Old Bailey Proceedings, 28th October 1820.
Reference Number: 18201028
Reference Number: f18201028-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace Oyer and Terminer, AND Gaol Delivery for the City of London, AND ALSO The Gaol Delivery For the County of Middlesex, HELD AT Justice Hall, in the Old Bailey; ON WEDNESDAY, 25th of OCTOBER, 1820, and following Days;

Being the Eighth Session in the Mayoralty of THE RIGHT HON. GEORGE BRIDGES , LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

Taken in Short-Hand by H. BUCKLER, Basinghall Street, (BY AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON.)

London:

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED, FOR H. BUCKLER, BY T. BOOTH, 31, St. Andrew's Hill, Doctor's Commons.

1820.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX.

Before the Right Honourable GEORGE BRIDGES , Esq. LORD MAYOR of the City of London; Sir George Wood , Knt., one of the Barons of his Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir James Allan Park , Knt., one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir Richard Carr Glynn , Bart.; Sir William Leighton , Knt.; Joshua Jonathan Smith , Esq.; Samuel Birch , Esq.; Aldermen of the said City; Sir John Silvester , Bart., D.C.L. Recorder of the said City; Christopher Magnay , Esq.; Robert Waithman , Esq., Aldermen of the said City; and Newman Knowlys , Esq., Common Sergeant of the said City; his Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of the Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

London Jury.

Thomas Burn Abgood

Charles Fielder

George Kempster

Charles Hackin

James Roland Carr

Peter Good

Thomas Bonnet

Thomas Hood

William Lee

George Bishop

Richard Phillips

Joseph Coward

First Middlesex Jury.

Jacob Wilson

John Lloyd

George Martin

Thomas Macender

Thomas Martin

James Brown

John Bohen

Thomas Bull

John Copeland

Thomas Obey

Timothy Smith

Thomas Phillips

Second Middlesex Jury.

Joseph Jarmain

John Jones

Richard Erlham

Charles Knight

James Lambley

Warner Cobham

Alexander Wilkie

Robert Slocombe

John Hunt

George Julian

Richard Haling

Joseph Garnet

SESSIONS HOUSE, OLD BAILEY, OCTOBER 25, 1820.

BRIDGES, MAYOR. EIGHTH SESSION.

Reference Number: t18201028-1

1226. HENRY TURNER was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of September , one coat, value 50 s.; two waistcoats, value 10 s.; one child's dress, value 10 s.; one pelisse, value 10 s., and one pair of breeches, value 6 s., the goods of William Billett , in the dwelling-house of William Baker .

WILLIAM BILLETT . I lodge with William Baker , in Lemon Tree-yard, Bedfordbury . On the 18th of September I took the prisoner to lodge with me; on the 24th he went out, and I missed these things - he did not return.

SARAH BILLETT . On the 24th of September my husband went out about seven o'clock; his clothes were kept in a box in the prisoner's room - I found it opened, and missed the property.

JOHN WOODYER . I am servant to David Moss , a pawnbroker, in the Strand. On the 22d of September the prisoner pledged a coat and waistcoat with me for 1 l. - they are worth 25 s.

WILLIAM LLOYD . I am servant to David Cameron , a pawnbroker, who lives in the Strand. On the 25th of September the prisoner pledged a pair of breeches and a suit of boy's clothes with me for 14 s.

WILLIAM MILLS . I am a constable. I took the prisoner into custody on the 2d of October. He took me to his lodgings in George-street, and gave me the duplicates.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 18.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Confined One Year .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18201028-2

1227. JOHN LILLEY and GEORGE HOLT were indicted for stealing, on the 3d of October , one watch, value 2 l. 2 s., the goods of Hugh Perrin , in his dwelling-house .

ELIZA PERRIN . I am the wife of Hugh Perrin , who lives at Tottenham . On the 2d of October the prisoners came to my house, and I bought 2 s. 6 d. worth of wood of them. They asked me to draw them a pint of beer; I went to the back of the room to draw it - they were then about half-way towards the fire-place. Soon after they left I missed the watch from the mantle-piece. White had come in while the prisoners were there to borrow a corkscrew. They asked what it was o'clock when they went out, I told them it was six - there was a clock in the room.

JOHN WHITE . I went to Perrin's to borrow a corkscrew; I saw two young fellows there, but do not know them. I did not notice the watch.

CHARLES SMITH . I am a headborough. On the 3d of October I went to the prisoners' lodgings - they live together in Kingsland-road. I searched them both, but did not find the watch.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18201028-3

1228. CHARLES GRIFFITHS was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of September , at Paddington , one gelding, price 10 l. , the property of Richard Smith .

RICHARD SMITH . I live in St. John's Wood-lane, Marylebone. On Saturday evening, the 30th of September, at six o'clock, I turned my gelding into Mr. Rice's field, by the canal; next morning, about six o'clock, I went to the field and missed it. I traced it over two ditches, and then lost the trace. On Monday morning, in consequence of information, I went and saw Hedges' son, and he went with me to Ford's, in Cow-cross, Smithfield, I there saw the skin of a grey gelding, which I am sure was mine. I turned round, and picked up a horse's leg, which I am also sure was mine.

WILLIAM HEDGES . I am a collar-maker, and live in the Edgeware-road - I have often seen the prisoner pass my house. On the 30th of September, at nine o'clock at night, my son brought the prisoner to me at the King's Arms, public-house. He asked me if I would buy a dead horse? I said Yes, and asked whose it was; he said it was his master's, Mr. Hicks, cow-keeper, in Shoe-lane, Holborn, and it must be taken away. I said I could not fetch it that night, he said it must be taken away that night, as his master did not like it to lay in the field with the cows. We went to the field to fetch the horse - it was in the second field in the Harrow-road, past the second bridge. The horse lay there - it was a grey one, and had been stuck in the throat - blood had flowed. I took it home, and the next morning sold it to Ford.

Q. What has a collar-maker to do with dead horses - A. We buy them. I gave him 30 s. for it, and sold it for 2 l. It was dark when I was in the field. I could see no

cows. I bought some harness of the prisoner about a fortnight before. On Monday morning Smith came to me, and I apprehended the prisoner myself on Thursday morning, at his house at Kensington Gravel-pits. I found there was a Mr. Hicks, a cow-keeper, in Shoe-lane. As soon as Smith saw the leg and skin he claimed them. He told me the marks on it before he went there.

THOMAS FORD . I am a horse collector, and occasionally deal with Hedges. I bought this gelding of him on Sunday morning, the 1st of October - its throat was cut - it appeared to have been dead about one day.

Prisoner's Defence. I am entirely innocent. I bought it of a man who was a complete stranger to me. I met him in the Harrow-road, and paid him 24 s. for it, not having the least idea of its being stolen, as a proof of which I never absented myself from my home.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 38.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18201028-4

1229. DANIEL GENTLE and WILLIAM READ were indicted for stealing, on the 5th of October , at St. George, Hanover-square, six china plates, value 6 l.; seven china cups, covers and stands, value 5 l.; one china cup and stand, value 8 s.; two china flower-pots, value 5 s.; one china cup, value 5 s.; one pair of boots, value 10 s., and one smelling bottle, value 5 s., the goods of John Mortlock , in his dwelling-house .

WILLIAM SAINSBURY . I lived servant with Mr. John Mortlock twelve or thirteen years, and left him last Wednesday. His warehouse is at No. 250, Oxford-street, in the parish of St. George, Hanover-square . He had a servant slept there constantly, to take care of the property; he is a china and glass dealer . Gentle lived warehouseman with him about five years, and left the day he was apprehended. Read lived there about a year, and left three years ago. In the last week of September, Mr. Mortlock sent me to Mr. Cook's in Wardour-street; I found some china plates exposed for sale, which I knew to be Mr. Mortlock's property; he described the person who sold them, and in consequence of which I went to Read's house as the person, and asked him if he had sold a lot of china plates and other things to Mr. Cook? he said he had; I asked who he bought them of? he said a lady; I asked what lady? he said he was not bound to tell; I said

"You must know who she was?" - he said he had an insuperable objection to tell me; I said I was placed in such circumstances that I really must know; he then said he should have no objection to inform Mr. Mortlock, or Mr. Brewer our head cashier; I said Mr. Mortlock was not at home, and asked him to walk with me to see Mr. Brewer. He would not inform Mr. Brewer or me. I asked him if he had any objection to write to Mr. Mortlock what he had to say; he objected to that, but wished to write to Mr. William Mortlock , the prosecutor's brother. I sent to him two days after to know if he had wrote; he sent me word he had. I went with the officer to take him up; the officer asked him how he came by the china plates; he said he took them of a lady in exchange for other goods; that is all he would say. When brought before the Magistrate his confession was taken down. Gentle was apprehended the same evening, he lived in the house. No threat or promise was made to induce them to confess.

Prisoner READ. Q. Did I not live three years with Mr. Mortlock - A. He might. I never knew him guilty of anything.

EDWARD COOK . I keep a china shop in Wardour-street. In June or July, I bought one India china jar; six china plates, worth 10 s. 6 d. each; six china cups, covers, and stands worth two guineas, and five or seven jars of different descriptions. I have sold six cups and four plates. I bought them of the prisoner Read all at once.

(Property produced, and sworn to.)

SAMUEL PLANK . I am an officer. I took the prisoners into custody. I took Read at his house in North-street, and questioned him how he came by the plates found at Cook's; he said he had them from a lady, but refused to tell who she was. I found a pair of boots, some flowerpots and a china cup, at the cottage of one King. I took Gentle the same evening, and found three keys on him; he said one was the key of his box at his master's, and the others were keys of two boxes which he had at King's cottage, who was also in Mr. Mortlock's employ. One of them was a skeleton key, the wards were filed out. He then acknowledged that it was not the key of his box, but the key of his master's desk, and that he filed out the wards himself to fit his master's desk. I found it did open the desk. When I returned from King's I told him what I had found; he said they were all his master's property, he had taken them and had robbed his master of a great deal more, and had given nearly all the property to Read, who disposed of it, and brought him his share of the money; that he had received about 80 l. as his share, and gave nearly all of it to a young woman named Wilmot, who he was about to be married to. I searched her boxes where she was in service, and found a china cup, a smelling bottle, with a book of a Saving Bank, as a receipt for 75 l. Wilmot came into the presence of Gentle, and said she had the money, cup and smelling-bottle from him. He acknowledged it, and said it was Mr. Mortlock's property, and the money was the produce of the stolen goods. I said nothing to induce him to confess, and the Magistrate reasoned with him on the impropriety of signing his confession - I saw them both sign them.

(read.)

The voluntary confession of Daniel Gentle , who says,

"I live warehouseman with Mr. Mortlock, I have lived five years there. I became acquainted with Read by his being there with me; he left Mr. Mortlock's above two years ago, and applied to me to give him various articles of china from the premises to sell, and he agreed to give me half what they sold for. He usually came after the shop was shut. I was the only person left in the premises at night, I slept in the kitchen. When he came we used to go into the warerooms and collect such articles as he thought would suit, he then packed up as much as he could in a handkerchief and took them away. I have received about 80 l. from him, which I gave to Eliza Wilmot , who lived servant with Mr. Parden, architect, in Berner's-street, and to whom I was going to be married; who placed the sum in the Provident Institution for Savings, Leicester-place, Leicester-square, in the following sums in the name of Eliza Wilmot .

1819. May 24th. 14 l.

June 7th. 10 l.

- 21st. 15 l.

July 10th. 11 l.

October 16th. 5 l.

November 20th. Interest 17 s. 11 d.

1820.

February 21st. 20 l. 75 l. 17 s. 11 d.

I also gave Wilmot a smelling bottle with a silver top, and a thimble. I also took two china garden-pots, a very nice Chelsea vase and covers, a seive-can and saucer, a pair of new boots and a table-cloth. I filed a key to make a skeleton key, with which I used to open the desk in which the money was kept, and have frequently taken various sums at different times; sometimes 5 s., sometimes 10 s. I made the key about twelve months ago; I opened the desk sometimes once a week, and sometimes twice. I do not claim the money in the Saving Institution as my property, but consider it being the property of Mr. Mortlock as the produce from the sale of the china given to Read and disposed of by him, and paid to me by Read as my share.

DANIEL GENTLE .

GEORGE FARRANT .

Witness, SAMUEL PLANK .

The voluntary confession of William Read , who says

"I lived with Mr. Mortlock three years as shopman, and left about two years and a half age. For nearly two years I have been in the habit of receiving various dessert china sets, tea services, and one dinner service from Daniel Gentle . I used to go after the shop was shut, and was let in by Daniel Gentle ; I used to tie up as much as I could in a handkerchief, and take them away at different times. I sold a dinner service to Mrs. Jones, No. 1, Park-lane, for fifty guineas; one dessert set to Mr. Dawson, Manchester-square, for fifteen guineas; one ditto to Mr. Hand, Stratford-place, for ten guineas; one breakfast ditto, for about six guineas; one tea ditto, for about five guineas; one dessert set to a gentleman I do not know for twenty guineas; one ditto to Mr. Folkes, Queen Anne-street, West, for 9 l.; one ditto to Sir Frederick Fowke , Baker-street, for twenty guineas. I resided at No. 14 and 19 in North-street, Manchester-square, at the time, and used to advertize the articles as the property of a lady embarrassed, in the Morning Post. I sold six services of plates to Mr. Cook, No. 123, Wardour-street, for ten guineas, with three china jars, five other jars, six basons and covers. I represented them as belonging to a lady. In consequence of distress, I planned with Gentle the mode of robbing Mr. Mortlock, and I agreed to give him half the articles sold for.

WILLIAM READ .

GEORGE FARRANT .

Witness SAMUEL PLANK .

GENTLE'S Defence. I lived five years with the prosecutor. I had only 1 l. a week, and I think I deserved 28 s. or 30 s. I throw myself upon your mercy.

READ'S Defence (written). I stand before you a dreadful example of the consequences arising from a master overstepping his line of duty, by depriving a servant unjustly of the character due to his services. Previous to my entering the employ of my prosecutor, I had lived fifteen years in some of the first families in London. I served my prosecutor for three years, in a situation of considerable confidence, with fidelity, and left him with assurances of support in placing me in business, and to which my father added the offer to him of 200 l. to promote that object. From some motives, of which I am ignorant, I was suddenly deprived of my prosecutor's and my father's flattering support, and found myself divested of friends, character, and employ. By casual employment, and some money saved by industry, I waited in hopes of the offer of some other situation, till becoming deeply embarrassed, I became involved in the charges which has led to the present indictment. My prosecutor having known my family for nearly forty years, and myself from childhood, deprived of the testimony of my friends from the influence of my prosecutor over their minds, I throw myself on the mercy of your Lordship and a Jury of my countrymen, and shall bow with humble submission to their judgment.

GENTLE - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 26.

READ - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 31.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18201028-5

1230. CHARLES KING was indicted for that he, on the 3d of October , at St. Margaret, Westminster , feloniously, wilfully, maliciously, and knowingly did send to the Rev . William Johnson Rodber , Clerk, a certain letter, without any name subscribed thereto, demanding money , which is as follows: -

"DEAR SIR, I take liberty of writeing to you, hoping I shall not offend you by so doing. I am going to relate to you a circumstance which you little think. I no any think off about Mrs. Rodbur going down to Wieghbridge with her father, to conseeal from her friends the ladies and gentlemen, and likwise the Ministers of this said Parish, which I do know what he whent down to Wieghbridge for has well has you or Mr. Dunn. I shall immediately write to the ladies and gentemen and Ministers, and state to them all the particulars has I know. has you have used me very ill, has you are going to relate to them faulsehoods, I shall tell them what I know, and every instance of it, has I know what she has been taken while there with her father. has you do expect her home this week I now have one favour to ask of you, has you have used me very ill, which is to afford me some relief. My clothes and every thing I have his in pledge for 4. 15, and if you will help me I shall be thankful, and burry the secret in my bosom for ever, and never utter a single silliable about the business. I know as much of the case has you do. If you will afford me anything, be pleased to direct B. B. B., Caledonian Coffee-house, Great Chappel, Broadway-street, Westminster, October 2, 1820." against the statute.

REV. WILLIAM JOHNSON RODBER . On the 3d of October I received a letter at my house in James-street, Westminster, by the two-penny post, it is signed B. B. B., and dated the 2d of October - (producing it.) I have not the least knowledge of the hand-writing, and know nobody answering to the name B. B. B. I never saw the prisoner to my knowledge, except at the police office. On receipt of the letter I sent for Pace, an officer of Queen-square, and in consequence of his advice I wrote a letter and took a copy of it; I sealed it myself, and gave it to the officer; and on the evening of the 12th or 13th I received another letter with the same initials.

Q. Are you married - A. I am, my Lord.

Q. Did you ever see any of the prisoner's relations to your knowledge - A. Not till I saw his father at the office; but at the office I found that his aunt washed my family's clothes, but I do not believe I ever saw her. She only fetches the linen, she does not wash in the house. I never saw the prisoner about my house.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Do you think you never saw the prisoner about your house with his aunt - A. Not to my knowledge. I am seldom at home when the linen is fetched. I did not know the letter came from him till he was apprehended.

Q. The letter gave you no alarm - A. I certainly thought if there was a report of that kind it must come from my

servants, and wished to find it out - it gave me considerable uneasiness. Mrs. Rodber was at Weybridge at the time I received it.

COURT. Q. What was her maiden name - A. Dunn. I have been married fourteen months, and am clergyman of St. Margaret's, Westminster.

THOMAS PACE . I am an officer of Queen-square. The prosecutor sent for me and gave me a letter. In consequence of my advice he wrote a letter, read it over to me, and gave it to me; I got a lad, named Johnson, to take it; I and Cooper went with him to the Caledonian coffee-shop, Broadway, Westminster, and saw him take it into the shop; we went in and saw the same letter laying on the bar window, it was directed

" B. B. B. Caledonian coffee-house." I did not see the prisoner that day. I went there again on the 13th, after receiving a second letter from Mr. Rodber, and saw the prisoner sitting in a box with a young man, they did not appear acquantances. In consequence of information I asked the prisoner if he was the person who received a letter left there a few days ago directed

"B. B. B." he said he was; I called the landlady from the bar, and asked her before him if he was the person she delivered the letter to directed

"B. B. B." She said Yes, he was - her name is Eliza Thompson . I asked his name, he refused to tell me, and said he was a gentleman. I took him to the Hoop and Grapes, public-house, opposite the office, searched him, and found two letters, one sealed and not directed; the other was directed to

"Mr. William Stewart , No. 110, Upper Thames-street, London." I found a common brass wafer seal upon him.

Cross-examined. Q. From whom did you receive a description of the prisoner - A. From Cooper. Mr. Rodber never gave me a description of him.

JOSEPH COOPER . I went to the coffee-shop with Pace on the 3d of October, and on the 13th, after he was conveyed from the office to the watch-house, I had some conversation with him. Neither of us held him out threat or inducement. I asked him how he came to write Mr. Rodber such a letter as he had? he said he had been attending the House of Lords, and there he met a young man who asked him to write a letter for him, and he being out of a situation at the time was very willing to do so. I then asked him whether he wrote the letter signed

"B. B. B." addressed to Mr. Rodber, James-street; he said he had written it. I asked if he had received any answer at the Caledonian coffee-house to the letter directed

"B. B. B." he said he had. I told him I thought it a very unlikely story that he should enquire for an answer to the letter he wrote for another person? he made no reply.

The letter was here put in and read, which was a fac similie of the indictment.

The prisoner made no defence.

GUILTY. - DEATH . Aged 18.

Recommended to Mercy .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18201028-6

1231. JAMES SHIELDS was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of October, in the 58th of George the III ., from the person of Margaret Cameron , one pocket-book, value 6 d., one 2 l. and three 1 l. Bank notes, the property of John Cameron .

MARGARET CAMERON . I am the wife of John Cameron . About three years ago we were at the foot of Southampton-street, Strand , about two o'clock in the afternoon, standing to see a funeral go by. We had stood sometime when two or three of the Bow-street officers came up and asked if we had lost anything - (several people were round) - I felt and missed my pocket-book, containing three 1 l. and one 2 l. Bank notes. They brought it back to me soon after.

JOHN CAMERON . I was with my wife on the 26th of October, 1817. The funeral of Mr. Raymond, the performer, was passing. My wife missed her pocket-book.

JOHN EDWARD WILSON . I am a constable. On the 26th of October, 1817, Lack fetched me to the corner of Southampton-street. I saw three men named Barney, Ting, and Ryland, and others, standing behind Cameron. We watched them, and saw three of them turn up the Strand. I went to Mrs. Cameron, she felt and missed her pocket-book. Lack followed the men into a public-house. I went down the Strand and took John Pullen , whom I saw with them. I saw the prisoner in the Strand, but not in their company.

SAMUEL LACK . I apprehended the prisoner.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18201028-7

1232. JAMES WILCOX was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Robert Cozens , about one o'clock in the afternoon, on the 7th of October , at St. Dunstan's, Stepney, (he and others being therein) and stealing therein, two pair of trowsers, value 3 l., his property .

THOMAS CLEMENTS EYSHAM . I live in Gloucester-street, Stepney , exactly opposite the prosecutor's. On the 7th of October about one o'clock in the afternoon, I saw the prisoner lift up the latch of the prosecutor's shop door very cautiously, I am sure it was latched, he opened it without the bell ringing, went in and looked round him; then went behind the door and took two pair of trowsers off the rail, and put them under his coat; I allowed him to come out and then stopped him. I asked him where he was going? he made no answer, but immediately threw the trowsers into the shop upon the floor. I alarmed the family, and held him.

ROBERT COZENS . I am a tailor, and rent the house, which is in Stepney parish. I was at dinner with my wife and apprentice; I heard a knocking at the door, my wife went up and called me. I found the prisoner in Eysham's custody, and the trowsers on the floor. I had left them hanging up - they are worth 3 l.

HANNAH COZENS . I came up and found the trowsers upon the floor close by the rail. I saw them hanging up before dinner.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I have nothing to say.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 19.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18201028-8

1233. SAMUEL MEERS was indicted for feloniously asaulting John Ricket , on the 16th of October , on the King's highway; putting him in fear, and taking from his

person and against his will, one watch, value 4 l.; two seals, value 10 s., and one key, value 6 d., his property .

JOHN RICKET . I keep the Old Pied Bull, public-house, at Islington . On the 16th of October, about nine o'clock in the evening, I was coming from the stage, which I had been to meet to get a newspaper, and close by my gateway the prisoner rushed violently against me, and with one hand struck me, and with the other drew my watch out. I called Stop thief! and followed him, but I being lame he got off - it was very light. I am sure he was the man - he lived in the neighbourhood. I described him to Upton.

JOHN UPTON . I am an officer. Ricket informed me of the robbery, and described the prisoner; he said he thought he could swear positively to him. I waited at his father's house till one o'clock in the morning, he did not come home. I found him next night at home, abed; I found nothing on him. Ricket identified him immediately at the office.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18201028-9

1234. JOHN HUNT was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of September , eleven ounces of tea, value 1 s. 4 d. , the goods of the United Company of Merchants of England trading to the East Indies .

MR. BOLLAND conducted the prosecution.

BENJAMAN COLE . I am in the East India Company's service, and also an officer. On the 25th of September, in consequence of directions, I watched in the warehouse in Crutched Friars , and about two o'clock saw the prisoner come to a chest in the room No. 23, put his right hand in, took some tea out, and put it into his breeches; he repeated it twice, then came again, took some with his left hand, and put it into his pocket. He was instantly apprehended, and tea found in his breeches pockets, and eight ounces in a bag in his breeches.

THOMAS CLARK . I am an Excise officer. I saw him brought into the elder's room, and the tea found on him.

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 60.

Confined Six Months .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18201028-10

1235. ROBERT NOTLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of September , one gown, value 3 s.; one shift, value 1 s.; one petticoat, value 2 s., and one pair of stockings, value 2 d. , the goods of Mary Ann Notley .

MARY ANN NOTLEY . I am a servant , and live in Claremont-place, Hackney-road. On the 13th of September, I hired the prisoner to carry my boxes from Crown-street, Bishopsgate-street , to my mother's in Claremont-terrace.

HARRIET DAVIS . I live in Crown-street. The prisoner came for Notley's boxes. She is his sister; I am his aunt. He was to take them to Claremont-terrace - I gave him the boxes.

CHARLES BOWRING . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Bermondsey-street. On the 14th of September, I took a petticoat and shift in pawn from the prisoner for 3 s., he said they belonged to his wife, and gave the name of John Brown, Snow-fields.

SAMUEL SHARWOOD . On the 14th of September a gown was pawned with me. I do not know who by.

THOMAS EAGLES . I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner on the 17th of September, in the Hackney-road. I took him to a house where his mother and sister were; he said he had the property, and lost it. His sister claimed a pair of stockings on his legs. He said he could get some of the duplicates in a few minutes. I searched a woman he cohabited with, and found them on her.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18201028-11

1236. JOHN GROVES was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of October , one coat, value 2 l. , the goods of John Burton .

JOHN BURTON . I live at Edmonton. On the 6th of October, my cart stood at Mr. Child's door, in Thames-street . I was in the house about three minutes, and on turning round, missed the coat out of it; I ran to Pudding-lane, and saw the prisoner with it under his arm. I followed him, a person behind me whistled, and he immediately dropped it; I called Stop thief! he was collared without my losing sight of him.

JOSEPH MARTIN . I am a confectioner. I was coming down Pudding-lane, and heard the cry of stop him; when the prisoner came to the top of the hill, he returned, I collared him, and said if he lifted his hand up at me, I would knock his head off. Burton came up with the coat.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing of it.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18201028-12

1237. JAMES CLAY was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of September , one pair of trowsers, value 30 s. , the goods of Richard Cleobury .

JOHN DANIEL CHALLENOR . I am shopman to Mr. Richard Cleobury , who keeps a clothes-shop in Cheapside . On the 16th of September, I hung these trowsers at the door. In the afternoon a person came in and said we had lost a pair; I saw some men running down Lawrence-lane, they stopped at the bottom of the Church-yard, in a moment I saw a crowd, and found the prisoner in custody with them.

JAMES CLARK . On the 16th of September, between four and five o'clock in the afternoon, I was going up Cheapside, and saw the prisoner running on the other side of the way with a bundle under his arm, and a quantity of people following him calling Stop him! he turned down Ironmonger-lane into Church-passage, and was there stopped. I came up, and took the bundle from under his arm, and found the trowsers in it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The man who took them, lives in Nightingale-lane.

GUILTY . Aged 29.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18201028-13

1238. JOHN COOMBS was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of September , one coat, value 8 s. , the goods of John Mills .

HENRY POWELL . I am shopman to Mr. Essex, a pawnbroker, who lives in the Strand. On the 6th of September the prisoner pledged a coat with me for 4 s., I am sure it was him. The duplicate I gave him, was found upon him.

JOHN HITCHENGS . I am chief porter of the Inner Temple. On the 9th of September, I apprehended the prisoner, and found the duplicate upon him.

MR. JOHN MILLS . I am a barrister . The coat is mine, the prisoner was servant at my chambers, in Pump-court, Middle Temple . I left him in charge of the chambers, when I left town. The coat was locked up in a trunk - when I returned, I found it opened by a false key.

Cross-examined by MR. PLATT. Q. When did you see it last - A. A very few days before.

Prisoner's Defence. I was led into it.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years. - Penitentiary .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18201028-14

1239. JOSEPH HENRY HOWELL was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of September , one 5 l. Bank note , the property of John Tucker .

JAMES TUCKER . I am the son of John Tucker , who is a cloth-dresser , and lives in Noble-street ; the prisoner was his servant . On the 27th of September, I lost the key of the desk, and as he swept the warehouse up every morning, I asked him if he had found it? he said he had not. On the Saturday following a 5 l note was missed out of the desk, and next day he was apprehended. I asked him at the watch-house how he got the note out of the desk? he said he found the key, and had thrown it into the cellar. I could not find it there.

JOHN CLINTON . I am an officer. On Sunday evening the 1st of October, I apprehended the prisoner - his mother being dangerously ill, I pretended I wanted him to mind his master's house. I took him to the watch-house, and found a 1 l. note, and 18 s. 6 d., a knife, and a box of brass dominos upon him. I asked him where he passed the note? he said in Long-lane, and shewed me Barton's house there; I took him in, and asked Barton if he knew him? he leant across the counter, and said to the prisoner

"Do I know you" - he made no answer. I said

"Should you like to give a boy in this situation change for anything?" he then said to the boy

"Have I given you change for anything?" I told the boy he had better say nothing, and asked Barton if he had given him change or not? he said he was not in that dress; I told the prisoner to pull his great-coat off; he then said

"That is the dress he was in, I gave him change for a 5 l. note one day this week." He produced the note, and it corresponded with the number I had received, 17825. The prisoner said he bought a donkey in Smithfield for 18 s. out of it, and paid 2 s. for a day's keep, at the livery-stables for it, and 2 s. for shoeing it, he paid 1 s., to a costermonger for letting it be in his stable, and 9 s. he paid for the breeches he had on. Barton said he gave him 2 l. the first day, and the rest a day or two after.

HENRY BARTON . I am a baker. The prisoner came to me, asked for a quartern loaf, and laid down a 5 l. note; I said I had no change; he said perhaps I could give him part, and he would call again. I gave him 2 l. and next morning 3 l. I took him for a customer, who comes every week with money in his hand. The note found upon him, is one of those I gave him.

JOHN TUCKER . The 5 l. note is mine.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Fined One Shilling , and Discharged.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18201028-15

1240. WILLIAM HARWOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of October , one handkerchief, value 1 s., the goods of Daniel Deacon , from his person .

DANIEL DEACON . On the 16th of October, about half-past seven o'clock at night, I was in Barbican , and found the prisoner taking my handkerchief out; I turned round, and saw him drop it. I secured him, and gave him in charge.

ROBERT CLAYTON . I took him in charge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18201028-16

1241. MARY BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of October , twenty-eight yards of stuff, value 26 s. , the goods of John Williams .

JOHN GLANDFIELD . I am apprentice to Mr. John Williams . On the 19th of October, about half-past five o'clock, I saw the prisoner take this stuff out of the shop, from the door; I immediately pursued, and caught her with it, wrapped in her apron, about six yards off. Two women tried to hinder me from following her - it hung inside the shop.

THOMAS COOPER . I am an officer. I was in Bishopsgate-street, and saw a crowd at the corner of Old Bethlem. I heard several voices say,

"Let her go." I made through the crowd, and took the prisoner into custody with the stuff.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A woman gave me a parcel to carry. She pulled this stuff down, and I picked it up.

GUILTY . Aged 42.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18201028-17

SECOND DAY, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 26.

1242. GEORGE THOMAS was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of October , one watch, value 15 s., and 12 s. 6 d. in monies numbered, the property of James Welch , from his person .

JAMES WELCH . On the 8th of October, about half-past eight o'clock at night, I was coming down Walker's-court, Portman-street , the prisoner and another man came up, hustled me, pulled me out of the court, and he took my watch out, and 12 s. 6 d. from my pocket. They both ran

away - I followed, and the patrol stopped the prisoner in Crown-court, and as he went in at the watch-house door, he dropped my watch. I am certain he is the man, as I never lost sight of him.

JOHN PHILLIPS . I am a watchman. I saw Welch following the prisoner, stopped him, took him to the watch-house, and he dropped the watch at the door.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. He was lying on the step of a door, intoxicated - we took him to Green-court, he did not seem much drunk, and we left him - he called Stop thief! and I was taken. He brought the watch in, and said I dropped it.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18201028-18

1243. WILLIAM DONWORTH was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of October , one watch, value 1 l.; two seals, value 2 l., and one key, value 1 d., the goods of Sir John Lade , Bart ., from his person .

SIR JOHN LADE , BART. On the 2d of October, I went out of my house at Kensington-gore , to speak to a friend at the door, between eleven and twelve o'clock - there was a great crowd - somebody came up, hit me very hard, and my watch was immediately pulled from my pocket; I turned round and saw a man running away swinging it in his hand. I called Stop thief! he was pursued, and in about half an hour I heard the man and the watch were taken. I cannot say the prisoner is the man.

JAMES GRAY . I live at Kensington. I saw the prisoner running across a grass field by the road, about half-past eleven o'clock - he jumped over a fence into a ditch, and ran along the ditch - I stopped him, he took hold of a tree, and got out of the ditch; I seized him again, King came to my assistance, and as we were taking him back he slipped his arms out of his jacket, and got away. We took him again. Gallon found the watch in the hollow tree.

JAMES KING . I was at the corner of Gore-lane, and saw the prisoner run past with something like a blue watch-ribbon in his hand - the prosecutor was running, and called Stop thief! the prisoner ran down a lane, broke through a gap, and got into a field; I followed him, and saw him running along a dry ditch. Gray took him. I saw the watch found in the hollow tree - I had seen him go to that tree.

HENRY YATES . I am a constable. The prisoner was given into my charge in the field. I took him to a public-house. Gallon delivered me the watch.

THOMAS GALLON . I heard the alarm, saw the prisoner come out of the ditch, and go to the tree. Gray secured him, he got from him, but was taken again directly. Some men came up, said he was not the man, and called out to knock the man down who held him. Three men went towards the tree, I followed them, one of them had his hand in the tree when I went up; they said the watch was not there, and wanted me to go to the next tree, but I shoved them away, and found the watch there.

ISAAC MARTIN . I was walking in the nursery, saw a mob, and heard the cry of Stop thief; I jumped over to the field, and saw the prisoner at the foot of the tree - Gray and King secured him, he ran away, leaving his jacket in their hands, and I stopped him. Some men came up, and said the thimble (which means a watch), was not in the tree - Gallon found it there.

GEORGE HEALL . I was working in the nursery-ground - a procession was going to the Queen - I saw the prisoner run down the field, and jump into a ditch. I saw him at the tree the watch was found in. Gray secured him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I heard an alarm, and saw the man jump into the ditch, and followed him some distance, they came and charged me with it.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years. - Penitentiary .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18201028-19

1244. THOMAS HUNT , THOMAS EATON , JOHN HUGHES , and JOHN SMITH were indicted for feloniously assaulting James Perkins on the King's highway, at Wilsden , on the 16th of September , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, one watch, value 5 l.; one ribbon, value 1 d.; one seal, value 6 d.; one key, value 1 d.; one tobacco-box, value 1 d.; one penknife, value 2 d.; one pair of gloves, value 1 d.; three balls of worsted, value 1 d., and 9 s. 2 d., in monies numbered, his property .

JAMES PERKINS . I live at Sudbury, near Harrow on the Hill, and am a gardener . On the 16th of September, between ten and eleven o'clock, I was coming from town alone, and when I got within four miles of home, just on this side of the stone bridge on the Harrow-road, near the Coach and Horses, public-house, I heard the sound of some people in the road, in a kind of a trot run - it appeared the sound of more than one person. I stopped a moment, and three of them passed me in the road. I said

"I wish you good night, gentlemen, you seem in a hurry" - they made no answer, but went on twelve or fourteen yards, and jumped up on the footpath. When I came up to them one or two others came behind me, and patted me on the shoulder; one of those before me said,

"D - n you, have you got any money?" I said

"No, I am only a hard-working man, have nothing to depend on but the sweat of my brow, and have been out of a situation since February - you cannot expect I have much about me." I had scarcely spoken these words before those in front turned my waistcoat pocket inside out, took my tobacco-box and penknife, took my watch from my fob, which cost me seven guineas and a half, and about 9 s. in silver from my pocket - they also took some halfpence and three balls of worsted from my coat pocket - they returned the worsted. When they were going to rob me, I told them I hoped they did not intend to ill-use me; one of them said No, if I did not resist.

Q. You know none of them - A. No, it was very dark. I said I thought none of them were much taller than myself, but I could not exactly tell; they might have stooped. On the 9th of October I saw a white-handled penknife in the hands of Lack, which was that I lost; I have found nothing else.

SAMUEL LACK . I was in company with my brother officers on the Harrow-road for near a week, and on Saturday night, the 30th of September, about eight o'clock; the prisoners, Hughes and Smith, passed as; Hunt and Eaton came on, and bid us good night - they were about one hundred yards behind the others. Limbrick, Chapman, and Woodbury were with me. We jumped up and pursued them all; they were walking on. Hunt and Eaton were then before Smith and Hughes. I went up to Smith, and said,

"What are you doing here? I am an officer." He directly pulled out this pistol - (producing it.) I seized it by the barrel, and wrenched it from him, it was loaded with powder and shot. I handcuffed him, turned my head round, and Eaton was by his side; I collared him, and Woodbury came to my assistance. I searched Smith, and found on him a half-crown, a shilling, a six pence, and a pocket-piece; and on Eaton I found five half-crowns, two shillings, two-pence, and a knife. Limbrick took Hughes, and Chapman took Hunt. Perkins claimed the knife. A pistol was found on Hunt in my presence.

RICHARD LIMBRICK . On the 30th of September I was watching on the Harrow-road; Smith and Hughes came up first, the other two came up directly after. We were sitting on a rail in the footpath. Woodbury and Chapman came up to us, we followed them; Lack took Smith and Eaton; Hughes was coming towards me, I laid hold of him and he of me. Hunt ran towards London, Chapman followed and secured him. I found a small clasp knife on Hughes.

ROBERT CHAPMAN . I was with the officers, and took Hunt - he ran from the rest towards London; I desired him to stop, or I would fire through him. I secured him, attempted to search him, and he pulled this pistol out, which I took from him, it was loaded with powder and swan-shot. I found a purse on him, with two 1 l. notes in it, four-pence, three half-crowns, and a sixpence - I also found a silk handkerchief and comb, which have since been owned.

WILLIAM WOODBURY . Limbrick and I took Hughes. I searched him, and found a steel purse, three 1 l. Bank notes, two half-crowns, a sixpence, and a comb.

JAMES PERKINS re-examined. The knife found on Eaton is mine; the handle is split right round the rivet. I gave 2 s. 6 d. for it, and have had it seven years.

EATON'S Defence. I bought the knife at a stall in Gee's-court; I cannot exactly say the shop, but a little girl came out, and asked me 1 s. for it, I gave her 9 d. I have had it about six weeks. I bought it when I was making hat-boxes in the Summer, and bought a pair of scissars at the same time.

EATON - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 26.

HUNT - NOT GUILTY .

HUGHES - NOT GUILTY .

SMITH - NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18201028-20

1245. THOMAS HUNT , THOMAS EATON and JOHN HUGHES were again indicted for feloniously assaulting Etienne Bertin on the King's highway at Paddington , on the 27th of September , putting him in fear; and taking from his person, and against his will, one watch, value 34 l.; two seals, value 6 l.; one key, value 1 l.; one lancet case, value 8 l.; one box coat, value 6 l.; one handkerchief, value 2 s.; 14 s. in monies numbered; one 10 l. and six 1 l. Bank notes, his property .

MR. ETIENNE BERTIN. I am a surgeon , and live in Berner's-street. On the last Wednesday in September, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, I was in the Harrow-road, in a single horse chaise, alone; a little beyond the two mile stone from London, three men came up to me - the road was repairing, and I was driving very gently - it was very dark. They came from the footpath, rushed up to me, and cried

"Stop!" One took hold of the reins at the horse's head, another came on the left, and got into the gig; the other came on the right and got on the step. The man who got in presented a pistol at my forehead, and demanded what I had. He took from my left breeches pocket one 10 l. and six 1 l. notes; he desired me to be quiet and he would not hurt me. The man on the step took my gold watch from my fob, which had two gold seals, a gold key, and a ring; he also took 15 s. or 16 s., and from one of my pockets I lost a gold lancet-case, containing two lancets; he took a silk handkerchief, and demanded my box-coat - I begged for it, saying I was a medical man, going a great distance, and that the weather was very cold. The one who held the reins called out,

"Blow his b - dy brains out, if he does not make haste!" They took the coat, and the one on the left looked to see if he had dropped anything in the gig, and finding my glove, he gave it to me, and told me to drive on. They went through a field. I have since seen my pocket handkerchief at Bow-street on the Monday after I was robbed, or the Thursday following. I will not swear, but I really believe Eaton, by his voice, to be the man who presented the pistol, and Hughes, by his voice, I believe to be the man who came on my right. Hunt I will not swear to, but it was a slender man who held the horse.

ROBERT CHAPMAN . On the 30th of September I was out with other officers - we took the prisoners; Hunt was the foremost towards the country. I told him to stop, for I was an officer, he immediately ran towards London. I told him if he did not stop I would fire at him, he pulled out a pistol. I secured him, and found two 1 l. notes, three half-crowns, a sixpence, four-pence, a steel purse, a handkerchief, and a comb on him. The pistol was loaded with swan-shot and powder.

WILLIAM WOODBURY . I searched Hughes, and found three 1 l. notes, two half-crowns, a steel purse, and a comb on him.

MR. BERTIN re-examined. The handkerchief is mine, and the one stolen that night. I know it by its being a particular pattern, and have had it many years.

HUNT'S Defence. I bought the handkerchief in Monmouth-street, seven months ago, for 2 s.

HUNT - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 23.

HUGHES - NOT GUILTY .

EATON - NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18201028-21

1246. THOMAS HUNT , THOMAS EATON , and JOHN HUGHES were again indicted for feloniously assaulting

Joel Tilke on the King's highway, at Wilsden , on the 21st of September , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, one watch, value 4 l.; one chain, value 2 l.; one seal, value 10 s.; one key, value 2 s.; one pocket-book, value 6 d.; one comb, value 2 d.; eight keys, value 6 d., and 25 s. 2 d. in monies numbered, his property .

JOEL TILKE . I am a baker , and live at Harrow. On Thursday, the 21st of September, about half-past seven or eight o'clock. I was in the Harrow-road, going home in my chaise-cart, at the rate of six miles an hour, the moon was remarkably bright; I saw three men about twenty yards off, as I advanced near they separated - one sprung from the footpath and seized my horse, that was Hughes. Eaton went round to the horse's head and caught hold of the reins likewise - the other prisoner jumped on the step of the cart, and the other jumped up, both came into the cart nearly together. Hunt had this bludgeon - (producing it) - it is the rail of a fence; it dropped out of his hand as he searched me, and I found it in the road. I asked what they wanted? they said my money. I said,

"You shall have it if you will not illtreat me;" both said,

"We will not ill-treat you." Hunt said he would not ill-treat me if I would be quiet. He rifled my pockets, and took about 25 s. my comb, and a bunch of keys, which he returned. They searched for my watch, but did not feel it then. Eaton drew a knife, went behind the cart, trod on the wheel, felt for my pocket, and found a pocket-book in it, he cut my pocket off and took it away altogether. I asked them to have the goodness to give me the papers which were in it, and which were of no service to them; they did not, but all retreated into the footpath. I stood up in my cart, and asked them to return my papers, as they were of service to me. They returned and threw the pocket-book into the cart without the papers. There was a 10 l. bill in it which they took. They entered the cart again as I stood up, unbuttoned my coat, and my watch-chain dropped down, they then found I had a watch. I said,

"Don't take my watch;" they said,

"We shall have it," took it, and retreated - it was a silver watch, the chain, seal and key were gold. It was very light - I saw all the prisoners as plainly as I do now and had an opportunity of taking a full view of them. I have since seen the tortoise-shell comb in Chapman's possession. I had had it for a year.

Prisoner HUNT. Q. At the first examination you fixed on Smith instead of me and pointed him out - A. I did not. I recognized Hunt immediately, and did not point at all.

ROBERT CHAPMAN . I searched Hunt, and found a comb on him.

JOEL TILKE re-examined. It is the comb Hunt took out of my pocket; it has been in my family twenty years.

HUNT'S Defence. I had the comb of a fellow-servant when I lived in the Strand.

HUNT - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 23.

EATON - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 26.

HUGHES - GUILTY. - DEATH . Aged 20.

HUGHES Recommended to Mercy .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18201028-22

1247. MICHAEL FOGERTY was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of September , one gun, value 20 l., the goods of John Manton and George Henry Manton , privately in their shop .

JAMES FOREMAN . I am servant to Messrs. John and George Henry Manton , gun-maker s, who live in Dover-street, Piccadilly . On the 30th of September, between four and five o'clock in the afternoon, I saw a gun being taken out of the shop - the door leads into the passage. I ran to the door and laid hold of the prisoner, the gun was then in the passage, and he was close to it - he denied taking it. Paytou came, he then asked for Gibson, who was called down, and said he had seen him once or twice. The prisoner was asked what he had to say to him? he hesitated, and said it was about his wife.

WILLIAM WARNER . I am servant to the prosecutors. About half an hour before the prisoner was taken, I was going to the Gloucester Coffee-house, and saw the prisoner about my master's door, he asked if that was Mr. Manton's? I said Yes. He asked if Gibson worked there, and said he wanted to speak to him. I told the clerk, and then came out and said he was not at work. He walked away.

EDWARD PAYTON . I found the prisoner in Freeman's custody; he asked if that was Mr. Manton's? I said Yes, He said he wanted Gibson. I said,

"If you want Gibson you must have known this was Mr. Manton's." He said he did not. Gibson was called down, he asked the prisoner his business, he objected to tell - Gibson authorised him to tell. He then said there was a dispute between Gibson and his wife. Mrs. Gibson was sent for - she said she had not sent him. The gun was in my possession three minutes before.

SARAH GIBSON . On the morning of the 30th of September I was going to move, the prisoner's mistress gave him leave to help me - he left at eleven o'clock, as I did not like him to help me. I did not send him to my husband - there was a dispute between us, and we were going to separate.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. Warner brought me word that Gibson was not there. I said I would return in half an hour, which I did. I knocked at the door, but did not like to tell my business, as it was a family quarrel.

WILLIAM WARNER re-examined. He did not say he should return.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18201028-23

1248. THOMAS SIMMONDS was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of September , six sheep, price 4 l., the property of William Harding , and one sheep, price 12 s., the property of Isaac Harding .

WILLIAM HARDING . I live at Cobham, in Surry . I had twenty-three sheep on the Common and my brother had three. I saw them safe on Saturday night, the 10th of June, and next morning missed twenty of mine - I found six of mine and one of my brother's on Thursday, the 28th of September, in possession of Watson, and on the following Saturday I found one, they were mine. Some had the tip of the near ear cut off, about seven of my ewes were so. They had been shorn since they were stolen.

Watson is a shepherd, and lives twenty-five miles from me.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODERICK. Q. The tips of their ears are cut off when they have the staggers, to bleed them - A. Yes, but this was done as a mark. I know them also by the breed, it was a forest breed.

ISAAC HARDING . On the 10th of June I had three sheep on the Common; I lost them, and found one in Watson's possession, it had the tip of the near ear cut off, and the near fore-leg was broken. We found them on Thursday, the 28th of September.

JOSEPH WATSON . I live at Westend, in Northolt parish, and deal in sheep. William and Isaac Harding claimed seven sheep which I had; I bought them of the prisoner, who is a shepherd, and lodged at Northaw then - he was looking after three or four hundred sheep in the same fold with me - he had no land of his own. I gave him 12 s. 3 d. each for them.

Cross-examined. Q. Is it common to fold sheep on other people's land - A. Yes. They were lean sheep - I put them in among four hundred, the prosecutors picked them out. They had seen them in my fold before they came to me.

WILLIAM HARDING re-examined. All those we found were ewes.

Prisoner's Defence. I gave my brother 12 s. each for them.

JOHN SHEWSMITH . I am a labourer, and live at Northolt, the prisoner lived nine or ten weeks at my house. On a Sunday, after they had had their dinner (I think it was two or three months ago) at my house, the prisoner asked his brother for a little money, Stephen said he had none at present, but would sell him some ewes or wethers if he liked. They agreed for seven ewes, at 12 s. each - they came to four guineas; the prisoner then said if he would give him 16 s., it would make the sum he owed him, which was 5 l.

COURT. Q. Did you see any money paid - A. Yes, 16 s. I heard them say they fetched the sheep from Harrow on the Hill. I saw them six or seven weeks ago at Northolt, in the field.

Q. Tell us when you saw them last - A. I cannot say exactly - it was a month or five weeks ago the outside; they were then in the possession of Stephen - it was after the bargain was made.

Q. Did you ever know them sell each other sheep before - A. No. I cannot say they were the sheep which Watson had.

STEPHEN SIMMONDS . I am the prisoner's brother, he lived at Shewsmith's - I was there; it might be two months ago. I owed my brother 5 l., and agreed to sell him seven sheep at 12 s. each, and paid him 16 s.

COURT. Q. Did you lodge at Shewsmith's - A. No; I occasionally slept there a night or two, and did so when I agreed about the sheep.

Q. You are now charged with stealing sheep, for which you are to be tried at Surry - A. Yes. I had them in my possession from the 18th of June.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18201028-24

1249. SARAH CORBYN was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of October , 50 lbs. of paper, value 16 s. 8 d. , the goods of William Lewis Newman .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be the property of the Mayor, Commonalty, and Citizens of the City of London .

MR. BOLLAND conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM THOMAS . I am shopman to Samuel Harrison , who is a cheesemonger, and lives in Fore-street. I know the prisoner perfectly well, and have frequently bought waste paper of her. On Saturday, the 7th of October, between twelve and one o'clock, she brought some, it weighed 11 1/2 lbs., I gave her 4 d. a pound for it. It is in the hands of Drinkwater.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Was it tied round with red tape when you bought it - A. Yes. I thought nothing improper in it.

RICHARD WARD . I am shopman to Mr. Harrison. I know the prisoner from her frequenting the shop to sell waste-paper. I remember her coming in October with some, which Thomas gave her 4 d. a pound for.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Nothing struck you as to its being improper for waste-paper - A. No. We call it waste-paper, whether it is written on or not.

GEORGE SWINBURN . I am a cheesemonger and pork-man. I have bought different lots of paper of the prisoner. I bought some the beginning of this month, which I gave to Harrison. She said it was waste-paper thrown out of the office.

JAMES CHAPPELL . I am a porkman. I know the prisoner perfectly well, and have bought a great deal of waste-paper of her four years ago, and up to the last two months. I have given 170 lbs. of it to the officer.

WILLIAM DRINKWATER . I am a constable. I took the prisoner into custody. She said she had never sold any paper - I produce paper which I received from Harrison; they are principally briefs.

ANTHONY HARRISON . I am a Marshal's-man. I produce some paper given to me by Swinburn and Harrison.

DANIEL BENJAMIN LEADBETTER . I am a Marshal's-man. I produce two parcels of paper delivered to me by Chapell - he afterwards delivered 170 lbs.

WILLIAM LEWIS NEWMAN , ESQ. I am the City Solicitor; the prisoner was employed as an assistant to Mrs. Ferler, the laundress - she has been employed there about four years. The papers belong to my office, and consist of office and fair copies of grants to Christ's Hospital, and a number of cases, with opinions on them, extremely valuable. Many of them are private papers, and are the property of the Corporation.

Cross-examined. Q. When did you see any of them last - A. Some of them within the last six months. Some papers relating to one case were put into a box, and the key of that box was taken out of my clerk's desk.

SARAH FERLER . I was laundress to the City Solicitor, and had been so twenty years. The prisoner has assisted me between four and five years. There was a quantity of papers in the chambers when she first came. I have not attended lately, being ill. I always told her never to meddle with papers written on, and not to destroy them. She also worked for the Remembrancer and Mr. Montague; I was laundress to them all. I had noticed her with money, which excited my suspicion, and

asked her how she came by it? she said she had a friend, who supplied her.

Cross-examined. Q. Can she write and read - A. She can read and scribble. I have been dismissed through her misconduct, as I could not attend myself.

Prisoner. I leave it to my Counsel.

GUILTY . Aged 46.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18201028-25

1250. EDWARD HUGO was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of October , one watch, value 50 l., the goods of William Norris , from his person .

WILLIAM NORRIS , ESQ . On the 19th of October, about six o'clock, I was at the corner of Jewin-street , in my way to Aldersgate-street; I was met by three men, one of whom rushed against me, and with the rapidity of lightning took hold of my watch-chain, which he pulled out - it was so instantaneous I could not prevent it - he ran away very fast. I pursued, giving an alarm; he was taken at the end of Maidenhead-passage, about a hundred and fifty yards off, and conveyed into a public-house. The prisoner is the man who took my watch, I have no doubt of it.

JOHN LACY HAWKINS . I am a Marshal's-man of the City, and live within twenty yards of where the prisoner was stopped. Some neighbours knocked at my door, I went out, and found the prisoner in custody of the prosecutor, who charged him with stealing his watch, and said he saw him take it.

JAMES ALLEN SPEERING . My father sells goods on commission. I found the watch in Maidenhead-passage; the chain and seals were snapped off and laid by it. I found them about half-past six o'clock, all was quiet then. It was returned to Mr. Norris.

WILLIAM NORRIS , ESQ. re-examined. The watch is under repair - I produce the chain and seals.

LAWRENCE COX . I am a ribbon-dresser. I was coming out of Castle-street into Maidenhead-court, and heard a cry of Stop thief! the prisoner came running along, I collared and held him till Mr. Norris came up and said he was the man. He asked me to let him go.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18201028-26

1251. WILLIAM JACKMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of October , 195 lbs. of lead, value 20 s., belonging to Thomas Dell , and fixed to a building of his .

ELIZA DELL . I am the wife of Thomas Dell , who keeps a livery-stable . On the 16th of October, about half-past ten o'clock at night, the watchman said there was a man upon the top of the ride, who he believed was our servant . (the prisoner had lived with us, but had left us about nine months) I took a candle, went down, and found him at his lodgings, in a tenement at the bottom of the ride. I said it would be better for him to own it. The lead was taken from the ride.

JOSEPH WILLIAMS . I am a watchman. At ten o'clock, I was going up White Horse-yard under the ride, and on entering the bottom of the yard I heard something fall very heavy in the stable or loft. I stood a short time, and heard the tiles rattle; I put my light out, went under the ride, and heard the tiles rattle again. I kept my eye on the place, and saw a man's leg three times. I went to the public-house, and beckoned Corking out; he looked up, and saw a man's leg. The landlord came out; I lifted him upon the wall so that he could get on the ride. Morris also went up. In the mean time the prisoner came out of the stable-door; I said

"William is it you?" he said Yes, I said

"Some person was on the top of the ride, I hope it was not you?" he said No, he had laid down in the stable, and went to sleep, and some noise awoke him. A light was called for by Corking; he went to his apartments, and fetched one. One Walford came out of the hay-loft, and said to the prisoner

"You are the man" - he said No. I am not. He gave me the candle in my hand. I then went to his apartment, and he was given in in charge. Mrs. Dell said he must go the watch-house; he fell on his knees, and begged she would shew him mercy, for the sake of his family, and acknowledged taking the lead.

WILLIAM CORKING . The watchman called me; I went down the ride, and saw a man's leg on the top of the tiles. I got upon the wall, and saw a man close by a hole, which had been made by taking the tiles off; I saw him go down there into the loft. I called to the persons in the yard, that I believed it was William, but was not certain. He was hostler there formerly. He was quite out of my sight, I could not discern whether it was him or not. I went to the hole, and there found a cursingle on the tiles close by the gutter; I got down the hole, and put my feet upon the lead in the loft; I immediately saw somebody come out of the stable-door. Nobody else was in the loft.

FRANCIS MORRIS . I heard a watchman come into the public-house, and call Corking. I went on the ride, and saw Corking upon the roof; he said somebody was gone through the hole, and in about two minutes I saw the prisoner come out of the stable, which the hole led to. I found the lead by the hole, and matched it to the gutter, it matched.

JAMES HERBERT . I am a patrol. I took the prisoner to the watch-house with the lead. I pulled his hands out of his pockets, they were all over lead; I said

"You are the lead merchant." I am certain he had been handling lead.

MARGARET HOWLET . I saw the prisoner upon the tiles in the gutter many times; he said he was looking where the wet came in.

Prisoner's Defence. Mrs. Dell came, and said if I would acknowledge it, no harm should come to me. Instead of my begging her pardon, I refused to do it. I admit I have been on the tiles cleaning the gutter, as the wet came in upon my bed, but was not on this night. On this evening I was rather tipsey, and quarrelled with my wife; I went to sleep in the stable, and was awoke by a noise, came out, and asked what it was about. Two or three men might have come out, while I went for the light.

GUILTY . Aged 32.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18201028-27

1252. JOHN WOOTTON , WILLIAM TOMS , and DAVID HUTLEY were indicted for stealing, on the 7th of September , ten tea spoons, value 3 l. 10 s., and 13 s. in copper monies, numbered, the property of Frederick Gye and Thomas Bish . One handkerchief, value 2 s. 6 d.; one crown-piece; one half-crown piece; 18 s., and seven sixpences, the property of Betsey Tucker ; and one handkerchief, value 4 s., the goods of Mary Buncombe .

FREDERICK GYE . I am a tea-dealer , and live in Ludgate-hill , in partnership with Thomas Bish . Wootton was our errand boy . I came to town on the evening of the 18th of September, I found two or three rooms had been opened, and property stolen. Wootton was not in the habit of coming on Sundays.

BETSEY TUCKER. I am servant to Mr. Gye. I went to Church at three o'clock in the afternoon, returned at seven o'clock, and missed this property. I found every thing turned out of my box.

SAMUEL SNEED . I am servant to the prosecutors. I let Wootton in about half-past five o'clock in the evening. I was at home all day - nobody but him came. I let him out about seven o'clock.

MARY BUNCOMBE . I am servant to Mr. Gye. I was in the country with him. I lost a handkerchief.

MARTIN RAINFORTH . I am porter to Mr. Gye. I was sent to Chatham with a warrant to apprehend Wootton and Hutley. I got information on board a ship, and found Toms and Wootton sitting in a public-house, eating soup with these silver spoons; they laid them upon the table as we entered the room. The officer took six spoons off the table, and we found two upon Toms, also a crown, half-crown, one shilling, and a silk handkerchief claimed by Tucker, and round Wootton's neck I found a silk handkerchief; I asked him what had become of the remaining spoon? he said we took but nine - (I had found one upon a sailor boy, who was with them) - he said

"I took nothing, Hutley took all." He then asked me what time it was found out? I said on Sunday afternoon; he said that was impossible, for it was eight o'clock when the thing was done.

WILLIAM MARKWELL . I am a patrol. I was informed that Hutley was concerned in the robbery; I went to his father's house in Little Bell-alley, and asked if he was there? his mother said No, he had not slept there since Tuesday - (this was Thursday evening) - I said it was useless saying so, for he was seen going into the house; she then said he was in the house. I went up, and found him upon the bed; I took him to the watch-house, and said it was a pity he went on as he did; he said he would tell me the truth - I neither threatened or promised him. He said on the day previous to the robbery, Wootton told him if he and Toms came to Fleet-street on Sunday, he should be able to supply them with money; that he and Toms accordingly went on Sunday evening, Wootton let them in, and they carried out 23 s. in silver, 13 s. 6 d. in copper, three silk handkerchiefs, and ten spoons. They then went to Gravesend by the boat, and sold one of the spoons to a Jew, for 1 s., after breaking the mark off the top. He said if I had come a day later, he had got a ship and was going away.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

WOOTTON'S Defence. Hutley told the officer wrong. He was after me for a fortnight, and Toms did not go into the house.

HUTLEY'S Defence. While I was helping a woman to move goods on Saturday, Wootton came up with a bag of tea, and asked me to go to Piccadilly with him, as he had a plan laid out; I said I would not, as I was moving goods; he said I should get much more by it, and I went with him. He said he had been nearly four hours gone with the tea, and expected to be turned away; and the best way was to get some money, and be off. I went with him on Sunday, as the officer said; he told me to crawl upon my hands and knees; I said he had better let me go out, he called me a coward, and gave me ten spoons to take out. Toms was waiting at a distance.

JOHN WOOTTON - GUILTY . Aged 14.

WILLIAM TOMS - GUILTY . Aged 17.

DAVID HUTLEY - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18201028-28

THIRD DAY. FRIDAY, OCTOBER 27.

1253. JOHN MOONE , PHILLIS JOHNS , RACHAEL HERBERT , RICHARD STEPHENS , ANN PRINCE , WILLIAM BANTON , WILLIAM SMITH , ROBERT GREENHILL , ANN CLIFTON , MARY LAMBERT , RUBEN DAVY , JAMES CRIDLAND , JOHN SCOTT HEATH , JOHN MATHESON , THOMAS WITTEY , MOSES BANNISTER , SUSAN DILLOW , ANN DEAN , ELIZA SLATER , and ELIZA BURNHAM , were severally and separately indicted for feloniously having forged 1 l. Bank notes in their possession, knowing them to be forged .

To which indictments they severally pleaded

GUILTY .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Before Mr. Recorder.

1254. The same prisoners were again indicted for feloniously and knowingly disposing of and putting away forged Bank notes, with intend to defraud .

MR. REYNOLDS, on behalf of the prosecution, declined offering any evidence.

NOT GUILTY .

Before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18201028-29

1255. SOPHIA ANDREWS was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of October , at St. Leonard, Shoreditch, one watch, value 10 l.; one chain, value 1 l.; one seal, value 10 s., and one key, value 5 s., the goods of Francis Bayliss , in his dwelling-house .

ESTHER BAYLISS . I am the wife of Francis Bayliss , we live at No. 10, Hill-street, St. Leonard, Shoreditch ; the prisoner took a furnished lodging at my house, on the first floor, at 16 s. a week - she always dined with me in my parlour - she left on Friday morning, the 6th of October, and said she was going to Blackwater. A morocco box was in a drawer in my parlour, containing a lady's gold watch, a neck-chain, a seal, a key, and three rings, all gold. She dined with me on Tuesday, and I asked

her to do some needle-work; while she was doing it she said Mrs. West, who lived on the second floor, told her I had a gold watch. I took it out of the box, shewed it to her, put it back again, and did not see it afterwards. I missed it on Saturday, she was then gone. Before she went she gave me two 1 l. notes for her lodging; one of them had

"Robson, No. 7, Duke-street, Mile End," on it. I went there, and in consequence of what I heard went to Robertson's, a pawnbroker, at the corner of Widegate-alley, Bishopsgate, and found every thing, except the rings. She lodged three weeks with us.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODERICK. Q. You have many female lodgers - A. Not many; they are all females. I lived there twelve months before I was married - I have been married two years.

Q. Your lodgers are visited by gentlemen - A. Yes. I did not know the prisoner till a week before she came to us, which was three weeks before the robbery. My maiden name was Taylor - I have gone by the name of Williams. I have lived with two gentlemen, and went by their names.

Q. On your solemn oath, when you shewed the prisoner the watch, did you not desire her to pledge it -

Witness. Am I to answer that question, my Lord?

COURT. Most undoubtedly - A. I never did. I had redeemed it about a week before. I never said I directed her to pledge it. I had redeemed it not many weeks before.

COURT. Q. What was your reason for asking whether you was to answer a question perfectly innocent - A. Because the gentleman seemed to ask such inconsistent things. I never did authorize her to pledge it.

FRANCIS BAYLISS . I am husband of the last witness. I was married at St. Bride's church, Fleet-street, on the 6th of November last - at that time I lived in Paul-street, Finsbury.

Q. That is not in the parish of St. Bride. How came you to be married there - A. My wife wished it. We were married by banns. The prisoner lodged in our house. On Saturday, the 7th, in consequence of what my wife told me I went to Robson's, and on Monday went to Robertson's. I was obliged to pay away the notes I took of the prisoner. I found the property at Robertson's. My wife let the prisoner the lodging.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you know what she came to lodge with you for - A. I believe she came for what the lodgings are let for. I only knew her while she lodged there.

Q. Look at her - do you mean to swear you have not known her some years - A. Not to my knowledge. I think I have some recollection of her about seven years ago living in Leonard-street - I visited her once there. I am not certain it was her.

Q. On your oath, when she came to lodge with you, did you not recognise her as an old acquaintance - A. I said I thought I had seen her.

THOMAS VANN . I am an officer. I produce a 1 l. note, which I found in the prisoner's pocket at Northall Cottage, Hampshire, on the 15th of October.

WILLIAM MORRISON . I am servant to Mr. Robertson, a pawnbroker. On the 5th of October, between six and half-past seven o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came to the shop with a small morocco box, containing a gold watch, chain, seal, and key; she wanted to sell it, I objected to that, but I took it in pledge for 8 l., in the name of Mary Wright . I know the note produced to have been in my possession on that day, by the writing of our shop-man on it, but will not swear I gave it her. I am sure she is the woman. I gave her seven 1 l. notes if not eight.

THOMAS VANN re-examined. I asked her where she got the note? she said she took it on Friday morning at the Spread Eagle, Gracechurch-street, where she paid her fare, in change for a 2 l. note, which she received from a gentleman at the west end of the town, who was a stranger. I asked her if she had ever pawned a watch at Robertson's, in Bishopsgate-street? she said No, and asked me what would be done to her? I said it was impossible for me to say, and then asked her what she had done with the ticket? she said she had destroyed it - she had denied pledging it.

Cross-examined. Q. Why did you enter into conversation with her - A. I thought it my duty.

(Property produced, and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent of taking it.

GEORGE NORTON . I am an optician. I have known Esther Bayliss from an infant.

Q. Would you believe her on her oath - A. I might in some cases; there are cases in which I would not. I have heard her say she pledged her watch to pay her rent - it was before this robbery.

COURT. Q. You visited her - A. She visited me, and I received her visits.

SUSAN NORTON . I am the wife of the last witness, we live in Fleet-market; the prosecutrix is his niece - I have known her fifteen years since I have been married to him. I would not believe her on her oath. She told me she pledged her watch to pay her rent.

COURT. Q. How long before that did she say it had been done - A. It might be eight weeks ago. I understood her to say she had pledged it some months previous. She came to see me about once a fortnight, and I called on her when I went that way, to keep up a regular intercourse with her.

GUILTY. - DEATH . Aged 26.

Recommended to Mercy .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18201028-30

1256. MARY LEONARD was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of March , at St. Luke, in the dwelling-house of James Green , one 10 l. and seven 1 l. Bank notes, his property .

FRANCES GREEN . I am the wife of James Green, who lives at Howard's-green, City-road, in the parish of St. Luke ; the prisoner has ironed for me eight or nine months - I take in washing. On the 23d of February she came to borrow 10 s. for Mrs. Nettleship, a laundress, whom she also worked for. I was ill in bed, and ordered my daughter, who is thirteen years old, to go to the drawer, and give me a pair of stockings, which I kept my money in - she brought the stocking, I took a note from the rest, and gave it to the prisoner - there was a 10 l. and seven 1 l. notes remaining. She stood at my bedside, saw me unroll the notes, and saw the drawer the stocking was taken from; it was in the same room and not locked; she saw it put back into the same drawer. I gave her a note, and told her Mrs. Nettleship might send me the change or not, as she liked. She went out, and came to work for me that, and the next week, as usual, and on the 6th of

March she came to beg a bit of starch for her cap. She knew I had to go to Brunswick-square, between twelve and one o'clock, to fetch linen. I went, leaving her in the house, alone, ironing her cap at a quarter before twelve o'clock. I returned in about an hour and a half, she was then gone; my little girl was then at home. I went to my drawer for money on the Thursday following, found the stocking unrolled, and the notes all gone. I missed one 10 l. and seven 1 l. Bank notes. She did not come to my house after that. She had told me she lived at No. 11, Edmond-street, Battle-bridge; I went there but did not find her. I enquired at different shops - a boy took me to No. 3, Paradise-place, Battle-bridge; I saw her bonnet hanging up, but Dudley, who kept the house, said she was gone to the Isle of Wight. I went with her to Button's, a pawnbroker, at Battle-bridge, who shewed me a 10 l. note. I do not know it myself, but Mr. Allingham is here, who paid it to me.

SARAH DUDLEY . I live at No. 3, Paradise-row, my husband is a paviour. I have known the prisoner about twelve months, she lived with me about three months. She came on Friday or Saturday about three months ago, and said she had got a laundress's place to go to the Isle of Wight. She said on the following Monday, if they would not pay her passage back she would not go. She came in about eleven or twelve o'clock, and said they were willing to pay her passage, and had advanced her some money to redeem her things. She asked me to go with her to Button's, the pawnbroker. I went; she gave him some tickets, he said he could not give her change, she said she must go and get it. She had offered him a 10 l. note. She went out for change, returned, and said she could not get it, he then changed it for her. She told me she was going to return the change to the gentleman who gave her the money, but did not say where he lived. On Thursday Mrs. Green came to enquire about her. She had left my house on the Thursday morning. I took her to the pawnbroker's.

DANIEL BUTTON . I am a pawnbroker, and live at Battle-bridge. On the 6th of March the prisoner paid me a 10 l. note to redeem some pledges, the amount was 13 s. I gave her change, after she had been out and could not get it. I wrote the name and address she gave me on the note; it was

" Mary Hopkins , No. 11, Edmond-street." I asked her who she received it from? she said from Mr. Farrington, No. 34, Bedford-square, which I also wrote. On the 15th of March I paid it into the Bank. I had shewed it to Green on the Thursday after the robbery.

GEORGE DYER . I am a clerk in the Bank. I produce a 10 l. paid in by Button on the 15th of March.

JOHN ALLINGHAM . I live in Hatton-garden; Green washes for my family. On the 8th of February I paid her 17 l. 6 s. 6 d. I gave her a 10 l. note, and the rest in small ones. The note produced has

"Hudson and Seabrook" on it in my writing. It has been through my hands - I cannot say it is that I paid her, but I rather think it is.

Prisoner's Defence. I got it from Mr. Farrang, who is gone to France. I went with the family to the Isle of Wight, and returned on the 17th of August. She has false-sworn herself - she left her daughter and a son eighteen years old in the house.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 38.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18201028-31

1257. LEWIS LAZARUS was indicted for feloniously assaulting James Filor , on the King's highway, on the 18th of October , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, one watch, value 5 l.; one chain, value 7 l.; two seals, value 5 l., and one key, value 10 s., his property .

JAMES FILOR . On the 18th of October, about six o'clock in the evening, I was getting into the Fulham stage, on the west side of Dover-street , I was surrounded by a mob, pressed very much, and as I put my foot on the step of the coach was robbed of my watch. I am certain it was the prisoner who snatched my watch - he was one of the crowd - they were returning from Hyde Park corner. I had a full view of his face, and saw the watch in his hand. I called Stop thief! pursued him about six yards, then got into the coach, and was informed he was taken. I found him in custody in a sadler's shop, not five minutes after. There was a very strong light. I am positive he is the man. I was very much hustled.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODERICK. Q. It was dark - A. There were very strong gas lights in a shop. I saw him clearly, and saw it in his hand.

EDWARD RHIND . I was in company with Read, close behind Mr. Filor - the sawyers were returning from Brandenburgh house - I saw the prisoner rush between him and Radauld, he put his left shoulder against Mr. Filor's right shoulder, and gave him a violent push. Supposing he had robbed him, I laid hold of him by the shoulder, and saw the watch pass; I believe it passed from his hand to another, who laid hold of it by the chain, it struck against a post, and the case fell off; the prisoner then got from my grasp, and was making off, when he saw the case on the ground, picked it up, and I secured him; my brother took it from his hand. I took him into a sadler's shop, Mr. Filor came in, and said he was certain he was the man.

Cross-examined. Q. His back was to you - A. No; his side. The case was picked up not four feet from the place.

RICHARD RADAULD . I was holding the coach door for Mr. Filor to get in; as he put one foot on the step the prisoner rushed up, and with main force hindered him from getting into the coach, and in a moment I saw the watch pass from towards him to a man, who ran away with it - it hit against a post, and the case came off. I instantly grasped at the prisoner, but could not stop him. He picked up the case, I collared him, and took him into the sadler's. Francis Rhind took the case from him.

Cross-examined. Q. Will you swear he took it - A. He is the man who rushed up to the prosecutor,

FRANCIS RHIND . I saw a gang of well known pickpockets round the coach. I saw the prisoner pick up the case, and took it from his hand - there was a great crowd.

CHARLES READ . I am a constable. I heard the alarm and assisted in apprehending him. I saw a gentleman hustled, but cannot say it was Filor, as I was behind.

(Watch-case produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I saw the case, and tried to pick it up, but was dragged into a shop.

GUILTY. Aged 25.

Of stealing from the person only .

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18201028-32

1258. PHILIP PHILLIPS was indicted for sacrilegiously stealing, on the 6th of September , in a certain chapel, one gown, value 2 l.; the goods of Andrew Reed ; two sets of robes, value 24 l.; one writing-desk, value 2 l.; one Bible, value 3 l., and one piece of carpet, value 6 s., the goods of Thomas Barker , James Walker , James Rose , Samuel Cole , Richard Levitt Brookes , and William Smith .

SECOND COUNT, stating them to belong to the said Andrew Reed .

THIRD COUNT, stating them to belong to Samuel Hawkins .

MR. ANDREWS conducted the prosecution.

REV . ANDREW REED . I am minister of Cannon-street-road Chapel , it is Independent, or Congregational Dissenters, not of the Church of England. On Wednesday night, the 6th of September, there was service in the chapel, I used one of the robes, there were three in the vestry. I had a writing-desk, with papers in it. I left the chapel about nine o'clock, Hawkins was there then - he keeps the key. The names of the trustees are rightly stated in the indictment.

SAMUEL HAWKINS . I keep the keys of the chapel. The robes are kept in a closet in Mr. Reed's study, over the Committee-room, I keep the key of it. On this night I shut up the chapel, and locked every thing up. Next day, about five o'clock, I went and missed the carpet from the pulpit stairs, the Bible, writing-desk, and all the gowns were gone. No outer doors were broken open. I suppose somebody had concealed themselves there the night before. Mr. Reed's study door was broken open.

SAMUEL MILLER . I am an officer of Lambeth-street. I searched the prisoner's house in Rosemary-lane on the 12th of September, by a warrant. In a closet on the second floor I found the scarf or sash, and on the third floor, on a bed, a quantity of papers laid, which Mr. Reed claimed.

WILLIAM FOSTER . I was with Miller, and found a carpet in the garret.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The Court ruled that the offence was not sacrilege, as the statute only affixed that protection to places of worship belonging to the Establishment.

GUILTY. Aged 42.

Of stealing, but not sacrilegiously .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18201028-33

1259. PHILIP PHILLIPS was again indicted for sacrilegiously stealing, on the 1st of September , in a certain chapel, one table, value 3 l., the goods of Benjamin Abbott and others .

1260. PHILIP PHILLIPS was again indicted for sacrilegiously stealing, on the 30th of August , in a certain chapel, two books, value 7 s. 6 d., the goods of James Vautin .

These cases being of the same nature, no evidence was offered.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18201028-34

1261. BRIDGET FARNES was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of September , one watch. value 25 s., and two seals, value 20 s., the goods of John Mahoney , in his dwelling-house .

JOHN MAHONEY . I am a tailor , and live in Shelton-court, Chandos-street . On the night of Saturday, the 26th of August, the prisoner came to my house, and said she had come by coach from Brighton, and was recommended to me to lodge, mine being a quiet house. I told her to stop until my wife came in. She said her husband was a valet, and lived in Russell-square. She lodged three weeks with us, and left on the 14th of September. On the Monday previous to her leaving, I had a few friends with me, and as my wife was letting them out, the candle went out; before it was lighted again, somebody took my watch off the shelf. On the Wednesday after she left, I saw her in St Giles's, and gave her in charge - she acknowledged stealing the watch.

Prisoner. Q. Were you drunk that night - A. Quite sober.

CATHERINE MAHONEY . I understood the prisoner lived at Lawrence-street, and went there. Mrs. Brown gave me the duplicate.

Prisoner. Q. Did not you send me to pawn it - A. No.

ANDREW CONWAY . I apprehended the prisoner. She said she was very sorry to be guilty of what she had, and that she took the watch and pawned it. I said nothing to induce her to confess it.

WILLIAM STILES . I am servant to Mr. Sherwin, a pawnbroker, who lives in Marylebone-street. On the 30th of August, the watch was pledged - I believe the prisoner to be the person.

GEORGE RICKETT . I am servant to Mr. Newton, a pawnbroker, who lives in Manchester-street. On the 29th of August, a seal was pledged; I do not know who by, but on the 20th of September, the prisoner came and said she had lost the duplicate, made an affidavit of, it, and brought a Jew with her to see if he would buy it.

JOHN MAHONEY re-examined. The watch and seal are mine. I am not certain when she first came.

GUILTY. Aged 22.

Of stealing to the value of 36 s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18201028-35

1262. MATTHEW WILKS and THOMAS THOMPSON were indicted for stealing; on the 25th of September , one watch, value 2 l.; one chain, value 6 d.; one seal, value 2 d., and one key, value 2 d., the goods of John Chandler , from his person .

WILKS pleaded

GUILTY .

Transported for Life .

JOHN CHANDLER . On the 25th of September, about twelve o'clock in the day, I was opposite Mr. Alderman Waithman's, in Bridge-street. St. Brides's parish were going up to address the Queen; my watch was snatched from me, I do not know who by.

WILLIAM WESTCOAT . I am an officer. On the 25th of September, I saw the prisoners in company together at Brandenburg House, attempting to pick people's pockets; Wilks went out of the crowd into a corner, and was fumbling about his breeches. I secured him, and found two handkerchiefs in his hat, and this watch in his fob; he

said he bought it at Bristol. The prisoner was in his company.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18201028-36

1263. THOMAS DORSET was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of September , one watch, value 3 l.; one seal, value 10 s.; one key, value 1 s., and one ribbon, value 1 s., the goods of James Pickles , from his person .

JAMES PICKLES . I am clerk to Messrs. Cardy and Co., of Bedford-row. On the 28th of September, between one and two o'clock in the day, I was on Ludgate-hill ; a procession was going to the Queen. A mob surrounded me, and my watch was snatched from my pocket. I seized the prisoner with it in his hand; I lost my hold, a gentleman collared him, took him into a shop, and it was found on him.

JOHN LAMBERT . I was on Ludgate-hill, and saw a procession coming. I stood next to the prosecutor - there was a great rush; I saw the prisoner in the centre of a gang of sixty or seventy - I saw him put his hand forward, and draw the watch out - I seized him with it in his hand. the prosecutor was struck, and I received several blows in the back of my neck, which nearly brought me to the ground. Several cried out

"Cut away!" I pulled him into a shop, and took the watch out of his hand; he said

"Here it is, I took it from another young man." I got an officer, who took him. The prisoner gave him a bunch of seals.

JOHN BARNLEY . I am an officer. I took the prisoner in charge. He gave me some seals, which he said he found on Ludgate-hill.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I took it out of the thief's hand.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18201028-37

1264. THOMAS REES was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of October , one waistcoat, value 4 s. , the goods of Samuel Sadler .

JOHN RICHMOND . I am shopman to Mr. Samuel Sadler , a pawnbroker , who lives in Aldersgate-street . On the 6th of October between four and six o'clock, the prisoner was lurking about the door. The boy missed a waistcoat, and pointed the prisoner out; I followed, and stopped him in Barbican, and found it in his hat.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18201028-38

1265. WILLIAM ROBINSON was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of September , one gown, value 4 s.; seven yards of printed stuff, value 6 s.; one yard of brown holland, value 8 d., and one handkerchief, value 6 d., the goods of Eliza Cutler , from her person .

ELIZA CUTLER. I am a dress-maker . On the 29th of September, about nine o'clock in the evening, I was walking along Finsbury-place , some person snatched this bundle from my arm over my shoulder; I turned round, and saw a man running with it - he turned down the street, and crossed Moorfields. I followed calling Stop thief! he was stopped in the middle of Moorfields. I think, I lost sight of him.

THOMAS WRAY . I was crossing Moorfields, and saw the prisoner running, he fell; I ran up, and picked up the bundle and his hat. I heard the cry of Stop thief! and saw him drop the bundle. I took him to the watch-house.

WILLIAM MARKWELL . I was standing by the watch-house in London-wall, and heard the cry of Stop thief! from a female voice. I ran into Moorfields, and came up with them in the centre; the prisoner was then endeavouring to get from three or four, who held him. He said it was the first offence.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I saw a man drop the bundle, and they took me for the thief.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18201028-39

1266. THOMAS MANTON was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of October , six bundles of willow, value 6 s. , the goods of William Kervill .

WILLIAM KERVILL . I am a willow manufacturer , and live in Primrose-street, Bishopsgate-street ; the prisoner was in my employ. On the 7th of October, I saw him going out with a bag; I asked him what he had got? he said nothing. I told him to come back, searched the bag, and found half a dozen of willow in it. He then said Bailey, my man, sent him to the weaver's with it. I took him to Bailey, who said he gave him no orders.

JOHN HARDING . I took the prisoner to the watch-house. He said another boy helped him to steal it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. It was given me to take to the weaver's.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Fined One Shilling , and Discharged.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18201028-40

1267. ROBERT HEWLINGS was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of September , one pair of half-boots, value 5 s. , the goods of George Clark .

GEORGE CLARK . I am a boot-maker , and live in Little Knight Rider-street . On the 21st of September, at eight o'clock at night, I missed a pair of boots, which hung on the wainscoat, in a quarter of an hour I missed another pair. I went down Lambeth-hill, which is one door from my shop; I saw the prisoner with another man, and saw the boots in his hand - he instantly dropped them, and I caught them as they fell. I secured him, and gave him in charge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I picked them up.

GUILTY . Aged 39.

Confined Six Months .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18201028-41

1268. JOHN RICHARDS was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of October , 12 lbs. of sugar, value 12 s. , the goods of John Hewley Booth and Thomas Ingledew .

WALTER STONE . I am an officer of Tower Ward. On the 14th of October, about eight o'clock in the evening, the prisoner passed me with a loaf of sugar. I asked him where he got it? he said in the Borough. I said I would take him there; he then said he did not know where he got it, and if I would let him go I might have it.

JOSEPH DAVIS . I was with Stone. The prisoner told me he bought it of a man at the corner of Fleet-market.

JOSEPH HAYNES . I am the prosecutor's carman. On the evening of the 14th of October, I went from their warehouse in Mill Wharf-lane, Upper Thames-street, with one hundred loaves of sugar; when I got to Griffin's Wharf , I had only ninety-nine. I drove the cart all the way. It could not fall out.

JOHN VAUGHAN . I delivered one hundred loaves to the carman.

MR. JOHN INGLEDEW . I am in partner ship with Mr. John Hewley Booth . We sent one hundred loaves of sugar to Griffin's Wharf. The carman returned, and said there were only ninety-nine.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I bought it in the street.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18201028-42

1269. NICHOLAS OMBRA was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of September , one pair of boots, value 20 s. , the goods of John Alger .

JAMES MORTIMORE . I am shopman to Mr. John Alger , who is a shoemaker , and lives in Lombard-street . On the 27th of September, about four o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner and another man came, and looked at some boots; the prisoner fixed upon a pair, which he tried on. While I was waiting on him, the other went out; I said

"Your shipmate is gone," he said

"He is not gone far, he will come again I dare say." He took me to the window to look at some shoes, which he tried on; they came to 14 s. He said he could not give so much, and offered 11 s. 6 d.; I refused it and he left. I immediately missed a pair of boots. I was alone, and could not pursue.

JOHN BROWN. I am an officer. On the 4th of October the prosecutor came to the Mansion House, and said two men were going along the Poultry who had robbed him. I went and took the prisoner. I found the boots in pawn at Parsons's.

JOSEPH TEBBS . I am servant to Mr. Parsons, a pawnbroker, who lives in Houndsditch. On the 27th of September, about six o'clock, the prisoner pledged the boots for 11 s.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I met the other man, and he sent me to pawn them.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Fined One Shilling , and Discharged.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18201028-43

FOURTH DAY, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 28.

1270. ABRAHAM MYERS was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of October , one watch, value 12 l.; one chain, value 50 s., and two seals, value 10 s., the goods of Samuel Barnard , from his person .

SAMUEL BARNARD . On the 13th of October, about seven o'clock in the evening, I was in Whitechapel ; a well dressed man ran up, snatched my watch out, and ran down Castle-street. I followed calling Stop thief! he was secured - I cannot swear to the prisoner.

JOHN ABBOT . I am a watch-maker, and live in Castle-street. I heard the alarm, came out, and made a snatch at the man, we both slipped - he recovered, and ran off down an alley - a number of his companions followed, knocked me down and cut my lip. I am positive the prisoner was the man - I had seen him several times before. Nobody else was running, when I first saw him.

ANN LARNER . I was at work at the corner of the alley, and heard the alarm; I saw the prisoner run down the alley, and Abbott after him. The prosecutor stopped at our door, and told me what he had lost. I am sure the prisoner was the man - nobody was running before him.

SAMUEL MILLER . I am an officer. Barnard described the prisoner to me. I saw him going into a public-house, at the top of Wentworth-street, and from the description I took him. He said he had not been in Castle-street for a week past, and had just come from supper with Mr. Decosta, but refused to tell what street Mr. Decosta lived in. It then wanted twenty minutes to eight o'clock.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18201028-44

1271. MARY THOMAS was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of September , 14 s., in monies numbered, the property of John Hailstone , from his person .

JOHN HAILSTONE . I am a hostler , and live at Chipping Ongar, Essex. On the 26th of September, about eleven o'clock in the day, I met the prisoner in Whitechapel , and went to a house with her. She suddenly left the room, and I missed 14 s. I got an officer, who took her up the street. Another woman came up, and said

"What are you doing to my sister?" the prisoner passed her hand to the other woman, and 3 s. 6 d. dropped on the ground.

RICHARD LANDERS . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner in Rose-lane. She dropped 3 s. 6 d., and I found 2 s. upon her.

Prisoner's Defence. He said I was not the woman.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18201028-45

1272. ELIZA SMITH was indicted for that she, on the 30th of September , feloniously did dispose of and put away a certain forged Bank note for payment of 1 l., with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England .

THIRD AND FOURTH COUNTS, calling it a promissory note for payment of money instead of a Bank note.

FOUR OTHER COUNTS, stating the prisoner's intent to be to defraud John Sparry .

MR. SERGEANT BOSANQUET, MESSRS. BOLLAND and REYNOLDS conducted the prosecution.

SARAH SPARRY . I am the wife of John Sparry , who is a butcher , and lives in Rosamond-street, Clerkenwell . On the 30th of September, between nine and ten o'clock at

night, the prisoner came and bought part of a shoulder of mutton, which came to 2 s. 6 d.; she gave me a 1 l. note, I asked her name, she said

"Smith, No. 6, Vineyard-gardens." I thought it a bad one, and gave it to my husband; he said he thought it a bad one, and gave it to Bradman, to take to Mr. Emery, the publican.

Cross-examined by MR. NORTON. Q. She heard you say you thought it bad - A. Yes. She was about twenty minutes in the shop before the constable came. Vineyard-gardens are behind my house.

JOHN SPARRY . I sold the prisoner half a shoulder of mutton, she paid my wife a 1 l. note, which she gave me - I suspected it, and gave it to Bradman to take to Mr. Emery, he and Emery returned with it in about ten minutes, and asked her name and address, she said

"Smith, No. 6, Vineyard-gardens." This is the note - (looking at it) - we detained her, and sent for an officer. She said she had it from her husband, who is a shoemaker, and he took it of his master in Norton Falgate.

Cross-examined. Q. You were busy - A. Yes. I might have received notes while she was there. We put her into the parlour while the boy went to Emery. I did not mix it with any other.

JAMES BRADMAN . I am shopboy to Mr. Sparry. He gave me the note, I took it to Emery to know if it was good - I did not lose sight of it. He gave it me back and returned with me. I heard the prisoner give the address, I enquired, and found no such name there.

Cross-examined. Q. What sort of a place is it - A. There is a row of about fifty houses. I only enquired at No. 6.

COURT. Q. Is there any other No. 6 - A. No, my Lord.

JOHN EMERY . I keep the John of Jerusalem, public-house, Rosamond-street. Bradman brought me the note, I marked it - (looks at it) - this is it. I returned with him, saw the prisoner there, and asked her it the note belonged to her? she said Yes. I asked her to step into the parlour, she did so. She said her name was Smith, and that she lived at No. 6, Vineyard-gardens. I said the note was forged, and proposed to send the lad to enquire - she said she would go and shew him, I said she need not trouble herself. He went, returned, and said he could find no such name. She wanted to go and shew me again. I proposed to send for a constable, she still said she lived there. Jordan was sent for; we went with the prisoner to Vineyard-gardens, she then said she lived at another place, and not at Vineyard-gardens; it was somewhere about Mutton-hill.

Cross-examined. Q. Mutton-hill is not far off - A. It is not a quarter of a mile. She said she had lived in Vineyard-gardens about a fortnight.

WILLIAM JORDAN . I am a constable. I took the prisoner in charge and asked her name? she said

"Smith, No. 6, Vineyard-gardens," which I wrote on the note. I and Emery went with her. When she got about half way she said

"I wish to go to my husband on Mutton-hill," and that she did not live in Vineyard-gardens. I took her to the watch-house, she said there that she lived at Pentonville, but could not tell what part. I asked her again where she lived? she said

"No. 6, Love-court, Mutton-hill." I enquired there, but found no such person, I told her so; she said it was the first court on Mutton-hill on the left hand. I went there - it was Saffron-place, and found one Smith lived there, but could not learn whether he was her husband.

Cross-examined. Q. Mutton-hill is much occupied by lodgers - A. Yes. I knew her before, and know her name is not Smith.

ANN HANSON . I occupy No. 6, Vineyard-gardens, and have lived there ever since it was built. The prisoner never lived there. I do not know her.

Cross-examined. Q. There are a good many lanes leading to it - A. There is Vineyard-walk and Garden-walk.

THOMAS GLOVER . I am an inspector of Bank notes. The note is forged in every respect.

JOHN COLE BAKER . I am a signing clerk. The note bears my name, but is not my signature.

Prisoner's Defence. I had it of my husband and did not know it was bad.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18201028-46

1273. THOMAS JOHNSON was indicted for feloniously being in possession of forged Bank notes, knowing them to be forged .

JOHN FOY . I am an officer of Marlborough-street. On the morning of the 13th of October I went with Mr. Glover to search the prisoner's apartments, on the first floor of No. 110, Curtain-road . On getting on the stairs of the first floor, I knocked at the staircase door, which leads into a passage; this door shuts the two rooms on the first floor entirely separate from the rest of the premises - the passage only leads to the two rooms.

Q. Is this a correct model of the floor - (producing it) - A. It is. The passage door was shut and bolted, the prisoner's wife opened it, and exactly opposite that door is the room door, which was open, the prisoner was in bed. I told him he was suspected of uttering forged notes and asked his name? he said it was James Johnson , and that he had lived there about three months. I found some linen drying in the front room, which his wife said, in his presence, was hers. I then searched the passage, and found, just opposite the bedroom door, the pannel was loose. I had a candle, as the passage was dark. On moving the pannel I found a small roll of black cotton, with eighteen 1 l. Bank notes in it, which I marked, these are them - (looking at them). I asked him how they came there? he said he knew nothing about them. Jeffries gave me a piece of black cotton from a table drawer in the prisoner's room. On comparing it with that the notes were in they fitted. I produce them - they are parts of a coat sleeve. These rooms run from one to the other. I have no doubt but they originally belonged to each other.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Is it an old house - A. Yes; the passage only leads to these two rooms. I never had complaints against persons in this house before.

CHARLES JEFFERIES . I was with Foy, and saw him find the notes in the wainscot. I found a piece of cotton in the table drawer, which I gave him.

Cross-examined. Q. Did the wainscot project - A. Rather so - it appeared as if it had been used to be taken in

in and out. If the room door was open the light would reflect on the pannel.

MR. SERGEANT BOSANQUET. Q. It was between the door and window - A. Yes. There was not light enough to see the pannel without a candle.

SAMUEL PLANK . I was with the other officers, they left me in the room with the prisoner. He and his wife stood at the window, exactly opposite the door. When they took the pannel down the prisoners saw them do it, and appeared agitated at that moment. Foy asked how they came there? he said he knew nothing of them. I saw Jefferies take the piece of black cotton from the table drawer. His wife said it was a piece of stuff she had been making her child's frock with.

Cross-examined. Q. How do you know she was his wife - A. He said so. The foot of the prisoner's bed comes opposite the end of the window.

SARAH KEW . The house No. 110, Curtain-road, belongs to me, I live in the adjoining house. The prisoner lodged on the first floor, in the back room - he was nearly three months there. When he first came Mrs. Cowden had the front room; she left a month ago, nobody occupied it after. I gave the prisoner's wife leave to dry her clothes there. His sister brought a bedstead in, but never lived there - his wife helped her in with the bedstead three days before the officers came. She brought nothing else, and did not stay many minutes. The passage door shuts the back and front room in separately, as if it was a house of itself.

Cross-examined. Q. How long had Cowden lived there - A. Almost eleven years. I never saw his sister but once after she took the room.

Q. Did a man and his wife leave your house very suddenly, who lived in your second floor - A. That was two years ago.

MR. SERGEANT BOSANQUET. Q. The prisoner's room was unoccupied sometime before he came to live in it - A. Yes.

ELIZA COWDEN . I occupied a front room in the house for eleven years, and left three weeks before I heard of this. I know nothing of the pannel in the passage being broken, or of any notes being there.

JOHN CORMACK . I live on the second floor, and was never in the passage leading to the prisoner's room.

ELIZA CORMACK . I was never in the passage, except three days ago.

MICHAEL JOHN FITZPATRICK . I am clerk to the Magistrates of Marlborough-street, and took down what the prisoner said on his examination, he declined signing it. I read it to him, and he said it was correct - (read.) The voluntary statement of James Johnson , who says,

"I am a plasterer, and came from Dalleystock about six months ago. I have worked for nobody since, but lived on 60 l. I decline giving any account how I got my living for the last twelve months, or answering any further questions."

THOMAS GLOVER . I am an inspector of Bank notes. The notes are all forged, and are off one plate. They are quite new, and all dated the 19th of August.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18201028-47

1274. GEORGE MASON was indicted for feloniously assaulting Richard Green , M. D. on the King's highway, at St. Paul, Covent Garden, on the 26th of October , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, one watch, value 10 l.; one chain, value 1 l,; two seals, value 2 l., and one key, value 2 s., his property .

DR. RICHARD GREEN . On Thursday last, about a quarter before seven o'clock at night, I was walking down Southampton-street towards the Strand; I made a momentary halt at the corner of Tavistock-street , and at that instant the prisoner seized violently hold of my watch-chain and seals, and pulled my watch out of my fob, and broke a steel chain, which I always carry as an additional guard, round my neck. I am positive he is the man. As soon as it was disengaged, he made a side movement, and as I thought, gave it to another person - his hat fell off, and he immediately ran away leaving his hat upon the ground. I followed him closely behind, calling Stop thief! and caught him myself immediately, before he had run fifteen yards. At that instant Congdon came up also, and seized him - it was just opposite a chymist's shop - we took him in there. He had only run across the street, and was not out of my sight. The watch was not found. My attention was fixed upon him, there might have been many persons near him, and I not see them.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. It was very dark - A. There was a lamp near. After he had got the watch out he pulled, and broke the steel chain which confined it. My hands were in that position that I could not resist; my right hand was twisted round my umbrella. I made no resistance, but the chain held the watch after it was out of my fob.

Q. You was not under the slightest apprehension - A. I cannot say that.

COURT. Q. Was there a considerable degree of force used to break the chain - A. There was, I felt a considerable pull; he broke it, I think, at the second jerk. There could have been time for me to have seized him, but my right hand held my umbrella. The lug occasioned no injury to my person.

CHARLES CONGDON . I was coming up the street, and saw Dr. Green following the prisoner. I took him into Godfrey's shop opposite Tavistock-street. His hat was afterwards brought in.

The prisoner made no defence.

GUILTY. Aged 17.

This case was reserved for the consideration of the twelve Judges, on a question whether the resistance of the chain was sufficient to constitute this offence a highway robbery .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18201028-48

1275. THOMAS DOBSON was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of October , one watch, value 8 l.; one chain, value 2 l., and one key, value 1 d., the goods of Stephen Tapster , from his person .

STEPHEN TAPSTER . I keep the Craven Hotel, in the Strand . On the 18th of October, about half-past eleven o'clock in the forenoon, I was standing at my door, the sawyers' address was going to the Queen; the prisoner and another pushed against me, as I stood in my doorway. I pushed him from me, and felt him pull my watch

out. I seized him, we struggled together a few yards, and he then dropped it - it was picked up, and brought to me.

JOSEPH INCE . I saw him drop the watch. It was picked up, given to me, and the prosecutor claimed it.

(Property produced, and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I beg for mercy.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Fined One Shilling , and Discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18201028-49

1276. SARAH JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of September , a certain male child named William Scott , under the age of ten years, (to wit,) of the age of seventeen months, feloniously by force did take and carry away, with intent to steal, one fur hat, value 6 d.; one handkerchief, value 6 d.; one frock, value 6 d.; two petticoats, value 1 s., and one pair of boots, value 4 d., the goods of Hugh Scott , being articles of apparel upon and about the person of the said child .

SECOND COUNT, for stealing the said goods.

ELIZA SCOTT . I am the wife of Hugh Scott ; my child is seventeen months old. On the 20th of September I was at work at my sister's in Widegate-street. About half-past eleven o'clock in the morning I sent my eldest boy down to mind the child; he returned in half an hour, ran up stairs to me, and said a woman had taken the child away. I ran as far as Shoreditch church to look after her, turned back, and when I got to Widegate-street the neighbours were all out. A person directed me to Rose-court, Spitalfields saying she had seen a child there that was lost. I went there and found my child there naked, with a white towel round it. A young man had picked it up in the ruins near Bell-lane. As I returned my boy came and said he had found the woman who took it with the clothes on her - they were the articles stated in the indictment, which it had on when it was lost. The shirt and spencer were left on it.

HUGH SCOTT . I am ten years old; the child is my brother. I took him down by the pawnbroker's shop in Bishopsgate-street, and was holding it in my arms, the prisoner came, and asked to have a kiss of the child, I said she should not. She said,

"I will take it away;" I said

"You shan't, I will go and tell my mother." She pulled me back, knocked my head against the step of a door, pushed me down, and ran away with the child - she gave a boy a halfpenny to hold me down. I am quite positive she is the woman. I ran home, told my mother, and found the prisoner myself up an alley. I asked her where the child was? A lot of boys held her while I went to my mother. She said she had left the child with a woman while she cooked her husband's dinner.

Prisoner. Q. Did I take the child, my dear - A. Yes, I am sure it was her.

THOMAS CHESTER . I am a broker, and live in Widegate-alley. There was an uproar in the street, I ran out; Mrs. Scott said she had lost her child. Soon after, the boy came and said he had found the woman, the child had been found then. I went with the boy, and saw the prisoner in Angel-alley with the clothes. We took her to Bishopsgate watch-house - she said she would smash my eyes out.

JOSEPH LEVY . I was going to dinner, saw a crowd under the gateway, and saw this child crying - it was stripped. I took it to the beadle, and was enquiring for the churchwarden, I met the prosecutrix and gave it to her.

JAMES HUETT . I am a news-vender. I took the prisoner in Angel-alley, by desire of the boy, with the clothes. She resisted a great deal, I had great difficulty in securing her.

JAMES GREGORY . I am a constable of Bishopsgate. About one o'clock I found her at the watch-house with two petticoats, a boot, a frock, a fur hat, and in her pocket I found the other boot.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I went up a turning near Rag Fair, and kicked against these clothes in a bundle. I met a woman and asked her to buy them, the boy came up, and said they were his brother's.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18201028-50

1277. JOHN GREEN was indicted for a misdemeanor .

THOMAS KITT . I am shopman to Samuel Stevens , a woollen-draper . On the 28th of July the prisoner came and asked for some patterns of green baize for Mr. Smith, of Cow-lane. In about three-quarters of an hour he returned with this order: - (Read) -

"Mr. Stevens, for William Smith , ten yards of baize, at 3 s. 3 d., ten ditto, at 2 s. 6 d. J. LEE." Knowing Lee was in Smith's employ I gave him the goods.

THOMAS LEE . I am foreman to Mr. Smith, who is a cabinet-maker, and lives in Cow-lane. The prisoner was our porter five months ago. I never sent the order nor received the goods.

GUILTY .

Confined Six Months .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18201028-51

1278. MOSES MARTIN was indicted for perjury .

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18201028-52

FIFTH DAY. MONDAY, OCTOBER 30.

1279. ISAAC HALFORD STEPHENS was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of October , one umbrella, value 2 s.; four pair of stockings, value 4 s.; one yard of kerseymere, value 8 s., and two yards of cloth, value 15 s., the goods of Thomas Wade .

THOMAS WADE . I am a draper , and live at Watford, in Hertfordshire , the prisoner was my shopboy . On the 19th of October he left me. As he went out I saw a handkerchief on the ground, and asked if it was his? he said No, and went out. I made enquiry, set off to town, and took him at the Green Man and Still, Oxford-street, when the coach came in. He said he had robbed me, had on searching his box this property was found.

WILLIAM CRAIG . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner, and found the property in his box.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Fined One Shilling , and Discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18201028-53

1280. MARTIN FEELEY was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Tollman , at Hampton, about twelve o'clock in the night of the 18th of October , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, 25 lbs. of bacon, value 12 s.; two sheets, value 5 s.; one handkerchief, value 7 s.; one waistcoat, value 4 s.; one loaf of bread, value 6 d.; eight ounces of soap, value 3 d.; the sum of 11 s. in monies numbered, and five 1 l. Bank notes, his property .

THOMAS TOLLMAN . I live at Hampton , and have a wife and four children. On the 18th of October, I went to bed between eight and nine o'clock at night, my doors and windows were all fastened. I rent a little common land; mine is a lone house, and stands on the common. About twelve o'clock or a quarter past, three soldiers burst into the house. I heard them burst the staple from the lock, and immediately jumped out of bed. They first came into the room where my son George and servant boy slept. I heard them say, they were come for the blunt, and the blunt they would have, or they would have our lives - I understood them to mean money. I heard them rumaging my son's room; they then came to my room door - both rooms are on the ground floor - I held the latch of my door as fast as I could. My wife said

"Let them in," I did so, three of them came in, and demanded my money; I said we were poor people, and had none by us. One said to the other

"Tie the cord round his neck, and keep him down." My wife said

"For God's sake do not kill my husband!" they put this cord round my neck (producing it.) and pulled me up by it till I was almost strangled. My wife said

"George, there is a 1 l. note in the little tin-box, in the chest of drawers, give it to them." George went to fetch it to give them, but they had got it before - I had seen the tin-box in their hands, and heard them knocking it about, but did not see them take the note - it was in my room. They were not satisfied with that, but went up to my wife's bed side, and ordered her out, she got out; they turned the bed down, and between the bed and mattress found four 1 l. notes, and 7 s. which I had put there for safety, about a fortnight before. They robbed the house of 25 lbs. of bacon, two dirty sheets one silk handkerchief, one waistcoat, pretty near a quartern loaf of bread, one piece of soap, and about 4 s., besides that with the notes. They staid in the house about twenty minutes or half an hour; when they left I looked out of the window, and saw them all in the yard, putting their soldiers' great-coats on - I saw by the light of the moon there were five of them in all, four came into the house, and another stood at the door - they had flannel jackets on in the house - they had no light except the light of the moon, which shone very bright in at the window - it was a very light night. I took particular notice of them, and can swear to the prisoner being one of the men who robbed my home, and who ordered the other to put the cord round my neck - I am quite certain of it - I never saw him before to my knowledge - he was in my sight ten minutes, and stood by me while the others plundered. I was very much alarmed, but am sure I am not mistakes. I heard his voice, and was not a yard from him - our room is very small - he is taller than the others. I cannot speak to them, but I am sure of him - he had a flannel jacket on, such as soldiers wear - I observed no other part of his dress. There are a good many soldiers quartered at Hampton and Hampton Court - he was quartered at Hampton Court - the constable and I took him there; we also took three other soldiers and a hostler, upon suspicion - he was discharged before the Magistrate, and the other soldiers put into the guard-house.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not swear the hostler was the man who put the rope round your neck - A. No, I did not swear to the hostler. The three soldiers were taken before the Magistrate. I said the prisoner was the man who ordered the rope round my neck, and he said if I did not not stand still he would blow my brains out. I swear to his features, as well as his voice - he stood by the side of the window, and the moon shone right into the room.

GEORGE TOLLMAN . I am the prosecutor's son. I was at home this night in the first bed-room with the servant boy, my father and mother were in the next room. I heard the door burst open, it awoke me - three men came tumbling into my room, and asked for the money? I said

"I do not know of any money in the house, for sometimes we have not got sixpence." They said they had come for the blunt, and the blunt they would have, or they would have our lives. I called out to my mother, and asked if there was any money? she said No, they then went to her room. My father held the door sometime, and then opened it, they went in, and my father said

"What do you want, my good fellows?" they said they came after the money, and the money they would have. I got out of bed, and went into the room with them. They rummaged about my father's room sometime, and kept asking for the money, and began to tie my father down. A little short soldier put the cord round his neck, and the tall soldier told him to tie him down, he seemed to be the commander of them. The short one had brought the cord with him - they put it about his neck, with a slip loop, and drew him up with their arms. My mother said,

"Don't hurt my husband!" She was frightened, and told me to go to the little box in the drawer, and give them a 1 l. note. When I came to look it was gone out of the box, and the things rummaged about. They had got it before; the box was opened. There were spoons and things in it, which were not taken. There were also some bills pinned together, which they took out. As they went out they saw by the light in the kitchen that they were not notes, and threw them down. My mother got out of bed; they rummaged the bed and mattress, and took four 1 l. notes and 7 s. from between the bed and mattress, the other one was rummaging my room while the others were in my father's. They took about 4 s. from a box in my room. I know the one who stood in my father's room against the window, it was the prisoner. There were two tall ones, he was rather the tallest - he ordered the man to put the cord round my father's neck. I was close to him all the time they were in my father's room, which was ten minutes, or a quarter of an hour. I

took particular notice of him, and am very positive he is the man. They all went out together. There were five of them when they got out, as I looked after them. They all appeared dressed alike, except one, who had white trowsers on - they had soldiers' clothes on. When they came into the room they seemed very tightly dressed.

Q. Were you present when the prisoner was taken - A. I came to the house when they had got two, and knew the prisoner instantly, he was in the guard-house. I afterwards heard him speak, and knew his voice. I have not a doubt of his being one of the men. When I looked out of the window they had got their soldiers coats on.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not say you could only swear to my voice - A. No. I said he was the very man before I heard him speak. I swear to his features.

WILLIAM RAGAN . I am sergeant of the 21st regiment. The prisoner was a soldier in that regiment; we were quartered at Hampton Court inn - he slept in the same room with me. I remember the night of the 13th of October he did not sleep at his quarters that night - I am sure he was not there at nine o'clock. I did not see him till next morning at eight o'clock. I went to bed at nine - he did not come into the room that night - he could not without my knowing it - other soldiers slept in the room - he ought to have slept there. I heard him say he slept in the hay-loft over the stable.

Prisoner's Defence. It is a large inn, and draws no beer. I stopped in the tap till eleven o'clock, and the house being shut up I went with the rest of my comrades, and slept in the hayloft. A man will swear that I was in my quarters at the time, but he is not here. I wish to ask the sergeant if the prosecutor did not take up a man who slept in the room with him that night.

WILLIAM RAGAN . A man whom the prosecutor suspected was taken up. I cannot swear he was in the room. He went down to light a candle, and when he came up I believed, by his voice, that he was the same man.

Prisoner. Q. Did he not say this man put the rope round his neck - A. No.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 22.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18201028-54

1281. WILLIAM WOODNUTT was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of October , four live tame ducks, price 12 s., and even live tame rabbits, price 10 s., the property of George Tollman ; and eleven live tame fowls, price 25 s., the property of Thomas Tollman .

GEORGE TOLLMAN . On the 15th of October I lost four ducks and seven rabbits, from the dog-kennel under the kitchen window. My father lost some fowls.

WILLIAM BURROWS . I am serjeant of the 51st regiment, which the prisoner belonged to. I was ordered to search his quarters, at the Red Lion, public-house, at Hampton, and in the chimney I found a duck's head and the skins of two fowls; five or six men sleep in the room. I found a duck under his bed, I went and found him fishing, and asked him where he got the duck that was under his bed? he said he found two under some rubbish in the cow-house of the King's Head, public-house. He said he knew nothing of the skins in the chimney. This was about the 20th of October.

GEORGE TOLLMAN. I saw the duck's head, and skins. I know the head, and one of the ducks.

Prisoner's Defence. I found them in the cow-house.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18201028-55

1282. JOHN PRITCHARD was indicted for feloniously assaulting Mary Ann Allen , spinster, on the King's highway, at St. Luke, on the 25th of September , putting her in fear, and taking from her person, and against her will, 864 brace ends, value 15 s., and one handkerchief, value 6 d., the goods of Edward Allen .

MARY ANN ALLEN . I live in Richmond-street, Bath-street. On the 25th of September, about nine o'clock at night, I was going up Whitecross-street , with six gross of brace ends in a handkerchief; just before I came to Cherry-tree-alley, I observed the prisoner standing and looking at me. I had seen him before. I shunned him - he darted towards me, caught hold of my bundle, flung me up against the wall, burst my gown and stays, bent my bonnet, and took my bundle. I pulled with both hands, but he got it from me at last, and ran up the alley. I was stunned for a moment; as soon as I came to myself I called out Stop thief! he had nearly got half up the alley. He was taken on the 30th. I never got my property again. I had seen him before, and positively swear he is the man. They were my father's, Edward Allen .

THOMAS BRADFORD . I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner from the prosecutrix's description; she said he was the man the moment she saw him.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent.

GUILTY. - DEATH . Aged 19.

Recommended to Mercy .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18201028-56

1283. SARAH PARSONS was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of September , six gowns, value 30 s.; three shifts, value 7 s.; two petticoats, value 4 s.; one scarf, value 5 s., and one pair of boots, value 3 s., the goods of Mary Naylor ; one pelisse, value 10 s.; one gown, value 6 s.; three pair of stockings, value 3 s., and three aprons, value 3 s., the goods of Mary Harris , in the dwelling-house of John Deeks .

MARY NAYLOR . I lodged at Mr. Deeks's, in Charlotte-street, Somers'-town . I left on the 3d of September, on the 8th I sent Goddard for my box, and found it empty.

MARY HARRIS . I lodged at Deeks's, and left about a week before Naylor. I left a box in Mrs. Johnson's room - hearing of the robbery, I went and examined my box in the prisoner's presence, and missed this property. I had left the box locked.

CHARLES GODDARD . I went for Naylor's box, the prisoner gave it to me at the door, it appeared empty and was unlocked. I asked her if she had the key? She went on the stairs, returned, and said Mrs. Johnson had not got it. I delivered it to Naylor in the state I received it.

ELIZA JOHNSON . I lodge at Deeks's. The boxes were in my room as the prosecutrix had slept with me. When Harris left I took the prisoner to sleep with me. Goddard came for the box, I asked the prisoner to take it down. She called out to know if I had the key, I said

No. She said nothing to me about its being open when she came up.

WILLIAM READ . I am an officer. On the 11th of September I took the prisoner in charge with a bundle, containing some pieces of stuff and cotton, which the prosecutrix claimed.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The pieces of stuff are not hers. I did not open the boxes. These things were given to me by a woman in the workhouse.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined Six Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18201028-57

1284. WILLIAM POWERS and JOSEPH PARSONS were indicted for that they, on the 23d of October, in and upon John Shires , a subject of our Lord the King, feloniously, wilfully, and maliciously did make an assault, and with a certain sharp instrument did strike, cut, and stab him, with intent, of their malice aforethought to kill and murder him .

TWO OTHER COUNTS, stating the prisoners' intent to be to disable him, or do him some grievous bodily harm.

JOHN SHIRES . I am a Bow-street patrol . On the 23d of October , between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, I went with a warrant against Thomas Marsh , at the suit of Eliza Kelly - I went with Parry. I found Marsh at the corner of Brownlow-street, Drury-lane . I told him I had a warrant, and he must go with me. He said,

"I will go." In about two minutes I was assaulted by sixteen or twenty desperate characters, who cried out,

"Tom, don't go; muzzle the b - g - rs, chiv 'em!" (which means to cut.) I was knocked down, and my head beat in a most dreadful manner. Marsh was rescued. As I was rising up again I was struck above my eye with something sharp, and was covered with blood. One of the girls lent me an apron, and that was soaked through immediately. I am sure Powers was one of them - I cannot say that he struck me. I saw Parsons the width of the street off. On recovering myself I saw Parry kicked and beat in a dreadful manner. I went to the doctor's, who dressed my head and gave me some stuff.

DANIEL PARRY . I was with Shires. Marsh was rescued from us by the prisoners and others. I am sure they were among them. They called out,

"Kill the b - g - rs, chiv'em!" I saw some of them hit Shires on the back of his head; the blow appeared to come from Powers. I turned round, and saw the blood flow from Shires's eye. I saw Marsh run across the street - I followed and collared him; they knocked me down, kicked me, rescued him, and got off altogether. About half an hour after I saw the prisoners standing in the passage of a public-house; Parsons had a bludgeon in his hand.

ELIZA KELLY . I went with the officers, they took Marsh. I saw Powers come up and strike Shires with his fist; I afterwards saw him with a knife in his hand, but did not see him strike with it. There was a cry of

"Chiv him!"

Q. Have you never said more than that you saw a knife in his hand - A. I saw him strike with his hand, and when he went to strike again the knife came out, but I did not see him make the blow; but when the blow was made I saw the officer bleed very much immediately afterwards.

SARAH BRANSCOMBE . I live in White Hart-yard. I saw Marsh in custody. A man came up and said

"Never go." I saw Parsons there with a knife, which he held in his hand. He made a blow at Shires in the face, while another hit him a blow on the other side. His hat fell off, and blood immediately flowed from his eye. Parry was knocked down and kicked about, and Marsh rescued.

WILLIAM JEFFERSON . I met Shires in Bow-street, covered with blood. I immediately went and apprehended the prisoners, in company with others, in Charles-street. Parsons had a bludgeon in his hand - they attempted to rescue him from me. Parsons escaped through a blacksmith's shop; he gave himself up after he was indicted.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18201028-58

1285. GEORGE BURY was indicted for that he, on the 30th of September , having in his possession a certain bill of exchange (setting it forth, drawn by George Bury on James Gregory , 49 l. 12 s. 6 d.) did afterwards feloniously forge an acceptance thereof, with intent to defraud Thomas Lee and William Butcher .

SECOND COUNT, for uttering and publishing the same as true.

MR. ALLEY conducted the prosecution, and on calling William Butcher , he would not swear that the bill was the same the prisoner paid him. - Mr. ALLEY stated that he could not proceed.

ACQUITTED .

London Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18201028-59

1286. JOHN NEAL and JAMES GIDDINS were indicted for feloniously assaulting James Swain , on the King's highway, on the 25th of October , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, one watch, value 5 l.; one chain, value 1 l., and two seals, value 1 l., his property .

JAMES SWAIN . I live in Upper Charles-street, Northampton-square. Last Wednesday evening I was at the corner of New-street, St. Martin's-lane , with three gentlemen, a crowd were returning from Brandenburgh House I endeavoured to pass between them - they drew together and extended themselves into the road to prevent our passing. Neal came up, drew my watch out, and ran off - I believe him to be the man. The others prevented my following him. I saw him at the office that night, but will not swear to him. I also believe Giddins to be one of them.

JOHN WRIGHT . I apprehended Giddins.

NEAL'S Defence. I was in Sidney's-alley, and a cadee stopped me, and asked if I had any fogles? I said No, and he took me to the watch-house.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18201028-60

1287. WILLIAM FORSYTH was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of September , ten window-sashes, value 3 l. 16 s.; three doors, value 15 s.; three chimney-pieces,

value 4 s.; six shelves, value 12 s., and two shutters, value 2 s. , the goods of Frederick William Taber .

FREDERICK WILLIAM TABER . I am a builder , and live in Old Cavendish-street. I lost these articles from a house in Lower Grosvenor-street , the prisoner was employed there as a carpenter . I missed property, and on the 18th of September I received information, and went with the officer to Tetsall's, where I found the property stated in the indictment, which was taken from the houses I was repairing.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Where was he employed - A. At No. 64, Grosvenor-street. Tetsall lives just behind the house. Tetsall had bought some old wainscoating of me.

JAMES TETSALL . I keep the Hertford Arms, public-house, Little Grosvenor-street. I bought these things at various times of the prisoner. They came together to 13 l. or 14 l.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you include the articles the prosecutor sold you in the amount - A. Yes. I was altering my house, and sent my carpenter to buy the things of Taber.

Q. You was not in the way when they came to search your premises - A. I was out collecting money, I returned at night. About twelve of the prosecutor's men frequent my house. I knew nothing of the search until I returned.

THOMAS DENNISON . I am a coachman. On the morning the things were found, Tetsall asked me to move the things to a house opposite, which he had bought, and was repairing. I had taken two or three boards and some sashes, and was going with more, when Mr. Taber's men came and claimed them. Plank took me in custody.

Cross-examined. Q. Tetsall was not out when you began to move them - A. Yes.

SAMUEL PLANK . I am an officer. I went to Tetsall's, there was some confusion at the door - it was ten o'clock. The prosecutor's man had stopped the sashes from going out. I asked Dennison if he had moved any? he denied it, and I took him in charge. He then said he had moved some sashes and shutters by Tetsall's direction. I found a pair of sashes and some shutters there. I then searched Tetsall's house, and found six sashes and a piece of timber with Mr. Taber's name upon it, in the spirit-cellar; we found three mantle-pieces, and various other boards, which the prosecutor claimed. Tetsall called upon me, and expressed himself ready to attend before the Magistrate, which he did.

Cross-examined. Q. Were the sashes in the other house concealed - A. No, there were lodgers in the house.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

- I am a shoemaker. Tetsall sent me one morning for some sashes he bought of the prisoner, at No. 68, Lower Grosvenor-street; I went and saw the prisoner in the passage, and he delivered them to me. I went another time, and he delivered me some more sashes.

MR. TABER re-examined. The prisoner never paid me for the sashes he sold him.

GUILTY . Aged 42.

Confined Six Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18201028-61

1288. THOMAS KEEVEN was indicted for stealing on the 11th of October , one watch, value 30 s.; three seals, value 2 l., and two keys, value 6 d., the goods of John Morton , from his person .

JOHN MORTON . I am an enameller on glass . On the 11th of October, about eleven o'clock in the morning. I was going along the Strand with some glass upon my arm, I was hustled and robbed of my watch - I turned round, and laid hold of the prisoner, who was next to me, and gave him in charge. I did not see it taken - the glasses prevented my seeing who it was. I suppose there was a thousand people round. The clubs were going to address the Queen.

EDWARD HALL . Morton gave the prisoner into my charge, and said he was the man who took his watch.

GEORGE RHIND . I am a smith and bell-hanger. I was in the Strand with the constables, and saw the prisoner, and his companions surround the prosecutor, at the corner of Norfolk-street; when we got over, I found he had collard the prisoner. He said he would take his oath, that the prisoner was the man who took his watch. His companions turned round to rescue him, but we kept him.

JOSEPH MORTON re-examined. Q. When Rhind came up, what did you say - A. He did not come up at all.

WILLIAM MOLE . I was at the corner of Norfolk-street. Morton gave the prisoner into my charge. The gang hammered and beat me terribly, I was knocked about, and blinded with one eye, and my staff taken away. Morton said the prisoner was the man who robbed him.

FRANCIS RHIND . I was with my brother, and the officers. We had watched the prisoner and two or three others, attempting to pick gentlemens' pockets, from Templebar. This robbery was done while I was looking at the procession, I saw Coney and a number of people round the prisoner down Norfolk-street. I heard the prosecutor say he would swear the prisoner was the man who took his watch. The gang tried to rescue the prisoner.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. What did he say at the office - A. He said there he believed he was the man. They were obliged to summons him twice, and then get a warrant, before he would appear.

GEORGE CONEY . I first saw the prisoner at Templebar with twenty or thirty pick-pockets. I saw him in particular attempt several gentlemens' pockets, and at the corner of Norfolk-street, I saw him and the prosecutor in the midst of about twenty - we could not get near enough to see him take the watch, but the prosecutor collared him, and said he had taken it. I and others rushed in, and got him a few doors down Norfolk-street; the prosecutor said

"D - n you, you should not have given my watch away if it had not been for these glasses." He told us positively that he was the man who took it, and if we took him before a Magistrate, he would take his oath of it. We were knocked about terribly, and there was a desperate attempt to rescue him - the neighbours brought us out sticks to defend ourselves - we at last got him to the watch-house, and next morning, the prosecutor did not appear at the office. Mr. Birnie granted us two summonses, and a warrant to compel him. He told me he knew he was the man, but would not attend, and no Magistrate should make

him, if he did not think proper, and when he did appear, he refused to sign the book.

JOSEPH MORTON re-examined. I never said no Magistrate should compel me to appear.

Q. How came you not to attend - A. I had business in the country. I do not recollect saying I would swear he was the man - I might have said so in my agitation.

FRANCIS RHIND . I have seen the prisoner several times dining with the prosecutor's friends.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18201028-62

1289. SARAH CASTLE was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of September , one gown, value 8 s., and one apron, value 1 s. , the goods of Mary Ann Bond .

MARY ANN BOND I live in New Tothill-street . On the 28th of September, I left the prisoner in my room. Next day I missed these things, and had her apprehended,

BENJAMAN TIMBRELL . I took her in charge, and found a duplicate of the things in her stays.

WILLIAM ELGAR . I am a pawnbroker. The prisoner pledged the gown and apron with me.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 52.

Confined Six Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18201028-63

1290. DEBORAH FILKINS was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of October , two 1 l. Bank notes, the property of Robert Olive , from his person .

The prosecutor did not appear.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18201028-64

1291. MARY GRAY was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of October , one watch, value 1 l., and one chain, value 1 s., the goods of William Bourn , from his person .

WILLIAM BOURN . On the 4th of October, about ten o'clock at night, I was in South Audley-street . I met the prisoner, and went home with her. In the morning I missed her and my watch.

BENJAMAN TIMBRELL . On the 5th of October, at night, I found the prisoner in Bennet-street; she was very much in liquor, and said perhaps she had left the duplicate down stairs, and that she pledged it at Morrit's. I found it there.

JOHN COX . I am servant to Mr. Morrit. The prisoner pledged the watch.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. He left me his watch, as he had no money.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18201028-65

SIXTH DAY. TUESDAY, OCTOBER 31.

1292. JAMES BARTRAM was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of October , one half imperial, value 10 s.; one sword, value 1 l.; two coats, value 5 l.; two pair of epaulets, value 4 l., and two shirts, value 10 s. , the goods of Sir Henry Bell , Knt., Commander of the Most Honourable Military Order of the Bath .

MR. LAW conducted the prosecution.

THOMAS SQUIRES . I am servant to Sir Henry Bell . On the 14th of October, between five and six o'clock in the evening, I was getting off his barouche seat to open the door, and saw the prisoner about a yard from the barouche with the imperial in his arms; he immediately dropped it, and ran to the top of the street. I called Stop thief! several people came, and I lost sight of him for an instant, and then saw him return - he was secured. I am sure he is the man.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Had not your master stopped the carriage to tell some men to get down - A. Yes, the imperial was safe then, but when I afterwards got down I saw the prisoner with it - the straps were all cut to get it.

CHARLES BEALE . I was at Soho on the night of the robbery, heard the cry of Stop thief! and ran into Soho-square. Several people followed the prisoner; he passed me and turned, I followed him down Church-street, and secured him in Oxford-street; he was running fast.

ROBERT HOWARD . I took the prisoner in charge, and found a knife on him. He fell on his knees and begged the prosecutor's pardon.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18201028-66

1293. CHARLES GOODWIN was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Wells , at St. Andrew, Holborn, about three o'clock in the afternoon of the 15th of October, 1819 ( Eliza Reeves and others being therein,) and stealing therein one time-piece, value 1 l.; one shawl, value 10 s., and one table-cloth, value 6 s., his property .

MR. BRODERICK conducted the prosecution.

ANN WELLS . I am the wife of John Wells , we live in Baldwin's-place, Baldwin's-gardens, St. Andrew, Holborn . On the 13th of October the prisoner came to our house - I am positive as to his person. I opened the door; he brought a great bunch of keys in his hand, and said he was sent to fit a key to a lock. I asked who sent him? he said he was sent by Mr. Extine, who was a smith, and lived in Gray's Inn-lane. I asked how Mr. Extine knew I wanted a key to a lock? he said Mr. Extine had seen my husband in the square and he had sent him. I looked at him, and said

"I think I know you;" he said Yes, he had hung my bells eight years before; he turned round, saw the wires of them were broken, and said he would call and repair them. I said he night come and repair them on his own account, to put a shilling or two in his pocket - he went away; he was with me ten minutes or a quarter of an hour. I have no doubt of his being the man. On the 15th of October I went out about eleven o'clock, and left the articles stated in the indictment in the front and back parlours. I locked the doors, and took my servant girl, named Pearson, with me. I gave her the key and sent her home for some bread and cheese. I had a lodger named Eliza Reeves ; at that time she was confined

to her room. I returned about half-past four o'clock, and missed these things. Pearson had brought me the key. I went to Mr. Extine, and gave information to Read.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Did you see the man from that time till the prisoner was apprehended - A. No. I am positive he is the man.

- EXTINE. I am a smith and bell-hanger. In October last I had a shop in Gray's Inn-lane; the prisoner was not in my employ then - he had not worked for me for six years. I did not meet Mr. Wells on the 13th of October, nor did he desire me to send to his house. The prisoner worked for me six or eight years ago, I know nothing of him since. I met him three months ago on Holborn-hill.

MATILDA PEARSON . I am near thirteen years old. I was servant to Mrs. Wells in last October, and went out with her the day the house was robbed. She sent me home with the key, I opened the door, and went into her room - it was near one o'clock; everything was then safe; the time-piece was on the front parlour mantle-piece. I locked the room door after me, and saw a man come down to the bottom of the one pair of stairs with a light coat on, I do not know whether it was the prisoner or not. I went out - I did not notice the front parlour door, as a door leads from the back room to it. Mr. Wells came home before I went out. I took the key to Mrs. Wells. The outer door of the house was only latched. The man asked me if Mrs. Wells was at chambers? I said Yes. He asked me to lend him a chair and a hammer; I got them out of the back parlour, and gave them to him, he returned them directly. I put them in again, and locked the door.

Cross-examined. Q. You do not know whether the front room door was open or not - A. No.

MRS. WELLS. When I went out I locked the back and front room doors. My husband has a key.

JOHN WELLS . I am husband of the first witness; the house is mine. On the 15th of October I came home about four o'clock in the afternoon, found both doors open, and missed the time-piece and a roll of flannel. All the drawers were open and robbed. I have a key of the front parlour, I gave it to my wife at eleven o'clock that morning. I locked the front room, and took the key to my wife at chambers. I had neither of the keys again that day.

ELIZA REEVES . I lived five years with Mrs. Wells, and remember the house being robbed. I was at home all day.

ELIZA REEVES . I am daughter of the last witness, and was there when the house was robbed in October. I saw the prisoner that day at the bells in the passage, doing something to them. I am sure it was him. I saw him as I went out; he stared at me and said nothing. I left him there and am sure of him.

Cross-examined. Q. Who told you he was there - A. I saw him myself. I am sure it was on the day of the robbery. It was between two and three o'clock, when I was going to fetch the children from my aunt's.

Q. Did not Mrs. Wells tell you something about a man who came about the lock - A. She said she suspected it was the man who called about the lock. I never said I could not be sure of him. He had a white coat on, and his hand was up at the bell by the street door.

CHRISTOPHER HODSON . I lived with Mr. Wells in October last. Between two and three o'clock on the day of the robbery I saw a man in the passage looking at the bells. My sight is very bad; I do not know him.

JOHN LIMBRICK . I am a police officer. On the 19th of August last, in consequence of information, I went to No. 20, North-street, Pentonville, searched the house, and found a time-piece on the mantle-piece, and a table-cloth and shawl in the bureau drawer in the parlour. Two women, named Goodwin and Griffiths, were there, I apprehended them - they were tried and acquitted last Sessions. I did not see the prisoner there. East was there at work.

ROBERT EAST . On the 19th of August I was in the house in North-street, at work, when the officers came; Mr. Horsefall, the owner of the house, had employed me there - I saw the prisoner there. On the day before he had come, and told me he had taken the house of my master, and on the 19th he wanted to come in - he said he wanted to bring his goods in. He followed me up to Tottenham-street in the morning, said he had a load of goods, and wanted to have possession - this was on the 19th - he came to me, and said he wanted the key, he had a load of goods at the door. I said I had the key, but would not give possession till my master ordered me. I saw my master, opened the door, and let them put their goods in - the prisoner owned the goods, and helped to carry them in - it was then about nine o'clock; the house was empty before that. The officers came about four o'clock in the afternoon. I saw the prisoner there five minutes before - he had his coat off then. I did not see him go out, but he left his coat behind him.

Cross-examined. Q. When did you see him again - A. Not till I saw him at Hatton-garden. I have been in the house every day since till now. He helped to carry the goods in - there were boxes and bedsteads. The officers found no man in the house, except one, who was at work. I was not there when they first came. I was gone for a ladder. They found a great many picklock keys and a crow in the two parlours, which the prisoner said he should occupy while the house was being done. I had a deal of conversation with him, and am sure he is the man.

EDWARD READ . I am an officer. On the 24th of September, in consequence of information, I went to a house in Ironmonger-row, St. Luke's, with Thorn. I knocked at the door on the second floor - they would not open it, but did at last. I went in, and found the two women, who were tried and acquitted the night before, with another woman and a man. I searched and found the prisoner under the bed, and took him out - he immediately began to fight to get from me. I got him to the head of the stairs, he held by the bannisters, they gave way, and we fell down stairs together - he made a violent resistance, and the persons with him assisted him. When I had locked him up I returned, and all the parties were gone. I found some skeleton keys there, and some in the privy.

WILLIAM THORN . I went with Read, and waited outside.

MRS. WELLS. The time-priec is my husband's; here is the foot which was broken off and left behind. The

shawl is mine, it has a mark of oil on it. I will not swear to the table-cloth.

Prisoner's Defence. I can prove I was at home at the time of the robbery, and can also prove how the things came into my wife's possession.

The prisoner called Thomas Trueman to prove he was at work with him at the time, but he could not even fix the month.

MARY GRIFFITHS . I was tried here last Session. The prisoner married my sister. I came from Edgware, and had been staying with her for two months before we were taken up. The table-cloth produced was my mother's - there is a darn in it which I did myself about six months ago, when I was in the country. My mother died about ten months ago, it was then given to me; I marked it with my sister's name before I left the country, and when I came to town I gave to her. I marked it six months before I gave it to her.

Q. Do you know anything of the time-piece - A. No.

Q. Don't you - A. That time-piece was brought to me by a young man when I lived at New Haggerston - he kept me company for two years; he gave it to me about two months before I was taken up, which was on the 18th of August; I do not know what has become of him - he promised me marriage. I have not seen him since we removed to Pentonville. He brought a box to our house in Cross-street, City-road - he said it was full of china, and I was to take care of it till he called again; we moved to Pentonville next day, and took the box with us - he came there that day, and opened it, but I did not see into it - he put the time-piece into the box then; he was there when the officers came, about four o'clock, and got out of the kitchen-window.

Q. Where did he open the box and put the time-piece in - A. At Cross-street; the box was not touched after it got to Pentonville till the officers came. I believe they found the time-piece in the box. I have not seen the man since.

MR. BRODERICK. Q. What was his name - A. George Brown . When the officers came I said I knew nothing about the time-piece, that was not true. I was at Iron-monger-row when the prisoner was taken.

Q. Did he go quietly - A. He wanted his hat. I did not help him to resist; he did not resist, only wanted his hat; they pulled the banisters down in getting him away.

Q. Was the prisoner at Pentonville when you was taken up - A. He breakfasted there in the morning. I will swear he was not there in the afternoon.

Q. Did the man at the bar help East in with the goods - A. No.

Q. Will you swear he did not help to unload the cart - A. My brother; Yes, he did help, I did not know whom you meant.

COURT. Q. You are not unacquainted with the bar, whom did you think was meant - A. The person who came with the cart.

Q. The goods belonged to your brother - A. Part of them; there was a sofa which the young man brought me at Haggerston. I will swear the prisoner was not in the house after twelve o'clock.

Q. On your oath, did he not escape out of window, and leave his coat behind him, when they came - A. No; he went out in a blue coat I did not see the things found by the officer till they were produced at Hatton-garden.

Q. Why did the young man put the time-piece in the box, when he had given it to you - A. He asked me for it.

ROBERT EAST re-examined. The prisoner, his wife, and last witness, were at the house; there was not a soul came there besides her before the officer came, except my fellow-workman. I was putting a water shoot up in front of the house. Nobody could come in or go out without my seeing them.

JOHN LIMBRICK . I found a box there, containing watches, a quantity of seals, and about six dozen and a half of pencil-cases, but no china; there was a silver milk-pot, cut up, some miniatures, and a number of other things. I opened them in the presence of Griffiths; a time-piece was there, but not the one produced, that was on the mantle-shelf.

ELIZA GRIFFITHS re-examined. Q. Did you see Limbrick open the box containing the things - A. I saw them at Hatton-garden, but not in the box; Brown told me it contained them.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 33.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18201028-67

1294. JOHN LANAWAY was indicted for the wilful murder of John Green .

MR. ALLEY conducted the prosecution.

ANN LINCOLN . In August last I lived servant to the prisoner, who kept a public-house in Church-street, Hackney . On the 14th of August, about twelve o'clock in the day, a dance was at Hackney-marsh; John Green came to the house, and remained there about two hours, he was tipsy when he came in - he went to the bar about two o'clock, my master served him with some gin, and asked for the money? he was very abusive, and said he would pay when he liked - my master shoved him backwards into the tap-room, he fell down and cut his head with the fender or table, at the back of it - it was not a violent push, perhaps it would not have hurt him had he been sober. He came into the passage to abuse him again, my master shoved him into the tap-room, and he fell again, came out of the tap-room, and my master shoved him out of doors, he fell on his back upon the threshold; my master picked him up, and dragged him into the yard by the shoulders; he got up in about two minutes, and went into the street, about four houses off, and laid down there about an hour and a half. My master was at home all the time. I told my mistress of it. I saw him get up, and lay down by the Cock, public-house.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. He behaved very rude to your master - A. Yes, he said he would pull the place down if he did not have another glass. I went to Worship-street six weeks after.

COURT. Q. When did you hear he was dead - A. About a week after.

WILLIAM PAGE . I live at Homerton. On the 14th of August in the evening, I saw the deceased near the White Lion, public-house, Hackney-wick, there was a gingling match there - his head was cut at the back part of it.

ROBERT PRESTIGE . I was at the gingling match, on

the 14th of August, and saw the deceased there, he was only a spectator. A dispute arose - he was struck once only, that was with a fist on the breast - he was not hit on the head - he fell upon the ground, was picked up, and taken to the public-house, as he could not walk. I remained there with him, and left between two and three o'clock in the morning - he was insensible.

Cross-examined by MR BRODERICK. Q. Did you afterwards see the man who struck him, with his hand tied in a handkerchief - A. Yes, he had no stick in his hand. There was a general fight, but he did not strike till he was struck.

BENJAMAN BAILLIE . I am a surgeon. I saw the deceased, he was brought to the London Hospital on Tuesday afternoon, about three o'clock, in an insensible state, remained so till that day week, and then died. He was wounded in the back of his head, it appeared to be made by an obtuse instrument - a fall against a table might have produced it - there were no external marks upon the body. I opened the head, and found a great deal of extravasated blood on the brain, which would produce stupor and insensibility. The injury on the head caused the extravasated blood, and that certainly caused his death.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODERICK. Q. What time elapses after the injury before insensibility is produced - A. Sometimes two or three hours, but it is much sooner when there is a considerable extravasation of blood - it appeared a contused wound.

Q. Suppose the wound to be given at two o'clock, would a man be about his ordinary business till night - A. If extravasation had not taken place - it does not always follow the blow immediately, the vessels are not able to emit the blood till the system recovers itself.

Prisoner. I leave my defence to my Counsel.

JOHN GARVA . I am a beadle of Hackney. I saw Green about seven o'clock in the evening after the gingling match, he appeared in liquor, but not suffering under any injury. I did not see his hat off.

HENRY LAVER . I am a pastrycook. I was at the gingling match, and saw the deceased there - there was a general fight. I saw him struck over the head with a stick, and was carried away senseless.

COURT. Q. Did you see a man strike him over the breast - A. Yes, he was also struck in the back part of his head, it bled.

MR. ALLEY. Q. Do you frequent the prisoner's house - A. Yes, the deceased was struck several times. I did not go to the public-house with him. There were between two or three hundred people at the match. I saw four or five cuts upon his head.

GEORGE FLOCK . I am a carter. I was at the gingling match, and saw Green there - he played at the game blindfolded - he was afterwards taken up for dead - he had been knocked down with a stick. I saw him struck on the back part of his head, he fell from the blow, and was kicked, stamped on, and carried off the field.

MR. ALLEY. Q. He fell on his face - A. Yes, and they knocked him over - I dare not assist him. I saw Laver there, he must have seen him stamped on, as well as me, and must have seen him blindfolded - he got five or six blows. When he got to the public-house he bled at his mouth and nose.

WILLIAM WARD . I live at Homerton, and was at the match. I saw Green knocked down with a stick, and carried away.

COURT. Q. Was he blindfolded - A. I cannot say, as I was blindfolded myself first. I helped to carry him to the public-house - a farrier was there who examined his head. I saw no wound.

EDWARD JAMES TURNER . I was at the match, and saw the deceased there. There was a quarrel about a man who had caught a young fellow. Green was knocked down with a stick, and could not get up - he bled very much at the back of his head - he was taken into the Temple Mills, public-house.

MR. ALLEY. Q. How many played - A. There were six blindfolded. Green did not join in the game, and was not blindfolded, if so I must have seen him.

JOHN LLOYD . I live at Bethnal-green. I was at the match, and saw Green knocked down with a stick, he was struck on the head with the stick. I had seen him fighting - I saw him before the match, he was intoxicated, but appeared well in health.

COURT. Q. What part of the head was he struck on - A. I cannot say. I saw one blow given him on the back of his head, and he bled at the back of his head.

MR. BAILLIE re-examined. I am certain there was only one external wound upon his head.

Q. Supposing both these accounts to be true, as to his being apparently in perfect health at six o'clock, should you ascribe his death to the first blow given at two o'clock or to any subsequent blow - A. The blow at the back of his head caused his death. I am firmly of opinion that the blow given him in the morning caused the extravasation, if extravasation took place before the match, he could not have acted as described.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18201028-68

1295. THOMAS GORDON was indicted for bigamy .

MESSRS. ALLEY and LAW conducted the prosecution.

EDWARD EDWARDS . I am clerk of Woolwich parish. I produce the register of marriages, and find that on the 11th of May, 1809, Thomas Gordon was married by banns to Harriet Cole . I witnessed the register.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did you print this bill - (producing it) - A. My son printed a thousand of them by order of Miss Lawes.

MALCOLM SELLERS . I have frequently seen the prisoner write, and am particularly acquainted with his hand-writing. The signature T. Gordon to the register is his. In 1814 he shewed me a certificate of his marriage, on the coast of America. He said he was married, and that was the certificate of it; he said he had got it from his wife, and that was all he wanted. In June, 1815, when we came to Portsmouth, he told me he had heard his wife had been with the boatswain's mate.

Cross-examined. Q. When did you see Miss Lawes - A. I saw her five or six months ago at Chatham, She asked me if I knew anything about it? I knew thirty guineas reward was offered for persons who would give evidence. The prisoner was on board the ship in October, 1813, when I joined her at Lisbon.

SARAH SHOTT . My husband keeps the Navy Arms, at Woolwich. I knew Harriet Cole and the prisoner, they went from my house to be married in 1809. He said he was going to be married and was short of money; I lent him 1 l. 12 s. They returned to my house before dinner, and slept there. He was then gunner of the ship Venus, which laid in Woolwich ordinary. They went on board the day after their marriage, remained there, and frequently came ashore to my house.

Q. In February last year did you see the prisoner - A. Yes, at my house, and told him Mr. Frazer, our minister, had sent to me concerning his being married to Harriet Cole . He said,

"Mrs. Shott, I am afraid of no one living but you, and if you will swear I am not the same man that married Cole, I will make over half the property to you and your children that I have got by my present wife." I said if he had got as much money as George the Third I would not do such a thing, for he was the man. He said it did not signify, for he could get a man named Collard to write him a burial certificate, to say she was buried at Munster. I said I thought that was a ready way to hang them both, and said in a jocular way,

"You had better get him to swear she fell overboard and was drowned."

Cross-examined by MR. BRODERICK. Q. Do you know the present Miss Lawes - A. Yes, she has been to me. I was subpoened here. I went to Chatham and Sheerness with her to find Cole. I saw some of the bills posted at Sheerness and Woolwich.

Q. Do you remember seeing a man named Bone at your house a few months ago - A. Very probably I might, but I do not know him by name. I never said it was of no importance whether Cole was alive or not, so that I got the reward, nor that there was a lady in London who would give 100 l. to a man to swear Gordon's first wife was alive.

SARAH STAINS . The prisoner lived with me in King-street, Deptford; he came to lodge with me again the beginning of 1813 or 1814, he was then with a woman, whom he called his wife; she lived three or four weeks with him, and then escaped out of the back parlour window - he had locked her in the room, as they had words, and when he came home she was gone. I saw her about twelve months after with a child. I saw the prisoner two or three times after. He called in the beginning of 1819, and asked if I had seen his wife? I said not since I saw him. He desired me to save his neck - I asked him what he meant? I understood him to say he was going to be married, or was married. I had seen his wife about four years before that.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Might it not have been 1810 or 1811 that you saw her - A. No; I can tell by my child's age; he was nine years old on the 27th of August, and he was a little boy at the time.

ELLEN BAKER . I live at Brompton, near Chatham; my husband is carpenter of the ship Cadmus. I first became acquainted with the prisoner eleven or twelve years ago; he was gunner of the Heroine, formerly called the Venus. He frequented our house - I was cook of the Venus. He had a woman with him, whom he called his wife, he always called her so. I saw her on the 4th of March, 1819; I know that was the day, because the ship sailed without me that day. A man named Owen bought Harriet Gordon a bonnet that day. I am sure she is the woman who lived with the prisoner as his wife.

Cross-examined. Q. How do you know it was eleven or twelve years ago that you first saw her - A. Because I left England soon after, and went round the Cape with my husband. I saw her again in August, 1818, and in 1817 I saw her on board the Cadmus with Owen.

Q. Did she go by Owen's name - A. No, they called her Lady Gordon. The prisoner knew me immediately he saw me at Marlborough-street. She was not so tall as me, and of a fair complexion.

SARAH SHOTT re-examined. That is the description of Harriet Gordon .

JOHN JOHNSON . I am boatswain of the Cadmus. I know Harriet Gordon . I saw her go past Chatham dock-gates in July this year, and have seen her in Baker's company. I saw her in 1818 in the brig with John Horn .

ALEXANDER GRANT . The prisoner lived at my house in 1817, about the latter end of the year. He told me there was a lady at the west end of the town, possessed of considerable property, if he could get married to her now, but he could not marry for two years, as his first wife had not left him five years. He said he left her for dead on the floor at Mrs. Stains's, in King-street, and had locked her in the room, and when he came home she was gone; that he went after her, and had sharpened his knife ready if he could have found her.

Q. Subsequent to this, did he live with you - A. Yes, after his second marriage, at the latter end of 1818, or the beginning of 1819. He came alone, took the apartment, and brought his wife next day.

GEORGE BOLTON . I am clerk of Doctor's Commons, and produce an affidavit made by Thomas Gordon to obtain a licence for marriage. He was sworn before Dr. Parsons on the 27th of August, 1818.

MALCOLM SELLERS re-examined. It is the prisoner's hand-writing.

(The affidavit was then read, in which the prisoner deposed that he was a batchelor.)

REV. RICHARD CHAPMAN . I have the register of marriages at St. Marylebone , in which I find that on the 13th of September, 1818 , Thomas Gordon , batchelor, was married to Frances Eliza Lawes , spinster , by licence.

MALCOLM SELLERS re-examined. The signature to this register is the prisoner's writing.

MISS SUSAN MATILDA LAWES . I had a sister, Francis Eliza Lawes - the signature to the register is hers. She lived about two years ago with my mother; she afterwards went to lodge at the prisoner's brother, and married the prisoner - she afterwards died. Before her death I told the prisoner I should see about his previous marriage. He said he never had been married to any other woman but my sister. He afterwards confessed it, and asked for mercy. He had behaved very insolent, and next day he requested permission to see me and asked for mercy. I said,

"How can you expect mercy, when you married a second wife, knowing your first was alive?" He then said he did not know whether she was alive or dead. My sister had about 2000 l. in the Bank, and other money - about 180 l. a year altogether. He said several

times he would give up the d - d business if I would allow him 40 l. a year. I said I would allow him nothing.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Your sister's money was left her by her mother at her sole disposal - A. Exactly so. I had no claim to it. She died about the beginning of March.

Q. Did you employ a Mr. Pugh, an attorney - A. He wrote to the trustees in January, 1819, my sister was then alive, she died last March. I had some bills printed and circulated at all the sea-ports before her death.

Q. Do you know one Nebemiah - A. There was a man of that name who tuned my instrument. I never offered him 20 l. to swear the prisoner's first wife was alive. I do not believe I ever said a syllable to him about the business.

MR. ALLEY. Q. Solemnly on your oath you never did - A. I never did. My sister lived with the prisoner till her death - I could not separate them. She was quite of infirm mind, and had a paralytic stroke, which affected her speech. Dr. Thornton and others have made affidavits of it.

Prisoner's Defence. The word

"Batchelor" in the affidavit, was done solely by mistake.

RACHAEL BROOKS . I had a niece named Harriet Cole , she married the prisoner - she led a very indifferent life. I saw her after her marriage, she told me he was gone to sea and applied to me several times for money. It is nine years since I heard any thing of her. I live in New-street, Dorset-square. I think she is dead.

ANN JONES . I live in Cleveland-street. Harriet Cole who married the prisoner, was my niece. I have not seen her for ten years, and have made every enquiry.

WILLIAM GORDON . I am the prisoner's brother. Miss Lawes lived in my house at Woolwich. He was about to marry her - I only knew of his intent ten days before the marriage deed was executed. Before that I made diligent enquiry for his first wife of Mrs. Brooks and Jones, at his particular request. Miss Lawes knew he was a widower - it was occasionally a topic of conversation, for they were in my house a month before they were married. My brother told me his wife ran away from him in 1813. Miss Lawes was present at her sister's death.

MR. ALLEY. Q. How long was that young lady in your house before he married her - A. About a month, and my wife had known her thirty years; in fact Miss Lawes was a tenant of mine some years ago. I made the enquiry about the years 1814 and 1815, not since. I never mentioned to Miss Lawes that my brother was about to marry her sister - they were acquainted about a month before they were married.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did you know whether they agreed to marry at first meeting - A. They walked out daily.

COURT. Q. As you knew Miss Laws so long, did you not call upon her, and say you was glad you were going to be related to her - A. She was out of town.

JOHN MILLINGTON . I am a rigger. and live at Poplar. I know the prisoner, the last time I saw him with his wife, was in 1813. I afterwards met her under the Piazza in Covent Garden, and went home with her. The last time I saw her was in 1815 - she went by the name of Mary White , she was in a very bad state of health, and I persuaded her to get an order from the Lord Mayor to go to the Hospital.

ELIZA MILLINGTON . I knew Harriet Cole , she lived at Woolwich when I first knew her. I saw her married to the prisoner in 1809. I saw her in 1813 at Deptford, she then went by the name of Mary White . In 1815, I met her in the Borough; she said she was going to try to get in the hospital. I went next day, and saw her there, she had just expired - she was the same woman who married the prisoner.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. Did not the prisoner lodge in the same house with you - A. Yes, in 1813, before his first wife died, he supported me - I lived with him from 1813 to 1816. I have been married two years.

COURT. Q. Have you been to the nurse that attended her - A. She is not there - I have not been to see. I am sure it was 1815, because I was going to town at the time. I was at the marriage, but did not sign the register. She was in Magdalen ward - she was laying dead upon the bed. I told the prisoner I saw her dead - it was in the Summer of 1815.

Q. Did you ever converse with Miss Lawes - A. I did.

Q. On your oath, did you ever tell her the prisoner's first wife was alive and at Plymouth - A. I did; but when I am on my oath I must speak the truth. It was a year and a half ago that I said so, and referred her to one Harris, who could give her information. She said she should send to Plymouth.

ELIZA ANN COHEN . I live at Newington. I first knew the prisoner and his wife in 1815. I met them at the corner of Chancery-lane. She told me she went by the name of Mary White , and she was going to try get into the hospital. I have not seen her since. She said she went by that name as Gordon might be looking for her.

MARTHA LEDGER . I belong to Guy's Hospital, and produce the register of deaths, and find the entry of Mary White , who was admitted on the 6th of June, and died on the 8th, in Magdalen Ward. When patients die they are removed in twenty-four hours.

MR. ALLEY. Q. I suppose you have many Mary Whites in the hospital - A. Yes, I was not applied to about this till six weeks ago - she had the foul desease.

THOMAS BONE . I am a blacksmith, and live in Gray's Inn-road. I know Mrs. Shot - several persons were in her tap-room, I heard her say

"What does it signify whether the first wife is alive or not, what odds is it, so as we can get the reward," and that she knew a lady in London, who would give 100 l. for any one to swear against Gordon, that his first wife was living. I have known Shott ever since 1813. I would not believe her on her oath, for I have often seen her drunk - I have no other reason.

MR. ALLEY. Q. Are you a journeyman - A. Yes. This happened last Sunday eight weeks at her house. I have not been examined about this before. A gentleman asked me what I knew, and I told him. Mrs. Millington fetched me to the gentleman's house. I had not seen Shott for twelve months before.

MR. BRODERICK. Q. When did you first see Gordon - A. In 1813. I knew Shott when I was on board the Pomona, and when I worked in the Warren.

COURT. Q. To whom did you first mention what Shott said - A. To the prisoner's attorney. I never told any other person of it. I never saw Shott between 1816 and then.

Two bills were then put in and read, offering a reward of thirty guineas to any person who could prove, that Harriet Gordon was living at the time of the prisoner's second marriage. The marriage settlement was also read, conveying the property of Miss Lawes to the prisoner in case he survived her, after his death to their children, and in case they had none, to their survivors.

- ROACH. I am a bookseller, and a trustee to the settlement. I knew both parties before their marriage. I understood Gordon had been married, but heard nothing of his former wife. Miss Lawes knew he had been married before, as she said she was very sorry he had been so unfortunate as to marry a bad woman.

COURT. Q. Which of the two was your friend - A. Mr. Gordon, he introduced me to her.

ELIZA MILLINGTON re-examined. Q. Were you on board the Pomona frigate - A. Yes, I joined her in the Downs. She was paid off in 1815, at Woolwich.

Q. On your oath was you not on board her at Plymouth or Portsmouth in July, 1815 - A. No, I left her in 1814. I was on board with the prisoner.

MALCOLM SELLERS re-examined. I saw Millington the latter end of May, 1815, at Portsmouth - she came on board the Pomona, and remained on board till August, 1815, with Gordon.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. When was the Pomona paid off - A. On the 14th of September, 1815, at Woolwich. She came from the Coast of America.

EDWARD EDWARDS re-examined. I have known Mrs. Shott thirty years, she is a respectable woman.

GUILTY . Aged 42.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18201028-69

1296. THOMAS DENT was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of October , 49 lbs. of lead, value 10 s., the goods of James Burton , and fixed to a certain building of his .

JOHN JENNINGS . I am foreman to Mr. James Burton . This building is on the east side of Regent-street .

EDWARD WITCHCROFT . I am a private watchman. About half-past seven o'clock at night, I heard a noise on the top of this house, and saw a man there. I got a light and went up a ladder, he jumped through the window, I followed him down to the first floor, and there took him, it was the prisoner. I found the lead on the roof unfixed and removed, but not taken away.

THOMAS GOOK . I am an officer. I went up the ladder and matched the lead to the place, it fitted.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18201028-70

1297. JOHN TOMS and JAMES BRAY were indicted for stealing, on the 18th of October , one handkerchief, value 3 s., the goods of James Taylor , from his person .

JAMES TAYLOR. On the 18th of October I was in St. James's-street, Westminster , at one o'clock, standing at a jeweller's shop-window; in about three seconds the prisoner Bray came in the rear of my left shoulder, I immediately felt his hand in my outside coat pocket. I felt and missed my handkerchief - I saw it in his hand, collared him, and saw him put his hand behind and give it to Toms, whom I also seized. Two officers came up and took them.

GEORGE TAYLOR . I am an officer. I saw the prisoners attempt several persons' pockets, in St. James's-street. I saw Bray put his hand into Mr. Taylor's pocket, and take the handkerchief out. I secured them both.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

TOMS'S Defence. Somebody tucked the handkerchief under my coat.

JOHN TOMS - GUILTY . Aged 11.

JAMES BRAY - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18201028-71

SEVENTH DAY. WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 1.

1298. THOMAS RICHARDSON was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of October , one spoon, value 2 s. , the goods of Margaret Wilson .

MARGARET WILSON . I live in Frederick-buildings, Whitechapel . The prisoner came to sweep the chimney . About five minutes after he left I missed the spoon from the sideboard, and told Lewis.

HOWARD LEWIS . I am an officer. I found the prisoner about twenty yards from the house, and found the spoon in his coat - he begged for mercy.

(Property produced, and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 50.

Confined Fourteen Days .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18201028-72

1299. ELEANOR CLARK was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of September , two pair of shoes, value 6 s., and one pair of boots, value 5 s., the goods of William Brown , privately in his shop .

WILLIAM BROWN . I am a shoemaker , and live in Oxford-street . On the 30th of September, about three o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner came to my shop with another woman. I came home, and found them there; I suspected them, and went after them; I brought them both back, and charged them with stealing two pair of shoes and a pair of boots - the prisoner ran into a public-house, and was taken.

CHARLOTTE GULLOCK . I was at the Spread Eagle, public-house, in Oxford-street. The prisoner ran in, and went towards the back of the bar; two men came in after her, she ran into a dark part of the passage, and then left the house. I found the boots where she stood.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. Brown came and spoke to me. I went across to speak to a person, and Brown took me.

GUILTY. Aged 59.

Of stealing, but not privately .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18201028-73

1300. RICHARD SCOTT was indicted for that he, about two o'clock in the night of the 26th of October , at St. Ann, Westminster , unlawfully, wilfully, and injuriously did force and break down part of the door of the dwelling-house of Charles Bell , Esq ., with intent to enter and steal, and that he having committed the said offence, in and upon William Thorn , (a subject of our Lord the King, and a nightly watchman of the said parish, in the execution of his duty) feloniously, wilfully, maliciously, and unlawfully did make an assault with a sharp instrument, and did feloniously strike and cut him in and upon his head, with intent to obstruct and prevent the apprehension of him the said Richard Scott for the said offence, for which he was by law liable to be apprehended for the said offence , against the statute.

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating instead of the words in italics, that he was found in an area belonging to the dwelling-house of the said Charles Bell , having upon him a chisel, a knife, and a saw; the same being implements of house-breaking.

THIRD COUNT, the same as the second, only omitting the words in italics.

FOURTH COUNT, for assaulting William Thorn , a subject of our Lord the King, and with a sharp instrument, feloniously, wilfully, and maliciously striking and cutting him in and upon his head, with intent to do him some grievous bodily harm .

MR. ANDREWS conducted the prosecution.

CHARLES BELL , ESQ. I am principal surgeon of the Middlesex Hospital , and live on the west side of Soho-square, in the parish of St. Ann's . I generally see my house fastened up at night, but do not know that I did on the 26th of October. I went down and examined the area door next morning; a hole had been bored at each corner of the pannel apparently by a gimlet; the moulding was split off one of the sides from one hole to the other - it appeared to have been done to move the pannel. The door leads from the area into the kitchen.

JOHN LAWRENCE . I am Mr. Bell's servant. I left a broomstick in the area.

WILLIAM MORTON . I am watchman of St. Ann's. This house is in my beat. On the night of the 26th of October, as I was calling half-past one o'clock, I observed three men standing still outside Mr. Bell's house. When they saw me coming up to them, one man in a white coat went off, and the other two went different ways. I followed the man in the white coat a little way. I walked round the square, and on coming to Mr. Bell's house again, I saw the same man there; he stood in the front of the area, walked away, and I followed him to the corner of Frith-street and down the left side as far as No. 3; he stopped there about a minute, and turned back towards Greek-street. I turned back to the corner of Carlisle-street, and then went back to Mr. Bell's area, stood there about a minute, and heard some person at work down the area, apparently cutting wood - the moon shone very bright. I drew alongside the area, and saw a man there at work, and on getting my rattle from under my coat; the man in the white coat (who was outside) came up, and asked me what it was o'clock? I said it was almost two; he instantly seized my rattle and broke the large part off, which prevented my springing it. I said there was somebody down the area; he said

"D - n your b - dy eyes, I'll area you." Another man stepped up instantly, and broke this broomstick over my head. When they saw that the blow made me stagger off the footpath, they called to the man in the area

"Come up." He came up through the area gate, which was open, went along the top of Frith-street, and down the left hand side; the other two went different ways. I followed the man towards Frith-street, calling Stop thief! Thorn, the watchman, attempted to stop him. I was about twenty yards off at the time, and never lost sight of him at all - it was the prisoner. When I came up, Leager had got him - he had passed the place where Thorn attempted to stop him. As he ran down Frith-street, I heard him throw something down, which sounded like keys. I went to the watch-house with him, and in the way he dropped a small chisel; I picked it up and gave it to Healing. I went back to Frith-street with Ivory and Mason; we found a bunch of keys exactly in the same spot where I heard him throw them - Ivory picked them up. I tried them to Mr. Bell's area gate, one of them locked and unlocked it. I afterwards saw the door, if the pannel had been cut out, there would have been room enough to let a man's body through. Thorne went to the watch-house all over blood - he was cut along his forehead. I never lost sight of the prisoner till he was taken.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did you observe what was done to the door - A. There were four gimlet holes in it, and where the pannel is let in, was cut all down and nearly cut away.

WILLIAM THORN . I am watchman of St. Ann's Westminster, my beat is on the west side of Frith-street, and the corner of Queen-street. On the night of the 26th of October, I heard the cry of Stop thief! and immediately crossed the way, hearing the footsteps of a man running towards me as hard as he could; it was the prisoner. I lifted up my stick, and called to him to stop, he was close to me, he said nothing, but lifted up his hand and made a blow at me, which nearly staggered me. I felt that it was the blow of an instrument, and the blood gushed from me in a torrent immediately. He then ran off as fast as he could, I followed him, springing my rattle, as hard as I could, and crying Stop thief! I did not lose sight of him, and saw Leager stop him. When I came up he had got him by the collar. I immediately took him by the other side, he was taken to the watch-house. My head was dressed - I received a cut across the temple. I am certain he is the man.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you your hat on when you received the blow - A. Yes; my cap was under my hat, the blow was below where the hat came, my cap was not down, it prevented my hat coming on my head. He struck me with a sweeping cut so - (describing it.)

ROBERT SEAGER . I am a watchman of St. Ann's, my stand is in Frith-street, nearer to Compton-street than Thorn's beat. I stopped the prisoner who Thorn was pursuing. Morton came up afterwards. I heard the rattle sprung when he came. I collared him and we took him to the watch-house.

JOSEPH MASON . I am a patrol. I saw him in custody, and heard the rattle spring. As he was moving on about ten yards from where he was taken, I saw him put his left hand under his coat, and saw something shining in his

hand, it turned out to be a chisel. I seized his hand, and called out for them to take notice that he was dropping his tools, he dropped an open knife and chisel - (producing them) - I caught him by the wrist as he dropped them, and held his hand till we got him to the watch-house. I went to Frith-street, and found the skeleton keys.

JOSHUA IVORY . I am a beadle. I was on duty at the watch-house; the prisoner was brought in. I picked up the keys in Frith-street, within a few yards of the spot Morton described. I found some pieces of wood in Mr. Bell's area, which I compared with the pannel of the door, they fitted it, and evidently came from it. If the pannel had been moved I could have got through myself.

MR. JOHN VALENTINE BRIDGEMAN . I am house-surgeon at Middlesex Hospital. Thorn was sent to me by Mr. Bell. I saw him at six o'clock in the evening, he had a wound about an inch and a half long, extending across the forehead, it appears to have been made with a knife, the one produced, it strikes me, was very probably the instrument. It was all the same depth, and began about three inches from the eye-brow on the left temple.

Cross-examined. Q. Was it any depth to make it dangerous - A. The skull was not exposed, it was a little less than a quarter of an inch deep. It must have been done by a cutting instrument. I have not a doubt of its being a cut, and not a contusion.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming down Frith-street, and that man stopped me. I made no resistance. I live in Crown-street, and was not above twenty yards from home. I did not come down Soho-square. There was not a person in the street. When Thorn came to the watch-house his head appeared swollen.

JOSHUA IVORY . The prosecutor's head was not swollen. It bled, and was completely cut.

Two witnesses gave the prisoner a character.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 21.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18201028-74

1301. GEORGE AUGUSTUS LAWSON was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of July , at St. James's, Westminster, one watch, value 10 l., the goods of James Aldous , and Eliza Ann Aldous , in their dwelling-house .

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

JAMES ALDOUS . I am a pawnbroker , and live in Berwick-street, Soho . I am in partnership with Eliza Ann Aldous , the prisoner was in my service up to the 15th of August. It was his duty to receive pledges, and enter them on the book. On the 6th of October a lady applied to me to redeem a gold watch, which had been pledged for 5 l. I found the counterpart of her duplicate on a watch in my hand-writing. I had put it on a gold watch. On opening the paper I found this silver watch, which I had seen in the prisoners bed-room as a wearing watch. Before he left I had missed other articles when persons came to redeem them, and he knew I obtained great discredit and injury by not having them to produce.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Did you take the gold watch in yourself - A. Yes; on the 20th of April.

SAMUEL PLANK . I am an officer. I went with Mr. Aldous to the prisoner, shewed him the silver watch, and asked if he knew it? he appeared at first not to know it. I said I was aware he knew it, he then said he did, that it had been his, and he had substituted it for a watch which he then had in his pocket. I said, No, he substituted it for a gold watch, which he denied. I found some keys on him, which he said belonged to his writing desk, and the bureau at his father's house, I said I was going to search his father's house for the gold watch, he then asked to speak to Mr. Aldous alone, Mr. Aldous refused. He then said,

"It is of no use denying it, you will find the gold watch in my desk at my father's." I did so. He then threw himself on the prosecutor's mercy, and said he had robbed him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 20.

Of stealing, but not in the dwelling-house .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18201028-75

1302. JOHN CHRISTOPHER CROFT was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of October , three flutes, value 6 l., the goods of Thomas Potter and others, his partners, in the dwelling-house of Sarah Gouldings , widow .

MR. ANDREWS conducted the prosecution.

JAMES LAWSON. I am shopman to Mr. Dobree, a pawnbroker, who lives at Charing-cross. On the 7th of October a young man pledged three flutes for two guineas and a half. I believe the prisoner to be the man. He said he had an order to send some to the Cape of Good Hope, and pawned them till he completed the order, they are wrapped in the same paper in which they were brought. I will not positively say he is the man.

MR. THOMAS POTTER . I am one of the firm of Golding and Co., I have different partners. The prisoner was in our employ about six weeks, from July to the 26th of August. We are music-seller s. After he left us he called repeatedly to know if we could employ him again, he always came between twelve and two o'clock, when the men were at dinner.

Cross-examined. Q. You have hundreds of these flutes - A. Yes.

SAMUEL HILL . I have the care of the flutes, the paper these flutes are wrapped in has a private mark, which I put on it. We only made eight of this sort, and sold none of them.

GEORGE WOOD . I made the flutes. On the 20th of September I sent the prosecutor two eight-keyed flutes, one of those produced is one of them. I know it by the formation of the key.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought them all, and told them if they sent an officer with me I would find the man. I informed the foreman the night before I was taken that I had bought them of a man who owed me money.

SAMUEL HILL re-examined. I am foreman. He told me he had advanced 14 l. on some flutes, and said they were in pledge at Dobree's, in Oxford-street, not at Charing-cross.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18201028-76

1303. JOHN CHRISTOPHER CROFT was again indicted for stealing, on the 20th of August , one flute, value

50 s., the goods of Thomas Potter and others, his partner s, in the dwelling-house of Sarah Goulding .

WILLIAM GORTON . I am a shopman to Mr. Dobree, a pawnbroker, in Charlotte-street, Fitzroy-square. On the 8th of August the prisoner pawned a flute in the name of Rose, London-street. In October he offered to pledge three, I questioned him, and his answers not being satisfactory. I took him to Mrs. Golding, and gave him in charge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only.

Judgment Respited .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18201028-77

1304. HENRY BAKER was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of October , one coat, value 2 l. , the goods of Thomas Berkley Bond .

THOMAS BERKLEY BOND . I live at Dorking, Surrey. On the 4th of October, I left my horse and chaise in care of a boy in Judd-street, Brunswick-square , about five o'clock in the evening. While I was absent the coat was stolen.

THOMAS HOWARD . I was minding the horse, the prisoner came up, and asked me to let him hold it. I said I would let nobody hold it. He took the coat off the horse, I ran after him, called Stop thief! and Kemp stopped him.

THOMAS KEMP . I ran after the prisoner, and saw him throw the coat into an area. I followed and collared him, he said, he knew nothing of it. I am sure he is the man.

JOHN GORING . I found the coat in the area.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18201028-78

1305. CHARLES PETER NORTON was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of September , eight pins, value 10 l.; twenty-one brooches, value 25 l.; five snaps, value 5 l.; forty-four rings, value 50 l.; three crosses, value 5 l.; five pair of ear-rings, value 7 l.; one pair of knee-buckles, value 2 l.; one watch, value 4 l.; five 10 l., nine 5 l., and six 1 l. Bank notes , the property of John Mainwaring .

The prisoner pleaded

GUILTY .

Confined Six Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18201028-79

1306. WILLIAM BROWN was indicted for embezzlement .

WILLIAM BRYAN . I am a farmer , and live at Wilsden , the prisoner was my servant . I sent him to Smithfield with hay, I entrusted him to receive the money from the salesman. On the 7th of September, he took a load, when he returned, I asked him for the money, he said he had it in his pocket. I was busy, and did not demand it of him. He absconded, and never accounted to me for it.

WALTER WEBSTER . I am a salesman. On the 7th of September I paid the prisoner 10 l. 7 s. 9 d. for three leads of hay.

Prisoner's Defence. I got my pocket picked at Bartholomew-fair.

GUILTY .

Fined One Shilling , and Discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18201028-80

1307. WILLIAM REYNOLDS was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of September , two live tame ducks, price 2 s. , the goods of George Collens .

The prosecutor not being able to identify his property, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18201028-81

1308. ELIZA MARSHALL was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of October , one watch, value 35 s. , the goods of John Meall .

JOHN MEALL . On the 4th of October, at twelve o'clock at night, I missed this watch from my shop in French Horn-yard, Holborn . I had met the prisoner in Holborn, and taken her to my shop.

WILLIAM FLEETWOOD . I work for Meall - he brought the prisoner and another woman in and gave them gin. I had put the watch on the box. The prisoner wanted to go out; I could not find the key, and let her out at the window - I heard it ticking in her hand. The other woman shewed us where she lived.

PATRICK CRAWLEY . I am a watchman. Fleetwood fetched me to the prisoner's room, she would not open the door, I burst it open, and took her to the watch-house.

JAMES WRIGHT . I found the watch in her bosom at the office.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Confined Six Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18201028-82

1309. HENRY CLUTTERBUCK was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of September , one pair of breeches, value 4 s. , the goods of Charles Hackney .

CHARLES HACKNEY . On the 20th of September I heard an alarm that the breeches were stolen from my door, I ran out, and secured the prisoner with them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Whipped and Discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18201028-83

1310. EDWIN DEAN was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of October , one cheese, value 18 s. , the goods of William Fox .

WILLIAM FOX. I am a cheesemonger , and live in Shoreditch . On the 7th of October, about half-past six o'clock, I lost a cheese from my door.

BARNARD GLEED . I am an officer. On the 7th of October I stopped the prisoner in Wheeler-street about seven o'clock, with the cheese under his arm.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Whipped and Discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18201028-84

1311. JOSEPH HARTWELL was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of September , one handkerchief, value 1 s, and four curtains, value 7 s., the goods of Ann Mince , now Ann Lacey , from her person .

ANN LACEY . On the 19th of September, at seven o'clock in the evening, the prisoner met me in Brick-lane , and snatched this bundle from me. I pursued till he was caught and dropped it.

JEREMIAH CREEMER . I heard the alarm and stopped the prisoner, he threw the bundle down.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Whipped and Discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18201028-85

1312. ROBERT GREW and CHARLES SMITH were indicted for stealing, on the 9th of October , one watch, value 2 l.; two seals, value 5 s.; two keys, value 3 s., and one chain, value 1 d., the goods of John Morgan , from his person .

JOHN MORGAN . On the 9th of October, between eight and nine o'clock at night, I was in Union-street, Spitalfields , at the corner of Gun-street; two or three men came right before me, and appeared in a hurry to pass - I drew back for them. A crowd came up behind, they all hustled me, and snatched my watch from my fob. A person behind held my arms - the man who took it ran down Gun-street. I ran a few yards after them, and was knocked down or tripped up. I received a blow with a bludgeon on the back of my head, which deprived me of my senses. When I recovered myself Wells said he knew two or three of them, but I knew none of them myself.

JOHN WELLS . I am a shoemaker, am fifteen years old, and live in Artillery-passage. On the 9th of October I was playing about, and saw a gang of fifteen or twenty parading up and down Union-street - they stopped at the corner of Gun-street. Mr. Morgan was walking rather slowly; two or three of them came in front of him - I then saw them all run down Gun-street; he followed them, was knocked down, and received a severe blow on the back of his head. As they ran away I saw the watch in Grew's hand by the gas-light. They all ran away, calling out,

"A mad bull!" Smith was one of them. I saw him before it and after.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Do you know Connell - A. Yes, he was a great way behind me. I never told him the gentleman offered me 5 s. a day to find the thieves. Pinnock and Potts were in the street, but not near me.

THOMAS GARTON . On the 10th of October Morgan and Wells came to me; Wells said he knew three of them. At night I took him to some flash houses, and found upwards of thirty at the Cross Keys, public-house, in Wentworth-street - he pointed Grew out, I sent him to the watch-house, then went to Bell-lane, he pointed Smith out from among six or seven others. I took him.

SMITH'S Defence. I was at home at the time.

EDMUND CONNELL . I saw Wells in Gun-street. Pinnock and Potts were with us playing at hoop. A mob surrounded a gentleman; I did not see the prisoners among them. At the time Morgan was knocked down Wells was at the corner of Steward-street with me, fifty yards off; I could see as much as him. As he returned from Worship-street that night he said he was promised 50 l. for every one he should hang, and 5 s. a day for attending the Old Bailey. I said

"John, how could you swear to the two young men, when you was at the corner of Steward-street at the time?" He said,

"Oh you fool! I shall have 50 l. for every one I hang - I will pick out two, and say they were them that robbed the man." Pinnock reckoned up 5 s. a day, and made 3 l. 10 s. for fourteen days. He said,

"There is a fine speck!" Next day I met him with about twenty officers. I followed him through several streets, he then parted from them, and came to me and Pinnock. He called me aside, and said Morgan had promised him 2 s. 6 d. next morning. I met him on Saturday morning in Widegate-alley. He had seen Mr. Grew talking to me. He said,

"Well, Ned, what did they get out of you yesterday?" I said,

"John, they got nothing out of me but the truth. I hear you swore at Worship-street that you saw the men knock the gentleman down and rob him of his watch." He said,

"I said no such thing, nor could I." James Garnham stood by, I told him to mark those words.

COURT. Q. Did you hear Wells say he knew two or three of them before Morgan spoke to him - A. Wells went up, and said he knew two of them; Morgan had not spoken to him. He did not tell anybody he knew them before he told Morgan. I saw no gang. I do not know how the prisoner's friends found me out.

WILLIAM PINNOCK . My father is a shoemaker, and lives in Widegate-alley, Bishopsgate. I was with Connell the night the gentleman was robbed. Wells was with us - he was forty-five yards from Gun-street - it has been measured by Mr. Potts. It was impossible he could see to the end of Gun-street.

COURT. Q. Was Wells near you - A. No, he was at the corner of Steward-street. We went to Worship-street out of curiosity - Wells said he knew two of them, and as he returned he said,

"Ned, I shall have 5 s. a day, and 50 l. if they are hung." Connell said,

"You will have their curses as long as you live." Wells said,

"What is a thief's curse?" Next day I saw him call Connell aside and speak to him.

COURT. Q. When you saw him with the officers did you tell him he could not have seen it - No. I had seen the gang at the corner of Widegate-alley. I knew none of them.

DANIEL POTTS . I was with Connell, we had been playing at hoop. I heard

"Mad bull!" called from the end of Gun-street, nearly forty yards off - Wells could not have seen so far. I went home.

Q. Who brought you here to-day - A. Mr. Grew.

JOHN WELLS re-examined. All they have said is false. Connell said to me,

"That is right, Jack, get as many taken up as you can, you will have 5 s. a day." I saw it as plain as I see now.

JOHN MORGAN re-examined. When I recovered myself I heard Wells saying to some boys that he knew two or three of them, and I applied to him, not him to me.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18201028-86

1313. WILLIAM BOSTOW was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of October , one horse-cloth, value 38 s.; one roller, value 13 s.; one blanket, value 16 s., and one bridle, value 10 s. , the goods of Lawrence Jopson Marshall .

GEORGE LIDDIARD . I am servant to Mr. Lawrence Jopson Marshall , who lives at Dalston . About half-past six o'clock in the morning, I found the stable-door open and these things gone. The prisoner worked in the stable in the Summer.

JOHN BALES . I am a sadler, and live in Finsbury-place. On Monday, 16th of October, the prisoner brought the horse-cloth and roller for sale. I remembered having made them for Mr. Marshall eight weeks before. The prisoner said he had had them four years. I gave him in charge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I bought them at a sale in Oxfordshire.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Confined One Year , and Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18201028-87

1314. HENRY EAST was indicted for embezzlement .

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18201028-88

1315. JOHN GREEN was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of October , 15 lbs. of lead, value 8 s., the goods of Thomas Matthews Redaway , and fixed to a certain dwelling-house of his .

THOMAS MATTHEWS REDAWAY . I have a house, No. 20, Frith-street, Soho , it was empty.

WILLIAM DEVAL . I am a watchman. On the 4th of October, about four o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner at the corner of Old Compton-street and Wardour-street, he was bulky behind; I stopped him, and asked what he had got? I found 30 lbs. of lead under his coat - it appeared to be fresh cut, and was part of a gutter. On Monday I compared it with No. 20, Frith-street, it fitted the gutter on the roof. I am certain it belonged to the gutter.

JAMES HOWARD . I am a watchman, and assisted in taking the prisoner.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I saw some men take a parcel from under their coats and hide it in a dry well. I went and got it.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18201028-89

1316. JOHN ARCHER was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of September , one pair of shoes, value 5 s. , the goods of Joseph Warner .

ANN WARNER . My husband lost a pair of shoes, some were found on the prisoner, but I cannot swear to them.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18201028-90

1317. ANN LEE was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of October , 5 lbs. of tobacco, value 25 s. , the goods of John Whitley .

JOHN WHITLEY. I am a tobacconist , and live at Ratcliff-highway . I employed the prisoner to strip tobacco. On the 7th of October she went out with a pint pot, and said she was going for beer. I noticed her being bulky about her hips, followed her into a public-house, and took 5 1/2 lbs. of tobacco from her in a bag, tied round her hips.

Prisoner's Defence. I went out in a hurry, and put it there.

GUILTY . Aged 48.

Confined One Year .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18201028-91

1318. WILLIAM MOON was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of September , one music-stool, value 1 l. , the goods of James Newton .

JAMES NEWTON , JUN. My father, James Newton , is a broker , and lives in Margaret-street . On the 16th of September, about one o'clock, the music stool was stolen off a table.

PHILIP PERRY . I am a broker, and live in Brewer-street, between four and five o'clock on the 16th of September, the prisoner sold me the stool for 16 s. - he said he made it. He called again three weeks after to sell a carpet, and I detained him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I do not recollect saying I made it. I met a man and bought it of him.

GUILTY . Aged 49.

Confined Six Months , and Publicly Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18201028-92

1319. WILLIAM MELLOWS was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of October , one pair of trowsers, value 6 s. , the goods of Richard Clements .

RICHARD CLEMENTS . I live in Little Earl-street . On the 21st of October I saw the prisoner snatch these trowsers from my door and ran off; I followed and secured him with them.

(Property produced, and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I was in distress.

GUILTY . Aged 45.

Confined Fourteen Days .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18201028-93

1320. JOHN PORTER was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of September , one necklace, value 3 s., the goods of Marshall Purland , from the person of Eleanor Purland .

SARAH PURLAND . I am the wife of Marshall Purland, we live in Crown-street, Finsbury-square. I was in Spitalfields-market , carrying my daughter Eleanor; I missed its necklace, and have not found it.

EMANUEL HOWSHIP . I am a basket-maker. I saw Mrs. Purland with her child, and saw the prisoner take the necklace off its neck. I took particular notice of him, and am certain of his person. He got away; I saw him next morning, and gave him in charge.

THOMAS HART . I took the prisoner in charge; he said if he got through this job he would not do so again.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Whipped and Discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18201028-94

1321. HENRY WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of October , one coat, value 30 s. , the goods of James Gibbs .

AMELIA GIBBS . I am the wife of James Gibbs , who is an Excise officer . About seven o'clock in the morning the prisoner came and stood by the side of the door - I took particular notice of him, fearing he was going to steal the ducks. I went into the back parlour, leaving the coat on the chair, I returned and missed it.

GEORGE FRANKLIN . I live about a hundred yards from Gibbs's. I saw the prisoner come from the house with the coat under his arm. I followed him, calling Stop thief. I am certain he is the man - he escaped.

HOWARD LEWIS . I apprehended the prisoner.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined One Year and Publicly Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18201028-95

EIGHTH DAY. THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 2.

1322. WILLIAM KELLY was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of October , 17 yards of floor-cloth, value 6 l. , the goods of Thomas Downing , Charles Downing , and and George Downing .

WILLIAM BORAMAN . I am servant to Messrs. Thomas, Charles, and George Downing , who are floor-cloth manufacturer s, at Knightsbridge. On the 7th of October I took this floor-cloth in a cart to Miller's Wharf, Lower East Smithfield . I went down the wharf to deliver another parcel, returned in about five minutes, and missed it. In about ten minutes I found Oborn with it about thirty yards off, and the prisoner in the watch-house.

THOMAS OBORN . I am a headborough. About six o'clock in the evening, I met the prisoner dragging the floor-cloth along the ground. I stopped him and asked how he came by it? he said he must do something for his victuals.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18201028-96

1323. WILLIAM M'FARLANE was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of September , one vice, value 8 s., and one bucket, value 2 s. , the goods of William Henry Hoard .

MR. HONE conducted the Prosecution.

JAMES WHEELER . I am watchman of All Saints, Poplar . On the 26th of September, about two o'clock in the morning I saw the prisoner on Hoard's premises, and asked what he did there, he said he came to get some water. I saw the bucket in his hand and the vice on his shoulder. I went up to him, he threw them down. He said he was going to get water from the well. I knew there was no well there. He ran into a field and I secured him without losing sight of him.

WILLIAM COULTMAN . I am foreman to Mr. Hoard. The vice and bucket are his, they were thrown down about forty yards from where I left them.

GUILTY . Aged 38.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18201028-97

1324. ROBERT WELLER and JOSEPH SMITH were indicted for stealing on the 22d of September , one coat, value 12 s. , the goods of Evelyn Pierpoint Meadows , Esq .

HANNAH TODD . I am servant to Mr. Evelyn Pierpoint Meadows , who lives in Charles-street, Berkley-square , the coat was stolen from the passage.

GEORGE NORTHEDGE . I was painting Mr. Meadow's stairs, about half-past five o'clock in the evening I opened the street door to give me light. Soon after two people came, and asked if any shavings were wanted. I said ring the bell, and you will be answered. They came farther into the passage, and requested me to go and ask the servant, which induced me to turn my head round, and seeing them in the middle of the passage, I said if they did not ring the bell I must shut the door, as it was opened for my convenience. They rang, and were answered from the area. Presently another person came, and enquired for the housekeeper, I told her to ring, but on turning round I saw one of the two in the passage who came before with the same basket of shavings; he went away very nimbly. I kept working on, and in a few minutes after that, I saw something cross the light behind me, and saw one of the prisoners with the coat in his hand going out. I called to him, he dropped the coat on the steps of the door. I immediately ran after him, called Stop thief! He was stopped in Berkeley-square, without my losing sight of him. An officer stopped him. It was Smith.

JAMES JEFFREY . On the 22d of September, about half-past five o'clock I and Lee were coming across Berkeley-square, and saw the prisoner in conversation with another, about four doors from Mr. Meadows's. We went to the Running Footman, public-house, opposite. Lee was in the tap-room, and I up stairs. Before I got to the window, I heard the cry of Stop thief! I stopped Weller with the basket in his hand.

WM. LEE. I was in the tap-room, heard the cry, ran towards Hill-street, and met Northedge with Smith in custody.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

WELLER - NOT GUILTY .

SMITH - GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18201028-98

1325. WILLIAM BARTLETT was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of September , one pair of shoes, value 5 s. , the goods of James Corss .

JOHN HUBE . I am servant to James Corss , a salesman , who lives in Shoredich . On the 28th of September, a girl came and said a man had stolen a pair of shoes, I ran down Swan-yard, and overtook the prisoner with them under his jacket.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined Six Months , and Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18201028-99

1326. WILLIAM HOLLEWELL was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of September , one coat, value 1 l., and one waistcoat, value 2 s. , the goods of Robert Black .

ROBERT BLACK . I live in Great Ormond-street . On the 23d of September, I gave a young man a parcel to take to Scotland. On the 28th he told me he had lost it.

THOMAS GOOK . I am an officer. I took the prisoner on the 27th of September, and asked for the duplicates, he burst out a crying, and said they were not pawned but sold to an Irishwoman in Monmouth-street. He took me to Leary's, and I found the coat.

MARY LEARY . I bought the coat and waistcoat of the prisoner.

JAMES POWELL . I had the parcel to take to the wharf, and lost it. The prisoner drove the cart.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Fined One Shilling , and Discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18201028-100

1327. WILLIAM KING and ROBERT WATTS were indicted for stealing, on the 27th of September , two handkerchiefs, value 4 s., the goods of Richard Outen , one handkerchief, value 2 s., the goods of Josiah Simcoe , and one handkerchief, value 2 s., the goods of Mary Douglas .

RICHARD OUTEN . I keep the Crown at Pentonville . On the 27th of September a person came to the bar, and said there was three improper persons in the tap-room. I went in, and saw the prisoners and another person there, but having seen Watts before, I did not suspect them. Soon after another person came and desired me to have an eye on them, as they were bad characters. A short time after being engaged in the bar, I saw a person pass, and on looking through the window I saw King making his escape out of the house with something under his coat. I pursued, tapped him on the shoulder, and said I suspected he had a mug under his coat, he replied he had nothing more than these silk handkerchiefs - (producing four). - I went in doors looked through the window again, and saw there was still a large bulk under his coat. A butcher then came and said he had stolen the handkerchiefs from the yard. I then pursued and brought him back, with the four handkerchiefs under his coat, and gave him in charge.

ANN CHURCHESS . I hung the handkerchiefs on the line, and pinned them on about half an hour before. They were wet.

JAMES PHIPPS . I was sent for, took King and one Cole in the tap-room, they made a desperate resistance; King bit my finger, and said he would cut my b - dy head off.

JOSEPH CADBY . I apprehended Watts, there was an attempt to rescue him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

KING'S Defence. I was drunk, they must have been put into my pocket.

KING - GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

WATTS - NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18201028-101

1328. WILLIAM PLATT was indicted for bigamy . The first marriage having been solemnized when both parties were under age, and there being no proof of their parents' consent, Mr. Alley declined proceeding in the case.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18201028-102

1329. JOHN OTTEY was indicted for embezzlement .

ROBERT PARKER . I manage my mother's business , she is a potatoe dealer, at Shoreditch. The prisoner was entrusted to take out goods and receive money. On the 24th of July I sent him to Mrs. Dunkins for 7 l. 9 s. 3 d. and Mrs. Springs for 5 s. 7 d. he returned, said they had not paid him, and absconded.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you a share in the business - No; I am sure he did not pay my mother. I always receive the money.

ESTHER DUNCAN . On the 24th of July I paid the prisoner 7 l. 9 s. 3 d.

JANE SPRIGGS . On the 24th of July I paid him 5 s. 7 d.

Prisoner. I beg for mercy.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined Six Months , and Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18201028-103

1330. WILLIAM JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of September , one watch, value 20 s., the goods of Andrew Peterson , from his person .

The prosecutor did not appear.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18201028-104

1331. WILLIAM TURPIN and THOMAS HUETT were indicted for stealing, on the 25th of October , one snuff-box, value 3 s., the goods of William Walker , from his person .

JAMES FOWLER . I am an officer. On the 25th of October I saw the prisoners in the Strand , just beyond Temple-bar, I suspected and followed them, and saw Huett force up against a gentleman who stood looking at a procession. Turpin went close behind him. I saw Huett take a snuff-box out of the gentleman's pocket, put it behind and give it to Turpin. I snatched it out of his hand, and with assistance took them both out of the crowd. The gentleman came and claimed the box in their presence, and said his name was William Walker .

JOHN COOPER . I saw the snuff-box taken out of Mr. Walker's pocket. Huett ran away, and I secured him.

CHARLES READ . I assisted in securing them, there was a quantity of thieves there.

TURPIN'S Defence. I was looking at the procession.

HUETT'S Defence. I picked the box up.

TURPIN - GUILTY . Aged 22.

HUETT - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18201028-105

1332. ELEANOR MAXWELL and SARAH SMITH were indicted for stealing, on the 24th of October , from the person of Edward Prince , one pocket-book, value 1 s., and five 1 l. Bank notes, his property .

EDWARD PRINCE . On the 24th of October, between ten and eleven o'clock at night, I met Maxwell in Whitechapel,

and went with her to her lodgings, in Wentworth-street . Smith followed us in, and asked for something to drink? I gave her some money to fetch some porter, and in about three minutes she came into the room without any. Maxwell directly snatched my pocket-book out of my side-pocket, containing five 1 l. Bank notes. I caught hold of her, and Smith put out the light while she escaped. I then secured Smith, but the watchman would not take her, as it was not in his beat, so I let her go. I gave information at the watch-house, and Maxwell was brought in, in about two hours. I am certain of their persons.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODERICK. Q. Were you drunk - A. Not the least. I am gamekeeper to Sir Wellesley Pole.

WILLIAM LITCHFIELD . I am a headborough. Prince came to the watch-house, and described Maxwell. I found her about one o'clock, in Whitechapel. I told her to pull off her stockings as I was searching her, and as she pulled them off, I took two 1 l. notes from her hand, they had been concealed in her stocking.

JOHN HANSON . I am a watchman of Spitalfields. About eleven o'clock, I saw Smith and Prince at the door of a house. He afterwards said he had been robbed, and I apprehended Smith.

EDWARD PRINCE . The notes are mine, I know them by the marks.

ELEANOR MAXWELL - GUILTY . Aged 18.

SARAH SMITH - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18201028-106

1333. JOHN SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of October , one watch, value 6 l.; one ribbon, value 2 d., and one key, value 3 d., the goods of Thomas Vardon , from his person .

MR. THOMAS VARDON . On the 25th of October, I was coming up Knightsbridge , and exactly at the barrack-gate, I was hustled by eight or ten men; I disengaged myself from them with difficulty, and missed my watch. In about three minutes a soldier brought the prisoner up, and said he saw him take the watch from my fob. I am certain he was one of them.

GEORGE CARDEN . I am a soldier. I was at the barrack-gate looking at a procession, saw Mr. Vardon surrounded, and saw the prisoner take the watch from his pocket. I secured him a very few yards off, and saw him take the watch from the flap of his breeches. As I was scuffling with him another came up, forced his hand through and received it of him. I secured him also, but let him go again.

CHARLES KYBERT . I am a patrol of Bow-street. I took the prisoner in charge.

Prisoner's Defence. I had not left my wife two minutes. The man said he once before took a thief, and got the watch for his trouble.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18201028-107

1334. THOMAS ARNOLD and JOHN ELSWORTH were indicted for stealing, on the 1st of October , 20 lbs. of lead, value 4 s. , the goods of Richard Allinder .

ROBERT HOPKINS . I am a labourer. This lead was stolen from Mr. Allinder's in Regent-street .

JAMES HUMPHRIES . I live in Gees-court. On the 2d of October, I bought 3 lbs. of lead of the prisoner, and sold it.

THOMAS GOOK . I apprehended the prisoner, and charged him with the robbery; he said he sold the lead to Humphries.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18201028-108

1335. WILLIAM NICHOLS was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of October , one bag, value 1 s., and 40 lbs. of barley, value 12 s. , the goods of George Tottmar .

SUSAN TOTTMAR . My husband's name is George, he is a grocer , and lives in East Smithfield . On the 5th of October, between nine and ten o'clock, I went into the parlour for a moment, a person came in and said a bag of barley had been stolen; I turned round, missed one, and in about ten minutes, I saw the prisoner with it on his back; the watchman followed and brought him back with it.

JAMES COLE . On the 5th of October, the prosecutrix said the bag had been stolen; I ran up Dock-street, and secured the prisoner with it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I found it, and was taking it to the watch-house.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18201028-109

1336. ANN SMITH and FRANCES OTTOWAY were indicted for stealing, on the 25th of October , one cloak, value 12 s. , the goods of Richard James and William James ,

JOHN DEACON . I am a cabinet maker. On the 25th of October, about two o'clock in the afternoon, I saw the prisoners close to Messrs. James' door in Middle-row, Holborn. I saw Smith snatch a cloak from inside the door, and Ottoway receive it from her. I told Mr. James and pointed them out.

WILLIAM JAMES . I am in partnership with Richard James . I secured Ottoway, and took the cloak from her.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

ANN SMITH - GUILTY . Aged 15.

FRANCES OTTOWAY - GUILTY . Aged 15.

Judgment Respited.

Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18201028-110

1337. ROBERT WELLER and RICHARD POOLE were indicted for stealing, on the 22d of April , one box, value 1 s., and seven handkerchiefs, value 2 s. , the goods of Jonathan Johnson .

JONATHAN JOHNSON . I lost these things, some were found on the prisoners, but I cannot swear to them.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18201028-111

1338. DAVID SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of October , one watch-chain, value 2 l.; six seals, value 10 l., and one key, value 5 s., the goods of Edward Blount , from his person .

EDWARD BLOUNT, ESQ . I was on a visit at the Duke of Norfolk's. On the 2d of October, between two and four o'clock in the afternoon, I was walking up St. James's-street , and was hustled by a number of men; as soon as I released myself, I got into an alley near the spot, and saw two or three men running down the street; a person said I had lost my watch. I found the watch safe, but the chain and seals gone; next day Gook produced them.

THOMAS GOOK . I am an officer. I saw the prisoner at Hyde Park Corner, about four o'clock; a procession was returning from Brandenburgh House - he was in company with about ten more, they took posession of the left side of Piccadilly, and attempted to hustle several people. The whole gang went into St. James's-street. I saw them surround Mr. Blount, and hustle him by Sir Robert Hreries 's banking house. I saw the seals in the hand of one of the party - they were then pulling at them. I saw them give way, and jumped in among them - the prisoner was near Mr. Blount - three of them ran towards the palace, he was the foremost of them. I followed, shoved him in among the soldiers, and said

"Give me what you have got." He gave me the chain and seals from his right hand.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18201028-112

1339. JOHN WESTLAKE was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of September , three bushels of coals, value 3 s. , the goods of John William Briant and William Henry Briant .

JOHN WILLIAM BRIANT . I am a coal merchant, in partnership with William Henry Briant . The prisoner was our horse-keeper .

JOHN GASKIN . I am a Thames police officer. On the 30th of September, about five o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner come from his master's wharf with a bag, and followed him to a house in Wapping - the bag would hold about two bushels. He returned, and filled the bag again. I stopped him, it contained coals - he said he did not know where he got them.

GUILTY . Aged 29.

Whipped and Discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18201028-113

1340. JOHN ANDREWS was indicted for embezzlement .

MR. HONE conducted the prosecution.

EDWARD JONES . I am a coal merchant , and live in Great Sutton-street, Clerkenwell. The prisoner was my collecting clerk . On the 12th of July, I sent him to receive 29 l. of Mr. Leach - he did not return.

SARAH LEACH . I live in Pond-street, Hampstead , and deal with Mr. Jones. On the 12th of July, the prisoner called for 29 l. I paid him five 5 l. and four 1 l. notes, and produce the receipt he wrote

(read.)

Prisoner's Defence. Distress occasioned it.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Confined Six Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18201028-114

1341. RICHARD THOMAS and NICHOLAS RYAN were indicted for stealing, on the 21st of September , three live tame fowls, price 7 s. , the goods of Thomas Brady .

THOMAS BRADY . I live at Kentish Town . I lost four fowls from my stable. I fastened them up about six o'clock at night, and missed them in the morning - the look was picked. I found the prisoners in custody with them.

JOHN DAVIS . I am an officer of Bow-street. I apprehended the prisoners, about a quarter before eight o'clock, on the 21st of September. I saw them come out of Skinner-street, Somers'-town. Ryan had a bag. I secured them, and asked what they had got? they said it was fowls that they brought from a baker's at Hampstead, and were to have 2 s. to carry them to a baker's in Tottenham-court-road. I was asking further questions when Thomas said

"Nick, don't say any more." We took them to the watch-house, and found three live fowls in the bag. Ryan said he stood at the back while Thomas got the fowls out.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

THOMAS'S Defence. I met Ryan, but know nothing of it.

RICHARD THOMAS - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined One Year , and publicly Whipped .

NICHOLAS RYAN - GUILTY . Aged 15.

Confined Six Months , and Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18201028-115

1342. JOHN THOMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of September , one set of bed-furniture, value 1 l.; one coat, value 10 s.; two sheets, value 7 s., and one piece of cloth, value 3 s. , the goods of Morgan Hughes .

MORGAN HUGHES. I live in White Lion-yard, Whitecross-street . On the 21st of September, these things were in a chest on my second floor landing-place, which was not locked. The prisoner lodged there from the 8th of September, I missed the property, and gave him in charge.

JAMES HANLEY . I took the prisoner in charge, and found four duplicates upon him, and a pair of stockings in his bundle.

WILLIAM BROCK . I am servant to Mr. Latter, a pawnbroker, who lives in the City-road. On the 21st of September, the prisoner pledged the bed-furniture with me; he also pledged a coat, and some cloth.

GEORGE GILLET . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Old-street. On the 23d of September, the prisoner pledged a pair of sheets with me.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 42.

Confined Six Months , and Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18201028-116

1343. MARGARET SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of October , one pie, value 2 s., and one dish, value 1 s. , the goods of Richard Goodrick .

LUCY GOODRICK . I live in St. John-street . I saw the prisoner go out of my shop with a pie, which she took off the counter. I followed, and took her with it.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Fined One Shilling , and Discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18201028-117

1344. JOHN BRICK was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of October , one mace, value 4 l. , the goods of Francis Jackson .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to belong to the Parishioners of Saint George .

FRANCIS JACKSON . I am the beadle of St. George's. On the 3d of October I went at the head of the procession to the Queen. On returning home at Walham-green , the procession stopped for refreshment at the Swan. When I mounted my horse it turned restive, and having the mace in my hand I could not govern it. Mr. Irish, one of our trustees desired me to give it to him. The prisoner was then riding in front of the carriage, he said to Mr. Irish,

"Give it to me, I can take better care of it outside," which he did. I left, and went in front of the procession. When we got home, we stopped at the Britannia in the New-road, and could find neither the prisoner nor the mace. It was silver, and worth 10 l. He was apprehended on the 6th of October.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODERICK. Q. Have you heard it was taken from him - A. No; It had the name of the parish engraven on it.

WILLIAM CRANFIELD . I am post-boy to Mr. Newman, of Millman-street. I drove the first carriage. When we arrived at Brandenburgh House, the prisoner came and spoke to me, he was dressed as a labourer, he followed us into the field, and took care of the flags, as we left he asked to ride behind my carriage, I refused, and saw no more of him till we got to the Swan. I then saw him standing by the third carriage.

JOSEPH TEBBY . I drove the third carriage, the prisoner stood upon the landau, and minded the horses when we were at the Swan, he rode on to town with us, and carried the mace for the beadle, and got off on the road, saying he would leave it at the Britannia as there was a crowd. I saw no more of him.

CHARLES COLBRE . I drove the same carriage, and saw the prisoner go towards the Britannia with the mace.

WILLIAM WILKINS . I live in Henrietta-street, Cavendish-square. On Friday the prisoner told me he sold the mace for 4 s. 6 d. per ounce. I had seen him with the top of it the day after the robbery. I was at work with him.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Confined Three Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18201028-118

1345. SARAH SCOTT was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of August , one ring value 1 s.; three seals, value 15 s., one key, value 6 d., and one brooch, value 2 s. , the goods of John Henry Lange .

HANNAH BARBARA LANGE . I am the wife of John Henry Lange , who lives in Thomas-street, Whitechapel-road . I took the prisoner as servant . I missed these things, and found them at the pawnbroker's. I keep a public-house.

CHARLES POPE . I am servant to Mr. Christie, pawnbroker, Whitechapel. I took three seals, a key, and a brooch in pawn of the prisoner.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I found them in the dust-tub.

GUILTY . Aged 36.

Confined Six Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18201028-119

1346. THOMAS SHEARING was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of October , one pound of silk, value 30 s. , the goods of Isabella Desanges , Sir Francis Desanges , Knight , and Louis Henry Desanges .

WILLIAM LOUGHAN . I am servant to Messrs. Isabella Desanges, Sir Frances Desanges , Knight, and Louis Henry Desanges . The prisoner was in their employ as dyer and carpenter , at the premises in Wheeler-street, Spitalfields . Having missed property, I watched in the silk room, he was working in the loft where the silk was. On the 25th of October, about half-past ten o'clock in the morning, I saw him put this silk in his hat, and put his hat on, he then went on working. I followed him down stairs, and secured him with it in his hat. He was apprehended.

EDWARD ORME . I am foreman. I took his hat off and found the silk in it.

Prisoner's Defence. Somebody must have put it in my hat while I was out of the room.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18201028-120

1347. GEORGE NASH and HENRY JOHNSON were indicted for stealing on the 26th of October , six locks, value 30 s. , the goods of Thomas Wallis .

The locks being fixed to the dwelling-house, the prisoners were on this indictment

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18201028-121

1348. JOHN MARRIOTT was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of October , one shovel. value 3 s.; one rug, value 2 s.; one hammock, value 6 d.; and one kettle, value 8 d. , the goods of George Davis .

WILLIAM SHEEN . I am servant to George Davis , a cow-keeper , who lives in Brick-lane . On the 20th of October, about three o'clock in the afternoon as I came home, I saw a person under the gateway, he ran away, and I saw the prisoner come out of the passage from the same place. I secured him, he knocked me down and kicked me. I however detained him, and found the stable door wrenched open, and these things tied up, ready to be carried away.

THOMAS HART . I took the prisoner in charge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I went there for a necessary purpose.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined Six Months , and Publicly Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18201028-122

NINTH DAY, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 3.

1349. WILLIAM BECKETT and WILLIAM THOMPSON were indicted for stealing, on the 10th of October , 30 lbs. of lead, value 5 s., the goods of Charles Southall , and fixed to a certain dwelling-house of his .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be fixed to a building.

CHARLES SOUTHALL . I live in Redcross-street. The house No. 28, Banner-street , is mine.

RICHARD WARD . I had the care of this house on the 9th of October, about one o'clock in the day, everything was quite safe - this lead was fixed to the cistern and sink. About eleven o'clock at night Cox alarmed me, I went and found it cut from its place, and lying in the kitchen in four pieces - the back door was forced open. About a week before that the prisoner, Thompson, had called and looked the house over.

THOMAS GRENVILLE . I am a watchman. One end of my beat comes into Banner-street. Cox called me over to him, I went to the door of No. 28, and saw a light in the kitchen. Cox called Ward up, and I saw the two prisoners come out of the back door of the house into the court. I took Thompson, Beckett ran back into the house - I saw him in the custody of Daniels; I am sure he is the man. We went into the house, and found four pieces of pipe cut from the sink. Some matches were found on both the prisoners.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODERICK. Q. Where was you when they came out - A. In the middle of the passage - I saw them come out of the back door.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Have you given evidence here before - A. Yes, on the trial of one Grant, he was acquitted.

JOHN COX . I am a watchman. I observed a light at No. 28, Banner-street, which was an empty house. I called Grenville, and knocked at the door three or four times - no answer was given. I went towards the next door, and the moment I knocked the prisoners came from the back door; we seized Thompson, and Beckett retreated into the house. Before I could spring my rattle he came out of the front door; Daniel seized him, he fell down in the kennel; I immediately secured and took him to the watch-house. I returned to the house, and found the lead on a table, and a crowbar on the copper. One match, partly burnt, was found on Thompson, and nine or ten on Beckett. At one o'clock I found a skeleton key in the court, and at two I found a dark lanthorn, with a wax candle in it, two or three yards from the back door. The lead was fresh cut, and weighed 30 lbs.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODERICK. Q. You could not see the back door - A. Yes. They said they went up the court for a necessary purpose, but I had seen them lurking about the house before ten o'clock.

CHARLES DANIEL . I am a cabinet-maker, and live a few doors from the prosecutor's. As I passed I saw the watchmen knocking at the door. I stood at the front door while they went down the court, and in about three minutes Beckett opened the back door and ran out; I laid hold of him till the watchman secured him. I went into the house and saw the lead torn from the cistern.

ELIJAH PICKNEY . I was constable of the night. I searched the prisoners, and found half a match on Thompson and ten on Beckett.

THOMPSON's Defence. I went up the court for a necessary purpose,

BECKETT'S Defence. I had been at work in a cellar, which made me have matches.

THOMPSON - GUILTY . Aged 25.

BECKETT - GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18201028-123

1350. WILLIAM LACEY was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of October , one set of chaise harness, value 30 s. , the goods of John Richards .

JOHN RICHARDS . I am a coach-painter - this harness was in Tottenham-mews .

CHRISTOPHER HAMPTON . I am a watchman. About nine o'clock at night I met the prisoner in Tottenham-mews with a sack. He said it contained corn - I found it was this harness.

Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Judgment Respited .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18201028-124

1351. THOMAS FREEMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of October , 40 yards of linen, value 30 s. , the goods of Edmund Haighton and Robert Gibbs .

ROBERT GIBBS . I am linen-draper . The prisoner came to my door and snatched at this linen, but did not get it down.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18201028-125

1352. JOHN DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of October , one coat, value 20 s. , the goods of Thomas Deeks .

THOMAS DEEKS . I am servant to Lord Carlton. I lost this coat from the stable in Bond-street . On the 26th of October, about nine o'clock in the morning, I was walking from my bed-room to the hayloft, and saw the prisoner run across the stable-yard with the coat, followed and secured him.

JOHN BARNWELL . I am a beadle. I stopped the prisoner with the coat.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Confined Six Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18201028-126

1353. WILLIAM COOPER was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of October , two coats, value 40 s. , the goods of Thomas Dalton .

THOMAS DALTON . I am a caulker . On the 24th of October, about six o'clock in the evening, I got out of my cart in Cotton-street, Poplar , to speak to my son, and on returning the coats were gone.

JOHN DODDS . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Old-street, Limehouse. On the 24th of October, about half-past seven o'clock in the evening, the prisoner pledged a coat - I am sure he is the man. He said he brought it from William Brown .

ISAAC BARNARD . I am a salesman, and live at Deptford. On the 24th of October, about half-past nine o'clock, the prisoner sold me a coat - he said it was his own.

WILLIAM CROUCH . I apprehended the prisoner on the 25th of October. He said the coats were his own, and he bought them at Deal.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 35.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18201028-127

1354. GEORGE COLLINS was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of October , one coat, value 15 s. , the goods of John Anscome .

JOHN ANSCOME . I am servant to Mr. Lindo, who lives at Canonbury . On the 25th of October, between five and six o'clock in the evening, this coat was taken from the laundry. I was in the garden, and saw the prisoner come and open the gate with something under his apron. I ran out, missed the coat, and told him to come back and produce the parcel which he had - he denied it - he then shewed me where he had thrown it; I found it over a garden-wall.

ANN OWEN . I caught the prisoner in the laundry, and asked him what he wanted? I told him never to come there again - this was on the 21st, and on the 25th he came again, and asked if I wanted any wood. I am sure he is the man.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I never saw it.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18201028-128

1355. THOMAS CLEBONY was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of October , one coat, value 10 s. , the goods of James Lowe .

RICHARD JOHNSON . I am ten years old. On the 21st of October I was standing by my father's workshop in Shoreditch , and saw a man take a coat off Lowe's cart and give it to the prisoner. I pointed out both the men to my father; he ran and brought the coat back but not the prisoner. I am sure he is the man.

THOMAS DEAKIN . I heard the alarm, and pursued the prisoner down Sanders's-gardens, he was stopped and liberated again - I followed him. His companions struck me several times; I caught him in Hoxton-square - he said I was not an officer, and had no right to detain him, I said I should.

GEORGE SMITH . Deakin stopped the prisoner and gave him to me.

JAMES LOWE . The coat is mine.

RICHARD JOHNSON , SEN. My son pointed out the prisoner and another man, I followed them. The prisoner threw the coat down, I picked it up, and never lost sight of him.

Prisoner's Defence. A gentleman asked me to carry it.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18201028-129

1356. WILLIAM MESSENGER , the Elder, and WILLIAM MESSENGER , the Younger, were indicted for stealing, on the 21st of September , 298 feet of iron railing, the goods of Edmund Waters , Esq ., set up and fixed in and upon a certain lawn belonging to his dwelling-house, they having no claim or title to the same .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be set up and fixed near the dwelling-house.

The Court ruled this indictment was not framed according to the statute .

NOT GUILTY.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18201028-130

1357. FREDERICK ABRAHAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of October , 20 iron bars, value 2 s., the goods of Joshua Binns , John Binns , and William Morrish , and fixed to a building of theirs .

JOSHUA BINNS . I am a carpenter and dealer in building materials , and in partnership with John Binns and William Morrish . On the 27th of October I missed these iron bars from the kitchen window, in front of a house which we had bought - they were fixed to the window-frame. I allowed poor people to inhabit the house till it was pulled down.

WILLIAM BROWN . I am an officer. On the 20th of October, between five and six o'clock in the evening, I was in my shop in Church-lane, Strand; some boys passed - somebody came in and said they suspected them, I followed them, they all ran away except the prisoner, who went into No. 4, Church-lane, with this grating. It is an old-iron shop. I took him with it, I fitted it to the house.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I found it pulled up.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18201028-131

1358. JOHN RICHARDS was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of October , one necklace, value 3 s., and one locket, value 1 s., the goods of William Courtnell , from the person of Susan Courtnell ; and GEORGE CRADGINGTON was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, knowing it to be stolen .

HARRIET LOWE . I was standing in Cannon-street-road , seeing a procession pass; I had Susan Courtnell in my arms. I saw her beads safe - in about two minutes I looked round, and saw them in Richards's hands. I caught hold of him, and Mr. Barber took him.

JOSEPH BARBER . On the 30th of October I saw Lowe holding Richards. I took him from her, and found 2 s. in his hand - he said he gave the beads to Cradgington. I went to Cradgington's lodgings and found them - he was not at home. I took him opposite to the office.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

RICHARDS'S Defence. I never had them.

RICHARDS - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined Three Months .

CRADGINGTON - NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18201028-132

1359. JOSEPH MALEY was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of June , one bed, value 50 s., and one blanket, value 5 s., the goods of John Powell , in a lodging-room .

JOHN POWELL . I live in Playhouse-yard . Last June I let the prisoner a lodging, with a woman whom he called his wife - she left in about a week. The prisoner and property were there on the 23d - it was gone on the 24th. I have not found it.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. How many lodgers have you - A. Six or seven.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18201028-133

1360. THOMAS WEEKS and STEPHEN HUNTLEY were indicted for stealing on the 13th of October , one watch, value 3 l., the goods of William Pauling , from his person .

The prosecutor did not appear.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18201028-134

1361. JOHN SAUNDERS was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of October , one watch, value 2 l.; one ribbon, value 6 d., and one seal, value 6 d., the goods of a certain man whose name is unknown, from his person .

GEORGE DORRELL . I am a brush-maker. On the 25th of October I saw the prisoner, in company with another, at Brandenburgh House . I saw the other take a watch from a gentleman's pocket and hand it to the prisoner, who ran off with it. I called Stop thief! and as he ran he threw the watch into the river. There was a number of thieves there. I was struck, and my life was in danger.

JOHN BUTCHER . I was with Dorrell, and saw the other man draw a watch from the gentleman's pocket and give it to the prisoner - we followed him. The gang was so strong we did not like to take him. I went for assistance, and on returning found he was secured.

WILLIAM PEARCE . I saw the prisoner receive the watch, and throw it into the Thames - it had seals to it.

WILLIAM JONES . I am boat-keeper to her Majesty. I saw the prisoner throw the watch into the river.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18201028-135

1362. WILLIAM PENNY was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of September , one watch, value 20 s.; one piece of ribbon, value 1 d., and one key, value 1 d., the goods of Richard Cornelius , from his person .

RICHARD CORNELIUS . On the 25th of September I was in Piccadilly , near the corner of St. James's-street - a procession was going to the Queen - I was surrounded by a number of persons, and my watch snatched from my pocket. I believe the prisoner to be the man who took it. I saw it in the prisoner's hand, seized him round the body, he was rescued from me, and the prisoner was taken directly.

FRANCIS RHIND . I was with the officers, and saw the prisoner with a gang of twenty or thirty persons surround the prosecutor - I saw him very busy in front of the prosecutor, and laid hold of him; the gang rescued him; I seized him, they kicked and knocked me about. If the officers had not come up I should have been killed.

EDWARD RHIND . I was there, saw the gang, and heard the prisoner call out stall round - which means, to surround the person - they closed round the prosecutor, he seized the prisoner, I rushed in, and saw the watch-ribbon in his hand.

CHARLES READ . I confirm Rhind's statement.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing of it.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18201028-136

1363. EDWARD LOVELL was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of October , one watch, value 3 l., and one key, value 2 s., the goods of George Silk , from his person .

GEORGE SILK . On the 18th of October I was going down Corporation-lane about three o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner came up, snatched my watch out, and ran away with it; I followed him, giving an alarm - he was taken and my watch produced.

RICHARD CORBETT . I was coming down Rosamond-street, heard the cry of Stop thief! and saw the prisoner running towards me; I crossed the street and stopped him. He said he was not the thief, and begged me to let him go. I said I must be better satisfied of that - he immediately threw the watch out of his hand into an area.

GEORGE BECK . I picked the watch out of the area.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I throw myself entirely on your mercy.

GUILTY. Aged 19.

Recommended to Mercy .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18201028-137

1364. JOHN JAMES and JAMES JONES were indicted for stealing, on the 12th of October , one handkerchief, value 5 s., the goods of John Harrold , from his person .

JOHN HARROLD . On the 12th of October I was walking along Coventry-street , Wright called out that my pocket had been picked, he had Jones in custody; I missed my handkerchief. A stranger brought James up with the handkerchief.

JOHN WRIGHT . I was in Coventry-street, and saw Jones put his hand into Harrold's pocket, take out a silk handkerchief, and pass it to James, who ran down the street. I seized Jones, and another person brought James up with it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JAMES - GUILTY . Aged 13.

JONES - GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18201028-138

1365. EDWARD JACKSON was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of October , one watch, value 10 l.; two seals, value 1 l.; one key, value 1 s.; and one ribbon, value 1 d., the goods of Eliza Watridge , widow , from the person of Judith Poor .

JUDITH POOR . On the 30th of October I was on the lawn of Brandenburgh House , and had a watch stolen from my pocket, it belonged to Eliza Watridge . I did not miss it till I left the lawn.

WILLIAM ODY . I am a constable. On the 3d of October I saw the prisoner, in company with others at Brandenburgh House, and watched them. I saw him come from the crowd in haste, with another, and stopped them both. The prisoner said with an oath that he had done nothing. I found this watch in his pocket, with a bad half-crown and two bad shillings. I gave him to a countryman to hold while I searched the other - he escaped from the countryman, I ran and stopped him.

(Property produced, and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I saw a gentleman put the watch under a tree, and I picked it up.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18201028-139

1366. JOHN BULL and JOHN BELL were indicted for stealing, on the 18th of October , one handkerchief, value 2 s., the goods of a certain man , whose name is unknown, from his person .

GEORGE TAYLOR . On the 18th of October I was in Piccadilly , a procession was returning from the Queen; I saw the prisoners together, trying several gentlemen's pockets. I followed them into Long-acre. There was a mob where the carriages stopped - they went up to a young gentleman, and Bell took his handkerchief out of his pocket. I secured him, and Bull was stopped about a yard off. The young gentleman was frightened, and ran away.

GEORGE DORRELL . I saw Bell put his hand into a young gentleman's pocket, and take the handkerchief.

BELL's Defence. I was caught hold of in a moment, and charged with it.

JOHN BELL - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Fined One Shilling , and Discharged.

JOHN BULL - NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18201028-140

1367. DAVID MARTIN was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of September , one coat, value 30 s.; one waistcoat, value 2 s., and one shirt, value 3 s. , the goods of Abraham Langley .

The prosecutor did not appear.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18201028-141

1368. THOMAS LAWRENCE was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of October , 5 lbs. of candles, value 4 s. , the goods of Peter Nicholls .

PETER NICHOLLS . I keep a shop, and sell candles . On the 16th of October, I found the prisoner in custody - he was my shopman. I found a deficiency of four or six dozen of mould candles - I did not suspect him before. I went out on the 16th of October, and ordered him not to leave till nine o'clock, when I should return. I returned before nine o'clock, and he was gone.

JOHN MILLER . On the 16th of October, about half-past nine o'clock, I saw the prisoner with a bundle, followed and stopped him in Golden-lane, with these mould candles; he said his mother gave them to him. I took him to the watch-house.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JAMES HANDLEY . The prisoner was brought to the watch-house; he said his name was Cox, and he came from Billingsgate. Next day I found the candles belonged to Mr. Nicholls, who lives at Islington.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Judgment Respited .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18201028-142

1369. JAMES DODDS was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of October , one table, value 10 s. , the goods of William Burgin .

The prosecutor refusing to swear to the property, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18201028-143

1370. WILLIAM BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of October , two saws, value 10 s.; two planes, value 6 s., and one rule, value 9 d., the goods of William Hagley Trotman , and one plane, value 2 s., the goods of John Walsh .

WILLIAM HAGLEY TROTMAN . I am a carpenter . On the 23d of October. I was working at Cecil-street - the prisoner had worked there for nine weeks, and left on Friday. On Monday about twelve o'clock, he came up, and seemed astonished that I was not gone to dinner. I directly went to dinner, and fastened the door. When I returned this property was gone. I found some at Arnold's. He told us to stop, as the prisoner was coming for the money; he came soon after, I collared him and found the rule in his pocket.

JOHN ARNOLD . I am a plane-maker, and live in Compton-street. On the 23d of October, between twelve and one o'clock, the prisoner left three planes for sale. I was out, but when I came home I knew I had sold one of them to Walsh three weeks before, and when the prisoner came for the money I detained him.

THOMAS PRITCHARD . I am shopman to Mr. Penyman of Compton-street. On the 23d of October, the prisoner pledged two saws with me.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 50.

Confined One Year .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18201028-144

1371. CATHERINE ROACH was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of October , one set of bed-furniture, value 20 s. , the goods of James Bolland , Esq .

JAMES BOLLAND , ESQ. I live in Seymour-place, Euston-square . The prisoner was my servant .

CATHERINE MILLIGAN . I live in Latham-place, Somers'-town. On Tuesday week, the prisoner brought this bed-furniture to me, and said she bought it at a broker's for 2 l. 10 s., and asked to leave it with me till her brother called for it. She was taken up next day at my house, and I took it to Mrs. Bolland.

PETER WHITEHAIR . I apprehended the prisoner upon another charge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18201028-145

1372. ROBERT NEWSHAM was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of October , one saw, value 5 s. and one plane, value 2 s. , the goods of William Cadham .

WILLIAM CADHAM . I am a carpenter . I was working at Furnival's Inn . I left work at half-past five o'clock, and at half-past seven, I found the prisoner in custody with my tools - he had been painting there eight or ten days before.

WILLIAM SIMPSON . I am a porter of Furnival's Inn. About half-past seven o'clock the prisoner passed the lodge, and stooped down as if to conceal himself. I followed him to Ely-place, and there secured him. I found the saw and plane under his clothes.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Publicly Whipped , and Discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18201028-146

1373. DANIEL CRANE and CHARLES MARSH were indicted for stealing, on the 19th of October , one handkerchief, value 6 s., the goods of Robert Tate , from his person .

ROBERT TATE . I am a baker , and live in High Holborn. On the 19th of October, about eight o'clock at night, I was at the bottom of Oxford-street , a person came and asked me if I missed my handkerchief? I felt and missed it - he told me to follow him, and about sixty yards off he took the prisoners - my handkerchief was not found.

CHARLES READ . I am a constable. I was in St. Giles's, saw the prisoners and another following Mr. Tate. Marsh took the handkerchief half out, and the others closed on him; a gentleman passed, and they left Mr. Tate for a moment; closed on him again, and the one not in custody put his coat up to cover. Mr. Tate's pocket, and in an instant the handkerchief was gone; they went off. I informed Mr. Tate, and secured the prisoners. I found five skeleton keys on Crane.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODERICK. Q. How far off were you - A. On the other side of the way.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18201028-147

1374. GEORGE GRAY was indicted for embezzlement .

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18201028-148

1375. THOMAS NOWLAND was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of October , 16 lbs. of mother of pearl shells, value 40 s. , the goods of the United Company of Merchants trading to the East Indies .

SECOND COUNT, stating them to be the property of persons unknown.

MR. BOLLAND conducted the prosecution.

ANDREW GRUBB . I am in the East India Company's service, and am an officer. On the 21st of October I was at the East India Dock-gate - the William Pitt was unloading at the time. I saw the prisoner drive one of the Company's caravans through the gate, and observed the nosebag of the side horse appeared heavy. I ran round, looked into the bag, and found these shells. I took him to Mr. Brooks; he said he picked them up under the stage where the goods were delivered from the ship.

EDWARD MUDD . I am in the Company's service. The William Pitt was unloading. The prisoner drove the caravan that took the goods to the warehouse. I saw the shells unloaded and weighed. The head of one cask broke, and some fell on the ground - it was put in his caravan without the top on. When he was apprehended I weighed the cask, and it was 32 lbs. deficient.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked them up under the stage.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined Two Months , and publicly Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18201028-149

1376. RICHARD BERRY and JOHN CHICKS were indicted for stealing, on the 11th of October , 2 lbs. of bacon, value 18 d. , the goods of Richard Tandy .

RICHARD TANDY . I am a cheesemonger , and live in Beach-street, Barbican . On the 11th of October, about seven o'clock at night, while I was busy, two officers brought the prisoners in with this bacon, which had been stolen from the window.

JOHN TWEEDY . I am a constable. I saw Bury put his hand upon the bacon, and walk away; he turned back, walked by the shop several times, and at last came up with Chicks, who knocked it off the window and Bury caught it, put it under his coat, and we secured them.

CHICKS'S Defence. I was going home.

RICHARD BURY - GUILTY . Aged 13.

JOHN CHICKS - GUILTY . Aged 13.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18201028-150

1377. GEORGE WILSON was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of October , one handkerchief, value 3 s. the goods of John Collier .

CHARLES ROOPE . I am shopman to Mr. Collier, a silk mercer , who lives in Rathbone-place . On the 27th of October, the prisoner came and bought a trifle. He came again, asked for a small article, and then for silk handkerchiefs. I shewed him some but he bought none. I missed one, and found it in his trowsers.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I used my handkerchief, and put this into my trowsers thinking it was my own.

GUILTY . Aged 13.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18201028-151

1378, ELIZA MARSHALL was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of October , one scarf, value 6 s., and one pair of boots, value 2 s. , the goods of Edward Flower .

MARY FLOWER . I am the wife of Edward Flower , we live at John's-row, St. Luke's . I left the prisoner in care of my place. I returned, and missed the scarf and boots.

MARY FLOWER , JUN. As I came home I met the prisoner with a basket. I missed the things went after her, and took a gown out of her basket - she delivered me the duplicates of the scarf and boots.

JOHN LANGFORD . I am an apprentice to Mr. Simmonds, of Bath-street, City-road. The prisoner pledged the scarf with me.

WILLIAM WILLIAMS . I took the scarf in pledge of the prisoner.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 29.

Fined One Shilling , and Discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18201028-152

1379. HENRY WERNHAM was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of October , 132, brass caddy feet, value 21 s., the goods of James Collins , privately in his shop .

GEORGE CAUSLEY . I am servant to Mr. James Collins , who is an Ironmonger , and lives in Barbican . I served the prisoner with one pennyworth of brass escutcheons, some caddy feet were in his reach. He was brought back with 132 caddy feet, which are ours.

JOHN TWEEDY . I am an officer. I stopped the prisoner

in Green Arbour-court, St. Luke's, with two other lads; the moment they saw me they separated. The prisoner had this property, he said he picked it up just there - it was very muddy, and the parcel was quite clean.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 14.

Of stealing, but not privately .

Confined Six Months , and Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18201028-153

1380. JOHN COTTER and JOHN FISH were indicted for stealing, on the 25th of September , one necklace, value 5 s., the goods of James Luther , from the person of Ann Luther .

JAMES LUTHER . This necklace was taken off Mr. Evans's child, it is not mine.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18201028-154

1381. JOHN TEMPLE was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of October , 17 ducks, price 25 s.; one goose, price 5 s., and one basket, value 3 s. , the goods of Thomas Purden and William Kent .

THOMAS PURDEN . I live at the New Inn, in the Old Bailey; this poultry was pitched in Newgate-market . I am in partner ship with William Kent - they were consigned to us.

ROBERT DICKMAN . I pitched this poultry in a flat, at Strickland's, in Newgate-market, about half-past four o'clock in the morning of the 23d of October.

THOMAS PIGGOTT . I manage Mr. Strickland's business. On the 23d of October I missed a flat from the door.

CORNELIUS WHITTON . I am a watchman. I saw the prisoner in Artillery-passage, coming towards me with a flat covered with cloth, about six o'clock in the morning. I stopped him in White's-row, and asked what he had got? he said they were fowls, which he got from Mr. Jones's, in Newgate-market, to take to Limehouse. I secured him.

(Flat produced, and sworn to.)

Prisoner. It is my first offence.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Confined Six Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.


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