Hackney-road . On the 6th of June, about six o'clock in the morning, I was awoke by the cry of Thieves! I ran into the garden, and found the prisoner in custody over two walls, with my property at his side; the men said in his presence, that they saw him throw them down.

JOHN ROBINSON . I was by Shepherd's house, and saw the prisoner get over the wall into the yard - an alarm was given; he then threw a coat and carpet over into the next yard; he came over himself, and I took him - he said they were only bits of things.

GEORGE SMITH . I took him into custody - he said he found them in the road.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Whipped and Discharged .

Third Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18210606-155

864. WILLIAM GOODHALL was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of May , one coat, value 3 l. , the goods of George Mills .

SECOND COUNT the same, only stating it to be the property of JAMES GRAHAM .

WILLIAM CORKING . I am servant to George Mills , who lives in Goswell-street. On the 21st of May, I fetched a chaise from Shacklewell, and about nine o'clock, I was in Goswell-street , taking the horse out, and saw the coat suddenly snatched off the chaise by a man. I followed him down Glasshouse-yard; I lost him, and gave up the chase, but as I returned, met the prisoner coming another way with it. I asked, what he had there; he said, it was nothing to me. I took the coat which was concealed under his own - he said it was his own. I took him to my master; he then said he picked it up. He was dressed the same as the man who took it - it belongs to Mr. Graham.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I saw it on the ground, and picked it up.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Whipped and Discharged .

Third Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18210606-156

865. JAMES NOWLAND was indicted for embezzlement .

ROBERT HOWARD . I keep the City Arms, public-house, City-road . I employed the prisoner to carry out beer since the 4th of April, and to receive the money for it - he ought to bring it to me immediately as he received it. On the 19th of May , he took the beer out at night - he had asked for Mrs. Roger's bill in the afternoon. He left in the morning early, and left the door open - his wages were due on Friday.

CHARLOTTE ROGERS . I dealt with Mr. Howard, and paid once a week, or once a fortnight. On the 19th of May, the prisoner brought the bill; I paid him 6 s. 1 1/2 d., between five and six o'clock in the evening.

SARAH HOWARD . I am the daughter of Robert Howard . On the 19th of May, about four o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner asked for Rogers's bill, saying, she was was going in the country - it was 6 s. 1 1/2 d. I gave it to him, and asked him at nine o'clock, if it was paid, he said, No, it would be paid in the morning. He left in the morning without notice.

JAMES HANLEY . I am an officer. I apprehended him at the Catholic chapel on another charge. He said he received 6 s. from Rogers.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Third Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18210606-157

866. THOMAS WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of May , one coral necklace, value 7 s. the goods of Jacob Cammann , from the person of John Thomas Cammann .

ANN WHITE . I am servant to Mr. Cammann, who lives in Blue Anchor-alley, Bunhill-row. I took their child named John Thomas out, about three o'clock, into Tabernacle-walk, City-road , it had three rows of coral beads on its neck. The prisoner came and undid them, took them off its neck, and gave them to a woman, who went off in an instant. I caught hold of his cuff, and held him for ten minutes, till the officer came and took him - we were looking at the sweeps.

WILLIAM PATRICK . I heard an alarm, and found White holding the prisoner, and took him; she charged him with it - he denied it.

Prisoner's Defence. I saw a piece of work - she laid hold of me.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Life .

Third Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18210606-158

867. MARY SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of June , three shawls, value 10 s.; one child's dress, value 2 s., and one frock, value 1 s. , the goods of Robert Peart .

MICHAEL PRITCHARD . I am shopman to Robert Peart , a pawnbroker , who lives in Whitechapel . On the 6th of June, in the morning, I saw the prisoner waiting about the shop window for an hour, suspecting her, I went behind the counter - she came inside the door; three shawls hung to the ceiling - she pulled them down, then pulled down a child's dress and frock, and put them in her apron. I followed her out and secured her three doors off, and took them out of her apron - she went into fits, and made a sad piece of work.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I was much in liquor.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

Third Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18210606-159

868. JOSEPH SHEPPARD was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of May , one bridle, value 6 s.; one horse collar, value 2 s., and one cloth, value 2 s. , the goods of Stephen Cox , and John Roalfe .

THOMAS LEE . I am servant to Stepen Cox, and John Roalfe , horse dealers , King's Arms-yard, Blackfriars-road ; the prisoner worked in the yard this property was stolen from.

THOMAS HASLE . I am a patrol. I was on duty on the 14th of May, at half-past twelve o'clock at night, and stopped the prisoner by Cow-cross, with these things on his shoulder, tied in a handkerchief; he said, he brought them from over the water, and was taking them to Dixon's repository in Barbican - he was going the wrong way. I took him to the watch-house; he then said, he stole them from over the water - I think he was intoxicated.

THOMAS THOMPSON . I am constable of the night. The prisoner was brought to the watch-house; he said, he had been drinking all day, and that after the men left Mr. Cox's yard, he went down, and took the things out of the stable. I went to Mr. Cox, who claimed them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was much in liquor, and did not know what I was about, till I found myself at the watch-house, and did not know I had taken them.

NOT GUILTY .

Third Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18210606-160

869. CHARLES LLOYD was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of April , one handkerchief, value 7 s., the goods of George Coleman , from his person .

GEORGE COLEMAN. I am a sweep . On the 24th of April, between three and four o'clock, in the afternoon, I was in Crown-court, St. James's , with Matthews, and felt my handkerchief go out of my coat pocket. I put my hand down, and missed it, turned round and saw the prisoner about six yards off, coming towards me; he suddenly turned into a hair-dresser's shop, I followed him, and saw him drop the handkerchief in the shop behind him. I picked it up - it was mine. I said, he took it; he said he was sure I was wrong. I said, I was not mistaken, and while I was talking to him, he dropped it.

WILLIAM MATTHEWS . I am a sweep. I was with Coleman; he called out

"I have lost my handkerchief, there goes the man into that shop." We directly followed him in - he was asking for Dr. Williams. Coleman said,

"You have got my handkerchief;" he said he was mistaken. I saw it lay down behind him, and fetched an officer.

ROBERT NEEDHAM . I took him in charge - he denied it.

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutor said to Mr. Williams, he could get a genteel living by prosecuting people, and being bribed not to appear, and getting his expences.

GEORGE COLEMAN . I never prosecuted, or gave evidence before.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Life .

Third Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18210606-161

870. CHARLOTTE MILLER was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of May , one watch, value 35 s. , the goods of William Todd .

The prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Third Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18210606-162

871. JOHN LONEY was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of May , 4 lbs. of bacon, value 18 d. , the goods of Edmund Stolworthy .

WILLIAM WARREN . I live with Mr. Stolworthy, a cheesemonger , who lives in High-street, Whitechapel . On the 5th of May, between nine and ten o'clock at night, I saw the prisoner come into the shop, and take the bacon out of the window - he carried it out in his hand, as if he had bought it. I overtook him about twenty yards from the shop, as he was putting it into his basket, and gave him in charge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 58.

Confined One Month .

Third Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18210606-163

872. ANN LEONARD was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of May , six pounds of beef, value 3 s. , the goods of George Abraham Read .

GEORGE ABRAHAM READ . I am a butcher , and live in Tottenham-court-road . On the 20th of May, about eleven o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner there, but did not see her go out. I was told something. I went out and overtook her about fifteen yards off - I shook her, and this beef fell from under her clothes - she had bought some pieces which came to 4 d. - this weighs six pounds.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I sat on a step, selling mackarel; a woman ran by and said,

"Here! take hold of this for me."

GUILTY . Aged 38.

Confined One Month .

Third Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18210606-164

873. THOMAS FOSSEY was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of June , three pieces of glass, value 4 s. , the goods Henry Newman .

HENRY NEWMAN . I live in Greek-street, Soho . On the 6th of June, the prisoner came and asked me for employment. I said I wanted nobody - he went away - I went out afterwards and had information, he was taken.

SARAH WILLIAMS . I am servant to Mr. Newman. On the 6th of June, when my master was out, the prisoner came and asked if my master had cut the glass - I said, I knew nothing about - he went to the place, took three pieces - he measured them and said, they were three feet and a half, and took them away.

Mr. NEWMAN. I saw him next morning in Cranbourne-alley, and took him. He said, he had sold it for 2 s. - he had said nothing to me about any glass when he called - he had worked for me for five days about six months ago.

Prisoner's Defence. I got a job and wanted three squares, and called there - she said, there was none in the binn. I went and found three, and told her to tell Mr. Newman I would pay in the morning. I met him in Ryder's-court, and told him I would pay him, but he would prosecute.

MR. NEWMAN. I never gave him credit - I said, I would prosecute the first man I found out.

GUILTY . Aged 38.

Fined One Shilling and discharged .

Third Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18210606-165

ELEVENTH DAY, MONDAY, JUNE 18.

874. STEPHEN PALMER was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of May , two bushels of oats, beans, and chaff (mixed together), value 4 s. , the goods of William Smith .

WILLIAM SMITH . I keep the Horseshoe public house, in Goswell-street , and keep horses in my yard. I had oats, beans, and chaff mixed together. The prisoner had the care of my horses . On the 27th of May, about seven o'clock in the morning, Thompson brought him to me, in custody. He slept on the premises.

THOMAS THOMPSON . I am an officer. On the 26th of May, about a quarter before six o'clock in the morning, I was in Whitecross-street, and saw the prisoner about six hundred yards from these stables, with a bag on his back. I watched him up a court - he knocked at a door - a naked child opened it. One Tee, who keeps a horse and cart, lives there. I asked what he had there - he said corn; that he worked for a corn-chandler close by, and brought it from there. I said,

"Take it up, and go to the place." When he got in the street, he said he was Smith's hostler, and brought it from him, and begged I would let him go - it was oats, beans, and chaff. I took

him to Mr. Smith, who asked, how he could do it - he said he took it from the granary.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Were you set to watch - A. No - he did not say they were not his master's, or that they were his perquisites.

WILLIAM SMITH . The bag is not mine - I asked how he could be so ungrateful as to rob me - he said, he took it out of the granary - he never pretended that he had a right to them - he had been eight years with me.

Cross-examined. Q. How do you settle with him - A. I deliver him three bushels at a time, and he is to pay me for it. If horses go away without eating their corn, I do not allow it him - I never gave him leave to take any - I expect him to pay me for the corn whatever he makes of it. If I receive the amount of the corn I am satisfied.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210606-166

875. ROBERT LLOYD was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of May , 13 s. 6 d. in monies numbered, from the person of Charles Lawson , his property .

CHARLES LAWSON . I belong to the second regiment of Tower Hamlets militia . On the 21st of May I called at a public-house in Whitechapel - I changed a sovereign and put the change (13 s. 6 d.) in my jacket pocket - I stood at the bar - the servant girl said I was robbed - I felt, and missed the 13 s. 6 d. - the prisoner was stopped immediately.

HARRIET NOLDING . I am servant at Mr. Gilbert's wine vaults. I saw the prisoner holding Lawson's jacket open, and with his left hand in his pocket - I drew it out, and called the waiter, who put him inside the bar - the officer found 13 s. 6 d. on him.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Did they appear acquainted - A. No; he did it slyly.

MARY ANN GILBERT . I gave Lawson 13 s. 6 d., which he put in his pocket behind him. Soon after the girl took hold of the prisoner's arm, and 13 s. 6 d. was found in his breeches pocket, among which was a crown piece, which I knew I had given him, by a mark on it. The prisoner said it was his, and he worked for it.

RICHARD PLUNKETT . I am an officer. I was fetched, and found two shillings, a sixpence, and some halfpence, in his right-hand pocket; and in his other pocket, a crown piece, five shillings, and three sixpences - before I found it, Gilbert said she could swear to the crown piece by a black mark on the head.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Whipped and discharged .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210606-167

876. HENRY COPAS was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of May , from the person of William Lowrie , one seal, value 10 s., and one key, value 6 d. his property .

WILLIAM LOWRIE . On the 13th of May, about half past nine o'clock at night, I was in Whitechapel - a person came up and laid hold of my seal - the ribbon broke, and he ran off with it. I was going to pursue, but some gentlemen said I should get ill used. I gave information at the watch-house.

RICHARD PLUNKETT . About half past ten o'clock at night, on Sunday, I was informed of another robbery. I found the prisoner in a room in George-yard, with four girls, and said,

"Copas, I am very sorry to find you here." I said a gentleman had lost his watch. On searching him, I found Lowrie's key and seal in his pocket. I had information of this robbery also, and took him to the watch-house. He said he picked it up, and went to that house to enquire who lost it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I went to see a young woman home, and by George-yard I picked up this seal and key. I then met an unfortunate girl, and went with her to this house. The prosecutor said a boy robbed him. I did not leave home till half-past nine o'clock.

WILLIAM LOWRIE . I thought it was a boy who robbed me, by his height - he ran down Castle-alley.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210606-168

877. SARAH BARNES was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of May , one gown, value 2 s. 6 d.; one petticoat, value, 5 s.; one spencer, value 15 s.; one pelisse, value 7 s.; one shawl, value 2 s., and three yards of calico, value 5 s. , the goods of Zachariah Senior .

SARAH SENIOR. I am the wife of Zachariah Senior , a grocer , who lives in Holborn . The prisoner was my servant - I missed things, enquired for them, and searched her box; but found nothing - on Wednesday, I missed more, called all the servants up, and said, I was determined to find it out - she appeared flurried, and while I was at dinner, she ran away - I found part of them in Golden-square.

WALTER CAMPBELL . I am a beadle. On the first of May, I was fetched, and took the prisoner; they detained her - I found a duplicate of the pelisse on her; she said, she had thrown the things in the Serpentine river, but afterwards said she left them in John-street, Hanway-yard.

JAMES TAYLOR . I am an officer. She took me to John-street, where I found a spencer, and a cap.

MARY MASON . On the 1st of June, I met the prisoner in Tottenham-court-road. She asked, if I knew of a lodging - she said she was in trouble, having lost her place on Wednesday, and was one night at a watch-house, and the next at a coffee-shop, in George-street; that she was very hungry, and had nothing to pawn but the pelisse on her back; and as she was never at a pawnbroker's, in her life, would I do it - I went and pawned it for 2 s., and she bought some victuals with it - I went with her to her mistress's door, for her to beg to be taken back.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 16.

Judgment Respited .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210606-169

878. WILLIAM BAXTER , was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of April , forty pounds of hay, value 18 d. , the goods of Josiah Parkes

JOSIAH PARKES . I am a hay dealer , at No. 5, wharf, Paddington . On the 30th of April, the prisoner came

into the yard to fetch some stones for his master - I went out, and on returning, was told he had stolen the hay - when his cart came into the yard it had no hay in it.

MARTHA PARKES . About eight o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner wrapping the hay up in a cloth. I said he had better leave it, for it belonged to us; he would not, I saw him put it in his cart - I called my man to take it out, he would not let him - his master was in the yard, and suffered him to take it; he rode off with it, I am sure it was ours.

HENRY HUMPHRIES . Parkes came and said he had lost a truss of hay, and the man was gone down the road with it - I went about two miles down the Harrow-road, and found the prisoner with some hay in his cart, and told him it was Parkes's - he was very loth to go with me; I at last got him in my chaise - he said,

"Dont' hurt me, and I will pay for it."

GEORGE DIXON . I am Parkes's boatman. I told the prisoner to give me the hay sooner than have a piece of work about it - he said he would not, that he brought it from home, and Will gave it him - I know he brought none with him - I went to fetch my master - I followed him out of the yard, with it on his cart.

JOHN MARSHALL . I was in Parkes's yard, and saw the prisoner untie a truss of hay, and put it aside; he then put it in his cart.

Prisoner's Defence. I brought it from home.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Confined One Month and Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210606-170

879. SARAH AUSTIN and MARY DAVIS were indicted for stealing, on the 22d of May , eight yards of of muslin, value 10 s., the goods of John Sparrow Benstead , privately in his shop ; and GEORGE GOODWIN was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, knowing it to be stolen .

JOHN CHAPMAN . I am a headborough of St. Pancras. On the 22d of May, between twelve and one o'clock, as I returned from Hatton-garden, I saw Austin come from Little Bath-street, into Great Bath-street, and meet Goodwin; something passed from her to him so quick, I could not discern what it was - thinking all was not right, I took him, and asked what he had got, he said,

"nothing" I took him into a public-house, and took this muslin from under his jacket; he said, he found it - I left him in charge, and went to look for Austin; and saw her and Davis sitting in Mr. Benstead's shop, in Little Bath-street; I took her, she asked Davis

"What does this mean" - I took them both, and on coming out, Davis said to Austin,

"I am afraid he is taken;" I found nothing on Davis, and discharged her - she followed us to Hatton-garden, and was taken - Benstead's shopman claimed the muslin.

JAMES SMITH . I am an officer. I was with Chapman, and saw Austin give something to Goodwin; we secured him and found the muslin on him.

JOHN HOLLIER . I am clerk to a solicitor. I had been to Hatton-garden with Chapman, and saw Austin pass something under Goodwin's jacket - the muslin was found there.

FREDERICK CARY . I am shopman to Mr. J. S. Benstead, linen-draper , No. 7, Little Bath-street . On the 22d of May, the female prisoners came in together, and asked to see some prints; I asked if they had tried a pattern which I gave them yesterday; they said, No, but they wanted another dress - they had paid 1 s. on a dress the day before - I gave them a pattern; they said, if it washed, they would have another - I shewed them a great many prints, on the 22d, and as they liked none of them, I asked them to look in the window, outside, and see if there were any they should like; and in a few minutes, Austin went out to look at the window, as I thought, Davis remained - she returned, and the officer came in - I did not then miss any thing, till he produced the muslin - they had come together the day before.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

AUSTIN'S Defence. I never saw the man, or gave him any thing.

DAVIS'S Defence. I do not think I was ever there before. He told us to look in the window; Austin went out, the officer came in and asked if she was with me, I said, Yes; he took us both, nothing was found on me, he discharged me - I said, I would not go without her.

GOODWIN'S Defence. I saw a man come out of the shop and drop it - I picked it up.

AUSTIN - GUILTY . Aged 17.

DAVIS - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

GOODWIN - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Three Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210606-171

880. ELIZA BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of May , two caps, value 1 s.; twelve saucers, value 1 s.; five tumblers, value 2 s.; two plates, value 1 s.; one quilt, value 2 s.; one blanket, value 2 s.; two brass ladles, value 6 d; one pepper castor, value 1 s., and three yards of ribbon, value 1 s. , the goods of Eliza Darby .

ELIZA DARBY . I live on Saffron-hill . One of my lodgers let the prisoner sleep in her room, on the 24th of May, and I lost these things from my parlour and kitchen.

WILLIAM READ , JUN. I took her into custody, and found an apron on her.

(Apron produced and sworn to.)

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before. Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210606-172

881. ELIZA BROWN was again indicted for stealing, on the 14th of May , three shifts, value 4 s.; four petticoats, value 6 d.; four pockets, value 3 s.; one gown, value 10 s.; three aprons, value 1 s.; six handkerchiefs, value 2 s.; one muff, value 2 s.; seven caps, value 4 s.; fourteen collars and frills, value 4 s.; one pair of boots, value 2 s., and two shoes, value 2 s. , the goods of Sarah Smith , widow .

SARAH SMITH . The prisoner lodged in the same room with me. On the 4th of June, about eleven o'clock, I went out, leaving these things in the parlour cupboard, and some on the lines, drying - she went out with me and said, she should return immediately, and finish a shirt which she was making - I returned at half-past six o'clock, and my property was then all gone - she was absent, I did not see her again, till she was in custody about a week after -

she was then wearing my shift, neck handkerchief, and cap - she stole all my needlework.

- CLIFFORD. I live in Corporation-row. On the 4th of May, about ten o'clock at night, the prisoner came and asked for a lodging, for one night, and brought a bundle with her, containing this property - she lodged three nights there.

WILLIAM READ . I am an officer. I found a bundle at Clifford's, and Collins gave me a muff and other things - I took a cap and handkerchief off the prisoner - she said, the prosecutrix's things were in Corporation-row.

RHODA COLLINS . I live at No. 26, Northampton-street. The prisoner brought the muff and other things to me to sell.

MARY COTTERILL . I lodge at Darby's. About the end of April, the prisoner came and asked me for a lodging, saying, she was distressed; and referred me to No. 26, Northampton-street.

Prisoner's Defence. Smith agreed to take another lodging with me - I went after one, she told me to take the things to the lodging - I met my husband, and could not go.

SARAH SMITH . It is false.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210606-173

882. WILLIAM GOULD , was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of March , two sets of harness, value 2 l. 10 s. , the goods of Robert Jenkins .

ROBERT JENKINS . I am a coachmaker , and live at Battle-bridge . On the 10th of March, the prisoner came to my shop and asked if I let chaise harness out; and said he wanted one for four days, to go to Oxford; and asked me to lend him another harness, for a particular friend, who was going with him - I let him have one harness, and he sent a man for the chaise and other harness - I asked where he lived, he said, in Rawstone-street, Clerkenwell, and kept a stable. On Monday, a man called, and gave me information - I went and found my chaise at a stable-yard, in Goswell-street-road; and the harness pawned in the Strand, for 50 s. - I apprehended him in Tottenham-court-road, two months after.

HENRY ASHMAN . I am a pawnbroker, and live in the Strand. On the 10th of March, the prisoner pawned this harness.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I hire ten or twelve every day, and let them out again - it did not suit me to go to Oxford, and wanting money, I pawned them.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210606-174

883. RICHARD HEATH , was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of May , one bible, value 15 s. the goods of Thomas Edwards .

THOMAS EDWARDS . I am a bookseller , and live in St. John-street . On the 2d of May, this bible was stolen from my shop.

WILLIAM PRIME. I am a butcher. I saw the prisoner take the bible off Edward's shop board, outside, and go off with it. I went after him, and asked where he got it; he wished me to let him go - I took him back a little way, he then dropped it; Edwards's boy picked it up.

MICHAEL ASHBORN . I am servant to Edwards. I saw him drop the book, six doors off.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I looked at the books, and as I was going away, the gentleman collared me, shoved me against the house, and knocked the book off the stand.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210606-175

884. ELIZA BALL was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of April , one cap, value 10 s. , the goods of William Woolsey .

WILLIAM WOOLSEY . I am an haberdasher . On the 27th of April, about eight o'clock in the morning, I went into my back room, and on my return, missed a bandbox with a cap in it; I found it at Mrs. Hogsflesh's in half an hour after.

JOANNA HOGSFLESH . I live at No. 14, George-street, and deal in ladies wardrobes; the prisoner brought the cap to my shop about nine o'clock in the morning; I will not swear to her, as I only saw her through the glass of the back room, I sent the money out to her; on the following Monday she brought something else, I detained her; she acknowledged selling the cap.

MR. WOOLSEY. I have since sold the cap.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210606-176

885. ELIZA HATSWELL was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of May , one gown, value 1 s.; one shawl, value 2 s.; one pair of gloves, value 1 s.; two caps, value 10 s.; two aprons, value 6 d.; and one piece of patchwork, value 18 d. , the goods of Caleb Chitty .

MARY CHITTY . I am wife of Caleb Chitty , who is a watch-maker , the prisoner came into my service on the 2d of April, and remained till the 22d of April, then left the house before I got up, and took these things with her; I had a good character with her; her mother found her next day - she then had the gown on.

WILLIAM READ . I apprehended her at her father's, in Exmouth-street and found these things on the table; she had the gown on; her father is a sawyer.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I am very sorry for it.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years ,

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210606-177

886. THOMAS STOCK was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of June , two pieces of gold, value 4 s.; and two pieces of silver, value 4 d. , the goods of Charles Lupton .

CHARLES LUPTON . I am a gold watch-case-maker , and live in St. James's-place, Clerkenwell . The prisoner lived twelve months with me as errand boy , he left for two months and came back. On the 2d of June, I missed two pieces of silver, and accused him of having them, he denied it, and said, he had not seen it, I said

"Then let me feel in your pockets;" I felt, and found the silver, and two pieces of gold in his pocket; he was a very industrious lad.

GEORGE BUTT . I am servant to Mr. Lupton. On the 1st of June, I observed the prisoner by the forge, he dropped his hand suddenly down, which rose my suspicion; I set him to blow the bellows, he kept his fingers close, as if something was between them; I told Mr. Lupton of it; we put some silver on the board, and missed it in about ten minutes; he said, he had seen neither gold or silver, and said,

"Me rob you, Sir, search me!" Mr. Lupton felt, and found the silver and gold on him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 15.

Judgment Respited .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210606-178

887. ABRAHAM MYERS , JOSEPH PHILLIPS and THOMAS PHILIPS , was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of May , one watch, value 1 l., and three sovereigns, the property of William Caton , from his person .

WILLIAM CATON . On the 4th of May, between six and seven o'clock in the evening, I was in Whitechapel-road , three or four young fellows came up, one collared me, and said,

"I have got charge of you;" he took me up a court, and took my money from my breeches pocket, that was neither of the prisoners; I never saw them; they were taken up about three days ago. - (The Court here referred to the deposition of the witness before the Magistrate.)

Q. On your oath, is not the man here who said, he took you in custody - A. He is not.

Q. Did you go to a public-house after - A. Yes, I saw nobody there, on my oath; I swore to the prisoners before the Justice; but now I come to think, I do not think that they are the young fellows - I swear that.

Q. How came you to swear that Thomas Philips came up and said, your father has given you in charge for robbing him of 16 l. - A. I thought then they were the men; I saw these young fellows in the mob, and thought they were the men.

Q. You were positive to them all - A. Yes, but when I come to look at them, I think I am wrong - I have received nothing not to swear to them - I have not got my watch again.

SAMUEL MILLER . On the 24th of May, Caton came up to me, and said, he was robbed, and could find the people; he took me into the George, public-house, in George-yard, Thomas Philips was there; I asked if he knew anybody there, he said, he did not; his mother came in, and said

"I have been looking for you all day, where is the money you robbed me and your father of?" and gave charge of him; I took him to the watch-house; the Magistrate discharged him; his father came down after, and told me to take the prisoners, the prosecutor named four of them, among whom were the prisoners, and he positively swore to them before the Magistrate. On the second examination, I saw Thomas Philips with him; Caton's father said, I insist on your telling the truth; he said, then that is the man who acted as constable, and took my sovereigns.

WILLIAM CATON re-examined. Q. You told Miller Thomas Philips was the man - A. Yes, but I cannot swear to him.

- (Committed.)

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210606-179

888. CHARLES JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of June , one jacket, value 5 s.; two waistcoats, value 3 s.; two shirts, value 3 s.; one pair of trowsers, value 1 s., and one handkerchief, value 6 d. , the goods of Francisco Antonio .

FRANCISCO ANTONIO . (Through an interpeter.) I am a sailor , and live in Prince's-square, Ratcliffe-highway , the prisoner lodged in the same house, and is a sailor - I lost these things.

JOHN LLOYD . The prosecutor and prisoner lodged at my house; Antonio left these things in my care, and about six weeks after that the prisoner got in liquor, and I missed them; I got a constable, and in the privy found a duplicate, and next day some of the things, in pawn, and some sold - Antonio was in the hospital at the time.

FRANCIS JACKSON . I am an officer. I was fetched to the house, and took the prisoner; he denied it; they said, he had been in the privy; I went there, and found the duplicate of a shirt torn up, and thrown down, and in his waistcoat pocket I found another duplicate - I found more property in Rosemary-lane.

JAMES LOVE . I live with Mr. Williamson, a pawnbroker, in Cable-street. On the 2d of June, the prisoner pawned a waistcoat and shirt, for 3 s. - he pawned other things and redeemed them.

GEORGE MOORE . I am shopman to Mr. Skines, slop-seller, Rosemary-lane - I have a jacket, shirt, trowsers, and handkerchief, which the prisoner sold on the 3d of June.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Whipped , and delivered to the American Consul.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210606-180

889. CHARLES DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of May , one watch, value 1 l.; one chain, value 2 s., and one seal, value 8 s. the goods of James William Drake and WILLIAM DAVIS was indicted for receiving the same knowing it to be stolen .

JAMES WILLIAM DRAKE . I am a watch-gilder , and live in Orchard-street, St. Luke's ; this watch laid on my shop-board; Charles Davis came up to shew me some watch wheels, about half-past nine o'clock in the morning, I left him in the shop about five minutes with my man, on returning, the watch and seals were gone, I could hear nothing of it; but in the afternoon, I went to Red Lion-street, and took him, he said, he knew nothing about it; I gave him in custody, and then, he said, he found it.

CHARLES WHITEHEAD . I am servant to Messrs. Barber and Read, pawnbrokers, Red Lion-street. On the 10th of May, in the morning, William Davis pawned the watch, chain, and seals, for 15 s.

ROBERT CLARK . I am an officer. I took the prisoners in charge, and found the duplicate on William Davis - Drake claimed it. The prisoner Charles Davis said, he found it in the privy.

J. W. DRAKE. It is a plain watch, and looks like mine; I will not swear to it - it has no name or number.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210606-181

890. JOHN PAWLEY was indicted for stealing, on

the 27th of April , twenty yards of cotton, value 18 s. , the goods of William Sharman .

PHILIP BURD . I am shopman to William Sharman , linen-draper , Ratcliffe-highway . On the 27th of April, about half-past nine o'clock at night, I saw the prisoner come inside the door, and take this print; I followed him up Cannon-street, and saw him drop it about thirty yards from the door; I followed, and took him; the print was brought in by a stranger.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I heard the cry, and ran in pursuit, a man laid hold of me - several were running before me.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210606-182

891. ALEXANDER TURNER was indicted for stealing on the 13th of May , one hat and feather, value 5 s., the property of Sarah Williams , from her person .

The prosecutrix did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210606-183

892. WILLIAM KIBBEY was indicted for embezzlement .

CHARLOTTE BRIDGES . I sell china, and live in Cumberland-row, St. Luke's; I owed Mr. Burn 11 l.; I paid the prisoner five 1 l. notes on his account, and at different times the rest, at 2 l. and 1 l. a time, during 1820; he gave me a receipt every time I paid him - I produce it.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Can you name any day on which you paid him - A. No, I never paid him above 2 l. at once.

JOHN BURN . I am a glass and china man , and live in Compton-street, Soho ; the prisoner was my servant , and entrusted to receive money and notes for me. On the 20th of May, he paid me 2 l. on account of Mrs. Bridges, which I entered, that is all he ever gave me on her account; it appears by the receipt produced. that he has received 7 l.; it is his hand writing - she owed me more, which another servant has received.

Cross-examined. Q. How long have you known him - A. Above twenty-five years; I never agreed to give him a per centage on the customers he introduced; I engaged him in December 1818 to travel; he was to have 20 s. per week, and 20 s. per day for travelling expences; I have his books here, he gave them to me to arrange; he objected to give me one book; I apprehended him on the 5th of May.

Q. What passed when you first engaged him - A. I took him quite against my friends' consent, and my brother particularly objected, and I said to him,

"I don't wish my brother to know you are with me; but if he finds it out, tell him I allow you a commission," but I did not; I have received about 1300 l. from him; he was not in the habit of giving me money without saying who he received it of - he never claimed any money as due to him.

Q. Do you remember receiving a sum from Mr. Locker, of Northfleet, which was not entered - A. Perfectly well, the prisoner kept the book, therefore I could not enter it; I never said, he had not paid me Mr. Locker's money; I have a clerk, named Edwards, who has robbed me - I have released him.

Prisoner's Defence. I agreed to have 10 per cent. commission on country orders, and 5 per cent on town; I travelled for his brother fifteen years; I have a wife and ten children who I brought up in the paths of honesty.

GUILTY . Aged 52.

Recommended to mercy.

Confined One Year .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210606-184

893. THOMAS JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of May , one pickaxe, value 3 s.; one hammer, value 2 s.; and one bag, value 1 s. , the goods of Richard Hyde .

RICHARD HYDE . I am a bricklayer ; I left the tools in my shed, at Limehouse , on Monday afternoon, at four o'clock, and next morning between four and five o'clock, I missed them; the lock was forced off the shed; the yard was secured by a gate, which was bolted; I found the prisoner at the office with them that day - he is a stranger.

JAMES ROGERS . I am watchman of Limehouse-fields. On the 22d of May, about two o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner, and about ten minutes past four, I saw him close against Mr. Hyde's kitchen door, with the tools across his shoulder - he threw them down on seeing me, I stopped him, and Mr. Hyde claimed them.

JOHN COMMANDER . I am a watchman. About four o'clock I saw the prisoner go down behind some new buildings without anything, he came back soon after with these things on his shoulder, and was stopped; a chissel was found on him at the watch-house, which corresponds with the marks on the shed door - he said, it was his.

Prisoner. I leave it to your mercy.

GUILTY . Aged 64.

Confined One Year .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210606-185

893. SAMUEL HUTCHINS , WILLIAM CORBETT , and WILLIAM WYATT , were indicted for stealing, on the 21st of April , from the person of Richard Holt , one pocket-book, value 2 s., and three 1 l. bank notes, his property .

WILLIAM COULTON . I am constable of Pancras. I know Richard Holt by seeing him on this occasion. On Saturday the 21st of April, about half-past two o'clock in the afternoon, I was going up Oxford-street, and saw the prisoners in a gang of seven, and pointed them out to Cooper, and desired him to watch them, and I watched myself - they turned into Bond-street - it was about four o'clock - the prisoners were then together. I saw Richard Holt , and I saw Corbett following him. I saw Corbett take a pocket-book out of Holt's pocket, and give it, I think, to Hutchins. I saw it pass between them, and I think Hutchins took it; he was close to Corbett; Wyatt was obstructing Holt in his way at the time; I saw Hutchins make a motion, as if he was putting something under his coat. I was on the opposite side of the way, and had been watching them for two hours. The rest of the party then joined them, and they all went down Brook-street, except one, who continued leaning on a post, looking at the gentleman; that was neither of the prisoners. As soon as I could, I ran to the gentleman

and told him he was robbed. He said, he was not; but felt and missed his pocket-book - he went into a shop, and I declined following them till I got his address. I then went immediately and got further assistance - I went in search, but could not find them. I took them on the Monday, in the act of picking pockets - I waited in Bond-street, and saw them come into the street together - Fowler and Saunders were with me. I pointed them out. - Fowler took Wyatt; Saunders took Corbett; Hutchins turned away down the street - I followed and took him. We found nothing on them - they were taken to the office - I am certain they are the men. Holt appeared against them as the person robbed, and described himself as Richard Holt . When I took Hutchins, he asked what I wanted, and what use was it my going to tell the swell - he said, it was of no consequence, it was only for an attempt, and he could get bail for 1000 l. I took him at that time in the act of attempting a gentleman's pocket. I saw Holt's pocket-book taken plainly; it was a red book.

Cross-examined by MR. HONE. Q. There were seven of them - A. Yes; sometimes together and sometimes apart - a great many people were passing - I think three of them were dressed in blue and another in green. I knew the prisoners before personally, and cannot be mistaken. I have been beat about by several gangs, and did not think two persons sufficient to take them - I went on Monday prepared for them.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. How came you to know Holt's Christian name - A. He appeared by the name of Richard. I went after them the instant I got his address.

JOHN COOPER . I am a staymaker, and live in Tash-street. On the 21st of April I was with Colton, and saw the prisoners and three or four more, and watched them from Oxford-street - I think they were there half an hour. They then went into Bond-street. I saw Corbett follow a gentleman, who I afterwards found to be Richard Holt - I was on the opposite side of Bond-street, and saw them there for half an hour; I then saw Corbett go behind Holt, take a red pocket-book out of his pocket, and give it to Hutchins - I believe it was taken from the outside pocket; the other four were close round surrounding them. Wyatt was just before Holt; I had observed them together all the time. Colton said it would not be safe to apprehend them, so we went and told the gentleman - he felt and missed his pocket-book - they went down Brook-street - one of the four remained, leaning on a post at the corner of Brook-street. I am certain of their persons.

Cross-examined by MR. HONE. Q. Are you a constable - No; I met Colton promiscuously, as I was going to St. Anne's-street on business; we walked up Oxford-street; he pointed them out, and told me to watch. I am not in the habit of accompanying him. I passed and re-passed them several times, and saw their faces. I am positive Corbett took the pocket-book. We watched them above two hours.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Do you ever find your way to Chancery-lane of an evening - A. I sometimes go to chambers to bail above, for a lawyer in Gray's-inn. I do not stand there - I am not in the habit of bailing people. I think I could pick out all the seven men. I may have given bail four or five times in my life; I never go before the Judge, nor do I swear. I was never rejected.

SAMUEL SAUNDERS . I am constable of St. Luke's. I went with Colton to apprehend seven persons. I took Corbett in the act of picking a gentleman's pocket - the other two were in his company. Colton took one and Fowler the other. As soon as Colton got into Bond-street, he said,

"There are the very three."

JAMES FOWLER . I am a constable. I went with Colton, and saw the prisoners in company in Bond-street. I took Wyatt by his orders. It was between three and four o'clock.

HUTCHINS - GUILTY . Aged 21.

CORBETT - GUILTY . Aged 21.

WYATT - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Life .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210606-186

894. SAMUEL HORN was indicted for embezzlement

NOT GUILTY .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210606-187

895. JAMES TIERNEY was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of April , one handkerchief, value 4 s. the goods of Thomas Slater , from his person .

THOMAS SLATER . I live in High-street, Marylebone. About six weeks or two months ago, in the day, I was in Church-street, Soho , with two friends; it was warm; I pulled my handkerchief out to wipe my face, and put it in my pocket again. A gentleman said, you have lost your handkerchief - on feeling, I missed it, and immediately I saw the prisoner running up the street - I followed and overtook him about thirty yards off - Bidgood stopped him and asked him for the gentleman's handkerchief - he pulled it from under his waistcoat.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Are you certain you put it in your pocket - A. I am.

WILLIAM BIDGOOD . I am a carpenter. I was in Church-street, and saw the prisoner sitting at a public-house door, with two others - Mr. Slater passed, wiping his face; they immediately got up and followed him - I saw Mr. Slater return his handkerchief into his pocket; they followed him, and the prisoner took it out; the others were by - I called,

"Stop him." I ran as hard as I could, and stopped him. I asked him for the handkerchief, and he gave it me from under his waistcoat.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was not running - I had had the typhus fever, and had only been eight days out of bed. I did take the handkerchief, but it was in Greek-street, not Church-street.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210606-188

896. JOHN SLEIGHT was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of June , one carpet, value 18 s.; one set of bed furniture, value 3 l. 10 s., and three pieces of carpetting, value 15 s. , the goods of Paul Mullett .

PAUL MULLETT . I am an upholsterer , and live in South-place, Finsbury-square . The prisoner was occasionally employed by me. I missed these things at various times, and found part of them at Wadmore's.

WILLIAM DAVIS . I am servant to John Wadmore , a pawnbroker, who lives in Tottenham-court-road. I have a four-post bed-furniture, and three pieces of carpet - the bed-furniture was pawned, in April, by the prisoner, and redeemed by his wife - she afterwards pawned it again - the prisoner pawned the carpet on the 30th of March and 5th of April.

THOMAS VANN . I am an officer. I went to the prisoner's house, No. 4, Southampton-court, Tottenham-court-road - I asked if he ever pawned any thing at Wadmore's - he denied it. I left him with Mr. Mullett's porter, and went over to Wadmore's. They searched the books, and assured me nothing of the kind was ever taken in. Wadmore said nothing had been brought there but rubbish - I said,

"Did you ever take in any furniture?" - he said,

"Never". Davis was not present. I came over to the prisoner again. The porter said, he thought the carpet on the parlour floor was his master's The prisoner went with me to Mr. Mullett, and acknowledged that part of the carpet was his, and said he had pawned the bed-furniture at Wadmore's, for 27 s. I went there next morning, and found the furniture of three four-post bedsteads, which were given up, and the carpet.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. Things have been missed which I never took; as to the rest, bad company led me into it.

GUILTY , Aged 21.

Confined Six Months .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210606-189

897. JAMES JONES and JOHN READ were indicted for stealing, on the 1st of June , one handkerchief, value 5 s., the goods of John Ellis Petch , from his person .

JOHN ELLIS PETCH . I am a chymist , and live in Porter-street, Newport-market . On the 1st of June, about half-past nine o'clock at night, I was at the entrance of Porter-street, and thought I felt a hand in my pocket; I immediately turned round, and found my handkerchief in the hand of the prisoner Read. I laid hold of him, and at the same time, Jones came and snatched at my watch; two officers secured Read - Jones got away, and was taken about an hour after.

WILLIAM COULTON . I was going up Whiteheart-yard, into Drury-lane, and saw the prisoners come out of a house, and follow a gentleman all the way to Chancery-lane; the gentleman went into a house, and they stood under the Rolls gateway, and there saw Mr. Petch, and followed him along the Strand, to Newport-market. I saw Read take a handkerchief from Petch's pocket; he turned and took it from him. Jones ran away - he had been following close with Read all the way. I took Read to the watch-house, and in three quarters of an hour, I saw Jones by the New Church, in company with another, and took him. Read made so much resistance, it was a quarter of an hour before I could handcuff him.

WILLIAM JORDAN . I was with Coulton; his account is correct. I saw Jones attempt gentlemens' pockets several times.

ROBERT CHAPMAN . I assisted in securing Read, fearing a rescne; he made desperate resistance, and the crowd were hustling the officers about.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

READ'S Defence. I never saw Petch.

READ - GUILTY .

JONES - GUILTY .

Transported for Life .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210606-190

898. BENJAMIN SMITH and JOHN WARD were indicted for stealing, on the 9th of May , one handkerchief, value 2 s., the goods of a man unknown , from his person .

THOMAS GOOK . I am a constable. On the 9th of May, His Majesty was going to Drury-lane theatre; as soon as His Majesty had entered, I observed a great crowd, the prisoners were among them. I saw them try several people's pockets, but the crowd was so great, I coud not tell whether they succeeded - I watched them till half-past ten o'clock. Ward had gone away for half an hour, and returned about half-past ten o'clock; a gentleman in black, stood opposite the box door; they went behind him, Smith put his hand in the gentleman's pocket - Ward was covering him. I saw his hand go down into the pocket, and come up with something, which he immediately shoved into his shirt - they both ran away on seeing me. I told the gentleman he was robbed, he missed his handkerchief, and followed me. I took them in Drury-lane - the gentleman was then gone. I found the handkerchief in Smith's bosom.

NOT GUILTY .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210606-191

TWELFTH DAY, TUESDAY, JUNE 19.

899. DAVID CREIGHTON was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of April , thirty reams of printed paper, value 15 l. , the goods of George Edward Griffiths .

SECOND COUNT only stating them to belong to John Porter .

JOHN PORTER . I am a bookseller , and live in Pall Mall, the prisoner was occasionally employed by me. Between Friday and Tuesday, the 17th of April, this paper was stolen from my warehouse, in Mason's-yard, Duke-street, St. James's . I found part of it at a tallow-chandler's in St. Martin's-lane - it was part of a work.

JAMES RIDER . I am an auctioneer. Mr. G. E. Griffiths employed me to take the stock of the Monthly review - he is the editor. On the 13th of April, it was correct, and on the 17th, I went to the warehouse, and found the first-floor window open, and many bundles gone from different parts of the warehouse.

GEORGE BAXTER . I am a tallow-chandler, and live in St. Martin's-lane. I bought several hundred weigts of this paper of the prisoner; he said he came from Mr. Porter, in Pall Mall, who had a large quantity, and was cleaning out his warehouse. I bought 20 lbs. of him on the 5th of April.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined One Year and Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210606-192

900. LUCY THOMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of January , one bed, value 50 s.; one bolster, value 10 s.; two sheets, value 8 s.; three blankets, value 9 s.; two curtains, value 4 s., and one looking glass, value 15 s., the goods of James Boylan , in a lodging-room .

ELIZA BOYLAN . I am the wife of James Boylan , we live in Monmouth-street, St. Giles's . The prisoner had lodged in our second floor, front room, for two years, at 6 s. a week, furnished; she paid regularly at first, she left on the 13th of January, without giving notice, and left the key under the door, but it was fastened. I broke the door open, and found it stripped of every thing; I have found none of the property, she owed me 16 s. 6 d. for rent - I let the lodging to her.

Prisoner. Q. Was not one blanket left behind - A. Yes, and three taken.

JAMES BOYLAN . The prisoner gave me no notice that she was going. I met her in Holborn on the 6th of April, and gave her in charge; she said she would make the things good if I gave her time - the property was worth 6 l. 10 s.

Prisoner's Defence. My sister took the lodging, four days before the Princess Charlotte died - I went to live with her; she was confined to her bed ten months, and spoiled the bed with her fomentations; my sister always paid the lodging. They broke the door open at one o'clock in the morning, which so frightened us we left.

MARY ANN M'CABE. I am the prisoner's sister. I rented these apartments, and was the person who took them, and I paid the rent till I was taken ill - the room was let to me; the bed was an old one, and had been bought seven years, I had spoiled it with my fomentations. I took the curtains down, because they were rotten - they were left behind.

ELIZA BOYLAN . I broke no door open at all. M'Cabe never paid me any rent - the curtains were not left.

JAMES BOYLAN . M'Cabe never paid me any rent, the prisoner always paid it - the room was let to her.

GUILTY . Aged 38.

Confined One Year .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210606-193

901. PHILLIP RYAN was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of June , one bolster, value 6 s.; one sheet, value 2 s., and one blanket, value 2 s., the goods of Samuel Mills , in a lodging-room .

SAMUEL MILLS . I live in Tufton-street, Westminster . On the 1st of June, I let the prisoner a front garret, at 4 s. per week; his wife did not come till the 8th of June. I suspected something, and got an officer, and missed these things; he said he had pawned them for his sickly wife; then he said she was a woman he picked up in Drury-lane, and that he was captain of a ship.

SARAH MILLS . I am the wife of Samuel Mills . I let the prisoner the lodging on the 1st of June; he slept there three nights, he then left, and returned on the 8th - his wife came that afternoon. I missed the property, and found it in pawn.

THOMAS BEESON . I am an apprentice to Mr. Newberry, a pawnbroker, who lives in Drury-lane. I have a bolster, blanket, and sheet, pawned on the 8th of June, about eight o'clock in the morning, by a woman, in the name of Ann Riley , No. 22, Drury-lane.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAM GOODENOUGH . I am a constable. I took him in charge, he gave me the duplicate.

Prisoner. I was distressed.

GUILTY . Aged 42.

Confined Three Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210606-194

902. ANN WILSON was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of May , one ring, value 6 s. , the goods of Charles Mawley .

The prosecutor stating this ring to belong to him and his partner Thomas Mawley , the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210606-195

903. JOHN COLLINS , was indicted for stealing, on 17th of May , twenty-eight yards of cotton, value 15 s. , the goods of John Sparrow Benstead .

JOHN SPARROW BENSTEAD . I am a linen-draper , and live in Cold Bath-square .

JOSEPH CADBY . I am a constable. I and Jordan were at the corner of Hatton-garden, and saw the prisoner with something in his apron - we secured him, and found it was twenty-eight yards of cotton - he said he was taking it to his mother's on Saffron-hill.

HENRY LEQUIRE . I live at the Coach and Horses, public-house, Eyre-street-hill. I was by Mr. Benstead's shop, and saw the prisoner and another, as I was delivering my beer, about one o'clock - I saw them walking up and down by the shop - I returned in about five minutes, found them still there, and saw the other, who was about twelve years old, snatch the print, which was piled up on the step - they got into Warner-street, and then the boy said

"You take it," and the prisoner put it in his apron - I went and told Benstead; I saw him at the office, and am certain of him - I noticed him very much.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I saw two chaps running down Leather-lane; one of them dropped this stuff, and I put it in my apron.

GUILTY Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210606-196

904. WILLIAM BATES , was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of May , twelve pounds of bacon, value 5 s. , the goods of Thomas Marsh .

THOMAS MARSH . I keep a chandler's shop , in Whitcombe-street . I was informed a man had run in and took this bacon - I ran after the prisoner and took him.

THOMAS BROWN . I was sitting with Marsh; I ran out and saw the prisoner within ten yards of the shop; just as I got up, he dropped the bacon.

EDWARD RHYND . I am a constable. I saw the prisoner and another, by Marsh's door; the other whistled on seeing me - I ran home, came out, heard the cry, and received him in charge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I never saw it.

GUILTY . Aged 37.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210606-197

905. WILLIAM HUTCHINSON , was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of June , one shawl, value 5 s. , the goods of George Franklin .

GEORGE FRANKLIN . I am a dyer , and live in Spital-square . On Saturday, the 9th of June, between seven and eight o'clock at night, I missed this shall from the window - I was called down and found the prisoner at the watch-house with it.

JOHN POORE . I am Franklyn's son-in-law. A boy said the shawl was taken from the window; I ran out and found the prisoner in custody with it, about 150 yards off - I took it out of his hat.

DANIEL BERRY , I am a jeweller, and live in Long-alley. About nine o'clock, I was coming down Union-street; I heard a cry of Stop thief! saw the prisoner running - I laid hold of him, he struggled, and we both fell; his hat fell off, and the shawl was in it.

WILLIAM MILLER . I am a butcher, and live in Union-street. I heard the cry, and saw Berry stop the prisoner - part of the shawl was on the ground, and part in his hat.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming down the square, and picked it up near the premises; heard the cry, and so I ran.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Whipped and Discharged .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210606-198

906. ROBERT REW , and THOMAS GIBSON , were indicted for stealing, on the 29th of May , one pair of boots, value 5 s. , the goods of Joseph Peate .

MARY BLYTHE . I live with Joseph Peate , a shoemaker , at Ratcliffe-highway . On the 29th of May, about nine o'clock, I missed the boots from the door, and was told two lads had stolen them - I had seen the prisoners about the shop the day before.

GEORGE DEAN . I am shopman to Mr. Turner, a shoemaker, who lives opposite Peate. Between nine and ten o'clock, I saw the prisoners walking by his door together, and watched them for a quarter of an hour; a dray passed - I saw them cross the road several times, and saw Rew unhook a pair of boots - I ran out and collared them, as they were going away, laughing, together, and Gibson dropped them - Rew took them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

REW'S Defence. I saw this young man pick up a pair of boots, and asked where he got them.

GIBSON'S Defence. I picked them up.

REW - GUILTY . Aged 20.

GIBSON - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined One Month , and Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210606-199

907. WILLIAM UNCEL was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of June , two pair of boots, value 30 s., and one pair of shoes, value 5 s. , the goods of John Mann .

SARAH MANN . I am wife of John Mann ; we live in the Haymarket ; the prisoner was our errand boy ; I suspected him, and sent to have his lodgings searched.

WILLIAM ROSE . I am an apprentice to Mr. Mann. On Friday before the 12th of June, a pair of boots were delivered to the prisoner, to take to York-place, and next morning Mr. Mann asked if he had delivered them; he said, he had, and the gentleman was going out of town, but would call before he went with further orders; the other pair were delivered him on Saturday night; I found both pair at his lodgings on Tuesday.

Prisoner's Defence. Being tired on Friday night, I could not go so far; I was afraid to say, I had not delivered them; I had no opportunity of taking them on Saturday, as I had a pair to take to St. Luke's church; Sunday I was going out and could not take them, I expected a holiday on Easter Monday, when I meant to take them, but my fellow servant had a holiday, and I could not.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.


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