Old Bailey Proceedings, 12th April 1820.
Reference Number: 18200412
Reference Number: f18200412-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace Oyer and Terminer, AND Gaol Delivery for the City of London, AND ALSO The Gaol Delivery For the County of Middlesex, HELD AT Justice Hall, in the Old Bailey; ON WEDNESDAY, 12th of APRIL, 1820, and following Days;

Being the Fourth Session in the Mayoralty of THE RIGHT HON. GEORGE BRIDGES , LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

Taken in Short-Hand by H. Buckler, Basinghall Street, (BY AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON.)

London:

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED, FOR H. BUCKLER, BY T. BOOTH, 31, St. Andrew's Hill, Doctors' Commons.

1820.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX.

Before the Right Honourable GEORGE BRIDGES , Esq. LORD MAYOR of the City of London; Sir Charles Abbott , Knt. Lord Chief Justice of his Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir Robert Dallas , Knt., Lord Chief Justice of his Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir Richard Richards , Knt. Lord Chief Baron of his Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir J. A. Park, Knt., one of the Justice of his Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir George Wood , Knt. one of the Barons of his Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir William Garrow , one of the Barons of his Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir William Draper Best, Knt. one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir John Richardson , Knt., one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir Richard Carr Glyn , Bart.; Sir William Leighton , Knt.; Joshua Jonathan Smith , Esq.; Samuel Birch , Esq.; Christopher Magnay , Esq., Robert Waithman , Esq., Aldermen of the said City, Newman Knowlys , Esq. Common Sergeant of the said City, and John Vaillant , Esq. his Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of the Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

London Jury.

William Holmes ,

Joseph West ,

John Rigby ,

John Harford ,

John Seer ,

Edward Wicks ,

Thomas Blanchard ,

Simon Lattery ,

William Greig ,

Richard Waystall ,

William Eldridge ,

Joseph Hodgson .

First Middlesex Jury.

David Forbes ,

John Lyns ,

Samuel Peacock ,

William Sadgrove ,

David Turner ,

Daniel Walters ,

Peter Phillips ,

James Colam ,

John Seagrove ,

John Thornton ,

Francis Homan ,

John Herns .

Second Middlesex Jury

William Eden ,

Joseph Walker ,

William Palmer

Charles T. Edwards ,

William Drain ,

Thomas F. Salter ,

Isaac Anderton

Daniel M'Millon ,

George Ellis ,

Samuel Mill ,

Joseph Taylor ,

John Marson .

SESSIONS HOUSE, OLD BAILEY, APRIL 12, 1820.

BRIDGES, MAYOR. FOURTH SESSION.

Reference Number: t18200412-1

350. MORRIS JONES was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Stephen Skinner , about eight o'clock in the night of the 24th of March , at St. George, Hanover-square, with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein one gown, value 3 s.; seven shifts, value 14 s.; two petticoats, value 3 s.; five handkerchiefs, value 10 s.; seven towels, value 7 s.; two pair of stockings, value 4 s.; two pair of drawers, value 5 s.; two curtains, value 3 s., and two pieces of flannel, value 1 s., the property of Cope Williams .

STEPHEN SKINNER . I am a milkman , and live at No. 44, South-street, Grosvenor-square , in the parish of St. George, Hanover-square - it is my own house. On the 24th of March, about half-past eight o'clock at night, my wife and I were sitting in the back kitchen, with my little girl - it was quite dark. I thought I heard somebody in the parlour, which was let to Mrs. Williams, who had been out ever since twelve o'clock in the day. I know the window of her room was shut down an hour before. My wife sent the girl up the area steps, she returned, and in consequence of what she said I went up the area steps; the prisoner jumped out of the window and fell into the area - I saw nobody else jump out. I secured him, and asked what business he had there? he said he was not in the parlour, but that a man had shoved him down the steps. I took him to Mount-street watch-house. I saw a bedgown found in his hat, which belonged to Mrs. Williams; she is my sister. He said he lived with his sister in St. Giles's, that his father had forsaken him, and when he came before the Magistrate he said he lived in Cato-street.

HARRIET WILLIAMS . I live with my brother. I left my lodgings at twelve o'clock, the windows were then shut; I locked the door and took the key. I left three shifts and a bedgown near the fire-place, and a bundle on a chest bedstead - when I came home I found the bundle moved to the piano-forte; two shifts and a bedgown were gone. I saw the bedgown found on the prisoner at the watch-house - I have not seen the shifts.

JOHN LUX . I am a beadle of the parish; the prisoner was brought to the watch-house by Skinner; I searched him, and found the bedgown in his hat.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was going home, and saw something laying down, I picked it up and put it into my hat. A man jumped out of the window and pulled me down.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 15.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18200412-2

351. THOMAS THORP was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of March , at St. George, Hanover-square, one watch, value 1 l.; one coat, value 1 l.; one pair of pantaloons, value 15 s.; one waistcoat, value 7 s.; one handkerchief, value 2 s.; one pair of shoes, value 1 s., the goods of John Dowell ; and one shirt, value 2 s., and one pair of stockings, value 1 s., the goods of William Elliment , in the dwelling-house of William King .

JOHN DOWELL . The prisoner and I were quartered at the Dolphin, public-house, in Albemarle-street , which is kept by William King ; it is in the parish of St. George, Hanover-square - we both slept in one bed. On the 30th of March I came home about twelve o'clock in the day, and found the lock of my box, which was in the bed-room, had been taken off and nailed on again - I had left it locked. I missed the articles stated in the indictment, which were worth 66 s. - I saw them all in the box that morning about eight o'clock, when I went on duty. I left the prisoner asleep in the tap-room when I went out. I took the key with me. I went to the barracks, and reported to the pay-sergeant that I had been robbed, and that the prisoner was absent. I have since seen a pair of shoes, which were taken from another box in the room which was not locked. I had seen them that morning.

WILLIAM ELLIMENT . I was quartered at the Dolphin. I lost two pair of stockings the same morning the other things were missed; I saw them safe when I went on duty with Dowell, in the same room, in a box which was not locked.

WILLIAM PRICE . I am a watchman. On Saturday night, the 1st of April, about half-past eleven o'clock, the prisoner came to me, and asked where the watch-house was? he said he wanted to give himself up as a prisoner, as he had robbed his comrades of a watch and other articles. I asked him if he had not better give himself up to his regiment? he said they would punish him, and afterwards

turn him over to the civil power. I took him to the watch-house.

JAMES PARKIN . I am pay-sergeant of the company to which the prisoner belongs. On the 30th of March Dowell reported to me that he had been robbed, and that the prisoner had absented himself from his quarters. I was present at the watch-house - Elliment's handkerchief, shirt, and stockings were found upon him. I had marked the shirt, and knew it to be his; a pair of shoes were also found on him, which he said belonged to Dowell.

JOHN KENDRICK . I am a beadle. I found the shirt, shoes, and stockings on the prisoner. He said he had sold the watch and the rest of the things at Rag Fair.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 22.

Recommended to Mercy.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

Reference Number: t18200412-3

352. ROBERT CLAXTON was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of March , at St. George, Hanover-square, sixteen silver spoons, value 10 l., the goods of Edward Jerningham , Esq. , in his dwelling-house .

MR. ARABIN conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM GRANT . I am butler to Edward Jerningham , Esq., who lives in Bolton-row, St. George's, Hanover-square . On the 26th of March, about ten minutes past three o'clock in the afternoon, I was near the pantry-door, I went up to answer the bell, and as I returned, I met a man in the servants' hall, just coming out of the pantry - he was a short young man, had an apron on, and had a dark handkerchief in his hand, which he held against his body. He said,

"I am a fishmonger." I said,

"Go into the kitchen." He then said,

"Is this Mr. Thompson's?" I said,

"No, it is not." He said nothing else, but ran into the area directly. I then ran into the pantry, and missed sixteen silver spoons, which I had left there ten minutes before. I immediately pursued, and saw the same man at the top of Bolton-street, and pointed him out to William Ede , who brought a man back three-quarters of an hour after - I cannot say he is the man. I pointed him out because he was running.

Cross-examined by MR. PLATT. I believe your sight is not very good - A. No. I only pointed him out because he was running.

WILLIAM EDE . I am a baker. On the 26th of March Grant pointed out a man to me in a fishmonger's apron, the man had passed me. I pursued him to Pall Mall, and only lost sight of him in turning the corners - he might have been out of my sight two or three minutes; another young man joined him, and ran just before him for a short time. When I came to Waterloo-place he crossed me - I thought he wanted to knock me down. I still pursued the prisoner towards Molteno's print-shop, and observed him throw a dark handkerchief down the print-seller's area - somebody immediately said,

"Here is the silver spoons thrown here!" I still pursued, and saw him pull his apron off, and throw it down another area. I at last secured him near the Opera House, and am certain he is the man I pursued from Bolton-row.

Cross-examined. Q. How many corners did you turn - A. I cannot say. I lost sight of him at every corner. It was on a Sunday - it rained very hard. He is the man that Grant pointed out to me.

JOHN ANTHONY WALKER . I am a music copyist. I met the prisoner running in St. James's-square; he had an apron on and a brown coat - another man was before him. I stopped the prisoner, and asked him which was the thief? he appeared confused, and said he did not know, I therefore let him go. I afterwards pursued, and saw Ede secure him - I am certain he is the same man.

Cross-examined. Q. You stopped him, thinking he was pursuing the thief, and let him go - A. I certainly did. I saw he had a bundle in a blue handkerchief - I afterwards took the same handkerchief off the area railing - the handkerchief and one spoon were left on the railing. I threw the spoon down myself that nobody should get it, as the area belonged to a respectable house. I asked which was the thief, as an ill-looking man was running before him.

WILLIAM EDE re-examined. Q. How was the man dressed that joined the prisoner - A. He had a blue coat and a yellow handkerchief. I saw him in the Court-yard to-day, but he escaped.

JAMES ANTHONY MOLTENO . I keep a print-shop at the corner of John-street, St. James's-square. Between three and four o'clock of the 26th of March I heard a great rush and ran to the door - I saw a spoon lying in the street, and some more in the area. I secured the property, and gave it to the constable, who returned it to me two or three days after. I produced them.

HENRY WINFREY . I am a beadle. I received the handkerchief and sixteen spoons from Mr. Malteno, and returned him the same.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 18.

First Middlesex Jury, before Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18200412-4

353. THOMAS POOLE was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Stephen William Young , about ten o'clock in night of the 8th of February , with intent to steal .

CHARLES YOUNG . On the 28th of February I was at my uncle's, Mr. Stephen William Young , who is a solicitor , and lives in Poland-street, Westminster . About ten o'clock at night I was sitting in the back parlour, and heard a noise at the street-door, which was then fast - I then heard the street-door open. I took up a candle, ran into the passage, and saw the door shut to by some person outside. I threw down the candlestick immediately, ran out, and observed the prisoner on the curb-stone, about five yards from the door - another man was about seventy yards off, who appeared to be looking out; he was standing still.

Q. Could any person have get that distance from your house in that time - A. It is impossible. The prisoner threw down two keys - I was close behind him, and seized him; he said,

"What do you want with me? it was a man in a white coat." I believe I had said

"You rascal!" but nothing else. He struggled a good deal, I brought him back to the door; in about ten minutes the patrol came up, and I gave him in charge. I picked up one key and the patrol the other - the first key the prisoner

threw down opens my uncle's door. I saw him searched at the watch-house - two whole Spermaceti candles, and two nozzles of candlesticks, were found in his pocket; a gold watch-chain and key were also found on him.

JOHN VESEY . I am a patrol. I saw a number of persons gathered round Mr. Young's door, went up, and found he had the prisoner in custody; he gave him to me with one of the keys - the prisoner said if we would go with him we should find a few more. We found two more.

Prisoner's Defence. A young man in a white coat came out at the door.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

Reference Number: t18200412-5

354. JOHN GOODMAN and JAMES GOODMAN were indicted for feloniously assaulting Isaac Queemly on the King's highway, on the 6th of April , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, one pocket-book, value 3 s., and one 5 l. Bank note, his property .

JAMES QUEEMLY . I live at Northampton, and came up on an arrest. On the 6th of April, about two o'clock in the afternoon, I was at Knightsbridge , walking with two friends arm in arm towards London - it was the chairing of Sir Francis Burdett . I felt a person pushing at my back, and a hand at my pocket-book. I turned my head, and saw the prisoner, John Goodman , at my back - I was squeezed on all sides, and could not release my arms. I am quite sure he is the man. I turned round and said,

"These villains are picking my pocket!" My coat was quite up and cut through. He turned himself round, and a third person started through the crowd. I got my arms at liberty, and seized the prisoner, John Goodman ; I said to him,

"You have picked my pocket" - he said,

"I have nothing about me but a pen-knife." I then let him go, and went to see if I could find the other, when James said,

"D - n it, Jack, do not be taken!" My friends surrounded them - we took them to the watch-house, and found nothing but a knife on either of them. I felt my pocket-book half a minute before - I found it go by the loss of weight.

Cross-examined by MR. CURWOOD. Q. You are a sheriffs' officer - A. Yes. I felt him down - he said he had nothing but a knife. When I let him go he might go three or four yards. I took him a second time, and said,

"If I cannot get my book I will have you, for you are the person."

JOHN AUSTIN . I am a carpenter, and live in Old Pye-street, Westminster. I was standing about the fourth person behind the prosecutor. I saw John Goodman pressing very much on the gentleman and lifting his pocket up. I called out to the prosecutor,

"That fellow is doing something to your pocket!" As soon as he got his hands at liberty he seized John Goodman - I saw a knife in his hand, but no pocket-book. James Goodman was behind him, and a man in a velvet jacket, he seemed very busy. Before he ran away, he was near enough to receive anything from John Goodman .

Cross-examined. Q. So you were one of the mob - A. Yes; I had no work to do. The crowd was not pressing in that part; the procession was gone past. There were about four or five persons. I saw John Goodman 's hand on the prosecutor's pocket.

RICHARD FORDER . I am a beadle. I searched the prisoners at the watch-house, and found a knife on each of them.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18200412-6

355. JOHN HORTON was indicted for sodomy .

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

Reference Number: t18200412-7

356. HENRY HAWKINS was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Drew , about nine o'clock in the night of the 19th of February , at St. Clement Danes, with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein one tin box, value 10 s.; one book, value 1 s.; one sovereign; six 5 l. and three 1 l. bank notes, his property .

ANN DREW . I live at No. 17, Portugal-street ; my husband's name is William. On the 19th of February, a little before nine o'clock in the evening, I only was at home, my husband was gone out, the window-shutters were up, and the door on the latch; I was in the parlour behind the shop, the parlour door was open - I was sitting there, and heard the shop door open, I rose from my seat, and went as far as the parlour door, a man came in as if to purchase, he shut the door, came forward, through the shop, to the parlour, lifted up something to my head, and said if I made any alarm he would blow my brains out - I instantly screamed out, he struck me on the head, I believe, with a pistol, I fell on the window seat in the parlour, took hold of his arm to secure him till some one came, but I could not; he struck me five or six times on the head, he then left me, and my female servant came in. I did not see any other person, nor did I see him take anything out of the shop. I am certain the prisoner is the person that struck me - I did not lose my senses; I saw him about two hours after at my house, he was brought by the officers, I was then in bed, but the instant I saw him I was certain he was the person - he was dressed the same as the person that struck me. I was confined to my bed some days.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. You attended two examinations before the magistrate - A. Yes; I then said the prisoner was the man - the door is opened in the usual way - I latched it myself. The property was gone.

Re-examined. I am sure I never took any money out of the cash-box, nor did any other person.

WILLIAM DREW . I keep the house, No. 17, Portugal-street, it is in the parish of St. Clement Danes. I remember the night in question I went out about twenty minutes before nine o'clock, I had examined my cash-box a few minutes before I went. I had more money than I liked to keep in the house, took out 45 l., and left six 5 l. and three 1 l. notes, a sovereign, and various papers, in the box. I was going to Holborn, as I passed Mr. Clark's I saw three persons standing at his private door - the prisoner at the bar was standing with his back to the shutters, the other

two, one looking towards Lincoln's Inn, the other towards the market - it was after his shop was shut; there was a gas-light just over the shop window; there is a light likewise from the Coffee-house; when I saw them stop, I was going to address them, but did not, thinking they were Mr. Clark's journeymen waiting to be paid their wages. I took particular notice of the prisoner, as the light was directly on his face. I went on to Holborn, was sent for back, and missed my cash-box with all its contents. I immediately went to Bow-street, and to Charles-street, Drury-lane, with Jeffrey, the officer, where I saw a boy that I met between my window and Clark's, and pointed him out to the officer. I went to the corner of Brownlow-street with Furzeman - there were about thirty or forty persons there; it was about eleven o'clock. I fixed on the prisoner as the person whom I saw at Clark's door, and he was taken into custody, We took up two other persons for obstructing the officer, and took the prisoner and the other two to my house. They were all shewn to Mrs. Drew separately, the other two before the prisoner; she did not hesitate a moment, for when the prisoner was brought before her, she exclaimed,

"That is the man!" and said she knew nothing of the other two. I never found any of the property.

MRS. DREW re-examined. The men were shewn to me separately. I had no doubt that the prisoner was the man. I never saw the other two before to my knowledge.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. I said before the Magistrate he was the man.

MARY KIRK . I am servant to Mr. Drew. On the 19th of February I was in the kitchen, which is below the shop, and remember hearing a noise in the shop. I went up stairs, heard Mrs. Drew call Murder! several times, and when I went into the shop there was no other person but Mrs. Drew.

MR. DREW re-examined. My shop is lighted with gas - there is a glass door to the parlour; any person might see into the parlour from the street-door, if there was a light there.

PAUL HARDY . The prisoner came into my shop for an ounce of tobacco about a quarter before nine o'clock - my shop is within two doors of Mr. Drew's, between his and Clark's. I said to him,

"You know it is not customary for grocers in London to sell tobacco." He left the shop, and turned up the street towards Drew's. I am sure the prisoner is the man who was in my shop.

JAMES JEFFERYS . I am a Bow-street patrol. I went to the Coach and Horses, Charles-street, with Mr. Drew.

SAMUEL FURZEMAN . I went to the Sun, public-house, Brownlow-street, with Mr. Drew - there were about twenty persons there; the prisoner was sitting opposite the door - he said,

"I think that is the man." I told him to stand up, and come to the light, which he did. Mr. Drew said he was sure that was the man he saw about his house. I told him to be particular, and to look at him again, which he did, and said he was sure he was the man, and I took him down to Mrs. Drew, who was in bed. We took the other two in first, but she said she knew nothing of them. She looked at the prisoner, shook her head, and said,

"That is the man."

PAUL HARDY re-examined. It was about five minutes before the disturbance at Drew's shop that the prisoner came into my shop.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent.

GUILTY . - DEATH Aged 18.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18200412-8

357. WILLIAM GIBSON was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of February , one silver mug, value 5 l.; one salt-cellar, value 3 l.; two forks, value 2 s.; one tablespoon, value 10 s., and two tea-spoons, value 7 s. , the property of Hannah Oxborough .

MR. ALLEY conducted the Prosecution.

MRS. HANNAH OXBOROUGH . I live at Connaught-terrace, Paddington . On the 23d of February, about half-past ten o'clock in the morning, the prisoner came to my house, I employed him to clean some plate . I saw him at half-past one, and noticed that his left-hand pocket projected out; he was walking on tiptoe, as if to prevent what was in his pocket from jingling. I sent him out on a message, and missed the plate in about five minutes after he was gone. When I saw him again I asked him where the silver pint pot was? he said it was down stairs; I charged him with stealing it, he denied it, and said he left part of the plate up stairs and part down.

CHARLOTTE SHAW . I am servant to the prosecutrix. I delivered the plate to the prisoner - when it was missed he said I had got it.

Prisoner's Defence. I went out with two or three messages that day.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18200412-9

358. ABRAHAM JACOBS was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of April , one trunk, value 5 s. , the goods of William Stringer .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating it to belong to James Taylor .

WILLIAM STRINGER . I am servant to James Taylor , who is a Hampstead carrier . On the 6th of April I left my cart at the corner of Friday-street and Watling-street , while I went to make enquiry at the Bell Inn in Friday-street. I was not absent two minutes, and on my return I found the trunk gone. It was directed to Captain Moore, South Moulton, Devon. I saw it next day at the Mansion House - it had not been uncorded.

DAVID DAVIS . I am a jobbing porter, and live in Thames-street. The prisoner brought a trunk to me, and said

"Old man, will you carry this trunk?" - I am certain he is the man. I borrowed a knot, he helped it on to the knot, and told me to carry it to Whitechapel. He walked before me about twelve yards - I then called to him not to go so fast, as I could not follow him. He went down Lower Thames-street, Pudding-lane, and into Botolph-lane. An officer stopped him, and asked if the trunk belonged to him? he said No - the officer then asked me if he was my master? I said he had employed me to carry the trunk - the officer detained him. I followed them to the Mansion House, and attended on Saturday, when Stringer claimed it.

ABRAHAM MILES . I am an officer. On Thursday, about half-past six o'clock in the evening, I was in Distaff-lane,

and saw the prisoner running down the Old Change, with the trunk on his back, I followed him into Thames-street, and saw him deliver it to Davis - I stopped him in Botolph-lane, and asked him if the trunk belonged to him - he said No. I secured him and the porter said he had employed him. I did not secure him when I first saw him, because I was carrying some prints.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I met a gentleman, who asked me to carry it, he afterwards took it off my back, and gave it to the porter.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-10

359. WILLIAM JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of April , one box, value 1 s. 6 d.; and 30 lbs. of vermicelli , the property Walter Levy , Lewis Levy , and Moss Levy .

MOSS LEVY . I am a partner in the house of William and Lewis Levy , we are vermicelli manufacturers , and live in White's-row, Spitalfields. On the 3d of April, about nine o'clock in the morning, I delivered a box of vermicelli to Woolf to take to Newgate-street, to be sent to Charles Taylor , at Kingston.

BENJAMIN WOOLF . I am servant to the prosecutors. I took eight or nine boxes in my cart. I was going along Newgate-street, about eleven o'clock, and saw the prisoner shoving behind the cart. He hung behind the cart to make it hang heavy. He pushed about one hundred yards till I got to Warwick-lane - then laid hold of a box, took it out, and ran down the lane with it. I ran after him, overtook him, and asked him where he was going? He used bad language, threw the box at me, and ran off. I caught the box in my arms and pursued, calling Stop thief! He was stopped before he got out of my sight. I am sure he is the man who took it.

MICHAEL CONNELL . I was in Newgate-street, and saw Woolf run down Warwick-lane. Several cried, Stop thief! and I secured the prisoner, who was the only man running from the cry.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was asked to carry it.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-11

360. JOHN JACKSON was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of April , one watch, value 25 s.; one seal, value 3 s.; one ring, value 1 s. 6 d., and one key, value 3 d. , the goods of William Barrington Reade .

WILLIAM BARRINGTON READE . I am midshipman of an East Indiaman, which laid at Northfleet . On Monday morning, about eight o'clock, I missed my watch and seals from the cabin, which were safe the night before. The prisoner was quarter-master on board the vessel. He left the ship on the Sunday following with leave from the commanding-officer. He could take the watch if so disposed. On the Tuesday week after it was stolen I saw it in possession of Rice the officer.

JOHN WILLIAM HARRISON . I am quarter-master of the ship. On Sunday evening, between eight and nine o'clock, I saw the prisoner in the cabin, and on Monday morning the watch was missed. The prisoner kept his hammock locked up which made me suspect him. He said, that any man who could find the watch should have a bottle of rum. On the Saturday following I was by the Royal Exchange, and saw the prisoner with a seal and key hanging to his trowsers; and as he ran up to me he tucked it in. I immediately fetched Rice the officer.

JOHN RICE . On the 1st of April, I took the prisoner into custody, and found the watch on him. He behaved very bad to me; I was obliged to get assistance. I saw him draw the watch from his person, I took it from him. He said he found it in the gun-room.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was employed to make the prosecutor's bed. He was intoxicated on Sunday night. He afterwards told me to tell the ship's company that he would give a bottle of rum to any one who would find his watch. I left the ship on Thursday, and met a man of whom I bought the watch for four guineas in the Minories. Another man and woman were with him.

HANNAH CLARK . I live in Aliff-square, Essex-street, Whitechapel. I work at the leather-breeches trade. I have known the prisoner eight years. I met him in the Minories about twelve o'clock on Saturday week. He asked me to lend him a few shillings to pay for a watch which he had bought of a man, and who was with him. I saw the watch in the other man's hand. There were three of them together, the prisoner and two more. I lent him ten shillings, the other man gave him the watch, and the prisoner paid him some notes and some shillings. The watch looked like silver.

Q. Have you seen the man who sold him the watch since - A. No; on the Monday I heard the prisoner was apprehended. I did not go to ask him for the ten shillings, as I thought he would pay when he got clear.

Q. How much money do you get - A. My husband allows me one pound a week for market money. I have four children. I did not see Rice, the officer, that day - it was about the middle of the day.

JOHN RICE re-examined. I apprehended the prisoner in the Jerusalem Coffee-house-yard, about twelve o'clock.

WILLIAM BARRINGTON READE re-examined. He had leave of absence about half-past ten o'clock on Friday. He could have got to town about two or three o'clock. Two persons left the ship on the Thursday. They tendered themselves to be searched and were searched, and are on board the ship now. The prisoner had an opportunity of taking my watch.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Confined Six Months .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-12

361. JOHN SMITH was indicted for stealing on the 26th of February , two looking-glasses, value 30 s. , the goods of Peter Jackson .

PETER JACKSON . I live at the corner of Harp-alley, Shoe-lane , and have a house opposite. I saw the prisoner come out of my shop with the glasses. I followed, and secured him about forty yards off with them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A man asked me to take them to the Strand.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined Three Months .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-13

362. RICHARD CLARK was indicted for stealing on the 11th of March , one coat, value 35 s ., the goods of Margaret Blackett , widow .

WILLIAM TRAPP . I servant to Mrs. Margaret Blackett , who is a widow, and keeps a clothes-shop in Newgate-street . On the 11th of March, a few minutes before the prisoner was brought into the shop, I saw the coat safe.

CHARLES GRIFFIN . I am a perfumer, and live in Skinner-street. I saw the prisoner take the coat down from inside the prosecutrix's shop and put it under his arm. I secured him crossing the road with it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. The deepest distress led me to it.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Publicly Whipped , and Confined Two Months .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-14

363. ROBERT GARDON was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of March , from the person of Margaret Bennett , one purse, value 1 d.; one half crown, and one 1 l. Bank note, the property of John Bennett .

MARGARET BENNETT . I am the wife of John Bennett , who lives in Park-place, Walworth. On the 11th of March I went into a cheesemonger's shop on Ludgate-hill , and had my purse in my hand - it contained a 1 l. note and a half crown; I put it into my pocket, as I thought, but it might have dropped. In a minute or two I felt something press against me, turned round, and saw the prisoner close by my side. I charged him with putting his hand into my pocket, but he denied it, and walked towards the door; I felt, missed my purse, and called to Mr. Brown, who is my brother-in-law, to run after him. I followed him, and he caught the prisoner just as he stepped off the pavement - I picked the purse off the pavement. It could not have dropped from me there.

ANDREW BROWN . I was with the prosecutrix, and stood by her side; the prisoner came in between me and her. I I did not hear him ask for anything. In about a minute my sister accused him of feeling in her pocket, which he denied and stepped towards the door - my sister said she had lost her purse. I went after him, and secured him just as he was stepping off the pavement; I saw the purse fall from him about the middle of the pavement - my sister picked it up. He might have picked it up without my observing him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. My master told me to call and ask whether they sold eggs. I saw the purse on the ground, and picked it up.

GUILTY . Aged 13.

Of stealing, but not from the person.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-15

364. JAMES CLAY was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of March , 128 lbs. of beef, value 3 l. , the goods of John Ellard .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating it to be the property of Richard Towne .

THOMAS COMBER . I am servant to John Ellard , who works for Richard Towne in Newgate-market. On the 16th of March I had the care of the cart, which had a side of beef belonging to Mr. Towne in it - it was to be taken to Oxford-street. I left the cart in Newgate-street about a quarter of an hour, and on my return I found a quarter of beef weighing 130 lbs., gone. I found the cart in Warwick-lane - some person must have drove it there. The prisoner was brought back with the beef.

ANTHONY TINDER . I am a porter of Newgate-market. I saw the prisoner in Newgate-street with a quarter of beef on his shoulder. I looked at him, and seeing he was a stranger, and the tail of the cart being down rose my suspicion. I followed him into Green Arbour-court, to Breakneck-steps, Seacoal-lane, and asked him where he was going with it? he said on board a ship. I said that was the wrong way; he then said he was going to Fleet-market to sell it. I took him back, and the prosecutor claimed it.

Prisoner's Defence. A man gave me 1 s. to carry it.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Confined Three Months and Whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-16

SECOND DAY, THURSDAY, APRIL 13.

365. ELIZABETH GIBBONS was indicted for stealing on the 22d of February , four shirts, value 30 s.; four table-cloths, value 30 s.; one napkin, value 2 s.; two shifts, value 4 s.; five towels, value 3 s., and one neck-cloth, value 2 s. , the goods of Joseph Smith .

MRS. SARAH SMITH . I live in Austin Friars, and am the wife of Joseph Smith . On the 22d of February I employed the prisoner to wash these articles - she went by the name of Cole, and lived at Islington - the clothes were not returned. I saw them again about the middle of the next week - I never gave her authority to pledge them.

WILLIAM PAINTER . I am a carman; I took a basket of linen from Mr. Smith, and delivered it to the prisoner on the 21st of February, about two o'clock in the afternoon - she lived in Popham-street .

JOHN WALTER. I am a pawnbroker, and live in Alfred-place, Goswell-street. On the 22d of February the prisoner pledged five shirts, five table-cloths, and a napkin, for 3 l. - I knew her before. She gave her address, " No. 28, White Lion-street."

GEORGE STOWEL . I am servant to Mr. Drew, who is a pawnbroker, and lives in Clark's-place, Islington. On the 28th of February the prisoner pledged two shifts, and five towels with me for 5 s.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I was in distress.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Confined Six Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-17

366. JAMES WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously assaulting John Taylor , on the King's highway, on the 26th of February , at St. Paul, Covent-garden, putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, one watch, value 2 l.; two seals, value 1 l., and one key, value 2 d. his property .

JOHN TAYLOR . I am a solicitor ; my office is in Walbrook. On the 26th of February, about twenty minutes past twelve o'clock, I was proceeding down Brydges-street , and as I was about to cross Exeter-street I felt a sudden blow behind me, in the lower part of my back - it was a violent blow. On being struck I attempted to secure the person whom I supposed to have struck me. I was about to turn round, but before I had done so a person rushed out of Exeter-street on me. The two together surrounded me a moment, and I felt my watch taken away - one of the party ran away. I turned round, seized the prisoner instantly, and am certain he is the person; he exclaimed,

"A dog has bit my thigh." I then dragged him into a public-house at the corner of the street, and desired the landlord to send for an officer, which he did, but with some reluctance. In the room I took the prisoner to there were a number of men assembled; as soon as I took him in, one of them asked me why I took a gentleman by the collar? he said he belonged to Bow-street. They got the prisoner away from me, and took him to the back of the room. The officer then arrived, and I pointed him out.

Q. Were many people in the street when you was robbed - A. No, only the two persons. I have not recovered my watch. As we were taking him to the watch-house a fellow came up, and tried to rescue him; he then attempted to escape himself, but did not. I felt the watch go from me.

Prisoner. Q. Did I take your watch - A. I cannot say, but I swear you struck me.

ALEXANDER DALLAS . I am an officer. I took the prisoner into custody, and searched him, but found nothing on him. I was taking him to the watch-house, and he endeavoured to disengage himself from his coat - he then whistled and one or two people came to his assistance. I sprang my rattle, and got the watchman to assist me in taking him to the watch-house. The men went away without attempting anything.

Prisoner's Defence. The person I lodge with was at work at the fire in Suffolk-street, and his wife sent me to see for him. A man came behind, and shoved me against the gentleman, a third came out of Exeter-street, and ran across the road. I had been bit by a dog about a week before, and I had hurt my thigh. The gentleman asked me what was the matter? I said I had hurt my thigh.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 17.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

Reference Number: t18200412-18

367. JAMES HAYES was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of March , at St. Paul's, Covent-garden, forty-five yards of bombasin, value 50 s., the goods of Joseph Sparkes , in his dwelling-house .

MARTHA SPARKES . I am the wife of Joseph Sparkes , who is a linen-draper , and lives in Southampton-street, Covent-garden , two doors from the Strand. On the 14th of March, between nine and ten o'clock in the morning, (a window had been broken about an hour before by accident - the panes of glass are large), I heard a noise in the window, which drew my attention; that part which was broken was concealed from my sight by a shawl hanging before it. I saw a man rise from under the window, and pass the door; I immediately went out a few paces from the house, and saw a man in the act of covering something over; I followed him a few yards. He then passed another man, I asked that man to pursue him, which he did; he went a very quick pace till he had covered the bundle, and then ran. I followed him into Tavistock-street, and saw him throw an apron down with something in it, in a court which leads to Covent-garden; he threw it down in the street, and turned into the court. A person gave me a piece of bombasin. I afterwards saw the prisoner secured; he is the same stature as the man, but I did not see his face. The pane was broken large enough for the property to be taken out.

THOMAS MILTON . On the morning of the 14th of March I was going up Southampton-street about ten yards from the shop - the prisoner passed me; he was then wrapping up a piece of bombasin in an old blue apron, which I at first thought was a bag - he appeared very much confused - I took particular notice of him. When he had wrapped the bombasin up he began to run. The prosecutrix came up to me, and I pursued him up Tavistock-street; he threw the bombasin away at the corner of Tavistock-court, I picked it up and gave it to her, and in about a minute the officer stopped him. Neither the bombasin or the prisoner were ever out of my sight.

THOMAS MIDDLETON . I am a constable. I saw the prisoner coming up Tavistock-court, and secured him in Covent-garden. Milton gave me the bombasin.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I never had it in my possession.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 23.

Recommended to Mercy.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18200412-19

368. WILLIAM PERKS and DANIEL THOMAS were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Mary Slade , widow , about nine o'clock in the night of the 9th of March , at Twickenham, with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, two watches, value 5 l.; three gowns, value 25 s.; one pelisse, value 1 l.; one pair of stockings, value 5 s.; one shirt, value 5 s.; three pieces of silver coin, value 7 s.; 5 s. 6 d. in monies numbered, and six 1 l. Bank notes, her property .

REBECCA BROWN . I am servant to the prosecutrix. On the 9th of March I went to bed about half-past nine o'clock at night; there were four lodgers in the house, who were gone to bed. There are three doors, which I bolted myself and fastened the windows, Mrs. Slade unlocked her bedroom door, and found two chests of drawers opened and emptied - I had seen all the property safe in them that day; I found the window half open, and half a pane out of it. This window opens into the back garden - there is a gate which leads into the back garden; the window is five or six yards from the ground - there was no ladder against it. We had a ladder in the garden which had marks of wet on it - it was a rainy day; the ladder was near the shed where it had been

left - there appeared only one footmark. We found five or six table-cloths, a new cloth, a timepiece, and five or six pair of sheets left behind in the shed.

MARY SLADE . I am a widow, and live at the White Hart, public-house, Twickenham . On the 9th of March I was in my room about six o'clock in the evening - the property was safe then; it was scarcely light. I did not go up again till I went to bed - I was principally in the bar; the bedroom window is exactly over the taproom; we could not see a person in the garden. When I went to bed I missed the property stated in the indictment, and about 11 l. or 12 l. in silver money. I had written the names of the persons of whom I took the notes on them. I have seen my gowns, watches, and notes since.

THOMAS HOOKER . I am an officer. In consequence of information which I received, I went to Colebrook, which is about eight miles from Twickenham, on Thursday, the 16th of March, about a week after the robbery, I got there about three o'clock in the afternoon, with Jefferys; we went to a house where I understood Perks lived - I did not see him there, but I saw a woman, whom I understand was his wife. I found some clothes there.

JAMES JEFFERYS . On Tuesday, the 14th of March I went to Westham, about half-past nine, and found both the prisoners at the Adam and Eve, public-house, at supper. I searched them both. On Perks I found a silver watch, and five 1 l. Bank notes; and in a leather purse 12 s. 6 d. in silver; and on Thomas, I found a silver watch and a 1 l. Bank note.

MARY SLADE re-examined. Both the watches are mine, and the five 1 l. notes found on Perks are mine; and they have my writing on them, and were stolen that day. The bundle of clothes is mine.

PERK's Defence. I have a wife and six children. Through the pressure of the times I had resource to smuggling and selling of liquor. On the night of the 9th, I went out expecting to meet a person but did not. I met a tall man, and bought the two watches and clothes of him for 6 l. 5 s.

THOMAS'S Defence. Perks gave me the watch. I was going to buy it of him.

PERKS - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 38.

THOMAS - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 30.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18200412-20

369. WILLIAM BURKE and WILLIAM THOMPSON were indicted for stealing, on the 28th of November , at St. Anne's, five spoons, value 20 s.; one pair of sugar-tongs, value 7 s.; one milkpot, value 2 l.; two rings, value 3 l.; and one watch, value 4 l., the goods of Mary Bond , widow , in her dwelling-hous e.

MARY BOND. I am a widow, and rent a house in the parish of St. Anne's, Limehouse . On the 28th of November, 1818, I had apartments to let. A gentleman came and took them at 15 s. per week. I cannot swear to him, but another was with him whom he said was his brother. The gentleman said he was a doctor, and attended the London Hospital. He said his brother was a seafaring man, and asked if I could allow him to come and spend an hour or two with him in the evening, as he had not seen him for a long time. I said I had no objection. They came about eleven o'clock in the morning, went away, and came again about five in the evening both together. My daughter let them in. They went into the parlour. Soon after a porter came with a parcel - they were both in the room then. I went into the room to the cupboard, and took a spoon out of a silver cream-jug, the watch hung over the chimney-piece then. I went down stairs leaving them in the parlour with the porter. In about ten minutes I head Pulaston, the porter, go out. I heard the door close to.

Q. Where was your daughter - A. She was down stairs with me. When Pulaston came back I opened the street door to him, he said he wanted the two gentlemen. I opened the parlour door and they were gone. I missed the property as stated in the indictment, which is worth 7 l. 17 s. Thompson was one of the men, I talked a great deal to him. He said he had been to the Mediterranean, the other said he was a doctor. I can swear positively to Thompson.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Do you live in the same house now - A. Yes. I did not see Thompson again till he was taken. He did not come till the evening, they then both came together.

EDWARD PULASTON . On the 28th of November, 1818, I took some tobacco for the prisoner Thompson, to the prosecutrix's house, he ordered it to be there by six o'clock. A little boy let me in and told me to go into the parlour where the prisoner Thompson, and the doctor sat together. I am sure Burke is the man who called himself the doctor. They were drinking grog. They told me I was half an hour too late, for the captain was gone to the Anchor-tavern to smoke his pipe. Thompson called himself the mate, and asked me for the bill and receipt, which I gave him. He asked me to take some rum which I did, and he wrote at the back of the bill

"Please to pay the bearer, as I have received the tobacco." They sent me with a boy, who they called Jack, to the captain, who he said was in the parlour of the Anchor-tavern. Jack shewed me the parlour door and left me, saying the captain was there. They told me to enquire for Captain Thompson. I found no such person. I enquired at the bar - they did not know him. I went out, found the boy gone, ran as fast as I could to the house, and found the prisoners were gone, and the tobacco also. I had taken them forty pounds of tobacco. I did not see them again till they were apprehended.

Cross-examined. Q. Who bought the tobacco - A. My master took the order, I am certain they are the men.

ELIZABETH BOND. I am daughter of Mary Bond . The doctor came about eleven o'clock, and took the lodging, and said he had a brother who was a seafaring man, and he wished to spend his evenings with him. He went away. He came again about five o'clock with Thompson, and a boy whom they called the cabin-boy. They sat in the parlour smoking till the porter came with the tobacco. When he returned and asked for the captain, I went into the parlour and they were both gone with the boy, then I missed the plate, which was safe when they went into the room.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you attend before Sir Daniel Williams , the magistrate - A. Yes; I said I was not certain the doctor was the man who took the lodging, because he was so disfigured and dirty. I thought at the office that as my mother swore to the other, it was not necessary for me to say more. I am now certain it was

him on seeing him now. I did not see the doctor till the second examination. I then said I was positively sure he was the man, but did not like to sware to him as my mother was not present.

BURKE'S Defence. I was never in the house in my life, and never saw her daughter. When they came to identify me they said positively they had no knowledge of me. I was not committed on this charge, but for the tobacco, and had no idea of having to meet this charge. It is near two years ago. Mrs. Bond must certainly have a better opportunity of recollecting me than the porter.

THOMPSON's Defence. I knew nothing of it. I was invited to the house by a doctor who was an acquaintance of mine. I left the house before he did, and knew nothing of the plate. It is more like a bad house than any thing else. That is the man (pointing to A. Seal), who persuaded her to swear to me.

ALFRED SEAL . The prisoner, Thompson, ordered some tobacco of me on the 28th of March, 1818. It is not true that I persuaded the prosecutrix or her daughter to swear to him.

Cross-examined. Did you hear the prosecutrix examined at the office - A. Yes; I understood her to say she could not swear to the doctor, but she believed he was the man. She swore to the man, and her daughter after looking at him, said she thought he was the man.

BURKE - NOT GUILTY .

THOMPSON - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 21.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

Reference Number: t18200412-21

370. THOMAS M'KENZIE was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of February , at St. Paul's, Shadwell, in the dwelling-house of Elizabeth Wheatley , widow , seven 1 l. Bank notes, her property .

ELIZABETH WHEATLEY . I am a widow, and live in Coleman-street, St. Paul's, Shadwell , and take in seamen to lodge. On the 15th of February, about eight o'clock in the evening, two lodgers came home and gave me seven 1 l. Bank-notes to take care of. Nobody was in the house but the prisoner, and he sat by the fire and saw me lock them up in my box below stairs. It stood on a table opposite the fire-place. I went out to get some butter and left him sitting there alone. I was gone about a quarter of an hour. On my return I found the door fast. A lodger who was out came up and we got in with her key. I found my box broken open, and the prisoner and money gone. He did not return. He had broken it open with a hatchet. I have not recovered the notes - he had lodged three weeks with me. I took him in out of charity. Nobody could have come in while I was out.

JOHN BROWN. I am an officer. The prosecutrix informed me of the robbery next morning. The prisoner was brought to me in three weeks after.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 36.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18200412-22

371. JOHN BARTON was indicted for feloniously assaulting George Hardy , on the King's high way, on the 27th of February , putting him fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, one watch, value 3 l.; one pocket-book, value 6 d.; two knives, value 3 s.; one pair of gloves, value 1 s.; one hat, value 15 s.; 4 s. in monies numbered; and a 1 l. Bank-note, his property .

GEORGE HARDY . I am servant to Mr. Holman. I live in Hop-gardens, St. Martin's-lane. On Sunday night, the 27th of February, I left the King's Arms, public-house , about twelve o'clock. As soon as I got out the door was locked, and I was knocked down at the corner of the house. I had left some company in the house. It was the prisoner and another that knocked me down. They both fell on me with their knees, held my mouth and hands, and robbed me of this property. I made every effort to cry out, but they throttled me. Before I could get up they run out of the court. One said to the other, have you got it? They then gave me a dreadful blow, and I was obliged to let my watch go. I lost them and returned to the house, knocked hard, but nobody came to the door, and I went home. Next morning I took an officer to the house and shewed the landlord where the prisoner sat, as he had been there all the evening. I knew him to be the man who robbed me, for it was a moon-light night and saw him plainly. I was sober. I had had a pot or two of beer before I went there. He was apprehended on Tuesday, and I am sure he is the man.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. How long have you been in town - A. I came up that night. I came from Manchester with Mr. Holden, he had been at the public-house with me, but was fetched home. We had called at several places in the afternoon.

Q. Was there any dispute at the house - A. There was a quarrel about a fire which was at the docks. I saw no fight. The prisoner and two or three others went out before me.

Q. On the Monday after did you see the prisoner - A. He came running after me in the court, and asked if I wanted him. I said I wanted nothing of him. He had changed his dress. He was then dressed in a drab coat like a quaker. I did not know him in that dress.

ISAAC HOBBS . I keep the King's Arms, public-house, and the prisoner used my house. He was there on Sunday evening when Hardy was, and left the house before him. Next morning Hardy pointed out where the prisoner sat, it was the right place.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you remember a dispute about a fire - A. Yes; I did not see the prosecutor asleep.

WILLIAM GODFREY . I am an officer. I went to enquire after the prisoner, and he wrote me this note (read). (Mr. Barton's compliments to Mr. Godfrey, having been informed he has a charge against him of a most distressing nature, Mr. Barton will wait on Mr. Godfrey to-morrow morning, at twelve o'clock). He called, but I was not at home. I took him the following morning.

Cross-examined. Q. You found him at Bow-street where he surrendered - A. No. I met him in Bow-street. I found Bank-stock receipts on him for 300 l.

Prisoner's Defence. I was at Hobb's about eight o'clock, the prosecutor and two friends were there. He was very much intoxicated - he was asleep. Next evening I was informed he had been after me, charging me with the offence. I went to the magistrate to surrender, he was not sitting, and on my return I met the prosecutor. He said he did not know me. My friends persuaded me not to trouble myself about it. I was not satisfied and wrote to

the officer, and went to surrender, but he was not at home.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

Reference Number: t18200412-23

372. JOHN RAMSDEN was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of March , one chest of drawers, value 2 l., and one table, value 30 s., the property of George Ingram , in the dwelling-house of Daniel Sole .

AMELIA INGRAM . I am wife of George Ingram , but am separated from him. I live in Broad-street, Shoreditch , my brother-in-law, Daniel Sole , keeps the house. The prisoner lodged in the house. On the 21st of March, about seven o'clock in the evening, I went for a cart to move my goods, and left the prisoner there. On my return I found him gone, and missed a chest of drawers and a table, and found them at Johnson's.

Cross-examined by MR. HONE. Q. How long have you been separated from your husband - A. Seven or eight months. The furniture is his. I never employed the prisoner to sell the furniture for me.

WILLIAM JOHNSON . I am a broker, and live in Tabernacle-square. The prisoner came to me to know if I would buy some chairs, a chest of drawers, and a table. He said they were rubbish, and I did not go to see them. A week after, about seven o'clock in the evening, he came and asked me to go and see the drawers and table. He took me to the house and asked 4 l. for them. I gave him 2 l. 10 s. for both, which I think was the full value. We carried the drawers, he came first. The prosecutrix afterwards claimed them.

Cross-examined. Q. You took them away at two different times - A. Yes. I bought them at one time.

COURT. It is all one sale if the delivery is at different times.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only.

Confined Three Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18200412-24

373. SARAH DIMOCKS was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of March , two 1 l. Bank-notes, the property of George Wilson , in his dwelling-house .

GEORGE WILSON . I live at Enfield . The prisoner lived with her uncle next door to me. The house was formerly one, but there is a party-door which is fastened on their side. She was not in the habit of coming to my house. On the 25th of March, I gave my wife a bag containing thirteen 1 l. notes.

ELIZABETH WILSON . My husband gave me the notes on Monday, I put twelve of them into a looking-glass drawer, which was not locked. On Friday I missed two, and next day the prisoner brought home several articles of wearing apparel, which made me suspect her.

WILLIAM SHAW . I am a linen-draper at Enfield. On Saturday, the 1st of April, the prisoner came with her aunt Norton, and paid me a 1 l. note for some calico.

CHARLES MIEL . I am an officer. I went to Norton's, and asked the prisoner what she had done with the notes, and told her she had better tell.

COURT. Then we cannot hear what she said.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18200412-25

374. MARY BELDON was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of March , one watch, value 4 l., and one chain, value 1 d., the goods of Thomas Stephen Weston , in his dwelling-house .

PHILLIS WESTON . I am the wife of Thomas Stephen Weston , we live in Great Aliff-street, Whitechapel . On the 30th of March, about seven o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came to look at some apartments I had to let, she said they were for a gentleman in the Bank. As she came down stairs she asked for my name and address, I asked her into my sitting-room to write it. She kept talking to my little boy, and said she would call again next morning at ten o'clock. As she was leaving the room she drew near the fire-place, and I heard the chain to the watch jingle - I immediately missed it off the shelf, and charged her with it, she made no answer, and held up her right-hand, I saw the chain hanging out. I sent for my husband, who came and took the watch out of her hand.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I never touched it.

THOMAS STEPHEN WESTON . My wife sent for me. I asked the prisoner how she could rob such poor people as us. She said she did not give that a thought.

GUILTY . Aged 49.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18200412-26

375. JOSEPH WEST was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of March , one purse, value 1 s.; one 20 l. Bank post-bill, and six 1 l. Bank notes, the monies of Robert Slade , from his person .

ROBERT SLADE , ESQ. I live in Doctors' Commons. On the 10th of March, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, I was in Guildhall , while the poll was being cast up, I was in the body of the Hall. I was unconscious of having been robbed till half an hour after, when I went into the Irish Chamber to write a letter, and enclose the Bank post-bill in it, I then missed my purse. I saw the prisoner a few days afterwards, with my purse, in possession of the officer - I knew the purse from its contents and appearance.

JOHN MARKWELL . I was an extra-constable. On the 10th of March I saw the prisoner go into Guildhall, just before the poll was closed, I suspected and watched him; he was alone - I lost him in the crowd, he came out in about half an hour, I then secured him, and found the purse in the left-hand pocket of his trowsers - it contained a 20 l. Bank post-bill, six 1 l. Bank notes, and some memorandums; I also found a silk handkerchief on him. Next day I took him before Mr. Alderman Ansley - Mr. Slade appeared at the second examination and claimed it. The prisoner said he found it in Guildhall.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN GARTON. I am a constable. I followed the prisoner into Guildhall. I did not observe Mr. Slade. I was with Markwell, and saw the purse found on him.

Prisoner's Defence. I found it, and asked several gentlemen if it belonged to them.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-27

376. RICHARD PARSONS and HENRY SAWYER were indicted for stealing, on the 20th of February , 18 yards of woollen cord, value 5 l.; 18 yards of woollen stuff, value 5 l.; and 18 yards of woollen cloth, value 5 l., the goods of James Brown ; 40 lbs. of tea, value 10 l.; one hempen sack, value 2 s., and the sum of 1 l. 4 s. 9 d. in monies numbered, the goods and monies of John Betts , Aurelius John Drewe , and Thomas Burton , privately in their warehouse .

MR. ALLEY conducted the Prosecution.

JAMES BROWN . I am warehouseman to the prosecutors, who carry on business in the Steel-yard, Thames-street . On Saturday, the 19th of February, about half-past seven o'clock in the evening, I left the warehouse safely locked up. I returned on Monday morning, at half-past six o'clock, and found the warehouse loft-door forced open; it was only fastened by a bit of wood. I then examined the warehouse, I found my desk forced open, a 5 l. and a 1 l. note gone, also 18 yards of woollen cord. I also found the till forced open, and 24 s. 9 d. taken. A chest of tea was broken open, and 40 lbs. gone, also a sack marked WW - we have a stock of these sacks. I saw a sack at Guildhall that day marked Slocock, we had some of that mark in the warehouse. The prisoner, Parsons, was employed by my masters about fifteen months previous, and Sawyer had been employed by us at Trigg Wharf, but not in the Steel Yard.

MR. AURELIUS JOHN DREWE . I am in partnership with John Betts and Thomas Burton . On the 21st of February I went to the warehouse, and discovered that there had been a robbery. A sack was found on the prisoner, which I have every reason to believe came from our premises, but we had missed none - we lost 40 lbs. of tea. The officer produced 36 lbs., and some had been spilt in the warehouse.

ROBERT FIELDING . I am an officer. On Sunday morning, a little after seven o'clock, I saw the prisoners in company together in Coleman-street, they each had a bag on their shoulder, which I produce. I followed them, they both turned down London-wall - I followed them to Cripplegate-buildings, and heard them enquire for the White Horse, which was pointed out to them and they went in - I followed them, both went into a box on the opposite side to each other, and called for a pint of beer - nobody else was in the room. I asked the prisoner, Sawyer, what he had there? he said it was no business of mine - I said I would see what it was; he said it did not concern me. I shewed my staff, he then said,

"Sit down and make yourself comfortable, we will make it all right with you." I said I wanted nothing to be made right, but to know where they had the bags from. He said he had some corded stuff for breeches in it, and that he had bought it at Manchester, but he had got no bill - I said that would not satisfy me. He said,

"Sit down and make yourself quiet, for 1 l. is as well in your pocket as it is in another person's" - they both said they would give me 1 l. to let them go about their business. I said I did not want their 1 l. notes, and asked Parsons what was in his bag? he said it was chaff, I am sure he said so. They told me not to talk so loud, and offered me 2 l. to let them go. I secured them both with the bags, and took them to the Compter, One bag was marked WW, and contained 36 1/2 lbs. of tea, the other, marked Slocock, had woollen cord in it. I found 1 l. 4 s. 9 d. on Parsons, but no money on Sawyer.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

WM. TURNER. I am clerk in the house of Messrs. Fryand Co.; we sent a quantity of tea to the prosecutors. I compared the tea found on the prisoners with that in the chest - in my judgment it is the same.

PARSONS'S Defence. I was walking through Bow-lane on Sunday morning, and met Sawyer; we met a man in Thames-street loaded with these bags, he asked if we wanted a job? we said we did not work on Sundays - he offered us 1 s. to carry it to the White Hart.

SAWYER'S Defence. I have nothing further to say. I did not know he was an officer, and did not like he should take them from us.

ROBERT FIELDING re-examined. They said nothing about being employed to carry them.

PARSONS - GUILTY . Aged 25.

SAWYER - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Of stealing, but not privately.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-28

377. JAMES DOWTON was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of February , six tame ducks, price 12 s.; one tame drake, price 2 s.; four tame geese, price 14 s., and one tame gander, price 5 s. , the property of James Morris .

JAMES MORRIS . I live at Harlington, near Uxbridge . On the 10th of February I lost the poultry - the geese were in the geese-house, and the ducks in an out-house - I saw them safe about six o'clock in the evening, and missed them at six the next morning; the prisoner lived about a mile off. The same day, at a quarter past ten o'clock, I found all the poultry at Leadenhall-market, in the possession of Parnell; they were all killed - the geese were cold, the head of the gander was quite warm. They were worth 10 l.; they were kept for breeding.

HENRY PARNELL . I keep a stall in Leadenhall-market On the 10th of February, between nine and ten o'clock in the morning, this poultry was brought to me by a man, who desired me to sell it for him, I did not ask him how he got them as I was busy - they were killed in an awkward manner, which I did not observe at the time. He stopped about half an hour with me. I did not particularly notice him.

Q. How long after was the prisoner taken up - A.About four or five days after. I believe he is the man, but cannot positively say. I thought the man was lustier, and of a fresh colour. I often have fowls killed in that way - it is the custom all over the market.

JOSEPH GROVER . I am a salesman in Leadenhall-market. On Thursday morning, about nine o'clock, the prisoner came into the market with the ducks and geese; he took them out of a bag, and laid them on Parnell's stall, which joins mine. I was present when Morris came and claimed them - I then looked at them, they appeared as if they had been stolen, for they were improperly killed - I should have suspected them if they had been brought to me. About a fortnight after I saw the prisoner in custody, and am sure he is the man.

EDWARD HOLDCRAFT . I am a poulterer. I saw the prisoner in the market on the day the prosecutor lost his property.

I am sure he is the man I saw take them to Parnell's; he had them in a sack. I afterwards saw the ducks and geese.

JOHN RICE . I am an officer. The prisoner was apprehended in the county - Parnell was also taken into custody.

HENRY BARNFIELD . I am constable of Harmondsworth, which is the adjoining parish to Morris's. I went to the prisoner's house five or six times, but could not find him. He was brought to me by two of the patrol about a fortnight after.

STEPHEN KING . I am a bricklayer, and live at Harmondsworth. On the 10th of February, between four and five o'clock in the afternoon, I saw the prisoner coming home - I do not know where he had been.

THOMAS UPJOHN . I am a poultry salesman. On the 10th of February, between nine and ten o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner in the market. The geese laid on Parnell's stall. I am sure he is the man.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-29

378. WILLIAM HALE was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of March , two pigs, price 1 l. 4 s. , the property of John Bowman .

JOHN BOWMAN . I live at Pinner . On Sunday morning, the 4th of March, I lost two pigs - a person could easily climb over a gate and get them; one of them had two brown spots down the face, on the forehead - they reached to the eye; that was a barrow pig. The prisoner was a stranger to me - I have not seen them since.

CHARLES MATTHEWS . I live in Prince's-street, Barbican, and am an officer. On the 5th of March I met the prisoner with a bag tied to his back like a knapsack - another person was with him. I stopped him, and asked him what he had got in the bag? he said they were rabbits, but I found they were two dead pigs; they were sold by the order of the Alderman, as we could find no owner - one was a brown pig, and that was marked; the heads of the pigs appeared to have been broken with a hammer, and the prisoner had a hammer - they appeared warm; they had been stuck also. I found a bloody knife on him.

PETER MURPHY . I was with Matthews. I observed a small mark on the forehead of the barrow pig.

RICHARD DADY . I am a butcher. On the 6th of March the pigs were shewn to me at the Mansion House. They were not quite cold. The barrow pig had two marks on the forehead.

GUILTY . Aged 33.

Confined Two Months .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-30

379. WILLIAM DEAN was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of April , two printed bound books, value 4 s. , the property of Robert Saunders .

ROBERT SAUNDERS . I have an auction-room in Fleet-street . On the 6th of April as I was proceeding with a sale the prisoner was charged with taking two books. He came to the table, and produced them, fell on his knees, and begged forgiveness.

WILLIAM WRIGHT . I saw the prisoner in the saleroom with a book in his hand. I suspected him, and saw him go towards the door. I told him he had taken two books - he refused to stop. I told Saunders, and the prisoner turned round, produced them from his pocket, and begged forgiveness.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded the greatest distress.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Recommended to Mercy.

Judgment Respited .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-31

380. JAMES EVANS was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of March , one handkerchief, value 3 s., the goods of William Ariell , from his person .

WILLIAM ARIELL . I am clerk to Messrs. Doriens bankers. On the 8th of March, about half-past twelve o'clock, I was at Guildhall at the election - the hall was much crowded. I felt somebody at my pocket, put my hand down, and missed my handkerchief, turned round, seized the prisoner and charged him with stealing it - he denied it. I took a handkerchief out of his waistcoat which was not mine, and returned it. An officer came up, and found my handkerchief in his bosom.

CHARLES BLIGH . I am a constable. I was in Guildhall, searched the prisoner, and found the handkerchief on him, which the prosecutor claimed.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN WILLIAMS . I searched the prisoner at the Justice-room, and found another handkerchief on him.

Prisoner's Defence. I saw the handkerchief on the ground, and picked it up, supposing it might have been stolen. Having no pocket I put it into my bosom.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-32

THIRD DAY, FRIDAY, APRIL 14.

381. CHARLES CRIDLAND was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of March , one handkerchief, value 6 s., the goods of Henry Coape Coates , from his person .

MR. HENRY COAPE COATES . I live in Essex-court, Temple. On the 14th of March, about half-past five o'clock in the afternoon, I was walking in the Strand , near Somerset House. A boy pulled my arm, and said,

"Your pocket has been picked," I immediately felt, and missed my handkerchief. I pursued in the way he directed me, and found the prisoner in the custody of a constable, who produced my handkerchief.

MR. WILLIAM ADAMS SMITH . I live at Purden; in Essex; I was in company with Mr. Coates. A boy came behind, and said his pocket had been picked, and the thieves had crossed the street. I joined in pursuit, and saw a man, who said two of them were gone one way, and one another. I saw the prisoner and a boy running up

Swan-yard, and Mr. Coates called out Stop thief! I found the prisoner in custody of Webb, and saw my handkerchief picked up in the direction he had run.

HAMMOND WEBB . I am a constable. I was at tea in my house in Clare-court, heard the cry of Stop thief! ran to the door, and saw Mr. Smith following the prisoner, who was coming from Drury-lane towards Blackmore-street; just as he turned into Blackmore-street I saw him throw the handkerchief down, and secured him about fifteen yards off. A woman picked it up and gave it to me.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY Aged 17.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-33

382. ROBERT STODHART and JOHN BASSETT were indicted for stealing, on the 29th of March , two watch-keys, value 10 s.; one brooch, value 10 s., and one pair of ear-rings, value 10 s. , the goods of Charles Garraway .

MARY GARRAWAY . I am the wife of Charles Garraway , who is a jeweller , and lives in Little Queen-street, Westminster . On Wednesday night, the 29th of March, about a quarter before eight o'clock, the prisoners came into the shop, and asked to see a gold seal; I was alone, and refused to shew them any. They then asked to look at some gold keys? and I shewed them four; they took them up, and asked the price of them? put them down, and drew a brooch towards them, which laid by me, and asked me the price of it? I said it was not for sale. They then reached farther across to a pair of garnet ear-rings; I said,

"Don't touch them, they are not what you asked for" - they then snatched up two gold keys, a brooch, and the ear-rings, and ran out. I followed them out, and there was a cry of Stop thief! but they got away; I am certain Stodhart is one, and believe Bassett to be the other, but am afraid to swear to him. They were apprehended next evening.

WILLIAM MILES . I am a constable. The prosecutrix sent for me, and I apprehended Stodhart at the corner of Chapel-street. I took him to the Castle, public-house, found the brooch in his waistcoat pocket, and a key dropped behind him - it must have dropped from him, as nobody was near him.

THOMAS PACE . I am an officer. I saw a mob before the public-house, went in, and assisted in searching Stodhart. I saw him throw the duplicate of a gold key away, which was pledged that day in the name of Bassett. I apprehended Bassett at the barracks near Buckingham Gate - he belongs to the 3d regiment of Guards. I told him that I took him on a charge of felony. He said,

"I suppose it is about the business of last night, being in company with Stodhart."

WILLIAM LANCE . I am shopman to Messrs. Graham and Co., who are pawnbrokers, and live in Stretton-ground, Westminster. On the 29th of March, about a quarter past eight o'clock, Bassett pledged a gold key with me in his own name.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

BASSETT'S Defence. I met Stodhart, and he asked me to pledge the key.

STODHART - GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

BASSETT - NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-34

383. WILLIAM PAINTER was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of George Gillings , about eleven o'clock in the night of the 3d of April , at St. Margaret, Westminster, with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, three coats, value 4 l.; two pair of trowsers, value 30 s.; three waistcoats, value 1 l., and one apron, value 6 d., his property .

JOSEPH PHILLIPS . I live in Greengate-row, Tothil-fields , in the parish of St. Margaret, Westminster, next door to Gillings's house, which has a garden before it. On the 3d of April they were out, and I heard a noise at their door or window - soon after that I heard a noise in the house. I went out, saw their garden gate open, and saw a light through a hole in the parlour window-shutter. In a short time I heard a noise at the window, saw it opened, and a man come out with something under his arm. He, came towards the gate, and I shut it, kept outside, and asked him what business he had there? He asked what business it was of mine. I collared him, and opened the gate; he threw the bundle behind the gate, ran back, and I with him. I held him till assistance came up. The light was put out before he came out.

GEORGE GILLINGS. I live in Greengate-row, and occupy the house. On Monday, the 3d of April, I went out about ten or eleven o'clock in the morning, and left my wife at home - I did not return home again. I went to my brother's with her between ten and eleven o'clock at night, and about eleven I was fetched home, and found Phillips with the prisoner in custody. He said in the prisoner's presence,

"Are those things behind the garden gate yours." I said Yes. I found no violence on the window or door.

ELEANOR LAWFORD . I was employed to nurse the prosecutor's child, and was there on Monday, the 3d of April. Gillings went out in the morning, I went out with his wife about ten o'clock at night, and took the child. I locked the door, kept the key, and shut the shutters to, but did not fasten them - they are outside; I am sure I shut the casement down - any one could open it from the street. I was the first person that entered the house after the prisoner was taken. I found the windows open, also a box and the drawers open. The articles stated in the indictment were taken out of a box which was not locked.

JAMES GILMORE . I was sent for, and took the prisoner and bundle into custody. A crow-bar was delivered to me next day by Gillings. I found about an inch of candle in the prisoner's pocket.

GEORGE GILLINGS re-examined. I found the crow-bar lying outside the window - the window slides aside. The articles are mine, and are worth 8 l.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going by the gate, and the gentleman charged me with the robbery - he dragged me into the garden.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 19.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18200412-35

384. WILLIAM JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of April , at St. Andrew, Holborn, forty-four yards of sheeting, value 3 l., the goods of David Finlayson and William Finlayson , in their dwelling-house .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating it to be the dwelling-house of the said David Finlayson only.

GEORGE DUNBAR . I live at the corner of Chancery-lane and Holborn, in the parish of St. Andrew, Holborn, and am servant to Messrs. David and William Finlayson , who are linen-drapers there - Mr. David lives in the house with his family, and Mr. William lives at the other shop in the Borough. On the 5th of April, between ten and eleven o'clock at night, I was shutting up the shop, and saw the prisoner come out with this sheeting under his arm. I ran in, spoke to Mason, then followed the prisoner, and caught him in Middle-row, with the sheeting under his arm; the watchman took it from him. He said he was not the person that took it.

HENRY MASON . I am the prosecutor's shopman. Dunbar came into the shop when the prisoner ran out. I took the sheeting from him; it cost 3 l. 12 s.

GEORGE SHIPLING. I am a watchman. I heard the cry of Watch! and assisted in securing the prisoner.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I beg for mercy.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 22.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18200412-36

385. JOHN SMITH was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Alfred Taylor , about twelve o'clock in the night of the 26th of March , at St. James, Westminster, with intent to steal .

ALFRED TAYLOR . I am a fishmonger , and live at No. 165, Piccadilly , in the parish of St. James, Westminster. On Sunday, the 26th of March, I went to bed last, about half-past ten o'clock at night. I fastened all the doors and windows myself; my house is at the corner of Villier's-court, into which I have a private door - I fastened that; there are two squares of glass in the door, each about ten inches by nine, one was broken on the Friday - the pane was broken quite out; I observed it to be so at three o'clock on Saturday morning, when I got up - it was perfect and firm on Friday night about ten. The prisoner was a cadee at the White Horse Cellar. On Sunday morning, about half-past one o'clock, the watchman called me up, and said a man was in my house; I came down, found nobody in the house, but found the prisoner's hat on the floor - he was gone to the watch-house. The bolts of the door and the double-lock were undone; but there was a secret latch which he could not undo - the shop-door was also open, but nothing taken. I went to the watch-house, found the prisoner there, and knew him. I neither threatened or promised him. I asked him how he got in, and what made him do it? he said he was coming up the court, saw the square broken, and thought he would get in. He said he had broken the square on the Friday.

DAVID EDWARDS . I am a watchman of St. James's. On the night, between Sunday and Monday, I was going my rounds at one o'clock; when I came to Mr. Taylor's house I heard something rattle in the shop - I passed by, and cried the hour three doors farther, but kept my eye on the door; I then returned, and heard a chain rattle - I also heard an iron bar make a noise and saw the door open. I stepped forward, pushed both the doors open, and found the prisoner in the shop without his coat and waistcoat. I charged him with robbing his master, and said I would see his master. I thought he was a servant. I alarmed the house; he ran in backwards and came back into the shop. I seized him, we both fell together, he got out and ran; I at last secured him, and took him to the watch-house. I saw a good deal of blood on the door in the court, just by the glass. When I got him to the watch-house I saw his hand was cut.

ROBERT NEEDHAM . I was constable of the night. The prosecutor delivered me a hat. I examined the prisoner's hand at the watch-house; it bled very much when he was brought in, and there was a large gash in his hand which appeared to be cut by glass. I found a small piece of glass in his pocket, which I compared with the piece took out of the door. It appeared the same kind of glass from the thickness and colour - it would not fit it. It was sticking in the top of his pocket, as if it had stuck there as he got through.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not say, I will sell you like a bullock at Smithfield - A. Never.

ANDREW HATWELL . I am servant to Mr. Taylor. I was going to my master's stables, in Bond-street, on Sunday night, between seven and eight o'clock, and saw the prisoner - I knew him before. He asked if I lived with Mr. Taylor? I said yes. He said, he supposed I slept at the top of the house. I said, I did not know whether it was the top or the bottom, I had but just come to live there. He asked who slept on the first floor, I gave him no answer and left him.

WILLIAM TAYLOR. I thought some drunken man had broken the glass, as it was about the height for a man to break.

His LORDSHIP in summing up the evidence, desired the Jury to consider whether they were of opinion that the prisoner broke the glass on the Friday night, with intention to enter at another time.

GUILTY. Aged 20. This case is reserved for the consideration of the Twelve Judges .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18200412-37

386. HENRY ODELL was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Ware , about twelve o'clock in the night of the 10th of April , with intent to steal .

JOHN WARE . I live at Wapping-wall , and keep the Prospect of Whitby , public-house. About the 12th of April, I shut up at eleven o'clock. Between twelve and one, the watchman disturbed me. I found a square of glass cut out of the tap-room window, but the shutter, which is an inside one, was not broken.

The COURT held this to be no burglary. NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18200412-38

387. JOHN PETRIE was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of February , in the dwelling-house of Charles Hepburn , one coat, value 2 l.; and one order for payment of and value 35 l., his property; one other coat, value 2 l.;

and one pocket-book, value 6 d. , the property of William Tuckey .

JOHN ASHDOWN . I am a baker, and live at Harbour-square, Commercial-road. On the 22d of February, about one o'clock, I saw the prisoner passing the house with two other boys. He had a blue coat on his arm. He left the other two, went behind a stack of bricks, and doubled the coat up in his apron which he had on. I followed, and as soon as they saw me they ran, and in crossing the ditches towards Stepney Church, the prisoner threw the coat into the ditch. Mr. Shord, who is not here, picked it up. I stopped the prisoner and took him to the prosecutor's house. As we brought him back we found a pocket-book within ten yards of the prosecutor's door. Shord brought the coat to the prosecutor.

CHARLES HEPBURN . I live at Harbour-terrace . On the 22d of February, when I came home, I heard of the robbery. The pocket-book contained a cheque for 35 l. I had given it to Mr. Tuckey, to pay into Messrs. Hankeys'. I have since lost the cheque.

WILLIAM TUCKEY . I am assistant to Mr. Hepburn, who is a surgeon . He gave me the cheque, and I put it into my pocket-book, which was in my great-coat side pocket, and hung in the hall - the door was open. I missed the great-coat. It was brought back in about ten minutes by Shord. Ashdown brought the prisoner in, and said, in his presence, that he detected him with the coat. I found Mr. Hepburn's coat on the steps.

JOHN BROWN. I am a constable. On the 22d of February I took the prisoner into custody.

(Coats produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A man threw the coat on my shoulder.

GUILTY . Aged 11.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18200412-39

388. MARIA COLEMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of March , one mantle, value 6 s.; three gowns, value 20 s.; one petticoat, value 2 s.; one shift, value 1 s.; one bonnet, value 12 s.; one cap, value 20 s.; two strings of beads, value 7 s.; one veil, value 10 s.; one spencer, value 10 s.; one ring, value 8 s.; one handkerchief, value 10 s.; one shawl, value 2 s., and one tea-caddy, value 5 s., the goods of William Owen , in the dwelling-house of Thomas Ingram .

ELIZABETH OWEN . I am the wife of William Owen . We live in Bedfordbury , and lodge in the house of Thomas Ingram . The prisoner came to lodge with me as a servant out of place four weeks before the robbery. On the 27th of March, about twelve o'clock, I went out and left her in care of my two children - returned about two, and found she had left the children by themselves. I found four drawers broken open, and missed the articles stated in the indictment. On the Wednesday following, between ten and eleven o'clock, I met her coming through the Horse Guards, with my mantle, bonnet, gown, petticoat, and shift on. I gave her in charge.

WILLIAM WALLIS . I am a constable. I took the prisoner in charge. The prosecutrix gave the prisoner into my charge, and claimed the things she had on. The prisoner confessed they were hers, and told me she lodged at No. 17, New-way, Westminster. I went there, and found a gown, a tea-caddy, and a few beads - a shawl and gown were given to me. The prisoner had the ring on her finger.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18200412-40

389. JOHN TODD was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of March , one box, value 2 s.; four shirts, value 10 s.; four waistcoats, value 4 s.; ten handkerchiefs, value 10 s.; two pair of stockings, value 5 s., and two pair of gloves, value 2 s. , the goods of William Town .

SECOND COUNT, the same only stating them to belong to Edward Dyson .

WILLIAM TOWN . I am a surveyor , and live in Rupert-street. About the 10th of March, I sent a box of linen to the Golden Cross, Charing Cross, to be forwarded to Tunbridge, Kent, to be washed. It ought to have been returned about the 17th, but was not.

EDWARD DYSON . I keep the Black Bear Cellar . Bidmead, the porter, left the box at my office for Mr. Town, and said he would call for it in the morning. I locked the office up between nine and ten o'clock at night, the box was safe then. Next morning, about six o'clock, I missed the box and a flat of butter. My desk was broken open.

CHARLES BIDMEAD . I am porter at the Golden Cross. On the 17th of March, about eight o'clock at night, I left the box at the Black Bear, having forgot to leave it in Rupert-street, and it being late. It came by the Tunbridge Wells coach.

GEORGE PAVEY . I am porter to Mr. Dyson. I locked up the warehouse at night, and saw the box safe. I came at half-past five in the morning, found the box and other things gone, and the desk broken open.

WILLIAM HARDING. I am apprentice to Mr. Ashman, pawnbroker, in the Strand. On the 18th of March, the prisoner pledged a handkerchief for 18 d., in the name of Turner.

THOMAS JONES . I am servant to Mr. Temple, a pawnbroker, of Panton-street, Haymarket. On the 21st of March, a person came and pledged a pair of white silk stockings for 2 s., in the name of James Todd . I believe the prisoner to be the man.

ROBERT SPARROW . I am shopman to George Benton , a pawnbroker, who lives in High Holborn. On the 23d of March the prisoner pledged a waistcoat, five towels, and a pair of stockings, for 6 s., in the name of Todd. I am positive he is the man.

JOHN PEARSON . I am shopman to Mr. Conner, pawnbroker, Tottenham-court-road. On the 23d of March, the prisoner pledged a shirt, waistcoat, and one pair of stockings, for 3 s., in the name of Tarn, Crown-street, Soho.

THOMAS FLUDE . I live with Barker and Co., pawnbrokers, Stanhope-street. On the 24th of March, the prisoner pledged a shirt, one pair of drawers, two waistcoats, and two handkerchiefs, for 3 s., in the name of Turton.

ROBERT HILDES . I live with Mrs. Barrow, a pawnbroker, High-street, Bloomsbury. On the 22d of March, the prisoner pledged seven handkerchiefs, for 3 s., in the name of John Todd , Broad-street, Bloomsbury.

JOSEPH COOPER . I am a constable. On the 22d of March, I was taking the prisoner to prison, he had on a white under waistcoat, and a shirt, which Mr. Town claimed. His brother is a porter at the office that was broken open. Knowing that, I said,

"You have done a bad job for your brother." He said,

"My brother is not in it, and as I am in your power, I do not care what becomes of me - I will tell you the truth. There was nobody with me. I lifted up the cellar flap about half-past twelve o'clock at night, and got in by that means; remained there till four o'clock in the morning, then left with the box containing the property, together with a basket containing three dirty gowns and nine aprons, and a flat containing twelve lumps of butter," and that his brother's landlord sold the butter for him for 12 s. - that I should find the box and flat at his lodgings, and all the property except what he had pledged - and if I took off his handcuffs he would give me the duplicates. He gave me eight duplicates. He lodged at Mr. Brown's, Broad-street, Bloomsbury. I found the box there.

JOHN COBHAM . I apprehended the prisoner, and found two handkerchiefs round his neck.

JOHN LAPPAGE . I am shopman to Mr. Harris, who is a pawnbroker; the prisoner pledged a neck-handkerchief with me.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18200412-41

390. ROBERT HARMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of March , one coat, value 10 s.; one pair of trowsers, value 5 s.; two waistcoats, value 3 s.; and 2 s. 6 d. in monies numbered, the property of James Andrews ; one razor, value 2 s., and one padlock, value 9 d. , the goods of Richard Severs .

JAMES ANDREWS . On Good Friday evening I slept on board a barge at Milbank, Westminster , and I gave the prisoner leave to sleep there also, as he could not get to his own barge. I awoke, and heard a rumaging about the cabin, got up, and asked the prisoner what he was about. He said if I did not hold my noise he would serve me out. I told him not to take my things for I was but a poor boy. He took my clothes, went out of the cabin, and fastened me in. I got out at a little hole under the stern sheet, and saw him get on the wharf. I lost the articles stated in the indictment, and two quartern loaves which I had to take home to my mother.

RICHARD SEVERS . I am master of the barge . I lost a razor, and a padlock.

JAMES GILMORE . I found the prisoner in custody of some watermen, near Horseferry-road, on Sunday morning. I found duplicates of the prosecutors' things on him, also the razor and padlock.

THOMAS SALT . I am servant to a pawnbroker in Bridge-street, Lambeth. On Saturday morning, the 1st of April, the prisoner pledged a coat, two waistcoats, and a pair of boots, for 12 s.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Confined One Year .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18200412-42

391. LYDIA SMITH was indicted for stealing on the 1st of March , one 1 l. Bank note , the property of Joseph Brown .

JEREMIAH PIKE . I am servant to Mr. J. Brown, who is a silk-mercer , and lives in Henrietta-street, Covent-garden . The prisoner was servant to Miss Morris, who has apartments in the house. On Wednesday, the 1st of March, I missed a 1 l. note from the till. Next evening, two new dresses were found in the kitchen, belonging to the prisoner. Next morning I found they were purchased at Mr. Curtis's, in King-street. I found the note in his possession which I had lost. He would not say who he took it of. The shop had been left unlocked that night.

JAMES BARTLETT . I am watch-house keeper. On the 1st of March I was sent for and took the prisoner. She denied having the note, said she had changed one in St. Martin's-court, but it was not that. Next morning, I went to her and asked her how she could tell such a falsity, for I found the note where she bought the gowns. She cried and said she had taken it out of the till.

FRANCIS BLAZE . I am shopman to Mr. Curtis. On the 1st of March the prisoner bought two gowns for 17 s. 6 d. and paid us a note, but I cannot say whether it was that which Pike claims.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

392. LYDIA SMITH was again indicted for stealing, on the 1st of March , eight yards of bombasin, value 1 l.; two sheets, value 12 s.; one pillow-case, value 2 s.; one handkerchief, value 5 s., and one ring, value 5 s. , the goods of Jane Morris .

MISS JANE MORRIS . I live at Mr. Brown's; the prisoner was my servant. Eight yards of bombasin were cut off a piece which I had; I could not discover it till the time Mr. Brown lost his note, I then found it in her trunk, made up into a gown - it had been worn. I also found a pocket-handkerchief and the duplicate of a pair of sheets, which were mine.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18200412-43

393. WILLIAM CHANDLER was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of March , at St. Botolph, Without Aldgate, four handkerchiefs, value 17 s., the goods of William Spark , privately in his shop .

WILLIAM SPARK . I am a linen-draper , and live in the Minories , St. Botolph, Without Aldgate. The prisoner and two others came to my shop on Friday evening, the 10th of March, between five and six o'clock. One of his companions asked to see some black silk handkerchiefs, and I produced some - they all stood together. One of

them asked the price? they did not suit, and as all three were going towards the door to leave the shop, I saw the prisoner putting something under his jacket, near his arm - at that time I did not perceive that any thing had been taken from the counter. I followed them out, laid hold of the prisoner, and took from under his jacket four black silk handkerchiefs in one piece. I took him back, and sent for an officer, who took him into custody; they cost me 17 s. I saw nothing to induce me to suspect them - nobody was in the shop but myself.

JOSEPH STONE . I am a constable. I took the prisoner and handkerchiefs in charge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I left the Old George, public-house, with three other soldiers, and went to the shop to purchase four black handkerchiefs, which was one for each. After paying for them, as I considered, they left the shop, and told me to bring the handkerchiefs away, as they had paid for them, which I was doing when I was stopped. I expected they had paid for them, or I should not have attempted to take them.

WILLIAM SPARK re-examined. When I took hold of him he said,

"What do you take me for?" I said,

"You have my property." He said he had bought them, and given the price of them. They had not asked the price of these. One of them asked the price of a single one which had been cut off from another.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 22.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-44

394. CHARLES BAKER was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of April , from the person of Eliza Mary Ward , one pocket-pook, value 1 s., and one 1 l. Bank note, the property of John Ward .

ELIZA MARY WARD . I am the wife of John Ward , and live in Church-street, Bethnal-green. On the 12th of April, about half-past twelve o'clock, I was in Messrs. Todds' shop in Fore-street ; the prisoner was on my right hand side for some time - I was sitting on a stool with my pocket-book containing a 1 l. Bank note in my lap. The prisoner came and took it out of my lap; I turned round immediately, followed him, and rose an alarm, but he got out of the shop, and was stopped in Aldermanbury - my pocket-book has never been found; I cannot be mistaken in his person. When I saw him stopped I returned to the shop - he denied it.

PETER HOVEY . I am a barber. I was coming down Grub-street into Fore-street, and heard the cry, saw the prisoner running, and several people pursuing him. I followed, and took him by Aldermanbury Postern; he used very bad language and made a great resistance - he kicked me as hard as he could. I kept him till assistance came, then took him to Messrs. Todds, and saw Mrs. Ward, who charged him with taking her pocket-book out of her lap. He denied it, and said he would give her 13 s., to let him go.

RICHARD WILLIAM PEARCE . I am shopman to Messrs. Todds'. I sold the prisoner 3-16ths of Persian, which came to 4 1/2 d. I saw him start from Mrs. Ward, who was at the opposite side of the counter, pursued him, and kept him in sight till Hovey stopped him. I did not see him throw any thing away.

MATTHEW POLLACK . I am a constable. I took the prisoner in charge, and found 13 s. on him, which he offered Mrs. Ward to let him go.

Prisoner's Defence. I never saw the lady.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-45

395. MARY SULLIVAN was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of March , one pair of braces, value 3 s.; one shirt, value 3 s.; one handkerchief, value 1 s.; one night-cap, value 6 d., and one towel, value 6 d. , the goods of Thomas Birchfield .

THOMAS BIRCHFIELD . I live at Seven Oaks. On the 29th of March I came to town with a bundle containing the articles stated in the indictment - I was going into the hospital. I was much fatigued with my journey, and went into the Three Tuns, public-house, in Smithfield . I fell asleep, and when I awoke my bundle was gone, The prisoner was taken in about half an hour after.

WILLIAM MAXWELL . I am shopman to Mr. Reeves, who is a pawnbroker, and lives in Smithfield. On the 29th of March, between eleven and twelve o'clock, I took a handkerchief and shirt in pledge of the prisoner.

THOMAS PIKE . I am a constable. I took the prisoner in charge between two and three o'clock in the afternoon. The landlord of the house took me to John's-court, where I found her. She denied it, but I found the duplicates between two boards of the partition in her room.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 37.

Confined Six Months .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-46

396. JOHN STARKEY was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of April , at St. Ann, Blackfriars, one bag, valued 2 d., and 12 l. in monies numbered, the property of John Hawkins , in his dwelling-house .

JOHN HAWKINS . I keep the Glaziers' Arms, Water-lane , St. Ann, Blackfriars; the prisoner was my pot-boy - he came to me on the 3d of April. On Saturday night, the 8th of April, I had a bag containing 20 l. I saw it safe about a quarter before eleven o'clock - it should then have contained 13 l. in silver; the bag was in a little room attached to the bar. I shut up at eleven o'clock - the prisoner had access to the room - the bag was on the sideboard. The shutters were not closed at the usual time, therefore I enquired for the boy, but could not find him anywhere, and the bag of silver was missing - he had given me no notice of his intention to leave. On Sunday night I went over to his former master in St George's Fields, but did not find him there. On Wednesday he came voluntarily to me, and I charged him with stealing the bag of silver, but he denied it. I told him the officer had found the bag in his jacket-pocket at his grandmother's - he said nothing to it. I found no property on him.

JOHN WOODWARD . I am a butcher. I have been in the habit of getting the prosecutor silver. On Sunday night I carried him 20 l. in silver, and on Monday I heard it was stolen. I have since seen the bag - it is the same I took the silver in.

EDWARD WITTS I am a constable. I went to the

house of a person who called herself the prisoner's grandmother, in Cooper's-gardens, Hackney-road, and found a jacket and waistcoat hanging up. I saw Hawkins find a bag in it.

JOHN HAWKINS re-examined. It is the jacket and waistcoat that the prisoner wore on the Saturday night he left.

JOHN WOODWARD re-examined. I know the bag by the make, and the string being sewn about an inch down. I described it before I saw it.

JAMES BLANDFORD . I went with Witts, and took the bag out of the right-hand pocket of the jacket. Woodward described it exactly, before he saw it.

CHRISTOPHER ACOTT . I am a city officer. Last Wednesday morning I received the prisoner in charge.

Prisoner. I leave it to the Court.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 18,

Recommended to Mercy.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-47

397. EDWARD FREEMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of March , one handkerchief, value 1 s., the goods of Robert Munn , from his person .

ROBERT MUNN . I live in Redcross-square, Barbican. On the 14th of March, about half-past one o'clock in the afternoon, I was standing at the bottom of King-street, near Guildhall , on the last day of the election. I felt a great push behind me, turned round, and saw the prisoner about five yards from me. I collared him, and saw him drop my handkerchief from under his apron. I picked it up, and gave him in charge.

CHARLES MATTHEWS . I took the prisoner in charge, searched him, and found a silk handkerchief on him, which the prosecutor claimed.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-48

398. WILLIAM REA was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of March , one handkerchief, value 1 s., the goods of a person unknown, from his person .

CHARLES CLINE . I am a constable. On the 10th of March I saw the prisoner in Guildhall , at the election. I watched him for about an hour, and saw him try several gentlemens' pockets; at last I saw him take a handkerchief out of a gentleman's pocket, whom I do not know. I laid hold of him, took it from his hand, and asked the gentleman if he had lost any thing? he said he had not. I told him to feel, which he did, and said he had lost a blue and white handkerchief. I produced one, and he claimed it. I went to the Magistrate's room with the gentleman and the prisoner, but the Alderman had done sitting. The gentleman refused to give me his name, and I have never been able to learn it. I found another handkerchief in the prisoner's breeches.

Prisoner's Defence. I went to the election. The gentleman said the handkerchief was a good deal like his, but I will swear it is mine.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-49

FOURTH DAY, SATURDAY, APRIL 15.

399. WILLIAM MARCHANT was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of March , one spoon, value 4 s., the goods of Joseph Ollier , and one spoon, value 4 s. , the goods of John Austin .

JOSEPH OLLIER . I live in Queen-street, Westminster , the prisoner was my errand-boy . On the 14th of March I missed a spoon, and found it on the 20th, when he was in custody.

JOHN AUSTIN . I reside in Mr. Ollier's house. I missed a spoon, and found it at the office. I never gave the prisoner authority to pledge it.

WILLIAM LOWE . I am servant to Graham and Co., pawnbrokers. On the 13th of March the prisoner pledged a spoon with us.

JAMES WILLIAMS . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Chapel-street. On the 4th of March the prisoner pledged a spoon with me.

JAMES GILMORE . I apprehended the prisoner. His mother gave me two affidavits of duplicates of the spoons.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I found them in the dust-hole.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Fined One Shilling, and Discharged .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-50

400. GILBERT HAYES was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of March , at St. Margaret, Westminster , in the dwelling-house of Joseph Foot , the sum of 2 l. 15 s. in monies numbered, eight 5 l. and eighteen 1 l. Bank notes, the property of Lionel Corbold .

The prisoner, after every admonition from the Court to take his trial, persisted in pleading GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 21.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-51

401. WILLIAM RILEY was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of March , two check braces, value 35 s. , the property of His Royal Highness the Duke of York .

WILLIAM LOVETT . I am coachman to His Royal Highness the Duke of York. On Saturday evening, the 4th of March, I drove the carriage to Covent Garden Theatre, every thing was safe when I set out - I missed the check braces about ten o'clock, but did not know whether I lost them in going or returning. I drove through Long-acre both times.

HENRY HUTCHINGS . I am a constable of St. Pancras. On Saturday evening, the 4th of March, I was in Long-acre, and saw the prisoner at the top of James-street; I saw His Royal Highness's carriage turn up James-street; the footman was on the coach-box. The prisoner got up behind the carriage, and leaned over till he got to Little Newport-street, and in turning the corner of Leicester-square I saw his hand up, as if he was undoing the braces; he got off the carriage in Chandler-street, St. James's, with the braces in his hand. I took him into custody under the piazzas of the Opera House with the braces. I had been watching him three nights.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I picked them up.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Lord C. J. Abbott.

Reference Number: t18200412-52

402. DANIEL EVANS was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of March , at St. Pancras, six spoons, value 2 l., and three silver forks, value 30 s., the property of Richard Bligh , in his dwelling-house .

JOHN WILDMAN PAINE . I am servant to Richard Bligh , Esq. , who lives at No. 6, Tavistock-place, St. Pancras . On the 27th of March, about four o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner came to the house with a pair of shoes for Mrs. Bligh. He said he brought them from Mr. Perkins, Red Lion-street, he waited on the mat of the passage to know if they would fit, while I took them up stairs - my mistress said they were not for her, and I brought them down. He appeared to be standing in the same place - I was not absent three minutes. I gave him the shoes, and said they were not for us; he said it was a mistake, and he would go back and see where it was. I let him out, and in coming across the hall, nearly at the top of the kitchen stairs, I turned my eye, and saw the parlour door open - I thought I had not left it open; the cloth was laid for dinner. I went in and missed six desert spoons and three silver forks from the sideboard, which I had put there about a quarter of an hour before. Nobody else had been in the passage or dining-room during that time. I immediately ran out down a street, but did not see him. I ran to the end of Tavistock-place, and saw him running slowly down Wooburn-place. I called Stop thief, he ran faster down Bernard-street, and was stopped in Little Guildford-street, taken to the watch-house, and the property found on him in my presence, under his waistcoat, and in his breeches.

JAMES SMITH . I am an officer of St. Pancras. On the 27th of March, between four and five o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner was brought to the watch-house. I attempted to search him, but he pulled the spoons and forks from between his breeches and shirt, saying he would give them up.

SAMUEL GRANGER . I was going along Bernard-street, and heard the cry of Stop thief, the prisoner ran by and I stopped him, Paine was pursuing him.

MR. BLIGH. The property is mine, and cost about 8 l.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I can say nothing.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 45.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Richardson.

Reference Number: t18200412-53

403. DANIEL PARSONS and WILLIAM WILSON were indicted for stealing, on the 4th of March , one shawl, value 10 s., and five handkerchiefs, value 5 s. , the goods of William Smyth .

THOMAS SMYTH . I am shopman to Mr. Smyth, who is a linen-draper , and lives in Piccadilly . On the 4th of March, about nine o'clock in the morning, the prisoners came to the shop, and asked to see some calico, which I shewed them. I was stooping to get some more, turned my head, and saw Parsons take something from his greatcoat and put it into his pocket - I then missed a shawl, and told them so; Wilson said,

"Nonsense!" I jumped over the counter, and stamped with my foot for assistance; Wilson pushed me aside, and both ran out - they threw a handkerchief down. I pursued them; Parsons was stopped in Shepherd's-market. I followed Wilson and secured him, but found nothing on him. The shawl was never found.

Cross-examined by MR. BOLLAND. Q. Where was the handkerchief - A. It hung in the shop - I did not see them take it; they might have brushed it down as they ran out. I never saw the shawl in his hand - it was in the shop when they came in.

EDWARD WARD . I was in Shepherd's-market, heard the cry of Stop thief, and stopped Parsons, who was running.

PARSONS'S Defence. My great-coat was on my arm; I took my handkerchief out of my right-hand pocket, and put it into the left; the shopman said he had missed a shawl. I certainly ran out, being afraid I should injure my character.

WILSON'S Defence. I went to buy some calico, the shopman accused me of stealing the shawl, and I ran out.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Lord C. J. Abbott.

Reference Number: t18200412-54

404. WILLIAM FLEMMING was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of March , two half-crowns , the monies of Thomas Trafford .

ANN TRAFFORD . I am the daughter of Thomas Trafford , who keeps the Bull, public-house, in Bull-court, Strand . About three o'clock I left the bar and went to the door to speak to my brother - I returned, and missed two half-crowns from the till; the prisoner was quartered at our house, and was in the tap-room with three more soldier s at the time - he was about two yards from the tap-room door.

SARAH DOBSON . I am servant at the Peacock, public-house, Maiden-lane. On the 29th of March, about three o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner came with two other soldiers and had a pot of beer - he paid me a half-crown, and I gave him the change; afterwards Acroyd, who came in with him, called for a pot, another half-crown laid on the table, Acroyd pushed it towards me, and I gave him the change - I did not see who took it up.

JAMES ACROYD . I am a private in the First Regiment of Guards. I was at the Bull with the prisoner - he went into the bar, came out, and then had some beer. We went out together, he asked me to go into the Peacock; he paid a half-crown for a pot of beer, he told me to call for another pot, and put down another half-crown; I pushed it towards the girl, and the prisoner took up the change.

JOHN BLEXLEY . I am an officer. On the 29th of March, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I took the prisoner in charge at the Bull, public-house. I found two sixpences in his waistcoat pocket, and 2 s. in his shoe. I took Acroyd in charge at the same time, and found 15 d. in copper on him.

Prisoner's Defence. The half-crowns were my own.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Richardson.

Reference Number: t18200412-55

405. THOMAS SUMMERS and WILLIAM HOWARD were indicted for stealing, on the 17th of February , twenty-one pieces of leather, called high-shoe legs, value 30 s.; one other piece of leather, value 4 s., and eight calf skins, value 5 l. , the property of Thomas Whitemore , the elder .

THOMAS WHITMORE , JUN. I am son of Thomas Whitmore , who is a currier , and lives at Weston, in Kent . On the 3d of February, about seven o'clock in the morning, I missed this property, they were very wet, and not finished - they were all intended to be blackened, but were not done. On the 17th I found the eight calf skins in possession of Richardson.

JOHN WILLIAMS . I am a currier, and live in Petticoat-lane. Summers applied to me some short time before he was apprehended, he was then a stranger - a woman, named Shepherd, whom I knew, came with him; he asked if I could black him eight calf skins - I said I could; he then asked what I should charge - I said one shilling each. He told me to send my boy to Mrs. Shepherd's for them. She lived at No. 10, John-street, Kent-road. He said he was a shoemaker, and was going to make them up. I sent for them that evening, found them very large, and sent word that I must have 2 s. for doing them, I gave them to Richardson.

Cross-examined by MR. BOLLAND. Q. What day was this - A. I do not know - it might be six or eight days before he was apprehended.

WILLIAM OSBORNE . I am in the employ of Mr. Williams. I went to Mrs. Shepherd's, in John-street, for the skins; she directed a little girl to shew me Summers's house in John-street, I there saw another little girl, and she gave them to me - I took them to my master. I had seen her and Summers at my master's house that morning. About a fortnight after, the two prisoners came to my master's and brought ten pair of high-shoe legs, and another piece of leather to be blackened. My master fetched the officer.

THOMAS RICHARDSON . I am a currier. On the 10th of February Osborne delivered me eight calf skins.

TOBIAS LOVE . I am a constable. On the 17th of February I went to Mr. Williams's, and found the prisoners there, with a basket containing ten pair of high-shoe legs, and another piece of leather. I asked Summers, in the hearing of the other prisoner, what was in the basket - he said, some leather, which belonged to him. He said he was a shoemaker. I took them both into custody.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

SUMMERS'S Defence. Howard and I went to Gravesend on the 3d of February, we met a man with a bag, and took him up in our cart; he asked us to buy the leather, it being unfinished, I thought he had not come by it honestly; he said he bought it of a man who had failed, and I bought it of him.

HOWARD'S Defence. I have no more to say.

SUMMERS - GUILTY . Aged 25.

HOWARD - GUILTY . Aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Lord C. J. Abbott.

Reference Number: t18200412-56

406. THOMAS STEVENS was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of February , one cradle, value 5 s., and three baskets, value 3 s. , the property of William Scott .

EDWARD WARD . I am servant to William Scott , who lives in the Hay-market. On Sunday, the 27th of February, I saw the prisoner in Catherine-street, Strand, with a cradle and three baskets, which I knew to be my master's. I stopped him, and asked him where he got them? he said, from your master - I did not know him. I said,

"I suppose you did." He then threw them off his shoulder, and said he bought them of a man in Westminster. I took them up, and told him he might follow me if he liked; he said he would follow me as far as I went. When we were in the Strand I took a nail out of his hand, he then ran away. I followed him, and he was stopped in Chandos-street. I am sure he is the man.

WILLIAM SCOTT . My shop is in the Haymarket . I locked it up safe on Saturday night; on Sunday I found the locks taken off the doors.

JAMES ULLING . I was with Ward, and saw the prisoner with the baskets.

JOHN TRIBUT . I am an officer. I received the nail, and compared it with the padlock of the workshop - it fitted the marks on the door.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming up St. James's-street, and a man sold them to me for 7 s.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Richardson.

Reference Number: t18200412-57

407. WILLIAM NEALE was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Brown Wilson , about six o'clock in the night of the 16th of March , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing five books, value 5 s., his property, and six other books, value 10 s., the property of Gilbert Barber .

JOHN BROWN WILSON . I am a school-master , and live at College-house, Hackney . My school-room is in a house in the garden, which was formerly a dwelling-house. The upper room is a school-room. There is a staircase leading to it from my garden. On the 17th of March, about half-past seven o'clock in the morning, I found a square of glass had been broken in the door, and some books stolen from the the desk which is near the door. The door was not opened. A female servant went into the room before me, she is not here. I saw every thing safe at half-past eight o'clock - it was then dark.

GILBERT BARBER . I am apprentice to Mr. Wilson. I left the room about nine o'clock at night, all was safe then. Next morning, about seven o'clock, I found a piece of glass broken - it was light then. The servant went in before me. I missed six books off a desk by the door. A man could scarcely reach them through the broken pane.

BENJAMIN SALMON . I am watchman of Spitalfields. On the 17th of March, at a quarter before six o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner standing at the corner of Wentworth-street with a bundle under his arm - the day was just breaking. It was three quarters of a mile from the prosecutor's house. He said to me

"Watchman, can

you tell me where there is a cook-shop?" I said, what bundle is that? He said, a bundle of clothes. I took it from him - he then said a bundle of books. I asked him where he had brought them from? He said from Hackney, and was going to take them to Stepney, and they were his own. As I was taking him to the watch-house he ran away, and hid himself in a house. Another watchman brought him out. I am sure he is the person.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I was in the greatest distress.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Of stealing but not of the burglary.

Confined Six Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Lord C. J. Abbott.

Reference Number: t18200412-58

408. ELIZA LUX and ELIZABETH TOPES were indicted for stealing, on the 1st of April , 12 yards of ribbon, value 6 s. , the goods of Giles Redmayne and Thomas Redmayne .

BRYAN CHARLESWORTH . I am servant to Messrs. Giles and Thomas Redmayne , who are silk-mercers , and live near Bond-street . On the 1st of April, between six and seven o'clock in the evening, the prisoners and another female came to our shop, and looked at a drawer of pink ribbons. They were about five minutes in the shop, then went out, saying, none would suit them. About half-past eight o'clock, Mr. Cope's young man came down. I then missed a piece of ribbon from the drawer I had them in.

THOMAS KING . I am servant to Messrs. Cope and Morrison, haberdashers, Oxford-street. On the 1st of April, the prisoners and and a young girl came to the shop. In consequence of what was missed, they were taken into custody in our shop. One of the young ladies found this piece of pink ribbon on them.

ELIZA BOURNE . I am shopwoman to Messrs. Cope and Co. The prisoners were in the shop. I was requested to search them up stairs. I found a piece of pink ribbon on Topes, in her pocket.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

LUX - GUILTY . Aged 19.

TOPES - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Judgment Respited .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Richardson.

Reference Number: t18200412-59

409. ANN ANDERSON was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of March , one coat, value 10 s., and one pair of gloves, value 1 d. , the goods of James Wightman .

JOHN OLDRINIE . On the 4th of March, about two o'clock in the afternoon, I was at Mr. Gosling's, in St. Martin's-lane , and saw the prisoner coming down stairs with something under her shawl. Before she got out I called to her, but she went on. I followed her into the next house, and she there asked for Mrs. Smith. I asked what she had got there? she said only a sack; which a woman gave her to take to Mrs. Smith. I took her back to Mr. Gosling's; Wightman claimed the coat.

JAMES WIGHTMAN . I am apprentice to Mr. Gosling. My coat and gloves were in my box on the second floor.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 45.

Confined Six Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Lord C. J. Abbott.

Reference Number: t18200412-60

410. JOSEPH MOORE was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of February , 8 lbs. of butter, value 8 s. , the goods of James Field .

JAMES FIELD . I keep a chandler's-shop in Artillery-row . On the 17th of February, about seven or eight o'clock in the evening, I was at work, and lost some butter. Susan Perrin gave me information, I ran out, and saw the prisoner come from a dark corner by Tothil-fields prison, with a bag under his arm, he was whistling. I asked him what he had got there? he said he found it, but did not know what it was. I took him back, and found the butter in the bag - he resisted going along. A cheese-knife was found on him, which I knew to be mine.

SARAH FIELD . I am the wife of the prosecutor; I was in the parlour behind the shop, my attention was called by Perrin; I ran out, found the butter had been pulled through the window, which had been broken, and a board put against it to secure it.

SUSAN PERRIN . I live opposite Mr. Field. About seven o'clock in the evening I saw two boys at his window - I went out and saw a boy's arm come out of the window, I immediately ran and told Mrs. Field, the boy was about the size of the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked it up.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Richardson.

Reference Number: t18200412-61

411. JONAS MYERS was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of March , one watch, value 3 l.; one seal, value 1 s., and one key, value 2 d., the property of Golden Harridge , from his person .

GOLDEN HARRIDGE. I am apprentice to a law-stationer, in Carey-street. On the 11th of March, at night, I went to a surgeon's in Seven Dials; I was returning between eleven and twelve o'clock at night with Hudson. When we got under the Piazza in Covent Garden , the prisoner came up and dodged us to prevent our passing; I thought nothing of it then, but he returned and dodged before us again - I pushed him off, and immediately missed my watch. I told the watchman, and ran into the market, but could not find him; we then went to the theatre door and saw him. He ran away, I pursued, and the watchman stopped him. I charged him with stealing my watch, he said,

"Do you mean to say that I have it?" A number of persons assembled, I was pushed into the court, and he was taken to the watch-house. On the way to the watch-house I was suddenly seized by the mob, very ill-used, and had my jaw-bone broken - I am certain he is the man, I had a full view of his face. My watch was safe just before - I have not found it.

ROBERT HUDSON . I am the prosecutor's fellow-apprentice, and was with him. The prisoner came before us, and dodged us - I am certain he is the man; he left us and came again. Harridge pushed him away, and immediately said he missed his watch. We found the prisoner at the corner of the Piazza; he set off as hard as he could run, but was stopped. I am sure he is the man; a mob came round, and said he should not go to the watch-house. They struck the prosecutor very violently, and broke his jaw-bone.

WILLIAM JACKSON . I am a watchman. I heard the cry of Stop thief! and saw the prisoner running, followed, and secured him at the end of Russell-street. He cried out to the mob,

"Come on, and I will get away!" About twenty came up to rescue him, and struck me on the head. I at last got him to the watch-house.

Prisoner's Defence. I went to the play with my sister, and lost her coming out, heard the cry of Stop thief! and ran. The gentleman stopped me - I never saw the watch.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Lord C. J. Abbott.

Reference Number: t18200412-62

412. WILLIAM NICHOLL was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of March , 24 books, value 15 s. , the goods of the Masters and Wardens, Brethren and Sisters of the Guild, or Fraternity of the Blessed Mary the Virgin, of the mystery of Drapers of the City of London .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating them to be the property of George Peche .

THIRD COUNT, the same, only stating them to be the property of Charles Durham .

MR. BARRY conducted the Prosecution.

FREDERICK GIBBONS . I belong to Bancroft's Alms-houses . On the 31st of March, about six o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner running over the garden-ground behind the house. I jumped over the wall, and caught him in the gardens with a bundle on his back, containing these books. He said they were his.

CHARLES DURHAM . I am second master of the hospital , and have the care of the books. They belong to the Drapers' Company.

Prisoner. Distress drove me to it.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Three Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Richardson.

Reference Number: t18200412-63

413. JOSHUA COLES was indicted for embezzlement .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 36.

Confined Three Months .

Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-64

414. WILLIAM POWERS was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of April , one watch, value 10 s.; two seals, value 6 d., and two keys, value 1 d., the goods of William Clapson , from his person .

WILLIAM CLAPSON . I keep a pork-shop in Chancery-lane. On the 7th of April, about eight o'clock in the evening, I stopped for a necessary purpose at the corner of Bolt-court, Fleet-street , and all of a sudden my watch was snatched from me. I saw somebody start from me, and called out Stop thief! a young man pursued, and secured him by Gough-square. I came up and found the prisoner in custody. My watch was produced.

JOHN OVER. I am a butcher, and live in Fleet-market. On the 7th of April I turned into Bolt-court, the prosecutor was against the wall. I saw the prisoner take something from the prosecutor's breeches and run off with it. I pursued him, calling Stop thief! and saw him stopped in Gough-square - the watch was picked up, and delivered to the prosecutor. The prisoner behaved very bad, and made use of bad language - he told me to be on my guard, for if he was in confinement there were those who would mark me, and he did not care for himself, for he was as well out of the country as in it and he knew we could not rope him for this.

THOMAS AUBREY . I am a painter. I was entering Gough-square, heard the cry of Stop thief! and saw the prisoner running towards me. I stopped him, delivered him to two other people, and picked the watch up about two yards from him, in the way he had run - nobody could have thrown it there but him.

GEORGE GUSHAM . I am a hatter. I was coming down Fleet-street, heard the cry, and ran into Bolt-court, saw the prisoner stopped, and saw him throw something from him. The watch was picked up by Aubrey. He said he could not be roped, only sent out of the country.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-65

415. ROBERT EMMERSON was indicted for embezzlement .

MR. JOHN JEPSON . I am a spice and drug-broker , and live in Cannon-street ; the prisoner was my clerk , and had been two months in my service. He was employed to receive monies on my account, and ought to pay them over to me daily, as he received them. On the 29th of January he absconded without my knowledge, and on the 9th of February I received this letter from him, which I know to be his writing - (read).

SIR,

HAVING received several sums of money, and not having accounted properly for them, I beg to inform you that I have supplied a countryman of mine, who is in the King's Bench; he deceived me with promises of payment every week, but has deceived me. I have to inform you that I have an assignment of 250, which I will not part with till I have received all that I have lent. I hope next week to be able to refund you the sum of 32: 14: 4, which is your just demand upon me; I have now received 12: 13: 7, which I will settle on Monday. Having so much deceived you, you need not wonder at my leaving, which I should not have done but for the disgrace.

GEORGE CHAPPLE . I live in Ray-street, Clerkenwell, On the 20th of January, I paid the prisoner three 1 l. notes. and 5 s. 7 d. for Mr. Jepson.

MR. JEPSON re-examined. The prisoner never accounted to me for this sum. He mentioned it in a list of what he says he owes me.

RICHARD MEAD . I am clerk to Messrs. Coutts, who are bankers in the Strand. Our clerk, who is in the country, paid the prisoner 207 l. 5 s. 10 d. I produce the prisoner's receipt.

GUILTY . Aged 29.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-66

416. LUCY WILSON was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of October , one gold ring, value 10 s.; four printed bound books, value 6 s., and four fans, value 1 s. , the goods of David Kerr .

DAVID KERR . I am a fan-maker , and live in Castle-street,

Falcon-square ; the prisoner worked for my wife, who is a milliner. We lost these things.

JOHN MATTHEWS . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Whitecross-street. On the 30th of October a ring was pledged with me in the name of Stewart. I do not know who pledged it.

JOHN RICHMOND . I am servant to Mr. Samuel Sadler , who is a pawnbroker, and lives in Aldersgate-street. Four books were pledged with me, two in the name of Stewart, and two in the name of Ann Wilson , but I do not know who pledged them.

WILLIAM TAYLOR . I am a constable. I found duplicates of the books and ring in the prisoner's box, also four fans.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Two Months .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-67

417. WILLIAM BURN was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of March , twelve yards of ribbon, value 7 s , the goods of John Meredith .

JOHN MEREDITH . I am a haberdasher , and live in Cannon-street . On the 17th of March, in the morning, I put a drawer of ribbons in the window. I went out about one o'clock, returned about five, and found that a piece had been taken out during my absence. A square of glass had been broken, but it was whole when I left.

JOHN COATES . I am a warehouseman, and live near the prosecutor. I saw the prisoner about half-past four o'clock in the afternoon, take a piece of ribbon out of the window, and put it into his pocket. A pane of glass was broken - I secured him. Another boy was with him whom I suspected.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-68

418. MARY READING was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of August , one sheet, value 3 s., and one shift, value 6 s. , the goods of James Blain .

JAMES BLAIN . I live in Cursitor-street . The prisoner came to live with me as servant , in August, and left me about a month ago. I charged her with robbing me - she was taken up, and gave me fifteen duplicates.

JAMES HOPPER . I am apprentice to Mr. Gardeen, who is a pawnbroker. and lives in Stanhope-street. On the 31st of August a shawl and shift were pledged with me - I do not know who by.

GEORGE WORRALL . I apprehended the prisoner - she said she pledged them.

GUILTY . Aged 47.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-69

419. ANTHONY PERRIGALL was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of March , one handkerchief, value 2 s., the goods of Thomas Pryer , from his person .

THOMAS PRYER . I live in Fenchurch-street. On the 8th of March I was in Guildhall-yard , returning from the hall at the election time. I was hustled by a number of persons - the prisoner was close behind me, and on looking round I saw my handkerchief in his breast. I secured him, with assistance, and he let it fall.

JOHN MARKS . I am a shoemaker. I was in Guildhall-yard, and saw the prisoner hustling to get away from the gentleman. I caught hold of him, and saw the handkerchief drop from him. Mr. Pryer picked it up.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I picked it up.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-70

420. HENRY RONEY was indicted for privately stealing, on the 30th of March , at St. Giles's in the Fields , one pair of trowsers, value 15 s. the goods of Benjamin Hoyle , in his shop .

The prisoner pleaded, GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 42.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-71

421. ISABELLA MARSDEN was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of February , one table-cloth, value 2 s., and one cloak, value 8 s. , the goods of Ann Godfrey .

ANN GODFREY . I live at Split's-terrace, Wapping - these things were sent to me to be mangled. On the 19th of February, about eleven o'clock at night, the prisoner called for a shift of hers - I was in the back room, and she was in the front room where the things were; nobody but her came there that night. Next morning I missed these things, and found them at her lodgings.

ELIZA MARSELLA . The prisoner lodged with me. She sent my servant to me with these things, and I lent her 1 s. 9 d. on them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was intoxicated, and cannot say what I did. I received my bundle from the prosecutrix's mother, and found these things in it. I sent the servant to borrow a few shillings on them.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Confined Two Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-72

422. ALEXANDER FRAZER was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of James Clift , about eight o'clock in the night of the 17th of March , at St. Andrew, Holborn, with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, one toast-rack, value 2 s., and two silver spoons, value 6 s., his property .

JAMES CLIFT , I am a solicitor , and live in New Ormond-street , St. Andrew, Holborn. On the 17th of February, between eight and nine o'clock in the evening, I heard a noise in the back parlour - daylight was entirely gone. I entered it, and saw the prisoner run across the room; he made his escape out of the parlour window into the street - mine is a corner-house, and the back parlour window leads into the street as well as the front. I jumped out, and pursued him some distance, knocked him down, and brought him back to the house - he had no property about him. I found my servant in possession of the property. I lost a plated toast-rack, and two silver spoons, worth about 8 s. together; a dark lanthorn was found outside the area railing - I had not moved the property from the side-board. My wife and servant were the only persons in the house.

SARAH CLIFT . I was in the back parlour about ten minutes before this happened - I went for the purpose of seeing that the window was closed, and left it closed - I put these things on the side-board myself. The prisoner was a stranger.

SARAH LYNCH . I am the prosecutor's servant. I had shut the back parlour window in the morning, and saw these things there about eleven o'clock, on the side-board. On hearing the alarm I went into the room, and went to the window which was open; the spoons and toast-rack laid on the ground inside, close by the window - I gave them to the officer. I am the only servant - I had not thrown them there.

MR. CLIFT re-examined. My wife and servant were the only persons in the house.

RICHARD HATTON. I am a constable. I received the prisoner and property in charge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing about the lanthorn.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 11.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-73

423. JOHN BELLOWES was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of March , at St. Luke, one watch, value 2 l.; one chain, value 2 s., and one seal, value 1 s., the goods of Edward Rowland ; one watch, value 2 l.; one coat, value 30 s., and three waistcoats, value 20 s., the goods of David Brees , in the dwelling-house of Evan Ellis .

DAVID BREES . I am a porter , and lodg at Evan Ellis 's, Cherry Tree-court, Upper Whitecross-street - I sleep on the second floor; the prisoner and Rowland sleep in the same room. On the 11th of March I went to bed about twelve o'clock - the prisoner slept by himself; he was in bed before me. Rowland awoke me about four o'clock in the morning - the prisoner was then in the room; I missed my watch from under the pillow - my coat and three waistcoats were in the cupboard; I saw them safe on Thursday. I afterwards saw my property, and knew it to be mine. The prisoner was a porter in Ironmonger-lane.

EVAN ELLIS . I am landlord of the house in Cherry Tree-court, Upper Whitecross-street, St. Luke's. Brees came down, and awoke me. I got a candle, found Brees' coat and three waistcoats doubled up, and laying on his own bed.

ROBERT GOULD. I am a watchman. On Saturday morning, the prisoner was given into my charge. The clothes were on the bed. One watch was on the table, and the other in the prisoner's hand.

EDWARD ROWLAND . I slept with Brees. About four o'clock in the morning, I heard the door open, which awoke me. I called to the prisoner, who was in the room out of bed. I heard him dress himself, he said nothing. I asked

"Who was there again?" he said, me. I said

"What are you doing?" he said, nothing. I jumped up found my clothes and my box as they ought to be, but found my watch taken from my pocket. I said,

"Where is my watch?" he said I do not know, I saw it on the table just now; and at that time I saw my watch in his hand, and saw him put it on the table. Brees jumped up and enquired for his watch. He said he did know - he then put his hand in his pocket, and delivered it up. Brees's clothes were on the bed. My watch is worth 2 l. We sent for the watchman. There is a lamp opposite the window which enabled me to see the prisoner at the table. He had both the watches.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I was out of employ.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 35.

Recommended to Mercy.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-74

424. WILLIAM MAIL was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of February , at Paddington, in the dwelling-house of George Skillecorn , two 1 l. Bank notes, his property .

GEORGE SKILLECORN . I keep the White Lion, Edgware-road, Paddington . I rent the house - the prisoner was my pot-boy . On Monday, the 8th of February, we took these two notes, and on Tuesday, the 31st of February, I and my wife went to Edmonton, and on our return, about five in the afternoon, we found him drunk. Between eight and nine o'clock, some shoes were brought home for him. He said to the shoemaker, the hostler will pay for them. as he has got money of mine in hand. His name is Bagwell. I took no notice till next morning at six o'clock. I then rung the hostler's bell - he produced the two 1 l. notes to me. In consequence of what he said, I sent for a constable. I never paid him more than 5 s. at a time, and could not have paid him a 1 l. note. He came to live with me in January.

HANNAH SKILLECORN. I am the wife of the last witness. On the 8th of February, I received those two 1 l. notes, and wrote the persons name on them, and laid them on the table to dry. I got up and turned round to serve a customer. I did not leave the bar, and in about a minute they were gone. My husband was in the bar, and went out; I thought he had taken them. I cannot say whether the prisoner was near me or not, it was about half-past seven o'clock.

GEORGE SKILLECORN re-examined. I do not know whether the prisoner was near or not at the time, and if he had been I should not have suspected him.

JOHN BAGWELL . I am hostler at the house. I received the two notes from the prisoner on a Monday, three days before I shewed them to my master, as near as I can guess.

RICHARD COATES . I am a constable. On the 1st of March the prisoner and notes were given into my charge. I neither threatened nor promised him. I asked him

where he got the two notes from. He said he received them from a man that came out of the country, and he had had them about three weeks. As I was taking him to the Compter, I said,

"I suppose you can produce the man you received them of?" he said, it is no use telling any lies, I took them out of my master's bar. I produce them.

Prisoner. Q. Did I not say I found them in the bar - A. No. -He said he took them.

HANNAH SKILLECORN . They are the notes.

Prisoner's Defence. I went to light the bar fire, and picked up a roll of paper. I was going to light the fire with it but saw it was notes, and put them in my pocket, expecting that if they belonged to my master they would be enquired for. In three weeks I gave them to the hostler, and made use of them.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 19.

Recommended to Mercy.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-75

425. JOHN ANDERSON was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of February , 14 lbs. of beef, value 7 s. , the property of James Griffin .

JAMES GRIFFIN . I live in Stretton-ground, Westminster . The beef was on my shop-board. I went out about seven o'clock, and found the prisoner in custody with it.

THOMAS GRITTIGE . I live opposite Griffin's. I saw the prisoner lurking about - watched him - and saw him take part of a rump of beef and walk away with it. I followed and secured him, about sixty yards off. He then dropped it.

Prisoner's Defence. I was not a running.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Whipped and Discharged .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-76

426. WILLIAM KING was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of April , twenty-four pair of gloves, value 30 s. , the property of John Frazer .

WILLIAM GREEN . I am shopman to John Frazer , who is a haberdasher , in Sloane-street . On the 4th of April, about half-past one, the prisoner came to my shop and asked if any thing was wanted. He was an artificial-flower maker, and we dealt with him occasionally. He waited about ten minutes, and as he left the shop I saw him take the gloves off the counter, and put them in his coat pocket. I rang the bell and sent the young man after him, but he could not find him. Next morning I saw him in custody.

ELIZABETH CAMPBELL . I live in London-road, Newington. On the 4th of April, about four o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner offered me a dozen and a half pair of gloves for sale. He said he was brought up to the business. I gave him 9 s. for them. Next morning Frazer claimed them.

MARY ROSS . I live in Bedford-street, Covent-garden, and deal in ladies wardrobes. On the 4th of April, about three o'clock, the prisoner brought two dozen gloves to me. I refused to buy them, as they were new. He said he was distressed, and I bought six pair for 5 s.

ALFRED POPLE . I apprehended the prisoner. He denied the charge, but as we went along, he said he did take them, and told me where he sold them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I have been better off in the world, and through the death of the King I have been in great distress, trade being very bad.

GUILTY . Aged 38.

Fined One Shilling, and Discharged .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-77

427. WILLIAM DOYLE was indicted for stealing, an the 19th of January , one cloak, value 3 l; one petticoat, value 5 s.; one tea-spoon, value 2 s., and eight pieces of silver money, value 2 s. 4 d., the property of William Cribb , in his dwelling-house .

WILLIAM CRIBB . I live in Tavistock-street, Covent-garden ; the prisoner was my errand-boy . I lost these things about the latter end of December; the cloak was very old fashioned, and had not been worn for some years - it was in a box on the landing-place of the top of the house. On the 16th of February I had him apprehended, taken to Hatton-garden. I went to him afterwards to the lock-up-room, and asked him his motive for robbing me? He said he ought to have been the last person to rob me, in consequence of the kindness I hat treated him with - he enumerated the several articles that he had robbed me of, began to cry, and said that if I would forgive him, he would confess all. I said on no condition would I forgive him? he said he had sold the cloak to a Jew in Gray's Inn-lane. I got a warrant and found it there. I found the other things in pawn.

MOSES DAVIS . I keep a sale-shop in Gray's Inn-lane. About three weeks before the officer came to my house, a man, whom I knew before, brought this cloak for sale - I offered him 6 s. for it, he refused that, and I told him to go and see if he could get more. In about an hour after, he brought it, and said his brother sent him with it - I gave him 5 s. for it; it was very old fashioned.

GEORGE LAWRENCE. I am servant to Mr. Townsend, who is a pawnbroker, and lives in Russell-street, Covent Garden. On the 30th of October the prisoner pledged a petticoat with me for 3 s.

THOMAS PERRY . I am apprentice to Mr. Hulme, a pawnbroker, in Museum-street. On the 25th of January the prisoner pledged a tea-spoon and eight coins with me for 4 s.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only.

Confined Six Months , and Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-78

428. SAMUEL STORR and HENRY LOYLD were indicted for stealing, on the 11th of March 47 lbs. of mutton, value 30 s.; 12 lbs. of beef, value 10 s.; 8 lbs. of suet, value 5 s., and one tongue, value 5 s., the goods of Abraham Slade and John Slade , in the dwelling-house of the said Abraham Slade .

ABRAHAM SLADE . I am a butcher , and in partnership with my brother John Slade ; we live in Tottenham Court-road , my brother lives opposite; the prisoner, Storr, was our servant , and slept in the house - Lloyd was a stranger. On the 11th of March, between seven and eight o'clock in the morning, Howard, the watch-house keeper, came and asked if we had missed any meat? I could not miss any, on account of the quantity we have, but I am certain we

had this meat in the shop. Storr went with me to the watch-house, where I saw the meat and Lloyd in custody. I asked Storr, on his return from market, if he had sent out any meat or missed any? he said No. I told him a man had been taken to the watch-house with the meat, and as he was my foreman, he could have no objection to accompany me to the watch-house to see if it was mine. He went with me, and at first said it was not mine. I said it depended very materially on his conduct how he should be dealt with, and desired him to tell me how the meat came there. In consequence of what he said I left him in custody. There was a piece of bone in the meat projecting out in a particular manner - it was torn - I compared it with a piece of beef in my shop which it was cut from, which perfectly satisfied me it was mine. I have preserved the bone, and produce it. The mutton was of the same quality with that in my shop, and it is not well dressed, having been done by my apprentice.

WILLIAM ALDRIDGE . I am a watchman. On Friday morning, the 11th of March, about a quarter past six o'clock, I saw the prisoner, Lloyd, coming out of Black Horse-yard, Tottenham Court-road, which leads to Messrs. Slade's back premises; he had a sack on his shoulder; I stopped him, and asked what was in it? he said,

"What is that to you?" I asked him where he was going with it? he said to St. Giles's, and I might go with him. I I said,

"You must go with me to the watch-house" - he said he should not; I insisted on it, sprang my rattle, and secured him. He threw the sack down and would not carry it - it contained beef, mutton, suet, and a tongue.

JOHN GARNER . I am in Messrs. Slades' service. I saw the mutton at the watch-house; I had cut it up the morning before, and am certain it had not been sold - it was safe in the house when I went to bed. Storr slept in the house; he got up earlier than me. We generally open shop about six o'clock in the morning; I got up a little after six. The meat was not sold that morning - I saw it at the watch-house about eight o'clock in the morning - it must have been stolen. Storr might have been in the shop alone for ten minutes or a quarter of an hour before I came down. I have never seen the two prisoners together. I was present when the beef was compared; it had been torn in a hurry.

Cross-examined by MR. BROADRICK. Q. Storr was gone to market before you came down - A. Yes. When I came down the door was shut - nobody could get in, except at the door. I found two of the hooks had had meat taken from them, but cannot say what meat had hung upon them.

HENRY HOWARD . I am the watch-house keeper. Lloyd was brought to the watch-house by the watchman; the meat was brought in a sack. He said he bought it, I asked where? he said that was nothing to me. I enquired at different shops. Garner came to the watch-house and claimed it as his master's. I then returned with him to the shop till Storr came in, and then Mr. Slade went with him and me to the watch-house. I shewed Storr the meat, and asked him if it was his master's? he said No; he said he could not tell whether the mutton was his master's or not, but the rest was not. I kept the prisoners separate, and told Storr that Lloyd said he gave it to him; he then turned to his master, said it was his first offence, and begged for mercy. No promise had been made to him.

JOHN GARNER . I compared the bones with the meat, they fitted.

STORR - GUILTY . Aged 24.

LLOYD - GUILTY . Aged 22.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-79

429. WILLIAM ARNOLD was indicted for feloniously assaulting Thomas Allison , on the King's highway, on the 3d of April , at St. Marylebone , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, one 1 l. bank note, his property .

The note in question was obtained from the prosecutor by threats to charge him with an unnatural crime.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 20.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-80

430. HENRY JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of April , forty-five yards of cotton, value 3 l. 8 s., and two yards of baize, value 2 s., the goods of William Miles , in his dwelling-house .

WILLIAM SALMON . I am a tailor, and live in Seymour-place. On the 5th of April the prisoner called on me, and asked me to new collar him a coat, which I did. On Thursday morning he called again, and brought a large parcel, and asked if I would purchase it - I said I would not. I did not open it then. He left it behind, and went to see Sir Francis Burdett chaired, and was to call for his coat. I shut my shop up between ten and eleven o'clock in the morning, and went to see the chairing myself. I left the parcel on my shopboard, returned at three o'clock, and found it still there. He came about four o'clock, and as I suspected it had been stolen I told him an officer had been enquiring after him (Ruthven had been), he said,

"For God's sake, has there, I must go." I said you shall not go unless you satisfy me where you got these things. I had opened it in his absence - it contained a piece of cotton; he set off, and ran away. I went after him, overtook him in about a minute, and asked him to satisfy me where he got the property; he said he would go with me to his father, who was in prison for debt, and this was property he had to sell to support him; we went as far as the Yorkshire Stingo, in the New-road, he then said he dare not go to his father, for he had robbed him, and that the property belonged to Mr. Miles, furniture warehouse, No. 33, Oxford-street. I wanted him to go there, he would not, and I took him to my house. He said,

"For God's sake, destroy it, or let me pledge it in your name." I said I should do nothing of the kind. We then set out to go to Mr. Miles; he said Mr. Miles had a man who had robbed him just before, and he had forgiven him, and if I would go to him, he would forgive him also. He was Mr. Miles's servant.

RICHARD COATES . I am a constable. On the 6th of April the prisoner was brought to the watch-house with this parcel; next day I got a search-warrant, went to Mr. Goldsmith's, Charlotte-street, Fitzroy-square, where he said he had a box, and gave me the key. He said his sister lived there. She shewed me his box, the key

opened it, and I found several pieces of cotton in it, wrapped in a piece of baize, which the prosecutor claimed.

ROBERT MILES . I keep a furniture warehouse , in Oxford-street ; the prisoner was my servant ; he left me on the 3d of April, of his own accord. On the 7th I went to the watch-house, and employed Coates to search the prisoner's box, and saw the things found. He might have taken them at different times.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18200412-81

431. EDWARD ROBERTS was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of December , at St. Botolph, Without Aldgate, in the dwelling-house of John Roberts , four watches, value 8 l.; two watch-chains, value 1 s. 6 d.; two seals, value 6 d.; two watch-keys, value 3 d., and thirteen 1 l. Bank notes, his property .

SARAH ROBERTS . I am the wife of John Roberts , who keeps the King's Arms, public-house, in Houndsditch , and rents the whole house. On the 30th of December four watches, and thirteen 1 l. notes were in a box under my bed. I saw them safe on Saturday morning, and missed them on the Thursday following, about half-past eleven o'clock in the morning - nobody could get up stairs without going through the bar; the prisoner was our servant - he slept in the house. He asked me on Thursday for a needle and thread to go up stairs to mend his clothes; his room is next to mine on the first floor. He came down in about ten minutes, stood by the taproom fire about two minutes, and was then going out, but I called him back to get me some sand. He came and took a penny, went out, and never returned - he had given me no notice. As soon as he went out I went up stairs, found my door open, and the box unlocked, with a pick-lock key in it - four watches and fourteen 1 l. notes were gone; I have not seen them since - I had been in the room about two hours before; the box was then under the bed. The doors were all safe just as I had left them. I afterwards found him in Tothil-fields. The bar was never left - nobody could have gone up.

Prisoner. Q. Was I in your employ - A. He was.

JOHN ROBERTS . The prisoner was in our service - we gave him his lodging for what he could do; I saw the box under the bed that morning. There is no means of getting to the room without going through the bar. He gave me no reason to suspect his going.

RICHARD GOODWIN . I am an officer of Aldgate; the prosecutor's house is in the parish of St. Botolph, Without Aldgate. About three weeks ago he took me to Tothil-fields, where I saw the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I merely went there till I could get employ, as he was my uncle, and ought to have done justice by me; I was apprenticed to a freeman and livery-man of the Merchant Taylors ' Company.

JOHN ROBERTS re-examined. The prisoner is no relation of mine at all. His father's name is John Roberts , and so is mine, but he was not related to me. We have no servants in the house.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 21.

Recommended to Mercy.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-82

432. MARY PALMER was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of April , one printed bound book, value 5 s. , the property of Stacey Grimaldi , and Henry Edward Stables .

THOMAS PAGE . I am clerk to Messrs. Stacey Grimaldi and Henry Edward Stables , who are solicitors , and live in Copthall-court, Throgmorton-street - the street door is always open. I found the prisoner on the stairs with the book under her arm, which was taken from our office on the first floor. She met Mr. Grimaldi on the stairs, and presented him a petition. I took the book from her. It was the 1st volume of Espinasse's Digest.

JOHN BARNET . I took the prisoner in charge. She said she gave a man 6 d. for it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A man met me, and said I should have the book for 6 d. I suppose it is a plan to get me off my parish, which is Blackfriars.

GUILTY . Aged 48.

Confined Two Months .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-83

433. BENJAMIN FURBER was indicted for stealing on the 26th of February , 2 reams of paper, value 1 l. 12 s. 6 d. the goods of Henry Case .

HENRY CASE. I am a grocer , and live in Fore-street, Cripplegate - this paper was outside the counter. The prisoner came into the shop about half-past eight o'clock at night; as soon as he left I missed it, went out, but could not see him. As I returned I stopped him in Fore-street, with it in his apron.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I picked it up in Fore-street.

GUILTY . Aged 36.

Confined Three Months and Whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-84

434. JAMES WARD was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of February , one bolster, value 5 s.; two pillows, value 3 s.; two blankets, value 6 s., and two sheets, value 6 s., the goods of John Evans , in a lodging-room .

SUSAN EVANS . I am the wife of John Evans ; we live in Hosier-lane . On the 28th of December I let the prisoner a furnished room, at 6 s. per week; he left on the 7th of February, before I was up - he owed me 8 s.; I then missed the things which were let with the lodging.

SOMERVILLE TELFER. I am a pawnbroker, I have a bolster and sheet, which I took in pledge of the prisoner, on the 9th of February.

THOMAS PIKE . I apprehended the prisoner, and found the duplicate upon her.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. They were taken when I was out at work.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined Two Months .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-85

435. BARNET EMANUEL was indicted for a misdemeanour .

MR. BOLLAND conducted the Prosecution.

JANE PIKE . I am the wife of Thomas Pike , and keep a chandler's-shop , in Cow-lane . On the 11th of March

the prisoner came and bought a herring, he offered me a sixpence, I rubbed it on my stone, and found it was a counterfeit; I looked at him, and recollected him. I asked him if he had any more silver? he said No. I said this looks suspicious, you have only one, and that is a counterfeit. My husband secured him, he snatched up the sixpence, and was going off the step - my husband brought him back.

THOMAS PIKE . My wife gave me the sixpence. I thought it bad, went into the shop, and asked the prisoner if he had any more - he said No. I put it down, and he ran out with it, I secured him, brought him back, and searched him, with the patrol's assistance, found two bad sixpences in his breeches-pocket, a bad shilling, and two more bad sixpences in his coat-pocket, one of them was the one he gave my wife. I knew it by the marks where she rubbed it. I found 2 s. 11 3/4 d. on him, and a candle, in his hat.

JOHN GILES SEWELL . I am assistant to the Solicitor of the Mint; the money is all counterfeit, and is only washed.

Prisoner's Defence. I found a paper in my pocket with them.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined One Year , and find Sureties for Two Years more .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-86

FIFTEENTH DAY *, FRIDAY, APRIL 28.

* The Ninth, Tenth, Eleventh, Twelfth, Thirteenth and Fourteenth Days were occupied on the State Trials.

436. THOMAS SALMON , MARY SMITH , GEORGE SCARBOROUGH , SAMUEL LONGMAN , ELIZABETH SMITH , JOSEPH HINDS , SOPHIA WOODBURY , THOMAS DYKES , DANIEL COX , GEORGE FANN , WILLIAM WOODHEAD , WILLIAM BROWN , WILLIAM HERBERT , HENRY CONNOLLY , JOHN AMBROOK , CHARLES ROSS , MARY ROBINSON , HENRY UPSTON , THOMAS MARR , WILLIAM WOODBURY , THOMAS GRAVES , RICHARD ELLARD , SAMUEL HASLER , ELIZABETH BROWN , ELIZABETH CLOUSLEY , JOHN PEARSON , JAMES RICHARDSON , JOHN SMALL , WILLIAM BULT , JOHN WILKS , WILLIAM YOUNG , and WILLIAM BROOKS were severally and separately indicted for feloniously having in their custody and possession forged Bank of England notes, they well knowing them to have been forged and counterfeited .

To which indictments the prisoners severally and separately pleaded GUILTY .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

437. The same prisoners were again indicted for disposing of and putting away, forged Bank of England notes, they well knowing them to have been forged and counterfeited .

MR. REYNOLDS on the part of the Governor and Company of the Bank of England declined offering any evidence.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-87

438. JOHN ROBINSON was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of George Hogg , about eleven o'clock in the forenoon of the 25th of February , (no person being therein), and stealing, one hat, value 5 s.; one shift, value 18 d.; one handkerchief, value 4 d.; one apron, value 4 d., and one pair of stockings, value 2 d., his property .

ANN HOGG . I am the wife of George Hogg , who lives in Morris's-gardens, Norton Falgate . On the 25th of February, about eight o'clock in the morning, I went out, and left nobody in the house; I was fetched from work about twelve o'clock, and found my line stripped of these things, which I had left safe, and locked the door. I found a piece cut out of the door, and the lock forced open.

PETER SAVAGE . I am a headborough. On the 25th of February I took the prisoner up at the door of Worship-street Office, and asked what he had done with the things he had taken from the prosecutor? he said he had taken nothing. The magistrate sent me to No. 8, Whitecross-street, where the prisoner said he lived. I went there, but found no such person lived there. I found a hat at No. 8, Pope's Head-court, Whitecross-street. on the ground floor, also a shift, a handkerchief, and apron.

ISAAC NEWMAN . I live next door to Hogg. About eleven o'clock I saw the prisoner go by and go to the bottom of the court - he then returned whistling. In about ten minutes he came back in a direction from the house, with a bundle under his arm - he walked exceedingly quick - I heard of the robbery about five minutes after. In about a quarter of an hour I saw him pass again, and asked him what he had done with the bundle that he had passed my house with? He said he had taken it to Worship-street Office - I said I would go with him to ascertain if it was so. I walked by his side, and when he got there he denied having told me any thing about it, and said he came there about a bad shilling. I gave him into custody.

JOSEPH TOMPKINS . I work at a willow manufactory. I saw the prisoner go into the house with a bundle, and saw him come out with one. He was in the house about a quarter of an hour - I am sure he is the man.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The street door was wide open, and I saw the things lying in the passage.

GUILTY . Aged 43.

Of stealing to the value of 4 s. 10 d. only.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-88

439. ELIZA WILLIAMSON was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of March , at St. James, Clerkenwell, one carpet, value 14 s.; one rug, value 8 s.; ten yards of muslin, value 20 s.; one blanket, value 5 s.; one sheet, value 6 s., the property of Charles Booth , and one waistcoat, value 1 l.; one pair of trowsers, value 2 l., the goods of William Purshouse , in the dwelling-house of the said Charles Booth .

MARTHA BOOTH . I am the wife of Charles Booth . We live in Alfred-buildings, Goswell-street-oad , in the parish of St. James, Clerkenwell, and rent the house. We let one room to a person named Langhall. On the 11th of March, the carpet and rug were on the front parlour floor, the muslin was in a box in the same room, not locked. The blanket and sheet were in the bed-room, the back room on the first floor. My brother, W. Purshouse, lives with me. His coat, waistcoat, and trowsers, were locked in a box in that room. I employed the prisoner daily to work for me. I am a milliner, and she had access to every part of my house. She came to me on the 1st of February, and continued till the 11th of March.

Q. When did you first miss the articles - A. On Saturday night, the 11th of March, about half-past eight o'clock. I left her in charge of the house while I went to Holborn. the lodger was ill in bed at the time, being near her confinement. I left nobody else in the house except two, small children. I returned before half-past nine o'clock, and she was gone, and my eldest child, who was six years old, was sitting up crying. I did not expect the prisoner to go. I went into the front parlour, and missed the property stated in the indictment, which was there when I left. I was in my brother's room before I went out, his box was then locked. I found it broken open. I did not see her again till the Wednesday following, when I met her by accident. I secured her and sent for an officer. I have seen the carpet, rug, muslin, and sheet since - they were worth 52 s. I knew my brother's things were in his box. I have not seen them since. When I took her she asked me to have mercy on her, and said, without either promises or threats, that she sold the coat, waistcoat, and trowsers, to a Jew for 25 s., in Fishmonger-alley. She lived in Francis-court, Berkley-street.

PAUL WYMAN . I am a broker, and live in King-street, Goswell-street. On Saturday evening, the 11th of March, about nine o'clock, the prisoner came and knocked at the door, and brought a carpet, rug, and blanket, said She was glad I was at home, for she had told my wife, on Tuesday before, that I was to go to buy some goods in Belvedere-place, for the person could not wait, and she had brought something. She represented that she were selling them for her mistress, and asked 15 s. for them. I gave her 14 s. I am positive she is the person - the constable took them away on the Wednesday evening.

SAMUEL SAUNDERS . I am a constable. I received the property from Wyman. I found the duplicate of the sheet on the prisoner.

SUSAN KIRKWOOD . I am wife of John Kirkwood , who is a pawnbroker, in Brick-lane, Old-street. I assist in the business. I took a sheet in pledge of the prisoner. I am sure she is the person.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I asked leave to go home to recover the property. I had not an opportunity to tell her where to recover it. She failed in payment latterly. The last week I only had 1 s. of her.

MARTHA BOOTH . I owed her 5 s. 6 d. She wished not to be paid till Saturday night.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 42.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-89

440. CHARLES BLACKMORE was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of April, 1819 , two gowns, value 10 s.; two petticoats, value 5 s.; two shifs, value 5 s.; two shirts, value 8 s.; four pair of stockings, value 2 s.; two handkerchiefs, value 6 s.; three curtains, value 3 s.; one shoe, value 2 s.; and four caps, value 2 s., the goods of Joseph Denny , in his dwelling-house .

MARY DENNY . I am the wife of Joseph Denny . We live in Wild-court, Great Wild-street . About twelve months ago I let the prisoner a furnished lodging. In April last we were moving and the prisoner assisted us. I left these things with him safe to take care of, and left the prisoner to sleep in the house that night. Next morning I found him and his wife were gone, also the things. I took the prisoner into custody about a month ago, as I could not find him before.

Prisoner's Defence. They were never in my place.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-90

441. WILLIAM THOMPSON and CHARLES THOMPSON , was indicted for a robbery, on the King's highway, on James Brookes , on the 21st of February , and taking from his person, and against his will, 24 oz. of silk, his property .

It appearing from the evidence that the property was stolen from Mary Anne Clark , and not from the prosecutor. The prisoners were

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-91

442. CORNELIA KNIGHT was indicted for stealing on the 28th of February , eleven yards of printed stuff, value 15 s., the property of John Veale , privately, in his shop .

JOHN SWAINE . I am shopman to John Veale , linen-draper , living at Islington . The prisoner and another woman came on the 28th of February, and asked to look at some muslin, which she said was too dear. She then asked to look at some lace. On the middle of the counter there was some stuffs and callicoes. While I was turning round to get the lace-box, I heard a rustling. I did not take any notice at the time. I shewed the lace, and they bought half a quarter of a yard, which came to 3 d., the other woman paid for it. I let them go out, and having a suspicion from the rustling, I called the other two young men, who were at dinner, to follow them. They both went and returned in about an hour and a half with the prisoner in custody, and 11 yards of printed stuff. I had shewn it to a lady about half an hour before.

Q. Did she acknowledge to have taken it, and wished to be forgiven - A. Yes; she said she did not know what possessed her at the time. She gave her address, Hampstead.

THOMAS STUBBINS . I am shopman to Mr. Veale. I was sent by Swaine to watch the prisoner in company with another. I came up to them at Islington turnpike, it is about a quarter of a mile from my master's. There was another woman in company with her. They went into a private house together, and when they came out they went down Chapel-street. About ten minutes after we took them at St. Pancras Church. They turned up a court, and

I saw the prisoner take the stuff out of a large bundle. I knew the stuff when I saw it, the other woman ran away into the fields.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I have nothing to say.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Of stealing, but not privately. Confined One Month .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-92

443. JOHN STICHWAY was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of April , at Christchurch, seven boots, value 5 l. 7 s. 6 d., the goods of John Andrews , in his dwelling-house .

JOHN ANDREWS . I am a boot and shoemaker , and live in Brick-lane , in the parish of Christchurch. On the 13th of April, at six o'clock in the morning, I called my apprentice up to open the shop; soon after, my niece called out that the door was open and the boots gone. They were there when I went to bed - there were three pair and an odd one. My apprentice is absent without leave.

WILLIAM MITCHELL , the apprentice, was called, but did not appear.

EDWARD DENCH . I am in the East India Company's service. On the 13th of April, about ten minutes past six o'clock in the morning, I was passing along Brick-lane, and saw the prisoner and another man coming out of the prosecutor's shop; they had a bag, through a hole in which I saw that it contained some boots. The prisoner turned to the left, and the other to the right - the prisoner kept the bag. I then went to the shop, but could make no one hear. I afterwards went in search of the prisoner, and got sight of him. The other, on turning round, and seeing me running after them, left the prisoner with the bag. I still pursued the prisoner, and came up with him in Spitalfields-market, collared him, and took him to the watch-house - he was running at the time; I am quite sure he is the man. I saw the bag examined; it contained two pair of top-boots, one pair of Hessian, and one odd Wellington boot.

JOHN SMITH . I am a stable-keeper, and live at No. 17, Paternoster-row, Spitalfields. I was at the watch-house, and took charge of the prisoner and boots.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence (written). Placed in the situation in which I now stand, Guilty, not, as I trust it will appear, from hardened depravity, but by the instigation of two others. It is the first time I have been in a Court of Justice. The apprentice beckoned me into the shop, told me what goods to take, and took the dog up stairs to prevent any alarm.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 21.

Recommended to Mercy.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-93

444. DANIEL BRISCOE was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Robert Hacket , about seven o'clock in the night of the 5th of March , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein two pair of shoes, value 16 s., his property .

ROBERT HACKET . I live in Baldwin-street , St. Luke's, and am a shoemaker . On the 5th of March, about seven o'clock in the evening, I heard a noise - it was then quite dark - I was on the first floor at the time. I came down stairs, the street-door was fast, and I heard a noise in the room, which induced me to go in. The prisoner was in the room. I said,

"Who are you?" he then jumped out of the window into the street.

Q. Had you left the window close - A. Yes. I then ran after the other; he had not the property when I took him. I said,

"You young rascal, what have you got?" he said he had given it to a man. On my return I found my stock two pair of shoes deficient. They were there about half an hour before. He was given in charge to Taylor, the headborough.

GUILTY . Aged 11.

Of stealing, but not of the burglary.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-94

445. WILLIAM BRYAN was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of March , one marble slab, value 18 s. , the goods of Thomas Sams .

THOMAS SAMS . I am a mason , and live in Dover-street, Piccadilly. I lost a piece of marble from a yard at Pimlico ; I saw it there a day or two before. I saw the prisoner with it on his shoulder, on the 4th of March, about ten minutes before twelve o'clock, at the Feathers, public-house, Grosvenor-place - I knew it as soon as I saw it. He said he was employed by a man named Johnson to take it to my house, and he was to pay me for it. He said he had known him for four years, and he was to wait at the public-house half an hour. I waited more than an hour, but he never came. I have no customer of the name of Johnson. I sent for an officer, who took him into custody. I saw him looking through the gate, and took particular notice of him.

JOHN THOMAS . I am an officer. I received the prisoner in charge - he told me the same story. I searched him, and found a chisel and a key, on him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I have nothing to add to what I told Mr. Sams, which was the truth.

GUILTY . Aged 50.

Confined Six Months , and Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-95

446. HENRY HUNT was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of March , 14 lbs. of nails, value 7 s. , the goods of James Bloomfield .

WILLIAM HINTON . I am foreman to James Bloomfield . The nails were in a chapel that is now building at the corner of Grafton-street . On the 17th of March, about six o'clock in the evening, I locked up the door - the nails were then in a bag; there were about two hundred weight. I returned about six o'clock the next morning, and found the watchman enquiring if we had lost any nails; a ladder was up against the building. I went into the chapel, and found half the nails on the ground. I put them into the bag again, weighed them, and found a deficiency of 14 lbs. The prisoner had no employment there.

THOMAS HEARN . I am a watchman. The chapel is near my beat. About two o'clock in the morning of the

17th of March, I saw the prisoner go past my box alone, he had a bundle under his arm - I did not stop him. He came by about three o'clock without anything. About ten minutes after four he came past again, I then asked him what he had got there? he said some nails. I asked him where he got them from? he said from his master. I said he should go the watch-house before he went to his work. I went to the chapel, and asked for the foreman; he went to the watch-house and owned the nails. I weighed them - there were 22 lbs.

WILLIAM KEEP . I am a watchman. The last witness called me, I went and assisted him to take the prisoner to the watch-house. I do not know of his having been there before.

(Nails produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was sent for by a Captain to go with him to India; as I was coming along I found the nails between Highgate and London.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Confined Six Months and Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-96

447. DANIEL GILBERT was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of February , one coat, value 4 s. , the goods of Eleanor Messenger .

ELEANOR MESSENGER . I live at the Archer, public-house, in Newton-street, Holborn . On the 22d of February, about half-past ten o'clock in the night, I saw the prisoner in the passage with the coat on his arm; I followed him out, caught hold of him on the step of the door, and asked him what he was doing with the coat? I called for my uncle. I let go, and he went some distance from the door; he afterwards came back, my uncle collared him, and I went for the watchman. It was a coat I wore myself. It was outside when I picked it up.

THOMAS TOOMBS . I keep the Archer, public-house, in Newton-street, Holborn. I heard my niece call out, and saw her pick up the coat - the prisoner was then coming towards the house, I secured him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. In coming out I felt something under my feet, I picked it up and laid it down again. I went out, hearing a noise, and in going back I was charged with the robbery.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-97

448. WILLIAM CRISP was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of March , 6 lbs. of pork, value 3 s. , the goods of Thomas Gissing .

THOMAS GISSING . I am a cheesemonger , and live in Lamb-street, Spitalfields . On the 18th of March I saw the prisoner looking sometime into the window; I saw him afterwards take the pork. The Saturday following he came and looked in again. I looked very hard at him, he said

"Why do you look at me?" I said

"I have been looking out for you sometime, for I expected you would come again." I secured him.

JURY. Q. When you saw him take the pork did you follow him - A. Yes, but the shop was full of customers, and I could not follow him so quick.

WILLIAM LICKFOLD . I am a headborough. I took the prisoner into custody.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent; but if I am found Guilty I hope to have the mercy of the Court.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-98

449. DANIEL HOLLAND was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of March , five silk handkerchiefs, value 20 s. , the goods of Isaac Crawshaw .

ISAAC CRAWSHAW . I live in Ratcliff-highway . On Thursday, the 23d of March, about seven o'clock, I lost five or six handkerchiefs out of the window; they were separate - I had seen them in the window in the course of the afternoon.

Q. Did you see the prisoner near your window in the afternoon - A. No.

JAMES PATRICK . I live with my mother, at No. 67, Old Gravel-lane; she is a straw-bonnet maker.

Q. Was you near Mr. Crawshaw's that evening - A. Yes; I was playing with my hoop, and saw the prisoner near Mr. Crawshaw's, cutting the window, he took out some handkerchiefs - there was a taller boy with him; they then ran across the street together. I went in, and told Mr. Crawshaw of it; when I got out of the shop they were out of sight.

Q. When did you see the prisoner again - A. I saw him next day up a court; the patrol was with me, and I pointed him out - I knew him before he did it; there was a gas-light. I said that he was the person.

WILLIAM SUMMERS . I am an officer. I took the prisoner into custody. The account Patrick gave was the same as he has now given.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing of the charge against me. I was out with muscles, by which I get my living; I was standing up a court, a gentleman and a little boy came up and took charge of me.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-99

450. JAMES BARNETT and WILLIAM SAMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of March , one watch, value 6 l.; one chain, value 1 l.; one seal, value 1 l.; one purse, value 6 d.; and 10 s., in monies numbered, the property of John Henney , from his person .

JOHN HENNEY . I live in Phoenix-street, Soho. On the 10th of March, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I was in Covent-garden , at the election. I put my chain and seals into my fob before I went into the crowd. I had a five-shilling piece and two half crowns in my pocket, in a purse. I was standing with two boys in front of me. I saw the prisoner, Barnett, a little to my left. I think Sampson was one of the boys, but I am not certain. I missed my watch and money, but did not perceive it go. I laid hold of a boy, who was searched, but nothing found on him - he was discharged. I went to Bow-street, hearing a person was taken. My watch was produced there, and I saw Barnett among others in the room, and identified him particularly, as being near me at the time. My purse was also produced. Part of the chain was broken in my pocket.

HOLLAND JONES. I was with Henney, and saw Barnett

about a yard and a half from him, and I think Sampson also, but I am not certain. I particularly noticed Barnett, I saw him leave a person who said he suspected him, and ran after him, calling Stop thief!

JOHN WRIGHT . I am a constable. I was on duty at the corner of King-street, heard the cry of Stop him! and stopped Barnett. I found a watch in his right-hand breeches pocket. About twenty minutes after, Henney came to the office and claimed it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAM CHARLES BROOKS . I saw Barnett running and assisted in apprehending him. I saw the watch found on him. After this Jones brought Sampson to me.

HOLLAND JONES re-examined. I found the purse in Sampson's hand.

JOHN HENNEY . I will not swear to the prisoner Sampson.

BARNETT'S Defence. Being out of employ, I went to the hustings to get employ to give bills about. I cast my eye on the ground and saw the watch. I cried out

"Who has lost a watch?" and not finding any owner, I put it in my pocket.

HOLLAND JONES. If the prisoner had called out I must have heard him.

BARNETT - GUILTY . Aged 29.

Transported for Life .

SAMPSON - NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-100

451. ROBERT HIXON was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of April , twelve gowns, value 9 l.; one pelisse, value 50 s.; one veil, value 1 l.; two gown bodies, value 3 s.; three pair of stockings, value 3 s.; two shifts, value 5 s.; and four petticoats, value 10 s. , the goods of Hannah Nash .

HANNAH NASH . I hold a situation in St. George's Infirmary, Hanover-square . On the 7th of April, in the course of the night, I lost the things out of an empty ward - some person had got in at the window and stolen them. The prisoner had been a patient, but was discharged a few days before.

WILLIAM DAVIS . I am watchman of Fleet-street. On the 8th of April, about four in the morning, the prisoner passed me at the end of Crane-court, with a bundle. I observed him look back, and suspected him; the patrol asked him what he had got there? he said it was womens' apparel, and that a woman gave it to him in Oxford-street, to take to Billingsgate for 2 s. He said he did not know the woman. I took him to the watch-house.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. They were given me to carry.

GUILTY . Aged 33.

Confined One Year .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-101

SIXTEENTH DAY, SATURDAY, APRIL 29.

452. JOHN TAYLOR was indicted for feloniously assaulting Perry William Hughes , on the King's highway, on the 4th of April , putting in him fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, one watch, value 3 l.; one chain, value 1 s.; two seals, value 20 s., and one key, value 5 s., his property .

PERRY WILLIAM HUGHES . I am footman to Count Carryman, who lives in Portland-place. On Tuesday night, the 4th of April, I was returning from Bishopsgate-street, and went into a public-house in Cheapside, about a quarter before eleven o'clock. I had a pot of ale, and came from there with a hackney coachman. He was a stranger to me. I merely rode on the box with him - I believe he is here. He sat me down in Charles-street, Covent-garden, about half-past twelve o'clock.

Q. You could not have been all that time going there, had you been drinking - A. I had, but knew what I was about - I may be mistaken in the time. I went into the watering-house, in Charles-street , and treated the coachman, my watch was then safe in my fob. I was going out and was surrounded by a set of people just at the door. A person came up to me and knocked me in the breast, merely to push me back, it was not a violent blow. He snatched my watch and ran away - they held me fast to prevent me running away. Every one in the house was concerned in it. They came round me and held me back that I should not run after the man. They came from the taproom directly as I was going out, I pushed them back and ran after the prisoner. He had got very near to the bottom of the street, towards Tavistock-street, and as he turned round a hackney coach at the bottom of the street, he flung the watch into the coach.

Q. Had any of them hold of you at the time he snatched the watch from you - A. Yes. They had at the very time it was taken from me. I was not able to defend myself and property. I did not stop to pick the watch up, but pursued after the prisoner and caught him. Just as I caught hold of him, two men came up and forced him away from me.

Q. Had you sufficient view of his person to be able to say the prisoner is the man - A. I saw him, looked him in the face, and know the prisoner was the man. I knew him by a rising on his nose, which I particularly noticed. He got away, and I took the two men who rescued him to the watch-house. They were bailed out. As soon as I gave them in charge, I came outside, and the beadle said,

"Should you know the man if you saw him?" I said I should. He took me to the house where I was robbed - it was the sign of the Marquis of Granby. When I got in I turned round, the prisoner was sitting in the room, and directly as he saw me he dropped his head, and covered his face. I went up to him, lifted up his hat, and pulled away his hand. He then said I am not the man who took your watch.

Q. Before he said so, had you given any intimation what was your reason for looking at him - A. No. I had said nothing. I am quite sure he was the same man I caught before. I gave charge of him to the beadle. I have not recovered my watch, it was new, and worth 3 l. I attended at Bow-street next day, and he was committed.

Q. Have you been able to see the parties who confined you to prevent your following him - A. Yes. I have seen several of them here. As I gave charge of the prisoner to the beadle, they surrounded us, and said he was

not the man, and he should not go to the watch-house. In going from the house they came round two or three times, and tried to rescue him.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Where did the men surround you - A. At the Marquis of Granby. I first laid hold of the prisoner at the house. I took the two men to the watch-house. The beadle returned with me, and coming from the house and while in the house the men surrounded us, and tried to rescue him.

Q. You say when the beadle had the prisoner, some men surrounded and tried to rescue him, where was that - A. In the house. I did not say at the watch-house, that my watch was worth seventy guineas, the men round said so, but I did not.

Q. On your oath, where you not insensibly drunk - A. I certainly had been drinking, but knew what I was doing at the time. If I was so I could not have done what I did. I described the man who robbed me as having a light coat on, and two belcher handkerchiefs round his neck, and told the beadle I should know him by the rising on his nose. I think he was taken about one o'clock, which was about three quarters of an hour after he got from me. I never entertained a doubt of his being the man. I should know the men who surrounded me. I never saw the coachman before. I did know the man before he took me from Cheapside to Covent Garden.

Q. Do you recollect taking your watch out when you was on the box with him - A. I do not. I know it was safe when I was in Bishopsgate-street about half-past ten o'clock - I was at the Four Swans, public-house, Bishopsgate-street, and walked alone from there to Cheapside. The prisoner is a coachman, but I do not know his number.

JOHN FITZGERALD . I am a watchman of St. Paul's, Covent-garden. On the 4th of April I was in Charles-street, and saw the prosecutor there - I was standing at the end, near Russell-street - the Marquis of Granby, public-house, is about the middle. I heard Watch! called, and when I came up the prosecutor laid hold of a man - there was a crowd of men about him, assisting the person he had hold of. The prosecutor said the prisoner had drawn his watch from him.

Q. What sort of men were they - A. They appeared like hackney coachmen. I laid hold of the man. The prosecutor gave him to me, and left him with me while he went to look for his watch in the coach.

Q. You did not come up till the watch was thrown into the coach - A. Yes. He was rescued from me, but I do not think I should know the persons who rescued him, and I cannot say the prisoner is the man, for his coat was over his head - I could not notice him when he was rescued. I called Stop thief! and sprang my rattle, but could see no man. The prosecutor called me to the coach - I told him to take the number. Some men behind me said,

"Take the coach to the green-yard" - the prosecutor was there at the time; they got quarrelling, and he gave charge of them; I took them to the watch-house. I should know them again if I saw them.

Q. Did the prosecutor appear to be able to hold the man - A. Yes. He held him till I took charge of him - he was tipsy, but appeared to be sensible; he walked, stood, and spoke very well. After this there was a cry of Watch! and I assisted in conveying the prisoner to the watch-house.

Q. Did the people about suffer him to go peaceably, or attempt to rescue him - A. No, not as we took him from the house to the watch-house. We pulled him along, for he did not wish to go. The watch-house is in the market.

Cross-examined. Q. The Marquis of Granby, public-house is a watering-house - A. Yes. I did not know the prisoner before that night - I was not in the public-house. When I took him he had a light coloured coat on, much the same as he has now. I did not notice it - I cannot say whether it was like it or not.

COURT. Q. How long was it from the time of the alarm, till the time you took him into custody - A. I think about three quarters of an hour. A man might change his dress in that time.

JURY. Q. Was any attempt made by other people to rescue him - A. No. He struggled himself.

JAMES BETHELL . I am beadle of the parish. The prosecutor came to the watch-house, said he had been robbed, and brought two persons in for attempting to rescue the prisoner from him - they were detained.

Q. Did he appear to be insensible - A. He appeared agitated from the robbery, and talked very fast - he did not appear incapable of giving an account; he had his senses about him. I went out with him, and asked him if he should know the man who had robbed him? he said he should, and that he had a rising on his nose. He said he had been robbed coming out of the door of the house. I walked with him under the Piazza, and into the first public-house, near Bow-street - he said that was not the house. We then went to the Marquis of Granby, public-house, and he said that was the house - it is kept by a widow woman. I knocked at the door, but it was some time before it was opened. I told the prosecutor to go in and look well about the taproom, but not to notice me as if I was in company with him. I went in in about two minutes, the taproom was full of people. He looked round, and pointed out the prisoner, who sat in a box in the corner of the room, with two or three coachmen round him. The prosecutor leaned over the table, put up the prisoner's hat, and I believe asked him what he had done with his watch? he said he had not got the watch. Two or three coachmen said,

"What do you mean by saying he has robbed you?" I went up and asked the prosecutor if that was the man who had robbed him? he said Yes. I told the prisoner he must come out, as the man had given charge of him.

Q. About what time was this - A. About a quarter past one o'clock - he did not come out. I said if he did not come out I should call a watchman in to bring him out by force. A man on the other side of the room said,

"Why, that shews you are guilty if you don't go out." He then came out, and as we were going towards the door they tried to rescue him from us, and when we got out we were surrounded by coachmen and others, who tried to rescue him.

Q. Should you know any of them again - A. I think I should know some of them. I called Watch! and the last witness came up among others.

Q. Was there any further attempt to rescue after that - A. Yes. As we went along Tavistock-row, by the New Hummums, I had hold of the prisoner by the left side, and the watchman on the other - I think it was another watchman that had hold of him, not the witness. They laid hold of him, and pulled him about, but I said if they did not stand back I would knock them down; we got him to the watch-house. He had a rising on his nose as the prosecutor described.

Cross-examined. Q. What had he on - A. I cannot say. I do not recollect the prosecutor's description of him. He said the watch was worth about 3 l. at Bow-street - I heard nothing about the value at the watch-house.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent, and leave it to my counsel and witnesses.

JAMES BARTLETT . I am watch-house-keeper of St. Paul's Covent-garden, and was on duty when the prisoner was brought in, I think it was after one o'clock. The prosecutor gave charge of two men for rescuing a man - he appeared to be tipsy.

Q. Do you mean fresh, or stupidly drunk - A. I believe he was not so far drunk, but he could recollect what he was doing - he appeared agitated at first. When the prisoner was brought in, I believe he had on the coat which he now wears; the two men were held to bail at Bow-street for an assault. I believe I should know them again - one of them is a printer. The prosecutor said himself that the watch was worth seventy guineas.

COURT. Q. Was you at the watch-house when he first complained of having been robbed - A. Yes. I did not hear him describe the man - it did not pass in my presence.

HENRY JUDD . I am a hackney coachman. I took the prosecutor up about half-past eleven o'clock at night; he was drinking in an alehouse - I did not know him before. I heard him say which way he was going; I said I was going that road, and he said he would give me something to drink to carry him - he said he wanted to go to Portland-place. I set him down at Drury-lane Theatre.

Q. Did you put him down on that spot by his own desire - A. No, by my own will. I know he had a watch, for I saw the chain. He was so drunk he could hardly stand when I took him up.

Q. When he left you did he talk sensible and rational - A. Yes; he went in to treat a coachman opposite where I put him down. I left him there about half-past eleven o'clock.

JURY. Q. How long were you coming from Cheapside to the Theatre - A. About half an hour; the Theatre was just breaking up when I set him down.

GEORGE RANDALL . I am a hackney coachman. I drive No. 713, for Mr. Boreham, No. 37, China-mews. I believe I have driven it two years.

Q. Where you at the Marquis of Granby, in Charles-street, on the night this happened - A. Yes; I was there before the Theatre broke up. I had been there about ten minutes when I heard a rattle spring - it was half-past eleven o'clock when I put my coach in the rank; I then went into the house, and sat in the taproom. I dare say there were a dozen or fourteen persons in the room.

Q. Did you see that lad there - A. The prisoner, Yes; he sat within one of me in the same box - he was asleep, leaning with his head on his hands; I knew him - I did not awake him. I had just began my supper, and then heard a cry of Stop thief! and Watch! I had been there about ten minutes then.

Q. Where was the prisoner then - A. Just by the side of me - he had not been out of my sight. I did not go to the door, but remained there eating my supper.

Q. Was he awoke by the noise - A. No, he was not.

Q. Could the prisoner have got out of the box without passing you - A. No.

COURT. Q. The prisoner appeared to be asleep - A. Yes, he appeared so to me. I afterwards saw the beadle at the entrance of the taproom door - he afterwards came in. The prisoner did not go out of the room from the time I went in till the beadle came. When the beadle and the prosecutor came the prosecutor looked about for two or three minutes. The prisoner awoke up, and was rubbing his eyes, as if he had awoke out of sleep, and the prosecutor said to him,

"I think you had a light-coloured coat on."

Q. That was the first thing he said to him, was it - A. Yes. I think he said,

"You are the young man that stole my watch." I believe he said he had a light coat on first.

Q. Will you swear that - A. I think I could.

Q. You must know whether the first thing he said was,

"I think you had a light coloured coat on," or not. Now mind, the beadle heard what was said - A. I will not be positive. I will not say whether he said that first or not, or whether he charged him with robbing him of his watch - I really think the first thing he said was about the coat.

MR. ANDREWS. Q. Tell us, as well as your memory serves, all that passed between the prosecutor and prisoner, in the order in which it happened - A. He accused him of having a light-coloured coat on; the prisoner said he never wore a light-coloured coat. Then again, the prosecutor said,

"I think you had a light-coloured coat on, and that you are the person who looked me in the face, and robbed me of my watch."

COURT. Q. Do you mean to swear that he said,

"I think you are the man," or did he positively say he was the man - A. He said he was the man; at first he said he thought so, and then he said

"I am sure you are the man." I am sure his first words were,

"I think you are the man."

MR. ANDREWS. Q. Was the beadle near enough to hear what passed - A. He stood at the entrance of the taproom, I dare say he could hear.

"I said,

"You know yourself innocent, and you had better go back into the parlour and be searched." The beadle immediately took hold of him, and instead of taking him into the parlour, he drew him out of doors, and took him to the watch-house.

Q. Do you mean to say that he went willingly, or was he obliged to be forced out - A. He went willingly. I said to the prosecutor,

"You must be a very false man for saying it was him, when the young man has been asleep here for this hour."

COURT. Q. Did you say that in the hearing of the people - A. I did. I said he had been there above an hour to my certain knowledge.

Q. You heard the cry of Stop thief! but had not the curiosity to go to the door to see what was the matter - A. No.

Q. How long before you heard the cry of Stop thief!

was it that the beadle came in - A. Near three-quarters of an hour. James Orger was in the box with me. When I first heard the cry of Stop thief! I was eating my supper; Orger did not go to the door, he remained in the box.

Q. Was any other person in the box - A. Yes, William Bridge; he did not go to the door. The house is kept by Mrs. Weedon, she was in the bar at the time - she is not here.

Q. Did you go to the watch-house with the prisoner - A. No, I did not think they were going to the watch-house, as I knew the lad was innocent. I thought they were going to take him into the parlour, but they took him out. I went out, but did not go farther than the first coach, and met the others coming back. They said they would let nobody speak.

Q. Why not say to the prisoner,

"I will go with you and explain that you are not the man" - A. I did not, because I had not paid for my supper.

Q. They would have given you credit - A. Yes. I did not think they would take him to the watch-house. The landlady knew the prisoner was not out of the taproom.

JURY. Q. Did any persons accompany the prisoner out of the taproom to the watch-house - A. Yes, the waiter was one that went to the watch-house. None of the coachmen went to my knowledge.

GEORGE WATSON . I am waiter at the Marquis of Granby, and have lived there ever since September. I saw the prisoner in the taproom about half-past ten o'clock on the night of the robbery. Randall came in and sat on the right side of him.

Q. Could the prisoner get out of the box without making Randall get up - A. Yes, the prisoner was nearer to the entrance of the box than Randall. Several others were between Randall and him.

Q. Did you hear the rattle sprung - A. Yes. I did not go out, for my mistress sent me after the prosecutor for his reckoning. They had a glass of rum and water and a pipe of tobacco between two of them. He stood in the bar, not in the taproom; he was drinking with Judd, who had driven him.

Q. Judd was with him - A. Yes, he brought him there. A person named Phillips, and another, whom I did not know, was drinking with him. My mistress gave the prosecutor leave to go into the bar; he went out of the bar into the street with his pipe.

Q. Was it immediately after that that you heard the cry of Stop thief! - A. Yes, two minutes before that, I saw the prisoner with his head down on the table; Randall was eating his supper by his side. I do not think the prisoner could go out without my observing him.

COURT. Q. Can you tell us what would prevent him - A. No, I cannot. As soon as my mistress sent me after the gentleman for his reckoning, he might have gone out. I went after him, and he was giving charge of two men. He had been out about two minutes when I went after him. He did not return to the house for better than a quarter of an hour after that.

JURY. Q. He requested leave to go into the bar - A. Yes, she gave him leave to come through the bar into the taproom, which my mistress never allows people to do after twelve o'clock.

COURT. Q. Did you hear the cry of Watch! and Stop thief! - A. Yes, and went out about two minutes after that, and saw him by the York Hotel, which is opposite our house. The gentleman who keeps the hotel said,

"Don't kick up a row here!"

Q. You heard the cry, and took no notice - A. Not till my mistress sent me out; I am sure Judd was there. When I returned to the house the prisoner was in the taproom. I cannot say he was there when I heard the cry of Stop thief! I was at the bar at that time. He was in the taproom just before the prosecutor was in the bar. Judd, the coachman, brought him there. The prisoner could have got out without passing Randall. The box was open at both ends.

HENRY JUDD re-examined. Q. You said you set him down at Drury-lane Theatre, were you at the Granby - A. He went and treated a coachman there, and bid me follow him; I went into the house at the same time with him. I left the house after him; I heard the cry of Stop thief!

Q. Did you go to the door to see if the prosecutor was the man that was robbed - A. Yes; I did not see him robbed. When I went out I saw him running down Charles-street. I went out immediately as he called Stop thief! I do not know the prisoner.

Q. Did you see him in the house - A. Yes, I saw him asleep on the table when I went to light my pipe. Whether he was there when I heard the cry, or not, I cannot say.

JAMES ORGER . I am a hackney coachman, and drive No. 720, for my father. I went to the Marquis of Granby about half-past ten o'clock on the night of the robbery. I went with the prisoner. I have known him about six years. Randall was there, and sat with his back to the window on the opposite bench to me - the prisoner was on the same bench with him, and went to sleep. There was a cry of Stop thief! about twelve o'clock. I did not go out, the prisoner was then asleep on the table.

Q. After that did Hughes come into the taproom - A. Not for a good while after. Taylor was then in the same place - he was awake then. Hughes said he thought he was the person that took his watch from him, and said he had a drab coat on. Taylor said he had not. Hughes said he had, and then the beadle came and took him out. He had not been out of the taproom. He had a snuff-coloured coat on, the same he has now. He never had a top-coat on - he could not have been the thief.

Q. Why did you not go to the watch-house when you knew he was not guilty - A. Several went, but Hughes swore so positive to him.

Q. You was not there - A. No. I went with him to the watch-house, but did not go in.

Q. Did you apply to go into the watch-house - A. No.

Q. On the solemn oath you have taken, could he have been out of the taproom, or out of your sight, before you heard the cry of Watch! - A. No; he was not.

COURT. Q. Can you give any reason why you did not go into the watch-house to declare the man was innocent - A. No.

Q. When the cry was rose, how many coachmen were there in the box with you - A. About seven; none of them went to see what had happened.

Q. When the prosecutor came in did he not positively

declare the prisoner was the man. No. He said he thought at first - he afterwards said he was positive.

JOHN EDWARDS . I am a coachman, and drive No. 712. I am servant to Mr. Boreham, who Randall drives for. I went to the Marquis of Granby, about half-past eleven o'clock, on the night of the robbery - all was quiet then. Taylor laid with his head on the taproom table. Randall sat on his right, and I was facing him.

Q. When did he first awake - A. When the gentleman came in he just rose up, was wiping his face, and was going to lay down again. The gentleman said,

"I think you had a light coat on - I think you are the man that looked me in the face, and took my watch." He said he was not, and we all said he was not, for he had not been out of the box. Randall advised him to go into the parlour to be searched. I expected he was going there, but he pushed him out into the street. To my thinking Hughes was no ways sober.

Q. Was it possible Taylor could have been out of the house for an instant - A. He was not. I am positive he did not change his dress. I went to the watch-house to say he was not out of the house, but they would not let me come in. I went to Bow-street next day, and they said I must attend at the Old Bailey.

Q. Before the springing of the rattle, and the cry of Stop thief! had you seen Hughes - A. No. Nor Judd.

Q. Was it possible for a man sitting where you were to see what passed in the bar or lobby - A. No.

COURT. Q. Did you go out to see what was the matter when you heard the cry - A. No. Nor any one at all from that box. The prisoner did not like to go to the watch-house. At first he stopped against the wall, and said he had done nothing.

Q. Did not any one attempt to pull him away - A. Not at all. I never saw any one, and I was close to him. I followed behind him.

Q. Will you swear nobody attempted to force him away from those who had him in custody - A. I am speaking about the door. I can swear nobody attempted to rescue him at all.

Q. I am speaking about the Hummums - A. I will swear nobody pulled him behind to get him from the beadle, if it did happen I must have seen it. I am sure it did not happen.

Q. Did any one leave the taproom before the cry - A. Nobody at all.

WILLIAM BUDGE. I am a coachman, and drive No. 173. I came down to the Marquis of Granby to water my horses just as the rattle was springing. I saw nobody about the door, but some persons were at the bottom of the street near the York Hotel. They said a man had been rescued.

Q. Did you go into the Marquis of Granby - A. Yes. The doorway was then quite clear. When I got in the prisoner leaned with his head on the taproom table asleep, with his arm on his head. I pushed his head up, he appeared quite intoxicated - his appearance was sleepy. I did not speak to him. He was dressed in a brown coat, the same he has on now. Randall sat in the same box under the window, within a yard of the prisoner. I went to the other side of the taproom and had my supper, and was there when Hughes came in with the beadle.

Q. Who spoke first - A. The prosecutor. When the prisoner awoke up he looked at him very hard, and said

"Hold up your head, young man - I think you had a drab coat on." Then he said to the beadle," I think it is him, we will take him at all events." They went out and took him to the watch-house.

Q. What did they take him for - A. They charged him with the theft of the watch. Somebody said,

"Go into the parlour and be searched." He got up, and the beadle pushed him out of the house.

COURT. Q. Then he never said particularly that he was the man - A. Never, I am quite sure. I will be on my oath that he never did say so in the house.

Q. Now, man! the beadle and prosecutor are here, will you say he told the beadle he thought he was the man, but would take him at all events - A. Those are the very words he made use of. I am quite sure he never said more than that he thought he was the man.

JAMES BETHELL re-examined. I am the beadle. The prosecutor never said he thought he was the man but should take him at all events, he said

"He was the man that robbed him, and he would take his oath of it - he was always positive." I saw he had his eye on the prisoner. He held up his hat - the words I heard I think were

"What have you done with my watch?" he said, what watch.

"Why" said the prosecutor

"You are the man that robbed me at the door." He never expressed the least doubt of his being the man.

JURY. Q. Was the prosecutor much agitated - A. Not when he gave him in charge. I saw Judd at the house, he came to the watch-house with another young man, and tried to rescue the prisoner.

Q. Was any attempt made to rescue him in the house - A. The most was at the door, it was made by persons who came from the taproom.

JOHN SMITH . I am clerk to Mr. Whitelock, an attorney, of King-street, Cheapside. I had been to Covent-garden Theatre. I was coming up Tavistock-street, towards Charles-street, there was a general row and calling of Stop thief! I went into the Marquis of Granby, in consequence of what passed, and was in the house at the time Hughes came in with the beadle.

COURT. Q. How long had you been there - A. About five minutes, not more. I was only looking at what passed.

MR. ANDREWS. Q. When Hughes came in, what did he say - A. I positively swear, he said, I think you are the person who stole my watch.

Q. Where was the prisoner - A. I did not see him. I do not know who Hughes addressed himself to. I stood by his side. I had other friends with me at the time, and went away immediately.

COURT. Q. Do you mean to say the cry of Stop thief! was only five minutes before the prosecutor came in - A. I cannot say when the cry was, I was at the door sometime with my friends.

Q. The prosecutor did not return for three-quarters of an hour after the cry, did you wait at the door all this time - A. I cannot say.

Q. All was quiet then - A. No; the coachmen and others were canvassing the thing over at the door.

Q. How long after that did you become attorney for the

prisoner - A. The prisoner's friends who were there, believing him to be innocent, entered into a subscription afterwards.

Q. How did they find you out - A. I go to the house every night.

Q. What, to the Marquis of Granby - A. No; to the Salutation.

Q. Did you see the prisoner laid hold of - A. I did not, the room was full of people.

Q. Could you avoid seeing him laid hold of - A. My attention might be directed to the people. I was talking to my friends at the time.

JURY. Q. You said you went in for the express purpose of seeing what passed - A. Yes.

COURT. Q. Is the defence of the prisoner your own business - A. No; it is Mr. Whitelock's - there are no profits. His friends wished me to ask Mr. Whitelock and I did ask him. I cannot say whether the prisoner was taken out of the room while I was there.

PERRY WILLIAM HUGHES re-examined. Q. Did you say to the prisoner or beadle, I think you are the man, but take him at all events - A. I never said so. Judd, the coachman, was close behind me at the time my watch was taken from me, and Randall was holding me by the coat at the time my watch was taken from me, and Orger was also close behind me at the time.

Q. Can you particularly swear to these persons - A. I can; for I took particular notice of them.

GUILTY .

Of stealing from the person, but not with force and violence.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-102

452. HANNAH READING and SARAH COX were indicted for stealing, on the 15th of March , four yards of linen cloth, value 8 s., the goods of John Veale , privately in his shop .

WILLIAM HARRIS STONE . I am shopman to Mr. John Veale , who is a linen-draper , and lives at Islington . On the 15th of March, between two and three o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoners came to the shop, Reading bought six yards of print, and paid 1 s. on it. I saw they had three half-crowns, and asked why they could not pay - they said they wanted the money. I asked where they lived, Cox gave me the name of

" Sarah Smith , near the Fox, Islington." Next morning Cliff came and produced four yards of Irish; I did not miss any - we had such linen on the shelf, but I cannot swear to it; we had about forty pieces near that quality. I am certain the prisoners were in our shop. They must have leant over the counter to get at the linen.

WILLIAM COX . I am constable of Shoreditch. On the 15th of March, I was going down Shoreditch, with Walters, and saw the prisoners going in and out of different shops, they then saw us, and turned into the Fountain, a public-house, which is a thoroughfare. I followed them, Cox appeared to have something under her shawl; they got through the passage. At the back of the house I secured Cox, and asked her what she had got under her shawl; she said about eight yards of linen - Walters took Reading, I found the cloth was four yards and a quarter - she said she bought it in Shoreditch, then in Old-street. Reading immediately said,

"No, you bought it of a man by Miles's Mad-house, Hoxton." They cried, and said if we would let them go we might have it. I went to different shops, and found it belonged to the prosecutor.

Cross-examined by MR. NORTON. Q. He could not swear to it - A. No. I only saw them go into one shop.

THOMAS WALTERS . I am a constable. I was with Cox; we watched the prisoners, and followed them into the Fountain, public-house. I secured Reading, and found 6 s. on her; Cox said the linen was about eight yards; she afterwards told me it came from a house at Islington, by which means we found the prosecutor out.

JOHN VEALE . I am a linen-draper, and live at Islington. I saw the prisoners come into the shop. I cannot swear to the cloth - it is a very common quality.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq

Reference Number: t18200412-103

453. MARY JONES and CHARLOTTE GREEN were indicted for stealing, on the 8th of March , from the person of James Barrick , one pocket-book, value 6 d.; two 5 l., and one 1 l. Bank notes, his property .

JAMES BARRICK . I am in the Second Battalion of Royal Veterans . On the 8th of March, I arrived late in the evening from Sudbury, in Suffolk. About eleven o'clock at night I was going down King-street, Westminster, and met the prisoner, Jones. She said,

"Sergeant! how do you do? will you give me a glass of gin? for I am very cold." I went into a public-house, and gave her a glass of gin; we came out, and she followed me into Great George-street. I went with her to her lodging No. 45, Duck-lane - I had no lodging of my own; I was on my road to Gosport. I went to bed with her, and we fell asleep. On waking in the night I found her and Green sitting by the fire in the room. Jones began to use bad language, and said she wanted more gin; I gave her a shilling, and she fetched some. Shortly after they both went out, and returned about six o'clock together. Jones then fell on me in the bed, and as soon as I could extricate myself from her, I missed Green from the room, and also missed my waistcoat from under the pillow, with a pocket-book containing two 5 l. and five 1 l. Bank notes. I got up, secured the door, and kept Green in the room. She said she knew nothing about it, and pretended to be very drunk indeed - she was a little tipsy. I dressed myself, locked her in the room, and went for an officer, returned, and found the outer door locked. The officer said he dare not break it open, but if I would come at night he would assist in apprehending them. I went at night, and looked up to the house to see what number it was. A woman came out, and I said,

"What number is this?" she said 48, and ran back into the house. I followed her; she ran into the room where I had been, and said,

"D - n your eyes! lock the door, he is come again!" I said,

"No, I will lock the door, and stop here till the officer comes." I saw Jones on the bed, apparently very drunk - Green was not there. I locked the door, and staid there from seven o'clock till nine, when I heard the watchman. I then ran to the

street door, called him in, and unlocked the room door. We secured her, and took her to the watch-house. I then returned with the constable of the night to search for this property, and found Green up stairs, half-naked, in the passage. I found part of my pocket-book under the bed - the contents were taken out. Part of the money was given to me to subsist upon on the road. I am certain they are the women.

ROBERT HUDSON . I am a watchman. I heard the cry of Watch! went to the prosecutor's assistance, and found the prisoner, Jones, on the bed, drunk - I helped to secure her. She said she knew the prosecutor, but knew nothing of his money. I had seen him going towards the house with her about half-past eleven o'clock the night before, and about four o'clock in the morning I saw her go out and fetch liquor. I took Jones to the watch-house, returned with the constable of the night, and found part of the pocket-book under Green's bed - the prosecutor described it before he saw it; we found Green in another apartment up stairs, and found the other part of the pocket-book in the privy, which belongs to several houses.

WILLIAM MILLS . I was constable of the night. Jones was brought to the watch-house. The prosecutor gave the account he has now done. I returned to the house, and took Green. She did not deny having been with the prosecutor.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JONES'S Defence. I was very much in liquor.

JONES - GUILTY . Aged 32.

GREEN - GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18200412-104

454, WILLIAM DOUGLAS was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of April , at St. Paul, Covent-garden, in the dwelling-house of George Duff , one pocket-book, value 2 s.; one knife, value 5 s.; one ring, value 2 s.; one seven shilling-piece; one 10 l., and forty-six 1 l. Bank notes, his property .

GEORGE DUFF . I live at Gloucester . On Sunday, the 26th of March, my housekeeper represented to me that the prisoner was in the neighbourhood in the greatest distress, and I ordered her to give him a dinner - when he came in he said he had dined. I asked him to sit down, and enquired the cause of his distress. He said he was coming from Leith to London to finish himself for his profession as a singer, that the smack he came in was run down by a Greenland ship, and they were wrecked. I asked him what brought him to Gloucester - he said Mr. Martin, who is a traveller, and lives there, had been a very great friend to him, and he came to get his assistance, but he was in Scotland, and would not be home till Friday or Saturday. I said if that was the case, I was going up the town to church, and if he would come again I would call on some friends of mine, and procure him a few shillings. I called on two friends, got 7 s., and put 5 s. to it myself - I gave it to him at tea. In the course of the evening I asked him where he thought of going? he said he must go to a public-house. I took him to a house where I knew he would be treated well, and told the landlord to let him have every thing in moderation that he wanted, and I would pay for it. On Monday morning I left home, and did not return till Thursday - while I was out I learnt that Mr. Martin would not return for three weeks. On my return I found the prisoner at my house - I have no family. I told him that Mr. Martin would not return for three weeks, and he might make my house his home till he did return. He continued with me from that time till Saturday morning, the 15th of this month. The night before he said he had taken some medicine, and if he had occasion to get up in the night we were not to be alarmed; I heard him get up about five o'clock in the morning but took no notice - I got up myself about eight o'clock, and missed him. I then suspected all was not right, and went to a portable writing-desk, where I put up some Bank notes the night before, and found it broken open; a pocket-book was gone, which contained a 10 l. and nine 1 l. Bank notes, forty-six country notes; a 7 s. piece and a ring were also taken out of my looking-glass drawer. I immediately took a post-chaise, went to Cheltenham, and pursued a young man answering his description to London - he had been booked by the name of Johnson. I came to town, and found nineteen of my country notes at the Bolt in Tun, Fleet-street. I gave information at Bow-street, and on Monday morning I found him in custody. The ring was found on him.

JOSEPH LAZARUS LAWRENCE . I am a salesman, and live in Brydges-street, Covent-garden. On Sunday morning, the 16th of April, the prisoner came to my house, and asked if I would supply him with wearing apparel? he said he was going to Scotland, and asked me if I could take country notes. He opened his pocket-book, and pulled out forty or fifty notes - some Bank notes were among them, I said,

"Can you not pay me in Bank of England notes." He said No, for country notes were of no use to him in Scotland. I said I could not take them unless they were payable in London. He said he would leave me sixteen notes, and send for the things in the morning - he bought things to the amount of 8 l., returned in about twenty minutes, and wanted five of the notes away again - I had told him in the morning that I should find whether they were good. I presented them at the Golden Cross, Charing-cross, where they usually pay them at a discount, and they stopped the notes. I returned, found the prisoner at my door, and took him into custody.

SAMUEL LACK . I am an officer. On the 17th of April, about half-past eight o'clock in the morning, I was fetched to Lazarus's, and took the prisoner in charge. I searched him, and found a knife on him with Mr. Duff's name on it, also a seven shilling-piece and a ring, and in his pocket I found a pocket-book, which contained 42 l.; a 10 l. Bank note was among them. He said they were Mr. Duff's property.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. My Lord and Gentlemen of the Jury, I am quite sensible of the punishment the law can inflict upon me, but I trust you will take my case into your consideration, that I may still be a useful member of society.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Of stealing, but not in a dwelling-house.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18200412-105

455. AMEY HAYWOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of April , one shirt, value 1 s.; one table-cloth, value 5 s.; five napkins, value 10 s.; one candlestick, value 1 s.; one gown, value 1 s,; one pillow-case, value 1 s.; two shifts, value 1 s.; one pillow, value 2 s., and one shawl, value 2 l., the goods of Aaron Israel , in his dwelling-house .

AARON ISRAEL . I am a tailor , and live Chapman's-court, Goodman's-yard, Minories . On the 23d of March the prisoner came to the house to nurse my wife - she reremained till the 17th of April, and then absconded before my wife got up. We missed all these thing, and on Monday her brother brought me the duplicate of the shawl. On Tuesday I went to her brother's lodgings, in Taunton-court, Lambeth-walk, waited there till she came, and then gave her in charge.

JOHN LAPPAGE . I am servant to Mr. Harris, who is a pawnbroker. The prisoner pledged a pillow-case with me on the 13th of April, for 6 d., a shirt on the 14th for 1 s. 9 d., and a bedgown for 1 s.

WILLIAM JOHN BIRD . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Blackfriars-road. The prisoner pledged a shawl with me for 10 s. It is not worth 20 s.

ROBERT HALL . I am shopman to Mr. Matthews, who is a pawnbroker, and lives in the Minories. On the 12th of April the prisoner pledged two candlesticks with me for 2 s.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GEORGE GOFF . I apprehended the prisoner, and she gave me the duplicates of the property produced.

GUILTY . Aged 33.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18200412-106

456. SAMUEL DENNISON was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of February , 24 yards of cotton, value 10 s. , the goods of Richard Dorville .

JAMES RIDGWAY . I am servant to Mr. Richard Dorville , who is a linen-draper , and lives at Stepney . On the 29th of February, a woman said two young men had stolen a piece of cotton from the door. I ran out, and pursued the prisoner, who was with another man; the other had the print, and he threw it into a court by the East London Water-works - I then lost sight of them both. I took the print out of the court, saw the prisoner standing by my side, and collared him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I had not left the waterside above five minutes. I saw a crowd, went to see what it was about, and he took me.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18200412-107

457. EDWARD HAMMOND was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of February , one pair of shoes, value 10 s. , the goods of George Newton .

GEORGE NEWTON . I am footman to Lord Derby. On the 17th of February I lived in Piccadilly ; my shoes were in the kitchen. Somebody came down the area steps, and stole them.

JAMES JEFFRIES . I belong to Bow-street, and lodge at the Running Footman, public-house, in Berkeley-square. On the 17th of February, about half-past nine o'clock in the morning, as I was sitting in the taproom, I saw the prisoner pass the window, and went after him with another man - we overtook him at the bottom of Charles-street, in the act of wrapping the shoes in a handkerchief. I asked him how he came by them? he said he was a shoemaker, and lived in Gray's Inn-buildings. I detained him - the other ran away. The prisoner ran at first, but I secured him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

ANN ELLIOTT . I am the prosecutor's fellow-servant. I know the shoes were safe the night before. I lost a shawl at the same time.

Prisoner's Defence. I am a shoemaker. I was waiting for a person in Cursitor-street, and a gentleman came up and sold me the shoes.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-108

458. WILLIAM BURNHAM was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of March , one box, value 2 s.; two shirts, value 14 s.; three pair of stockings, value 9 s.; one handkerchief, value 4 s., and one waistcoat, value 1 s. , the goods of Robert Clark .

ROBERT CLARK . I am servant to Mr. Welling, who lives in Portland-place . These things were stolen from the Bromley cart, where they were going to be washed.

JOHN BALCOLME . I was at the door with the cart. I put the things into the cart myself, and went in to shew the gentleman of the house a sample of oats. I turned round, and saw the prisoner with the box. I followed him, and he threw it down. I secured him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Fined One Shilling, and Discharged .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-109

459. THOMAS WALL was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of April , two handkerchiefs, value 7 s. , the goods of Thomas Sowerby .

WILLIAM HENRY BAYFIELD . I live with Mr. Thomas Sowerby , who is a pawnbroker . On the 6th of April, about half-past six o'clock in the evening, the handkerchiefs were safe in the shop window; I was watching the prisoner from an upper window. I saw him put his hand in at the window, take a handkerchief, and go away with it. I ran down stairs, pursued him, and caught sight of him about fifty yards off; I am positive he is the person - I had seen him lurking about for some time previous - another boy was with him - he was stopped before I came up. I myself took the handkerchief out of either his hand or bosom - we lost two handkerchiefs; the window was cut to get them out.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN OSMANT . I am a plasterer. I heard the cry of Stop thief! and saw the prisoner running, stopped him, and saw the handkerchief taken from him.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked it off the pavement.

GUILTY . Aged 13.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-110

460. ELIZABETH JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of March , one sheet, value 8 s., and one cap, value 7 s. , the goods of William Baker .

WILLIAM BAKER . I live in Coventry-street, Bethnal-green . On the 6th of March, about six o'clock in the evening, the prisoner absconded from our service - she only came to live with us the day before. On the 20th I met her in Red Lion-street, and found the cap on her.

PHOEBE BAKER. I sent the prisoner down stairs to make the bed, and she absconded with the sheet and the cap.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Confined Three Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-111

461. JOHN MATTHEWS was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of March , one watch, value 2 l.; one chain, value 1 s.; two seals, value 2 l., and one key, value 2 s., the goods of Edward Stanfield , from his person .

EDWARD STANFIELD . I am a painter , and live in Mortimer-street, Cavendish-square. On the 13th of March, between four and five o'clock in the afternoon, I went to a banker's in Henrietta-street, on business. My watch was then safe - it was the time of the election. As I returned towards the City, the prisoner, and two others, surrounded me, and forced me into the crowd. I begged of them to let me go, as I did not want to go into the crowd. About a minute after they gave way, and let me out. I immediately missed my watch, turned my head round, and saw the prisoner hand it over to one of the others. I immediately rushed in and collared him, and his companions called for assistance. The others was rescued by the mob, but I never lost my hold of the prisoner. I have not recovered my watch.

FREDERICK DESCHLEIN . I am a bookbinder. I was at Covent-garden , at the close of the poll, in the outskirts of the crowd. I heard a person call for assistance - the prisoner was making his escape. I seized him and gave him to Westcoat. I saw him hand the watch over.

WILLIAM WESTCOAT . I am an officer. As I was going along the market, there was a cry of Rescue! A great mob was following the two witnesses who had the prisoner in custody. I went into the mob - the prisoner said, I will go peaceably with you, your are an officer. I found a knife in his pocket.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-112

462. DAVID MORGAN was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of April , one basket, value 10 s.; and twelve loaves of bread, value 8 s. , the goods of Peter Gardener .

PETER GARDENER . I am a baker . My basket stood in charge of a fruit woman at Charing-cross , while I went to a customer. I returned in about a quarter of an hour, it was then gone. I found the prisoner at my master's shop with it.

ELIZA JACKSON . Gardener left the basket in my care. The prisoner came up and was taking it, I said you have no business with that. He said his name was Morgan and the baker sent him for it, and he should go back and tell him I would not let him have it. He left his name with me and took it. I watched him down the street. I am sure he is the man.

LAWRENCE WHITAKER . I am a baker. Jackson described the prisoner to me, and about half-past one I saw the prisoner in Queen-street, with the basket. I looked at him, I put my finger up to my nose, and asked if he had prigged it. He came back and asked if I wanted a punch of the head. I followed him up South Audley-street, and took him. The basket contained twelve quartern loaves and four half-quarterns.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Six Months , and Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-113

463. ANN HUMPHRIES was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of April , one pair of stockings, value 7 s. , the goods of Daniel Harris .

JOSEPH WILD . I am servant to Mr. D. Harris, who lives in Marylebone-street . On the 1st of April, the prisoner and another woman came to the shop, and looked at some stockings. I asked 9 s. 6 d. a pair for them - she offered 9 s. which I refused. They went out - returned and bought 1 1/2 yards of gauze. I was doing up the parcel, and saw the prisoner putting a pair of stockings under her child's clothes, and then into her pocket. They bought things which came to nearly 1 l., which the companion paid for. They went out, I followed, and brought the prisoner back, and she delivered them to me.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I beg for mercy.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Fined One Shilling, and Discharged .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-114

464. HANNAH WESTCOMBE was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of March , one coat, value 10 s.; one pair of breeches, value 3 s.; and two yards of lace, value 15 s. , the goods of John Hoare .

JOHN HOARE . I live in Banner-street, St. Luke's . My wife is a laundress, and employed the prisoner to wash for her. These things were missing. I got an officer, went to her apartments, and found duplicates of all the property on her.

THOMAS MILLER . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Golden-lane. On the 3d of March, the prisoner pledged a pair of breeches for 2 s.

JAMES ROBERT CAPELL . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Old-street. On the 2d of February, the prisoner pledged a piece of lace for 10 s.; and on the 1st of March a coat for 8 s. I knew her very well.

SUSAN KIRKWOOD. I am a pawnbroker. I have a waistcoat, which I took in pledge of the prisoner.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I found the things in a bundle in the passage.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Confined Six Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-115

SEVENTEENTH DAY, MONDAY, MAY 1.

465. JOHN WALTERS and THOMAS COCK were indicted for that they, on the 18th of March , at St. James, Clerkenwell, feloniously did dispose of and put away a certain forged and counterfeit Bank note (setting it forth, No. 5746, dated February 10, 1820, 1 l. signed S. Draper), with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England , they well knowing the same to be forged and counterfeited .

SECOND COUNT, for offering to Theophilus Price Haddock a like forged and counterfeit Bank note, with the like intent, knowing it to be forged and counterfeited.

THIRD AND FOURTH COUNTS, the same, only calling the forged instrument a promissory note for payment of money, instead of a Bank note.

FOUR OTHER COUNTS, the same, only stating the prisoner's intent to be to defraud the said Theophilus Price Haddock .

MR. SERGEANT BOSANQUET and MESSRS. REYNOLDS and BOLLAND conducted the prosecution.

THEOPHILUS PRICE HADDOCK . I am a grocer , and live at No. 61, Margaret-street, Hackney-fields . On Saturday evening, the 18th of March, about nine o'clock, the prisoners came to my shop together, and asked for a pound and a half of butter, a pound of 8 d. sugar, and two ounces of tea. One said to the other,

"We may as well have two pounds of sugar, for one pound will not be sufficient for the whole week." No answer was made. I served them, the articles came to 3 s. 2 d. Cock put down a 1 l. Bank note - they were both in company - I took it up, and was looking at it when Mr. Chapman, a neighbour of mine, came in, he said, Mr. Haddock, give me that note. I did so. He then said the prisoners had been passing bad notes - they could hear him, I thought. Cock rather smiled. I gave Mr. Chapman the note, then desired that I might mark it; he gave it to me back, and I marked it with my initials (looks at one), this is it. Mr. Chapman and Mr. Gray, who was with him, took the prisoners away in custody.

Prisoner COCK. Q. Did you or your wife take the note - A. My wife might have taken it first, but it was never out of my sight.

HENRY HAYWARD . I am a butcher, and live in Margaret-place. On Saturday night, the 18th of March, between eight and nine o'clock, Walters came to my shop, and bought a leg of pork, which came to 4 s. 8 1/2 d., and gave me a 1 l. Bank note. I asked him his name and address? he gave me

"Walters, Wick-street, or Wick Hackney." I said,

"You appear like an honest man, I suppose you took this of your master?" he said Yes, and that he had been a cook in London-wall. I did not mark the note, as I considered it useless. I do not remember his saying when he received it. Directly after he was gone, a neighbour came in, and gave me reason to suspect it was forged; it laid on the block. I then took out two or three notes from my pocket to compare with it, I could discover no difference. I always kept it separate from the others. Sometime after, Chapman brought Walters in, and I gave him the same note Walters paid me I am certain.

JAMES CHAPMAN . I am a cheesemonger, and live in Margaret-place, Hackney. On the 18th of March, a little before nine o'clock in the evening, the prisoner, Walters, came to the shop, and bought 3 lbs. of butter. He asked if I could give him change for a 1 l. Bank note? I said I believed I could (in order to get the note into my hands.) - He gave me the note; I looked particularly at the signature and date, as I had previously taken some bad ones; they did not correspond - it was signed E. Staple. I could not tell whether it was good or not. I told him I could not give him change, and returned it to him. He told me to weigh him a pound of cheese, and then perhaps I could. I said No. I noticed the date of it. He went out, leaving the goods, and said he must see if he could get change somewhere else. I followed, suspecting him; he carried the note in his hand, and went into Mr. Hayward's shop, a few doors further on. I saw him give Hayward the note, and get the change. He then came out, went down Margaret-street, and about twenty yards from the shop the prisoner, Cock, joined him. They conversed together, then went into a chandler's-shop at the bottom of the street, and had some grocery weighed, but did not purchase it. They came out, I followed them up Margaret-street again about twenty or thirty yards; they then went into Mr. Haddock's. They stopped, and had some conversation together in the middle of the street before they went in, they then both went into the shop together, I went over to a butcher's shop, where I saw Gray, and called him to assist me. I stood looking through Haddock's window, saw him looking at the note by his lamp, and observed one of them hand some paper behind him to the other; we then went in. I asked Haddock to give me the note, and said, quite loud enough for the prisoners to hear me, that I knew they had been passing bad notes. Haddock gave me the note, and then said

"Give it me again" - he marked it and returned it to me, it was not out of my sight - it was not the note he offered to me, for it was a different signature. I secured them both, took them into Hayward's shop, and asked him, in their presence, to give me the note he had taken from Walters; he did so, and Walters gave him back the change - it was the same number and signature as the note he offered to me. I and Gray then took the two notes to the house of Mr. Glover, the inspector, and gave them to his housekeeper. I put my name on both the notes at his house - (looks at two) - these are them.

Q. You had both the prisoners in custody at Hayward's - A. Yes; and while Walters was giving back the change Cock escaped. When I secured them at Haddock's, and said they had been passing bad notes, they both said,

"If they are bad we have just taken them of our master." I am sure they said we, and I understood them that they had just taken them. It was on Saturday night.

Q. Did either of the prisoners come to your shop on the 25th of February - A. Yes, Cock came about eight o'clock in the evening, and asked if I had got a hock of bacon? I said No. He had a piece of bacon and some butter weighed, and gave me a note. I asked him his name? he said it was Cook, and that he lived in Mutton-lane. I am

certain he did not say Cock. This is the note - (looking at it). I gave him the change, and he left.

MARY VILLENDER . I am housekeeper to Mr. Glover. On the 8th of March Chapman gave me two notes, I delivered the same to Mr. Glover.

THOMAS GLOVER . I received two notes from the last witness, those produced are them. Chapman afterwards marked them in my house, in my presence, and I kept them till I delivered them to the Solicitor for the prosecution.

EDWARD MUSGRAVE . My father was tax-collector in Mutton-lane, Hackney; he is dow dead. I have collected the taxes for two years. No person of the name of Cook or Cock lived there in February last.

JAMES GRAY . I live in Margaret-street, Hackney, and am a gardener. I accompanied Chapman; I have heard his evidence - what he has stated is correct. Haddock put his name on the note in my presence, and delivered it to Chapman. We took the prisoners to Hayward's, and he gave Chapman a note; the change and meat were returned to him. We took the notes to Mr. Glover's housekeeper, having left the prisoners at Hayward's; we returned, and found Cock had escaped; I took Walters to the watch-house. He said he had been cook at the Refuge for the Houseless, at London-wall, and had taken the notes there six weeks ago.

THOMAS GARTON . I am a constable of Hackney. On the 19th of March I and Gleed went to apprehend Cock, Gray was with us. We went to Hackney-wick. I fixed Gray at the front door and Gleed in the garden - it was about seven o'clock in the morning. I looked over into the back-yard, and saw the door ajar; I got into the garden and saw Cock; he turned round, saw me, and went into the front room directly. I went into the house, and saw his wife and sister there. I went into the front room; it was all darkness - I called for a candle, they had none. The shutters were opened, I looked round, but could not see him. I at last found him in a cupboard, doubled up, and a knife in his hand, which was shut. I told him I took him for passing bad notes, in company with another man, the night before; he immediately said he was with Walters the night before, and that he had the notes from Walters, who owed him 15 s.

BARNARD GLEED . I am a constable. I was with Garton, his account is true. The prisoner gave me a key, with which I opened a large chest, and found twenty half-crowns and 1 s. 6 d., which he said he put by to pay his rent.

THOMAS GLOVER . I am an inspector of Bank notes. The note uttered to Haddock is forged in every respect, and is not Draper's signature; the other two are also forged in every respect. Two are off one plate. That uttered to Hayward is from a different plate.

SAMUEL DRAPER . I am a signing-clerk; there is no other of my name. The note is not signed by me, nor does it bear any resemblance to my writing. Another of them bears my name, which is not my writing.

(The note was here put in and read.)

WALTERS'S Defence. I went to the London-wall Asylum, and was a cook there for six weeks and five days; they gave me 1 s. a day. When I left there I went to lodge with Cock. The next morning he went into his garden, and said he had lost three 1 l. notes. I had two 1 l, notes, and gave them to him to take care of - I had 5 s., which lasted me till Saturday night, I then asked him for one of my notes to get victuals. He said,

"Never mind, you can have victuals with me, and pay me next week," and on the next Saturday night he gave me these two notes and said,

"These are the two notes you had from London-wall." He sent me into the shops for the articles.

COCK's Defence. This man came to lodge with me. On the Saturday night he asked me for the two notes, I gave him one. One William Cook lodged with me before he came - he paid me 2 l. 3 s., and said he was going to move to Mutton-lane. I changed the note, and thought proper to put his name on it. I did not know they were forged, but I understand he gave me a false address.

MR. JAMES CASLOW . I was Chairman of the House Committee of the Society at London-wall, and had the management of the establishment. Walters was received there as an assistant-cook for about six weeks, and as he was considered a laborious and deserving man, a gratuity of 1 s. a day was given him when he was discharged, which was on the 1st of March. I myself paid him two 1 l. notes and 6 s. I was in the habit of paying new notes; I almost always paid everything in new notes. I have a strong impression in my mind that I paid him two new notes - I should certainly think I did not pay him these two - (looking at them.) The notes I paid almost invariably came from my bankers, Messrs. Smith, Payne and Co., or from Messrs. Lubbocks', the bankers of the establishment. I certainly do not think these notes ever passed through my hands. He behaved extremely well with us.

WALTERS - NOT GUILTY .

COCK - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 49.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-116

466. WILLIAM HENRY STANFORD was indicted for, that he on the 29th of January , at Saint James, Clerkenwell, feloniously did dispose of and put away, a certain forged and counterfeited Bank note (setting it forth, No. 57711, dated March 16, 1819, 10 l. signed C. Phillips), with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England , he well knowing the same to be forged and counterfeited .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only calling the forged instrument a promissory note for the payment of money, instead of a Bank note.

THIRD AND FOURTH COUNTS, the same, only stating the prisoner's intent to be to defraud John Tuson .

Counsel as before.

JOHN TUSON . I am a surgeon , and live in Percy-street, Rathbone-place . On Saturday, the 29th of January, about half-past eight o'clock at night, the prisoner called on me, and said he was recommended by Mr. Charles Ross , whom I knew. He consulted me professionally. I examined him and found little or nothing the matter with him, and told him so. He said he was going to be married and was particularly anxious respecting himself, and so I prescribed for him. He then asked what my fee was, I told him one guinea. He presented a 10 l. Bank note, and gave me his name, which I put on the note, with my initials and the date. I then sent my son out for change which I

gave to the prisoner (looks at a note), this is it, it has Stanford, with my initials, on it. He told me where he lived, but whether it was Newington or Kennington, I cannot say, but I recommended him to get the prescription made up at Godfrey's, in Southampton-street, as he would pass there on his way home. I gave him the whole 10 l. - he returned me a 1 l. note and 1 s. He said he was going to some place in Berkshire, on Tuesday, and promised to call on me on Monday, but did not. I did not see him again till I saw him at Marlborough-street, which was about three weeks after. He was about five minutes consulting me.

CATHERINE CANE . I live at No. 15, Craven-buildings, Drury-lane. On Thursday, the 16th of December, the prisoner was at my house, it was about two o'clock in the day. When I saw him, he was in Eliza Roberts 's room, who lodged with me. She was in the back room with another female, the prisoner and a young man named Stewart, were in the front room. They had ordered breakfast for four, and I assisted Eliza Garton , the servant, to take it up. They had come to my house about four o'clock in the morning, and did not rise till two in the afternoon. When breakfast was over the bell rang - I answered it. The prisoner gave me a 10 l. Bank note, and asked what there was to pay? the reckoning was 18 s. I came down and sent the servant with the note to Mr. Phillip's oil shop, in Drury-lane, to know if it was good. She returned, and I sent her to Messrs. Hodsolls', the bankers, to enquire there. While she was gone the bell rang, I answered it; and one of the young men told me to order a coach. The servant returned with the note, and in consequence of what she said, I went up and gave the change for the note into the prisoner's hands, and asked him to put his address on the note (looks at one), this is it. He put William Stanford , Sherard-street. The two men then went away together in the coach.

Q. What did you do with the note - A. I laid it on a shelf in a cupboard up stairs, and in the afternoon I changed it at Mr. Cameron's, where I went to redeem some plate. I am certain I gave him the same note. He also marked it.

Prisoner. Q. How long was the note out of my possession before you returned with the change - A. Half an hour or three-quarters. I did not perceive that he evinced any anxiety while she was gone for the change.

Q. Did you not see Stewart three or five days after I paid you the note - A. Yes. I had then received information from Cameron that the note was bad. I told Stewart of it (he was convicted last Sessions for passing bad notes), and he left me a pair of ear-rings and three rings, which Mr. Lees, the inspector, has got. He wanted the note back, I told him it was in the hands of Mr. Cameron, and sent there, but they were gone to bed. I have no doubt of the prisoner's person.

ELIZABETH GARTON . I was servant at this house in December last. Eliza Roberts lodged there. On the 16th of December, the prisoner came home with her from a ball, about four o'clock in the morning. Mr. Stewart and another lady were with them. They all four slept in the house, and got up between one and two o'clock in the afternoon. The bell rang, and they ordered breakfast for four - the two gentlemen were together, and the ladies in their bed-room. My mistress assisted me to take the breakfast up. After breakfast, my mistress gave me a note to enquire if it was good. I took it to Mr. Phillips; returned, and then took it to Messrs. Hodsolls', the bankers, and made enquiry. In consequence of the answer they gave me my mistress changed the note. I never lost sight of it till I returned it to her. I returned her the note she gave me. I am certain the prisoner is the person who was with Stewart. I saw him about four times while he was in the house.

ALEXANDER M'BETH. I am shopman to Mr. Cameron, pawnbroker, in the Strand. On the 16th of December, Mrs. Cane paid me this 10 l. note (looking at it), it has her name, residence, and the date on it, written by myself. I doubted it at the time, but took it on her responsibility. I paid it to Mr. Faulkner with other notes next morning, it was returned to me that evening (Friday the 17th), and I returned it to her that evening myself.

JOHN CLARKE . I am a waiter at the Blenheim coffee-house, Bond-street. On the 18th of December, about half-past eleven o'clock at night, the prisoner came in company with George Stewart , who was afterwards apprehended. They sat down in the same box together, opposite each other, and called for a bottle of claret. I served them, they had pen, ink, and paper. When I drew the cork, I observed that the prisoner had a dirty shirt on, which did not look like a gentleman. They wrote notes across the table to each other. I looked through the curtain and saw on a piece of paper which Stewart wrote to Stanford,

"Do not drink so fast." They called for another bottle. I said my master was gone to bed, as I did not wish to serve them. They saw me with some negus, and asked for some. I gave them each a glass. They asked what was to pay? I said 14 s. Stanford gave me a 10 l. note, which he took loose from his right-hand waistcoat pocket. I said I did not think that I had sufficient change. I took it to the bar to my master, and told him what I had observed, and he declined changing it, and I took it back to the prisoner. He said he had no way of paying unless that was changed. I returned with it to my master; he examined it by another; and at last changed it. I gave them the change; I did not mark the note, but should know it again, it was so particularly marked I thought it unnecessary (looks at one), this is it. It was stained with red ink, and there is a mark at the top which I particularly remember.

Prisoner. Q. Why did you refuse me another bottle - A. Because I did not like appearances. I did not ask his address, as I had every reason to suppose he would not give a correct one.

JAMES FOSBURY . I keep the Blenheim coffee-house. I remember Clarke bringing a 10 l. note to me. He first came for a bottle of claret, which I delivered to him. He came for a second, but in consequence of what he said I refused it. He brought me a 10 l. note. I marked it as I did not like it (looks at one), this is it. I put W, for waiter, and F. for my name on it.

THOMAS CONNELLY . I am in the house of Mr. Jarman, who is a jeweller, in the Strand. On the 21st of December, between five and seven o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came to the shop, and asked to see some seals - he bought a gold seal and key; he then offered me a 10 l.

note. On first sight I thought it was bad. However I examined it very minutely, and saw it was more perfect than many I had seen, and from that, and his genteel appearance, I was induced to take it. They came to four guineas. I gave him the change, and shewed him some pins, he paid me 12 s. in silver, for one. I observed a stain on the note, and the name of Tomlinson and Co. on it, before I took it. I did not ask his address.

Q. When did you see him again - A. At Marlborough-street. I kept the note in my possession till I produced it there, and then marked it. My employers were in France, and as I doubted it I would not pay it away - (looks at one) - this is the indentical note I took of the the prisoner.

CHARLES WATHEN . I am a waiter at Payne's Hotel, Brook-street, Bond-street. On Sunday, the 2d of January, I saw the prisoner at the Nelson Inn, North Cheam, where I then lived; he came in a horse and chaise, with another young man, they came into the house, and remained three-quarters of an hour, or an hour. The reckoning came to 9 s. 6 d. - the prisoner gave me a 10 l. Bank note, I took it to my master, at the bar, he could not change it. I then took it to a person named Lott, who keeps the tap at the inn, Mrs. Lott gave me a 5 l. and four 1 l. notes, and 1 l. in silver; I brought the change back, put it on the table, the prisoner took it up, and was going to put it into his pocket, when his companion said,

"It is my change," and took it. They staid about ten minutes longer, gave me half a crown, and went away in the chaise together, to Epsom; they ordered dinner to be got for four persons on the Wednesday following. I was frequently in the room, and have no doubt of his person.

AMEY LOTT. My husband keeps the tap of the Nelson inn, I remember early in January, the last witness brought me a 10 l. note, I gave him change, took the note up stairs, and put it into the drawer - there were two more 10 l. notes in the drawer; they were rolled together with some smaller ones. I put this by itself. I had no loose 10 l. notes in the drawer, except this. I locked the drawer, and always kept the key myself. I paid the same note to Mr. Taylor, who is clerk to Mr. Earl, of Kingston. I put no mark on it myself.

JAMES TAYLOR . I am clerk to Mr. Earl, who is a corn-dealer, at Kingston. Lott is a customer of ours. On the 13th of January, I called on him for a bill of 17 l. 12 s. 6 d. Mrs. Lott brought the money down to him, and he gave me a 10 l., and seven 1 l. Bank notes, and 12 s. 6 d. in silver. I marked them all at the time I received them (looks at one), this is the 10 l. note she paid me. It has Lott, Cheam, January the 13th, and J. T. my initials.

MARIA BROOKS . In February last, I was servant to Mr. Braham, Euston-street, Euston-square, New Road. He keeps a private house - the prisoner lodged there for three weeks. He gave me a note which I did not look at. He said it was a 10 l. note, and told me to go and pay Mr. Lunn's bill, at the public-house, and bring him back the change - the note was open. I took it over and gave it to Mr. Lunn, jun. He deducted the bill, and gave me a 5 l. and three 1 l. notes, with some silver. I brought the change back and put it on the prisoner's table. He took the notes up, and asked me to get him five 1 l. notes for the 5 l. note, as it was a very old one. I did so, and gave them to him. I never changed a 10 l. note for him before. He went away about an hour after, and left no direction where he was gone to. I did not see him again till he was in custody. I believe he left on the 3d of February.

Prisoner. Q. You was aware that I was going away - A. Yes; he told me to pay the publican as he was going. I believe it was on a Wednesday evening - he discharged his bills weekly.

GEORGE LUNN . I am the son of Richard Lunn , who keeps the Euston Arms, Euston-street. On the 3d of February, about seven o'clock in the evening, Brooks gave me a 10 l. note to pay Stanford's bill, which was between 1 l. and 2 l. I gave her the change and marked the note directly, this is it - (looking at it) - it has

"Stanford, No. 18, Euston-street," on it. I gave her a 5 l. and 3 l. notes. I never changed a note for the prisoner before. The 5 l. note was an old ragged note. She brought it back, and I gave her five 1 l. notes for it.

HENRY MILLER . I am a solicitor, and live at Froome, Somersetshire. On the 5th of February, I was at the Sussex Hotel, Bouverie-street, and was desired to assist in securing the prisoner - he was out then. I went up into the sitting-room, where I found a young woman. There was another in the bed-room; both rooms looked into the street - the other woman came into the room. I took my station at the window, and they both went up into the bedroom. In consequence of information, I insisted on their coming down, and placed them at the back part of the room that they should not look out of the window. I placed myself so as to look out of the window without being seen. I did not see the prisoner in the street, he came into the room. I immediately went to him and charged him with uttering a 10 l. Bank of England note, knowing it to be forged. I did not tell him to whom he uttered it. He said I must be mistaken in the person, for he never changed a 10 l. Bank of England note in his life - I am perfectly sure that he said so. I kept him waiting till Mr. Ross came. He then told him he had uttered a 10 l. note to Mr. Tuson, and shewed him the note. He then admitted that he had paid it to Mr. Tuson, but added, that he had given his right name and address. I had two constables in waiting - I called them in, and delivered him up to them. He asked if he might be allowed to have some dinner, I permitted him. He then wished the constables to withdraw, which I permitted - I and Mr. Ross remained with him, I believe the young women were not there. He asked Mr. Ross, what end he could have in prosecuting him? and said he was the only man that could possibly save his brother, but if Mr. Ross persisted in what he was doing, he would turn against his brother, and nothing would save him (a person named Charles Ross was then in custody). I left him with the officers and proceeded to the Bank Solicitors' office. When I returned he held a full glass of wine in his hand, and asked if a guilty man could hold a glass so steadily. He was abusive, and was taken off in a coach.

Prisoner. Q. Can you be positive that I did not say I never passed a bad note - A. The impression on my mind was that he never changed a 10 l. Bank of England note. I did not mention Mr. Tuson's name to him.

HUGH ROSS . I am a solicitor, and live in Wardrobe-place, Doctors' Commons. On the 5th of February, I went

to the Sussex hotel, the prisoner was not then within, he afterwards came in; he was in the custody of Mr. Miller. On my entering the room I charged him with passing a forged 10 l. Bank of England note; he said he had done no such thing. I said I had a charge of that nature against him. He asked to whom he had passed it? I told him to Dr. Tuson, of Percy-street, Rathbone-place. He said he believed he had passed a 10 l. note to Dr. Tuson, but he was not aware that it was forged, and that he had given his right name - he might have said that he gave his residence also, but I am not certain. I gave him in charge; he wished the officers to withdraw, they did so; he then said it would be of no service to me to prosecute him for this note, but that ultimately it might do me much mischief; that he was enabled to help my brother's case very materially, and that he was the only person who could do it (my brother was in custody on a charge of this nature). He said, if I suffered him to depart in the present instance he should feel grateful for it, as I must be aware it was a case that would at any rate affect his liberty, and perhaps his life; and if I would not comply, he should be compelled to be hostile, which I understood to mean respecting my brother.

Q. Had you any transactions with him yourself - A. Never. I saw him once by accident, but did not then know his name. He said a great deal more, which I do not recollect. I afterwards saw him at dinner, as Mr. Miller has stated.

Prisoner. Q. Did I not tell you that it was a serious charge, but under the mysterious circumstances of my being connected with your brother, I had not an opportunity of proving my innocence - A. I believe he did, and he held out to me that he could be of service to my brother.

WILLIAM WILLIAMS . I occupy Nos. 10 and 11, Sherard-street, Golden-square; the prisoner lodged at No. 11, with his wife; they came there in September, and went away on a Friday. Plank and another officer came after him, with a jeweller from Bond-street; when he heard they had been he never came back - this was on the 17th or 18th of December.

Prisoner. Q. Who told me they had been - A. I do not know, but his wife was at home when they came. He might go up stairs without my knowing it. I watched for him, but could not see him. I made a seizure the next day, and turned his wife out. I had given him warning five weeks before, but could not get rid of him.

THOMAS GLOVER . I am an inspector of Bank notes - I have been so twenty-six years. The note uttered to Mr. Tuson is forged in every respect, and is not the signature of C. Phillips, which it purports to bear. The others are also forged in every respect, and appear all to be impressed from the same plate. They are all signed Kensall (excepting that uttered to Mr. Tuson), but are not his writing.

CHARLES PHILLIPS . I am a cashier at the Bank, and sign 10 l. notes. There is no other of my name. The note is not signed by me.

(The note was here put in and read.)

Prisoner's Defence. I have heard the evidence, which requires no ordinary mind to disconnect. I admit passing the notes, but you will find I gave no false names or addresses to them. I might have told Dr. Tuson that I was going to Kennington. Mrs. Cane did not bring me the change for three-quarters of an hour; but there is no evidence of my betraying any fear; and I will leave you to judge whether, in the course of passing six notes, there is sufficient to prove that I knew them to be forged, further than bare suspicion. Misfortune drove me to the life I have followed, which was depending on the chance of a billiard-table. I am aware that was not a reputable life, but I trust you will allow that in that life I may have taken the notes in question. You will see whether I passed the notes for any unnecessary articles - one was for wine, another for jewellery, and a third was to pay the publican. The bare suspicion of my knowing them to be forged, is not sufficient to prove me guilty of an offence which I am to suffer death for. The officers who apprehended me have not been called. -

MR. SERGEANT BOSANQUET. My Lord, they shall be called, if the prisoner wishes it.

THOMAS SMITH . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner.

Prisoner. Q. Did you find any bad notes on me - A. No. I went into his bed-room, and found nothing but six duplicates.

EDWARD HASKIN . I am an officer, and assisted in apprehending the prisoner. I found 12 s. 6 d. on him, but no notes.

Prisoner (in continuation.) It was my determination to plead Guilty, but the Court advised me not, and I put myself on my trial, not for the purpose of vindication, but that I might address you. I have made application to the Bank, with a full confession that I passed the notes, and praying their mercy on account of my youth, and having had no paternal protector since the age of sixteen. I wished to make every atonement in my power. Various misrepresentations have been made to influence their opinion. I have nothing but death before me, having been denied their clemency. Instead of my being the leader of a desperate gang, I was only the instrument of Stewart - he took advantage of my distresses; my wife and myself had not bread to eat for two days. Stewart said if I could pass bad notes he could get them for me. I was provided with one, and passed that; he got me another. He was apprehended in a day or two, and laid the blame on me; he was allowed to be transported for fourteen years. I was then sure that the officers were after me - I had no money to leave the country, and was led to the desperate resolution of passing more, to raise money to leave the country; at this time I became acquainted with Mr. Ross (the brother of the witness, who has only done his duty) - I informed him of my situation, and that the officers were after me - he was living with his father at home, enjoying a comfortable house and everything he wished for. He said if I would suffer him to join me, he would pass sufficient notes to get us both out of the country. I suffered him to participate in it, he passed notes with me, and through the means of his brother's taking me, he was allowed the clemency of the Bank; and I suppose, from misrepresentations on my character, I am to be cast for death. I now throw myself entirely on their mercy, and

perhaps, before I suffer I shall detail the circumstances more particularly, and shew that I deserve the same mercy as others.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 20.

Recommended to Mercy by Mr. Tuson and the Jury, on account of his youth.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-117

467. JOHN BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of April , one looking-glass, value 3 l., the goods of Jacob Richards , in his dwelling-house .

JAMES HOLMES . I am servant to Mr. Richards, who is an upholsterer , and lives in High Holborn . On the 18th of April, about half-past eight o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner go out of the shop with the looking-glass. I followed, and stopped him with it - he was quite a stranger. It is worth 40 s.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-233

468. MARY REVLET was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of April , four 1 l. Bank notes, the goods of George Edwards , from his person .

GEORGE EDWARDS. I keep a coal-shed in Old-Round-court, Chandos-street. On the 9th of April, about ten o'clock in the evening, I went with a young man to No. 2, Newton-court, Wild-street , to see the prisoner - she is a woman of the town. While I was in the room I put this money from my breeches-pocket into my jacket-pocket; I did not perceive it taken away, but caught her hand as she was returning the purse to my pocket, with only four 1 l. notes in it - there were eight before.

Prisoner. Q. Was you not with me the morning before - A. I was not - I am sure I was sober. I gave her no money.

HENRY LEADER . I am a watchman. I was called up to the room about eleven o'clock; the prisoner stood at the bottom of the stairs. I told her she had got the man's money; she said Yes, she had, and out of the 4 l. she had earned her 2 l., and would not give it up. The prosecutor gave her no answer.

GEORGE EDWARDS re-examined. I had been with her in the morning, and given her no money.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-118

569. WILLIAM COX was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of February , 50 lbs. of lead, value 10 s., belonging to Matthew Whiting , and fixed to a building of his .

MATTHEW WHITING . I am a general merchant , and have a warehouse at Stepney - it is my sole property; lead had been stolen from it three or four times. I told the watchman to look out.

JOHN TAYLOR . I am a private watchman. On the 20th of February, about six o'clock in the morning, I had a person to call up, which I did, and then returned to the premises, which join Mr. Whiting's. I heard something fall heavily from the roof, ran down the alley, and heard a man say,

"What do you do at the top of the building, stealing the lead?" I then saw the prisoner drop from the building, and secured him; a person looked out of a window, and said that was the man who was on the roof. I said,

"I have got you at last - I have been looking for you a long time, for the people have been robbed four or five times." He said,

"Then I suppose I must pay for all" - I asked if any body was with him? he said No. I found 56 lbs. of lead by his side, and took him to the watch-house, then returned to the roof, and found another piece of lead cut off, ready to be thrown down. I saw it all fitted to the roof; it was quite fresh cut. I found a knife on the tiling.

CHARLES WITROE . I am a labourer. I saw the prisoner on the roof alone, called to him, and heard a noise like a lump of lead falling. I opened my window, and asked him what he was about? he dropped from the building, and Taylor secured him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-119

470. WILLIAM KNIGHT was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of March , one coat, value 2 l., and one pair of gloves, value 6 d., the goods of William Griffiths ; and one pair of overalls, value 4 s. , the goods of John Watley .

WILLIAM GRIFFITHS . I am coachman to John Gale , who is a coachmaster. On Saturday morning, about six o'clock, I missed my coat and gloves from the stable, in Phoenix-street . I saw them safe about nine o'clock the night before; my fellow-servant had left the stable door open while he went for a pail of water. I found the prisoner at the watch-house with them.

JOHN WATLEY . I left the stable door open while I went for a pail of water, and on my return I missed a pair of overalls; I saw the prisoner leave the yard, and followed him almost to Oxford-street. As the hostler took him he dropped my overalls.

WILLIAM PORTERAGE . I am a hostler at the stable. I saw the prisoner leave the yard about ten yards from the stable, stopped him, and found the coat on him. I saw him drop the overalls.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I was intoxicated.

GUILTY . Aged 36.

Confined Six Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-120

471. JAMES WHITE was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of April , one seal, value 20 s.; two rings, value 2 s., and one key, value 6 d., the goods of John Watkins , from his person .

JOHN WATKINS . I live in Crown-street, Finsbury-square, and am a corn and nail operator . On the 7th of April, I was in the Strand , about eight o'clock, and met the prisoner near St. Martin's-lane. He made a snatch at my watch-chain - the chain gave way, and two rings went with the seal; he ran off. I pursued him, calling Stop thief! he cried out also, and ran through the courts towards Chandos-street; I was close behind him, but not near enough to lay hold of him. He was met by Greve, who stopped him. I found my key on the ground, but not the seal.

HENRY GREVE . I heard the cry, and stopped the prisoner, who was also crying Stop thief! - we both fell together; the prosecutor charged the prisoner with robbing him. I took him to Bow-street, and picked up the key.

Prisoner's Defence. I heard the cry, and ran with the rest, saw somebody run into the public-house, and ran in after him.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-121

472. WILLIAM LANGSHAW was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of March , one coat, value 5 s. , the goods of William Walker , the younger .

WILLIAM WALKER , JUN. I am the son of William Walker , and live at Enfield. On the 11th of March I was driving a cart loaded with oats, in Kingsland-road . A man called to me, and said that my coat was stolen off the cart; I looked up, and missed it. I saw two men running in Swan-lane - the prisoner was one. I saw him throw my coat away - he was stopped.

Prisoner. Q. Was you not asleep in the cart - A. No. I was on the cart, but not asleep.

JEREMIAH SAVAGE . I saw the prisoner run down the lane, and drop the coat.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Confined Two Months and Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-122

473. JOHN WOODCOCK was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of April , one handkerchief, value 5 s. , the goods of Thomas Sowerby .

MATTHEW HEATH MOSS . I am servant to Mr. Thomas Sowerby , who is a pawnbroker , and lives in Chiswell-street . I heard a noise in the shop, ran out, and stopped the prisoner with this handkerchief - he threw it down. I saw it safe just before.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I am extremely sorry for it.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-123

EIGHTEENTH DAY, TUESDAY, MAY 2.

474. WILLIAM FARMER was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of March , one watch, value 5 l.; one watch-chain, value 3 l.; one seal, value 30 s., and one key, value 5 s., the goods of Robert Balls , from his person .

ROBERT BALLS . I am a grocer , and live at Brentford. On the 17th of March, about twenty minutes before five o'clock in the evening, I was at Brentford Butts - it was the first day of the election. I attended Mr. Whitbread to his carriage from Mr. Thompson's door - there was a great crowd; the carriage drove away. I walked about two hundred yards in my way home, and missed my watch - I did not perceive it taken. I went to the constable, and next morning I found my watch in the possession of Thompson.

THOMAS THOMPSON . I was on duty at the election, and saw the prisoner in company with two more; I saw Mr. Whitbread's carriage drive from the door, and saw the prisoner close by the prosecutor, standing round him with his companions. They made a rush round him; the prisoner immediately left the others. I laid hold of him, and found the watch in his hand.

Prisoner's Defence. I went to Brentford to meet my friends, who are freeholders. I was in the crowd, and saw the watch, picked it off the ground, and cried out,

"Who has lost a watch?" Nobody answered. Thompson seized me, and I said if he would describe it he should have it.

THOMAS THOMPSON re-examined. He never cried out,

"Who has lost a watch?"

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-124

475. JOHN ROBINSON was indicted, for that he, on the 29th of February , at St. Mary-le-Bow, feloniously did dispose of and put away, a certain forged and counterfeit Bank note - (setting it forth, No 1258, dated November 1, 1819, 1 l., signed J. Vautin) - with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England , he well knowing it to be forged and counterfeited .

SECOND COUNT, for offering to Joseph Morris a like forged and counterfeit Bank note, with a like intent, he well knowing it to have been forged and counterfeited.

THIRD AND FOURTH COUNTS, the same, only calling the forged instrument a promissory note, for the payment of money, instead of a Bank note.

FOUR OTHER COUNTS, the same, only stating the prisoner's intent to be to defraud the said Joseph Morris . MR. SERGEANT BOSANQUET and MESSRS. REYNOLDS and BOLLAND conducted the prosecution.

RICHARD HILL . I was sixteen years of age on the 5th of April last. My father was a shoemaker; I worked with him till he died, and then went to New Providence. On my return I was ill, and was confined in St. Bartholomew's Hospital. After that I went to sea, came home again, and went to St. Thomas's Hospital, which I left a fortnight before I was taken up. About the 3d or 4th of February, I was loitering about Charlotte-buildings, Gray's Inn-lane (it was about a week before I was taken), and I met a man named Lloyd - I had some conversation with him; the prisoner was not with him. I met him afterwards, and he proposed to introduced me to somebody. On the 26th of February he introduced me to the prisoner at the door of the Black Dog, public-house, Gray's Inn-lane. He said to the prisoner,

"Here is a chap that will pass pap for you, and I know he is all right." The prisoner then said,

"Very well, shall we have any thing to drink?" They said Yes. He took us into a public-house, and treated us with gin, (Lloyd, me, and two young women) - the prisoner gave me 1 s. to buy some victuals, and I went away. I did not like to go out that night.

Q. When did you meet him again - A. I met Lloyd next day, by accident, Sunday, the 27th, in Holborn - he gave me 4 d. to pay for my lodging, and appointed to meet me at the

Black Dog on Monday morning. I went there about nine o'clock, staid till eleven, then Lloyd came - some men who pass bad notes, came in afterwards; they were strangers to me. The same day, between five and six o'clock, the two young women whom I saw on Saturday night, went with me and Lloyd to St. Giles's - the young women went before, and Lloyd and I went after. We met the prisoner about Broad-street, and then went to a house in St. Giles's. Lloyd and the prisoner went up stairs, and told me to remain at the bottom; Lloyd came down, and told me to come up - (do not know the street or number, but I should know it if I saw it). I went up into the garret, and there saw the two young women, another girl, a man whom they called Mike, Lloyd, and the prisoner; the prisoner told me to stop till they came back - he and Lloyd went out immediately; I waited there, and they returned in about three-quarters of an hour. The prisoner pulled out five 1 l. Bank notes, and gave one to Mike. Lloyd got a pen and ink, wrote on the other four both back and front, and put them into my coat-pocket. He said,

"Here are the notes, put your hand upon them" - the prisoner was in the room; I desired to look at the water-mark. The prisoner said there is a good water-mark on them, and nobody will tell them from good. I looked, and saw West Smithfield on one of them. The prisoner, Lloyd, and I left the house, and as we went along, Lloyd said,

"You shall have 6 s. for each note you do for us," meaning the prisoner and him - we were all three in company. The prisoner said I should have some bottles. Lloyd said,

"Here is a bottle shop;" the prisoner told him to go in and buy one or two. Lloyd went in, and bought a small bottle for me to put the rum into, and a pint and a half bottle for the prisoner to put it into as I came out with it. As we were going along, the prisoner said,

"This house I know, if they stop you they will let you go" - it was a public-house and wine-vaults. The prisoner told me to wait while Lloyd went and got the chaunt.

Q. What was the chaunt - A. The direction of some neighbour's door. Lloyd brought me this direction,

"Mr. Orton, No. 42, Devonshire-street, Red Lion-square, plumber and glazier." The prisoner said,

"Go in there, (pointing to a wine-vaults), ask for three half-quarterns of rum, and give the chaunt which Lloyd gave to you."

Q. Did you keep the four notes, or return them - A. I forgot to mention that I gave them back to Lloyd before he got the chaunt, and when he brought it he gave me one of the notes back. I went into the wine-vaults, kept by Mr. Clark, I believe, at the corner of a passage in Devonshire-street, Red Lion-square. I went in, asked for three half-quarterns of rum, and said, please to change a note for my master. The rum was put into the bottle, and I asked for change? He said he had not got change, and I then said I could not have the rum; he emptied it out, and I came away with the bottle and note, and told the prisoner and Lloyd, who were waiting for me at the door, that I could not get change. The prisoner pointed to the Turk's Head just by, and told me to ask for the same thing there, and give the same chaunt. I went in - there was a lady in the bar, and asked her for the rum, and to change a note for my master. She asked what direction? I said,

"Mr. Orton, No 42, Devonshire-street, plumber and glazier." She took the note, and gave me 19 s. 1 1/2 d in change. I came out, and Lloyd came to me and asked if I had the smash, (the money). I said I had - the prisoner was by - they always kept together, and outside. I gave the prisoner the change and rum, and told him he owed me 5 s., which with the 1 s. I owed him on Saturday night, would make the 6 s. for the note. He grumbled, and said,

"What?" and on hearing him grumble, I said,

"Nothing." Then we all three went up by another public-house, near Devonshire-street, close to Red Lion-square, and Lloyd gave me another 1 l. note. The prisoner told me to ask for the same quantity as before, and give the same chaunt. I went in - it was the Hole in the Wall; I saw a man and woman in the bar, the woman was sitting down. I asked for the rum and change, and gave the same name. The woman said she did not know any such a person, but the man said,

"Yes, I do; he mended my pipe last week." They gave me 19 s. 1 1/2 d. in change; I came out, and gave the rum and change to the prisoner. We then went down into Red Lion-street, and Lloyd gave me a note; the prisoner told me to wait while Lloyd went and got a new chaunt. He brought me one, but I told him that was too hard a name, and I could not recollect it - he then brought me,

"Mr. Brandt, watch and clock-maker" - I think it was Theobald's-road or street, and by Lloyd's direction I went into a wine-vaults in Red Lion-street (I don't recollect the name). I asked for three half-quarterns of rum as before, gave the note to a woman, and gave her that direction. She said,

"I know Mr. Brandt, but I don't know you." I told her, as Lloyd had instructed me to say in case I should be questioned, that I had only come there that morning. She took the note, wrote the name on it, and gave me 19 s. 1 1/2 d. and the rum. I went away, and gave both the rum and change to the prisoner - they were both waiting outside; the prisoner always received the change, except once. He then said we must go down to Temple-bar - we all three went. Lloyd went and got a chaunt, and brought me, I think it was,

"Mr. Hambler, boot and shoemaker, Water-street." I went into a public-house, in a street on the right hand side from Temple-bar, going down towards the water. I asked for the same quantity of rum, and change. He said he had got but 15 s., or else he would give my master change, without the note or the rum. I went away, and found Lloyd and the prisoner at the corner of the street. The prisoner pointed to a public-house in a passage, and told me to go in there. I went, and asked for liquor and change as before, and gave the same chaunt. The woman said,

"Are you sure you are right?" I said Yes. She then gave me 19 s. 1 1/2 d. and the rum; I gave her the note, and left the house - Lloyd was at the door, but the prisoner was absent. He said,

"There is somebody coming after us, let us run." We ran through Temple-bar, towards St. Paul's, and joined the prisoner in a court, I was going to give him the rum and change, but he said,

"Give it to Lloyd, that is his note" - Lloyd took it from me, and I said he owed me 6 s. for it; he said,

"Lend me this 6 s. for I want to get my top-boots tonight." I said I supposed he would pay me, and he said Yes. I asked the prisoner for the money for the three notes I had done for him? and he gave me 17 s., and 1 s. he lent me on Saturday night, made 18 s. We did nothing more that night. He agreed with Lloyd to bring another young man with him on Tuesday night, which was the

next night. Lloyd and I left the prisoner, and went to Gray's Inn-lane. Lloyd left me at the Black Dog.

Q. On Tuesday, the 29th of February (the next night), did you meet them by appointment - A. Yes, between five and six o'clock, Lloyd, I, and a young man named Nicholls, went up to the same house in St. Giles's, and saw the prisoner there; he told me and Nicholls to wait till Lloyd and he came back, we did, they returned in about three-quarters of an hour, the prisoner came and pulled out eight notes, I am certain, if not nine - I saw him give one to Mike, who was there - he lived there with two young women, and a girl. Lloyd asked for a pen and ink and wrote on the eight notes, back and front. I saw him put them into a piece of brown paper - he then put them into my pocket and told me to put my hand on them. Lloyd told Nicholls and me to go to the corner of Fleet-market, at the Fleet-street end, and he and the prisoner would meet us there. We all four left the house. I and Nicholls went there, they went a different way; we found the prisoner and Lloyd on the spot they had appointed - they were there before us. Lloyd asked me for the eight notes, I gave them to him in the same paper, he gave Nicholls one, they went on towards St. Paul's, and Lloyd gave him a chaunt; he went into a wine-vaults, which Lloyd shewed him, and got change - we three waited at a little distance, not altogether.

Q. Did you afterwards go to Castle-court - A. Yes; Lloyd gave me a chaunt,

"Mr. Janson, Castle-court;" I went into the public-house, they told me to get Mr. Janson's name on it, for they did not know me, and stopped the bottle. I came out, and told the prisoner and Lloyd. the prisoner said,

"Never mind, come on, here is another bottle;" and gave me Nicholls's bottle. We all four went to Coleman-street, Lloyd gave me,

"Mr. Johnson, Bell-alley," for a chaunt, and directed me to go to the Three Tuns, kept by Needham. I asked for three half-quarterns of rum, and, by mistake, I gave Johnson, Brad-alley. The lady gave me change, and desired me to look at it before I left the bar, as she would not change it after. I came out - as we were going on to Mr. Morris's, Nicholls left us. I gave the change and the rum to the prisoner. As we went along we stopped, and I said there is somebody touting us (which means watching). The prisoner told me to wait a bit, and Lloyd went and looked at the man, who was an officer; he then seemed to go away, and the prisoner said,

"Now go."

Q. To where were you to go - A. To Morris's, the Blue Anchor. Lloyd had given me a 1 l. note out of the eight, between Needham's and there. I went into Morris's, and gave the name of

"Johnson, Brad-alley;" and asked for the same quantity of liquor. Morris asked me several questions, where Brad-alley was, and if it was in Coleman-street - I said Yes, for I did not know where it was. He was writing on the note when the officer came in and collared me, before I got the change. He asked what I was doing, and took me into custody.

Q. Was the prisoner soon afterwards taken - A. As we went along the prisoner and Lloyd came to rescue me; they had told me before, that they would rescue me if I was taken - they came round, followed us, and came in front of the officer. I supposed they wanted to rescue me. The officer told another man to take me into the public-house - I went in quietly - the officer ran out, and brought the prisoner in. That is all I have to say.

Q. When the prisoner was taken, was anything said - A. The officer said to me, Do you know this man? I was going to say Yes, but before I could get the word out, he knocked his hand down, and said,

"By G - d, you don't know me!" and then I said No.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Have you no other name but Richard Hill - A. None, except what the boys in Gray's Inn-lane gave me. I had no home. I returned from sea three months before I was taken, and was two months and a fortnight in St. Thomas's Hospital; and for the other fortnight I lodged in Field-lane. I loitered about Charlotte-buildings, because I had nothing to do, and I must own I was obliged to pilfer and do other things. I have a father-in-law, a shoemaker, at Bradford, in Wiltshire, his name is John Stokes ; I have not heard of him these two months. My father brought me up in the Wiltshire militia. I was thirteen years old when he died.

Q. What was the first ship you went to sea in - A. The brig Junius, Mr. Miller was the captain; I left him at New Providence, and worked my passage home in the brig Swan. I have had no employ on shore.

Q. Have you lived by thieving - A. Sometimes I have opened the hackney-coaches for people, and other times pilfered meat to eat.

Q. Have you ever been a prisoner - A. Yes, three months ago I was in this very prison for stealing a piece of bacon - the Court had mercy on me. I was taken up once on suspicion. I have been in custody three times including this time, and no more.

Q. When were you promised mercy, on condition of being a witness - A. About a week after I was taken. I was told to tell the truth, and I thought it best to tell the truth. I wrote on a paper what had passed between me and the prisoner, and when the gentleman of the Bank came I shewed it to him; he asked me some questions about it, and wrote down what I said. I have thought it best to tell the truth, and I hope I shall get a ship and go to sea, for I have had my life threatened by a parcel of rascals in the prison.

Q. Do not you call yourself a rascal - A. Yes, I am a very bad boy. They threatened to stick a piece of steel into me, and I can call them nothing else but rascals.

Q. Did you know what pap was before you knew the prisoner - A. No, I learnt all the slang when I was in the Old Bailey, of course I was not here three months without hearing these things.

Q. Did you write down all the chaunts they gave you - A. No, I went and shewed the officer the houses, and that called it to my recollection.

Q. Where did you get the clothes you have on to-day - A. With a little money the Bank allowed me for victuals, I lived on the gaol allowance, and bought the clothes with the money.

MR. REYNOLDS. Q. What did the turnkey give you - A. Ten shillings a week. I was destitute of employ, and had no friend to apply to.

SARAH PUGH . I am servant to Mr. Pitt, who keeps the Turk's Head, East-street, Red Lion-square. On Monday,

the 28th of February, about seven o'clock in the evening, a boy came for three half-quarterns of rum, I served him - I cannot positively say it was Hill. I put it into a small black bottle, which he brought; it came to 10 1/2 d. He put down a 1 l. Bank note, and asked me to give him change. I asked who it was for? he said,

"For Mr. Orton, Devonshire-street, plumber and glazier." I knew there was such a person, and gave him 19 s. 1 1/2 d. and the rum. I wrote on the note

"Mr. Orton, Devonshire-street, 28th Feb., 20. Pitt" - (looks at one) - this is it.

Cross-examined. Q. Was any one in the bar with you - A. My cousin, who is a female. I recollect that it was a boy, because I thought it odd that he should come such a distance.

THOMAS LENNEY . I keep the Hole in the Wall, public-house, Gloucester-street, Queen-square. I remember a lad coming to my house, but whether it was the witness or not I cannot say. He came for three half-quarterns of rum, I or my wife served him, we were both in the bar; the rum was put into a small black bottle of his, it came to 9 d., he gave me a 1 l. Bank note. I asked him where he came from? he said

"From Mr. Orton, plumber and glazier, Devonshire-street." My wife was not agreeable to give change, and I said Orton had mended a water-pipe for me. I gave him the change, and marked the note directly - it might be in his presence - (looks at one) - this is it; it has

"Orton, 2; 28" on it. It was a lad about Hill's size.

SARAH ELKINGTON . I am servant at Mr. Dyer's wine-vaults, Red Lion-street, Holborn. On the 28th of February, between six and seven o'clock in the evening, I remember the witness, Hill, coming - I know it was him. He came for a quartern and a half of the best rum, and brought a small bottle, which I put it in; he gave me a 1 l. note, I asked him the address? he said,

"Mr. Brandt, watch and clock-maker, Theobald's-road," which I wrote on it immediately, and told him I knew Mr. and Mrs. Brandt, but did not know him. He said he had not lived there long. I gave him 19 s. 1 1/2 d. change - (looks at a note) - this is it. I wrote

"Brandt, 32, Theobald's-road," on it.

Cross-examined. Q. It was dark - A. Yes, we had lights. I noticed him, because I did not know him, and at first disputed giving him change. I wrote the name and address in his presence.

JAMES ADAMSON LAIRD. I keep the Three Horse Shoes, Milford-lane, Temple-bar. I remember a lad coming to my house at the latter end of February; I think the witness is the boy, but he was differently dressed. He brought a bottle, and asked for three half-quarterns of rum. I put it into the bottle - he tendered me a 1 l. note, I said I could not give him change, for I did not know him. He said he came from Mr. Hambler, No. 2, Water-street, boot and shoemaker - I knew him very well, and it induced me to take the note. I marked it, and told my wife to give him the change, which she did, reluctantly - (looks at one) - this is it; it has that on it in my writing.

MARY DOWNS . I am the wife of George Downs , who keeps the White Horse, in Cloak-lane. I know Hill, he came to our house between six and seven o'clock in the evening - I rather think it was on a Saturday - he put a dirty-looking bottle on the bar, and offered a 1 l. note. I asked him where he lived? he said

"with Mr. Janson." I asked if the other boy was gone away? he said Yes. I told him to go and get his master's name on the note, and I would change it. He went away, leaving the bottle, and did not return. I gave the bottle to Hughes, the constable.

JOSEPH MORRIS . I keep the Blue Anchor, in Coleman-street . Hill came to my house in February last about nine o'clock in the evening; he sat a black bottle on the bar, and asked me if I could give change for a 1 l. note for Mr. Johnson, Brad-alley, Coleman-street? I said I knew no such place; he said it was in Coleman-street. I said I thought it very strange that Johnson did not send to the house he used. He said he had been there, and they had no change. I should have given him change. I had the note in my hand, and was preparing to write the name and address on it, when the officer came in and took him into custody. I gave the same note to the officer, and saw him write on it - (looks at one) - I can swear this is it.

WILLIAM HUGHES . I am a City constable. On the 29th of February, about ten minutes or a quarter before nine o'clock in the evening, I was in Coleman-street, and saw the prisoner and another young man standing opposite the Blue Anchor. I saw Hill standing by himself at the gateway adjoining the public-house - I suspected them. The other man came up, looked me full in the face, and I went away up the street sixty or seventy yards, then crossed over, came down on the opposite side, and took my station in Bishop's-court, directly opposite to where I stood before, they could not observe me. They remained there; the boy had crossed over to them, and was in conversation with them for about five minutes; he then ran across into the public-house, a hackney-coach was just passing at the time. I ran, keeping the coach between me and the men, and went into the public-house. The boy was at the bar, Morris had the note and pen in his hand. In consequence of what he said, I took the boy into custody. Morris gave me the note, I desired him to notice it, and I marked it in his presence with my initials - (looks at one) - this is in. I found a bottle standing on the bar, and brought it away. I found nothing on the boy. Before I left the house I got Wright to assist me. In our way to the Compter with the boy, I went into White Rose-court, and when I got to the end I met the prisoner and the other man; they must have gone down London-wall, and up Basinghall-street. When they saw me they fluttered and fell back - I had the boy by my side. When I got opposite to the Bell, public-house, which is about fifteen yards from the court, the prisoner was not two yards behind me. I said to Wright,

"Take care of this boy while I apprehend this party" - the prisoner must have heard me. Directly as I spoke, the prisoner and the other took to their heels, and went down White Rose-court - I cried out Stop thief! and kept them both in sight. I came up to the prisoner and collared him, the other was a-head and got away. I said to the prisoner I want you!" he said

"No, it is the other man you want." I took him into the Bell, where the boy was, and said to the boy

"You know this man very well." He seemed anxious to answer me, but the prisoner knocked his fist down and said,

"By G - d! you don't me, do you?" the boy said,

"No, I don't." I searched the prisoner, and found 3 l. 9 s. 6 d. in silver and 1 s. 5 d. in copper

all good money. I asked him his residence? he said he did not choose to tell me. I never learnt where he did live.

Cross-examined. Q. Hill was a stranger to you - A. Yes. I had no communication with him before I took him. I saw the prisoner before I went into the house. I do not think he knew me.

THOMAS WRIGHT . I live at Mr. Mason's livery-stables, Coleman-street. On Tuesday evening, the 29th of February, about half-past eight o'clock, I was at the Blue Anchor. I had occasion to go to Fore-street, and saw the prisoner, another man, and a lad, standing opposite the Blue Anchor door. I returned in about five minutes, they were then gone from where I saw them. I went into the Blue Anchor, and saw the boy, Morris, and the officer. I knew him to be the same boy I had seen with the prisoner. Hughes applied to me to assist in taking him, and I went with him through White Rose-court, into Basinghall-street. Two men followed a little after us, about six yards behind. When we came within six yards of the Bell, the officer turned round and said,

"This is the man I want" - (they might hear him) - he left the boy in my charge. They instantly turned back and ran away. I took the boy into the Bell till Hughes returned with the prisoner in custody. The prisoner, I understood, asked the boy if he knew him. He hesitated, and said he did not.

Cross-examined. Q. Are you sure the prisoner was one of the men that followed you - A. Yes.

WILLIAM MORECRAFT . I keep the Fountain, in Coleman-street. On the 29th February, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, the prisoner himself came to my house with a bottle like that produced, and bought three half-quarterns of rum - it came to 10 1/2 d. I asked who it was for. He said Mr. Johnson, No. 26, Bell-alley, which is directly opposite my house - he paid me a 1 l. note. I put

" Johnson, B. A. " on it, for Bell-alley - (looks at one) - this is it. I gave him 19 s. 1 1/2 d. change.

JOSEPH NEEDHAM . I live at the Three Tuns, Coleman-street. On the 29th of February, a person came to my house for three half-quarterns of rum - it was not the prisoner, I think. The person brought a bottle like that produced. I served him, and he offered me a 1 l. note. I said I could not change it. He said he came from Mr. Johnson, Bell-alley. I said, then take the rum and pay for it another time, it is of no consequence. He said it was partly for change that he wanted it, for Mr. Johnson wanted to pay a bill. I looked, and found I had sufficient silver and changed it - (looks at it) - this is it. I wrote on it. The person was a stranger, and not the prisoner.

THOMAS JOHNSON . I live at No. 24, Bell-alley, Coleman-street; I know Needham and Morecraft. I sent no person to either of their houses on the 29th of February for change or rum. The prisoner and the boy are both strangers to me.

THOMAS GLOVER . I am an inspector of Bank notes; the note set out in the indictment is forged in every respect, paper, plate, and signature; the signature is not Vautin's writing, which it purports to be. The other six are forged in every respect.

Q. Look at the backs of them, and see if there are any endorsements - A. That uttered to Morecraft has,

"Mr. Williams, tailor, Cloath Fair," and on the back is,

"Mr. Lloyd, Smithfield; that uttered to Mr. Needham, has,

"Mr. Lloyd, Westt Smithfield, and on the front,

"Mr. Jones, Cloath Fair;" on that uttered to Mr. Laird is,

"Mr. Lloyd, Westt Smithfield." The same endorsement is on Dyer's and Lenny's notes, they are all spelt the same way, and all appear to be in the same hand-writing - five of the notes are off the same plate. The notes uttered to Needham and Morris are off one plate, but not the same as the others.

JAMES VAUTIN . I am a signing-clerk of 1 l. notes - there is no other of my name. The note in the indictment is not signed by me. Four others have my name, but are not my signatures.

(The note was here put in and read.)

Prisoner to NEDHAM. Q. When you was before the Lord Mayor, did you not swear that I passed the note - A. I did not.

The Court referred to the witnesses's deposition, which says,

"A man whom the informant believes to be the prisoner."

Prisoner's Defence. The gentleman who lives opposite Bell-alley swore that he believed I was the man, but he could not be certain, and that I had a bottle, but none was found on me. Nobody can claim the money that was found on me.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 26.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-125

476. WILLIAM BROOKS was indicted for that he, on the 21st of February , at St. Mary-le-Bow, feloniously did dispose of and put away, a certain forged and counterfeit Bank note, (setting it forth, No. 33970, dated December 22, 1819, signed J. Tilbury) - with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England , he well knowing the same to be forged and counterfeit .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only calling the forged instrument a promissory note for the payment of money, instead of a Bank note.

TWO OTHER COUNTS, the same, only stating the prisoner's intent to be to defraud John Newman .

JAMES WINDLE . I am shopman to Mr. Newman, who is an oil and colourman , and lives in Fore-street . On Monday, the 21st of February, the prisoner came to my master's shop, about eleven o'clock in the morning, with Mr. Field's compliments, and presented a 1 l. note to be changed - I knew Mr. Field. I took it, asked the address, and endorsed the address on it which he gave me - (looks at one) - this is it; it has,

"Field, Addle-street, 2-21-20." I gave him the change, and he went away; we paid the note away, and it was returned the same week, as forged. I went and made enquiry of Mr. Field. I am sure the prisoner is the man.

JOHN NEWMAN . I am an oilman, and live in Fore-street. On the 21st of February the prisoner came to the shop, and asked for change for a 5 l. note for Mr. Field, of Addle-street, I will not be certain of his person, but am fully convinced he is the man. I asked if he would take four 1 l. notes, and 1 l. in silver? he said Yes, and I gave it to him so. I handed the note over to my son Charles, who wrote on it in my presence - (looks at one) - this is it. It has that address on it in my son's hand-writing.

Prisoner. Q. Did you know me when I worked for Mr. Field - A. I remember him at Mr. Field's perfectly well. I think his coat was off, and his shirt-sleeves tucked up, as if he was at work - he stood at the counting-house door. Mr. Field is a hot-presser.

CHARLES NEWMAN . I am the son of the last witness. I was in the counting-house; my father gave me the note, and I marked it - (looks at one) - this is it. The prisoner was gone before I came in.

FRANCIS FIELD . I am a hot-presser, and live in Addle-street; the prisoner left my service three years and a half ago. I did not send him to Mr. Newman's on the 21st or 22d of February, to change any note. He bore a good character with me - I used to send him to Newman's.

JOHN WILLIAM FORTMAN . I am a baker, and live in Crown-street, Finsbury-square. On the 4th of February, between seven and eight o'clock at night, the prisoner came to the shop, and asked the servant for change for a 1 l. note for Mr. Cox. I heard him, came into the shop, and said,

"Mr. Cox of Wilson-street?" he said

"Yes" - he is a bonnet-maker, and his men often come for change. I said I could not do it, unless he took 10 s. in copper. He hesitated, and then said he dare say it would do, he would take 10 s. worth. In the mean time I sent Mrs. Fortman next door with the note. He saw her go out, and I told him we always liked to ascertain whether a note was good - I put my initials on it before I sent it out - (looks at one) - this is it. When I said we liked to ascertain whether they were good, he said he would go and see whether Mr. Cox would take 10 s. worth of halfpence - he had agreed to take them before. I said,

"No, stop a bit." He then run away, and I ran after him till I got into some ruins behind some houses; he had three or four pals waiting for him there - they kept close up to him, and I rather thought they were going to stop me. I thought it prudent to return - he had his coat off, his shirtsleeves turned up, and an apron on.

WILLIAM COX . I live in Wilson-street; I did not send the prisoner for change to Fortman on any occasion - he often changed notes for me, but I have no recollection of the prisoner.

THOMAS GARTON . I am an officer of Worship-street. I received information and a description of the prisoner - he was brought to the office. On the 13th of March I was in the lock-up-room with him, and asked him if he ever lived with Mr. Field, of Addle-street? he said Yes. I asked him if ever he changed any notes for Mr. Field at Newman's in Fore-street. He said he never did.

THOMAS GLOVER . I am an inspector of Bank notes. The note uttered to Windle is forged in every respect; it has the name of Tilbury, but it is not his signature. The 5 l. note is also forged in every respect, also the 1 l. note uttered to Fortman. They are off different plates.

JOHN TILBURY . I am a signing-clerk; the note is not signed by me - it is like my signature.

(The note was here put in and read.)

Prisoner's Defence. I am as innocent as you are. Mr. Newman seems doubtful of swearing to me, he might be as certain as his servant. When I was at Worship-street I did not know the day it was done, or I could have proved where I was.

The Court referred to the depositions made before the Magistrate, in which the date was mentioned.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 21.

Recommended to Mercy.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-126

477. WILLIAM HARRIS was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of James Hopkins , at ten o'clock in the forenoon of the 27th of March , (no person being therein), and stealing 5 l. in monies numbered, and twenty Bank notes of 1 l. each, his property .

JAMES HOPKINS . I live at Hounslow , and am a journeyman painter . On the 27th of March, between eight and nine o'clock in the morning, I went out and locked my house up. I had upwards of 100 l. in my house, most of it was in Bank notes; they were all in a box under the bed, except two 1 l. notes, which were in a drawer. I returned between three and four o'clock in the afternoon and found the door as I left it - it appeared they had entered at the window. I went up, found the door broken open, and all the money gone.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. He lives next door to me. It was known in the neighbourhood that I had money in the house. I did not see the prisoner about the house; his wife and sister live with him. I saw him next day. I have since seen a 1 l. note, which I know to be mine by the hand-writing on it, it was in my house at the time. There was also a needle-case in the drawer next to that which contained the money - I have since seen part of the case. The prisoner was apprehended on the 30th of March.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Did a young woman named Wedole occasionally work at your house - A. Yes; she is in confinement now - she was taken up for the pin-case.

Q. Did you not charge her with the robbery - A. Yes. I have a nephew named Richard Hopkins ; he and my mother were at my house before the robbery.

Q. Have you not learnt that your nephew gave the needle-case to Clements - A. I do not know. I always kept the key of the bureau - I never gave it to my mother.

Q. Have you not said that she had the means of getting your money, and that she did get it - A. I do not know that she had a key that could open my bureau. I will not swear that I did not say she had.

Q. Did you mention the robbery to Goddard - A.Yes, and to other people; they told me to go to the Magistrate.

Q. Why did you not go to the Magistrate in your own neighbourhood - A. I was advised to go to Bow-street. I have seen a note in the possession of Mr. Cook - it has the name of Kayne, of Richmond, on it in my own writing. I did not put the date on it. I had taken one or two of him before.

Q. His name would be on any note you took of him - A. I do not think I have taken three notes of him altogether. I never charged my mother with stealing it. She left my house suddenly.

COURT. Q. Had you seen the notes safe after your mother left - A. They were safe in the morning when I went out.

JOHN FINAL COOK . I am chief constable of the Hundred, and live at Heston. On the 29th of March Mr. Trimmer, the Magistrate, desired me to apprehended the prisoner. I went between seven and eight o'clock next morning, he was not at home; I told his wife he was suspected of robbing Hopkins. I searched the house, but found nothing. While I was there the watchman apprehended the prisoner, and brought him to me. I sent to Brentford for Hughes, who occasionally assisted his brother, who keeps the One Tun, public-house - he gave me a note, which the prosecutor said was the one he took from Kayne. I found

"Kayne, Richmond," on it.

Cross-examined. Q. What is the date on the note - A. the 28th of May, 1818. Hopkins claimed it.

JAMES HUGHES . I live at Egham, and work for Mr. Cooper, who keeps the Catherine Wheel , public-house; I have known the prisoner from a boy. On the 27th or 28th of March, about seven o'clock in the evening, he came to me in the yard of the One Tun, where I was at work for my brother - he asked me to come in and sit down, I said I could not, for I was busy. I went to him about eight o'clock, he asked me if I wanted money - I had not told him that I did. He said,

"If you want a pound, take it." I said I thought his wife and family wanted it more than I did. In about ten minutes he repeated the offer; I told him as before. He offered it a third and fourth time, put his hand into his pocket, pulled some out, and put it into my hand. As soon as he gave it to me I took it to my brother, and told him what had passed. I should know the note again, as my brother wrote on it,

"Given to James Hughes by William Harris ." He wrote it ten minutes after I received it from him.

Q. Did you ask him how he came by it - A. No, but he told me he had an old uncle dead at Hessam (which I believe is in the Portsmouth road), who had left him a house, which he had been offered 500 l. for. On the 30th of March I heard of the robbery, and made it known that I had this note.

WILLIAM HALL . I am constable of the night at Hounslow. On the 30th of March I went to the prisoner's house; I found him at the King's Arms, public-house, in a lane near his house, and took him to his own house; I then told him I took him on suspicion of Hopkins's robbery, he said he was innocent. I found only 1 1/2 d. on him. Next morning I went to the cage and found he had hung himself. I found him tied up to the bar of the cage by his handkerchief, and almost dead.

JOHN FINAL COOK re-examined. I do not think the prosecutor charged anybody else with the robbery till after the pin-case was found, then the girl was called to account for it.

JAMES HOPKINS re-examined. Q. How do you know this note - A. By the name on it. I took other notes of him before.

MR. ANDREWS, on behalf of the prisoner, called

HENRY GODDARD , JUN. I have known the prisoner twenty years; he worked for my father at Hounslow, which is about one hundred and fifty yards from his own house. He usually came to work about half-past eight o'clock in the morning. On Monday, the day of the robbery, he went to work with me at Mr. Williams's, on the Heath, which is nearly three-quarters of a mile from where he lived, about half-past eight o'clock in the morning; he joined me about two hundred yards from his own house. I was with him from that time till a quarter past one, when he went to dinner; he returned to me about two o'clock, and remained with me till near four. I went with him to Brentford to the election, and lost him in the crowd about five o'clock.

COURT. Q. Do you know how much he got a week - A. Sixteen or eighteen shillings.

THOMAS CARTER . I advised Hopkins to go to Bow-street. I enquired of him what he thought he had lost? - this was on the afternoon of the robbery. He said he could not tell, but he supposed there was 200 l. or 300 l. in notes and gold.

Q. Did you ask him when he saw it last - A. He said he had seen the paper that covered it, and it appeared not to have been removed, but he had not counted it. He said he did not know that he had marked any of the notes.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-127

478. ROBERT MILLS was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of February , one watch, value 2 l.; one seal, value 10 s., and three watch-keys, value 5 s., the goods of John Pott , from his person .

JOHN POTT . I am a hackney coachman , and drive No. 897, for Mr. Johnson. On the 25th of February, about four or five o'clock in the morning, I was attending with my coach at Willis's Rooms - there was a ball there. I was sitting in the Golden Lion with some more coachmen, and fell asleep; I awoke in about an hour and missed my watch. I found my coat unbuttoned and the watch gone. I found it in pledge about three weeks afterwards. The prisoner was in the house after I lost it.

WILLIAM LANTS . I am servant to Messrs. Graham and Stocks, pawnbrokers. The watch was pledged with me. I have not got it.

Q. Why not - A. When I went before the Grand Jury the prosecutor promised to tell me in the evening whether the bill was found or not, and in the evening he came with the prisoner's brother and another coachman, and told me the bill was thrown out. They produced the ticket and redeemed the watch. I thought I had no right to detain it as the bill was thrown out. Mr. Stokes delivered it to the prosecutor. I do not know who pledged it.

JAMES GILMORE . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner. The bill was not brought into Court until the next morning. The prisoner's brother and the prosecutor were drinking together.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-128

479. WILLIAM KIGGINS was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of February , 24 knives, value 14 s., and 24 forks, value 6 s. , the goods of William Felton .

WILLIAM FELTON . I am an ironmonger , and live in St. Martin's-lane . I lost these knives and forks. The prisoner was my servant .

JAMES COLLINS . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Long-acre. On the 26th of February, between ten and eleven o'clock in the morning, the prisoner brought two dozen of

knives and forks to pledge. I saw Mr. Felton's name on them, and took them in on purpose to detect the prisoner, as I knew Mr. Felton very well. The prisoner was apprehended that day.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I beg for mercy.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-129

NINETEENTH DAY, WEDNESDAY, MAY 3.

480. GEORGE ASKEW was indicted for embezzlement .

The prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-130

481. DANIEL THOMAS was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of January , one bushel and a half of wheat, value 5 s., and one sack, value 1 s. , the goods of Michael Keen .

The prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-131

482. JOHN WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of January , 60 lbs. of iron screw bolts, value 10 s., the goods of Richard Salisbury , Thomas Hawkes , and Robert Keates ; and one bag, value 6 d.; one plane, value 6 d., and one screw-driver, value 1 s., the goods of John Huggins , and one chissel, value 6 d. , the goods of William Huggins .

The prosecutors did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-132

483. JOHN READ was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of April , one seal, value 20 s., the goods of John Beavan , from his person .

JOHN BEAVAN . I am a stable-keeper , and live in Bury-street, Bloomsbury. On Sunday evening, the 2d of April, between eight and nine o'clock in the evening, I was standing at the corner of Hyde-street , and saw the prisoner come by, alone, he immediately turned round and caught hold of my watch-chain - I held it as fast as I could - he broke the ring, got the seal, and ran off. I pursued, calling Stop thief, and he ran into the hands of Furzeman, who secured him. I am confident he is the man. The seal was found on the ground.

SAMUEL FURZEMAN . I am a constable. I was in Holborn, and heard the cry of stop thief - the prisoner passed me, and finding no one running but him, I went after him up a turning in Smart's-buildings; I turned round, and caught hold of him, he immediately pulled towards a house, I heard something drop, and found the seal in the passage. No person but him could have put it there. The prosecutor came up and claimed it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I ran with the people, and he took me.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-133

484. BENJAMIN FRENCH was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of March , one coat, value 20 s., one waistcoat, value 10 s., and one handkerchief, value 2 s. , the goods of Charles Jacot .

CHARLES JACOT . I am a tailor , and live in Pickering-place, St. James's-street - the prisoner had lodged in the house. On Saturday, the 18th of March, about nine o'clock at night, I went home, and missed these things - the staple of my box was forced out. I found the prisoner in custody with them, on Monday.

THOMAS GOOK . I am an officer of St. James's. On the 18th of March the landlord of the house gave the prisoner into my charge. About an hour after he wrote down,

"Now gentlemen, I will open the ball, the tickets are in the privy." I went to the privy, and found two duplicates of the property.

WILLIAM SHARP . I am shopman to Mr. Harrison, who is a pawnproker, and lives in Tottenham-court-road. The prisoner pledged a waistcoat with me.

BRODLEY CHAMBERLAIN. I am am apprentice to Mr. Wise, who is a pawnbroker, and lives in Broad-street. On Saturday evening, I took a coat and waistcoat in pledge of the prisoner.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Six Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-134

485. GEORGE GREENWOOD was indicted for that he, on the 4th of March , did dispose of and put away a certain forged and counterfeit Bank note - (setting it forth, No. 17242, dated January 14, 1820, 1 l., signed T. Holland) - with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England , he well knowing it to have been forged and counterfeited .

SECOND COUNT, for feloniously offering to James Creed Eddells a like forged and counterfeit Bank note, with a like intent, knowing it to be forged.

THIRD AND FOURTH COUNTS, the same, only stating the forged instrument to be a promissory note for the payment of money, instead of a Bank note.

JAMES CREED EDDELLS . I am assistant to my brother John, who is a hosier , and lives in Coventry-street . On the 4th of March, about ten o'clock at night, the prisoner came, and bought a pair of stockings and a pair of gloves, which came to 5 s. He gave me a 1 l. note; I suspected it, and asked him his name and address, which I wrote on it - (looks at one) - this is it. It has,

" George Williams , No. 103, Old-street-road, at a printseller's shop" on it. I then called the watchman in to ascertain if it was correct, and gave him in charge. I told him I thought the note was bad, and asked him where he took it? he said at the other end of the town - I understood him to say in the neighbourhood of where he gave his address. After the watchman came in he confessed that his name was George Greenwood , and that he lived at the Sun in Round-court, Strand, and that he had taken the note of Mr. Parkinson, who kept the house, in change for a 5 l. note.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Have you ascertained that to be true - A. I believe he has lodged there; he said he was an herald painter. I believe he said

at Marlborough-street that he gave a wrong name, because he did not like it to be known that he lived at a public-house. I do not recollect his saying so at our shop.

THOMAS GOOK . I am a constable. I received the prisoner in charge at the watch-house, searched him, and found eight duplicates on him, three of which were in his own name, and five in others. Those in his own name are dated March 2, for 2 s. 6 d., February 28, for 12 s. 6 d., and January 8, for 6 s. - the others are in the name of Ann Young . The note was given to me, and I asked him if the address on it was his? he said it was not. I asked him where his right address was? he said at the Sun, Old Round-court, and that he gave the wrong address because he did not like his friends to know where he lodged. I said I knew the house, and well he might be ashamed of it - it is the sign of the Rising Sun - he said so afterwards. said he took the note of Parkinson, at a public-house, in Old Round-court (he keeps the Rising Sun), in change for a 5 l. note, which he took four or five days after the funeral of the King. I asked him how he came to pledge property when he had these notes; he said he often pledged property to the amount of 2 s. or 3 s., rather than change a note. I said the duplicates were to the amount of 14 s. or 15 s. He said he could not account for that. He said the things pledged in another name he bought of a young woman. I went next morning to New Round-court, and went to Old-street-road, but found only 119 houses there, and no such person as Williams.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you go to Old-street - A. Yes, but found no such name there.

ELIZA COUSINS . I live at No. 143, Old-street; the prisoner never lodged with me.

WILLIAM LOVE . I am a tax-gatherer in Old-street and Old-street-road. There is no No. 143 in Old-street, to my knowledge, I think there are not so many houses. I know no printseller's but one, but that is a low number, and kept by Roberts, nearly opposite Mrs. Cousins's, in Old-street. I know of no print-shop in Old-street-road.

Cross-examined. Q. Both Old-street and Old-street-road are in a line - A. Yes. The numbers are very irregular.

JAMES GODDARD . I am shopman to Mr. George Wegulin , who is a pawnbroker, and lives in Chandos-street. On the 28th of February the prisoner pledged a metal watch and a pin with me for 12 s., and on the 2d of March a waistcoat and pencil-case for 2 s. 6 d.

Cross-examined. Q. Can you say he pledged these very things - A. I can. He came to alter the pledge on the 24th - they might have been in another name before. It was a transfer in some way or other.

COURT. Q. Can you say whether the original pledge was his or not - A. I cannot. When he transferred them he must have increased the sum or paid the interest.

THOMAS GLOVER . I am an inspector of Bank notes; the note is forged in every respect, and is not the signature of Holland. It is dated January 14, 1820. On the back of it is endorsed,

"Ramsbottom and Co." I believe that is not a banking house now.

THOMAS HOLLAND . I am a signing-clerk at the Bank. The signature is not my writing. I think Ramsbottom's has not been a banking house for six years - it was not so in January last.

(The note was here put in and read.)

Prisoner's Defence. My only reason for giving a false address was, that I did not wish my employers and friends to know that I was living at a public-house, but directly I was told it was a forged note I wrote my real name and address on a card which was given to me, and whom I took the note of.

MR. EDDELLS re-examined. He did write his name on a card after I called the watchman in. He wrote,

"G. Parkinson, Round-court."

GEORGE BISHOP . I am an herald painter, and live on Bennet's-hill, Doctors' Commons. The prisoner worked for me about the time of the King's funeral. On the 21st of April I paid him 8 l., but I cannot say there was a 5 l. note among them. I had many 5 l. notes in my possession.

WILLIAM PARKINSON . I keep the Sun, public-house, in Old Round-court; the prisoner came to lodge with me at the latter end of January, and lodged there when he was taken up. I changed a 5 l. note for him, and gave him two 1 l. notes, and 15 s., in silver - next morning I gave him two more 1 l. notes, and kept 5 s. which he owed me.

MR. REYNOLDS. Q. How long have you kept this house - A. Ever since Christmas. I believe I changed the note four or five days after the King's funeral.

Q. What description of persons usually come to your house - A. People who live in the neighbourhood - they are tradesmen and working people, to the best of my knowledge.

Q. The police officers often came to your house - A. Yes, often; a man, named John Smith was taken up there. He lodged and boarded with me - he was executed for passing forged 10 l. notes. Six others were taken up at the same time - one of them slept at my house.

Q. Did a person named Bult lodge at your house - A. Not to my knowledge - I do not recollect it.

Q. Do you mean to swear that - A. I do not recollect it.

COURT. Q. You must recollect it - A. If he was apprehended at my house, it was unknown to me. I never enquire what sort of people come. The officers often come to my house after persons.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-135

486. LOUISA THORN was indicted for having in her custody and possession, a forged 1 l. Bank of England note, she well knowing it to be forged .

THOMAS DENHAM . I am a stationer , and live in Great Windmill-street - I am also a constable. On the 24th of February , about ten o'clock at night, the prisoner came and bought a pocket-book, which came to 4 s. 6 d. She produced a 1 l. note and 2 s., and said she was sorry to trouble me for change, but that was all the silver she had. I suspected her, marked the note, and said I had not got change, but I would try to get it in the neighbourhood. I went out, returned, and asked her her name and address, and of whom she took the note. She said she was an unfortunate woman, and the note was given to her by a gentleman in Shepherd-street - she gave her name as Louisa Thorn , City-road. I said I must search her, which she objected to. I repeated the request, and stated that I was a constable, but she still objected to it. I said I must take her to a place where we should force her to be searched -

she was searched in our back room by a woman, and taken to the watch-house; she then said she had no place of residence. I said she must have some place to keep her clothes in; she said she had nothing but what she had got on. I said it was strange she should buy a pocketbook for 4 s. 6 d. when she could get one for 8 d. or 9 d. that would answer her purpose - she made no answer. I returned home, and on going to the shop, in the place where she stood, I found a new umbrella - next morning Mr. Simms claimed it - (looks at one) - this is it.

BENJAMIN SIMMS . I live in Marylebone-street. On the 24th of February, about a quarter past nine o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came to my shop, and bought an umbrella for 7 s. 6 d., and said if it turned out good she would recommend me a customer. She tendered me a 1 l. note, but I begged of her to give me silver; she produced 2 s. and a 1 l. note from under her glove, said that was all she had, and she was determined to have an umbrella. I held the note up to the light, and saw the water-mark, then went out to borrow a few shillings, and gave her change - the umbrella produced is the one she bought. I gave the note she gave to me to Abbott; who got it changed for me.

JOHN ABBOTT . I live with Mr. Simms. I was in the shop when the prisoner came in. Mr. Simms gave me the note, and I took the same note to Mr. Lawrence, who changed it.

FRIEND LAWRENCE. I am a baker, and live in Marylebone-street. On the 24th of February I changed a note for Abbott; I marked it, and put it by - (looks at one) - this is it.

THOMAS GLOVER . I am an inspector of Bank notes; the notes are both forged in every respect, and both impressed from the same plate.

(The note was here put in and read.)

Prisoner's Defence. I met a gentleman, who paid me the note. I know nothing of the other.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-136

487. ELIZABETH M'BRIDE was indicted for a like offence .

JOHN GARDEN ROSS. I live with Mr. Thomas Somerville , who is a grocer , and lives in Clare-street . On the 8th of February , about seven o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came to our shop and bought two ounces of tea and a pound of sugar. She gave me a 1 l. note, I suspected it to be bad, and asked her address - she gave me

"Elizabeth M'Bride, No. 6, King-street, Drury-lane," which I wrote on it - (looks at one) - this is it. I asked her where she got it? she said she had it from a gentleman that day, she did not know where. I sent for a constable and gave her in charge.

JOHN BRANDON . I am a constable of St. Clement's. I took the prisoner in charge. Next day I found she lived at No. 14, King-street, and not at No. 6.

THOMAS COLLINS . I am a grocer; and live in Drury-lane. On the 29th of January, in the evening, the prisoner came into the shop, and bought two ounces of tea and a pound of sugar; she tendered me a 1 l. note. I asked her where she lived? she said at No. 6, King-street, Drury-lane, and that her name was M'Bride. I suspected it was bad, and sent it out by Lee; he brought it back - I did not mark it. I then asked her who she took it of? she said of a gentleman, she did not know who. She said a woman of her description might take a note, and not know from whom. I said it was bad, and if she would leave it I would send it to the Bank on Monday, and if it was good or bad she should have it again. She said,

"Very well," and left the house. I locked the note up in my desk by itself, and on Monday sent Lee with it to the Bank - he marked it in my presence before he took it away - (looking at it) - this is it. She did not call for it.

GEORGE LEE . I am shopman to Mr. Collins. When the prisoner came to the shop Mr. Collins gave me the note; I took it to Mr. Bealby, and brought it back. I am sure she is the woman. On Monday I took it to the Bank, and found it was forged.

THOMAS BROWN . I am a linen-draper, and live in High Holborn. On Saturday night, the 5th of February, between seven and nine o'clock, the prisoner came and bought goods to the amount of 5 s. 2 d. - she tendered me a 1 l. note, I asked her where she had received it? she said she had just got it from a gentleman down Holborn. I asked her name and address, she said,

"Elizabeth M'Bride, No. 13, King-street, Drury-lane" - (looks at one) - this is it. I told her I intended to send it to the Bank on Monday, as I thought it was forged. I told her to call on Monday morning to ascertain if it was good. She did not come. I went out soon after she left.

GEORGE PRICE GRIFFITHS . I am shopman to Mr. Brown. I saw the prisoner in the shop. Mr. Brown's account is correct. The prisoner returned in about an hour and a half after, my master was then out. She said she came to pay for the goods; she had not sufficient money, but she would pay for what was cut off, and have the note back. I told her Mr. Brown had got the note, and if she called about twelve o'clock on Monday she might know about it - she said she would, but did not. I went on Tuesday to No. 13, King-street, but could not find her there. I met her in the street, and she returned with me to No. 13. She said she was in a hurry, but would call in the evening and pay for the goods. I believe she lived at No. 13.

MR. GLOVER. The three notes are all forged in every respect, and appear to be impressed from the same plate.

JAMES VAUTIN . I am a signing-clerk. The signature to the notes is not my writing.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-137

488. ROSINA PARNNINGTON was indicted for a like offence .

JOHN BUTTERS . I am shopman to Mr. Hixon , who is a grocer , and lives in the Strand . On the 3d of March , about twelve o'clock, the prisoner came to the shop, I did not serve her. I saw a 1 l. note lying on the counter before her; no other customer was in the shop, the apprentice had served her. I took the note up, and while he gave her change I enquired her name and address? she said,

"Mrs. Marriott, No. 4, Off-alley, just by." I wrote that on the note - (looks at one) - this is it. The change

was given to her, and she went away. I afterwards enquired at No. 4, Off-alley, and could hear of no such person. Sometime after I found the prisoner lived there, but not by that name. I afterwards went there with Mayhew, about eight o'clock that evening, and found her sitting in the room with a woman, a child, and her husband. The officer knocked at the door, we could not get admission. I heard her voice say,

"There is a knocking!" We went in, I pointed her out instantly, and asked if she did not recollect me? she said she did. The officer asked her where she got the note? she said from her husband (pointing to the man who sat opposite). The officer said he should take him, and went to collar him; he asked for his authority, he produced it; he then said,

"I must see your warrant" - the officer said he had none. The woman came and laid hold of him, and said,

"For God's sake, don't let him be taken!" I saw the man draw a pistol. He was at last secured and brought down stairs. The prisoner ran out; she came back without her bonnet, and said,

"Where is my husband, where have you taken him to?" I said,

"We are waiting for you!" She ran out, I pursued and secured her.

THOMAS MAYHEW . I am a conductor of the patrol of Bow-street. I went with Butters to No. 4, Off-alley, and found the prisoner in a room there, he pointed her out. She asked if he came from the grocer's over the way? he said he did. I asked her where she took the note? she said from her husband (pointing to a man in the room). I asked him where he got it? he said he took it in trade, and that he was a tailor. I said he must go to the office, he refused; I put my hand on him - he asked for my authority, I shewed him my staff. He said if I had no warrant he would not go - a struggle ensued. I have heard the account given by Butters, it is correct. I took the pistol from him - it was loaded within half an inch of the muzzle, and in a drawer behind him was another pistol, loaded with three bullets. The one I took from him was a screw barrel, with one bullet in it.

JAMES LEMON . I am a cheesemonger, and live in Church-lane, Strand. On a Saturday evening, about ten days before the prisoner was apprehended, she came to my shop about nine o'clock in the evening, bought a loin of pork, and tendered me a 1 l. note. I asked her her name, she said,

"Davidson, No. 39, St. Martin's-lane." I saw my wife endorse the note - (looks at one) - this is it. I got change and gave it to her; it was returned to me two or three days afterwards, as forged. I went to No. 39, St. Martin's-lane, but could find no such person. She came alone.

PHILIP INGRAM . I live at No. 39, St. Martin's-lane; the prisoner did not live there. I do not know her.

ROBERT WINKFIELD . I am assistant to Joseph Winkfield , who keeps a public-house in the Strand. About a fortnight before the prisoner was apprehended she came and bought some spirits, which came to 3 s., and paid me a 1 l. note. I asked her address, she gave me

"Tilley, No. 5, Off-alley," which I wrote on it - (looks at one) - this is it. I gave her change and she left. I afterwards made enquiry, but could find no such person there.

HANNAH HOLLINS . I am the wife of John Hollins , who keeps the Green Dragon, in Villers-street. On the 19th of February the prisoner came with another woman, and had half a pint of the best gin, I served her - she asked for change for a 1 l. note, I said I had not got it. She asked if I could not send for it? I sent out for change, she laid the note down, my son took it up, and asked her address; she gave him

"Mrs. Walker, No. 4, Off-alley," which he wrote on the note in her presence - (looks at one) - this is it. I gave her the change.

GEORGE HOLLINS . I am the son of the last witness. I remember the prisoner coming to the house. I wrote on the note - (looks at one) - this is it. She gave me that address.

MR. GLOVER. The notes are all forged in every respect, and are all off one plate.

JOHN COLE BAKER . I am a signing-clerk. The notes are not signed by me.

Prisoner's Defence. I had them from my husband.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-138

489. THOMAS NICHOLLS was indicted for a like offence .

RICHARD BOUCHER . I keep the Coach and Horses, in Brewer-street, Golden-square . On the 3d of March , about seven o'clock, the prisoner came with a bottle, I served him with half a pint of rum, which I put into the bottle; he gave me a 1 l. note, I asked who it was for? he said,

"Mr. Shearman, No. 6, Pulteney-street," which I wrote on it, and asked him if he worked there? he said Yes. I knew a Mr. Shorman, lived there, and suspected him, as he did not give the name. I said it was a bad one, he immediately made a snatch at it, but did not get it - he ran away, leaving the note behind and the bottle. I ran after the prisoner, and called out Stop him! he was stopped, and was not out of my sight. I gave him in charge. (Looks at a note) - this is it.

JOHN WHALES . I am an officer of Marlborough-street. Boucher gave the prisoner into my charge. I found a letter on him, he said he found the note in that letter, in Fleet-street; that his name was Thomas Nicholls , and he lived in West Smithfield.

JOHN WILLIAM SHORMAN . I am an engraver, and live at No. 6, Great Pulteney-street. I never sent the prisoner with a note. I do not know him.

THOMAS GLOVER . The note is forged in every respect, and is not Draper's signature. It is endorsed

"Mrs. Lloyd, Westt Smithfield."

(See No. 475.)

SAMUEL DRAPER . I am a signing-clerk. The note is not signed by me.

(The note was here put in and read.)

Prisoner's Defence. I am perfectly innocent. I found the note enclosed in the letter.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-139

490. THOMAS WILLIAMS was indicted for a like offence .

GEORGE BRIGG . I keep the King and Queen, Old Gravel-lane . On the 11th of February , about ten o'clock at night, the prisoner came in with two others, and asked me for three glasses of rum, and gave me a 1 l. note. I

asked his name - he said

" John Williams ," I understood him to say John. He said he lived at No. 15, Anchor and Hope-alley, which I wrote on it - (looks at one) - this is it. I also wrote

"Brig Effort," on it. I asked him where he took it, he said he took it from his Captain, for wages, and that he came home in that brig. I said I really think it is a bad note, he said it was a good one, that he had received 15 l. for wages, and this was among it; he said he had received two 5 l. notes. I asked him if he had not changed them, and got 1 l. notes for them; he said No, it was one of the notes he had received of his Captain, and that he went to the Bank with his Captain to receive it. I said I could not take it. One of the party said,

"I have plenty of silver, I will pay you," and did so. They then went into the taproom and had five pots of porter; one of them, named Phelps came out of the taproom, and said,

"Master, you may as well change this note, it is a good one, we received it for wages, and shall spend 3 s. or 4 s. more." I said perhaps I would by-and-by. They had two more pots of porter. At eleven o'clock I cleared the taproom out, they all three came together to the bar, and asked for three glasses more of rum; the prisoner said

"You must change my note now, for the other man has spent all his silver." I took the note, and said

"Your name is John Williams ?" he said Yes. I told a gentleman to go to Anchor and Hope-alley to see if that address was correct. As soon as the gentleman went away, Phelps went out first, the other man next, and the prisoner after him. I sung out to them to stop a moment, but they all went out, leaving the note. I secured the prisoner myself, Phelps was brought back, and the other man escaped. The prisoner was searched at the watch-house, and sixpence and a penny found on him - a shilling dropped from him in the way to the watch-house. Phelps had a bundle containing sugar, tea, and tobacco. I asked him where he bought it - he said in the Highway; at first he said he paid for it in silver, and then with a 1 l. note.

JOHN PETERSON . I am a watchman of Gravel-lane. I heard the cry of watch, saw the prisoner running, and stopped him. We kept his hands together. We took him to Brigg's, and as we were taking him to the watch-house a shilling dropped, it must have fallen from him. He said he would make it better for me than I could make. I told him I could hear nothing of the kind. I supposed he meant to offer me money to let him go; we had several skirmishes together.

RUBEN LAWRENCE . I was with Peterson; his account is correct. I saw the prisoner put his hand into his pocket, and at that moment a shilling dropped - it must have dropped from him.

WILLIAM SUMMERS . I am a headborough. The prisoner was brought to the watch-house - Brigg gave me the note, I marked it - (looks at one) - this is it. I asked the prisoner his name, he said,

" Thomas Williams , No. 15, Red Lion-street," and that he took the note from the Captain of the brig Effort. I asked the Captain's name - he said I might go and find that out. I found sixpence and a penny on him. Brigg gave me a shilling, saying the prisoner dropped it - he did not deny it. I went to No. 15, Red Lion-street, and found it had been shut up sometime.

GEORGE SANDS . I am a patrol. I heard the cry, saw two men running, and stopped Phelps, who had a bundle, which contained sugar, tea, and tobacco.

MANASSA ISAAC GOULDSTEIN . I am a slopseller. I was at Brigg's, and saw the prisoner offer him the note. I went to No. 15, Anchor and Hope-alley, but could hear no account of him there.

WILLIAM FOSTER . I am keeper of the lock-up-room at Lambeth-street office. The prisoner and Phelps were finally committed for trial; about six o'clock I found Phelps had escaped. I found a crow-bar there. The prisoner was all over mortar, as if had attempted to escape also. He appeared to be very lame.

Prisoner. Q. Do you know at what time the man escaped - A. About a quarter before four o'clock in the morning.

THOMAS GLOVER . I am an inspector of Bank notes. The note is forged in every respect.

CHARLES WATTS . I am a signing-clerk at the Bank. The note is not signed by me.

Prisoner's Defence. I met Phelps, whom I knew from having worked on board the ship, we went into the prosecutor's, I treated him with rum, and finding I had only 7 d. I tendered the note, and gave my name, Thomas Williams , No. 15, Anchor and Hope-alley, which joins Red Lion-street. I live in Red Lion-street. He said it was bad, and returned it to me; if I had known it was bad I should have gone away, and not stopped half an hour at his house. I took it of Captain Furnet , of the brig Effort, and on every note he put his name. Phelps made his escape by his wife bringing him a crow-bar; he would do it, I endeavoured to prevent him, but he pulled out a knife, and swore he would stab me if I said anything. I determined not to escape, but to stand my trial before you. The hole was open from four until six o'clock in the morning.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-140

491. JOHN BAKER was indicted for a like offence .

JAMES CLEMENT . I am a cheesemonger , and live in Picket-street, Temple-bar . On Wednesday, the 9th of February , the prisoner came and bought 1 lb. of butter. My wife served him. He tendered a 1 l. note. I heard her ask him whose note it was. He said he came from

"Mr. Walters, No. 114, Chancery-lane." She marked it in my presence, and I afterwards put my initials on it - (looks at one) - this is it. She gave him the change. The note was afterwards returned to me. I found Mr. Walters had not lived there some time.

Cross-examined by MR. BROADRICK. Q. You found there had been such a person there - A. Yes.

SARAH CLEMENT . I am the wife of the last witness. I remember a person coming and paying me this note. I asked him whose note it was. He said

"Mr. Walter's, No. 114, Chancery-lane," which I wrote on it, and gave him change - (looks at one) - this is it. I cannot speak positively to his person.

DAVID WALTERS . I lived at No. 114, Chancery-lane, and moved on the 24th of December last to Ship-yard, Temple-bar. I dealt with Clements, but did not send the prisoner there. He is a perfect stranger.

WILLIAM PLANK . I live at No. 114, Chancery-lane, and have done so sixteen years. Mr. Walters lived there up to

the 24th of December. I know nothing of the prisoner, and sent nobody to Clement's shop.

WILLIAM READ . I am an officer of Hatton-garden. On the 16th of February, I saw the prisoner at Hatton-wall with two others, named Fan and Young. Fan got into a a one-horse chaise. The prisoner and Young, were on foot till they got into Holborn - they then got into the chaise. My brother was with me. I took a chariot, followed them to Hyde Park-corner, stopped them there, and searched them. On Young I found four 1 l. forged notes, and two guineas, in silver - these are the notes. On the prisoner I found 8 s. in silver, but no notes. I told them I had information that they were going to Windsor to pass forged notes. Young said he did not know they were bad.

EDWARD READ . I was with my brother. I searched Fan, and found two forged notes in a tin-case in his side pocket. He said he took them of a horse-dealer in Smithfield-market.

THOMAS GLOVER . All these notes are forged in every respect, and the whole seven are off one plate.

EDWARD STAPLE . I am a signing-clerk. Three of the notes bear my name, but are not my writing.

Prisoner's Defence. I was taken to Hatton-garden, and about one hundred people came to look at me, but no person could identify me. After that the officer took me out by myself, and the prosecutor swore to me.

MR. CLEMENT. I took particular notice of him, and was certain he was the man the first time I saw him.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18200412-141

492. WILLIAM EARL and JOHN BATTEN were indicted for a like offence .

MARTHA STOCKHAM . I live with my brother William, who is a baker , and lives in St. John-street, Smithfield . On the 10th of February , between eight and nine o'clock at night, the prisoner, Earl, came and bought a quartern and a half-quartern loaf, which came to 1 s. 1 1/2 d. He paid me a 1 l. Bank note. I gave him change, and asked his address. He said

"Johnson, No. 10, Wilderness-row," which I wrote on it - (looks at one) - this is it. He went out, and was brought back in about ten minutes with Batten, in custody of Morgan. I gave Morgan the note.

HENRY MORGAN . I am a patrol of St. Sepulchre's. On the 10th of February, between eight and nine o'clock at night, I saw the prisoners and three others lurking about Stockham's shop, talking together. I saw Earl go into the shop, the rest were about five yards off. Then one of them went up to the door of the shop, and the others went down the street - the shop door was open. I stood on the other side of the way, and saw Earl offer a piece of paper to the last witness, and saw him receive the change. He took up the bread and came out. He went towards Wilderness-row, in a direction that Batten went. I ran into the shop, came out, and saw the prisoners going up the street together. I overtook them in Wilderness-row, and met Read. He secured Batten, and I took Earl. Batten then had the bread. I found 18 s. 10 1/2 d. on Earl.

CHARLES READ . I met Morgan, and assisted in taking Batten, who had the bread in his apron.

JAMES ARIELL . I live at No. 10, Wilderness-row, and have lived there fourteen years. No person named Johnson lived there. I know nothing of the prisoner.

THOMAS GLOVER . The note is forged in every respect.

WILLIAM WADLE . I am a signing-clerk. The signature to the note is not mine.

EARL's Defence. I was coming down St. John-street, a young man in a flannel jacket put the note into my hand, and asked me to go and get the bread. I asked why he could not get it himself. He said he lived at Mr. Johnson's, a bookseller, No. 10, Wilderness-row - I have been to that shop twenty times. He said he had had some bread in trust for his master, and did not like to go himself. I went in, came out, and put the bread into his lap. We went and got some porter, and before I gave the man the change, I heard the cry of Stop the boy! I stopped and was secured. I believe the man sold the bread to this prisoner. The girl did not put her address on the note till I was brought back.

MARTHA STOCKHAM re-examined. I wrote the address before he left, but put my own name on it when he was brought back.

HENRY MORGAN . I am sure they were in conversation together, and Earl went into the shop. I saw no person with a white jacket. I called at Mr. Johnson's, No. 37, Wilderness-row, they had sent no person there. I saw him give Batten the bread.

JAMES ARIELL . There is a Mr. Johnson, a stationer, at No. 27, he lives there now.

BATTEN's Defence. I never had the bread from this lad in my life. I bought the bread of a man in the street, and in about three-quarters of an hour the gentleman said I must come back to the shop the bread came from. I know the man by sight.

HENRY MORGAN . When I came out of the shop, they were in my sight directly.

MARTHA STOCKHAM . When the bread was brought back I knew them to be the same loaves.

EARL - GUILTY . Aged 18.

BATTEN - GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18200412-142

493. THOMAS HENLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of April , three yards of baize, value 4 s.; three gallons of wine, value 20 s.; ten bottles, value 2 s.; one box, value 5 s.; 6 lbs. of candles, value 3 s.; and one looking-glass, value 7 s. , the goods of George Ford , William Allers Hankey , Thomas Robinson , Thomas Wilksmond , George Green , and Stephen Greenhaugh .

THOMAS ROBINSON . I am a tallow-chandler , and a joint trustee of a chapel at Stepney , with the other persons stated in the indictment. On Saturday, the 1st of April, the articles in question were stolen from the chapel. I saw them all safe the Sunday before.

WILLIAM DAVIS . I live at Mile End-road, about a quarter of a mile from the chapel - the property was under my care. I am the pew-opener. I locked all the articles up safe on the Wednesday, about six o'clock in the evening, I went again on Saturday, the 1st of April, the vestry windows were broken open and the articles gone - a cupboard in the vestry was broken open and fourteen bottles

of wine gone. I saw the property on the Tuesday following at Shadwell office, where the prisoner was in custody.

RUBEN LAWRENCE . I am a patrol. On the 1st of April, about ten minutes past five o'clock in the morning, I met the prisoner in Spitalfields, about half a mile from the chapel - another person was with him carrying a looking-glass. I stopped them, and asked what they had got there. They said they did not know, but they were to take them to a ship in the London Docks. They went with me a little way. The prisoner had a box. When we got to the corner of the watch-house, the other one put down the looking-glass and bundle. While I was putting the prisoner in the watch-house, the other man ran away, took the bundle with him, but left the looking-glass. They said they were sent by a captain at Stepney, to carry them to the London Docks. They said it was Captain William James , whose name was on the box - it was directed

" William James , on board the Brilliant, South Quay, London Docks." I enquired on board that ship, but found no person of that direction.

FRANCIS JACKSON . I was constable of the night. The prisoner was brought to the watch-house with a box. He said he had them from a young man who gave him 1 s. to carry them, that they called the young man William, and that was all he knew. I found a flint, steel, and tinder-box, in his pocket. I also found a towel in his pocket, which Mr. Davis claims.

WILLIAM DAVIS re-examined. The property all belongs to the chapel. The box contains the black cloth which was on the pulpit - the thieves had taken it off. The direction has been put on the box since.

Prisoner's Defence. The man who ran away was to have paid me for carrying the box. The tinder-box I use, as I am a conjurer.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-143

494. JOSEPH MUNT and GEORGE DAVIS were indicted for stealing, on the 26th of February , 107 lbs. of lead, value 10 s., belonging to Henry Wyatt , Esq. , and fixed to a building of his .

MR. AUGUSTUS WYATT . I am nephew of Mr. H. Wyatt, who is executor to my late father's estate. This building is situated in Langham-place, Marylebone - I live in the adjoining house. On Saturday evening, the 26th of February, about half-past ten o'clock, Chapman, the watchman, informed me that some lead was thrown off the ledge of the house. I instantly went to the house with my servant and the watchman, and on the first-floor dining-room, I found the prisoner, Davis, hid in the chimney-place. Chapman secured him.

THOMAS CHAPMAN . I am a watchman. On Saturday, the 26th of February, between six and seven o'clock in the morning, I observed some dirt on the palisades of Mr. Wyatt's new house. I called Hollingsworth to watch while I informed Mr. Wyatt. He was not up, but sent word for me to go in and search. I did so, and on the third story I found Munt in a corner of the front room - there was a crow-bar by his side, bent. He advanced towards me, and I took him down to Hollingsworth. He said he came there to ease himself. I took him to the watch-house - returned to the house and searched the premises. I found no person but Munt there then. Davis was found in the same house in the evening.

Q. When you searched the house after you took Munt, what did you find - A. I found three pieces of lead packed up, fresh cut. They laid on the top of the ledge, and weighed about 30 lbs.

Prisoner MUNT. Q. Did I not say I came to sweep the chimney - A. No; he was not dressed like a chimney. sweeper.

JOHN MARTIN . I found Munt at the watch-house with the lead. I afterwards compared it with the building - three pieces of it fitted exactly.

MUNT'S Defence. I was going to Paddington, two men, dressed like bricklayers, came over the railing, and asked me to go and do the chimnies. They sent me up to look at them, and said they would settle with me. The gentleman came up and found me there.

The Court directed the Jury to acquit the prisoner, Davis, as the case formed two separate offences.

MUNT - GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

DAVIS - NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-144

495. JAMES SCOTT was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of March , two blankets, value 14 s.; two sheets, value 10 s., and one gown, value 3 s. , the goods of Eliza Sullivan , widow .

ELIZA SULLIVAN . I am a widow, and live in Shouldham-street, Edgware-road . On the 7th of March, about eight o'clock in the evening, I made my bed, and immediately after missed these things. I found the two blankets and gown next night at the watch-house, and found the prisoner in custody - he was a stranger. I believe the street door was left open.

CORNELIUS HURLEY . I am a watchman in Seymour-place, Crawford-street, about twenty yards from Shouldham-street. On the 7th of March, about a quarter past eight o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner coming from Crawford-street into Seymour-place, with a bundle under his arm, in company with two other boys who had nothing. When he saw me coming after him he gave the bundle to another boy and ran into Stingo-lane. I went to seize the boy who had the bundle, he dropped it, and all three got away. I picked up the bundle and took it to the watch-house - it contained two blankets and a gown. I had known the prisoner for two years, and described him. I found him in custody next night, and I am certain he is the man.

RICHARD COATES . I was constable of the night. On the the 7th of March, the bundle was brought to the watch-house by Hurley, who said Scott was the man. I had known him from his infancy. Next morning I took him at the Yorkshire Stingo - he denied it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-145

496. THOMAS PAGE was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of April , one watch, value 5 s., the goods of a man unknown, from his person .

JAMES DOYLE . I live at Broadwall, Blackfriars-road. On the 6th of April, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I was standing at the door of the Crown and Anchor, Strand . The Westminster members were being chaired - there was a great crowd in the street. I saw the prisoner and three or four men in his company, come rushing on the pavement - the one before him kept shoving while the prisoner put his hand before him and took a watch from a seafaring man's pocket. I saw him do it - he was next to me. He immediately passed it to another man behind him. The seaman cried out Stop thief! I have lost my watch. I immediately collared him and held him with difficulty - he tried very hard to get from me, and a man kept pulling one way while the prisoner pulled the other. I kept my hold till the officer came up. I tried to get back to the seafaring man, but could not find him. The prisoner was taken to Bow-street - the seaman never attended. I saw him take it plainly, it appeared to be a silver watch.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. What are you - A. A brass-founder - nobody charged me with the robbery. I work for Johnson and Co. New-street, Gough-square. I have worked there eleven years - there were five or six in the gang.

EDMUND PEPPER . I am a constable of St. James's. I was with Glasborough, and heard the cry of, Stop him! or That is him! I rushed forward, with my staff, and found the last witness holding the prisoner - the crowd was pushing him backwards and forwards. I asked what was the matter? Doyle said the prisoner had stolen a gentleman's watch. I asked where the man was? he said he was gone off with the pressure of the people. With great difficulty we got the prisoner out of the crowd.

THOMAS GLASBOROUGH . I am an officer, and was with Pepper; several bad characters came out of the mob, who were known to me. I said,

"Let us go after them," and at that moment I heard the cry of Stop him! rushed forward into the mob, and found Doyle with the prisoner. I secured him, and with great difficulty got him out of the crowd.

GEORGE DONALD . I was on the spot, and heard the cry of,

"Rescue! Rescue!" from several persons in the mob. I looked round, and saw the witness with the prisoner in custody; several well known characters were behind, trying to get him away.

Prisoner's Defence. I went merely to see the chairing, and know nothing of the watch.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-146

497. THOMAS WOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of March , forty yards of baize, value 5 l.; two cushion-covers, value 2 s.; one basket, value 1 s.; one great coat, value 6 s.; twelve quarts of wine, value 2 l., and twelve glass bottles, value 1 s. , the goods George Wolff , John Butcher , James Hammond , John Hallam , William Clulow , James Milbourne , Joseph Beardmore , Thomas Mortimer , Christopher Sundius , Robert Scott , Joseph Taite , Joseph Palmer , William Jerram , Thomas Collinson , Launcelot Haslope , John Josiah Butness , John Scott , Thomas Jones , Robert Taylor , John Shipton , Thomas Shepherd , and Isaac Day .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating them to be the property of Charles Clapham .

THIRD COUNT, for stealing, twelve quarts of wine, value 2 l.; five pieces of wax candle, value 1 s., and twelve glass bottles, value 1 s. , the goods of James Machu and John Reddall .

FOURTH COUNT, for stealing, forty yards of baize, value 5 l.; five pieces of wax candle, value 1 s.; two cushion-covers, value 2 s.; one basket, value 1 s.; two printed books and one slate book together, value 1 s.; one great coat, value 6 s.; one hat, value 2 s.; twelve quarts of wine, value 2 l., and twelve glass bottles, value 1 s. , the goods of persons unknown.

FIFTH COUNT, for stealing one great coat, value 6 s.; one hat, value 2 s., and two printed books and one slate book together, value 1 s. , the goods of George Colley .

MR. ANDREWS conducted the prosecution.

MICHAEL HUGHES . I am a watchman. On the 4th of March, between five and six o'clock in the morning, before daylight, I stopped the prisoner coming up Petticoat-lane with a basket on his head. I asked him what he had got in the basket? he said it was linen. I asked him where he brought it from? he said from No. 22, Finsbury-square, and was going to take it to the West India Docks, and that the captain of a ship gave it to him. I asked him if he had any bill? he said No. I called Stone to my assistance, and told the prisoner he had a glass and a basket, and said he must go to the watch-house. He said if he must go to the watch-house we might carry the basket ourselves; Stone carried the basket, and I took the prisoner - he went quietly to the watch-house. He put his hand to his pocket, and dropped something behind him, which appeared to me to be white, as if it was candle. The basket contained twelve bottles of wine, and was covered with brown Holland; some toe kept the bottles from breaking. On the prisoner's person was found a small hand crow-bar, a large clasp knife, three books, one was a slate book, a memorandum book, and a hymn book, with

"Hoxton Accademy" printed in it. He had a hat in his hand, which he said he bought in Rosemary-lane for 4 s. 6 d. Mr. Colley claimed it.

WILLIAM STONE . I remember Hughes calling me - he had the prisoner in custody with the basket; we took him to the watch-house. He said he was going on board the Levant, and that he bought the hat in Rosemary-lane.

CORNELIUS WHITTER . I am a watchman. On the morning the prisoner was apprehended I picked up a piece of wax candle in Petticoat-lane, and a few minutes after, I picked up three more pieces. I shewed Hughes where I picked them up.

MICHAEL HUGHES re-examined. It is the spot where I saw him throw something down.

CHARLES CLAPHAM. I am keeper of the City-road chapel . The property was entrusted to my care - the articles produced are all the property of the chapel; every thing was safe about ten o'clock on Friday night, the 3d of March. Next morning, about six o'clock, I found every thing gone - the black cloth that hung round the gallery was stolen; that has not been found.

SAMUEL HART . I am a headborough. I found a crowbar in the prisoner's breeches pocket, and three books in

his waistcoat pocket. I compared the bar with two or three places at the chapel that had been broken open. The impression in the wood exactly fit the crow-bar. The wine-cellar in the chapel had been forced open. The knife found on the prisoner fitted it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was hired by a captain, who met me in the City-road, to carry them to the London Docks.

GUILTY . Aged 28,

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-147

TWENTIETH DAY, THURSDAY, MAY 4.

498. ELIZABETH LOWE was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of April , two sheets, value 3 s.; one gown, value 1 s., and one cap, value 6 d. , the goods of Charles Eyles .

ELIZABETH EYLES . I am the wife of Charles Eyles , and live in Belton-street . I went out about twelve o'clock, returned in about ten minutes - I left these things in the front garret. I met the prisoner on the stairs with them in her apron; she said,

"Don't make a noise!" I took her into the room, and gave her in charge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was desired to go to the house for a Mrs. Matthews, and the woman stopped me - I had nothing in my possession.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-148

499. WILLIAM SANDERS and JOHN WILLIAMS were indicted for stealing, on the 12th of April , at St. Andrew, Holborn, one saddle, value 2 l.; one mare, price 50 l., and one gelding, price 16 l. , the property of Thomas Saxby .

JAMES BARTLETT . I am servant to Mr. Thomas Saxby , who is a farmer , and lives at North Ease, Sussex , about four miles from Lewes. On the 11th of April I saw the mare and gelding put into the stable. I saw the stable doors locked about half-past eleven o'clock at night, and a chain put across them. Next morning I found the locks broken, and the horse and mare gone, with two saddles and two bridles. I have since seen the mare and saddle, and know them to be my master's.

CHARLES RUSSELL . I am hostler at the Half-moon, on the Godstone-road, about thirty-six miles from North Ease - it is about three miles and a half on this side of Godstone. On the 12th of April, about six o'clock in the morning, the prisoners both came there - I am sure of their persons. Williams rode a bay mare, which I have since seen, and Sanders was on a dark gelding pony - they each had a saddle and bridle on. I have seen the mare twice since in the possession of Saxby. It had been thrown down in the night, and dreadfully cut on the knees, the lip was also cut. I washed and cleaned it - they had both been travelling very hard; the mare could not feed, they remained for about an hour - I am certain they are the men. I helped Sanders to cut a piece of the mare's lip. I never saw them before. Our house is about sixteen miles from London.

THOMAS FOX. I am hostler to Mr. Gearing, Red Lion-yard, Gray's Inn-lane. On the 12th of April, about half-past eight o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoners in our yard - I am certain they are the men. Williams was on a bay mare, and Sanders was on a brown pony; they appeared jaded, as if they had travelled - the mare was cut and very much hurt. The prisoners put them up at our inn, and went to lodge at the Bull, near our stable. They came backwards and forwards, and went away on the 14th. I had an opportunity of seeing them those two days, and am certain they are the men; I conversed with them about the horses - they said they were going to stop a night or two. Williams took the bay mare away about nine o'clock on Friday morning, and Sanders took the pony away about eleven o'clock. I have seen the mare since in the possession of Saxby - it is the same. I have not seen the pony.

STEPHEN PALMER . I am hostler at the Horse Shoe inn, Goswell-street. On the 14th of April, between nine and ten o'clock in the morning, Williams came on a mare; he rode her into the yard, and wanted to put her up to bait - he told me to clean her, and then went to a public-house; he was intoxicated. I said to him,

"Her knees are broken." He said,

"Oh! we have had a good many ups and downs since I have had her." I have had the mare in my possession ever since - Mr. Saxby claimed it.

RICHARD STEVENS . I am a saddle and harness-maker, and live at No. 14, Goswell-street. On Wednesday, April the 12th, Saunders came to my shop about the middle of the day, and asked if I bought second-hand bridles and saddles? I said I did. He went away, and brought a bridle and saddle, which I bought of him; I gave it to the officer - (looks at one) - this is it; I particularly noticed the saddle - he said his master came from Lewes, and I saw Lewes on it. When he brought it I believe he asked 49 s. for it; I said 30 s. was the most I could give. He said,

"Can't you afford to give more. Well, you must have it." I asked him where he brought it from? he said his master's name was Captain Parker, that he had a letter from him, saying he must come to town immediately, and take a ship to go to sea, that he brought the horses up to the Repository, and sold them - he said his master gave him the bridle and saddle, and he did not want to take it into the country again.

Prisoner SANDERS. I said the saddles were Captain Parker's, but did not say he was my master - A. I believe he said he was his master.

ARTHUR BROOKE . I am a saddler, and live at Lewes. I heard that the horses were stolen, and traced the prisoners to London. I took them at the Bull inn, Gray's Inn-lane, in company together, in the same room.

THOMAS SAXBY . I am a farmer, and live at North Ease, near Lewes. I have seen a mare in the possession of Palmer, which is mine - I have never found the pony; I lost them both on the 11th of April. The saddle is mine, and I believe the bridle is mine. There is no Captain Parker in my neighbourhood, but there was a Colonel Parker, who

is gone to Ireland - the mare was never his. I bought it last August, and have known it more than twelve months; I had had the pony about three months. I saw them both the day before they were stolen, and in the morning about five o'clock, I found the stable broken open, and missed them. I gave 55 l. for the mare; she was in very good condition when she was stolen, and had met with no accident. There was a drain in the road, between Mersfield and East Grinstead, with marks of some horse having met with an accident. The pony was worth 16 l.

JAMES BARTLETT re-examined. I can swear to the saddle.

GEORGE BRADY . I am a broker, and live in Portpool-lane. On the night the prisoners were apprehended I was at the Bull - I am a constable. I took them to the watch-house; they were both in the same room - Sanders sat in the same box with me. I said it was a pity men could not come to do business without being drunk, as Williams was drunk. He said Yes, it was, and it had been 25 l. out of their way.

SANDERS'S Defence. My father lives at Ringmer, in Sussex, about two miles and a half from Lewes, and about half a mile on the London-road. I left my grandfather's about a quarter before nine, and went on the London-road to fall in with the mail. I waited at the public-house till about half-past nine o'clock, when the mail came by, but could not take me. I walked to Hucklesfield to get a bed, but it being late the house was shut up - it was between eleven and twelve o'clock. I walked on till I came within a mile and a half of East Grinstead, when the prisoner, Williams, overtook me with two horses, one of which he rode and the other he led. He asked me if I was out of work, and where I was going? I said I was, and was going to town. I mounted the mare, rode a little distance, and fell into conversation. I said I was a gardener, and was going to Lewisham for employ; he said if I would stop with him a few days, he would give me 5 s. a day and part of my board, as he expected to buy some more horses. accepted his offer; we put the horses up in Gray's Inn-lane. He said to the hostler,

"I have borrowed this saddle, and must take it to a friend" - he offered it for sale, but the person would not buy it; he went to another place, but the master was not at home, and he left it there. As we went up Goswell-street he said,

"You had better go into the saddler's there, and ask if he buys them." The man said he did; I said I had one, and he said if I brought it he would buy it. Williams told me to fetch it, and to tell the man it was made at Lewes, and that it was Captain Parker's, who had sold his horses, in consequence of taking a ship to go to sea - I did so. After that, I remained with him two days. We stopped at the Bull inn, the first afternoon he got in. He went to a man about the mare; they called next morning to look at the horses, and said they would call again in the afternoon, but did not. About nine o'clock he took the mare to the Horse Shoe, and told me to go with him; about half-past ten o'clock he sent me to fetch the brown gelding, and gave me the money to pay for the standing, which I did, took it to Goswell-street, and a man there bought the horse. I was taken into custody with him at the Bull, but do not know how he got them.

WILLIAMS'S Defence. On the 12th of April I was coming to town, and bought a chesnut horse at Medhurst Fair. In my way to town I met two men with a mare and a gelding. I chapped with them, gave them my horse and five guineas for the mare, and sixteen guineas for the pony. The man said he bought them of Captain Parker, of Lewes, who was going abroad, and had no farther use for them. I paid him the money, proceeded to town, and met Sanders. The horse I had in hand hung backwards, and would not lead well - Sanders said he had missed the mail. I said I would give him a lift if he would pay the gates. We stopped at the Half-Moon to breakfast, and I offered him 5 s. to stop a day or two with me, as I meant to buy some more horses.

MR. SAXBY re-examined. Colonel Parker left Lewes several months before my horses were stolen. Sanders is a gardener, and has worked for me.

SANDERS - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 30.

WILLIAMS - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 20.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-149

500. RICHARD JAMES BECKLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of March , one ounce and seventeen pennyweights of silver, value 8 s. , the goods of Joseph Angel .

MR. ALLEY conducted the prosecution.

JOSEPH ANGEL . I am a silversmith , and live in Compton-street, Clerkenwell ; the prisoner worked at my house. On the 16th of March, in consequence of information I received from my brother, I determined to watch the prisoner as he went to dinner at one o'clock. When he was going out I stood at the street door; he worked in the back-shop, and had been mounting silver teapots with silver wire. I called him into the counting-house, accused him of losing his time a great deal, and said I thought he could not live honestly - he asked me if I thought he had robbed me? I said I suspected he was either robbing me or somebody else, and was determined to search him. He opened his coat and waistcoat, and said you may search me - I said I suspected he had some of my property about him. He then opened his coat and waistcoat again, and said,

"Do you suppose I am robbing you?" I sent for an officer. Before the officer came he said he had got a few bits of bead wire about him, but what of that? He produced the wire from his breeches-pocket. Limbrick came, and I gave him in charge. We asked him if he had any at home - he said there were two little pieces at home, and a number of pawnbrokers' tickets, but he could account for them, for he bought them of Prickett. We went to his lodgings, and found a small melting pot, which appeared to contain about twenty-four or twenty-five ounces of silver, very recently melted; the silver was not in it - the crucible had been broken, to get the metal out. On searching up stairs I found fuel in a grate, which appeared to have a hole in it, that had recently contained the crucible - there was the shape of it in the coals. There was also a pair of common tongs, and a poker, all over smoke, as if they had been just used.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. How long had the prisoner lived with you - A. Ten years; he came to

me as an apprentice. I had a good opinion of him before this.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-150

501. JOHN PRICKETT was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of March , 40 ounces of silver, value 10 l. , the goods of Joseph Angel .

JOSEPH ANGEL . The prisoner worked eighteen months with me, during which time I have lost silver to a considerable amount. In consequence of the apprehending of the last prisoner, and discovering the duplicates, it induced me to go to Armstrong's, a pawnbroker, in Baldwin's-gardens. I went there on Friday, the 17th of March, about half-past one o'clock, which was the day after Beckley was apprehended. While I was there the prisoner came in to redeem four silver figures. I was giving a description of him to Armstrong at the time he came in. Mr. Armstrong said,

"This is the man!" and seized him. He seemed confused at the sight of me, and begged he might have some water or something, for he was near fainting. We took him to the public-house opposite Hatton-garden office; I there asked him where he got the things from which were in pledge at Armstrong's? and asked him if he had not taken my silver to manufacture them? I made no proposition to him whatever. He said, Yes, he had. I said I was afraid a great many more were concerned. After that he begged I would be merciful, and said all the things were made of my silver.

JOHN LIMBRICK . I produce twenty-three duplicates, which I found in the present prisoner's house; they are all for silver articles - spoons, snuff-boxes, mugs, and other things; I also found some pieces of silver.

JOSEPH ANGEL re-examined. I can positively swear to one of the pieces of silver; I saw it three days before in a box in my workshop - it weighs about an ounce and a half.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. How many men have you - A. About thirty. They all slept out of the house, except the apprentice. I found near forty ounces of silver at Armstrong's.

THOMAS ARMSTRONG , JUN. My mother keeps a pawnbroker's shop, at No. 38, Baldwin's-garden. The prisoner has been in the habit of pledging articles at our shop. I produce four silver images, which I took in pledge of him for 13 s. - they weigh about three ounces - he pledged them in the name of Edward Turner . I have known him sometime before - we always knew him by that name; he gave his residence in Gray's Inn-lane. I have a teapot-stand, a desert spoon, and various articles in snuff-boxes, spoons, &c. He always told us he was in business on his own account. I took him into custody as soon as he came to redeem the images.

THOMAS WADMORE . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Tottenham-court-road. I produce six tea-spoons and two silver-mounted snuff-boxes, which were taken in pledge by a young man who has left us. The residence on the duplicates is Tottenham-court-road.

JOSEPH CHAPMAN . I am a pawnbroker, and live at No. 50, St. John-street. I have a silver pepper-box, a pair of sugar-tongs, a silver mug, a snuff-box, two salt-spoons, four table-spoons, six tea-spoons, a gravy-spoon, and two desert-spoons - they are all new, except the pepper-box, and were pledged by the prisoner.

THOMAS FLUCE . I am servant to Mr. Banton, who is a pawnbroker, and lives in Monkwell-street. I have six tea-spoons and a snuff-box, which I took in pledge of the prisoner. I took in more things, which cannot be identified.

FREDERICK EDWARDS . I live at Mrs. Fothergill's, who is a pawnbroker, and lives in Aldersgate-street. I produce a milk-pot, which I took in pledge of the prisoner. He said he lived in Aldersgate-buildings; I have known him to live there for three years. I understood he worked on his own account. I have also a silver teapot-stand, three snuff-boxes, and a pair of desert-spoons.

JOHN LIMBRICK re-examined. I apprehended the prisoner in Aldersgate-buildings.

JOSEPH ANGEL re-examined. I have lost upwards of 300 ounces of plate within the last twelve months. The goods were not before him when he made the confession. I described the articles to him which I had found at the pawnbrokers' - he said they were made out of my silver. His confession was not confined to the goods found at Armstrong's.

Prisoner's Defence. I have been in business for myself three years, and bought the goods. Four of the snuffboxes were made for me by Mr. Angel's men in their over-hours. Everybody knew I was in business - his men have been to my house, seen me at work, and have issued cards. The prosecutor is greatly mistaken in the property he has selected from my stock - he has selected me for prosecution from suspicion only. The silver mug was given to me by my master, Mr. Socket, of Camberwell, when I was out of my apprenticeship. I was going into partnership with him, but he died while it was in agitation. I commenced being journeyman in April, 1818. The prosecutor had no reason to suspect my honesty, but as soon as he found out that I was in business for myself he suspected I must have robbed him. I went to Armstrong's on business, and met the prosecutor there, who gave me in charge. I do assure your Lordship I am entirely innocent. The same chaser worked for me as for the prosecutor. I have bought 173 oz. of silver within the last three years.

JOSEPH ANGEL re-examined. I never knew he was in business for himself, if I had I should have discharged him immediately. I saw his card at his lodgings, but never before.

THOMAS WARNER . I am an artist. I have known the prisoner for sometime; he has mounted a snuff-box for me. I first saw his cards seven or eight months ago, and circulated some of them among my friends.

WILLIAM LANGLEY . I lodged with the prisoner in Aldersgate-buildings. He used to work in his own room at his over-hours.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-151

502. GEORGE CASTLE and WILLIAM WINGAR were indicted for stealing, on the 19th of March , two gallons

of gin, value 20 s.; one quart of spirituous liquor called cloves, value 3 s., and two bottles, value 2 s. , the goods of Alexander Gordon , Charles Gordon , and William Knight .

CHARLES GORDON . I am in partnership with Alexander Gordon and William Knight ; we live in Goswell-street ; both the prisoners were in our service. Wingar sleeps in the counting-house, where the keys of the cellar were kept locked up - Castle was an out-door servant . On Sunday, the 19th of March, at seven o'clock in the morning, all the keys were in the counting-house, and could not be got at without opening my desk. About nine o'clock I was informed the prisoners were apprehended. I never send liquor out on a Sunday.

THOMAS CHILD . I am a constable. On Sunday morning, the 19th of March, I was in company with Dean, and saw the prisoner, Castle, in Bridge-street, opposite Earl-street, about a quarter past seven o'clock, carrying a bundle under his right arm - the other prisoner joined him on the bridge, he had no bundle. They walked together to the other side of the bridge, then Wingar took the bundle from him. They relieved each other till they got to Lambeth-marsh, about thirty yards beyond the Anchor and Hope, then Wingar stopped and I seized Castle, who had the bundle - it was a two-gallon bottle, tied in an apron, and a silk handkerchief over it. Dean collared Wingar. I asked Castle what he had got there? he said,

"You know what I have got." I said I did not know, and asked him who they worked for? they said they had no employ. We took them both to the Anchor and Hope, into the back parlour. In going along he said he would tell me all about it. When I got into the parlour I put the bottle down, and while I was tying them together Castle said he would give me a 1 l. note, or anything to drink, to let them go, for they should lose their situations. They said they worked for Messrs. Gordons, of Goswell-street. Directly as I secured them, Castle seized the bottle, stamped it on the floor, and broke it all to pieces; the contents were all spilt. They said they had it from their masters' premises, but it was for a sick man. I saw them in possession of it in Middlesex.

WILLIAM DEAN . I was with Child. Wingar gave me a bottle of cloves from his pocket. Child has given a correct account of what passed.

MR. GORDON re-examined. We deal in gin. I will not swear to the cloves.

CASTLE'S Defence. On the 19th of March Wingar called at my lodgings, and asked me to take a walk with him; I said I would meet him in St. John-street - I overtook him in Smithfield. He said he was going over the water to see a friend; he had the bundle, and gave it to me to carry. It was not me that threw the bottle down.

WINGAR'S Defence. I found the cloves under the gate - I bought the gin and the bottle too.

CASTLE - NOT GUILTY .

WINGAR - GUILTY . Aged 24.

Confined One Year .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-152

503. JOHN BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of February , three live tame fowls, price 6 s. , the goods of Peter Griffiths .

PETER GRIFFITHS . I am a publican at Stanwell , and keep fowls. On the 26th of February the fowls were kept in a hen-house adjoining the stable. I saw them safe at nine o'clock at night. I was awoke at four o'clock in the morning, and found the prisoner in custody with the fowls, which had just been killed.

JOHN SILVER . I am servant to Mr. Griffiths, and sleep over the stable. About four o'clock in the morning I was awoke by the ringing of the bell, which comes from the hen-house door to my room. I went down, and saw the hen-house door broken open and the prisoner inside - he had three fowls, killed, in a bag. He ran away, I secured him soon after, and brought him back.

Prisoner's Defence. I never meddled with the fowls.

GUILTY . Aged 63.

Confined One Year .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-153

504. SAMUEL ALLEN was indicted for stealing, on on the 21st of December , twenty-four tumbler glasses, value 18 s. , the goods of James Twitchet .

JAMES TWITCHET . I am a glass drop-cutter , and live in Bath-street, Hackney ; the prisoner was in my employ. I was in want of money, and told him if he could sell any of these wine-glasses I would allow him 1 s. a dozen - I did not intend to entrust him with them. Next day I went out, and told my wife not to let him have them till I saw him - when I came home I found he had got them. He left me on the 20th of December without notice.

JOHN PARKER . On the 21st of December my mistress told me to go with the prisoner, and take the glasses to the Hoxton coffee-house. He took me to Hoxton-square - he had some of the glasses. He gave me 3 d. to fetch some bread and cheese, and told me to come to the coffee-house to him; when I went he was not there.

Prisoner's Defence. My mistress give me two dozen of glasses. I sent the boy to fetch me some bread and cheese, and to bring it to the Crooked Billet, he never came. I received some of the money for the glasses and lost it; I intended to work it out. Next morning I heard the officer had been after me, which terrified me, and prevented my return.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-154

505. ANDREW SYANSON was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of March , one pocket-book, value 6 s., and 8 s. 6 d. in monies numbered, the goods and monies of Thomas Bryant , from his person .

THOMAS BRYANT . I am a rope-maker . I was in Narrow-street, Lambeth , on the evening of the 3d of March, about half-past nine o'clock - I came out of the Crown, public-house, with a friend - I was a little fresh. My friend stopped behind for a necessary purpose, I stopped at a door for him. The prisoner came up as if he was going to speak to me, put his hand into my pocket, snatched my pocket-book out, and ran off - I pursued and secured him, without losing sight of him. My friend was coming towards me, the prisoner turned round and came to the hollow of the bridge; I saw him make a motion with his hand, as if he threw the pocket-book over the dock bridge - it was found near that spot. It contained 8 s. 6 d. then.

JAMES JOHNSON . I picked the pocket-book up near the spot where the prisoner threw it down.

JOHN LINES . I was constable of the night. I took the prisoner in charge. The prosecutor appeared quite sensible to me.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A man stopped me, and the prosecutor came up and said I was the man.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Judgment Respited .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-155

506. WILLIAM SANDERS and THOMAS BARFORD were indicted for stealing, on the 15th of March , 3/4 cwt. of lead, value 10 s., belonging to John William Bacon , Francis Darcy Bacon , and Charles Bicknell , and fixed to a building of theirs .

MR. CURWOOD conducted the prosecution.

RICHARD ATTFIELD . I am bailiff to Mr. Bacon, who has a house at Finchley , which was empty. I examined the house, and found the coping of one of the cisterns stripped of fourteen feet six inches of lead, weighing about 90 lbs.; it appeared recently cut, and was very fresh. The house is the property of John William Bacon and Francis Darcy Bacon .

THOMAS HURST . I am constable of Hampstead. I met the prisoner about eleven o'clock in the morning in Shepherd's-field, Hampstead - it is three or four miles from the premises; they were each carrying a basket on his shoulder - I followed and took them into custody in Bellsize-lane. I found each basket contained lead, about 3/4 of a cwt. together. I tried it to the roof, and it fitted exactly.

JOHN PHILLIPS . I assisted in apprehending the prisoners, and afterwards compared the lead to the building - it fitted exactly.

JAMES TYRRELL . I am a carpenter, at Hendon. On the morning of the 15th of March, about ten o'clock, I saw the prisoners in a bye lane, in a direction from the premises to where they were stopped.

SANDERS'S Defence. We were out of employ, and a man asked us to take the lead to the City-road.

SANDERS - GUILTY . Aged 42.

BARFORD - GUILTY . Aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-156

507. GEORGE SMITH and CHRISTIAN ASQUITH were indicted for stealing, on the 26th of February , 12 lbs. of mutton, value 9 s. , the goods of Samuel Summers .

ROBERT TEASDALE . I am headborough of St. Pancras. On the 28th of February, I saw the prisoners and another going along Suffolk-street, knowing them all, I followed them - Asquith had a bundle, he set off running as soon as he saw me; the others did not run at first. I followed and Asquith dropped the bundle as he turned the corner, I picked it up. Taylor took Smith, the next day he was discharged from Hatton-garden office. I took Asquith myself - they were both together. I found a leg of mutton in the bundle, which the prosecutor claimed; there is a particular mark on it. I am a butcher myself.

SAMUEL SUMMERS . On the 26th of February, between eight and night o'clock, I lost a very large leg and chine of mutton, from my shop, which is at the corner of Skinner-street; I saw it safe about six o'clock, it then hung on a hook outside the shop. Teasdale afterwards shewed it to me; it was a particular sort of mutton - the chine had been taken away then.

ASQUITH'S Defence. I bought it of a hawking butcher.

SMITH - NOT GUILTY .

ASQUITH - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18200412-157

508. JOHN DART , ROBERT CHANDLER , JOHN DUKE , and JAMES RICHARDS were indicted for stealing, on the 20th of February , 13 lbs. of veal, value 9 s., and one machine cloth, value 5 s. , the goods of William Lincoln .

JOHN CHAMBERLAIN . I am apprentice to Mr. Lincoln, who is a chimney-sweeper , and lives in White's-alley, Chancery-lane . On Sunday, the 26th of February, about six o'clock in the morning. I saw Chandler take a breast of veal out of the safe - Richards, who is also my master's apprentice let him in, all the prisoners had lived with my master once. They staid in the parlour about ten minutes, then Richards told me to go down into the cellar, and fetch up the soot-cloth, which I did, and gave it to him; he gave the cloth to Chandler, who went out soon after - he wrapped the veal in the cloth, and Richards let him out; they all three went out together. After they were gone, Richards told me he had taken the veal out of the safe; I said he should not have let them had it. My master came down about seven o'clock, and asked where Richards was? I said he had ran away.

Q. Did you tell him the others had been - A. I did not think of it, but I told him in about an hour.

WILLIAM LINCOLN . I am a chimney-sweeper; Richards was my apprentice, and Chandler worked for me - they all three lived in Mullen's-rents, Shoe-lane. I missed the veal, went there about a quarter-past seven o'clock, and found the three prisoners there - Richards was not with them. I asked them if they had seen Richards? they said they had not, and I returned home; Chambers then told me the meat had been stolen. I returned between ten and eleven o'clock with the officer to Mullen's-rents, and found part of the veal boiling in the pot. Richards told me that night that the remainder was baked, and sent to Giltspur-street Compter. We took Duke and Chandler at the house, and they denied having seen the meat, but said nothing when it was found - I also found the cloth in the room. Dart was taken next morning. I took a post chaise, and apprehended Richards that evening at Brentford.

HENRY SMITH . I am servant to Mr. Silvester, who is a butcher, and lives in Chancery-lane. On Saturday evening Lincoln bought a breast of veal and a shoulder. He afterwards brought the breast to me, and I weighed it - it weighed the same as when I sold it. I knew it by the chopping.

WILLIAM HENRY KING . I am a constable. I went to the prisoner's lodgings, and found the breast of veal in a saucepan, and also found the cloth. I apprehended Duke and Chandler.

JOHN MALMAN . I am a sweep, and live in Shire-court,

Ship-yard. On Sunday morning, about nine or ten o'clock, Richards came to me, and said three persons had stolen some veal from the safe - he mentioned no names, but said he gave the apprentice the machine-cloth, and they went away with it. I persuaded him to go home, but he said if he did, he should get wallop'd. He told me his master came in as he was at breakfast, where they all lived, and he went up the chimney, and that he heard him come into the room. He said he should go to Brentford, which I told Lincoln.

DART'S Defence. I am innocent.

CHANDLER'S Defence. Richards owed me 6 d., which I went to him for, and asked him for a piece of cloth? he gave me the machine-cloth, and said it was of no use.

DART - GUILTY . Aged 21.

CHANDLER - GUILTY . Aged 19.

DUKE - GUILTY . Aged 16.

RICHARDS - GUILTY . Aged 15.

Whipped and Discharged .

First Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant. Esq.

Reference Number: t18200412-158

509. EDWARD DOUCH was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of March , one watch, value 20 s.; one piece of ribbon, value 1 d.; two watch-keys, value 1 s., and one seal, value 6 d. , the goods of James Graham .

CHARLOTTE GRAHAM . I am the wife of James Graham , and live at Limehouse . I am no business. The prisoner came to my house, on Thursday, the 9th of March, between four and five o'clock in the evening, and asked for lodgings - he was in the house all night. He had breakfast in a back room, and about ten o'clock he asked to go into the parlour to wait for a gentleman whom he expected to meet him there. During the time I went into the room and saw the watch there on the mantle-piece, where I am in the habit of keeping it. It was a silver watch - it had a ribbon, two keys, and a seal to it. He staid there an hour and no one came - he went out and said he should return again before one o'clock. I immediately went into the parlour and missed the property. I ran after him, and saw him running - I called to him to stop for I would have him, and he did. He came back without any force. When we had got back he gave up the watch without any officer. I sent for an officer.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I leave my case to the Court.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq

Reference Number: t18200412-159

510. JAMES TURNER was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of April , nine chisels, value 4 s., and one hammer, value 6 d. , the goods of Benjamin Gitkins .

BENJAMIN GITKINS . I am a stone-mason . I was at work at Mecklinburgh-square . About twelve o'clock, the time of our going to dinner, I put my tools into the passage of the house, there were nine chisels, a hammer, and other tools. I had not been more than ten minutes before my employer came and asked me if I had lost any tools - the prisoner was then in custody with them. I asked him what could induce him to rob a poor man like me, he said it was through poverty that he did it.

THOMAS GRIMSHAW . I am a carpenter, I was working on the premises. I saw the prisoner about five minutes past twelve o'clock come into the building - he was going out, and I immediately went after him. I saw him putting his hat on his head. He had eight chisels in his hat, and a chisel and a hammer in his pocket. I asked him how he came by them, he said he took them out of the passage.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I did it through distress.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Three Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18200412-160

511. CATHERINE WORTH was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of April , one coat, value 20 s. , the goods of John Wallender .

JOHN WALLENDER . I keep the King's Head, Leather-lane , it is in the county of Middlesex. On the 13th of April, about half-past six o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner in the lobby. My coat hung in the bar when she came in - there is a door communicating with the bar. I took the coat from her. She had been in the house about half an hour. She had it in a basket, sitting on it.

HARRIET FORD . I am servant to Mr. Wallender. I was sitting at tea behind the screen and saw her take it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing about it.

GUILTY . Aged 55.

Confined One Year .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-161

512. MICHAEL BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of March , one box, value 1 d., and 3 s., in monies numbered , the goods and monies of John Maggs .

MARY SHOVE . I know John Maggs , he lives at No. 17, Commercial-road - I mind his house. On the 30th of March, I was in the little room at the back of the shop, I saw no person coming into the shop - I was stooping down. On rising I saw the prisoner behind the counter, I came and laid hold of him - he had the till in one hand and the box in the other. I held him sometime before I could make any one hear - there was one shilling and four sixpences in it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined Two Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-162

513. JOHN DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of April , one pewter pot, value 1 s. 2 d., the goods of Richard Gardener , and one other pewter pot, value 1 s. 2 d. , the goods of Thomas Hunt .

THOMAS HUNT . I keep the St. Andrew, at the corner of George-street and Baker-street, Marylebone . I lost a pint-pot on the 12th of April, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening.

RICHARD GARDENER . I keep the Manchester Arms, Manchester-street . I had been informed by a young man that the prisoner had taken a pint pot from some person in the neighbourhood - I went after him into Portman-square. I asked him what he had in his basket? he said nothing. I took hold of him and brought him to my house - I searched and found the two pots on him. One has my name and sign on it, and the other has Mr. Hunt's.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I have been out of work for a length of time, and I have a wife and four small children.

GUILTY . Aged 53.

Confined One Year and publicly Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-163

514. HENRY GRAHAM was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of March , four pieces of woollen cloth, value 30 s.; one waistcoat, value 2 s., and one pair of breeches, value 2 s. , the goods of Richard Howard .

RICHARD HOWARD . I am a taylor , and live at No. 1, Coventry-court, Haymarket . On the 29th of March, I lost these things from the shop window - I saw them safe the evening previous. I missed them on the 29th, about half-past eight o'clock, I suppose the door was left open.

THOMAS GOOK . About eight o'clock, on the 29th of March, I saw the prisoner in Coventry-street, I followed him, he turned up George-court out of Rupert-street. On getting into Seven Dials, I saw some person throw something down - I had called out Stop thief! when I came up, I found it to be the foreparts of a coat. I picked them up, likewise a pair of breeches and a waistcoat. I never found the prisoner till the Saturday week after - he is the person I saw in Coventry-street.

THOMAS LADBURN . I apprehended the prisoner - he said he knew nothing about it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-164

515. HENRY HARRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of March , one saw, value 2 s., the goods of William Jones , one saw, value 2 s., the goods of Edmund Lefevre , and one other saw, value 2 s. , the goods of John Cooper .

EDWARD LEFEVRE . I am a cabinet-maker . I had a saw stolen on the 13th of March, from a bench in the workshop at the back of the premises of Mr. Houlditch. I saw it about one hour before. It was missed on my return from dinner. Jones's saw was in the same shop, and that was missing. I saw them again at Bow-street, on the same day, between six and seven o'clock - the prisoner was then in custody.

JOHN COOPER . I was one of the workmen in the premises, the saw was safe at one o'clock, I returned at two, and missed it. The prisoner had been errand-boy at our house. I found it at Bow-street.

DAVID WALDEN . I am a cabinet-maker, at Mr. Houlditch's. I watched between the hours of one and two o'clock, and saw the prisoner come into the loft and take the saws. When he saw me he dropped one, and ran away. I went after him, and never lost sight of him till I took him - he was taken to Bow-street, and Dickens, a constable, searched him and found one of the saws in his trowsers.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going down Long-acre, and some person dropped the saws - I picked them up - they called out Stop thief! and I was taken.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 13.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-165

516. WILLIAM HARRISON and HENRY DYSON were indicted for stealing, on the 30th of March , one watch, value 3 l., the goods of John M'Queen , from his person .

JOHN M'QUEEN. I live at No. 5, Elder-street, Spitalfields. On the 30th of March, about eight o'clock in the evening, I was returning home through Osbourn-street , near Montague-street, a person came up and made a sudden snatch, and took away my watch. I could not see any person near me when I lost it - I called out Stop thief! I could not see the features of the person that robbed me. I lost sight of him - I pursued, but did not see him till he was stopped - it was Harrison. The other was not taken till the Saturday week following. On the 1st of April, I saw my watch again - it was dark at the time.

JOHN BRAKE . I live in Dog-street, Rosemary-lane. I was in Osbourn-street, when Mr. M'Queen was robbed. I saw three persons together. I was crossing from the corner of Church-street to Booth-street, and heard a little of their conversation. I am not certain that either of the prisoners were part of the three - one of them said,

"Will you stick to me?" They answered they would as close as the shirt to his back. About five minutes after I saw two of them make a rush upon Mr. M'Queen - they both came up to him. I did not see what they did at the time - they lugged away the lady from his arm, and something from him. Mr. M'Queen ran about half-way down Booth-street, and fell down, and I fell likewise. I got up immediately. I lost sight of him till he (Harrison), was in custody at the watch-house. I cannot say that he was one of them. In going to Worship-street, on the Saturday, I saw Dyson there, I said I thought he was one of the party, and he was taken into custody.

THOMAS MANSON . I am a watchman. I was coming out of my residence, Pussey's-court, Booth-street, I heard the cry of Stop him! I saw three men running down the street, I went after them and called out Stop thief!

Q. Were the three persons in sight when you saw Mr. M'Queen fall - A. I lost sight of Harrison when he turned the corner. When I got to the same corner, he was the only person in the street. I came up to him in John-court, and stopped him - he was the same man I first pursued. I called out Stop thief! and he did the same. When I came up to him, he said

"Why do you stop me, I am not the man, he is gone through the court - I was in pursuit of him as well as you." The watch was picked up at the corner of the same street where the prisoner turned. He did not stop, neither did I see him throw anything away. I saw Dyson on the 1st of April, at the watch-house door - I have no recollection of him.

(Watch produced and sworn to.)

HARRISON'S Defence. I am innocent of the charge. I was coming out of my door and heard the cry of Stop thief! A gentleman came up and said I was the thief - he called to me to stop, and I did.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-166

517. JOHN HAINES was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of February , one seal, value 50 s. , the goods of Alexander Gordon .

MARGARET GORDEN . I am sister to Alexander Gordon , he is a silversmith , and lives in St. Martin's-lane . The prisoner

was brought into the shop by a person living next door, between five and six o'clock on the 28th of February. The window was cut - I saw the seal in the window in the course of the day.

WILLIAM BUTTENSHAW . I live at No. 132, St. Martin's-lane. I saw three persons round the shop - one of the party (the prisoner), was at my window. They all went to Mr. Gordan's window together - then I saw the seal move in the window. I then went out and laid hold of the prisoner, the other two made their escape. He then dropped the seal, I delivered the same to Miss Gordon.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-167

518. WILLIAM IZARD was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of February , one sheet, value 2 s. 6 d. , the goods of Jack White .

The sheet being let to the prisoner with a furnished lodging, he was ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-168

519. WILLIAM IZARD was again indicted for stealing, on the 14th of January , one pair of shoes, value 5 s. , the goods of James Cross .

JAMES CROSS . The prisoner was taken in by me out of charity, while he was there a pair of shoes were pawned. I never gave him authority so to do - I suspected he was the person that did it. I saw them at Hatton-garden office - he was then in custody.

GEORGE CROSS . I am an apprentice to Mr. Hawkins, pawnbroker, in Drury-lane. On the 14th of January, I took a pair of shoes in pledge of the prisoner - I am quite sure he is the man.

WILLIAM THISLETON . I am an officer of Hatton-garden. The prisoner was taken into custody on the 26th of February, for stealing a sheet, he then gave me the duplicate of the shoes.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I was in distress.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-169

520. JAMES MURSILL and ROBERT LEGGETT were indicted for stealing, on the 10th of March , four hand-glasses, value 6 s. , the goods of William Manden .

WILLIAM ARTHUR . I live in Exeter-street, Chelsea. On the 10th of March I lost four hand-glasses. I locked my garden gate about six o'clock in the evening, which is surrounded partly by houses, and partly by a fence five feet high. About seven o'clock in the morning, I found the mats had been removed, and the glasses gone. I went to Church-street, Chelsea, and found them in the possession of Daniel Bassett - this was on the 13th; Mursill was a particular acquaintance of mine; I have known him five years. I got an officer, and searched Daniel Bassett 's house, but he was not at home - I saw him that evening about half-past nine o'clock. Bassett and I went in company with an officer, and found Mursill and Leggett near Chelsea-common. I asked Mursill how he could use me so, after having been friends so long? he made me no reply.

Q. How near to his house was the prisoner, Mursill, taken - A. Very near.

ELIZABETH BASSETT . I am the wife of Daniel Bassett , who lives in Church-street, Chelsea. On the 10th of March, about half-past seven o'clock in the evening, there were four hand-glasses left on my husband's premises. I did not see the person who brought them, but I knew by the voice that it was James Mursill - I do not know how many persons there were; I only heard the voice of one. I have been acquainted with James Mursill three or four years. He said he was going to leave a few gooseberry-bushes in the garden, and I did not get up from my seat.

Q. Did you hear the step of more than one person - A. No. I should think it was him.

Q. Did you hear him go away - A. Yes. He staid but a few minutes. I did not go into the garden till Monday. The next morning my husband asked me who had brought the hand-glasses.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. As you trust to your ear for the knowledge of the person, do you mean to swear that it was James Mursill 's voice - A. It was like his voice - my husband discovered the glasses next morning. I saw them on the Monday.

DANIEL BASSETT . Q. How late in the day was you in your garden - A. At dusk - the glasses were not there at half-past six o'clock. On Saturday morning I found them there - there were no gooseberry-bushes there. On the Saturday night Mursill came and asked me if I had seen the glasses he left there the night before? I said Yes. He said they were things I should want, and I should have them for 6 s. I declined buying them - they were not taken away then, but remained till they were owned. Leggett was with him, but said nothing.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you enquire how he came by them - A. No, neither did he tell me.

Q. Are they bell-glasses - A. No.

JOHN SNOWSELL . I apprehended the prisoners on the 13th of March. They were together; Mursill said he bought the glasses; they both said they came honestly by them, and gave 5 s. for them. I asked them if they knew the person they bought them of? Mursill said No. Leggett said he came by at the time, and assisted in carrying them.

Q. Where did they say they bought them - A. In Lander-street, Chelsea-common.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

LEGGETT'S Defence. I had nothing to do with it. I certainly met Mursill, and went with him.

LEGGETT - NOT GUILTY .

MURSILL - GUILTY . Aged 26.

Confined Two Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-170

521. ROBERT LEGGETT was again indicted for stealing, on the 13th of March , one axletree, value 7 s. , the goods of John Simpson .

JOHN SIMPSON . I am a brickmaker , and live at Chelsea. I keep a horse and cart; the axletree was on the cart, under the wall in South Parade . On Monday, the 13th of

March, between twelve and one o'clock, I was called up by the watchman, went to the watch-house, and there saw the axletree - I do not know that Leggett took it. It was secure on the cart.

JOHN SNOWSELL . I apprehended Leggett with the axletree on his shoulder, about ten o'clock at night - he carried it part of the way to the watch-house; the prosecutor owned it - the prisoner said he found it.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he say we, or I, found it - A. He said I, not we.

Q. Did you find any tools on him - A. No. It was about two hundred yards from where it was stolen.

JOHN SIMPSON re-examined. I have only one pair of wheels to two carts; they were not on this cart. The axletree could not have been taken off without a hammer, or something of that kind.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I found it.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Confined Two Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-171

TWENTY-FIRST DAY, FRIDAY, MAY 5.

522. JAMES NEW was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of March , 260 lbs. of liquorice-root, value 6 l. , the goods of James Moore .

MR. ALLEY conducted the prosecution.

JAMES DIXON . I live with Messrs. Dixon and Co. in Covent-garden. On the 16th of March, about eleven or twelve o'clock in the morning, the prisoner brought a sample of liquorice-root, and offered it for sale - he said he had about two hundred weight at 50 s. a hundred. I asked him where he brought it from? he said from Norwood, near the Jolly Sailor, and that his name was John Saunders , or some name very similar to that. I knew they did not grow liquorice there. After sometime we said we would take it - he was to bring it on the Saturday following, the 18th. After he left I went, made enquiry, and had a police-officer in waiting. On Saturday morning he came between eight and nine o'clock, with the liquorice in a cart, which had the name of

"Stone, Mitcham," on it - we gave him in charge. The liquorice was weighed. Mr. Butler came and saw it at our place.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. He produced it publicly - A. Yes. He said he grew it himself. When he was taken he did not say Armstrong employed him to sell it. It is of that sort called runners, and only fit to grow again, and is never sold.

JAMES BUTLER . I am an herbalist in Covent-garden. On the 16th of March the prisoner called on me, said he had two hundred weight of liquorice to dispose of, and would take 50 s. per hundred. He said he grew it himself at Norwood, and had a little more in the ground. He produced a sample, and said being short of money he would take 10 s. less. I had my suspicious, and declined buying it. On the Saturday following I saw it at Dixon's, and directly knew it to be Mr. Moore's, of Mitcham. It was tied with pitched string. I knew he always tied his that way, and from its general appearance I knew it to be his. It is worth 60 s. a hundred weight.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you know Mr. Moore grew liquorice - A. Yes, I have bought a quantity of him. I speak to its being his more from the root itself than the mode of tying it - there is a vast difference in the growth. I do not know that Overton is a grower - he has ran away. I am sure the prisoner said he grew it himself at Norwood.

GEORGE STONE . I live at Mitcham. On the 18th of March the prisoner applied to me to lend him a cart, and said he wanted to fetch some things for his wife, and boxes from Clapham.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you know the prisoner worked for Armstrong - A. Never. I knew Overton had about two acres of ground, and have seen some liquorice-root in it, but it was a very small young root, and what they call runners. I have heard he has run away. I never saw Armstrong and the prisoner together.

COURT. Q. Do you know much about liquorice-root - A. Very little. That which grows on Mr. Moore's ground is very different from runners. They are too young to bring to market.

JAMES MOORE . I am a grower of liquorice-root at Mitcham . The prisoner had lived servant with me many years, and so had his father and all the family. The prisoner had been discharged several months before the robbery, but some of the family are still with me. In the month of March I had many tons of liquorice-root in the store-house fit for sale. On the 19th of March I heard of the robbery, looked at my store, and perceived some was gone - I thought 4 cwt. was gone. I had sold none after the 15th. I saw the liquorice at Dixon's, and have no hesitation in saying it is mine - it is four years old, and I never heard of any grower growing it four years, except myself - two or three years is the common time. Runners are what the root is propagated from - they are not fit for consumption, except to plant, and are very seldom sold.

Q. Did the prisoner continue to live at Mitcham - A. He lived nearly opposite to me, and was in my house that day; he came backwards and forwards almost every day. I sold the liquorice for 60 s. or 70 s. per cwt. It was kept in a bed of earth near my house, about five inches deep.

Cross-examined. Q. Is your bailiff here - A. No, not on behalf of the prosecution - I took the prisoner up myself. He is in Court. I can swear to the liquorice, to the materials with which it is tied, and the colour of the soil. I have seen every crop in England, and never saw any like my own - it has a whiter hue than any other; it is grown in a marly soil.

COURT. Q. Had Armstrong any ground at Mitcham - A. Yes; he shewed me all his crop the day before he absconded - it was by no means fit for market, and his soil is quite different from mine; it is as different from mine as it can be. His was only two years' growth - he had been there but two years.

GEORGE BIRD . I am now steward to the prosecutor, and have no hesitation in saying this liquorice was grown by him - it is nothing like runners.

LEWIS LEWIS . I am an officer of Bow-street. I took the prisoner into custody on Saturday morning, he gave me the name of James Sanders , and in about half an hour afterwards he said his name was New, and that he brought the liquorice-root from his master's, who lived at Mitcham. When I first took him he said he had it from Norwood, and that he lived there.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he not say he came from his master, Mr. Anderson, of Mitcham - A. Yes, and he said his master would come and prove what he said.

Prisoner's Defence. When a man is hired, is he not to obey his master's orders? He sent me with the property, and told me to give a false name to the people as he was in distress, and I did so. He told me to say it was grown at Norwood. I took it to Dixon's shop, and after it was weighed two officers came in and said it was stolen. I said,

"If you think so take me into custody." I was examined four times, and they would not let me speak once. I do not call this shewing a prisoner justice.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-172

523. THOMAS MATTHEWS was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of April , two salt-cellars, value 5 s., and two salt-spoons, value 6 s. , the goods of Stephen Henry .

STEPHEN HENRY , ESQ. I live in Wobourn-place . On the 15th of April, about twelve o'clock, I was called into the kitchen by the screams of the servants, and followed the prisoner up the area steps into Russell-square, and up Bedford-place. I again caught sight of him in the field by Tavistock-square - he got over the fence into the square. I called Stop thief! at the end of the square - he was stopped by a stranger. From the time I first saw him he was never out of my sight. I collared him, and brought him back to the house. The servant brought me up a pair of salts. Nothing was found on him belonging to me.

JOSEPH BUTLER . I was going down Bedford-place about a quarter past twelve o'clock, and saw the prisoner running in a direction from Mr. Henry's house. I heard the cry of Stop thief! and saw him throw two salt-cellars down, I picked them up, and gave them to Mr. Henry's servant. I am sure he is the man. I only lost sight of him in turning the corner.

THOMAS ELSTEAD . I am servant to Mr. Henry. I was in the drawing-room, heard an alarm, ran out, and Butler delivered me the salt-cellars.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was selling mats - I went down the area; the servants called Stop thief! and the gentleman stopped me.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-173

524. FREDERICK PITT , THOMAS DODD , WILLIAM PRUSSIA , JAMES SIMPSON , and JOHN HEWITT were indicted for stealing, on the 29th of February , 113 yards of woollen cloth, value 30 l., the goods of John Dolan and John James Dolan , and 9 yards of woollen cloth, value 9 l. , the goods of John James Dolan , Lawrence Henry Dolan , and Thomas Smith ; and JOHN FRANKLIN was indicted for feloniously receiving the said goods, well knowing them to have been stolen .

TWO OTHER COUNTS, the same, only stating the nine yards of cloth to be the goods of Thomas Arlington and James Stockdale .

MR. ANDREWS conducted the prosecution.

MR. JOHN JAMES DOLAN . I am in partnership with my father, John Dolan ; we live in Gate-street, Lincoln's Inn-fields; the bale of army cloth was the property of my father and myself, the other cloth belonged to us and Mr. Smith; the superfine cloth is the property of Thomas Arlington and James Stockdale . Our factory is in Stonecutter's-alley , separated from the house by a yard - Mr. James Dolan slept in the house on the night of the robbery. The workmen leave about nine o'clock - the door is usually fastened by a bar, which is put across inside - that door communicates with Stonecutter's-alley. The door leading from the warehouse into the yard was locked.

Q. Did you see the warehouse on the morning of the robbery - A. I was called up about three o'clock in the morning of the 29th of February, I went to the warehouse, and observed the door leading to the yard open, and a skeleton key in the lock - it appeared they had entered there. I found a crow-bar on the premises; the door was left open. The door leading into Stonecutter's-alley was opened; the bar had been removed inside, it must have been opened inside. There is no access to the yard without getting over the wall, which is about ten feet high - there were marks on it, as if some person had climbed over. I missed three pieces of army cloth, in all about one hundred and thirteen yards. I saw them at Worship-street two days afterwards, and knew them to be ours.

THOMAS SMITH . I am a partner in the firm. I saw nine yards of black cloth at Worship-street, which I saw in the warehouse two days before the robbery.

DANIEL SWINGLER . I am a watchman of Gate-street; the door of the prosecutors' workshop is in my beat. I tried it at nine and at twelve o'clock, it was safe then. Just before three o'clock in the morning I went up the alley, and saw some men pass by me in Stonecutter's-alley, at different times, and went towards Weston's-park, then up the mews again, and made a run. I wondered what was going to be done. I took my lanthorn, walked gently, and looked down Weston's-park, I there saw the back of a coach, it was yellow - there is a hackney-master lives at the upper end of the park. I went on the left hand, came to Mr. Dolan's warehouse door, and found it open; I then saw a parcel of cloth strewed about the yard by the door. When I got to the door, I saw the coach driving off in a direction towards Searle-street. I immediately sprung my rattle, and went round to Lincoln's Inn-fields. When I came round the corner two watchmen stood there; I desired them to follow the coach - it drove furiously away when I sprung my rattle, and I never got up to it.

Cross-examined by MR. ARABIN. Q. You could not keep up to it - A. No, I was never nearer to it than forty yards, and did not see what was in it.

FREDERICK BIDWELL . I attend Spitalfields-market, and usually go to business about five o'clock. On Tuesday morning, the 29th of February, about half-past six, I saw a coach in Dorset-street - it was a yellow-bodied coach, and stood before an alley. I took notice of it, as my father supposed there had been a robbery, and saw six or seven young men round it - I noticed two or three of them, and should know them again; I could distinguish Pitt, Dodd, Prussia, and Simpson, and the coachman, which was Hewitt, the prisoner. They stood round the coach, I watched them about a quarter of an hour; then Pitt, who had a white coat on, asked me if I knew where there was a public-house, for he wanted something to drink? I said I did not know of any being open. They found I was watching them, came to the coachman, and he drove round to the end of the alley.

Q. Had he to pass the end of Crispin-street - A. Yes, to Little Paternoster-row. The men went up the nearer way and met the coach. I followed the men up the alley, and saw the coach right up at the end of the alley. Hewitt got off the box, opened the coach-door, and the men went up and took the cloth out. I think there were two or three more men than I have mentioned. It was woollen cloth. Pitt took one piece out of the coach, and went into Franklin's house, and the others followed with each a piece. I have known Franklin's house a long while. The coachman held the door open for them - the coach was emptied all at once. I did not see Franklin then, his house was not open - he keeps a little broker's shop, I have known him two or three years; the coach remained there. I went and told Gregory, the officer, what had passed; he ran down the court, and saw the men in the room; he sent for Armstrong. Gregory's house is eight or ten doors from Franklin's.

Cross-examined by MR. ARABIN. Q. Were not the shops open - A. There were none but potatoe-shops open. I was just by the coach, and saw them plainly - it was between dark and light. Franklin generally opens about half-past seven, or eight o'clock.

Cross-examined by MR. HONE. Q. You never saw Simpson before - A. No. I particularly noticed them all, and have no doubt of any of them.

WILLIAM MILLER . I am a cooper, and work at the corner of Little Paternoster-row. On the 29th of February, about half-past six o'clock in the morning, I was going to work, and saw the prisoner, Pitt, who had a light-coloured great-coat on; he came, and walked up Paternoster-row - a short man was with him, it was not any of the prisoners. Pitt went down the alley, and into Franklin's house, alone. I knew the house before, but did not know Franklin. I think the shop was open and the goods at the door. Pitt came out instantly with a blue coat on - he had taken his great-coat off. He walked down Paternoster-row, and was crossing over towards the Ten Bells; at that time I heard the noise of a coach - Gregory and others had stopped the coach. Pitt stood still; the man who was with him was a Jew - when Pitt left, the Jew joined him again. The coach was standing at the Ten Bells door, which is about two hundred yards from Franklin's - it could have got within twenty yards of his house.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Franklin's shop was open - A. Yes, and a few goods before the door. I think he was putting the window up; he was not out at the door when Pitt went in.

COURT. Q. Were the shutters down - A. I did not go up to the house, and do not know.

JOHN GREGORY . I am a potatoe-salesman, and lodge with my brother in Spitalfields. In consequence of what I was told, between six and seven o'clock in the morning. I went up Little Paternoster-row, and saw Pitt, Dodd, Simpson, and Prussia inside Franklin's door - the shutters were down then. I saw a coach, which was No. 13, standing at the bottom of Little Paternoster-row. I then went and informed my brother, returned, and found the coach at the Ten Bells, and the coachman at the coach-door. It remained there till about twelve o'clock, and then drove away. I ran and saw an officer come up and open the coach-door, nobody was in it then. I immediately ran to Franklin's house, went in, and saw five or six men in the back-room behind the shop, Franklin was with them - they could see me. I stood there a minute or two, and the men ran out of the side-door into the yard; Franklin came into the shop. I followed them into the yard - they began to get over the wall into a farrier's yard, which communicates with the street. I ran round and saw Simpson, who had got over the wall into the farrier's yard. I saw the four prisoners, excepting the coachman and Franklin, in the yard. There were others, who got away. Simpson was immediately secured, and I took him to the watch-house, the others were also secured. I saw the cloth in Franklin's back-room, where the prisoners were. It was afterwards shewn to Mr. Dolan.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Whether Franklin was receiving it or not you cannot say - A. No; there was no appearance of his wishing to turn them out.

RICHARD GREGORY . My brother gave me information. I stood at my own door, and saw a yellow-bodied coach, No. 13, standing at the Ten Bells, about half-past six o'clock. I immediately sent for Armstrong and Van, and about half-past seven I saw Pitt go up to Hewitt, the coachman, and speak to him, he then drove on, and was going to turn his coach back to Franklin's; I followed, called two constables to take him, and I secured Pitt, who was taken to the watch-house. As I came out of the watch-house Armstrong came up, he and I went to Franklin's, and found the cloth in the room behind the shop - it was not at all concealed, and under the cloth was found a white great-coat. In justice to Franklin, I must state, that when I said

"Whose cloth is that - who brought it here?" He said immediately,

"I was knocked up, and my master's son, Mr. Pitt, brought it here." It was then eight o'clock.

JOHN ARMSTRONG . I got the cloth from Franklin's and took him into custody; he said he was knocked up, and his master's son brought it - it laid quite open. He said three or four men came with it, and he thought he should know them.

COURT. Q. Was there any more cloth in the house - A. None; there was no appearance of dealing in cloth - it was near eight o'clock. I know Pitt as a broker.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

FREDERICK BIDWELL re-examined. That is the coat Pitt wore.

THOMAS CHAPMAN . I apprehended Dodd in Union-street, leading to Bishopsgate-street. I had heard the alarm, and saw him come out of the farrier's yard. I pursued

him, calling Stop thief! - he had a stick in his hand, another person attempted to secure him, he struck him with it. I secured him, and took from his pocket a tobacco-box, containing tinder, and a knife, which appeared to have been used as a steel.

ROBERT CHRISTIAN . I am a headborough. Pitt was brought to the watch-house. When Dodd and Simpson were brought in I observed them frequently putting their hands to their pockets, as if they wanted to get away something. I searched Dodd, and found two centre-bits on him, and Chapman found a tinder-box and knife on him; the knife appears to have been used as a steel, and the tinder was fresh made. I found two flints on Simpson, and some list.

MR. DOLAN. The list has been torn of some of the cloth.

THOMAS HART . I am an headborough. I searched Pitt, and found a large skeleton key and several smaller ones on him.

EDWARD RAE . I am a constable. I apprehended Prussia concealed in a privy in a private yard adjoining Franklin's house - it was not the farrier's yard - he could have got there from the roof of an adjoining shed.

THOMAS VAN . As I was taking Hewitt to the office, he said he would not be hurt for others who had hired him, and that Simpson hired him at Charing-cross a little after two o'clock in the morning, and brought him to the corner of Gate-street, Lincoln's Inn-fields, a little way up the street on the left hand, which is Stonecutter's-alley; that they brought the cloth from the alley - he could not tell from where they brought it out, but they brought it round the corner, and that he drove up and down the Strand till the watch went off.

PITT'S Defence. A Jew fetched me to Franklin's to ask what the cloth was worth a yard; another person was with him, whom I took for one of Franklin's lodgers - I said it was worth about 5 s., a yard, and went away with the lodger and the Jew to the Ten Bells. Some persons were running - I believe Gregory was running after the men who belonged to the cloth. The boy pointed to me, and they seized me, and took eight 1 l. notes from me.

DODD'S Defence. I was in Union-street, and heard' the cry of Stop thief! a man stopped me, I said I was not the thief, and he let me go. I was afterwards taken again.

PRUSSIA'S Defence. I saw a number of people going down French-alley, they said there was some stolen property in the house. I went round the yard to assist in taking the men, and in about ten minutes several people came and took me.

FRANKLIN'S Defence. I knew nothing of the property having been stolen. It was brought to my place by the desire of Pitt, and I believe these to be the men who brought it, except the coachman. I did not know what sort of goods were coming.

PITT - GUILTY . Aged 25.

DODD - GUILTY . Aged 23.

PRUSSIA - GUILTY . Aged 21.

SIMPSON - GUILTY . Aged 21.

HEWITT - GUILTY . Aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

FRANKLIN - GUILTY . Aged 40.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-174

525. WILLIAM PIZZEY and WILLIAM BRYANT were indicted for stealing, on the 22d of March , 60 lbs. of lead, value 10 s., the goods of Daniel Pizzey , and fixed to his dwelling-house .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating it to belong to John Amer , and fixed to dwelling-house of his.

WILLIAM WHITE . I work for Mr. Porter. On the 22d of March, between eight and nine o'clock, I saw Bryant leaning over the stile of John Harris 's door, at Branstone-green ; Pizzey was in Harris's house talking to Bryant. He got out of the window, with a bundle in his arms, accompanied by a man named Wicks - they took a sack from Harris's door; Wicks took the sack up, and carried it. - Pizzey took the bundle, and Bryant walked by his side. I watched them all three together into the fields, almost a quarter of a mile off. I saw them hide it in a hedge in the fields, and then all three went away - I went, and told Mr. Lancaster, my master, and we both went about an hour and a half after I told him. He told me to watch to see if they returned, which I did for an hour, but nobody came. I went into another field, from which I could see if they came. I saw the men after they were taken into custody by Lancaster - the sack laid in the same place. A person, named Westman, carried it away - I knew Pizzey before; I was a schoolfellow of his. I am certain Bryant is the man who accompanied them.

WILLIAM LANCASTER . I am a farmer's man. I went with Mr. Amer, the prosecutor, in consequence of the boy's information, and took Bryant and Pizzey into custody - the boy told me the way, and I followed about a mile and three-quarters before I took them. When the boy told us it was about half-past eight o'clock - it was about ten minutes before I saw them; they were separating, Wicks went one way, and they another. I found the sack when I got up to them, which contained lead - they resisted. I told them I stopped them for taking a sack and bundle away from Harris's house. They said they had taken nothing.

WILLIAM PORTER . I am a bricklayer, and live at Harrow on the Hill. I assisted the last witness in taking the prisoners into custody. I fitted the lead to Mr. Amer's house, over the door, and it tallied with the shape of the roof - it was ripped off. It weighed about 60 lbs. The sack belongs to Burrows.

JOHN AMER . I am a farmer , and live at Ossandon-hill; the house belongs to me - Pizzey's father lives in it. I am positive that the lead produced is that which was fastened to the brickwork of the house - my house is called Peddyson's Hall; that house is fifty yards from my residence. The bundle has not been found - I know both the prisoner's.

BRYANT'S Defence. I was seeking for work, and know nothing of the lead. I did not know Pizzey was in the house. I merely looked into the house by accident.

PIZZEY'S Defence. I know nothing of the lead.

PIZZEY - GUILTY . Aged 19.

BRYANT - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18200412-175

526. ANTHONY TIDEY was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of February , eighty bushels of oats, value 20 l. the goods of Thomas La Coste and George La Coste ; and

JOHN MULLARD was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, he well knowing them to have been stolen .

SECOND AND THIRD COUNT, the same, only stating them to be the property of some person of persons unknown.

JAMES SIMMONS . I live at Twickenham. On the 9th of February, I was going by some stables belonging to Messrs. La Costes', about two o'clock in the daytime, and heard some one say,

"All is right." At that instant Mullard came out of the stable door, (I do not know of their being Messrs, La Costes') - Mullard opened it to come out; Tidey was at the door too, walking about. I saw Mullard with something in his apron, which upon my looking, I saw to be about a peck of oats. I knew him before; he is in the hardware line - he was going towards his own stables In passing by I looked down, and then saw the oats. I ran towards the King's Head, and was informed that Messrs. La Costes were the owners, and they knew of it. On the 26th, as I accompanied Mr. La Coste to the Magistrate, Tidey was going at the same time, I heard him acknowledge to Mr. La Coste, his stealing the corn, and selling it to Mullard.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. They were both close to the stable when,

"All right" was uttered. Tidy was about three yards from the stable when it was said.

GEORGE LA COSTE . My brother's name is Thomas; Tidey was in our service. I am proprietor of a stage-coach concern ; our horses and corn were in our stable - Tidey had been four or five years with us - he had the care of the oats , and I had the best opinion of him. Mullard said it was a very bad job, and acknowledged that he had been guilty. This he said was the first person he had ever wronged, but he had done this several times. The corn was kept in a sack, sufficient for the supply of the day, which was taken every morning.

Cross-examined by MR. HONE. Q. What quantity of oats was daily sent to the stable - A. They ought to have taken about a bushel. I cannot tell what he did take.

TIDEY - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Fined One Shilling, and Discharged .

MULLARD - NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18200412-176

527. JOHN JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of March , 20 lbs. of lead, value 3 s., the goods of Alexander Copeland , Thomas Palmer Ackland , William Osgoode , Henry Lutterel , Richard White , and Henry Sanford , and fixed to a building of theirs .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating it to be fixed to the building.

MR. ARABIN conducted the prosecution.

JAMES CATON . I am a porter at the Albany . One Monday in March, I saw a person named Coleman, walking about the buildings - he had no right to be there; I watched him on several other occasions. On this occasion he got out of my sight, and I found some lead secreted in a dark part of the buildings, which could not be seen without a light. I know where the lead was taken from. Before the prisoner was taken I saw the lead fitted to the tank.

JOHN NOEL . I took the prisoner into custody in the court-yard; he was in company with Goulden - this was on the 15th. On Tuesday or Wednesday, I was on the watch, and about half-past nine o'clock I saw them come into Albany west door steps, where I had seen the lead laying; they both returned, and the lead was concealed by Johnson in his jacket under his arm. Gouldin walked fast; Johnson was standing, and I took him into custody, but Goulden escaped. I did not know the lead belonged to the Albany but by its being there. I stopped him in the court-yard.

JAMES CATON re-examined. After the lead was taken I went to the tank, and found the lead taken - it was left secure. I compared it, and it fitted exactly. I am positive it is the same.

WILLIAM PEPPER . I am a constable. The lead weighs 21 1/2 lbs. It has been in my possession ever since.

MR. THOMAS LUXAM . I am steward to the Albany. The names of the trustees are stated rightly in the indictment.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. One witness said 14th, and the other 15th, but I was taken on the 14th.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-177

528. MARY MARTIN was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of April , one ham, value 5 s. , the goods of William Mears .

WILLIAM MEARS . I am a shopkeeper at Enfield . On the 15th of April, in the evening, the prisoner's mother was in my shop - I did not observe the prisoner there. I lost a ham. It was found on the prisoner about a quarter of a mile from the shop; she was there as if waiting for somebody. She was taken into custody the Monday following.

GEORGE DELLER . I work for Mr. Mears. I saw the prisoner standing some distance from the shop, and I informed my master.

Q. Was she standing near enough to give a signal to any person in the shop - A. No.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-178

529. FRANCIS XAVIER was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of April , one watch, value 10 l.; two seals, value 2 l., and one watch key, value 5 s. , the goods of James M'Donald .

JAMES M'DONALD. I live in Glasgow. The prisoner was servant to a fellow-passenger. I came on shore at Yarmouth, and left my watch by mistake, on the pillow, on board the smack, lying in Yarmouth Roads . The vessel arrived at the wharf on Saturday, and I went on board on Monday, the 19th of April - the prisoner was then gone. I made enquiry for my watch, but I could not find it. I saw it a few days afterwards at Bow-street - they were worth upward of 40 l. I was present when he was taken in the lodgings of his master, Captain Lisle , in Hanover-street.

ROBERT ELDRIDGE . I live with Mr. Barrow, in High-street, St. Giles's, he is a pawnbroker. I received the watch in pledge on the 15th of April - I wrote the ticket, but I do not recollect the prisoner.

WILLIAM SHARP . I am a pawnbroker, and live with

Mr. Morris, Tottenham-court-road. I received two seals in pledge of the prisoner on the 15th of April. I asked him how he came by them, he said they were given to him by a gentleman with whom he formerly lived. I lent 12 s. on them, and he gave his address

" John French , No. 13, Piccadilly."

WILLIAM BOND. I took the prisoner into custody, I asked him what he had done with Major M'Donald's watch and seals? he said he did not know any thing of him or his watch. On searching him I found some keys which opened a box of his in Pullen-street, in which I found two duplicates.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined Three Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-179

530. HENRY HAINES was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of March , one watch, value 30 s.; one chain, value 4 s.; one seal, value 10 s., and one ring, value 6 d., the goods of Harriet Kite Snook , widow , from her person .

MRS. HARRIET KITE SNOOK . I am a widow, and live in Warren-street, Fitzroy-square. On the 22d of March, about three o'clock in the afternoon, as I was going down the City-road , near Nelson-street, in company with a lady who is here as a witness. A man put his hand over my right shoulder and took my watch and seal; the chain was round my neck, and the watch was in the bosom of my pelisse - it was a small gold watch. After he took it, he came before me and I had an opportunity of seeing his features. I am sure it was the prisoner - he was stopped in about twenty minutes in some street in Clerkenwell. He had got out of my sight, I followed him some distance, and he was taken. The watch and seal were produced, and I knew them.

MISS CHARLOTTE SEAMAN . I was walking with Mrs. Snook, and I saw the prisoner in the act of taking the watch over Mrs. Snook's shoulder - I saw the chain in his hand. I accompanied Mrs. Snook to Worship-street, and I am sure he is the person that snatched the watch; I did not observe any other person with him.

JOHN COOPER . I am a cork-cutter, and live in Fox-court, Gray's Inn-lane. I was on the opposite side of the City-road, and saw a person run from the ladies, they called out Stop him! I ran after him, and lost sight of him in his going round a corner. He was stopped in Compton-street, Clerkenwell. I have no doubt he is the person I first saw - the watch was found in the breast of his jacket which he threw to some of his companions - they struck me several times.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I throw myself on the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-180

531. JAMES SPITTLE was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of March , one shirt, value 5 s., and the sum of 4 s. 3/4 d., in monies numbered , the goods and monies of Daniel Lancaster .

DANIEL LANCASTER . I live with Lady Lushington, in York-place. I was out of a situation when I lost the property - I lodged in North-street, York-place . On the 14th of March, the prisoner came to lodge with me, and we slept in the same bed. I missed the things on the 16th, they were in my portmanteau. I went to bed about ten o'clock, he was there, and it was safe; I saw the prisoner when I awoke at half-past six o'clock dressed - the morning before he got up at seven. He went out and never returned to the house. I got up at half-past seven o'clock, and missed my shirt and money. We took him between one and two o'clock the same day, and he declared he had not done it. I found the three farthings on him, one was new, and notched round the edge, and the other was an old one worn whitish.

RICHARD COATS . I am a constable - the prisoner was delivered into my custody. The prosecutor described what he had lost, and the farthings were found as he had described them; he had some silver, but it could not be identified.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I have a small family. The room I lodged in had no lock on, and the house full of lodgers who could go to it if they pleased.

GUILTY . Aged 42.

Confined Three Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-181

532. LAWRENCE MANNING was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of February , one ladder, value 3 s. , the goods of John Ansley .

JOHN ANSLEY . I live in Market-street, Fitzroy-market, I am a nightman . The ladder was in use in Buckeridge-street, St. Giles's - I saw the ladder about a quarter of an hour before I missed it. I saw it at Hatton-garden office; the prisoner was in charge.

WILLIAM BOSTOCK . I am a watchman. About a quarter before two o'clock, I saw the prisoner between Middle-row, and Southampton-buildings, Holborn, with the ladder on his shoulder. He said he was taking it from Seven Dials to Rope-maker-street - he threw down the ladder and tried to get away.

Prisoner's Defence. I found the ladder near Middle-row, Holborn. It was of no use to me, if I did steal any thing I would have had something that was of use to me.

GUILTY . Aged 37.

Fined One Shilling, and Discharged .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-182

533. CHARLES WHITE was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of April , two sheets, value 10 s. , the goods of William Gosling .

ROBERT SIMONS . I am shopman to Mr. Gosling, who lives at Shoreditch . A person opposite came and informed me that a man had taken two sheets from the door; I went after him and took him in Webb-square.

ROBERT BARNS . Mr. Gosling lives nearly opposite to me, he is a pawnbroker ; I saw the prisoner take the sheets from the door, and gave information - we pursued the prisoner and took him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I did it through distress, the sheets were lying on the pavement.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Judgment Respited .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-183

534. JOHN MURPHY was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of February , three hearth rugs, value 5 l. , the goods of Thomas Liddle .

THOMAS LIDDLE . I live at No. 9, Tottenham-court-road , and am a rug-maker . On Saturday, the 19th of February, the prisoner came to my shop, and told me that Mr. Bentley sent his compliments and wished him to send two or three rugs to show a customer; to send the lowest price, and one only would be kept. I knew nothing of him, therefore would not send them by him, but sent them by my man - I am quite sure the prisoner is the person.

MATTHEW NELMES . I am in the employ of Mr. Liddle; he sent me with the prisoner to Mr. Bentley's, and when we got there, he said he was going to show the rugs to a lady in Thornhaugh-street. We went down Francis-street, towards Thornhaugh-street, at the corner of which we went into a public-house and called for some beer, he asked me to let him have the rugs to show the lady. I parted with them. I waited for him, but as he did not return I suspected him, and went to Mr. Bentley to enquire if all was right. I did not see him till six weeks after, in the custody of Read the officer - we have never found the rugs since. I was with him about five minutes.

WILLIAM BENTLEY . I know the prisoner, he formerly worked for me. I am an upholsterer, and he was not in my employ at the time. I never sent him for any rugs to show a lady - I did not see him on that day in the neighbourhood.

WILLIAM READ . I apprehended the prisoner on the 2d of April, on another charge - I never found the rugs.

Prisoner's Defence. I never went to Mr. Liddle about any rugs, or know anything of it.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-184

535. JOSEPH POWELL was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of March , one tea-caddy, value 20 s. , the goods of Frederick Christian Breamer .

SARAH FURLEY . I am servant to Mr. Breamer, who lives in Warren-street, Fitzroy-square . On the 24th of March, I saw the prisoner turn from the garden-gate, about four o'clock in the afternoon. I saw him with a caddy under his arm. I went into the front room to see if our caddy was gone. I then went after him, and am quite sure he is the man I saw at the gate. I got sight of him about a quarter of a mile from the house, and he dropped the caddy. I saw it in the parlour at two o'clock.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. The front-door is in Warren-street - A. Yes; the garden-door is not bolted in the day time - the door was open at the time he was brought back.

EDWARD DEWSBERY . I live at No. 13, Little Brook-street, the servant came and asked me if I had seen a a person go by with a caddy. I went after the prisoner, he was walking, and I stopped him - he had nothing about him. Sarah Furley was with me. She asked him what he had done with the caddy - he made no answer. If he had spoken I should have heard it. I saw the caddy afterwards, and Sarah Furley claimed it. He was walking towards me, and said, that if it had not been for the dog we should not have taken him.

CHARLES SMITH . I was standing in Fitzroy-place, and saw the prisoner run through the court with a caddy under his arm. The servant came up and asked me if I had seen a man go by with a caddy? I said, Yes. I ran on before her and got sight of him - the dog had then hold of him. He had not got the caddy under his arm then - he dropped it, and I picked it up and gave it to her. He was about ten yards from me when I saw the dog lay hold of him.

Cross-examined. Q. He was going towards the fields - A. Yes; running - and when he returned he was walking. I never knew him before. I saw his face as he was running through the court - they called after him, and he turned round. I am sure he is the man that dropped the caddy. He was absent about a minute - he ran behind some houses and returned walking.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing of the transaction. I was walking towards them when two men laid hold of me.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Three Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-185

536. WILLIAM RILEY was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of February , one seal, value 8 s., and one piece of ribbon, value 1 d., the goods of John Daft , from his person .

JOHN DAFT . I am a lace-seller , and live at No. 16, Charterhouse-lane. On the 23d of February, between twelve and two o'clock, I was going down the City-road . I had a watch in my fob, a seal, ribbon, and key - I lost my seal, but not my watch. I felt something touch me, I put my hand down and missed my seal. I laid hold of a boy, he seemed confused, and was putting something into his pocket. I said to him,

"You little rogue you have cut off my seal!" and said,

"Give me the seal and go about your business;" but an officer saw him and took him into custody.

GEORGE LACK . I am an officer. I was present when Mr. Daft charged the boy with the offence. I asked him how he came to do it, he said that he found it - if that had been the case it would have been dirty. I searched him, and found two duplicates, but no scissars on him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. Where the fire was in the City-road, there was a crowd and a great noise - I went to see it, saw the seal and picked it up.

GUILTY . Aged 13.

Transported for Seven Years. - Penitentiary .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-186

537. MARY M'NIFF was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of February , one watch, value 20 s.; and one seal, value, 1 s., the goods of William Huxley , from his person .

WILLIAM HUXLEY . I am now a watchman , and have been a seafaring man. I live at No. 4, Cable-place, Cable-street.

On Monday, the 28th of February, about a quarter after four o'clock in the afternoon, I went into the Blakeney's-head, Cable-street , with a sailor (whom I thought I knew) and the prisoner - my watch then was safe. We had two pots of beer together, but finding he was no shipmate of mine, I went into another box - the prisoner then came and asked me to let her have some gin and water. I did not sit above two minutes there. She then went out - there was no other person on the same side as I sat. On the other side of the box there was a millwright. When I went out of the door she was there, and asked me to go home with her, which I refused. She then snatched my watch, and ran up a court; I ran after her, when two men came up and knocked me down. I went home and washed myself, being bruised, and described her to an officer, who apprehended her the same evening. The watch was afterwards brought to my house by a child, but not the seal. I am sure the prisoner is the woman, I have seen her before.

JAMES STERLING . I am an officer. I received information from Mrs. Huxley that her husband had been robbed - he appeared to have been cut. He described the prisoner's dress and person. About six o'clock, I found her at the Blakeney's-head - I told her the charge, which she denied. He was not intoxicated, for he gave a clear account of the affair and of the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going along Cable-street, and met a sailor whom I knew; I asked him to treat me, and he said he had no money - this man came up and said he would treat us. I went to the Blakeney's-head to redeem a ticket which I had left with the landlady, she then detained me till an officer came.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-187

TWENTY-SECOND DAY, SATURDAY, MAY 6.

538. ARTHUR LEONARD was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of January , twenty-eight planes, value 1 l. 17 s.; ten chisels, value 5 s., and one iron cramp, value 10 d. , the goods of Henry Drisdale .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 30.

Confined Six Months , and Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-188

539. ANN JEFFRIES was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of April , four 1 l. Bank notes, the property of Samuel Johnson , from his person .

SAMUEL JOHNSON . I am a waterman , and live in Milk-street, Spitalfields. On the 4th of April, about four o'clock in the morning, my wife was taken in labour. I went to fetch her assistance, and on coming up Angel-alley into Wentworth-street , the prisoner came up, and seized me by the fob, in which I had four 1 l. notes. I insisted on her going away, but she still kept hold of me - two other women were in the court; she took her hand out of my fob. I seized her hand, and she dragged me away up the alley. I still held her hand, and found a 1 l. note in it - she had either dropped the other three or given them to the other women, who were close to her. The watchman secured her.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not accost me - A. I never spoke to her.

JAMES BRIEN . I heard a scuffle in the alley, and the prosecutor calling out Watch! the prisoner was also calling Watch! and said the man charged her with robbing him, but she had none of his property. He said,

"How can you tell such a lie, for I have just taken this note out of your hand?" The other women were going away; she said she had nothing to do with it. When I came up they were struggling together. The prisoner seemed a little in liquor.

JOHN BOOTH . The prisoner was brought to the watch-house. Johnson appeared rather fresh; he said he had been to fetch his wife a nurse.

Prisoner's Defence. It is all false. He gave me the money to hold till he got change,

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-189

540. JOSEPH JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of April , four shirts, value 15 s.; two waistcoats, value 18 s.; five handkerchiefs, value 6 s.; one tobacco-box, value 2 d., and one piece of soap, value 1 d. , the goods of Thomas Ween .

THOMAS WEEN . I live in Great George-street, Westminster , and am coachman to Dr. Sutherland. On the 9th of April, about nine o'clock at night, I left the property safe in the stable, I was called up about four o'clock in the morning, by the watchman, and found the stable door broken open; the lock was picked, and I missed the property out of a box.

THOMAS BOYLE . I am a watchman. I stopped the prisoner in Prince's-street, Westminster, about three o'clock in the morning, with a bundle, about a quarter of a mile from the stable. He said it was dirty linen, which he had brought from Grosvenor-square, and was taking to his mother to be washed. I took him to the watch-house, and found it to be the property stated in the indictment - three of the shirts were clean.

BENJAMIN TURNBULL . The prisoner was brought to the watch-house. I found a handkerchief and a duster in his hat, with the prosecutor's name on them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-190

541. THOMAS HOLLINGSWORTH was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of March , five bushels of oats, value 18 s. , the goods of John Eames .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating them to be the property of Charles Russell .

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

JOHN EAMES . I am the proprietor of the coaches at the Angel, St. Clement's ; I have no partner in the coach concern. We have coaches which change horses at Enfield ; there is a considerable stock of oats and beans at the Angel, from which I occasionally send to Enfield to supply the

horses. The prisoner was in the employ of Mr. Charles Russell , a farmer at Enfield - he carts oats for me occasionally.

WILLIAM ANSEL . I manage Mr. Eames's coach concern at Enfield. On the 23d of March I sent the prisoner up for eight quarters of oats and two quarters of beans, and gave him seventeen sacks to fetch them in. When he came back he brought sixteen sacks full of oats, and one empty sack, but no beans - the sixteen sacks held ten quarters. He said there were no beans, and so he brought a sack empty. He said Mr. Eames had no beans and so he brought a load of oats.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. You sent him for eight quarters of oats and two of beans - A. Yes. He brought ten quarters of oats.

WILLIAM CRAFTON . I am employed at the Angel. On the 23d of March the prisoner applied for oats and beans; my master said he had no beans, and I filled sixteen sacks with five bushels of oats in each - he said I might as well fill the other, which I did. After this he came to me, and said his master would only expect twelve quarters, and we might as well whack that sack between us, and said he would give me 5 s. I said,

"No, I never sold oats yet, and will not begin now." He said,

"Why, you do not put every thing down." I said Yes, I did. He said then I was a fool, but if I put them down he must deliver them. I entered them in the book - he took away seventeen five-bushel sacks of oats.

Cross-examined. Q. You measured him five bushels more than he asked for - A. As we had no beans, he said I might as well fill the empty sack. I afterwards heard from Enfield that they had only received ten quarters.

GUILTY . Aged 24,

Confined Six Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-191

542. WILLIAM BENNETT was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of January , one shawl, value 2 l. , the goods of Jane Franks , widow .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating it to be the property of John Bundy .

JOHN BUNDY . I am a common carrier to North Mimms ; the prisoner was my servant . I sent him on the 8th or 9th of January, to fetch a parcel for Mrs. Franks, which he brought, and I delivered it to her in the country, but did not know that anything had been taken out. The prisoner absconded.

MARY MORRIS . I am servant to Mrs. Jane Franks , who is a widow. I put a hat and a shawl into a band-box, and delivered it to the prisoner. About three weeks after, I heard the shawl had been taken out.

MARIA TAYLOR . I was with Mrs. Franks in the country. When the box was delivered to me it contained only the hat.

GEORGE LOWTHER . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Tottenham-court-road. On the 8th of January the prisoner pledged the shawl with me, and said that his mother sent him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I beg for mercy.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Confined Three Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-192

543. JOHN DREW was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of March , seven bushels of coals, value 7 s. , the goods of Joseph Kain , George Joseph Kain . and Francis Kain .

MR. ALLEY conducted the prosecution.

JOSEH KAIN. I am a coal-merchant , and am in partnership with George Joseph Kain , and Francis Kain , at Ratcliff-cross. On the 8th of March, about eight o'clock in the evening, my lighterman came to me. I went down to the craft with him, and there saw the prisoner with some others in a boat. They rowed up to my barge, and took some coals out. I followed them ashore, and secured the prisoner with the coals in a bag. The others made off.

Prisoner's Defence. I was waiting for a man, whom I was to look about for, and they took me.

GUILTY . Aged 33.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-193

544. THOMAS BARRON was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of March , 10 lbs. of mutton, value 8 s. the goods of Richard Arnold .

RICHARD ARNOLD . I am a butcher , and live in Henry-street, Pentonville . On Monday evening, the 13th of March, I saw the prisoner come in, and take the mutton off a hook at the back of the shop. He went out, and I secured him with it. He resisted very much, and almost killed me.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-194

545. ELEANOR M'LEAN was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of April , one shift, value 1 s. 6 d.; two aprons, value 1 s., and one chair-cover, value 6 d. , the goods of Richard Venables .

MARY VENABLES . I am the wife of Richard Venables , who is a baker , and lives in Rosemary-lane ; the prisoner was four months in our service. On the 6th of April I missed these things, and got a constable, who found them in her box.

JOHN BOOTLE . I am a constable. I was sent for, and found the property in the prisoner's box - she opened it herself.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Fined One Shilling, and Discharged .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-195

546. JOHN THOMAS was indicted for stealing, on 10th of April , one cloak, value 20 s. , the goods of Ann West , widow .

ANN WEST . I live at the Bull and Ram, in Old-street . On the 10th of April I lost this cloak from the taproom - the prisoner was a stranger.

JOHN MASON . I am a carpenter. I saw the prisoner at the watch-house, and asked him if he knew anything Cabout the cloak? and he told me to go to the Goat and Cherry-tree. I went there, and the property was brought, and put on the taproom table, but I do not know who by - the prisoner was in the watch-house.

SAMUEL SAUNDERS . I am a constable. About ten o'clock on Monday night, I apprehended the prisoner, and one

Jennings at the Goat and Cherry-tree, on suspicion of stealing the cloak. Jennings said the prisoner and another went with him, and the prisoner said,

"It is a nice cloak, and we will have it," and that he left them at the watch-house. He said if I let Jennings go I should do wrong. Jennings was afterwards admitted as an evidence.

WILLIAM JENNINGS . I am a smith, and work for Mr. Madden, who lives in Goswell-street. I was at the Bull and Ram when the prisoner and Waller came in together - I sat in the same box with them. The prisoner said,

"That is a nice cloak - that will do." The other said Yes, it would. I left them there, and went to the Goat and Cherry-tree in the evening. The prisoner came in, and was very tipsy. I said,

"Why, you are tipsy now, and in the morning you said you had no money." He said,

"I have now, for I stole the cloak."

Q. Then you gave him into custody I suppose - A. No, I was taken myself, and when I got to the watch-house I told of it. As we went to Worship-street he told me not to say too much against him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-196

547. JOHN TURNER was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of March , 3 lbs. of bacon, value 2 s. , the goods of Thomas Gammage .

THOMAS GAMMAGE . I am a cheesemonger , and live in King-street, Seven Dials . On the 10th of March I saw the prisoner and another come up to my window, and both take a piece of bacon out. I secured the prisoner about one hundred yards off with one piece.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Three Months , and Publicly Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-197

548. ELIZABETH JENKS was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of April , twenty-six yards of linen cloth, value 3 l. 8 s. , the goods of William Spooner .

WILLIAM SPOONER . I live in Chiswell street, Finsbury . On the 1st of April, between four and five o'clock in the afternoon, I stood at my door - the prisoner was in my shop. My man could not understand what she wanted, and I went in, and asked her what she wanted? several customers were in the shop. She seemed confused, and had a basket under her shawl, in which I found twenty-six yards of Irish linen.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I bought some gingham, and was putting it into my basket, but being intoxicated, in an unguarded moment I took the Irish, of which I sincerely repent.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Confined Two Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-198

549. WILLIAM ROBERT ROW was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of March , the sum of 1 s. 10 d. in monies numbered , the monies of William Spooner .

WILLIAM SPOONER . The prisoner was my shopman , and lived two years and a half with me. On Tuesday, the 23d of March, in consequence of suspicion, I marked the money in the till about eleven or twelve o'clock in the day, and went out about eight at night; I returned about eleven o'clock - the till was not locked - he was my only shopman. I do not know how much money there was in the till. When I came home he was in bed. I did not charge him with the offence till Wednesday night after he had shut up. I then took him up stairs, and asked him what change he had in his pockets? he said he had only one or two shillings. I asked him if he had not got to the amount of a guinea? he said No. I then said,

"William, you have been robbing me - I know better," he made no reply. I said,

"Come, pull it out," and he immediately pulled out 22 s. 6 d. marked, four or five were unmarked. I told him he had increased his stock since last night - he said nothing. There was always sufficient money in the till to give change. On Tuesday night he asked me for 2 s. 6 d., which I owed him, and said he had not got one shilling.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. He sometimes gave the customers change out of his own pocket - A. Never. We had above 16 l. in silver in the till all that day. I sent for the prisoner's father, and allowed him to go away with him, on his father's promise that he should return next day. My loss is above 300 l.

WILLIAM RAE . I am a constable. I took charge of the prisoner; the money was on the table, and I returned him 3 s. 6 d., which was not marked. He claimed that, but not the marked money.

Prisoner. My master humanely forgave me, and told me to come next day, which I did.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-199

550. JOHN RILEY was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of April , one pocket-book, value 10 s., the goods of John Freeman , Esq. from his person .

JOHN FREEMAN , ESQ. I live in Mount-street, Grosvenor-square. On the 3d of April I was in Oxford-street , I accidentally put my hand into my pocket, and missed my pocket-book - it was safe when I left home. I had not seen the prisoner. On Tuesday morning it was brought to me with several of my own cards and memorandums in it.

EDWARD TRANTON . I am a carpenter, and live in Gray-street. On the 3d of April I saw the prisoner put his hand into a gentleman's pocket, at the corner of the Regent's Circus, Oxford-street, and take out a blue morocco pocket-book; he put it under his coat, and came up the Circus to where I stood. I asked him what he had been doing? he answered

"Nothing." I collared him, he knocked me down, I still held him - assistance came, and he was secured. He threw the pocket-book away - I saw Smith pick it up. We took him to Marlborough-street.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. What distance was you from him - A. Six or seven yards. The prosecutor went on; I had not an opportunity of calling him.

THOMAS SMITH . I am a painter. I was at work at the building, and saw Tranton lay hold of the prisoner - they were struggling, and I went to his assistance. Tranton

was on the ground, but still kept his hold. I saw the prisoner throw a blue morocco pocket-book away, and I picked it up.

JOHN WHEELER . The prisoner and pocket-book were given into my charge. I found Mr. Freeman out.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I picked up the pocket-book. The man seized me, and in the struggle it dropped from me.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-200

551. ARTHUR LANGFORD and MICHAEL CORNERY were indicted for stealing, on the 8th of March , one axe, value 2 s. , the goods of Hugh Hussick .

HUGH HUSSICK . I am a sawyer , and work at Mr. Lepenze's, in Shoreditch . I left work at eleven o'clock in the morning of the 8th of February, returned at half-past one, and missed the axe from the saw-pit, I found it next day at Mr. Middleton's gateway - the officer told me to look there for it.

HENRY DYALL . I am a ribbon-weaver, and live in Cumberland-street, Shoreditch. I was about thirty yards from the saw-yard, and saw the prisoners come by the yard towards me - they had nothing with them then. Cornery stopped near me, Langford went back towards the yard. Cornery said

"Go it!" I had hardly turned round before I saw Langford come out of the yard with the axe; they ran away. I went to Lepenze's, and described them. I saw them next day at the office, and knew them again.

CHARLES ALDERMAN . I was at the end of Cumberland-street, and saw Cornery standing by the gate, Langford went into the yard, and brought the axe out; I ran after them, but they got away. I saw them next day at the office, and knew them again. I heard Cornery say

"Go it!"

JOSEPH BIRCH . I am an headborough. I apprehended the prisoners on the 8th of March. Langford said the axe was concealed in Middleton's gateway.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

CORNERY'S Defence. I know nothing about it.

LANGFORD - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Six Months .

CORNERY - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-201

552. THOMAS BURKE was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of March , one pint of cream, value 1 s.; one bason, value 2 d.; three caps, value 2 s.; two pair of stockings, value 2 s.; one handkerchief, value 1 s.; one shirt, value 1 s.; four shawls, value 1 s., and one piece of lace, value 1 s. , the goods of William Barrett .

WILLIAM BARRETT . I am a milkman , and live in William-street, Lisson-grove . On the 5th of March, about four o'clock in the morning, I heard a noise in the area, as if some person had jumped off the rails; I got out of bed, opened my door, and found these things all gone from a cupboard in the area - I could see no person. About six or seven o'clock in the morning I saw the prisoner and another come by, the prisoner had something in his apron. I asked him what he had got? he then ran away. I overtook him, and he dropped the shirt out of his apron. I found the bason in his hat, which had the mark of cream in it. He then took me to some new buildings, and shewed me where he had concealed the towels in a chimney.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I got up about half-past six o'clock in the morning, and found these things lying in the chimney.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-202

553. JOHN ADAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of April , 10 lbs. of sugar, value 10 s. , the goods of Edward Cheekley .

EDWARD CHEEKLEY . I live in Moffat-street, City-road , and am a grocer . On the 18th of April, about twelve o'clock, I was next door, as I returned I saw the prisoner in the shop, with a loaf of sugar under his arm; he ran out. I called to him to bring it back, but he still ran. I followed and secured him.

JAMES WOODCOCK . I saw the prisoner throw the sugar down.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Three Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-203

554. MARY SMITH and ANN WYLEY were indicted for stealing, on the 27th of February , one 1 l. Bank note, and 5 s. 6 d. in monies numbered, the monies of Thomas Holder , from his person .

THOMAS HOLDER . I live in Southampton-court, Holborn, and am a statuary-mason . On Saturday, the 27th of February, about eleven o'clock in the morning, I was standing at the door of No. 6, Lawrence-street, St. Giles's , and going to pay my labourer some money that I owed him. I thought I saw him cross the street, I turned round, and saw the prisoner, Smith, she immediately pushed her hand into my right-hand breeches pocket, and took out a 1 l. note and 5 s. 6 d., and ran into No. 6; the 5 s. 6 d. was wrapped in the note. I followed her into the house, and laid hold of her by her wrist - she handed the money over her shoulder to the other prisoner, who was in the room - (she was not present when it was stolen.) I found it was a bad house. I was going to secure them both, they cried out, and about a dozen more women came in with one man, struck me, cut my eye, rescued them, and beat me out of the house. I fetched a constable and returned, but could find neither of them. In about a quarter of an hour I saw Smith about a hundred yards from the place, and the constable took her - I am positive she is the woman. Wyley came to her at the watch-house, and was secured.

JAMES JORDAN . I am a beadle. Holder applied to me, I went to the house with him, it was full of bad characters, both men and women. I did not find the prisoners then. In about a quarter of an hour we saw Smith - she answered

the description he gave me. She ran from Lawrence-street to Bainbridge-street, I secured her. Wyley followed her to the watch-house, and was secured.

SMITH - GUILTY . Aged 27.

Transported for Life .

WYLEY - NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-204

555. WILLIAM SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of April , one saw, value 2 s. 6 d.; one square, value 3 s.; one rule, value 2 s., the goods of Robert Baleham , and one saw, value 5 s. , the goods of Samuel Allaway .

ROBERT MIDDLETON . I am a carpenter. I was at Claremont-terrace, Islington , about half-past twelve o'clock, when the rest of the men were at dinner. I saw the prisoner come to the back of the houses, go down a ladder into the area, pull his apron off, and go into the building; I and another carpenter secured him as he was coming out with the property.

RICHARD BALEHAM . I left the tools in the building, they are mine.

Prisoner. I was out of work.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18200412-205

556. JOHN JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of April , one pair of breeches, value 12 s. , the goods of George Turner .

MICHAEL TURNER . I am nephew to Mr. George Turner , who is a pawnbroker , and lives in Lower John-street, Grosvenor-square . On the 5th of April the prisoner came to the door, and staid looking at the breeches which hung there, he then unhooked them off the nail, but they still hung on a line. He went out and touched a woman, they both came together to the door, he took them off, and put them under the woman's shawl; she went off, and he came into the shop, and produced a pair of shoes to pledge. I ran by him, and caught the woman in Golden-square with the breeches; I brought her back, and made her produce them. I told her the prisoner was the man who took them. He still remained there, as he did not know I was gone after the woman. I went for an officer, and our foreman let the woman go.

Cross-examined by MR. NORTON. Q. He might have escaped - A. Yes, but he did not see me go out.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. Every word he has said is false. I went to pledge the shoes, he brought a woman in, and charged me with the robbery.

GUILTY . Aged 39.

Confined Six Months and Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18200412-206

557. MARGARET HOLLOWAY was indicted for stealing on the 14th of April , one gown, value 7 s.; one handkerchief, value 2 s.; one pair of shoes, value 6 d.; and one bonnet, value 6 d. , the goods of Sarah Walker .

SARAH WALKER . I live in Elder-walk, Williams'-court, Islington . The prisoner lodged ten days with me. On the 4th of April, at half-past four o'clock in the morning, I went to work in Norfolk-street, and left her asleep. I returned about eight o'clock in the evening, and missed these things off my box by the bed side - she was not at home then. She slept with me. She came home in a half an hour very much in liquor, and abused me very much - she had my bonnet on her head, and my shoes on her feet. I asked her where my things were, and told her if she had pledged them to give me the duplicates. She said she would not, but she would bring them home as she liked. I got a constable who took her. Some duplicates were found on her at the watch-house that related to my property.

CHARLES DOWNER . I am servant to Mr. Thumbleby; who is a pawnbroker, and lives in Old-street-road. On the 4th of April, the prisoner pledged a gown for 18 d. She said it was her own, and she had had it seven years.

GEORGE STOEL . I live with James Drew , a pawnbroker, in Clark's-place, Islington. I took two handkerchiefs in pledge for 16 d., on the 4th of April, from the prisoner. I knew her before.

JAMES FRANKLIN . I searched the prisoner at the watch-house, and found the duplicates on her.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. She was in the habit of lending me things, and I took the liberty to take them as I wanted money.

GUILTY . Aged 38.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18200412-207

558. JOHN HOLDEN was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of April , one marble frieze, value 25 s. , the goods of David Barnes .

DAVID BARNES . I am a surveyor , and live in Change-alley. This marble was taken from a house I had lately built in South-place, Moorfields . I saw it between ten and eleven o'clock in the morning safe in the parlour - it was not fixed. I ordered Crisp to watch the premises, and found the prisoner in custody next day with it.

WILLIAM CRISP . I am a stable-keeper. On the 15th of April, about six o'clock in the evening, I watched the premises till about ten at night. I saw a person come to the corner of the house - two persons came to the end of the building; then the man whom I saw at the corner came to them and gave a whistle. I saw the prisoner put something on his shoulder - he came across the street with the marble on his shoulder. I followed, collared him, and told him he had stolen it from the new building. He said he picked it up coming across Moorfields. I told him I saw him take it up at the corner of the building. Several more came up and said they saw him find it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I found it lying in the fields, and brought it to the corner of the house to see what it was.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined Six Months and Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18200412-208

559. WILLIAM GEORGE was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of April , one shirt, value 18 d., and one pair of stockings, value 6 d. , the goods of the Overseers of the Poor of the parish of Edmonton .

JAMES HARDING . I am master of the poorhouse at Edmonton ; the prisoner was a pauper in the house. On the 3d of April I missed a shirt and a pair of stockings, suspected the prisoner, and found them secreted in his room, where we lock him up every night. They were between the bed and the sacking - he was the only person who slept there.

JAMES MANN . I am a pauper in the house; the prisoner slept in a place by himself. On the 3d of April I was looking out of the window, and saw him take the stockings off the line. I told my master, and he found the shirt and stockings in the prisoner's room.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18200412-209

560. JOHN HICKEY was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of March one handkerchief, value 2 s., the goods of Henry Thornton , the elder , from the person of Henry Thornton , the younger .

The prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18200412-210

561. MARY CLAYSON was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of March , one watch, value 20 s. , the goods of William King .

The prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18200412-211

562. MARIA BISHOP was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of February , from the person of William Walker , one coat, value 40 s.; one pocket-book, value 6 s.; one watch, value 26 s.; one key, value 2 d.; two lbs. of beef, value 1 s., and one 1 l. Bank note, his property .

WILLIAM WALKER . I am a tobacconist , and live in Salter's-street, Cannon-street-road. On Saturday evening, the 25th of February, about seven o'clock, I went to market to buy some beef. About half-past ten o'clock I met this woman in High-street. Whitechapel - I was quite sober. She asked me to go home with her, which I did to Exeter-street , up one pair of stairs - we got there about eleven o'clock, and I went to sleep - no one was there but her. I had my watch, key, and the beef at the time - the beef was taken up stairs, but not dressed. I had not been with any other woman that evening; the door was not bolted. When I awoke, about half-past three o'clock, she was gone. I found the watch, key, beef, and the coat at the watch-house.

ADAM CLEGG . I am a watchman; my beat is in Essex-street, Whitechapel. I know the prisoner, and know the house she lived at. On the 26th of February, about three o'clock in the morning, I saw her coming out of Sugar loaf-court with something in her apron. I asked her what she had got? she said a blanket, but I saw it was a coat and a piece of beef, and stopped her - there was no watch found on her. When I had taken her to the watch-house we searched her room, but found nothing; the bed had not been laid upon. We afterwards went to a room in Sugar-loaf-court, where a companion of her's lodged, and found the prosecutor. We asked him if he had lost anything? he said he did not know. We asked him what clothes he had? he said a great coat and a body coat. As he was getting up he said he had lost his watch, went to the watch-house, and claimed the coat.

SIMON SOLOMON . I was constable of the night; the prisoner was brought to the watch-house with the coat and beef, after which we went to the house in Sugarloaf-court, and found the prosecutor. He complained of having lost his watch and pocket-book with a note; he said the prisoner was the person who picked him up in the street. He did not appear drunk when we found him.

ADAM CLEGG re-examined. I saw the prisoner come out of Sugarloaf-court.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. As I was coming home on Saturday night I met a woman who gave me the coat and piece of beef. The watchman stopped me, and took me to the watch-house.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-212

563. THOMAS ANTHONY was indicted for embezzling the sum of 5 s. 8 3/4 d. , the monies of George Wells .

GEORGE WELLS . I keep the Red Lion, St. John-street-road ; the prisoner came into my employ in November, as pot-boy and general servant . I used to trust him to receive small sums of my customers. I had a good character with him, and he lived three months with me.

ANN TREEBLE . I live at No. 23, Goswell-street-road, and dealt with Mr. Wells. On the 21st of February I paid the prisoner 2 s. for beer; Mr. Wells came afterwards and enquired if had paid him any money. I told him I had. I paid him myself.

MARY LYTE . I live with Mr. Hughes, at Sadler's Wells. I paid 3 s. 2 1/4 d. to the prisoner on the 21st of February, I saw Mr. Wells the same night, and told him I had paid it.

ANN COATES . I live in Northampton-square. I was a customer of Mr. Wells's. I paid the prisoner 6 1/4 d. myself. I saw Mr. Wells three days after, and told him I had paid his servant.

GEORGE WELLS re-examined. It was the duty of the prisoner to account to me for the money he had received, but he never did. He left me on the 21st of February, and left this letter (read) -

"My reasons for leaving you I dare not say, I have no fault to find - what money I owe you I will call and pay. I am obliged to fly for reasons. I have no doubt you will think harsh of me, and it will go as hard with me for so doing, but I dare not tell the reason."

Prisoner's Defence. I had not drawn my wages of my master; I was going to receive my prize-money to make the deficiency good.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Three Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-213

564. JOHN FITZGERALD was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of April , one watch, value 10 s.; two seals, value

30 s., and one watch-key, value 5 s., the goods of Robert Mayne , from his person .

ROBERT MAYNE . I live in the Kent-road, at the floorcloth manufactory. During the chairing of Sir Francis Burdett I attended two ladies to see the chairing in the Haymarket, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I left the ladies there in a coach, and went to Charing-cross on business; on my return, in about a quarter of an hour, a young man passed before me, and made a snatch at my watch - he got it - it had also two seals; I seized him immediately, and held him about half a minute, when I was surrounded by a gang of them. They took him from me after a great resistance. The prisoner bit my thumb; he is not the person who took my watch, but he was one of the party - there were about twelve of them; they came up immediately, and the prisoner bit my finger, which made it bleed freely. I called out for assistance, but there was such a gang of them that the people were afraid to come and help me. I kept hold of the prisoner - they turned out my pockets, and kicked me. I did not lose anything else.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. You were in the crowd - A. No, I was not in the crowd at all - it was in Cockspur-street . I took the prisoner at the time. When I went before the Magistrate I only charged him with an assault, and through the solicitation of his father he was held to bail. After that I went before the Grand Jury, and preferred a charge of felony. I told them the same story I have told you.

Q. What is the reason, after you preferred a charge of assault, that you went before the Grand Jury - A. I heard that he was a bad character. I believe he was found at his own dwelling.

JURY. Q. Is the prisoner the man who bit your hand - A. Yes. He bit the hand that I held the other by, to induce me to let him go.

RICHARD HAYWARD . I am an officer, and live in Coventry-court, Haymarket. I saw two men holding the prisoner, and calling for an officer. Mr. Mayne told me that he had been robbed by a gang - his hand was bit; they did not attempt to molest me. I said he had bit the gentleman's hand. He said the gentleman had nearly choaked him, and he bit him to make him let go.

Cross-examined. Q. It was all over before you came up - A. Yes. When the complaint was made at Marlborough-street Office, the prisoner was remanded for re-examination. He was charged with the same offence as he is now, but there was some little difference on the second examination. The prosecutor did not appear quite so sure of his being the man. He was, with the approbation of the prosecutor, committed into custody for an assault.

COURT. Q. Did he ever say that the man only struck him, or that he was one who attempted to rescue the other - A. He said he tried to rescue the other.

THOMAS GOOK . The prosecutor came to Hicks's Hall and filed a bill for Grand Larceny. I was sent to take the prisoner into custody - he had not surrendered to his bail when he was apprehended. He said he supposed he should go for life. I was not present when he was first apprehended.

Prisoner's Defence. I was with my father; I went into the crowd, and was separated from him. I never struck Mr. Mayne; he took hold of me by the collar - I said

"You will strangle me!" and hit him to make him let go.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-214

565. RICHARD SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of March , one copper, value 15 s. , the goods of William Moore .

WILLIAM MOORE . I am a broker , and live in St. John-street, Smithfield . On the 3d of March I lost a copper; it was on the cellar-flap under the bow window - I saw it safe in the morning, about eleven o'clock, on my return about nine at night it was gone. I found it at Hatton-garden office next day. I never saw the prisoner before.

WILLIAM AIRES . I am fourteen years of age, and lived with Mr. Moore. Some person gave information, I went down Passing-alley, and saw the prisoner with the copper under his arm. I called Stop thief! and he dropped it; I picked it up and brought it home.

THOMAS SIMS . I was in the employ of Mr. Moore. I was told the copper was taken, and went down Passing-alley, where I saw the prisoner with it. There was a person taller than himself with him. I ran after him, he turned down Badger-yard, and then into Berkley-street. The man went down Badger-yard. We found the prisoner behind a door - he had an apron on.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

HENRY MORGAN . I am a patrol of St. Sepulchre's. The two lads told me that the prisoner was down Badger-yard. I found him there behind a door.

Prisoner's Defence. They never saw my face.

WILLIAM AIRES re-examined. Q. Did you ever see the face of the prisoner - A. Yes, he turned round to see if we were near him.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Four Months , and Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-215

566. ANDREW BAXTER was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of April , three handkerchiefs, value 9 s. , the goods of Jacob King .

OSBORNE SPENCER . I live with Mr. King, who is a linen-draper , and lives at No. 111, Long-acre . On the 14th of April, between eleven and twelve o'clock, the prisoner came into the shop, and asked to look at some black silk handkerchiefs; I shewed him some, he wished to see some smaller. He said he had not money sufficient, and would call on Monday and buy them; the price was 4 s. 6 d. While I was looking for the smaller ones he took the three handkerchiefs and put them into his breeches-pocket. I let him go out of the shop, then went after him immediately, and brought him back. He pulled them out of his pocket; they were all in a piece.

JOHN NEWMAN . I was sent for to take charge of the prisoner and handkerchiefs.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I never had them.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Confined Three Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-216

567. ROBERT WYBURN was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of February , one shawl, value 5 s., and one

apron, value 6 d., the goods of Peter Gray , from the person of Mary, his wife .

The prosecutrix did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200412-217

568. JOHN STAPLETON was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of March , one watch, value 20 s., and one handkerchief value 4 s. , the goods of Isaac Medell .

ANN MEDELL . I am the wife of Isaac Medell , we live in Mourning-lane, Hackney . On the 15th of March, between eleven and one o'clock, the watch was safe in a drawer in my room. I was out at work, returned about nine o'clock, and it was gone. I saw it afterwards at a pawnbroker's in Barbican.

ROBERT HUXSON . I am a pawnbroker and live in Barbican. On the 15th of March, in the afternoon, the prisoner pledged the watch with me for 14 s. Mrs. Medell claimed it three or four days afterwards.

JOHN GARVA . I am a constable of Hackney. I apprehended the prisoner on the 25th of March; I told him it was for stealing the watch, he made no reply.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.