Old Bailey Proceedings, 17th February 1820.
Reference Number: 18200217
Reference Number: f18200217-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace Oyer and Terminer, AND Gaol Delivery for the City of London, AND ALSO The Gaol Delivery For the County of Middlesex, HELD AT Justice Hall, in the Old Bailey; ON THURSDAY, 17th of FEBRUARY, 1820, and following Days;

Being the Third Session in the Mayoralty of THE RIGHT HON. GEORGE BRIDGES , LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

Taken in Short-Hand by H. BUCKLER, Basinghall Street, (BY AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON.)

London:

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED, FOR H. BUCKLER, BY T. BOOTH, 31, St. Andrew's Hill, Doctors' Commons.

1820.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX.

Before the Right Honourable GEORGE BRIDGES , Esq. LORD MAYOR of the City of London; Sir Robert Graham , Knt., one of the Barons of his Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir John Richardson , Knt., one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir William Curtis , Bart.: Sir James Shaw , Bart.; Thomas Smith , Esq.; Joshua Jonathan Smith , Esq.; Sir William Domville , Bart, Aldermen of the said City; Sir John Silvester , Bart., D. C. L. Recorder of the said City; Sir Matthew Bloxam , Knt.; Robert Albion Cox , Esq.; John Thomas Thorp , Esq., Aldermen of the said City, Newman Knowlys , Esq. Common Sergeant of the said City, and John Vaillant , Esq. his Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of the Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

London Jury.

David Williamson ,

William Gregg ,

Jeremiah Mitchell ,

John Robinson ,

George Machin ,

Thomas Farrance , Jun.

Peter Low ,

John Leyden ,

Thomas Reynolds ,

William Hoskins ,

Thomas Rumball ,

Richard Parry .

First Middlesex Jury.

James Gates ,

James Hoare ,

James Clark ,

John Todd ,

Charles Slade ,

William Walker ,

Edward Marshall ,

Rupert Kirk ,

Jacob Edwards ,

William Kierns ,

Richard Jones ,

Richard Joy .

Second Middlesex Jury

James, Graham ,

Esquire Dukes ,

George Heneky ,

Thomas Mercer ,

Thomas Ashton ,

Robert Willis Hall ,

Alexander Otterly ,

Charles S. Masterman ,

John Gillies ,

Isaac Francis ,

Thomas Elves

Samuel Dyer .

SESSIONS HOUSE, OLD BAILEY, FEBRUARY 17 *, 1820.

* Wednesday being the day appointed for the interment of our late venerable and beloved Sovereign, the Court did not meet pursuant to adjournment.

BRIDGES, MAYOR. THIRD SESSION.

Reference Number: t18200217-1

350. JOHN LAWRENCE was indicted for feloniously assaulting Sarah Greenstreet on the King's highway, on the 5th of February , putting her in fear, and taking from her person and against her will, three shirts, value 9 s., and seven handkerchiefs, value 5 s., her property .

SARAH GREENSTREET . I am the wife of Edward Greenstreet, and live in Worship-street. On the 5th of February, between seven and eight o'clock at night, I was in Rose and Crown-court, Long-alley , carrying a bundle of linen home which I had to wash; a person came by my side, and threw some snuff in my eye - the bundle was instantly snatched from under my arm by the prisoner. I ran after him, calling Stop thief! and never lost sight of him till he was taken. I laid hold of his coat, and he threw the bundle down - a woman picked it up and gave it to me.

RICHARD YORK . I am a constable. I was in my shop, and heard the cry of Stop thief! - I ran out and saw the prisoner running, a female caught hold of his coat - I stopped him. The prosecutrix came up and gave me the bundle.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I saw something go from the prosecutrix's arms, and ran after the man who took it - they took me.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Of stealing from the person, but not with force and violence.

Confined Six Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18200217-2

351. THOMAS MORLEY was indicted for feloniously assaulting Ebenezer Start , on the King's highway, on the 30th of January , at St. John, Clerkenwell , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, nine silver tops, value 3 l., and one silver desk-plate, value 10 s., the property of John Douglas .

EBENEZER START . I am servant to Mr. Douglas, who lives in Red Lion-street, Clerkenwell. On the 30th of January, about five o'clock in the evening, my master sent me to fetch nine silver castor-tops and a silver desk-plate from Goldsmiths' Hall - I had taken them to be stamped. I was returning with them through Eagle-court, St. John-lane , when the prisoner came up, and held me round the throat with both his hands, while another, who was with him, cut the bag, which I held by the string. He cut the bag in half, and ran away with the bottom half, which contained the silver - it lasted a very short time.

COURT. Q. When the prisoner held you by the throat were you frightened - A. Yes, my Lord. I called out at first, and he then held me tighter. As soon as the other ran off with the bag the prisoner let go, and walked away very fast on the other side of the way - I could not halloo directly, for he hurt my throat. I followed him a little way, and then called Stop thief - Mr. Malcolm stopped him a little way up St. John-street, without my losing sight of him. I was not above a yard from him, and am certain he is the man. I did not see the other man afterwards.

FREDERICK ALEXANDER MALCOLM . About half-past five o'clock in the evening I was coming down St. John-street, and heard Start call Stop thief! I crossed over and stopped the prisoner - it was dark. A mob gathered, and I left him in charge of two young men while I fetched an officer. I did not lay hold of him, but told him to stop, and he did so. Start pointed him out to me.

JOHN DOUGLAS . I am a silversmith, and live in Red Lion-street. On the 30th of January, about half-past four o'clock in the afternoon, I sent my boy to fetch these things from Goldsmiths' Hall; he returned about half-past five o'clock, produced half the bag, and said he had been robbed.

GEORGE MILES . I belong to the Assay Office, Goldsmiths' Hall. I delivered the things to Start about half-past five o'clock in the afternoon - he had brought them in the morning.

WILLIAM PAYN . I am keeper of St. Sepulchre's watch-house. Malcolm fetched me to St. John-street, and I took the prisoner in charge. The boy said he had been robbed, and shewed me the bag - he charged the prisoner with it.

Prisoner's Defence. I conceive there is nothing against me. I am not the person, and there is nothing to support the boy's evidence. Is it to be supposed that a man with a wooden leg could commit a highway robbery? he was asked at the office by what he knew me? - he was mute. A person whispered in his ear,

"Because he has a wooden leg."

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 20.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18200217-3

352. ROBERT GADSDON was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John West , Esq. , about one o'clock in the afternoon, on the 29th of January , at St. Marylebone, (Harriet his wife, and others being therein), and stealing therein one shawl, value 20 s. , the goods of Sarah Griffiths .

SARAH GRIFFITHS . I am servant to Mr. John West , who lives in Baker-street, Portman-square, St. Marylebone . On the 29th of January, about one o'clock, I was in the house; Mrs. West, and five of the servants were at home. My shawl laid on a table in the housekeeper's room, opposite the window which looks into the area - it was about a quarter of a yard from the window - the sash was down; nobody was in the room. I was up stairs, heard an alarm, came down, missed it, and found the prisoner in custody. It is worth 1 l.

WILLIAM LEDGER . I am servant to Mr. West. I had been out to fetch some water, and as I returned I saw the prisoner down the area - he was a stranger. I watched him, saw him lay a bundle of wood on the ledge of the window, lift up the sash, and with a stick that had a hook to it, he drew out the shawl off the table, put it under his jacket, and walked on into the passage of the house. I ran down stairs, secured him in the passage, and saw him throw the shawl down.

RICHARD COATES . I am a constable. I was sent for, and took the prisoner at Mr. West's, with the shawl.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I went to see if they wanted any wood; the shawl laid on the window-ledge, and I carried it into the passage. He took me, and it fell from my hand.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 22.

Recommended to Mercy.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18200217-4

353. JOHN BELSTEAD was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of James Anderson , about twelve o'clock at noon, on the 27th of January , at St. Ann, Westminster, (he and others being therein), and stealing therein two bed curtains, value 13 s.; two valences, value 4 s; one looking-glass, value 3 s, and two pictures, value 2 s., his property .

MARGARET ANDERSON . I am the wife of James Anderson ; we live in Moor-street, St. Ann's, Westminster - we let the back room on the second floor to the witness Youren. On Thursday, the 27th of January, a little before one o'clock in the day, I was coming down stairs, found his room door open, and saw the prisoner in the room with a bundle in his hand, or his hand on the bundle, which contained the articles stated in the indictment - he tried to pass me. I saw that the sheets, pillows, quilt, curtains, and valences were stripped off the bed; he had put them into the pillow-case. He also had a bundle with two pillows, some pictures, and a looking-glass, which were my husband's property.

Q. Where was the pillow-case - A. On the bed - the room is very small. He passed me as far as the stairs, but I called Stop thief! and Youren seized him; he said he would not flinch, and did not attempt to go further; he had left every thing on the bed - I had made the bed not half an hour before, left the door locked, and took the key into the top room until Youren came for it. We both came down stairs together; he put the key to the door, and found it was open - I had left the things in their proper places. The street door was left open.

THOMAS YOUREN . I am a currier, and occupy part of a back room at Anderson's; I went out between eight and nine o'clock, and gave her the key to make the bed. I returned home a little before twelve o'clock, went up to her room for the key, and she came down with me. I put the key to the door, and it flew open; it was unlocked, and the prisoner was there - he either had his hand on the bundle, or the bundle in his hand. While I turned round to the landlady he came out of the room, and passed me; she cried out Stop thief! and I seized him directly. I found the room stripped of every thing, the pictures taken off the wall, and the curtains off the bed; I found a bundle and a pillow-case in the room containing the property - he appeared agitated. I asked him how he got into the room? and he gave me some keys, one of which opens the door. There is a door from the front room into mine, that was locked and bolted.

WILLIAM BRAND . I am a constable. I took the prisoner in charge, and found a bundle of small keys on him; some others were given to me by Youren, one of which opens the door.

MARGARET ANDERSON re-examined. A young man lodges in the front room; the door between them was padlocked and bolted.

Prisoner. I was in the utmost distress, and have had no work since July last. I put myself entirely on the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 25.

Recommended to Mercy.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Richardson.

Reference Number: t18200217-5

354. WILLIAM SIMONS was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of February , at St. George, Hanover-square, in the dwelling-house of Thomas Mason , one sovereign, one 5 l., and one 1 l. Bank notes, the property of James Hutchins .

JAMES HUTCHINS . I am servant to Mr. Dashfoot, who lives at Sidmouth. I lodged at the house of Mr. Mason, who keeps the Plume of Feathers, Grosvenor-place, St. George's ; I had been there three weeks. I had a pocketbook with 20 l. and one sovereign in it, in my portmanteau. On the 8th of February I was going to return to Sidmouth; I went to my room, unlocked my portmanteau, and missed a 5 l. and a 1 l. note, and a sovereign from my pocket-book. The 5 l. note was No. 12163. I had not counted my money after the second day after I arrived - my portmanteau was forced open; I called Mason up and told him - the prisoner lodged in the house, he belongs to the 19th regiment of Lancers . I locked the door, returned about six or seven o'clock in the evening, and Mason said he suspected the prisoner - he was in the taproom drinking and treating all the soldiers. I went into the taproom, and he asked me to drink. I sat there twenty minutes, and saw him take a purse full of silver out of his pocket - I saw some paper in it. Soon after I went to Mr. Griffin's, who keeps the Goat, public-house, at Pimlico, and saw the prisoner there. I slipped back that he should not see me, and called Mrs.

Griffin into the parlour to speak to her. I got information from her, and found my 5 l. note next morning at Mr. Goding's. I knew it by the number.

THOMAS MAITLAND . I am the son of Mrs. Griffin - I do not know the prisoner. On the 6th of February I changed a 5 l. note for a man, whom I do not exactly recollect; he was not in a soldier's dress. I gave him four 1 l. notes, all of which I endorsed; I also endorsed the 5 l. note, and put it in the till. I paid it to Mr. Goding's clerk, a brandy merchant, on the 8th. I asked the person who it was for? he said it was for Adjutant Glanville, his master.

EDWARD EAMES . I am clerk to Mr. Goding. I produce a 5 l. note, which I had received on the 8th of February from Mrs. Griffin.

THOMAS MAITLAND re-examined. It has my endorsement

"Adjutant Glanville" on it - it is the same note; here are two notes which were found on the prisoner. They are two of those that I gave to the person - they are endorsed 6 - 2.

ALFRED POPLE . I am a constable. On the 9th of February, about eleven o'clock in the morning, I apprehended the prisoner at Adjutant Glanville's, his master, at upper Eaton-street, Pimlico; he said he knew nothing about it. I found two 1 l. notes, and 14 s. on him.

JAMES HUTCHINS re-examined. The 5 l. note is mine. My portmanteau was torn and cut at the top, so that an arm could be got in.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 19.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18200217-6

355. WILLIAM PIERCE and EDWARD WILLIAMS were indicted for stealing, on the 13th of January , at St. Giles's in the Fields, six blankets, value 30 s., the goods of John Harris Heal , privately in his shop .

JOHN HARRIS HEAL . I keep a bedding warehouse in Tottenham-court-road . On the 13th of January, about eight o'clock in the evening, I was in the back room, and heard something fall in the shop. I went into the shop, and missed some blankets off a pile of goods, about two yards from the door; they could not be reached without coming into the shop. I went to the door; Gwynn came up, and asked me if I had sent any blankets out? I said No. He then told me to follow him up a mews which is three doors from my house, which is no thoroughfare, and behind the wall of a stable we found the prisoners tying up the blankets; we secured and took them to the watch-house - they are worth 30 s.

ROBERT GWYNN . I saw the prisoners and another man in Tottenham-court-road between eight and nine o'clock in the evening; Pierce was carrying some blankets before him; they were about two doors from Heal's shop; one of them said,

"Cross over the road." I saw them turn up Alfred mews, and told Heal; we secured the prisoners behind the wall - the other was gone. Pierce said if I would let him go he would fetch the man who took them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

MARGARET BROWN . I am Heal's servant. I saw the prisoners lurking about the house shortly before the blankets were stolen.

PIERCE'S Defence. A man told me to carry them. He took me down the mews, and gave me a handkerchief to tie them in. We were taken, and the man went off.

JOHN HARRIS HEAL re-examined. I saw nobody else in the mews.

PIERCE - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 16.

WILLIAMS - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged. 16.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18200217-7

356. JOHN HORWOOD and JOHN BLANCHARD were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Diana Matilda Dedrick , about three o'clock in the night of the 27th of January , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, 2 lbs. of butter, value 2 s.; 3 lbs. of bacon, value 2 s.; 3 lbs. of beef, value 2 s.; two loaves of bread, value 18 d., and one Venetian blind, value 2 s., her property .

DIANA MATILDA DEDRICK . I live in Nottingham-street, St. Marylebone . On the 27th of January, about half-past three o'clock in the morning, I heard a noise at the staircase window - I then heard a noise like somebody being in the house. I went to the back bedroom window, and saw a man with a jacket on crawling on the wall - I then called the watchmen. They searched the house, but found nobody there. Some victuals was taken from the safe in the back area - it was not taken away. The sash of the staircase window was broken down, and the Venetian blind taken away. The shutters do not go to the top - they were fast. There were footmarks on the shutter, as if some person had slidden down.

SIMEON HIGGINS . I am a watchman. I heard the alarm, went into a small court, and secured Blanchard in a stone-yard, next to Mrs. Dedrick's garden - he was walking towards the wall - he said he came there to sleep.

JOHN HUTCHINSON . I am a watchman. I heard the alarm, went to the house, and found the victuals in the middle of the area. The window-shutter was daubed with dirt, as if a person had been sliding down - the Venetian blind between the shutter and window was torn away; there was room for a person to get over the top of the shutter. A pane of glass was broken, and the bolts drawn aside. There were also dirty footmarks on the stairs and landing-place.

HAROLD CLARKE . I am a watchman. I went to the back of the house, and traced the print of a man's foot over the prosecutrix's wall. I found Horwood concealed behind a privy-door in the next garden. He said he heard the alarm, and got there out of the way. He was dressed in a light jacket.

RICHARD COATES . I was constable of the night. The prisoners were brought to the watch-house. I went to the house next day, and traced the footmarks from the stone-yard to a leaden flat, about a yard below the staircase window. A pane of glass was broken opposite the fastening of the window, and the top sash pulled down. There were footmarks on the stairs and landing-place.

HORWOOD'S Defence. I went there to sleep.

BLANCHARD'S Defence. I went there to rest.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18200217-8

357. SARAH RAWLINS was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of February , 11 yards of sarsnet, value 49 s, the goods of Mary Colls , in her dwelling-house .

MICHAEL SMITH . I am shopman to Mary Colls, who is a linen-draper , and lives in Grace's-alley, Whitechapel . On the 11th of February the prisoner came to the shop with another woman, and looked at some prints - none would suit them. I saw the prisoner take the piece of sarsnet out of the window, put it on a chair, and conceal it under her clothes. I followed her out of the shop, brought her back, and took it from her - it cost 49 s.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I did not take it.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only.

Confined Two Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Richardson.

Reference Number: t18200217-9

358. GEORGE HEARD was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of February , one great coat, value 5 l., the goods of George Anthony Goad ; one great coat, value 1 l., and one handkerchief, value 1 s. , the goods of Thomas Dancer .

THOMAS DANCER . I am master of the Southgate coach , which starts from the Four Swans' yard, Bishopsgate-street . On the 5th of February I missed Mr. Goad's coat off the boot, and saw the prisoner behind another coach with it it in his hand. I made him pick it up and take it into the house, and found he had another coat on his back, which belonged to me.

JOSEPH GREGORY . I took the prisoner in charge, and found two silk handkerchiefs on him; also a silk handkerchief in Dancer's coat. As we went to the watch-house another handkerchief fell from his trowsers, and I saw another coming out of the bottom of his trowsers; I found a third in his trowsers - the prosecutor said he also lost a blue coat. I went to the watch-house, and the prisoner came up without a coat, but he had it on when I took him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. Two of the handkerchiefs are mine; the other three were thrown away by two lads.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18200217-10

359. JOHN WALLANS was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of February , six handkerchiefs, value 1 l. 5 s. , the goods of George Wright .

JAMES JOHNS . I am apprentice to Mr. George Wright , who is a linen-draper . On the 8th of February, about nine o'clock in the evening, Morgan called me, pointed the prisoner out, and said he had taken some handkerchiefs out of the window. I collared him, and as I brought him back he dropped them, and Morgan picked them up. I gave him in charge.

HENRY MORGAN . I saw the prisoner walk by, put his hand into the window, and take the handkerchiefs out. I went and told the shopman, and then saw him drop them. I picked them up, and gave them to the shopman.

PATRICK CASSIDAY . I saw the prisoner pull the handkerchiefs half-way out; the patrol came by, and he ran to the other side. We watched him, and Morgan saw him take them out. A pane of glass was taken out.

DAVID M'COMBIE. I am an officer. I took charge of the prisoner, found 11 s. 6 d. on him, and a knife which appears to have been used in cutting a window. It fits the dents in the window.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. There was a crowd at the shop; I went to see what was the matter, and they said I stole the handkerchiefs.

GUILTY . Aged 42.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18200217-11

360. MARY LYNCH was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of January , one watch, value 8 l.; one chain, value 10 s.; two seals, value 30 s., and one key, value 5 s., the goods of Thomas William Henry Brandon , from his person .

THOMAS WILLIAM HENRY BRANDON . On the 19th of January, about five minutes after ten o'clock at night, I was at the corner of Plough-court, Fetter-lane ; I was returning home, and had occasion to stop in Plough-court. I live in Fetter-lane, within three doors of the court. The prisoner came up, and asked me for drink - I had my watch when I spoke to her; when I got home I missed it, and found it the next morning at Guest's in Fleet-market. I am certain the prisoner is the woman who spoke to me.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not go home with me - A. I did not - I positively assert I did not.

MARGARET LYNCH . As I was standing in Fleet-market Mrs. Weir sent for me, and said she was short in her rent, and was ashamed to pledge herself. She gave me the watch, and I pledged it for her for four guineas at Guest's. The prisoner did not give it to me.

Q. She is your namesake - A. Yes, but no relation. Weir gave me the number of the place where she lived; I know nothing of the prisoner except seeing her in the market - I cannot tell where she lived. I pledged it in my own name.

Q. When you went to the pawnbroker's did you say it was your own property - A. No, I said it belonged to a person who wanted to make up some rent. I did not say it was my husband's - Weir said she lived at No. 3, Plough-court.

WILLIAM STEVENS . I am apprentice to Mr. Guest, who is a pawnbroker, and lives in Fleet-market. On the 20th of January, between eleven and twelve o'clock, the last witness pledged a gold watch with me. She said at first that it was her husband's, then that it belonged to a gentleman; I suspected her, but I thought a gentleman might have sent her - she never mentioned the name of Weir. I did not ask her where she lived, as I knew her.

CHARLOTTE HAWKINS . Mr. Brandon lodged at my house - on the 19th of October he came home perfectly sober at a very few minutes after ten o'clock.

GEORGE CORBY. On the 20th of January, in the evening, Mr. Brandon applied to me, stating that he had lost his watch, and had found where the prisoner lived who had robbed him. We went with Lynch, the witness, who shewed us which house the prisoner lived at - it was No. 3, Plough-court. I took the prisoner to the Compter, returned and took Mrs. Weir, and afterwards took the witness Lynch.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutor went home with me, and was three-quarters of an hour there. In about half an hour afterwards I found the watch in my room, and shewed it to Weir - she said if the gentleman called she would give it to him, but it being left in her house she had the best right to it.

GUILTY . Aged 29.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18200217-12

361. JOHN JACOBS was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of February , one cart harness, value 10 s. , the goods of George Blakeley .

MICHAEL DURGON . I am porter to George Blakeley . On the 2d of February I was looking out of the warehouse window, and saw a strange man go towards the stable-door - I sent Rees down, returned to the window, and saw the prisoner come out of the stable with the harness on his shoulder. Some words passed between him and Rees; he threw the harness down and ran away - I am sure he is the man.

JOHN REES . I am Durgon's fellow-servant, he sent me down to the stable; I went towards the door, saw it open, and heard the harness being taken down - the prisoner came out with it on his shoulder and walked by me. I said,

"What are you going to do with that harness?" he said he was going to take them, and asked if they belonged to me? I said Yes - he said,

"There they are for you; don't take me - good luck to you let me go!" He ran off, and I pursued, calling Stop thief. He was stopped without my losing sight of him.

JOSEPH GREGORY . I took the prisoner in charge - he had a bag with half a quartern loaf in it.

Prisoner. I was greatly distressed.

GUILTY . Aged 32.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18200217-13

362. WILLIAM KIGELL was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of January , one pair of shoes, value 2 s. , the goods of John Davison .

WILLIAM DOWLING . I am apprentice to John Davison , who is a shoemaker , and lives in Field-lane, Holborn . On the 20th of January, about nine o'clock, I saw the prisoner take a pair of shoes off the ledge of the window - I ran out and two men stopped him; the shoes were found on him.

JOHN MARCHANT . I live three doors from Davison. I heard the cry of Stop thief, and ran out; the prisoner was stopped, and I found the shoes on him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Confined Three Months , and Whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18200217-14

363. GABRIEL CUSSELL was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of January , nine live tame pigeons, price 20 s., and two live tame rabbits, price 6 s. , the property of Gibson Hynson .

GIBSON HYNSON. I am a hop-porter , and live in Bermondsey-street, Borough . On the 22d of January my shed was broken open, and nine pigeons and two rabbits stolen - I found them in Leadenhall-market that morning.

DAVID HART . On the 22d of January Hynson fetched me to Mr. Weston's shop, where we found eight pigeons, which he claimed. Weston said he bought them of a boy named Haynes, who lived in Grange-walk, for 7 s. Edwards came up and said he had bought one of a boy named Dawson, and had sold it to Graham.

JOHN GRAHAM . Edwards sold me a pigeon for 1 s. in the market.

JAMES WESTON . Dawson and another lad sold me eight pigeons alive for 7 s. I believe the prisoner was the other lad, but will not swear to him. He said his name was Haynes, and that he lived in Grange-walk.

JOHN EDWARDS . I bought a pigeon of Dawson for 9 d., and sold it to Graham - nobody was with him.

WILLIAM DAWSON . My father deals in fowls in the market. On the 22d of January the prisoner, whose name is Smith, came and asked me to buy some pigeons - I said I would take him to a person who I thought would buy them. Another boy was with him, who had the pigeons; Weston bought them of him. I opened the bag to look at them, and one flew out; I afterwards caught it and sold it to Edwards.

WILLIAM ALLEN . I am servant to Weston. Dawson brought the pigeons in a bag - he said he would fetch the boy to whom they belonged, to see if he would take the money - he brought the prisoner, who said there had been nine, but one was lost.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I did not steal them - the other lad had the money.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18200217-15

SECOND DAY, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 18.

364. PHILIP BURN was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of January , two sheets, value 8 s.; two pillow-cases, value 2 s.; one shirt, value 2 s.; two shifts, value 2 s.; two jackets, value 3 s.; four neckcloths, value 4 s.; four bed-gowns, value 5 s.; two handkerchiefs, value 5 s.; three towels, value 3 s.; one table-cloth, value 3 s.; four collars, value 2 s., and one pair of trowsers, value 3 s. , the goods of George Young .

GEORGE YOUNG . I am a hair-dresser , and live in Wigmore-street, Cavendish-square. On the 24th of January I gave these things to my laundress.

RICHARD VALENTINE . My grandmother is a laundress. On the 24th of January I was in Cumberland-street , with this bundle on a barrow, a young man came up and asked the way to Portland-street? I turned round to shew him, and on my turning again I missed the prosecutor's bundle off the barrow, which I had received that morning. A man came up and said a person had run through the Park with it, I followed, and saw the prisoner drop it. He was taken by a soldier before I lost sight of him - the prisoner is the man who dropped it.

ROBERT TILLING . I was standing in Great Cumberland-street - a man went up to the last witness and asked him a question; the prisoner crossed over, took the bundle off the barrow, and walked into the Park with it - I told the boy.

SAMUEL SMITHERS . I am a soldier. I was crossing Hyde Park about one o'clock in the day, and heard the cry of Stop thief - I turned round and saw the prisoner running; I stopped him, and asked what he had been doing? he said,

"Nothing at all," but he was afraid of injuring his character. I told him to go back, he said he would not, and I took him back - we met Valentine with the bundle of linen under his arm. Tilling said he saw him take it. I took him to the watch-house.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I saw a man put it behind the door, I took it up, and they charged me with the theft.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18200217-16

365. JOHN ROTHERY was indicted for the wilful murder of Thomas Coakley .

WILLIAM BODDY . On the 1st of February I worked at Mr. Jones's iron-manufactory, Shadwell ; the prisoner and the deceased, Coakley, worked there also - the prisoner was overseer of the workmen . I saw the prisoner and Coakley at work together at seven o'clock in the morning. I went to where they worked again at half-past seven o'clock - Coakley was blowing the forge fire; the prisoner took two pieces of iron out of the fire with a pair of tongs, which were to be welted together, they were six or seven inches long, he had them in his hand; the deceased came to strike them with the hammer to welt them - I heard no quarrelling between them. I then observed the prisoner poke one piece of iron at him. I cannot say whether it struck him or not.

Q. Did he appear to do it angrily or in a jest - A. I saw no appearance of anger, my Lord; the deceased was close by the anvil. A skirmish immediately ensued, and they fell, the prisoner undermost; I do not know what became of the iron. They both got up, and I separated them - I saw no blows pass then; I did not hear Coakley complain. After I had separated them the prisoner struck him with his fist, they then had another scuffle, and both fell on a chest under the bellows. I went away to work in another part of the premises, and left them scuffling - I thought they might fight it out. I returned in about five minutes, and saw Povey talking to Coakley. I told the prisoner I thought it very wrong to push the hot iron at him - he made no answer. I did not then hear the deceased complain.

HENRY POVEY , JUN. I worked at the manufactory. Between seven and eight o'clock in the morning a lad about thirteen years old came to me, and said Rothery and Coakley were fighting. I followed the lad, and saw them laying on a box under the bellows; the deceased then lay on the prisoner - his hands were under the prisoner's neck. I lifted the deceased off, and advised them in a peaceable manner to leave off.

Q. Were any iron instruments about them then - A. The prisoner had his hand over a box which had old iron in it. Near the place where they fell there is an iron rod about three feet high, which is drove into the ground with a branch standing out, which has a point to it to hold a lamp on; this was bent nearly double. I supposed they had fell on it and bent it. Coakley did not complain of being hurt then. I left them sitting together.

HENRY POVEY . A little after six o'clock in the morning, I went into the smiths' shop; the deceased was then smoaking his pipe - the prisoner had a good deal of work to do, and could not get him to assist. I remonstrated with him on the impropriety of his conduct, and said if he did not assist he should go about his business; he then began to blow the bellows, and I went into the adjoining shop. The boy ran and said they were fighting. I rather thought it was a fit, as the deceased was subject to fits every week, and the prisoner had a great deal of trouble in rendering him assistance in these fits. I went, and found my son parting them; the prisoner was underneath on a box, with his head hanging over the box; the deceased was on the top of him, and appeared to be holding him by the throat. My son pulled him off; he took no notice of his being hurt. I tried all I could to persuade him to go to work, instead of which he went up into the hayloft. I was in the yard about half an hour after, and he came out of the loft. I asked him why he did not go to work or go home? he immediately went home; I took no notice of any thing being the matter then, except a bruise on the nose, which might be occasioned by the fall. I went into the shop to the prisoner, and saw that he had a black eye; he worked two years for my master, and was very attentive to the prisoner when he had fits: He was the most sober and the most humane man I ever knew.

MR. JOHN BRADY . I am a student, and practice as a surgeon at the London Hospital. On the 1st of February the deceased was brought to the hospital. I found him sitting on the bed, stripped him, and examined his wound, which was above the groin; it appeared like a burn, as if it had been done with a hot instrument, about a quarter of an inch broad - he died next day. I opened him; the wound had passed quite into the cavity of the abdomen, and through two portions of the intestines. The inflamation produced by it was sufficient to occasion death; an inflamation took place in the bowels. The external wound appeared very slight.

Q. Could you trace the progress of the wound into the bowels - A. Yes my Lord, it appeared to have been done with a blunt instrument; I did not observe his clothes or his shirt. If they had been burnt I think it would have struck me.

Q. All the internal symptoms were those of inflamation, which might be occasioned by cold as well as heat - A. Yes my Lord, but there was the appearance of a dreadful burning; the part where it had penetrated was quite destroyed.

Q. If a person received a wound of that sort, do you consider it possible for him to stand for hours on his legs, and struggle with his antagonist - A. It does not appear to me possible that he could stand.

JOHN WEAL . I am an officer of Shadwell. I apprehended the prisoner on the morning of the 2d of February at work. I told him I had come to fetch him, for the

young man he had burnt the day previous was dead; he appeared a good deal affected. I took up a poker, and asked him if he stabbed him with that? He moved several pieces of iron which lay on the forge, picked out two pieces, which I produce, and said it was with a piece similar to those.

Prisoner's Defence. I do not know that I burnt him; I attempted to frighten him away because he would not work - I do not think I touched him with the iron. He hit me on the arm with his hammer, and I struck him.

GUILTY .

Confined One Month .

Of Manslaughter only.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18200217-17

366. GEORGE STEWART , ALBINE COOK, WILLIAM OWEN , JOHN COATES , WILLIAM SCOTT , JAMES LANG , MICHAEL LAMBERT , THOMAS PHILLIPS , WILLIAM QUIN , JAMES RILEY , JAMES ARCHBALD , HENRY LEWIS , THOMAS MARTIN , HENRY BUCKNELL , WILLIAM HARRIS , ANN FARRELL , SARAH FARRELL , MARY GOULD , SUSAN MARR , MARY JONES , DANIEL LUCAS , JOHN CURTIS , ANN CURTIS , WILLIAM ROSE , MARY HEARD , and JOHN CARTER were severally and separately indicted for having in their custody and possession, forged Bank notes, knowing them to be forged .

To which indictments the prisoners severally and separately pleaded GUILTY .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18200217-18

367. GEORGE STEWART , ALBINE COOK , WILLIAM OWEN , JOHN COATES , WILLIAM SCOTT , JAMES LANG , MICHAEL LAMBERT , THOMAS PHILLIPS , WILLIAM QUIN , JAMES RILEY , JAMES ARCHBALD , HENRY LEWIS , THOMAS MARTIN HENRY BUCKNELL , WILLIAM HARRIS , ANN FARREL , SARAH FARREL , MARY GOULD , SUSAN MARR , MARY JONES , DANIEL LUCAS , JOHN CURTIS , ANN CURTIS , WILLIAM ROSE , MARY HEARD , and JOHN CARTER were again indicted for forgery .

MR. BOLLAND for the Prosecution, declined offering any evidence.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18200217-19

368. CHARLES ELLIOTT was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of February , at St. Marylebone, six handkerchiefs, value 1 l., the goods of Martha Blakeman , widow , privately in her shop .

MARTHA BLAKEMAN . I am a widow, and keep a haberdasher's shop in Oxford-street , in the parish of St. Marylebone. On the 8th of February, about eleven o'clock in the morning, I was in my back parlour adjoining the shop - the folding-doors between the shop and the parlour were open; I saw a boy run out - nobody was in the shop. I followed the boy, and as I ran through the shop I missed five silk handkerchiefs and one cotton one; he must have crept under the counter to the end of the window to take them - they could not have been reached without creeping under the counter; I had put them there that morning. I followed him into the street, crying Stop thief! and Rickman secured him. I saw him all the way up the street till he turned the corner. I am sure he is the boy; Rickman was pursuing the boy who ran out of the shop. He brought the prisoner back, and the handkerchiefs were found in his hat - they cost me 5 s. each.

TIMOTHY RICKMAN. I am constable of St. Marylebone. I was standing in my shop, which is about thirty-six yards from Blakeman's, heard the cry of Stop thief! and ran out - the prisoner ran by my door. I pursued, and secured him about six yards off. I found the handkerchiefs in his hat.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

THOMAS BLAKEMAN . I am the prosecutrix's son. I saw the handkerchiefs found in the prisoner's hat. I was down stairs when they were taken.

Prisoner's Defence. I heard the cry, and saw a little boy about my size going along; he dropped the handkerchiefs. I told him he had dropped them; he said,

"Never mind, keep them," and I put them into my hat.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 9.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Richardson.

Reference Number: t18200217-20

369. WILLIAM SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of February , at St. Mary, Whitechapel, two cows, price 36 l. , the property of William Morris .

WILLIAM MORRIS . I am a farmer , and live at Lee, in Kent , about seven miles from town. On Wednesday, the 9th of February, I missed two cows, and saw them on the Friday following at Joseph Martin 's of Mile End. I had issued hand-bills, offering a reward for them. I am certain they are mine.

JAMES MARTIN . I work for Mr. Morris. On the 9th of February, in the morning, I missed two cows, and found them at Martin's. I am certain they are my master's.

JOSEPH MARTIN . I am a cow-keeper, and live at Mile End; I know the prisoner perfectly well. On the 9th of February, between six and seven o'clock in the morning, I saw him in Whitechapel-road driving two cows, one was black and white, and the other red - he was crossing the road. I asked him where he was going to with the cows? he said to sell them at Romford-market. I asked him what he would have for the red cow? he said 10 l., and 14 l. for the other. I said if he would drive them into my yard, I would look at them; he drove them in, and I asked him where he came from? he said he came from Camberwell, and his name was William Smith . I said I would give him 20 l. for them both, but he must call for the money at five o'clock in the afternoon. He said they belonged to his father, who was seized on, and he sold them to make up a sum - he went away. When daylight came, on examining them I found they were worth much more money - I hired a horse, rode over to Camberwell, and enquired for Mr. Smith, but could find no such a man. On my return I found Freeman had been to see me about them. I went to Lambeth-street Office to him, and stated the particulars. By agreement, he came to my house at four o'clock, and waited there till a little after five, when the prisoner came for the money. I told him I had been to Camberwell, and found no such person there as Smith. He asked me why I did not tell him in the morning that I was going, and he would have gone with me to satisfy me.

Freeman then asked him where he got the cows from? he told the same story, and was taken into custody.

FRANCIS FREEMAN . I went to Martin's on Wednesday morning, understanding that two cows had been sold under suspicious circumstances; I found them there - Martin was not at home! he afterwards came to me, and desired me to come at four o'clock. I went, and waited till about five minutes after five o'clock, when the prisoner came. Martin said,

"You have come for your money are you? I don't much approve of my bargain; I have been to Camberwell, and made every inquiry, but can find no such person as William Smith ." He said,

"If you had told me you were going I would have gone with you, you have not been to the right place, or you would have found it." I then asked him whose property they were? he said they were the property of his father, William Smith , down a lane, near the Red Cap, Camberwell-green - I took him into custody. He said his father was in difficulties, and he was selling them to make up a sum. On Friday I found they belonged to Morris.

Prisoner's Defence. I was looking for a job, and met a man in the Kent-road, who said if I would meet him at the Bull, in Kent-street, between five and six o'clock in the morning, he would give me a job - I met him. He said he was going to Romford, and told me to drive them through Whitechapel, and if any one asked me where I was going to, I was to say to Romford-market. I met this man, sold them to him for 20 l., and said they belonged to my father. I saw the man again, and he sent me for the money.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 24.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18200217-21

370. ROBERT SMITH was indicted for feloniously assaulting Edwin Weller on the King's highway, on the 14th of January , at St. Dunstan, Stepney , putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, one watch, value 5 l., and one key, value 6 d., his property .

EDWIN WELLER . I am a seaman , and live at Limehouse. On the 14th of January, between ten and eleven o'clock at night, I was going along High-street, Shadwell - I was a little intoxicated, but not much. The prisoner took hold of my arm, and began talking about the roads being bad, and said he would help me along; I was walking steadily along I am certain. We walked on past Shadwell Office, he having hold of my arm; in passing Ratcliff-cross, some person from the footpath crossing the road, struck me a blow on my left temple, which knocked me down, and the prisoner fell on the top of me; in raising up again I found his hand taking my watch from my fob - I felt him doing it as he laid on the top of me. The man who knocked me down stood up by me; I am sure it was the prisoner's hand at my fob - I felt the watch go from my pocket while we were on the ground together; we rose up together and proceeded forward - I laid hold of his arm; the other man ran off before we got up. I observed to the prisoner that the man had run away with my watch; he said he saw him run up Butcher-row - I saw nothing pass between them; we then proceeded to my house. About 150 yards from my house another man came up and talked to him, then took hold of my arm, and we all three walked home together.

Q. How came you to observe to the prisoner that the other man had run away with your watch - A. I knew the prisoner had taken it, but I did not want to charge him with it until I got home, as I knew an officer who lived near me; I thought he might escape before I could give him in charge. When I got home I called the watchman, gave him in charge, and went to the watch-house with him myself; I was quite able to recollect what passed, and am quite sure the prisoner took the watch from my fob.

JOHN LINES . I was constable of the night at Limehouse; Weller and a watchman brought the prisoner to the watch-house; he said his name was Richard Smith , that his father lived at No. 10, Pell-street, Ratcliff, and that he himself lived at No. 14, Colchester-square, Whitechapel. I found no such person at either place; there was a Mr. Smith in Pell-street, but not his father. Weller appeared by his countenance to have been drinking, but walked very steadily, and signed the book very well.

Prisoner's Defence. It was a slippery night; I went home with him, and he said I robbed him.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 22.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Richardson.

Reference Number: t18200217-22

371. JOHN WILLIAMS and SARAH POWELL were indicted for feloniously assaulting James Graham , on the King's highway, on the 4th of February , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, 1 l. and 4 d. in monies numbered, the monies of David Miller .

JAMES GRAHAM . I am servant to Mr. Miller. On the 4th of February, about half-past three o'clock in the afternoon, I was coming through Cowheel-alley, Redcross-street , with 1 l. in silver, and 14 s. 8 d. in copper in my basket; Powell and another man ran up the alley, and pretended to be playing - they made a stoppage, so that I could not pass - Williams and some others came behind me, pulled my basket off my shoulder, put his hand in, and took 1 l. of silver out, and then all ran away. They were afterwards apprehended. I am sure Williams is the boy. Powell was brought to my master's shop in about half an hour, and some money found on her. I knew her again.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. Powell did nothing - A. No, only stopped up the passage.

JOSEPH PRINCE . I am an officer. On the 4th of February I went in search of the prisoners from the description the boy gave me. I took Williams - he was dressed in sweep's clothes. I took Powell at the Green Man and Still, and found 12 s. and a half-crown on her. She said she received it in change for a 1 l. note at the Rum Puncheon, which I found correct.

WILLIAMS'S Defence. I was only at the corner of the court.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18200217-23

372. WILLIAM GRADY was indicted for feloniously assaulting John Hunt on the King's highway, on the 20th of January , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, one watch, value 20 s., his property .

The prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Richardson.

Reference Number: t18200217-24

373. JAMES DUNN was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of January , thirty yards of rope, called a wharp, value 14 s., and twelve yards of rope, called ratline, value 4 s. , the goods of Francis Lack ; and GEORGE TYLER , was indicted for feloniously receiving twelve yards of ratline, part and parcel of the said goods, he well knowing it to be stolen .

FRANCIS LACK . I am a lighterman , and live at Vauxhall. On the 25th of January, my two barges, Rachael and Frances, were in Whitefriars dock .

JOHN SMITH . I am employed by Lack. I had the care of the Rachael, which laid in Whitefriars dock. I saw all her ropes safe about nine o'clock in the evening of the 24th of January - the Frances was also there; I went again about eleven o'clock on the night of the 25th, the ratline was then gone out of the cabin, which was broken open - it weighed 25 lbs. or 26 lbs. I have seen Dunn on the river. On the 27th I went with Forrester to Tyler's house, he keeps an old iron shop in Shoe-lane, and asked him if he had bought any rope lately? he said No. Forrester said if he was an honest man he would let us search, to which he consented in three or four minutes. I saw the ratline under some old rags opposite the door. Forrester took him into custody; the wharp of the Frances was stolen - I had seen it safe two or three days before. On the 27th we found it all at Jarvis's, who keeps an old junk shop at Queenhithe.

CHARLES HUGHES . I am a waterman, and live in Blackfriars-road. On the 25th of July, about one o'clock in the day, I saw Dunn go on board the Rachael at Whitefriars dock. I stood on the wharf, saw him break the cabin open, and come ashore with an old tin saucepan full of grease in his hand. He went on board again into the cabin, returned and went ashore - he had nothing then - I did not see him on board the Frances, but it laid close to the Rachael. I went away, heard of the robbery about half-past nine o'clock, and mentioned this. I knew Dunn before, and did not suspect him.

JOHN BROWN. I am an officer. On the 27th of January Dunn was given into my charge about eleven o'clock in the morning by Smithers at Bow-street Office, charged with breaking open two barges - I neither threatened or promised him; he stated that he, and a man named Pratt had broken open the Frances and Rachael at Whitefriars dock, and had taken part of the wharp and some other rope, and that they had sold the wharp to Jarvis of Queenhithe for 4 s. 8 d., and had sold the other in Shoe-lane, next door to a chandler's shop. I went and took Pratt into custody at his house in Shoe-lane, which is a chandler's shop. I found a piece of wharp at Jarvis's, and sent Forrester to Tyler's; Pratt was discharged.

THOMAS JARVIS . I am a ship owner, and deal in new and old rope. On the 25th of January, about five o'clock in the evening, Dunn brought this wharp - he said he had some old rope. I weighed it and paid him him 4 s. 9 d. for it, and went up stairs. Next morning upon opening it I found it was old rope put round good serviceable rope, and put it by, supposing it would be owned - if I had seen the good rope I should not have bought it. On the 27th Brown came and I shewed it to him; he claimed it - it is worth 10 s.

JOHN FORRESTER . I am an officer. In consequence of information that I received from Dunn, I and Smith went to Tyler's in Shoe-lane, and asked him if he had bought any rope lately? he said he did not recollect that he had bought any, and did not think he had any on the premises. I cast my eye round, and saw a piece under some old rags, which Smith claimed. I pulled the rags off, and found some more; there was about fourteen or fifteen yards cut into twenty pieces, eighteen of which were new rope.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

TYLER'S Defence. It was brought while I was out.

DUNN - GUILTY . Aged 49.

Transported for Seven Years .

TYLER - NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200217-25

374. WILLIAM CONNOLLY was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of February , four yards of calico, value 1 s. 6 d. , the property of the United Company of Merchants trading to the East Indies .

For the Prosecution, MR. BOLLAND.

ROBERT WISE . I am a labourer in the East India Company's service. The prisoner was employed there with some painters - he had to sit on the board to keep it steady. I was set to watch them, and heard a piece of cloth tear - I looked between some bales, and saw the prisoner put a piece of calico into his hat. I told Mr. Alleway, who came up, and told the prisoner he had got something about him which he should not have. The prisoner pulled off his hat, took a piece of calico out, and said,

"That is what you want." Mr. Alleway took another piece out of his side-pocket, and took him down stairs.

JOHN ALLEWAY . I am an elder in the Company's service. I ordered Wise to watch the painters. In consequence of information I came up as the prisoner was going, and told him he had something which he should not have - he took a piece of calico from his hat, and said

"This is what you want." I said,

"That is not all." I took another piece from his pocket. There were four yards in all found on him.

WILLIAM SHIRES . I took the prisoner in charge, and found about a yard and a half of calico in his hat, and a yard round his waist.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked them off the ground, to wipe the wet off the window-sashes.

GUILTY . Aged 50.

Confined One Month and Whipped

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200217-26

375. WILLIAM ALLEN and HENRIETTA SPERRY were indicted for stealing, on the 27th of January , at St. Ann and Agnes , in the dwelling-house of Henry Nutting , the younger, three half-crowns, two shillings, one 50 l., two 25 l., three 20 l., one 15 l., six 10 l., three 5 l., and forty-seven 1 l. Bank notes, the monies and property of Henry Nutting , the elder .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating them to be the property of Henry Nutting , the younger .

HENRY NUTTING , JUN. I rent the upper part of a house, No. 38, Noble-street, Falcon-square , in the parish of St. Ann and Agnes - nobody sleeps in the house but myself

and family; the lower part of the house is a warehouse, occupied by the firm of Masters and Nutting. We have an internal communication with it - the prisoners are strangers to me. On the 27th of January, about five minutes before nine o'clock in the morning, I took the notes and cash stated in the indictment out of the iron chest, and laid them on the desk - there was 297 l. 9 s. 6 d. in all - the warehouse-door was open. I went into the back warehouse, leaving nobody in the counting-house; the door was open. I was not absent five minutes before I heard the warehouse door shut; I came into the front warehouse to see who was gone out, and immediately missed the property. I went out, and saw a man running in the middle of the road, fifteen or twenty yards from the door; I pursued him some distance, calling Stop thief, but he got off, and I cannot say who he was. The notes were my sole property - I had received the whole of them the night preceding from William Shepherd , and a memorandum with them, which laid between the notes and silver. I saw the memorandum next day at Marlborough-street office.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Your father is a partner in the premises - A. Yes. I pay the firm rent for it. I do not know the numbers of the notes. They were my father's private property, I was to have paid them to him. The man I pursued appeared to be alone.

JONATHAN NICHOLSON . I am a linen-draper, and live at No. 318, High Holborn. On the 27th of January, about three o'clock in the afternoon, the female prisoner came to our shop, and bought a hearth-rug, carpet and counterpane, which came to 2 l. 18 s.; she paid me a 20 l. note, I gave her the change and goods, and she left the shop. About fifteen minutes after, from information I received, I went out to look for her, and saw her at the corner of Gray's Inn-lane, in company with the male prisoner. I followed them up Gray's Inn-lane, and saw them go into the Marquis of Granby - the man had a bundle under his arm when he went in. They came out in a minute, and I followed them as far as Gray's Inn-gate, across the square through the passage up Brownlow-street into Holborn again, and up to Manning's, the linen-draper, at No. 52, Broad-street, St. Giles's - the female prisoner went in there, and the man returned down Holborn in the same direction in which he came. I followed Sperry into the shop, and communicated my suspicion to one of the shop-men. While I was there I heard her ask for change for a 25 l. note. I went over to Manning's other shop, at the corner of Museum-street, she was brought over there, and a constable was sent for. I went to look after the man, and saw him standing about thirty yards from the shop, where the four streets meet, and asked him to step into the shop with me, telling him the young woman was there whom he was with - he went in without hesitation. In the mean time the constable came, and went into a private room with Manning - the male prisoner walked off. On the following day I was with Plank, and pointed him out in Leather-lane, and he took him into custody; he struggled to get away. I gave the note to Mr. Nutting, after marking it.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you point him out to Plank, or did he ask you if he was the man - A. No, I said

"that is the man." Plank said

"Be sure" - I was sure, and he took him. I had described him to Plank before.

FRANCIS WILSON . I am apprentice to Mr. Emerson, who is a linen-draper, and lives at No. 305, High Holborn. On the 27th of January, about three o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner, Sperry, came to our shop; she bought a pair of blankets for 22 s., and gave me a 25 l. Bank note; I gave her the change - my master paid the note away. I saw her at Marlborough-street two or three days after, and was sure she was the person. I asked her name, she said

"Jones, No. 14, Great Warner-street, Coldbath-fields," which I immediately wrote on it - I saw it again at the office. She said she had just began houskeeping, that she should want many more things and would come again, but did not.

MARK RUSHMER . I am shopman to Mr. Manning. On the 27th of January, between three and five o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner, Sperry, came into the shop - I sold her twelve yards of calico and six yards of Irish, which came to 18 s. together; she paid me a 25 l. Bank note, and gave her address,

"Simpson, No. 14, Great Warner-street, Coldbath-fields." While I was serving her Nicholson came in and gave me information - I stopped the note and informed Mr. Manning, she was detained. Nicholson went over to the other shop, I took her and the goods over also, and delivered the note to Plank that night, having wrote the address which she gave me on it. I did not see the man.

HENRY OGSWELL . I am shopman to Mr. Blisset, who is a hatter, and lives at Holborn-bars. On the 27th of January, about half-past ten o'clock in the morning, the prisoner came to the shop, and bought a hat for 27 s., he paid me a 5 l. note, and I gave him the change. He wrote on the note himself,

"Simpson, No. 6, Leather-lane, Holborn" - I also wrote that on it, and delivered it to Plank about two days afterwards.

SAMUEL PLANK . I am an officer of Marlborough-street, On the 27th of January, between six and seven o'clock in the evening, Sperry was brought to the office under suspicion of uttering a 25 l. note - Rushmer delivered the 25 l. note to me as that he received from her, I have kept it ever since. I asked her how she got the note? I neither threatened nor promised her - she said it was given to her by a gentleman from the country, who frequently visited her, and that he gave her two 25 l., a 20 l., and a 1 l. note. She did not know his name, nor what part of the country he came from. I asked her if her name was Simpson, and if she lived at No. 14, Great Warner-street? she said that was her name and residence. I said I should immediately go there, and if it was not so I should discover it - she then said it was not her address, but that she lived at No. 4, Vine-street, Mutton-hill, and her name was Henrietta Allen - that she was a single woman, and lived there alone. She was committed to New Prison, Clerkenwell. At a late hour that night, Mr. Nutting brought me a printed bill, with a description of the notes; one of them exactly corresponded with the 25 l. note delivered to me. Next morning I went with Mr. Nutting and Mr. Shepherd to New Prison, and asked her, in their presence, if what she had told me the night before, as to her name and address, as also the person she had the note from, was all correct? she said it was. I asked her when the gentleman gave them to her? she said last Wednesday (which was the

26th). I said,

"You was apprehended on Thursday, are you sure it was not that day?" she said, No, she was certain it was the day before. I said it could not be, because I had a bill, describing the notes to have been stolen on Thursday, and this gentleman (pointing to Mr. Nutting), was the owner - she declined saying any thing more. I found she did lodge in Vine-street in the name of Allen, in the back room first floor - it is a little broker's shop.

Q. What do you know of Allen - A. I was in Leather-lane with Nicholson about the middle of the next day, Friday - he had given me a very exact description of the man before that. I saw the prisoner at some distance before me, with a large bundle under his left arm, and an umbrella in his right hand - his back was towards us; Nicholson said

"That is the man!" I desired him to be sure. I got as near to him as possible - he looked at him, and gave me a signal; when he got near him I advanced by the right side of Allen, and asked him to step into a shop, as I wished to speak with him. He rather started back, and said,

"What do you want?" I seized him by the right arm and said I suspected him to be the man who had robbed a gentleman of 297 l., and if he was innocent he could have no objection to walk into the shop with me. He instantly threw his bundle and umbrella down, and made considerable resistance - I succeeded in getting him into Mr. Green's shop. In securing him the bundle was lost, as a mob gathered. The umbrella was brought in, it was broke in the scuffle. I put him into a coach, took him to the office, searched him, and found one 50 l., two 20 l., four 10 l., two 5 l., one hundred and five 1 l. notes, and 3 l. 15 s. in silver, and a key, which he said belonged to his room. I told him he lodged at No. 4, Vine-street, Mutton-hill, he said he did. I tried the key - it opened the door, and in that lodging, the back room on the first floor, I found a 10 l. note in a small box. He said I should find more money there. I also found a memorandum, which I produce - Nutting claimed it. I also found a shop-bill of Nicholson's for a counterpane, a carpet, and a hearth-rug, which came to 2 l. 18 s. I found a duplicate in his pocket of a hearth-rug, carpet, and quilt, pledged that day at Hill's, Turnmill-street - I went and found them there. I found a new hat on his head, with Blissett's name in it.

Cross-examined. Q. You found nothing at the lodgings but the 10 l. note - A. No. If Sperry had not given me the address I might not have found him. She said she was drawn into it by a man.

MARK RUSHMER re-examined. The 25 l. note is the same which Sperry gave to me.

MR. NUTTING re-examined. This is the memorandum that was between the silver and notes.

JONATHAN NICHOLSON re-examined. This bill is what I gave Sperry. I saw the goods - they are those I sold her.

HENRY OGSWELL re-examined. It is the hat I sold him.

JOHN BOTELER . I am foreman to Mrs. Hill. On the 28th of January, in the morning, the prisoner, Allen, pledged the articles referred to in the duplicate produced. He was in the habit of pledging with us. He brought them in and said,

"I have just been buying these, lend me 5 s. on them," which I did without undoing them.

WILLIAM SHEPHERD. I am a goldsmith, and live in the Strand. On Wednesday evening, the 26th of January, I paid Mr. Henry Nutting , jun. 297 l. 9 s. 6 d.; I made a memorandum of it before I paid it. I have a copy of the memorandum. I delivered a paper with it - it was composed of the different notes stated in the indictment - (examining the notes produced). The 25 l. note paid to Manning, the 50 l., two 20 l., four 10 l., and forty-three of the 1 l. notes found on the prisoner, the 10 l. note found at his lodgings, have all my writing on them, and are part of the notes. The 20 l. note paid to Nicholson, the 25 l. paid to Wilson, and the 5 l. paid to Blisset, are all notes which were among them.

Cross-examined. Q. Will you swear they are all the identical notes you paid him - A. I do; I paid them to nobody but him.

ROBERT CLARK . I am constable of St. Giles's. I was sent for and took Sperry in charge. She said a gentleman from the country gave her the note. I produce the blankets which were bought at Emerson's. I found them at the Marquis of Granby, public-house, on Friday. I saw them there on Thursday.

FRANCIS WILSON re-examined. They are what I sold her.

JONATHAN NICHOLSON re-examined. Allen had a bundle the size of a pair of blankets, when I followed him.

ALLEN'S Defence. I picked them up in Noble-street.

SPERRY'S Defence. I have, unfortunately, lived with the prisoner for sixteen months. He said he found the notes. I went to lay them out to furnish two rooms.

ELIZA ORTON . The prisoners lodged together at my house. On the morning that Sperry was apprehended she breakfasted at home - Allen breakfasted with her at half-past nine o'clock - she had not been out then. He went out as usual, between six and seven.

ALLEN - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 28.

SPERRY - NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200217-27

THIRD DAY, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 19.

376. WILLIAM FULLWOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of February , one handkerchief, value 3 s., the goods of William Kieran , Esq. from his person .

WILLIAM KIERAN, ESQ. On the 1st of February, between two and three o'clock in the afternoon, I was near St. Giles's church , in company with Mr. Dick - the prisoner rushed by; Mr. Dick exclaimed,

"You have lost your handkerchief! it is in that fellow's bosom, who has just ran by." I felt, and said,

"You are right." Mr. Dick seized him - he put his hand into his side-pocket, and threw my handkerchief down, I picked it up.

MR. WILLIAM FOSTER DICK . I was with Mr. Kieran; the prisoner passed, and I saw Mr. Kieran's handkerchief in his bosom - he had followed us a considerable distance - I seized him, his waistcoat tore, and he got off; I seized him again - he made a desperate resistance.

Prisoner's Defence. I never saw it.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18200217-28

377. JOHN SMITH was indicted for that he, on the 26th of January , at St. James, Clerkenwell, feloniously did dispose of and put away a certain forged and counterfeit Bank note, which is as follows (setting it forth, No. 11525, 10 l. dated October 5, 1819, signed C. Phillips) with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England , he well knowing it to be forged and counterfeited .

SECOND COUNT, for feloniously offering to Ann Applebee , widow, a like forged note, with a like intent, knowing it to be forged.

THIRD AND FOURTH COUNTS, the same, only calling the forged instrument a promissory note for payment of money instead of a Bank note.

FOUR OTHER COUNTS, the same, only stating the prisoner's intent to be to defraud the said Ann Applebee .

For the Prosecution, MR. SERGEANT BOSANQUET, MESSRS. REYNOLDS and BOLLAND.

ANN APPLEBEE . I am a widow , and keep a hosier and glover's shop in Parliament-street, Westminster . On Wednesday, the 26th of January, about seven o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came to the shop and asked for a pair of gloves; I opened not less than three dozen before I could find a pair large enough to fit him - I tried to fit him, and took notice of the size of his hand, it was particularly long and large; I at last fitted him. He also bought two pair of drawers, six pair of men's and four pair of women's lamb's-wool stockings, two nets for the neck, and three pair of muffatees, they came to 2 l. 12 s. He said he was going into the country by the coach, and gave me a 10 l. Bank note. My daughter was present, and said,

"Mother, you can't give change." I then took it to my father, and sent my other daughter, Ann, next door, to get it changed - the prisoner remained in the shop. She returned in seven or eight minutes alone, and said she could not get change - he said,

"Then you must send the goods;" she gave him the note, then took it out of his hand again, and said she would try another neighbour, a Mr. Manson - she went out; a man came in, about two minutes after she went out, and said in the prisoner's presence that he was come for a pair of stockings, which he had been for in the afternoon, when I could not change him a 1 l. note - (he had been in the afternoon, and offered me a 1 l. note - I did not like the looks of him nor the note). He paid me 3 s. in silver for the stockings. While he stood there, the prisoner said,

"It is a fine night." I think he said,

"Yes, it is." I folded the stockings up and the man went away. The prisoner directly got up, and said he must go, he could not wait, and I must send the goods. He was moving rather in a hurry towards the door, I asked him what his name was? he said, as he was going out,

" John West ." My daughter, Eliza, was in the shop at the time. I asked him if I was to send the change with the goods? he said Yes. I asked where? he said, to the White Horse Cellar - he had by that time got out of the door. I desired my daughter to ask him whether it was the New or Old White Horse Cellar? he was then quite off the steps of the door. He hallooed out,

"The Old White Horse Cellar, Charing-cross," and went away.

Q. How soon after did your daughter Ann return - A. In three or four minutes with Mr. Manson; she gave me back the note; I compared it with a note I had, and marked it - (looks at one) - this is it. Some conversation passed between me and Manson, and I went to his shop, sent for Pace, the constable, and gave him information.

Q. On the following morning did any one come to your shop dressed as a porter - A. Yes, about twelve o'clock a person came to the shop and brought this note - read - ( JOHN WEST wishes to know the reason why his things and change were not sent to the Old White Horse Cellar last night, as he was waiting for them. He wishes them to be sent by bearer. George and Dragon, Wednesday Morning.) - I asked the porter where the George and Dragon was? he said in Jeremy-street. I sent for Pace, and sent him and my servant there with the things, but not with the note - they returned with them.

ANN APPLEBEE , JUN. I am the daughter of the last witness. I recollect the prisoner coming to the shop; I received a 10 l. note to get change, and was out seven or eight minutes, but could not get change, so returned and gave the prisoner the note; I did not lose sight of it while I was out. I took it out a second time to Mr. Manson's, which is not a minute's walk; I shewed him the note, and he returned with me. The prisoner was then gone, and I gave the note to my mother.

RICHARD MANSON . I am a cheesemonger, and live in King-street, Westminster. Miss Applebee came and shewed me a 10 l. note. I went went with her to her mother's, and Pace was sent for.

THOMAS PACE . I am an officer of Queen-square. I was sent for to Manson's, where I saw Mrs. Applebee; she shewed me two 10 l. notes, and I marked one in her presence. About the middle of the next day I went to Mr. Applebee's, and she shewed me the note which has been read. I went with her servant to the George and Dragon, Jermyn-street; the servant carried the goods - I remained at some distance from her; she came out in about three minutes, and we went to the Old White Horse Cellar, Piccadilly - there is no Old White Horse Cellar at Charing-cross. We afterwards returned to the George and Dragon, waited there two hours and a half, and enquired for a person named West - a person calling himself West had been there to write a note; I found no direction about leaving the things, On the 3d of February I was informed that a man resembling the prisoner was in Tothil-fields prison, and I immediately took Mrs. Applebee and her daughter there. They saw the prisoner, and identified him immediately.

ROBERT MARRIOTT . I am a cheesemonger, and live in Wilson-street, Finsbury-square. The prisoner came to my shop on Tuesday, the 18th of January, about four o'clock; he had a large rough white coat on over the coat he now wears. He asked for a double Gloucester cheese; I showed him two or three - he fixed on one and a ham; they came to 1 l. 4 s. 5 1/2 d. He said he had bought a cheese of the same description at my house two or three weeks previous - I did not recollect him. He gave me 5 s., and a 5 l. note which he took from some others; I was to give him 4 l. 6 1/2 d. - he put the goods into his basket. I asked him his name and address? he said,

" John Wilson , Edmonton;" which I put on the note, and and asked him if there was any particular part of Edmonton that I could

put on the note? he said,

"No, that his father was pretty well known by every body at Edmonton." This is the note - (looking at it) - it has my signature and the name on it. I told him I could not change it, but I would go out and try to get change. Having a suspicion of it I took it to a neighbour, and then to another, who said it was forged. I and three neighbours returned to my shop, intending to secure him, but found he was gone, and had left the basket, goods, and 5 s.; I did not see him again till he was in custody.

THOMAS WATTS . I am shopman to Mr. Marriott. The prisoner came and bought a cheese; my master's account is correct. When he was gone out the prisoner stood at the door watching, and before my master returned the prisoner came to me, said he must go, and would return for the basket in a short time. He never returned for it or the change.

PETER PERRY . I am a Bow-street officer. I, Bond, and four other patrols, took the prisoner and six others on the 1st of February at the Sun, public-house, in Round-court, but not for this offence. After apprehending him I suspected he was wanted for other things; I discovered on hand-cuffing him that he had a remarkable large hand, which induced me to suspect him, as I had information that a man with a large hand had committed another offence. I afterwards asked him his name,? and he said it was either John or Robert Smith .

WILLIAM BOND. I am an officer. I was with Perry; the prisoner said his name was John Smith , which I wrote down. I never learnt from him where he lodged.

JOHN LEES . I am an inspector of Bank notes, and have been so twenty-two years. The 10 l. note is forged in every respect; it is neither the Bank paper, plate, or the signature of Phillips. The 5 l. note is also forged in every respect.

CHARLES PHILLIPS . I am a cashier of the Bank. The signature to the note is not mine - it is a bad imitation.

(The note was here put in and read.)

The prisoner made no defence.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 22.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18200217-29

378. CHARLES HARRIS was indicted for that he, on the 4th of December , at St. James, Clerkenwell , feloniously did dispose of and put away a certain forged and counterfeit Bank note, which is as followeth - (Setting it forth No. 12757, 5 l., dated September 22, 1819, signed J. Kensall) - with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England , he well knowing the same to be forged and counterfeited .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only calling the forged instrument a promissory note for payment of money instead of a Bank note.

THIRD AND FOURTH COUNTS, the same, only stating the prisoner's intent to be to defraud Henry Almeroth .

Counsel as before.

BENJAMIN ALLEN . I am shopman to Mr. Almeroth, who is a grocer , and lives at Whitechapel-road, Middlesex . On the 4th of December, between eight and nine o'clock at night, the prisoner came to the shop, and bought 1 lb. of 8 s. tea, and 4 lbs. of sugar, they came to 11 s. 8 d.; he gave me a 5 l. Bank note, and I gave him the change. I asked the prisoner his name and address? he said,

"Wilson, No. 13, Great Garden-street," which I wrote on it - (looks at one) - this is it. I then gave it to my master, who was in the shop, and he desired me to take it next door to ascertain whether it was good; I did so, returned and told my master he was not at home. The prisoner was then in the shop with the goods tied up in a silk handkerchief.

HENRY ALMEROTH . I recollect the prisoner coming to the shop, and my man serving him - the note was given to him; he went out, returned and said my neighbour was not at home. I then said to the prisoner,

"If you have no objection I will go with you" - he had given the name of,

"Wilson, No. 13, Great Garden-street," which is not a quarter of a mile off. He said certainly not, he had no objection, and I went with him. We turned up Great Garden-street, and just as we got to No. 13, (I was about half a yard behind him), in an instant he turned round, and threw the bundle of grocery violently in my face, which stunned me, so that I could not see for two or three minutes. When I recovered I found the bundle and my hat on the ground. I looked up, and saw him running about twenty or thirty yards before me; I immediately called Stop thief! and ran after him - he turned down Chicksand-street, and got away. I returned and marked the note - (looks at one) - this is it. I had it with me all the while; I am certain he is the man. I saw him in custody about two months after,

JOHN SLATER . I am servant to George Lear , Esq., who has occupied No. 13, Great Garden-street for eighteen years. The prisoner is a perfect stranger, and never lived in the house.

JAMES GRAY . I am a grocer, and live in Bishopsgate-street. On the 1st of December, about seven o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came to my shop, and bought 1 lb. of tea, and 4 lbs. of sugar, which came to 11 s. 8 d.; he gave me a 5 l. note, and I asked him what name I should put on it? he said,

"Mr. Richardson, No. 11, White Lion-street, Norton Falgate;" which I wrote on it - (looks at one) - this is it. I asked him what Richardson was? he said he was a merchant, and lived in a private house. I said I thought it was not a good note; he put his hand out to take it, saying,

"Indeed, Sir!" I kept it from him, and asked him to wait while my young man went down to Mr. Richardson's; he said he had no objection, and my young man went to get his hat. I was coming round the counter to get between him and the door, and on my turning the corner of the counter the prisoner was gone; my man pursued, but did not overtake him. He left the grocery behind, and never returned for the 5 l. note.

RICHARD WINKFIELD . I am shopman to Mr. Gray. The prisoner came to the shop; his account is correct. While I was getting my hat to go to Richardson's the prisoner went off; I ran out, but could not see him. He never called for the note, change, or grocery.

JOSEPH PEARSON . On the 1st of December I occupied No. 11, White Lion-street, Norton Falgate; the prisoner never lived there. I never sent him with the note, nor did I ever see him till to-day.

GEORGE PERREN . My aunt keeps the Phoenix, public-house, in East Smithfield; the prisoner came there on

the 15th of January, in the evening, with a bottle, and bought half a pint of brandy, which came to 1 s. 8 d., I served him; he gave me a 1 l. note - I asked him where he came from? he said from Mr. Hackworth, down Butcher-row. I desired him to put his name on it, which he did; I also asked him to put his own name, he did so - (looks at it) - this is it - it has

"Hackworth, No. 38, Butcher-row, Charles Harris ." I saw him write it all. I gave the note to my wife, and gave him the change.

ANN PERREN . I am the wife of the last witness. On the 17th of January he gave me a note, which I marked - this is it - (looks at it) - it has my writing on it. I saw the prisoner, and know him to be the man - I also know this to be the note he offered; I marked it that day fortnight, as I was going to pay it away - I kept it all that time.

MARY KING . My husband keeps the Blue Anchor, public-house, East Smithfield. A man resembling the prisoner came with a bottle, about the beginning of January, and asked for a pint of the best brandy. He gave me a 1 l. note, I was very busy, and told him to put his address - he wrote

"Hackworth, 38, Butcher-row." I gave him the change, and he left. - (Looks at one). This is it.

JOHN HACKWORTH . I live at No. 36, Butcher-row, and have lived there forty years. I know nothing of the prisoner - I never sent him for any thing. No Charles Harris lodged with me. A Mrs. Greer lives at No. 38, and keeps a cook-shop.

THOMAS COMPTON . I keep the Prince of Wales, public-house, Church-lane, Whitechapel. On Saturday, the 22d of January, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came with a pint bottle, and bought a pint of the best brandy; I served him, and put the bottle into his pocket. He gave me a 1 l. note. As soon as I saw the signature I perceived it was a bad one. I asked him whose name I should put on it? he said he came from Mr. Taylor, No. 4, Back Church-lane, which I immediately wrote on it, with my name and date - (looks at the note) - this is it. Taylor is a customer of mine. The prisoner stood at the bar about ten minutes - I was very busy. As soon as the customers were gone I went up to him, and said,

"I doubt this note being a good one, I will go with you to Mr. Taylor" - he said,

"I will go with you." We went; he himself knocked at the door, Taylor came out. I said,

"Mr. Taylor, have you sent this young man with a note for half a pint of brandy?" he said,

"No, Mr. Compton, I never send any one to you but part of my family, or come myself," he said he never saw the prisoner - he made no answer. I took the prisoner by the arm, and said

"You have given me a wrong account, you shall go with me;" he said he would follow me. I took him to Lambeth-street, and gave him in charge of Miller, the constable.

COURT. Q. Did you communicate your suspicion before you came round the counter to him - A. No, my Lord. He could have escaped when we were out, if he chose.

GEORGE TAYLOR . I live in Back Church-lane. On the 22d of January, Compton brought the prisoner to my house. I never saw him before, and had not sent him with the note. The prisoner said I was not the person who gave it to him; that he had recived it from a person for making a waistcoat, which came to 6 s. He did not say where the person lived.

JOHN LEES . I am an inspector of bank notes. The note uttered to Almeroth is forged in every respect, and is not Kensall's signature. The others are also forged in every respect. The two 5 l. notes are off the same plate, and so are the three 1 l. notes. The whole five have the name of Simmons, 24, Oxford-street, written on them with the same hand-writing.

FRANCIS KENSALL . I am cashier at the Bank. The 5 l. notes, purport to be signed by me, but are not my writing.

(The notes were here put in and read.)

The prisoner made no defence.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 21.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Richardson.

Reference Number: t18200217-30

379. JAMES GRIFFITHS and WILLIAM JENNINGS were indicted for that they, on the 15th of January , at St. James, Clerkenwell , feloniously did dispose of and put away a certain forged and counterfeit Bank note (setting it forth, No. 21017, 1 l. dated October 5, 1819, signed C. Tabor), with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England , they knowing it to be forged .

SECOND COUNT, for feloniously offering to Joshua Boggis , a like forged and counterfeit note, with the like intent, knowing it to be forged.

THIRD AND FOURTH COUNTS, the same, only calling the forged instrument a promissory note for payment of money instead of a Bank note.

FOUR OTHER COUNTS, the same, only stating the prisoner's intent to be to defraud John Adams .

Counsel for the Prosecution, as before.

JOSHUA BOGGIS . I am shopman to John Adams, who is a butcher , and lives in Union-street, Middlesex Hospital ; I know both the prisoners. On the 1st of January, between eight and nine o'clock in the evening, Jennings came to the shop with a woman, they bought a shoulder of mutton, it was brought to me to weigh, and came to about 3 s. 6 d.; the woman gave Mrs. Adams a 1 l. note - she was sitting at the desk, and asked the name and address; one of them gave the name of Brown, No. 3, John-street, New Road. I saw her write on the note. She gave me the change, and I gave it to Jennings. He offered the mutton to the woman, she said she would be d - d if she would carry it - they went away together, Jennings having the mutton - I did not see Griffiths then.

Q. On Saturday, the 15th, did either of them come - A. Yes, Griffiths came between eight and nine o'clock - he first came into the shop, Jennings was outside, about two yards from the door, while Griffiths was inside. Griffiths bought an aitch-bone of beef, he brought it to me to weigh - it came to 4 s. 1 1/2 d. he gave me a 1 l. Bank note, I told him it was a bad one, and that he knew it - he said nothing. I collared him immediately. The moment I collared him I saw Jennings run away from facing the shop, where he was standing in the road. I think he saw me collar Griffiths - he could see me. I called Adams in, and gave him the note. Jennings was brought back in about three minutes.

LUCY ADAMS . I am wife of John Adams . On the 1st of January I remember a man and woman coming to the shop, and buying a shoulder of mutton - I cannot say it was Jennings.

They paid me a 1 l. note, which I marked - (looks at one) - this is it; it has

"Brown, 2, John-street, New Road" - I believe the woman gave the address.

JOHN ADAMS . I am a butcher. I recollect on Saturday, the 15th of January, being called in to Griffiths, whom I found in the custody of Boggis. Either my wife or Boggis gave me a note, I marked it immediately in his presence - (looks at it) - this is it. Jennings was brought in two or three minutes after. They both said they never saw each other in their lives, and persisted in it. The watchman took them to the watch-house.

THOMAS OLLIVE . I am shopman to Adams. On Saturday, the 1st of January, I saw both the prisoners at my master's - only Jennings was in the shop with a woman, Griffiths was at the door. A shoulder of mutton was bought, and Jennings and the woman went away. Griffiths was then standing at the door, and said to me,

"Tom, that is my woman," pointing to the woman who was with Jennings - he joined their company, and all three went away talking together. I had known Griffiths before for three years; his name was Brooker three years ago, when we lived opposite each other.

Q. On the 15th of January did you see them together - A. Yes, outside the door, examining the meat - Griffiths came in; I kept my eye on Jennings all the time, knowing they had been there before - he waited just outside. My master was called in, and he ran away; I pursued him as hard as I could, and took him opposite a hair-dresser's shop kept by Murrell, in Titchfield-street. He fell down there. It was a little after nine o'clock at night.

WILLIAM PUDDEFOOT , JUN. I am twelve years of age, and apprentice to Mr. Murrell, who is a hair-dresser, and lives at the corner of Union and Great Titchfield-streets. On Sunday morning, about half-past eight o'clock, I found a 1 l. bank note right opposite the shop, in the horse-road, about two yards and a half from the curb; it was rumpled up - I gave it to my father.

WILLIAM PUDDEFOOT , SEN. I am father of the last witness. He gave me a 1 l. note on the Sunday morning following the Saturday the prisoner were taken; I marked it directly - (looks at one) - this is it. I took it to Adams that day.

ALEXANDER BISSON . I am clerk to the magistrates at Marlborough-street. I was present at the prisoners' examination - neither threats nor promises were held out to them. I took down their examination; it is signed by themselves and the Magistrates (reads).

William Jennings says,

"I have lived at No. 20 and 21, Church-lane, St. Giles's, for six years, with my wife, and was never at Adams's in my life. I don't know Griffiths at all." - William Griffiths says,

"I live at No. 3, John-street, New Road, and sell fruit. I sold a jack ass in Smithfield, and received the note in payment. I don't know the man I sold it to. I know nothing of Jennings."

JOHN LEES . I am an inspector of Bank notes; the the notes are both forged in every respect, also the one found in the street. All three are off the same plate; the first and last are the same date and signature, and the numbers are composed of the same figures transposed.

CHARLES TABOR . I am a signing-clerk; two of the notes purport to bear my signature, but are not signed by me.

(The note was here put in and read.)

GRIFFITHS'S Defence. On the 1st of January a woman came and asked me for drink; I said I had no money, and told her I lived in John-street, New-road - she said she was going that way; she fell in company with another man, and they went into Adams's; they told me to stop at the door - I spoke to Ollive. When they came out I said that was going to be my woman - they treated me with gin; I should know the man again - it was not Jennings. On the Friday fortnight following I sold my ass for 14 s. in Smithfield, and the man paid me the 1 l. note. Jennings was not in my company when I went to buy the meat.

JENNINGS'S Defence. I was going to Poland-street, and accidentally looked at the shop. I thought it was late, began to run; I never saw Griffiths in my life, and never was in the shop.

GRIFFITHS - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 28.

JENNINGS - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 20.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18200217-31

380. WILLIAM AINOW was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of January , one boot, value 10 s. , the goods of Aaron Gush .

JAMES DODWELL . I am servant to Mr. Aaron Gush , who is a bootmaker , and lives in Lothbury . I was at work in the back shop, and heard a scuffle, looked up, and saw the prisoner by the door. I asked him what he wanted? he said he wanted a pair of shoes. I told him to sit down, but he would not. I missed a boot, and found it under his jacket.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Whipped, and Discharged .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200217-32

381. WILLIAM RAYNER was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of January , nine pair of gloves, value 18 s. , the goods of Thomas Flint .

HENRY LEE . I am foreman to Mr. Thomas Flint , who is a haberdasher , and lives on Fish-street Hill . On the 11th of January, a pane of glass was cut in the window, and these gloves stolen.

JOSEPH CARPENTER . I am a hosier, and live opposite Mr. Flint. Between four and five o'clock in the afternoon, I saw the prisoner and two others lurking about his window. I saw the prisoner very busy, went over, and saw it was cut. As I crossed the road the prisoner ran through Monument-yard - the others went away. I pursued, secured him in Pudding-lane, and found nine pair of silk gloves under his coat. I took him back; one of the boys met him, and said,

"Halloo, Jem!"

(Property produced and sworn to.)

DANIEL BOGGIS. I took the prisoner in charge; he said a gentleman gave them to him to carry to Tower Hill. I found a knife on him with the point broken.

Prisoner's Defence. A sailor asked me to carry them to Tower Hill, and said if I was asked what I had got, I was to say nothing.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant

Reference Number: t18200217-33

382. REUBEN CLARK was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of February , one handkerchief, value 5 s., the goods of James Ryder , from his person .

JAMES RYDER . I am a boot-maker , and live in the Old Bailey. On the 7th of February, about ten o'clock in the morning, I was coming through Ball-alley ; the officer asked me if I had lost my handkerchief? I felt and missed it. We pursued, stopped the prisoner, and he pulled his coat and waistcoat off. I felt it in his coat-sleeve, and took it out.

JOHN BARLEY . I am a constable. I saw the prisoner and another man in Fish-street Hill. I saw him turn sharp round, and follow Mr. Ryder - about an inch and a half of his handkerchief was out of his pocket; they followed him into Lombard-street, and in Ball-alley I missed them - there are several turnings there. I caught sight of them in George-yard; they were then running from Mr. Ryder - the other man ran down an alley. I saw the prisoner tucking something down the arm of his coat, and asked Mr, Ryder if he missed his handkerchief? he said Yes. We pursued, and overtook the prisoner; he was very willing to be searched. Mr. Ryder found the handkerchief in his coat-sleeve.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence I picked it up between the gentleman's legs.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200217-34

383. JOHN DITCHEN was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of January , one pair of hind quarters of mutton, value 30 s. , the property of William Collingwood .

WILLIAM COLLINGWOOD . I am a butcher in Newgate-market . On the 29th of January, in the morning, I missed a pair of hind quarters of mutton. I afterwards saw it at the watch-house; it was mine, and was at my shop the night before, hanging outside.

SAMUEL SNELLING . I am a watchman. On the 29th of January, about two o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner coming along Paternoster-row with the mutton on his shoulder, in a direction from Newgate-market. I crossed over to him, and said,

"You have a nice piece of meat there, where did you get it?" He said two men gave it to him to carry to Fleet-market - he was not going the way to Fleet-market. I said he must go to the watch-house, but he said he would not; he threw the meat on the ground, and escaped. The patrol stopped him before I lost sight of him.

WILLIAM RANDALL. I am a patrol. I stopped the prisoner.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200217-35

384. HUMPHRY PAGE was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of January , one garnet and pearl cross, value 30 s., and one garnet locket, value 18 s. , the goods of Francis Featherstone .

FRANCIS FEATHERSTONE . I am a working jeweller , and live in Great New-street, Fetter-lane ; the prisoner was my errand-boy . On the 21st of January I lost a garnet locket and a pearl cross. I sent the prisoner to deliver them to Mr. Fisher, Leicester-square; I afterwards applied for the settlement of the account, and found they had not been delivered; on my return home the prisoner had absconded. On the 26th he was brought to me by Caines, and I asked him what he had done with my property? Some duplicates were found on him.

GEORGE CAINES . I live in Lower West-street, Smithfield; the prisoner and his father lodged with me. On the 26th of January the prosecutor came to inquire for him - he had not been home all night; he came home between ten and eleven o'clock that morning. I told him his master had been for him, and he had better go to him; he cried very much, and said he had got duplicates of the greatest part of the property. I took him to his master, and as we went up Shoe-lane he gave me eight duplicates in a piece of paper - they referred to Cotterrell's in Shoe-lane.

THOMAS PRESTIGE . I received the prisoner in custody, and have eight duplicates, which Caines gave to me.

JOHN FLOWER . I am servant to Mr. Cotterrell, who is a pawnbroker, and lives in Shoe-lane. On the 17th of January a garnet locket and pearl cross were pledged with me by the prisoner, in the name of Jones - the apprentice took them in in my presence.

Q. Were any questions asked him - A. The first time he came was the first of January; he said he came from his master, Mr. Featherstone, New-street - I made no inquiry; I have known the boy four years. I told the apprentice to take no more, as I thought they were made up to cheat us.

(Property produced and sworn to)

GUILTY . Aged 13.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200217-36

385. THOMAS JAMES was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of February , from the person of William Miller , two 1 l. Bank notes, his property .

WILLIAM MILLER . I am a seaman belonging to Glasgow. On the 18th of February, about four o'clock, I received two 1 l. notes at an office in Doctor's Commons; I put them into a canvass purse in my jacket-pocket. I was with Thompson, and told him I had lost them; the prisoner was before me. He turned back, and said,

"Do you say I have got your money?" I said,

"I don't know, but there was nobody in the office but you" - he was in the office when I received it; he scratched my face. I turned back to see if I had dropped it in the office, but could not find it; he was secured while I was gone. I had noticed Nos. 2 and 4, on the notes when I took them - he was quite a stranger.

ALEXANDER THOMPSON . I am a seaman, and was with Miller; he received his money, and I saw him put two notes into a bag, and put the bag into his pocket in a public-house - the prisoner stood close by us at the time - he was a stranger. In about five minutes Miller said he had lost his money. I told the prisoner that Miller had lost his money, and blamed him for it, as nobody but him was near enough to take it. The prisoner went forward, swore

at him, pushed him about, and struck him in the face. I advised Miller to go back, and see if he had dropped it, and he went; I saw the prisoner throw away a small canvass bag, and then put his hand to his breeches-pocket. I seized him, and called for assistance; he pulled his hand out, and put some paper into his mouth, then dropped it - it was two 1 l. notes. He was secured.

JOHN COMBS , ESQ. I live in Cloak-lane. I was coming down Dowgate-hill between four and five o'clock in the afternoon, and saw several people wrangling; Thompson desired me to come and take the part of a poor sailor; he said the prisoner had put two pieces of paper into his mouth - he was in the custody of several carmen. I said

"You had better give the man his money, or I will give you in charge" - he made no answer. I told the men to take him to the constable's, which was done; he struggled to get away. One of the carmen said it was in his mouth, seized his throat, and I saw him disgorge the two 1 l. notes.

JOSEPH COVERLEY . I am a constable. Mr. Combs gave me the notes.

WILLIAM MILLER re-examined. They are the two notes, and have the Nos. 4 and 2 on them.

Prisoner's Defence. I was much in liquor, and recollect nothing of it.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200217-37

386. EDWARD CLARE and JOHN ALLEN were indicted for stealing, on the 18th of February , one handkerchief, value 6 s., the goods of Jasper Judge , from his person .

JASPER JUDGE. I keep a lace-warehouse in Coleman-street. On the 18th of February, between two and three o'clock in the afternoon, I was in Maiden-lane, Cheapside , and felt something at my pocket, I immediately turned round, and observed the prisoner and two others, behind I felt and missed my handkerchief, which was safe two minutes before - Clare was behind the other two. They were secured, and the third boy was remanded. I picked my handkerchief off the ground - it dropped from one of the three.

ROBERT HESKETH . I am a constable. I saw the prisoners in company with another lad, who is in custody. I saw Clare take the handkerchief from the prosecutor's pocket - the other two were covering him; he immediately gave it to Allen; Judge turned round and picked it up. I had been following them all three from Prince's-street. As I went along Allen threw another handkerchief away.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

CLARE - GUILTY . Aged 13.

ALLEN - GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200217-38

387. DANIEL JAMES NOWLAND was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of February , one funnel and hose, value 1 l. , the goods of Thomas Walter .

THOMAS WALTER . I keep the Crown, in St. Paul's Church-yard . Last night the prisoner came to my house, and I gave him a funnel and hose to take to Child, Vickers, and Co., King-street, Borough - he said he lived in Stoney-street. He left my house between eight and nine o'clock. I found him at Guildhall with it this morning.

CORNELIUS ELLIS . I keep the Horse Shoe, public-house, Fleet-street. The prisoner came to my house about half-past eleven o'clock at night, and offered the funnel-hose for sale - he was quite sober. I told the watchman to look after him.

WILLIAM DAVIS . I am a watchman. I followed the prisoner out of Ellis's house, down a court, he turned towards Temple-bar. I took him by the arm, and he said he was going to the Borough to deliver the hose to the owner. I told him that was not the way, and took him in charge.

WILLIAM TURNER . The prisoner was brought to the watch-house. He said he received the hose from Mr. Taylor, and was going to take it to Thomas-street. He could not tell who the owner was.

Prisoner's Defence. I went to the distiller's, but they were shut up, and I meant to deliver it in the morning.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200217-39

FOURTH DAY, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 21.

388. JAMES BARNES was indicted for that he, at the General Quarter Session of the Peace, holden within and for the city of Bristol, on the 8th of January, in the 56th year of the reign of his late Majesty, George the Third, was convicted of grand larceny, and was ordered to be transported beyond the Seas for the term of seven years, to such place as His Majesty, with the advice of his Privy Council, should think fit to declare and appoint, and that he, on the 8th of November last, at St. James, Westminster , feloniously was at large, without lawful cause, before the expiration of the said term, for which he was so ordered to be transported .

For the Prosecution, MR. ADOLPHUS.

JOHN SMITH . I have come from Bristol, and produce a copy of the record of the conviction of James Barnes , which I saw the Clerk of the Peace sign. I attended at Bristol; the prisoner is the person who was tried - I am certain of it. I took him into custody, and conveyed him from Bath to Bristol.

The certificate of the prisoner's conviction, and his being sentenced to be transported for seven years, was then put in and read.

JOHN HUNT. I am a Sergeant in the Royal Marines. On the 7th or 8th of November last, the prisoner enlisted with me in the parish of St. James, Westminster, by the name of James Barnes . He was at large there of his own accord; his conduct was very good.

Prisoner's Defence. (Written.) The morning after my escape from the hulks, I entered into the Marines, intending to serve my King and country. I would gladly enter the service again, and endeavour to make amends for my past misconduct.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged. 23.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18200217-40

389 RICHARD HAMMOND was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of January , one bottle, value 1 s., and 3 lbs. of castor oil, value 15 s. , the property of Benjamin Toney Hopwell .

BENJAMIN TONEY HOPWELL . I am an apothecary , and live in George-street, Portman-square . On the 24th of January, about half-past nine o'clock in the morning, I was in my back parlour, and on turning round I saw the prisoner's back; he was in the act of taking a bottle of castor oil off the shelf; he put it under the flap of his coat, and ran out. I immediately followed, took him into custody, and took the oil from him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I went in for liquorice. I was reading the label of the bottle, and he said I stole it.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18200217-41

390. SAMUEL BRYANT was indicted for that he, on the 5th of January , feloniously did dispose of and put away, a certain forged Bank note, for payment of 5 l., with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England , he well knowing it to be forged and counterfeited .

SECOND COUNT, for offering to George Sheran , a like forged note, with a like intent.

THIRD AND FOURTH COUNTS, the same, only stating the forged instrument to be a promissory note for the payment of money, instead of a Bank note.

FOUR OTHER COUNTS, stating his intent to be to defraud the said George Sheran .

For the Prosecution, MR. SERGEANT BOSANQUET and MR. BOLLAND.

GEORGE SCHERAN . I am a salesman , and live in Ratcliffe-highway . I knew the prisoner before this circumstance; he bought a jacket of me once - I did not know his residence. On Wednesday, the 5th of January, he came for a jacket and breeches which he had ordered - he gave me the name of Samuel Bryant when I measured him. On the 5th, when I delivered him the clothes, he tendered me a 5 l. note; I suspected it, and sent my wife to a neighbour with it. I asked him his address? he said,

"No. 54, Great Hermitage-street" - (looks at one) - this is the note. My wife returned with Thomas and Simmons; they gave me the note, and I sent for an officer by their advice.

FRANCIS JACKSON . I am a beadle. On the 5th of January I was sent for, and took the prisoner in charge; Simmons said, in his presence, that he had paid a note which he suspected to be bad. I asked the prisoner who he received it from? he said from a man named John Smith , the mate of a ship - he could not tell me the name of the ship or the captain. He said he only knew Smith by being on board the ship, and that he received the note for work done, but he could not tell me for what work. He said he met Smith by chance in the Strand, and he paid him this note, and that he had sailed to the Cape of Good Hope. I asked him where he lodged? he said at No. 54, Great Hermitage-street, opposite Coxhead and Co's. stave wharf. I said there was no wharf there; he said,

"Well then it is facing the brewery." I said there was no brew-house in the street, and that he must mean Wapping-street; he said,

"Well, then I suppose it is Wapping-street, but I am a stranger there." He said he lodged at a chandler's shop, up steps, next door to a barber's, and that was Smith's also. I told him his answers were not satisfactory, and took him into custody. He referred me to Mr, Cottom's and Mr. Christie's, where he said he worked - I could get no intelligence of him from them. There is no chandler's shop next door to a barber's, as he described.

JURY. Q. I believe there is a stave wharf in Hermitage-street - A. There is none now. The brewhouse does not come into the street - it is Steward's cooperage.

SARAH BARROWLEY . I have occupied No. 54, Great Hermitage-street - it is a private house. I never saw the prisoner.

WILLIAM TINDLEY . I live at No. 54, Wapping-street, about two hundred yards from Great Hermitage-street. I never saw the prisoner; there is a barber's shop about ten doors from my house, and a chandler's shop a few doors from it.

JURY. Q. Is there any communication between Coxhead and Co's. upper wharf and Hermitage-street - A. I believe part of the wharf communicates with it.

ALEXANDER CHRISTIE . I am a lighterman at Galley Quay; the prisoner was not in my service in January - he worked for me about three years ago. I discharged him on the 18th of December last; he went by the name of Saltenstall - I never knew him by the name of Bryant.

JAMES COTTOM . I keep the Antigalican, public-house, in Tooley-street. I have known the prisoner fifteen years by the name of Saltenstall. Any inquiry made at my house for Bryant would meet with no information.

JOHN LEES . I am an inspector of Bank notes. The note is forged in every respect.

FRANCIS KENSALL . I am a cashier at the Bank. The note is not my signature, which it purports to bear.

Prisoner's Defence. I took it in payment. I frequently endorse notes with Bryant for brevity, as it is my mother's maiden name.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18200217-42

391. CHARLES HUNT was indicted for that he, on the 12th of January , at St. James, Clerkenwell , feloniously did dispose of and put away, a certain forged and counterfeit Bank note - (setting it forth No. 6736, 1 l. dated December, 22, 1819; signed J. Tilbury) - with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England , he well knowing it to be forged and counterfeited .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only calling the forged instrument a promissory note for the payment of money, instead of a bank note.

TWO OTHER COUNTS, the same, only with intent to defraud Robert Thomson .

Counsel as before.

ROBERT THOMSON. I am a baker , and live in Exeter-street, Covent-garden . On the 12th of January, between six and eight o'clock at night, the prisoner came to my shop with a 1 l. note, and asked for change for Mr. Rogers, a grocer in the Strand - he said Mr. Rogers was short of

change, and had sent him; he was dressed in a dark coloured coat and waistcoat, a worsted jacket under his coat, with red wristbands, a white neck-handkerchief, and without his hat; he had a grocer's apron on, turned down in the front with a fringe to it, and fastened behind with a hook; Mr. Rogers is a customer of mine, and I gave him change without the least hesitation - he rang the silver on the counter and while he was so doing, I wrote on the note,

"Rogers, grocer, Strand, January 12 - 20" - (looks at one) - this is it; I folded it up, and put it into my pocket. Next night my attention was called to it, and the day after I found it was forged. I applied to Rogers, and found he had never sent him. I am certain he is the man.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Was it dark - A. Yes, nobody else was in the shop - I am certain he is the man; I have a strong gas light in my shop. I paid the note away with fifteen others to Mr. Wilson, and marked them all. It was returned from the Bank.

Q. How long after did you see the prisoner - A. I first saw him ten or twelve days after at the Brown Bear , public-house, Bow-street, with nine or ten others; I went there to see a painter named Brown, and saw the prisoner; I knew him directly, but did not charge him with it, as there were so many bad characters there. Immediately as the prisoner saw me his head dropped on the table, and he never lifted it up again, except when he took his hat off to wipe his head. Two days after, Brown and Maidment came down to me, and took a description of the prisoner - I heard he was taken. I understood he lodged at that house.

LEWIS ROGERS . I am a grocer, and live in the Strand. I deal with Thomson, and live near him; I never sent the prisoner to him for change. I never saw him before to my knowledge - I sent nobody there.

JEREMIAH MAIDMENT . I took the prisoner into custody at the Brown Bear , public-house, in Bow-street, on the Saturday morning after I had received information from Thomson.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you find any bad notes on him - A. No, two good ones; I took him in the public-house with another. I had been after him some time - the upper part does not belong to the public-house.

JOHN LEES . I am an inspector of Bank notes. The note is forged in every respect, and is not the signature of Tilbury.

JOHN TILBURY . I am signing-clerk at the Bank; there is no other of my name. The note has not my signature.

(The note was then put in and read.)

Prisoner's Defence. Brown knew I was at the Brown Bear . I rather think he told Thompson that I was in the habit of passing bad notes, as he once told me so himself. I never had one in my possession.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 17.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Richardson.

Reference Number: t18200217-43

392. STEPHEN GOLD was indicted for feloniously, knowingly, and without lawful excuse, having three forged notes in his possession, he well knowing them to be forged .

Counsel as before.

DENNIS SINCLAIR . I am waiter at the Newcastle Arms, Nightingale-lane, East Smithfield . On the 22d of January, the prisoner was in the parlour; a man, named Smith, asked him for the loan of 5 s. I afterwards saw him come into the taproom alone; he had a glass of rum and water, which came to 6 d., and gave me a 1 l. note. I immediately took it to Mr. Lange, at the bar, and told him Stephen Gold had given it to me, as I had heard Smith call him so. It was not long before he came out, and my master, asked me if that was the man? I said Yes. He went out, came in again, and asked me for the change. I said my master would give it to him, and then went into the taproom.

LUDOWIG LANGE. I keep the house - the prisoner was there; Sinclair brought a 1 l. note out to pay for a glass of rum and water. The prisoner went out, returned in a few minutes, and came before the bar for his change. I asked him where he got the note? he said, over the water, and that he worked for a distiller. I said that it was forged; he gave me 1 s. in silver, and I returned him the note, having marked it with F; he was searched in my house about ten minutes afterwards, and some notes found on him. I sent for a constable, as I found I had another bad note, which I suspected Smith had passed, but he was gone.

THOMAS HARRISON . I am a beadle. I was sent for to Lange's, took the prisoner in charge as he came out of the taproom, and said,

"I suspect you have some bad notes about you." I took him in front of the bar, searched him, and found a pocket-book in his waistcoat-pocket, containing five 1 l. notes. I asked him how he got them? he said he would sooner die under the stick (gallows) first, than tell me. Several people came into the watch-house, and among others a Mr. King. The prisoner said to him

"You appear to be a gentleman, I'll tell you how I got them. I picked the pocket-book and notes up on Tower-hill this morning." Soon after Smith was brought in, charged with passing a bad note to Lange. He was telling me how he came by it, but the prisoner called through a hole, and said,

"Smith, if you split I will burst you when you come in;" in consequence of which I took Smith to another watch-house. Next morning the prisoner said he did not know that he had the pocket-book, and if he had, somebody must have put it into his pocket.

JOHN LEES . The five notes are all forged in every respect, and off the same plate.

ROBERT LOWE . I am a signing-clerk. Four of them bear my name, but are not my signature.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not know that I had them.

GUILTY Aged 24.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18200217-44

393. WILLIAM KENNELLY was indicted for that he, on the 23d of January , being in the dwelling-house of Elizabeth Rickards , did steal one sheet, value 3 s.; one tablecloth, value 3 s., her property; one pelisse, value 4 s.; one cloak, value 2 s.; four gowns, value 10 s.; and three aprons, value 18 d., the property of Sarah Dixon ; and that he afterwards (to wit), about two o'clock in the night, burglariously did break the said dwelling-house, and get out of the same .

SARAH DIXON. I am niece to Elizabeth Rickards , who keeps a coffee-shop in Holywell-lane, Shoreditch . On the 22d of January, about two o'clock in the morning, the prisoner came and engaged a bed for the night - we open about that time - he went to bed. About a quarter of an hour after I went to see if my aunt's bed-room door was safe, and found the prisoner's door wide open. I suspected something, went into his room, and found him lying on the bed, with a pelisse and sheet wrapped round him; he was dressed. I asked him how he came by them? he said a coachman, who slept up stairs, gave them to him. I examined further, and found all the articles stated in the indictment concealed in his bosom and in his breeches. He was intoxicated. I was going to leave the room, he said he would go and shew me the man who gave them to him - I pushed him on the bed, shut the door, and gave the alarm; my aunt and one of the lodgers came up. We found he had escaped out of the window - the window was a little open when I first went into the room. The officers came directly, and traced his footmarks in the snow on the tiles, to the window of some back premises.

Q. Do you always keep such late hours - A. We open at that time, and do not close again all day.

JOSEPH DAVIS . I am a headborough. I was fetched to the house about two o'clock in the morning, saw the footmarks on the tiling, and heard a man's voice faintly say,

"For God's sake let me in!" - he was at the window of a house in the court. I and Reeve went up Red Lion-court to the house - two women were terribly frightened on seeing him come in at the window. I went up stairs, and found the prisoner sitting in a chair under the window, with a great deal of blood about his person. I asked him how he could rob the people? he cried, and begged for mercy, and said another man gave him the things to bring down stairs. He appeared very much in liquor. I found a bolt broken off the closet door of Rickards's bedroom, where the property was stolen from.

JOSEPH REEVE . I am a constable. I was with Davis, his account is correct. I asked the prisoner how he became so bloody? he said the glass bottles cut him when he got over the tiles.

ELIZABETH RICKARDS . I keep the house. Nobody but the prisoner slept there that night. My drawers were broken open.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The things were thrown into the room.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Of stealing, but not of the burglary.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Richardson.

Reference Number: t18200217-45

394. ELIZABETH WING was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of December , in the dwelling-house of Joseph Organ , two 10 l. and one 1 l. Bank notes, his property .

JOSEPH ORGAN . I am a shoemaker , and live at Limehouse . About three weeks before the robbery, the prisoner was employed to make up some linen for my wife. On the 7th of December, about five o'clock in the evening, I went out, and left my daughter-in-law in the house. I had a 1 l. note in the till of my box, and two 10 l. notes at the bottom of my box, which was in the shop. I only rent two rooms in the house, the landlord lives there. I returned in about three-quarters of an hour, and found a drawer moved off the box, the box was open, and the money gone. I questioned the girl, and had the prisoner apprehended. The notes were safe when I went out.

ELIZA SALMON . On the 7th of December my father-in-law left me and my little brother in the shop. The prisoner came in about five o'clock, and asked if my mother was at home? I said, No. She told me to fetch her half a quartern of liquor, I said my father would be angry if I did. She said,

"Go along! you will be back before your father returns." I went, and was sometime before I could get served - on my return I found she was gone. I saw that my father's tools were moved off the box. I left nobody but her and my little brother there.

JOHN LINES . I am a constable. Blandford apprehended the prisoner, and gave her into my charge.

GUILTY . Aged 29.

Of stealing, but not in a dwelling-house.

Confined One Year .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18200217-46

395. MARION PALMER was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of January , two pillow-cases, value 7 s., and three sheets, value 20 s. , the goods of George Miller .

GEORGE MILLER . I am a shoemaker ; the prisoner was my servant . On the 15th of January I missed a pair of ladies boots from the warehouse, which had been brought in the night before. Suspicion fell upon the prisoner, and on the Saturday following I sent for an officer to examine her boxes, in which he found a dark lanthorn ready trimmed, and six duplicates, three of which relates to this property, pledged in her name.

HAZLEWOOD WORRALL. I am an officer. I searched the prisoner's box, and found the dark lanthorn and duplicates.

WILLIAM FRICK . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Fleet-market. I have three sheets and a pair of pillow-cases, which I took in pledge of the prisoner, I believe. The duplicates are mine.

(Property produced and sworn to. )

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18200217-47

396. HENRY NORWOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of January , one handkerchief, value 1 s., the property of a person unknown, from his person .

WILLIAM HILL . I am an inspector of Hawkers and Pedlars. On the 31st of January, about twenty minutes before twelve o'clock, just before the Lord Mayor's carriage came up to Chancery-lane to meet the procession, on the day of proclamation - there was a great concourse of people. I saw the prisoner among a great number of others, whom I knew to be pickpockets. I saw the prisoner lay hold of a gentleman's pocket, and take this handkerchief out, he immediately put it into his bosom. I collared him, and asked the gentleman if he missed any thing? he missed his handkerchief; I produced it, and he claimed it. He followed me to St. Dunstan's watch-house, there was no

constable there. I took him to Fleet-market, the gentleman did not follow me, but sent to say he would not attend.

Prisoner's Defence. It hung out of the gentleman's pocket.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18200217-48

397. THOMAS GARDNER was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of February , one handkerchief, value 2 s., the property of Peter Adams , from his person .

PETER ADAMS . I am a solicitor . On Saturday, the 19th of February, about twelve o'clock at noon, I was in Newgate-street , and felt my handkerchief go from pocket - I turned round, and discovered the prisoner close behind me with it in his hand; I secured and took him to the Compter. He pleaded distress - 6 s. was found on him. I had seen him in Holborn, talking to other boys.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was walking with two lads before me, one of them threw the handkerchief down, and I picked it up.

GUILTY Aged 16.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18200217-49

398. JOHN POTTER was indicted for that he, about the hour of eight in the night of the 21st of January , at St. Andrew, Holborn , the dwelling-house of James Sadd feloniously and burglariously did break and enter, with intent to steal, and stealing therein three sheets, value 1 l. 10 s.; two table-cloths, value 14 s.; one towel, value 6 d.; twelve yards of gingham, value 12 s., and two keys, value 6 d. his property .

JAMES SADD . I am a builder , and live in Graystoke-place, Fetter-lane , in the parish of St. Andrew, Holborn, and keep the house. On the 21st of January, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, the prisoner, I suppose, secreted himself in the workshop till the men were gone, and then forced his way into the dwelling-house by forcing a door open, which goes with a spring latch - it was forced with a screw-driver, there are the marks of it on the door. I know nothing of it, except that the property is mine.

JOHN BYNON . I am foreman to Mr. Sadd. At night, when the men left work, I locked up the premises a few minutes after six o'clock; the prisoner was formerly a workman there, but not then - he was discharged about Christmas.

Q. Was the door between the shop and the house fast - A. Yes, my Lord; I shut it, and returned to the building between seven and eight o'clock that evening - I had occasion to go to the shop, and saw the counting-house door open, and the rushlight blown out, which I had left alight for Mr. Sadd, who was gone out to dinner. I went to the bottom of the stairs, and called out Master! twice, nobody answered. I went down stairs, got a light, and locked myself and another man in the building; went up stairs, across the workshop, through the counting-house to the street-door, and tried the street-door, which was fast. I had locked it in the afternoon, and given Mr. Sadd the key. On returning to go up stairs again, I discovered the prisoner in the passage, with a bundle, and his shoes in his hand. I asked him what he did there? immediately took hold of him, and said he should not go from me till I took him to a place of justice. I took him to the gates, and sent for Hawlks to assist me in taking him to the Compter. As he went along he threw a key away, a young man picked it up, and gave it to Hawlks; and as we crossed over to Giltspur-street he gave me another key. Hawlks took the bundle. It was between seven and eight o'clock at night - I fastened the doors at six.

Prisoner. Q. Did you find the bundle on me - A. He stood alongside of it. Part was tied up, and part not tied - it was brought from up stairs into the passage.

JAMES HAWLKS . I am fellow-workman with Bynon - he sent to my lodgings for me. When I got out, I found he had got hold of the prisoner outside the shop-gates in Graystoke-place; he told me to go into the passage, and I should find a bundle; I went and saw it lying in the passage, partly tied up; I brought it out, went with him to Giltspur-street Compter. and delivered it to Brand there. I saw the prisoner lay a screw-driver on the table at the Compter, which I afterwards saw the officer try to the door, it seemed to fit the marks.

WILLIAM BRAND . I am a marshalsman. On the 21st of January, about eight o'clock at night, the prisoner was given into my charge with a bundle, containing the articles stated in the indictment - a screw-driver was given to me as coming from the prisoner. I then searched him, and found two small picklock keys, and a number of duplicates of other property. I then went to the premises, and found the door which goes out of the workshop into the dwelling-house had been forced by an instrument. I applied the screw-driver to the marks on the door-post, it appeared to correspond with them exactly. I went up stairs, and found that another door had been tried by the same instrument, but was not forced. The prisoner had given up two larger keys, which had been taken from some large locks in the counting-house; we tried them, and they fitted the locks in the counting-house. The two pieces of gingham were not in the bundle - I found them by the gate, apparently as if they had been dropped in coming out.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. There are things in the bundle which were not there when I was at the Compter. I saw the door open, and went in, knowing the place; I stopped there sometime. The door was shut while I was in there. I went to the hall-door, intending to go out that way - two women, and other people, went in and out while I stopped.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 36.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18200217-50

399. WILLIAM RICKETS was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of January , one till, value 10 d., and 15 s., in copper monies numbered , the property of Henry Stuckey .

HENRY STUCKEY . I keep the Barley Mow, public-house, Upper Thames-street . On the 26th of January, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I was in my parlour,

heard my till and copper fall, and saw the prisoner run from the bar - I pursued, and secured him in High Timber-street. He had left the till on the floor - it contained 15 s. in copper. I never lost sight of him.

Prisoner's Defence. He took me half a mile from the house.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined Six Months , and Whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18200217-51

400. CHARLES NYE was indicted for embezzling one bill of exchange, for payment of and value 81 l. 7 s. 1 d. , which he had received on account of John Thompson , Thomas Bonar , John Christopher Wegulin , and Andrew Henry Thompson , his masters.

SECOND COUNT, for stealing the said bill.

ANDREW HENRY THOMPSON , ESQ. I am in partnership with John Thompson , Thomas Bonar , and John Christopher Wegulin ; the prisoner was our clerk , and had been so five or six years, and was entrusted with checks and money. On Saturday, the 4th of September , I gave him a number of bills, and told him to pay them into Messrs. Masterman's, as was usual every Saturday, for the purpose of their receiving the assets when due in the following week. This bill for 81 l. 7 s. 1 d., accepted by S. and G. Thornton and Co., payable at Sir Peter Pole 's, was among them; Messrs. Masterman never accounted to us for it. I hold the bill in my hand, and find by the back of it, over our endorsement, are the words

"Received for," and under it,

" Charles Nye ," which is the prisoner's handwriting. I had given him no authority to receive it - his duty was to pay it into the bankers'.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. He was employed to receive money on bills - A. No, not on bills; we seldom employed him to receive money.

THOMAS CLIFTON . I am clerk to Sir Peter Pole and Co. I paid this bill, and took the receipt. It did not come from Messrs. Masterman's; if it had it would be paid at the clearing-house.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr Recorder.

Reference Number: t18200217-52

401. WILLIAM LAYCON was indicted for a misdemeanour .

For the Prosecution, MR. ADOLPHUS.

CHARLES M'ALPINE . I am a perfumer , and live in Threadneedle-street . On the 15th of January , about one o'clock, the prisoner came, and bought a cake of Windsor soap, which came to 4 d. - he tendered me 1 s. I was about to sound it on the counter, when he put his hands across, and said,

"If you don't like it I will give you another." I said,

"No, I had rather not, for I rather think I have taken a few of these before from you." He immediately made the best of his way to the door, and endeavoured to force himself out. I said,

"Now I have got you, and will keep you." He said,

"For God's sake don't keep me, I am an old man, and the cold will kill me!" He began crying out Murder! I had sent for an officer before he tendered the money. He came, and I gave him in charge - another counterfeit shilling was found on him.

WILLIAM BRADBURY . I am an officer. I found the prisoner in the shop. He cried out Murder! said nobody should secure him, and offered me 5 s. to let him go. He attempted to put his hand into his left pocket, where I found a bad shilling.

JONAH SEWELL . I am assistant to the Solicitor of the Mint. The shillings are both bad, and off the same die.

Prisoner's Defence I received it in change.

GUILTY . Aged 66.

Confined One Year , and to find Sureties for Two Years more .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18200217-53

402. GEORGE TAYLOR was indicted for unlawfully receiving stolen goods, the property of William Partridge and Michael Farrell , well knowing them to have been stolen .

WILLIAM PARTRIDGE . I am servant in a Manchester warehouse. I lost a quantity of things from my house, and found them on the 21st of January at the prisoner's shop in Bridgewater-gardens - he keeps an old iron shop . I suspected Lowther, and charged him with it, as I had watched him out of the house, followed him to the prisoner's, and found him there, concealed behind a curtain. I asked the prisoner if he had brought any thing in? he said No - I found 1 s. 1 d. in the boy's hand, told the prisoner what I had lost, and if he had brought it there to say so, but he positively denied it. I got a warrant, and found the property on the premises.

CHARLES EDWARD LOWTHER . I am an errand-boy. I sold the prisoner a salt-box for a halfpenny, a pair of scales for 2 d., a jar for a halfpenny, a frying-pan for 2 d., a coffee-pot for 2 d., two brushes for 1 1/2 d., and a girdle for 3 1/2 d. I stole them from the prosecutor's house, where I lived.

MICHAEL FARRELL . I met the boy coming out of the prisoner's shop, took him back, and asked the prisoner if he had sold any thing? He said No, he had been to buy a pennyworth of nails. The frying-pan is mine - it was quite new, and cost 2 s. 6 d.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I gave the full value for them.

GUILTY . Aged 66.

Confined Six Months .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18200217-54

FIFTH DAY, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 22.

403. GEORGE WELLINGTON was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of November , one coat, value 20 s. , the goods of James Campbell .

ROBERT HEWITT . I am servant to Mr. James Campbell , who lives in Baker-street . On the 26th of January, about nine o'clock in the morning, I brought the gig out of the stable - the coat was on the gig; I went into the stable to fetch the horse out, and a boy hallooed out that the coat was gone. I directly pursued the prisoner, and saw it under his arm. He threw it down, and was stopped by Christmas.

JOHN CHRISTMAS . I was going by, heard the cry, and stopped the prisoner at the corner of Baker-street - he threatened to knock me down. Hewitt was close behind with the great coat.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18200217-55

404. WILLIAM HENRY LUNNON was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of January , one box, value 2 s.; four shirts, value 1 l.; six handkerchiefs, value 6 s., and one great coat, value 10 s. , the goods of Henry Wardall .

HENRY WARDALL . I am a painter , and live in Old Gravel-lane. On the 7th of January the prisoner accompanied William Smart to my house with a cart load of wood. Smart said the prisoner came to shew him the way, and he was to shew him the way from my house to London Bridge, as well, for 6 d., which I paid him, with 3 d. for assisting to unload the cart, and gave him a pint of beer. I wrote them a list of places where they were to call for parcels, and delivered a box of linen into the cart from my own house. I have now got the direction I gave to them, and find that,

"Matthews, No. 23, Bethnal-green-road," has been added to it. The box contained the articles stated in the indictment.

WILLIAM SMART . I am carrier from Southgate. The prisoner came to shew me the way; the box of linen was put into the cart by Wardall, and the prisoner brought me the direction in his hand, and said I was to go to Bethnal-green ; I could not read, but I said I thought I had been to all the places my master had told me. He said,

"If you can't read it, we will get somebody to read it," which he did; he then said,

"Go and fetch the things, and I will mind the cart." I said,

"No, you go, and I will mind the cart." He pretended to go after them, returned, and said he had seen the things, but the man would not let him have them, and I must go myself. I said we would take the horse and cart and both go, but he persuaded me to go alone. I left him in care of the cart, and when I got there I could find no such name or number. I came back, and found the prisoner and the box gone - he left the whip at a shop.

JOHN FORRESTER . The prisoner was given into my charge; I found nothing on him.

Prisoner's Defence. A man brought me the direction, and said another parcel was to be received - I gave it to Smart, The same man came and told me to follow him, and I left the cart.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18200217-56

405. ANN ELIZABETH HARWOOD alias ELIZABETH ADAMS was indicted for that she, on the 25th of January , at St. Marylebow, in the ward of Cheap , in London, feloniously did dispose of and put away, a certain forged and counterfeit Bank note - (setting it forth No. 15870, dated December 22, 1819, 1 l. Signed W. Wade) - with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England , she well knowing it to be forged and counterfeited .

SECOND COUNT, for feloniously offering to John Harwood , a like forged and counterfeit Bank note, with a like intent, she well knowing it to be forged and counterfeited.

THIRD AND FOURTH COUNTS, the same, only calling the forged instrument a promissory note for the payment of money, instead of a Bank note.

FOUR OTHER COUNTS, the same, only stating the prisoner's intent to be to defraud the said John Harwood .

For the Prosecution, MR. SERGEANT BOSANQUET and MR. BOLLAND.

JOHN HARWOOD . I am a grocer , and live in Long-lane, Smithfield . On the 25th of January, about seven o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came to the shop, and bought articles amounting to 2 s. 2 d., for which she offered me a 1 l. Bank note; on looking at it I saw it was forged, and immediately told her so. She said she did not know it, but she could change it from where she had it, and wished me to return it. I kept it, and asked her where she got it? I told her it was quite new, and had no writing on it. She said she would not tell me, but she got it honestly; at last she said she got it from a gentleman at No. 13, Seacoal-lane, whom she had picked up in the street, and he took her there, and gave her this pound note that evening. I asked her how she got her livelyhood? she said it was the first time she ever submitted to this, and that she worked as a shoebinder for Mr. Miller, in Skinner-street. She said she went into the front room on the first floor with the gentleman, and he paid 3 s. to the mistress of the house, for the use of the room, in addition to the pound note.

Q. Did she give any other account of herself - A.She said she was married, and her husband's name was Turner, that he was a hackney coachman, and named the number that he drove, which I do not remember. I asked her where she lived? she said at No. 108, Saffron-hill, with her mother, whose name was Adams, and that her name was Adams. I said,

"You told me you was married to Turner." She said he had deserted her, therefore she went by the name of Adams. I sent for Godfrey, who came, and I told him the note was offered to me, and I was sure it was bad; I gave it to him - the prisoner was close by. Previous to that she had called my wife to the back of the shop, and said she wanted to go into the yard; Godfrey stood at the counter with her - the shop door was open; we have a very strong light in the shop; about a dozen people were collected round the door. A boy rushed into the shop between her and Godfrey, and asked for a pennyworth of something? I said we had not got it, and he went out.

Q. Did he come in like a customer - A. No. He came in violently, and seemed to try to get between her and the constable. My wife proceeded to search her, but nothing was found on her, except 6 d. While we were searching her, immediately after the boy went out, a mob of fifty or a hundred persons collected, and broke my windows, so that I was obliged to shut up. We sent for several neighbours, and took her to the watch-house; she went quietly, but several of the mob called out,

"Rescue!" As soon as the mob dispersed, I and the officer took her to Seacoal-lane.

We said we came respecting a forged note which the prisoner said she had taken there that night of a gentleman; The woman said,

"She has not been here, for I have only had a certain number of persons here to night, and I know them all." I said the prisoner said she had been taken into the room on the first floor. The woman said she was positive she had not, and asked her to describe the furniture? she did so, and the woman's answer was,

"That description would have done very well nine months ago, but it is quite different now" - we waited some time to go into the room, but it was engaged. We took her to Mr. Miller's; the foreman recognized her person, and said he had seen her there some eight or nine months ago, and she had then been in the habit of bringing home work for a person who worked for them, but they knew nothing of her now. I then left her in the custody of Godfrey and another officer, to take her to Saffron-hill.

Q. When you refused to give the note up, what did you do with it - A. I placed a weight upon it on the counter, and as soon as Godfrey came he marked it; it was never out of my sight till then - I saw him mark it - (looks at one) - this is it. My wife said, in her presence, that she found a memorandum on her. When she was at Seacoal-lane, she began to state the situation of the bed in the room, and said the furniture was a chintz pattern, and such a colour, and that the window-curtains were the same.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not send a boy with the note to a neighbour to see if it was good - A. No; I sent him for Godfrey, but the note was not out of my presence until Godfrey came and marked it; he then took it out to ask an opinion on it. The boy never touched the note.

GEORGE GODFREY . I am superintendant of the watch at St. Sepulchre's. On the 25th of January Harwood sent for me, he said the prisoner had tendered a bad 1 l. note, which he gave me. I asked him if he was sure it was bad? he said he was. I told him he had better not act upon his own judgment, and I would shew it to a friend of mine in the neighbourhood, who was a very good judge. He gave me the note, I held it in my hand, and asked the prisoner her name? she said, it was

" Eliza Adams , No. 108, Saffron-hill" - that she met a gentleman that evening, who took her to No. 13, Seacoal-lane, to the front room on the first floor, and paid 3 s. for the use of the room. She said she was a married woman. The prosecutor then stated that she had wanted to go backwards, and he wished her to be searched. We took her into the parlour, where Mrs. Harwood and I searched her, and found 6 d., with a written address on her.

Q. Before that did any thing happen - A. While I stood with her at the counter, a boy rushed in in a violent way between me and the prisoner, though we stood very close together, he forced himself through. I suspected from his manner that he came for no good purpose, and put him on the other side of the woman - he asked for a pennyworth of something, Mr. Harwood did not serve him, and he went out. Before I searched her, I took the note out to a friend and shewed it to him - it was never out of my sight. I brought the same note back, and marked it then - I rather think I did not mark it till then - (looks at one) - this is it - it has my mark on it, and is the same note Harwood gave me. I did not give it to any person, nor did the prosecutor - it was not out of my sight till I marked it. After the boy left the shop a mob collected to a very great extent, and when we had nearly searched her I heard some glass break in front of the shop. Some neighbours came in; the prosecutor then shut up, and we took her out. I suspected an attempt to rescue would be made, and requested assistance. We went out of the private door - there was immediately a great groaning and hissing, and the mob pressed round me, but the neighbours came round me. The mob cried Rescue! we at last got her to the watch-house, sent for Worrall, another constable, and then took her to No. 13, Seacoal-lane; I there saw a female, and asked her if she had any knowledge of the prisoner? she looked at her, and said she thought she had seen her at that house. I asked her if she had seen her there that evening? she said she had not. The prisoner said she had been there with a gentleman - the woman persisted that she had not. The prisoner said she had been in the front room one pair of stairs; the woman said she had not been there that evening. I asked her to describe the room, as we could not have access to it - she said she thought she could describe it. I asked her what kind of a looking-glass there was? she said she could not tell. She said it was a fourpost bedstead, with chintz-pattern furniture, rather dark, and the window-curtains corresponded. The woman of the house said that might have been the state of the room sometime back, but now there were light curtains to the window. Finding we could not get access to the room we came away, and then took her to Miller's; she went in with great reluctance, I forced her in. Mr. Miller said he did not know her. A young man there looked at her, and after sometime seemed to recollect her - that she used to bring home work eight or nine months back, but he knew nothing of her now. She endeavoured to make herself known to him, by stating who she brought the work from - he then recollected her, and said it was eight or nine months back - we took her to the Compter. I went to Saffron-hill myself next morning, into the garret, as she said her mother lived in the garret. I found nobody at home in the garret, I then came down to the bottom of the house - it is a green-shop. I asked the man if he knew Adams? he said there was a woman of that name in the house, who had a daughter, but he thought she did not live with her mother, but she came backwards and forwards occasionally. The house is let out in tenements.

Prisoner. Q. Was not the note handed to several persons, and compared with two or three more - A. No, it was not - one note was taken from the till and compared with it; it was an older note than that, I had them both in my hand at the time. She did not ask me to go to Seacoal-lane, I suggested it. The note was not out of my sight till I marked it.

JOHN HARWOOD re-examined. It was not out of my presence till it was marked.

JOHN LACY HAWKINS . I am a marshalsman. I was in Smithfield, and saw an immense mob turning the corner of Long-lane, and going towards the Compter. The prisoner was in custody, I found she was charged with passing a forged note. There were about one hundred and fifty persons round, some of whom were very active. One said

"Go it!" another said,

"It won't do now" - I was

disguised, they did not know me. At last they said,

"Now go it! now is the time!" One of them lifted up this stick - (producing it) over his shoulder, he was close by Godfrey, and appeared in the act of going to strike him, I said,

"It will not do, indeed!" I snatched the stick from him, and said,

"I dare say you know me, and if you don't go you shall have it about your shins." They immediately dispersed.

SARAH HARRISON . I am servant at No. 13, Seacoal-lane, and remember the officers and the prosecutor, bringing the prisoner to our house, between eight and nine o'clock, I think. The prisoner had not been at the house that evening, nor in the front room up one pair of stairs. She attempted to describe the furniture of the room - she at first said it was white, then she said,

"I mean to say a white counterpane, and that the bed furniture was dark chintz, and the curtains the same." The furniture is a dark chintz-pattern, but the window curtains are a leopard-pattern, and quite light. About nine months ago they were nearly alike, any one might have made a mistake then, but they cannot now. I am certain she was not there that night. The room was engaged when they came. There is another servant, but I am the only one who receives the company, and shew them up stairs. I am certain I saw all the company that had been there that evening - I think there had been only four people. The persons who were in that room had been there from half-past five o'clock, and nobody but them had been in that room that day. The prisoner said she had been there at four o'clock, then she said it was after five, and then, that it was just before she went to Harwood's. She said there was no glass in the room, which there was. I think I saw her at the house some months ago.

GEORGE BELLAMY . I live with Mr. Miller, in Skinner-street. I remember the prisoner being brought to the shop, she did not work there then - she had been backwards and forwards, fetching and returning work, ten or eleven months before - I believe it was on her own account. She worked in the name of Nickling, or Nickley.

FRANCES BISHOP . I live at No. 108, Saffron-hill, which is let out in tenements. I have every reason to believe the prisoner lives there, by her coming in and going out at night. Her mother's name is Adams. She generally came in at night, when I was abed, but we knew her footstep. I have only lived there four months.

Q. Was there any interval during those four months when you did not see her - A. No, I used to see her almost every morning, or two or three times every week.

MR. WILLIAM ROBERT HENRY BROWN . I am keeper of Newgate. I was in the habit of seeing the prisoner from the 5th to the 15th of January, during that time she was not living on Saffron-hill. She went by the name of Harwood.

JOHN LEES . I am an inspector of Bank notes. The note is forged in every respect. It has the imitation of a water-mark, which is made afterwards by pressure. It is signed Wade, but is not his writing.

WILLIAM WADE . I am signing clerk. The note is not my signature - it is a bad imitation.

(The note was here put in and read.)

The prisoner made no defence.

SARAH CARTER . I have known the prisoner seven or eight years; she lived with her mother on Saffron-hill. I never knew her by any name but Adams. I produce the register of her baptism, (17th of February, 1796), which is in the name of Elizabeth Adams ; her mother gave it to me. I never knew of her being married to Turner.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 24.

London Jury, before Mr. Justice Richardson.

Reference Number: t18200217-57

406. MARY RANDALL was indicted for that she, on the 31st of January , in the 1st year of the reign of George IV. at St. Marylebow, feloniously did dispose of and put away a certain forged and counterfeit Bank note (setting it forth, No. 12140, 1 l., dated November 11, 1819, signed J. C. Baker), with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England , well knowing the same to be forged and counterfeited .

SECOND COUNT, for feloniously offering to John Minto a like forged and counterfeit Bank note, with a like intent, knowing it to be forged.

THIRD AND FOURTH COUNTS, the same, only calling the forged instrument a promissory note for payment of money instead of a Bank note.

FOUR OTHER COUNTS, the same, only stating the prisoner's intent to be to defraud the said John Minto .

EIGHT OTHER COUNTS, the same, only stating the felony to have been committed on the 29th of January, in the 60th year of the reign of George III., instead of the 31st of January, in the 1st year of the reign of George IV.

SEVENTEENTH AND EIGHTEENTH COUNTS, the same as the first two, only stating the felony to have been committed on the 29th of January, without mentioning in whose reign.

NINETEENTH AND TWENTIETH COUNTS, the same as the two last, only stating the prisoner's intent to be to defraud the said John Minto .

Counsel as before.

JOHN MINTO . I am a fishmonger , and live in Cow-lane, West Smithfield . On the 29th of January, at a few minutes before or after nine o'clock at night, the prisoner came to my shop, and purchased a quarter of a hundred of herrings, which came to 2 s. 3 d., and tendered me a 1 l. note. I took it out of her hand, and on looking at it, I suspected it, by the face being so glossy. I asked her for her address? she said,

"Jones, No. 25, White-street, back of St. George's church, Borough." I asked her where she got it from? she said from her husband, who was a coal-heaver, but she did not know who his master was. Her giving such an address, and her coming such a distance strengthened my suspicions, and I told her she could purchase herrings much cheaper nearer home; she said she wanted to get change to pay a person a few shillings. I told her to wait in the shop while I took it to a neighbour to ask if it was good. I left her with Mrs. Minto, and took it to a neighbour two doors off, and put it into his hand, but did not lose sight of it; he gave me back the same note, and returned with me - the prisoner was in the shop. I desired her to go into the parlour, then sent for Pike, the officer, who searched her, and found 1 s. 6 d. on her; I gave him the note, and he took it with her to the Compter. I went to the Compter directly after, and she there gave me her name as Mary Randall , No. 46, White-street - she before said No. 25.

Prisoner. Q. Was not the note given into several person's hands - A. Yes, five or six neighbours had it in my parlour, but I had it in sight all the time.

THOMAS PIKE . I am a constable. On the 29th of January I was sent for, and found the prisoner at Minto's; they said she had uttered a forged note; Minto gave it to me, and said he suspected it. I did not like to take her into custody without being satisfied that it was forged, and took it to a person, who satisfied me that it was - it was not out of my sight. I kept it in my possession, wrapped in a piece of paper, until I delivered it to a young man at the Bank, who marked it in my presence; I saw him write my name on it. It is the same note I received from Minto.

Q. Did you inquire in White-street - A. Yes, the next day I went and made every inquiry at Nos. 46, and 25, and at different numbers, but could find no such person - she said at the Compter it was 46; I inquired for both names. I heard her tell Minto that her name was Jones; I did not hear the residence she gave him.

ANTHONY SNELLGROVE . I am an inspector of Bank notes at the Bank. On the 31st of January Pike produced a note to me at the Bank - (looks at one) - this is it; I marked it, and wrote my own name and Pike's on it, in his presence. It is forged in every respect.

MICHAEL RICHES . I occupy No. 25, White-street, Southwark, at the back of St. George's Church, and have lived there twenty years; the prisoner did not live there - I do not know her, nor any person named Jones or Randall.

WILLIAM THOROUGHGOOD . I have occupied No. 25, White-street for two years and a half; it is the same house as Riches, only there are two entries. Neither the prisoner or any person named Jones or Randall lived there; there is no other No. 25. I do not know the prisoner.

WILLIAM CHANCE . On the 29th of January I occupied No. 46, White-street, Southwork; the prisoner did not live there - I do not know her - neither Jones or Randall lived there. I have lived there nine years, and have no lodgers.

JOHN LEES . I am an inspector of Bank notes. The notes is forged in every respect; the signature is not the writing of Baker - I am well acquainted with it.

JOHN COLD BAKER . I am a signing-clerk. The signature to the note is not my writing. It is a very good imitation.

(The note was here put in and read.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming from Salisbury, and met a bargeman at Brentford. I was in distress, and he gave me the note to stop with him till the morning. He said his name was Jones, and gave the me address which I have given, as I had no residence of my own.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 29.

London Jury, before Mr. Justice Richardson.

Reference Number: t18200217-58

407. DAVID MOSS was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of October , one pair of scales, value 30 s.; two locks, value 10 s., and three deal brackets, value 10 s. , the goods of Thomas Howis .

THOMAS HOWIS . I am a builder , and live at Wapping . On the 20th of October I let the prisoner a house for a week or ten days until he could suit himself with another. He came to me a few days after, and wanted to borrow a pair of scales that were in the shed, but I refused; a few days after, I missed them - he still remained in the house. I sent a man to say if he did not return them, I should get a warrant against him, and he said he would. I found them at an auction room in Brown's-lane. Just as I was leaving the room the prisoner came in, and said,

"What do you want here?" I said I would let him know - Haynes, the auctioneer, refused to give them up unless I prosecuted him; the locks and other fixtures were stolen from the house. I could not get him out of the house, and applied to the Magistrate, who said he could do nothing it, and that I must indict the prisoner if I did not like his decision.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. How long have you been out of gaol - A. I was in gaol about two years ago. I did not lend him the scales, or carry them to his house.

Q. When did you tell the officer not to take the prisoner, that you might say he ran away - A. I said if he would quit the house I would not trouble him.

JOSEPH BARKER . I am servant to Mr. Haynes, who is a broker, and has an auction room in Brown's-lane. The prisoner brought the scales for sale, and I advanced him 6 s. 6 d. on them; he bought them in several times, and said he would have them back as soon as he got money - he paid 4 s. 6 d. in part, and after that Howis came and claimed them.

Prisoner's Defence. He sold me the scales, and I held the candle for him to get them down. I was to barter them for potatoes, but could not agree about them, and took them to be sold by auction.

JOSEPH WEIGHTS . I am a potatoe merchant. Howis had a pair of scales in his shed; I went to borrow them of him, but he said he had sold them to a man, who wanted to sell them again, and took me to the prisoner's house. The man, whom I think was the prisoner, said they were not at home, and I borrowed some others.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Richardson.

Reference Number: t18200217-59

408. SAMUEL ELLIOTT and JAMES SERMON were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Brooks , about seven o'clock in the night of the 17th of January , at St. Leonard, Shoreditch, with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, three watches, value 3 l.; nine silver spoons, value 1 l. 4 s.; eleven shirts, value 1 l.; two coats, value 1 l.; one counterpane, value 10 s.; two boxes, value 3 s.; three pair of breeches, value 3 s.; two pair of pantaloons, value 2 s.; eleven waistcoats, value 5 s.; fourteen handkerchiefs, value 4 s.; fifteen pair of stockings, value 7 s.; three pair of drawers, value 1 s.; one 50 l., and thirty-nine 1 l. Bank notes, his property .

WILLIAM BROOKS . I am a porter , and live at No. 7, Wilmore-gardens, Kingsland-road, St. Leonard, Shoreditch , and occupy the house. On the 17th of January I went out early in the morning, and left my nephew and his wife in care of the house. I returned about a quarter past nine o'clock at night, found the lock of the door picked, and the neighbours in the house. On going up stairs, I found a deal box broken open, the lock of another

picked, and a tin cash box, which was in one of the deal boxes, broken open, and a 50 l. note, thirty-nine 1 l. notes, and a printed agreement were stolen out; the rest of the property was taken out and left on the floor. I have never recovered the notes. Attfield produced the agreement to me, and I knew it to be mine.

JAMES HEDGES . I am a bricklayer, and live at No. 1, Wilmore-gardens. About half-past six o'clock, on the evening of the robbery, in consequence of an alarm given by Felstead, I went with him to Brooks's house - it was quite dark; the outer door was on the latch only. We entered the house, and saw two men standing at the foot of the stairs - one had a light in his hand; I immediately seized the poker, and they ran up stairs. I said they were going out at the window. I heard a noise at the window, and as I went out of the door Elliott came out of the window and fell on me - we both fell together; he got up and I followed; he tried to jump over the pales, but fell, and I fell on him. He said,

"For God's sake don't take me." I secured him, and gave him to an officer. I do not know the other man - we were the first that entered the house,

CHARLES FELSTEAD . I live in Harford-street, Shoreditch, and am a turner. I was passing Brooks's house between six and seven o'clock in the evening; Chowns said somebody was robbing the house. I went and called Hedges; we went to the house and found the door ajar. - I pushed it open, went in, and Hedges followed. As soon as I got in, two men came down stairs - one had a light in his hand; I said,

"Here they are!" The prisoners immediately hurried up stairs; Hedges got the poker - the window was pushed up. He opened the door, went out, and I followed him; we pursued Elliott. and as I was following him Sermon turned back, and passed us - the place is no thoroughfare; he was running. I pursued him, crying Stop him! When he got to the top of the gardens, a man with a gun in his hand met him, and he fell down; he recovered himself, and made his way across Kingsland-road; I, with assistance, secured him there. I never lost sight of him after he ran by me; we took him into the King's Head, public-house - he said he had been rascally ill-used, and had lost a hat, and a silk handkerchief, and he would seek his recompence. I first saw him about twenty yards from the house. They ran down the gardens, which are no thoroughfare.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Could you tell who the persons were in the house - A. No. Sermon was running the contrary way, and passed me.

JAMES HEDGES re-examined. When I was pursuing Elliott there was a man before him, who jumped over the pales; I did not see a third person. I kept my eye on Elliott.

WILLIAM CHOWNS . I live down Wilmore-gardens. About half-past six o'clock, or later, I saw four men standing by a gate at Mr. Brooks's house. I passed them twice, then went up to the King's Head, public-house, and they were gone - the prosecutor's door was open; I saw one man inside the door, and another going up stairs, which rose my suspicion - I informed Felstead. Hedges came up, went down to the house, and rushed in. I went further down the garden, returned, and saw a man push up the window and jump out - it was dark. Felstead secured one man.

WILLIAM PRICE . I live in Nelson-street, Bethnal-green. On the 17th of January I was returning from shooting, with a gun in my hand, and as I passed the end of Wilmore-gardens I heard the cry of Stop him! and saw a man running up. I put myself in the middle of the street, with my gun extended - I thrust my gun against him, and he fell over it; I also fell - I heard something fall like a key; he got up, and got away. Felstead and others secured him immediately; I assisted in taking him to the King's Head, public-house - it was Sermon. I got a light, returned to the spot where he fell, in less than ten minutes, and found a printed agreement with Brooks's name to it; a boy picked it up in my presence - I saw it given to Attfield. I then went to Brooks's house, and found nobody there - the boxes were broken open, and the things thrown about. I left Mrs. Pilgrim in the house, and fetched Attfield.

Cross-examined. Q. How far was Sermon from the house - A. About thirty yards.

JAMES EDIS . I am Brooks's nephew. On the 17th of January I was left in care of the house; my wife went out about nine o'clock in the morning, and did not return. I went out to Lindsay's about half-past five - it was not quite dark then - I locked the door, and left the key at Pilgrim's. I returned about eight o'clock with my wife, found the house broken open, and robbed. The boxes were moved and broken open, and the things thrown about the floor. I had seen Elliott at Lindsay's on the Saturday night, but never saw him before.

DEBORAH PILGRIM . I live at Wilmore's-gardens. Edis left the key with me about half-past five o'clock on the night of the robbery. I kept it until after I heard of the robbery, and then went to the house with Price, locked the door, and put the key into my pocket until Edis came home. I found the property scattered about, and the window open. I kept in sight of the house until the officer came.

THOMAS EAGLES . I am a headborough. I went to the house with Haycock about seven o'clock, found the boxes broken open, and all the property scattered about, except the notes, which were gone; the cash box was broken open by some instrument, and laid on the bed. I found the prisoners at the public-house, and assisted in taking them to the watch-house.

THOMAS HAYCOCK . I have heard the account given by Eagles; it is correct.

WILLIAM ATTFIELD . I am an officer. I took the prisoners into custody; two hats were left behind - Sermon claimed one of them. Next day, at the office, a crow and a lanthorn were given to me. I produce an agreement, which Beasley picked up, and gave to me. I compared the marks on the box with the crow, and found it fitted them.

JAMES SHARPE . I live next door to Brooks. On the night of the robbery, about half-past six o'clock in the evening, I picked up a hat, a night-cap, and a handkerchief opposite the house, and gave them to Attfield. About an hour after, my daughter gave me a piece of iron, which I also gave to him.

JOHN BEASLEY . I am pot-boy at the King's Head, public-house. I went with a light with Price, and picked up the agreement, which I gave to Attfield.

SUSAN SHARPE . I found the iron bar at the top of the gardens, by the Kingsland-road, and gave it to my father.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoners made no defence.

ELLIOTT - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 23.

SERMON - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 21.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Richardson.

Reference Number: t18200217-60

409. GEORGE FIELD was indicted for a misdemeanour .

WILLIAM CHALLANDS . I keep the Star, public-house, Old Bailey . The prisoner called at my house in October - I saw him several times; he represented himself as a lawyer, and wanted credit for things; he said he should have some jobs in a short time by attending the Old Bailey, and asked me if I had any thing to do? I employed him to collect several old debts , thinking him to be a distressed man; I sent him to collect from James Blaze , John Wyley , and Henry Jarvis . I saw him a few days after; he said he had called upon them, and if they did not settle, he should use means to make them. He said they did not seem disposed to settle, and he must serve them all with copies of writs, and that he should want 2 s. 6 d. for the writ, and 2 d. for the stamps, which I gave him. He called a day or two after, and shewed me three writs. I afterwards gave him 6 s. 2 d. to carry on proceedings, and after that I gave him 7 s. 1 d. Towards the end of November he came and had 14 s. 2 d. for the declaration - I gave him in all, 2 l. 15 s., besides a score he owed me; he never recovered any money for me. Wyley was put in Whitecross-street Prison for two or three days, and Blaze for twelve hours.

MR. JAMES ANDERTON . I am solicitor to the Courts of King's Bench, Common Pleas, and Chancery. I examined the rolls of those Courts, and found but one George Field , who was admitted in 1790. I found no writs were issued against Wyley, Jarvis, or Blaze.

MR. GEORGE FIELD . I am a solicitor in all the Courts - there is no other of my name. I was admitted in 1790; I never authorized the prisoner to use my name. I have no office in the Old Bailey.

GEORGE HAZLEWOOD WORRALL . I apprehended the prisoner before the last Session, and found a memorandum in his pocket - reads - (Copy of a bill of Middlesex against Jarvis, Wyley, and Blaze; endorsed, George Field , No. 16, Old Bailey) - I also found a memorandum book on him, containing these words,

"Tried at the Old Bailey September 23."

MR. FIELD. I did not issue that warrant.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in the habit of calling at the house. I acted according to his instructions, and issued process.

(See September Session, 1819.)

GUILTY .

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200217-61

410. THOMAS WANT and SAMUEL BULKELEY were indicted for a conspiracy .

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200217-62

SIXTH DAY, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 23.

411. ISAAC FOOT was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of November , 3 lbs. of pepper, value 6 s. , the goods Joseph Turrley , Sen. and Joseph Turrley , Jun .

JOSEPH TURRLEY , SEN. I am a lighterman , in partnership with my son Joseph; we live in Redcross-square, Wapping; the prisoner was our boatman . On the 11th of November I sent him to fetch fifty bags of pepper from the East India warehouse at Bow Creek, and in the evening I sent Peck to assist in bringing it alongside the Semaphore ship, near Parsons-stairs. About eight o'clock the following morning Hunt came and informed me the boat had been robbed - the prisoner's duty was to take care of it - he absconded for six weeks, then came and demanded his wages, and I gave him in charge.

WILLIAM HUNT . I am an Excise officer. I saw Turrley's boat alongside the Semaphore, the prisoner was not on board then. I found a bag of pepper there, which appeared to have been cut open, and sewed up again. I weighed it - it weighed 2 cwt. 3 qr. 4 lb. I took the outer bag off, and found the inner one was cut and not sewed up again - it was marked MPR No. 53; the others were put on board the ship. Attwood delivered me 3 1/2 lbs. of pepper.

JAMES GREEN . I saw fifty bags of pepper delivered on board the boat at the warehouse, in the charge of William Hunt , the bag marked MPR. No. 53, weighed 2 cwt. 3 qr. 12 lb. On the 12th of November I weighed it again - it was about 8 lbs. deficient; both the bags were cut - the outer one was sewed up again.

JAMES ATTWOOD . I am an Excise watchman. On the 11th of November, between six and seven o'clock in the evening, I took charge of the fifty bags of pepper, in Turrley's boat, at Blackwall ; the prisoner and Peck were on board; in the morning I missed the men from the oars. I was on board all night, under the tarpauling. I went aft, and saw the prisoner sewing up the bag which was cut, and a parcel of pepper in a handkerchief by the side of him. Peck came forward, he said he was only taking a little pepper for his own use; I took it from him - he wanted to get it from me. I went ashore, and took the pepper to my superior officer, Hunt, and informed him.

Prisoner's Defence. Peck was tried for this offence, and he was sworn to be the man.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200217-63

412. JOHN PRITCHARD , JOSEPH CLARK , and ISAAC WRIGHT were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Jane Mann , about eight o'clock in the night of the 29th of January , at St. Dunstan's, Stepney, with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein one gown, value 10 s.; one skirt, value 5 s.; one pair of shoes, value 3 s.; one parasol, value 7 s.; one pelisse, value 8 s., and one silver spoon, value 2 s., her property .

JANE MANN . I am a single woman , and rent a house in the parish of St. Dunstan, Stepney . On the 29th of January, about eight o'clock at night, I bolted my back door, fastened the window, went out, and double-locked the front door. I returned about a quarter before nine - on putting the key into the door it opened - I found Clark coming down stairs from my bedroom; I knew him before - he lived a few doors from me. I went into the parlour, found the drawers broken open, all my clothes taken out and put on the table - they were locked. I left a bunch of keys in one of the drawers, but one was broken open, as the key would not open it. Clark ran out, and was brought back soon after. I am sure he was the person. The other two were secured in my back yard by the officer - they all three lived in the neighbourhood with their parents. Pritchard lived next door, his mother worked for me, and he used to clean my knives - he knew the house. The articles stated in the indictment were on the table, except the spoon, which I have not found; it was in the tea-chest.

SAMUEL DOBSON . I am constable of Stepney. I was fetched to the house, and found Clark there - somebody had brought him back. I went into the back yard, and found the kitchen window open, and a table under the window with footmarks on it - it was a dirty night. I took Clark to the watch-house, with the property. When I returned Catling brought the other prisoners to me. I found two knives in Wright's pocket; they were talking to each other when their friends were at the watch-house. They were neither threatened or promised, Wright said to Pritchard,

"You broke the tea-chest open with this knife." Pritchard said,

"No, it was not with that, it was with the other." I heard them say they took the tea-chest to Webb-square, broke it open as they went, and took the spoon out; that the man looked at it, said it was only brass, and threw it behind the grate; he would not buy the tea-chest.

JOSEPH CATLING . I am a watchman. Clark was brought to the watch-house; I then went to Mann's, and found Pritchard and Wright in her back yard, which communicates with Pritchard's house. I took them to the watch-house; when they got there Wright and Clark said Pritchard opened the back window, and let them in at the front door. Pritchard said nothing to it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

CLARK'S Defence. Pritchard got over the wall, opened the window, and let us in in front.

WRIGHT'S Defence. We met at eight o'clock. Pritchard said he would get in at the window, and let us in at the door, for, he said, his sister would not hurt us if she caught us.

PRITCHARD'S Defence. They were going to get the tea-chest before.

CLARKE - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 15.

WRIGHT - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 14.

PRITCHARD - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 11.

Recommended to Mercy.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200217-64

413. JANE ROBERTS was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of January , four coats, value 4 l., the goods of Daniel Angell , in the dwelling-house of Abraham Ropus .

DANIEL ANGELL . I live in Feld-lane ; Mr. Ropus keeps the house - I deal in clothes . On Sunday, the 30th of January, I went out about seven o'clock in the evening, and left the landlord and the prisoner in care of the shop, returned, and missed four coats - the prisoner was gone. I saw him two or three days after, and gave him in charge.

JAMES HANCHETT . On the Saturday after the robbery, I took the prisoner in charge. He said if I went with him to Petticoat-lane, he thought he could find the man he sold them to. He took me to a public-house, but could not find him.

MOSES ROPUS . I keep the house, and let part of the shop to Angell. The prisoner went backwards, returned, and asked me if I had sold four coats? as he missed them. I said No, and told him to run out, and see if he could find anybody with them - I did not see him after.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Of stealing, but not in a dwelling-house.

Confined Three Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200217-65

414. THOMAS BISHOP was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of August , four coats, value 3 l.; one waistcoat, value 3 s., and one pair of breeches, value 10 s., the goods of George Baxter , in his dwelling-house .

GEORGE BAXTER . I live in Beaufort-buildings, Strand ; the prisoner lived with me till September last. On the 14th of January I understood some duplicates were found on him - I accompanied Ellis to the pawnbrokers, and found this property. He had lived about three years with me.

JAMES ELLIS . I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner on the 14th of January, at the Marquis of Granby, public-house, Chandos-street, on another charge. I took him to his lodgings, and found a number of duplicates in the table drawer, some of which relate to this property, pledged at different times - I also found some buttons with a crest on them.

JOHN BUGG . I am shopman to Mr. Ashman, who is a pawnbroker, and lives in the Strand. In August last the prisoner's wife pledged two coats for two guineas, in the name of Smith, Castle-court, Strand. A pair of breeches were pledged, but I did not take them in.

WILLIAM DUTTON TOWNSEND . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Russell-street, Covent-garden. On the 25th of February, 1819, the prisoner's wife pledged a coat for 16 s., on the 26th of January last a coat and waistcoat.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I beg for mercy.

GUILTY . Aged 33.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200217-66

415. CATHERINE MAY was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of January , three gowns, value 30 s; one pelisse, value 3 l.; one gown-body, value 10 s.; two caps, value 4 l.; one veil, value 10 s.; three pair of stockings, value 6 s.; two scarfs, value 2 l., and one spencer, value 10 s., the property of Robert Lee , in his dwelling-house .

MARY LEE . I live in Upper Eaton-street, Hanover-square , and am the wife of Robert Lee , he has not lived with me for eight years; the prisoner was my servant , she lived five days with me. On the 19th of January, about twelve o'clock in the day, I went out, and left her in the house; some carpenters were at work - I returned about a quarter after one, and found she had left the house. I missed the articles stated in the indictment, and gave information at Queen-square.

JANE MANNING . On the 9th of February I met the prisoner in the Park, but said nothing to her then. I saw her again in about an hour on Constitution-hill, and asked her if she knew who wanted her? she said,

"No, I don't know who wants me;" and I think she said,

"I don't care." She had on a black silk gown, answering the description of one Mrs. Lee lost. I told her Mrs. Lee wanted her, and I wished somebody was near that I could give her in charge. I asked two soldiers to take her, they said they would have nothing to do with it. I followed her, and asked a gentleman where I could find a constable? he said at the Palace gate - one came immediately, but before he could get a sight of her she had escaped. She once lived in the family where I do, and I had heard of the robbery.

RICHARD MONDAY. I am an officer. On the 14th of February a constable informed me that he had a prisoner at the watch-house - I went with him, and took the prisoner to a public-house opposite Queen-square office. I found a gown-body on her, which the prosecutrix claimed - she said she had pledged the pelisse, gown, and scarf at Kemble's, at Knightsbridge. I went, and found none had been sold or pledged there. She said she had sold the duplicate to a woman in Whitechapel, but she could not tell her name or residence.

THOMAS DENFORD . I am a constable of Knightsbridge. On the 14th of February I took the prisoner into custody.

MRS. LEE re-examined. The gown-body is mine.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18200217-67

416. JAMES FOLLARD was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of February , 21 yards of stuff, value 21 s., the goods of Griffith Foulkes , privately in his shop .

GRIFFITH FOULKES . I am a linen-draper , and live in Little Russell-street, Covent-garden . On the 2d of February, between four and five o'clock in the afternoon, two women came into the shop, the prisoner followed them - they all consulted together a little while before they came into the inner door - the prisoner immediately ran off. I ran out, and saw him running across Drury-lane. I overtook him, and found the piece of stuff under his greatcoat.

JEREMIAH MAIDMENT . I am an officer. I saw the crowd, and met Mr. Foulkes with the prisoner. I found half a yard of stuff in his pocket.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I was very much in liquor.

GUILTY . Aged 46.

Of stealing to the value of 4 s. 11 d. only.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18200217-68

417. SARAH HANSBURY was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of January , one shawl, value 4 s., and one pair of stockings, value 3 s., the property of John Brown ; and one shawl, value 3 s. , the property of Alice Fogarty .

MARY BROWN . I am the wife of John Brown, we live in Lawrence-lane, St. Giles's . On the 24th of January I gave the prisoner leave to be in my room, as she said she had quarrelled with her landlord. I left her there alone, when I returned to the room she was gone, and I missed these things.

GEORGE THWAITES . I am a pawnbroker. On the 24th of January the shawl was pledged with me, I do not know who by.

RICHARD COATES . I took the prisoner into custody, and found a shawl on her.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I was intoxicated.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18200217-69

418. ABRAHAM POLACK was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of November , one watch, value 5 l. , the property of Elizabeth Moore , spinster .

ELIZABETH MOORE. I am a single woman. At the latter end of November I lost my watch from my apartments in Upper Charlotte-street, Fitzroy-square . I came out of Drury-lane Theatre, and on getting into a coach my foot slipped, the prisoner and another assisted me into the coach. They heard me tell the coachman to drive first to No. 6, Upper Rupert-street, Haymarket. I was not in my apartments two minutes before the prisoner and the other gentleman came up into my sitting-room; my watch was on the table. I went into the bed-room to take off my spencer, and the other gentleman followed me - I was not there two minutes, and returned to the sitting-room; I then shewed them both down stairs, returned into my room, and missed my watch. They had promised to return in half an hour. I did not see the prisoner again till the 13th of January, when I met him in Oxford-street. I knew him, got an officer, and took him up. I have not recovered my watch.

Q. Why do you accuse him, in preference to the other man - A. I was in the sitting-room all the time the other was; he had no opportunity of taking it without my seeing him.

Cross-examined by MR. WALFORD. Q. You never saw either of them before - A. Never. I am not very often in the habit of seeing strangers. It was on a Saturday night.

Q. What is the house - A. It is an oyster-shop. The private door is always shut.

WILLIAM DEAN . I was in Oxford-street; the prosecutrix and another female came to me, and said two men had run round the corner, and one had stolen her watch. The prisoner was pointed out to me, with another person. I followed, stopped him, and said two ladies wanted to speak to him - the prisoner asked for what purpose? I said it was something respecting a watch. The prosecutrix came up and said,

"This is the man who stole my watch!" I took him to Marlborough-street. He wished me to call on his friends - they said they would not come near him.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you know the house - A. I called there by the prisoner's desire. It appears respectable - it is not a brothel.

SAMUEL PLANK . On the 13th of January Mr. Dean brought the prisoner to Marlborough-street office. Moore charged him with stealing her watch at the latter end of November, he said he was not in England at the time, for he was just come from Gibraltar, and that a captain in the 64th regiment came home with him. I found a book on him - he said it was a journal which he kept, I found the last entry to be Yarmouth, the 19th of November, which proves he could not be at Gibraltar; I also found letters addressed to him in England before the robbery, in the name of G. T. Polack, Esq. R. N.

Cross-examined. Q. Did the prosecutrix fix on the day - A. She said it was on a Saturday, and mentioned the performance she had seen, and we found it was performed on the 27th of November, and on no other night in that month.

GUILTY Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18200217-70

419. CHARLES ROBINSON was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of January , five pewter pint pots, value 5 s., the goods of Samuel Smith ; one pewter quart pot, value 2 s., and one pewter pint pot, value 1 s., the goods of Thomas Hodges ; and one pewter pint pot, value 1 s. , the goods of George Watts .

SAMUEL SMITH. I keep the Coach and Horses, public-house, Conduit-street, Berkeley-square . On the 18th of January, about ten o'clock in the morning, I went to No. 47, Berkeley-square, and missed five pots from the area rails - the prisoner was seen putting them in a bag; he threw them away on being seen, but was secured. As he was going to the office I found two pint pots in his coat-pockets.

EDWARD SMITH . I was in Berkeley-square; a person called Stop thief! I ran and stopped the prisoner - as he ran he threw away a green bag, containing five pots.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18200217-71

420. GEORGE SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of January , one pair of shoes, value 5 s. , the property of William Hayhow .

WILLIAM HAYHOW . I am a shoemaker , and live in New Road, St. George's . On the 19th of January, about five o'clock in the afternoon, I was going home, and saw the prisoner run from my shop - I followed, and he was stopped at the corner of Prince's-square.

THOMAS DOUGLAS . I am shopman to Hayhow. I was standing in the shop, saw the prisoner come up to the door, take a shoe in each hand, and break it from the doorpost - they hung by a string inside the shop. I immediately pursued him down an alley adjoining the shop, and all round Prince's-square - I secured him without losing sight of him. The shoes were picked up close by him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18200217-72

421. JAMES WILCOX and JAMES WILSON were indicted for stealing, on the 8th of February , 6 lbs. of bacon, value 4 s. , the goods of Jacob Sherwin .

HENRY ANDREWS . I am a lamplighter. On the 8th of February, in the afternoon, I saw the prisoners looking in at Sherwin's window - Wilson crossed, and came out of the shop with the bacon. A third man joined them. I secured Wilcox, and Christie secured Wilson - the other escaped with the bacon. I am sure they were together.

JACOB SHERWIN . I lost the bacon out of my shop.

ROBERT CHRISTIE . I saw the three men together, and saw Wilcox give the bacon to the third man.

The prisoners pleaded distress.

WILCOX - GUILTY . Aged 17.

WILSON - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined One Month .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18200217-73

422. LUCY BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of January , one coat, value 2 s.; one pair of breeches, value 1 s.; one waistcoat, value 1 s., and one bag, value 6 d. , the goods of John Picton .

JOHN PICTON . I am a carpenter . On the 29th of January, at night, the prisoner brought a shirt to my wife to iron; next morning I missed my son's clothes.

JOHN PICTON , JUN. I brought my clothes home from school. On Saturday afternoon I hung them in the passage, next morning they were gone; the prisoner had been to the house to fetch the shirt - nobody had been to the house but her. I followed her home to Burleigh-court, and found my clothes under her bed.

JAMES STIRLING . On the 30th of January Picton took me to the prisoner's lodgings; I found the clothes under her bed.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I found them in the street.

GUILTY. Aged 19.

Judgment Respited .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18200217-74

423. GEORGE DOWLING was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of January , two table-cloths, value 5 s., and two goblets, value 2 s. , the goods of John Thomas .

SUSAN GRAY . I live at John Thomas 's alamode beef-shop, in Clare-court . On the 27th of January the prisoner supped there; he paid for his supper, and sat a short time. I left the room for six or seven minutes, during which time the prisoner took two table-cloths off the table, and put them into his pocket - I passed him on the stairs as he was going down. As soon as I entered the room I missed the cloths, and ran down - he had not got out. When he heard me speak he ran as fast as he could; the porter pursued and secured him. I saw the table-cloths and two goblets found in his pocket.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined Six Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18200217-75

424. MARY FERRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of November , one table-cloth, value 8 s.; one shift, value 4 s., and one apron, value 1 s. , the goods of James Haine .

ANN HAINE . I am the wife of James Haine , and am a laundress; I employed the prisoner to iron for me. I missed these things at different times, and found them at the pawnbroker's.

WILLIAM HUMPHREY . I am a constable. On the 21st of November I took the prisoner into custody, and found eleven duplicates on her, some of which relate to this property. She said she stole all the property the prosecutor had lost.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 43.

Confined Six Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18200217-76

425. SAMUEL WINDSOR and ROBERT BYWATER were indicted for that they, on the 24th of January , 20 lbs. of lead, value 2 s., the property of Richard Joshua , and fixed to a dwelling-house of his, feloniously did rip and break, with intent to steal .

SECOND COUNT, for stealing the said lead.

For the Prosecution, MR. ALLEY.

EDWARD CONNOR . I lived at No. 1, Leicester-street, Golden-square , in Mr. Richard Joshua 's house - I occupied the garret. On the 24th of January, between twelve and one o'clock at night, I heard a noise over-head, got up, opened the window, got out, and observed a man on the roof - I called to him to know his business, but got no answer. I saw the lead which covered the window ripped up from the gutter; the tiles were moved - the lead was not taken away. I saw two men running over the adjoining roof, I pursued them along Warwick-street, over ten houses, to the corner of Berwick-street; I there lost sight of them. I returned, dressed myself, and went and told the watchman. I went on the roof again and met Parker. A man ran from the window, which had been broken open after I was first on the roof - we pursued, but lost sight of him, but found a watchman on the roof had taken him. The nails were taken out of the lead; it was completely separated.

Cross-examined by MR. ARABIN. Q. How long before had you seen the lead safe - A. Not for six months. It was ripped up. I found a ripping chisel on the roof next morning.

THOMAS PARKER . I assisted in pursuing the prisoners on the roof. A man rushed out from the window; I pursued, but fell down - the watchman took him.

WILLIAM STRATHAM . I am a private watchman at the corner of Berwick-street. I heard a noise about a quarter past twelve o'clock, as if something was falling, and ran immediately to see what it was. I found a man lying flat on his back, groaning, as if he had fell, it was the prisoner, Bywater - he had dropped from the scaffold of a house, which is partly built, at the corner of Berwick-street. I secured him, and asked what he did there? he made no answer.

PATRICK MURRAY . I am a watchman. After Bywater was secured I went up the scaffold, put my head through the trap-door of the house, and called to the man to surrender, or I would run him through the body - Windsor was there; he said he would surrender rather than be killed. As we came down the ladder he pushed my comrade down and escaped, I pursued and secured him.

SAMUEL BURRIDGE . I assisted in bringing Windsor down the ladder - he pushed me down and escaped. I am sure he is the man.

WINDSOR'S Defence. I went to see what was the matter, and was taken.

BYWATER'S Defence. I fell down, and the watchman secured me.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18200217-77

426. THOMAS SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of January , one dish, value 3 s., and 2 lbs. of pork, value 2 s. , the goods of Henry Cook Todd .

HENRY COOK TODD . I live at Stepney . On the 30th of January, I was awoke about three o'clock in the morning, by hearing a strange noise in the back kitchen. I went to the door, and saw a man cutting the lead pipe; I opened the door, and he ran down the garden, over the rails, and into a neighbour's garden. I got the watchman, who secured him, and found a dark lanthorn in his pocket, and the pork under his arm. As we took him to the watch-house a piece of wire fell from him. We found a tinder-box, matches, and two bits of candle in his pocket. He had taken the pork out of the safe.

DANIEL ENGLISH . I am a watchman. I got over the prosecutor's wall, and found the prisoner in the next garden. I secured him, and found the pork under his arm, and the other things on him, as Todd has stated. He dropped an iron stock and centre-bit.

GUILTY . Aged 74.

Confined One Year .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18200217-78

427. HENRY COOK was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of February , one gown, value 1 s; three spencers, value 2 s.; three frocks, value 3 s.; one cloak, value 1 s.; two petticoats, value 6 d.; four slips, value 2 s.; three handkerchiefs, value 3 s., and one shirt, value 6 d. , the goods of Peter Goodwin .

JANE GOODWIN . I am the wife of Peter Goodwin , who is a porter at Covent Garden Theatre; we live in Bridgewater-street, Somers'-town . On the 30th of January, about half-past six o'clock in the evening, these things hung in the garden to dry. I found the line cut, and all the things gone. My son went round to tell the watchmen. I found the prisoner at the watch-house with the clothes.

THOMAS MAY . I am a patrol. About seven o'clock in the evening I was in Sidney-street, Somers'-town, and saw the prisoner and another come out of a vacant space, where there was no house. The prisoner went back, and went down this space; I asked him what he did there? he said he lived in Judd-street, Somers'-town. I said,

"You know Judd-street is not in Somers'-town." He then said he lived in Waterloo-place, Cromer-street. A gentleman came across with a light, and I found these

things wrapped in a great coat, within two yards of him, in this space.

JAMES FARRANT . I lodge in Waterloo-place with the prisoner. I know the coat, that the things were in, to be his.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing of the things.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18200217-79

428. SOPHIA DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of February , one shawl, value 12 s.; one apron, value 6 d.; one bonnet, value 2 s.; one ring, value 4 s.; one gown, value 6 s., and one shirt, value 4 s. , the goods of Hannah Conner , widow .

HANNAH CONNER . I am a widow, and live in Ray-street, Clerkenwell ; the prisoner's mother lives at the bottom of the street - I often employed her. On the 5th of February she scoured out a lower room for me. I went out, left her at work, and went to her mother's, which is five doors off; when I returned I found her gone, and the door open. I found my drawers open, and the things stated in the indictment gone. Her mother went with me all day in pursuit of her, and on Tuesday I found her in Chequer-alley, Golden-lane; she would not open the door to me until I fetched an officer. I found my bonnet on the bed, and she was drying my apron by the fire; the officer took her. She said she had robbed me, and pledged the gown in Golden-lane.

DIX MORE. I am an officer. On the 8th of February I was sent for, and took the prisoner into custody.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18200217-80

429. CHARLES FREDERICK HOLLAND was indicted for perjury .

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200217-81

430. JOHN APPLETON was indicted for a like offence .

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200217-82

SEVENTH DAY, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 24.

431. JEREMIAH BURN , MARGARET BURN , HANNAH HAY , and CATHERINE BRYAN were indicted for stealing, on the 22d of January , from the person of John Hills , 10 s. in monies numbered, one 10 l., and eighteen 1 l. Bank notes, his property .

JOHN HILLS . I am a mariner from South Shields. On the 22d of January I went to lodge at Burn's house, between twelve and one o'clock at night - he keeps a lodging-house for sailors; I had a 10 l. note, and nineteen 1 l. notes in my pocket. I had received them that day; I sat down to drink with the four prisoners on the first floor - I knew them all before; I was not sober, but sensible. I went to bed in the upper room alone, and put my pantaloons, with the money in the pockets, under the pillow. awoke about half-past eight o'clock in the morning, found my pantaloons on the bed, and my notes gone. I went down stairs, and the three women were sitting by the fire. I asked Burn where her father was? she said he was gone out. I said I had lost 29 l. and some silver - no answer was made. On Monday I saw three of the 1 l. notes in the possession of Seward.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You was in liquor when you got there - A. I was. Burn offered me a key to lock my door, but I did not lock it, because his daughter said she would lock it - I did not even shut it.

WILLIAM KIRBY . I am clerk to Nicholson and Co. who are bankers in Abchurch-lane. I paid the prosecutor nineteen 1 l. notes, a 10 l., and a 5 l. note on the 22d of January - the name of Ires was on one of them, in the handwriting of one of our clerks. I saw three of the notes before the Magistrate a day or two after.

Cross-examined. Q. Is that name generally on your notes - A. Yes, but it is dated, and these notes came in just as the check was presented, which was late in the afternoon.

JOHN SEWARD . I live in Back-lane, New-road. On the 24th of January, between nine and ten o'clock in the morning, the three female prisoners came to my shop; one laid out 1 l. 9 s. 3 d., and the other 2 s. 5 d. Burn paid me two 1 l. notes, in the name of Mary Jones , 29, Old Gravel-lane. Hay gave me a 1 l. note, and gave her name as Hannah Johnson , No. 5, Pell-street. About five minutes after the officer came, and I showed him the notes.

WILLIAM KIRBY re-examined. They are three of the notes paid away that day.

ROBERT WILLIAMS . I am constable of Shadwell. On Sunday morning Hills informed me that he had been robbed at Burn's house, in Elbow-lane, Shadwell . I went and found the three women there; they said they knew nothing about it, but their father was gone away that morning. I took him on Tuesday, the 25th, at his own house; he came home in a coach, very much in liquor. I found nothing on him.

JOHN BROWN. I took the women into custody, as they came out of the linen-draper's shop. I told them that I wanted them for robbing Captain Hills - they made no answer. I found 26 s. and a pair of stockings on Hay; she said old Burn took the notes, and gave them to them to circulate.

M. BURN - GUILTY . Aged 18.

H. HAY - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

J. BURN - NOT GUILTY .

C. BRYAN - NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200217-83

432. JOHN SUMMERFIELD was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of August , 50 lbs. of paper value 16 s., and twelve books, value 16 s. , the goods of his late Majesty .

For the Prosecution, MESSRS. REYNOLDS AND BOLLAND.

JOHN FINLASON , ESQ. I am chief clerk at the Admiralty Office of the Record department; the papers in question were kept in the garrets of the Admiralty Office ; the prisoner had the charge of them for two years. He had the key of the door, and another messenger, named Leggate, also had a key.

Q. In consequence of information did you examine the room to see if the papers were removed - A. I did, and missed a great quantity, principally log-books, journals of ships, and port lists.

Cross-examined by MR ADOLPHUS. Q. How long before had you been into the room - A. About two months. I suspect about two ton weight have been taken.

GEORGE DONALDSON . I am a constable of St. Martin's in the Fields. I searched the prisoner's house, No. 1, Hunt's-court, St. Martin's-lane, for Admiralty papers, and found a quantity, which I produce. I afterwards received papers from Cordery.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN CORDERY . I am a cheesemonger, and live in the Strand. I bought the papers which I gave to Donaldson of a man, named Ingram, at five or six times. I bought 7, or 8 lbs. at a time.

HENRY INGRAM . I make up tradesmens' books, and collect debts; I live in Burleigh-street, Exeter Change; the prisoner gave me the papers to sell. I went to the garrets of the Admiralty to him, where there was a quantity of books of this description. He said they were waste paper, and perquisites of his. He generally brought me 7 or 8 lbs. at a time, tied in a handkerchief,. I sold them to Cordery for 4 d. per lb., and gave him the money.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200217-84

433. WILLIAM GILES was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of January , 8 lbs. of paper, value 2 s. 8 d. , the goods of his late Majesty .

JOHN FINLASON , ESQ. The prisoner was employed in a room adjoining the garrets at the Admiralty, as a journeyman binder . I missed a quantity of papers from the garrets.

JOHN DONALDSON . I searched the prisoner's house, No. 14, Todd's-row, Lambeth, on the 18th of January, and found these papers in a cupboard. He said he thought he was doing no harm in taking them.

JOHN GEORGE . I am a cheesemonger, and live in Round-court. I have bought about 32 lbs. of paper of the prisoner at 4 d. per lb. I bought 10 or 15 lbs. at a time.

(Property produced and sworn to)

GUILTY . Aged 30

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200217-85

434. JOHN BIRD and GEORGE BIRD were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Wyllie , Esq. , about twelve o'clock in the night of the 29th of January , at Fulham , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, six spoons, value 10 s.; three candlesticks, value 25 s.; three pair of snuffers, value 4 s.; one extinguisher, value 2 s.; one snuffer-tray, value 5 s.; one pair of sugar-tongs, value 5 s.; one sugar-bason, value 5 s.; two pair of nut-crackers, value 5 s.; four salts, value 3 s.; two decanters, value 5 s.; two miniature paintings, value 5 s., and one table-cloth, value 3 s., his property .

For the Prosecution, MR. ADOLPHUS.

ELIZABETH PIKE . I am servant to Mr. Wyllie, who lives in Broomhouse-lane, near Parson's-green . On Saturday night, the 29th of January, I shut the house up secure; I shut the windows - it was perfectly safe. I went to bed between ten and eleven o'clock at night, and got up a little after seven in the morning. I opened the parlour door, and saw the papers laying about the room, on the table and the floor; there was a candle on the bar of the fire-grate, which was in the candlestick the over night - candle-grease was dropped on the papers and on the sideboard; a small drawer full of papers, in the sideboard, was broken open - the cellaret was also broken open. There was a round hole in the small drawer, which had been scooped out, and the cellaret-drawer was broken in front.

Q. Where was the plate - A. The four salts were in a drawer above the cellaret, which was not locked; a silver sugar-bason and tongs were taken from a cupboard in the cellaret, which was not locked; a pair of plated candlesticks, and a bed-side candlestick were taken off the table; a pair of decanters, two stoppers of other decanters, a table-cloth, and a small and large pair of snuffers - also a small taper-stand off the chimney-piece. I went and called my master up.

Q. How had the thieves entered the room - A. A square hole had been cut in the outside shutter that contained two small bolts, which fastened the sash - they were forced. The window was not broken; every thing was safe the night before - it was getting light when I arose. I was about a quarter of an hour coming down stairs. It must have taken some time to force all these places.

WILLIAM WYLLIE , ESQ. I rent the house, which is in the parish of Fulham. The servant called me up, upon which I immediately went down, and found every thing in confusion in the parlour; I was the last person there the night before, except the servant - the drawers were locked, and all things safe and in order. In the morning the papers were all scattered about - I missed the articles stated in the inditment - sixteen or eighteen holes were cut in the shutter by a centre-bit, and all broken out into a square hole. A candle was left on the grate, which appeared to have been burnt, from the quantity of grease that was laying about the grate, and my papers were covered with grease - I gave information to Pople. I have since seen a pair of steel snuffers, on the Monday, which I knew to be mine - they were in a drawer of the sideboard over night.

Q. Did you see Pople apply the centre-bit to the holes in the shutter - A. Yes; it did not fit them - it was applied to the holes in the drawer of the sideboard, but did not fit. A crow-bar was produced, which exactly fitted the holes in the sideboard - it was of a particular shape, and fitted the impression exactly. To the impression of different parts of the drawer and the window, a chisel was also applied, but I cannot speak to that.

GEORGE POPLE . I am an officer of Queen-square. On Sunday morning the 30th of January, Mr. Wyllie applied to me. I went to his house, and examined it. The window-shutter was bored with a centre-bit, and the piece broken out, sufficiently to let a hand in to undo the bolt; I suppose twelve or fourteen holes were bored in it - it would take two or three minutes to do it. After the shutter was opened the sash was forced up by some instrument, apparently by a crow-bar, and the fastening broken. I examined the sideboard in the parlour, and in the middle drawer there was a hole made with a centre-bit, so as to get the bolt of the lock back, and two other drawers appeared to be forced open with a crowbar. I found a piece of printed paper in the room which smelt very strong of tinder, and on this paper was printed

"Keech, coffee-warehouse, Stretton-ground, Westminster."

Q. Was the breaking effected by clumsy thieves or not - A. By old thieves, in my judgment. The same afternoon I received information, went to the Bell, public-house, Old Pye-street, Westminster, with Alfred Pople , and found both the prisoners there. I apprehended George Bird , and searched John, but left him there till next day - I found nothing on either of them. I kept George Bird , and desired Alfred to search his lodgings, No. 44, in a court in Duck-lane. I knew them to be his lodgings by having frequently been there to him - it is the first room on the right-hand side of the ground floor. The following day I was not satisfied with my brother's search, went there myself, and in the table-drawer of the room I found a centre-bit, and in the cupboard I found a tobacco-box full of tinder. I went to the Bell, public-house, again, and found John Bird , searched him, and told him I was going to search his lodgings, and he had better go with me - I did not know where he lodged until the evening before, when I went there; he took me to his lodgings, No. 4, Duck-yard. I searched, and found a pair of steel snuffers there, hanging on a nail in the room - a girl whom he cohabited with was there; I am confident they were not in sight when I was there the night before - the prosecutor claimed them. An iron chisel was found there; my brother afterwards produced a crow-bar to me. I went to the house, and compared the centre-bit with the marks on the shutter and sideboard, but they were rather larger than the instrument. The crow-bar fitted as exactly as possible with the marks on the cellaret.

WILLIAM WYLLIE , ESQ. re-examined. The grocer's paper was not in my house the night before.

ALFRED POPLE . I am an officer. By my brother's direction I searched the lodgings of George Bird , No. 44, Duck-lane, on Sunday evening, and in a corner cupboard in the room, I found a crow-bar, which has the point broken at one end. I was present when it was tried at the prosecutor's house - it fitted exactly in every particular, and the other end corresponded with the shutter. We went to John Bird 's lodgings, and found an iron chisel behind the table against the wall. We took it down to Mr. Wyllie's - it also fitted the marks on the shutter. Next morning we went and took John Bird at the Bell, public-house, Old Pye-street, and took him to his lodgings; my brother found a pair of snuffers, which were not in the same place the night before. A young woman who was there, said, in his hearing, that a young man had given them to her, who was either gone abroad or was dead, I cannot be certain which. The prisoner said she had better come to the Magistrate to explain that. She came up, but did not come forward.

MR. WYLLIE. I know the snuffers, they belonged to our chamber candlestick, which was missing that night, and had been left with it. I have not the least doubt of their identity.

THOMAS CORDWELL . I look after the Fulham stages. On Saturday night, the 29th of January, I was at the Bull, Stamford Bridge, and saw the prisoners there, about half-past nine, or a quarter before ten o'clock. I knew them quite well before. I called for a pint of porter - they asked me to drink with them; I did so, and put my pint to their pot. They then said they were going on a crack, and shewed me a chisel and a crow-bar, like those produced. I noticed it being broken at the end - it is the same. I noticed one corner of the chisel being broken, and so is this; they both produced them, each produced one from their persons. I went away, heard of the robbery next day, and on Monday morning I told Mr. Wyllie what I knew.

JOHN BIRD . Q. Did you tell the Magistrate you knew the instruments - A. I said I knew them by what I observed on them.

JAMES LEDSHAM . I keep the Bull, public-house. I remember on the 29th of January, when the robbery was committed; the prisoners were at my house that evening, and had a pot or two of porter. I am certain of it - the last witness was there, talking to them, he had a pint of porter. I did not know them before.

ROBERT GILLINGHAM . I am watchman of Walham-green, about a mile from Mr. Wyllie's, between the Bull and his house. On the night of the 29th of January, about half-past eleven o'clock, I saw the two prisoners - I am confident they are the men - I did not know them before. I saw them at the corner of Sandyend-lane, which leads to Parson's-green, in the way to Mr. Wyllie's house. They went down the lane.

JOHN BIRD 'S Defence. When Pople looked round the room he found the snuffers, and said they were the articles he wanted; the young woman who belonged to the room, said they belonged to a young man, who was either dead or out of the country.

GEORGE BIRD 'S Defence. On the night of the robbery I was at the Wheatsheaf, public-house, New Tothill-street, from about eight o'clock in the evening until near twenty minutes after twelve. I left there, went home to my brother's, No. 10, Cross-street, King-street, Walworth. I got there about half-past one o'clock, and stopped there all night.

THOMAS HUISH. I was at the Wheatsheaf, public-house, New Tothill-street, Westminster, kept by Ilet. On the 29th of January I went there at eight o'clock at night, and saw the prisoner, George Bird , there. I had seen him there before. I was in the house till half-past eleven o'clock - he was there the whole of the time - it was the night the King died. I am a painter by trade, and live in New-court, Orchard-street, about twenty yards from the

house. I merely know him by seeing him come there to drink.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Is Ilet here to day - A. Yes; I believe six men of the 2d of regiment of Guards were present, they were to attend, but I believe they are out of town. Frederick Mitcham was there. I was drinking at the same table - Mitcham was also at the same table. I was drinking with a friend, I do not know his name. I went away at half-past eleven o'clock, and left George Bird there, my friend, and Mitcham; the six soldiers were at the same table. I believe George Bird had some oysters.

Q. Did you attend at Queen-square - A. No, I was subpoened here last Thursday evening, a young woman brought the subpoena. Mitcham met me, and asked me to come forward. I said I would if I was subpoened.

FREDERICK MITCHAM . I live at No. 46, New-way, Westminster, and keep a coalshed. I know both the prisoners by seeing them at the Wheatsheaf, public-house. On Saturday evening, the 29th of January, about eight o'clock, I saw George Bird there. I staid till twelve o'clock - we came out together; he turned to the right to go to his home, and I turned to go to mine.

Q. When did you hear he was in custody - A. On the Monday morning; I heard several people talking about it in the public-house. I did not hear what he was taken up for. I was subpoened to come here, on this day week a young woman brought the subpoena; she said George was taken up for something when he was drinking with me, and I knew it was on the 29th.

Q. But you was often drinking with him - A. She said it was the Saturday night that the King died.

Q. How was you to know it was the 29th that he was charged with it - A. I heard many people say so. The woman did not say it was the night the King died; she said it was the Saturday night he was drinking with me.

Q. You drank with him many Saturday nights - A. I was with him that night.

Q. How do you know it was the 29th - A. The young woman said he was drinking with me the Saturday night the King died.

Q. Did she say it was on the Saturday night the King died - A. No, she said nothing about it.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Do you know the young woman - A. I had seen her before - she goes by the name of Maria. She once lived in the Almonry; she never lived with me. I have a house in the Almonry, which I let to one Douglas.

Q. You only know George Bird by seeing him at the public-house - A. I have met him at several places. I have seen him at Bow-street office. I was not a witness for him there.

Q. What did you appear for - A. About a bit of velveteen of his brother's; I do not know that he lived near me. I go to the Wheatsheaf every night; many others were at the same table - I believe George had some oysters - the landlord cleared us all out when he was going to shut up.

WILLIAM ILET . I keep the Wheatsheaf, public-house, George Bird frequented my house for sixmonths. On the 29th he was at my house - I am certain of it.

Q. What makes you certain of it - A. There was a poor man, who was discharged from the Guards, came in with pies to sell about a quarter before nine o'clock, and a person for mischief knocked his tins over, and about sixpenny worth of his pies were thrown down. There was a subscription to defray the expence, and the prisoner, George, subscribed. I think Mitcham was there.

Q. How should you know Bird was there any more than Mitcham - A. It was partly the prisoner's fault that the pies were kicked down. I was very much displeased at it, and spoke crossly to Bird about it.

Q. If Mitcham was there he must have heard it - Yes. I spoke very high. The prisoner subscribed 2 d. The poor man comes in every night. I did not mention this to him. I can prove nothing more than up to nine o'clock, for I had company in the parlour, and particularly attended to them.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. What time did you shut up - A. A little before twelve o'clock. I do not know when Huish went away. Several men were in company with Bird; one was named Hall. The company all left of their own accord. I do not remember seeing Bird after nine o'clock. I paid more attention to the parlour than to them. A man, who is here, brings oysters in every night.

HENRY COLLWELL . I lodge in New Tothil-street. On Saturday, the 29th of January, I was mending a pair of boots for the landlord of the Wheatsheaf; he gave them to me about four o'clock that afternoon - I live next door to him. I went in again at eight o'clock, and saw George Bird there, and he was there at four o'clock when I got the boots. I staid till eleven o'clock, and had three pints of beer myself - I sat on the seat opposite Bird. The landlord sat on a seat near the bar, and had a pint of beer.

Q. Did he scold anybody that night - A. No.

Q. Did anything happen about nine o'clock - A. A man asked the pieman for a pie; he wanted the money first - some words occurred between them, and he knocked his tin down. The landlord said it was a shame; he did not speak to Bird in particular. I think I left the house before Bird.

Q. When were you told to come here - A. On Wednesday a man wanted me to go to Queen-square on the Monday following; and about ten days ago a woman subpoened me.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Since you was subpoened, have you been to the Wheatsheaf, as usual - A. I was there last night. The pieman stood in the centre of the taproom when his pies were knocked down. The man asked me to buy some of his broken pies, but I would not. I did not see the man knock them down - the men in the opposite seat bought them. I think I saw a dozen pies on the ground. The landlord was in and out, attending to his customers. I think he sat in the taproom near an hour.

THOMAS BENTLEY . I sell oysters and fish, and live in Dalley's-court, Queen-square. I go to the Wheatsheaf about six times every day with oysters. I know the prisoner in the smock-frock ( George Bird ), he bought some oysters of me there the last Saturday in January - I went in there three or four times. The last time I was there was at eleven o'clock, he was there then. I saw him there at five or six also.

Q. When was you applied to to give your evidence - A.

I knew nothing of it till the landlord was talking about being up here two or three days, and he thought I had better come - I was not subpoened. I first heard of this charge ten days ago.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. How long have you known George Bird - A. Not long; no further than dealing with him. I was there at five, seven, nine, and eleven o'clock. I heard some talk about the pieman. Mitcham and the landlord were at the table with Bird - I believe he was drinking with him. I am nearly positive he was there at eleven o'clock when I left. Mitcham and the painter was also there. I think the landlord was drinking with them at eleven o'clock. He was in the taproom every time I went.

Q. Have you often been brought up to Queen-square office - A. Not for these four years; before that I was taken up, but as soon as I took to work I was not molested.

HENRY COLLWELL re-examined. I do not know whether Bird left before or after me - I saw him there at eight o'clock.

ELIZA JACKSON . I live at No. 4, Duck-yard, Westminster. Neither of the prisoners lived in that house. John Bird used to come backwards and forwards - it was not his lodgings. The snuffers were found in my room, they are mine; they were given to me two years ago this April, by a young man named Cooper, who is gone out of the country. I always kept them hung on a nail in the room, and never used them - they are plain steel snuffers, about six inches long. I am an unfortunate girl.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did you serve any subpoenas - A. No.

Q. I suppose you mean Cooper was transported - A. He was. They hung there the night Pople first came. I do not think they were broken. They do not stand on any feet. I had borrowed the chisel to mend my bedstead.

ANN ALLEN . I live in Old Pye-street. I know the snuffers have been in the possession of Jackson since April I was in the room when Cooper gave them to her.

Q. He has had the misfortune to be transported - A. I never heard of it. I have cleaned them myself - they hung over a glass in the room; they were seldom used - I have seen them used once or twice.

MR. ADOLPHUS called

ROBERT MITCHELL . I am a carpenter, and live in King's Road, Fulham. On the night of the 29th of January I was at the Bull from nine to ten o'clock. I cannot swear to the prisoners, but I firmly believe them to be two of the three persons who were there in company. I was not there above two or three minutes after they came in.

J. BIRD - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 26.

G. BIRD - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 20.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200217-86

435. JAMES WRIGHT was indicted for embezzlement .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 38.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200217-87

436. ROBERT HALL and GEORGE KING were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Richard Chase , Esq. , about two o'clock in the night of the 30th of January , with intent to steal .

MR. ADOLPHUS, for the prosecution, stated that he had not sufficient evidence to bring this case home to the prisoners, and declined offering any evidence.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200217-88

437. BENJAMIN DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of January , 3 s. in monies numbered , the monies of Arthur Warmoll .

ARTHUR WARMOLL . I live in Crown-court, Shoreditch , and am a grocer ; the prisoner was my shopman . On the 15th of January Ranson marked 18 s. in my presence, and sent Harris to my shop to buy 2 lbs. of tea with them - two or three minutes after I went home, went to the till, and found only fifteen of the marked shillings there. I sent for Ranson, and charged the prisoner with robbing the till - he said nothing, but took his hat, and was going out, Ranson stopped him. We took him up stairs, and he voluntarily produced three shillings, which we had marked.

Cross-examined by MR. WALFORD. Q. Did he not say he had borrowed it - A. No.

JAMES RANSON . I marked eighteen shillings, and gave them to Harris. I afterwards went to the shop, and saw the prisoner give up three of the shillings I had marked. Before that he came round the counter, and took his hat to go out; I stopped him, and desired him to go up stairs - he fell on his knees and begged pardon. He took me to his trunk and gave me 2 l., saying he had robbed his master of it.

MARY HARRIS . I received eighteen shillings from Ranson, and bought 2 lbs. of tea at the prosecutor's shop; the prisoner served me. I laid the same money on the counter, he counted it, and gave me 8 d. change.

Prisoner's Defence. I took the 3 s. to pay a debt of 12 s., as I had only 9 s. in my pocket, and could not get to my box.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Confined Three Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200217-89

438. ABRAHAM BOLTON was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Baily , about two o'clock in the night of the 29th of January , at Wilsden, with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, one bridle, value 1 s.; one collar, value 2 s.; one pair of hames and traces, value 6 s., his property, and one jacket, value 6 d., the property of William Herridge .

WILLIAM HERRIDGE . I live with Mr. Baily at Kelsal-green, in the parish of Wilsden . I sleep in the house over the brewhouse - my bedroom joins the dwelling-house. I fastened up the house between six and seven o'clock at night; all the doors and windows were secured. At two o'clock in the morning the watchman gave an alarm, I awoke, came down, and saw two men in the wash-house and brewhouse; they could not have got in without breaking the fastenings of the house - three doors were broken open. Dalton secured both the men - one was standing up, and the other lying down; we kept them in the house

- the prisoner was one whom we kept in custody; I never saw him before. The other was named Lucy.

Q. What became of Lucy - A. They both broke out of the round-house - the prisoner has since been taken.

Q. After you secured the prisoner, did you discover how the house had been entered - A. The door leading from the cow-house into the yard was entirely forced down - they had broken another door before they could get into the brewhouse, where we secured them. I found a bundle, which was left on the copper the over-night, was moved into the brewhouse; a collar, and hames and traces were moved - they hung up over a door which leads from the cowhouse to the brewhouse; that door was nailed up; they had broken the boards down, and took the collar and harness off the peg. My jacket hung at the foot of the ladder where I go up to bed - I found it lying on the floor in the same room, about three yards from where it hung. Mr. Baily's drawers were moved off the copper.

THOMAS BAILY . I live in Wilsden parish and rent the house. Herridge fastened the doors. I was called up in the night; I went with Herridge, and found the prisoner in the middle of the wash-house - he could not have got there a without breaking three boards, which was originally a doorway - they were pulled down between the cowhouse and brewhouse - they were safe overnight; it would take considerable force to remove them. I struck a light, as it was quite dark; I then asked the prisoner, Bolton, where his companion was? he said he was lying in one corner of the room - I found him lying there, and kept them in custody there till seven o'clock, then sent for the constable, and conveyed them to the round-house. The collar, traces, and drawers were moved from where they were the over-night. The cow-house joins the dwelling-house, and is part of it.

JURY. Q. Was Lucy asleep - A. I think not - he was sober.

JOHN DALTON . I am a watchman of Wilsden; I go round these premises every half hour. At half-past eleven o'clock every door was safe and fast. I went again rather before two, having seen two men of suspicious appearance go in a direction towards Baily's. When I went into the yard I found the boards pulled flat down to the ground where the doorway was. I went round to the other door, which goes into the house, and found that open - they could not get at that without forcing the boards down. I sprang my rattle, went in, and found the prisoner there; I kept him in custody till the servant came down. I found a tall young man lying by the side of a truss of hay - I secured him, and took them both to the round-house at seven o'clock in the morning, and the same night I heard they had escaped; I afterwards saw the prisoner in custody at Bow-street, and am certain he is the man. They were both sober.

RICHARD LIMBRICK . I am a Bow-street officer. Baily told me the men had broken from the watch-house. I found the prisoner at Bayswater on the 7th of February. I asked him if his name was Bolton? he said No, it was Owen. I knew he was the same man.

WILLIAM JENNINGS . I went in company with Limbrick to apprehend the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I was at work at the canal - I was paid on Saturday night between eleven and twelve o'clock, and staid half an hour at the Chequers, public-house. I was very tired, and went into this yard, saw the door open, walked in and laid down, being very tired. I said I came there to rest.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 43.

Recommended to Mercy.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200217-90

439. JOSEPH LAZARUS was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of February , one watch, value 20 l. , the goods of James Trendall .

JAMES TRENDALL . I am a watchmaker , and live at Reading . On Wednesday, the 26th of January, about seven o'clock in the evening, my wife alarmed me; I found my window broken, and two gold watches stolen out. I went out, but saw nobody. I saw one of the watches at Bow-street nine days after; the prisoner was then in custody - he was a stranger to me.

WILLIAM ALDRIDGE . I live with my father, who is a pawnbroker, and lives in Orange-street, Bloomsbury. On the 1st of February the prisoner pledged a watch with me for 5 l., in the name of Joseph Lazarus , Ebenezer-square, Houndsditch.

Cross-examined by MR. ARABIN. Q. You know he deals in these articles - A. Yes. He redeemed articles pledged by other people.

THOMAS MAYHEW . I belong to Bow-street. I went with Aldridge to Ebenezer-square, and found the prisoner there. He said he found the watch at the west end of the town on Monday morning, and shewed it to several people.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you not find some seals on him - A. Yes. His answer related to the watch.

Prisoner's Defence. I said I found the seals, not the watch.

BENJAMIN HARRIS . I live in Ebenezer-square. I am licenced to buy wearing apparel of the soldiers at the barracks; the prisoner deals in clothes about the street - he dines with me every day at six o'clock, and did so on Wednesday, the 6th of January - he has done so every day for five months. He left about half-past nine or ten o'clock. Simmons came in, and saw us there that evening.

COURT. Q. Where does the prisoner live - A. Next door to me. He pays me 10 s. 6 d. a week for his board, and 12 s. in holiday time.

Q. What makes you recollect the 26th of January - A. Because I have a receipt in my pocket of some clothes I bought that day at the barracks. He did not shew me the watch.

MOSES SIMMONS . I am a salesman, and live in Ebenezer-square; I go up to Marylebone every day. On the 26th of January I walked home with the prisoner; we got home about a quarter after six o'clock. I saw him again between seven and eight o'clock at Harris's.

Q. Have you any particular reason for remembering that day - A. Yes, I wear out a great many shoes, and the last pair I bought I put the date in them to see how long they would last. I bought them on the 25th, and put them on the 26th.

COURT. Were you at the examination - A. Yes, and

remember about the date on the shoe. I had them on at the time, but did not pull them off to look at the date.

Q. Where did you meet him that day - A. I was with him every day for the last six months; we meet at a coffee-house every day at three o'clock, and have coffee together. We are prohibited from taking any thing else - he never shewed me the watch.

THOMAS LEGG . I am a tailor, and live in South Moulton-street. On the 1st of February the prisoner told me he had bought a watch, and shewed it to me, and in the evening he shewed me the duplicate; it was a gold horizontal watch, engine turned. I have often seen him with watches - he barters watches for clothes.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200217-91

440. DAVID MORGAN was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of January , one handkerchief, value 4 s., the goods of George Knox , from his person .

MR. GEORGE KNOX . I am a merchant , and live in Seething-lane. On the 22d of January, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I was walking on the pavement between Finsbury-square and Moorfields . I found a pressure on me behind, put my hand round, and my handkerchief was put into it - it did not drop from my pocket. I turned round, and saw the prisoner in custody.

GEORGE MOSS . I am a clerk in the Post Office. I observed a boy following Mr. Knox, and looking at his handkerchief, which was about two inches out of his pocket. The prisoner came up Chiswell-street, joined him, and drew the handkerchief out. I seized him, and he immediately dropped the handkerchief. Mr. Knox caught it as it fell.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Fined One Shilling, and Discharged .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200217-92

441. HENRY WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of February , two candlesticks, value 5 s., and one caddy-spoon, value 1 s. , the goods of Ann Elstob .

ANN ELSTOB . I live in Grove-row, Mile End . On the 15th of February, about one o'clock, these things were on the sideboard in the back parlour. About two o'clock my daughter heard a noise; I went up, found the window open, and missed them; there is a gate in the back garden, which was not fastened. My daughter rose an alarm, and the prisoner was brought back with the candlesticks, but not the spoon.

WILLIAM BURDOCK . I am a milkman. I was near to the prosecutrix's house, talking to a man; a little girl came out, and said they had been robbed. I ran and secured the prisoner about a quarter of a mile off, and told him he had the candlesticks; he said he had not. I found them in his bag. Three others were with him, who ran away - his bag contained hearth-stones.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A person asked me to carry the bag, and when the man came he ran away.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200217-93

EIGHTH DAY, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 25.

442. DAVID SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of February , 41 lbs. of sugar, value 30 s. , the goods of John Tyler and John Batger .

THOMAS WESLEY . I am carman to Messrs. John Tyler and John Batger , who are sugar-bakers . On the 5th of February, about nine o'clock in the morning, the cart stood at the warehouse door, in Prince's-square , and had a hundred and fifty loaves of sugar in it. I saw a loaf taken off the cart, ran out, and secured the prisoner with it under his arm.

Prisoner's Defence. It fell down as I passed the cart.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Confined Four Months , and Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200217-94

443. FRANCOIS GERARD was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of September , two watches, value 40 l. , the goods of John George Fearn and Joseph Litteler .

For the Prosecution, MR. DOWLING.

JAMES CHANDLER . I am in the employ of Messrs. John George Fearn and Joseph Litteler , who are jewellers , and live in the Strand . On Saturday, the 11th of September, the prisoner came to the shop with an interpreter, and desired to see some spoons and forks, and two gold watches; he said he would not decide on them; I saw him again on Monday with a fresh interpreter, when he desired to see the spoons and forks he had seen on Saturday; he fixed on them, and desired to see some plated goods, saying he was going to housekeeping, and could not afford silver. He ordered a sugar-bason, milk-pot, and a gold watch, chain, seal, and key, in all they came to 54 l. He then asked to see some gold watches, and I produced the two he had seen; he said he did not understand watches, but if I would send them to his lodgings, No. 6, Frith-street, he had a friend there, and he would determine which he would take. I took them myself in about an hour, and saw him with the interpreter; I put them on the table. He asked, through the interpreter, if I would allow him to take the watches to a friend in the next room? I said,

"Certainly," and gave them to him. As soon as he left the room the interpreter asked me if I knew him? I said No - he never returned. I inquired, and found he had escaped out of the house; I did not see him again until the 2d of December, when I apprehended him at Bath. I found one watch in pledge at Bath, and saw the other at Bow-street; I should not have parted with them without the money. He had ordered the spoons and forks to be engraved.

THOMAS BROWN . On the 13th of September I was shopman to Mr. Chasseroe, who is a pawnbroker, and lives in Marylebone-street. The prisoner pledged a gold watch with me between two and three o'clock in the afternoon, in the name of Delisle.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAM LEE . I am a Bow-street officer. On the 2d of December I apprehended the prisoner at Bath, where he lodged in a garret by the name of Captain Delisle , and brought him to town. When we were at Reading he

asked leave to get of the coach, and immediately ran away, but I secured him.

Prisoner's Defence. I agreed to buy the watches on credit. When I left the room I received a letter from a friend, who I expected some money from, and was obliged to set off for Bristol. I did not think proper to write to the prosecutor till I could pay him.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200217-95

444. HENRY SHONE was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of January , two mahogany boards, value 2 l., and eight mahogony veneers, value 1 l. , the goods of Thomas Morris .

GEORGE RIVERS . I live in Judd-street, and have the care of Thomas Morris 's business; the boards were in the warehouse in Crescent-mews . On the 29th of January I secured the prisoner coming out of the mews with one of them on his back. I found the staple of the door forced, and eight veneers gone.

THOMAS YOELL . I saw the prisoner come out of the shop, with a board, three times in the course of the day.

JOHN RAYNER . I am a cabinet-maker, and live in Berwick-street; the prisoner took me to Morris's shed, and offered to sell me the whole of the property there for 10 l. Next morning he brought eight veneers to sell to me, and I gave information.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200217-96

445. PAUL EATEN was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of January , one saddle, value 1 l. , the goods of Augustus Manning .

WILLIAM MITCHEL . I am coachman to Mr. Augustus Manning , who lives in John-street, Adelphi; the saddle hung at Mash's stables, St. Martin's-lane . I missed it on the 14th of January; the prisoner was hostler in the yard - he was apprehended, and denied it. The boards of the stable were broken down to get in.

ESTHER YOELL . I live in Brownlow-mews. On the 13th of February I saw the prisoner going down Great St. Andrew-street with a saddle.

JOSEPH POWTER . I am a broker, and live in Dartmouth-street. On the 13th of January I bought the saddle of the prisoner for 7 s. He said he was a groom, and it was given to him by his master in the country.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200217-97

446. JOHN COX was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of February , one pair of breeches, value 5 s., and one waistcoat, value 5 s. , the goods of Isaac Swain and George Clutton .

ISAAC SWAIN . I am servant to Mr. Clutton, of South Mimms; my breeches were taken from the yard, where they hung to dry.

GEORGE CLUTTON . I was on a visit at Mr. Garret's, and my waistcoat was stolen off the hedge. I found it in pledge at Ratcliffe.

FREDERICK PROPSTRING . I am constable of Henley. On the 15th of February, between eleven and twelve o'clock at night, Mr. Garret informed me that the prisoner was in the next house, I broke the door open, as it was bolted inside, and found the prisoner there; he said it was his home. I secured him, and asked him what he had done with the breeches and waistcoat? He said they were pledged at Ratcliff-highway, and wrote the direction down.

JOHN COX . I am a pawnbroker. On the 10th of February the prisoner pledged the waistcoat and a pair of breeches with me for 9 s.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200217-98

447. ROBERT SHAFE , WILLIAM GOULD , and JOHN LONG were indicted for feloniously ripping, cutting, and breaking, on the 25th of January , 60 lbs. of lead, the property of the parishioners of St. James's , and fixed to a building of their's, with intent to steal .

SECOND COUNT, for stealing the said lead.

THIRD AND FOURTH COUNTS, the same, only stating it to belong to the Right Honourable William Huskisson , William Dakers Adams , Esq. , and Henry Dickens , Esq. , and fixed to a building of their's.

For the Prosecution, MR ALLEY.

WILLIAM CONNELLY . On the 25th of January I was watching the premises belonging to St. James's workhouse - I am employed to watch by the Commissioners of the New-street. About seven o'clock in the evening I saw Shafe getting into the gutter of the school-room, and told Irwing. We got on the premises, and found Long was getting through the hole in the palings, where they had broken through; Shafe came off the roof, and I collared him. Gould tried to escape through the hole, but was secured. I found 3/4 cwt. of lead on the ground under the wall.

WILLIAM IRWING . Connelly called me, and I saw Shafe and Long on the roof of the school, in King-street, Golden-square; I secured them as they came through the hole. I saw them throw the lead on the ground; I compared it with the roof, and it matched exactly. A knife was found in the yard where the prisoners were taken to.

PATRICK CLYNE . I secured Gould as he came through the fence, which was broken down. I saw him come from the wall where the lead was.

DAVID ELBS . I am in St. James's school. I found a knife in the yard.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

SHAFE'S Defence. I was only in the yard.

SHAFE - GUILTY . Aged 16.

GOULD - GUILTY . Aged 13.

LONG - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200217-99

448. ROBERT KILBY was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of February , one watch, value 10 s.; one chain, value 6 d., and two keys, value 2 d., the goods of Edward Keen , from his person .

EDWARD KEEN . I am an iron-founder , and live in Crawford-street. On the 13th of February, between eight and nine o'clock in the evening, I was in High-street, St. Giles's ; the prisoner and two others came up, one on each side, and the other in front - they made a pull at my watch, but did not get it; they then made another pull, got it, and ran off. I pursued, and caught the prisoner with it in his hand, but the others got off - I was quite sober.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200217-100

449. THOMAS OWNER was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of January , one ring, value 10 s., and one spoon, value 4 s. , the goods of Jane Spratt ; and RICHARD JAMES and JOSEPH JAMES were indicted for feloniously receiving the same, knowing them to have been stolen .

JANE SPRATT . I live on Moffat-terrace, City-road . On the 21st of January I employed Owner to clear away the snow from the front and back of my house; I gave him 3 d., and a bason of tea in the kitchen. My ring was taken out of the looking-glass drawer on the ground floor.

GEORGE GOODLUCK . I am headborough of Hoxton. On Sunday, the 23d of January, I apprehended Owner - he denied having been near the house. I got information, and went to Rose-lane, Spitalfields, after Joseph James ; I got into a house full of thieves - I said I wanted a duplicate, and a man brought me the duplicate of the spoon. In the evening I went again, and found Joseph James ; he said it was his father that pledged the spoon. I left him in charge, and found his father (Richard) at the ship, public-house, in Wheeler-street - he denied it. Next morning, I found the ring had been pledged in the Kings-road, and redeemed again. I found it at Owner's aunt's.

CHARLES DAWSON . I am servant to Mr. Humbleby, who is a pawnbroker, and lives in Old-street. On the 22d of January Richard James pledged the spoon with me.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

RICHARD JAMES 'S Defence. Owner said he found the spoon, and asked me to pledge it as he was under age.

OWNER - GUILTY. Aged 13.

Judgment Respited .

R. JAMES - NOT GUILTY .

J. JAMES - NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200217-101

450. RICHARD GRANTHAM and THOMAS SHAW were indicted for stealing, on the 10th of January , three carriage seat-cloths, value 2 l. 5 s., and one chaise headlining, value 5 s. , the goods of Charles Joseph Thrupp , John Augustus Thrupp , and Henry Joseph Thrupp .

CHARLES ATWELL . I am clerk to Messrs. Charles Joseph Thrupp , John Augustus Thrupp , and Henry Joseph Thrupp , who are coachmaker s, and live in George-street, Oxford-road ; the prisoners were labourer s in their employ. On Sunday morning, the 16th of January, about ten o'clock, Spendlove fetched me to the Duke of Wellington, public-house, in Crawford-street, where I saw the prisoners - they appeared confused. Shaw took a bundle off the table, and said he must go; I asked him what he had got there? he said he had got dirty linen. I pulled it from him, opened it, and found it was a blue seat-cloth. He said Grantham gave it to him; he denied knowing any thing about it, but at last said,

"To cut the matter short I'll tell you how I got it; it is Messrs. Thrupps' property, and came out of their premises, but I did not take it." I gave him in charge of Wales, accompanied him to Shaw's lodgings, and found some pieces of leather, and two wrenches like those that are used at our shop. We then went to Grantham's, and found two seat-cloths under the bedstead, and part of a chaise head-lining.

JOHN WALES . On the 16th of January I took the prisoners in charge. Grantham directed me to his lodgings, No. 10, East-street, Manchester-square, with a message. Atwell's account is correct.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAM SPENDLOVE . I am a dealer in harness. I met Shaw; he asked me if I did not live in South-street? I said I now lived in Crawford-street. He said he knew a man who had a hammer-cloth to sell, and he would bring it to-morrow - he said he worked at Thrupp's. On Sunday morning, about nine o'clock, he brought one, tied up in an apron; he said it belonged to another man, and he was to have 30 s. for it - I offered him 1 l.; he was to let me know in an hour. I locked it up, and gave information to Mr. Thrupp. I returned, and found both the prisoners at the door. Grantham said the hammer-cloth belonged to him. I told them to go to the Wellington, public-house, and I would be with them. I fetched Attfield, and we went together.

SHAW'S Defence. I did not know it was stolen.

GRANTHAM - GUILTY . Aged 39.

Confined Two Months .

SHAW - NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200217-102

451. THOMAS GATES and JOSEPH GATES were indicted for stealing, on the 20th of January , five thimbles, value 7 s. 6 d. , the goods of Joseph Taylor .

JOSEPH TAYLOR . I am a comb-maker , and live in St. Martin's-court . On the 20th of January as I was serving a customer, a woman brought a thimble in, and said it fell from the case. I went to the door, and found the glass of the case broken, and five thimbles gone - three were on the ground - the prisoners passed my door; about a minute after, a baker gave me information, and they were brought back by Harrison in about ten minutes. Joseph Gates 's hands were cut, and very bloody. On his way to the watch-house he escaped, but I secured him again.

JAMES HARRISON . I am a constable. On the 20th of January, about half-past four o'clock, I saw the prisoners coming away from Taylor's window - they were close to it. I saw them pass and repass several times, and once or twice they stopped at the window. About five o'clock I heard the glass was broken and the thimbles stolen; I immediately went and secured them in Castle-street. I told them Taylor's window was broken, and I had seen them

pass several times. They made great resistance, but I took them back. Joseph's hand was cut and bled, as if from the glass. As I took them to the watch-house he escaped, and Mr. Taylor secured him.

THOMAS GOOK . I am an officer. I assisted in taking the prisoners to the office. Taylor gave me three thimbles - two were stained with blood.

THOMAS GLASSBOROUGH. The prisoners were brought to the watch-house. I found a handkerchief all over blood in Thomas's hat; he said he had lent it to his brother.

THOMAS GATES 'S Defence. I made no resistance.

T. GATES - GUILTY . Aged 18.

J. GATES - GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200217-103

452. JAMES IMPORT was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of January , 14 lbs. of lead, value 6 s., belonging to William Giles , and fixed to his dwelling-house .

WILLIAM GILES , JUN. I live in Wych-street, St. Clement's . On the 26th of January the leaden pump, and some pipe belonging to it, were ripped off and stolen. Young brought the prisoner back with it about ten o'clock in the morning. The pipe was in his coat-pocket, and two pieces of the nozzle of the pump in his apron.

JOHN YOUNG . I lodge at Giles's. I saw the prisoner come from the pump, which is in the passage - I saw it was cut and went after him; I brought him back, and found the lead on him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I went to the privy, and a man gave me the lead at the door.

GUILTY . Aged 59.

Confined Six Months , and publicly Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200217-104

453. WILLIAM KING was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of January , 15 lbs. of figs, value 14 s., and one umbrella, value 2 s. , the goods of William Tombs .

WILLIAM TOMBS . I am a fruiterer , and live in Devonshire-street . On the 28th of January the figs were on the counter, and the umbrella by the parlour-door - I missed them, received information, went out, and secured the prisoner in Harley-street, running in company with two others, one of whom threw the umbrella down, and the prisoner threw the figs from under his jacket.

SAMUEL RINGROSE . I saw the prisoner and two others lurking about the shop - one went in, and threw the figs to the prisoner, who caught them and put them under his coat; the other came out with the umbrella. I ran in, and told Tombs.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200217-105

454. WILLIAM MARTIN was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of February , 15 lbs. of lead, value 2 s. 6 d., the property of John Hammon , and fixed to a building of his .

JOHN HAMMON . I am a plumber , and live at Hendon . On the 1st of February, about eight o'clock at night, I missed about 15 lbs. of lead from a chimney over the wash-house - it was a gutter; it was fixed to the building. On Tuesday I found the prisoner at Bow-street with two pieces exactly like it - he lived in the neighbourhood.

JOHN SMITH . I am conductor of the Bow-street patrol. On the 1st of February, about twelve o'clock in the day, I met the prisoner in Hampstead Road, with the lead on his shoulder in a bag. He said he was out of work, and took it from the prosecutor's. I compared it with the roof, and it matched exactly.

GUILTY . Aged 29.

Fined One Shilling, and Discharged .

Second Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18200217-106

455. FRANCIS MAYLE was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of January , three saws, value 15 s. , the goods of William Dunsmore .

WILLIAM DUNSMORE . I was at work at a building in Euston-grove, Euston-square - my saws were stolen about ten o'clock in the morning. Beaver brought the prisoner to me and charged him with it; he said he received two of the prisoner, and he did not deny it, but he said he had pledged the other.

GEORGE BEAVER . I am a carpenter. On the 20th of January the prisoner came up to where I was at work, and asked for Dunn, the apprentice. When the prosecutor came in he missed his saws. I went after the prisoner; he was brought to the premises about one o'clock by the apprentice. He denied it, but at last he took me to a house in Phillips's-buildings, and produced two saws - he said he had pledged the other at Bell's, in Holborn.

ROBERT SPARROW . I am servant to Mr. Bell, who is a pawnbroker, and lives in High Holborn. The saw was pledged by the prisoner in the name of Jones.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I am sorry for it.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Whipped, and Discharged .

Second Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18200217-107

456. JOHN WALTERS and GEORGE EDMONDS were indicted for stealing, on the 26th of January , 150 yards of printed cotton, value 6 l. , the goods of George Stafford .

CHARLES STAFFORD . I am shopman to my brother, George Stafford , who is a linen-draper , and lives in Oxford-street . On the 26th of January, about five o'clock in the evening, a lady came into the shop - in consequence of what she said I ran out and saw the prisoners; Walters was walking about five yards behind Edmonds, who had the printed cotton on his shoulder. As soon as Walters saw me, he ran up and seized Edmonds, saying,

"This is him!" I went up, seized them both, and brought them back to the shop - I gave them in charge. The print was in the shop five minutes before, by the door.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN ELSON . I am a painter. I was passing the shop, and saw Walters about three paces from the door. I had hardly got a step further before I saw Edmonds take the bundle of cotton from the inner door of the shop, and go down the street with it; Walters followed him after Stafford came out, but did not move till then. I suspected him,

but was not certain that he was concerned. I ran with Stafford, and pointed them out - he secured them. I took Edmonds back with the bundle.

EDMONDS - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

WALTER - NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18200217-108

457. JAMES MUNYARD was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of February , seven gowns, value 90 s.; two boxes, value 10 s.; two bonnets, value 2 l.; one dress, value 1 l.; one tea-chest, value 8 s.; four shifts, value 1 l.; eleven aprons, value 1 l.; twelve pair of stockings, value 30 s.; eleven caps, value 11 s.; five yards of net, value 5 s.; one petticoat, value 4 s., and one handkerchief, value 18 d. , the goods of Esther Galton .

ESTHER GALTON . I am a servant out of place, and live in Tash-court, Gray's Inn-lane. The prisoner carried my boxes to Peckham about six months ago. On the 7th of February I sent him to fetch a chest and a box from there, and to bring them to Tash-court - he did not come, but next day Brown fetched me to the office, where I found the prisoner, with the chest broken open; it had contained the articles stated in the indictment - I missed several of them.

JOHN BROWN. I am an officer. On the 8th of February the prisoner came into the Lebeck's Head, public-house, Shadwell, and had something to drink. I was in the bar; he took me for the landlord, and asked me for a lodging. He seemed rather intoxicated, and had a chest with him. I asked him where he came from? he said from the Sussex frigate. I told him there was no such ship, and asked him where he brought the chest from? he said from Gravesend, and was very tired. It did not look like a seaman's chest, which arose my suspicion. I looked at his hands, and said he was no sailor. I went to examine the chest, he wished me not to do it, and said it was his daughter's, and he was moving it from her place of service. I secured him - he struggled, and threw two duplicates from his left hand, which were picked up and given to me. He cried, and said he was very sorry, he had done wrong, and that he was sent by a young woman in Tash-court to fetch a chest and box from Peckham, and that he took it to Deptford, broke it open, and pledged some of the things. I fetched the prosecutrix, she claimed the things, and missed several. He said he had left the second box at Greenwich, after it was broken to pieces - I went and found it there.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN DECKER . I am a pawnbroker, and live at Lime-house. On the 8th of February the prisoner pledged three gowns for 5 s., in the name of Clark.

RICHARD PARRY. I am a pawnbroker, and live at Deptford. On the 27th of February a gown was pledged with me, I do not know who by.

Prisoner's Defence. I meant to redeem them.

GUILTY Aged 42.

Confined One Year .

Second Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18200217-109

458. THOMAS YOUEN was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of January , one pair of half-boots, value 5 s.; three muffin cakes, value 1 d.; two crumpet cakes, value 1 d., and one handkerchief, value 6 d., the goods of William Hyde , from the person of Sarah Hyde .

SARAH HYDE . I am the daughter of William Hyde , who lives in Stewart-street, Spitalfields, and am ten years of age. On a Thursday, about a month ago, my mother sent me out with a handkerchief to fetch a pair of boots and some muffins and crumpets - I got them. A man snatched the handkerchief from me in Spital-square , between five and six o'clock, and ran away. I called out; a gentleman stopped him, and said he saw the prisoner throw the bundle away. He had a whitish apron, and so had the man who robbed me.

JOHN FAIREY . I am a watch-maker, and live at Ratcliff-highway. I saw the child in Spital-square, very much frightened. I had seen the prisoner run by with her bundle - I cried Stop thief, and ran after him; he was stopped. I kept him in sight all the way, and saw him throw the bundle away.

JAMES ELEAZOR TAYLOR . I live at Hackney. I was passing the end of Spital-square, heard the child cry, and saw a man with a whitish apron running towards me. I attempted to lay hold of him, but he got into the road and threw the bundle away. I secured him without losing sight of him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was running home and they stopped me. I know nothing of it.

GUILTY . Aged 49.

Confined Six Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200217-110

459. CAROLINE PALMER and HANNAH WALKER were indicted for stealing, on the 16th of January , one petticoat, value 6 d.; one piece of calico, value 1 s.; one shift, value 6 d.; one sheet, value 2 d., and one napkin, value 1 d. , the goods of William Larkins .

WILLIAM LARKINS. I am a cabinet-maker , and live in Air-street, Bethnal-green. On the 16th of January, about eleven o'clock at night, I met the prisoner, Walker, in Brick-lane; Palmer came up, and both invited me home with them. I sat by the fire half an hour, and put my bundle in the chair. I said I had no money before I went in. They both left the room at the same time, and I missed my bundle; I did not see them take it. They returned, and I asked them for it; they denied having it. I said I would charge the watch with them - I fetched him, and he took them. The bundle was found in the next room.

WILLIAM LICKFOLD . I heard a noise in George-street, and found Larkins in the passage - he said he had been robbed. Palmer gave me the key of the room, and said I should find the bundle there, I did so.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

WALKER'S Defence. We never touched his bundle. He was drunk and fell asleep in the room.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200217-111

460. GEORGE ROSS was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of January , one watch, value 15 s.; one chain, value 6 d., and one seal, value 6 d. , the goods of John Ferris .

JOHN FERRIS . I am a corporal in the 57th Regiment. On the 27th of January, about half-past three o'clock in the afternoon, I left my watch in the privy of the Feathers public-house, Dean-street, Westminster . I remained cleaning my boots by the door for about five minutes, and then missed it - nobody had been in but the prisoner. I went after him, and found him in about half an hour - he denied it.

JAMES LAWSON . I am foreman to Mr. Dobree, pawnbroker, Charing-cross. On the 27th of January the prisoner pledged the watch for 10 s.

JAMES GILMORE . I am an officer. I took the prisoner into custody, and saw him chewing a piece of paper, which I believe was a duplicate.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Confined Two Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200217-112

461. SARAH DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of January , one watch, value 2 l.; one seal, value 1 s., and one handkerchief, value 7 s., the goods of William Hardy , from his person .

WILLIAM HARDY . I am in the First Regiment of Life Guards . On the 19th of January, about twelve o'clock at night, I was in Leicester-square , the prisoner accosted me; I went up a court with her for a moment, and as soon as I left her I missed my handkerchief from my breast-pocket, and my watch - I saw it at the office three days after. I was sober.

THOMAS GOOK . I am a constable. On the 19th of January, about two o'clock, the prisoner was brought into St. James's watch-house from St. Martin's - they said she had a watch about her; I asked her to give it up, she refused, and said it was her husband's. I at last got it from her, and the prosecutor claimed it afterwards.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

EDWARD HUSSEY . I am a watchman. I took the prisoner in St. Martin's-court, between two and three o'clock in the morning - she was offering the watch for sale to the people as they passed.

Prisoner's Defence. He left it instead of money.

GUILTY . Aged 29.

Confined Three Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200217-113

462. DANIEL STEWART was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of January , three shifts, value 5 s.; one tablecloth, value 5 s.; one shirt, value 4 s.; one waistcoat, value 2 s.; two towels, value 6 d., and one gown, value 2 s. , the goods of James Layton .

MARY LAYTON . I am the wife of James Layton ; we live at Pope's-hill, Shadwell . On the 24th of January, I put the articles stated in the indictment between the bed-tick and the sacking on the first floor, locked the door, and went out about twelve o'clock - I returned in ten minutes, found the door forced open, and the things gone. I gave an alarm, and the prisoner was secured in the house with them, tied in a handkerchief which was not mine. He had concealed himself in an empty room.

MARY SHARRAT . I live in the house. I heard the alarm - the prisoner was secured in the empty room.

JOHN BROWN. I was sent for, and found the prisoner in a cupboard in the empty room, sitting on the bundle. I found 2 l. 8 s. 6 d. on him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY Aged 64.

Confined Two Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200217-114

463. ANN STRINGER was indicted for embezzlement .

MARY ANN WESTERN . I am a laundress ; the prisoner was my servant , and entrusted to receive money for me. Mrs. Munting's bill was due at Michaelmas, the prisoner never accounted to me for it.

SARAH MUNTING . I live in Holborn-court, Gray's Inn, and am servant to Mr. Robert Jobbings . At Michaelmas last he lived in Verulam-building; Western washed for him. On the second Monday after Michaelmas I paid the prisoner 4 l. 3 s. 6 d., and in a fortnight after I paid her 11 l. 3 s. 11 d. I gave her a 10 l. note and the rest in silver. Some weeks after the prosecutrix applied to me for it.

JAMES GILMORE . I apprehended the prisoner, who had absconded. She said she had spent all the money.

MARY ANN WESTERN re-examined. She did not leave me till a fortnight after she had received it.

GUILTY . Aged 50.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200217-115

464. GEORGE KING was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of January , one gun, value 36 s. , the goods of James Hall .

JAMES HALL . I live at Mr. Jenkins's, Portland nursery, New Road. My gun was by a cottage in Regency Park ; I lost it - next day I found it in the prisoner's apartments; he worked for Mr. Jenkins. I had given him leave to take it whenever he wanted it.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200217-116

465. SARAH WARREN was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of January , one gown value 3 s., and one flat iron, value 6 d. , the goods of John Kemp .

JOHN KEMP . I lodge in Sander's-gardens, Kingsland ; the prisoner came to nurse my wife. While she was there we lost a gown, and asked her what she had done with it? she said she had pledged it.

WILLIAM DOWNER . The prisoner pledged a gown and iron with me for 1 s. 10 d.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in want of money.

GUILTY Aged 40.

Fined One Shilling, and Discharged .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200217-117

466. WILLIAM WHITTLE was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of February , one cheese, value 18 d. , the goods of Ann Luke , widow .

ANN LUKE . I am a widow, and keep a chandler's shop in Clifton-street, Finsbury . I was alarmed, and missed a

Dutch cheese off the counter, ran out, and secured the prisoner with it under his coat.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Confined Six Months , and Publicly Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200217-118

467. JOHN WHALEN and JOHN COLLICOTT were indicted for stealing, on the 24th of January , three pieces of timber, value 3 s. , the goods of John Dottridge .

JOHN DOTTRIDGE . I keep a public-house in Nightingale-lane; I have some houses rebuilding in St. George's - the timber was in the yard; I saw it safe about four o'clock in the afternoon. The yard has a high wall round it. About nine o'clock I heard they were taken, and found them at the watch-house next morning.

ROBERT HICKS . I am patrol in Old Gravel-lane. On the 24th of January, about eight o'clock at night, I found the prisoners standing under the wall of the house, and the three pieces of timber close by them. They both said they were employed by Mr. Watts to take it to his timber-yard in Old Gravel-lane; I knew no such place, and secured them. I took them to Old Gravel-lane, but they could not point it out - the prosecutor claimed the timber. Another man went away; they said they did not know him.

COLLICOTT'S Defence. I went to the wall for a necessary purpose, and a man asked me to help him put the timber over the wall.

WHALEN - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined Six Weeks .

COLLICOTT - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Three Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200217-119

NINTH DAY, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 26.

468. TIMOTHY EDDOWS was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of February , one handkerchief, value 3 s., the goods of Peter Alley , Esq. , from his person .

PETER ALLEY , ESQ. On the 3d of February I was passing through Marylebone-street, Golden-square , and saw the prisoner and two others close by me - the prisoner was behind me; I turned about, and a gentleman said,

"Sir, your pocket has been picked!" I instantly missed my handkerchief, and seized the two men, but understanding that the prisoner had run away with the handkerchief, I pursued him down a street, towards Piccadilly, and secured him without losing sight of him. I told him he had my handkerchief, but he denied it. I began to search him, and saw my handkerchief behind him, fixed between the railings.

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Confined Six Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200217-120

469. JOHN REYNOLDS was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of January , one handkerchief, value 4 s., the goods of Bryan Mackey , from his person .

MR. BRYAN MACKEY . I am a surgeon , and live in Manchester-street, Manchester-square. On the 28th of January, about seven o'clock in the evening, I was in Piccadilly , and felt my handkerchief going; I turned round, missed it, and saw the prisoner in custody with it.

WILLIAM BIDGOOD . I live in Castle-street, Oxford-market. I was coming along Piccadilly, and saw the prisoner and another attempt to pick the prosecutor's pocket. I followed them about two hundred yards, then saw the prisoner take up the skirt of his coat, and take the handkerchief out; the other man got behind him. I secured him with the handkerchief under his arm - the other man escaped.

JOHN LATHAM . I was with Bidgood. His account is correct.

(Property produced and sworn to)

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200217-121

470. JOHN GREFFIS was indicted for that he, on the 26th of July , with a certain offensive weapon (to wit) a knife, upon Edward Kelly , unlawfully, violently, and feloniously did make an assault, with intent to rob him, and his monies from his person and against his will, violently and feloniously to steal .

EDWARD KELLY . I live at Paddington, and have the lease of the Kilburn tolls . On the 26th of July, (which was the first day of West End fair) between six and seven o'clock in the evening, I was collecting money from different gates. As I was standing against Kilburn gate , Henley (who has since been executed), and Barratt (who was convicted), with five others, the prisoner was one, came up to the gate, and paid the toll to my collector. I received a blow from Henley over my hat, which cut my hat and head. He said,

"You b - g - r, how are you off for old iron! Do you want to transport another man for stealing iron?" - the blow stunned me. Before I could lift my hat up they all got out of the cart, and hustled and throttled me, so that I was almost choaked; I felt them pulling my watch, but they could not get it out. Barrat and the prisoner took hold of me by my neck-handkerchief; I had 320 l. in my pocket, and put my hand there to secure it. My hand was cut by some sharp instrument - I have the mark of it now; it was either Barratt or the prisoner who did it. Some people came to my assistance, and they all got into the cart, and drove off towards the fair. I saw the prisoner and Barratt next day, and seized the prisoner, but he got from me. I did not see him again until the 9th of this month, when he was taken.

Cross-examined by MR. ARABIN. Q. You was alarmed - A. Yes, and I have had messages sent me that I should not live if I prosecuted him.

RICHARD COATES . I am a constable. I met the cart about a quarter of a mile from the gate; six or seven people were in it - the prisoner was one.

JOHN MARTIN . I am constable of St. Marylebone. On the 9th of February I apprehended the prisoner. He asked me if I took him for a row in Bell-street? and said he hoped it was not for Kelly's charge, for if it was so he was done.

Prisoner's Defence. I never asked him any such a question.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200217-122

471. CORNELIUS REYNOLDS and HENRY FOKES were indicted for stealing, on the 7th of January , two coppers, value 20 s. , the goods of Jane Surr , widow .

The coppers being affixed to a building, which the indictment omitted to state, the prisoners were ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200217-123

472. CORNELIUS REYNOLDS was again indicted for stealing, on the 18th of December , two saddles, value 10 s. , the goods of John Cockleson .

RICHARD BARTLETT . I am servant to John Cockleson , Esq , who lives at Wandsworth . On the 18th of December, about seven o'clock in the evening, I found the window broken, and two saddles stolen from the stable. I found them at the prisoner's shop. He is a dealer in marine stores .

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. He said he bought them - A. Yes.

RICHARD LUCAS . I live at Chelsea. On the 31st of December I saw the saddles exposed for sale at the prisoner's door. I heard that Bartlett had lost them, and went and told him. We went to the prisoner, and asked him if he had a couple of side-saddles for sale? he produced these, and the prosecutor claimed them. He said,

"If they are stolen take them. I gave 10 s. for them."

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200217-124

473. WILLIAM WEEDON , SAMUEL WORMWOOD , and THOMAS WACKEY were indicted for stealing, on the 20th of January , one hat, value 2 s., the goods of Joseph Stringer , from his person .

JOSEPH STRINGER . I am a Chelsea pensioner . On the 20th of January, at half-past eleven o'clock at night, I was between George-street and the Three Crowns, public-house, Chelsea , in my way home, three men stopped me, and asked me for my money - Wormwood was one of them. I said I had none, he snatched my hat off, and all three ran away; I called watch, and in about a quarter of an hour I saw the prisoners in custody. I was sober.

JOSEPH CHAMPION . I am an officer. About a quarter before twelve o'clock I was returning from duty down George-street, heard a man call watch, and saw the three prisoners running down on the opposite side of the way; I and Gill ran after them, they crossed, turned towards me, and stopped - each had a hat in his hand besides what he wore; they made a momentary stand, and Weedon said he could or would have had the old b - g - r's shoes. I seized them, and asked them how they came by those three hats, Weedon said,

"That is nothing to you, let me go." He used bad language, said he knew who we were, and he would not be taken by any bl - dy patrol. I said I should insist on knowing how they got the hats, he said

"What hat?" and immediately dropped his behind him. We secured them. The hats all appeared to belong to poor people. Wormwood had the prosecutor's - Weedon had two handkerchiefs, and a shawl. On his way to the watch-house he said he would cut his throat, and so I took a knife from him. I found the prosecutor about two hundred yards off - he was sober, and so were the prisoners.

BENJAMIN GILL . I was with Champion; his account his correct.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoners all pleaded intoxication.

WEEDON - GUILTY . Aged 22.

WORMWOOD - GUILTY . Aged 20.

WACKEY - GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200217-125

474. WILLIAM WATSON was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of February , one handkerchief, value 2 s., the goods of Alexander Edwards , from his person .

ALEXANDER EDWARDS . I am a carpenter , and live in the country. Last Saturday, between one and two o'clock in the day, I was in St. Giles's , and lost a handkerchief. The officer produced it to me.

JOHN WALES . I am an officer of Marlborough-street. I was in High-street, St. Giles's, and saw the prisoner following Edwards; he pulled the handkerchief a little way out - he pulled it three times between High-street and Coventry-street, Haymarket, and in Coventry-street he went up very close. I saw him cross the street, and secured him with the handkerchief in his hand.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200217-126

475. CHARLES THOMAS was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of January , one piece of marble, value 15 d.; one piece of oak quartering, value 20 d., and one piece of wainscot, value 15 d. , the goods of Thomas Fender .

THOMAS FENDER . I am a builder , and live in John-street, Fitzroy-square ; the prisoner was in my employ. I suspected him, and got a warrant - an officer accompanied me and Sanders to his lodgings, where I found the articles stated in the indictment. I was returning with the officer and passed the house where the prisoner was at work, he saw us, and ran away. I told him to stop, and he did.

Cross-examined by MR. ARABIN. Q. Did you not permit him to take a chimney-piece home to work - A. I did, but with strict orders that it should be cut out on the premises. This marble was of the same description.

JAMES SANDERS . I went with Mr. Fender, and found the property.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200217-127

476. JOHN CROFT was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of January , one bed, value 5 s. , the goods of Richard Munday .

RICHARD MUNDAY . I am a broker , and live in Broadway, Westminster . On the 29th of January the prisoner came into my shop, and looked about, I asked him what he wanted? he said a second-hand bedstead. I asked 14 s.; he left, saying it was too much. In about five minutes, as I was in the back parlour, he crept softly to the end of the shop, took the bed up, and went out with it. I followed and secured him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 45.

Confined Two Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200217-128

477. JOHN SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of January , one rope, value 30 s. , the goods of George Moore .

For the Prosecution, MR. CURWOOD.

GEORGE MOORE . I am a drayman at Whitbread's brewery. On the 15th of January I went with my dray to the Tyson's Arms, Dalston, between five and six o'clock in the evening, I saw the rope hanging over the pin when I was by the London Apprentice - it could not fall off - I missed it when I got to the Tyson's Arms .

JOHN LINES . I am an officer. On the 15th of January, about six o'clock in the evening, I saw eight drays go through the London Apprentice gate, and soon after I met the prisoner and another in Kingsland-road - the other gave the rope to the prisoner; I turned and followed them, the prisoner then dropped it. I secured him, and the other ran away. They were in company.

Prisoner's Defence. The man asked me to hold it for him while he ran over to his cart.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Whipped and Discharged .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200217-129

478. RICHARD SAY and CHARLES WILLIAM SNOOK were indicted for stealing, on the 13th of January , ten feet of iron rail, value 4 s., the property of William Barlow , and fixed to a building .

WILLIAM BARLOW . I am in possession of a piece of ground in the City-road , which is surrounded by a wall with iron railings on the top; thirty or forty feet were broken and taken away. On the 14th the officer brought the prisoners in custody with some of it. It fitted the wall, and was the same size.

PETER WELCH . I am a watchman. On the 13th of January, between nine and ten o'clock at night, I saw three or four boys together in the City-road. I followed them, seeing two of them heavily loaded; Snook came out of a field, looked me full in the face, and then went away. I followed the three, who saw me, and parted in different directions. I secured Say, and in his apron I found some iron railings. He said he found it, and afterwards that he had it given to him; he dropped it, and said,

"If I am to go to the watch-house, I won't carry the iron" - they were all together in the field. I am sure Snook was one of them. I found another piece of iron in the garden.

SAMUEL SANDERS . I received information, and apprehended Snook. I compared the iron railing with the wall.

SAY - GUILTY . Aged 13.

SNOOK - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200217-130

479. MARY SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of January , one watch, value 3 l., the goods of Philip Olwell , from his person .

PHILIP OLWELL . I am a labourer to the East India Company. On the 17th of January, between nine and ten o'clock, I met the prisoner in Whitechapel, and went to a house in George-court with her; she was going out for some gin, and asked me what o'clock it was? I pulled my watch out; she snatched it from my hand, and ran down stairs. I pursued, but missed her, and called the watchman. As soon as I got out the door was shut, but it was opened to him, and the woman of the house pretended to be in fits, which quite confused me. I saw the prisoner sitting by the fire, but did not recollect her then. Next night I went with Dickenson and took her. I do not think I was in liquor.

WILLIAM DICKENSON . I took the prisoner in charge. She admitted having seen the prosecutor over-night, but denied having the watch.

Prisoner's Defence. I was sitting with the landlady, who was very ill. The prisoner came in, and said he should not know the person. He was going to swear to another woman.

WILLIAM DICKENSON re-examined. He did not accuse any other woman.

ELIZA LEONARD . My husband is a porter, and rents the house; the prisoner lodged in a room with a woman to whom I let it. The night the prosecutor lost his watch she had been nursing my child, then went out, and did not come home until after the loss - I was confined to my bed at the time. When he came into my room she asked him if he should know the girl again? he said he thought he should if he saw her. Since the prisoner has been confined, the prosecutor came, and offered me a 1 l. note to find out the right girl. He was very much intoxicated.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18200217-131

480. SARAH QUINLAND was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of February , from the person of Daniel Hughes , one purse, value 6 d.; 8 s. in monies numbered, and two 1 l. bank notes, his property .

DANIEL HUGHES . I am a servant out of place. On the 1st of February, about ten o'clock at night, the prisoner met me in Tottenham-court-road, and I went to No. 8, Maynard-street with her. I came out in about five minutes, and when I got a few yards from the door I missed my purse, which contained two 1 l. notes and 8 s. 6 d.; I returned, found her room locked, and she was gone. She was taken next day, but neither my notes or purse were found - I was sober.

Prisoner's Defence. He said he had only 1 s.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18200217-132

481. SAMUEL MYERS was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of January , one coat, value 7 s. , the goods of William Gobby .

WILLIAM GOBBY . I am carman to Mr. Benton. On the 18th of January my coat hung on the railings at Mr. Sutton's, Rupert-street , while I filled a rubbish cart. I missed it, and saw the prisoner running with it on his arm,

about twelve yards off. Mr. Hall and I pursued, and secured him. I saw him throw the coat down, and am sure he is the man.

JOHN HALL . I am a cooper, and live in Lemon-street, Goodman's-fields. About five o'clock in the evening I was going along Rupert-street, where two carts were loading; Gobby hallooed out, and I saw the prisoner run across the road with the coat on his shoulder. I secured him in Great Prescot-street without losing sight of him - two others appeared to be in his company. He dropped the coat.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. Not a word that he has spoken is true.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18200217-133

482. BENJAMIN MORRIS and SAMUEL WOOLLER were indicted for stealing, on the 4th of February , one copper pot, value 3 s. , the goods of George Daniel .

GEORGE DANIEL . I am a broker , and live in Wild-passage, Drury-lane . On the 4th of February, about twenty minutes after two o'clock, the copper pot was inside my door. Wooller came in, and asked the price of some fire-irons; I said 4 s. 6 d.; he said that was too much, and left. Morris came in about ten minutes after, looked about, and said nothing - I was in the counting-house; he called to Wooller, who came and snatched the pot up. They went down the court with it; I ran out, and overtook them two doors off, carrying it between them - Wooller was putting it into Morris's apron. They saw me, threw it down, and escaped. I followed, and secured them without losing sight of them. I picked the copper pot up.

JOHN JAMES BESWICK . I keep Daniel's books. I was in the counting-house when Wooller came in and asked the price of the fire-irons. In about half an hour Morris came and stood before the window; he made a motion to Wooller, who came, and they both took the pot up, and ran off with it. I ran out, and saw them putting it into Morris's apron.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

MORRIS'S Defence. I know nothing of it.

MORRIS - GUILTY . Aged 18.

WOOLLER - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18200217-134

483. GEORGE BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of January , two planes, value 5 s.; one oil-stone, value 2 s., the goods of John Wheeler ; two planes, value 5 s., and one square, value 18 d. , the goods of Francis Newman .

JOHN WHEELER . I am a carpenter . I was working at No. 10, New-street, formerly Hare-street , and left my tools there. About five o'clock the door was broken open and the tools stolen.

PATRICK KEYS . I am watchman of St. James's. On the 15th of January, between seven and eight o'clock at night, I saw the prisoner at the door of the house with these tools in his apron, he said he was waiting for one of his partners, who was gone to the public-house to be paid - I said,

"You have broken the door of the house open and stolen them."

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I was in great distress.

GUILTY . Aged 32.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18200217-135

484. WILLIAM BARBER was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of February , one box, value 3 s. , the goods of Charles Pike .

CHARLES PIKE . I am a box-maker , and live in St. John-street . I know nothing of the circumstances.

JOHN FORBES . I am a constable. On the 2d of February, in the evening, I saw the prisoner and two others lurking about - they went up to Pike's door, the prisoner took a box off the shop-window, and all three ran away with it; I secured the prisoner.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Whipped and Discharged .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200217-136

485. WILLIAM JACKSON was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of January , one coat, value 30 s. , the goods of John Summers .

CHARLES WESTMORE . I am servant to Mr. Summers, who lives in Queen-street, Edgeware-road; the coat was at a livery-stables in Oxford-street , the prisoner was employed at the stables . I lost the coat, and asked him if he knew any thing of it? he said he did not. About a month afterwards I saw it exposed for sale at Benjamin's.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Do you know Hull - A. He works at the stables.

MARK BENJAMIN . I am a salesman, and live in Marylebone-lane. The prisoner sold me the coat for 32 s. - he said it was his own.

JOHN WALES . I am an officer. On the 3d of February, from the description Benjamin gave me of the man who sold the coat, I went to the stables and took the prisoner; he said he had not sold it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 44.

Confined Six Months , and Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200217-137

486. THOMAS COOK was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of February , one bag, value 1 s., and 31 sheets, value 7 l. , the goods of George Thorpe .

SECOND COUNT, stating them to belong to William Diggens .

CHARLES PLUNKNET . I am a porter. On the 13th of February I put a bag containing nineteen sheets in a cart from Mr. George Thorpe 's hotel, in St. Martin's-lane - Diggens drove the cart on, and stopped at Mr. Lamb's, higher up. In about half an hour I found the property at the watch-house.

JOHN DUNBAR . I was with Diggens; he went to No 19, and I got out of the cart to fetch some straw. I returned in about three minutes, and the bag of sheets was gone. A woman directed me into Duke's-court - the prisoner was secured and taken to the watch-house.

HENRY GROVE . I am a constable. I went into Orange-street, and secured the prisoner with the bag, he immediately threw it down.

Prisoner's Defence. A man asked me to carry it to Leicester-square.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Confined Six Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200217-138

487. JOHN ALLEN was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of February , 24 bistery scales, value 20 s., and 12 lancet scales, value 4 s. , the goods of John Millikin .

JOHN MILLIKIN . I am a surgical instrument-maker , and live in the Strand , the prisoner was employed to paint my house . I missed about 40 l. worth of goods while the painting was being done. Nobody but him was there.

JOHN BAKER . I am a cutler, and live in Bishopsgate-street. About three months ago the prisoner came to my shop, pleaded distress, and asked me to buy these things; I said they were of no use to me, but in consequence of his distress I bought two dozen of bistery scales for 2 s. In about half an hour he brought some lancet scales, and said he found them in some rubbish. I gave him 18 d. for them. About a month after, I sold them to Petch's wife.

THOMAS PETCH . I make handles for surgical instruments. I saw these things at Baker's shop, my wife bought them.

JOHN MILLIKIN re-examined. Petch brought them to my house for sale, and I recognized them as mine. He said he got them from Baker's - I went there and found more.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I found them at the corner of Newcastle-street, Strand.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200217-139

488. RICHARD NARROWAY and JOHN HUTTON were indicted for stealing, on the 6th of January , one saddle, value 40 s. , the property of James Compson .

JAMES COMPSON . I live at Hanwell. On the 6th of January I stopped with my horse at the Red Lion, at Acton , about ten o'clock in the evening; my horse stood at the door - when I came out the saddle was gone. Williamson brought it to my house about a fortnight after.

JOHN WILLIAMSON . I am constable of Acton. I found the saddle at Mr. Harris's, at Brentford, on the 12th of January. The prisoner had been in custody from the 10th.

JOHN HARRIS . I am a horse-dealer, and live at Brentford. I bought the saddle of Hutton, about the middle of January, for 15 s. - I knew him before. He said he had taken it for an old debt for tares. I did not ask him who he had it from. I saw Narroway in his company afterwards.

THOMAS CHAPMAN . I am a smith, and live at Acton. The prisoners were in custody on a charge of mine. I had information of the saddle being sold to Harris, and found it there.

HUTTON's Defence. I was going to Brentford, and saw it in a ditch.

NARROWAY - NOT GUILTY .

HUTTON - GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18200217-140

489. JOSEPH LYONS was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of January , one watch, value 2 l.; one piece of ribbon, value 1 d., and one watch-key, value 1 d., the goods of Charles Field , from his person .

CHARLES FIELD . I am a labourer to the East India Company. On the 27th of January, about a quarter past six o'clock in the evening, I was in Whitechapel ; the prisoner came up to me, pressed me very hard on my left side, and muttered something. I thought he wanted to go up George-yard, and made way for him. He snatched my watch from my fob, I saw it in his hand. He ran off and I lost him, as three others pushed me into the road. I had a good view of him from the gas-light, and am certain he is the man. I gave information to two officers. I heard three persons were to be examined at Bow-street on the Thursday following. I went there, and saw the prisoner in the office as a spectator, and desired the officer to take him. I am positive he is the man.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Are you sure of him - A. I had a full view of him, I cannot be mistaken. I knew him directly I saw him in the office, and said so as soon as Jefferson came in.

WILLIAM JEFFERSON . I am an officer. I took three men the day the King was proclaimed, and sent for the prosecutor to see them. The prisoner came into the office, as his brother was in custody - he came forward to bail him. The prosecutor said he was the man who had robbed him.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you ever see a man very like the prisoner - A. Yes, as much like him as two peas. I believe that man was once in Newgate for stealing a watch. I knew the prisoner to bear a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18200217-141

490. MORRIS ROACH was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of January , one silver watch, value 50 s., one seal, value 6 d., and one key, value 6 d. , the goods of John Ellis .

JOHN ELLIS . I am a seaman . I lost my watch in Michael Welsh 's house, the Rose and Crown, public-house, in Parson's-street , where I went for a quartern of gin, about one o'clock in the night; Brown was with me. My watch was in my fob; I stood at the bar, and took my watch out to get at my money; I put the watch on the counter - by the time I had drank the gin my watch was gone. I asked Welch for it; he laughed and said,

"Do you suppose I have got your watch?" I called the watchman, and charged Welch with stealing it. He was taken before the Magistrate, and I believe he was bailed - the prisoner was a witness for him at the office, but I do not know how he got charged with stealing it.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Nobody was near you but Brown and Welch; it must have been one of them - A. Yes.

FRANCIS JACKSON . I am beadle of St. George's in the East. Welch's brother gave the prisoner into my charge some days after the robbery.

THOMAS SHERIDAN . I was in the house when the prosecutor was robbed. I went out for a necessary purpose, Roach was outside the house; he said the two men had a

watch, and he would have it from them. Welch was afterwards given in charge for stealing it.

Q. When did you tell this story - A. Not till nine days after. I told Welch's servant of it, and she told his brother. After Welch was taken to the watch-house the prisoner and I walked home together. He took the watch out of his pocket, shewed it to me, and said it was the watch he took from the two men - I made no answer. He went to the bar for some tobacco while the prosecutor was there.

Cross-examined. Q. Is Welch here - A. No. I lodged with him nine months ago. I was in the house when he was charged with stealing it, but said nothing for nine days after.

Q. On your oath, did you not say to Welch's servant,

"If your master is questioned about it I will say Roach did it" - A. No.

Prisoner's Defence. I never said a word of the kind. I understood I was charged with stealing it, and went to the office, where I saw Welch's brother, and told him to send for an officer.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18200217-142

491. WILLIAM HYDER was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of February , seven bottles, value 3 s., and six quarts of wine, value 25 s. , the goods of Robert Bartlet and William Hill .

WILLIAM HILL . I am a wine merchant , and am in partnership with Robert Bartlett . For some time we had missed wine, and in the course of five days we found the stock eighty-five bottles less than had been sold. On the 3d of February I received information, and went down to the warehouse about twenty minutes after nine o'clock, when the men ought to be at breakfast. I found one half of the beer-cellar flap, which opens into the street, open - they ought both to have been down. I called out,

"Below! Who's there?" After a moment's hesitation, the prisoner said he was. I went down, and at the bottom of the beer-cellar stairs, on the right-hand side, is the door of the wine-vault, which I found forced open by the hinges. Thinking somebody else was there I told the prisoner to go up; I went up with him, and put down both the flaps. When the cellarman came, I told him, and desired him to keep the prisoner in the cellar till I got an officer, but he let him go, and told me he had run into the mill next to my premises. I followed him, brought him back, and put my hand to his pocket; I felt something hard, and told the cellarman to search him. Finding me determined, he pulled a bottle of Port wine out of each pocket - it was drawn out of a pipe I had. I charged him with robbing me; he made no answer, but presently after he took two more bottles from the ground, which were, uncorked, and dashed them into a tub of water - they were on the ground in the beer-cellar, not in the wine-vault; no wine ought to have been there. I took the bottles out; they both had wine left in them. I gave him in charge, and desired them to search the beer-cellar. The cellar-man said, in his presence, that there were two more bottles at the end of the beer-cellar. The prisoner was my servant, but had no business there at that time.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Did he beg a bottle of wine for his sick child - A. No.

THOMAS MUNROE . I am cellarman to Mr. Hill. On the 5th of February, about nine o'clock in the morning, I went to breakfast, and left the cellar quite secure. I shut both the flaps, barred them, and put the keys in the counting-house. I returned about half-past nine o'clock, and found it open, went to the wine-vault, and found the hinges off the hooks, and the door broken open. There was a pipe of Port on the draught - I had left no wine in bottles, except three that were uncorked; the prisoner went into the wine-vault with me, and my master told me to secure him. I observed his pockets bulky; he went to the mill for water, but I followed, and brought him back. My master told me to search his pockets, but he said,

"That is more than you or any man dare to do." I said,

"If you have got any thing in your pockets, deliver it up." He took two bottles of wine out, one corked and the other uncorked. I sealed them, corked them both, and gave them to Mr. Hill; it is the same sort of wine that was in the pipe. I asked him what induced him to do such a thing? he said he did not know. He said there were two more, and he wished me to take them away, or throw them down, but I did not touch them; he took them up, and put them into the water - Mr. Hill took them out. He said there were two more bottles behind the prickles, and I found them there. I found another bottle of wine with the seal partly cut off.

GUILTY . Aged 44.

Confined One Year .

Second Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18200217-143

492. JOHN JAMES was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of January , one piece of timber, value 5 s. , the goods of William Hall .

WILLIAM HALL . I am a builder , and live in St. John's Wood-lane, St. Marylebone . One the 28th of January I missed a piece of timber out of my yard.

HENRY SMITH . I am watchman of St. Marylebone. On the 28th of January, about twenty minutes past six o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner go along my beat, from the prosecutor's premises, with the timber on his shoulder. I stopped him, and asked him where he came from, and where he was going to? he would not answer, but walked on as fast as he could. I laid hold of him, and said,

"Throw it down, I will see what it is!" It was laid in a sack, entirely covered over. He said,

"Let me go," and resisted very violently. He escaped after I had torn his jacket; he was secured about half a mile off. I sent him to the watch-house, and took the timber to Hall. I saw him getting over the wall of the premises.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 29.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18200217-144

493. MARY RILEY was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of February , 4 lbs. of bacon, value 2 s. , the goods of Samuel Gammage .

SAMUEL GAMMAGE . I am a cheesemonger , and live in King-street, Seven Dials . On the 5th of February, about half-past ten o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner come into the shop, and take the piece of bacon off the

window; a man came in with her, under the pretence of buying some, and had a piece weighed, then said it was too dear. As the prisoner was going out she took a piece off the window, and put it under her apron. I secured her, and brought her back.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18200217-145

494. ANN BULLING was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of January , one tea-spoon, value 1 s.; one pair of silver studs, value 6 d.; one pencil-case, value 2 d.; one pair of stockings, value 2 s., and one pair of braces, value 6 d. , the goods of Daniel Barker .

DANIEL BARKER . I am a drayman , and live in John-street, New-road; the prisoner was my servant for a short time - she left me on the 8th of January. On the 10th I missed my spectacles, went to her, and asked her if she had seen them? she said she would return them that night, but did not; I missed nothing until the 10th, when I went home I missed other articles. On Sunday evening she gave me a pair of stockings, and said she took the other things, and sold them to a pawnbroker.

GEORGE FLINT . I am a pawnbroker. The prisoner sold me the things about a week before the prosecutor came to me.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18200217-146

TENTH DAY, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 28.

495. JAMES JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of January , four salt-cellars, value 4 s.; one cross, value 18 d.; one buckle, value 18 d.; two spoons, volue 18 d.; one pair of sugar-tongs, value 18 d.; one tooth-pick, value 3 d.; one ring, value 4 s.; two necklaces, value 1 s.; two pocket-books, value 6 d.; two frocks, value 2 s.; six handkerchiefs, value 6 s.; one table-cloth, value 1 s.; one spencer, value 4 s., and one pair of gloves, value 6 d. , the goods of Samuel Tuttle .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200217-147

496. JOHN MACK was Indicted for stealing, on the 9th of February , three pewter pots, value 3 s. , the goods of John Scott .

JOHN SCOTT . I keep the sign of the London Hospital, Whitechapel-road ; the prisoner came in, and had half a pint of beer. About half an hour after the servant gave me information; I went up to him, and found a quart pot on him, He gave me two more from under his clothes.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 60.

Confined One Year .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200217-148

497. ELIZA ANN BALL was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of December , eight yards of poplin, value 30 s., and one shift, value 6 s. , the goods of Richard Patterson .

RICHARD PATTERSON . I keep an eating-house in London-street, Fitzroy-square . The prisoner was a charwoman in my house; on the 3d of December I missed these things two days after from the bedroom at the top of house. On the 7th of February she was in custody.

WILLIAM WORDLE . I am servant to Mr. Wadmore, who is a pawnbroker, and lives in Tottenham-court-road. On the 3d of December, in the evening, the prisoner pledged eight yards of poplin with me, in the name of Pearce.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. There were four servants in the house.

GUILTY . Aged 38.

Confined One Year .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200217-149

498. LAZARUS BARNET was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of January , one pair of stockings, value 2 s. , the goods of James George Cazaly .

JAMES GEORGE CAZALY . I am a hosier , and live in Bishopsgate-street . On the 17th of February, about half-past eight o'clock at night, these stockings were stolen off a wire in the shop. They have not been found.

GEORGE MOORE . I was Mr. Cazaly's servant. I saw the prisoner put his hand in, reach round the wire guard, pull the stockings off, and run away. I ran after him, and saw him drop something - he was stopped in Spital-quare; I am sure he is the man. I only lost sight of him in turning the corner.

CHARLES BALLARD . I assisted in securing the prisoner, and saw him fall; something fell from his bosom.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing of them.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200217-150

499. WILLIAM GLEGG was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of February , at St. Andrew Holborn, one box, value 6 d.; eight gowns, value 2 l.; fourteen towels, value 10 s.; seven pair of stockings, value 3 s.; three shifts, value 4 s.; one handkerchief, value 6 d.; one necklace, value 1 s.; one pair of stays, value 1 s.; seven petticoats, value 6 s.; one piece of sarsnet, value 3 d.; one piece of lace, value 1 s., and one fan, value 1 s., the goods of Letitia Harriet Chomel , in the dwelling-house of John Cheek .

ANN CHOMEL . I live at Mr. Cheek's No. 65, High Holborn . On the 4th of February my daughter's box was brought there, and put into the passage. It was stolen in about ten minutes.

LETITIA HARRIET CHOMEL . My box, which contained the articles stated in the indictment, was stolen from the passage between six and seven o'clock in the evening - I saw it safe about a quarter of an hour before. The officer brought it back next day. I do not know what parish the house is in.

CHARLES READ . On the 4th of February I was with Thompson, in Goswell-street, rather before seven o'clock

in the evening, and saw the prisoner; he appeared to be walking with another man; the prisoner was carrying the box on his shoulder. As soon as they saw Thompson they parted, the prisoner crossed the road, and the other man ran down a street, I went up to the prisoner, and asked him where he got the box? he said he was going to take it to Mrs. Lane. I asked him where she lived? he said if I went with him he would shew me. As we went along he said a man met him in Holborn, and gave him 6 d. to carry it to the Three Cups, in Aldersgate-street, where it was to be booked to go into the country, and that the man who gave it to him ran away.

Q. Did he say where Mrs. Lane lived - A. No, my Lord, nor did he know who it was to be booked to. I opened the box, and found two letters in it, by which I found out the prosecutrix.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. The prisoner did not increase his pace - A. He walked pretty fast.

JOHN FORBES . Read and I were on one side of the road, and Thompson on the other. I saw the prisoner walking with the box, and another behind him; after passing Thompson the prisoner crossed the street to the side we were on. I ran down, and got before him, turned back, and Read stopped him. He gave the account Read has stated, then changed his story, and said he was going to the Three Cups.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he not say the man told him to carry it for Mrs. Lane to the Three Cups - A. I do not think he did.

THOMAS THOMPSON . The prisoner passed me, and crossed from the side of the road that the Three Cups were on.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. What the officers have stated is wrong. I said my name was Lane, and I was going to the Three Cups, and that a man gave it to me at the top of Hatton-garden.

CHARLES READ re-examined. He said he was going to take them to Mrs. Lane.

GUILTY . Aged. 26.

Of stealing, but not in a dwelling-house.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200217-151

500. GEORGE PATTERSON was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of December , one gold brooch, value 20 s.; one other gold brooch, value 20 s., and one other brooch, value 20 s. , the goods of William Home , Eliza Shan , John Shan , Ann Spencer , William Mash , William Tomlinson , Frances Harris , Joseph Webb , William Hanbury , John Hughes , John Latham , Eliza Owen , John White , and Mersey Tomlinson .

MR. CURWOOD for the Prosecution, declined offering any evidence, being unable to prove the case.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200217-152

501. THOMAS WELDON was indicted for that he, on the 29th of October , having in his custody and possession a bill of exchange for payment of 50 l. - (setting it forth, drawn by Thomas Welldon , at two months after date, on Mr. Samuel Welldon, Cambridge) - on the same day feloniously did forge and counterfeit on the said bill, an acceptance thereof, with intent to defraud Samuel Welldon .

SECOND COUNT, for feloniously uttering the said forged acceptance as true, with the like intent.

TWO OTHER COUNTS, the same, only stating his intent to be to defraud Joseph Parkin .

For the Prosecution, MR ALLEY.

JOSEPH PARKIN . I keep the George, public-house, George-yard, Whitechapel . On the 29th of October the prisoner came to my house with his brother (not Samuel). He asked me to give him cash for a bill, which I produce? it had about a fortnight to run - the acceptance was on it at the time. I said I could not cash it unless his other brother endorsed it. He took it away, and brought it back with the name

" Samuel Welldon " endorsed on it. I then gave him 10 l., and wrote to his brother, whose acceptance it purported to be; I advanced him in all 35 l. in goods and money. On the 19th of December it was due, but was not paid.

Q. Was the prisoner afterwards apprehended - A. Yes, and said if he had had the full amount of the bill his brother would have paid it. His brother refused to attend here.

HENRY BEVERLEY WAKELING . I am clerk to Mr. Price, the attorney for the prosecution. I know the hand-writing of Mr. Samuel Welldon ; the acceptance is not his hand-writing; I have seen him write a number of times, and can undertake to swear it is not his writing; I lived at Cambridge with my father, who is Esquire Beadle, and was very intimate with Samuel Welldon . I saw him write on the 18th of January last, when I went to present this bill; his writing appeared the same then as it used before.

WILLIAM WELLDON . I am half-brother to Samuel Welldon of Cambridge. I do not know whether the writing is his or not. I am not well acquainted with it.

Prisoner's Defence. My brother gave it to me. I wrote to him not to honour the bill, because Parkin only advanced me 15 l. on it. He keeps a noted house for thieves. My brother Samuel is ill, and not able to attend.

HENRY BEVERLY WAKELING re-examined. I saw him on Friday last - he was well then.

WILLIAM WELLDON . I have seen my brother's writing, but never saw him write. The name William Welldon on the back of the bill is not my writing. I never gave the prisoner leave to put it there. I do not think the acceptance is my brother's.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200217-153

502. CATHARINE CHITTERONI was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of February , one counterpane, value 3 s.; one quilt, value 3 s.; four blankets, value 18 s.; two sheets, value 7 s.; four blankets, value 18 s.; two bolsters, value 7 s., and one pillow, value 1 s. , the goods of James Shepherd .

WILLIAM BURNETT . I live with James Shepherd , who keeps the Half-moon, public-house, in Portpool-lane . On the 5th of February, about ten o'clock at night, I met a woman, who I believe to be the prisoner, coming down stairs with a bundle. I said nothing to her.

THOMAS HEAD . I am a shoemaker, and live in Laystall-street. On the 5th of February, about twenty minutes after twelve o'clock at night, the prisoner came into my room with two blankets, and asked if I would let her leave them till Monday morning, saying, she had taken them out to pledge to pay her rent, that her husband had been severely beating her, and she was afraid to go home, and asked me if I would let her lay on my boards, and wrap herself in the blankets? I said she should lay on my child's bed, which she did. In the morning she went away, leaving the blankets, and in the evening she came, again, and asked me to put them out of the way? I asked her if they were her own? She said Yes, but she was till afraid of her husband, for he was angry with her. On the Monday she did not come. I heard of this robbery, and applied to the police - the prosecutor claimed them.

PATRICK CREE . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Gray's Inn-lane. On Saturday, about five minutes after nine o'clock in the evening, the prisoner pledged two sheets, a blanket, a counterpane, and a quilt with me for 10 s., in the name of Mary Welch . Next day the prosecutor claimed them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Confined Six Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18200217-154

503. JOHN LIVERSEDGE and DAVID YATES were indicted for stealing, on the 4th of February , one gown, value 4 s.; five yards of cotton, value 4 s.; four yards of Holland, value 2 s.; two petticoats, value 1 s., and one pair shoes, value 1 s. , the goods of William Levison .

CATHARINE LEVISON . I am the wife of William Levison ; we live in Carburton-street, Fitzroy-square. On the 5th of February, about seven o'clock in the evening, I was going to Barnet - I was too late for the stage, and waited at the Bell, public-house, at Pentonville, for a stage to pass. An elderly woman was with me, who assisted in carrying my bundle, which contained the articles stated in the indictment. She called for two pots of beer, which made me angry with her - the prisoner, Yates, was in the taproom, and offered to carry my bundle to Islington for 1 s.; the woman of the house wanted me to leave it there, but I took it away myself. When I got to the door Yates took it from me to carry it - another young man was with him (not Liversedge). We went to the Peacock, at Islington , Liversedge then came up. I became alarmed, and said,

"Now, young man, give me my bundle." He said,

"There will be a mail up in a few minutes, and I will give it you then." We then went on to the turnpike - Liversedge told me to run into the toll-house , and they would tell me when there would be a mail up. I was not a moment talking to the man, when I returned they were gone with the bundle. A little girl said they were gone into the Swan, public-house, just by - I went there, and saw Liversedge in the taproom. I asked him what he had done with my bundle? he used most gross language. I said I wished I could get a constable - one came, and took him. The landlord said I must be mistaken, for he had not been out of the house, but I am sure he is the man. I described Yates to Purton; he took him on the Thursday following, and produced my bundle; several things had been taken out.

JOHN PURTON . I am a Bow-street officer. I was standing by the Peacock, the prosecutrix gave Liversedge into my custody, I found nothing on him. Next evening I took Yates, and found the property at his lodgings, tied in a handkerchief.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

YATES'S Defence. I waited twenty minutes for her, then went to the toll-house, and asked if she had been there? he said she was gone to Pentonville. I took the bundle to my lodgings, and left my address with Hicks, the landlord, in case she should come back.

- HICKS. I am landlord of the Bell, at Battle-bridge. The prosecutrix was at my house. I do not think she was capable of knowing what she was about - she was very much intoxicated. I do not know whether she had a bundle or not.

Q. On the oath you have taken, did you see her with a bundle - A. Yes, I did.

Q. Then why did you say you did not know - A. I offered to take care of it for her. Yates did not give me his address.

JAMES BEARLEY . I saw the prosecutrix very much intoxicated that evening - she almost fell inside my door.

JOHN PURTON re-examined. She was very ill and agitated - I do not think she was intoxicated - she is subject to fits. I have seen her in the same state since.

LIVERSEDGE - NOT GUILTY .

YATES - GUILTY . Aged 23.

Confined Six Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18200217-155

504. THOMAS NICHOLSON was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of January , 21 yards of cloth, value 23 l. , the goods of John Harris and Thomas Griffin Rawlins .

ROBERT HOLLEC . I am carman to Messrs. John Harris and Thomas Griffin Rawlins , who are clothworkers , and live in St. Martin's-lane. On the 28th of January, about six o'clock in the evening, I was in Whitcombe-street , with eight or ten pieces of woollen-cloth in my cart. I got off the cart for a necessary purpose; the prisoner and two others came up to the near side of the cart; the prisoner asked me the way to Manchester-square, and kept shoving me from the scraper of the cart towards the wheel - the other two went round to the off side of the cart. I told him to go up Coventry-street. I missed a piece of cloth immediately they were gone from the off side, and saw them all going up Whitcombe-court with another man. The three ran, the prisoner stopped behind and struck me; I secured him, dragged him to a public-house, and then put him into my cart, drove him home, and gave him in charge. I think I saw the cloth with them.

Q, Who was the first that pushed you - A. The prisoner - he pushed me against the wheel; there was plenty of room for him to pass; they came in a direction to meet the cart. I saw the prisoner speaking to them in the court; the prisoner was running away with them. He stopped, and would not let me pass to secure the men with the property. The court is just wide enough for one person to go through.

Cross-examined by MR. WALFORD. Q. Was it dark - A. Yes. He was not out of my sight. He struck me before I collared him.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18200217-156

505. JOHN NEWMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of February , nine chisels, value 2 s.; two gouges, value 6 d., and one spokeshave, value 2 d. , the goods of John Holmes .

JOHN HOLMES . I am a turner , and live in Hartshorn-court, Drury-lane . On the 17th of February, about half-past seven o'clock in the morning, I missed my tools, and saw the prisoner in Playhouse-yard, about half-past nine, offering them for sale - I stopped him, and gave him in charge. He used to come to my shop.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Confined Two Months , and Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200217-157

506. GEORGE OLDCROFT was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of February , two sheets, value 5 s. , the goods of Henry Jenkinson .

HENRY JENKINSON . I am Secretary to the Middlesex Hospital ; the prisoner was a servant there, and left about six months ago. I have missed several sheets, which were under my care.

JOHN LEVY . I keep a saleshop in Whitecross-street. On the 17th of February the prisoner offered two pair of sheets for sale for 18 s., he said they were his own. I saw the hospital mark on them, and said I doubted their being his - he said they were, that his wife died in the hospital, and that the gentleman had given him the sheets - I gave him in charge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I was out of a situation.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Confined Two Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200217-158

507. MARY PHOENIX was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of January , two leather trunks, value 10 s.; twenty-five caps, value 12 s.; two pillow-cases, value 2 s.; one blanket, value 1 s.; four pair of gloves, value 1 s.; seventy-five frills, value 6 s.; one hat, value 5 s.; two books, value 1 s.; three pair of shoes, value 18 d.; four aprons, value 4 s.; three gowns, value 3 s.; fourteen pair of stockings, value 7 s.; nine handkerchiefs, value 9 s.; three shifts, value 6 s., and four petticoats, value 2 s. , the goods of John Chawner .

ELEANOR CHAWNER . I am the wife of John Chawner. and lived in Vinegar-yard, Drury-lane ; my husband is at Bengal. I only knew the prisoner a few days before the robbery; she called on me two or three times that day. I was quite a stranger in this country, and agreed to lodge with her; she said she had moved her things, and I had better move mine. She persuaded me to go out with her. I left my lodgings with her at half-past six o'clock. She took me into a public-house in Ratcliff-highway, and left me there, saying she would return in two or three minutes, she never returned. I did not see her again till the 29th, when she was in custody. I got back to my lodgings about nine o'clock, and missed my two trunks, containing the articles stated in the indictment, and many more. The day she was taken I saw my trunks at her husband's lodgings, No. 8, Russell-court.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. You was to move your property to the lodgings she took - A. Yes, I gave her no leave to move my things - we were to have a coach to move them.

MARTHA FATHAM . The prosecutrix lodged with me in Vinegar-yard. On the 11th of January she left the house with the prisoner. The prisoner came again about half-past seven o'clock with a coach - I knew they had agreed to lodge together, and therefore let her take the trunks away. When the prosecutrix returned, I told her the prisoner had taken them away. On the 29th the prisoner called upon me and I stopped her. She desired me to say she had bought the things of Mrs. Chawner.

DAVID PERRYMAN . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Compton-street. I have a gown, two petticoats, a shift, a pinnafore, and a towel, pledged on the 17th of January for 5 s., by a woman, in the name of Phoenix, No. 10, New-street.

HENRY HALL . I am apprentice to Mr. Brooks, who is a pawnbroker, and lives in High-street, Bloomsbury. I have two gowns, a shift, and a towel, pledged on the 12th of January by the prisoner, in the name of French, Storey-street; and on the 13th of January she pledged two shifts, five towels, and two aprons, for 6 s.

JOHN PULLY . I am servant to Mr. Wise, pawnbroker, Long-acre. I have three gowns, a flannel waistcoat, six towels, and a pillow-case, pledged on the 14th of January by the prisoner.

THOMAS WESTBROOK . I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner in Vinegar-yard, at Fatham's - she said she bought the things, and that the boxes were in New-street, Carnaby-market; I found them there, with some of the property in them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I gave her 3 l. 10 s. for them - the landlady saw me pay her 10 s. in part.

MARTHA FATHAM re-examined. I heard no bargain about them, and saw no money paid.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined One Year .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200217-159

508. WILLIAM WOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of December , one sheet, value 4 s. , the goods of Joseph Wittrick .

ANN WITTRICK . I am the wife of Joseph Wittrick , we live in Ray-street, Clerkenwell . The sheets were let to the prisoner with a furnished lodging.

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200217-160

509. PHILIP WHITEHEAD was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of February , one table, value 2 s. , the goods of Edward Simmons .

EDWARD SIMMONDS . I live in Barbican . On the 1st of

February a table was stolen from my shop; a person gave the alarm, I ran out and secured the prisoner in Playhouse-yard with the table on his shoulder.

THOMAS SWENDALE . I saw the prisoner take the table, and am sure he is the man.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY Aged 23.

Fined One Shilling, and Discharged .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200217-161

510. SARAH WILSON was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of February , four pair of shoes, value 16 s. , the goods of George Applegarth .

CATHARINE STEEL , I am servant to George Applegarth , who is a hosier , and lives in Circus-street, Marylebone - he also sells shoes . I was in the parlour, and saw the prisoner go out of the shop; I followed her, and told her to put down the shoes. She threw down two pair, went on a little further, and then threw down another pair - a baker stopped her, and found another pair on her.

JONATHAN BROWN . I am a baker. I heard the cry of Stop thief, stopped the prisoner, and found a pair of shoes under her apron.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Confined Six Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200217-162

511. CAROLINE WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of February , 12 s. in monies numbered, the monies of William Williams , from his person .

WILLIAM WILLIAMS . I am a shoemaker , and live in Hanover-street, Long-acre. On the 2d of February, about half-past one o'clock in the morning, I was returning home from Vere-street, where I had been with a friend; the prisoner accosted me in Short's-gardens , I pushed her away. She put her arms round my waist, I pushed her away again, and caught her hand in my pocket - she retreated from me with my money in her hand - I lost 12 s. 1 d. I laid hold of her; the watchman came up. I had seen her put her hand to her head; I saw some money in her mouth, and while the patrol was looking on the ground I saw her give him something, and asked him what it was? he said

"Never mind." When I got to the watch-house I described the money as consisting of a new crown piece, a half-crown, and the rest shillings.

JAMES RUTH . I am a watchman. I heard the call of watch! the prosecutor had hold of the prisoner, and told me to search her bonnet, which I did, and found nothing in it. She gave me a penny out of her hand; the patrol came up. As we were taking her to the watch-house she pinched me, and said,

"Take this, hold your tongue, and share the money."

JOSEPH CANT . I am a patrol. I went to the prosecutor's assistance, he had hold of the prisoner - I took my lanthorn to search her; she pinched my hand, and put a new crown piece in it - and while the watchman was looking on the ground she gave me a half-crown, and said,

"Say nothing about it." The prosecutor said there was a new crown piece and a half-crown among his money.

Prisoner's Defence. He gave me the money in my room.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200217-163

511. ROBERT BUTLER was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of February , 5 s., in copper monies numbered , the monies of John Meakin .

TIMOTHY SHEHAN . I was sent by Mr. Meakin to fetch 5 l. worth of copper money. I got very tired in Long-lane, and rested; I asked several persons to help the basket on my shoulder. The prisoner offered to carry it, and carried it into Fetter-lane , and then put the basket on my head. I saw him turn very red in the face, which made me suspect him; he ran off down Fetter-lane, and I cried out Stop thief; he was brought back, and I missed a 5 s. paper of halfpence from the basket, which was found at the knee of his breeches.

JOHN DRAKE . I saw the prisoner put the basket on Shehan's shoulder, and run; the boy called out. I pursued and secured him. took him to the office, and found the 5 s. paper of halfpence in his breeches.

RICHARD LIMBRIC . The prisoner was brought to the office, and I found the money in his breeches.

Prisoner's Defence. It is my own.

GUILTY . Aged 29.

Fined One Shilling, and Discharged .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200217-164

512. ROBERT COLLETT was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of February , one spoon, value 10 s. , the goods of Peter Nicholson .

MARY CHARLES . I am servant to Mr. Peter Nicholson , who is an architect , and lives in London-street, Fitzroy-square . On the 15th of February, between nine and ten o'clock in the morning, the prisoner came to the kitchen for some water to shave my master with - he is apprentice to a hair-dresser ; he stood by the fire for half an hour. I told him to go up, for I was blamed for his stopping there. He said he was waiting to cut the child's hair, and told me to go up, and see if the child was ready. I went up - the spoon was then safe in the kitchen; he followed me up stairs in about five minutes, and said he was going for his scissors. In about half an hour I missed two spoons - his master afterwards produced one.

WILLIAM HOOPER . I am a hair-dresser; the prisoner was in my employ. The prosecutor informed me of his loss, and I searched the prisoner, but found nothing on him. I afterwards found the spoon in my wash-house, concealed between the skirting-board and the wall - the prisoner said I should find it there.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I am sorry for it.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Fined One Shilling, and Discharged .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200217-165

513. JOHN ELIAS PUTTERSFIELD CLARK was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of February , 1 cwt. of iron, value 4 s. , the goods of John Fielder .

JOHN SIMPSON . I am servant to John Fielder , Esq . Some iron had been taken off the cart-wheels, and put on the premises at the back of the King's-road, Chelsea . I saw it safe the day before it was stolen - the prisoner worked on the premises.

JAMES MOORE . I am a patrol of Bow-street. On the 14th of February, about nine o'clock at night, I stopped

the prisoner in Sloane-square, with a sack on his back. I asked him what he had got? He said some iron, which he was going to take to a friend in George-street - he said it was his own. I followed him to the house of one Reynolds, a dealer in marine stores, in Jews'-row, Chelsea. I heard Reynolds ask him what he wanted for it? he said five farthings a pound; Reynolds offered him a farthing, and I took him into custody. He then said he himself was a dealer in marine-stores, and lived in Arthur-street, King's-road. I found he lodged there, at the back of the premises where the iron was stolen from, and kept no shop. I matched the iron to the wheels.

THOMAS JONES . I was with Moore. The iron weighed 98 lbs.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I met a man, who called me by name, and asked me to carry it to Jews'-row. I was to meet him at the Prince of Wales, public-house, when I had sold it.

GUILTY Aged 36.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200217-166

514. ANNN HAYES and ANN STUBBS were indicted for stealing, on the 19th of February , two gowns, value 10 s. , the goods of Hannah Bannister , widow .

HANNAH BANNISTER . I am a widow, and live in Broad-street, Bloomsbury , and keep a sale-shop . On the 19th of February the prisoners came into my shop between five and six o'clock, to buy two black gowns; they agreed for them. They said they would fetch the money, and when they got out they snatched them up, and ran off. I pursued but lost them. I described them to the watchman, and they were taken in about two hours with the gowns on their backs.

JAMES SANSON . I apprehended the prisoners at a house in Phoenix-street, and took them to Bannister, who claimed the gowns on their backs.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

HAYES - GUILTY . Aged 16.

STUBBS - GUILTY . Aged 15.

Confined Three Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200217-167

ELEVENTH DAY, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 29.

515. THOMAS HAWLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of February , 50 lbs. of iron, value 7 s. , the goods of Thomas Edge .

For the Prosecution, MR. ADOLPHUS.

WILLIAM GREEN. I am servant to Mr. Thomas Edge , who is a manufacturer of articles for the Gas Company , at No. 56, Great Peter-street ; the prisoner was a smith in his employ, and lived at No. 36, nearly opposite. He was entrusted with the keys of the shop, and coal storeroom, in which was a quantity of copper and iron tubes, about which a dispute had arisen, and they were put there till it was determined - he had no business to move them. In consequence of something I and Maggs watched the premises. On the 10th of February, as the watchman was going past four o'clock, the prisoner entered the premises with a candle in his hand, went into the shop, and unlocked the door. I entered the manufactory. I could hear him filling a hamper with coals, which he brought out, and went to the passage door - we could see him go home; he returned in a few minutes, and from a different place in the yard collected a vast quantity of iron in heaps, took one lot of it, and went off the premises with it. We then went to the bottom of the stairs - he came and took another load in his leather apron, and we seized him with it as he was going out at the door; we gave him in charge. He had about 50 lbs. of iron then.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. When did he usually go to work - A. At two, three, or four o'clock - he was late this morning.

Q. Had you not ordered him to come early to make some gun barrel pliers - A. Yes; but he would not want such iron as this to make them. He did not light a fire that morning. I never stopped his wages.

Q. Did you not put one Harris in gaol for stealing iron - A. I told my master about him.

SILAS MAGGS . I am servant to Mr. Edge. I was watching with Green, and saw the prisoner come on the premises at four o'clock in the morning; he took some coals out of the shop into the street, then returned, and took a bundle of iron from the yard into the street, came back again, and took a second quantity - Green stopped him in the passage with it, called me down, and gave him in charge of the watchman.

Cross-examined. Q. Where were you - A. At the window; I could not see him go into the street, but I heard him go off the premises.

JOHN LOURING . I am a patrol. I was called, and took charge of the prisoner about half-past four o'clock in the morning. Green charged him with stealing iron. He went into the passage, and retreated into the shop. I collared him, and brought him to the door. He said nothing. He heard the charge, and did not deny it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I never robbed my master.

GUILTY . Aged 43.

Confined One Year , and Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200217-168

516. ABEL PYERS was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of February , one silver pepper box, value 1 l. , the goods of Robert Stuckey .

MARY STUCKEY . I am daughter of Robert Stuckey , who lives in the Curtain-road . On the 9th of February I was sitting by the kitchen fire, the prisoner and another boy came down the area, and knocked at the door. I opened it - the boy who has escaped, asked me to buy a bonnet box - he had two - they stood on the step. I asked him how much they were, he asked 1 s. 6 d. I offered him 1 s. 2 d.; the prisoner said take it. I went across the kitchen for the money, and on my return I found the prisoner at the dresser; he put the box on the dresser, and behind the box, on the shelf, was the silver pepper box - the other remained at the door; the prisoner took the pepper-box. I heard him say to the boy,

"You go, and I'll take the money." I saw him hand the pepper-box to the boy. I said,

"You have given the boy the pepper-box" -

the boy ran away. I hallooed out, and ran up the area-steps, but was so frightened I could go no further, I came down the steps and stopped the prisoner; he said,

"Don't be frightened." I called out, and two of our men came down and took him. He said,

"Don't be frightened, and I'll tell you all about it. The boy told me to go in, for there was plate about, and I did take it and gave it to him - you will be sure to have it again. His name is John Hall, he lives at the corner of Sander's gardens - if you will go at twelve o'clock at night, and ring the bell twice, you will find him there."

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200217-169

517. JOHN WRIGHT was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of February , one pair of pantaloons, value 20 s. , the goods of James Eddles .

JOHN EDDLES . I am nephew to James Eddles , who keeps a clothes shop in Coventry-street . On the 18th of February I saw the prisoner at the door, watched him, and saw him snatch the trowsers from inside the shop, and run away. I followed, secured him, and picked the trowsers up.

WILLIAM JONES . I saw the prisoner throw the trowsers down.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200217-170

518. JOSEPH WYNCH was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of January , one wheelbarrow, value 10 s.; one spade, value 1 s.; two pair of shears, value 8 s.; one suckering iron, value 2 s., and one pair of leather straps, value 1 s. , the goods of John Pensam , Esq .

PETER CANNON . I am gardener to John Pensam , Esq., who lives at Fulham . On the 18th of January these tools were all locked in the tool-house, except the barrow. I found them next day at Union Hall.

JAMES FAIR . I locked the tools up in the tool-house; next morning, about seven o'clock, I found the door forced open, and the cowhouse also forced open. I found the property at the office, and the prisoner in custody. He lives in our neighbourhood.

SAMUEL LEWIS . I am foreman to Ann Levy , who keeps a saleshop in the Borough-road. On the 19th of February, about eleven o'clock in the morning, the prisoner came to our shop, with the barrow and other articles; he asked 6 s. for them, which made me suspect him. I asked him if he was a gardener? he said he was, and lived at Lambeth. I gave him in charge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200217-171

519. THOMAS SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of February , two iron gratings, value 5 s. , the goods of William Thomas .

WILLIAM THOMAS . I live in Aylesbury-street, Clerkenwell ; these iron gratings hung in my window. I was in the street, and saw the prisoner pass with them; he dropped one, and I secured him.

JOHN CARPENTER . I am a watchcase-maker. I saw the prisoner running, and helped to secure him.

WILLIAM ROBERTS . I saw him take the gratings from the window.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY. Aged 20.

Judgment Respited .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr, Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200217-172

520. CHARLES YOUNG was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of January , three pair of stockings, value 3 s.; two razors, value 2 s.; two pocket-books., value 1 s., and two handkerchiefs, value 2 s. , the goods of Stephen Rodway .

MARY WELCH . The prosecutor lodges with me. On the 19th of January the prisoner came and enquired for a room. I let him a bed in the same room in which Rodway slept. Next morning he went out without my seeing him. I found the room-door open, and the prosecutor's box broken open.

STEPHEN RODWAY . I left the prisoner in bed, my box was then safe - I returned at eleven o'clock at night, and found it broken open, and the articles stated in the indictment gone. The prisoner never returned.

WILLIAM READ . I am an officer. The prisoner was brought to the office, I searched him, and found a pocketbook and a pair of stockings on him, which the prosecutor claimed. He appeared much distressed.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I had eat nothing for a day and a half.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200217-173

521. ELIZABETH GOODWIN was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of June , one ring, value 10 s. , the goods of William Crane .

MARY CRANE . I am the wife of William Crane , who keeps a coffee-shop in Long-acre , the prisoner was in my service about six months ago; I took my gold ring off my finger and laid it on the shelf in the parlour, I missed it almost directly; the prisoner denied all knowledge of it; she left me. I saw the ring seven months after in Oddy's possession.

GEORGE ODDY . I am a constable of Bow-street. I took the prisoner in charge on the 19th of February, and took the ring off her finger. I told her I took her for stealing it, she cried very much.

(Property produced and sworn to)

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.


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