Old Bailey Proceedings, 14th February 1821.
Reference Number: 18210214
Reference Number: f18210214-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace Oyer and Terminer, AND Gaol Delivery for the City of London, AND ALSO The Gaol Delivery For the County of Middlesex, HELD AT Justice Hall, in the Old Bailey; ON WEDNESDAY, 14th of FEBRUARY, 1821, and following Days;

Being the Third Session in the Mayoralty of THE RIGHT HON. JOHN THOMAS THORP , LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

Taken in Short-Hand by H. BUCKLER, Basinghall Street, (BY AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON.)

London:

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED, FOR H. BUCKLER, BY T. BOOTH, 31, St. Andrew's Hill, Doctor's Commons

1821.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX.

Before the Right Honourable JOHN THOMAS THORP , Esq. LORD MAYOR of the City of London; Sir Robert Graham , Knt., one of the Barons of his Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir William Draper Best , Knt., one of the Justices of Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir John Richardson , Knt., one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir John Perring , Bart.; Sir James Shaw , Bart.; Joshua Jonathan Smith , Esq.; Sir Claudius Stephen Hunter , Bart., John Atkins , Esq. Aldermen of the said City; Sir John Silvester , Bart., D.C.L. Recorder of the said City; Christopher Magnay , Esq.; Robert Albion Cox , Esq., and Richard Rothwell , Esq., Alderman of the said City; and Newman Knowlys, Esq., Common Sergeant of the said City; his Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of the Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

London Jury.

Joseph York Hatton ,

Richard Gibbs ,

Richard Harris ,

Alexander Curling ,

Edward Edenden ,

Robert Quarman ,

William Ward Eagle ,

William Dale ,

Thomas Thorn ,

Joseph Bowman ,

John Taylor ,

John Williamson .

First Middlesex Jury.

Philip Padbury ,

George Dalmaine ,

John Doyle ,

John Frederick Setchell ,

Joseph Lock ,

Joseph Godfrey ,

Andrew Flockhart ,

George Belshaw ,

James Jackson ,

William Gustard ,

Robert Sanderson ,

James Hummell .

Second Middlesex Jury.

James Silver ,

John Bellingham ,

Elijah Solomon ,

Edward Evans ,

Richard Lawrence ,

John George ,

Thomas Lane ,

John Dale ,

Edward Darley ,

Richard Doubleday ,

James Hewitt ,

Edward Wallis .

Third Middlesex Jury.

John Wells ,

George Barbut ,

Alexander Jebb ,

John Payne ,

William Smith ,

John Sheppard ,

Archibald Eason ,

Thomas Owen ,

Thomas Booth ,

Thomas Streats ,

Henry Williams ,

Christopher C. Clark .

SESSIONS HOUSE, OLD BAILEY, FEBRUARY 14, 1821.

THORP, MAYOR. THIRD SESSION.

Reference Number: t18210214-1

336. JOHN SKORDY and THOMAS GRADY were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Philadelphia Loughnam , widow , about five o'clock at night, on the 26th of January , at St. Marylebone, with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein eleven napkins, value 20 s.; two sheets, value 10 s.; two table-cloths, value 3 s., and one pillow-case, value 1 s., her property .

SARAH WATTS . I am servant to Mrs. Philadelphia Loughnam, who lives in Lower Seymour-street, Portman-square . On the 26th of January, about half-past five o'clock in the afternoon, I went into the house-keeper's room, which is the front of the house - it was quite dark - I found the cupboard door wide open, and two napkins on the ground - the window was also wide open. I missed the napkins, and immediately went to the pawnbrokers to enquire, and there found Wales and Clements, the officers I informed them, they came to the house, and examined the room. The window was shut before, but not fastened.

JOHN WALES . I am an officer. I was at the pawnbroker's, with Clements, Watts came in, and informed us of the robbery; we went to the house, but found no marks of violence. On returning we called at a pawnbroker's in Duke-street, Manchester-square, and as I came out the prisoners passed me - we followed and stopped them about thirty yards off; Skordy had a bundle at his back - Clements was pursuing Grady - I took him into a shop, and secured the bundle; it contained the things described to us by Watts. About ten o'clock I saw Grady in Calmall-buildings, playing with another boy; I ran and got Clements, we enquired where he lived, describing him as lame, and found him in a back attick in the buildings. I knew him to be the boy. I asked him if he had been out - he said he had not been out of the court. I said he had been further - he denied it. I said he had been in Duke-street - he denied it, but afterwards admitted it, but denied being with Skordy, or any knowledge of him. I am certain we saw him with Skordy - he walked on crutches. Clements not seeing him at first, followed another boy.

THOMAS CLEMENTS . I am an officer. I was with Wales at the pawnbroker's, Watts came in, and gave information. As we were coming out of the pawnbroker's, in Duke-street, Wales pointed out the prisoners - we secured Skordy. I went after Grady, and laid hold of another boy, who was near them, but let him go - I did not mistake him for Grady. I afterwards went with Wales to his lodging. I found in the room two tablecloths and a pillow-case, wrapped up, which Watts claimed.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

SKORDY. I leave myself on your mercy.

GRADY'S Defence. I know nothing of it.

SKORDY - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Of Stealing only.

Transported for Seven Years .

GRADY - NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18210214-2

337. JOHN COLLINS was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of January , at St. Marylebone , three candlesticks, value 2 l.; eleven tea-spoons, value 30 s.; one cream-jug, value 1 l.; one pair of snuffers, value 2 s.; one snuffer-tray, value 6 d., and one extinguisher, value 1 d., the goods of Richard Addams , Esq. , in his dwelling-house .

THOMAS EWER . I am servant to Richard Addams , Esq., who lives in Baker-street , in the parish of St. Marylebone. I saw the property stated in the indictment safe in the pantry, at the back of the house, five minutes before eight o'clock in the morning of the 24th of January; I saw them again in the kitchen about nine o'clock that morning - the prisoner was then in custody. It is worth about 5 l.

ELIZABETH BOWRON . I am cook to Mr. Addams. I saw the prisoner brought back by a soldier about a quarter past eight o'clock in the morning, with this property, which I had seen in the pantry at eight o'clock. I had heard a bustle, and saw the prisoner go out of the area door, and called out Stop him! I did not lose sight of him until he was taken - he asked me to let him go.

JOHN SMITH . I am a private in the second regiment of dragoons. The last witness called out Stop that boy! I saw the prisoner throw the plate out of his apron; I picked it up, called stop thief, and he was secured. I am sure he is the boy.

DANIEL ANSTEAD . Ewer delivered the plate and the prisoner to me.

JOHN HOLBERY . I am in the Life Guards. I saw the prisoner running, and stopped him in Kendall-mews,

about 100 yards from Mr. Addams's; I took him back to the house; he begged to be let go, and said he would do so no more.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming down East-street, and met a man, who sent me down Kendall-mews, to ask for one Coombs; a boy, similar to myself, ran down the mews, the soldier ran into a house, and charged me with stealing this plate.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 16.

Recommended to Mercy.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Best.

Reference Number: t18210214-3

338. EDWARD LERAMOUNT was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of January , 22 silver spoons, value 10 l., and four silver forks, value 2 l., the goods of Henry Cerf , in his dwelling-house .

MR. LAW conducted the prosecution.

GEORGE NADEN . I am servant to Henry Cerf , Esq. , who lives at Isleworth . Some property was missed on the 22d of August; the prisoner was in my master's employ, and cleaned knives and and plate in the pantry where the plate was kept, and was often there; only him and the coachman had access to it - he was about three months with us, and left in August or September - he had not left a fortnight when the property was missed. He came to the house three times after he left, went into the pantry, and eat and drank there.

THOMAS SMITH . I am shopman to Mr. Baxter, a pawnbroker, who lives in Norfolk-street, Middlesex Hospital. On the 4th of September, the prisoner pledged some spoons in the name of Edward Clark ; he said it was for his brother, who was a market gardener at Hounslow. He came again on the 12th, and pledged seven table and three desert spoons in the same name.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GEORGE WELFARE . I am a constable. I searched the prisoner when I was bringing him from Southampton. He said he knew what I came after him for, it was for robbing Mr. Cerf of his plate; I told him to say nothing to convict himself. He said he hoped he should see his brother in his place, as he was the person who stole the plate and gave it him, but he kept the money because his brother kept his wages. His brother is gardener to Mr. Cerf.

HENRY CERF , ESQ. The prisoner was a labourer in my garden , employed by his brother - he left some time in September. I used to pay his brother his wages, as he lived with his brother. About a fortnight after he went the plate was missed; I heard the prisoner was seen in the pantry, dressed better than usual with a watch in his pocket. I took out a warrant against him immediately I missed it; his brother is still in my service as a labourer, but not as a gardener. I have a quantity of plate, this might have been taken some time without being missed.

GEORGE NADEN re-examined. I missed the plate in the month of August, the prisoner had not left the service a fortnight when it was lost; I think I missed it about ten days after he left. He left on Saturday night, came again on Sunday morning and on Monday, and helped me clean the plate in the pantry; next day I missed it - he was in the pantry alone for four hours. It could not all be taken away at once without my missing it.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Richardson.

Reference Number: t18210214-4

339. ANN BARRETT was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of January , two table-cloths, value 5 s.; six sheets, value 30 s., and one shawl, value 1 s. , the goods of Stephen Jones .

CHARLOTTE JONES . I am the wife of Stephen Jones , and am a washerwoman, we live on Cambridge-heath . I employed the prisoner to iron . On the 11th of January about two o'clock, I went out leaving her there; I returned about half-past three o'clock, and missed this property.

MATTHEW POLLOCK . I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner on the 12th of January, and found several duplicates on her, among which were three for four sheets.

WILLIAM HARRISON . I am foreman to Mr. Richards, a pawnbroker. On the 12th of January, about two o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner came and pledged two sheets with me for 3 s.

JOHN HAWKES . I am servant to Mr. Chaffers, a pawnbroker, who lives in Watling-street. I do not know the prisoner; I have a sheet pledged for 5 s. on the 11th of January, I believe by the prisoner, but am not positive.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing of them. I returned her the shawl.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Confined Six Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18210214-5

340. JAMES WILKINSON was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of January , one portmanteau, value 25 s.; two coats, value 3 l., and two pair of trowsers, value 1 l. , the goods of John Joseph .

JOHN JOSEPH . I am amanuenthis , to Mr. Wilberforce. On the 20th of January, I was at Kensington Gore ; when the carriage arrived I missed the portmanteau, and it was brought to the house next day.

PETER ANTROBUS . I am a patrol of Kensington. I saw the prisoner and another in the road, about seven o'clock on the night of the 20th of January, each having hold of an end of the portmanteau; I asked them what it was? they threw it down and ran off. The prisoner was stopped by the crowd, without my losing sight of him - I am certain of him. The portmanteau was gone when I returned - it was found next day.

GEORGE - . I am coachman to Mr. Wilberforce. I brought the portmanteau from Bath on the carriage; it was safe at Turnham-green. The coach was about a quarter of a mile on this side Kensington, about ten minutes before seven o'clock.

JOHN WILKINS . I found the portmanteau about 300 yards from where it was thrown down.

PETER ANTROBUS re-examined. It appears the same portmanteau they threw down - they were within a quarter of a mile on this side of Kensington Town.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming from Hammersmith, heard an alarm, and turned down the lane, two men seized me, and said I had a basket in my hand.

PETER ANTROBUS re-examined. I never charged him with having a basket.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Best.

Reference Number: t18210214-6

341. CHARLES COX was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of January , one bedstead, value 16 s. , the goods of Joseph Smith .

JOSEPH SMITH . I am a cabinet-maker , and live in Charles-street, New-road . I missed a bedstead from my door between one and two o'clock, I had seen it about a quarter of an hour before; I saw it next day at No. 20, Southampton-court, Tottenham-court-road, the prisoner rented the room it was in; he was brought there in about half an hour by Cousins.

CHARLES COUSINS . I apprehended the prisoner on the 20th of January, at Newport-market, and took him to Southampton-court; he said he lodged there.

WILLIAM WELLS . I am a broker. On the 20th January, I received information, and went to Southampton-court, and saw the bedstead which I had sold to Smith; the prisoner was there, he said he had lodged there two months.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I bought it at the prosecutor's door, of a man supposing him to be the owner; his premises are up a step-ladder, any one might stand below, and sell it without his knowledge.

JOSEPH SMITH re-examined. There is a step-ladder leads up to my shop.

Prisoner Q. Is your name Smith - A. It is Dawson, I changed it to Smith.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Richardson.

342. CHARLES COX was again indicted for stealing, on the 15th of January , one grate, value 12 s. , the goods of William Wells .

WILLIAM WELLS . I am a broker , and live in Tottenham-court-road . On the 15th of January, I lost a grate from my yard, which is open to the street. I saw it again on Saturday evening at No. 20, Southampton-court, about six o'clock in the evening, with a fire in it - the prisoner and his wife were there; he said it was his grate, and that he bought it of a stranger for 5 s. a fortnight ago; I had not lost it a week. He took us to Newport-market, and we took him into custody.

CHARLES COUSINS . I took the prisoner at Newport-market, in bed.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was not in bed, I was on the bed. He said if I took it home he would not prosecute me, and I promised to send it home.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Confined Three Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Richardson.

Reference Number: t18210214-

343. MICHAEL GARVIN was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of February , 12 s. in monies numbered, the monies of Herman Hayling , from his person .

HERMAN HAYLING . I am a seaman , and belong to Hanover. On the 7th of February, about ten o'clock, I was at a public-house in Rosemary-lane; the prisoner sat there, and I gave him part of a pot of porter. I went out for a necessary purpose, he followed me, and said,

"Let us go to another house, there is nothing but thieves here." He took me round the corner of White-yard , put his hand into my pocket, and took out 12 s. - I had 15 s. - I seized him, and called the watch; when the watchman came he threw it away in the mud. I found 3 s. in my pocket; I got none of the money again.

GEORGE DAVIS . I am a watchman. I was called, and saw the prosecutor holding the prisoner by the collar; he gave him in charge for robbing him. I found 2 s. 11 1/2 d. on him. I saw no money on the ground; the prosecutor pulled out 3 s., and said that was all he had left.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18210214-150

344. NICHOLAS HINDLE was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of January , one blanket, value 5 s. , the goods of Thomas Roberts .

THOMAS ROBERTS . I am a publican , and live at Chelsea . The prisoner belongs to the Foot-guards ; he was at my house on the 11th of February. I lost a blanket from the back room, and White brought him back with it.

ROBERT WHITE . I stopped the prisoner in the passage with the blanket under his coat, round him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

THOMAS NEAT . I am a constable. I took the prisoner in charge. He said he opened the back window, and pulled the blanket out.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been drinking, and have received a wound at Waterloo, so that when I drink I lose my sences, and may be charged with any thing.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Confined Three Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Best.

Reference Number: t18210214-8

345. MARY HAYDON was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of January , 10 s. in monies numbered , the property of George Renman .

GEORGE RENMAN . I am a publican , and live in Royal Hospital-row, Chelsea . On the 9th of January, I put some 5 s. papers of halfpence in the larder; about eleven o'clock at night I missed a paper of penny-pieces, and suspected the prisoner who was my only servant, she had been to the larder that night. When I went to bed I left 25 s. in copper, and next morning I found it safe. I missed another paper half an hour after, and asked her for the copper she had taken; she denied it. I and the officer searched her box, and found 7 s. 6 d. in penny-pieces tied in her apron. She said she would shew where she put the other 5 s. paper, she took him to the other end of the larder, and shewed it to him, hid under the knife-box. We found the brown paper which had inclosed the penny-pieces, in her pocket.

THOMAS FAULKNER . I am a constable. What Renman has said is correct.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing of the penny-pieces. I saw the halfpence in the larder, and shewed them.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Three Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Richardson.

Reference Number: t18210214-9

346. JULIA MURPHY was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of February , two blankets, value 30 s.; one counterpane, value 5 s., and one sheet, value 5 s., the goods of Benjamin Blake , in his dwelling-house .

BENJAMIN BLAKE . I keep the Saracen's Head-tavern, Friday-street . On the 6th of February, about a quarter-past eight o'clock at night, the prisoner called and asked for a character, she had left my service about three weeks before. I said she should have such a character that would get her a situation, she thanked me, and left the bar; about five minutes after, the chambermaid went to my bedroom, and found her there; she had stripped the bed of two blankets and one sheet. I sent for an officer.

MARGARET BURK . I am chambermaid to Mr. Blake. I went up to the bed-room, and saw hertieing up two blankets and a sheet at the corner of the room. I gave the alarm, and she was taken.

JOHN JACKSON . I am an officer. I was fetched, and found the things in the room. I searched her, and found four duplicates down the back of her neck.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. They swear false. I went up to the water-closet, and turned into the bed-room as a gentleman was there, the woman came in.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210214-10

347. ANN FREEMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of February , nine fowls, price 16 s. , the goods of William Stevens .

WILLIAM STEVENS . I am a poultry salesman , and live in Leadenhall-market . On Saturday morning, about eight o'clock, I missed three fowls, after that two more, then two more, and then one; seeing the prisoner in the shop, I suspected her, and the last time she came into the shop, I set some persons to watch her; an alarm was given, and I saw her drop a fowl; I secured her, and she offered me 2 l. to let her go, but I refused. I found the fowls in a basket in the market.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. They were plucked, how do you swear to them - A. I missed them from different lots, and each person has a particular method of killing.

THOMAS FORD . I am servant to Mr. Stevens. I saw the prisoner take the fowl, and drop it.

Prisoner's Defence. I never took one; I bought them for 15 s. 6 d. I saw a fowl laying down, and picked it up.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined One Year .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210214-11

348. GEORGE BARRY was indicted for feloniously assaulting William Carswell , on the King's highway, on the 2d of February , at St. Dunstan in the East , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, one watch-chain, value 3 l.; two seals, value 2 l.; two keys, value 5 s.; one pocket-book, value 6 d., and two 1 l. Bank notes, his property .

WILLIAM CARSWELL . On Friday evening, the 2d of February about six o'clock, I was about the middle of Mincing-lane , a man ran very violently against my breast, which caused me to fall on my back, and the instant I was down two others came as if to assist me, but they took my pocket-book, and watch-chain, the ring broke from the watch, I saw the prisoner pull at my watch-chain, and I pursued him, calling to two people who were coming up to stop him, which they did, and I seized him. I am sure he is the man who took the watch-chain - I did not lose sight of him - he was one of those who came as if to assist. I found nothing of mine on him; I took him to Davis, the officer.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. You never saw him before - A. No. It was a tolerably dark night, but I could see him as he was on the top of me; there were very few people there; I followed him closely. He was not searched till he got to Davis's.

ANTHONY LIDDELL . I was going along Mincing-lane with a friend, heard the cry, turned round, and saw two young men running towards us, one left the other and ran down Tower-street. I stopped the prisoner; Carswell immediately came up, and charged him with robbing him. We took him to Davis.

EDMUND TAYLOR . I am a labourer. I was going up Mincing-lane, and heard something fall against a gate. I saw two men jump up and start, and the prisoner start after them, the prisoner was the last man who rose from the prosecutor - he was secured - I am sure he is the man. He said,

"If you find the chain and seals let me go, for I am innocent," (as it was said he had dropped them).

Cross-examined. Q. He said so after being searched - A. No, he said so in the lane, when Tennant said he saw him throw his hand up; the prisoner then said,

"Well, go back and look, and if you find them let me go." We went with a candle, but could not find them.

JAMES TENNANT . I was going up Mincing-lane, and saw three men scuffling with the prosecutor, two ran away, and then another who was stopped. I am certain it was the prisoner, he threw something from his left hand, but what I do not know.

JOSEPH DAVIS . I am an officer. The prisoner was brought to my house. I searched him and found 6 d. on him. The prosecutor felt and missed his chain, seals and pocketbook; his pocket was torn.

Prisoner's Defence. I saw the man laying on the ground, and hit my foot against him; he said

"I am robbed." I ran after the man, and they stopped me.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 21.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210214-12

349. JOHN COTTER was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of January , three pictures in metal frames, value 6 d., and one looking-glass, value 2 d. , the goods of Thomas Batts Hodge .

THOMAS BATTS HODGE . I am a pewterer , and live in Long-lane . On the 10th of January, about seven o'clock in the evening, the prisoner and two others came in, pretending

to buy some things. I sent my children to fetch something, while their backs were turned the prisoner took these things; my boy said the prisoner had got something; I saw him drop them.

JOSEPH BATT . I brought the prisoner back, and saw the property found on him.

GEO. STANLEY. I am an officer. I was fetched, and found the property on him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 11.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210214-13

350. SAMUEL NIGHTINGALE was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of February , three pieces of linen-cloth, value 3 s., and three other pieces of cloth, value 3 s. , the goods of Stephen Maberley .

GEORGE BURDEN . I am foreman to Mr. Stephen Maberley of Paul's-wharf . I called the prisoner to work on the wharf, and about five o'clock I sent him away for the night; between six and seven o'clock I found him in the linen warehouse, I asked what he had about him; he said nothing at all; I said I was certain he had from his appearance, and found three pieces of linen-cloth about his body and in his trowsers. We gave him in charge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I took it to make a bed for my children.

GUILTY . Aged 35.

Confined Three Months .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210214-14

SECOND DAY, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 15.

351. WILLIAM MITCHELL was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of December , 3000 lbs. of saltpetre, value 30 l., and 20 bags, value 5 s., the goods of Thomas Brandram , Samuel Caldron Brandram , William Charles Brandram , and Harry Laugton .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY .

Fined One Shilling, and Discharged .

Before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210214-15

352. CHARLES SKEGG was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of December , two trusses of clover-hay, value 4 s. , the goods of Edward Tuck .

EDWARD TUCK . I am a market-gardener , and live at Edmonton ; the prisoner was my carman . On the 15th of December, I received information, and examined the hay in the stable; I wrote my name on paper, and the constable put it in the truss; on another paper the constable wrote his own name and put it in. We were watching, about one o'clock in the night of the 16th, saw the prisoner come out with the truss of hay on his shoulder and put it in a ditch. He then brought out a second truss, and afterwards brought out his allowance hay, which is half a truss, for his horses. He then brought his horses out, and was putting them in his cart, I went and examined the hay and concealed myself. He brought his cart in the road, then took the two trusses from the ditch, put them in the cart, and drove on. I followed him to town, and at Tottenham High-cross a man ran up and spoke to him; the hay was then put into a ditch. I had him secured at Spitalfields. I can swear the hay is mine.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. What was the cart loaded with - A. Vegetables. After he was taken we returned to the ditch, but the hay was gone.

JOSEPH GIBSON . I saw the hay in Tuck's stable covered with straw, I saw the prisoner bring the two trusses out of the stable, and put them in the ditch; he afterwards put them in the cart, and then drove off. I saw the hay on the cart at Tottenham - I was before the cart, and saw it was not in the cart when he got to the watering-house. I took him at Spitalfields, and asked him what he had done with the two trusses of hay; he said he threw them in a ditch by the Seven Sisters, at Tottenham. I went and saw the marks of them there.

Cross-examined. Q. You did not see him throw them in the ditch - A. No.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing of it.

GUILTY . Aged 29.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210214-16

353. SAMUEL YOUNG was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Ann Weeks , spinster , at St. Mary, Islington , about twelve o'clock, in the night of the 31st of January , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, 24 live tame fowls, price 50 s., and two live tame turkeys, price 10 s., her property .

MR. LAW conducted the prosecution.

ANN WEEKS . I live at Highbury-place , in the parish of St. Mary, Islington. On the night of the 31st of January, the key of the poultry-house was delivered to me, and next morning some poultry were missing. I saw a cock at Hatton-garden on Monday, which I am certain is mine; also two turkey's heads, they were hen turkeys, and corresponded with mine, one was old and the other young.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODERICK. Q. When you saw the turkeys they were without feathers - A. Yes, I lost them on Wednesday, and saw the cock on the following Monday, that was not picked.

GEORGE TAYLOR . I am servant to Miss Weeks. On the 31st of January, I locked the poultry in the stable, which is enclosed with the dwelling-house by a fence; I locked both locks, and took the keys into the house; the cock and turkeys were then safe. I afterwards saw the cock in the possession of the constable, one of the turkeys was old and the other young. About half-past seven o'clock next morning, I found the door open; it appeared to have been done by a crow or chisel. There were also traces of footmarks, which lead over a fence six feet high. I can swear to the cock having seen it from a chick; it was whole with the feathers on. The constable also had two turkey's heads, and some fowl's feet.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODERICK. Q. How far is the stable from the dwelling-house - A. Eleven yards, it opens into a paddock which is a quarter of an acre, it is fenced quite round. It was dark when I found the door open.

MR. LAW. Q. Does not a wall connect the stable with the dwelling-house - A. Yes, it goes from the house to

the stable, and then on to the garden, and connects again with the house. I got up about a quarter past seven o'clock, it was dusk then. I do not sleep near the place.

GEORGE TAYLOR . I am a constable. On Friday the 2d of February, between six and seven o'clock in the evening, I went to the prisoner's house, and in the coal-hole found a hamper containing two hen turkeys picked, one was bigger than the other. I asked the prisoner who they belonged to; he said they were his, and were sent from Suffolk by his mother. I asked him if there were any more poultry there; he said No, I felt there was, and brought it up. I gave it to a person at the door, charging him in the King's name to take care of it for me. Mrs. Wilson who keeps the house was fighting to get the prisoner from me. I found the cock in the same basket, and a great quantity of feathers; the cock was not picked. I also found two hens in the basket, which were picked. I took him to the watch-house, returned to the premises with Cadby, and on taking up a board in the privy floor, I found a quantity of fowl's heads and feathers, the quarter of a fowl cut up, and the remains of several fowls.

Cross-examined. Q. Were the turkeys and three fowls all in the same basket - A. Yes. He lodged at the house. I produce the head of the cock.

MISS WEEKS re-examined. I know this to be the head of my cock, the comb was cut off when it was a chick in a particular manner, and the spurs were sawed off; it is a game cock; we lost twenty-six or twenty-seven fowls that night.

GEORGE TAYLOR re-examined. I know it to be the cock.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent.

CHRISTIANA WILSON . The prisoner lodged in my house with his wife. I am a laundress; I remember the Wednesday, which was two days before the officers came, the prisoner was at home on that night, I saw him at tea between four and five o'clock, he was up and down stairs all the evening; he lodged in the first floor front-room. I saw him at ten o'clock, and he wanted to go to bed; I made him up a bed in the kitchen as his sister-in-law slept with his wife. I saw him next morning about ten minutes before seven o'clock, getting up; he went out a little before eight o'clock, and not before. He bears an honest sober character.

MR. LAW. Q. He might have gone-out in the night - A. I locked the door, but left the key in. I do not know how the chickens came there.

Q. You wanted to get him from the officers - A. I did not. I slept up stairs.

ELIZA WILSON . I am daughter of the last witness. On the Wednesday night before the officers came, I helped my mother to make the prisoner's bed in the kitchen. I went up and told him his bed was ready; his wife and her sister were there; he had the head-ache, and was eating bread and cheese for supper - it was ten o'clock - I had seen him at five o'clock, and after that. About ten o'clock I gave him a light to go to bed. I came down next morning about twenty-five minutes before seven o'clock; he got up before seven o'clock and went out a little before eight o'clock.

MR. LAW. Q. You saw him in the morning before daylight, did you take him a candle - A. Yes, and I looked at the clock, it wanted twenty-five minutes to seven.

COURT. Q. Does not his wife make the bed - A. Sometimes, and sometimes my mother. I remember it was twenty-five minutes before seven o'clock in the morning when I saw him.

SARAH WAITE . I came home very ill to my sister's, three weeks ago; I remember on the Wednesday before the officers came, my brother was in the house between four and five o'clock, he went out after tea for half an hour or an hour, and was in before eight o'clock. I saw him the rest of the evening, and at breakfast about eight o'clock in the morning.

MR. LAW. Q. Did you come from his mother's in Suffolk - A. No. He went out about half-past five or six o'clock; he had the head-ache.

GEORGE TAYLOR re-examined. The prosecutrix's house is nearly two miles from the prisoner's - it is in the parish of St. Mary, Islington.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 24.

Recommended to Mercy.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Best.

Reference Number: t18210214-17

354. JOHN BILLET and THOMAS DOLING were indicted for stealing, on the 23d of January , one great coat, value 3 l., the goods of Nicholas Darlington Kent , in the dwelling-house of Catherine Kent , widow .

MR. BRODERICK conducted the prosecution.

MR. NICHOLAS DARLINGTON KENT . My mother Catherine Kent , lives at No. 52, Southampton-row, in the parish of St. George, Bloomsbury . On the 23d of January I left her house about a quarter past six o'clock, to go to my office in Clifford's-Inn, and left my great coat hanging in the passage near the door; it cost me five guineas and a half, and is worth above 3 l.

JAMES EAMES . I am servant to Mrs. Kent. On the night of the 23d, Mr. Kent went out about half-past six o'clock; a knock came at the door, and a lad asked if Mr. Watson lived there, (I afterwards saw a lad answering his description apprehended with Billet) a knock came to the door at half-past seven o'clock, on my going to the door Doling was there, he gave me a note and said he had brought it from Mr. Williams; part of Mr. Williams's family had been out with the Miss Kents that morning, and as I had never seen him before I asked him if he lived with Mr. Williams? he said No; I asked him where he brought the note from? he said from Mr. Williams, of Hart-street - I am certain he is the man - he requested an answer. I observed two great-coats hanging in the passage as I took the note into the parlour, and as I delivered it to Mrs. Kent, the street door slammed too; I instantly ran out, opened the street door, and shut it after me; Billet stood in front of the area rails; I asked if he had seen any person run out with something on his arm? he said

"Yes, he ran up that way," (pointing towards Russell-square) I went that way, and asked an old gentleman if he had seen any body; I was in the act of returning when I met Billet walking towards me with his hands behind him. I accused him of being concerned in stealing a coat, and sending me the wrong way; he denied it. Plaistead came up, and

said he had met a man running towards Bloomsbury-square with a coat on his arm. I went with him, but did not find the man. I returned and missed the coat from the passage, it hung there when the note was brought. I saw Billet in custody next day with a lad answering the description of the one who first knocked. I went with Jefferies to the Falcon, public-house, in Sutton-street, and immediately pointed out Doling in the tap-room from among twenty others.

MR. KENT re-examined. I was present at the prisoner's examination, what he said was not taken down in writing.

JAMES EAMES continued I was present at the examination on the 25th of January; Doling said some man sent him with the letter.

MRS. ELIZABETH RANDALL . I went to my mother's, (Mrs. Kent's) with my husband about seven o'clock that night; a great coat hung in the passage, and my husband hung his up also. About half-past seven o'clock the servant brought a note in; he ran out quick, and we all ran into the passage hearing the door slam too. My brother's coat was gone, but my husband's remained.

HENRY PLAISTEAD. On the 23d of January about half-past seven o'clock, I was in Southampton-row, and met Doling at the corner of the row and Bloomsbury-place, running towards Bloomsbury-square - I was going towards Queen-square. He had a great coat on his left arm, and ran against me; I am certain of his person. I went on past Mrs. Kent's, and about five houses down the servant asked me if I had seen any one running, he was talking to Billet; we pursued Doling, but did not catch him.

Cross-examined. Q. Was there a light for you to see him - A. Yes there was a lamp just by the corner of Bloomsbury-place. I looked him full in the face; he was running as from Mrs. Kent's. I saw him again a week after.

COURT. Q. Did you particularly notice Billet - A. I will not swear to him; I had a better opportunity of seeing Doling than him, for I ran against Doling.

MR. KENT re-examined. I know there was a lamp at the corner of Bloomsbury-place; it has been removed within the last few days. I heard Doling tell the Magistrate a young man at the corner delivered him the note; the Magistrate asked him if he was to wait for an answer? he said Yes; the Magistrate said,

"Then you ran away without one."

NATHANIEL AVELING . I am an oilman, and live at No. 54, Southampton-row, two doors from Mrs. Kent. I know Billet. On the 23d of January, about a quarter or half-past seven o'clock in the evening, he came to my house, and enquired the name of the people who lived at No. 52. I told him Mrs. Kent.

Cross-examined. Q. Was it not later than that - A. No. I knew him before; I believe he lives at Somer's-town.

JAMES JEFFERYS . I am an officer of Bow-street. I went with Eames to the Falcon, public-house, he immediately pointed out Doling. I took Billet at his father's in Tucker's-rents, Somer's-town. I took his brother at the same time, he was afterwards discharged.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you fetch the servant to the Falcon, public-house - A. No. I took Doling on the 25th. There were sixteen or twenty people there.

JAMES EAMES re-examined. I went to the Falcon, in consequence of information I had. The boy who was taken with Billet appeared, in height and size, the same as the first who came to the door, I am sure Billet is the man who spoke to me at the area rails; there is a lamp at the next house, it is not a gass light. He stood on the Bloomsbury-square side of the door.

Prisoner DOLING. I leave my defence to my counsel.

BILLET's Defence. My brother was at home at the time. I was sent into Holborn on a errand.

BILLET - NOT GUILTY

DOLING - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 23.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Richardson.

Reference Number: t18210214-18

355. WILLIAM FELL was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of January , at St. Giles's in the Fields , one bag, value 1 s.; six shirts, value 3 l.; seven neck-cloths, value 1 l.; three waistcoats, value 6 s.; three pair of drawers, value 6 s.; two table-cloths, value 2 l.; six napkins, value 20 s., and two night-caps, value 2 s., the goods of Sir William Draper Best , Knight ; four shirts, value 2 l.; five neck-cloths, value 15 s.; two pair of drawers, value 4 s.; four waistcoats, value 20 s., and four hankerchiefs, value 20 s., the goods of William Samuel Best , Esq. , in the dwelling-house of the said Sir William Draper Best , Knight .

WILLIAM MOLE . I am butler to Sir William Draper Best, who lives in Bedford-square , in the parish of St. Giles's. On the 23d of January I was coming down from the dining-room to the pantry, on the area floor, between one and two o'clock in the day, and as I crossed the passage, I saw a man going out of the door into the area with a large bag on his back - when he saw me he dropped it on the threshold of the door, and ran up the area steps; I pursued him, and in running up the area steps I lost sight of him for a moment; I then saw him running towards Bedford-street, nobody else was within sight. I collared him and asked what he was going to do with the things? he said

"What things? don't say I want to steal your things, I have not been down your area, go to No. 27, where I work and enquire my character." I said come with me and answer the charge; he resisted and struck me. I brought him back and took him into the house. I had a full view of his dress and person, and had he been longer out of sight I could have recognized him; I am perfectly certain of him. The bag contained the articles stated in the indictment - they were in the bag before he took it - it was laying on a table in the passage, two yards from the door, ready to be taken in the country to wash; they are worth between 15 l. and 20 l. I am confident he is the man.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was going home, and on turning the square, I stopped to tie up my stocking; the gentleman caught hold of my shoulder, and said I had been in the house and removed the linen upwards of two yards. I said I had not; he took me back. I know nothing of it whatever.

WILLIAM MOLE re-examined He did stop and pretended to be tieing his stocking. I never mentioned about his moving the linen two yards. I said

"You are the person I want."

JURY. Q. How long have you lived with the prosecutor - A. Two years and ten months. I was at the bottom of the steps when the prisoner was at the top.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18210214-19

356. WILLIAM BURR and JOSEPH LOOSELEY were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Stephen Search , at Heston , about eleven o'clock on the night of the 19th of January , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, 80 lbs. of pork, value 40 s., his property .

STEPHEN SEARCH . I live in the parish of Heston, and keep the house; the prisoner Looseley lived with me. On the 19th of January we went to bed a little after nine o'clock. I had seen the house fastened myself, the doors were locked and the windows shut. I heard nothing in the night. I get up between five and six o'clock, it was then dark; I had a candle, and missed a flitch of bacon, which had laid under the kitchen window. I found the shutter unkeyed, inside, and let down; the casement was taken out and lay two or three yards from the window. I found Looseley at home in bed; I sent for a constable and took him. When we went to bed we latched his door, and in the morning it was open, which rose my suspicion. I charged him with it, he said he had not been out of his room. I asked him how his door came open? he said he had not been down. I found the bacon the same day at Burr's house; he was taken in about half an hour.

ESTHER SEARCH . I am the wife of the last witness. I remember the house being fastened; my husband called me up, I found the shutter down, the casement taken out, and put near the door; it must have been done by a person inside. The bacon was gone. I fastened Looseley's door the night before, and in the morning it was open; he denied the charge.

BENJAMIN NICHOLS . I am beadle of Heston. I was sent for, and took Looseley; he denied the charge. I searched Burr's house, and found the bacon in his bedroom, cut in two halves. He was taken, and said Looseley was to get him some bacon and place it where he could find it; he shewed me where he took it from, which was by the railing of Search's garden.

HENRY ISHMEAL . I am a horse patrol. I apprehended Burr at the Duke's Head, public-house, one mile from his house; he said he could prove the bacon was sent to him out of the country.

WILLIAM WATSON . I keep a public-house at Heston. On the 19th of January about six o'clock in the evening, the prisoners came in and were in company about a quarter of an hour, then Looseley went away, and Burr stopped till about eight o'clock; my house is half a mile from Search's. Burr went out when somebody whistled outside, he had a bag. I do not think it was much after eight o'clock. I saw them whispering gently together at my house.

Prisoner BURR. Q. I had an apron - A. It was a piece of sacking, I took it for a bag.

ESTHER SEARCH re-examined. I know the bacon, I have the fellow side, which it matches. I went to bed a little after nine o'clock. I salted the bacon myself.

JOHN COUSELL . I am a butcher. I sold Search the bacon, and know it.

BURR's Defence. I had a pint of beer at the house; the clock struck nine as I came out. I went to Hounslow to see one Crips. I saw the bacon in the path at Lambton.

LOOSELEY's Defence. I know nothing of it.

His Lordship in recapitualating the evidence to the Jury, stated, that if Looseley, alone, was accused with this offence, he should direct an acquittal, as it was evident he did not break and enter; but if the Jury were of opinion that both were guilty, he recommended them to find that verdict, and he would submit the point to the consideration of the Twelve Judges, whether as both shared in the crime, both were not equally guilty.

BURR - GUILTY . Aged 22.

LOOSELEY - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Reserved for the consideration of the Twelve Judges on the point stated.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Best'

Reference Number: t18210214-20

357. JOHN GODLIMAN was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Gamble , at Bedfont , about two o'clock in the night of the 6th of January , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, 200 lbs. of bacon, value 5 l., and 30 lbs. of cheese, value 15 s., his property .

MR. BRODERICK conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM GAMBLE . I live at Bedfont, and keep a chandlers' shop . On the 6th of January, about half-past nine o'clock at night, I shut up the shop, and went to bed at ten o'clock. There is a casement window in the shop, which was nailed up, and there are three bars across, inside, it does not open. I fastened the door and the other shop windows, which have shutters. Next morning about six o'clock, or half-past, on getting up, I missed the cheese from the window, and two sides of bacon from the front of the counter, which were in the shop the night before. It was dark, and I had a candle to examine; I found the door a little way open and the casement window broken all to pieces, and hanging outside; a man could squeeze between the iron bars. One side of bacon was very long and thin in the neck part; I had bought it in London, on the 1st of January, and on bringing it home in the cart I sat upon it, the corner stood out, I rested my shoe upon it, and it made a mark on the corner very black and dirty. I saw it again in possession of the constable, and know it to be the same; I am quite positive of it. I also saw 4 lbs. of cheese, the same sort and quality as I lost. I lost 40 lbs. and 2 cwt. of bacon; I found 50 lbs. I locked the door at night, and left the keys inside; if a person broke through the window, they might get out by opening the door.

WILLIAM BETTS . I am constable of Feltham, about a mile from Bedfont. I have known the prisoner some years, I had occasion to go to his house on the 17th of January, between ten and eleven o'clock in the morning, and found him there - it is about a mile and a quarter from Gamble's. I found a quantity of bacon and cheese there. I got a warrant, and went again in about three-quarters of an hour, and found the house shut - I knocked - there was a padlock on the door. I broke it open, but he was gone. I found 50 lbs. of bacon and 4 lbs. of cheese. I also found some

instruments, a chisel, pickaxe, a saw, crowbar, and some other pieces of iron. I could not see him again till the 5th of February, I then met him in a lane between Chelsea and Kensington, near twelve miles from Feltham. I had not been particularly looking for him. I told him he was wanted for a burglary committed at Gamble's; he said he knew nothing of it, and wished me to let him go. I know the house was his, he lived there from the 9th of September, till the day I searched his house - he is a single man, and knew I was a constable. I went to enquire for his father.

COURT. Q. Was he in any business in which he might use the instruments - A. I never saw him do a bit of work.

(Property produced, and sworn to.)

WILLIAM GAMBLE re-examined. Here are the marks of my feet on the bacon where my heel rested. I had observed these marks while it was in my house - it was worth 5 l. The shop is part of the dwelling-house.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought it at Brentford-market, thirteen or fourteen weeks ago; there was 110 lbs. of it, at 6 d. per pound, it came to 2 l. 15 s., and I bought some cheese there.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 21.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Richardson.

358. JOHN GODLIMAN was again indicted for stealing, on the 22d of December , one bedstead, value 2 l. , the goods of Eliza Copping , widow .

ELIZA COPPING . I live at Hanworth . On the 21st of December, I lost a bedstead from a shed by my house. The constable fetched me on the 17th of January, to look at one, I knew it to be mine.

THOMAS COPPING . I am the son of the last witness. I missed the bedstead on the 22d of December, it was safe overnight; I found the lock forced open, and two bedsteads gone. I afterwards saw one of the bedsteads at Feltham.

WILLIAM BETTS . I found the bedstead at the prisoner's house.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was out one night, and saw a person throw it out of a cart.

GUILTY

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Richardson.

Reference Number: t18210214-21

359. ANDREW M'LOCKLAND was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of February , at St. Mary, Islington , one pair of coach traces, value 30 s.; one collar, value 10 s.; one pad, value 10 s., and one pair of hames, value 5 s., the goods of Samuel Bennett , in his dwelling-house .

SAMUEL BENNETT . I am a coachmaker , and live at Battle Bridge , in the parish of St. Mary, Islington. I rent the house, the shop is part of it. On the 2d of February, between two and three o'clock in the afternoon, I stood about sixty or seventy yards from my door, and thought I saw a man go into my shop; I went towards the shop, and about forty yards from it met the prisoner with a carriage harness, complete, except the bridle and reins - (another coachmaker lives just by) - I said,

"What is your pleasure, what do you want there?" He said,

"Where?" I said

"Did not you come out of the coachmaker's?" he said No. I let him go, thinking the property was not mine. I returned to my shop, missed part of the harness, which had hung inside my shop, and pursued, but could not find him. I saw the harness at Bow-street, and am sure it is mine. I picked out the prisoner from six others, and am certain of him.

ROBERT BLOWER . I am a butcher, and know the prisoner perfectly well. On the 2d of February, about two o'clock, I saw him Everett-street, Brunswick-square, with the harness; I turned back to my master's house, and told him I suspected the prisoner - he desired me to go after him. He was not out of my sight. I went and asked him if the harness was for sale - he said Yes, and asked 25 s. for it. I saw there was no bridle, and noticed it. He said he had not got it. I asked him if he was disturbed, and could not get it? He said he did not know what I was talking about, it was given him to sell by a groom. I said it was odd a groom should have such harness to sell, as it was new. He said he was well known about the neighbourhood, and went with me to No. 51, Great Guildford-street - they knew nothing of him. I let him go, and took it to my master's, and in the evening I took it to Bow-street. He called at my master's that evening for it. I refused to give it up till he went before a Magistrate, and gave him in custody, and delivered the harness to Pitcher.

ROBERT PITCHER . I am an officer. On the 2d of February, the prisoner was brought to me at Bow-street by Blower, with the harness.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. Distress caused me to do it.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 32.

Recommended to Mercy.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18210214-22

360. MICHAEL FOGERTY was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of January , one handkerchief, value 2 s., the goods of James Wooley , from his person .

JAMES WOOLEY . On the 26th of January, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I was by the Royal Exchange , I felt some one at my pocket, looked round, and saw the prisoner concealing something under his coat, which made me suspect him. I accused him with taking my handkerchief, but he denied it, and ran away. My partner, who was with me, called Stop thief! an officer took him without my losing sight of him, and picked up my handkerchief.

GEORGE GARRAT . I am a patrol. I was coming down Cornhill, and saw the prisoner running, he was some distance from me. I stopped him; the gentleman said,

"That is the man who robbed me;" and with assistance I took him.

DANIEL FALSHAW . I saw Wooley scuffling with the prisoner. I secured him and took two handkerchiefs from his hat; he said he bought them at Blackwall.

JOHN CASLAKE . I am an officer. I heard the alarm, and somebody put the handkerchief into my hands. I found the prisoner wanted to shift his hand into his left pocket; I felt and found two more handkerchiefs there, which he

said were his, and had no marks on them; two of them were marked.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought them of a sailor at Blackwall.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210214-23

361. EMANUEL ALLEN was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of January , one watch, value 16 l.; two seals, value 2 l.; one key, value 1 s., and one ribbon, value 1 d., the goods of Duncan Campbell , from his person .

MR. DUNCAN CAMPBELL . On the 13th of January, about four or five o'clock, I was in Hounsditch , I felt my watch drawn from my pocket; I instantly pursued the prisoner who was near me, and took him; I delivered him to the officer. My property was not found; I only felt it go - I observed nobody snatch it - I saw nobody near me till I felt it go, and at that instant saw the prisoner and pursued him.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. He being near you, you followed him among others - A. Not among others, he was close to me.

DAVID M'COMBIE. About five o'clock in the evening of the 13th of January, I was in Hounditch, and Mr. Campbell passed me; I noticed his seals hanging out. I just spoke to a person, and heard a noise; I went up and Mr. Campbell, gave the prisoner in my charge; I found nothing on him.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210214-24

362. GEORGE ASHCROFT was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of January , one handkerchief, value 1 s., the goods of George Lemon , from his person .

GEORGE LEMON . On the 19th of January, between eleven and twelve o'clock in the day, I was by St. Sepulchres Church , with my sister. I felt some one touching me, turned round, and saw the prisoner with my handkerchief; I pursued, and took it from his bosom; I secured him, and told him to deliver it up; he said,

"I will if you will let me go." The constable came up, and took him in charge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JAMES TEINDER . I was going by, and heard the prosecutor say

"You rascal, you have got my handkerchief." I saw the handkerchief in his bosom, and collared him.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked it up.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210214-25

363. WILLIAM POWELL was indicted for feloniously assaulting Naomi Sanderson , on the King's highway, on the 13th of January , at St. Bartholomew by the Exchange , putting her in fear, and taking from her person, and against her will, one gown, value 15 s.; one pair of ear-drops, value 2 s.; one habit shirt, value 2 s.; one pinafore, value 6 d., and one ball of sewing cotton, value 1/2 d., the goods of Thomas Sanderson .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating the gown, ear-drops, and habit shirt, to be the goods of Jemima Sanderson , and the pinafore to be the goods of Naomi Sanderson .

NAOMI SANDERSON . I was going through Angel-court , to my sister's, with a bundle, a man came up, laid hold of it, and knocked me down; I got up and ran after him; I hallooed out, and at the top of the court he was taken by the officer, who found the bundle on him. He was only out of my sight while I was getting up, and when I turned the corner I saw him again. I am sure the prisoner is the man.

Prisoner. Q. Did I knock you down - A. He pushed me down, and took hold of the bundle.

CHARLES STAPLES . I was at the corner of Bartholemew-lane and Lothbury, and heard the cry of Murder! and Stop thief! I crossed the read, and saw the prisoner running as hard as he could, I overtook him by the church and collared him; he said

"If you are not an officer, I'll not give myself up." I found he was shuffling something under his coat, and found the bundle buttoned up under his coat. The child's face had marks where he struck her.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner made no defence.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 30.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210214-26

364. PHILLIP GAVIN was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of January , 50 lbs. of lead value 10 s., the goods of William Moreland , James Browning , and Walker Emmott , and fixed to a building of theirs .

CATHERINE BRENNY . I live in West-street, Smithfield . Last night, about ten o'clock I went out, and saw the prisoner and one Jordan talking together in the court - I passed them, and when I came in I told my husband, (there had been lead stolen there more than once) as Jordan was a watchman he thought it odd he should be standing there, and called one of our men to watch. Between one and two o'clock, I saw the prisoner cutting the lead from the roof. I went out and told the watchman; he said

"Call me when he comes off." I saw him come down, and take the lead into his house. The watchman came in, and took him and the lead - he lived three doors off.

JOHN KILBY . I was employed to watch the premises, and about one o'clock heard tiles falling from the roof. The man was standing in the gutter, lifting the tiles up, and taking the lead, The constable took the prisoner at his own house; he was going to strike me. Some of the lead was thrown out of the window,

JAMES WILLIAMS . I am a watchman. I saw the prisoner in custody at half-past three o'clock in the morning. I searched the premises, and heard the lead fall from the first floor window. I found another piece in the chair. The prisoner lived in that room.

GEORGE POWELL . At three o'clock this morning I was called in, and took the prisoner in charge.

JAMES BROWNING . The house the lead was stolen from was in my possession,

Prisoner's Defence. It is all a spite against me because I owe her 9 s. My wife was put to bed, I could not sleep at home, and was going out to sleep when they took me.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210214-27

365. JAMES BENNETT was indicted for a misdemeanour .

THOMAS PEWTRES . I am a stationer , in partnership with James Low and Benjamin Pewtres ; we live in Gracechurch-street . On the 29th of January the prisoner came to our shop, said he resided at Bishop Stortford, and had been pastor to a Baptist church there twelve months; that the people were poor, and could only raise him 50 l, a year - that he had an assistant to maintain, and found himself deficient; and his friends recommended him to open a shop in the linen-drapery or stationery line, he wished to commence in a small way, and should take 10 l. or 15 l. worth of goods. Believing his account to be correct, we agreed to supply him; he wished to have them immediately, as he was going to Bishop Stortford by coach next day. We promised him part if we could not get all ready. I made out a list of them, and our young man packed them up - they amounted to between 8 l. and 9 l.

JOHN HUNT . I am apprentice to the prosecutors. I looked out the order, and was packing the goods up when the prisoner came in, and asked if they were ready. I said I had got part of them ready, and would send them immediately. He said he could wait nearly an hour, if I could get the whole. I said we had got up what he would want most, and he appeared satisfied. I sent them to the New Inn, in the Old Bailey, directing them,

"Mr. Bennett, passenger, Bishop Stortford." When the porter returned, he said Mr. Bennett told him the coach was gone, and he would be glad if I could pack the rest, and send them next day.

JOHN FREESTON . I am a porter. I took the goods to the New Inn, and saw the prisoner; he said he was too late for the coach; and asked me to take them into the public-house, which I did. He said,

"This is not all, I wish you would bring the rest to-morrow by twelve o'clock." I took another parcel next day there for him; my master came up with an officer, and took him. We then went to his lodgings, and found the first parcel, at Drury-lane.

JAMES LOW. I am in partnership with Messrs. Pewtres. On the 29th of January being informed the defendant was an impostor, I went with our porter to the New Inn, gave him in charge, and enquired what had become of the goods? He expressed his willingness to return them if I pardoned him. He said they were at a room in Drury-lane, which he had taken the night before. I went and found the goods unopened.

GEORGE HAZLEWOOD WORRALL . I am an officer. I searched the prisoner, and found two duplicates on him, a red book, and a parcel of knives, and the key of his room. I found the property in his room, No. 3, Pitt's-court, Drury-lane. He went by the name of Mansfield, there.

JOHN PRATT . I live at Bishop Stortford, am a clock and watchmaker, and a member of the Baptist church; the prisoner was not pastor there, had no salary of 50 l. a year, nor did he live there - it is all untrue. He preached there a few times, occasionally, but never a fortnight together; they gave him 1 l. for preaching on a Sabbath. He slept at my house two nights, and said he was a painter.

Prisoner's Defence. It is with feelings I cannot describe, or express, that I stand here; little did I think a few months ago that I should be placed in such circumstances. I am not able to employ counsel, but if I was I should not, as I know your Lordship's known humanity will mention to the Jury every favourable circumstance in my case. I gave them information where to find the goods; for after I got them my conscience would not let me part with them. The moment I saw Mr. Dean, (my prosecutor in another indictment,) I told him I had injured him. As to my altering my name, it was because I was ashamed of what I had done. I am glad they have got their goods back, Nothing but the greatest distress caused me to do it.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210214-28

THIRD DAY, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 16.

366. THOMAS ROBINSON , WILLIAM HOPKINS . JOHN SLATER , JOHN LEARY , THOMAS GREEN , SAMUEL ELLIS , MATTHEW TIERNEY , JAMES CAVANAUGH , GEORGE SMITH , SARAH SMITH , MARIA SMITH , ANN LEVITT , and MARGARET CONNOR were separately and severally indicted for feloniously and knowingly having in their custody and posseson forged Bank of England notes .

The prisoners severally and separately pleaded GUILTY .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Before Mr. Recorder.

367. The same prisoners were again indicted for feloniously disposing of and putting away, forged Bank of England notes, with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England .

MR. REYNOLDS, on the part of the Governor and Company of the Bank of England, declined offering any evidence.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210214-29

368. ANN ATKINSON was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of January , 22 shifts, value 5 l.; 26 handkerchiefs, value 20 s.; two pinafores, value 2 s.; two pair of stockings, value 4 s.; 11 towels, value 5 s.; one tea-caddy, value 30 s,; five cups, value 5 s.; six saucers, value 5 s.; one bason, value 1 s.; one knife, value 5 s., and one fork, value 5 s., the goods of William Murray , Esq. , in his dwelling-house .

WILLIAM MURRAY , ESQ. I live in Bryanston-square . The prisoner was in my service at ladies' maid; she came on the 15th of April, and left on the 10th of August, at Bologne, and came to England. I went over to Paris, and returned to England with my family. On the 20th of January, in consequence of information which was given us by a servant, that articles were missed, I got a search-warrant, went to Carburton-street, with Plank, the officer, and found the prisoner there; and in the room she was in I found the articles stated in the indictment, which are

mine. None of them were at Bologne - they were at my house.

SAMUEL PLANK . I am an officer. I went with Mr. Murray to the prisoner's lodging, which was a shop and parlour - she was in the parlour. I asked her if both belonged to her - she said Yes. She acknowledged having lived with Mr. Murray. I asked her if she had any property on the premises which was not her own, and if she had to give it up - she still denied it. I said Mr. Murray suspected her, and I had a warrant to search her - there were five trunks in the parlour. She delivered me the keys upon my asking for them. I found this property - Mr. Murray came in while I was searching her, and recognized it, She said she had great part of the property from a lady named Morland, whom she formerly lived with.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. No one article was worth 40 s - A. No.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JANE FITCH . I lived with Mr. Murray, and had charge of the house in his absence. I had suspicion of property being taken away, and saw some curtains of my master's at the prisoner's lodgings.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Of Stealing to the value of 39 s. only.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18210214-30

369. WILLIAM ROBINSON and WILLIAM POWELL were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Joseph Manton , the elder , about two o'clock in the night of the 27th of January , at Hayes , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, five shirts, value 50 s.; two table-cloths, value 10 s.; three towels, value 3 s., and one clothes brush, value 1 s., his property; two shirts, value 20 s., and one hat, value 5 s., the goods of Joseph Manton , the younger ; four shirts, value 40 s., the goods of Henry Manton ; and six shirts, value 40 s. , the goods of Frederick Manton ; MARY JONES was indicted for feloniously receiving, on the same day, at the same parish, two shirts, value 20 s., the goods of Joseph Manton , junior; one shirt, value 10 s., the goods of Henry Manton ; and three shirts, value 20 s., the goods of Frederick Manton , part of the goods as aforesaid stolen, well knowing them to have been stolen ; and SARAH WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously receiving on the same day, at the parish aforesaid, three shirts, value 30 s., the goods of Henry Manton , other part of the goods so aforesaid stolen, well knowing them to have been stolen .

MR. ANDREWS conducted the Prosecution.

JOHN HUSSEY . I am servant to Mr. Manton, who lives at Southall , in the parish of Hayes. On Saturday, the 27th of January, I went down to sleep there, and got there about six o'clock, and fastened the doors myself about half-past eleven o'clock. Mrs. Manton's two daughters, and one son, were at home. I got up at half-past seven o'clock next morning - it was light, and had been so about twenty minutes. I found the kitchen door open, which I had fastened the overnight, and a square of glass was broken out of the kitchen window, large enough for a man to get through. I looked about, observed a candle had been used, and saw the droppings of tallow where they had stuck it in the kitchen; I missed the linen from a basket, and the drawers were open. The linen was safe overnight. I found a hat left behind, on the dresser, some pieces of paper were in it, and concealed under the lining was a duplicate; the name of Parker was in the hat. I went to town to Lightfoot, and shewed him the duplicate.

SAMUEL PLANK . I know Mr. Farrant's hand-writing. I saw this confession taken, and the prisoner sign it (read).

The voluntary confession of William Robinson , who says -

"I am a gardener, and have been out of a situation about three weeks, and lodge at No. 1, Baker's-court, East-street. I served the last service at Southall-green, with Mr. Parker, the pawnbroker. Between nine and ten o'clock on Saturday evening, the 27th of January, I set off from London, on foot, with a young man named James, a baker, for Southall - we had agreed to rob Mr. Manton's house there. - we got there between eleven and twelve o'clock. On Sunday morning we broke a bar in the kitchen window, and a pane of glass, got in, and opened the door of a room in a passage by the kitchen and saw a man in bed - he appeared awake, but never spoke. We found sixteen or seventeen shirts in the kitchen, two tablecloths, a pillow-case, and two glass cloths. We took a tinder-box and a candle with us, and struck a light before we got into the house. The man with me took a hut from the kitchen, and left his own. The moment we saw the man abed we made our escape, and returned to town; we went to my lodging, No. 1, Baker's-court, East-street, kept by Mrs. Thompson, where I lived with ( Sarah Jones ), Sarah Williams . Mary Jones , who lived with Powell, was also there. Powell and I divided the shirts, eight each, and tossed up for the odd one, which Powell won. We got to town again about seven o'clock in the morning. We gave the shirts to the two women we lived with to dispose of for us.

"W. ROBINSON."

JOHN HUSSEY re-examined. I slept in the front drawing-room; a lad slept on the kitchen floor - they could see him from the passage.

MARY BARRY . I live at No. 1, Baker's-court, East-street, Manchester-square; Robinson lodged in the same house, by the name of Jones. On Sunday morning, the 28th of January, about half-past seven o'clock, I met him with another man in the passage, each had a bundle; I do not know the other man - they went up stairs to Robinson's room. I know Williams, she also went by the name of Jones, and lived with Robinson, as his wife. The other man had a fustian jacket, and, I think, fustian breeches.

RACHAEL THOMPSON . My husband keeps the house which Robinson lived in. I did not see him on Sunday - Williams lodged with him - the female prisoner, Jones came to see the male prisoner, Jones; she was there the two or three last days before Robinson was taken up.

ELEANOR M'GRATH. I live in Simmon's-buildings, Westminster. I know Powell by sight; he went by the name of Bill Powell - he came to my lodgings last Monday fortnight, and brought a bundle; he told me to keep it, and to give it to no one till he returned, for he was going to look for Mary Jones , which is the prisoner. Plank came, and I gave him the bundle. It contained two shirts, and a damask table-cloth, marked

"Manton."

MARY M'GRATH. I am the daughter of the last witness. Powell came on a Tuesday morning to my mother's lodgings,

about half-past ten o'clock, for the coat he has now got on - Mary Jones had left it; he left his jacket on the table, and said he would call by-and-by for it, and put the coat on. Plank came and took the jacket. Mary Jones had lived in our court for twelve months. I first knew Powell about three weeks ago.

WM. ELGOOD. I am shopman to Mr. Lightfoot, of Bulstrode-street, Manchester-square. I know Powell - he brought some pistols to our shop on the 13th of January (looks at the duplicate found in the hat at the prosecutor's house), this is the duplicate for them - it was made out in my presence, in the name of Mr. Thomas. I knew him before by the name of Powell, but he did not give me that name on this occasion. The duplicate is the counterpart to one in our possession, I saw him pledge the pistols it belongs to, and is in the hand-writing of Caslake, our shopman, who is not here.

JOHN WALES . I am an officer. I apprehended Powell on Tuesday, the 30th of January, at the corner of Hatton-garden. I produce the hat I took from off his head; I took a shirt from off his body with the marks cut out; the maker's name is on the hat - it is Galon and Co. He said he bought the hat and shirt of a Jew. I apprehended Robinson, and took a shirt off his back with the mark cut out. I found a jacket amongst the bed-clothes at M'Grath's.

MARY M'GRATH re-examined. It is the jacket he left.

SAMUEL PLANK . I am an officer. I went to Lightfoot's on Sunday, the 28th of January, and next morning, the 29th, about eleven o'clock, I went towards Lightfoot's, and about thirty yards from the shop, I saw Mary Jones , suspecting her, I asked what she was waiting for? (she was looking towards Lightfoot's) she said she was waiting for nothing; I asked her what see had in her bundle under her arm? she said it was her own. I asked her if she was waiting for any one? she said No. I took her into Lightfoot's, and found the bundle under her cloak - which was four shirts all marked, Manton. She said

"There is another woman here, she and I were together last night in Oxford-street, and met two well dressed gentlemen, each had a bundle, we went with them to a house where we slept, and in the morning they gave us these shirts instead of money;" and they were going to India. I asked her if she had any more shirts, or had pledged any? she said No. I then saw Williams in another room there, and shewed her a shirt, which I received from the pawnbroker. I asked her if that was the shirt she brought to pledge? she said Yes, and gave the same account as the other woman, and mentioned the house they went to - she said it was in Woodstock-court. I asked her if she had pledged any of the shirts before; she said she had not, and that she had no lodging. Jones heard her mention Woodstock-court and agreed that they slept there. I left Jones in the watch-house, and took Williams to point out the house; she shewed me No. 3, Woodstock-court. and herself asked the woman if she had not slept there last night. I told the woman to answer truly as the girl was in custody for a robbery; she said,

"You did not sleep here;" she replied

"I did, I slept in No. 9," the woman said,

"That is impossible, there are two persons in bed there now, who have been there all night." I took her back to the watch-house, and took Jones there, she would not be possitive that was the house, and the woman denied her having slept there. Jones gave me her residence, No. 4, Simmon's-buildings, but said she had not slept there that night. I was present when Robinson and Powell were brought in, and the shirts taken from them. I searched Williams's lodgings on the evening of the 30th of January, and found a shirt, tablecloth, two napkins, and a towel - it was at No. 1, Baker's-court, East-street; she there went by the name of Jones. I learnt from her and Robinson that they lived together there by the name of Jones. I asked Powell when Wales took the shirt from him what he had done with the shooting jacket as he had one on yesterday; he said he never had one, and never wore any such thing. The same evening Wales and I went to M'Grath's, and found the shooting jacket. On the Thursday following, the 1st of February, I went again to M'Grath's, and she gave me a bundle.

Prisoner POWELL. Q. Will you swear I said I never wore a shooting jacket, or did I say I never had one of my own - A. He said he never wore one.

JOHN WALES re-examined. I searched Robinson's lodgings, in Baker's-court, and found two duplicates and part of another.

THOMAS PARKER . I am a goldsmith, and live in Berner's-street. The hat left in the house is mine. Robinson lived three years with me, and left me three or four months ago.

MR. MANTON. The hat found on Powell, belongs to my son Joseph.

JOHN HUSSEY . That hat was in the house on the night of the robbery.

WILLIAM RICHARDS , I am servant to Messrs. Jones and Moxon, who are pawnbrokers. On the 29th of January, I took two shirts in pledge of a woman, in the name of Mary Manton . I do not know her. The duplicates produced, were found at Williams's lodgings, and belongs to them. I believe Jones to be the woman; I did not know her before. I have a table-cloth pledged on the 29th of January, by a woman, in the name of Mary Jones . I do not know her - it is marked Joseph Manton .

JOHN CRESSEY . I am servant to Mr. Morritt, a pawnbroker. I took two sheets in pledge on the 29th of January, in the name of Ann Williams ; I believe Jones to be the person. The ticket produced as found at Williams's lodging, and is the counterpart of the duplicate.

DAVID RICE . I live with Mr. Hall, a pawnbroker. On the 29th of January, a shirt was pledged with me by Williams. The ticket produced by Wales is the one I gave her.

JOHN WALES re-examined. That ticket was picked up in the street near Lightfoot's, where Williams had been standing.

JAMES ROSS . I live with my mother, who is a pawnbroker. I produce two shirts, pledged with me on the 29th of January, in the name of Mary Manton , by Jones, for 10 s.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

ROBINSON I am guilty.

POWELL'S Defence. I had nothing to do with breaking the house, though I had the goods, and gave them to the women to pawn. I did not tell them they were stolen.

JONES'S Defence. I went to this man's house one night - they were all drunk, and in the morning he said he had no money, and gave me the things to pawn.

ROBINSON - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 30.

POWELL - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 23.

JONES - GUILTY . Aged 24.

WILLIAMS - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Best.

Reference Number: t18210214-31

370. WILLIAM ROBINSON and WILLIAM POWELL were again indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Parker , at Hayes , about the hour of two o'clock in the night of the 2d of January , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein. one tea-pot, value 40 s.; one tea-pot stand, value 20 s.; 18 tea spoons, value 5 l.; two sheets, value 10 s.; one counterpane, value 5 s.; two pair of pistols, value 40 s.; one snuff box, value 5 s.; one coat, value 10 s.; one whip, value 2 s.; one hat, value 2 s.; one pair of breeches, value 5 s.; one gown, value 5 s., and one pair of overalls, value 3 s., his property ; and EDWARD DRINKWATER was indicted for feloniously receiving, on the same day, at the parish aforesaid, one tea-pot, value 40 s.; one tea-pot stand, value 20 s., and 16 spoons, value 3 l. 10 s., part of the goods aforesaid stolen, well knowing them to be stolen .

WILLIAM LANGRIDGE . I am servant to Mr. Parker, who lives at Southall , in the parish of Hayes. On Tuesday, the 2d of January, I was there with my wife, and we went to bed about ten o'clock - nobody else was in the house. I had fastened the doors and windows - it was a boisterous night. I was not alarmed, and got up about half-past six o'clock - it was dark, and about half-past seven o'clock I went on the lawn, and found a ladder standing against my master's bed-room window, which was broke and the shutter cut; some person had let down the top sash, and got down into the room - the drawers were broken open. I sent to town to my master, and the things remained as I found them till he came - it was daylight when I discovered it; I had a candle when I got up. I heard no noise after I was up, if it had been done after I rose I might not have heard it, as the window is in front of the house.

MR. THOMAS PARKER . My servant gave me information. I went down on the afternoon of the 3d of January, and found the shutters cut, and the windows broke, the drawers turned round and broken and several things taken out. Robinson had lived three years with me, and left three months ago. I generally ordered the plate to be taken up into the bed-room; I never ordered him to do it, and I do not know that I ever did in his presence. I missed the articles stated in the indictment, and lost a hat with my name in it.

SAMUEL PLANK . I saw Mr. Farrant sign this paper, and saw Robinson sign it - his confession was voluntary.

(read.)

The voluntary confession of William Robinson , who says

"About a month ago we set off from London, about seven o'clock in the evening; we had agreed to rob Mr. Parker's house, at Southall-green. We went on foot, and got there between nine and ten o'clock at night. We found a ladder in the rick-yard, and got in at one of the bed-room windows by breaking a pane of glass. We forced and broke some of the drawers open, in Mr. Parker's bed-room (no person being therein), and took four pistols, a silver tea-pot, a small silver waiter, some table and tea spoons, two pair of salt spoons, a flannel-gown, some stockings, and some handkerchiefs, a white connterpane, a man's silk hat, and a pair of leather breeches. We sold the plate to Edward Drinkwater , the man who keeps the General Townsend , public-house, in Oxford-street, for 35 s.; we sold most of the other articles to a Jew at the General Townsend , public-house, for about 2 l. I had one pair of pistols, and the baker the other pair We had no light at Mr. Parker's; we remained about an hour in the bed-room, and then returned by the window, leaving the upper sash down, and the ladder there. I told Drinkwater when I sold him the silver articles how we came by them.

"W. ROBINSON."

WILLIAM ELGOOD . I produce a pair of pistols, which Powell pledged with me on the 13th of January - he gave them into my hand, and wanted 15 s. on them; we offered him 10 s., he went out and came back.

SAMUEL PLANK re-examined. I received the duplicate of the pistols from Mr. Manton.

MR. MANTON. Hussey gave it to me.

JOHN HUSSEY . I got it out of the hat that was left at the house.

MR. PARKER re-examined. The hat and pistols are mine, and were stolen that night.

JOHN WALES . Here is a hat, which I took off Powell's head on the 30th of January.

JOHN HUSSEY re-examined. It is Mr. Manton's, and was stolen on the night of the robbery, when the other was left.

SAMUEL PLANK re-examined. I searched Drinkwater's house on the 30th of January; he keeps the General Townsend , public-house, in Oxford-street. On the previous evening, I went there, and enquired for Powell, the baker, he promised to give me all the information he could about him. I told him I wished to take him respecting a robbery. In consequence of information, I and Wales went there again, we said we had come on an unpleasant business, and had a few questions to ask him, and begged he would take time before he answered, as it was a matter of consequence to him. I asked if he knew Robinson, (describing his person) and said I supposed him to be a companion of the baker; he said he knew no such man, either by name or description. I asked him if he had any boxes, bundle, or property left there by any person, or if he had bought any plate, and named a silver tea-pot. stand, and spoons? he said he had seen nothing of the sort; I said that was not true, and that I had a warrant to search his house, and again entreated him to tell me if he had any thing of the sort; he said he had not, but when I was about to search the house, he said there was a trunk left there by a man. I told him I would look at that presently. His wife in his presence gave us a key of a cupboard, in which I found four table-spoons and one gravy-spoons. I said those were the very things I wanted, and questioned him about the tea-pot and stand; he said

"I will tell you presently." I

said

"I must know immediately;" he then said they were at Danell's, a silversmith's in Oxford-street, to have his name engraved on them. I asked how he got them; he said he had them of Robinson, and to whom the box belonged, in payment of a score of 3 l. 15 s. He said he had nothing else from him. I took him up to his bed-room, and there we found four silver salt-spoons, plain; he said they were his own, and I left them there. There was a cloth marked P.P. he said he did not know how it came there. The prosecutor and I went next morning, and found the salt-spoons and took them away; Wales took the box. I went to Danells, and found the tea-pot, stand, and seven tea-spoons.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. You knew Drinkwater many years, did you not consider him respectable - A. I did so. I apprehended him on the 30th of January.

JOHN WALES re-examined. I went with Plank, his account is perfectly correct. Drinkwater said the box belonged to a man who he called the gardener, but appeared not to know him by the name of Robinson. There was nothing particular in the box. I went to Danell's, and found the property.

JOSEPH DANELL . I am a silversmith, and live in Oxford-street. Drinkwater brought the tea-pot to have a new nob, and the bruises taken off, and a few days after he brought it back with the stand, to be engraved; I told him it appeared to have had initials or a crest taken out from the upper part; he said he thought it would bear engraving, and that he bought it.

LOUISA DANELL . I am the wife of the last witness. I remember the tea-pot being brought back to be engraved. While had it Drinkwater came, and wanted to see some spoons; I shewed him some; he asked me if we took old silver in exchange? I said Yes; he then brought some spoons, for which I agreed to allow him one guinea. I remarked that the handles were old fashioned, and he said they were his wife's mother's, and had been in the family many years.

(Property produced, and sworn to.)

ROBINSON. I took the plate from Mr. Parker.

Powell made no defence.

DRINKWATER'S Defence. I am sorry to be placed in this situation, as the mere dupe of these two fellows. I had taken the house about a fortnight, and Robinson was recommended to me by the late landlady as respectable. He came in a few days, and asked me to lodge him, but I could not. He said he was going into the country, and asked to leave the box till he returned. He called in a day or two, brought the plate into the bar, and I bought it of him not knowing it to be stolen.

ROBINSON - GUILTY . - DEATH. Aged 30.

POWELL - GUILTY . - DEATH. Aged 23.

DRINKWATER - GUILTY . Aged 30.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Best.

Reference Number: t18210214-32

371. WILLIAM ROBINSON and WILLIAM POWELL were again indicted for stealing, on the 10th of January , three ink-stands, value 12 l.; one clock, value 5 l.; three pair of boots, value 1 l.; one hat, value 1 l.; one cloak, value 10 s., and twelve printed bound books, value 1 l. , the goods of John Penn , Esq; and EDWARD DRINKWATER was indicted for feloniously receiving one clock, value 5 l., and one hat, value 1 s., part of the said goods, well knowing them to be stolen .

SARAH BALDWIN . I am servant to Mr. John Penn , of Stoke-park, Buckinghamshire . On the 9th of January, in the afternoon, I secured the windows, and next morning I found them open, and missed the property. I once saw Robinson in New-street, at Mr. Penn's town house; he came to see the coachman.

SAMUEL PLANK. On the 2d of February, I went to one Hailing in Clipston-street, and found the table-clock. On the 5th I went with Gutteridge, (Mr. Penn's butler) to the House of Correction and saw Drinkwater; I asked to see the hat which was on his head. Gutteridge claimed it as Mr. Penn's. He said he had it from Robinson. I searched Robinson's lodgings, and found some keys, which Mr. Penn claimed. I saw Robinson sign this confession.

(read.)

The voluntary confession of William Robinson , who says -

"About four weeks ago, in the evening, I left town in company with William Powell and a boy who we called Bill. (he frequented the General Townsend, public-house, in Oxford-street) We walked, and got down near one o'clock in the morning to Stoke Park. I pushed up the library window, cut a hole in the shutter with my knife, and we all got in. We took some books from the book-case, and a silver ink-stand from off the library table. We then went into a little room adjoining, and took a cloak, two pair of boots, a pair of shoes, and a new hat. We then went into another room, and took another silver inkstand, and a clock from a little room near the dining-room; we put the silver and other articles (except the clock) into a bag, and took a tinder box and candle with us and struck a light after we got into the library. We left about half-past two o'clock, and came on the road to town: we arrived about nine o'clock, and went to the General Townsend , public-house. I told the landlord (Drinkwater) I had two pair of boots, which I sold him, and the table-clock (by Jeremiah Newbrough ). I asked him for one pair of boots 10 s.; for the other pair 12 s., and he gave me 15 s. for both pair; and as I owed him 30 s., I gave him the clock to pay the debt. He had four volumes, one pair of shoes, and an ink-glass silver mounted, which he agreed to purchase, but we had not agreed for price, and not having seen him since, I have not been paid for them. The large silver ink-stand, the smaller one, and the cloak, I sold to a Jew, who frequented the General Townsend for 4 l. Powell had about 1 l. 5 s. as his share, and the boy 1 l. 2 s. 6 d. I formerly lived eight years with Mr. Penn.

WILLIAM ROBINSON .

Taken before me this 9th

day of February, 1821.

GEORGE FARRANT .

HANNAH HAILING . I live at No. 8, Clipston-street. Drinkwater brought the clock to my husband's, one month or five weeks ago, to repair.

WILLIAM HAILING . I was sent for to Drinkwater. He said he had a clock to repair, and asked if I knew any one to do it. I said I would get it done.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

DRINKWATER'S Defence. Robinson left them at my house when I was out. Next morning I saw him; he said

the hat was his brother's. He told me to get the clock repaired for him, and I asked Haling to get it done.

ROBINSON - GUILTY . Aged 30.

ROBINSON was Recommended to Mercy by Mr. Penn.

POWELL - NOT GUILTY .

DRINKWATER - NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Best.

Reference Number: t18210214-33

372. JAMES FLEMMING , JOHN BURRS , and RICHARD REES , were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Parry , about six o'clock in the night of the 18th of January , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, two waistcoats, value 8 s., and seven petticoats, value 21 s., his property .

ELIZA PARRY . I am the wife of Thomas Parry , who lives at Limehouse , I take in washing. On the 18th of January, about six o'clock we were robbed of several articles, - it was dark - they were taken from the front room. The windows were pushed up, and the things taken out - they were not fastened, and the window sash was half open.

WILLIAM HALL . I am a watchman. My house is not half a mile from the prosecutor's. I apprehended Rees on the night of the robbery, with some of the property in his apron; one or two more were with him.

JOHN OWEN . I am the headborough. Rees was brought to the watch-house, with part of the property.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

THOMAS PARRY . I found the window open, alarmed the neighbourhood, and in the street, behind my house, I saw Flemming and Burrs. I asked what they had been after? they said,

"D - n you, we have not got your watch." They went off, and I went home; in about ten minutes some of the property was brought to me. Next morning I went to Rees's house, in George-yard, and found Flemming there; he ran out on seeing me. Burrs came in and was taken.

NOT GUILTY

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Richardson.

Reference Number: t18210214-34

373. JOHN PAUL , CHARLES WILDEY , and GEORGE SMITH were indicted for stealing, on the 19th of January , 32 lead pencils, value 1 s.; six plummets, value 1 s. 6 d.; seven pieces of whip cord, value 2 d., and four pieces of French-chalk, value 18 d. , the goods of Thomas Tyler .

THOMAS TYLER . I am a stationer , and live in Hertford-street, St. Pancras . On the 20th of January, I missed these things, and afterwards saw some of them in the officer's possession. I do not know the prisoners.

JAMES DAINTON . I am a constable of St. Pancras. I apprehended Paul between two and three o'clock in the morning of the 20th of January, in a court leading to Fitzroy-market, I found a quantity of plumets whipcord, and some French chalk on him. Wildey was brought to the watch-house; he took six plumets from his pocket, and handed them to me. Paul said he bought them of a Jew for 6 d. Next morning I took Wildey home to his mother, and then took Paul home, but not seeing his father, I brought him back. Smith was taken on the Sunday.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

NOT GUILTY

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Richardson.

Reference Number: t18210214-35

374. SAMUEL YELL was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of February , six spoons, value 1 l. , the goods of Joseph York Hatton .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 13.

Transported for Seven Years .

Before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210214-36

375. EDWARD JONES and WILLIAM HARRISON were indicted for a fraud .

MARK RENISDEW . I am clerk to Mr. Matthew Ledgworth , of Friday-street . On the 30th of December , the prisoner Harrison called with an order for one piece of blue pelisse cloth at 13 s. a yard, and said he came from Mr. Steadman's. I said we had not a piece at that price, but we had some at 8 s., and 9 s. I gave him back the order, and in about an hour he brought this order. On the credit of the order I delivered him one piece sixteen yards long, at 9 s. per yard, and another twenty-three yards, at 8 s. 9 s., in all 17 l. 5 s. 3 d. He said his name was Groves, which I entered in the book. I afterwards heard that the prisoners were taken, and saw them at Worship-street. Harrison said he had the order from Jones, and Jones confessed giving it him, but denied writing Mr. Steadman's name.

JOHN STEADMAN . I deal with Mr. Ledgworth Jones lived with me nine or ten months, and left in April or May. This order is not my signature.

JOHN MANCE . I am an officer. In consequence of information I received from Mr. Steadman that the prisoners had obtained goods by counterfeiting orders, I and Vann apprehended them on Saturday, the 6th of January, they were identified.

THOMAS VANN . I was with Mance, and took Jones in the Strand, about eight o'clock at night. We then went to a house, in Chandos-street, and there took Harrison.

(order read.)

Mr. Ledgworth,

Sir, - I am not particular about the colour, if it is more of a purple, you may send two pieces very near the colour.

JOHN STEADMAN .

HARRISON'S Defence. Jones gave me the order; he had a tall genteel person with him. I was led into it.

JONES'S Defence. I got in company with a tall genteel man, who led me into it.

HARRISON - GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined One Year .

JONES - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Six Months .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210214-37

376. EDWARD JONES and JAMES RICHARDS were indicted for a like offence .

EDWARD KITCHEN . I am clerk to Mr. Nevins , of Aldermanbury . On the 28th of December , Richardson came to the warehouse. and brought an order as from Mr. Steadman, for a piece of blue pelisse cloth. I delivered him one, which came to 1 l. 2 s. 10 d.

JOHN STEADMAN . I do not know Richards, and the order is not my writing. I deal with Mr. Nevin.

JOHN MANCE . I apprehended Jones on the 6th of January. Richards had been apprehended in the City. At the examination; he acknowledged receiving the cloth, and said he received the order from Jones - Jones said he wrote it, but did not sign it.

RICHARDS'S Defence. I received the order from Jones, and I received 5 s. for fetching the cloth. They came to me at the coffee-shop, and asked me if I wanted a job.

JONES - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined six months at the expiration of his former sentence .

RICHARDS - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Six Months .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210214-38

FOURTH DAY, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 17.

377. WILLIAM SINFIELD was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of January , one handkerchief, value 2 s., the goods of John Moore , Esq. , from his person .

JOHN MOORE , Esq. On the 31st of January, about half-past two o'clock in the afternoon, I was walking up Tottenham-court-road , I felt some one touch me, and on turning round, saw my handkerchief in the prisoner's hand. I pursued him calling Stop thief! he ran down a street, and a gentleman's servant rode across, which stopped him. His hat came off, and the handkerchief blew out. I collared him, and he begged forgiveness.

WILLIAM SMITH . I was in Tottenham-court-road. I heard a cry of Stop thief! and saw the prisoner running towards the square; a man rode his horse to the pavement, which stopped him; his hat fell off, and the handkerchief came out; he ran about three paces, and I seized him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. That is not the same handkerchief that was produced at the office.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210214-39

378. DAVID TINDALL was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of February , one prayer-book, value 10 s. , the goods of Samuel Lee .

SAMUEL LEE . On the 13th of February, the prisoner came to my shop, in the Strand , and asked for a common prayer-book; I shewed him three or four. He then asked for Johnson's Rasselas and several other books. I went to the other side of the shop for them. The moment I put them before him, my apprentice came from the back counting-house, and intimated by signs that he had taken a book. I charged him with it; he denied it. I insisted on searching him, which he did not resist. I took a prayer-book from his coat-pocket; he pleaded distress, and begged me to let him go.

JOSEPH GIBSON . I saw the prisoner leave the counter, go to a glass-case, take a book out, and put it into his pocket.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I hope you will look over it.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Judgment Respited .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210214-40

379. EDWARD PARSONS and WILLIAM DAWSON were indicted for that they, on the 2d January , at St. James's Clerkenwell , feloniously did dispose of and put away a certain forged and counterfeit Bank note, (setting it forth 1 l. No. 11384, dated October 7, 1820, signed N. Stock) with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England , they knowing the same to be forged and counterfeit .

SECOND COUNT. For feloniously offering to Hannah Stevens a like forged note, with a like intent, they knowing it to be forged.

THIRD AND FOURTH COUNTS. The same, only calling the forged instrument a Promisory note, for payment of money instead of a Bank note.

FOUR OTHER COUNTS, the same, only stating their intent to be to defraud Thomas Stevens .

HANNAH STEVENS . I am the wife of Thomas Stevens , a copper-plate printer , who lives in Mary-le-bone . On the 2d of January, between one and two o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoners came in together; Parsons asked for half a quire of paper, and an almanack for Miss Doyle. I looked them out - he tendered me a 1 l. Bank note; I handed it to Mr. Stevens, in the adjoining room - he came and put his back to the door, to prevent their going out, and said,

"What name shall I put to this?" Parsons said the name was on it. I went to call assistance - (the name of Miss Doyle was on it) - they were secured.

THOMAS STEVENS . My wife called me and I came into the shop; the prisoners were there. Parsons looked very earnestly at me; Dawson was looking at some pictures, apparently taking no part in it - I asked, what address I was to put on the note I had received from my wife? and Parsons said,

"The address is on it." My wife went for assistance - the address on the note is

"Miss Doyle, 10, Montague-square, 2 - 1 - 21." Mr. Morris and others came in; Parsons was trying to get out of the door, he was pulling it open as I stood against it - I secured him; and as we were going out, he said,

"Take that man (Dawson), it is him I had it from." Davison heard it, but made no reply, that I heard - he was about five feet from me; they were both secured, and I marked the note before it went out of my possession - this is it - (looking at one).

COURT. Q. Did you put it in your pocket before you marked it - A. Yes, I had no other, I am sure it that which my wife gave me.

Mrs. STEVENS re-examined. I heard Parsons say,

"Take that man, he gave it me." Dawson looked strange, as if he knew nothing of it, and said,

"Me! - What!"

RICHARD COATES . I am a constable, and took the prisoners in charge; I found a bunch of keys and a memorandum-book on Dawson. Parsons said,

"That is the book he gave me the note out of." Dawson made no answer.

ESTHER CURTIS BLACKMAN . I keep a pastry cook's shop in Duke-street, Manchester-square. On the 2d of January, Parsons came, as I suppose, but cannot positively swear he is the man; he asked for a 5 s. cake for Miss Doyle - I asked,

"Which Miss Doyle?" he said,

"Miss Doyle, Montague-square." I put up the cake, and he tendered me a note; I asked, if he had the note from Miss Doyle - he said,

"Yes," and I wrote her address on it - (looks at one) - this is it. I wrote

"Miss Doyle, Montague-square, 2-1-21, E. C. B." I was taking the change out, and as the note lay on the counter, I compared it with others - I did not like it, and said,

"I will send the cake:" he said,

"The note is very good." I returned it him, saying,

"I'll send it." I sent it, it was returned the same day. I live a few streets from Mr. Stevens. I believe Parsons to be the man.

MISS DIANA DOYLE . The prisoner lived with my uncle Colonel Doyle , many years back, but not lately. I live in Montague-square with my father - I did not send Parsons at any time for a cake, nor for paper, or an almanack; I never saw him in my life to my recollection, but suppose as he lived with my uncle, when I was a child - I may have seen him - I have sisters, the eldest is fourteen years old; she was at home in January - I never saw him about the house.

COLONEL FRANCIS HASTINGS DOYLE. I live at No. 10, Montague-square. Parsons lived at my brothers about eight years ago; I saw him last about a year ago - I gave him no note, nor sent him for stationery or cake. He bore an excellent character. When my brother left England, he got him a situation in the Commissary department.

MICHAEL JOHN FITZPATRICK . I am clerk to the magistrates of Marlborough-street, and was present at the prisoners examination - (looks at it) - this is it; it is signed A. Hepburn, which Dawson signed and said it was his proper name - I saw him sign it, and took it down. He said, he wished to account for the note in question (read).

The voluntary statement of A. Hepburn, taken on 15th January, 1821, who says,

"I had some property at a pawnbrokers, and being short of money, I, sold the duplicates and received the note in question of the person I sold them to, and 5 s. in silver. I do not know his name, or where he lives, but he promised to meet me next day, at the Gower's Arms, between ten and eleven o'clock, as I said it was probable I should have more duplicates to sell."

Signed,

GEORGE FARRANT .

MR. JOSEPH MAYNARD . I am clerk to the Solicitors of the Bank, and was present at Marlborough-street, on the 5th of January, at the prisoner's examination; what he said was not taken down at that time - they were going to be committed for re-examination. Mr. Farrant asked, if they wished to say any thing; Parson's said,

"I had the note from this man, (pointing to Dawson), he asked two other people to pass bad notes for him;" (Dawson heard it, but said nothing). I said, what were their names? Parsons said, Charles Dolby , King's Head, Albemarle-street, and Abraham Burt , Yorkshire Gray, Woodstock-street." Dolby was found at the address; the other man was known at the Yorkshire Gray, but was out of town.

CHARLES WATKINS DOLBY . I am a servant. I was out of employ just after Christmas, and lodged at the King's Head, Albemarle-street - Parsons used the house, and I became acquainted with him; I did not know Dawson. Several days before they were in custody, Parsons came to me at the Blue Posts, Bond-street, and said a person wanted to see me outside. I left him in the house, and went out and saw Dawson, who I never saw before. He asked, if I would pass a forged note; I said, I never did, and should not like to do it - he said, he would pay me if I did; and asked me to meet him next morning in Oxford-street, at nine o'clock. I made no answer and came away - he mentioned no place in Oxford-street. I met him three days after in Oxford-street, and he asked me to do the same. I had seen him before that, and he asked me, why I did not come according to appointment? I said,

"I made no appointment." He then asked, if I would pass them? I refused. He said, I could get a very good living by it - that he had passed above one hundred in the country. I left him.

Q. How came you here - A. Mr. Christie, the inspector, fetched me here.

COURT. Q. When were you in place - A. I lived with with Captain Pollard last July, and since that I have been driving horses for Towers, in Woburn - I have had occasional help from friends.

JURY. Q. Recollect as well as you can, when you were called out of the public-house - A. It was a week or ten days after Christmas. I met them in the street three or four days after that, accidentally. I never intended to go to him.

COURT. Q. How soon after you were called from the public-house, were you questioned about this - A. About a fortnight after. I have lived with Sir Edward Paget . I left Mr. Pollard on account of his going abroad.

THOMAS GLOVER . I am inspector of the Bank of England; have been so upwards of twenty-six years (looks at the note) - it is forged in every respect, it is neither the Bank paper, or plate, nor is it the signature of Nathaniel Stock , as it purports to be.

NATHANIEL STOCK . I am signing clerk. There is no other of my name - the note is not my signature.

PARSON'S Defence. I met Dawson promiscuously in the Spread Eagle, Oxford-street, and asked him for eighteen peuce which he owed me. He said,

"You must get change, and I want a cake." We went out, and I asked what address I should put on it; he said,

"Put any address, it does not matter." I have no place of residence of my own, and I had better give an address that was known; I then gave Colonel Doyle . The woman put the note into the drawer and was giving change. She took it out, and said,

"I will send the cake." I said, I believed it to be good - she said, she did not know. and would send the cake. I came out, and told him the person said the note

was bad. He said,

"No, it is not, you may depend on it." I said the woman would not refuse it if it was not - he said,

"I want an almanack and some paper; go and get it, and I will go with you; I am sure it is good." I went in, and gave the note to Mrs. Stevens, who gave it her husband in the parlour; he put it in his pocket, but they never asked me for any address; but he came and took hold of me, and said,

"It is a bad note - we have been tricked by some of you before.

"I said,

"That is the man who gave it to me - why not take him?" At the office he denied giving it me, but he knows he did; he afterwards wavered, and said, he did give it me. They asked me several questions, at the house of correction. He said, I need not be afraid, for he had taken it of a man he had sold some things to, and that he would go to the house with me. Mr. Stevens asked me for no address. After leaving Colonel Doyle 's service, I entered the Commissary's department, by his recommendation; and as storekeeper in the Duke of Wellington's staff, in the Peninsula. I have also been under Lord Combermere.

DAWSON'S Defence. I received the note from a man I sold some duplicates to, he used to play at skettles with me at the Jew's Harp. I told him I had other things to sell, and he promised to meet me the following morning, but did not come, since that I understand he has called at my lodgings; I owed this person a trifle, and gave him the note to get changed, I told him

"I was certain it was good," but now I find it is bad.

DAWSON - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 45.

PARSONS - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 38.

Parsons Recommended to Mercy.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Best.

Reference Number: t18210214-41

380. WILLIAM MESSENGER was indicted for that he, on the 9th of January , at St. James's, Clerkenwell , feloniously did dispose of and put away a certain forged and counterfeit Bank note, setting it forth (for payment 1 l., No. 12,238, November 8, 1820, signed J. Vautin) with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England , knowing the same to have been forged and counterfeited .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating the forged instrument to be a promissary note, for payment of money, instead of a Bank note.

TWO OTHER COUNTS, the same, only stating the prisoner's intent to be to defraud Matthew Green .

MATTHEW GREEN , I am a Tailor and Salesman , and live in Edgeware-road ; the prisoner came to my shop on the 24th November, and bought a pair of shoes for 9 s. 6 d. and a fustian jacket for 6 s., he offered me a 1 l. note, my daughter was in the shop, I said I did not like the note, she said she had seen him many times, I said

"Well then I will take his direction." I asked his name, and where he lived. He gave his name George Cooper , at Mr. Gardener's, cowkeeper, Chiswick; which I put on the back of it, in his presence - (looks at one) - this is it - I paid it away, it came back to me before Christmas; I can swear to the note, there is Matthew on it, which I write on all my notes. I found a Mr. Gardener, a cowkeeper, at Chiswick. I inquired at all the public-houses, but could not find Cooper.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODERICK. Q. Will you say on your oath, that you did not say,

"Give me the direction of the person you took it of" - A. I asked his name, he said George Cooper , he said he lived himself with Mr. Gardener, and I concluded that he took it of Mr. Gardener, and I think he said so, but cannot charge my memory with that - he never said he received it of a man who lived with Mr. Gardener.

MR. REYNOLDS. Q. Did you see him in custody? - A. Yes, on 2d January -

"I told him I had taken a bad 5 l. note." He said I did not pay you a 5 l. note. I said I know that. He said I paid you a 1 l. note, and bought a pair of shoes and a fustian jacket.

JOHN GARDENER , I am a Cowkeeper living at Chiswick, I do not know the prisoner, nor any George Cooper . No such person lived with me in November last - nor did the prisoner; I do not keep many men.

JOSEPH DALE , I am a potter, and live in Harrow-road, Paddington. I was at the King's Arms, Edgeware-road, in October or November, and saw the prisoner there, he was asking the landlady to change a 1 l. note for a pot of beer, she said she could not. I had silver and gave it him; I am sure he is the man, I had not seen him before. He gave me the name W. Messenger, and referred me to Adams's eating-house at Paddington, (looks at a note) this is it. I then left him. I paid the note for a bill, it was returned a fortnight after, marked forged. I then went over to Adams, they knew him, but could not tell where he lived, but said they would mention it to him when they saw him. I never saw him about it. I do not know when it was returned; I am certain he is the man. I understood them to say he had lived there.

WILLIAM PRENDERGAST . I am a constable, and apprehended the prisoner on the 8th of January. I went to the King's Arms, Edgeware-road after him, I think it was on the Wednesday before; the maid servant gave me information; but I could not find him.

ANN CROW . I was in the tap-room of the King's Arm's, when Prendergast came in. I saw him looking over the glass of the door into the tap-room, the prisoner was there that day, but was gone then, he could not have been gone more than a minute; he had been sitting in a box by the side of the window, and got into the street through the window; I did not see who lifted up the sash, it was down before. I saw no more of him: Prendergast was in the passage, not in the street. I have known the prisoner some years, he is a sawyer.

SARAH HARRIS . I know the prisoner. I recollect Prendergast coming to the King's Arms; when he came in, the prisoner was in the tap-room. I saw him there for two hours before Prendergast came, he wanted the prisoner, I looked, and he was gone.

THOMAS GLOVER . I am an Inspector of Bank notes; the note is forged in every respect. The other is also forged in every respect, they are not the signatures of Vautin.

JAMES VAUTIN . I am a signing clerk, there is no other of my name, neither of the notes are signed by me (read).

Prisoner's Defence. I changed the first with Dale, but as to Green, I have not been in his shop for eighteen months.

GUILTY . - DEATH .

Recommended to Mercy by the prosecutor.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18210214-42

381. TIMOTHY CRAWLEY was indicted for feloniously disposing of and putting away a forged 1 l. Bank note, knowing it to be forged , with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be a promisary note for payment of money instead of a Bank note.

THIRD COUNT, the same only stating his intention to be to defraud James Banting .

JAMES BANTING . I am a butcher , and live at Chelsea . On 3d February , at half past six o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came and bought 2 lbs. of mutton, and offered me a 1 l. note. He gave me his residence at

"Whitehead's Buildings" the name T. Crawley; I asked if he worked for Mr. Mote? - seeing him in the dress of Mote's men - he said

"Yes." Mr. Mote is a soap-boiler. I gave my wife the note to mark it; and saw her indorse it (looks at one) this is it.

Q. Why is Exeter-buildings written on it? - A. Whitehead is a builder in our neighbourhood, and the buildings belong to him, it is known by the name of Exeter-buildings. The prisoner went out, I looked after him, but he was out of my sight in an instant. I do not know which way he went. Five minutes after, another man bought meat which came to 1 s. 3 d. and offered me 1 l. note - I marked the address as he gave it me (looks at one) this is it. We gave him 10 s. having no more change, I watched him, and saw he went a different way to Whitehead's Buildings (which address he had given me) I followed him and saw him join the prisoner, they went together 200 yards from my shop, I followed them up North-street into Sloane-street, suspecting them I went over to the constable, but as they turned, I followed them into the Cock public-house, I beckoned the landlord out, and saw them both together over a pint of porter; I fetch'd a constable who came at last, and I gave them in charge. I had before that sent to enquire at Whitehead's buildings. I saw them together for ten minutes before they went into the public-house.

SOPHIA BANTING . I am the wife of the last witness. He gave me the note the prisoner brought, I endorsed it (looks at one) this is it. I am sure the prisoner is the man. I heard him give the address.

JOSEPH BALL . I collect rent of 18 houses, from Nos. 1 to 18, Whitehead's-buildings; there are 21 houses there. I do not know the prisoner. I never knew him to live there. It is also called Exeter-buildings. I go there two or three times a week.

JAMES SHERIDAN . I live at No. 19. The prisoner did not live there.

CALEB BLUNT . I have lived at No. 21 these five years. The prisoner never lived there, I do not know him.

JEREMIAH ISLE . I live at No. 20, I never saw the prisoner, he did not live there.

ALFRED STAFFORD . I have worked at Mr. Mole's five or six years. I do not know the prisoner, he was not in his service; I know all the men, there are thirteen.

RICHARD MAYBANK . I am a constable. I went to the Cock, and found the prisoner in company with another. I searched them and found 19 s. 4 d. on the prisoner, and two pieces of mutton, I asked where he lived - he said I believe any where. As I took them down Sloane-street, the prisoner tried to get out of the handcuffs; I got assistance, and took them to the watch-house - he said he found the note in this pocket-book, which the 19 s. 4 d. was in. The mutton was inside his smock frock.

WILLIAM MILLER . I am Clerk to the Magistrates of Queen-square, and was present at the examination of the prisoner - he was asked his name, he said Crawley, and that he lived in Blackhorse-yard, Poplar; he afterwards said he had removed a week from there; both gave the same address. I do not know which said they had moved, but both were present - they gave no other address.

THOMAS GLOVER . The note is forged in every respect. It is signed C. Tabro, but it is not his writing; the other is also forged.

CHARLES TABOR . I am a signing clerk. The note is not signed by me; there is no other of my name.

(read)

Prisoner's Defence. I am a poor unfortunate man, out of work. Leary, who has pleaded guilty, gave me the note to get some refreshment. I did not know it was forged.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Richardson.

Reference Number: t18210214-43

382. JAMES OWEN was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of February , twelve pair of braces, value 3 l., and thirty purses, value 3 l. the goods of William Clark Smart .

MR. LAW conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM CLARK SMART . I keep a shop in Exeter Change . The prisoner was my servant , he came in April, and left in December; I have missed property to a large amount, he left me to go into business for himself; I sent an officer to his shop, who brought me some property which is mine.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS Q. When you took your stock, you missed nothing? - A. Nothing, but he took the stock - I missed the property three days after he left.

DAVID TIMOTHY . I assisted in taking the prisoner. I took the account, but the prisoner called out the number of articles.

Cross-examined. - Q. You missed property three days after he left, but you took no steps till February? No, we had no proof till some goods were bought.

ROBERT CHAPMAN . I was sent to the prisoner's shop in Fleet-market, and bought a pair of braces, on the 2d of February. He asked 7 s. 6 d. for them; I said they were dear, he said he knew a house in the Strand where they charged 13 s. for them; he was afterwards apprehended.

JOHN LACEY HAWKINS . I am a marshalman. I searched the prisoner's premises, and found twelve pair of braces and other property.

MR. SMART. They are mine. They were never sold, they cost me 8 s. 9 d. and sell for 11 s.

THOMAS BRAND . I made all those braces, and sold them to the prisoner (at Mr. Smart's shop, when he was in his service) I sold no others in the trade, not a single pair. I charge 6 s. 6 d. a pair, but Mr. Smart supplied the ribbon and buckles, which must cost 2 s. The fair selling price is 11 s.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined Two Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Best.

Reference Number: t18210214-44

383. ROBERT SPENCER was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of February , one jacket, value 5 s.; one waistcoat, value 2 s.; one pair of overalls, value 4 s.; one pair of gaiters, value 3 s.; the goods of James Robins , and two pair of shoes, value 7 s. the goods of James Smith .

JAMES SMITH . I live at Hounslow Heath . On the 1st of February, I lost these things from my stable-loft. I heard my brother call out Stop thief. I went to the door, and saw him brought back with a bundle containing these articles.

JAMES ROBINS . I am the hostler . I saw the prisoner walk towards our house about half past twelve o'clock in the day; he was out of my sight twenty minutes, I then saw him with a small bundle - I stopped him, and asked if he had anything of mine? He said No, and he would walk back with me. I untied the bundle and found these things, which he had taken from our stable.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 50.

Confined Three Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210214-45

384. MARY SCOFIELD was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of January , one watch, value 1 l.; two seals, value 8 s., and one sheet, value 3 s. , the goods of James Whitley .

JAMES WHITLEY . I am an iron founder . On the 23d of January, about four o'clock, my wife went out, and during her absence my watch was stolen. The prisoner rented a room on the first floor.

SUSAN WHITLEY . I am the wife of the last witness. I went out about eleven o'clock, and returned about twelve o'clock. I missed the watch from a closet where I left it, and the prisoner was gone.

GEORGE TWAITES . I am servant to Mr. Radley, who lives in Broad-street, Ratcliff. I took the watch in pawn, on the 23d of January, about one o'clock, of the prisoner, for 30 s. She pledged a sheet on the 16th.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 35.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210214-46

385. JAMES WEBB , JAMES GUEST , and JAMES HAWKER were indicted for stealing, on the 20th of January , two pair of shoes, value 18 s., the goods of John Bailey , privately in his shop .

JOHN BAILEY . I am a shoemaker , and live at Kensington . I lost the shoes, on the 20th of January.

MARY BAILEY . I am the wife of the prosecutor; I was in the yard, close to the door, the prisoners Guest and Webb came to the door; they asked me to buy some herrings; I refused. They asked again, and I refused; in five minutes after the shoes were missing; I heard nothing of them till next morning.

THOMAS M'GEE. On the 20th of January, the prisoners were given into my charge for stealing bacon, they had an ass. I found the shoes in one of the panniers; Webb said he got them in exchange for herrings near Brentford, he drove the ass. I enquired, and found they belonged to the prosecutor. Hawker also said they bought them, all three of them being in company together.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

WEBB'S Defence. I gave a man 6 s. and 200 herrings for them.

WEBB - GUILTY . Aged 19.

GUEST - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

HAWKER - NOT GUILTY

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210214-47

386. GEORGE WILSON was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of January , one bridle, value 12 s. , the goods of Thomas Leaton Forman .

WILLIAM JARVIS . I am employed at the livery-stables, in Castle-street, Leicester-square , and have the care of Mr. Forman's harness and horse. On the 25th of January, between one and two o'clock, I saw the prisoner come out of the stable. I told him it was a D - n pretty time to muck out the stable; he said it was. He was going to dinner - his coat was buttoned. I did not see him again until the 28th of January, when he was in custody. I missed the saddle and bridle when I returned from dinner.

JOHN WALES . I am an officer. I met the prisoner in Panton-street, Haymarket, on the 25th of January; I saw he had a bridle under his coat; I followed him into a saddler's shop, and waited outside the door - he came out without the bridle. They informed me at the shop that he was to call again in a quarter of an hour. I waited, and when he came I represented the master, and asked him what he wanted; he said he called about the bridle he left there, that he wanted to sell it, and asked 9 s. for it; he said it was his own. I told him I doubted it, and should take him to Marlborough-street. He said he bought it of a servant of Mr. Smith's, at a mews near Park-lane. I found he was not known there.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 35.

Confined Six Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210214-48

387. THOMAS MULLENS was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of January , two shifts, value 4 s.; one gown, value 18 d., and one towel, value 2 s., the goods of Margaret Scott , from her person .

JOHN SCOTT. I am brother to Margaret Scott . The prisoner came and took the things from me as I stood unlocking the door; he ran away, and I pursued him. I am ten years old - I called Stop thief! and he was taken; there were two other boys with him, who ran away. I do not know what he did with the things - I am sure he is the boy - I did not lose sight of him.

THOMAS OLIVER . I was going up Howland-street , and heard this boy cry Stop thief; I stopped the prisoner who was running; he got from me. Another man turned him back, and I caught him. The property was never found.

Prisoner's Defence. I was passing by when the gentleman took me. I had nothing to do with it.

GUILTY . Aged 13.

Of stealing, but not from the person.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210214-49

388. MARY M'DONALD was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of January , two gallons of oil, value 3 s., and two cans, value 1 s. , the goods of Henry Woodruff .

HENRY WOODRUFF . On the 22d of January. I lost this oil from the entrance of the East London Theatre - it was in tin cans. I found them next day at Worship-street. I cannot swear to the cans or oil.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210214-50

389. GEORGE HAWKINS was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of February , two books, value 4 s. , the goods of John Welton .

JOHN WELTON . I am a bookseller , and live in Gray's-Inn-lane . On the 7th of February I lost two books.

WILLIAM WELTON . I am the prosecutor's son. About dusk in the afternoon, the books were lost; I found them at a book-stall next day, in Bell-court - the selling mark was rubbed out, but the private mark remained. I got a constable to take them.

JAMES TRINDER . I found the books at Bell-court, and apprehended the prisoner.

JOSEPH ROBINS . I bought the books of the prisoner, on Wednesday evening, about five o'clock.

Prisoner's Defence. I sell fruit. A man sold me the books - I gave 18 d. in money.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Confined Three Months , and Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210214-51

390. JAMES HODGE was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of January , five plates, value 28 s., and one saucer, value 3 s. the goods of James Towers .

JAMES TOWERS . I sell earthenware , and live in Titchfield-street . On the 19th of January, about two o'clock, I heard a noise in the street - my son went down and secured the prisoner.

WILLIAM TOWERS . I saw the prisoner and another in the shop, with plates in their hands. I pursued him - he put them down in a passage. I took him with assistance.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Confined Three Months , and Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210214-52

391. SARAH DURHAM was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of January , one watch, value 2 l., and 16 s. in monies numbered, the property of Henry Bellchamber , from his person .

HENRY BELLCHAMBER . I am in the East India Company's service . I met the prisoner in Whitechapel, and went home with her to the George Yard . I felt myself uneasy - she went down stairs for a light, and I examined the room, and said I would not stop. I missed my watch and money - she said she knew nothing of it. I gave her in charge; but nothing was found on her. I am certain it was safe when I entered the room.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210214-53

FIFTH DAY, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 19.

392. EDWARD RILEY and JOHN BAYS , were indicted for stealing, on the 24th of January , two mahogany frames, value 5 s. , the goods of William Stedman Ritchie .

WILLIAM STEDMAN RITCHIE . I am a window blind maker , and live in Tabernacle Walk . On the 24th of January, a little before five o'clock, I placed two blinds in the centre of the shop. I went out; and just before nine o'clock, a person called to know if I had lost any blinds: I missed them, and found the prisoners at Dinne's shop with them. I knew Bayes before.

MARY DINNE . The prisoner Bayes came to my father's house, at Hackney, about a quarter before nine o'clock, and offered the frames for sale; he said, he bought them at Petticoat-lane, for 9 d. I sent to my father, who ordered them to be returned, as he considered them stolen. Riley was then looking in at the door; and as soon as my father said that, he went away. My father told Bayes to stop, but he ran away, saying, he would fetch his father. In three or four minutes he brought Riley in, who he said was his brother - in the meantime, my father had sent for Mr. Ritchie, who claimed them.

AMELIA POWELL . About half-past six o'clock, I saw the prisoners standing at Ritchie's shop-window; I was was putting the shutters up. Bayes came in and asked the time - I said, I did not know. I went into the passage for another shutter; when I returned, they were gone.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

RILEY - GUILTY . Aged 15.

Judgment Respited .

BAYS - GUILTY . Aged 11.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210214-54

393. JOSEPH KITSALL was indicted for stealing, on the 6th day of December , at St. George, Bloomsbury , fifty spoons, value 40 l.; sixteen forks, value 16 l.; five ladles, value 5 l.; one fish slice, value 48 s.; one skewer, value 38 s.; one pair of sugar tongs, value 14 s.; one knife, value 14 s.; one coat, value 3 l.; one waistcoat, value 1 l.; two jackets, value 2 l.; one hat, value 1 l., and two cloths, value 3 s., the goods of Joseph Chitty , Esq. in his dwelling-house .

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM JAMES . I am butler to Joseph Chitty , Esq. who lives in Bedford-square , in the parish of St. George, Bloomsbury. The prisoner was his footman , and had lived with him a fortnight. On the 6th of December, I went out; I had seen all the plate put into the pantry cupboard. It was my duty to attend the bell; and if I was out, the prisoner ought to do it; the plate stated in the indictment was there - he had a suit of black livery, and two morning jackets, which belonged to my master. I went out about ten minutes before nine o'clock, after putting the plate safe away, and returned about half-past nine o'clock. I had told him not to go out whilst I was out. I did not see him again, till he was apprehended.

I gave information at the office - none of the plate has been found. When I returned he was gone, and the plate missing; all the other servants were at home.

Prisoner. Q. After the plate was brought out of the dining-room, did not a friend of your's come and take some refreshment in the kitchen - A. No, I swear it.

JOSEPH HARLING . I am groom to Mr. Chitty. I came in about half-past eight o'clock. When the butler went out, the prisoner sat by me in the kitchen; after that, he left the kitchen and shut the door - I did not see him again, nor hear him go out. Nobody came to the house, until the butler returned; I let him in. I knew the prisoner was out, as the parlour bell rang half an hour after the butler went out, and the maid answered it. No friend of the butler's was in the kitchen.

JOHN MARSH . I am a police officer of Gloucester. In consequence of a description in the newspaper, I apprehended the prisoner at the Crown, at Gloucester. I found his waistcoat and one cotton jacket at his lodgings; and he had his hat on. I found a coat and jacket, at the pawnbrokers; there are stiches on the shoulder of the coat, which appeared as though the epaulette had been taken off. He told me, as we came up on the coach, that he heard the bell ring: went to the door, and saw a girl whom he knew, he took her to the butler's pantry, and asked her to have something to drink - that he went across the square, and fetched a pot of porter - when he returned, she was gone, and the plate missing. He went to look after her, and not finding her, he was afraid to return.

JOSEPH HARLING re-examined. The clothes look like the same that he had - the shoulder of the coat has marks of the epaulette. When he left, he had his black livery on; the hat has the same maker's name in it, and is like his. I heard no bell ring, nor any girl come down. I should, if it had happened. We found no porter pot about the pantry. I never saw him after he left the kitchen - he then had his black livery on. I must have heard the bell ring, as it rings just over the kitchen door. A person can go into the pantry without going through the kitchen. He did not have two jackets on.

WILLIAM JAMES re-examined. The clothes are the exact pattern and colour; I believe the coat to be the same, and the hat - the jackets are only worn in the morning; the waistcoat is what he wore with the black coat. I found no porter pot about; he was washing up the tea things when I went out - the plate was worth above 50 l.; and the clothes were worth 9 l. when they were stolen, and the hat 23 s.

Prisoner's Defence. The butler said he was going out; there came a ring at the bell, which I answered. I found it was a woman whom I had seen at a public-house, and who had told me she was a soldier's wife, and asked if I wanted any one to wash for me? I had told her where I lived, and said she might call; she called that evening - I took her into the pantry, and took a jug to get her the porter, from the Bedford Arms. When I returned, I found the door wide open and she gone: I went in pursuit, and was afraid to return. The coachman swears, that the bell did not ring - it is well known, there is a hell which must ring every time any one goes out; it rung when I went out, and when the woman came in.

JOSEPH HARLING re-examined. There is a large bell to the door, and a small one; neither of them rang - I must have heard if they did. Nobody could come in without either knocking or ringing.

JURY. Q. How do you distinguish between the parlour bell and the door bell - A. By the sound.

WILLIAM JAMES re-examined. I found no vessel whatever with porter in it, nor any jug whatever.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 23.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Best.

Reference Number: t18210214-55

394. WILLIAM FORDER was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Evans , about eleven o'clock at night of the 27th of January , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, one pewter pot, value 3 s., and one cask, value 6 s., his property .

THOMAS EVANS . I keep the Old Hat, at Ealing . I had seen the prisoner about the house later than he ought to be; he was servant to a coach proprietor , who rented stables of me. On Saturday night, the 27th, he was in front of the house at half-past nine o'clock; I set Oliver and Evans to watch. I had been robbed two months before, and had the cask stolen - the constable found it at the prisoner's house. I fastened the shutter and bar at half-past ten o'clock, and went to bed - I was called up again at half-past eleven.

EVAN EVANS . I was set to watch - I saw the prisoner go to the larder window, between ten and eleven o'clock; he forced the shutter, pushed up the window, put in his hand, and took something out; the beef was within his reach. He run towards the road, and I lost him; he was taken next day - I heard one of the shutters forced before we saw him.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. He came to work the next day as usual? - A. Yes - the pot and cask were not stolen from the larder.

RICHARD OLIVER . I watched with Evans - his account is correct.

JOHN LEMBRICK . I apprehended the prisoner on a Sunday - I searched, but found no beef.

THOMAS EVANS re-examined. The pewter pot and cask were not missed that night, but a month before.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Richardson.

Reference Number: t18210214-56

395. JOHN FRY was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of December , four yards of silk, value 2 l., and one blanket, value 1 l., the goods of Jane Tuart , in her dwelling-house .

JANE TUART . The prisoner lodged with me six months, and absconded a few weeks ago. A chest and pair of drawers were in his room, he had the use of them, except one drawer, which was locked, and I kept the key. I opened it on the 18th of December, and missed some black silk; I afterwards saw him with a waistcoat, which I can swear was off the same silk. He stopped three or four weeks after, and then something occurred. I told him to leave, and he must pay for the silk; he refused, and said he bought it of a man who worked with him

at Ratcliffe-highway, whom he would try to find - he never found him. After he left, I missed a blanket which was on the bed, where he and his wife slept - it was worth 20 s. I never recovered it; I found the prisoner near Whitechapel. He went by the name of Frazier then. I discovered a key in his drawer, which opened my drawer, easier than my own.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. - A. How long have you had the silk? - A. Fourteen years. I would not take 39 s. for it. His wife shewed me the waistcoat herself in his presence.

ELIZA BENGENSON . I am the daughter of the last witness, and was with her when she put the silk in the drawer. I saw the prisoner's key tried - it opened it. He did not pay the rent. I found him near Whitechapel; he passed by the name Frazier.

Cross-examined. - Q. Did you never say to Hutchings, I am convinced he has not stolen it - A. Never.

MICHAEL MORRIS . I produce the silk waistcoat, which the prisoner brought to the office himself. I left word at his house, that he was wanted at the office. He came with Hutchings, and brought the waistcoat.

JANE TUART . Here is my daughter's gown, which was made from the same silk; the waistcoat comes from the same silk in my opinion. The waistcoat has been spunged, which takes out the mildew which it gets from laying in the drawer.

ELIZA BENGENSON . There are marks of mildew on the waistcoat, by which I know it to be the silk.

Prisoner. I leave it to my counsel.

GEORGE HUTCHINGS . Bengenson came to me on the same day the prisoner was charged with stealing the silk, and said she was now convinced that it was not the same.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Best.

Reference Number: t18210214-57

396. WILLIAM HAYNES and WILLIAM HARRISON were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Richard Plunkett , at St. Mary, Whitechapel , about five o'clock in the night of the 16th of January , with intent to steal .

RICHARD PLUNKETT . I am the beadle of Whitechapel , and live in Baker's-row , in the parish of St. Mary, Whitechapel. On the 16th of January, about a quarter past five o'clock, I was sitting at tea in the back room, and heard a noise in front, which I thought was my boy shutting the shutters, but hearing a rumbling, I got up and opened a door leading to the front room; I saw a man standing in the middle room, by the light of a butcher's shop opposite, and at the same time saw Harrison come from the dark part of the room, ran towards the window, and jumped on the table, then over the upper part of the sash, and the other immediately followed him the same way. I knew Harrison before, and saw the side of his face; he had a pair of trowsers and a ragged coat on; I am certain he is the man. When the second jumped on the table I got hold of his gaiter, but he got from my hold. I jumped out of the window and pursued - it was dark, and I could not see their faces without the aid of a light. I saw the front window safe one hour before; the lower sash was fastened, but the other has no fastening - it was shut. I usually shut the shutters about dark, and generally before that time - it is a private room. I secured Haynes about five or six yards off; he was never out of my sight, except as he turned the street; as he turned he began to walk, and was going as from my house. I saw Harrison running fifteen or twenty yards further; I saw nobody else in the street. Brock came up behind me, and I got him to hold Haynes. I then pursued Harrison, who was not then in sight, he had turned the corner of Baker's-row towards Church-street. I passed the door of a public-house, seven doors down, and he immediately came out; I turned round and seized him as he made towards the opposite street; I said

"You are the man," he said,

"No, by God it is not me, I have just come out of the Red Lion, Whitechapel-road." (which is 200 yards off) He denied being at my house, and began fighting, and it was with difficulty I got him to the watch-house. I saw him five hours before, and I am sure he is the person. The room had furniture in it.

GEORGE BROCK . I am a labourer, and live at Camberwell. I saw Plunkett take Haynes, and he delivered him to me. I heard an alarm, and saw him running from the window - he was two yards from it. Plunkett stopped him just round the corner, and gave him to me.

HAYNES'S Defence. I was not in the place, and had just left work.

HARRISON'S Defence. I came from the Red Lion, and as I came away, looked into a house at the corner to see a friend, he was not there, and I came out.

HAYNES - GUILTY . Aged 23.

HARRISON - GUILTY . Aged 23.

Subject to the opinion of the Twelve Judges, whether as the shutters were not shut at the usual time, this offence was a burglary.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Richardson.

Reference Number: t18210214-58

397. WILLIAM FRENCHAM and JOHN MILLS were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Joseph Crawley , about eleven o'clock in the night of the 8th of January , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, twelve live tame fowls, price 10 s., his property .

MR. WALFORD conducted the prosecution.

JOSEPH CRAWLEY . I am a farmer , and live at Clay-hill . I have a hen-house five or six yards from my house - it stands in a yard, which has a fence, and is enclosed. On the 8th of January, the hen-house door was spiked up, and the window fastened with rails. About eleven o'clock at night an alarm was given; I and two young men got up, and pursued two men who were running. When we returned we picked up some dead fowls, there were feathers where they had killed them, and blood upon the fowls; a coat and hat laid five or six yards from the house.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. How is your house enclosed - A. It is enclosed all round by fences and sheds, the hen-house is within the enclosure. The hen-house is connected with the dwelling-house by a gate, when it is shut. The prisoners came up to me in the road; I said they looked like the men, and as I knew Frencham, I told him to go home as I knew where to find him; he would go back to the house with me, and I then detained them, but let them go in the morning on their promising to pay 10 s. each, being neighbour's children.

COURT. Q. Is the hen-house separated from the dwelling-house - A. Yes, my Lord

JAMES CRAWLEY . I am nephew of the last witness. A five bar-gate joins the dwelling-house to the hen-house, and shuts the cart-way. I was called up, and found the hen-house broken - it was fast the night before. I picked up two fowls in the road, and three more in the field. I stood under the hedge when Mills came up. I asked him where he was going; he said to Edmonton; he had no coat or hat, but a short smock-frock on; we let him go. We got a lanthorn, and went down the road; he came back, and my uncle said he would take him. Frencham came up without a hat, and asked what the row was. He was asked where his hat was; he said be neither knew nor cared. They were detained till morning.

Cross-examined. Q. Is not the hen-house separated from the dwelling-house - A. Yes, a rail and gate goes across the cart-road, which separates it, you cannot pass from one to the other without going through a gate.

WILLIAM CORKING . I know the premises; there is a paling of four yards next to the dwelling-house, and then a gate, it parts the cart-way which goes into the farmyard. Mills came up in a short smock-frock, and said he was going to Edmonton. I saw by the light that his breeches were torn, his hands were bloody, and there were feathers on his waistcoat. He claimed the coat, and said

"It is mine, find it where you will." The cart-way which is railled off, separates the hen-house from the dwelling-house. Frencham came up, he had feathers about him, and a spot of blood on his shirt. The hat was brought to him, he said

"If it is mine I will put it on;" he did so, and kept it.

JOHN MEAD . I apprehended the prisoners. Frencham asked what I wanted him for? he said - That bed - n - it was all settled, and they were to pay 10 s. each.

FRENCHAM'S Defence. I was never near the place.

FRENCHAM - GUILTY . Aged 20.

MILLS - GUILTY . Aged 28.

Of the Larceny only.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Best.

Reference Number: t18210214-59

398. RICHARD TURNER and EDWARD TURNER were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Swan , about twelve o'clock in the night of the 4th of January , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, four chairs, value 8 s.; one table, value 6 s.; one chest of drawers, value 2 l.; 18 wine glasses, value 10 s.; 24 plates, value 1 l., and 70 books, value 2 l., his property .

JOHN SWAN . I live in Hans-place, Hackney-road . On the 24th of January, about three o'clock in the afternoon, I was going home and found the place broken open, and the property gone. I had not slept there the night before, having a lodging in the City-road; my furniture was there; I only left it for the evening - I missed the articles stated in the indictment. The house was entered through the kitchen window - Edward Turner 's father lives near me.

JAMES SALMON . I am a broker, living in Wheeler-street, Spitalfields, about a mile from the prisoners. On the 6th of January, the prisoners came to my shop, and offered to sell some blue and white plates. Richard said his father gave them to him, and that they had been in the family some time; I gave him 2 s. 6 d. - there were about eleven of them. He said, he had three or four articles in the furniture line, if I would walk home and look at them - he asked me 2 l. for them. He assured me his father gave them to him, as he was about to be married; but he was obliged to sell them to go into the country to his uncle. I offered one guinea and-a-half for them; he refused - I returned, and offered 2 s. more, which he refused. He took me to a house, which he called his own, near Shoreditch Church - both went, but Richard was the man I dealt with. About two hours after, he came and asked me to buy some books; he had them in his hand - I declined. He said,

"Can't we agree for the other things?" I refused to give more, but gave them 1 s. to bring them, which they did that night. I paid them 1 l. 12 s. 6 d. for a chest of drawers, four chairs, and one wash-hand-stand table - it was twilight when they brought them. I sold all the things. I sent Mr. Swan to where I sold the drawers. I do not know who bought the other things.

MR. SWAN re-examined. I can swear to the drawers; I have had them four years, and gave 50 s. for them - the plates were blue and white.

RICHARD TURNER 'S Defence. We got up to go a skaiting - these articles stood by the side of the prosecutor's house; we stood there half an hour, then took them home, kept them two days, nobody claimed them, and we sold them.

EDWARD TURNER 'S Defence. We found them in the road.

RICHARD TURNER - GUILTY . Aged 18.

EDWARD TURNER - GUILTY . Aged 22.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Richardson.

Reference Number: t18210214-60

399. JAMES PITCHER was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of December , at St. Andrew, Holborn , 270 yards of poplin, value 40 l.; 100 yards of sarsnet, value 22 l.; seventy yards of lutestring, value 4 l.; 67 yards of bombazeen, value 5 l.; two yards of pelisse cloth, value 1 l.; 28 yards of printed stuff, value 38 s.; 30 yards of printed cotton, value 35 s., and three yards of net, value 7 s., the property of Charles Langley Maltby and William Mew , in their dwelling-house .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating it to be the dwelling-house of the said Charles Langley Maltby , only.

MR. ALLEY conducted the prosecution.

CHARLES LANGLEY MALTBY. I am in partnership with W. Mew; we are linen-drapers , and live in Holborn , in the parish of St. Andrew. The prisoner came into our service in January, 1819, and continued till the 21st of last January, as porter . He asked leave to go into the country, in December, and was two days absent; and again on Thursday the 18th of January, he asked leave, saying, his father was dead - he went, saying, he would be back on Sunday. About a fortnight after, I heard something of him - he had not returned. I went to Reading about the 2d of

of February, and there saw a trunk at Davis's house; all the contents were mine, but not all that I had lost.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. You entertained no suspicion of him - A. No - he never bought but two articles of me; which was a shawl, and some cloth for a pelisse.

JOHN MASON . I am an excise officer, at Reading. On the 17th January, I seized two boxes at the house of John Pitcher , the prisoner's brother-in-law, at Theale, two miles from Reading - one of the boxes is here; I delivered it to Thomas Moore Davis . While I had possession of it, I received this demand (looking at it).

THOMAS MOORE DAVIS . I am an officer, at Reading. I received the box from the last witness, and gave it to Mr. Salmon as I received it.

WILLIAM SALMON . I produce it.

MR. MALTBY. They are all mine - here is 16 yards of poplin, worth 2 l. 8 s., and some lutestrings, worth 48 s. I can swear to every article - the whole cost me above 80 l. I produce the pieces which some of them are cut from, and they correspond. I am positive they are mine - some have my private mark on them (looking at the affidavit and demand), the signatures are the prisoner's writing (read).

I hereby demand and require of you to deliver up the possession of the several goods mentioned and particularized in the schedule or inventory, thereof, hereunder written, the same being my property, which said several goods are now in your custody, possession or power; and in case of your refusal to deliver up the same to Mr. John Shaw , the bearer hereof, whom I hereby authorize to receive the same, I shall commence an action against you for the recovery thereof. Dated this 27th day of January, 1821.

To JOHN MASON .

JAMES PITCHER .

The schedule or inventory above referred to:

Puse silks in the following lengths, viz - 8 yards, 9 do., 9 do., 9 do., 8 2/1 do., 7 1/2 do., 9 1/4., 9 do., 9 do., 20 0 0 and 9 1/4 do. of the value of twenty pounds.

Black sarsnet silks in the following lengths, viz. - 9 yards, 7 3/4 do., 8 do., 7 1/2 do., and 8 do., of the 10 0 0 value of ten pounds.

Poplar coloured silks in the following lengths, viz. - 11 yards, 9 1/2 do., 11 3/4 do., 8 do., 7 do., 10 do., 8 1/4 do., 9 1/2 do., 10 do., 9 1/2 do., 9 3/4 do., 8 3/4 do., 11 do.; 10 1/2 of sage poplin, do 8 1/2, poplar do 7 1/2, do., 8 1/2 do., 9 1/4 do., 9 do., 9 1/4 do., 7 1/4 do., 9 do. of the value of 35 0 0 thirty-five pounds.

Black figured poplar silks in the following lengths viz. - 8 3/1 yards, 9 do., 8 1/2 do., 9 do., 9 1/2 do., 9 3/4 do., 15 0 0 and 9 do. of the value of fifteen pounds.

Bombazeens in the following lengths, viz. - 9 1/2 yards, of maroon, 9 1/4 of bombazeen, 9 1/2 do., 9 do., 9 3/4 do., 9 of black, do. 1/4, do. 6 3/4, do. 8 do., of the value of 10 0 0 ten pounds.

Together with certain prints and cloths in the following lengths, viz. - 16 1/2 yards of print, 6 1/4 of ell wide do, 4 1/2 do., 5 do., 4 1/2 do., 7 1/2 do., 4 1/2 do., 5 1/4 do., 7 1/4 do., 8 1/4 do., 7 do., 9 do., 12 do., 8 1/2 do., 5 1/2 do., 12 1/2 do., 6 do., 6 1/2 do., 9 do., 9 do., 6 do., 5 1/2 do. 6 do., 3 do., 4 3/4 do., ell wide do, 7 do., 6 do., 7 do., 5 do., 5 1/4 do., 4 3/4 do., 6 do., 6 do., 5 do. of cloth one piece, 24 yards - 10 yards of long do., and 2 1/2 pieces of cloth, and of stuffs 28 yards, of the 30 0 0 value of thirty pounds.

120 0 0

LONDON (to wit). James Pitcher , of No. 28, Middlesex-street, Somer's Town, in the county of Middlesex, draper, maketh oath, and saith - That the goods seized at the house of this deponent's brother, John Pitcher , situate at Theale, in the county of Berks, as being considered prohibited goods, and which are now lodged in the Town Hall of Reading, on suspicion of the same being improperly obtained, and consisting of namely, silks, sarsnets, bombazeens, poplins, cottons, and linen, all of which are of British manufacture, and are the bona fide property of this deponent; the greater part of which were purchased by him of Mr. John Singleton , of No. 38, Baltic-street, Old-street-road, in the county of Middlesex, aforesaid; and this deponant further saith, that the said goods were deposited by him with his said brother, John Pitcher , at his house at Theale, aforesaid, until this deponent had an opportunity of disposing of the same. And this deponent further saith, that the reason of this deponent's not attending personally before the Magistrates at the Town Hall of Reading, to claim his property, and make out his legal right thereto, was, and it is inconvenient to this deponent to leave London, where his attendance at this period is particularly essential to his interest, and would also be attended with an expence which he is unable to bear, and is at the present time a considerable loser by the detention of his said property.

Sworn at Guildhall, this 30th day of January, 1821.

JAMES PITCHER .

Before me, JOHN THOMAS THORP , Mayor.

MR. MALTBY. I have compared the account in the schedule; most of them tally with what I lost - they are cut about the lengths I should sell them in my shop. I have every thing entered that is sold, and appoint a young man to receive the money. I have not taken stock for twelve months. The prisoner sent me a pair of scissars which he used to trim the lamps with, and said he should not be able to return so soon, and I must look out for another porter. When he left in December, he said his father was ill; and in January, he said he was dead. I do not think the trunk which contains the property was ever in my house. The shop is part of the dwelling-house; I sleep there only - it belongs to the firm.

WILLIAM SMITH . I apprehended the prisoner at Weymouth Mews, at a public-house. He said he did not care, we could do nothing with him.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought the things of Mr. Singleton, No. 38, Baltic-street. He travelled for many houses in the City, and has since became a bankrupt.

RICHARD SIDWELL . I enquired last night at No. 38, Baltic-street, Old-street, for Singleton, but did not see him.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. - Q. On your oath, is it not a common brothel. - A. Not to my knowledge. It is a private house, there is no appearance of business.

WILLIAM BROWN . I live at No. 38, Baltic-street. John Singleton lodged with me about a month; he left, I think, about a month ago to day. I never saw any goods in his possession. The house has never been a brothel since I kept it.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 21.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Best.

Reference Number: t18210214-61

400. PETER DAWSON was indicted for embezzlement .

RICHARD BENTLEY . I am a cabinet-maker , and live in Tottenham-court-road ; the prisoner was my servant , and entrusted to receive money for me. On the 23d of October , I sent him to Mr. Lance, to receive 1 l., the balance of an account; he returned, and said it was not convenient for him to pay it. Nine days after I discharged him, but afterwards had him apprehended. He gave an account of the money received on my account, which I found correct. He never accounted to me for this money.

GEORGE LANCE . My father is a cabinet-maker. On Saturday, the 23d of October, the prisoner came for 1 l. I gave it to him, and took his receipt. I saw him write it.

(read)

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210214-62

401. WILLIAM LAYTON was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of January , 40 lbs. of hay, value 1 s. , the goods of Edwin Adkins .

EDWIN ADKINS . I am wharfinger , at St. Andrew's Wharf, Wapping . The prisoner was my carman ; I missed some hay, and mentioned it to him. On the the 24th of January, I received information; I ran home and saw the prisoner at the wharf. I told him it was not the first time he had robbed me, and I should take him. He begged forgiveness, as it was his first offence, and said he would work it out. On going to the watch-house, he bolted from us. The next morning I found him in custody.

JOHN PARSONS . I am a patrol. On the 24th of January, about seven o'clock, I was on my beat in East Smithfield, I saw the prisoner with a truss of hay. I was informed he had offered it for sale. He told me he was going to Nightingale-lane; I took it from him, he went away, and was afterwards brought to the watch-house.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Confined Six Months , and Whipped .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210214-63

402. RICHARD LEACH and JAMES HACKS were indicted for stealing, on the 15th of January , five jugs, value 2 s.; four mugs, value 6 d.; two pots, value 1 d.; and two butter tubs, value 9 d. , the goods of John Burn .

JOHN NERCH . I am servant to John Burn , who keeps an earthenware-shop in Covent-garden . On the 15th of January, I fastened up the place at night. Next morning, I found the bar forced, so as to admit the door being pulled open five or six inches. I found the prisoners in custody with the articles.

JOSEPH LEWIS . On the 15th of January, about eleven o'clock, I watched the prisoners by Burns's shop, for half an hour. I got another man to watch, and hid myself in a corner. I saw them come from the piazza to the garden, we seized them, and found a bag under one of their coats, I do not know which; the property was in the bag. They had been standing against Burns's shutters.

JOHN WEST . I am a watchman. I was set to watch five chaps about eleven o'clock; when they came over, I seized one. He put a pot on the ground; I do not know which it was. I found a quantity of crockery behind the baskets. One had a pot, and another a bag with two mugs in it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

LEACH'S Defence. My father sent me out for some pens, Hacks went with me, and as we returned we were taken.

LEACH - GUILTY . Aged 16.

HACKS - GUILTY . Aged 15.

Confined Three Months .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210214-64

403. WILLIAM HUDSON and JOHN HALL were indicted for stealing, on the 31st of January , six bushels of grains, value 2 s. , the goods of Michael Brown .

FRANCIS JOHN GATES . I am a patrol of St. Giles. Between seven and eight o'clock at night, on the 31st of January, I heard a man coming along with a truck. I ran after him, but lost the sound of it. In Bloombury-square, I saw a waggon loaded with grains, and the truck drew up, both close to the rails of the square. I saw a man on the top of the waggon throwing the grains into the truck; but which it was I cannot say, as it was dark. I and Price went and took the waggoner (Hudson), into custody, and Clark took Hall,

WILLIAM PRICE . I was with Gates, and saw Hall taking the truck close to the railing of the square. We saw it stop. Hudson drove the waggon close to it, one was holding the truck, and the other filling it, but from the smoke from the grains, we could not distinguish them.

ROBERT CLARK . I am a constable. Mr. Brown's name was on the cart. I sent to him. It was on the west side of the square.

WILLIAM BROWN . I am a cow-keeper in Mary-le-bone. Hudson was my waggoner. I do not know the other man.

HUDSON's Defence. The man minded my waggon, and I gave him a few grains for helping me.

HALL's Defence. He gave me the grains instead of money.

HUDSON - GUILTY . Aged 20.

HALL - GUILTY . Aged 30.

Confined Three Months .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210214-65

404. MARTIN SELLERS was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of January , one watch, value 14 s.; one seal, value 6 d.; one watch-key, value 6 d., and one ribbon, value 1 d., the goods of John Skaites , from his person .

JOHN SKAITES . On the 22d of January, at ten o'clock in the morning, I was in the Strand . An address was going to Bradenburgh-house; I stood up till it passed. In a few minutes, I felt my fob disturbed, and saw my watch in the prisoner's hand - he struck me in the face - I seized him - a scuffle ensued - he was rescued by a gang; but before that, I had marked his cheek with a pallet I had - the officer secured him. I am certain of him; I never lost sight of him, till he was taken; he had the mark on his cheek - I have not found my watch.

JOHN DAVIS. I was at the bottom of Southampton-street; the brass-founders were passing. I heard a man cry,

"That is him with the mark on his face." I and another officer ran up - twenty or thirty were rescuing him. I

drew my staff - they let him go - we seized him; his face was covered with yellow paint.

Prisoner's Defence. I was looking at the procession, and they took me.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Life .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210214-66

405. MARY MALPAS was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of January , 18 s. in monies numbered, the property of William Varney , from his person .

WILLIAM VARNEY . On the 16th of January, I had met a female, and went to a house with her, in Calmell buildings, near Oxford-street ; three women were in the room - I gave them drink. In about an hour and a half, the prisoner asked for the money for the room, 1 s., which I gave her. I counted my money, and I asked where I was to sleep? She said,

"In that room." They went out and shut the door. In the morning, I was interrupted about five o'clock - I felt something moving under the pillow; and by the light of the fire, I saw the prisoner with my breeches, taking the money out. She threw them down - I insisted on having the money - she refused. I went to the door to call the watch, but could not make him hear: on my return, the woman was gone, but the prisoner remained. I went again, and saw the watchman, who came in and took her. I am positive she is the woman.

JAMES BUBB . I am the watchman. I was called, and took her - she said, she had not got it.

Prisoner's Defence. He sent a girl for some gin; she did not return - he felt in his pocket, and missed his money, and said, I should make it good.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Transported for Seven Years .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210214-67

406. JOHN JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of February , one table, value 3 s. , the goods of Francis Marks .

MARIA MARKS . I am the wife of Francis Marks , who is a dyer , and lives in Long-alley . On the 3d of February, about half-past ten o'clock, the table stood outside the door for sale; it was fastened - the prisoner asked the price of it: I said 18 s.; he said, he could get three such for that. About half-past ten o'clock, I saw him and another coming up Long-alley; the other came in for a half-quartern loaf, which I gave him, but did not stop to take the money. I saw Jones take the table, and put it on his head - I ran after him - the other said,

"Drop it, Jones." The watchman came up and took him. I am sure he is the man.

STEPHEN CURLING . I am a watchman. I heard the cry, and met the prisoner running; I took him back. She said, he was the man.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The watchman stopped me as I was running.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210214-68

SIXTH DAY, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 20.

407. JAMES HARROD was indicted for embezzlement .

MR. ALLEY conducted the Prosecution.

ANN O'LEARY . I am a widow , and keep a sadler's shop at Hounslow . The prisoner was my servant , and entrusted to receive money for me. He never paid me 4 l. 3 s. on account of Mr. Gardner.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODERICK. Q. He lived some time with you - A. Yes - he never said he had paid me. I did not apprehend him earlier, because I had not positive proof against him. He said, that Mr. Gardner was angry and said, he thought me very troublesome; and when it suited him, he would pay it.

JOHN GARDNER . On the 1st of September I paid the prisoner 4 l. 3 s.

Cross-examined. Q. He called several times about the bill - A. No - only once; that was, when I paid him.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined Six Months .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210214-69

408. RALPH DOUGHTY was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of February , one bonnet, value 1 l., the goods of Mary Burn , from her person .

MARY BURN . I am a japanner . I am a single woman , and live in Henry-street, Hampstead-road. Last Sunday fortnight, just before eleven o'clock, I was in Thornaugh-street , with a young man and woman - the prisoner seized my bonnet from my head, and I saw no more of him; he said nothing, but run off, and the young man with me pursued him.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. He was in company with three or four young gentlemen - A. Yes - they were tipsy, making a noise, and knocking at doors. They were all taken up, and the Magistrate held him to bail, for an assault, which I have indicted him for.

Q. What then induced you to indict him for felony - A. Cousins, the watch-house keeper, told me to tell my story. I know it was only a drunken frolic.

JAMES WILKINSON . I am a cabinet-maker, and was with the prosecutrix in Thornaugh-street, seeing her home. Mr. Doughty, and three other gentlemen, stood in the street; and as we passed them, Mr. Doughty took her bonnet off. I asked his meaning; he made an evasive answer, saying, he would serve me the same, if I troubled my head about him. I gave him in charge - they all ran - I pointed him out; and insisted on his being taken, the other gentlemen held the watchmen, to prevent his springing his rattle. Some officers came up - Courtney Philips struck one of them. They were taken to the watch-house.

Cross-examined. Q. Did not the prisoner tear the bonnet to pieces immediately - A. Yes - I do not suppose he meant to steal it for any purpose.

JOHN COUSINS . I am a watchman. I was informed, the prosecutrix was robbed of her bonnet. Mr. Doughty was pointed out; I overtook him in Thornaugh-street; one of

the others seized my rattle, and the other my stick; the other stopped my mouth, and beat me.

Cross-examined. Q. The watch-committee directed a prosecution for an assault - A. I know the woman was robbed of her bonnet.

JAMES COUSINS . The prisoner was brought to the watch-house, charged with an assault and riotous behaviour.

Cross-examined. Q. And you have made felony of it - A. I have nothing to do with it.

NOT GUILTY

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210214-70

409. JAMES HYLAND was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Henry William Philpot , about six o'clock in the night of the 6th of February , with intent to steal, and buglariously stealing therein, one candlestick, value 2 s., and two castors, value 3 s., his property .

HENRY WILLIAM PHILPOT . I live in North-street, City-road . On the 6th of February, about half-past six o'clock in the evening, I went to the front room, to fasten the shutters, and saw a boy go through the window; I went through after him, and was told he had ran up the street. I ran up, and found him in the hands of Thomas Death . I asked if he had taken anything? he denied it; I examined the side-board, and missed two castors. While I was looking a neighbour called in, and said he had thrown something down before he was stopped. I went and found the sugar castor in the kennell - the pepper castor is still missing. The shutters were not fastened; the window was up, but was shut before he entered.

MARY ANN PHILPOT . I left the house about a quarter before six o'clock, the shutters were not then shut, but the window was down.

GEORGE GARROWAY . On the 6th of February I was coming down North-street, and saw the prisoner come out of Philpot's window with the candlestick, he jumped on a woman's shoulder, and the candlestick fell into the road. I am certain he is the lad.

THOMAS DEATH . I heard the cry of Stop thief! and saw two lads running, the prisoner was first - the other was a bigger lad. I gave the prisoner in charge to the prosecutor.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was going up the street when the gentleman collared me.

GUILTY . Aged 12.

Of stealing only.

Transported for Seven Years .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210214-71

410. FRANCIS BENNETT was indicted for feloniously assaulting Benjamin Smith , on the King's highway, on the 11th of February , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, one hat, value 2 s., and one handkerchief, value 1 s., his property .

BENJAMIN SMITH . On Sunday morning, the 11th of February, about two o'clock, I was at the end of Earl-street and Monmouth-street , shaking hands with Bowers, at that instant five men came up, (the prisoner was one of them) and assaulted us; I was knocked down twice, and when I got up the second time I found the prisoner in custody; the rest made off. As we went to the watch-house some of the gang followed us, and we were again assaulted. I was again knocked down, and quite stunned. I recollect nothing till I got up to look for my hat and handkerchief; I could not find them, but found they had the prisoner in custody.

Q. Had they said nothing to you - A. No. I was quite sober - I lost only my hat and handkerchief, which was taken after the prisoner was in custody.

JOHN BOWERS . I and Smith were parting, when five men came up, and shoved against us; I asked if they had no room to pass; the prisoner knocked me down, and on rising I was knocked down again; I gave the prisoner in charge, and the gang dispersed; we met them afterwards, and I was knocked down again; my waistcoat was nearly torn off.

WILLIAM NOTLEY . I am a watchman. I took the prisoner in charge, and received a terible blow, which knocked me down; the prisoner was rescued, but was secured again.

NOT GUILTY

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210214-72

411. MATTHEW HORGAN was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of January , one coat, value 3 l., the goods of Charles Williams , in the dwelling-house of Susan Williams , widow .

FRANCIS M'GAUMER. I am servant to Mr. Williams, of Finsbury-square . On the 16th of January, a little past nine o'clock in the morning, Mr. Williams opened the door to let the air in, and while he went to the back door, the coat was stolen.

THOMAS NOTTAGE . I was in the City-road, and heard the cry of Stop thief; I saw the prisoner with a coat under his arm - he threw it away, and was stopped by a gentleman, who gave him to Garton. I saw a gentleman pick up the coat. I am certain the prisoner is the man, I never lost sight of him.

THOMAS GARTON . I am an officer. I stopped the prisoner, and the coat was given to me.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I never had it.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Of stealing, but not in a dwelling-house.

Transported for Seven Years .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210214-73

412. GEORGE GOODE was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of January , one watch, value 3 l.; one seal, value 3 s., and one key, value 3 d., the goods of Noah James Tarrant , in the dwelling-house of John Davidson .

MARIA TARRANT . I am the wife of Noah James Tarrant , who is a shoemaker ; we occupy the second floor front room, at No. 26, Marylebone-lane . On the 18th of January, between seven and eight o'clock the prisoner called, and stopped twenty minutes - I have known him twelve months - he gave me 1 s., and sent me to fetch some liquor; I refused, but afterwards gave him the child to hold while I fetched it. I went two doors off for it, and we drank it; he was standing, and said he was in a hurry, as he had

to meet a young man at eight o'clock. I lit him down stairs directly, and we stopped some minutes at the door. When he left I went to the mantle-piece, and missed the watch. I left only him and the child in the room. My cousin was with me when he came, but she left me then. I left a child three years and a half old in the room.

ANN DIXON . I called to see my cousin. I let the prisoner in, he went up stairs, and I left; the watch was then on the shelf.

JOHN DRAKE . I live in the next room to the prosecutor, and heard the prisoner say to the child

"I will bring it back to-morrow."

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Of stealing, but not in a dwelling-house.

Transported for Seven Years .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210214-74

413. EDWARD OLIVER was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of January , one watch, value 30 s. , the goods of William Coward ; and WILLIAM CLARK was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing it to have been stolen .

WILLIAM COWARD . I live at Tottenham . On the 24th of January, I lost my watch off the shelf. I missed it about eight o'clock in the morning, and in the evening found it had been offered for sale to Mr. King, the broker at Edmonton. I had the prisoner, Oliver, taken up, he lives a little way from me, and Clark is a watchmaker at Edmonton. The officer took Oliver before a Magistrate, what he said was taken down. I saw Clark deliver the watch to the Magistrate.

ANN COWARD . About seven o'clock in the morning, I went up stairs, leaving the door open; when I returned I missed the watch. The prisoner came in in five minutes, and asked if I wanted water; I asked if he could find the watch, and his countenance altered.

JOSEPH GIBSON . I am a constable. I know this confession to be signed by the Magistrate, and saw the prisoner sign it. The watch is worth 12 s.

(read.)

Edward Oliver confesses that, he stole the watch, and took it to Mr. King's, the pawnbrokers, but he was not at home; he then took it to Mr. Clark's, and sold it to his son for 6 s. He took 5 s. home to his mother, and told her he got it from a gentleman, for holding his horse.

OLIVER - GUILTY . Aged 12.

Whipped and Discharged .

CLARK - NOT GUILTY .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210214-75

414. JOHN ROBINSON , JOHN HUMPHREYS , and THOMAS FREARSON were indicted for stealing, on the 29th of January , ten bushels of flour, value 5 l., and two sacks, value 5 s. , the goods of William Stanbrough .

MR. ALLEY conducted the prosecution.

MR. WILLIAM STANBROUGH . I keep the flour mills , at Isleworth , and employ a great number of men. Humphreys was my flour dresser , Robinson the waggoner , and Frearson keeps a little shop at Brentford. On the 29th of January, I had an order for twenty sacks of flour for Mr. Hawkes, a baker. I had told Robinson, the day before, that he was to go, and ordered Humphreys to deliver them to him; a quarter of barley meal was also to go to Mrs. Day, at Hammersmith. I told him that there were twenty-three sacks in the mill, and to take twenty from them. Humphreys took the sacks, and Robinson received them into the waggon. I stood near the waggon, and was too and fro; we always pitch the sacks on an end, and can then tell by looking at the waggon the exact number in in the waggon; I counted seven on each side, and six in the middle, which made twenty. I went to the tail of the waggon, and found they had put a quarter of pollard in instead of barley meal; while he was gone to put it back, I looked under the tarpauling, and found a sack of flour, laid across the head of the waggon, covered with loose hay and a cloth; I covered it over, and got down. Robinson came and put the barley meal in, and came to me in the counting-house for a delivery note. I said,

"Now, John, what have you got?" he said,

"I have got twenty sacks of flour for Hawkes, and a quarter of barley meal for Mrs. Day." He then took the team, and went off. I followed him in my chaise, and passed the waggon at Hammersmith. I called on Gammon, at Turnham-green, and informed him.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODERICK. Q. They were to take twenty sacks from twenty-three - A. Yes. There was nothing the matter with the tail-board.

MR. ALLEY. Q. I believe the three sacks remained in the lost, therefore the sacks in question must have come from another part of the mill - A. Yes.

CHARLES GAMMON . I am high constable of Kensington. On the 29th of January, about ten o'clock in the morning, the prosecutor called on me. I first saw the waggon on the road, about the five mile stone. I could perceive twenty sacks of flour in the waggon, but I could not see what was under the tarpauling. I let him pass' and followed him to Mr. Hawkes's, at Kensington; he backed the waggon under a gateway. I told Edgson, who was with me, to look at the front of the waggon, while I went into Mr. Bird's, the adjoining house, where I could observe what passed under the gateway. I saw Robinson take ten sacks in, and a man who assisted him, took eight; Robinson then got up into the waggon, before the waggon was drawn from under the gateway. I saw two other sacks laying across the front of the waggon, under the tarpauling; he moved these two sacks into the middle of the waggon, then he took a great coat, opened it, and laid it over them, and put the tarpauling over that. The two sacks of barley-meal remained where they where, and the other two sacks which stood upright were taken into Hawkes's. The horses were put too; I followed the waggon to Mrs. Day's, and saw the barley-meal delivered, and twenty or thirty empty sacks were put into the waggon for Mr. Stanbrough; the two sacks of flower still remained under the tarpauling, he then turned his horses round, got in, and the prisoner Frearson got in with him, and they drove away.

Q. Before that, had you seen Frearson with a bundle. - A. Yes, at Hammersmith, he threw a bundle into the waggon, it was large enough to contain two sacks, they were tied up in a handkerchief. They then drove about twenty yards from Mrs. Day's, they then stop a short

time, and Robinson lifted one of the sacks from under the tarpauling, upright, untied the mouth, and Frearson held an empty sack, while Robinson shot part of the full sack into it; they were then laid down on the bottom of the waggon, but not under the tarpauling. Instead of going into the regular road, they turned to the left, into a bye lane, where the waggon stopped again; Frearson held up another sack, while Robinson shot some of the flour into it, he quite emptied it; it was put down among the other empty sacks. Frearson tied one of the sacks up, and the other was only twisted round. The waggon went on to the Coach and Horses, public-house, at Hammersmith. Robinson got out, and then Frearson went into the house; he got into the waggon again, and pulled the tarpauling over the flour, and got out again. I believe they saw me there. Frearson got off, and I did not see him again for two days. There were several people about, and being well known about there, I left. The waggon and Robinson went on. I followed him to Mr. Stanbrough's yard. He drew the waggon into the yard, and called out

"Humphreys take this flour out of the waggon," (it was then in three sacks.) I said,

"No, no, that flour must not be moved till either Mr. Stanbrough, or some of his family come to see the sacks it is brought home in." I asked Robinson, whether Mr. Stanbrough sent out skotches of flour in that way (meaning parts of sacks) he said,

"he had taken two sacks of flour by mistake, he had got two more than he knew of." I asked why he did not bring it home in the manner he took it out, he said,

"The sack had burst." I asked, why he and the man that was in the waggon, did not put it into one of Mr. Stanbrough's sacks, as he had twenty or thirty there; he made no answer to that. These two sacks were corn, and not flour sacks, and marked T. F. Mrs. Stanbrough came out and saw the flour. I saw it moved into the dwelling-house. Robinson was taken into custody that night, when Mr. Stanbrough came home, and Frearson was taken on the 1st of February. He keeps a chandler shop at Brentford. I took him myself, at twelve o'clock in the day. I told him I had a warrant to search his house. I found two sacks in his shop, and part of another, marked T. F, the same initials as those in the waggon. In the kitchen, I found two sacks and a half of barley, with the same initials; and in his bed-room, seven sacks of flour, with the same initials: none of them tied up. He said he could prove where he got them. I took him into custody. He said,

"Let me go up stairs, to put on more clothes." He did so, and when I first saw him, he had the same jacket on which he wore in the waggon. I told him so; he said,

"I seemed to have a fancy for it, he knew nothing of the waggon, he was not there," and when he was before the Magistrate, (what he said, was not taken down) he said, he got up into the waggon to ride, being tired - this was after I had sworn he was there. As I took him to Newgate, he said, he expected some more would go with him, he little thought of going by himself. I produce the sacks, the flour was emptied into. When the waggon got home I found no bundle in it. Frearson took nothing away with him.

EDWARD EDGSON . I am a constable. I saw Frearson in the waggon.

EDWARD HAWKES . I only received twenty sacks of flour that day.

JOHN DAY . My mother lives at Hammersmith. The barley-meal was delivered, and we returned all the empty sacks we had. They were all marked with Mr. Stanbrough's name.

ROBINSON - GUILTY . Aged 28.

HUMPHREYS - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

FREARSON - NOT GUILTY .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210214-76

415. JOHN ALLEN was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of February , one box, value 5 s.; 18 pair of stockings, value 4 l.; 10 towels, value 1 l., and one shift, value 5 s. , the goods of Henry Hartless Hayward .

HENRY HARTLESS HAYWARD . I live at Acton. On the 5th of February, at night, I fetched my wife from Hammersmith in a cart - I put her boxes in the cart. We got to Acton at ten o'clock, and missed this box. I returned to Hammersmith, thinking I might have left it there. Next day, I found the prisoner in custody with it.

WILLIAM WATSON . I am a patrol of Kensington . At ten o'clock at night, I saw a man looking in at the toll-house window. I ran down the road, and saw a cart; I seized hold of the horses head - three man jumped out, and ran away. I believe the prisoner to be one of them; the box was in the cart.

JAMES PATTEN. I saw three men jump out - one had a white hat on.

HENRY WINNETT . I heard the rattle sprung, and ran down; the patrol turned the cart round. I seized the prisoner, who was running, as if from the cart.

THOMAS MASLIN . I heard the alarm, and stopped the prisoner, who was the first that run up.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

NOT GUILTY .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210214-77

416. SAMUEL SALMON was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of January , three prayer-books, value 46 s. , the goods of Robert Ogle , James Duncan , and John Ogle .

JAMES DARLING . I am shopman to Robert Ogle , James Duncan , and John Ogle , who are booksellers , and live in Holborn . On the 16th of January, I was sitting in the back part of the shop, and saw the door open, and the prisoner standing and taking something from the window; I run and seized him, a short distance off - he gave me a large prayer-book from under his arm; and on bringing him back, he gave me two others from his pocket.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. In April last, I received 300 l., and sailed for New South-Wales. I went ashore for three hours, at Gravesend; the ship sailed, and I lost all my property. I am in great distress.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Fined One Shilling, and Discharged .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210214-78

417. ROBERT JOYCE was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of January , three pair of reins, value 18 s.; three

single reins, value 4 s.; one breeching, value 5 s., and one comb, value 9 d., the goods of Thomas Billings ; and one lanthorn, value 1 s. , the goods of James Haydon .

JAS. HAYDON. I am servant to Thomas Billings , who is a stable-keeper at Brompton . At half-past eleven o'clock at night, I met a man in the yard with the lanthorn; he said, he had been to Mr. Billings. I let him go on, and found another man in the manger - I missed the property. The prisoner is as much like the man who had the lanthorn, as two peas.

JOSEPH COOPER . I apprehended the prisoner - the lanthorn was produced at the office. He said it was given to him.

NOT GUILTY .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210214-79

418. GEORGE HIPKINS was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of January , one watch, value 2 l.; one chain value 6 d., and two keys, value 6 d., the goods of George Minns , from his person .

GEORGE MINNS . I am fourteen years old. As I was walking up Mile-End-road , on the 24th of January, the prisoner came up and asked if I was going to Bow; I said, I was going through Bow. He asked the time - I said,

"When I passed the hospital, it was a quarter past ten o'clock." He presently after asked me to let him look at my watch; and as I wanted to know the time, I did; but held the chain in my hand, quite tight. He said, I need not be afraid that he was going to run away with it, and gave me a piece of paper, which he had before told me was a pound note, that he had had the misfortune to tear; on this, I did not hold it quite so tight - he snatched it out of my hand, and ran away. I caught hold of the flap of his coat, and called,

"Stop thief!" he broke from me, and I pursued him, and never lost sight of him till he was taken. My watch was found on him.

THOMAS WOOTTEN . I was coming up Globe-lane, the prisoner was running in the road. I stopped and asked what he had been doing; he said, it was only play. I let him pass; the boy came up, and said, he had robbed him - he turned down a place which was no thoroughfare; I secured him again. He gave me the watch from his waistcoat pocket.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. He gave it me - I returned it to him, and he gave it himself to the constable.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined Three Months , and Whipped .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210214-80

419. MARY WILSON and ELEANOR SMITH were indicted for stealing, on the 18th January , one watch, value 15 s., the goods of William Bayer , from his person .

WM. BAYER. I am a journeyman baker . On the 8th of January, between nine and ten o'clock at night, I met the prisoner Wilson, in St. Giles's, and went to No. 8, Maynard-street with her. I took my watch from my pocket, and put it in my hat; there was a row in the street; she went to the window, and said, she must go down to see what it was about; and in about two minutes she brought Smith up - they began sky-larking together, and knocked the candle off the table. I saw Wilson put her hand into my hat, but what she took out I cannot say; she went towards Smith - I felt in the hat, and missed my watch. I demanded it of Wilson - she took up the poker and offered to strike me, if I did not go out of the room; I said, I should not till I got my watch; Smith said,

"She did not rob you of your watch." I got a watchman, and gave them in charge.

EDWARD YARRANTON . I am a watchman. I heard a confesion in the house, and a man saying,

"You have got my watch, and if you don't give it me I'll give you in charge." He came down to me; I went up and saw Wilson on the landing-place, going up another pair of stairs; but I kept her, and sent Bayer for another watchman, who came and took Smith. As we brought them down stairs, Smith said to another girl,

"For God's sake, go and take it out of the pitcher." I went up, and found it in a pitcher of water.

WILLIAM CONNELL . The prosecutor fetched me. I met Smith trying to get down stairs; she said to a tall woman,

"For God's sake, go and take it out of the pitcher." We went up, and found it in a pitcher of water.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILSON'S Defence. He struck me and knocked me about.

SMITH'S Defence. Wilson called me up - I saw the man with the poker in his hand, and took it from him.

WILSON - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

SMITH - NOT GUILTY .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210214-81

420. JAMES BRUNTON was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of January , one sheet, value 5 s., the goods of Samuel Richards , in a lodging-room .

ELIZA RICHARDS . I am the wife of Samuel Richards , and live in Newton-street, Holborn . I let the prisoner a furnished room at 3 s. 6 d. per week; and in about three days, Wilson came to me; I then went up, and missed a sheet off his bed - he produced it - he had the prisoner in custody. I thought he merely took it to pawn, and would have redeemed it.

JOHN EDMUND WILSON . I stopped him in Holborn, on Saturday night, with a bundle, and asked what he had got; he said, it was a sheet which he was going to pawn; that he lived in Newton-street. I took him back.

(Property produced, and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I thought I could redeem it again, as I had to receive some money from the Court of Requests.

GUILTY . Aged 56.

Fined One Shilling, and Discharged .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210214-82

421. MARY SULIVAN was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of January , two half-crowns, value 5 s. , the property of John Cater .

SARAH CATER . I am the wife of John Cater ; we keep a green-grocer's shop at Clapton . I just went into the back-room for a moment - turned and saw the prisoner in the shop; I missed two half-crowns from the till, which I had just taken. I charged her with it - she denied it, and

asked for a half-penny orange, but went out without it. I sent my neice after her; she brought her back, and I found the two half-crowns in her shoe.

CATHARINE COKER . My aunt sent me after the prisoner. I overtook her just through the turnpike, and asked if she had not been into the green-grocer's shop - she said,

"No." I said, she was the person that was described to me; she coloured up and said nothing. I told her to come back - she said, she would not, for she must go and sell her things which she had in her basket. I said, she had taken two half-crowns from the till - she said nothing to that, and returned with me at last, and said, if I would let her go, she would give them to me - she said, she had them in her shoe. I took her shoe off, and found them.

GUILTY . Aged 11.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210214-83

422, WILLIAM BAYLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of January , one pickaxe, value 4 s. , the goods of John Baylis .

JOHN BAYLIS . I live at Islington . On the 19th of January, about five o'clock in the evening, I left this pickaxe in the tool-house - next morning I found the door broken open, and it gone. I found it at a pawnbrokers'.

JAMES ROY . I am servant to Mr. Walters, a pawnbroker, who lives in Goswell-street. The prisoner pledged the pickaxe for 1 s., on the 20th of January.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I had no hand in it - it is a spite against me.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210214-84

423. ROBERT ROACH was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of January , one bushel of oats, value 3 s. , the goods of George Tuson .

GEORGE TUSON . I am a coach-master , and live at Hammersmith; the prisoner was my servant , and took care of my horses . Having frequently been robbed, on the 25th of January, I went into Mr. Gough's room, which commands a view of my stable. At seven o'clock I went into the stable, and asked the prisoner about the horses; he said they were all well, except the mare. While he was gone to water the horses, I saw an empty sack in the corn-binn - it was not mine, and there was no name on it; the people I buy my corn of, have their sacks marked. I told him to do the horses up, and let them go to rest. I left the stable. went into the garden, and looked through a crevice; I saw the prisoner take the candle and the sack, and go into the loft, which joins the granary. I climbed up a pear-tree, and could see what passed in the lost and granary; he put some hay down the rack for the horses, then went into the granary, mixed some oats, beans, and chaff, and put it in the corn-binn for the horses; he then opened the loft window, and threw a truss of straw out; he then scraped a quantity of oats into the sack, from the rack, twisted the mouth of the sack round, and threw it down after the straw. I then went to Gough's window, saw the prisoner come out of the yard, and go into the Roebuck, public-house, next door. He soon after went into the stable-yard, and came out with the sack on his back, covered with a dark great coat; I followed him about 100 yards, then collared him, and said,

"Halloo, Robert! what do you call all this? it is some of my corn;" he said

"How do you know that?" I said,

"Because I saw you take it, and you have not been out of my sight." He said

"If it is your's, take it," and let it fall. I picked it up, and he went off. I had him secured about five o'clock next morning.

CHARLES GAMMON . I took the prisoner in charge. He said he found the corn in the road.

Prisoner's Defence. He laid it in my way to entrap me, as my brother drives an opposition coach against him.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Confined Six Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210214-85

424. ANN CLANSON was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of February , one sheet, value 7 s., and two curtains, value 20 s. , the goods of Sarah Rawlinson .

SARAH RAWLINSON . I let these things to the prisoner with a furnished room.

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210214-86

425. JAMES WARREN FITZGERALD was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of February , five books, value 5 s. , the goods of William Clarke .

GEORGE CLARKE . My father, ( William Clarke ), is a bookseller , and lives in New Bond-street . On the 13th of February, between four and five o'clock, I was called down. In consequence of what I heard I ran out, and overtook the prisoner in Hanover-square; I was without my hat, when he saw me, he ran. I saw him drop five books. I picked them up, and kept him in sight till he was secured.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

HENRY GOODMAN. I was passing Mr. Clarke's shop, the door was half open, I saw the prisoner go into the shop, and come out with the books. I described him to Mr. Clarke.

SAMUEL PLANK . I saw the prisoner break from a man, and I secured him.

Prisoner's Defence. I have been in his Majesty's service for twenty years, as a master's-mate and midshipman, under the command of Captain Brooke , and received several wounds at the engagement with the Cheaspeake, which caused me to be deranged. I was in Bedlam nine months; the surgeons found me unfit for service, and I had a small pension; if that is taken from me, a wife and four children must look to a workhouse. When I take liquor I do not know what I am about.

GEORGE CLARKE re-examined. He was sober.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Confined Two Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210214-87

426. DANIEL HOLLAND and ELIZA JOHNSON were indicted for stealing, on the 14th of February , one watch, value 3 l., the goods of George Dodds , from his person .

GEORGE DODDS . I am a sailor , and come from Berwick. I belong to the Mary Ann Allison . On the 14th of February, I came out of the Royalty Theatre at half-past ten o'clock; Johnson and another girl followed me across to a public-house, and asked me to give them some beer. I stood drinking with them for half an hour - we had two pots of beer between us three and a companion of mine. My companion left, and I went with them to a house in Rosemary-lane; I got there about half-past eleven o'clock. The other girl took me up stairs, and I gave her 3 s., and 6 d. to get a pot of beer, she did not return for a quarter of an hour. Johnson stood at the door with me waiting for her to return. Holland and another man came into the street, and asked what was the matter; Holland said he would try to find her. She came back; the two woman and the two men then took me to a coffee-shop, a good way off; we had some coffee, which came to 8 d. - all sat in the same box. Holland took his watch out, and shewed it to me; he then asked to look at mine; I took mine out, he opened and examined it, shut it again, and returned it to me. Then Johnson asked to see it, but I said No; she then snatched it out of my hand, and away she ran out of doors. I followed her, but two men in the passage prevented my getting out, and when I did get out they directed me the wrong way after her - I do not know who they were. I was quite sober. I have not found my watch.

WILLIAM BUDGEN . I am a watchman. On this night, between twelve and one o'clock, I heard a rush at the door of this coffee-shop, which is in Wentworth-street . I immediately went with my lanthorn, and pursued Johnson and Mary Williams . I saw Dodd trying to get out of the passage, Holland and another man were preventing him. I heard them say

"They are gone to the right;" when in fact they were gone to the left. I called to Dodd to follow me; Johnson and Williams ran into a privy in Crown-court, and we secured them. Dodd said Johnson had stolen his watch. Holland was taken next day.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Did you know Johnson before - A. Yes, by seeing her about - she ran out of the house. I had seen Holland about before - he knew I was a watchman. I heard him direct Dodds the wrong way; I knew his voice, and saw his face by the gas light. I saw the scuffle in the passage to prevent his getting out.

JOHN HARRISON . I am a watchman. I was nearley opposite the coffee-shop, saw two women rush out, and run down Crown-court, into the privy. When we took them we found it was Johnson and Williams. Holland came to the door not a moment after them. I heard him tell Dodds to turn a different way to what they were gone.

JOHN MANCE . I am an officer. I apprehended Holland next day in Rosemary-lane. He said he was at the door at the time, but knew nothing of it.

JOHNSON's Defence. I was coming along, and met Williams; we went to the vaults, and the prosecutor charged us with robbing him. I never saw him before.

HOLLAND - GUILTY . Aged 19.

JOHNSON - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210214-88

SEVENTH DAY, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 21.

427. CHARLES HARRIS and RICHARD HAYES were indicted for stealing, on the 13th of February , one handkerchief, value 4 s., the goods of Hyam Ansell , from his person .

HYAM ANSELL. I am a watch-maker , and live in Sugar-loaf-court. On the 13th of February, at half past six o'clock in the evening, I was in the City-road , with Mr. Mayers. The prisoner and another boy, were walking first before, and then behind us. I felt a hand in my pocket, I turned round and saw Harris give something to Hayes. I siezed him. Mayers pursued Hayes, who was brought in a few minutes with the handkerchief. No others were near enough to commit the robbery.

MICHAEL MAYERS . I live in Upper Fountain-place. and am a musician. I was with Ansell, he stopped suddenly, and said he was robbed. I had noticed the prisoner and another younger. He turned and seized Harris. I saw Hayes running off, and saw him drop the handkerchief. I collared him; he got from me, and ran down Tabernacle-row, I took him again without losing sight of him. I picked the handkerchief up.

THOMAS VANN . I am an officer. I had seen the prisoners in company about two hours before, in Chequer-square. Hayes was going to fight another boy for money. I dispersed them.

(Property produced, and sworn to.)

HARRIS'S Defence. Two lads ran from him. He turned and seized me.

HAYES's Defence. A lad ran before me, and threw the handkerchief on me, then it fell from me. I had my hands is my pockets.

HARRIS - GUILTY . Aged 14.

HAYES - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210214-89

428. CHARLES SMITH and RICHARD SMITH were indicted for stealing, on the 3d of February , 45 lbs, of cheese, value 23 s. , the goods of Thomas Kirkpatrick .

THOMAS KIRKPATRICK . I am a cheesemonger , and live in St. John-street . On the 3d of February, between five and six o'clock in the evening, some one said I had lost a cheese. I turned round and missed one. I went to the door, and saw the prisoner in custody with it.

THOMAS THOMPSON . I was coming down Holborn-hill, and saw the prisoners lurking about a cheesemonger shop. I followed them to the prosecutor's, then saw one take the cheese and give it to the other. I secured them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

CHARLES SMITH - GUILTY . Aged 19.

RICHARD SMITH - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210214-90

429. JAMES MITCHELL was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of December , one shift, value 3 s. , the goods of Margaret Croston , widow .

MARGARET CROSTON . The prisoner was my servant . On the 26th of December, she went out and did not return. I missed a shift. She came next day, as usual. I charged her with it; she said she had pawned it for 6 d., and would get me the duplicate. She promised it me from day to day, but never produced it. I gave her in charge, as she abused me. She then said it was in pawn for 2 s.

JOSEPH HALL . On the 26th of December, the prisoner pawned the shift with me.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Judgment Respited .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210214-91

430. ROBERT JOHNSON and SAMUEL HOWARD were indicted for feloniously receiving, on the 23d of December , 3000 lbs. of saltpetre, value 30 l., and twenty bags, value 5 s., the goods of Thomas Brandram , Samuel Caldwell Brandram , William Caldwell Brandram , and Harry Laughton , of which William Mitchell was convicted on his own confession, of feloniously stealing, they knowing it to be stolen .

MR. ALLEY conducted the prosecution.

(The record of the conviction of William Mitchell , was put in and read.)

JAMES NEWPORT . I am clerk at the prosecutors wharf, at St. Saviour's-Dock, Borough . In December last, they had a quantity of saltpetre, in bags. I missed twenty bags on the 1st of January, after receiving information of the robbery.

WILLIAM MITCHELL . I pleaded guilty to stealing this property, and have been fined 1 s. I am a waterman, and know the prosecutors. Johnson was their porter . Howard is a scavenger and dustman , and lived in Church-lane, Commercial-road. There was saltpetre in the prosecutors warehouse at St. Saviour's-dock. Johnson and others told me of it; it was first proposed to steal some-lead, that was gone, and Johnson said we could have some saltpetre, and that would pay better. He told me so a week or a fortnight before Christmas. Howard was not there then. Painter and Herbert asked if we got it - whether I knew any one who would have it. I came over to Howard, and asked, if he would have some saltpetre - he said, Yes, and told me to bring him a sample, and asked where it was to come from; I said, from Mr. Brandram's, I asked where it was to be landed if I brought it; he said, at St. Catherine's-dock. (which is in Middlesex). I told the other two men that he must have a sample, and in two or three days, they gave me one. I took it to Howard, he was not at home, and I left it with his wife. I went over two or three days after and saw him. He said he had got a customer for it, and I might bring it when I liked. Previous to that, Johnson had told us we were to get in at the shutter, which he would leave open, then we could get in at the window, and find the keys of the warehouse gates. On the Thursday before Christmas, I and the other two were standing at Dockhead, we took a barge, and put it under the prosecutor's warehouse, which joins the river, and when the tide was down, we walked down, and got in at the window, and I found the keys hanging in the counting-house; we took twenty bags of saltpetre, one was sweepings and dirty, we chucked that overboard, and had nineteen left. We went over to Howard, and told him we had got the saltpetre, and was going to bring it over when the tide was up, he said he wished he had known it sooner, as he did not know where he would get the keys of the wharf at St. Catharine's-dock. We went with him to some street in the Minories, he went into a house, brought me the keys, and told me to put it into a wooden counting-house, on the wharf, and bring him the keys in the morning. We went home and brought the barge to St. Catharine's-dock, and put the bags of saltpetre in the counting-house, as he desired, and next morning I took him the keys. We went to a public-house kept by Avel, he told me he had got a man that would have it. I asked him for some money towards the saltpetre. He gave me two half-crowns and 1 s., and said he was going to Smithfield, to buy a horse, and said he should be at home in the evening. I went over in the evening and saw him at the public-house again. He said he had got a person who was coming to look at it. We went home and saw him again on the Saturday morning. I asked for some money. He said he had seen a wine-merchant, who was coming to look at it, and was to bring 10 l. or 15 l. and when he took it away he would bring the rest. I do not know when he was to pay for it. We waited till between eight or nine - no one came. I asked him for 1 s. to get some bread and cheese, he gave me one; we had three or four pots of beer, at the public house, which he said he would pay for - nobody came. I told him we would take the saltpetre away, as I thought by his manner, he had taken it away from us. He gave me the keys; I went to the wharf and found it was gone. I went and accused him of taking it, he said he had not. He went down to the wharf with us, we made inquiry, and heard it was gone to the Thames-police. I was apprehended at his house the day after Christmas day, and had two hearings when I told this to the Magistrate.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODERICK. Q. Howard was taken before you - A. Yes, I was not promised a light punishment to plead guilty. I never said I would be revenged on Howard. I said it was through him that I was taken, and called him a rogue.

JAMES MACKEY . I am a wharfinger, and live in Vine-street, Minories; my wharf is at St. Catherine's Dock. On the Thursday before Christmas, about ten o'clock at night, Howard called on me, and said a friend of his was going to unload a barge of goods at my wharf - he said part of it was saltpetre, and asked if I would be down there at three o'clock in the morning, which was high-water time? I said No; that Smithers had the keys of the barge gate of the wharf, and he had better get them of him that night, in case he should not be there early enough for him to cart them. He said he wanted the key of the small shed, as some of the goods might be damaged if it was wet. I gave him the key - that shed is a counting-house. I was afterwards fetched to the office about this, and was detained until an explanation was given.

Cross-examined. Q. What goods came to the wharf - A. I do not know, I never saw them. I went to Howard's

and left a message for him to appear at the office, and he surrendered himself.

MR. ALLEY. Q. When he surrendered, Mitchell was not taken - A. No.

JOSEPH MITCHELL . I am a lighterman, and brother to the witness. About Christmas I saw Howard with my brother, at a public-house on this side of the water, with two others; I think it was on Boxing day; they had a deal of talk together, and then went to St. Catharine's-stairs. I went with them, but do not know what their conversation was about; they all four got over the wharf gate, and were quarrelling. I now remember that it was on a Saturday.

HENRY AVEL . I keep the Cherry Tree, public-house, Church-lane, Whitechapel - Howard lives a few doors above me; I saw Mitchell with him at my house, but not together; four men asked for beer in the tap-room on account of Mr. Howard - the last witness was one of them; Howard then came in, went into the parlour, and told me to let them have it.

JOHN MURRANT . I am a Thames Police officer. On the 23d of December I had received information that stolen saltpetre was at St. Catharine's-stairs; I went and found nineteen bags of saltpetre there, in a shed or counting-house; next day I took Mackey, and went to Howard's house - he was out. He came down to me on Christmas Day, and asked if Mackey was in custody. He said he had borrowed a key of a shed from him for a friend of his, named Mitchell, to put some goods in.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

THOMAS BRANDRAM . I am in partnership with Samuel Caldwell Brandram , William Caldwell Brandram , and Harry Laughton .

Prisoner HOWARD. I leave my defence to my Counsel.

JAMES BIDDLE . On the night of the 22d of December I was employed by Howard to empty a privy in Bristow-street, Ratcliff. We were there from twelve o'clock until three - he was present.

HOWARD - GUILTY . Aged 35.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

JOHNSON - NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210214-92

431. JAMES MACNAIN was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of January , from the person of James Noble , one round frock, value 2 s.; one handkerchief, value 6 d.; one pocket-book, value 2 d., and four 1 l. Bank notes, his property .

JAMES NOBLE . On the 12th of January, I had been to receive my pension at Chelsea, and went with an old friend to a public-house in Royal Hospital-row - remained there till five o'clock; and was then going home with my basket on my shoulder, the prisoner overtook me in Sloane-street. I did not walk very steady." He asked how far I was going; I said,

"To Edgware-road. He asked if I had been at Chelsea; I said,

"Yes." He said he would carry my basket and bundle, and see me safe through Hyde Park; and when I came to Knightsbridge, we went into the White Hart. He said, he would take off his watchman's coat, as he was rather behind time, and did not wish to be known - he had a glass of rum, and I gave him 1 s.; and when we got to Hyde Park gate , I said,

"Watchman, I shall get home safe now, I will have a coach." He called one; and while I was speaking to the coachman, I turned round to ask the prisoner for my basket and bundle, and he was gone with them. I then felt in my coat pocket, and missed my pocket-book, which contained four 1 l. notes - the other things were in my bundle. I went to the watch-house and gave information.

RICHARD COATES . The prisoner was one of our watchmen at Mary-le-bone. Noble gave information of the robbery. The prisoner was beyond his time, and we noticed him to come in with a basket - we sent Noble to look at him - he said he was the man, and in his watch-box - I found the prosecutor's handkerchief and a piece of mutton; I found the pocket-book behind his box, emptied of the notes; and in another part of his box, I found the four 1 l. notes, He had the smock-frock on, under his watch-coat.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I met this man - he was very much in liquor - he gave me the basket and smock-frock; and at the bottom of Oxford-street, I offered him the basket, but he would not take it - he said, the servants of the watch-house were friends of his; and while he was arguing with the coachman, I was afraid of losing my place, it being late, and so I took the basket to my watch-box, and it being cold, I put the smock-frock on.

GUILTY . Aged 43.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210214-93

432. JAMES FORD was indicted for that he, on the 31st of January , 10 lbs. of lead, value 2 s., the goods of Henry Scott , and fixed to a certain dwelling-house of his, feloniously did cut, with intent to steal .

SECOND COUNT, stating to be fixed to a certain building.

HENRY SCOTT . I keep a grocer's shop . On the 31st of January, between seven and eight o'clock, in the morning, a boy called me; I went and found the prisoner in the cistern, and the lead cut. I gave him in charge.

MARGARET STILLWELL . I live in New Exchange-court, Strand , On the 31st of January, about seven o'clock in the morning, I was dressing to go to work, and heard some one come along the passage, and go into the cellar. I got a light and found the prisoner standing by the water-butt he begged my pardon - said he had made a mistake, and come down stairs being ill; I said, he should have gone to the privy - he went away. I heard the water come in with a strange noise, and found the pipe cut. I went into the next door and said to Scott,

"I hope your pipe is safe, for mine is cut;" and in a few minutes, the prisoner was found in his cistern, cutting the pipe.

MARY WEBB . I heard that my neighbour's pipe was cut - ran down and found mine torn from the wall, and two holdfasts out. I called my husband - he found the prisoner in the privy; but was not secured.

WILLIAM NETTLEFOLD . I took him in charge, and

found two holdfasts by the water-butt, the pipe was pulled out at Webb's house, and at No. 2, it was cut.

Prisoner's Defence. I went down with no bad intent.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210214-94

433. RICHARD CLIPSTONE was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of February , one pocket-book, value 3 s., the goods of Houston Wallace , Esq. from his person .

HOUSTON WALLACE, Esq. On the 6th of February, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I was walking in Bond-street , and was told my pocket-book was taken. I felt and missed it from my coat pocket; a gentleman pointed the prisoner out just before me; I followed and collared him - shook him - and my pocket-book fell from him. He was making away with it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

ALFRED JOHNSON . I met the prosecutor; he was followed by four men - I looked round, and saw one of them pick his pocket; the book fell on the ground, and the prisoner picked it up - I pointed him out to Captain Wallace, who seized him, and it fell from his breast - he said, he picked it up, and would be glad to restore it; but before that, he had been making off with it.

Cross-examined. Q. What became of the other three - A. They escaped - all four were together at the time of the transaction.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked it up - I declare to God and man no person was in my company; the moment the gentleman said it was his, I said,

"Sir, take it; I picked tup." I did not know the gentleman was robbed of it.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210214-95

434. ROBERT STONE and JOHN PETTIT were indicted for stealing, on the 23d of January , four bell pulls, value 5 s. , the goods of Adolph Leopold Pfeil , John Zeldwick , and John Sutton Nettlefold .

THOMAS COX . I am porter to Adolph Leopold Pfeil , John Zeldwick , and John Sutton Nettlefold , who are ironmongers . On the 23d of January, I was ordered to watch, and about half-past seven o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner Stone leaning over the counter, opening the cupboard under the counter, take some brass work out, and give it to Pettit, who put it under his coat. Stone made a motion to him to go out; but I called him and said, he had taken something - he said he had not. I then called Pettit, and said he had got the articles, and found four bell pulls on him. They are strangers.

GEORGE BARRETT . I was in the shop. Stone asked for one penny worth of nails - while I went for them, I set Cox to watch.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

STONE - GUILTY . Aged 16.

PETTIT - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210214-96

435. MARY SALTER was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of February , one tea-caddy, value 3 s., the goods of William Bourne , privately in his shop .

WILLIAM BOURNE . I am a cabinet-maker , and live in the Commercial Road . On the 7th of February, about four o'clock in the afternoon, my man called me - he ran out and seized the prisoner, who had come in at the window, which is open all down, and taken the caddy.

WILLIAM BURGESS . I work for Mr. Bourne. I saw the prisoner reach into the shop and take the caddy. I followed and took her - she threw it down, and denied touching it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I never meddled with it.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Confined One Month .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210214-97

436. SARAH PELL was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of February , two spoons, value 12 s.; two hatbands, value 4 s., and two pair of gloves, value 2 s. , the goods of John Fleetwood .

JOHN FLEETWOOD . I am a cashier in the Bank . I took the prisoner into my family as chair-woman , during which time we missed these articles. I did not suspect her, and from the good opinion I had of her, I recommend her to a situation in Chiswell-street - her box was searched in consequence of what passed there, and this property in it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Judgment Respited .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210214-98

437. CHARLES NASH , SAMUEL HERRING , and RICHARD HALEY were indicted for stealing, on the 13th of January , one shirt, value 5 s. , the goods of Frederick Wessell .

The prosecutor not appearing, the prisoners were ACQUITTED .

Reference Number: t18210214-99

438. GEORGE KEATH was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of January , two window-curtains, value 1 s.; one neck-handkerchief, value 4 d.; one shirt, value 2 s.; one pinafore, value 3 d.; one waistcoat, value 1 s.; one gown body, value 2 d.; one cloak, value 6 d., and one dress, value 2 d., the goods of John Richardson ; one coat, value 1 s., one hat, value 3 d.; one handkerchief, value 1 s.; one shirt, value 6 d., and one tobacco-box, value 1 s. , the goods of James Justin .

MARY RICHARDSON . I live in Portpool-lane . On the 15th of January, between four and six o'clock, I missed these articles, and was informed the prisoner had been in my room - he had lodged with me a fortnight before. I had him apprehended.

JOHN JUSTIN . I lodge at the house and missed my things, and found the prisoner in Rupert-street - I found part of the property on him. He told me where the rest was.

MOSES DAVIS . The prisoner sold me a coat and hat.

WILLIAM READ , JUN. I am an officer. The prisoner was given in my charge; I found the handkerchief in his hat - he said, he sold part of the property to Davis, and left the other part at the White Heart. I found them there.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I am sorry to be charged with a crime undeservedly.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210214-100

439. PATRICK HAYES was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of February , one blanket, value 18 d. , the goods of the Mayor, Commonality, and Citizens of the City of London, Governors of the professions, revenues, and goods of the Hospital of Edward the VI. of Christ, Bridewell, and St. Thomas Apostle .

THOMAS DAVIS . I am pass-master for the County of Middlesex. On the 5th of February, the prisoner was brought from Bridewell , to be passed to Bristol, and in the morning when he was in the waggon, we missed a rug from where he slept; and found it in his bag with a blanket belonging to Bridewell.

GEORGE DAVIS . I found the blanket in his bag.

JOHN LOCKLEY HARPER . I belong to Bridewell. On the 29th of January, the prisoner was sent down as a pauper. I sent him on the 5th of February to the pass-house, and next day Davis sent to me; I missed a blanket, and found it to be ours.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. It was put into the bag instead of my own.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Confined One Month .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210214-101

440. MARGARET CONNER was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of December , one whittle, value 8 s.; one purse, value 1 d., and 11 s. in monies numbered , the property of Bryan Grady .

ANN GRADY . I am the wife of Bryan Grady . On the 31st of December, I went to be churched; I left the prisoner in care of the house and children. On my return she was gone; I missed my whittle, and a purse with 11 s. in it. I found her at Dover-street, Borough, and my whittle in pawn.

MARY NEWBORN . The prisoner came to me on Sunday, and gave me the whittle to pawn. She left the purse on my mantle-shelf. I live in Dover-street.

WILLIAM JONES . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Blackfriar's-road. Newborn pledged the whittle with me.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. Grady keeps a house for girls; she gave me the purse and whittle to look out for money; she would not let me wear pockets. I met some girls, who said they were treated well in Dover-street, and as I was half starved, I went with them.

ANN GRADY re-examined. I did not give it to her - I do not keep a bad house.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined Three Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210214-102

441. MARY BRADLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of February , one gown, value 8 s.; one pair of stockings, value 2 s.; one fruit knife, value 1 s., and one shift, value 1 s. , the goods of James Ralph Auterlony .

JAMES RALPH AUTERLONY . I am a dyer , and live in Chancery-lane . The prisoner worked for me.

LYDIA TAYLOR . I am servant to the prosecutor. About the begining of this month, I went to the prisoner's lodgings, in Whetston-park, and found a night-cap, which is my master's. I afterwards saw a shift produced, which I knew.

JAMES SWEETMAN . I am servant to Mr. Barker, who is a pawnbroker, and lives in Holborn. On the 18th of November, a fruit knife was pledged with me in the name of Smith.

HENRY KING . I am an apprentice to Mr. Gray, a pawnbroker, who lives in Fleet-street; a pair of stockings were pledged with me, in the name of Ann Smith .

JOSEPH CRUTCHLEY . I am servant to Mr. Burton, a pawnbroker, who lives in Holborn. On the 23d of January, a gown skirt was pledged with me in the name of Smith; I believe the prisoner to be the woman.

THOMAS TIERNEY . I am a beadle. On the 1st of February, I took the prisoner into custody; I found the body of a silk gown, and some pieces of cloth at her lodgings.

WILLIAM READ . I am an officer. I found the property at the pawnbroker's by the prisoner's information.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. Taylor asked me to pawn the knife saying she found it, which I did; she then said it was her mistress's.

TAYLOR re-examined. It is false.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined Six Months .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210214-103

442. WILLIAM WHITTLE and GEORGE SYMONDS were indicted for that they, on the 10th of February , 24 lbs. of lead, value 4 s., the goods of Robert Gasking , and fixed to his dwelling-house, feloniously did cut, with intent to steal .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating it to be fixed to a certain building of his.

ROBERT GASKING . I live in Backhouse-walk, Hoxton . I saw the lead safe on the roof of my house, on the 10th of February in the morning.

MARY GASKING . On the 10th of February, about eight o'clock at night, I was told some men were on the roof; I went out, and saw two men rise off their knees. I called to know what they did there; they came down, and were secured.

ELIZA EVANS . I live near the house. I saw two men on the house, and told Mrs. Gasking; she came round, and saw them. I then saw one on the wall, and Symmons on the ground; he was laid hold of, and Whittle was on the wall; I know them to be the men.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. What opportunity had you of seeing them - A. It was moonlight.

JOHN SMITH . I saw the prisoners on Gasking's house, and never lost sight of them till they were secured.

JOHN MASON . I am a constable. I took the prisoners in charge, went on the roof, and found about 24 lbs. of lead torn off, and rolled up, ready to be carried away - it

was quite fresh cut, but not separated. They said they were flying pigeons. I found a knife on them.

WHITTLE'S Defence. I leave it to the mercy of the Court.

WHITTLE - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

SYMONDS - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Judgment Respited .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210214-104

443. MARGARET DUNN was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of February , one table-cloth, value 7 s.; one petticoat, value 7 s., and one handkerchief, value 2 s. , the goods of Sarah Gale , widow .

SARAH GALE . I live at No. 11, Arundel-street, Strand , and let lodgings. The prisoner came into my service, on the 2d of February, and next day as she was going to bed, she was intoxicated; I was up in her room, a silk handkerchief, and a duplicate for a table-cloth and silk petticoat dropped from her person. She said she took the handkerchief to dust the drawing-room - I had left it in the kitchen. I gave my daughter the duplicate, this was on the Saturday, and on the Monday I went to the pawnbroker's, and found they were mine, and had been taken from my wardrobe. I had told the prisoner on the Saturday that she must be very clean in my service, and I believe she was distressed, which might induce her to do it.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. In what language did you desire her to be clean - A. I said she must be clean in her person, as single gentlemen were very particular, and she being an Irish girl, whom I knew were not particular. I never suggested that she should be smart and wear frills. She acknowledged to the officer that she had robbed me.

Q. Do your daughters dress smart - A. They are children, one is fourteen years old, and the other fifteen.

Q. Do single gentlemen stay for a night or so - A. Mine generally stop weeks and months.

Q. Do you know one Samels - A. The last time I saw him was on the steps of the Sessions-house at Clerkenwell. He was never employed by me in this business, or any other; I first knew him by seeing him at Mr. Martin's, a paper-hangers, in the Strand. I never authorized him to say I would prefer no bill if I received 8 l. The bill was taken out on the last day of the Sessions; we went there three times.

GEORGE FROST . I am servant to Mr. Hawkins, who is a pawnbroker, and lives in Drury-lane. On the 3d of February at night, the prisoner pledged the table-cloth and petticoat with me, in the name of Williams, Fleet-street. Mrs. Gale claimed them on Monday.

JOHN LANGFIELD . I am a constable. On Sunday morning, between eleven and twelve o'clock, Mrs. Gale came to me, and I took the prisoner in charge at her house. She admitted pawning the things, and said she had torn the duplicate that they should not find it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. When Mrs. Gale hired me she ordered me to have dinner ready by the time she came home. She keeps different houses of ill-fame, and went out at eleven o'clock to receive the money from them, returned at half-past five, very much in liquor, and found fault with me and the other servant for not getting the work done. She went out again, returned at half-past eleven o'clock, used very improper words and swore. On Saturday she said gentlemen and ladies resorted there, and I must have better clothes, or not continue with her. I said I had been a year and a half out of place, and what few things I had were in pawn. She said, so help her God, I should not remain in her place any longer, as I had bad shoes. I said I should have another pair at night, and would keep myself as clean as possible. She said she did not particularly wish me to have good clothes, but to go dressy, or she should loose the custom of her house, as it depended on the servant. Herself, her daughters, and servants, were in the habit of seeing gentlemen, that she saw one gentleman three times a week, and ordered me to have wax candles up ready. When she went out, I took and pawned these things, and redeemed some of my own to appear decent. She has detained my box which has three yards of ribbon, and twenty-four duplicates. A respectable servant will not live with her.

SARAH GALE re-examined. On my oath, I never kept any thing from her. The officer took her box away. I keep no other house. I am well known, and can refer to the most respectable people in town.

JOHN LANGFIELD . I opened the prisoner's box before her, and have returned it to her mother; it was not locked. There was a pocket-book with twenty-one duplicates in it.

MR. LAW called the following witnesses.

MARY DUNN . I am the prisoner's sister-in-law. I saw the prosecutrix with Samels at a public-house, by the Sessions-house, Clerkenwell - they met us there. Samels said, in her hearing, that if I would bring the jink with me, the bill would be done away with, and it should all be settled; and if I did not bring 8 l., my sister would be prosecuted. I said, it was a deal of money; that my husband was only a labourer, and asked what it was for, as I feared I might be doing wrong. I asked it he was a constable; he said, No, he was a higher post. I was to meet him next morning, at the Plough, at Whitechapel, with the money, (this was Wednesday). I met him there. Mrs. Gale was not present. I saw her on Friday, at the same public-house; Samels was with her, he asked if I had brought the jink. I said, No, it was a deal of money. He said, well then, Mrs. Gale must go and take out the bill immediately; and asked her if she would, she said, what he said she would apply to. I said 8 l. was a deal of money, he said,

"Why Mrs. Gale's money is 5 l." Mrs. Gale wished us good day, and left. He said, what he said was law with her, he could do any thing with her. I went to borrow the money - thought I was doing wrong. I enquired at the prison, and happened to meet the Reverend Mr. Cotton. He took me to Mr. Sheriff Williams, who advised me not to pay the money.

COURT. - Q. The proposal was first made on Wednesday? - A. Yes, I am sure Mrs. Gale heard the proposal, but on Friday, they would let nobody hear what passed; she said what he said she would apply to. I told her, I expected, that if I paid it, she would receive it with her own hands, and give me a receipt for it, that I might have no trouble hereafter. I live in Alfred-street, Poplar.

ELIZA DUNN . I am the prisoner's sister. I heard the last witness examined. Her statement is correct.

COURT. - Q. Did you hear this man propose to do away with the indictment for 8 l. - A. Yes, at the bottom of Clerkenwell, in the street, which leads to Mutton-hill. Mrs. Gale was not in hearing; at first he talked to us about half an hour, then he fetched her. He took us into a public-house. Mrs. Gale took a drop of brandy. I believe this was on a Thursday, it was the first day that we met him. He asked Mrs. Gale what she would do, she curtsied and said, what he said she would apply to. I saw them together on the next day, (Friday). He would let nobody but my sister-in-law hear what passed then. He proposed to have a private room, but could not get one; he came and staid outside in the street. I went out and heard him say if the 8 l. was brought up to-morrow morning, it would make it up, and prevent the bill coming into Court, and pay Mrs. Gale and the officers.

Q.- I thought he would not let you hear. - A. No, not at first, but my sister-in-law asked if I might; he said on the first day, that he should have to give the officers 3 l. for taking my sister, and 3 l. for Mrs. Gale, and 2 l. for his trouble; as we were poor people, he would charge no more. I said,

"Mr. Gale, if the money cannot be made up, I hope you will punish my sister as little as possible;" she said she would do whatever Samels wished - he said, if it was not made up, she must take the bill out immediately.

GEORGE FROST re-examined. - Q. Do you know of any delay, in taking out the bill. - A. We were sworn on the Wednesday. Samels said he did not think it worth while to put in the bill that day, as we should not get it out, he wanted to put it off till Saturday. I said, I could not come then, we agreed to meet on Friday, at eleven o'clock. On Wednesday, Samels and Mrs. Gale went away together. On Friday I went, and understood they had put it off, and attended on Saturday; the bill was put in on Saturday, about eleven o'clock. Samels would not let the officer take the bill, he gave it to Mrs. Gale.

JOHN LONGFIED . I saw Samel's at Hick's Hall. I understood him to be Mrs. Gale's attorney.

- BURK. Last Wednesday, I met Mrs. Gale and Samels. She said, whatever he said she would do. No proposal was made in my hearing.

SARAH GALE re-examined. - Q. Did you authorise Samels to make it up for money. - A. Never, on my oath, he told me they had applied to him to make it up. I said, I would hear nothing of it. He had been recommended to me as a clever fellow to collect small debts.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Confined Six Months .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210214-105

444. HARRIET WISE was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of February , three blankets, value 9 s.; one coffee-mill, value 4 s.; one counterpane, value 7 s.; one sheet, value 18 d.; one frock, value 9 d.; one pair trowsers, value 9 d.; one waistcoat, value 18 d.; two handkerchiefs, value 18 d. and a pair of boots, value 4 s. the goods of Henry Kent .

HENRY KENT . I am a watch-jeweller , and live in Smith-street, Clerkenwell . The prisoner lived servant with me three months. I missed these things, and found them at the pawnbrokers.

JAMES WOOD . I am servant to Mr. Sowerby, a pawnbroker, who lives in St. John-street. On the 3d of February, the prisoner pawned a pair of boots for 7 s. 6 d., and a coffee-mill for 2 s. I have other things claimed by Mr. Kent, but I do not know who pawned them.

PETER TATE. I am servant to Mr. Chapman, a pawnbroker. On the 5th of December, a counterpane was pawned for 5 s., and on the 27th of January, a frock and trowsers. I do not know who by.

WILLIAM READ , JUN. I am an officer. On the 5th of February, I apprehended her. She said one of the lodgers had the duplicates, she gave to me.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Judgment Respited .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210214-106

445. MARY LANGLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of February , 10 yards of printed cotton, value 9 s., the goods of Samuel Cater , privately in his shop .

THOMAS WOOD . I am servant to Mr. Samuel Cater , a linen-draper , who lives in Finsbury-place . On the 8th of February, the cotton hung inside the door-way. About twelve o'clock, a woman asked if I missed any thing. I ran to the door, and immediately missed it. I went down the street, and took the prisoner fifteen doors off, with it under her apron. I had not seen her at the shop.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I leave it to the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Three Months .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210214-107

446. ANN KING was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of February , one gown, value 10 s. , the goods of William Whitbread .

ELIZA WHITBREAD . I am wife of William Whitbread ; we live in Brick-lane . On the 6th of February, this gown laid on the counter. I keep a clothes shop - the prisoner came in between three and four o'clock, with another woman; I was in the back room. I came out and saw her companion take it up, put it under her shawl, and both go out together. I overtook the prisoner at the corner of Old-street. I have not recovered the gown - she at first denied having been in the shop; but when I said I never lost sight of her, she acknowledged it, and told me the other woman's name who had been with her.

ANN MACKEY . I lived at the house, and saw the prisoner and another woman go in; as I came out, they called out to know the price of a bonnet, and in a few minutes they passed me, laughing; I asked what they were laughing at? They said, there was nobody to serve. The prosecutrix came out and laid hold of the prisoner.

JOSEPH PRINCE . I took the prisoner in charge, and she said, the other took the gown.

NOT GUILTY

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210214-108

EIGHTH DAY, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22.

447. MARGARET BARRY was indicted for that she, on the 20th of January , six pieces of false and counterfeit milled money, of the likeness and similitude of good shillings (the same not being cut in pieces) feloniously did put off to George Heath , at a lower rate and value than the same, by their denomination, did import and were counterfeited for (i. e.) the sum of 2 s .

MR. BOLLAND conducted the prosecution.

GEORGE HEATH . I live in Bartlet-court, Drury-lane . Furzeman applied to me to assist in detecting the prisoner, and on Saturday morning, the 21st of January, I went to deal with her - one Williams introduced me to her, at No. 39, Charles'-street, Drury-lane, on the first floor. Ellis had given me a half-crown. I saw two bad shillings on the mantle-piece - Williams said,

"This is a friend of mine; you may trust him, the same as me." She said, if he was agreeable, it should be so, and put a new shilling from her pocket into my hand, and asked if they were not a very good die; I said they were; and asked the price - she said, they ought to be 4 1/2 d. each; but as I was a friend of Williams's, I should have them for 4 d. I agreed to take four, which she gave me, and I paid her for them. When she shewed them to me, they were not coloured; she took the poker out of the fire and coloured them; wrapped each in a peice of brown paper, and gave them to me. I left, and in the evening met Furzeman and Ellis, by appointment, at a house in Short's-gardens; I gave them the shillings - they marked them, and gave me three good marked shillings, and two sixpences to purchase more. I went to her at seven o'clock that night, alone - two children were in the room; they fetched her, and I asked if she could let me have more; she said,

"Yes - how many?" I said twelve. She said she could only let me have six. She took them out of a paper which she had in her lap, and put them on the poker, and then gave me six. I gave her 1 s. and two sixpences for them. She said, she had had good success, and had passed seven that day. I sent the little boy for something to drink; and as he went out, the officers came in, and found six bad and two good marked shillings on me, and asked, who I bought the bad ones of; I said, of the prisoner. She was in great confusion, and put the paper under her person, as she sat on the chair.

JAMES ELLIS . Furzeman and I gave directions to the last witness in consequence of information which we had. I gave him a good half-crown, not marked, and met him at five o'clock, he produced four counterfeit shillings, which we marked - I produce them. After searching him, I gave him three good shillings and two good sixpences all marked, and six penny-pieces to send the children out for gin, as a signal to us. At seven o'clock we went into the Coach and Horses, opposite the prisoner's house, and sent him over to purchase more. I saw a child come out, and went up into the room. I took Heath, and found on him six counterfeit shillings, wrapped in brown paper, and two of the good shillings, which I had given him; he said he had the bad shillings from her; she denied it, and made a howling noise. I saw Furzeman take from her pocket one shilling and two sixpences marked, and which I had given Heath. She drew her chair to the fire, and threw something under the grate; Furzeman picked it up - it was twelve bad sixpences and five bad shillings.

JOHN FURZEMAN . I saw Ellis give Heath half-a-crown, and at five o'clock he gave us four counterfeit shillings, which I marked and gave to Ellis; we gave him 3 s. and two sixpences marked, watched him into the house, and waited till a boy came out; we then went up, and found him and the prisoner in the room with a bag. I seized the prisoner; Heath said he had the money from her, and she screamed out. I put my hand into her pocket, and found 1 s. and two sixpences, which we had given Heath. I asked her where she got them; she said she took them in change. I went close to the bed, and heard 1 s. fall against the fender. I found under the grate twelve sixpences and five shillings all counterfeit. I asked her what she threw them away for; she said she did not throw them there.

MR. CALEB EDWARD POWELL . I am assistant to the Solicitors of the Mint. The four shillings are counterfeit, and of the same die; the five shillings and twelve sixpences are also counterfeit, and the shillings of the same die; five of the six last produced are counterfeit, and one is good.

JAMES ELLIS re-examined. They have got mixed at the office; the good one is one I found on Heath.

Prisoner's Defence. A woman lodged with me; I was told she had bad money, and informed Furzeman's brother. She heard of it, and said she would get a man for 5 s. to put me where I wanted to put her. I could not get rid of her. I was selling vegatables in the street; my little boy came and said a man wanted me, and he had seen him give ( Ellis Welch ) the woman some money. I went home, and she said

"Here is your rent," and give me 2 s. and two sixpences; the man said

"Let the boy get some gin, we won't part dry." Welch went down, and immediately the officers came up. They found nothing on me, but the money Welch gave me.

GEORGE HEATH re-examined. I never saw a woman there; a friend came up the second time I was there; the prisoner told her I was a friend of her's, and she left immediately - she gave her nothing.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Confined One Year .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210214-109

448. JOHN DORING was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of February , 40 oz. of tobacco, value 15 s , the goods of the London Dock Company .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating it to belong to a certain person or persons unknown.

MR. BOLLAND conducted the prosecution.

HENRY WATTS . I am foreman of the tobacco warehouse, in the London Docks . The prisoner was a labourer there, and was on duty at the scale on the 12th of February, weighing tobacco; as he came out, I rubbed him down, and found something was in his sleeve. I said,

"You had better make it straight, or they will make a noise when you get to the other gate," but I found the other arm was the same. I took his coat off, and found some tobacco in each sleeve. I searched further and found

more in his shoes, and a quantity in his breeches, in all 2 1/2 lbs. He said he got it from the scale.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. - Q. What had you been doing - A. Weighing inwards. It was not in the custody of the Excise.

WILLIAM FOLDER. I heard Watts's statement and confirm it.

Prisoner's Defence. There was a quantity of damaged tobacco being burnt, I picked this good out from it.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Confined One Month , and Publicly Whipped, in or near the Docks .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210214-110

449. CAROLINE COATES was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of February , one pair sheets, value 20 s.; one shift, value 5 s.; one pair stockings, value 1 s., and six napkins, value 5 s. , the goods of Robert Halford .

The prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210214-111

450. JOHN YOUNG was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of January , one picture frame, value 10 s. , the goods of John Eckford .

JOHN ECKFORD . I am a carver and gilder , and live in Water-street, Bridewell. I sent two picture-frames to the Bolt-in-Tun, Fleet-street, directed to Mr. Twyford, Midhurst, Sussex; and in about four days, the officer brought one of them to me.

WALTER HARRIS . I am an apprentice to Mr. Eckford. I delivered the frames at the coach-office.

ROBERT GRAYS. I am proprietor of the Bolt-in-Ton. I forwarded the parcel by the Chichester coach, on the 18th of January.

JOHN EDMUND WILSON . I am a constable. On the 22d of January, in the evening, I and Chapman were at a public-house, in Brook's-market. The prisoner was there, and had this picture-frame behind him in a handkerchief. I asked what it was, he said he bought it of a man, who was dressed in black, in Holborn, for 15 s. I secured him.

Cross-examined. - Q. Nobody claimed it at his first examination, and he was let go - A. Yes, on his father's recognizance. He came to claim it afterwards. I told the Magistrate I had found the owner.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210214-112

451. NICHOLAS WALKER , MICHAEL LYNCH , TIMOTHY SULLIVAN and EDWARD FREEMAN were indicted for stealing, on the 3d of February , one piece of fir wood, called a spar, value 10 s. the goods of Alexander Massie .

ALEXANDER MASSIE. I am a mast and block maker , and live at Wapping . On the morning of the 3d of February, I was informed, two men in a boat had taken a spar, I went down and missed one from the raft. I went down in the Thames-police boat, and boarded a lighter in which were the prisoners and some chips, which corresponded with my timber. One of them said, they must have fallen on board from some vessel that was alongside. They appeared recently taken off the wood. We found an axe on board which corresponded with the chips, the notches in the edge of the axe corresponded. A bargeman came up and said, a waterman had picked up the spar, we sent a boat down and found it: it is above thirty feetlong. I should know it from a hundred. I have cut off one end of it to bring here. I cannot swear to the chips, but are the same quality of wood.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. - Q. How far was the lighter from your premises. - A.Three-quarters of a mile.

JOSEPH DAY . On the 3d of February, I saw two men take the spar from the prosecutor's premises. I do not know them.

WILLIAM LANGFORD. On the 3d of February, I was rowing down the river, and saw a man in a lighter throw a spar out of it - I picked it up. There were five men in the lighter - it was not the one the officers boarded.

JAMES EVANS . I went with Mr. Massie, to look for the spar, we boarded a lighter which the prisoners were in. I asked, where the chips came from: one of them said, he supposed they came out of some ship. I saw a parcel of the same sort of chips floating. Langford brought the spar up, and said, he saw the men in the lighter in which we were throw it overboard.

WILLIAM LANGFORD . It was thrown from a ballast lighter. I thought the prisoners were in it, but cannot swear it.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210214-113

452. DANIEL DOUGLAS was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of February , one shift, value 2 s.; two petticoats, value 11 s.; one pair of stockings, value 1 s.; two gowns, value 4 s.; one bag, value 6 d.; two handkerchiefs, value 2 s. and one habit shirt, value 1 s.; the goods of Ann Ellard , widow , two petticoats, value 2 s., one shift, value 2 s.; two pair of stockings, value 2 s.; two handkerchiefs, value 2 s.; three gown bodies, value 2 s.; and one frill, value 6 d. , the goods of Ann Burch , spinster .

MR. ALLEY conducted the prosecution.

MARY ANN COBBIN . I am servant to Mr. Parke, who lives in Cannonbury-place, Islington . Mrs. Ann Ellard and Miss Ann Burch were visiting there; they gave me the articles stated in the indictment to be washed. On the 7th of February, I put them in a bundle on the pantry table, near the area-window. I was sitting in the kitchen about four o'clock in the afternoon, and heard the window slap down. I immediately ran into the pantry, and saw the prisoner turning from the window, and getting over the rails, and another standing by him. I ran out and pursued the prisoner a little distance. He then turned and met me (the other had the bundle). He said,

"What is the matter." I tried to take hold of him, and said,

"You know what is the matter." He ran away, the same way as his companion. I followed, calling, Stop thief! Some gentleman in the field stopped him, without my losing sight of him. The other threw the bundle down.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was returning from Highbury, heard the alarm, and asked, what was the matter, she said, I knew. I ran after the man, and was stopped.

THOMAS FRANKLIN . I am an officer. I searched the prisoner, and found a pack of cards, and two pieces of chalk on him.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210214-114

453. WILLIAM WILKS was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of February , one lace veil, value 2 s. , the goods of Richard Ebsworth .

MARY ANN EBSWORTH . I am the wife of Richard Ebsworth, who is a musician ; we live in Cirencester-place, Fitzroy-square . On the 13th of February, between eight and nine o'clock at night, I was in the front parlour; some one came in, and took this veil, and other things from the back-room. I believe the door was open.

JOHN SMITH . On Wednesday, the 14th of February, about seven o'clock in the evening, I was in Portland-road. I went down Norton-street, and saw the prisoner with two others; I passed them, and returned, took the prisoner, and Davis took the others; in the prisoner's hat I found this veil, and in his pocket a latch-key, which opens the prosecutor's door. He said the veil belonged to a young woman,

JOHN DAVIS . I was with Smith; we watched the prisoner and two others some time; they went to different doors on each side the street, as I thought to try the keys. After seeing them go to several doors, I ran and told Smith, and we apprehended them. I found some keys on the others, and on the prisoner a latch-key and the veil.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I bought it of a man in the street.

ELIZA HARRIS . I live at No. 22, Gower-place, Euston-square, and am a dress-maker. I live with the next witness ( Louisa Lyon ). On Tuesday, the 13th of this month, the prisoner came to tea with her, between five and six o'clock. He remained in our company till ten o'clock - he did not go out at all. I am in partnership with Lyon; the prisoner is apprenticed to his father, who is a tailor. He came about four o'clock.

COURT. Q. Did he sup there - A. No. We amused ourselves during the evening by talking and playing at cards - there was nobody but us three. I do not know much about cards, I was trying to play. I do not know what game they called it, if she put down diamonds, so did I, and if hearts, I put down hearts.

Q. Well - A. We went a little way home with him, as far as Fitzroy-square.

Q. What makes you recollect the day - A. He was taken up next day, and the constable came. I told him he was with us.

JOHN DAVIS re-examined. I called there next morning to enquire about the property. The prisoner did not tell me he had been there that night, but he said he was there a few nights before.

LOUISA LYON . I live at No. 22, Gower-place.

Q. Does the last witness live with you - A. She comes to see me. On the 13th of February, the prisoner came to tea with us - he comes to see me, and was with me from four to ten o'clock, and did not move out of the room.

COURT. Q. This woman does not live at your house - A. No, she comes to see me, and helps me sometimes.

Q. How did you amuse yourselves - A. We sat talking and laughing about one thing or another; we played at no game, neither drafts nor cards.

Q. Did you go and see him part of the way home - A. I have been to his house, and he has seen me home, but I never saw him home. I am certain we did not play at cards.

Q. Have you any partner in business - A. No, she is not my partner.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210214-115

454. THOMAS PIKE and THOMAS DOVE were indicted for stealing, on the 18th of January , 200 lbs. of iron, value 15 s. , the goods of John Milner , Thomas Ward , and Robert Ward ; WILLIAM COOPER , alias HOMAN , and CATHERINE JOHNSON , alias HOMAN , were indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing it to have been stolen .

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

JOHN BLAND . I am a blacksmith, in the employ of Messrs. John Milner , Thomas Ward , and Robert Ward , who have a wharf at Wapping-wall , and are blacksmiths , and mast-makers ; Pike was in their employ as blacksmith , and Dove was a waterman ; the men go to dinner at one o'clock, and return at two o'clock. On the 18th of January, I was eating my dinner, in the shop, Pike came in, and said,

"Old man, have you any beer to give away?" I said

"No, I have not, for I buy it." He then said something to the boy about looking out; I said No, I would have no such thing. He then went out; I went out soon after, and saw him handing iron over the wharf to Dove, who was in his boat - it was high-water. I said to Pike,

"This is a barefaced thing, I cannot keep it secret." He moved his hand for me to be silent, and I said nothing. He had no business to send iron off.

THOMAS ROACH . I am son-in-law to Bland, and was dining with him; I looked out of the window, and saw Pike standing in the top-house, where they make the ship's tops. I told my father, and soon after Pike came in and asked for beer; he said something about looking out, which I could not understand. We went out, and saw him giving Dove the iron into the boat - it was his dinner-time.

ALEXANDER MITCHELL . I am a Thames-police officer. On the 19th of January, I was fetched to the prosecutor's premises, and took Pike; Dove was sent for to the office. I asked him if he had taken any iron from the premises; he said he had, and had taken it to Wapping dock-stairs; that he and the female prisoner (who he called Homan's wife) carried it from the boat to a house there. I took him there, and he pointed out a house in King Edward-street, where he said he left it (it is Kean's house). I found the iron there.

MARY KEAN , I live in King Edward-street. The officer found the iron at my house; the female prisoner and Dove brought it there in three or four lots. She asked me to let her leave a lot of iron there, which her husband had bought at a sale over the water, as the boat she engaged to fetch it, had came to Wapping dock-stairs instead of

New-crane, where she lives. Dove said he would help her in with it, but he had not time.

Prisoner COOPER. Q.Your name is not Kean - A. No, but I have lived with Mr. Kean seven years as his wife, but as my husband is not dead, I am not married to him.

JOSEPH KEAN. On the evening of the 18th of January, Cooper came to my house, and asked if any iron had been left there for him. I said there was; he asked for a light to look at it - he turned it over, said it was all right, and said he would fetch it away next morning.

Prisoner COOPER. Q. Did I not say I supposed it was all right - A. He said,

"It is all right."

JOHN ROBERTS . I am foreman to the prosecutors. The iron is their property. I have known Dove some time, Pike is his brother-in-law. I have seen Cooper on my masters' premises, and my masters told me always to order him out - he used to go about buying old iron. When we employ waterman they always have a delivery note.

Prisoner COOPER. Q. Have I not dealt with your master - A. Six months back my masters bought some nails of him, as they could get none elsewhere.

PIKE's Defence, (written.) I acknowledge myself guilty of the crime, and have nothing to say in my behalf, when I have plunged three innocent individuals into an abyss of misery. I employed Dove to take the iron to Cooper for sale.

DOVE's Defence. Pike hired me to fetch the iron away. I did not suppose it to have been stolen.

COOPER's Defence. I had nothing to do with it.

JOHNSON'S Defence. I and my husband dealt in marine-stores. Dove came and said he had a quantity of iron for sale; I agreed to buy it, not suspecting it to have been stolen, and in the evening told my husband I had left it at Kean's till he called to see it.

PIKE - GUILTY . Aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

DOVE - NOT GUILTY

COOPER - GUILTY . Aged 30.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

JOHNSON - NOT GUILTY

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210214-116

455. JOSEPH STEVENS was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of February , one box, value 5 s.; one pelisse, value 2 l., and nine dresses, value 6 l. , the goods of Charlotte Brown , spinster .

CHARLOTTE BROWN . I live with Mrs. Ruddell, in Tottenham-court-road. I was going to my place - I had left my box in the country, and wrote for it to be left at the White Horse-cellar, till called for. On the 12th of February. I called a chariot to drive up to the White Horse-cellar - the prisoner drove it; I got in with my trunk, and told him to drive to my lodgings in Castle-court, Oxford-market , which he did. I got out, and was not four minutes going up with my band-box - when I came down, he had drove off with the trunk. I went to the stand in Piccadilly, and told the waterman of it; and next day he gave us information. I have lost all my clothes.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODERICK. Q. What time was this - A. About twenty minutes past eight o'clock.

JOHN GREEN . I am a waterman. This chariot was on my stand in Piccadilly twice on this night - two man were with it. I do not know the number. Another man, besides the prisoner, then got on the box: in about half an hour, the same chariot came into the ranks with the two men; one got down - he had a drab coat and top boots on; and when the chariot was called, he led the horses to the White Horse-cellar.

Cross-examined. Q. One Tuxford drove - A. He led the horses down. I know nothing of the prisoner - I did not see him there. I cannot say he is, or is not the man; but if he was there, I did not see him.

COURT. Q. Does not the prisoner drive a chariot - A. Yes; a yellow bodied one. Whether he is one of the men I do not say.

GEORGE ODDY . I am an officer. The waterman came to the office with the prosecutrix - he said, Tuxford pulled down the chariot, and Stevens was the driver. Next morning I enquired, and found Stevens drove to one Lukey, on the other side of the water. I went there, and found four brothers, named Stevens; and asked who drove the chariot that day - the master said, one of them had been asking him leave to go to Bow-street. I took the prisoner and his brother William; the prisoner's chariot was ready, and I took them both to Bow-street. The prisoner then drove me to Marlborough-street, as we could not find the prosecutrix; he then drove me to her lodgings, and found she was gone to Bow-street. I took them both there - the prosecutrix said the prisoner was the man; she had no hesitation about it.

Prisoner's Defence. I leave it to my counsel.

ROBERT BANKS. I am an auctioneer. On the 12th of February, about seven o'clock, I put an old gentleman in a chariot, in Leicester-square, to go to Titchfield-street. I cannot say that the prisoner drove: I know his family, but not him. The coachman said,

"How do you do, Mr. Banks;" but it being dark, I will not say it was him; and an explanation has since been given, by which I recollect his family.

SARAH SCOTT . I am servant to Mr. Cole. About eight o'clock in the evening, the prisoner drove him home in his chariot to Titchfield-street, Oxford-market; he was sometime getting out of the chariot, which made me notice the prisoner. Mr. Cole is lame - he helped him into the passage. It was a yellow bodied chariot.

Q. You only saw him from the chariot to the door - A. No - he had a brown coat on.

- . I am a waterman of the stand in Oxford-street. The prisoner came on the stand with his chariot at a quarter past eight o'clock this night.

JOHN GREEN re-examined. Q. How came you to mention the name of Stevens - A. I learnt that.

GEORGE ODDY re-examined. He said, he would swear his name was Stevens.

CHARLOTTE BROWN re-examined. A man drew the chariot down. I do not know whether that was the prisoner, as I went into the office while the porter looked for the trunk; in the meantime, two men came to the horses' head, when the chariot came out, the other man left, and the prisoner asked the porter to assist him with the box. I am certain the prisoner drove me - he had a large blue top coat with capes.

GEORGE ODDY re-examined. I fetched his great coat from his coach, as she described it.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210214-117

456. ROBERT STEVENSON was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of January , one coat, value 15 s. , the goods of Joseph Dean .

JOSEPH DEAN . I am a farming man . On the 5th of February, about nine o'clock, I was driving my waggon down the Commercial-road , going home; a boy said my coat was stolen. I ran and overtook the prisoner with it on his back, wearing it. I called, Stop, thief, he threw it off, and I secured him.

JOSEPH HERBERT . I saw the prisoner running, he was stopped, and the coat was picked up.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was pursuing the boy who had it.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210214-118

457. JAMES SALWAY was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of February , a watch, value 3 l.; one chain, value 1 l., and one seal, value 5 s., the goods of Richard Ball , from his person .

RICHARD BALL . On the 10th of February, I stood at a neighbour's door; the prisoner ran by and snatched my watch out, but did not get it from my person, as I had a chain round my neck, which held it. I secured him about the middle of the street.

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210214-119

458. JOHN ROBERTS was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of January , seven yards of cotton, value 7 s. , the goods of Frederick King .

JOHN JEFFERIES . I am a dentist. On the 23d of February, about six o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner take this cotton from Mr. King's door, in St. John-street . I seized him with it.

FREDERICK KING . It is mine.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Six Months , and Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210214-120

459. JOHN RICHARDSON was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of January , six gallons of blacking, value 20 s.; thirty-six bottles, value 3 s., and one cask, value 18 d. , the goods of Richard Turner .

DENNIS CONNER . I am carman to Richard Turner . On the 19th of January, at half-past five o'clock in the afternoon, I left my horse and cart in Aldersgate-street , while I went into the Red Lion public-house; when I came out, the horses were drawn off, I overtook them by Jewin-street, and missed two casks of blacking.

JOHN FORBES . I am a constable. I was going along King-street, Clothfair, about five o'clock, three persons passed me, two of them were carrying a cask. I followed them, endeavouring to get assistance to take both. I lost sight of them, and saw them again in Charterhouse-lane, Coleman and I stopped the prisoner with the cask on his shoulder. He said he was employed to carry it.

JOHN COLEMAN . I stopped him with the cask.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210214-121

460. MARY PARRY was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of January , one tub, value 4 s. , the goods of John Williams .

ELIZA WILLIAMS . I heard a noise in my kitchen, and met the prisoner on the stairs with the tub. She said, a woman sent her for it. She stroked me down the face, and begged me to let her go.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 41.

Confined One Year .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210214-122

461. ROBERT NORRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of February , three 1 l. Bank notes, from the person of Thomas Day , his property .

THOMAS DAY. On the 14th of February, I took a coach at Charing-cross, the prisoner drove it. I sat on the box with him; he drove me to Westminster-bridge, I ordered him to turn and drive to Chandos-street. I was not sober. We got down at the wine vaults at the corner; but before this, we were in the Ship, public-house, and I felt a hand in my breeches pocket. We went again to the Ship and stopped there. I called for two half-pints of pearl. I asked his demand, he said a guinea, but as I had been good to him, a 1 l. note would satisfy him. I took three 1 l. notes from my breeches pocket, which I deposited with the landlady; she gave the prisoner 1 l., and returned them to me: she put them into my breeches-pocket. I went into the tap-room; I again found his hands in my pocket; I felt, and told the landlord my money was missing, he felt, and it was gone; the prisoner said,

"it cannot be gone, let me feel." He took the two notes from his own pocket, and put them into mine, then took them out, and put them on the table; the landlord put them again into my pocket, and went to look for a friend to take me home, and during that time, the prisoner went away. The landlord returned, I told him my notes were gone. When I first went out, I had eight 1 l. notes, and 18 s., I changed two notes, and lost six. I felt his hand in my pocket twice.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODERICK. - Q. Did not you give him two notes. - A. No, nor did he give change for a note. I took the coach at nine o'clock, and kept it till half-past ten. I recollect very well what passed, after I got to Chandos-street.

JOHN PARKER. On the 14th of February, about half-past ten o'clock, the prisoner drove to my door, (the Ship, in Chandos-street ), he came in with the prosecutor and drank some purl. I advised him to go home, as he was rather tipsy; he asked the prisoner his demand; he said it ought to be a guinea, but a pound would do. Day gave my wife three notes; she gave the prisoner one, and returned the rest - he put them in his pocket. I went out and took the number of his coach, as I thought he

charged more than he ought. When I returned, Day missed his notes: I also felt and missed them - the prisoner felt, and pretended to find them; he produced them; I put them into the prosecutor's pocket - he sent me for a friend - when I returned he missed them again.

RICHARD MUNDAY . On the 14th of February, I went to the prisoner's lodgings, in Church-lane, Strand, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, and found the prisoner in bed; and in his breeches pocket I found three 1 l. notes, which I produce.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he not say the prosecutor gave them to him - A. No.

THOMAS DAY . They are my three notes. I know them by the dates and signatures.

GUILTY . Aged 35.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210214-123

462. JOHN MACE was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of February , one tame live fowl, value 2 s. , the goods of Francis Clark .

FRANCIS CLARK . I am a carpenter , and live at Hackney . On the 10th of February, about twelve o'clock in the day, I heard my fowls fluttering; I saw the prisoner run away - followed and took him, with one under his coat; he had caught it with a rat-trap which was found on him - it was caught by the head.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I saw some rats there, and set the trap, but happened to catch a fowl.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Whipped and Discharged .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210214-124

463. WILLIAM LINNETT was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of September , two mahogany boards, value 5 s. , the goods of Richard Yates .

RICHARD YATES . I am a chair-maker , and live in Brunswick-street - in consequence of information, I had the prisoner apprehended, as I had lost a quantity of mahogany. He acknowledged taking these boards - he was my servant .

HENRY NICKFOLD . The prisoner asked me to take two mahogany boards to Lucas for him, to make him a box. He gave them to me from the prosecutor's premises.

HENRY LUCAS . I made the boards into a box, for the prisoner. I produce it - he said it was to contain a bible.

RICHARD YATES . The wood is the same grain as what I lost.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not promise me two boards for a box which I gave you - A. I promised him two deal boards for an old deal box which I wanted in a hurry, but not mahogany.

GEORGE OWEN . I apprehended the prisoner, and found the box and a knife-box in his house.

Prisoner's Defence. My master promised me two boards.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210214-125

464. JOHN HALL was indicted for that he, on the 20th of January , feloniously did rip up 20 lbs. of lead, value 3 s., the goods of William Blackford , and fixed to his dwelling-house, with intent to steal the same .

WILLIAM BLACKFORD . I live at No. 6, Vine-street, Hatton-wall . On the 20th of January, my wife called me; I went and heard a noise on the wash-house roof - I got a candle, and saw the water-pipe moving; I called out,

"What are you at?" I went into the yard, and found the prisoner in the privy, with his back to the pipe - his hands were black, as if he had been handling lead. I found the pipe dragged from the wall, and twisted nearly off. He gave no reason for his being there.

ROBERT LUNDER . I am a watchman. I heard an alarm - the prisoner was brought through the next passage to Blackford's; he held down his head - I knew him, and had been looking for him. I took him to the watch-house.

JOHN HOWES . I am a patrol. The prisoner was brought out, I said

"You rascal, you only came out of prison last Wednesday." I found the staple drawn out, the pipe pulled from the wall, and nearly twisted off.

SARAH CARTER . I live next door to Blackford. I heard a noise, went down, and found the prisoner was secured. He must have gone through my passage to have got at it; I had bolted the door not a quarter of an hour before.

Prisoner's Defence. I touched nothing.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210214-126

465. MARY the wife of John Peat was indicted for that, on the 18th of August, 1799, at St. Martin in the Fields, Mary Bond , spinster, was married to John Peat , and him had for her husband, and afterwards, and during the lifetime of the said John Peat , (i.e.) on the 15th of September, in the 59th year of the reign of our late Sovereign George the III. , at St. Mary Whitechapel , feloniously did marry William James Staines , and him did take as her husband .

MESSRS. BRODERICK and PRENDERGAST conducted the prosecution.

JOHN TAYLOR . I am parish clerk of St. Martin in the Fields. I produce the register of marriages, by which I find John Peat was married to Mary Bond , on the 18th of August, 1799. It is signed by both parties, and witnessed by William Goldborough and myself.

WILLIAM GOLDBOROUGH . I was present at St. Martin's, at this marriage, and gave the prisoner away, she was a spinster.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. How do you know she was a spinster - A. She passed as single, and was a servant.

ROBERT MAGSON . I am sexton of Whitechapel, and have the register of marriages, by which I find Mary Peat , widow, was married to William James Staines , widower, on the 15th of September, 1819. It is signed by the parties, I and my daughter witnessed it.

JANE TENNISWOOD . I am sister to Mr. Peat, the prisoner's husband, and know her writing perfectly well; to the best of my belief, the signature to the register is her's.

I know she lived some time with Mr. Staines. I saw my brother the day before yesterday - his name is John Peat .

Cross-examined. Q. Have you seen her write - A. Yes, and received letters from her.

Q. Has your brother's lawyer (Mr. Taylor) brought any action lately - A. I believe he has.

RICHARD STAINES . I am the son of William James Staines. The prisoner lived with my father as his wife. After she was married, in the latter part of 1819, she laid in. I told her she had done wrong by marrying my father; she said she did not do it for the good of herself, but for the good of my father.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. What family has your father - A. Eight, the prisoner may havebeen indulgent to some of them, but not to me, nor to another of my brothers

Q. Do you contribute towards the expences of this prosecution - A. No, not one farthing. Peart is a finisher in the morocco line.

Q. You first complained of the prisoner when she found fault with you for frequenting the free-and-easy club - A. I never did; I believe she said so. I went once as I knew a person there. She never fetched me from the public-house - I seldom go there. I do not live with my father; I am in business for myself. I left because she and I could never agree, and my father said I should be there no longer.

Q. Did you not strike your father - A. I know I struck him once in the heat of passion, and I am sorry for it.

MR. BRODERICK. Q. Have you seen her write - A. Yes, frequently; I believe the signature to the register is her's. I had a letter from her about two years ago; she writes very queer.

JOSEPH ATKINS . I know the prisoner; she and Staines lived together as man and wife, both before and after their marriage. In May, 1819, I received 150 l. from her on account of Staines. I am his brother-in-law; I have not visited him since he took her to live with him.

WILLIAM JAMES STAINES . - Q. Did you marry the prisoner. - A. I did, on the 15th of September, 1819, at Whitechapel church.

MR. ANDREWS. - Q. Has she conducted herself to you, as a truly good wife. - A. She has, I have had ten children; she has acted to them as a tender parent. She complained of the conduct of my eldest son; he has left me two years. This prosecution is not at my instance, my desire is to live with her all my life.

Prisoner's Defence written. About twenty years ago, I married my first husband; all the time I lived with him, I experienced nothing but distress, trouble, and misery. In 1817, he left me. I was obliged to apply to the parish for relief, they issued a warrant against him; both the officers and I, used all diligence to find him, but could not. During the two years of his absence, it was reported that he was dead, which I believed, and in 1820, an altrecation took place between me and my second husband's son; I fetched him from the public-house, and told him of the impropriety of his conduct, in going to a free-and-easy club, and beating his father. It was then I became the victim of his vengeance; he got his father served with the copy of a writ, and then caused me to be prosecuted.

JAMES CROCKWELL . I am one of the beadle's of St. Leonard, Shoreditch. The prisoner was relieved by me, in July, 1818, and a warrant issued against her husband. for deserting her. I exerted myself to find him, but without effect. I went to where he had worked, they said, he had left some time, and might be dead.

MR. BRODERICK. - Q. Was there not a warrant in 1817. - A. Yes, I took him then, and he was sent to prison; he afterwards disappeared, but I found him in November, 1819, as a pauper in the work-house. Staines is fellow beadle with me. I have had no conversation with him about this affair.

MARY ANN PEAT . I have lived all my life with my mother, except a short time. I now live in the Curtain-road. I have not seen my father for about two years and a half. He left my mother in 1817; he was released from prison on promising to allow her 4 s. 6 d. a week, which he never did, I heard in June, 1819, that he was dead; my mother and Staines also heard it.

Cross-examined. - Q. Did you hear any one tell them so. - A. Yes. One Steadman, who is now dead, made a collection to pay for my father's funeral. My mother first went to Staines as his housekeeper.

MARY MAYCOCK . I remember the prisoner's husband deserting her. She was in great distress; I supported her fifteen months.

MR. PRENDERGAST, - Q. During that time, did you see Staines and her together. - A. Only once, she then said he wanted her to be his housekeeper. I never knew of their being acquainted till Mrs. Staines was dead.

GUILTY .

Recommended to Mercy.

Judgment Respited .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210214-127

465. WILLIAM KIRBY was indicted for embezzlement .

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210214-128

466. MARY GYON was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of January , four pieces of leather, value 14 d. , the goods of George Fitch and Robert Cort .

SAMUEL RANDALL . I am servant to George Fitch and Robert Cort , who are curriers and leather sellers , and live in Cowcross . On the 26th of January, about six o'clock in the evening, I was standing outside watching the prisoner, who was in the shop; I saw her take a piece of leather off the window-board, and put it under her shawl; she then took another piece from the bin. I came in, and said,

"Mrs. Gyon, you have something which does not belong to you," she denied it. She at last pulled out one piece, and said, that was all. I said,

"You have more," and she produced three more pieces.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

THOMAS HASSELL . I am a patrol. I saw the prisoner take one piece.

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY .

Fined One Shilling, and Discharged .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210214-129

NINTH DAY, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 23.

467. JAMES GILCHRIST was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of February , one bonnet, value 4 s. , the goods of Thomas Jackson .

CHARLOTTE JACKSON. I am the wife of Thomas Jackson ; we live in Adam-street, West . On the 13th of February, about eight o'clock in the evening, the watchman brought the prisoner in with this bonnet, which was safe in the shop just before.

WILLIAM SMITH . I am a watchman. I saw the prisoner and another looking into a cheesemonger's window. I watched them to the door of this bonnet shop - they both went in - nobody was in the shop. I ran across, and fell, got up, the other was gone, but I caught the prisoner with the bonnet in his hand. He said he had bought it, but I saw him take it.

(Property produced, and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming by with a boy who went into the shop. I saw the bonnet laying at the door, and picked it up.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Three Months , and Whipped .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210214-130

468. CATHERINE DOYLE and SUSAN JAMESON were indicted for stealing, on the 4th of February four half-crowns, the property of John Hitchin , from his person .

JOHN HITCHIN . I live in Willow-street, Paul-street, Finsbury, and am a jeweller . On the 4th of February, I was coming home, not exactly sober, and met Doyle in Old-street, and went to a public-house in Golden-lane with he. We each had a glass of gin, and then went to a house in Providence-place ; Jameson was in the room. In about five minutes I missed four half crowns from my coat-pocket, and my handkerchief was moved from my coat-pocket into my hat. I charged Doyle with it - they both denied it. I said I would charge the watch with them - one took up the poker, and the other the saucepan. I ran out - locked them in the room, and took the key to the watchman; when he came, the door was unlocked, but they were still there. We found a young man in the cupboard, and the four half-crowns under the sash of the window.

THOMAS BECKSON . I am a watchman. The prosecutor fetched me to the house; I found the prisoners there - the money under the sash, and a man in the cupboard. The prosecutor did not appear very drunk.

DOYLE'S Defence. He gave me the money - I put it in the window; he wanted it back - I refused, and he fetched the watchman.

NOT GUILTY

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210214-131

469. CHARLES COOPER and JAMES JOHNSON were indicted for stealing, on the 26th of January , nine yards of baize, value 16 s. , the goods of James Owen .

JOHN HOWES . I am a patrol. On the 26th of January, at half-past eleven o'clock at night, I stopped the prisoners in Field-lane - Johnson had the baize covered with an apron. He said it was flannel; Cooper stepped up and said,

"What do you want with him - it is my property;" that his master gave it him to make aprons of; that his master was Mr. King, a linen-draper over the water. The prosecutor is not here to swear to it - he has himself been convicted of a robbery this Sessions.

ACQUITTED .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18210214-132

470. SAMUEL CHIP was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of February , nine lbs. of beef, value 6 d. , the goods of Joseph Wager .

MARY WAGER. I am wife of Joseph Wager , a cabinet-maker , who lives in Crown-street, Soho . I keep a butcher's shop. On the 30th of February, I was in the back shop - a boy said the beef was stolen; I ran out and saw the prisoner put the beef into the girl's apron and run away - we lost him; I secured the girl in about five minutes - she would not say what she had done with it. I am sure he is the boy.

CHARLES SCOTT . I am eleven years old; my father is an optician. I saw the prisoner take the beef and throw it in a girl's apron; she ran away as hard as she could - the prisoner ran down the street with her. I am sure he is the boy.

RICHARD HOWARD . I am a constable. The girl gave me information, and I took the prisoner.

THOMAS IVESON . I am a patrol. I took the girl - she strongly denied knowing any thing of it; at last she said, Samuel Chip stole it, and shewed us where he lived.

Prisoner's Defence. I was not in Crown-street that night.

MARY WAGER . I saw him the same night, and charged him with it; he said he would give me b - y thump. While I went for the watchman, he got off.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Three Months and Whipped .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210214-133

471. MARGARET COMER was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of January , one ring, value 5 s., and one pair of ear-rings, value 3 s. , the goods of Mary Burke , spinster .

MARY BURKE. I am a servant in Jeremy-street. About a year ago, my box was broken open, and nine rings, and a pair of ear-rings taken out. About three weeks ago, the prisoner came into the house where I am in service. I knew the ring on her finger to be my mother's - she said her son sent it her from France; and at the office she said she had no son. I understood she lodged one night at my cousin's where my box was.

ANDREW WHITE . I was at the public-house in Jeremy-street, where the prosecutrix lives. The prisoner came in on the 29th of January last; the prosecutrix charged her with stealing the ring, which was on her finger - she went away saying, her son sent it her from France.

THOMAS GOOK. I found a duplicate of the ear-ring on the prisoner.

WILLIAM DANIEL. I am servant to Mr. Dobree. On the

10th of July, the ear-rings were pledged in the name of John Conner .

WILLIAM HEWER . On the 30th of January, the prosecutrix pointed the prisoner out to me. I followed her home, and next day took her - she had the ring on her finger.

NOT GUILTY .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210214-134

472. THOMAS CROSBY was indicted for that he, on the 2d of February , at Acton , about ten o'clock in the night, feloniously did pluck up 56 shrubs, value 2 l., the goods of David Watts , and standing growing, and being in a certain nursery-ground of his, against the statute .

SECOND COUNT, for stealing the said shrubs.

DAVID WATTS . I am a nurseryman , and live at Acton. On the 2d of February, I was at work at the border of my garden, where some Sweedish juniper-plants had been growing for three years, and a little after five o'clock in the evening as I left work I passed them again; my man observed to me what fine plants they were - there were twelve or fourteen of them. Next morning at eight o'clock I went to the same place, and missed them all, they had been plucked up, and taken away with a quantity of others. There were footmarks across the fresh mould, which had been dug the day before, clear from the hedge to where the junipers grew. Next day two officers came, and enquired if I had lost any plants; I said I had lost junipers; they took me to Mr. Lees, at Hammersmith, where I saw my plants - there were junipers, hollies, and arbavites, which were all mine. I have known the prisoner ten years, he is a gardener, and lived with Mr. White, just opposite my garden.

JOHN COOK . On Friday evening, the 2d of February, my master and I were going from work; the junipers were then safe; next morning I missed them.

THOMAS FLOOKER. I am a patrol. On the 2d of February, between ten and eleven o'clock at night, I met the prisoner on the Kensington-road with a sack containing these plants; he said he picked it up in the road near Brentford. I detained him, and found the owner.

DAVID WATTS re-examined. I can swear to them all; I grew them and grafted them; other people always bud their's.

Prisoner's Defence. He told the Magistrate they might be his. I came from Brentford about eight o'clock at night, and just below Turnham-green I picked them up; a gentleman came by, and said he supposed it was a parcel, which had fallen from a cart, and advised me to take it to the green-yard.

GUILTY . Aged 58.

Transported for Seven Years .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210214-135

473. JANE BROWN and MARY WILLIAMS were indicted for stealing, on the 4th of February , two shawls, value 2 s., and one handkerchief, value 1 s. , the goods of Thomas Miller and Ann Smith .

THOMAS MILLER . I am a pawnbroker , in partnership with Ann Smith , we live in Golden-lane . On the 1st of February, about five o'clock in the afternoon, I saw the prisoners pass the window, they were large loose cloaks; they snatched at some handkerchiefs which hung at the door-post. I immediately went round the counter, and secured them two houses off. Williams then dropped a white handkerchief from under her child which was in her arms, and at the door a white handkerchief fell from one of them; I have not got the third handkerchief. I lost three, which were all pinned together. I gave them in charge.

MARGARET LETTER . I was in the shop, and saw Williams snatch something from the door; Miller ran out, brought them back, and the handkerchief dropped from her.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

BROWN'S Defence. I was not near the place.

WILLIAMS - GUILTY . Aged 30.

BROWN - GUILTY . Aged 37.

Confined Three Months .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210214-136

474. WILLIAM BATTEL was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of February , one hat, value 7 s., and one pair of boots, value 7 s. , the goods of George Marks .

GEORGE MARKS . I am a labourer , and live at the Castle, public-house, in Tothill-street . On the 8th of February, I went to bed about ten o'clock, and about eleven a strange man came and slept in the next bed. In the morning he was gone with my hat and boots.

JOHN M'GEARY. On the 8th of February, I came home to the Castle, public-house. I am certain the prisoner is the man who slept in the prosecutor's room. On the following Monday I met him in Park-lane, and secured him.

ANN HOLLEWELL . I keep the Castle, public-house. The prisoner is the man who slept that night in the prosecutor's room; he told me he had lodged at Chelsea two years, and worked at the water-works. I let him the lodging weekly, but he only stopped one night.

GEORGE MARKS re-examined. When he was apprehended I found my boots on his feet.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. They are not his, I came from Norwich the night before.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210214-137

475. JOHN BARRETT was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of January , 18 lbs. of beef, value 15 s. , the goods of Robert Slade .

ROBERT SLADE . I am a butcher , and live in Lamb's Conduit-street . On the 27th of January, about seven o'clock in the evening, I was in the counting-house, and this beef was stolen from the shop-board.

ABRAHAM POLLY . I saw the prisoner with another lad, who took the beef, and put it in the prisoner's apron; I followed, and caught him with it. I had watched them for an hour and a half.

WILLIAM BANTING. I am a patrol. I was going my

rounds, and heard the call of watch, ran over, and found the prisoner in charge with the beef.

Prisoner's Defence. They all swear false, I never had it.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210214-138

476. ELIZA TWINE , SARAH GRIFFIN , and ELIZA NORMAN were indicted for stealing, on the 9th of January , one box, value 18 d.; one pair of scissars, value 1 s.; one necklace, value 1 d., and one ear-ring, value 1 s. , the goods of Mark Dawson .

ELIZA DAWSON . I am the wife of Mark Dawson - we live in Queen-street. On the 9th of January, I took my work-box to my mother's in Chapel-street, Edgware-road . I went out between three and four o'clock, and on returning my box was gone from the side of the fire. Next morning Norman came to my lodgings, and said they took the box and sold it to Clendon.

HANNAH CLENDON . I live in Homer-street, New-road, and sell thread, tapes, and things. The prisoners Twine and Norman, came and asked me to buy a box; she said, they were in distress, and wanted 1 s. for it. I said I had not got one - they said they would leave it till to-morrow; I said, they had better sell it. I gave them 6 d. and said, they should have the rest in the morning. I found a pair of scissars in it after they left. Next morning they came for the money - I said, they had better take the box back and not bother me; they said, they wanted money for breakfast - I gave them 3 d., and they bought 3 d. worth of things, and said their sister gave them the box.

THOMAS STEVENS. I am an officer. I took the prisoners in charge, and found the beads round Twine's neck.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN DAWSON. I am the prosecutrix'e father. The prisoners all three came into the house, and asked for some coffee, which my wife sells to the working people. A parcel of boys came after them, and I ordered them out. Norman and Twine were near the fire-place - she said her petticoats were untied. Norman afterwards surrendered herself and said, they took the box to an old iron shop and got a key to it for 2 d., and sold it to Clendon. I went to her - she said, she had not seen the girls, or the box.

TWINE's Defence. I left the other prisoners and went home, and afterwards met Norman with the box.

GRIFFIN'S Defence. Twine stole it - she has not told the truth.

NORMAN's Defence. I did not know that Twine had it till we came out.

TWINE - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

GRIFFIN - NOT GUILTY .

NORMAN - NOT GUILTY .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210214-139

477. WILLIAM COOK was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of January , one handkerchief, value 3 s., the goods of a certain man unknown, from his person .

JOHN FURZEMAN . I saw the prisoner and two others following a gentleman at Charing-cross - the prisoner drew the gentleman's handkerchief half-out; he stopped at a picture-shop, then went on, and opposite Southampton-street he drew it quite out. I secured him - the gentleman said, his name was Captain M'Cullock. He has joined his ship at the Downs.

NOT GUILTY .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210214-140

478. JOSEPH SANSOM was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of February , two shirts, value 20 s. , the goods of Charles Ogle .

SECOND COUNT, stating them to belong to William Wise .

WILLIAM WISE . I left the prisoner in my room in Pancras-place , while I fetched a pint of beer - when I returned I gave him some victuals, and next day missed the shirts from the room.

WILLIAM THESSLETON . I apprehended the prisoner, and found the duplicates of the shirts on him, and a passport for France.

BENJAMIN GRIFFIN . I have a shirt of his pledged with me; I do not know who by - the duplicate is our's.

DAVID TRIAL. I am a pawnbroker - the prisoner pledged a shirt with me.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded the greatest distress.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Recommended to Mercy.

Confined One Month .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210214-141

479. JAMES HARRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of February , one coat, value 25 s., and one handkerchief, value 9 s. , the goods of Thomas Harris .

THOMAS HARRIS . I am apprentice to a plasterer . On the 13th of February, in the morning, when I went out (I live with my mother), all was safe - I came home in the evening, found my box open, and my coat and handkerchief gone. I suspected nobody but the prisoner, who I am sorry to say, is my brother . I have put him to school time after time, but he will not keep to any thing. I found my coat at the pawnbroker's. In coming home I met him in Oxford-street, with two more, and took him and another to the watch-house. I found two shillings, in copper, on him. He said the boy (Wilkins), who got away, had the duplicate; I fetched him to the watch-house; he said my brother had half a crown in his boot; which I found true.

WIELIAM READING. The prisoner gave me the coat to pawn, and said he had it from his uncle. He also sent me to pawn a silk handkerchief.

JAMES CLARK . I am a pawnbroker. Reading pawned the coat with me.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Whipped and Discharged .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210214-142

480. HART HENRY was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of January , one jacket, value 10 s. , the goods of George Abbott .

GEORGE ABBOTT . I am a carpenter . On the 30th of January the prisoner came up to my room, enquired for my wife, and promised to bring her some fringe to buy - he came again about four o'clock, and said he particularly wanted her. I said she was out - he stood by my jacket; I crossed the room to go to my chest, he ran down, saying, he would call at five o'clock. I missed the jacket - my wife and went I after him. I told him I would give him in charge - he said

"Do, for I want to go." I know he brought nothing into the room.

ELIZA ABBOTT . I was coming home, and met the prisoner in the passage with a bundle under his arm; when I got up stairs I missed the coat.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined One Month .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210214-143

481. MARY FRANCIS was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of February , one table-spoon, value 10 s.; one petticoat, value 6 d.; one apron, value 2 d.; one quilt, value 2 s., and one book, value 1 s. , the goods of Sarah Hawkins , widow .

LOUISA BUNYAN . I am cousin to Sarah Hawkins , who is a widow, and lives at Hackney . On the 10th of January, I was fetched to her; she was very ill. I missed a shift and handkerchief, and on the 5th of February, I missed a table and tea-spoon; I suspected the prisoner, who attended her, and mentioned it to her; she said it was a pity to rob such a poor old creature, she would rather beg for her, than rob her. I said, I should see into it, and had her apprehended.

WILLIAM JOHN HUETSON . I am a pawnbroker. Jessee Smith, pledged a table-spoon with me for 10 s.; she said, it was for her mother.

ANN WILD . I bought a handkerchief, a petticoat, and apron of the prisoner; she offered me a quilt, which I refused to buy.

JESSEE SMITH. I pledged the spoon for the prisoner, and gave her the money.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 37.

Confined Three Months .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210214-144

482. ANN BRUCE was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of January , one quart pot, value 18 d. , the goods of Samuel Bird .

JAMES PHILLIPS . I am an officer. On the 21st of January, about four o'clock in the afternoon; I was at my door in White Lion-street, Pentonville , and saw the prisoner take a pot from the rail of the opposite house; I followed, and took it from her pocket. I found a bag on her, and petitions to several ladies.

SAMUEL BIRD . The pot is mine.

GUILTY . Aged 70.

Confined Three Months .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210214-145

483. FRANCIS BAILEY , RICHARD BARNETT and ELIJAH FRY were indicted for stealing, on the 29th of January , one jacket, value 15 s. , the goods of Christopher Windle .

CHRISTOPHER WINDLE . I am a tailor , and live in King's-road, Pimlico . On the 29th of January, I came home in the evening, and missed a jacket.

WILLIAM WILLERTON . On the the 29th of January, I was at Pimlico, and saw the prisoners lurking about the prosecutor's shop; the window was broke, and I saw Fry and Barnett go up to it several times; they took something out, ran across and gave it to Bailey. I went up and found the jacket under his arm.

ROBERT CAMPION . I was at the corner of my shop, and saw the prisoner's lurking about the neighbour's window; they had a glaziers' diamond. I sent my lad to watch, he called me, I ran out and found Bailey in custody; I took the other two.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

BAILEY - GUILTY . Aged 14.

BARNET - GUILTY . Aged 13.

Confined One Month , and Whipped .

FRY - GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210214-146

484. MARY HEALY and HANNAH HOUTCHING were indicted for stealing, on the 16th of February , three yards of lace, value 9 s., the goods of Thomas Gardner , privately in his shop .

SUSAN GARDNER . I am wife of Thomas Gardner , a haberdasher - we live in Norton Faldgate . On the 6th of February, about half-past six o'clock in the evening, one of the young ladies was called down; and as she stopped some time, I went to see what detained her, and found the prisoners in the shop. The young person said, she laid four cards of lace on the counter, and one was missing - they said, they had not taken it, and she must have made some mistake. I said, if they had it, they had better give it up, and go about their business - they refused and said, they were willing to be searched. I took them into the parlour, and found it on Houtching.

HANNAH BURY . I was servant to Mrs. Gardner, and saw the lace found on Houtching.

ANN ALLEN . I am shop-woman to the prosecutrix - the prisoners came in and asked to see some lace; I put four cards on the counter - they objected to the patterns. I went to the window for more, and on returning missed one card - Mrs. Gardner came down.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

HOUTCHING - GUILTY . Aged 16.

HEALY - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined One Month .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210214-147

485. THOMAS BLAND was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of February , 40 lbs. of lead, value 5 s., the goods of Jesse Greig , spinster , and fixed to her dwelling-house .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to belong to the Honourable Frances Compton , spinster , commonly called Lady Frances Compton , and fixed to a certain dwelling-house of her's.

MARGARET SINCLAIR . I live at No. 21, Fletcher-street, Westminster . At a quarter of an hour before seven o'clock, on Sunday morning, I heard a noise outside my house, as if something hard was grating against the iron. I heard

different voices about the door - got up - looked out, and saw two men holding the prisoner, and a roll of lead laying by the hall door; it was stolen off the hall door. I heard them wrenching it off. Two more houses were robbed in the same way.

ROBERT MITCHELL . I heard a noise - opened the shutter, and heard three men jump down; one picked up the lead and put it on his shoulder. The prisoner was one of them - I am certain.

HENRY LOVEL . I was coming up Fletcher-street, and saw the prisoner on the lamp-iron, leaning over the door place - he got down and went on the other side of the street. I met Allen, returned with him, and then saw the prisoner drop the lead down and folded it up - we went to meet him; he held a knife in his hand, and shoved Allen down. I ran after him to Whitehall, where a soldier stopped him; I had not lost sight of him - he got from the soldier - was secured again, and threw the knife down.

EDWARD HOMER. I was coming out of Whitehall - heard the alarm - saw the prisoner running and stopped him; he got from me - I caught him immediately, and he threw a knife away.

JOHN ALLEN . Lovel told me there was a robbery. I went with him, and saw the prisoner rolling the lead up. I went to collar him; he threw his hand out - I saw a knife in it, and picked up the lead.

WILLIAM MILLS . The prisoner was given in my charge. I compared the lead with the place. It fitted it exactly.

Prisoner's Defence. I saw it on the pavement - the knife laid on it. I never touched it.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210214-148

486. MARY ROSS was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of February , from the person of Edward Collingride , one box, value 6 d.; 2 s. in monies numbered, and one 1 l. Bank note, his property .

The prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18210214-149

487. WILLIAM BETTON was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of February , 15 lbs. of lead, value 2 s. 6 d., the goods of Eleanor Houghton , widow , and fixed to her dwelling-hous .

ELEANOR HOUGHTON . I live at No. 18, Grafton-street, Soho . On Saturday, about half-past nine o'clock, I heard a noise in the passage - ran down, and found Temple holding the prisoner. I found a quantity of pipe pulled from the wall in the kitchen, and laid on the stairs - it was broken off.

WILLIAM TEMPLE . I lodge with the prosecutrix. I heard a noise - the prisoner passed me in the passage; I caught him by the shoulder, and found the lead pipe torn away.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was taken ill - saw the door open, and asked a lady at the door to let me go into the yard; she directed me down stairs - I kicked against something, and as I came up this gentleman took me.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: o18210214-1

JOHN STANLEY , JOHN HARRIS alias KEYLOCK , GEORGE HARRIS alias KEYLOCK , and WILLIAM HARDY , convicted with others at the last Session, of feloniously assaulting John Marsden , and rescuing Samuel Jones and William Dunn , who were charged with felony, from and out of his custody, which said Samuel Jones and William Dunn have been since convicted of felony, were put to the bar, and asked the usual question, viz. What they had to say, why they should not have sentence to die according to law.

The prisoners on their knees prayed the benefit of the statute.

The Court informed them, that counterpleas were filed against them, which stated that they had been allowed the benefit of clergy before.

The counterpleas were then read, setting forth that the prisoners had before been convicted of felony, and received the benefit of the statute, and praying they might receive judgment of death according to law.

The Court informed them, that if they denied being the same persons as described in the counterpleas, the Jury were present to try the question, which the prisoners were entitled to have tried.

The prisoners severally admitted being the same persons therein described, and that they had received the benefit of clergy before, and sentence of death was accordingly passed on them with the other capital convicts.

Reference Number: o18210214-2

WILLIAM WATTS , WILLIAM JONES , MARK HERD , and ROBERT M'BRIDE , convicted of the same offence, were then placed at the bar, and prayed the benefit of the statute.

No counterpleas being filed against them, the Court sentenced them severally, to be confined twelve calender months in the House of Correction kept to hard labour , and during that time to be twice publicly whipped .

Reference Number: o18210214-3

THE KING against MOTT.

On the second day of the Session, Robert Mott convicted in September last of forgery, was placed at the bar, when Mr. Baron Graham delivered the decision of the Twelve Judges on his case, as follows: -

"In this case the prisoner was indicted for that he (stating the indictment) vide Sessions Paper, Bridges's Mayoralty, 1820. page 519. The prisoner was tried at the last September Session by Mr. Justice Best, in the presence of Mr. Justice Richardson, and myself. It appeared in evidence, that on the day laid in the indictment, the prisoner had applied to Messrs. Hoods, ironmongers, to supply him with a quantity of iron, for the use of Dover, the acceptor, and gave at the same time this bill to T. E. Hood, one of the partners, and from the nature of it, we take it as a fact, that he endorsed the bill to Mr. Hood, and gave it to him in payment for the iron. The prisoner received from Messrs. Hoods only 20 l. worth of iron, but was to have as much as came to the full amount of the bill. Charles

Dover, the acceptor, named in the bill, was called to prove that his name was forged. Messrs. Hoods had released Dover; still it was objected that Hoods had only an interest in the bill to the amount of 20 l., and that Dover could not be a competent witness without a release from the prisoner in respect of the residue of the value of the bill. The learned Judge thought that a release from the holder of the bill, completely discharged the acceptor, and Dover was examined, also T. E. Hood, and on their evidence the prisoner was convicted; and the learned Judge at first only reserved the question as to Dover's competency, but it afterwards very properly occurred to him, that doubts might be entertained as to the competency of Hood's evidence, and particularly as to the effect of the release on his testimony, and both points were reserved for the opinions of the Judges.

As to Dover, I think I may say that the Judges were clearly, and unanimously of opinion, that the release, by the holder of the bill, was a complete discharge of the acceptor: Hood's having the full, legal right to dispose of the bill; and that their release was equivalent to an actual receipt of the money.

But the question as to Hood's competency, was not so easily disposed of. Let us first consider how T. E. Hood stood affected, before he executed the release; and how he stood after. Before he executed the release, it is clear he had no interest to destroy the bill, by assisting to arrive at the proof, that it was forged. On the contrary, it was his interest to prove it a good bill; for if it was forged, he lost his 20 l. worth of iron; but if good, he was sure of being able to pay himself. But when he had executed the release, he stood in a different situation, in point of interest; for it may be very plausibly argued, that having taken upon himself to discharge the acceptor, he had made himself responsible to the prisoner for the residue of the bill, beyond the 20 l. worth of iron.

It occurred to several of the judges, that being before the execution of the release, unexceptionable as a witness, he could not by a subsequent act of his own, deprive the King of the benefit of that testimony , which he owed to the interests of Justice; as in the case of a wager laid by an essential witness, after a party had acquired an interest in his testimony, but I believe all the Judges wished that there opinion, should not rest on a broader ground.

Some Judges thought that this was not the case of a witness, who was called to extinguish, or destroy that instrument , which on the face of it, charged the witness himself . I am not sure , that this ground was generally adopted , for the his evidence, did not directly impugn the instrument, it formed a necessary step, together with his release, to enable another witness to do the same thing , but all the Judges concur in the opinion, which it is essential for the public to know, that under all the circumstances of the case, the witness was competent.

In stating therefore, what I have further to say , I mean only to explain the grounds of my own opinion, taking to myself alone, the responsibility of error, if I have mistaken the grounds on which the Judges went. Before the witness opened his mouth to give testimony, he had incurred the whole responsibility, by executing the release, and that he had done under the assurance, and of his own persuasion, that the acceptance was a forgery, still it must be inferred, that the witness was more secure, by assisting to convict the prisoner. But supposing the prisoner to be acquitted, the verdict of acquittal, cannot help the prisoner in an action against the witness; for the prisoner must begin by proving that he gave the witness a valid bill, and this the witness is prepared to disprove. If the liability of the witness was the certain consequence of the acquittal, I should decide otherwise; as in an action againt the master for the negligence of the servant, the latter is incompetent, because the verdict against the master is a direct and certain charge against the servant, and is evidence to prove the whole damages which the master has sustained through the servant's default.

In this case, the verdict is no evidence in an action or suit by the prisoner to call upon the witnesses for the residue of the value of the bill - such an attempt is therefore uncertain, improbable, and capable of being met by a clear disproof. But the witness is called to prove the utterance only, and if this objection were to hold the ends of justice, would nine times out of ten, and in a greater proportion be defeated? For in most instances, bills of exchange, or more commonly Bank notes are tendered to one person alone; and when a bill of this sort is with-held or impounded, the party does it at the risk of an action, such as this witness may be said to be exposed to. Every prosecution may be said to be at the risk of an action for a malicious prosecution; and in strikes me, that in order to incapaciate a witness, the verdict must either give to the witness a direct and certain benefit, or fix upon him a direct and certain loss. In this case, before the witness gave the release, he might have been satisfied to demonstration, that the acceptance was forged - as for instance by seeing or knowing the acceptor's hand-writing, his character for credit or veracity, rate of knowledge and education, so as to make it plain, that he would not have written two for to, or excepte instead of accepted; and being so prepared, he must not only stand indifferent as to any risk of being called upon to account for the bill; but must be able to set every such attempt at defiance.

And therefore the Judges are unanimously of opinion, that notwithstanding the release given by Messrs. Hoods , that Mr. Hood is a perfectly competent witness in point of law, though there might be a bias in his mind, he may be said to be under no risk at all ; in consequence of his being prepared to prove the bill forged, and the prisoner must prove what is impossible , viz. - That it is a valid instrument .

THE JUDGES are of opinion, that the conviction is LEGAL.

Reference Number: s18210214-1

TENTH DAY, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 24.

The Court met to pass sentence on the several prisoners convicted.

Reference Number: s18210214-1

JOHN STANLEY , JOHN HARRIS alias KEYLOCK , GEORGE HARRIS alias KEYLOCK , and WILLIAM HARDY , convicted with others at the last Session, of feloniously assaulting John Marsden , and rescuing Samuel Jones and William Dunn , who were charged with felony, from and out of his custody, which said Samuel Jones and William Dunn have been since convicted of felony, were put to the bar, and asked the usual question, viz. What they had to say, why they should not have sentence to die according to law.

The prisoners on their knees prayed the benefit of the statute.

The Court informed them, that counterpleas were filed against them, which stated that they had been allowed the benefit of clergy before.

The counterpleas were then read, setting forth that the prisoners had before been convicted of felony, and received the benefit of the statute, and praying they might receive judgment of death according to law.

The Court informed them, that if they denied being the same persons as described in the counterpleas, the Jury were present to try the question, which the prisoners were entitled to have tried.

The prisoners severally admitted being the same persons therein described, and that they had received the benefit of clergy before, and sentence of death was accordingly passed on them with the other capital convicts.

Reference Number: s18210214-1

WILLIAM WATTS , WILLIAM JONES , MARK HERD , and ROBERT M'BRIDE , convicted of the same offence, were then placed at the bar, and prayed the benefit of the statute.

No counterpleas being filed against them, the Court sentenced them severally, to be confined twelve calender months in the House of Correction kept to hard labour , and during that time to be twice publicly whipped .

Reference Number: s18210214-1

THE KING against MOTT.

On the second day of the Session, Robert Mott convicted in September last of forgery, was placed at the bar, when Mr. Baron Graham delivered the decision of the Twelve Judges on his case, as follows: -

"In this case the prisoner was indicted for that he (stating the indictment) vide Sessions Paper, Bridges's Mayoralty, 1820. page 519. The prisoner was tried at the last September Session by Mr. Justice Best, in the presence of Mr. Justice Richardson, and myself. It appeared in evidence, that on the day laid in the indictment, the prisoner had applied to Messrs. Hoods, ironmongers, to supply him with a quantity of iron, for the use of Dover, the acceptor, and gave at the same time this bill to T. E. Hood, one of the partners, and from the nature of it, we take it as a fact, that he endorsed the bill to Mr. Hood, and gave it to him in payment for the iron. The prisoner received from Messrs. Hoods only 20 l. worth of iron, but was to have as much as came to the full amount of the bill. Charles

Dover, the acceptor, named in the bill, was called to prove that his name was forged. Messrs. Hoods had released Dover; still it was objected that Hoods had only an interest in the bill to the amount of 20 l., and that Dover could not be a competent witness without a release from the prisoner in respect of the residue of the value of the bill. The learned Judge thought that a release from the holder of the bill, completely discharged the acceptor, and Dover was examined, also T. E. Hood, and on their evidence the prisoner was convicted; and the learned Judge at first only reserved the question as to Dover's competency, but it afterwards very properly occurred to him, that doubts might be entertained as to the competency of Hood's evidence, and particularly as to the effect of the release on his testimony, and both points were reserved for the opinions of the Judges.

As to Dover, I think I may say that the Judges were clearly, and unanimously of opinion, that the release, by the holder of the bill, was a complete discharge of the acceptor: Hood's having the full, legal right to dispose of the bill; and that their release was equivalent to an actual receipt of the money.

But the question as to Hood's competency, was not so easily disposed of. Let us first consider how T. E. Hood stood affected, before he executed the release; and how he stood after. Before he executed the release, it is clear he had no interest to destroy the bill, by assisting to arrive at the proof, that it was forged. On the contrary, it was his interest to prove it a good bill; for if it was forged, he lost his 20 l. worth of iron; but if good, he was sure of being able to pay himself. But when he had executed the release, he stood in a different situation, in point of interest; for it may be very plausibly argued, that having taken upon himself to discharge the acceptor, he had made himself responsible to the prisoner for the residue of the bill, beyond the 20 l. worth of iron.

It occurred to several of the judges, that being before the execution of the release, unexceptionable as a witness, he could not by a subsequent act of his own, deprive the King of the benefit of that testimony , which he owed to the interests of Justice; as in the case of a wager laid by an essential witness, after a party had acquired an interest in his testimony, but I believe all the Judges wished that there opinion, should not rest on a broader ground.

Some Judges thought that this was not the case of a witness, who was called to extinguish, or destroy that instrument , which on the face of it, charged the witness himself . I am not sure , that this ground was generally adopted , for the his evidence, did not directly impugn the instrument, it formed a necessary step, together with his release, to enable another witness to do the same thing , but all the Judges concur in the opinion, which it is essential for the public to know, that under all the circumstances of the case, the witness was competent.

In stating therefore, what I have further to say , I mean only to explain the grounds of my own opinion, taking to myself alone, the responsibility of error, if I have mistaken the grounds on which the Judges went. Before the witness opened his mouth to give testimony, he had incurred the whole responsibility, by executing the release, and that he had done under the assurance, and of his own persuasion, that the acceptance was a forgery, still it must be inferred, that the witness was more secure, by assisting to convict the prisoner. But supposing the prisoner to be acquitted, the verdict of acquittal, cannot help the prisoner in an action against the witness; for the prisoner must begin by proving that he gave the witness a valid bill, and this the witness is prepared to disprove. If the liability of the witness was the certain consequence of the acquittal, I should decide otherwise; as in an action againt the master for the negligence of the servant, the latter is incompetent, because the verdict against the master is a direct and certain charge against the servant, and is evidence to prove the whole damages which the master has sustained through the servant's default.

In this case, the verdict is no evidence in an action or suit by the prisoner to call upon the witnesses for the residue of the value of the bill - such an attempt is therefore uncertain, improbable, and capable of being met by a clear disproof. But the witness is called to prove the utterance only, and if this objection were to hold the ends of justice, would nine times out of ten, and in a greater proportion be defeated? For in most instances, bills of exchange, or more commonly Bank notes are tendered to one person alone; and when a bill of this sort is with-held or impounded, the party does it at the risk of an action, such as this witness may be said to be exposed to. Every prosecution may be said to be at the risk of an action for a malicious prosecution; and in strikes me, that in order to incapaciate a witness, the verdict must either give to the witness a direct and certain benefit, or fix upon him a direct and certain loss. In this case, before the witness gave the release, he might have been satisfied to demonstration, that the acceptance was forged - as for instance by seeing or knowing the acceptor's hand-writing, his character for credit or veracity, rate of knowledge and education, so as to make it plain, that he would not have written two for to, or excepte instead of accepted; and being so prepared, he must not only stand indifferent as to any risk of being called upon to account for the bill; but must be able to set every such attempt at defiance.

And therefore the Judges are unanimously of opinion, that notwithstanding the release given by Messrs. Hoods , that Mr. Hood is a perfectly competent witness in point of law, though there might be a bias in his mind, he may be said to be under no risk at all ; in consequence of his being prepared to prove the bill forged, and the prisoner must prove what is impossible , viz. - That it is a valid instrument .

THE JUDGES are of opinion, that the conviction is LEGAL.

ADJOURNED TO WEDNESDAY, APRIL 11, 1821.

The case of Mary Peat, is reserved for the consideration of the Twelve Judges; on a question as to the validity of the indictment.


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