Old Bailey Proceedings, 18th September 1820.
Reference Number: 18200918
Reference Number: f18200918-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace Oyer and Terminer, AND Gaol Delivery for the City of London, AND ALSO The Gaol Delivery For the County of Middlesex, HELD AT Justice Hall, in the Old Bailey; ON WEDNESDAY, 18th of SEPTEMBER, 1820, and following Days;

Being the Seventh Session in the Mayoralty of THE RIGHT HON. GEORGE BRIDGES , LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

Taken in Short-Hand by H. BUCKLER, Basinghall Street, (BY AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON.)

London:

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED, FOR H. BUCKLER, BY T. BOOTH, 31, St. Andrew's Hill, Doctor's Commons.

1820.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX.

Before the Right Honourable GEORGE BRIDGES , Esq. LORD MAYOR of the City of London; Sir Robert Graham , Knt., one of the Barons of his Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir William Draper Best, Knt., one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir John Richardson , Knt., one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir William Curtis , Bart.; Sir James Shaw , Bart.; Joshua Jonathan Smith , Esq.; Thomas Smith , Esq.; Sir William Domville , Bart., Aldermen of the said City; Sir John Silvester , Bart., D. C. L. Recorder of the said City; John Thomas Thorp , Esq., Alderman of the said City, Newman Knowlys , Esq. Common Sergeant of the said City; John Vaillant , Esq., and Henry Revel Reynolds, Esq. his Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of the Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

London Jury.

R. Camp Sheppard ,

William Horsey ,

William Payne ,

William Phelps ,

Draper Newman ,

Thomas Brinkwell ,

Samuel Morton ,

Joseph Sandall ,

John Shoorey ,

George Powell ,

John Schindler ,

Thomas Coe .

1st Middlesex Jury

Richard Gamble ,

Richard Brown ,

James Smith ,

Lewis Lourant ,

William Southey ,

Thomas Read ,

William Caddison ,

Samuel Maddock ,

George Phillips ,

Gerrard Mose ,

William Greening ,

Francis Paxton .

2d Middlesex Jury

Thomas Mason ,

George Closier ,

John Barnes ,

Joseph Robson ,

Robert Cooke ,

Henry Harding ,

George Fullwood ,

Thomas Chambers ,

Anthony Woodruff ,

Thomas Hatchett ,

John Hillman ,

Thomas Charlton .

3d Middlesex Jury

Thomas Brown ,

Alexander W. Mills ,

Joseph Craddock ,

George C. Tucker ,

William Payne ,

William Mackenzie ,

Joseph Sergeant ,

Samuel Harper ,

William Tagg ,

Thomas Boucher ,

Samuel Fuller ,

John Simpson .

4th Middlesex Jury

Richard Stephens ,

James Mellush ,

Benjamin Chevalier ,

George Bonus ,

Alexander Maxwell ,

John Sainsbury ,

Jonathan Nicholson ,

William Payne ,

John Baker Ely ,

James Godwin ,

Robert Emerson ,

Thomas Stephens .

SESSIONS HOUSE, OLD BAILEY, SEPTEMBER 13, 1820.

BRIDGES, MAYOR. SEVENTH SESSION.

Reference Number: t18200918-1

899. GEORGE ORFORD and PETER TYLER were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Philip Hardwick , Esq. , about twelve o'clock in the night of the 16th of July , at St. James, Westminster , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein one tea-pot and stand, value 10 l.; one milk-pot, value 2 l.; fourteen spoons, value 4 l.; one pair of sugar-tongs, value 5 s.; two sauce ladles, value 30 s.; twelve forks, value 6 l., and one hat, value 5 s., his property .

The prisoners, after being admonished by the Court to take their trial, persisted in pleading GUILTY . - DEATH .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18200918-2

900. JOHN BATES was indicted for that he, on the 5th of June , feloniously and maliciously did set fire to a certain house then in his possession , with intent to defraud William Cunliffe Shawe , the treasurer of a certain society, called the Sun Fire Office Company .

FOUR OTHER COUNTS, stating his intent to be to defraud different persons.

MESSRS. BOLLAND, ANDREWS, and WALFORD conducted the prosecution.

RICHARD LAWLEY . I live in Love-lane, Ratcliff. I know the King's Arms, High-street, Shadwell - it was the prisoner's house - it had been shut up sometime. On the 5th of June, a little after ten o'clock at night, I was coming up the street, and heard the watchman's rattle sprung; I went to the house, several people had collected before I arrived, but none had entered the house. I went home, got a mawl, broke the pannel of the door open, and was the first person that entered the house - the street door was bolted, and had a small chain across, which would enable it to be opened a little, if unbolted. I let the people in, went along the passage, and on the right hand, at the end, I discovered a fire.

Q. Was it in the fire-place - A. I cannot exactly tell, there was a great deal of smoke. I saw the fire burning under what I thought was a boiler, but afterwards it turned out to be a cask with a cock to it - it was in the bar; we called for water, which the neighbours handed in, and we put the fire out in the bar, and at the bottom of the cellar stairs we found a pile of wood on fire, against the partition which was also on fire - it did not blaze - water was thrown on it, and it was put out. I then got the watchman's lanthorn, and opened the cellar flap. I had made a hole in the floor to throw the water into the cellar, but on examination found it was not opposite the place. I saw the prisoner about eleven o'clock, but had no conversation with him.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. Do you not know that coals and wood were kept in the cellar - A. I do not know. The fire had burnt through the floor to the bar.

WILLIAM THOMAS JAMESON . I live nearly opposite to the King's Arms. I heard a noise about eleven o'clock at night, and went to the house - they were then throwing water on the fire. I went home, changed my dress, and on my return they were opening the cellar flap; I entered the cellar with other people, and observed the partition burning, and a quantity of wood laid against the partition - it appeared a place intended to keep wood in. I took up a piece, it was the stave of a cask; Randall, the fireman, was knocking the partition down. I remained there until the fire was completely extinguished, we went to the front room on the first floor, which was full of smoke. We opened the windows, and examined every room - there were beds there, but no sheets on them. I went to the back parlour, and saw some pieces of paper and other stuff on fire in the cupboard, sparks of fire were on them; they were opening the cupboard, and taking the paper out as I went into the parlour. The bar is on the right-hand side of the passage, and the room with the cupboard was on the left - it was impossible for one to burn through to the other; the closet was near the stove of the back room, but there was no communication between them; a bundle of candles were taken out of the closet, partly burnt, and the door of the closet was blistered inside, as if by fire. The house was quite different from being fully furnished. I am an appraiser myself, but had rather not set a value on it - it was quite contrary from being good.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. How long had the house been closed - A. Only since September I know there was a petition from the churchwardens and inhabitants to renew the licence. The place in the cellar appeared a place to keep wood in. Several people were in, I saw none with torches, but the watchmen had their lanthorns. The people had been in the house an hour or more before I went to the cupboard; part of the paper was consumed, but there were only sparks when it was discovered.

ROBERT WILLANS . I am an officer of Shadwell. About ten o'clock at night I heard of the fire, and was among those who first went in. I ordered two men to get pickaxes and break open the door. I did not examine the back door until sometime after - it was then open; the fire in the bar had burnt upwards and downwards. I went down and found the wood burning against the partition - there was no fire-place in the cellar. I came up to the back parlour, opened the closet door, which was closed, I opened it with my fingers, and discovered pieces of paper burning, but they were all burnt out then, and were in a state of tinder; there were sparks of fire and two bundles of candles lay there, a little burnt and melted, and the door rather blistered. It seemed a general closet for all sorts of things. I went to the cellar again to look under the closet to see if any fire was there, but found none. There was no fire in the fire-place of the parlour, but on a round table there was a small bundle of matches, a tinder box, and a candle half burnt - it was not burning then; none of the matches were burnt. I examined the house, and found some empty boxes, the drawers were also empty, and the beds had no sheets or curtains on them. There was not much furniture in the house.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. There was no fire in the parlour, therefore it was necessary to have matches to strike a light - A. Yes.

COURT. Q. Were people living in the house at the time - A. Yes; none of the matches were burnt. The street door was chained across; I think the force of a maul broke the chain.

WILLIAM RANDALL . I am a fireman of the Phoenix Fire Office. When I arrived at the fire several persons had entered the house. I got there about eleven o'clock, and entered at the cellar window - water was brought, and I put the fire out. I went to the upper rooms - we opened the staircase window on the first floor to let out the smoke. I found a room on the second floor fastened by a piece of wood being put through the asp, I went in, and found the furniture in confusion - a quantity of loose paper laid on the floor, in a heap, I suppose a bushel. We then came down to the back parlour, and saw the officer open the cupboard door; a fellow-servant of mine held up a piece of wood or iron with the embers of fire on it. I found Mr. Bates at Mr. Jones's, Stepney-green; he came to the door - I had my fireman's dress on - I told him the house had been on fire, but it was then out, he said he would go with us - I had not asked him. On our way he asked me if I had the keys? I said No, we were obliged to break the door open. I asked him whom he was insured with - he said with the Sun. Mills, who was with me, said

"Was not you in your house this evening?

"He said Yes, and supposed he left about half-past eight o'clock. Mills asked him if he locked the door after him, and if he was the last person in the house - he said he was. Mills then said,

"Certainly you must have the key." He said,

"Oh, dear! Mrs. Bates has got it." When we got to the house I told the Sun firemen he was insured with them, and left him with them.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. The room where the papers were was up two pair of stairs - A. Yes; there was no appearance of fire in that room.

JOHN MARTIN . I am a constable of Shadwell. I went to the house, and saw a quantity of loose stuff laying on the cupboard floor - it appeared a general cupboard to keep things in. The wrong end of the candles are melted, the tops are not burnt.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. It was a cupboard where the refuse for lighting fires in the house was kept - A. I supposed so.

THOMAS MATTHEWS. I am a watchman of Shadwell. I saw Lawley break the door open, he was the first person that entered. I went to the bar, and found it on fire; after throwing water on it we found it arose from the cellar, which had burnt through. I did not see the back door.

COURT. Q. The front door was fastened inside, whoever locked it could not have left that way - A. No, my Lord. I went into the parlour on the left, and saw some remains of fire in the grate; a sailor-looking man threw water on it by my desire, the smoke was then so great I was obliged to go to the front. I know the prisoner was master of the house.

JOSEPH GREENING . I am foreman of the Sun Fire Office, and was called to Bates's house on the night of the fire. I asked him whom he was insured with - he said with the Sun. I asked to see his policy to take the number of it; he produced it from his pocket, and I took the number.

MR. WALFORD. We have served the prisoner with notice to produce the policy.

MR. ALLEY. Here it is (producing it).

ROBERT ATKINS . I witnessed the execution of the policy.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. Did you see this examined by the directors after the premium was paid - A. Yes. W. C. Shaw, is the treasurer, Brice Pearce , and Edmund Hanniford , all three are directors.

(The policy was here put in and read, by which the prisoner's household goods, apparel, books, plate, and stock and utensils, were insured, in all, at 2100.)

WILLIAM ROBINSON SAFFROM . I am clerk in the Sun Fire Office, and recollect receiving money for the renewal of this policy - the receipt is attached to the policy, and is dated the 15th of April, 1820 - (read) - I cannot say who paid it.

Cross-examined. Q. The policy was originally made two years ago - A. Yes.

JAMES TOPLIS . I am surveyor and appraiser to the Sun Fire Office; it is my duty when a fire happens to survey the premises. I went to these premises on the 6th of June, which was the following day; it was impossible for the fire in the cupboard to be occasioned by the one in the cellar - they were twenty feet asunder - nor could the fire in the grate communicate to it, there was at least eight feet of brick-work between them. I saw Bates on entering the house, and after examining it had some conversation with him.

Q. What furniture did you discover - A. A very miserable quality; I valued the whole, including his own wearing apparel and his wife's, at 115 l. 15 s., which was all there was to satisfy articles insured for 1000 l. I found china and glass, value 9 l. 7 s. insured at 100 l., and the stock and utensils, which I consider the fitting up of the bar and the fixtures, value 96 l. 8 s., insured at 500 l. I

asked Bates if he had lost anything - he said Yes, he had lost a leather portmanteau about a yard long, from under his bed in the front one pair room, and it contained a quantity of plate, which he mentioned, it was a silver teapot, nine table-spoons, seven tea-spoons, four dozen of ivory handled knives and forks, with silver tips, a gold necklace, two silver snuff boxes, a pair of sugar tongs, seven or eight rings, a pair of silver buckles, and many other articles of jewellery. I enquired if anything else was lost, he said only eighteen common dinner plates from the kitchen. I said the circumstances of the fire were so very suspicious, that I could not presume for a moment, that he would be paid a farthing for his loss - he said it was a hard case.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. The beer and other things constitute the stock in trade - A. Certainly. I do not know whether the brewer can tell what beer was there. It would cost him nothing to renew his policy when his licence was renewed. His bed appeared to have been slept in, but there were no sheets on it. If he had moved his stock the office would have allowed him to transfer his policy. His wife subsequently complained of linen being lost.

JOHN PAULIN . I am an auctiooner and appraiser. I went with Mr. Toplis and valued the furniture at 221 l. 10 s.

EDWARD GRIFFITHS , ESQ. I am a magistrate of Shadwell. The prisoner's licence was suspended twelve months ago, not in consequence of his misconduct, but his wife's. The licencing day is to-morrow.

Prisoner's Defence. I trust I shall give every satisfaction. I hoped to obtain my licence again, and remained in the house. Immediately as my business was over I went to the Excise Office, withdrew my entry, and returned my beer and liquor. I thought it not worth while to alter my policy. When they sent to me to pay the money I took my policy and gave it to the gentleman, he said the old policy would do; he took 2 l. short in payment, sometime after they sent to inform me of it, and I went and paid it. A Mr. Jones had agreed to take a house about the time of the fire, we were to meet his brokers at the Sampson and Lion, public-house, about it, at eight o'clock. On the 5th of June Jones called on me, we went with his wife and mine - all four set off together - the brokers did not come; we left, went to a house in Neptune-street, and remained there about three-quarters of an hour - it was then near twelve o'clock; we then went towards Jones's house, called at the Ship, and asked the landlord to let us take home half a gallon of porter, as it was late; just as we had had supper at Jones's, a knock came at the door, I heard myself asked for, and was informed my house was on fire; I got my hat, and ran after the man. I said I had given my wife the key. I never saw the house after I left it at eight o'clock.

ELIZA RYDER . I was employed as an occasional servant to the prisoner, I lived as a regular servant with him ten months; they kept another servant for eleven weeks, and then I occasionally went to assist them; only he and his wife lived there, the children were at school. The firewood and coals were kept in the cellar. There was a black and white cat in the house, I saw it after the fire, it had the hair on its back burnt. Candles for the evening's use, and rags to clean the candlesticks with, were kept in the cupboard.

MR. ANDREWS. Q. When were you there last before the fire - A. The day it happened, I called as Mr. and Mrs. Bates were going into the country to fetch the children home.

Q. After you ceased to be the prisoner's regular servant, where did you live - A. I lived at Mrs. Jones's three months; I cannot say whether Mr. Bates ever slept there. The cat's hair was burnt about the breadth of the palm of my hand - Rose, the fireman, saw it. They generally went out at the back door at night, as the front door had bad fastenings.

COURT. Q. While you was in their service had they sheets to their beds - A. Yes, my Lord; they kept their plate in a portmanteau under the bed, there was always sufficient for use about.

WILLIAM BIDDULPH . I live next door to this house. I went in on hearing the alarm, it was an hour before the cupboard was opened - the door was opened while I was in the room, the papers appeared to have been recently on fire. The fire could not have been more than a quarter of an hour's continuance.

MR. BOLLAND. Q. Then it must have caught fire while the people were in the house - A. That is my opinion.

COURT. Q. On what is your opinion founded - A. On my observation on the evidence; it was burnt so little I think it could not have burnt longer - it was but partly burnt.

ROBERT JONES . I am a publican, and keep the Sampson and Lion, East Smithfield. In the early part of June I lived at Stepney-causeway; I intended to go into my house on the 6th of June. I saw the prisoner on the night of the fire, I had called on him with my wife at eight o'clock, for him and his wife to go with us to the Sampson and Lion - I called by appointment - we were going to meet the brokers. I went into the prisoner's back parlour, we came out at the front door, he fastened himself in, and came out at the back door; we waited for him in the street, and he came round to us; we then went to the Sampson and Lion, stopped there till near half-past ten o'clock, the brokers did not come, and we went away. It rained hard when we got to the Neptune, at the corner of Neptune-street, we called in there until the rain abated, then left; it rained again, we called at the Ship, remained there until half-past eleven o'clock, then proceeded to my house at Stepney-causeway. About half-past twelve o'clock a knock came to the door, and Mr. Bates was asked for. He had remained in our company from the time we left his house until then.

MR. ANDREWS. Q. Did you expect to be kept so late at the Sampson and Lion - A. No, the brokers were to come at eight o'clock. It was nearer to go to my house than to the prisoner's. He was to sleep at his own house that night.

Q. Had you prepared any bed for a stranger that night - A. No; Mrs. Bates did not go with her husband, she went into Seabrook's, and remained behind.

COURT. Q. When you called at eight o'clock where did you find Bates - A. In the back parlour; there was a fire in the grate; he did not go into the cellar that I know.

ELIZA JONES . Deposed precisely to the same effect.

WILLIAM BURNET . My mother kept the Sampson and Lion. On the evening of the 5th of June the last witness came there and remained until twenty minutes past ten o'clock. The prisoner was with them.

Q.How do you recollect it was the 5th of June - A. He was apprehended soon after, and I traced back the day. I happened to look at the clock when they left. The Sampson and Lion is about half a mile from Jones's.

- AMBERS. In June last I kept the Sampson and Lion. I was in treaty with Jones to purchase it. Mr. and Mrs. Jones, and Mr. and Mrs. Bates came to my house on the 5th of June, about half-past eight o'clock in the evening - the brokers were expected, but they did not come; they remained till a quarter or half-past ten. I heard of the fire the next day.

JOHN AUSTIN . I keep the Cock and Neptune. On the 5th of June, about half-past eleven o'clock at night, I saw Bates at my house, with his wife, and Mr. and Mrs. Jones - they came in for shelter, and left in about ten minutes. I knew him before.

JANE DODD . My father keeps the Ship, public-house. On the 5th of June, a few minutes after eleven o'clock, the prisoner came to our house, with his wife, and Mr. and Mrs. Jones.

JOHN KELLY . I am an appraiser, and was employed by the prisoner to sell his house - this is the agreement - (producing it) - it was for 1200 l.; it is witnessed by myself, and is dated the 17th of June, 1819, when the licence was in force. I know the prisoner laid out several sums of money on it.

JOHN ROSE . I belong to the Sun Fire Office. I was present when the fire was discovered in the cupboard - the paper was partly consumed. I saw a cat there next day, the hair on its back was burnt about the size of the tip of my finger.

ROBERT WILLANS re-examined. I cannot say whether the cupboard was fastened with a button or not, I opened it with my fingers.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Best.

Reference Number: t18200918-3

991. WILLIAM FISHER was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Sumersby , about eleven o'clock in the forenoon of the 25th of April , at Paddington (no person being therein), and stealing therein four gowns, value 20 s.; one jacket, value 5 s.; two pair of breeches, value 10 s.; two pillows, value 5 s.; one coat, value 40 s.; one waistcoat, value 4 s., and the sum of 20 s. in monies numbered, his property .

WILLIAM SUMERSBY . I live at Bayswater , in Paddington parish, and rent a house there. On the 25th of May, I left my house about half-past twelve o'clock, and left nobody in it. I fastened both the doors and windows - my house stands by itself. I returned in about half an hour, and found the door half open - I am certain I had locked it. I think it had been opened by a picklock-key, as no force had been used. Two boxes in the bed-room were broken open, and all the things strewed about; my wife was at work at Bayswater Tea Gardens, just by. I missed the articles stated in the indictment, 25 s. in money, and other things. I saw the money safe, and both boxes locked, about half an hour before.

WILLIAM WOODBERRY . I am a patrol of Bow-street. On the 25th of April, about one o'clock, I saw the prisoner and Price, who was convicted last Session, come out of Harper's fields, which lead from Bayswater into the Edgware-road; the prisoner carried a large bag across his shoulder, the other man walked at a distance behind; they turned down John-street, Edgware-road, and walked very fast - I suspected them, and followed at a little distance. Harper's fields is in almost a straight line from the prosecutor's. Price looked back to see if any one was watching them; they crossed the end of Cato-street, the prisoner returned back, and went into Cato-street; I then got up to Cato-street, and saw the prisoner turn into a house, Price looked back, ran by the door, and ran out at Queen-street end; by the time I got to the door the prisoner was in the passage; he rebounded back out of the passage, with the bag behind him, and dropped it - I secured it, and he ran into John-street again; I called stop thief, he ran into Mitcham-street, through a house, got out on Lisson-green, and escaped. I can positively swear he is the man. I kept the property till Price's trial, and then returned it the prosecutor.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Had Price got into the Edgware-road before you found him - A. I saw them together.

SARAH STOREY . I live in Cato-street, Price lodged with me; the prisoner frequently came to see him. On the 25th of April, when Woodberry found the bundle in my passage, I saw the prisoner running away; I only saw his back, but am sure it was him.

JEREMIAH MAIDMENT . I am a constable. On the 26th of April information was given at our office. The prisoner was afterwards apprehended over the water, and I laid a detainer against him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. It is a conspiracy. Maidment said he would hang me like a dog.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 21.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18200918-4

902. ABRAHAM ISAACS was indicted for feloniously assaulting James Chamberlain , on the King's highway, on the 1st of August , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, 5 s. in monies numbered, his property .

JAMES CHAMBERLAIN . I am a baker , and live in Brown's-lane, Spitalfields. I was present at the opening of the Regent's Canal , near to where the barges enter from the river - there was a great crowd; the prisoner came, and upheld both my arms, while two others picked my pocket of 5 s. I could not move my hands to defend my property. I let him alone till the crowd dispersed, and when I saw an officer I gave charge of him, and am sure he is the man. I looked over my shoulder and saw him.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. How long before you were robbed did you see the prisoner come up - - A. Nearly ten minutes; we did not secure the others as we had only one officer. He removed with the crowd, and I followed him.

WILLIAM MAHONEY . I am a headborough. I was standing on the bridge, and saw Chamberlain seize the prisoner - he got from him, and I secured him. There were fourteen or fifteen in the gang.

Prisoner's Defence. I never saw the man in the crowd.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Richardson.

Reference Number: t18200918-5

903. HENRY SMYRKE was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of July , one silk handkerchief, value 4 s., the goods of William Robert Henry Brown , from his person .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18200918-6

904. ANTONIO PARADIO was indicted for stealing, on the 38th of May , one milk kettle, value 1 s. , the goods of David Davis .

DAVID DAVIS . I am a milkman , and live in Bell-court, Doctors' Commons. On the 27th of May I lost my milk kettle.

JOHN MADDOX . I am a butcher. On the 28th of May, between four and five o'clock in the morning, I was in my stable, at the Oxford Arms, Warwick-lane, minding my horse, which was very bad; I had been with him since the Friday before, and being tired I laid down to rest under the manger, the prisoner opened the door, came in, and took up a bottle, which was in the manger, and then took a saddle off a hook - I jumped up and secured him - he was very insolent. I sent for an officer, and the prisoner said he would shoot me if he got his liberty. The milk-can was found on him.

HENRY HONEY . I am an officer. I found the milk-can in his pocket.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I bought it for 5 d.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18200918-7

905. JOHN HOLMES was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of July , 3 lbs. of raw silk, value 3 l., the goods of Matthew Topham Gibson , from the person of Joseph Collier .

JOSEPH COLLIER . I am a ticket-porter . On the 14th of July, about three o'clock, I was employed by Mr. Gibson to fetch a bale of silk from Mr. Brandon's in Leadenhall-street. I brought it as far as Bread-street, and between Bread-street and Watling-street , I felt something touch the bale, and felt a nick at it, as if a string was cut by a knife; I turned round, and saw the prisoner with my parcel before him, trying to conceal it - he had cut it off the bale. I threw my bale down, and he immediately ran away, leaving the silk on the cill of a door. I called out stop thief, he ran about twenty yards, and was taken; I went up, and knew him to be the same man. The parcel was a sample of the bale.

ROBERT BROOKS . I am porter to Mr. Brandon. I delivered the silk to Collier. I secured the sample on the bale, it could not come off without being cut.

JAMES GRANT . I am porter to Mr. Black, in Bread-street. I saw the prisoner come suddenly up to our door, with his face against the glass, as if he was hiding from some one; he folded his arms, and then he put his hand to his pocket, and almost at the same instant he started from the door; I heard a cry of stop thief, opened the door, and ran after him. He was stopped by Taylor. I found the parcel of silk and the bale near our door.

WILLIAM GARDENER TAYLOR . I was standing at the gate in Bread-street, where I live, I heard the cry of stop thief, and saw the prisoner running violently, and crying stop thief most lustily, I caught hold of him, suspecting he was the thief; he said I was mistaken, for the man who stole the parcel had ran into Cheapside. I held him till Grant came, he immediately said he was the man, and he could swear to him. Grant desired me to take care of a knife which he had in his pocket. I fetched the officer, and while the officer was searching him I saw him pull his hand from his breeches pocket - I seized it, and took the knife from his hand.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I passed the porter, he turned round, pitched his load, and called stop thief! I ran, and they took me instead of the man.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18200918-8

906. JOHN SAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of August , 105 lbs. of printed paper, value 2 l. 12 s. , the goods of Francis Charles Rivington and John Rivington .

THOMAS YOUNGHUSBAND . I am a cheesemonger, and live in St. Martin's-le-grand. On the 25th of August I bought some paper of the prisoner at 4 d. per lb. I gave him an account of it, it came to 1 l. 15 s. which I paid him. Next day a gentleman called and produced some of the same sort, and I shewed him what I had bought.

JOHN FORRESTER . On the 28th of August Mr. Rivington gave the prisoner into my charge. I asked him if he knew anything of the paper he sold to Younghusband? he directly said

"Yes, I have sold some to Younghusband, a cheesemonger, in St. Martin's-le-Grand," but Turner, who is in the prosecutor's warehouse, authorized him to take it out to sell, but that he, the prisoner, received part of the money he sold it for. I found some books at his house which the prosecutors would not exactly swear to.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he say Turner ordered him to sell it - A. Yes, he said he received a regular quantum of the money.

FRANCIS CHARLES RIVINGTON , ESQ . I am in partnership with John Rivington ; we are booksellers , and live in St. Paul's Churchyard ; the prisoner was one of our porters , and had been in our employ between three and four years. The paper is sheets of Miller's Gardener's Dictionary. I heard it had been sold to Younghusband. No paper of this description had been ordered to be sold - the prisoner knew that it was part of a very valuable work, and not refuse sheets. None of our servants are authorized to sell paper.

Prisoner's Defence. I had instructions to sell it. and gave him the money.

GUILTY . Aged 44.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18200918-9

907. THOMAS STONG was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of July , one watch, value 30 l.; one chain, value 5 l.; two seals, value 4 l., and one key, value 1 l., the goods of David Knox , from his person .

GEORGE MARSHALL . I am a shoemaker. On the 15th of July. I was coming from a friend's, at Ratcliff, across Tower-hill, and up the Minories, I saw eight or ten men surround Mr. Knox; I immediately went to assist him, and saw the prisoner with the watch in his possession - I saw the seals through his fingers - I did not see him receive or take it. I collared him, and tried to take it from him, but he knocked me down. I got up, seized him again, and he dropped the watch. I made a second attempt to pick it up, and was knocked down again. I held him till we got him into a shop - somebody picked the watch up, and gave it to the prosecutor. I am certain the prisoner is the man. I did not let him go for a moment.

DAVID KNOX . On the 15th of July, the glass-blowers were going in possession, I stood at the corner of the Minories , and was hustled by six or seven men, the prisoner came up, I felt my seals go, and seized him; I held him, called for assistance, and never quitted him till he was secured. The watch was picked up, without the case, and given to me.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was going to Newgate-market, and stopped at the corner of America-square; some men robbed the gentleman, and they collared me.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18200918-10

908. JAMES WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of August , from the person of Arthur Morris , Esq. , one pocket-book, value 6 d.; one warrant for payment of, and value 40 l., and one 1 l. bank note, his property .

ARTHUR MORRIS , ESQ. On the 7th of August I came to town, and about one o'clock was going with a Mr. Smedley, from Somerset House towards Whitehall , a gentleman joined us, and said a gang of thieves were gone down the Strand, I immediately felt and missed my pocket-book. Mr. Smedley ran to Child's to stop payment of a 40 l. cheque, which was in it.

FRANCIS SMEDLEY , ESQ. I met Mr. Morris at Somerset House, and just as we passed Exeter Change a gentleman came up and said some thieves were gone down the Strand, Mr. Morris then missed his pocket-book. I went to stop payment of a cheque, in a coach, and got there in less than ten minutes - it was presented afterwards.

JOHN WORMALD . I am clerk at Messrs. Child's. About ten minutes after Mr. Smedley left our office the prisoner came in and presented the cheque - I said it was stolen, and asked him where he got it; he said he brought it from No. 6, Shire-lane, from a gentleman, who desired him to change it for eight 5 l. notes. The constable took him.

WILLIAM TURNER . I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner at Messrs. Childs'; he said he was sent by Mr. Dudfield, who kept the Antigallican, in Shire-lane; that a gentleman who came in there sent him to change it. I went to the Antigallican with him, they said a gentleman and a lady had been there, and given the waiter the cheque, and said they would return in half an hour. I called several times, but never found the gentleman.

MR. MORRIS. The draft is mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I lived porter at the Antigallican. My master sent for me, a gentleman and lady there sent me to change the cheque. I found it was stopped. I told the officer that I was a servant, and described the gentleman.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18200918-11

SECOND DAY, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 14.

909. FREDERICK PIXLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of July , one handkerchief, value 2 s., the goods of Sir James Cockburn , Bart. from his person .

SIR JAMES COCKBURN , BART. On the 26th of July, about half-past five o'clock in the afternoon, I was passing over Paddington-green , to go to my house at Westbourn-green, the prisoner and another man noticed me; I suspected them, and as I came close to the paling of Cochrane's nursery-ground they came up quite close to me, one on each side of me - as the prisoner brushed past me, on my right, I saw him take my handkerchief from my coat-pocket, and put into his right hand jacket-pocket. I observed the corner of it hanging from his pocket; I immediately collared him, charged him with it, and in the struggle he put his hand into his pocket, and threw it away; he then said

"I have not got your handkerchief, the wind blew it from your pocket into the road." I took him to the watch-house, with assistance. He struggled, and the other escaped.

ALFRED ROBINSON . I went to the prosecutor's assistance, and laid hold of the prisoner.

DAVID WALTERS . The prisoner was given into my charge. I was taking him to the watch-house, he struggled on Paddington-green, and at the corner of James-street, he pulled his hand out of the handcuffs, and a boy endeavoured to rescue him. He was rescued by a vast number. I described him to Sellers, and am sure he is the person.

WILLIAM SELLERS . I apprehended the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going to bathe with a young man - the prosecutor's handkerchief hung out - I suppose the other took it.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18200918-12

910. WILLIAM HILL was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of July , one watch, value 3 l.; one seal, value 7 s., and two rings, value 2 s., the goods of a certain man , whose name is unknown, from his person .

ROBERT MATHERLY . I was going home on Saturday night, the 3d of July, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, and observed a quantity of people following

the Queen's carriage from Berkeley-square to South Audley-street , I saw a man draw a watch from a gentleman's pocket, and pass it to the prisoner - I saw him receive it, and put it into his pocket. I took him aside, and asked him for the watch which he picked from the gentleman's pocket - he said he had none. I told the people I saw him take it, and offered to feel for it. He then put his hand into his pocket, pulled a watch out, and said he had none but his own. I knew it to be the same that I saw pass from one to the other. I did not know the gentleman.

STEPHEN ACOURT . I am a constable. The prisoner and watch were delivered to me. I found two silk handkerchiefs on him, marked differently, and a silver pencil-case. We cannot find the gentleman.

Prisoner's Defence. I found it in Berkeley-square.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18200918-13

911. FRANCIS HALL was indicted for feloniously assaulting Joseph Welham , on the King's highway, on the 12th of August , putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, 6 d. in monies numbered, his property .

JOSEPH WELHAM . On the 12th of August I was in Chequer-alley , about ten o'clock at night, a parcel of young men came round and held me, one pulled at my watch, but did not get it - they then tore my pocket down, and took sixpence out, which was all I had - they struck me twice. I got from them, and they ran away. I am certain the prisoner was one of them, I knew him before by seeing him about. I was going home to my father's in Chequer-square. I went with Bond to look after them, met the prisoner in Old-street, and took him. I understand they had all come from a raffle.

WILLIAM BOND. I went with the prosecutor, met the prisoner in Old-street, and secured him.

JOSEPH SWEATMAN . On the 12th of August Welham brought a boy to the watch-house, and said he supposed he was one of them. I found nothing on him, and let him go. The prisoner was afterwards brought in.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming from Tottenham-court-road when they took me.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18200918-14

912. JOHN DAVIS was indicted for feloniously assaulting Edmund Emanuel Godhart , in a certain field and open place near the King's highway, on the 1st of July , at St. John, Hackney , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, one watch, value 5 l.; one chain, value 1 s., and two seals, value 1 s., his property .

EDMUND EMANUEL GODHART . I am fourteen years old, and live with my mother, at Hackney. On Saturday, the 1st of July, I was crossing the London field from town to Hackney, at two o'clock in the afternoon, and met the prisoner - I am sure he is the man; he passed me, and as soon as he got behind me he laid hold of me, and snatched my watch out of my fob; he caught hold of my arm with one hand, and snatched it out with the other. He said, at the same time,

"I'II cut your throat." I was frightened, which prevented my resisting. The watch was not gone from my person when he said those words. He let go of me, went a little way, and then stood still, and looked at me; as soon as he saw I went away home, he went towards town. I saw him again on the Friday following at the watch-house, where he was in custody on another charge, and am sure he is the person. I found my watch at the pawnbroker's.

Cross-examined by MR. NORRIS. Q. You were too frightened to follow him - A. Yes. I am confident he is the man.

THOMAS PETO . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Brick-lane, Bethnal-green; about a mile and a half from the London field. This watch was pledged with me by the prisoner on the 1st of July, about a quarter before three o'clock, for 2 l. I am positive of him.

WILLIAM MERRY . I am a constable. On the 7th of July the prisoner was given into my custody on another charge. I took Godhart to see him, he said he was the man.

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutor said at Worship-street that it was eleven o'clock in the morning, now he says it was two o'clock in the afternoon. I was at Leytonstone till ten that night.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 18.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Best.

Reference Number: t18200918-15

913. CHARLES EVANS was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of July , at St. James, Westminster, one hat, value 1 l., and one box, value 6 d., the goods of James Swallow ; and one purse, value 1 s.; one ring, value 4 s., and three guineas, the goods and monies of Martha Medlicott , spinster , in the dwelling-house of the said James Swallow .

JAMES SWALLOW . I am a hatter , and live in St. James's-street, Westminster . Mrs. Medlicott is housekeeper to my lodgers. On Saturday, the 8th of July, she discovered that her purse had been taken out of the kitchen drawer. The prisoner had come into my service about five weeks previous as an errand boy , and was then with me. I knew that a fortnight previous I had seen a watch in his possession, which he had not when he first came to me. I missed a lady's beaver hat three or four days before the purse was missed, but was not quite certain it was gone. I had him apprehended on Monday morning, the 10th, and went with Cobham to his house in Warwick-row - the prisoner said it was his mother's house. We found the hat and hat-box in the front parlour there.

MARTHA MEDLICOTT . I am housekeeper to Mr. Swallow's lodgers. On the 8th of July I missed a purse from the kitchen drawer, containing three guineas, a gold ring, and some memorandums. I afterwards saw the purse at Queen-square.

Prisoner. Q. The ring and purse were given to you - A. The ring was returned to me in Mr. Swallow's presence. I saw a woman bring it, whom I believe to be his mother - the purse was not offered to me.

JOHN COBHAM . I am an officer of Queen-square. I took the prisoner at Mr. Swallow's shop. I found a watch, a

little pocket-book, and a knife, on him, but no money. I asked him what he had done with the money - he said, voluntarily, that he had spent it, and had bought the watch, seal, and key, with part of it, at a shop in the Broadway, Westminster; he said he did not know the man's name, but he knew the shop; that he spent the rest of the money; one part he hired a horse with, and that the purse and ring were at his mother's, in Warwick-row, Pimlico. I went there, accompanied by him and Mr. Swallow, he went in, and whispered to his mother, she then produced the purse, and said the ring was given to some young woman, but she would get it. The prisoner said he gave the guineas to Mr. Rudd, a broker, in Pimlico, to change, who changed them at Wadmore's, the Magdalen, at Pimlico. He took me to the shop in the Broadway, where he bought the watch. I returned to his mother's in the evening, and found the hat and box, which I produce.

RICHARD RUDD . I am a broker, and live at Pimlico. On the 19th or 20th of June the prisoner requested me to get some guineas changed - it was about a fortnight before he was apprehended. He asked me if I could give him change for three guineas, as his master was distressed for change, and he was going somewhere with goods, and wanted change. I said I had not sufficient. I went to Wadmore, who keeps a public-house, and got three 1 l. notes and three shillings, which I gave him - he waited in my shop. I told him I would get the change there.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JAMES SWALLOW re-examined. I remember the prisoner's mother coming to the shop with a lad who had the ring on his finger, with a glove over it. She desired the lad to take it off, and give it to me, which he did.

Prisoner. When Cobham came to me at the shop - he said if I would own to the money I should get discharged.

JOHN COBHAM re-examined. I said no such thing.

MR. JAMES SWALLOW re-examined. I was present with the officer, and never left him; Cobham said no such thing.

Prisoner's Defence. (written). I humbly beg leave to state that when I was engaged in this transaction I had no idea of the extent of criminality attached to it. I feel sincere contrition, and hope compassion will be extended towards me.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 17.

Recommended to Mercy.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Richardson.

Reference Number: t18200918-16

914. SUSAN THOMAS was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of August , at St. Marylebone, one watch, value 3 l.; one chain, value 1 l.; two keys, value 2 d.; one seal, value 5 s.; one coat, value 5 s.; one waistcoat, value 2 s.; one pair of breeches, value 3 s.; one pair of knee buckles, value 4 s.; and one pair of boots, value 20 s., the goods of John Shain , in his dwelling-house .

MARY SHAIN . I am the wife of John Shain ; we keep the Edinburgh Castle, public-house, in Welbeck-street, St. Marylebone - the prisoner was our servant . On Tuesday, the 1st of August, at night, we missed all the property stated in the indictment - I had seen it safe in the afternoon. The watch was in my bed-room. The prisoner was the first person who gave the alarm. I had sent her up stairs to see if the child was asleep, she came down, and said my room-door was open. I immediately went up, found the door and window open, and a lamp, which I always leave when the child is abed, put out, and put under the bed - the door was on the latch before - it was always kept locked till the child was put to bed. This property was gone. I immediately called my husband up - he came, saw the state of the room, and concluded some one had got in unperceived, and put the things out of window. On the Saturday following the prisoner wanted to go away; I consented to her going on Sunday - she said she was going to her friends in Herefordshire, and on Sunday morning, when she left, I had her apprehended by two constables. My property was all produced on the Thursday following by Coates - it was worth above 10 l. She told me she was first going to Kensington Gravel-pits.

RICHARD COATES . I am a constable of Marylebone. On Sunday, the 6th of August, I was sent for to the prosecutor's, and watched the prisoner out of the house, thinking she was going to Kensington Gravel-pits, instead of which she went into a house in Oxford-buildings. She had a box with her - she came out without it. I apprehended her in a few minutes, took her back to the house, and told her I took her on suspicion of being concerned in robbing Mr. Shain, she declared her innocence. I then searched her box, and found two wine-glasses and some papers of tobacco. I took her to the watch-house, and on Monday morning she said to me,

"Do you suppose Mrs. Shain will forgive me, if I inform her where her things are?" I said she might do as she pleased, I could not tell what Mrs. Shain might do. She then said if I would let her go close to Charing-cross she would fetch the box. I went with her and another constable to a house in a court in Villers-street. She took me up stairs to a room, unlocked the door with a key which she took from behind a partition; we found no box there - she appeared alarmed about what had become of it. The woman of the house came in, she asked her where the box was? she said,

"I have sent it, according to your direction, to your mother's in Herefordshire - I have taken it to the Green Man and Still to go there." I took the prisoner to the Green Man and Still, and found a box had been sent on the day before, which was Sunday. I took the prisoner to Marlborough-street, and set off for Hereford. She gave me a direction; I wrote it down as I stood by her - I have lost it. She told me it was directed to Jane Thomas , to be left at Mr. Davis's, shoemaker, Hereford. I went to Davis's, and found the box had not been delivered, but I found it at the coach-office - I produce it - it contains the articles stated in the indictment. Before I sat off she informed me where the key was in the prosecutor's house, and I found it there.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. My mistress cannot swear I took it out of the house. She said at the watch-house she would not hurt me if I owned it.

MARY SHAIN re-examined. I said I would be as merciful as I could.

RICHARD COATES re-examined. The prisoner told me where to get the box before Mrs. Shain came.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 24.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutrix.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Best.

Reference Number: t18200918-17

915. THOMAS GOUGH was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Milburn , about two o'clock in the afternoon of the 30th of June (no person being therein,) and stealing one coat, value 15 s.; two pair of pantaloons, value 15 s.; one shirt, value 7 s., and two blankets, value 3 s., his property .

THOMAS MILBURN . I am an officer of the Customs , and live at Stepney . On the 30th of June, about eight o'clock in the morning, I went out and locked the house up - one of the windows might have been left open to the air in. I returned about five, and found the neighbours round the house. A window was open, and also a door which had been unlocked inside - the house stands alone. I missed this property, which was all safe when I went out. Different articles in the house were moved and had marks of sooty fingers.

WILLIAM NORTH . I am twelve years old. On the day of the robbery I met the prisoner, who was dressed as a chimney-sweeper. I saw him look over the bank of a field opposite the prosecutor's house - he said,

"I will get it now if I can." I went to see what it was. He went to the garden door and knocked at the front door - two other sweeps were with him. He asked me if I belonged to the house? I said No. He then said,

"What are you looking at?" I went and told my mother. I saw him brought out of the house in about a quarter of an hour.

SARAH MARSHALL . I live next door but one to Milburn. On the 30th of June I was cleaning the first-floor window; my father was passing, and said he believed some one was breaking into Milburn's house. I went, and found the garden-gate broken open - I also saw a window open. My father being lame, told me to get in at the window - I got in, and he stood outside. I saw the house had been rifled, and searched two rooms. I thought I heard a noise in the third room, went in, and heard a noise in the chimney. I called my father; he went to see that the person did not get out at the top. I put my hands up, laid hold of his leg, and pulled him down - it was the prisoner - I brought him out to my father through a door, which was open - he was secured. The drawers were open, and sooty marks on the linen.

ROBERT CHRISTIAN . I am an officer. I took the prisoner in charge. He asked for his hat, and said it was on the stove - I found it there.

Prisoner's Defence. I was returning from Stratford, and went in to ask if the chimnies wanted doing; the woman shoved me into the house, she did not find me in the chimney.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Of stealing only.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18200918-18

916. EDWARD HAMMOND was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of September , one clock, value 5 l., the goods of William Archer , in his dwelling-house .

WILLIAM ARCHER . I live in Norfolk-street, Strand . On the 6th of September I missed this clock from my hall, and found it at Aldous's next day. I know nothing of the prisoner.

JOHN WINTLE . I am shopman to Mr. Aldous, who is a pawnbroker, and lives in Berwick-street. On the 6th of September the prisoner pledged the clock for 4 l. He said his name was John Daniels , and he lived with his mother in Gray-street. I knew his mother very well - she went by the name of Daniels.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN UPTON . On the 6th of September I apprehended the prisoner, and found 3 l. 10 s. 6 d. on him.

Prisoner. Q. Did not Cundell, who gave you information, remain on the stairs while you took me - A. Yes, I took him away in a coach with that boy.

Prisoner's Defence. I went to Aldous's to redeem a suit of clothes; I met with Cundell - he said,

"If you have got money to spare here is a bargain." He took me to a public-house in Oxford-street, where two men had the clock. He asked me to pledge it - I said I would have nothing to do with it. He said,

"It belongs to me, and if you pledge it for 4 l. 10 s. you shall have the ticket." He staid outside while I went in. They would only give me 4 l., I went out and told him. I went there again in about an hour; Cundle was there then, and had opened the clock for the shopman.

JOHN WINTLE re-examined. I was trying to open the door of the clock when Cundell came in; he opened the door for me. The prisoner came in and ran out again. I only know the boy's name was Cundell by what the prisoner says.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Richardson.

Reference Number: t18200918-19

517. FBEDERICK BATTLEY and RICHARD ANDREWS were indicted for feloniously assaulting Catherine Barrick , on the King's highway, on the 2d of September , putting her in fear, and taking from her person, and against her will, 1 s. 1 1/2 d. in monies numbered, and one 2 l. bank note, the property of James Barrick .

CATHERINE BARRICK . I am the wife of James Barrick . On the 2d of September I came up from Chelmsford - I had walked twenty-five miles that day, and arrived in town between one and two o'clock in the morning - I then took a coach, and told the man to drive me to the end of Bow-street . I do not know where he took me to, but he took me to a public-house; I went in, and gave him a glass of liquor; I took my purse out, which had 1 s. 1 1/2 d., rolled in a 2 l. bank note in it. The coachman said I was a poor woman, and he would pay. I put my money into my bosom - the prisoners were in the house, and could see me put my purse there. I went out, intending to go to Islington to see a friend. Battley took me by the arms and held me while Andrews took my money. Battley whistled, and down came twelve or fourteen men - they used very improper expressions, and if I had been a girl of the town they could not have used me worse. I should know three or four of the others if I saw them - they all appeared to be hackney coachmen - they all ran away. I told the watchman, he said there

were too many, he was afraid to go near them, and I had better make the best of my way to Bow-street, which I did; an officer came down with me, and found them at a watering-house. I pointed Andrews out, he refused to go, and Battley ran out of the place - Avery ran after him and secured him; he had then the marks of blood on his face where I had scratched him. They had used me terribly, and turned my clothes over my head.

Cross-examined by MR. WALFORD. Q. What is your husband - A. A sergeant in the Veteran Battalion , which is in Ireland. I never was away from him till he went. I got to the beginning of London about one or two o'clock - I believe it was at Whitechapel church; I had been to Sudbury for a week - this happened on Saturday; I had left town on Thursday, the day before the robbery. Before that I lived in St. Martin's work-house. I had four or five lodgings in the course of the month before.

Q. You got to town at two o'clock, and reached the public-house at five, what were you doing for three hours - A. The coachman kept driving me about, and these men were with him part of the way; the coachman got into the coach with me, and one of them drove. I took the coach in Blue-cross-street, Lincoln's Inn-fields, as they tell me. I had been there on business.

Q. Why did you tell the man to drive to Bow-street - A. I intended to go to Islington.

SAMUEL DICKENS . I am an officer. About half-past five o'clock in the morning the prosecutrix came to the office; she took me to the watering-house, in Charles-street; the moment I went in she pointed out Andrews, and said

"You have robbed me of 2 l. 1 s. 1 1/2 d." He denied it. He said he would not go. There were eight or nine hackney coachmen in the room. I fetched Jennings and we took him. She did not point any one else out.

WILLIAM JENNINGS . I am an officer. Dickens fetched me to take Andrews. The same morning, while I was there, she pointed Battley out. She said she had no charge against him, because he did not commit the robbery. His face and the back of his hands were scratched - she said she had done it. He afterwards came to the office to testify that Andrews was innocent; she then said he assisted in the robbery, and he was detained.

JOHN AVERY . I am a patrol. From the description the woman gave I saw Battley on the office steps, and put several questions to him - he said he was one of the party who had the gin, and I took him. When he was put to the bar she said he was the man who held her arms.

WILLIAM STREEP . I am a watchman. About five o'clock in the morning I heard a noise at the bottom of White Hart-yard, and saw the prosecutrix with her clothes tied up, and eight or ten hackney-coachmen round her - she said she had been robbed.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18200918-20

918. WILLIAM HIGHAM was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Richard Hart Davis , Esq. about nine o'clock at night of the 8th of September , and burglariously stealing therein, one bed, value 50 s.; one bolster, value 7 s., and one coverlid, value 3 s., his property .

ELIZA COX . I am servant to Mr. Richard Hart Davis. These things were in the stable, which communicates with the kitchen. On the 8th of September the doors were all made fast - there was a broken pane in the stable window, through which a hand might be put, and the window unbuttoned. Three gentlemens' servants came to me about nine o'clock, I went to the stable with them, and found the bed, bolster, and pillow on the stairs, tied up ready to be taken away. They were kept in a room over the stable. I missed some blankets.

STEPHEN HOLDING . I am porter to the Earl of Radnor. I saw the prisoner and another man standing at the corner of Mr. Davis's stables. I had known him by sight for twelve months. Lord Sidmouth's coachman asked them what they wanted - the prisoner said he belonged to the premises, and began to pump at the pump; the other man said he came to fetch some things of the prisoner's away. The coachman told him to convince him that he had a right there to come to the Burlington Arms, as the people were there who knew the premises; the prisoner went to the corner, but would not go in. He referred us to the Green Dragon, in Swallow-street, where he said his coat and hat were. We went there, he took his coat off the bench, and went out with it, but without his hat. We afterwards went to the front of the house to warn the people, and found the prisoner in custody.

JOSEPH PRATT . I am servant to Mr. Ramsay, of Conduit-street. I heard the prisoner talk to Holding, and confirm his statement - they left me, and went with the prisoner to the Green Dragon. I then went to my stable in the same mews; I afterwards came out, and saw the prisoner coming up the street, he saw me, and made into the Burlington Arms - he was without his hat, but had his coat on then. I followed him into the yard, and saw him get on the parapet wall, and into the prosecutor's stable window. I called to him, he said he was going to sleep there. I said good night, then procured five men and a light, placed three at the back of the house, and took two with me to the front, and found him at the bottom of the stairs. The property was tied up, and his hat laid by the side of them - he claimed the hat. He said Lady Rumbold's coachman gave him leave to sleep there.

Cross-examined by MR. ARABIN. Q. Did you know Lady Rumbold's coachman - A. Yes; Lady Rumbold's family had these stables once.

RICHARD NORRIS . I am porter at the Green Dragon. The prisoner left his coat there, and said he should return in half an hour, which he did, without his hat, and said,

"Dick, I want you to move my boxes out of Old Burlington-street." He took me down the mews, the witness spoke to us, and he began pumping. I left with them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only, but not of the burglary.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Best.

Reference Number: t18200918-21

919. ROBERT COLLIER , JAMES HAWKINS and WILLIAM DAWKERS were indicted for stealing, on

the 11th of August , one handkerchief, value 1 s., the goods of a certain man unknown, from his person .

WILLIAM BUXTON . I am a constable. I was on duty in Lower Thames-street, on the 11th of August, between five and six o'clock, Buckmaster came up and said he saw three pickpockets take a handkerchief from a gentleman's pocket, and pointed the prisoners out. I followed them a few yards up Fish-street-hill - Dawkers and Collier were walking together, and Hawkins close behind. I saw Dawkers take a gentleman's coat tail in his right hand, and put his left hand in; finding nothing they passed by, and followed another gentleman who was just before them; Dawkers took hold of that gentleman's coat in the same manner, and drew a blue silk handkerchief from his pocket. I called Meakins and Bailey to assist me, followed them up Crooked-lane, and at the top of the lane Bayley took Hawkins, I took Dawkers and Collier - Dawkers immediately struck me several times over the head, and made a great resistance. Meakins took Collier from me, and I was obliged to force Dawkers into a house till Bayley came to help me. I had been watching them for half an hour. I do not know who the gentleman was.

WILLIAM BUCKMASTER . I belong to the Gas Light Company, and was attending at the end of Thames-street to keep the carts away, as the pipes were being laid down. Between four and five o'clock I saw Hawkins and Dawkers going backwards and forwards two or three times - they then came and leant over the bar, and used very bad language. They went up Fish-street-hill, and returned with Collier; they turned round towards Thames-street, and Collier pulled a pocket-handkerchief out of the flap of his breeches, and gave it to Hawkins, which made me suspect them. I pointed them out to the officers.

THOMAS MEAKINS . I am an officer. On the 11th of August, between five and six o'clock in the afternoon, Buckmaster pointed the prisoners out to us - Buxton and Bayley agreed to follow them, and in a few minutes Buxton ran down to me, and said Bayley had taken one of them. I went with him to Great Eastcheap, nearly opposite Crooked-lane - Buxton said,

"There are the two men, I can swear to them." He took Dawkers and I took Collier. Dawkers began to get resolute, and said if we did not let them go he would knock us down. I struck him, and said I would knock his head off if he resisted. He seemed more quiet, and I left him with Buxton. I took Collier to the watch-house, and found a tobacco-box and a cotton handkerchief on him.

JOHN BAYLEY . I am an officer. I went after the prisoners; when they got to the Monument they turned back, crossed, and went up Crooked-lane; I stopped Hawkins, and seeing him take something from under his arm, asked him what he had got, turned his coat aside, and found a handkerchief down each side of his waistcoat, two under each arm, and two in his hat, one of which was a blue one. I found an empty purse in his pocket.

COLLIER'S Defence. I was returning from Deptford with Dawkers.

HAWKINS'S Defence. I met a Jew on the bridge, who sold me the handkerchiefs for 17 s., and told me I had better put them under my waistcoat.

DAWKERS'S Defence. The officers struck us several times.

COLLIER - GUILTY . Aged 24.

HAWKINS - GUILTY . Aged 19.

DAWKERS - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18200918-22

920. THOMAS GREEN was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of July , one gold chain, value 8 l.; one seal, value 2 l., and one ring, value 5 l., the goods of John Barlow , from his person .

JOHN BARLOW . On the 4th of July, about nine o'clock at night, the prisoner met me exactly opposite the end of Catherine Wheel-alley . I was walking up the street, and he was coming down, and at that instant he made a violent snatch at my watch-chain; he got the chain, seal and ring, and then directly ran up the alley. I pursued crying stop thief; the alley is very narrow, he was stopped there, and taken into a public house close by, and was given in charge, but nothing was found on him; there was a strong light at the corner of the alley; I saw him clearly, and did not lose sight of him.

JOSEPH BURTON . On this night I heard the alarm in my bar, I ran out, and stopped the prisoner in the alley.

JOSEPH GREGORY . On the 14th of July I was at the end of the next street, heard the alarm, and ran towards it. I pursued the prisoner, and came up with him in the alley; next morning I went there as soon as it was daylight, and was going away without finding it, but happening to kick my heel against a stable gate I found the chain - it was about four o'clock - at five I went to the spot where the robbery was committed, and found the key.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18200918-23

921. ROBERT HARRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of September , one basket, value 1 s.; 47 lbs. of butter, value 3 l., and one cloth, value 6 d. , the goods of George Bowles .

GEORGE CLITHEROW . I am a butcher, at Newgate-market On the 4th of September, about nine o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner go down Rose-street, I watched him all down the street, lost sight of him, and in two minutes he came up Rose-street again with a flat on his shoulders, I followed him across the market, and collared him in Paved-alley, he threw it off his shoulder, and begged of me to let him go - he said he was out of place, I said he had turned a number of young men out of place himself. I saw Bowles come up, claim the flat, and said he had but just put it where it was taken from. I give him to the officer.

GEORGE BOWLES . The flat of butter is mine, and had only arrived from the country five minutes before it was stolen.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 48.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18200918-24

900 GEORGE KIRKLAND was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of July , one pair of bronze candlesticks, value 3 l. , the goods of Robert Johnston , William Brooks , Thomas Hector , and Robert Davidson .

ROBERT BIRD . I am a pawnbroker. On the 28th of July the prisoner pledged a pair of bronze candlesticks with me for 1 l. I asked very particularly if they were his own, and if he ever sold any of the sort; he said Yes, and wanted to sell me them, but I would not purchase them, he said he was the maker, and had just set up, and at this season trade was bad; when he left I went to see if he had given me a right direction, and found no such person; he called in a few days with a very handsome pair, I told him he gave me a wrong direction last time, he said he had not. I said it was strange no one should know him; he persisted that he lived there, and said if I would call at five o'clock in the evening he should be at home, and would shew me what he had for sale, but in case he was not at home to ask for the name of Blabrook, and he would tell me where to find him; I thought he seemed to be correct, and went at five o'clock, but then no one knew him. I went about the street enquiring, and at last came to where Blabrook lived, he was not at home. I went at nine o'clock, and described the man to Blabrook he was in the bronze way, and said he worked with him; I told him the prisoner had offered me some goods, he seemed astonished, and said he had no doubt but he had them from his employer. I told him to tell his master to call upon me.

THOMAS HECTOR . I am a brass-founder in partenership with Robert Johnston , William Brooks , and Robert Davidson ; the prisoner worked at our manufactury at New-street-square .

(Property produced and sworn to.)

CHARLES PUCKERIDGE . I am an officer. On the 3d of August, I was sent for to the prosecutors', and took the prisoner into custody, he said he was sorry for what he had done, and hoped they would forgive him; the next day he gave me the duplicates of three candlesticks, and said he could not find the rest of the duplicates, or he would give them to me.

The Prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18200918-25

922. JOSEPH CLARK was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of July , one chest of drawers, value 3 l. , the goods of William Towne .

WILLIAM TOWNE . I am a cabinet-maker , and live in Great Trinity-lane. On Saturday, the 1st of July, I sent the apprentice with the prisoner to carry the drawers to King-street, Holborn. The prisoner was the porter to carry them.

WILLIAM PALMER . I am apprentice to Mr. Towne. I went with the prisoner to Mr. Gee's, in King-street; he did not want any drawers, and we brought them away. I left him in Cheapside , while I went to know if my master would take less than 3 l. for them, as the prisoner said he could sell them in Moorfields. My master said he would not take less. I returned, and could find neither prisoner nor drawers.

THOMAS OSBORNE . I am headborough of Aldgate. I apprehended the prisoner in Sun-yard - he said he sold the drawers.

WILLIAM TOWNE re-examined. The prisoner was only to carry them, the apprentice was to sell them.

Prisoner's Defence. I went into a house to get some beer, when I came out the drawers were gone.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Confined Six Months .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18200918-26

THIRD DAY. FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 15.

923. JOHN BUTLER was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of September , one pair of spectacles, value 5 s., the goods of James Cochrane , from his person .

MR. JAMES COCHRANE . On the 1st of September, about two o'clock in the afternoon, I was passing the Horse Guards , there came a great crowd from the Park, I found myself surrounded by them. I in some measure effected my escape, when a man tapped me on the shoulder, and asked if I had lost any thing? I said I was not aware that I had - I felt, and missed my spectacles and case - he produced them.

THOMAS THOMPSON . I am an officer. On the 1st of September I was in the Park - the Queen was coming down, and a great mob running by the side of her carriage. I suspected something would take place, and ran to the Horse Guards - three persons, whom I knew to be bad characters, surrounded the prosecutor, and tried to get his watch. I believe they saw me and went off. The prisoner immediately backed behind the gentleman; I saw him lift the pocket up with his left hand, take the spectacles out with his right, and put them in his right-hand pocket; I secured him, and took them out of his pocket. With assistance I took him to Mr. Cochrane.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18200918-27

924. JOSEPH CHISSELL was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of July , one coat, value 30 s. , the goods of William Henry Poland .

MR. ARABIN conducted the prosecution.

JOHN READ . On the 3d of July I was at work near Mr. Poland's house, saw the prisoner get half in at the window, and drag the coat out with a stick with a pin at the end of it - I followed and took him about twenty yards off with it.

WILLIAM HENRY POLAND . I live at Islington . The coat is mine.

GUILTY . Aged 13.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18200918-28

925. JOHN SIMON MAN was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of July , one watch, value 3 l.; one chain, value

30 s; three seals, value 30 s., and one key, value 1 d., the goods of Samuel Furze , from his person .

SAMUEL FURZE . On the 15th of July, at half-past five o'clock in the afternoon, I was in Portman-street - there was a small crowd at the Queen's house, she was getting into her carriage. I stood on the opposite side, where there were very few people, and observed the prisoner at my right hand. The moment the Queen was getting into her carriage, I stepped into the road that I might not be in a crowd; the prisoner came behind me, snatched my watch out, and ran towards Oxford-street; I followed, crying Stop thief! and before we got to the end of Oxford-street Toole stopped him, I was close behind. In the scuffle he got himself towards Mr. Thomas's, the grocer; he then took the watch from part of his dress, and threw it down the area. I attempted to catch it, but it fell through the grating, the servant took it up and brought it to her master, it was mine. The prisoner had been taken into the shop to prevent his being rescued. Bond came and took him in charge, he then fell on his knees and begged forgiveness.

JAMES TOOLE . I saw the prisoner running and stopped him. I threw him down, a scuffle ensued, he took the watch out of his waistcoat pocket, and threw it down the area.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18200918-29

926. EDWARD CALLAGHAN , MARY DONOVAN , WILLIAM DONOVAN , and DANIEL DONOVAN were indicted for the wilful murder of Jeremiah Carthy .

MR. JESSOP conducted the prosecution.

SARAH WILLIAMS . My husband is a seaman. I live in George-yard, George-court, Whitechapel - the George, public-house , is in that court; the back door joins the court. On the 20th of July I was in the taproom of the George, Jeremiah Carthy was there, I knew him by sight; it might he nine o'clock at night, or a few minutes after - he was sitting in a box, smoking his pipe with two Englishman, named Fortescue and Jones; the four prisoners were in the room, also William Garvin and Sylvester Marney . Two young women were dancing with Callaghan, whose names I do not know. One of the women said,

"Will you get up and dance, Jerry Carthy ?" He got up to dance, and Callaghan immediately struck him - Fortescue and Jones caught hold of Carthy's arm, and persuaded him to sit down. He sat down in a box - he never returned the blow. Garvin came up, and put his hand out to shake hands with him, and Carthy put his hand out. Garvin shook him with one hand, and with the other he immediately struck him two or three times; then Mary Donovan came up and struck him; Daniel and William Donovan also came up. Mary Donovan said to the deceased,

"You are the bully among these Englishmen, in company where you ought not to be." - (He was an Irishman.) I then saw Callaghan, Daniel and William Donovan , Garvin, and Marney catch hold of each side of Carthy, and drag him into the yard - they dragged him by the collar into George-court; he made no resistance that I saw. I was very much terrified at seeing this disturbance. I went out, thinking to part them. In passing through the court I saw Garvin, Marney, and all the prisoners there. Garvin attempted to jump on the deceased's head, he was on the ground in the court then. I opened my door and went in. Carthy laid five or six yards from my door. I locked my door. and as I stood by the fire-side my door was broken open. Garvin was the first that entered my room, with William Donovan . He took hold of my poker - it was a stout poker, with a big knob to it. I saw Marney at the deceased twice. They left my house with the poker. The prisoners were all in the court then. I will not be positive as to Daniel Donovan , they were all there at first. I saw Garvin strike the deceased three times on the head with the poker; he was then on the ground, and the others were about him. I saw Mary Donovan throw a brick at him while they were in the court - I do not know whether it hit him, but I heard him say,

"You have cut my head with the brick!"

COURT. Q. Was the brick thrown before they struck him with the poker, or after - A. I cannot say, but it was after they took the poker. Before they broke into my house Mary Donovan came with some very big sticks, and gave them to the men. I saw Garvin and Marney strike the deceased with the sticks - he was then standing. He hallooed for mercy, and they left him with his head cut in a shocking manner.

Q. After the blows with the poker what did you see - A. I saw no more; they left him on the ground in the court. I went to Whitechapel watch-house for assistance. I saw Garvin and Marney knock him down with the poker. The first blow with the poker knocked him down - they struck him twice after. He said his head was cut very bad, and he could not move. Several Englishmen came to his assistance, and the Irish went away altogether. He walked out of the court with assistance. I saw him go to the doctor's - his head was bleeding then, and in a shocking state.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Was your husband in this house - A. No, he was not in town. I suppose I had been there half an hour, or rather more, in company with my cousin. I never went by any name but my husband's. I was never prosecuted myself, except about a few words with a woman; I was then put in Clerkenwell prison for two days till my friends bailed me.

Q. Did you know any of the prisoners before this night - A. Yes, by seeing them go through the court three or four times a day. There might be two or three more in the public-house whom I do not know. William Donovan went out and returned again.

Q. How long was it from the first of the quarrel to when they broke into your house - A. I dare say twenty minutes. Carthy was being ill-used by them all the time. It was not a general row. No person received a blow, except Carthy, without the Englishmen did. Carthy did not offer to return the blows.

Q. How far from the public-house is the place where the dance was on the Friday after, when the floor fell in - A. I knew nothing of it. I heard there was a dance in the next court. I saw the deceased at work for about an

hour one day after this affair - he was pulling up some bricks at the George; he had a poultice on his head, and it was tied round with a handkerchief. I saw him return to the public-house about ten o'clock on the night this happened.

MR. JESSOP. Q, Is the taproom very large - A. No. There might have been people there whom I did not see.

JOHN FORTESCUE . I am a butcher, and live in George-yard. I have frequently seen the prisoners about there. On the 20th of July I was in the George, public-house; the prisoners sat in a box on the other side by themselves - Carthy sat in a box with me and Jones, and another Englishman whom I do not know. The servant, and another woman or two, were dancing. Carthy went to light his pipe and dance with them, I believe. Two of the Irishmen jumped from their box when they saw Carthy going to dance, pitched into him, and gave him three or four blows - they were Callaghan and Daniel Donovan . They put him in his seat, and said

"Don't fight, Jerry." After I had hallooed out,

"Don't murder the man," Daniel Donovan held out his hand to shake hands with him, but instead of which he struck him about his head - Garvin was present.

Q. What took place next - A. I went out, and Carthy followed, as I had said,

"Don't stop here, my friend." I went to George-court and he followed me into the court; the prisoners walked out first. I said

"There will be a row in the court," and directly we went out they chucked a brick.

COURT. Q. I understood you to say Carthy followed you quietly out into the court - A. He did. The Irishmen had gone out previously, and, I suppose, were waiting for us to come out into the court. A woman, who had been in the George, then threw a brick, it hit Carthy on the head - I believe it was Mary Donovan . Garvin rushed into some person's house in the court, and brought out a poker. Carthy was reeling against the wall, and Garvin struck him on his head with the poker, it knocked him down. He said he was a murdered man, or something of that sort, and I ran away. Two or three of them were about him, but I cannot say who they were - all the prisoners were there. I saw Callaghan and Daniel Donovan rush out of the court, where all the Irish live, into George-court. They knocked me down at the end of the court, and took my hat and handkerchief away - they had a good many sticks. I saw Carthy next day, he was trying to work; he complained of a clicking in his head where it was fractured. I went with him that morning to the doctor's in Wentworth-street, near George-court, and saw his wounds dressed; there were two or three wounds and a large fracture in the skull. I saw him again next day, with his head in a dreadful state. He asked me to go with him to have it dressed, but I could not bear it. The plaister had worked off, it appeared to be a large wound, as if done with the knob of a poker.

Cross-examined. Q. You went out of the house and the deceased followed you - A. Yes. I cannot say whether he was dragged out, the prisoners went out two or three minutes before us. A woman came and told us that they were going to murder us; part of the prisoners remained there after us, but I cannot say who they were. Mrs. Williams was in the tap-room.

Q. Were you drinking with Carthy on Thursday - A. Yes, with him and three or four more, we might have had a gallon of beer.

Q. You did not go out with him on the Sunday - A. No, he could not go out for he seemed quite deranged, he used to say he had such a clicking in his head, he was sure he was murdered, and I persuaded him to try and get into the hospital.

MR. JESSOP. Q. You left the house in consequence of hearing that the Irish were coming to murder you - A. Yes, I left hastily. I saw Carthy running out after me. The deceased got worse and worse, he did not appear in a condition to go to a dance on the Sunday.

MARY M'CARTHY. At the time this happened I lived in Wentworth-street. I was not at the George, but saw the three Donovans come out of the George into the court; I lived in New-court, which comes into George-court; I did not then see Callaghan, it was between eight and nine o'clock, they were coming into New-court out of George-court, they had just left the public house, there was a hallooing in the court, and when Mary Donovan ran by me, she called out murder, and said they were killing her; the deceased pulled her into the court, and she said to him,

"is not that you, Jerry Carthy " he said Yes, using words which I cannot mention; she then said, you lie, you b - dy s - d, he then used worse expressions than before; she said I must have a good deal of patience with you, and so she stooped down, and took up a piece of mud and chucked it at him.

MR. JESSOP. This is not the witness I called - I called Eliza M'Carthy.

The witness said the prisoners friends sent her.

WM. ROBERTSON. I am a carpenter, and live in Wentworth-street. On the 20th of July, I was in the tap-room of the George, Carthy and I went in together. I do not recollect seeing S. Williams, about twenty persons were there, principally Irish. I recollect Callaghan, and Mrs. Donovan there; Callaghan was dancing with some women, Carthy got up to go to the fire to light his pipe; he took hold of the servant, and said

"Betty, we will have a step together;" Callaghan then struck him, and immediately another man who is not here, came out and struck him too, he did not return the blow, but was sitting down, and was immediately seized by several people, who said nothing but dragged him away into the back yard, they were then going out as fast as they could - they collared him and dragged him away as though he was a child, he was on his feet as long as I saw him; I went into the court and saw a quantity of people rushing through into New-court. I saw Garvin and Marney with bludgeons, beating Carthy. I did not notice any of the prisoners. I saw several women heaving brick bats towards the deceased. I stood there till they had pretty well killed him. I suppose there were forty or fifty, men, women, and children there. I do not remember seeing the prisoners in the court, they might have been there.

Q. When you last saw the deceased, in what situation was he - A. Apparently dead, and all over in a gore of blood, he appeared to be wounded in the left side of his head. I saw him a quarter of an hour after with his head tied up. I saw him five or six times every day, he appeared in a very bad state.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you see him struck - A. Yes, a brick-bat hit me on the head. I was left in the taproom alone for a minute or two.

JULIUS NATORFF . I am a German, and an apothecary. On the 26th of July, I was assistant to Mr. Rogers, in Wentworth-street, Brick-lane, about twenty yards from the George, public-house, an Irishman was brought in wounded, between ten or eleven at night. I ordered a hairdresser to shave him; he could not do it, and so I did it myself; his wounds appeared dangerous; it was the same man that afterwards went into the hospital, they called him Jerry. I dressed his wounds in Fortesque's presence, the principal wound was in the side bone, on the right hand side of the skull, that was the most dangerous. I probed it, but could not say whether the skull was fractured. I attended him four or five days and told him to go into the hospital, but he would not. I thought by good care his wounds could be cured, but he came more than once intoxicated. I told him if he did not pay attention, he would die of his wounds; the principal one seemed to be done with a blunt iron; he was bruised all over; when he was dead, I felt that his skull was fractured, but before I could not tell that, as it was so swollen. I had told him not to work.

Cross-examined. Q. When he first came to you, did he appear drunk or sober - A.Drunk; he called on me on the Monday after the accident, without any dressing whatever on his wound; he said he could not keep them on; he mentioned nothing about any accident happening to him on Sunday.

MR. JESSOP. Q. You told him to take care, or his wounds would he fatal - A. Yes, I told him to take the people up. Such a blow would occasion a man to appear intoxicated, but he smelt of gin. There was no appearance of a new injury on the Monday.

JOHN GREEN . I live with the last witness, and assisted to dress the deceased twice, he was intoxicated once.

WILLIAM SELF . I am a pupil at the London Hospital. On the 28th of July, the deceased was admitted as a patient; the principal wound was on the left side of the head; he had a very trifling one on the back of his head. A small quantity of hair round the wound had been shaven off, they appeared to be inflicted by some weapon. I suppose they had been inflicted several days; the inflammation on the skin had subsided very much; the wound was closing. I probed it, there was a very trifling fracture of the external table of the skull, but it had rose again, there was a circular fissure but it was not depressed. In consequence of the wound an inflammation had taken place in the brain, which caused his death; but probably the inflammation would not have been so severe if he had not continually drank, but there would be no inflammation had it not been for the wound; the brain was injured both by the depression and inflammation, the blow naturally produced inflammation, and intemperance afterward would increase it. Intemperance would not occasion the inflammation if it was not for the blow.

Cross-examined. Q. The skull was not depressed when you saw it - A. No. I suppose it had been, on account of the fracture all round; the diameter was about the size of a sixpence. The inflammation might be much aggravated by intoxication. If he had proper attention, and was kept sober, he probably might have recovered.

MR. JESSOP. Q. He was in the hospital from the 28th of July, till the 4th of August, during that time there was no intemperance - A. Certainly not. I do not think the wound would have caused the death of the most temperate man, he was intoxicated when he came to the hospital, the wound might have been healed with proper attention, it was very slight; the fracture did not press on the brain, it was the pressure of the matter that caused his death, the accident was the existing cause, no doubt. I ascribe the inflammation to the wound.

MR. JUSTICE BEST. Q. Suppose the man to have received the blow and lived temperately, and not had surgical assistance, do you think the blow would have caused his death - A. The blow of itself would certainly have killed him, if he had no had surgical assistance.

(The prisoners being called upon for their defence, severally declared themselves innocent.)

DENNIS SULLIVAN . On the 20th of July I was in Wheeler's-buildings, I saw the prisoners come out of the George, Mary Donovan was not with them, they were going towards New-court, where they live, Jerry Carthy and his companions followed them, he had eight or nine persons with him, the prisoners took no notice of him, he first called after them, and one of his companions threw a brick at them, then a fight began. Carthy called this woman what is not fit to mention; the deceased's party and the prisoner's party were fighting with bricks, and stones and sticks. Carthy said

"go it my boys," when they all set-to.

MR. JESSOP. Q. Where is Wheeler's-buildings - A. Just by George-yard, the row was all in Wheeler's-buildings, not in George-yard. I saw Mary Donovan standing at her own door, he called her the bad names after the fight.

JAMES COPLIN . I am a labourer. I was at the George on this night. William Donovan and his companions were drinking beer very quietly together; Carthy seemed to be something disagreeable, and went about the taproom, Callaghan got up to dance, and Carthy went and insulted him; both had a row, and William Donovan got up with his companions and walked out, the deceased, and his company followed.

MR. JESSOP. Q. Where do you live - A. At Black-wall; Mrs. Donovan was there. I saw no blows at all.

JEREMIAH MAHONEY . I was at the George on this night, between five and six o'clock, and saw the deceased there, like a drunken man. I stopped until seven o'clock. Callaghan came in and sat at my table - he began to dance with some woman, the deceased interfered and interrupted the dance - Callaghan shoved him aside, and a man of Carthy's company stood up, and said

"D - n me if you are for fighting, let us make a general fight, and side out man for man." A woman said

"If you don't get out, you will get hurt by these people;" I said for what - I then went away as quick as possible, all the company I sat with went out. Carthy's party followed them out, a row commenced, and I ran to the Black-horse.

MR. JESSOP. Q. What time did you leave - A. Between eight and nine o'clock.

RICHARD THORN . I have kept the George since the 3d of July. I have been eight years in the business. I was at home until about seven o'clock, I then went into the City; the deceased had been working for me several days before. My wife sent for me, when I came home I found Carthy standing at the door of the taproom, it was about nine o'clock. I believe he was alone in the house, as the doors had been shut; I remonstrated with him for getting tipsy, saying, I supposed he had caused the quarrel, he said he had not, and immediately left the house - he was very tipsy then. I had refused to serve him about five o'clock in the afternoon; he was drunk the whole of the next day with his friends, and on the Saturday he came and blocked up a door-way for me, he had been drinking then. On the Monday or Tuesday following, when I got up, I found him at my door, he said he had been up all night, and went to sleep upon my table.

MR. JESSOP. Q. Did you see the last witness at your house that night - A. No, I think Callaghan was there. I had seen the deceased ten days before that, he had two black eyes, and his temple was cut.

MARY M'KENNEDY. I knew the deceased. On the Sunday after this row, I danced with him, there was a large party, more than three dozen - there was a piper, it was in George-yard, New-court, the floor give way under us, and we all fell into the cellar, Carthy fell - I saw him when he came out of the cellar, and I asked him if he felt hurt, he said Yes, in his head a little - the dance lasted three hours.

MR. JESSOP. Q. You danced with him three hours - A. Yes. We took it by turns. He brought the piper into the court.

MICHAEL LAHOE . I was at the dance with Carthy on the Sunday after the row, there were about fifty persons, the floor gave way, and Jerry and I fell in together; he was in liquor - he had been drinking with me the whole day, and would not be satisfied until he had a jig. I picked him up - his nose bled, I took him into the George, and asked him what he would have to drink, he said he could bear nothing, that his head and his heart were bruised, and he should never get over it.

MR. JESSOP. Q. Was his head bound up when he fell - A. No, he was very well - nobody would have thought any thing was the matter with him.

JOHN HICKMAN . I am beadle of the London Hospital. the deceased had leave to go out the day he came in, but returned between seven and eight o'clock, and had evidently been drinking.

E. CALLAGHAN - GUILTY . Aged 36.

W. DONOVAN - GUILTY . Aged 40.

D. DONOVAN - GUILTY . Aged 30.

Of Manslaughter only. Confined One Year .

MARY DONOVAN - GUILTY . Aged 26.

Of Manslaughter only. Confined Fourteen Days .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18200918-30

928. STEPHEN JENNINGS was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of July , one pair of spectacles, value 8 s., and one case, value 1 s., the goods of James Curtis , Esq. , from his person .

JAMES CURTIS , ESQ. I live at the Old South Sea-House. Between two and three o'clock on the 11th or 12th of July I was very near the corner of Clement's-lane, Lombard-street , I lost my spectacle case from my outside coat-pocket, they were safe three minutes before; I did not perceive them taken, but the witness said my pocket had been picked; the prisoner was stopped about one hundred yards off. I have never seen them since - it was a red case, and quite new.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODERICK. Q. Might you not very easy have let them fall - A. It is possible. I had used them at a house in Clement's-lane.

THOMAS RICHES . I am clerk to Mr. George Morley , a Barrister, of Lincoln's Inn. I saw Mr. Curtis at the corner of Clement's-lane, the prisoner and two others were close by him in the lane, I perceived something red come from Mr. Curtis's pocket; it was taken by the prisoner or his companions - I saw it pass from one to the other. All three turned down Lombard-street, and Mr. Curtis crossed, I went to him, and told him that his pocket-book was taken, seeing it was something red; he felt, and missed his spectacles. I went after them, and laid hold of the prisoner, the other two went off. I saw the prisoner looking at what had been taken, which was in the hands of the other two. I told the prisoner he had been picking a gentleman's pocket, and by that time Mr. Curtis came up. I delivered him to Mr. Curtis, and went after the others, but lost them. I took the prisoner to the Mansion House.

Cross-examined. Q. The prisoner said he knew nothing about it - A. He did. I saw them speaking to him before and after the robbery, and all three walked away very leisurely. It was imposible for one not to know what the other was doing.

Prisoner's Defence. I was passing along on business and was as likely to be behind a thief as he might.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200918-31

929. EDWARD BARTRAM was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of August , 72 yards of silk mode, value 5 l. , the goods of Joseph Wilson and Ambrose Moore .

MR. BOLLAND conducted the prosecution.

MR. AMBROSE MOORE . I am a silk-manufacturer , and in partnership with Joseph Wilson ; the prisoner was in our service for twelve months. On the 8th of August he was sent to Mr. South, of Leicester-square - next day Mr. South called and gave me a duplicate. I went to the pawnbroker's - the duplicate was for seventy-two yards of sarsnet, pledged on the 7th of August, in the name of Henry Smith , Whitechapel, for 5 l. The pawnbroker produced the goods; it was a piece of silk mode, and not sarsnet, and is our property; we have the fellow pieces, which tallied with it. We missed this piece, it was in a raw unfinished state, and was never sold. We found a piece of paper in the cellar, which had contained the mode - the number was 4918, this was on the piece.

CHARLES STUBBING . I live with Messrs. Milburn, pawnbrokers, 120, Minories. I produce a piece of silk mode, which was pledged by the prisoner; I gave him four 1 l. notes and 19 s. 10 d.

JOSEPH MARTIN . I am an officer. I took the prisoner

into custody, and found four 1 l. notes on him, which I produce. I found a piece of paper in the prosecutor's cellar, which served as a wrapper to the mode. I found more silk in the cellar. The prisoner said he intended to pledge that to redeem this piece.

CHARLES STUBBINGS re-examined. They are the notes I gave him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. With the deepest contrition for my offence, I beg most humbly to say it was not my intention to defraud my employer, but to redeem the goods; but as one crime leads to another, I was tempted to it. I beg for mercy.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Recommended to Mercy.

Judgment Respited .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200918-32

930. WILLIAM EYRES was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of July , one box, value 11 s. 6 d. , the goods of William Castleman and Edward Castleman .

WILLIAM CASTLEMAN . I am in partnership with Edward Castleman , we live in King-street, Cheapside . On the 11th of July I saw the prisoner come in and take this empty box off another in the passage, and sent Bates after him.

THOMAS BATES . I am servant to the prosecutors. I ran out, and secured the prisoner with the box in Lothbury.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was employed to carry it.

GUILTY . Aged 36.

Fined One Shilling, and Discharged .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200918-33

FOURTH DAY, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 16.

931. JAMES SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of July , one pair of trowsers, value 4 s.; one jacket, value 4 s., and one handkerchief, value 1 s. , the goods of William Candy .

WILLIAM CANDY . I am a seaman. These things were on board my ship in the Export Dock at Poplar . I left at one o'clock, returned at half-past two, and missed them.

ALEXANDER LEWSTED . I was mate of the ship. I saw the prisoner come out of the aft deck port, I enquired who he wanted, he could not tell. I stopped him, and found he had Candy's clothes on under his own.

JOHN ROEBUCK . I took the prisoner in charge, and found the property on him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 49.

Confined Six Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200918-34

932. ANN ADAMS , ELEANOR SMITH , and JANE SMITH were indicted for stealing, on the 6th of September , one watch, value 2 l., and one seal, value 2 s., the goods of John Ellis Salmon , from his person .

JOHN ELLIS SALMON . I am a cabinet-maker , and live in South-street, Manchester-square. On the 5th of September, at twelve o'clock at night, I was in High-stret, St. Giles's, the prisoners accosted me; I went home with Eleanor Smith , to No. 8, Maynard-street , the other two came in and said the room was theirs - I was there about three-quarters of an hour. I gave Eleanor Smith 1 s., and then began to admonish her on her situation. Adams came in, I gave her 1 s., and begged them to let me go. Adams and Eleanor Smith asked what hour it was, I pulled out my watch, and Adams snatched it from my hand - she still remained in the room. I asked her to return it, and so did Eleanor Smith . I went to force it from her, and both called Jane Smith in to their assistance. I locked the door to keep them in. I let Jane Smith return to her own room. I have not recovered my watch. I called the watchman, who took them.

ANDREW CONWAY . I was called in, and took Eleanor Smith and Adams. I searched, but found no watch.

EDWARD YARRANTON . I am a watchman. I took Jane Smith in her room.

ADAMS'S Defence. We refused to stop with him, and he called in the watchman.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200918-35

933. JOHN WOOD , ELIZABETH GOULD , JOSEPH ASTON , WILLIAM STEVENS , JOHN DUGARD , JOHN SMITH , GEORGE BROWN , EDWARD DOWDEN , alias SYKES , CHARLES WATKINS , ROBERT ELLIS , JOHN SMITH , GEORGE CORKETT , MARY HOWARD , JONAS WAIGHT , SARAH WRIGHT , MARY JONES , and WILLIAM HOWARD were indicted for feloniously and knowingly having forged notes in their possession, with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England .

The prisoners severally pleaded GUILTY .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

934. The same prisoners were again indicted for disposing of and putting away forged Bank notes, with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England, knowing them to be forged .

MR. REYNOLDS offered no evidence.

NOT GUILTY .

Before Mr. Baron Graham , Mr. Justice Best, and Mr. Justice Richardson.

Reference Number: t18200918-36

935. WILLIAM SIDNEY SMITH and FREDERICK HOPKINS were indicted for feloniously assaulting John Middleton , Esq. , on the King's highway, on the 15th of August , at St. Clement Danes, putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, one pocketbook, value 10 s.; one purse, value 1 s.; one watch, value 25 l.; one chain, value 5 l.; one key, value 16 s.; two seals, value 6 l.; 15 s. in monies numbered, and seven 1 l. Bank notes, his property .

MR. ANDREWS conducted the prosecution.

JOHN MIDDLETON , ESQ. On the 15th of August I was passing in the Strand , and about the end of Southampton-street I was met by a crowd of persons; they came before me, so as to interrupt my going on, and next moment I

was surrounded by them, they jostled me with their shoulders and elbows - I then thought they were about to rob me, and endeavoured, with all my force, to get into a shop - the door being open, I got within about a yard of the door, when some of the gang got between me and the door, and prevented me. I thought I could have reached the door-post, to have drawn myself into the shop, and tried all I could to do so, but they prevented me. I found my arms raised up, and several of them were close round me. About this time I felt somebody pulling at my watch - I was desirous of getting my hand down to prevent its going. The tugging still continued, and I saw by the muscles of the person's face that he was doing it with great force, I then felt it go; and the next moment the party who drew the watch out turned round and quitted.

Q. How many do you suppose there were - A. I was much alarmed, and unable to count them, but suppose there were twenty or more. They threw themselves into the crowd, so as not to leave me altogether, by which means they concealed each other from my view - they ran away. I could only see the shoulders of two or three of them. I instantly walked into the shop and told of my robbery, and while I was so doing Taylor came in, and threw my pocket-book on the counter - till then I did not know that I had lost it, I then felt, missed it from my inside coat-pocket, and knew it to be mine - nothing had been taken out. I have never recovered my watch; it was worth 35 l. with its appendages. The pocket-book contained a receipt for 287 l. 10 s., which I was carrying to my banker's, to receive the money that day - it was to be paid on the production of that receipt; there were also seven 1 l. notes and some loose papers. I lost my purse from my right-hand breeches pocket, with 15 s. in it. I have no knowledge of the prisoners, they were both apprehended in about a minute after, Taylor produced the pocket-book. It happened between eleven and twelve o'clock, just as Sheriff Parkins's carriage was going by with the procession.

GEORGE TAYLOR . I am an officer of St. James's, Clerkenwell. On the 15th of August, as the City were going up with their address to the Queen, I was on the alert with other officers, and took particular notice of a gang and followed them from the corner of Bridge-street, Fleet-street, as I knew several of them. I saw them what they call ramping every gentleman as they went on. They kept rather a-head of the Sheriffs' carriage; they kept the foot pavement to themselves. When they came to the end of Southampton-street I heard Mr. Middleton cry out

"The scoundrel has got my watch!" I was then in the middle of the road close to the Sheriffs' horses. Mr. Middleton was surrounded by them. I saw them all in a cluster together. I think he was dragged off the foot pavement. I made an effort to get to assist Colton, who was with me - he had got hold of the person who robbed Mr. Middleton. As I was forcing my way in I saw a pocket-book come from a man, who, to all appearance, was Hopkins; he said,

"Here, take it!" - it was thrown up above the height of a man. To the best of my knowledge it was Hopkins - it was not the man whom Colton had hold of, but to the best of my judgment the prisoner is the man, but I will not swear it. The book fell down, and I scrambled in among them and picked it up - the person it was meant for missed it. I was making my way out from them, and they sung out

"Chiv him!" which means to use their knives. I got a cut over the knuckle, my hand was all over blood. I then got the pocket-book into my breast. Two or three persons said the gentleman was in the shop, I went in and found the prosecutor there. He described the contents, it was returned to me, I have had it ever since. I then found Smith in custody of Colton and Gook, we took him to Bow-street, and got him secured, we then went after Hopkins, and found him at Kensington with the same gang, opposite the Sheriff's coach. I pointed him out to Gook, and said,

"That is the man." As soon as he saw me he kept dropping out of the gang. I said

"I think he wants to be off" - we went into the mob and took him, he was walking away very quick. I told him what it was for, he said he knew nothing of it, and was not there. We found nothing on him, and took him him to Bow-street. I did not see him with the gang till we came to Kensington, as I did not get up with the head of the gang till then, but we overtook them about Knights-bridge, they were then keeping at the head of the Sheriff's carriage.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. What time did you first see the Sheriff's carriage at Bridge-street - A. I should think between ten and eleven. The gang kept in a body by themselves.

WILLIAM COLTON . I am a broker. I was in company with Taylor before the procession came - we went into Fleet-street, and saw the gang waiting; we proceeded on to Southampton-street - I kept my eye on them. I saw them lay hold of a gentleman about the middle of the Strand, who escaped from them. I then told Taylor to be on his guard, and in about two minutes I observed they had got a gentleman up in the corner, it was Mr. Middleton. There was a board round a house which was repairing, which obliged persons to pass out of the great path; they got the gentleman in the corner, on the footpath; I pushed in among them, and heard one of them say,

"D - n you, do you mean to rob me?" and trying to get the pocket-book into his side-pocket - it was the prosecutor's book. The man put it into his pocket as if he was in danger - it was neither of the prisoners. There were twenty-five or twenty-six in the gang, as near as I can tell, and were all young men, and many of them genteelly dressed. The man could not get the book into his pocket, being rather thick, he put it under his arm. I collared and held him, he lifted up his arm to strike me, and then the book fell. I was struck, knocked down several times, and got injured. What became of the book I do not know. The corner was rather clear for a short time. After I got out I went in pursuit of Smith - I am sure he was among the gang. I did not notice the prisoner, Hopkins. - I got hold of Smith as he went on, he was about the last of the gang. I got him down Cecil-street - all the rest of the gang immediately came down to rescue him, and cried out,

"Chiv him." Several of them who knew me before pointed to me. I had a pistol of Taylor's, and with that I kept them off, detained Smith, and took him away, with assistance, to Bow-street. The gang all left. I am positive I had seen Smith endeavouring to prevent the

prosecutor from getting into the shop. We afterwards followed, and got up with the gang about the half-way house, they were then rather before the Sheriff's carriage - Taylor pointed Hopkins out, he immediately dropped back, slackened his pace, and separated himself from the gang. Taylor seized him, and gave him to Gook.

THOMAS GOOK . I am a constable. I met the procession opposite Somerset House, and saw the prosecutor at the time, the gang surrounded him; I saw Smith keeping them up with his shoulders as they surrounded the prosecutor. I saw the prosecutor's coat turned up, but did not see the pocket-book taken out; he was close to the prosecutor - one man was half between them, and he was keeping that man up to Mr. Middleton, who called out,

"You have got my watch, you rascal;" or words to that effect. I then heard a cry of he has got the book. I saw Colton knocked down in the mob, and ran to his assistance - there was a call of Stop him! Stop him. I saw Smith running round the board from where he had been, I ran round a waggon, and caught him as he ran away. The gang were rather behind him in a body, when I took him. Considerable resistance was made, but Colton had recovered, pulled out a pistol, and they left - we secured him. I went on to Kensington, and took Hopkins, whom Taylor pointed out. I had not observed him.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you know Hopkins before - A. I did; I think I must have known him if I had seen him.

JOHN WIGGINS . I am a constable of Clerkenwell. I was with Taylor and Colton. I did not observe either of the prisoners until Smith was taken. They have spoken correctly.

WILLIAM EWER . I am an officer. I saw the gang opposite Somerset House, and afterwards saw them surround the prosecutor - Smith was one of the gang. I saw him before the prosecutor was attacked. I did not see Hopkins, except at Kensington, he then shrunk back from the gang.

MR. MIDDLETON. The pocket-book is mine.

SMITH'S Defence. I am a shoemaker, and when out of work I do a little in the poultry line. I was going to get some giblets, and being in a hurry, I pushed through the crowd, several officers surrounded me, and said I had been guilty of a robbery in the Strand. I know nothing of Hopkins, and never saw him before.

HOPKINS'S Defence. I met a man in Oxford-street about five minutes before eleven o'clock, and went straight from there to see the Queen. I met the procession in Piccadilly.

WILLIAM CLARK . On the day the City address went up I met Hopkins in Soho-square, exactly at eleven o'clock; he said he was going to Hammersmith to see the procession come up, and left me.

MR. ANDREWS. Q. What distance is that from Southampton-street - A. About a quarter of a mile; he said he should be too late, as it was eleven o'clock. I was at a house in Charles-street, there was a clock in the room.

JOHN BARNFATHER . On this day I was attending Mr. Sheriff Parkins behind the carriage, and saw a number of people opposite Southampton-street - I did not see Hopkins there. A tall man threw the book away, and went down Adam-street.

WILLIAM EWER re-examined. Charles-street is about a quarter of an hour's walk from Southampton-street.

SMITH - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 19.

HOPKINS - NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18200918-37

936. WILLIAM PATTERSON was indicted for a Rape .

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Richardson.

Reference Number: t18200918-38

937. ROBERT MOTT was indicted for that he on the 17th June at St. Ann Blackfriars , having in his custody and possession a certain bill of exchange (setting it forth, dated the 15th June 1820, at two months after date, 50 l. drawn by Robert Mott , on Charles Dover , builder, Whaddon, Bucks), he afterwards did, on the same day at the same parish, feloniously and falsely make and counterfeit, and willingly act and assist in the falsely making, forging, and counterfeiting, an acceptance of the said bill , which is as follows: - (Excepect by me, Charles Dover , payable when due at Mr. William Dowgul , No. 8, Great Winchester-street, London Wall,) with intent to defraud Thomas Edington Hood , and William Comber Hood .

SECOND COUNT, for feloniously uttering and publishing as true, a like acceptance of the said bill, with a like intent, he well knowing the same to be forged and counterfeited.

TWO OTHER COUNTS stating his intent to be to defraud Charles Dover .

THOMAS EDINGTON HOOD . I am in the iron trade , in partnership with William Comber Hood , and live in Earl-street, Blackfriars. On the 17th of June the prisoner applied to me to purchase iron for a Mr. Dover, who he said, was a friend of his, stating him to be a respectable builder at Whaddon. and that it was to finish a house; when he first came he could not give a proper description of the goods, but afterwards produced this order (read.)

"Mr. Mott, Salesman, Leadenhall-market, I received your letter on Saturday, ten bundles of double steel iron, eighteen inches wide, ten bundles of single from twelve to twenty wide, ten bundles of best plate iron, all different tiles; they will know at the yard. The plate iron is not restricted to width - I remain, yours,

"Whaddon, Bucks.

CHARLES DOVER ."

P. S. Mr. Cross is in town, and will bring it down. You will buy it in Newgate-market. Please to send the hats back.

He gave me a bill of exchange to pay for the iron, I produced it; I asked who he was, and where Mr. Mott lived, he said he himself was Mr. Mott, the poulterer, of Leadenhall-market, and that the acceptor was a respectable builder at Whaddon. On his saying he was Mr. Mott the poulterer, of Leadenhall-market, I then said

"You supply some of my friends with poultry," naming Messrs. Randull and Souter; he said

"yes, I have supplied them for years." On that I was perfectly satisfied of the bill being good, it being the bill of Mr. Mott, and let him have the iron to the amount of 20 l. or 30 l. this is the bill he gave me; (producing it, read.) He sent a cart down for the iron, I did not see it taken away. I saw it afterwards at an auction room, and knew it to be the same I sold him; I think it was moved from my warehouse on Monday, the 19th

or 20th. The prisoner said they were going to an inn to be sent down to Whaddon; I saw them at the auction-room on the following Thursday, I think. I have enquired, and find the prisoner's name is Mott, but not of Leadenhall-market.

Cross-examined by Mr. ADOLPHUS. Q. He did not ask for the difference of the bill - A. I think the iron came to more than 50 l. but I do not know the amount of it.

Q. I thought you said it was 20 l. or 30 l. - A. That is as near as I can guess, but I think it was more than 50 l. he said Dover was a friend of his, and he had an order from Mr. Dover to execute for the building for which Mr. Mott was to pay. I did not take the bill to Mr. Mott of Leadenhall-market. The prisoner particularly stated that he supplied the friends whose names I mentioned.

RICHARD ROTHWELL , ESQ. Alderman and Sheriff. I know Mr. Mott, of Leadenhall-market, he has been a poulterer there for twenty-five years, the prisoner is not that person.

Cross-examined. Q. You cannot say the prisoner is not a poulterer in that market - A. Exactly so; he is not my poulterer. I never heard of any other of that name, but I am now informed there is another.

DANIEL BENJAMIN LEADBEATER . I am Marshalman of the City, and am well acquainted with Leadenhall-market. I know two poulterers there named Mott, the prisoner is not either of them. I believe he is nephew to one. I never recollect seeing him about there. If there were any others of that name I think I must know them. There may be wholesale dealers coming in the morning, but none but these two keep a shop there, and neither of them are named Robert Mott .

Cross-examined. Q. Who do you understand the prisoner to be nephew to - A. Thomas Mott . I do not know the people who merely come in the morning.

STEPHEN FLOOK . I produce a release from Thomas Edington Hood and William Comber Hood to Charles Dover for this bill. It was executed this morning (read.)

"Mr. Adolphus contended, that before Mr. Dover could be called as a witness, there must be a release from the prisoner as well as the prosecutors, as they were bound if the bill be genuine, to give him the balance, and the effect of the acceptors evidence would be to destroy the bill."

MR. JUSTICE BEST.

"If there is any thing in the objection the prisoner shall have the benefit of it."

MR. HOOD re-examined. The order he gave me was for more than 50 l. worth, but the cart would not take the whole away.

Q. Was more than 50 l. worth set apart from your stock for him - A. I cannot say what was weighed off, I should have delivered the rest if called for, supposing it to be a genuine bill.

CHARLES DOVER . I live at Whaddon in Buckinghamshire; I know the prisoner. I cannot say what he is. I never knew him to live in Leadenhall-market; the first of my knowing him was in May 1818, when I bought ten hogsheads of ale of him, the letter produced is not written by me, nor is the signature mine; the acceptance of the bill is not mine, I have no knowledge of it. There is no other Charles Dover but me living at Whaddon. I am a bricklayer and builder.

Cross-examined. Q. When was the ale delivered to you - A. On the 3d of June, 1818, and since that I sold him a poney, I paid him a 20 l. bill.

Q. Do you know a man named Bailey - A. Perfectly well. - (looks at a letter.) - It is my writing. I am certain neither the bill or acceptance is my writing. I was a patient in St. Bartholomews-Hospital at the time the bill was issued. I was admitted in January, and left on the 3d of August.

Q. How many times did you meet the prisoner in June - A. Perhaps seven or eight, we had some conversation; one Robert Taylor , a farmer at Whaddon, requested me to send him down the price of Berwick pork; I asked the prisoner where it could be bought, he said in Thames-street, it was not to be paid for by a bill to my recollection.

Q. On your oath did you not tell Bailey you gave the prisoner this bill to get discounted for pork, but as he passed it for iron, he might take the consequence - A. No, I did not; I had no such conversation with him or Mr. Richardson. Bailey came to me and said, I am come concerning Mott, he is in the Compter about a bill, and if you do not go to him it will play hell with him. I said, I know nothing about the bill. I said I had paid one bill to him; Bailey said,

"Oh! that is a bill accepted by Taylor." That is the only bill I ever gave him.

COURT. Q. You have had dealings with him; do you know his hand writing - A. Yes, I believe the letter and bill to be his writing, but not the acceptance.

Prisoner's Defence. I sent Mr. Dover ten hogsheads of ale, which came to 60 l. I met him one day, and asked if he had any money, he said he had not, but if I came to a public-house he would give me his bill, and tell me where to get it done, which was at the pork-warehouse in St. John-street, instead of which I got it done at Hood's and that is the reason he denies his writing.

CHARLES DOVER . Q. Was this bill given in part of payment of 60 l. for ten hogsheads of ale - A. No, the ale was bought on the 3d of June 1818, I produce his receipt for it.

DAVID BAILEY . I am a chair and cabinet-maker, I live in Old Moutague-street, Whitechapel; I received this letter from Mr. Dover - (looking at it.) - and sent the goods down to him which he ordered in it, and received the money. When Mott was taken up he sent for me, knowing I knew Dover. I went to Dover, and asked him to come forward concerning the bill of Motts', he said he had authorised the prisoner to part with that bill for pork, but not for iron. I have seen Dover write, I received two letters from him. I saw him afterwards, and he asked if I received the letters; I said I did.

Q. Look at the acceptance of that bill, and say if you believe it to be his writing - A. I believe it is.

COURT. Q. Have you received more than two letters from him - A. No, it was more than two years ago, the last is dated 27th March, 1818. I have not seen him write since that.

Q. What is the post-mark on that letter - A. I cannot discern it, it came by the post. I did not preserve them, but when Mott was apprehended, I looked among my papers and found them, I looked at them to refresh my memory.

Q. When was it Dover talked to you about them - A. About half or three-quarters of a year ago, when he

wanted something for selling the goods, I allowed him 9 s. I think.

Q. If you had not seen these letters, but spoke from your memory of a year and three quarters ago, could you undertake to swear as to your belief of his hand writing - A. Yes; I could.

Q. Where do you live - A. In Charles-street, Commercial-road, I left Old Montague-street last week. I mentioned Old Montague-street, because the letters were directed to me there. Dover said the bill he gave to Mott was to be laid out in pork and not in iron.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Recommended to Mercy.

This case is reserved for the consideration of the Twelve Judges on the point argued.

London Jury, before Mr. Justice Best.

Reference Number: t18200918-39

938. MARGARET BLIZARD was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of July two frocks, value 12 s., two petticoats, value 5 s., 1 1/2 yard of gingham, value 2 s. two pelisses, value 6 s., and one piece of bed furniture, value 2 s. the goods of Moses Abraham .

MRS. ABRAHAMS. I am wife of Moses Abrahams , the prisoner was our nurse , and had the care of the childrens' clothes, she was about three weeks in our service, during which time I missed these articles. She left on Thursday, the 6th of July.

WOLFE SOLOMONS. I am a constable; on the 10th of July Mr. Abraham sent for me, and charged the prisoner with robbing him, he produced the bed furniture, and some duplicates, which he said he took from her, she said they were hers. and that she had no other duplicates. I found four more on her relating to some bed gowns and frocks.

JOHN HOW . I am in the second battalion of Grenadier Guards, on the 9th of July I was at the Tower, Mrs. Abrahams came up with the bed furniture in her hands, and asked me to shew her an officer. I saw the prisoner about ten yards off, I ran after her, and told her to stop till the lady came up; she said I was no constable, and she would not, as she had no property but what belonged to her. I detained her, and took her to Mrs. Abraham's house, when the constable took her in charge I saw a white frock, handkerchief with lace round it in her possession. She said the prosecutrix gave it to her.

MARY SIEBERT . I was servant to Mrs. Abrahams at time the prisoner was there. She gave me one yard and a half of gingham and a white apron, to pledge for nine-pence, to buy soap to wash her clothes and some of the children's. I told my mistress of this, after she was apprehended. When I went out with her, she used to take things out, but I do not know what they were.

ROBERT JONATHAN HERNE . I live with Mr. Matthews, a pawn-broker. On the 12th of May, a child's frock and petticoat were pledged with me, in the name of Ann Phillips , and on the 13th some gingham and an apron for 9 d, in the name of Harris - I do not know who by.

JOSEPH TEBBS . I am servant to Mr. Parsons, a pawnbroker in Houndsditch. A frock and petticoat were pledged with me in the name of Hyams.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The duplicates were given me by my fellow-servant to take care of. When I met my mistres I told her they belonged to Mary, and delivered the tickets.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200918-40

939. SAMUEL KENDALL was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of July , two handkerchiefs, value 18 d.; one waistcoat, value 6 s., and 4 s. in monies numbered , the goods and monies of William Burges .

WILLIAM BURGES . I live in Red-lion passage, Cloth-fair . The prisoner slept in the same room with me. On the 20th of July I went out, leaving him at home, and on my return I missed the things from my box - he was gone. He was apprehended on the 22 d.

JOHN DAWKINS . I am a constable. The prisoner surrendered himself to me on the 22d - he said he was the man who committed the robbery in Red Lion-passage. I found one of the handkerchiefs on his neck; he said it was not one of them.

(Handkerchief produced, and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 32.

Confined One Month , and Whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200918-41

940. ELIZA JAMES was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of July , two pair of stockings, value 3 s. 4 d. , the goods of Robert Ireland

ROBERT IRELAND . I am a hosier , and live at Holborn-bridge . On the 11th of July, in the afternoon, these stockings hung by the door, inside the shop - I was sitting by the counter, reading a newspaper - observed the shade of some person in the door-way - I looked up, and observed the prisoner at the door - I missed a pair of stockings. I got over the counter - she presented a pair of new bellows, and asked if I wanted to buy them. I said no, took hold of her arm, and found the stockings under her arm, and another pair in her bundle. I gave her in charge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 35.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200918-42

941. ELIZA TWITCHETT was indicted for stealing on the 1st of August , one pillow and case, value 4 s.; and one table-cloth, value 3 s., the goods of William Porter , in a lodging-room .

ANN PORTER . I am the wife of William Porter ; we live in Graystoke-place Fetter-lane . On the 29th of July the prisoner took my second floor, furnished, at ten shillings per week - the things were let with the lodgings. On the 4th of August, she called me up to tell me something, I then missed the things, and found them in pledge.

HENRY THOMSON . I am servant to Mr. Brown, a pawnbroker. On the 31st of July the prisoner pledged the pillow and case, and on the 1st of August, the table-cloth.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Confined Two Months .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200918-43

942. CATHERINE STEVENS was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of June , two sheets, value 10 s., and one

quilt, value 5 s., the goods of James Butler , in a lodging room .

MARTHA BUTLER . I am wife of James Butler . We live in Angel-alley, Bishopsgate-street . The prisoner took my second floor, furnished, at 4 s. 6 d. a week; she introduced two young women, and their behaviour being bad, I gave her notice. I missed this property, and gave her in charge.

MARTIN GILDERSLEEVE . I am an officer. I took the prisoner in charge, and found the duplicates on her. The Lord Mayor gave her time to redeem them, but she did not.

GEORGE DERHAM . I am a pawnbroker. I took a sheet and counterpane in pledge of the prisoner.

JOSEPH DOWNER . I live with Mr. Copley, at Shoreditch. The prisoner pledged a sheet with me.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I meant to redeem them.

GUILTY . Aged 43.

Confined One Month .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200918-44

943. MARIA DOUGLAS was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of August , one pocket-book, value 4 s., and four 1 l. bank notes, the property of John Davis , from his perso n.

JOHN DAVIS . I live in Greenfield-street, Commercial-road, and am door-keeper at the Cobourg Theatre . On the 18th of August, at half-past eleven o'clock at night, I was going home, up Fish-street-hill, the prisoner laid hold of my arm, took her scarf from her neck, and gave it to a young woman who was with her; she continued with me, and in King's Head-court she clung round me. I felt her hand in my pocket, and missed my pocket-book, I charged her with it, she denied it. I suppose she gave it to the other woman as she returned and gave her the scarf. I called the watchman and gave her in charge. I am sure it was safe when she met me.

DANIEL BOGGIS . I was constable of the night. The prisoner was brought to the watch-house. I searched her, but found nothing on her.

Prisoner's Defence. I refused to go with him for sixpence, he then charged me with taking his pocket-book. No other girl was near me.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200918-45

944. WILLIAM CARROLL was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of August , one hat, value 4 s. , the goods of Thomas Lockey .

THOMAS LOCKEY . I am a hatter , and live in Long-lane . On the 12th of August, about twelve o'clock at night, this hat was taken off a rail at the door; the prisoner was brought back with it.

JOHN DAVIS . I am a labourer, and live opposite to Mr. Lockey. I saw the prisoner walking backwards and forwards with a little boy, he tried at the hat but could not get it. Next time he came by and took it off - I followed and caught him with it, in Charterhouse-square.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined One Month .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200918-46

945. EDWARD HYDE was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of August , one shawl, value 10 s. , the goods of Thomas Batts Hodge .

SARAH HODGE . I am the wife of Thomas Batts Hodge; we live in Long-lane . On the 28th of August, about twelve o'clock, I missed this shawl off the dining table in the back-parlour - it had been taken through the window.

MARGARET BIRCH . I live near the prosecutor. About two o'clock on the 28th of August, I saw the prisoner walking up and down, and looking in at the window; he went away, and returned with another. I saw the prisoner put his hand in at the window, and snatch the shawl out; I ran down stairs as fast as I could, but he was gone. I am certain he is the man. I saw him in custody four days after.

MARTHA ANDERSON . I am servant to Mr. Hodge. I saw the prisoner walking about the window about half an hour before the shawl was taken. I am sure he is the man.

JAMES HARLEY . On the 9th of September Birch pointed the prisoner out to me, he ran among others into Chequer-alley, I followed, and he was stopped - he said he was ill of a fever at the time, under Dr. Smith's hands.

Prisoner's Defence. I had the typhus fever at the time.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined One Year .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200918-47

FIFTH DAY, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 18.

946. JOHN MULLINS was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of August , one seal, value 20 s.; one chain, value 2 d., and one key, value 1 d., the goods of James Sherriff , from his person .

MR. JAMES SHERRIFF . I am keeper of Aylesbury goal . On the 24th of August, about five o'clock in the afternoon, I was in St. James's-square . I tucked my watch-seals under my waistcoat. The Queen's carriage passed by, and there was a great rush, which carried everybody before it - at that instant I felt a violent snatch at my chain, I felt my watch rise in my fob, the chain broke or was cut, and the seal and key taken away. The prisoner was close to me at that moment, and he ran away as well as he was able, stooping down. I endeavoured to lay hold of the flap of his coat, but he slipped by me. I followed him about twenty yards, then seized him, and charged him with stealing my seal. I was within a yard and a half of him at the time. He said he had not got it. I shook him, and at that instant saw him fumbling about with his hands. I seized his hand, and the seal, key, and part of the chain dropped from it, I picked it up. He said he would not go with me. Several bad characters came round, and with the assistance of two persons I secured him. It was impossible any one but him could have done it. Some fellows behind him, said,

"D - n it, go it Bob!"

JOHN VAUGHAN . I work at Taplin's livery-stables, in Gray's Inn-lane. I was in St. James's-square, and saw Sherriff following the prisoner; he came up to him, and charged him with robbing him. The prisoner was very resolute. I saw the chain and seal on the ground - they must have dropped from the prisoner.

JOHN JAMES SMITH . I took the prisoner in charge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing of it. Somebody behind me said

"Here is the chain."

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200918-48

947. JACOB GOLDING was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of February , two 1 l. Bank notes , the goods of Joseph Spicer .

MR. ALLEY conducted the prosecution.

MR. JOSEPH SPICER . I am a wine-merchant , and live in Duke-street, Manchester-square. On the 10th of February two 1 l. notes were put into some napkins, to be sent to my house at Harefield, and put into a basket. A few days afterwards I heard that the prisoner, who was my servant , had absconded.

ELIZA LIVETT . I am servant to Mr. Spicer, at Harefield. On the 12th of February the prisoner brought me the basket, he always fetched it from the carrier's. I opened it in his presence, the napkins were there, but no notes. I told him the money was not there, and I supposed my master was coming down; he said he wondered he had not sent it, as he never omitted to do so. I had lent him 1 s. the week before. He left on the 14th of February without notice.

WILLIAM HAINES . I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner. I met him at Marlow, in Buckinghamshire, but I had no warrant then. I said,

"Jacob, how came you here?" he said he did not know what to do, for he was half starved. I said,

"How could you take your master's money? how did you get it?" he said he put his hands between the basket and cover, and took the money out.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Three Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200918-49

948. CHARLES LEE was indicted for that he, on the 15th of August , at St. James, Clerkenwell , feloniously did dispose of and put away, a certain forged and counterfeit Bank note, (setting it forth, No. 9557, 1 l. dated April 16, 1820, signed R. Lowe,) with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England , he knowing it to be forged and counterfeit .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only calling it a promissory note for payment of money instead of a Bank note.

TWO OTHER COUNTS, the same, only stating the prisoner's intent to be to defraud Robert Byers .

MR. SERGEANT BOSANQUET, MESSRS. REYNOLDS and BOLLAND conducted the prosecution.

MARIA BYERS . I am the wife of Robert Byers , who is a linen-draper , and lives in East-street, Manchester-square . On the 15th of August, between nine and ten o'clock at night, the prisoner came and asked for a ready-made shirt, I shewed him two, he selected one which came to 9 s., he also bought a pair of stockings for 2 s., and gave me a 1 l. note. I asked his address - Norbury and another boy were in the shop with me. He gave his name

"Reeves, No. 2, Lisson-green, Paddington" - I am certain of it; I asked him twice - Norbury wrote the address on the back of it. I had plenty of change, but suspecting the note, I sent Norbury out for change. The prisoner remained in the shop; and while the boy was gone my husband came in, and asked what the man was waiting for? I said he was waiting for change, and that I had sent the boy for it. Mr. Byers gave me 9 s. from his pocket, which I gave to the prisoner. I told Mr. Byers I thought the note was not good, but he said,

"It is good; I have seen it." The prisoner was near enough to hear it; he then went away. The boy returned in a few minutes and said it was bad; my husband immediately sat off up the street, brought the prisoner back, and asked him where he got the note? he said he took it of a higgler for fowls, at the Red Lion, Paddington. He was taken into custody.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. You took the note of the prisoner - A. Yes, and gave it to Norbury, who immediately wrote on it - it was not out of my sight till he wrote on it. I always ask strangers for their names. I am confident he gave the name of Reeves; he gave it twice to me and once to the boy.

JOSEPH NORBURY . I am shopboy to Mr. Byers. I remember the prisoner coming to the shop, and saw him give my mistress a 1 l. note, which she gave to me to put his name and address on. She asked his address once, and I asked it twice, and wrote it on the note. I am quite sure he gave his name

"Reeves, No. 2, Lisson-green," which I wrote on the note - (looks at one) - this is it; it has that on it in my hand-writing and my initials. I took it to Mr. Miller's, in Dorset-street, and enquired about it - it is the first turning from my master's house. I saw my master at the corner shop. I shewed the note to Mr. Miller, he returned me the same. I took it home, and told my master what he thought of it - Mr. Byers went out, and returned in a few minutes with the prisoner. The note was never out of my sight.

Cross-examined. Q. How long were you gone - A. About five minutes. I asked twice for his name to make sure of it, and wrote what he told me.

ROBERT BYERS . I am husband of the first witness. On the night of the 15th of August I was at the corner of East-street, the boy came up and gave me the note, I examined it, and thought it good; I came home directly, and gave my wife 9 s., which she gave the prisoner, who was there - he went out directly. The boy returned immediately he left. In consequence of what the boy said I fetched the prisoner back - he had only got five doors off. I asked him where he got the note? he said he took it of a higgler at Paddington for some fowls. Wales came in and took him.

JOHN WALES . I am an officer. On the 15th of August I apprehended the prisoner at Mr. Byers's shop, and found three duplicates on him, but no money. Seeing the name of Reeves on the note, I asked him if his name was not Lee? as I knew him before, he said it was. I asked him

if he lived at No. 2, Lisson-green? he said he did not, but he had lodged there the night before. I asked at what place, Lisson-green? he said by Lisson-green. I asked the name of the street? he said he did not know. I said there were several streets about Lisson-green, and asked if he was sure it was No. 2? he said it was No. 2, but he could not tell the name of the street. I asked who kept the house? he said Dunford. I took him in charge. On the following morning I went to Lisson-green, and enquired at the neighbouring houses for such a place as No. 2, Lisson-green, but could not find any such place. I found a woman named Dunford, at No. 14, Little James-street, Lisson-green, but could learn nothing of the prisoner.

Cross-examined. Q. You never asked him to shew you the house - A. No. I am well acquainted with Lisson-green. I do not know Lisson-green-street, grove, terrace, or court. I have lived half a mile from Lisson-green for nine or ten years. All the streets about there are called such a street, Lisson-green.

Q. Has the prisoner an impediment in his speech - A. He has not.

ANN DUNFORD . I live at No. 14, Little James-street, near Lisson-green. I have frequently seen the prisoner pass up and down the street, and in the neighbourhood; he slept at my house five or six months back, when I lived at No. 11 - I have lived at No. 14 since Midsummer; he did not sleep there on the 14th of August. He went by the name of Lee. I have lived seven years in the neighbourhood, and know nobody else of my name.

Cross-examined. Q. Does your street come into Lisson-green - A. It leads from Lisson-street - my house is several doors from Lisson-street. I have four single men lodges with me - they have no keys to let themselves in. I have seen him in company with my lodgers.

JOHN WALES re-examined. He told me in the prosecutor's shop and in his presence, that he did not live where the address was given, but with his father at Knights-bridge, near Sloane-street.

JOHN MAYNE . I live at No. 2, Lisson-grove, South. I know nothing of the prisoner.

HANNAH HART . I live at No. 2, Grove-place, Lisson-green. I know nothing of the prisoner.

THOMAS GLOVER . I am an inspector of Bank notes, and have been so upwards of twenty-six years. The note is forged in every respect - it is not Mr. Lowe's signature.

ROBERT LOWE . I am a signing clerk. The siguature to the note is not mine -

(read).

The prisoner made no defence.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 19.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

Reference Number: t18200918-50

949. SARAH PRICE was indicted for that she, on the 24th of June , at St. James, Clerkenwell , feloniously did dispose of and put away a certain forged and counterfeit Bank note (setting it forth, No. 3376, 1 l., dated April 10, 1820, signed J. C. Baker), with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England , she well knowing the same to be forged and counterfeited .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only calling it a promissory note for payment of money instead of a Bank note.

TWO OTHER COUNTS, the same, only stating the prisoner's intent to be to defraud John King .

WILLIAM HENRY TAPSTER . I am errand-boy to Mr. John King , who is a shoemaker , and lives in Castle-street, Leicester-fields . On the 24th of June, between five and six o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came to the shop, and asked for a pair of shoes; I served her, they came to 4 s. 6 d., she gave me a 1 l. note - I went to the foot of the stairs, and called to my mistress for change, as Roberts, the shopman, was not at home; my mistress said she had none. I asked the prisoner to wait till my master came in, which she did - a customer was in the shop. I laid the note on the desk by itself. Roberts came in in two or three minutes, I gave him the note, he gave her the change, and she went away. After she was gone he made an observation of the note, and asked which way she went, I told him and he went out, brought her back in about five minutes, and asked her to wait while he went and enquired about the note, which she did. He went out - a gentleman came in, and while I was waiting on him she went away - Roberts returned in about five minutes, and fetched her back. He took up the note she gave me.

Cross-examined by MR. CURWOOD. Q. What did he do with the note - A. He put it in the drawer. I saw myself that no other note was there, and none were taken afterwards. She cried when she was brought back, and walked away while I was engaged.

JAMES ROBERTS . I am shopman to Mr. King. On the 24th of June I found the prisoner in the shop, the boy said she was waiting for change, and the note was on the desk - she was near enough to hear him. I took it up, and gave her 15 s. 6 d., without particularly looking at it. After the prisoner left I examined it more minutely, and thought it bad. I went out, overtook her in Newport-street, and brought her back. I told her I wanted her address, she returned to give it me. When we got to the shop I asked her if she had any more money, and she offered me a good note. I left that on the desk, and told her to wait while I enquired further about the other, and asked where she got the first one? she said her husband took it for his wages. I went to Mr. Thomas two doors off. In consequence of what I heard there I returned and found her gone - the good note was not there either. I went in pursuit, and overtook her, walking pretty quick across Bedford-street to Maiden-lane, brought her back, and gave her in charge. I just put J. R. on the note, and before I parted with it I marked S. M. C. for St. Martin's-court, and put it in my pocket - (looks at it) - this is it. I saw 15 s. 6 d. found on her, which I had given her.

Cross-examined. Q. You put it in your pocket with one or two others - A. No, when I take a good note I put it in my fob, I put this by itself.

GRIFFITH THOMAS . I am shopman to David Thomas , No. 1, Castle-street. The prisoner came to our shop on the 24th of June, and bought a piece of nankeen for 7 s. 9 d. - she gave me a 1 l. Bank note, and I gave her change. I looked at the note and noticed the signature, C. Watts, on it - I then put it it in my till, after making a slit under the letter L. I am sure she is the woman. A young man who lives with me put another note on the top of it - I saw him do it. We had occasion, about a quarter of an hour afterwards, to take this note out of the till, I knew it directly to be the one she gave. In consequence of Roberts's coming, I went to his shop, saw her, and desired

she should be detained till I returned for the note. I fetched it - (looks at one) - this is it; I am certain it has my mark on it. Our shop is next door but one to King's. I saw her there in a quarter of an hour, or less, after she had been in our shop. She was not there when I first went in - I returned, and found her in custody, I then asked her what became of my goods she bought and the silver? she said she did not know anything about me.

Cross-examined. Q. You did not specify nankeen to her - A. I do not think I did. I cannot say there was no other note in the till signed Watts, but swear that is the note I took of her, by the slit which I made in it.

JAMES HARRISON. I am a constable. I took the prisoner into custody at King's, and found 15 s. 6 d. on her, a pair of new shoes, and a bunch of keys.

THOMAS GLOVER. I am an inspector of Bank notes. The notes are forged in every respect, and are not the signatures of Baker and Watts. They appear to be impressed from the same plate, and are of the same date, and Nos. 3276 and 3376.

JOHN COLE BAKER . The note is not signed by me - (read).

Prisoner's Defence. I received the notes of two women, one of whom bought a mattress of me, and the other half a dozen chairs - one came to 25 s. and the other to 14 s. I gave the change. The man did not ask where I got them.

WILLIAM BECK . I am a shoemaker, and live in Great Suffolk-street, Borough. I have known the prisoner four years - she kept a broker's shop in the New-cut. I was in the habit of working for her and her husband, and one day, when I brought some work home, two women were there, one of whom bought two small mattresses, and the other some chairs - it was about ten weeks ago. She desired me to sit down till she had done with them. I was in the habit of working for the woman who bought the chairs - I have seen her in Giltspur-street Compter this morning. She gave the prisoner a 1 l. note and some silver, and the other gave her a 1 l. note, and asked for change.

MR. SERGEANT BOSANQUET. Q. How long has she lived there - A. Eight or nine months. I do not know either of the two women's names.

COURT. Q. What led you to the Compter - A. The prisoner's attorney wished me to go - he told me she was there for presenting the notes to the prisoner,

JAMES ROBERTS re-examined. I am certain the prisoner said her husband received the note for wages.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 43.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Best.

Reference Number: t18200918-51

950. THOMAS GOODALL was indicted for that he, on the 17th of August , at St. James, Clerkenwell , feloniously did dispose of, and put away, a certain forged and counterfeit forged Bank note (setting it forth, No. 15130, 1 l., dated May 20th 1820, signed C. Tabor,) with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England , knowing it to be forged and counterfeited .

SECOND COUNT, for offering to Charles Temple a like forged note, with the like intent, knowing it to be forged.

THIRD AND FOURTH COUNTS, the same, only calling it a promissory note for the payment of money instead of a Bank note.

FOUR OTHER COUNTS, the same, only stating the prisoner's intention to be to defraud Margaret Winkfield .

CHARLES TEMPLE . I assist Margaret Winkfield , who keeps the Fox and Hounds, Tottenham-court Road . On the 17th of August, Mary Ragan came in about a quarter before nine in the evening; I have seen her before, she lives in the neighbourhood; she asked for change for a 1 l. note, which she put into my hand, and I made an observation to her about it, she said she received it from a person; she then went out, I saw her go and speak to the prisoner just across the street, he then walked away from her, and went down High-street; I ran after him, and overtook him; he walked fast. I told him to come back and see about his note, if it was his note the girl had brought in; he said it was, and he took it of a friend of his who had enlisted in the militia; I said it was a bad note; he said the young man he had it of was at the Phoenix, public-house, Phoenix-street. I went there with him; he pointed the house out, we found nobody there that knew him. I then took him to the watch-house. He was searched in my presence, and a knife, snuff-box, and a duplicate, were found on him, this is the snuff-box (looking at it,) it has three different openings; the duplicate is for a coat, pledged the same day in the name of George Sykes , for 18 s.; I wrote Winkfield on the note at the watch-house, (looks at one,) this is it, it was not out of my possession.

MARY RAGAN . I live at No. 11, Church-street. On the 17th of August I lived in Maynard-street, St. Giles's; I have seen the prisoner two or three times before the 17th of August, when I met him at the corner of Oxford-street, about nine o'clock; I went up, and asked him to treat me with some gin; he said he had no less than a 1 l. note, which he gave me, and said, if I went and changed it, he would give me a drink out of it; I went to the public-house, and asked Temple for change, he took it in his hand and kept it; he questioned me; then came out after me. I was asking the prisoner how he came to give me a bad note; he said he did not know it was bad; he was standing where I left him; he walked away from me; he said he received it of one Mr. Smith, down High-street, and would go and fetch the man who gave it him. Temple followed and took him.

COURT. Q. What are you - A. An unfortunate girl. I know this public-house very well.

THOMAS STEVENSON . I am a constable, on the 17th of August, Temple and a watchman brought the prisoner to the watch-house, the box and duplicate were found upon him. Those produced are the same.

MICHAEL JOHN FITZPATRICK . I am a clerk to the Magistrates at Marlborough-street. I remember the prisoner being brought there, charged with putting off forged notes; one Sykes was also brought there and examined; first what he said was taken down, the prisoner was not present. After Sykes made his statement, the prisoner was brought in, and his statement was taken on the same paper; they were then both brought before the Magistrate together; what Goodall had said was read to Sykes; he made a statement in Goodall's presence, which was also taken down in Goodall's presence, and the prisoner acknowledged

that Sykes's last statement was all true; all they said was quite voluntary, they were told it might be produced in evidence against them, before they said any any thing. This is their statements (looking at a paper,) it is signed by Sir Nathaniel Conant . -

(read.)

"The prisoner, George Sykes , voluntarily says, that I received the 1 l. note I paid to George Westbrook , from a Serjeant in the Militia, either East or West Kent, on Monday last, as a part of the bounty of 2 l. 10 s. upon enlisting with him as a substitute at Seven Oaks, in Kent; I received it in two 1 l. notes and 10 s. in silver, the other note I paid away on Tuesday last in the Borough. About two months ago I worked for Mr. Gray, of Upper Garden-street, Vauxhall-road. I have no settled residence; about twelve months ago I lived near the Horse and Groom, at Ealing, the prisoner Goodall enlisted on the same day and at the same place as I did. We came to town together on Tuesday last, since which time I have not seen him."

" Thomas Goodall voluntarily says, that I live at Sunbury, and am a labourer; I came from Sunbury on Tuesday last by myself, and I met Sykes that morning in the Haymarket; I knew him very well, but I had not seen him for sometime before. I went with Sykes to Mr. Lucas Giles on that day, and purchased a pair of boots; the note I gave to Mary Ragan to get changed I received from Sykes yesterday, he made me a present of it, and told me that he received three 1 l. notes from a young man. Since Tuesday last, I and Sykes have been lodging at the Phoenix, in Stacey-street. I came up to town merely for the purpose of taking some clothes out of pawn, which I did, at Mr. Hulme's, in Museum-street, to the amount of 1 l. 5 s. the duplicates found upon me belonged to George Sykes ."

THOMAS GOODALL .

Upon the above statement being read over, Sykes in the presence of Thomas Goodall , as also the statement of the said Thomas Goodall , the said George Sykes denies the above statement being true, and voluntarily now states as follows: -

"My real name is Edward Dowden , on Sunday last I went down to Seven Oaks in company with Goodhall, with whom I had been working at harvest work as a labouring man. We went down for the purpose of enlisting as substitutes in the Militia, and on the Monday following, we met the Serjeant of the Militia, at the Crown-inn, and I received 2 l. 10 s. from the Serjeant upon enlisting, as the bounty money. Thomas Goodall also enlisted, and received the like sum; I and him started from Seven Oaks on Monday night, and arrived in town on Tuesday morning; we went on Tuesday to Clerkenwell, for the purpose of enlisting again as substitutes in the Militia, but did not; on the Wednesday we went to the Borough for the like purpose, but did not succeed; yesterday morning we went down to Westminster, and coming back we met with two young men whom I had known before, and one of them called Jem, asked us both to buy some forged notes of him, at 5 s. each, and we agreed to buy three 1 l. notes, but having no money, Goodhall agreed to pawn his coat and breeches, which were at a house in Lloyd's-court, No. 3, and we all went together, and Goodall delivered me his coat and breeches, which I went and pawned at Dobree's, in Holborn, for 18 s. Goodhall and the other men waited for me by St. Giles's Church, and when I joined them again I gave the young man 15 s. and Goodall 3 s. and the duplicate, and the young man then went away, and in about a quarter of an hour afterwards he met me and Goodall at a public-house, by appointment. I and the young man and his companion, then went to St. James's Park, where Goodall joined us, and the young man took the notes out of his pocket and wrote on one of them which he gave me, the other two were put in my snuff-box, which Goodhall took into his possession, and then went to Mr. Giles's shop, and offered the 1 l. forged note, when I was taken into custody. Goodall went with me to the street, and was to remaln at a public-house there untill I joined him."

EDWARD DOWDEN .

Signed in the presence of me, J. E. CONANT.

"I Thomas Goodall having been present, and heard the last statement made by Edward Dowden , voluntarlly admit that it is all true; one of the two forged notes that I received I threw away after I was taken into custody."

THOMAS GOODALL .

Signed in the presence of me, J. E. CONANT.

THOMAS GLOVER . The note is forged in every respect, it has not Tabor's signature.

CHARLES TABOR . The note is not signed by me. -

(read.)

Prisoner's Defence. This young man, Edward Dowden , said nothing to me about the note being forged; he asked me to lend him 15 s., I said I had none; he said, you have got your things out of pawn, cannot you pawn them again? I said no; he said it would do some good for us if I would; he said you, may as well come along, I have got a friend here, which was these two young men; he did not say what he was going to do. I lent him my clothes, and he pawned them for 18 s. and gave me 3 s.; I never saw him give the young man 15 s.; they went away. I went and dined in Chandos-street; he came back, and said he was going to St. James's Park. I said I should have my dinner. I did not see the young men give him any note, nor did he shew them to me till we got to Silver-street, he then said he had got 3 l., I was to have 1 l. and he would see me in Stacey-street. I knew nothing of the notes being bad.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 23.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Richardson.

Reference Number: t18200918-52

951. HENRY HARRIS was indicted for that he, on the 9th of August , at St. Mary-le-Bow , feloniously did dispose of, and put away, a certain forged and counterfeit Bank note, (setting it forth, No. 12155, 1 l. dated June 10, 1820, signed J. C. Baker,) with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England , he knowing it be forged and counterfeited .

SECOND COUNT, for offering to Richard Baker a like forged note, with the like intent.

THIRD AND FOUTH COUNTS, the same, only calling it a promissory note for payment of money instead of a Bank note.

FOUR OTHER COUNTS, the same, only stating his intent to be to defraud the said Richard Baker .

RICHARD BAKER . I am master of the Taw smack, belonging to Whitstable . On Wednesday, the 9th of August, I was on board the Hannah Eliza smack, at Billingsgate ; a man came down; I asked if he wanted oysters, he said yes, he then asked the price, I told him 15 s. a bushel; he said he supposed 7 s. would do for half a bushel; I told him yes; he then offered me a 1 l. Bank note. I immediately said to him, there has been several bad notes passed this morning, and I am not the proper

salesman, if this is bad I shall get into disgrace. I then called Holden, the proper salesman - I was supplying his place. He came on board, I passed the note to him. I said in his presence, that the man wanted half a bushel of oysters, and had brought this note; he said that it was a bad one, for it looked very much like the others he had taken that morning; he had taken three before, and being backed with red ink as the others were; he left me to supply his place in order to go to the Bank; I believe the man went with him, but I did not move from my place.

WILLIAM HOLDEN . I was salesman to the Whistable Oyster Company. On the 9th of August Baker called me to the Eliza Ann , smack, he gave me a note, and asked if I liked to take it, saying he had received it of this man, (pointing to the prisoner). I looked at it, and seeing it marked with red ink, thought it bad, as I took three others that morning marked so that were bad. I went with the prisoner and two porters to the Bank, carrying the note in my hand, and delivered it to a gentleman in the Investigator's Office, it was returned to me some little time afterwards to write my name on. It was not out of my possession more than three or four minutes. - (looks at it.) - This is the note I marked.

Q. Did you enquire of the prisoner where he got it - A. I asked his address; he said he had been at work, pulling down some old buildings, and the foreman paid him that note for his week's work.

Cross-examined by Mr. ANDREWS. Q. Did he tell you the foreman's name - A. I think he did; I do not know what it was. I handed the note to Mr. Williams at the Inspector's Office. The prisoner was within hearing, and saw Baker give me the note; he never denied giving it to Baker.

JOHN WILLIAMS . I am an inspector at the Bank. On the 9th of August I saw Holden coming into the Investigator's office, with the prisoner in custody of Foy. He produced a forged 1 l. note, which he said he received of the prisoner. I asked if he had marked it, he said No; I immediately, without taking it out of his sight, desired him to write his name on the back, which he did. It is the note he gave me.

JOHN FOY . I am an officer of Marlborough-street. I was at the Bank when Holden and the prisoner came into the office. I took him into custody and asked his name, where he lived, and what he was; he said his name was Harris, and he lived with his mother, at No. 11, Bedford-street, Liquorpond-street, and was a butcher; I asked from whom he received the note; he said from the person who was removing the bricks from the scite of the new Post-office in St. Martin's-le-grand, that he did not know his name, but he worked there three weeks, and was discharged on the Monday before. This was Wednesday, I think. He said he kept the note in his possession till he offered it for the oysters. He distinctly stated he did not know the person's name who gave it to him, nor where he lived, but it was in the neighbourhood of Long-lane. I asked where he sold oysters, he said no where particularly. I said,

"It is but a short time since you was in custody before for passing a note, did you get that note from the same person? He said No; I took him to the office, and went in search of the person who was removing the bricks. I found him on the spot, his name is Griffiths.

Cross-examined. Q. Was the note given to you - A. No, He never denied passing the note.

WILLIAM GRIFFITHS . I live in Bridgewater-gardens, Barbican, near Golden-lane. I was employed in moving bricks from the ground of the new Post-Office, and pay the persons who worked there; the prisoner was never employed by me; I never paid him a note; I was pointed out to him at Marlborough-street and the House of Correction, as the person employed to move the bricks; he said nothing that I heard of, neither that I was, or was not the person.

Cross-examined. Q. Are you the only person employed there - A. I only bought part of the bricks, others bought the rest, and would clear them away as well as me. My men paid no notes away for me. Nobody was employed there but me in August.

COURT. Q. Do you remember when the prisoner was apprehended - A. Yes; nobody but me was employed there for a month before that.

CHARLES CHRISTMAS . I am an inspector in the Bank, and was present when Griffiths and the prisoner came together. I took him to the House of Correction, and told the prisoner, that was the master he had represented to have received the note from; he said

"Yes, that is my master, and that is the person I received the note from." Nothing more passed.

SAMUEL SAPSWORTH . I am shopman to Mr. Gibbons, a hosier, who lives in Coventry-street, Haymarket. On Saturday, the 10th of June, about five o'clock, the prisoner came, and bought two pair of coloured and one pair of white stockings; they came to 5 s. 6 d. - he tendered me a 1 l. Bank note - I looked at it, and rather suspected it - he said he was sure it was a good one. I asked him where he got it, he said his master had just paid it to him - that his master was a brass-founder, and lived in Compton-street. I went up to Mr. Jackson, and shewed him the note. It was not out of my sight - he returned it to me. I took him into the back parlour, sent for Denham, the constable, and gave it to him; he returned it to me when he came from the watch-house, and I marked it - (looks at one) - this is it. It was returned on the Monday.

THOMAS DENHAM . I am a constable. I was sent for, and received the note from Sapsworth, which I put into my pocket - I had no other note. I took the prisoner to the watch-house, and afterwards returned the same note to Sapsworth. This is it - (looks at it.) - The prisoner told me a gentleman in the street gave it to him, and requested him to buy two pair of stockings, and on his return, he should have 2 s., and the stockings for his trouble.

Cross-examined. Q. Was the note out of your possession - A. Not until it was marked.

THOMAS GLOVER. The notes are both forged in every respect, and are not the signatures of Baker and Vautin, which they purport to bear. They appear to be impressed from the same plate. I do not think the paper is the same.

JOHN COLE BAKER . I am a signing clerk. The note uttered to Baker, bears my name but is not my signature - (read) -

Prisoner's Defence. I leave it to my Counsel, but would wish Griffiths to be examined, whether no other men pay money but him.

WILLIAM GRIFFITHS . I have not paid a note to a labourer for four months. There were none at work the week before the 9th of August; nobody but me and my two men have been at work in the ground since March last. The prisoner never worked for me. I do not recollect hearing him say in prison that I was the man who paid him the note.

CHARLES CHRISTMAS re-examined. Griffiths was present with me when the prisoner said,

"That is my master, and the man who paid me the note" - I should think he must have heard it. Griffiths said he knew nothing of him.

JURY to BAKER. Q. Did the man remain with you from the time you received the note, until Holden came up - A. Yes. The note remained in my possession until gave it to him. The vessels were alongside each other.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 19.

London Jury, before Mr. Justice Richardson.

Reference Number: t18200918-53

952. ELIZA BURNHAM was indicted for that she on the 1st of August , feloniously did dispose of and put away a forged 1 l. Bank note, with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England , knowing it to be forged .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only calling it a promissory note for payment of money instead of a Bank note.

TWO OTHER COUNTS, stating the prisoner's intent to be to defraud George Hodges .

GEORGE HODGES . I keep the White Hart, Portpool-lane . The prisoner's mother dealt with me, she lived in Bedford-street, Liquorpond-street - she left off dealing with me in May last; about ten days after the prisoner came and asked if I would trust her mother with a pint of beer - she had the beer, came several times after, and ran up a score of about 5 s., which, I believe, she paid in silver. She afterwards ran up another score of 7 s. or 8 s. and tendered a 1 l. note for it, either to me or my wife - change was given to her. About a week after she came and asked me to change her mother a 1 l. note, which I did. I omitted to mark one of them. This note (looking at it), No. 1250, is one of them I am certain. She afterwards came again, asked what her mother's scores were, and said her mother would either come or send in the evening. I told her what it was, she came that day and gave me a note. I gave her change - (looking at it) - this is it, No. 12134. I wrote Mrs. Burnham on it. I paid it away that night to Messrs. Barclays' clerk - it was afterwards returned to me as forged. I went to her mother, but could not find the prisoner. About three days after she came again, asked what her mother's score was, and said her mother would either send or come herself. I asked if she recollected changing a note at my house a few days ago, and asked if it was her note or her mother's - she said her mother's, and that it was her mother's score that was on my book. I asked what she meant by telling me such a lie, and took her to Hatton-garden.

SARAH HODGES . I took one note of the prisoner when she came, I took it across the way to Mrs. Benton, and she changed it.

ANN BENTON . I live in Portpool-lane. Mrs. Hodges brought me a note - I think it was in July. I put it by itself, gave it to my husband, and told him whom I took from.

WILLIAM BENTON . My wife gave me a note, which she said came from Mrs. Hodges - it was on the 26th or 27th of July. This is it (looking at it). I marked it.

WILLIAM READ . I am an officer. I took the prisoner in charge. She told me she got the note from a gentleman she had been with. I asked her where she lived - she said it was nothing to me, she lived any where. I asked her if she had passed any notes at Hodges's besides the one produced - she said No, that was the only note she ever passed there or anywhere else.

Cross-examined. Q. Did she mention Bell-court - A. It was some where about Holborn.

SARAH BURNHAM . I live in Bedford-street, Liquor-pond-street. I dealt with Hodges about three months ago. I then told him it did not lay in my power to have beer, since that I have not sent anybody to him.

THOMAS GLOVER . The three notes are forged in every respect, and are all off the same plate and paper (read).

Prisoner's Defence. I told my mother I was going to service. I was seduced to a bad house by a gentleman named Smith. He took me to a had-house, No. 4, Bell-court, and gave me the three notes. I told Hodges they were my mother's, because I thought he knew I could get money nowhere else, but declare I did not know they were forged.

SARAH CHAMBERS . I keep a house in Bell-court. The prisoner was there three nights with a gentleman, a month or five weeks ago - he was a tall thin man.

MR. SERGEANT BOSANQUET. Q. Your house is a common brothel - A. It is a house of accommodation. I am certain it was in August. She came to my house five or six days before that with another man.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18200918-54

953. PHOEBE BORRENSTEIN was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of July , two gold rings, value, 14 s. , the goods of William Mott .

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM MOTT . I am a jeweller , and live in Bishopsgate-street . On the 27th of July, about five o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner came to my shop, and asked to see some wedding rings. I handed her three cards containing six gold rings each. On turning to shut the sash, I observed she had taken the six rings off one card, sat down, and shot all six into her lap - she had taken her gloves off. I observed a gilt ring, and a paste half-hoop on her hand, both on the same finger - she took them off, and fitted one of my gold rings on - one of them fitted her. She asked the price of putting a posey to it, and said she would write it. I gave her some paper, and she wrote

"Love till death." She put six rings on the card, laying them loosely altogether. She then took up a second card of broader rings, and said that she should like a broader one - it was not for herself, but a young friend. On her taking up that card I begged of her to allow me to detach them, as I had observed her detach the others in an unpleasant way. I had observed that she had mixed her gilt ring with my gold ones. She paid no attention to me, but

stripped them off into her lap, and kept fitting them on her finger one after another, and at the same time asked me what I would take to mount the paste ring in fine gold, and if I would shew her some patterns; which I declined doing at that moment. I withdrew the third card, and laid it on the back counter - they had not been touched. She gathered the rings upon her lap, and put them on the second card as before, saying that none of them fitted her, and observing I had withdrew the third card, she wished to see it. I then told her there was one exchanged on the first card, and that one was missing from the second. I had only put the rings on the cards on the Friday preceding, and I am certain there was no gilt ring upon it when I handed it to her - it could not miss my eye for a moment if it had been so - it would be as conspicious to the eye of a jeweller, as black from white. I am also certain, no gilt ring was on the second. Miss Ballard was in the shop purchasing a ring, before she came in, and remained there - she did not touch either of the cards. The prisoner, as though not regarding what I had said about the ring being missed, put her hand into her basket, and took out of her handkerchief a 1 l. note making no reply to what I had said. At this moment another Lady came in, and wished to see some pearl and amethyst rings. I shewed her three, neither of them were the size - I begged her to call again on her requesting to see the tray, as I was particularly engaged at that time, and the prisoner said she could not wait. I have not seen that lady since. On her withdrawing she took the prisoner's basket; she had got to the door when the prisoner turned round, and said

"Ma'am you have taken my basket!" - she returned the basket. The prisoner then went to the counter, and said if I would take ten shillings worth of halfpence, she would call again in a few moments - that was for the ring which fitted her.

Q. Did she give any reason why you was to take halfpence - A. Not the slightest. I told her I must consider that a mere pretence for leaving the shop, for there was a ringmissing, and I thought as she had a 1 l. note, the best way would be for her to pay for it, and leave the shop. She said she did not know any thing about a ring being missing, and she certainly did not take it. I said if she wished me to consider her a customer, she should pay for the ring - as she had a note, and I had plenty of change. She said, she did not wish me to think she came to steal a ring - she would pay for the ring. I gave her 10 s. out of a 1 l. note. I then endeavoured to convince her there was a ring missing, by delivering her that which fitted her, and shewing her there were but four in the card. She said she had not taken it - I said I had no proof of that, and was alone in the house, and could get no proof of it; otherwise I did not doubt, but I should find it on her. I requested her to leave the shop - she said she had no objection to be searched, if I thought she had got it. I said I had no one to search her, and desired her to leave - she said I had grossly insulted her, and her husband should come and see her righted. I understood her husband's name was Collinson - I saw him at the Mansion-house, and found it was Borrenstein.

Q. She said her husband should see her righted - A. Yes, I begged her not to interrupt me in my business and leave - I would put up with the loss. She then began to be violent, saying it was a shame I should charge her with taking a ring. I begged Miss Ballard to call in Mr. Nicholson, a neighbour - he came immediately, and said I had better let her go about her business. I said she insisted on being searched - she then said to him, that she wished to be searched - I believe she had loosened part of her dress; she came forward, and said Mr. Mott accuses me of taking a ring, and putting her hand upon the counter placed a gilt ring there, and said

"Here is the ring." I am confident that before that there was no ring upon the counter - I then found it was a gilt one, and said

"Ma'am this is not the ring, this is a gilt one" - that was a second gilt ring. I had no gilt rings near that spot. I have only a few in the shop, and they are very old, and are kept upon a wire in a drawer. I am certain that ring was not upon either of the cards in her possession - I had shewn her none. Mr. Nicholson then said I had been robbed and swindled too, and advised me to charge an officer with her, which I did. The officer proposed that Miss Ballard should search her; she went backward with her for that purpose - they returned, and Miss. Ballard said she believed she had nothing about her - the officer took her away. I think she first said she lived at Hackney, or that her friends lived there. She afterwards mentioned Blackfriars-road, and at the Compter she said John-street Blackfriars-road - I found she lodged there, and that her husband was a journeyman printer.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODERICK. Q. How many persons serve in your shop - A. One lad besides myself - I have had no servant this two or three months. Before this I had not shown those rings after they were carded.

Q. She came as any other lady would - A. Yes, it was unusual for a lady to take them off the card, four of them might have been tried without detaching them. When she laid the rings upon the first card, there were still six, but one was a gilt one - she had put the one which fitted her upon the card with the others, and I put it aside. I wanted her to leave, but she continued to express her indignation at the charge.

Q. She insisted on being attended to before the lady who came - A. I requested her to wait and she consented, but in a minute or two said she would not wait.

Q. She might have kept a ring by mistake - A. That could not be, because a second was missing.

MR. ADOLPLUS. Q. The first card had six rings, all gold - A. Yes; and she returned me but five gold and a metal one; and on the second card only five were returned.

Q. Did she wish to be searched until the lady had left the shop - A. No, that lady had stood close to her side, their clothes might touch; the counter is about eighteen feet long. A metal ring was produced at the office as one found on her. This made a third metal ring.

ANN BALLARD . I live in Baker's-buildings, Old Bedlam; I was in Mr. Mott's shop when the prisoner came in, I did not particularly direct my attention to her, but to the best of my recollection, she sat herself down in a chair by the counter, and asked for a wedding-ring for a friend of hers, who was going to be married. Mr. Mott

took three cards from the window and handed her two, she took the rings off the card into her lap, I think she slipped both cards and put them in her lap together, but my attention was not particularly fixed on her. When Mr. Mott said he missed a ring, she said she did not take it, and the ring she fixed on she would pay for; she took a 1 l. note out of a handkerchief, and said she would go and fetch 10 s. worth of half-pence; that she was going to get it a little way from his shop, and would be back soon. Mr. Mott said he had plenty of silver, and would accommodate her with change. A lady came in and asked to see a ring which was in the window, it did not fit her. Mr. Mott said he should have a variety to-morrow, and as she was going out she took up the prisoner's basket, when she got to the door, the prisoner observed it - she had not been in the shop above ten minutes, and stood next to the prisoner - the prisoner got her basket again. Mr. Mott immediately said he missed two gold rings, and two base ones were substituted for them; she said she did not take them, and it was unknown to her, and requested to be searched. Mr. Mott said he had no female in the house. I afterwards assisted in searching her. I found nothing on her, and she was afterwards given in charge.

Cross-examined. Q. She denied it, and behaved as an innocent woman would - A. Certainly. She took her gown and stays off, and shook them; I did not touch her clothes, nor did the maid who was with me.

JOSEPH GREGORY . I am a constable; I took the prisoner to the Compter in a coach with Mr. Mott; I found a metal ring in the palm of her hand, in her glove, besides a gold and paste one, which she had on her finger. She was endeavouring to shuffle it down.

MR. MOTT. I missed the gold ring, and found a metal one substituted for it before the other woman came into the shop; I missed one from the second card; I could not mistake them for gold rings for a moment, one is rather broader, which matches the second card, but it could not impose on a tradesman for a moment. The other woman did not touch the cards.

Prisoner's Defence. I hope you will take my much injured case into your consideration. I went with intent to purchase a wedding ring, having unfortunately lost my own. I met my father in Old-street-road, on the Saturday before, and told him of the accident, he expressed his sorrow, and it being too late, and not being provided with sufficient money, he said I had better leave it till next week, and I bought a gilt ring as a substitute. On the following week, as I was going to my father's at Hackney, I called at the shop of Mr. Mott, when this unfortunate circumstance took place. I hope you will be satisfied I am not a person of that description.

SAMUEL AARON . I am the prisoner's father, she is married; she told me she had lost her ring, and I observed she had none on her finger; I know she bought a metal one as a substitute. This was on the Saturday.

MR. MOTT. I believe she made this statement at the Mansion-House, but at my shop she said it was for another person.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200918-55

SIXTH DAY. TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 19.

954. SAMUEL WAINWRIGHT was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of August , one coat, value 1 l. , the goods of Jasper Hall , Esq .

WILLIAM LEE . I am servant to Jasper Hall, Esq., who lives in Davis-street, Berkeley-square . This coat was in the stable; the prisoner was employed by the stable-keeper . At seven o'clock in the morning of the 17th of August, I told him to harness the horse and keep the door locked. I came back about nine o'clock and missed the coat. The prisoner said he hoped the thief would be found out. On the 9th I saw him in custody with it. It was found in a stable rented by Lord George Thynne .

JAMES JEFFERIES . I am an officer. The prisoner was given into my charge. He called God to witness that he never touched the coat - he afterwards told me I should find it concealed in the straw-lost over the stable, which I did.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I put it there, intending to sleep there that night, but had no intention of making away with it.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Confined Three Months , and Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200918-56

955. JAMES DUNN was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of July , from the person of Michael Clark , 2 s. in monies numbered, and eight 1 l. Bank notes, his property .

MICHAEL CLARK . I am a labourer , and live in Grosvenor-market - the prisoner slept in the front room and I in the back. My purse, containing 8 l. 5 s., was in my breeches pocket. I went to bed about nine o'clock, and about four o'clock I saw the prisoner at my door with my breeches in his hand - I was afraid to speak him, as he had a knife in his hand. I missed my money when I got up - he was apprehended the same day.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODERICK. Q. Your room is very dark - A. Yes. Daniel Cannon slept with me; his brother Michael charged the prisoner with it. The prisoner desired he might be searched, but he had been out before that.

Q. Did you say to Ann Murray , that you would swear the prisoner took it, whether he did or not - A. Never.

MICHAEL CANNON . I slept with the prisoner; he got up twice and left the room - I do not know where he went to. Clark complained of being robbed between three and four o'clock, and said he saw Dunn with his breeches in his hand. I told the prisoner he must have robbed him. He drew his knife on me, and said if I said so again he would run it through me.

Cross-examined. Q. The prisoner was ill - A. He said so. I saw him go into Clark's room.

ANN MACDONALD . I rent the first floor of the house. I heard Cannon tell the prisoner he had Clark's money. He told him if he said so again he would run him through with the knife which he had. He said he had never been out of his room all night. My husband said,

"Why do you deny that?" - he then said he had been out once.

Prisoner's Defence. He said he would have all the house taken up. Cannon said

"We must all be searched." I was ill in the night, which made me get up.

EDWARD M'KILLEN. I slept in the room, and saw the prisoner going about in his shirt, with some papers in his hand.

ANN MURRAY . I am the prisoner's sister-in-law. I was talking to Clark about this, and he said whether it was the prisoner or not he would swear it was, and if he was acquitted he would hang him if he could.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200918-57

956. ELIZA CALLAGHAN , JOHN NEWNAM , and JOHN MADDEN were indicted for that they, on the 10th of June , at St. James, Clerkenwell , feloniously did dispose of and put away a certain forged and counterfeit Bank note, (setting it forth, No. 18007, 1 l., dated May 6, 1820, signed S. Draper,) with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England , they well knowing it to be forged and counterfeited .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only calling it a promissory note for payment of money instead of a Bank note.

TWO OTHER COUNTS, the same, only stating the prisoners' intent to be defraud Samuel Cordell .

SAMUEL CORDELL . I keep the Lord Hood, public-house, in Wych-street, Limehouse . On the 10th of June, sometime after four o'clock, the female prisoner came in with a bottle and had some liquor, which came to 10 d. or 1 s., she gave me a 1 l. note and I gave her the change. I kept the note in my hand, and immediately she left, my brother-in-law, Bird, came in and said something, I then wrote

"Mrs. Murphy" on it, as she appeared to be an Irishwoman - (looks at one) - this is it. I do not remember whether any men were in the house when she came in, I was too busy. On Saturday, the 17th, the prisoner, Newnam, came about four o'clock - a number of people were there. He asked for change, he gave the note to my wife, I took it out of her hand, and she said to him,

"That is a bad note, you shan't have change. I shall keep the note, and you had better be gone." My brother-in-law was in the passage, Newman was stopped. I marked the note

"Saturday, 17th" - (looks at one) - this is it.

ANN CORDELL . I am the wife of the last witness. On the 17th of June Newnam came for change of a 1 l. note, which he gave me; I looked at it, and perceived it to be like some bad ones we had taken - I said it was bad, and would not give him change, and told him to go about his business. I kept it, and gave it to my husband, who imdiately marked it - (looks at one) - this is it.

SAMUEL BIRD . I am the prosecutor's brother-in-law. On Saturday, the 10th of June, I was at his house, and saw Madden in the passage, nearly opposite the bar, alone - I saw him outside a minute or two after, in company with the other prisoners and another man, coming towards the house, and were about sixteen doors off. The three men came into the house - Callaghan stopped behind, and the men went into the taproom, I still stood at the door. Callaghan walked to and fro, then came in, stood in the same place where I first saw them together. I went into the taproom, and observed the men had got some beer and change. In about two minutes Callaghan came in and went to the bar. I went and observed her give the prosecutrix a note and pull a bottle out of her pocket - she was served and had her change given to her, and as she was taking up her change Madden came and stood at the taproom door, which is on a line with the bar - he could see what passed in the bar. When Madden observed her taking up her change, he said to the other two men,

"Come, I am not going to wait any longer," and all went out in company together, the three men and Callaghan.

Q. On the next Saturday was you there - A. Yes, I saw Madden in the yard; it had just turned four o'clock. I was going in to tell my sister, and just as I was going to speak to her I saw Newnam present a 1 l. note (I had discovered the first note to be a bad one) - Madden at that time stood on the back-door step, and could see what Newnam did at the bar. My sister said

"This is a bad note, I shan't give you change or the note either." He was going to turn from the bar and I seized him - Madden was then on the step; I do not know what became of him. I gave Newnam in charge of one Wood, while I fetched Penfold. I went with him and Newnam, and as we went along, at the back of the house, I saw Madden and Callaghan in Gun-lane, looking at us on the opposite side of the way - Wood secured them in consequence of what I said. Madden said he was no thief, and where I wished him to go he would. He took a few halfpence out of his pocket, and began playing with them; he then fumbled in his fob, and took out a piece of paper, rumpled it up, and put it into his mouth. I could only see that it was paper. I immediately told Penfold I suspected he had swallowed a note - he throttled him, but he resisted, Callaghan struck Penfold, and he swallowed it. He said it was tobacco, but there was no appearance in his mouth of his chewing tobacco, for we made him open his mouth. I told him it was a note, he said I was a liar. I told Newnam he was at the shop on the Saturday before, he said he was not.

JOSEPH PENFOLD . I am a headborough of Limehouse. I was sent for, took Newnam in charge, and afterwards apprehended the other prisoners. As I was taking them to the watch-house Madden put his hand into his fob, took something out, rumpled it up, and put it into his mouth - they said he had swallowed a note. I opened his mouth, but he had got it in his throat. He made a blow at me, and said he should like to give me a thrashing. I collared and struck him, and told him not to offer to strike me. He said

"D - n you, I should like to thrash you." He said he had swallowed tobacco, but there was no appearance of that. I took him to my house, and sent for Vince.

STEPHEN VINCE . I am a constable of Limehouse. I assisted in taking the prisoners to the watch-house, and searched them there. I found a pint bottle on Callaghan; on Madden I found a good note and about 3 s. I partially searched them then, and secured them in the lock-up room. About nine o'clock I went to the watch-house, brought them from the lock-up room, and searched them again, but found nothing on them; but on searching a

cast-iron privy in the lock-up room, it has a pipe leading to the drain, and on looking in there I discovered a parcel of particles of Bank notes in the bason of the privy, torn up and scattered. I collected them, with another officer, and pasted them together on a paper - they made three notes. I marked some, and Lines marked the others - (looks at them) - here are some which I marked.

Prisoner MADDEN. Q. Did you not search every pocket I had - A. I believe I did. Nobody but the prisoners had had access to the privy. I only partially searched them, being a young officer I had not experience.

JOHN LINES. I am beadle of Limehouse. I saw the iron privy at the watch-house cleared out on the 17th of June - nothing was left in the bason or tube. Nobody had access to it afterwards but the two male prisoners. When they were put in I informed them there was a privy. I returned and asked Madden where he resided? he said at his father's, in White Lion-court, Bermondsey-street. I went there and found his father, but Madden did not live there. About nine o'clock in the evening of the 17th I searched the privy, and found several pieces of Bank notes - they appeared quite new. I marked some and Vinee the rest - (looking at them) - here are some which I marked. The privy was cleaned about three hours before the prisoners were put there.

JOHN COMMENDINE . I am the watch-house keeper. I washed out the cast-iron privy in the afternoon of the 17th of June - nothing was left in it. I locked it up, and nobody went there before the prisoners were put in - nobody was put in but them.

JAMES ROGERS . I saw the privy cleaned - nothing was left in. I afterwards saw the pieces of notes found.

THOMAS GLOVER . I am an inspector of Bank notes. The notes uttered by Callaghan and Newnam are forged in every respect, are off the same plate, and are not the signatures of Draper and Watts, which they purport to bear. The pieces of notes produced are parts of three forged notes. There is not sufficient of the pieces to ascertain whether they are off the same plate, but they are forged.

SAMUEL DRAPER . I am a signing clerk. The signature to the note is not my writing - (read.)

SAMUEL BIRD re-examined. I saw the three prisoners at the house both on the 10th and 17th, but on the 10th there were three men. I am sure the male prisoners are the same that were there on the 10th.

MADDEN'S Defence. I was unfortunately walking in the Commercial-road, and happened to meet this woman; she was apprehended, and the officers took me.

* CALLAGHAN - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 17.

* NEWNAM - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 22.

* The prisoners Callaghan and Newnam had pleaded guilty to knowingly having possession of the said notes,

MADDEN - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 20.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Best.

Reference Number: t18200918-58

957. WILLIAM TUCKHIELD was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of July , at St. Mary. lslington, one gelding, price 10 l. , the property of Joseph Liley .

MR. ANDREWS conducted the prosecution.

JOSEPH LILEY . I had a gelding turned out in Mr. Stevens's field, near Redburn, in Hertfordshire ; it was worth 10 l., it had been fired, and was turned out to get right for work. I found it slaughtered at Watts's, and knew it again, it had not been skinned.

JOHN STEVENS . I saw Mr. Liley's horse in my field between four and five on Saturday morning, the 22d of July, the field was secure, it could not get out.

JOHN DIXON . I saw the horse in the field at nine o'clock in the evening, safe.

JOHN PARRIOTT . I am hostler at the Great Red-lion, St. Albans. On Saturday the 22d of July I saw the prisoner there, he asked me to lend him a halter, and said he was going to fetch some horses from the country; I lent him one, about eight o'clock on Saturday morning. He left our house about eight that night, and went towards Redburn. I did not see him again.

WILLIAM FAREY . On Saturday, the 22d of July I came by the Chequers, between Redburn and St. Albans, and saw the prisoner sitting drinking with two other men, he called to me. Next day I heard Liley's horse was missing. I came to town in search of the prisoner, and found him in Park-street, Islington, and told him I took him on suspicion of stealing a horse; he said

"I did not steal it, I bought it of John Tandy ." I asked what Tandy, he said

"of old John Tandy , of Newport, Buckinghamshire." - I said

"Blair-eyed John Tandy ?" he said Yes. I took him into custody, and afterwards went with Liley to Maiden-lane. He pointed the horse out.

JAMES HOWE . I am a collar maker; I was at Edgware on Sunday the 23d of July, and bought a horse of the prisoner, between four and five in the morning, he was fired, and appeared to have come a distance. The prisoner said he brought it from St. Albans since the overnight, and asked 2 l. for it; I gave him 1 l. 11 s. 6 d., and sold it to Watts; I bought it for that purpose. I knew the prisoner before.

THOMAS WATTS . I live in Maiden-lane; I bought a horse of Howe on Monday the 24th of July, to slaughter, he brought it to me, it was in a very poor condition, and fit for nothing but slaughter, and appeared completely worn out, and had been fired all round; it died before I got it into the slaughter-house. The prosecutor saw it, and claimed it.

Prisoner's Defence. I was at St. Albans; a man came by the Red-lion with two horses, and said his name was Tandy, I gave him 30 s. for the horse, a young man was with him and some gentlemen farmers were there in company with me.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 27.

Recommended to Mercy.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Best.

Reference Number: t18200918-59

958. WILLIAM JOHN PANNINGTON was indicted for that he, on the on the 24th of June , did feloniously dispose of and put away a certain forged and counterfeit Bank note, for the payment of 1 l. well knowing it to be forged, with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only calling it a promissory note for payment of money instead of a Bank note.

THREE OTHER COUNTS, the same, only stating the prisoner's intent to be to defraud Thomas Bean .

ELIZA SOPHIA BEAN . I am daughter to Thomas Bean , who is a butcher , and lives in Dean-street, Holborn . On Saturday, the 24th of June at seven o'clock at night, the prisoner came and bought some mutton and steaks, which came to 4 s.; Adams, our shopman, served him, he gave me a 1 l. Bank note. I knew his father by the name of Pannington, he lived in Cromer-street, I do not know where the prisoner lived. I wrote Pannington on it, and asked his address, he said Phoenix-alley, Long-acre, - (looks at it.) - this is it; he took his change and left, I gave it to my father. About eleven o'clock that night another person came, and bought a shoulder of mutton of my father, and gave me a 1 l. note, and gave the name of Kemp, No. 1, Bury-street, Bloomsbury, which I wrote on it, and gave it my father; he looked at it, and sent Adams out to stop him, but he was gone; I went with Adams to Bury-street, and found one Kemp lived there, but he did not answer the description.

THOMAS BEAN . I remember the prisoner buying some meat, he gave my daughter a note, which she gave me; sometime after he was gone I said it was bad.

JOHN HADDICKS . I am shopman to Mr. Bean. On the 24th of June, the prisoner came and bought some meat; I served him, it came to about 4 s.; he gave Miss Bean a note; a person named Kemp came about eleven o'clock that night, and bought a shoulder of mutton, at that time I saw the prisoner at the corner of the street; I passed him at the time he was standing and leaning against the corner, about three doors from our house, on the opposite side, he could see what was going on in our shop - we have strong lights. I came into the shop; Kemp was there then, he left as soon as Miss Bean gave him his change. She gave the note to her father, and he, almost immediately, said it was bad. I ran out, but the prisoner and Kemp were both gone. About half-past twelve o'clock that night the prisoner came by and I secured him. I had seen him once before.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not ask if I bought a shoulder of mutton - A. Yes, and he said it was a leg, and said he paid a note for it, he came back willingly with me.

THOMAS BUBBUS . I am shopman to Mr. Iron, of the Strand, on the 3d of March a woman passed a note at our shop for grocery, which came to 2 s. 9 d. I marked the note - (looks at one.) - this is it. I wrote Mrs. Marriott, No. 4, Off-alley, Strand, on it. She was tried here in April, by the name of Rosanna Pannington. I went with Mayhew, the officer, the same evening to No. 4, Off-alley, and took her, we found the prisoner there also. The officer asked her where she had the note; she hesitated, and said she had it from her husband, and pointed to the prisoner. Mayhew asked him where he got them, he then said all the notes she passed she received of him, and he received them in the course of trade, and said he was a tailor. Mayhew said, then I shall take you; he placed himself in a fighting position, and said,

"Will you, will you." I then saw a pistol in his hand; the woman escaped, and the pistol was taken from him after a long struggle, it was loaded to the muzzle; he was taken away.

THOMAS MAYHEW . I am a conductor of the Bow-street Patrole. On the 9th of March I met with Bubbus, and apprehended the woman, the prisoner and another woman were in the room with her. The woman said she had the notes of her husband, pointing to the prisoner, and he said he took them in trade. I said he must go with me, he wished to see my authority, I produced my staff; he said that would not do if I had no warrant. I said I should take him, and advanced towards him, he drew back about a yard from me, and pulled a pistol from his waistcoat, which was cocked, primed, and loaded with ball. I seized it; drawing my cutlass, and he surrendered. As I was taking him to the office, he said if I would not mention any thing to the magistrate concerning the pistol, he would tell me where to get plenty of forged notes. I said I certainly should mention it. I found another large pistol at his place, cocked and loaded.

THOMAS GLOVER . The notes are all three forged in every respect, and are off the same plate.

ROBERT LOWE . I am a signing clerk of the Bank, the note is not signed by me.

- (read.)

The prisoner put in an exceedingly long written defence, stating that he received the note from his father, and did not know it to be forged.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Best.

Reference Number: t18200918-60

959. GEORGE DOWLING was indicted for stealing on the 22d of July , a watch value 25 s. and one key, value 2 s. , the goods of George Cowle .

GEORGE COWLE . I live in Holborn. I lent my watch to Mr. Edwards.

MARY EDWARDS . My husband keeps a ham-shop in Aldersgate-street ; this watch hung in the parlour on the 22d of July, about ten o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner leaving the room; I asked him what he wanted, he said a pennyworth of pudding. I turned round and missed the watch; he ran out, I followed him; he was stopped, and the watch found on him.

JOHN BRENTELL . I am a hair-dresser, I live in Aldersgate-street. I heard the alarm; I joined in pursuit of the prisoner; he turned back, and I secured him. He produced the watch from his pocket.

RICHARD WAYT . I followed, and saw him deliver up the watch.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Six Months .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200918-61

960. THOMAS PERKINS was indicted for feloniously receiving on the 5th of June , twenty bobbins, value 3 s., and sixteen ounces of silk, value 32 s., the goods of George Lawrence , whereof William Cullin , at the Session held for the County of Essex, at Chelmsford, in the said country, was convicted of stealing; the prisoner knowing them to be stolen .

MR. JESSOP conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM DEAN . I am clerk to Mr. Lawrence a silk-manufacturer , at Stratford . I produce a copy of the record of the conviction of William Cullen . I got it from Mr. Knap's office, - (read.) Cullen was a weaver in the manufactory; I had delivered him thirty bobbins of sage coloured silk to work on, he took it away in a basket, and

returned in five minutes with the basket empty. The bobbins were marked with Mr. Lawrence's name, or initials; the silk was wound round them. I saw him next day as I returned from town; I overtook him with a man who was much intoxicated. I had him apprehended, and next day in consequence of information, got a search warrant, and went to the prisoner's house in Angel-alley, with Mr. Lawrence and Matthews, while they were up stairs I found one of the bobbins below among the ashes; it was cut up, and partly burnt, and had Mr. Lawrence's name on it. Those I delivered to Cullen were of a similar description; they all came down stairs. I charged the prisoner's wife, in his presence, with burning part of the bobbins; she admitted it. Some more were produced.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You may have some thousands of bobbins alike, and sometimes they go out, and are not returned - Q. I may have lost fifty in the last two years. They are more valuable than fire-wood.

GEORGE LAWRENCE . I am a silk-weaver; I also went to the prisoner's house on the 7th of June. I and the officer went up stairs, leaving Dean below; we found the door open, and in the top room found the prisoner winding silk on one of my bobbins. I picked another off the floor, and asked if he knew the name on it; he said he did not. Matthews asked what he had done with the silk that was on the bobbins, and after some hesitation he said he had taken it off, and put it on a larger one, and sold it to a man who was gone to Coventry. He said it was the same colour as that of which part remained on one of them, which was sage green, and the same colour I had lost, and in the same state; it had been a little unravelled, and would not come off with the rest. We found twelve bobbins which I can swear to, they have all my initials or name on them. He said he did not know the man he bought the silk of.

Cross-examined. Q. He answered all your questions - A. Yes; I will swear it is the same silk.

CHARLES MATTHEWS . I am an officer. I went to the prisoner's house, and confirm the prosecutor's evidence.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200918-62

961. WILLIAM TEMPLE , JOHN TOBIN and JOHN, GARNER , were indicted for stealing, on the 23d of July , one handkerchief, value 2 s. the goods of William Frederick Harper , from his person .

MR. WM. FREDERICK HARPER . I live with my father, who is a silversmith, near Temple-bar. On the 23d of July, between ten and eleven o'clock in the evening, I was coming towards home, and was within six doors of Temple-bar ; the three prisoners were behind; I felt my handkerchief drawn from my pocket within six doors of my home. I turned round, and saw Tobin and Garner (I had seen a third person with them before. I first saw them near Johnson's-court.) On my turning round, Garner said he perceived I wanted a pocket handkerchief, and he would lend me his with a great deal of pleasure. I said I did not want his, but was sure that he or one of his party had taken one belonging to me; he and Tobin abused me, and wanted to know how I could be so impudent as to charge such persons as them with it. I told the watchman at Temple-bar, that I had been robbed. He said point out the party, and I will take them. I pointed them out; there was a crowd, the watchman took them, and Temple came through the bar. They recognised each other; and said they had all been together the whole of the morning. I should not have known him without that. My father was with me, and with assistance they were taken to the watch-house. Temple had my handkerchief in his hand when he walked into the watch-house. I am certain it is mine. They spoke to each other as companions.

MR. T. HARPER. I was with my son; I did not see the prisoners till he said he had been robbed. I then saw Temple go through the Bar in the road-way, and the other two went through the foot-way. Temple came round and met them; they all identified each other; observing, they had been together all the evening. It was Sunday night, they were decently dressed. I desired the watchman to take them to the watch-house. He quitted his hold of Tobin, and took hold of Temple; Tobin said he would go with us. But a little way further I met another, and desired him to take him. My son looked at Temple's hand, and said, that is my handkerchief, it was taken from him, and proved to be so. Three very good gloves were found in Temple's pocket. I asked what he wanted with three gloves; he replied one was his father's; but Garner cried out, that is my glove. They still continued to identify each other till the handkerchief was found. Then the other two declared they never saw Temple before in their lives.

JURY. Q. Did Temple conceal the handkerchief - A. I rather think he had it in his hand all the way; it was rumpled up in his hand in a very small compass. He held it between his hands.

JOHN BAKER . I am a watchman. I was on duty near Mr. Harper's door; the prosecutor, his father, and some others of the family, came home about eleven o'clock - the son came up, and said three notorious thieves had been at his pockets. I said point them out - I stepped with him under the foot archway of the bar, and there he pointed out Tobin and Garner. I collared them, and the instant I had done so Temple got to the entrance of the Strand side of the bar, coming into it - he advanced a few paces, Mr. Harper said

"This is another of the fellows, I think." I let go of Tobin, took Temple, and with assistance the prisoners were taken to the watch-house. Garner was exclaiming against Mr. Harper for charging him with a crime - Temple said

"Hold your tongue, there will be plenty of opportunity to say what you have to say afterwards." When they got to the watch-house, the prosecuter saw his handkerchief in Temple's hand, I also saw it at the same time, he said

"That is my handkerchief" - Temple immediately laid it on the table - he claimed it, and Temple said nothing to it - one of them had three gloves, another who had only one claimed it. I cannot exactly say who it was.

WILLIAM TURNER . I am a constable. I was at the watch-house, when the prisoners were brought in. I found three gloves on Garner, and one on Tobin - Garner said they were his father's - Tobin said it was his. Temple had Mr. Harper's handkerchief rumpled up in his hand.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

TEMPLE'S Defence. You will plainly see I am not the individual. I heard Mr. Harper charge the two with picking his pocket, I naturally stopped, picked up the handkerchief, and followed them to the watch-house with it, and when I heard it was the same handkerchief which was lost I immediately produced it. I was not charged with the robbery till then. If I had intended to rob him of his property I should not have gone to the watch-house; I voluntarily produced it.

JOHN BAKER re-examined. Q. Temple did not go voluntarily to the watch-house - A. I collared him all the way.

W. TEMPLE - GUILTY .

J. TOBIN - GUILTY .

J. GARNER - GUILTY .

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200918-63

962 GEORGE ROWDEN was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of July , 39 1/2 lbs of sugar, value 1 l. 19 s. 6 d. , the goods of John Smith .

HENRY TURNPENNY . I belong to the day-patrol, near the Mansion-house. On Sunday morning the 30th of July, about a quarter past six o'clock, I stopped the prisoner in Aldersgate-street with a basket, and asked what he had got - he said it was a piece of beef - I removed the cloth which covered it, and found it was a loaf of sugar. I asked where he brought it from - he said from Messrs. Eagletons' in Newgate-street - he wished me to let him go and keep the sugar myself. I took him to Eagletons', rang the bell - nobody answered. He then said he bought it of a man at the corner of Butcherhall-lane. Mr. Smith claimed it - it weighed 20 lbs. I found more at his lodgings.

Cross-examined by MR. ARABIN. Q. I believe he keeps a small chandler's-shop - A. Yes, he has a very few things there. I had a man named Corney in custody for this felony.

JOHN HARKER . I am an officer. I was with Turnpenny, and confirm his statement.

MR. JOHN SMITH . I am a grocer , and live in Aldersgate-street . I know the prisoner by sight - I never dealt with him. I saw this sugar at Guildhall on the Wednesday following - I saw two loaves, one weighed 20 lbs. which I knew to be my property - I had bought it of a wholesale grocer in Bucklersbury. On Sunday morning my carman came for the keys before six o'clock - his name is Joseph Cameron . On Wednesday morning I examined my stock; on the 26th of July, I had received from Messrs Rhodes and Co. Leman-street, one hundred and eleven loaves, they weighed 20 cwt. 2 qrs. and 25 lbs. On the 27th I sent thirty-two to the Albion, which would leave seventy-nine, we sold no more afterwards, but on Wednesday I found only seventy-seven loaves remaining, they were all marked No. 23 - there were two produced bearing that mark - I have no doubt but they are mine - it is a particularly fine sugar, and they were put in a particular paper, and remained in the same paper when found upon the prisoner.

Q. Many people come in your shop - A. Yes. I took the whole baking of the sugar-baker.

MICHAEL HARRIE . I am warehouseman to Messrs. Rhodes, who are sugar-bakers. The two loaves of sugar, are their manufacturing, and what I sent on the 26th of July, to Mr. Smith. None of the rest were papered except about 100 which were sent to Ireland - they are papered different from the common way - one sheet is smaller than another, which is unusual.

FRANCIS ADAMS. On the 26th of July, I delivered 126. loaves of sugar at Mr. Smith's - I saw several of the loaves papered.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I keep a coal-shed and chandler's shop in Hatfield-street. I bought it of a man in Whitecross-street, at 11 1/2 d. per pound.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200918-64

SEVENTH DAY, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 20.

963. RICHARD JOYCE was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of September , from the person of William Spink , one pocket-book, value 6 d., two 10 l. and one 1 l. Bank note, and one 10 l. and one 5 l. promissory note, his property .

WILLIAM SPINK . I am a servant out of place , and lodge at the Black Boy, public-house, Long-acre . On the 2d of September I went into the taproom at half-past nine o'clock, and at half-past ten got up to go to bed. I missed my pocket-book, containing these notes, which were in my pocket when I entered the room, I was sober. I sat the in different parts of the room, playing at bagatelle. I cannot say whether the prisoner was there.

JOHN WHITEHEAD . I live in Martlet-court, Bow-street. On the evening of the 2d of September I was at the Black Dog - I know the prisoner very well, and am certain he was there - he had left when Spink missed his pocketbook. Nobody was suffered to go out till an officer was sent for - he searched several.

SARAH GILES . I live in Wych-street, and am a baker. On Sunday morning, the 3d of September, between eight and nine o'clock, I changed a 10 l. Bank note for Smith, which Spink claimed.

JOSEPH SMITH . I am waiter to Mr. Coveney, who keeps the King of Prussia, in Wych-street. I received the 10 l. note from Norman, and immediately changed it at Giles's.

ELLIS JAMES NORMAN . I keep a chop-house in Wych-street. On Sunday morning, the 3d of September, about half-past eight o'clock, the prisoner came and asked me to change him a note - I had seen him before. I took the same note to Smith, returned and told him it was a 10 l. note. He said,

"Yes, it is; I found it about eleven o'clock last night - I found 36 l. in all." I gave him the change. He waited sometime with me. He lived at the Red Lion, Charles-street, Long-acre. He fetched me a 10 l. and a 5 l. country note, and said if I heard of any one who had lost them he would give them up; that he found

them between the Black Dog public-house and Bow-street.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q.He made no secret of it - A. No, fourteen or fifteen people were in the room when he mentioned it; he told me where he worked and lived. Next night he came for his change, and I gave him in charge.

FRANCIS HOLYLAND . I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner at Norman's; he produced eight 1 l. notes, which he said he received in change for the 10 l. note; that he threw the pocket-book down an area in King-street, Covent-garden. He pointed the area out, and the servant brought it up.

Prisoner's Defence. It is true I converted part of the money to my own use, as I expected to have part for picking it up.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200918-65

964. THOMAS SKINNER was indicted for bestiality .

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 44.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Richardson.

Reference Number: t18200918-66

965. JOHN DIMSDALE , WILLIAM SEABROOK , and THOMAS GREEN were indicted for feloniously attempting to discharge a loaded fire arms at William Mitchell , with intent to kill and murder him .

This case arose from a disputed right of possession of a house at Kinsbury. The Court ruled that it did not come within the meaning of the statute, and the prisoners were ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Richardson.

Reference Number: t18200918-67

966. THOMAS WEBB was indicted for burglariously, sacrilegiously, and feloniously breaking and entering the church of the parish of Enfield , about twelve o'clock in the night of the 30th of June , with intent to steal, and burglariously, &c. stealing therein 60 yards of cloth, value 60 l., the goods of John Vaughan , Esq. , Earl of Lisburne of that part of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland called Ireland ; Dame Dorothy Elizabeth Palk , commonly called Lady Dorothy Elizabeth Palk; and Mallet Vaughan , spinster , commonly called Lady Mallet Vaughan; and one surplice, value 2 l., the goods of Richard Browning , Phineas Patershall , and Andrew John Nash , Churchwardens of the said parish .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating the cloth to belong to John Vaughan .

THIRD COUNT, stating the cloth to belong to the Reverend Harry Porter , and the surplice to belong to the Churchwardens of the said parish .

MESSRS. WALFORD and BRODERICK conducted the prosecution.

ALEXANDER YOUNG . I am parish-clerk of Enfield, and have been so twenty-seven years. On Friday, the 30th of June, I was in the church at prayer-time till half-past twelve o'clock, I then locked the vestry-door and the north door. The church was hung with black cloth in memory of the Earl of Lisburne. A surplice, marked E P 3, hung in the vestry. I have many times known the church to be hung with black - most of it is given to the vicar, and part to the clerk. I was called up on the Saturday morning, a little after two o'clock, by the beadle, and went to the church with him and the constable. I found the cloth and surplice gone - a candle was found in the church; I received it from the Vicar and gave it to the constable. A small piece of cloth had been left on the sounding-board of the pulpit. Some cloth was afterwards brought to Enfield - I compared it, it tallied with that left on the pulpit, and corresponded in quality - I have no doubt of its being the cloth. The surplice was also produced. The churchwardens provide the surplice.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Who has the care of the church - A. I take care of the vestry and the sexton the church. I keep the keys of the vestry and north doors, and take them home with me - they hang in my room if they are wanted. The vestry is part of the church, and communicates with it.

JOHN ADE . I am the sexton. I shut up the church about nine o'clock, the night before the robbery. I locked the front door. I went there at two o'clock the next morning with the beadle, on hearing the alarm, and found the south door open, which I had locked; we were the first that entered. I could see that the door had been unlocked, but no violence had been used. The vestry door appeared to have been unlocked too, but not broken - the cloth and surplice were gone. I found two pieces of wax candle and some pieces of matches in the church.

Cross-examined by Mr. ADOLPHUS. Q. Were the wax candles used at the funeral - A. The funeral was a month before. I had been at work near the church till nine o'clock, and went all over it at eight, to drive a bird out, and locked it at nine. I delivered the candles to the Vicar.

WILLIAM WILSON . I attended the funeral of the Earl of Lisburne. The church was hung with black by my order, which I received from Lady Elizabeth Palk . I look to the executors for the expence of putting it up - they have not administered. The Earl was a lunatic. I believe there is no will. The present Earl's name is John Vaughan , his sisters are Ladies Dorothy Elizabeth Palk and Mallet Vaughan - I put it up by their direction. I received the order from Lady Elizabeth Palk . The present Earl told me he left the orders to her, Upwards of twenty yards of fine, and thirty of second cloth were hung up.

MR. HENRY SAWYER . I am vestry-clerk of Enfield. The churchwardens are Richard Browning , Phineas Patershall , and Andrew John Nash . The Rev. Harry Porter is vicar.

JOHN MEAD . I am a patrol of Enfield. On the 1st of July, in consequence of the alarm, I went in pursuit with Cufley. We received information, and got into Kingsland-road, and observed a waggon, with two bundles on the shafts, going towards town. The waggoner was with it, and three men walked by the side, rather behind, the prisoner was one of them. I went up and spoke to the waggoner, then one of the men came up and asked my business, and where I was going? I said I had been to meet my mother, who was coming up by the waggon, but she was not come. I walked on till we came nearly to Essex-street, Kingsland - there one of the men gave the waggoner

some money and left him, the other two went on with the waggon. It was just before we came to Kingsland turnpike. I first saw the waggon nearly a mile from Shoreditch Church. One of the men that remained had a grey-coloured coat and the other a blue one, the prisoner was one of them. The man who left had a black coat and waistcoat - the prisoner had a blue coat, light waistcoat, and boots on. Before the man in the black coat went away the one in the grey coat stepped back and said to the other two (one of whom was the prisoner)

"Shall we take our luggage off here?" I did not hear what answer was given, or which answered - they did not take it off. The man in the black coat left, and the waggon proceeded up to the Mail Coach, public-house, about one hundred yards nearer to Shoreditch than Essex-street. It stopped, and the waggoner said to them,

"You had better take your luggage off here before I go any further" - they were both together at the time. The man in the grey coat then went round to the horse on the offside of the waggon, and the prisoner came on the nearside. I observed him push very close towards the waggon, apparently to take the luggage off - he was close to the luggage. I went round and caught hold of the other man, called a man to my assistance, and gave him to that man, while I ran after the prisoner, who had set off as soon as he saw us scuffle (that man escaped). I ran after the prisoner, and gave an alarm of Stop thief! Two or three people tried to stop him, he knocked one or two of them down. He was not ten yards from me all the time. He had a nosegay in his hand, which he threw apparently at my face, but it went against the wall. He stumbled on some rubbish, and I gained ground on him. He tried to get through a door but could not; he then put his hand into his pocket, and threw away a canvas bag, it went on a shed close by - I saw some skeleton keys fall out of it; another person picked them up. I secured and took him to the Cherry Tree, public-house, searched him, and found a small crow, a snuff-box with tinder in it, a steel, and a small piece of wax-candle. The bundles were left on the waggon till I returned; I took them into the public-house. I found a surplice, and about fifty-five yards of black cloth in them - I compared it with that in the church. it appeared to be the same. A piece remained on the sounding-board, which I produce - I compared it with the cloth. it matched with the rest of the cloth, and fitted the different parts of the Church. I saw the skeleton keys tried, they opened the vestry-door; those I saw tried did not open the doors.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. At what time did you overtake the waggon - A. It was between ten minutes and a quarter before five o'clock when I was at Shoreditch church. I had been out on duty till past one that night. The man who came and spoke to me walked at a greater distance from the waggon than the others, but they were altogether when I first saw them, and kept together till he came and spoke to me. I saw them for a hundred yards before I came up to them. I do not know whether the other man put his hand on the luggage. I did not see the prisoner lay his hand on it, as I drew back. As soon as he saw me draw back, a signal was given and he ran. I saw the prisoner hold out his arms, as if to take it.

WILLIAM CUFLEY . I am a patrol of Enfield. About two o'clock in the morning, I found the front door on the south side wide open and alarmed the sexton - it was twilight.

NATHANIEL ELLIOTT . I am a waggoner. On the 30th of June I was coming to town from Cambridgeshire - when I got a little on this side the Two Brewers, at Ponder's End, in the parish of Enfield, a man came up, and asked if I would take a parcel as far as Shoreditch church for him? I said he might bring it and lay it on the shafts if he liked - this was about twenty minutes past two o'clock. He said

"Very well, my mate is just by with it," or

"them." He was dressed in a dark or blue coat; then a man came up in a grey coat, with a parcel in a bag, and the man who first spoke brought a parcel in a silk handkerchief - we put them on the shafts, and the man in the grey coat said,

"Give me the whip, and I will drive for you;" he did so, and I sat on the shaft, laid my head on the bag, and went to sleep. I awoke near Tottenham, got up, and looked back - the two men were then walking together, and one was driving - this was about three miles from Ponder's End - the prisoner was one of the two that were walking. The man who drove gave me the whip, and waited till the other two joined him, then all came on together. The man in the dark coat had got a handful of flowers out of a garden; I saw the prisoner with the nosegay afterwards. I went on with the waggon; they all walked conversing together. I heard Mead examined, his account is correct. The man in the dark coat went away before the other two - he gave me 1 s. for bringing the parcels. The prisoner and the other came on. I stopped opposite the public-house, and told them to take their parcels off; they were then on the path. The man in the grey coat went on the off-side, and the prisoner came up to the horse on the near side - I did not see him do anything. An alarm was given, the prisoner then went round the hind part of the waggon and ran away. I remained with my waggon, Mead pursued.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. The man who came up to you at Ponder's End was not the prisoner - A. I cannot tell. I first saw the third man at Tottenham. I cannot say which it was, as I took little notice. The man in the grey coat drove. The bundles lay between the shafts, they might be reached from either side - the largest was more on the off-side than the other; the nearside was the handiest to get the least bundle. The man who first spoke to me in the dark coat had the small bundle, and the prisoner went nearest to the small one, when I said,

"Take your bundle."

JOSEPH HALLIDAY . I live in Kingsland-road. On the morning of the 1st of July I heard an alarm of Stop thief! I went out and saw the prisoner running down the road with a nosegay in his hand; I came in contact with him at the corner of Union-street, he ran down there and I after him; he placed himself against the wall, and said,

"What have I done?" the officer said

"You have robbed a church, you know it." He then put his hand into his pocket, and took out something bright, which I supposed to be a crow, and said

"D - n my eyes, I will serve you out!" I thought it was a knife, and immediately ran from him. He struck a blow with his fist, and knocked a man down, who was behind me. He returned from the lower end of

the street, and ran towards Union-road, took a bag of keys from his pocket, and threw it on a high shed - I got it off the shed. One of the keys fell out of the bag, and it contained two double and one single one; there were only two in the bag. I tried the keys to the church; one opened the vestry-door. I found a large needle near his feet at the public-house, after he was searched.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Did you try them to the church-door - A. None of them would fit. I saw the bundles, they were done up in a bag, and directed to Mr. Robinson, Tailor, Houndsditch, it was sewn with the same sort of twine as that in the needle.

JOHN ADE . I produce the two pieces of candle I picked up in the church. The pieces found appear to be parts of the same candle.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I can prove I was at home at the at the time the robbery was committed.

JOHN MEAD re-examined. Ponders End is near two miles from Enfield church, it is not the direct road from there to town, but nearly as near.

PHILIP SIDNELL . I live at No. 6, Coulston-street, Whitechaple. The prisoner is my landlord, I have lodged two years with him. On Friday, the 30th of June I spent my evening with him there. I rent the front room first floor, he sleeps below; I was with him till past ten o'clock, I then went to bed, and believe he did. The house is generally fastened with two bolts. There is no key. I saw him at half-past two o'clock next morning. I heard him call James Perry , a lodger, up, I thought he was come to call me, I opened the door and spoke to him, I asked what time it was, he said between two and three o'clock. I went to bed again, and some time after, heard the watchman go half-past two.

MR. WALFORD. Q. What are you - A. A carpenter, and work for Mr. Clark. The prisoner is a bricklayer, he takes jobs for himself. I did not go before the magistrate, as I did not hear of this till Saturday night.

Q. When were you first called on to be a witness - A. The day before yesterday; I did not hear he was taken up for a week or a fortnight after the robbery. I understood he was in the country.

Q. Did you not say you heard of it on Saturday night A.- I heard he was absent. I never heard about what hour the robbery was committed. Speering knew and saw him as well as me.

Q. Did you talk over with him what you was to say when you came here - A. I did not.

JAMES SPEERING. I lodged in the prisoner's house, and do now; he called me up on the last morning in June, I had been in his company the night before, and left him between nine and ten o'clock; he called me up between two and three, and soon after I heard the watchman call half-past two; it was earlier than I wished to get up, and I went to bed again. I saw him go out and fastened the door after him.

MR. BRODERICK. Q. Will you swear you saw him go out at half-past two o'clock - A. Yes; I came here part of the way with Sidnell; we both talked about what we were coming here for. I told him more than a week ago that I remembered hearing the hour cried, and since that we have often spoke of it. He said he remembered hearing the watchman call the hour, and so did I. I cannot say that I saw Speering when the prisoner called me. Our rooms are both on one floor; I did not hear him speak to the prisoner.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Whether Speering awoke before you, you cannot say. - A. No, He was in the room with us the night before.

THOMAS GLOVER . On the the 30th of June last I slept at Stoke Newington, at Mr. Davis's house. I was making up his books. The prisoner came there about four o'clock that morning; it was Saturday, he came to look at a stove and copper, which was to be set. I let him in myself; he staid perhaps a quarter of an hour.

MR. WALFORD. Q. What is Mr. Davis - A. He is in the wool trade; I was making up his books, he wanted to go to Wales, and asked me to sleep there that night to finish the books.

Q. Did you let him in - A. Not at first, I understand he came before, then went and took a walk. I let him in the second time. I heard a noise when he came the first time. The house is three miles and a half from Whitchapel. I let him in ten minutes after I got up; and heard the watchman call half-past three after I was up.

COURT. Q. What makes you remember the day - A. For the best of all reasons. I was obliged to pledge a coat, it was out that day, and I borrowed the money from Davis to redeem it.

NATHANIEL ELLIOTT re-examined. Q. The man came to you at Ponder's-End at twenty minutes after two o'clock - A. Yes; it was a quarter past two o'clock when I was at the White Hart, and in five minutes I saw the man.

JOHN MEAD re-examined. Tottenham is five miles from Shoreditch. I should think it is six or seven miles from Whitechapel. I first came up to the waggon about a mile from Shoreditch Church, and got to the church at twelve minutes before five; I took particular notice. I was at the church before I saw the waggon. I had been to town, and was returning; it was about five when I met him.

GUILTY . - DEATH .

Recommended to Mercy.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Richardson.

Reference Number: t18200918-68

967. HENRY TODD was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of August , at St. Luke, in the dwelling-house of Lewis Desanges , one 10 l., one 5 l., and one 1 l. Bank note, the property of Henry Overton .

HENRY OVERTON . I am groom to Lewis Desanges , Esq. who lives in Finsbury-square , in the parish of St. Luke. On the 17th of August I went to take a horse to grass, and left the prisoner in the stable; he was the helper. I sleep in a room over the coach-house, which is at the bottom of the garden, it belongs to the house, and communicates with it through the garden, which is surrounded by a wall. The prisoner did not sleep there, and had nothing to do with the house. I told him not to leave the stable till I returned, which I expected would be about eleven o'clock. I left a pocket-book, containing a 10 l. a 5 l. and a 1 l. Bank note in my box in my bedroom. I saw it there that morning; my bed-room door

was locked, I had the key with me. I returned about a half-past two; the prisoner was then gone, he had locked the stable and had the key, and I had another, he did not return at all; this was Thursday. I went into the country and returned on Monday; I missed my money, and found his key shoved under the stable door, and the door which leads to the yard, locked; I had left it unlocked. I found the lock of my door forced; I missed the pocket-book and notes from my box.

SAMUEL SHEPPARD . I am a constable. On the 22d of August I apprehended the prisoner. I found no money on him. I asked what he had done with the money; he voluntarily told me, he had spent it, and bought his clothes and a watch. He had new clothes on and a watch. He said he sold the notes to a stranger, that he got 8 l. for the 10 l. and 4 l. for the 5 l.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 17.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Richardson.

Reference Number: t18200918-69

968. JOHN NAPPER was indicted for stealing on the 22d of July , at St. Marylebone, eighteen spoons, value 5 l.; one pair of sugar tongs, value 6 s.; three yards of linen, value 18 d.; one gown, value 2 s.; one yard of cotton, value 1 s.; one apron, value 1 s.; one spencer, value 2 s.; one yard of lace, value 1 s. and one ring, value 6 s. the goods of John Wells in his dwelling-house .

MR. NORTON conducted the Prosecution.

MARY ANN WELLS . I am the wife of John Wells , who keeps the Half Moon, public-house, Clipstone-street, St. Marylebone . On the 22d of July, at a quarter before seven in the evening, I served the prisoner with a glass of cyder in the parlour, which joins the bar. There is a door leads from the parlour to the bar; he paid for it, and left the house. At half-past nine the same evening I saw him again. I heard Murphy, the servant, speaking to some one on the stairs, and having no lodgers, I called to know who she was speaking to. I saw the back of a man going into the yard. I took a candle, and followed him. I found a small piece of muslin and a piece of cotton, strewed about the yard, which had come from my work-bag up stairs. I saw the man go into the privy, and I asked what business he had up stairs. He said, my name is John Napper , and I came out of the parlour; he came out, and then I saw his countenance. I said to him I have served you before this evening; he said Yes, certainly you did. I threw the parlour door open; the prisoner then went into the parlour. I left him there while I went to look in the yard; I went to the privy, and there saw a bag down on the soil. I saw a man immediately take it up with a rake. There was an old silk gown, and some articles of no value in it, it was mine. I went into the parlour, and said to him, did not you take the keys out of the parlour cupboard,

"Pray do tell me if you have." I had missed them ever since he came for the cyder. I sent for a smith, and had the cupboard-door opened, and to my surprise, there was no plate in it. I sent for Warren, the constable, who took him into custody. I had put the eighteen spoons in a box in the cupboard at six o'clock that night. I locked it, but did not take the keys out.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. You knew him to be of very respectable parents - A. I believe so; nobody else was in the parlour when I served him.

MARY MURPHY . I am servant to Mr. Wells. A man passed me on the stairs, and asked if it was not club-night; I said No, and my mistress called me down.

JAMES WARREN . I am a constable of Marylebone. On the 22d of July I was fetched to Wells's, and took the prisoner to the watch-house. He said his father was to be found at a public-house in a street in Tottenham-court-road; that he lived at Camden-town. In consequence of what I heard, I went to No. 4, Miller-street, Camden-town, and enquired for Mr. Napper. I found nineteen pieces of plate in a box there. I afterwards saw Coates fit a key to that box, it opened it.

RICHARD COATES . I am a constable, I went to No. 4, Miller-street. I had found a key on the prisoner, which he voluntarily told me it was the key of his box. He said he did not wish me to have the key. I found a box in Miller-street, which the key opened. Warren was with me, he had found the plate overnight.

MRS. WELLS. The property is mine. When the prisoner was taken, I heard him say, he lived with his father at No. 4, Miller-street, Camden-town.

GUILTY . - DEATH Aged 18.

Strongly recommended to Mercy.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Richardson.

Reference Number: t18200918-70

969. EDWARD GROVE was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of July , one pocket-book, value 4 s. the goods of Justice Errick Bollman , from his person .

JUSTICE ERRICK BOLLMAN, M.D. I live in Sloane-street, On the 15th of July I was in St. Paul's Church-yard . I had a bustle behind me, and on turning round I saw a gentleman, who called

"Stop thief!" he pursued a person, and soon after, I saw the person pursued throw a pocketbook over the railings on the north-side. He was secured and brought back. It was the prisoner. The pocket-book was picked up; I found it was mine. I had felt it safe ten minutes before.

JOHN ALFORD CHOWN. I live near Wimbledon. I was passing through St. Paul's Church-yard, about two o'clock in the afternoon, and met three or four men, who I suspected. I turned round, and followed them five or six yards, I then saw three of them close upon Dr. Bollman, I am sure the prisoner was one of them. I saw they were picking his pocket, but could not see which hand did it; and at the same instant I saw one of them give the prisoner a pocket-book. I collared the prisoner and another, both struggled to get from me; the prisoner succeeded in getting away with the pocket-book. I let go of the other, and ran after him, and saw him throw the pocket-book over the rails. A person came up, and made a desperate effort to knock me down as I was pursuing the prisoner. He was secured before I lost sight of him, and I am sure he is one of them. I climbed over the rails, and got the pocket-book, which Dr. Bollman claimed.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200918-71

970. RICHARD STANTON was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of July , 2000 printed bills of parcels, value 2 l. 10 s. the goods of William Innes .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating them to belong to Mary Sampson Innes , widow .

ROBERT FIELDING . I am an officer. On the 25th of July, between eight and nine o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner with another man in Coleman-street, running. I stopped them, the prisoner had a bundle under his arm. I asked what it was, he said he did not know, nor did he know where he got it from; he said so two or three times. I took him to the watch-house, and found it contained 2000 bills of parcels. Mrs. Innes claimed them.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did he not say they were given him to carry - A. No.

JOHN GIRTON . I was with Fielding, and confirm his statement. The prisoner afterwards told me, a gentleman in Coleman-street gave them to him to carry to Paterson's, in Barbican. I was gone in pursuit of the other boy when the prisoner was stopped.

MARY SAMPSON INNES . William Innes was my husband. I have carried on the trade of an engraver and printer , in Bell-alley, Coleman-street , for five years, on my own account. I did not miss these bills till the officer brought them. I have the plate from which they were printed. They were safe on the desk at nine o'clock the night before. We open shop between seven and eight. My daughter was dressing to take them to Sir Robert Burnet .

Cross-examined. Q. Do you pay the engraver, or does he share the profits - I pay him; I have no partner whatever. I have not seen my husband for five years, and do not know whether I have one.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200918-72

971. JOSEPH EASTMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of August , two brass weights, value 2 s., the goods of John Bird .

JOHN MIMS . I am servant to John Bird , who keeps a cook-shop in Golden-lane. I was reading a newspaper, I heard the weights jingle, turned round, and saw the prisoner going out. I stopped him with the two weights.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Fined One Shilling, and Discharged .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200918-73

972. PETER FOULSER was indicted for embezzlement .

MR. BARRY conducted the prosecution.

SOPHIA CHAPMAN . I am the wife of Thomas Chapman . On the 29th of February I paid the prisoner 3 l. 10 s. on account of Mrs. Clark, and took his receipt (read.) I gave him four 1 l. notes, and he gave me 10 s. change.

SARAH SANDERS . I have been lately married to Mr. Sanders. On the 29th of July I was a widow, and my name was Clark; the prisoner was my servant , his duty was to collect money for me, he had a guinea a week; he was to receive a quarters rent from Mrs. Chapman, due at Christmas last - he never accounted to me for it; he ought to have paid it me immediately he received it - he absconded, and afterwards wrote me a letter.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. When did your husband die - A. On the 8th of February. Every thing was left with the prisoner after my husband was taken ill - he was a collector of rents - he was my servant to do whatever I ordered him. I was married on the 2d of May.

A letter was then read from the prisoner, acknowledging he had received various sums of money, and appropriated them to his own use, and expressing his contrition.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200918-74

973. CHARLES WATSON was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of July, 72 lbs. of candles, value 3 l., the goods of John James Cole , in his dwelling house .

MR. ARABIN conducted the prosecution.

CHARLES KITCHEN . On the 25th of July I was porter to Mr, Cole, who is a dry-salter . The prisoner was his warehouseman . In July he gave me a basket of candles to carry to Mr. Oakley, of St. Paul's Church-yard - I think, there were four dozen, he packed them up himself. Mr. Oakley did not pay me for them. My master asked me about it three days after, and I told him where I took them - I told Oakely that Watson sent them.

Cross-examined. by MR. ANDREWS. Q. The prisoner sent out all the candles - A. Yes, I do not exactly recollect how long ago it was. I did not then know I was doing wrong.

GEORGE OAKLEY . I keep the King's Head, on the south side of St. Paul's. Kitchen brought me six dozen of candles. I paid the prisoner three guineas for them - I knew nothing of Mr. Cole. The prisoner solicited my orders and I gave it him. The bill and receipt were made out in Watson's name - he gave me the bill when he called for the money.

MR. JOHN JAMES COLE . I am a dry-salter, and live in Eastcheap . The prisoner was my warehouseman. In consequence of information I had him apprehended on the 29th of July, on this charge. All the goods in my warehouse are my property. About the latter end of April the prisoner requested me to send a quantity of candles to Mr. Oakley, they are entered in my book as delivered out in May, at 9 s. 6 d. a dozen - Oakley now owes me for them. There is no other entry taken.

Cross-examined. Were they sent out in your name or his - A. Certainly in mine - I think they are not worth 40 s.

GEORGE OAKLEY re-examined. I did receive six dozen from Mr. Cole on the 1st of April.

Prisoner's Defence. I intended to make the money good on Monday.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only.

Confined Six Months .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200918-75

974. CHARLES TAVISHER was indicted for feloniously asaulting Joseph Fernie on the King's highway, on the 24th of July , putting him in fear, and taking from

his person, and against his will, one watch and chain, value 3 l; and two seals, value 2 l, his property .

JOSEPH FERNIE . I am an accountant , and live in Leadenhall-street. On the 24th of July, about a quarter before one o'clock in the day. I was at the corner of Bishopsgate-street and Leadenhall-street, I had just left the shop of Mr. Macklin the silver-smith, and on crossing to go home, I perceived a number of persons moving forward with flags and music. When I got to the corner of Leadenhall-street I saw a number of persons whose appearance attracted my attention, one of them was the prisoner - I can speak with certainty to him. I fixed my eye on him, and at that moment he made a desperate pull at my watch-chain while I was looking him in the face; I immediately collared him - my chain was broken and went with the seals, I think they were taken before he struck me - I found my watch still in my fob. I was surrounded by twenty of the gang, knocked down, and kept down until the prisoner escaped. As soon as I got from them, I ran in the direction the crowd took, came up with the prisoner at St. Peter's Church, and found a sailor scuffling with him - I endeavoured to get to them, saying

"That is the man who robbed me," but the gang said he was not the man - they all set upon the sailor, and the prisoner escaped a second time. I found him in custody on the 16th of August, on another charge. I have no doubt whatever of his being the man; I was obliged to look at him some time at the Mansion House, because he was shaven quite clean - when he robbed me he had a very rough beard.

JAMES REDFERN. I am a seaman, and live at Romford. On the 24th of July, I was in Cornhill going to the Jerusalem Coffee-house, and at the end of Bishopsgate-street there was a mob - I stopped and saw the prisoner trying to get from somebody. I am positive he is the man. A gentleman sung out

"He has got my watch stop him!." I tried to stop him - the mob pushed me violently, and he got from me; they were crying out

"That is not the man, let him go." When he got clear of me he pulled out a knife, and was going to cut away - the gang hustled him lower down, and I lost him. I saw him in custody two or three weeks afterwards, and I am certain he is the man.

LOUISA STEWART . I live in Dorset-street, Spitalfields. On the 24th of July the weavers committee had a procession, which drew a crowd. About twenty men came up in a gang in Camomile-street and about the Old City Chambers, three of them tried at a gentleman's watch - they were with a little boy, which excited my attention. The gentleman gave him a rap on the head. I observed the prisoner and another with the gang. I went to the corner of Leadenhall-street - the prosecutor stood against a post, and ten or twenty of them stood close by him, the prisoner was one; he stooped right in front of the prosecutor. I saw his hand go towards Mr. Fernie, and before he could make any resistance he pulled out his watch; as I thought. Mr. Fernie said

"I am robbed!" I said,

"That is the man who has got your watch." He collared him, and in the scuffle both fell. The gang called each other, and all got round the prosecutor and rescued the prisoner. He got as far as the coach-stand, when the sailor seized him and held him as far as St. Peter's-court. The gang said

"This is not the man," I said he was. The sailor held him a minute or two; he then cried out

"He has stabbed me!" and let him go. I saw him afterwards at Lambeth-street, and am positive he is the man. He had a large brown coat on at the time.

JOHN FORRESTER . I am an officer. On the 11th of August the prisoner was apprehended on another charge. I took Stewart to the office on the 14th; she pointed the prisoner out from among the other prisoners - the prosecutor and the sailor also swore to him.

Prisoner's Defence. I was looking at the procession, when they laid hold of me, and said I had robbed the gentleman.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Of stealing from the person only.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200918-76

EIGHTH DAY. THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 21.

975. JOHN BRUCE was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of August , four brass sheaves, value 10 d., and four other sheaves, value 10 d. , the goods o our Lord the King .

MR. BOLLAND conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM VINCENT . I am in the Ordnance Office in the Tower ; the prisoner was employed in the storehouse - the men were moving a quantity of blocks. I saw the prisoner in a part of the place he had no business in, feeling his pockets to see if they protruded, he then left the storehouse. I followed, overtook him at the Bloody Tower, and told him he had got something which he ought not to have; he said it was the first time he ever took any, and begged me not to mention it. He produced four brass sheaves from his pocket, they were the King's property.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 48.

Confined Three Weeks .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200918-77

976. JOHN ADLAND was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of August , one handkerchief, value 7 s. 6 d., the goods of William Dent , from his person .

WILLIAM DENT , ESQ. I live in Hertfordshire. On the 9th of August I was crossing from Southampton-street into the Strand , a person called after me, and produced a handkerchief, which was mine.

JOHN COOPER . I am shopman to Mr. Sparkes, a linen-draper, in Southampton-street. I saw Mr. Dent going down Southampton-street, and the prisoner with his hand in his pocket - a boy about twelve years of age was by his side. I ran out, at that time his hand was out of his pocket. I laid hold of the prisoner, and as I was calling Mr. Dent a boy said

"Look behind you." I looked, and found he he had thrown the handkerchief down on a grating, which I picked up. The little boy went off directly.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming along and he collared me, but I am innocent.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200918-78

977. ADAM DUCKETT was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of August , at St. Andrew, Holborn, 14 yards of cambric, value 4 l.; 26 yards of linen, value 2 l., and 12 yards of lawn, value 1 l., the goods of Joshua Craig , in his dwelling-house .

JOSHUA CRAIG . I am a linen-draper , and live in High Holborn ; in the parish of St. Andrew; the prisoner was my shopman . I did not miss this property, but in consequence of information which I received I went to Harrison's, the pawnbroker, in Tottenham-court-road, and found the property stated in the indictment, all of which I knew to be mine. The piece of cambric was worth 4 l. I had seen them safe in June. I gave the prisoner in charge, and told him it was for felony - he said nothing, but next morning I received a letter from him, which I knew to be his writing - I had said nothing to induce him to confess. He left my service the latter end of June. At the time of the robbery 6 l. or 7 l. was due to him for wages.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. He was going to be married - A. He had left me six weeks with an intent to commence business; he was twelve months with me. The fourteen yards of cambric were in two pieces, one of which cost me 84 s.; it was of a particularly fine quality. It was never sold.

(A letter from the prisoner was then read, confessing his guilt, and expressing sincere contrition.)

JOHN BONNELL . I am a linen-draper, and live in Shoreditch. About two months ago the prisoner came to my house, and said he had left Mr. Craig about a month; that he had been to a sale of unredeemed pledged, and bought a lot of goods very cheap. Next morning he called with them, and I bought them of him. A day or two after he called, and said he had bought some duplicates, I said I would have nothing to do with them, and that evening I sent for Mr. Craig to the Feathers, in Hand-court, and shewed him some cambric. We went to Harrison's, the pawnbroker.

CHARLES READ . I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner, and saw him give Mr. Bonnel some duplicates, which he gave to me - I produce them.

EDWARD HULL . I am shopman to Mr. Harrison, pawnbroker. I have a piece of lawn, some sarsnet, a piece of cambric, and a scarf - I do not know who pawned them. Sharp, who took them in, has left us - he was bound over to appear here, but is dangerously ill. The duplicates belong to our shop, and relate to the property I produce.

MR. BONNEL re-examined. I gave the officer the same duplicates the prisoner gave me.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

THOMAS THOMPSON . I took charge of the prisoner, and saw him write the letter.

Prisoner. I leave it entirely to your mercy.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 28.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Best.

Reference Number: t18200918-79

978. JOSEPH ELLINGER was indicted for feloniously assaulting John Aird in a certain field near the King's highway, on the 1st of August at St. John, Hackney, putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, three 10 l. two 5 l. and three 1 l. Bank notes, his property .

MR. JOHN AIRD . I live at Hackney. On the 1st of August I had been taking a walk in Hackney-fields , and was coming home, I walked on the banks of the canal , as some barges were coming along, I stood by the handle of the lock; a crowd came round, and one put his hand to my throat and crushed me back; there was a great many people, I was quite surrounded and hustled about a long time, and saw my watch chain out, I took hold of it, and the man who had hold of it made a severe pull at it, and broke the chain. I was then thrown on the ground, and all ran away. Wells came to my assistance, I found my money gone, and my pockets turned out. I lost the notes stated in the indictment, a memorandum, and some keys. I had endorsed the notes myself with

"19th July."

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You did not see the prisoner - A. I cannot say I did.

THOMAS WELLS . I am a tailor, and live at Hackney. I was within ten or fifteen yards of Mr. Aird when he was robbed, and went to his assistance. I picked him up. In consequence of something that was said, I pursued and saw the prisoner taken and searched, three 10 l. and two 5 l. Bank notes were found on him, and some papers were found in his hat. Mr. Aird was not present. I know his hand-writing, and saw it on the notes. I had followed the prisoner near a quarter of a mile.

Q. In what way was the prosecutor treated - A. He was on the ground, and several were pushing him with their knees to keep him down.

JOHN ADEY . On the 1st of August I was coming along the canal and saw the prosecutor in a flurry, he said he had been robbed. I went in pursuit with Wells, I seized another man who was by his side, but seeing a crowd by the canal. I let that man go and pursued the prisoner, saw him taken, and the notes found on him.

Cross-examined. Q. How far did you first see him off. - A. Near a quarter of a mile.

WILLIAM LANE . I am a carpenter, and live at Islington. On the 1st of August I first saw the prisoner at Cambridge Heath Bridge, running in very great haste. I heard the cry of Stop thief! and immediately pursued and secured him, with his right hand in his breeches pocket. He made great resistance, and a man came up and said

"If you do not let that man go, you will be murdered, for the gang are coming." I said, let the consequence be what it might I would not let go. Wells came up and pushed him into a private house, searched him, and took the notes from his pocket.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you know the person who said the gang was coming - A. I suspect him to be one of them. He remained with me but was not suffered to go into the house.

THOMAS FRAMPTON . I am an officer. I searched the prisoner, and found two 5 l. and three 10 l. notes on him; he said they were his own, and that it was two 5 l. and five

1 l. notes. I found some papers and a handkerchief in his hat. I delivered the notes to Howard.

HENRY HOWARD . I am an officer. I produce the notes and papers I received from Frampton.

MR. AIRD. They are the notes and memorandums which were in my pocket when I was robbed.

The prisoner made no defence.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 21.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Best.

Reference Number: t18200918-80

978. GEORGE EDWARDS was indicted for feloniously assaulting Henry Berridge on the King's highway on the 3d of July , at St. Marylebone, putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, one watch, value 4 l.; one seal 15 s.; one key, value 1 d., and one piece of ribbon, value 1 d., his property .

HENRY BERRIDGE . On the 3d of July, at half-past nine o'clock at night, I was in Edgware-road , it was not dark, but dusky. I was going down Chapel-street with Hopkins, the prisoner came behind me with two or three more, he had a dog which he was leading, and endeavoured to entangle the handkerchief or string which he had it by, round my legs; feeling it round my legs, I endeavoured to get out of his way, and he accused me of treading on his dog, he said.

"You trod on my dog," and instantly struck me in the mouth with violence, it made it bleed, he knocked me up against some shutters, came close to me, and drew my watch from my fob. I laid hold of him and accused him of stealing my watch, - I saw it in his hand, he was in the act of passing it behind him to some of the others; he then twisted under my arm and ran off, the others had run away directly he gave them the watch. I ran after him, and saw two young men stop him. He was never out of my sight. I am sure he is the man. I have not recovered my watch.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODERICK. Q. It was nearly dark - A. Yes; I looked round before it occurred, and did not notice many people about. He did not appear in liquor. I was alarmed very much and confused. I think the occurrence might last five or ten minutes. I cannot be mistaken in his person. I do not think that I trod on his dog. I certainly did not before it was twisted round my legs.

CHARLES HOPKINS . I was with the prosecutor, and saw the prisoner strike him in the face, he advanced on him, and took his watch from him as he fell against the shutters, he put it behind, and I saw one of the persons go up and receive it from him and run away. The prisoner got off and ran too, we followed, and he was never out of my sight till he was taken. I am sure he is the man.

JAMES ROBERTS . I am a coachman. I saw the prisoner strike the prosecutor against the shutters, he pulled his watch out, and gave it to one of his companions and ran away, I followed him, and was struck myself and knocked down on one knee as I attempted to take the man with the watch. I then followed the prisoner down Chapel-street, and secured him. I am certain he is the man.

THOMAS TOMS . I am a plaisterer. I stopped the prisoner; the prosecutor was three yards behind him.

The prisoner made no defence.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 27.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Best.

Reference Number: t18200918-81

979. THOMAS BROWN was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Daniel Mahoney , about the hour of six o'clock in the forenoon of the 14th of July , at St. George, ( Jane Croker and others being therein,) and stealing, one gown, value 4 s.; one petticoat, value 2 s.; two aprons, value 6 d; one pair of stockings, value 1 s.; one pocket, value 3 d., and one pocket-book, value 3 d., the goods of John Croker .

JOHN CROKER . I rent a room in Daniel Mahoney 's house, in the parish of St. George, Middlesex . On Friday morning the 14th of July, I went to Billingsgate about five o'clock, leaving my wife and two children in bed; I returned home at seven o'clock, and in about a quarter of an hour missed my wife's clothes off the back of a chair at the foot of the bed, also her pocket, which contained a pocket-book with some duplicates in it. I had left the door on the latch. I saw the prisoner the same morning at a clothes-shop in Rosemary-lane, laid hold of him, and said I understood it was him who took my property. He denied it, and attempted to get from me - I held him and delivered him to the officer. He pulled the duplicates and pocket-book from his bosom when I took him. I am sure I shut the door.

JANE CROKER . I am the prosecutor's wife. He left me in bed with the children. I awoke a little before eight o'clock, and missed my clothes from the back of the chair, my pocket, pocket-book, duplicates and a pair of stockings - I have recovered the duplicates, pocket-book, and one stocking. The clothes were worth 8 s., the property pledged, by the duplicates, was worth about 2 l. I was not awoke by any one coming into the room.

ANN COSTELLI . I work in Rosemary-lane. About half-past six o'clock on Friday morning, the 14th of July, I saw the prisoner going up the court. I opened my window and saw him go to Croker's door, lift up the latch, and go in. I stood at the door and saw him come out with a bundle, which he had not when he went in. I saw him at Lambeth-street at eleven o'clock that day, and I am sure he is the man.

JAMES GREEN . I am servant to Mr. Connel, a salesman. On the 14th of July, the prisoner brought me a pocketbook containing duplicates, and asked me to buy them. He went into the shop pulled two or three out - Croker came in, and he put the remainder of the duplicates into his pocket. Croker took him.

WILLIAM TAYLOR . I am an officer. I took the prisoner in charge with the pocket-book and duplicates.

JOHN CROKER . They are mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I was enquiring for a shipmate who lived in the same yard as the prosecutor - they said sailors lodged at that house, I went up; a woman opened the door and said the sailors were gone to work, and told me to call again - I called at eight o'clock, they were not returned, and as I came down stairs I picked up this pocket-book. I have been seventeen years in His Majesty's service, and was at the battles of Copenhagen, Trafalgar, and Algiers.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 55.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Best.

Reference Number: t18200918-82

980. JOHN KELLY was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of July , at St. Marylebone, one piece of printed calico, value 3 l., the goods of Clement Sharp , in his dwelling-house .

CLEMENT SHARP . I am an upholsterer and cabinet-maker , and live in Berner's-street, Oxford-street , in the parish of St. Marylebone. On the 12th of July, about two o'clock, I missed this piece of printed cotton from my shop, which is part of my dwelling-house - the prisoner was brought back with it about three o'clock. It is worth about 5 l.

MARY CUNNINGHAM . I work for Mr. Sharp. I was sitting at work about half-past two o'clock, and saw a man go out of the shop with a piece of cotton under his arm - I did not see his face; he had a blue coat on, and was about the size of the prisoner. I cannot swear it was him. He is the man that was brought back.

JOSEPH DANIEL . I am a jobbing porter On the 12th of August the prisoner was going by my door, I heard the cry of stop thief, and took him in Edward-street, Cavendish-square. I found nothing on him. I brought him back to Mr. Sharp's, and the constable took him. He asked me to let him walk by himself. I refused.

WILLIAM WEEDON . I produce the calico which Mr. Sharp delivered to me.

MR. SHARP. Barrand, a witness, who is not here, present, gave the calico to me, with the prisoner; he told me, in the prisoner's presence, that he saw the prisoner come out of my shop with this roll of calico in his hand - that he followed him up the street, and never lost of him till he was taken, that he saw him drop it just before he was taken, and he took it up, and still followed him. The prisoner made no answer, but said he hoped I should have mercy on him. The property is mine. I saw it in the shop the day before.

The prisoner made no defence.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 17.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Best.

Reference Number: t18200918-83

981. THOMAS FULLER HARNETT was indicted for that he, on the 2d of August , at St. Martin the Fields, having in his custody and possession, a certain bill of exchange for payment of 20 l. (setting it forth, dated the 26th July, 1820, at thirty days after date, drawn by Thomas Fuller Harnett on Lieutenant-Colonel Gordon, Fifth Dragoon Guards, Manchester), feloniously did falsely make, forge, and counterfeit upon the said bill of exchange an acceptance thereof , which is as follows: -

"Accepted. Arthur H. Gordon . Payable at Messrs. Greenwood and Co.'s, Craig's-court" - with intent to defraud Thomas Thompson .

SECOND COUNT, for feloniously uttering and publishing as true a like forged acceptance of a like bill of exchange, with a like intention, knowing it to be forged.

THIRD AND FOURTH COUNTS, the same, only stating his intention to be to defraud Arthur H. Gordon .

THOMAS GEORGE THOMPSON . I am the son of Thomas Thompson , who is a linen-draper , and lives at No. 29, St. Martin's-lane . I have frequently seen the prisoner at my father's. I believe he has been a Captain in the Army. On the 2d of August he came - he had been there on the 17th of July, and purchased about 2 l. worth of goods; he did not pay for them, but bought other goods at different times to the amount of 14 l., which he proposed paying for by a bill accepted by Colonel Gordon. On the evening of the 2d of August he brought me that bill - (looking at it) - this is it. I gave him 5 l. and some silver in change. The acceptance was on it then as it is now. On the same day, before he gave me the bill, he gave me a slip of paper to enquire about it; this is the paper - (looking at it,) read -

"Draft accepted by Col. Gordon, 5th Dragoon Guards, at thirty days, payable at Cox and Greenwood's, for 20 l." He gave me this to enquire at Cox and Co.'s, if a bill so accepted would be paid. He came in the evening, and in consequence of what passed I took it. He afterwards bought more goods, which he proposed paying for by another bill; he bought part of them that day, after he had delivered me the first bill. A few days after, he bought other goods, and on the 9th more. On the 10th he gave me another bill, and said he would send his man for the change, or come himself for it. He had had goods and cash together to the amount of 8 l. 19 s.

THOMAS THOMPSON . On the 2d of August my son gave me the bill; I paid it away to Bath and Co. on the 3d.

GEORGE PHILIP WYETT . I am clerk to Messrs. Greenwood, Cox and Co. Lieut. Col. Gordon was in the 5th Dragoon Guards - our house are agents to the regiment. I know his hand-writing - (looks at the bill) - I believe the acceptance not to be his hand-writing. I have seen him write, probably, from six to a dozen times - it bears some resemblance to his hand. He keeps cash at our house. If it was a genuine bill it would be paid. I do not know the prisoner.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Are you in the habit of paying his acceptances - A. I pay bills drawn by him, I never saw him accept a bill. I never noticed any difference in his hand. The first time I saw the bill was at Cox and Co.'s. I believe it was the day before I went to Bow-street. It was not presented for payment. The acceptance is in a different hand to the body of the bill.

COURT. Q. What is Col. Gordon's name - A. Arthur H. Gordon ; I am not acquainted with his second name. The bill was brought to our office to ascertain whether the acceptance was genuine.

Q. If it had been due then should you have paid it - A. I should consider not.

CHARLES HUMPHRYS . I am a Bow-street officer. Mr. Thompson applied for a warrant on the 11th of August, and I apprehended the prisoner in bed at the Bull and Bush on the other side of Hampstead - I told him I had a warrant against him, and told him what it was for. He said it was all his own doings, that his servant had nothing to do in it, and he must suffer. I had told him I took him for obtaining goods from Thompson by a forged acceptance on Col. Gordon. Mr. Thompson came in directly with the prisoner's servant, whom I had apprehended. When I told the prisoner he was in custody for this offence, he said he thought it was his servant's doings - the servant said nothing. The prisoner immediately said it was his own doings, and his servant had nothing to

do with it, and that he himself must suffer for it. He then said to Mr. Thompson,

"If you had remitted me the change I should have gone to Bath, then to Bristol, and from thence to Ireland."

THOMAS THOMPSON re-examined. I went into the room with the officer - the prisoner, I believe, was asleep. Humphreys touched him, he jumped up and said,

"What do you want with me?" he said,

"I have a warrant against you" -

"At whose suit?" said the prisoner; Humphrys said

"At Mr. Thompson's." I immediately shewed myself. Humphreys said,

"It is for obtaining goods from Mr. Thompson, and paying with a forged acceptance of 20 l." He got up in bed, and said

"Good God! I am undone. It is all my friends' fault that they did not relieve me." He began to dress himself. He swore at his servant, and sent him for water to mix with some laudanum. He took a bottle out of his pocket, which he called laudanum - I asked him how many drops he wished to have? he said thirty - I told his servant to give him thirty. I left the officer and my son with him while he dressed himself, and we brought him to town.

THOMAS GEORGE THOMPSON re-examined. I was in the room nearly all the time - the others were not in above two minutes before me. I think the prisoner asked for soda-water and then some gin to take some laudanum in, which he had in a phial. I heard him say if he had got the money he intended to go to Bath and Ireland, and and would have sent us the money from Ireland. He had sent his servant for the change of the second bill.

Q. Do you know the hand-writing of the body of the bill - A. I think it is the prisoner's. I saw him write the particulars of the bill - I cannot say it is the same.

(The bill was here put in and read.)

Prisoner's Defence. My Lord, it was my intention to have left my defence entirely to your Lordship's mercy, but when I hear that brought against me which is devoid of truth I cannot avoid speaking. A circumstance has been mentioned which may operate very much against me. I broke a blood-vessel about two years ago - it was not my intention to use the laudanum improperly when it was given me by the doctor. I leave the rest to your Lordship and the Jury, with only this observation, that from the suddenness of the prosecution, I have not been able to call on the most respectable families in England to give me a character.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 27.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury and Prosecutor.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Best.

Reference Number: t18200918-84

982. JAMES LEITH was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of April , one diamond and ruby ring, value 10 l., and three diamond and ruby pins, value 15 l., the goods of William Haydon , in the dwelling-house of Edward Cole .

MR. BARRY conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM HAYDON . I am a jeweller . I live in Rupert-street, Haymarket , at Mr. Cole's. On Sunday, the 2d of April, at eleven o'clock in the morning, I locked all my property up safe in the presence of two of my servants. I returned at ten o'clock at night, I found the door of my chest unlocked, and about 600 l. worth of Jewellery gone, it was all my own, except about 80 l. of Mr. Hamlet's. I heard nothing till Saturday, the 24th of June, when I called at Mr. Hatton's on business. I called again in the afternoon, and took Bedford with me. I saw a man by the door who I believe to be the prisoner.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did you not tell the Justice you went out about three o'clock - A. It was between twelve and three o'clock. When I came home I found my brother in bed, he said I was very careless about my property; for he had found diamonds on the floor. I locked the chest, but not the room door.

JOHN HATTON . I am a gold and silver refiner, and live in Chapel-street, Oxford-street, and have known the prisoner many years; on the 24th of June he brought me a ring and three pins, and asked if I would buy them, he said he had them to sell for a person who wanted 10 l. for them, and I should have them for 11 l.; he took them away. The prosecutor called on me that day, and it struck me it might be his property. I told him to come in half an hour, and I would get them from Leith, he did not come till a quarter past ten o'clock at night, and while I was talking to him, the prisoner was waiting at the door expecting either the money or the things, as I had got them from him. Haydon claimed them. I do not think them worth above 12 l.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAM HAYDON re-examined. I believe they are worth 20 l.

JOHN WARWICK . I am servant to Mr. Hatton. I saw the prisoner at his house, and the property laying on the counter.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Best.

Reference Number: t18200918-85

983. GRIFFITH PARRY was indicted for assaulting James Carter , on the Kings highway, on the 20th of August , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will one watch, value 5 l.; one chain, value 5 l.; two seals, value 1 l., and one key, value 5 s., his property .

MR. BRODERICK conducted the Prosecution.

JAMES CARTER . On the 20th of August I came from Lisson-green in the Paddington stage, which set me down at the end of Castle-street, City-road. I certainly was a little intoxicated, and in getting out of the coach I missed my step, and fell on the foot-path. I heard a voice say,

"I know the gentleman very well, and will take care of him;" the person then took me up. I turned round, and looked at him, it was the prisoner. I said I am going to Barbican; he took me down Castle-street , and in about five minutes put his foot against my heel, tripped me up, and as I fell I felt a hand at my fob, and cried out

"Do not take my watch." I am certain he tripped me up. He ran away immediately. I gave an alarm, followed him, calling Stop thief! a person brought him back, and produced my watch.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Are you certain of him - A. Yes; I observed him particularly. I knew perfectly well what I was about.

JOHN WEST . I was in Castle-street, standing at my door, I heard a person say,

"Do not take my watch." - I

then heard stop thief cried. I pursued, but did not see the prisoner till he was brought back; he then said to me, do not hurt me, the gentleman shall have his property again. I found the watch in the area of No. 10, Castle-street. The gentleman who brought him back told me it was there. Immediately I took him to Mr. Carter; he said

"You rascal, give me my watch."

SAMUEL BLACKBURN . I was passing the end of Castle-street, and heard the cry of Stop thief! turned round and saw the prisoner running, he made a full stop over the area of No. 10, as two or three got before him, he then stooped in a reclining posture. I saw him take something from his pocket, and throw it down. I saw the watch taken out of the area.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Of stealing from the person only. - Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Best.

Reference Number: t18200918-86

984. JOHN DOYLE was indicted for feloniously assaulting James Gough , in an open place, near the King's highway, on the 26th of June, putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, two coats, value 4 l.; one waistcoat, value 10 s., and two pair of trowsers, value 1 l., the goods of William Robinson .

JAMES GOUGH . I am sixteen years old. On the 26th of June I was carrying these clothes from Mr. William Robinson 's, of Ludgate-street, to No. 6, Clements-Inn. I got there at twenty minutes past twelve. I saw the prisoner at the door, he was alone. He asked if I had brought Captain Smith's clothes. I said I had, and he said he would run and fetch Captain Smith, as he was gone out with a gentleman. He returned in about five minutes, and said Captain Smith was taking a glass of wine with a gentleman, and would be home directly. I waited till Captain Smith came home. I had seen him before, and gave him the clothes. He asked if I had change for a 10 l. note, he then asked me to go with his servant and he would get me change. I came down with the prisoner (who was the servant) into the Strand, he then asked if I had got the receipt. I said I had a stamp, but it was not wrote; when I came to the turning beyond Exeter-change, he took me into a public-house, to write the receipt while he waited outside. I perceived him going on, and came out after him, and told him they could not lend me a pen and ink, and if he would come down into the Strand I could get him change, and write the receipt there. He then wanted me to wait for him at the end of Swan-yard . I said I should follow him for the money, and followed him down the yard, till he came to a cellar, he then gave me a severe blow on the eye, and knocked me down; I got up and hallooed Stop thief! but he got away.

Q. You delivered the clothes to Captain Smith, who had ordered them - Yes; the prisoner took nothing from me, my master ordered me not to part with the clothes without the money. I am sure the prisoner is the man. Captain Smith told me the prisoner could get change and pay me. I returned to Clements-Inn, and found neither him nor the goods there, and have never found them.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Had you ever delivered goods there before - A. No; I had never seen Captain Smith but once at my master's. When I saw him at Clements-Inn, he gave his servant a note, or something to pay for them. I delivered the clothes just inside the passage.

THOMAS STOCK . I am in in the employ of Mr. Robinson. On the 26th July, about a quarter before twelve I packed the parcel up for Gough to deliver to Captain Smith.

WILLIAM JEFFERSON . I am a constable. On the 5th of July I apprehended the prisoner in Long-acre, he saw me, and ran into Little St. Martin's-lane. I secured him, and told him I wanted him for the Swan-yard job, meaning this. He said he did not have the clothes. I had seen him on the 26th of June, under the Swan-yard gateway with Gough. I passed the end of the yard about ten paces, then heard the cry of Stop thief, and saw the boy covered with blood. I followed the prisoner, a number of girls of the town and others closed on the prisoner, and threw the boy down; the prisoner got away. I searched the privy of the house he ran into on the 27th, and found two sheets of brown paper there.

JAMES GOUGH . They are the two sheets of paper the clothes were wrapped in, I think. I left paper and all with the Captain. He did not open it.

THOMAS STOCK . I cannot swear to the paper positively, but it appears to be the same, here is a smaller piece which was put on the top of them, as the two sheets were not large enough.

MARY THURLOW . I am a straw bonnet maker. On the 26th of June, between one and two o'clock, the prisoner ran down into my kitchen, a mob came down the court, calling Stop thief! he was in the kitchen one or two minutes, then pulled his coat off, and went up stairs to the people who lived in the garret. He went out in about ten minutes; the person in the garret was named King, he appeared a horse-dealer.

WILLIAM WILSON . I am a linen-draper. I was with Jefferson when he took the prisoner, a mob collected round, and attempted to rescue him. Jefferson said

"I want you for the Swan-yard job." He said, I know nothing of the clothes. The boy pointed him out from among sixteen others.

Prisoner's Defence(written.) I was standing at Parr's Register Office. A gentleman came and asked if I wanted a place, and if I was used to the care of horses, he gave me his address,

"Captain Smith, No. 5, Clements-Inn," and told me to wait outside the door till a bundle came, then to ask if it was for him; then I was to fetch him from the Angel. The lad gave him the bundle, he then said,

"Take that 10 l. cheque to Mr. Burn's, in the Strand, and enquire if he can change it." I could find no such person; the boy said I had better go to his master. I gave him the paper, and told him to bring the change back, he was insolent, and said I had robbed him, and so I gave him a slap in the face. I returned to look for Smith, but could not find him.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Of stealing from the person only. - Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Best.

Reference Number: t18200918-87

985. JAMES DENCH was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of April , one gelding, price 5 l. , the property of Lettey Brewer .

JOHN MANCHESTER . I live at Islington. On the 28th of April I bought a gelding of the prisoner in Smithfield, for 4 l. 10 s. On the 8th of July Brewer claimed it.

WILLIAM HULL . I am an officer. On the 20th of July I apprehended the prisoner in Smithfield, by order of Manchester, for selling him a stolen horse. He said he bought it of a man named Sinfield.

WILLIAM HAYDON . I live at Luton, in Bedfordshire. I was present when the prisoner was taken. I knew the horse to be Brewer's. I saw her at Luton market with it on a Monday, it was stolen the Tuesday following.

THOMAS HEDGES . My father sold the horse to Mrs. Brewer. On the evening of the 13th of April I saw it in her possession, about dusk; next morning I found it gone, and her stable broken open.

LETEY BREWER. I deal in straw plat . On the 13th of April, between nine and ten o'clock at night, I locked the horse in the stable, and between five and six o'clock the next morning I found it gone, and the stable broken open. I live at Luton , which is thirty-three miles from town. I found it on the 28th of July in Bull Head-yard, Smithfield, and am sure it is mine. It cost me eleven guineas ten years ago. It was a brown horse, about fourteen hands high, had lost an eye, and had a white blaze down the forehead.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought the horse, and not being able to write, I got a person to write a receipt; I was soon after called on to account for it, and tried all I could to find the person. He gave his name to me,

" David Sinfield , Little Brick Hill, Buckinghamshire." The first Sunday I was in Newgate, to my astonishment, I saw Sinfield in the chapel - he was convicted last Session of horse-stealing, which horse, I believe, was stolen from Buckinghamshire. I immediately identified him, and when I saw Mr. Sheriff Parkins I told him of the circumstance - he asked if any other person could identify him. I said Yes; he then ordered Sinfield to be put with other persons, and my friends were sent for, they immediately identified him. I requested he might not be sent away, but he was sent to Sheerness, and when he arrived there, I am informed, he wrote a letter to Mr. Hardy, stating that I was innocent.

JOHN BULLOCK . I live with Mr. Marne, who is a horse-dealer, in Great Dover-road, Borough. About the 14th or 15th of April my master sent me into Kent-street. I met a man in the alley on a horse, with a broken knee, and blind in one eye. I asked him the price - he said 4 l. but at last he said I might have it for 3 l. 10 s.

COURT. Q. Should you know the horse again - A. Yes; I have not seen it since, but by the description given of it, I think this is it. I met a man about an hour after, who said Deneh had bought it. The prisoner is a costermonger - he did not deal in horses; he kept a horse and cart.

Q. What sort of a man was it - A. A young man, rather pale, about my height; he had a brown coat, velveteen breeches, a redish waistcoat, and high-low shoes; he was sitting on an old coat, and had neither saddle or bridle, only a halter in the horse's mouth. The horse looked very poor - this was about nine o'clock on Saturday morning - both its knees were broken, but not bleeding; the skin appeared white.

Q. It could not have been done so late as the night before - A. No, it was an old wound. I have not seen the man since.

MRS. BREWER re-examined. At the time I lost it there was not a blemish in it at all.

THOMAS HEDGES re-examined. The horse's knees were not at all blemished.

WILLIAM HAYDON re-examined. It had no blemish whatever, but it had broken knees when I saw it after it was stolen.

ENOS HANCOCK . I am the prisoner's servant. On the 15th of April I saw him buy the horse in Kent-street for 3 l.; it was a dark brown horse, had four black legs, two cut knees, and its right eye was out. The man gave his name,

" Richard Sinfield , Little Brick-hill, Buckinghamshire." I afterwards saw him in Newgate, and am sure he is the man.

COURT. Q. Were its knees bleeding - A. No, it seemed a fresh cut, the hair was all off - there was no scab; it did not seem to have bled. It was about fourteen hands and a half high. The man said Bullock had bid money for it. The horse only had a halter. I worked the horse three weeks after about the country with hams and cheeses - this I am sure of, and was present when my master sold it. Both its knees were cut - the skin had been grazed, but there was no scab.

Q. If the skin was grazed there must have been a scab at one time or other - A. Yes.

JOHN FINLETTER . I keep a horse and cart, and sell firewood. I was present when the prisoner bought the horse at the Golden Lion, in Kent-street, for 3 l. - it had black legs, two knees cut, and its right eye out. The prisoner said he thought it was necessary that I should go over to write the address down, as the man was a stranger. I wrote a receipt as well as I could. I have seen him since in Newgate, and am sure he is the man. His name is David Sinfield. I produce what I wrote - (read) -

" David Sinfield , of Little Brick-hill, Bucks, sold a horse to Dench on the 14th of April, 1820, for 3 l. Witness, J. Finletter."

COURT. Q. Have you kept that ever since - A. It was given to me to bring forward. I wrote it when he bought the horse. I have seen the horse since Dench was apprehended.

Q. Are you certain Sinfield is the man - A. I am not. I said I thought he was the man. When he sold the horse he had a white coat, corded breeches, and top boots and spurs. He had a saddle, which appeared to have been in use sometime, and I believe the stirrups were plated; it was an iron bit.

GEORGE MIMS . I know the prisoner. I went to Newgate with Finletter and Hancock - Finletter immediately knew the man, and was quite sure of him.

COURT. Q. He has sworn he is not sure of him - A. Hancock said he was the man.

J. W. PARKINS, ESQ. SHERIFF. I was present when Finletter and Hancock saw Sinfield among other prisoners - Finletter hesitated, and said that he was not the man, and after coming away I heard him say he was afraid of his life to declare he was the man. On a subsequent day

Hancock pointed Sinfield out positively as the man. I had placed Sinfield in a room with other prisoners of his size, and sent them through a room where Hancock sat, and he said he was the man.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200918-88

986. LEWIS KELDEN was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of July , 15 lbs. of copper, value 18 s., belonging to Julius Ludolphus Schroder , John Lutwych , and John William Bryant , and fixed to a building of theirs .

SECOND COUNT stating it to belong to Julius Ludolphus Schroder , and fixed to a building of his.

GEORGE BAYLIS . I am a patrol of Vintry Ward. On the 10th of July, between one and two o'clock in the morning, Dawson, the watchman, brought two pieces of copper to me, which he said he found at the door of the sugar-house in Maiden-lane , they weighed 15 lbs. I went with him, searched the premises, and saw where the copper had been taken from, the mortar was quite fresh - we found a hammer and wrench just by, which it had been done with. The prisoner was brought down from the upper part of the premises; I took him to the watch-house, and put the tools upon the table. He said the hammer was his, but he did not know the wrench.

THOMAS DAWSON . I am a watchman. Mr. Schroder's sugar-house is in my beat. Between one and two o'clock I saw a light there, and heard a noise like copper moving. I found the door not locked, and two pieces of copper outside on the threshold - the moment I called my partner the light was put out. Baylis went with me, the prisoner was brought down.

JOHN PETTIFER . I am a watchman. I saw the copper at the door - the light was put out when I came up. I went on the roof of the premises with Mr. Schroder, and found the prisoner behind a chimney, brought him down, and asked him if he had any more with him? he said he was alone.

MR. JULIUS LUDOLPHUS SCHRODER . I am a sugar-refiner . The premises were not at work at this time. I consider the buildings to be my sole property. I am in possession of them. I was called up by the watchman, and found part of the copper gone - it was the lining of some frame-work, it appeared quite fresh done. I fitted it with the copper that remained - much more was taken.

Prisoner's Defence. I saw the door half open, and went there to sleep, as I was turned out of my lodgings. When the watchman came I was alarmed, and ran upon the roof.

GUILTY . Aged 60.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200918-89

NINTH DAY, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 22.

987. PATRICK CANNON was indicted for bigamy .

MR. ARABIN conducted the prosecution.

JOHN TAYLOR . I am parish-clerk of St. Martin in the Fields. I produce the register, by which I find, that on the 10th of September, 1819, Patrick Cannon was married by banns, to Sarah Davis - his mark is put to it, and it is witnessed by Eliza Curry and myself.

MARY CURRY . I had a daughter named Eliza, she is now deceased. The signature to the register is her writing. I knew the prisoner well - he was then a neighbour of mine. I was intimate with Sarah Davis - I sent them the fruit for their wedding dinner. I know my daughter left my house to accompany them to church - after that Davis went by the name of Mrs. Cannon. They lived together as husband and wife, and he always called her his wife from that day. I saw her last week, she was then alive.

Cross-examined by MR. WALFORD. Q, Where do you live - A. In Whitcombe-street; I then lived in Bluecross-street. I am a grocer - I have lived in that neighbourhood thirteen years - my daughter dined with them.

THOMAS CURRY . I am brother to Eliza Curry . The hand-writing to the register is hers. I know the prisoner and Davis lived together as man and wife till within the last five months. The prisoner used to call her Mrs. Cannon.

- DAVIS. Sarah Davis is my daughter. I never heard of her being married to the prisoner - I was told she was. She went by the name of Cannon.

ANN CLARK . I first became acquainted with the prisoner three years ago; he courted me two years, and told me he was single. I was married to him at Christ church Newgate-street , on the 25th of July, 1818, by the name of James Cannon . I had saved about 8 l. in service, and had 50 l. left me. He lived four months with me - spent all my money, and left me pregnant by him. I then lived on Saffron-hill - my child is now dead. When he left me I was obliged to get relief from the parish.

JOHN CARTER . I am an officer of St. Andrew's parish. Clark complained of the prisoner deserting her, for which I apprehended him in Drury-lane; he was imprisoned in Clerkenwell. I afterwards found he had been married before. I produce a copy of the register at Christ church, - (read.).

Prisoner's Defence. I leave it to my Counsel.

The prisoner's counsel called several witnesses to prove they had seen one Patrick Cannon in company with one Sarah Davis , as man and wife; and that the prisoner always went by the name of James.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200918-90

988. JANE HAWKINS and MARY GIBSON were indicted for stealing, on the 22d of July , one watch, value 4 l.; one chain, value 1 s., and two seals, value 2 s., the goods of Thomas Griffiths , from his person .

THOMAS GRIFFITHS. I am a carpenter . On the night of the 22d of July, I was going down Gray's Inn-lane , two or three woman stood at the corner of Liquorpond-street. The prisoners followed me down Gray's Inn-lane, and laid hold of my arms on each side. Hawkins asked me to go home with her - I said No. She immediately snatched my watch from my fob, and handed it to Gibson. I seized Hawkins, and Gibson ran away - I called the watchman, and he took Gibson.

Prisoner HAWKINS. Q. Was you not tipsey - A. No. It was about twelve o'clock.

ROBERT HILL . I am sergeant of the watch. I was on duty near the end of Little Gray's Inn-lane. The prosecutor gave Hawkins to me, and said, in her presence, that he saw her hand his watch to another woman. I sent Murphy after her - he brought Gibson back, and took the watch from her pocket.

WILLIAM MURPHY . I apprehended Gibson in Gray's Inn-lane. I searched her, and found the watch in her pocket.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

HAWKINS'S Defence. He was in liquor, and he asked me to go with him. I refused, and he said I took his watch.

GIBSON'S Defence. The watchman picked it off the ground.

WILLIAM MURPHY . I took it from her pocket.

JAMES MURRELL . I am a manufacturing jeweller. The watchman told me he found the watch on the ground. He spoke low to me.

WILLIAM MURPHY . It is false.

SARAH IRESON . I heard the watchman say he found it on the ground by Gibson - he said so outside the door.

ROBERT HILL re-examined. I held Gibson, while he took the watch from her pocket.

JANE HAWKINS - GUILTY . Aged 29.

MARY GIBSON - GUILTY . Aged 33.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Best.

Reference Number: t18200918-91

989. HENRY JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of July at Ealing, thirteen yards of linen, value 26 s.; thirteen yards of cotton, value 15 s.; two pair of stockings, value 4 s., and three handkerchiefs, value 4 s., the goods of Henry Payne , in the dwelling-house of Thomas Pratt .

ELIZA PAYNE . I am the wife of Henry Payne , who is a gardener at Twickenham. On the 11th of July, I bought the articles stated in the indictment at Mr. Sexton's. I left the parcel at Thomas Pratt 's at Brentford , on a table by the window, which was open. I went out for half an hour, and on returning, it was gone - I paid 47 s. for it all - it was afterwards produced.

Cross-examined. The bill of parcels still remained in it, by which I knew it.

GEORGE CLEMENCE . When the prisoner was apprehended he took me to a field, delivered me the parcel, and said he hoped the people would not come against him.

WILLIAM ADDERLEY . I am constable of Ealing. Pratt's house is not in that parish. The prisoner was brought to me on the 11th of July, at ten o'clock at night, with the parcel.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Of stealing, but not in a dwelling-house.

Confined Six Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Best.

Reference Number: t18200918-92

990. CHARLES BRETON was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of August , two coats, value 1 l.; one pair of trowsers, value 5 s.; one waistcoat, value 2 s., and one shirt, value 2 s., the goods of Edward Haarnack ; one jacket, value 5 s.; one waistcoat, value 2 s., and one pair of trowers, value 4 s., the goods of Christian Haarnack ; one jacket, value 5 s., and one pair of trowsers, the goods of Henry Haarnack ; and one sheet, value 2 s., the goods of Sarah Haarnack , in the dwelling-house of Mary Langley .

SARAH HAARNACK . I live in Mary Langley 's house, at St. Pancras . On the 30th of August I lost my son's clothes out of my drawers. I found the drawers open about eleven o'clock, and saw the things at Marlborough-street in about an hour.

ANN MORRIS . I live at Langley's house, in the next room to the prosecutrix. She went out about eleven o'clock, and left me the key to attend to her child, which was asleep in her room. I went into the kitchen, came up in about twenty minutes, and found her door open. I pushed her door, somebody pushed against it, the prisoner then came out, and knocked me down. I screamed out, he got down stairs into the street, and threw a black silk handkerchief down in the passage. I ran after him, and my father, William Clark , pursued and brought him back. I am sure he is the man; I never lost sight of him till I shewed him to my father. I went into the room, and found all the things tied up on the drawers, ready to be taken away.

WILLIAM CLARK . My daughter pointed the prisoner out, I pursued and brought him back. He said he was not the man, my daughter said he was. I found the shirt in his hat.

THOMAS RICHARDS . The prisoner was given into my charge - he said he did it through distress.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Best.

Reference Number: t18200918-93

991. RICHARD BRADSTREET was indicted for feloniously assaulting Thomas Owen , on the 24th of July , at Hornsey, in a certain open place near the King's highway, putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, the sum of 5 s. in monies numbered, his property .

THOMAS OWEN . I am shopman to an apothecary . On the 24th of July I had been to Edmonton, and was returning to town. When I got to Hornsey fifty or sixty men surrounded me - there was going to be a fight, and a number of people were collected to see it. A number of them got round me, pushed me about, tore off the skirt of my coat, and my pocket, which contained several letters and bills which I had paid. On turning round I caught the prisoner's hand in my breeches-pocket, which had 7 s. or 7 s. 6 d. in it at the time - when I got clear of the mob I found only 18 d. remaining. My knife and several other things were gone. I am sure the prisoner was one of them. I came home, told two or three people of it, and saw the prisoner next morning playing on a dung-heap with another lad, in the Jolly Butcher's yard, and knew him directly - I sent for Allen, who took him. I had seen him pass our door eight or nine times before. I live

within four doors of the Jolly Butchers. When I was robbed the skirt of my coat was thrown at me again. It was cut so as to take my inside and outside pocket; it was cut through the seam and then completely torn off. I am certain it was first cut with some sharp instrument. I was much alarmed at the time and resisted, but while some held my arms the others cut my coat away.

WILLIAM ALLEN . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner on the 25th of July about twelve o'clock, I did not search him.

Prisoner's Defence. I was bathing in the New River, heard a there was a fight, and went to see it. I came home and went to work at my master's, where I have been four years and a half.

WILLIAM ALLEN . He did work in that yard but not then.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 14.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Best.

Reference Number: t18200918-94

992. JOHN HEMMINGS , JOHN CONNELLY , and JAMES JACOBS were indicted for feloniously assaulting Joseph Wright in an open place near the King's highway, at St. Paul, Covent-garden, on the 1st of August , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, one watch, value 1 l.; one watch-chain, value 1 s., and one watch-key, value 1 d., his property .

JOSEPH WRIGHT . I am a potatoe-merchant . On the 1st of August, as half-past six o'clock in the morning, I was in Covent-garden on business, walking behind my man, who had a load of cabbages on his back. I had one hand on a cabbage to prevent it falling, and as I came against a stand the prisoner, Jacobs, rushed against me, pushed me against some baskets, and then put his arms round my body. As soon as I recovered myself a little I felt my watch go from my fob. Hemmings drove against me also with violence, as if he was in liquor. I felt my watch go, and saw it passed to Hemmings - I saw Jacobs hand it over to Hemmings; I immediately charged Hemmings with robbing me of my watch, as I saw it last in his possession, he said he had not got it - we secured them. I thought Connelly was one of the party, as he said he was an officer, and wanted to take one of them from me; he did not touch me or receive the watch. We took them all three to Bow-street, where Wilcox produced my watch.

Cross-examined by MR. BOLLAND. Q. What part of the market was this in - A. It was at the end of James-street - that part was not crowded. I am convinced that only the three prisoners were together when I saw them. I saw Hemmings receive my watch. All three presented themselves together.

GEORGE NICHOLS . I am a potatoe salesman in Covent-garden market. I saw Wright lay hold of Hemmings, and say,

"You have robbed me of my watch!" he said nothing that I heard. Connelly laid hold of Hemmings, and tried to rescue him from Wright. I then took Connelly, and saw Jacobs stooping down - Hemmings did not appear drunk. They were all taken to the watch-house.

THOMAS AGAR . I am a green-grocer. I was passing, heard Wright accuse Jacobs of stealing his watch, and said if he had not got it he had given it to that man (pointing to Hemmings) whom I immediately secured - I saw nothing more.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. He charged Jacobs with taking it - A. Yes, and of passing it to Hemmings. He said,

"You took my watch, and passed it to that man."

RICHARD WILCOX . I am a gardener. I heard the prosecutor charge Jacobs with robbing him of his watch. He collared him, a scuffle ensued, a crowed collected, and as soon as it dispersed a woman came by. I saw the watch laying between two baskets, about two yards from where the prosecutor attacked Jacobs; the woman picked it up and gave it to me - I produce it.

JOSEPH WRIGHT re-examined. The watch is mine.

JACOBS'S Defence. I was buying some things, saw a crowd, went up, and he collared me.

HEMMINGS - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 23.

CONNELLY - NOT GUILTY .

JACOBS - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 21.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Best.

Reference Number: t18200918-95

993. HANNAH JARVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of September , at St. James, Clerkenwell, in the dwelling-house of Thomas Rogers , five 5 l. and two 1 l. Bank notes, the property of Elen Woodfall , widow .

THOMAS ROGERS . I am a dealer in carpets, and live at No. 1, Spencer-row, Goswell-street-road , in the parish of St. James, Clerkenwell; the prisoner was my servant - I discharged her on the 11th of September. Mrs. Woodfall has boarded and lodged with me for eight or nine years.

ELEN WOODFALL . I saw my notes safe about a week before Monday se'nnight; they were in a tin box, locked up in another box, which I kept in my bed-room. I missed five 5 l., and, I think, three 1 l. notes, but I am certain of two. I cannot tell when I lost them. I saw the prisoner in custody the day after she left her place; one of my 5 l. notes was found in her possession - I know it to be mine.

JOHN LIMBRICK . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner on Tuesday, the 12th, and found a 5 l. note, No. 19087, three 1 l. notes, and some silver on her. I charged her with robbing Mrs. Woodfall. She went up stairs to be searched by some women, came down again, and at the lock-up place she said she hoped Mr. Rogers would not be hard with her, and that she could not tell what she was about - that was all she said to me. I found some things at her lodgings, which she said she bought with the notes. I took the prisoner at Mr. King's. I produce the note.

MRS. WOODFALL. I know my notes were following numbers. I produce one that was left in my box, it is 19088 - the notes that were lost were following numbers below this, I am sure of it.

SUSAN BRIEN . I was at Mr. King's shop when the prisoner came in, she produced four or five notes, and paid him some. The officer took her away. I searched her up stairs, and found nothing but a ring on her. I urged her strongly to confess.

JURY to MRS. WOODFALL. Q. Do you recollect the number of the note, or has it been mentioned to you here - A. No, I recollect it.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 25.

Recommended to Mercy.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Best.

Reference Number: t18200918-96

994. ROBERT WEBSTER was indicted for feloniously assaulting Thomas Allerson , on the Kings highway, at St. James, Westminster, on the 29th of August , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, one watch, value 3 l.; one watch-chain, value 6 s.; one seal, value 4 d., and two watch keys, value 2 d. his property .

THOMAS ALLERSON . I am a publican . On the 29th of August, about one o'clock in the day, I was in St. James's-square , a mob came round, hustled me, and forced me against the iron-railing. I tried to extricate myself from them, and then found my watch was gone, they were about two minutes hustling me, they turned my waistcoat up, and took my watch. I do not know who did it. I dare say twenty of them got round me, and forced me against the railing. I was within three doors of Lord Castlereagh's house. I do not know the prisoner.

WILLIAM SMITH . I am a patrol of Bow-street. I saw the prisoner with three others in the square, and followed him out of the mob. Furzman took hold of him, and I took this watch out of his trowsers pocket.

THOMAS ALLERSON . It is my watch.

JOHN FURZMAN . I am an officer, and was with Smith. I saw the prisoner putting the watch in his pocket, nearly opposite Lord Castlereagh's house; he was near the rails; three others were following him out of the crowd. I followed him to the other end of the square, and then took him. The watch was found in his pocket. He could not have picked it up; there were too many people.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked it up by Lord Castlereagh's house, and said,

"Is there any one who owns this watch." The man saw me put it in my pocket and took me.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 22.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Best.

Reference Number: t18200918-97

995. DANIEL LOW and JOHN FOX were indicted for feloniously assaulting William Izod , on the King's highway, on the 10th of August , at St. Leonard, Shoreditch, putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, one watch, value 40 s., his property .

WILLIAM IZOD . I am a baker , and live in Harlequin-street, Hoxton. On the 10th of August, about half-past eleven o'clock in the morning, I was going through Spital-square , and was met by three men, the prisoners and another. I am sure of their persons. Low came before me, and threw me back against a window, and drew my watch out, I laid hold of him. Fox was close to him. Fox was on one side, and the other man on the other. Beaumont came up; I said to him, in their presence,

"This young man has robbed me of my watch." I had hold of Low at the time. He said directly that he had not got it. Beaumont said

"You have, for I saw it in your hand after you took it from him." He took him in custody. Fox ran away when I secured Low, but the beadle met and stopped him.

Cross-examined by MR. NORRIS. Q. Fox did nothing - A. No; he was close to the others. I saw them all three talking together for several yards before they came up. Fox was stopped ten or eleven houses from where I was robbed. He walked away, but when there was a cry of Stop thief! he ran.

JAMES BEAUMONT . On the 10th of August I saw the two prisoners and another, all three pressing against Izod. I saw Low take the watch from him. I immediately came up, collared Low, and said he had stolen the old gentleman's watch; he denied it. I saw it in his left hand, and saw him put it behind him, he let it fall, and I picked it up. Fox walked away with the other. I saw them all three pressing on the old gentleman.

Prisoner. LOW. Q. Did not a man in a brown coat pick it up and give it to you - A. No; a man in a brown coat was in their company, he was going to pick it up. I asked what he was going to do with it. He said I will give it to you. I thanked him, and picked it up myself.

WILLIAM IZOD . The watch is mine.

LOW's Defence. He charged me with it, but I am innocent. Nobody was near me.

LOW - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 17.

FOX - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 18.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Best.

Reference Number: t18200918-98

996. HENRY LEE and JOHN THOMAS MARTIN were indicted for stealing on the 31st of August , at St. John, at Hackney, three coats, value 4 l., and two pair of pantaloons, value 14 s., the goods of Alida Hilliard , widow , in her dwelling-house .

ELIZABETH WALLIS . I am servant to Mrs. Alida Hilliard , who is a widow, and lives at Upper-Clapton , in the parish of St. John, Hackney. On the 31st of August these clothes were lost from the dressing-room, they belonged to her late husband. I saw the prisoner, Martin, about a quarter past three o'clock in the afternoon, sitting by the side-door, within a dozen yards of the house. I saw the things at Worship-street the same evening.

LUCY PLASTOW . I am the prosecutrix's servant. On the 31st of August, at a quarter past three o'clock, I saw Lee in Hill-street, looking into the front room, outside the area wall, talking to some one, but I did not see who. I could not see the side door when I was passing by him. I went and looked out of the side door, and saw the feet of two men, who were in conversation. I did not see who they were. I went in, shut the door, and went up stairs to the nursery, and in twenty minutes after I saw Lee go out of the front court, he looked up at me and shut the gate after him with both hands in his pocket. He went up Hill-street. I missed the clothes in about ten minutes. I had seen them in the wardrobe a day or two before. I found the window open, any one could get in there; it was over a cellar window, a man might step up from the ground and get in.

ANN NEWMAN . I am a dress-maker. I live at Newlington. On the 31st of August, I was at Upper Clapton; I saw both the prisoners walking by the side wall of Mrs. Hilliard's house. They then went and sat down, and as I returned in ten minutes, I saw them both standing at the side door with a bundle, it was between two and three o'clock. I afterwards saw them in custody, and I am sure of their persons.

JOHN BALLASIER . I am a plasterer. I saw the prisoners together at one o'clock, coming across the Bird-cage fields, about a quarter of a mile from the prosecutrix's house, and about two o'clock I saw them both together get behind the prosecutrix's area-wall. I watched them,

and about three o'clock I went across to my place, and saw Lee lift Martin up, and take a bundle over the prosecutrix's fence. I ran and told her; pursued, and saw Martin drop the bundle. I ran on. The officer picked it up. I secured, and delivered him to Prescod. I am sure of both their persons.

ROBERT PRESCOD . I am an officer. I pursued with Ballasier; I saw Martin drop the bundle, I picked it up; he begged for mercy. I had said nothing to him. I assisted in apprehending Lee two days after in Whitechapel. I had seen him running with Martin on the day of the robbery; I knew him before perfectly well. The clothes are worth 10 l. and are nearly new.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

LEE'S Defence. At Worship-street the lady swore she saw me take the things out of the window.

ANN NEWMAN re-examined. I said no such thing.

LEE - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 15.

MARTIN - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 18.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Best.

Reference Number: t18200918-99

997. JAMES JAMES was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Chapman , about eleven o'clock in the forenoon, on the 12th of September , (Eliza, his wife, being therein) and stealing one pair of breeches, value 5 s., his property .

THOMAS CHAPMAN . I live in Hoxton-fields . On the 11th of August I went out about eleven o'clock in the morning. I saw the prisoner and another laying in a field in which my house stands, as I thought, asleep. I went up Ask-terrace, met a friend, turned round, and saw them both go towards my house; I saw the prisoner lift the other in at the window, which was shut before I came out, he gave the prisoner a pair of breeches. I ran and saw him stopped with the breeches under his arm. He was never out of my sight. They were not worth 5 s.

JOHN LANCASTER . I am a labourer. I stopped the prisoner in Scott's-road, with the breeches under his arm.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was awoke by a cry of

"Stop thief!" ran away, and was stopped. The property was not found on me.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Of stealing to the value of 1 s. only.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Best.

Reference Number: t18200918-100

998. JAMES ROBERTS was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of September , one mare, price 10 l. the property of James Cood .

JAMES COOD . I live in Saunder's-gardens, Kingsland-road. I lent my mare to Sarah, my sister. I have since seen it in the possession of Jenkins. I am sure it is mine.

SARAH COOD . My brother lent me the mare. I kept it at Walthamstow. On the 11th of May it was turned out on Epping-forest , six miles from town, and on the 12th it was gone. My brother brought it to me last Tuesday week. I am sure it is the same.

EDWARD JENKINS . I bought the mare of Slaughter the latter end of May, and delivered it to Cood.

SAMUEL SLAUGHTER . I bought the mare of the prisoner about the middle of May; he brought her to me in Euston-mews, Euston-square, and asked for a man named Moore. I asked if the mare was for sale, he said Yes; and asked 6 l. for her, which I gave him after I had been to Jenkins to see if he would buy her. I am sure the prisoner is the person. He said he was a cow-keeper, and lived in Bishopsgate-street.

Cross-examined by MR. ARABIN. Q. When was it - A. I think it was on the 24th of May, it was about a week before Epsom Races. I believe after he was taken, the Magistrate allowed him two days liberty to find the man he said he bought it of.

JOHN MANCE . I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner on the 8th of September, in Sweet Apple-court. I told him not to hurry himself, but to say how he became possessed of the mare. He said he swapped a poney for her at Blackheath-fair. He said he did not think he should know the man again. I then asked him if any witness was by. I told him not to hurry himself; he said he believed not; No. He said Slaughter sold her for him. He was examined next day, and told the Magistrate two Jews were present when he bought her.

THOMAS VANN . I am an officer. I assisted in apprehending the prisoner. He said he could not recollect any witness being present.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent.

SAMUEL DAVIS . I am a horse-dealer, and live in Middlesex-street, Whitechapel. I was at Blackheath-fair on the 12th of May, with the prisoner; we sat off together from the stable in Bishopsgate-street, he deals in cows and horses , we went together in a chaise-cart, and had a black poney behind, which he swapped away for this mare and a 1 l. note, with a farmer-looking man, who said he came from some part of Wales. I have known him six months, he bears a very good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Best.

Reference Number: t18200918-101

999. ESTHER SHERIDAN was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of July , one set of bed-furniture, value 4 l.; two sheets, value 5 s., and two sheets, value 4 s., the goods of Thomas Evans , in his dwelling-house .

THOMAS EVANS . I live in St. Martin's-street . The prisoner was my housekeeper , and had the care of every thing. She left me on the 18th of July, and next morning I missed this property. I found them in pledge.

JOHN PURTON . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner, I found sixteen duplicates on her. She said she had nothing but her own things.

THOMAS JONES . I am an apprentice to Mr. Temple. On the 12th of June the prisoner pledged three sheets with me.

JAMES LAWSON . I am servant to Mr. Dobree. The prisoner pledged several articles with me, among others is some bed-furniture, which was worth 20 s. She never pledged 40 s. worth of property with me at once.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The sheets are mine. He could not pay me, and I made free with the other things.

GUILTY . Aged 42.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Best.

Reference Number: t18200918-102

1000. ROBERT PLATT and JAMES SMITH were indicted for feloniously assaulting Abraham Simmons , on the King's highway, on the 20th of June , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, one watch, value 12 l.; one chain, value 4 l.; two seals, value 2 l., and one key, value 10 s., his property ,

ABRAMAM SIMMONS. I am an army-clothier . On the 20th of June, about half-past eight o'clock in the evening, I was walking down the Strand , and just as I got to the corner of Round-court, I saw the prisoner, Platt, push me off the curb, and at that very moment Smith came in front of me, drew my watch from my fob, and ran up the court with it. I followed, calling Stop thief! we both fell down, and at that moment I endeavoured to lay hold of his hand which had the watch in it. Platt came up, struck me several blows, and said

"What do you want with this man." They both got off. I am positive to their persons. I was merely pushed slightly off the curb. I saw them in custody about ten days after.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Was it dark - No; I had frequently seen them both about the neighbourhood before, and knew them.

WILLIAM JEFFERSON . I am an officer. I and Maidment apprehended Smith about the middle of July, and found two handkerchiefs, the cap of a watch, two watch keys, and a piece of crooked wire on him. I found a letter in his pocket. - (read.)

Dear Friends. -

"Mike and I am now in trouble through getting you away, and hope you will not forget me now I am there; all I ask of you is to get me a counsellor, and nothing else. I expect to suffer for it, but if I get counsel I may get off, as I am called Captain of the Gang. The watchman swears to my cutting his head, and getting you away."

R. PLATT.

SAMUEL LACK . I apprehended Platt.

SMITH'S Defence. The letter cannot relate to this robbery, for no watchman was there.

SMITH - GUILTY . Aged 21.

PLATT - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Of stealing from the person only. - Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Best.

Reference Number: t18200918-103

1001. JOHN HOLDER MERRET was indicted for embezzlement .

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200918-104

1002. ANN JUDD was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of August , one set of bed-furniture, value 10 s. , the goods of Thomas Sparks .

ANN SPARKS . I am wife of Thomas Sparks ; we live in Cartwright-square, East Smithfield . I left home about four o'clock on the 12th of August, returned next day, and I missed this bed furniture. The prisoner washed for me. I did not leave her in the house. I met her afterwards, and urged her to confess.

JOHN CARLISLE . I took her in charge, and found the furniture was pledged by a duplicate which Sparks gave me.

JOHN LAPPAGE . I am servant to Mr. Harris, a pawnbroker. On the 11th of August the prisoner pledged the furniture.

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutrix sent me to pledge it, as I could get no money from her.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200918-105

1003. HANNAH EMMENS was indicted, for stealing, on the 17th of July , six sheets, value 30 s.; two pair of stockings, value 2 s.; two table-cloths, value 20 s.; four shifts, value 20 s.; four handkerchiefs, value 4 s.; six towels, value 6 s., and one blanket, value 4 s. , the goods of James Lester .

Mr. Arabin, on behalf of the prosecution, declined offering evidence, not being able to prove the case.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200918-106

1004. THOMAS ROSS was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of September , one handkerchief, value 4 s., the goods of William Woodroffe , from his person .

WILLIAM WOODROFFE . I live in Fleet-lane. On the 14th of September, about eight o'clock in the evening, I was in Holborn , going home, just as I came to the end of Fetter-lane a person said my handkerchief had been taken away, and pointed a man out without a coat. I followed up the lane, and up King's-head court, which leads into Holborn again, and found the prisoner in custody at the end of the court with the handkerchief. He was without his coat.

ALEXANDER FRANCIS WORNEL . I am servant to Mr. Ridgeway, of Newgate-street. I was in Holborn, and saw the prisoner take the handkerchief from the prosecutor's pocket, and informed him. I pursued, and Jones stopped him. I am sure he is the man.

CHARLES JONES . I am a ticket-porter, and live in Chequer-square, Aldersgate. I heard somebody call to the prosecutor that his handkerchief was gone, and saw the prisoner running in his shirt sleeves. I turned back, and met him at the end of the court. He threw the handkerchief down as I caught him.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been drinking, and met the gentleman, he charged me with this.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200918-107

1005. THOMAS CARR , was indicted for feloniously assaulting Jane Cox , widow , on the King's highway, on the 28th of December, 1819 , at St. Botolph, Without Bishopsgate, putting her in fear, and taking from her person, and against her will, two shirts, value 1 l. 10 s.; one table-cloth, value 7 s.; two hand towels, value 3 s.; one toilet cloth, value 2 s. 6 d.; two pair of stockings, value 1 s., and four handkerchiefs, value 4 s., the goods of Joseph Richard Judkins . - Five shirts, value 2 l. 10 s.; five shifts, value 1 l. 15 s.; three night shifts, value 15 s.; six handkerchiefs, value 6 s.; six towels, value 12 s., and six pair of stockings, value 12 s., the goods of John Barlow ; two shirts, value 1 l. 10 s., and six cravats, value 10 s., the goods of Henry William Faber .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating the goods to belong to Jane Cox .

JANE COX . I am a laundress and a widow. On the 28th of December, 1819, I was at the corner of Skinner-street, Bishopsgate-street , quite alone. I had the articles stated in the indictment, tied in a damask table-cloth. I had fetched the linen to take home to wash from Mr. Faber's, at the top of Bishopsgate-street. I live at Bethnal-green. It had not gone five o'clock. I was in Skinner-street, a little way out of Bishopsgate-street, and saw three men at the corner - I saw them very clearly, the lamps were being lit, and there was a great deal of snow on the ground - it was a clear night. All of a moment, one of them came and knocked me down, and attempted to get the bundle, but I held it fast, thinking it better to die than to loose it. The other came and dragged me till my strength was gone, and got the bundle from me. The third stood by my side, and said

"What is the matter, mistress, do not hollow so - can I help you?" I am sure he was one of the three, I saw them all very clearly before. The man who had my bundle was convicted. The prisoner is the man who knocked me down, I am quite sure. I have not seen the third man since. I followed them as far as I could, and went to the lodgings of the one who had my bundle, and had him apprehended next morning. I have met the prisoner once since it happened; hat was three or four months ago, I could not take him myself, but went and told the officer. He was apprehended seven weeks ago (I think) and taken to the Mansion House. I am quite sure he is one of them, and was sure when I met him. I have no doubt whatever of it.

MARY LANGLEY . I live in Crown-court, Angel-alley, Bishopsgate-street. I know the prisoner, and I knew Lomer, who was transported for life. On the evening the prosecutrix was robbed, I was going up Skinner-street, out of Bishopsgate-street, and in a little alley which turns down to Angel-alley I met Lomer, the prisoner and another man were walking alongside of him. Lomer had the bundle. I heard the prosecutrix cry out that she had been robbed; at that time, she was about half way down the alley. I ran back - she said she had been robbed of a bundle. I said

"Come with me and I will shew you the fellows who have got it." I took her to Angel-alley, and shewed her the house where Lomer lived, which was opposite mine. We did not see him. I knew him well before. I have seen the prisoner several times since, and told of his being about. He was taken up about six weeks ago. My husband is a watchman. I do not know the third man.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not go and tell Cox that Carr was taken, and she asked you if it was a fair or a dark man. - A. She did, I said it was a dark man; then she said, that is the man who knocked me down. The other was a fair man.

HANNAH HOWES. I live at No. 185, Bishopsgate-street. I delivered Mrs. Cox Mr. Judkins's things, as stated in the indictment, and have never recovered them.

MARY PUGH . I live in Cornhill. I delivered Cox the property in the indictment stated to belong to Mr. John Barlow , and have not seen it since.

JOSEPH GREGORY . I am a City officer. The end of Skinner-street, near Bishopsgate-street, is in the City. I apprehended the prisoner on the 22d of July, and told him it was for a highway robbery on Mrs. Cox, he denied it. On the following Monday Cox saw him among five or six more. I took particular care no one should shew him to to her. I asked her to point out the person, and she pointed him out. I had been looking for him ever since the 28th of December.

Prisoner's Defence. When I returned from sea, I went to learn the shoe-making business at Groves's, and on the night of this robbery, I was going to my brother's, and in Skinner-street I saw two men pass me with a bundle. I went on; and afterwards moved to Nichols-street, Shoreditch, and remained there till the officer took me.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 33.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutrix.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200918-108

1006. WILLIAM ROBERTS and JAMES SMITH were indicted for stealing, on the 2d of September , seven dozen bottles of Madeira wine, value 9 l. 10 s., and seven dozen of glass bottles, value 10 s. , the goods of Jonas Waters and James Waters .

JAMES WATERS . I am a wine-merchant , in partnership with Jonas Waters , we have cellars at No. 11, Cloak-lane . On the 2d of September, about eight o'clock in the morning, I found them broken open, and seven dozen of Madeira gone. I have not seen them since.

JAMES DUNLEVY . I am a bricklayer, and work in Cloak-lane, close to Messrs. Waters' cellars. On the 2d of September, about ten minutes past six o'clock in the morning. I saw Roberts with a prickle-basket opposite the cellars, on the other side of the way - I saw a flag-basket also, they appeared to be full, another person was with him. I cannot say it was Smith - they both took the prickle-basket and wanted to carry it, but could not, it was so heavy, it fell down, and part of the bottles broke; they went away with the flag-basket, and returned in five minutes for the prickle-basket - they dragged it along the pavement; I thought they might be employed at the vaults. I saw Roberts at Lambeth-street soon after, and I am sure he is the man.

DANIEL FORRESTER . I live at Mrs. Copelands's wine-vaults, Aldgate. On the 2d of September, about seven o'clock in the morning, Roberts came in - Smith stood at the door with a prickle and flag-basket which appeared full. Roberts opened a bottle of wine, and asked me to take some with him - I lent him a glass, it was white-wine, it appeared to be Lisbon wine, but I am no judge. Smith went away with the flag-basket, leaving the prickle behind, then returned, and they both took the prickle-basket away. I saw him on the Monday following, in custody, and I am sure he is the man.

JOSEPH BRENN . I am a watchman of Whitechapel. On the 2d of September, after ten at night, Roberts gave me charge of a man for robbing him, and owing to what passed I was confirmed the prisoner had been doing wrong. I informed Forrester, who took Roberts, and the week following I took Smith in Wentworth-street.

THOMAS BARRETT . I am a porter at Whitechapel-market. On the 2d of September, between seven and eight o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoners in Gulston-square, with a prickle on the pavement - I came by with my barrow; Roberts stopped, and asked me to let him

have the barrow to take the prickle to Petticoat-lane - he was a stranger, I would not lend it him, but wheeled it myself. Three men put the prickle into the barrow, the prisoners were two of them. Roberts went away; I asked who was to pay me? the other man said

"You shall be paid." Smith and the man remained, and steadied the barrow. They took me down Wentworth-street. I said the road was so rough the bottles would break - the wheel went into a gutter, and broke a bottle. It was white wine - they lifted the barrow out. I put the wine into a dirty house which I shewed the constable. They paid me 6 d., an elderly woman was there. I saw Roberts at the Mansion House a few days afterwards, and am certain of both of them.

JOHN FORRESTER . I am an officer. I apprehended Roberts on the 5th of September, and told him he was charged with stealing wine; he said he knew nothing of it. Barrett shewed me the house, No. 146, Wentworth-street, Roberts occupied the very room he shewed me, I apprehended him there - there was a basket in the room. I went to the cellars, and found the padlock knocked off.

WILLIAM ROBERTS - GUILTY . Aged 30.

JAMES SMITH - GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200918-109

1007. THOMAS SHEFFIELD was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of July , twelve glass lamps, value 2 s. , the goods of John Patrick .

ANTHONY HARRISON . I am a Marshalman of the City. On the 11th of July, about nine o'clock in the morning, I was walking by Mr. Patrick's premises in Newgate-street , and saw a little girl taking the prisoner's breakfast to him under the gallery of Christ church. He looked round, then took his hat off, and put something from it into the child's lap. The child went away, and Forrester followed her home. Next morning I saw her bring his breakfast again, and saw him put something from his hat into her lap - I followed her and stopped her opposite Mr. Alderman Cox's. I found five illumination lamps in her lap. I went and took the prisoner at Mr. Patrick's; the child was brought before him, he said nothing to the charge.

JOHN FORRESTER . I confirm Harrison's statement. I went to the prisoner's house with Mr. Patrick, and found twelve lamps. The prisoner said he was sorry for it, and hoped the prosecutor would take no notice of it.

JOHN PATRICK . I am a lamp contractor . The prisoner was my servant ; he had no lamps on my premises. He was called up when the child was brought in, and the officer charged him with stealing lamps - he said it was the first offence, and hoped I would forgive him. I am certain they are mine.

Prisoner's Defence. A man sold them to me at the door for ten-pence.

GUILTY . Aged 50.

Confined Three Months , and Whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200918-110

1008. THOMAS ABDEY was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of July , one handkerchief, value 3 s., the goods of Sutherton Backler , form his person .

MR. SUTHERTON BACKLER. I am a student at Cambridge, and live at Thavies Inn. On the 29th of July, between one and two o'clock in the afternoon, I was walking on the right hand side of Fleet-market , and missed my handkerchief as I was going to use it. I turned round, and saw the prisoner close to me; I collared him, and saw his waistcoat protruded, lifted it up, and took my handkerchief from it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence, I saw two lads drop it, and I picked it up; it was not in my waistcoat, but in my hand.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200918-111

TENTH DAY, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 23.

1009. JOHN ALLCOCK was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of June , one pair of trowsers, value 20 s. , the goods Francis James Nugee .

MR. ARABIN conducted the prosecution.

FRANCIS JAMES NUGEE . I am a tailor , and live in St. James's-street ; the prisoner was my clerk and shopman . In consequence of information I received, on the 15th of August I searched his lodging, in Bear-yard, Lincoln's Inn-fields, and found the duplicate of a pair of trowsers. I found them at the pawnbroker's, and immediately knew them, as I cut them out myself - a customer had returned them - I saw them safe three or four months before. I saw the prisoner at his lodgings about an hour after, and asked him how he came possessed of them. He said,

"Why, the blue trowsers, I had them with the things you gave me last." Those I gave him wore worn out, and these were new. The last blue trowsers he had was on the 20th of September, 1819. He afterwards complained of their being worn out, and had a pair of grey ones.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. How long had he lived with you - A. Fourteen or fifteen months. I am certain they are mine - they were not much worn.

EDWARD GREEN . I apprehended the prisoner, and heard him say they were given to him.

ROBERT KENDREW . I am servant to Mr. Allen, pawnbroker, Clare-street. The trowsers were pledged with me on the 6th of June, by a female, in the name of Crowder.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200918-112

1110. JOHN LONG was indicted for that he, on the 28th of August , upon George North , feloniously, wilfully, and maliciously did make an assault, and with a sharp instrument did strike and cut him, in and upon his face, with intent to kill and murder him, and do him some grievous bodily harm .

ANN HICKMAN . I live in Gardner's-lane, King-street , Westminster. The prisoner and his wife lived in the same house. On the 28th of August I was looking out of window, and saw the prisoner and his wife in the yard,

with North, consulting about parting - his wife had cohabited with North, and wanted her clothes to go away with him; the prisoner said if she came up stairs she should have them - then all three came into the passage. I heard words at the foot of the stairs, went down, and saw North against the wall - he said,

"I am done for." I saw his hand drop against the wall, it was all bloody. The prisoner was about half a yard form him. I did not see him do anything, and never heard him threaten North. I saw a knife in his hand, and said

"Long take care what you are at, and give me the knife." He shut the knife up, and gave it to me - it was rather bloody. North had three cuts in his face; I saw nothing more. He was taken to the doctor's. A quantity of blood laid at the door. Whatever happened was done before I came down.

HENRY BETTS. I am a constable. About eight o'clock on the night this happened, I was sent for, and knocked at the prisoner's room door, and told him to open it. I found it open, he was there in bed with his wife, she was in liquor. I took him to the watch-house. Four or five days after I saw North, his wounds were dressed. He had one cut from his ear down towards his mouth, his lip was cut, and he had a stab in his cheek.

Prisoner's Defence. My wife had deserted me, and gone with North; I met them together, and North said if I touched her he would break every bone in my body. She followed me home, I was going to take her up stairs, and he seized me by the throat.

GEORGE NORTH , being called, did not appear.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Richardson.

Reference Number: t18200918-113

1011. SARAH CRAWFORD was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of August , one watch, value 3 l., the goods of George Curly , in his dwelling-house .

ALICE CURLY . On the 15th of August I allowed the prisoner to sleep with me. In the morning I went up stairs, came down, and she left. I missed my son George's watch from the bed - I informed the officer. I am a widow, the house is mine.

JOHN DODD . I am shopman to Mr. Diggen, a pawnbroker, at Limehouse. On the 15th of August the prisoner came to pledge the watch - I gave her the duplicate, then stopped the watch and sent for her husband, as she gave me two different directions.

JOHN BROWN. I am a constable. On the 15th of August the prisoner came to me for a warrant against her brother-in-law - my wife said,

"That is the woman who robbed Mrs. Curley of her watch." I asked where she slept? she said nowhere. I took her, and found the duplicate in her pocket.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I asked the pawnbroker to give it me to return it to the woman.

GUILTY . Aged 48.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only.

Confined Six Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Richardson.

Reference Number: t18200918-114

1012. THOMAS SHERLOCK was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Margaret Tipper , widow , on the 23d of June (no person being therein), and stealing one watch, value 1 l.; one cloak, value 5 s.; four gowns, value 2 l.; and one pelisse, value 2 s., her property .

MARGARET TIPPER . I live in Corporation-row, Clerkenwell . On the 23d of June, about four o'clock in the morning, I went out and left nobody at home; I locked the door, returned at seven o'clock, found it broken open, and every thing gone. The prisoner lodged two years with me, and left on the Monday before - I do not think he robbed me.

THOMAS HOPKINS . I am a carpenter. About a quarter past five o'clock in the morning, I passed Tipper's house, saw her door open, and saw a person peep out and then shut it to. I went about twenty yards further, turned round, and saw the prisoner walking down the street, coming form the house, within a few yards of it - I did not see him come out. He turned round, looked at me, and then walked on - I knew him before. He had nothing with him.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODERICK. Q. Another man was charged with this as well as him - A. Yes.

JOHN MILLS . I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner at his lodgings in Prince's-street, Northampton-square - I found nothing there.

Prisoner's Defence. I declare I am innocent.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Richardson.

Reference Number: t18200918-115

1013. EDWARD CHARLES TIERNEY was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of September , at St. George, eight waistcoats, value 8 l.; five coats, value 20 l.; four pair of trowsers, value 4 l.; one silver barrel, value 4 l.; 17 knives, value 11 s.; 14 forks, value 10 s.; two pair of snuffers, value 10 s.; two magnets, value 5 s.; one mahogany case, value 1 l.; one looking-glass, value 10 s.; one pair of scissars, value 6 d.; five brushes, value 2 s.; two razors, value 10 s.; one comb, value 6 d.; one razor-strop, value 6 d.; one bottle, value 1 s., and one box, value 6 d., the goods of Charles David Gass and Charles Bracewell , in a certain vessel called a cutter, in the port of London, the same being a port of entry and discharge .

CHARLES DAVID GASS . I am master of the Voston cutter , which laid in the London Docks since July; she was loading for the Cape and Africa - I and Bracewell are the owners, the prisoner was the cabin-boy - since the 12th of July he had charge of the vessel. I left him to sleep on board with Tolley, the mate - he was so employed till he was apprehended.

THOMAS TOLLEY . I am mate of the Voston. I did not sleep on board the prisoner did, alone; he had charge of the cargo and ship in my absence. On Tuesday, the 13th of September, a young man in the hospital gave me some information, in consequence of which, on Wednesday morning, at half-past nine o'clock, I met Capt. Gass on board by appointment - we sent for Walmsley, and sent the prisoner out of the way. We searched, and found that some of the cases of goods on board had been broken open; some were cases of hardware. We then went into the cabin, and found in the prisoner's bed-place, between the blankets, three white-handled clasp knives, and in the after-locker, on the larboard side, I saw a new blue surtout

coat and some spotted silk waistcoats (I think three) some of the prisoner's books were in that locker - I had often seen him go to it. We found a mahogany dressing-case in one of the lockers, with the name erased off it. I think we found a pair of white jean trowsers with the coat. I went again on Thursday with Murrant, and in the cabin, on the starboard side, we found a new blue coat, a dozen ivory-handled knives and forks and two pair of carvers. The prisoner had been apprehended at two o'clock on the Wednesday, I had frequently seen him go to all the lockers and the cabin. I took the keys of the hold away every night but one.

DENNIS WALMSLEY . I am twenty years old on the 3d of January. I am apprentice on board the brig Nelson, which laid in the London Docks at the time the Vaston did, she laid in the next tier. I got acquainted with the prisoner soon after the vessel came there, and was on board with him at different times. I went into the hold with the mate when the search was made. Some of the cases had been split and opened, and the cover of one had been prized open. I went down into the cabin one night, and the prisoner asked me to lend him a towell - this was above a month before the search. He told me to go down into the cabin and fetch a leather belt; I went down, put my hand into the locker, and felt a quantity of handkerchiefs. I came up and said

"You have got a good stock of handkerchiefs on board" - he said

"Yes, I was such a fool I forgot to get them out of the Dock." I helped to to push them into his pockets, and he went away with them. When I went into the cabin with the mate I saw a mahogany dressing-case, with the name scratched off the brass plate. I had seen the prisoner shave himself one night with one of the razors, which he took out of it - he put it in again. He took the dressing-case from under his bed in the cabin, and put it there again after using it. The locker where it was found was close to his bed. I saw the mate find all the things. About a week before the search I had been putting our Captain ashore, the prisoner was in the boat with me; he said

"Jerry, did you ever see such a thing as this?" and produced a thing which had the handle done all over with red sealing-wax, it drew a piece of steel to it - he put them into his pocket; he said it was a magnet. The dressing-case was fitted up with a looking-glass, scissars, inkstands, and other things. About a fortnight before the search, I saw him open a chest of clothes in the cabin, on the starboard side. He shewed me a coat, some white waistcoats, and a piece of nankeen in it. He said his mother bought him the dressing-case, that it cost five guineas, and the razors cost a guinea each.

JOHN MURRANT . I am a Thames Police officer. I went on board the vessel with the mate, and found the things as he has stated. I apprehended the prisoner on Wednesday, about two o'clock. I searched him the same evening, and found two keys in his pocket; I tried one of them to the lock on the fore-scuttle; it opened it, but any key would open it. A person might go from the fore-scuttle into the hold. I took possession of the property found on board, Mr. Smith claimed them. On Friday, the 15th of September, Mr. Haughton gave me a blue coat, three waistcoats, and two pair of jean trowsers - his neice, Eliza Saunders , gave them to me by his desire. A shirt, a pair of white silk, and a pair of cotton stockings were in the same bundle, and a shirt collar. I took a black kerseymere waistcoat off the prisoner's person. Saunders also gave me a magnet and a pair of scissars, and two pair of plated snuffers.

WILLIAM BENJAMIN SMITH . I am a cutler, and live in Lombard-street, I shipped three packages of goods on board this vessel; the dressing-case was in one of them; it was quite new, and cost four guineas with the fittings- the other property produced were in the packages, and are mine. The dozen knives and forks, with the carvers, cost 3 l. 6 s. A silver barrel was also enclosed in a portmanteau in one of the cases - it was to hold wine, and was worth 7 l. They were going to Cape Coast.

FREDERICK BESCH . I shipped some goods on board this vessel. There were four other coats, and six pair of trowsers; they were packed in a tin case and soldered down, and then put into a wooden case. The bottom of the tin case is now broken open, it is in Court. Five pair of trowsers and two waistcoats remain, the rest are taken out. Here is all but one waistcoat.

ELIZA SAUNDERS . I am neice to Mr. Haughton, who keeps the Three Crowns, near the London Docks, the prisoner lodged at my uncle's - he brought some clothes in a bundle there about a fortnight before he was apprehended. He used to come and dress himself almost every evening; he brought another blue coat, white waistcoat, and pair of trowsers, they were all new. He gave me two magnets and two pair of plated snuffers, and asked me what I thought was the value of them? I said I did not know. He said he gave 5 s. each for the magnets. Last Wednesday week, early in the morning, he brought a pair of scissars. I delivered the bundle to the officer, he brought every thing which it contained.

Prisoner. Q. Was not every thing brought before the ship Thames sailed.

Prisoner's Defence. I was ship-keeper and not cabin-boy. I intended to go to my uncle at Cape Coast. My mother is deranged on account of my being here. I could not get my witnesses up.

GUILTY . - DEATH Aged 24.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Richardson

Reference Number: t18200918-116

1014. MARY GRIFFITHS , MARIA GOODWIN , ANN MASON , ELIZABETH ROBINS , and THOMAS ROBINS were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Israel Joseph , about seven o'clock in the evening of the 11th of August (no person being therein), and stealing 25 watches, value 35 l., 75 pencil-cases, value 6 l.; two eye-glasses, value 1 l.; 20 seals, value 8 l.; 28 toothpicks, value 14 s.; 14 snuffboxes, value 2 l.; one miniature picture, value 1 l.; four tobacco-stoppers, value 8 s., and one pair of snuffers, value 3 s, his property; one gold chain, value 2 l.; one watch, value 1 l.; one miniature picture, value 1 l.; one milk-pot, value 1 l.; one pair of ear-rings, value 1 l., and one necklace, value 10 s., the goods of Charles Ellis .

ISRAEL JOSEPH. I am a watch-maker , and rent the house, No. 113, Drury-lane ; the prisoner, Ann Mason , lodged in my second floor back room ever since I have been there, which is ten or eleven months. I understand from her that she is sister to Elizabeth Robins , but I do

not recollect Robins being there, except on the day of this robbery. On the 11th of August I left home before six o'clock, and came to my father's, which is opposite, a little after six, but did not go home till nine o'clock; I remained at my father's. I had left my wife and sister in the house, besides Mrs. Mason. When I came home, in consequence of what my wife said, I found my bureau, in the front room first floor, broken open, and about one hundred watches, and the rest of the property stated in the indictment gone - their total value was about 150 l.. I saw them all safe about nine o'clock in the morning, and also at five in the afternoon. I do not know that I left my bureau locked, but the room door was. The screw which fastens the knob of the lock was lost, and on touching the knob the spindle comes entirely out. Mason's husband also lodged in the house, but was not there when I left. When I came home and discovered the robbery, it struck me that nobody but Mrs. Mason was in the house, and it must he her - she was then, I believe, in bed with her husband. I went up and accused her of the robbery, she denied it. I sent for an officer to search her place; nothing was found, except three or four knives of mine, which were not stolen then. While I was at my father's I saw Elizabeth Robins come out of my door, about half-past seven o'clock, with a large bundle before her, but took no notice - I am sure it was her.

ISAAC JOSEPH . I am the prosecutor's father, and live opposite to him. On the night of the robbery I was standing at my door with him, and saw Elizabeth Robins come out with a bundle, but had no idea of the robbery. Next morning she came to my son's, I asked her what that bundle was that she brought out? she at first said she did not remember it, and then said it was some clothes she had brought Mrs. Mason to iron. I said it was very comical that she should bring them to her to iron - she said, I did bring them to her.

ELIZABETH ELLIS . I am the prosecutor's sister, and lived in his second floor front room - Mason's door is opposite mine. On the evening of the robbery I lost a gold chain with a miniature, a pair of ear-rings, a cream jug, a necklace, and several other articles - my drawers were forced open, and the things taken out. I had left the room locked, and had the key with me. I was terrified on hearing of the robbery, and cannot say whether I found the door locked or not when I returned. I saw the things safe that day, and had shewn the miniature to Mrs. Mason that day. My husband's name is Charles. She was frequently in my room when I was dressing, and saw where I kept my things.

Cross-examined by Mr. ANDREWS. Q. Did you know Mrs. Goodwin before this - A. No; I have frequently seen Mrs. Robins with Mrs. Mason, they were intimate. Thomas Robins has called when Mrs. Mason was not at home, and I have answered him.

SOPHIA ABRAHAMS . I am sister-in-law to Joseph, but do not live in his house. On the night of the robbery, about seven o'clock, I went over to his house from his father's by his desire, to see if my sister (his wife) wanted me. On putting my hand to the knocker the door went open. I heard somebody on the stairs, went up, and saw the prisoner, Mason, pulling my sister's front room door to on the first floor - she had pulled the spindle out of the lock. She had something in her hand, which she either dropped, or it fell out of her hand, and struck against the side of a box, it sounded like a stone or some hard substance. She said,

"Mind how you tread." I asked if my sister was at home? she said No. I thought I heard a moving in the front or back room; it was a rustling noise, as if somebody was moving. She had the spindle of the door in her hand. I tried the back room door, it was shut - she then stood with her back against the back room door and her hand behind her. I said,

"I shall go up stairs, and see if my sister is up in Mrs. Ellis's room." She put her hand against the stairs, and said,

"You need not go up, there is nobody at home." I then went down stairs. She told me to mind and shut the door, but she followed me down with the spindle in her hand, and shut it after me. Her dress was in disorder. I left. I had no idea of her doing any thing wrong.

EVAN EVANS . I am a brass-founder. On the 6th of August Robins sent for me. I was going to him but I met him in Holborn, he said we will have a walk. As I was walking with him, he said he knew of a good thing, and going down Drury-lane he pointed out Mr. Joseph's house, and said that his sister, Mrs. Mason told him, that in paying her rent to Joseph, she saw considerable property in watches in his bureau. He asked if I knew any person who would undertake the job; he said he knew one Schooley, who he was to see, or expected to see, and he was a very clever chap, and could open iron-chests. And there was a job at a watch and clock-makers in Holborn, and none but Schooley could do it, that several of them had attempted it, but that he could do it. And that there was a job at Coram's, where he lodged, and 14 l. was lost, and only 3 l. 10 s. brought to light. We walked over Waterloo-bridge and returned to Drury-lane, a boy ran up, and said,

"Father, here is Mr. Schooley;" he came up, and said he could not come before, or something of that kind. We then walked round Russell-street, and looked about Joseph's back premises, then came to the corner of the court. Mr. and Mrs. Mason both came up at the same time to Joseph's street-door. Mason crossed the road, and Mrs. Mason stood with her back to the door. Robins and Schooley spoke to her as they passed. We then went up a court into Wild-street. Schooley pulled out a large bag with a good many keys, and said nothing would do. Robins said it was too late, and we walked into Wild-street, and at the corner of Holborn I parted with them. On the Monday following I had some business in Lee-street, and called at Robins's house, and saw Mrs. Mason and Mrs. Robins there, but not Mr. Robins. His wife said he was gone out with a man. I asked what man, she said she believed with the man her boy brought down to us in Drury-lane. I said what time did they come home last night. She said at half-past eleven o'clock. I said I left them at half-past nine. Mason said

"Did Tom tell you any thing about that last night;" I said Yes. She said, I paid my rent to Mr. Joseph, and saw a great many watches and other property, in the bureau; that the lock was a common one, that the handle would come out, or it might be opened easily by a key. That they were out till past twelve o'clock last night. I went away, it was Monday morning. The same evening Robins called on me, and said he heard I had been there; he said he had been with

Charley, that he had a partner at Hatton-garden, and would breakfast with him. He left me, and called again on Wednesday evening, nothing was said about this robbery then. On the Saturday morning following, I went up to him, he opened the door, which was locked inside, he said,

"Do not come here, for there is a fine piece of work." I said, About what? He said the robbery at Joseph's, which had been committed. I said

"I suppose you know all about it, but you kept the affair very sly to yourselves." He said,

"Do not stand baffling here, you had better go about your business, if you are caught here, it will give you a good deal of trouble, particularly as you keep a shop." I was surprised, and went home. In the afternoon he came to me, and said, there was a fine bother, that his wife had gone down to Mrs. Mason, and he supposed they had kept her. I said

"I could see from the first of it you did not intend to let me be connected in it. You have not acted quite right, but I am better perhaps without it." He said,

"You had nothing to do with it, and can expect nothing." I said,

"No; but you acted so d - d sly;" a person came in and he left, but returned in two hours, and brought a fork with him, he threw it down in the window, and said it would fetch something. He said that Schooley was a d - d rascal, and he was about moving, and he did not know where to, and he would go after him. When he left I thought the fork was meant to do me an injury; it was a white-handled one. I told a person of it; he said it was a trap, and so that afternoon I wrote to Mr. Joseph, saying I would come forward, and give every information. Salmon came to me about three days afterwards.

Prisoner ROBINS. Q. You recollect coming to me, and saying you believed Schooley robbed the place - A. I mentioned it,

RICHARD LIMBRICK . I am an officer. On Saturday, the 19th of August, I went to No. 20, North-street, Pentonville, and found Griffiths and Goodwin in the house. I think Goodwin opened the door to me. She told me they had taken the house and come in that morning. I heard afterwards that a man was there, but I did not see him. She said she expected her husband home every moment. I went into the parlour, and found a deal box, asked whose it was, Goodwin said she did not know, nor had she the key. I broke it open, and found a quantity of jewellery which the prosecutor claims. Griffiths also said she did not know how it came there. The furniture was in the house, all loose, as if just brought in.

EDWARD READ . I was with Limbrick; and afterwards went and found more property.

ROBERT EAST. I am a carpenter. On the 18th of August, a man came to me and said he had taken his house of my master, it was neither of the prisoners. He wanted to come in immediately. I said he could come at any time, he said he would come in early in the morning. I went to my master's in Tottenham-street, he followed me. I saw him knock at the door, I asked what he wanted, he said the key. I said he could not have possession till I saw my master. I gave the man possession on the morning of the 9th, and helped him to carry the box in, in which Limbrick found the property. Griffiths was there when they broke it open. I worked there all that day.

Cross-examined. Q. The man called himself her husband - A. Yes; she sat on the things when I came to help him in with them. I do not know who brought them there.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

MASON'S Defence. Miss Abrahams came and knocked twice at the door. I let her in, I told her not to run over my kettle, which was on the stairs, she kicked it over. I followed her up stairs, she asked if her sister was at home, I said I did not know, she went and tried Mrs. Ellis's door. I went into my room, and was not out of it again till Mr. Joseph came home.

SOPHIA ABRAHAMS . Not a word of it is true.

ELIZA ROBINS 'S Defence. Our place was searched, and nothing found. The bundle was clothes which I took to my sister to wash, she could not do them, and I brought them away.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Richardson.

Reference Number: t18200918-117

1015. MARY GRIFFITHS and MARIA GOODWIN were again indicted for stealing, on the 19th of August , one sofa, value 4 l.; eighteen yards of hair cloth, value 3 l.; forty-five pounds of horse-hair, value 2 l., and one hammer, value 3 s. , the goods of John Chuck .

JOHN CHUCK. I live in Shoe-lane. On the 30th of July I lost this property from my warehouse in Gunpowder-alley, Bishopsgate-street . I received information on the 19th of August, and went with Limbrick, to No. 20, North-street, and found the prisoners there. Goodwin said her husband had taken the house. I found the back of my sofa on the bed in the left hand parlour, and the rest of it at the foot of the bed. The other property was there also. Goodwin said she bought the sofa of an upholsterer at the west end of the town two months ago, but did not know his name. I said I had only lost it five weeks, then Griffiths said they only had it three weeks.

Cross-examined. Q. It was impossible for a woman to carry it - A. Yes; her husband has absconded.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Richardson.

1016. The prisoners were then given in charge of the Jury on the following indictments, but it appearing from the depositions taken before the Magistrates, that the only evidence against them was, the property being found in this house, the witnesses were not called.

For stealing on the 19th of August , eleven pair of shoes, value 2 l., and four pair of boots, value 30 s. , the goods of William Thorn .

Stealing on the 19th of August , one dressing-case, complete, value 12 l., and three musical snuff-boxes, value 6 l. , the goods of William Smith .

Stealing on the 19th of August , one time-piece, value 6 l.; five seals, value 10 l.; two spoons, value 10 s.; forty-eight watch-hands, value 2 l., and one pair of scales and weights, value 5 s. , the goods of Joseph Chadwick .

Breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Lambert Gornig , about one o'clock in the afternoon of the 18th of July (no person being therein), and stealing a child's coral, value 15 s. , the goods of Jesse Mulawney .

Breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Wells , about three o'clock in the afternoon of the 15th of August , and stealing one time-piece, value 1 l.; one shawl, value 10 s., and one table-cloth, value 6 s., his property .

Breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Short , about eleven o'clock in the forenoon of the 9th of August , (he and others being therein) and stealing one hat, value 18 s., and three handkerchiefs, value 12 s., the goods of Thomas Dobson .

Breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Charles Gatty , about six o'clock in the forenoon of the 13th of July (he and others being therein) and stealing two looking-glasses, value 7 l.; and two glaziers' diamonds, value 18 s., his property .

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200918-118

1017. THOMAS CATON was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Samuel Evans , about the hour of eight in the forenoon of the 23d of July at St. George (he and others of his family being therein,) and stealing one watch, value 20 l.; one brooch, value 20 s.; one hat, value 10 s.; two handkerchiefs, value 5 s., and one shirt-collar, value 1 s., his property .

SAMUEL EVANS . I am a brush-maker , and live at No. 1, Grove-street Commercial-road , St. George's in the East. On Sunday morning, the 23d of July, at half-past seven o'clock, the sash of my parlour window was lifted up, and all this property taken off the table - they were in a hat, which was also taken. I, my father, and others were at home at the time. The sash was not fastened, as the fastening was broken the day before - I intended to replace it. The things were all mine, and worth 6 l. I found the prisoner at the watch-house. I had left them there at eleven o'clock the night before

CHARLES EVANS . I live with my son. He rents the house. I got up on this morning between seven and eight o'clock, and opened the shutters - I shut the sash down, it was not fastened. The hat with the things in it, were afterwards taken.

FRANCIS JACKSON . I am beadle of St. George's. On sunday morning, the 23d of July, about eleven o'clock, I apprehended the prisoner on another charge, with two others. I found a shirt collar round his neck, which Mr. Evans claims; the prisoner said he bought it in Rag-fair on Saturday for four-pence.

(Shirt-collar produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I bought it.

GUILTY. - DEATH . Aged 16.

Of stealing, but not of breaking and entering .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Richardson.

Reference Number: t18200918-119

1018. JOHN KEYES was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of June , one watch, value 3 l.; one chain, value 2 s.; one seal, value 10 s., and two keys, value 5 s., the goods of Frederick Mann , from his person .

MR. BOLLAND conducted the prosecution.

FREDERICK MANN. I live with Mr. Brady, of Bartlett's-buildings. On the 24th of June, between nine and ten o'clock at night, I was going down Holborn , I saw a man standing at the end of Plumbtree-court, he appeared as if he was going to cross the street. I stepped back from him, he immediately snatched my watch out, and ran up the court. I followed him to the top of the court, calling Stop thief! he attempted to turn round and fell. I attempted to seize him to get the watch as he was on the ground, and five or six other young men immediately came round him from the left side of the court (it is a thoroughfare) they stopped down in different directions, and I observed the watch pass from his hands to the hands of the prisoner; the chain was fastened to the watch. He walked off leisurely, but seeing me following him, he ran off into Shoe-lane, towards Fleet-street. I pursued him with several others. He was stopped by a man within twenty or thirty yards. I never lost sight of him - he fell down in endeavouring to hide the watch in the dark. As soon as he took his hand away from it, a person near him put his foot on it, broke it, and ran off. I took it up, and the prisoner was taken to the watch-house.

ABRAHAM COLEY . I am a watchman. I was going down Red Lion-court, I heard the cry of Stop thief! I turned round, and the prisoner ran past me at the end of the court; he was stopped and fell. I immediately laid hold of him, and heard Mr. Mann say, he had picked the watch up. He resisted as much as he could.

JOHN SHARMAN . I was constable of the night. The prisoner was remanded three times. I was taking him before the Alderman on the 10th of July, and he escaped. I am sure he is the man.

CHARLES HURDSFIELD . I am a constable. On the 23d of July. I apprehended the prisoner in Liquorpond-street, at a house. I went up stairs, knocked at the door, it was instantly locked, and something was put over the key-hole. I looked through a broken pannel in the door, I thought I saw a man going towards the window. I ran down stairs, and as I going out of the back-yard, he jumped out of the window. I secured him.

Prisoner's Defence. I heard the alarm in the court, and was stopped.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200918-120

1019. WILLIAM RICHARDSON , JEREMIAH JOHNSON , JONATHAN SHAW , and DENNIS SWEENEY were indicted for stealing, on the 14th of September , one handkerchief, value 3 s., the goods of David Davis , from his person .

DAVID DAVIS . I live with Mr. Simpson, a haberdasher, in Bishopsgate-street. On the 4th of September, about half-past twelve o'clock in the day, I was in Cheapside ; the prisoners all suddenly rushed up against me near Ironmonger-lane. I instantly missed my handkerchief, which was safe two minutes before. They all went away together, I followed them, and was about charging Johnson with the theft, seeing his hand in his bosom, when the constable come up, took my handkerchief out of his bosom, and secured three of them on the spot. Richardson was taken about thirty yards off as he walked away.

ROBERT HESKETH . I am a constable. I saw all the

four prisoners together in Prince's-street, Bank, about twenty minutes past twelve o'clock, walking very slow, and observing the pockets of different passengers; I followed them, and at the top of the street they turned to the right. I ran over to the Mansion House, and got Wiltshire, we followed them, and near Messrs. Goodbehere's, the prisoners Shaw, Johnson, and Sweeney ran up to the prosecutor - Shaw picked the handkerchief out of his pocket; we immediately ran over, and laid hold of the three. Richardson went away; I am certain he was in their company - I ran and secured him. Directly we went up the prosecutor took the handkerchief from Johnson. At the Mansion House Richardson gave a false address, he afterwards said they all slept together the night before at St. Giles's.

WILLIAM WILTSHIRE . Hesketh fetched me; his account is correct. I saw them all in a party together, going up the Poultry. I found a silk handkerchief in Richardson's hat.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

RICHARDSON'S Defence. My mother had been to the Bank to receive a pension, my father being an officer. I was going home when I was taken.

JOHNSON'S Defence. My father turned me out of doors. I could get no money anywhere.

WILLIAM RICHARDSON - GUILTY . Aged 17.

JEREMIAH JOHNSON - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Life .

JONATHAN SHAW - GUILTY . Aged 14.

DENNIS SWEENEY - GUILTY . Aged 12.

Transported for Seven Years. - Penitentiary .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200918-121

1020. GEORGE WATKINS was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of August , one ream of foolscap paper, value 21 s., and one other ream of pot paper, value 10 s. 6 d. , the goods of Orlando Hodgson .

WILLIAM SHUTER . I am an officer. On the 15th of August, I was going down Hosier-lane, near Cow-lane, I heard the cry of Stop thief! and saw a man running down George Inn-yard; I remained to meet him, and found the prisoner watching; I took him to Mr. Hodgson, whose wife said she saw him take two reams of paper, which had been brought in by another person.

ORLANDO HODGSON. I am a stationer . The paper is mine.

Prisoner's Defence. A man gave me the paper to carry.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200918-122

1021. WILLIAM DURHAM was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of September , one watch, value 3 l.; one seal, value 16 s.; two keys; value 6 s., and one ribbon, value 1 d., the goods of William Akers , from his person .

WILLIAM AKERS . I live in the Old Bailey. On the 13th of September, when an address was going to the Queen, I was standing at the corner of St. Martin's-court, Ludgate-hill , about twelve or one o'clock in the day; I found myself pressed a good deal, and went farther up the court, when a person came and said my watch had been stolen; I then missed it, but did not know who took it.

WILLIAM JONES . I am a constable. I was attending the Sessions, and observed a crowd coming down. I and Taylor immediately went to Ludgate-hill; I saw Akers at the corner of the court by the picture-shop, and five or six persons round him. I saw the prisoner take hold of the ribbon of Mr. Akers's watch - he kept pressing round him; I then saw the watch in his hand. A witness laid hold of him, and told Akers. In the scuffle the ribbon broke, and two keys fell on the ground, which I produce. Several tried to get the watch away, while we were securing the prisoner; he was never out of my sight.

GEORGE TAYLOR . I am a constable. I was attending this Court, and ran to Ludgate-hill; I saw Akers by the picture-shop. I saw a gang coming down; the prisoner was among them. They surrounded Akers, who was a little way in the court. Jones said

"He has got the watch!" I immediately laid hold of the prisoner - the rest tried to rescue him, I kept them off with my stick, pushed him into a public-house, and secured him.

Cross-examined by Mr. LAW. Q. Did you not see a numerous gang - A. Yes, the gang got him out of the crowd.

WILLIAM JORDAN . I am a constable. I was attending here - I went to Ludgate-hill, and saw a considerable number of persons, whom I knew to be thieves; at the corner of St. Martin's-court, they hustled the prosecutor, and took his watch; the prisoner was one of them - I saw the watch in his hand, and laid hold of him. In a moment a man put out his hand, and the prisoner gave him the watch; he set off with it.

JOHN WIGGENS . I am a constable. I saw prisoner with his hands at the prosecutor's pockets - I saw him pull his hand up; we collared him.

WILLIAM COULTON . I am a broker. I ran down from here, and saw the prisoner take his hands from the gentleman, but saw nothing in it.

Prisoner's Defence. I was not near him.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200918-123

1022. NANCY DARTER was indicted for stealing on the 23d of June , in the dwelling-house of William Ball , two table-spoons, value 12 s.; three tea-spoons, value 6 s.; and one table-cloth, value 2 s. 6 d., his property; two coats, value 30 s.; two pair of pantaloons, value 1 l.; one waistcoat, value 3 s.; one gown, value 14 s.; and eight 1 l. Bank notes, the property of Charles Falck .

CHARLES FALCK . I live at No. 2, Union-street, Little Moorfields , in Mr. Ball's house - I lived in the front room on the first floor, and had a bed-room on the second. I knew the prisoner about three months before I took her to live with me - she lived one week with me.

Q. Will you swear she is not your wife - A. Yes. She took the lodgings herself - we lived there as man and wife.

Q. And now you charge her with a capital felony - A. Yes. When she wanted money she had it - she laid out money for the house. I am a journeyman carpenter. When I left her at one o'clock all this property was safely locked up, and I had the keys. I returned about seven,

found the apartments locked, and she was gone. Next morning I found her at the Fox, in Charter-house-lane. The officer took her, and she produced the duplicates. I did not give her my clothes to sell.

Cross-examined by MR. AMDREWS. Q. Where do you come from - A. Falmouth, in Cornwall. I work for Mr. Rolph, the City Carpenter. I became acquainted with her by working at her father's house.

Q. How soon after did you seduce her away - A. I did not seduce her, I did not promise to marry her.

Q. Did she not, at your invitation, leave her home - A. It was her wish as much as mine.

Q. Did you not impose this unhappy girl on Mrs. Ball as your wife - A. No. Mr. Rolph does not know of my living with her. I earn 30 s. a week.

Q. Have you any other clothes than what you now wear - A. That is nothing to anybody.

Q. Did you go to the Compter to her - A. Yes, she sent for me, and I went to her, as I thought she would give me information of my property - that was my only object.

Q. On your oath, did you not tell her that if she would not trouble you further you would not appear at the trial - A. No. I think I went three times to her in the Compter once in Newgate. I did not force her to dress fine.

Q. Are you not ashamed of seducing her and then prosecuting her - A. I am not ashamed.

COURT. Q. Do you swear you are not ashamed of taking her to live with you - A. She enticed me.

JANE BALL . I am the wife of William Ball , we keep the house; the prosecutor and prisoner came to lodge with me, and left the middle of June. She took the lodging, and said she had just married without her father's consent - I supposed them to be man and wife; they were to pay 12 s. a week - my things were all let with the lodgings, except one spoon, which she borrowed. If I had not thought them married I should not have let them live with me.

Cross-examined. Q. She went by the name of Mrs. Falck - A. Yes.

JOHN BROWN. I am an officer. I found the prisoner at the public-house. I told her she was charged with felony, she immediately said

"I will go up stairs with you, and deliver up every thing I have." She gave me a pocket-book with five duplicates, two keys, and a 1 l. note. The prosecutor then wished me to step down stairs, as he wished to speak to her alone - I did so, and afterwards conveyed her to prison.

FREDERICK EDWARDS . I am shopman to Mr. Fothergill, a pawnbroker, in Aldersgate-street. On the 24th of June the prisoner pledged a table-spoon and a tea-spoon at our house, for 10 s.

BENJAMIN COGSWELL . I live with Mr. Essex, a pawnbroker, in Aldersgate-street. I have a coat, waistcoat, and two pair of trowsers, pledged by the prisoner on the 24th of June.

JAMES WHITEHEAD . I am servant to Mr. Reeve, a pawnbroker, of Redcross-street. On the 22d of June the prisoner pledged a coat with me 10 s.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. He came to me in confinement, promised he would not indict me, and said he was very sorry for what he had done. I said,

"Charles, you know don't deserve it."

JURY to FALCK. Do you live at the same house now - A. Yes.

HANNAH PORTER . I am the prisoner's sister. She lived with us comfortably, till about three weeks after Falck left working at our house.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200918-124

ELEVENTH DAY. MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 25.

1023. GARVIN GRANGER was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of September , one pair of trowsers, value 5 s. , the goods of Edward Brewster .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY .

Confined Two Months , and Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200918-125

1024. JOHN GOODRICKE , JOHN SAMUELS , JOHN THOMAS , and JAMES BURKE were indicted for stealing, on the 8th of April , two chimney pieces, value 30 l.; one pestle and mortar, value 7 s., and 12 books, value 6 s., the property of Elizabeth Margravine of Brandenburg, Anspach, and Bareuth, Duchess of Prussia , Countess Sayn , and Princess Berkeley ; 20 lbs. of lead and one copper, belonging to her, and fixed to a building .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating them to belong to the Margravine of Anspach.

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the Prosecution.

PHILIP HENRY ROPER , ESQ. The pavilion at Hammersmith , is the property of Elizabeth, Margravine of Anspach. The property stated in the indictment was there. The lead was fixed to the house. I saw every thing safe the night previous to the robbery, and next morning I missed them, and offered 10 l. reward. Sometime passed before I heard anything.

WILLIAM SPARKES . I work on board a barge, and live at Hammersmith, with my parents. I have known the prisoners two or three years. One night about April I slept on board Gearey's barge - it was two or three days before I heard of this robbery, I was under the boats head - it is a decked boat, but has no tilt; between twelve and one o'clock in the morning, I knew their voices, I laid still, and did not speak; they could not see me. there was a box before me; it was starlight, and I could see them. They brought something large on board - Goodrick said

"Don't make such a noise, or some one will hear you." And Samuels said

"How much do you think this copper will fetch?" Burke said,

"It will fetch 20 s. or 30 s. a piece." They put it in the stern of the boat, under the hatches; their boat laid at anchor a good distance from shore, they put it in the boat I was in. Next morning, about four o'clock, Ledgewood came and put me into Goodrick's boat, and I went to sleep, when I awoke the boat with the copper in it was gone. Goodrick came on board his boat, and said,

"D - n you, I

thought I told you not to sleep in a boat last night. I have a great mind to lay a rope's end about your back." I had been at work for him that day, and had nowhere to sleep. About three o'clock the day before the robbery Thomas broke a window in the pavillion, and at the same time he picked up two pieces of marble, and said they would do to pave his hearth.

Q. When did you first tell about this robbery - A. The next day I told Ford, the bricklayer, that they must mind they did not get taken up. I told my father of it three or four weeks after, when I came from Brentford, where I had been at work.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODERICK. Q. Was you not put in the workhouse, charged with this robbery yourself - A. Yes; I did not hear of the reward till I came to Hammersmith. I worked for Goodricke, he discharged me the day before the robbery.

Q, You said nothing about it till you was accused - A. Not till I was fetched.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Who sent you to the workhouse - A. Mr. Hanson, the Magistrate. I was taken before him to tell what I knew, I was not charged with being the thief. I went to work at Brentford on the day of the robbery and remained there three or four weeks. I was afraid to mention it.

EDWARD EDGSON . I am constable of Hammersmith. I searched Samuel's and Goodricke's houses, two days after the robbery, and said what I came about. I saw them about the neighbourhood afterwards. I found nothing.

WILLIAM FELTS . I am a constable. I fetched Sparks before the Magistrate, in consequence of what his mother told me.

JOHN TOWLES . I keep a chandler's-shop, at Hammersmith. I had the care of an empty house, next to my own, on the waterside - Goodricke's father inhabited it last. I believe he left about Christmas. I found a marble mantle-piece in the cupboard there. I also found a hearth and two other pieces of marble in the house, eight or nine days after the robbery. I had the key of the house.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200918-126

1025. JOSEPH GRAY was indicted for feloniously assaulting James Everitt on the King's highway, on the 2d of September , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, one watch, value 5 l.; one chain, value 2 l.; two seals, value 2 l., and one key, value 8 s., his property .

JAMES EVERITT . I am a back-maker , and live in Compton-street, Clerkenwell. On the 2d of September, about three o'clock in the afternoon, I was told the Queen was passing, and went to the end of the street into Goswell-street . A number of people were collected, and as I got to the end of the street, the prisoner struck me in the lower part of my belly, and pulled my watch out in an instant as he struck me. I saw him hand it over to his companions, and secured him immediately. I am sure he is the man. I have not recovered it.

ALLEN SPRAGG . I am servant to Mr. Everitt. I saw the Queen coming up Goswell-street, and fetched my master to the corner of Compton-street, and saw the prisoner snatch the watch from his pocket, I immediately laid hold of him, and saw it pass to another.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Of stealing from the person only. - Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200918-127

1026. FREDERICK BATTEY was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of August , one coat, value 50 s., the goods of Thomas Jones , in his dwelling-house .

THOMAS JONES . I live at Bethnal-green . On the 23d of August I took the prisoner home, and gave him some victuals, he stopped from ten o'clock in the morning till twelve. I told him I had a coat to sell, if he knew any body who wanted it, he asked to see it; he pulled off his own coat, threw it down, and went out with my coat on his back, he remained out about five minutes. He asked how much I wanted for it; I said 2 l. 5 s. my wife said, nobody should have it under 50 s. He then ran out and through the passage of a public-house. I lost sight of him. He had put it on over his own, and ran off with both. I have not found it.

MARY JONES . I saw the prisoner run off with the coat.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought it for 45 s.

(See No. 917.)

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200918-128

1027. JOSEPH SMITH and WILLIAM TUBBS were indicted for feloniously assaulting Henry Stocks , on the 30th of July , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, one watch, value 20 s., and one chain, value 2 s., his property .

HENRY STOCKS. I am a millwright , and live in Fuller-street, Bethnal-green. On the 29th of July, at half-past twelve o'clock in the morning, I was going home, perfectly sober, and as I passed Brick-lane seven young men stood at the corner together. It was a fine night. Just as I passed them, two came from them, one laid hold of me by the arm. I asked what he wanted and went on. Then another came and took hold of my arm. I asked what he wanted, he gave no answer. Three others came up, and said if they could not have me they would have my wife. Three took her away, and four surrounded me, and my pocket was picked of four 1 l. notes; but whether any of them were the prisoners, I cannot say. I laid hold of the man, and called out Watch! took my notes from him, and ran across to the watchman, and said,

"Why did not you come to my assistance." He took my arm, and as I was crossing the road with two watchmen, Smith came up, put his hand round me, and took my watch from my fob; he was one of those I saw at the corner. I caught hold of him, and the watchman took it out of his hand. I did not see Tubbs at that time. I think he was not one of the party.

LEWIS MYERSON. I am a watchman. I was on duty on the spot. Stocks came over to me, and I went with him. I and another watchman laid hold of his arm. Smith came up, laid hold of Stock, put his arms round him, and said

to me,

"You shall not take him the watch-house." (I was going to take him home). I saw him pull the watch out, and endeavour to hand it to a companion behind him; there were seven in the gang. Wood said,

"There goes the watch," but I had seen it myself. I secured Smith, and took it from his hand, with great difficulty we got him to the watch-house, several attempted to rescue him. I am almost positive Tubbs was active in endeavouring to rescue him. He was apprehended afterwards.

JAMES WOOD . I am a watchman, and was with Stocks, conveying him home, as had characters were about. Smith rushed up, and pulled his watch out. Myerson secured him, four or five more came up, and insisted on our letting him go. I will not swear Tubbs was one. Stocks was perfectly sober.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

SMITH'S Defence. The prosecutor was in liquor, and pulled the watch out himself.

SMITH - GUILTY . Aged 23.

Of stealing from the person only. - Transported for Life .

TUBBS - NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200918-129

1028. ANN ROLAND was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of August , one handkerchief, value 1 s.; 15 s., in monies numbered, and one 1 l. Bank note, the property of James Roberson , from his person .

JAMES ROBERSON . I am a seaman , and live in Leather-lane. I was coming from Chelsea on the 11th of August, and saw the prisoner in Drury-lane. I went home with her to No. 5, Church-street , to a house they call Rats' Castle , the door was locked. I awoke about five in the morning, took out my pocket-book, and missed this money. She was gone. I went out, saw her peeping round the corner, and secured her. She said she took my handkerchief and about 5 s., and that there was 5 s. under a cup in the room.

WILLIAM SABINE . I took her in charge, and found the handkerchief in her hand.

(Handkerchief produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. He gave me the handkerchief.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Six Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200918-130

1029. JOHN STUBBS was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of August , 3 s. in monies numbered, the property of Henry Noabs , from his person .

HENRY NOABS . I live in Thornhaugh-mews. On the 15th of August, between eight and nine o'clock in the evening, the prisoner stood by the Orange-street, public-house , selling oranges . I went into the public-house, he came in and sat by me. I had 3 s. 6 d. in my jacket pocket, on the side nearest to him, in about ten minutes I felt in my pocket, and there was only 6 d. I had felt 3 s. 6 d. there after I had sat down. Nobody else was near me. I charged him with it, he denied it. The constable was sent for, and found it on him. I knew one of the shillings by having cut it to see if it was good.

CHARLES COUSINS . I am a constable. I searched the prisoner, and found 4 s. on him. The prosecutor described one as having a notch - I found it so. The prisoner said it was his. He had tried to conceal that shilling from me.

Prisoner's Defence. They gave me 4 s. 9 d. change in the house.

GUILTY . Aged 32.

Confined Three Months , and Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200918-131

1030. ISRAEL HYAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of August , one watch, value 5 l.; one seal, value 1 l.; one ring, value 2 s., and one ribbon, value 1 d., the goods of Charles Bell , from his person .

CHARLES BELL . On the 22d of August, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I was standing between the Admiralty and Great Scotland-yard , in the middle of the street. The Queen had just returned from the house. Clark came up. and asked if I had lost any thing. I felt, and missed my watch; he pointed out the prisoner, who was running from the horses head of a hackney-coach behind which I stood. I stepped forward, collared him, and charged him with stealing my watch, he denied it; another person collared him, he then stooped down, put his hands behind his legs, and said,

"Here it is, I have just picked it up," and gave it to me.

DANIEL CLARK . I am a paper-hanger, and live in Baalam's-buildings. I was behind a coach, Mr. Bell stood on my left, and the prisoner just before me. I saw him as if in the act of taking something from Mr. Bell's pocket; he suddenly turned round and went away. I told Bell, he felt, and missed his watch. I pointed the prisoner out going towards Scotland-yard, the prosecutor stopped him. I saw him draw the watch from between his legs.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200918-132

0031. SAMUEL MORGAN was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of August , one pair of trowsers, value 12 s.; two handkerchiefs, value 5 s.; one sheet, value 3 s., and one gown, value 5 s. , the goods of John Matthews .

CECELIA MATTHEWS . My husband's name is John, we live in Marylebone-lane . The prisoner is my son. On the 16th of August, about six o'clock in the evening, he went out with me, but left me in about five minutes. He has not lived at home for six months. I returned in two hours, and missed the things.

THOMAS POILE . I am servant to Messrs. Stone and Co. pawnbrokers, Oxford-street. On the 1st of August, between seven and eight o'clock, I took a pair of trowsers and a handkerchief in pledge for 8 s. of the prisoner. I knew him before.

RICHARD KINGSTON . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Upper Marylebone-street. On the 16th of August the prisoner pledged a sheet with me.

JAMES HUMPHRIES . I keep an old iron-shop, in Gee's-court. On the 16th of August, the prisoner brought some old clothes to sell. I called my wife, who offered him 15 d. for them. I did not see what they were.

RICHARD COATES . I apprehended the prisoner on the 17th of August, and found the duplicate of shirt on him, he afterwards said he left his mother's gown at an old

iron-shop, in Gee's-court. I found it at Hopkin's. He did not wish me to search.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years. - Penitentiary .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200918-133

1032. WILLIAM HENRY HARDISTY was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of July , one watch, value 2 l., the goods of James Thomas , from his person .

The prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200918-134

1033. GEORGE MARTIN was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of July , one pair of boots, value 5 s. , the goods of John Floyd .

JOHN FLOYD . I am a clothes-salesman , and live in the City-road . The boots hung outside my window for sale. Between seven or eight o'clock, I was told they were taken, I went out and secured the prisoner about a quarter of a mile off, with them. He said he found them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I saw two men throw them over some paling, and I picked them up.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200918-135

1034. ELIZA BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of August , two 10 l. notes, the property of Shepherd Stammers , from his person .

SHEPHERD STAMMERS. I live at Finchenfield, Essex. On the 6th of June, I came to town with my waggon, and met the prisoner about three o'clock in the afternoon, at Whitechapel, with another woman, I had 140 l. in my purse. I went to a house with the prisoner alone, she locked the room door. I said

"Do not lock it, for my waggon is going on." She said she must have something to drink, and called the other girl up to fetch some. Three other woman came up and shoved me down stairs, and took my purse in a moment, and ran off. I am certain the prisoner was one of them.

Cross-examined by MR. ARABIN. Q. What house was this - A. I do not know the house.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200918-136

1035. SAMUEL HARRISON was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of August , 50 lbs. of lead, value 7 s., the goods of William Wisdom , and fixed to his dwelling-house .

RICHARD COUSINS . I am a patrol. On the 22d of August, about five o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner and two others in Ryder-street, endeavouring to get the lead off the porch of the prosecutor's door - two of them were on the ground and another on the rails. I heard the lead fall and ran up, they all ran away. I lost sight of them for near a quarter of an hour. The prisoner was brought back - I did not know him; he had a light coat on, and so had the man on the rails.

ROBERT CLEGG . I am a watchman of St. James's. I heard the alarm - the prisoner ran by me very fast; I secured and took him back to Mr. Wisdom's house - his hands were very black. I saw the lead fitted to the porch.

MR. WISDOM. The house is mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I left home about six o'clock, and was late, which made me run.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18200918-137

1036. ANTHONY BEACHAM was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of July , one miniature-painting, value 30 s. , the goods of George Paris .

JANE PARIS . I am the wife of George Paris ; we live at No. 29, Globe-road, Mile End . This miniature painting hung over the parlour chimney-piece. On the 21st of July, about eight o'clock in the evening, I heard some one run across the passage, followed the person out of the gate, and saw two or three lads running down the road. I returned to the parlour, and called a neighbour, but missed nothing then. I saw the prisoner in custody in about half an hour, and found the miniature at the office next morning.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAM HEMMINGS . I am a flax-dresser, and live in Globe-fields. At eight o'clock in the evening, I heard a cry of Stop thief! in ten minutes I went into our yard, and found the prisoner between some tar-barrels there, with his right hand under his arm, folding something in a handkerchief - I collared him and asked what he did there? he asked what business it was of mine? I found the miniature in his hat. He began fighting me, and I took him to my master - he told two or three different stories. He said he had been selling apples about with a donkey, and somebody gave it to him, but he did not know who; and then he said his brother gave it to him. He was given into custody.

Prisoner's Defence. I saw a boy throw it down, and picked it up.

GUILTY . Aged 13.

Transported for Seven Years. - Penitentiary .

First Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18200918-138

1037. DAVID WILSON was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of August , two printed bound books, value 12 s. , the goods of Thomas Colthard .

THOMAS COLTHARD . I am a bookbinder . These books were sent to me as a pattern to bind others by. The prisoner lived three weeks with me as errand-boy - I missed the books, and had him apprehended. Six days after that I found them in pledge - the pawnbroker is not here. I found the Quarterly Review, which is one of them, at Wilks's.

CHARLES WILKS . I am a bookseller, and live in Union-street. I bought the book of Jarvis.

WILLIAM JARVIS . I am a bookseller, and live in Chesterfield-street. I bought the Quarterly Review of a person, but do not know who it was.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200918-139

1038. WILLIAM WHITE was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of July , one carpet, value 15 s. , the goods of James John Clemans .

JAMES JOHN CLEMANS . I am a broker , and live in Hollywell-row, Shoreditch . The carpet stood at the further end of my shop. Ellis called to know if I had sent a man out with it. He ran out and brought the prisoner back with it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GEORGE ELLIS . I am a porter. I saw the prisoner push the prosecutor's door open, and go half-way down the shop; he took a fender and chair off the carpet, and came out with the carpet under his arm. I followed and secured him, without losing sight of him.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18200918-140

1039. JOHN JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of July , one pair of boots, value 10 s. , the goods of William Doody .

HENRY FIELD . I am coachman to Mr. Theobald, who lives in Upper Brook-street; the stables are in Portman-yard . Doody, the prosecutor, is a servant , whose horses are in the same yard. The prisoner and I were in the yard, the gate-keeper told me to mind and shut the gate, I did so, and the prisoner followed me out with a blanket under his arm. I asked if that was his? he said it was George's blanket to put under his head. Next morning I went to where the prisoner slept, and found the boots there concealed in the straw.

JAMES COLLINSON . I am a beadle. I took the prisoner in charge - he said he did not put the boots there.

WILLIAM DOODY . I am groom to Mr. Knatchbull. I hung my boots in the stable in the evening of the 8th, and missed them next day.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined Six Months , and Publicity Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18200918-141

1040. JOHN EMERY was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of June , one watch. value 50 l., the goods of Samuel Atkins , in his dwelling-house .

SAMUEL ATKINS . I am a watch-case maker , and live in Prujean-square, Old Bailey ; Thomas Cordell keeps the house - I have known the prisoner four years. On the 21st of June he called and said I was wanted by an aunt of his in Giltspur-street, named Kidder, who wanted to apprentice a youth to me, and that she lived in Nevill's-court. I said I did not want one, but would go and speak to her. He began talking to me, and waited to go with me - I was washing myself to go. At this time the watch hung on the work-board; all my workmen had left. The moment I began to wash myself, he said he would go and fetch the youth. I turned round immediately he left and missed the watch - he did not return. I went immediately to the house, and found I was not wanted. He was apprehended in ten days. The watch was worth about 36 s.

WILLIAM WOOD . I was employed by the prosecutor, and remember the prisoner coming. The watch was safe when I left - he was still there.

THOMAS PIKE . I apprehended the prisoner on the 8th of July.

Prisoner's Defence. My aunt employs people to swear against me.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Of stealing to the value of 36 s. only.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200918-142

1041. MARY HUGHES was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of June , two shirts, value 10 s.; two handkerchiefs, value 2 s. 6 d.; two bed-gowns, value 5 s.; one cap, value 2 s.; one shawl, value 3 s.; one shirt, value 6 d., and one apron, value 1 s., the goods of Mark Rawlinson ; two shifts, value 10 s.; four petticoats, value 10 s. 6 d.; two pair of stockings, value 3 s. 6 d.; one pair of pockets, value 4 s., and one handkerchief, value 1 s. 6 d., the goods of Thomas Patrick .

TWO OTHER COUNTS, stating them to belong to Ann Reed , widow .

CATHERINE CHOPPING . I carried the articles stated in the indictment from my grandmother, (who is the wife of Thomas Patrick ,) to Mrs. Raymond, on the 21st of June.

EDITH RAYMOND . I am a laundress, and live in Parker's-rents, Shoe-lane. Chopping brought a bundle of linen to me for my daughter, Ann Reed , to wash. The prisoner came and said she was going to wash for my daughter, and asked if there was any linen for her - I delivered her the bundle, and another from Mrs. Rawlinson.

ANN REED . I live in Brownlow-street, Drury-lane, and wash for Patrick. The prisoner brought me no linen on the 21st of June. I expected some - it was generally left at my grandmother's. The prisoner had washed three times for me, but she used not to fetch it - I always sent my little girl.

ELIZA RAWLINSON . I keep a chandler's-shop in Shire-lane, my husband's name is mark. I sent my things to Mrs. Raymond's, and have not seen them since.

CHARLES GOVER . I am a shoe-maker, and live in Moore-square, Moore-lane. About the middle of July the prisoner came to lodge with me, and in a day or two she expressed that her mind was much troubled concerning some linen she had to wash, that she had made away with it, and could not get the money to restore it. I understood her to say that the person lived in Shoe-lane. She left me on the 31st of July.

WILLIAM READ . I am an officer. On the 17th of August I had the prisoner in custody for uttering forged notes, and detained her on this charge.

REBECCA CHOPPING . I am daughter to Thomas Patrick . I gave my daughter the linen.

Prisoner's Defence. Raymond called and gave me the linen - I got drunk and lost them.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200918-143

1042. MARY JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of July , from the person of Charles Garland , four 1 l. Bank notes, his property .

CHARLES GARLAND . I am a journeyman tailor , and live in Charles-street, Horsleydown. On the 25th of July, about two o'clock in the morning. I was at this end of Fleet-street , returning from a benefit club of which I am

steward, held at the Red Lion, in Drury-lane. The prisoner accosted me by putting her hand round my waist, and wished me to go with her, I refused; she went away in a short time, abusing and swearing at me. I had my hand in my breeches-pocket just before she came up, I had four 1 l. notes there - as soon as she left I missed them. I had not lost sight of her. I came up with her about twenty yards off, took hold of her, and said she had robbed me of four 1 l. notes, and if she did not return them I would charge the watch with her - she denied it; I called the watch. Some man immediately came up and knocked me down - he was a perfect stranger to me. He said,

"D - n you, who are you giving in charge?" The watchman then came up; he ran away, and the prisoner was taken to the watch-house. She was searched, and almost stripped, but they could not find the notes. I said I was positive she had them. I saw her convey her hand to her mouth - I forced my finger into her mouth, and took them from under her tongue.

THOMAS PARKER . I am a watchman. I came up, hearing the cry; Garland was holding the prisoner, and charging her with robbing him of four 1 l. notes. I took her to the watch-house - he was just rising from the ground when I got up.

WILLIAM MONDAY . I was constable of the night. I received the prisoner in charge, and saw the prosecutor take the notes from her mouth.

Prisoner's Defence. He used me very indecently, and gave me the notes.

GUILTY . Aged 46.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200918-144

1043. JOHN WEEDON was indicted for embezzlement .

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200918-145

1044. RICHARD STAGGS was indicted for a misdemeanor .

MR. BOLLAND conducted the prosecution.

ANN MARTIN . I live with Mr. James , who is a haberdasher , on Holborn-bridge . On the 25th of July , the prisoner came with another person, and bought two pair of worsted stockings for 5 s. 6 d., he paid me a 1 l. note; I gave him 14 s. 6 d. change. He then bought three pair of white stockings, which came to 8 s. 6 d. I observed some money in his hand, and from its appearance concluded it to be counterfeit. He laid down 8 s., all bad, and a good sixpence; I mentioned it to Mrs. James, who fetched a constable - I went and closed the door, and said he must not leave. They succeeded in opening the door, when Mrs. James came and prevented them leaving. Corby secured them - I gave him the bad money. Before he came I observed the prisoner concealing something in his bosom. There was one crown-piece, among the change I gave him.

GEORGE CORBY . I am a street-keeper. Mrs. James fetched me; while I was searching the prisoner six bad half-crowns fell from his waistcoat, and in his waistcoat pocket, I found four bad shillings, and a bad half-crown, I found a good sixpence, and much more silver on him, which I returned. Martin marked the eight shillings, and gave them to me.

MR. CALEB EDWARD POWELL . I am an assistant to the Solicitor of the Mint. The six half-crowns are counterfeit, off the same die, and have not been in circulation. The eight shillings are also counterfeit, off the same die, and have not been in circulation. The four shillings found on him are counterfeit, off the same die, and the half-crown is counterfeit, and off the same die as the others.

Prisoner's Defence. She did not give me a crown-piece.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Confined One Year , and to find Sureties .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200918-146

1045. ELEANOR MACQUIRE and JOHANNAH WELCH were indicted for a like offence .

SARAH HALL . I am the wife of John Hall , who keeps the One Tun, Holborn . On the 2d of July, between five and six o'clock in the evening, the prisoners came in; Macquire called for a quartern of gin, which came to four-pence; She gave me a half-crown, which I put into my apron pocket - I had no other there. They drank the gin together, stopped full an hour at the bar, and then called for a quartern and a half more, which came to sixpence. Macquire paid for it with another half-crown, which I put into my apron pocket. Another woman came in, they drank together, and went outside; came back, and Welch called for another quartern. While I was drawing it, one of the three put down another half-crown - I put it with the others, and Welch took the change up. I had no others, but what they paid me. I afterwards examined them, found them all bad, and gave them to the officer.

ELIZA WHITE . I live with Mr. Hall. After the prisoners had gone out they returned; Welch called for a pint of beer, and paid me a half-crown; I found it was a bad one, and told her it was not worth a penny - she gave me twopence halfpenny. I observed a small cotton bag in Macquire's hand. During this time another woman came in, had a pint of beer, and gave me sixpence; I said it was a bad one; Wortley took it, gave it to the woman, and she ran away. This made my sister look at the half-crowns, and she found them bad. One of the prisoners had gone out at the side door, leading to Field-lane; I think it was Macquire, Wortley went out and brought her back. My brother at night found a bag, at the side door, which was the same I saw Macquire with; it contained one half-crown, and some sixpences, folded in separate papers.

JOHN HALL . I keep the One Tun. My sister gave me the sixpence, and I examined my wife's half-crowns, they were all bad; before I could examine them, they all ran out in different directions; I gave them to Dent. Wortley brought one of them back, she then threw six good shillings and one bad half-crown upon the counter. When I went to shut the door, about half-past ten o'clock, I found the bag which I produce; it has a bad half-crown, and a quantity of sixpences, with paper between them.

JOHN DENT . I am a constable. I took the prisoners to the watch-house; one bad half-crown was found on Welch. I produce the money.

JAMES WORTLEY . I am a stable-keeper, in Bleeding Heart-yard. I went out and took Macquire at the front door. Welch turned a bad half-crown, and five or six shillings, out upon the counter.

MR. CALEB EDWARD POWELL . The five half-crowns are all counterfeit, and off the same die; and the nineteen sixpences are also all counterfeit.

MACQUIRE'S Defence. I did not know they were bad.

ELEANOR MACQUIRE - GUILTY . Aged 33.

JOHANNAH WELCH - GUILTY . Aged 29.

Confined One Year , and to find Sureties .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200918-147

TWELFTH DAY, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 26.

1046. JAMES THOMSON was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of July , one hat, value 4 s. , the goods of Joseph Cape .

JOSEPH CAPE . I am a hatter , and live at Shadwell . About nine o'clock in the morning, I missed this hat; the prisoner was stopped with it.

HENRY JERRATT . I am a painter. I was at Lewis's, and saw the prisoner go into Cape's shop, and come out with the hat.

SAMUEL LEWIS . I keep a clothes-shop opposite Mr. Cape. I saw the prisoner lurking about; Jerratt called me, I ran out and secured him with the hat.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Confined Six Months , and Publicly Whipped .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200918-148

1047. MARY VONGLAHN and ANN RAINES were indicted for stealing, on the 7th of June , one linen sheet, value 8 s. , the goods of Matthias Prime Lucas , Charles Lucas , and John Townsend .

MR. CHARLES LUCAS . I am a sugar-refiner , in Osborn-street, Whitechapel , in partnership with Matthias Prime Lucas, and John Townsend . The prisoner, Raines, was house-keeper in our sugar-house ; her husband is principle man in the sugar-house. Vonglahn was chair-woman . I only know the sheet, it is marked, Lucas and Co. Osborne-street.

Cross-examined by MR. WALFORD. Q. Raines's business was to get things in for the house - A. Yes, she did not advance the money.

CHARLES POORE . I am servant to Mr. Peat, a pawnbroker, in Whitechapel. On the 7th of June, Vonglahn pledged a sheet with me for 5 s., in the name of Raines. The prosecutor's names was on it, which I did not observe at the time.

MOSES FORTUNE . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoners, and charged them with stealing the sheet. I found the duplicate on Raines.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

MARY VONGLAHN - GUILTY . Aged 27.

Confined One Year .

ANN RAINES - GUILTY . Aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200918-149

1048. PEREGRINE WOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of August , one watch, value 8 l.; one seal, value 1 l., and one key, value 5 s., the goods of Richard Peters , from his person .

RICHARD PETERS . I live in Duke-street, Lambeth. On the 23d of August, about five o'clock in the evening, I was opposite the Horse Guards , just as the Queen was passing; I felt my watch drawn from me, and saw it pass from one to the other. I collared the prisoner who was near me, he said

"Me got your watch! search me." I cannot say he was one of the party.

NOT GUILTY .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200918-150

1049. WILLIAM GARMESON was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of August , one barometer, value 5 s. , the goods of Richard Gude .

MR. WALFORD conducted the Prosecution.

RICHARD GUDE , ESQ. I live in Bedford-row . On the 16th of August, at one o'clock, I saw my barometer hanging in my hall; I missed it at half-past three o'clock. The prisoner was clerk to Mr. Smith, whose office is at the back of my house, he had been to my house that morning, to light a candle; he must have seen it hanging up.

Cross-examined by MR. BOLLAND. Q. The passage leading to Mr. Smith's office passes your door - A. Yes, any one going there could not avoid seeing it. I received a description of a person, who was seen near my house with the barometer; it did not answer the prisoner's description, but directed my attention to one Lloyd.

THOMAS BEESTON . I am shopman to Mr. Newby, a pawnbroker, in Drury-lane. On the 16th of August, between two and three o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner and another young man brought in a barometer to pledge, it was in the prisoner's hand - he asked two guineas on it, I offered him 15 s., he refused and said he should like 30 s., I would not advance that, and he went away.

Cross-examined. Q. The other man was much shorter than the prisoner - A. He was, he stood behind the prisoner. I do not know how he was dressed - they were in the private boxes.

JOSEPH ROSED . I am shopman to Mr. Lamb, a pawnbroker, in Stanhope-street. On the 16th of August, about three o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner came, in company with another person, whom I could not exactly distinguish, as he was outside the shop. The prisoner asked two guineas or 35 s. on the barometer; I offered him 15 s., he immediately said he would take it. He pledged it in the name of John Harris , Hart-street, Bloomsbury.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was asked to pledge it by Lloyd, and gave him the money and duplicate.

AUGUSTINE WILLIAM FABER . I was clerk to Mr. Ching, a Chancery Barrister, sixteen or eighteen years ago. I live in Parson's-court, Bride-lane. I now write for Law-stationers. I have been intimate with the prisoner for two years. On the 16th of August, about half-past two, or a quarter to three o'clock I saw him at Mr. Smith's office, we went and dined together in Gray's Inn-lane, and then proposed to take a walk, we went to Drury-lane, and met Thomas Lloyd , whom I had seen in his company before,

he had a barometer, he said he had it to pledge for a person, and asked the prisoner to pledge it, as he said he was better dressed than himself, and could obtain more for it. Lloyd was shabbily dressed. The prisoner immediately took it, he and Lloyd went on to Newby's, and came out without pawning it. The prisoner took it to the opposite shop. Lloyd and I waited outside, he then went to a third shop in Stanhope-street, the prisoner went in alone, Lloyd and I waited at the corner of the street, the prisoner came out, and gave Lloyd 15 s. and the duplicate, deducting some halfpence. Lloyd parted with us at the end of the street, he then took a boat, went up the river, and returned to the office.

NOT GUILTY .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200918-151

1050. JAMES MITCHELL , ROBERT COLLIS , and JOSEPH WILD , was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of July , one handkerchief, value 2 s., the property of William Wall , from his person .

WILLIAM WALL . I am a tailor , and live in Bury-street, St. James's. On the 23d of July, about nine o'clock in the evening, I was just opposite Exeter-change , and felt a slight pull at my pocket, I immediately felt, and missed my handkerchief; I turned round, and saw three boys in the road, four or five yards off, going away from me, the street was nearly clear. I was going to follow them, but saw two young men, they were the prisoners. I have never found my handkerchief.

Cross-examined. by MR. BRODERICK. Q. How far was one before the other - A. A very little way, they were together.

WILLIAM JONES . I am a constable. I was in the Strand, and first saw the three prisoners near Southampton-street, in company together. I saw all three take notice of gentlemen's pockets, they came close behind the prosecutor, I watched them narrowly, saw one, (I cannot say which) put his hand into Wall's pocket, and draw the handkerchief a little way, and as they got opposite Exeter-change, they made a pull at it, and it came out, they had kept close to him for about one hundred yards. One of them immediately crossed into the middle of the road, the other two went on. Mason secured the one in the road, I secured the others, searched them, but found no handkerchief. I am certain I saw them take it. As I was taking them up Catherine-street, a young lad, whom I knew to be a thief, came up, and spoke to one of them, he attempted to strike at me with a stick to get them away, but I took them to the watch-house. Mr. Birnie admitted Mitchell to bail.

Cross-examined. Q. They were to be tried at the petty Sessions - A. Yes; I did not give the instructions for the indictment.

WILLIAM MASON . I am a stationer and live in Chapel-court, Swallow-street. I was with Jones, and followed the prisoners, they were in company, talking together. I was on the other side of the way, and saw Wild draw the handkerchief out a little, and about twenty yards further one of them drew it quite out. Collis got into the middle of the road, about twelve yards off; I seized him. Jones took the others.

MITCHELL'S Defence. They swore I took it, at Bow-street.

WILD'S Defence. They said the other took it, and now they say I did.

COLLIS - GUILTY . Aged 15.

WILD - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

MITCHELL - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Six Months and Whipped .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200918-152

1051. CHARLES PRICE was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of June , five fowls, price 6 s., and four boards, value 6 s. , the goods of William Eaton .

MR. ARABIN conducted the Prosecution.

WILLIAM EATON . I am a farmer , and live at Palmer's-green, Edmonton , the prisoner was my labourer . On the 5th of June I missed five fowls, and afterwards got them back. I got a search-warrant afterwards in consequence of suspicion, and searched the prisoner's premises, which are fifty or sixty yards from my house. I found two elm and an oak board nailed up to his pig-stye, which I had lost, and am certain of them. I did not like to pull them down, but marked them, and went next morning to take them down, but they were gone. I could not find the prisoner till three weeks ago, when he surrendered himself. He was a weekly servant, and left me on Saturday without coming for his wages.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODERICK. Q. He sent you word he was ready to surrender - A. Yes, on the 3d of August. I said I was engaged, but at any time after I would attend him. He surrendered on the Wednesday. I swear to the boards - when they were removed the rest of the sty remained, which were old boards.

THOMAS AUSTIN . I am a constable. I accompanied Eaton on the 8th of June to the prisoner's house - he claimed three boards which were nailed to the pig-stye, they were too good for that purpose. He marked them, went for them next morning, and they were gone. The prisoner absconded.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Confined Two Months and Whipped .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200918-153

1052. GEORGE JAMES DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of July , one spoon, value 10 s. , the goods of Charles Rawlins .

JOSEPH CLUTTERBUCK . I live at No. 29, Brook-street, Holborn , Mr. Rawlins lives at No. 9. On the 14th of July, at five o'clock in the morning, I was sitting at my window, and heard his kitchen window break; I lifted up my curtain, and saw the prisoner and another man with their backs to Mr. Rawlins's door - the prisoner had a basket under his arm tied in a white cloth. I saw him looking at the window of the opposite house; they walked away towards Holborn, then returned to Rawlins's; each stooped down and looked through the area window, then went by the house to Greville-street, looked down the street, and returned to the house - nobody was passing. The other man took some instrument out of the prisoner's hand, which he screwed together, put them through the grating into the kitchen window, and drew it back with a spoon at the end of it, and gave it to the prisoner with the instrument. They crossed and went up a court next to my house, which leads into Gray's Inn-lane. I came down,

went up the court, and met a woman, who gave me information. I went into Holborn, and saw them walking on the pavement towards the City. They returned, and crossed over to the east end of Middle-row; I saw some watchmen and informed them - they went round and met them; the prisoner was secured. I went after the other but he escaped. As the prisoner crossed the road in custody, the instruments were picked up exactly in the crossing he went over. I saw the spoon found on him.

AMBROSE MOSS . I am a watchman. I apprehended the prisoner in Middle-row. The spoon was found in his sleeve. Clutterbuck gave me the instrument - it was made like a fishing-rod.

CHARLES DIXON . I searched the prisoner, found the spoon in his sleeve, and some old bent forks in his pocket.

SARAH DAMAT . I am servant to Mr. Charles Rawlins ; the spoon was his. I found the window broken over the part where it laid.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200918-154

1053. WILLIAM HILL was indicted for bigamy .

MR. BRODERICK conducted the prosecution.

LIPSCOMBE PRICE. I produce an examined certificate from the marriage register of St. George, Bloomsbury, by which it appears that William Hill was married to Mary Pearce on the 30th of May, 1802.

EDWARD SCAMELL . I know the prisoner, and was present when Mary Pearce was married to him at St. George, Bloomsbury, in May, 1802. I saw her alive on the 3d of September.

MARY HARRIS . I was married to the prisoner on the 16th of August, 1813 - I was then a widow, and my name was White. We lived together near six years; I then found that he had been married before and left him. I have since married Mr. Harris

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You became convinced that he had another wife soon after you got acquainted with Harris - A. Yes. When I was married to Harris the prisoner watched me into church, and said,

"I now suppose, Mary, that you will have me taken up." I said

"No, if you'll take care of the child I shall not." He then sent it into the country, and treated it ill.

GUILTY . Aged 45.

Confined Three Months .

Third Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18200918-155

1054. WILLIAM DAY was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of July , one basket, value 3 s.; one horse-rope, value 6 d.; one whip, value 2 s. 6 d.; one dung-fork, value 2 s., and one sack, value 2 s. , the goods of John Whitbread and Samuel Whitbread .

MR. ARABIN conducted the prosecution.

JAMES DEARMAN . I am servant to Mr. Pearson. On the 28th of July I slept at Messrs. Whitbreads' warehouse; about three o'clock in the morning I heard a noise in the stable, went down, saw the prisoner going out of the yard with these things, and secured him.

JOHN WHITBREAD , ESQ.. I am in partnership with Samuel Whitbread , we have a farm at Edmonton ; these things are our property, and were about the farm the night before.

THOMAS AUSTIN . I am constable. I took the prisoner before the Magistrate, and saw him sign his examination; what he said was voluntary - (read.) The prisoner confesses the charge, and says he took them between two and and three o'clock in the morning.

Prisoner. I was starving.

GUILTY . Aged 55.

Confined Three Months .

Third Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18200918-156

1055. THOMAS DUNTER , CHARLES WINKWORTH , and WILLIAM CHAPMAN were indicted for stealing, on the 15th of July , one watch, value 29 s., and one chain, value 2 s., the goods of John Marks , from his person .

JOHN MARKS. On the 15th of July, about twelve o'clock in the day, I was standing at the entrance of Cumming-street, Pentonville , leaning over a post by my house, the glass-blowers were passing - the prisoners and some other persons came by, put their arms round me, while another person drew my watch from my fob. A person called Stop thief! I looked to my left, and about six yards off a person was taken - I saw that person put his hand behind him and missed the watch - it was picked up and given to me. They took the person into my house, and Taylor took him away. I do not know who he was.

GEORGE TAYLOR . I am a constable. I was at this place with nine other officers. I saw a gang of thirty or forty coming at the head of the glass-blowers. We followed them from Battle-bridge, and saw them surround Mr. Marks - I saw the prisoners among them, but did not see them do anything then; I am certain they were in the gang. I saw Mr. Marks's watch on the ground, and a number of people scuffling for it; I picked it up, and gave it to the prosecutor. I took the watch out of his hand, or they would have taken it from him again. I took Dunton into Mr. Marks's fore-court; we shut him in, as there was a cry of Rescue! We afterwards took fourteen more of the gang - Winkworth and Chapman were among them.

WILLIAM COLTON . I am a broker, and was with the officers. I saw a number of lads and men coming along. I verily believe I saw Dunton take the watch from Mr. Marks, but will not be certain - he held it out for some one to take; I rushed in, and took him with it in his hand. Winkworth and Chapman, I am certain, called the rest of the gang; they came up, I was knocked down, and lost both the prisoner and watch. Dunton was taken into the prosecutor's house. Several gentlemen complained of having been robbed.

ANDREW SYKES . I am a vellum-binder, and live in Field-lane. I saw Mr. Marks attacked by the gang. Colton seized one, he was knocked down - I think Dunton was the man, but am not certain. I held him myself four or five minutes, and heard Winkworth calling the gang up to rescue him.

JAMES SMITH . I am an officer. I was called out by another person, who had been robbed, and followed Winkworth and Chapman to White Conduit House, and secured them with others. The whole gang ran away immediately they were pointed out.

JOSEPH CADBY . I took Dunton in charge as Colton

was knocked down. I saw that Duton was the man whom Colton had hold of, I knew him before. I saw the other two in the gang.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

CHAPMAN'S Defence. A man came and took me, but found nothing on me. I am innocent.

NOT GUILTY .

Third Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18200918-157

1056. ANN HARE was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of September, 1819 , one pair of stockings, value 10 s.; two pillow-cases, value 3 s., and one frock, value 3 s. , the goods of Thomas Slater .

MR. ARABIN conducted the prosecution.

MARTHA SLATER . I am the wife of Thomas Slater , who is a butcher , and lives at Kensington ; the prisoner was nurse in my family twelve months, and lived at Mr. Hall's, No. 18, Knightsbridge. On the 26th of August I found two keys which excited my suspicion. I lost this property from a drawer, which one of the keys opened.

EDWARD JOHN HANDLY . I am an officer. I searched the prisoner's lodgings, and found two pillow-cases, and duplicates of the other property.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

EDWARD DRY . I am servant to Mr. Kimber, a pawnbroker, of Knightsbridge. On the 24th of August, 1819, a pair of stockings were pledged for 2 s. The duplicate of them is among those produced.

FREDERICK JONES . I am shopman to Mr. Hudson, an ironmonger. I sold the prisoner two keys similar to those produced.

Prisoner's Defence. The pillow-cases were mine, and if the keys were mine I should have taken better care of them - the other things were sent to me when I had her child to nurse.

MRS. SLATER re-examined. She had my child to nurse. I did not send the child's linen to her.

GUILTY . Aged 34.

Fined One Shilling, and Discharged .

Third Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18200918-158

1057. JOHN WARD was indicted for a misdemeanor .

WILLIAM PRITCHARD . I am servant to Mr. Smith, who is a portable desk-maker , and lives in Cow-lane . On the 18th of August the prisoner came and produced a note, he said he brought it from Mr. Batley, of Brownlow-street. I sent the note to Mr. Smith, in the counting-house, tied up the skins, and delivered them to him; he took them out, and the constable stopped him.

MR. WILLIAM SMITH . Pritchard sent the note to me; I ordered the skins to be delivered to him - I had provided a constable to secure him. I produce the note - (read.)

"Mr. Smith, leather-seller, Snow-hill. Mr. Batley's compliments, and will feel obliged if Mr. Smith will send by bearer three best Russia skins, and a bill. No. 8, Brownlow-street."

WILLIAM BATLEY . I am a pocket-book-maker, and live in Brownlow-street. The prisoner is a perfect stranger to me - the note was not written by me.

GEORGE WORRALL . I apprehended the prisoner near Field-lane, with the letter. He said he was taking it to the end of Fleet-market to a gentleman, who gave him 1 s. to carry it - he had passed Fleet-market.

Prisoner's Defence. A man stopped me at the end of the market, and gave me 1 s. to fetch the things.

GUILTY .

Confined Six Months .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200918-159

1058. THOMAS DERRY was indicted for perjury .

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

MR. CHARLES BROUGHAM . I am clerk to Mr. Justice Bailey. I produce an affidavit from the chambers, it was duly sworn there on the 6th of October, 1819 . I cannot say the defendant is the person who swore it.

BARNARD GLEED . I am an officer of Worship-street, and know the defendant's hand-writing, the signature to the affidavit is his, and I believe the body of it.

- (read.)

KING'S BENCH. -

" Thomas Derry , of Lucas-place, Bethnal-green-road, make the oath and said, that James Lloyd, of Lucas-place, butcher, did, on the 18th of September, without any just cause or provocation, make an assault on this deponant, and did beat and kick this deponent, and throw this deponent with such great force, and in so violent a manner down upon the pavement, as to materially hurt and injure this deponent's right shoulder and arm in such manner, that this deponent hath ever since that time been in great pain, and unable to make the smallest use of it. And this deponent saith that his right shoulder and arm was and is very much swollen, and very black, occasioned by the kick and fall this deponent received from the said James Lloyd , whereby this deponent is at present incapable of getting his livelihood, and that the said assault so made on him by the said James Lloyd is the sole cause of his incapability of at present getting his livelihood, and that he is not a member of any Benefit Society, and hath a wife and two small children dependent on him for support."

MR. PHILIP LEIGH . I attended before Mr. Justice Bailey as attorney for Lloyd, on a summons to shew cause why he should not be held to special bail for this assault. The defendant attended in person.

MR. BENJAMIN WELLS . I am clerk to Mr. Justice Bailey. I remember the hearing of the summons, I stated the circumstances to the Judge, and he directed me to issue a summons on the affidavit.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Why was not an order granted on the affidavit - A. The Judge in his extreme humanity will not grant an order in the first case, but orders a summons to see if the parties cannot settle it.

JAMES LLOYD . I am a butcher , and live in Bethnal-green-road , and did so in October, 1819, the defendant lived next door to me. On the 18th of September, I had a shutter put up to guard my meat, the defendant came home at five o'clock in the afternoon, and instead of going into his house, came straight to my door, and insisted I should take the shutter down, or he would knock it down. I perceived he was in a state of intoxication, and therefore made no reply, but stood before my door serving my customers. It was Saturday, he was not deprived of his senses; he began to push the meat and the stall-board about. I merely laughed at him; he turned himself round, and attempted to take the shutter down, it was

very slightly hung on a hook. He pulled it different ways, but could not get it off, turned round, and swore at me. He had some crumpets in his hand, his wife was at the door; she begged him to come in, and not make a fool of himself, and took him by the arm to pull him in, but he thrust her away from him, came back to the shutter, and pulled it violently; he at last saw how it hung, and lifted it off; he walked fourteen or fifteen feet towards the road-side, and pitched it into the road with all his force. I went to pick it up, and as I passed him he said,

"There, d - n you, I will serve you the same." In pitching it down he fell himself, that was before I went to take it up. I was on the footpath, not within reach of him, when he fell, standing with my hands tucked between my waistcoat and apron, his wife came and picked him up, and begged him not to make a fool of himself. Instead of going in, he came before the shop, and pulled the stall-board and meat about, swearing he had bought the whole of the ground, and the house was all his, he had paid for it, and I had no business there; he swore by all the oaths he could make, that d - n his eyes, he would make me shut up shop, and run away. His wife and some one took him in doors. He had not been long before he came out with a great coat on, and went down the road, he returned in about twenty minutes, with his arm in a sling, and d - d and swore how he would serve me, and make me spend every shilling I had. He pushed me away from the front of the shop, caught up a chopper, and swore he would split my skull with it. I took it from him, and told him to go in doors. As the people came up, he said,

"D - n it, do not buy any meat of that b - dy butcher; whoever buys meat of him, ought to go to eternal damnation." He collected a mob before the door, I sent for a constable. Just before the constable came he ran up stairs, opened his first floor window, abused me from there, and advised the people not to buy of me, saying I gave short weight. Essex, the constable, came, he abused him in the same way, and set him at defiance.

Q. In the whole course of the transaction did you strike or kick him - A. No; I never touched him except to take the chopper from him; I never struck or threw him down. I was afterwards taken before a Magistrate by him, and put into Giltspur-street Compter, and was served with the summons which Mr. Leigh attended on my behalf.

Cross-examined. Q. His wife keeps a haberdasher's shop - A. There is a shop of that description. I did not go near him till after he fell. I snatched the chopper out of his hand; I did not trip up his heels or push him.

THOMAS ELDRIDGE . I am a cooper, and live next door to Lloyd. On the 18th of September I was coming out of Mr. Fuller's house, six doors from Lloyd's; the prisoner passed, he seemed in liquor. I walked behind him past his own door up to Lloyd's; he desired Lloyd to pull his shutter down, Lloyd said he would not, and told him to go in. Derry immediately swore, and said

"These premises I have paid for, and you have no business here," and began to pull his meat and cloth about. His wife came and said,

"Come in, and don't suffer yourself to be laughed at." He gave her some crumpets out of his hand, caught hold of the shutter, and endeavoured to wrench it down, but did not succeed, and began throwing the meat about again, threatening Lloyd how he would serve him. He turned again to the shutter, got it off the book, and carried and threw it into the middle of the road, as far as his strength would admit, and in turning round from throwing it he fell. Lloyd followed him with both his hands tucked in his apron, as he had stood all the while, picked up the shutter, and gave it to me - I took it in doors. In the mean time Derry was picked up by his wife and a man; he was using very bad expressions all the time. I went away, and saw no more. Up to that time Lloyd had not touched him.

Cross-examined. Q. Are you an acquaintance of Lloyd's - A. Not particularly; I deal with him.

EDWARD BAIRNES . I am a clerk in the Bank, and live in Pott-street, Bethnal-green. I was buying meat at Lloyd's, and saw Derry come up and abuse Lloyd in a most shameful manner about the shutter - he had not said a word to him. He made several attempts to take it down, he succeeded the second time, and threw it into the middle of the road; the force he threw it with threw him down - Lloyd had not laid a finger on him; his hands were in his apron or breeches, and could not possibly touch him, he was as cool as possible - he went and picked the shutter up, and gave it to Mr. Eldridge. I then went away.

Cross-examined. Q. You saw no chopper used - A. No. Derry was rather intoxicated.

EDWARD EDWARDS . I am servant to Lloyd. I was at home when Derry first came up. My master stood outside the shop; Derry said

"You must take that shutter down or I will" - Lloyd refused. He then attempted to pull it down, went away, returned in a moment, and got it down; he took it out, and threw it into the middle of the road - as he turned round he fell. My master went and picked the shutter up - I think this was before Derry was down. My master never touched him, his hands were in his apron. He gave the shutter to Eldridge, who took it in. A woman picked Derry up, and he went in doors. He came out again, went away, returned in a quarter of an hour, and abused my master very much. He had his hand in a sling. He took a chopper in his left hand, and said he would split my master' skull with it; my master took it from him without any violence, and sent for an officer; when he came the prisoner had gone in, and he abused the officer from the window.

Cross-examined. Q. Where were you - A. In the shop, twenty or thirty yards from them. I believe my master was about a yard from Derry when he fell.

WILLIAM HARRIS . I was at Lloyd's, and got there rather before the prisoner had come up. I saw him kicking up a row about the shutter, which he endeavoured to take off, but did not succeed; the second time he got it off, turned and threw it down, and by throwing it he fell himself. Lloyd was two or three people from him at that time, and not near enough to strike or kick him. I saw every thing that passed. Lloyd went out and picked the shutter up. Derry's wife and some one came and took him in; he came back before the shop, and used most horrible language; Lloyd sent me for a constable, I returned with one; Derry was then up at his window, abusing Lloyd. After the constable was gone Derry walked before the door, and said if he had a knife he would stick him.

JAMES ESSEX . I am a constable. Harris fetched me.

Derry was waving his arms from the window, abusing Lloyd, and deterring the people from buying meat. He abused and dared me to take him, as he was on his own premises.

HENRY FULLER . I am a surgeon, and live in Bethnal-green-road. On the 18th of September, between five and seven o'clock in the evening, the prisoner sent for me - he had a sling round his shoulder, which appeared to have had his arm in it, but he was in a violent passion at this time. He threw one arm down violently on the counter, and held a knife in the other, swearing he would stab Lloyd if he could get at him. He used both arms with great strength; if he had been hurt it would be impossible for him to have used them in that way - by the action of his arms they could not have been injured. I saw him nine or ten days after, putting up his shutters with both arms.

MR. ANDREWS addressed the Jury on behalf of the defendant, and called four witnesses to contradict the case, but they confirmed the evidence for the prosecution.

GUILTY .

Confined One Year , and Fined One Shilling .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200918-160

1059. THOMAS STARKEY and JOHN STARKEY were indicted for a conspiracy .

MR. ADOLPHUS declined offering any evidence.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200918-161

THIRTEENTH DAY. WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 27.

1060. JOHN WALKER and THOMAS WHITE were indicted for stealing, on the 19th of August , 90 lbs. of lead, value 12 s., the goods of John Harding , and fixed to a building of his .

JOHN HARDING . I live at No. 12, King-street, Golden-square . On the 19th of August, about five o'clock in the morning, I was alarmed; I arose opened the parlour window, and saw Finnigan in his shirt, saying thieves were in the house. I let the watchman in, and heard footsteps going down the kitchen stairs - the watchman brought the prisoners up. A man next door brought some lead which I found had been stripped off the roof of my privy; I compared it, and it fitted exactly. My neighbour's privy had been stripped the week before.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODERICK. Q. How high is the roof - A. About seven feet. It was cut in two pieces and folded up.

EDWARD FINNIGAN . I lodge next door to Harding. I was getting up about five o'clock, and saw Walker coming down off the roof of the privy, and White take his apron off and putting a piece of lead into it. They must have got in at the door of No. 12 or 13 to get there. They heard me open the door, and got in at the back-door of No. 12. I alarmed Harding, and found the lead stripped off. A strange key was picked up in No. 13, which opened the door.

JOHN PHILLIPS . I am a watchman. I found White behind the kitchen door, and Walker behind some wood. I saw the lead fitted to the roof, it matched, and had been fresh cut.

WALKER - GUILTY . Aged 16.

WHITE - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Fourth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200918-162

1061. MARY SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of September , three sheets, value 15 s. , the goods of James Bowlen .

JAMES BOWLEN . I keep the Sir George Osborne, public-house, Princes-street . The prisoner lived seven weeks with me, when she left I missed three sheets. She was apprehended three days after.

EDMUND GREEN . I apprehended the prisoner at the prosecutor's back door. As I was taking her to the office she put the duplicates of the sheets in her month. I took them out.

JOHN HENRY DAVIS . I am servant to Mr. Law, pawnbroker, Church-lane. On the 2d of September a sheet was pawned for 4 s., in the name of Eliza Wilson , John-street. I believe the prisoner to be the person.

JOHN KELLINGSWORTH . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Brick-lane. The prisoner pawned a sheet with me on the 23d of August.

JOHN VAUGHAN . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Whitechapel. On the 2d of September the prisoner pawned a sheet with me.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I wanted some money to prevent a friend going to prison, I could get none of Mr. Bowlen, and his wife told me to pawn these things. His house is a resort for thieves and bad people, he stops up till four or five o'clock to receive thieves and their goods. I intended to have his licence taken away, and he does this to prevent me. The second night I was there three young fellows came in with a box of jewellery and went up to bed. He has a back door for them to escape out of.

JAMES BOWLEN . She did not say my wife gave her them to pledge when she was taken.

JOHN VAUGHAN . She said nothing of the kind. The house is very respectable.

GUILTY . Aged 32.

Transported for Seven Years .

Fourth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200918-163

1062. EDWARD IRELAND was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of August , one suit of boy's clothes, value 9 s. , the goods of James Crow Eastling .

JAMES CROW EASTLING . I live in Tothill-street, Westminster . About nine o'clock in the evening these clothes were stolen from the door. I ran out and stopped the prisoner with them about one hundred yards off.

ELIZA HODGKINS . I saw the prisoner take the clothes from Mr. Eastling's.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Six Months .

Fourth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200918-164

1063. MARY COOK was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of July , from the person of John Carr , one 1 l. Bank note, his property .

JOHN CARR . I keep the Union, public-house, Bagnigge Wells-road . On the 14th of July, the prisoner came to sell potatoes, she waited sometime; my wife called me, and said she suspected her - she immediately ran out - I followed, and charged her with taking a 1 l. note from the till; she denied it. I sent for an officer; she then took the note out of her bosom, and begged for mercy. It has my wife's writing on it.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Of Stealing, but not from the Person.

Confined Two Months .

Fourth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200918-165

1064. DENNIS ALCOLORET was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of August , six pair of boots, value 30 s., the goods of William Patterson , privately in his shop .

ROBERT VINE . I am servant to Mr. William Patterson, who is a shoemaker , and lives at No. 1 and 2, Broadway, Westminster . On the 30th of August, between seven and eight o'clock, as I was opening the shop, the prisoner came and asked for a pair of leather boot-laces, I said I could not cut them; he went away, saying it would do when I had opened the shop. He returned in half an hour, had one, and a pair of silk shoe-strings, which came to threepence; he then left the shop; and in about a quarter of an hour I was tying up some shoes, and was going into the shop No. 2., I saw him come out of the door with six pair of boots; on seeing me he threw them down, and ran out; I overtook him in York-street, he said

"I have got nothing, what do you want with me?" I did not see him take them - they are worth 30 s.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I took these boots off a nail, intending to buy them for my wife. He said I intended to steal them, and I went away.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Life .

Fourth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200918-166

1065. THOMAS PICTON was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of July , one gun, value 5 s. , the goods of Thomas Young .

JOHN WINCH . I am servant to Mr. Young, a farmer at Edmonton . I missed this gun from an empty house in the field; I asked the prisoner, if he knew anything of it? he said No.

JOHN MEAD . I apprehended the prisoner in August, and found the gun in his father's house. He said he took it to shoot sparrows off his father's cherry-tree.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I found it in a hedge.

NOT GUILTY .

Fourth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200918-167

1066. CHARLOTTE WEBB was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of August , one gown, value 12 s. , the goods of Joseph Perry .

HANNAH PERRY . I am wife of Joseph Perry , we live in Oxford-market . On the 20th of August, about five o'clock, I thought I heard somebody coming down stairs, I looked out of the window, and saw the prisoner going out; I overtook her about thirty yards off with this gown, which she had taken from the attic.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 47.

Confined One Year .

Fourth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200918-168

1067. JOHN RICKETTS was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of August , one watch, value 40 s., the goods of William Thorn , from his person .

WILLIAM THORN . I belong to the ship Providence . I was standing opposite the Black Horse public-house, New Gravel-lane , waiting for a shipmate; the prisoner and two others came up, and got into conversation with me. Carpenter came up to wish me good bye, as I was going to sea - the prisoner snatched my watch out; all three ran off together. I followed and overtook him, without losing sight of him, but he had not got my watch. I paid 4 l. for it the day before.

ELIZA CARPENTER . I live in Sun-court. I was going to speak to Thorn; the moment I got up the prisoner snatched his watch out, and ran off with the other two; he was stopped.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Life .

Fourth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200918-169

1068. JOSEPH MAYHOUSE was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of July , one watch, value 15 s. , the goods of Eliza Bennett , widow .

ELIZA BENNETT . I live in King's-court, Blue Anchor-alley, Whitecross-street . On the 24th of July, about half-past nine o'clock in the evening, I was at the Green Man and Still, rather the worse for liquor, but perfectly sensible; the prisoner and another man said they would assist me home; when I got to the door and was feeling for the key, they tried to get my ear-rings off. Instantly I opened the door they both rushed in and sat themselves down in the great arm-chair, and in a few minutes knocked the candle off the table; the other snatched the watch off the shelf, and ran off. The prisoner ran down into the kitchen and broke the pannel of the door in trying to escape.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Have you not said that the prisoner did not take it - A. No.

NATHAN CROSSLEY . I lodge in Bennett's kitchen. I heard her come home, two men, her daughter, and another woman were with her; in five minutes I heard a bustle; she cried out murder! and they called for a light. The prisoner ran down stairs with such force, that he broke the pannel of the door; I secured him.

SUSAN BENNETT . I am the prosecutrix's daughter. She was the worse for liquor, when she went to the public-house. Ellinam and I went to try and get her home; we found the prisoner and another man sitting by her, they said

"Mrs. Bennett, we will see you safe home." They followed us, and in the passage tried to take her ear-rings. Both came and sat in the arm-chair, then knocked the candle out, and the other ran away. My mother said the

watch was gone, and charged him with it; he tried to escape the back-way, but there was no back door - he ran into the kitchen.

Cross-examined. Q. Was not your mother beastly drunk - A. No.

ANN ELLINAM . I live in King's-court. Susan Bennett got me to fetch her mother home. The prisoner and another man sat in the box with her. We at last persuaded her to come home, and the men accompanied us; at the door she told them to let her ear-rings alone; both sat in the arm-chair; then the one who escaped, went across the room, and sat alone; he knocked the candle off the table, and ran out. I did not see the watch taken.

Prisoner's Defence. I leave it to my Counsel.

JOHN MAYHOUSE . I am the prisoner's brother. I saw the prosecutrix in a public-house yesterday, she said

"So help me God, may my right arm perish off, if ever poor Joe took my watch, or knew anything of it." I positively swear it.

COURT. Q. How came you to see her - A. We were waiting for the trial, she came up to the table where we sat and said so. She insulted me, and said she did not care for Judge or Jury, they might all ***.

JAMES GREEN . I was in the parlour of the Pitt's Head yesterday, and heard her say, poor Joe knew nothing of the watch, d - n her if ever he saw it. I am no acquaintance of the prisoner's; I was merely at the public-house. She used most shameful language.

JOSEPH CHAMPNESS. I was a market gardener, but am now in the Rules of the Fleet. I heard the prosecutrix declare, with bitter oaths, that the prisoner knew nothing of the watch.

ELIZA TAYLOR . I saw the prosecutrix at the public-house. She wished her right hand might drop off if Joe knew anything of her watch. I live opposite to her; I would not believe her on her oath.

ANN PAIN . I live in King's-court. I was looking through the public-house window - I saw Bennett beating her hands upon the table; she said she wished her hand might never unclose, if ever Joe took her watch.

WILLIAM JORDAN . I am a constable of Clerkenwell. I observed the conduct of the prosecutrix at the public-house yesterday, it was disgusting, and last night she lay in the passage of the court, beastly drunk.

NOT GUILTY .

Fourth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200918-170

1069. ROBERT DARLING was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of July , two seals, value 2 l.; one key, value 10 s., and one ring, value 10 s., the goods of John Morgan Machin , from his person .

JOHN MORGAN MACHIN . I live at Shadwell. On the 13th of July, about ten o'clock at night, I was in Albion-street, Commercial-road ; a person passed on my right and another on my left hand, the one on my right hand snatched at my watch, the ring broke, and he got the chain and seals; I cried, Stop thief! and stopped him about twenty yards off, it was the prisoner; I never lost sight of him - the seals were found upon the spot where I stopped him.

- ANDREWS. I keep a shop in the Commercial-road. I heard the cry of Stop thief! and collared the prisoner at my door - nobody was running with him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Six Months .

Fourth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200918-171

1070. WILLIAM CRANMER was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of June , one saddle, value 2 l.; two bridles, value 2 l., and one martingale, value 10 s. , the goods of Charles Finch .

MR. ARABIN conducted the prosecution.

JOHN FENNER . I am groom to Mr. Finch, a mustard manufacturer . On the 21st of June, these things were locked in the stable - they belong to Charles Finch . I fastened the stable-door at half-past eight o'clock at night, I returned at half-past five o'clock in the morning, found it broken open and the property gone.

FRANK HOUSE SMITH SHORTLAND . I am a labourer, at Staines. On Wednesday night the 21st of June, I was at the Phoenix, public-house, at Staines; I saw the prisoner there with two more - I knew him before. I left them there about twenty minutes past ten o'clock - it is about one hundred and fifty yards from the prosecutor's stable; he lived in the neighbourhood. Between two and three o'clock next morning, I saw him and two others within thirty yards of the stable - I only saw their backs; they were going in a direction from the stables. I did not then know of the robbery.

CHARLES GOODLUCK . I am a postboy at Leatherhead. On the 23d of August, I was at the Swan at Egham, and saw the prisoner on the road. On the 25th of August, I was at my father's at Staines; the prisoner came and asked if I knew who wanted to buy a saddle and two bridles; I said No, and asked him what they were worth; he said 15 s., I said I would buy them in the morning. I informed Mr. Finch, and went next morning to the prisoner, to buy them, he was abed; he said I was to wait at the Phoenix, public-house, until he came; I asked him where the things were? he said it would not do, I could not have them till night, and they were at a house at Knowl-green, where there was no suspicion. I found him at the Phoenix, public-house, at eight o'clock at night - I gave him a bag to put them in. We went to Knowl-green - he brought them out in the bag. I gave him 15 s., and went away. It was a saddle, two bridles, and a martingale.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. Goodluck asked me where there was two good stout horses, as he wanted to steal two, to go in the Gravesend coach. He said he would stand fence for anything, even if it was the King's Crown. He gave me 11 s. for them.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Fourth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200918-172

1071. WILLIAM HENRY HUNT was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of August , one watch, value 3 l., the goods of Henry M'Cullock , from his person .

HENRY M'CULLOCK. I am a bookbinder , and live in Albion-buildings, Bartholomew-close. On the 28th of

August, between twelve and one o'clock at night, I had been with some friends, but was sober. I was knocking at the workhouse door on Saffron-hill with my knuckles, about a woman I had met, whom I knew twelve years ago. The prisoner came up and asked if I wanted to get in? I believe him to be the man, I said I did, he said he would soon get admission for he was a parishioner, and knocked at the door with his umbrella. I took out my watch to see the time; he immediately snatched it out of my hand, broke the chain, and left the seals in my hand. I pursued him down the hill, calling Stop thief! and in about ten minutes found him in custody with the watch.

THOMAS DAY . I am a watchman. I was at the corner of Crawford-passage, about one hundred yards from the workhouse. Hearing the alarm I followed the prisoner, who passed my box, and was running very fast across the road; I lost sight of him for five or six minutes, and found him in charge of Taylor. I fetched the prosecutor, who said he could not swear to him. The prisoner then said we ought to be sent to the watch-house for stopping him. While we were round him at the corner of Baker's-buildings, I saw him stoop down and take the watch from his trowsers; he rose up with it in his hand. We had before that searched him outside, and told him to go about his business.

Prisoner. Q. Did you see me take it from my trowsers - A. Yes.

MICHAEL TAYLOR . I am a watchman. I stopped the prisoner at the corner of Bath-street, he appeared to be out of breath, when he saw me he turned back, I did not follow him, but went up Bath-street, met him again, and took him. Day came up and said he was the man. We took him to the corner of Baker's-row. The prosecutor said he was the man. The prisoner said,

"You cannot swear to me." He said he could not. He then talked of giving charge of the prosecutor. I let go of him, he said

"You had better go to your duty." My brother watchman gave him a shove, and told him to go home to bed. I noticed that he did not stir his legs when he was shoved, he then stooped, as if to tie his shoe, and the watch was found, whether it was taken out of his hand or not, I cannot say. We then took him to the watch-house.

JOHN DALEY . I am a watchman. I heard the cry of Stop thief! and saw the prisoner coming out of Bath-court, walking very smart. When he saw me he turned, and went down Bath-street. I went after him, and told Taylor to stop him, he did so, He seemed to have been running very hard. and was in a great perspiration. We took him to the top of Baker's-row, the prosecutor came up and could not swear to him, but thought he was the man. I felt outside his coat, felt nothing, and told him to go about his business. He stooped down, and when he rose, I took the watch out of his hand. He had an umbrella.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I declare I never saw it till the watchman produced it.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Life .

Fourth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200918-173

1072. THOMAS HAYDON was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of August , two baskets, value 1 s., and nine bushels of potatoes, value 10 s. , the goods of Daniel Poyser .

DANIEL POYSER . I live at Enfield . On Saturday morning, the 16th of August, these potatoes were in baskets in a field adjoining my house, I had thirteen baskets there, they were all emptied out and taken away with two of the baskets.

JOHN MEAD . I am a constable. The prisoner was a labourer at Enfield. In consequence of suspicion, last Monday week, I went to his house with a search-warrant, and found two baskets, one nearly full of potatoes, they appeared not to have been out of the ground above two or three days. He said he bought them, and found the baskets floating down the river. I took him on another charge.

(Baskets produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I found them.

GUILTY . Aged 43.

Transported for Seven Years .

Fourth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200918-174

1073. CHARLES POWIS was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of June , one watch, value 2 l., and two seals, value 30 s. the goods of Charles Large , from his person .

CHARLES LARGE . I am a servant . On the 27th of June, about eleven o'clock at night I was at the Hereford Arms, King-street, Portman-square . My watch was stolen from me while I was asleep. I did not see the prisoner there.

THOMAS WADMORE . I am a pawnbroker. On the 28th of June the prisoner pawned the watch with me.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I found it in the public-house.

NOT GUILTY .

Fourth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200918-175

1074. JOHN WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of August , one watch, value 20 s., the goods of Thomas Cummings , from his person .

THOMAS CUMMINGS . I am a pilot , and live in London-street. On the 8th of August about ten o'clock at night, I was in Ratcliffe-highway , the prisoner came against me, and pulled my watch out. I ran after him, but lost him, he was stopped in five minutes. I am certain he is the man.

WILLIAM COLLINS . I am a watchman. I stopped the prisoner as he run across Deal-alley, I found nothing on him.

Prisoner's Defence. At the office he could not swear to me.

The Court referred to the prosecutor's deposition, which stated he could not swear to him.

NOT GUILTY .

Fourth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200918-176

1075. JOHN OWEN was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of July , one watch, value 1 l.; one seal, value 1 l.; one key, value 1 d., and one ribbon, value 1 d., the goods of Abraham Mott , from his person .

ABRAHAM MOTT . I live in Crown-court, Pulteney-street, and am a sawyer . On the 1st of July, about two o'clock in the morning, I was coming along Oxford-street ,

from a bean-feast, and was in liquor, and lost my watch, I saw it again, but cannot positively swear to it. I laid hold of the prisoner at the time, suspecting him. He said

"For God's sake, forgive me, for my wife and family's sake."

DANIEL BLISS . I am porter at the Argyle-rooms. I was at the door of the rooms in Regent-street. I heard a noise, went out, and saw the prosecutor and his friends going to fight, and saw Owen come across the road, I kept my eye on him. He went up to Mott, whose coat was off, and begged him not to fight, then put his elbows against his stomach, drew the watch out of his fob with the other hand, and walked about two yards, when Mott's friends told him his watch was gone. The prisoner immediately ran, a man collared and charged him with it. He strongly denied it. I stood behind him, and saw him throw it away. I picked it up, collared him, and told Mott it was his watch, and that the prisoner robbed him of it. He said,

"For God's sake forgive me, for the sake of my wife and family." I gave him in charge.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Did you state all this before the Magistrate. - A. Yes.

THOMAS GLASSBOROUGH . I took the prisoner in charge, the prosecutor claimed the watch without hesitation. I was obliged to summon him to attend here.

WILLIAM SHARROL. I am a watchman. Bliss gave the prisoner to me with the watch. Mott said it was his.

THOMAS GOOK . I was constable of the night. Mott claimed the watch.

ABRAHAM MOTT re-examined. Q. Is that the watch that was taken from your pocket - A. I cannot say, it must have been, it seems altered. The robbery was committed in Regent-street.

Prisoner's Defence. I stopped to see the quarrel, and was going home with both hands in my pocket, when I was charged with this. I went to the watch-house without hesitation. I wish to put some questions to Bliss.

Prisoner to DANIEL BLISS . A. On your solemn oath did you never say you expected money on my conviction - A. Never; they told me at the watch-house I deserved 20 l. for taking such a noted character. His wife came and offered me a 1 l. note. I would not have it.

GUILTY . Aged 29.

Transported for Life .

Fourth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200918-177

1076. JAMES BIGGS was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of August , one watch, value 1 l., the goods of Robert Newnham , from his person .

ROBERT NEWNHAM . I am groom to Mr. Cobin, of High Holborn. On the 20th of August I was in White Hart-yard, Brook's-market , about ten o'clock at night; the prisoner and two others were going to have some beer with me. He was in liquor, and just at the public-house door he snatched my watch out, and gave it to another. I had fell in with him in Holborn, but knew none of them before. I secured him immediately, and the others ran away. A man brought my watch to the office the next day.

JOHN SHEPHERD . I am a watchman, and took the prisoner in charge.

CHARLES READ . I am a constable. I was standing at Hatton-garden Office the day after the robbery, a man who said he was the prisoner's brother-in-law, brought me the watch.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I met him in Holborn, he said he knew me, and asked me to drink with him. He said a man had taken his watch, and he would hold me till he got him.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Recommended to Mercy. Confined Six Months .

Third Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18200918-178

1077. ANN JENKINS was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of September , 150 yards of muslin trimming, value 10 l., the goods of Robert Marr , privately in his shop .

ROBERT MARR . I am a haberdasher . I live in Rathbone-place, Oxford-street . On the 7th of September, between ten and eleven o'clock in the morning the prisoner came and bought two nails of muslin at 2 s. a yard, and tendered me 1 s. I had not got a 6 d. in the till, and nobody else was in the shop. I turned my back to call the cook to get two sixpences for a shilling, and gave the prisoner 9 d., another woman came into the shop with the prisoner. I had been showing some muslin trimming to a person. When the prisoner was gone I missed the whole bundle of trimming, (the other woman still remained) it consisted of 150 yards. I followed her, secured her, and immediately the whole dropped from her gown.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

ROBERT WADKINS . I live opposite Mr. Marr. I saw him take the prisoner into his shop. He shook her clothes, and this bundle of trimming fell out.

Prisoner's Defence. The muslin was not near me.

GUILTY . Aged 42.

Transported for Life .

Third Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18200918-179

1078. CATHERINE WHEELER was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of September , one sheet, value 10 s., and one pair of stockings, value 2 s. , the goods of John Cook .

SARAH COOK . I am the wife of John Cook . The prisoner nurse d me during my lying-in, when I recovered, I missed these things, and charged her with it, she solemnly denied it. She was taken up on another charge, and the duplicates found on her.

GEORGE PERRY . I am a watchman. The prosecutor told me to apprehend the prisoner for stealing wine, and next night I took her in Fox-court, Gray's Inn-lane. I took a paper out of her hand at the watch-house, containing three duplicates.

WILLIAM CREE . My father is a pawnbroker, and lives in Gray's Inn-lane. A sheet was pawned with us in the name of Ann Jones ; the duplicate produced belongs to it. The prisoner uses our house, and pledges in that name.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Confined Three Months .

Third Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18200918-180

1079. JOHN ROWLES and JOHN MALCOLM were indicted for stealing, of the 15th of August , one handkerchief, value 3 s., the goods of a certain man , whose name is unknown, from his person .

WILLIAM MASON . I am a stationer, and live in Chapel-court, Swallow-street. On the 15th of August, about half-past one o'clock in the afternoon, I was at Hyde-park Corner, a procession was going to Brandenburgh-house, it had passed about a quarter of an hour, when the prisoners with another, ran by me down the road. I knew them, and followed them towards Knightsbridge ; they saw me, and I let them go on, then followed two or three hundred yards, till they came behind a gentleman, followed him some distance, then the third man (not in custody) pulled the handkerchief a little way out of the gentleman's pocket, they still followed him to the Cannon Brewery, then Rowles took it quite out. I went up, they separated on seeing me. Rowles got behind a cart, and put the handkerchief in his coat-pocket. I secured him, took it out, and took him to the gentleman, who refused to attend the office. Malcolm was apprehended that night. I am certain he is the person.

ROWLES'S Defence. I had the handkerchief two days before.

ROWLES - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Life .

MALCOLM - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years. - Penitentiary .

Third Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18200918-181

1080. WILLIAM MARTIN was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of August , one handkerchief, value 5 s., the goods of Samuel Serle , from his person .

MR. SAMUEL SERLE . I am an officer in the East-India service , and live in Bedford-row. On the 30th of August, between two and three o'clock in the afternoon, I was just entering Bloomsbury-place , with a lady on my arm, I felt something touch me, turned round, seized the prisoner, and saw him drop my handkerchief; he said,

"What have I done?" I said,

"You young rogue, what do you mean by saying you have not robbed me?" he said,

"There are two boys behind who took your handkerchief?" There were two boys four or five yards behind, but I saw it in his hand.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I never touched him.

GUILTY . Aged 12.

Transported for Seven Years - Penitentiary .

Third Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18200918-182

1081. WILLIAM FENTON , was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of August , one watch-chain, value 6 d.; one key, value 6 d.; one ring, value 3 d., and one seal, value 10 s., the goods of Joseph Hopwood , from his person .

JOHN HOPWOOD . I am a cabinet maker , and live in the Commercial-road. On the 2d of August, between five and six o'clock, as I passed a coffee-house in Osborne-street, Whitechapel, I saw three men standing at the door, the prisoner was the outside one - I passed them, and when I came to the corner of Montague-street , by the Compasses, public-house, the prisoner followed me, turned round, and laid hold of my watch-chain, it broke, and he ran across with it in his hand, into Wentworth-street - I followed calling Stop thief! the other two followed me, and a man stood in the road, and did not offer to interfere, the other two said,

"D - n you, leave him alone, or we will soon do for you." The landlord of the Two Brewers came out, and said I should be murdered if I went down there, which was George-yard. I returned, and he sent me to the watch-house. When I described the prisoner, they said his name was Tenton. I went down Wentworth-street with Partridge, and saw him come out of a public-house. I am positive he is the person.

JOHN ASBURY . I keep the Two Brewers. About five o'clock in the morning of the 2d of August, I heard the alarm, and saw Hopwood following the prisoner. I am certain he is the man - I knew him before. I advised Hopwood not to follow, as George-yard is a bad place.

JOHN PARTRIDGE . I apprehended the prisoner with a gang of twenty.

Prisoner's Defence. I was at the City of Norwich, public, when he took me.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Life .

Third Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18200918-183

1082. CHARLES JACOBS and JAMES ASBURY were indicted for stealing, on the 22d of June , two silver watch cases, value 3 l., the goods of John Andrews , from the person of Henry Faulkner .

HENRY FAULKNER . I am errand boy to Mr. Andrews, who is a watch-case finisher . On the 22d of June I had two silver watch-cases in a bag, between twelve and one o'clock, Jacobs came up, and asked which was Clerkenwell-green - I told him, he said,

"Come and shew us." He gave me a little broken whip, and asked me where I was going - I said, to Mr. Stodhart's, No. 61, Red Lion-street. He then asked what I had got in my bag, which hung over my shoulder. I told him I was going there with two silver watch-cases. He followed me up Bishop's-court, and I went straight to Red Lion-street. I knew him before, he went to school with me. Asbury came up to me in Red Lion-street , and said he was come for those two watch-cases of Mr. Stodhart's - he came as if from that house, and I gave them to him. Jacobs had left me in Bishop's-court; I had not seen them speak together. I looked back and saw Asbury running past Mr. Stodhart's house as hard as he could tear. I was frightened, and went home to my master, but did not like to tell him. I went and dined at my mother's, then returned, and told him. I saw the prisoners together that afternoon, about four o'clock, in King-street, Goswell-street, standing under a gateway, I ran by them to St. John's-square, where I was going, and as I returned I saw a whole parcel of them on Clerkenwell-green. I described them to my master.

JOHN ANDREWS . On the 22d of June I delivered Faulkner one gold and two silver watch-cases, the silver ones were for Mr. Stodhart - he informed me he had lost them, and gave me the same account he has now. I apprehended Jacobs myself, Asbury was with him at the time, but I was not certain of him; he answered the description the boy gave, but a boy was with me who knew Jacobs.

JAMES BANKS . I live with Mr. Perry, in Upper Ashby-street.

I saw Jacobs go up to Faulkner, put his arm round his neck, give him a little whip, follow him into Bishop's-court, and there left him. Asbury and the other lad then ran on to Red Lion-street; Jacobs walked slowly behind. I saw no more.

JAMES ASBURY 'S Defence. This lad asked the way to Clerkenwell-green, and I directed him.

JACOBS - GUILTY . Aged 15.

ASBURY - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Life .

Third Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18200918-184

1083. JOHN EDEN and JOSEPH LAND were indicted for stealing, on the 28th of August , one handkerchief, value 3 s., the goods of a certain man unknown, from his person .

WILLIAM EWER . I am a constable. On the 28th of August I was in St. James's-square , and saw the prisoners with another, trying several gentlemens' pockets. I saw one of them draw a handkerchief out of a gentleman's pocket - I think it was Land, but am not certain. I could not get to the gentleman, the crowd was so great, but followed the prisoners, who ran round the square together. I took Land, and Gook took Eden, the third escaped. I found the handkerchief in Land's trowsers; I had seen him put it there.

THOMAS GOOK . I was with Ewer, and saw the prisoners and a larger boy, they were acting under his direction. I saw them try several gentlemens' pockets; they did it awkwardly, and the other seemed to reprimand them. I saw Land put his hand into a gentleman's pocket, then the big one interfered. I saw the handkerchief come from somewhere, and they ran into the crowd. I called to the gentleman, but lost him. I followed them round the square, and secured them. I found another handkerchief on Eden.

EDEN - GUILTY . Aged 15.

LAND - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years. - Penitentiary .

Third Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18200918-185

FOURTEENTH DAY, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 28.

1084. THOMAS POULTER was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of September , 2 lbs. of horse-hair, value 10 s. , the goods of Caleb Welch Collins and Richard Wells .

MR. STIRLING conducted the Prosecution.

MR. RICHARD WELLS . I am a horse-hair manufacturer , in partnership with Caleb Welch Collins . On the 13th of September the prisoner came to our house - in consequence of what our porter said I charged him with stealing horse-hair. He was searched, and 1 1/2 lb. found on him; he said it was his first offence.

JAMES RYAN . I am the prosecutors' porter. The prisoner came to exchange some horse-hair; I saw him take some and put it into his breeches - I told my master; it was found on him.

GUILTY . Aged 67.

Confined Six Months .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200918-186

1085. FRANCIS JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of August , one half-crown , the money of Samuel Corder and James Corder .

The prosecutor, being a Quaker, refused to be sworn.

NOT GUILTY .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200918-187

1086. COLIN ROBERTSON was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of July , one coat, value 10 s.; one waistcoat, value 2 s.; three handkerchiefs, value 2 s. 6 d., and one pad, value 6 d. , the goods of Richard Hemmings .

RICHARD HEMMINGS . I lodge at the General Howard at Chelsea, and am a pensioner . On the 13th of July I left these things in the care of Ann House ; they were stolen, and I found them at Bow-street on the Monday.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. How came they there - A. I knew her by being in service with her father.

ANN HOUSE . I live with my father in Paradise-row, Chelsea . These clothes lay in the front parlour; the prisoner worked for my father. He came between ten and eleven o'clock that night to see my sister - I was in bed in the back room and heard his voice. Directly he left I got up to look for these things and missed them.

Cross-examined. Q. When did he live with your father - A. Three or four years ago. He continued acquainted with my sister. I heard he had got a good deal of money by the death of his grandfather, I did not spend it for him. My sister was in bed when he came, and got up to speak to him. I get my living in service.

WILLIAM CRUSH . I live with Mr. Townsend, a pawnbroker, in Little Russell-street, Covent-garden. On the 14th of July, Mary Turner pledged a coat, waistcoat, and three handkerchiefs; she gave her address in Drury-lane.

JOHN SNOWSEL . I apprehended the prisoner on the 16th of July, in Millman-row, and told him he was charged with stealing the clothes from House; he said the bundle was at a friend's house just by - he dressed himself to go with me. I then said that I thought he had pawned them, and he gave me the duplicate.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Confined Six Months , and Whipped .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200918-188

1087. SAMUEL WOOLDRIGE was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of August , one pair of shoes, value 4 s. , the goods of Samuel Child .

SAMUEL CHILD . I am a shoemaker , and live in Fenchurch-street , the prisoner lived six years with me. On the 30th of August I sent him to the City-road with some boots and shoes, he did not return. Next morning I found him at Worship-street, with a pair of shoes which I had received from abroad as a pattern.

JOHN RICHARDS . I keep a shop in Golden-lane. On the 30th of August, about half-past nine o'clock at night, another lad brought these shoes for sale; the prisoner came in and asked if I would buy them? I thought they had been stolen, and sent him to the watch-house.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Fined One Shilling, and Discharged .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200918-189

1088. THOMAS CATON , MICHAEL BROWN , and JAMES INGLEBY , were indicted for stealing, on the 23d of July , one tea-caddy, value 5 s., and one spoon, value 1 s. , the goods of John Robertson .

JOHN ROBERTSON . I live in Bowyer's-buildings, Cannon-street-road , and am a revenue-officer . On the 23d of July I went to chapel about eleven o'clock in the morning; the caddy and spoon were in the front parlour.

ROBERT ROBERTSON . I was left at home, and sat in the kitchen. I heard a noise above, heard the table creak, and the cupboard door open. I went to the bottom of the stairs, saw the shadows of two or three people against the wall, and heard them whispering. I went backwards and called Mr. Harper next door, and he gave the alarm. I saw the prisoners at the watch-house in about half an hour.

THOMAS HARPER . I heard Robertson say there were thieves up stairs - I ran up, went to the prosecutor's window, and found it open; a woman passed, and informed me that three or four persons had run up James-street, at the end of the buildings. I pursued, and saw the three prisoners running in company with two others. Two or three women endeavoured to stop them; they ran over a rope-ground. Brown threw the caddy away, which I knew to be Robertson's. All three were secured, and I am certain of their persons.

EBENEZER SPENCER . On the 23d of July, about half-past ten o'clock in the morning, I saw the three prisoners and two others in company talking together, in Bowyer's-buildings, where I live. They went round the court two or three times, sauntering about, and the third time I heard Brown say,

"We will come at six o'clock, and then they will be out." Caton said,

"No, four o'clock." They stood a few minutes, then Ingleby, Brown, and one of the others went up the court; Caton stood at the corner. In two or three minutes I heard somebody running down the court turned round, and saw all five running into Cannon-street-road. Caton had something in his pocket. I had seen Ingleby before.

FRANCIS JACKSON . I am a constable. On the 23d of July Ingleby and Brown were given into my charge, and I took Caton.

PETER SCALT . I live in Christian-street. I heard the alarm, stepped out, and saw the three prisoners running. Ingleby dropped the spoon. I knew them before.

BROWN - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

(See 1017.)

CATON - GUILTY . Aged 16.

INGLEBY - GUILTY . Aged 15.

Confined Six Months , and Whipped .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200918-190

1089. WILLIAM DODD was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of August , 27 yards of linen cloth, value 35 s , the goods of James Shoolbred and John Fergusson .

JAMES SHOOLBRED . I am a linen-draper , live in Tottenham Court-road , and am in partnership with John Fergusson ; the prisoner was our porter . I suspected him, had his trunk searched, and found a piece of Irish linen, which I am certain is ours; he said he bought it ten months ago. I saw it safe the week before.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Confined Six Months , and Whipped .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200918-191

1090. HENRY HEALD was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of August , one watch, value 20 l.; one chain, value 7 l.; three seals, value 3 l., and one key, value 1 l., the goods of Thomas Wakeley , from his person .

MR. THOMAS WAKELEY . I am a surgeon . On the 27th of August I lived in Argyle-street ; my house was on fire, and I was crossing the street to Mrs. Baker's, a neighbour, my watch was in my fob. There was a vast crowd of persons. I was holding my head down, not wishing to see the flames. I felt a something at my side, and saw a person's hand having hold of my chain; the watch was immediately snatched from my fob - I immediately collared the person who took it. He held up his hands, but had not got it then, and said,

"I have not got it." He was taken from me by a constable before I could observe him. I do not think the prisoner is the person. Immediately as he said he had not got it a person picked it off the pavement.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Are you able to say the man you seized took your watch - A. Most posively. That man's face I thought totally different from the prisoner's, but his coat was the same. He had a brown coat and a black handkerchief.

THOMAS GLASSBOROUGH . I am a constable. I was at the fire; a boy ran to me, and said a man had taken a gentleman's watch. I went into the mob, and collared the prisoner, who was pointed out as the thief - some gentleman had hold of him at the time, but I do not know who, I believe it was the prosecutor. I delivered him to Bowser.

Cross-examined. Q. Mr. Wakeley appeared much alarmed - A. He did.

JOHN DAVIS . I am labourer to Mr. Parker, of Argyle-street. I was getting the things out of Mr. Thompson's house during the fire; my master had hold of Mr. Wakeley's arm, and told me to take hold of the other, as seemed much distressed. When I came to the door Mr. Wakeley said he had lost his watch, and I picked it off the pavement. My master's door was about five or six yards from the prosecutor's. I did not see him lay hold of any one. Some person kicked my arm to prevent my picking it up.

ROBERT BOWSER . I am a constable. I was at the fire. Glassborough gave the prisoner to me; I took him to the watch-house. He said nothing to it.

MR. WAKELEY re-examined. Nobody but me laid hold of the man till the constable did. I did not part with him till the constable took him from me, It was between two and three o'clock in the morning.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing of it.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Life .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200918-192

1091. CHARLOTTE HENSHAW and SARAH HIPPENSTALL were indicted for stealing, on the 13th of September , one hat, value 8 s; one coat, value 16 s.; one waistcoat, value 8 s., and one handkerchief, value 4 s , the goods of Francis Lillicrap .

FRANCIS LILLICRAP . I am a wheelwright . On the 13th of September I came from Plymouth, and about seven o'clock in the evening I saw the prisoners at the Cooper's Arms, Stretton-ground. I enquired for a lodging, and they took me to theirs in Duck-lane - I did not expect them to stop with me. I paid them 3 s. for the

room, and gave them money to drink. I awoke about eleven o'clock, and missed my clothes. They were apprehended that night.

ROBERT HUDSON . I am a watchman. About eleven o'clock I heard a cry of Watch! and found the prosecutor with only his trowsers on. He said two girls had robbed him, but he did not know they were women of the town - it is a very bad house. About half-past twelve o'clock I saw the prisoners sitting on a step; they said it was no use to take a candle up till they were certain he was gone. We afterwards took them both in the room.

JAMES M'CULLOUGH. I am a watchman. I was present, and took the prisoners; they were bad girls - nobody could mistake them. There is a hole by the door to unbolt it outside.

HENSHAW'S Defence. We took him home, but did not rob him.

NOT GUILTY .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200918-193

1092. JAMES WESTWOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of July , 2 ounces of silver, value 4 s. , the goods of Thomas Emmett .

THOMAS EMMETT . I am a working silversmith , and live in Sutton-street, Clerkenwell ; the prisoner had worked for me, and I gave him leave to work in my shop. We missed silver several times, and on the 28th of July, when he left, he was brought back; I charged him with taking silver, and desired him to produce it - he produced some from his pocket.

CHARLES GREEN . I followed the prisoner and brought him back. He denied having any silver, and afterwards produced it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was intoxicated, and found it in my pocket, but do not know how it came there.

GUILTY . Aged 52.

Confined Six Months .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200918-194

1093. JONATHAN HASLOP was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of August , two shirts, value 7 s.; one shift, value 2 s.; one shawl, value 2 s.; two pair of stockings, value 1 s., and one apron, value 9 d. , the goods of Owen Hagan .

SUSAN HAGAN . I am the wife of Owen Hagan , we live in Turk's-row, Chelsea . On the 2d of August, at two o'clock in the afternoon, these things were safe on the first floor, I went into another room, and when I came out they were gone. I went down stairs and mentioned it, and about three o'clock I found the prisoner in custody with them at the Cheshire Cheese, public-house; he said he did not take them himself.

SARAH FISHER . I keep the house. I saw the prisoner standing at the corner of the passage for ten minutes, but did not see him go in or out; he was the only person near the house. I afterwards saw him going down the road.

MARY SNELLGROVE . I was sitting on the steps of the Mermaid, next yard to the prosecutrix's, and saw the prisoner pass without anything. He returned in about half an hour, with a blue and white spotted bundle under his arm, going towards the Cheshire Cheese; I asked him what he would take for his bundle? he made no answer. I told the prosecutrix, and directed her which way he went. He returned in two or three minutes, and said

"Who is that that has lost her bundle?" I said,

"A poor woman."

SARAH FOSTER . I live in Jew's-row. I saw the prisoner come down with a blue and white spotted bundle, and saw him apprehended.

WILLIAM KING . I am a constable. I took the prisoner in charge at the Cheshire Cheese with the bundle - he said he did not leave it there. I found three skeleton keys on him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The landlady said I did not leave them there.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200918-195

1094. JOHN WEST was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of July , 20 lbs. of lead, value 2 s., the goods of Joseph Goddard , and fixed to his dwelling-house .

MR. JOSEPH GODDARD . I live at No. 14, Southampton-street, Bloomsbury . On the 11th of July the lead pipe was stolen from my front area.

GEORGE HEATH. I am a watchman. After calling three o'clock I was passing Mr. Goddard's area, and saw something black over the cistern - I found it was the prisoner; I secured and took him to the watch-house. I found the lead pipe broken in three pieces, and doubled up in the area, it weighed 24 lbs. I heard something fall from him in the area.

MICHAEL SCHRINE . I assisted in securing the prisoner in the area, and found the lead.

Prisoner's Defence. Some drunken gentlemen knocked my hat over the rails, and I went for it.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200918-196

1095. JOHN BRIANT was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of August , 18 yards of printed calico, value 10 s. , the goods of Thomas James Love .

THOMAS JAMES LOVE . I am a linen-draper , and live at Shadwell . On the 19th of August this calico hung at the door inside the shop. Shade alarmed me, I ran out, and saw the prisoner thirty yards off, with another man. He called out to the other man

"Go it, Jack!" I took him in charge.

HENRY SHADE . I am a cabinet-maker, and live at Ratcliff-highway. I was coming from a public-house, about eleven o'clock at night, nearly opposite Love's, and saw the prisoner and another man standing on his steps. I saw the prisoner cut something and put it on his arm, it appeared to be dark cloth - I informed Love, and we pursued them. The prisoner cried out to his companion,

"Go it, Jack!" I supposed he had the calico.

Prisoner's Defence. The gentleman said he would take me whether I was the man or not.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200918-197

1096. STEPHEN JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of August , three spoons, value 10 s. , the goods of William James Davies .

JOHN TURNER . I am a basket-maker, and live in Coventry-court, Haymarket, and work in Rupert-street. On the 14th of August, about half-past five o'clock, Bailey and I were walking together, heard the cry of Stop thief! turned round, and saw the prisoners running in the road from the cry in Rupert-street. I tried to catch hold of the prisoner, but missed, and Bailey stopped him - he immediately dropped two spoons.

RICHARD BAILEY . I stopped the prisoner, and picked up the spoons which he dropped.

HUGH CHURCHILL . I am a watchman. I saw the prisoner and another man at the corner of Macclesfield-street, the other was fishing down the prosecutor's area, and hooked some spoons up the window. They saw me, and ran away. I followed, crying Stop thief, till the prisoner was secured, he threw three spoons down; I picked one up, and Bailey two.

JOHN HOULDRICK . I found a hook and part of a rod, on the prisoner.

WILLIAM JAMES DAVIS . I live in Macclesfield-street . The spoons are mine.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200918-198

1197. PHOEBE PAGE was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of July , one sheet, value 2 s., and two blankets, value 4 s., the goods of William Moss , in a lodging-room .

MARY MOSS . I am the wife of William Moss , and live in Wheeler's-alley, Spitalfields . On the 11th of July, the prisoner took my front-room furnished and on the 23d I saw her go out with a bundle, and said I suspected it was my things. She said if I thought all was not right, to go and look. I went up, found her husband on the bed, and missed two blankets and a sheet.

HARRIET TAPLEY . I bought a sheet of the prisoner for 18 d.

WILLIAM LUCKFOLD . I took her into custody. She said I should find the blankets in Long-alley. I did so.

(Property produced, and sworn to.)

NOT GUILTY .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200918-199

1098. JOHN ELY was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of July , one gown, value 3 s., and one box, value 2 s. , the goods of Thomas Parrish .

THOMAS PARRISH . I live in Davis-place, Chelsea . On the 22d of July, about five o'clock in the morning, I found the prisoner in my room with his shoes off. He was quite a stranger. I collared him, and found my box and gown moved to the door.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I took it for a public-house.

GUILTY . Aged 42.

Confined Six Months , and Whipped .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200918-200

1099. RICHARD THORETT was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of August , one jacket, value 3 s.; one pair of of trowsers, value 3 s.; one shawl, value 1 s.; one pair of stockings, value 6 d., and one cake of soap, value 18 d. , the goods of John Burgess .

JOHN BURGESS . I live at Colebrook . On the 2d of August I expected a parcel from Mr. Biddlecome, it did not arrive. I found the prisoner at Eaton that day, with the jacket and trowsers on him. I saw him give a woman a pair of stockings before I got up to him.

THOMAS LEXTON . I am a constable of Stanmore. The prisoner was given into my charge, for stealing the bundle, he said voluntarily that he committed the robbery, but it was the first he ever did, and if he got through it, it would be a warning to him, and that the soap and shawl were hid in Ditton Park.

GEORGE BIDDLECOMBE . I am steward of the Naval Institution. I sent a parcel containing these things to the Old White Horse Cellar, directed to Burgess. I had given them to him.

JOHN LAMBERT . I am a waggoner. I had one parcel, and missed it at Colebrook. The prisoner went down in the waggon that day.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I was in distress.

GUILTY . Aged 43.

Confined Two Months .

Third Middlesex Jury, before H. R. Reynolds, Esq.

Reference Number: t18200918-201

1100. ANN WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of June , forty-eight handkerchiefs, value 5 l, , the goods of Charles Dimes .

CHARLES DIMES . I am a haberdasher , and live in Holborn. On the 8th of June, the prisoner came to my shop, and said she was servant to the niece of Mrs. Collyer, of the Bull Inn, who was married, and lived in Northampton-square, and her mistress wished to see some handkerchiefs, that she was going out, and they must be sent directly. I looked out three or four dozen, and sent my daughter with them. They then went away together.

ELIZA DIMES . My father sent me with the prisoner. I had the parcel. When we got to the back of Merlin's Cave, public-house , she said

"This is our house, if you will stop a few minutes in the garden I will see if my master is at home." She spoke to a person at the bar, returned and said she did not know what to do, for her mistress was gone to her sister's. I agreed to go there. She said I could wait in the parlour till she returned. I gave them to her and sat down in Merlin's Cave. She did not return, and was apprehended two days afterwards. I gave them to her to shew her mistress, she was to bring me back what her mistress did not choose.

JOHN BARNLEY . I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner, and found two duplicates in her pocket, and three more in a bureau in her room.

ALEXANDER MILNE . I am a pawnbroker. On the 9th of June, the prisoner pledged three handkerchiefs, and on the 10th two more.

JOHN WHELDEN . On the 8th of June, the prisoner pledged eight handkerchiefs with me.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was sent by Mr. Patterson for them, and gave them to him. He said he should send back what he did not keep.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined Six Months .

Third Middlesex Jury before H. R. Reynolds, Esq.

Reference Number: t18200918-202

1101. ANN DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of August , two gowns. value 4 s.; one shawl, value 12 s.; two handkerchiefs, value 6 s,; one spencer, value 4 s.; one pair of salt-holders, value 2 s.; two castors, value 2 s. , the goods of Eliza Pounder .

ELIZA POUNDER . I live in Litchfield-street, Soho . On the 5th of August, the prisoner came to lodge with me. I missed this property, and gave her in charge.

ROBERT HILDITCH . I am a pawnbroker. On the 9th of August the prisoner pawned a shawl for 10 s., and on the 12th a gown for 4 s.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined Six Months .

Third Middlesex Jury, before H. R. Reynolds, Esq.

Reference Number: t18200918-203

1102. GEORGE OLDHAM was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of July , one handkerchief, value 2 s., the goods of John Stephens , from his person .

JOHN STEPHENS . I am a merchant , and live in the Adelphi. On the 9th of July, about ten o'clock at night, I was coming along the Strand , felt something touch my pocket, looked round, and caught hold of the prisoner, who was immediately behind me, and took a handkerchief from his waistcoat, which was not mine. A person came up, and said, in his hearing, that he saw the prisoner give my handkerchief to another. I gave him in charge.

THOMAS GROVES . I am a sword-cutler. I was going down the Strand, and saw the prisoner in company with another. I saw the prisoner take the handkerchief from the prosecutor's coat-pocket, and give it to one of the others, who ran across the street. The prosecutor turned round, and I secured him. I saw it distinctly.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years . - Recommended to Mercy.

Third Middlesex Jury, before H. R. Reynolds, Esq.

Reference Number: t18200918-204

1103. THOMAS EVANS was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of July , one handkerchief, value 2 s., the goods of John Stephens , from his person .

JOHN STEPHENS . On the 3d of July I was again coming up the Strand , and near Bedford-street, felt a touch at my pocket; turned round, saw four boys behind me, and saw the prisoner, who was one of them, drop my handkerchief. I secured him, and the others dispersed.

GUILTY . Aged 13.

Transported for Seven Years - Penitentiary .

Third Middlesex Jury, before H. R. Reynolds, Esq.

Reference Number: t18200918-205

1104. JOSEPH COLLINS was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of July , one watch, value 25 l.; two seals, value 9 l.; one key, value 1 l., and one ring, value 1 l., the goods of Samuel Verdy Read , from his person .

SAMUEL VERDY READ . I am a ship-owner in Jamaica . On the 21st of July, about nine o'clock in the evening, I was going by George-yard , with a lady on my left arm. The prisoner made a slip with his foot, and fell slightly with his head against my breast, at that instant he made a snatch at my watch, pulled it out, and ran up George-yard with it. I immediately called Stop thief! and received several violent blows from others. An officer knocked him down, and the case of the watch dropped from him immediately. I saw it fall from him. I never lost sight of him till he was secured.

SAMUEL MILLER . I am an officer. I was in George-yard, heard the cry of Stop thief! and stopped the prisoner who was running before all the rest, we both fell down, and at this instant the case fell on the ground, and the watch close to it. It fell from him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Life .

Third Middlesex Jury, before H. R. Reynolds, Esq.

Reference Number: t18200918-206

1105. ROBERT BAKER was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of July , two seals, value 6 s., and one ring, value 1 s., the goods of John Thomas Woodham , from his person .

JOHN THOMAS WOODHAM . I am a sawyer . On the 30th of July, about eleven o'clock at night, I was in Drury-lane , with my wife, the prisoner came up, snatched at my seals, the ribbon broke, and he got off with them. I followed, and secured him in Castle-street, without losing sight of him.

ROBERT CRAWLEY . I am a watchman. I heard the alarm, and saw Woodham stop the prisoner.

WILLIAM READING . I am a watchman. I assisted in stopping the prisoner, and found the seals on the ring, on him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Confined Six Months .

Third Middlesex Jury, before H. R. Reynolds, Esq.

Reference Number: t18200918-207

1106. JOHN THOMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of August , one handkerchief, value 2 s., the goods of a certain man unknown, from his person .

HENRY YATES . I was on duty as a constable in St. James's-street , and saw the prisoner very active in the mob - he attempted a dozen different peoples' pockets. At last I saw him take a blue handkerchief from a gentleman's pocket, and as the Queen left the house, I followed him to Pall-mall, apprehended him, and took six handkerchiefs from him, one of which was that I saw him take I had told the gentleman of it, but he went away.

EDWARD RHIND . I was with Yates, and saw the prisoner take the blue handkerchief from a gentleman in the square, secured him, and found six handkerchiefs on him.