Old Bailey Proceedings, 17th May 1820.
Reference Number: 18200517
Reference Number: f18200517-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace Oyer and Terminer, AND Gaol Delivery for the City of London, AND ALSO The Gaol Delivery For the County of Middlesex, HELD AT Justice Hall, in the Old Bailey; ON WEDNESDAY, 17th of MAY, 1820, and following Days;

Being the Fifth Session in the Mayoralty of THE RIGHT HON. GEORGE BRIDGES , LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

Taken in Short-Hand by H. BUCKLER, Basinghall Street, (BY AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON.)

London:

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED, FOR H. BUCKLER, BY T. BOOTH, 31, St. Andrew's Hill, Doctors' Commons.

1820.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX.

Before the Right Honourable GEORGE BRIDGES , Esq. LORD MAYOR of the City of London; Sir John Bayley , Knt, one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir William Garrow , Knt., one of the Barons of his Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir John Eamer , Knt; John Ansley , Esq.; Sir John Perring , Bart.; Sir Claudius Stephen Hunter , Bart.; Matthew Wood , Esq.; Christopher Smith , Esq.: William Heygate , Esq., Aldermen of the said City, Newman Knowlys , Esq. Common Sergeant of the said City, and John Vaillant , Esq. his Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of the Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

London Jury.

Richard Bennett ,

Robert Wilson ,

William Savery ,

Samuel Fisher ,

Hamilton Meager ,

George Landless ,

Thomas Breenau ,

James Felton ,

Robert Dent ,

William Taylor ,

Richard Croft ,

Charles Simmons .

First Middlesex Jury.

Charles Brown ,

Isaac Royal ,

John Scrivener ,

John Robson ,

William Hallett ,

James Large ,

William Martin ,

Timothy Heavey ,

Charles Major ,

Jonathan Sampson ,

David Peck ,

Daniel Smith .

Second Middlesex Jury.

Jeremiah Rubar ,

Robert A. Jenkinson ,

Michael Anderson ,

William Judd ,

George Raby ,

Jonathan Hebner ,

Robert Franklin ,

James Mason ,

John George ,

Charles Gurney ,

Charles Ritchie ,

Richard Howell .

SESSIONS HOUSE, OLD BAILEY, MAY 17, 1820.

BRIDGES, MAYOR. FIFTH SESSION.

Reference Number: t18200517-1

584. JOHN HARVEY , JOHN BERRY , and WILLIAM BERRY , were indicted for stealing, on the 31st of March , one sheep price 60 s. , the property of Edward Boards .

SECOND COUNT, for wilfully and feloniously killing the said sheep, with intent to steal the whole carcase.

MR. ARABIN conducted the prosecution.

EDWARD BOARDS . I am a farmer , and live at Edmonton . On the 31st of March, between nine and ten o'clock in the morning, I missed a sheep - it was safe at six o'clock at night, with others, in Mr. Corbett's marsh, about a mile from my house. I found the skin and head in a ditch in the marsh, and can swear it is mine. I have the skin now. I made enquiry, and offered a reward of 10 l., but heard nothing for six weeks after. Day then gave me information (he is a labourer and worked for me, but not at that time), he lived about a mile and a half off; the prisoners were in custody on another charge, when he accused them - they have all three worked for me, and knew my premises. William Berry lived about half a mile from me, and Harvey about a mile off.

JOSEPH DAY . I am a labourer, and live about half a mile from Mr. Boards. On the Friday morning before Easter, about three or four o'clock, I was going on the Chingford-road, to my grandfather's, and met the prisoners with one George Boreham , about a quarter of a mile from the marsh; I asked where they were going? William Berry gave a saucy answer - nothing further passed then. I kept behind, watched to see where they went, and kept at a distance from them.

COURT. Q. Were you going the same way as them - A. Yes, my Lord. They went into Corbett's marsh, drove the sheep up in one corner next to the large river, near the ditch. They caught one and all knelt down, and stabbed it; then took the skin off and threw it into the ditch - all three put the carcase into a sack, and took it away. William Berry carried it part of the way, and then Harvey carried it. They came up the back way into the street where Harvey lived, and carried it into his house, and I went away.

Q. What distance were you from them when they slaughtered the sheep - A. About one hundred yards. I do not think they saw me.

Q. Did you hear a reward was offered - Yes. I was afraid to tell Mr. Boards, because Harvey threatened to murder me if I mentioned any thing of the kind - that was about a fortnight afterwards. And they all threatened me when they were in the cage for stealing potatoes. They said they would murder me if they got free from this. I was behind a tree when I saw them kill the sheep.

Q. Did you know of their getting any thing else - A. I lodged in the house before this happened; they were always being brought in, and so I left.

Q. Had you any quarrel with them - A. No; but my wife is separated from me, and lives in the house with Harvey.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18200517-2

585. JOHN HARVEY , JOHN BERRY , WILLIAM BERRY , and ANN HARVEY , were indicted for stealing, on the 3d of April , two tons of potatoes, value 14 l. , the goods of James Southgate .

JAMES SOUTHGATE . I am a farmer at Edmonton . I lost about two ton of potatoes from my potatoe-barn in the course of the first week in April. The thatch was pulled off the barn. I did not miss them till the 10th of April.

JOSEPH DAY . About the 3d of April, I was at work with John Harvey , by the potatoe-house, and two of Mr. Southgate's men came for some tar out of the potatoe-house. Harvey said to me

"D - n me if I don't have a good ton of potatoes out of here, for the women to take away tomorrow morning." He went to the back of the potatoe-house, and pulled off the thatch from between the two rafters - it was about five o'clock on a Monday evening. He got in, took out about a sack of potatoes, and took them home. I saw him sell two pecks of them that evening - his house is about a mile from the barn. I went home with him the back-way across the fields; he carried it all the way himself. The sack held about five bushels, and he returned a good many times. I went to work with him next day, and that evening, about nine o'clock, all the prisoners and Boreham, went in and got three sacks out between them, and brought them home to Harvey's house. I met them about a quarter of a mile from the barn with them. They said they had been to Mr. Southgate's barn and got a quantity of potatoes. I did not go home with them, as I did not live with them then. On Wednesday night, I saw

them all again about eleven o'clock, just by the potatoe house. They had each got nearly a sack.

COURT. Q. How came you out so late that night - A. I was coming from Enfield, the road goes close by the barn. Harvey said they had twenty-one bushels out that evening, but they had not got them all with them. On Thursday evening, I saw them with a quantity more about half-past ten o'clock, in a lane coming down by the Bell at Edmonton - they each had a load. And in the morning, when I went to work, I saw Harvey cover up the hole in the thatch. There is a foot-path across the field, but the hedge hides the hole.

Q. How soon did you inform Southgate of this - A. About two days ago.

WILLIAM PEARCE . I am a constable, and apprehended the prisoners. Harvey told Mr. Southgate, that Day and himself were at work on the dung-hill, and saw the potatoes in the barn when the men came for the tar, and then they said they would have some potatoes - that Day broke the thatch and took them out.

JAMES SOUTHGATE re-examined. I remember Harvey sending for me. He said Day was the first man that broke in, got two or three pecks of potatoes, and threw them out; and he told him he would get transported for it. He did not accuse himself of anything.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18200517-3

586. HENRY LUFF was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of May , at St. George, Bloomsbury, thirty yards of sarsnet, value 6 l., the goods of Frederick Balaam and John Williams , in their dwelling-house .

FREDERICK BALAAM . I am in partnership with John Williams ; we are linen-drapers and mercers , and live in Southampton-row , which is in the parish of St. George, Bloomsbury; Mr. Williams lives in the same house, and we rent it jointly, and pay for it out of the profits of the trade. On the 12th of May, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came to the shop, in company with another man - it was dusk; I was attending to a lady. My apprentice, Haynes, came up to me, and said the prisoner had taken a piece of sarsnet; I looked at them, and saw a piece of the sarsnet hanging out of the prisoner's coat. I had laid it on the counter myself not two minutes before. He had it inside his great coat. I saw a little bit of it hanging out under his great coat, which was on his arm - I laid hold of him, he laid it down, and the other ran out of the shop directly. The prisoner said he wanted to go after his brother, and made towards the door; I pulled him back, and sent for a constable, who took him to Bow-street. The sarsnet measured upwards of thirty yards, and is worth 6 l. - it cost me 5 s. a yard. His great coat was on his arm, he was not wearing it.

THOMAS HAYNES . I am apprentice to the prosecutor. On the 12th of May the prisoner came to the shop with another person; the other said,

"I want half a yard of green persian, the same as I had before" - they had both been in the shop before - I do not know what they bought. I did not serve them, but I saw them.

Q. Did you get him the persian - A. Yes, and served him. He then asked for some black ribbon, and I cut him a yard - he also bought a bootlace, and gave me the money. I then saw the prisoner take the sarsnet off the counter - it was about ten yards from me; he took it as privately as he could, and was watching Mr. Balaam at the time. I immediately went up to Mr. Balaam, called him into the back room before I gave the other man the change, and told him what I had seen. He directly went round the counter, and seized the prisoner, upon which the other immediately walked out without the change. The things, I believe, came to 6 d., and he paid me 6 d., therefore I had no change to give him. He had nothing to detain him in the shop, and took away what he had bought.

Q. How long was you away from them when you went to speak to your master - A. About a minute - there was time enough for them to go away if they thought fit. When my master seized him he wanted to go after his brother. He immediately put the sarsnet down on the counter, and said,

"Is not this the persian you wanted?" - this was before he wanted to go after his brother; the sarsnet was near Mr. Balaam before the prisoner took it.

Prisoner's Defence. I am a shoemaker , and have been in the employ of several respectable individuals until within these three weeks. During that time I have not been able to work, in consequence of a rupture produced by over-exertion. On the day mentioned, I had been to Paddington, and had just left the stage, when I, by accident, met the person who was in company with me. I had very little previous acquaintance with him, merely knowing him by the name of Wilson, a boot-closer. He said he was going to purchase a piece of green silk to make a shade for his eyes. I accompanied him, and while he was settling for what he had purchased, I took from the counter a piece of silk for the purpose of looking at the shade of it. I turned towards the light, and having a great coat on my arm I laid the silk upon it - having satisfied myself I returned it to the place from whence I took it. In a moment after, the person who served in the shop, came round the counter, seized me, and said I had robbed him. The person who was with me, fearing, perhaps, that I had actually committed a theft, left the shop.

THOMAS HAYNES re-examined. I am sure he said he wanted to go after his brother. He laid the silk on the counter as Mr. Balaam was going to seize him, and before he seized him. Mr. Balaam was in the act of seizing him when he said,

"This is the persian you want."

Q. What had Mr. Balaam done to make him think he was going to seize him - A. I had called Mr. Balaam into the back room, upon which he rose up the flap of the counter, and went straight up to him.

MR. BALAAM re-examined. I am sure he said he wanted to go after his brother - I cannot say whether he produced the silk before I seized him, but I saw him lay it down - it was under his coat, apparently concealed. I only saw a very small piece hanging out. I should not think he had it in his possession more than one or two minutes.

JURY. Q. Was there anything to prevent him from running away - A. Nothing that I know of, but to the best of my recollection the apprentice had to give him 3 d. change, for he had 3 d. in his hand when he came to me, but in the confusion he could not state that. There were

five or six yards of the sarsnet unrolled at the time it was on the counter.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 22.

Recommended to Mercy.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18200517-4

587. JOHN BONNY was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of April , one mare, price 10 l.; one cart, value 10 l.; 160 lbs. of mutton, value 5 l., and 200 lbs. of veal, value 6 l. , the goods of Christian Deering .

JAMES DEERING . I am son of Christian Deering , who lives in Kennington-lane, and is a butcher ; the prisoner used to mind the butchers' carts at Smithfield-market - we sometimes bring meat there to carry to other places, when we come to buy cattle. On the 15th of April I left my cart at the corner of the Hide-market, in Leadenhall-street , in the care of Hatton - it contained the carcases of two calves and three sheep. I returned in three-quarters of an hour and took Hatton away to fetch two pigs. We came back in about ten minutes, the cart, horse, and meat were gone. I found the cart about half an hour afterwards, standing empty opposite Whitecross-street prison; the meat was all gone. I waited there sometime, no person came to it, and I drove it back to Leadenhall-market.

SAMUEL HATTON . I am servant to Mr. Deering. I left the cart for about ten minutes, when I returned it was gone. I did not see the prisoner near it.

THOMAS KING . I work for Mr. Hewitson, who lives in Golden-lane. I was standing at the door, and saw the cart drive by, the prisoner and another lad were in it - he hung down his head as he passed - my master sent me to watch him. I saw him go up Ball-yard, and take four sides of veal and three carcases of sheep out of the cart - he took them one at a time down Catherine-wheel-alley.

Cross-examined by MR. ARABIN. Q. You did not know who the horse and cart belonged to - A. No. I am sure the prisoner is the lad.

WILLIAM HEWITSON . I am a coal-dealer; King works for me. We were standing at the door, and saw the prisoner and another drive by - he held his head down. King said,

"What makes Bonny hold his head down?" I said,

"Perhaps he has got something he does not wish us to see, run after him." I knew him before by seeing him about.

SAMUEL DEBONAIRE . I am servant to Mr. Haines, who lives in the Borough. I was at Leadenhall-market, and saw the prisoner in the cart - I looked at him and he at me. The prosecutor's son came to me soon after, and enquired for his cart - the prisoner was then gone. I saw him and the same cart at Worship-street. I had seen the prisoner before at Newgate-market.

THOMAS VANN . I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner in Bunhill-row.

Prisoner's Defence. I was at home with my mother at the time.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Of stealing the meat only.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow .

Reference Number: t18200517-5

588. WILLIAM BRANCH was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of May , one necklace, value 5 s., the goods of James Adams , the Elder , form the person of James Adams , the Younger .

JAMES ADAMS . My child James was playing at my door in the Curtain-road ; the prisoner was brought to me with a necklace, which he had taken off its neck.

HENRY DYER . I work for Mr. Gould, within two doors of Mr. Adams. I saw the little boy playing about the door, he is four years old. I saw the prisoner go behind the child, take the necklace off its neck, and run away with it; I followed and took him with it.

THOMAS BARNLEY . I am a brass-founder. I saw the prisoner run by, the child cried out for its things. I stopped him, he kicked me, and tried to get away. I saw the necklace in his hand - he dropped it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I picked it up, and was running home to shew it to my mother.

GUILTY . Aged 11.

Transported for Life. - Penitentiary .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow .

Reference Number: t18200517-6

589. WILLIAM BARBER was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of May , one copper-pot, value 18 d. , the goods of Nathaniel Wadsworth .

MARY WADSWORTH . I am the wife of Nathaniel Wadsworth , who is a tinplate-worker , and lives in the Hackney-road . On the 10th of May, about eight o'clock in the evening I missed the copper pot, which was stolen from an out-house.

JOHN INGRAM . I am a watchman of Shadwell. About four o'clock in the morning I saw the prisoner coming along with the pot, and asked him what he had got there? he said it was a pot, which had been sent him from Manchester. I took him to the watch-house.

JOHN JOHNSON . I am a headborough. The prisoner was brought to the watch-house; he said he had been drinking with some men, and that the pot was left for him by the Manchester carrier. I believed distress had drove him to it. He afterwards said he took it from a little house through the turnpike, where his master lived.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Of stealing to the value of 1 s. only.

Confined One Month .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18200517-7

590. MARY BUCKINGHAM was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of May , the sum of 4 s. in monies numbered, the monies of John Bullen , from his person .

JOHN BULLEN . I am a solicitor , and have chambers in the New Inn. On the 2d of May, about twelve o'clock, I had just left the Cheshire Cheese, public-house, and was returning to my chambers. As I came towards the Angel, St. Clement's, the prisoner came and threw her arms round me. I tried to get from her, and went to the left side of Wych-street , she followed me. I saw her put her hand towards her pocket, and said I would charge the watch with her. A woman came behind her, they spoke and she went on - I gave the prisoner into custody; she was never out of my sight.

Cross-examined by MR. BROADRICK. Q. What did you lose - A. A half-crown and some small silver - it was safe before she came up. I did not feel her hand in my pocket.

JOHN DORAN . I am a watchman. I took the prisoner to the watch-house.

GEORGE CONEY . I was constable of the night. The prisoner was brought into the watch-house; I searched her, and found only 6 d. on her.

Prisoner's Defence. I was returning from Westminster, the gentleman accosted me, I told him he was mistaken, and desired him to leave me. He let his umbrella fall, I picked it up and gave it to him. He felt in his pocket, and said

"I think you have taken some silver from me!" I shewed him the contents of my pocket; he said he was not certain that he had lost any, but he wished to make an example of me.

MR. BULLEN re-examined. I had no umbrella. I told her it was useless to search her, for she had given the other woman the money. There is no foundation for what she says. I was quite sober.

JOHN DORAN re-examined. I do not know whether the prosecutor had an umbrella.

GEORGE CONEY re-examined. I think he had an umbrella.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow .

Reference Number: t18200517-8

591. JOHN CROUCH and WILLIAM SHAW were indicted for stealing, on the 2d of May , one table-cloth, value 5 s. , the goods of the Rev. John Luxmore , D. D., Bishop of St. Asaph .

JANE FOWLER . I am housekeeper to the Bishop of St. Asaph; he lives in Gloucester-place, Portman-square , On the 2d of May, about a quarter before twelve o'clock, the table-cloth was stolen from the servants' hall.

SIMON WILSON . I am a painter and glazier. On the 2d of May, about twelve o'clock, I was at work opposite the Bishop of St. Asaph's, and saw the prisoners, with another, looking down several areas - at last Shaw stopped by the Bishop's area-gate; he nudged Crouch, who went down the area, and came up with the table-cloth under his arm, folded up. Shaw held his coat open; and Crouch put the table-cloth under his coat, crossed over, and ran away. I pursued and overtook him, without losing sight of him. He said I was mistaken - I said

"No, I am not." I took the table-cloth from under his coat, and took him back to the Bishop's.

ELIJAH RICHARDS . I was with Wilson, and took Crouch.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

CROUCH - GUILTY . Aged 13.

SHAW - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18200517-9

592. CHARLES DEDGE was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of April , one mattock, value 2 s., the goods of John Hierons ; one mattock, value 2 s., the goods of William Reece ; one mattock, value 2 s., and axe, value 1 s., the goods of John Rook ; one shovel, value 1 s., the goods of William Weatherby ; one pick-axe, value 2 s., the goods of Henry Kelsey , and one hoeing-pick, value 2 s. , the goods of James Williams .

JOHN HIERONS . I am a gardener , and live at Smallborough-green , the other prosecutors were in my employ. I lost a mattock from the garden - I saw all the things safe on Friday night, the 21st of April.

JOHN ROOK . I am in Mr. Hieron's employ. I had three mattocks and an axe when I left work - I buried them in the earth, the rest of the men buried theirs also, about one hundred yards apart. I returned to work on Saturday morning, and all the tools were missing. On Sunday I saw some of them in possession of Page.

THOMAS PAGE . I live with Mrs. Ball, who keeps the Black Horse, at Greenford-green. On Sunday, the 23d of April, about ten o'clock in the morning, the prisoner and two others left the tools with me for their score - they each had some of them.

WILLIAM WEATHERBY . I lost a spade and shovel from the Green. I know Kelsey's and Williams's things.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JAMES HAZARD . I am a labourer. I bought a mattock of the prisoner and another man on Saturday morning, the 22d of April, about half-past six o'clock - I gave the other man 1 s. for it; they were both together, and had several other tools.

SAMUEL MARNHAM . I am a labourer, and live at Harrow on the Hill. I bought two mattocks of the prisoner and another man, on Saturday, the 22d of April, about twelve o'clock at noon. I was at work in the road, and they asked me if I wanted to buy them? I said No. I went in and told the headborough that I thought they had stolen the goods, he told me to go and buy them - I went after them, the prisoner said,

"You shall have this mattock for 1 s.," I bought it - he came up again, and said I should have the other for the same money, the others said I should not have it for that - the headborough was afraid to interrupt them.

Prisoner's Defence. I met two men with the tools; they said what tools they did not want they would sell to pay the reckoning.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Two Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow .

Reference Number: t18200517-10

593. CHARLES GOULDING was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of May , one handkerchief, value 5 s., the goods of Henry Baldwin , from his person .

HENRY BALDWIN . I live in St. John-street-road. On the 11th of March, about one o'clock in the day, I was in St. John-street , and felt a catch at my coat pocket, put my hand down and missed my handkerchief. I turned round and saw the prisoner put it into his jacket pocket. I immediately seized him, and he struggled to get away, but did not succeed. He said he had nothing belonging to me. I saw him put his hand behind, pull it from his pocket, and let it drop. I caught it before it reached the ground, another boy was with him, who ran away.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I picked it off the ground - the gentleman knocked me down and beat me.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18200517-11

594. CHARLES PINKSTON was indicted for embezzling, the sum of 2 l. 15 s. 4 d., which he had received on account of his master , John Barton .

JOHN BARTON . I am a baker , and live at Pleasant-place, Holloway . The prisoner was my servant nine months - he was entrusted to carry out bread and receive money . Mr. Williamson used to pay his bill once a week, the prisoner always received it and gave receipts for me. On the 5th of February, I sent him out with bread, he was to go to Williamson's but never returned. I did not see him again till he was apprehended. He paid me no money on account of Williamson that day.

GEORGE WILLIAMSON . I live in Whitecross-street, and sell bread which I have from Barton - I generally paid the prisoner the bills. On the 5th of February, he brought me some bread. I asked if he had brought a receipt from his master? he said No, but he would fetch one. He went out, bought a stamp, and I gave him 2 l. 15 s. all in silver, and 4 d. in copper. I produce the receipt, which he wrote in my presence (read).

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow .

Reference Number: t18200517-12

595. JOHN ROWLES was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of May , one handkerchief, value 2 s., the goods of Thomas Richmond , from his person .

THOMAS RICHMOND . I am an artist , and live in Half-moon-street. On the 8th of May, about nine o'clock in the evening, I was in Sidney's-alley , and felt my handkerchief taken from my pocket; turned round, and saw the prisoner walking away. As soon as he saw me look at him he set off running. He was stopped before he got out of my sight, and I saw him drop it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I heard the cry of Stop thief! and saw some boys running.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18200517-13

596. JAMES TUFFNELL was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of April , one spade, value 4 s., and one axe, value 2 s. , the goods of William Swain .

WILLIAM SWAIN . I am a blacksmith , and live at Enfield . I keep a shop about a quarter of a mile from my house, nobody sleeps there. On the 27th of April, about half-past five in the morning, I went to the shop and found the staple of the lock drawn, and a bill and spade stolen. I saw them safe about eleven o'clock the morning before. I got a search-warrant, went about ten o'clock to the prisoner's house, which is about twenty yards from my house, and found the spade and axe. I had not missed the axe till I found it. I do not know when I had seen that last. I had not sold it. Nobody but my son and myself serve in the shop.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN MEAD . I am constable of Enfield. I went with a search-warrant to the prisoner's house, and found the spade in his back room - he said he found it. I said he must give a better account, and went up stairs and found the axe under his bed. He said he bought that of an old-iron man for 3 s. or 3 s. 6 d., but he did not know the man. He said it was without a handle when he bought it.

Q. How long before did he say he bought it - A. About three months. I heard him examined before the Magistrate. What he said was taken down and read to him, he admitted that it was correct, and was asked to sign it. I think he said he could not write. The Magistrate put his name to it - (looking at it) - this is it. Nothing whatever was said to induce him to confess.

EDLIN SWAIN . I am son of the last witness. On the 26th, between six and seven o'clock in the evening, I made every thing fast, and I knew the spade was there then, because I had it in my hand. I knew it by the handle, there was Bishopsgate-street written on it - it is now scratched out. I know it by the make and shape. Part of the axe is my own work. I saw it safe within two months of the robbery, and never sold it.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not say it belonged to another man - A. Yes, it did; we new laid it - (Examination read).

"The prisoner says he found the spade about fifty yards from the said shop, between nine and ten o'clock last night, and took it home and put it where it was found; and that he bought the axe six months since of an old-iron-cart man - gave him 3 s. for it, and put the handle to it."

Prisoner's Defence. I took it to the prosecutor's shop, and put the axe handle on it.

WILLIAM SWAIN re-examined. He brought a handle in, but I did not see the axe.

GUILTY. Aged 22.

Judgment Respited .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow .

Reference Number: t18200517-14

597. JAMES HYATT was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of April , one bottle, value 2 d.; one phial, value 1 d.; one pint and a half of brandy, value 4 s., and one pint of shrub, value 1 s. , the goods of William Bulnois , Jun .

WILLIAM BULNOIS , JUN. I am a wholesale liquor-merchant , and live in Tower-street - the prisoner lived eightteen months with me. On the 29th of April, about six in the evening, I had him taken into custody as he left my premises. I asked if he had any of my property in his possession? he said he had not. We searched him, and found a phial of shrub in his great-coat pocket, and a bottle of brandy inside his breeches. they were taken from the cellar, he was my cellarman . He said he was very sorry, and begged forgiveness.

Cross-examined by MR. ARABIN. Was it a sample bottle - A. No; I do not keep samples of shrub.

WILLIAM WILTSHIRE . I watched the prisoner out. Mr. Bulnois tapped him on the shoulder, and said

"James, I believe you have my property about you?" he said he had not. We took him back, I searched, and found in his great-coat pocket a bottle of shrub. He said it was only a little shrub. I found a bottle of brandy in his breeches - he then cried and begged forgiveness.

JOHN GRIFFIN . I accompanied the prosecutor to the prisoner's lodging, in Mary-street, Spritt's-fields. I found two bottles of brandy and one of Riga in his bed-room. I saw his wife in the room.

Mr. BULNOIS. I went with Griffin to the prisoner's lodgings. I had seen the woman before he was married. He

told me he was going to be married to her, I believe she was a publican's daughter.

Prisoner's Defence. The brandy found at my lodgings was given me by my father-in-law.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Confined Six Months .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200517-15

598. JAMES EDWARD TURNER was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of April , one handkerchief, value 4 s., the goods of Benjamin Hodson , from his person .

BENJAMIN HODSON . I live at Worcester. On the 20th of April, about a quarter before nine o'clock in the evening, I was walking along Cheapside , a gentleman came and asked if I had lost my handkerchief. I felt and missed it, and found the prisoner in custody with it - it was safe two minutes before.

GILES STEVENS . I live in Bell-yard, Fleet-street. I saw Mr. Hodson walking along with another gentleman, the prisoner and two others were behind them. I saw one of them hand the handkerchief to the prisoner - he was near enough to take it out of his pocket. He turned towards St. Paul's, and I laid hold of him, the others walked on. The prosecutor claimed it.

JOHN CLINTON . I am an officer. I saw a crowd and went up, the prisoner was trying to get from Stevens - he had got one arm out of his coat, and was slipping it off as I secured him. The gentleman fetched Mr. Hodson back. I found the handkerchief lying at the prisoner's heels - Hodson claimed it.

WILLIAM TAYLOR . I saw the handkerchief picked up at the prisoner's heels.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I never had it.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200517-16

599. MARY LAWRENCE was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of April , one tea-caddy, value 1 s.; one sheet, value 3 s.; one apron, value 6 d.; one spencer, value 6 d.; one neck-chain, value 6 d., and one hat-box, value 2 s. , the goods of Edward Martindale .

EDWARD MARTINDALE . I keep the Flower-pot, in Brick-lane . On the 21st of February, the prisoner came to live with me, and left on the 28th without notice. I missed the things in about ten days. She said at the watch-house that she pledged the sheet in Broderick's name.

CATHARINE BRODERICK . I live in George-yard, Fenchurch-street. On Sunday, after the prisoner left the prosecutor's, she lent me a neck-chain - she lodged in Creechurch-lane.

DAVID M'COMBIE. I am a constable. On the 24th of April, I went to the prisoner's lodgings, No. 7, Creechurch-lane, and found the spencer and tea-caddy. I found the duplicate of the sheet on her.

THOMAS PARSONS. I am a pawnbroker, and live in Houndsditch. The prisoner pledged a sheet with me in the name of Broderick.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Two Months .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200517-17

600. EDWARD TRUBY was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of May , one coat, value 12 s.; one pair of pantaloons, value 3 s.; four waistcoats, value 7 s.; three shirts, 7 s. 6 d.; four pair of stockings, value 3 s., and two handkerchiefs, value 6 d. , the goods of Thomas Talbot .

THOMAS TALBOT . I am a shoemaker , and live at the Green Dragon . On the 4th of May, about six o'clock in the morning, I left these things safe in the garret there, returned about half-past nine, found my box broken open, and missed all the articles stated in the indictment.

HANNAH JENKINS . I am the daughter of the landlord. Between eight and nine o'clock in the morning the prisoner came in, said he had just come by the coach, and wanted to lay down. I told the girl to shew him to the room adjoining the prosecutor's. About half-past one o'clock I went up stairs, heard a noise above, and found the prisoner had locked himself in another room - he was dressed in Talbot's clothes.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 44.

Confined Two Months .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200517-18

601. ELIAS REBECK was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of May , thirteen yards and a half of printed bed-furniture, value 18 s. , the goods of John Shaw .

JOHN SHAW . I am a linen-draper , and live in Fleet-street . On the 4th of May the officer brought the prisoner into the shop with the bed-furniture. It was safe at the door about half an hour before.

JOHN MARKWELL . I am an officer. I was in Fleet-street about five o'clock in the afternoon, and saw the prisoner snatch the bed-furniture from the door, and put it under his coat. I secured him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I saw it lying in the street, and picked it up.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Confined One Month and Whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200517-19

602. ELIZABETH BATES was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of May , thirty-one yards of printed cotton, value 20 s. , the goods of Martin Shepherd and William Herbert .

MARTIN SHEPHERD . I am in partnership with William Herbert - we are linen-drapers . On the 2d of May, about nine o'clock in the evening, I missed two pieces of printed cotton from the door. I and Barton ran out, stopped the prisoner about fifty yards off, and found it in her apron - she begged for mercy.

JOHN BARTON . I found the cotton in the prisoner's apron.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was selling radishes , and picked the cotton up.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Six Months .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200517-20

603. EDWARD GREGORY was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of May , one handkerchief, value 5 s., the goods of John Bogue , Esq. , from his person .

JOHN BOGUE , ESQ. I live in Great James-street. On the 8th of May, about three o'clock in the afternoon, I was walking in Skinner-street towards the City. I perceived I had lost my handkerchief, and at the same time a man came up and said the thief was taken. I found the prisoner in custody with it.

WILLIAM COLTON . I am a broker, and live at Battle-bridge. I was coming up Holborn, and saw the prisoner in company with a little lad very genteelly dressed, and about thirteen years old. I watched them. The prosecutor went into a shop in Holborn, and they waited about twenty minutes at the shop till he came out - (they sat on a cart at the door), they then followed him to Skinner-street, and I saw the prisoner several times put the lad before him, and point to the pocket. When they came nearly to the top of the street he pushed the lad towards the prosecutor, and I rather think he struck the lad; the prisoner went up, took the handkerchief out himself, and put it under his coat - I was watching them on the other side. The prisoner crossed the road, and ran towards me; I stopped him, took it from under his coat, and sent a gentleman to inform Mr. Bogue, who claimed it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I picked it up.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200517-21

604. ELIZABETH AMOS was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of May , one quilt, value 2 s.; one pelisse, value 2 s.; two shirts, value 1 s., and one handkerchief, value 6 d. , the goods of Richard Dimmock .

JOSEPH GAZZAM . I am a dealer in earthenware , and live in Ivy-lane . I was sitting in the room on the first floor, and heard somebody going down stairs. I opened my door, and asked if it was a person belonging to the house? the answer was Yes, but Mrs. Dimmock opened her door, and said it was nobody belonging to the house. I followed the person, who was a female, down stairs - she had got out and turned the corner into the market. I then caught sight of her, and overtook her in Rose-street - she must have been the person. I found a large bundle in her lap containing the articles stated in the indictment. She begged for mercy, and said her friends were respectable - she had an infant with her.

LYDIA DIMMOCK . I am the wife of Richard Dimmock ; the prisoner was quite a stranger to me. The articles are our property, and were taken out of a box in the top room.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I was in distress.

GUILTY . Aged 31.

Confined Six Weeks .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200517-22

605. JOHN FINCH and WILLIAM JOHNSON were indicted for stealing, on the 13th of May , one basket, value 2 s.; nine shirts, value 4 l. 10 s.; two shifts, value 10 s.; two pair of silk stockings, value 6 s.; six neck-cloths, value 12 s.; five napkins, value 2 s. 6 d.; twelve pair of socks, value 6 s.; seven handkerchiefs, value 7 s.; three tablecloths, value 15 s.; two pair of trowsers, value 5 s.; two frocks, value 5 s.; two pinnafores, value 1 s.; two other shirts, value 2 s.; five towels, value 7 s.; one gown, value 2 s.; one petticoat, value 2 s. 6 d.; one pair of stays, value 1 s.; five knife-cloths, value 2 s.; one couch-cover, value 10 s., and four chair-covers, value 4 s. , the goods of Edward Edwards .

EDWARD EDWARDS . I live at Clapham; my wife is a laundress. On Saturday I came to town with some linen in a basket, to deliver at Dr. Mitchel's, in Gate-street, Lincoln's Inn-fields. I was delivering a basket in Bridge-street, Blackfriars , when a man came and informed me that a basket had been taken from my cart. I then missed it.

GEORGE ADAMS . I am a cabinet-maker, and live in Long-alley, Moorfields. I saw a mob, and heard that the prosecutor had been robbed. I went along St. Paul's Church-yard, and was informed that two men were gone along with a basket. When I got as far as Cripplegate I saw a basket on a man's head in Fore-street, ran as hard as I could, and saw the prisoners with it in Moorfields; Finch had it on his head, and Johnson was by his side. I went by them, and they put it down - I stood by the London Institution, and watched them; one of them took the basket up, but I do not know which. I saw Stone who went after them. I took Finch with the basket on his head, and Stone took Johnson. I told them they had taken the basket out of the cart, but they said they had done nothing - we took them to the Mansion House. I went and found Edwards, who claimed the property. I first saw them about ten minutes after I had heard of the robbery.

SAMUEL STONE . Adams called me, I followed the prisoners and laid hold of Johnson, he took Finch - they were both together. Johnson said

"I have done nothing, why do you lay hold of me?" As we were going along Johnson escaped and ran down Bell-alley. I called out Stop thief! he was stopped. I again took him into custody - he said he would not go with me and struggled. Smith came up and said he would go with him.

JOHN SMITH . I secured Johnson and took him to the Mansion-house. In his pocket I found the silk-stockings, which the prosecutor claimed.

STEPHEN CADMAN . The prisoners were brought to the Mansion-house. I found the stockings on Johnson, they were damp, as if fresh from the wash.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

FINCH'S Defence. A man met me in Newgate-street, and gave them me to carry to the Dragon, in Bishopsgate-street.

JOHNSON'S Defence. He asked me to go with him. The stockings fell out of the basket, and he asked me to put them in my pocket.

FINCH - GUILTY . Aged 20.

JOHNSON - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200517-23

SECOND DAY, THURSDAY, MAY 18.

606. JOHN WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of May , one plane, value 1 s., and one axe, value 1 s. , the goods of Harrison William Smith .

HARRISON WILLIAM SMITH . I am a carpenter . I left my plane and axe, in the parlour of Mr. Roberts's house, Brick-lane , and about eleven o'clock at night, I found the prisoner in custody with the plane. I found my axe next morning in the kitchen.

JOSIAH ROBERTS . I live in Brick-lane. I have a house opposite mine which was repairing, the prisoner was found there.

JOHN BARRS . I am a watchman. On the 9th of May. I was sent for to search the house, and found the prisoner concealed in the kitchen cupboard, and behind him was the plane and a water-cock.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 29.

Confined Three Months , and Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18200517-24

607. WILLIAM MAY was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of May , one wooden-till, value 1 s., and 9 s. 6 d., in monies numbered , the goods and monies of Charles Kilbey .

CHARLES KILBEY . I live in Northumberland-street, Marylebone . On Monday evening last, I was sitting in my parlour, and saw the prisoner behind the counter with the till in his hand. He went out with his hat over it, and as he jumped over a basket he threw the till down. I followed him - the people stopped him and gave him to me without my losing sight of him. The till contained 13 s. in silver, and 5 s. in copper - he threw it down and some of the money fell out.

(Till produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing of it.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18200517-25

608. THOMAS CUMBER was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of May , at Hampton, nine sheep, price 23 l. , the property of Robert Spencer .

ROBERT SPENCER . I am a butcher , and live at Hampton . I lost nine sheep on the 4th of May, I had seen them safe on Wednesday evening the 3d, in an enclosed field in the parish of Hampton. The prisoner had been my servant , he came to me in October, and left in February.

CHARLES PASSENGER . I live at Hampton, my father is a gardener. I know the prisoner, he had been servant to Mr. Spencer. On Thursday, the 4th of May, between eight and nine o'clock in the evening, I saw him at the gate of Mr. Spencer's field - I saw some sheep in the field by the gate then, I did not count them. I passed on, and next day I heard Mr. Spencer had lost sheep, and mentioned it to him.

Cross-examined by MR. BROADRICK. Q. You did not speak to him - A. No; I merely passed him.

GEORGE COX . I am a butcher, and live in Ray-street, Clerkenwell. I have known the prisoner for years, he came to me on Thursday, the 4th of May, and was with me half an hour. He dined with me, and asked me if I would let him kill some sheep at my house? I said I would, and I could help him. He said a friend was going to send him some from the country to make the best of them, and he was going down to see about them. Next morning, at three o'clock, before day-light, he came to my house again and knocked me up. I found him standing at the door with nine sheep, and helped him to get them in - he then went home to bed, and I went to bed. He returned about nine o'clock, and then we killed the whole nine sheep - seven were sent to Newgate-market, and two I had myself, the carcases fetched 18 l. 7 s. I sold them at the market and paid it to the prisoner. I gave him a 5 l. and thirteen 1 l. notes. The sheep were marked with a cross on the rump (a black mark), I should think it was a pitch mark, and a little stroke underneath. We sent the skins to Mr. Griffin, the salesman. The prisoner bore a good character.

JOHN DAFFARN . I keep the Twelve Bells, Bride-lane, Fleet-street, the prisoner lodged at my house for five weeks. He left at different times to go after situations, and he said he was going to East Sheen. I do not know where he was on the Monday before he was apprehended. On the 8th of May, he brought me 20 l. and wished me to take care of it for an hour, and said he had received it at Newgate-market for meat - there was one or two 5 l. notes, and the rest 1 l. notes. About four o'clock that afternoon, he asked me for it, and I gave it to him.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you known him long - A. Nearly four years; he bore an honest character.

ROBERT SPENCER re-examined. My sheep were marked with a pitched cross on the rump, and a little stroke underneath. I had had them in my field for a week, and observed the mark. The prisoner was in the habit of coming to my house to see my maid-servant.

Prisoner's Defence. On Monday, the 1st of May, a person came to the Twelve Bells, and asked for a person named Cumber, I said I was the person. He asked if I knew Stiles, I said

"what Stiles?"

"Why your father-in-law that is to be, said he." I said I knew there was such a person, he then said he was recommended by him to me to kill a few sheep, and dispose of them as I thought best, as he was embarrassed, and he must not be seen to do them away himself. Having been out of employ sometime, I said I had no objection, and asked what day they would be sent - he said about Thursday next. I did not see him again till Thursday morning, when he came to me at the end of Bride-lane, and said the sheep would come on the following morning, and if I met him at Kensington turnpike, or Hyde-park, I should see him there, and settle whether I should go all the way, or meet him. I met him by Hyde-park-gate, walked on towards Hamersmith, and he agreed I should meet his son with the sheep about Kensington - we went to a public-house, and had some rum and water, went to Astley's theatre, and after leaving there we went on to Kensington, and met the sheep and his son, whom he called George, with them. After he got through the gate I had stopped behind for an occasion, and when I came up, he said his son had sold three at Brentford, or there would be twelve for me to kill. When

we got to Piccadilly we found an obstruction, and then they drove them round; and his son met me and a person named Williams at Hatton-garden - there he parted. His son and I went down nearly to Cox's, then his son left, and I took the sheep into Cox's. I went home, returned at nine o'clock and killed the sheep. The skins were placed out in the street, and after some time, I went home to Bride-lane, and met him. He asked when I should take the money, I said I did not exactly know then when I should be paid for the skins, but the fat would be paid for in the afternoon. I went to Cox and told him what passed. We took the fat, I got 1 l. 11 s. for it, and I met him afterwards and gave it to him. He said he should call round and sell the sheep. I remained at Cox's all the afternoon, expecting him to call; and as he did not come, Cox and me, went down to my lodgings and waited there a few minutes - as he did not come Cox went home. A few minutes, after he came to the door to me, I gave him the money for the fat. He said he had not time to call round to see the sheep, this was Friday night. On Saturday morning, I received a note from him, to know when he could have the money, saying, he expected I should get it ready by Tuesday. I told Cox, and shewed him the note. Cox said, if he had known it he could have had it before. After my going home, and coming from Bride-lane, I met the man again and told him he would have the money on Tuesday. On Saturday, I received another note, saying, that instead of Tuesday, he should send his son to meet me at the Rodney public-house to take the money. I received the money, went and put it into my landlord's hands; having lost 48 l. three weeks before - I was afraid to keep it myself. About four o'clock in the afternoon, I went to meet the man at the Rodney, and he was not there. I met him at Westminster-bridge, returned with him to the Rodney, and waited there an hour. I wanted to leave the money with the landlady till he came, she said she did not wish to have any thing to do with it. I met him on Westminster-bridge and gave him the money, he asked for the letters I received, and I gave them to him. I am unprepared for trial or I could have got the landlady of the Rodney to prove I offered to leave the notes with her.

ROBERT SPENCER re-examined. My field is about fifteen miles from town.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 26.

Recommended to Mercy.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow .

Reference Number: t18200517-26

609. GEORGE PALMER was indicted, for feloniously assaulting John Sanderson , on the King's highway, on the 7th of May , at St. Marylebone, putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, one watch, value 2 l. 10 s.; one seal, value 1 l.; one ring, value 1 s.; two keys, value 2 d., and one piece of ribbon, value 1 d., his property .

JOHN SANDERSON . I am a butcher's servant , and live in, High-street Marylebone . On Sunday evening, the 7th of May, between eight and nine o'clock, I was nearly home. I was going along stooping my head, three or four young men were coming along High-street, and when they came up to me one of them struck me under my chin, and my watch was taken by one of them.

Q. Did the blow knock you down - A. Not that blow; they hit me on the back of my neck and then I slipped down, that was after my watch was taken. I recovered myself, and as soon as I could get up, I looked round, and saw the prisoner running across the road. I ran after him, calling Stop thief! I lost sight of him hardly a minute in turning the corner of Little Woodstock-street - the watchman stopped him in Weymouth-street. My watch was found next morning down an area, at the corner of Weymouth and Wimpole-street. I am sure the prisoner is one of the four persons that met me. I did not notice him more than the rest till I saw him running. I have seen him many times before. The others ran in different directions, none of them ran to Little Woodstock-street. The watch was found in the area of No. 43. I saw him pass that house, and saw him stopped a very little way from it.

Prisoner. Q. Was you not in Little Marylebone-street, when I was stopped - A. He was stopped as I turned the corner, I did not see the watchman actually stop him. I said at the office that I did not know him to be the man that took my watch, but he was the man I pursued - I know him by seeing him about the street. Some person pointed him out to me, saying that is the one who has got your watch, and I pursued. I did not say I did not know what time I lost it. I had been with some friends and was rather in liquor, but knew what I was about; and with the blow that I had at the back of my neck I fell against the curb and it stunned me. I recovered myself as soon as I could get up, it was getting dusk - part of my ribbon was in sight.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

RICHARD COATES . I am a constable. I received the watch from Britton, and have had it ever since.

SAMUEL BRITTON . I am a watchman. I saw the prisoner running, sprang my rattle, and saw him stopped by Gage. About four o'clock in the morning I took the watch out of an area, within a yard or two of where he was stopped - it was then light. I looked for it at eleven o'clock at night, but could not see it because it was so deep - it was general suspicion which induced me to look there. I did not see him throw it down.

Q. What made you spring your rattle - A. I heard the cry of Stop him! in Little Marylebone-street. I was then in Weymouth-street, and saw the prisoner run up Little Woodstock-street as hard as he could, and three or four more running after him, crying out Stop thief! I sprang my rattle, and saw Gage stop him - I brought him into Little Marylebone-street. Sanderson came up, and said he was the man who had taken his watch - he was stopped in Weymouth-street, and ran through Little Woodstock-street. I suppose Sanderson was about two or three hundred yards behind him, and he must have lost sight of him. Nobody was running before him.

WILLIAM GAGE . I am a watchman. On the night of the 7th of May I stopped the prisoner in Weymouth-street, between Wimpole-street and Wimpole-mews - I did not see him throw anything away, but I saw the watch found in the area of No. 43; I stopped him by that area. I heard the rattle spring, and a cry of Stop thief! and went to meet him - nobody was running before him; he was very quiet when I laid hold of him - I met him just by the corner and stopped him. Sanderson came up in about two

minutes; the prisoner was close to the area-railings when I caught him.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not hear them say it was about six o'clock - A. No.

Prisoner's Defence. I was to meet a young man about a quarter before nine o'clock in Foley-place - it was gone nine, and being late I ran, heard the cry of Stop thief! and was stopped.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 15.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18200517-27

610. JOHN ATKINS was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of April , at St. Leonard, Shoreditch, 160 lbs. of annatto, value 14 l., the goods of Matthew Fulwood , the elder , in his dwelling-house .

MATTHEW FULWOOD , SEN. I am a manufacturer of annatto , and live in Old-street-road - I have a son of my name; the business is entirely my own. I rent the house, the prisoner had been four years in my service. On Monday, the 10th of April, about seven o'clock in the evening, about an hour after the men had left work, the prisoner returned to the house, and rang the bell, my son went down to ask him what he wanted - I was sitting at the parlour window, and my son asked me if he might let him in? I gave him leave; he went into the warehouse, remained there about two minutes, and was then let out. On the following morning, the 11th of April, my man gave me information, in consequence of which I went to the upper floor of the house, and missed a quantity of annatto - I was there the day before, and saw it there then. I made a calculation, and missed about 1 1/4 cwt., more or less. It was worth 14 l.

Q. Who had access to the floor where it was kept - A. Four of my men. I have not seen it since; the prisoner did not come to work on the Tuesday or afterwards - he was apprehended on the 14th.

Cross-examined by MR. NORRIS. Q. were you present when he confessed it - A. No. I made him no threat or promise. I believe I said I would be as lenient towards him as I could. I had no reason to suspect his dishonesty before.

JAMES BAKER . I was foreman to Mr. Fulwood. On Monday, the 10th of April, the annatto was spread on the floor to dry; I left the warehouse about six o'clock, and made it secure - we all went out together, and left nobody there. I went about seven o'clock in the morning to the warehouse, but was the first person that was there - the prisoner was not there. I went up to the floor of the warehouse, and directly missed some annatto. I went down, saw the door open, and traces of the feet of persons having conveyed something through - it being a rainy night there were marks of wet feet. I informed Mr. Fulwood, who went up and examined it, it appeared that about 1 1/4 cwt. was missing - some was taken off the floor, and more from the cask. We expected the prisoner on Tuesday, but he did not come - he was apprehended on the 14th.

Cross-examined. Q. Other men had access to the place - A. Yes, but not after the warehouse was locked up.

HARRIET GREGORY . I live at No. 18, Old-street-road, with my parents, directly opposite the prosecutor's manufactory - I knew the prisoner was employed there. I saw him throw a sack down from the hay-loft into a man's hands, and the man went away with it - I saw this three different days, but do not know what date; one time was before Good Friday; the last time was between six and seven o'clock - one time was about one o'clock in the afternoon; I mentioned it to my father every time that I saw him do it. The transaction between six and seven o'clock was after Good Friday.

Cross-examined. Q. What distance is your father's house - A. About the length of this Court - it is opposite; I was up stairs at the window. The second time I saw it I was at the top of the house - the window was closed.

JAMES BAKER re-examined. We missed nothing before this time. The men go to dinner at twelve o'clock, and return at one.

THOMAS SMITH . I live next door to Gregory, on the same side of the way; I knew the prisoner by his working at Fulwood's manufactory. On Easter Monday, about five minutes after one o'clock, when the workmen had left, I was looking out of the window, and saw the prisoner throw a bag out of the hay-loft on to a man's shoulder. Soon after I saw the prisoner come down the regular way, and follow the man with the sack.

MATTHEW FULWOOD , JUN. On Monday, the 10th of April, I was at home; the men left work about six o'clock; after that the prisoner came, and asked me if I would let him go and fetch a letter out of the warehouse - I let him go alone, went away, and do not know how long he stopped; he could let himself out, as there is a latch inside the gate. He could get to the hay-loft door.

MATTHEW FULWOOD , SEN. re-examined. Q. Is the loft part of your dwelling-house, or a detached building - A. They are joined together. I go from my house into the yard, then a door opens into the warehouse. The men go from the street into the warehouse without going through the private house - no person can go to it from the street without going through the yard. Down to this time I always found the prisoner to be an industrious, civil, and well-behaved young man.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 17.

Strongly Recommended to Mercy.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow .

Reference Number: t18200517-28

611. JOSEPH BELL was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of April , at St. Margaret, Westminster, in the dwelling-house of Mary Trigg , widow , one watch, value 20 l.; two chains, value 14 l.; one pocket-book, value 1 s.; one eye-glass, value 1 l.; two pair of ear-rings, value 3 l.; one handkerchief, value 2 s.; 25 s. in monies numbered, and seven 1 l. Bank notes, her property .

MRS. MARY TRIGG . I live at No. 25, Storey-street, St. Margaret's, Westminster , and rent the house; the prisoner had been about seven weeks in my service, he left on Saturday, the 29th of April, I did not expect him to leave - I missed him in the morning when I got up, and went into the parlour - I found the drawers broken open, and all this property gone - a very valuable gold watch with two seals, a large gold watch-chain, two pair of earrings, an eye-glass off a gold neck-chain, it cost me 5 l., a silk handkerchief, which the watch was folded in to keep it from being scratched, a lion's claw, with a hook to hang

the watch on, an old pocket-book with some bills, seven 1 l. Bank notes, and 25 s. in silver - there were nine half-crowns amongst it.

Q. When had you seen your watch - A. On the Friday night. I went to the play about six o'clock, and saw every thing safe then, and the lock of the drawer also; I did not look at it again till morning, when I found it broken open. The prisoner was at home abed when I came home in the evening. On missing the property I advertised it, and immediately sent to his father. I have since seen the handkerchief the watch was in, but nothing else that I can swear to - (Clemence here produced a handkerchief) - this is it; I know it by the work, a young woman hemmed it for me; I know her work. Some notes were found - (looks at them) - they are folded up in the same manner as I fold them. I am certain the handkerchief is mine - my name is not on it; I know it by the neat work on it. The prisoner was apprehended on the Monday after the robbery.

Prisoner. Q. The money belongs to me - A. He had not got a shilling, nor hardly a rag on his back.

WILLIAM CLEMENCE . I am a constable. I was sent for to take the prisoner in charge - his father brought him out of the crowd at the execution of the state prisoners - I took the handkerchief off his neck. I found 1 l. 12 s. 6 d. in his trowsers pocket, and in his fob I found two 1 l. Bank notes. He had new stockings and new half-boots on, and another new silk handkerchief. I asked him how he came by them? he gave me no answer; he appeared rather in liquor - it was about eleven o'clock. I heard him tell Mr. Birnie that he sold the property to a Jew in Houndsditch. I went to a Jew's house, but found nothing. He said he sold the watch for 2 l., or 2 l. odd, that the Jew told him it was metal, and that all the money he received of the Jew was 2 l. 16 s.

JOHN HILL . I keep the Ship tavern, Charing-cross. Knowing the prosecutrix had lost this property, when the prisoner was in custody I questioned him how he disposed of it - I neither threatened nor promised him. He said he was afraid other persons would be led into trouble if he gave any account of it, and as for himself, he wished to go out of the country.

MRS. TRIGG re-examined. I do not know who I took the notes of. The watch cost me fifty-five guineas thirty years ago. The outside case was very heavy fine gold.

Prisoner. I am very sorry that I have done it.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 16.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18200517-29

612. JAMES CURTIS was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Cole , about eleven o'clock in the forenoon of the 29th of April ( Jane Garnham and others being therein,) and stealing one box, value 4 s.; twelve books, value 20 s.; two hats, value 10 s., and three lockets, value 5 s., his property .

SUSAN COLE . I am the wife of William Cole , he is a labouring smith . On the 29th of April, about a quarter past ten o'clock in the morning, I went out, and left Jane Garnham in the house. I locked the door of my own room and took the key. I returned in half an hour, found the door broken open, the lock forced off, and missed a box containing these articles, and four duplicates; I have since seen the duplicates.

WILLIAM CLARK . I am a constable of Clerkenwell. On the 30th of April, about half-past eight o'clock in the evening, I searched the prisoner at the watch-house, and found three duplicates on him in a pocket-book. After his second examination he said he found them in the Holloway road, he would say nothing about them before. I found 3 l. 9 s. on him. He said he had no lodging.

Prisoner's Defence. I came to town on the 23d of April. On Sunday I picked up a paper near Sadler's Wells, containing the duplicates - I intended to take them to the pawnbroker's on Monday, but was apprehended that night.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18200517-30

613. WILLIAM SALMON was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of May , one coat, value 10 s.; one waistcoat, value 2 s.; one pair of breeches, value 5 s.; one shirt, value 2 s.; eight crown pieces and four half-crowns, the goods and monies of William Rodwell , in the dwelling-house of Sarah Turpin , widow .

WILLIAM RODWELL . I drive a hackney-coach , and live in Star-court with Mrs. Turpin - the prisoner slept with me. On the 30th of April, when I went to bed, my clothes and money were all safe in my box. I went out next morning, left the prisoner in bed, returned about five o'clock in the evening, and found my box empty.

SARAH TURPIN . The prosecutor and prisoner lodged with me. I lent Rodwell the box, there was no lock to it. On Monday the prisoner came down between ten and eleven o'clock, with a small bundle, without his hat, it was in a dirty white pocket handkerchief. He went out, returned about three o'clock, and said he had a quarter of an hour's work to do up stairs; he went up, and came down again with a large bundle under his arm - he came home at twelve, and was apprehended. He was a tailor - I thought he might be carrying out work.

WILLIAM WALKER . I live in Field-lane, and am a dealer in clothes. On Tuesday week I bought a coat, waistcoat, and a pair of breeches of the prisoner for 15 s.; the prosecutor claimed them.

JOHN LOCKHAM . I am a constable. I took the prisoner into custody, and found three crowns, nine half-crowns, and 3 s. on him; I also took a handkerchief out of his hat.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I humbly beg to state, that extreme distress is the cause of my committing this crime - I have been out of work five months.

GUILTY . Aged 32.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only.

Confined Eighteen Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow.

Reference Number: t18200517-31

614. JAMES SMITH and AMBROSE BOHAM were indicted for stealing, on the 16th of April , one portmanteau, value 5 s.; sixty ounces of silver, value 15 l.; two pair of shoes, value 10 s., and two pair of boots, value 10 s., the goods of the Honourable Godfrey Bosville ; one portmanteau, value 5 s.; six shirts, value 30 s.; six neck-cloths,

value 18 s.; six handkerchiefs, value 18 s., and six pair of stockings, value 12 s. , the goods of John Hall .

MR. BROADRICK conducted the prosecution.

JOHN MORRIS . I am servant to the Hon. Godfrey Bosville . On the 16th of April I was going down Welbeck-street on the General's carriage with four horses; Mr. Hall's trunk and my master's portmanteau were behind the carriage - Mr. Hall's trunk was covered with canvas. We passed through the end of Marylebone-street, and saw three men running behind the carriage - I really think the prisoners are two of the men; they are the same in appearance. We got to Welbeck-street about eight o'clock, the trunk and portmanteau were then stolen. We had come from Waltham-cross.

HARRIET NEWELL . I live with Lady Lambert, in Manchester-square. On the 16th of April, about eight o'clock, or a little after, I was in Welbeck-street, and saw a carriage and four horses drive along, two persons were on the box. I observed two men going along behind, and in an instant I saw a man go away with a portmanteau, and another followed with a trunk - one of them was covered, I think it was the largest; the men rested them on the steps of a door for a moment. A man passed me - I said,

"Those men have cut these trunks from behind that carriage;" he said it was not the trunks but that it was a coat. He ran over to them directly, and all three went together from the door along Welbeck-street, turned round the corner of Great Marylebone-street, and while I was speaking to two coachmen at the stand, the man I spoke to before came and abused me; he said,

"D - n your eyes! who are you, and what do you want?" - he went away directly, and I mentioned it to the landlord of the public-house, and in consequence of what was said to me, I looked at a coach and saw the coachman was on the box with the man who had abused me. The prisoners have every appearance of being the men who cut the trunks away.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Was the carriage going fast - A. At a middling rate. I followed the men, and lost sight of the carriage.

JAMES HOLMES . I drive the coach No. 690. On the 16th of April, about eight o'clock in the evening, my coach was fourth on the stand in Marylebone-street. I had just got out of the house, and before I got to the horses' heads, two trunks or portmanteaus were thrown into my coach - I found three men putting them in as I came out - they were both covered with white cloth. The prisoners are the men I am sure. One of them told me to drive to the corner of Hopkins-street, Carnaby-market - one of the prisoners got behind the coach, another inside, and the other on the box with me, who took the reins out of my hand. They hurried me along, and would not let me wait for my great-coat. I drove by the end of Marylebone-street to the corner of Hopkins-street, Broad-street. Smith gave me 5 s., he was inside - he said,

"D - n you, if you tell it shall be worse for you!"

Q. Did they ask your fare - A. No, the fare was 18 d. The trunks were taken out of the coach almost before I could get off the box; they went up Hopkins-street with them. I am sure the prisoners are two of the men.

Cross-examined. Q. How long have you drove the coach - A. Four years. I was never charged with any offence - I was put in the watch-house about this. I have seen Bohan in the street before, driving for his father. The man drove all the way.

HARRIET NEWELL re-examined. Q. Did you see them take the coach - A. Yes, it was near the top - there were twelve or more on the stand.

SAMUEL LACK . I am an officer of Bow-street. On the 19th of April I searched Smith's lodgings, which was on the second floor of No. 53, Charles-street, Drury-lane. I found him in bed with a woman of the town. I found this neckcloth in a trunk in the room - the woman said it was the skirt of her child's frock and that she had the body. There is a mark on it, part of which is picked out. I apprehended Boham the same morning.

Cross-examined. Q. No person claimed the trunk - A. No, I knew it to be Smith's, as I had seen it before at his former lodgings.

JOHN HALL , ESQ. I was travelling on the day in question with General Bosville , my trunk was behind the carriage, covered with canvas - there were some neckcloths in it - the one produced is mine, I have no doubt of it; it is marked in the middle with the number I have of the kind, 1 H 6, which appears to be the number picked out here. I have another in my pocket, I compare them - they appear of the same quality and size, and are marked with red silk. I had a great deal of wearing apparel and papers of consequence in my trunk. I saw the trunk safe when we were at Portland-place, and hit a man off the carriage. We went to No. 76, Welbeck-street.

THE HON. GODFREY BOSVILLE . I was travelling in the coach. There was a quantity of old plate and books in my portmanteau.

JOHN MORRIS re-examined. The portmanteau was heavy, but a man might carry it. There were fifty or sixty ounces of plate in it.

SMITH'S Defence. The coachman said they were both covered with canvas.

BOHAM'S Defence. I could not carry the trunks.

JAMES HOLMES re-examined. Q. Did you see Boham with both trunks - A. No, I said all three helped them in. I know one was covered with canvas. They were both thrown in before I got up. They put the trunks in on the off-side.

SMITH - GUILTY . Aged 17.

BOHAM - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18200517-32

615. THOMAS HOAR , JAMES HOAR and JORAM FOOT were indicted for stealing, on the 6th of May , 120 lbs. of lead, value 18 s., belonging to Peter Clutterbuck , Esq. , and fixed to his dwelling-house .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating it to be fixed to a building of his.

PETER CLUTTERBUCK , ESQ. I live at Stanmore . On the morning of the 5th of May I saw the lead safe on the roof of my office, which is attached to my house. Next morning it was gone.

JOHN EDMUND WILSON . I am a constable of Bow-street. On Tuesday, the 8th of May, between seven and eight o'clock in the morning, I saw the three prisoners together at Hampstead. James Hoar was driving a cart, walking by the horse's head; Thomas Hoar and Foot were both

riding on the top of the cart - the horse appeared much fatigued. I stopped them coming down Hampstead-hill. I told them I insisted on stopping them to see what the cart contained - Hoar stopped immediately. I found a vast quantity of lead with some straw in the cart. Hunt secured Thomas Hoar and Foot, and I ordered James to drive the cart into the yard, then found it full of lead. He said he met the other two, and brought it three miles from this side Watford, and they were to give him 3 s. to drive it to town. I said it was very heavy - he said it was; they had a horse behind the cart, which James said was his, but the horse in the shafts they had hired to bring the lead up; I and Pool took Thomas Hoar and Foot to town. Last Monday I received the lead, and measured the prosecutor's roof, the dimensions corresponded both in length and breadth - it made up the whole piece complete, and corresponded in every respect. There was other lead in the cart.

THOMAS HUNT . I was with Wilson - he has spoken correctly.

JOHN THUSSELL. I am a carpenter, and live at Stanmore - I work for the prosecutor. I took the dimensions of the lead, which corresponded exactly, and was of the same thickness as that which was left. They took all the hip of the building away - it was not cut.

THOMAS HOAR 'S Defence. I was going to see my mother, and stopped at Watford till my brother came back with the cart, as I had sprained my ancle.

JAMES HOAR 'S Defence. On Saturday evening, about eleven o'clock. I rode to Hampstead, which I always do at night to clear the turnpikes. When I got to Pickersteed Mill I stopped till Monday evening at ten o'clock, and then set off to Round Head. I wrapped myself in a sack, and did not see a soul till I got to Kingsland; then four or five men passed me, called me, and said they had something for me to take to town. I asked what it was? they did not exactly give me an answer, but said it was very heavy. I said I would have 10 s., and they said we should not fall out about that. When I got to Golder's-green my horse was very tired, and I hired one of a poor man at North End.

FOOT'S Defence. I met some men who appeared to be plumbers; they said they wanted to get some lead to the Adam and Eve, Tottenham-court-road. I met this man, and asked him to buy it. We took up Thomas Hoar on the road as he was lame.

T. HOAR - GUILTY . Aged 31.

J. HOAR - GUILTY . Aged 27.

FOOT - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow .

Reference Number: t18200517-33

616. ROBERT WEBB was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of April , one skittle-bowl, value 5 s. , the goods of Thomas Kingley .

WILLIAM KINGLEY . I am the son of Thomas Kingley , who is a turner , and lives in Long-lane . On the 26th of April, about one or two o'clock in the afternoon, this skittle-bowl was safe; it was stolen from the window before nine o'clock. Next morning the officer brought it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN MILLER . I am a watchman. On the 26th of April, about ten o'clock at night, hearing the cry of Stop thief! I stopped the prisoner in Baldock-street, Golden-lane.

THOMAS EASTERFIELD . I am a stationer, and live in Golden-lane. The prisoner brought the bowl to me for sale; he said it was his own, and that he lived in Hartshorn-court, close by. I went with him to see if he did live there. He went up stairs, and called out some name, but nobody answered; he came down, and said they were not at home, but all was right. I called out Prince, the officer, who lived close by, and the prisoner immediately ran away. I pursued him, and never lost sight of him till Miller stopped him.

Prisoner's Defence. I found it by a wall in Goswell-street.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined One Month .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18200517-34

617. HENRY WINCOTT was indicted for stealing on the 20th of June , one hone, value 5 s. , the goods of John Illingworth .

JOHN ILLINGWORTH . I am a baker , and live in Whitechapel-road ; the prisoner left my service about ten months ago. While he was with me I missed the hone from a drawer in the parlour, and saw nothing of it till Eastwood produced it - the prisoner was apprehended, and said he would pay Eastwood for it. I said if he did it might finish there. He wished to implicate another servant, told me to do my best, and so I prosecuted him.

WILLIAM EASTWOOD . I bought the hone of the prisoner about four or five months ago. He left it with me for a week. It laid publicly in my room all the time, and he did not caution me to conceal it.

Prisoner's Defence. The hone laid about the bake-house, and I took it home to sharpen my razor. I had no idea that it was my master's.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow .

Reference Number: t18200517-35

618. THOMAS HUNT was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of May , one tea-chest, value 1 s.; one wrapper, value 1 s., and 80 lbs. of tea, value, 10 l. , the goods of John Ball and John Lloyd .

JOHN LLOYD . I am a town-carrier , and am in partnership with Joseph Ball . On the 5th of May, I was employed by Johnson and Co. to carry some tea from the East India Company's warehouse, to Cox Key, Lower Thames-street - there were fifty-one chests, which the warrant authorized the delivery of.

WILLIAM MILLER GOULD . I live with Mr. Wrench, a seedsman, in Lower Thames-street. On the 5th of May, about two o'clock in the afternoon, I was going down Thames-street , towards Tower-hill, I saw Lloyd's waggon with some chests in it, and observed three men standing at the tail of the waggon - the prisoner was one. I passed the waggon about twenty yards, and saw one of them jump into the waggon and turn one of the chests out; I ran back and saw the prisoner with it. I called out to the men, pursued, and as he was going under the arch of St. Magnus's Church, London-bridge, I stopped him. He

immediately threw down the tea and ran away towards Upper Thames-street, I followed and never lost sight of him till I caught him - the tea was taken to the waggon. I went back and took the mark of the chest, it was M. C. 5795; I. H. 1069.

JOHN MARKWELL . I am commodore in the East India Company's shipping department. On the 5th of May, about half-past one o'clock, a chest of tea marked M. C. 5795; I. H. 1069, was delivered to Ball and Lloyd's waggoner, with fifty other chests.

HENRY STRIVENS . I am a labourer in the East India Company's service. I know the mark, and put it on the wrapper.

WILLIAM WELSH . I am a labourer, I cased the chest.

JOHN SALMON . I am a constable. The prisoner was brought to the watch-house and given into my charge. He said he was very sorry. He told me one of the men was Cass, and used a house in a court in Smithfield.

Prisoner. I beg for mercy.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined One Year and Whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200517-36

619. WILLIAM GROVES was indicted for s tealing, on the 26th of April , the carcase of a hog, value 3 l. , the goods of Michael Scales .

MICHAEL SCALES . I am a butcher , and live in Aldgate High-street , the carcase of the hog was under the shed in front of the house. On the 26th of April, about twelve o'clock, I left the street door, and about two o'clock I received information that the place was robbed. I saw the carcase before the Lord Mayor, and am sure it was mine. I have known the prisoner many years.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. He was employed by your brother - A. Yes; there was a relation of my brother's was apprehended, but the bill was thrown out.

JAMES ROBERTS . I am a patrol of Portsoken-ward. About two o'clock in the morning the watchman came and told me that two men were loitering about the house, we went across the road and saw them (the prisoner was one), he saw us and they walked away. I got sight of them about five minutes after. They put their hands on the carcase, went away again, and returned in about five minutes - they stood there some little time, I then saw the prisoner put his back under one of the hogs, and carry it off towards Aldgate Church. I went up to him and asked what he was going to do with it? he threw it down and ran off; I never lost sight of him till he was stopped - he had carried it four or five doors from the shop.

SAMUEL LEWIS . I am a watchman. I saw the prisoner near Mr. Scales's shop with another, about two o'clock in the morning, and in going down Aldgate High-street, I saw two persons coming from the house, and the carcase of a hog lying on the ground. I told Roberts what I had seen, we went to the corner of Petticoat-lane; I then went on my beat whilst Roberts watched them. I picked up the carcase three doors from Mr. Scales's.

Cross-examined. I did not see it taken.

MARIA COOK . I was employed by Mr. Scales to watch the premises. I did not see the person take the first hog, I saw a person with a hog on his back, and called out Stop thief! and the officers stopped him.

TOBIAS LOWE . I was constable of the night. I stopped the prisoner about three hundred yards from the house.

Cross-examined. He did not appear quite sober - he never said any thing about a frolic between him and the other man.

Prisoner. I was very much in liquor.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined Six Weeks and Whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200517-37

620. JOHN BLACKMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of May , one box, value 3 s.; three pair of scissars, value 2 s. 8 d.; two nutmegs, value 4 d.; one pinafore, value 1 s. 6 d.; two pair of wristbands, value 1 s. 6 d., and twelve shirt-buttons, value 6 d. , the goods of John Miller .

JOHN MILLER . I live at No. 200, Upper Thames-street , and am a carpenter . On the 8th of May, about six o'clock in the morning, I opened the kitchen window and the box was safe close to the window. I left the house at that time, and shut the door; when I came back the box was gone, and the prisoner stopped with it in his possession - I never saw the prisoner before. There is a glass-door in the passage, the street-door is opened when the female part of the family get up. There did not appear any force, it must have been opened by a pipe key.

ROBERT BUTLER . I am a labourer by the water-side. I saw the prisoner come out of Mr. Miller's house, about ten minutes before eight o'clock. He was a stranger to me. He went to two other persons close by the door, and said he could only open one lock with the key; he then returned back, and said there was a room up stairs with the door open, and a box on the table - they desired him to go and fetch it, and he did so. I let them go off the premises; they weighed the box in their hand to see how heavy it was. I stopped him before I lost sight of him, and the others went off. I took him to Mr. Miller's house, and delivered him to a constable. I did not see the box opened, I am quite sure he is the man that went into the house.

Q. Were you in sight of the prisoner when you heard him speak - A. No.

LYDIA MILLER . I was at home when the prisoner was brought into the house, I cannot say whether the box was brought in with him. He said the prisoner had stolen the box - I knew it when I saw it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. It is all false, I was not in the house or with any one.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200517-38

621. CHARLES ROMLEY JACOBS , WILLIAM WALKINGHAM , JOHN SAYERS , and WILLIAM WOODROFFE , was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of April , one handkerchief, value 2 s., the goods of a certain man, whose name is unknown, from his person .

WILLIAM COLTON . I am a broker, and live at Battle-bridge. On the 29th of April, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I was returning from Stamford-hill, and saw Woodroffe, Sayers, and Jacobs, near the Regency Canal, City-road, following several gentlemen. Woodroffe knew

me, and I sent my apprentice to watch them. They then came into the City-road, near Brick-lane. I then saw Johnson the officer, and told him my suspicious. I kept back but never lost sight of them. About seven o'clock, they went down Bath-street and Bunhill-row, towards Chiswell-street - there were only the three at that time. I saw Woodroffe try a gentleman's pocket in Bunhill-row , they then went into Chiswell-street, up and down, for two hours - one of the prisoners was on the opposite side of the way to the other two. Then Walkingham joined them and made the fourth. Jacobs was following a gentleman who had two ladies with him, and the other three joined him. I saw the handkerchief taken from the gentleman's pocket by one of them, I do not know which, they were close together - he had a lady on each arm. I stopped him and told him his pocket was picked. I went after the prisoners and met with them going into Bridgewater-square, I took Jacobs and Sayers, Walkingham got away and threw down the handkerchief. Johnson followed Walkingham and brought him back. Woodroffe was taken on the Monday, I knew him, he was one of the party - my apprentice was not with me when the pocket was picked.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. The gentleman did not give you his card or his name - A. No. I did not stop, I went after the prisoners. There is two letters on the handkerchief, and I saw it taken from the pocket.

WILLIAM JOHNSON . I am an headborough. I was in the City-road on business between four and five o'clock, and was accosted by Mr. Colton, in consequence of which I watched three persons following a gentleman. I only recollect the persons of two, Jacobs and Sayers, I cannot recollect the features of the others, and was induced to follow them. They turned round and went into the City-road, I followed them - they were playing about some time on and near the Bridge. They then went towards Bunhill-row, I followed them, it was then dusk. They tried a gentleman's pocket in Bunhill-row, one tried first, then a second, and a third tried, but without success, he was taller than the other two. They then went to the lower end of Bunhill-row (there was a mob there), they staid there some time, and afterwards went down Chiswell-street, they were joined by Walkingham. They went down one side of the way, crossed over, and followed very close to a gentleman with two ladies. I did not perceive them take the handkerchief. Colton said they had got it, and three of them instantly crossed the way. I did not see Woodroffe, I could not swear to him. Colton spoke to the gentleman, and then went after the prisoners, I followed him, and we tried to secure them all. Walkingham threw down a handkerchief and ran away, I pursued him and brought him back, and never lost sight of him. I went to Colton, he had got the other two, and the handkerchief. We went on Monday into the City-road and apprehended Woodroffe. I do not know who the gentleman was, I never heard his name.

Cross-examined. I did not hear the name of Dennis given.

WILLIAM JOHNSON re-examined. Q. Were was the place - A. Opposite Stains's Chapel, it is in the City.

GEORGE BLIZARD . I am an apprentice to Mr. Colton. I was coming from Stamford-hill in the City-road, on the bridge I saw the three prisoners - I only watched them to the end of Brick-lane.

SAYER'S Defence. Colton and his apprentice are noted thieves, I know nothing of the handkerchief.

WOODRUFFE'S Defence. I was going up the City-road on Monday, and two gentlemen came, and said I was with three boys picking a gentleman's pocket.

JACOBB'S Defence. As I was going down Barbican, two men came up and told us that we had been picking a gentleman's pocket.

MARY JACOBS . I live with my mother, at No. 6, Union Crescent, Kingsland-road, I am sister to the prisoner Jacobs. He was in company with his mother at five o'clock, and was at home a little before six. He was taken up the last day of April. I was not at home all the afternoon, I was at home at five o'clock. I saw my mother when I came home, she was home first; my brother was also at home, this was about five o'clock. He left home again about half an hour after, alone - our house is about a quarter of an hours walk from the canal, he did not come home that evening. I heard of him on the Sunday afternoon, he sent word that he was in the Compter. I only knew one of the others, Sayers, he lives about half an hours walk from us. He had not been doing anything that day. I am a straw-bonnet make. I did not go to him, I saw him the Thursday following at the Mansion House. On Saturday, I told several persons that my brother was at home at five o'clock.

Q. Did you go to the Justice and tell him so - A. No.

Q. There has been persons who have sworn very different, do you mean to swear that you saw him at home at five o'clock on that day - A. Yes.

WILLIAM COLTON re-examined. I saw Jacobs about four o'clock, and did not loose sight of him for two minutes. I know Union Crescent, it is a mile from the place.

GEORGE BLIZARD re-examined. I saw Jacobs at four o'clock or half-past four, I do not know Union Crescent.

WILLIAM JOHNSON re-examined. I first saw the prisoners before five o'clock, Jacobs was with them.

Q. Could he have gone a quarter of a mile distant - A. I do not think I lost sight of him one minute.

HANNAH JACOBS . I am the wife of Samuel Jacobs , and live at No. 2, Garden Crescent, Hull-street. The prisoner Jacobs was with me at half-past two o'clock, and at half-past three, I saw him with his mother in Whitecross-street. They went and bought a pair of shoes; I saw him a quarter before four o'clock in Whitecross-street.

Q. Where is his mother - A. She is ill.

Q. Is she in bed - A. Yes.

Q. Do you mean to say that she could not come - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know that there are such things as hackney-coaches - A. Yes. I did not see him later than a quarter before four o'clock.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200517-39

622. JAMES STROUD was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of April , one handkerchief, value 2 s., the goods of Skeffington Robinson , from his person .

SKEFFINGTON ROBINSON. I live in New Broad-street. On the 24th of April, about half-past twelve o'clock, in the

day, as I was passing along Cornhill , I felt a pressure at my pocket, and suspected that some one was picking it, I turned round and saw the prisoner with the handkerchief in his hand. I laid hold of him, he dropped it. I held him with my right hand, picked it up with my left, and took him to the Mansion House.

CHARLES MATTHEWS . I am an officer. I received the prisoner and handkerchief in custody.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing at all about the handkerchief.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200517-40

623. JAMES EGLESS was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of May , five bottles, value 1 s. 6 d., and four quarts of wine, value 15 s. , the goods of John Farncomb .

JOHN FARNCOMB . I live in Tower-street , and am a wine-merchant , the prisoner was my porter . I know nothing of the transaction.

GEORGE MATTHEWS . In consequence of information I watched Mr. Farncomb's house, I was six or seven yards off - the prosecutor's house is up a court. About ten minutes before eight o'clock in the morning, the prisoner came out of the court, I followed him to Fenchurch-street, and took him into a grocers'-shop, near the corner of Mincing-lane. I took from his pockets five bottles of wine, and asked him where he got them from? he said the cellarman had spoken to his master about them, and he was to pay for them on Saturday night; I took him to the Mansion House, and then to the Compter. I went and took the cellarman, but he was afterwards discharged.

JOHN HODSON . I am a messenger of Giltspur-street Compter. The day the prisoner was committed he gave me a note to deliver to a man of the name of Reve. I gave it to Matthews. That is the note - (read) -

To Mr. Reve, No. 91, Great Tower-street.

Mr. Reve,

As I was taken this morning by an officer, I should be obliged to you to go my master, and beg him not to appear against me, and to likewise go to my wife, and tell her my misfortune.

JAMES EGLESS .

JOHN FARNCOMB re-examined. I did agree to let my cellarman have some wine, which was to be paid for on the Saturday night.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The cellarman came and called me up to work. The five Bottles of wine were in the passage, and he told me to take them to a place, and leave them there for him till the evening. He said they were his own.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Confined Six Months , and Whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200517-41

THIRD DAY, FRIDAY, MAY 19.

624. THOMAS JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of April , four live tame fowls, price 10 s. , the property of Christopher Scott .

WILLIAM SCOTT . I am the son of Christopher Scott , who lives at Kentish-town . On the 27th of April, about eight o'clock in the evening, I put four hen fowls and a cock in the henhouse, and padlocked the door, next morning, about six I found it broken open, and the poultry gone. I found them at the watch-house, and knew them well.

GEORGE CLUNES . I am sergeant of the watch. On the 28th of April, between twelve and one o'clock at night, I met the prisoner in Sol's-row, Hampstead, about a mile and a half from Mr. Scott's, with a bundle. I asked him what he had got - he said they were fowls which he had received from a gentleman at Hampstead, to carry to Mr. Cook, of Somers'-town - they were dead, but warm. I took him to the watch-house; he then said he found them under a hedge, and afterwards that he took them from a house in Kentish-town. I found they belonged to Mr. Scott.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Three Months , and Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18200517-42

625. JOSEPH MILLS was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of April , one handkerchief, value 2 s., the goods of Thomas Margetts , from his person .

REV. THOMAS MARGETTS . I live at Risley, in Bedfordshire. On the 29th of April, about eleven o'clock at night, I was walking up Holborn with two friends, and felt my handkerchief being drawn from my pocket; I turned round, and saw the prisoner in the act of taking it out; I seized his arms, called out "Pick-pocket!" he dropped the handkerchief from his hand, and my friend picked it up. He denied taking it, and said it was some other person. He began to resist and strike me - I was obliged to return his blows, and when I let go to strike him, he escaped from my left hand, and ran into Brook-street - he was stopped there. I never lost sight of him till he was apprehended. I positively swear he is the man; nobody was near enough to take it but him, and I saw him drop it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GEORGE STRIPLING . I am a watchman. I was at the corner of Gray's Inn-lane, and heard the call of Stop thief! I saw the prisoner run, and pursued him down Brook-street - I never lost sight of him until he was stopped. When I took him he struck me. The prosecutor came up immediately.

Prisoner's Defence. There were three lads behind the gentleman, immediately as they took the handkerchief he laid hold of me.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18200517-43

626. WILLIAM COOPER , GEORGE THORPE , ROBERT IRELAND , GEORGE HENLEY , JOSEPH LENNY , GEORGE SEYMOUR , FRANCES BEDCUTT , and SAMUEL SLOW were indicted for having in their custody and possession forged Bank notes, knowing them to be forged and counterfeited .

To which indictments the prisoners pleaded GUILTY .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Before Mr. Justice Bayley and Mr. Baron Garrow .

627. The same prisoners were again indicted for uttering and putting off as true certain forged and counterfeit Bank notes, with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England .

MR. REYNOLDS on the part of the Governor and Company of the Bank of England declined offering any evidence.

NOT GUILTY .

Before Mr. Justice Bayley and Mr. Baron Garrow .

Reference Number: t18200517-44

628. WILLIAM WILKINSON was indicted for feloniously assaulting Edward Hodder in a certain open place near the King's highway, on the 22d of April , at St. George Hanover-square , putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, the sum of 7 s. 6 d. in monies numbered, and two 1 l. Bank notes, his property .

The property in question was obtained from the prosecutor under a threat from the prisoner to charge him with an unnatural crime. The particulars are of too indelicate a nature for publication.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 22.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18200517-45

629. BENJAMIN CONSTABLE was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of May , at St. George, Hanover-square, 13 pair of pistols, value 30 l., the goods of Isaac Riviere , in his dwelling-house , and ELIZA, the wife of the said Benjamin Constable , was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing them to have been feloniously stolen .

ISAAC RIVIERE . I am a gunmaker , and live at No. 315, Oxford-street , the male prisoner worked for me. I lost about four pair of pistols, and afterwards missed more. They were finished, and kept in a drawer under the counter in the front shop - he worked in the back shop and did not serve. I missed four pair of pistols on the 10th, went to Tates, the pawnbroker, on the 11th, and found six pair. I had seen them safe about two days before. I afterwards found more at Harrison's and Leighton's. I went to the prisoner's apartments, but found none there.

JOHN DAVIS . I am a general salesman. On the 11th of May, the prosecutor sent for me. I went to the Malborough-head, public-house, and in my presence the prisoner delivered over six duplicates - another was found in his fob.

WILLIAM KING . I live with Mr. Tate, who is a pawnbroker, and lives in Cambridge-street, Golden-square. On the 10th of May, a man about the size of the male prisoner, pledged a pair of pistols with me for 14 s., and on the 15th of February the female prisoner pledged a pair in the name of Constable. I asked if they belonged to her? she said her husband made them for sale.

JOHN FOUCH . I am shopman to Mr. Harrison, who is a pawnbroker, and lives at No. 95, Wardour-street. On the 15th of February, a woman pledged a pair of pistols, and on the 29th of April, she pledged another pair. I have also a pair which Mr. Harrison received.

THOMAS STEPHENS . I am shopman to Mr. Leighton, who is a pawnbroker. A pair of pistols were pledged with with me on the 29th of October, and on the 16th of March, another pair for 7 s., in the name of John Adams . I have no recollection who pledged them, the duplicates are my writing. I believe the male prisoner is the man that came on the 29th of October, but cannot swear to him. I have no knowledge of having seen him.

JOHN DAVIS re-examined. The prisoner delivered me the duplicates of the six pair.

ISAAC RIVIERE re-examined. I found the six pair at the pawnbrokers before the prisoner gave up the duplicates, the best pair cost me four guineas and a half, they are double barrelled. I know them all to be my property, I never sold them.

Prisoner B. CONSTABLE. I confess myself guilty, but wish to vindicate my wife of receiving them, she did not know they were stolen. I throw myself on the mercy of the Court.

B. CONSTABLE - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 24.

ELIZA CONSTABLE - NOT GUILTY .

Recommended to Mercy - considering it may be his first offence, and the ease with which men find in getting rid of property by the negligence of pawnbrokers.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow .

Reference Number: t18200517-46

630. PHILLIS YOUNG was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of May , two petticoats, value 1 s.; one pail, value 6 d.; one shift, value 3 d.; two pinafores, value 1 s.; one handkerchief, value 1 d., and one pair of stockings, value 3 d. , the goods of William Bethell .

ELIZA BETHELL . I am wife of William Bethell , and live in Drury-lane . About one o'clock I missed my pail, and next morning I missed the clothes stated in the indictment, and found them at the prisoner's lodging in Great Wild-street, behind her box. One of her children had the pinafore on, she was a stranger.

GEORGE GLASIER . I am a constable. The prisoner was given in my charge by another constable. She said she lived at No. 26, Wild-street, I went and found the property there. When she saw me with them, she said they were sent to her to be washed - she escaped from me, and I secured her again.

MARY BRITTEN . The prosecutrix lives with me. On the 2d of May, about ten o'clock, I saw the prisoner go down our stairs with the pail in her hand, but do not know whether anything was in it. I saw her again on the landing-place, about five o'clock, and told her she was the person who went down with the pail; she said she would make any recompence for the pail or property - the prosecutrix gave her in charge.

JOHN BLAKENEY . I apprehended the prisoner, and asked her where she lived? she first said at No. 26, Wild-street,

and then at Eagle-street. She was dressed in a black gown.

ELIZA BETHELL re-examined. About five o'clock a girl came and said a woman was at my door. I went, and found the prisoner there. She asked for Mrs. Smith, a charwoman, but no such a person lived there. Mrs. Britten came out, and said she was the person who went down with the pail. She wanted us to let her go.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A woman, who was dressed in a black gown, came to me, and asked me to wash the things. She then sent me to this house for Mrs. Smith to do some work for her.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Confined One Month .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18200517-47

631. MARY ANN PEARCE was indicted for stealing on the 17th of March , in the dwelling-house of James Carley , two sovereigns; four 1 l. Bank notes, and one 10 l. promissory note, his property .

MR. NORRIS conducted the prosecution.

LYDIA CARLEY . I am the wife of James Carley ; we live at Hounslow . On the 17th of March I lost a 10 l. Uxbridge note, four 1 l. Bank of England notes, and two sovereigns from a chest; the prisoner has frequently been in the habit of coming to my house - I employed her in my garden two days in the week that I lost the money; she has been to see me when I was ill, and saw where I kept my money. The witness, Littlefold worked in our field on the Tuesday of that Week. He was not in the habit of coming to the house.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You missed your property on the 18th of March? Was the first step you took to recover it to go to a fortune-teller - A. Yes. I took the prisoner up on the Monday after on suspicion, but she was set at liberty, and has been so ever since. After that a gentleman served me a process from the King's Bench, and I was obliged to pay her 5 l.

Q. Did you not this morning, at the door of this Court, tell Littlefold to be sure, and swear positively that Poll Pearce gave him the note - A. I did not. I told him if he was concerned in it to say so.

COURT. Q. What day did you go to the fortune-teller - A. On the Saturday night after I missed the money - she lives at Brentford. She said she knew what I wanted, that I had lost a sum of money, and it was by a person who was intimate with me, lived near me, and frequently used my house. I said I knew of nobody but Mary Pearce . She said it would be some time before I found it out, and I should have a great deal of trouble, and so I have had. I gave her 2 s. for her advice.

JAMES CARLEY . I am the husband of the last witness, and have a bit of ground at Hounslow. On Friday, the 17th of March, I met the prisoner coming out of my garden gate. She said,

"Pray, master Carley, where are all your people gone? anybody might rob your house, and you be none the wiser. I have been in, but have not stopped."

Cross-examined. Q. Her father lives next door to you - A. Next door but one; the money was in a box in the bedroom up stairs; I slept there that night, but did not examine it - Littlefold lives next door to me. He has not been in the house five times since I have known him.

ROBERT LITTLEFOLD . I live at Hounslow. As I was going home the prisoner called me to her gate, and asked me if I was going down to Hounslow town? I said not then, but should after I got home, to sell a few radishes. She asked me to bring her a purple purse, two red spotted handkerchiefs, and a pair of silk gloves. She gave me a 10 l. Uxbridge note and 4 s. - this was on the 27th of April, about five o'clock in the afternoon; she told me to go to Mr. Wood's shop, but to no other, and the articles hung in the corner of the window, and that if I did not see her when I came home I was to hide them till I did see her - she told me to say I had lived at Mr. Wild's four years, and to deny my name. I went there and bought the things, Mr. Wood asked me who I came from, and I said from Mr. Wild's - when I returned I did not see her, and hid them in a heap of turf. I did not see her till the morning, then asked her to go with me, and I would give her the articles? she said No, she could not stop, for she was going to Isleworth for greens, but when she came back she would. I watched her back, and asked her again, but she said,

"You are not going to bring me into any scrawl," and did not go with me. I fetched them, and gave them to her before a witness, Mr. Field.

Q. They went on purpose to see what passed - A. Yes. When I put them into her hands she said it was a fine present, and then my father and the constable took her. She held them in her hands all the time.

Q. Never threw them down - A. Yes.

Q. Did she not say,

"It is a fine present, but I know nothing about it." - A. Yes.

Q. Had you been questioned about the note before - A. Yes, directly I came home Mr. Wood came to me, and I denied it. I did not give the prisoner the change.

Cross-examined. Q. How old are you - A. Nearly fifteen. I never had a sovereign in my possession - I did not tell Mr. Wood that I found the handkerchiefs and the gloves.

Q. Did you never offer to give Sarah Weven a purse - A. No. I am sure I never had a sovereign.

Q. Before you had the note, you had heard of the prisoner's being taken up for the robbery - A. Yes. I gave Mr. Wood 4 s. 6 d., besides the note, because she told me.

Q. When Mr. Wood charged you with it you told him you knew nothing about it, and that you was never in his shop in your life - A. Yes, and next morning I told this story.

Q. Did you not know in March that the Uxbridge note was stolen - A. Yes, and I heard that a young woman of a fair complexion was suspected.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow .

Reference Number: t18200517-48

632. JAMES THOMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of April , three pieces of mahogany, value 30 s. , the goods of Daniel Edward Colston .

DANIEL EDWARD COLSTON . I am a timber-merchant , and live in Duncombe-place, City-road, Islington . On the 21st of April, about ten minutes before five o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner coming out of my yard

with two pieces of mahogany on his shoulder; I was dressing myself at the time, and called to my boy, who slept in the adjoining room. I dressed myself, and followed him down the City-road; he went to a house in Smith's-buildings, and was in the act of putting it down the cellar, when I seized him, and charged him with taking it out of my yard. He begged to be let go - I knew it to be mine.

Cross-examined by MR. BROADRICK. Q. Is not your yard open - A. No. I found some more of my property in the cellar.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. It stood by the road-side, and I took two pieces, thinking I could make a table of it.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Confined One Year .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18200517-49

633. JEREMIAH RILEY was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of April , one iron block with four brass sheaves, value 3 l. , the goods of Joseph Capon .

CHARLES HARWOOD . I am a labourer; this block was on Mr. Smith's premises at Islington . On the 18th of April I saw the prisoner go into the building, and bring it out. I secured him with it.

JOSEPH CAPON . I am wharfinger to Mr. Smith; the block was on his premises. It is mine, and was used to hoist large stones on the building.

Prisoner's Defence. It stood outside the building. A man unhooked it, and said it was very heavy. I lifted it to feel the weight, and this man seized me.

CHARLES HARWOOD re-examined. I saw him go into the building without anything, and come out with the block. My fellow-workman called to him, but he went on with it. I secured him, and he said a man in the place lent it to him.

GUILTY . Aged 33.

Confined One Year .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow .

Reference Number: t18200517-50

634. JOHN NEWMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of May , 4 lbs. of bacon, value 4 s. , the goods of John Taylor .

CHARLES BROTHERTON . I live opposite Mr. Taylor. On the 6th of May I saw the prisoner go by my window with another boy, and in about ten minutes I saw them both running from Mr. Taylor's with the bacon. I pursued, and overtook the prisoner with it.

JOHN TAYLOR . The last witness brought the prisoner and bacon to me. It had hung at the door - the hook was taken with it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18200517-51

635. MILICIENT CORDEROY was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of April , one pair of trowsers, value 2 s. , the goods of Edward Brander .

EDWARD BRANDER . I am a shopkeeper , and live at Harmondsworth . On the 23d of April the prisoner came to buy a little tea and sugar - the trowsers laid on the counter. A few minutes after she left I missed them, got a warrant, and found them in her apartment at Harmondsworth.

JAMES APPLETON . I was at the prisoner's apartment when she gave up the trowsers, and said she found them. Before that she said she knew nothing about them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I found them by the prosecutor's shed.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Six Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow .

Reference Number: t18200517-52

636. JOHN WALROND was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of March , one coat, value 10 s. , the goods of Samuel Parquot .

MR. BOLLAND conducted the prosecution.

SAMUEL PARQUOT . I am a clerk in the Cashbook-office at the Bank . On the 26th of March, about seven o'clock in the evening, I left a coat at the office - the 27th was a holiday, and the next day was Sunday. On Monday I went to the office about nine o'clock, and missed it; the prisoner brought newspapers to the office every morning. On the 2d of May the prisoner was brought to me by the porter with the coat on his back. He said he bought it of a man in Webb-square, named Grant, about five months before, and that he gave 16 s. 6 d. for it. While we were debating what to do with him he got away. I saw him again next day, went with Turnpenny to his lodgings, and found the coat there. We took him to Grant's, and asked him if he sold the prisoner the coat? he denied it. The prisoner said nothing.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not tell the Lord Mayor that it had been altered - A. No. I said it might have been altered a little, but I knew it.

GEORGE SCULFOR . I am a porter at the Bank, and have the care of the Cashbook-office; the prisoner used to leave the Times newspaper there every morning - he generally came about half-past seven o'clock; the prosecutor lost his coat. I saw the prisoner in Wilson-street, Finsbury, with it on his back, and followed him to the Bank, waited till he came out, and then told him a gentleman in the Cashbook-office would be glad to see him. I delivered him to the gentleman.

HENRY TURNPENEY . On the 3d of May I apprehended the prisoner, went to his lodgings in Duke's-court, Long-alley, and found the coat - he said he bought it of Grant. I took him to Grant, who said he never sold it to the prisoner.

WILLIAM GRANT . I am a shoemaker, and live in Webb-square. The prisoner used to come to see my apprentice - I never sold him the coat.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I bought it of Grant.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Three Months , and Whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200517-53

637. WILLIAM DAVIS was indicted for feloniously assaulting Thomas Wolley on the King's highway, on the 18th of April , putting him in fear, and taking from his

person and against his will, one hat, value 1 l.; one pocket-book, value 1 s., and one warrant for payment of 4 l. 4 s. 6 d., his property .

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

THOMAS WOLLEY . I am collecting clerk to Messrs. Hale and Co., who are brewers. On the evening of the 18th of April I had been out collecting orders and money, I was about the middle of Houndsditch at nine o'clock, and was knocked down - there were at least two or three persons round me at the time. I was knocked down by a fist - I was hurt in more places than one; I received a blow in my face, my arm and breast were also bruised - I was rendered insensible at the time. When I came to myself I found a crowd collected round me, and requested that I might have assistance home. I got home to Wellington-street, Goswell-street, about eleven o'clock, but was detained sometime at the watch-house for a coach. I was quite alone, and had given offence to no person. When I got to the watch-house I found I had lost my hat and a pocket-book containing a check on Messrs. Barclay and Co., drawn by Messrs. Wyatt and Son for 4 l. 4 s. 6 d. I caused notice to be sent to the bankers' before the house was open in the morning, and saw the check next day at the Mansion House. I cannot say I was perfectly sober, but could go home very well.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Were you not very drunk - A. I was not - I knew what I was about as well as I do now. M'Combie went home with me - I got to bed myself without any person's assistance. The check was dated in February, I do not remember what day. My own name was endorsed on it; it was in my pocket-book when I was knocked down.

DAVID M'COMBIE. I am street-keeper of Houndsditch. On the 18th of April, between eight and nine o'clock at night, I was nearly opposite Aldgate church, a boy said some person had been robbed; I ran down, and found the prosecutor most dreadfully cut and all over blood - he was standing up without his hat, and a mob round him. I conceive this to have been about twenty-five minutes before nine. I took him to the watch-house, and found 22 l. in his breeches-pocket. He was rather fresh, but still sensible - he remained there till ten o'clock, I then took him home in a coach. He spoke quite reasonable; and complained of losing his pocket-book, with a check for 4 l. 4 s. 6 d. on Messrs. Barclay and Co., and gave orders to his wife to stop payment of it.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you ask if he was robbed, or did he tell you - A. Immediately as I came up he said he had been robbed, but did not describe the parties. I asked him if he had been seen by any girls? as he was near where girls walk. I found him opposite St. Mary Axe. I took him to the watch-house for protection.

Q. Have you not said that you went home with him because he was so drunk - A. No doubt I have, and I said on account of the state he was in I doubted whether he had lost a pocket-book at all. The place he was robbed at is farther down than where the women frequent.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. How do you know where he was robbed - A. I saw him coming up for a good way farther down. He was quite sensible to know what he was about.

COURT. Q. Could the bruises on his face have arisen from the fall - A. No, it must have been from personal violence.

THOMAS DUNFORD . I am clerk to Messrs. Barclay and Co. On the morning of the 19th of April orders were given to stop payment of a particular check, and about eleven o'clock, or ten minutes after, the prisoner brought the check and presented it to me. I asked him of whom he received it? he said he received it of a person, whom he would fetch. Wishing him not to suspect there was any reason for questioning him, I told him it was a good one. I said to the person next to me,

"This is the check which is stopped" - the prisoner might have heard it. He was requested to walk to the back of the house, he did so, and I remained at my station. We sent to the prosecutor - Mr. Higgins, of the firm of Messrs. Hale and Co. came - an officer afterwards came. I marked the check before it left my hand, and delivered it to the officer.

Cross-examined. Q. Was not his first question,

"I want to know whether this is a good check" - A. It was not. After saying he would fetch the person, he said,

"I hope it is not forged;" I said it was good.

JOHN BROWN. I am an officer. I was sent for to Messrs. Barclays'. I received the check and produce it; it is dated the 15th of February - I took the prisoner into custody there; he told me he took it of a man whom he had dealings with for some goods; that he did not know his name, nor where he lived, but if I would go with him he would be at his house by twelve o'clock. I took him to the Mansion House, and sent an extra constable, named Esketh, to his house - according to the direction he gave it was No. 2 or 8, at the bottom of Lemon-row, Lemon-street, Goodman's-fields; this was about eleven o'clock in the morning - Esketh returned to me at the Mansion House about one. I went there myself about four o'clock - it is a small private house with two rooms; the lower window was shut up, and a girl was going out - no business whatever appeared to be going on. He produced a publican from Rosemary-lane at his examination, and at his request he was examined.

Cross-examined. Q. You went to the house some hours after he was apprehended - A. Yes; no name was on the door.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did you find any goods in the house - A. None packed up - I found a piece of calico and some waistcoating, and binding for bed furniture; also a pair of womens' shoes, in different drawers. He said they were the goods he sold for the check, and that he had sold several of the waistcoat-pieces before to some other people, and had been taken in with them.

THOMAS WOLLEY re-examined. This is the check, it has my writing on it.

Prisoner's Defence. On the evening of the robbery, from four o'clock in the afternoon till eleven o'clock at night, with the exception of a few minutes, I was at one house. I got up on the following morning at-half-past seven o'clock. Having quarrelled with my wife we were separated, and I had a girl to mind the house. I went into Brick-lane for my father, who I do business for. I have been in the habit of purchasing rope from the ships in the docks, and on this morning I received the check from a man whom I frequently sold rope to before. He

came to my house - my father is very ill, and does not attend to business. I returned that morning to breakfast, the girl told me the man had been, and while I was at breakfast he came and asked if I had any rope? and said he had bought some a day or two before - he said he wanted half a hundred weight. I had the linen, waistcoat-pieces, and shoes on the sideboard; he bought them of me for 2 l. 4 s., and asked if I could give him the difference of a check? I said I would ask my father if he would take it. I went and saw my father at breakfast, he said he would not take it. Being anxious to sell the rope I asked my sister to lend me a pound or two; she could not, but advised me to go to Mr. Wright, the baker - he was not at home, but his wife advised me to go to the banking-house to enquire about it. I left the man whom I took it of at the corner of the Minories, and went to the banking-house - it was the first check I ever presented, and went to the wrong counter. I laid it on the counter, the gentleman said,

"Who presented this check?" I said

"I did, I will thank you to inform me if that person keeps cash at your house." He said it was a good check, and I was asked to walk backwards. When at the Mansion House I asked Mr. Wolley to state the exact time he was robbed, he said ten o'clock, and M'Combie corrected him. I proved I was at a different place.

CHARLES CRAGG . I am clerk to Messrs. Barclays, and was at the counter when the prisoner presented the check. I did not hear the conversation between him and Mr. Dunford; the conversation I heard was between him and Mr. Barnes, another clerk. He presented the check to Dunford, who spoke to Barnes, and desired him to introduce the prisoner to one of the principals. I went into the inner room soon after, and asked him how he came by the check? he said he received it of a man who came to the house that morning to purchase some articles in which he dealt, that he called a second time, and he not being conversant with checks, was not willing to part with the goods till he ascertained that it was a good one, and that he had desired the man to come again in about two hours for the goods. The prisoner said he hoped the check was not forged, I said it was not, and he expressed himself much relieved. I told him a person had been robbed the preceding evening, and it would be necessary that he should assist in tracing the delinquent, which he expressed himself ready to do. I kept him in conversation till Brown came. He said he was unwilling to take any check, and particularly one that was dated so far back.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did he tell you the man came with him to the corner of the Minories - A. No. I think he said something about having shewn it to his father. He called himself a dealer in marine stores, and said he had had many transactions with the man, but did not know his name.

ELIZA DAVIS . I live at No. 2, Dock-street, Rosemary-lane, and am the prisoner's sister. On the morning he was taken up he came about nine o'clock to my father's house, and asked him to cash the check - my father looked at it, and noticed the date; it was the 15th of April, and this was on the 19th.

Q. Take time to recollect yourself; what was the date of the check - A. It was the 15th of April - I do not positively say so. My father said he would not take a check of anybody, unless he knew them. It was for 4 l. 4 s. 6 d. I could swear to the check if I saw it. He then asked me to lend him some money, as he had sold goods and wanted the change. I advised him to go to Wright's. He went away. (Looks at the check) - this is it, I am sure. I was mistaken in the date.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You are positive that is the check - A. Yes, I noticed it. My father is not here - he is ill - he is scarcely out of bed two days together. He was in bed this morning.

Q.He can get up early - A. He is obliged, as he cannot afford to lay abed.

Q. When was he out last - A. On Monday. He deals in coals, and buys rope at the Docks.

Q. Was your mother at home when he brought the check - A. Yes, she was in the shop.

COURT. Q. Your mother knew of his bringing the check - A. Not till after he was taken. My father was at breakfast in the parlour behind the shop. My mother was busy, and saw nothing of it. My brother said he had sold the rope to this man. He kept a little servant girl about twelve years of age, she left the day after he was taken, as his wife came from the country. He only kept a servant when his wife was out.

MARY WRIGHT . My husband is a baker, and lives in Rosemary-lane. On the morning that the prisoner was taken into custody, he brought a check to my house, and asked me what I thought of it? I said I thought it wrong to have anything to do with it, as it was dated the 15th of February, which was so long back, and he had better go to the banker's and see if it was all right. I saw no person waiting at the door for him.

JOHN GAVILL . I keep the Two Brewers, public-house, in White's-yard, Rosemary-lane. The prisoner lives at the top of Fourall's-alley, I believe it is close to Lemon-row. He was in the habit of coming to my house - I heard of his being taken up the day after it happened.

Q. What day of the week was it - A. I really do not know, but I saw his examination in the newspapers.

Q. Do you know where he was on the night of the 18th of April - A. I do, it was Friday; I first saw him between three and four o'clock in my skittle-ground, with a great many more people - I was in and out serving them. I did not lose sight of him, to the best of my knowledge, till a quarter before nine o'clock, and then he came into the taproom, and staid there till half-past eleven. He was out a few minutes.

COURT. Q. What distance is your house from the middle of Houndsditch - A. It is the best part of half a mile I should think.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Was the skittle-ground covered - A. I have three, two are open; he was in the open ground. I believe it was a fine afternoon. A man named Green and William Press were there. The playing at skittles went on till they came into the tap-room. I do not light the skittle-ground up at all. I generally put them away when it is dark - they very often play in the dark.

COURT. Q. Do you mean to say it was anything like light at a quarter before nine o'clock on the 18th of April - I did not particularly notice. I did not see them in the taproom till then.

Q. Will you swear you saw him playing an hour before he was in the taproom - A. I do.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. The sun set at seven o'clock, do you mean to swear that people were playing in your skittle-ground for two hours after that - A. People were playing. He did not go away to my knowledge.

Q. You have sworn you did not lose sight of him - A. I did not to my knowledge. My reason for remembering it is because I had a precept served on me between nine and ten o'clock to attend at Hicks's Hall, and he was in the taproom then. The people played for porter, and I took it to them. The prisoner payed for three or four pints. I went to the Mansion House at the first and second examination, which was three days after the 18th I believe. I do not know whether it was one, two, three, or four days after - it was not the next morning, I think.

COURT. Q. How many days before you had to attend Hicks's Hall was the process served - A. I had to attend next day, but did not go, for I was ill, and continued ill a day or two.

Q. Then you could not have been at the first examination - A. Yes, I was. I read his examination in the newspaper, and his sister told me of it. I really do not recollect when I first heard of it - there were only two persons in my taproom.

Q. Can you tell the names of any other persons who were in the skittle-ground - A. There were Thorpe, Lloyd, and Piper. They are carmen who use the house.

WILLIAM PRESS . I am a carman, and generally use Gavill's house - I live within two doors of him. I did not hear of the prisoner's being apprehended for eight or ten days afterwards; Gavill was the first person that spoke to me about it. I then remembered having been in company with the prisoner in the skittle-ground on the 18th. I am quite sure it was the 18th, for I earned 3 s. 4 d. that day.

Q. Was that an uncommon thing - A. Yes. I had to give three months credit for the money; I went to Gavill's about half-past five o'clock; a man named Davis, and Green, Lloyd and the prisoner were there - the prisoner was not out of my sight till I left the ground, which was about a quarter before nine o'clock. I then went into the house, and he also went into the house with Green and Lloyd. I staid there a short time, and then went to look at my horses - it was neither dark or light.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Was the prisoner committed when Gavill spoke to you - A. I cannot say - it was between light and dark when we went into the house, but I am sure there was daylight enough to see a man's face. I left the house in about ten minutes, it was hardly light then. It was as light as when I came into Court now - (quarter-past nine o'clock.)

Q. If anybody told you that you were playing two hours after sunset, you would say that was false - A. I do not say I should. It wanted about ten minutes to nine by the taproom clock when I went in.

COURT. Q. Was there any light in the taproom - A. Two candles.

Q. How much does it cost to keep a horse and cart - A. About one guinea a week. I keep four carts.

Q. Did you think 3 s. 4 d. a great deal to earn - A. Sometimes I earn nothing - I remarked in the skittle-ground that I had earned 3 s. 4 d. I frequently saw the prisoner there.

Q. What did Gavill tell you - A. He said Davis was apprehended for robbing a gentleman, that was all he said.

Q. Then how came you to know it was on Tuesday the 18th, when he mentioned no day - A. He said no more. It was mentioned at Gavill's house four days after that it was Tuesday, the 18th - Green and two or three others mentioned it, they said they believed the man was there at the time, and I said I knew he was; Green said he could not tell what he was taken up for. I remember I had carted a puncheon of rum that day, looked at my book, and saw it was the 18th; Green said he had seen it in the paper, but he did not know what it was for - he did not know what he had robbed him of. I could not walk from Gavill's to the bottom of Houndsditch in five minutes. I should think it would take fifteen.

WILLIAM GREEN . I am a carman; I have often seen the prisoner at Gavill's. Gavill told me of his being taken up.

Q. Did Gavill himself tell you - A. Yes, some men were talking about it in his house, he was one, and asked me if I remembered playing at skittles with him? I did not at first recollect the day, but I remembered having loaded cork that day, went to my book, and found it was the 18th of April. I had carried six bundles of work for Pickford's in Fore-street, and I had carried none there for two years before. I went to Gavill's about half-past five o'clock that day, and played at skittles; I played three rubs with the prisoner, and left the ground at dark, I should think it was very little after eight o'clock - we could not see to play. I believe I left the prisoner on the ground - I went out at the side door, and stood at the front door which leads into the house. I stood there about twenty minutes, then went in, and sat talking to the prisoner and others in the house - he was smoking his pipe, and sat on my left hand, four others sat on my right. I remained there till near ten o'clock; the prisoner was not out of my sight long enough to have gone to Houndsditch - I should think it would take him twenty minutes or half an hour.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Was he in the ground when you went - A. He was. I did not see him leave the ground, for it was so dark.

Q. Might he not have gone to Houndsditch during the twenty minutes you was at the door - A. He must have passed me to have gone out.

Q. How soon after the 18th was it that Gavill talked about this - A. About a fortnight after. Lloyd and I were present when he spoke of it, but Press was not; I think he said he was taken up for a check - he did not tell me that he had been to the Mansion House about it. I never read about it in the newspaper, nor never told any one that I had.

MR. ANDREWS. Q. You frequent the house, and do not particularly notice the company in the room - A. No. Press never read the newspaper to me. Nobody ever told me they read it in the newspaper.

COURT. Q. You frequent the house - A. Yes, most every evening. I heard nothing of this for a fortnight after. When Gavill told me of it, he said it was on the 18th of April.

Q. What did you get for carrying the cork - A.6 s. 8 d. - it was a bad day's work. I saw Lloyd there, but heard nothing about what he had earned. Press did not say what he had earned, I am sure of that - he said nothing about 3 s. 4 d. I went to the house almost every evening. I left the skittle-ground a little past eight o'clock.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200517-54

638. WILLIAM RUSSELL was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of May , 150 lbs. of lead, value 18 s., belonging to our Lord the King , and fixed to a barrack .

MR. BOLLAND conducted the prosecution.

JOHN WHITEHEAD . I am sergeant of the barracks in St. John's-wood . On the 5th of May I missed thirty-four feet of lead off the barracks - it was in two lengths. I afterwards saw two pieces that were found on the prisoner, and assisted the officer in comparing them to the building - they fitted exactly.

JOHN SMITH . I am a conductor of the patrol. On the 6th of May, about ten o'clock in the morning, I stopped the prisoner with another man who walked away - the prisoner had three pieces of lead tied in an apron. He said he had been to work at Kilburn, brought it from there, and was going to take it to Mr. Bing, of Tottenham-court-road, to change for new lead - that he was to bring 25 lbs. back, and his master lived at No. 7, Duke-street, Bloomsbury. He said he had about 40 lbs. of lead.

JOHN DAVIS . I am an officer. I produce three pieces of lead which Smith gave to me - three more pieces were found in a field adjoining the barracks. We took the prisoner to a public-house, and met Mr. Bing's foreman there; he said, in his presence, that he did not know him, and that he had no dealings with any one in Duke-street. I went to No. 7, Duke-street, but found no such person there - I compared the lead with the rest, and they tallied exactly.

GEORGE ROBINSON . On the 7th of May I found three pieces of lead in a field by Primrose-hill. They fitted the three pieces that were found on the prisoner, and all six fitted the building.

GUILTY .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18200517-55

639. ELEANOR HAGGERTY and CATHARINE MAHONEY were indicted for stealing, on the 13th of May , 23 lbs. of rope, value 10 s. , the goods of Thomas Brocklebank .

MR. ARABIN conducted the prosecution.

MARK WILKS . I am a Thames Police surveyor. On the 13th of May, about eight o'clock in the morning, I was at Blackwall, and saw the prisoners coming from where Mr. Brocklebank's rafters lay; Haggerty had a bag on her head, containing 23 lbs. of raft-rope - Mahoney was six or seven yards behind her. Haggerty had a case-knife in her hand, which she endeavoured to throw away as soon as I took her, I asked her where she got the rope from? she said she picked it up in the mud, but directly after she said she cut it from the rafters - it appeared fresh cut. I examined the knife, and found it had fresh tar on the edge, as if it had been used in cutting rope. Mahoney said she was to receive part of the profit on it.

GEORGE HITCHINGS . I am a timber-rafter, in the employ of Mr. Thomas Brocklebank , who is a timber-merchant . He had timber lashed at Blackwall ; I can swear to one piece of rope by a knot which I tied in it myself. I left the rope on the rafters, and know it to be the same - it had been cut, and I made it fast again. I have the other end of the rope here, which matches.

DANIEL BALLARD . I was in the prosecutor's service up to the time the prisoners were apprehended, and saw them come from the raft with the bag. I saw the rope safe between six and seven o'clock, and when I saw them coming I found it cut in three different places. They had been cut the week before, and I replaced them.

HAGGERTY'S Defence. I was never there but twice in my life.

HAGGERTY - GUILTY . Aged 38.

Transported for Seven Years .

MAHONEY - NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18200517-56

640. PETER MILLER was indicted for that he, on the 6th of January , at St. James, Clerkenwell , feloniously did dispose of and put away a certain forged and counterfeit Bank note for payment of 10 l. (setting it forth, No. 1226, dated July 6, 1819, signed C. Watts) with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England , he well knowing it to be forged and counterfeit .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only calling the forged instrument a promissory note for payment of money instead of a Bank note.

THIRD AND FOURTH COUNTS, the same, only stating his intent to be to defraud George Jubb , Peter Shippen , and Catherine Orton Clark .

TWO OTHER COUNTS, the same, only stating his intent to be to defraud Catherine Orton Clark , George Urling Clark , James Clark , Henry Clark , Frederick Clark , Catherine Clark , Alfred Clark , Ann Clark , Edward Clark , and Mary Clark .

MR. SERGEANT BOSANQUET and MESSRS. REYNOLDS and BOLLAND conducted the prosecution.

RICHARD DALGLISH . I am gardener to Mrs. Catherine Orton Clark , who lives in Shoreditch, she also has a house at Chutt's-hill, Tottenham. On the 6th of January, about twelve o'clock. I saw the prisoner in the farm-yard there, he brought another young man with him. The farming man went into the stable, and while he was putting the saddle on the colt, the prisoner said,

"Who takes the money?" Skinner, the farming man, said,

"the gardener will." The price of the colt was 15 l., the prisoner immediately pulled a 10 l. and a 5 l. Bank note out of his pocket, I asked him to put his name on them, he said he was no scholar. I told him to come round to the garden-shed and I would mark them. We went in, he gave me the

name of

" John Mills , Holloway," which I wrote on both the notes, and the date - (looks at two) - these are them. He said he bought it for his brother, who lived at Hampstead. While I was writing his name on the notes I said there were many bad notes about; he said,

"Is there? I have all my notes from the Bank." He took away the colt, and I took the money. He said he paid away a deal of money both in town and country, and that he was well known at Holloway. I put the notes into my pocket, went into the stable, and kept them nearly two months; I then gave them to Mrs. Clark - I kept them till she came to town.

Q. How soon after you gave them to her did you learn anything respecting them - A. A few days after I heard they were bad; I then made diligent enquiry for the prisoner, but could get no intelligence of him. I enquired at Hampstead, but did not find that his brother lived there.

Q. Did he, in conversation with you, say he had agreed with any one in town about the colt - A. I asked him if he had agreed with anybody? he said he had agreed with a tall young man in Shoreditch. Mrs. Clark's son is grown up, but is not very tall.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. The prisoner was a stranger - A. Yes. I first saw him in the farmyard; he had spoken to Skinner about the colt before he spoke to me. He gave the notes into my hand, and I immediately wrote on them.

Q. Was not your question,

"What name shall I put on the notes" - A. Yes. I am sure I put down the address he gave me. I enquired at Hampstead for a person named Mills. I asked at one public-house, and enquired of several people passing by. I had no other 5 l. or 10 l. note in my possession.

COURT. Q. How long was the prisoner with you - A. Between five and ten minutes. I saw him again when he was in custody. We had very little conversation. He told me he had sold Mr. Clark a horse about two years ago. I am quite sure he is the person. I think he had a blue coat on.

DANIEL SKINNER . I was in the service of Mrs. Clark, as farming-man. The prisoner came to me in the early part of January and saw the colt, he took her away next day.

Q. When he came the first day what did he say - A. He came into the yard, and said

"You have got a colt to sell?" I said Yes. He asked to see it; I said it was out in the field just by. I went with him, he liked the colt very well, said it was a pretty colt, and asked the price? I told him 15 l.; he said he could not give that money, but would give 13 l. I said I would not sell it for less, as that was the price, and told him he must go to town to Mr. Clark, and see if he would take less. As he was going out of the yard he said to me,

"I will give you 10 s. more." I said I could not take less. He came next day about twelve o'clock, he had a porter with him; he said,

"I am come for the colt." I said,

"You have bought it, have you?" he said Yes. I said

"What did you give?" he said 15 l. I said,

"Did you see Mr. Clark?" he said, Yes. I said the colt was out in the field. He asked me for a halter, and said my master told him I had halters to put on the colt - I said I would fetch one. He then said,

"Shall I and the man go and fetch the colt out of the field into the yard?" I said Yes, and they did so. He asked who was to take the money? I said the gardener, and fetched him - I did not see him pay him. I put the halter and bridle on the colt while he went to pay the money, and delivered it to his man, they then went away - the prisoner followed behind with a whip.

Cross-examined. Q. How long was it before you saw him again - A. Last Wednesday.

COURT. Q. Had you a good deal of conversation with him - A. Yes. I have no doubt at all of his being the man - I know him as well as I know my own brother. He had a blue coat and blue apron on.

GEORGE CLARK . I am the son of Mrs. Clark, who lives in Shoreditch. I never saw the prisoner, nor ever had any transactions with him whatever.

Q. What are the names of your mother, brothers and sisters - A. My mother's name is Catherine Orton Clark - my brothers are George Urling , James, Henry, Frederick, Alfred, and Edward; and my sisters, Catherine, Ann, and Mary.

JOSHUA ARMSTRONG . I am an officer. I went to the Crown and Sceptre, public-house, in Golden-lane, on the 14th of April, and saw the prisoner standing in the entry, talking to another man. As soon as we came in, and got towards the prisoner and the other, the prisoner went out at the side door - I went out after him, fetched him back, and asked his name? he said it was Miller. I asked him where he lived? he said in Aylesbury-street, Clerkenwell. I asked him what trade he was? he said he was a dealer. I then unbuttoned his coat, put my hand into his waistcoat pocket, and found 13 s. in silver. I asked him if he had any more money? he said No. I put my hand into his fob, and there found two notes, one good and the other bad. I then said,

"Vann, lay hold of him, he has some bad notes." I gave these notes to the landlady, Mrs. Potter, and made her mark them in his presence - I also marked them myself. I then saw Vann take out of the prisoner's left-hand breast coat pocket four other notes. I gave them to Mrs. Potter also - she marked them in our presence - (looks at them) - these are them. I asked him of whom he got them? he said he was a dealer, and took them in trade, but he did not know of whom. I went with him to Aylesbury-street, but could find no such person there. I found he lived in Woodbridge-street, which is close by.

THOMAS VANN . I was in company with Armstrong, and took four notes from the prisoner's person - I saw Armstrong take two others - his account is perfectly correct. I marked them all - (looks at them) - these are them.

CATHERINE POTTER . I keep the Crown and Sceptre, in Golden-lane. I marked these notes in the prisoner's presence. I saw them taken from his person.

JOHN HICKS . I live at No. 7, Woodbridge-street, Aylesbury-street, and deal in charcoal - the prisoner lodged with me between five and six months up to the time of his apprehension. He lodged with me at Christmas and in January.

PETER SHIPPEN . I am an executor of the late James Clark , together with George Jubb and Catherine Orton

Clark; he died on the 24th of January - he had a colt when he died, I did not dispose of it.

THOMAS GLOVER . I have been an inspector of the Bank for twenty-five years. The 10 l. note is forged in every respect, paper, plate, and signature. It bears the name of C. Watts, but is not his writing; he is not a cashier, and is not authorized to sign 10 l. notes - there is no other clerk of his name. The 5 l. note is also forged in every respect, and bears the name of J. Vantine, we have no such person; we have a Vautin, it is not his signature - he only signs 1 l. notes. The five 1 l. notes are all forged in every respect, are off one plate, and bear the same kind of water-mark - they are not the signatures of the clerks whose names they purport to bear. All the notes have the same water-mark - the paper is of the same fabric.

COURT. Q. Is there any appearance of correspondence of signature between the 10 l. and 5 l. notes - A. Yes, I should think the same person signed both.

CHARLES WATTS . I am a signing clerk of 1 l. notes; I have no authority to sign 10 l. notes - it is not signed by me.

(The note was here put in and read.)

Prisoner. My Lord, I have nothing to say.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 26.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18200517-57

641. JAMES GARDINER and JANE HARRISON were indicted for that they, on the 4th of April , at St. James, Clerkenwell , feloniously did forge and counterfeit a certain Bank note for payment of 1 l. (setting it forth, No. 6471, dated Feb. 10, 1820. signed U. Wardle), with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England .

SECOND COUNT, for feloniously disposing of and putting away a like forged note, with a like intent, knowing it to be forged.

TWO OTHER COUNTS, the same, only calling the forged instrument a promissory note for payment of money instead of a Bank note.

JOHN SAUL . I am a cheesemonger, and live at No. 18, Suffolk-street, West, St. Pancras. On the 13th of March I became acquainted with the prisoners.

Q. In any after-dealings with them had you directions from the Bank - A. Yes, my first connection with them was not by the direction of the Bank, I did afterwards communicate with them by direction of the Bank, and all future transactions were by that direction.

Q. On Thursday, the 16th of March, was anything given you by Mr. Fish - A. A 1 l. note - he is one of the inspectors of the Bank - it was for the purpose of purchasing forged 1 l. notes of the prisoner, Gardiner, who lived at No. 13 or 15, Rose-street, Covent-garden; the female prisoner lived in the same house with him. I went, gave the 1 l. note to Gardiner, and told him I wanted two of the best, or three of the common, if he had not got the best.

Q. What did you mean by the common or best - A. Forged notes. There are two sorts, as he had informed me; that the best was 8 s. a piece and the common 5 s. I was to have 1 l. notes. Harrison was present at the time I spoke of the notes. He said he could supply me with three of the common at 5 s. each, but he had none of the best. He told me I should mark or blot them with ink, and be very cautious how I passed them, for nineteen out of twenty went to the Bank. I gave him the 1 l. note I received of Fish. We were to meet again that evening between six and seven o'clock. I was to have three notes - he gave me 5 s. change. It was in the afternoon when I paid him for them. I think I went with him to Burn's, the Sun, public-house, Windmill-street. I saw him again the same evening - I think it was at the Sun; we met there for me to have the three notes. After we had sat drinking there sometime, he told me to put my hand down; I put my hand down on the seat by the side of us, and he put some paper into my hand; I put it into my breeches-pocket, and shortly after we parted. I am not certain that this was on the 16th, but it was the same evening that I gave him the note. I went home, and in my bed-room I took the notes out of my pocket, put them into a small box on my mantle-shelf, got up in the morning, and took them to the Crown tavern, Clerkenwell-green, and delivered them to Foy in the presence of Mr. Christmas, having first marked them myself - (looks at three) - these are them. I first marked them with the number of the note, and then the letter S.

Q. When did you see either of them again - A. I went again next day, the 17th, early in the day; Wales, an officer of Bow-street, went with me to Rose-street; he parted with me, and saw me enter Gardiner's house. I saw Harrison; she said Gardiner was not in, but I might find him at the Sun, in Windmill-street. I went and enquired there for him; he was not there. I saw him that day at his own house, and purchased three notes of him for 15 s. I paid him 10 s. in silver, and 5 s. in copper. I delivered the copper to Harrison. Gardiner was not by at the time. I was to have the notes at the usual time, which was between six and seven o'clock. I was to apply at Rose-street to see Gardiner; I saw him at the time appointed, and had the three notes of him, in his own room; he took them from the cuff of his coat, and marked them with a pin, at the end of the word

"England;" he said they would then appear to have been filed from the Bank, for all notes had a hole in that place. I took these notes to the Crown, and delivered them to Christmas and Foy - (looks at three) - these are them.

Q. When did you next see him - A. On the Saturday afternoon. I am not sure whether Wales was with me that day. I went to his house and saw Harrison, and asked her when Gardiner would be in; she said she did not know; and, after having some conversation together, she asked if I wanted to do anything that evening? I said Yes: I wanted to go to work. She asked how many I wanted? I replied, two. I paid her 10 s.; she took a piece of whitey-brown paper out of her pocket, containing a great number of notes; after looking them over on the table, she picked out two for me, and said

"these are two very good one's;" wrote on the front of each, and then delivered them to me. I went to the Crown tavern, Clerkenwell-green, and delivered them to Foy; these are them - (looks at three) - there is

"Hilman, Brownlow-street," written on them.

Q. Had you any conversation with her respecting another person - A. I said I had a companion that was helping me to pass these notes, and I wished to introduce him

into the company the next time I came. I cannot rightly remember what she said then; the next dealing I had with her was on the 21st.

Q. Now, on the 21st, did you go alone - A. I was accompanied by Thomas Liberter ; I went into the house in Rose-street, leaving Liberter in the street; he was introduced to me by Foy, Wales, and Christmas, for the purpose of seeing the transaction between me and Gardiner. I went in; Harrison was at home. I asked for Gardiner; she said he was not in, but would be home between one and two o'clock. I left, and found Liberter in the street, where I left him. I went at the time appointed, accompanied by Liberter. I went alone into the house, and saw both the prisoners; after some short discourse, Gardiner said, he would take me to the man he got them from; he took me through a passage, by his own house, to the Red Lion public-house. I do not know the street; he went out two or three times, returned, and said he could not introduce me into the man's company to deal with instead of himself, but I had better have half a score. He had two in his hand, which I had paid him for before, he looked at them, said these are prime one's and he asked if I knew what to do respecting the wire-mark. I said, No. He then took a silver tooth-pick from his pocket, made a hole in each note, and said they then appeared to have been filed, as all Bank-notes were filed in that place. I took them to the Crown tavern, and delivered them to Foy, in the presence of Christmas, after first marking them - (looks at them) - these are the same.

Q. On Wednesday, the 22d of March, were you at the Crown tavern - A. Yes - Wales, Christmas, Foy, and Liberter, were there. I was searched by Wales - I had nothing but a 6 d. in my possession; a 1 l. note, and, I think, 2 l. in silver, was given to me, but I am not positive. I went to Gardiner's house with Liberter and Wales. I went into the house, and left them in Rose-street. Liberter followed me, and passed as I went in at the door; and Wales was at the end of the street. I cannot remember whether I had any transactions there then, or who were there. Gardiner, I now remember, accompanied me from his house to the Sun. He asked how many I wanted; I told him seven or eight, or half a score. He asked if I had got the blunt, meaning the money. I belive I said I had. He said,

"Have you two ten?" I understood this to mean 2 l. 10 s.; and at the door of the Sun I gave him a 1 l. note that I had received of Mr. Christmas. I gave him 10 s. in silver, and was about giving him the remainder, when he said,

"I have enough." We then went into the Sun; and after being in company some time, he went out, returned again, and shortly after said,

"Put your hand down, here are three and your own back."

Q. What was that - A. Three forged notes, and the Bank-note I paid him, as he had not got half a score. I put the paper into my breeches-pocket, returned to the Crown immediately, opened it, and found the 1 l. note I paid him and three forged notes. I marked each note - (looks at three) - these are them. He said, If I would come next day, he would complete the half score. I am not sure whether I did not ask him if I could not get them from him at home. I think he said No, it was dangerous, and he never kept any in his house. I saw him again the following day, accompanied by Liberter.

Q. Had you any dealing with him on the 23d of March - A. I bought one note of him; I think it was at the Sun. I gave it to Foy, after marking it - (looks at one) - this is it. I then owed him 10 s.

Q. Had you seen Liberter between the 23d of March and the 10th of April - A. I had not, nor had I seen the prisoners. On the 10th of April, I went with Liberter to Gardiner's house; he was at home; and after waiting sometime, I said,

"I owe you some silver." He said,

"Yes, you owe me 10 s." I paid him the 10 s., gave him 10 s. more, and told him I wanted two notes; and, at the same time, Liberter gave him 6 s. and said he wanted one. He returned Liberter 1 s. and said,

"You have given me a shilling too much." We all three went to a public house in Rose-street; left that and went to another house, next door to his own; and after being there sometime, he called me out, and said,

"Here is ten I will complete the order to-morrow." I put them into my breeches-pocket. I gave them to Foy and Christmas, at the Crown; I never opened them till I got there; and then found there were fifteen - (looks at them) - these are them. Before I went to the Crown, I went to his house, and told Harrison I had got ten from Gardiner, and to tell him to get the other half score, as I was to complete the score by to-morrow; we were to meet the following day.

Q. On the following day, before you went, was any thing given you by Christmas - A. Yes; I had two 1 l. notes, and 2 l. in silver; and Liberter had 5 s. in copper. I and Liberter went to Gardiner's house together, and saw both the prisoners. I got in conversation with Gardiner, and asked how many he gave me last night; he said,

"I gave you fifteen." I said,

"You said there were only ten, but, when I opened them, I found fifteen." I gave him the two 1 l. notes and 2 l. in silver I received from Christmas, and Liberter gave him the 5 s. in copper which was left on the table. Shortly after he received the money from me, Wales and Jefferson came in, followed by Christmas and Foy.

Q. Why did you pay him 4 l. 5 s. - A. It was for the score of notes; nothing was mentioned about the other five, because the officer came in.

THOMAS LIBERTER . I live in Captain's-walk, Vine-street, Narrow-wall, Lambeth. I am a labourer, and deal in coal and corn, or any thing that comes up the River. I was requested by Wales, the police-officer, to employ myself in detecting the prisoner. He directed me to Christmas, Foy, and Saul. On the 20th of March, I went with Saul to the end of Rose-street. Saul returned to me at the end of Rose-street. I went to the prisoner's house with him again that evening; he left me at the corner of the street; remained in the house about ten minutes or a quarter of an hour, or little longer, then joined me again. I do not know where he joined me; we went to Clerkenwell, and saw Christmas and Foy.

Q. Did you accompany Saul next day, the 21st - A. Yes, we went to the prisoner's house again, and waited at the corner of Rose-street. I saw him go into the prisoner's house and come out again; he joined me in about half an hour. I do not recollect whether we went again this day or not. I think I and Saul went to the Rising Sun, in Windmill-street. I do not remember seeing Gardiner on this day.

Q. Did you see Saul on the 22d - A. Yes; I met him at Clerkenwell; Christmas and Foy were there. I believe Saul was searched; I saw him searched by Wales one day, and I believe this was the day. I saw, I think, 2 l. 10 s. given to him. I accompanied him and John White to Rose-street; Saul went in and remained about twenty minutes, and joined me again in the evening; I believe nobody was with him.

Q. Did you see Gardiner that day - A. I do not know that I did - I did not know him then.

Q. Did you see Saul again on the 23d of March - A. Yes, and accompanied him from Clerkenwell to Rose-street. He went into the house, remained about a quarter of an hour or twenty minutes, and then joined me again - I do not remember that he had anybody with him. If I recollect right we went from there to Clerkenwell-green.

Q. Did you go into any public-house with him - A. I do not recollect that we did no that day. I saw him again next day, the 24th, but I believe we went no where then. I saw him, and went with him to Rose-street nearly every day, or every other. I did not go in.

Q. Did you at any of your visits to Rose-street see Gardiner - A. The first time I saw him was on the 28th, at his own house - that was the first day that I went into the house. I took a letter which Christmas and Foy wrote. I saw Harrison when I first went in, but Gardiner was not there, and I gave her the letter, said I had got a letter from Mr. Saul, and I was to take what he had written for; she said

"Gardiner is not within, if you step in in half an hour, he will be in to his tea." I left the letter and money with her. I saw a 1 l. note and 10 s. put in it. I went again in half an hour, he was then at tea - he said,

"Stop a bit, I will take a walk with you;" he asked me where Saul was, and what had happened. I told him he had sprained his ankle at the Black Horse, Tottenham-court-road. He went out, and I followed him - he said he was going to see about the things. We went together to near St. Giles's church; as we went along he said,

"I must call in at a friend's house, just wait a bit, and I will come to you." He returned me the money I gave him, and the letter. I asked him if the things were in there which he had written for - he said No. He left me by St. Giles's church, to call at his friend's. I saw no more of him that evening. I saw him again next day at his own house; he said I missed you last night, and did not fall in with you again. I went up to St. Martin's-lane with him, and then we parted. I asked him if he had got anything yet; he said No, he had not, they were not come out of the country, and that he had got orders then for fifty fives, besides others; we appointed to meet next evening, as he said he expected them to come by the six o'clock coach. I called next evening - I saw Harrison every time I called. I saw her that evening, she said she expected he was at Brown's, the Rising Sun, Windmill-street. I do not recollect that I found him that night. I went next day or the day after, but do not recollect that I saw him.

Q. Had you any dealings with him for notes - A. I had, on the 4th of April I went to his house between six and seven o'clock in the evening, Harrison opened the door; she said,

"Do you want anything to-night?" I said,

"Yes, I was to have half a score, but I can't take more than five to-night." She went to the table drawer, took a paper parcel, which contained a great many notes, and said I will pick you out five good ones; which she did, and told me they were good ones. I asked her how much they were - she said 1 l. 5 s. I gave her a 1 l. note and 5 s. in silver, which I had received from Foy and Christmas (I had returned them the money that was in the letter when I came back). I had not put the notes into my pocket when Gardiner came in himself. I said

"What sort are these?" I gave them out of my hand. He said,

"They are very good ones - they are all of the 10th." He turned them over, and looked at each. Harrison still remained in the room. He gave them into my hand, and I put them into my pocket. He said to me,

"Mind, and be cautious in passing them - don't offer two in one shop;" and then said,

"Jane, has he given you any money?" She said,

"Yes, 1 l. 5 s." He said that was all right, and nothing more passed. I took the notes that evening to Christmas and Foy, and marked them T. L. before I delivered them - (looks at the notes) - these are them.

Q. When did you see him again - A. On the 6th, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, I went to his house, he was not at home. Harrison said I should find him at the Rising Sun, in Windmill-street. I went there, found him, and stopped sometime with him; we then returned back to his own house, and there I got four notes from him. I gave him 20 s. in silver for them - (looks at four) - these are them.

Q. Who did you find at the house - A. When I went indoors he shewed me a piece of brown paper, and said

"Here are these things." When we got in a strange man was there; Gardiner then went to the window-shutter, took out a paper, then went into the passage, putting his hands behind him, and gave me the notes. I went to the Crown, neither Christmas nor Foy were there. I took them home, they remained in my breeches-pocket unopened, and next morning I went to the Crown, and delivered them up to Foy and Christmas, having first marked them.

Q. When did you see him again - A. On the 8th, at ten o'clock in the morning, at his own house; Harrison was in bed in the same room. I said I was come for some more; he said,

"Jane, where are these things?" she said,

"They are under the floorcloth, near the fire-place in the front parlour." He stooped down, and picked up something wrapped in paper; he opened it, shewed me the notes, and said,

"Here are three prime ones, give me 15 s." I did so - there were only three in the paper. He and I then went to Long-acre together, he was going to Covent-garden-market. We wished each other good-by after having a glass of liquor. He said,

"Did Saul tell you he owed me any silver?" I said

"Yes, he told me of it; you need not be afraid of the money, you will have it on Monday. He said Saul owed him 10 s.; that he was not afraid, but he did not know whether he had mentioned it or not. I marked the three notes, and gave them to Christmas and Foy at the Bank - (looks at three) - these are them.

Q. When did you meet again - A. On the 10th of March; Saul was with me. We went to Gardiner's house between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, he was

not at home; we went to the Sun, he was not there; we returned to his house, and he was then at home. I lent Saul 4 s. to make up enough for two. Saul asked for a score. I do not know what passed. We then went out. He wanted us to go to another house, which we objected to. He then called Saul out - I had seen Saul give him the money, and I gave him 6 s. for one - he said,

"You have given me 1 s. too much." Saul said,

"I owe you some silver" - he said,

"Yes, you owe me 10 s.," and Saul paid him. We were to have the notes next night; we returned to the Crown, Clerkenwell. We went next night, and took 2 l. 5 s. in silver and two 1 l. notes; we saw both the prisoners at the house; Saul said,

"Do you know what notes you gave me last night?" Gardiner said

"Fifteen." Saul said,

"You told me there was only half a score, and when I opened them I found fifteen." Saul said he had come to pay him for the remainder of the score, and had brought 4 l. 5 s. - he had 4 l., and I had 5 s. in halfpence in my pocket. I gave him the 5 s. in copper, and Saul gave him 4 l. Gardiner said,

"I will go and get them presently." Harrison was present, and heard what passed. Before he got them the officers came in.

JOHN FOY . I am a police officer. Saul and Liberter were employed by me to assist in detecting the prisoners. On the 17th of March Saul brought me three notes to the Crown, Clerkenwell-green, at eleven o'clock in the morning - I took them in the presence of Christmas. He brought me three more in the evening. He brought two more on the 18th of March, two on the 21st, three on the 22d, at ten at night, and one on the 23d, at ten at night. On the 4th of April Liberter brought me five, and on the morning of the 7th he brought me six. On the 8th he brought me three to the Bank, at twelve o'clock in the day, and on the 10th of April Saul brought me fifteen at twelve o'clock at night; I marked them all. (The witness examined and identified the several notes as he mentioned them.)

Q. I believe you was present on the 11th of April, when the prisoner were apprehended - A. Yes, I went into the house with Wales, Jefferson, and Christmas; the prisoners were there, Saul and Liberter were there also - the prisoners were sitting by the fire. Wales went up to Gardiner, took something off the floor, held it in his hand, and said,

"What have you got here?" Gardiner said,

"I do not know, it belongs to these men (pointing to Saul and Liberter), if they are doing anything wrong it is more than I know." Saul and Liberter were sitting by him in a chair. I said,

"Who are these men?" he said,

"I do not know who they are." I asked Harrison if she knew who they were? she said No. We searched the prisoners, found nothing material on them, and took them to Marlborough-street. I left Wales and Jefferson to search the house. On taking them to the office I asked Gardiner what he knew of the two men we found there? he said he did not know either of them; that they came in just before we did, and the short man (Saul) asked him to look at two Bank notes for him, and to give him two notes for 2 l. worth of silver. I asked him if he had any money from either of them before? he said he never had. I asked him if he had given them change at any time before? he said he had not. I said,

"Did not you think it extremely imprudent that a total stranger to you should come into your house and request you to give him notes for silver?" He said that Jane had seen the short man before, when he used to come to the house with girls - (it is used for such purposes). Harrison was present when he made this communication. He said they were both strangers to him, but corrected himself instantly and said,

"Yes, I think I saw them last night at a public-house near my house." Harrison was close to him. After taking this statement in my book, I read it loud enough for her to hear. Gardiner said it was correct, and she did not contradict it.

JOHN WALES . I am an officer of Marlborough-street. I know Saul and Liberter; I accompanied them to the prisoner's house in Rose-street on the 17th, 18th, 22d, 26th, and 27th of March, and on the 11th of April. I was present when Christmas delivered Liberter some money, at the Crown, on the 28th of March.

Q. Look at this note, and see if you know it - (looks at one) - this is it. I marked it - it was given in my presence (No. 47844, dated 10th of Feb. 1819) - Christmas gave this note in a letter to Liberter. On the 11th of April I accompanied Foy - Saul and Liberter had gone into Gardiner's house about a quarter before eight o'clock. I waited some distance from the house for ten minutes or a quarter of an hour, then joined Christmas, Foy, and Jefferson, and went to the house; I went in first, and was followed by Jefferson. On my entering the house I saw Gardiner sitting by the fire, and immediately made up to him. I saw him draw his left hand back from towards his thigh, and while I was in the act of taking hold of his hand, something dropped from his hand on the floor, I picked it up, and asked him what he had got there? he said it was what those men had brought - (looking round at Saul and Liberter) - and that if they were doing anything wrong he did not know it. I examined the paper. and found it contained the money that had been marked by me that day, and which I had given to Saul at the Crown - it contained two 1 l. notes and 2 l. in silver; a 5 s. paper of halfpence laid on the table.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. Except on the day you took them into custody you was not in the house - A. I was not.

GEORGE COXHEAD . I am in partnership with Mr. Lovel; we are grocers, and live in New-street, Covent-garden - the prisoner, Gardiner, was a customer of ours, he also paid us the rent of his house, which we receive for a gentleman in the country. On the 6th of April I received 17 l. 9 s. of him - 15 l. for rent and 2 l. 9 s. for grocery; it was paid by a woman, but I cannot say whether it was Harrison or not.

Q. Look at these 1 l. notes, Nos. 51633 and 47844, and say if they form part of that payment - A. They do both. I marked them

"Gardiner, Rose-street, April 6, 1820."

ROBERT FISH . I am inspector of Bank notes. On the 16th of March I furnished Saul with 1 l. Bank notes to detect a man named Gardiner I took the numbers and dates; the 1 l. note, No. 51633 is one of them.

CHARLES CHRISTMAS . I am an inspector of Bank notes. I furnished Saul with a genuine Bank note on the 23d of March, to be paid to Gardiner, and put it in a letter - it was afterwards returned to me by Saul; I gave it to Liberter on the 4th of April - it was No. 47844. I was present

when Foy marked the different notes brought by the witnesses; I marked them also myself.

THOMAS GLOVER . I am an inspector of Bank notes. The note set out in the indictment is forged in every respect. The others are all forged; they appear to be all of the same description, and filled up by the same person though with different names.

(The note was here put in and read.)

Prisoner GARDINER. I leave my defence to my Counsel.

HARRISON'S Defence (written.) My Lord, and Gentlemen of the Jury, I am very young, under twenty years of age. I was living with Mr. Gardiner as his housekeeper, and delivered out the papers without any knowledge of their being forged notes.

GARDINER - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 33.

HARRISON - NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow.

Reference Number: t18200517-58

642. JAMES DEAN was indicted for unlawfully and by false pretences obtaining goods value 8 l. 7 s. , the goods of Stephen Maberley .

JOHN HILLYARD . I am foreman and warehouseman to Mr. Stephen Maberley , he is the contractor for supplying the cavalry . I first saw the prisoner on the 16th of March, 1819, at the warehouse; he told me he came about Captain Lacon 's business, and that he wanted twenty-four head-stall collars, six pair of overall chains, twelve cavalry feathers and cases, twelve pair of spurs and twelve pair of spur-leathers; he said he wanted them for Captain Lacon 's troops - they were to be sent to the Yarmouth Arms, Thames-street, and he was to receive them there to take to Yarmouth. We have served Captain Lacon ever since 1817. He was very urgent to get them off, and said the troop could not go on duty without them. I have authority to execute all orders, in consequence of which I sent them off on the 17th - I have never seen them since. I then believed them to be for the troop, as I knew the prisoner belonged to it. I saw him the latter end of April, when he was apprehended - they were worth 10 l.

Prisoner. Q. At the time you say the things were ordered, to whom did I say they were to be directed - A. To Captain Lacon , of the Yarmouth Yeomanry Troop.

CHARLES EGGEN . I am a porter. I conveyed the goods to the Yarmouth Arms, directed to Captain Lacon . When I got there I enquired of the landlady for Sergeant Dean. I saw the prisoner ten minutes afterwards, and told him I had brought the goods agreeably to his order. I am sure he is the man.

EDMUND KNOWLES LACON , ESQ. I am Captain in the Yarmouth Yeomanry Cavalry, the prisoner had been a sergeant in my corps. He had no authority to order any things for me, he had left the troop. I discharged him the latter end of 1818, or beginning of 1819. I never received the goods - he was perfectly unknown to me at the time. The troop was not in want of them. He was discharged by being struck off the rolls, and sending for his accoutrements. He never was on duty after that, neither would he be permitted.

Q. You are sure the prisoner was discharged - A. Certainly.

Prisoner's Defence. During the eight years I was under Captain Lacon , I was authorized by him to order what things might be wanted, but I have never ordered anything since. I never did receive any things at the Yarmouth Arms.

GUILTY . Aged 32.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200517-59

643. JOHN DUNSDON was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of May , one handkerchief, value 1 s., the property of George Webb , the Younger , from his person .

GEORGE WEBB , JUN. I live in Prujean-square, Old Bailey. On the 12th of May, between ten and eleven o'clock, I had been at the west-end of the town; and, in coming through Temple-Bar , on the Temple side, I felt something at my pocket. I turned round, and was called to by a gentleman, who said, that the person crossing the road had got my handkerchief. The prisoner was the person; and I collared him before he got to Shire-lane. I asked him for my handkerchief; he had got it in his hand; I took it from him, and gave him in charge. I did not see any one with him.

MR. WILLIAM CLARKE . I am in the Town Clerk's Office. I had been to Somerset House; and in returning through Temple-Bar with a friend, I saw Mr. Webb and a young woman with him; it was on the Strand side. In going through the arch, I saw a handkerchief partly out of his pocket. There were only two persons between Mr. Webb and us. Suspecting them, I watched them, and saw the prisoner take the handkerchief from Mr. Webb's pocket; he was then through the arch. Mr. Webb turned shortly round, and I said to him,

"There is the thief that has got your handkerchief." I did not know what became of his companion, he disappeared. Mr. Webb laid hold of him before he got to Shire-lane, on this side of the Bar. We went as far as Chancery-lane, and delivered him into custody.

WILLIAM TURNER . I am a constable of St. Dunstan's; the prisoner was brought to the watch-house; he did not deny the robbery.

Prisoner's Defence. In going towards Temple-Bar, I saw a person throw away a handkerchief; I picked it up, and the young gentleman came and insisted that I had stolen his handkerchief. I denied ever having taken it from his pocket.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200517-60

644. JEREMIAH HARIGAN was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of April , two geese, value 10 s. , the property of Charles Dean .

JOSEPH TEE . I am servant to Charles Dean , who lives in Newgate-street ; he is a salesman . On the 29th of April, he had two geese stolen from him; I saw them about twelve o'clock; they were dead, and on the shop-board; they were missed about half an hour afterwards. The prisoner came into the shop and set down; he was known before; he goes about selling poultry. About two minutes after I missed the geese, I went after him; I saw him in Newgate-street and came up with him. I told him he had stolen my master's geese; he threw the basket off his

head, and told me to take them back. I told him to take them back, which he did, and I sent for a constable; they were worth 10 s.

HENRY HONEY . I am the constable who took him into custody; he said that he thought he had bought the geese.

Prisoner's Defence. If I had this man's money one hundred miles from hence, I would bring it back.

GUILTY . Aged 60.

Confined Three Months .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200517-61

645. EZEKIEL COHEN was indicted for a fraud .

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200517-62

646. EDWARD PATTEN was indicted for a fraud .

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200517-63

FIFTH DAY, MONDAY, MAY 22.

647. THOMAS GRAY was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of May , one watch, value 3 l.; one ribbon, value 1 d. and one key, value 1 d. , the goods of Michael Wilson .

MICHAEL WILSON . I now belong to the ship Tuscan. On the 4th of May the ship Mary, to which I then belonged, came into Pool, in the Pelican-tier . I saw the prisoner on board another vessel; and having known him two years before, I asked him on board the Mary. While we were below at supper, he saw me wind my watch up and put it in the hammock; he sat with his back against the hammock. When supper was over, all hands were called to put a rope off deck; I went up first, the rest followed; the prisoner came up last. When the rope was put off deck, I put him ashore at King James's Stairs; and directly after landing him, I missed the watch from my hammock. I got Brown, an officer, and found the prisoner, about half past ten o'clock, in Parson's-street, and asked him for my watch; he said he had not got it. Brown collared him, and he instantly pulled it from his pocket, and gave it me.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined Six Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant. Esq.

Reference Number: t18200517-64

648. JOHN LOCK was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of May , one coat, value 20 s. , the goods of Richard Ramsden .

ELIZABETH WOOD . I live with the Rev. Mr. Chapman, one of the Masters of the Charter House School, in Rutland-court, Charter-house-square - Richard Ramsden boards there. On the 8th of May, about one o'clock in the day, three men came to the area, looked in the kitchen-passage, and asked if I wanted any wood; only one came down; I said I wanted none; he immediately went up the steps, took the coat from the window on the ground-floor, and ran away. I ran up and called out that somebody had stolen a coat; and as he ran out of the court into the square, he dropped it. Pybus pursued and took the same man who took the coat, and I picked it up.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAM PYBUS . I live in Rutland-place, and am a carpenter; I was in the court, heard Wood call out, and saw the prisoner drop the coat; I pursued and secured him without losing sight of him.

Prisoner's Defence. I was running after the men.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18200517-65

649. HENRY BROWN was indicted for that he, on the 26th of February , at St. James, Clerkenwell , feloniously did dispose of and put away a certain forged and counterfeit Bank note for payment of 10 l. (setting it forth, No. 11,257, dated October 5th, 1819, signed R. Clough) with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only calling the forged instrument a promissory note for payment of money instead of a Bank note.

TWO OTHER COUNTS, the same, only stating his intent to be to defraud George Jarritt .

GEORGE JARRITT . I am a hatter , and live at No. 199, Piccadilly . On Saturday evening, the 26th of February, about half-past eight o'clock, the prisoner came to my shop and asked for a hat; I showed him several; he chose one, and said he wanted another, a size larger, for a brother; he looked out one, and wanted crape for both. He enquired the price; I told him 28 s. and 18 d. each for crape. He desired I would make out a bill and receipt in the name of Lieut. Henry Bly , of the Artillery, Woolwich, and then gave me a 10 l. note, and, at the same time, asked if I sold hat-brushes. I fitted a brush to the hat, and looked at the note by the light, to see if it was correct, which it appeared to be. His bill was 3 l., and I gave him 7 l. change. The hats were to be sent to the George Coffee-house , Coventry-street. He said he belonged to the Artillery, at Woolwich; that they were going to the Cape of Good Hope; and were to sail on Tuesday; and, if he had time to come from Woolwich before, he should want a servant's hat and silver band, and that General Douglas would only allow them to have a band of a certain width, that all their servants might appear alike; I showed him some bands. I marked the note the moment he went away; I had no other 10 l. note in the house - (looks at one) - this is it. I observed the name of Antrobus and Co. on it at the time he gave it to me, and concluded it had been through their hands; I wrote Bly, 26th May. He was about a quarter of an hour with me; I had a deal of conversation with him.

COURT. Q. When did you see him again - A. On the 12th or 13th of April, at the House of Correction, and am perfectly certain he is the man.

JAMES WILLIAM DUNBAR . I am sergeant in the Artillery Corps; there is no Lieutenant Bly in the corps; the prisoner was no officer to the corps in February last. I have been twenty-seven years in the Artillery, and eighteen years clerk to the Adjutant-General, and knew all the

officers by name, and most of them by sight; it is only one corps at present.

CHARLES WILLIAM BEARD . I am clerk to T. F. Dollman, who is a hatter, and lives in St. James's-street. On the 5th of February, about a quarter past seven o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came to the shop, and said he wished to see a hat. I showed him one, and after trying it on, he said he would have another; when he tried that on, he desired me to make out a bill of the two. I went to the desk and made out a bill without a name, and presented it to him, with a receipt; he gave me a 10 l. note; I then asked his name; he said Captain Close , and the name was then put on the bill. I asked where I should send the hats; he said to Craven-street, Strand. I asked the number; he said

"it is the first house you come to on the left hand after you get into the wide part of the street." He gave me a 10 l. Bank note; I took it to the counting-house and wrote Close in front, with my name and the date - (looks at one) - this is it; it has

"Close, 5-2-20, C. W. B." written on it. I knew there was a Captain Close , and immediately called on Mr. Dollman, who was in the parlour, and desired him to give me change for a 10 l. note; and while he was walking towards the prisoner, I said,

"Are you Captain Close of the Royal Artillery?" he said,

"Yes." Mr. Dollman gave him the change in my presence, and he left. I have no doubt of his being the person. I saw him again, I think, exactly ten weeks after.

WILLIAM WILLIAMS . I keep a hatter's-shop in New Bond-street. About eight o'clock on the evening of the 9th of February, the prisoner came and bought two hats, which came to 2 l. 19 s. He gave me a 10 l. note; I marked it - (looks at one) - this is it. I marked it before Mr. Freeman, at Bow-street, the following day. He gave me the name of

"Captain Close , Joy's, Grand Hotel, Covent-garden." There were two or three names on the note when he brought it.

Q. Did you mix it with any other note before you marked it - A. No; I laid it on the desk on a 10 l. note, and compared it, which was signed by the same name,

"Kelsal;" my suspicions arose. In three quarters of an hour I sent the hats according to his direction, and the person who went with them brought them back, saying, there was no such person there. Somebody else afterwards called for them; I delivered them to that person, then let him go, and followed him; he first took them to Richardson's coffee-house; I told him it was Joy's. He then took them to Joy's. We found, by the waiter, he had desired them to be taken in, if they were brought there. I have no doubt of the prisoner's person. I left the note in my money-chest, and kept the key; nobody has access to it but myself; I have no doubt but the note is the same.

JOHN GADBURY . I am foreman to Mr. Copson, a hatter, in New Bond-street. The prisoner came to my master's shop on the 10th of February, a few minutes before nine o'clock in the evening, and bought two hats, with crape-bands, which came to 3 l. 1 s.; he tendered me a 10 l. Bank note. I asked his name and address, he gave me

"Lieut. Crow, Golden-cross;" they were to be packed in boxes, and sent there. I wrote on the note, in his presence,

"Lieut. Crow, 10-2-20" - (looks at one) - this is it; and gave him change. He said, if the hats could be got ready in three quarters of an hour he would call for them in a coach, which he did, and I gave them to him. I saw him again about the 16th of April, and am perfectly clear of his person.

HENRY PAGET O'SHAUGHNESSY. I am a boot and shoemaker, and live in St. James's-street, Piccadilly. The prisoner came to my shop on Friday night, the 11th of February, between eight and nine o'clock, and asked for a pair of top-boots and a pair of shoes; he was served; and they came to 3 l.. He paid me a 10 l. Bank note; and I observed

"Captain Close " written on the back. I went into the parlour to ask my father for change and then gave it to my sister, Teresa Crane , who went out and got change, which I gave him myself. I asked him his name and address; he gave me,

"Lieut. Webb, Golden-cross, Charing-cross." He said, I need not send the boots, as it was a wet evening; he was going to take a coach and would call for them; he did call for them, but I did not see him. Before this I went down to the Golden-cross. I saw him again at Lambeth-street police-office a month ago, and have no doubt of his being the person - (looks at one) - this is the note; it has

"Captain Close ," on it, which I had observed; there is none of my writing on it. I went to every address that was on the note, to see if I could find him.

TERESA CRANE . I am sister to the last witness; I was in the back-parlour and saw the prisoner come in. My brother gave me a 10 l. Bank note to get change; I went to Mr. Williams and got it from his man; I think I gave the note to the man; I saw him give it to Mr. Williams, and saw one of them put a name on it; I observed

"Captain Close ," on it - (looks at one) - this is it; it has

"O'Shaughnessy," on it.

HENRY WILLIAMS . I am a hosier; Miss Crane brought me a 10 l. note; I changed it for her, and wrote the name on it myself - (looks at it) - this is it; it has

"O'Shaughnessy, St. James's-street, February 11th," written on it.

GEORGE MACDONALD . I am a hatter, and live in Jermyn-street, St. James's. On the evening of the 26th of February, soon after nine o'clock, the prisoner came to my shop, purchased two hats, and paid me a 10 l. note. I asked his name; he said Dawson. I asked his Christian name; he desired me to put H. Dawson, which I did in his presence - (looks at one) - this is it; I wrote

"H. Dawson, Esq. 26-2-20." on the note I am sure he is the person.

JOHN LOADER . I am shopman to Mr. Gould, who is a boot-maker, and lives in Fenchurch-street. The prisoner came to the shop on the evening of the 29th of February, at half-past eight o'clock, and bought a pair of top-boots and a pair of shoes - he gave Mr. Gould a 10 l. Bank note, Mr. Gould gave it to me - (looks at one) - this is the note Mr. Gould gave me - I marked it at the Bank the next morning. The prisoner is the man, to the best of my recollection. He was about eight minutes in the shop - I have no doubt him. He was dressed in a drab great coat.

JOHN GOULD . I am a boot and shoe-maker, and live in Fenchurch-street, Loader is my foreman. I recollect a person coming on the 29th of February, and giving me a 10 l. note, which I sent next morning to the Bank by Loader. I gave him the same note the man gave me. I

had received no other 10 l. note that evening. I did not mark it.

RICHARD BOWYER . I am shopman to Mr. Gardiner, hatter, of Chiswell-street. On the evening of the 7th of March I saw the prisoner at the shop; I knew him perfectly well, he had been with me about three weeks before that. He bought a hat, and paid for it with a 5 l. note; he gave me the name of

"Williams, No. 2, Bedford-row, and Castle and Falcon" - (looks at one) - this is it. I marked it before I parted with it, and before he left I wrote that address.

SAMPSON DOLLMAN. I am a hatter, and live in Newgate-street. On the 7th of March the prisoner came into my shop about five minutes before nine o'clock in the evening, and bought a hat; he tendered me a 5 l. note. I observed a name on it - I think it was Rundle and Bridge. I got it changed at Mr. Peppercorn's, a chemist, opposite my house. I gave him the same note the prisoner gave me, and saw him write on it in his counting-house. I have not a shadow of a doubt about the prisoner's person.

EDWARD PEPPERCORN . I am a chemist, and live in Newgate-street. On the 7th of March Mr. Dollman brought me a 5 l. note, I changed it - (looks at it) - this is it. I wrote his name on the back - it also has Rundle and Bridge on it.

JOSEPH WILLIAM SNELL . I am a boot and shoe-maker, and live in Nassau-place, Commercial-road. On the 11th of April the prisoner came to my shop. I knew him, I had seen him about six weeks before. He asked if we had some boot-garters, better than those we had sold him before - (we had sold him a pair before) - I said we had none very good. He then went to the window, and saw a pair of jockey-boots, which he bought for 1 l. 15 s., and paid me a 5 l. note; I gave him the change and asked his address? he said,

"Brown, No. 17, Langdon-street," which I wrote on it - (looks at one) - this is it. I wrote that on it with my initials. After he left I suspected the note to be bad, went to John Burt , my brother-in-law, and shewed it to him; I left his shop and went to a friend. I gave the note to my lad, who took it to the Bank next morning. We went in search of the prisoner, and found him at the Roebuck, public-house, kept by Myers - I got a patrol, who took him into custody. I and Burt followed behind him to the watch-house. When we came to the watch-house door the patrol knocked and the prisoner ran away. I followed him about a quarter of a mile, and when I came within twenty yards of him, he said

"D - n your eyes, if you come near me I will do for you!" He was seized by the officer, and taken to the watch-house. He did not offer to wound any of us.

COURT. Q. Had he any instrument in his hand - A. No, my Lord, it was only a threat; he had not the means of putting it in execution.

JOHN BURT . I am a shoemaker, and live in Princes-place, Commercial-road. On the 11th of April, about seven o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came to my shop, bought a pair of boots and shoes - he gave me a 5 l. note, and said his name was Brown, Langdon-street; he said

"Langdon-street, you know where I live." I had done a job for him before. (Looks at a note) - this is it; I marked it while he was there. I wrote

"Brown, 11-4-20." I went the same evening to the Roebuck, and assisted Snell in apprehending him. As we were going to the watch-house he turned round and said,

"Gentlemen, do not do this, you will ruin me!" I gave him 2 l. 11 s. in change.

Prisoner. Q. You detained a pair of shoes of mine - A. He brought a pair to be stretched, I gave them to the patrol.

ELIZABETH MYERS . My husband keeps the Roebuck, in Cannon-street, St. George's in the East. I have frequently seen the prisoner. On the night of the 11th of April he had two bottles of wine at my house, gave me a 5 l. note, and asked for change; I gave him 4 l. 8 s., his reckoning was 12 s. As I was in the act of taking his address Snell and Burt came in. I kept the note in my hand, and saw Snell shew something. Burt asked me if I had been giving change. I marked the note before I parted with it, and then gave it to them - (looks at one) - this is it.

ISABELLA SNOW. The prisoner lodged at my house by the name of Henry Brown ; I then lived at No. 17, Langdon-street. He had lodged with me seven weeks on the Monday, and he was apprehended on the Tuesday. He passed with me as the steward of a ship. On Monday evening he told me he was going to the Captain's house, and begged me to get his linen ready. He left my house about a quarter past six o'clock on Monday evening, and returned next morning - he appeared quite fatigued, said he had got very short notice, and said he was going away early the next morning, as the ship was going to sail - he was apprehended that night.

THOMAS GLOVER . I am an inspector of Bank notes. The note uttered to Mr. Jarritt is forged in every respect. R. Clough is a cashier, and authorized to sign 10 l., notes, but the writing is not his. I have examined the other ten notes carefully, they are forged in every respect. The 10 l. notes are off one plate and the 5 l. notes off another. The filling-up of all of them appear to be done by the same person, though they are different names.

ROGER CLOUGH . I am a cashier, and sign 10 l. notes. The signature to the note is not my writing - it is an imitation of it.

COURT to MR. JARRITT. Q. How was the prisoner dressed - A. He had an olive brown top-coat, buttoned over his other coat.

GEORGE MACDONALD re-examined. The prisoner was dressed as Mr. Jarritt has described.

(The note was here put in and read.)

Prisoner. I have merely to say that I am quite unprotected, and have not the means of employing Counsel. I have used every means to be allowed to plead Guilty to the minor offence, as others have done; but I must throw myself on the mercy of your Lordship and the Jury, and hope I shall be recommended to mercy by the prosecutors and witnesses. My friends all live in Ireland.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 28.

Recommended to Mercy by Messrs. Jarritt and Dollman.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18200517-66

650. SAMUEL BENJAMIN MEREDITH was indicted for that he, on the 27th of April , at St. James, Clerkenwell , feloniously did dispose of and put away a certain forged and counterfeit Bank note, for payment of

1 l. (setting it forth, No. 91742, dated 10th February, 1820, signed W. Wade), with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England , well knowing it to be forged and counterfeited .

SECOND COUNT, for feloniously offering to Matilda Witnell a like forged and counterfeit Bank note, with a like intent, knowing it to be forged.

THIRD COUNT, for feloniously offering to Ermin Jordan a like forged Bank note, with the like intent.

THREE OTHER COUNTS, the same, only calling the forged instrument a promissory note for payment of money, instead of a Bank note.

SIX OTHER COUNTS, the same, only stating his intent to be defraud James Poore .

ELIZABETH SIBLEY. I live in White Hart-yard, Drury-lane. On the 27th of April, between five and six o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came to my house, and enquired for a person named Cameron, who formerly kept the house. I said I did not know her, but heard such a person had lived there. He said he did not want her, but wanted a person who formerly lodged with her. I called Jordan, my servant, down, who had lived with Cameron, and she called a person who also lodged there with Cameron; she came down, told the prisoner one was dead and other was married, and asked him to give her something to drink? he said he never gave anything away to drink, but he would toss up for half a pint - they tossed, and he lost; he then asked me to change him a 1 l. note, which he produced. I said I had no silver, he went behind the street door, and pulled out a 1 l. note. I heard paper rustle, as if he took it from others; he asked me for a pen and ink, which my servant gave him, he stood by the drawers, wrote his name on it, and gave it to my servant, she went out for change, returned in about three minutes, told him it was a bad one, and that Mr. Poore had kept it. He said he took it at Dover, in change for a 5 l. note. He went with Jordan to the public-house, I followed in about three minutes, and found him detained there. I am certain he is the man.

Prisoner. Q. Your's is a house where both sexes resort - A. I understand it was so before I came, but it has not been so in my time.

ERMIN JORDAN. I live with Mrs. Sibley. I remember the prisoner coming to the house a little before six o'clock in the evening on the 27th of April, he gave me a 1 l. note to pay for some gin - he wrote on the right-hand corner of it in my sight, on the drawers; when I got it from him I saw he had written

"B. Meredith," on it. I went to went to fetch half a pint of gin from Poore's, the young woman said it was bad note, and took it to Mr. Poore, he came and asked me where I took it - I said of a young man. I went back and the prisoner returned with me to Poore's, who asked him where he took the note - he said in Kent, at Dover.

MATILDA WITNELL . I am bar-maid to Mr. Poore; the last witness came to the house, and gave me a 1 l. note, I gave the same note to Mr. Poore, who was the back room, instantly, without putting it out of my hand.

JAMES POORE . I keep the Barley Mow, wine vaults, Drury-lane. I received a note from the last witness, perceived it was bad, and objected to it. The prisoner came in in a few minutes, with two women and Jordan, they said, in his presence, that he wanted to go, but they would not let him, and they brought him to the bar. I asked him where he got the note - I do not recollect what place he first mentioned - he said it was in Kent; some person said, that place is not in Kent. I then asked him what part of Kent - he said Dover; but that was not the first place he mentioned. He said he took it in change. I said I was confident it was a bad one, and could not think of letting the note go.

Q. Had he said anything to you about it - A.He said he was confident he could bring proof where he got it, and wanted to get it into his possession. I said I could not let it go, and asked him if he had any other note - he said he had no other, nor any money. Two men were outside the bar, I sent one for an officer, and told the other to prevent his going out. I marked the note - (looks at one) - this is it. He said the writing on it was his.

Q. Was anything said in his hearing about other notes - A. girl said, in his hearing, that he had other notes about him. This was after he had said he had no other notes or money - he made no answer to that. The officer took him into the back room, searched him, and found 5 l. 6 s. 6 d. in silver, in a bag, and other small articles, on him. About ten minutes or a quarter of an hour after he was taken, my servant, Ann Pearse , brought me some more notes. I marked them (looks at some) - these are them. The gin came to 7 d. or 8 d.

COURT. Q. Did he tell you when he came from Dover - A. He said he only came the night before; I asked his residence in town - he refused to tell me; then he said it was in a small street near the Theatre. I asked him if it was at the Brown Bear , Bow-street - he said Yes; and that he slept there the night before. He said he came to town to purchase a hawker's licence.

Prisoner. Q. Did I not tell you I had 5 l. 6 s. in a bag to pay for the licence - A. No, I am quite sure of that; he said he had no other money, nor any other notes. He was taken away before Pearse found the notes.

Q. Do you know of any notes being found in the taproom - A. They might call it the taproom, it is outside the bar - persons of all descriptions come to my house - it is a liquor-shop, not a public-house - people only come in for spirits, and remain but a short time. His statement about the hawker's licence was not till after the money was found on him.

ANN PEARSE . I am servant to Mr. Poore. I remember the prisoner coming to the house, he stood by the front door, with his face to the bar. After the officer had taken him to Bow-street, I went out, I dare say it was a quarter of an hour after, I came in again, and as I came to the bar counter I picked up a roll of paper, exactly on the spot where he had stood, I opened it, and pulled them out singly, and found it contained five 1 l. notes; I gave them to Mr. Poore, and marked them also myself before I lost sight of them - (looks at five) - these are them.

THOMAS AMSDEN . I am a patrol of Bow-street. I took the prisoner at Poore's house, took him into the parlour, and asked him if he had any money about him - he said he had 3 l. or 4 l., he believed. I put my hand in his pocket and found a pair of new gloves, they had just been

put on, two pair of new scissars, a key of his box, as he called it, and 5 l. 6 s. 6 d. in silver, in a yellow bag.

Q. Did you tell him you belonged to Bow-street before you asked what money we had - A. Yes; I asked where his box was; he said,

"Do not ask me any questions, I will answer you nothing." He said he came to town the day before, but did not tell me for what purpose, or where he slept the night before.

Q. Did you find any paper on him which appeared to have had wrapped notes in it - A. None of any description.

THOMAS GLOVER . I am Inspector of Bank notes. The note is forged, and has not the signature of Wade. The other five are also forged. The whole six appear to be an impression from the same plate, and filled up by the same hand, though the signatures are different. They appear fresh notes.

WILLIAM WADE . I am a signing-clerk; the signature to the note is not my name; it is a very bad imitation.

(The note was here put in and read.)

Prisoner's Defence. I assure you I am innocent of this charge. I received the note from a hawker at Brighton; he gave me 3 l. in silver and two notes. I came to town for a fresh supply of goods, and to obtain a licence. I slept at the Brown Bear , Bow-street, that night. I formerly knew a woman who kept this house, and called to know where Betsey Powell was; they informed me she was married. A female called me in, and asked me to give her some gin - I said I never gave things away. We tossed for some, and I lost. I took the note, wrote B. Meredith on it, and gave it to her. She returned, and I immediately went with her to the house and was detained. I solemnly declare I knew nothing of the five notes found in the tap-room. Is it to be supposed, if I had forged notes, I would have accompanied a woman so far, and not attempt to escape. Upwards of twenty persons, of all characters, were in the house, and might not some of them have dropped them.

GUILTY . - DEATH Aged 20.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow .

Reference Number: t18200517-67

651. JAMES GARDINER and JANE HARRISON were again indicted for that they, on the 8th of April , at St. James, Clerkenwell , feloniously did forge and counterfeit a certain Bank note for payment of 1 l. (selling it forth, No . 6471, dated 10th Feb. 1820, signed J. C. Baker), with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England .

SECOND COUNT, for feloniously disposing of and putting away a certain forged and counterfeit Bank note, with the like intent, well knowing it to be forged and counterfeit.

TWO OTHER COUNTS, the same, only calling the forged instrument a promissory note for payment of money instead of a Bank note.

THOMAS LIBERTER . I am a labourer, in the employ of Mr. Wabbleton, timber-merchant, near Waterloo Bridge. I was first introduced to the prisoner, Gardiner, on the 28th of March, by Saul; he lived at No. 13, Rose-street, Covent-garden. I took a letter to him that day, but did not find him at home - I saw him at home afterwards on that day, and told him I had a letter which Saul had sent me with, and I was to receive what he had written for. He said

"Where is Saul?" I said he had sprained his ancle, and was not able to get out. He then said,

"I am going to see about the things, if you will stop a moment I will go with you." I went with him towards St. Giles's church. I got nothing that day, but in going along he returned me the money which I had taken in the letter, screwed up in a piece of the letter. I saw him again next day at his own house; he asked me where I had missed him last night? I said I had missed him. He said it was of no consequence, as he could not get any; he also said

"There is a man come out of the country for fifty fives, besides other notes, and it is very expensive for him to wait in town, but I cannot get them out of the country." - I got nothing from him that day. On the 4th of April I received five 1 l. forged notes from Harrison, and before I put them into my pocket I shewed them to Gardiner - he said,

"These are good ones, they are all the 10th" (meaning the date.) He said,

"Jane, have you got any money?" she said,

"Yes, 1 l. 5 s." - I had paid her that for the five notes, I had received it from Christmas - (looks at five) - these are them. He said,

"You must be very cautious how you pass them; do not offer two in one shop whatever you do." On the 6th of April I saw him at the Sun, in Windmill-street. I stopped there sometime, and came out with him, and just before he got to his own door he said

"Here are the things," and shewed me a brown paper parcel. I went into his room, there was a stranger there, he took a paper from the window, came round, and slipped them into my hands, turning his back to me. I received four from him, and gave him 20 s. in silver for them - (looks at four) - these are them. I then came away. On the 18th, about ten o'clock, I saw him at his house; I said,

"Have you got any more?" he said

"Yes. Jane, what did you do with those things?" she said,

"They are under the floor-cloth, near the fire-place in the front parlour." He and I went out of that door, he went into the front parlour, and picked something up from under the floor-cloth wrapped in brown paper - he opened it, and there were three 1 l. notes. He said,

"They are all prime ones - give me 15 s." which I did; he wrapped them in brown paper, and gave them into my hands. I went with him into Long-acre, had a glass of liquor, and there we parted. (Looks at them) - these are them, they are in the same paper. He asked me if Saul ever told me he owed him any silver? I said,

"Yes, he did; you need not be afraid of the money, you will have it on Monday." He said he was not afraid, but he did not know whether he had told me or not. This was on Saturday. I saw him again on Monday evening, about half-past seven o'clock; Wales and Saul were with me. Saul and I went into the house together; Wales stopped at the end of Rose-street. We sat down; Saul said,

"We are come to complete the score and pay the 10 s. I owe you," which he did, and paid him 10 s. for two more notes, and I gave him 6 s. in silver for one; he returned me 1 s., saying,

"You have given me 1 s. too much."

Q. Was this for notes you were to receive - A. Yes; we did not get them that night. We had fifteen that night, left his house, and went to a public-house over the way. Gardiner came in, after we had been there half an hour, and wanted us to go into another public-house, which we

did, and in a few minutes he called Saul out - we parted. I saw him again next night at eleven o'clock - Wales accompanied us to Rose-street. After sitting down Saul said to Gardiner,

"Do you know what you gave me last night?" he said,

"Yes, fifteen." Saul said,

"You told me there were but ten - when I opened the parcel I found fifteen." Then Saul paid him 2 l. in silver and 2 l. in notes, and I gave him 5 s. - (we had received the money from Foy and Christmas.) Gardiner said,

"I will go and get the others presently." The officers immediately came in and took him.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. How long have you been employed by the Bank - A. Since the 20th of March. I have been paid for my loss of time. Nobody accompanied me to the house on the 8th.

JOHN SAUL . I introduced Liberter to the prisoner. I received fifteen notes from him the evening before he was apprehended. I marked each of them and gave them to Christmas - (looks at fifteen) - these are them.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. You introduced Liberter to the Bank - A. No. I believe Wales did. Foy and Christmas introduced him to me on the 21st of March. I did not know him before.

JOHN FOY . I am an officer of Marlborough-street. Liberter was introduced by Wales to Saul. On the 4th of April Liberter gave me five 1 l. notes in the presence of Christmas. On the 7th of April he brought four 1 l. notes, and on the 11th of April he brought three 1 l. notes to the Bank. On the 10th of April, at twelve o'clock at night, Saul brought fifteen. On the 11th of April I accompanied Wales and Jefferson to Rose-street; Saul and Liberter went in first - I did not see them go in. We went in in about twenty minutes, and found the prisoners and their servant, and Saul and Liberter sitting in the parlour - Gardiner was nearer to the fire; Wales went up to him, and took something off the ground, which laid between Gardiner and the fire. Wales held it in his hand and said,

"What have you got here?" Gardiner said he did not know, that it belonged to those men, and if they were doing anything wrong it was more than he knew. I asked him who the men were? he said he did not know, they were strangers to him. After searching them I took them to Marlborough-street, and left Wales and Jefferson to search the house. Gardiner said at the office that the two men came in just before we did, and that the short man (Saul), asked him to look at two notes for him, and to give him two notes for 2 l. in silver. I asked if he had ever given him change, or had any money from either of them before? he said he had not. I then said,

"Did not you think it a very impudent thing for a person to come in and ask you to give him notes for silver, if you did not know him?" He said Jane had seen him before when he had come to their house with girls, but that they were both strangers to him. He said afterwards,

"Yet I think I saw them at the public-house near my house the night before." I found two papers in a drawer or desk close to where they were sitting.

JOHN SAUL re-examined. Q. At what time in the evening did you receive the fifteen notes - A. About eleven o'clock at night, and then returned to his house with Liberter, stopped there a quarter of an hour or twenty minutes, then went to the Crown, and delivered them to Foy.

JOHN WALES . I am an officer. I employed Liberter by direction of the Bank, introduced him to Saul, and accompanied him several times to Gardiner's house. I accompanied Liberter on the 17th and 18th and on the 20th, 26th, and 27th - I went with both. I saw nobody have any communication with them. I marked a 1 l. note which was delivered to Liberter - (looks at one) - this is it. On the 11th of April I went into the house, and saw Gardiner sitting by the fire; I saw him draw his left hand towards his thigh, I attempted to seize his hand, and at that moment something fell from his hand on the floor; I picked it up, and asked him what he had got there? he said it was what those men had dropped (looking round at Liberter and Saul, who sat there) - and if they were doing anything wrong he did not know it, or it was unknown to him. On examining the paper I found it contained the money I had marked that day and given to Saul - there were two 1 l. notes, 40 s. in silver, and a 5 s. paper in copper laid on the table, which had been delivered to Liberter - we furnished them that evening, before they went to pay him for the notes. They were secured.

GEORGE COXHEAD . I am partner with Mr. Lovel; we live in New-street, Covent-garden. Gardiner, was a customer of ours, he also holds a house for which I receive rent. He owed me 2 l. 9 s. for grocery and 15 l. for rent, which was paid by a woman, whom I do not know. These two 1 l. notes, Nos. 51633 and 47844, I received in part of that payment - they have

"Gardiner, Rose-street, 6-4-20" on them.

THOMAS GLOVER . I am an inspector of Bank notes. The notes are forged in every respect. The note set out in the indictment is signed J. C. Baker, but is not his writing. They all appear to have the same kind of filling-up and paper, and are impressed from the same plate.

JOHN COLE BAKER . I am a signing-clerk; the signature to the note is not my writing.

(The note was here put in and read.)

GARDINER'S Defence. On the night of the 10th, when the men state I was with them, I can prove I was playing the violin for a musical club, and that they were not in my company. They have been employed by the Bank, have been in training together day by day, and were to have 80 l. for my conviction. My brother went and asked them how they could deal in blood? Saul told him if I would give him 100 l. he would get out of the way and go to Scotland. I cannot bring my brother to prove this - I have other friends.

WILLIAM HALL . I am an upholder, and lived in Great Windmill-street, but not now; I have been moved this day by an Habeas from the King's Bench. I have known the prisoner some time. On Monday, the 10th of April, I saw him at the Sun, next door to my own house, at six o'clock in the evening. I met him there, and was with him till, I should think, ten minutes past eight o'clock; it was past eight o'clock, I am certain. He left me in the street; we were to meet again, which we did, at half-past nine o'clock, and continued with him till half-past eleven o'clock. He then left me at the public-house in Rose-street, near Covent-garden - Harker was with us.

MR. SERGEANT BOSANQUET. Q. How far is Rose-street from the Sun - A. I should think, half a mile. He went

out with me and Harker a little after eight o'clock. I parted with him in St. Martin's-court.

Q. How came you to meet him again by appointment - A. He said, some years ago he was a musician, and invited me and Harker to go and hear him and his two friends play the violin and flute. When we got to St. Martin's-court, he said he should go and seek for his friend Salmon; that is about half-way to the Sun. We went to a public-house in Rose-street, kept by Honeyball; I do not know the sign; it is in the same street as his house. I have never seen him since till now.

Q. You knew this on Saturday - A. Certainly; I was here on Saturday, but was not examined.

Q. When did you first see Harker - A. He came to my house in Windmill-street, and asked me to go to Burn's; the prisoner was there; I cannot say what part of the room he was in; he had some gin and water before him; I will not say whether any one was in his company or not; it is a small room; there might be other persons there; nobody took him out, or had any conversation with him but what I could hear. Harker called on me, and we went together; and we all three left together. The prisoner left us to look for two friends, who would entertain us with music, and we went into Hobb's; we parted at the door of the King's Arms, in the middle of the court. He might have gone either to the right or left. I should think it was twenty minutes or a quarter past nine o'clock, when we saw him at the public house, in Rose-street. We waited there a quarter of an hour for him, and took some supper before he came in; it was a hot knuckle of ham, which we bought opposite an oyster-shop in New-street; we finished it before he came in, which was about half-past nine o'clock. I observed the clock at the ham-shop.

Q. When was this first called to your recollection - A. About two days after somebody came and told me Gardiner was in trouble. I thought that strange, when he had been in my company, and began to recollect what time he was with me.

Q. How came you to know it was for anything on the 10th - A. I heard nothing of the 10th, I only heard he was in confinement. I never heard anything about the 10th at all. He said he was very tired, for he had been out to play the week before, which was Easter week.

COURT. Q. What time was you here on Saturday - A. At half-past nine o'clock in the morning, and remained till the Judges left the Court.

WILLIAM HARKER . I am a tailor, and live in Queen-street, Golden-square. I use the Sun in Windmill-street. I was in the prisoner's company there on the Monday before he was apprehended. I went in about six o'clock in the evening, and he was there. I remained there two hours, and went away with him and Hall. The prisoner left us at the door of the King's Arms, St. Martin's-court. He appeared to go towards St. Martin's-lane, on the way to Rose-street. We met him about half past nine o'clock, or rather later, at a public-house in Rose-street, kept by Honeyball; I do not know the sign. We left him there about half-past eleven o'clock; there was music and singing there.

MR. BOLLAND. Q. What reason have you for remembering this was the night - A. The gentleman who played the violin mentioned that he had been playing there three or four nights the week before, being Easter, and that he was tired. I heard he was apprehended on the Wednesday, but did not hear any particular time given to the offence he was charged with. He could not have left Burn's so as to go to Rose-street, if he did, he was back directly; it was about ten minutes' walk. After he came into the public-house in Rose-street I do not think he went out; he might, but I never missed him. I think it was about half past eleven o'clock when I left him.

COURT. Q. Did you go to the Sun alone, or did you take anybody there - A. I went alone. The prisoner, Hall, and several others, were there when I went in; it is a common sitting-room, and is divided into boxes. Hall sat next the prisoner, drinking.

Q. You found Hall and the prisoner there - A. I cannot exactly recollect whether I went in with Hall, or alone; to the best of my recollection I went in alone.

Q. Did you go from your own house to the Sun - A. Yes, and walked alone. I am quite sure I called on nobody. I had seen Hall in his shop in the course of the day, by daylight.

Q. If any one has said you called on Hall, and went with him to the Sun, it is not true - A. I do not think it is. I cannot say whether I saw him at the door or not. I am quite sure I did not go to his house. I supped with Hall, in Rose-street, before the prisoner joined us; we had a knuckle of ham.

EDWARD HONEYBALL . I keep the Cooper's Arms, in Rose-street. On the 10th of April the prisoner was at my house.

Q. You have been in the gallery of the Court, and heard all the evidence - A. I have, and was also here on Saturday. On the 10th of April, I went into the parlour; after eleven o'clock there was some music. We had a painting society there, and being a member, I went in, as I understood my servant was dancing. I recollect seeing the prisoner there, and the last witness, but I did not know them. There is one house between the prisoner's and mine.

GARDINER - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 33.

HARRISON - NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow .

Reference Number: t18200517-68

652. GEORGE DUDFIELD was indicted for having in his custody and possession a forged and counterfeit Bank note for payment of 1 l., he well knowing it be forged and counterfeit .

HENRY THURLING . I am a butcher, and live in Lower Chapman-street, St. George's in the East. On the 9th of April, between ten and half-past ten o'clock in the morning, the prisoner came and bought a loin of lamb, which came to 3 s. 8 d. he paid me a 1 l. note, I called my wife down, she gave him change. I asked his name - he said

"Jessee Wan," which she wrote on it in his presence - (looks at one) - this is it.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. This was on Sunday morning - A. Yes, my shutters were up, but the door was open. I saw him at Lambeth-street on the Thursday week after; I said I could not exactly identify him, as he stood there, until I spoke to my wife.

MR. REYNOLDS. Q. How was he standing when you said you could not identify him - A. In the lock-up place,

which has no window. When he was before the magistrate I had no doubt of him.

ELIZA THURLING . My husband called me down, and I changed the note. I understood him to say his name was Jessee Wan - but, by mistake, I put Joseph. I am not exactly certain that the prisoner is the man, he is very much like him.

JOHN FOY . I have known the prisoner two years; his name is George Dudfield ; he lived at the Antigallican, in Shire-lane.

ELIZA MYERS . I keep the Roebuck, Cannon-street-road, Whitechapel. On the 11th of April, a man named Brown, was taken up at my house for uttering forged notes. Mr. Snow was talking to me on the subject when the prisoner came in, and gave the watchman something to drink, Snow said,

"Here is a friend of Brown's, who can give us every information about him." He said,

"I know Brown." They went out together for a short time, and returned with two or three of the patrol. The prisoner said,

"Do you recollect what was in to-day's paper about false imprisonment?" And

"What could you do with a drunken man?" My husband said he was not drunk.

JOHN SNOW . I am a plumber, and live at No. 17, Langdon-street; the prisoner used to come there to see Brown. On the 13th of April, about twelve o'clock at night, I saw him at the Roebuck, public-house, he came in, and gave the watchman some drink. I said, here is Brown's friend, who can give us information about him. He said he knew Brown. We went out - he said,

"Has Brown been robbing or murdering?" I said, I dare say you know what he has been doing. My wife came over, and asked him if he could tell us about Brown - he answered her as he did me. I said he had been detained for passing forged notes. My wife asked him if he was with Brown the night before - he said he was. When we got opposite my house, he said he knew Brown's niece and nephew, and he would go to them and be back in two minutes. I said he should not go - he said Not go! I said No, unless I go with you. He ran from me a few yards, and I collared him, he collared me, and threatened to charge me with false imprisonment if I gave him in charge; we struggled from one end of the street to the other. I gave him in charge to the patrol - it was a rainy night. The prisoner was quite sober. We were proceeding from my house towards James-street.

WILLIAM LYON . I am a patrol. On the 11th of April I heard the cry of Patrol! in Langdon-street, and found Snow and the prisoner struggling together; Snow said he thought Dudfield was concerned with Brown in passing the notes. I said you may depend upon it he has brought no notes here, it is of little use taking him. He collared Snow, drew him towards the house, and said they would have something to drink. I took him to the watch-house - seven-half-crowns and about sixpence in copper, was found on him. I then returned to the spot where I first saw them struggling, and there found a piece of brown paper rolled up corner ways - it was very wet, and contained two 5 l. notes - (looks at two) - these are them.

Cross-examined. Q. Brown was taken at the Roebuck - A. Yes, Brown would go by Langdon-street to the watch-house.

RICHARD POTTER . I am a patrol. On the 11th of April I saw the prisoner and Snow, they had hold of each other, struggling; I caught hold of the prisoner, and asked Snow if he would give charge of him - he said No; the prisoner said if he did he would punish him for false imprisonment. We were going to let him go, and he asked me the nearest way to Whitechapel. As we went along the other patrol called to me to bring him back. I did so.

WILLIAM SUMMERS . I was at the watch-house when the prisoner was brought in, the landlord said he was intimate with Brown - the prisoner said he did not know him. I brought Brown out, he said he never knew him in his life. I found a piece of brown paper on him - next morning another piece, which contained the notes, was shewn to me, the two pieces were compared, and they matched.

JOHN GIBBON . I apprehended Brown at the Roebuck, and took him to the watch-house. We went quite a different way from Langdon-street.

THOMAS GLOVER. I am an inspector of Bank notes. The note is forged in every respect. The two 5 l. notes are also forged, and signed by the same person that signed the 1 l. note.

(The note was here put in and read.)

Prisoner's Defence. They are entirely mistaken in my person. They said at first I was not the man - I suspect the Bank know I am not the man. I can prove I was in bed at the time; they found several papers on me, all of which I put my name on. I know nothing of the brown paper. I had been drinking, and gave the watchman a shilling to show me the way.

WILLIAM SUMMERS re-examined. He marked and numbered his papers up to No. 22, and then refused to mark any more.

ANN DAVIS . I am the prisoner's servant; he keeps the Antigallican in Shire-lane. On the Sunday morning before he was taken up I got up at nine o'clock, I was the first person up. I go into his room every morning for the key - I saw him in bed on this morning at nine and eleven o'clock.

MR. SERGEANT BOSANQUET. Q. You did not speak to him - A. No. I remember it because I go in every morning.

DENNIS CUMBERLAND . I was servant to the prosecutor. I heard of his being apprehended on the Monday - on the Saturday night before that he slept at home; we shut up about four o'clock in the morning. When I went in to fetch his trowsers to brush, he told me to take his money out and put it on the table. He got up about eleven o'clock.

MR. REYNOLDS. Q. Do you go into his room every morning - A. Almost. He usually goes to bed about three o'clock in the morning, except on Saturday nights, when we stop up later, being busy.

Q. Can you tell us what time he went to bed on Friday night - A. No. It is a British wine-shop.

Q. Is it not a house of accommodation for men and women - A. Twice a week - on Mondays and Thursdays.

Q. Why is the house kept open so late on Sunday morning - A. People come for wine. The girl fetches the key every morning.

MR. ANDREWS. Q. What is done on Mondays and Thursdays - A. There is a dance.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18200517-69

653. JOHN PRICE was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Sumersby , about eleven o'clock in the forenoon of the 25th of April , at Paddington (no person being therein,) and stealing therein four gowns, value 20 s.; one jacket, value 5 s.; two pair of breeches, value 10 s.; two pillows, value 5 s.; one coat, value 40 s.; one waistcoat, value 4 s., and 20 s. in monies numbered, his property .

WILLIAM SUMERSBY . I live at Bayswater , in the parish of Paddington; I rent the whole house, and go about as a jobbing gardener . On the 25th of April I left my house about twelve o'clock - my wife was out; I have no family, and left nobody in the house. I locked the outer door, put the key into my pocket, and left all the property safe; I left all the articles stated in the indictment there. I returned in about half an hour, and found the door half open and half shut. My wife was at work next door, I went to her. I found nobody in my house, they had entered it by a false key; it had not been forced - I am certain I locked it before I left. I found two boxes broken open, the gowns and money taken out; my clothes which hung up, and the pillows on the bed were taken. There is only a front and a back room, no upper room. The coat, waistcoat, and breeches were in a bundle - they had been left at my house by a drover. I found nobody about the premises. I had seen the prisoner before, he lived in Cato-street, within about ten yards of my house; he used to frequent my master's, the Bayswater tea-gardens, which joins my house. I found the property next day at Bow-street, where the prisoner was in custody. They were worth 54 s., and I lost 20 s. in money. I found a screwdriver on the box, which corresponds with the marks on them, it was not mine. They must have entered at the door, the windows were all fast.

WILLIAM WOODBERRY . I am a patrol of Bow-street. On the 25th of April, about one o'clock in the day, a person called on me, and said there were two persons in the fields near Bayswater. I went out, and saw two men in John-street, Edgeware-road. I went to the end of John-street, and saw one man with a bag, and the other apparently looking round to observe if they were watched. I have no doubt of their being in company together. I went down John-street and followed them, but before I got to the end of Cato-street the man with the bag turned into Cato-street - the prisoner looked about, turned himself round, and followed him. I followed them into Cato-street as fast as I could, and the man with the bag went into a passage a little way, so that the bag remained partly outside the door. The prisoner turned round again, and saw me coming after him - he was then very near the man with the bag.

Q. From the time you first saw them they kept close together - A. Yes, seeing me coming after them the prisoner passed very quickly by the house where the man with the bag was, and before I could get up the man rebounded backwards from the passage, threw the bag down, and ran off. I called out Stop thief! I could not run myself having slippers on; not being on duty I was at work as a shoemaker. The man with the bag escaped through a house in Mitcham-street, five or six hundred yards from Cato-street - the prisoner went out at the Queen-street end; I was then informed he lived in the house where the man was going in with the bag. I took the bag to my house, which was just by, then returned to the same house in Cato-street, in the passage of which I had seen the other man. The landlady of the house unlocked the door of the front room on the first floor. The first things I saw were two centre-bits, one larger than the other, two pistol flints, and a powder-can, but no powder in it. I tried to open the table drawer, but it was locked; I afterwards opened it, and found eight or nine picklock keys, two common keys, a phosphorus bottle, two duplicates, and a pair of spurs.

Q. When did you next see the prisoner - A. On the Saturday week after, at Bow-street - the 25th of April was Tuesday. I have no doubt of his being the person who was in company with the other man. The bag contained the articles stated in the indictment, except the money.

JEREMIAH MAIDMENT . I am a Bow-street officer. On the 5th of May I apprehended the prisoner at No. 3, Charles-street, Drury-lane - I found nothing on him.

SARAH STOREY . I live at No. 7, Cato-street, Edgeware-road; the prisoner lived at my house six weeks. I remember Woodberry coming to the house - the prisoner had lived with me six weeks on the Saturday before the bag was dropped, which was on Tuesday; it was dropped in my passage about one o'clock in the day. I shewed Woodberry the prisoner's room, and unlocked the door for him. He came to me as a married man, and brought a woman as his wife - she only stopped a week. He lived alone in the room for five weeks before the officer came. I saw Woodberry find the skeleton keys - the account he has given is correct. The prisoner did not return to his lodgings afterwards. He had not intimated any intention to leave, but said he was very comfortable and should stop.

Prisoner. Q. Did I not tell you I was going into the country that day to live, and say I expected two men to call - A. No; he said he was going out a little while, but should be back at half-past twelve o'clock. He went out between ten and eleven o'clock, and a woman called and enquired for him. I told her he would be home by half-past twelve o'clock. I did not show her into the room. When the room was taken, two young women came and engaged it, subject to his approval. One of them spoke as his wife, and said, if her husband liked it she would take it.

Q. Did not persons frequently call on me - A. Not to my knowledge. I gave him the key of the front door, and did not trouble myself about it. He never left the key of the room with me before, and then he expected his brother to call to breakfast. I offered several times to make his bed, but he said he could do it himself. I do not think there was any key to the table-drawer. I cleaned the room out before he took it, and moved the table about; and if the keys had been there, I must have heard them rattle. I cleared the room out for him once, and I believe he once

left it open for my son to go in and clean his boots. I have a lodger in the back room on the same floor. The keys of the rooms are different; I do not know whether one opens the other.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. On the 5th of May I was apprehended. I hope you will take my case into your serious consideration, and not find me guilty, as I can positively assert I know nothing of the affair.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 25.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200517-70

654. WILLIAM MITCHELL was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Hilliar Pelafinet , about eight o'clock in the night of the 14th of May , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, one handkerchief, value 1 s., and 18 s. in monies numbered, his property .

MARY ANN PELAFINET . I am the wife of Hilliar Pelafinet. We live in Providence-street, City-road . On Friday, the 14th of May, I went up stairs. The door was fastened by a spring-latch. The window was down, but not fastened. About eight o'clock in the evening (I had left the parlour about ten minutes), I heard a loud knocking at the door - it might be daylight in the street. I came down, and the people said there was a thief in the house. I perceived the prisoner in the parlour, and he was secured. I found a handkerchief hanging over the cupboard-door, and missed about 18 s. off the mantle-piece. I had left the handkerchief on a chair.

THOMAS CHILDMAID . I am a boot and shoemaker. On Sunday, the 14th of May, about a quarter past eight o'clock, I was informed a man had been seen lurking about. I live opposite the prosecutrix, and saw her window open; the man then moved a step or two from the window. I asked who was there; I received no answer. A man passed by, and whistled twice. I then suspected he had accomplices inside. I shut the window, closed the shutters, and then knocked at the door. I found the prisoner in the parlour, and he was secured. The man outside walked off. There might be light enough to distinguish a man's features.

JAMES BANKS ARABIN . I am a constable. I took charge of the prisoner. I found nothing on him. I found the box, which had contained the money, laying in the ashes.

Prisoner's Defence. I saw two boys lurking about, and watched them. They took my hat off, threw it into the window, and I got in after it.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Of stealing, but not of the burglary.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200517-71

SIXTH DAY, TUESDAY, MAY 23.

655. JOHN LOCKYER PASSMORE was indicted for embezzlement .

MR. ANDREWS, for the Prosecution, stated, that he was unable to support this indictment, and offered no evidence.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200517-72

656. THOMAS POOLE was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of April , one coat, value 20 s. , the property of John James .

JOHN JAMES . I am a farmer , and live at Uxbridge. On the 20th of April, I lost my coat from No. 9, Castle-street, Holborn ; it hung in the passage at eleven o'clock; I returned at three o'clock, and it was gone; it is a private house.

WILLIAM NICHOLS . I am an officer. On the 20th of April, about a quarter past one o'clock, I was in Broad-street, Carnaby-market, and saw the prisoner cross and go up Hopkins-street, with the great-coat under his arm. I followed and saw him putting it on over his own coat. A lad went up and spoke to him. He then pulled it off and put it under his arm again. I called for Dawes and we secured him. He said he had it to mend for a man, and would take us to the place. He took us to a Jew's, who is a dealer in marine-stores, in Crown-court. The man denied giving him the coat. I advertized it, and Mr. James claimed it. (Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I bought it in Holborn.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200517-73

657. JOHN ALLEN was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of May , one hammer, value 4 d.; one hatchet, value 1 s.; and one hoe, value, 8 d. , the goods of John Holdup .

JOHN HOLDUP . I keep the Hole-in-the-Wall, in Kirby-street . These things were stolen from a garden I have in Spafield's , which has a fence round it three feet high.

THOMAS MERCER . I have a garden by Mr. Holdup's. Having been repeatedly robbed, I sat up to watch, and, about half past three o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner come from the prosecutor's garden. I followed and secured him at the end of Margaret-street, with the hatchet and hammer under his coat, and the hoe in his hat. He said he brought them from Wapping.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Confined Six Months , and Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200517-74

658. EDWARD CHEAR was indicted for that he, on the 21st of April , at St. Mary-le-bow , feloniously did dispose of and put away a certain forged and counterfeit Bank note (setting it forth, No. 8993, 1 l. dated February 10th, 1820, signed S. Draper) with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England , well knowing it to be forged and counterfeited .

SECOND COUNT, for feloniously offering to William Henry Hewitt a like forged note, with a like intent, knowing it to be forged.

THIRD AND FOURTH COUNTS, the same, only calling the forged instrument a promissory note for payment of money instead of a Bank note.

FOUR OTHER COUNTS, the same, only stating the prisoner's intent to be to defraud William Chaffers .

WILLIAM HENRY HEWITT . I am shopman to Mr. William Chaffers , No. 42, Watling-street, City . On Friday morning, the 21st of April, about twelve o'clock, the prisoner came and bought a gold watch-key for 6 s., and tendered

me a 1 l. Bank note. I asked his name and address, and he gave me

"Cox, Joiner-street, Tooley-street, just at foot of the Bridge." I immediately wrote that address on it. I then looked at it and suspected it was bad - (looks at one) - this is it. I then told him I suspected it was a bad one; and I asked my fellow shopman's (Rogers) opinion on it. He said I had better take it to the Bank, and see if it was good or not. The prisoner said,

"If you don't like it, here is another for it;" and he tendered another which I refused, and said,

"I shall take it to the Bank." I left him in care of Rogers, took it to the Bank, showed it to Mr. Christmas, an inspector, and he and Foy returned with me. I ran on before and found him in the house, and they came in, in three or four minutes. I then heard the prisoner say he lived at No. 15, Joiner-street. I have been to Nos. 13, 14, and 15, Joiner-street, and found no such person lived there.

Prisoner. Q. Did I not say I received it at Billingsgate for two dozen and a half of oyster-barrels - A. No; I heard him say nothing about where he got it.

WILLIAM ROGERS . I am shopman to Mr. Chaffers, and remember the prisoner coming to the shop. Hewitt showed me a note, and I said it was bad. He took it to the Bank, and left the prisoner with me. While he was gone, the prisoner asked me several times if I would not take the other note and give him change, and he would call again for the other. I said No, I was convinced it was a bad one, and he should prove how he got it. He said he took it of his master for wages; and that his master lived at No. 16, Joiner-street, and he lived at No. 15. He did not mention his master's name. Hewitt returned in about ten minutes with Christmas and Foy.

JOHN FOY . I am an officer of Marlborough-street. On the 21st of April I apprehended the prisoner at Mr. Chaffers's shop. Christmas asked him where he lived; he said No. 14, Joiner-street, and that his was name Chear. I said we would have a coach and take him there, to see if his address was correct. He then said he did not live in Joiner-street, but at No. 7, Bett-street, Ratcliff-highway. I then asked where he got the note that he had paid, he said he received it on the Wednesday preceding, at Billingsgate, for some oyster-barrels, from Mr. Roberts, fishmonger, of No. 180, Oxford-street, and that he had sold him barrels two or three times before. I found a 6 d. on him, and a good 1 l. note, which I gave him silver for. I took him to Marlborough-street, went to No. 180, Oxford-street, but found no such person as Roberts there. It is not a fishmonger's, it is a house under repair, and has been so for some months. I made diligent enquiry in the street, and could find no Roberts, a fishmonger. I did not enquire at Billingsgate.

THOMAS COX . I am a cooper, at No. 14, Joiner-street, Tooley-street. I have no recollection of the prisoner. I did not send him to change a note anywhere. There is no other cooper in the street, nor any person of my name that I know - there are about fifty houses, and I have lived there eighteen years. My house is about fifty yards from the bridge.

THOMAS WOOLFORD JONES. I live at No. 15, Joiner-street, Tooley-street, and am a publican. I do not know the prisoner, and never sent him to change a note.

CHARLES CHRISTMAS . I am an inspector of Bank notes. Hewitt came to the Bank and I went with him and Foy, whose account is correct. I marked the note - (looks at one) - this is it.

THOMAS GLOVER . I am an inspector of Bank notes - the note is forged in every respect, and is not Draper's signature.

SAMUEL DRAPER . I am a signing-clerk of 1 l. notes - the note is not signed by me.

(The note was here put in and read.)

Prisoner. I have nothing to say.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 21.

London Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18200517-75

659. DAVID SINFIELD was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of May , at St. Matthew, Bethnal-green, one gelding, price 5 l. , the property of George Jonathan Burnham .

GEORGE JONATHAN BURNHAM . I am a chymist and druggist , and live at Bedford. I lost a dun-coloured gelding, thirteen hands high, off New Close, Carlington, near Bedford , on the 9th of May, or early on Wednesday morning, the 10th - I was in London at the time, and received a letter to say it was gone. I heard of it being gone on Wednesday evening the 10th, I had seen it safe on the 7th, about ten o'clock in the morning, and found it on the 16th, in possession of Shearman, in Church-street, Bethnall-green. I am sure it is mine. I know the prisoner by sight, and have seen him repeatedly at Bedford.

EDMUND REEVE . I am clerk to Messrs. Pearce and Son, Surry-street, Bedford. On Tuesday, the 9th of May, about seven o'clock in the evening, I saw the horse at New Close. I knew it before. I have seen it in town since, and am sure it is the same. I do not remember having ever seen the prisoner. I missed the horse on Wednesday morning, about seven o'clock. I was in the habit of going there morning and evening, as my pony was in the same close. I found the gate taken off its hinges. I looked round to see if the horse had got out at any gap, but could not perceive it had. Bedford is fifty miles from town.

JAMES SHEARMAN . I live at No. 178, Church-street, Bethnal-green. I have the horse now in my possession. I bought it of the prisoner, Sinfield, on the 10th of May, about two o'clock in the afternoon - it was tired, and very lame - it appeared to have come off a journey. I asked where he brought it from - he said from Newton, in Buckinghamshire, and that he bought it a little after Christmas; he asked seven guineas for it - I was to give him 4 l. 15 s. I asked him several times where he brought it from - he told me so many different stories, therefore I suspected him, and did not pay him. He said his name was David Toms , and that his father and uncle were farmers at Newton. I asked him to refer me to somebody in town who knew him - he said he was going to Chequer-alley, Bunhill-row, for some things his father had left there. I asked him to take me there, he said he could not, as he was in a hurry to go into the Borough. I said I would not pay him unless he went with me to Worship-street Office - he went willingly. When he got there I mentioned the circumstance to Garton and Armstrong - they detained him. The prosecutor and Reeve have seen the horse.

THOMAS GARTON . I am officer of Worship-street. On the 10th of May Shearman brought the prisoner to me and Armstrong; he told me his name was David Toms , that he came from Newton, and he bought the horse at Leighton, in Buckinghamshire, about Christmas. I asked him whom he bought it of - he said he did not know the man. I then went and made enquiry in Twister's-alley, returned to him, and said your name is Sinfield, he said, it is. I then asked how many weeks it was since he bought it - he said he hardly knew. I said was it two, three, or four; he said

"It is five weeks ago, and the man's name was Coster that I bought it of, and I gave him 5 l. for it; I do not know where he lives." I detained him, and advertized the horse.

Prisoner's Defence (written). My Lord, and Gentlemen of the Jury - I have been completely brought into his most serious charge by my inexperience and ignorance; I was bred in Layton, in Bedfordshire, and at the age of fifteen was with my uncle, working at his business, until he was obliged to give it up. I was determined to come to London for work, and when I was within ten miles of town I saw the horse standing at the door of a public-house, and whilst I was looking at him the owner, as I supposed, came out and asked if I would purchase him? I enquired the price, and was informed it was 5 l. Thinking that it would not only help me on the road, but likewise I should make something by him on my arrival in London, I bought it. In Church-street, Bishops-gate, a person asked me if it was for sale, I answered it was, and then agreed about price, &c.; he then questioned me, and asked me to go to Worship-street to receive the money, which I did, without any hesitation, believing he was actually going to pay me the money in lieu of which I found he had brought me to the office, under the consideration of my having stolen the horse.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 20.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18200517-76

660. EDWARD SMITH was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Eustace , about two o'clock in the night of the 29th of April , at St. Andrew, Holborn, with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, one watch, value 1 l., his property .

JOHN EUSTACE . I am an egg-merchant , and live at No. 101, Saffron-hill , I rent the house. On the 29th of April, about a quarter past one o'clock in the morning, I and my wife were a bed; she alarmed me, I got out, listened, and heard somebody in the house. I knocked at the door, and called my man. I then heard a noise, as if some person was making his way out of the house. I went and looked through my back-room window, and saw the prisoner go over the wall. I went to the front window, and told the watchman some person had been in the house, and was coming out of the next passage. He was at last stopped by another watchman, brought back, and taken to the watch-house. My property was not found on him. I am sure he is the man - I remember him particularly; he had a red waistcoat. I noticed his handkerchief and face as he got over the wall; he would then come into the yard of another house, which is let out in lodgings, and the passage door is open continually - that yard belongs to two houses. He came out of the second house; both of them are lodging-houses - it was moon-light; I saw no one else. When the watchman came back I found he had entered at the back door, which I saw Godfrey fasten when I went to bed (he is not here). It was fastened with two bolts, one of which was broken off and laid on the ground, the other was wrenched off and hung on a nail; there were marks of a crow-bar on the door. I lost a watch, which hung on the mantle-piece in the kitchen - I wound it up at half-past ten o'clock at night; I have not seen it since. Next day I saw the watchman compare the marks with a crow-bar which Passoway had.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. What parish is your house in - A. St. Andrew 's, Holborn, I believe, but am not postive. I saw one side of his face - I was almost even with him; he had a hat and a long blue coat on. The wall is about fifteen feet high. If he had not been taken that night I am sure I should have known him again.

WILLIAM PASSOWAY . I am a watchman. I know Eustace's house is in St. Andrew's, Holborn, Middlesex. I heard him call out that somebody was at his back door. I ran under his window, and heard him call out,

"Tom! Tom! somebody has broken into the house!" I immediately heard some person jump apparently off the wall - I also heard tiles rattle and glass break. Eustace called out of the first-floor window, and said

"Watch! watch! somebody is getting over the wall, go into the next-yard!" I ran immediately to the next door to the prosecutor's, thinking he would come out there, but instead of that the prisoner came out of the next door. I struck at him with my stick, and saw him with the crow-bar in his hand. I pursued as fast as I could, and called out,

"Clark, stop him!" He ran towards Fleet-market on the right-hand; Clark came out of his box and the prisoner knocked him down. He turned down White's-yard, and down a court, I immediately followed him; he ran into a house, and I found him in the passage up two pair of stairs in White's-yard - he could not get into any room - I saw him run in at the door; I secured him. He said,

"What the b - dy h - ll do you want of me?" I said I would let him know, and brought him away. I sent Karl up stairs, he brought the crow-bar down. I took him to the watch-house. He was searched in my presence, and a dark lanthorn, a phosphorus box, and a candle were found on him I did not compare the crow-bar with the marks on the door-way - Nailor, the constable of the night, took care of it.

Cross-examined. Q. Eustace first called out to you for help - A. Yes. I heard his wife call to him three or four times. He said at the watch-house he was certain of the prisoner being the man, by his waistcoat, and that he saw the side of his face and his handkerchief. The house is in the liberty of Saffron-hill, in the parish of St. Andrew Holborn.

SAMUEL CLARK . I am a watchman. I heard Passoway give an alarm. I ran and tried to stop the prisoner; he crossed the road with an iron weapon of some description, and knocked me down. I got up in about two minutes, followed him, and saw him taken in White's-yard. I am sure he is the person who knocked me down. While they were taking him to the watch-house I searched the house

but found nobody else there. I did not compare the crowbar with the marks. The house is in St. Andrew's parish.

THOMAS KARL . I am a watchman. On the morning of the 29th of April I heard an alarm, and saw somebody running towards me into White's-yard, which is no thoroughfare. I pursued - Passoway was on before me; he ran up the staircase, and I saw him brought down. I went up immediately afterwards, and found the crow-bar on the top step of the stairs, where he stood. It was two pair of stairs high. I was not near enough to say he was the person I saw running. I delivered the crow-bar to Boyce.

HENRY BOYCE . I am the watch-house keeper. I searched the prisoner, and found the lanthorn and phosphorus bottle on him. The crow-bar was delivered to me. Some of the watchmen had it to compare with the door - I think it was Passoway.

JOHN EUSTACE re-examined. It is the crow-bar that was compared - I think Passoway compared it. It was at the time they called for me to go and appear against the prisoner. I observed that it fitted the marks - I saw Barnley and Nailor fit it to the marks; they are not here. The purchase is about a quarter of an inch. I know the house is in St. Andrew's parish, by paying the poor's rates.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in company with William Carn , the prosecutor's brother-in-law, whom I accompanied to Saffron-hill; he went over the wall, and said he would borrow a shilling of his brother. I waited a quarter of an hour for him outside, and as he did not come I opened the door - I saw nobody in the back yard. I sat down in the next yard to the prosecutor's, and on the seat I found the lanthorn and phosphorus bottle. I had hardly put them into my pocket before Carn jumped from the wall, and said

"Run out, there is something the matter!" The watchman made a blow at me as I ran. I remained in White's-yard ten minutes before he took me.

JOHN EUSTACE re-examined. My brother-in-law, William Carn , is not the man I saw go over the wall - he might have been with him.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 24.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18200517-77

661. HENRY MACE was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of April , 7 lbs. of tobacco, value 20 s. , the goods of the London Dock Company .

SIX OTHER COUNTS, stating it to be the property of different persons.

MESSRS. REYNOLDS, BOLLAND and ARABIN conducted the prosecution.

GEORGE CHAPMAN. I am a tidesman in the Excise. I was placed on board the Fairy, at Gravesend, she came from Virginia. On the 18th of April I accompanied her into the London Docks - her cargo was tobacco in casks. On the 23d of April, about six o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner on the forecastle of the ship, and asked him what he wanted? he said he wanted to see a shipmate. I said there was no shipmate there, and he must go ashore. The cook of the ship was eating something on deck - he said the prisoner had come up the forecastle - he left the ship; Reader went after him, he said he had nothing about him. We found a quantity of tobacco tied round his waist in hands as it is packed - I found more in his hat; he said he had it from a person belonging to the ship. I found the bulk-head partly broken down, and planks removed to get at the hogsheads - part of one was broken and tobacco gone. I asked him several times to describe the man who gave it to him, he refused.

JOHN READER . I am a tidesman. I was with the last witness, his account is correct.

Prisoner's Defence. I belonged to a ship in the docks . A young man sold me the tobacco. I described the man, and asked them to bring him forward.

GEORGE CHAPMAN re-examined. He said he could not describe the man whether he was tall or short, but next morning he said he was as tall as me.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200517-78

662. DANIEL MENDOZA was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of April , from the person of John Hyde , Esq. , one pocket-book, value 1 s., and eight 1 l. Bank notes, his property .

MR. BOLLAND conducted the prosecution.

JOHN HYDE , ESQ. On the 27th of April I was standing at the corner of Cockspur-street , to see the King go to open the House - there was a great crowd. I felt a pull at my pocket, and immediately missed my pocket-book, as soon as I could put down my hand; it contained eight 1 l. notes, and a game certificate and receipt. I had received the notes from Messrs. Jones and Lloyd the day before.

JAMES TEWSLEY . I am clerk to Messrs. Jones, Lloyd and Co. I remember paying Mr. Hyde thirty 1 l. notes; they were running numbers, and dated the 28th of March, 1820.

GEORGE ROBINSON . On the 27th of April I was with Batten, and saw the prisoner a little after three o'clock at Waterloo-place, in company with three others, attempt a gentleman's pocket. He lifted his coat up with one hand and put the other into his pocket - he left without taking anything. I followed him towards Charing-cross, and as I was coming up St. Martin's-street with Dukes and Batten, I saw the prisoner and two others go into the Horse and Dolphin there, I followed, and went into the taproom, no person was there; I went into the yard, saw the prisoner, and took him. I was in the act of searching him when he took eight notes from his left-hand breeches-pocket, and rolled them in his hand, I took them out. A game certificate was picked up in the yard by the landlady. Two other persons were in the yard, and as I opened the yard door one bolted out, and got away. Duke secured the other, but found nothing on him.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. The yard leads to the privy - A. Yes; the notes are No. 44501, and following numbers.

WILLIAM JEFFERSON . I produce a pocket-book which I saw Mrs. Jackson deliver to her husband, about four or five o'clock in the afternoon.

SARAH JACKSON . My husband keeps the Horse and Dolphin; the prisoner was in my house in company with two men, between three and four o'clock; about half an hour after the officer came and found a game certificate in the yard, and in about half an hour after that I found the pocket-book by the yard door - nobody had been there

except the prisoner and his companions; nobody but them were in the house.

SAMUEL DICKENS . I searched the prisoner in the house, and saw the notes found on him.

WILLIAM BATTEN . I am an officer. I saw the prisoner at the corner of Waterloo-place, in company with two others; I did not follow him, but saw him again going into the Horse and Dolphin, followed him directly into the house, and saw him searched. I had seen him put his hand into a gentleman's pocket in Waterloo-place.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200517-79

663. WILLIAM MURRAY was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Susan Hughes , about two o'clock in the night of the 4th of May , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein two snuff-boxes, value 1 l.; one nutmeg-grater, value 3 s.; one tea-spoon, value 3 s.; two bags, value 6 d.; one seal, value 14 s.; one pair of spectacles, value 4 s.; one hone, value 2 s., and one desk, value 5 s., her property; and one clock, value 2 l., the property of John Watts .

COSTELINA MEARS. I am servant to Mrs. Susan Hughes . I have not seen her for a week. I understand she is ill; I still live in the house, which is in Vincent-square, Westminster . On the 3d of May I did not fasten the house up, I believe the other servant did, she is not here. I got up between four and five o'clock next morning - John Skelton called me. I missed the clock off the landing-place, which, I believe, belonged to Mr. Watts, my mistress's brother - he is not here.

JOHN SKELTON. I am an apprentice to Mr. John Watts . I slept in the house by the prosecutrix's desire. I fastened all the doors between ten and eleven o'clock at night, and heard Mrs. Hughes lock the parlour door; every thing was safe then. I saw the clock. I have lived with my master six years, and have seen the clock in his house. I do not know when it was taken to the prosecutrix's. I got up about five o'clock in the morning, and found the kitchen-door open, which I had shut. I went to bed again, finding it was only five o'clock. The watchman rang the bell soon after to know if all was safe. I went up and found the inner-door on the top of the stairs forced open, and a square of glass was taken quite out. Between this and the yard-door is a water-closet - the sash-frame was entirely forced out of the brick-work into the yard; it looked into the yard, and I saw it safe the day before. I missed the clock.

Cross-examined by Mr. ARABIN. Q. You was not up till after daylight - A. No; - I heard my mistress lock the door.

EPHRAIM WILTON . I am a patrol. On the 5th of May, about three minutes past three in the morning, I was in Rochester-row. About the middle of the row is a small bridge, which leads to Vincent-square. I saw three men coming towards me in a direction from the prosecutrix's in the square, about eighty yards from her house; the prisoner was one, and he got behind the wall of an adjoining garden; they were in company together. I have seen them in company many times before, and one of them asked me what o'clock it was - I said you know better than me; they passed me and went into Rochester-row. The moon shone, and it was getting light. I then went towards the wall, and saw the prisoner go from the wall under the railings of the square - he pretended to be looking through the railing. I told Cox and Shields - Cox lifted up his lantern, and by the light of it we found the clock among the bushes, on the very spot where he was looking through. The prisoner was then gone through a little street into Rochester-row - I went into Rochester-row and saw he had joined the other two again. They went through a passage into the fields. I met another with him, and followed them. I went to get some person to prevent them escaping, and on my return I found a watchman in pursuit of the prisoner. Kidd and Evans secured him, the others escaped - he was searched at the watch-house and two small bags found on him, which the prosecutrix claimed. I am certain he is the man who hid himself behind the wall, and went to the spot where the clock was found.

Cross-examined. Q. It was quite daylight - A. It was getting daylight. The clock was within the palisades opposite another house.

JOHN KIDD . I am a watchman. A little after three o'clock I saw the last witness, he described three men to me, and desired me to look out. I placed myself at the back of Rochester-row, and saw the prisoner come down a lane, and seeing me and two more watchmen he turned back. I pursued - he got over three or four garden-walls, and I at last secured him in a privy.

WILLIAM COX . I am a watchman of Vincent-square, on the opposite side to Hughes's house. On the 5th of May, as I was calling three o'clock, Wilton came and asked me if I had seen three men? I said No. He said there had been robbery near my beat. I went to the corner by the shrubbery, I threw my lanthorn in to hide it, and saw the face of the clock inside the shrubbery paling - it struck three as I took it into my hand - I got it over the railing. I left it at the watch-house after the prisoner was taken. I went round to the house, and found it belonged to Hughes. I alarmed the apprentice - I found a desk was gone, and saw it laying on a flower-bed in the next garden. Some writings, a medal, and about twelve keys were on the flower-bed - the desk was open. The garden was very much trampled - more persons than one had been there. A person must pass through this garden to get to the prosecutrix's water-closet.

ROBERT EVANS . I am a watchman of Tothil-fields. A little after three o'clock Wilton told me what he suspected. I saw the prisoner about ten minutes after, and helped Kidd to pursue, and saw him taken in the privy of No. 9, Rochester-row. I returned with Gough to the privy about five o'clock, got a light, and found a silver nutmeg-grater and two snuff-boxes on the soil, thrown down the hole, also a silver tea-spoon and a knife.

WILLIAM GOUGH . I searched the privy with Evans, and found the snuff-box, tea-spoon, and knife on the soil.

JOSEPH SHAW . I found two bags in the prisoner's pocket at the watch-house.

COSTELINA MEARS re-examined. I am sure the clock was in the house at night when I went to bed. I do not

know the value of the property - I know it to be my mistress's, and am positive one of the bags was in the house.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I lodged in Rochester-row. I was going to work, heard the alarm, and went the back way because I was afraid they would take me. I told the constable of the night at the time that the bags were my own, and that I used them to keep bird-seed in.

JOSEPH SHAW re-examined. The prisoner claimed the bags, and said he kept seed in them - there was no appearance of any.

MARY MACDONALD . I have lived with the prisoner seven years as his wife, at his mother's, in Rochester-row; since he has been apprehended I have lived in Charles-street, Westminster-road - I do not know the landlady's name. I had some patch-work for my mother to make a quilt six or nine months ago, and believe one of the bags formed part of it. I think I can swear to it.

COSTELINA MEARS re-examined. I had a gown of the pattern, and gave my mistress a piece; she made two bags out of it. It is a bit of my gown I am certain.

GUILTY . Aged 31.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only, but not of the burglary.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18200517-80

664. BENJAMIN JOHNSON , SEN. , BENJAMIN JOHNSON , JUN. , and ROBERT JOHNSON were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Mary Pearce , spinster , about eleven o'clock at night of the 13th of May , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, four sheets, value 16 s.; three blankets, value 15 s.; one quilt, value 3 s.; one pillow, value 2 s., the goods of Hyam Isaacs ; one pelisse, value 10 s.; one bonnet, value 7 s.; one spencer, value 8 s.; one gown, value 8 s., and one box, value 3 s., the goods of Isaac Noy .

MARY PEARCE . I am a spinster, and live in Bluegate-fields, St. George's in the East . I rent two rooms in the house; Hyam Isaacs is the landlord, he does not live there. Benjamin Johnson , Jun.'s sister lives up stairs, and I let Celia Noy one of my rooms. On the 13th of May I went out about half-past ten o'clock, returned at half-past eleven, found the place open, and her box and the bed-clothes gone - she had gone out before me.

CELIA NOY . I am the wife of Isaac Noy , and rent a room on the ground floor of Pearce - my husband does not live with me. I went out at half-past ten o'clock, after locking my door; I returned about half-past eleven, found the room open and stripped, and my box was gone, which contained a bonnet, a spencer, and a gown - I lost the other things from the room. The bed-clothes belonged to Hyam Isaacs, who had let the room to Pearce. The door had been opened by some key. This was on Saturday night, and the next morning I found all the things at the watch-house - the three prisoners were in custody. They all lived in one house in the same fields. They used to come to see the sister, who is the daughter of Benjamin Johnson , Sen. I once saw him there.

ELIZA ILBANK . I live next door to Pearce - the prisoners live a little lower down than I do. About half-ten o'clock on the night of the robbery I saw Benjamin Johnson , Sen. and Benjamin Johnson , Jun. in Pearce's house - I do not know whether she was out or not. I saw them come out of the house together. Benjamin Johnson , Jun. had something heavy and white under his arm. In about an hour I heard the place had been robbed, and told what I had seen. I did not suspect them as their sister lived there.

GEORGE ORD . I am a patrol of St. George's in the East. About half-past eleven o'clock I came past the house, and was told of the robbery - we immediately searched the house next to Pearce's, but found nothing; we then made enquiry of Ilbank, she gave me information, and I went to the prisoners' house - they all lived together. I only found the father, mother, and some some small children at home. I found the box up stairs in a cupboard open. The father was abed. I found a spencer in the box, and on the first floor I found the blankets, sheets, pelisse, and quilt - no person slept there; also a gown and a bonnet.

PETER PAGE . I am a watchman of Shadwell. I went to the prisoners' house with Ord, his account is correct.

JAMES SUMMERS . I am a patrol of Aldgate. Between twelve and one o'clock in the night of Saturday, the 13th of May, I saw the two younger prisoners together, they both had something. I took Benjamin, the other ran away. I asked Benjamin what he had under his coat? he said it was a petticoat, I found it was a pelisse, which Noy claimed. He refused to give me his name or address.

THOMAS HARRISON . I was constable of the night. Benjamin Johnson , Jun. was brought to the watch-house, I asked him how he came by the pelisse? he said it belonged to his sister, and he came out to pledge it. I said it was an odd time to pledge things. His mother came to see him at the watch-house on Sunday, and in his presence said it was his sister's, and told me the colour of it. I asked her how it was made? she would not tell me.

FRANCIS JACKSON . I took Johnson, Sen. in charge at St. George's watch-house, about twelve o'clock at night. I then went in search of the other prisoners, and found Robert at his father's house, about two o'clock in the morning - I knew they all lived together there. I told him what I took him for, he denied it, and the father said the things were brought into the house unknown to him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

BENJAMIN JOHHNSON, SENIOR'S Defence. About ten o'clock that night I went home and went to bed - between eleven and twelve the officer came, knocked at the door, and said I had the property there. They found the linen in a closet; I went to the cupboard in my room, and there found the box.

Prisoner, ROBERT JOHNSON . I and my brother stole the property - my father is innocent.

B. JOHNSON, SEN. - NOT GUILTY .

B. JOHNSON, JUN. - GUILTY . Aged 25.

R. JOHNSON - GUILTY . Aged 23.

Of stealing, but not of the burglary.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200517-81

665. ELIZA AMOS was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of April , one coat, value 3 l.; one waistcoat, value 10 s., and one pair of trowsers, value 30 s., the goods of Edward Moorman , and three counterpanes, value 3 l., the goods of Lucy Ripley , in her dwelling-house .

LUCY RIPLEY . I am a widow , and live in Pitt-street, Tottemham-court-road . On the 28th of April, at seven o'clock at night, I missed this property. The counter-panes were in a drawer in the front garret, which Moorman rented. I saw his clothes safe the evening before; next day I found them in pledge. The prisoner is a stranger to me - I do not know that she was ever in the house.

EDWARD MOORMAN . I lost my clothes from the drawer.

JAMES CHAMBERLAIN . I live with Mr. Wise, who is a pawnbroker, and lives in Broad-street, Bloomsbury. On the 28th of April, between two and five o'clock, the property was pledged by the prisoner - she asked particularly for 1 l. 14 s. on the clothes and 12 s. on the counterpanes, which she received; I made them in separate duplicates by her desire. I asked her if they were her own? she said No, that they belonged to Mrs. Wilson, No. 25, Red Lion-street, and that she knew them to be her property. The prosecutrix redeemed them afterwards, and shortly after an Irish girl called with the duplicates of the counter-panes - I detained her. I afterwards saw the prisoner in Newgate, and asked her, by the Magistrate's desire, if she gave the duplicate to a man? she said she did, but still insisted that she pledged them for Mrs. Wilson. I went to No. 25, Red Lion-street, but found no such person there.

SAMUEL LACK . I was fetched to Wise's to take charge of the Irishwoman. She said a man in St. Giles's sent her to redeem them. She shewed me the man and I took him. He said he had them from a woman whom he lived with, and who was in Newgate - he was discharged.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A woman brought them to me to pledge, saying she had an execution in her house.

(See First Day.)

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200517-82

666. THOMAS CLEAVERLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of April , 3 lbs. of bacon, value 2 s. 6 d. the goods of James Harding .

CAROLINE HARDING . I am the wife of James Harding and keep a chandler's-shop in Globe-alley, Limehouse . On the 24th of April, about nine o'clock in the evening, I was in the parlour; the prisoner opened the door and came into the shop, and before I could get up he ran off with the bacon.

EDMUND TAYLOR . I saw the prisoner open the door and take the bacon - he was secured and dropped it.

GUILTY. Aged 17.

Judgment Respited . - Sent to the Refuge for the Destitute .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200517-83

667. MICHAEL JACOBS was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of April , one watch, value 4 l.; one chain, value 2 l., and three seals, value 2 l., the goods of John Dixon , from his person .

JOHN DIXON . I am an inspector in the East India Company's service , and live in Commercial-road. On the 20th of April, about half past three o'clock in the afternoon, I was returning from the India House, and was going by Castle-street or court, Whitechapel , which is under a gateway. I was walking in the street and did not turn down the street. All at once I felt myself hustled by three or four men. I felt much alarmed, having above 150 l. about me. I extricated myself and threw them all from me. As soon as they left, I saw one of them with my watch in his hand, hanging by the seals. I felt and missed it - I knew it to be mine when I saw it - he was not two yards from me. I immediately called out Stop thief! attempted to run after him, and fell. Lock came up and I pointed the man out to him. He ran down Castle-court. I saw Lock pursuing him at the bottom of the court, they then turned to the left, and I myself lost sight of them and was too much alarmed to follow. I returned to wash myself, having lost blood by my fall. I saw the prisoner at the watch-house in about an hour, and, to the best of my belief, he is the man. I am positive that the man Lock pursued was the man who took my watch, and who I saw with it. I have never recovered it.

Cross-examined by MR. BROADRICK. Q. You do not swear to him - A. No; but I have no doubt of him; I think he had a blue coat on, and when I saw him at the watch-house he had a brown one.

GEORGE LOCK . I am a City officer. I was in Whitechapel between three and four o'clock, within two doors of Castle-street, and saw Mr. Dixon on his hands and knees, crying out stop thief. He said he had lost his watch, and pointed out the prisoner, who was running down the gateway, between forty and fifty yards down - nobody but him was running then. I pursued him immediately to the back way of the Cross Keys public-house, and he got from me there. In about twenty minutes or half an hour I returned and found the prisoner coming out of the passage leading to that house. I pointed him out to Stone. I did not know him before; but noticed his features as I pursued him. I found him within a door or two of the Cross Keys. The passage is a thoroughfare. I am sure he is the person I pursued into the Cross Keys; he had changed his dress then - when I pursued him he had on a blue coat and trowsers; on seeing him the second time, his neck-handkerchief was off, and he had a brown great coat on and no stockings, which he had before. When I laid hold of him, he said, he was waiting at home while his stockings were washed, and denied being the person. Stone took him to the watch-house, and I fetched the prosecutor, who said he could not swear positively to him, as he had not got his spectacles on. I can swear he positively he is the person he pointed out to me.

Cross-examined. Q. You did not know him before - A. No - he turned his head round several times. I could have picked him out from a crowd.

JOSEPH STONE . I am a constable. On the 20th of April, I was accosted by Dixon and Lock, and within two doors of the Cross Keys we met the prisoner - he appeared in a flurry. Lock came up and said he was the person. I took him to the watch-house. Dixon said he believed him to be the man. I found 3 s. 2 d. on him.

ROBERT GILLON . I am fourteen years old, and live in Mitre-street, Aldgate, with my father. I saw the prisoner running down the street with the watch in his right hand.

I saw a mob, and also Mr. Dixon; and heard him call out

"Stop thief." I am quite sure the prisoner is the person. He had a blue jacket on, striped waistcoat, and blue trowsers. I ran after him and lost sight of him, just as he turned round by the Cross Keys - he was about six yards from me. I saw Lock returning, saying, he should fetch another officer. He came with one, and I saw them take the prisoner, and said he was the man - he then had a brown great coat on, and was very hot.

Cross-examined. I am positive he is the man.

Prisoner. I am not the man.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200517-84

668. MICHAEL LAWLER was indicted for stealing, on the 5th May , two seals, value 6 l., and four yards of towelling, value 3 s., the goods of Charles Carron , in his dwelling-house .

CHARLES CARRON . I am a conveyancer , and live in Princes-street, Spitalfields . On the 5th of May, I missed two seals, which were new, and cost me six guineas. I saw them two days before in my dining-room closet. The prisoner was a carpenter employed in the house. I took him immediately and went to his lodgings with an officer, where we found four yards of towelling, which is new. He then said he took the seals and sold them to a Jew, whom he called Davey for 3 s. each, and said he was distressed. He might have taken them at different times.

WILLIAM FOSTER . I am a constable, and heard prisoner say he took the seals.

Prisoner. I was in distress, and was out of work all the winter.

GUILTY . Aged 51.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only.

Confined Six Weeks .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200517-85

SEVENTH DAY, WEDNESDAY, MAY 24.

669. MATHEW COTTON , ARTHUR LANGLEY , and JOHN AUSTIN , were indicted for stealing, on the 28th of April , 17 lbs. of camphor, value 1 l. 8 s. , the goods of Ernest Hudtwalcker .

THE SECOND COUNT stated it to be the goods of John Topping .

MR. ANDREWS conducted the prosecution.

JOHN ALLSOP . I am a commodore in the East India Company's warehouse, Blackwall . I delivered a chest and thirteen tubs of camphor, on the 28th of April, on the wharf. George Smith received them of me. All the packages were sound, and in a proper state. Next day I weighed them again, and there was a deficiency of 3 lbs. in one tub and 14 lbs. in the other; one was broken open, and the other wrenched; they were carefully put down again. I examined them on the 29th, at the Thames police-office, and saw some camphor there; it corresponded in quality with that in the tub.

GEORGE SMITH . I attended the delivery of the goods at the Company's warehouse, and received the camphor. The packages were all sound and safe. I delivered them in the lugboat to the prisoner, Cotton, at Blackwall, about one o'clock, on the 28th; he was alone; he was to navigate the boat; it went away about half past two o'clock. The Edward lighter, which the other prisoners navigated, was at Blackwall at the time; it was an open lighter, and had no cabin, but a place where they stow the tarpauling. The Edward came there empty, and took in tin. Both craft went away together.

MARK WILKS . I am a Thames Police officer. On the 28th of April, a little after seven o'clock in the evening, I was on duty, and went on board the Edward, which laid at the Orchard house plying place, near Blackwall, Austin and Langley were then on board - she was made fast by a rope, waiting for the tide. I asked Langley what his cargo was - he said block tin. I said I suspected there was camphor on board, as there was a strong smell? He said there was none in his boat, but it was in the lugboat, which was astern. Cotton's lugboat was astern then. I went on board the lugboat, but found nobody in it. Two of the tubs of camphor appeared to have been very recently broken open, and a small portion of camphor littered about at the end of the lugboat. I went into the Edward - they were still both on board; and in the locker, or bed-cabin, I found a canvas bag, containing 17 lbs. of camphor, covered over with a great coat, which Langley said belonged to him. They said they did not know how the camphor came there. Langley then said he saw me coming, and had he known it was there, he would have thrown it overboard. I said I should take them into custody, and asked who belonged to the lug-boat; they pointed to Cotton, who was in another boat, as the man - he had just come out of the cabin of a sailing lighter, which was near shore. I asked if he knew his lugboat had been robbed; he said No, and immediately came on board. He said he had been ashore to get refreshment. I secured them all. I believe Austin said he knew nothing of it.

MATTHEW NOTTINGHAM . I am clerk to Mr. John Topping , who is a lighterman - the lighter is his. Cotten was apprentice to our foreman; he was to take the camphor on board a vessel laying off Rotherhithe.

JOHN LITTLE . Langley and Austin were my servants, and were conveying a cargo of tin up the River for me. I authorized them to bring no camphor. Langley was the watchman - it was their duty to stay in the barge.

COTTEN'S Defence. I went ashore for refreshment.

LANGLEY'S Defence. I went ashore about three o'clock and returned about six.

AUSTIN'S Defence. I was asleep for three hours.

LANGLEY - GUILTY . Aged 35.

Transported for Seven Years .

COTTON - NOT GUILTY .

AUSTIN - NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200517-86

670. SAMUEL DAVENPORT was indicted for embezzlement .

MR. BARRY conducted the prosecution.

MR. BENJAMIN WHITAKER . I am an attorney , and live in Broad-court, Long-acre ; the prisoner had been my clerk two years. I took him by assignment from Mr. Fletcher, and entrusted him to receive money on my account. I expected Mr. Pownall to pay some money at

my office on account of an action. About the middle of September I went into the country, when I came to town again I found he had been gone sometime without any intimation of his going. I offered a reward, and he was brought to me in March last. I discovered he had received 47 l. 12 s. which he never accounted to me for.

Cross-examined by MR. ARABIN. Q. He was in distress - A. He was; I advanced money for him on his brother's security. He had no protector but myself.

MR. JOHN POWNALL . I am an attorney, and live in Staples Inn. On the 25th of September I paid Mr. Whitaker's clerk 47 l. 12 s. at my chambers; the prisoner is so much altered in dress and manners, that I have no recollection of him - he wrote the receipt, which I produce, in my presence. I paid him some 10 l. notes, also two 1 l. notes. He called on me for the money, and I paid him.

MR. WHITAKER re-examined. The receipt is the prisoner's writing.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200517-87

671. GEORGE PETTITT was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of May , at James, Clerkenwell, one show-glass, value 4 s.; twenty-seven pocket-books, value 2 l. 13 s; six card-cases, value 4 s.; eight pencil-cases, value 8 s.; one silver pen, value 18 d.; eleven packs of toy-cards, value 2 s.; ten watch pieces, value 6 s., and two breast-pins, value 4 s., the goods of James Francis , in his dwelling-house .

JAMES FRANCIS . I am a stationer , and live at No. 9, Great Bath-street , in the parish of St. James, Clerkenwell. On the 10th of May, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, I was standing in the parlour, which commands a full view of the shop, reading the paper, just turned my eye up, and saw the prisoner going out of the shop with my show-glass; I went after him, and he was stopped about 150 yards from the shop. I lost sight of him, but believe him to be the same person - it contained the articles stated in the indictment, which are worth above 4 l. 2 s. He was a stranger to me.

EDWARD AVIOLET . I am a butcher, and live next door to Mr. Francis. I saw him run by, calling Stop thief! I ran out, went through the court, and saw the glass showcase lying in the street, and the prisoner running up the court, about fifty yards off. He ran into a house in Ray-street, the people turned him out, and as he came out I saw a pocket-book sticking out of his pocket; I laid hold of him, and said,

"What have you been doing?" He said,

"Nothing, I am a respectable man." I said,

"Then you can have no objection to go with me to Mr. Francis;" he said he had not, and went back with me. Francis claimed the pocket-book, and said he could almost positively swear he was the man.

JOSEPH HARDING . I am thirteen years old. I saw the prisoner running in Coppice-row, as fast as he could, about a hundred yards from the prosecutor's - he had a looking-glass, which he threw down - I picked it up, and took it to Mr. Francis. I saw the prisoner stopped, and saw a pocket-book sticking out of his waistcoat; I saw him throw it away, picked it up, and gave it to Mr. Francis, who claimed it. I picked up a pencil-case in the direction he ran. I do not know that he threw that away.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. He was a stranger to you - A. Yes; the looking-glass was broken. I did not see it in his hand.

JAMES FRANCIS re-examined. The looking-glass is not mine. Harding delivered me the pencil-case and pocketbook, which I am sure were in my shop before the man ran out; they have my private mark on them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAM READ , JUN. I am an officer of Hatton-garden. I was sent for, and took the prisoner into custody. I found nothing on him. Francis delivered me the pencil-case, with its contents, a knife, and the show-glass.

Prisoner's Defence. I have lived in St. Andrew's and Clerkenwell parishes, four years. I had occasion to go to Mr. Baker's, in Margaret-street, Spafields, I went down Coppice-row, and might have run, as I had a person waiting for me. I also had occasion to go to Bartlett's in Ray-street, on business, I had not been in the parlour five minutes, when Mrs. Bartlett said a number of people at the door wished to speak to me - I went to the door, and in about five minutes the boy said

"that is the man." I asked what was the matter, they said Mr. Francis had been robbed, and I went back with them.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 26.

Recommended to Mercy.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200517-88

672. JOHN JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of May , one scarf, value 2 l. 18 s., the goods of Thomas Baker , in his dwelling-house ; and MARY DOWNS was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, knowing it to have been stolen .

THOMAS BAKER . I live at Fulham, and have another concern at Hammersmith , where this scarf was stolen from. I do not live there.

ANN MARY JOHNSON . I live at Hammersmith. I took the scarf - the prisoner, who is my brother, just shewed it to me, and I took it off Mr. Baker's counter. A great many people were in the shop - it was about five o'clock in the afternoon of the 11th of May. My brother was two or three yards from the shop; he pointed it out to me, and asked me to take it. I went in and took it, came out again, found him in the same place, and gave it to him. I do not know where he took it to. Downs lives in King-street - I believe it is not far from the shop. I never had any conversation with her about it. I was taken up on the Saturday after, and told what I knew about it. My parents live at Hammersmith.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. What are your parents - A. Nothing. I do not know how they live. I am fourteen years old.

Q. You took the scarf, put it in a basket, and went off with it - A. Yes, and gave it to him.

EDWARD EDGSON . I am a constable of Hammersmith. About four o'clock on Friday afternoon, the 12th of May, I was sent for to Mr. Carter's shop, and took the prisoner, Johnson, into custody, who was charged with stealing a pair of breeches. He said, of his own accord, that if I would go with him to his mother he would tell me where

he sold them and other things which he had taken. He said he sold the scarf to Mrs. Downs for 6 s. - she keeps a clothes-shop about two hundred yards from Mr. Baker's shop - I took him there about six o'clock that evening, and enquired about a pair of breeches. I afterwards put him in the cage, returned alone to Downs, and asked her if she had not bought a scarf of that boy? she paused, and then said it was sold, and if I would give her her liberty she would go and see after it. I called again, she was not returned. I called between nine and ten o'clock, and observed she had got it laid on the counter.

Cross-examined. Q. Did not the boy shew it to you on the counter when you took him there - A. I do not think he did. The Magistrate blamed me for not taking it away. She said the boy told her he brought it from his mother. I did not take her into custody - she came herself to the office.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

DOWNS'S Defence. I believed the prisoner's friends to be in distress, and bought it without knowing it to have been stolen. I gave it up the moment they came for it.

JOHNSON - GUILTY . Aged 14.

Of stealing, but not in a dwelling-house.

DOWNS - NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

673. JOHN JOHNSON was again indicted for stealing, on the 12th of May , one pair of breeches, value 7 s. , the goods of William Carter , and MARY DOWNS was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, knowing them to have been stolen .

ALFRED CARTER . I am the son of William Carter , who is a clothes salesman at Hammersmith , about three hundred yards from Downs's shop. On Friday, the 12th of May, between ten and eleven o'clock in the morning, the breeches were stolen from the door. About seven that evening I saw them in the possession of Edgson - they are a very small size.

EDWARD EDGSON . I apprehended Johnson between four and five o'clock at an apothecary's shop, and asked him if he had not taken a pair of breeches from Mr. Carter's shop door? he took me to Downs's, I asked if she had not bought a pair of breeches of the prisoner? she said Yes. Johnson's father is a tall man, about six feet high; he is well known about Hammersmith. She produced them immediately, and said he told her he brought them from his mother.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHNSON - GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years .

DOWNS - NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200517-89

674. JOHN SWAIN was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of May , two towels, value 2 s.; one table-cloth, value 1 s.; two rope mats, value 1 s.; 18 lbs. of ham, value 18 s., and one brass cock, value 1 s. , the goods of John Richards .

JOHN RICHARDS . I keep a glass-warehouse in Old-street . On the 6th of May, about half-past five o'clock in the morning, I was called up, and found my back door wrenched sufficiently open to put a hand through to undo the bolt, the door was wide open. I found the prisoner in the next yard in the custody of Fowler with the property.

JAMES FOWLER . I live in New Ford-street, at the back of Richards. About half-past five o'clock in the morning I was in my own privy, and through a crevice I saw the prisoner and a man come over two walls from Richards's. I called to them and the man escaped - I secured the prisoner with a bag on his shoulder, containing the articles stated in the indictment, except the ham.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I saw them laying down.

GUILTY . Aged 13.

Transported for Seven Years. - Penitentiary .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200517-90

675. THOMAS JAGGER was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of May , two bushels of apples, value 12 s. , the goods of Joseph Graham .

JOSEPH GRAHAM . I have a stall in Covent-garden-market . On Thursday night, the 4th of May my baskets of apples were safely tied round with mats and corded - about seven o'clock in the morning I found two bushels gone.

JAMES SMITH . I work for a brickmaker. About half-past eleven o'clock on Thursday night I was sitting in the market close to Graham's stand, waiting till the play was was over to open the coaches. I saw the prisoner come with a bag, cut the string of the bushel baskets, put his arm in, and pull out as many as he could; he then pulled out the basket, emptied it into his bag, and went away. I followed him to the grocer's shop, and saw by the light in the window that he was a person I knew in the market, and thought he belonged to them. Next day I told Graham what I had seen and he was apprehended. I am sure he is the boy.

ERHRAIM WILTON. I am a patrol. On the 6th of May I was in Covent-garden-market, Smith pointed the prisoner out to me; he heard us talking about him and ran away; I followed and secured him in Duke's-court. I did not say what I took him for. He said,

"I know nothing of the apples, it was a bag of nuts I had."

Prisoner's Defence. I had no apples.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Confined Three Months , and Publicly Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200517-91

676. JOHN GEORGE was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of May , three coats, value 4 l. , the goods of James Startin .

JAMES STARTIN . I rent a billiard-room in Duke's-court, Covent-garden - my outer door is open all day, there are two inner doors. On the 12th of May I stopped the prisoner coming down stairs with these three coats on his arm, and gave him in charge. He was a stranger to me, and had taken them from a room on the second floor.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 44.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200517-92

677. WILLIAM CROOK was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of March , one pistol, value 2 l. , the property of our Lord the King.

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating it to be the property of William Skidmore .

WILLIAM SKIDMORE . I am in the Royal Horse Guards , Blue, the prisoner was a cadee about the yard at the Saracen's Head Inn, Maidenhead , where I was quartered. On the 20th of March, in the morning, my pistol was stolen from the sleeping-room - I had to make it good to the regiment; the prisoner had the means of going there. I found it at Queen-square - it was not loaded when I lost it.

THOMAS JENKINS . I am a constable of Fulham. On the 11th of April I found the pistol in the prisoner's possession at the White Horse, at Kensington. He said his grandfather died and left it to his uncle, and his uncle left it to him, and that he kept it to kill hares, when he could not catch them. It was loaded with slugs.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I found it on the Colebrook road. A man named Shepherd said it belonged to the Life Guards. I went by the Windsor barracks, and if I had stolen it I should not have passed there. I went to deliver it up at the barracks.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200517-93

678. MARY CORBETT was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of March , one wheelbarrow, value 15 s. , the goods of Edward Hannan .

MARGARET HANNAN . I sell fruit in the streets. I lost my wheelbarrow from my yard in High-street, St. Giles's , about eleven o'clock at night, and about a month after I found it at No. 3, King's Head-court, Gray's Inn-lane, up three pair of stairs.

SAMUEL HALES . I am a baker, and live in Bell-court, Gray's Inn-lane. The prisoner sold me the barrow about the latter end of March - I sold it to Harley.

MARGARET HARLEY . I live at No. 3, King's Head-court. I bought the barrow of Hales.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Confined Two Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200517-94

679. EDWARD BRADY was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of April , one ass, price 11 s., the property of Samuel Brigg , and one ass, price 20 s. , the property of James Pitter .

SAMUEL BRIGGS . I am a mat-maker , and live at Barnet. On the 20th of April I turned my ass out in Galley-lane, Barnet Common , between seven and eight o'clock at night, and missed it about five o'clock in the morning - I found it a week after in possession of Cousins. The prisoner is a stranger.

JAMES PITTER . I am a labourer . I lost my ass at the same time.

CHARLES COUSINS . I am keeper of the watch-house at Hampstead-road. On the 21st of April, at three o'clock in the morning, the prisoner was brought to me with two asses - he said they were his own, that he bought one at Smithfield three weeks ago, and the other three days ago. The prosecutors claimed them, and described them before they saw them.

WILLIAM HOOPER . I am a watchman of Hampstead-road. About a quarter past three o'clock in the morning of the 21st of April I stopped the prisoner on the road with two asses, he said he bought them at Smithfield.

Prisoner's Defence. I met two men with four asses, and gave them 1 l. for two. They told me how long they had had them, and I thought proper to say the same.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200517-95

680. JOHN BILLET was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of April , one coat, value 30 s. , the goods of Gerrard Andrews .

JOHN DEAN . I drive a coach for Mr. Gerrard Andrews. On the 22d of April, about a quarter past ten o'clock at night, I went behind my carriage in Portman-square , and on coming round I missed the coat off the box; I found it next day at the watch-house.

BENJAMIN BUSSEY . I am a watchman of Upper Berkeley-street. Dean informed me that his coat had been stolen - I saw the prisoner with it in Montague-street; at the end of the street he put it on; I stopped him, he said he was a gentleman's servant, I asked him where he lived? he said

"What is that to you?"

ROBERT HALL . I assisted in securing the prisoner; he struggled with Bussey.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I saw a person drop it.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Fined One Shilling, and Discharged .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200517-96

681. THOMAS NEAL was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of May , 50 lbs. of lead, value 5 s. the property of John Brice , and fixed to a certain building of his .

JOHN BRICE . I keep the White Horse, at Stepney . On the 8th of May, I lost some lead off the roof of my skittle-ground, which is covered with lead, and nailed on. I saw it all safe about nine o'clock on Sunday evening, the 7th of May. The watchman called me up about one o'clock in the morning - I found part of the roof stripped - he fetched the lead, which we compared with the roof at daylight - it fitted two nail-holes which were left and corresponded with the next sheet - here is about 50 lbs. in all. I found the prisoner in custody at Shadwell police-office. He was a stranger.

WILLIAM ALDRIDGE . I am a watchman of Stepney. On the 8th of May, about a quarter past twelve o'clock, I saw the prisoner, and three more, about twelve yards from Brice's skittle-ground. I heard them whispering, held up my light, and saw the prisoner by the side of two bundles of lead. I was going to take them, and the stoutest man said,

"If you come near us, you old b - g - r, I will knock you down." I sprung my rattle and two watchmen came to my assistance. As soon as they heard footsteps, they made off, and I after them - all three escaped. I alarmed Brice and took the lead to him. I traced them by footmarks,

and took the prisoner about half-past two o'clock that morning, about twenty yards from where I first saw him. When they escaped, he got over a fence into some rains. I suppose he must have returned. I am certain he is one of the men. I saw his face and viewed his dress. He was the only remarkable man among them. The moment I took him, he whistled twice. I was concealed. I told him what I took him for, and asked him where the other two were - he made no reply.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18200517-97

682. JAMES SWAYNE was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of April , 6 lbs. of lead, value 1 s. the property of Joseph Brooksbank , and fixed to a certain building of his; and one fixture, that is to say, one brass cock, value 1 s., his property, and fixed to the said building .

REV. JOSEPH BROOKSBANK . I live at No. 11, Winkworth's-buildings, City-road . The pipe that conveyed the water into my wash-house was fixed to the garden-wall - the cock was at the end of it. I saw it safe in the afternoon of the 22d of April, and next morning, at a quarter past six o'clock, the watchmen came and said I had been robbed. I went with them and found the pipe gone, and the brick-work of the copper partly broken away. Abel brought the pipe - it matched exactly - it was fixed to the wall, and run through the brick-work of the house.

THOMAS HAINES. I am a watchman. About five minutes past five o'clock in the morning, I saw a man at the end of Craven-street, behind the prosecutor's premises, with a bag under his arm - he saw me and went away. I looked over the wall and saw the prisoner in the garden of No. 9. I asked what he did there, and what he had got. He said he had got nothing. He used bad language when he came out of the gate, and offered me a crown to let him go - I still kept my hold. He said,

"It is a d - d hard thing you can't let a man get his living." I took him to the watch-house with assistance - he still persisted that he had nothing; but when he got there, he pulled the pipe and cock from his bosom, said that was all he had, and he found it in the garden, where he had been easing himself. We went to the garden of No. 9, found no pipe gone from there, traced his footsteps into the prosecutor's garden, and there found the pipe cut off.

BENJAMIN ABEL . I am a headborough. I received the lead and prisoner in charge. I have no doubt but it is the same pipe; it appears to be partly cut, and then twisted off. I found a knife on him with some appearance of lead on it. After I told him where he got it from, he said he did it through distress.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant. Esq.

Reference Number: t18200517-98

683. JOHN DAWS and JOHN HILL were indicted for stealing, on the 9th of May , fifteen staves, value 10 s. , the goods of George Davis , John Bond , and Charles Nelson .

JOHN POULTER . I am foreman at Mr. Brown's pot-ash manufactory, Bromley. On the 9th of May, about half past four o'clock, I was called up, and was informed somebody was robbing my garden. I live in North-street, Poplar, about 300 yards from the manufactory. I got up and went to my garden at Limehouse, about a quarter of mile off. When I got to the bridge, which crosses the water, I saw Daws going away with a bundle of wood on his shoulder. I immediately ran towards him - he did not see me - and he put his load down to rest. I asked what he had got there; he said, what was that to me. The place where he was is private property, and belonged to Mr. Gunn. It has an open footpath with a board up, stating that the grass is not to be trod upon. I told him he was trespassing, and then saw the load was staves and not my property. He had come out of a ditch which parts my premises from Gunn's. I said he must go with me - he was very impudent, and was going to make a start. I took hold of him, and he caught hold of me and tried to throttle me. I threw him down and secured him. I took him back to the bridge, and sent one of Brown's men for the staves he had left in the field. I had them in sight all the time. I was looking at the man who was bringing the staves to me, and saw Hill come out of the same ditch, and from exactly the same part - he was also carrying some staves on his shoulder - he was about fifty yards off. I sent the men to secure him, and saw them take him. We took them both to the watch-house with the staves, and about ten o'clock found they belonged to the prosecutors. Daws told me, that as soon as he got out of custody he would give me a pill, by day or by night, and when he came to the Bar, he hoped they would send him out of the country, for there were more Thistlewoods than one. He had five staves, Hill had three, and seven were left in the field - three of those Daws had were marked.

THOMAS NEWPORT. I am a carpenter, and live at Poplar. At half past five o'clock I was going to work, and saw six or eight people in the road. I perceived Poulter had Daws, and he said there was an old man in the field. I then saw Hill come out of a ditch in Mr. Gunn's field with three staves on his shoulder - I secured him with them, and said,

"You must come with me." He said he would not, a scuffle ensued, and he threw them down. We took the prisoners to the watch-house with them.

JOHN WALES . I belong to Shadwell Police-office, and received the prisoners in charge with the staves.

GEORGE DAVIS . I am partner with John Bond and Charles Nelson - we are coopers . We had about 1200 of these staves on our premises in Church-row, Limehouse , about a quarter of a mile from where the prisoners were taken. Our premises reach down to the River Lee. They were in piles. I found a deficiency, but cannot say how many. Some of them are marked, by which I know them.

DAWS'S Defence. I met a man who said, if I would take three-staves over the common, he would come to me. He said he bought them of a bargeman.

DAWS - GUILTY . Aged 20.

HILL - GUILTY . Aged 57.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18200517-99

684. JOHN BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of May , the sum of 3 s., in monies numbered , the monies of David Jack .

DAVID JACK . I am a baker , and live in York-street .

Marylebone. The prisoner was my servant . On the 12th of May I missed 5 s. out of my pocket. I sleep on the second floor, and the prisoner used to call me in the morning. I was determined to mark my money, which I did, on the edge. On the 14th, I went to an officer, and shewed him the money I had marked; and, on the 15th, on going to bed, I had fourteen shillings and four sixpences, all marked, in my breeches-pocket. Next morning he called me, as usual, about half-past three o'clock. I did not examine my pocket then, but went up to clean myself about eight o'clock, and three shillings were gone. The officer came about half-past nine. When the prisoner came in, I told him to go into the parlour, which he did. I said I suspected he had taken money out of my pocket. He said directly, that I must be mistaken. I had paid none of the money away. The officer said he must search him. He said,

"I will show you all the money I have." He pulled 4 s. 6 d. from his pocket, and three of my marked shillings were among them. I can swear it was safe when I went to bed.

CHARLES PRENDERGAST . I am a constable. On the 14th, Mr. Jack showed me the money he had marked, and on Tuesday morning I went to his house. He brought the prisoner into the parlour. I said I must search him - he threw three shillings and three sixpences on the table. The three shillings had the mark on them which Mr. Jack had shown me. The prisoner insisted on their being his own.

Prisoner's Defence. If they were marked he paid them to me for wages.

DAVID JACK . I paid him on Saturday, but I am certain that I paid him no marked money.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Four Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200517-100

685. ELIZA WRIGHT was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of May , one handkerchief, value 18 d., the goods of Howard Lewis , from his person .

HOWARD LEWIS . I am a salesman , and live in Cable-street, Whitechapel. On Sunday afternoon, the 14th of May, a mob was collected round a chymist's shop, in Whitechapel . I leant over the people to see into the shop, felt something at my pocket, and saw the prisoner with my handkerchief in her hand; I took hold of her, and she let it fall - I picked it up, and took her to the watch-house.

Prisoner's Defence. This gentleman trod on my toes, I pushed him off, and he said I had picked his pocket.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant

Reference Number: t18200517-101

686. JAMES HOLMES was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of May , 30 lbs. of lead, value 5 s., the goods of John Gilbert , and two fixtures (i. e.), two brass cocks, value 2 s., his property, and fixed to a building of his .

JOHN GILBERT . I have a house in Batty-street, St. George's . On the 10th of May, about three o'clock in the afternoon, every thing was safe; at ten o'clock at night I had information, went next morning, and missed the lead and cocks. The prisoner had been at work as a painter on the premises for two months - he is not a plumber. I believe he had been measuring his work that day.

JOHN JONES. I am a carpenter. I had the care of Mr. Gilbert's two houses. On Wednesday, the 10th of May, I was informed some pipe had been taken - I went and found it so - I was told the prisoner, who had taken it, was gone up the Commercial-road; I went that way, and met Clements; in consequence of what she said I went into Plumber's-row, and found the prisoner going into the passage of a painter's shop, with the lead pipe and two brass cocks. I took him to the watch-house. They appeared freshly torn off, and exactly matched the pipe on the building - it is nearly new pipe.

JANE CLEMENTS . I live about twenty yards from Mr. Gilbert's premises. I saw the prisoner within four yards of the house, and followed him, with the pipe on his shoulder, into Greenfield-street, to a dark place, where he stopped, and twisted the pipe up. I kept him in sight till he got to Plumber's-row, and then informed Jones.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Confined One Year , and Publicly Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200517-102

687. THOMAS BRIMBLE was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of May , 12 lbs. of soap, value 8 s. , the goods of Richard Hockly .

RICHARD HOCKLEY . I am an oilman , and live in Little Earl-street, Seven Dials ; the prisoner had been my porter for three months. On Saturday, the 13th of May, between eight and nine o'clock in the evening, he came in to be paid, I observed his coat looked bulky, took a piece of soap out, and found about a pound between his jacket and waistcoat. I sent for a constable, who took him to the watch-house; he immediately took off his hat, and there was two pounds and a half in it; I then went to his lodgings, and there found two pounds and a half more of the same soap - it had only come in at four o'clock that day. I also found nine pounds of yellow soap. He begged for mercy.

Cross-examined by MR. HONE. Q. He bought it of you - A. The week before he bought three pounds and a half. He had no family, and did not take in washing. This was a particular sort, and only came in that day.

WILLIAM SABINE . I am a constable. I found the soap in the prisoner's hat, and some more at his lodgings. He said it was his first offence.

Prisoner's Defence. Seven pounds of it is mine, the other I had of my young master.

RICHARD HOCKLY re-examined. He made no such statement before.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200517-103

688. MARY ANN BARNES was indicted for bigamy . There being no proof of a second marriage, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200517-104

689. ANN LINNELL was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of May , one watch, value 20 s., the goods of John Pincapal , from his person .

JOHN PINCAPAL . I am a servant in Connaught-place. On the 3d of May I was near Tyburn-turnpike , about twelve o'clock at night, saw the prisoner, and was about ten minutes with her - we went nowhere. About five minutes after I left her I missed my watch; I went after her and asked her for it - she denied having it. It was found in her hand. She knew where I lived.

WILLIAM LEE . I am a constable. I saw the prisoner and prosecutor go across the road together; soon after the prisoner ran back, and crossed towards the wall again; the prosecutor came, and charged her with stealing his watch - she denied having it; I found it in her hand. As she went to the watch-house she said she was going to take it to him. She was rather in liquor.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I did not take it from his pocket.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200517-105

690. ANN MAGNEN was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of April , one scarf, value 25 s.; two gowns, value 20 s.; three shifts, value 12 s.; one shawl, value 10 s., one pair of stays, value 5 s., and one petticoat, value 3 s. , the goods of William Smith .

ELIZA SMITH . I am the wife of William Smith , who is a linen-draper , and lives in Great Titchfield-street ; the prisoner was my servant . On the 28th of April I missed these things from a box on the third floor, which was not locked - she had then left me. I had not examined the box for three weeks. I had her apprehended, and found the stays and petticoat on her, and a gown and a pair of stockings hanging in the yard at her mother's house, where we found her.

THOMAS GOOK . I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner at her mother's, and found the property; she took me to the stairs, put her hand down, and took the remainder of the property from a box under the stairs. I took them from her.

JAMES BARNWELL . I live with Mr. Turner, who is a pawnbroker, and lives in Brewer-street. I have three shifts and a scarf pledged with me for 14 s. 2 d. by the prisoner, and a gown, for 5 s.

THOMAS STEVENS . I am a pawnbroker. The prisoner pledged a whittle with me for 6 s.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined One Year .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200517-106

691. WILLIAM MACDONALD was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of April , one coach glass, value 20 s , the goods of Lynch White .

GEORGE STALLARD . I am coachman to Lynch White, who is a livery-stable keeper . On Friday, the 21st of April, I took a glass-coach to Covent-garden Theatre , between six and seven o'clock in the evening, the glass was safe then, on the Sunday following I missed it, I had not examined it before. I found it at St. Giles's watch-house, and compared it with the other - I am sure it is ours. I waited for the company at the Theatre, they came home at half-past ten o'clock.

JOHN FURZEMAN . I am a constable. On the 21st of April, about a quarter past ten o'clock at night, I saw the prisoner with two more men - I saw the prisoner shift the glass from one side of him to the other. I followed him into Covent-garden-market, and secured him; one of them said,

"What does that bl - dy b - g - r want?" I took the glass, and secured the prisoner; he said he found it in Russell-street. I advertized it, and the prosecutor claimed it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming from New-street, and picked it up against a post.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200517-107

692. GEORGE NEWMAN and JOHN PHENIX were indicted for stealing, on the 18th of May , part of a watch-chain, value 6 d.; one seal, value 18 s., and one key, value 5 s., the goods of Robert Besley , from his person .

ROBERT BESLEY . I live in Clerkenwell. I was returning from work on Thursday night, about a quarter past eleven o'clock, and on going through St. John's-lane it rained. I had an umbrella up, and saw some men standing at the corner of George-court - I think there were four. When I came within a yard of them the two prisoners came out against me - it was just under a very strong gas-light; I am positive as to their two persons. Newman laid hold of the bottom of my waistcoat, and a the same instant. I felt my watch violently pulled, I put my hand down and laid hold of it - another pull was given, they broke the chain, and got part of it and the seals; they both ran away together. I immediately pursued, and got a head of Newman; he turned back. I rose a cry, and just as I came up with him Phenix passed before us - they were both taken immediately. When Newman was secured I heard something fall, and my chain and seals were picked up.

WILLIAM WILLIAMS . I am a constable of Clerkenwell. I was sent for to the watch-house; the prisoners were brought in with the watch-chain and seals. I found two other seals on Newman and a knife on Phenix.

MATHIAS NEWMAN . I am a watchman. I heard the cry of Stop thief! the prosecutor took Newman and gave him to me. I saw Phenix secured; he said he was coming by, and went to assist the gentleman.

PHENIX'S Defence. I heard the cry, ran up, and was secured.

NEWMAN - GUILTY . Aged 18.

PHENIX - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200517-108

693. WILLIAM WEBB , WILLIAM GARDINER , and JOHN LOVITT were indicted for stealing, on the 9th of May , one watch, value 5 s. , the goods of Thomas Cabbell .

CAROLINE CABBELL . I am the daughter of Thomas

Cabbell, who lives at Bow . On the 8th of May, at nine o'clock in the morning, I saw the watch hanging safe over the mantle-piece, and missed it about one - I believe the street-door was open. I saw it in about a quarter of an hour in the possession of Manning.

EDWARD MANNING . I am a dyer, and live at Bromley. I was coming home about one o'clock, and saw the watch laying in a path, it was open, I picked it up, and immediately after heard a cry of Stop thief! I turned my eye, and saw Gardiner and Lovitt advancing, they were eighteen or twenty yards from the watch, running in a direction from it - several people were pursuing them; Webb came round the corner with the people. I gave the watch to Hudson.

Prisoner, LOVITT. Q. Did you not say at the office that if you had known it had been stolen you would have kept it - A. I never said so.

RICHARD PAYNE . I am a bricklayer. A gentleman came past my door, which is about thirty yards from the prosecutor's, and gave me information; I went out immediately, and saw Webb and Gardiner, one on each side of Cabbell's door. Before I came up to them Lovitt came out of the house - I saw him put something into his pocket; they all ran together, as soon as he came out, through Bromley. I lost sight of them for ten minutes - they turned a corner which would take them to where the watch was found.

WEBB'S Defence. I came up in the bustle, and was taken.

LOVITT'S Defence. I was going to my uncle's.

WEBB - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined One Year and Whipped .

GARDINER - GUILTY . Aged 19.

LOVITT - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200517-109

EIGHTH DAY, THURSDAY, MAY 25.

694. JOHN DEACON was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of May , one shirt, value 5 s., and one handkerchief, value 9 s. , the goods of Frederick William Ripley .

FREDERICK WILLIAM RIPLEY . I lodge at the Boar's Head, in King-street, Westminster , the prisoner lodged in the same room. On the 3d of May I missed a shirt and a handkerchief from my box.

DANIEL WATERS . I am apprentice to Mr. Perryman, who is a pawnbroker, and lives in Compton-street. The prisoner pledged the shirt and handkerchief with me.

CHARLES DREW . I apprehended the prisoner, and found the duplicate in his fob.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Fined One Shilling, and Discharged .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200517-110

695. JOHN EATON and WILLIAM HARDING were indicted for stealing, on the 24th of April , one handkerchief, value 5 s., the goods of Joseph Tomlinson , from his person .

The prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200517-111

696. JOHN COOK PEGG was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of March , one saw, value 5 s., and one carpenter's plough, value 15 s. , the goods of Edward Humphrey .

EDWARD HUMPHREY . I am a carpenter . I was at work in Philip-lane ; I saw my tools safe on the 3d of March and missed them on the morning of the 6th.

THOMAS MILLER. I am a pawnbroker, and live in Golden-lane. On the 6th of March the prisoner pledged the saw and plane with me for 6 s., and last Monday week he brought something else, and I detained him.

JOHN TWEEDY . I apprehended the prisoner, and found duplicates of the property which has been claimed by different carpenters, on him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I met a man who gave them to me, as I was in distress.

GUILTY . Aged 36.

Confined One Year , and Publicly Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200517-112

697. JOHN SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of May , one watch, value 4 l.; one chain, value 2 l.; two seals, value 1 l., and one key, value 2 s., the goods of Benjamin Tratt , from his person .

BENJAMIN TRATT . I am an upholsterer , and live in Lower Brook-street. On the 3d of May, about half-past nine o'clock in the evening, I was coming up Berwick-street towards Oxford-street , the prisoner came up to me and immediately pulled my watch out of my fob quite suddenly, another man was with him; he immediately ran away, and I after him, calling Stop thief! he ran towards Wardour-street, down Edward-street, and was stopped there without my losing sight of him.

ROBERT HOWARD . I am a constable. The prisoner was brought to the watch-house at ten o'clock at night; I searched him, and in his right-hand pocket I found part of the glass of a watch. The watch was given me by Tratt, the chain was gone.

JACOB VALENTINE . I live at No. 78, Wardour-street. I heard the cry of Stop thief! ran out, saw a mob, and heard them say

"He will drop it!" I stooped and picked up the watch - I put in on my counter, and afterwards delivered it to Tratt. Several of the mob said I had picked up the chain and seals with it, but I did not. There was no glass to it.

JOHN PUCKRIDGE . I am a shoemaker, and live in Wardour-street. I was in my shop, heard the cry of Stop thief! ran out, collared the prisoner opposite Valentine's shop, and brought him back - he was taken to the watch-house.

WILLIAM HURCUMBE . I was in Wardour-street, looked in the road, and saw the prisoner running; he was putting the watch, chain and seals into his apron - I saw him doing it; we stopped him, and he dropped the watch from before him, with the chain and seals attached to it - I saw Valentine pick them up. He wound the chain round his

finger - I saw the seals also. We took the prisoner to the watch-house - Valentine refused to give up the chain and seals.

WILLIAM TOWNSEND. I was in Mr. Buckle's shop in Wardour-street; I saw the prisoner running, pursued him, and saw the watch, chain and seals drop from him.

WILLIAM PARKHURST . I heard the alarm, and saw the prisoner drop the watch, the chain and seals were attached to it; Valentine picked them up.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. Several persons asserted that Valentine had this property.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200517-113

698. JOHN GURNEY was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of May , one handkerchief, value 6 d.; one pair of shoes, value 1 s. and one pair of trowsers, value 1 s., the goods of John Veal , from his person .

JOHN VEAL . I live in Brill-row, Somers'-town . About twelve o'clock at night, I was coming up the road rather in liquor, and met the prisoner, and another, one of them knocked me down - I had those things tied in a bundle, and when I got up I could not find them. When the prisoner was taken, he had the handkerchief in his hat. I cannot swear to the other things.

WILLIAM SUMMERS . I am a constable. The prosecutor informed me he had been robbed. He said he had been drinking with the man.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200517-114

699. JAMES TYRRELL was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of April , nine cotton handkerchiefs, value 8 s. , the goods Lionel Mayhew .

LIONEL MAYHEW . I am a linen-draper , and live at Hackney . The handkerchiefs were stolen from the door. A stranger brought the prisoner in with them before I missed them.

GEORGE TAYLOR . I am a constable of Clerkenwell. On the 26th of April, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I was in Wheeler-street, Spitalfields, and saw the prisoner with three more lads. He had a bundle in his apron. I was behind them, and heard them talking about where was the best place to fence them. I secured the prisoner, and asked what he had got. He said it was some things the others gave him to carry. I found they were nine handkerchiefs, all rumpled together.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 12.

Transported for Seven Years. - Penitentiary .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200517-115

700. GEORGE THOMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of May , twenty-eight yards of printed cotton, value 25 s. the goods of Joshua Craig .

JAMES SALTHOUSE. I am shopman to Joshua Craig , who is a linen-draper , and lives in High Holborn . I was returning home about nine o'clock at night, and saw the prisoner take a bundle of fifteen pieces of cotton off a chair, and take one from under them. He got away with it, and I pursued and secured him in Brownlow-street. It was inside the shop.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Confined One Year , and Publicly Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200517-116

701. JORGAN JORGENSON was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of May , one bed, value 40 s.; one bolster, value 5 s.; two blankets, value 4 s. and one quilt, value 2 s., the goods of Sarah Stourbridge , in a lodging-room .

SARAH STOURBRIDGE . I live in Warren-street, Fitzroy-square . On the 5th of March, the prisoner took a small room of me furnished, at 7 s. a week. He said he was a gentleman, and would always pay before-hand. He mentioned the names of Lord Castlereagh and other respectable persons. I let him the room - the articles stated in the indictment were let with it. On the 15th of April he came down, I asked him to pay what he owed me, and he said he would leave the house directly. I got a constable and went into his room - he was sitting at the table writing. I told him I was come up to see that all my property was safe. I pulled the press-bedstead down and missed this property. I asked him where they were. He said he did not know, but that they were stolen, and, if I would let the constable go away, he would buy more. The constable took him - this was on Monday night, the blankets were brought home the same evening. I saw the bed next morning.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not object to Mr. Hunter's coming into my room - A. No; he had a deal of company.

Q. Do you remember my saying,

"If anything was lost I would pay for it" - A. He never said so.

Q. Did I not show you a 50 l. bill - A. He showed me a twopenny-stamp and said it was a 50 l. bill; and said it came in a letter from Lord Castlereagh, and that he had money at Drummonds', the bankers.

HENRY CROCKER. I am an officer. On the 15th of May, the prosecutrix sent for me, and I searched the room. The prisoner was sitting at breakfast and writting a letter when she missed the property. I asked what had become of it - he hesitated, and said he would make it good. I found the bed at Davis's, tied up in the quilt.

THOMAS DAVIS . I am a broker, and live in Windmill-street. I received the bed, bolster, and quilt from Harrison, the pawnbroker, in Tottenham-court-road. On the 9th of May, I redeemed them.

Q. How came you by the duplicate - A. The prisoner applied to my father. I was present, and heard him say he wished to sell the duplicate, and asked one guinea and a half for it. I said I would take the bed out of pledge, and if it was worth the money, I would give it him, which I did. They were pledged for 2 l. and were scarcely worth that. I told him I would not give more than they were pledged for, but would keep them a week for him, and, in the mean time, they were claimed. He said, if I liked, I might pledge them again.

Prisoner. Q. Did I not say the bed was not my own - A. He did not.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner made an exceeding long and unconnected defence, stating that he did not intend to steal the property, and that he told Davis the bed was not his. He

complained of improper administration of justice in this country.

JAMES HUNTER . I am a naval-officer in his Majesty's service and lodged with the prosecutrix. I very frequently ate and drank in the prisoner's room. The prosecutrix objected to it. The blankets were pledged in my name, and I redeemed them. I did not pledge them.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18200517-117

702. JOHN BAKER was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of April , one handkerchief, value 3 s., the goods of Charles Blew , from his person .

CHARLES BLEW . I am a collecting-clerk to Messrs. Wyatts, brewers. On the 27th of April, about ten o'clock at night, I was at the end of Gray's Inn-lane, Holborn , and felt a snatch at my coat - I turned round and missed my handkerchief. I saw two men standing close to me and I laid hold of one, who was the prisoner - the other went away. The prisoner was wiping his face with a handkerchief - I took it out of his hand, but it was not mine - he denied knowing anything of mine. I took him to the watch-house, and nothing was found on him. He was moved to Eagle-street watch-house, where a purse, containing two 1 l. notes was found on him. He said nothing about the other man.

WILLIAM JORDAN . I am a constable. I was going down Gray's Inn-lane, and saw three or four men, whom I knew, following the prosecutor. The prisoner was one. I saw him take the handkerchief out of his pocket and give it to the other immediately. I pursued, but lost the others. I saw Blew take the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. Three or four were behind him when he collared me.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18200517-118

703. ELIZA CAMMELL was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of May , one 5 l. and six 1 l. Bank notes, the property of William Hughes , from his person .

WILLIAM HUGHES . I am a seaman . On the 11th of May, I saw the prisoner in the taproom of the George and Ball, Westminster. She was acquainted with my shipmate. We had a little to drink. I was taken very unwell in the taproom, and said,

"If I could have half an hour's rest, it would do me good." She proposed that I should go to her room, and then I should be safe and not disturbed - it was ten o'clock in the morning. I went with her and left my shipmate behind. She shut the door and went out. I laid on the bed and put my handkerchief over my forehead and eyes. In a few minutes she came in and put her hand over my side into my trowsers-pocket, and took one 5 l. and six 1 l. Bank notes out in a roll together. I laid on my left side. I immediately felt her hand in my pocket and attempted to catch hold of it as it came out. I saw the notes in her hand and asked where she was going with that money. She ran down stairs immediately, and I followed - she got outside the door and shut it. I secured her in a quarter of an hour at a public-house door. I caught hold of her and she called for assistance. I was abused by the people, who surrounded and knocked me down. She escaped, leaving part of her gown in my hand. Next morning, about five o'clock, I was called up by the landlady of the house where she lived. I got a constable, went to the house, and found her door padlocked outside. We came down, and the woman sent us to another house in New-court, Duck-lane, where we found her under the bed. My 5 l. note was produced before the magistrate. I am certain it was the same - she gave it to the officer - I have since changed it. I knew it by the number, having just received it at the India House.

BENJAMIN TURNBULL . I took the prisoner into custody - she afterwards sent for me. I told her, whatever she said I should give in evidence. She said she had robbed the man and given the notes to the woman - she told me where she was to be found. I apprehended the woman, and she denied it.

GUILTY . Aged 33.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18200517-119

704. SUTHERLAND ROBERT ACKERMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of May , one handkerchief, value 2 s., the goods of Henry Gahagan , from his person .

HENRY GAHAGAN, ESQ. I live in Lincoln's Inn-fields. On Sunday last, about twelve o'clock in the day, I was at the corner of St. Martin's-lane, and perceived the prisoner in company with another; they followed me to Charles-street, St. James's-square; and, as I turned out of Charles-street to the Colonade, I felt a jerk at my pocket. They immediately passed, and got a few yards before me. I saw the prisoner concealing something in his breast, and secured him - he instantly threw the handkerchief down an area. His companion, who was younger, escaped.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18200517-120

705. JOSEPH CRISTALL was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of April , one pair of ear-rings, value 30 s. , the goods of Jane Waltho .

JANE WALTHO . I live in Matilda-place, St. George's in the East . On the 3d of April I missed the ear-rings from a box in my parlour. I found them at Marshall's. The prisoner has been acquainted with me for three years. They cost two guineas and a half.

GEORGE MARSHALL . I am a jeweller, and live in Cannon-street. On the 8th of April the prisoner brought me the duplicate of the ear-rings pledged at Latter's, and I declined buying them. Next day he called again, pleaded great distress, I took them out of pledge, and found them not worth what they were pledged for. I, however, gave him 2 l.

JAMES LATTER . The prisoner pledged the ear-rings with me, on the 2d of April, in the name of Soames.

JANE JOHNSON . I am Waltho's servant. The prisoner used to visit there. While she was gone to the office to take out a warrant against a man for an assault, the prisoner

came, and waited about ten minutes. I went out, and when I returned he was gone.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I went to her house with George and Thomas Warner . I left them in the parlour. It is a common brothel.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200517-121

706. ROBERT GRIMSDALE and JOHN HUTCHINS were indicted for stealing, on the 22d of May , four seals, value 5 l.; one key, value 5 s., and one ring, value 5 s., the goods of Gustavus Thomas Hume , from his person .

GUSTAVUS THOMAS HUME , ESQ. I am an officer in the Hussars . On the 22d of May, about eleven o'clock in the morning, I was in the court-yard of the palace seeing the guard relieved, and observed the prisoners, with several others, nearer to me than I thought the pressure of the crowd required, and not liking their appearance I moved to another part of the yard - I again found myself surrounded by the same party, and determined to stand and see what they would do. I put my hand into my pocket and kept hold of my watch. I observed Hutchins standing half in front of me, with his hand near my ribbon; I felt that he had hold of the seals ready to pull, and felt his hand tremble as he cut off the seals. I kept looking at them both in order to identify them - a young man was with them. All at once they moved away; I put my hand down, keeping my eye on them, and felt my seals gone - I followed and collared them both before they were out of my sight. I have not recovered my seals.

JOHN CALLS. I am a coachman. I was in the court-yard, and saw the prosecutor move from one place to another - six or eight of these gentlemen followed him, and all collected round him. I was at the back of Hutchins, he pulled a sharp instrument out of his pocket, I saw him cut the seals off, they dropped into Grimsdale's hand, and another man went off with them directly - I should know him again. I secured Hutchins, and assisted in taking both to he watch-house.

ROBERT NEEDHUM . The prisoners were brought to the watch-house. I found a knife on Hutchins.

GRIMSDALE'S Defence. The gentleman took me as I was leaving the yard.

GRIMSDALE - GUILTY . Aged 21.

HUTCHINS - GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200517-122

707. JAMES ALLGER , HENRY JUDD , and GEORGE RANDALL were indicted for stealing, on the 4th of April , one watch, value 3 l.; one chain, value 1 s.; two seals value 30 s., and one key, value 2 d., the goods of Perry William Hughes , from his person .

PERRY WILLIAM HUGHES . I lived in Portland-place; I was waiting till the French Ambassador returned - I had been in his service. On the 4th of April, about half-past eleven o'clock at night, I was returning home from the City, and went into a public-house in Cheapside; I saw Judd there, he asked me where I was going to? I said to the west end of the town. He said he was going to Covent-garden, and if I liked to ride he would take me there. I accepted his offer, and called for a pot of ale to treat him. He wanted me to get inside his coach, but I got on the box, and drove myself as far as Catherine-street, my watch was then safe. He then said the people were coming from the play, and I had better give him the reins; he drove to Charles-street, and stopped just before we came to the Marquis of Granby , he and I went in. I asked what I should pay him? he said nothing but what I chose to treat him with. I went into the house, and at that time another coachman came in, he asked me to treat himself and his friend. I treated them with a glass of rum each, and I had a glass of gin and peppermint. I did not stop long, as I came outside, and stopped on the cill of the door. I was surrounded by a parcel of people; Taylor, who was convicted, drew the watch from my fob and ran away with it - I went after him, and they held me to prevent my running.

Q. Did you observe whether they had hold of you while your watch was taken - A. No, I did not. I turned round directly and saw Judd behind me; I said,

"Now, you let go of me, or it will be worse for you." I tried to get away again - I turned round and saw three more, they were Randal, Allger, and another, whom I should know if I saw him. I knocked them back clean from me, ran after Taylor, and saw him throw the watch into a hackney-coach. I described him to Bethell, who followed me outside the watch-house. I saw him at the public-house about three-quarters of an hour after, Randall and Allger were then there.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. What countryman are you - A. Wiltshire.

Q. Do you know the gentleman who sat by me just now - A. I do not remember seeing him till Allger's father brought him to ask me questions. The night before the robbery I slept in the Compter as I was drunk. I did not know Judd before.

Q. Did you have pipes of tobacco at the Granby - A. I did not, that I recollect - we drank at the bar. I did not see Allger or Judd before they robbed me. I am sure I did not smoke there.

Q. When you was going away had you paid your reckoning - A. I had four half-crowns and a 1 l. note in my pocket - I will not swear that I paid, but I know by the money I had in my pocket I must have paid, or it would have been impossible for me to have given the boy a shilling, which he said I did. I will be upon my oath that I put a half-crown down on the bar before I attempted to go away. It appeared to me that the person who snatched my watch came from the street. I was at the door when they held me behind, and prevented my following him.

Q. Did you charge any one else with robbing you - A. Yes, two men. They came up the first time that I took Taylor, and got him from me. Taylor had a light snuff-coloured coat. I did not see that he left his coat behind when he escaped.

JAMES BETHELL . I am beadle of Covent-garden. On the 4th of April, at half-past twelve o'clock at night, Hughes came to the watch-house and said he had been robbed, and after we went out he described the features of the person. He appeared to have his senses about him -

he walked very steadily. I went to Charles-street with him. The first public-house we came to was the Coach and Horses, he said the house was further down; we went into the Granby, four or five houses further down; I told him to go in and take no notice of me - he fixed on Taylor; he had told me the man had a rise on his nose, which Taylor had; he gave him in charge, and I took him to the watch-house. When we got outside the door we were surrounded by coachmen, who obstructed us. I called the watchmen to assist me - we were interrupted once or twice in going to the watch-house.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Was Bartlett at the watch-house - A. He was. Hughes said he had had the man in custody and had a full view of his face, and he had a rise on his nose. Mrs. Weedon keeps the public-house, she was in the bar. I could see what Hughes did.

Q. A person in the bar can see distinctly what passes in the taproom - A. I do not think they can. There is a wainscot between her and the taproom. I cannot say that I saw either of the prisoners there - I do not say they were not there. The first attempt to rescue Taylor was by the Hummums, and then by Tavistock-row; Fitzgerald and Sullivan were with me then, they might have seen the interruption. There were no blows given. I told them that if they came near me again I would knock them down. Hughes had charged two men with rescuing Taylor before this; I heard they were discharged for want of prosecution. He told me his watch was worth 7 l. or seven guineas.

PERRY WILLIAM HUGHES re-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Did you see Mr. Chave at Hicks's Hall - A. Yes, but I did not know his name; he said his brother meant to proceed against me for taking him up. I did not offer to compensate him not to appear here. We had some bread and cheese and beer together.

JOHN FITZGERALD . I am a watchman of Charles-street. I was standing at the end of Charles-street, near Russell-street, and heard the cry of Watch! a little after twelve o'clock - the voice came from the lower part of Charles-street. I ran up, and saw Hughes standing with a crowd about him - he had hold of a man. I rushed in among the crowd, and he gave charge of the man - he was rescued from me, and got away. Hughes went towards a coach, and said his watch was thrown into it. I afterwards assisted in conveying Taylor to the watch-house.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Was Hughes sober - A. He was capable of walking and speaking well - he had taken liquor, but was quite sensible; two men were quarrelling with him, and he gave charge of them. I had to hinder him several times from making a noise in the street. He went to the watch-house, and then he and Bethell went to the public-house; they brought Taylor out, and called me to assist - I took hold of his right side and Sullivan was on his left; Bethell was pushing him behind to make him go forward. I did not notice any attempt to rescue him - I heard some talk behind, but took no notice. Just as we had passed the Hummums I heard him talk about people tripping him up, or coming too close to him.

DANIEL SULLIVAN . I am a watchman of Great Russell-street. I assisted in taking Taylor to the watch-house from the door of the public-house. Bethell pushed him behind, as he did not wish to go.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. There was no attempt to rescue him - A. A quantity of people followed us, I do not know that any attempt was made to rescue him.

RANDALL'S Defence. Every word the man has said is false. When he came into the house he said Taylor had a light-coloured coat on, and he thought he was the man. I said,

"Never mind, if you know yourself innocent, go into the parlour and be searched." They shoved him out of the door; I did not follow him out directly. I was going to the watch-house, but they said they would not allow any one to speak. He has sworn to five men besides me.

ALLGER's Defence. I was at the house when Hughes came in. He put his hand on Taylor's head, and said,

"I think you are the man who took my watch." He said he had not been out of the house; nor was I out of the house until Taylor was taken out.

JUDD'S Defence. He drove my coach as far as Catherine-street. We went into a wine-vaults, he had some peppermint, and I had some rum. I then drove to the Granby, we had sixpenny worth of rum and water, and some tobacco. We all three had a pipe each.

ANN WEEDON . I keep the Marquis of Granby, public-house; my bar is on the left of the lobby, and the taproom on the right. I can see through the bar window into the taproom. I know the prisoners very well. I remember Hughes coming to the house about twelve o'clock, with two coachmen - he called for a glass of rum and water, and three pipes of tobacco; I served him, then a man named Nicholls came in, and asked Hughes if he might not have a pipe too - Hughes said he was one of the party, and he should have one. All four had a pipe of tobacco each in the lobby. Hughes asked me to let him go into another room; I said I could not, as it was a late hour, and it is for the accommodation of the coachmen - he was very much intoxicated.

Q. Was that your reason - A. Yes; we are not allowed to let them in, but I do not say I never do. He then went out at the door - all three went out.

Q. Did they all three go out without going into the taproom - A. They did; I had observed Taylor, Randall, and Allger in the tap-room, before eleven o'clock; Hughes did not pay his reckoning before he went out. I am perfectly sure he did not lay a half-crown on the bar; I sent the boy after him for his money, and he brought me a shilling.

Q. How long after Hughes left your house with the three coachmen, did you hear the cry of Watch! - A. I heard no cry at all, nor any alarm. I know when the boy came back Taylor, Randall, and Allger were all three in the taproom - Taylor was asleep with his head on the table. Bethell and the prosecutor came in in about three-quarters of an hour. I am certain Taylor, Randall, and Allger, had not quitted the house all that time. They took poor Taylor out - it is my firm opinion that Taylor is innocent. I then went into the taproom, Hughes looked round for a moment or two, then went up and touched Taylor on the shoulder - he had just awoke, and was rubbing his eyes - he asked him if he had not had a drab-coloured

coat on that evening? Taylor said

"No, I had no other coat on than that I have on now." Hughes then said,

"I think, by your side-face, you are the man who robbed me of my watch." Taylor said,

"You think very wrong, for I have never been out of this place." Hughes said to the beadle,

"Take him away, be it as it may."

Q. At that time was Bethell a little distance from you - A. He was. I did not think he was come in with Hughes. I thought he was come in to order me to shut up. Randall and Allger said, take him into the parlour and search him, if you think he has got anything. I cannot say who said so. Taylor went away very willingly, and was not searched. He said he was sure he should not be kept.

COURT. Q. Did you appear on Taylor's trial - A. No; I was not subpoened - they said they knew he was innocent, and it would not be necessary for me to attend.

Q. Did you send your boy here - A. He was subpoened, and I gave him leave to come.

Q. Do you mean to say you never heard the least alarm of robbery, till your boy came back with the shilling - A. I do; I heard no rattle sprung. Hughes was smoking in my lobby for a quarter of an hour. Neither Randall, Taylor, nor Allger, came out of the taproom while Hughes was there. I think I had seen Taylor once before.

Q. Should you have known him if you met him in the street - A. I think I should, for he had assisted me to get a drunken man out that night, between ten and eleven o'clock.

Q. Did the potboy help - A. Yes; we all persuaded him to go, and put him into a coach. His name was Titness.

GEO. WATSON. I am waiter to the last witness. Hughes came into the lobby with Cole and Judd. He ordered six-penny-worth of rum and water, and they had four pipes of tobacco - one each. Nicholl's came in and asked Hughes if he would like to hear a song, and said,

"I dare say Mrs. Weedon will not be against our going into the taproom." I was drawing a pint of porter in the bar at the time. I took the beer into the taproom to Randall, and heard no more.

Q. When you took the beer into the taproom to Randall, who was there - A. Taylor was asleep, Allger sat by him, and Randall sat at the end of the box. I stopped there till my mistress came in, and said,

"Is not that gentleman come in here."

Q. Meaning into the taproom - A. Yes; at that time nobody had moved from their places. My mistress said,

"He has not paid his reckoning." She said it was 10 d. I went out over against the York Hotel, and asked him for it. He said,

"Do you dispute my word?" The watchman staid by the side of him. Mr. Stannard was at his door. He said,

"My name is Perry William Hughes , of Portland-place." I said,

"Let you be what you will, you must not go without paying your reckoning." He pulled four shillings out of his pocket, and gave me one. At that time he was giving charge of two young men. I was by the taproom fire when he returned with Bethell. The three men I mentioned were still there. My mistress stood at the bar-door. Taylor was just rising himself up, and wiping his eyes. He directly looked at him, and said,

"I think you are the man that had a drab coat on a little while ago."

Q. Was Titness there then - A. He was just gone home with his coach. He was tipsy. My mistress advised him to go. Hughes said nothing about his face, as I heard. Randall said,

"If you think he has got your watch, take him into the parlour and search him;" but they took him out. Allger sat next to Taylor, and Randall on the other side of the box.

Q. Did Hughes say,

"Why, you are one of the men that held me" - A. No; he said nothing of the kind. I did not hear the rattle sprung.

COURT. Q. Pray, what song was it that was sung - A. I heard no song. My mistress stood at the bar when Nicholls proposed to sing a song, close by, and must have heard the proposal. It is a small house.

Q. Who told you to come here last Sessions - A. A gentleman brought me a written order to attend, and said I must come. She knew I came to say, Taylor was in our house; and she knew he was in the house at the time.

Q. Your mistress asked you whether they had come into the taproom - A. Yes; and said he had not paid his reckoning.

Q. You heard no noise or bustle about the door - A. No; I took no notice. I heard no rattle sprung; if one had sprung, I should have heard it.

DANIEL SULLIVAN re-examined. Q. Did you hear any rattles sprung - A. No; my station is at the end of Charles-street, by the pastrycook's. I saw nothing of the robbery.

JOHN FITZGERALD . Q. What drew you to the spot - A. I heard

"Watch!" called. I was talking to Sullivan. I went up, and saw Hughes struggling with a man, whom he gave charge of.

JOHN EDWARDS . I am a coachman. I was at Mrs. Weedon's when Hughes came in, in company with Randall and Allger. Taylor was there. I got there about half-past eleven o'clock. Taylor laid with his head on the table, asleep. I did not see Hughes till he came in with the beadle. He asked Taylor what he had done with his light-coloured coat. He said,

"What makes you ask that question?" Hughes said,

"I think you are the man that looked me in the face, and took my watch."

Q. Are you sure he said,

"I think" - A. I am. Randall advised him to go into the parlour and be searched. They went out at the door. Randall, Allger, and Taylor, were not out of the house from the time I went in till Taylor was taken away. I did not expect he would be detained. I had heard the cry of

"Thief!" very distinctly.

COURT. Q. Did you, or any one, go out to see what was the matter - A. No. Mrs. Weedon was in the bar at the time. I cannot say whether she heard it - they might be heard as well at the bar as the taproom.

FREDERICK COLE . I am a coachman. I saw Hughes in the street. He had hold of a coachman with a drab coat on - he got away. I know Taylor, it was not him.

COURT. Q. Was the man like Taylor - A. I do not think he was. I went directly to Weedon's, and saw Taylor there, sitting by Allger; he had a brown great-coat on. I had seen him there that night before. I never saw him in a drab coat.

Q. What was he struggling with the man about - A. He said he had lost his watch. I was led to the spot by a very great noise - I was sitting in the taproom in Weedon's house and ran out.

Q. Do you think any one in the taproom or lobby must have heard it - A. I should think they must. Hughes was struggling with the man close to the York hotel, nearly opposite the house.

CAMPBELL. I am a watchman of Tavistock-street. About twenty minutes past twelve o'clock I saw Hughes by the coach-stand, with his hand on the coach-door; he said he had been robbed of his watch, and would insist on the coach being taken to the watch-house. I said

"What can you do with the coach or the horses? you had better take the number, and summons the coachman tomorrow." He was rather obstinate. I said I must not have a disturbance. Weedon's waiter came and asked him for the money for his liquor; he said he had paid it, the waiter said he had not. He pulled out 4 s. and gave him 1 s. He stood talking to the people, and said he would charge somebody.

Q. Charge somebody with what - A. Robbing him, I suppose. I said,

"What use is that, unless you pitch on the right man? let me see him, and I will take him." He looked about, saw nobody he could charge, and I returned to my beat. I am confident he was quite intoxicated - he certainly was not sober enough to know a man.

COURT. Q. He could not speak plain, I suppose - A. No; he could walk, but he staggered about. I took the number of the coach, it was 1127.

WILLIAM STANNARD . I keep the York hotel, Covent-garden. On the night of the robbery I heard a noise, went to my door, and saw Hughes give the waiter some money. Before that he had charged two or three people with robbing him, and seemed so intoxicated that the watchman did not know how to act. I considered him a drunken Irishman. He said he would have the coach taken to the watch-house - then two young men came up and said something about the Greenyard; he challenged one of them to fight, and told the watchman to take one to the watch-house.

COURT. Q. Do you mean that he charged any one with robbing him, or with rescuing a man from him - A. That I cannot say.

Q. What brought you to your door - A. I heard Watch! called, and, I think, Stop thief! - it was close by my door.

WILLIAM CHAVE . I live with my father in Flying Horse-yard. I was out of employ, and now work with my brother in the leather-trade. I was in Charles-street between eleven and twelve o'clock on the night of the robbery, and saw Hughes in York-street, at the corner of Charles-street - a crowd was opposite the York hotel. Hughes had hold of a coach-door, and insisted on the coach and horses going to the watch-house. I thought it a curious thing, and my friend said,

"You had better send it to the Greenyard" - he was going to strike my friend. He gave charge of us, we went half-way to the watch-house, he turned back - the watchman said,

"Unless you go we will not take them;" he did not go, and we were liberated. I came back, and stood at the corner of Charles-street, by the York hotel, for five minutes; Hughes came, and said to Fitzgerald,

"Take these men, they shall go to the watch-house" - I said,

"We are innocent, and will go." When we got there he said we had rescued a person from him, and that 50 l. would not fetch his watch, chain and seals. We were sent to Tothil-fields, and discharged without any indictment. The prosecutor came to me at the Sessions House, Clerkenwell, and said he was sorry I was sent to Tothil-fields, and said,

"You ought to have let me know you was there." I said that it was not my place. He said,

"If I had known it you should not have been kept there," and that the beadle had told him it was not necessary to bring an indictment against any but the man who committed the robbery. After that he asked me to drink; I went to the Crown - he said he was sorry I had been in confinement, and wished to know where my brother lived. He told me to bring him to No. 54, Portland-place.

Q. Did he say anything about your coming on this trial - A. He asked me if I could not keep out of the way during the trial? I said I could not.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200517-123

708. TIMOTHY COLLINS and WILLIAM JONES were indicted for stealing, on the 25th of April , one dress, value 3 s.; two shirts, value 3 s.; two shifts, value 3 s.; two bed-gowns, value 2 s., and one pair of stockings, value 1 s. , the goods of Henry Dunton .

HENRY DUNTON . I am a labourer . On the 25th of April this linen hung out to dry, I saw it safe at ten o'clock. The watchman alarmed me, I went into the garden, and missed it - I found the prisoners in custody with it.

CHARLE READ. I am an officer. About half-past twelve o'clock at night of the 25th of April, I met the prisoners at Hampstead coming to town, and found some of this linen in Jones's apron and the rest round Collins's body. They said they got it from Dunton's garden.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

COLLINS - GUILTY . Aged 16.

JONES - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Whipped and Discharged .

First Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant. Esq.

Reference Number: t18200517-124

709. CHRISTOPHER CRANE was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of May , 100 lbs. of lead, value 15 s., the goods of Elizabeth Fraile , and fixed to her dwelling-house .

HENRY MARCHANT . I am footman to Mrs. Elizabeth Fraile , who lives at No. 60, Russell-square . On the morning of the 15th of May we missed this lead off the privy in the back garden - I saw it safe two days before. I was awoke about a quarter past four o'clock in the morning by a female servant, who said somebody was stealing it - it was daybreak. I got up; we searched the garden, and found three pieces of lead - one piece in the garden, one on the parapet, and another in the next garden, they were rolled up. I left the watchman in the garden and went up stairs for my stockings. I looked out of window, and saw a man going over three garden walls into Mrs. Hoffman's garden, he had a long coat and a hat on. I saw him in custody before five o'clock that morning. The watchman brought him out of Southampton-mews. By getting over the walls he might drop into that mews. He had the same kind of a coat on as the man I saw get over the walls.

LETITIA OAKLEY . I am servant to Mrs. Hoffman, of No. 57, Russell-square. About three o'clock in the morning I got up, went to the window, and saw a man at the corner of Mrs. Fraile's garden, he was stooping. I opened the window, he tried to conceal himself behind the trees. In a few minutes I heard a noise like a hinge or something knocking, which alarmed me. I called the watchman, he sprang his rattle, and another came. I saw him get over Mrs. Fraile's wall and seven other walls, the last of which led into the back of Bedford-place and Bloomsbury-square, he could then get into the mews. He had a bottle-green loose great-coat on. I saw a man jump from a house at the corner of the mews, and run along the mews about three-quarters of an hour after. I watched him getting over the walls till that time.

JAMES ARTIS . I am footman at No. 59, Russell-square. I was awoke a little before four o'clock by the watchman's rattle. I looked out of the window, and the watchman asked me if any man was in the gardens? I then saw a man going out of the gardens over several walls; he had a dark loose great coat on. I had a side view of his face, and can swear the prisoner is the man. It was quite light. I and the watchman went into every garden in Bedford-place till we came to Bloomsbury-square, I then saw him at the top of the stables in Southampton-mews, sitting behind a chimney. I called to him, he came towards me, and said,

"It is no use making a resistance." As soon as he came to the parapet wall, which is twenty feet high, he jumped down and the watchman took him at the end of the mews. I am quite sure he is the man - I had a full view of his face.

JOHN SIMMONDS. I am a watchman of Russell-square. About a quarter past four o'clock in the morning Oakley alarmed me; I placed watchmen in different directions, and went round myself to the mews, hearing he was coming that way, and stopped him - he had a loose brown great coat on.

MATTHEW RAGAN . I am a watchman. I saw the prisoner drop from the stable, he was secured.

THOMAS MARONEY . I am a watchman. I found part of the lead in Mrs. Fraile's garden, and part in the adjoining garden. I was present when it was compared with the building, it exactly covered the privy, and matched a small piece at the end which was left.

SAMUEL FURZEMAN . I am a constable. I compared the lead - it was nailed at the sides, and this was cut out of the middle - it matched exactly; there was above 100 lbs. of it. On the seat by which the prisoner stood at the lock-up house I found a knife, he told me to notice that I did not find it on him - no person there claimed it.

WILLIAM LIGHTFOOT. I am a watchman. I collared the prisoner in the mews.

Prisoner's Defence. A bricklayer told me to come for a job; I went up a ladder to the tiles.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18200517-125

710. ELEANOR CURTIS was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of May , one watch, value 5 l. , the goods of Bartholomew M'Carthy .

BARTHOLOMEW M'CARTHY. I am a labourer . I went into the prisoner's room and waited there for three-quarters of an hour. I missed my watch - I suppose I must have given it to her.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200517-126

711. GEORGE DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of February , 100 lbs. of lead, value 10 s., the goods of Henry Wyatt , and fixed to a certain building of his .

AUGUSTUS WYATT , ESQ. I live in Langham-place , I have three houses there unfinished. On the 26th of February, at half-past seven o'clock in the evening, Chapman, the watchman, fetched me. I went into the adjoining house, which is unfinished, and on the first floor I found the prisoner hid in the chimney-place. The house is now in the possession of Henry Wyatt , Esq., my father's executor. The prisoner was taken to the watch-house.

THOMAS CHAPMAN . I am a watchman. I went up Langham-place, about half-past seven o'clock in the evening, with Hollingsworth and Mr. Wyatt's servant, who said somebody was on the building, throwing lead off the house. I fetched Mr. Wyatt, and found the prisoner on the first floor, and found about one hundred weight of lead thrown off the ledge into the pleasure-grounds.

JOHN WIGGINTON . I am servant to Mrs. Hibbard, of No. 3, Langham-place. On the 26th of February, about half-past seven o'clock in the evening, I was alarmed by something falling from the house; I went out and saw a roll of lead laying in the pleasure-grounds of Mr. Wyatt's house - I saw the prisoner throw another piece off the ledge. I went into the house with Chapman, and found the prisoner on the first floor.

JOHN MARTIN . The prisoner was brought to the watch-house with the lead - I compared it with the roof; the nail-holes corresponded, and it matched exactly. I found 2 s. 6 d. on him.

Prisoner's Defence. I thought it no harm to go into an unfinished house to sleep, having no money.

GUILTY . Aged 62.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200517-127

712. WILLIAM HOMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of May , one truck, value 5 l. , the goods of John Alder .

JOHN ALDER . I keep the Cock and Lion Tavern, Lower East Smithfield . On the 10th of May, about six o'clock in the evening, the truck was taken from near my cellars in Burr-street , which is within a few yards of my own house.

NATHANIEL CLARK . I am a turner, and live in New Montague-street. On Monday evening, the 10th of May, I was passing through Burr-street, and met the prisoner, with another person, not in custody; I watched them a few minutes, saw the prisoner go up to the truck, and draw it away from the cellar - he passed by me, and drew it down Burr-street to Nighingale-lane. I followed, and had him in sight until a cart prevented me, then the other had got it. I turned up Well-street, the prisoner was walking

behind the truck; when he got to the Theatre he saw me, and said.

"To the right." The other person went to the left. The prisoner stopped at a public-house to drink, I watched him out, the other man turned the corner, and I heard the truck drop; a boy said, the man who drew the truck has ran away. I immediately collared the prisoner. Alder claimed the truck.

JOHN PHILLIPS . I am servant to Mr. Alder. I was gone out with some porter. I saw the truck safe about four o'clock. I know it to be my master's.

THOMAS HARRISON . I took the prisoner in charge.

Prisoner's Defence. I met a man, named Smedley, about eleven o'clock, he said he knew a man who had some old iron to sell, and as we went by Burr-street he said,

"I have seen this truck several times in the street, and I mean to take it to the Greenyard." I said I would have nothing to do with it. I met him again about four o'clock, he said he would take it to the Greenyard. I said,

"You may do as you like, I will have nothing to do with it." He said give me a spell - I laid hold of it, and dragged it to Nightingale-lane, he then walked away with it. I went into a public-house with a man whom I knew, came out again, and was taken.

THOMAS HARRISON re-examined. He was going quite a contrary way than to the Greenyard.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Confined Three Months , and Publicly Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200517-128

NINTH DAY, FRIDAY, MAY 26.

713. THOMAS HAYWOOD , SAMUEL HOOD , and MARY HUMPHRIES were indicted for stealing, on the 13th of May , 36 lbs. of beef, value 1 l.; 10 lbs. of mutton, value 5 s., and a wrapper, value 1 s. , the goods of Benjamin Macauley .

The prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200517-129

714. THOMAS JOHNSON and THOMAS SMITH were indicted for stealing, on the 21st of April , one set of chaise-harness, value 20 s., and two whips, value 2 s. , the goods of Barbara Potts , widow .

JOHN PARTERIDGE . I am an officer of Whitechapel. On Saturday morning I stopped Johnson in a passage by Whitechapel Church with the saddle and part of the harness on his back. He said they were his master's, a Mr. Goodwin, of Whitechapel-market. I went to his lodgings, and found Smith in bed there - they lived together. I found the bridle and two whips by the bed-side. He said he knew nothing of them. I found about twenty pick-lock keys concealed in the chimney, with files for making them.

THOMAS JONES . I live with Barbara Potts - the property is her's, and was safe the evening before in the stable, in Old Montague-street, Whitechapel . It was locked.

JOHNSON's Defence. I found the harness about twelve o'clock.

SMITH'S Defence. About twelve o'clock, Johnson called at my room. I did not know that he had left anything there.

JOHNSON - GUILTY . Aged 65.

Confined One Year .

SMITH - NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200517-130

715. JOHN PRICE was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of May , one pair of trowsers, value 8 s. , the goods of James Corss .

JOHN HUBE . I am shopman to James Corss , who lives in Shoreditch . The trowsers hung at the shop-door - a woman said they were taken. I ran out and saw the prisoner with them. He threw them down and I secured him.

JOHN INGRAM. I am a watchman. I heard Hube call

"Stop Thief!" and saw the prisoner with something under his arm. The trowsers were found on the ground.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I never had them.

GUILTY . Aged 52.

Confined One Year , and Publicly Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200517-131

716. JOHN POTTER was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of May , one bed, value 2 l.; one bolster, value 5 s.; two pillows, value 6 s.; one pillow-case, value 1 s.; one counterpane, value 5 s.; one blanket, value 2 s.; two sheets, value 6 s., and one tea-board, value 2 s., the goods of Margaret Byers , widow , in a lodging-room .

MARGARET BYERS . I am a widow, and live at St. Luke's . On the 19th of April I let the prisoner a parlour furnished. On the 1st of May the officer took him, as I discovered I had been robbed.

ANN ABEL . I am a broker, and live in Leonard-square. I bought a bed and bolster of the prisoner for 2 l., and sold it to Cross.

EDWARD CROSS . I bought a bed and bolster of Abel for 2 l. 8 s.

WILLIAM PATRICK . I am an officer. I took the prisoner into custody, and found the bed and bolster at the broker's.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 53.

Confined One Month .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200517-132

717. CATHERINE RILEY was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of May , 4 s., in monies numbered , the monies of Daniel Gill .

DANIEL GILL . I keep the Black Horse, at Stepney . The prisoner was my servant . On the 30th of April I missed 9 s. 6 d. from a drawer in my bed-room. I then marked my money; and about six o'clock in the afternoon I missed 4 s. I had her taken up, and they were found upon her. They were marked.

MICHAEL MORRIS . I was sent for, searched the prisoner, and found four marked shillings on her.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Fined One Shilling, and Discharged .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200517-133

717. THOMAS SUTTON and HENRY HYDE were indicted for stealing, on the 28th of April , one table, value 3 l. , the goods of George Smith and Edward Skegg .

GEORGE SMITH . I am in partnership with Edward Skegg . We are cabinet-makers , and live in Old-street, St. Luke's . On the 28th of April, about six o'clock in the evening, I missed this table from inside the door. I found it, about nine o'clock, in Fox-court, Gray's Inn-lane. The prisoners stood on each side of it. Sutton said,

"Oh, here is the gentleman coming." I secured them. He then said,

"It was given me to carry."

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JAMES JACKMAN . I was coming down Ironmonger-row, about six o'clock in the evening, and saw the prisoners running together. Sutton had the table - he appeared intoxicated. Hyde told him, he had better give a man a shilling to carry it. He gave it to me. I carried it to a coach-stand. He then put it into a coach, and told the man to drive to Battle-bridge. They both ran by the side of the coach.

SUTTON'S Defence. A man asked me to carry it to Somer's-town. I could not carry it, being drunk. The boy came up, and I asked him to lend me a hand. I do not know the number or street.

SUTTON - GUILTY . Aged 40.

Confined Six Months .

HYDE - NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant. Esq.

Reference Number: t18200517-134

718. FRANCES SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of April , one half-crown, the monies of Robert Moscrip , from his person .

ROBERT MOSCRIP . I live in Queen's-court, Lincoln's Inn-fields. On the 21st of April, about two o'clock in the morning, I was coming down Queen-street , the prisoner came and laid hold of my arm, I pushed her away, she came up again, put her hand into my waistcoat pocket, and took a half-crown out. I laid hold of her, she called the watch, who came, and I gave her in charge. The half-crown fell from her at the watch-house. She had denied having any money.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. You had been out - A. I had been with some friends. I did not know her before.

GEORGE MARTIN . I am a watchman. I heard the alarm, and found the prosecutor and the prisoner scuffling together; he said she had robbed him of a half-crown, she denied having any half-crown about her. I was going to search her in the watch-house, and it fell from her.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Three Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18200517-135

719. JOSEPH BANNISTER was indicted for stealing, ing, on the 2d of May , one handkerchief, value 3 s., the goods of a man unknown , from his person .

WILLIAM MASON . I am servant to a stationer, and live in Chapel-court, Swallow-street. On the 21st of May, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I saw the prisoner near Exeter Change, Strand, in company with two other lads, following a gentleman; one of the three took hold of a gentleman's pocket and felt it; they left that gentleman, and went on, through Charing-cross, into Cockspur-street, then all three followed a lady and gentleman to the Colonade , and there I saw the prisoner take the handkerchief out of the gentleman's pocket - the other two were on each side of him. He put it into his pocket, and went on. I secured him, but nobody would assist me to find the gentleman. A gentleman on horse-back told me where he was gone. I came up to him in Waterloo-place - he felt, missed his handkerchief, and asked me to give it him. I refused. I had found it in the prisoner's pocket.

Cross-examined by MR. HONE. Q. Are you sure he is man - A. I am. I did not ask the gentleman his name, and do not know it.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked up the handkerchief by the Opera House, and asked several people if they had lost an handkerchief.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Recommended to Mercy.

Confined One Year , and Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18200517-136

720. MARY COOK was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of May , one quilt, value 2 s.; one jacket, value 6 d.; one sheet, value 9 d., and one hammock, value 3 d. , the goods of Thomas Parker .

SARAH PARKER . I am the wife of Thomas Parker , who lives in Pye Horse-court, Gray's Inn-lane , and is a seaman . On Sunday evening, the 21st of May, I missed these things from our lodgings; about an hour after I took the officer to the prisoner's lodgings, and found them all there. I knew her before. She had been to my house about half-past ten o'clock, with a man named Thunnell, and went up stairs - I saw all the things safe after they left. She is a girl of the town. I went out for about half an hour, and when I returned I missed them.

THOMAS REPPETT . I am a watchman of Gray's Inn-lane. Between twelve and one o'clock on Monday morning, the prosecutrix said she had been robbed - the prisoner stood at the end of the court - the prosecutrix said nobody but her and Thunnell had been in the house; we asked the prisoner where Thunnell lodged - she said he was an honest man, and refused to tell us. She advised the prosecutrix to have every house in the court searched; the prisoner was going away, I detained her; she afterwards shut herself in her mother's house, where she lived, in the same court. I got an officer, and found the things on the first floor there, and found the prisoner on the second floor, lying on the bed - she pretended to be asleep. We were obliged to carry her down stairs.

WILLIAM SUMMERS . I went and found the property

stated in the indictment, and the prisoner at her mother's house, where she lived.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18200517-137

721. JOSEPH DUNDERDALE was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of May , one watch, value 19 s. , the goods of Samuel Bonton .

SAMUEL BONTON . I am one of the horse-patrol . On Saturday, the 20th of May, I was attending to my horse, at the back of my house at Hornsey , and saw the prisoner go out of my front gate; I went in, missed the watch - I went after him, and overtook him about three hundred yards off. He pulled the watch out, and said,

"There it is, you have lost nothing."

Cross-examined by MR. HONE. Q. Did you know him before - A. He has been at Highgate, acting in imitations, the same as Mr. Mathews.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Strongly Recommended to Mercy.

Confined One Month .

First Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: o18200517-1

IN the Report of the last Session, the case of JOHN SMITH , convicted of burglary, page 292, was stated to be reserved for the consideration of the twelve Judges. The learned Judge had expressed a doubt on a point of law there stated, which doubt was afterwards removed, and the prisoner received sentence of Death at the usual period.

Reference Number: o18200517-2

The following Prisoners, on whom the Judgment of the Court was Respited at former Sessions, have been sentenced as follows:

Sophia Chew , page 140 Thomas Harris , 142 Joseph Munday , 144 Lucy Brown , 185 Charles Young , 211 Elizabeth Lopez , 299 Eliza Lux , ib. Charles White , 353 Samuel Springett , 365 Atkinson Buck , ib.

Fined One Shilling, and Discharged .

Reference Number: o18200517-3

Thomas Owner , page 195 - Transported for Seven Years

Reference Number: o18200517-4

John Fuller , page 26, has received a Free Pardon .

Reference Number: o18200517-5

Judgment in the Cases of Joseph William Pullen and Andreas Syanson , is still respited .


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