Old Bailey Proceedings, 28th June 1820.
Reference Number: 18200628
Reference Number: f18200628-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace Oyer and Terminer, AND Gaol Delivery for the City of London, AND ALSO The Gaol Delivery For the County of Middlesex, HELD AT Justice Hall, in the Old Bailey; ON WEDNESDAY, 28th of JUNE, 1820, and following Days;

Being the Sixth Session in the Mayoralty of THE RIGHT HON. GEORGE BRIDGES , LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

Taken in Short-Hand by H. BUCKLER, Basinghall Street, (BY AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON.)

London:

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED, FOR H. BUCKLER, BY T. BOOTH, 31, St. Andrew's Hill, Doctors' Commons.

1820.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX.

Before the Right Honourable GEORGE BRIDGES , Esq. LORD MAYOR of the City of London; Sir George Sowley Holroyd , Knt, one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir James Burrough , Knt., one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir John Perring , Bart.; Sir Charles Flower , Bart.; George Scholey , Esq.; Joshua Jonathan Smith , Esq.; Christopher Smith , Esq., Aldermen of the said City; Sir John Silvester , Bart., D. C. L. Recorder of the said City; Robert Albion Cox , Esq., Alderman of the said City, Newman Knowlys , Esq. Common Sergeant of the said City, and John Vaillant , Esq. his Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of the Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

London Jury.

Frederick S. Hopkins ,

John Lee ,

John William May ,

Lawrence Thompson ,

Edmund Donolan ,

John Day ,

William Abel ,

Charles Burn ,

Henry Ellerby ,

Richard Jones ,

Henry Thorn ,

John Williams .

First Middlesex Jury.

George Dodgson ,

Henry Seaborn ,

Roger Purcell ,

Robert K. Dickman ,

Chace Craddock ,

Thomas King ,

Thomas Sharratt ,

David Jones ,

Edward Harsant ,

John Lowen ,

Thomas Humphries ,

John Smith .

Second Middlesex Jury.

Francis Wearing ,

Francis Beacham ,

Isaac Leaf ,

George Cadogan ,

William Goulding ,

Thomas Smith ,

Jeremiah Mann ,

Samuel Messant ,

Stephen Weatherdon ,

Ellis Jones ,

Samuel Helmsley ,

Thomas Benson .

SESSIONS HOUSE, OLD BAILEY, JUNE 28, 1820.

BRIDGES, MAYOR. SIXTH SESSION.

Reference Number: t18200628-1

722. WILLIAM FRY was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of May , one boat, value 10 l.; 4 lbs. of iron chain, value 2 s., and one block, value 18 d. , the goods of Thomas Gell .

MR. ADOLPHUS, on behalf of the prosecution, stated, that the boat had belonged to the prisoner, but had been seized for the rent of the premises on which it stood, and the prisoner conceiving, undoubtedly, that he had a right to it, had taken it. The Court ruled this to be no felony.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

Reference Number: t18200628-2

723. JOHN ABBOT was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of January , one mare, price 30 l. , the property of Edward Brown .

MR. ARABIN conducted the prosecution.

EDWARD BROWN . I am a farmer , and live at Ashwell Thorp, Norfolk . On the 30th of January I saw my mare safe about the stable-yard - next morning, when I came down it was gone. On the 11th of May I was in town, and accidentally saw it in Mr. Pullen's cart in Newgate-street - I am positive it is mine. It has been returned to me.

Cross-examined by MR. NORRIS. Q. What sort of a yard was it in - A. An enclosed yard.

EDWARD BROWN , JUN. I am the prosecutor's nephew. I saw the prisoner at Ashwell the day before the mare was stolen, on a visit at his mother's, but when it was stolen I could not find him. London is a hundred miles from Ashwell.

RICHARD PULLEN . I am a butcher. I bought the mare of Mr. Marshall on the 28th of March, and have returned it to Brown.

CHARLES MARSHALL . I am a veterinary surgeon. I sold the mare to Pullen. I was present when Brown saw it and claimed her.

SAMUEL HOWARD . I am a dustman. The prisoner drove my team three or four years. I sold Marshall the mare - I bought it of the prisoner on the 16th of February, and kept it about six weeks; he told me he bought her in the Romford road. I gave him 14 l. for her, and sold her for 20 l.

Q. Did you ask him where he got the money to buy her - A. After he left me he was in business for himself. It was too light for my work, and I sold her. He had two horses.

Prisoner's Defence. I got home to Spencer's-court, Bethnal-green, on Sunday night, at ten o'clock, on the 30th of January. I bought the mare on the Romford road. Howard can prove I was at home on the 30th of January.

SAMUEL HOWARD re-examined. Q. Do you know whether he was at home on the 30th of January - A. I think so, because he came to me on the morning of the 31st, about nine o'clock - it was on a Monday. I will not swear to the date. He said he was going into the country to agree for some tares, and solicited my custom.

Cross-examined by MR. ARABIN. Q. You do not know the date - A. It was the 30th of February.

Q. February was it - A. No. January.

HURLINGS MOORE. I am a builder. I heard of this charge, went to the prisoner, and told him of it - he went to the office with me, willingly - he proposed it himself.

FRANCIS FREEMAN . Moore brought the prisoner to me, and I took him - I had no warrant against him. He said he bought the mare in the Romford road three or four months before, in his way home.

EDWARD BROWN re-examined. On Saturday, the 29th of January, I served the prisoner in my shop with some tobacco.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough:

Reference Number: t18200628-3

724. RICHARD MUMFORD was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of April , one mattock, value 2 s., the goods of John Hierons ; one mattock, value 2 s., the goods of William Reece ; one mattock, value 2 s., and one axe, value 1 s., the goods of John Rook ; one shovel, value 1 s., the goods of William Weatherly ; one pickaxe, value 2 s., the goods of Henry Kilsey , and one hoeing-pick, value 2 s. , the goods of James Williams .

JOHN IRONS . I am a gardener , and live in Gunnersbury-lane. On Friday night, the 20th of June my men were at work, and buried the tools in the garden - next morning they were stolen.

JOHN ROOK . I work for Mr. Irons. I buried my tools in a garden at Smallborough-green , and missed them the next morning.

WILLIAM WEATHERLY . My shovel was buried with the tools.

JAMES HAZARD . I am a labourer. On Saturday morning, the 22d of April, I bought a mattock, a spade, and a shovel of the prisoner, and another person, at Greenford. I paid the prisoner the money.

THOMAS HOOKER. Hazard delivered me the things. I got some of them from Greenford-green and Sudbury.

THOMAS PAGE . I attend at the Black Horse, at Greenford-green. The prisoner and two others came there, and drank to the amount of 4 s.; they left a shovel and two axes, and said they would call on Monday, pay the 4 s., and fetch them - they did not come.

SAMUEL MARNHAM . I am a labourer, and work at Sudbury. On Saturday, the 22d of April, about half-past eleven o'clock in the morning, two other men asked me to buy the tools - the prisoner was not then with them. I told the headborough, and in about half an hour I went after them, and said I would buy them. I saw them at the Mitre; the prisoner was with them then, and said,

"Who offered you these tools at a 1 s. a piece?" He afterwards sold me the axe for a shilling.

Prisoner's Defence. I met two men who asked me to carry them.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Confined Two Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

Reference Number: t18200628-4

725. JOHN BELL was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of June , at St. Mary, Whitechapel, six dresses, value 5 l. 17 s.; four spencer bodies, value 4 l.; one yard of muslin, value 2 s., and one handkerchief, value 1 s., the goods of Sukey Martin , widow , in her dwelling-house .

SUKEY MARTIN. I am a widow, and live in Prescott-street, Goodman's-fields , in the parish of St. Mary, Whitechapel. On Sunday, the 11th of June, between nine and ten o'clock in the morning, a bundle, containing the articles stated in the indictment, was placed near the window - the garden gate had been left open - I did not miss them until the officer came. I found them at Lambeth-street Office, in his possession, one of the bodies was then missing. They are worth 10 l. at the least.

ANN PRIOR . On Sunday, the 11th of June, about half-past nine o'clock, I saw the bundle near the window, which, I believe, was open. It stood on a chair within the reach of a person outside.

GEORGE LIDDELL . On the morning of the 11th of June, I stopped the prisoner at the gate of the Tenter-ground, about a hundred yards from the prosecutrix's house, with the bundle under his jacket; he came along the footpath, in a direction from her house. He said a young man gave it to him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 22.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18200628-5

726. JOSEPH HURST was indicted for feloniously assaulting Edward Woodward , on the King's highway, on the 12th of June , at St. Luke, putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, one watch, value 50 s.; one chain, value 1 s.; two seals, value 30 s., and one key, value 1 s., his property .

EDWARD WOODWARD . I am a Manchester warehouseman , and live in Wood-street, Cheapside. On the 12th of June, about twenty minutes past ten o'clock at night, I was going along Goswell-street - opposite the dead wall there is a court, and about ten yards from the court three men suddenly rushed upon me, one of them forced himself against me; he came very hard against me, pushed me aside, and almost stunned me - it was certainly done designedly - one of the others came on the other side of me; I was so confused that I do not know where the third man was, they were in different directions about me; one of them snatched my watch, I felt it going, and put my hand down to save it, but could not. I turned round, and struck a man's arm on my watch - the watch dropped, the chain broke, I snatched at the watch to get it off the ground - the prisoner and the others snatched at it also. I can swear he was one of them - he snatched it off the ground. I immediately caught hold of him, and called out for help - he was too strong for me, got off before any one came, and ran up a narrow street, down Sycamore-street, into Old-street, across Goswell-street, into Wilderness-row, where he was stopped. I never lost sight of him from the time he got from me till he was taken by Fisher. Next morning, about five o'clock, I went to the Charterhouse-gardens, with Hone and Fisher, and found the watch in the gardens, the Wilderness-row side. I had seen the prisoner opposite that place. I received the push at the time the watch was taken.

Cross-examined by MR. ARABIN. Q. The prisoner was a stranger to you - A. Yes. I never lost sight of him.

THOMAS FISHER . I was passing along Goswell-street, heard the cry of Stop thief! and saw the prisoner running as fast as he could, without his hat, from Old-street-road, down Wilderness-row; I pursued, and just as I was in the act of taking him I saw him throw the watch over the wall into the Charterhouse-gardens - I saw plainly it was a watch. I secured him. Next morning, between four and five o'clock, I went with the prosecutor and constable and found it there, within four yards of the wall. The prosecutor claimed it.

Cross-examined. Q. Were you sober - A. I never tasted anything but water in my life.

THOMAS HONE . I am a constable. I went with Fisher to the gardens, and found the watch.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I understand Fisher has been convicted in this Court, and his brother-in-law is now in Newgate for trial.

THOMAS FISHER re-examined. I never was here in my life, and have no brother-in-law in Newgate.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 21.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18200628-6

727. THOMAS BAIRNES was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of June , at Hornsey, one wether sheep, price 2 l. , the property of John Booth , Esq.

SECOND COUNT, the same, only for wilfully and feloniously killing a like sheep, price 40 s., with intent to steal the whole carcase.

SAMUEL WINTERBURN . I am shepherd to John Booth , Esq., of Crouch End, Hornsey . On Friday morning, the 16th of June, between eight and nine o'clock, I missed a South-down wether sheep; I had counted them the morning before, there were ninety - they were marked with B on the near hip, and were kept in the meadow. The skin and entrails were afterwards found on my master's premises.

WILLIAM DAVENPORT . I am a patrol of Bow-street. On Friday morning, the 16th of June, I was with Izard, at Hornsey - I heard somebody coming, got behind a tree, and saw two men, one had a bag, and the other was walking about two yards before him. I came from the tree, and got in front of them - I saw the prisoner rather wished to make his escape, and laid hold of him. I asked them two or three times what they had got there, and both said

"Nothing." I called to Izard to be sure and hold the other, but he threw the bag away and we could not catch him. I searched the prisoner, and found two knives in his pocket, which I produce; one of them was all over fat and blood. I found a small whetstone on him, and a bag under his arm.

Q. What was in the bag which the man left behind - A. A sheep. I asked the prisoner about the sheep, he said he found it lying by the road-side, about three hundred yards from where we took him. I took him to the cage with the sheep; when we got there I saw his hat was greasy, I took it off, and found about four pounds of fat inside it - a handkerchief was between it and his head - it appeared to be the fat of a sheep. He said his name was John Cox . I believe it to be the carcase of a wether sheep.

Cross-examined. Q. You do not know whether it was a ewe or a wether - A. No, it was so mangled. They both said they had nothing.

Q. The prisoner had nothing - A. He had the fat in his hat.

THOMAS IZARD . I am a patrol. I was with Davenport, we met the prisoner and another man, who threw down the sheep, and ran away; I pursued, but lost him. I returned, and took the carcase of the sheep to Mr. Booth's, which is about fifty or a hundred yards from where we stopped them. I afterwards found the skin and head of the sheep in Mr. Booth's ground, about three hundred yards from where we stopped the prisoner. It was very warm, as if it had just been killed - in fact it smoked when we took it to Mr. Booth's. The skin was marked with a B. The entrails laid close by it, the fat had been taken from them - they were both very warm. I produce the skin. I believe it was a wether sheep.

SAMUEL WINTERBURN re-examined. It is the skin of my master's wether sheep; he has four hundred with that mark, but all the rest are at home. None of them had been sold.

Prisoner's Defence. We had been out all day looking for work at haymaking - At night I got tired, and laid under a hedge; the other man came back to me and said,

"Let us walk down the road" - as we were coming down we saw this bag laying on the bank. He said,

"You take the fat and I will take the sheep;" I objected to it - he said,

"Take it!" I said I had rather not; he said I should. We came along, and these men met us. The other man said,

"There is nothing in the bag," but I told them that what was in it we found on the bank side.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 23.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

Reference Number: t18200628-7

728. JOHN TILLING and HENRY MARSH were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Caroline Matilda Morgan , about three o'clock in the afternoon of the 21st of May , at St. Leonard, Shoreditch (no person being therein), and stealing therein three gold rings, value 15 s.; one pair of silver sleeve-buttons, value 1 s.; one silver box, value 2 s.; one toothpick, value 1 s.; two watches, value 20 s.; one silver wine-strainer, value 10 s.; two silver ladles, value 10 s.; one pair of spurs, value 7 s.; one necklace, value 2 s., and 19 pieces of silver coin, value 1 l. 5 s., her property .

CAROLINE MATILDA MORGAN . I live at No. 6, Fenton-street, Hoxton . On Sunday morning, the 21st of May, I locked up my house about ten o'clock, and left no person in it - I left the key with Mr. Hart. I returned between four and five o'clock, and found the street-door had been opened with a picklock key - I had double-locked it; people were then in the house. I found my drawers and boxes all open - seventeen locks of drawers and boxes had been picked and broken, and the articles stated in the indictment stolen. The silver coin consisted of sixpences, half-crowns, and different pieces.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. Your sister, who is dead, kept the house - A. Yes; when she died I administered. She rented the house for one year, and died in the middle of the year - I have continued to live in it, and occupied it as a tenant. I intended to leave, but had not given it up.

SOPHIA BILBY . I live opposite to Mrs. Morgan. On the 21st of May I saw her go out, and about half-past twelve o'clock, I saw the prisoner, Tilling, knock at the door, Marsh was then about four doors off. In about five minutes I saw Tilling open the door; he put his hand down by his side, and then appeared to put it to the keyhole; he went in and beckoned to Marsh. I went to Mr. Hart, told him, and he went to the door - they had bolted themselves in, and came out the back way. I saw Tilling run, he was secured by Hart in Fenton-street. I went into Branch-place, saw Marsh running, and saw him secured. They were in the house about a quarter of an hour.

JOHN HART . I am landlord of the house, and live near Bilby - the key had been left at my house. Bilby came to me about half-past two o'clock. I got Mr. Tilbery, who went with me and Burk. I asked Burk to watch the back of the house - we went to the front and tried the key, but found it was bolted inside. Shortly after, I heard a cry of Stop thief at the back of the house; we ran round, and Tilling ran into our arms; we took him back to the house, and sent for Abel, the officer, who found several things on him. The prisoners behaved very well.

JOHN BURK . I am a watchman. Hart sent me to the back of the house. I saw Marsh come out of Morgan's house, he ran away, and took off one of his shoes - I pursued and took him, he then said he was done. We took him back to the house and sent for an officer.

BENJAMIN ABEL . I am an headborough of Hoxton.

On the 21st of May I was sent for, and took the prisoners in charge. I found on Marsh, in his different pockets, nineteen pieces of silver coin, three gold rings, one with Morgan on it, a pair of sleeve-buttons, a scent-box, two thimbles, a silver funnel, and a watch, all silver; also a dark lanthorn, a piece of candle, and three skeleton and one pick-lock keys. On Tilling I found a wine-strainer, two ladles, a pair of spurs, two knife-rests, and a watch, all silver; a necklace, an instrument-case, a pencil-case, a metal watch, a bag, twelve picklock keys, and a crow-bar. After I brought them out of the house I met Gleed, and gave Marsh into his care, with the keys, crow-bar, and bag.

BARNARD GLEED . I produce the keys and crow-bar.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner MARSH. After such clear evidence I have nothing to say.

TILLING - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 20.

MARSH - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 50.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutrix.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18200628-8

729. CHARLES MILLS was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of December, in the dwelling-house of James Sanford , one piece of foreign silver coin, value 4 d.; 3 s. 6 d. in monies numbered, and eleven 1 l. Bank notes, the property of Eliza Pearce .

ELIZA PEARCE . I live in Wheeler-street, Spitalfields . Mr. James Sanford , my master, rents the house. I keep my box up in the workshop. On the 23d of December I missed all this property - it was safe the day before; the prisoner worked in the shop; he came to work at six o'clock, knocked at my door, and I gave him the key of the shop. I heard him go out in about a quarter of an hour. I went to my box about ten o'clock, and missed all this property; the prisoner never returned; he was apprehended on the 29th of May. He came to me three times that morning for a light.

SARAH CROSS . I sleep with the prosecutrix. The prisoner came about six o'clock in the morning - he usually came at half-past seven; he left about a quarter past six, and did not return. He worked there daily.

WILLIAM ATTFIELD . I am an officer. On the 29th of May I apprehended the prisoner at Bethnal-green; I could not find him before.

RICHARD STEVENS . I work in the same shop. On this morning I went into the shop about a quarter after six o'clock, the prisoner was then standing by the side of the prosecutrix's box; he appeared flurried, and went out directly. I asked him where he was going - he said into the yard, but I heard him go out at the street-door; he did not return.

Prisoner's Defence. I had quarrelled about not coming sooner to work, and went this morning at half-past six o'clock. I told them I was working for 1 s. less than others, and should suit myself as soon as I could. I was rather poorly that day, and went to take a walk. I bought some oranges, and have been selling them about Spitalfields ever since. The lady said she had been robbed, that she did not know it was me, but she would take me up for my d - d impudence, and would have me hung or transported.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

Reference Number: t18200628-9

730. ELIZA SCURLS was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of June , in the dwelling-house of John Barton , two 5 l., three 2 l., and eight 1 l. Bank notes, his property .,

JOHN BARTON . I live at Gray-hill, Enfield . On the 17th of June I missed these notes out of the table-drawer in my kitchen. I cannot say when I put them there - I had not seen them for a fortnight - the drawer was always locked - I found it still locked. The notes were in a canvas bag - four were still left; they were all marked with a B in the corner, and a cross in the middle of the front. The prisoner lived in my house at the time. I let her a bed at 1 s. a week.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. How old are you - A. Seventy-four; the prisoner lived three times at my house; she is a distant relation of mine.

Q. Did you not often visit her at her brother's house, at Hackney - A. No; I went after my money; I never went there to have any kind of intimacy with her.

Q. How well you understand me; did you not go to see her, and request her to come back to your house - A. No; I never took liberties with her.

Q. Did she not tell you she was going to leave you, and you gathered some gooseberries for her to take with her - A. Yes. When she was taken before the Magistrate the first time he discharged her; I did not tell him there was but 18 l. in the bag. I will not say I did or did not.

Q. Did you not say to her,

"There is only you and me in the house, you may as well make one bed as two" - A. Yes, I did say that.

Q. Did not Mrs. Jeffries speak to you about taking liberties with the girl in her presence - A. She did not. She was first taken up on Saturday, and again on Wednesday.

Q. Did you not tell the Magistrate on Saturday that you had found one of the notes at Mrs. Mardon's, which was one of those the prisoner stole - A. Yes.

Q. Did you not afterwards tell the Magistrate that it was not one of the notes - A. It was dark then, and they would not let me take it to the light; it was daylight, but not light enough in the room.

COURT. Q. Did you not swear before the Magistrate, that you believed it was not one of the notes - A. I might have said so.

AMELIA MARDON . I live in Baker-street, Enfield. On the 13th of June the prisoner paid me a 1 l. note, which I produce.

JOHN BARTON . It is my note.

COURT. You swore in your deposition before the Magistrate, that you believed it was not your note.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

Reference Number: t18200628-10

731. CATHARINE M'CABE was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of May , at St. Lawrence Jewry, sixty yards of Aberdeen dowlas, value 3 l., the goods of John Smith , Sen. , John Smith , Jun. , and Thomas Smith , in their dwelling-house .

DECIMUS KNOWLDEN. I am warehouseman to Messrs. J. J. and T. Smith, who live in Cateaton-street , in the parish of St. Lawrence Jewry. On the 26th of May, about four four o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner came in and presented

a petition for relief, I said I could give her nothing, and desired her to go. She stopped a few minutes, and then walked towards the door. She had come 12 or 14 yards into the warehouse - some pieces of Aberdeen dowlas were standing on their ends in the warehouse; they generally run about sixty yards; the lowest price we can buy them for is 3 l. a piece. She passed them as she came in and as she went out. I saw her stoop - (the dowlas is twenty-seven inches high) - I then followed her to the door. I saw her come from the cloth, which was between the two doors. I will not swear it, but I have every reason to believe it was not there when she came in - it-was not the proper place for it. She then sat herself down on the step of the outer door, before the piece of cloth. She stopped a minute or two, then looked round, took up the cloth, threw her handkerchief or apron over it, and then walked down the street with it; I followed and brought her back with it under her arm. I knew it to be my masters' property - it has a private mark on it in my own hand-writing; it cost above 3 l. I sent for a constable, who took her in charge. She appeared quite sober, and told me she had had nothing to eat or drink.

ANTHONY HARRISON . I am a marshalman of the City, and took charge of the prisoner and dowlas. I found a petition on her, and thirty-five duplicates of wearing apparel.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was in trouble before and was guilty, but am innocent of this. I saw the cloth laying outside the door on the curb-stone - I thought I might as well have it as any one else. I saw him peeping.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 55.

Recommended to Mercy.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200628-11

732. JAMES PURKIS was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of June , 18 lbs. of sugar, value 16 s.; 10 lbs. of currants, value 9 s., and 3 lbs. of other sugar, value 1 s. 6 d. , the goods of Nathaniel Fenn and John Lee Hewson ; and JOHN SMALL was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, knowing them to be stolen .

MR. JOHN LEE HEWSON . I am in partnership with Mr. Nathaniel Fenn ; we are wholesale grocers , and live in Botolph-lane , the prisoner, Purkis, was our carman . On the 7th of June Child and Dean called and informed us we had been robbed, and that Small was in custody - they produced a loaf of sugar to me, which I knew by the mark to be our property.

THOMAS CHILD . I am a constable of St. Saviour's. On the 7th of June I was with Dean in the middle of High-street, Borough, and saw a cart coming towards St. Margaret's-hill, it stopped near Union-street - Purkis was walking on the other side, nearly facing Union-street; he was dressed in a coarse frock and apron. When the cart stopped he went and put in a bag and a bundle which he had under his left arm. He got into the cart, and Small, who was the driver, drove on. They covered the bag over with straw. They stopped at a gin-shop near St. Thomas's Hospital, Small got out and went in there, Purkis remained in the cart. We kept sight of the cart - it went over London Bridge, and stopped by the church at the corner of Lower Thames-street, City; Purkis then got out, and immediately went down Lower Thames-street, towards the prosecutors'; Small drove the cart along Upper Thames-street, and to very nearly opposite Cripplegate Church. He stopped by a ruinous place, and left the cart there for about a quarter of an hour; he went to Ship-yard, then returned, let down the tail-board of the cart, took the straw off the bag, and took the bag out. I followed him to Ship-yard again, and entered the yard with him. He went into a house on the left-hand side. I went into the passage, and asked him what he had got? I saw him move his arm as if he threw something away, and heard it fall on the ground. A person ran up stairs, I followed, leaving Small in charge. I found it was a woman who ran up, I found nothing on her. I heard Dean and Small scuffling together and went down; he said Dean should not hold him, I secured him. I saw Dean take the bag from under the table, it contained a loaf of sugar and a bundle of currants, which the prosecutors claimed. I put him in the cart, and drove him to Giltspur-street Compter. I drove the cart over to a Mr. Story's, whose name was on it, and then went to a house in a yard in High-street, Borough, where I understood he lodged. In a cupboard on the first-floor landing-place I found a handkerchief with several pieces of loaf sugar in it, also a pair of small scales, which had currants sticking to them. I then went and took Purkis at his masters', and asked him if he was not the man who went over London Bridge as I drove the cart back? he said No, he had not been away from the premises. I took him to the Compter, and found a bag under his frock, which had currants sticking to the inside of it, and raw sugar at the bottom, as if it had contained some. On pulling up his frock I found a cord fastened round his waist, also a cord under his breeches.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. I believe he was ruptured, and so you found the cord round his waist - A. I do not know.

RICHARD DEAN . I am a constable. I was with Child; his account his correct. When he ran up after the woman Small attempted to pass me, I said he should not till I knew whether things were right or not. A scuffle ensued, he tried to get from me, Child came to my assistance, and we secured him. I heard the bag fall under the table.

JOHN KEPPLE . I am warehouseman to the prosecutors. I know the sugar to belong to them. Purkis was not in the habit of buying sugar - I know nothing of Small. I sleep in the house. Purkis was not sent out with anything that day, and had no business out. He ought to be at the warehouse at six o'clock. I saw the bag found on him, it had both raw sugar and currants in it. The handkerchief found in a yard in the Borough I am certain is Purkis's - he used to bring his victuals in it.

PURKIS'S Defence. I was not out of the premises except to fetch a newspaper from Cornhill - the handkerchief is not mine. I had the things given to me in the Borough; the man told me to take them to Ship-yard.

SMALL'S Defence. I met this man, who told me a person had given him the things to take to Ship-yard, and the person would be there to pay. He told me to leave them there.

PURKIS - GUILTY . Aged 33.

Transported for Seven Years .

SMALL - GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200628-12

733. LYDIA WESTERN was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of May , twenty pair of sheets, value 7 l.; forty-nine pieces of sheeting, value 20 s.; nine blankets, value 2 l. 14 s.; one rug, value 4 s.; twenty yards of towelling, value 15 s.; four bed-ticks, value 3 s.; nineteen pieces of bed-ticking, value 2 s.; twelve remnants of flannel, value 8 s.; and one pair of curtains, value 2 s. , the goods of the Mayor, Commonalty, and Citizens of the City of London as Governors of the House of the Poor, called St. Bartholomew's Hospital, near West Smithfield, London , of the Foundation of Henry the Eighth.

MR. ALLEY conducted the prosecution.

RICHARD LIMBRICK . I am an officer. On the 19th of May I searched the prisoner's house, No. 14, Barrett's-court, Wigmore-street - she came in while we were there; I asked her if the premises were her's? she said Yes. Before she came home I had searched the first floor, and found twenty-eight pair of sheets with the hospital mark on them, three pair of blankets, a piece of sheeting, a quantity of towelling, and a great many other things - I found in all as much as a small cart would hold. I attended her examination, she said part of the things were given to her by a sister in the hospital, who was dead.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Was her declaration made as to part or all the property - A. To that which was marked. She meant a sister of the hospital. I found a great many things with the marks cut out.

WILLIAM TILLEY . I am clerk to Mr. Wood, who is solicitor for the prosecution. What the prisoner said before the Magistrate was not taken in writing.

MR. WILBY. I am steward of St. Bartholomew's Hospital. The prisoner was a sister of Faith's ward for nine years, she resigned last April.

Q. While she was there, had you reason to complain to her of losing property - A. Yes, principally sheeting; she said the patients must have taken them away. The property produced belongs to the hospital; some of it has been marked within the last two years. We never sell old linen, it is used for bandages.

Cross-examined. Q. May not linen get out of the hospital by patients not restoring it - A. I never knew it. We never allow it to servants as perquisites.

Prisoner's Defence. The sheets were given to me by Mrs. Foot; I refused to take them, but she said they were her perquisites.

GUILTY . Aged 35.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200628-13

733. CHARLES BAGNALL was indicted for embezzlement .

MR. ANDREWS conducted the prosecution.

MISS ELIZA TAYLOR . I went with Mrs. Simpson to the prosecutor's on the 19th of May , and bought two amber-coloured toilet-bottles for 38 s. - I directed them to be sent to Mr. Taylor's, No. 8, Featherstone-buildings, between four and five, or at six o'clock; they were afterwards brought. A man attended us in the warehouse; I do not know whether it was the prisoner or not. We went again next day to the shop.

WILLIAM MELLON . I am servant at the prosecutors' warehouse in Fleet-street . I remember Miss Taylor coming with another lady, the prisoner attended on them; when they went out he came to the desk - I said,

"You have had two fine young ladies in the shop, have you sold them anything?" he said

"No, we had not the colour they wanted." If he had sold anything it was his duty to inform me; he should also have gone to the clerk, who attends to put down the sales.

MARY JONES . I am servant to Mr. Taylor. The prisoner brought the two toilet-bottles, I took them to Mrs. Simpson; she gave me two 1 l. notes, I gave them to the prisoner, and he gave me 2 s.

JOSEPH BRELET . I am clerk to Messrs. John and James Davenport , and remember the ladies coming; the prisoner attended them - he never accounted to me for 38 s. received of them - he ought to have informed me that he had made the sale the moment they left, and to have given me the money the moment he received it. The ladies called again next day, this was then discovered and the prisoner apprehended.

MR. JAMES DAVENPORT . The prisoner never accounted to me for the money.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Confined One Year .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200628-14

SECOND DAY, THURSDAY, JUNE 29.

734. MARY NORRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of May , one watch, value 1 l.; one seal, value 10 s., and one chain, value 1 s., the goods of John Scott , from his person .

JOHN SCOTT . I am a tailor . On the 22d of May, between eleven and twelve o'clock at night, I was in Leicester-street, Leicester-square , the prisoner asked me what o'clock it was? I pulled out my watch and told her, and as I returned it to my pocket she snatched it out of my hand, and handed it to another girl who stood by her. I called the watchman and gave her in charge, the other ran off.

Prisoner's Defence. He laid hold of me, and accosted me as his wife.

GUILTY . Aged 35.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18200628-15

735. JOHN BLAKE , JOHN LANCASHIRE , and HENRY PARKER were indicted for stealing, on the 28th of April , 80 lbs. of lead, value 14 s., the goods of George Ford , and fixed to a certain house of his .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating it to be fixed to a building.

ROBERT NORTHERN ROPE . I am a carpenter. George Ford 's house is in Five-fields, Chelsea ; my garden runs at the bottom of his. On the 29th of April, about half-past eight o'clock in the evening, I was in my garden, and saw the prisoner, Lancashire, get over the wall, the other two were on the premises. Knowing they had been robbed before I went in doors, got a stick, returned, and

saw there was more than one. I went to the York depot, and got a corporal, who went in front of the house. I returned to the garden, and saw a bag containing lead put on the wall, I climbed over the wall and pushed it back, the prisoners then let go, and retreated into the wash-house; they were Lancashire and Parker - I got a light, and on opening the door I found them there, they had moved the cistern from the wash-house. We found Blake in the coal-cellar in the area, he pretended to be intoxicated. A soldier came down, he then recovered, and denied having any one with him, but on coming into the yard the other prisoners said

"Tom, where is your hat?" A hat was found in the wash-house, which he claimed.

JAMES STRICKLAND . I am a corporal in the second regiment of Guards. Rope informed me there were thieves in the house, I placed two soldiers in front, and two went with me; I observed a bag of lead on the wall, and found Lancashire and Parker in the wash-house - Blake was brought out of the coal-cellar.

JOHN COLES . I am a constable. I took the prisoners in charge at the house. Part of a large cistern and the pipe was cut. I compared it with the cistern, and it matched.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

BLAKE'S Defence. Two men took me there.

BLAKE - GUILTY . Aged 22.

LANCASHIRE - GUILTY . Aged 29.

PARKER - GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18200628-16

736. JOHN RENT was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of June , at St. James, Westminster, two 10 l. Bank notes, the property of William Sams , in the dwelling-house of George Palmer .

MR. WILLIAM SAMS . I am a bookseller , and reside at No. 62, Pall-mall; I carry on business at No. 1, St. James's-street , where the notes were lost from, in the dwelling-house of George Palmer ; it is in the parish of St. James, Westminster; the prisoner was my servant . On Tuesday, the 6th of June, I counted my money and locked it in my desk, there was 70 l. - next morning I counted it, and missed two 10 l. Bank notes - I have one of them here; I got it from Mr. Lee, a florist, at Brompton, on the Saturday following; it has the Duke of Richmond's name on it, he is a customer of mine. I do not know whose writing it is, but I had observed that name on it. The prisoner continued with me till the Saturday, when I had him apprehended.

THOMAS SMART. I live in Little Ryder-street, St. James's, and am a watch-maker. A black man came to me on Wednesday evening, the 7th of June, between seven and eight o'clock - I think it was the prisoner, but cannot swear to him; he had a dirty blue jacket and no handkerchief on. He bought a second-hand watch for two guineas, and paid me with a 10 l. note. I gave him 8 l. in change, and he paid me 2 s. next day when he came for the watch. Mr Sams has the note - (looks at it) - this is it; it has my writing on it. He took the watch away next day, and bought a second-hand seal and gold key; he said his name was John Thomas , and that he lived at No. 62, Pall-mall.

JOSEPH COOPER . On Saturday, the 10th of June, I took the prisoner into custody, told him he was charged with robbing his master, and asked him what money he had about him? he gave me his purse from his pocket, it contained a 10 l. and four 1 l. Bank notes, and 13 s. 6 d. I found a silver hunting watch, with a gold seal and key in his pocket. I asked him how he got the money? he said he found the big note in the shop two or three days back; he afterwards said it was on Wednesday - he said he found two notes together, and bought a watch with the other.

THOMAS SMART re-examined. It is the watch, seal and key I sold him.

MR. SAMS. I cannot swear to the 10 l. note found on him - I lost two. He behaved very well while with me.

THOMAS CLARK SMITH . I am clerk to Mr. Sams. The money was missed on Wednesday. I did not observe the desk till Thursday evening, when Mr. Sams was out. I locked the desk, and lifted up the flap afterwards. I found the asp had been wrenched from the flap, and stuck in again.

Prisoner's Defence (written). Sometime ago I broke a window - my master said if I broke another I should be turned away. I had the misfortune to break another; the woman who cleans the shop said I had better take care of my clothes, as the last boy was turned away without clothes or wages. Thinking I should be turned out destitute, I determined to take what I thought due to me, which I thought was two 1 l. notes, but as I could not read I took two 10 l. notes. When they were missed, and I found they were 10 l. notes, I was afraid to acknowledge it. My former master, Colonel Nicholls , questioned me about it, and I told him the truth. According to the ideas in which I had been brought up I thought I might take a compensation for my services, but I now know that I have done wrong. I humbly trust that when a British Jury considers that I have not had a Christian education, they will recommend me to the mercy of my King, for whom my fathers have often fought against the American States.

MR. SAMS re-examined. When he came to me I clothed him, but if he had asked for money I should have given him some. I believe a woman in my service may have misled him.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 21.

Strongly Recommended to Mercy.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

Reference Number: t18200628-17

737. ROBERT ANDERSON was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of May , at St. John the Evangelist, Westminster, one watch, value 3 l.; one seal, value 2 s., and one bed-hook, value 1 s., the goods of Thomas Draper , in his dwelling-house .

THOMAS DRAPER . I live in Golding-street, Westminster , and am a coal-dealer - I rent the house, which is in the parish of St. John the Evangelist. On the 28th of May, at nine o'clock in the morning, my watch hung on a nail, over the fire-place in the front parlour. I went into the yard, my housekeeper, Sarah Waller , alarmed me - I came through the passage, ran into the street, and saw a

crowd, but noticed no person in particular. I have never found my watch; it was safe when I went backwards, and was worth 3 l. I was informed by the crowd that the man had run to the left. I had seen the prisoner walking up and down the street about half an hour before - he came as far as my door, then turned back twice, and sometimes he went by. I knew him before, and knew him to be the man I saw.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not say a man came to you and said that if you would give him 10 s. he would shew you the man - A. A neighbour said he knew him, and went with me and the officer and shewed me the prisoner.

SARAH WALLER . I am housekeeper to Draper. He went up the yard between nine and ten o'clock; I was in the wash-house, turned my head, and saw a man reaching the watch from the mantle-piece - it was the prisoner I am certain - I had seen him before, he had come into the shop and asked the price of charcoal. On seeing him take the watch I called out,

"Thomas, the man is taking your watch!" He turned round, looked me in the face, and then walked out and turned to the left. I saw him lift the watch off the shelf.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not tell O'Brien that you saw two men in the street, and accused one of them of it - A. No.

JOSEPH O'BRIEN. I am a hair-dresser, my house is nearly opposite Draper's, about four doors lower down. On the 28th of May I was in my parlour between nine and ten o'clock, my wife said

"There is somebody in the shop!" I went in and there saw the prisoner, I drew a chair for him, thinking he wanted something in my way. He sat down, then jumped up, asked me if I had got any paper, and said he wanted to go backwards. I gave him some paper, he went towards the front door instead of going backwards; I told him that was not the way, and shewed him the way backwards. He said,

"Never mind now." He went out, and ran up the street past the prosecutor's house again. I thought he seemed confused, which made me go to the door to see which way he went; he turned the corner of Little Smith-street - I am sure he is the man.

Prisoner. Q. Did not Waller accuse another man of it - A. She did accuse a person of it on Sunday, and said he was the man who took the watch - he was dressed like the prisoner. I said he was not the man who came into my shop.

SARAH WALLER re-examined. I went after another man, who had the same sort of coat on, but when I saw his face I knew he was not the man. I will swear the prisoner is the man - I have no doubt of it.

JOSEPH O'BRIEN re-examined. I did not see her when she first stopped the man; the people said she had accused him, but I heard her say nothing. When she was at Queen-square, she said,

"That is the man, is it not?" I said he was the man that was in my shop. I dare say she doubted it by asking me.

JAMES GILLMOR . I am an officer of Queen-square. On Saturday, the 28th of May, I received information of this robbery; Draper and O'Brien described the prisoner, but I could not find him. On the Monday I found him at a house in Milbank-street, at Mrs. Trotter's, up one pair of stairs, dressing himself. Under the pillow of the bed on which he lay I found a dark lanthorn and a picklock key - his wife was in the room. I found eleven skeleton keys in her pocket, which he afterwards admitted that he gave her. On the chimney-piece I found a phosphorus-box and matches; he said he knew nothing about the watch. Next day I found another skeleton key in the pocket of a black coat in his room, which I had not searched before.

Prisoner's Defence. I was not out of the house that day, and as to the keys I took a shed for my business, and when I cleaned it out I found them - they were not in my wife's pocket.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 40.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18200628-18

738. JOHN VICKERS was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Martha Jarvis , widow , about two o'clock in the afternoon of the 3d of June , at St. Leonard, Shoreditch (no person being therein), and stealing therein two shawls, value 13 s.; one shirt, value 3 s.; two cloaks, value 5 s.; one gown, value 3 s.; one shift, value 2 s.; two petticoats, value 6 s.; one dress, value 3 s.; two boxes, value 1 s.; one pair of scissars, value 6 d., and two yards of cotton, value 2 s., her property .

MARTHA JARVIS . I live in James-street, Old-street , and am a widow. On the 3d of June, about eleven o'clock in the morning, I left my house, and left no person there, except a corpse. I locked the front door, and latched the back. I returned a little before twelve, and found the front door locked and the back door shut, as I had left them; I missed a sheet off the clothes-horse, opened the back door, went into the yard, and found a trunk there which I had left up stairs at the head of the bed - it was broken open, and the articles stated in the indictment, except the shirt, taken out - it was emptied; a shawl, two cloaks, a shift, and a piece of cotton, were quite gone, the rest were left on the ledge of the wall; a red cloth shawl was also taken off a basket by the back door. In less than an hour I found some of them at the pawnbroker's. No door or window was left open. I suppose they must have got over the wall, and opened the back door, which I am certain was latched.

LOUISA MAY . I went into the house with Jarvis; the box stood by the yard door. On the edge of the wall I found two petticoats, a frock, and a remnant of cloth.

ROBERT SIMONS . I am shopman to Mr. Gosling, who is a pawnbroker, and lives at No. 42, Shoreditch. On Saturday, the 3d of June, about half-past twelve o'clock. the prisoner brought two cloaks, a frock or gown, and a shift, to pledge; he was so dreadfully intoxicated that I thought it not prudent to advance him any money, but took them from him, and laid them aside for him to fetch when he came to himself. He said his name was William Carr , and he lived in Church-street, Bethnal-green. I did not know him before - he did not fetch them. Gleed took them.

WILLIAM FOSTER . I live with Mr. Higham, of Bishopsgate-street. On the morning of the 3d of June the prisoner pledged a shawl with me for 4 s., and gave me the name of John Fitzgerald . I did not observe whether he was sober or not.

THOMAS GARTON . I am an officer. I and Gleed apprehended

the prisoner on the 3d June, about two o'clock in the afternoon, and found a muslin collar in his pocket.

BARNARD GLEED . I examined the premises. He must have entered at the back door.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I leave it entirely to the Court.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 28.

Recommended to Mercy.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18200628-19

739. JOHN LANGBRIDGE was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of May , at St. Marylebone, one coffee-pot, value 2 l. 18 s.; one cream-jug, value 30 s.; one pair of silver tongs, value 18 s.; one butter knife, value 2 s.; two muffiners, value 20 s.; one ladle, value 8 s.; five teaspoons, value 1 l.; one pair of sugar-tongs, value 8 s., and one pepper ladle, value 2 s., the goods of Henry Meyrick Hoare , Esq. , in his dwelling-house .

THOMAS SHELDRAKE . I am butler to Henry Meyrick Hoare , Esq., who lives in York-place, Portman-square , in the parish of St. Marylebone. On the 25th of May, about half-past three o'clock in the afternoon, I perceived the pantry door open - I thought I had locked it - I went in, and saw the prisoner standing behind the door - it is inside the house; I asked him what he was doing there? he then delivered me the articles stated in the indictment from under his clothes, and from his pockets. I sent for Chesterman, who took him, with the plate, which he had taken from a cupboard in the pantry. I think the lock of the pantry door had been picked, but am not certain.

WILLIAM CHESTERMAN . I am a constable. I took the prisoner and property in charge. I had the silver weighed - the value as old silver is above 8 l.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I throw myself entirely on the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 16.

Recommended to Mercy.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

Reference Number: t18200628-20

740. CHARLES JACKSON was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Yates , about two o'clock in the night of the 26th of May , at St. Giles's in the Fields, with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein nine handkerchiefs, value 1 l.; one pair of shoes, value 1 s.; one sheet, value 1 s.; one petticoat, value 1 s., and twelve pieces of calico, value 5 s., his property .

JOHN YATES . I live at No. 45, Great St. Andrew-street, Seven Dials , and am a shoemaker . On the 25th of May I made the house secure myself, and went to bed about half-past eleven o'clock, I was alarmed between one and two, hearing a confused noise on the stairs, I jumped out of bed and put my hand on some person - I could not see who it was in the dark - I asked him what business he had there, he said he had assaulted a person in the street, and had run away from the watchman; Benington came up directly, and took him, saying,

"You are the person I want."

Cross-examined by MR. WALFORD. Q. Do you deal in wearing apparel - A. Yes.

SUSANNAH YATES . I am the wife of the prosecutor; when we went to bed on the night of the 25th the articles stated in the indictment were all safe, in a room adjoining the shop. When the alarm was given I got up, the watchman found the property tied in a bundle. I knew it to be ours.

THOMAS BENINGTON . I am a watchman. On the 26th of May I was on duty between one and two o'clock in the morning, sitting by the side of my box, in White Lion-street, a watchman nearly opposite called to me, and said he heard a noise; I went over and saw a person going down the street, and heard a rumbling noise inside the prosecutor's door, which was ajar - I went in, and by the light of my lanthorn found two bundles in the passage. I immediately sprung my rattle, and gave the bundles to the watchman; seeing the prisoner run up stairs, I ran up after him, and just within the door of the first floor I found him, and took him to the watch-house - the other watchman followed with the bundle. I gave him in charge of Furzeman. I saw several articles found on him. He appeared sober.

JOHN BOYLE . I received the bundles from Benington, and gave them to Furzeman.

SAMUEL FURZEMAN . Benington brought the prisoner to the watch-house. I immediately searched him, and found seven silk handkerchiefs, some in his hat, some in his breeches, and some in his coat pocket; also a pair of black silk stockings, a brush, a pair of shoes, a pack of cards, a set of dominos, and a box of phosphorus. I produce the bundles.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 17.

Recommended to Mercy.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18200628-21

741. JAMES GLARE and STEPHEN ROSIER were indicted for stealing, on the 1st of June , at St. Pancras , in the dwelling-house of William Boulton , one 5 l. Bank note, his property .

WILLIAM BOULTON . I keep a chandlers'-shop . On the 1st of June, about half-past seven o'clock in the evening, the prisoners came to my shop for some salt and cheese - Glare asked for it - Rosier stood leaning against the counter opposite to where the till was, and Glare stood before him; I was on the other side of the counter, nobody else was there. I turned my back to go to the salt bin - they had the things, and Glare paid for them - it was less than sixpence. A few minutes after they were gone I missed a 5 l. note from the till - nobody had been in after them, and I only had the notes a few minutes before they came in - a person might reach over and open the till, it was exactly opposite to where they stood. I had given change for the note not five minutes before. I had it from Mrs. Barnham's servant. Next morning, between seven and eight o'clock, I had both the prisoners taken up; I knew them both before, and saw the note in the possession of Squibb.

GEORGE SQUIBB . The prosecutor applied to me on the 2d of June, between seven and eight o'clock, Rosier was then in custody at his house. I went and took Glare where he worked, and told him the note was lost

while he and the other boy were in the shop, and I was confident he must know something about it. Soon after that he said it was in his box at his lodgings in Brady's-passage, Camden-town. I knew him before. I went and found the 5 l. note in his box, in a little pocket-book, as he said.

WILLIAM BOULTON re-examined. It is my note, I am certain. I made no mark on it.

GLARE'S Defence. I saw it on the floor as I came out.

ROSIER'S Defence. I know nothing of it.

GLARE - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 18.

ROSIER - NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18200628-22

742. ELIZA BROWN , LUCY SAUNDERS , and EDWARD CRISPIN were indicted for feloniously assaulting William Burgess , on the King's highway, on the 22d of June , putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, one pocket-book, value 6 d., and two 1 l. notes, his property .

WILLIAM BURGESS . I keep a horse and cart , and live in Fuller-street, Bethnal-green. Last Thursday morning, about five o'clock, I went into a coffee-shop in Wentworth-street , I saw the prisoners and another woman there - I think they followed me in - they came and sat down close by me; they asked me for some coffee, and came hunching up to me and feeling my pockets - I gave them some to keep them off. I came out about a quarter before six o'clock, the women followed me out, and hustled me in the passage; when I got about five steps from the door my pocket-book was taken - Brown took it out of my pocket. I caught hold of her, a number of men came round and kicked me - I almost got my brains knocked out. Crispin was in the passage; when I came out he caught hold of me and said,

"Let the woman go, or I will knock your eye out!" - I was obliged to let her go. Crispin kept holding me to stop me from pursuing her.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. You rose early that morning - A. I was up all night. I had been to an auction by the Tower; we dined together afterwards, and stopped at the public-house till twelve o'clock, I then walked part of the way to Highgate, as we had some business to settle. I left him between two and three o'clock, and as I returned I went into this shop, which I thought was a public-house - I had been with no women. Some women spoke to me in Webb-square, I do not know whether they were the prisoners or not.

Q. Did you not say you had lost a 20 l. note - A. No. The coffee-shop man stood at the door when I was robbed, and would not assist me.

Cross-examined by MR. BROADRICK. Q. Were you in company with two girls in Wentworth-street - A. No, on my oath I was not. I was perfectly sober. I went to no house in George-yard. I called for a watchman, but could get none.

BROWN'S Defence. I was in his company in Webb-square before he went to the coffee-shop.

CRISPIN'S Defence. I know nothing of it.

JOSEPH BRANT . I am a watchman of Whitechapel. About a quarter past four o'clock in the morning of the robbery I saw the prosecutor go into a house of ill fame in George-yard, he had two girls with him, Brown was one of them; he told me to take charge of them. I said,

"What should I take charge of them for? they have charge of you, and if you don't mind they will have all you have in your pocket." He appeared a good deal the worse for liquor.

COURT. Q. It was your duty to take them up. How came you to let him go into a bad house with them - A. I could not prevent him.

BENJAMIN HART . I keep the coffee-shop in Wentworth-street. Burgess came in about ten minutes past five o'clock - he was drunk, and brought in three women; he kept singing to the women, and said he was a queer fellow. Saunders had come to my house about four o'clock the day before - she was asleep by the fire when Burgess was there. About five o'clock in the morning, after he went out, I heard an alarm - she was then asleep there. I did not see Crispin. Burgess never asked me to assist him.

SAMUEL STARKEY . I am a watchman of Spitalfields. I saw Burgess in Rose-lane with two women, about a quarter past four o'clock; he was very drunk, the women could hardly keep him from falling.

COURT. Q. Why not take him to the watch-house till he was sober - A. I did not know but one of the women was his wife.

WILLIAM BURGESS . I have a witness to prove I was sober.

FRANCIS ROSE . I am a constable. Burgess called me up before six o'clock that morning - I never saw a man more sober. I went with him, and took Crispin at the Three Compasses, at a little after seven, and about two hours afterwards I took the women at the coffee-shop. Burgess said they were the persons.

HENRY MARSHALL . I am a constable. I was called up with Rose, and took Crispin. Burgess was perfectly sober. I took the women at the coffee-shop about ten o'clock.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

Reference Number: t18200628-23

743. DANIEL CRANE was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Mary Eales , about ten o'clock at night of the 3d of June , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, one counterpane, value 10 s.; two sheets, value 4 s.; one blanket, value 3 s.; one pillow, value 1 s., and one table-cloth, value 6 d., her property .

MARY EALES . I live in Buckingham-place, Fitzroy-square . On the 3d of June, about ten o'clock at night, I found my street-door open - it was twilight. I went into the parlour, and found the bed stripped.

CHRISTOPHER EALES . I was at home on the night of the robbery, and went out about ten o'clock. I found the door latched, and locked it after me I am certain, for I tried it. It was a clear evening, I could discern any person's features.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. When did you return again - A. At half-past ten. My mother has lodgers in every room, some of them have a key.

JOHN LEE . I am a watchman of Upper Ogle-street. I

apprehended the prisoner a little after ten o'clock with a bundle containing this property - he said he came from his sister's in Union-street, and was going to No. 23, Castle-street. I said I was going that way, and would shew him No. 23 - he then said it was Cleveland-street. I delivered him to Allcock.

WILLIAM ALLCOCK . Lee delivered the prisoner and bundle to me. I accompanied him to No. 23, Cleveland-street, he then said it was the other No. 23. I took him towards there, and when he came to Carburton-street he dropped the bundle and ran away. I secured and took him to the watch-house.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Of stealing, but not of the burglary.

Confined Three Months , and Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

Reference Number: t18200628-24

745. WILLIAM GUITON was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of May , one chest, value 1 s., and 82 lbs. of tea, value 20 l. , the goods of Joseph Travers , John Travers , and Joseph Travers the Younger .

MR. ALLEY conducted the prosecution.

FREDERICK WILKINSON . I am in the employ of the prosecutors, who live in Swithin's-lane . On the 9th of June, between two and three o'clock in the afternoon, several chests of tea were brought to the door in a waggon; the carman had gone for refreshment. I heard an alarm, ran out, and found Mr. Smith in pursuit - I joined him, and saw the prisoner in Sherborne-lane with the chest of tea on his shoulder; he was secured at the bottom of the lane by Macdonald. I saw him throw the chest down before he was stopped. It was my masters' property.

JAMES SMITH . I am carman to Mr. Cobley. I saw the prisoner in Sherborne-lane with the chest of tea, he threw it down and ran away - he was taken in about three minutes by Macdonald. He knocked a man down who attempted to stop him.

JOHN MACDONALD . I am a shoemaker, and work in Sherborne-lane. I heard a hue and cry, jumped out, and seized the prisoner, who was running as fast as he could.

MR. JOHN TRAVERS . I am in partnership with Messrs. Joseph Travers , Sen. and Joseph Travers , Jun. - the tea is ours.

Prisoner's Defence. I met a man in Sherborne-lane, who asked me to carry it to Gracechurch-street. There was a cry of Stop thief! he immediately absconded - I threw it down to overtake him.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200628-25

746. THOMAS KING was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Howell, Jones , about two o'clock at night of the 23d of June , at St. Lawrence Jewry, with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, one pair of boots, value 6 s.; one umbrella, value 15 s.; one sheet, value 5 s.; one pillow-case, value 2 s.; three pair of stockings, value 30 s.; two shirts, value 20 s.; four table-cloths, value 1 l., and five towels, value 2 s. 6 d., his property; one umbrella, value 2 s.; one coat, value 2 s. 6 d.; one hat, value 5 s., and one pair of shoes, value 5 s., the goods of Richard Hutchence ; one shawl, value 5 s.; two shifts, value 6 s., and two aprons, value 1 s., the goods of Orlinda Lacey .

HOWELL JONES . I live at No. 12, Lawrence-lane , in the parish of St. Lawrence Jewry, and rent the house - I sleep in it, but let out the lower part. On the 22d of June I went to bed about twelve o'clock; I was the last person up, the house was quite secure. About nine o'clock in the morning, Lacey, my servant , came up - I missed an umbrella and a pair of boots from the farthest part of the kitchen; the umbrella was new, and cost me 28 s., the boots were worth 6 s. - I saw the officer find them in the chimney of the prisoner's room. I have seen the prisoner looking out of the window of Messrs. Blackenhagen, whose house is only parted from us by Mr. Hixon's skylight. Directly after the alarm was given I examined the skylight, and found a pane of glass broken.

ORLINDA LACEY. I am servant to Mr. Jones. I went to bed when he did. I came down between seven and eight o'clock in the morning, and found the drawers of the dresser all open, which were closed when I went to bed. I was the first person up. On going to set the breakfast things I missed a table-cloth. I afterwards missed four tablecloths, which were safe the night before, and are worth above 20 s.; my master's umbrella and boots were gone from the kitchen. I also missed three pair of silk stockings, two pair of which were my masters; they were new, and worth 20 s. - a shawl, two shifts, and two aprons, worth 12 s. together; a coat, a hat, and a pair of shoes were also gone, they belonged to Richard Hutchence , who is clerk to the gentleman who rents the warehouse. Every thing was safe when I went to bed.

Q. In what state did you find the door - A. The chain was off and the bolts undone - they were secure overnight; the skylight, which was safe the night before, was broken; it must have been broken by the thieves getting in at the window. The windows were all shut, but a person could get in by coming over the houses. The prisoner was Messrs. Blackenhaghen's servant, I have seen him at their kitchen window. I saw the property the same morning - I believe he was then in custody. Hutchence slept in the house, but did not get up till after I came down.

ROBERT BROWN . I am apprentice to Mr. Hixon, who lives next door to Mr. Jones. On the 23d of June, about half-past three o'clock in the morning, I saw a black man on the leads of our skylight, which is just under one of Mr. Jones's windows - there was daylight enough to distinguish him. I saw him take from Mr. Jones's window a coat, a hat, an umbrella, and take them towards Messrs. Blackenhaghens' house - I did not see him go into the house. I made no alarm at the time, but told my master when I came down. The window was open when I saw him take them. I knew the prisoner lived at Messrs. Blackenhaghens' - I cannot say it was him that I saw.

WILLIAM WILTSHIRE . I am an officer of the Mansion-house. The prisoner was apprehended, and I was sent to search Messrs. Blackenhaghens' house, where he lived. In his bed-room on the second floor, up the chimney, I found two umbrellas. In the pantry I found a hat in his master's hat-box, which was claimed by Hutchence, and in his master's bed-room I found a pair of boots and shoes

among his master's - Jones claimed the boots and Hutchence the shoes. In his master's wardrobe, among his master's clothes, I found a great-coat, which was claimed by Hutchence. I then went to a room at the top of the house, and behind, and in a box, I found four table-cloths, two shirts, five towels, two shifts, three pair of stockings, a pillow-case, and a sheet, which were claimed by Jones and Lacey.

THOMAS PRESTIGE . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner about one o'clock in the day. I took him to his bed-room, which, I think, was on the third floor. I saw Brown find the linen in a box in the lumber-room, where the prisoner cleaned his knives and shoes.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I leave it to the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY. - DEATH . Aged 20.

Of stealing in a dwelling-house, but not of the burglary .

Recommended to Mercy.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200628-26

747. THOMAS PARROTT was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of June , one handkerchief, value 4 s., the goods of Page Ward , from his person .

PAGE WARD . I am a lace-dealer , and live on Holborn-hill. On the 4th of June, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I was in Skinner-street , the witness called to me, I then missed my handkerchief, and found the prisoner in custody with it.

WILLIAM WHITLEY . I live in Kingsgate-street. I was passing at the bottom of Holborn-hill, and saw the prisoner attempt a gentleman's pocket - I desired Jarvis to be attentive to him. We watched him to the corner of Seacoal-lane, and a few yards from there I saw him take a handkerchief from Mr. Ward's pocket, I ran across, and met him running round the corner of Seacoal-lane. I collared and threw him down, and in the scuffle he threw down the handkerchief; a boy picked it up and gave it to me.

JOHN JARVIS . I am a carpenter. Whitley directed my attention to the prisoner - I saw him take the handkerchief from Mr. Ward's pocket and informed him of it. I assisted in taking the prisoner to the Compter.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I throw myself on your mercy.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200628-27

748. WILLIAM BENWELL was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of June , one sheet, value 7 s. , the goods of James Manning .

MARY MANNING . This sheet was let to the prisoner with a furnished lodging.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200628-28

749. JOHN DRING was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of May , one handkerchief, value 1 s., the goods of William Denby , from his person .

WILLIAM DENBY . I am a carpet-manufacturer , and live in Union-street, Borough. On the 27th of May I was coming from Throgmorton-street , and at the corner of the Auction Mart I was told my pocket had been picked. I felt, and missed my handkerchief. A gentleman pointed the prisoner out, I went to him, and asked if he had got my handkerchief? he said No, the other boy had it. I saw no other boy, secured him, and saw the handkerchief found in his bosom.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

THOMAS SMITH . I was in Throgmorton-street, and saw Mr. Denby with the prisoner behind him. I did not see him take the handkerchief, but saw him put one into his jacket. He crossed towards the Bank, I pointed him to Denby. I took him to the Mansion House, and saw the handkerchief found on him.

JOHN HESKETH . I am an officer. I found the handkerchief under the prisoner's jacket. I found another round his neck, and two in his bosom.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200628-29

750. SUSAN JAMESON was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of May , one crown piece, one half-crown, two shillings, and three sixpences, the monies of John Macdonald , from his person .

JOHN MACDONALD . I live in Leather-sellers'-buildings, London-wall. On the 22d of May, about half-past one o'clock at night, I was rather intoxicated, and met the prisoner on the Pavement in Moorfields. I walked to Golden-lane with her, and went up a court there - I was not there above three minutes. She asked me for money for gin, I gave her 6 d. and a few halfpence. Immediately she left I missed my money from breeches-pocket. I followed and asked her for my money, she said she had none - the watchman then came up, I gave her in charge, and described the money before they searched her. She said she had no crown piece - she pulled a crown piece from her pocket, and then said it was a bad one.

JOSEPH HORTON . I am a watchman. I heard a noise up Lion-court, and went up, the prosecutor said the prisoner had stolen his money, she said she had none of his money. I took her to the watch-house. He said,

"Before you search her I will tell you what I lost," and described the money. I took a crown piece out of her lap; she produced a half-crown, three shillings, and three sixpences.

Prisoner's Defence. He must know that I did not rob him.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200628-30

751. CHARLES HOPWOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of June , one shawl, value 6 s., and 8 1/2 yards of bombazeen, value 15 s. 7 d. , the goods of William Barnes .

JESSE PIM . I am shopman to Mr. Wm. Barnes , who is a linen-draper , and lives in Barbican . The prisoner came into his service on the 7th of June; on the 14th of June Mr. Drake produced a shawl, which I had seen three or four days before in the window. The prisoner was apprehended, and denied any knowledge of it.

ROBERT DRAKE . I am a pawnbroker. The prisoner pledged a shawl with me on the 14th of June in the name of Richardson.

JAMES WALTER . I am servant to Mrs. Fothergill, who is a pawnbroker, and lives in Aldersgate-street. On the 14th of June, between eight and nine o'clock in the morning, the prisoner pledged eight yards and a half of bom-bazeen, in the name of John Richardson , Golden-lane - it was quite new - I am sure he is the person.

WILLIAM GOATER . I live with Mr. Barnes. On Wednesday morning, the 14th of June, the prisoner came down about six o'clock, which was his usual time. I sleep in the shop - I got up immediately and called Pim up; when I came down the prisoner asked if Pim was getting up? I was absent about three minutes - I said he was not out of bed yet. He immediately went to the end of the shop where the bombazeen was - I was putting my bed away. I then went to the end of the shop to open it - he asked me how that piece of bombazeen was left out from the rest? this very piece of bombazeen then laid on the counter. I said I could not tell. When he was apprehended I told Pim of it, the bombazeen was then measured, and eight yards and a half were gone.

HENRY TURNPENNY . I am an officer. I took the prisoner in charge. I took him up to his bedroom - he said it was useless my searching there, for he had destroyed the duplicates. I found another shawl at Sadler's, in Aldersgate-street, by his direction.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200628-31

THIRD DAY, FRIDAY, JUNE 30.

752. JOHN BELL was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of June , one watch, value 20 s., and one seal, value 10 s., the goods of John Casson , from his person .

JOHN CASSON . I am an half-pay officer of the Tower Hamlets, and live near the Obelisk, in St. George's-fields. On the 15th of June, a little after nine o'clock in the evening, I was in Brick-lane, Spitalfields , and near a butcher's shop I and my brother officer were surrounded by four or five persons, the prisoner was in front of me. I am positive he is the man. He laid hold of my watch-ribbon, and immediately drew my watch from me - I felt it go - both my arms were engaged in supporting my brother officer, who was intoxicated. I left him, and seized the prisoner, whom I never lost sight of. He was secured, but the watch was not found on him. I was quite sober.

JAMES ORPWOOD . I was with Mr. Casson. I was a little in liquor. We were surrounded by a number of men and women, Casson lost his watch, and seized the prisoner.

EDWARD BRIGHT . I am an officer. I was at my door, about six yards from where the robbery was committed, and saw Casson and the last witness surrounded by several persons, I got my staff, and saw Casson pass several persons and seize the prisoner, who was making away.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing of it.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18200628-32

753. THOMAS ETHERINGTON was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of April , 1 s. , the monies of Ingram Mayer .

INGRAM MAYER. I am a horse-hair manufacturer , and live in Water-street, St. James's-street ; the prisoner was my servant . On the 28th of April I marked the money in my till, I do not know how much - next morning I found 1 s. gone. I had the prisoner apprehended, and the shilling was found on him; he had lived six years with me. He said I gave it to him on the Saturday, but I am certain I did not.

ROBERT HOWARD . I am the officer. The prisoner denied having any money about him. I found 1 s. in his fob; he then said his master paid it to him.

Prisoner's Defence. I really did not take it.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18200628-33

JOSEPH GREENOP , BENJAMIN GLOVER , JAMES DOWNES , THOMAS MATTHEWS , WILLIAM SHRIBS , CHARLES M'KAY , SARAH HEWSTER , HARRIET FREEMAN , SARAH CARTER , PHILIP JOHNSON , DANIEL CUMMINGS , and JAMES HINNEGAN were severally and separately indicted for having in their custody and possession forged Bank notes knowing them to be forged .

To which indictments the prisoners pleaded GUILTY .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Before Mr. Justice Holroyd and Mr. Justice Burrough.

755. The same prisoners, except James Hinnegan , were again indicted for disposing of and putting away forged Bank notes, with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England .

MR. REYNOLDS, on behalf of the prosecution, declined offering any evidence.

NOT GUILTY .

Before Mr. Justice Holroyd and Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18200628-34

756. SAMUEL HOYE was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of August, 1818 , at St. Luke, Chelsea, one time-piece, value 8 l., the goods of John May , in his dwelling-house .

MARIA MAY . I am the wife of John May , who is a livery-stable keeper , and lives at Chelsea , in the parish of St. Luke. On the 7th of August, 1818, I was washing in my own room, and saw the prisoner come down the yard - he appeared as if he wished to enter my room - a carriage stood near the door - there is no thoroughfare in the yard; he said,

"Am I to go through the carriage?" I told him to go round it. In about two minutes I went out, drew some water, about three yards from the door, and on my return I saw him standing at the back of the carriage, covering something over with his coarse apron, which he had taken off. I said nothing to him. He went

up the yard, and in a few minutes the landlady of the public-house called to me - I then missed my time-piece off the chimney-piece of the room I was in - it stood there when I went for the water. I went out and met Brumwell.

THOMAS BRUMWELL . On the 7th of August, 1818, I saw the prisoner outside the Coach and Horses, public-house door, with a little boy; he said to the boy,

"Stand there, and I will do it myself." He went right through the public-house, and in about three minutes he came through all in a bustle, with the time-piece in his hand; I saw the best part of it, and knew it was a time-piece, the feet were either brass or gold, and it appeared to be a mahogany case. The public-house leads into the yard where the prosecutrix's house is - her door rather faces the public-house back-door; he was wrapping the timepiece up in an old coarse apron. He came very near to me, ran as hard as he could, and turned up White Lion-street. Soon after that I went into the Coach and Horses, the landlady sent and alarmed Mrs. May, who missed her time-piece. He was not apprehended then - I knew him before. I and the constable went three days and three nights after him, but never could take him - we heard of him several times, and described him, but we did not know his name.

Prisoner. Q. Why did you not apprehend me when you saw me before - A. I was with a man who was going to pay me some money, he had given me the slip twice, and I did not like to leave him. I told several people which way he went, but they took the wrong road. On the 24th of May I saw him at my door in Grosvenor-row - he came to ask the price of a pair of shoes. I told a man in my shop to keep an eye upon him while I fetched May, but immediately as I left the door he walked away.

WILLIAM KING . I apprehended the prisoner.

MARIA MAY re-examined. The time-piece cost 8 l. at a sale, five or six years ago - it was worth 4 l. It had a mahogany case, with four brass feet.

Prisoner's Defence. I have no friends, as I do not live in town.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 32.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18200628-35

757. ELIZABETH HALESWORTH was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Ann Sawyer , widow , and Jemima Hill , spinster , about ten o'clock in the forenoon of the 6th of June , at St. Luke ( Susannah Sawyer being therein), and stealing therein two sheets, value 12 s., and three towels, value 6 s., their property .

ANN SAWYER . I am a widow, and live in Little West-place, City-road , in the parish of St. Luke. I rent the house with my sister, Jemima Hill, we only rent two rooms in the lower part of Mr. Harris's, who does not live in the house. On the 6th of June, between eleven and twelve o'clock, I went out and left my child, Susannah, at home. I locked the door, and took the key out - I was absent ten minutes or a quarter of an hour, and on my return I found a false key in the door, but the door was locked. I unlocked it with that key - I had my own in my pocket. I turned round and missed the cloth off the table, also two sheets, and three towels, which were sent us to wash - they were worth above 1 l. In about an hour or two I found them at Miller's. The prisoner told me to think myself well off that I had got my property.

JEMIMA HILL . I rent the rooms with Sawyer. I went to Miller's, and described the property. Soon after he stopped the prisoner.

THOMAS MILLER . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Golden-lane. On the 6th of June, between twelve and one o'clock, the prisoner brought two sheets, and three towels to pledge; I offered to lend her 10 s. upon them - she would not leave them for less than 11 s. - they are worth about 16 s. She left the shop. I stepped into the parlour, and having heard that something was ordered to be stopped, I went out and brought her back with them; she said they were her daughter's, who kept a straw-bonnet shop in Long-lane. I said some articles had been stopped, and I would go with her to her daughter's. She went part of the way, and then said a man was to give her sixpence to pledge them, and he was to be found at the top of Brick-lane.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JAMES RIDDILL . I took the prisoner in charge, and found fourteen keys of different sorts, and nineteen duplicates upon her. She said she could but die for it.

Prisoner. I know I am guilty.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 69.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18200628-36

758. JOSEPH WEBB was indicted for feloniously assaulting Frederick Winkley , on the 28th of May , at St. Andrew, Holborn, putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, the sum of 12 s. in monies numbered, his property .

FREDERICK WINKLEY . I am a printer , and live in Peter's-lane, St. John-street. On Sunday, the 28th of May, about eleven o'clock at night, I was going through Bell-court, Holborn , leading to Brooks-market, and saw a woman standing at a door - she invited me in - I went in, and directly as I entered I saw two men, the prisoner was one; I sat down, and the prisoner said if I chose, he would get me one of the finest women in England. I told him I was not inclined that way.

Q. How came you to go in - A. I went in, but by the appearance of the two men I was alarmed - I had been drinking; he then asked me to send for half a pint of gin - I refused, and said I should go. I got up to go, he came across the room, and gave me a shove into the cellar, the cellar-door was open, but I had not observed it; it was six or seven feet deep, and goes down a ladder - a light appeared at the top. I immediately looked up, and saw the prisoner coming down, I begged of him, for God's sake, to let me out of the place; the light was then taken away, and he came down, put his hands down me, and took 12 s. or 15 s. out of my left-hand pocket. I do not exactly know what I had, but I know there was 12 s., and it was chiefly in half-crowns - he took it as soon as he could come down. I crawled up the ladder, and got out of the house as fast as I could, leaving him in the cellar - the other man sat there, but took no part in it. I do not know who brought the light to the cellar-door. I did not know him before, but am quite positive to him - I was quite sensible. As soon as I got out I went into Gray's

Inn-lane, told the watchman, and went back - the prisoner and the other man were still there. I pointed him out as the man who robbed me, and the watchman took him. I did not hear him say anything to it. It was not more than ten minutes after that I took the watchman there. In taking him to the watch-house he made his escape.

Prisoner. Q. Were you not sick with liquor - A. No, I have told the truth.

GEORGE PERRY . I am a watchman. The last witness applied to me about twelve o'clock on the night of the robbery; I went with him to a common bawdy house - I knew it to be so. I found the woman who keeps it, a man that cohabits with her, and the prisoner, there. The prosecutor said the prisoner was the man - he said he knew nothing about it. As I took him out, he said he could go without holding - I said I must hold him. On going up Holborn he kept shuffling, and when he got to Hand-court I had a desperate struggle with him - he got from me, ran across Holborn, through Turnstile, into Whetston's-park, and there I took him again. Six half-crowns were found on him.

JAMES TRINDER . I was constable of the night. I searched the prisoner, and found six half-crowns, 2 s. and two 6 d. on him. The prosecutor was frightened, but very collected. I went and examined the cellar, I never was in such a place in my life - any man might be murdered there, and nobody know it - it is very dark, and full seven feet deep; there is a ladder in it, with some of the steps broken. A sort of cupboard leads to it.

Prisoner's Defence. The man and woman were in the house when I was. I know nothing of the prosecutor. The money is mine.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 28.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18200628-37

758. JAMES BRADFIELD was indicted for feloniously killing and slaying William Sapwell .

WILLIAM WEBSTER . I am thirteen years old. On the 15th of June I was in a small cart with William Sapwell , on the Westminster side of Temple-bar , the cart was standing still, rather in the middle of the street, the horse's head was towards the City. There was a stoppage of carriages; two brewers' drays were coming towards Westminster - the first passed without running against us, the second caught the wheel of our cart, and pulled us back, turned the horse round and threw us over; it caught the off-wheel - Sapwell was thrown out under the cart, he was hurt and taken to the doctor's. I afterwards saw him in St. Bartholomew's hospital. The dray was stopped by a waterman. There was room enough for both drays to pass; the prisoner rode on the fore horse of the second dray and drove it, it went at a smartish walk. Sapwell died on Monday morning. Our cart did not move till the dray caught the wheel.

HENRY POPLE . I was present at this accident. There was a stoppage of carriages - the first dray passed the cart quite clear, there was quite room enough for it to pass; the cart was drawn some distance, and the horse drove nearly round before it was thrown over. There was time enough for it to stop to prevent the mischief. The deceased, the boy, and the people hallood out, but he still went on - the horse went at a very smart walk. There was nothing to prevent his stopping, and if he had stopped when he was called to, the mischief would have been prevented. The man was thrown out of the cart, and fell under it. I ran after the drayman , he never stopped till I stopped him opposite Mr. Twining's tea-warehouse; he rode the first horse with his whip. The dray was about a yard from the pavement, when it passed - it might have gone a yard from the cart.

HENRY PAGE , ESQ. I was returning from Westminster in a chariot; when I came within twenty yards of Temple-bar I saw a confusion. All of a sudden I saw the dray turn the cart over and throw the man out.

MR. JOHN JOSEPH LETSOM . I am house-surgeon of St. Bartholomew Hospital. The deceased was brought in on Thursday, the 15th of June, about five o'clock in the afternoon. He died on Monday, was opened and examined - the cause of his death was a fracture between the fifth and sixth vertebrae, which might have happened from this accident.

Prisoner's Defence. I was tired, and jumped on my fore horse as soon as I got out of the City. I thought there was room enough to pass the cart - I stopped my horses as soon as I could.

GUILTY . Aged 35.

Confined Six Months .

London Jury, before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

Reference Number: t18200628-38

759. FREDERICK HIRSCH , and MARY his wife , were indicted for stealing, on the 31st of May , 20 printed bound books, value 4 l.; two curtains, value 30 s.; one teaspoon, value 2 s.; one pocket-book, value 10 s.; one umbrella, value 10 s.; 12 napkins, value 12 s.; two towels, value 2 s.; one table-cloth, value 10 s., and one jacket, value 5 s., the goods of the Honourable Fitzroy James Henry Somerset , commonly called Lord Fitzroy Somerset , in his dwelling-house .

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

THE HON. LORD FITZROY JAMES HENRY SOMERSET . I have a house in Pall-mall , the male prisoner was my servant there. About the end of May or the beginning of June, I had brought three trunks and one case from Paris, principally filled with books; they were deposited in a sort of porter's lodge, and of which the prisoner had the key - it is part of the dwelling-house.

WILLIAM RAWLINGS . I am butler to his Lordship. About a fortnight after the prisoner left I had occasion to open the trunks. I found one had the asp of the lock broken, the other was uncorded. I could see things had been taken out, as I had seen them packed at Paris. The prisoner left on the 1st of June.

WILLIAM JONES . On the 17th of June I apprehended the prisoner at his lodgings in Church-court, Jermyn-street.

WILLIAM SALMON . I am an officer. Jones directed me to the prisoner's lodgings. I searched them on the 17th - I found some duplicates, and many of the articles stated in the indictment in the room.

WILLIAM WARREN . I am shopman to Mr. Rochford, pawnbroker. I produce three volumes, Cox's Walpole, a Description of Paris, and Sandford's Genealogical

History, which were pledged by the male prisoner at two different times, in the name of Wells, King-street, and Wilson, Windmill-street - he said he bought them at a sale.

HENRY ASHMAN . I am a pawnbroker. On the 26th of May the female prisoner pledged some books in the name of Dupree.

WILLIAM MOXON . The female prisoner pledged an umbrella and a napkin with me.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The Court ruled that a wife could not be found guilty of the same felony of which the husband was convicted.

FREDERICK HIRSCH 'S Defence. I bought the books of a captain in the army, the umbrella I had before I came into his Lordship's service.

FRED. HIRSCH - GUILTY . Aged 28.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only.

Confined One Year .

MARY HIRSCH - NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18200628-39

760. SOPHIA BRANDY was indicted for killing and slaying Antonio Dosser .

TINDAL THORNTON. I am a pupil in the London Hospital. On the 13th of May Antonio Dosser was brought there with a wound on his nose - it produced a fever, from which he was quite recovered on the 23d of May. He died of a typhus fever afterwards - it had no connexion with the wound.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

Reference Number: t18200628-40

761. SAMUEL RENTON was indicted for wilfully and maliciously striking, maiming, and wounding a mare, price 105 l. , the property of John Cole .

MR. ADOLPHUS, on behalf the prosecution, stated that he was unable to prove the prisoner had any malicious intent towards the owner of this mare, as he had never even seen him.

The COURT ruled this to be a necessary proof, and the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18200628-41

762. JAMES SUDBURY was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of May , one truck, value 5 l. , the goods of John Alder .

JOHN ALDER . I keep the Cock and Lion, Lower East Smithfield . On the 10th of May I lost this truck from my cellar in Burr-street .

NATHANIEL CLARK . On the 10th of May, about six o'clock in the afternoon, I saw the prisoner in Burr-street with one Horman, who was tried last Sessions. I saw Horman lift the truck from the guard, the prisoner was behind him. Horman drew it opposite the London Docks, I then lost sight of them, and on turning the corner of Wells-street I saw the prisoner drawing it. Horman called out

"To the right!" The prisoner saw me, went up White Lion-street, and at the corner of Wellclose-square he ran off - I secured Horman.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did you hear Horman ask him to assist in taking it to the Green-yard - A. No. I saw an officer of the Court of Requests drinking with Horman. I heard nothing of his having a warrant to arrest the prisoner. They were not going the way to the Green-yard.

Prisoner's Defence. Horman asked me to help him with it to the Green-yard. I saw an officer who had an execution against me, and ran away.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

Reference Number: t18200628-42

763. JOHN BROWN, alias BRIGGS , was indicted for feloniously assaulting Frederick Turner , on the King's highway, on the 1st of June , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, one watch, value 20 l., one chain, value 10 l.; two seals, value 5 l.; one ring, value 5 s., and one key, value 10 s., his property .

MR. ARABIN conducted the prosecution.

FREDERICK TURNER , ESQ. I live in Bloomsbury-square. On the evening of the 1st of June, about half-past eleven o'clock, I was returning home, and as I entered Hyde-street a girl followed and spoke to me - she still kept walking about two yards from me, when I perceived four or five men coming towards me. I continued to pass on, and as I approached, the prisoner, who was nearest to the houses, got on the step between me and the houses, which placed him rather above me. This circumstance drew my attention towards him, and enables me to recollect his person. There was sufficient light from the lamps, I could distinctly see his person and dress. I put my hand on my seals to conceal them, and at that moment he made a rush at me, caught hold of my watch-chain, which was between my watch and my hand, and with great force tore my chain from my watch - at that instant I was violently pushed or knocked down by his companions behind. The the force that was used threw me on the pavement. I let go my seals and fell on the pavement with great force. The seals and chain had been separated from my watch just before, and on my letting go they fell on the pavement. My small-clothes were torn from my fob about six or eight inches down with the violence, and my watch lifted about four inches from my fob.

Q. At the time the chain was separated from your watch, had you the seals in your hand - A. I had. As I fell I drew part of the chain out of the prisoner's hand, and let go myself at the same time - I instantly got up and picked them up. I saw one of his companions, and immediately called Watch! they came round me and threatened me, but I continued to call. The watchman came up, and I told him to take the man I first saw on rising. I turned round to the others, recognized the prisoner, and charged him with being the person who seized my chain - he immediately ran away, but was stopped.

COURT. There is no proof that the prisoner ever had complete possession of the chain or seals. It is only an attempt to rob, though it is very near being a highway robbery.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

Reference Number: t18200628-43

764. BENJAMIN LLOYD was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Richard

Jones , about seven o'clock in the afternoon of the 21st of May (no person being therein), and stealing nine handkerchiefs, value 36 s.; one coat, value 2 l.; one pair of breeches, value 1 l., and one pair of gaiters, value 4 s., his property; two pair of ear-rings, value 7 s.; one toothpick, value 2 s.; one brooch, value 4 s., and one string of beads, value 5 s., the property of Sarah Page .

RICHARD JONES . I keep the Windsor Castle, public-house, in the City-road . On the 21st of May, about half-past seven o'clock in the evening, an alarm was given. I went up to my bed-room, found all the drawers broken open, and every thing scattered about. I suppose there were one hundred and fifty people in the house at the time drinking. The lock of my bed-room door was picked.

SARAH PIKE . I am servant to Mr. Jones. The prisoner came into the drinking-room - I missed him from there, went up stairs, and found him in my master's bedroom. He came running from behind the bed, and said

"Oh dear! I have made a mistake, and come into the wrong room." I caught hold of him and called my master. He dragged me down three or four stairs and got from me - I am certain he is the man. I went up to my own bed-room, found the locks of three boxes broken open, and the property gone.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. You first saw him in the public room - A. Yes. I am positive he is the man.

JOSEPH NEWMAN . I am servant to Mr. Jones. I heard Pike call, ran out. and met a man at the door - he asked what was the matter? I said I did not know, and presently the prisoner came out at the door, and said to the man,

"D - n you, it is all right, hold your tongue!" The prisoner then ran round a little garden, which leads on to Windsor-terrace. I saw Davis catch him - he was never out of my sight.

JOHN DAVIS . I am a porter. Newman pointed the prisoner out to me - I caught him climbing over some high paling; he then tried to split the railing to get through. We had a scuffle, and I threw him down. I secured him - his hat fell off, a man handed it to me, and there were nine silk handkerchiefs in it.

JOHN BREEDY . I took the prisoner in charge, with the handkerchiefs. Next morning, as I was taking him to Worship-street, he made his escape across Finsbury market with his handcuffs on - he was stopped in Long-alley. We were surrounded by bad characters, who tried to rescue him; I was kicked and beat about.

(Handkerchiefs produced and sworn to.)

SAMUEL SANDERS . I am a constable. I examined Mr. Jones's bed-room, and found five locks broken, also a desk and a tea-caddy. A suit of clothes were in the middle of the floor, and a quantity of things about the place.

WILLIAM REEVE . My paling was broken down where the prisoner was stopped. I went there next morning, and found two pair of ear-rings, some beads, a brooch, a toothpick, and a picklock key.

JOSEPH TAYLOR . I assisted in retaking the prisoner when he escaped. He bit two of my fingers.

Prisoner's Defence. They have sworn falsely.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Of stealing only.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

Reference Number: t18200628-44

765. SARAH HAYES and JANE HOBY were indicted for stealing, on the 2d of June , one coat, value 5 l., and one pair of trowsers, value 2 l., the goods of William Alexander Read , in the dwelling-house of Christopher Quin .

WILLIAM ALEXANDER READ . On the 2d of June, I was residing in Basinghall-street. About four o'clock in the morning I met the prisoners in Covent-garden, and went with Hayes to a house in Vine-street, Chandos-street . Hoby and another woman went in about the same time. I gave Hayes some silver, and paid one of the others 18 d. for the room. they left the room to get something to drink. I went to bed, and about half past five o'clock the two prisoners and the other woman came in. I am sure they are the women - it was daylight. Hoby and the other took my coat and trowsers, and all went away together with them. I came down stairs as I was, and left the house shortly after. I met Hayes; she had nothing with her, and I did not stop her. I was not perfectly sober, but I knew what I was about. When I returned, I found the rest of my things gone. My coat and trowsers were worth 8 l.

Cross-examined by MR. ARABIN. Q. Were you not very drunk - A. I was not; I am certain they are the women.

GEORGE BUCHANAN . On the 1st of June I lived with Mr. Brewer, in Chandos-street. I saw the prisoners with another woman, about five o'clock in the morning, at the corner of Bedfordbury. Hoby had a blue great coat in her apron; they went through May's-buildings. Hayes turned back. I afterwards saw the prosecutor in Vine-street, and told him; he went after them. I saw Hoby after this at the corner of New-street; she still had the bundle in her apron; she saw us and ran away - we lost her; it was a blue coat with a velvet collar.

WILLIAM ALEXANDER READ re-examined. Mine was a blue coat and had a velvet collar.

ELEANOR QUIN . I am the wife of Christopher Quin . The prosecutor came to our house; he seemed much intoxicated; four or five women went up stairs with him. Hoby lodged in the first floor. I did not see him, I only heard him.

ISAAC PIKE . I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoners about ten o'clock.

The prisoners denied the charge.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

Reference Number: t18200628-45

766. ROBERT M'DONALD was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of May , one handkerchief, value 7 s., the goods of Charles Toswill , from his person .

MR. CHARLES TOSWILL . I am a druggist , and live in Friday-street. On Sunday, the 28th of May, about half-past eight o'clock in the evening, I was in Fleet-street , returning from St. Dunstan's Church. I was walking with my wife's sister, and my wife was walking behind with a lady. My attention was attracted by seeing my wife run after the prisoner. I had not observed him near me. I joined in the pursuit; my wife laid hold of him and charged him with stealing my handkerchief - he denied it. I then felt and missed it. I have never found it.

MRS. ELIZA TOSWILL . I went to church with my husband

and came out with him. I was walking behind him, and, about forty yards from the church, I perceived three boys walking between me and him - the prisoner was the middle one. I saw the prisoner stoop and take the handkerchief from my husband's pocket. I laid hold of him directly, and the other two escaped - they were about twelve years old. The prisoner struggled very much to get from me, and drew me into the middle of the road. He was secured immediately, without having broke from me. I saw him hand the handkerchief to one of the others.

JOHN WALLIS . I took the prisoner in charge.

Prisoner's Defence. I was pushed by a crowd, and saw two or three lads following a gentleman - I was pushed rather towards him. A lady laid hold of the tail of my coat, I turned round stepped off the pavement, and asked what she wanted; she charged me with this robbery.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200628-46

767. EDWARD FOWNES was indicted for embezzling three 1 l. Bank notes, and 2 s. 1 d. , which he received on account of Edgar Corrie and William Corrie .

MR. WALFORD conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM HEWITT . I am cash-keeper and principal clerk to Messrs. Edgar and William Corrie , who are West India brokers . The prisoner was in their employ as clerk in April and May. I do not know that he was so in February. He supplied his brother's place, who was ill.

CHRISTOPHER STORROW . I am clerk to the prosecutors. The prisoner was in their employ in February. He supplied the place of his brother, who was ill. He made out sales and bills, and, occasionly, received money. The counting-house is in Mincing-lane. On the 20th of May I applied to Mr. Banks for money, and Millner showed me the bill with the receipt and initials to it; they are the prisoner's hand-writing - it was dated the 14th of February, 1820.

Cross-examined by MR. BROADRICK. Q. I believe his parents are very respectable - A. I believe so. He has a twin brother, who is extremely like him. His brother attended in the counting-house, but did not go out, being ill. I have mistaken one for the other myself. The writing is his, and not his brother's.

GEORGE MILLNER . I am clerk to Mr. Bankes, of Little Distaff-lane. He had transactions with Messrs. Corrie. I remember a person calling for 3 l. 2 s. 1 d., which was their their account. I cannt swear it was the prisoner. He put his initials on the bill - it is since destroyed. I showed it to Mr. Storrow before it was destroyed. I paid the person three 1 l. notes and 2 s. 1 d.

WILLIAM HEWITT re-examined. It was the prisoner's duty to bring the money to me the day he received it. He never brought this sum to me as that sum. The day after it was received, he brought me 3 l. 11 s. 6 d. as received from Mr. Fenwick. On the evening of the 20th of May I went to his lodgings - he came to me outside the door. I told him something unpleasant had occurred, that a sum or sums of money had been received, and they did not appear to be accounted for; and I meant to be candid with him, provided he was candid with me. He immediately said he received one sum only, and that was 3 l. 2 s. 1 d. from Mr. Bankes, and had applied that sum to replace 3 l. 11 s. 6 d. which he had from Fenwick, and lost out of his pocket.

Q. Are you certain it was him that said so - A. Yes, it was not his brother. He said he paid me the very money he received from Bankes.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Four Months .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200628-47

768. ANN READ was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of June , two shirts, value 5 s ., the goods of Elizabeth Smith .

ELIZABETH SMITH . I lodge in Moor-square, Moor-lane . On the 18th of June I took the prisoner into my room out of charity. I went out next morning, and returned in a few minutes, she was then gone. I missed two shirts, and found them at the pawnbroker's.

SAMUEL HAYES . I am shopman to Mr. Goodman, pawnbroker, Paternoster-row, Spitalfields. One of the shirts was pledged with me.

WILLIAM MILTON . I am servant to Mr. Thimbleby, pawnbroker. On the 9th of June the prisoner pledged a shirt with me.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN FENTON . I apprehended the prisoner - she said she had destroyed the duplicates.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Confined Six Months .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200628-48

769. WILLIAM KEATON was indicted for stealing on the 14th of June , at St. Giles Without Cripplegate, in the dwelling-house of William Gordon , one shilling, three sixpences, and two 1 l. Bank notes, his property .

WILLIAM GORDON . I keep the Green Dragon, public-house, in Fore-street, St. Giles Without, Cripplegate , City. On the 14th of June, at half-past two o'clock, this money was in a till in the bar - I saw it safe a minute before it was missed. The prisoner was a stranger to me, I saw him in the taproom about one o'clock as a customer - the bar fronts the taproom-door - the bar-door is left open in the daytime. While I was walking towards the kitchen I saw the prisoner in the bar - I had left nobody there. I saw him draw the till out, returned, and caught him at the bar-door. I seized his hand, and took two 1 l. notes, a shilling, and three sixpences - I charged him with taking it out of the till. He had left it half open; I had closed it and turned the key. He said nothing. I put him in the taproom and sent for an officer. I examined the till, and found just that sum deficient.

MATTHEW POLLOCK . I am a constable. I took charge of the prisoner. Gordon charged him with stealing this money from the till. He was turbulent at first, but when he found that I was an officer he went quietly with me.

Prisoner's Defence. I was walking along Cheapside, out of work, and having a large family, I met a labourer. who took me to the house to set a stove - the prosecutor said he had the mortar and every thing ready. I went

into the kitchen, after having three or four pots of beer, which rather affected me. I was cutting the bricks away to make it fit - the prosecutor said if I did not do my work like a tradesman he would not let me finish it. I got drunk, and what occurred I do not know.

WILLIAM GORDON re-examined. Two labourers brought him in, he was rather intoxicated, and did abuse me for not letting him set the stove. I had marked the two notes half an hour before - the shilling and three sixpences laid on the notes. I know the notes are mine, they are marked Hayes, and Need whom I took them of.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 40.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200628-49

770. FREDERICK STEVENS was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of May , two seals, value 5 s., the goods of Thomas Whitelock , from his person .

THOMAS WHITELOCK . I am a seal-engraver , and live in St. John's-square. On the 24th of May, about nine o'clock in the evening, I was in Barbican , and found myself pushed about by a party, and on turning round these seals were taken out of my waistcoat pocket - I was taking them home, they were in a piece of paper. The party separated - the prisoner passed me, and went into a baker's shop. I cannot say he was one of the party. I went into the shop, and accused him of picking my pocket. He wanted to force his way out of the shop, I pushed him in, and said he should not go till he was searched; and in the act of pushing him in I saw him throw the parcel into the street; I jumped out and picked it up, it was my parcel. I laid hold of him - one of the party came and said he would assist me in taking him - I said

"You are an accomplice, and I shall not let him go." The prisoner then struck me, the men jumped on my arm, and wrenched him away from me - I followed and secured him without losing sight of him. He struck me and got away again; several of them rescued him - everybody was afraid to assist me. I dodged him round a cart and took him again, he was then secured. I never lost sight of him.

MR. WILLIAM BROWN . I am a mason, and live in Swallow's-gardens. I saw several people walking together behind the prosecutor, he said he had lost his property, and I saw the prisoner throw it away. He broke from the prosecutor, and was taken again. I was afraid to assist in taking him, but never lost sight of him.

JOHN KIRBY . I am a patrol. I saw the prosecutor very ill used by the prisoner; I took him in charge, he was rescued from me - I never lost sight of him. I took him into the Still, the landlord turned us out; he was rescued again, and again secured. He pinned me against a gate by my throat, and said

"D - n you, I will not be taken."

JOHN SERGEANT . I assisted in taking the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I am sure the gentleman is false.

GUILTY . Aged 32.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200628-50

FOURTH DAY, SATURDAY, JULY 1.

771. THOMAS GIBSON was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of June , one pocket-book, value 1 s., and one bill of exchange for payment of and value 90 l., the property of Henry Cato , from his person .

HENRY CATO . I live in Staffordshire; I was in town on the 6th of June, in South Audley-street , waiting the arrival of the Queen, the prisoner was behind me, he touched my hat two or three times, I told him if he repeated it I would knock him down. He said

"Why don't you take off your hat?" I told him if he had asked me civilly I would have taken it off. I had my hand on my pocket-book - a person jostled my hat, I released my hand from my pocket-book to put my hat right, and on returning it I missed my pocket-book; the prisoner was then running away, I pursued and caught him. A person came up, struck me with an umbrella, and said the prisoner was not the person, but that my pocket-book was picked up on the spot I had gone from. It was returned to me before the Magistrate.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18200628-51

772. DANIEL JUDSON was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of June , one watch, value 10 s.; one ribbon, value 2 d.; one seal, value 10 s.; one ring, value 1 d., and one key, value 1 d., the goods of Samuel Dorrington , from his person .

SAMUEL DORRINGTON . I am a bookbinder , and live in Fountain-court, Strand. On the 16th of June, about half-past six o'clock, I went to Covent-garden Theatre , and put my seals out of sight just as I got to the mob by the pit-door - I missed my watch after I was seated in the pit. In about half an hour afterwards the officer asked if any person had lost a watch. I went to Bow-street, and saw it there.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

ROBERT EDWARDS . I am a patrol of Bow-street. On the 16th of June I was on duty in the passage of the pit; the prisoner came there just as the crowd were going in. I had seen him once or twice before when the people were going in. I saw him come out, wiping his face with his handkerchief, and walking gently away - he was going out at the entrance from Covent-garden - I stopped him, and said I believed he came there for no good purpose. On searching him I found the watch in his fob, with the ribbon tucked over inside his waistband. I asked him how he came by it? he said he bought it that morning of a young man in Cloth-fair, but he did not know who the young man was. I asked him if he knew the maker's name or the number? he said No.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Did he say he said that in order to keep it and get the reward - A. No; at the second examination he said he found it in the pit.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18200628-52

773. JOHN THOMAS was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of June , 11 handkerchiefs, value 11 s. , the goods of John Stevenson .

JOHN STEVENSON . I am a linen-draper , and live in Tottenham-court-road . On the 3d of June I was talking to a gentleman at the bottom of my shop, a person in the street called out that something was stolen; I went out, and secured the prisoner in Rathbone-place. I found my eleven handkerchiefs in his bosom.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Confined Three Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18200628-53

774. JAMES MARSDEN and ISAAC SMITH were indicted for that they, on the 5th of May , at St. James, Clerkenwell , feloniously did forge and counterfeit a certain Bank note for payment of 1 l. (setting it forth, No. 14022, dated April 26, 1820, signed T. Elgar), with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England .

SECOND COUNT, for feloniously disposing of a like forged note, with a like intent, they knowing it to be forged.

TWO OTHER COUNTS, the same, only calling it a promissory note for the payment of money instead of a Bank note.

MR. SERGEANT BOSANQUET, MESSRS. REYNOLDS and BOLLAND conducted the prosecution.

FRANCIS FREEMAN . I was introduced to the prisoners on the 25th of April; I was employed by the Solicitors of the Bank, and was introduced to the prisoners at the Sun, public-house, at the corner of Brownlow-street, Drury-lane. I saw Marsden there - a person was there whom I knew; he spoke to Marsden after I had been there about ten minutes - that person and Marsden both went out into the passage; I was afterwards called into the passage and saw them there. The person asked me in the hearing of Marsden to lend him 6 s., I did so, he gave it to Marsden, and Marsden gave him a piece of paper folded up, which he gave to me; I put it in my fob, and said to Marsden that I should like to have one myself. I said nothing else, but went out of the passage into the taproom, and was called into the passage about five minutes after by Marsden - I gave Marsden 6 s., and he gave me a 1 l. forged note. I put it into my fob with the other, and then said I should like to have something in a larger way; he said I could have them at any time.

Q. Did you express what you meant by something in a larger way - A. I said I should like to have a 5 l. note, he said I should have one next day, at three o'clock. I asked what price it would be? he said 24 s. I then went away, took the two notes to the Crown tavern, Clerkenwell, and gave them to Foy, the officer.

Q. When did you see Marsden again - A. On the 27th, at four o'clock in the afternoon, in the taproom of the Sun, public-house, Drury-lane - he said he expected to have seen me in the morning; that he had got a five for me, but he had put it away as I did not come, and asked if I would have it now? I said No, I had not the money to pay for it. He asked me how many ones I would have, and if I would have three? I said I had not money enough, but I would have two. He said,

"Stay till it is dark and you shall have them?" I staid there till nine o'clock; he went out, and soon afterwards returned - he called me out, we went down Charles-street and Drury-lane, into a back room of the Coach and Horses, public-house - nobody but ourselves were in the room. He asked me if I was ready? I said Yes, and gave him three half-crowns and a crown piece; he gave me two 1 l. notes, desired me to look at them, and asked if they were not fine ones? I said nothing, but doubled them up and put them into my fob.

Q. How came you to give him 12 s. 6 d. - A. He had not a 6 d. to give me change, and returned me a half-crown. I went to the bar, got change, and returned him 2 s. I took the notes to the Crown, marked them, and gave them to Foy - (looks at two) - these are them. On Saturday the 29th, I saw him again in the tap-room at the Sun, at seven o'clock in the evening; he had sent a person for me. On my going there, he said he had got a five for me, and said he had sent a person for me. He asked if I would have it; I said, Yes - what price is it: he said 26 s. I told him, he said before I should have them for 24 s.; he said he would see if he could get one at that price, and, if not, how many one's would I have, as I might have as many as I pleased. I said I would have three or four, but I I would rather have a five. He went out, returned in about twenty minutes, and said he had sent a person for a five, and it would not be long before it was there. He said he had sent to Skinner-street, Snowhill, for it. In about ten minutes the prisoner, Smith, came in, he whispered to Marsden, then Marsden turned to me, and said the only five they had was gone, and asked me how many one's I would have; I at first said I would have three, but afterwards said I would take four. Marsden turned to Smith, and whispered to him - Smith then went out; while he was gone a person, who was sitting in our company, asked Marsden what the old man's (Smith's) name was? Marsden said he was called Isaac Nelson , but that was not his name, his name was Isaac Newton , and that he was nearly seventy years of age. Marsden then said to me,

"You would hardly suppose that he has been transported for fourteen years, and I myself have been cast for death twice, and once transported?" I said,

"The Devil you have!" He said he had, but he had only served sixteen months of his time at the Bay, but the old man had served his time duly and truly. Smith came back, and whispered to Marsden; Marsden went out, and beckoned me out, took me down the cellar stairs of the public-house; when we got to the bottom, he said,

"Here is a place where we shall not be seen." There was light there. He undid a small roll of paper, and gave me four 1 l. Bank notes, one at a time - they were all the roll contained. I had only ordered four. He told me to look at them - I did so, folded them up, and put them into my fob. I paid him 24 s. for them. We returned to the taproom, had something to drink, and came away. I went to the Crown tavern, marked each note on the face, and delivered them to Foy, in the presence of Mr. Christmas, a Bank inspector - (looks at them) - these are them, they have

"J. Marsden, 29 - 4 - 20, F. F." on them. I saw Marsden again on the 3d of May, at two o'clock, at the Blue Lion, public-house, Gray's Inn-lane - we met there by his appointment.

Q. Why was the house of meeting changed - A. He said he would rather deal with me by myself somewhere else. I had met him always before at the Sun, in company with another person. On my going there, he said the old man would be there shortly, and we were to wait till he came. Smith came in in about three-quarters of an hour, and whispered to Marsden; Marsden said, he (meaning Smith), has got but two, will you have them? I agreed to take them. He desired me to go down the ground, and he would follow - there is a pleasure ground there. He followed me, and gave me two 1 l. notes, and I gave him 12 s. for them. We returned to the taproom, Smith was sitting there, he said to Marsden,

"Has he got them?" Marsden said Yes. He then said,

"Has he paid for them?" He said,

"Yes, it is all right." Marsden asked me to come the next day at twelve o'clock and I should have half a score. I agreed to go; I took the notes to the Crown tavern, marked them on the face, and delivered them to Foy - (looks at two) - these are them. I marked them

"J. Marsden, 3 - 5 - 20. F. F." I went there again on the 4th of May and waited there. Marsden came about half past twelve o'clock; said we must wait till the old man came, and he would bring them; we waited there till near three o'clock; he did not come, and Marsden appointed to meet me at one o'clock next day. I accordingly went there to the same house, and waited for him in the street; he came in about ten minutes; we went into the house and waited there about half an hour for the old man; I said I could wait no longer; we agreed to meet again at two o'clock; I went away, and saw Foy and Christmas, who were waiting for me; I went again at two o'clock; Marsden was not there; I waited in the street till he came; we then walked up and down the street waiting for the old man, and in about a quarter of an hour Smith came; he joined us in Guildford-street.

Q. Could you command a view of him before he approached you? - A. Yes; before he came up, he took his hat off and waved it as a signal that he was coming; he might be a dozen yards from us then. We all three went into the taproom of the Blue Lion - none but ourselves were in the room. Marsden asked Smith if he had got the things; Smith said Yes, and pulled out a parcel and offered it to me - it was not open - I told Marsden to take it while I got the money out of my pocket; I asked how many notes there were; Smith said ten - he handed them to Marsden, who undid the roll a little; I said I could only take eight; Marsden undid the roll again a little, and Smith took two of the notes out; then Marsden gave me the parcel, containing eight; I gave him a 1 l. Bank note and 28 s. in silver, and asked if I could rely on it that there were eight; he said Yes, I might rely there were - Smith also said there were eight. Marsden gave Smith the money, and Smith asked if it was all good; I said Yes, and Marsden said, he would be bound it was all good; Marsden asked if I was going into the country; I said I was, I had previously told him so; he said, you cannot justly say when you shall want any more then? I said I could not tell; he said when you do want any more, write to me at the Sun, the day before you want them, and I will meet you. Smith was present all this time; he must have heard it, we were all in company. After a short time, we went to the door, shook hands, and separated. I went to the Crown, marked each note on the face, and gave them to Foy, in the presence of Christmas - (looks at them) - these are them; they are marked

"J. Marsden, 5th of May - 20 - F. F." I saw Marsden again by appointment on the 10th of May (I had sent him a letter), at the Blue Lion at twelve o'clock; he had nothing then; he said he would meet me again at three o'clock; I told him I wanted some notes - nothing passed at three - we met again at six, and I gave him a 1 l. Bank note and 10 s. to bring me five ones the next day; we were to meet at the Union, public house, Spafields, and did so; this was on the 11th, at twelve o'clock; he met me at the Union door, and asked me to go down the road with him, which leads by Bagnigge Wells; I went with him into a field past Bagnigge Wells; he said Smith was there, and would not come up, and I had better go down to him. When we got into the field, Smith was there waiting for us - I asked him if he had got them - he pulled out a brown paper parcel, tied round with a bit of thread, gave it to Marsden, and he gave it to me. I asked Marsden how many there were, Smith replied fifteen; I asked what sort they were, if there was a 5 l. note; Smith said they were all ones; I broke the string they were tied with; they said I had no occasion to count them, they were all right; I said I could only take ten; I took ten away, and returned the five to Marsden - he returned them to Smith.

Q. You had paid him 1 l. 10 s. the night before? - A. Yes, and I gave Marsden 1 l. 10 s. more then, which was 3 l.; he asked when I should want any more? I said I could not say for a day or two; he said when you want more write as before, and you shall have them; I asked them to drink, but they refused and we parted. I took them to the Crown, marked them, and gave them to Foy, in the presence of Christmas. - (looks at 10) - these are them.

Q. During these transactions had you been furnished with money by Christmas, and did you communicate from time to time the whole transaction - A. I did the whole of it.

Prisoner MARSDEN. Q. Who introduced you to me - A. A man named Bumpus.

JOHN FOY . I am an officer of Marlborough-street office. On the 25th of April I received two notes from Freeman, at the Crown, Clerkenwell-green. On the 27th of April he gave me two, and on the 29th of April four. He gave me them all at the Crown. I had frequently communicated with him relative to this subject, and it was arranged that he should bring me the notes he might purchase of the prisoner. On Wednesday, the 3d of May, I saw Christmas give him some money, I do not know how much, it was to pay the prisoners for forged notes; and on Thursday I and Christmas went in a coach opposite the Blue Lion, Gray's Inn-lane. We got there about two o'clock, or rather earlier; I saw Freeman shortly after, he went into the Blue Lion. I saw Marsden coming towards there from Guildford-street way; it is at the corner of the passage leading to Bagnigge-wells. Marsden appeared to see Freeman going in, for he ran after him and got in nearly at the same time. We remained in the coach, and in about a quarter of an hour Freeman and Marsden came out together; they spoke together and separated. We

then drove to the Crown. Freeman came up almost immediately, and returned Christmas the money he had given him. Freeman went to meet Marsden again about four o'clock. I saw Christmas return him the money. Wales was directed to go before us into the Blue Lion, and watch what passed between Freeman, or any one else who might be there. Freeman followed Wales in - I and Christmas followed them in a coach. We went nearly opposite the Blue Lion - got there about a quarter or half an hour after four o'clock; Freeman staid at the door, watching. He was shortly afterwards joined by Marsden, and both went into the house together. We waited till after five o'clock, and as neither of them came out, we returned to the Crown; and about half-past six o'clock Wales and Freeman came there - Freeman delivered me two notes. On Friday, the 5th of May, I saw Christmas give him some money for the same purpose. Wales and Jefferies were directed to go to the Blue Lion, to observe what passed. Christmas and I went in a coach, saw Freeman standing at the door, and very soon after I saw Marsden on the opposite side of the way - he beckoned to Freeman, who went over to him. They spoke together and then crossed over into the house, remained there about half an hour, then came out and separated - that was at twelve o'clock. We went again a little before two o'clock; on getting to the house, Freeman was standing at the door, and was soon after joined by Marsden. They walked up and down the street together, and went frequently opposite to the end of Guildford-street. Marsden appeared to be looking for some one in Guildford-street; after doing this three or four times, I saw him cross quickly over into Guildford-street; Freeman followed him, and in an instant they came in sight again, accompanied by Smith; they walked together, Freeman being before the prisoners, and went into the Blue Lion. After remaining there nearly half an hour, all three came out, had a short conversation in the street, shook hands with Freeman, and separated. The prisoners went away together, and Freeman went towards Battle-bridge. We returned to the Crown, Freeman came to us shortly after and delivered me eight notes, which I marked. On Thursday, the 11th of May, I saw Christmas give Freeman some money for the same purpose.

Q. In consequence of information you received from Freeman, were Wales and Jefferies directed to the Union public-house, Spafields? - A. They were, I and Christmas also went there about half-past eleven in a coach. When we got there, I saw Freeman standing at the door, and saw Marsden come up to him, they walked down the road together out of our sight. We went to the Crown about twelve o'clock, and at half-past twelve Freeman came, and delivered me ten notes. On the 25th of May, I I apprehended Smith in Wellington-street, Strand; which leads to Waterloo bridge; Plank was with me, I saw him in the street, and took him; I asked him if he had any thing about him, he said No; I said I should secure him, and proceeded to do so, he struggled a little; I found 4 s. 6 d. in his breeches pockets, and in his breast coat pocket, a brown paper parcel; I asked what it contained, he said he did not know. I asked him where he got it from, he hesitated a little, and said he had picked it up just before as he came over the bridge, in the road; the parcel was perfectly clean and dry, it was a rainy day, and the streets were very dirty; on opening it, it contained 50 1 l. notes in three distinct parcels, two of 20, and one of 10; we tied them with packthread, and marked them before I parted with them. - (The witness examined, and identified the several notes as he mentioned them.

MARSDEN. Q. Did you at any time see Freeman give me any money, or receive any from me? - A. Never.

SMITH. Q. The road I found them on was gravelled. A. It is rather a dry road, but the gravel was wet, there was no appearance of its having been on the ground.

CHARLES CHRISTMAS . I am an inspector of Bank-notes, Freeman was employed under my direction, I supplied him with money from time to time, he reported his proceedings to me, and the appointments he made, I was in company with Foy, when he at different times brought forged Bank-notes to the Crown. On the 3d of May, I was with Foy in a hackney coach, near the Blue Lion, and saw Freeman there; he was afterwards joined by Marsden, it was about two o'clock. At five we were there again, and saw the two prisoners and Freeman, they went into the Blue Lion, we came away, and went to the Crown. On the 4th of May, we went to the same place, and saw Marsden and Freeman in the street, they went into the Blue Lion. Next day at twelve o'clock, we went there, and saw Marsden meet Freeman in the street; I think they did not go into the house that time, but I am not certain; we left in about half an hour, and went again at two, and saw Freeman waiting in the road. Marsden came up to him, they walked backward and forward sometime, then crossed together, went into Guildford-street, and returned back with Smith, Freeman was before them; they walked towards the Blue Lion, all three stopped at the door about three minutes, and talked together, then all went into the house, and were there sometime; they came out together, and shook hands at the door - the prisoners went up Gray's Inn-lane and Freeman towards Battle-bridge. I saw Marsden on the 11th at the door of the Union, in Spafields, Freeman was waiting there for him; they went away together towards Bagnigge Wells.

Prisoner &MARSDEN. Q. Did you see me give or receive anything from him - A. Certainly not.

JOHN WALES . I am an officer of Marlborough-street. On the 3d of May I went in disguise to the Blue Lion about four o'clock in the afternoon. I sat in a box in the taproom nearly opposite to where Marsden and Freeman sat - I think I got in before them, but it was nearly about the same time - they sat in a box together, and another person with them, for upwards of three-quarters of an hour. They had some ale together, and were in conversation. Marsden went out, and returned almost immediately with Smith, and both sat down with Freeman four or five minutes, then Freeman and Marsden went out of the taproom, leaving Smith behind. They all three appeared in conversation. Freeman and Marsden presently returned to the same box, remained there ten minutes or a quarter of an hour, and then went away. On the 4th of May Mr. Christmas gave Freeman some half-crowns and shillings. I went again to the Blue Lion with Jefferies about twelve o'clock - we were disguised. Marsden and Freeman came in, and remained till about three - they both went out and in during the time I believe. On the

5th of May I went there again into the parlour, which looks directly into the street. In a short time I observed Marsden and Freeman in conversation on the other side of the street, near Guildford-street, for near ten minutes. They parted soon after - one went one way, and the other another - this was soon after twelve o'clock. The same day, at two o'clock, I and Jefferies went there again, and while waiting in the front parlour I observed the two prisoners and Freeman together under the parlour window, just by where we were sitting - they parted, and went away. On the 25th of May, about four o'clock in the afternoon, Plank, Jefferies, and I went to the Sun, in Drury-lane, and found Marsden there, standing between the fireplace and the tap-room, and apprehended him. I found nothing material on him, he only had 1 s.

Prisoner MARSDEN. Q. Did you see Freeman give me or I give him anything - A. No.

CHARLES JEFFERIES . I am an officer of Marlborough-street. On the 4th of May I went with Wales to the Blue Lion, and saw Marsden and Freeman together in the taproom - they continued together from about half-past twelve o'clock till near three, and had some ale, bread and cheese and raddishes together. I was on one side by the window, and Wales on the opposite side. I saw Freeman go away, leaving Marsden there. On the 5th I went to the same house again with Wales about twelve o'clock, and soon after saw Marsden beckon to Freeman, who was outside, they joined company together. We went away, came again at two o'clock, and saw Marsden and Freeman outside the house, Smith joined them soon after. I believe, they went into the taproom, but cannot say, as I was in the parlour - they appeared to be acquainted - they came out in about a quarter of an hour and parted. On the 11th of May, about twelve o'clock, Wales and I went to the Union, in Spafields, and saw Freeman there - Marsden joined him about a quarter past twelve - they went down the road together towards Bagnigge Wells. On the 25th I apprehended Marsden at the Sun with Plank and Wales.

Prisoner MARSDEN. Q. Did you see me pay or receive anything from him - A. No.

JAMES MAYHEW . I am servant at the Blue Lion. I have seen the prisoners there in company twice. I have seen Freeman there three times in company with Marsden, and have seen Smith in company with Freeman once, they were talking and drinking together, but the two prisoners I have only seen together twice.

WILLIAM BISHOP . I am clerk to the Magistrates at Marlborough-street. The prisoners were examined there - I took down what they said, it was quite voluntary; it was read over to them, and they signed it - these are the papers they signed; they have Mr. Farrant's signature to them - (read.) -

"The prisoner, Marsden, says, I am entirely innocent, have no acquaintance with Smith, and was never in company with him and Freeman in my life. I never was in the Blue Lion or the fields by Bagnigge Wells, in company with him. I have been seven or eight times in company with Freeman, but not with Smith. I never had any money transactions with Freeman, or received or paid him any money.

"The prisoner, Smith, said,

"I never saw Freeman till I saw him at this office. I never was in company with him and the prisoner, Marsden, together in my life. I have no acquaintance with Marsden - I never paid or received any money from Freeman, and never received any note from Marsden."

THOMAS GLOVER. I am an inspector of Bank notes, and have been so upwards of twenty-six years - (looks at the notes uttered on the 5th of May) - they are forged in every respect. One is signed T. Elgar, but is not his writing. The whole of the notes produced are forged in every respect, and are not the hand-writing of the persons they purport to be - they appear to be signed by the same hand but the names are different. The fifty found on Smith are also forged.

Prisoner MARSDEN. Q. Are the fifty signed by the same persons as signed the others - A. No; but all those produced by Freeman are off one plate.

THOMAS ELGAR . I am a signing-clerk at the Bank, there is no other of my name. The signature to the note is not my writing. Another has my name, but it is not my writing.

(The note was here put in and read.)

MARSDEN'S Defence. I believe, in the first place, Freeman says he was only in my company ten minutes, and after that he asked me to give him a bad note, to which I agreed. Now, is it consistent with reason that I should sell him a bad note after ten minutes acquaintance? Admitting that I was a dealer, is it consistent that I should risk my life for that. I do not know who his friend is - it is easy to bring his friend forward. I deny ever having had any connexion with him. I believe he says I sold him notes three times at the Sun, and once that I took him into the cellar. Now, as he acknowledges being employed by the Bank, is it not reasonable to suppose he would have marked money in his possession? He had an opportunity to have me taken, and by finding the marked money on me it would have convicted me. He had every opportunity to have me taken, but there is no person to prove he was seen to give me a note or receive any from me. He says I sold him notes at the Sun, and afterwards he said it was at the Coach and Horses, in Charles-street. He afterwards said he met me at the Blue Lion, and if so he could have had me taken. If I had sold him notes at that house it is evident the officers would have taken me with the marked money, which would have convicted me at once, but we never had any dealings. But those that adopted the plan had more judgment in them than I should have had to escape. He says he objected to take the notes from Smith in the field, and would have them of me - now, if so, would not any one suppose it was to get the person into trouble who sold them?

SMITH's Defence. I know nothing about it.

MARSDEN - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 48.

SMITH - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 64.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

Reference Number: t18200628-54

775. JOHN MYERS was indicted for that he, on the 21st of May , at St. James, Clerkenwell , feloniously did dispose of and put away a forged and counterfeit Bank note (setting it forth, No. 17292, 1 l. dated 26th of April,

1820, signed J. C. Baker), with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England , knowing it to be forged and counterfeited .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only calling it a promissory note for payment of money, instead of a Bank note.

TWO OTHER COUNTS, the same, only stating his intent to be to defraud John Bee .

HENRY MURRAY . I am a shoemaker, and live in Broad Arrow-court, Grubb-street. I have known the prisoner four or five years - my wife had his child to nurse. On Sunday, the 14th of May, between ten and eleven o'clock, he called, and said,

"Here, Nance, go and get change for this note, and bring an ounce of tobacco and a quartern of gin." He put a note into her hand, she gave it me, and told me to go. I took a bottle, and went over to Mr. Bee's, the chandler's-shop, his wife gave me the change, and sold me the tobacco, which came to 4 1/2 d. I told her the note belonged to Mr. Myers, and she marked it in my presence. I bought a quartern of gin out of the change, returned, and gave the rest to the prisoner - he counted it, and put it into his pocket. Next day he came again, gave her another note to get some trifling articles from the chandler's-shop, she went out, returned with tea and sugar, and gave him the change - he counted it, and put it into his pocket. On the Tuesday following he came again, between eleven and twelve o'clock, and gave her another note to get changed; she went out, returned, and I saw her give him the change, he counted it, and put it into his pocket.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Did he owe you any money - A. He owed my wife some, he gave her 2 s. 6 d., she wanted 4 s., he said he could not afford to give her more. She had lived with him as a servant, eighteen or twenty months, when he kept a house in Bridgewater-square - he has a wife and two children. I understand he has money in the Bank.

Q. Had you not proposed to go over to Ireland to avoid coming here - A. No.

MR. REYNOLDS. Q. Was any proposal made to you to go to Ireland - A. Yes; some of his family proposed it to me since he was apprehended.

ANN MURRAY . I am the wife of the last witness. I had the prisoner's child to nurse. On the 18th of May he came to my room, and gave me a 1 l. note to get changed, and buy some tobacco and gin. I gave it to my husband, he took it out, and brought the change back to him; next day he gave me a 1 l. note to change, and to fetch some tea and sugar. I got it changed at Mrs. Bee's - the things came to 2 s. 2 d. I returned, and gave him the change - he stopped two or three hours with his child, and then went away. Next day he called again, gave me a note, and told me to bring in a quartern loaf and some butter. I changed it at Bee's, and gave him the change. I told her both times whose notes they were, and she marked them; he staid an hour, or an hour and a half. I saw him again the day following, he requested me to get him change for a 1 l. note, and get a bit of bread and ham, which I did - they came to 11 d., and I brought him 19 s. 1 d. change. He called again on the Saturday following, and asked for his child - I told him the mother had taken it home. He left, came again on Sunday at one o'clock, stopped a minute or two, and went away; he came back again at three o'clock, asked me to get change for a note, and bring in a small complement of green ham and a bit of bread. I got it from Bee's, gave her his name on that note, and gave 19 s. 1 d. change; he then went away.

Q. Did you lay out any other notes for him besides what you took to Bee's - A. Never. When I was his servant he paid every thing himself. The most I spent for him at one time was 1 s. 3 d.

WINIFRED BEE . My husband's name is John; he keeps a chandler's-shop in Grubb-street . I remember Henry Murray coming to our shop on Sunday the 14th, for an ounce of tobacco, and change for a pound note. He said it belonged to Myers; I marked it

" Henry Murray , Broad Arrow-court" - (looks at one) - this is it. Next day his wife brought a 1 l. note, and bought a few articles - she said she brought it from Myers. On Tuesday she came again for a few things, and had change. On Wednesday she paid me another note, bought a few articles, and said she came from Myers. I marked them all - (looks at three) - these are them; they have Murray and Myers on them. I received another from Murray on Sunday - (looks at one) - this is it. The four first were returned to me as bad. I kept the fifth in my possession

THOMAS VANN . I am an officer. I apprehended Ann Murray , and then took the prisoner at a public-house in Bunhill-row; I told him I took him for giving five forged notes to Mrs. Murray and her husband. He said

"I certainly did give some notes to them, but my notes were all good, because I had them from the Bank."

THOMAS GLOVER . I am an inspector of Bank notes. The notes are all five forged in every respect. They appear to be impressed from the same plate, and filled up by the same person, and are all dated the same. They are not the signature of the clerks which they purport to bear.

JOHN COLE BAKER . I am a signing-clerk. The signature to the note is not my writing.

Prisoner's Defence Not ever having had to address a Court, I trust no misconstruction will be put on what I have to say. It is my life for which I am pleading, and also my character. When a man's reputation is once lost, then farewell to future prospects; and I would as soon lose my life as my character, which I have proved, by throwing myself into your hands, instead of accepting the lenity which is allowed in these cases. Knowing myself not guilty, why should I plead guilty? But, knowing my innocence, I place myself under your protection, hoping to show my innocence. I do not wish to say any thing against the proceedings of the Bank; but I must say, there are some, at times, who state themselves to be innocent, and yet plead guilty to the minor offence, being afraid of being convicted of the capital offence; but this is not my case. I throw myself on your hands, and trust to you for an impartial hearing; and to you, Gentlemen, for an impartial verdict. You may be assured I would sooner die than live, should your verdict be against me. Mr. Bee knew nothing of me, but by seeing me pass his shop. Murray lived servant with me for two years, and had many notes in that time to pass. I left Bridgewater-square in consequence of losses, and was afterwards arrested, and was four months in Whitecross-street prison; since that I have lived on my dividend of 26 l. a quarter,

and can it be supposed I should so far traduce myself as to become an utterer of forged notes, when I have a comfortable living without labour. On the 8th of April, I received my dividend, and 20 l. of it was in 1 l. notes, all dated the 9th March; I had a child at nurse at Murray's, and it was only natural that I should go there, she was always in want of something, and very seldom without going for a glass of gin. I have given her notes at different times, it appears she and her husband were taken up for passing bad notes, and she said they had them of me. The notes I gave her I had from the Bank, I had no others whatever, I paid no others. Were I an utterer of forged notes, was it reasonable I should go to those who so well knew me. Murray has said, if I would give him 30 l. ready money, he would go out of the way, and not be seen in this country for eighteen months? Why should he who has nothing to fear, wish to compound with one who has every thing to fear? I could have got this money, a friend offered me 40 l.; but no, I would sooner trust myself to a British Jury, than compromise when I know myself innocent, and wait with firmness your verdict; but let it be what it may, I shall not repine, for innocence knows no shame.

JOS. SWEATMAN. I am a horse-boiler, and live in Grub-street. Just before they were going to file the bill against the prisoner, I saw Mrs. Bee at her shop; some party or other had mentioned, that it was desirous not to hurt the prisoner, provided she could have things settled. When I heard it, I went over to her, and mentioned it, she said that things might have been put to rights, if they had not gone so far. I told her, if she had wished to have done my brother-in-law any kindness, as respected me, she might have told me, and not had him dragged off by the officer.

Q. Is the prisoner any relation of yours? - A. He married my sister.

MR. SERJEANT BOSANQUET. Q. You went to know on what terms this could be made up, did you take any letter from the prisoner to Mrs. Bee - A. Yes; she looked at it, and said she should show it to some friend, she did not read it, the letter was directed to me, I took it to her.

Q. Did not you desire her to say she mixed up these notes with those, that she could not distinguish one from the other - A. I do not recollect it, I did not on my oath.

Q. You positively swear it - A. To the best of my recollection.

Q. How long ago was it, was it a fortnight, more or less - A. I cannot say. You are getting me to such points, I cannot answer you. The prisoner requested me to go and see how things could be settled; Mrs. Bee observed to me, that if things could be settled, she did not wish to come up here at all. Something was said about 145 l. that was 120 l. for the bail, if the Sheriff should seize, and 25 l. for expences.

WINIFRED BEE re-examined. Sweatman came to my house, and he brought me a letter, which I returned to the prisoner's wife, I read it to Sweetman when he delivered it to me, and said that the expences could be paid, and I could do away with attending here, and if I said I took up the notes and signed them indiscriminately, it would do away with the prosecution. I told him I knew nothing about it, but I would show it to a friend. I told him I wanted no recompence for my trouble, and I did not want to extort money, but I suppose it must go through the regular process.

HENRY MURRAY . I made no proposal to Sweatman to to go to Ireland, but he did to me; and said he would give me money that would satisfy me, and what need I care about any one else.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18200628-55

776. DANIEL M'CARTHY was indicted for feloniously assaulting Henry D'Esterre , on the King's highway, on the 28th of June , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, one watch, value 5 l.; one piece of ribband, value 6 d.; two seals, value 2 l.; one ring, value 1 s., and one key, value 2 s., his property .

HENRY D'ESTERRE, Esq. I live at Limerick, in Ireland. In June, I was at Long's hotel, Bond-street. On the 28th, about half past nine at night, I was in the Strand, near Round-court , going towards Charing-cross; and exactly opposite Round-court, the prisoner shot quickly before me, and snatched my watch immediately from my fob, and ran up the court, I immediately called stop thief, and kept my eye on him. Duncan put his hand on him, but he passed him, and kept close to him; he called stop thief himself, as many people got about him; I said No, that is the thief; he had not run twenty yards before he was stopped. I never lost sight of him, he was surrounded by a number of people, I saw the watch picked up at his feet, the seals were taken off, they were produced at the watch-house, I did not actually see the watch picked up, but I saw Duncan's hand rise with it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAM DUNCAN . I am a broker. I was sitting at my door, at the corner of Round-court, and heard the prosecutor cry Stop thief! - I turned, saw a man running towards me, and attempted to stop him, but he cried Stop thief also, and I let him pass. The prosecutor said

"Stop him! the villain has got my watch. He had not gone above four or five steps before he was secured by some women, and I laid hold of him again. A crowd came round, and I with many more, attempted to search him. In the act of searching him I felt the watch in a hand - it was as close to him as possible, and might have been his hand, but I cannot say, there was such confusion. I got fast hold of it, and on going to the watch-house a neighbour, Mr. Haynes, said, he had got the seals.

THOMAS HAYNES . I live in Round-court. I heard the cry of Stop thief! went up and saw the prisoner running, and laid hold of one of them - I cannot say it was the prisoner, it was like him. A number of persons came round and laid hold of him. As soon as their arms were extended to lay hold of him, I put my arm under theirs, and saw the seals hanging down his left thigh - I seized them, and endeavoured to draw them, he made a bob, the ribbon broke, and I got the seals.

THOMAS THOMPSON . I belong to the Grenadier Guards. I was sitting at a door in New Round-court, where I am quartered, and saw the prisoner run up the court - I am certain it was him; he was pursued by some men. One made a catch at him; he cried out Stop thief! and he let

him go. The prosecutor said,

"That is the thief!" I caught him, and saw the seals hanging from his trowsers; some one snatched at them and they came off. I held him till he was taken to the watch-house.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Of stealing from the person only.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18200628-56

777. ROBERT ROBERTS was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of May , one great coat, value 2 l. , the goods of Robert Castle .

ROBERT CASTLE . I am a stable-keeper , in Little Moorfields . This coat was left in my care by Mr. Fry's coachman.

THOMAS CRIBB . I am servant to Mr. Castle. On the 27th of May I saw the prisoner coming out of the counting-house with this coat. As soon as he saw me he dropped it. I walked up to him, and asked what he was going to do with it? he said some strange man, with a knot on his head, sent him for it. I ordered him to take it up and put it where he found it. He put it on a chair in the counting-house, where I had seen it before - I then gave him in charge.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18200628-57

778. THOMAS WOODS was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of May , one painting framed, value 2 l. 10 s.; one counterpane, value 23 s.; one hat, value 15 s., and 30 yards of hair-seating, value 2 l., the goods of George Mitchell , in his dwelling-house .

SARAH MITCHELL . I am the wife of George Mitchell , who is an auctioneer , and lives in Broadway, Blackfriars . In the middle of March the prisoner hired himself to us to make mattresses - he slept in the house. I missed these things at different times. When I missed the counterpane I told him to make diligent search for it - he said he knew nothing of them. I found them at different pawnbrokers. We had sold the painting and its fellow for 7 l., but had not delivered it - the prisoner had the care of them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

HENRY DEMPSTER . I am shopman to Mr. Kirkham, who is a pawnbroker, and lives in Union-street, Borough. On the 15th of May the prisoner pledged a piece of hair-seating for 1 l. - he said he should want it back next day.

GEORGE DEAN . I am shopman to Mr. Phillips, pawnbroker, Great Surry-street, Blackfriars. My master took the painting in pledge, I wrote the duplicate, and remember it was the prisoner who pledged it, in the name of Thomas Jones , for 10 s. - he wanted 1 l., my master thought it worth very little more than 10 s. I am sure he is the person.

HENRY DEMPSTER re-examined. The picture-frame is composition. I would not give above 2 l. for the pair, frames and all. I do not think any person who knew the value would give more.

GEORGE GRAY . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Fleet-street. A counterpane was pledged with me for 11 s. I do not know the person.

JOSEPH GREGORY . I am an officer. On the 29th of May I was sent for to Mitchell's store-room in Norton Falgate, found the prisoner there, and took him into custody. I found a duplicate of the hair-seating in the lining of his hat.

JOHN KNOWLES . I am servant to Mr. Fleming, pawnbroker, Fleet-market. On the 11th of May a hat was pledged with us in the name of Robert Jones . I do not know the prisoner.

SARAH MITCHELL re-examined. The paintings were charged to us at six guineas the pair. I would not give 2 l. for the two myself.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only.

Confined One Year .

London Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18200628-58

779. JAMES HUNT was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of June , one watch, value 25 s.; one chain, value 18 d.; one seal, value 6 s., and one compass, value 6 d., the goods of John Shury , from his person .

JOHN SHURY . I live in Little Carter-lane, Doctors'-Commons, and am a glass-cutter . On the 18th of June, about half past one o'clock at night, I was returning from a society of which I am a member, and was rather the worse for liquor. When I got to St. Paul's Church-yard, I met the prisoner, who offered to conduct me home. I accepted his offer, but was able to go alone. Instead of his taking me to my door, I found myself in Knight Rider-court . I leant against the wall and found him gently going away. I immediately felt and missed my watch, collared him, and charged him with taking it. The watchman came and found it in his pocket.

JOHN JENKINS . I am a watchman. On Saturday morning, a little after two o'clock, I heard the cry of

"Watch" from Knight Rider-court. I found the prosecutor holding the prisoner against the wall. He said he had robbed him of his watch. The prisoner said nothing. I laid hold of him and found the watch in his coat-pocket. He said he was in distress and out of work.

JAMES BROWN . I am a coachman. On the cry of

"Watch," I came up, and saw the prosecutor holding the prisoner. Jenkins collared him, took him to the watch-house, and found the watch in his coat-pocket.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I was in great distress.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined Four Months .

London Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18200628-59

FIFTH DAY, MONDAY, JULY 3.

780. JAMES NELSON and JOHN ROBERTS were indicted for stealing, on the 31st of May , 23 yards of cambric, value 30 s. , the goods of Thomas Bew .

THOMAS GIBBONS . I am shopman to Thomas Bew , who is a linen-draper , and lives on Pimlico-terrace . On the 31st of May, between seven and eight o'clock, the prisoners

came in, asked for black cotton handkerchiefs, I showed them some - they then asked for silk one's. I went to the bottom of the shop for them, and saw Nelson putting something under his jacket. I brought the handkerchiefs and showed them to them - they said they were two dear. Nelson said to Roberts,

"You had better buy two, and our comrade outside will take one." He went out, leaving Roberts in the shop. I jumped over the counter, went out, saw him walking towards the Park, and brought him back. In the meantime, Roberts went out. I found the cambric under Nelson's jacket. We apprehended Roberts that night at the Queen's Barracks.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

NELSON'S Defence. I took it to the door to look at, and I returned with the cambric, as it would not do.

ROBERTS'S Defence. I was not in the shop.

NELSON - GUILTY . Aged 24.

Confined Three Months .

ROBERTS - NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18200628-60

781. JAMES SATCH was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of May , twenty-four plants, called Camellica Japonica, value 15 l. , the goods of Conrad Loddiges , William Loddiges , and George Loddiges .

SECOND COUNT, stating them to be trees instead of plants.

FRANCIS UNDERHILL . I am gardener to Messrs. Conrad, William, and George Loddiges , who keep a nursery-ground at Hackney . We had some Camellica Japonicas on our ground - they grow nearly to the height of twelve feet. On the 17th of May, in the morning, I missed thirty-eight. I saw them safe at seven o'clock the night before; they were in the green-house, growing in pots, and were about two feet high - (looks at one) - this is one; it is about four years old. I grew it from a slip, and know them all - one plant is worth 2 l. They were taken out of the pots, and the pots left behind.

THOMAS BOWLES . I am a patrol of Hackney. On the 16th of May, between eleven and twelve o'clock at night, Reading and I stopped the prisoner at Homerton, about half a mile from the prosecutors', with twenty of these plants under his arm. I asked what he had got - he said he had a parcel of laurels which he had picked off a dung-hill. We took him to the watch-house, as the roots were fresh, and I was satisfied they had just come out of the ground.

JOHN GARVA . I am watch-house keeper of Hackney. The prisoner was brought to the watch-house with these plants. I gave them up to the prosecutors, after marking them; that produced is one.

Prisoner's Defence. I worked for the prosecutors fifteen years ago. I was getting my living by selling plants . I was at Low Layton, and met a man on the road with them under his arm. He said he did not know what they were, but he was going to sell them. He asked 18 d. each for them, which I gave him, as I knew what they were, and that they were worth more.

GUILTY . Aged 41.

Confined One Year .

First Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18200628-61

782. JOSEPH WILLIAM STAPLETON was indicted for that he, on the 16th of May , at St. James, Clerkenwell , feloniously did dispose of and put away a certain forged and counterfeit Bank note (setting it forth, No. 12168, 1 l. dated 11th of December, 1819, signed J. C. Baker), with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England , well knowing it to be forged and counterfeited .

SECOND COUNT, for feloniously offering to one James Poore a like forged and counterfeit Bank note, with a like intent, knowing it to be forged.

THIRD AND FOURTH COUNTS, the same, only calling it a promissory note for payment of money, instead of a Bank note.

FOUR OTHER COUNTS, the same, only stating the prisoner's intent to be to defraud the said James Poore .

JAMES POORE . I keep the Barley Mow, in Drury-lane . On the 16th of May, between nine and ten o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came to my house, in company with two girls of the town; he said he wanted something to drink, and unless I could give him change for a 1 l. note he could not have it. I said I would see if I could give change. He then asked for two glasses of rum, and one of gin, which came to 6 3/4 d., and offered me a 1 l. Bank note in payment. I then asked his address - he said,

"If you will give me a pen and ink I will put my address on it." He then wrote the address on it. I perceived the note to be a bad one, and asked him if that was his address - he said it was. I then asked him whom he took the note of - he said he had it of his father. I asked him if his father lived at No. 3, Shepherd-street, Bond-street, which he had written on it - he said Yes. I told him the note was a bad one, and I should detain him. I had him taken into a back parlour, and sent for an officer immediately. Before the officer came the prisoner attempted several times to go away, pushed against me, and said no person should stop him. I said,

"I will stop you." He shoved against me a number of times to pass me, but I insisted that he should not go. Edwards, the officer, came in about a quarter of an hour; the prisoner refused to let him search him. We were obliged to send for Edwards's son, another officer, when he came he was searched - but not until after he had put his hand into his pocket.

Q. Did you see him put his hand into his pocket - A. Yes; into his right hand breeches-pocket, and afterwards take it out, I then saw 1 s. 6 d. in silver, and 2 1/2 d. in copper, in his hand. He was taken to the watch-house. I marked the note - (looks at one) - this is it - it is marked

" William Stapleton , No. 3, Shepherd-street, Bond-street," and has J. Poore, in my hand-writing, on it.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not accompany me to the watch-house at my request - A. I did, being afraid he would get away, but not at his request. He said at my house, that if Edwards was not an old man, he would knock him down.

Q. Did you not tell me you went out for the purpose of procuring change for the note - A. I deny that.

THOMAS EDWARDS . I am a Bow-street patrol. I was sent for on Tuesday, the 16th of May, to Poore's, and found the prisoner in the parlour; Poore handed me a note, I asked the prisoner where he got that note, but he would not give me any account. I asked him where he

lodged - he said at No. 3, Shepherd-street, Bond-street. I said I must detain him, and search to see what he had about him; he said he would be d - d if he would be searched by any one man until he was before a magistrate. I said there was no magistrate sitting, and if there was, I should search him before he went out of the house. I endeavoured so to do, he was very resolute resisted, and said I nor any one man should search him. I sent to the office for my son, he came - I then searched his left hand side, and my son the right. I saw his hand in his right hand breeches-pocket, and told my son of it - he seized his hand and took 1 s. 6 d. in silver, and 2 1/2 d. out. We got two or three more to assist, and took him to the watch-house, as he had made resistance on being searched, and said if I had not been an old man he would have knocked me down. He made no resistance in going along, but kept looking behind him, and there were two or three men behind him. I told one of them to take hold of his coat, two more, besides my son and I, went with him. Next day I went to No. 3, Sheppard-street, Bond-street, and made strict enquiry for Stapleton, but could find no such name. I told him he did not live there, and he said he would not tell me where he lived at all.

Prisoner. Q. Did I attempt to conceal the money - A. He put his hand into his pocket when it was found, and said it was all he had about him.

Q. I could have concealed it while you went for your son - A. I did not go for my son.

THOMAS EDWARDS , JUN. I am son of the last witness, and assisted in securing the prisoner at Poore's - he resisted a good deal, and said he would not be searched by any one till he went before a Magistrate. I went to catch hold of his arm, and he thrust his hand into his right-hand pocket - I pulled it out, and in his hand I found a shilling, a sixpence, 2 1/4 d., and some keys. I opened his hand by force, and took it out with much difficulty - he resisted a great deal before I could get it out of his hand. He told me he lived at No. 3, Shepherd-street, Bond-street - I have not been able to find where he did live.

Prisoner. Q. Did I not count the money when I delivered it to you - A. Yes.

Q. Then you acknowledge that I delivered it to you - A. No, I do not, I forced it out of his hand.

PETER GRIST . I live at No. 3, Shepherd-street, Hanover-square - it is frequently called Shepherd-street, Bond-street, it is the same place. I have lived there two years; the prisoner never lived at my house, nor any person named Stapleton. I do not know that I ever saw him till this morning.

Prisoner. Q. Are there not houses there of a certain description, that persons may procure lodgings at for a night or two - A. There are two houses of ill fame there - there is no other No. 3 but mine.

THOMAS GLOVER . I am an inspector of Bank notes. The note is forged in every respect, and is not the signature of J. C. Baker, which it purports to bear.

JOHN COLE BAKER . I am a signing clerk at the Bank. The signature to the note is not my writing. There is no other of my name.

Prisoner's Defence. I stand here, entirely resting on my own innocence. I have refused to plead guilty to the minor charge knowing myself to be innocent. My friends and relations are in France. I left Paris three days prior to this circumstance. The night previous to my being apprehended I slept at a house in Shepherd-street. Having met a woman at Drury-lane Theatre, I told her I had no money, nor anything but a watch, which cost me thirty francs, and which I meant to dispose of, as I intended to return to Paris. I accompanied her and another female to sell it - they took me to a house in Drury-lane, and I received this note of a man there for the watch, of course I cannot produce the villain who paid me the note. I wanted change, to defray the expences of the night, and put my right name and address (Shepherd-street) on it, as, in all probability I should have accompanied her there again that night. Sometimes I come to London, and sometimes my brother - we are under our father.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 23.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

Reference Number: t18200628-62

782. MICHAEL SULLIVAN was indicted for feloniously disposing of and putting away a certain forged and counterfeit Bank note for the payment of 1 l., with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England , knowing it to be forged .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating it to be a promissory note for payment of money instead of a Bank note.

TWO OTHER COUNTS, stating his intent to be to defraud John Gaines .

MARY GAINES . I am the daughter of John Gaines , who is a gardener , and lives at Battersea; he has a stall in Covent-garden market . On the 27th of May the prisoner bought two bundles of asparagus of me for 2 s., and paid me a 1 l. note - I had no change, he said he would leave it and call again. I asked his name and address; I understood him," Donovan, Clare-market," which I wrote on it - (looks at one) - this is it. I wrote that address, and

"rabbit-man" on it, as I knew him by selling rabbits about the market. He had paid me a note a month before for some asparagus; I did not then ask his name, but I wrote on the note. He came between these two times and paid me another note - I wrote

"rabbit-man" on it - (looks at two notes) - these are them.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. How many years have you known him about the market - A. Several. The notes were all three paid within six weeks.

ALFRED POPLE . I am a constable of Queen-square. I apprehended the prisoner in Covent-garden market on the 10th of June; I took him to a public-house and searched him - it was with great difficulty that I got this key and a handkerchief from him; he particularly resisted about the key, which was fastened to his braces in his breast - he said he lived in Clare-market; I asked where in Clare-market? he said that made no odds to me, he should stop till he got before the Magistrate. He told the Magistrate that he lived at No. 18, Haughton-street - I went, and found he did live there - it is in the neighbourhood of Clare-market, but whether it leads into it or not I cannot say. I found a letter in his pocket, directed to him at a stand in Clare-market, but could find no stand of his there.

Cross-examined. Q. The letter has a post-mark on it -

A. Yes; it is a summons to the Court of Requests. I have no doubt but Haughton-street leads into Clare-market.

THOMAS GLOVER . I am an inspector of Bank notes. The notes are all three forged in every respect, are all off one plate, and are of the same date. They are not the signatures of Elgar and Wells, which they purport to bear.

THOMAS ELGAR . I am a signing clerk. Two of the notes have my name, but are not my signature.

Prisoner's Defence. I knew nothing of the notes being good or bad - I only dealt with her. I only paid her one note, and gave my address,

"Sullivan, Haughton-street, Clare-market."

PHILIP DIGNUM . I am a publican, and live in Haughton-street, Clare-market - it leads into the market. The prisoner had a stand in the market on Saturday and on Christmas Eve.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18200628-63

783. JOHN QUINTON was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of May , two heifers, price 25 l. , the property of Thomas Lunn .

MR. ALLEY conducted the prosecution.

HENRY HUTCHINGS . I am servant to Mr. Thomas Lunn , he has a farm at Barking, in Essex. On the 21st of May I saw all his cattle safe in the field at Putney , between seven and eight o'clock at night, and next morning (Monday), between five and six, I found three heifers gone. The gate had been unlocked, and locked again in a different manner. I saw the hides of two of them afterwards.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. How far is the field from town - A. Six or seven miles from Whitechapel. I found one in the adjoining marsh.

THOMAS LUNN . On Monday, the 22d of May, my servant informed me the cattle were stolen. They were unfit for market, they wanted about six weeks in the early part of the season - when they come from grass there is a difference in the flesh easily ascertained. I went to Newgate-market on Wednesday, and saw two aitch-bones of beef at Mr. Lee's - they looked as I expected mine would. I immediately went to the prisoner's house in Church-street, Bethnal-green, and asked him where he got the heifers, the bodies of which were at Mr. Lee's? he said from Epping, from the same person he had others from before. He afterwards said the man's name was Crawley. I said I knew several persons at Epping, but none of that name, and begged him to say what size he was; he said he was about my size, and lived on Thorney Common, below Epping, and was a farmer. I expressed surprise that he should send them to him instead of the wholesale market. He said he became acquainted with Crawley when he attended Epping market, and he thought he could do better for him than a stranger. I said he could have no difficulty in finding him - he hesitated, and said he did not know, and that Crawley was going into Kent - that he gave him 12 l. on account, and was to settle the rest afterwards. He said the person who drove them brought a note from Crawley, and he gave him 12 l. instead of Crawley. He was asked for the note, and he went out saying he would fetch it - he returned, saying he could not find it, and he supposed the children had destroyed it. I gave him in charge. I afterwards went to Salloway's, a tanner, at Bermondsey, and saw two hides, which I am certain are the hides of my two heifers.

Cross-examined. Q. You found the prisoner at home - A. Yes; he mentioned no name but Crawley. He did not describe the man who drove them. Another man, named Lye, was brought before the Magistrate, he was discharged on promising to appear next day, but did not appear - he was apprehended on the information of the prisoner's wife - it was not through the prisoner's instrumentality that we found the hides.

JOSEPH SYMONDS . I am a butcher, and in the employ of Mr. Crow; his slaughter-house is in Webb-square, Shoreditch. On Monday, the 22d of May, somebody brought two heifers to be slaughtered. I saw them about three o'clock; the prisoner was there with them all the while I killed them, and he had the key, and took them away himself next morning. The hair was cut off the tails of them when I killed them, which denoted that they came from Smithfield-market, and the prisoner said he brought them from Smithfield.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you killed beasts for him before - A. We killed nothing else that day. I do not know who took the hides away.

Q. Were they heifers or cows - A. One was a heifer, and the other a cow.

JAMES ROSE . I am fellow-servant to Symonds. On the 22d of May the prisoner brought some cattle to the slaughter-house, I gave him the key to put them into the slaughter-house about eleven o'clock. Symonds and I killed them. There was one cow and one heifer.

JOHN VERTUE. I work in Leadenhall-market for Mr. Terry, a hide-salesman. On the 22nd of May, between nine and ten o'clock, the prisoner brought two hides, one of them I can swear to - they are here.

GEORGE LEE . I am a salesman in Newgate-market. The prisoner brought me the meat, which Lunn claimed. He sold it at a fair price.

THOMAS LUNN re-examined. The hides are the hides of my cattle.

Prisoner's Defence. About four years ago I lived in Wilson-street, Finsbury-square, and was burnt out, I lost every thing but some meat, which I took to Romford market, and from there to Epping; I there became acquainted with Crawley, we did a great deal of business together - he agreed to send me his cattle to sell in London. One Lee, a drover, who had heard this conversation, brought three cows to me, and said he came from Crawley - I gave him 12 l. on account - he brought them between seven and eight o'clock in the morning, and I asked Crow to slaughter them for me. Next morning I sold the bodies of beef to Mr. Lee. I put him in possession of all the information, and offered to do all in my power to bring the guilty person to justice, and told him where the fat and tripe were taken to. I sent to my wife to get Lee apprehended, which was done with difficulty - he was then liberated to appear next day, but never did. I have a witness to prove that I was at home all Sunday night.

THOMAS BIRD . I live in Gibraltar dye-house, at Brook-green. I know a man named Lee or Lye - I saw him about five o'clock in the morning. He rang the bell at our place; I opened the door and let two cows in. He

drove them in, and asked leave to put them in the stable till Quinton came; and about eleven o'clock Quinton came and fetched them away. I afterwards saw Lye driving the cows to the slaughter-house - I have not seen him since.

EDWARD BOSTON . I live in the house with the prisoner, in Church-street - he married my daughter. I went to bed a few minutes after ten o'clock - the prisoner was then at home; he went to bed before me, with his wife. His bed-room joins mine, on the ground-floor. I got up about seven o'clock, and saw him then; he did not appear to have been out. Mr. and Mrs. Gross, who live up stairs, usually lock the door, and always take the key up.

MR. ALLEY Q. How many rooms are there on the ground-floor - A. A shop and three rooms - the prisoner, his wife, and four children sleep in the back-room. He cannot get out without applying to Gross for the key.

MARY ANN TYLER . I am the prisoner's servant and sleep in the next room to him. On the night of the 22d of May he slept at home - he went to bed first. I fastened the street-door myself that night - there was no key to it - there were two bolts. We were all in bed about ten o'clock. My master got up about a quarter before seven o'clock in the morning - he could not have gone out without my hearing him.

MR. ALLEY. Q. Perhaps you over-slept yourself - A. The prisoner called me. He is a butcher, and very seldom goes to market before eight o'clock. He could not have gone out before he called me, because I found the door fastened; and if he had gone out, he could not have come in without my getting up to let him in.

Q. He might have gone out, left it open, come in, and bolted it again - A. Yes; two of the children sleep with me.

MR. ANDREWS. Q. Is there no lock to the street-door - A. There is a lock, but no key to it.

GEORGE GROSS . I keep the house which the prisoner lodges in. I sleep on the first floor, and he and his family on the ground floor. I saw him at home about four o'clock in the afternoon of Whit Sunday; next morning I got up between five and six o'clock, and always open the street-door to let my journey woman in at six o'clock; she came at her usual time that morning. I opened the door before six o'clock, and left it open.

Q. Who fastens the door at night - A. We generally leave that to Quinton, but on this night my son came home late, and he fastened it.

MR. ALLEY. Q. The door was left wide open after six o'clock - A. It was left ajar.

Q. Could any one have found it bolted at a quarter before seven o'clock - A. No. It was not shut after I opened it.

SARAH GROSS . I am wife of the last witness. I went out on Whit-Sunday, and came home between eight and nine. I got up between five and six in the morning, and I think I saw the prisoner between seven and eight, he did not appear to have been out; there are three rooms besides the shop, they were in the middle room which the servant sleeps in at night, the prisoner must come through that room to go out.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

Reference Number: t18200628-64

784. WILLIAM JONES was indicted for feloniously assaulting Charles King , on the King's highway. On the 25th of May , and putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, one watch, value 30 s., and one key, value 4 s. his property .

CHARLES KING . I am a boat-builder , and live at Limehouse. On the 25th of May, about nine at night, I was at Stepney-fair ; the prisoner shoved me against a gentleman and lady, put his arms round my waist, and I felt my watch drawn from me; and he being the next person to me, I charged him with it; a party came up, and asked me several questions, and I left the prisoner with them. I found Weale the officer, and pointed him out, and he took him; I might have lost my watch before that.

JOHN WEALE . I took the prisoner in custody. I received several severe kicks, and he gave me a blow with his stick.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18200628-65

785. HANNAH BROOKS was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of June , from the person of Patrick Peppard , one watch, value 1 l.; 1 key, value 1 d., and seven 1 l. Banknotes, his property .

PATRICK PEPPARD . I live in Silk-street, Grub-street. On the 20th of June, about twelve o'clock at night, I was returning from Quebec-street, I was a little intoxicated, and met the prisoner and another woman in Barbican; I refused to go with them, they took me to a public-house, and we had a quartern of gin; I stood away from the counter, and removed my watch from my fob into my coat-pocket, they both came out with me, and in less than five minutes I missed my watch; I charged the prisoner with taking it, she said No, and laughed. I said I would give her a pound note to return it; she said she would, if I gave her a note. They walked home with me to Chapel-street, close by and waited. I went home, and brought out seven one pound notes rolled together; the prisoner rubbed me down, and said,

"No have got your watch," she put her fingers in my waistcoat-pocket, and took the notes out, I seized her, she reached her hand over to the other woman, who went away; I gave charge of the prisoner, she then said she did not think I had lost a watch, but said so to get the money.

Prisoner. Q. Did I not give information to have the other woman taken - A. She took the watchman out, and brought in a woman, I cannot say whether she was, or was not the woman.

ALEXANDER MARTIN . I took charge of the prisoner, she was brought in by the watchman. I found nothing on her, she gave me the name of the other woman; I sent her out with two patrols, they brought a woman in, who answered to that name, the prosecutor could not be certain about her, he was much intoxicated.

Prisoner's Defence. I saw nothing in his hand but a handkerchief, which he said he would not take a pound for; he went home, returned in about ten minutes, and charged me with robbing him.

JAMES TAUNTON . I am a patrol. I met the prisoner and prosecutor in Bowling-alley, Whitecross-street, standing with another female; they were making a great noise, I told them to disperse, he said he was robbed of a watch,

I wanted him to give them in charge, but he would not; he said you are an honourable girl, and if you will go home with me, I will give you a pound note; she said

"I am in distress, but have no watch." I do not think he knew what he was about.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200628-66

786. MARY DALEY was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of June , one gown, value 4 s., the goods of Jane Morris , and one pinafore, value 6 d. , the goods of George Robson .

CATHERINE ROBSON . I am the wife of George Robson , who lives in Poppin's-court, Fleet-street . On the 4th of June, this pinafore and gown were in a back bed-room on the first floor; my little girl opened the door, and screamed out thief, I immediately ran to the door, and took the prisoner about three yards off; the pinafore we found on the stairs, I do not know what became of the gown. She would neither give me her name or address, she said I might find it out.

JANE MORRIS . I lost a gown from the house, it hung in the bed-room; I saw the prisoner open the bed-room door and take them; I thought she had come to frighten me; I was so overcome, I did nothing, but the little girl called stop thief out of the window, I am sure she is the woman.

Prisoner's Defence. I met a woman who said she lived in Poppin's-court, I went to see her, not supposing it was the prosecutor's house.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Confined One Year .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200628-67

787. ELI DAWES was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of June , one gelding, price 7 l. , the property of William Wilcox .

WILLIAM WILCOX . I live in Much Park-street, Coventry; I am a ribbon weaver . On the 9th of June, between eight and nine o'clock, I turned my gelding out on Whitley common , about a mile off; at four o'clock in the morning I missed it, I found it again on the 23d, at the Bear and Ragged Staff, Smithfield; the prisoner was then in custody - the gelding had my name on it. It appeared to have been ill-used, and rode very hard.

WILLIAM HULL . I am an officer of Smithfield-market. On Monday morning, the 12th of June, about half past seven o'clock, the prisoner was exposing this gelding for sale in the market, it had been rode very hard, and Monday not being horse market day. I was with Taunton, we went to the prisoner and asked the price, he asked 9 l.; I asked where he brought it from, he said from Daventry, that he bought it three months ago, of one Clift, a jobber. I questioned him about it, he afterwards said he bought it of Clift in Smidfield-market, Birmingham, a month ago; I took him before a magistrate, and locked the horse up. A bill came into my hands, describing the gelding, and I found out the prosecutor. I took the gelding to the Bear and and Ragged-staff yard.

JAMES TAUNTON . I was with Hull, and corroborate his statement.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought it in Smithfield, Birmingham, and rode her to town to see my sister; I was in Smithfield, the gentleman asked me to sell it for 5 l.; I said he was making a joke of me, and he rested the pony from me. A gentleman said I had better get an officer to get the pony again, I went and got an officer, they took me to a public-house, and wanted me to drink, and tore all my tickets to pieces. I bought it of Clift. The magistrate wrote to Birmingham. I have lived there twenty-three years.

STEPHEN ARMFIELD . I live in Stingo-lane, Marylebone. I am an ivory turner, I have known the prisoner twenty-four, or twenty-five years, and always knew him to be a deranged man at the change of the moon; he has been confined by his father several times, and has been in prison many times for his mad tricks, but I never knew him confined for theft. I have not seen him for five years, I have known him afflicted with insanity eight or nine years. I married his sister, he is well known all over Brimingham as a madman; if he gets a pint of ale, he roves about and foames at the mouth like a madman.

- ARMFIELD. I am the prisoner's sister, he has been deranged ever since he was fourteen years old; where he was apprenticed to a baker, his master gave him a blow on the head with a peel, since that time he has been deranged.

NOT GUILTY. Believing him at the time to be Insane .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200628-68

788. WILLIAM CAVANAUGH was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of June , at St. Michael Bassishaw, eighteen yards of woollen cloth, value 10 l., the goods of John Thomas and William Maingy , in their dwelling-house .

MR. WILLIAM MAINGY . I am in partnership with Mr. John Thomas , we are cloth factors , and our warehouse is in Basinghall-street ; it is part of the dwelling-house, which is given to our warehouseman to live in with his family, he was out of town at the time; and the clerk slept there; he has no controll over the house, but lives there merely as our servant.

JOHN HILL . I am clerk to the prosecutor's. On the 8th of June, about half past eight o'clock in the morning, I heard a noise below stairs, I immediately ran down, and saw a young man at the bottom of the stairs; he said there had been thieves in the house, and begged I would pursue after them; I did so, and ran into Aldermanbury, through Church-court, and when I got by the side of the Axe-coffee-house, there was a piece of cloth laying down in the court, which I had seen in the warehouse the night before. When I went up to breakfast at eight o'clock, I shut the door, but two servants had been to the door afterwards, and might have left it open; persons might get into the warehouse without making a noise; the young man ran to the end of the court with the cloth, the prisoner had been stopped, and they were bringing him back; the cloth measures nineteen yards and a quarter, and cost 16 s. per yard. It is worth above 10 l.

JOB JESSOP. I am porter to Mr. Smith, who lives next door to the prosecutors', the house is in the parish of St. Michael Bassishaw. On the 8th of June, the prisoner came in, and asked me for a person named Fell, in the bombazeen way, I said no such person lived there, and I knew no such person, I did not like his appearance, and

watched him; he went into the prosecutors', I stopped, and saw him come out with a piece of cloth on his shoulder. I immediately locked my door, went into the prosecutors', and alarmed Mr. Hill, and told him to follow with me, the prisoner was out of sight then, I caught sight of him in Three Nunn-court, Aldermanbury, with the cloth on his shoulder, and called out stop him; I immediately saw him drop the cloth and run. I picked it up, and went to the end of the court, and saw him brought back two or three minutes after. I am sure he is the person.

JOHN SALTER . I am an officer. I took the prisoner into custody.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going down Basinghall-street, enquiring for Mr. Fell, as I heard he wanted somebody; I came out of the gentleman's house, and saw a man with this cloth on his shoulder, I asked him where Fell lived, he said he knew no such person, and asked me to hold the cloth; a man called stop thief, and he ran away, and called me to run too; but as to going into the warehouse I am innocent of it.

JOB JESSOP re-examined. There were two persons on the opposite side to the prosecutors'. When he came out of the warehouse, and I saw him beckon to them; when I was going towards the court these two went down the street; I saw him come out with the cloth.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 15.

Recommended to Mercy.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200628-69

789. ELIZA MILLEN was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of June , from the person of Thomas White , a 1 l. Banknote, his property .

THOMAS WHITE . I am a mason , and live in Norwich-court, East Smithfield. On the 6th of June, about eleven o'clock at night, I met the prisoner on Tower-hill; she asked me to give her and another girl a glass of liquor, which I did at a public-house, at the back of Postern-row ; I was quite sober. On taking my money bag out to pay for it, I immediately came out, she asked me to go home with her, I refused, and by some means she got the note out of my waistcoat pocket; after she had robbed me, the other came up, I said you have robbed me, she said it was the other girl. I pursued the prisoner into the Minorities, the watchman took her, and found the note on her. I described it before I saw it.

JOHN WHITEFOOT . I am a watchman. I found the prisoner in the Minories, in the City; the prosecutor said his note had the name of Breuster on it. I found it on her.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked the note up, and being in distress, kept it.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Of stealing, but not from the Person.

Confined One Year .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200628-70

790. GEORGE ENGLEBERT , and ROBERT ENGLEBERT were indicted for a misdemeanor

MR. ARABIN conducted the prosecution.

CHARLES FRANCIS ROBINSON , ESQ. I am in the profession of the law , and reside at No. 10, Crown-office-row, Inner Temple , I sleep there; my chambers have an inner and outer door, the lock of the outer door was fastened by screws, which have four nuts inside. On the 25th of March, at eleven o'clock in the morning, I observed that the lock was perfectly secure; I had heard chambers attempted before, which made me particular in examining the lock. I went out, came home about six o'clock, and left my chambers about a quarter past six, I had left my outer door open, any person could get at the lock of it. On shutting it, I observed the screws had been moved, I immediately sent a porter for a locksmith to repair it. I returned in about five minutes; the stair-case is a spiral one. My chambers are on the second floor; I remained outside the door about a minute, then heard footsteps coming up stairs, it turned out to be the prisoners, when they faced my door they appeared confused at seeing me, and made a pause; I asked who they were, and what they came for, they told me their real names; and said they were coming to Mr. Johnson, Hare-court-buildings, which my chambers join - no such person lived there. I asked them who sent them, they said they were standing at their father's door in the Strand, and a gentleman going by, told them to go to Mr. Johnson, Hare-court-buildings, and see if he was at home; this rose my suspicion. I fetched Hitchin to search them, leaving them in custody of Mr. Bohen's clerk and Hebden. I saw a large hammer found on George, also a pair of pincers, and a piece of paper, he said he found the paper in Temple-lane as he came down; I asked him how his own name came written on it? he paused some time, and then said he would tell the truth, he wrote it himself. The outer door had been open the greater part of the day. The nuts of the lock were found at the bottom of the stairs three or four days after.

JOHN HITCHEN . I am a porter of the Inner Temple. I produce the paper found on George, it has the following names on it,

"Mr. Robinson, Hare-court-building; Mr. Fish, No. 1, Pump-court; Mr. Sergeant Doyle , No. 4, King's Bench-walk; Mr. Nolan, No. 5, ditto; Mr. Bohen, Mr. Debetas, Clement's Inn, by George Englebert ." I find all these gentlemen have chambers according to these directions, Mr. Bohen's are on the same stair-case; I went to them all, and found the screws off the locks of each chamber door. On George I also found a hammer, a penknife and key; also a handkerchief marked I. G., No. 1. On Robert I found a screw-driver and a pair of pincers, each handle of the pincers form a turn-screw. On going to Mr. Debetas' door, the lock fell off on touching it, and I found marks of the end of the pincers on the door.

JOHN HEBDEN . I was with Hitchen, his account his correct.

PEREGAL WOOD. I am a locksmith. I went to the prosecutor's door, and found the nuts off, the pincers could take them off without making a noise, they were originally common ones, but have been altered to fit the nuts of locks.

GEORGE ENGLEBERT 'S Defence. My brother is a painter , and lives in Craven-street, Drury-lane. He had a job to do in Kent, and was going to move there, he asked for a hammer and pincers to take down his shelves, I was taking them to him, a gentleman sent me to Mr. Johnson, to say Mr. Cunningham would be glad to see

him. I heard somebody walking up these stairs, and thought they might inform me where he lived, and they detained me. Does it stand to reason that I should go to break open doors?

ROBERT ENGLEBERT 'S Defence. I was with him.

G. ENGLEBERT - GUILTY .

R. ENGLEBERT - GUILTY .

Confined One Year , and Puplicly Whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200628-71

SIXTH DAY, TUESDAY, JULY 4.

791. ANN SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of June , two coats, value 20 s.; two pelisses, value 10 s., and four gowns, value 20 s., the goods of Thomas Vasey , in his dwelling-house .

MRS. MARY VASEY . I am the wife of Thomas Vasey , who is a clergyman , and lives in New Chapel-yard, City-road . The things were in a cupboard, and part on a chair in the first-floor. On the 1st of June, between one and two o'clock, I saw a woman come to the door, and sent my daughter to answer her - she saw nobody and shut the door, which was open before. In about a quarter of an hour a person was heard above. My daughter came down and missed the things - some of them were a good deal worn.

ANN WADE VASEY . I am daughter of the last witness. I saw a woman go out at the door with a large bundle. I was going to see what the noise was. I went after her, and only lost lost sight of her for a moment, as she turned the corner. She was stopped nearly at the bottom of Tabernacle-row with the things. I took them from her.

CHARLES CLAPHAM . I am sexton of the chapel. Miss Vasey beckoned to me and pointed the prisoner out - she was stopped with the bundle.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 32.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200628-72

792. ELIZA NEWMAN and SARAH GRIFFIN were indicted for stealing, on the 22d of June , one coat, value 2 l., and three spoons, value 10 s., the goods of William Friswell , in his dwelling-house .

The prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200628-73

793. JOHN BENFIELD was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of June , at St. Marylebone, six table-cloths, value 5 l., the goods of John West , Esq. in his dwelling-house .

SARAH GRIFFITHS . I am housemaid to John West , Esq. who lives at No. 27, Baker-street , in the parish of St. Marylebone. On Monday the 12th of June, these tablecloths were in the house-keeper's room on the area floor, they were missed soon after ten o'clock in the morning; I had seen them safe about three minutes before, I found them at Marlborough-street office that morning, the prisoner was then in custody. Somebody must have come down the area to take them. There were six table-cloths, I was to have paid 30 guineas for them if they had not been found - they cannot be worth less than 5 l.

JOSEPH NOLTE . I am a porter, and lodge near Baker-street. A little after ten o'clock in the morning, I was coming down Baker-street, and saw the prisoner and two more; he and one of the others went down the area of No. 27, I saw them go inside the house, and in about five minutes the person down the area whistled, the other stood opposite the area gate in the street, with a stick. I stopped to watch them, and saw the prisoner come out with all this linen under his arm into the street, with the one that went down with him, but he had nothing. A gentleman told me to halloo out stop thief, I did so, and they all three ran; I ran after the prisoner, and never lost sight of him, a coachman laid hold of him, he threw the linen down about two minutes before he was laid hold of, and ran down Blandford-mews. I never lost sight of him. Mrs. Fisher picked up the linen, it was five small and one large table cloth.

ELIZABETH FISHER . I live in Blandford-mews. I heard the cry of stop thief, as I was going up the mews, and saw the prisoner throw down the linen. I picked it up, it was one large and five small table cloths. I gave them to the constable at the watch-house, the prosecutor's servant claimed them. I saw the prisoner stopped.

WILLIAM LEAGER . I am footman to Admiral West. I was looking out of the dining-room window, and saw the prisoner come up the area steps with the linen under his arm; I gave the alarm, and ran after him, saw him stopped, and saw Fisher pick up the linen, it is my master's.

DANIEL ANSTED . I am a beadle. I saw the prisoner running, and pursued, I was in Dorset-street, I took him into custody after he was stopped. I saw the linen laying in the kennel. Fisher gave it to me.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The Prisoner made no Defence.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 17.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200628-74

794. MARY GREEN was indicted for stealing on the 2d of June , at St. Marylebone, one shawl, value 3 l., the goods of James Pincott , privately in his shop .

JOHN AUSTIN . I am in the employ of James Pincott , who is a linen-draper , and lives in Oxford-street , in the parish of St. Marylebone, I believe. On the 2d of June, about two o'clock, I saw the prisoner in the shop, she was going towards the door, nobody but myself was in the shop, nor any customer. I did not see her till she was leaving the shop, I did not miss anything; no shawls were on the counter, but some were in the window within reach of a person who might come into the shop, they could not be taken from the outside; I heard footsteps at the door, looked round and saw the prisoner going out, I ran to the door, looked at the window, and missed a shawl off a board, where it had been put by itself. It rained hard, I stopped to get my hat, and pursued after her into Oxford-street, turned round, and saw her standing at the entrance of the Union public-house, seven or eight doors off. I went up to her, she had her apron up, I asked what she had in it? She said something, I do not recollect what. I pulled her apron down, and found a gown in it, and under the gown was this shawl, which I know to be my

master's. I had placed it on the window twice that morning, it has our mark on it, and cost 3 l.

WILLIAM SELLERS . I am a constable. I received the prisoner in charge with the shawl. The prosecutor's house is in the parish of St. Marylebone.

Prisoner's Defence. I went to the pawnbroker's, and as I returned, I saw this shawl on the ground, and picked it up. I went into the public-house out of the rain, when he took hold of me.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 39.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200628-75

795. HENRY JAMES was indicted for that he, on the 6th of May , at St. Mary, Whitechapel, upon John Browning , a subject of our Lord the King, feloniously, wilfully, maliciously, and unlawfully did make an assault, and with a sharp instrument, feloniously, &c. did strike, stab and cut him in and upon the left side of his body, with intent in so doing of his malice aforethought to kill and murder him .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating his intent to be to disable him.

THIRD COUNT, the same, only stating his intent to be to do him some grievous bodily harm.

JOHN BROWNING . I am a butcher , and lodge at No. 20, Baker's-row, Whitechapel - the prisoner was a stranger to me. On the 6th of May, between four and five o'clock in the afternoon, I was coming through Rosemary-lane, and saw the prisoner and another man run up another street into Rosemary-lane - an elderly man came up, and a scuffle ensued between him and the prisoner, his companion was with him - the prisoner did not appear to be sober, but the elderly man was. He knocked the prisoner over a woman's barrow; several people stopped and laughed, and I joined in the laugh. The elderly man was then taken from the prisoner, and the prisoner asked me what cause I had to laugh? I had not spoken to him, I only laughed with other people - I told him to say nothing, the old man was enough for him; I then walked on in the road, leaving him and his companion behind - that was all I said to him.

Q. Did you attempt to strike him, or hold up your fist at him - A. No, not at that time. I had not walked many yards before the prisoner and his companion came up to me - the prisoner asked me what business I had with the affair that had just happened? I had taken no part in it, I was only a spectator. I told him again that it was nothing to me, the old man was enough for him, and if he had any call with me he would not come off so easy. The prisoner said to his companion twice,

"Give me the stick!" his companion did not give it to him, but came up to me, took me by the arm, and told me to excuse the prisoner, for he was in liquor. I told him not to lead me, for I did not want to have any thing to do with him or the prisoner. I then left them, and went up Back-church-lane, about a quarter of a mile off, and in less than a quarter of an hour after I left them I went into a wheelwright's yard in Back-lane, and asked the price of some wheels. I turned my head round, and saw the prisoner's companion standing against the gate of the yard; his companion said,

"Here he is! go on" - I did not see the prisoner at that time. I then came out of the yard, his companion still stood at the gate, and looked me very hard in the face. I came out, passed him, and saw the prisoner a little way forward. I passed the prisoner also - I neither spoke to him, nor made any gestures at him - I took no notice of him. Both of them then followed me very close, so close that I was afraid they were going to trip me up. I crossed over the road, they both crossed after me. I came into the Commercial-road, they still followed me. I had occasion to go through Brick-lane, Whitechapel , and as I had heard there were many idle fellows about there, I was afraid the prisoner and his companion might attack me, I turned round, and told them it was of no use to follow me, and if they wanted anything they had better take it out of me then. The prisoner then said,

"Why, I will rip your bl - dy guts open!" We were then about half a mile from where I parted with them in Rosemary-lane. He immediately made a stab at me with his hand. I had no suspicion at that time that he had any instrument with him. He struck me, I lifted up my hand to strike him - I then saw the knife in his hand, and felt the blood running down me from my left side in the lower part of my body. I cried out,

"Oh, my God! that man has stabbed me!" The prisoner and his companion immediately ran away; they were pursued. I was immediately taken to a surgeon's in Whitechapel, and got my wound dressed, I then went home and went to bed. On the Wednesday following it got so bad I was obliged to go into the hospital - (it happened on a Saturday) - the surgeon who attended me there is dead. I continued in the hospital as an in-patient for a fortnight. I was confined first at my own house for three days. I could walk with great pain, but did not till I went into the hospital. I was confined a week to my bed there.

Cross-examined by MR. ARABIN. Q. You came up, hearing a running and noise - A. I was going past; I heard no cry of Stop thief! I think the old man had two arms. The prisoner was in liquor, but did not appear very drunk - he could walk and run very well.

Q. You said he should not come off so easy with you - A. When he followed and spoke to me I did - I did not wish to fight if they would let me alone. If he had struck me I should have struck him again. I did not say I would bring him to his senses, or any thing of the kind. I do not know that he had a knife in his hand then.

Q. In the Commercial-road you said if they wanted any thing out of you they had better take it, you meant to fight - A. Yes. I did not put myself in a fighting attitude till after he struck me, I then lifted up my arm to attempt to strike him but did not. I did not tell the Magistrate that I struck him.

HENRY WEBB . I have been a labourer in the East India Company's service, and live in Turner-street, Commercial-road - I am out of employ being ill. The prisoner and prosecutor were both strangers to me. I saw the prisoner, his companion, and the prosecutor standing at the top of Back-church-lane talking; I was on the opposite side of the way. I saw the prisoner make a thrust at the prosecutor - I did not see any weapon at the time - the prosecutor doubled up immediately as if he was going to fall. He exclaimed,

"Oh Lord! he has stabbed me!" I came across the road; he pulled his waistcoat up, and the blood ran profusely from the lower part of his side. I

saw the prisoner and his companion run away. I stopped with the prosecutor till some people went away with him. I left, and did not see the weapon with which the wound was given. The prisoner was taken and brought back - a knife was produced; I did not see it taken from him - there was no appearance of blood upon it. I did not see the prosecutor again till after he came out of the hospital.

Cross-examined. Q. You did not hear what language passed - A. I did not.

WILLIAM FORSTER . I am an officer. The prisoner was brought to the office about five o'clock in the afternoon of the 6th of May, he was charged with stabbing a man. I found a very small knife in his pocket, which I produce; it did not appear to be bloody - no other knife was produced. No person appeared with him as his companion. The prosecutor was not able to attend. I saw his wound about an hour after - the doctor said it might have been done with this knife. I know he was confined sometime in the hospital - the doctor who first attended him is not dead.

Prisoner. Q. Was I not very much in liquor - A. Certainly, he was. I believe he has shown every contrition for it, and appeared very much concerned.

Prisoner's Defence. I never wished to do anybody grievous bodily harm, and never had the intent. I never heard the words. On the 6th of May, about half-past four o'clock, I was coming along very drunk, ran against a public-house window, and broke it - the servant laid hold of me, somebody said,

"Let him go, I will pay for it" - he let me go and struck me; he had but one arm. Being in liquor I struck him again; some people who knew me took me away. I fell over a wheelbarrow. I walked on, Browning came after me and said to me first,

"The old man would have beat you well." I did not speak to him, for I was so much in liquor - I did not know which way I was going. A young man told him to take no notice of me, for I was in liquor. I turned up Church-lane; Browning came after me and said,

"You have broken a window, and ought to pay for it." The young man told him again not to notice me, and shoved me on. Browning said,

"Lend me that stick, if he is in liquor I will fetch him out." He would not lend him the stick, but took hold of his arm, and pressed him not to notice me. Accordingly Browning came after me - I took my knife out of my pocket, and said,

"Young man, if you will let me have half that stick he may take the other half, and see if he can beat me with it." Directly Browning heard this, he flew at me, and struck me on the back of my neck - I went to hit him again, and when I hit him, whether I stuck the knife into him, or he ran against it, I cannot tell. He hit me away from him - I stood, and never moved from the spot. When he was going to hit me again, somebody cried out,

"He has got a knife, or some sharp instrument, in his hand!" I walked away, and as I was going away, he said,

"He has stabbed me!" I was taken afterwards, but being in liquor I could not stand, and was sick in the lock-up place. On Sunday I sent to the prosecutor's - he said he was stabbed, but not much hurt; and as I was in liquor he would take no notice of it. I said I would give him 2 l. Next day I sent, and he said 5 l. would pay his expences, and he would take that, and have nothing to do with it. Since that he has sent his landlord to say, that if my friends would rise 5 l. now, and 5 l. more in a fortnight, he would give it up. I could have no malice towards him, and did not want to take his life. I did not go up to him like a thief. I did not think I had the knife in my hand when I struck him.

ELIZA CLARK . I live in Brown Bear-alley, East Smithfield - I am married and am a silk-weaver. The prisoner is a stranger to me. I was going to Bow to meet my mother and help her home from work. I left home at five o'clock, went up Back Church-lane, and saw the prisoner cross and Browning after him. Browning was behind the prisoner, and took hold of him and shook him. I saw nobody with the prisoner, but I did not take notice. Several people were round him, so that I could not see whether he had a companion or not. That is all I have to say.

Q. Then you did not see any wound - A. No: my business called me to meet my mother at such a time, and I went on.

Q. How came this to strike your attention - A. Why, I will tell you. I came back again, saw the mob there and this young man, and gave him my direction. I had then met my mother by the hospital, about a quarter of an hour's walk from where I saw him strike the prosecutor.

Q. Your mother came to the spot with you - A. No, not the spot, because I met her, and then returned back. The crowd was then at Lambeth-street office - I went into the lock-up place and told the young man what I had seen. I did not know what had happened then. I went in from curiosity, and heard he had stabbed a man.

BROWNING re-examined. The prisoner did same frequently, in kindness, to enquire after my health.

Two witnesses gave the prisoner a good character for mildness and evenness of temper.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 18.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200628-76

796. CHARLOTTE TURNER was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of June , one shawl, value 1 l.; one pair of boots, value 10 s.; one coat, value 10 s.; one waistcoat, value 5 s., and one pair of breeches, value 5 s., the goods of Robert George , in the dwelling-house of Richard Ridout .

ELIZA GEORGE . I am the wife of Robert George , and lodge with Mr. Ridout in Drury-lane . On the 19th of June we went out about five o'clock, and left the prisoner in the room - she lived with us as a servant . I returned in a quarter of an hour - she was then gone, and left my boy in the room. In consequence of what he said, I missed the things. On the Friday following I saw her in custody.

ROBERT CLARKE . I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner on the 23d of June, and found three duplicates on her - one was for the suit of clothes. I went by her direction to the pawnbroker's, where she said she pledged the prosecutrix's silk shawl, and found it had been redeemed three hours before.

WILLIAM FARRANT . I am shopman to Mr. Flemming, a pawnbroker, in Fleet-market. On the 19th of June, a

woman pledged a pair of boots with me, in the name of Ann Davis .

JOHN GARWOOD . I am a shopman to Mr. Philips, pawnbroker, who lives in Blackfriars-road; the prisoner pledged a waistcoat and a pair of small-cloathes with me for 13 s., they were not worth 20 s.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 47.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only.

Confined One Year .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200628-77

797. SAMUEL DENNISON was indicted for feloniously assaulting John Davidson on the King's highway, on the 12th of June , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, one watch-chain, value 1 s.; one key, value 5 s., and one seal, value 1 s., his property .

JOHN DAVIDSON . I am a mariner . On the 12th of June, between nine and ten o'clock at night, I was coming up Dean-street, Wapping , going on board the ship Edgar - I was sober; the prisoner and two others came running down the street towards me. He clapped his hand upon my shoulder, intending to knock me down, but I recovered myself - he did not strike me - it was a violent push. He made a snatch at my watch; I had my hand on my fob, and kept my watch - the swivel broke, and he got off with the chain - the swivel broke while I was laying hold of the watch. He ran off, I followed him, his companion, followed me. I pursued the prisoner down a dark lane, and when he got into the street he turned about and met me. He unbuttoned his waistcoat, and told me to search him; he then said if I would let go he would go where I pleased. I let go; he started off, and I followed him - he got out of my sight a few minutes. A mob gathered round; he came up, and I laid hold of him - I am sure he is the man.

JOHN BROWN. I took the prisoner in charge.

Prisoner's Defence. I saw a mob, went up, and he charged me with the robbery.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Of stealing from the person only.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200628-78

798. WALTER KEATON was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of June 16 reams of paper, value 35 l.; 100 pocket-books, value 10 l.; 50 card cases, 2 l.; 8 lbs. of sealing-wax, value 36 s.; 11 printed bound books, value 2 l.; three account-books, value 14 s.; 23 skins of leather, value 7 l.; five packs of playing-cards, value 2 l., and 60 black-lead pencils, value 35 s. , the goods of John Poole and Andrew Richard Poole .

MR. WALFORD conducted the prosecution.

MR. ANDREW RICHARD POOLE . I am in partnership with my father, Mr. John Poole , we are manufacturers of paper and pocket-books , and live in Fetter-lane . A man named Walter O'Donnel was in our employ in May last. We missed various articles, which were afterwards produced by Mrs. Andrews, in the lodgings of O'Donnel - he has absconded. The prisoner was a stranger to me. - Player gave me information - I went with him to Bateman's-buildings, and found the articles stated in the indictment. They were worth 86 l.

NICHOLAS PLAYER . I am a book agent, and occasionally deal in paper; I live in Hudson's-court, Strand. About the 6th of June the prisoner offered me some paper for sale - he brought me some patterns, and mentioned the quantity he had of each article and the price - it was marble paper. I told him the price was too high, and if he would leave his direction I would call. I called on him afterwards at No. 9, Barrett's-court, Wigmore-street, at his own lodgings. He said he had not got the paper there, but had moved it No. 3, Bateman's-buildings, Soho-square I went there next morning, it was Mrs. Andrews's house. I knocked at the door, he opened it; I went up stairs, and he shewed me a quantity of marble paper, about sixteen reams. I said it did not suit me; he asked more for it than I could buy it for at the manufacturer's. On looking at it I suspected it to be Mr. Poole's. He asked 2 l. for it. I said it was not worth more than 25 s. a ream. I went away and informed the prosecutor.

ELIZA ANDREWS . I live in Bateman's-buildings. O'Donnel took a lodging at my house in the name of Daniels, at the latter end of May - my servant let it to him, he and the prisoner were together - they both came frequently to the house together and both frequently brought a great many parcels together - they appeared to be parcels of paper. I do not know that the prisoner ever came alone. I remember Mr. Poole and Player giving me information about the prisoner. He came next day with a stick, and asked if Daniels was at home? I said he was not, but that he had sent to me to desire I would give up all his property to two porters - that he had sent a note by a little boy, who I believe was his (the prisoner's) boy. He said

"No, I have not the honour to be his father." I said I had told the boy I would not give up the property to any person but those it belonged to, and perhaps he was come for it. He said

"No, I am not, for I am lame, and cannot carry it." He went away. I was not able to find any one to stop him. I beckoned him back, coaxed him into the house, and said I hoped he would not behave ill to me, but I should detain him as an accomplice, for bringing stolen goods into my house. The property was in the bed-room which they hired. He said he would not be detained, and began to cry. I said,

"You shall be detained," and my son being in the room said so too. A great scuffle ensued between me, my son, and him in attempting to detain him. He flew to the window, and attempted to break it to push the frame out; then he got to the street-door, and hurt me very much with his stick - he at last burst through the window and ran away. I called Stop thief! and he was secured.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Were you present when the room was let - A. No. I came home and saw O'Donnell, and acknowledged him as a lodger. The prisoner was present when they were let, and recommended O'Donnel to me - he said he lived in town, and that O'Donnell came from the country.

JOSHUA IVORY . I was called to assist in securing the prisoner about six hundred yards from the house. He ran into a room in Portland-street, Wardour-street. I pursued him hearing the cry. As soon as the door was open

the prisoner stood with the tongs in his hand ready to strike me, but I threatened to strike him and he surrendered. I said

"Is your name O'Donnel?" he said it was. I said

"You are the man I want" - Mrs. Andrews came up and said he was the man. I brought him down stairs, and on the staircase he tried to throw me over.

ELIZA EDWARDS . I live in Fetter-lane, nearly opposite to Messrs. Poole's. I have frequently seen the prisoner on the step, waiting for O'Donnell between seven and eight o'clock in the morning, and on Sunday morning in particular. I have seen them converse together.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you ever see him go in - A. Once, and have seen both come out. I have seen O'Donnell bring property out in the morning before I thought Messrs. Poole were up, not when the prisoner was waiting.

MR. POOLE re-examined. I sleep in the house, and m generally absent on Sundays.

Prisoner's Defence. I leave it to my witnesses.

THOMAS THELLFALL . I am a carpenter, and live in James-street, Manchester-square. I met the prisoner in Oxford-street, and went to a public-house with him - it is a month ago to-morrow. A man came in, said he had bought some paper, and asked him to dispose of it for him. The prisoner said he did not like the job, that he did not understand it, and asked him where he got it from? the man said that was no odds to him. He gave the prisoner 2 s., and said he would settle with him when he saw him again. He gave him some sheets rolled up in other paper, and wrote down the price.

MR. WALFORD. Q. Did you expect to meet the prisoner - A. No. They appeared to know each other - they went away together.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200628-79

799. ROBERT COOKE was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Barnes , about ten o'clock in the night of the 30th of June , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein seven printed books, value 4 l., his property .

THOMAS BARNES . I am a bookseller and binder , and live in Piccadilly. These books were in my house in Smith's-court , which is not part of the dwelling-house - the prisoner had worked for me near a year, and had left about three months. I missed these books on the 27th; two volumes of the Journals of the House of Commons - next day I missed four more volumes. They have not been found, and were worth 39 s.

WILLIAM BOCKETT . I am in the employ of Mr. Barnes. On Friday night, the 30th of June, at twenty minutes after nine o'clock, I was on the watch. I waited at the door, and saw the prisoner coming down the court; I then locked myself in, took the key out, and concealed myself under the stairs. The prisoner came, unlocked the door, came in, and locked himself in. He came up stairs into the shop - I heard him moving the books. I called out, he made no answer. I went and found a volume of the Journals of the House of Commons moved from the top of the pile - I had seen it safe on the pile that night. Nobody had been in the shop but Johnson. I asked the prisoner what he did there? he said he came to do no harm, only to borrow a few tools to finish some books which he had at home. It was so dark that he could not see the pattern of tools.

Prisoner. Q. Was I not in the habit of coming to borrow tools - A. No; he had a latch key, but not one to the lock.

JOHN JOHNSON . I am an errand-boy to the prosecutor, and sleep in the shop. I was on the watch with Bockett, and saw the prisoner coming up the court. I had been in the shop five minutes before, and saw the pile of Journals safe - I went in with Bockett, and afterwards I heard the prisoner come in. I dropped out of the window to secure him if he came out, he was taken to the watch-house. In the morning I found the book off the pile, and found a key of the door in the shaving tub close to where he stood.

THOMAS GOOK . I took the prisoner in charge, and found the title page of a Journal at his lodging.

Prisoner's Defence. I left some books there, and called on this evening for some tools.

GUILTY . Aged 47.

Of Larceny Only. - Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18200628-80

800. JOHN DORAN was indicted for feloniously assaulting John Kain on the King's highway, on the 20th of June , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, one watch, value 5 l.; one chain, value 10 s., and three seals, value 20 s., his property .

JOHN KAIN . I live in White Lion-street. On the 20th of June, about seven o'clock in the evening, I was in Rose-lane, Spitalfields , with a bundle of linen on my back, and another on my arm - three men met me at the corner of Fleur-de-lis court, one took my bundle, and the other snatched my watch. I ran after them crying stop thief. I believe the prisoner is the man that took my watch - but I am sure he was one of the three. The people all made a fool of me, and would not follow him.

MARGARET HOBBER . I was in Rose-lane, talking to Read, and saw Kain with his bundle - two men in blue and one in green went up to him, the man in the green coat snatched his watch - it was the same coloured coat the prisoner has on. I think him to be the man by his appearance. I never saw his face before.

SARAH READ . I am a shoe-binder. I was with Hobber, and saw the three men, one had a coat like the prisoner's - they surrounded Kain, and took his bundle. I only know the prisoner by his coat.

JOHN MANCE. I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner ten days after the robbery, from the description Kain gave me - there is another man who answers the description. I have not seen that person since. Kain said he had no doubt of the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. He never saw me before.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18200628-81

801. WILLIAM SIMPSON was indicted for a fraud .

MR. BOLLAND conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM OFFIN . I am a carrier , and live at Brentwood,

Essex. In 1817, I knew the prisoner as a broker, he was recommended to me, and bought stock for me; two or three times before this transaction. In July 1816, I had 950 l. in the Navy 5 per cents. On the 1st of February, 1817, I saw him in the Rotunda, at that time I had 1,000 l. stock - we had some conversation respecting the price of the stocks, or what they were likely to be, and he advised me to sell out my 1,000 l. in the Navy 5 per cents; and buy in 1,000 l. in Exchequer-bills, as it would be advantageous.

Q. On that day did this transaction take place - A. Yes; he gave me this memorandum of the sale, (read) and paid me 36 l. in money. I had a letter from him on the 1st of June, 1817, which is destroyed; the purport of it was to recommend me to come to town before the 4th of June, saying, the 4th would be a proper time for me to replace the 1,000 l. in the Navy 5 per cents, with the Exchequer-bills he knew I was in possession of. I came to town on the 3d, and saw him in the Rotunda, and asked him to replace this 1,000 l. in the Navy 5 per cents; he said, if I would come again in an hour and a half, it should be done - he asked if I had got the bills, I showed them to him, and said I would give him them when the stock was bought. I returned in an hour or two, and found him in the Rotunda - he immediately told me it was all ready, by which I understood the stock was bought - he again held his hand out for the bills, and said, let us go and do the business. He went with me into the 5 per cents. office, and when I got up to the counter, I thought I was justified in giving him the bills, and did so; it was a 500 l. and four 100 l. bills, and were the very same he had purchased for me before - be took them in his hand, and said, if you will stop here a moment or two, I will return. He was absent about ten minutes, and on his return, he wrote on a piece of paper and gave me, calculating the amount of the bills, and making me a debtor of 92 l. 6 s. 6 d.; then adding his commission, which was 25 s. for buying the 1000 l., and 9 s. for selling the Exchequer-bills. I gave him this draft for 94 l. (looks at it) - it has been paid by my bankers; as he was going out of the office, I said, I beg your pardon Mr. Simpson, but this is not the sort of receipt I have been used to have when I have purchased stock - he said,

"It is all right Mr. Offin, you must be here on the 22d of July, when you will sign the transfer, and receive your dividend" - He turned to the counter, and wrote

"22d of July," and said you will be sure not to forget to be here on that day. I never saw him again till I saw him at the Mansion House. I have never been able to get a dividend.

Cross-examined by. MR. ANDREWS. Q. Had he done much business for you - A. He has sold 1,400 l. for me in the 3 per cents.; he never made but one transfer except this. I was introduced to him by Mr. Harvey, of Brentwood; I have blamed Mr. Harvey for introducing him to me - and showed him the paper on the day after the transaction, and said, I was afraid I should lose my money. Mr. Harvey said, if it was 100,000 l. it would be as safe as the Bank.

Q. Did you not tell him you trusted entirely to Simpson to lay out your money, and you was without a remedy - A. No; I merely asked if he thought it was safe, I never said I employed him to speculate with it.

Q. Was the first transaction you had with him a purchase for the day, or time - A. For the present day, he did not tell me this was a purchase for the opening. I believe the 22d, was opening day.

MR. BOLLAND. Q. You sent a letter for him to come up on the 3d, and purchase Exchequer-bills - A. Yes; I never knew anything of buying for time.

JOHN HATCHETT . I am a clerk in the Navy 5 per cents. On the 30th of July, 1816, I find 950 l. transferred to William Offin , of Brentwood, Essex, carrier, and on the 21st of January, 1817, I find 50 l. more, in all 1000 l. On the 1st of February , I find the whole was sold for him to William Harman , of the Stock Exchange. I find on the 24th of May about 600 l. in his name.

MR. OFFIN. I bought that stock very lately.

CHARLES IRELAND . I am a parish clerk of St. Bartholomew. The Navy 5 per cents. office is in that parish.

MR. ANDREWS addressed the Jury in behalf of the prisoner.

GUILTY . Aged 35.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200628-82

802. WILLIAM SIMPSON was again indicted for a like offence .

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200628-83

803. DAVID CONNELL was indicted for obtaining goods under false pretences .

GEORGE TOWLEY . I am a warehouseman to Mr. Walter Brind , a silk weaver , who lives in Paternoster-row . On the 25th of May, the prisoner came for two pieces of twelve-penny white sarsnet ribbon, for Mr. W. Townsend of Holborn, who is a customer of ours. I asked his name, he said it was Smith, I gave it to him, he went away. I charged him 28 s. and gave him a bill - he came again next day with a written order for more, he was desired to call again as I had suspicion - and on his return we had him apprehended.

MR. WILLIAM TOWNSEND . I am a haberdasher, and live in High Holborn. I have dealt for twenty-five years or more with Mr. Brind, I did not send the prisoner for any ribbon. I never saw him before.

GUILTY . Aged 29.

Confined Three Months .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200628-84

804. CAMILLA LYON was indicted for a libel .

The Defendant pleaded Guilty - and entered into security to appear for Judgment when called upon .

Reference Number: t18200628-178

SEVENTH DAY, WEDNESDAY, JULY 5.

805. WILLIAM CONSTANTINE was indicted for feloniously assaulting Edmund Dove on the King's highway, on the 30th of June , putting him fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, one watch, value 2 l.; one seal, value 30 s.; one key, value 5 s., and one ring, value 5 s. his property .

EDMUND DOVE . I am servant to Mr. Grove, of Weymouth-street, Portman-place. On Saturday morning, about half-past one o'clock, I had been out with a friend, and was rather in liquor. We were at the corner of Well-street, Oxford-street . I was attacked by four men, who were in company - they separated my friend from me. One man took my watch, and at the same time I received a violent blow on my ear. I cannot say whether it was before or after the watch was taken - they separated and ran away - it was a dark night. The prisoner resembles the man, from his size and appearance - I have every reason to believe he is one of them. I pursued the man who I thought had the watch - he crossed the way and turned towards Poland-street - I pursued and stopped him. I do not think I lost sight of him, if I did, it was only for a moment. The prisoner was the man - nobody was near me but the four men. I stopped him about thirty or forty yards down Poland-street, called

"Watch," and he came up in three or four minutes and took him. He was running when I stopped him; and I am almost positive that I saw the watch in his possession - I have not seen seen it since.

HUGH BYRNE . I am a watchman of Poland-street. I heard a cry of

"Stop thief!" came up, and found the prisoner in custody of Dove. He said the prisoner had the watch - the prisoner said he was mistaken and he had no watch. The prosecutor spoke sensibly. I searched the prisoner but did not find the watch.

JOHN PHILLIPS . I am a watchman of Oxford-street, opposite Well-street. I heard the cry of

"Stop thief!" from the top Poland-street. I observed the parties before that and had my eye on them. I saw the prosecutor with a young man on the Well-street side of the road; and just as they got to the corner of Well-street, I saw four men meet them; he was hustled by them, and immediately afterwards they all ran down Poland-street, and he after them crying

"Stop thief!" I sprung my rattle and pursued as fast as I could, and did not see him lay hold of the prisoner. I saw the watch on the ground, about thirty yards down Poland-street; and as I stooped to pick it up, one of the party hit me a blow - he picked it up and put it in his right-hand pocket. I pursued, he got from me by a coach passing. There was no others near, but the four who surrounded the prosecutor. His friend did not push me. About half an hour after, two of his companions came to look for the watch, I said I would take them, and they ran off.

Prisoner's Defence. I was playing the violoncello at a gentleman's house and was out very late. I was coming down Oxford-road, a little in liquor, saw a disturbance on the opposite side and crossed over. The prosecutor was running after a man - he came and took me.

HUGH BYRNE . When I took him, I found no musical instrument on him - he did not appear intoxicated.

CHARLES LOWE (a blind man). I am the prisoner's brother-in-law. On this night I left him, near ten o'clock, in Oxford-street, near Swallow-street. He plays the violoncello - he was in liquor, and said he should go and get more. I took his instrument from him, for fear he should break it.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Of stealing from the Person only.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200628-85

806. JOHN PANNIFER was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of January , one promissory-note, for payment of and value 10 l, and three 1 l. Bank notes the property of William Waterhouse , Thomas Botham , George Botham , John Halcomb , Richard Banks , John Townsend , William Parsons , and Bradshaw Lewis Reilly .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating it to belong to William Stephens .

MESSRS. ADOLPHUS and HONE conducted the Prosecution.

WILLIAM STEPHENS . I live at Kingsdown, near Bristol, and am a bookseller . On the 4th of January I sent one 10 l. Chepstow Bank, and three 1 l. Bank of England notes, in a small parcel, to Mr. Kelly, bookseller, Paternoster-row - I made it up myself, put the notes inside an order for books, made it up in the form of a letter, and put four other letters for other persons in it beside. I enclosed them all in a blue paper, which I sealed in two or three places with wax, and folded that in brown paper, which I sealed and tied, and directed it

"Mr. Thomas Kelly , No. 17, Paternoster-row, London," and took the parcel myself to the coach-office, at the Bush Tavern, Bristol, about three o'clock, where the mail goes from; delivered it to Thomas, the book-keeper, and paid him two-pence for booking; it was to go off that night by the mail, which leaves about four o'clock.

JOSEPH THOMAS . I am book-keeper at the Bush Tavern, Bristol. On Wednesday, the 4th of January, Mr. Stephens brought a parcel to the office for London. I took it from his hands myself and placed it in a basket with other parcels to go to London - the basket was in the office by where I sit. He brought it about an hour before the mail started. James Morris puts the parcels in the seat of the coach and locks the seat up. The key is kept hung up in the office - another key is kept at Bath, one at Marlborough, one at the Gloucester Coffee-house, Piccadilly, and another at Lad-lane. On the 4th of January I booked four inside passengers, and have the book here. On Monday morning, at half-past ten o'clock, a gentleman came and asked if he could go to London on Wednesday night - I said he could. I have seen him since in London, but lost him. He booked two inside places for London, in the name of Johnson. While he was paying the money, in came another person, who I believe to be the prisoner, but will not swear to him. He paid me for a place to London in the same mail, in the name of Wheeler. In the course of an hour a gentleman in black came, and asked if there was room for another person in the mail for London - I said there was, and he took a place in the name of Franklin. Another gentleman applied afterwards for a place in the name of Hensall - he could not have it, and took one outside.

Q. When the mail started, were all the persons in and on the coach - A. Yes; they all four got in, in a moment. Mr. Hensall was on the roof. On Thursday morning I was informed of several parcels having been opened and their contents taken out. I went to the Mansion House in about a month, saw the prisoner in custody, and was satisfied in my own mind that he was one of the party who took the places. He was not pointed out to me.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. The seat is a common place for putting in all small parcels - A. It is

I believe another person was charged with this offence before the prisoner; he has been transported for another offence, and this charge was reserved against him, in case he should have been acquitted. I took particular notice of them all; for finding so many applications for London in the course of an hour, I thought there must be some law-suit going on. I believe he had a black hat, white handkerchief, and black coat. The proprietors, at the places I have mentioned, keep the keys of the seats. The coach stops at Marlborough fifteen minutes to sup. I have not heard of any servant there being discharged.

JAMES MORRIS . I am porter at the Bush coach-office, Bristol. On the 4th of January I put all the parcels in the seats of the mail - both seats had parcels in them - I locked them, and hung the key up under the desk of the office. I remember putting a brown paper-parcel for Mr. Kelly into the seat - I had marked No. 9 on it. The mail started at four o'clock. There were four passengers inside - they had no luggage, except a very small brown valice. Two came first and two afterwards, about three minutes apart from each other - one gentleman was outside - they all started with the coach at four o'clock.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Parcels, which the proprietors have a premium for, are put in so the seat with others - A. They are. I am sure I locked the seat - nobody could have had possession of the key after I locked it before the coach set off.

THOMAS ELLIOTT . I am porter at the Swan with Two Necks. The Bristol mail came in on the morning of the 5th of January, a little after nine o'clock. I unlocked both seats myself - the parcels appeared just the same as on another morning. A small parcel was entered in the weigh-bill for Mr. Kelly - I chequed it off as having arrived. The parcels were delivered to different porters - Crouch was one of them. About two o'clock I heard of some parcels having been opened.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Have you more than one key - A. No: it opens both seats. I opened the seats the moment the mail arrived. It was bad weather, and I believe frosty.

SAMUEL CROUCH . I am porter at the Swan with Two Necks. On the 5th of January I delivered the parcels about town. I delivered one to Mr. Kelly, Paternoster-row. I delivered it to Bird, the shopman.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Who delivered it to you - A. It was called over and thrown into my place about ten minutes after it arrived, and I delivered it, in about an hour and a half, in the same state I received it.

JAMES BIRD . I am shopman to Mr. Kelly. On the 5th of January I received the parcel from Crouch, and put it on the desk in the counting-house till he came down, which was in a few minutes. Nobody went into the counting-house till he came down, except a young lad, who is here. Mr. Kelly called me to see the parcel - it was done up in such a way that it might pass anybody's eye - it had been opened. I saw him take out letters, they had all been opened.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. What time did it arrive at your house - A. About half-past two o'clock, I think.

CROUCH re-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. How came you not to deliver it before two o'clock - A. I delivered it before twelve o'clock I am certain, for I went round Clerkenwell afterwards and got home before two o'clock. I had the parcels in a cart. I had a boy with me - he has been turned away, I do not know what for. He was not in the cart till after I took this parcel out to deliver it. I then left him at the end of Paternoster-row with the cart.

THOMAS KELLY . I am a bookseller, and live in Paternoster-row, On the 5th of January I received a parcel from Mr. Stephens, of Bristol, with an order and letters in it - the packthread was round it, apparently safe, but on undoing it I found the seals broken; this is the brown paper that was outside - (producing it) - there was also a blue paper. The seals of both were broken, and the seals of the letters were also broken. The order mentioned that there was 13 l. enclosed, but no notes were in it then.

WILLIAM STEPHENS re-examined. They are the four letters I sent in the parcel, and this is the paper that covered it.

JAMES MORRIS . The figure of 9 was on the paper which I marked.

DAVID HIGHLAND . I am one of Mr. Kelly's shopmen. I was in the counting-house when Mr. Kelly came in and took up the parcel; nobody had been in there but Bird.

ELIZA MORRIS . I am the wife of John Morris , who is a mariner, and lives at Bristol. On Monday, the 3d of January, I was at the St. John's porter-house there - Merchant kept it. I was coming out between eleven and twelve o'clock in the morning, and met five men going in - I knew one of them, it was William Freeman - I shook hands with him. I well know the prisoner to be one of them, I knew him before, he was at Bristol last September, and went by the name of Wellington; they all five came in, called for breakfast at Merchant's, and conversed together as companions. When Freeman shook hands with me he asked me if I had heard his old woman was dead. I returned between two and three o'clock, and saw the same five men sitting together in the parlour, and I am sure the prisoner was one of them; they called for dinner, and while it was getting ready they asked if they could have beds - they were asked how many they should want - they said two. Freeman said he lived in Bristol, and should not sleep there. In the course of the evening they said they should go to the Play. I came to the house as an assistant to Merchant. Two went out first, and the other two followed - Freeman had left them then. They all four returned and slept there. I saw the prisoner with them. Next morning they sent for breakfast, after that they went out, returned, and dined together there - Freeman dined with them. While they were at dinner I heard them say they were going to take places in the mail for London. I know Freeman did not go in the mail, for I saw him afterwards.

Q. Did you see them go out of the house to go to the mail - A. I saw them go out between half-past three and a quarter before four o'clock, and as they were going, they said,

"If we do not look sharp we shall be too late for the mail." They went up stairs, fetched down their great coats, and I believe there was a little portmanteau. They went up Small-street, in a direction to the Bush.

Q. How soon after that were you brought to London - A. About a month after, and was taken to the Mansion House, I there fixed on the prisoner as being one of the

men, he was not pointed out to me. I saw him in the middle of a crowd, and knew him directly. I am sure and positive he is the person.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Have you been married twice - A. Yes, I married my first husband in Wales. I do not sleep at Merchant's house.

Q. Who did you first inform of this dinner party - A. I went to live servant at the Bank tavern, John-street, and one day I was reading the newspaper; the first thing I saw was the robbery of the mail, and a description of the parties. I said directly to the landlady

"I am confident they are the same men that slept at Merchant's last Monday." A person afterwards told the book-keeper, I was sent to town, and identified the prisoner.

JAMES MERCHANT. I keep the St. John's porter house, at Bristol. On Tuesday, the 3d of January, four persons lunched and dined at my house - my daughter waited on them. They slept there, breakfasted and dined the next day. On the second day a fifth person dined with them.

Q. Have you seen either of them since - A. I thought I saw one of them during the trial of the conspirators. I have not seen him since. I am certain the prisoner is one of them - I knew him before, for he was at my house last September fair several times. I have no doubt of his person. I went to see him at the Mansion House, and saw him with four or five others, and pointed him out myself.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Was the prisoner ironed when you saw him - A. I think not. Morris came occasionally to my house to get a pint of porter.

Q. Is she not a loose woman about Bristol - A. Not that I know. I did not see her in the room where the men were - she might assist in washing a few things, but she did it voluntarily. I had a few more persons at my house that day.

COURT. Q. Had you any other dinner party - A. No.

ANNA MERCHANT . I am wife of the last witness. On the 3d of January, there where four persons dining and sleeping there. I am certain the prisoner was one - he also dined and breakfasted there on the 4th. Morris was a sailor's wife, she was at my house on the 3d, and I believe on the 4th. She just came in and washed a few glasses to assist when I was busy. I saw the prisoner at the Mansion House, I am certain of his person. I had seen him at the September fair several times, the fair lasts a month. I saw him for a fortnight in and out.

JOSEPH EMERY MERCHANT . I am the son of the last witness. On the 3d of January, I remember four people being at the house. I saw five of them on the 4th - I should know the fifth man. I believe the prisoner to be one of the four, but cannot be positive. I remember them leaving the house on Tuesday, between three and four o'clock. I heard them say they should be too late for the coach or mail.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Had either of them a white hat on - A. Not that I know, we had no other party that week.

MARY MERCHANT . I am daughter of James Merchant . On the 3d of January, a party dined, supped, and slept there, and breakfasted next morning. I went into the country before dinner-time. I am positive the prisoner was one of them. I waited on them at dinner on Monday, and was frequently in the room - I have not the least doubt of him. I believe Morris was there part of the time.

MR. EDWARD HENZELL . I am a corn-dealer. On the 4th of January I was at Bristol, and came from there that afternoon outside the mail, as I could not get an inside place - we supped at Marlborough. I went into the same room with the inside passengers. I have no doubt of the prisoner being one of them - we supped at the same table - the coach stopped twenty minutes. I took notice of them from their particular demeanor.

Q. What was that - A. The prisoner went out of the room while we were at supper, without having paid his full fare, which is usual to do there. When the man came in for the fare, the three men then in the room, appeared to be perfect strangers by their conduct to each other - and did not appear to know the prisoner when he came in - he paid the porter the full fare, and the guard who leaves at Marlborough came in for his compliment - they were then silent, not appearing to know each other; but the moment the guard retired, they appeared very familiar, calling each other by their Christian names, and answering together as acquaintances. I had pulled off my coat, and expressed an intention of stopping at Marlborough, and ordered a bed in their hearing; but I came on with the mail, finding I could not get to town in time if I stopped.

Q. Was it after you expressed your intention of stoping, that they conversed with each other by their Christian names - A. It was; till that time they appeared distant to each other. They did not leave the coach anywhere except at Marlborough - two of them got out at Kingston Church, the prisoner I believe was one of them; the other two got out at the end of Sloane-street. I came on to the end of Lad-lane. Nobody else had got inside the coach till I left, except the guard, who got in at the Gloucester coffee-house. I afterwards saw the prisoner at Giltspur-street Compter, and at the Mansion House. I never had any doubt of the prisoner. I am quite positive he is the man.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Is your sight good - A. Very good. I never saw anybody like the prisoner - he wore a black coat and waistcoat, and blue trowsers - he had a handkerchief tied round his head. I did not see the guard take any parcels out at the Gloucester coffee-house. I dare say he was in the coach about a quarter of an hour.

WILLIAM BREDMORE . I am porter at the Lamb Inn, Bath. I keep the key of the seat. On the night of the 4th of January, I remember the Bristol mail coming. I put a parcel in the boot that night, but I did not open the seat; there were four inside passengers, they did not get out.

FRANCIS NORTH . I am porter at the Angel at Marlborough. The key of the seat is kept in the office - it is my duty and the book-keeper's to lock and unlock the seat when the coaches stop. On the 4th of January, between nine and ten o'clock, the Bristol mail came and supped. I unlocked the hind seat to look for a parcel, which I found, and locked the seat again; the bookkeeper was there. No other person searched the seat.

THOMAS HILLIARD . I am book-keeper of the mails at Marlborough. I remember the Bristol mail coming on the

4th of January, I always look for parcels which are put in the bill

"insured," there was one that night which I found safe, put it in, and locked the seat again.

CHARLES GUNNION . I am porter at the Gloucester coffee-house, and keep the key of the seat of the Bristol mail. On the 5th of January, I examined the seat, and found all safe as I thought - the locks were safe, and the number of parcels right. I locked them up again.

JOHN WICHELON . I am coachman to the Bristol mail, and drove it to town on the morning of the 5th of January, from Newbery. I had four gentlemen inside, and one out. I put down two at the Tuns at Kensington, and the other two at the corner of Sloane-street. I cannot say whether the prisoner was one. I drove to Lad-lane - nobody got inside.

MR. FRANCIS HOBLER . I am clerk to the Lord Mayor, and attended the Mansion House when the prisoner was examined. On the first examination, it was said he answered the description of the man - the prisoner said he had not been out of town for a period of two months. It was on the 1st of February; one William Watson was under examination with him. It appears that on Saturday the 5th of February, he and the prisoner were brought up, a warrant was produced from Birmingham to apprehend Watson, and he was sent there - the prisoner remained for forther examination, the prosecutor being absent.

ANTHONY HARRISON . I am a marshal's-man of the City. I searched some lodgings at No. 93, Leather-lane, which I do not know to be the prisoner's. I produced a portmanteau or valice, and a pair of trowsers to him which I found there, he said they were his. I found four skeleton keys in the portmanteau.

JAMES MORRIS . I think the valice is rather larger, but it is the same colour.

Prisoner's Defence. I have witnesses to prove I was in London at the time.

GEORGE GUILLAN . I keep the Rose and Crown, in Goswell-street. I have known the prisoner sometime; I remember seeing him at my house on the 4th of January, on Tuesday - he first came about half-past eleven o'clock in the morning, and I saw him again about half-past two. He called for a glass of ale, and a young man named Collard, who was in the taproom, drank it from him; he called for a second glass, which my wife served him with, and Collard drank that too - they appeared to be acquainted. I went into the cellar, my beer being off, and and while I was there the prisoner called for a third glass, I heard him. Collard tried to play the same trick, and when I had been in the cellar a few minutes I heard some words between them, and a carpenter, who was repairing the cellar stairs, said,

"Landlord, you had better go up, the men are quarrelling." I went into the taproom, found them fighting, and tried to part them. Collard had got the prisoner under the table, I pulled him away; he came with violence against me, and struck me - he hit me twice because I would not let him fight, and nearly knocked one of my teeth out. The prisoner got a terrible black eye, and his coat was torn in the fight - the flap was torn nearly off - a gentleman assisted me to part them. The prisoner then came into the parlour, and one Allen, who came in, lent him his coat, while his own was sent to Sherwood's, the tailor, to be mended.

Q. How do you know it was the 4th of January - A. Because on the 3d I went to my brewers to pay half a year's rent, said the cellar stairs wanted repairing, and next day the carpenter came to do them.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. How long have you known the prisoner - A. About a year. He might call at my house about once a month. He went by the nick-name of Lord Wellington. The man who fought with him lived somewhere in Spitalfields. I had a sore mouth from the blow he gave me for above a week. We settled it between us - he treated me with a glass of brandy to wash my mouth.

Q. When did you first hear of the prisoner being taken up on this charge - A. I cannot say. I did not go to the Mansion House. I was subpoened here the Sessions before last - I mentioned it to no one; they mentioned it to me when they brought the subpoena, I then remembered it. I cannot say when the prisoner was at my house before - he did not come often.

Q. He never came to tell you how bad his eye was - A. Yes, he did the next night - the man he fought with and the tailor were there on that night, to the best of my recollection. My wife is not here.

Q. Can you speak of his being at your house at any other time - A. No.

MR. ANDREWS. Q. Has Collard been attending here - A. I have not seen him this Sessions - he was here in April and May.

SAMUEL PYEBALL , I am a carpenter, and work for Mr. Potter, who is in the employ of Messrs. Goodwyn and Co., brewers. On the 4th of January I was sent to repair the cellar stairs at the Rose and Crown, it was on Tuesday. While I was there there was a skirmish between the prisoner and another man, who is not here; the prisoner got a black eye. The landlord was there and parted them - he got a blow himself. I remained there till six o'clock; the prisoner had his coat torn. I called the landlord out of the cellar to part them. The coat was sent to Sherwood's, the tailor.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Where do you live - A. In Joiner-street, Commercial-road. I know it was on the 4th of January, because I keep an account of my work. I never saw the prisoner before - I only saw him then for a moment.

COURT. Q. What was the longest time that you think you saw the prisoner - A. Ten minutes.

Q. Why, you have-got from a moment to ten minutes! - A. I heard a skirmish, went up, and saw them parted.

Q. When were you first spoken to about coming here - A. In February. I did not go to the Mansion House. I should not know the man he fought with again, but I took more notice of the prisoner.

COURT. Q. They were both equally strangers to you - A. Both. His coat was torn before I got up. I noticed the prisoner because of his black eye - I did not notice the other.

Q. It has been sworn that in the April and May Sessions he was here, did you see him to know him - A.No; I was here with the witnesses.

JOHN POTTER . I live in Lower East Smithfield. I was ordered by the house of Goodwyn and Co. to repair the cellar stairs of the Rose and Crown on the 3d of January - I have a memorandum of it in this book - (producing it.)

COURT. Q. Is this the only memorandum you have - A. It is the order made by Goodwyn and Co.; it goes from June the 3d to the 8th. The work might have been done any day in that week. I went there on the evening of the 3d of January, and sent Pyeball next day to do the job. I made the entry in another book from the account he gave me of his time on Saturday night. The days are not distinguished in the book.

MR. HONE. Q. Was Pyeball working there on Wednesday - A. Yes, three parts of the day on Tuesday, and all Wednesday.

SAMUEL PYEBALL re-examined. I was at the house two days - this happened on the first day; I am certain I was there the whole of the second day - I did not see the prisoner come then with a black eye. I left about eight o'clock in the evening - I drank in the taproom before I left.

WILLIAM SHERWOOD . I am a tailor, and live a few doors from the Rose and Crown. On the first Tuesday in January, about half-past five o'clock in the evening, a man brought a coat, and said he came from a gentleman named Wellington, from the Rose and Crown, and said it must be done that evening - I took it there about half-past nine, and saw the prisoner there with an old drab coat on; I helped him on with the coat. I had a glass of ale, and he paid me for the coat. I was there about a quarter of an hour - several other persons were in the parlour. On the 19th of February, to the best of my recollection, I was called to the Mansion-house to prove this. I am sure the prisoner is the man.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Do you keep books - A. Yes, my apprentice enters every thing in the books as I cannot write.

Q. How do you know this was on Tuesday more than Wednesday - A. It was the second money I had received that year, and I remarked it - it came to 2 s. 6 d. It was not entered in the book till the end of the week.

Q. Did you ever offer any silk handkerchiefs for sale to the solicitor for this prosecution, or to any of his family, saying you bought them at this public-house - A. Not at this house, it was at the Horse-shoe.

COURT. Q. Did the landlord of the public-house go with you to the Mansion House - A. No, but I saw him there.

Q. Your only reason for knowing it was a Tuesday is because it was the second money you took - A. No, I took a pair of pantaloons home afterwards to one Duke, a farrier, in Little Moorfields. I never saw the prisoner with a black eye.

JOHN GREENAWAY . I keep the Robin Hood , public-house, in Leather-lane - the prisoner lodged nearly opposite me for two months before he was taken. On Tuesday morning, the 4th of January, I had my horse and chaise at the door, and was going to Redbourn fair, which was held on Wednesday - he came over to me and asked where I was going, and I told him. This was about a quarter past ten o'clock.

MR. ADOLPHUS, Q. Did you not offer to become bail for the prisoner - A. My name was given in unknown to me. I would have bailed him if I had been asked. Redbourn is about five miles from town; I was going to buy a horse. I saw the prisoner again on Wednesday evening, between nine and ten o'clock, he had a great black eye. I never heard of his being at Bristol fair. I have heard him called Wellington. He called at my house every day, from the 1st to the 8th of January.

MARY MARRIOT . I live at No. 93, Leather-lane; the prisoner lodged with me; he came a fortnight before Christmas, and left the latter end of January, when he was apprehended. He might have slept out for one night - I never recollect his sleeping out two nights together; he occasionally had the key. It is my belief he was not absent two nights together.

MR. HONE. Q. What is your husband - A. A printer, at the Sun newspaper office. I will not swear he was not absent two nights together.

GEORGE GUILLAN re-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Since you were examined I have made enquiry, and now ask you if your house is not a common resort for thieves - A. Not that I know of. One Crowther was taken out of my house for thieving about eighteen months ago.

THOMAS PULBERTON . I am apprentice to William Sherwood , and keep his books. I produce the book in which the entries are made - it is entered in a small book as it is done, and then brought into this book. I find a coat entered in the name of Wellington on the 3d of January.

Q. The only date in the account is the 3d of January, which was the first day of the week; under the 3d of January you enter the business of the week - A. Yes, I entered it in the large book on the 4th, because at the end of the week I enquire of the men when the job was done.

MR. HONE. Q. Whose writing is the entry in the small book - A. The journeyman's. We made the prisoner a black coat and waistcoat on the third Monday in January.

WILLIAM SHERWOOD re-examined. Q. You said you did not see the prisoner from the time you saw him in the public-house till you saw him before the Magistrate - A. If you had asked me I should have said I made him a coat and waistcoat. When I measured him his eye was very black.

JOHN POTTER re-examined. I produce the book containing the order for the work to be done at the public-house - it has no date.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200628-86

807. THOMAS BOLTON and WILLIAM BEST were indicted for stealing, on the 29th of May , 32 bushels of wheat, value 16 l. , the goods of William Rayner .

MR. WALFORD conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM RAYNER . I am a farmer , and live at East Bedfont . On the night of the 29th of May my barn was broken open, and about eight sacks of wheat stolen, which were loose on the floor. I saw it the morning before, and guessed the quantity to be about six quarters. Some wheat was dropped from where they had carried it on their backs to about two hundred yards off, where I suppose they loaded it. There is a mark as if the whole quantity had been pitched there. I traced the tracks of a horse and cart from there back again into the road. Best lived with me two years ago - Bolton keeps a horse and cart.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Does Best lodge

with Bolton - A. Yes. Marks of the cart were traced from my place to Bolton's. The wheat was only partly dressed, and not fit for market - I produce a sample of it. I have been a farmer twenty-five years, and can guess pretty well the quantity of wheat in bulk.

JAMES ANTHONY RAYNER . I was with my father. I traced the cart from where the wheat had been shot to Bolton's yard-gate, which is about a mile and a half. The two hind shoes of the horse were turned up behind. I left Lowin to watch, and went with my father to get a warrant.

Cross-examined. Q. Is it uncommon for a horse's shoe to be turned up behind - A. No. I saw his horse's legs were all over dirt. I returned with a warrant and saw Bolton, but he made his way off before we could get to him. I found the shoes of his horse were turned up behind.

WILLIAM LOWIN . I am servant to Mr. Rayner. I traced the horse and cart up to Bolton's premises. There were a few rough nails in the horse's front shoe; it was about twenty minutes before six o'clock in the morning. My master left me while he got a warrant. While I was there I saw Best go into the barn three or four times - I saw Bolton come out of the barn in about an hour. I found his horse's shoes were turned up, exactly the same as the print, and the fore shoe had three rough nails.

Cross-examined. Q. How soon was he taken - A. Next morning. The road was very wet. His house is in a private lane.

WILLIAM RAYNER re-examined. I went with the constable to Bolton's house, between seven and eight o'clock in the morning; we saw him walk off from the house before we had got the warrant. I found eight sacks of wheat on his premises - it had been cleaned more than when it left my barn at the top of the sacks, but the middle was just the same. I am sure it is my wheat. I have a sample of both quantities.

Cross-examined. Q. When did you find Bolton - A. On Monday morning. Two persons could dress the little wheat that was done before I found it. I know it by some particular seeds, and there is a bur in it. Bolton grows wheat himself, but there is no bur in his.

JOHN CATTERY . I tried to find Bolton but could not. Best said he had assisted to clean the wheat, but knew nothing of it.

HENRY HOWLAN . I apprehended Bolton about a mile and a half from his house - he said he grew the wheat; Best said he was Bolton's servant.

BOLTON'S Defence. I grew the wheat.

BEST'S Defence. The corn was there when I went to live with him.

- LANGLEY. I am a labourer, and have worked for Bolton. I left him just after Michaelmas. He had ten or twelve sacks of wheat then - I produce a sample of it, which his son brought to me last Wednesday - there is no bur in it.

Q. Is the sample produced like what you threshed for him - A. No.

BOLTON - GUILTY . Aged 54.

Confined One Year .

BEST - NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18200628-87

808. ISAAC QUIN was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of June , one pair of trowsers, value 18 s., the goods of Thomas Broadwood , and one handkerchief, value 2 s. , the goods of John Hopkins .

MR. ANDREWS conducted the prosecution.

EMMA HOLLINGSWORTH . I am cook to Mr. Thomas Broadwood , who lives in Cadogan-place . On the 5th of June, about two o'clock, I saw the prisoner in the pantry, and asked him what he was doing there? he made no answer, but jumped out of the window. I went round to the area, and saw him coming up the steps with a basket in his hand - I followed, and saw him throw the basket over into the square. He was stopped, and the handkerchief found in his pocket - the trowsers were found in the basket.

MICHAEL MURPHY . On the 5th of June I was sitting on Mr. Broadwood's steps, and saw the prisoner going down the area; he came up again, and said to two men who were waiting for him, that the lady would not give so much for the things. The two men sat on the steps, and held me, to prevent my giving any alarm, and told me not to ring the bell. The prisoner went down, lifted up the sash a little, and then flew back to the area steps; he then went into the pantry, put the trowsers into his basket, which had shavings in it, and put the handkerchief into his pocket. He lifted the window up higher, jumped out, ran up, and threw the basket over the rails of the square. The cook and I followed the prisoner, the others ran down Cadogan-place. The prisoner was stopped, and the cook took the handkerchief out of his pocket. I got the basket over the rails.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined One Year , and Publicly Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200628-88

809. ELIZA WEST was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of June , one watch, value 30 s.; one chain, value 1 s., and one seal, value 6 d., the goods of Thomas Ganley , from his person .

THOMAS GANLEY . I live in Chapel-place, Russell-square. On the 10th of June, about twelve o'clock at night, I was coming from the Rose, in Rose-street, Long-acre; the prisoner and another came up to me by the Coal-yard, in Drury-lane , and wanted me to go with her, I refused. She asked for drink, I said I had no money - her companion said,

"If you have no money I have, and will treat you for my country's sake" - I refused. The prisoner clapped her hand round me, took my watch out, and handed it towards her companion. I seized her and took it from her, as her companion was not near enough to receive it. I called the watchman, who took her.

Cross-examined by MR. ARABIN. Q. Were you sober - A. I was not drunk - I knew what I was about.

RICHARD SMITH . I am a patrol. The prosecutor gave the prisoner in charge - the case of his watch was gone.

WILLIAM READING . I am a watchman. I went up with Smith, and took the prisoner and another woman. The prisoner said the prosecutor gave her the watch to raise money on it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was returning from my sister's, this man attacked me and pulled me about, and because I would not go with him he gave charge of me.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Confined One Month .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200628-89

EIGHTH DAY, THURSDAY, JULY 6.

810. SARAH EDWARDS was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of May , one pair of trowsers, value 20 s., and one waistcoat, value 10 s. , the goods of John Kerr .

MARGARET KERR . I am daughter of John Kerr , who lives in St. Martin's-street . On the 31st of July, I missed these trowsers off the banisters, ran out, and secured the prisoner in Whitcomb-street with them.

WILLIAM WALLIS . I took the prisoner in charge, and she said she took them for want.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A woman dropped them, and I picked them up.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Confined Three Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200628-90

811. WILLIAM NICHOLS and DANIEL RYAN were indicted for stealing, on the 10th of June , one necklace, value 5 s., the goods of William Sinclair , from the person of Thomas Sinclair .

The prosecutor not being able to identify the property, the prisoners were

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200628-91

812. ELIZA ROBINSON was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of June , from the person of William West , three 1 l. bank notes, his property .

WILLIAM WEST . On the 21st of June, between nine and ten o'clock at night, I met the prisoner in Back-church lane, Whitechapel. I keep an academy in Chamber-street. I went to a public-house with her, two women of her acquaintance came in. I was with her an hour or two at the Jolly Sailors, till twelve or one o'clock; it being then late, I went to her lodgings, and was there till between two and three. I locked the door, put the key into my pocket, and took my notes out in her presence, to satisfy myself that they were safe. I only took my coat off and put it under the pillow. I was awoke in about half an hour by the door opening; I then found my coat at the bottom of the bed, and my notes gone, but the pocket-book remained - the prisoner had then got outside the door. I called for a light, they said they would bring me a knife if I did not immediately leave the house - there were ten or twelve persons in the house. I was struck with a shovel in the house, and terribly ill-used. Immediately as I said I would give her into custody, the prisoner made a blow at my head, I warded it off.

Prisoner. Q. Was not a woman named Jones, with you - A. She introduced a person of that name.

JOSEPH KENDALL . I am a watchman. I heard the cry of Watch about 20 minutes past two o'clock, and found West at the door in a terrible bustle. I asked for a light, one was brought, he said he had been robbed of three 1 l. notes. I found the prisoner standing at the foot of the bed - she wished to be searched - I found nothing on her. Four or five men and different women were in the house.

WILLIAM SOMERS . I was constable the night, the prisoner was brought to the watch-house - West said, in her presence, that she had beat him with the shovel.

Prisoner's Defence. I was walking with my child, and met him with Jones, and they took me into a house, we eat and drank there, he was very tipsy. I took my child home and returned to him, he followed me home - and when I asked him for a compliment, he charged me with robbing him of his watch - he found that safe, and then charged me with stealing the notes - he struck me with the handle of the brush. I called out Murder! the mistress of the house came up, and he charged her with it. He had been at a notorious house in the neighbourhood all the afternoon drinking with Howard, who went to the office with him. I never touched his money.

WILLIAM WEST re-examined. Howard is no acquaintance of mine. I did not take him to the office, he was there. He came to Hicks's-hall while I was there. I do not think I spoke to him.

WILLIAM SOMERS re-examined. I think I saw Howard in the office before West came; they appeared to know each other.

MARY RICHARDSON . I live at this house, the prisoner lives there. My husband is a tailor. I heard a noise and cry of murder - West had the handle of the broom in his hand, and was striking her. She said he had given her no money, and he said she had robbed him of his watch, he found that safe. I said

"You had better see if your pocket-book is safe" - he examined his pocket-book, and then said she had robbed him of 2 l., and said he was an officer himself - he gave charge of me likewise.

WILLIAM SOMERS . This woman informed me she kept the house.

ANN WILMOT . I live in George-street, my husband is in the East India service. I called on Mr. Spellman, and stopped there all night, as I had to go into the City early in the afternoon - she keeps the house. I heard the prisoner call murder. I had seen the prosecutor come in very much intoxicated.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200628-92

813. JAMES CUSTANCE was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of June , two bonnets, value 4 s. , the goods of Joseph Hockey .

JOSEPH HOCKEY . I live in Skinner-street, Bishopsgate-street . I am a willow weaver , the prisoner was in my service. I missed two bonnets about eight o'clock in the morning. I gave him in charge, and the officer found them at his mother's - he said his mother told him to bring

them, and he was to pay for them on Saturday out of his wages.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. He has sold bonnets for you before - A. Yes; and given a fair account of them.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200628-93

814. JOHN ROBERTS was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of May , one bag, value 6 d; two live tame fowls, price 7 s.; one bed, value 2 s.; one plane, value 3 s.; one saw, value 2 s.; four chisels, value 1 s.; one gouge, value 6 d., and one pound of feathers, value 6 d. , the goods of Henry Thomas Galliers .

HENRY THOMAS GALLIERS . I live in Cable-street , these things were stolen from my back warehouse.

WILLIAM HOWMAN . I am a watchman. On the 21st of May, at three o'clock in the morning, a person called me into the next yard to the prosecutors', and said somebody was in his yard. I found the prisoner standing in a small court which joins the prosecutor's garden - he was standing close by this property, which was in a small corn bin in the court. I found a small bag in the bin, containing the fowls, which were just killed; the tools were by the side of the bag

JOHN EDWARDS . I live at the prosecutor's. I saw the things safe at eleven o'clock at night.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAM SOMERS . I took the prisoner in charge, and found some twine on him, which the prosecutor claimed.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined One Year , and Publicly Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200628-94

815. EDWARD RAWLEY and JAMES BAKER was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of May , one cream jug, value 1 l. , the goods of William Lee the elder ,

Rawley pleaded GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined Three Months , and Publicly Whipped .

AMEY MARRIOT. I am servant to Mr. William Lee , who lives in Shore-place, Hackney - this cream jug was in the kitchen, Rawley came down to sell some potatoes. I left him standing at the kitchen dinner-hall. I went to get some money, Baker was outside; about a quarter of an hour after he was gone, I missed the jug. About two hours after the constable brought Rawley back with it. Baker was found and taken, and said Rawley gave him the jug at Homerton.

THOMAS GOODWIN . I am a constable. On the 23d of May, Marriot described the boy to me. I found Rawley in Mare-street about two o'clock, with a donkey. I asked him if he had been selling potatoes in Shore-place - he said he had, and that the other boy who was with him, had gone to town. I afterwards found Baker waiting in a field, and found the jug on him - he said the other boy gave it to him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

BAKER'S Defence. Rawley gave me the jug.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200628-95

816. WILLIAM GRIFFITHS and JOHN KIRKMAN were indicted for stealing, on the 8th of June , two trowels, value 5 s., and one hammer, value 2 s., the goods of William Sherriff ; and one jacket, value 18 d. , the goods of James Tovey .

WILLIAM SHERRIFF . I am a plasterer , and live in Kentish-town. On the 8th of June these trowels and hammer were in the parlour of a house at the corner of Harrison-street, Gray's Inn-lane , which is under repair. I had used them till half-past six o'clock, when we left work - the house was closed. The prisoners are strangers. I returned at half-past five o'clock next morning - my tools were then gone, and other things lost, worth about 20 s. The area-door was found open. Two days after I found the prisoners in custody with the trowels and hammer.

Cross-examined by MR. ARABIN. Q. What day of the month was it - A. We missed them on Wednesday morning, the 8th of June. I know James Tovey left his jacket there, saw it produced before the magistrates, and knew it to be his.

GEORGE TAYLOR . I am a constable of Clerkenwell. On Thursday, the 8th of June, about eight o'clock in the evening, I found the prisoners, and two others in company, coming up Bagnigge Wells-road, and coming across the fields. I followed them - Kirkman had the jacket with the trowels under his arm; and the one who ran away had another bundle under his arm. Griffiths was in company with Kirkman. When I came up to the Small-pox Hospital, I stopped Kirkman, and asked what he had there - he said they were his brother's tools which he had brought from the building. I asked where his brother worked - he said he would show me; when he turned round to go, he said, No, they were not his brother's, but that Dunn gave them him to carry. I said I should take him into custody. Griffiths walked away - I made no charge against him as I knew where he lived - I took him at his mother's door.

JOHN DUNN . I am an apprentice to a plasterer. I know Sherriff. I never gave Kirkman the tools to carry, I never had them. I was not working at these houses, but at my master's buildings, in Euston-square. I met William Griffiths and George Vanderval together on Thursday evening, a little before eight o'clock. He asked if I wanted to buy any plasterer's tools - said he had found some in a field, but he thought they had been stolen, and he took and hid them again. They asked if I would come and see them. Kirkman was standing by when I met them, and he asked if he should come and see them - they went and fetched them, and brought them to us. They told us to wait at the end of the field by Bagnigge-Wells, and they would fetch them. They showed them to us in that field, which is about a quarter of a mile from Harrison-street. When I saw them, I said they did not suit me, that my master found me in tools, and that I did not want to buy them. I have known Kirkman eight or nine years, and know Griffiths also - they live in the same neighbourhood. Kirkman carried the tools, and they asked me to carry the brushes for them, which I did, and gave them to Griffiths again, when we came into Weston-street, where he lived. I do not know what has become of them. I gave them to him before he came to his

mother's door. Taylor came to my master's buildings on Friday, and I told him what I knew.

WILLIAM COLTON . I was with Taylor this evening, and saw all four in company. I left Taylor with Kirkman while I ran after Vanderval, who ran away with something under his arm - it appeared to be some planes - he got away. When I returned, Taylor asked Kirkman where he got the trowels - he said they were his brother's; and as we went to the watch-house, he said Dunn gave them to him to carry.

JAMES DEVEY . I am a carpenter . I worked at the house, and left my jacket there and a parcel of tools. I returned at half-past five o'clock next morning - my basket of tools and all were gone.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GRIFFITHS'S Defence. I was crossing the fields with Vanderval, and saw this property under an archway. I said I did not like to take them. I went to Somers'-town and told several persons, they said what a fool I was, and I went to fetch them. I met Kirkman, and then met Dunn, and asked him to buy them.

GRIFFITHS - GUILTY . Aged 17.

KIRKMAN - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined One Year , and Publicly Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200628-96

817. JAMES MARTIN , WILLIAM HYDE , and ANN HYDE , were indicted for stealing, on the 25th of May , one pelisse, value 10 s.; one petticoat, value 2 s.; one pair of stockings, value 1 s.; one cap, value 6 d.; one bolster, value 1 s.; two curtains, value 2 s.; one bonnet, value 2 s., and one tea-kettle, value 1 s. , the goods of Dennis Jackson .

DENNIS JACKSON . I live in Cannon-street, St. George's in the East, and am a gingerbread-baker . I had a stall at Stepney fair . On the 25th May, about one o'clock in the morning, I missed all these things from my stall. I found my booth was cut open. I heard my bed and blankets were found at Hyde's - he keeps a drinking booth - I went and found twenty or thirty persons there. I found Martin there, and he said,

"Mr. Jackson, what are you come here for?" - I said I had lost something. I set two men to watch the booth, and fetched a constable. Moss called me, and I found Martin in his custody - a pelisse, the stockings, cap, and bonnet, were found on him. I found the rest of the property in Hyde's booth and secured him.

CHARLES MOSS . I am a servant to Jackson. About three o'clock in the morning I went into Hyde's booth, Martin came in and said,

"I suppose that **** has come to look after the bed and blankets, knock his head off his shoulders." I made no reply, but came out; and in about ten minutes I saw him come out with a bonnet and bundle - he dropped the bundle. I pursued him and took him with the bonnet in his hand. I picked up the bundle and knew the property. I afterwards went to the booth, and found the other things in the morning. Ann Hyde was setting on the kettle to conceal it.

JOHN BROWN. I am an officer. I received the prisoners in charge with the property.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

MARTIN'S Defence. I never had the things.

HYDE'S Defence. People come to my booth and bring tea-things - I supply them with water and take care of their things. I do not know how these things came there.

JAMES MARTIN - GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

WILLIAM HYDE - NOT GUILTY .

ANN HYDE - NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200628-97

818. WILLIAM THOMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of May , twenty-four pair of scissars, value 20 s. , the goods of John Payne and Thomas Simpson .

THOMAS SIMPSON . I am in partnership with John Payne . We are cutlers , and live in the Borough . The prisoner was an apprentice to one of our workmen. He came to the shop on Saturday evening, about eight o'clock - the scissars were on a back counter. He was apprehended on Monday, and I then missed them.

ALBERT SOILLEUX . I am a working-cutler, and live at Bethnal-green. On Monday, the 29th of May, the prisoner called with two dozen pair of scissars, and asked if they would be of any value to me. I found the prosecutors' names on them, and asked how he came by them. He said he found them in the City-road, and offered them for sale in Whitecross-street, and they offered him 18 s. for them. I gave him in charge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Whipped and Discharged .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200628-98

819. JACOB MOSES was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of May , one watch, value 4 l.; one chain, value 2 d.; two seals, value 30 s.; one ring, value 5 s., and one key, value 3 s. , the goods of Charles Newton Mills .

CHARLES NEWTON MILLS . I am in the East India Company's service , and live in James-street, Bethnal-green. On the 28th of May, about half-past nine o'clock at night, I was crossing the end of Artillery-lane , with a large bundle under my arm, and heard a person coming behind me, I just turned round to see who it was, and at that instant I saw the prisoner come in front of me - he reeled about, pretending to be drunk; when he came up to me he ran his head towards my face, and at the same instant snatched my watch from my fob; I saw it in his hand - he ran up Artillery-lane, and I followed, calling Stop thief! a person attempted to stop him, but he got away, turned Sandy's-row, and I followed him into a public-house, where he was secured, with the watch in his pocket. I am certain he is the person.

JOHN LESTER . I am a dyer. I was at the corner of Artillery-lane, heard the cry of Stop thief, and saw a man running - I pursued him into the public-house. I only lost sight of him in turning the corner. I laid hold of him in the public-house - it was the prisoner. He said if I would go aside he would deliver it up. I saw him deliver it to the prosecutor.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I beg for mercy.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200628-99

820. THOMAS PRENDERGAST was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of May , one watch, value 2 l., the goods of William Smith , from his person .

WILLIAM SMITH . I live in Lincoln's Inn-fields. On 23d of May, between eleven and twelve o'clock, I was near the corner of Petticoat-lane, Whitechapel , with my nephew; just before I came to the corner of the lane, the prisoner ran against me, snatched my watch from my fob, and I saw him hand it to another. I secured him, and gave him to the watchman.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Where had you been - A. To see a friend in Nelson-square. I had come through Stepney fair at four o'clock. I was sober, and am sure he is the person.

WILLIAM SMITH . I am nephew to the prosecutor; we were both sober. I was pushed off the curb at the corner of Petticoat-lane, and on turning round I saw my uncle lay hold of the prisoner, and charge him with taking his watch.

Prisoner's Defence. I was just entering my door when he stopped me.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Recommended to Mercy.

Confined One Year , and Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200628-100

821. MARY REVLET was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of June , from the person of John Herbert , one watch, value 4 l., and four 1 l. Bank-notes, his property .

JOHN HERBERT . I am servant to Dr. Berkbeck, of Coleman-street. On the 12th of June, I was sent with Mr. Edwards's coach to Willis's rooms. I went to a public-house close by, called for some gin and water, and took out four 1 l. notes from my fob to pay. I afterwards put them into my fob again, on the top of my watch. I did not change either of them. I then ran home as fast as I could - when I got as far as Bedfordbury , the prisoner caught hold of me, and wished me to go home with her. I refused, she instantly put her hand into my waistcoat pocket, and took 5 d. out; she would not return it, but said she would spend it - we went to a public-house, and had two glasses of gin with it - when we came out, it struck me, that as she took my halfpence, she might take my watch - and I put my chain down into my fob, on the notes - she walked on, and insisted on my going further with her. I said I would not, she instantly put her hand into my fob, and got the watch and notes out. I caught the watch in her hand as she pulled it out - I took it from her, and put it in again. I then felt and missed the notes, she ran down a passage, and was taken about two hours after - as the publican knew her, and gave information. She went by the name of Modest Mary. I was with them when she was taken, about twenty yards from where I was robbed. I positively swear she was the woman.

RALPH FELLOWS . I am a grocer, and live in Maddox-street, Golden-square. I was with the prosecutor at the time, and I saw him produce four notes.

Prisoner's Defence. He spoke to another woman, then he wanted to go home with me - but said he had no money, and would leave his watch. I went home.

GUILTY . Aged 38.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18200628-101

822. JOSEPH HAT was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of June , one sun-dial, value 5 s. , the goods of Francis George .

ZENOBIA GEORGE . I live in Blandford-place , and am the daughter of Francis George . A dial was stolen from our garden - the one produced is like it.

RALPH HADLEY . I am a watchman. On the 4th of June, about seven o'clock in the morning. I stopped the prisoner in Seymour-street with the sun-dial. He said he found it.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked it up.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18200628-102

823. WILLIAM HOLLEMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of June , one pocket-book, value 1 s., and two 1 l. Bank-notes , the property of Henry Habel .

HENRY HABEL . I live in Rosamond's-buildings, Islington, and am a baker . I have taken a house at Holloway , and was having some stoves set there. On the 23d of June, about four or five o'clock, I left my coat in the back kitchen, my pocket-book, containing two 1 l. notes was in it. I went there between eight and nine o'clock and found it gone, the prisoner had been working there - we went to his lodgings, but found nothing. The officer went a second time, and produced the pocket-book, which then contained memorandums of mine - but the notes were gone.

GEORGE FOWLER . I am a constable. I found 13 s. 6 d. in the lining of the prisoner's hat. I found the pocket-book at his lodgings in a small drawer, covered with rubbish.

GUILTY . Aged 41.

Confined Six Months , and Publicly Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18200628-103

824. GEORGE GOLDING was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of May , one sheet, value 3 s. , the goods of Henry Freeman .

The prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18200628-104

825. CATHERINE COLLYER was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of June , three handkerchiefs, value 4 s.; one yard of linen, value 1 s., and one apron, value 6 d. , the goods of John Stow .

SUSAN STOW . I am the wife of John Stow , we live at Howard's-green, City-road . I am a laundress. The prisoner had washed and ironed for me about seven weeks. I lost three handkerchiefs, the first or second week in April, and a good many more things, and discharged her in consequence.

BARNARD GLEED . I am a constable. On the 13th of June, I apprehended the prisoner for stealing a watch, and in her pocket I found duplicates of this property.

HENRY SHAW . I am a journeyman to Mr. Thimbleby, a pawnbroker, Old-street. I have three handkerchiefs and an apron pledged by the prisoner. I have known her about a year.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. She sent me to pledge things for her every day of my life.

GUILTY . Aged 43.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18200628-105

826. MARY BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of June , one yard of patent cord, value 4 s. , the goods of John Swift .

JOHN SWIFT . I live in Crown-street, Finsbury-square , I am a shoe-maker . On the 9th of June, the prisoner came in and asked for a pair of child's shoes - she was shown a pair, and asked to see another pair - she then offered less than I could take - but knowing her before, I said she should have them. She then made an excuse, and said she would send her child for them - she went out. I missed nothing, but followed her, and asked her if she had anything of mine - she said No; I called and brought her back. I felt her clothes, and a yard of patent cord dropped from her. I picked it up, she then said she hoped I would forgive her; I said I would not, for I had long looked for her.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I will never come here again.

GUILTY . Aged 55.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant. Esq.

Reference Number: t18200628-106

827. MARY SHOUGH was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of May , one sheet, value 8 s.; one gown, value 5 s.; one shift, value 5 s.; and one pair of stockings, value 1 s. , the goods of Barnaby Fling .

MARY FLING . I am the wife of Barnaby Fling , we live in George-street, Bethnal-green ; the prisoner lodged with me. On Whit Tuesday I left her in care of my place. I came home about eleven o'clock at night, and missed her and the property. Next morning she was apprehended, very much in liquor.

SARAH BAKER . I lodge at Fling's, and was left with the prisoner. I went to bed for a short time, got up, and missed her.

Prisoner's Defence. I rather think it is a little bit of spite.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant. Esq.

Reference Number: t18200628-107

828. WILLIAM THACKER was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of June , one iron chain, value 20 s. , the property of Benjamin Gould .

BENJAMIN GOULD . I am a carman , and live in Worship-street . On the 22d of June, about seven o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner go out of my yard, with a log on his back. I ran down, missed the chain, followed and secured him with it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 19.

Judgment Respited .

Second Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18200628-108

829. WILLIAM ROBINSON was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of June , one watch-chain, value 1 s. and one key, value 6 d., the goods of Augustus Davis I'ons , from his person .

AUGUSTUS DAVIS I'ONS . I am a schoolmaster , and live in Heath-street, Stepney. On the 9th of June, about a quarter past nine o'clock at night, I was returning from Cumberland-street chapel, and looking in at a bookseller's window - I felt a pull at my watch, and saw the prisoner run from me, and two others, whom I suspected to be his companions - he was almost close to me, and turned up a yard. I followed, calling Stop thief - his companions ran another way. I followed him in the middle of the street, and hardly lost sight of him two seconds before I found him in custody, and am certain he is the person who stood close to me. I found a link of my chain broken, and the ring left, and the rest was gone with the key. He denied it at first, but when he found I was determined to give him in charge, he asked me to go back, and I should find the chain, but I did not. Nobody but him could have taken it.

WILLIAM PUGH . I am a hair-dresser, and live in Rose-lane, Spitalfields. I saw the prosecutor and prisoner scuffling, and joined in pursuit. I did not see him at the window - I saw him turn short round when the prosecutor called Stop thief. Nobody was near but him and the other two.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18200628-109

830. WILLIAM BEAVER was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of February , twenty hand glasses, value 2 l. , the goods of William Thomas , Junior .

WILLIAM THOMAS , JUNIOR. My father is a market gardener, and lives at Bromley . We lost some hand glasses about the 7th of February.

JOHN LEE . I am a nursery-man, and live at Poplar. About the 13th of May I bought ten hand-glasses of him for 1 l., which is a fair price. I believe him to be strictly honest - he had exposed them for sale openly in the street before I bought them. He said he bought them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200628-110

831. ISAAC MYERS was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of June , from the person of Jane Stewart , one 10 l. Bank note, her property .

JANE STEWART . I lodged five months at the prisoner's in Back-church-lane - I am an unfortunate girl. I paid him 24 s. a week for board. On Wednesday night, the 21st of June, I was packing up my clothes to go into the hospital, the prisoner came into the room, forced his hand into my pocket, and took out a small box containing a 10 l. note; he took the note out, laid the box on the table, and left the room - he was quite sober. I had paid him my rent. I called the watchman, it was sometime before he came, he went to fetch an officer. The prisoner then went out, and returned before the officer came - he denied taking it and was taken to the watch-house, and then gave charge of me. I found my note at the office. Next day I happened to go into the Prince of Wales, public-house, kept by Compton, and told my story - he asked what sort of a note it was? I said it was torn not quite in the middle, and had red writing on it; he then shewed it to me. I cannot read.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Did you lose a 1 l. note that evening - A. Yes. The prisoner said if I would send for some gin he would find it - I agreed to it; he brought the gin and gave me 18 s. 6 d.; four of us drank

of it. He took the 10 l. note afterwards. I have heard him say he cannot read or write.

THOMAS COMPTON . I keep the Prince of Wales, public-house, in Church-street, about one hundred yards from the prisoner's. About eleven o'clock on the night the prisoner was charged with this robbery, he came into my house, held up a 10 l. note, and said he wanted change; I told him it was a 10 l. note, and I could not give him change, for my father had taken the small notes up when he went to bed. He asked for a shilling's-worth of liquor, which he had. I gave him 19 s., and told him I would give him the rest next morning - he left the note with me. Next morning the prosecutrix came with another female. I delivered the note to my father; he shewed her the note - she described it first, said it was torn across, and had a red-ink mark over the Ten, which was an exact description.

RICHARD BLANKET . I am a beadle. The watchman sent me to the prisoner's house, I found him and the prosecutrix in the room, about a quarter past eleven o'clock at night. She said he had robbed her of a 10 l. note, he said he never had a 10 l. note; that she had thrown her notes about the floor, that his mother picked up a 1 l. note, and he went to get some gin with it. I saw five notes on her chest. I detained them both.

JANE STEWART re-examined. It is the note I lost.

GUILTY . Aged 36.

Confined One Year , and Publicly Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200628-111

832. JOSEPH NETTLEFOLD was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of June , six pair of soles, value 4 s., and four haddocks, value 2 s. , the goods of Robert Henry Davis .

ROBERT HENRY DAVIS . I am a fishmonger , and live in the City-road . On the 20th of June, Harcourt came into my shop and gave me information. I then missed the fish off my board, ran out, and overtook the prisoner about two hundred yards off, in the act of putting them into the bosom of his smock-frock.

JAMES HARCOURT . I live near Davis. I was at my door and saw the prisoner pass with the fish. I told Davis and he secured him.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought them.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Publicly Whipped and Discharged .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200628-112

833. JOHN COTTER was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of June , one necklace, value 5 s., the goods of John Goddard , from the person of Emma Goddard .

ANN EYRE . I live in North-street, City-road, and am sister to John Goddard . Emma is his child, and about five years and a half old. I, my sister, and niece, were walking in the fields towards Islington , with the child and my little daughter. The two children walked before us, and I heard them scream. My sister said the child had lost its necklace. I saw the prisoner run from behind her - he was not above a yard from her. A gentleman pursued and caught him. Part of the necklace was picked up and put into my hands - the string must have been broken or cut - nobody was near enough to do it but him.

AMELIA GODDARD . I am aunt to the child. I had hold of the child's right hand and saw the prisoner behind her some way. The child screamed - I then missed the beads off its neck. I saw the prisoner throw them away and picked them up.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I picked them up. I am eleven years old.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200628-113

834. ELEANOR SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of May , from the person of John Jackman , one watch, value 30 s.; one seal, value 8 s.; one key, value 1 s.; one pair of breeches, value 20 s.; 10 s. in monies numbered; one 10 l. and two 1 l. Bank notes, his property .

JOHN JACKMAN . I am a servant out of place . On the 25th of May, about half-past eleven o'clock, I went to a house in Maynard-street with the prisoner. I was sober, and had this property in my breeches pockets. We were the only two in the room. I missed the prisoner about half-past three o'clock, but did not rise till seven o'clock, as I did not know where to go. I missed the articles stated in the indictment, and have never found any of them.

SAMUEL FURZEMAN . I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner on the 26th, in the same room. I could not find her before.

Prisoner's Defence. He went home with me, and in a few minutes, I lit him down stairs, and saw no more of him.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200628-114

835. SARAH JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of May , one coat, value 3 s. , the goods of John Smith .

JOHN SMITH . I am a pawnbroker and live in Charles-street . The prisoner came to my shop, and I missed the coat about ten minutes after. I learnt where she lived and got an officer, who found it there.

MICHAEL NORRIS . I found the coat up stairs - the prisoner sleeps down stairs in the house. I apprehended her next day - she said a woman gave it her to carry at Smith's door.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200628-115

836. FRANCES NICHOLLS was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of June , from the person of John Ashworth , one 1 l. Bank note, his property .

The prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200628-116

837. SARAH MYERS and EDITH WATERHOUSE were indicted for stealing, on the 8th of June , one necklace, value 20 s., the goods of Thomas Sharp , from the person of Thomas Sharp , the younger .

EDWARD GINGER . I am servant to Thomas Sharp , and had the care of his son Thomas, who is fifteen months old. On the 8th of June I was opposite Whitechapel church with him in my arms. Coates came and said the girls had stolen the necklace off its neck, and pointed to the prisoners - they were secured - it has not been found.

SARAH COATES . I live in Grove-street. I was in Whitechapel-road, between four and five o'clock in the afternoon, and saw the prisoners close behind the child. Myers attempted to take the beads off its neck, but did not. Waterhouse then went up and took them off. They both went away together. I told the boy, and they were secured.

MYERS'S Defence. I stopped to look at the mob and was taken.

MYERS - GUILTY . Aged 17.

WATERHOUSE - GUILTY . Aged 15.

Confined Three Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200628-117

NINTH DAY, FRIDAY, JULY 7.

838. ANN WHITAKER was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of May , 9 s. 6 d. in monies numbered, the monies of Farndon Bond , from his person .

The prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200628-118

839. RICHARD STIFF and CHARLES LUCY were indicted for stealing, on the 23d of March , 200 lbs. of hay, value 10 s. , the goods of Rowland Alston , Esq .

MR. ALLEY conducted the prosecution.

ROWLAND ALSTON , ESQ. I reside in Harley-street , and have a coach-house and stable there. Stiff was my coachman . The witness, Foort, had been six or seven weeks in my service - Stiff hired him, and caused him to be discharged. Foort charged Stiff with stealing hay. I said then I was satisfied it was not true, and was ready to give him every assistance to punish the boy for so false a charge. About two days after Stiff took a warrant out against him.

Cross-examined by MR. BROADRICK. Q. The charge for stealing hay was made by Foort, after Stiff took him before a Magistrate for an assault - A. No: he informed me of it two days before.

DANIEL FOORT . I was stable-boy in Mr. Alston's service. The first week I went into his service, about six o'clock in the morning, I saw a cart drawn up to the loft-door, and hay pushed into it - I did not see Lucy with the cart then, but have seen him three times with it before, at the same place. Stiff put three or four trusses of hay into it, apparently - nobody but him had an opportunity of doing it - the loft communicates with his bedroom. When the cart drove away, some hay was scattered over the ground, and Stiff swept it up to the dunghill.

Cross-examined. Q. Where did you come from before you lived with Mr. Alston - A. I came from Ruslip parish, but had only been in town a short time. I told Mr. Alston I had lately come from the country.

Q. When you heard you was to be discharged, did you not use violent language to Stiff - A. No: I only d - d him, and said I would talk to his master, and then I should be sure to do him. I made no charge against him before, because I thought he had got me the place.

EDWARD FOORT . I am uncle to the last witness, and in the service of Mr. Ricardo, whose stable-door is exactly opposite Mr. Alston's. I have seen a cart there once, or twice, early in the morning - hay was put into it, and it was trod down - the cart was filled. Stiff pushed it out of the loft into the cart, - it was rubbishing, loose hay, not trussed.

WILLIAM WAINWRIGHT . I am an officer. On the 25th of May I apprehended the prisoners. Stiff said he had given some hay to Lucy, but it was the sweepings of the loft and he received nothing for it.

ANDREW LANE . In March last I supplied the prosecutor with hay, it was good hay and all fit for use.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200628-119

840. SAMUEL BOWER and JAMES COKER were indicted for stealing, on the 27th of June , two geese, price 5 s. , the property of Benjamin Bilsborough .

BENJAMIN BILSBOROUGH . I live in Belgrave-street, Pimlico . On the 27th of June two geese were stolen from my yard. I was disturbed about four o'clock in the morning by Vine. The prisoners were brought back with the geese, which were stolen from my yard.

RICHARD VINE . I am servant to Mr. Bilsborough. At half-past two o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoners coming out of the yard with two geese. I saw them ringing their necks, and secured Coker - when he saw me, he let the goose drop. The gates were open, as the men had come to work.

SAMUEL ELLIOTT . I am a watchman. I secured Bower behind the premises with a goose.

BOWER - GUILTY . Aged 25.

COKER - GUILTY . Aged 27.

Confined Two Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200628-120

841. JOHN READY was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of June , one fixture (i.e.), one copper, value 20 s., the goods of Joseph Sapswell , and fixed to a certain building of his, the prisoner having no title, or claim of title, to the same .

SOPHIA SAPSWELL . I am the wife of Joseph Sapswell , we live in Tottenham-place, St. Pancras . A copper was fixed in the wash-house. I saw it safe on the 5th of June, at eleven o'clock at night, and missed it next afternoon. It could have been got through the next house.

THOMAS SWAILES . I am a watchman. I stopped the prisoner on the morning of the 6th of June, at three o'clock, with the copper on his head, in Union-street, Middlesex Hospital. He said he brought it from Hampstead, and was taking it to his mother's, who is a washerwoman, and lives in Bird-street. I asked what number; he said,

"Ask no questions."

RICHARD COATES . The prisoner was given into my charge, and I advertised the copper.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200628-121

842. JOHN TARBOX was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of June , one bird-cage, value 2 s. , the goods of James Aslet Clark .

JAMES ASLET CLARK . I live in the Curtain-road . This cage hung out at the first-floor window at six o'clock in the morning. I came home at twelve o'clock at night and it was gone.

MARY GUICHENS . I live in Old-street. I bought the cage of a man, I cannot say it was the prisoner.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200628-122

843. ROBERT GREENHILL was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of June , one cart, value 5 l., and one set of cart-harness, value 1 l. , the goods of John Greenhill .

JOHN GREENHILL . I live in Sloane-street, Chelsea . The prisoner, I am sorry to say, is my son. On the 24th of January, at nine o'clock in the morning, the cart was safe; and about four o'clock in the morning I missed it. The officer produced it to me on the Monday following with the harness. I never gave my son leave to take it - he did not live with me.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not give it to me - A. Never.

MARY GREENHILL . I am the prisoner's mother. My husband lent him the cart once or twice, and said, if he could get any bread by it, he might take it at any time.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200628-123

844. JAMES HOLLIS and THEODORE PIKE were indicted for stealing, on the 15th of June , one handkerchief, value 4 s., the goods of James Bernard Bernard , from his person . - MR. HONE conducted the prosecution.

JAMES BERNARD BERNARD . I am a barrister , and reside in Gray's Inn. On the 15th of June, about nine o'clock in the morning, I was in Castle-street, Bloomsbury - I heard a voice call out

"They have picked your pocket." I felt and missed my handkerchief - and at the same time, turning round, I saw two persons running away. I pursued them towards Plumtree-street, into Museum-street, Broad-street, St. Giles's - and there they divided. I secured Hollis, and never lost sight of him. Pike was brought back, and my handkerchief produced.

WILLIAM HATTON . I am eleven years old, and belong to Shelton school; I live in Little Russell-street. On the 15th of June, I was coming out of a dairy in Castle-street with some milk, and saw Hollis draw the handkerchief from Mr. Bernard's pocket and give it to Pike, who followed close behind him. I am certain they are the boys. I immediately called to Mr. Bernard, they both ran away. I went home, and saw them at the office the same day.

JOHN CAREY . I am a shoemaker, and live in Plumtree-street. I was passing from Museum-street to Drury-lane, and saw Pike running with a handkerchief in his hand. I joined in the pursuit - and when he ran across, he threw it into a shop-door. I picked it up, and gave it to the prosecutor - he was stopped directly.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoners pleaded distress.

HOLLES - GUILTY . Aged 14.

PIKE - GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200628-124

845. GEORGE WARNER was indicted for embezzlement .

JOHN FORDHAM . I am a soda-water manufacturer . On the 22d of May I saw the prisoner in the neighbourhood of the Old Bailey, and asked him if he wanted work, he said Yes; I told him to go to my shop in Church-lane, Commercial Road , and he should carry goods out for me. I authorized him to receive money for me.

MARY THORPE . I ordered two dozen of spruce beer of the prosecutor - the prisoner brought it with a bill, receipted by the prosecutor, which I produce. I paid him 11 s. in silver.

MARY ANN FORDHAM . I sent the prisoner to the prosecutor's, he returned with some empty bottles, and said she would call and pay. He went to dinner, and never returned.

Prisoner's Defence. I went into a crowd in Cheapside, and it was taken out of my pocket.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Confined Fourteen Days .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200628-125

846. ELIZA STINTON was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of June , twenty-two plates, value 7 s. , the goods of William Parker .

JANE PARKER . I live at No. 22, Judd-street , and am in the earthenware business . I saw the prisoner take ten plates off the step of my door.

SOPHIA PARSON . I was at Mrs. Parker's, and saw the prisoner take the plates - in about two hours she came and took another quantity, and was secured with them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I picked them up.

GUILTY . Aged 43.

Confined Fourteen Days .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200628-126

847. JOHN WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of May , one pair of breeches, value 15 s.; one pair of trowsers, value 10 s., and one handkerchief, value 6 d. , the goods of John Kelly .

JOHN KELLY . I live in Lamb's-passage, Chiswell-street ; the prisoner was a lodger of mine. I went out on Monday, and left the things in the bed-room, on the ground floor.

JOHANNA KELLY . I saw the prisoner going off our steps. I went into the rooms and missed my husband's things, ran after him, and found them on him.

EDWARD OSBORNE . I stopped the prisoner with the clothes in a bundle.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200628-127

848. SAMUEL WATKINS was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of June , one seal, value 30 s.; one ring, value 4 s., and two keys, value 1 s., the goods of Thomas Kipling , from his person .

THOMAS KIPLING . I live in the Strand. On the 27th of June, between ten and eleven o'clock at night, I was coming home with my wife, and at the corner of Swan-yard the prisoner made a snatch at my watch, the ribbon

broke - he got the seal, keys and ring. I immediately pursued him up Swan-yard, and never lost sight of him till he turned the corner - and was only out of sight for half a minute - the watchman took him. I am sure he is the person. I have not found my property.

CHARLES SIMPSON . I am a watchman. I was standing nearly at the top of Swan-yard, heard the cry of Stop thief! and saw the prisoner come hastily through the posts, from Swan-yard, into White Hart-yard. I heard the cry of Stop thief immediately, and supposing him to be the thief, I ran across to take him, but he passed me. The road being up from one end to the other, he stumbled, and I secured him. Mr. Kipling immediately came up and said he was the man. Nobody was between him and the prosecutor.

Prisoner's Defence. I was running, and they took me.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200628-128

849. ELIZABETH JENNINGS was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of June , 4 s. in monies numbered, the monies of Joseph Cox , from his person .

JOSEPH COX . I live in Union-street, Hoxton. On the 16th of June, between eleven and twelve o'clock at night, I was near the New Bridge in the City-road ; I had been out on business - the prisoner ran smack up against me, and said,

"Ah my love," put her arms against me, and in an instant I felt her hand in my breeches pocket - she took 4 s. out. I seized her hand, and endeavoured to take it from her, she made a disturbance - two men came up from behind a wall and took her part, one of them struck me. I kept hold of her, called the watchman, they ran away, and I gave her in charge. I was quite sober. A note has been put into my hands since I came here, threatening my life if I appeared against her.

SAMUEL SANDERS . The prisoner was brought to the watch-house, a shilling dropped from her - I found only 1 d. on her. She said two men would come to vindicate her cause. The prosecutor was sober.

The Prisoner's Defence charged the prosecutor with improper conduct towards her.

JOSEPH COX . I took no liberties whatever with her.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200628-129

850. FRANCIS IMBER was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of June , one handkerchief, value 3 s., the goods of Joseph Hunt , from his person .

JOSEPH HUNT . I live in Crutched Friars. On the 25th of June, about seven o'clock in the evening, I was standing by the Canal in the City-road , a man asked if I had lost anything? I felt and missed my handkerchief - I laid hold of the prisoner, and found it in his pocket - it was a hot day. I think I might have dropped it in putting it into my pocket.

JAMES BARBER . I am a constable. I saw the prosecutor take the prisoner, he said he found the handkerchief.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked it up.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200628-130

851. JOHN CHARLTON was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of June , one hat, value 15 s., and one pair of gloves, value 1 s., the goods of William Philips , from his person .

WILLIAM PHILIPS . I am a servant out of place . On the 24th of June I was at a coffee-shop in Drury-lane , about twelve o'clock at night, and fell asleep with my head on the table; I awoke by feeling my hat go off - I found an old hat left by my side in its stead.

JAMES FARMBOROUGH . I live at the coffee-shop; the prisoner and another man came in, and in about ten minutes they hurried away. I saw the prosecutor's hat was gone, went out, and secured the prisoner six doors off. I found the hat on his head, with the gloves in it.

LUKE SINGER . I assisted in securing the prisoner.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I thought it was my own.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Fined One Shilling, and Discharged .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200628-131

852. JOHN SCRIVEN was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of June , one umbrella, value 5 s., and two shells, value 5 s. , the goods of John Fosh .

JOHN FOSH . I am a weaver , and live at Bethnal-green . On the 28th of June, about half-past seven o'clock in the evening, the prisoner was found in my room with this umbrella and shells - he was a stranger.

SARAH FOSH . I went out to get something for supper, the umbrella was then hanging up; on my return I found the prisoner in the room, and asked him what he wanted? he appeared much confused, and asked for some water. I found the umbrella by his side, and the officer found the shells in a chair on which he sat - they were taken from the table.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I went to ask for water.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Publicly Whipped, and Discharged .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200628-132

853. JOHN SWAIN was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of June , one pair of breeches, value 1 l., and 17 s. 6 d. in monies numbered , the goods and monies of John Hart .

JOHN HART . I lodge at the Nag's Head, in Carnaby-market , and am a tailor . On the 13th of June the prisoner came and took a bed for the night - he slept in the same room with me and went to bed first. When I went to bed I had 17 s. 6 d. in my pocket, and a new pair of breeches laid on the table. A soldier, who slept with the prisoner, awoke me about five o'clock, and asked me if I knew when the man went away? I said No, and immediately missed my money and the breeches. A few days afterwards I saw him in custody; he offered me a silver watch and other things if I would let him go - I refused.

SAMUEL LLOYD . The prisoner slept with me on the night of the robbery - I am certain of his person. I missed him at five o'clock. There was nobody else in the room.

THOMAS GLASSBOROUGH . I took the prisoner into custody; he denied it - I found nothing on him.

Prisoner's Defence. I slept there, but know nothing of the robbery.

GUILTY . Aged 41.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200628-133

854. JOHN MILLS was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of May , one basket, value 18 d.; 6 lbs. of marking letters, value 8 s.; 14 shaving-boxes, value 4 s.; one set of dominos and box, value 2 s.; one razor-strop, value 1 s.; eight boxes, value 1 s.; one bottle of marking-ink, value 6 d.; 12 pencils, value 18 d.; one pair of curling-irons, value 18 d., six looking-glasses, value 18 d., and 14 knives, value 4 s. , the goods of Henry Blay .

HENRY BLAY . I live in Great Crawston-street, Oxford-street, and keep a stand of hardware in Oxford-street . On Saturday night, between ten and eleven o'clock, these things were packed up in a basket, ready to send home - two boys came and asked the prices of different things, which drew my attention from it. I happened to look round and the basket was gone, the boys were gone also. Next morning, between eight and nine o'clock, I went to No. 15, Gee's-court, and found fourteen shaving-boxes, one box of dominos, fourteen pencils, a razor-strop, and some letters there.

JOHN LANEY . I am a locksmith, and live in Gee's-court. The prisoner came to me on Sunday morning, at eight o'clock, with another man, and offered these things for sale. I gave them 7 s. for them - I am sure he is the man. He left some printing letters with me. A short time afterwards Blay came and saw them on my counter. On Tuesday the prisoner came for the letters and I detained him.

THOMAS STEVENS . I took the prisoner into custody; he said he only went to shew the man where to sell them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I met a man in Oxford-street, he asked me where he could sell them; I sold them for him.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Confined Three Months , and Publicly Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200628-134

855. RICHARD LAWRENCE was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of June , two chairs, value 5 s. , the goods of George Shew .

GEORGE SHEW . I am an auctioneer , and live at the corner of Gate-street, Lincoln's Inn-fields . On the 26th of June two chairs were stolen from my passage, and two others had been stolen about six weeks before.

MATTHEW ASH . I am servant to Mr. Shew. About twelve o'clock in the morning a lady came and gave me information; I missed the chairs, I had seen them an hour before.

HARRIET HEMENS . My husband is a broker. On the 26th of January, at half-past eleven o'clock in the morning, the prisoner came to my house in Nottingham-court, Holborn - I immediately sent for Mr. Shew, as I knew him to be the man who stole the first two chairs; I also sent for an officer, and detained him with assistance. He struck me, and threatened to send my head through the wall if I did not loose him. He had at this time brought two chairs up the court to my house, and wanted 5 s. each for them. I gave one of them into my lodger's hands - the prisoner immediately took the other, and was going to run off with it, but I secured him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A man named Harding, whom I knew three years ago, met me, and asked where he could sell these chairs, and told me to dispose of them for him - the woman said they were stolen, and I was going to look for Harding, but she detained me.

GUILTY . Aged 62.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18200628-135

856. HENRY JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of June , two spoons, value 5 s. , the goods of John Malins .

JOHN MALINS . I live in Union-street, Somers'-town . On the 22d of June the prisoner came to look at an apartment we had to let, he said it was for a lady and gentleman, and requested an address to give them. My wife left him in the parlour, and came to me to write the address. I saw him leave the house and run, my wife said the spoons were gone - I pursued, and took him at the top of Wilstead-street; I desired him to shew me the contents of his pockets, which he did, and I discovered the two tea-spoons between two books.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded extreme poverty.

GUILTY . Aged 42.

Confined Six Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18200628-136

857. ISABELLA HURST was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of May , 2 lbs. of bacon, value 18 d., and one tongue, value 6 d. , the goods of John Elsworth .

SAMUEL DENNIS . I am servant to Mr. John Elsworth , who is a cheesemonger , and lives in Drury-lane . On the 31st of May, between six and seven o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner take a tongue and put it in her apron, she then took a piece of bacon. I told my master, he came and secured her, and took the bacon from her.

THOMAS EDWARDS . I took the prisoner in charge, and found the tongue in her pocket.

GUILTY . Aged 72.

Confined One Month .

First Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18200628-137

858. THOMAS DAY was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of May , one pair of shoes, value 1 s.; one coat, value 5 s.; one clock, value 15 s., and one shirt, value 4 s. , the goods of John Stump .

JOHN STUMP . I am a brick-maker , and live at Balls'pond - the prisoner worked with me, and lodged at my house. On the 22d of May when I got up in the morning, he was gone with this property. On the 29th of May I found him at work at Limehouse, with my shoes on his feet.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

CHARLES HOOD . I lodge at Draper's, in Kent-street. On Whit Monday I met the prisoner, he asked me if I wanted to buy a coat or jacket? I said No. He shewed me the clock, I said I had only 5 s. - he tied it up and went on; he then called me and said as I was a poor man I should have it.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Confined Six Months , and Publicly Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18200628-138

859. JOSHUA BARKER was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of May , one ham, value 1 l. , the goods of John Hackey .

THOMAS SAMS . I am servant to the prosecutor, his name is Mackey. NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18200628-139

860. JAMES EASON was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of June , one handkerchief, value 3 s., the goods of Joseph Talkington , from his person .

JOSEPH TALKINGTON . I am a waiter at the Old Bell inn, Holborn. On the 6th of June, between twelve and one o'clock in the day, I was in the Strand , and was robbed of my handkerchief. I knew nothing of it until Thompson called to me.

THOMAS THOMPSON . I am a constable. On the 6th of June I was in the Strand, and saw the prisoner in company with two others; I suspected and watched them, as they followed the prosecutor - one of them took the handkerchief out of the prosecutor's pocket, and put it into the prisoner's hand; I siezed him, took it out of his hand, and called to the prosecutor, who claimed it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18200628-140

861. RICHARD JAMES was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of May , 100 lanthorn horns, value 19 s. , the goods of William Dickenson and Thomas Arnott .

MR. ANDREWS conducted the prosecution.

THOMAS LAURIE . I am a tinman and brazier, at Wapping. On the 11th of May, between five and six o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner came and offered me 100 lanthorn horns for sale, he asked 12 s. I asked if that was the lowest - he said he did not wish to be hard, and would take 11 s. I asked where he lived, and his business - he said he made them himself. I thought the price was lower than it ought to be. He gave me the name of

" Thomas Jennings , No. 24, Drury-lane," and said he worked in the cellar as an horner, that he had some more at home, and would bring them. I suspected he was not acquainted with the business. He said he should be that way again in a few days - I paid him 11 s. and we parted. I knew the hand-writing on the paper which enclosed the goods, having dealt with the prosecutors. After receiving a second parcel of goods from him I went and informed the prosecutors.

ALEXANDER MITCHELL . I am a Thames Police surveyor. Beechey gave the prisoner into my custody on the 30th of May. I asked where he got the horns which he sold Laurie, he said he had them from John, at Dickenson and Arnot's warehouse. I asked how he came to go to their premises, after being ordered by Mr. Dickenson not to go - he said he should not have gone if John had not called to him - that John called him out of Allhallow's-lane, and he waited in the warehouse while John went and got the horns. I then asked how he came to give Mr. Laurie a false address, he said he was not going to be such a fool as to give his own address. I asked what he gave John for the horns, he said 2 s. 6 d. and afterwards said 7 s.

WILLIAM DICKENSON . I am in partnership with Thomas Arnott . I forbid the prisoner coming to the warehouse about two months ago - he had been occasionally employed there; the paper containing the horns has my writing on it, and came from our warehouse. John, my porter, had access to them, he has absconded.

GUILTY . Aged 55.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18200628-141

862. MICHAEL JONES and WILLIAM BUNN were indicted for stealing, on the 8th of June , one watch, value 30 s., the goods of Anthony Smith , from his person .

ANTHONY SMITH . I am in the service of Sir William Burrell , and live in Berkeley-square. On the 8th of June, about seven o'clock in the evening, I was at the corner of Dean-street, South Audley-street , at the time the Queen was there; there was a great crowd - the constable tapped me on the shoulder, and said my watch was gone. I felt and missed it, it was safe about a quarter of an hour before. I assisted him in securing the prisoners - a mob surrounded us, gave me a blow on my head, and knocked my hat off. They were secured at last.

Cross-examined by MR. HONE. Q. You did not feel your watch go - A. No; I was not exactly in the crowd.

THOMAS THOMPSON . I am a constable. I was in South Audley-street, saw the prisoners, and watched them for near half an hour. I saw them go up to Smith; Jones leant his left hand against his right arm, and with his right hand took the watch out, and gave it to Bunn. I stepped over and told Smith his watch was gone, and to follow me. I ran and seized Bunn, he had his left hand in his breeches pocket. I pulled it out, seized it with the watch in it, and took it from him - several desperate characters tried to rescue him - we kept him at the risk of our lives, and at last got him to the watch-house. Smith assisted in securing Jones; one of them struck me over the head, and said nobody should take him.

CHARLES READ . I am an assistant at Hatton-garden. I saw Jones take the watch and deliver it to Bunn. I secured Jones, he immediately struck me, and asked what I wanted - there was a great resistance. More officers came up and assisted. Several well-known characters endeavoured to rescue him. He said he would have killed me.

JOHN DAVIS . I am an officer. I was known by the bad characters, and kept back from their view till I saw them laid hold of. I then advanced and assisted - there was a desperate resistance. I was obliged to produce my pistol; we were struck in all quarters. Jones said in the way to the watch-house, that two or three of us should not have secured him.

WILLIAM LEE . I assisted in securing the prisoner with great difficulty. I struck Jones over the head, and took him. There were a great many thieves there.

CHARLES JONES . I assisted in securing the prisoner.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

BUNN'S Defence. Jones was not in my company.

JONES - GUILTY . Aged 20.

BUNN - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200628-142

863. JAMES BOX , DANIEL RYAN and WILLIAM HARWOOD were indicted for stealing, on the 22d of May, four live tame fowls, price 8 s. , the property of Luke Buttress .

LUKE BUTTRESS . I live in Ratcliffe-row, City-road , and keep fowls in my back yard. On Monday morning, about six o'clock, the watchman called me up. I found my fowls at the watch-house - they were safe over night.

WILLIAM HARTLAND . I am a watchman. About four o'clock in the morning I heard fowls cackling, I ran up the street, and found Lewin with the fowls. I ran after the thieves as he directed me, and saw Ryan and Harwood down George's-row, I took them to the watch-house. I was informed Box was gone into a house in George's-row, I went there after five o'clock and found him there.

WILLIAM LEWIN . I am a watchman, my box is near the prosecutor's house. I heard the cock making a noise, looked up, saw the prisoners' run across, and go down Nelson-street. I took a bag from Box, and asked what it contained - he ran off saying he did not know. I found four fowls in it. I can swear to him, but not to the others.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

BOX'S Defence. Buttress informed my mother he would not prosecute us.

RYAN'S Defence. I and Harwood were going to the river when the watchman took us.

BOX - GUILTY . Aged 15.

Confined Three Months , and Publicly Whipped .

RYAN - NOT GUILTY .

HARWOOD - NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200628-143

864. WILLIAM STANLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of June , one seal, value 30 s., and one key, value 2 s. 6 d., the goods of Stephen Demole , from his person .

STEPHEN DEMOLE . I live in Great Russell-street, Bloomsbury. On the 7th of June, about one o'clock in the day, I was in South Audley-street , going towards Piccadilly; the constable said I had been robbed. I then missed my seal and key, my ribbon was cut. The constable had then got the prisoner in charge.

GEORGE TAYLOR . I am a constable. I was in South Audley-street, and observed the prisoner there and Mr. Demole - a carriage was coming by Mr. Alderman Wood's house - the prosecutor was in the thickest of the crowd - as the carriage passed I saw a boy go behind him, and make a motion. I thought he cut his seals off. I jumped over and laid hold of the prisoner, who was before the prosecutor; the boy got away. I saw the seal fall in the road, it appeared to fall from the prisoner. I secured him, and he denied it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200628-144

865. BENJAMIN JOHNSON , Senior , was indicted for feloniously receiving, on the 13th of May , four sheets, value 16 s.; three blankets value 15 s.; one quilt, value 13 s.; one pillow, value 2 s., the goods of Hyam Isaacs; one gown, value 8 s.; one bonnet, value 7 s.; one box, value 3 s., the goods of Isaac Noy ; of which Benjamin Johnson , Junior, and Robert Johnson were convicted of stealing, well knowing them to have been stolen .

The evidence in this case was the same as last Session, when the prisoner was indicted as a principal.

(page 412)

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200628-145

866. WILLIAM BOWEN was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of May , 60 lbs. of lead, value 14 s., the goods of Francis Calder , and fixed to a certain house of his .

SECOND COUNT. The same, only stating it to be fixed to a building.

FRANCIS CALDER . I live in Market-street, Oxford-street, and have a house under repair in Marylebone-lane . I saw the lead-work safe at three o'clock on the afternoon of the robbery, and next morning I found the prisoner in custody with it - he had been discharged from working at the house the day before. I saw it fitted to the building, it matched exactly.

JOSEPH MARTIN . I work at the house. I left a little after six o'clock - all was then safe. I returned at half-past nine o'clock, and stopped there an hour, in consequence of suspicion. I heard some person coming down stairs. The prisoner came into the room where I was concealed with a bag on his back. He looked out of window to see if any one was watching him, as the watch-house is opposite, and then turned and walked down stairs. I went to the window, and told the watchman, who was coming by, to stop him - he brought a light, and I unlocked the door. He came in and found the prisoner concealed under a work-bench. The bag was behind the street-door with 60 lbs. of lead in it, which was afterwards fitted to the roof and tallied with it.

ALEXANDER FRAZIER . I am a watchman. Martin called me. I found the prisoner concealed under the carpenter's bench and the bag in the passage.

RICHARD COATES . I took the prisoner in charge, and fitted the lead to the roof. He had got the whole gutter away, and found a knife on him which appeared to have ripped it.

Prisoner's Defence. I went after my tools.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200628-146

867. GEORGE SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of May , eight caps, value 4 s.; two frills, value 6 d.; two spencers, value 1 s.; two hats, value 3 s.; two handkerchiefs, value 1 s.; one curtain, value 3 d.; three bonnet-boxes, value 3 s.; two mats, value 1 s.; one fender, value 6 d., and 20 lbs. of preserved limes, value 10 s. , the goods of Charles Smith .

CHARLES SMITH . I am a cheesemonger , and live in Butcher-row, East Smithfield . On the 12th of May I missed these things. I had employed the prisoner to remove some goods for me.

MARY ANN RAMPLEY . These things were left in my possession by Smith - they were in boxes. The prisoner came and asked for them, and I delivered him three boxes containing the property - he said Mr. Smith sent him. This was on the 12th of May, about ten o'clock.

WILLIAM SUMMERS . I am an officer. On the 13th of May the prisoner was given into my charge. He took me

to Norton's house, where he said he had sold some of the things. She delivered me three boxes containing the property.

SARAH NORTON . On the 12th of May I bought the property of the prisoner for 3 s. 6 d. He said they were given to him for moving.

ANDREW BUTLER . I was at Mr. Smith's when the prisoner brought some things - he told him to fetch no more.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I only had 1 s. for three days' work.

GEORGE SMITH . I paid him 2 s. 6 d. and was to give him more.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined Two Months , and Publicly Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200628-147

868. ALEXANDER RYAN was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of June , two sheets, value 8 s., and one blanket, value 3 s., the goods of John Davidson , in a lodging-room .

MARGARET DAVIDSON . I am the wife of John Davidson ; we live in Joiner-street, Wellington-square, Pancras . I let the prisoner a furnished lodging, at 3 s. a week. He remained four weeks, and left on the 20th of June without notice. I found the door open, and missed the sheets and blanket. He was apprehended that evening. Another man, whom he recommended to me, lodged with him, and both left together - he occupied another room.

WILLIAM THISTLETON . I apprehended the prisoner and another person, and found duplicates of the sheets and blanket on him.

SAMUEL HAMPSTEAD . I am a servant to Mr. Nicholas. On the 22d of June I took a sheet in pledge, in the name of Ann Davis . I do not know who pledged it.

JOHN TURNER . I am a servant to Mr. Crow, a pawnbroker. On the 21st of June the prisoner pledged a blanket for 3 s., in the name of John Myers .

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I intended to redeem them.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined One Year , and Publicly Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200628-148

869. ELEANOR LEARY was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of June , one handkerchief, value 1 s., and 10 s. in monies numbered, the goods and monies of Valentine Biles , from his person .

VALENTINE BILES. I am a porter , and live in Dean-street, Holborn. On the 11th of June, about eleven o'clock at night, I met the prisoner at the corner of Vine-street , and went to a house there with her. Immediately on her leaving me, I missed my handkerchief from my coat-pocket - the money was tied up in it. I told the watchman, and she was taken next morning.

WILLIAM CONNELL . I am a watchman. The prosecutor said he was robbed of 10 s. and his handkerchief, and described the person. I took the prisoner about five o'clock. I found the handkerchief, and two half-crowns tied up in it, on her. Biles described the handkerchief before it was produced. She then said she did take it from his pocket.

(Handkerchief produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was in distress, and went with him. I found the handkerchief laying at my feet.

GUILTY . Aged 44.

Confined One Year .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200628-149

TENTH DAY, SATURDAY, JULY 8.

870. CHARLES DARMOUR NASH was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of May , three brass rods, value 10 s., and one brass door-handle, value 2 d. , the goods of Frederick West .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200628-150

871. SAMUEL BROOKS was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of June , six planes, value 1 l.; one saw, value 4 s.; one square, value 3 s.; one oil-stone, value 1 s.; one hammer, value 9 d.; one screw-driver, value 1 s.; one basket, value 2 d., and four chisels, value 3 s. , the goods of John Greenin .

The prisoner did not plead to the indictment; and the Jury, being sworn to make inquest, on the evidence of Mr. Box, the surgeon, and Mr. Brown, the keeper, found him INSANE .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200628-151

872. ANN ESTHER HARRISON was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of May , one lock, value 1 s, and two keys, value 3 d. , the goods of David Richardson .

THOMAS TURNER . I am servant to Mr. Richardson. The lock was screwed on the door, and a fixture.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200628-152

873. JAMES KENDALL was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of May , one watch, value 1 l.; one shirt, value 2 s.; one waistcoat, value 1 s.; one pair of stockings, value 6 d., and one handkerchief, value 3 d. , the goods of William Hewson .

WILLIAM HEWSON . I live in Crown-court, Tooley-street , the prisoner and I slept together. On the 26th of May, about eight o'clock in the morning, I left him in the room, these things were then safe. I returned in a quarter of an hour and missed them, he was then gone.

THOMAS WESTBROOK . I am an officer. On the 27th of May the prisoner came into the Bunch of grapes, public-house, in Bow-street, informed me that he had committed a robbery, that he was very uneasy about it, and wished to give himself up. He took me to a shop where he said he had sold the watch.

JOHN HENRY SMITH . I am a salesman, and live in Holywell-street. On the 26th of May, about ten o'clock, the

prisoner sold me the watch for one guinea - I bought the duplicates of other things of him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I beg for mercy.

GUILTY . Aged 32.

Fined One Shilling, and Discharged .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200628-153

874. MARIA HARVEY and JANE BALL were indicted for stealing, on the 23d of May , one pair of shoes, value 2 s. , the goods of William Christmas .

WILLIAM CHRISTMAS . I live in Oxford-street . On the 23d of May the prisoners came to my shop with another woman, who bought a pair of shoes, she gave them to Ball to carry - all three went out together. I went after them, and found Ball on the opposite side of the way with a pair of child's shoes, which she had taken off the counter - she said Harvey stole them and gave them to her. I took Harvey afterwards - they both stood at the counter.

HARRIET POWELL . I live next door to Christmas. I saw the three women come out of the shop, and saw Harvey give a pair of shoes to Ball out of a paper, and informed Christmas.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

BALL'S Defence. Harvey gave them to me.

BALL - GUILTY . Aged 22.

HARVEY - GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined One Month .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200628-154

875. ANN DUNSTONE was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of May , two pillows, value 14 s.; two sheets, value 12 s; two blankets, value 8 s.; one quilt, value 8 s., and two pillow-cases, value 4 s., the goods of Henry Rogers , in a lodging-room .

The prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200628-155

876. WILLIAM CARTER was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of June , 144 buttons, value 16 s. , the goods of Thomas Greatrex .

THOMAS GREATREX . I am a tailor , and live in John-street, Oxford-street . On the 3d of June, 1816, the prisoner was in my employ. I missed these buttons, and have never found them - I have never seen him since till now.

RICHARD OUTRUM . I was apprentice to Mr. Greatrex. I gave the prisoner a gross of buttons to be used on some work - nobody but the prisoner was in the work-room - he left in about half an hour, and never returned. I missed the buttons, he had used none of them on the work.

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutor had beat the apprentice for taking them, and he owned it.

THOMAS GREATREX re-examined. I never charged the apprentice with taking them, I have the greatest confidence in him.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200628-156

877. GEORGE BRYANT was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of June , two sheets, value 8 s., and one counterpane, value 4 s., the goods of John Davidson , in a lodging-room .

MARGARET DAVIDSON . I am the wife of John Davidson ; the prisoner lodged in my parlour, at 5 s. a week. He came on the 20th of June, and left the same day. I missed these things, which were let with it.

WILLIAM THISTLETON . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner with Ryan, who was tried last night. I found duplicates of this property on the other man.

THOMAS ARMSTRONG . I am a pawnbroker. I have two sheets, pledged by Ryan.

SOMERVILLE TELFER. I am journeyman to Mr. Blackman, pawnbroker, Saffron-hill. I have a counterpane, pledged by Ryan.

Prisoner's Defence. I certainly took the lodgings, and my wife took another at the same time, so I left this.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200628-157

878. MARY RINGWOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of June , two table-cloths, value 4 s.; two napkins, value 2 s.; one towel, value 6 d., and one milk-pot, value 6 d. , the goods of Isabella Spratt .

ISABELLA SPRATT. I live in a garret - the prisoner lodged in the house. These things were in a drawer in her room, but not for her use; I missed them, and found them in her box.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 41.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200628-158

879. GEORGE COTTERELL was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of June , one counterpane, value 10 s. , the goods of Joseph Wray .

ELIZA WRAY . I am the wife of Joseph Wray , we live in Britannia-row, Islington - these things were by the parlour window, which was open at half-past eight o'clock, but the blind was down. I missed the counterpane about nine o'clock, and found it at Brown's.

ROBERT BROWN . I am a constable, and live next door to the prosecutor. A neighbour said somebody had taken something from the window, I went out, and secured the prisoner with the counterpane in his apron.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I saw it lying against the window, and of course picked it up.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Confined One Year , and Publicly Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200628-159

880. JOHN WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of June , one gown, value 4 s. , the goods of Thomas Sowerby .

JAMES WARD . I am shopman to Mr. Thomas Sowerby , a pawnbroker . On the 13th of June, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I missed this gown from the door, went out, and took the prisoner with it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 36.

Confined Two Months , and Publicly Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200628-160

881. WILLIAM JONES and JOSEPH PRESTON were indicted for stealing, on the 16th of June , one slip, value 10 s.; one spencer, value 1 l., and one skirt, value 1 l. , the goods of Melinda Colebrook , Spinster .

CHARLES SMITH . I am thirteen years old. I live in Cow-yard, Hampstead, and work for Miss Colebrook. About eleven o'clock in the morning of Friday, the 16th of June, I saw the prisoners in her field, where some linen was hanging to dry - there is a high gate with spikes to it. I saw them take these things off the lines, and go across the fields with them. I went into the kitchen and told the servants - they were taken on the Tuesday following. The linen has not been found. I am sure they are the boys; Preston took the things, and Jones stood by him.

ANN THUMWOOD . I am servant to Miss Melinda Cole-brook . Smith said two boys had taken the linen; I looked, and missed it. The prisoners lived at Hampstead.

JAMES ANTOBUS . I am a labourer. I heard of the robbery about three minutes after it happened. I was close to the terrace, and caught sight of the prisoners coming over the pales. I knew them before, but could not follow them then, being ill. I do not know which of them had the things.

JONES. Q. Did I not offer to give myself up to you afterwards - A. Yes.

JOHN EDWARD WILSON . I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoners on the 20th of June, at Hampstead. Smith, charged Jones with being one of them - he said he was ready to go to the prosecutrix. I saw Preston, and secured him.

JONES'S Defence. I was in Oxford-street at the time of the robbery, and then went to Deptford. I met a butcher, he told me what I was charged with, and I said I would give myself up.

PRESTON'S Defence. I heard the constable wanted me, I went and waited in the road for him to come by and take me.

JONES - GUILTY . Aged 17.

PRESTON - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200628-161

882. JOHN READY was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of June , one pistol, value 5 s. , the goods of Robert Harry Sparks .

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

SAMUEL MILLER . On the 8th of June I saw the prisoner at the door of a gunmaker's shop in Little Ayliff-street; I asked him if he had got a pistol for sale? he said he had, and produced it. I asked him where he got it from? he hesitated, and said he had it from a gentleman's servant at Clapton, that the gentleman had been in the cavalry, and had given it to him. I went to Mr. Sparks, and his gardener claimed it.

SAMUEL SAITCH . I am a gardener to Robert Harry Sparks , Esq. , who lives at Tottenham , the prisoner was employed there three years as under gardener , and left in November. We had a blunderbuss, pistol, and sword in the tool-house - he watched with these arms every third night. I saw the pistol safe on the 5th.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Confined Two Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200628-162

883. CHARLES HIATT was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of May , one pair of reins, value 7 s., and one bridle, value 7 s. , the goods of James Wood .

JAMES WOOD . I am a coachmaker , and live in Theobald's-road . On the 24th of May, between three and four o'clock, I saw the prisoner leave the shop, and asked what he wanted? he asked for a job. He went out, I followed him, and in Devonshire-street laid hold of him - he produced the reins from his hat - the bridle was lost two hours before.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I was out of work.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Confined Three Months and Publicly Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200628-163

884. HENRY HANCOCK was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of June , one handkerchief, value 7 s., the goods of Robert Bailey , from his person .

ROBERT BAILEY. I live at the London-tavern. On Sunday evening the 4th of June, about nine o'clock at night, I was in Chiswell-street with some friends - I observed two persons close behind me. I suspected them, and kept my eye on them. I put my hand to my pocket, and found my handkerchief was safe, in a few minutes I saw them again close behind me - I walked on, and in a few seconds I put my hand to my pocket and missed it; nobody was near me but them. I observed the prisoner and the other then across the road. I watched till the prisoner got to the corner of Lamb's passage, I immediately ran across the road and saw him with the other, who was not above twelve years old, with the handkerchief, looking at it by the gas, both were examining it. I seized the boy being the the nearest - they both had it in their hands. The moment I seized the boy, I lost sight of it, and the prisoner ran away. I let the boy go and followed him, calling Stop thief! he ran about one hundred and fifty yards, and was stopped without my losing sight of him. I took him into a public-house, he said if I would take him into the street, he would take me to the boy who had the handkerchief. I did so, and when he got five or six yards from the door, he made a terrible noise, crying out for a lad who had found a handkerchief. I thought I would get him back to the public-house, and did so with much difficulty - and at the door he was seized by three or four girls, who wanted to rescue him, but the watchman took him.

Prisoner's Defence. Some gentlemen said if I went out I should find it. I know nothing of it.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200628-164

885. JOHN HAYNES was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of May , one watch, value 10 l.; two seals, value 2 l., and one key, value 10 s. , the goods of William Hooper .

WILLIAM HOOPER . I am a blue manufacturer , and live in St. John-street , the prisoner was my servant . On the 6th of May, about eleven o'clock in the morning - I left

my watch in the privy, he was at that time beating my coat close to the privy door. I missed it in about a quarter of an hour, I went to the privy and found it gone. He was apprehended that evening.

JOHN HIGGINS . I am a constable. I searched the prisoner, and found the watch in his neck-handkerchief.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not know whose it was.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Whipped and Discharged .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200628-165

886. ELIZA FISHER was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of June , one watch, value 30 s. and one chain, value 5 s. , the goods of Robert Miller .

ROBERT MILLER . I am a mariner . I gave my watch in charge of Chambers.

JOHN CHAMBERS . Miller gave me his watch to take care of. I put it under the pillow, the prisoner slept in the same room, about six o'clock she was gone. I found her in the Three Crowns - she denied it. I found it at the pawnbroker's.

THOMAS WALKER . I am servant to Mr. Morriton, pawnbroker. On the 28th of June, I saw the prisoner pledge the watch.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Confined One Year .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200628-166

887. JOSEPH COLLINS was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of June , one watch, value 2 l.; one seal, value 10 s., and one key, value 5 s., the goods of Thomas Johnson , from his person .

The prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200628-167

888. WILLIAM BUSSILL was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of June , one seal, value 18 s., and two rings, value 2 s., the goods of Edward Brannan , from his person .

EDWARD BRANNAN . I am a gentleman's servant , and live in Paddington-street. On the 30th of June my seal and rings were fast to my watch-ribbon, when I was near the bottom of Half-moon-street, near Curzon-street , between eight and nine o'clock at night in a crowd, as the Queen was expected to come down there, the prisoner came and cut my ribbon, and got my seal and rings. I felt a tug at my watch, I put my hand down, caught his hand with them in, and took them out of his hand.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAM BUDDEN . I am a labourer. I was in the crowd with Brannan, the prisoner came before us and stopped. I suspected what he was after, and saw him cut the ribbon - the prosecutor seized him, and took the seals from him.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked them off the ground.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200628-168

889. JAMES WOODRIFF was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of June , one handkerchief, value 7 s., the goods of Thomas Barnabas Dinn , from his person .

THOMAS BARNABAS DINN . I live at Stoke Newington. On the 15th of June, between twelve and one o'clock, I was passing through the Shepherd and Sheperdess-fields, Islington; a young man in a sailor's dress got into conversation with me about the weather, till I came to the beginning of the fields, and there four or six boys stood by the post, they followed me very close, the sailor kept in my company, and left me at the foot of the bridge, and when I came to the top of the bridge, a young man ran after me, and said my pocket was picked. I immediately missed my handkerchief, turned round, and saw the prisoner, and another of the gang in custody, about fifty yards off. My handkerchief was produced.

RICHARD GABLE . I am a florist. I was in my garden looking over the fence, and saw the prisoner and three or four boys close behind Mr. Dinn, a sailor was talking to him. I saw one of the four boys take a handkerchief from him. I ran and informed him, and laid hold of the prisoner and another of them, and gave them up to Mr. Dinn, one of the others had thrown the handkerchief over the paling. I got over and returned it to Dinn.

ROBERT BROWN . I am an officer, the prisoner was delivered into my charge. I took him to the watch-house, the sailor came and said he was his brother.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I never saw it.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200628-169

890. HANNAH PARTRIDGE was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of June , six silver spoons, value 13 s. , the goods of John Hulme .

RICHARD CARPENTER . I am a servant to John Hulme , a pawnbroker , of Elephant-place, Commercial-road . On the 7th of June the prisoner came and asked to see some spoons. I showed her some - she wished somebody to go with her as far as the Good Samaritan, to show them to her mistress. I took three half-dozen, and went with her. When we got to the house she took them from me, wrapped them in a handkerchief, and said she did not wish the master to see them, as her mistress wanted to replace them unknown to him. She wished me to stop outside, while she went in, to enquire if her master was come home. She went in, the door being half open, returned, and said her master had come home unexpectedly, and asked me to go into the parlour, or I might leave them with her mistress myself. I went in, she shut the door, and directly after returned, saying, she wished me to have something to drink, that her master should not suspect anything. I said I was not in the habit of drinking, and she brought me a glass of beer, which she said her mistress sent me. She went out and shut the door, saying, she was going to her mistress. She had the eighteen spoons, and I saw no more of her. I enquired at the bar, and they knew nothing of her. I went to different pawnbrokers, who had been served the same way. I found her on Saturday week at Goodburn's, a pawnbroker, where

she had been stopped. I am positive she is the person. Six spoons were found at Avila's, a pawnbroker, in Mile-end-road - he is not here. Another half-dozen were found at Reynolds's, another pawnbroker. I am certain they are my master's - I have no doubt of it.

JOHN HULME . I am a pawnbroker. I saw the spoons at the office, and I am certain they are mine.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18200628-170

891. JAMES CULVERHOUSE was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of July , eighteen brushes, value 13 s. , the goods of William Smith .

MARY SMITH . I am the wife of William Smith , who lives in Orchard-street, St. Luke's - the prisoner is my apprentice . On the 1st of July, at night, he asked leave to go out to buy salts; instead of going out at the street-door, he went through the yard. I heard the shop-door open in front, and saw him coming in out of the street. I found the brushes tied up in his handkerchief - they had been moved from one shop to the other.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Fined One Shilling, and Discharged .

Second Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18200628-171

892. ALFRED CAESAR JOY was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of June , two seals, value 30 s.; two keys, value 10 s., and one chain, value 10 s., the goods of Joseph Wheeler , from his person .

JOSEPH WHEELER . I am a tailor , and live in Bunhill-row. On the 16th of June, about ten o'clock at night, I was coming along Chiswell-street ; and just before I came to Lamb's-passage, I saw the prisoner standing against a post. He darted back, on seeing me, and then rushed on, as if going to pass me. He seized my chain, which broke - he got two seals and two keys, with the chain. He ran up Lamb's-passage, a young man got behind him and pursued him; being lame, I missed him. I am certain of his person - it was just under a gas-light. I informed the officer in about half an hour. I never saw the young man after, and suspect he was one of the gang. I saw the prisoner about three quarters of an hour after, among a famous gang of them, in Chequer-alley, in a coffee-shop. I knew him directly, and pointed him out from above ten others.

JAMES HANLEY . I went to the coffee-shop with Wheeler, - I directed him there. He described the prisoner accurately, and I knew him from the description he gave me. He pointed him out the moment he went into the coffee-shop. While I was securing him, some of the party left the shop; and as I brought him down the steps, he struggled to get away, and, with the assistance of the gang, he got away. Several then rushed out of the shop. I secured him within twenty yards of the shop - some seized my arms, and others shook and beat me most horribly.

Prisoner's Defence. I have been in the Refuge two years, and they bound me apprentice.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18200628-172

893. SARAH CHAMBERLAIN was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of June , one gown, value 2 s.; one petticoat, value 1 s.; one bonnet, value 1 s., and one necklace, value 3 s. , the goods of Catherine Anderson , spinster .

CATHERINE ANDERSON . I live in Sun-yard, East Smithfield . I am an unfortunate girl, and the prisoner is also the same. On the 24th of June these things were in my room. I had pulled them off over night, and went to bed. I had taken her to sleep with me till she could get into the hospital, as she was ill. She had been about a week with me. I went to bed, rather tipsy; she did not come to bed that night, but was in the room when I did. I awoke about six o'clock and found her and the things gone. I found her at the watch-house with them.

JOSEPH WITNEY . I am a patrol. I stopped the prisoner by the watch-house door with these things in a pinafore, about half-past one o'clock in the morning. I asked what she had got, she said nothing but what was her own.

THOMAS HARRISON . The prisoner was brought to the watch-house, she said the things were her own, and she lived in Bishopsgate-street.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18200628-173

849. JOHN ALLEN was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of July , one pair of trowsers, value 5 s. , the goods of George John Green .

GEORGE JOHN GREEN . I am a clothes saleman , and live in Oxford-street . On the 1st of July, about half past eight o'clock, the prisoner came with a person who bought a pair of trowsers. I saw the prisoner take another pair off the counter, and put them under his coat - both left together. I fetched him back, and took them away from him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined Six Months , and Publicly Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant. Esq.

Reference Number: t18200628-174

895. JAMES NEWMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of June , one tea-caddy, value 30 s. , the goods of John Thomas Thompson .

JOHN THOMAS THOMPSON . I am an upholder , and live in Long-acre . The prisoner was brought to my shop with the caddy, which I saw safe on the parlour table just before, in the middle of the room; he must have got in at the window - mine is a corner house.

THOMAS SMITH . I am a butcher, and live in King-street, Seven Dials. I was going up Langley-street, Long-acre, and saw the prisoner and two other boys walking by, and looking in at Thompson's window, which was open. I went on, and as I returned, I saw the prisoner lift another boy up to the window. I ran and told my master, who was at a house just opposite - he told me to watch them. I ran down the street and caught the prisoner in White Lion-street, with the tea-caddy in his

hand, wrapped in a handkerchief - the other two ran away.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I saw a boy running, and picked the caddy up.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18200628-175

896. MARY MOORE was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of June , one shift, value 2 s. , the goods of Thomas Martin Lightfoot .

THOMAS MARTIN LIGHTFOOT . I am a pawnbroker and live in Woodstock-street . I saw this shift hang up in my shop at ten o'clock in the morning, and between eleven and twelve I missed it off the counter. I suspected the prisoner who was in the shop, and took her to my wife.

MARY LIGHTFOOT . I searched the prisoner, and found the shift concealed under her apron.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 14.

Judgment Respited .

Second Middlesex Jury, before J. Vallaint, Esq.

Reference Number: t18200628-176

897. FRANCES KETTLE was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of June , one shawl, value 8 s. , the goods of Mary Taylor .

MARY TAYLOR . I am a servant , and lodge in King-street, Golden-square , the prisoner came backwards and forwards to see the landlord. On the 17th of June I missed my shawl; she was in the house, and I mentioned it to her - she would hear nothing about it. On the Friday following the landlady found some of her property on her; we then had her apprehended, and the duplicate of my shawl was found in her room in Little Marlborough-street.

WILLIAM PICKERING . I am a constable. I took the prisoner in charge; she took me to her lodgings, where I found the duplicate.

RICHARD KINGSTON . I am a pawnbroker. The prisoner pledged a shawl with me.

GUILTY . Aged 39.

Confined Three Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18200628-177

898. THOMAS HARDY was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of June , one jacket, value 10 d., and one hat, value 6 d. , the goods of William Gee .

WILLIAM GEE . I am a labourer . On the 15th of June, between eleven and twelve o'clock, I was lying down to sleep on Hampstead Heath , with several more labourers - we had made a tent. I put my jacket over my children for a covering. About two o'clock my eldest child said the kettle was gone; I got up and found it outside the tent, but all our victuals was gone out of it. I missed the jacket and hat, and on Sunday, the 18th, I found the prisoner in the cage with them.

WILLIAM POOL . I apprehended the prisoner with the jacket and hat.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: o18200628-1

ANDREW SYANSON , page 343 WILLIAM DEAN , alias J. W. PULLEN 290 JAMES TUFFNEL 373 THOMAS CLEVERLEY 413

Fined One Shilling and Discharged .


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