Old Bailey Proceedings, 11th April 1821.
Reference Number: 18210411
Reference Number: f18210411-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace Oyer and Terminer, AND Gaol Delivery for the City of London, AND ALSO The Gaol Delivery For the County of Middlesex, HELD AT Justice Hall, in the Old Bailey; ON WEDNESDAY, 11th of APRIL, 1821, and following Days;

Being the Fourth Session in the Mayoralty of THE RIGHT HON. JOHN THOMAS THORP , LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

Taken in Short-Hand by H. BUCKLER, Basinghall Street, (BY AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON.)

London:

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED, FOR H. BUCKLER, BY T. BOOTH, 31, St. Andrew's Hill, Doctors' Commons

1821.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX.

Before the Right Honourable JOHN THOMAS THORP , Esq. LORD MAYOR of the City of London; Right Honourable Sir Charles Abbott , Knt. Lord Chief Justice of his Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir George Wood , Knt., one of the Barons of his Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir James Allan Park , Knt., one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir Richard Carr Glyn , Bart.; Sir William Leighton , Knt.; Samuel Birch , Esq.; Christopher Smith , Esq., Alderman of the said City; Sir John Silvester , Bart., D.C.L. Recorder of the said City; Christopher Magnay , Esq.; William Heygate , Esq.; Richard Rothwell Esq.; and John Garratt , Esq. Aldermen of the said City; Newman Knowlys , Esq., Common Sergeant of the said City; William St. Julien Arabin , his Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of the Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

London Jury.

John Ryant ,

William Johnston ,

John Valentine ,

Charles Chatfield ,

William Stevens ,

Benjamin Wilson ,

John Southgate ,

Joseph Sadler ,

John Paton ,

John Simpson ,

Richard Henry Poulton ,

William Russell .

First Middlesex Jury.

Alexander Williams ,

James M'Lellan ,

George Daniels ,

Henry Lazenby ,

William Ganben ,

William Kitchen ,

Francis Humbert ,

John Tate ,

Robert Harvey ,

George Richardson ,

Richard Powell ,

Thomas Baldwin .

Second Middlesex Jury.

William Reynolds ,

John Foster ,

William E. Johnston ,

James Douglas ,

Thomas Toulon ,

John Cox ,

John Sturges ,

Mathew Jackson ,

Joseph Spicer ,

James Day ,

Edward Freeman ,

Thomas Cafe .

SESSIONS HOUSE, OLD BAILEY, APRIL 11, 1821.

THORP, MAYOR. FOURTH SESSION.

Reference Number: t18210411-1

488. WILLIAM LAKE was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of January , one spoon, value 3 s. , the goods of Frances Dodds , widow .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 12.

Whipped and Discharged .

Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210411-2

489. DENNIS SHEHEE was indicted for that he, on the 13th of February , feloniously, wilfully, maliciously, and unlawfully did make an assault upon Bartholomew Lucett , and with a certain sharp instrument did strike and cut him in and upon his head, with intent to murder him .

TWO OTHER COUNTS, stating his intent to be to disable or do him some grievous bodily harm.

BARTHOLOMEW LUCETT . On the 13th of February I lodged at No. 5, Calmell-buildings, St. Marylebone , at the prisoner's house. On Tuesday morning, the 13th of February, a great many people had been at the house - there had been a wedding - they went away between two and three o'clock in the morning, William Burn was the last that went out - it was after three o'clock. The prisoner was invited, but said he could not come. He and his wife came at night. My wife and I had been down in the back kitchen, and when we came up Burn was standing behind the door, my wife asked him what was the matter - he said there was a man in the passage with a sword, and he was afraid of his life. I told him I would see him safe out. My wife was before me with a light, the prisoner stood in the passage with a sword, he made towards me, and made a blow at me with it, my wife put her hand up, and received the blow on her hand - it cut her fingers - he made a second blow, and cut my head; he rose his hand, and struck again, I ran up, and caught him - we struggled and fell, the light was put out, my wife went and got another, and as soon as she brought it it was put out again; she fetched some people to my assistance, and we took the prisoner to the watchman.

Q. What sort of a wound was that on your head - A. Not very deep, it was about two inches long. I had not not got my hat on. I got well without a doctor.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. There were a great many people - A. Yes; some were tipsy, I was sober. There was some talk between my wife and the prisoner about producing 50 l. - there were no blows between them; he gave me some blows and, I dare say, I gave him some - that was down stairs. The company were all gone when he cut my head with the sword. I did not throw a quart pot at him. Anglin was at the wedding, Conner, Welch, nor Duffey were neither there; they might have called in and gone out again.

MARY LUCETT . I am the wife of the prosecutor. At three o'clock in the morning, when all the company had left, except Burns, Burns was going out but turned back, went behind the kitchen door, and said there was a man in the passage with a sword, and he was afraid of his life. I and my husband came up, the prisoner made a blow at him, I put my hand up, and received the blow, which cut two of my fingers - he made a second blow, and cut my husband's head; the candle was immediately put out, I got another, and it was put out again. I went out and got assistance, the prisoner was brought into the court, and the watchman took him.

Cross-examined. Q. Had there been any dispute about a wager - A. I heard none. There was no scuffle or fighting between him and my husband that I know of.

JAMES BURT . I am a watchman. I was fetched, and found the prisoner in the buildings, with a great number of people round him. I secured him, and found a naked sword in his room - it had fresh marks of blood on it.

Cross-examined. Q. Had the prisoner any wounds - A. He was scarred, as if he had been pulled about, and rolled in the kennel. Lucett appeared to be sober.

WILLIAM BURN . I had been at the wedding - some of the people left before me. I heard a loud scream, and went away. I know nothing more. I was not very sober, but capable of going home.

Q. Had you seen a man with a sword in his hand - A. No: nor did I tell Lucett that I did, that I know - there had been no fighting. When I left several of the company were still there. I have no recollection of returning behind the door, and saying I saw a man with a sword.

RICHARD COATES . The prisoner was given into my charge at the watch-house.

Prisoner's Defence. I never had the sword in my hand - they must have cut themselves. They were laying a wager that they were worth more money than I was, and struck me with a candlestick and fender.

EDWARD ANGLIN . I live in Calmell-buildings, and was at this wedding. I was there until two o'clock in the morning. They were going to dance on the first floor, but the prisoner told them it would injure the building, and they might dance in the kitchen. Lucett offered to bet the prisoner 5 l., and the prisoner said he would give him 20 l. if he could produce 5 l. His wife said if my husband has not got 5 l. I have 10 l., and more. One word produced another, and Lucett took up an empty pot, and told the prisoner to get out of the kitchen immediately, or he would strike him with it. I took him by the breast, and said it was a shame to strike the man - he got angry with me, and got from me, then his wife took up a candlestick, and said she would let him know she had got some blood. They collared Shehee, and turned him out of the room. I went to bed in about five minutes, and saw no more. Lucett was a little in liquor, when he first came in he took up a glass, and said it was the thirteenth he had had that day.

ELEANOR DRURY . I was sitting up with a gentleman, and between two and three o'clock in the morning, I heard an alarm, and saw Shehee on the floor, with four of them stamping on him. Lucett and his wife were two of them. I called out,

"Shame, don't murder the man." I saw nothing done with a sword.

ELEANOR SHEDY . I work up stairs. I heard the prisoner call to his daughter to let him into his room. Lucett, his wife, and some others, forced him into his room.

NOT GUILTY

First Middlesex Jury, before Lord Chief Justice Abbott.

Reference Number: t18210411-3

490. DAVID DOUGLAS was indicted for bigamy .

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM COLE . I am clerk of the parish of St. Paul, in the city of Canterbury. I produce a certificate of the marriage of David Douglas to Sarah Asquith , on the 7th of August, 1815. I compared it with the register.

ELIZA FISHER. In 1815 I lived at Canterbury, and was present at the prisoner's marriage with Sarah Asquith . I saw her alive this morning - she was never married before. I knew them both well.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODERICK. Q. How long had you known her - A. Eight or nine years. I never knew her by the name of Richards or Sooker. She was too young to be married when I first knew her. She lived with her father-in-law.

JAMES WRIGHT . I am clerk to Mr. Harmer. I have a copy of the register of St. James's parish , by which it appears that on the 25th of December, 1819 , David Douglas and Mary Eliza Offer were married. I examined it myself.

MARY ELIZA OFFER . On the 25th of December, 1819, I was married to the prisoner. I was then seventeen years of age. I was never married before.

Cross-examined. Q. How long had you known him - A. Seventeen months - he boarded with my father. In the February following I discovered that he had another wife, went to Ramsgate, and made enquiry about it; I then returned, and lived with him from the 10th of June till the 8th of August, when his wife came and demanded him, and 5 l. which he had promised her as a bribe.

Q. Did you not part by mutual consent, and he was to allow 10 s. 6 d. a week - A. No; when I returned to live with him in June, a paper was drawn up for him to allow it to me, but I never asked him for it. I only asked him to buy the baby clothes. I left him when his wife demanded him, but before I did not know whether I was his lawful wife or no. He told me his wife had another husband, and that he was not lawfully married.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. What did you say about a bribe - A. When his wife demanded him, he said he had promised her 5 l. not to answer any questions I put to her at Greenwich. When I refused to live with him, he removed close by my father's, and then right opposite, so that he could see into my room.

Prisoner's Defence. I had the misfortune to marry a bad woman, whose husband was living when I married her - she left me to live with him. I married this woman. went into the country for eight or ten days, and on returning she had made off with my property. I demanded her; they went and found out the woman - she told them she was married, and had another husband. On the 8th of December she came to me, and wanted me to let her lay in at her father's, and to allow him so much a week. I said if she came back to me I would do all I could.

EDWARD LUCAS. I am a shoemaker, and live at Canterbury. I was a serjeant in the Radnorshire militia.

Q. Look at that woman (S. Asquith, the prisoner's first wife), do you know her - A. Yes - Henry Richards was a private in the militia, in Captain Bevan 's company, fifteen or sixteen years ago, I remember him being married, and lent him money to pay the expences. I was not present at the marriage, but Asquith lived with him, and went by his name - they lived together in the town about two months, and then parted. I was not present at the marriage, but I was there in the afternoon, wished Mrs. Richards joy, and she thanked me. I took her by the hand, and saw the ring on her finger; I remember Mr. Richards got tipsy, and her mother threw a loaf at his head. She lived with her father-in-law, James Ockley .

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. How long ago was this - A. About sixteen years - I do not think it is twenty. She appeared to be about sixteen or seventeen years of age.

Q. Will you swear that is the woman - A. I will; she is very much altered.

Q. Look at her well - will you venture to swear you ever saw that woman in Richards's company in your life - A. She is altered, I will not swear it.

Q. On your oath, do not you know she is not the woman A. I do not.

Q. Will you swear you believe her to be the woman - A. No.

MR. BRODERICK. Q. How many times did you see this Mrs. Richards - A. Several.

WILLIAM SNELLER . I am a boot and shoemaker, and live at Canterbury. I knew Sarah Ockley (Asquith), about sixteen years ago; I also knew Richards; to the best of my recollection that is the woman who was married to him. They lived together a short time as man and wife. I was not present at the marriage,

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Will you venture to swear you believe she is the woman - A. Yes, I believe it.

Q. The witness, Fisher, is your sister - A. Yes; she knew her as well as I did - she is related to her.

MR. BRODERICK. Q. Did you know a person named Sooker - A. No, but they used to call her Mrs. Sooker.

Mr. Adolphus called

JOHN OCKLEY . I live at Canterbury; Mrs. Douglas is my daughter-in-law - she is thirty or thirty-one years of age. I married her mother about sixteen years ago. She was never married, except to Douglas, the prisoner. I have seen a soldier whom they called Richards; I think he was in the Radnorshire militia. No daughter of mine ever went by the name of Richards. My daughter was absent at times, when she went to her aunt's, at Hastings. She never lived at Canterbury, except at my house.

MR. BRODERICK. Q. When you married your wife your daughter was not at home - A. No; she came home in a few weeks. She never went by the name of Sooker. I went to Margate for about four years, and left my daughter at Canterbury, with her mother.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Do you maintain her - A. Yes; her husband allows her nothing, When I married she was about fourteen years old.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

Reference Number: t18210411-4

491. THOMAS DUTTON was indicted for stealing, in the 18th of January , one truss of hay, value 2 s. , the goods of James Frost ; and JOHN KNIGHT was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, knowing it to have been stolen .

JOHN STAINES . In January last I drove a team for Mr. Frost, of Finchley. On a Friday morning my master found something out; on the morning before we went to Northall with two teams, Dutton and I - each took two trusses of hay; the first house we stopped at was the White Horse, Potters End , kept by Knight. Dutton left a truss of hay with Knight, and I left one - Knight gave me 1 s. for it. We had no orders to leave any hay there. The price was about 2 s. 6 d. a truss. Knight knew whose service we were in. I had known him from the Monday morning, had called at his house every morning for four days, and had spoken to him.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODERICK. Q. No money was given to Dutton - A. Not to my knowledge. I saw Knight take the hay out of the cart and put it in the stable. We were going further. It was not loose hay, it was a regular truss.

JAMES FROST . I am a farmer , at Finchley . Dutton and Staines were in my employ on my farm at Finchley. In consequence of something which I discovered, I took them up - Dutton absconded, and I did not catch him until the 16th of March. I took up Knight on the 23d of January, and told him what he was charged with; he was examined before the magistrate. On the 26th of January he called on me - he was hostler at the house - his master asked me, in his presence, to settle the business without going before the magistrate - I declined. I allowed the man half a truss of hay for the horses.

Cross-examined. Q. Knight was bailed, and has surrendered his morning - A. He has.

JOHN CONWAY . I am an officer. I apprehended Knight on the 21st of January, by a warrant, for receiving stolen goods. I read the warrant. He said it was a bad job, but he had a good deal of money, and his family would be very well off.

ROBERT GRANSTON . I work for Mr. Frost. The day before Staines was taken up I met him and Bolton with two trusses of hay in the cart.

DUTTON'S Defence. I called my fellow-servant up to go to Northall, and put a truss and about 6 lbs. of hay in the cart, for the horses; when I got to the watering-house I took one truss out to bait the horses, took as much as I thought necessary, and left the rest with the hostler till I returned; he gave my fellow-servant a shilling to get some ale. Next morning we were going for another load, he said he had no food for his horses, and I gave him some chaff for them. My master asked what I had in my cart, I said there was a little for my fellow-servant; on searching his cart two trusses were found. I declare I know nothing of it - they made him drunk to get him to say bad things against me.

KNIGHT'S Defence. I never received the man's hay.

DUTTON - GUILTY . Aged 44.

Confined Two Months , and Whipped .

KNIGHT - GUILTY . Aged 38.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Lord Chief Justice Abbott.

Reference Number: t18210411-5

492. JOHN KENDRICK , ANDREW TRUMBLE , PHILLIP WARD , CHARLES READ , and FLORENCE MURPHY , were indicted for stealing, on the 27th of February , twenty-four bottles, value 6 s.; five gallons of wine, value 4 l.; two gallons of shrub, value 1 l., and two gallons of cloves, value 1 l., the goods of Thomas Blyth , in his dwelling-house .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be the property of Robert Waithman and James Williams , Esq s., in the dwelling-house of the said Thomas Blyth .

THOMAS BLYTH . I keep the Wheatsheaf, public-house, New Tothill-street, Westminster . The Sheriff's officers were in possession of the house and property. On the 27th of February I went out about eight o'clock in the evening, and left two Sheriff's officers in the house - one was named French, the other's name I do not know; I locked the cellar a few minutes before I went out; I had found it open, as I supposed, by some mistake of the servants. I locked it and put the key into my pocket - the prisoners were all in the house in the course of the day, but whether they were there when I went out, I do not know. I returned about twelve o'clock at night. Before I went out I was in the taproom - there was a great quantity of people there, smoking, I suppose twenty, or more. There was upwards of two dozen of Port, and two dozen of Sherry in the cellar - I saw it in the course of the day - there was some shrub and cloves also, On my return I found the brandy cask in the cellar turned upside down, and the bung out. The wine and shrub were stolen.

Prisoner KENDRICK. Q. Did you not give us a quantity of gin - A. I gave them each a glass of gin.

ANN ACOME . I am the mother of Blythe's wife, and was at his house on the 27th of February. I had lodged there for two months. I was in the bar in the evening - the prisoners were all there in the course of the day. Trumble and another man, who is not here, quarrelled and fought -

they began fighting, and I sent them out, but they went over to the skittle-ground, and so did several others. While they were there I saw a man come out of the cellar; I laid hold of him - he is not here - he denied being in the cellar; he was just pushing the cellar door to when I laid hold of him. He had a chisel in his hand. He got from me, and ran away. There had been dancing and singing, and a great noise before the scuffle. I sent for Gilmore, who came and cleared the house - most of them were intoxicated. The gas light in the room was put out twice, but it was burning when the man came out of the cellar. I found a cask of shrub or cloves under the taproom table - it was taken out of the cellar.

MARY ANN BROWN . I was servant at the Wheatsheaf. I saw all the prisoners in the taproom in the course of the day. Trumble and another man were fighting, but before that the gas light was put out three times - I saw Kendrick put it out once - the others were dancing about. When I went to light the gas Trumble knocked me away from it, and prevented my lighting it. I usually sat in the box by the gas light, but was prevented by the dancing and disturbance. If I sat there I could see persons come out of the cellar - I saw nobody go there; I had no key. My master was not at home.

Prisoner TRUMBLE. Q. Did you leave the taproom when I pushed you from the box - A. Yes, and went into the bar.

Q. Did you not want me to dance with you - A. No.

GEORGE GARRET . I am a watchman. I was going by the Wheatsheaf, heard a noise, and saw ten or twelve persons making a noise outside the house - they ran on before me; Ward, Read, and Murphy were three of them - I saw them handing two bottles from one to another. I saw them come out of the house.

JOHN CRONIN . I was at the Wheatsheaf. I had business with the Sheriffs' men - one of them was serving in the bar. I was in and out several times in the course of the day - from seven o'clock in the evening till twelve or one, principally in the bar and lobby; there was a very great noise in the taproom, and occasionally some of them said,

"Now!" and then they all got up and danced. I saw Mrs. Acome lay hold of a person by the cellar door, which was partly open; I examined it, and found the lock wrenched off, and hanging by one nail - the bolt was not shot back. I saw Blyth lock the door before he went out, and put the key in his coat pocket, which hung up in a little room - the cellar door is in the corner of the taproom; they danced between the cellar door and the bar, so that while they danced we could not see the cellar door. Trumble was very much intoxicated. I saw Ward and Murphy there, in the course of the evening. All that were in the taproom were dancing, they made a very great noise, and jumped very high.

EDWARD FRENCH . I was in possession of the Wheatsheaf, employed by the Sheriffs' officer. I saw all the prisoners there, dancing and hallooing - the greatest part of them went into the skittle-ground to fight, and Mrs. Acome stopped a man coming out of the cellar - he got away. The gas light was put out three times; the last time it was done by Kendrick, I saw him do it - this was before they went into the skittle-ground. I found a keg, containing two gallons of cloves or shrub, under the seat in the taproom. I went into the cellar, and missed a quantity of wine.

JAMES GILMORE . I am an officer. On the 27th of February I was fetched, found the house in confusion, and a fight in the skittle-ground. Murphy was in the passage - he pushed by me, and went out. Trumble was fighting, and Kendrick acting as his second. I cleared them all out.

KENDRICK'S Defence. Twenty or thirty people were dancing; I went to light my pipe by the gas, and it went out.

TRUMBLE'S Defence. I went there, the girl told me I should have been there two hours before, as some gin had been distributed, and she wished she could get a fidler, as the licence was gone, that there might be a proper outcry in the house. Her sweetheart kicked up a row, and we went into the skittle-ground to fight.

MURPHY'S Defence. About fifty people were making a row near the house; I went in the skittle-ground, and saw a fight - the constable ordered us out.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Lord Chief Justice Abbott.

Reference Number: t18210411-6

493. JULIA COCHET D'OUVRANE was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of February , at St. Paul's, Covent Garden , one watch, value 8 l., and one chain, value 2 s., the goods of Henry Lees , in his dwelling house .

HENRY LEES . I live in Tavistock-street, Covent Garden , and keep the house. The prisoner has come for the last two or three months to teach my daughter French, she is nine years old. On a Friday, I missed this watch off the dressing table in the bed room, I had seen it a day or two before; she had been to my house on the Tuesday or Wednesday; she usually gave her lessons in the parlour below stairs, I do not know that she was in the habit of going up stairs. I went to Bow-street, and had hand-bills distributed - the watch was produced by Cowlishaw. I then went to the prisoner's lodgings and had her apprehended. At her second examination, I saw her in the cell and she delivered me the chain, which was attached to the watch; I have not brought it here.

JOHN COWLISHAW . I am servant to Mr. Wilkinson, a silversmith, in Piccadilly. About the 17th of February, the prisoner came to the shop and offered a watch for sale, I offered her six guineas for it, she said she was to have six guineas and a half for it, but I said I could give no more. I afterwards shewed it to Mr. Less. (I produce it.) I am sure she is the person.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. There is nothing very particular in the watch? - A. No.

MR. LEES. The watch is mine, I know it by its general appearance, the face is chased off just above the figure 12 - it is my wife's watch.

Cross-examined. Q.- You know it by its being chased - A. Yes, by its general appearance, there was nothing very particular in it. I saw it on the Tuesday previous to the Friday it was produced. I have seven or eight female servants, my wife is a millener; the prisoner understands English very imperfectly. I should imagine she does not understand what is going on now. I did not buy it. I know the maker of the watch lived in Frith-street.

JOHN COWLISHAW . She spoke English to me very well. Six guineas is the full value for us to give for it.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not take it.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 23.

Recommended to Mercy.

First Middlesex Jury, before Lord Chief Justice Abbott.

Reference Number: t18210411-7

494. JAMES ROBINSON was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of February , 12 lbs. of sugar, value 11 s. , the goods of James Smith .

THOMAS FINNIS. I am apprentice to Mr. James Smith, a grocer , who lives in Tower-street . On the 19th of February, about half-past seven o'clock, I was weighing up sugar at the back of the shop, and heard some person come in, a bag of loaf sugar was near the door, I turned round, and some person run out, I pursued and overtook him about half way across the street, it was the prisoner. I saw him throw the bag down, I picked it up, there was 12 lbs. of sugar in it.

WALTER STONE. I am a constable. I heard a noise, ran up, and found the prisoner in custody, the bag was delivered to me.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I never had it.

GUILTY . Aged 44.

Confined Two Months , and Whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210411-8

495. SAMUEL KERSLAKE and EBENEZER WILLIAMS were indicted for stealing, on the 3d of April , one basket, value 6 d., and eighty-six bottles, value 23 s. , the goods of Richard Pemberton .

RICHARD PEMBERTON. When I am in town I live in Castle-street, Holborn. I am a bottle merchant . Williams was my servant , and had lived with me about six years; my bottles were in a place at Dowgate-hill . On Tuesday evening, the 3d of April, about a quarter before six, I was going down Dowgate-hill and saw Kerslake coming out of my place; he had a knot and prickle basket of bottles; when he got about twelve yards from the place I stopped him, took him back, and asked where he got them, he said he was taking them for Williams, I called Williams up, and I think he repeated it in his presence - Williams denied that he had given them to him. I took one bottle out of the prickle, I do not know how many there were, it appeared full - a prickle usually holds seventy-two bottles, which were worth about 24 s. I gave him in charge, and the officer thought it necessary to take Williams, I said I would answer for his appearance to-morrow; there were no other servants on the premises. Williams appeared intoxicated - he said Kerslake was frequently about there.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. - Q. What sort of a place is it. - A. It was a place by itself, there are rooms above it. I found a vacancy were the bottles were taken from, the bottles were packed in hay, which is unusual; my horse was kept in the stable. Williams had a wound in his head, and is deaf, I think he must know they were taken - he sometimes has fits.

RICHARD DALDY . I am a constable. I was coming up Dowgate-hill and saw the prosecutor lay hold of Kerslake. I crossed and took him back. I asked him, in Williams's presence, how he came by them, he said Williams helped him up with them. I asked where he was going to take them to, he said he did not know, but he thought Williams was following him. Williams appeared in liquor, and said he knew nothing about it.

WILLIAM SMITH . I took Williams in custody, he denied helping him up with the bottles.

KERSLAKE'S Defence. I am a jobbing porter, this man came to me at the corner of Dowgate-hill, and said he wanted me to carry a prickle of bottles; he told me to go on, and he would shew me where to take them, the prosecutor came up, I said the man was behind.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210411-9

496. RICHARD ARMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of March , one mahogany plank, value 35 s. , the goods of John Paynter and Thomas Haynes .

DANIEL FOOTHART . I am a painter in the service of Messrs. Paynter and Haynes of Coleman-street. On the 2d of March, about twenty minutes before six in the evening, I was coming out of my master's premises, and a man named Whorwall gave me information, and I followed the prisoner with the mahogany plank on his shoulder. I collared him near the end of Bell-alley, and said

"Where are you going with this?" - he pitched it down; he said a man told him to take it from Mr. Paynter's premises. I gave him in custody.

BENJAMIN WHORWALL . I am a trunk-maker in Coleman-street , about twelve doors from Mr. Paynter's. I saw the prisoner with the mahogany plank on his shoulder, about twenty yards from the premises, he went up Bell-alley. I informed Foothart who took him with it.

ROBERT FIELDING . I saw him with the plank, and when he was taken he said he would be at the bottom of the street.

MR. THOMAS HAYNES . I am in partnership with Mr. John Paynter . I saw the plank safe about two o'clock, inside the gate; the prisoner had no business there.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I had it, but did not intend to defraud the prosecutors; a man told me to fetch it, and said he would be up the street. I had been drinking all day, and did not know what I was about.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Confined Two Months , and Whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210411-10

497. JAMES DWYER was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of March , one handkerchief, value 1 s., the goods of John Pullen , from his person .

JOHN PULLEN , ESQ. On Friday the 16th of March, about ten o'clock in the morning I was passing through Long-lane , and nearly opposite the turning which goes into Charterhouse-square, I felt what I supposed to be a hand in my pocket, I instantly turned round and saw the prisoner with my handkerchief in his hand; he was in company with another person, I laid hold of him and gave him to a constable.

JOSEPH RICH . I am a constable. I was sent for, and I took the prisoner, but found nothing on him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Recommended to Mercy.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210411-11

498. SIDNEY SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of April , one handkerchief, value 8 s., the goods of Thomas Breach , from his person .

THOMAS BREACH . I am a cheesemonger , and live in Old Jewry. Last Friday night, about nine o'clock I was at the top of Newgate-street , and felt a handkerchief drawn from my pocket, the prisoner past me, he was alone; I saw him putting something into his breast, I laid hold of him and pulled my handkerchief from under his coat. I gave him to a watchman, and gave the handkerchief to the constable of the night.

JOHN HEBBERD. I am a watchman. I heard a cry of watch, I came up and found the prosecutor holding the prisoner, I took him in charge; he begged forgiveness, and said he did it through distress. I took him to the watch-house, and five more handkerchiefs were found in his hat.

JOHN TONGE . I was constable of the night, and took the prisoner in charge. We found three handkerchiefs in his hat, and two in his pocket.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was going home; in going up Newgate-street, the prosecutor was before me - I saw a tall man behind him run across the road, I picked a handkerchief off the ground - he took hold of me; as to the other handkerchiefs, they are what my mother used to put me out victuals in, as my father-in-law turned me out of doors.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210411-12

498. SARAH BOLTON was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of February , one 1 l. bank note , the property of Samuel Nicholson and Thomas Brooks .

THOMAS BROOKS . I am in partnership with Samuel Nicholson , and live at No. 117, Bishopsgate-street , City. The prisoner was our servant for about two months. I gave her some money belonging to the partnership account, and on the 16th of February she went out about six o'clock in the evening, with leave. I followed her to a straw bonnet shop in Sun-street, where she bought a straw bonnet; she came out with it - I followed her, and thought she was coming home, but she went to a haberdasher's shop. My wife gave me a note, which I gave to Shirley.

ESTHER BROOKS . I am the wife of Thomas Brooks . The prisoner went out to buy a bonnet; my husband returned from following her, and I went to Thompson's, who delivered me a 1 l. note, which I gave to my husband.

MARY THOMPSON . I keep a straw bonnet shop in Sun-street; the prisoner bought a bonnet of me. Mrs. Brooks came in in a few minutes, and I gave her a 1 l. note, which the prisoner paid me. The bonnet came to 6 s. I gave her change, and put the note in a closet, which I locked; there was no other note there.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODERICK. Q. Where do you keep your money - A. In a box, which is in that cupboard, but I had not time to put it in the box; there were no other notes in the cupboard, loose. I am sure she is the woman.

JOHN SHIRLEY . I took charge of the prisoner for stealing a 1 l. note. Mr. Brooks gave me the note, which I produce

SAMUEL NICHOLSON . I am in partnership with William Brooks . On the 10th of February this note was in my possession, and early on the 11th; on Monday morning, the 12th, I missed it. My partner's hand-writing is on it, with the name of the person he took it from. I had not paid it away. I am certain it is the note - I kept it in a drawer, which I kept locked. I never paid the prisoner any money - her wages were not due.

Cross-examined. Q. What is the endorsement on the note - A. I cannot exactly mention it now, but to the best of my recollection, it is

"Emerson, Spitalfields." I believe I had twenty-seven 1 l. notes, all of which were endorsed by my partner, myself, or shopman. On Monday morning I found only twenty-six left, She came into my service from Mr. Riley, South Audley-street. I am certain that I missed one note.

JOHN SHIRLEY re-examined. I have the key of the prisoner's box - it also opens the prosecutors' drawers. She said it was the key of her box.

GUILTY . Aged 37.

Confined One Year .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210411-13

499. JOHN WALTON was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of April , one table-cloth, value 2 s. , the goods of Adam Stuart .

SECOND COUNT, the same, stating it to be the property of Joseph Trickett .

JOSEPH TICKETT . I live with Mr. Adam Stuart , who keeps an eating-house on St. Dunstan's-hill . The prisoner came in between six and seven o'clock, and had some cold beef - he was the only one in the room; he stopped about a quarter of an hour, and almost immediately as he left I missed a table-cloth. I went after him, and caught sight of him by Harp-lane. I called Stop thief! he ran very fast, but was stopped without my losing sight of him. I saw him drop the cloth from his clothes.

HENRY STONEMAN. I am a constable. I was in Tower-street, saw the prisoner running, and several people pursuing him. I collared him. I found nothing on him, but some salt in his pockets. He had about 18 d. in halfpence. Some salt-cellars were missed.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I heard a cry of stop thief, and ran with the rest.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Confined Two Months , and Whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210411-14

500. ROBERT BULLARD was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of April , one box, value 3 s., and 20 lbs. of candles, value 15 s. , the goods of William Walton , the younger , and Joseph Walton .

MR. JOSEPH WALTON . I am in partnership with William Walton ; we live in Little Britain , and are in the tallow business . The prisoner lived with us some years back. On the 6th of April, about half-past seven o'clock in the morning, we missed a box, containing 20 lbs. of candles. I was passing through the warehouse, and saw a man take

up a box, and run out with it. I immediately pursued, came up with him, and found it in his possession - it was the prisoner. It is worth 15 s.

WILLIAM TAYLOR . I am a constable. The prisoner and candles were delivered to me.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I did it through necessity and want.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Confined Six Months , and Whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210411-15

SECOND DAY, THURSDAY, APRIL 12.

501. RICHARD JOHNSON BURBRIDGE , BRIANT COLEMAN , SAMUEL PALEY , MICHAEL MULLINS , BARNARD LARAGY , JOHN BLACK , EDWARD WAKELING , ALEXANDER MYERS , HENRY MARTINEER , HUGH GREEN , JAMES M'NABB , GEORGE COOK , THOMAS MITCHELL , WILLIAM JONES , WILLIAM SCOTT , THOMAS BELL , EDWARD BROWN , THOMAS HODGES , HENRY WINCHESTER , JOHN EVERET , JOSEPH GIBBERTS , HENRY HARRIS , JOHN COATES , MARY ANN SMITH , LYDIA HINES , ANN WHITE , MARY SINGLETON , JAMES ROWLAND MATTHEWS , JOHN FREDERICKSON , MATILDA WILKINSON , JOHN FROST , HENRY MILES EASTGATE , WILLIAM SEERS , HENRY STEVENS , and ELIZABETH VINCENT , were severally and separately indicted for feloniously having forged Bank of England notes in their possession, knowing them to be forged .

The prisoners pleaded GUILTY .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

502. The same prisoners, with the exception of J.R. Matthews, were again indicted for disposing of and putting away certain forged and counterfeit Bank notes, with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England .

MR. SERGEANT BOSANQUET, on behalf of the Governor and Company of the Bank of England, declined offering any evidence.

NOT GUILTY .

Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210411-16

503. EDWARD GARRATT , ANN WATSON , and ELIZA DONOVAN were indicted for feloniously assaulting William Payne , on the 13th of March , on the King's highway, at St. Martin's in the Fields , and putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, one hat, value 6 s., his property .

WILLIAM PAYNE . On the 13th of March I was in Cranbourne-passage a few minutes after twelve o'clock at night, and met the prisoner, Watson - I did not know her before; she came up, spoke to me, and requested me to go with her to her private lodging, which she said she had in Long-acre. I said as they were her private lodgings I would go. When I met her I was going towards Long-acre. I walked with her to Long-acre, we turned up Legg-alley, in Long-acre , and went into a house there - Donovan opened the door, and from her appearance, I suspected it was not a private house. I said I do not think this is a private lodging, and I had rather not go in. She insisted that it was, and I went in with her, and followed her up stairs. When I saw the room I felt certain that it was not a private lodging, and said I would leave the room, for she had deceived me. She said

"If you leave the house you must give me some liquor first, likewise pay for the use of the room, and give me some money." I refused - she went to the top of the stairs, and called,

"Betty, fasten the door, and let no one out." She went down stairs, I followed her, and found she and the other woman had placed themselves against the door to prevent my going out. I asked why they would not let me out - she then pushed me back, and said, if I offered to stir, or to open the door, she would tear all my clothes to pieces; a man then made his appearance at the further end of the passage; she called, to him

"Ned, come and see me righted." He came forward, and asked what the row was, and said he was the master of the house (it was the prisoner Garratt.) I said, if you are the master of the house, you had better let me out - these women are detaining me against my will, and if you suffer me to be detained it will be at your peril. He said, you had better pay, Sir; you must know before you came into the house, it was nothing more nor less than a b - dy house. I said I would not pay; he said, if that was the case he must go, and leave us to settle it among ourselves. He then turned away. I endeavoured to make my way between the two women, to get out, but they both pushed me back with their hands. I turned my head, and saw Garratt standing by my side - he then said

"You will not pay, Sir, will you?" I said

"No, I will not;" he struck me a violent blow on my body, which stopped my breath, and I fell speechless against the wall; he caught me by the arms, and forced me along the passage to the further end, when one of the women opened a back door, and I was forced through it into a back yard, the door was bolted after us. He then endeavoured to push me down - I said,

"For God's sake do not murder me;" and as soon as I found I had recovered my strength I called out Watch and murder! as loud as I could. He put up his hand to my mouth, and said

"I will soon stop your calling." I pushed his hand from my mouth, and called out, a second time, Watch and murder! and directly after a watchman came at the door I was pushed through, and took him into custody. I found my hat was gone off my head, and told the watchman of it, and on searching for it, found it concealed under a water butt, in the back yard - I believe it went off in the scuffle. It was on my head when the scuffle began.

COURT. This is not a robbery, your hat fell off.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Ld. Chief Justice Abbott.

Reference Number: t18210411-17

504. JAMES SOMERSET was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of February , one coat, value 30 s.; one pair of trowsers, value 10 s.; two shirts, value 5 s., and three handkerchiefs, value 5 s., the goods of William Taylor , in the dwelling house of Robert Munroe .

WILLIAM TAYLOR . In February last I lived in Robert

Munroe's house, in Drury-court . On Sunday morning, the 18th, I missed a coat, a pair of trowsers, two shirts, and three handkerchiefs. I had seen them on the Saturday in my room where I lodge. I keep one key of the room, and the landlady keeps another - the prisoner and another person lived in another room - he had lodged there several months. I went and informed the landlady.

MARGARET MUNROE . I am the landlady. Taylor came down on Sunday morning, and said his clothes were lost. On Saturday evening, a little after eight o'clock, I was serving in the shop, the prisoner came in, took his candle, and went up stairs - he left his candle on the stairs, alight, and went out afterwards. He did not come home all night, nor did I see him again until he was in custody.

JOHN TURNER . I am shopman to Mr. Marsden, who is a pawnbroker, and lives in Drury-lane. I have a coat and a pair of trowsers which I took in pledge of the prisoner, for 1 l., on the 17th of February, about nine o'clock at night - they are worth about 30 s. I am certain he is the man; they were wrapped in a handkerchief.

EDWARD JOSEPH BURCHALL. I am an officer of the Refuge for the Houseless, in Bishopsgate-street - the prisoner lodged there about ten nights. On the 7th of March the prosecutor came in, and said he had seen a man come out who had robbed him. On the 8th I sent for the prosecutor - he said the prisoner was the man, and claimed the shirt which he had on. I gave him in charge, and took the shirt off, when his friends supplied him with another; I produce it. I also produce a shirt which I got from the pawnbroker, in Drury-lane, he gave it up before the Magistrate, and a handkerchief, which I had from a pawnbroker's, at Brentford. The prosecutor gave me three duplicates.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. About three days after I gave up the duplicates, upon condition, that if I got the things out of pawn, nothing was to be said about it.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Of Stealing to the value of 39 s. only.

Confined Six Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Ld. Chief Justice Abbott.

Reference Number: t18210411-18

505. RICHARD JACKSON was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of George Lawrence , at Ickenham , about twelve o'clock in the night of the 19th of March , and stealing therein, 2 lbs. weight of suet, value 6 d.; 1 lb. of dripping, value 4 d., and one tin pan, value 1 s., his property .

GEORGE LAWRENCE . I live in the parish of Ickenham, Middlesex, and keep the house. I was alarmed between twelve and one in the night of Monday, the 19th of March by my son John.

JOHN LAWRENCE . I am the son of the last witness. I got up about twelve o'clock on Monday night to come to London (I had gone to bed about seven.) I was getting something to eat before I went out, I was in the kitchen and heard a noise in the pantry, I went in and found the prisoner there; I had not been in the pantry before - it is part of the dwelling-house. I secured him but found nothing on him - he had got in through the iron bars of the pantry window. A pane of glass was taken out of the window near the handle, he could then reach and open the window, the bars were wide enough a-part to let a person of his size through. When the constable took him, I went outside and found the fat and suet under his great coat; I suppose he must have reached them out before he got in - I found a hat and coat under the pantry window, and under them a tin pan with the dripping and 2 lbs. of suet - he had no hat on when I found him - he claimed the hat and coat, there was an iron wrench on the suet. My mother was the last that went to bed that night - she is not here. I had been in the pantry a little before seven o'clock in the evening to get my supper, the window was then shut, the pane of glass safe, the pan of dripping and suet stood within reach of the window.

GEORGE LAWRENCE re-examined. I went to bed before my son - I saw every thing safe about seven o'clock in the evening, I went into the pantry for that purpose.

WILLIAM BALL . I am a constable. I was sent for and took the prisoner in custody; J. Lawrence fetched the coat and hat in, which the prisoner claimed, also a iron bar which was with them.

Prisoner's Defence. I was out of employ and very much distressed.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 53.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Lord Chief Justice Abbott.

Reference Number: t18210411-19

506. THOMAS BROOKS was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Daniel Skinner , at St. Marylebone , about eight o'clock in the night of the 3d of March , and stealing therein two counterpanes, value 10 s.; one pelisse, value 6 s.; three gowns, value 12 s.; two petticoats, value 5 s.; one curtain, value 6 d.; one pair of breeches, value 2 s.; one waistcoat, value 1 s.; two jackets, value 8 s.; one apron, value 1 s., and one flute, value 3 s., his property .

CHARLOTTE SKINNER. I am the wife of Daniel Skinner , who lives in Portman-green , in the parish of St. Marylebone - there are several houses close to it. I and my husband went out on Saturday morning, the 3d of March, and left nobody in the house; I locked the door and pinned the shutter with an iron pin - the sash slides back it does not draw up, it was fastened with an iron pin in the middle, inside; my husband went home before me, I did not come back till the Saturday following.

RICHARD COATES . I produced some clothes and things which I received from Rogers. I found a German flute in the prisoner's pocket at the watch-house.

HENRY ROGERS . I am the watchman of St. Marylebone. I met the prisoner at half-past eight on Saturday night, the 3d of March, with this bundle on his head in Upper York-street, about a quarter of a mile from Portman-green, it had been dark about an hour and a half or two hours, then. I stopped him and asked what he had got there - he said dirty linen; he put it down on the post, I put my hand on it and said,

"Why this is wearing apparel;" he said

"Yes, it is, it belongs to my master who is a pawnbroker;" and that he was carrying them home for his master, who had bought them of another pawnbroker who was selling off; that his master lived in East-street, and he was before him going home with another bundle; I took him to the watch-house with the bundle, he

attempted to get away from me, but I secured him, he was searched at the watch-house, and the flute found - I delivered the bundle to Coates. That produced is it.

Prisoner Q. Did I not say I found them - A. No.

MRS. SKINNER. The parlour window is in front of the house - there is a garden before the house and a path close to the window - there is no area; the things are all ours, they had been left in a box in the bed-room - the box was not locked. I missed a Bible which is not found - here is a counterpane, a quilt, a pelisse, three gowns, a leather apron, a curtain and two petticoats; they are worth 24 s. 6 d. together, and were all in the same box with my husband's clothes.

DANIEL SKINNER . I went out with my wife on Saturday morning - I returned on Thursday following, and found the house had been robbed, a pane of glass near the fastening was broke and taken out - by that means they got in. I saw every thing fast before I went - here are a pair of breeches, a waistcoat, two jackets and a flute, which are mine; they are worth 31 s. 6 d. together.

Prisoner's Defence. The watchman says I wanted to escape; as I was walking with him my foot slipped, he knocked me down, and said I was trying to get away - I made no resistance.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 17.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Lord Chief Justice Abbott.

Reference Number: t18210411-20

507. JAMES JORDAN , WILLIAM DONALD and THOMAS STEERS were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Ephraim Harris , at St. Marylebone , about four o'clock in the afternoon of the 6th of March , the said Ephraim Harris and others being therein, and stealing therein, six silver spoons, value 20 s. his property .

EPHRAIM HARRIS . I am a silversmith , and live in William-street, Manchester-square . Mr. Payne came to my house one day between four and five o'clock in the afternoon. I had been at home all the afternoon in the parlour behind the shop, my family were also at home, there was nobody in the shop - it is part of the house. Payne brought one of the prisoners into my shop, I sent him to the watch-house. I went with Payne to the Jacob's Well, public-house, in Charlotte-street, the landlord produced some spoons to me which Coates has.

WILLIAM PAYNE . I now live in Beaumont-street, and am a shoemaker. At this time I lived at No. 29, Marylebone-lane, directly opposite the prosecutor's shop, which is at the corner of William-street. On Tuesday afternoon, the 6th of March, I took Jordan to his house. I had seen the three prisoner's in company about his house, I saw Jordan and Donald stand opposite a square of glass. I saw Jordan take an instrument from his pocket and do something to the glass; Steers stood four houses off. Jordan looked a little about him and walked a pace or two, and then came back and put his fingers through a hole he had made in the window and took six silver spoons out, then all three ran away, Jordan and Donald turned the corner, and I think Steers took an opposite direction. I ran after them, knocked Donald down, followed Jordan, he fell down by the Jacob's Well, public-house, and threw the spoons down into the cellar, the flap of which was open. I laid hold of him as he threw them down, took him into the public-house, and told the landlord, in his presence, that he had thrown the spoons into the cellar. I then took Jordan to Mr. Harris, and he was sent to the watch-house; I returned to the public-house with Harris, and the landlord produced the spoons. I took Donald two days after, I knew them all before by seeing them about - I had seen them all three together on the Sunday night, and on Monday morning, and on Monday afternoon I saw them together standing by Harris's window looking about, watching the shop. On the Wednesday morning, about ten o'clock, I and Coates followed Steers into a coffee-shop and took him.

Q. On Tuesday afternoon when the spoons were taken, where was Steers. - A. Standing four doors off, I observed him for about ten minutes; I saw them all three come up together from Oxford-street way. I was standing at my father's door, they passed Harris's door two or three times before they stopped. Steers did not stop at the Oxford-street side of the house, but the other way.

JORDAN. - Q. Was Steers with us. - A. Yes.

JOHN WAITE . I am landlord of the Jacob's Well, public-house. Payne brought Jordan to my house, and said some spoons were in the cellar; I went down and found six spoons tied together, which I gave to Harris.

RICHARD COATES . I produce the spoons. I took Steers in the coffee-shop.

EPHRAIM HARRIS . The spoons are mine, a ticket with my shop mark was on them. When Waite delivered them to me it was gone. I know them to be mine, I have been in the habit of cleaning them once a month for the last two years - I saw them in the shop on that morning. When Payne brought the boy in, I looked and missed them from the window.

JORDAN's Defence. I broke no window - nor took them.

DONALD'S Defence. The window was broken before. Steers was not in it, he is innocent. I met Jordan at the time he said he was going somewhere.

STEERS'S Defence. I know nothing at all about it.

HARRIS re-examined. My window was cracked before, but not broken; there had been a good many cracks in it for some days before.

JORDAN - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 13.

DONALD - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 12.

STEERS - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 13.

Recommended to Mercy on account of their youth.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Lord Chief Justice Abbott.

Reference Number: t18210411-21

508. ABRAHAM ISAACS was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Adrianus Bommenaer , at St. Dunstan, Stepney , about nine o'clock in the forenoon of the 7th of March , (he and others being therein) and stealing therein, nineteen yards of muslin, value 40 s.; 100 yards of nett, value 4 l. 10 s., and eighteen yards of ribbon, value 18 s., his property .

ADRIANUS BOMMENAER. I am a haberdasher , and live in Mile-end-road , in the parish of Stepney. I have no partner - I was up stairs in the house at the time of the robbery.

ELIZA WILTSHIER . I am servant to the prosecutor. On Wednesday, the 7th of March, I saw my mistress put the things into the window, the glass was whole and safe; at half-past eight o'clock in the morning. After the window was set out, I was going in to breakfast about nine o'clock, my mistress had gone to breakfast - my master was up stairs in his dressing-room. I was coming out of the kitchen, and looked in the shop as I passed through it, and saw the prisoner with another man at the window, I went down the shop nearer to the window and saw the prisoner in the act of pulling the muslin out of the window, and tucking it under his coat - he dragged it through a broken pane of glass. I ran to the door and cried Stop thief! they separated and ran off - I followed the prisoner. A man at a building stopped him, and took him to the Black Boy, public-house - he had got about a hundred yards, he was searched there; when he was first taken I saw him drop a piece of handkerchiefs in the dirt, I did not pick them up. When I got to the house I saw another piece of handkerchiefs and a piece of muslin taken from under his coat by Taylor.

WILLIAM TAYLOR . I was at the Black Boy, I saw the prisoner drop a piece of muslin as they were was bringing him to the public-house, I picked it up, took it to the public-house, and when he was brought in I took two more pieces of muslin from under his coat, I kept all three till the officer came, and then delivered them to Wiltshier in the officer's presence.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODERICK. - Q. Are you sure he dropped the muslin. - A. Yes, I did not lose sight of him afterwards.

JAMES STONE . I am an officer. I produce three pieces of muslin which I received from Wiltshier.

ELIZA WILTSHIER re-examined. I know them by the private mark - I missed other things from the window, some Mecklin net and ribbon; my mistress told me the lace was missing - she is not here.

Cross-examined. - Q. Did the person turn the corner, so that you might lose sight of him. - A. No, I am positive he is the man.

MR. BOMMENAER. The three pieces of muslin cost me above 30 s.

Prisoner's Defence. When I was taken into the public-house, that man was there - the muslin was dropped in the street, how could he see me drop it; I was running after the thief, and got the muslin from him, they took me because I had the property. A carman came by who knew the man that took it.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 30.

Recommended to Mercy by the prosecutor.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Ld. Chief Justice Abbott.

Reference Number: t18210411-22

509. WILLIAM TOSELEY was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of March , at St. Marylebone , one mare, price 12 l. , the goods of Anne Rance , widow .

JAMES RANCE . I live with my mother Ann Rance , (who is a widow,) at Wooburn, Buckinghamshire . We missed the mare on the 24th of March, between four and five in the morning. I had seen her safe at half-past eight the night before, I found her next day (Sunday) about three o'clock in the afternoon at a livery stables in Berkley-mews, Portman-square, Harold shewed her to me. On Tuesday morning I saw Moores - he saw the mare, it remained at the stable till Tuesday, I was never with him when he saw the mare - it was in Harold's stable. There were more horses there - she was a dark brown Welch mare, fourteen hands and a half high, heavy in fold, had a star on her forehead, and a cut tail - I am sure it was my mothers. The prisoner lived for sixteen years very near our house, and has been about the place from time to time ever since; he was never absent above a month or two, I had seen him at Wooburn not long before.

JAMES EVANS . On Saturday morning between eight and nine o'clock, I saw the prisoner on the Bayswater-road, I was in a neighbour's garden, I live at Bayswater; the prisoner was in the road, he called to me, and said he would give me 2 s. to lead the mare to town, I did so - he went with me. I took it to Mr. Barker's on the Bayswater-road - he deals in dead horses; the prisoner asked me if I knew any body who bought horses, I said there was a knacker's up the road, we took her to Barker's; the prisoner offered to sell her to young Mr. Barker, he said he did not like to buy such things of strange people; we then went to Tyburn-turnpike, he offered to sell her to the turnpike man, who refused to buy her; we then took he down to Berkley-mews, we there saw Moores, and offered to sell her to him, he would not buy her, but took the prisoner in custody, and put the mare in a stable in the mews - she was a dark brown mare, very heavy in fold.

WILLIAM MOORES . The prisoner and last witness came into Berkley-mews with the mare, the prisoner said he had got the mare for sale. I asked him the price, he said 6 l. - I asked if he would take less, he said No, that he had been offered 4 l. for her. I asked where he brought her from, he said from Wickham, that his uncle was dead, and had left him a cart, horse and harness, he had sold the cart and harness, and he wanted to sell the mare, being distressed for rent. I had him taken up, and put the mare in Harold's stable - she was a dark brown mare, and heavy in fold. I thought her worth 12 l., I was present when she was delivered to Mr. Rance - I saw him take her away after he had sworn to her.

JAMES RANCE re-examined. I did not recollect it, but Moores was there when I rode off with the mare.

THOMAS GALL . I am a constable. I took the prisoner in charge, and saw the mare in Harold's stable.

Prisoner's Defence. I turned King's evidence when the officer's took me, and told them every thing. I was going home and met two men, who asked me to go with them and the horse, I refused, but they persuaded me and gave me money to pay the turnpike, and said they would stop on the road while I went to town to sell the mare, and not to sell it under 6 l., and make haste back, and they would satisfy me. I am not so sharp as I should be.

JOHN TOSELEY . I am the prisoner's father, he has not got his right senses as he should have, and he tells me he did not steal it.

Q. How do you mean he has not his senses. - A. He is not so sharp as many be. He was apprenticed to a shoemaker, and cannot count half a crown's worth of halfpence.

JOSEPH BODY . I live at Wooburn. I have known the prisoner sometime - he is not right in his head at times

like other people, he is very comical at different times, not like the rest of us.

Q. Do you think he knows his own goods from other peoples - A. I should think so.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 27.

Recommended to Mercy.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Ld. Chief Justice Abbott.

Reference Number: t18210411-23

510. MATTHIAS GEORGE DRISCOLL was indicted for feloniously assaulting Thomas Wood , on the King's highway, at St. James's, Westminster , on the 16th of March , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, one pair of shoes, value 1 s.; one coat, value 2 s., the sum of 10 s. in monies numbered, and one 5 l., and three 1 l. Bank notes, his property .

MESSRS. ADOLPHUS and PLATT conducted the prosecution.

The property was obtained from the prosecutor by the prisoner, under a threat, to charge him with an unnatural crime; the particulars are to be omitted by order of the Court.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 19.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Ld. Chief Justice Abbott.

Reference Number: t18210411-24

511. HERTZIG BRANDHAM was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of February , four spoons, value 3 l. 10 s., and one pair of ear-rings, value 5 s., the goods of William Crowder , in his dwelling-house .

MARY CROWDER . I am the wife of William Crowder , we live in Greenfield-street, Commercial-road , in the parish of Stepney . The prisoner lodged at our house from the 11th of December, 1812, until the 12th of February following, which was on a Monday - he was was in my debt; he slept in the bed next to my bed-room. At nine o'clock in the morning he came down to the kitchen, and said -

"Good morning;" he returned up with the clothes brush, and came down in about half an hour, wished me good morning, and said he should return about one o'clock, and should bring me some money. I had left my bed-room door ajar, as my child was in bed. I went up stairs about an hour after, and missed these things from the drawers, I saw no more of him till the 6th of March when I met him in Aldgate, he passed me, ran across the road, looked at me, and ran towards Whitechapel - he was apprehended on the 9th.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. - Q. Have you found any of your property. - A. No, he owed me 24 s. I had not threatened to arrest him for it; he was found in the London hospital, which is not far from my house.

WM. CROWDER. I saw every thing safe at half-past ten o'clock at night.

Prisoner's Defence. I owed the gentleman some money, his wife asked me many times for it; when I went out, I said I should get some money, I could not get it, and did not like to return, and went to lodge at another place, I soon found the officers were after me. I said I had only left my lodgings in debt; I got ill and went to the London hospital, I was in there the day that the prosecutrix says she met me, and was not able to move.

LAWRENCE SUMMERS . I know the prisoner, I saw him about almost every day in February, he was at my house in Leadenhall-street, and boarded with me till five weeks back.

DINA LEVY . The prisoner came to lodge with me, he went but publicly.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Ld. Chief Justice Abbott.

Reference Number: t18210411-25

512. SAMUEL PROCTER was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of March , two seals, value 3 l., and one key, value 14 s., the goods of John George Fearn , in his dwelling house .

MR. DOWLING conducted the prosecution.

MR. JOHN GEORGE FEARN . I live in Cornhill, in the parish of St. Michael , and rent the house; the prisoner was in my employ, as porter ; he came in April, 1819, and left a short time, being ill, returned about the 6th of September, and remained in my service till he was apprehended. He had the care of the shop, while the shopmen were at dinner. I took stock at Christmas, missed a variety of articles, and caused enquiry to be made at at different pawnbrokers, in consequence of which I had him apprehended on the 28th of March.

THOMAS ARMSTRONG . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Baldwin's-gardens. I produce two gold seals and a gold key, which I took in pawn of the prisoner on the 26th of March, for 1 l. 14 s. I am sure it was the prisoner.

Cross-examined by MR. WALFORD. Q. You do business with a variety of people. - A. Yes, he was five or ten minutes with me, and pawned them all at one time.

WILLIAM DRINKWATER . I am an officer. The prisoner was apprehended by Mayhew, and given in my charge - I went to search for the property.

THOMAS MAYHEW . I apprehended the prisoner at his master's house.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

513. SAMUEL PROCTER was again indicted for stealing, on the 5th of December , two seals, value 3 l. 17 s., and one key, value 10 s., the goods of John George Fearn , in his dwelling house .

JOHN GEORGE FEARN . The prisoner was my porter, and was apprehended on the 28th of March.

WILLIAM ALDRIDGE . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Orange-street, Red Lion-square. I produce two gold seals, and a gold key, which were pawned by Charles and Emanuel Procter , on the 5th of December, for 2 l., they both dealt in the transaction. I have known them both for eight or nine years; I was present on the 29th of March, when the prisoner was examined, these seals and key were produced, and sworn to by Mr. Fearn. I am not certain whether what the prisoner said was taken down.

ROBERT MAYHEW . I was present. What the prisoner said was not taken down. I saw the two seals and key produced by Aldridge; the prisoner said he gave them

to his two brothers, Charles and Emanuel, to pawn - I had apprehended them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210411-26

514. CHARLES BALL was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of May , one seal, value 3 l., the goods of John George Fearn , in his dwelling house .

MR. JOHN GEORGE FEARN . I live in Cornhill . The prisoner came into my service as porter , in August, 1819, and continued till the end of October, or the beginning of November last. At the commencement of this year, I took stock, and missed a quantity of gold seals and keys, and other articles, and in consequence of which I had the prisoner apprehended. He had access to the shop while the shopmen were at dinner.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Can you say when you last saw the seal in question. - A. No, I did not part with the prisoner on suspicion of dishonesty.

ROBERT SPARROW. I was shopman to Mr. Benton, of 244, High Holborn. I produce a gold seal, which was pawned on the 2d of May, 1820, by the prisoner, for 26 s., he is the man, I knew him before.

Cross-examined. Q. How often have you seen the prisoner. - A. Four or five times. I do not know whether it was pawned by day or night - I am certain he pawned this seal. I know it was on the 2d of May, by the date of the duplicate; he usually came to me on a Saturday, he might come on other days - 26 s. is a fair price to lend on it.

MR. DOWLING. - Q. Is your's an extensive business - A. Yes, to the best of my knowledge the prisoner is the man who pawned it - it was in the name of John Cooper .

Q. Are you certain the prisoner is the man. - A. If there is the least benefit, I always give it to the prisoner, but to the best of my recollection, he is the man. I am not quite sure.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

THOMAS MAYHEW . I apprehended the prisoner in Gerrard-street, Soho, but found nothing on him.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

515. CHARLES BALL was again indicted for stealing, on the 11th of March , one seal, value 2 l. 10 s., the goods of John George Fearn , in his dwelling-house .

MR. FEARN. I am a jeweller, and live in Cornhill. The prisoner was my porter, and left in October, and in the beginning of this year I missed some property, and had him apprehended.

ROBERT SPARROW . I was shopman to Mr. Benton. On the 11th of March, 1820, I took a gold seal in pawn of the prisoner, in the name of John Cooper , for 26 s. I am positive the prisoner is the man who pawned this seal - I had seen him three times before.

Cross-examined. Q. What makes you now so positive. - A. It is a particular sort of seal, I observed it as a good seal, he pawned it at night, and I think on Saturday, which is a busy night with us. He usually came on Saturday night, and I thought he wanted to make up some money. I am positive it was the prisoner.

(Property produced, and sworn to.)

(The prisoner made an exceeding long defence, but all that related to the question, was, that the pawnbroker must be mistaken in his person, and declaring his innocence.)

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210411-27

516. HENRY HARRISON was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of February , one set of fire irons, value 18 s. , the goods of Richard Denham .

MR. BRODERICK conducted the prosecution.

JOHN SMITH . I am fourteen years old, and live in Brewhouse-yard, Shoe-lane, with my father, who is an upholsterer. I have known the prisoner about three months; in February last, I saw him in Fetter-lane, he asked me to pawn a set of fire-irons for him - he had them with him; he did not direct me to any particular pawnbroker's, I took them to Flemming's in Fleet-market, and pawned them in my own name for 5 s., and took him the money - he gave me 3 d. for my trouble. I found him still in Fetter-lane, at the corner of Greystoke-place, where I left him - I had known him about a month before that.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. What is your employment. - A. I had no employ, I was charged with this, and put in prison. I now live with Mr. Burton - I never left him. I knew the prisoner lived with Mr. Denham, but did not know that he stole them.

Q. Do you mean to say you did not know what you were about. - A. I knew I was pawning fire-irons - I did not know I was doing wrong. I know a boy named Spires, he was taken to gaol also.

Q. How did you get out of custody, - A. I was bound over to appear against the prisoner - I was imprisoned about four days.

COURT. Q. Could you suppose he came honestly by them. - A. I did not suppose any thing of the kind.

MR. BRODERICK. - Q. Where did you first become acquainted with him. - A. In Fetter-lane; there was a boy named Winston, who the prisoner knew, and he was acquainted with Spires - I have seen them together in Shoe-lane.

CHARLES POORE . I am a shopman to Mr. Flemming, a pawnbroker in Fleet-market. On the 15th of February, I took in a set of fire-irons, for 5 s. in the name of John Smith , New-street. I cannot say who brought them - I took no others in that day: they were pawned in the paper they are now in.

JOHN SMITH . I cannot say they are the fire-irons, but they are exactly like them - I pawned them with Poore.

JOHN OADES . I am shopman to Mr. Denham, who lives at 102, Fetter-lane. I believe the irons to be the prosecutor's, there is no mark on them, but the paper has our

private mark on it, in the hand-writing of Mr. Wiltshire, who was formerly in the employ of Mr. Carter, whom Mr. Denham succeeded in business.

Cross-examined. Q. You was shopman when Mr. Carter had the business. - A. Yes, he was never in partnership with Denham. I know the paper was once in the possession of Mr. Denham, or Mr. Carter, and was used to wrap irons in; if they have good paper round them, we probably send them out in it when we sell them, we perhaps sell fifty pair in a year - they may have been sold, I did not miss any, I cannot say what number the stock consists of. I never saw Smith in the shop - the shop joins Greystoke-place.

MR. BRODERICK. Q. Have the irons been used at all. - A. They are quite new. The prisoner was in Mr. Denham's employ for about three months as errand boy, since Christmas, he had access to the stock - we have five servants.

ABRAHAM CARTER . Mr. Denham succeeded me in the business, on the 19th of October, and took the whole of the stock. I believe I have seen these fire irons before, and there is a private mark on the paper, which I can swear to, it is the hand-writing of a former shopman of mine.

Cross-examined. Q. You only swear to the paper. - A. No, the irons are quite new; they may have been two or three years in the shop for what I know. I should think they must have been two years, as they are not modern.

C. R. DENHAM. I am an ironmonger , and live in Fetter-lane , my private mark is on the paper - my mark is the same as Mr. Carter's, it has not been put on since I took the stock; we have irons of a similar pattern to these, we should not send them out in the paper ragged as it is now, they had this paper round them when I first saw them. I have sold none of this pattern since I took the stock. I never sold the prisoner any. I fetched an officer, and told the prisoner I was informed he had robbed me, he denied it, but acknowledged it before the officer took him away. I said nothing to induce him to confess - I might have said it was useless to deny it.

WILLIAM HENRY KING . I am ward beadle. On the 15th of March, I was fetched, and took the prisoner in custody. He was called into his master's room, and charged with dishonesty, which he denied for a long time; I left the room with a friend of the prosecutor's to consult about it, the prosecutor then said he had confessed it - I heard no confession.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. - Q. Why were you sent out of the room. - A. I was not sent out, I went out to consult about it, as the prisoner denied it. Mr. Denham told me, in the prisoner's hearing, that he had confessed it.

Q. Did not the prosecutor tell you he was desirous of getting a confession, as he had no other means, not being able to swear to them - A. He said no such thing - he said he did not know he was robbed till he was told of it - the prisoner did not deny having confessed it.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210411-28

517. HANNAH HUNT was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of February , one pair of blankets, value 12 s.; two pillows, value 5 s.; two pillow-cases, value 2 s.; one gown, value 5 s.; one frock, value 2 s.; one hat, value 2 s. 6 d., and one candlestick, value 1 s. , the goods of William Mortimer .

WILLIAM MORTIMER . I live in Cross Keys-square, Little Britain ; the prisoner was formerly my servant , and left about thirteen months ago. On the 21st of February, about six o'clock, my wife saw every thing safe in the bed-room, and at nine she informed me we had been robbed. I went up stairs, and missed the articles stated in the indictment, which I had seen safe that morning. I had not seen the prisoner for seven months. Next morning I found a pair of pillows pawned with Perry - suspicion fell on the prisoner - I went with Sheppard next day, and found the prisoner at her mother's in Attfield-street, Goswell-street, and charged her with the robbery - she denied it; she was searched, and two duplicates of the pillows found on her - I went to the pawnbroker's, and found them. My house is not left open in the daytime.

TIMOTHY PERRY . I am an apprentice to Mr. Cassell, who is a pawnbroker, and lives in Old-street. I took two pillows in pledge of the prisoner, in the name of Eliza Jones , Gee-street, on the 21st of February - she pawned them at one time, but had separate duplicates. The duplicates found on her are those I gave her. I am certain she is the woman.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAM SHEPPARD . I am a constable. I took the prisoner, and found the duplicates in her bosom.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Confined Three Months .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210411-29

THIRD DAY. FRIDAY, APRIL 13.

518. JONATHAN HENRY CHRISTIE and JAMES TRAILL were indicted for the wilful murder of John Scott .

MR. BOLLAND conducted the prosecution.

MR. THOMAS JOSEPH PETTIGREW. I am a surgeon, and live in Spring-gardens. I was not acquainted with Mr. Scott. I have been acquainted with Mr. Peter George Patmore many years; I was requested by him to attend professionally. On Friday, the 16th of February , at noon, he called on me, and requested me to attend.

Q. Did he request you to be present at any time or place - A. No.

Q. In consequence of information which you afterwards received, did you attend at Chalk Farm - A. I did, at the request of Mr. Patmore - my pupil, Mr. Morris, went with me. On arriving at the end of the lane leading to Chalk Farm, about eight or half-past eight o'clock, we went towards the fields - it was moonlight.

Q. Before you arrived at the spot you afterwards reached, did you hear the report of a pistol - A. I did not; I reached the top of the hill, and saw four gentlemen

in the neighbouring field, two of them were walking back wards, and the two others by the side of the hedge, between the bill and the field. I heard the knocking of pistols, the priming of pistols, and the shutting of the pan - soon after shots were exchanged.

Q. How do you mean - A. Both pistols were fired. I heard the sound, and saw the flash; I then heard an exclamation from one of the gentlemen on the ground, as if wounded. I got over the hedge, and found Mr. Scott on his knees, on the ground - he pointed out to me that he was wounded on the right side - the other gentlemen were supporting him.

Q. Did you hear any conversation between them - A. Not till I had examined Mr. Scott. I partly undressed him, and examined the wound - Mr. Scott was fainting. One of the gentlemen came up to him, and took him by hand - I cannot say which gentleman it was; he expressed a wish that he had himself been in his situation rather that Mr. Scott.

Q. On Mr. Scott's recovery, did he say any thing - A. He addressed those around him, and said,

"Whatever may be the result of this case, I beg you all to bear in remembrance that every thing has been fair and honourable." During the time I was making further examination of the wound, an altercation commenced between two other gentlemen on the ground, one of them was Mr. Patmore. I am not at all acquainted with the person of the other.

Q. Can you state what passed - A. I did not distinctly hear the whole of the conversation. I heard Mr. Patmore exclaim,

"Then why was it not communicated to me - I knew nothing of it." During the altercation between the other two, the third, which was the person who first addressed Mr. Scott, came up and enquired what I thought of the wound, whether I regarded it as fatal. Mr. Scott was at that time in a state of fainting. I replied,

"That conceiving the ball to have perforated the cavity of the abdomen, I feared it was mortal." The gentleman was in great agony, wringing his hands, and exclaimed, in words, as nearly as I can recollect,

"Good God, why was I permitted to fire a second time, I fired down the field, and could do no more." I cannot recollect any thing else that passed on the spot. I had examined the wound on his recovery from fainting. I thought it best that he should be removed to town, gave orders to that effect, and went to prepare for his reception. I saw him again next day, and every day till his death. In my judgment the wound was the cause of his death. He was not brought to London.

Cross-examined by MR. GURNEY. Q. You mentioned that the gentleman said, Good God, &c. did he not add,

"When I fired down the field, the first time I was compelled to fire in my own defence" - A. He said words to that effect, but the precise words I cannot state. He appeared in the greatest agony that a man could; the attention that all the gentlemen paid to the deceased was all that kind and humane friends could do - it was as great as it possibly could be. I placed him on the shutter, and the gentlemen conveyed him down the field to the house.

COURT. Q. I observe in your deposition you mentioned the gentlemens' names, had you any knowledge of either of them - A. I had not; the night, though moonlight, was particularly foggy. I stated their names from what I understood. On my oath, I have no knowledge of either of the two persons in the field.

WILLIAM BEVILL MORRIS. I am pupil to Mr. Pettigrew. I accompanied him to Chalk farm. As we went towards the bill I distinctly heard the report of a pistol - I only heard one sound; I went to the spot from whence it came, and reached the hedge before Mr. Pettigrew, but not the spot in question, till after. I pursued a tract by the side of the hedge, Mr. Pettigrew went on an eminence - I did not arrive on the spot until after him; I heard a noise, like the ramming of pistols, and saw two heads above the hedge; I ascended the hill, and observed two gentlemen at a distance presenting a pistol at each other; at that moment they fired, and the gentleman nearest to me on the left, fell on his knees - I assisted to raise him up with Mr. Pettigrew, and Mr. Pettigrew examined his wound; a gentleman came up at that time, took Mr. Scott's hand, and exclaimed, that he wished he was in Mr. Scott's situation - I should not know that gentleman again, I am certain of it. A conversation ensued between two gentlemen, one of whom was Mr. Patmore, the other I do not know. Mr. Pettigrew ordered me to run and get the postchaise brought up; I brought the chaise - I had to pass the farm, and was there stopped. I remained there sometime, then returned, and found them bringing the deceased on a shutter - there were four or five bringing him - I cannot say who they were; I can only recognize one, and that is Mr. Christie; I recognize him as having been in the room at the house after Mr. Scott was brought in - he must have accompanied Mr. Scott on the shutter; I cannot say whether he was one of the gentlemen in the field. I attended Mr. Scott till further assistance came.

HUGH WATSON . I am the landlord of Chalk Farm tavern. On the evening this affair happened, about a quarter past nine o'clock, two gentlemen called, and had a bottle of wine in the parlour. I should not know them again.

COURT. Q. Were they disguised - A. No, my Lord; I did not go into the parlour while they were there. I did not serve them.

MR. WALFORD. Q. Very little of the wine was drank - A. Oh, yes; near two-thirds of it; they went away, and went down the lane, towards the Hampstead road, which is the main road to London.

Q. Do you recollect after this an alarm being given of an accident happening - A. Yes, it was a quarter of an hour or twenty minutes after the two gentlemen left - Smith, Rutherford, and I think Ryan, the hostler, were in my house at this time; I desired them to take a shutter to assist the gentlemen - the wounded gentleman was afterwards brought to my house.

Q. Did any persons accompany him, who had been at your house before. - A. I cannot say whether either of them were the two who had the wine, I remember that these gentlemen, the prisoners, were two who accompanied Mr. Scott into my house, and stopped to assist in getting him into bed, and Mr. Christie soon after went away. They most certainly conducted themselves with the greatest humanity towards Mr. Scott. Mr. Traile went away I think in an hour or more.

JAMES RYAN . I am hostler at Chalk Farm. I remember the two gentlemen coming, I do not think I should know them again, they came between six and seven o'clock. I think I saw them go away in about twenty minutes, down the lane towards Hampstead.

Q. Did you afterwards hear an alarm of an accident in the field. - A. Yes, it might be a quarter of an hour after. I went to the field with a shutter; I found Mr. Scott there, and four or five more gentlemen stood together about thirty yards off, I called to them, they came up directly, I put him on a shutter with their assistance, he was taken to Chalk Farm, one or two of the gentlemen held his feet, and I had hold of his shoulder; we conveyed him to the Farm, the gentlemen I found in the field all went with me. I believe every one went into the house.

COURT. Q. Have you any knowledge of any of the gentlemen you saw in the field. - A. No, my Lord.

Q. You saw them afterwards at the house. - A. I had only a small glimpse of them, they ordered me out of the room, after I put Mr. Scott on the chair.

THOMAS SMITH . I am a carpenter, I lived at Kentish-town, I now live at Hampstead. I was working at the farm, and was in Mr. Watson's house when an alarm was given, I went to the field with a gentleman and Ryan, and found some gentlemen in the field, Mr. Traill was one of them. Mr. Scott was brought home to the farm.

DR. GEORGE DARLING . I am a physician, and reside in Brunswick-square. I was called on by Mrs. Scott, to attend Mr. Scott, between twelve and one o'clock on Saturday, in the middle of the night. Mr. Scott's Christian name was John. I found him suffering from the wound he had received; he was sensible, he was certainly in great danger. I communicated my opinion to him, he asked if his wound was necessarily mortal - he was told that it was not necessarily mortal, but it was next to that; he was informed that it was just possible, that his intestines had not been perforated by the ball, in which case there might be a recovery, otherwise there was little hope.

COURT. Q. The enquiry now is directed particularly to the communication made to him, not to the opinion you formed. - A. I communicated to him, that it was possible the ball might have passed, without perforating the intestines, in which case, a recovery was possible; he afterwards enquired of Mr. Guthrie, the surgeon, in my presence, his words as near as I can recollect were

"I have only one question to ask, is my wound necessarily mortal?" Mr. Guthrie answered not necessarily (this was before the ball was extracted). Mr. Guthrie added, that it was a case necessarily of the greatest danger, but he had seen a recovery from similar wounds. Mr. Scott replied

"I am satisfied," and laid down.

Q. He had raised himself up then. - A. He had just raised himself up from the pillow.

Q. Was any further communication made by yourself or Mr. Guthrie, to Mr. Scott, as to the condition he was in. - A. To the best of my knowledge not.

Q. You had some conversation with Mr. Scott, on the subject of what passed in the field. - A. After that I had - he made a statement on that subject to me.

Q. Was the statement made immediately after your conversation, or subsequent. - A. My conversation to him was when I first called to see him, and on my visit next morning, he made the statement to me.

Q. Had you any further conversation relating to the danger of his situation. - A. Nothing that I know of, this was on Saturday - the ball was extracted on Sunday.

The Court ruled, that Mr. Scott's statement could not be given in evidence, as it was uncertain that he considered himself at the point of death.

MR. CHRISTIE. My counsel will call some witnesses who will say, whether through life, from my habits or character, I am likely to have committed murder.

MR. TRAILL. I am represented by two gentlemen far more experienced than myself, who I shall leave it to.

(A numerous body of most respectable witnesses gave both the gentlemen an unusually excellent character, for humanity and good temper through life.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Lord Chief Justice Abbott.

Reference Number: t18210411-30

519. WILLIAM WATERFORD was indicted for the wilful murder of James Edwards .

JOHN CRISP . On Monday morning 26th February , about ten o'clock, I was within one house of the corner of Cromer-street, Gray's Inn-lane , and saw an old man coming over the road - he appeared about seventy years of age. I saw three horses coming up the road, two men were on two of them, the other was led horse, the prisoner was leading it, and riding another, galloping up the road. I saw him fifteen or twenty yards from the old gentleman - the other man passed him without hurting him; the prisoner came up, and the chest of the horse he was riding, ran against the man and knocked him down, that caused the horse and the prisoner to fall together.

Q. Had any body called to the old man - A. Several people called to him - so did the prisoner, and tried to stop his horse, but he could not - he sung out

"Hoy," for the man to get out of the way - I do not think the old man heard him - he was about fifteen yards off when he called.

Q. Did he try to pull up, when he was fifteen yards off - A. He tried but could not. I ran to the old gentleman and helped him on a shutter - he was very badly wounded on the temple - his head was fractured very much. We took him to St. Bartholomew's Hospital, I remained there half an hour - he never spoke, I saw his body the next night - he was then dead.

Cross-examined by MR. BOLLAND. Q. How far were the horses from you when you first saw them - A. About twenty yards, the man had a cap on - I do not know whether it prevented his hearing, the prisoner did all he could to pull up, he was very much hurt himself, and it was ten to one he was not killed - he was leaning on his right hand, and had only the left to pull with.

COURT. Q. The other man was galloping too - A. Yes, it is a populous neighbourhood.

JOHN HAWKER . I saw the accident. Three horses were galloping on a-breast, and were about twenty yards from the deceased when I first saw them; the horse knocked him down - I picked him up - he was laying almost double, and bleeding at the nose very bad, his temple was fractured and his eye bruised. I carried him

to the hospital, he died in about three quarters of an hour - he never spoke after he was knocked down.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you hear the passenger's call to him to stop - A. Yes, and I think one of the men on the horses called, he endeavoured to stop his horse just as he came abreast of Cromer-street, but could not; the prisoner was hurt very much, it is a wonder he was not killed himself - the old man fell, and then the horse and prisoner fell.

Prisoner's Defence. Another man was riding with me, the horse the other man was riding slipped and ran away with him, then my led horse began galloping, which caused the other to start as well; I kept pulling them as hard as I could, but the more I pulled, the more they ran. I never saw the man till I got within three or four yards of him, as I was noticing the horses all the time; when I saw what danger I was in, I called out stop as well as I could.

GABRIEL SHERWOOD . I live with Mr. Malcott, a stonemason, in Newgate-street. I was in Gray's Inn-lane, with my master's riding mare, on the off side of the road, the prisoner was on a horse leading another - we were walking very gently; my mare started opposite the dust-yard, which is about 200 yards from Cromer-street - she went right into a gallop; I heard the prisoner behind me, and supposed by my mare starting, it caused his to start too, he had no saddle - we were not racing.

WILLIAM WHITEHEAD . I am a livery-stable keeper, in Harper's Mews. The prisoner was in my service - the mare he was riding was a thorough bred one, and the horse he lead was a spirited one.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18210411-31

520. JOHN GENOU was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of March , four pair of boots, value 2 l. 10 s.; one coat, value 1 l., and one pair of breeches, value 10 s., the goods of Peter Turnerelli , in his dwelling-house .

PETER TURNERELLI . I am an artist . The prisoner was my workman, and employed in casting plaister figures - he received weekly wages. He left me on Saturday, the 10th of March, that was the last time I saw him.

MARY DUGGAN . I am servant to the prosecutor. On Sunday morning, the 11th of March, the prisoner came to clean the boots, as he was accustomed - it was about half-past ten o'clock. I took the boot to him in the workshop, in the yard, and laid them down at the door for him. I saw him take them up, and go into the workshop; he did not sleep in the house at that time. I did not see him again until I saw him at Marlborough-street. I went into the workshop to send him on an errand, about a quarter of an hour after I took the boots, but he was gone - the four pair of boots were gone also. Nobody had been in the shop that morning. I have not seen them since - they had been worn; and repaired. I should have given about 4 s. for them, if I was to buy them. Nothing else was missed that morning.

MR. TURNERELLI re-examined. My boots were worth about 30 s. altogether. A suit of livery was missed that morning, but I do not know when it was taken. There is a back door to the shop, which he might unbolt and let himself out. I never saw the livery after it was in the press.

JOHN MURTY. I work for the prosecutor. I met the prisoner about a week after he left, and asked him why he did not come to the shop to work - he said he would not come again, because he had taken some clothes and boots.

GEORGE HARMAM. I was present when the prosecutor gave a suit of livery into the care of the prisoner. It was about a fortnight before he left the house. I saw the prisoner put them into a press in the prosecutor's study.

Prisoner's Defence. I was cast away on the coast of Cornwall. I walked to town, and applied to the prosecutor for work, which he gave me, at 1 s. a day. I came on this day as usual, the maid brought me four pair of boots; I laid them on the bench in the back shop, and went out to breakfast; I met a friend, who told me of a better place, at Greenwich, where I could get more wages. My master had told me to leave if I could better myself. I went to Greenwich about it, and did not return to clean the boots. I did not succeed, and did not like to return, thinking he would not employ me. I shut the door when I left, and did not steal the boots. I have been fourteen years in his Majesty's service.

GUILTY . Aged 36.

Of stealing to the value of 30 s. only.

Confined One Month and Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Ld. Chief Justice Abbott.

Reference Number: t18210411-32

521. JOHN REES was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Richard Rogers , at Ealing , about twelve o'clock in the night of the 7th of April , with intent to steal, and stealing therein. 1 lb. of tobacco, value 4 s.; one seive cloth, value 2 d., and the sum of 25 s. in copper monies, numbered, his property .

ANN ROGERS . I am the wife of Richard Rogers , who keeps a house at Brandford , in the parish of Ealing, and is a bricklayer . On Sunday morning, the 8th of April, I rose about six o'clock, and found the tiles taken off the wash-house, and the plaister broken through - it is a low building in the yard, enclosed with the dwelling house, and a door leads from the dwelling house to it. I was the last person up that night, and went to bed a quarter before eleven - I am sure the house was all shut up and fastened. I have two sons and two daughters, they were all a-bed before me; the hole was made large enough to admit a person's body. I missed five papers of halfpence, each containing five shillings, and a few loose halfpence, which were tied up in a seive cloth, and about a pound of tobacco, worth 5 s. per pound at the selling price - the cloth was worth 6 d.

HENRY SEVERS . I am watchman of Ealing parish - about a quarter before three o'clock last Sunday morning, I saw the prisoner coming, and get over Mr. Osborne's palings, which are some distance from the prosecutor's; I made him come back, and took him into custody - I took him to the cage, and searched him, and found four papers of halfpence, of 5 s. each; about 5 s. in loose copper, and about a pound of tobacco, in a cloth. I gave it to Gore.

WILLIAM GORE . I produce it.

MRS. ROGERS. It is my cloth.

The prisoner made no defence.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 28.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18210411-33

522. JAMES DUNN was indicted for feloniously assaulting Louisa Atkinson , spinster, on the King's highway, on the 20th of February , putting her in fear, and taking from her person, and against her will, one muff, value 20 s. her property .

LOUISA ATKINSON . On the 20th of February, between eleven and twelve o'clock at night, I was in Oxford-street, alone, going towards Cumberland-street, and coming from Covent-garden theatre. At the corner of Duke-street, Manchester-square , I was molested by the prisoner, who came up, and gave me a severe blow on my breast with his hand; he took my muff out of my hand - I am certain he struck me first - he ran away - I called Watch, and Stop thief! - I saw him stopped, near James-street, with the muff in his hand.

Prisoner Q. Was I not drunk - A. I did not perceive it.

Q. Were not two men walking by the side of me - A. The street was quite clear.

THOMAS STEPHENS . The prisoner was brought to the watch-house, and threw the muff down.

THOMAS MOLE . I am a watchman - I heard an alarm, ran up, and took the prisoner, with the muff in his hand.

Prisoner. Q. Did I not give it to her, and she threw it into my hands - No.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I had been to Guildford-street, after a situation, and was coming down Oxford-street, quite tipsy, and might have reeled against this girl - I suppose she was waiting for me, or some one else; she turned round and threw the muff at me - I said I wanted no such thing; somebody said call the watch, she did - when he came, the muff laid on the pavement; he said I had better take it in my arms - I did, and he pulled me to the watch-house.

THOMAS MOLE . I thought he had been drinking, but he was capable of knowing what he was about - he had the muff in his hand.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18210411-34

JOHN SMYRKE was indicted for feloniously assaulting Thomas Muers , on the 28th of February , on the King's highway, at St. Pancras , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, against his will, one watch, value 30 s.; two seals, value 5 s.; one watch key, value 3 s,; one slide, value 2 d., and one ring, value 2 d., his property .

THOMAS MUERS . I am a coach-spring maker , and live in Langley-street, Long-acre - on the 28th of February, about nine o'clock at night, I was coming from the city, and going along Hatton-wall, as I crossed the street, my foot slipped - a young man came up and took me by the arms, and said, my friend, you had like to have been down - I said it was very slippery walking; we entered into conversation - he asked where I was going - I said, as far as Tottenham Court-road; he said he was going as far as Rathbone-place, had I any objection to accompany him? We walked together to Liquorpond-street - I called on a coachmaker, a customer, in Lamb's Conduit-street, he waited at the door the while - I knocked at the coachmaker's door, he came out, and we went to a public-house, at the corner of Great Ormond-street, close by - I asked the prisoner to come in with us, and he did - I had some cloves and gin, and paid for all that we had - I then proceeded on with the prisoner, (the person I called on went home,) we went on talking together till we got to Tottenham Court-road - he said he was unfortunate and out of employment, or, as I had treated him, he would treat me, but he had no money. We went into the Black-horse, Tottenham Court-road - I had some cloves and gin, and he had a glass of rum - I paid for it, and we went on - I was going to Clements's New Inn-yard, Tottenham Court-road, to carry a message from Mr. Pointer, (the coach-maker I had called on) to a wheeler in the yard. I pulled out my watch, found it was late, and would not go - I turned up Goodge-street to go home - I went on till I came to Upper Rathbone-place , to a passage leading into Newman-street, and going along, (it is a very dark place) I had my umbrella under my left arm, and the prisoner laid hold of my right arm - I received a blow on my eye, and fell, and as I fell, I found my watch drawn from me - I do not know who did it - nobody but the prisoner was near me, to my knowledge, but I do not know who might be behind me. When I fell, I called Watch and Stop thief! a young man assisted me up, and said the man was taken - I went to Mr. Fountain's public-house, at the corner of Rathbone-place - I believe it is the Marquis of Granby. I found the prisoner there, he was taken to the watch-house - I saw my watch in the possession of the watch-house keeper.

Q. Is the prisoner the man who came up to you in Hatton Garden, walked on with you, and had hold of your arm when you received the blow - A. Yes; I cannot swear that he gave me the blow, but I am sure he had hold of my arm at the time - he took hold of my arm before I received the blow (in Tottenham Court-road) and had hold of it when I received the blow.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You were walking arm-in-arm, as any two men might be - A. Yes; I had been drinking, and was inebriated, I was drunk.

Q. Did you not fall down once or twice during your walk - A. Not to my knowledge; I did not fall in Hatton-garden, my foot slipped; he walked with me all the way - I halloed out instantly on receiving the blow.

Q. You went down Goodge-street into Upper Rathbone-place; if you meant to have gone home through Rathbone-place, you might have gone through Charlotte-street - A. People do not always go the nearest way; Upper Rathbone-place is darker than Charlotte-street; Fountain's is a very few yards from where I received the blow.

Q. Did you not say when you saw him, that is not the man that struck me, I am sure - A. Not that I know - I was in liquor. I said I could not believe he was the man who could do it. I received the blow on my right eye, on the edge of the bone - he stood on my right side, his arm being within mine. It was after nine o'clock when I looked at my watch.

COURT. Q. Can you say he was with you up to the instant you received the blow - A. He was; and when I recovered and rose, he was gone.

DENNIS BRADLEY . I was sergeant of the watch, and was stationed in Charles-street, Rathbone-place; I heard a cry of Watch! when I was at the corner of Rathbone-place, and Percy-street, and I went towards the cry - heard a call of Stop thief! and in hardly half a minute I saw the prisoner running by Fountain's, as fast as he could go - a man was close behind him, and tried to stop him - he swung round his arm, and I collared him; a person came out of Fountain's and said he had broken a window - we took him into

the bar - a young woman went out and brought in a watch, which she put into Fountain's hand - a young man came in, and desired me to detain the prisoner, for he had knocked a man down, and robbed him of his watch; he went out and said he would help the prosecutor in, as he was so much hurt, he was hardly able to come along; he went out, and brought the prosecutor in; directly he came in, he looked at the prisoner, doubled his fist and said,

"you are the man that knocked me down, and robbed me of my watch." Fountain, at this time, had the watch in the bar - it was not shewn to him till he got to the atch-house - he then claimed it.

Q. You met him running; before you stopped him, had you met or seen any other person - A. Not a soul; I did not hear the prisoner say any thing - there was a cry of Stop thief! behind him.

Cross-examined. Q. You crossed diagonally from one pavement to the other - A. Yes; when I came up, the prisoner was half way between Fountain's and Percy coffee-house.

Q. Might not another person have been before him, and you not see him - A. The street was quite clear, my face was towards Fountain's, I know nobody passed before him; the young man who tried to lay hold of him was not above two yards from him when I came up. He went to the door of the public-house - whether he went in or not, I cannot say; somebody came out, and said the window was broken before I took him into the house, but the watch was found afterwards.

ELIZABETH SEYERS . I was going down Rathbone-place, in a direction which would take me to the passage leading into Newman-street - a young man ran very fast by me; I cannot say the prisoner is the same man; I saw the prisoner at Fountain's - I heard a cry of Watch and Stop thief! behind him - I then turned round, looked at him, and saw his hand move, as though he threw something away - this was at Fountain's window; and at the instant I saw him move his hand, I heard a crash, like a pane of glass breaking - I saw two men following him.

WILLIAM FOUNTAIN . I keep the Marquis of Granby, public-house, at the corner of Upper Rathbone-place; the prisoner was brought to my house - I heard a pane of glass broken just before he was brought in - a watch was brought to me by some person, I do not know who, there was so many people collected. Muers came in after the watch was brought in - he saw the prisoner, and said, you are the man who knocked me down and robbed me. His eye was very much hurt - I did not take notice of his clothes - he appeared very much intoxicated - I delivered the watch to Howard, the watch-house keeper, myself.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you hear the glass break before or after the prisoner was brought in - A. Before. I was in my parlour when I heard the window break - I went out immediately, and saw the watchman bringing the prisoner in - the window is in Upper Rathbone-place. It was about thirty feet from me - I am sure the prosecutor said the prisoner was the man, but when he was going to sign the charge at the watch-house, the prisoner said, you are not going to sign a charge against me, I am not the man; he said, I know you are not; he afterwards said he was - he was so intoxicated, he hardly knew what he said.

HENRY HOWARD . I am watch-house keeper - I produce the watch which Fountain gave me. When the prosecutor came to the watch-house, he said that was the man who robbed him - the prisoner said,

"Do you say I robbed you?" he said,

"You know who robbed me." I did not hear him say he was not the man - but he might have said so, while I was taking the charge down. Smith was there.

THOMAS MUERS . It is my watch.

Prisoner's Defence. I am perfectly innocent, and throw myself on the mercy of the Court.

CHARLES SMITH . I was in Rathbone-place at the time the prisoner was apprehended, I was nearly opposite - I went to Fountain's, hearing a noise, and saw the prosecutor and prisoner - he was beastly intoxicated, I never saw a man worse in my life.

Q. Were you there before the prosecutor came in - A. No; I saw the watch either there, or at the watch-house.

Q. When it was produced, did you hear the prosecutor say whether the prisoner was or was not the person who took it for him - A. Yes, many times - I heard him say he was not the man, as well as from a question put by myself.

COURT. Q. He said the prisoner was not the man who did what - A. Knocked him down. I believe he was so intolerably intoxicated, he did not know what he said. I took him to the watch-house myself, and had great difficulty in getting him there.

GUILTY . - DEATH .

Recommended to mercy by the Jury.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Ld. Chief Justice Abbott.

Reference Number: t18210411-35

523. JOHN LINCH was indicted for feloniously assaulting William Perkins on the King's highway, on the 12th of March , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, one watch chain, value 18 s.; one knife, value 6 d., and one watch key, value 3 d.; his property .

WILLIAM PERKINS . I am a weaver , and live in the Curtain-road; On the 12th of March, about seven o'clock in the evening, I was going down Redcross-street , walking very fast; at the end of Ball-alley I felt my watch going - I saw no one, I had my umbrella up, I put my hand down, and caught hold of my watch; I looked down, and saw a boy having hold of my chain; I heard the chain break while I was endeavouring to prevent my watch going from me; I attempted to run after the boy, when the prisoner got hold of my waistcoat, and held me; I collared him - and, at that moment, some gentlemen came up - I asked them to assist me. Herdsfield came up and took him, he was never out of my hands.

Q. At the time the boy laid hold of your watch, did he pull hard at it, before it broke - A. It broke on my holding it; the prisoner was a stranger to me; when he laid hold of me he used dreadful oaths.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Which way were you going - A. Towards Little Britain. I saw no one till I felt the watch pulled - the chain was snatched at one snatch. I changed my umbrella from one hand to the other, then put my hand down, and it was snatched violently - I had not taken one step to run after the boy, when the prisoner laid hold of me.

Q. Did you not run against the prisoner, and he laid hold of you, and said,

"Holloo, what are you at?" - No; he was behind me; I turned round to go up the court, and he

seized me; I collared him, and he caught hold of me - he did not ask why I ran against him; he did not give me his name or address.

COURT. Q. Had you laid hold of the chain, to save it, before it was pulled from you - A. I laid hold of it, and it broke in the attempt to get it out of my hand.

THOMAS BATES . I am a watchman, and live in St. Swithin's-lane; I was going into Bridgwater-square, and close to Paul's-alley, I met a friend, with whom I was in conversation, when Perkins passed us with an umbrella - as soon as he passed I heard a scuffle, he was then about six yards off. I heard him call out for assistance - I went up, and heard the prisoner say,

"Why did you hold me?" Perkins said,

"Because my chain is taken" - and at that moment Herdsfield came up and took the prisoner.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you see any boy run - A. No; I did not hear the prisoner say, because you held me first - he gave his right name and address, when he was asked - he said he lived in the City-road, and was going to his aunt's.

JOHN HERDSFIELD . I am a constable; about seven o'clock on the 12th of March, I was at the corner of Paul's-alley. The prosecutor had hold of Lynch - he said he was robbed of his chain and seals - I took the prisoner to the Compter, where I searched him, and found no chain on him. The prosecutor said the prisoner was the person who prevented his taking the thief.

Cross-examined. Q. Did not the prisoner say, he ran against him, and so he laid hold of him - A. I did not hear it at all - I heard him say, what did you lay hold of me for?

Prisoner's Defence. My mother sent me to my aunt's about seven o'clock - she lay dangerously ill, in Paul's-alley - on my arriving at the corner of the alley, the prosecutor was walking by me - he turned round, and accused me of running against him. He said, have you seen what has happened? I said No. He said, I beg your pardon for running against you. He stopped a few minutes, then said I am robbed of my chain by a boy, and I imagine you was in his company. I said no, there was no person in company with me - I gave him my address, he collared me, and I submitted, without the least resistance, knowing my innocence.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Of stealing from the person only.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210411-36

524. RICHARD THOMPSON and CHARLES THOMPSON were indicted for stealing, on the 5th of April , one bag, value 1 d., and 5 lbs. of wafers, value 10 s. , the goods of Catherine Cartwright .

CATHERINE CARTWRIGHT . I am a widow , and live in Leadenhall-street , and am a stationer - a person who was passing told me I was robbed; I sent for an officer - the prisoner, Charles Thompson , was my errand boy ; I asked if he knew any thing of the wafers being stolen - he denied it - he had lived five months with me. The officer brought the bag of wafers with the other prisoner - it contained 5 lbs. of wafers. I was not down stairs at the time.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. The prisoners are brothers - A. Yes. Richard could not come in and take them without Charles knowing it. I have no partner.

JOHN BARNETT . I am a hair-dresser, and live in Leadenhall-street; at past seven o'clock on Thursday morning, the 5th of April, I was going up the street, to dress a gentleman, and saw the prisoner Richard standing at Mrs. Cartwright's door; before I came up to him, I suspected him, and directly I came up to him, he stepped into the shop, and took a paper bag - the other prisoner was in the shop at the time; I turned round, and Richard kept turning round, and looking at me, quite agitated. At the time he took the bag Charles stood on the mat, within a yard of him - it could not have been done without his seeing him. I went into the shop immediately Richard was gone, and enquired of Charles what man that was who took the parcel out of the shop? He said,

"Sir, There has nobody taken any thing, I have seen nobody." I said

"There has, and I know the person." He said

"There was a parcel on the counter, and it is gone - but I did not see any person take it." I told him I should return after I dressed a gentleman, and I would see to the bottom of it, as I had been often robbed myself. I told the servant - she went to fetch her mistress down. After I had been on my business, I returned to the shop, saw Mrs. Cartwright, and told her, in his hearing, what had been done - I told her to keep him, and I would return. I went again at half past ten o'clock, found Richard there, and said, he was the man.

JOHN MARTIN . I am an officer; I apprehended Richard at his father's house, in Colchester-street, Whitechapel - he was in bed. I said I wanted him for stealing a bag of wafers that morning - he got up, and took me to a house in Lambert-street, Goodman's-fields - he went into the parlour, and asked for the bag he had left there that morning. The bag was produced, containing 5 lbs. of wafers.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

RICHARD THOMPSON - GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined Three Months , and Whipped .

CHARLES THOMPSON . - GUILTY . Aged 12.

Confined Two Months .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210411-37

525. THOMAS LAKE was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of April , one watch, value 1 l.; one seal, value 2 s., and one watch chain, value 6 d., the property of James Byron , from his person .

JAMES BYRON . On Tuesday last, I was going over London-bridge , to the Borough, between four and five in the afternoon - I had not reached the centre of the bridge, before I met a procession coming towards the City; I stopped on the edge of the pavement, and directed my eye to the procession. My watch was then in my fob, I saw the prisoner advancing towards me, at a quick pace, and when he came even with me, I felt my watch going very gently - he hardly made any stop - I had hold of my wife's arm, and had an umbrella in my other hand. I turned round and saw the back of the case of my watch in the prisoner's hand; he darted away; I went after him, and cried Stop Thief! There was a great noise of carriages. I saw him for several yards, but could not come

up with him. I did not see him stopped, he got out of my sight as the carriages intervened; I ran round the carriages, and found him in custody of the next witness, who had my watch. I am quite sure it was the prisoner who took it.

ROBERT ATHERTON . I am a carver and gilder; I was at the head of the procession, it was the Society of Odd Fellows, going to the East London Theatre. I saw the prisoner running, two others were running behind him; the others tried to obstruct me in pursuing the prisoner. I directly got between them and shoved them away, and pursued the prisoner. He ran backwards and forwards several times. I at last stopped him, near the bridge; he had his left hand in his left hand breeches pocket, part of the watch chain was out of his pocket; I shoved him back on the pavement, he fell, and the watch fell out of his hand. I picked it up, Byron came up in a minute or two, and asked if I had got the watch. I said I had - he claimed it, and said the prisoner was the person, but he did not wish to prosecute him.

JOHN SALMON . The prisoner was brought to the watch-house, with the watch - the prosecutor said he took it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was looking at the Odd Fellows' procession, and saw a watch lay on the ground - I picked it up, and was going on when the gentleman stopped me.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Confined One Year .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210411-38

526. EDWARD BROOKS was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of February , one handkerchief, value 1 s., the goods of George Fox , from his person .

GEORGE FOX. I live at Deptford. On the 26th of February, I was at the Court of Common Pleas, Guildhall , attending as a witness; my handkerchief was safe when I went in, which was between eleven and twelve o'clock: in about half an hour I felt it going out of my pocket, I turned round and charged the prisoner with it - he was the nearest person. As I felt it going, I put my hand down and caught it - he was the next person to me; others were near enough to do it. I called him a villain, and told him I always put an old one in my pocket when I came to town; he denied it, and left - some people followed him, and I was sent for.

JOHN HERDSFIELD . I am an officer. I took the prisoner in custody just by the Court of Common Pleas; a gentleman fetched me to him, and charged him with picking his pocket - he said nothing. I searched him and found a handkerchief round his neck, another in his breeches, between his legs - he had one in his pocket - I found one pair of scissars in his waistcoat pocket.

Prisoner's Defence. I went to several brass founders to look for work; I went into this place, and staid hearing the trials; the gentleman turned round and charged me with it - I denied it; after that, he went for an officer, who found a handkerchief in my trowsers - my pocket was torn, and I put it there by accident.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210411-39

527. SARAH SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of March , two petticoats, value 7 s.; two handkerchiefs, value 15 s.; one scarf, value 11 s., and one pocket, value 6 d. , the goods of Samuel Franklin .

SUSAN FRANKLIN . I am the wife of Samuel Franklin , and live at No. 5, Huggin-lane , the prisoner was a stranger. On the 29th of March, about half-past two o'clock in the afternoon, I was in the lower room - the lodgers sometimes leave the door open. I heard a strange foot coming down stairs, I got up as quick as possible to see who it was, but before I got to the door, the street door was opened and shut. I opened it and went out, and saw the prisoner going through a court opposite my door. I overtook her, I said,

"Ma'am, who did you want in the house you have just come out of?" she said she only went into the passage, to tie up her stocking, I asked what she had in her apron, she said Nothing; I pulled it open and found the articles stated in the indictment. I said,

"You have been robbing my house of them;" she gave different accounts. I took her back to the house, and sent for an officer who took her.

DAVID EDGCOMBE . I am a constable, and took the prisoner in charge. I searched her, and found three keys on her, one of which fitted the prosecutor's, and the other a neighbour's door.

Prisoner. I beg for mercy.

Confined Six Months . GUILTY . Aged 41.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210411-40

FOURTH DAY. SATURDAY, APRIL 14.

528. MATTHEW TELLYER was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of April , one live tame duck, price 18 d. , the goods of James Sadler , Esq .

WILLIAM BEST . I am a labourer, and live at Harlington, near Harmondsworth. On the 1st of April, between four and five in the afternoon, I saw the prisoner with a live duck in his apron, about 100 yards from Mr. Sadler's. I went after my brother's horse, and as I returned, I found him breaking the duck's neck; I passed him, looked back and saw him going towards the dung heap. I went home and told my brother, and told White; we went together to the dung-heap, and found the duck concealed there - it was the same I saw him with - it was not quite cold then. I had known the prisoner five or six years; he was taken up the same evening. I am certain it was the same sort of duck as that I saw him with.

JAMES HILL . I am servant to Mr. James Sadler . I saw the ducks safe on Saturday night, there were seven of them; about five o'clock in the afternoon, I was called and missed one. I went to the dung-hill, and saw the duck, and am sure it was my master's; they were kept in the poultry-house; the dunghill was about 700 yards from the house - the prisoner had no business on the premises.

HENRY BAMFIELD . I am a constable. I work for Mr. Sadler. I took the prisoner in custody about seven o'clock, the duck was dead - I am sure it was my master's.

TIBBLE WHITE. I live in Gray's Inn-place, and am brother to Mr. Sadler. I was at his house about six

o'clock in the evening, and missed one of the ducks. I took the prisoner, he said, no man should take him; I said,

"What have you done with the duck you held in your hand just now?" he denied having any. I told him he had been seen with it.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not take it, the dog killed it as I was going along the road, the dog went after the ducks - I never meddled with it.

GUILTY . Aged 42.

Confined Six Months , and Publicly Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210411-41

529. WILLIAM WALKER , JUN. and THOMAS JOHNSON were indicted for stealing, on the 24th of March , in the dwelling-house of William Walker , Senior, twenty Bank notes, value 10 l. each; twenty Bank notes, value 5 l. each; eighty-eight Bank notes, value 1 l. each, and one Bill of Exchange, value 200 l., the property of Edward Robson and George Robson .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be the property of William Walker , Senior .

MR. ALLEY conducted the prosecution.

GEORGE ROBSON . I live at Newcastle upon Tyne, and am in partnership with Edward Robson . On the morning of the 22d of March, I sent some money to town by the Edinburgh mail, it would arrive in London on the morning of the 24th; it consisted of a bill drawn on Chappel and Co. for 200 l. payable at Messrs. E. Robson and Son, and 388 l. in Bank notes; there were some 10 l. and 5 l. notes, but they were principally ones. They were directed to Mr. Walker, Senior, No. 8, Hackney-road, Shoreditch ; they were wrapped in paper, and then put in a box which was nailed down.

WILLIAM WALKER . I am a sadler , and live at No. 8. Hackney-road. I was employed by the prosecutors to pay bills for them, ever since 1818. On the 24th of March, about nine o'clock in the morning, I went to the coach-office, and brought the box containing this money home. I opened the box in the shop and took it into the back room, to count ready for the clerk when he came - the room joins the shop. I have a little warehouse behind. I found it all right, and put it in separate papers, and put it in a chest in the middle room.

Q. Did you put it in the box in which it came - A. No, I put it in a chest, my wife came in the room at the time I was counting it. Johnson and the other prisoner, who is my son, were in the house at the time, passing backwards and forwards; they were filling a water butt, which my son had asked him to assist in filling - he was an acquaintance of my son's; his father is in the spinning way. I went up stairs for five minutes or more, as I had left a glue pot on the fire. When I came down, I believe they were still in the house, but cannot exactly say.

Q. Did you see them after you came down - A. Yes, I saw them several times in the course of the morning, going backwards and forwards; then both went away before the clerk came, which was about eleven o'clock. I do not think they left half an hour before that; when they left, one went to the right and the other to the left; they did not go out at the same time. I think my son went out first, the other about a quarter of an hour afterwards. When the clerk came for the money, I went to the chest, and found it was gone. I had left the key in the box; I wrote to inform the prosecutors of the loss - there was nobody in the house except them and my wife.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Who came in or went out while you was up stairs, you cannot tell - A. Nobody came in to my knowledge. I opened the box on the shop-board, any one passing might see it, but I did not undo the papers till I got into the room; they were wrapped up in paper, and string round them. I did not shut the back room door - the clerk came about eleven o'clock. My son left the house about an hour and a half after the parcel arrived. They surrendered themselves before the Magistrate. My wife told my son of the loss immediately as we missed it - he declared he knew nothing about it.

Q. In what part of the room was the chest - A. Close by the door leading from the shop - the shop door was open.

MR. ALLEY. Q. Could any one in the street have seen you put the property in the chest in the back room - A. I should think not.

ANN WALKER . I am the wife of the last witness. I do not know what became of the notes - I saw my husband count them, and remarked at the time that it was a very improper place to do it. They were counted on the box in the back room - the doors were all open. I think people passing could see the chest from the street. I went to Johnson, and took my son with me - they both said they were very sorry for it; and Johnson, Sen. and his son came to my house about two hours after.

JOHN TITCHFIELD. I am a shoemaker, and live in Whitecross-street; my master, Mr. Edmund Sinclair keeps a shop there. About a week after the 24th of March I saw both the prisoners at my master's shop - they came for a pair of shoes - Walker bought them; Johnson paid 10 s. 6 d. for them, in copper, and asked my mistress if she would oblige him with 5 s. for 5 s. worth of halfpence.

Q. Did you see any thing in their hands - A. No; Johnson had been on the Tuesday before, and bought a pair of shoes for 10 s. 6 d., which he paid for in silver. I saw nothing in his hand.

Q. Did you see no papers of any kind - A. No.

GEORGE JOSEPH RUTHVEN . I am an officer. I took the prisoners into custody. I found Walker at his father's house, on Saturday, the 31st of March - he was in his business. I examined the lower room, the chest was pointed out to me; I observed its situation, and think it was not possible to be seen from the street - I did not go into the street to look; it was placed in a nook on the left hand of the door. I believe the hinges of the door are on the right.

Cross-examined. Q. How far was the extremity of the box from the door - A. About nine inches. I should think there was not more than sufficient room for a person to stand between the box and the opening of the door.

COURT. Q. Is the shop door in the middle - A. The shop door is on the left hand, and the room door on the right; there is not a direct view through the two doors. a person looking through the window, can see into the shop.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18210411-42

530. JOHN CHILES was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of March , at Enfield , and within the distance of 500 yards of the boundaries of the counties of Middlesex

and Hertford, one sheep, price 20 s. the property of William Bottomley .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only for killing the said sheep, with intent to steal the carcase.

JOHN BOTTOMLEY . I manage a farm for my brother William, in Enfield parish - part of the farm is in Middlesex, and part in Hertford: the sheep, on the night in question, were in Hertford; the distance from the division of the county to the field they were in, is about two hundred and forty yards - I am quite sure it is within five hundred yards of the county of Middlesex; my brother had fifty-five sheep in the field, on the 10th of March - I saw them on the morning of the 10th of March, and missed one next morning; they had no particular brand-mark, but were marked with red ochre. I marked them myself; I am not certain whether it was a cross, or down the nose. After searching the hedges and ditches, we found the skin and a head under a hedge; in the ditch of the same field, in consequence of the rain we bad had two or three days previous, I was enabled to trace footsteps from the field the sheep were in, across the farm, on the road which leads from Bull's-cross to Cotton-gate, and down by the side of the road, then across three or four other fields, to the back of some cottages, in one of which the prisoner lives. I cut up one of the footsteps, so as to preserve it; I have the sod here. I compared it with the rest - they were all like it. I also compared it with the prisoner's shoe, before the magistrate; I have his shoe here - I think it exactly fits it. I did not attempt to trace the footsteps farther than his house. I traced them to his house. I missed the sheep on Sunday. Jessopp and Shearing were with me. The prisoner was not at home, his wife was there - I knew her before. We found half a sheep in a closet under the stairs, covered with fire wood; it was cut up in joints; the entrails and feet were left in the skin; the joints of meat were compared with the feet, before the magistrate (Mr. Harvey), on the Monday - they exactly corresponded. The prisoner was taken up directly. We found him in an adjoining cottage, standing talking to his neighbour.

EDWARD JESSOPP . I am servant to Mr. Bottomley; I went with John Bottomley , and saw the footsteps, and saw them compared with a shoe.

WILLIAM SHEARING . I went with Mr. Bottomley, and saw the sod of earth which has the foot mark, compared with the other foot marks; they were all of one shoe; they were impressions of the left foot. There was also one impression of the right foot, but we only cut the left up.

JOHN MEAD . I am a constable; I went to search the house, with a warrant, on Sunday, with Mr. Bottomley. I know it to be the prisoner's house. I found half a sheep in the cupboard under the stairs, it was in separate joints. All was wrapped up in a piece of cloth and fire wood put on them. It was not warm, but it had been killed a very short time - the blood was scarcely drained from it. I compared the joints with the skin; the head and feet were left in the skin - the joints answered to the feet. I have the joints here, and produce them. I believe them to belong to the same animal. Some of the bones were split, they were not jointed well. I am convinced it was the same animal. I produce his shoe.

JOHN BOTTOMLEY . I am convinced this skin is the skin of my brother's sheep. I produce the sod - in my judgment it exactly corresponds with the shoe.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been walking out on Sunday morning, at a quarter past six - by the side of the wood, I saw two joints of mutton, took them up, and carried them home, and did nothing else with them.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 46.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18210411-43

531. THOMAS LEE was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Ann Jaques , widow , at St. Matthew, Bethnal-green , about eight o'clock in the night of the 5th of March , with intent to steal, and stealing therein, eight gowns, value 40 s.; one whittle, value 5 s., and eight pair of stockings, value 8 s., the goods of Margaret Felton , spinster ; and four gowns, value 16 s.; two pair of stockings, value 2 s.; one shawl, value 2 s., and the sum of 15 s. 6 d. in monies numbered, the property of Elizabeth Knight , spinster .

MARGARET FELTON . I am servant to Ann Jacques , a widow, who lives in Pollard's-row, in Bethnal-green parish - she keeps the house. On Monday evening, the 5th of March, about eight o'clock, I was down in the kitchen, my mistress was sitting in the parlour, my fellow-servant was in the kitchen with me; there was a fire in the neighbourhood, and my mistress ran up stairs to see it; she called me, and I ran up to the two pair of stairs, I perceived the trap-door thrown down, which led to my room - we go up a step-ladder to it, there was a tiling over the trap door; I could have opened the trap-door. My mistress's is a corner house, at the end of the row, it joins the next house; a person could come from one roof to the other; the next house was uninhabited. I ran down stairs into the street, and called out there were thieves in the house. I saw Mr. Raccine, who was coming to our house, to spend the evening. I and Mr. Raccine went up stairs into the rooms, and saw the clothes laying on the top of the tiles - they were my clothes and my fellow servant's. They were in drawers under my box. The constable took them. I saw two men come out of the empty house.

Q. When was this - After I came down stairs with Mr. Raccine. We went out into the street, and saw two men come out of the empty house, it was about five minutes after I heard the trap-door shut. Mr. Raccine took the first that came out, it was the prisoner. I did not know him before, the other ran away. I lost eight gowns, eight pair of stockings, three petticoats, and some caps.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. What communication was there between this and the next house - A. There are trap-doors on the roof. I was up stairs ten minutes before. The trap-door leads to our bed-room.

COURT. Q. Nobody at the top of the house could get to the trap-door without breaking in - A. They must break our bed-room window to get in. I was in the room between four and five o'clock; the window was then fastened with a bolt, as usual. I found it open after the alarm. Nobody was up stairs after I saw it bolted. They did not break the window, but forced it open.

MR. LAW. Q. You saw it fastened between four and

and five o'clock - A. Yes; nobody went up afterwards, except my fellow-servant. My mistress is an old lady - she never goes up there - the ladder leads to it. The bundle of clothes was given in at the window to me - I gave it to the constable, without opening it.

ELIZA KNIGHT . I am servant to Mrs. Jacques - I had been up stairs, at six o'clock, the window was then fast - Nobody came to the house after. I lost 10 s. 6 d. out of my box - I have not recovered it. Four gowns, two pair of stockings, and a shawl, were also taken out of my box - they were worth 21 s. together.

Cross-examined. Q. Where were you, from six to eight o'clock - A. In the kitchen. The window was on the roof. I and Felton sleep there. Nobody else sleeps on the same floor.

WILLIAM HENRY RACCINE . I was going to Mrs. Jacques's on this evening - I went up stairs, and, on coming down, went into the street, and stood opposite the door of the empty house. The prisoner came out, and another afterwards. I took the prisoner, and gave him to Mrs. Jaques's son, who lived in the same row, and Mr. Dickinson. He had nothing with him. I found a dark lanthorn on the tiles of the house - a light was then burning in it, and the clothes laid by it.

Cross-examined. Q.Was he intoxicated - A. He smelt of liquor. The other person came out directly after. I could not secure both. The fire was above a mile off.

WILLIAM JACQUES . I live twelve doors from my mother's house - the servant alarmed me. I found the prisoner in custody of Mr. Raccine. Mr. Dickenson was with me. A man ran by my door, as I came out. I saw the prisoner searched at the public-house, at the corner of the row, by Mr. Howard. I took him there. Some skeleton and picklock-keys, and a phosphorus box, were found on him.

Cross-examined. Q. What time was it dark - I should think about half-past six o'clock. This was about eight o'clock. He did not appear intoxicated. The house next my mother's had been empty about fourteen or sixteen months. It is a good house - not in ruins.

SAMUEL TURNER . After the prisoner was taken I went on the roof, and found two bundles, and a dark lanthorn there, lying very near the clothes. The thieves must have come from the empty house. I found the trap-door of the empty house open, and went in. It had been empty fifteen or sixteen months.

THOMAS HOMEWOOD. I am a constable. The prisoner was given into my custody. In his coat pocket I found seven skeleton keys, two picklock keys, and a phosphorus box. The clothes were given to me by the servants.

JAMES KENNEDY . I am an officer of Worship-street. I went to the premises and saw the marks of some instrument on the window, like a crow-bar. The prisoner was brought to the watch-house.

MR. RACCINE. I saw the prisoner come out of the door of the house - it opened, and he came out.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I leave it to my counsel. I was never near the empty-house.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 37.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18210411-44

532. JABEZ PICKERING and GEORGE DAVIS were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Allaway , at St. Marylebone , about seven o'clock in the night of the 7th of March , with intent to steal, and stealing therein thirty books and 15 l. his property .

JOHN ALLAWAY . I am a bookseller , and live at No. 53, Rathbone-place , in the parish of St. Marylebone. On Wednesday, the 7th of March, about half past six o'clock in the evening - it was rather dusky - I found my shop window either cut or broken, and about thirty volumes of books stolen. There were three volumes of Lord Byron's Works, octavo, bound in green morocco, gilt leaves, which cost me 4 l. 4 s.; one octavo, and two minion Bibles, bound - the first worth 1 l. and the two others 7 s. each; also part of a set of Lord Bacon's Works, six volumes, worth 3 l. 3 s.; - four were left; I lost other books. I do not suppose they could carry away all at once. I was in the shop at the time, and heard a noise, but as it rained I thought it was the umbrellas knocking against the window. I was alarmed ten minutes after, they were all taken, at one time, I had seen them safe, and the window quite perfect, about half past four o'clock. Next day I saw part of them at Bow-street. They had my mark in them, in my own writing. I have recovered all but one Bible. I received the octavo Bible, and Hoyle's Games, from Ackerman on the night of the robbery.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. What part of the window was broken - A. All the pane was out, except a small bit - the books could not have fallen through - they did not rest on the glass.

JOHN DAVIS . I am a Bow-street officer. On Wednesday evening, the 7th of March, between seven and eight o'clock, I saw the prisoner Davis in Oxford-street, near Chapel-street, on the opposite side to Rathbone-place, near the Pantheon, coming from that way - he had some bound books under his arm - he passed me. A short time after I saw him again without them. I passed on and spoke to two brother officers - I then crossed over the street, and saw Davis come from Chapel-street again. He crossed the street, as if going towards Rathbone-place. He was hardly out of my sight a moment, before he returned with Pickering. They both ran into Chapel-street again - they had nothing with them then. We followed them, and saw them go into Ackerman's, which is a rag shop - and as soon as he went in, the door was pulled to, and Ackerman stood outside of it. Read rushed by him, and got into the shop, and there we found the two prisoners. Ackerman said to me,

"Take these fellows away, and them books," pointing down to the same books, which laid on some rags, all loose on the counter. We then secured the prisoners. I produce the books. Pickering denied any knowledge of them, and Davis said, he had been employed to bring them there, at three different times, by a man on the other side of the street.

Cross-examined. Q. Davis was alone when he had the books - A. He was.

CHARLES READ . I have heard the account of the last witness, and confirm his statement. I did not see the books. Pickering said he had been there in the morning, to buy a coat, and he came to fetch it. I saw no coats at Ackerman's - he keeps an old rag shop.

THOMAS VENIS . I am an Officer. I was with Read, and confirm his statement. I saw no coat in the shop - there were different articles there - rags and vials.

THOMAS ROBERTS. I am a carpenter - I was with Davis, and saw the prisoner, with a parcel of books under his arm. I afterwards saw him and Pickering cross from Rathbone-place way. They ran across - Davis was first, and Pickering followed him to Chapel-street. They were about half a yard apart - they appeared together. I saw them both go into Chapel-street.

Cross-examined. Q. Davis was alone when he had the books - Yes, it had been raining, and looked heavy, when they were running. I saw them together in the shop.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

DAVIS'S Defence. I was going down Oxford-street, about six o'clock, and met a genteel looking man, who asked me to carry the parcel. I carried it to this house as he told me. I untied the handkerchief, and took it back to him. He gave me another parcel - I took three in all. I then went back, but could not find him - I returned back to the shop, to know where I was to be paid - the officers came in and took me.

PICKERING GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 22.

DAVIS GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 22.

Of stealing in the dwelling-house, but not of burglary.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18210411-45

533. THOMAS SEAREY was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Taylor , about five o'clock in the night of the 20th of February , and stealing therein six silver spoon, value 30 s.; one pair of sugar tongs, value 1 s.; one time-piece, value 30 s.; one ham, value 10 s., and one decanter, value 1 s., his property .

WILLIAM TAYLOR . I keep the King's Arms, public-house, in Castle-street, Long-acre . On the 19th of February, I went to bed about twelve o'clock, examained my door and saw it all fast. I was alarmed about twenty minutes before six o'clock in the morning, I got up immediately, it was near break of day. I found the bar was taken off the shutter, and two panes of glass broken out of the bar window frame, and cut away large enough to admit a man through. I missed the property stated in the indictment.

JOHN WILKIE . I am watchman at Mr. Comb's brew-house. About twenty minutes before six o'clock, I was going to call a man who lodged at Taylor's, to come to work, and found the house in this state; the prisoner standing with one arm and his head in the window - I knew him before; he had a small candle in his hand a-light. I walked on about six or eight yards, then turned back - he looked at me. I said,

"I think I see what you are after," he put his light out, and ran away. I have known him five years, and am sure he is the man.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Did you never tell Furzeman, you saw a man half in and half out. but you could not be positive to his person - A. I said, I did not like to swear to any man, because it was dark. I said, I did not like to swear against him - I did not say I could not identify him. I said if he had not had the candle in his hand, I should not be able to swear to him. I could have taken him, but he having a light, I thought it was somebody belonging to the house.

JOHN FURZEMAN . I apprehended the prisoner on the 9th of March. I found nothing on him.

Cross-examined. Q. Did not the last witness tell you, he could not identify the man - A. He said he could not swear to him. I questioned him particularly on the morning of the robbery, he said several times, that it was a person he did not know.

JOHN PURTON . On the 10th of March, I called Walker up to see if he could identify the prisoner; he said it was no use his going to the office, for he could not swear to any body - we told him we were officers.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18210411-46

534. THOMAS LANGTON was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Samuel Hutton , at Staines , (no person being therein,) about two o'clock in the afternoon of the 23d of March , and stealing therein one coat, value 10 s.; one pair of breeches, value 9 s.; two handkerchiefs, value 5 s.; one yard of cotton, value 6 d., and one pair of trowsers, value 6 d., his property .

SAMUEL HUTTON . I have a cottage, in the parish of Staines, Middlesex. I have a wife but no children. On the 23d of March, I got up at four o'clock and went to work. I left my wife at home, I returned a little after two o'clock to dinner, and met the prisoner with a bundle under his arm, and a shovel on his shoulder - Hather and Baker were with me; he tried to hide the bundle as he passed us, but he could not, so he threw it down and ran away; I pursued after, him, I picked it up and found it was my property; I kept my eye on him till he was caught. The bundle contained the articles stated in the indictment, which were in the house when I left.

ELIZABETH HUTTON . I am the wife of the last witness. I left the house, I had locked the door and fastened the window, at twelve o'clock, and returned just after two o'clock, and found a pane of glass broken out of the window, they then put their hands in, undid the window and could get in - my husband was then gone after the man - Hather gave me the bundle.

JOHN HATHER . I saw the prisoner coming along with the bundle, he threw it away, Hutton picked it up and gave it to me, to take home - I gave it to the prosecutor's wife.

THOMAS BAKER . I saw the prisoner with the bundle under his arm.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was never near the place - the bounds were out that day hunting, I was running after them, they called after me, and I was stopped.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 45.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18210411-47

535. HARRIET YORK was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Burton , about four o'clock in the afternoon of the 12th of March , no person being therein, and stealing therein, two waistcoats,

value 8 s.; three shirts, value 2 s.; two pair of stockings, value 6 s.; two caps, value 8 s.; two frills, value 2 s.; one gown, value 5 s.; one box, value 2 d.; two pieces of ribbon, value 2 d.; one pair of shoes, value 1 s.; one handkerchief, value 1 s., and two sheets, value 3 s., his property .

ELIZABETH BURTON . I am the wife of John Burton , who lives at Kensington , he is a plaisterer . On the 12th of March, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, we went out together. I took the key of the door with me; the window was shut down, and the property all safe. My little boy came home between five and six, he then came and alarmed me, I went back, found my bed turned up and the sheets gone, with the rest of the property. On the 14th, I found the prisoner in Jenning's-buildings, Kensington, with my apron on her lap, and the cotton-box just by her, also a waistcoat.

GEORGE WILLMOTT . I am servant to Mr. Carradine, a publican. I went on the 12th of March to Burton's house, about twenty minutes after four o'clock, I called for the pots at the door - the door was fastened. I was going round the corner, and saw the prisoner at the window, with the window open, and a child in her arms. I asked if Mrs. Burton was in, as I thought she was talking to Mrs. Burton, she said she did not know, that Mrs. Burton had three gowns of hers to make, and had had them three month, and she had either pawned or sold them - I went away.

JOSEPH BURTON . I am eleven years old. I came from school at five o'clock, and found the door locked, but the window open. I was going to get in at the window, and saw foot-marks on a chair, and found the things gone.

GEORGE HULL . I am a constable. I found the prisoner at the relation's of a man she lived with - she said she bought the things. I found them in one or two boxes in the room.

Prisoner. Q. You came on Monday, and asked the boy if he knew me - A. Yes, and he said he thought she was the person. I took her to the watch-house on Wednesday, but then she had her bonnet on.

GEORGE WILMOTT re-examined. When the constable took me to her house, she had not the same things on, and no bonnet on, but when I saw her at the watch-house, she had the same dress, and I knew her.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I bought the things of a woman, who had a child in her arms, and said she had burried her husband the day before - was in great distress, and was going into the country.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18210411-48

536. WILLIAM THOMAS was indicted for stealing on the 10th of February , one pair of sheets, value 30 s. the goods of John Barnes , in a lodging-room .

SECOND COUNT, not stating them to be stolen from a lodging.

RICHARD HERGEST . I am a waiter at the Bull Inn, Bishopsgate-street , which is kept by John Barnes . On the 10th of February, between seven and nine o'clock at night, the prisoner came and asked for a bed, after having had a glass of gin and water - he was shewn into his bedroom; I did not see him again until he was apprehended.

MARY POPE . I am chambermaid at the Bull Inn. I attended the prisoner to his bed-room, and turned down the sheets for him. I asked him for the money for the bed - he said he should not go to bed, he should sit down and write. I went to the room about ten o'clock next morning, the sheets were then gone, and the key of the bed-room door; he had locked it, and taken the key with him - we opened it with another key. He slept in the room No. 24.

WILLIAM ROBERTS . I am a pawnbroker, and live in the Borough-market. On the 10th of February, between six and nine o'clock at night, the prisoner pledged a pair of sheets with me. I am confident he is the man. Our shop was open until twelve o'clock.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

EDWARD JOHN HANDLEY . I am an officer. I took the prisoner on the 19th of February, and found a quantity of duplicates on him, one of which related to these sheets. I found about a dozen keys on him, one of which had a brass label attached to it, with No. 24, on it; it opened the room door he slept in at the inn.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought the tickets of a woman for 2 l. 10 s. I was confined, ill in the hospital at the time they say I was at the inn.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210411-49

537. THOMAS PERRY and JOHN GRIFFITHS were indicted for stealing, on the 26th of March , one snuff-box, value 5 s., the goods of Ellis Shipley Lobb , from his person .

MR. E. S. LOBB. I am a hosier , and live in Cheapside. On Monday morning, the 26th of March, I was at the Cheapside end of Newgate-street , going towards Holborn, a gentleman gave me information, I felt in my pocket, and missed my snuff-box, which I had put there at breakfast time. I had not perceived the prisoners near me. I found it at Bow-street two or three days after.

CHARLES READ. I am an officer. On the 26th of March, between twelve and one o'clock, I was coming along Lincoln's Inn-fields, and saw the prisoners coming towards me - as they shunned me, I laid hold of Griffiths, and began to search his pockets - Perry immediately ran away; I left Griffiths, and followed him, crying Stop thief! a baker attempted to stop him, but he knocked him down. I secured him without losing sight of him. He said he had merely met Griffiths.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODERICK. Q. You found nothing on him - A. No; he did not throw the box away.

WILLIAM BARTON . I am coachman to Mr. Golding, of Temple-place, Blackfriars. I was walking with Read, he laid hold of Griffiths, and Perry ran off; Read let Griffiths go, and I laid hold of him - in less than a minute after he put his hand in his coat pocket, and threw the snuff-box over the rails, into the garden; when Read came up I gave Griffiths to him, I then got over into the garden, and picked it up.

Prisoner GRIFFITHS. Q. Did you keep hold of me all

the time - A. Yes; he was walking away - I collared him immediately that Read let him go. He threw the box away after I collared him.

GRIFFITHS. Q. Did I not say I would go quietly with you - A. No, he said he would not go.

WILLIAM BENNETT. I am a leather-dresser. I was passing near Gate-street, and saw the prisoners running; I followed, and saw Barton detain Griffiths - I saw Griffiths throw something over into the garden; Barton got over and brought the snuff-box. Perry was stopped in Holborn.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

PERRY'S Defence. I know nothing of it.

GRIFFITHS'S Defence. I am innocent.

PERRY - NOT GUILTY .

GRIFFITHS - GUILTY . Aged 30.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210411-50

537. JOHN THOMAS , and THOMAS NOAKES , were indicted for stealing, on the 24th of March , one pig's head, value 2 s. 6 d. the property of Michael Scales .

MICHAEL SCALES. I am a butcher ; the pig's head was taken from my stall-board, in Aldgate High-street . On the 24th of March, between ten and eleven o'clock at night, I came home. I set my clerk to watch Noakes, who was my servant . I sat in my counting-house. My clerk called out,

"He is taking another." I ran and saw Noakes deliver a pig's head to Thomas, who was formerly my servant. I asked what he had there - he retreated back and said,

"Nothing, master." I gave them both in charge - he had the pigs head in his apron.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Noakes was authorized to sell - A. Not altogether - he did sometimes. He did not say he sold it to him, and was to be paid for it to-morrow - he said he had not sold it. I live in Aldgate High-street.

WILLIAM BODY . I am clerk to Mr. Scales. I was sitting in the counting-house, and saw Noakes take a pig's head off the stall board, and put it in Thomas's hand, who went away. I did not mention it till my master came home. He frequently sold things at the door - but he did not receive the money for this.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210411-51

538. JOSEPH DICKENSON was indicted for feloniously assaulting George Smart on the King's highway, on the 8th of April , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, one watch, value 2 l.; one ribbon, value 1 d., and one key, value 1 d., his property .

GEORGE SMART. I am a harness maker , and live in Half Moon-alley, Alderagate-street. I work for Mr. Waterhouse of the Swan with Two Necks, Lad-lane. On Sunday morning last, about a quarter past eight o'clock, I was near Half Moon-alley , about forty or fifty yards from my door. As I was going along the alley, a person came behind me, and snatched my watch from my pocket. I saw it fall on the stones. I looked for the person but he was gone out of my sight. It was not the prisoner, another person picked it up and ran away. I do not believe he is the person. Some person had got hold of my coat. I made a grasp with my right hand, but could not hold him. I struck at him with my stick - I think I marked him with the blow.

THOMAS GARTON . I am a constable. On Tuesday morning I apprehended the prisoner. He had a mark on his right cheek.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210411-52

539. JOHN SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of February , one coat, value 10 s.; one handkerchief, value 1 s., and one pair of stockings, value 1 s. , the goods of William Thorne .

WILLIAM THORNE . I lodge in Warwick-lane . I missed these things from the top room, from a bundle. The prisoner lodged in the same house, but not in the same room.

ROBERT POWELL . I am a salesman, and live in West Smithfield. On the 23d of February, about ten o'clock in the morning, the prisoner brought me a pair of trowsers - I bought them of him next morning. He brought a black coat tied up in a shawl, I asked if he knew what he had left in the pocket of the trowsers which he sold to me? He said he did not know he had left any thing - and he would thank me for it. He had left two duplicates and a letter directed to the prosecutor. I said I could not buy the coat till I knew whether he got it honestly - and asked if he knew the Jolly Butchers, in Warwick-lane - as the letter was directed there. I took him to the Jolly Butchers.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Whipped in Gaol and Discharged .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210411-53

540. EDWARD TUFFS was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of February , at Allhallows, Barking , one hat, value 5 s. , the property of Nathaniel Dawson .

NATHANIEL DAWSON . I am a hosier , and live in Trinity-square . On the 26th of February, about eight o'clock in the evening, my hat laid within three or four feet of the door. My boy called me down stairs - I heard a cry of Stop thief! - I found the prisoner in custody, with it in his hand.

MARGARET INGRAM . I was in Mr. Dawson's shop - a man came in and took the hat off the counter - the prisoner was brought back with it.

(Property produced, and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I heard the cry, and picked it up.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210411-54

FIFTH DAY. MONDAY, APRIL 16.

541. JOSEPH VALE was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of February , 21 lbs. of sugar, value 19 s., and 7 lbs. of salt, value 1 s. the goods of John Capel .

MR. ALLEY conducted the prosecution.

CHARLES BOLTON , I am a patrol of Bow-street. On the 21st of February, about half-past nine o'clock, I stopped the prisoner in Capel-street, St. George's in the East, with a bag on his shoulder. I untied it, and found two loaves of sugar. I asked him where he got it - he said he kept a shop, and I should find it all right. He equivocated, and I took him to the watch-house. He said he had it from Macdougal, in Charlotte-street, Whitechapel. Gooding went and enquired - he returned, and told the prisoner Macdougal denied his buying any sugar of him. After some conversation, he said he found it in Thornhaugh-street - there was a brown paper on the sugar - the direction on it led me to Mr. Capel's. There was also 7 lbs. of salt.

SAMUEL POTTER . I live at Hornsey. On Saturday, the 17th of February, I sent this paper to the prosecutor's office, in Cornhill - it has my hand-writing on it.

JOHN CAPEL , Esq. I had this paper from the last witness, and sent it to my house, in Russell-square , on the 17th of February, and saw it there - I believe the sugar to be mine.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. You are sure you saw the paper at your house, in Russell-square - A. I have doubt of it. I think I can positively identify the sugar. I bought a considerable quantity of it in July, 1819, and have several loaves of it - they are each numbered 78 at the bottom. I had forty-one or forty-two loaves of it, and missed some, but did not know how they went.

MR. ALLEY. Q. You keep no sugar at your country-house - A. None at all.

JOHN KING . I am footman to the prosecutor. On the 21st of February I saw the prisoner at my master's house, in Russell-square - his brother is in my master's service. I saw this paper that day - it contained pork.

GUILTY . Aged 41

Confined Six Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210411-55

542. DAVID VALE was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of February , twelve napkins, value 2 s.; twenty-two quarts of wine, value 22 s.; twenty-two bottles, value 2 s.; one pound of tea, value 7 s., and two quarts of brandy, value 4 s., the goods of John Capel .

THOMAS GOODING . I am an officer. In consequence of information, on the 23d of February, I went to Mr. Capel's in Russell-square , and saw the prisoner. I called him aside into the pantry with me - I said I had come on very unpleasant business, and asked him if he had any of his master's property - He said he had nothing. I searched, and found in a cupboard over where he slept, a box containing twelve bottles of wine, each had a napkin round it. I afterwards found ten more, in all twenty-two bottles - and two of brandy, and some tea. Mr. Capel asked how he could do such a thing - he said he was very sorry for it. I searched here and found two bunches of keys.

JOHN CAPEL , ESQ. I heard the prisoner say he was sorry for what he had done, and it was his first offence - he was my butler , and entrusted with all my plate, and to pay all my bills - he did it faithfully - he lived two years and a quarter with me. The napkins were what he had the care of.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210411-56

543. EDWARD PEMBERTON was indicted for a rape .

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18210411-57

544. JOSEPH SANDERSON was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Charles Hopping , about five o'clock in the afternoon of the 3d of April , no person being therein, and stealing one coat, value 30 s.; one pair of pantaloons, value 12 s.; two waistcoats, value 20 s.; two handkerchiefs, value 1 s. 6 d.; three pair of stockings, value 2 s., and three shirts, value 5 s., the goods of Charles Hopping .

CHARLES HOPPING . I live at Hounslow-heath . I keep the house, and Charles Littlewood lives with me. We pay the rent between us. On the 3d of April, about twelve o'clock at noon, I went out, and locked the door. There is only one room - the windows were safe, and the shutters closed. I returned at six o'clock in the evening, and saw Littlewood working in the garden. I had locked the door, and put the key in a particular place for him. We opened the door, and found it on the latch, and the key laying on the floor. I found my box open, and the property stated in the indictment gone. I have since recovered the handkerchief.

WILLIAM WESTGOAT . I apprehended the prisoner on the 10th of April, at the Sun public-house, near Golden-square, and found this handkerchief, marked J.H. in his hat, with a pair of stockings, I found another handkerchief round his waist - I asked him if there were any marks about the handkerchief - he said, No.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I am not guilty of thieving.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Of stealing only.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18210411-58

545. WILLIAM PAVELEY was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of March , at St. Leonard's, Shoreditch , in the dwelling-house of George Weston , one 25 l. Bank note, his property .

MARY ANN WESTON . I am the daughter of George Weston, who is a publican , and lives at the corner of

Worship-street , in the parish of St. Leonard, Shoreditch. The prisoner lived with us six or seven months, and left on the 26th of February. I believe my father gave him warning. I know King, her father is a silk dresser in our neighbourhood. On the 1st of December last, between ten and eleven o'clock in the morning, she came to our house for change for a 25 l. note - I gave her change. I was in the bar, and went up stairs to my mother, and got change. I wrote her father's name on the face of the note -

"Mr. King, Worship-street, December 1, 1820," - and put it in the till, which I did not lock. The bar will not hold above two or three people - Our friends sometimes go in. My mother came into the bar at three o'clock - I had been out of the bar into the tap-room, several times before that, I do not know whether any one went in while I was absent, as I cannot see the bar from the tap-room. The prisoner and female servant used to go into the bar, to draw beer, and fill pipes of tobacco. When my mother came at three o'clock, she looked in the till I looked also, and found the note was gone. I do not recollect asking the prisoner about it. He remained in my father's service till the 21st of February.

JOHN BALL . I am a shoemaker, and live in Clifton-street, Finsbury-market. The prisoner used to bring me beer from the prosecutor's. About the 1st of February he had a pair of boots of me. He came to pay me for them one day, I cannot tell the day - he put his hand in his pocket, pulled something out, and then paid me 16 s. or 18 s. in silver. He pulled out at the same time, what appeared to me to be a piece of an old newspaper, which he left on my floor, and went away. He returned in about fifteen or twenty minutes, and said he had lost something - and then looking towards the place, said,

"Here it is" - taking up the paper, he opened it. I was sitting at dinner, and could not see whether it was a 25 l. note, or what, but he said it was a 25 l. note. I could see it was neither a 1 l. 5 l. or 10 l.

THOMAS GARTON . I am a constable. I went and apprehended the prisoner, in company with Attfield and another person, on the 13th of March, at No. 1, Luke-street, about two hundred yards from Weston's house. We found him there. I told him what I wanted him for. I was searching his box - he said, there was no occasion to search his box. One of his sisters said,

"For God's sake, if you know any thing about it, tell Mr. Weston." I said nothing to induce him to say anything. One of his sisters wanted to go out. I told Mr. Weston to let no one out. He then said the boy at the White Hart, Clifton-street, had got the 25 l. note. He did not say who the boy was. I left him in Attfield's care, went to the White Hart, and found Charles Paveley there, and told him what the prisoner had said. He pulled out his pocket-book and gave me this 25 l. note. He said he could not read, and had never looked at it.

Cross-examined by MR. NORTON. Q. He told you about it immediately he was desired - A. Yes. I did not know the prisoner was the boy's brother till afterwards.

GEORGE WESTON . I have heard Garton's account - it is correct. I employed the prisoner to carry out beer, at 5 s. 6 d. per week, and gave him board and lodging. When he left me I paid him about 11 s. I generally paid him once in three months, or when he asked for money. I discharged him.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you know he cannot read - Q. I do not know. We missed the note on the 1st of December, and found it about the 13th of March. He left me in February. I keep the house myself - it is in the parish of St. Leonard, Shoreditch.

M. A. WESTON. It is my father's note, and that I received from King - it has my writing on it.

Prisoner's Defence. Master said, if I would tell him where it was he would not prosecute nor hurt me.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 19.

Strongly recommended to Mercy.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18210411-59

546. JOHN RICHARDSON was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of December , one pistol, value 3 s.; one Bible, value 7 s.; one shawl, value 30 s.; one scarf, value 5 s.; four shirts, value 12 s.; five gowns, value 10 s.; four sheets, value 5 s.; one handkerchief, value 1 s.; two pair of stockings, value 6 s.; four petticoats, value 4 s., and one pestle and mortar, value 2 s., the goods of Richard Reeves , in the dwelling-house of Hannah Spencer .

RICHARD REEVES . I live at Shoreditch , at the Gun, public-house, kept by Hannah Reeves , who is a widow. The prisoner lodged in the same house. He left in December. He took the articles mentioned in the indictment away with him. I missed them after he left the house.

Prisoner. Q. Did you lose them all at once - A. They were in boxes, which I very seldom look into - perhaps not once in three months.

JAMES FOYE . I live at Friar-street, Bethnal-green, and am a weaver. I have known the prisoner twelve months. I met him at the beginning of December, about the 15th, on a Monday, at the Gibraltar public-house. I observed a Bible close at his feet. I said,

"What have you got there?" - he said, a Bible that he wanted to part with - that his uncle was dead, and had left him this and several other things - he asked 12 s. for it, I gave it him, and took it away.

WILLIAM BROWN . I am a weaver. On the 29th or 30th of November, I saw the prisoner at the Frying-pan public-house, in Brick-lane. He said he had kept company with a woman for a considerable time, who was since dead - that he had bought her a shawl and scarf, and as she died he pawned them, and meant to sell the duplicates, and offered them to me for 6 s., which I gave him for them, and went with him to Price's, the pawnbroker, to see one of the shawls. I sent my sister to redeem them.

THOMAS PETERS . I am shopman to Mr. Sowerby, a pawnbroker, who lives in Brick-lane. On the 28th of November, the prisoner pawned two shawls, in the name of John Johnson , for 5 s.

WILLIAM WHITEHEAD . I am a mason. About the end of November I was at the Gibraltar public-house. The prisoner came and offered a pistol, which he said was for sale. I at first refused to buy it. He said his uncle was dead, and left him that and some other property - I gave him 3 s. 6 d. for it, and sold it a day or two afterwards, for 4 s. 6 d. to Haywood.

SAMUEL HAYWOOD . I bought the pistol of Whitehead

WILLIAM ATTFIELD . The prisoner told me he had sold a pestle and mortar to a publican in Mile End New Town - I went and got it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. Distress drove me to it.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only.

Confined Six Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18210411-60

547. ISAAC ALLEN was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of December , in the dwelling-house of Thomas Selby , one pocket-book, value 3 d., and three 1 l. Bank notes, his property .

JANE SELBY . I am the wife of Thomas Selby . and live in Shakespear-walk, Shadwell . About a fortnight before last Christmas, the prisoner came to my house - he came in and called for a quarter of an ounce of tobacco. I keep a chandler-shop ; he had a bundle which he laid down on the counter, while I weighed the tobacco. A Jew followed him to my door, he said

"I will give you 2 l. 10 s. more for these things than I offered you before," they talked together about clothes for some time. I was behind the counter, he told the Jew to go about his business, he would have no concern with him. He and the Jew both stepped out, leaving the bundle on the counter; the Jew came in alone, and asked me to try to buy them for him, (the prisoner was dressed as a footman) he directed me to give him 7 l. for them, and gave me a dollar as earnest; the prisoner came in and met the Jew at the door, and said to him

"Won't you let me have those things my good man," he said

"No, begone about your business, you rascal;" the Jew went out, the prisoner came in and sat down behind my counter, he said,

"I have come to sit down to get rid of that Jew, for if any of our family saw me with that Jew, I should be discharged directly, though I have been fifteen years in my place;" he then said,

"My good woman, will you have these things, I had sooner you should have them for 7 l., than that rascally jew for 10 l." he said they were three superfine coats, that his master gave the butler, and the butler asked him to bring them out to sell, as his master had died suddenly. I never looked at them, but bought them of him for 6 l. 10 s. I took out of a chest, a pocket-book containing three 1 l. notes, which I gave him, and a single 1 l. note from my pocket; I then went to the further end of the room, and unlocked a tea-chest, and in taking out my keys, I took out a small red pocket-book, which I laid on the counter, near to where the prisoner sat. I gave him four dollars and the Jew's dollar, he went away - I then missed my pocket-book.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. You thought you were buying a bargain for the Jew - A. Yes, the Jew said he would give me 30 s. to buy them, but I said no, I would not take 30 s. for the use of my money. I did not offer to sell them to Mr. Cohen for eight guineas. I asked him the value of them, I asked him to buy them, but do not think I asked any price. I said I was afraid when my husband came home I should be murdered.

COURT. Q. What did you say to Cohen - A. I asked him no price for them - my husband did not know I had the money.

MR. ALLEY. Q. How came you to give him silver, if you had notes - A. I knew who I took these notes of, and therefore would not pay them to strangers - I kept the notes to pay the baker. I did not tell Catherine Barnes I had given the Jew all my money.

Q. You told nobody that you lost 3 l., till you saw the prisoner in custody - A. Nobody, but the applewoman, for I did not want my husband to know.

Q. When the magistrate desired you to point the man out at the office, did you not seize the officer Jones, and say,

"You villain you have robbed me" - A. No, I laid hold of him, and said,

"You are not the man, you are pock-marked." I was told to look higher, as I did not see the bar - I looked up and said,

"That is the man," I think he put his hat on, but I saw him in the prison before that.

JAMES LEA . I am patrol of Bow-street, and took the prisoner in custody on the 7th of March. I was passing up Belton-street, Long-acre, and saw nearly 1000 people running after the prisoner. I took him at the White Hart, public-house - he was covered with mud.

Prisoner's Defence. I declare myself innocent, and was never in the shop.

RICHARD WESTBROOK . By order of the magistrate, I let the prisoner out among about fourteen others, the prosecutrix looked round - a person said,

"Look at that man," she said,

"You Jew thief, it was you that robbed me," and directly gave him a slap of the face - she looked several times first.

SAMUEL COHEN . I live at Shadwell, within five minutes walk of the prosecutrix; she brought three coats to me, and asked eight guineas for them - I said they were not worth 2 l., she said

"I have given every farthing I had in the world for them; 4 l. which I had up stairs, unknown to my husband, and 2 l. he gave me to pay the baker." I saw her husband coming, she said,

"For God's sake hide me." I put her in my back room; her husband came and asked if I had seen any coats, I said no, I did not wish to get her in trouble, I had sent her out another way - she never mentioned losing 3 l.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18210411-61

548. ELIZA PICKETT was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Wisker , about eight o'clock on the night of the 9th of April , with intent to steal, and stealing therein three blankets, value 6 s.; one sheet, value 2 s.; one coverlid, value 18 d.; and one apron, value 6 d., the goods of John Wisker .

MARY CAREY . I am the wife of Charles Carey , and live in Red Lion-street, Spitalfields . Between eight and nine o'clock on the ninth of April, I went to show my father a light up stairs, at his house in Dorset-street. A woman passed me in the passage - the door was open. I saw the bed clothes on the floor. I ran out and overtook her - it was the prisoner. I brought her back; the sheet was found on her left side, under her shawl, and my father's apron was found in her pocket. I found three blankets and a coverlid in the passage.

JOHN WISKER . My house is in the parish of Christ-church . I went out about nine o'clock in the morning. I live on the first floor, and let the rest. The door was on the latch. I do not know whether I found the door latched or not; my daughter's account is true.

THOMAS HART . I am a head borough. I was fetched to the house, took the prisoner, and found an apron in her pocket, and a key, with which I opened Wisher's door; I found a pair of scissars on her. There were marks on the door which corresponded with them - it had been opened by violence.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 38.

Of stealing only. - Confined Six Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18210411-62

549. JAMES FORD , SEN. WILLIAM WHITE , and WILLIAM WELLS , was indicted for stealing on the 17th of September , 590 lbs. of silk, value 600 l., the goods of John Alphonso Doxat , and others, his partners .

SECOND COUNT. The same, only stating the goods to belong to John Alphonso Doxat , Alexis James Doxat , Lewis Doxat , and Alphonso Doxat .

MESSRS. BOLLAND and ALLEY conducted the prosecution.

RICHARD THOMAS WISEMAN . I am clerk to Messrs. Doxat and Co. silk merchants , No. 13, Bishopsgate-street without . They have a warehouse attached to their premises. On Saturday, the 16th of September, about five o'clock, I left the warehouse - there was silk there. On the Monday, about nine o'clock, I went to the warehouse, and missed four bales of silk, worth about 620 l.; the bales and package were all gone. I had seen the top of the bales opened. The silk stood with its ends upwards. It was raw Reggio silk, mixed white and yellow, which is very unusual. I could not see the way it was tied. At the latter part of Monday, we discovered in an empty house the four packages, which had contained the silk. The back part of the house joins the passage leading to the Quaker's Meeting-house, on which passage the prosecutors premises abut. I discovered every thing there which had covered the silk, even the paper. I carried two of these packages and locked them in a closet. Mr. Caples carried the other two. Mr. Lewis Doxat kept the key of the closet. In February last, I saw part of the silk at Coventry, in the office of the magistrate, and part at Mr. Rawlinson's, a throwster, in the same state it would have been in the package, there was about 20 lbs.; the rest was throwing. I saw rather more than 200 lbs. at the magistrate's office.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. How was it packed - A. With canvass, oil-cloths, canvas again, and then paper next to the silk, which is the usual way it was sent; the four bales each contained the same sort of silk. Reggio silk is died in a particular way, and it is long reiled silk. A small part of the silk was left in the package.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. What parts of the packages were open - A. The upper part - the length of the skein is the length of the bail. It was opened as we open them to shew the merchants.

MR. BOLLAND. Q. You saw some of the silk before you saw any at Coventry - A. Yes, some was left in the package.

MR. LEWIS DOXAT . I saw the tops of the packages. It was Reggio raw silk, principally yellow; but there is a mixture of white, which is unusual; it was tied in a particular way, and was very scarce in the market. On the Monday evening after the robbery, I observed the packages in an empty house, and on the 11th of January I discovered about 1 lb. of the silk among the paper of the package. I had locked them up myself, and kept the key.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. This silk you did not see till the 11th of January - A. No, it had been locked up and I kept the key all the time. I have seen white and yellow silk mixed before, but it is a very rare occurrence. I know it from its quality, and the description of the skein. I only had these four bales in the house at the time, and to the best of my knowledge there was no other in the hands of any other merchant.

COURT. Q. Does your seeing the top of the package give you a full view of the whole - A. It does, I have no doubt of its identity.

WILLIAM THORP . I am a coach-master and live at Stoke, near Coventry, and have been in the silk trade. I have known Ford fourteen years - he lived at Coventry till within the last four years - he is a bead-maker. I received a letter from him in December, which I burnt - it came from Birmingham to me at Stoke, and stated, that there was about 5 cwt. of raw silk to be sold worth the money, in consequence of this I called on Ford, at Birmingham, and asked if I could have a sample of the silk, he said he could get one and would send to me - he said it was smuggled. I got a sample and came to London with him to the Oxford Arms, Warwick-lane. I went to Mr. Palmer's, in Gutter-lane, who I had before seen at Coventry, and shewed him the sample - he agreed to buy it when I came to London, at 13 s. per lb. We staid at the Oxford Arms about eight days, and breakfasted together most days. We met at the Mitre, in Goswell-street.

Q. Who met - A. Ford, his son, and myself. The meeting was by Ford's appointment. We all three went from there to a public house, near the City-road, and there found five others; White was one of them. I and Ford's son, and two others (neither of the prisoners) went there to a house near Hackney-road; to a private house, which I shewed the officers - we met at the Mitre for the silk, and to pay the men for it. I had told Ford I would find the money for it. Ford said he was to pay 200 l. for it, and I gave him 200 l., supposing it to be 5 cwt.

Q. When you left the Mitre, what did you go to the other public-house for - A. Ford took me there to pay the men who were the owners of the silk. I had no conversation with the men there. Ford conversed with them. I did not hear what was said. I and Ford's son, and two of the men them came to the house in Hackney-road, for the silk; the two men who went with us went up stairs and fetched down the silk. We took some wrapper to pack it in, and after we had packed it up, young Ford fetched a cart. I remained in the lower part of the house - the men brought it down in seven bags - we undrawed the bags, took the silk out, and packed it in the packages - we put it into five packages. Young Ford went and fetched a cart and we all helped to put it in. I then went with the carman (who was the prisoner Wells) to the Oxford Arms. I had not seen him before the cart came. I went to the Oxford Arms, and on the road, Wells said it was very singular that he should take it to the place and fetch it away. The packages were put into my bed-room in the Oxford Arms. I treated Wells with a glass of rum and water, which was charged to the joint bill of Ford and myself.

Q. Old Ford had said he would pay the carter - A. After the silk was put into my room I saw Ford and his son at the Oxford Arms gate, coming in; Ford, Sen. asked me if it was all safe in. I said it was all in my room, and I had got the key. I sent two packages of it next morning to the Cross Keys, Wood-street, directed to Mr. Palmer, Coventry - it was about 2 cwt. I sent the other three to Mr. Palmer's house, in Gutter-lane - he had paid me 250 l. before; I went with Ford to the Mitre - he gave it to me in five 50 l. Bank notes; I gave three of them to Ford, in part payment, before I got the silk. I gave him another of the notes that night, or next morning, being in all 200 l. I did not see any thing paid to the five men at the public-house, Ford, Sen. told me he was to pay them for the silk. I paid the expences at the Oxford Arms, and gave 15 l. more to Old Ford, which he said he should give to his son, for his expences and trouble.

Q. After the silk was gone to Coventry, did you meet either of the prisoner - A. I saw Old Ford every morning, and I saw his son. I had some conversation with Young Ford about it; I said

"This silk is not honestly come by;

"he said he believed it was prigged. I felt alarmed at that, went out of the way, and was with Young Ford , at Hoxton. I slept at a house near him, but lived with him all day, and kept myself as close as I could,

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. How long have you been a dealer in any thing you could get - A. Nearly all my life; any thing I could get in a fair way. I never dealt in any thing that I knew was wrong. I thought this silk was smuggled.

Q. You would not touch it if you thought it was stolen A. Not at that risk. I should not like to have bought such an amasing quantity, if I had known it was stolen. I would not buy a small quantity, knowing it to be stolen, I did not think Old Ford would be engaged in any thing but smuggling. I did not doubt its being smuggled till I got to Hackney. I then thought it had been stolen.

Q. Why then did you receive it at the Oxford Arms - A. I had parted with my money - I did not go to Mr. Palmer and tell him I believed it was stolen, I told him so at Coventry, three or four days after I sent for the silk,

Q. You paid the rest of the money after you was satisfied of its being stolen - A. Yes, I never saw White before I got to the public-house; we left him and old Ford there, while we went to Hackney.

Q. You made the seven parcels into five, being fully convinced that they were stolen - A. Not at that time, I suspected it, but did not ask the question. The tavern bill at the Warwick Arms, was made out in our joint names, and I paid it. I believe Mr. Palmer came to town about the same time, but arrived a day or two before me, I was apprehended about a month ago; I had been advertised in the Hue and Cry, about a month before I was taken. I never told any one what had happened - I advised Mr. Palmer about it once or twice.

Q. Had you ever borrowed money of old Ford - A. I may, there were several money transactions between us. Ford lives at Birmingham, which is eighteen miles from Coventry.

Q. As soon as you got to goal, did you offer yourself as a witness - A. No, they asked me to speak the truth, and I said

"I should." I was in Coventry the whole of September - I only drove my coach to Daventry, and was not nearer to town than that.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. What time were the goods moved from Hackney - A. I think on the 1st of January.

THOMAS PALMER . I live at Toll-hill, near Coventry, and have a warehouse in Gutter-lane. About the 23d of December, I agreed to buy a quantity of silk of the last witness. I was to have 5 cwt. at 13 s. a lb. which would amount to 229 l. if it had all been delivered; three bags were sent to my warehouse, and two to Coventry, by the Shamrock-coach. I found them at Coventry, it was Reggio silk; I unpacked the two bags at Coventry, and sent it to Mr. Haywood, to be delivered to a throwster, named Rawlinson, they weighed 180 or 200 lbs. I took the silk out of two of the bags in town, and put it in boxes, and the other, bag and all, into a tin case. I saw only one tin case at Coventry, it was the one which had the silk only in it; it was afterwards taken by Goodhall, the constable, to the Mayor of Coventry, and is now in the same state - some of the silk I sent to Rawlinson is also here. I paid Thorp five 50 l. notes on account, I got them from a cheque of Messrs. Smith and Rackster, the bill-brokers, on Messrs. Williams and Co. the bankers. I sent Williams, my servant. to receive the cheque, he brought me back five 50 l. notes, which I gave Thorp.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. How long had you known Thorp - A. Ever since I was born, I have employed him as a manufacturer, but never bought silk of him before. I was very ill and confined to my bed in Gutter-lane, when the silk was sent to Coventry - Thorp told me of it, and charged me with the carriage - I was confined for about eight days after; it was fourteen days after the silk was sent to Coventry, that I went myself, and saw Thorp there five or six days after that, or more; I think. He never at any time, communicated to me, the least suspicion that the silk had been stolen - he never told me so in his life.

Q. Do you remember the police taking the silk - A. Yes, I did not see Thorp after that, except at the Mansion-house, and had no communication with him there.

Q. Did you see him after some part of it was seized - A. I did, I went down to Coventry on Thursday, the 6th of February; I think (I had been twice in London,) I returned to Coventry by the mail, about the 6th of February. I saw Thorp directly I got in, and communicated to him what I had heard unpleasant about the silk - he said it was all right; he never told me he believed it to be smuggled, If he had ever given me the least idea that it was stolen, I should certainly have informed the police. I was held in recognisance of 1000 l. myself on the 7th of February, and did not see the Thorp after I had told him what I had heard, till I saw him at the Mansion-house - the silk weighed 422 lb. 8 oz.

JEREMIAH WOODHALL . I am the high-constable of Coventry. I brought the silk from Coventry, which I got from Mr. Palmer's; it was sealed and delivered to the solicitor for the prosecution. I received 86 lb. 15 oz. from Mr. Haywood, and delivered it to William Bateman , to take to Mr. Cotter; I sealed it before I delivered it - the silk in court is the same. I also received a bag from Mr. Palmer, which I did not weigh.

MR. PALMER. I sent about 3 cwt. to Haywood, the rest was delivered up to my solicitor Mr. Minster of Coventry, and from there sent to the office.

WILLIAM HAYWOOD . I got some silk from Mr. Palmer, and delivered 296 lb. 12 oz. to Wilson to take to Rawlayson.

JOHN WILSON . I am servant to Mr. Rawlayson. Haywood gave me some silk in a bag, which I carried to my master.

EDWARD RAWLAYSON . I am in the employ of Mr. Palmer. On the 17th of January, I took about 103 lb. of silk from him to Mr. Haywood - it was taken out of a tin case.

MR. PALMER. It is the same silk which was taken to the Mayor - I had no other silk. I have been twenty-two years in the trade - a person can swear to silk after examining it minutely.

THOMAS COPE , ESQ. I am a silk manufacturer at Coventry. I first saw this Reggio silk in the Mayor's parlour in two tin cases. One chest had 116 lb. 8 oz. and the other 112 lb. 8 oz. about 35 lb. was taken out of one case as a sample - the rest was left as it was before.

MR. GEORGE STEVENS . I am solicitor for the prosecution, and received the silk sealed from the high constable - it was only opened before the Grand Jury, and sealed again.

MATTHEW WILLIAMS . I was clerk to Mr. Palmer. On the 1st of January, I got change for a cheque on Messrs. Williams for 250 l. it was paid in five 50 l. notes, I took them up stairs to Mr. Palmer, Thorp was in the room and took them all up - it was Andrew Smith 's cheque.

WILLIAM VENTON . I am clerk to Messrs. Williams. On the 1st of January, I gave cash for a cheque of 250 l. drawn by Andrew Smith , I paid five 50 l. notes, one was No. 7989, I cannot tell the date.

WILLIAM TAYLOR . I am a clerk at the Bank note pay office. On the 2d of January, I exchanged a 50 l. note, I did not take the date, but know it when I see it, (looks at No. 7989, dated September 15th, 1820,) this is it; the person changing it, wrote on it,

" James Ford , New Meeting-street, Birmingham," and underneath, is written in my own hand

"Oxford Arms, Warwick-lane," it is a rule with us to have a reference in London; the man gave me that as his London address - he brought it with the first address on it.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. It neither says Ford senior or junior - A. No, there may be a note of the same number, but not the same number and date.

CHARLES EDWARD WALLEE . I am a clerk in the Bank of England. I refer to my book and find an entry made by my assistant of the notes he gave for the one in question. Taylor is my assistant.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You cannot identify a note without both number and date - A. No, there may be notes of the same number and year, but not the same day.

JEREMIAH GOODHALL . I know the hand-writing of Ford, sen. and firmly believe the indorsement on the note to be his by his own hand-writing. I have received letters from him and answered them, but never saw him write.

ELIZA LEWIS . I am chambermaird at the Oxford Arms. Ford, sen. and Thorp came to my master's house together, some time in December; they were there eight nights, in December, and to the end of December - they might have been there part of January. I have the account which I give in to my mistress, which is dated, December 31st. They may have been there a week before or after. I cannot say which, as my mistress has a bill weekly. Mr. Thorp asked me for a candle, and said he had some things to go up stairs. I asked if he wanted me, he said no - I went into his room when he went to bed, there was some things there like bales.

JOSEPH HAYES . I am porter at the Oxford Arms, and remember Thorp and Ford being there. I carried four bags for Thorp into his bed-room, on the first floor. They came out of a tilted cart which came into the yard. I did not see Thorp at any other time to my knowledge.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Did Thorp tell you to carry them - A. Yes, I saw nothing of Ford at that time, he was not present, he had nothing more to do with them.

JONATHAN CHAMBERS . I live at Coventry. In February last, I applied to Ford to know where Thorp was to be found, he said, he knew where he was, and I might convey any information I wished through him, but he could not let me know where he was. Ford lived in New Meeting-house-street, Birmingham.

JOHN FORRESTER . I am an assistant to the Marshalmen. I went with Thorp to Hackney - he pointed out No. 8, Claremont-place, Hackney-road, as the house the silk was deposited in. I also accompanied Smith there. I afterwards went to White's house, No. 1, John-street, Commercial-road. I found his wife living there, he did not tell me where his house was, he would not say where he lived. I found some silver spoons and watches which were there, which he claimed, and the woman living there went by the name of Mrs. White. I saw her at the Mansion-house, and Compter, he called her his wife. One of the watches had

" William White " on it. We also found four hundred skeleton keys, three centre bits, three dark lanterns, some waxed keys (which are used to mark the wards of a lock) two phosphorus boxes, three iron crows, three pair of plyers, and a latch key. It is a private house.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Were they all in the box which contains them now - A. No, most of them were. He had been in custody about half an hour when we found them. It was on the 19th of February.

RICHARD SMITH . I live in Bond's-place, Hackney-road. I do not know either of the prisoners. The house, No. 8, Claremont-place, is mine. I let it to one Jones - he refered me to Mr. White, a cabinet maker, No. 1, John-street, St. George's. I went there but did not see him. The house was taken on the 11th of September, and given up nine or ten days before the 11th of January.

WILLIAM MAY . I know the house, No. 8, Claremont-place. I have seen White there several times between September and January. On the 1st of January, at night, I saw a covered cart driven from the house, whether he was present or not I cannot say. I saw two men putting something into it, what it was I do not know. The house was shut up next day.

FORD'S Defence. I am very innocent, and have no doubt but I can prove as clear an alibi as ever was proved.

JOSIAH EAMES. I live in Tower-street, Birmingham, and am a jeweller. I went to Bristol about the 3d or 4th

of September last, and remained there a month or five weeks, and saw Ford there at my own lodging, in Bristol. I had known him for years. I believe he came from Birmingham to Bristol on the 12th of March, I am quite sure I saw him every day, from the 13th to the 16th. I was in his company each of these days, on business and pleasure. I saw him at the White Hart coach-office, Bristol, on Saturday, the 16th, when he left, I think it was between six and eight o'clock in the morning. I saw him get on the Hero coach, which goes to Birmingham. I saw it set off with him on it. I am certain it was Saturday, the 16th.

MR. ALLEY. Q. What is he - A. A watch-maker, but now carries on the trade of a bead-maker.

Q. You speak very particular as to dates, what took you to Bristol - A. The fair. I was applied to to come here a week or ten days ago - my memory is often bad.

MR. ANDREWS. Q. Have you the slightest doubt of being correct in the date - A. No.

COURT. Q. How long does Bristol fair last - A. The charter is for fourteen days, but I believe it often lasts three weeks, or a month.

Q. What makes you recollect it as from the 13th to the 16th that you saw him - A. Because I waited on him at the coffee-house, to take me a parcel when he got home, and I received the answer to that parcel on Monday following. I believe I left Birmingham about the 1st or 3d. The fair begins on the 1st. I remember this, because it brought me a parcel to Bristol on the 13th. I particularly recollect it was that day from several circumstances. I recommended him to a place to sell some goods.

Q. He might sell goods any day. I want to know what makes you recollect it was from the 12th to the 16th. A. I recollect it perfectly well; one circumstance is, that Doncaster races happened on Monday following, the 18th. I received an oil bottle, and some beads of his in the parcel, which I had to deliver to a customer of his at Bristol.

Q. Who was that - A. I cannot challenge my memory, but I think the very man lives in London now. I cannot tell where the man lived at Bristol.

JOHN WILDEY . I drive the Sheffield mail. I remember the prisoner, Ford, coming into Mrs. Thomas's the King's Head, Worcester-street, Birmingham, on Saturday, the 16th of September. I knew that was the day because of his going to Doncaster races on the Sunday. He came in between nine and ten, or half-past ten o'clock at night, and appeared as if he had been travelling. The Hero arrives about half-past eight or nine o'clock. I went to the races, they last four days.

COURT. Q. Did you see him alight from any coach - A. No; the Hero goes to the Swan. The Mail sets off from Birmingham to town about four o'clock. The last coach that goes is at a quarter past six o'clock, one sets off at a quarter to five next morning, and arrives in town about eight.

JOSEPH EARL . I am a jeweller, and live in Worcester-street, Birmingham. I have known Ford about twelve years, he lives in New Meeting-house-street. My mother keeps the King's Head, Worcester-street. I was there on Saturday night the 16th of September. I generally spend my evenings there. I wait on the company. I am sure Ford was there. I think Doncaster races began on the 16th, but I have a card of them (looks at it), read, September 16. I am sure I saw him there that night. I was also there the next night, Sunday, and saw him in the parlour between nine and ten o'clock. On the Saturday he appeared as if he had just come off a journey. The Hero, Bristol coach, comes in about eight or nine o'clock - it is very uncertain. I saw him on the Monday at his own house; I went there for a watch which he had repaired for me.

Q. Was Doncaster races a subject of conversation at your house - A. Yes, we had a steak at our house.

MR. ALLEY. Q. Have you been in Court during the examination of the last witness - A. Yes; I am intimate with Ford, he has children grown up, they are not here. I was first desired to come here about a week ago. I was in Ford's company most days, but I can speak to the 16th because of the Doncaster races. I will not say I did not see him on the 12th or 13th.

COURT. Q. How did he appear to have been travelling - A. He had dirty boots, and a great coat. I cannot say what weather it was; they get dirty in travelling, whether it is dirty or clean.

Q. What makes you recollect his being there on that day - A. Because on the 17th I observed to him that Wilde, Barton, and some other gentlemen, were gone to Doncaster races - he said he had heard them talking about it. I kept the paper about the races in my drawer till I was subpoened here, I then put it in my pocket.

JOHN BATES . I drive the Hero coach, and know Ford; he was a passenger by my coach on the 16th of September, from Worcester to Birmingham. That is the stage I drive.

Q. Did you receive this weigh bill at Worcester - (looking at it) - A. Yes; Ford's name is on it, and I found him on the coach when I took it at Worcester, and drove him to Birmingham; we got there about nine o'clock. He paid the full fare from Bristol. I am certain it was on Saturday, the 16th.

MR. ALLEY. Q. Can you tell, without the weigh bill, that it was on the 16th - A. Yes; it was on a Saturday. I was desired to come here eight or nine days ago. I ordered a new watch of him on that Saturday. It was a wet afternoon - he rode on the box with me.

RICHARD GADSBY . I am a straw hat maker, and live at Birmingham. I have known Ford two years. I saw him at Mrs. Thomas's one Saturday night - he came in dirty, and had a bad cold; he said he had been to Bristol fair. I do not recollect the date. I saw Earl and Wilde there; I saw Ford there again on the Sunday evening. There was a talk about the races on Saturday,

A Juror to MR. COPE. Q. What was the market price of this silk at that time - A.21 s. 6 d. and the duty is 5 s. 6 d. per lb.

JOHN JONES . I am clerk to Messrs. Williams and Co. I have the book with the entry of the 50 l. note, No. 9789, paid on the 1st of January, to the draft of A. Smith; the date was the 15th of September. I did not take down the year.

WHITE - GUILTY . Aged 44.

Transported for Seven Years .

FORD - NOT GUILTY .

WELLS - NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210411-63

SIXTH DAY. TUESDAY, APRIL 17.

550. ABRAHAM LENOY and HENRIETTA LENOY were indicted for stealing, on the 26th of February , two coats, value 3 l.; three waistcoats, value 10 s.; four pair of trowsers, value 3 l.; three pair of breeches, value 1 l.; one shirt, value 5 s., and one pair of buckles, value 5 s. , the goods of Peregrine Courtenay , Esq .

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

ANN ARNOLD . I am housemaid to the Board of Controul, and take care of some of the apartments. The building is is Cannon-row . Mr. Courtenay is secretary to the Board . The windows are about twelve feet from the ground - there is a grass plat at the back, leading to the river. Mr. Courtenay usually leaves the office about four o'clock - it is my duty to shut up Mr. Bathurst's room, which is below Mr. Courtenay's. I left the shutter unclosed, and at half-past seven o'clock next morning, the 24th of February, I went to the room, and saw somebody must have been there. It was a white frost, and there were prints of the feet of a grown person on the grass plat leading from the window to the river, and finger marks on the window frame, and marks on the grass, as if a bundle had been laid there. About three years ago, the male prisoner was employed at carpenter's work at the building for about a week.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Whoever came must have got out the river way - A. Yes; They must have escaped by a boat. I missed the things on the 25th. I had seen them on the 24th.

HENRY BILBY . I am groom to Mr. Courtenay. On Friday evening, the 23d of February, I left the office about five o'clock, and saw all his clothes in the drawers, which I left locked, and went out of town with him. On the Monday following I found all the drawers broken open, and missed the articles stated in the indictment.

JAMES GILMORE . I am an officer of Queen-square. On Tuesday, the 27th of February I examined the drawers, and found they were forced by a small gimblet and a chisel. I saw the mark of the worm of a small gimblet and chisel - there were finger marks, as if they had got out at the window, and closed it after them. They could then get through a wharf, as there were craft laying there. I searched the prisoner's lodging, pointed out by Pace, and found a chisel and gimblet there, which I compared with the drawers. They exactly fitted the impressions.

Cross-examined. Q. Would not any chisel of that size make those marks - A. Yes; but there were notches in the chisel which corresponded with the marks.

THOMAS PACE . I am an officer of Queen-square. In consequence of information I went to Hyam's shop, and apprehended the female prisoner. She took me to her lodgings, No. 16, Duke-street, Westminster. I found her husband on the 15th, at a house in Crown-court, St. Giles's. They acknowledged each other as man and wife, and he claimed the things found at the lodgings. I found a number of duplicates there, relating to the prosecutor's property - and when I took him, he had a pair of grey pantaloons on, which are Mr. Courtenay's.

Cross-examined. Q. When did you go to his lodgings - A. On the 7th of March. The duplicates were in a small pocket-book, in a drawer.

JOHN WINTLE . I know these pantaloons to be Mr. Courtenay's. I was his groom formerly, and had the care of them while in town.

THOMAS P. COURTENAY , ESQ. I cannot precisely swear to the pantaloons. I did not give them away after Wintle left me.

HYAM HYAMS . I live in Dean-street. At the end of February, or the beginning of March, I bought a coat, trowsers, and two waistcoats of the female prisoner.

FRANCIS RAMSAY . I live in Liquorpond-street. I have a coat, two waistcoats, and a pair of trowsers, which I received in pawn from the female prisoner.

HENRY POWELL . I am shopman to Mr. Powell, a pawnbroker, who lives at Lambeth. The female prisoner pawned a pair of breeches with me.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

ABRAHAM LENOY 'S Defence. I am a carpenter , and have many tools which may fit the place.

ABRAHAM LENOY - GUILTY . Aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

HENRIETTA LENOY - NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210411-64

551. RICHARD WRAIGHT and CEPHAS QUESTED were indicted for that they, and other persons, to the number of 200 and more, on the 11th of February , within Great Britain, to wit at Lydd, in the county of Kent , being armed with offensive weapons, to wit, guns, pistols, and cutlasses, unlawfully and feloniously did assemble, and were assembled together, in order to be aiding and assisting in the illegal running, landing, and carrying away uncustomed goods, and goods liable to pay certain duties of custom, which had not been paid or secured - that is to say - 1000 gallons of foreign geneva, and 1000 gallons of foreign brandy, against the statute, &c .

SECOND COUNT. That they and the said other persons, on the same day, at the same place, being armed as aforesaid, unlawfully and feloniously were aiding and assisting divers other persons, who were also armed as aforesaid, in the illegal running, landing, and carrying away uncustomed goods, describing the goods as in the first count.

THIRD COUNT. They and the said other persons, on shore on the same day and place, unlawfully, maliciously, and feloniously, did shoot off and discharge divers guns and pistols, loaded with gunpowder, slugs, leaden bullets, and shot, at Edward Digby , John Jones , and Charles James Franklin Newton , John Churcher , John Jackson , William Crockford , and Joseph Bone - the said Edward Digby , John Jones , and Charles James Franklin Newton , being officers of his Majesty's Navy, and deputed officers of his Majesty's Customs , and being in the one execution of their respective duty under the powers, provisions, and authorities of divers statutes, made for the prevention of smuggling - and the said John Churcher ,

John Jackson, William Crockford , and Joseph Bone , being aiding and assisting them in the due execution of their respective duties, under the said statues. Against the statue, &c.

FOURTH COUNT. That divers persons unknown, on the same day and place, on shore, being assembled armed as aforesaid, unlawfully, &c. did shoot, as in the third count - and that the prisoners, well knowing the premises, were unlawfully and feloniously aiding and abetting, and assisting them the said last-mentioned felony, to do and commit, against the statute, &c.

FIFTH COUNT. That the prisoners, and divers other persons, on the same day, on shore at the same place, unlawfully, maliciously, and feloniously, by the means of the shooting off and discharging divers guns and pistols, loaded with gunpowder, slugs, leaden bullets, and leaden shot, at the several before-mentioned persons - and Edward Clark , and Joseph Paramour , did unlawfully, maliciously, and feloniously dangerously wound them, the said Edward Digby , John Jones , Charles James Franklin Newton , and Edward Clarke , being respectively deputed officers of his Majesty's Customs, and in the execution of their respective duties, under the powers, authorities, and provisions of divers statutes made for the prevention of smuggling - and the said John Jackson , John Churcher , William Crockford , Joseph Bone, and Joseph Paramour , being respectively aiding and assisting them in the due execution of their respective duties, under the said statutes, against the statute.

SIXTH COUNT, That divers persons unknown, on the same day, being assembled, armed with fire arms and other offensive weapons, on shore, at the same place, unlawfully, and by the means of shooting off and discharging divers guns and pistols, loaded with gunpowder, slugs, leaden bullets, and leaden shot, at the same persons named in the last count, did unlawfully and dangerously wound them, they being such persons, and in the duties mentioned in the last count - and that the prisoners well knowing the premises, were unlawfully and feloniously aiding, abetting, and assisting the said last-mentioned persons the said last-mentioned felony, to do and commit, against the statute, &c.

SEVENTH COUNT. The same as the Third, EIGHTH COUNT. The same as the Fourth, NINTH COUNT. The same as the Fifth, TENTH COUNT. The same as the Sixth,

only stating

that the officers were in the execution of their duties under the powers, authorities, and provisions of divers statutes relating to the revenues of Customs of Great Britain, instead of statutes made for the prevention of smuggling - and that the other persons were aiding and assisting them in the execution of their respective duties, under the statutes.

MR. SOLICITOR GENERAL, MESSRS. JESSOP, BOLLAND, and REYNOLDS, conducted the prosecution.

MR. CHARLES JAMES FRANKLIN NEWTON . I am master's mate of H. M. S. Severn , and a deputed officer of Customs, and was so on the 11th of February, and employed on the coast blockade. We were stationed at Thanet watch-house, about five miles west of Londoness light-house. I had the charge of the watch on land at the Thanet watch-house. In the night between Saturday and Sunday, about half-past two o'clock of the Sunday morning, the 11th of February, having previously visited my men to the westward, I was in company with John Treader , a petty officer of my party, and observed a flash of a pistol to the westward - I ran in that direction, with Treader, and ordered a man who was posted near me, to send the watch, who were a-bed, to cut inland to the place where the flash had been seen.

Q. What does that mean - A. To go straight by land, instead of going by the coast, to intercept any smugglers they might fall in with. I and Treader ran to the place from whence we had seen the flash. I fired pistols off twice, to extend the alarm, having observed more firing to the westward. I met A. Motts and William Bailey , two of our party, near Harvey's watch-house, and cut inland. Motts and Treader accompanied me to the spot where I had seen the flash, towards the north. On our reaching the spot where I cut in, I observed a large body of men apparently covering another body, who were retreating inland - and at the same time a volley of musquetry was fired from this body of men. Before they fired I called to them to stop - they answered by firing. We laid down to avoid the fire, and could hear the balls pass over our heads. Several guns were fired, I am certain. We were at that time about 200 yards from the sea.

Q. After the musquetry was fired at you, did you fire your pistol - A. Yes, I did. After our firing the two pistols I mentioned, I fired a third, to extend the alarm, and in a short interval called to them to stop - and then they fired. They then proceeded in a direct line from the sea. I and the two men with me followed them.

COURT. Q. In what direction did you fire, towards the noise, or how - A. I really cannot recollect, I only fired to give the alarm - not at them - my pistol would not reach them. We pursued, and from time to time fired our pistols, to extend the alarm and at one time we aimed at the party, but could never get near enough, for they kept up a continual fire. The wind was about north, and that was the direction they fired, that would enable me better to hear their steps - and at one time we heard them talk very plainly. In the course of our pursuit we were joined by Mr. Jones, an Admiralty midshipman, of the Severn, and four or five men with him, belonging to the Severn. We all pursued the party, and kept them in sight - they were not out of sight at that time. We fired at them, but we had only pistols, and could not take a direct aim with them - and we wanted to take them, but their numbers were so great, and they kept up a continual fire. There was a very large body of them - I should suppose between two and three hundred men.

Q. Do you mean both parties were of that number - A. Yes; I should suppose the covering party were nearly one hundred men.

Q. In the course of your pursuit, when the smugglers fired, were any of your party wounded - A. Yes; one Crockford. Digby had joined us. I was at the head of my men, and did not know that any were wounded, till after the conflict. I then found William Crockford , John Churchill , John Jackson , John Jones , and Edward Digby were wounded, and I was wounded myself, some time

after. I was afterwards joined by Messrs. Digby and Mackenzle, and several men, and our party then consisted of twenty-four or twenty-five. We pursued the party to Scotley-cut farm, which is a great distance from Lidd. The smugglers halted there, and fired on our party. We laid down to avoid the fire, and heard the balls or slugs passing round. They halted, and formed a direct line, at the time we were laying down, and fired a quick fire, one after the other - and at that time I heard some of them complain of being short of ammunition. After firing they retreated - we pursued, and heard their voices - we afterwards laid down for nearly ten minutes. We fancied we heard them again - we heard a great shouting - the moon was under a cloud, and we thought they would lay in ambush for us. We afterwards pursued them for two miles or more - we were in the marshes, and obliged to pass through all the ditches. We then came up to a farm where one Lee lived - in consequence of information we received there, we got into a public road. I there saw two men, on the left side of the road, apparently with muskets presented at us - it was rather dark then, it might be nearly five o'clock - we were close to them - I am certain they had muskets in their hands, apparently presented - we ran after them to catch them, but they escaped. In the course of the pursuit, several muskets were fired at us. I observed the man nearest to me run into a field, near the body of men. The men among whom he ran were firing from a field on the left hand side of the road. I saw five or seven men on the right side of the road.

Q. I believe you was disguised - A. I was dressed in a white Guernsey frock and thick blue Flushing trowsers. I stood near our party, and one of the men on the right ran down to me, and shoved a musket into my hand - he appeared much agitated, and said twice

"Shoot the ***," very quick. I seized him by the frock, and gave the musket in charge of John Treader , who was close to me. The man was going to make a noise at the time, and my party being all round me, I gave him to them - it was the prisoner Quested. In the confusion our parties divided - there was at this time firing from both sides of the road, right and left. I endeavoured to join Messrs. Digby and Mackenzie, who had charge of Quested - I had been separated from them. I mistook the armed party of smugglers for my own party, and was walking towards them. They called out

"Who are you?" I fired off my pistol for assistance, and then a volley of muskets were fired at me. One ball came in contact with the metal button on the waistband of my trowsers - it broke the button, drove it through my trowsers, cut my skin, and I fell. A ball came through my frock, and grazed the skin of my left shoulder. I was knocked down by the ball that struck me on my stomach, and as I fell they called out,

"There the d - d *** drops; there he drops." It was said exultingly. They fancied fancied they had shot me. I got up almost immediately, and succeeded in joining Mr. Jones, and some men who were with him, and we laid down to conceal ourselves till day-light was coming on. In about an hour, on day-light coming, I saw two men - one of them had two tubs on his back - we ran after him, he dropped the tubs, and escaped towards Brockland, and was followed by Mr. Jones and some of his men. The other, who had no tubs, took the direction towards Lee's, and I followed him, but he escaped. He got into Lee's house. I afterwards found the body of a dead man of their party. I sent for a cart, to take the body and the two tubs away, which had been picked up. We could not get one.

Q. After that, did you meet with any other party of smugglers - A. Yes; about twenty - some on foot, and some on horses, came out of Brockland. Three or four of them were armed with muskets - this was about eight o'clock in the morning. As we were waiting at Lee's house for the cart, one man rode to us and challenged us to fight. The rest of the party were standing near where I found the dead body. A gun was fired at us as one of our men, named Holt, who I sent to make enquiry, was returning, he appeared to have mistaken these men for us - and on discovering his mistake, he ran away, and a gun was fired at him.

Q. A man ran towards you - A. Yes; apparently to ascertain our strength. He challenged us to fight, and said,

"Come along, we will see what we can make of you." Our ammunition was wholly expended then - we had two pistols, loaded, and two cartridges, that was all that was left. I, Jones, and the party, retired to a watch-house called Jew's-gut. We took the five tubs with us, which had been seized - they were given in charge of Mr. Digby. I could tell by their smell that they contained either spirits of gin or brandy, much above proof.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. The third shot you fired was at them, and before they fired at you. A. I cannot say. I took no aim. When the two first pistols were fired, it was merely for alarm. I could not see the smugglers. I very likely fired the third in a direction towards them. I am certain Quested is the man who gave me the musket. I never doubted about it.

Q. You saw no tubs for an hour after you yourself had been wounded - A. No.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. I believe it was about two o'clock when you first saw cause for alarm - A. I think it was about half-past. At that time I was on the beach. The firing took up aconsiderable time. I dare say Lee's house is about five miles from the beach. It took some time to get through the marshes. We walked quickly - I dare say it might take us two hours. The party came out of Brockland after day-light, about eight o'clock in the morning - we were then about five miles from the coast. Lee's farm is about a mile from Brockland.

Q. Look at this plan, and say if it is correct - A. It does not appear correct.

COURT. Q. Look at this, is it correct - A. Yes.

Q. At what time was the latest firing from the smugglers - A. I think the conflict took place about five o'clock I merely go by the moon. We were then near Lee's house, about a mile from Brockland.

COURT. Q. You went up this marshy way towards Lee's farm. You followed the smugglers' noise, and therefore supposed they went that road - A. They were north, and we went in that direction. We supposed we were following their steps, as we frequently heard them.

MR. JARVIS. Q. About what time did you see the two men, one of whom had the tubs - A. Daylight had

broken, it might be about seven o'clock. I saw the party come from Brockland about eight o'clock.

MR. EDWARD DIGBY . I was an Admiralty midshipman of the Severn, and a deputed officer of the Customs. On the 11th of February I was stationed on the coast blockade, at Jew's-gut watch-house, which is about four miles from Lidd. I was in company with Mr. James Mackenzie , the deceased officer. About a quarter before three o'clock in the morning, I heard a firing. I was about a mile to the westward of my watch-house. The firing was eastward - supposing a smuggling transaction was going forward, I pursued east, in company with Mr. Mackenzie, and finding it was east of my watch-house, I pursued inland, to intercept them. John Jackson , a seaman, was in company with us. I observed a considerable deal of firing, still going inland. It was further east. Proceeding inland, about a mile and a half, I perceived the firing did not proceed from pistols - I supposed it to be musket shots, from the report, it was not pistols. I used the Lidd-road as my guide, and heard distinctly a company of men using the most opprobious and disgraceful language, to excite others of their gang to fire on the blockade party. There was a considerable firing on both sides. I fancy the firing of our party was for the purpose of strengthening the alarm. I joined Mr. Newton and Mr. Jones, and their party. Mr. Mackenzie was with me. Our force then consisted of about twenty-five. We followed the smugglers. I should think there was two or three hundred, or two hundred and fifty. There was a cart with them. I observed cart wheels.

Q. As you approached, did they fire on you - A. They halted, and exclaimed,

"Come on." We collected our men together, and halted - while we were doing this they fired on us, and wounded W. Crockford, and I was wounded in the belly, only skin deep - it went along, about four inches. John Churcher and John Jones were also wounded. We laid down about ten minutes, to avoid their fire, and they retreated and stopped firing. we got up and went after them. They halted again at Scotney-cut.

Q. At Dowell's farm or Scotney-cut, what took place - A. They again halted, we laid down, and they discharged their arms at us. John Nichol was wounded there in the arm and legs - we laid down and received their fire for about ten minutes. They again retreated, we followed - and I believe, from the road we took, that they retreated by a private cart road, through all the marshes; we at times heard them, and proceeded in the direction of the voices, and came out in the public road, between Lidd and Rye, about a quarter of a mile east of a finger post, pointing to the Romney, Lidd and Rye roads, and not knowing our position, we obtained information from a house where we were. I supposed the smugglers to be going towards Brockland; we proceeded that way - Lee's house was in our way there. About half a mile on the east side of Lee's house I perceived a man on the road, with a musket in his hand, holding it downwards - he saw me - we were a head of our own men, and we all (I and four others), pursued him, supposing him to be one of the gang. I got ahead of them all, overtook the man, and collared him; at this time men were rising both on my right and left, flashing and shouting - two or three muskets were discharged, the balls of which passed me on my left. A scuffle ensued between this man and me, he extricated himself from me, and endeavoured to get the muzzle of his musket to my body, but I pushed him off, and discharged a pistol at him. I perceived four or six men about eight yards on my right from me, with muskets in their hands, apparently in confusion, one of the four or six men, which was Quested, came from them, and I saw him go into custody of Mr. Newton - he was taken by Mr. Newton. I now heard Mr. Mackenzie calling to me to come and assist him. I went, and observed him in contact with a tall man, with a musket in his hand, I went, wrenched the musket out of the smuggler's hand - we each laid hold of his hands - and hauled him away, when a musket ball or balls shot our prisoner (the smuggler), and Mr. Mackenzie; they both fell at the same time. I know it was a musket ball that shot Mr. Mackenzie - he died the midnight following.

Q. The man died immediately - A. Mr, Mackenzie just said to him

"You are shamming;" and he just had life to say No, and died, I believe, for I left him there. At this time there were bodies of men in the field on each side of the road, firing - the fields are divided from the road there by a ditch. My own party at this time were both behind and before me. Mr. Mackenzie was fainting, I caught him in my arms, and supported him, eastward, about two hundred yards, then left him to fetch men to his assistance, to carry him off the field, as I could only carry him upright myself. I pursued eastward, and saw Quested in the custody of James Hill, a seaman; Hill said he was stubborn, and we each laid hold of his collar; he had not been out of custody since. I am sure he is the man. Perceiving that he was intoxicated, he had been drinking by the smell of his breath, I thought a ducking would do him good. I threw him across a ditch, and went down to the watch-house at Jew's-gut. I afterwards examined his person, and took some swan shot from his trowsers pocket - it was but a few grains - it appeared that his pockets had been emptied, for they were black. I also found a fowling-piece flint on him. On arriving at the watch-house I found the prisoner, Wraight, there - it was between seven and eight o'clock, and was daylight. George Mockford and Nicholl had him in custody. On searching him I found a knife in his pocket, the crevices of which between the blades were full of wet powder. I took a quantity of wet powder out of his pocket - it was not so wet but what it would burn - he was wet himself. I also took about a charge of shot from him, but no pistols or arms; his hands and face were black with gunpowder, down the right side of his mouth or chin; the inside of his pockets were also black with gunpowder; I might almost say plaistered with it. I saw Mr. Wood, the surgeon, put his finger on the black upon his face, and take it off. I observed Wraight's frock tucked up under his arms, apparently, for the purpose of getting at his jacket pockets more easy, both of which were plaistered with gunpowder.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODERICK. Q. How far were you from the coast when you fell in with Newton and his party - A. About a mile. It was a dark night, but not so dark but what I could see twenty yards. When I first saw Quested distinct enough to speak to him, he was in

Hill's custody; that was not five minutes after Mr. Mackenzie was killed.

Q. You found swan shot on him, such as would be used in killing wild fowls - A. Yes; he was intoxicated, but he had his wits about as much as I had.

Cross-examined by MR. PLATT. Q. Your wound I believe was caused by a ball or slug - A. Yes; small shot could not have occasioned it. When I laid down I heard balls and slugs distinctly pass over me. Mr. Mackenzie was killed by a ball, it was impossible from the position of our party, that the ball could come from them. I should think a quarter of a pound of powder was found on Wriaght, it stuck over his pockets. I produced what powder and shot I selected. I found no cartridge on him.

COURT. Q. Could that shot do harm to an individual - A. Certainly, if they were fired at him.

JAMES HILL . I am a petty officer on board the Severn, and was one of the party who pursued the smugglers to Lee's farm, and there Quested, the prisoner was delivered into my custody by Mr. Mackenzie. Mr. Digby joined me about twelve minutes after. I took him to Jew's-gut watch-house. I left him in custody till then. I was close to Mr. Mackenzie when he took him. I saw nothing in his hand.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODERICK. Q. Was there much confusion - A. It was dark, and at the head of me there was a good deal of firing. I could only see by the flashes. I do not know whether our party were mixed with the smugglers.

MR. J. JONES. I am Admiralty midshipman of the Severn, and a deputed officer of the Customs. On the forenoon of the 11th of February, I was out after the smugglers. Mr. Mackenzie called out for Hill to take a man in custody. I saw Mr. Newton deliver a gun to John Treader . I received it from Treader, near Lee's Farm, and carried it to Jew's-gut watch-house, and put it in Mr. Digby's bed-room, left it there - the door was open. I examined it in about half an hour after, and am certain it was the same gun - it was a foreign gun, marked

"Thorn and Huck, Amsterdam," on the lock. I drew the charge, it was swan shot and gunpowder. I have it here.

JOHN TREADER . I am a petty officer of his Majesty's ship Severn. On the 11th of February I was near the beach - the moon was up. I saw some bodies of men some distance from the beach; one body appeared higher than the other. The highest body were in advance in-land, the other body behind were armed. I joined my own party.

Q. Do you remember coming up to the finger post - A. Yes; a little distance from there several flashes were observed. Mr. Newton seized a man alongside by his frock. I was alongside the man when he put a fowling-piece into the hands of Mr. Newton, (he had seized him first) then the man seemed to go a few paces back, when Mr. Jones came forward and said,

"If you offer to resist, I'll blow your brains out;" he said he would give himself up, he was done, it was the prisoner Quested. He was secured, and the musket given in my charge. I kept it till daylight, then delivered it to Mr. Jones. Just at the break of day I went towards Lee's house, and saw two men together, one carrying two tubs slung across his shoulder, which, on giving pursuit, he threw down. I saw them picked up by Holt, they appeared the usual contraband spirit casks, and smelt of spirits. I tasted it afterwards, on Tuesday, the 13th. I had delivered them to Mr. Jones, at Jew's-gut watch-house. I saw three more tubs, two in one field and one in the other. The two were fastened together by a small-cord, so as to enable a person to sling them across his shoulder.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. How far were they from the sea - A. Between four and five miles. I found them between six and seven o'clock in the morning.

MR. REYNOLDS. Q. Had any of the party been on the spot where the three were found the night before - A. Yes, these fields had been occupied in the night by the smuggling party. A dead body was found about fifty yards from one of them. I took the tubs afterwards to the custom-house.

JOHN JONES . I ordered Treader to carry the tubs down he gave them to me at the watch-house; they were in our mess-room for some time - then put in our store-room. I saw the man drop them.

JOHN TREADER re-examined. Mr. Farrer delivered them to me. I took them to the custom-house - one of them was broached there. I tasted it, it was foreign brandy. We had no other tubs in our watch-house but these.

WILLIAM CROCKFORD . In February I was a seaman of the Severn, stationed at the westermost station of the Thanet watch-house, a quarter of a mile from Moot's post - he is the next. Between two and three o'clock I observed a pistol fired, proceeded to the spot, and heard several pistol fired as I went along the coast. I observed several men ranged from the top of the beach down to a white boat, which laid just on the beach; they were taking some tubs out of the boat. I suppose there were two or three hundred men - they saw me, turned round immediately, and fired at me, and said

"Come along you black *** we are ready for you." I returned, and as I was going back met Hill, we both returned to the smugglers, and fired our pistols, they returned our fire directly, and fired a good many paces at us. I then saw the boat of the Rose, which is a King's ship, pulling in, some men landed from her. The smugglers were then all over the full of the beach, and when we got on the top they fired at us, and wounded two or three of our people. Clark and another were shot. We followed the smugglers, and were at times within one hundred and fifty or two hundred yards of them. I could not see whether they had anything with them - there might be nearly three hundred of them. We were joined afterwards by Messrs. Newton, Treader and others. I did not get quite to Dowell's farm - there was some firing. I was wounded with a slug in my right arm, which is there now. I was then taken back to the watch-house.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODERICK. Q. The transaction had began when you were first alarmed - A. Yes; I went down to the beach between two and three o'clock, and saw a white boat, it was close by Harvey's watch-house. I know by the tide that it was not later than three o'clock.

COURT. Q. You saw them taking tubs out of the boat; could you tell that part, or all of those men went on to the place where you was wounded - A. Yes; they all kept together. The firing I first heard was a pistol - it was an alarm to us. I was on the watch when I heard it - it was after I heard the pistol fire that the men fired at me.

ABRAHAM MOTTS . I am a seaman belonging to the

Severn. On the morning of the 11th of February, I was stationed on the beach by Harvey's watch-house, I saw a boat between two and three o'clock in the morning, plying into the shore. I walked towards her as she pulled in, as soon as she touched the beach, two men jumped out of her, dressed in long frocks, they immediately ran up the beach, and the boat shoved off about her own length. I ran after the men, and as soon as I got to the top of the beach, I saw a great body of men (two or three hundred), some of them appeared to be armed. I ran back over the full towards the sea, ran along and fired my pistol in the air, as a signal of alarm; as soon as I fired, they fired a volley at me. I suppose nine or ten pieces were fired. I heard the shot, it passed very close to me. I waited there, and saw the body of men go down to the boat and come back again, with packages on their shoulders. I could not see what the packages were, but I saw something on their backs, one before and the other behind, in the way smuggled spirits are carried. There was two or three hundred men running, I stood there, charged my pistol again, and by that time Mr. Newton came up; he and I pursued together on the beach, within about fifty yards of them, then he fired his pistol, and they immediately gave us a volley. We followed them, Treader and Motts joined us. We all four followed the party over the shingles, and now and then fired an alarm, and when we fired they fired at us. We pursued them till about five o'clock. I saw a man drop two tubs.

Q. Did you continue to follow the same party that you originally saw - A. Yes; but the tubs were not dropped till after daylight. I was present when Quested was taken.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. Did you never loose sight of them - A. Yes; they gave us two or three vollies, and so we laid down - they were out of sight half an hour or more.

COURT. Q. Was firing going on during that half hour. - A. Yes; when we came in sight of them, they appeared about the same quantity of men. We travelled five miles.

GEORGE MOCKFORD . I am a seaman of the Severn. On the 11th of February, I was on the beach, and heard an alarm between two and three o'clock in the morning, I went from my station to Jews-gut watch-house, found nobody there; I proceeded up the Lidd-road towards the firing, and met Jackson and Churcher both wounded, and returning to the watch-house. In consequence of information they gave, I proceeded up the road to Dowell's farm. I never overtook the party - I stopped there. I afterwards met Nichol, one of our party; he and I waited some minutes and laid down on the ground, and saw about six men moving at Dowell's farm, at the east end of the building; we could see them better laying down than standing up; we could see the figures of men above us, and hear them talking, but could not hear what they said. As we lay in that situation, a man came within two yards, I rose and stopped him, and asked who he was - he answered, a friend - we asked where he was going, he said to Rye, and had come from Hythe; I told him it was the wrong road, and asked what time he left Hythe; it was the wrong road - he was coming to the sea coast, and going in a direction to Dungeness light-house, from Dowell's farm; we stopped him in a field about ten yards off the cart-road, leading from Lidd. I searched him, but found nothing on him. I said I should take him to the watch-house, he said he would go with me, but I had no business with him. I asked if he had heard or seen any firing, he said No. I had heard firing a quarter of an hour or ten minutes before. I took him to the watch-house, he stopped twice as we went along, and would not go in till I threatened to shoot him. It was about twenty minutes before four o'clock when I first took him, he had a grey coat and a long frock underneath, tucked close up under his arms. I saw Mr. Digby search him; a knife with wet powder sticking about it, and some small shot were found in his breeches pocket, and marks of gunpowder were on his face; his pockets were black, and powder in one; his right hand was black, particularly between his fingers, and his finger ends were black with powder; there were marks of powder on his nose and mouth. Hemmings, the quarter-master, tasted it.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. It was near four o'clock when you met him - A. It wanted twenty minutes. I had heard firing about twenty minutes before; I was then three quarters of a mile from where I met him; the voices I heard, did not appear to be the voices of above half a dozen men. I and Nichols were the only King's men there; I should think those persons were within hail when I took Wraight, he made no noise - I was armed with a cutlas and pistols, I presented my pistol immediately as I saw him.

JOHN NICHOL . I am a seaman on board the Severn. I was centry on the beach between two or three o'clock, and saw pistols fired to the eastward; I ran and saw a boat on the beach belonging to the Rose - I saw no others. When I got there, I saw Clark, the officer, one of the Rose's galley - I found Clark and two more men had been wounded. I ran about half a mile over the beach, and joined Newton and his men; there was firing as we went along - Jackson and Churcher were wounded. I went on till we got to Dowell's farm - Crockford was wounded there; we went to Dowell's farm, they came upon us, and we all retreated. I lost my party, and fell in with Mockford, we both laid down on the grass, and saw six or seven people moving at the east end of the barn - the firing had then ceased about ten minutes. A man came towards us from the east end of the barn, where I had observed the others, we both jumped up, Mockford searched him to see if he was armed, he merely rubbed him down, but did not examine his pockets; he said he came from Hythe, and was bound for Rye - we were then between Dungeness light-house and Dowell's farm - that is not the way from Hythe to Rye; the Dungeness light was burning and visible.

Cross-examined by MR. PLATT. Q. It was very dark - A. Yes, the east end of the farm was about sixty yards from us.

COURT. Q. Did you not ask if he had heard the firing - A. Yes, my Lord, he said he had been asleep by the farm yard, and the firing awoke him.

EDWARD CLARK . I am a deputed officer of His Majesty's Customs belonging to the Rose cutter, which laid off Jews-gut about a mile from shore; we were in the galley on watch, and saw another boat between two and three o'clock in the morning, westward of Harvey's watch-house

- it laid on the beach; we rowed to get up to it, before we got to her, I heard a firing; on coming up to her, we found she was a French galley, or tub-boat, painted white; two men jumped out just before we came to her, and over the beach; we got into her, there was nothing but masts, sails, and oars in her - we seized her. I saw about half a dozen men a-shore, two of them were of the Severn's crew, we landed and joined them; went to the full of the beach, and saw a great number of people over the full - there might be sixty or seventy, or more. After Paramour (one of the Rose's crew) fired a pistol in the air, they fired a volley at us; they fired fifteen or twenty guns at us. Joseph Paramour and I got wounded, I was wounded in the left thigh and right shoulder, with a bullet or slug - it is in my shoulder now.

JOHN JACKSON . I am a seaman of the Severn. On the 11th of February, I was stationed at Jew's-gut watch-house. In consequence of an alarm, I got up between two and three o'clock, and went with Churcher; we met Messrs. Digby and Mackenzie and other men, we went a little way, and saw between two and three hundred men; they fired on us, and I received a wound in my left arm. Churcher was wounded in the thigh, two or three minutes after; and I received another wound in my right leg - it was with slugs; we returned to the watch-house, and met Mockford in about half an hour, and gave him directions. Wraight was brought to the watch-house, ten dragoons soon afterwards came in. Wraight's face was black, the sergeant of the dragoons said to him

"You have been at it, you have been biting the cartridges;" I heard no answer; two young men were afterwards speaking to him, he said he had left Hythe at ten o'clock at night, and was going to Rye, to see a friend; they told him the place he was taken at, was about five miles out of his road, he then said he was going to call at a house which lay towards Dungeness light-house, and mentioned the persons name, but I do not recollect it - they told him it was entirely out of his road to that house.

Cross-examined by MR. PLATT. Q. Did not he say the friend lived at Northland - A. I do not recollect the place or name.

MARTIN LINDSEY . I am a seaman on board the Severn. On the 11th of February, I was stationed at Carrick watch-house, heard an alarm, went westward, and joined Newton and Treader; we went on, and when we came to the finger-post, we went towards Brockland, and saw Newton seize Quested - Treader received a musket from Mr. Newton. At daylight I saw two men, one of them had two tubs slung across his shoulder; on seeing us he hove them off, and they escaped; the tubs were secured by one the other party - three more of the same kind was picked up afterwards; one of them leaked, I put my finger to it and tasted it, it was foreign spirits - I believe brandy; we saw a dead body in the road, about fifty yards from where the tubs were found, which was in the direction the party had gone. I picked a musket up twenty or thirty yards from the dead body, and a cutlas along side of it, which belonged to one of the other party - none of us had muskets - the dead man was one of the shore people, and had a smock frock on. I carried one the tubs to the watch-house - it was marked SS. which I believe means spirits of brandy - another was marked S.G.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODERICK. Q. Were you in the field when the two tubs were found - A. Yes, it was between six and seven o'clock. I saw the other three found, it was four or five miles ashore - the dead body was in the road, not far from the farm-house.

COURT. Q. The two first casks were on a man's back, did he drop them in a field or in the road - A. He ran across the field, then dropped them.

JOSEPH BONE . I am a seaman of the Severn, and was on duty on the 11th of February. I met the Rose's people on the beach, went to the full of the beach with them, and saw a large body of men going inland, moving towards N. E. - we afterwards joined Lindsey and others, and pursued; a firing took place, more than a mile inland, they fired a good deal - I got a shot in my left arm; I still followed them, and got wounded in my right leg. I was with Mr. Newton, and saw him lay hold of a man who had a fowling piece in his hand - I heard him say that he gave up; they began firing on us immediately, and I was wounded. Towards daylight I saw a man with two tubs on his shoulder, near where the skirmish took place - he threw them down and fled. I picked up three more tubs after that, they were the sort of tubs which smuggled spirits are conveyed in, they were half-ankers, and already slung on to carry one before and another behind - they were taken to Jew's-gut watch-house.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODERICK. Q What time was the skirmish - A. About five o'clock in the morning; the man with the tubs came to the spot between six and seven o'clock - we did not see which way the party went.

MR. ALEXANDER WOOD . I am assistant surgeon to the Severn. On the 11th of February I went to attend the men who were wounded, at five o'clock in the morning. I found Jackson and Churcher wounded. They were gun-shot wounds, and both with slugs. Jackson was badly wounded. I saw Wraight in custody. I observed his nose was black. I took something off his lip, tasted it, and found it was gunpowder. I said,

"What have you been doing with this?" he said,

"I have some in my pocket, I was shooting rooks, Saturday in the afternoon." I went away to Thanet, to dress other wounded men.

Cross-examined by MR. PLATT. The blackness was on his upper lip - A. Yes; it appeared as if his hand had been in his pocket, and he had rubbed his face with the powder.

GEORGE PIDDLESDEN . I am warehouse keeper at the custom-house, New Romney. Treader brought me some casks. I examined them - one marked S. G. contained three gallons and a half of foreign gin - it is a half-anker - they are not used in this country.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODERICK. Q. When was it - A. On Tuesday, the 13th of February, in the afternoon. Jew's-gut watch-house is seven miles from us.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You know the coast - look at this plan, is it pretty correct - A.(looking at it) Yes; if a man was going by the coast from Dowell's farm to Rye, he would have to go down towards the coast - I do not know that the nearest way is to go to the sea side.

WRAIGHT'S Defence. (Written.) Before I enter upon my

fence, I most humbly request that you will discharge from your minds any report that you may have seen in the public prints, tending to prejudice your mind against me, - and that you will form your conclusions as to my guilt or innocence upon the evidence that has been, and shall be, adduced to you, and upon that only.

I am a labouring husbandman, and reside at Pedlinge, near West Hythe, Kent.

For several years past my mother, (who rents a small farm, and for whom I attend the markets to purchase seed and sell the crops,) have had dealings with one Thomas Baker , a farmer, who resides in the parish of Fairfield, in Romney Marshes ; and having met the said Thomas Baker in or about November last, I agreed that my mother should let him have some seed beans in the beginning of this spring, in exchange for which he was to let her have some seed barley - in pursuance of which agreement, in the beginning of February last (the said land being ready to receive the barley), I wrote to Thomas Baker , to inform him thereof, and that I intended to be at his house in about ten days or a fortnight, to select the seed, and fix the time for the teams to meet, to make the exchange - and pursuant to such letter, and by the desire of my mother, I made my arrangements to go on Saturday, the 10th of February last, and having an acquaintance, named William Baker , at Northland, near Lydd, and another friend at Rye - I concluded in my own mind to pay them both a visit, before I returned - and accordingly, on Saturday evening, I left work, and about half-past six o'clock I left home with the intention to go to the house of William Baker , at Northland, and sleep there that night, and to go to Rye next morning, and to Thomas Baker 's, at Fairfield, on Sunday evening, and return home on the Monday following - and had preceeded as far as West Hythe, which is about two miles from my house, when I stopped at a public-house, and had some beer, and a pipe of tobacco to smoke on the road. I then pursued my way through Dimchurch and Romney (which is eight miles and a half from West Hythe,) and having passed through Romney, I turned over into the fields, with an intention to go to North-land, which lies between Lydd and the coast, as I thought I knew the road that way - but I took the wrong footpath, and had proceeded near to the beach before I discovered the mistake; I turned off again to the right, and kept on walking until I felt convinced that I must have got considerably beyond Northland, I determined not to go back at an uncertainty whether I could find it or not, but to make the best of my way to Rye, which I supposed laid before me - but coming up to a shepherd's house, belonging to a man named Dowell, I knocked him up and inquired the road to Rye, which he told me - but finding that it was a considerable distance, and feeling myself sleepy and tired, I laid down to sleep by the side of a hay stack, and continued so for some time, until I was awakened by hearing some men talking who went past where I lay, to whom I did not speak, but feeling very cold I got up, and thought I would proceed to Rye, - but I had not proceeded far, when I was taken into custody.

As to the circumstance of my having a little powder and shot in my pocket, and my face and hand being smeared as if with gunpowder, I can only say that I am in the constant habit of going out with a gun on my mother's farm, for the purpose of shooting rooks and other birds, that destroy the seed corn, for which purpose I am very seldom without a little powder and shot in my pockets - and that the loose gunpowder that was found in my pocket, had worked out of a paper containing a small quantity of gunpowder, which I had put in that pocket a day or two before, and which had become damp through the accidental breaking of a vial which I had carried in that pocket afterwards - and I have no doubt the fact of my face and hand being smeared, was occasioned by my sometimes carrying my hands in my jacket pockets, as I was walking along on the night in question, and then wiping my nose with my hand, without thinking at the time of the damp powder being in my pocket.

I shall now leave my case in the hands of my Counsel, to call witnesses on my behalf - but if there should be any whom you may think material to the case not called, I trust you will give me credit when I say, that if I had been tried in the county where I was apprehended, I could have had the attendance of ten times the number of witnesses to my character, than I can possibly expect to be in attendance here to-day.

QUESTED'S Defence. I am innocent of the job.

MARTHA WRAIGHT . I am the prisoner's mother, and live at Pedlinge, near Hythe. My son is married, and has seven children. He is my bailiff. I am a widow. I know Mr. Baker, of Northland, and Mr. Baker, of Fair-field. On Saturday, the 10th of February, my son left my house to exchange some corn for seed, with Mr. Baker. He went away in the afternoon or the evening. He has exchanged corn with Baker several times. My son was to give him corn for beans. The beans were for seed for my land. He left my house after he had done work.

Q. Do you know whether he ever shoots rooks on your land - A. Yes; and carried ammunition with him for that purpose. I used to provide it for him. I do not know where he kept it.

MR. JARVIS. Q. To which of the Baker's did you send your son. - To Fairfield, not to Northland. My son's house is under the same roof as mine.

Q. Did your son take any corn to Fairfield with him - A. Not to my knowledge. I had had a sample of beans from Baker about a month before. I had a little in a sample bag. The beans were sent in after the barley was carried away - that was a week after my son went away. I sent five quarters of barley to Baker. I did not hear where my son was for a week after he left. I live about a mile from Hythe. I sent my waggoner with twenty quarters, a week after him, on the Monday, and he brought back the beans in the waggon. I had sent the barley in the waggon.

Q. Who brought you the sample of beans - A. My son.

Q. The prisoner - (hesitating) A. Mr. Baker. He brought it himself in a little bag. Baker had a sample of my barley two months before, I sent it to him by my son.

Q. Do you know whether this sample was sent or taken by your son. - A. I do not know any thing about it. My business was carried on unknown to me sometimes.

Q. You have sworn that Baker had a sample from you two months before - A. Yes; I recollect now, he had a sample from me - he came to me for it. He came alone. I saw him, but did not see the sample given to him. I recollect his going to the barn to my son. The barley was threshed.

Q. Pray have you seen any written defence that was to be put in for your son - A. No; I have not seen any.

Q. Was any paper read over to you, as your son's defence - (hesitating) A. No; I do not remember any; none has been read to me.

Q. Had your son been out shooting that day - A. He might possibly go out while he was threshing - he had been threshing in the barn all the day. I did not see him with a gun.

Q. Can you tell what time he returned from this journey - A. Possibly about five o'clock. He knew the road pretty well.

COURT. Q. Let me quite understand you, be attentive - are you quite sure it was a sample of beans that Baker brought you - A. Yes. I am certain he was to let me have beans.

JOHN BAKER . I live in Fairfield, and was bailiff to John Walker , Esq. of Dover, who is now deceased. He had land at Fairfield. I have exchanged corn several times with Wraight. I paid him for some corn in November, and told him I should want some barley seed - he said he had some which would suit me, and he should like beans in exchange.

Q. Did you ever give a sample of beans, or receive one of barley - A. No doubt samples passed, and I think I do recollect that I carried a sample with me. I went to their house, and looked at the barley in the barn - it was about January. I was to give him beans in exchange. I received a letter from Wraight about the 1st or 2d of February. I have not got the letter, I destroyed it. In consequence of that letter, I expected to see him on the 10th of February. I live about eighteen miles from him. I expected him to come to my house, but he did not. I have since perfected the exchange - I think it was on the Monday week following.

MR. BOLLAND. Q. How soon after this business happened did you hear of it - A. On the Tuesday. I live six or seven miles from Dowell's farm, and about two miles and a half from Brockland. I heard of the affair the next day, but not about the prisoner. I have seen him at Fairfield a great many times. The road is sometimes difficult at night. There are many turnings.

Q. Your expression just now was,

"I do think I carried the sample;" had any one told you what Mrs. Wraight had been saying - A. No.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You say you have dealt with her before; was it by exchange - A. Yes; I always dealt by exchange - our waggons used to meet at St. Mary's. What I expected him about on the 10th, was to appoint where they were to meet. I should think Dowell's farm is fifteen miles from his house.

WILLIAM TERRY . I live at Saltwell, and have some land adjoining Wraight's, On the 10th of February I saw him about noon, in the road by my house. I saw him on the Wednesday before that, out with his gun, shooting rooks. I gave him some powder and shot. He took it in a paper, and rolled it up. I gave him between two and three charges. He put it in his waistcoat pocket. I gave him two or three charges of shot; I think it was No. 3. about the size of those produced.

MR. JARVIS. Q. Does he use a flask - A. I never saw him with one - I often gave him powder.

JOHN JARMAN . I keep a public-house at West Hythe. On the 10th of February, about seven o'clock in the evening, the prisoner Wraight came in, and went away at a quarter before eight o'clock. I noticed his lips were smeared over with black. He had a pipe of tobacco and two pots of porter. I believe he took his pipe out with him.

MR. JARVIS. Q. What is your sign - A. The Carpenter's Arms. Nobody came in with him.

ABRAHAM DOWELL . I am a looker, and live at Scotneys. I was called up on the night of the 10th of February. I do not know the hour. It was dark. I do not know the person who called me up - he enquired the road to Rye, I sent him by the main road, by the sea side. The road is just by my house. He would go right by the hay-stack, Lydd way.

MR. JARVIS. Q. Did you hear any firing - No; I only saw one man, and answered him from the window.

WRAIGHT - NOT GUILTY .

QUESTED - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 30.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18210411-65

552. JOHN SMITH was indicted for a misdemeanour

MR. BOLLAND conducted the prosecution.

JOHN CLINTON , JUN. I live in Noble-street , and assist my father in business, who is a green-grocer . On the 12th of April a little girl came to buy three oranges, she pulled out half a crown, I found it was bad - my father came in, and I showed it to him; William Taylor was going by at the time; I told him what had happened, he took the little girl away with him, and went over to the other side of the way - my father went with him; he came back in about ten minutes. I went with him to the ruins in Foster-lane, where the new post office is building, we found the gate locked; we went round to Bell-square, and found that gate locked also, so that nobody could have been in the ruins. We got over the hoard, looked about for some half crowns, and in about ten minutes my father picked up one, and called me to look at it before he picked it up - it was bad; I found in a piece of paper two more half crowns, about a yard from where the first was found - they were folded with a piece of paper between them; they were marked, and then given to my father.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. The little girl was alone - A. She was, the prisoner was not in the shop. I did not see her with him, except at Guildhall, they there addressed each other as father and daughter.

JOHN CLINTON , I am the father of the last witness. I came in and found a little girl in the shop; from what she told me, I went out, and found the prisoner about seven or eight houses off, on the other side of the way, in Noble-street, he was walking to and fro. Taylor was with the little girl, he stopped and spoke to her, the prisoner saw her, and went on very quick; I followed

him into Foster-lane, and he turned up a court, not a thoroughfare - I went up to him, looked him in the face, and said

"I believe you are one of the men I want." He said,

"No, I am not." I told him I was sure of it. I laid hold of both his hands, one hand was in his right hand breeches pocket - he struggled very much to get his right hand from mine, and then he threw two parcels from him over the board, in St. Martin's-le-Grand; the wind blew the paper of one of them back on the ground. I called Mr. Lobb to pick it up - Taylor came up at the time and took the prisoner into a baker's shop; he took a pocket-book from him, in which I found three good half-crowns, a good five shilling piece, and five-pence half-penny in copper. I returned to my house and took my son to the spot where he threw the parcel over. We got there in ten minutes. I saw a half-crown, and called my son to look at it, he picked up a paper about a yard off, containing two more in the direction in which the man threw it. I produce them, my son gave them to me, and I marked them before I lost sight of them. I produced one half-crown, the one found upon the ruins and the one found by my son. I saw the prisoner and the girl together, they recognized each other - he was very resolute, and very unwilling to be secured; we were obliged to tie him, and she said

"You shall not tie my father."

WILLIAM TAYLOR . I assisted in taking the prisoner. I found the pocket-book on him. I attempted to search his daughter - he attempted to give me a blow. I found one penny on the daughter, and found a paper on him with these words on it

"Send me three times three."

MR. CALEB EDWARD POWELL . I am assistant to the solicitor of the Mint, the half-crown uttered is counterfeit; the other two are counterfeit, and are also of the same die.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Confined Six Months , and to find Sureties .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210411-66

553. JOHN DOGHERTY , was indicted for a misdemeanor .

HENRY GARLAND . I keep the Half Moon, Duke-street, Smithfield . On the 26th of March , between seven and eight o'clock, the prisoner came and asked for a glass of gin, and offered me a shilling. I gave it him back, telling him it was bad; he offered another, I said that was bad; he said I did not know good silver from bad, he laid down two-pence and went away. Both the shillings appeared new. Next morning, between eight and nine o'clock, he came again, and asked for a glass of gin - I did not draw it, he laid down sixpence; I said,

"My friend, this is too bad to come these games again, you was here yesterday;" he said he was not. Harker was in the shop and took him; he said he had no more money; he was searched, and a bad six-pence, a good shilling, and seven-pence halfpenny in copper found on him.

JOHN HARKER . I was at Garland's when the prisoner came in, and saw him put the sixpence on the counter, it was new and bad; I asked if he had more money, he said

"No, only two farthings;" I asked his name, he said John Mulligan , and that he lived in Fox and Knot Court, but he did not know the number. I found sevenpence halfpenny on him, and in his breeches pocket a bad sixpence and a good shilling; he then said he lived in John's-court, West-street.

MR. POWELL. The sixpence is counterfeit and merely washed. It appears not to have been in circulation, and the other is also counterfeit, and off the same die.

Prisoner's Defence. I took them at market.

GUILTY . Aged 44.

Confined Six Months .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210411-67

554. ROBERT WILCOX was indicted for a misdemeanor .

MR. WILLIAM TREEWILLIAM . I live at No. 42, Coleman-street , and rent the house. On the 10th of April, about five minutes before eight o'clock, I came home to breakfast and opened the door with a key which I keep in my pocket, and found the prisoner at the foot of the stairs, the door was always kept shut; he was a perfect stranger. I asked what he did there, he said he had two boys sweeping the chimnies - he was dressed as a sweep. I called the servant up and asked if any sweeps were below; she said No, nor had she sent for any. I asked what business he had there; he said he came in after the boys. I desired him to turn out his pockets; he said, he had but one, he turned that out, and out fell a key, which I tried to my door, and it opened it; he said, he hoped I would forgive him. I gave him in charge. I went out at six o'clock in the morning and closed the outer door.

JANE MORTON . I am servant to the prosecutor. The kitchen is below. I expected no sweeps. I had opened the door to clean the lobby, and am sure I closed it.

ROBERT FIELDING . I was sent for to take the prisoner. I tried the key to the door, it fitted it. As I took him to the Mansion-house, he said he could only be transported for seven years; and when he came back he would be the death of the prosecutor and his servant.

Prisoner's Defence. I saw the door open and went in after two boys.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Six Months , and Publicly Whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210411-68

555. SAMUEL JACOBS was indicted for a conspiracy .

The prosecutor did not appear. ACQUITTED .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210411-69

556. WILLIAM STAFF was indicted for a misdemeanor .

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210411-70

557. WILLIAM GEDGE was indicted for a libel .

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210411-71

SEVENTH DAY. WEDNESDAY, APRIL 18.

558. JOSEPH ARNOLD was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of March , from the person of George Allen , twenty-six 1 l. Bank notes, his property .

GEORGE ALLEN . I am a mariner , of South Shields. On Thursday, the 8th of March, about eleven o'clock at night, I was accosted by a girl, who took me to a room on the second floor, in Seven Star Alley . I was intoxicated, but not insensible. The woman remained in the room sitting up, and the door locked. I awoke about six o'clock and she was gone. I found my pocket-book in my pocket, but the notes gone, and my watch safe. I expected to find her still there. I had received the notes on the Monday before, and made a memorandum of the notes and dates. I made a noise and the prisoner came up. I asked if he belonged to the house, he said he did, and his name was Arnold; he said he neither knew the woman or me. I went and got Brown, the officer, returned, and found the house locked up. I went to the Bank and stopped the notes, the prisoner was taken next morning.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. Where did you get the notes - A. From a banker's in Lombard-street. I made a memorandum of the notes before I lost them. I have a memorandum of what notes I paid away, those lost are successive numbers.

JOSEPH WALLIS . I was in company with the prisoner at a public-house, on Friday morning, at half-past nine, and saw him pay a note there. He lives in Seven Star-alley.

THOMAS COLLETT . I keep the Jolly Sailors, public-house, the prisoner and Wallis came in together - I changed a note for the prisoner, it is No. 75176, dated the 13th of February, 1821. I knew Wallis or I should not have changed it.

CHARLES TIDDLE . I am a constable. I knew the prisoner kept this house - I found it shut up at twelve o'clock in the forenoon - it is a common house.

JOHN BROWN. I fetched the prisoner to the office on the morning of the robbery, his wife keeps the house.

Prisoner's Defence. I never saw him till the morning when he asked if I belonged to the house. I was apprended at work at my shop.

Mr. ALLEY to ALLEN. Q. On your oath did you not give the girl a one pound note to get supper - A. I did not.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210411-72

559. JOHN SNAPE , was indicted for that he, on the 20th of April , in the fifty-ninth year of the reign of our late King, George the Third, at St. Mary-le-Strand , feloniously did utter and publish as true, a certain false, forged, and counterfeit acquittance, and receipt for money , which is as follows: i.e.

* An account of the quantities of provisions saved by the company of H. M. S. Spartan, out of their daily allowance, between the 13th of Jan. 1818, and the 13th of March, 1818, with the value thereof, at the prices settled for the payment of savings, the name of the person appointed to receive for each Mess, the signatures of the persons to whom the amount was paid, and the signature of the witnesses to the payment.

A 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 Mr. Tills 12 280 12 16 18 5 3 18 6 March Wm. Till Mr. Bell, 16 4 Office List 7 120 8 8 6 1 18 4 L. Bell 10 T. Evans 73 68 2 10 T. EvansA. Quantity of provisions saved by each Mess1. No. of persons In the Mess.2. Name of person appointed to receive for the mess3. No. of the S. B. of the person receiving4. Bread lbs.5. Beef, 8lb. pieces6. Pork 4lb. pieces7. Sugar lbs.8. Cheese lbs.9. Value of provisions due to each Mess10. When paid11. Signature of the person to whom paid

W. F. WISE, Captain WM. WHITE, Master,

Signature of the witnesses to payment

These are to certify, that the aforesaid is a just and true account of the savings due to the company of His Majesty's ship Spartan, between the 13th of January, 1818, and the 13th of March, 1818, (stating particulars) the value whereof, at the prices settled for the payment of the same, amounts to 35 l. 9 s.

JOHN SNAPE , Purser's Steward.

N. HEDE.

These are to certify, that the foregoing amount of monies due for the savings of provisions, was actually paid to the respective persons, and that we have every reason to believe the same is a just and true account.

W. F. WISE, Captain.

W. WHITE, Master.

he well knowing them to be false, forged, and counterfeit, with an intent to defraud our said late Sovereign Lord the King.

* The indictment set out two other accounts of a similar nature to the above, but as this only was read in evidence, it is judged sufficient to state. It may be also necessary to mention, that the account set out contained a variety of other names, which made the total amount 35 l. 19 s., but only the three stated were proved to be forged.

FOUR OTHER COUNTS, varying the manner of laying the charge.

MESSRS. BOLLAND, ADOLPHUS, and NORTON, conducted the prosecution.

RICHARD HOLT . I am accountant and principal officer in the Victualling Board Department. It is the custom for pursers in the navy to send us accounts of the provisions received by them, and the manner they are disposed of. The provisions are supplied agreeable to the demand which the captain may make. The purser usually writes the demand and the captain approves of it - it should be proportioned according to the number of men on board. The savings accounts are divided into messes - it is an account of such part of the provisions each mess takes up less than the proportion which is allowed.

Q. What is done with these savings - A. When the purser renders an account of savings, the amount in money is placed to his credit in his account, in another department.

RICHARD GREENING . I am post messenger to the Victualling-board, my business is to receive packets and letters passing through the post-office. I received a package

dated the 20th of April, 1819, directed to the Commissioners of the Victualing-board. I made a memorandum of it at the time - it was in a square deal box. I received it at the post-office, and took it to Somerset-house. I opened the box myself, and saw the contents were the Purser's account of the Spartan. I paid twelve pounds fifteen shillings for the postage, on the 22d. When I opened the box, I took it to Mr. Geoghegan.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. You received it at the post-office in the city - A. Yes; I did not make my memorandum from what is written on the outside of the box, but from the schedule of the accounts. I always look at the accounts myself, they are frequently in different parcels, and sometimes in one. The outside of the parcel generally has the contents written on it. It was done so in this instance, or I could not have taken the memorandum. I never recollect accounts being directed to be left at the post-office. The course of business is for me to go daily and fetch all the letters for the board - they are not sent.

MR. JOHN GEOGHEGAN . I am clerk in the Secretary's office in the Victualling department (looks at a letter) this letter was received by me, on the 20th of April, 1819, as it is marked. The letters

"W. G.

"at the bottom of it is an official mark - it is the signature of Mr. Gordon, the secretary.

TIMOTHY HONE . Q. Look at these accounts, and tell me if you examined them with anything - A. They were received by me at the victualling-office on the 22d of April, 1819, and examined by the schedule which accompained them - the red ink marks are official marks made in our office - they are not all my marks.

DAVID THOMAS RENOYARD , - I am a clerk in the impress department of the victualling-office. I can speak to all the red ink marks on this document being made by persons in our office, and some black ink marks also.

(Here the witness pointed out a variety of red ink marks, initials, letters, words, and figures, all of which he stated to be official, but as it was impossible to set them out in the indictment, it would only render the case complex to state them here.)

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. Whether the marks are official or not they have not been made by you - A. Part of them.

MR. BOLLAND. Q. Look at the letter, whose writing is the red ink marks there - A. All mine.

FRANCIS BLAKE MARTIN. In 1819, I was on board the Spartan, as Admiralty clerk. On the 24th of March we were at sea on our passage - the prisoner was purser. I have frequently seen him write. I believe the black ink part of the letter is his writing. I believe the signature John Snape , in the document, to be his; all the signatures, John Snape , I believe to be his writing, and I believe the body of the account, and the body of the certificate to be his writing, except the names, which do not purport to be his. I know the Captain's hand-writing, William Furlong Wise , from my knowledge of his writing, I do not believe the signatures on the accounts to be his. I know William White , the master of the ship, and have frequently seen his writing.

Q. Here is his name witnessing some payments; do you believe them to be his writing - A. I believe they are not his. I know William Tills , the Admiralty midshipman. I have seen him write frequently, and know his writing. I believe the signature not to be his writing. I remember Luke Bell , he was carpenter of the Spartan. I have frequently seen him write, I believe neither of the signatures in the columns to be his.

Q. Was Nicholas Hede the purser's steward - A. Yes; I know his writing, I do not think the signature at the bottom to be his writing. I know the writing of Thomas Gray , the gunner, and do not believe the signature on any of the papers to be his, here is the name of Shirley on two of the papers, I know his writing and do not believe it to be his. These signatures purport that the persons signing have received from the purser the sums, (as savings,) against which their names are affixed.

Q. What are the savings for provisions - A. What is not taken up though allowed, they are supposed to receive these sums in lien of provisions.

Letter read.

Madeirs, March 24, 1819.

His Majesty's Ship Spartan.

HONOURABLE GENTLEMEN. - Herewith you will receive my accounts as purser of His Majesty's Ship Spartan, between the 13th of January, 1818, and the 28th of February, 1819.

I have the honour to be, Gentlemen, Your obedient servant, JOHN SNAPE .

To the Honourable Commissioners for Victualing His Majesty's Navy, London.

CAPTAIN WILLIAM FURLONG WISE . I was Captain of the Spartan, rather more than three years. It is the duty of the captain, to certify the payment of allowances for messes to the men. I am not at all interested in it, the signatures on the papers are not mine - I never witnessed any payments made by the prisoner to these persons.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. Are you in the habit of seeing the payments made, or do you leave it to the representation of your servant - A. I should not sign my name as witnessing a payment, unless I had seen the money paid.

WILLIAM TILLS . I was midshipman of the Spartan, between the 13th of January, 1818, and the 28th of February, 1819. I was appointed to the midshipmens' mess, the signatures on the papers are not mine; I never received any money whatever from the prisoner, or gave him a receipt for it.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. Have you not received an equivalent - A. In one instance, I received nine dozen of wine, in lieu of spirits, as part of my allowance.

COURT. Q. You changed spirits for wine, but had you any allowance of money - A. No, there was once a balance of 6 l. 3 s. in my favour, and by consent of my messmates, it was agreed to take it in provisions - I understand pursers gave large securities for the performance of their duty.

MR. BOLLAND. Q. Were you entitled to any thing for short allowance, or had you all your allowance - A. I was not entitled to any thing.

LUKE BELL . I was carpenter of the ship, and was at the head of the carpenter's mess; the signatures on the paper are not my writing, nor did I receive the money.

Cross-examined. Q. Were any provisions saved by your mess - A. I suppose so, but I kept no account.

Q. Did not the prisoner offer to give it you, and you said he was welcome to it - A. I told the steward so, but I did not know he was in my debt to that extent, as I took nearly all my allowance; the signatures are not mine, I never authorized any body to make them.

D. T. RENOYARD re-examined. Q. Will you turn in your ledger to the account of Snape as purser of the Spartan, and see if he received credit for these vouchers - A. He has, I did not make the entry.

EDWARD JENKINS . I made the entry - the prisoner is credited in the ledger on the documents produced.

Prisoner to MR. TILLS. Q. You stated you were not aware of any money being due to your mess - A. I said I never received any.

Q. Is it not within your knowledge that you were one, two, and three months creditor, and you told me whenever you were creditor, I was justly entitled to it - A. No, I never told him so.

The document was here put in and read.

Prisoner's Defence. My Lord and Gentlemen of the Jury. - You have heard the charge on the part of the prosecution, I have therefore only to hope that upon mature deliberation you will clearly perceive, that no frand could have been contemplated on my part. First, as it regards the individuals in question, and next as it relates to my King. If these are forgeries my Lord and Gentlemen of the Jury, they are in their tendency, of a most innocent and singular nature; Mr. Tills, Mr. Bell, and Mr. Gray, admit that they have not been defrauded; and that one member of their mess, has at different periods received various sums. Having said so much, and I trust carried conviction to your mind upon this part; I shall endeavour to shew, that so far from my King having been defrauded, the public have been benefited, in as much that by the documents in question I was returning to my country, a quantity of provisions at a lower rate than they could be procured under any other circumstances; at a lower rate than the government pay me upon the balance of my account, and thereby subjecting myself if in debt to the Crown, to four, five, and in some instances, six times the amount of the benefit I could possibly derive to be levied upon me, and my securities, to the extent of twelve hundred pounds, at any time the Commissioners for Victualling His Majesty's Navy might think proper. It now behoves me, my Lord and Gentlemen of the Jury, to substantiate these assertions, by official documents under the different heads, to which I have alluded; in so doing it may be necessary to state for your information, the mode adopted for the renumeration of Purser's, which I am in hopes will more readily convey to you, an adequate feeling of the benefit derived by His Majesty's Government in a transaction of this nature; supposing for instance, my Lord and Gentlemen of the Jury, there is one pound of bread due to any mess, I pay them one penny halfpenny; one gallon of rum, 2 s.; one piece of beef of 8 lb. 1 s. 6 d.; one piece of pork 4 1/2 d.; one pound of sugar, 4 d., and one pound of cocoa, 4 d. If I had a desire my Lord and Gentlemen of the Jury, to defraud my country, I would pay this sum myself, and the Government must repay me 1/2 per pound in addition for bread, 4 d. per gallon in addition for rum; 2 d. per piece in addition for beef; 1 d. per piece in addition for pork 2 d. per pound in addition for butter as sugar, and 2 d. per pound in addition for cocoa, as cheese. If on the other hand my Lord and Gentlemen of the Jury, I have drawn this money with a nefarious intent, I subject myself to be charged in place of one penny halfpenny for bread, four pence halfpenny; in place of 2 s. per gallon for rum, 12 s.; in place of 1 s. 6 d. per piece for beef 4 s. 8 d.; in place of 1 s. 3 d. per piece for pork, 3 s. 6 d.; in place of 4 d. per pound for sugar as butter, 1 s., and in place of 4 d. perpound for cocoa, as cheese, 1 s., or such other price as the several species may have cost His Majesty, in any part of the world. I beg most respectfully to state, that I have a wife with six children, dependent upon my personal exertion for support; I have received many wounds in defence of my country, and I trust that your verdict of this day, will be tempered with that humanity, which is so predominant in the breast of every English Judge and Juryman.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 45.

Recommended to Mercy.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

560. JOHN SNAPE was again indicted, for that he, on the 20th of April , at St. Mary-le-Strand , feloniously did utter and publish as true, a certain false, forged, and counterfeit certificate, well knowing the same to be forged and counterfeit, in order to receive certain allowances of money, due for and in respect of the services of one Luke Bell , a warrant officer, performed on board a certain ship of our late Lord the King, called the Spartan - (here the indictment set forth a similar account to that in the preceding case; one among which purports to be a receipt of Luke Bell , for 2 l. 4 s. 8 d. witnessed as before. The total amount of savings, according to the certificate. was 59 l. 18 s.) - with intent to defraud our said late Lord the King .

SEVEN OTHER COUNTS, varying the manner of laying the charges.

RICHARD HOLT . I am an accomptant in the store department of the Victualling Office. My evidence in the last case is correct.

RICHARD GREENING . I am post messenger. My evidence in the last case is correct.

JOHN GEOGHEGAN . I received this document on the 20th of April, with the receipt inclosed with the same letter.

TIMOTHY HONE . I received this document on the 20th of April, 1819, in the Victualling Office, Somerset House. The red and black marks, and initials are official marks.

MR. RENOYARD. The red ink marks are official.

WILLIAM BOWKER , ESQ. I am solicitor to the Victualling Board. I received this receipt from the Victualling Office, with the paper attached to it. I believe Mr. Hone delivered it to me.

FRANCIS BLAKE MARTIN. I am Admiralty clerk of the Spartan. The signature to the letter is the prisoner's writing, and I believe the body is also. The body of the account and certificate, and the signature to the receipt, I also believe to be his.

(The letter was here put in and read, the same as in the last case; also a receipt for 59 l. 18 s. for savings.)

CAPTAIN WILLIAM FURLONG WISE . I know the prisoner's hand writing - the receipt is his writing. The certificate purports to bear my signature, but is not my writing. I never saw the sums paid which it states I did.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. What are the sums set opposite the persons names - A. Provisions saved by the ship's company, and for which they would be entitled to receive money.

LUKE BELL . I was on board the Spartan, and at the head of the carpenter's mess. I did not receive this sum of 2 l. 4 s. 8 d. The receipt is not my writing. He never paid me that money.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Did you ever receive an equivalent - A. Not to my knowledge. I was in the habit of receiving one species of provisions for another. I am not indebted to him. He never made any demand on me.

COURT. Q. Did you ever authorize him to put your name to this receipt - A. Certainly not.

MR. LAW. Q. How do you settle the difference between a superior and an inferior article - A. If I take more than the portion allowed, he would have a demand on me; but I took a less quantity. If I wanted wine instead of gin, the quantity of wine would be equal in value to the gin.

Prisoner. Q. I believe you admit that, at various times, you were creditor to different species of provisions - A. I kept no account.

Q. I could have charged for the provisions you had, a higher price than what I should have to charge for the savings - A. Yes. One member of my mess was a boy, in the early part of the time, I believe he received sums from the steward, as savings for rum, but that is a separate account altogether.

(The certificate was here put in and read.)

NICHOLAS HEDE . I was first steward of the Spartan. The signature to this certificate is not mine. The account is an account of savings paid to the men. No transaction of the sort took place on board the ship, to my knowledge.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. Were the boys paid grog money - A. They had an allowance of money instead of grog - but not under this certificate.

COURT. Q. This certificate is for meat and bread - A. Yes. I never knew him pay any money for savings.

Prisoner's Defence. There are numerous documents taken to different officers to sign, when it is almost impossible for them to tell what they are. At times they write when the ship is reeling to and fro, and they sign them on their knees - and a few hours after, would say they had not signed them. I have sent Government regular accounts, and they have debited me with provisions, thereby subjecting myself to five or six times the amount I should be able to realize - they cannot be injured. The midshipmens' mess and the gun-room mess generously gave me leave to take what was due to them, in lieu of my contributing to their comforts. There are books in the office to prove the Government could not be injured.

GUILTY . - DEATH. Aged 36.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18210411-73

561. HENRY YOUENS was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of February , at Paddington , ten spoons, value 3 l.; one bread basket, value 1 s.; 1 knife steel, value 3 s., and two castor tops, value 3 s., the goods of John Joseph Stockdale , in his dwelling-house .

JOHN JOSEPH STOCKDALE . I live at Westbourne-terrace , in the parish of Paddington. The prisoner was my outdoor servant . On the morning of the 15th of February, before eight o'clock, I missed the plate mentioned in the indictment, which was in use. I had seen it at ten o'clock the night before. It was in a japanned bread basket - the steel was ivory handled, bound with silver. Two metal spoons were found in the road, but nearly a month elapsed before I heard any thing of the rest. I found parts of them broken, in the possession of the prisoner. On the Monday before the prisoner was committed, I got a search-warrant, and went with an officer to the prisoner's parents' house, at Kensington Gravel-pits. He was at my house at the time. I found nothing there Before the constable took him into custody he most positively denied all knowledge of it. In consequence of my having produced to him the broken pieces which were actually in his possession, he took me and the officer into a stable, where he worked and dug up two of the pieces of a silver table-spoon. It was a very little depth under the manger. On the officer's proceeding to handcuff him, he stated there was some more property under the tiling of his mother's wash-house, and the other parts of it were sold at a pawnbroker's and a watchmaker's, at Kensington. I went with the prisoner and the officer to the pawnbroker's and watchmaker's, and received from them portions of two table spoons, broken. He stated he had thrown the knife into a field, and the two castor tops and two salt spoons, into some lime, where some bricklayers were building. He said that he had accomplished the robbery by getting over the front railing, getting round the house, and opening the passage door, after the servants had come down - that he had come to the back of the house, having buried the property, and called at the outside of the gate, as was his custom, for admission. He denied having any participators in the robbery, till he came before the magistrate - he then said a boy, whose name he did not know, received the things from him over the back gate, and assisted him to bury them.

WILLIAM HUMPHRIES. I am an officer. I went with Mr. Stockdale to the prisoner's house, and found nothing. I returned and questioned him. I said,

"Part of the plate is found, I wish you to tell me where the rest is. If you do not tell me, I shall take you to the Office.

"He took me to the stable, and shewed me two parts of the spoon under the manger, covered over with straw. I searched his mother's wash-house, and found this gravy spoon, and two parts of a tables-poon. I went to a pawnbroker's in Kensington, and found the bowl of a tablespoon. And at the watchmaker's I found two pieces of a table-spoon.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner made no defence.

GUILTY . - DEATH - Aged 14.

Recommended to Mercy.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18210411-74

562. JANE SMITH was indicted for feloniously being at large within this kingdom, before the expiration of seven years, for which period she had been ordered to be transported .

WILLIAM WOODBERRY . I am a Bow-street constable. I apprehended the prisoner on the 17th of August, 1819, for felony. She was tried and convicted. I produce the certificate of her conviction. (Read.) On the 13th of February last she was brought to me at the Office. I am sure she is the woman who was tried in September, 1819.

NATHANIEL NICHOLLS . I am steward of Bethlem Hospital. The prisoner was sent to us from the Penitentiary, by a warrant from Lord Sidmouth, dated the 5th of June, 1820, and remained till the morning of the 26th of July, when it was discovered she had made her escape over the wall. I heard nothing more of her till I saw her at Bow-street.

Q. Was she lunatic - A. She was. I presume her to be so.

ELIZABETH FORBES . I am matron of the hospital. I conceive the prisoner to be insane. I thought her so at the time of her escape.

JANE GUNSTON . I belong to the Penitentiary. The prisoner was under my care, and was removed to the infirmary, being ill.

WILLIAM DEAN . I am the headborough of St. Giles's. I took the prisoner on the 13th of February, in Charles-street, Drury-lane, on a charge of robbery.

WILLIAM ROBERT HENRY BROWN , ESQ. I have noticed the prisoner, since she has been in my custody, and think she is not of sound mind.

Prisoner's Defence. I was not insane - the reason I made my escape was, that I might not go back to the Penitentiary.

NOT GUILTY .

Believing her to be insane.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18210411-75

563. JOHN TAYLOR was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of April , in the dwelling-house of George Beaton , one pocket book, value 18 d., and five 1 l. Bank notes, the property of Edward Lewis .

EDWARD LEWIS . I am a sailor , of the ship Preston. On the 12th of April I received 10 l. and four 1 l. Bank notes. I bought some clothes, and changed the 10 l. and then had six 1 l. notes out of the 14 l. I went to the Golden Anchor, public-house, in East Smithfield - the prisoner was there, sitting with a broom in his hand. While he was there, I took out a pocket-book and a 1 l. note, which I gave my landlady to get changed for me. I went out with my landlady, and in about a quarter of an hour I missed my pocket book, I went back to look for it, and so did my landlady. It was about three o'clock in the afternoon. The landlord took a candle to look for it, but could not find it - the prisoner was helping us to look for it. I do not know when he went away.

Q. When you took a 1 l. note out of the book, did you put it back again - A. I cannot say whether I did, or whether I dropped it, or put it on the table before me. I had put the silver into it which the landlord gave me. I saw my pocket-book, next morning, about seven o'clock, at the watch-house, and the prisoner there. There was only one shilling in it then.

Prisoner. Q. What part of the room was I in - A. Cleaning knives. I do not know whether he came near me or not. I had two women with me at first - one was a woman of the town. The woman I call my landlady was not a bad woman. I was not very sober. I knew my landlady went back with me.

GEORGE BEATON . I am a publican, and live in East Smithfield. I do not know the parish the house is in. The prosecutor came to my house on the 11th of April, between three and four o'clock in the evening, with his landlady and another woman. He was in liquor, and stopped a quarter of an hour. The prisoner attended in the room as a waiter . They all three went out together - he returned in ten minutes, and said he had left his pocket-book on the table, or dropped it. Both the women came back with him. I told him to take a candle and look for it in the corner, as nobody had been in the room since he had left. I looked, but could not find it. The women said they could not find it. The prisoner went out about a quarter of an hour, and brought in a new waistcoat - I asked him how he came by it; he said he came honestly by it, he had plenty of money. I saw he had a watch, which he never had before - and I gave him in charge.

THOMAS HARMAN . I am a constable. I was sent for. I took the prisoner up stairs and searched him, and found eight shillings in silver and a few halfpence. I questioned him how he came by them - he said he had saved them up, that he bought the watch three or four months ago. I told him to take me to the person he bought it of. He then took me to a Jew, who said he sold it to him that very day, for 2 l. 18 s. I said,

"What have you done with the pocket-book?

"He said, he had thrown it behind the water butt in the wash-house. I went and found it there, with 1 s. in it.

Prisoner's Defence. About two hours after he left the room, I swept it, and found the pocket-book.

GUILTY . Aged 33.

Of stealing, but not in a dwelling-house.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18210411-76

564. CHARLES ROGERS was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of February , two mahogany bed-posts, value 48 s., the goods of Thomas Bennett , in his dwelling-house .

THOMAS BENNETT . I live at No. 17, Little Windmill-street, St. James's, Westminster . On the 19th of February I lost a pair of mahogany bed-posts. I did not see them taken from the shop.

Q. Is this shop part of the dwelling-house - A. There is a thoroughfare through it to the adjoining house, and also to my house. The people who occupy the next house have a right to pass through my house to it. They have no other way. The shop is not exclusively my house, I have no right to shut them out. The posts cost me 48 s.

EDWARD MARTIN . I am a broker. On the evening of the 19th of February, the prisoner brought these posts to me. I bought them of him for 24 s. I consider that the full value.

JOHN MILLS . I apprehended the prisoner about twelve o'clock on the night of the 19th of February.

Prisoner's Defence. I was standing in Leather-lane, at half-past seven o'clock, and met a young man who offered me one shilling to sell them.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Of stealing, but not in a dwelling-house.

Confined Six Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18210411-77

564. MOSTYN JONES was indicted for a misdemeanor .

MESSRS. ADOLPHUS and PLATT conducted the prosecution.

THOMAS CHARLTON . I have come from the Vicar General's Office. I know S. R. Meyrick, Esq., he is surrogate of the Vicar General, and is Doctor of Laws, by degree - he acts for the purpose of administering oaths to persons obtaining licences for marriages. Sir William Scott is Vicar General of the province of Canterbury, and the Official Principal. When a licence is obtained, it is under the seal of the Vicar General himself. The affidavit is never filed, unless the licence is obtained. We enter the names of persons obtaining licence in a book. I produce an affidavit made by a Mr. Jones. It is signed by him and the person who administered the oath.

DR. SAMUEL RUSH MEYRICK . This affidavit was sworn before me. I do not know who the deponent was.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Are marriage licences under seal - A. Sometimes under seal of the Vicar General, and sometimes under the Surrogate. I am appointed Surrogate. I am not aware that any form is necessary on my appointment, except being introduced to the Judge. I am not aware that I have any applications under seal.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. When you take the affidavit, and the licence comes out, is it under seal - A. I have nothing to do with the licence. It is under seal of the Vicar General. In November last Charles was Lord Archbishop of Canterbury, and Sir William Scott , Vicar General.

SAMUEL BIRD . I know the defendant, and have seen him write (looking at the affidavit), to the best of my knowledge the name is his hand-writing.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Who are you - A. A boat and barge builder. I built a boat for him nearly three years ago, and he gave me two notes of hand for it. I have not compared them with this signature. I have not got them. I held them a long while in my hands. I also saw his writing when he gave me an order to receive money.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Look at these letters, and say if you believe it to be his writing - A. I believe the signature to be his.

PETER HARVEY LOVELL , ESQ. I reside at Cole Park, Wiltshire. I am father of Charlotte Lovell . I know the defendant very well. I remember taking my family to a review at Cirencester, in June. I think I took my three daughters - Charlotte was among them. I have nine children. I might have seen the defendant among the officers at the review, but never knew him. He was introduced to my family about three weeks afterwards - I believe at Bath.

Q. He came to Cole Park, where you reside - A. Yes. Before he went away, he addressed me in these words -

"Mr. Lovell - I think I should not be acting correctly, if I did not tell you my intentions towards your daughter - I have a fortune of 500 l. a year." I said that was a good fortune, if unencumbered, and told him we were almost strangers, and I would think of it, and let him know my determination. I believe next day he left Cole Park. I made enquiries, was not satisfied, and communicated that to him, by letter.

WILLIAM NICHOLSON . I served the defendant with notice to produce this and other letters, on Saturday, between six and seven o'clock in the evening. I served him with another notice to the same effect, on the 13th of February.

(notice read.)

MR. LOVELL (continued.) Q. You communicated by letter, your determination - A. Yes; my letter was to this effect - that I had considered the subject, and my present resolution was, that nothing more should take place between him and my daughter - and concluded by stating I should always be glad to see him as an acquaintance. I afterwards received this letter from him (looking at it), I believe it to be his writing. -

(The letter was here produced, stating the defendant's regret at Mr. Lovell's decision, and offered to satisfy him on every point. Signed E. M. JONES.)

Q. After the receipt of this letter, when did you see Mr. Jones - A. I think accidentally, at some races, near Swinbourn, in Wiltshire, on the 1st of September. I had my daughters Charlotte, Jane, and Fanny there with me. Mr. Jones came and asked me how I did. I talked with him civilly, that was all. I think after that I saw him at Bath, probably about three weeks after - it was about the latter end of October.

Q. Did you afterwards see him at Bath, in company with your solicitor - A. I did. That was after I had heard something about my daughter. I had seen him in London about three weeks before that.

Q. State what passed when you saw him in town - A. I asked if he was married to my daughter - he said he was; I enquired at what place, and by what clergyman - he said he would not tell me. I said,

"Mr. Jones, my daughter being under age, you must be well aware that the marriage cannot be valid." - There was then a proposal made of re-marriage, and money was talked of. I said I would go down into the country, and consult my wife about that. I went down, and a few weeks after met him at Bath, on the subject of the marriage - he wished me to deposit money - then he talked of terms, and something about a settlement. He said there was 1000 l. in his power, and he must talk to his mother - but I have a confused recollection of that.

Q. Did the treaty come to any thing - A. No. I had information where my daughter was.

Q. From the first time you saw him, till the present, did you ever consent to your daughter becoming his wife - A. We talked of terms. I consented to his marrying her, on his making a certain settlement - that settlement was never made. I heard where my daughter was, and went to the house where she resided. She came away with me willingly. Her clothes were detained at her lodging, I

have never been able to get them. She was 19 years of age last April.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. A good full-grown girl, is not she - A. Pretty well.

Q. I do not mean any thing offensive - but many a girl of twenty-five looks quite as young as she does - A. Appearances vary.

Q. When the defendant said they were married, did he not offer to marry her again, if you thought fit to give your consent - A. On my giving some money.

Q. Did you not tell him, if he settled 1000 l. in the stocks, which he expected from his mother, that you would give another 1000 l. and they should be married again - A. On my oath I really do not recollect. We did talk about terms. Nothing was finally settled - but really I do not recollect whether I agreed to settle 1000 l. on his doing the same. I think I remember proposing that he should marry her, on my giving him 1000 l. - I think that was at Bath. He talked about terms, and I referred him to my solicitor, who said he was not competent to make the settlement.

Q. Do you recollect saying to Mr. Walker, I shall be happy if he marries her, and add

"blessed be the peace maker" - A. I did not, after I heard where she was; I said, blessed be the peace maker when I talked about the re-marriage. Until I saw my solicitor I had made up the differences, and consented, but after I saw him he declined.

Q. When he first proposed to marry your daughter, did you not tell him she would have a fortune of 5000 l. - A. On my oath, I did not. I have heard he is the possessor Lincoln house - his mother lives there; he said his estate there was worth about 500 l. a year. I did not tell him Archdeacon Wells had left 20,000 l. among my daughters, I said it was among my grand-children.

Q. Did not the defendant accompany your daughter to the balls at Bath, and to the races, and parade the ballrooms with her on his arm - A. No: on my oath, he never went to Bath with her once to my knowledge. I never said I believed he thought my daughter twenty years of age.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. The defendant applied to you as a suitor to your daughter, to which you gave a negative answer - A. Yes; I never saw him at my house afterwards. I did not invite him to join us at the races. My daughter was with me in the carriage, she did not join him without my being with her. I heard of her going away with him about the latter end of November, and had an interview with him in London five or six days after, and saw him at Bath in about three weeks. I did not then know where my daughter was.

Q. At Bath there was a talk about your each giving 1000 l. - A. Yes, Mr. Jones's solicitor was present, and mine was not, and not having seen my attorney I would have consented to the marriage if terms had been settled; the settlement never was made, nor any agreement for it. I never consented to a marriage without a settlement. I found her at Islington - she is here to day.

MISS FRANCES LOVELL . I am daughter of the last witness, and have a sister named Charlotte. Lady Gould is my aunt. My sister and I went on a visit to Sir Davidge and Lady Gould's, at Orkshead, in Hertfordshire; we travelled from my father's house to Chippenham, in his carriage, and from there to London in the stage coach; the defendant joined us in the morning at Calne - he came into the stage coach. I knew it was not my father's wish that he should associate with my sister; he travelled to London in the same coach with us. In the course of the journey we were speaking of ages, he said he should take me for the eldest of the three sisters - he thought me older than either my sisters, Charlotte or Jane; I said Charlotte was the eldest, Jane and myself the youngest. I told him Charlotte was not nineteen till the February following, which was last February, and told him the ages of my other sisters; he parted with us on arriving in town. We stated in conversation with him, that we were going to Lady Gould's - we parted at Hatchett's hotel; a carriage conveyed us to Jermyn-street, where Sir D. Gould was waiting for us; the defendant knew where Sir D. Gould lived; we went to Hertfordshire a day or two afterwards, and about ten days after, I saw the defendant - he rode by the lane fronting the house; I saw him many times - he was never admitted into the house on any footing whatever. We generally took a drive every day in Sir Davidge Gould's carriage, and once met the defendant in the lane on horseback, Lady Gould was with us - he did not join us.

Q. In consequence of the appearance of this gentleman, had Sir D. and Lady Gould said any thing - A. They had written to Papa, and in consequence of that I had an interview with defendant at the gate of Sir D. Gould's garden (we had been there about three weeks) I told him Sir Davidge had written home, to say that he was constantly riding by, and that we had received an answer, to say they should fetch us home, if he appeared again before the window. I entreated him to leave the neighbourhood. he requested an interview with Charlotte, which I told him was impossible, and after some slight conversation, I left him; he renewed his appearance, in consequence of which, I wrote a letter, and got my sister to sign it - it was dictated by Sir Davidge.

(Mr. Adolphus here called for the letter, for the production of which notice had been served on the defendant. Mr. Alley refused it.)

MR. ADOLPHUS to MISS F. LOVELL. Q. What was the contents of your letter - A. That his appearance before the window, was extremely disagreeable to Charlotte; that we had received a letter, saying we should be fetched home, and that she was determined not to marry him, without her friends consent, and entreating him not to make his appearance again; we received this letter in answer; (looking at it) the writing on the third leaf, was not discovered till about a month ago - I believe it was produced by holding it to the fire.

Q. When did you next see the defendant, after the receipt of this letter - A. On the Sunday morning, about ten days after; Sir D. and Lady Gould were gone to church, and all the men servants; we were left at home, sitting in the drawing-room, when we heard the sound of wheels; Charlotte first went out, and when I came out, I found her in conversation with Mr. Jones at the gate, he was asking her to elope with him, the gig had then passed on out of sight - a man named Rawlins was with it. The defendant said he had got every thing

prepared, with a licence in his pocket, which he produced - I saw the outside of it; he said he had every thing ready to be married at St. Martin's church, next morning; she begged him to go away, saying, she never would have him, without her friends consent. I remonstrated with him, and requested some private conversation, and told him, if he would desist from taking her away, I would write to my father, and ask his consent, he said he never should have such an opportunity again, and no earthly being should ever make him give it up; he appeared in great agitation, when she moved down the walk as I was conversing with him; she went up one of the gravel walks towards the house, and I believe entered the house; he appeared extremely agitated, and went to her in the gravel walk, met her and siezed her by the arm, and said nothing should make him give it up; he said to me

"If you will only let me take her down the lane for five minutes, on my soul, I'll bring her back again." I said,

"No, he might speak to her inside the gate, but not down the lane;" he dragged her down the lane, partly by force, and I followed her; when I saw he was using force, I tried what strength I had, I took her by the other arm and pulled the other way, and said

"Charlotte, is it of your own consent you are going away?" she said,

"No, go I entreat you, Mr. Jones, the carriage will be come from church;" he said he was determined never to stir from the spot without her, and called me harbarous and inhuman; he then beckoned to the gig, which came up, and attempted to lift her into it - and once I completely pulled her out.

COURT. Q. Did she struggle against your pulling her out, or in favour of it - A. I hardly know, I was in such agitation, she resolutely said she would not go to the last moment. He lifted her into the gig - Rawlins still holding the horse. I appealed to him, and asked if he could see a lady taken away against her consent.

Q. Did your sister appeal to him - A. I do not recollect, but she intreated Mr. Jones to go away, and said she never would go with him. He succeeded in getting her from me - put her her in the gig and drove off.

Q. Did you cry out and raise the neighbourhood - A. There was no neighbourhood to raise. I did not run after the carriage.

Q. What occasioned you to stay from church - A. We both had the hooping cough, she had it slighter than myself.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Have you a grandmother living in Milson-street, Bath - A. I had; my sister was there six days, I was not with her, it was after Mr. Jones had been rejected by my father as a suitor; the visit was very sudden - she went to purchase clothes - it is twenty-one miles from home - she did not propose going herself.

Q. On going to town you knew you should meet Mr. Jones somewhere - A. I did not know it till I met him.

Q. On the road you learnt he was to meet you - A. Yes, I heard it at Chippenham - we slept there - my brothers came with us to Chippenham.

Q. Had your brothers left you before you learnt the defendant was to meet you - A. Yes; my eldest brother that was with me, is thirteen years old, and the other is eleven. I knew my father had forbidden his seeing my sister, and perhaps I acted foolish in getting into the stage coach. Mr. Jones appeared to know we were going to Sir Davidge Gould, he generally rode by Sir Davidge's twice a week, and sometimes every day. I did not meet him at the gate by appointment - I went to tell him how angry the family were - I did not know he was coming on Sunday.

Q. Had you expected that he would come some time or other and take your sister away - A. I had suspicions - I did not actually know it - I rather expected it - I did not tell Sir Davidge.

Q. Now, I beg you to recollect, when you sister was going off with Mr. Jones, did not you appeal to her and say

"Will you leave me;" and did she not say,

"I am determined to go;" - A. Never, she certainly was not sufficiently firm.

Q. Did not she do every thing to resist your attempts to prevent her going - A. She made no resistance, one way or the other - she appeared frightened. We heard she kept the house for a week, with the hooping cough, except going into the garden now and then.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Is it not inconvenient to go to church with the hooping cough - A. Yes, there are many charity children who might be affected by it.

The following is the letter referred to in evidence -

HATFIELD, NOV. 1820.

Nothing was wanting but your letter of yesterday to complete the misery you have from time to time heaped upon me; however, your commands, as for as regards me, shall be obeyed. I will give up the only ray of comfort I have known since I left Bath, that of seeing you for a moment as I pass; and cease to appear before that house that holds every thing that is dear to me, but when you bid me think no more of you, you ask a thing out of my power to comply with, as it rests with you alone. Give me back that happiness you have robbed me off - restore that heart which you alone possess, and take from me the remembrance that I have ever seen or loved you, and then I will think of you no more.

The sanction of your father I once gained, but he withdrew it from me without a reason; or if he had one, without allowing me a chance of an explanation. I addressed a letter to him couched in terms that could not offend; in as much as it breathed the most fervent respect for him, and the most ardent affection for you. I only entreated, that should my endeavours to satisfy him on every point succeed, he would no longer withhold his approbation, but he rather choose to increase the anguish he was conscious I must feel, by leaving my letter entirely unanswered.

The cutting style in which your letter is written, particularly its conclusion, is a cruelty I have not deserved; what conduct of mine has tended to lesson your esteem for me I know not. I have uniformly studied to preserve that interest I thought I possessed in your heart; and to loose it will constitute the greatest affliction in my life: and, remembering as I do, that happiness was almost in my grasp till removed by an invisable* hand is another aggravation to my sufferings. Believe me then Charlotte, I will ever strive to deserve you, and therefore bid you adieu; with feeling, that the love I have for you will never know a change, except by increase of affection.

I have put a dash under invisable, to give you a hint.

(Signed)

E. MOSTYN JONES .

( MY VERY DEAR CHARLOTTE.

Pity the misery I feel, and strive to allay its acuteness; write to me my sweet girl and tell me that you still love me, and remove the doubts and agony your letter has thrown me into;

let me know how they found me out. And Oh! Charlotte! if you really love me, you will end sufferings I can no longer hear, by running away with me. Your father will forgive us, I know he will, and you will have, no doubt, claim on the heart of him who can never cease to love you.

Direct, Post Office, Hatfield.)

CAPTAIN THOMAS VAUGHAN . I was present at a conversation between Mr. Lovell's brother and the defendant, on the 14th of December last, at Chippenham. I went to Cole Park, by desire of the defendant, and offered to take a letter to Mr. Lovell, to let him know the state his daughter was in. The defendant had informed me she was in London, and unmarried. I had an interview with Mr. Lovell, and delivered him the letter, and broke this unpleasant business to him, and in consequence of this, I and Mr. Lovell's brother met the defendant at Chippenham. Mr. Lovell's brother requested Mr. Jones to give up his niece, and if he would do so, or say where she was in London, that he might fetch her, Mr. Lovell would enter no proceedings against him, as he wished to have his daughter. Mr. Jones refused to give her up; without Mr. Lovell came down with a settlement to pay his debts. He said he would marry her providing his debts were paid, and Mr. Lovel came down with a settlement, but he would not give her up without. Mr. Lovell returned to Cole Park. The defendant called on me on his way to town from Bath, and said he had seen Mr. Lovell with both their solicitors but they could not settle any thing, and he was on his way to town by the mail. The defendant told me he was a man of very little property, and that he had incurred some debts by this running off.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. He is a brother officer in your regiment - A. Yes; he served with me in Ireland. I understand his mother to be a respectable lady.

Q. I believe this lady's mother requested you to introduce him to her family - A. She did afterwards. I never met him at any balls.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Pray how did the defendant's introduction happen - A. He wished me to introduce him at Cirencester, which I declined, and he called on me at Chippenham, to desire me to go over with him to introduce him, which I declined. I met him at Bath races, and he wished me to introduce him. I felt a delicacy at doing so without applying to Mrs. Lovell, and I applied to her on the race course; I told her I knew very little of him, and wished to ask her permission before I introduced him. He was introduced on the race course.

MR. RICHARD BOWSHER . I am solicitor to Mr. Lovell. I have heard him examined. I was present at the interview at Bath. I met the defendant and Messrs. Walker and Lovell. I pointed out to the defendant the crime he had been guilty of in swearing a false affidavit; he said he had sworn to the best of his belief. I told him he must have made a positive affidavit that she was of age. We then entered into conversation respecting matters being arranged. Mr. Walker, the defendant's solicitor stated what I consider to be the real situation of the defendant. The property was stated to be at 500 l. per annum; consisting of a large old mansion, and a few acres of land, which a gentleman that fancied such a thing would give any thing for. I happened to know the property I believe it is let at two hundred and seventy pounds a year; and I believe there is forty or fifty acres of land, let at about two hundred pounds more, and that he had one thousand pounds more in the funds. On farther enquiry, it appeared his mother had an annuity of above one hundred and thirty pounds, payable out of the property for life. The defendant stated that his mother would wave that. I said it was necessary that it should be done in writing. On further enquiry, it turned out that Jones was only tenant for life. Mr. Lovell consented to his daughter marrying the defendant on the settlement being made, which never was done, he said he could not settle it without going to his mother.

The paragraph enclosed was produced by holding the letter to the fire.

COURT. Q. All this passed while Mr. Lovell was ignorant where his daughter was - A. Yes, he certainly talked coolly about it. If the settlement had been made he would not have objected to it.

MR. ALLEY addressed the Jury at considerable length on behalf of the defendant, pointing out the evident consent of Miss Lovell to elope with him, and the consent of Mr. Lovell to arrange the matter subsequent.

GUILTY. Aged 28.

Judgment Respited .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210411-78

EIGHTH DAY. THURSDAY, APRIL 19.

565. MARTHA KING was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of March , two pieces of ribbon, value 8 s., the goods of Jacob King , privately in his shop .

EDWARD CONNELIUS COOPER . I am shopman to Jacob King , a linen-draper , who lives in Long-acre . On the 19th of March, about one o'clock in the day, the prisoner came to buy ribbons - I did not hear her ask for them. I observed her speaking to a young man; she was about leaving the shop, I heard her say she would not buy the ribbons unless he would agree to take them back again after they were cut off, if not approved of. I suspected her, and perceived a piece of ribbon concealed in the palm of her hand; she saw that I saw it, and immediately threw it down - I seized her arm, she was very much agitated, and drew another piece from her pocket. I afterwards found another piece near her. She begged pardon, and requested we would not send for any body. She was taken into custody. The pieces of ribbon she took from her pocket were worth 5 s. 9 d.

WILLIAM NETTLETON . I took the prisoner into custody.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Of stealing, but not privately.

Confined Two Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18210411-79

566. GEORGE HUGHES and WILLIAMS ADAMS were indicted for stealing, on the 18th of March , 86 lbs. lead, value 10 s., the goods of Henry Wilson , and fixed to his dwelling-house .

GEORGE BLANDFORD . I am porter at the Gloucester coffee-house , kept by Mr. Henry Wilson, at the corner of Berkeley-street and Piccadilly . The officer brought the

prisoner back to our house with the lead. I believe it was on the 20th of March. I saw it fitted to the larder where lead had been cut from - it is part of the dwelling-house. I first missed it on the evening of the 18th. I had seen it safe in the evening of the 17th.

BENJAMIN WEBB . I am a watchman. On Sunday morning, the 18th of March, about five minutes past six o'clock, I was coming up Vigo-lane, turned round Saville-row, and saw the prisoner coming towards me, Adams had lead on his head in a bag, and Hughes had a basket under his arm. I said,

"You are the very chaps I have been looking for all the morning," Adams had passed me. I said to Hughes, I want you - he said to Adams,

"This man wants you" - Adams turned round and said he would be d - d if I should not carry the lead myself - he threw his basket of lead down and ran away - I followed him - he got away, Hughes escaped up Saville-row; next day he was brought to Malborough-street. I took Adams on the Friday following. I am sure they are the men, I knew them before, both the bag and basket contained lead. I took it to the watch-house and marked it. I was present when it was fitted to the larder - it corresponded exactly. I had left it at the watch-house with Pepper.

EDMUND PEPPER . I am a constable. I produced the lead, it weighs 86 lbs. I took it to the Gloucester Coffee-house, and fitted it - it fitted in every respect.

HUGHES'S Defence. I am innocent.

ADAMS'S Defence. I am innocent.

HUGHES - GUILTY . Aged 18.

ADAMS - GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18210411-80

567. JOSHUA ROBERTS , JUN. was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of February , three glass cruets, value 3 s. and four cruet stands, value 6 d. , the goods of Charlotte Cousins , widow .

CHARLOTTE COUSINS . I am a widow, I live at No. 8. Old Tothill-street, St. Margaret, Westminster . I keep a china shop . This property was in my shop on the 28th of February, about a quarter before nine o'clock in the evening, standing on a shew board, about three steps from the street door. I was in the parlour behind the shop. I heard a noise in the shop, and in a quarter of an hour after the prisoner was brought in with it.

GEORGE BEDFORD . I was sitting in Mrs. Cousins's parlour and saw the prisoner come in at the shop door and take the cruets which stood on the show board. I desired him to leave them alone, before he had got his hand on it, he took them off the board, and I got within a yard or two of him - he attempted to run out - he then ran, I followed and took him about twenty-five yards from the door. He threw them down. I brought him back and gave him in charge - he was never out of my sight.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. If I had thrown them away they would have been broken to pieces.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Whipped and Discharged .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18210411-81

568. THOMAS FREARSON was indicted for receiving on the 29th of January , five bushels of flour, part of the goods of which John Robinson and John Humphreys were at the last Sessions convicted of stealing, he well knowing it to have been stolen .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 64.

Confined One Month .

Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210411-82

569. WILLIAM MELLOWS was indicted for stealing on the 4th of April , two coats, value 1 l.; two pair of trowsers, value 10 s.; four shirts, value 8 s.; two handkerchiefs, value 6 d., one pair of stockings, value 6 d., one pair of shoes, value 2 s., and 4 s. in monies numbered, the goods of John Witchall 's, in the dwelling-house of Thomas Turfrey .

JOHN WITCHALLS . I live at the City of Carlisle public-house, in the parish of St. Leonard, Shoreditch , Thomas Turfrey keeps the house. I lodge in the back garret. I missed the articles stated in the indictment on Wednesday evening, the 4th of April. They were kept in a chest. I saw them all safe in my chest on Monday morning, the 4 s. was in my pocket-book, which was also in my chest, it was locked - the prisoner lived in the same room - he was a shoemaker , - I sell oysters in the street . The chest was still locked - it must have been picked, or a false key used. He left the house at half-past eight o'clock on Tuesday night, without notice. I found one coat and a pair of trowsers at the pawnbroker's. I never gave him authority to pawn them.

GEORGE BLAIN . I am a tailor, and live at No. 25, Cornwall-place. On Saturday morning, the 7th of April, the prisoner was brought to my door - the person who brought him charged him with this robbery. I searched him and found the duplicate of a coat, pawned for 15 s., and one pair of trowsers pawned on the 5th of April. I asked if the duplicates were his own, he said they did not belong to the prosecutor. I brought him to town and found the waistcoat and trowsers at the pawnbroker's.

THOMAS MARCHANT . I am apprenticed to Mr. Robinson, a pawnbroker, who lives in Bishopsgate-street. I have a coat pawned by a man for 16 s. in the name of George Cline . I have no recollection of the person. The duplicate found on the prisoner is what I gave the person.

SAMUEL CHAPMAN . I am shopman to Mr. Folkard, a pawnbroker, who lives in Providence-row, Finsbury. I have a pair of trowsers, pawned by a man (not the prisoner) on the 5th of April, for 10 s.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

THOMAS TURFREY . I keep the house. The prisoner gave me no intimation that he was going to leave - he did not settle his rent.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked them up in the street.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only.

Confined Six Months , and Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210411-83

570. DANIEL DUNN was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of February , one barge, value 20 l. the goods of Mary Saville .

MARY SAVILLE . I am a widow , and live at Mill Wall, Poplar . I had a barge there - I do not know the prisoner.

THOMAS ALLEN . I am apprenticed to Mrs. Saville. On the night of the 20th of February, I had moored her barge close by Mill Wall, and fastened her safe - she had a new headfast and could not have got off by accident. Between eight and nine o'clock the same night it was gone. I saw her afterwards high and dry, within high-water-mark, on the Greenwich side of Deptford, nearly broken up, on the premises of William Allen . The barge was in a good state for work for years, and quite unfit for breaking up.

THOMAS SAVILLE . I am the son of the prosecutrix. I saw the barge laying at Deptford creek, between nine and ten o'clock in the morning after it were missed - she was a good deal broken up. I did not at first know it, she was so altered - I went away. On the Tuesday morning Mr. Fuller told me about her. I then went and knew her to be my mothers'. The tide was running down when she was left.

MICHAEL MORRIS . I am an officer of the Shadwell office. The prisoner was apprehended and given into my custody on the 12th of March, on a charge of stealing the barge. I had no conversation about it with him. I was present at his examination before Mr. Griffiths; neither threat or promise were held out to him - what he said was taken down.

THOMAS MALLETT . I am clerk in Shadwell office. I remember the prisoner being examined on this charge. I took down what he said - neither threat or promise were held out - neither he nor the magistrate signed the examination; (reads) the prisoner says,

"I and Welch took the barge, and I sold it to Ashdown for four guineas; Welch was with me when it was sold - Welch is the man who went up and cast her off. I asked 6 l. for it - did not agree for the price till she was broken up. Welch lent a hand to break her up, and after she was broken up I came, and she was taken away; and on the Friday night, I and Ashdown made the agreement."

JOHN FULLER . I am a barge builder, and knew this barge, she was worth 15 l. when she was broken up. It was not unservicable.

GUILTY . Aged 39.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

571. DANIEL DUNN was again indicted for stealing, on the 8th of March , one boom, value 7 l. , the goods of William Curling , Jessee Curling , William Young , and George Frederick Young .

MR. G. F. YOUNG. I am in partnership with Messrs. William Curling , Jessee Curling, and William Young . We are ship-builders , and live at All Saints, Poplar .

JOHN HUTCHINGS . I am watchman to Messrs. Curling. I remember the boom being on their premises. I saw it last a little past five o'clock in the afternoon, of the 8th of March. She was made fast at both ends to our yard gate, leading to our dry dock, and was quite safe. I missed it about eleven o'clock at night, the ropes were untied, they were cast off - it must have been done designedly. I have not seen it since.

GEORGE STONEMAN . I am foreman to Messrs. Curling and Co. The boom was worth about 7 l. I found it at Greenwich, in the possession of one Allen, cut into pieces, it was an old ship's mast, but perfectly serviceable - when cut up it would not be worth half that. I am sure the pieces I saw were pieces of it - there were several ring belts and other marks by which I knew them.

THOMAS MALLETT . The prisoner was also examined on this charge. I took down what he said, it was part of the same examination; (reads) the prisoner says,

"He and another man (Welch) took the boom, that Welch cast it of the fastenings, and that he and Welch were the two who were seen towing it up the creek - that he sold it for 2 l., he wanted 2 l. 10 s. Ashdown agreed to give him 2 l., and paid him 1 l. down, and that Welch informed him were the boom was."

Prisoner's Defence. What I have done is through poverty.

GUILTY . Aged 39.

Confined Four Months , and publicly Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210411-84

572. THOMAS BRANSGROVE was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of November , 100 lbs. of lead, value 10 s. belonging to the Duke of Northumberland , and fixed to a building of his .

JOSEPH FIELD . I am a labourer, at Isleworth , I know the Duke of Northumberland's. On the morning of the 24th of November, I was at work in a garden, in Wheatley-lane, about eight o'clock. I saw the prisoner and another man come down the lane, with each a sack on his shoulder, which appeared very heavy. I watched the prisoner to the corner of the lane, he put his bag down and looked about - then took it up, and both went together towards Brentford. I followed them and sent for assistance - he stopped to rest. I followed them to Iseleworth Park - when they saw me following them, they took towards Isleworth they saw me - then threw down the bag and ran away. I did not see him again till he was taken up. I am sure the prisoner is one of the men. I knew him before. I followed them to the lodge - Neal came out and overtook the other man who has been convicted. I did not see the prisoner again till about a fortnight ago, when I took him myself, at Mr. Hunt's, a chimney-sweeper's, at Brentford. When I went to enquire for him he was denied - I found him in a bed-room. I left the bags with Winkworth.

JOHN BOUGHTON . I went in pursuit of the men. I can not swear the prisoner is one of them. I found the lead and remained with it till the constable took it. I saw it fitted to the Duke's observatory staircase - it fitted exactly, and was quite fresh cut; there was 107 lbs. in the two bags.

JOHN WENKWORTH . I am carpenter to the Duke of Northumberland. On this morning I was going home to my breakfast, about half-past eight o'clock, and met two men in the lane heavily laden, with each a bag. I will not swear the prisoner is one of them. When they came opposite me, they threw the bags down, and ran away, one was secured, and the other escaped. I fitted the lead to the staircase - it fitted the edge and was quite fresh cut - it was stolen from those premises. It is worth about 25 s. per cwt. and would take much more to repair it.

JOHN DENYER . I am a constable, I produce the lead which I compared.

RICHARD NEALE . I am steward to the Duke - the observatory is in the parish of Isleworth.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent. I was going along with Reece, he said he would pay me if I carried the bag for him, I said I would - we went up Quaker's-lane - I put it down by the wall and waited for him - then took it up; they called out Stop thief, I threw it down and ran away, being frightened.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210411-85

572. JOHN TITMOUSE and WILLIAM CLEAR was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of March , three books, value 10 s.; three pints of wine, value 6 s.; two bottles, value 3 d., the goods of William Hamilton , and two books, value 10 s. , the goods of John William Hamilton .

MR. JOHN WILLIAM HAMILTON . I lived at Clapton , in the house of Mr. William Hamilton - it is a private house; I have no knowledge of the prisoner; the house had been burnt, on the 5th of March, and these articles were there at the time of the fire. I saw the prisoner at the office with them, and knew two of the books to be mine.

CHARLES MIELL . I am a patrol of Bow-street. On the 7th of March, at a quarter before nine o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoners near Hackney new church, coming in a direct line from Clapton, towards London; they passed me, I observed they had a bundle, I returned and asked what they had, Clear said he had a bag of tools, and produced a hammer from the bag - Titmouse said nothing; he had another bag - I stopped them, put my hand to the bag, found a book and two bottles in it, there were tools besides; I then took them to a public-house, and found one book in Clear's coat, and a small book in his coat pocket. I found two small books in Titmouse's coat pocket; they were dressed as working men, and said they had been at work were the fire happened. I took them both to Mr. Hamilton - he claimed the books.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. You found they had been at work at the ruins of the fire - A. Yes, Mr. Hamilton said no doubt the books were his. I did not hear him say he could not swear to them - Titmouse gave me no account where he got them.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Clear said he saved the things out of the rubbish to take care of them - A. He said so before the magistrate.

JOHN FLETCHER . I am an auctioneer. On Tuesday, the 6th of March, I was employed to go to Clapton, by the Hand in Hand fire-office, to estimate the loss of Mr. Hamilton and Mr. Judson; Titmouse met me at Clapton by my order, and we there met Mr. Rubens, who informed me where the furniture was put. Titmouse accompanied me to take an inventory of them; we found the furniture and property, in five or six different houses. On the following morning, the prisoners went with a small caravan to collect the different articles of Mr. Judson's, to a place of safety, which they did, and in the evening of Wednesday, I saw what property of Mr. Hamilton's was saved in the opposite house; some furniture and about 100 volumes were in the green house. When they finished their work, I told them they might go; the books had not then been removed from the green-house. I left the prisoners there between five and six o'clock, and told them to go, as they had nothing more to do - they said nothing about finding any books or wine - what property was found, was to be deposited in the neighbourhood, not taken to town.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. What time in the evening would the green-house be locked - A. I do not know that there was a lock on it, the property was under the protection of the fireman - I told them they might go - Titmouse was very active.

(Property produced and sworn to. )

TITMOUSE - GUILTY . Aged 31.

CLEAR - GUILTY . Aged 37.

Confined Six Months , and publicly Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210411-86

573. EDWARD WILTSHIRE was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of February , two sheets, value 10 s. , the goods of William Crawshay , Esq. , and one pair of shoes, value 2 s., the goods of Nathaniel Child .

STEVEN LEE . I am coachman to William Crawshay , Esq. On Saturday, the 17th of February, I lost these things from the sleeping-roomover the stable, at Stoke Newington . Between six and seven o'clock in the evening, I was up in the room, the sheets were then on the bed, and the shoes by the bed side; I locked the stable door - I returned at seven o'clock, and found the sheets gone. I suspected the prisoner, as he was lurking about the gate in the day-time. I got information on Sunday, and in the evening I took him at his lodgings at Shadwell, with the shoes on his feet. I asked what he had done with the sheets, he said he had pawned them, and gave me the duplicate - I gave him in charge.

MATTHEW CHILD . I am also coachman to William Crawshay , Esq. I went home about six o'clock from the stable, and was returning about seven o'clock, my fellow servant called me up stairs - I found my shoes gone.

JOHN WORKMAN . I am a constable, and took the prisoner in custody. I went to the pawnbroker's and found the sheets - the pawnbroker was here, but I cannot find him now.

(Sheets produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was crossing the fields between six and seven o'clock, and picked up a bundle with the sheets and shoes.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Three Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210411-87

574. SAMUEL JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of February , one till, value 2 s.; one tobacco box, value 1 s.; one key, value 6 d., and the sum of 2 s. 6 d. in copper monies numbered , the goods of George Austin .

MR. ANDREWS conducted the prosecution.

GEORGE AUSTIN . I keep the Red Lion, public-house, at Enfield . On the 28th of February, about ten o'clock at night, an alarm was given, I and Barnett ran out and

overtook the prisoner about a hundred yards from the house; in bringing him back, we heard him drop something from his hand, which sounded like halfpence I took him back and gave him in charge, and then took a lanthorn and went to search for my till, which I missed from my bar; we found it laying in a ditch, and the halfpence laying by the side; a tobacco box which was lost from the till, was found in his hat, the patrol asked how he came to do it, he said if he had done wrong, he must suffer.

THOMAS BARRET . I have heard Austin's account, it is correct.

JOHN MUNT . I am hostler at the inn. I saw the prisoner standing in the passage. I put some coals on the fire, and heard a rattling in the bar like copper, I went and looked - missed the till, and saw the prisoner going off. I overtook him - he said if he had done wrong, he must suffer.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was in liquor.

GUILTY . Aged 47.

Confined Six Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210411-88

575. THOMAS BELSHAM was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of March , two shirts, value 9 s. the goods of Sarah Highfield , widow .

SARAH HIGHFIELD . I am a laundress . On the 17th of March, between three and four o'clock, I lost two shirts out of the back of my yard - they were hanging to dry.

MICHAEL BOLLAND . I saw the prisoner lurking about this place - and when the shirts were missed I suspected him, and got an officer, and we took him.

JOHN BIRD . I was sent to apprehend the prisoner, in James-street, Featherstone-street, and found the shirt hanging on the chair back drying. I asked who it belonged to? A young woman in the room said the prisoner brought it in - he said he had not got the other, but he had the duplicate of it, and took me to the pawnbroker's.

CHARLES SCOTT . I am a pawnbroker. I took the shirt in pledge from a girl.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 15.

Judgment Respited .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210411-89

576. MARY WEBB was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of March , from the person of Samuel Everett , one watch, value 2 l.; one seal, value 1 l.; one key, value 5 s.; one handkerchief, value 1 s.; 17 s. 6 d. in monies, numbered; one 20 l., and two 10 l. Bank notes, his property .

SAMUEL EVERETT . On the 19th of March, about nine o'clock, I met the prisoner, who was a stranger, and went with her in a coach to Westminster . The coachman that drove us went into a public-house, to have some drink - he opened the coach door, and when I was getting out I found I had lost my watch, and charged her with it. I took her to the watch-house, and found I had lost 17 s. 6 d. and a key. On feeling in my pocket, I also missed one 20 l., and two 10 l. notes - the 20 l. note was marked

"Cope," and the one of 10 l. also, and the other

"Alder." I described them to the constable. I had been in company with no one else. They searched her, and found the property on her. The watch was found by the coachman, the silver on her person, also the key and handkerchief. Two 10 l. notes were found under her arms, and the 20 l. note she had dropped.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. You was perfectly sober - A. When I first met her we went to two public houses. I knew perfectly well what I was about.

HENRY BETTS . I am a constable. The prisoner was brought to the watch-house about a quarter before twelve o'clock. They said the prosecutor had been robbed of his watch - the prosecutor said he had also lost some Bank notes. I proceeded to search her, and asked if she knew any thing of the money - she declared, with many oaths, that she knew nothing of it. I found under her left arm two 10 l. notes - I left the patrol in the room, and asked the prosecutor if he knew his notes - he gave me a full description of them. I searched her very close, but could not find the 20 l. note - I also found a silk handkerchief, and 17 s. in silver on her. The prosecutor said it was part of the 1 l. note which he had changed.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you observe him - A. He had been making tree, but knew what he was about. She said she picked the notes up in the coach.

WILLIAM GOUGH . I am a patrol - I took the prisoner to the watch-house, and saw her pull the two 10 l. notes from her bosom - and while she was putting her clothes on, I saw her drop the 20 l. note from between her fingers.

JOHN SQUIRES . I am a watchman - the prisoner was brought to me - I took her to the watch-house.

SAMUEL EVERETT . The notes are mine, and have my writing on them.

Prisoner's Defence. He gave me the notes.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210411-90

577. FREDERICK CLAYTON was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of February , one sheet, value 12 s., the goods of James Strong , from the person of Ann Eliza Strong .

ANN ELIZA STRONG . On the 24th of February, about half-past six o'clock, I was taking a basket of clothes home, a sheet laid at the top of them. I was in Jermyn-street . I went into the paved yard before No. 24; two men came in after me. One took the sheet and gave it to the prisoner, who put it under his arm and ran away. I ran after him, crying Stop thief! He dropped it, and was taken, without my losing sight of him.

THOMAS RAGLISS . I live in Piccadilly, I heard a noise, opened the door, and saw the prisoner drop a sheet - I picked it up.

JAMES WINSTANLEY . I heard the alarm, and secured the prisoner.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A man threw it into the road - I picked it up.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Three Months and Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210411-91

578. CAROLINE CASTLE was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of February , fifteen shillings in monies, numbered, and one 1 l. Bank note , the property of William Moore .

WILLIAM MOORE . I am a salesman , and live in Church-lane, in the Strand . On the 23d of February, between eight and nine o'clock, the prisoner came into my shop, and asked if my wife was at home. I replied she was not. She said she wanted to see her. I desired her to walk in the parlour, as she would soon be in. She did so - she sat on the left hand side of the fire-place. A few minutes after a person came in and paid me 1 l. 15 s., I left the money on the table, while I shewed him to the door. I returned and took the money off the table, and placed it on the mantle-piece, in a mug. A person then came in, and while I was attending him, I saw her move from the left side of the fire to the right. She then took the opportunity of taking the money out of the mug. I heard her say to my daughter,

"Tell your mother I shall be in in two or three minutes, when she comes in." Nobody was in the room but my daughter and her. The prisoner went out, but returned in twenty minutes. I have not recovered the money.

JANE MOORE . I am the daughter of the last witness. The prisoner was in the room, at the time she got up, and sat on the other side and took the money out of the mug, and put it under her sleeve. I heard it jingle. She said she would return soon. I went to tell my father, but she was gone down the steps. She lived in the next house. I went for her - she came in about five minutes, and said, she had not got it. While my mother was gone for a constable, she attempted to get out, but I prevented her.

JURY. Q. Why not stop her when she took it - A. She was gone before I could tell my father.

HENRY GROVE . I took her in custody. I found nothing on her.

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutor called me in, and gave this girl sixpence to fetch gin - his wife and he had a glass. The girl said if I went away her father would beat her, for bringing 3 1/2 d. gin instead of 4 d. Presently they charged me with this. I never saw it.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210411-92

579. THOMAS ROGERS was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of March , two blankets, value 6 s., and one saucepan, value 1 s., the goods of John Best , in a lodging-room .

JOHN BEST . I live in Clement's-lane, Clare-market - I let the prisoner a room at five shillings per week, about the latter end of February - and about the 5th of March, I missed him, broke the door open, and missed the things. I found him at St. Giles's work-house, and had him apprehended. I said I was come for my key, he took me to a lodging in Parker-street, Drury-lane. I found one of my blankets in the room, and a spoon and an iron.

WILLIAM CAMPBELL . I took the prisoner into custody, and found part of the property in Parker-street, which he said was his lodging, and he intended to return them when he got work.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I could not pay the rent, and took a cheaper room.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Confined Three Months , and Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210411-93

580. WILLIAM CAMDEN and JOHN BURN were indicted for stealing, on the 9th of March , ten yards of cotton, value 10 s. , the goods of Richard Darwell .

JAMES LANCASTER . I am shopman to Mr. Richard Darwell , a linen-draper , who lives at Cock-hill, Ratcliff . On the 9th of march, at a quarter past eight o'clock at night, Brown informed me two persons had taken a piece of print from the door. I pursued the prisoners, and overtook Camden. Brown said he was an accomplice with Burn. I charged him with it - he denied all knowledge of it. I gave him in charge.

CHARLES BROWN . I was going by Darwell's shop, and saw the prisoners and another opposite the shop. Burn crossed over and took a piece of print from the door, and ran towards Shadwell-office. I went in and told them. I and Lancaster went towards Shadwell-office, and coming back met the prisoners, one on each side of the way. He took Camden, and Burn got away. I knew Burn before, and am sure they are the men.

JOSEPH EDNEY . On the 9th of March, between eight and nine o'clock, I stood at my father's door, which is within four doors from Mr. Darwell's, and saw a piece of paper with 10 d. marked on it. I picked it up, looked further, behind a hatch-door of the next house, and found a piece of print, which Darwell claimed.

JOHN BROWN. I apprehended Burn on the Sunday following.

CAMDEN'S Defence. I was coming by the house, and was taken.

CAMDEN - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined Three Months and Whipped .

BURN - GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210411-94

581. EDWARD CHIDLEY and JOHN BROWN were indicted for stealing, on the 12th of March , one gown, value 10 s., and one pelisse, value 1 l. , the goods of Eliza Mears .

ELIZA MEARS . I lived servant with Mr. Dyer. On the 12th of March I missed my gown and pelisse, from a closet at the back of the house, which leads into the Park. The prisoners are strangers to me. I found the pelisse at Neat's. I missed them between seven and eight o'clock.

GEORGE PICKETT . I am a pawnbroker. I took a pelisse in pledge - on the 12th of March, in the evening. I am not certain who I took it of - it was pledged in the name of Gibbon. Either she or Enwright pawned it. She was in the habit of pawning for Gibbon.

ELIZA RYAN . I am an unfortunate woman. Chidley gave the duplicate of this pelisse into my hands. This is all I know.

Cross-examined by MR. PLATT. Q. You were taken into custody about this - A. Yes. The duplicate was found pinned under my stays, at the watch-house. I am positive he gave it to me.

Q. You was once in Newgate - A. Yes; and turned out on proclamation. I have only been charged with robbery three times. I was present when Brown sent Enwright to pawn it - she lived with me as a servant.

MARY ENWRIGHT . I am eleven years old. Mrs. Ryan sent me to pawn a gown, and when I came back, Chidley put a brown pelisse in my apron, and told me to pawn it. I did so - and he gave the ticket to Mrs. Ryan.

Cross-examined. Q. Does not Ryan go by the name of Gibbons - A. Yes.

SAMUEL PLANK . I was informed of this robbery, and took Ryan - she denied it, and said the duplicate was at home in her stays, and that Chidley gave it to Enwright to pawn. I went to Calmell-buildings, and took the prisoners into custody. Enwright, in their presence, denied pawning it, but in their absence she said she did.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210411-95

582. SAMUEL HILL and WILLIAM GILBERT were indicted for stealing, on the 2d of February , seven pewter pots, value 7 s., the goods of Edmund Butt ; three pewter pots, value 3 s., the goods of Thomas Mills ; three pewter pots, value 3 s., the goods of John Brown ; one pewter pot, value 1 s., the goods of John James ; one pewter pot, value 1 s., the goods of Jeremiah Bell ; and one pewter pot, value 1 s. , the goods of James Clark .

EDMUND BUTT . I keep the Black Cap, public-house, at Camden-town . I know the prisoners. On Friday morning, the 2d of March, about eight o'clock, Bradley came to me, and said, two boys were stealing my pots. I came up with the prisoners about half a mile from my house, going into Somers-town. They both had pots. Just before I came up with them, I saw Gilbert give a string of pots to Hill to carry. I took hold of Hill, and asked what he was going to do with the pots - he said to take them home to scour them. I never employed him to do it - he had seventeen in all. There were three quart pots, and four pint pots of mine, with my name on them. He did not say where he lived. A man who is not here, assisted me in bringing them back. One of the pint pots had only been bought the day before.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Gilbert shifted the pots to Hill, as you went up - A. Yes. I had them in sight about three minutes - they were in company together.

THOMAS MILLS . I keep the Gate, public-house, in Frederick-place, Hampstead-road . When the prisoners were taken, three of the pots found on them were mine, and had my name on them - they had no business with them.

JOHN BROWN. I keep the New Southampton Arms, public-house, in Camden-town . Two or three of the pots are mine, and had my name on them - the prisoners were not authorized to take them.

JOHN JAMES . I keep the Bedford Arms, in Camden-town . I found a quart pot of mine among those found on the prisoners - I never desired them to clean them.

JEREMIAH BELL . I keep the Globe public-house, London-street, Fitzroy-square . I do not know the prisoners. One quart pot is mine - I never authorized them to take it to clean.

JAMES CLARK . I keep the Camden Head, Camden town . The prisoners were brought to my house with the pots - one of mine was amongst them, and has my name on it - they were never authorized to take it. I know one of them, by seeing him singing in the street.

JAMES BRADLEY . I live at Mr. Wood's, Pleasant-row, Camden-town. I was in Baker-street. I saw the prisoners with some pots on a leather strap on their backs. I watched, and saw them go to No. 28, a private house, and take a pint pot off the rails - they then went to No. 30, where there were three pots on the rails - they took one of them. They then went to No. 35. and took one pot from there - then to No. 37, and took one. I saw the road they took, and told Butt what I had seen. We followed them to several houses in Somers town. They were secured - they had seventeen pots in all. They said they were going to take them to scour them.

JOHN DAVIES . I am a Bow-street officer. The prisoners were delivered to me - I live in the neighbourhood.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GILBERT'S Defence. I was out of employ.

GILBERT - GUILTY . Aged 27.

Confined one year and twice publicly Whipped .

HILL - GUILTY . Aged 15.

Confined one year and Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210411-96

583. JAMES BRAY was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of February , one coat, value 30 s. , the goods of John Young .

JOHN YOUNG . I live at No. 39, Upper Gower-street ; this coat was in my bed-room closet - it was my own coat; the prisoner was my servant . I do not think I had seen it for three or four weeks before it was missed, as I went into mourning. I had given him warning to leave on Monday - but he left me on Saturday, the 17th of February; he had told my wife two days before, that he should go on Saturday. I did not pay him on Saturday, but desired him to come on Monday; he he came on Monday, about nine o'clock at night, and in consequence of what I heard, I accused him of having taken my coat - he denied it at first, I said

"James you know, I know you to be a thief, and I will send for the watchman;" he then burst out crying, and said he had taken it, and if I sent the cook to his lodgings, she would have it. I went with the watchman by his direction to a house in Upper Norton-street, and found the coat. I found it so altered I could not swear to it, but he told me he had taken it to a tailor, and had a velvet collar put on and other buttons - I never gave him the coat.

WILLIAM LOVELL . I am a tailor; the prisoner brought me the coat about the 8th or the 9th of February; it had been very little worn - he was then living with Mr. Young. I put new buttons to it, and a velvet collar; the buttons on it before were plain gilt, I put the same sort on, and altered it to fit him - he said he bought it for about 30 s. but did not say of whom - I saw the coat at Marlborough-street - it is the same.

ROBERT WOOD . I am a tailor. I have every reason to believe I made this coat for Mr. Young - I always work for him; it has since been made less in the body, and about the shoulders.

WILLIAM CAPE . I am a watchman. I took charge of the prisoner, Mr. Young accused him of stealing his coat - he cried, and as I took him to the watch-house he said distress drove him to do it. Next morning, I went with Mr. Young to No. 2, Upper Norton-street, and found the coat hanging on a chair in the bed-room - I heard him say he lodged there.

CHARLES COUSINS . I was officer of the night. Cap delivered the coat to me. I produce it.

WILLIAM LAVELL . It is the coat I altered for him.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought it of a Jew for 30 s.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined Six Months and Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210411-97

583. JAMES KNIGHT was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of March , one watch, value 5 l.; three seals, value 30 s., and one key, value 1 s., the goods of Thomas Lewis , from his person , and MARY ANN SHEARMAN , was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, knowing it to he stolen .

THOMAS LEWIS . I live at Chiswick. On Saturday, the 31st of March, I lived at No. 22, Hill-street, Berkley-square, in Mr. Pain's service. I had been to Portman-square, a few minutes after nine o'clock at night, and as I returned down Orchard-street , just before I came to Somerset-street, I met the prisoner - he was alone; just as I came within a yard of him, he made a bolt at me, ran his breast against mine, which staggered me - I saw my watch going from me, nobody was near enough to take it but the prisoner - my wife was with me. It was a silver hunting watch, I gave seven guineas for it, it is worth 5 l. I had three gold seals worth 1 l., and a gold key. I followed in an instant, he turned down Calmell-buildings, and got to the bottom; I saw a woman in the court - I saw his hand go towards her hand, and at the moment I was in the act of seizing him, we both fell. I got up and collared him, a watchman came up, and immediately as I collared him, the female prisoner came up, and said,

"what are you at? that is my husband, I have not left him ten minutes;" she was dressed the same, and was the same in appearance as the woman. I have never seen my watch since. It was not half a minute from the time I saw his hand touch the woman till I took him. I took Knight by the watchman's assistance, but the woman was not taken till Monday; she followed us to the watch-house, and was searched there that night.

Q. Did she follow you instantly - A. She got there nearly as soon as us, but which way she came I cannot say. On the Monday following, I had occasion to go to Portman-square, and met her - she stopped me herself; I was not aware that she was by me, she said,

"I beg your pardon, Sir - are you not the gentleman who lost the watch on Saturday night" - I said I was; she asked if I would persevere in prosecuting the prisoner, if I got the watch restored to me; I said I would make no proposals, till I saw the watch. She then asked where I lived - I told her; she said she would bring it me in half an hour, that she had got 14 s. of a person, and that would obtain it - she left me. I then went to the watch-house to tell them, and just as we got near the watch-house, Coates took her.

KNIGHT. Q. Did you not say I put my hand out to to the woman, at the time I was on the ground - A. I said, just in the act of falling, he put his hand out to her before he fell.

THOMAS KINDER . I am a plumber, painter and glazier. I was going down Orchard-street, about nine o'clock at night, on the 31st of March, and saw a man run against Lewis, and take his watch out of his fob. I saw the prisoner run away and go down Calmell-buildings to the bottom - Mr. Lewis stopped him; I saw a crowd come up - there was a woman there. I saw the prisoner put his hand behind his back - a woman was behind him. I cannot say who it was - not whether he parted with anything; the watchman came up and took him - I followed him to the watch-house; the female prisoner came to the watch-house - she said she was his wife.

RICHARD COATES . I am a constable of the night; both the prisoners were brought to the watch-house. I searched, but found nothing on them - we let the woman go. On the Monday, she came to me again, and asked, if I thought the prosecutor would make it up, if she could get the watch, as she had heard, somebody had picked it up. I told her to get it; she came back without it, and said she could not find the person, but she would go again. I followed her to Gee's-court, and into Henrietta-street. I saw her stop with a man - I suspected something, and apprehended her.

KNIGHT'S Defence. I was coming up Orchard-street, and went into Calmell-buildings, to buy some tobacco, and as I returned, heard the cry of Stop thief! - somebody passed me. I ran in pursuit, and at the end of the court, fell over some rubbish - Lewis fell over me, said I was the thief, and took me; the young woman by me, went to the watch-house with us. Lewis said when I came here, I should be hung, and that greatly alarmed me; he said if the watch was brought forward, I should be discharged; so I sent this woman to enquire for it, that I might be saved from condign punishment - I gave her what money I had to get it.

JURY to COATES. Q. Did you find any tobacco on him - A. None.

SHEARMAN'S Defence. I met the prosecutor, and asked him to describe the watch, and told him Knight desired me to get it down the buildings.

KNIGHT - GUILTY . Aged 40.

Transported for Life .

SHEARMAN - NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210411-98

584. WILLIAM KERBY was indicted for embezzlement .

MR. LAW conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM FEARMAN . The prisoner was in my service. I commenced business about February, 1818; he was at that time my shopman , and collecting clerk , entrusted to receive money and effects for me, and was to account to me immediately on the receipt of them; he left me in June, 1820. Thomas Coakley was in partnership with me till the 26th of October, 1819. In October, 1819, Mr. Robert Stodhart was a debtor of mine, of 6 l. 10 s. 10 d. I never received that sum - it was due to the partnership. Coakley never interfered in the concern; I never received this money, nor any draft for it, either from Mr. Stodhart or the prisoner.

Q. Look at this letter, and tell me whose writing it is - A. It is the prisoner's. I know it well, he left me very unwell. I received this letter on the 27th of June, 1820, and took out a warrant against him about that time. When he left me, I had a Mr. Smart to succeed him, for a short time.

Q. Look at this receipt - whose writing is it - A. The prisoner's, Mr. Stodhart shewed it to me, about the time that I took out the warrant, and after the prisoner left me. I am not indebted to the prisoner.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Is Mr. Coakley alive or dead - A. He died about six months ago. There was a dispute between us at one time, but a dissolution took place - we had nothing to do with law after the dissolution.

Q. Do you know that Mr. Coakley warned the prisoner not to pay over any money, till the dispute was ended - A. I never knew it; he never interfered. When the dispute happened, Mr. Coakley consulted a Mr. Bull - I believe he demanded 300 l.

Q. Now, I put it to you again, and desire you will never cautiously. Did not Mr. Coakley and his solicitor, tell you, no more money should be paid to you by the collector, till you satisfied his demand - A. Never, Mr. Bull is not carrying on a lawsuit against me now. There was an arrangement when the dissolution took place - 100 l. was paid over.

Q.Was the prisoner a person who went backwards and forwards between you, Coakley, and Mr. Bull - A. I do not know that ever he went.

Q. Are you aware that you are a witness on your oath - A. Yes; the unpleasant manner in which you put your questions, induces me to say I will not answer any more.

COURT. The Court will decide what are legal questions, and if they are legal, you are bound to answer; the Counsel has a right to pursue his instructions - if questions are illegal the Court will interfere.

MR. ANDREWS. Q. Now, Sir, was not the prisoner sent again, and again, between you and Mr. Coakley, to the solicitor who arranged the business between you - A. I do not recollect ever sending him, the business was arranged by my solicitor. I kept the books. Kirby sometimes made an entry, he was the only person appointed to collect booksellers' bills. Mr. Stodhart is a bookseller. When the prisoner received money, it was his duty to enter it - if I was there he sometimes gave the money to me. I have the cash-book here, there is no entry of this money in it. When I observed the money unpaid, I credited Mr. Stodhart in my ledger in these words,

"Cash paid to Kirby."

Q. Where is the pocket-ledger which the prisoner used to carry about to collect it - A. I believe it is in the library, it is a book of no consequence - I have brought all the books that are necessary. I have not got it here.

Q. Has it happened to you to burn any books, or were they burnt by accident - A. No; no book has been burnt by accident or design. The receipt is dated the 16th of October, 1819. Coakley was alive when I discovered this money was paid. I did not go to Mr. Coakley to represent to him any thing about debts being stopped in the hands of the collector. I took out a warrant against the prisoner shortly after I discovered it. Lavender or Bishop had it to execute - I do not know when he was taken. I went before the Grand Jury last Sessions - I was not aware that I could go before the Grand Jury till he was apprehended.

Q. Now, on your oath, did you not know where to find the prisoner from the time he left you as well as you knew where to find the Sessions-house, in the Old Bailey - A. On my solemn oath I did not - his letter was dated from Lumber-court. On my oath I do not know where he lived, I never met him to my knowledge.

MR. LAW. Q.Was Coakley an acting or sleeping partner - A. A sleeping partner. The prisoner was to account to me and not to him - the book is one he entered names in of persons he had to collect from - it was his own memorandum book. This was discovered subsequent to the dissolution. I kept the partnership's book - Coakley had nothing to do with them.

The receipt was then put in and read, dated the 16th of October, 1819, and signed William Kirby , also the following letters:

JUNE, 27, 1820.

SIR, - I am extremely sorry for my ill conduct to one, I must say, who always treated me with the greatest kindness. I am also sorry to say I cannot make a friend to pay you the money I have so unjustly made free with; but should it meet your approbation to continue me in your employ, depend it shall be my constant study to give you general satisfaction. I should be happy to pay you ten shillings per week, and should you be pleased to advance my salary, I will then pay you more; other-ways than this I have no means whatever, I wish to God I had.

I remain yours very respectfully,

W. KIRBY.

11, Gray place.

To Mr. Fearman.

5, LUMBER-COURT, SEVEN DIALS.

To Charles Gaines , Esq.

HONOURED SIR, - I most humbly beg to solicit your kindness towards me, respecting Mr. Fearman's business, if you will prevail on Mr. F. to withhold the warrant for one month, I shall say you are the preserver of my life, and it will enable me to repay that that I have so unjustly made free with. My proposals are as follows: in the first month (or at least the expiration of) I will give Mr. Fearman from five to ten pounds, and then I will give him half a guinea per week until the whole is paid or my own bills for the account. I beg to observe that I do not limit myself exactly to the above sums as probably I can pay more, but depend on it, I declare most solemnly that I will pay the above, should it meet Mr. Fearman's kind approbation. I must beg pardon for not giving a correct statement of the accounts at first, but I hope you will make some allowance for the state my mind was in at the time.

Sir, I remain yours most respectfully,

Sunday, August 26, 1820.

W. KIRBY.

MR. ROBERT STODHART . I am a bookseller, and live in the Strand - the prisoner gave me this receipt on my paying him the account due to Mr. Fearman. I gave him a check on Messrs. Lubbocks for 6 l. 10 s. 1 d. on account of Mr. Fearman, the check was returned as paid by my bankers. I have burnt it.

Q. I suppose you have no account of it on your duplicate check - A. I have not looked for it. I keep short accounts of checks. I never saw Mr. Coakley to my knowledge. I never heard his name before - nobody ever called to tell me not to pay Mr. Fearman, nor was any notice left with me.

JAMES BEVAN . I am clerk to Messrs. Lubbocks. I turned to Mr. Stodhart's account, and found, on the 16th of October, 1819, an entry of a draft for 6 l. 10 s. 1 d. paid in the name of Kirby. I gave him six 1 l. notes, 10 s. 1 d. that is the entry.

Cross-examined. Q. You have no recollection of the person who received it - A. Not the smallest - Kirby is the name the person gave. I made the entry myself.

Prisoner's Defence. I beg to say I particularly wished Mr. Fearman to bring all his books, and sent him a letter

to that effect, telling him they were necessary to establish my innocence, particularly a red book which he well knows that he burnt before me, with an intent to defraud his partner, and laughed at the idea of it; also a green book in which I entered money I received. I frequently collected perhaps 29 l. in a day, and laid out 25 l. All the money in the concern was Mr. Coakley's. I kept the business together - I wanted 100 l. a year, he gave me 30 s. a week. I was to be advanced as business increased, but I never had that honour, though I made his business to exceed 1000 l. a year, and was always considered to be Mr. Fearman, and was sent by him to attend the opera, and visited every place of amusement with him, and he promised me part of his business. When I left him I was confined by illness, and I told him I was going to live with Mr. Parkes, in Dean-street, Soho; he knew I lived at this house for six months, and never slept from it - I went out every morning to my business. I was told he had a warrant out against me, but knowing my innocence I never absconded. He frequently met me and turned round to look at me, and why not take me, but no, he had not then proved that inveteracy against me which he is so capable of. When his partner died he knew his friends would enter an action against him for burning the old books and making new ones, and at that time I did not countenance him as I did before, and he did not take me to places of amusement as before. I was appointed arbitrator between him and his partner. I met him one night to investigate the books - he bought a new cash book, and said,

"Now I will do them for all their deepness" - he got me to call over the sums - he entered the large ones in the new book, and left out the small ones, then burnt the book. His poor partner was in a dreadful state of mind and came to the shop - he told him the concern was going to the devil, and the business was worth nothing, when it was worth 1000 l. He frequently told me to turn him out of the shop. When he came to enquire when his partner died, and he found I would not countenance him, he charged me with embezzlement. I trust the Court will see this is as great a conspiracy as was ever heard of. I declare my innocence.

WILLIAM GAUNT . I am a surgeon, and live in Grafton-street, East, Fitzroy-square. I knew the prisoner about the latter end of 1820. He was confined for some months, being lame - he lived in Gray-street, Manchester-square. I visited him from March to June, and saw him many times after at my house; he was about in our part of the town. When he left Mr. Fearman, he lived in Dean-street, Soho. I never saw him in Grey-street, after he left.

MR. FEARMAN. I have heard the prisoner's defence, on my solemn oath, there is no truth in it. I never burnt any books, there are the books from the beginning of the concern.

GUILTY . Aged 34.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210411-99

NINTH DAY. SATURDAY, APRIL 21.

585. JOHN PYNE was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of March , 2 lbs. of coffee, value 2 s. , the goods of our Lord the King .

TWO OTHER COUNTS, stating it to be the property of different persons.

MESSRS. REYNOLDS, BOLLAND, and WALFORD, conducted the prosecution.

JOHN WELLS . I am a foreman in the West India Dock , Royce is also a foreman in the coffee department. On the 29th of March he was employed in the east warehouse, and had access to what was called the further east warehouse. Some coffee was in the east part of No. 1, warehouse - it had come by the Havannah. I saw the bags perfectly safe in the morning, just before. I examined a bag, and found it had been cut - the cut, which was at the top of the bag, was about six inches long - it appeared to have been plundered. I went to Mr. Royce, and he kept watch. I afterwards saw the prisoner in custody at the front door of the east wing. I said to him

"Oh, Pyne, shame on you, what have you been doing?" I saw the coffee taken from his pocket. I believe he took it from his pocket himself. There was about 2 lbs. of it.

Cross-examined by MR. DOWLING. Q. What was he - A. An Excise weigher . There were other persons about the warehouse. The coffee bags had been there ever since July. I saw them safe about ten o'clock in the morning - they stood in rather a dark place. I saw the prisoner in this warehouse.

AARON ROYCE . I am foreman of the coffee warehouse. Between one and four o'clock I was placed to watch the warehouse, and saw the prisoner between two and three o'clock coming from the inner east passage; when he came to one of the bags he stopped, turned himself round, leaned over the bag, and appeared to be taking coffee out - he stood there about two minutes, and then returned the same way he came; I then went and examined the bag, it appeared to have been disturbed. I gave information, and he was taken.

Cross-examined. Q. How many were employed in the warehouse - A. About thirty. I was about eighteen yards from the bags. I saw no coffee on the floor - there was a deficiency of 5 lbs. in the taring weight.

DANIEL TALMEDGE . I am a constable. On the 29th of March I was on duty, and took the prisoner into custody, standing on the quay in front of the warehouse, No. 1. I found two pounds of coffee in his coat pocket - he said it was coffee sweepings, and desired me not to take notice of it, as he had a very large family - I have a sample from the bag also; he said he intended to put it into the bag he thought it came out of.

JOHN WELLS . I am responsible for the coffee; the sample corresponds - it was in my care.

Cross-examined. Q. You speak to it from its similarity A. Yes; there is a great deal comes from the Havannah, there may be two bags alike, but in general they are very different. He had no business with any coffee whatever.

Prisoner's Defence. I have been many years in the Customs, and was transferred to the Excise; in execution of my duty I gathered up what loose coffee there was to put into the packages. I put it into my pocket, not with intent to take it - for I would not forfeit that solemn oath I took when I had my place.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Confined six Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18210411-100

586. SAMUEL AYLETT was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of February , two handkerchiefs, value 4 s., and fifteen quarts of wine, value 30 s., the goods of Henry Revell Reynolds , Sen. Esq. and one cravat, value 2 s. , the goods of Henry Revell Reynolds , junior .

MR. WALFORD conducted the prosecution.

H. R. REYNOLDS, ESQ. I am a barrister , and live in Bedford-row . The prisoner was in my service, as footman , for about fifteen months. In consequence of suspicion, on a Friday, about the middle of February, I sent him out on a message, and in his absence went down to his apartment, where he slept. It was below, and he was the only servant who slept below. On searching this apartment, I found a silk pocket handkerchief of mine in the recess where his bed was, and a cravat of my son's, who was at that time at Cambridge. He had been there about ten days. I have also missed wine and spirits from the cellar. I got Ruthven, the officer, to come in the evening, and went out with him to a mews, at the back of John-street, Bedford-row, to a laundress.

BENJAMIN ROBERT STRANGE . I am turned nine years of age. I go to church, have learnt my catechism, it is a bad thing to tell a lie. I believe God will punish wicked persons in the next world (sworn). I know the prisoner. I went to Mr. Reynolds's house, to fetch some linen from the prisoner, just before he was taken up. I brought it home to my mother to wash. I gave her the same he gave me.

ANN STRANGE . I live at No. 8, John's Mews. I have washed for the prisoner a long time. Shortly before he was taken up. I sent my little boy to him for his linen - he brought it. Mr. Reynolds and Ruthven came to my house soon afterwards. I shewed them a neckcloth and silk handkerchief, which Mr. Reynolds claimed - they were part of what my son brought me.

H. R. REYNOLDS, ESQ. (re-examined.) I selected a cravat of my own, and a handkerchief of my son's, and gave them to Ruthven, and returned to my house with him. The prisoner opened the door to us. I told him Ruthven was an officer, that I suspected him of stealing my linen and wine, and he must search him. He made no objection, but went down with us to his room. Ruthven searched, and somewhere found a third handkerchief, the one I had seen by the bed in the morning was gone. On looking at it, I found it marked H. R. R. I asked him how he came by it - he said I gave it him, which was certainly not so. Ruthven opened his box, and somewhere found a key. He asked the prisoner what key it was; he said it belonged to his son. I tried that key, and found it opened my library table, in which I keep my cellar keys. He knew I kept them there, and has seen me take them out from there. I had missed wine before. I came down and told him it was now clear to me how he had got the wine and spirits, which I had often smelt him to have been drinking. He said,

"Well, if I have had wine and spirits, it is impossible I could get through the hard work of your place upon small beer." In November last I had fifteen dozen bottles of a particular Port sent into my back cellar, of which I had at that time used but two bottles - it was not the cellar in which the wine in drink was kept. I examined the quantity left, about two days after the prisoner was apprehended, and then found only eight dozen and a half left. I missed about six dozen. That wine could not be got at without a false key to my cellar, or a false key to the drawer in which the cellar key was kept. There was not the least appearance of force being used to the cellar. I attended the examination before the magistrate - what he said was not taken down. After the examination of myself, the magistrate asked if he would put any questions to me - he said,

"I am sorry for what I have done, but I have not taken so much wine as my master supposes."

GEORGE RUTHVEN . I am an officer of Bow-street. I was fetched to Mr. Reynolds's, and produce two handkerchiefs found at the laundress's. Mr. Reynolds took them off the horse. I then went back, and searched the prisoner's room, in his presence, and found this handkerchief between the mattress and sacking. I found a neckcloth in the dirty clothes bag, in his room. He said the one I found under the bed was his; and when Mr. Reynolds came down he said he gave it him. Mr. Reynolds denied it. I found a key in the prisoner's box, which he said belonged to a box he had in the City. I asked where? - I pressed the question. He then said it belonged to a box of his son's, at No. 16, Castle-street, Southwark. He then said it was No. 26. I went and found his son either at No. 25, or No. 27 - The key would open no box there.

MR. REYNOLDS. I found in the back part adjoining the cellar, two or three dozen empty bottles, marked the same as the wine I lost - I had no others marked that way.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The handkerchief found in my bed I took out of my master's coat pocket, when I brushed it, and forgot to take it up. I found Mr. Reynold's son's handkerchief in his pocket, and forgot to give it to the housemaid.

GUILTY . Aged 38.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210411-101

587. WILLIAM HOLMAN and HENRY DAVIDGE were indicted for stealing, on the 15th of February , 150 slates, value 12 s. , the goods of John Campbell .

JOHN CAMPBELL . I am a slater . I was slating Mr. Jay's house, at Kilburn . Holman was employed by me at the building. Davidge was a bricklayer . I had some information from Hathaway, and sent him to get a search warrant.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. The slates were very old - A. No; I never gave him leave to take them in lieu of mortar.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did you not have them from another buildings - A. They had been used at Highbury, but were not old. I had bought the old materials, to use such as were serviceable. I do not know that Davidge's ladders or scaffoldings were used in the building. Holman did the work for me.

JOHN HATHAWAY . I am Mr. Campbell's brother-in-law. Mr. Hussey gave me information, and I informed my brother. A search warrant was taken out. On Monday, the 19th of February, I went to Davidge's premises, at

Hampstead-hill. He was not at home. I found some slates there - I knew them to be my brother-in-law's. I had loaded them into a cart, to be sent to Jay's - they were the very same sort. When I found them at Davidge's, they were covered over with a kind of shutter - it did not conceal them - he was taken to Bow-street the same day. They might be worth 4 s. or 5 s. - but I have sold them out at my brother's, at 12 s. per 100. There were about one hundred and fifty.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Why are they worth only 5 s. - A. They are old. I never heard that they were given to him - it is usual for slaters to use what scaffolding is at the building. I never heard of their making a compensation for it. We do not allow the men to give them away.

MARTIN HUSSEY . I am sixteen years old, and am apprentice to Mr. Campbell. I was employed in carrying up the slates, in October. The prisoner Holman sat me to work at one end of the roof, and went down the ladder to the other end, and put a tier and a half of slates into Davidge's cart - he lived at Hampstead. I told my master of it in February, when he asked me about it. I had no quarrel with Holman. I went to work with him at Camden-town, and he said if it came to his master's ears he would turn him away, and give him a bad character - and when I came into the shop afterwards, the men would be always drilling me, and I should never learn my trade. He told me not to tell of it.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. Who drove the cart - A. Randall. We had no quarrel at all, he might have been swearing at me, and wanting me to do more work than I ought.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did Holman put the slates in - A. Both of them. Davidge's ladders had been used while we were there. I told two men of it when it happened. They are not here.

JOHN RANDALL . I was in Davidge's employ, and worked with him at the building. I took the slates away in his cart, to his yard. I think he, Holman, and myself put them in. I was to be apprenticed to him if I liked the business - but I did not.

Q. Did you leave him out of ill will - A. He told the men he would not pay me. I said I would leave - and he said I might. I knew nothing about this till I was fetched to Bow-street.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Were they old slates - A. Yes. A good many of them were broken. Davidge's ladders and scaffolding were used at the back of the building. I heard my master say he wanted some old pieces of slate. Holman managed the business, and had both mortar and ladders from my master. These slates were picked up as pieces - all the men were at work when they were put in the cart.

THOMAS HUNT . I am a constable. I went with a search warrant, and found these slates. Some were broken, and some whole - most of them were broken. I apprehended Davidge the same day, the 19th of February. He said he let them have some loads of mortar for them. I know him well - he bears a good character.

CHARLES ADAMS . I am a constable. I was with Hunt.

JOHN SMITH . I am a constable. I took Holman, at work, near Bedford-square. He said he gave Davidge some pieces of slate, which were useless.

HOLMAN'S Defence. What I did I considered for my master's good. I gave the slates for the use of mortar and scaffolding.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210411-102

588. MICHAEL TWYCROSS was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of March , 94 lbs. of roll brass, value 4 l., and forty files, value 12 s. , the goods of Edward Keats .

MR. BARRY conducted the prosecution.

EDWARD KEATS . I am a watchmaker and brass-founder , in St. John-street . I missed the property about March last, and employed Ellis the watchman. I had reason to suspect one of the boys. I went with Ellis to an old iron shop, kept by the prisoner on Saffron-hill - his name was over the door. Ellis went behind the counter, and handed me up a roll of brass, it weighed about 50 lbs. - and in the parlour another roll was found, about the same weight. It was new brass, and I am certain it is mine - it is worth 1 s. 3 d. per pound. I told him it was mine - he said it was not; that he had bought it of a gentleman who was distressed for money, to make up a bill. He said it was a pity to deprive him of his liberty, and I might take the property back. In consequence of something Ellis asked him if he knew my boy - he said he did not. My boy Warner was there at the time, in custody.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Did not the boy say he carried it to the prisoner - A. He said he gave it him in his master's shop.

JAMES ELLIS . I belong to Bow-street. I was employed by Mr. Keats on the 7th of March, in the morning. I followed Warner from Mr. Keats's to the prisoner house, on Saffron-hill. He had made several halts and turns, and looked round as if he thought he was watched. He turned suddenly back on Saffron-hill, and I went into a house, that he might not suspect me. I lost him for about ten minutes - then saw him come out of the prisoner's house. He went a few doors down the street, into a shoemaker's, and the prisoner followed him - and in a few minutes came out. I saw nothing with him. Next day I followed the boy again, from his master's, about half way down Saffron-hill - I there apprehended him. He had nothing with him. I took him to Mr. Keats. I then went to the prisoner's house, and found two rolls of brass, one in the shop, and the other in the parlour. He said he had bought it of a man like a porter, with a white apron on. I understood him to say he gave 12 1/2 d. per pound for it. When he got to the Office he was shewn to the boy, and asked if he knew him, and if he was the person he bought it of? He said No - it was a man much older, and that he never saw the boy before, and that he did not know the prosecutor or his shop.

Cross-examined. Q. Was Keats present when he said he did not know him - A. He was. I do not believe that he was pointed out to him. He was in the shop, and claimed the brass when I found it.

RICHARD WARNER . I am servant to Mr. Keats. I lived about two years with him. I first got acquainted with the prisoner about nine months ago - I took him a little

brass of my own, and sold it to him - he asked how I came by it - I said it was my own - he said I need not mind, for if it was any thing belonging to my master he would buy it of me; he took me into his back parlour and gave me something to drink. I afterwards met him in St. John-street, he took me to a public-house and gave me something to drink again, and said if I would bring any thing belonging to my master he would buy it, and nobody would know any thing of it. I took him three square files, and he bought them.

Q. Do you remember seeing him on the 6th of March - A. Yes, he asked what time my master would be up in the morning, and what time I went into the shop, and if I served in the shop. He came to the shop on the 6th and 7th of March, both mornings, and I delivered him a roll of brass each morning in the shop - he brought a basket; and came to buy a file, and I put the brass into his basket, he told me they weighed 34 lbs. I was to have 4 d. a lb. for it. I saw them afterwards at Bow-street they were the rolls I delivered him; he paid me 2 s. at a time for it. We tossed for gin, and victuals and things together.

Cross-examined. Q. How long have you been robbing your master - A. Six or eight months. I sold goods to nobody but him - I thought all along it was a shocking thing. I told about it the moment I was taken. Wilson was in the shop on the morning when he came, but did not see it taken. I went to the prisoner's house the same day. I am eighteen years old.

WILLIAM TILSBURY . I am a shoemaker, and live in Saffron-hill. The prisoner and Warner came to my house together, the prisoner had told me he should send a young man to be measured for a pair of shoes, and he would be answerable. I made Warner a pair, and he paid for them. I delivered them to the prisoner two or three days before he was taken.

WILLIAM JAMES WILSON . I am apprenticed to Mr. Keats, I have served four years. Warner was errand boy, I have seen the prisoner at the shop between seven and eight in the morning, he came in and enquired for the other young lad - we had no other but Warner. I only saw him once, but took particular notice of him - he had a basket between his legs.

Cross-examined. Q. Where did you see him - A. Standing between the counter and the door. I remained in the shop while the prisoner was there, and saw him take nothing.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I am not guilty of the charge.

GUILTY . Aged 45.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210411-103

589. JOHN BROOKS , CHARLES WILDEY , and GEORGE ELLIS , was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of April , one inkstand, value 1 s.; one file, value 6 d.; one dog's collar, value 6 d.; one turn handle, value 2 d.; three hundred screws, value 6 s.; two locks, value 1 s.; nineteen keys, value 3 s., and twelve carpet wires, value 1 s. , the goods of our Lord the King.

SECOND COUNT, stating them to be the property of Thomas Cole .

MR. BOLLAND conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM HAMILTON . I keep an old iron shop in Short's Gardens, Drury-lane. On the 11th of April, between seven and eight o'clock in the morning, Ellis and Wildey came to my shop with a quantity of screws, locks, inkstands, horn handles, files, and a dog's collar, which they offered me for sale. I asked who sent them - they said they got them in Regency Park. I said they do not suit me, at the same time a man came in and told me to take them in charge, while he went after more; he brought Brooks in, and took them away with the property.

RICHARD ROWE WICKS . I was on duty on the 11th of of April. Between seven and eight o'clock I saw four boys at the corner of Shorts Gardens, having lead, it was the three prisoners and George White , who escaped; they went into Hamilton's shop - at the time I went in they were shewing these things, he was asking were they got them, they told him they got them out of the Regent's Park. I went out after Brooks and White, and took both of them - White got away. I found nineteen keys, one lock, and a large quantity of screws and brads on Brooks. On White I found thirteen brass carpet wires.

JOHN BARTLETT . I am headborough of St. Giles's I was on duty - Wicks's account is correct.

THOMAS COLE . I am foreman of the Regent's Park , and had the care of all the articles, they were kept in a lodge. I found the window of the lodge taken out - some of the things are mine, and the rest belong to the Crown. I had seen most of them on the Friday before, this was Wednesday. I was in the lodge, and they were safe the evening before.

BROOKS'S Defence. I found them in the fields.

ELLIS'S Defence. I was with him - they laid by a ditch.

BROOKS - GUILTY . Aged 17.

ELLIS - GUILTY . Aged 14.

WILDEY - GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210411-104

5 JOHN SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 5th March , 12 lbs. of salt, value 3 s., and 1 lb. of flower, value 3 d ; the goods of Robert Moseley .

ELIZA MOSELEY . I live at No. 58, Charlotte-street, Whitechapel . I saw the prisoner going out of our bake-house - he was a servant . I stopped and told him I suspected he had been stealing something - he denied it. I took salt out of each of his four pockets, and a bag of salt out of his hat - he begged me to let him go, There was also 2 lbs. of flour in his pockets.

ROBERT MOSELEY . I was out - when I came in the prisoner was standing in the parlour. I fetched the officer.

RICHARD PLUNKITT . I took charge of him, and found the 6 lb. of salt wrapped round him in a stocking.

Prisoner's Defence. I have three children who were starving, and I throw myself entirely on your mercy.

GUILTY . Aged 32.

Confined Three Months , and Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210411-105

591. WILLIAM DUPIER and WILLIAM BARNETT was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of April , 30 lbs. of rope, value 2 s. , the goods of John Farringdon .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to belong to John Huggens .

THOMAS TOUSE . I am a bargeman, and work for Mr. John Huggens . On the 6th of April, the barge laid astern of the Tender, off the Tower - the rope was in the barge - I saw it safe at twelve o'clock at noon - we then went to the cabin to dinner, and about two or three yards from the barge, I saw both the prisoners in a boat, and the rope in it - they were rowed after - they pulled over as hard as they could to the Surrey side, and got into the tier. I missed them, and in a moment or two after I saw them row to the same side. We got a boat and rowed after them, and took them just by the Custom-house, and saw Dupier throw the rope overboard, they had cut it off the barge - I am sure they are the men.

JOHN GOTTY . I belong to the Thames Police. I received them in charge.

WILLIAM BAXTER . I belong to the barge. I saw the boat with the prisoners in it, and the rope in the boat, I assisted to bring it on board, they immediately rowed away as fast as they could - I followed with the Captain and collared them.

DUPIER'S Defence. I threw a stone overboard.

BARNETT'S Defence. He threw a stone, and they said it was this rope.

DUPIER - GUILTY . Aged 25.

BARNETT - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210411-106

592. DANIEL LAWRENCE was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of March , one pair of boots, value 4 s. , the goods of William John Huetson .

JOHN LOWGER . I am servant to W. J. Hentson , a pawnbroker , who lives in Kingsland-road . On the morning of the 21st of March, between eight and nine o'clock the prisoner came to the shop, and requested to look at a pair of second-hand shoes, I said we had none - and shewed him a pair of new ones - he said he did not like them, and left, and returned in two minutes to look at another pair, we shewed him a pair and asked him 1 s. 6 d. for them. I saw him stop at the door close by the boots - suspecting him, I went after him, and saw him turn round to look at me. I then followed and found the boots under his coat, he said it was all a joke.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in liquor and carried them on my arm one in the other, and did not know I had them till he came after me.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Fined One Shilling, and Discharged .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210411-107

593. WILLIAM AUSTIN was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of March , seven live pigs, price 8 l. , the goods of John Westwood .

JOHN WESTWOOD . I live at No. 18, Star-street, Shadwell , and am a milkman . I keep pigs, and lost seven out of eleven; they were kept in a sty in the cow-house. I missed them on the 3d of March, about five o'clock in the morning.

EDWARD WESTWOOD . I am seventeen years old. On the 2d of March, about seven o'clock, I locked the pigs up safe. I went there at five o'clock next morning, and found the staple of the middle door drawn, and seven pigs gone. I saw five of them again on the 10th of March, at the prisoner's house - he was a hawking butcher. I know them by the marks on the rump, which I put on them when my father bought them - they were alive; he had them in a dark corner of his shed. I had called at his house on the 8th, and asked his wife if they had any; I went in the yard and looked at two sows. On the 10th, I got a search warrant out and found them.

JOHN SUMMERS . I live at Romford. I sold nine pigs to Westwood, on the 28th of February. I saw them at Shadwell, am sure they are the same - they had my mark on them.

JOHN BROWN. I am an officer. I went and found the pigs secreted in a dark place at the prisoner's house - bills had been printed and circulated; he said he bought them of a man three week before.

Prisoner's Defence (written.) I deal in pigs. I bought them of a person unknown to me, at Ratcliff-highway, for 23 s. each.

(To this defence was attached a receipt, dated the 12th of February.)

JOHN SUMMERS . I was not in possession of them so early as the 12th of February, I bought them at Chelmsford on the Friday before I sold them.

GUILTY . Aged 41.

Confined Six Months and Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210411-108

594. JOHN WILLIAM PENNINGTON was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of March , four pewter pots, value 4 s., the goods of John Henry Watchorn ; three pewter pots, value 2 s., the goods of William Seex ; one pewter pot, value 6 d., the goods of John Smallman , and two pewter pots, value 1 s. , the goods of Thomas Hunt .

JOHN HENRY WATCHORN . I keep the Westmoreland Arms, public-house, at the corner of Manchester-street . The prisoner was apprehended with four of my pots. I saw them at Marlborough-street, on the 21st of March; they had my predecessor's name on them - and have my mark on them.

WILLIAM SEEX . I keep the Bricklayer's Arms, public-house, Quebec-street . I found the prisoner at Marlborough-street with three of my pots.

THOMAS HUNT . I keep the St. Andrew, public-house, Gower-street, Portman-square . I found the prisoner in custody with two of my pots.

JOHN SMALLMAN . I live in Adam-street, West, Edgeware-road . I found one of my pots at the office, with my predecessor's name on it. I have had the house seven months, and took all the pots. I saw the prisoner taken just opposite my door, at half-past eight o'clock in the morning, with a basket full of pots; a boy was taken at the same time, and got away, but was taken again.

ROBERT CROWEN . I am a constable. I stood at my door, in Adam-street, and saw the prisoner rushing out of the Mews by my door; a man was following him, and calling out,

"Hold him!" I followed them into Berkley-street, and he was given in my charge, for stealing pots. Mr. Davis came up with this basket of pots, and said in

the prisoner's presence, that he saw him throw it down - I collared him directly. When I came to Berkley-street, I found a boy in the mews in custody - he got away, but was taken again, and after getting the prisoner to the office he attempted to escape.

ROBERT PINDY . I am a coachman. I was standing by the coach-stand, in Adam-street, West; some men came up, and asked if I had seen a man and boy with each a basket. I had seen a man exactly like the prisoner, pass with a basket, about two minutes before, and heard the rattling of pots in the basket. I then heard a cry of Stop thief! and saw the prisoner running through the mews - I stopped him. I saw the basket thrown down that he had when he passed me - it contained pots. I assisted in taking him - the boy was discharged.

Prisoner. Q. Will you swear it is the basket I dropped - A. It is exactly like it. He offered me money to let him go, and said, I wished I had nothing to do with it, as it would be more out of my way, than I should get by it.

THOMAS MILLET . I am an officer. I was going up George-street, Portman-square, and saw the prisoner with a frail basket with a cover to it, and saw him take two or three pint pots from the rails and doorway of different houses. I saw him at No. 30, King-street, Portman-square, in company with a boy about eleven years old; the boy took a pint pot off the door, and the prisoner put it in the basket. I went towards Edgware-road, and saw the prisoner coming along with the basket, apparently very heavy. I thought he belonged to a publican, and did not suspect him; he came to Adam's Mews, dropped the basket and ran off. There was a cry of Stop thief! - he joined in the cry, I saw him stopped; some time after, I went to Marlborough-street, and saw him in the middle room - he tried to escape.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210411-109

595. JAMES MOODY was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of March , one coat, value 5 s. , the goods of George Higgins .

GEORGE HIGGINS . I keep a china shop in Oxford-street; my coat was in a basket, in a cart, which stood at a china shop in Compton-street . I stood in the shop, a man stood at the doorway, blocking it up - a lady said she did not like him; I turned round, and saw the prisoner on the wheel of the cart - I saw him take the coat out of the basket; I tried to get out, but the man at the door tried to prevent me, I pushed him away, ran after the prisoner, he dropped the coat, and was stopped about thirty yards from the cart. I picked it up, and am sure he is the man.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. He cannot swear I was the person.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210411-110

596. WILLIAM HARTLIN was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of March , one box, value 2 s., the goods of Francis Smith ; and one box, value 2 s., and twelve printed bound books, value 20 s. , the goods of Henry Colbourn and Simon Saunders .

SIMON SAUNDERS . I am a bookseller , in partnership with Henry Colbourn . I only know the property.

GEORGE LEDGER . I am a carrier, and live at West Horsley, Surry. I had two boxes of books in my cart, on the 1st of March. When I got to the corner of Air-street, Piccadilly , I went into a shop for some things, a man ran in, and said my cart had been robbed; I ran out, the prisoner was brought back, and Smith brought the trunk back. Two trunks were stolen from cart.

JOHN SMITH . I am carman to Mr. Godfrey, of Piccadilly. I saw the prisoner take the trunk out of the cart. I followed and caught him about a hundred yards off, with it on his back.

GEORGE AVIS . Smith gave me the trunk; I saw him take it off the prisoner's back. The prisoner ran away - I followed, and secured him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A man asked where he could get a porter. I said I wanted a job, he gave me the box to carry, then struck me, and charged me with stealing it.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210411-111

597. WILLIAM ROWE was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of February , two saddles, value 30 s.; one bridle, value 6 s.; one pair of girts, value 1 s.; three brushes, value 1 s., and one rug, value 2 s. , the goods of Soloman Sawrey , Esq .

EDWARD JENKINSON . I am servant to Soloman Sawrey, Esq.; his stables are at the back of the house, in Bedford-row . I went out about one o'clock on the 15th of February - they were then safe; I returned about six o'clock, found the stables wide open, and missed the articles stated in the indictment. I found them at Marlborough-street, on the Friday week after.

ROBERT COWEN . I am a constable. I was returning from the Sessions House, and overtook the prisoner in Weymouth-street, with this bundle, hanging over his shoulder; it was about three o'clock in the afternoon of the 15th of February. I said,

"What have you got there?" he said he had some things, and that he was going to the west end of the town. I said,

"Where?" He said to the Oval, in Upper Gower-street; that he brought them from his brother's, who was butler to Miss Doughty, in Bedford-row; that the coachman desired him to take them for him, but that he did not know the coachman's name, nor did he know the man's name he was to take them to. Two carriages came by at the time, and he made off with the bundle; I instantly followed, overtook him in about two minutes, and found his account false.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I went to Bedford-row to enquire after my brother, who had lived with Miss Doughty, I met a groom whom I had often seen, he asked me if I was going to the west end of the town, and gave me them things to carry to the Oval.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Confined Three Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210411-112

698. GEORGE ROBERTS was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of February , one handkerchief, value 5 s., the goods of a certain man, unknown , from his person .

This offence having been committed in the City, the parties were bound over to prefer a fresh bill, and on this indictment the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210411-113

599. ROBERT REYNOLDS and WILLIAM CHAPMAN were indicted for stealing, on the 11th of March , one hat, value 8 s.; one cap, value 6 d.; and one handkerchief, value 6 d., the goods of Joseph Bevis , from his person .

JOSEPH BEVIS . I am a milkman , and live in Bevis-court, Mutton Lane, Mile-end. On the 11th of March, between nine and ten o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoners behind the London hospital. I saw Chapman first in the fields - I had seen him about before; Reynolds was with him; there was a mob, I did not go into the mob, but as I passed by, Chapman came behind me, and snatched my hat off, and threw it away over the mob; Reynolds was was hustling me, and shaking me by the collar the while, with about a dozen more; the others hustled me while Chapman took my hat off - my handkerchief and cap were in it. I went home directly they let me go. I am certain they are the persons - I had seen them both before.

WILLIAM HEWITT . I am a Bow-street patrol. I was coming down Mile-end-road , and saw a mob, and the prosecutor with his hat off; he pointed out Reynolds as one of them who hustled him, and I took him; and in consequence of information which Reynolds gave me, I took Chapman next morning.

REYNOLDS'S Defence. He said he had lost his hat, the mob pushed me against him.

REYNOLDS - GUILTY . Aged 17.

CHAPMAN - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Six Months , and Publicly Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18210411-114

600. RICHARD DOUGLAS was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of February , one coat, value 25 s. , the goods of George Stansby .

GEORGE STANSBY . I live in Seamour-yard, Bryanston-square. On the 24th of February, about seven o'clock in the morning, I was driving my cart in Hyde Park , and saw the prisoner behind the cart, at that instant I saw my coat drop from behind the cart - I saw him pull it towards him immediately. I ran round and laid hold of him, but he got away, but was taken in about half an hour; he left the coat and his hat behind - I am sure he is the man.

Cross-examined by MR. HONE. Q. You was before the cart - A. By the side of the horses - it was a thick fog, but I saw him distinctly; he must have pulled it out of the cart, because it had two horse cloths over it; it was impossible that it could have fallen out - and after it was on the ground, he pulled it to him at least two yards.

THOMAS CROW . I am park gate keeper. I saw the prisoner running without a hat by the stable yard, about a mile from Hyde Park; he said, do not stop me, for there is a man going to beat me.

Prisoner's Defence. I saw it drop from the cart, and told him of it, he said I stole it, and struck me, and followed me.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Whipped and Discharged .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18210411-115

601. THOMAS NEWTON was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of March , 66 lbs. of lead, value 7 s., the goods of James Boreham , and fixed to his dwelling house .

SECOND COUNT the same, only stating it to be fixed to a building of his.

JAMES BOREHAM. I keep a chandler's shop in Hollywell-row . On the 15th of March, between eleven and twelve o'clock at night. I was called up - they said thieves were in the house; the watchman searched my yard, and we saw the print of a man's shoe. Next morning, I missed the lead from the roof of my coal shed - it joins the dwelling house. I saw it afterwards fitted, it corresponded.

RANDAL BAZILL. I am a watchman. I was on duty near Mr. Brown's house, and saw a large piece of lead laying in the gutter. I saw somebody creeping along the gutter, he got into the privy of the next house, and the prisoner was taken there. I fitted the lead on the premises.

JOHN REUSH . I am a watchman. I searched the privy of the next house, and found the prisoner there with the door shut, standing up. I said, you are the person I am looking for; he said he had no accomplice in it, that he meant to take all the lead away himself.

THOMAS BRADLEY . I saw the lead fitted to the premises, there was 70 lbs. of it - it corresponded.

Prisoner's Defence. They have sworn falsely.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18210411-116

602. BENJAMIN BATES was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of March , one peck of wheat, value 2 s. , the goods of Samuel Hutchings .

MR. SAMUEL HUTCHINGS . I live at Earl's-court, Kensington . On Sunday evening, the 28th of March, about six o'clock, I saw the prisoner coming from a barn, in which he had been cleaning wheat - he was in my employ; he had a basket on his shoulder, I suspected him from his manner, and asked him what he had there; he told me, nothing; my bailiff came up, and found a peck of wheat in his basket; we questioned him what he was going to do with it, he said he was going to make some coffee of it - he made his escape. I had him taken two days afterwards.

JAMES RABERGAL . I am a bailiff, my master's account is correct.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Confined Three Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18210411-117

603. WILLIAM WHITEHEAD was indicted for stealing, on the 1st March , one coat, value 2 l. , the goods of John Atkins .

JOHN ATKINS . I am a dealer in calves . I was in Crown-street, Finsbury on the 1st of March, and saw the

prisoner running away with my coat on his arm, he had taken it off the cart; I pursued him, he dropped the coat, and was secured about sixty yards off, without my losing sight of him - I returned and picked my coat up.

JAMES BROWN . I am an officer, and apprehended the prisoner - he was running; I saw him drop the coat - Atkins said he was the man.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I passed Atkins, and heard an alarm, saw a lad with the coat on his arm, I followed, but could not take him.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Whipped and Discharged .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18210411-118

604. HENRY SAUNDERSON was indicted for stealing, on the 3d February , one table, value 3 s. , the goods of Francis Marks .

MARIA MARKS . I am the wife of Francis Marks . I live in Long-alley , and keep a chandler's shop . On the 3d of February, a man named Jones, (who was convicted last Session) came and asked the price of a table; in about half an hour he came along Long-alley, with the prisoner, who came and asked for a halfpenny worth of bread - they were both together then, and while I was serving the prisoner with the bread, Jones took the table and put it on his head, it was fastened inside with a cord, I ran after him and the prisoner ran after me, and said

"Drop it Jones, drop it Jones;" he dropped it directly and was taken, the prisoner escaped, but came again afterwards. I was afraid to touch him, because he caught hold of my shoulders and pinched me, to prevent my running after Jones - he told me to take him if he was guilty, the officer was out and I could not take him. When he heard I had a warrant out against him, he came by about a month after, and said,

"What you have transported one, and when you catch me you may transport me; and if I see you out of doors, I will see you do not go home alive again." His sister lived servant with me once, but I did not know where he lived, and I did not then know he was her brother. I had seen him in the shop many times, but did not know who he was.

JOSEPH WALTON . I am an officer. I took Jones, and on the Monday following I went after the prisoner. I had seen him that night, but did not know he was concerned, he was in the alley standing by, I only came up after Jones was taken by the watchman. I took him on the 27th of March. I had been looking for him several times, and once saw him, but he jumped out of the window in his shirt at one o'clock in the morning and escaped.

Prisoner's Defence. As I went out of her shop she flew by me and said I have lost a table, she collared me, and said you are one of them; I said if so, give charge, the watchman came up and said, I know him well, let him go.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18210411-119

605. THOMAS GEORGE , TIMOTHY CATON , and THOMAS SPLATT , were indicted for stealing, on the 23d of March , four pig's feet, value 2 d.; one cloth, value 1 s.; one basket, value 1 s.; and 20 s. in copper monies, numbered , the property of William Dancer .

WILLIAM DANCER . I am a carrier , and live at Newton, in Bedfordshire. On the 25th of March, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, I was in John-street, Oxford-road , and missed four 5 s. papers of halfpence, which were in a basket; there was also a cloth and some pig's feet. I saw it safe about ten minutes before. I found it at Bow-street the same night.

JOHN DAVIS . I am a patrol. I was in John-street with Read, and saw the cart, we followed the prisoner and another, all the way from St. Giles's, they were following another cart, they left there and went to Berners-street; we followed them, they came opposite John-street - Splatt and George crossed and went into John-street, and joined Caton. Read went on the left-hand side and I on the right; the moment I got into the street I saw this cart unloading. I saw George go in front and take the basket from the cart - he then walked as if he was going into Oxford-street. I followed him - Caton and Splatt gave him a signal that I was following - he then dropped the basket. I caught hold of him, pulled him across the street, and took Caton. Read picked it up and secured Splatt.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

CHARLES READ . I was with Davis - his account is correct. I picked up the basket and took Splatt.

GEORGE'S Defence. These two are innocent. I got in company with a bad man, who drew me into it, and he gave me beer to drink, and took the basket and gave it to me.

GEORGE - GUILTY . Aged 18.

CATON - GUILTY . Aged 20.

SPLATT - GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18210411-120

606. JAMES DUFFEE was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of February , one handkerchief, value 2 s. 6 d. the goods of Howell Hart , from his person .

HOWELL HART . On the 19th of February, about a quarter past eight o'clock at night, I was in Kingsland-road , and felt something against my coat pocket. I felt and missed my handkerchief. I turned round and saw the prisoner with it in his hand - he turned round and ran away - I pursued, calling out Stop thief, and the officer took him without my losing sight of him - he took the handkerchief from him.

THOMAS WALTERS . I heard the cry of Stop thief, and stopped the prisoner - he resisted - a person in the crowd gave me the handkerchief.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Whipped and Discharged .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18210411-121

607 JOHN MILLER and JOSEPH CRISTELL was indicted for stealing, on the 22d. of March , one handkerchief, value 5 s. the goods of a certain man unknown .

JAMES GRIFFITHS . On the 22d of March I was in St. James's Park between one and two o'clock in the day - it was the Drawing-room day. I saw the prisoner Miller

take a handkerchief out of a gentleman's pocket, and as he was passing it to Cristell, I laid hold of it, and secured them both. I could not get at the gentleman as there was a crowd. I had seen them talking together - other officers came to my assistance - they stood side by side behind the gentleman.

EDWARD RHIND . I am a constable. I was in the Park, and saw the prisoner attempt at several gentlemens' pockets - they appeared to know me so I sent Griffiths into the crowd after them - he brought them out of the crowd with the handkerchief. I asked them if there was any mark on it, they said No.

WILLIAM EWER . I assisted in taking the prisoners into custody. I did not see the transaction.

MILLER'S Defence. I had my handkerchief in my hand when they seized me.

CRISTELL'S Defence. I know nothing of it.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18210411-122

608. LOUISA WARD was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of March , 13 s. in monies numbered, and a 1 l. Bank note, the property of William Atkinson , from his person .

WILLIAM ATKINSON . On the 6th of March, I was returning home, I was at the corner of Shadwell Church-yard, at eleven o'clock at night. I met the prisoner, and went home with her to her house, as she called it. I gave her half-a-crown for the lodging - she left the room after I got into bed, and I saw no more of her. I fell asleep and awoke about an hour afterwards - when she came up, and told me to turn out for her husband had come up from Gravesend; she insisted on my getting up - I got up, went to my pantaloons, and missed 13 s. out of the pocket. I looked in my pocket-book and missed a 1 l. note out of it - she denied taking it - I asked her name, she said it was Caroline Matilda . I said, if she did not return the money, I would have her taken up. I called the watchman who secured her. I had not been drinking, my money was safe a quarter of an hour before. I had no more money.

GEORGE CLIVE . I took the prisoner in charge, I searched her pocket and found 8 s. 6 d. in silver, and 4 d. in copper. I heard some silver drop as I went into the room - the watchman found 3 s. I found no notes on her - she said the money was her own.

THOMAS MATTHEWS . I know no more than Clive - I heard the money fall.

ATKINSON re-examined. I had 13 s. it consisted of shillings and sixpences. I was perfectly sober - I took her to be a woman who let lodgings, that is all.

Prisoner's Defence. - He was very much in liquor, he offered less money than I would have, and then he charged me with the robbery.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18210411-123

609. JOHN CHURCH was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of March , two sheets, value 5 s.; one bolster, value 5 s.; one quilt, value 8 s.; two blankets, value 4 s., and two pillows, value 3 s., the goods of John Pounsberry , in a lodging-room .

JOHN POUNSBERRY . I live at No. 50, Huntingdon-street, Hoxton . The prisoner rented a room, ready furnished, of me, on the 9th of February. He had a wife and one child, and lived there until the 17th of March.

SARAH POUNSBERRY . I am the wife of the last witness. The prisoner took a furnished room on the 9th of February. These things were let with the lodgings. He continued there until the 17th of March. I missed the property, and saw them afterwards at Worship-street. I was present when the officer came to take him.

JAMES HUNT . I am servant to Mrs. Williamson, a pawnbroker, who lives in Shoreditch. I produce two sheets, which were pledged on the 10th of February, by a short woman.

JOHN HENRY TOWNSEND . I live with Mr. Miller, a pawnbroker, in Kingsland-road. I have two pillows and a blanket, pledged by a short woman, whom I saw at Worship-street.

JOHN LONGER . I live with Mr. Hamilton, in Kingsland-road. I produce a quilt and blanket pawned by a short woman.

JOSEPH DOWNER . I am a pawnbroker. I produce a bolster, pawned on the 17th of February, by a short woman.

JOSEPH SEDGWICK . I am an officer. On the 17th of March, about one o'clock in the morning, I went to the prosecutor's house - I knocked at the prisoner's room door, and went in. He was at home. Mrs. Pounsberry said she suspected her things were taken. She read over an inventory of the things which she let with the room, and she missed these things. He said he had pawned them. I asked for the duplicates. He said he could not produce them, because they were with his brother-in-law. I said if they were not produced I must search him. He then took out a purse containing about fifty duplicates, and selected four from them. One of them was dated the 10th of February. The prosecutrix said she only let him the lodgings on the 9th. His wife is a short woman.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I did not intend to steal them - I intended to redeem them.

GUILTY . Aged 31.

Confined Six Months , and publicly Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18210411-124

610. THOMAS LAWRENCE was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of March , one watch, value 3 l., the property of Thomas Croxford , from his person .

The prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18210411-125

TENTH DAY, MONDAY, APRIL 25.

611. CHRISTOPHER PRICE was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of March , four 1 l. Bank notes, the property of Joseph Carter , from his person .

JOSEPH CARTER . I live at Dodd's-place, Rotherhithe,

and am a coal whipper . On the 27th of March, about half-past six o'clock in the morning - I had been out all night - I was attending to my business till half-past one o'clock, and fell in company with the prisoner at the Bunch of Grapes, public-house, in Ratliff-highway. There were three or four in company. I had four 1 l. notes and 20 s. in silver, in my breeches pocket. The prisoner was in company with the man who robbed me. We sat on a bench before the fire. I remained there until four o'clock. I was sober. We went from there to the Newcastle coffee-house, Billingsgate. My money was safe when I was at Billingsgate. There were three men in company - the prisoner and the man who robbed me, and a woman. We stopped there till half-past five o'clock, and went from thence to Whitechapel. I paid for four pots of beer for the prisoner, as his share - he had no change, and said he could get change at Whitechapel. We all four went together to a coffee-shop, in Wentworth-street - the master refused to serve us. We left the house altogether, and went to the Compasses, in Brick-lane . We staid in the tap-room, and had a pot of porter together. I wished the prisoner to get change, and pay me what I had laid out for him. He said he could not, but he thought I could give him change for a 1 l. note. To satisfy him, I pulled out my silver and four 1 l. notes with it. The other man snatched the notes, and ran away. I ran after the other man - the prisoner followed, and tripped me up in the street, when I was close to the other man. I should have caught him if it had not been for him. They then both ran away together - but Reynolds stopped him. I was quite sober. The woman remained in the tap-room.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. You were not intoxicated - A. No. We had seven pots of beer at Ratcliff-highway, three at the next place, and one at the last. The woman was tipsy. I am sure the prisoner tripped me up. I perceived him kick my heel up sideways. I am in the habit of drinking a great deal.

THOMAS REYNOLDS . I am a constable of Spitalfields. I saw the prisoner running past my house, and the prosecutor following him. A man was running on the other side of the way. I secured the prisoner. The prosecutor said he was one of the men who robbed him. I found no money on him.

JOHN BARRY . I am an officer. I was in Wentworth-street between five and six o'clock in the morning, and saw the prisoner, prosecutor, and another man, and a woman go into the coffee-shop. When they came out I watched them into the Compasses, and saw the prisoner and another man come running down Wentworth-street. I waited there till they came back to the Compasses again. Every thing appeared quiet, and I left. I afterwards found the prisoner, and asked what he had done with the note he wanted the prosecutor to change. He said he supposed he had lost it.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210411-126

612. JAMES HAYNES was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of February , five shillings in copper monies, numbered , the property of John Pistor .

JOHN PISTOR . I am a baker , and live in Whitechapel-road . I had tied up five 5 s. papers of copper, and put them on a shelf. I went out, and did not see the transaction.

JOHN DUNGATE . I am a watchman. On the 20th of February, about nine o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner lurking about this window. I watched, and saw him take something through the glass, which was broken. I then heard some penny pieces fall. I picked up those that were dropped, and laid hold of him, and found a quantity of halfpence on him - part of them dropped from his hat.

SIMON SOLOMON. The prisoner was brought to the watch-house - his hands were scratched and bloody. The copper amounted to 4 s. 5 d.

JOHN PISTOR . The glass was cracked before, and part of the pane out - I had placed a small board before it. The money was about two feet from the window.

Prisoner's Defence. I heard halfpence fall, and helped the people to pick them up, and gave them to the watchman.

GUILTY . Aged 12.

Whipped and Discharged .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210411-127

613. PETER KEEGAN was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of March , one cruet stand, value 2 s., and seven cruets, value 8 s. , the goods of Amelia Forrester , widow .

JOHN HEBERT . I am a Thames Police officer. I was sent for on the 10th of March, and took charge of the prisoner at Mrs. Forrester's - and found four door keys on him, and a large knife. He said they were given him to carry.

AMELIA FORRESTER . I am a widow, and live in Bedford-place, Stepney . These things were on the sideboard in the front parlour. The prisoner was a stranger to me. They are my property, and cost me 17 s.

CATHERINE SHARP . I was at Mrs. Forrester's house, on the 10th of March, and saw the cruets safe on the sideboard. About a quarter before seven o'clock in the morning, I heard an alarm - I went to the door, and found the prisoner there, with a great many people round him. They asked if he had done it. He denied it. I had opened the windows to let in the air. The cruets were in May's possession. I had shut the shutter to, and drawn the blind, as a gentleman lay dead in the house. I found them disturbed. I had not left the parlour more than ten minutes.

JOHN MAY . I am a sawyer. About a quarter before six o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner and another lad - they were close together. The prisoner had an apron on. One of them got over a piece of timber, which I was getting into my gate. I suspected, and ran after them. He was fifteen yards beyond me. As soon as he saw me running, he ran too, and his companion also. Before I overtook them, he dropped the cruets and stand out of his apron. I brought him back, and said,

"Shew me where you took them from." I saw Forrester's window was the only window open - so I knocked at the door, and they claimed them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. It is my first offence.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Whipped and Discharged .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210411-128

614. JAMES HOWLETT , JOHN MORRIS , and SAMUEL BARRETT were indicted for stealing, on the 2d of April , one handkerchief, value 3 s., the goods of Alfred Nicholson , from his person .

MR. ALFRED NICHOLSON . I live in David-street, Berkley-square. On the 2d of April, between twelve and one o'clock, I was in St. James-street . My handkerchief was in my pocket. At the corner of Jermyn-street, I saw a crowd. I attempted to get through - it reached almost all down the street. A procession was going to the Queen. I fell in my pocket, and missed my handkerchief. The prisoners were secured instantly, and my handkerchief found.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAM JONES . I am a constable. I was stationed in St. James's-street, and saw the three prisoners, in company with another, coming up the street, close behind Mr. Nicholson, We had noticed them before for three or four minutes, close together. I saw Howlett sounding Mr. Nicholson's pocket first, and immediately a girl of the town hit him on the shoulder - the other three followed. Morris put his hand into the gentleman's pocket, and took a handkerchief out - I secured him with it.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. What procession was it - A. The Odd Fellows were going to the Queen. Sounding, is feeling to see if any thing is in the pocket.

JAMES GRIFFITHS . I belong to the Royal Humane Society. I saw the three prisoners, with another, coming behind the prosecutor, Howlett touched his pocket - Morris then took his handkerchief out - Barrett was close behind him, and must have seen it. I took Barrett directly - they were all together.

ROBERT DEAN . I am a broker, and live in the New-cut. I was in company with Jones, and saw the prisoners and another behind the prosecutor. I saw Howlett feel the pocket, and afterwards saw Morris with the handkerchief in his hand, shoving it up his jacket. We secured the three.

WILLIAM MASON . I am a constable, and was with the others, and received them in charge.

WILLIAM WILSON . I am a Bow-street patrol. I saw the prisoners walking up St. James's-street; they were together, in company with another. I followed them, and saw Morris take the handkerchief from the prosecutor's pocket, and put it up his jacket. The fourth man got away.

HOWLETT'S Defence. I was looking after work - I did not see them take it.

BARRETT'S Defence. Griffiths laid hold of me, and said,

"I have just come in time for a chance." I was standing to see the procession, but know nothing of the robbery.

HOWLETT - GUILTY . Aged 20.

MORRIS - GUILTY . Aged 22.

BARRETT - GUILTY . Aged 26.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210411-129

615. JAMES CURTIS and ROBERT WILLIAMS were indicted for stealing, on the 5th of March , twelve pair of stockings, value 3 l. , the goods of James Withers .

JAMES WITHERS . I am agent to a hosier , at Nottingham, and live in Cateaton-street . I was informed Curtis was in custody, and missed twelve pair of stockings from my warehouse, on Monday, the 5th of March - they were in two packages, numbered 5 and 6 - each containing six pair; they were seven or eight yards from the door. I found them at Worship-street seven or eight days afterwards. Curtis's father was my porter, and Curtis came to assist, occasionally, in the morning - the other was a stranger.

JOHN ASTON . I am servant to Lucock and Co., who are pawnbrokers, and live in Whitecross-street, St. Luke's. On the 3d of March, about three o'clock in the afternoon, both the prisoners came together, Williams gave me one pair of black silk stockings, and pawned them for 4 s. I saw them again on Monday, they were brought by an officer, the prosecutor claimed the stockings. I asked Williams where he brought them from - he said, from Mr. Williams, No. 67, Banner-street.

JOHN AARON . I am servant to Mr. Smith, a pawnbroker, who lives in Old-street. On the 5th of March I received a pair of stockings in pawn from Williams, for 5 s. He was alone.

LEONARD MATTHEWS . I live with my father, at No. 104, Whitecross-street. On Saturday, the 5th of March, Williams pawned two pair of stockings with me for 10 s. - another person was with him; they were quite new. He said he had brought them from his mother; I knew his brother, and took them in. On the Monday following Curtis pawned two pair, saying, his father sent him with them; that he lived with Mr. Morgan, of Chiswell-street, and his master authorized his father to pawn them.

SAMUEL CHAPMAN . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Providence-row, Finsbury. I have two pair of black silk stockings, pledged by Curtis.

THOMAS GARTON . I am a constable. I apprehended Curtis on the 5th of March, and found four pair of silk stockings in his pocket, and a paper with No. 6 on it - he said he found them against Holborn-bars. I took Williams also.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

CURTIS'S Defence. I found them.

CURTIS - GUILTY . Aged 15.

Whipped and Discharged .

WILLIAMS - GUILTY . Aged 15.

Confined Six Months , and Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210411-130

616. JONAH DAMION was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of April , eight pigs, price 16 l. , the property of John Gunn .

JOHN GUNN . I am a cow-farmer , and live in the Commercial-road . I keep pigs in a sty in my yard. I lost eight on the 5th of April. I saw them safely put into the sty at seven o'clock in the evening - my watchman came at nine, and I missed them; I found them on Saturday morning. I know nothing of the prisoner. The yard has a railing four feet high round it.

THOMAS ENDERSBEE . I am a watchman. On the 6th of April, about ten o'clock at night, I went into New-court, Whitechapel, and saw a quantity of pigs - eighteen or twenty people were round - the prisoner was one of them; nobody claimed them, but they tried to keep them from me. I got six away, went back again, and the prisoner said two had got down a privy; I looked, but could not find them; we traced footmarks of them from the spot into his yard, listened, and heard pigs grunt: Partridge knocked at the door several times, but got no answer - we found the pigs tied to a table in the front room - Partridge found the prisoner up stairs - he occupied the house. We found the other pigs in a sty at the back of that house.

JOHN BOWTLE . I am a constable. The pigs were brought to the watch-house. I went with Endersbee - his account his correct. The prisoner said a woman, named Knight, left the pigs there for the rent.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210411-131

618. JAMES DALTRY and THOMAS HILL were indicted for stealing, on the 19th of March , 8 lbs. of brass, value 10 s. , the goods of John Rigby .

JOHN RIGBY . I am an ironmonger , and live in Shoreditch . On the evening of the 19th of March, a little after nine o'clock, the prisoners came to my shop - Daltry asked for half a pound of iron wire. I told the shopman to serve him. Some brass wire was in a kind of cupboard on the counter - they stood close to the cupboard. I saw them shuffling about, and after they were served, he found a piece of brass wire under Hill's apron. I said he should go to the watch-house. Daltry immediately fell on his knees, and begged forgiveness. While the watchman was gone for, Hill produced two more pieces. None was found on Daltry.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

DALTRY'S Defence. I am innocent.

HILL put in a written defence, acknowledging his offence, and begging for mercy.

DALTRY - GUILTY. Aged 15.

HILL - GUILTY. Aged 13.

Judgment respited .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210411-132

617. DAVID DAVIS and JOHN HAYNES were indicted for stealing, on the 15th of February , one half crown , the property of Thomas Cave .

THOMAS CAVE . I am a butcher , and live in Whitecross-street . On the 15th of February, about a quarter before three o'clock, I saw the prisoners standing about my door for half an hour. The till was at the back of the shop.

WILLIAM CAVE . I am in partnership with my brother. The money in the till belonged to us both.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210411-133

618. EDWARD BOLTON and JOHN WILLIAMS were indicted for stealing, on the 23d of March , one tea kettle, value 3 s. , the goods of Hannah Fall Bannister , widow .

H. F. Bannister. I am a widow, and live in Plumbree-street, Bloomsbury . The prisoners and another boy, all three were dressed at chimney sweeper s - came to my house, saying they came to sweep the chimnies. I said I wanted no sweeps. Bolton kept me in conversation, saying

"May we come to-morrow?" - and while I was talking, the other, who is not taken, snatched the kettle up off the fire, and ran away with it.

RICHARD ROWE WIEKS . I am a constable. On the 23d of March, I was coming by - the prosecutrix informed me that she had detained Bolton. I took him, and asked who the other two were - he said one was the coloured boy Williams, and the other was Saucy Jack. I went into Short's-gardens, and found Williams and another in an old iron shop, with the kettle. They threw it down and ran away. I took Williams the same night.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

BOLTON'S Defence. I met the other lad. He asked if I wanted work. He said he had six jobs to do, and I might have half the profit. It is a rule to help each other. I followed him, as I thought, to sweep the chimney - and while I was talking to him, he snatched the kettle.

WILLIAMS'S Defence. I saw a mob, went home, and when I was at tea the constable came and took me.

BOLTON - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Whipped and Discharged .

WILLIAMS - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210411-134

619. EDWARD CAVENAUGH and ELIZA RUSSELL were indicted for stealing, on the 6th of March , 17 lbs. of flour, value 3 s. , the goods of William Walters .

WILLIAM WALTERS . I am a Scotch factor , and live at Wapping . This flour was in my warehouse, which is close to the river. Cavenaugh had lived two years with me as carman . The police officers came to me one evening and produced 20 lbs. of flour - I never sold him any.

THOMAS WISE . I keep a cart of my own. I was drinking with Cavenaugh at a public-house, at Wapping, in the evening. He asked if I would have a bit of flour to take home. He had worked with me about four years ago, at a meal warehouse. I said I did not care. I gave him my handkerchief, and he went and fetched me some. I knew he was in Walter's employ. He brought me back 7 lbs. His wife came in and asked if he was coming home. (The public-house is in front of the prosecutor's) - he asked her to drink some porter; she went on, and he and I came after. There was something under her shawl. I did not see who gave it her. I was taken before the Magistrate, and have been in custody seven weeks.

WILLIAM JUDGE. On the 6th of March, about eight o'clock in the evening, I saw Russell loitering about the dock bridge, with something under his arm. I went away, and coming back, I saw Russell and Wise together. I asked Wise what he had got there - he said, a little flour. In the mean time Russell went into the road. I went after her, and asked what she had got - she made no answer. I found it was 10 lbs. of flour. Wise had 7 lbs. Russell said she brought her's from St. Catherine's, and Wise said he gave a man two pots of porter for his.

JOHN GOTTY. On the 6th of March Cavenaugh came to the Office, and inquired for Russell. He said she was his wife. I asked who he worked for - he said Mr. Walters. I went and searched Mr. Walter's sacks, and found them open, and some taken out. Cavenaugh said there was some taken from almost every sack in the warehouse, and that he took it out. He said it fell out of the sacks and he picked it up.

MR. WALTERS. These sacks were opened, which was improper. It is not sweepings.

CAVENAUGH'S Defence. The sacks were open - Master allowed me the sweepings, and this is what I saved up.

CAVENAUGH - GUILTY . Aged 26.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged .

RUSSELL - NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210411-135

620. WILLIAM CAREY was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of February , two pails, value 3 s. , the goods of James Beale .

JAMES BEALE . I am a cooper , and live in Cow-cross . The two pails were taken from my shop front. The prisoner was brought back with them.

WILLIAM MORGAN . I am a patrol. I saw the prisoner drop the pails - he ran away as soon as he saw me - he was about twenty feet from Beale's shop. I took him back.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A man gave me some liquor, which overcame me - I fell against the pail, picked it up, and was putting them up when they took me.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210411-136

621. ELEANOR EDWARDS was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of March , one spoon, value 2 s. , the goods of Eliza Mason , widow .

ELIZA MASON . I am a widow, and live at Bethnal-green - the prisoner was my char woman . I missed things several times.

THOMAS PETO . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Brick-lane. The prisoner pawned this spoon with me on the 20th of January, for 2 s., in the name of Ann Edwards .

JOHN MANCE . I took her into custody, on the 30th of March, at the back of the prosecutor's house. I told her it was for robbing her mistress. On the way to the watch-house, I asked her if she knew Sowerby, a pawnbroker - she said she had pawned several things there, but she denied having pawned the spoon.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I am sorry for it - it is my first offence.

GUILTY . Aged 38.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210411-137

622. MARY KALLARD was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of March , one gown, value 4 s. the goods of Elizabeth Henry , widow .

ELIZABETH HENRY . On the 23d of March this gown hung in my yard, in Tower-street, St. Giles's - the prisoner was a stranger to me. The street door was open generally: the landlady called me down stairs - I found it was gone - the prisoner was brought back in five minutes, and the gown found in her lap.

CATHERINE HEALEY . I live next door to the house - I was standing at the door and saw the prisoner come out of the house with the gown in her apron - I ran and told the people - she was pursued and brought back.

THOMAS GOOK . I was with Ewer, near the prosecutrix's door - the prisoner came up the street - I saw Healey go to the window, then run away - she came back with the prisoner and gown.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. It laid by the door folded up.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Confined Two Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210411-138

623. MARY ANN LORDEN was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of March , six spoons, value 12 s., and two frills, value 2 s. , the goods of Samuel Boulter .

SARAH BOULTER . I am the wife of Samuel Boulter - I did not miss these things - they were brought to me on the 21st of March - I had not seen the spoons for seven or eight days. The prisoner had lived in my service eight days.

SARAH LAWTON . I live in Angel-court, Windmill-street - my husband is a porter - I have known the prisoner six years, She came to me on the 21st of March, and brought two frills and a cap, which she said she found in Leicester-street, Leicester-square - Mrs. Boulter afterwards claimed them. My husband had recommended her to the prosecutrix.

JOHN BANNISTER . I am servant to Mr. Sharman, of Marylebone-lane, pawnbroker - on the 21st of March the prisoner came and offered us six table spoons, plated - she asked 4 l. 10 s. on them - she said she brought them from a washerwoman, named Mary Smith - and that she lived with one Davis, in Jermyn-street. She was detained.

BENJAMIN VALENTINE . I am an officer. I was sent for to take the prisoner - she said Mrs. Smith, of Windmill-street, gave them her to pawn for her - that she was a washerwoman, and lived in the two pair of stairs. I went and found her - she denied it. The prisoner then said she was a servant to one Davis, in Jermyn-street - all which was false.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Confined One Year .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210411-139

624. HENRY LAWRENCE was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of April , two quarts of wine, value 8 s., and two bottles, value 6 d. , the goods of Charles Revell .

CHARLES REVELL . I am a wine porter . On the 10th of April I had ten dozen of wine to deliver in Spital-square . While I was talking to the servant at the door, the prisoner took two bottles from the cart. I followed him and overtook him about thirty yards off. He tried to put them down - they both fell down and broke. I secured him.

MARY ANN OAK . I am servant to Mr. Gorch, of Spital-square. I saw the prisoner take the two bottles, and told Revell - he followed and brought him back.

Prisoner. They are swearing very wrong.

GUILTY . Aged 58.

Confined One Month .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210411-140

625. MARGARET MURPHY and MARY BROWN were indicted for stealing, on the 12th of March , one pair of gloves, value 2 s., and one handkerchief, value 18 d. , the goods of Joseph West .

JOSEPH WEST . I am a haberdasher , and live in Whitecross-street . Brown came into the shop about half-past seven o'clock in the evening, and while the apprentice was attending to her, I saw Murphy lay her arm on the counter, where the gloves and handkerchief were. The apprentice gave me information, I came out and said to Murphy,

"You have something which does not belong to you in your pockets, turn them out." She produced the gloves. I said,

"You have something more;" she then produced a cravat. Brown began crying, and said,

"Peggy, how could you serve me so - this is the second, time you have got me into a scrape." I gave them in charge. I found Brown had been sent by her mistress to buy cotton.

JOHN THOMAS HARRISON . I am apprentice to the prosecutor. Brown asked for a ball of cotton, but bought none, as she was stopped - Murphy placed her arm over the counter, covered the things with her apron, and drew them into her pocket.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

MURPHY'S Defence. I am quite innocent.

BROWN'S Defence. I know nothing of it.

MURPHY - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

BROWN - NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210411-141

626. JAMES MORRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of February , one pair of boots, value 5 s. , the goods of Daniel John Spencer .

DANIEL JOHN SPENCER . I live in Phillip-street, St. George's in the East . My daughter said somebody was taking away some boots off the drawers in my room. I ran down stairs, and saw a boy at the door, who directed me after the man. I overtook the prisoner - Stamell first took him. I saw him push the boots away, and drop them - he asked if he could not settle it.

WILLIAM STAMELL . I saw the prisoner drop the boots. I am sure he is the man.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Confined six Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210411-142

627. ABRAHAM PENTON was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of March , 5 lbs. of pork, value 3 s., and 2 lbs. of beef, value 1 s. , the goods of Samuel Somers .

SAMUEL SOMERS . I am a butcher , and live at the corner of Skinner-street, Somers-town . On Saturday afternoon, the 31st of March, I was in my back parlour; a person said a man had stolen some meat. I ran out and overtook the prisoner six doors off, and found the beef and pork on him; he said he meant to pay for it - he was rescued, and my son followed him over the fields, and secured him.

DANIEL TALBOT . I am an officer. I took the prisoner on the 31st of March.

Prisoner's Defence. It was necessity. I merely took it in my hand to price it.

GUILTY . Aged 66.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210411-143

ELEVENTH DAY. TUESDAY, APRIL 24.

628. MARY SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of April , 4 lbs. of bacon, value 18 d. , the goods of Edmund Stolworthy .

WILLIAM WARNER . I am shopman to Edmund Stolworthy , a cheesemonger , who lives in Whitechapel . On 7th of April I saw the prisoner opposite our shop, and missed a piece of bacon, which I had seen two minutes before; she had just got across the way, I followed her, she dropped the bacon immediately as I stopped her. I knew it to be ours' - it weighed 4 lbs.

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY. Aged 26.

Judgment Respited .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18210411-144

629. ANN SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of March , forty-one yards of cotton, value 40 s. , the goods of Samuel Cousens .

SAMUEL COUSENS . I am a linen-draper , and live in Norton Falgate . I missed this cotton from my door. Hull brought the prisoner back with it, and said he saw her take it - she did not deny it.

JOHN HULL . I am a linen-draper. I was by Cousens's shop, and saw the prisoner handling some print - suspecting her, I crossed over, and watched her - she walked away, returned, and I saw her take the print, and go about twelve yards from the door. I went and brought her back with it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 16.

Judgment Respited .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18210411-145

630. MARTIN SULLIVAN was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of March , one bed, value 10 s. , the goods of David Frederick Russell .

DAVID FREDERICK RUSSELL . I keep the Rose and Crown, Essex-street, Whitechapel . On Saturday, the 17th of March, the prisoner came, stated himself to be a traveller, and asked for a lodging; he came at night to sleep, and went to bed between seven and eight o'clock. There were two beds in the room, but the one in question was on the landing-place, on another spare bed. In about

an hour and a half, in consequence of what my servant said, I went up, and found this bed tied up, and put into his basket, in his room - he was fast asleep. I sent for an officer, and had him secured. He asked who had tied the bed up in his basket. I told him nobody but himself. He pretended to know nothing about it. His room was on the second-floor - nobody but him had been up there.

JOHN PARTERIDGE . I was fetched, found the prisoner in bed, and the bed tied up in the basket.

Prisoner's Defence. I called in the morning, and left the basket there. I got a little too much to drink, and went to bed - my basket was on the floor.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18210411-146

630. JOHN WHITNEY was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of March , 3 lbs. of beef, value 2 s. , the goods of Samuel Somers .

SAMUEL SOMERS . I am a butcher , and live in Skinner-street, Somer's-town . On the 17th of March I saw the prisoner come in and take this beef off the hook. I stopped him as he came out - he said he was sorry for it. I have made enquiry, and found he was greatly distressed.

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Fined One Shilling, and Discharged .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18210411-147

631. JOHN HART and JAMES MOORE were indicted for stealing, on the 11th of February , four coach glasses, value 3 l. the goods of John Jones ; and WILLIAM LEDDINGHAM was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, knowing them to be stolen .

JOHN JONES . I am a coach-maker , and live in George-street, Portman-square . On the 11th of February, about seven o'clock in the morning when I got up I missed these glasses from the different carriages - they were safe overnight - they were worth 4 l. I have not seen them since. Hart lived in the same mews, close by my premises.

WILLIAM JONES . I am Mr. Jones's nephew. On Sunday morning, the 11th of February, I got up at half-past six o'clock, and going through the yard at seven, I found two carriage doors open, and four glasses taken, they were safe overnight.

SAMUEL RINGROSE . I work with Mr. Jones. On Sunday, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I went to Davis's coffee shop, in Marylebone-lane, and had some coffee, I did not then know of the robbery. Hart came in soon after, I had known him some time about the Mews, he asked me to mind a purse for him till he wanted it, as he was afraid of spending all his money; he put it into my hand - directly after W. Jones, (Mr. Jones's nephew) came in, and Hart gave some loose money into another person's hand to keep for him. Jones told him if he stirred, he would knock him down, and said, he knew what he had done, they sent for an officer - the young man who had the loose money threw it down, and I threw his purse on the table and came out.

ROBERT WOLMER . I am coachman to Colonel Dean, whose coach is kept close to Mr. Jones's premises. On Sunday morning, the 11th of February, I was going to the the stable, and saw Hart in the Mews with a parcel in his arms, it appeared the size and shape of coach glasses, he was going towards the end of the Mews - the watchmen were just going off duty - he turned back to shim them, and came towards me, and went up to two lads who stood at the corner of the Mews, and gave them the parcel, he then called me, and said he wanted to speak to me (I knew him before) I asked where he had been, as he had left his friends for a fortnight or three weeks - he made no answer. I asked what he had on his arms, he said they were carriage glasses which he had been taking out of Mr. Jones's shop - he turned from me. I said

"That will either hang or transport you;" he ran off - I went and told his uncle who informed Mr. Jones.

WILLIAM DAVIS . I keep the coffee-shop. Hart came in between four and five o'clock in the afternoon; Jones came and the constable was fetched - I did not notice Moore in the shop that day.

SAMUEL PLANK . I am an officer, I had been in search of Hart all day, and took him at the coffee-shop. I told him I took him for robbing Mr. Jones, of coach glasses, he said he did take them, that he got out of a window of his uncle's house into Jones's premises. In consequence of what he said, I apprehended Leddingham, and searched for the glasses but found none. I also took Moore from Hart's information - he firmly denied it.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. I believe Leddingham assisted to apprehend one of the boys who contrived to escape - A. Yes.

DANIEL HARVEY . I work with Mr. Cole, a plaisterer, of Barton-street, Manchester-square. On Sunday morning, the 11th of February, about a quarter past seven o'clock, I was in Gloucester-place, Hart came up with a sack and asked where I was going, and asked me to go with him. I went with him to George-street, St. Giles's, and waited at the end of the street - he came to me again with some money - he left the sack in George-street.

HART - GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Seven years .

MOORE - NOT GUILTY .

LEDDINGHAM - NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210411-148

632. JOHN GAME was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of February , 13 lbs. of flour, value 2 s. the goods of Thomas Young .

THOMAS YOUNG . I am a baker and farmer , and live at Enfield , the prisoner was my servant , I suspected him and met him coming up the yard - he had left the waggon which contained nine sacks of flour. I found six of them untied. I searched the stable immediately, and found about 14 lbs. of flour in the corn bin, and a bag under his great coat, it was about eleven o'clock at night - others besides him worked in the stable. He said it was given to him. I weighed the sacks and found them about that weight deficient.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. He had been to the mill for flour - A. Yes; I gave him 14 l. to pay for it - he told the Magistrate it was flour which was shook out of empty sacks. Nobody is here who weighed them at the mill.

JOHN HORGAN . I am an apprentice to Mr. Young. I went to meet the prisoner as he was late coming home, and met him about one hundred yards off; he had the bag on the top of the sacks, and was doing something to the sacks. I afterwards saw the same bag in the stable, he told my master somebody gave it him, and said next day, that it was shakings.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210411-149

633. JOHN HEAD and THOMAS CRAWLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of February , one pelisse, value 1 l. 5 s. the goods of Charlotte Thomas , from the person of Mary Ann Blunt ; and ELIZABETH WARD , was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, knowing it to be stolen .

Crawley pleaded GUILTY . Aged 19.

MARY ANN BLUNT . I am servant to Mrs. Davis, who lives in High-street, Islington. I am thirteen years old. Mrs. Thomas had lent this pelisse to my mistress's sister. Mrs. Thomas lives in Yardley-street, Spa-fields; I was taking it there on Thursday, the 22d of February, about ten minutes past nine o'clock at night; as I went along, I saw a boy and a young man standing by the Angel, they were the prisoners - they followed me to the first turning leading to Sadler's Wells, waited there a little and saw me go down there; they then went on, and I suppose came down the other side by the water - they met me at the New River Head , snatched the pelisse, and ran away with it, they turned round - there was a gas-light, I looked at them, and am quite sure of them, the pelisse was wrapped in two sheets of paper. I saw them and the pelisse at Hatton-garden, on the Monday after, and was quite sure of them.

CHARLOTTE THOMAS . I am a widow, and live in Yardley-street. I lent the pelisse to Davis one wet night - it was not returned till the officer brought it to me.

JOSEPH CADBY . I am a constable of Clerkenwell. On the 22d of February, I was informed of this robbery, and next day Taylor and I went to search, I found Head and Crawley at Ward's house, in Fryingpan-alley. Ward had the pelisse in a handkerchief, half untied, she was in the act of tying it up - she threw it on the bed; I said it was what we wanted. I took the boys away - she followed after them, and I took her also.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODERICK. Q. She is a girl of the town - A. Yes; the boys had their coats off and were singing - she said she did not know where they got it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

HEAD'S Defence. I met Crawley he asked me to go with him. I had not been there half a minute when they came and took us. I was in bed the night before at nine o'clock.

HEAD - GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years .

WARD - NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210411-150

634. PAUL BEAL was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of March , 2 lbs. of beef, value 18 d. 8 lbs. of Mutton, value 4 s.; one loaf, value 8 d.; and one knife, value 2 d. , the goods of Joseph Jesson .

JOSEPH JESSON . I keep the Marquis of Granby, public-house, St. Catherine's . On the 6th of March, about eight o'clock at night, the prisoner was at my house, and these articles were in a safe, in the passage.

ELIZA JESSON . On the 6th of March, about eight o'clock, the prisoner was walking about the passage, I was coming down stairs and saw the prisoner take the mutton, he saw me and threw it down. I called my father and missed the other articles - he was secured, and six penny loaves found on him.

SAMUEL MILLER . I am a constable. I found the knife on him.

GUILTY. Aged 53.

Judgment Respited .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210411-151

635. MARY SIMMONDS and SARAH EVANS were indicted for stealing, on the 24th of March , one pocket-book, value 6 d.; one 30 l., one 20 l., and ten 1 l. Bank notes, the property of William Sallett , from his person .

WILLIAM SALLETT . I live at the Naval school, Blackwall. On the 24th of March, between half-past six and seven o'clock, I had been drinking at a public-house, in Winkfield-street. I had received these notes from Grote and Prescott's, and had it all safe in my pocket-book, which was in my jacket pocket. I was the worse for liquor, but not insensible. I went into a shop for half an ounce of tobacco. Evans came in and asked me to walk up stairs with her. I went to the front room - first floor, and found Simmonds there - I staid about five minutes. Evans went below leaving us together; she said it was her sister's room, but her house was over the way. I went over into George-yard with her, to a front room on the first floor, and some time after Evans came up and asked what was the matter. Simmonds said

"He will only give me -

"mentioning some sum, what I forget. I found myself in an awkward predicament - Evans said I will take it, and I gave it her - what it was I cannot say - it was either 18 d. or 2 s. I had given it to Simmonds and she gave it to Evans. Simmonds came and leant over my left shoulder or under my arm, and took my pocket-book from my pocket, and went down stairs immediately - I jumped up and followed her. Evans did not attempt to hinder me - - this was Saturday. I saw her again on Wednesday week following - they were taken in Shire-lane, Temple-bar I have not recovered my property. I am positive of their persons.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODERICK. Q. What age are you - A. Thirty-seven - I am boatswain's mate on board the School ship. I was not very drunk. I had seen two or three girls about an hour or two before. This happened about half-past six or seven o'clock. I had received the money in payment for board wages, of some of the lads on board.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210411-152

634. CHARLOTTE MILLER was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of February , one waiter-stand, value 2 s.; two pair of stockings, value 2 s.; one bolster, value 2 s., and one pillow, value 2 s. , the goods of Joseph Vining , and JOHN DAWS was indicted for feloniously receiving the same knowing them to be stolen .

ELIZA VINING . I am wife of Joseph Vining , and live in Howard-street, Norfolk-street, Strand . The prisoner Miller lived a fortnight with us as servant , and during that time, I missed several things, and found all but the stockings at Daws's lodgings; one pair were found on her feet, and the other in a drawer in the kitchen; she said they were mine, and she had taken other things - this was on the 28th of February.

DOROTHY ROBINSON . I live in Jeffrey's-gardens, Horseferry-road. Daws lodged with us, and lived in the same room; Miller did not come to see him. On the day before the officer came I saw him bring in a pillow, bolster, and waiter-stand - he said nothing about them.

MARY GRAY . I am Robinson's daughter, and live with Miller's mother, in Langly-court, Stretton-ground. Daws brought the pillow, bolster, and stand to my room, a day or two before he was taken; he said they were not his own, that they were purchased for 6 s. Next day, Miller came to my room, I asked her if she sent any thing by Daws, she said she sent a bundle, and said they were her own, and it was all right. I understood from her that she was going to leave her place on Saturday; Daws afterwards took them out of my room; they were found at my mother's - he brought them in a bundle and untied them.

FRANCIS HOLYLAND . I am a constable. I apprehended Miller on the 27th of February; I told her the charge against her; the prosecutrix claimed the stockings on her legs, they had the initials picked out, but I could trace the marks. I went to Daws's lodging and found the things, and another pair of stockings tucked in between the bolster - they had the initials on them. I took Daws ten minutes after at Miller's mother's - he said Miller brought him the things.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JAMES HEMMINGS . I was errand boy to Mr. Vining, and have seen both the prisoner's in company in the kitchen, four or five times - he visited her. I saw her pick the marks out of some stockings; the bell rang, and I heard her say, when she came down, that they were Mrs. Vining's, that she had plenty, and did not want them - I told mistress.

MILLER'S Defence. I deny picking the marks out, or any thing being found on me; the pair I had on, were my own; as to the other things, Daws understood that I bought them.

DAWS'S Defence. I went to see Miller; she gave me these things, saying she bought them of a cook, and asked me to take them to her mother's; she was not at home, and I took them to Gray.

MILLER - GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined Two Months .

DAWS - NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210411-153

637. THOMAS BALLS was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of March , one glass salt holder and stand, value 2 s., and one glass tumbler, value 1 s. , the goods of Paul Wyman .

PAUL WYMAN. I am a broker , and live in King-street, Clerkenwell On the 8th of March, about five o'clock in the afternoon, these things were on a table in the shop; in consequence of what was told me, I went out, turned the corner, and followed the prisoner who had turned up Seward-street - another boy was with him; when they saw me, they set off running. I called Stop thief! and they called out also. I saw the prisoner throw some of the property over the rails of a yard; I knew him before, and went to his father's - he was not at home. When I got home, I missed a salt-holder, stand, and tumbler; a man produced the stand from over the rails - It was in my shop just before.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. By what do you know it - A. I have more at home. He was not at home. I went out and took him in the street, he was dressed in a brown coat; I think I can positively swear it was brown. I knew him by sight very well before. I did not want any thing from his father to settle it. I know where the other boy is, but do not wish to trouble my head about it.

SARAH SCOTT . I live next door to the prosecutor. I saw two boys standing by his door - I only know one of them, and that is the prisoner. I saw him stoop and take something from the door, I said,

"Bring that back directly;" he turned round and laughed at me. I saw him with glass in his hand, and told the prosecutor which way he went.

Cross-examined. Q. What are you - A. My husband is a butcher, it is a corner house; the prisoner was dressed in a brown coat and leather apron - I saw him take the things.

THOMAS BURNIGE . I am a constable. I received the prisoner in charge.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent.

JOHN BOOTLE . I keep a coal and potatoe warehouse in Seward-street. I was standing at my warehouse, and heard a cry of Stop thief! I jumped upon my step, and two boys passed me on the run - no one was pursuing them particular.

Q. What do mean by particular - A. Not close to them; people were out hearing the cry; two boys ran by, one in blue, and the other in brown; the one in blue threw the glass over, and ran towards John's-row, I followed, but he was too nimble for me; a little boy called out,

"Ball." Ball went one way, and the one who threw the glass another.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Confined Three Months and Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210411-154

638. WILLIAM WOODROFFE was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of February , two pair of gloves, value 2 s. , the goods of Joseph West .

JOSEPH WEST . I am a hosier , and live in White Cross-street . On the 21st of February, about twelve o'clock, I went into my parlour, and in half a minute my lad said they had pulled the gloves. I ran out and saw the prisoner in company with two others, walking down Old-street, about fifty yards off. I got in front of the prisoner, and saw him putting the gloves on his hands, and secured him with them; he had the other pair in his pocket - they were pinned together before.

THOMAS HARRISON . I am apprenticed to Mr. West. I saw the prisoner with two others, passing and repassing several times; the braces hung on a rod about a foot

inside the shop. I heard a violent pull, I jumped over the counter and missed the gloves from the door, and saw the prisoner and two others running off; we followed them, and caught the prisoner with one pair on.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I met two boys who asked me to buy them, I tried one pair on, and the gentleman took me.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined One Year , and Publicly Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210411-155

639. ISAAC WOLF was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of April , 8 s. in monies numbered, the property of David Hart , from his person .

DAVID HART . I am a Thames police officer , and live in Russell-street, Bermondsy. On the 12th of April, about half-past eight o'clock at night, I was coming by the East London Theatre , and saw a number of people in the alley near the theatre, and went to see what was the matter. I stood against the corner of the door, and had not been there above two minutes, before I felt a hand in my right hand breeches pocket; I seized it, looked round, and saw a face, but the hand was immediately snatched away. I cannot say whether it was the prisoner or not; I waited there a few minutes, as the company were going into the theatre. When I felt the hand, I found my pocket turned inside out, and three half crowns and 6 d. gone; this was not the pocket in which I felt the hand; they had robbed this first. I saw my money again, and knew one of the half crowns by a mark which I pointed out to the officer - I had taken it in the course of the day; it was one of George IV. and the first I ever saw; it had a scratch on the head from the nose to the four figures of 1 - I found that it corresponded.

FREDERICK DORRINGTON . I am a patrol of Bow-street. I was at the Royalty, as the half-price was going in, and saw the prisoner attempt several people's pockets. I saw him put his hand round Hart, and put his fingers about half way into his pocket, but saw him take something. Presently Hart came back; I went after the prisoner and took him in less than three minutes, under the gallery of the Theatre, at the outer seat. I found three half crowns and 6 d. on him; Hart described a mark on one half crown before I produced it.

HART. This is the half crown.

Prisoner's Defence. He said he could not say any of it was his.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210411-156

640. JOHN WRIGHT was indicted for stealing, on the 26th March , 3 lbs. of pork, value 3 s. , the goods of Elisha Knight .

ELISHA KNIGHT . I am a cheesemonger , and live in Pleasant-place, Battle-bridge - the pork was mine.

WILLIAM COLTEN . I am a broker, and live about fourteen doors from Wright. I saw a man take the pork from his window, and give it to the prisoner - he put it under his arm. I secured him as he was putting it in his pocket.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Fined One Shilling and discharged .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210411-157

641. WILLIAM JACKSON was indicted for embezzlement .

CHARLES STEVENS . I am a grocer, and live in Shoreditch . I employed the prisoner to carry out goods, and to receive money for them . On the 4th of April I sent him out with goods, and gave him a bill and receipt 1 l. 13 s. 6 d. from Mr. Lewis - this was on Wednesday - he did not return, and I took him on Saturday. He begged forgiveness.

EDWARD LEWIS . I am a tailor, and live in Stanhope-street. I owed Stevens 1 l. 13 s. 6 d. On the 4th of April the prisoner brought some goods, with a bill and receipt for it. I paid him a 1 l. note and 10 s., and wrote back word why I did not pay the rest. Stevens called on me about eleven o'clock that night.

GEORGE SMITH . I am a constable. I took the prisoner on Saturday. He begged forgiveness.

Prisoner's Defence. I met a friend, got drinking, and had the misfortune to lose it. I wrote to him to offer to pay it at 2 s. per week.

LEWIS re-examined. When he was taken he did not say he had lost it. His wife said, in his hearing, that he had spent it - he made no reply.

NOT GUILTY . Aged 27.

Confined Three Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210411-158

643. WILLIAM WADE was indicted for embezzlement .

JAMES WILKINSON . I deal in earthen-ware , and live in a cottage at Paddington . I entrusted the prisoner to take out goods, and receive the money for them . I hired him till August next, at 14 s. per week, board and lodging. On the 3d of April he started with goods to the amount of 3 l. 1 s. 8 d. - he did not return. I found him next day, at the Globe, public-house, in the Borough-road, and told him he might as well give me up the license, and what money he had - he refused and used ill language. I asked him repeatedly - he kept abusing me, and I sent for an officer. I got back goods to the amount of 1 l. 11 s. 3 d. - all the rest were gone - he gave me no money.

JAMES ARNOLD . I am a baker, and live in Pennington-place, Lambeth. On the 30th of April I bought a set of china of the prisoner, for which I paid him 11 s. in silver. I saw Wilkinson in the following week, and told him.

CHARLES HUSKETT . I took him in custody.

Prisoner's Defence. I had some ale with a friend, he kept me some time - it was too late to go home. I fell in with a woman, went home with her, and do not know how the money went.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined Three Months and Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210411-159

643. THOMAS HERRING was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of February , one pair of pantaloons, value 2 s. , the goods of George William Finch .

GEORGE WILLIAM FINCH , ESQ. I live at No. 62, Lincoln's Inn fields - these trowsers were in my bed room. I was sitting in the front room - heard somebody in the bed room, and went and found the prisoner there, with a large basket on the ground, half full of my clothes, and on

the top of it the trowsers - he had no business in the place - he had opened my wardrobe and half filled the basket. While I was ringing for the servants, he re-placed the things in the wardrobe.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY Q. Was the door left open - A. Not to my knowledge - the house is let out in chambers.

JOHN ELLIS . I took him in charge, and found two bundles of quills, and two small keys in the basket.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined One Year and Publicly Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210411-160

644. ROBERT BLACKMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of March , one handkerchief, value 4 s., the goods of Thomas Arthur .

THOMAS ARTHUR . On the 10th of March, about two o'clock in the morning, I was looking at a caricature shop in St. James's-street , and lost a handkerchief from my pocket. I did not miss it till the officer produced it.

WILLIAM JONES . I am a constable - I was watching the prisoner for ten minutes, and observed him very active about this shop, and saw him looking at the prosecutor's pocket. I watched and saw him put his hand in and take the handkerchief out - he pushed out of the crowd - I went after him, and took him with it in his hand.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAM EWER . I am a constable - I saw the prisoner close to the prosecutor, but did not see him take the handkerchief - Jones took him with it in his hand - he made a great resistance.

WILLIAM MASON . I am a constable - I saw Jones seize the prisoner, with the handkerchief.

EDWARD RHIND . I saw the prisoner take the handkerchief.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was going to my uncle's - I saw the handkerchief laying down, and picked it up and gave it him.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210411-161

645. MARY CHUTE and MARY STEVENS were indicted for stealing, on the 3d of March , from the person of James Ward , one sock value 1 d.; 25 s., and four 1 l. Bank notes, his property .

The prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210411-162

646. JOHN CRAWLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of March , one quilt, value 4 s , the goods of James Norman .

JAMES NORMAN . I keep a coffee and chop-house , at No. 57, Wych-street - this quilt was in the one pair back room - the prisoner is a stranger - I took him in the house, hearing my daughter call Stop thief!

HARRIET NORMAN . My mother was ill a-bed - I was up stairs, hear her call out, went down, and saw the prisoner in her room - she said

"Stop that man, he has taken something" - I ran and saw the quilt under his arm; he threw it down, I picked it up - he had taken it off my mother's bed. We have lodgers - the street door was left open, but her door was shut. It was between twelve and one o'clock at night.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A man told me to meet him at this shop, and he would give me work - they said there was another room up stairs - I went up, and picked this quilt up off the floor.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined One Year , and Publicly Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210411-163

647. HENRY HERET was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of April , ten metal cocks, value 20 s. , the goods of Joseph Samuel Cox .

SARAH COX . I am wife of Joseph Samuel Cox , a locksmith , who lives in Whitcomb-street . On the 12th of April, about half-past seven o'clock at night, the prisoner and another came in - one asked for a pair of finger plates, and the prisoner for a pair of hinges. While I shewed the finger plates, he reached down some parcels - one of them fell, I picked it up, and saw he had two parcels of metal cocks under his arm - there were five in each parcel. I ran round the counter and secured him - my husband secured the prisoner - the other ran away.

EDWARD RHIND . I took him in custody at the door, with one parcel under his arm, and another at his feet. There was an attempt to rescue him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. It is a troublesome business - I wish you to settle it among yourselves.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210411-164

648. ANTHONY HARROGAN was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of April , one fish-kettle, value 7 s. , the goods of William Wray .

SARAH WRAY . I am the wife of William Wray , who is a tin-plate worker - we live in High Holborn . A boy said the fish kettle was stolen I went out and stopped the prisoner one house off, with it - he was putting a loaf out of his basket into it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A lady bid me buy one - I was measuring this, when they took me.

GUILTY . Aged 60.

Confined One Year .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210411-165

649. SARAH MURRAY was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of March , one jar, value 2 s., and 6 lbs. of tobacco, value 30 s. , the goods of William Hambleton .

ELIZA HAMBLETON . I am the wife of William Hambleton . The prisoner came into the shop, on Mutton-hill - I saw her go out with the tobacco in the jar under her

arm - there were 6 lbs. or 8 lbs. of tobacco in it. I went after her, and secured her.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 37.

Confined Three Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210411-166

650. CHARLES JEWELL , JAMES NEWBERRY , and WILLIAM CAMELFORD were indicted for stealing, on the 7th of March , one handkerchief, value 2 s., the goods of Edward King , from his person .

EDWARD KING . I am a clerk On the 7th of March I was returning through Lincoln's Inn Fields, in my way home, about eleven o'clock at night. I was passing at the end of Duke-street , where there is a gateway, saw three boys - the youngest came out and asked me to give him a penny - It was Jewell - I replied, it was quite time for him to be a-bed, and told him to go about his business. I walked on, and in about half a minute I heard one of them cry out. I turned round, and saw Jewell with my handkerchief in his hand, and my dog had hold of his thumb. I seized the handkerchief - he let it go immediately, and ran away. I kept my eye on Camelford, and secured him - he cried out that it was not him that took the handkerchief, it was the other boy. I asked who the other boy was - he said he did not know. I gave him to the watchman, who got from him where the other boys were. They were taken in less than five minutes - I cannot speak to Newbery.

JOHN QUIFF . I am a watchman - Camelford was given in charge to me - he gave me information, and I found the others close by, behind a cart.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JEWELL'S Defence. I was playing with the dog, it bit me - I went to hit it, but brushed by the gentleman's cuff.

CAMELFORD'S Defence. He was playing with the dog, and hit the gentleman's pocket.

JEWELL - GUILTY . Aged 9.

Confined Two Months , and Whipped .

CAMELFORD - NOT GUILTY .

NEWBERRY - NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18210411-167

651. GEORGE REVIERS was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of March , one trunk, value 8 s. , the goods of John James .

CHARLES JAMES . I live with my father, John James , who is a trunk-maker , and lives at No. 95, Coventry-street - the prisoner was brought in with the trunk, which I had seen in front of the shop about an hour before, and know it to be ours'.

RICHARD HOWARD . I am constable of St. Martin's. I was coming off duty at the House of Commons, and saw the prisoner run by my door about seven o'clock with the trunk before him; he came down Coventry-court - the prosecutor's house is at the corner of the court. I thought by his manner, that he had stolen it, and so I went after him - he dropped it, and ran away. I pursued, took him, and said,

"You have taken this trunk, where did you get it from?" He said he had been to the coffee-shop in the court. I found it belonged to Mr. James.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was out of place, and had pawned and sold all my clothes - hunger drove me to do it. I throw myself on the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined Six Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18210411-168

652. SAMUEL RUSHTON and JAMES EWING were indicted for stealing, on the 12th of March , one brass cock, value 10 s. , the goods of William Patterson .

WILLIAM PATTERSON . I keep the Cock, public-house, Brook-street, New-road . I lost a brass cock - I do not know who took it. The officers produced it.

JOHN SMITH . I am an officer of Bow-street. On Monday, the 12th of March, between six and seven o'clock in the evening, I was on duty in Tottenham-court-road, with Davis, and saw the prisoners together, near Howland-street - Rushton appeared to have something under his jacket; I spoke to Davis to follow them, he did so; when I came up I found them in his custody; he gave me this cock. I shewed it to Patterson, who claimed it.

JOHN DAVIS . I am an officer. I was in company with Smith, and followed the prisoners - it was about three hundred yards from Patterson's. I followed them down Howland-street, they turned down John-street, I got close to them, and laid hold of one with each hand - Ewing then had the cock under his jacket - he dropped it, and said he would never do so any more. I gave the cock to Smith. Rushton said he was employed by the other to go with him to the Cock, in Brook-street, and that the cock was laid in the area, so that they could reach it, and he was to have part when it was sold. Rushton afterwards stated that Ewing had lived at the Cock a few days previous, and he had put it there. I took them both into custody.

WILLIAM PATTERSON re-examined. I do not swear to the cock. I missed one about the size of this - I did not miss it till the officer brought it; I had used it a long time before; when the officers came I went into the cellar, and missed one. I had not seen it there for fourteen or fifteen weeks - I had not been down there. Ewing had been with me for a day or two.

RUSHTON'S Defence. We were walking along, Davis came and took hold of us, turned us about, and the cock laid in the middle of the road.

RUSHTON - GUILTY. Aged 13.

EWING - GUILTY. Aged 14.

Judgment Respited .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18210411-169

653. JAMES VAUGHAN and ROBERT JACKSON were indicted for stealing, on the 5th of April , four fenders, value 30 s. , the goods of George Bishop .

GEORGE BISHOP . I am a broker and coal-dealer , and live at No. 16, Baldwin's-gardens . I lost four fenders from my shop on the 5th of April - I had seen them a quarter of an hour before - I was gone into Liquorpond-street, and on my return they were gone. I saw them next day in possession of Davis, who had the prisoners in custody.

WILLIAM DAVIS . I am a toy-maker. I was in Baldwin's-gardens, and saw the prisoners loitering about the prosecutor's premises with another; I saw a man take the fenders out of Bishop's shop, run off with them, and give them to Vaughan - that man got off. They were all three in company. I saw the prisoners taken.

JOHN DAVIS . I keep a shop in Baldwin's-gardens, four doors from the prosecutor's; the last witness is my son. I told him to go and watch the prisoners, whom I saw loitering about the prosecutor's house; at first the two prisoners were about, and then a third joined them. I saw the one who has escaped come repeatedly to my shop, and look at my boots, then cross, and speak to the others. The man who has escaped took the fenders from Bishop's shop, I ran out, and saw him with them on his shoulder. I followed all three into Hole-in-the-Wall-passage, when the man gave them to Vaughan, after carrying them some way. After following them altogether some way, I took Jackson, and gave him into custody of a butcher, followed the other, but lost the man who took them, ran round, into Gray's Inn-lane, saw Vaughan, and took him. The man who took the fenders, said to Vaughan,

"Come, you take them;" and he took them.

WILLIAM READ . I am an officer. The prisoner was given into my charge with the fenders.

GEORGE BISHOP re-examined. I cannot swear to the them. I lost four such on that day.

JACKSON'S Defence. I went to see my father, came down Holborn, into Baldwin's-gardens, and when I came to Hole-in-the-Wall-passage a man came up, and asked Vaughan to carry them to Mr. Ball's, a fender and fire-iron maker, and he would give him sixpence; in Brook's-market a man caught hold of him, and said they were stolen.

VAUGHAN'S Defence. I have the same to say.

VAUGHAN - GUILTY . Aged 19.

JACKSON - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined Six Months , and Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18210411-170

654. THOMAS JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of March , one hat, value 5 s. the good of William Blake , from his person .

SAMUEL RAVEN . I am a private watchman. I was in Russel-street, Whitechapel , at one o'clock in the morning, I heard the cry of Stop thief; the prisoner ran by me - I followed, and overtook him about three hundred yards off, and saw him throw the hat over the iron rails into the area. I stopped him, he said,

"What do you run after me for, I have nothing about me." I took him to the watch-house, and in the mean time the prosecutor came up with the hat, and charged the prisoner with stealing it, and a pair of gloves - he gave the name of Mr. Blake - he is not here. The prisoner did not deny it.

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18210411-171

655. WILLIAM SPRAY was indicted for embezzlement .

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18210411-172

656. JAMES PAIN was indicted for embezzlement .

SAMUEL DALTON . I am a corn-chandler , and live in Camden-place, Camden town . I employed the prisoner occasionally to go out with the horse and cart, he was employed by the day as carman . I believe this was paid on the 4th day of his services. I paid him 2 s. or 2 s. 6 d. a day, according to his time. I employed him to deliver my goods and authorised him to receive money for me. On the 16th January , I sent him to Mr. Stanford, of Finchley, with corn, and gave him a receipt for 8 l. 13 s. 6 d., which he was to receive; he came home about three o'clock in the afternoon with the horse and cart. I was obliged to go to bed ill, and saw no more of him till about the beginning of this month, when I saw him at Guildhall, he never came near me, nor ever accounted to me for this money. When he was apprehended he offered to satisfy me. I had not discharged him.

RICHARD STANFORD . I live at Finchley, and deal with Dalton for corn. On the 16th of January, I paid the prisoner 8 l. 13 s. 6 d. on his account, and produce the receipt (read) I gave him a 5 l. and three 1 l. notes, the rest in silver.

JOHN DAVIS . I took the prisoner in custody, and told him what it was for, he said he was coming over Finchley common and lost 2 l. of the money, and was afraid to return to his master, and absconded.

Prisoner's Defence. I have no more to say than what I told the constable.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18210411-173

657. FREDERICK KITCHEN and JOHN BARRY were indicted for stealing, on the 5th of April , one handkerchief, value 5 s. the goods of a certain man whose name is unknown , from his person .

WILLIAM COULTON . I am a broker, and live at Battle-bridge. On the 5th of April, between one and two o'clock in the day, I was going through Seven Dials; the prisoner, with four others, were tossing up with halfpence, a gentleman crossed the Seven Dials, his handkerchief just appeared hanging out of his pocket - I could hardly observe it; the prisoners and the others immediately jumped up from their halfpence and ran after him down Queen-street , Barry and another walked some distance behind, looking behind, while the other three ran up to the gentleman. I saw Kitchen take this handkerchief from the gentleman's pocket, and put it into his breast - they all ran away one after the other. I then returned back, they observed me coming back after them. Kitchen ran into a coffee-shop and eating-house, with two others, while Barry, and another, stood at the door to watch me. I thought it unsafe to go into the coffee-shop. Just as I was going in, Kitchen ran out, Barry whistled and he ran into an iron shop. I took him with the handkerchief, and have had it ever since. I took Barry two or three days after, and have never found the gentleman.

WILLIAM JORDAN . I am a japanner and an officer. I was with Coulton, going to Bond-street, and observed the prisoners and others playing in Seven Dials, Coulton said they have taken a gentleman's handkerchief. I ran after the others - I had seen them altogether in company.

WILLIAM THISSELTON. I am an officer of Hatton-garden. I saw Coulton with Kitchen in custody, and about one hundred and fifty or two hundred men after him. I I told him he was charged with stealing a fogle - he said it was through distress. I found 2 s. 11 d. on him - this was Thursday; on the Saturday following, I received Barry in charge.

JAMES FOWLER. I am an officer. I went with Coulton to Seven Dials, into a coffee-shop, there was nearly twenty bad characters there. Coulton said that was one of the party who robbed the gentleman (it was Barry) I told him I wanted him for robbing a gentleman of his handkerchief, he said he knew no such person as Kitchen, and afterwards, as we came along, he said he did know Kitchen, but he did not know he would split.

KITCHENS'S Defence. The gentleman came and took me in a coffee-shop.

BARRY'S Defence. I never saw these boys till I came to Newgate.

KITCHEN - GUILTY . Aged 16.

BARRY - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Two Months , and Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18210411-174

658. WILLIAM MELLIS and THOMAS HAWKINS were indicted for stealing, on the 8th of March , two loaves of bread, value 18 d. the goods of Peter Ferguson .

ARCHIBALD HOWIE . I am a baker, and live in Rosamond-street. I am servant to Mr. Ferguson. I was serving my customers - I went into the Coach and Horses to get refreshment, and left my basket at the door. I came out in about ten minutes or a quarter of an hour and missed two quartern loaves. I have never seen them. I saw Mellis running, and saw a lad of my acquaintance secure him as he went through the archway. I took Hawkins myself as I came out of the public-house.

ANN HUGHES . I am servant at a house opposite the Coach and Horses - I was at the nursery window, and saw the baker's basket; three boys were playing about, two of them went up and took two quartern loaves, it was the prisoners - they gave it to the other boy who ran away with them. I saw the prisoners taken at the time, and am sure of their persons.

WILLIAM CLARK . I am an officer, I was coming along, and Howie gave the prisoners in my charge.

MELLIS'S Defence. I am innocent.

HAWKINS'S Defence. I have only a father, and he is in the poor-house.

MELLIS - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Whipped and Discharged .

HAWKINS - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Judgment Respited .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18210411-175

TWELFTH DAY, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 25.

659. JAMES BROOKS was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of January , from the person of John Wilcock , 7 s. in monies numbered, and two 1 l. Bank notes, his property .

JOHN WILCOCK . I am a labourer , and live in Goulston-street, Whitechapel. On the 4th of January, I was at the Compasses public-house, Brick-lane , drinking. I had deposited three 1 l. Bank notes, with the landlord and about 7 s.; I asked him to return them - the prisoner was present. The landlord gave me two 1 l. notes, two half-crowns, and two shillings in silver - the prisoner said Wilcock, have you got your money safe. I said Yes, I have got it in my hand, he instantly knocked it out of my hand, snatched it up and ran away with it - the landlord saw it and went after him with me to different public-houses, but could not find him. I did not see him for a month after, when I met him in Cannon-street, and asked his reason for doing it, as he knew I had a wife and family; he said he did not mean to run away with it, but he would make it up if I would take a trifle at the time, as he could get it. I said if he brought it all I did not mind making it up, he said he could not do it, but would meet me on the Saturday night following at the Osborne's Head, Princes-street. I went there at seven o'clock, the time appointed, and stopped till nine. He did not come - he was taken on the 5th of March. I could not find him before.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. How long had you known him - A. Twelve months - I knew where he lived, and that he worked at Romford - there was two or three girls in company, but not with me. I paid for part of what they had - I was perfectly sober. I received 10 s. from the landlord when I gave him the notes - the reckoning was 13 s. I took none of the girls out, I went to the prisoner's lodging next day, and saw his wife.

Q. Did you not tell her you had been in bad company and lost your money. and if her husband did not make it up you would prosecute him - A. I did not. He proposed something about subscribing to make up my loss. I took an officer to find him, but did not go to Romford.

COURT. Q. What time did you go to the public-house - A. Between three and four o'clock; this happened about seven o'clock - I paid the landlord 3 s.

JONATHAN TOE . I am landlord of the Compasses, public-house, the prosecutor came to my house and called for some beer, he had only 3 l. and no change; he gave me the notes about seven o'clock, which was the time he came into my house, and asked me for them about eight o'clock. I gave him two notes, with two half crowns and 2 s. wrapped in them; the prisoner was in the tap-room, I do not know whether he saw it - I gave him the notes just before the bar. I saw him and the prosecutor bustling together, and immediately went and told them to be quiet. I then went into the bar; there was a dispute among them about seeing whether he had the notes, the prisoner said, let us see whether you have got the notes; the prosecutor put his hand in his pocket, and said,

"Here they are," producing a bit of paper; the prisoner tore it in pieces, and said, that is not a note; the prosecutor then produced them from his pocket, he knocked them out of his hand on the floor, picked them up and ran away with them. We went after him to several houses, but could not find him.

Cross-examined. Q. How many girls were there there - A. My brother's wife and another married woman - there

were no girls of the town; he was quite sober - he came about seven o'clock, as near as I can guess.

GUILTY . Aged 34.

Confined Three Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18210411-176

660. JOHN JEVES was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of March , one sack, value 1 s., and 49 lbs. of meal, value 3 s. , the goods of Daniel Austin .

DANIEL AUSTIN . I am a coal merchant , and live at Mile-end . The prisoner was my servant , and had the care of my corn; an officer brought me the meal and sack. I did not know of the robbery.

WILLIAM DICKENSON . I am patrol of Bow-street. On the 17th of March, about half-past eight o'clock at night, I was on duty at Mile-end, and saw the prisoner about 300 yards from the prosecutor's house, with a sack containing meal. I asked, what he had there, he said, some chaff, that he bought it at Bow; he would not tell me who he bought it off. I told him to put it down, he did so, and said it was meal. I said that he had stolen it, he said he had; he would not tell me who his master was - I found Mr. Austin out.

MR. AUSTIN. I had such meal as this, the prisoner had access to it - the sack is mine.

GUILTY . Aged 33.

Confined Three Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18210411-177

662. WILLIAM GULLEN was indicted for stealing on the 1st of March , four casks, value 25 s. , the goods of Philip Betts Blake and James Mann .

MR. ALLEY conducted the prosecution.

PHILIP BETTS BLAKE . I am in partnership with James Mann , we are brewers , and live at Mile-end .

THOMAS BUTLIN . I am drayman to the prosecutors. On the 1st of March, I took out the beer from the brew-house, Mile-end, and came by Whitechapel church, about ten o'clock in the morning, and put four empty casks down by the church, intending to call for them as I returned. I put them under the rails of the church, in the open street. I returned between six and seven o'clock in the evening, and they were gone. I informed the street-keeper, he said he saw them safe just before. On going home, I told my master, and went that night to look after them, and next morning, about ten o'clock, I went to the prisoner's; he is a cooper, and lives in Wentworth-street, and saw the casks under the shed of his cooperage; I saw them through a hole in the door - he saw me looking through the hole, came out and asked what I wanted there, I said,

"You have got my master's casks;" he said

"Hush, hush, let us make it up;" he offered to return them to me - he agreed to leave them at the cobler's in Montague-street. I went home and told my master I had found them - we went to him; he said he bought them of a drayman of Messrs. Cummings, for 14 s. I got an officer, went to the premises, and found three nine-gallon casks and a kilderkin; the kilderkin was on the premises, and the other three at the cobler's - they were those I lost; about two gallons of beer had been left in the kilderkin, and that was in it when I found it.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. How far is the church from your master's - A. About half a mile - we were in the habit of leaving them there when the horse was overloaded.

Q. The prisoner said he saw them laying in the road, and took them home for security - A. No, he lives a mile from my master's. I had a glass of gin with him. I did not propose to send them to the cobler's, I promised to fetch them from there with the dray, as I was afraid he would make away with them. He did not offer to shew them to me. I called out for an officer, he said

"Hush, Hush, don't make a noise," I do not know why all four were not sent to the coblers.

MR. ALLEY. Q. Was anything done to the cask which was left in his premises - A. Yes, it was all over dirt, and my master's name was defaced - I had examined it in the morning, the mark was chipped off with an adze, the wood was quite fresh chipped - the name Blake and Co. still remained visible.

SAMUEL MILLER . I am an officer. On the 2d of March, I went with Butlin, with a search-warrant to search the prisoner's house, and found a kilderkin which Butlin identified. I asked the prisoner where he got them, he said, a man dressed as a brewer's servant, left them with him, but he had not bought them; he said he bought some other casks of a man named Dunn. He said he took three of the casks to a shoemaker's shop in Old Montague-street - I took him to the office. As we went along,; I had hold of him by the cuff of his coat, he said,

"Don't lead me like a dog, I'll go quiet;" I let him walk by my side, and at the corner of Red Lion-street, he ran off - I pursued, called Stop thief! and secured him.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you ever know a man carry one eighteen and three nine-gallon casks on his back at one time - A. I should think he might, if they were lashed together.

WILLIAM FOSTER . I am an officer. I assisted in securing the prisoner, and found the eighteen-gallon cask on his premises; an attempt had been made to take the name off - it was fresh chipped - about two gallons of beer was in it.

(Property produced, and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. Mr. Blake took four casks from me, and three from the shoemaker's. I told him they were sent there by his man's desire.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210411-178

663. THOMAS ELLIOT was indicted for bigamy .

MR. BARRY conducted the prosecution.

THOMAS VANN . I apprehended the prisoner for bigamy, on a warrant, four or five weeks ago; I shewed him my warrant - he laughed at it.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Where did you take him - A. In Nelson's-buildings, Bath-street, City-road.

JOHN BRADY . I am a hatter. I know the prisoner, and knew him in Ireland, and was present at his marriage there, eleven years ago last May; he was married to Honora Smith , at Castle Harland, in Ireland - I knew them both before, they were both Roman Catholics ; they

were married at the house of Daniel Riley , the priest. I saw his first wife here about an hour ago - I have been in London two years. When I first saw her in town, she was going up with the Queen's address, one day. I saw them together several times, she lived in Grub-street - the prisoner lived near her I believe.

Q. Did you see the marriage ceremony performed - A. I saw them go into the priest's house, and saw them on their knees, and the clergyman in his robes, saying some words. I waited till it was all over, and saw them come away - I saw them married; the prisoner is the man and Smith is the woman.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. What are you - I keep a green-stall in Fuller's-rents - I live in Spread Eagle-court, Gray's Inn-lane. My father farmed some land in Ireland, and lived at Castle Harland. There is a church and chapel there - I am a Catholic. Smith lived about a mile from the priest's, and the prisoner two miles from him - the marriage was about seven or eight o'clock in the evening. I lived near Riley's and knew them both as neighbours. I went in and saw the marriage, the same as another - it was not private, the door was open.

Q. How much do you get for coming here - A. Nothing. I saw them married by the laws of God and man, and that is all I know. Mrs. Elliott told me to come here, she never lived with me, nor in the same house. She told me he was living with another woman. Riley, the priest, lived in the town of Crushyfahan (he is dead) the wedding was at the prisoner's father's, about a mile from the priest's. The priest had a robe on, the same as they generally wear - there was a cross on it - about twenty people were present. I believe Smith's father is dead - they do not have marriage lines in Ireland, that I know of. They signed all their names in a book, and the priest wrote his - the service was in English. I saw them lawfully married, according to the laws of God and man.

Q. Who told you to say that - A. Nobody. I was under no criminal charge before I left Ireland - I was never charged with forgery.

MR. BARRY. Q. Is there the least reason for saying you were ever charged with any crime - A. No.

Q. What do you mean by the marriage being in the afternoon - A. Eating and drinking - they went from the priest's to Smith's father's, and there kept the wedding.

COURT. Q. You said they were married at the priest's, and then at her father's house - A. They were married at the priest's - they went from the father's to be married.

(Here the witness, by desire of MR. ANDREWS, was re-sworn, with the book open, and stated all he had before said was true.)

FANNY BOYLE . I live in Broad Arrow-alley, Grub-street - I know the prisoner; his brother and sister lodged at my house this time twelvemonth, and three months after he brought his wife, and called at my place. I said,

"Is this another sister of your's?" he said, No; it is my wife and child. She lived with me a fortnight - I have seen that woman since - she calls herself Mrs. Elliott - he came backwards and forwards to her, and paid her lodging. I saw her here to-day - he slept there two nights.

JULIA CALE . I am a widow, and live in Type-street - I know the prisoner and his wife Honora Elliott. I first saw her in the court opposite my house - I have seen him and her together. One night he had put her in the watch-house, and said he would give fifty pounds to get his wife out. I saw them together about four or five weeks ago.

HENRY WILLIAM FACEY . I am parish clerk of St. Luke, Old-street, and produce the marriage register, by which I find, that on the 28th of February , 1821, Thomas Elliott, widower, was married to Jane Tayler , by license - it is signed

"J. H. Rice, D. L. Curate." I am one of the subscribing witnesses, and know the prisoner to be the man. It is signed by them.

Cross-examined. Can you swear he is the man - A. I can - I have a full recollection of his person, I should not know the woman.

Prisoner's Defence. What this man swears is all false - I never saw him in my life - and as for the place where the priest lived, it is quite a different land. Her father and mother lived next door.

JOSEPH MURRAY . I lived in Ireland eleven or twelve years ago, at Connykel, at Castle Harland. It is a parish where there is a chapel and church - Father Dan Riley was the priest there - Father John Riley is the priest now. The marriage ceremony is sometimes performed in a private house - they must have authority from the vicar for it.

COURT. Q. What business are you - A. A labouring man. The young man must get a certificate - there is no particular hour for the ceremony being performed. I know a family in Ireland named Elliott, they are Protestants. I am the prosecutor's brother-in-law - my wife is not a Catholic.

GUILTY Aged 36.

Confined Six Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210411-179

664. THOMAS SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of March , 170 lbs. of lead, value 26 s., the property of James Cromwell , and fixed to a certain building of his .

MR. HONE conducted the prosecution.

JAMES CROMWELL . I am a brewer , and live at Hammersmith - In March I missed this lead from the hips of my barn, it was fixed there - I saw it safe on the 10th.

THOMAS CLOSE . I sell herrings and oranges in the country - I saw the prisoner come into the Chaise and Horses, public-house, at Hammersmith, on a Sunday evening, about five or six weeks ago - I never saw him before - I think it was between eleven and twelve o'clock at night. He forced his conversation, and asked where I was going - I said to Windsor - I was travelling with a horse and cart. He asked me if I would earn five shillings, to take this lead to London - he asked the landlord if I could have a bed, and said he would call me at four o'clock in the morning. I had a bed, and the landlord called me at six o'clock. I came down, the prisoner came there, he took me up a lane to a dunghill - he turned some dung off the lead, and told me to fetch the cart. I did so, and brought it to the dunghill - he put the lead in, and I drove off, he said he would follow me. I was to go to Hyde Park Corner, and wait there till he came up to me.

He followed the cart, and at Kensington two officers stopped me - one laid hold of the horse, the other told me to get out - I did not see the prisoner then - I saw him following when I started, and missed him as soon as I got out of Hammersmith. The officer took me.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Where do you live - A. At No. 16, Old Bethlam, Bishopsgate-street, with my mother who is in the bottle trade - she never buys lead, but deals in bottles and rags. I have travelled with oranges about four years, and go through Hammersmith every Tuesday to Brentford market. I stopped at the Chaise and Horses about two months before this - I never slept there before; the lead was in two bags, which were not mine - I did not know the lead was stolen, I was going to Windsor to meet a person who was coming from the country. We left town about nine o'clock at night - I never was in trouble about any thing before.

Q. If you were going to meet a friend, how came you to go back - A. I thought five shillings would be as much as my friend would give me for meeting him - his name is Thomas Page ; he lives in Whitecross-street.

THOMAS DRINKWATER . I keep the Chaise and Horses, at Hammersmith - On Sunday morning, the 12th of March, Close came to my house, about one o'clock. When Smith came in, they shook hands together - Smith asked where he was going, and how trade was with oranges. and asked what time he wanted to get to Windsor; he said seven o'clock would be time enough - then Smith told him he was foolish to go on, as he might go to bed, and get up time enough - they agreed for me to take his horses, and for him to go to bed, which he did, and Smith went home - he appointed to come and call Close at four o'clock, but did not come till six o'clock, and sent me to call him - he got up directly; they had a pint of purl - Smith went away first; Close had his horse put in, and he went away. Instead of going to Windsor, they turned towards London, and turned up Bodmen-lane, which was to the left. I immediately sent for an officer, having heard lead was stolen the night before - I know there is a dunghill at the bottom of that lane.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you know Close before - A. I do not know that I ever saw him - he came to my house about one o'clock in the morning, and Smith came five minutes after - they shook hands, like two friends - the prisoner is a labourer, and lived not far off. They did not go out together first. When the cart came out of the lane, Smith came round the other way, and asked if Close was gone - there are footpaths leading from the lane round that way - he did not mention Close's name, he said

"Is he gone?" - I gave him an answer, and he went away directly.

COURT Q. Which way did he go - A. He turned towards London. Mine is a night-house - the prisoner's house is half a mile from mine; it is nearer to Smith's house than mine - Smith did not stay above half an hour at night - Close never left my house from the time he came in, till he went away with his cart in the morning.

SAMUEL WHITTICK . I am special constable of Hammersmith - Edgson was following this cart, and I joined him. We overtook Smith at Kensington - I said,

"Tom, how are you?" - We got before him, and within about twenty yards of the Half-way-house, overtook the cart, (it is about a mile from where we saw Smith). I went to the horses' heads, and Edgson got in the cart, and took Close, and told him we suspected he had stolen property in his cart. We found two bags of lead in it; we then went off, and took Smith in bed. I have known the prisoner from a child; he is a labourer - he was going towards London.

EDWARD EDGSON . I am a constable. I followed the cart of which Drinkwater had given me a description - I ran as hard as I could towards London, and just as we got through the Turnpike, at Kensington, passed Smith - I was on the other side of the way, and did not speak to him. We overtook the cart just by the iron gates, by the halfway house, about half or three-quarters of a mile from where we saw Smith. I got in - collared Close, and asked what he had in the two sacks - opened one, saw it was lead; he said a person was to give him 5 s. to take it to Hyde-park Corner.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

BENJAMIN BARTLETT . I live in King-street, Hammersmith, and am a plumber. I compared the lead with the barn, it fits exactly.

Prisoner's Defence. I was returning from Brentford, I called at his house and got in conversation with Mr. Close, we talked about trade - he asked if I knew the landlord, and told me to ask him to take care of his horse and cart, and let him have a bed; he asked me to call him at four o'clock - I said I would, but did not awake till six, and then called him, as I had to go to Brentford; he said he would give me a lift in his cart - I said it was too late to go, he said he must go as he had particular business, but did not say what it was. I wished him good-bye, and did not see him any more. Between eleven and twelve o'clock, the officer came and took me out of bed - he took me because he had seen me at the house.

JURY to DRINKWATER. Q. Where does Smith live - A. At Hammersmith, nearer to Windsor than my house, and so does the prosecutor.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210411-180

665. JOHN TANN was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of March , one spoon, value 10 s. the goods of John Pauly .

LOUISA PAULY . I am wife of John Pauly , an engineer , we live in Nelson-place, City-road . On the 27th of March, the prisoner was put in possession of the house, in execution for rent - he was there from nine o'clock until five in the afternoon, and after he left I missed two spoons, and found he had pawned one and redeemed it about an hour after. I sent for an officer, who took him, and he told where he sold it.

WILLIAM COLTON . I am a baker. I took the prisoner at his lodgings in Grub-street - he took us to where the spoon was sold, and said distress drove him to it - he has five children all under nine years of age.

WILLIAM JORDAN . I am an officer. I went to the prisoner's lodgings - he gave me fifty-nine duplicates - every thing he had was in pawn.

BENJAMIN EDWARDS . I took the spoon in pawn of the prisoner on the 27th of March.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I have a wife and five children - my wife is pregnant. I applied to the parish four times.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Confined Fourteen Days .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210411-181

666. THOMAS FISHER was indicted for embezzlement .

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210411-182

666. THOMAS CONDON was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of March , three pair of stays, value 7 s. the goods of Alfred Carter .

NATHANIEL ELLIS . I am collector of the Chelsea Water-works. On the 19th of March, about seven o'clock at night, I was in Oxford-street , and saw five or six lads near Carter's shop. I suspected them to be pick-pockets, and felt to see if my pocket was secure - two of them fell back, the prisoner was one of them. I turned round to see if they were near me, and saw the prisoner coming out of the shop, tucking something under his jacket. I said

"You have been stealing something" - he said,

"Me, Sir;" I said

"Yes; what have you here," he threw the stays down - I secured him, part of his cuff gave way and I collared him.

MARY ANN COOPER . The stays are the property of my employer, Alfred Carter .

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210411-183

667. JOHN TIMMINS was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of April , three trowels, value 3 s. the goods of Joseph Brown .

JOSEPH BROWN . I am a plaisterer . On the 7th of April, I was working in Regency-street , and left my trowels in the house while I went to dinner - on returning I missed them and next morning found it in the officer's possession.

RICHARD ROWE WICKS . I am a constable. On the 7th of March, about one o'clock, I saw the prisoner with a quantity of bolts under his jacket, and watched him into an old iron shop, in Short's Gardens, went in and found him offering them for sale. I took him in custody.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. They swear false, they were my old masters.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210411-184

668. JOSEPH PEELING and JOHN BILLETT were indicted for stealing, on the 29th of March , one bullock's tongue 5 s. , the goods of Isaac Page .

DANIEL COLE . I am shopman to Mr. Isaac Page , an oilman , who lives in Great Portland-street ; this tongue was stolen from the door.

CHARLES READ . I am an officer. About eight o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoners, suspecting them, I followed them, and just as I turned the corner, one of them snatched this tongue down - I saw them run from the shop with it - they had nothing before. I followed and stopped Billet, he said he had it of Peeling, and Peeling said he did not have it from him.

JOHN DAVIS . I met Read, following the prisoners. I went on; soon after the prisoners came by me with something - they had nothing before; we stopped them, one said it was a tongue which he had from the other, and the other said he knew nothing about it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

PEELING'S Defence. I met this man, he said he was going my way; he left me, and soon after brought the tongue up, saying he found it.

BILLETT'S Defence. They have both told an untruth - the tongue laid inside some rails in the New-road - I took it out.

PEELING - GUILTY . Aged 19.

BILLETT - GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years ,

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210411-185

669. ELIZA STANTON was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of April , one cloak, value 5 s. , the goods of Thomas Miller and Ann Smith .

THOMAS MILLER . I am in partnership with Ann Smith, we are pawnbrokers , and live in Golden-lane . On the 13th of April, about four o'clock, I was told a woman had taken something from the door, I ran out and took the prisoner with the cloak in her lap.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 46.

Confined Three Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210411-186

670. GEORGE STANTON was indicted for stealing on the 9th of April , one adze, value 5 s.; two planes, value 8 s.; and one rule, value 2 s. , the goods of Simeon Clark .

SIMEON CLARK . I am a carpenter . On Saturday night I left my tools safe at a building in Popham-terrace , and on Monday I missed them.

EDWARD PALMER . I am a watchman. On Monday morning about 5 o'clock, I met the prisoner in Lower-street, Islington, with the tools, and took him to the watch-house.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined One Month .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210411-187

671. WILLIAM APPLEBY and ISAAC CRAWLEY , were indicted for stealing, on the 13th of April , one boot, value 5 s. , the goods of William Chapple .

WILLIAM CHAPPLE . I am a boot-maker ; I only know the property.

THOMAS POVEY . I am a shoemaker, and live opposite to William Chapple : on Friday evening, the prisoners were loitering about his shop; I watched them some time; they came back, and Appleby took the boot and gave it to Crawley; I called stop thief, and they were immediately taken. I am sure of their persons.

THOMAS HOPKINS . I was going along Chandos-street , opposite the prosecutor's shop, somebody called stop thief; I ran after the prisoners, and saw them drop the boot between them; I collared them both, when Crawley asked what it was to me.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

APPLEBY'S Defence. I heard the cry, and witness stopt me.

APPLEBY - GUILTY . Aged 22.

CRAWLEY - GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210411-188

672. ROBERT CALLON was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of March , one pair of stockings, value 2 s., and a watch ribbon, value 6 d. , the goods of John Ficken .

JOHN FICKEN . I live with my father, who is a haberdasher ; his name is John Ficken . On the 15th of March the window was cut, and seven or eight pairs of stockings taken out.

STEPHEN HAPGOOD . I saw a boy lurking about the prosecutor's window. I went up, and saw the prisoner pull a pair of stockings through the square of glass; I ran after him, he threw them away, and I secured him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210411-189

673. CHARLES BARBER was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of March , one carpet, value 30 s. , the goods of James Miller .

WILLIAM WADE . On the 15th of March, about seven in the evening, I was near Clerkenwell-green , and could see Miller's the broker's shop; I saw the prisoner on the Green, and saw him take the carpet, which hung on the pailings outside the shop, and run away with it; he had two more with him; he ran down the Green, and I showed him to Miller's young man. I saw him a few minutes after, and knew him to be the boy who received it. Another boy took it and threw it down; the prisoner took a bag and put over it, and ran down the Green with it.

SAMUEL BECKWITH . I was on Clerkenwell-green, and saw the prisoner run down the Green with the carpet under his arm; I watched and followed him about three hundred yards, and saw him put it into a house, he just threw it inside the door, and walked away and joined another boy at the corner of the street, who was waiting for him; they walked away up the Green: several of them said to him,

"Are you in it?" I found Miller had lost a carpet: Miller and I went to search the house; the carpet was gone, and has never been found. When we returned, the prisoner was taken: I am sure he is the boy.

JAMES MILLER . I am owner of the shop. I lost a carpet on this evening, it hung on the rails in front of my house. I have not seen it since. The prisoner was taken about an hour and a half after, and denied the charge.

JOHN WIGGINS . I am an officer. I was sent for, and secured the prisoner, and left him at the house while I went to look for the carpet, but could not find it. I asked how he came to steal it? he said he knew nothing about it. I asked his name? he said he did not know his name.

Prisoner's Defence. Two lads tapped me on the shoulder and said,

"Has your father lost a carpet;" I went with them directly and said I knew nothing about it.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Three Months , and Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Wm. Arabin , Esq.

Reference Number: t18210411-190

674. CAROLINE HUMPHREYS and MARY JONES , were indicted for stealing on the 12th of March , one counterpane, value 7 s. , the goods of Frances Avis , widow .

FRANCIS AVIS . I am a widow, and live in Tower-street, Seven Dials , and take in washing . About 10 o'clock in the morning, I hung this counterpane in the yard of my house to dry: it is a private yard. I missed it in about half an hour, and have not seen it since. It was a large white knotted one. I know nothing of the prisoners. I do not wash for either of them.

ELIZA COCHRANE. On the 12th of March, about half past 10 o'clock I was sitting at Mr. Spicer's door, which is three doors from Avis's. I saw the prisoners come out of Spicer's wine vaults: Humphries clapped her hand in her bosom and said,

"D - n my eyes if I have not lost it." She took her shawl and covered her bosom. I saw them both turn into Avis's; in about five minutes, Humphries came out with a large white counterpane - the corner hung down at her feet - she carried it openly. Jones was with her. They went went down through Lombard-court. Avis came out in about half an hour, and I told her which way they went. I knew them both before, they are loose women, and live in Seven Dials.

JURY. Q. Why not tell the prosecutrix? A. She takes in washing. They brought it out openly - I did not know any thing was wrong. I sell fish in the streets.

WILLIAM LEE . I am a patrol of Bow-street. I apprehended the prisoners about 1 o'clock - Humphries was much intoxicated.

JOHN MOKELAND . I am a fishmonger, and live at No. 8, Lombard-court. On the 12th of March, about 11 o'clock, I saw Humphries (who I knew before), come by my shop with the other prisoner; Humphries had a great white bundle under her arm - I think it was a counterpane.

HUMPHRIES' Defence. I never saw that woman. She owes me a spite, because I had a few words with her.

JONES'S Defence. I never saw any thing in her possession.

COCHRANE. I never spoke to her.

HUMPHRIES - GUILTY . Aged 26.

JONES - GUILTY . Aged 34.

Confined Three Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Wm. Arabin , Esq.

Reference Number: t18210411-191

675. EMANUEL PROCTER & CHARLES PROCTER were indicted for feloniously receiving on the 5th of December , 2 seals, value 3 l. 17 s.; and 1 watch-key, value 10 s., the goods of John George Fearn , of which Samuel Procter was at the present Session convicted of stealing, they knowing them to be stolen .

MR. JOHN GEORGE FEARN . I am a jeweller , and live in Cornhill ; I lost a variety of seals. Samuel Procter was my porter, and younger brother to the prisoners. I prosecuted him this Session, and he was convicted. I have seen both the prisoners at my house two or three times visiting their brother.

DAVID SIMPSON . I am shopman to Mr. Fearn; there were a quantity of seals missing. I went about to the pawnbrokers with the officers and found several seals out, but was

not present when these were found, they were brought to me and I identified them.

WILLIAM ALDRIDGE . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Orange-street, Bloomsbury. On the 5th of December, 2 seals and a gold key were pawned with me by the two prisoners, openly in their own name, for 2 l. I produced them, they are the same, and the duplicate tallies with them.

THOMAS MAYHEW . I am an officer. I detained the prisoners as Giltspur-street compter, where they came to see their brother, who was in custody. When the brother was committed, what he said was not taken down, no inducement was held out to him. He said he gave them the seals to pawn, and told them a man had given them to him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

E. PROCTER'S Defence. My brother stated before the Jury that he gave them to us, saying they had been made a present to him by some workmen, and desired us to get 2 l. on them. We have known Aldridge for years. I am a jeweller, and have pawned articles with him before.

C. PROCTER'S Defence. He said a workman gave them to him, and being in the same business, I have had presents made to me, and had not the least reason to suspect him.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Wm. Arabin , Esq.

Reference Number: t18210411-192

676. ESAU HART was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of March , one shilling , the property of Robert Crane .

ROBERT CRANE . I am a milkman , and live at Hoxton . The prisoner is a stranger. I missed money off my mantle shelf, in the front room down stairs, several times, and so I marked a shilling and sixpence, and put them on the mantle shelf, and left Edwards to watch, and afterwards found the prisoner in custody. It was on the 23rd of March, between six and seven o'clock in the morning.

THOMAS EDWARDS . I am a working silversmith. Crane set me to watch in the back premises, and I saw the prisoner come in under pretence to warm his hands, take the shilling off the mantle shelf and put it in his pocket. I never saw him before; he is a neighbour's child, but I did not know it. His father bears a good character.

RICHARD CONSTANTINE . I am a constable. The boy was brought to me. I searched him, and found the shilling in his left side pocket. He said he was going to the baker's for his father, and lost a shilling, and took this to pay for the bread, that his father might not find it out.

ROBERT CRANE. The shilling is mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I throw myself on the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Whipped and discharged .

First Middlesex Jury, before Wm. Arabin , Esq.

Reference Number: t18210411-193

677. JOSHUA JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of February , one blanket, value 3 s. , the goods of George Howard Denham .

HANNAH FOSTER DENHAM . I am the wife of George Howard Denham , a publican . We live in Prince's-street, Westminster . The prisoner was quartered on us. We have missed things for the last six months, while he was with us. I did not miss this blanket, but on Saturday the 24th of February Donahoo brought it to me. I know it to be ours; it was on a man's bed in the same room where the prisoner slept.

MICHAEL DONAHOO . I am servant to Mr. Denham. On the 24th of February, between six and seven o'clock in the morning I met the prisoner in Tothill-street with this blanket, and followed him down to New Tothill-street, then stopped him, and said this is my master's property. He told me to go home, and he would give me 1 s. to say nothing about it. He knew me, I took the blanket home.

GEORGE POPLE, I am a constable. The prosecutor applied to me to apprehend the prisoner. He belongs to the 1st regiment of guards . I took him in custody that evening, he would say nothing to me, he would not tell me his name.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I never saw the boy or blanket.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Wm. Arabin , Esq.

Reference Number: t18210411-194

678. THOMAS JONES and JAMES LACEY , were indicted for stealing, on the 13th of April , one mattress, value 5 s.; one bed, value 2 l.; one bolster, value 10 s.; two pillow cases, value 5 s.; two pillows, value 10 s.; and two blankets, value 10 s. , the goods of John Egleton .

JAMES MITCHELL . I had the care of a house, No. 4, Dalby-terrace, City-road , which belonged to Mr. John Egleton, who has now removed to Liverpool; he moved a little before Quarter day, and left me in care of his house and furniture. On the 13th of April I left the house locked up safe, at a little after seven o'clock in the evening, and about nine o'clock was informed of the robbery. I went to the house, and found the gates and doors open, and these articles missing. I found them that night at the watch-house, with the prisoners in custody.

JOHN KILLDRUP . I am servant at the City of London public house, City-road. On the 13th of April, about ten minutes before nine o'clock at night, I was about six doors from this house, and saw Lacey go into the garden and go down the area. I had seen the prisoners before, walking up and down, in company with another man and woman. I then saw Jones go in, and in a short time saw him come out with a bundle, and directly after Lacey came out with another bundle. I saw Mr. Cheslin, my master, coming, and I told him. Brown took Jones alongside his bundle. Lacey threw down his bundle and ran away. I and Hunter pursued him to the corner of River terrace, and took him without losing sight of him. His bundle remained where he threw it. Both bundles were taken to the watch-house.

JOHN BROWN. I saw the last witness, he gave me information. I saw three men and a woman walking about, - I do not know them. I went with my beer, and as I came down the road I saw two bundles falling. I saw one bundle drop, and Lacey ran from where it dropped. He was taken in my sight, - the bundles were taken to the watch-house. I did not see Jones till he was at the watch-house.