Old Bailey Proceedings, 12th January 1820.
Reference Number: 18200112
Reference Number: f18200112-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace Oyer and Terminer, AND Gaol Delivery for the City of London, AND ALSO The Gaol Delivery For the County of Middlesex, HELD AT Justice Hall, in the Old Bailey; ON WEDNESDAY, 12th of JANUARY, 1820, and following Days;

Being the Second Session in the Mayoralty of THE RIGHT HON. GEORGE BRIDGES , LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

Taken in Short-Hand by H. BUCKLER, Basinghall Street, (BY AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON.)

London:

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED, FOR H. BUCKLER, BY T. BOOTH, 31, St. Andrew's Hill, Doctors' Commons.

1820.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX.

Before the Right Honourable GEORGE BRIDGES , Esq. LORD MAYOR of the City of London; Sir George Sowley Holroyd , Knt., one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir James Burrough , Knt., one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir John Perring , Bart.; Sir Charles Flower , Bart.; Sir Claudius Stephen Hunter , Bart; George Scholey , Esq.; Christopher Smith , Esq., Aldermen of the said City; Sir John Silvester , Bart., D.C.L. Recorder of the said City; Sir Matthew Bloxam , Knt., Alderman of the said City, Newman Knowlys , Esq. Common Sergeant of the said City, his Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of the Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

London Jury.

Joseph Sparks ,

Thomas Collins ,

Joseph Todd ,

James Jones ,

John Donaldson ,

William Gilbert ,

William Cragil ,

Edward Rough ,

Henry Frederick Ehm ,

John Furze ,

Edward Edwards .

Philip Palmer .

First Middlesex Jury.

Joseph Mills ,

Nathaniel Jerwood ,

Charles M'Kenzie ,

John Holland ,

Thomas Harris ,

John Cartwright ,

Philip Gornell ,

Thomas Mantel ,

Thomas Acres ,

Thomas Stoco ,

James Nelson ,

William Erskine .

Second Middlesex Jury.

John Harris ,

James Wessunt ,

Edward Turner ,

George Monkhouse ,

James Hulm ,

Jeremiah Beach ,

James Pinnock ,

John Fellows ,

John Briggs ,

Andrew Tweedy ,

Benjamin Pipping ,

John Davis .

SESSIONS HOUSE, OLD BAILEY, JANUARY 12, 1820.

BRIDGES, MAYOR. SECOND SESSION.

Reference Number: t18200112-1

209. JOHN JONES was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Want and John Richardson , about three o'clock in the afternoon of the 4th of January , at St. James, Westminster ( Samuel Hatfull and others being therein), and stealing, one coat, value 18 s., and one sheet, value 2 s., the goods of the said Samuel Hatfull .

The prisoner pleaded,

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 45.

Before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18200112-2

210. GEORGE COOKE was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of May , two loaves of bread, value 18 d. , the goods of James Barham .

JAMES BARHAM . I am a baker , and live in Oxford-market. On the 7th of May I set my basket down in Park-lane, opposite Grosvenor Gate . I stood just by the gate, and saw the prisoner come along with a baker's barrow, a basket, and bread; he stopped at my basket, then went up to it, uncovered the flannel, and took two loaves out, which he put into his own basket - he could see me; he saw me advancing towards him, took them out, and put them back again. I asked him what business he had to take my bread? He said,

"Mr. Barham, I have got none of your bread." I said,

"You returned it when you saw me coming." Another baker came up, said the prisoner was out of place, and he had employed him to take care of his barrow. The prisoner said,

"D - n you, if you say I took your bread I will give you a punch of the head;" which he immediately did, and knocked me down. I got up, and he put himself in an attitude of fighting - the other man got between us. I told him if he would give me his name, I would stand against him in another way; he knocked me down again. The baker told me where his master lived.

JOHN MINER . I was sweeping the crossing, and saw the two men having a dispute; the prisoner said if Barham said he stole his bread he would knock him down - he knocked him down twice. The other baker wanted them to make it up.

Prisoner's Defence. I was intoxicated, ran my barrow against his basket, and knocked it over; two loaves fell out. I put them in, and he called me a thief.

JAMES BARHAM re-examined. My basket was not overturned.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Confined Six Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

Reference Number: t18200112-3

211. HENRY DORAN was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Benjamin Pugh , about six o'clock in the night of the 4th of January , at St. Pancras , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, thirteen plates, value 6 s. 6 d.; five dishes, value 2 s. 6 d.; 2 lbs. of bread, value 1 s.; 3 lbs. of cheese, value 1 s. 6 d.; 1 lb. of butter, value 1 s.; one pork pie, value 2 s., and 5 lbs of beef, value 2 s. 6 d., his property .

Counsel for the Prosecution, MR. ANDREWS.

MICHAEL BARRY . I am a patrol on the Foundling Estate; Bernard-street is on my beat, and in the parish of St. Pancras. On the 4th of January, about a quarter past six o'clock in the morning, I was passing Mr. Pugh's house - it was quite foggy and dark. I observed that one of the wooden panes on one side of the scullery door appeared to be out, which made me think somebody was about the place. I went down the area, and found the scullery door partly open - the watchman was coming down the street; we found the area gate unlocked. I told him to keep the gate fast while I went down the steps; I was going down, and found the prisoner coming out of the scullery door. He said he had got up too early to go to work, and that he met two men, who told him to come down to such an area, where they would find plenty of grub, and they would share with him.

Q. Had he any thing with him - A. No. Before I took him away I found a sack with five dishes, part of three half-quartern loaves, a piece of beef, two pieces of cheese, a piece of dried salmon, a quantity of butter, and a small pan of kitchen-stuff, all tied up in the sack which was in the scullery.

Q. Is the scullery immediately underneath the step of the street door - A. Yes, it is part of the area, which is enclosed. The kitchen door enters into the scullery, and the scullery door into the area.

JOHN PHILLIPS . I am watchman of Bernard-street. On the morning of the 4th of January Barry told me to

wait at the gate while he went down - I saw the prisoner come out of the scullery; Barry held him while I went and looked to see if there were any more. I brought the bag up.

JANE LITTLEFIELD . I am cook to Mr. Benjamin Pugh . The scullery is immediately under the step of the street door; one door leads into the area, and the other into the kitchen. On the night of the 4th of January, when I went to bed, I made the doors fast - I bolted the door leading to the area, at the top and bottom. About six o'clock in the morning, the watchman called me, and I found it open; a pane of wood, which was safe when I went to bed, had been taken out; a man could put his body through, and unbolt the door, top and bottom. I saw the sack with the things in it - I had left them all safe - the sack was not there the night before; thirteen plates were tied up in a handkerchief under the sink - I had left them in a plate-rack. I am certain I fastened the doors, and the area gate was locked; the door leading to the kitchen was not opened. Last night I found these things in the water-cistern in the scullery - here is a skeleton key, which opens the area gate easily, also a bottle, a steel, and a flint.

Prisoner's Defence. The evening before, I had some words at home, and went out; I fell in company with two young men at a public-house, and told them I was out of work. They said if I would meet them at the corner of Bernard-street at six o'clock they would get me work. I met them; they sent me down to the scullery for the bag. The patrol came and caught me on the steps.

GUILTY . - DEATH Aged 22.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18200112-4

212. JOHN RIDLEY was indicted for feloniously assaulting William Mold , on the King's highway, on the 23d of December , at St Andrew, Holborn, putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, one watch, value 5 l.; two seals, value 2 s., and one key, value 1 d., his property .

WILLIAM MOLD . I am a labourer . On the 23d of December, about a quarter past six o'clock in the evening, I was bringing a trunk from the Old Bell, Holborn. As I came up Holborn , opposite French Horn-yard, with the trunk on my shoulder, I was ran against by three persons - all three met me, and ran against me. I saw them before they came up to me, and made way for them, but they ran against me, and drove me up a gateway, about five yards from where they met me - it was done wilfully and designedly; the prisoner was on my right hand, he put his hand on my watch; another was on my left, and the other behind, who laid hold of my trunk. The prisoner said,

"What is the matter, my friend?" and at that instant his right hand came to my watch. I let go the trunk, and seized him before he got it out of my pocket - all three then threw me down. The prisoner held the watch in his hand, and endeavoured to give it to the others, but I still held him; he said nothing. I screamed out Thieves! knocked the watch out of his hand, and it fell. The witness came to my assistance, and collared the prisoner as he lay down - they were all three on me at that time, endeavouring to get the prisoner clear; the other two escaped; I said I had lost my watch. My case was found first and then the watch. The trunk was about five yards behind me.

Q. The prisoner did not take the watch out of your pocket while you was standing - A. Before I fell it was out of my pocket; it was taken out in the struggle. I saw it in his hand, and believe I knocked it out as he was handling it across to the others. It was picked up, and given to me.

Prisoner. Q. A woman picked up the watch - A. She picked up the case, and a man picked up the watch. She did not say a taller man threw it away. I heard her say nothing, except

"Here is your watch-case."

(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAM LATHAM . I was going into the gateway with a caravan, and heard Mold call for assistance. I saw the prisoner in the gateway, and collared him - Mold had hold of him at the time; there were two others there, trying to rescue him, but when I got hold of him they escaped. I saw the watch given to Mold - I heard the woman say nothing.

Prisoner's Defence. I was returning from Dean-street, heard the call of Thieves! went up the gateway, and the prosecutor laid hold of a man, who got from him - he took me, and pulled me down. A woman brought the watch, and said she saw a man drop it, who went towards Holborn.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 29.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18200112-5

213. THOMAS BRANSGROVE was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of December , at Hayes, five oxen, price 60 l. , the property of William Welch .

SECOND COUNT, for stealing on the same day, three oxen, price 60 l., the property of Richard Parsley and William Cox , and two oxen, price 20 l., the property of Henry Parsley .

For the Prosecution, MR. ADOLPHUS.

WILLIAM WELCH . I am a beast-salesman , and live at Southall. On the 8th of December Richard Parsley delivered to me nineteen Devonshire oxen for sale, on his account. I was responsible for the amount of them. I sold fourteen of them at the market, and delivered the rest to my servant to put in a close by the roadside, at Southall, Middlesex. I marked all the beast sent to me with a large slip over the hip, and a short slip under it. I saw these five marked. One particular bullock I marked myself with a small V - the five were worth from 110 l. to 115 l. I have seen some of the skins among a number of others, in possession of Mr. Lewin, a tanner, at Watford. I picked them out, and said

"These are the hides of the five oxen that I lost, and which my servant put into the close." I knew them by the marks. Pinner is eight miles from Southall.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. You lost them from the parish of Hayes - A. It is the precinct of Southall, in the parish of Hayes .

JAMES RAINES . I am servant to Mr. Richard Parsley . I took the five oxen from Southall-market to Mr. Welch's close, by his desire, on the 8th of December, about one o'clock in the afternoon. I chained the gate. I went next morning, about eight o'clock, to fodder them, the gate was open, and the beast gone.

Q. Have you since seen the skins found at Lewin's - A. Yes, and am sure, by the marks, that they belonged to the five oxen; Mr. Parsley bought them last spring. I have been in the habit of seeing them ever since that.

Cross-examined. Q. The nineteen were marked the same way - A. No; sixteen were marked one way, and three another. I know two of them by the hair marks.

JOHN LEACH . I live at Pinner; the prisoner also lived there - he is a butcher. On the 8th of December, about ten o'clock at night, I saw him with some oxen - I thought he had eight or ten. He was driving them up the street, and asked me to lend him a hand to drive them up a little alley, which goes to his shop, which I did; I did not count them - it was a dark night - the beast were very much heated. I merely turned them into the alley, and then went away.

WILLIAM BUNKER . I am a butcher, and live at Pinner, which I think is about six or seven miles from Southall; the prisoner keeps a butcher's shop at Pinner - he was in a small way of business. On the 9th of December, about twelve o'clock in the morning, he asked me to come to his slaughter-house, which is up an alley, to assist in dressing three oxen. I went directly, and assisted in slaughtering and dressing them - he and his brother helped a little, but not much; he was present. I helped to kill three, and saw no more killed, but there were two heads in the slaughter-house. The beast were in a cool state.

Q. Do you know the marks of the salesmen about the neighbourhood - A. Yes; I saw Welch's mark on them. I always work left-handed, by which I know my work from other peoples'. I have seen the five skins found at Lewin's - I know my work is on three of them.

Q. Did you see any thing done with the meat - A. Two hind-quarters and a fore-quarter were cut up in the prisoner's shop, and another fore-quarter was sold to the master of the work-house, by the prisoner's direction. I helped to load a cart with four fore-quarters and eight hind-quarters, to go to Newgate-market - he said they were to go there. This was on the 11th of December.

Cross-examined. I can swear they are the hides I took off the beast. I have not dressed any others for a long time.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did you know how the five hides got off the prisoner's premises - A. On the morning of the 10th of December I assisted in putting them into a cart; he told me they were going to Bushey Heath, which is about two miles from Watford, to be sent to town by a waggon.

MAURICE JARVIS . I am a fellmonger. On Friday, the 10th of December, the prisoner brought the five hides to my yard at Watford; I bought them of him at 2 s. a stone, and sent them to Mr. Lewin's. I collect hides for them - the same hides are here.

WILLIAM LEWIN . I am a tanner, at Watford. I received six hides from Jarvis - five of them were afterwards seen, and claimed by Welch - he selected them from eight or nine in all; two of them are here - I am sure they are the same.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought them.

GUILTY. - DEATH . Aged 23.

Recommended to Mercy .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

Reference Number: t18200112-6

214. GEORGE NEWLY was indicted for feloniously assaulting Henry Davis , on the King's highway, on the 8th of December , at St. James, Westminster , putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, one watch, value 10 l.; one seal, value 4 l.; one ribbon, value 6 d., and one key, value 5 s., his property .

HENRY DAVIS . I am a surgeon , and live in Conduit-street. On Wednesday, the 8th of December, about half-past three o'clock in the afternoon, I was in St. James's-square, between King-street and York-street - there was a number of people there - a man ran against me with violence, I pushed him from me, and as he fell I felt my watch go from my fob. I am sure he took it, he was the only man close to me, and I saw the watch in his hand. The prisoner is the man, I endeavoured to lay hold of him, but received several blows from the people round me, they hustled and struck me, which prevented my securing him. I pursued him to the corner of King-street, and said he had robbed me - he escaped. He had a grey coat on. On Friday morning Dorrell fetched me to Bow-street, and my watch was produced - it is a gold watch. I produce it. The case was lost in the scuffle.

GEORGE DORRELL . I am a brushmaker, and live in Bird-street, Manchester-square. On the 8th of December I was in St. James's-square, saw the prisoner run against Mr. Davis, and snatch the watch from his pocket, the gang was round - he stumbled and fell to the ground. I pursued him to the bottom of King-street, there took him into custody, and found the gold watch and seals, without the case, in his right-hand breeches-pocket. I am sure he is the man. I delivered it to Mr. Davis on the 10th, at Bow-street.

JOSEPH POWELL . On the 8th of December I was in St. James's-square, and saw the prisoner stumble, he got up, and ran off, Dorrell and I followed, he turned down a court, and was secured there. I found the watch in his breeches-pocket. A number of persons were with him at first, who hustled a great many people.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked it up in the mob, it was all smashed to pieces.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 18.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18200112-7

215. SUSAN JENKINS was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of December , one coat, value 4 l., the goods of William Adkins , in his dwelling-house .

MR. WILLIAM ADKINS . I am Governor of the House of Correction for the county of Middlesex . On the 14th of December, between three and four o'clock, I hung my greatcoat up in the passage, and missed it about ten o'clock next morning.

SAMUEL WRIGHT . I am a pawnbroker, and live on Mutton-hill. On the 14th of December, about seven o'clock in the evening, the prisoner pledged the coat with me for 1 l.; she said she brought it from John Smith , No. 27, Hatton-garden. It is worth two guineas, or 2 l. 5 s. She came the next evening, and wanted 10 s. more on it. I had her detained, as Mr. Adkins had given information.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN CLARK . I am gatekeeper at the House of Correction. On the 14th of December, between six and seven

o'clock in the evening, the prisoner knocked at the gate, said she came from the Governor's brother, and had business with the Governor; I saw her go into the house, and come out with something under her arm. She had rolled it up, I only saw the silk, and did not suspect her. She went away.

JOHN READ . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner.

GUILTY. Aged 40.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Confined Six Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18200112-8

216. CHARLES DODWELL was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of January , in the dwelling-house of John Wells , two coats, value 7 l.; one waistcoat, value 5 s., and one 1 l. bank note, the property of Henry Corless .

HENRY CORLESS . I live with John Wells , who keeps the Red Lion, public-house, in the City-road ; I lodged in the front garret, and the prisoner in the back. On Wednesday, the 5th of January, about half-past ten o'clock, I went to my box, and found it locked, but missed this property; I had seen them safe on Monday. The great coat cost me 4 l. 10 s. I had never worn it.

SAMUEL LACK . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner at the guard-house of the Horse Guards, on Thursday. I found a bill in his pocket belonging to Corless. I went to Read's lodgings, and found a black silk waistcoat and an under coat, but no great coat.

HENRY CORLESS re-examined. The coat and waistcoat are mine. The bill was locked up in my box.

ELIZA READ . I went to the guard-room on Thursday, where the prisoner was confined, at the request of Elizabeth Smith , with whom I lodge, to fetch a jacket. He gave me a silk waistcoat and a blue coat to take to her, which I did, and hung it up in her room, where we both lodge.

CHARLES GUTHRIE . I am a patrol. On the morning of the 6th of January, I went with Lack to the guardhouse; the prisoner was there, dressed in regimentals. It was stated, in his presence, that he went in dressed in coloured clothes, and they were given to a woman - he denied it. We found the coat and waistcoat at Smith's.

JOHN GUISH . I am a porter. I was at the Red Lion, public-house, on Wednesday, the 5th of January, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon; the prisoner came in with his foraging cap and great coat on, and said he had been walking all night. He went up stairs, then came down in about a quarter of an hour with his great coat off, and a bundle wrapped up in it. I asked him for a piece of leather? He left the bundle on the table, went up stairs, and brought a piece down. He went up again, came down, and went out with the bundle.

Prisoner. I beg for mercy.

GUILTY. Aged 30.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Confined One Year .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

Reference Number: t18200112-9

217. JAMES PAGE and RICHARD BERRY were indicted for stealing, on the 31st of December , one castor, value 6 s.; one silver milk-pot, value 50 s.; three teaspoons, value 9 s., and one candlestick, value 5 s., the goods of Robert Wattleworth , in his dwelling-house .

ROBERT WATTLEWORTH . I live at Holloway . On the 31st of December I went out, and left my door ajar, returned in about ten minutes, and saw the prisoners run out of my front door, and go down the steps; Page had a bundle under his coat. I pursued and secured them in a field opposite the house, and brought them into the road. When I got an officer, I returned to the spot where I took them, and picked up a handkerchief with the plated castor in it - I did not find the other things. They were safe in the cupboard when I went out; the prisoners said a third boy had been with them; I found a candlestick in the field about an hour after. They could have gone into the house twice while I was absent; they must have taken the other things before.

THOMAS RICHARDS . I am a constable; the prisoners were given into my charge. On the 5th of January Page told me, in his father's presence, that they gave the silver milk-jug and spoons to a third boy. Another boy followed them to the office, but they said that was not him - they afterwards said he was the boy.

JAMES GOODCHILD . On the 31st of December I assisted in searching the prisoners.

PAGE - GUILTY . Aged 13.

Confined One Month .

BERRY - GUILTY . Aged 13.

Confined Six Months and Whipped .

Of stealing the castor only.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

Reference Number: t18200112-10

218. GEORGE CLARK and SAMUEL CARTWRIGHT were indicted for stealing, on the 5th of December , one sheep, price 4 l. , the property of Charles Poole , Esq .

SECOND COUNT, for wilfully killing the said sheep, with intent to steal the carcase.

JOSEPH IRISH . I am servant to Charles Poole , Esq., who lives at Stanmore . On Sunday, the 5th of December, about one o'clock in the afternoon, I went down to the Fourteen Acre field, and found a very valuable ram had been killed; the skin and three feet were cut off, and left, but the carcase was gone. I traced the footsteps of two men over the hedge and up to Elstree, to a cottage in which Clark lived - Cartwright lived farther down the village. Next morning I got a warrant to search Clark's house first, and found part of a very fine fat shoulder of mutton, dressed. Clark came in at the time, and we asked him where he bought it? He said at Watford, but afterwards said he thought it was at Jonathan's of Edgware. We then went to Cartwright's, and found two bits of fat mutton, they were parts of a shoulder, and a bag, which was fresh with fat and blood, as if hot meat had been in it. We took them into custody, took a shoe off each of them, and compared them with the foot-marks - they matched in length and breadth.

Q. Was there any blood near to where the skin was found - A. Yes, the sheep appeared to have been killed there. It was a wet day; I could trace them step by step on the grass, and lost the trace between two and three hundred yards from Clark's house. On Tuesday, the 7th,

Pinnimore fetched me to the Artichoke, public-house, where I found some mutton; the shank of the shoulder matched with that found at Clark's - they appeared both to belong to the same sheep.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. The mutton found at both the houses was dressed - A. Yes. The shoulder-bone found at Clark's matched the shank.

THOMAS BUDGE . I am constable of Great Stanmore. I had a warrant, and searched Clark's house, and found part of a shoulder of mutton, dressed; I also found part of a shoulder, undressed, at Field's, who keeps the Artichoke, public-house - it corresponds with the other; there is a splinter in the bone, which matches with it; I found two small pieces and a bag at Cartwright's. Three days afterwards. I saw the mutton at Field's, and compared the feet with two legs, which were found in a hollow tree. They appeared to match exactly when I first saw them, but they have been so long in the bag that the sinews are contracted. I am a butcher myself; they were jointed in a different way to what butchers would do them. The bag found at Cartwright's was very greasy and bloody - the fat of mutton was very plainly to be seen in it.

Cross-examined. Q. If he had bought a sheep's head, and put into the bag, it would have this appearance - A. No, there was suet and kidney fat.

THOMAS WARDELL . I am a butcher and farmer. On the 7th of December, in the afternoon, a man came to say some mutton was found in a hollow tree in my field. I went to the hollow tree - several men were round it - it was taken out before I got there. I found two legs of mutton, part of a loin, a neck with part of a loin to it, part of two shoulders, and other parts, cut in a very unbutcher-like manner; they were taken to Field's next day (Wednesday). I was present and saw the part of the shoulder which the constable produced - the bone appeared to correspond. I have no doubt but it belonged to the same animal.

Cross-examined. Q. The bone was dressed - A. Yes; the other was raw. There might be a bone to fit it which did not belong to it - it matched to a nicety. Roasting would not alter it much.

JOSEPH PINNIMORE . I am a labourer. On Tuesday, as I was going to dinner, I found this mutton in the hollow tree in the field, covered with a sack. I saw a bit of the sack hanging out - it was concealed there.

WILLIAM KILBY . I drove the ram into the Fourteen Acre field, on Saturday, with the sheep.

JOSEPH IRISH re-examined. Clark's is a short squabby foot. The footmarks corresponded.

CLARK's Defence. On Tuesday the constable took our shoes off to see if they corresponded, and he said they did not match.

CARTWRIGHT'S Defence. They said my shoe was nothing like the mark.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

Reference Number: t18200112-11

219. JOHN GREEN was indicted for that he, at the General Quarter Session of the Peace, held by adjournment, at the New Bailey Court-house in Salford, for the County Palatine of Lancaster, on the 25th of October, 1815, was convicted of petit larceny, and was ordered to be transported beyond the seas for the space of seven years, and that he on the 25th of October, 1819 , feloniously was at large without any lawful excuse, at St. Mary Woolnoth , before the expiration of the said term for which he was so ordered to be transported .

The prisoner pleaded

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 27.

Before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18200112-12

220. CHARLES KNIGHT was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of January , one pair of sheets, value 13 s., and one towel, value 3 s. , the goods of George Lloyd .

GEORGE LLOYD . I keep the Three Tuns, public-house, in Smithfield . On the 31st of December the prisoner came and had a bed at my house, he came down next morning between ten and eleven o'clock, and as he passed the bar he asked if he could have a bed at night again? I said Yes. In all, who was in the bar, said he had robbed him of a pair of sheets sometime ago. I immediately sent up to see if mine were safe. I found the sheets on his bed, but missed a pair off a bed in the next room; he ran out, we pursued him down West-street, and secured him on Little Saffron-hill, brought him back, and took the sheets from his person.

JOHN INALL . I am a publican. I was at Lloyd's on the morning of the 1st of January, we were talking in the bar, the prisoner came down, and asked if he could sleep there that night, Lloyd said he could. When he was gone I said I believed he was the young man who had robbed me of a pair of sheets. Lloyd sent the servant up, she said she missed the sheets from the next room. I followed and took him on Little Saffron-hill, unbuttoned his clothes, took the sheets from round his body, and found a towel in his hat.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18200112-13

221. THOMAS HERRING was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of December , seventeen keys, value 10 s. , the property of the Honourable Society of Governor and Assistants, London, of the New Plantations in Ulster, in the Realm of Ireland .

SECOND COUNT stating them to belong to Henry Schultes .

THOMAS WILSON . On the 16th of December I called at Mr. Slade's chambers in Doctors' Commons , and could see into Mr. Schultes's room - I saw the prisoner there, standing against the desk - nobody else was there - he took up a bag, which I thought contained money, and supposed he did. He put it into his waistcoat-pocket, and went out, I pursued him, overtook him walking up Godliman-street very quick, towards St. Paul's churchyard, and took him back; he pulled the bag out, laid it on the desk, and begged I would forgive him. He had a bundle of wood in his hand.

HENRY SCHULTES . I am Secretary to the Irish Society , and have the keys of their chambers. I followed the prisoner, and saw the keys taken from him.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Six Months .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18200112-14

222. SAMUEL VICKERY was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of December , one tumbler glass, value 2 s. , the goods of Samuel Pearce .

SAMUEL PEARCE . I keep the Marlborough Head, public-house, Bishopsgate-street . On the 8th of December, between twelve and one o'clock, the prisoner came in for a glass of porter, the waiter came to me, and said he had put a glass into his pocket. I went outside the door, he came out, and I said, "I believe you have some of my property." He asked what I meant, pulled out the glass, and begged I would let him go. I gave him in charge. At three o'clock a gentleman found a glass under the seat where he sat, which was not mine. The prisoner claimed it before the Lord Mayor.

WILLIAM PEARCE . On the 8th of December the prisoner came and had a glass of porter, I suspected and watched him; I saw him pull a glass under the newspaper, and put it into his pocket.

Prisoner's Defence. I exchanged the glasses.

GUILTY . Aged 46.

Confined Six Months .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18200112-15

223. ELIZA PARROT was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of December , one sheet, value 3 s. , the goods of the Governor of St. Bartholomew Hospital .

WALTER WILLIAM WILBY . I am Steward of St. Bartholomew Hospital . The sister of one of the wards came to me with some duplicates, saying, she had lost sheets, and that she had taken the duplicates from the prisoner. I found the sheets at the pawnbroker's.

ELIZA LAXTON . I am sister of the ward. On the 24th of December I missed four pair of sheets; the prisoner was nurse in the same ward. I asked her if she knew any thing of them? She acknowledged pledging three pair, but said she knew nothing of the other. She gave me the duplicates, and I gave them to the Steward; I gave her some money, and she brought a pair home. She was ten weeks in the hospital.

WILLIAM MAXWELL . I am servant to Mr. Reeves, who is a pawnbroker, and lives on Snow-hill. On the 23d of December the prisoner pledged a sheet with me for 3 s.; the mark was blacked over. On the 11th and 15th of November two more were pledged, but I do not know who by.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I intended to redeem them again, not thinking they would be missed so soon.

GUILTY . Aged 35.

Confined Six Months .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18200112-16

224. THOMAS KETTLE was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of January , one pewter pint pot, value 1 s. 6 d., and two knives, value 1 s. , the goods of Cornelius Ellis .

CORNELIUS ELLIS . I keep the Horseshoe and Star, public-house, Fleet-street . On the 8th of January, between eleven and twelve o'clock, while the taproom was being cleaned, the prisoner came and had half a pint of beer - I missed a pint pot and two knives; I found him detained at the Angel, public-house, Fleet-market, with them in his basket.

WILLIAM STERLING . I keep the Angel, public-house, Fleet-market. On the 8th of January the prisoner came in with a small basket in his hand, and had a pint of porter - he remained there about two hours, and shifted his seat from one end of the room to the other, which made me suspect him - there were two pots before him for sometime, one was missing for about ten minutes; the prisoner suspecting that we were watching him, pulled it out of his basket. When the prisoner got up to go away I wished to see his basket, and there found the prosecutor's pot and two knives, and another knife belonging to Mr. Remmington, who keeps the Mail Coach, public-house. I saw him bring the basket in.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I took a basket in with some broken victuals, and fell asleep; a woman sat by me with a basket. She must have taken my basket away, for this was not mine.

GUILTY . Aged 55.

Confined Six Months .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18200112-17

225. LEWIS CANSTATT was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of December , one umbrella, value 3 s. , the goods of Manly Emanuel .

MANLY EMANUEL. I live in St. Martin's lane. On the 23d of December, about six o'clock in the evening, I went to Mr. Canstatt's, who is a surgeon in Smithfield , and left my umbrella in the shop. I missed it about ten o'clock, and asked the prisoner if he knew any thing about it? as I suspected him. He said he knew nothing of it; he is the son of the person who keeps the shop. About ten days afterwards he behaved disorderly at home, and they gave him in charge of an officer, who found the duplicate on him.

JOHN ANNIS . I am a pawnbroker, and live at Sparrow-corner, Minories. On the 23d of December, between six and seven o'clock in the evening, the prisoner pledged an umbrella with me for 2 s.

WILLIAM FAWCET . On the 1st of January the prisoner's father gave him in my charge, and I found the duplicate on him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I throw myself on the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18200112-18

226. ELIZA JAMES was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of December , one coat, value 3 l. 10 s. , the goods of William Randall and Samuel Nightingale .

WILLIAM HERRIGE . I am foremen to Messrs. William Randall and Samuel Nightingale , who live at the corner of Ironmonger-lane, in Cheapside . On the 20th of December, as I was engaged with a gentleman at the lower part of the shop, a person came in, and said they saw the prisoner take a coat from the passage. I went out, and saw

her in Lawrence-lane, secured her in Wood-street, and took it from her. She said she picked it up, but it was a very dirty evening, and the coat was quite clean. It was concealed under her pelisse.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I picked it up.

GUILTY . Aged 34.

Confined Six Months .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18200112-19

SECOND DAY, THURSDAY, JANUARY 13.

227. WILLIAM COLE was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of December , two knife-rests, value 10 s., and one ring, value 20 s. , the goods of Thomas Barnard .

VINCENT LADE . I am servant to Mr. Thomas Barnard , who is a silversmith , and lives in the Strand . On the 7th of December I went into the cellar with Graham, and found, in a hole between the ceiling of the cellar and the kitchen-floor, some silver and three dollars; and on the opposite side of the hole was a pearl ring wrapped in tissue paper. I went up and informed Mr. Duper, the shopman - the prisoner was my master's porter.

JOSEPH GRAHAM . I am servant to Mr. Steward, who lodges at Mr. Barnard's. I went down into the cellar with Lade, and found the silver in the hole, and in a piece of tissue paper on the opposite side of the hole, was a pearl ring. I put it back, and informed Mr. Duper - I merely went out of curiosity, knowing the prisoner kept his money there. I then went down with Duper, and saw him find two knife-rests in the same hole.

GEORGE DUPER . I am shopman to Mr. Barnard; Lade informed me that the money and pearl ring was concealed in the hole. I and Graham went to the cellar, and in a hole which he pointed out, I found a pearl ring, wrapped in paper, a quantity of shillings and sixpences, and three Spanish dollars. On the opposite side of the hole I found two silver knife-rests, which I took up stairs with the ring, and called the prisoner into the parlour - he denied all knowledge of it. I then went into the cellar, brought up the silver, and asked him if he knew any thing of that? He said that was his. I fetched the officer.

WILLIAM LEE . I am an officer of Bow-street. I took the prisoner into custody. He at first denied all knowledge of it, but afterwards said he took it to assist him when out of a situation.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18200112-20

228. JANE BRAY was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of November , in the dwelling-house of Catharine Edwards , one gown, value 2 s.; one pocket-book, value 1 s.; one guinea, and ten 1 l. Bank notes, the property of Mary Parker .

MARY PARKER . I lodge in White Horse-street, Piccadilly ; Catharine Edwards keeps the house; the prisoner lodged there, and slept with me - she represented herself as a servant out of place . I was very ill one morning, got up, and took my pockets from behind the pillow - I heard something fall out of them, went down stairs, and thought no more of it. The prisoner went out that morning after breakfast, returned in about an hour, and said she had got a situation at No. 25, Portland-place, and that she must go immediately - she left the house. I missed my purse next day, which contained ten 1 l. Bank notes, a guinea, some silver, and a piece of paper with the words,

"Two pair of ear-rings" written on it; also a certificate of my baptism. She was apprehended next day, and I saw these papers found in her pocket. She had not got a situation in Portland-place.

JOHN WALES . I am an officer. I went with the prosecutrix to the prisoner's lodgings in Portland-mews, on the 1st of December, and found her there. I desired her to take her pocket outside her gown, and while she was doing so I heard something fall on the floor from her pocket - it was a pocket-book, which the prosecutrix claimed; it contained memorandums, which she said were with the notes. I found a gown in the prisoner's box, which the prosecutrix said was stolen from her room - I found no money.

MARY PARKER re-examined. The pocket-book is mine, and also the memorandums - they were in the pocketbook when I lost it.

GUILTY. Aged 23.

Of stealing, but not in the dwelling-house .

Confined One Year .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

Reference Number: t18200112-21

229. JOHN BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of January , two saddles, value 15 s.; two bridles, value 4 s.; two saddle-cloths, value 6 d., and one leather strap, value 6 d. , the goods of John Sparks .

WILLIAM BURGESS . I am a watchman of Bedford-bury. On the 1st of January, about three o'clock in the morning, Mr. Sparks's man passed me in Hop-gardens with a light. I went up to his cow-house door to light my pipe; he called out,

"Watchman, the lock is broken off the door!" The prisoner flew out of the door, but we stopped him, and took him to the watch-house. I found a flint, a steel, some tinder, and a piece of candle on him. I returned to the cow-house, and found the door had been broken open.

JAMES ADAMS , I am servant to Mr. Sparks. About three o'clock in the morning, of the 1st of January, I was going to his cow-house, and found the lock off the door - the watchman was close behind me; the prisoner came out in a great hurry, we seized him and took him to the watch-house. I called my master up, and we went to the cow-house; I had left the saddle-cloths and bridles hanging up in the loft - they were gone. I found them on the dung-hill, about fourteen yards from the loft, covered with straw. I found the lock of the door inside the premises; I found a crow-bar and a piece of the binding of a hat in the loft.

JOHN SPARKS . My servant fetched me - his evidence is correct.

HENRY GROVES . I heard the alarm, and saw the watchman with the prisoner. I took a flint, a steel, and a piece

of candle out of his pocket, with some tinder and matches. We searched the loft, and found a piece of leather. I took the prisoner's hat off and it fitted it. He said the leather had been lost out of his hat two months.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I picked up a bundle, containing the matches and things.

GUILTY Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18200112-22

230. WILLIAM WOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of December , one tea-board, value 6 s. , the goods of William Brooks .

ELIZA SAUNDERS . I live in Dean-street, Westminster. On the 28th of December, about half-past six o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner with two others and watched them; a cart and a coach passed by. The prisoner crossed the road, and took the tea-board from Brooks's door. I called out Stop thief! and followed him down the Almonry with the tea-board under his arm. I turned up the New Way and saw two boys. One of them said,

"What a row I have made." I heard a whistle - they turned and met the prisoner in the middle of Orchard-street, then all three turned down New Tothill-street into Swiss-yard. The prisoner went up to a cart and put the tea-board into it. I went to Mr. Brooks's other house and told him of it. He went with me, and took the prisoner at the corner of Swiss-yard. I never left the prisoner until I brought him to the cart, took the tea-board out, and gave him to the officer. I am quite sure he is the boy who took it. I had seen him before.

JOHN PRATT . I am a constable. I was in Mr. Brooks's shop in Tothill-street when Saunders came in. I saw her take the take the tea-board out of the cart. She had hold of the prisoner, and gave him to me.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was in Tothill-street, saw two boys running, and followed them. A woman came and said I stole the tea-board.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Three Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

Reference Number: t18200112-23

231. MARGARET GRAHAM was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of December , one watch, value 3 l., the goods of John Tagney , from his person .

JOHN TAGNEY . I am a tailor , and live in Chandos-street. On the 5th of December I met the prisoner in New Round-court, and went with her to her lodgings in Vine-street . I found two other women there, and one of them went out for liquor - the sight of the place put me into a tremble. I had drank two or three glasses of gin, but knew what I was about - it was between eight and nine o'clock in the morning. I had been out all night at a coffee-shop.

Q. One of the women went out for gin - A. Yes; the prisoner was close to me. In about a minute she said she wanted to go down stairs, which she did immediately. I missed my watch which was safe just before, and told the other girl that my watch was gone. I went down, found the prisoner in the back yard, and charged her with it - she said I might search her, but I could not find it. She went up stairs with me, and remained about ten minutes or a quarter of an hour after. I asked her for my watch? She denied it, and told me to go about my business. I fetched an officer, and gave her in charge about an hour after. I have never found the watch. I had been with no other girl.

Prisoner. Q. Was you not intoxicated and with another woman when you took hold of me - A. No.

Prisoner's Defence. I leave it to the Court.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18200112-24

232. HENRY WARD was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of February , one pair of breeches, value 10 s.; one shirt, value 4 s.; one waistcoat, value 1 s., and two pair of stockings, value 3 s. , the goods of William Page .

WILLIAM PAGE . I am a labourer , and live at Hornsey . On the 17th of February, 1819, when I came home at night, I found the lid of my box open, and missed these things; the prisoner lodged with me - he was apprehended about three weeks ago. I did not see him after the robbery until he was taken. A man who is not here gave me a waistcoat, which is mine.

THOMAS IZARD . I am a constable. I took the prisoner in charge on the 23d of December. I asked him if he knew what he was taken for? He said he supposed for that job of Page's, and that he sold the breeches at Islington for 1 s., and meant to make them good again.

Prisoner. I leave it to the mercy of the Court.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

Reference Number: t18200112-25

233. ANDREW WELLS and WILLIAM SCULTOCK were indicted for stealing, on the 13th of December , one copper pot, value 8 s. , the goods of James Heather .

SARAH HEATHER . My husband, James Heather , is a broker , and lives at Hampstead . On the 13th of December, about half-past twelve o'clock, a gentleman alarmed me, and I missed a copper pot from the fore-court. In about half an hour I found the prisoners at the watch-house with it.

EDMUND HOGG . I was going by Heather's premises. In consequence of what I heard I alarmed her, and pursued the prisoners, who were running about a hundred yards off with the pot before them - each had hold of it. I followed them to the Regency Park - Wells then had the pot - they were walking then; he saw me and gave it to Scultock. I asked what they were going to do with it.? Wells said they were carrying it for a gentleman. I took them to the watch-house.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

WELL'S Defence. Scultock asked me to hold it while he put on his gloves.

SCULTOCK'S Defence. A person in the Park offered me 1 s. to carry it.

WELLS - GUILTY . Aged 18.

SCULTOCK - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Six Weeks .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18200112-26

234. ELIZABETH MOSS was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of December , one coat, value 20 s., the goods

of Robert Haslop ; and one jacket, value 5 s., the goods of Thomas Minns .

ROBERT HASLOP . I am servant to General Champney, who lives in Hounslow-street, Cavendish-square . On the 18th of December, about half-past three o'clock, I missed my driving coat from the servants' hall - it was safe at one o'clock. A person coming down the area could get it. I also missed a jacket belonging to Thomas Minns , my fellow-servant.

WILLIAM PAILE . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Oxford-street. On the 18th of December the prisoner pledged a jacket with me. She said it was her husband's. I have known her some years.

JAMES JORDAN . I was sent for and apprehended the prisoner at Mr. Brooks's, a pawnbroker, and found a duplicate of the jacket on her. Brooks delivered a coat to me - he is not here.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I met a person in Oxford-street, who asked me to go and pledge the coat at Brooks's

GUILTY . Aged 46.

Confined Six Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

Reference Number: t18200112-27

235. EDWARD STEPHENSON was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of December , two tea-kettles, value 10 s. , the goods of Alexander Aberdour .

ALEXANDER ABERDOUR . I am a tinman , and live in Queen-street, Holborn . About half-past five o'clock in the evening, I was in the parlour, my daughter, who was in the shop, screamed out; I looked immediately and saw a hand taking two tea-kettles which hung up in the shop. I ran out immediately and saw the prisoner running away with them - I saw him throw them away; he ran into Prince's-street. I called out, and a gentleman stopped him. I brought him back - he is the boy.

ISABELLA ABERDOUR . I am the prosecutor's daughter - I saw a man come and take two kettles. I called out Stop thief! and my father came out. I picked the kettles up.

Prisoner's Defence. I heard the cry, some boys were running, and a gentleman took me.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Confined Two Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18200112-28

236. JOSEPH CRAGG was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of December , 24 lbs. of lead, value 8 s. , the property of John Field .

For the Prosecution, MR. ANDREWS.

JOHN FIELD . I live in Bennet-street, St. James's. I am building a house in St. James's-square , for the Earl of Bristol; the prisoner was a plumber in the service of Mr. Holroyd, who is employed by me to do the plumber's work. On the 22d of December, between four and five o'clock in the afternoon, I saw him leave work, he passed me; I was at that moment inquiring if my orders respecting the cuttings of lead had been complied with. I called to him as he passed, and said,

"Plumber, have you brought down any cuttings?" He did not attend to me, but kept walking on. I called again, he said,

"Sir;" but kept still going on. I followed, and overtook him just beyond the gateway which leads out of the premises. I said,

"Why don't you stop, don't you hear what I say to you?" On looking at him I saw he had something concealed under his dress, and on laying my hand on his side, I felt something which I had no doubt was lead, brought him back a short distance towards the premises, and called Churchill and Welch. While I was endeavouring to get the lead from him it fell from under his waistcoat. He said he hoped I would look it over. I said I should make an example of him, as a warning to others. He was taken to the watch-house.

Q. How long had he worked there - A. One week; the lead is mine. I had given orders that the cuttings should be brought to the counting-house, which is inside the gate, he had passed it.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. He said he went outside the gate for a necessary purpose - A. No. He had come down a ladder sixty feet high from where he worked; the men usually carry lead on their shoulders.

JAMES CHURCHILL . I saw the prisoner going out of the building, Mr. Field stopped him outside the gate, and brought him back; he unbuttoned his coat himself, and out came the lead.

JOHN TIPPER . I saw the prisoner leaving work, Mr. Field called to him, he kept walking on; Mr. Field brought him back, and the lead fell from him.

Prisoner's Defence. I could not come down the ladder without concealing the lead in my coat; if it had fallen I should have been tried for my life, as many men were underneath.

GUILTY . Aged 36.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

Reference Number: t18200112-29

237. SAMUEL JONES was indicted for feloniously forging a certain receipt for payment of money , which is as follows: -

November, 20, 1819.

Received of Mrs. Gandolfi, the sum of Eight Pounds, Fourteen Shillings, for Corn, as per Bill.

MARY PARKIN .

8: 14: 0

with intent to defraud Teresa Gandolfi , widow .

SECOND COUNT, for feloniously uttering and publishing the same as true, with the like intent.

TWO OTHER COUNTS, the same, only with intent to defraud Mary Parkin .

The prosecutrix stating her name to be Teresa Margaret Gundolfi , and Mrs. Parkin having no demand upon Mrs. Gandolfi at the time the receipt was uttered, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18200112-30

238. SAMUEL JONES was again indicted for a like offence, in uttering a like forged receipt for the sum of 50 l. 10 s. with the like intent .

This case was precisely under the same circumstances as the preceding, and the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18200112-31

239. WILLIAM ROW was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of January , 3 lbs. of nails, value 1 s. 9 d. , the goods of William Young .

WILLIAM YOUNG . I am an ironmonger , and live in Oxford-street ; the prisoner was my porter . Last Saturday night I sent him into the cellar to put some old nails by; I suspected him, listened, and distinctly heard him take up several handsfull of nails. He came out of the cellar, I waited about ten minutes till Bond came in, then called him and the prisoner into the counting-house, and ordered him to deliver up the nails which he had taken from what he took down into the cellar; he said he had none. I said if he did not deliver them up I would send for an officer. He then emptied both his waistcoat-pockets of nails, and begged of me to forgive him, as it was his first offence - there were 3 lbs. of nails. While I sent for an officer he made his escape out of the counting-house into the smith's shop; I followed, and brought him back, he got on a ladder, and partly dragged me up; I hung to his collar; he made a slip, and shook me off; he then ascended the ladder, got on the shed, and broke through a window into a woman's room; he could not escape through there, and returned. I found him on the roof of Mr. Dickenson's livery stables, and gave him in charge.

CHARLES BOND . I am apprentice to Mr. Young, and saw the prisoner pull the nails out of his pocket.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Confined Two Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18200112-32

240. THOMAS HUGHES was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of November , three pair of boots, value 3 s.; one pair of shoes, value 6 d., and one coat, value 17 s. , the goods of George Cole .

GEORGE COLE . I am a goldsmith , and live in Tower-street, Westminster-road. On the 27th of November I sent the prisoner to fetch the articles stated in the indictment, and some money, from my brother's, Abbey-street, Bermondsey - he never brought them home - he knew I was waiting for them.

SAMUEL AVILA . I am a pawnbroker, and live at Mile End, Middlesex. About the latter end of November a coat was pledged with me for 13 s. by the prisoner. I believe him to be the person.

THOMAS POWELL . I am a paperhanger. On the 27th of November, in the evening, the prisoner called on me in Newton-street, Holborn, and said he had come from Bermondsey with some wearing apparel, which he had in a handkerchief, and some boots tied in another; he left three pair of boots and a pair of shoes at my house; he said they belonged to Cole, and he would call in a day or two for them.

CHARLES DIXON . I am a constable. On the 15th of December I searched the prisoner at Eagle-street watch-house, and found the duplicate of the coat on him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence (written). Being out of place, I was recommended to a situation at the house of one Dudfield, in Shire-lane, Temple-bar, not being aware that it was a common brothel I went; the prosecutor lived there with a common prostitute, called Dandy Sall , until she was obliged to be taken to the hospital. He sent me for these things, and on my arriving at his new lodgings, in Mead's-row, Lambeth, I found I had lost the letter which contained the money. I wrote to him, telling him of my misfortune; but was foolish enough to get out of the way, and make money of the things. He would not have prosecuted me if it was not for Dudfield, as I had given information against him for selling spirits without a licence.

GEORGE COLE re-examined. I know nothing of what he states. I am sorry I ever was in the house he mentions, but that is not the reason I prosecute him.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Confined Three Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

Reference Number: t18200112-33

241. RICHARD CARTER was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of December , seven pencil-cases, value 13 s. 6 d.; seven toothpicks, value 6 s.; two pen-knives, value 4 s.; eight watch-keys, value 6 d.; seven seals, value 1 s. 6 d.; ten pair of gloves, value 1 l. 4 s., and eight umbrellas, value 5 l. 15 s. , the goods of Thomas Phelps .

WILLIAM PHELPS . I am the son of Thomas Phelps , who is an optician , and lives in Jewin-street - he has a shop under the Royal Exchange . On Saturday evening, the 18th of December, the shop was broken open. I went on Monday and got an officer to look at the shutter, and then went with him to my father's house to ask the apprentice what time he left the shop, as he had the keys, and used to lock it up. He told us that the prisoner had called there in the evening; he went with me and the officer to the Mansion House. We then went to look after the prisoner, but could not find him - we found Martha Parnell with whom he kept company; while we were in her apartments I saw three pair of gloves on the table; she went with us to her mother's lodgings. I asked her for the key of a box which was in her apartments? and asked her what was in in it? She said there were two silver pencil-cases, a silver toothpick, and a knife, and that they were given to her - we found them there as she stated; I knew the pencil-cases to be my father's. I then asked her if she knew any thing of the prisoner? She said he was to meet her at eight o'clock that evening. I said with her until the officer and apprentice apprehended him.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Have you any share in the business - A. Not in the business - I have in the premises. I am a carpenter.

THOMAS GROVE . I am apprentice to Mr. Phelps. On Saturday, the 18th of December, about six o'clock in the evening, I was going to shut up the shop under the Change, and heard somebody getting behind the outer gate. I took a light to see who it was. The instant the prisoner saw me he ran from behind the gate, and as soon as he got into Castle-alley he called out to somebody. In a few minutes he returned and asked me if I was going to shut up the shop? I said Yes, and he bid me good night. I shut up the shop, locked the outer gates, and went home. I am sure the prisoner is the man. I have seen him at the Change before.

Cross-examined. Q. How long have you known the prisoner - A. It may be about two months - I only know

him by his coming to the Change to inquire for a situation - I did not know his name. I never visited him.

Q. Did you know Parnell - A. About a week before the shop was broken open, he brought her to the Change to shew her to Mr. Mansfield, the soda-water man. That was the only time I ever saw her. The prisoner went by the name of Bryant at the Change.

ELIZA ATKINS . My husband is a labourer; I live at Greenwich. The prisoner is my brother - he brought the umbrellas to our house about a fortnight ago last Monday, I believe. He asked me to pawn two of them, which I did at Harker's and Graham's. I also pledged some gloves at Harker's, which I received from him. His name is Richard Carter .

MARTHA PARNELL . I live in Dunk-street, Whitechapel. On Sunday, the 19th of December, the prisoner gave me a pencil-case and toothpick as a present - he has visited me for the last twelve months; he also gave me a knife and a pencil-case to take care of for him. They were found there next day.

WILLIAM HARKER . I am a pawnbroker, and live at Greenwich. On the 20th of December Eliza Atkins pledged an umbrella and seven pair of gloves with me.

GEORGE GRAHAM . I am a pawnbroker, and live at Greenwich. On the 20th of December Atkins pledged an umbrella with me.

CHARLES MATTHEWS . I am an officer. On Monday morning I was sent for to the Exchange, and found the shop broken open - I told the gentleman it had not been done by a regular housebreaker. It appeared to have been done with a knife, and in a very awkward manner. I then went to the apprentice, searched him, and brought him to Mr. Wontner - he described the prisoner, and I apprehended him at a public-house in Dunk-street. He asked me what I took him for? I said I had some pencil-cases, and that the girl he was to meet at night could not meet him. I found a pencil-case and 23 s. on him; I also found an umbrella in the parlour where he had been; he said the umbrella was his sister's. He said he expected to be taken, and he would tell me all about it - I told him to say nothing about it. He said the man that was with him was to meet him that night, and that he had only 20 s. out of the property that was pawned at Greenwich. At Atkins's I found five umbrellas, the duplicates of the property, some watch-keys and seals, a knife, some silver pencil-cases, and a toothpick. I found a knife, two pencil-cases, and a toothpick at Parnell's, as she has stated.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Fined One Shilling , and Discharged.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18200112-34

242. CATHARINE ROOK was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of December , one pelisse, value 2 s. 6 d.; one pair of pattens, value 1 s., and one towel, value 1 s. , the goods of Henry Sims .

GRACE SIMS . I am the wife of Henry Sims , and am a laundress - we live in Red Lion-court, Cock-lane . These things hung in the passage, and were taken away about eleven o'clock in the morning.

JOHN STAUNTON . I lodge at Sims's. I was looking out of the window, and saw the prisoner come into our passage. I went down, stopped her as she was going out, and asked her what she had got? She said nothing but her own property, and immediately dropped these things on the ground.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was in liquor, and do not know how I came by them.

GUILTY . Aged 55.

Confined Three Months .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18200112-35

243. SAMUEL BEASLEY was indicted for stealing. on the 12th of December , one horse-cloth, value 18 d. , the goods of Robert Lambert .

ROBERT LAMBERT . On the 12th of December, I was at Leadenhall-market . My cloth was stolen off the horse of the Blackwall coach.

JOHN EVANS . I am watchman of Lime-street ward. About eight o'clock at night I stopped the prisoner in the market with the cloth. A man who looks after the horses, told me about seven o'clock that it was stolen; the prisoner said he found it. He was going towards Lime-street, about two hundred yards from where it was lost.

JOHN RICE . About a quarter before eight o'clock Evans brought the prisoner to the watch-house. He said he picked the horse-cloth up. I said he could not, for the cloth was quite clean, and it was a very dirty night. I had been watching him about the coach stand for an hour and a half.

JONATHAN BACKHOUSE . I attend the coaches in the market. I missed the cloth off the horse about seven o'clock.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I picked it up.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18200112-36

244. JOHN GODSELL was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of December , three stockings, value 3 s. , the goods of Joseph Carpenter .

BRYANT COFFEY . I am a watchman of Bishopsgate-street . On the 6th of December, about half-past nine o'clock at night, I saw the prisoner in the middle of the street, looking towards Mr. Carpenter's shop - I walked on the other side. He went over to the shop, and looked in at the window sometime, then stretched his hand out, and took some stockings from inside the door. I crossed, and took him into custody within twenty yards of the house. He pulled a stocking out of his trowsers, and said it was all he had. I took him back to the shop, and they missed a pair and a half; he said he took but one. I took him to the watch-house, and the officer found the pair in his hat.

THOMAS KEATS . I am servant to Joseph Carpenter . The stockings are his.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked them up.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18200112-37

245. FRANCIS LORD was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of December , four handkerchiefs, value 20 s. , the goods of George Wright .

WILLIAM COKER . I am shopman to Mr. George Wright , who is a linen-draper , and lives at Aldgate . On the 1st of December, about half-past one o'clock in the day, I heard a pane of glass break, and in about ten minutes I saw the prisoner cutting the putty away. I went out, collared him and he dropped the handkerchiefs at the door. I first saw him at a short distance from the window; he pretended he had hurt his knee, and hobbled across the road. I afterwards saw him cutting the putty, and took him.

LEAH ISAACS . I was going by, and saw the handkerchiefs drop from the prisoner's coat. I picked them up, and gave them to the prosecutor.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing of it.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18200112-38

THIRD DAY, FRIDAY, JANUARY 14.

246. FRANCIS MORRIS and ROBERT WALTERS were indicted for stealing, on the 20th of December , one coat, value 30 s. , the goods of Edward Jeggins .

MR. EDWARD JEGGINS . I am an assistant at a school . On Monday, the 20th of December, I lost my coat from Mr. Pimlett's, No 37, Spencer-street . Between ten and eleven o'clock in the morning, I was sitting in the parlour, and heard a knock at the door; the servant not being in the way, a child about four years old, opened it, and brought two or three apples in, saying, they were three dozen for 14 d., or 1 s. - he went out again, being told none were wanted. Not shutting the door, the lady with whom I was sitting went out, and shortly after she called me; I went and found my great coat had been taken. I ran out, pursued Morris by the direction I had given to me, and found him in the custody of Mr. Buckler, with the coat. Walters stood at the door with a sieve of apples.

MRS. MARY MACKEY . I was sitting in the parlour with Mr. Jeggins, and heard a knock; a child about six years old answered the door. I heard a voice say,

"Do you want any apples?" The child said No, shut the door, and came in. In about five minutes there was another knock, and a child about four years old opened the door. I heard a voice say,

"Here are three dozen for 14 d." The child brought two into me, and I said,

"We don't want any, take them to the boy, and shut the door." At that moment I heard the child say,

"Adone, don't take my father's coat." I went out, missed the coat, and saw the prisoner, Walters, at the door with the apples, and asked him if he saw any one take it? Instead of answering me, he said,

"Do you want any apples, Ma'am?" I wished to pass into the street, but he put his sieve of apples before me to prevent me. I again asked him if he saw any one take it? He said,

"Yes, but I am innocent, I know nothing of it." He appeared agitated. I detained him, thinking him guilty, and called Mr. Jeggins; Mr. Buckler pursued the boy towards Goswell-street, by my direction. I said to Walters,

"If you are innocent, I shall detain you until the boy is brought back." I saw a boy running, in appearance and statue like Morris.

HENRY BUCKLER . I heard the alarm of the coat being stolen. Mrs. Mackey directed me the way the boy had run, and I pursued him across Goswell-street-road into Pepper's-gardens - the coat was picked up by Cooper, and given to me; Morris was brought back to me in custody. On my return I found Walters was detained, and questioned him about it. He said he saw Morris take the coat, but did not know why he did not stop him. He afterwards said it was a taller boy than Morris that took it. The coat hung quite at the farther end of the passage from the door.

JAMES COOPER . I was crossing Pepper's-gardens, and saw Morris running with a blue coat under his arm - he nearly knocked me down; soon after there was a cry of Stop thief! upon which he threw the coat down, and I picked it up. A butcher secured him - I am sure he is the boy.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

MORRIS'S Defence. As I was going along Goswell-street, a young man was coming along, and dropped the coat. I hallooed after him, and said,

"You have dropped the coat," He said,

"Never mind, you may have it." I heard a cry of Stop thief soon after, and a butcher stopped me. I said I picked it up.

WALTER'S Defence. I am innocent.

MORRIS - GUILTY . Aged 16.

WALTERS - GUILTY . Aged 13.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18200112-39

247. WILLIAM CLARK was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of December , two sweetmeat-glasses, value 2 s. , the goods of Samuel Chevalier .

HANNAH CHEVALIER . I am the wife of Samuel Chevalier , who keeps a China-warehouse in Bath-place, New-road . On the 8th of December, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, I was in the parlour, and saw the prisoner stoop down, put his hand inside the door, and take these glasses off a shelf behind the door. I went to the door, called Stop thief! and pursued him - he let them fall. Two officers secured him. I am sure he is the boy.

GEORGE ROBINSON . I belong to Bow-street. I saw the prosecutor pursuing the prisoner. I turned down Henry-street, and Plank seized him - he said,

"I am not the boy."

SAMUEL PLANK . On the 8th of December I saw the prisoner running down the road. He threw something out of his hand, turned round, and I laid hold of him. He said,

"It was not me, I did not break the glasses."

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18200112-40

248. EDWARD WELSH , JAMES WRIGHT , ANN HALL , JAMES CONLEY , JAMES CAREY , WILLIAM BROWN , WILLIAM WOOD , HENRY BUCKNELL ,

JAMES MELVIN , HENRY JOHNSON , JOHN WILLIAMS , SARAH PALEY , SARAH WICKS *, JOHN PARSONS , JOHN STOREY , GEORGE PERRY , WILLIAM GARRATT , MARY KELLY , JAMES BRYANT , and CATHARINE MARTIN were severally and separately indicted for feloniously and without lawful excuse, having in their possession, forged Bank of England notes, they well knowing them to be forged .

To which indictments the prisoners severally and separately pleaded,

GUILTY .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Before Messrs. Justice Holroyd and Burrough.

Reference Number: t18200112-41

249. EDWARD WELSH , JAMES WRIGHT , ANN HALL , JAMES CONLEY , JAMES CAREY , WILLIAM BROWN , WILLIAM WOOD , HENRY BUCKNELL , JAMES MELVIN , HENRY JOHNSON , JOHN WILLIAMS , SARAH PALEY , JOHN PARSONS , JOHN STOREY , GEORGE PERRY , WILLIAM GARRATT , MARY KELLY , JAMES BRYANT , and CATHARINE MARTIN were again indicted for disposing of and putting away forged notes, with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England .

MR. REYNOLDS for the Prosecution, declined offering any evidence.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Messrs. Justices Holroyd and Burrough.

Reference Number: t18200112-42

250. JOSEPH SKELTON was indicted for the wilful murder of William Turney .

For the Prosecution, MR. ALLEY.

WILLIAM HUGHES . I and the deceased William Turney , were coal-heaver s, in the employ of a coal-merchant. On the 23d of December, about five o'clock in the evening, he and I were driving the waggon along Chandos-street, Covent-garden - the lamps were lit in the shops and street - the prisoner is a dustman ; he was fetching dust out of a house; his cart stood in the narrow part of the street, his horse's head was towards Covent-garden; he stood tolerably straight, the cart was between two or three feet from the pavement, and a potatoe-cart stood on the opposite side of the way.

Q. Were you able to pass with your waggon - A. There was not room. The deceased stopped, went to the prisoner, and asked him civilly to be so good as to move his cart a yard forwards. The prisoner said,

"No, d - n his eyes, there was room enough for any man that knew how to use his whip." The deceased said to me,

"Go on, Will; we can pass if any one can." Our waggon touched the hind part of the prisoner's cart, but did no injury. We passed both the dust and potatoe-carts without doing any injury. Immediately as we got past, the prisoner ran up, hit the deceased right and left, and knocked him under the wheel. I ran from the fore horse, which I had hold of, to save the deceased, and said to the prisoner,

"What did you hit him for?" he up with his fist, and knocked me against the horse of the potatoe-cart. Our horses, being young, went on before I could recover myself, and ran over the deceased.

Q. Had you done any thing to the prisoner before he hit you - A. No, I only asked what he hit the deceased for?

Q. If he had not struck you, could you have saved the deceased - A. I think he must have had one leg broken, but I should have saved his arm. I called to the horses to stop, and as I was taking hold of the deceased, I asked him what he hit him for? and he knocked me down. The horses went on; the fore wheel of the waggon went over his legs, and the hind and fore wheel over his arm. We took the deceased to the Westminster Infirmary. The prisoner must have seen the situation the poor man was in, when he struck me, he was not two yards from him. This was on Thursday, he died on Saturday morning.

JURY. Q. Did the prisoner know the deceased before - A. Not that I know of. He drove, and had the whip. The waggon had thirty-five sacks of coals in it.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. You had a team of young horses - A. Yes. We were near the end of Bedfordbury, which is the narrowest part of the street, and were going towards St. Martin's-lane.

Q. Did not your mate use very coarse language to the prisoner - A. Not that I heard.

Q. Did not somebody say to the deceased,

"I'd be d - d if I would not go on at any rate" - A. No. I had the fore horse, the deceased was at the wheel horse.

Q. When you passed the prisoner's cart, did not somebody cry out,

"Why you have almost killed a man" - A. Several cried out so when the deceased was ran over. Our waggon drove the hind part of his cart towards the houses. If our horses had not gone on this would not have happened. The whooping and hallooing would make them go on.

MR. ALLEY. Q. The cry of

"You have almost murdered a man!" was after the deceased was ran over - A. Yes. When the horses stopped the deceased laid just before the fore wheel. I could have saved him if the prisoner had not struck me.

JURY. Q. Could the prisoner have made room with his cart if he chose - A. Yes, and it was in his power to have helped the deceased up, if he had been so disposed.

MR. ANDREWS. Q. Did not your mate think there was room to pass as he went on - A. As the prisoner said there was room, my mate told me to go on, and said he would see if he could pass. There was not room - we hit his cart in going by.

COURT. Q. When you saw the horses going on again why not stop them - A. They stood still until he struck me, then the hallooing made them go on.

JAMES GORMAN . I am a bricklayer. I was in Chandos-street - the dust-cart stood on one side, and a potatoe-waggon on the other, which blocked up the street - there was not room for a waggon to pass between them; the dust-cart stood about fourteen inches from the curb, a sufficient space could have been made by moving it nearer to the pavement. The deceased went to the prisoner, and begged him to move on about a yard, and he would have room to pass; he spoke as civil us any man could, but all he could do he could not prevail on him, he refused. A Hammersmith stage-coachman got off his box, and asked him to move, he would not. The coachman went to move his horses a bit, and the prisoner knocked him under the horses' feet. At that moment the prisoner went in to

bring out some dust, taking no farther notice, and without moving his cart. The coachman was covered with mud; he got up, and asked which of the two dustmen had knocked him down? the prisoner said he was the man, and if he wanted any thing to come out into the street, and he would serve him the same again; the coachman then went away to his coach. The prisoner went, and fastened his horse's head down to the collar, he would not move his cart. He turned, and went into a cook-shop for dust, saying there was room enough for any man who knew how to use his whip. At that moment the deceased dragged his horses on slowly; the wheel of his waggon touched the wheel of the dust-cart, and brought the cart and horses round, and turned the horses's heads into the middle of the street, no mischief was done. The deceased was near the centre of his horses, and Hughes was at the horses' heads, leading them - the dust-cart was partly over the pavement. Several people were standing by; it was very near driving them through the window. The prisoner did not wait to put his cart right, but ran off after the deceased - the waggon was still going on, until it got about thirty yards down the street. The prisoner swore with an oath that he would knock him down; and as the hind part of the waggon was passing the fore horse of the potatoe-cart, he shot by between them, and came up to the deceased behind him - he touched him on the left shoulder, and as the deceased turned round, he gave him a violent blow, and knocked him right forward under the horses' feet; the horses were then going on - he fell under the nearest horse to the shaft horse. Hughes hallood to the horses to stop, they stopped for about half a second. The deceased cried out,

"For God's sake stop the horses!"

Q. How far was the prisoner from him then - A. Not a yard, I suppose. He had sufficient time to draw him from under the horses and save his life, if he liked, but he made no attempt to do it. Hughes left the fore horse immediately, came to the prisoner, and asked him what he did that for? he up with his fist and knocked him on the pavement - he went against the front of the houses, or he must have fallen.

Q. On your oath, might the prisoner have saved the poor man's life - A. In my opinion he could have done it if he had wished.

Cross-examined. Q. This happened in the narrow part of the street, near Bedfordbury - A. Yes; the accident happened there, but the dust-cart stood about thirty yards nearer to Covent-garden. The pavement is so narrow, that when the dust-cart swung round, it endangered the lives of the passengers. Some women cried out,

"You have nearly killed the people." Mr. White was in his shop, his window was not broken. I think there was not room for a person to pass between the tail of the cart and the houses - there is not room for more than two when there is no obstruction - the cart was turned round. The prisoner used bad expressions, and followed the deceased directly. The horses were going on when he struck him - they stood still at the instant he struck Hughes, the hallooing made them go on. The potatoe-cart was rather more towards St. Martin's-lane than the dust-cart; the horses' heads were both one way.

Q. The Hammersmith coachman used very coarse language - A. He said he must be at his destination at a certain time.

MR. ALLEY. Q. The potatoe-cart was quite close to the pavement unloading - A. Yes; if the dust-cart had been close there would have been plenty of room. The horses did not stop until the deceased fell. I declare the prisoner might have saved the man's life with all the pleasure in the world.

WILLIAM JEFFERSON . I am a constable. I was in Chandos-street, on the left-hand side of the way, coming from St. Martin's-lane. Just as I came by Bedfordbury I saw some confusion. I got about three doors past Bedfordbury, and saw the dust-cart with the ladder against the wheel - the foot of the ladder was against the curb-stone, to keep it from slipping. I had not time to observe any thing else, before the dust-cart turned short round - I could not pass, and crossed over, about thirty yards farther down towards St. Martin's-lane, and just as I came round the horses' heads of the coal-waggon, the prisoner came and struck at the deceased, who stood by the next horse to the shaft horse, the horses were then going on. The deceased called out,

"For God's sake stop the horses!" I called out,

"Bring a light!" the deceased laid close by the horses' feet, under the shaft horse. I turned to look at the prisoner, for he nearly hit me when he struck the deceased. Hughes came towards the prisoner, and said,

"What did you hit my mate for?" the prisoner up with his fist, hit him away from the horses' heads, and from his mate, as he was going to stop the horses.

Q. If the prisoner had not struck him from the horses might he not have stopped them - A. I should think he might. The horses instantly went on again, and I heard the man groan. I got a light, and saw him lying flat on his back, with his leg broken to pieces, his whip laid by him. I secured the prisoner with assistance. At that instant Hodge, the prisoner's partner, came up, and told him to bolt; for it was all wrong. I left the prisoner in custody of some people I knew. I took Hodge also.

Cross-examined. Q. You must have been as near the deceased when he fell as the prisoner was - A. I dare say I was. I was glad to get out of the way from the scuffle. I had no idea at that moment that he was in any danger, and thought he would have scrambled out of the way.

COURT. Q. Did you see Hughes come up to the prisoner - A. Yes, my Lord. The horses had been made to stop for a moment - the mischief was occasioned by their going on. Hughes called whoa! to the horses, and then went up to the prisoner.

LUKE FRANKLIN . I am a carpenter. I was standing in Mr. Bennett's shop, just opposite the tail of the coal-waggon. I heard a great confusion in the street, and saw the dust-cart at the cook-shop door. Somebody asked the dustman to move on. I came out, and heard one of the dustmen say, d - n their eyes, they would not move for any one. I came to the tail of the coal-waggon, a coachman was knocked down against me; I ran back to the shop, returned, and heard some one order the coal-waggon to drive on. I crossed over by the eating-house, and was driven into the door by the tail of the dust-cart. I

heard the prisoner use bad expressions, and say he would knock him down, or give him a downer. In a moment after I heard the deceased cry out,

"You have murdered me!" or

"I am murdered!" He laid with his arm over his head; his leg was crushed to pieces. I wiped the blood off his face, and helped to carry him to the hospital.

MR. HENRY BOND . I am house surgeon of the Westminster hospital. The deceased was brought in about six o'clock in the evening. I found him with a severe compound fracture of his left leg and left arm - amputation was performed. He lived until six o'clock on Friday evening. The injury he received was the cause of his death.

Prisoner's Defence. Jefferson has false-sworn himself.

MARY BAKER . I lodge in Chandos-street. I was looking out of window, and heard the deceased say he would go by. The Hammersmith coachman got off his box, and asked who the dust-cart belonged to? he said,

"D - n me if I don't see who it belongs to." He moved it to make room. There was an altercation between him and one of the dustmen. A man said,

"If I belonged to that waggon I would see if I could not pass or no." The deceased then said,

"D - n me if I don't go on." He whipped his horses violently, and they went very fast along, and his waggon turned the dust-cart furiously round - one or two persons on the pavement had nearly met with an accident from it, if White's door had not been open. The prisoner ran across after the waggoner - I saw nothing more.

GEORGE WHITE . I keep a cook-shop in Chandos-street - the dust was loading from my house. The prisoner was filling in my cellar, and the other dustman was minding the horse. The wheel of the cart was nearly a foot from the pavement. There was a potatoe-waggon nearly opposite my house. The coal-heaver asked the prisoner's mate to move, that he might pass; he refused until he had done, and said they were allowed twenty minutes. He fetched another basket up, and was again asked to move, but refused - he went down again. A coachman got off his box, and d - d and swore; he looked into my house, and said,

"Why don't you move this cart?" He began to abuse a man, and said,

"Why don't you move this cart?" The man said the cart was nothing to him. The coachman said, that unless he found the man that did belong to it he would move it himself. He went to the horse's head - the prisoner was underneath, and must have heard all that passed. He ran up and said,

"D - n me, the first man that moves my horse I'll knock him down." He rushed out, and the coachman came to my door covered with mud. I did not see him knocked down. I went out and told the prisoner to move away, and come another day for the dust. The prisoner immediately went to move his cart. He said he would move it for me, but not for them. He was just clearing from my window to move it, when it was jammed against my door. I crept out of my door, under the cart, after the coal-waggon, to take the number. I saw a woman with her hands up, screaming Murder! Just as I passed the waggon; I saw a man lying in the road; he appeared to have been ran over - he was carried away on a shutter. I took the name on the waggon, for running violently against my house and endangering peoples' lives. I have known the prisoner two years - he is an inoffensive man, and acted with forbearance.

MR. ALLEY. Q. Do you call it forbearance to knock the coachman down - A. I did not see him knock him down - he said he would.

JANE ISAACS . My father lives in Chandos-street. I saw the coal-waggon come up; there was not room for it to pass, the coachman said he would find a passage - he moved the cart. He said to the deceased,

"If I was you I would soon make the cart move." The deceased then said,

"D - n me, and so I will." He whipped his horses and went on; the wheel of his waggon turned the dust-cart round with great violence - several people expected. White's window would be broken. Jefferson said he had enough to do to save a woman's life. I afterwards heard a man was run over.

GUILTY. Aged 27.

Of manslaughter only .

Confined One Year .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

Reference Number: t18200112-43

251. THOMAS BROOPHY was indicted for killing and slaying Catharine , his wife .

MARGARET KINSLEY . I live in Nottingham-court, St. Giles's ; the prisoner and his wife lodged in the two pair back room. On Sunday, the 5th of December , about twenty minutes after one o'clock in the morning, the prisoner came home - his wife was within three weeks of being confined. He went up stairs, and had not been in the room five minutes before I heard a noise - I thought they were at words. I heard her say,

"Let him be." A child three years of age was in the room. After that, I heard something very heavy fall on the floor - in a few minutes his wife called out Murder! five or six times, in a low voice. She was in health; I had seen her about eight o'clock. I went up, and as I entered the room the prisoner stood with the door in his hand, which was open. I asked him what he had been doing? he said he had done nothing to her. She sat at the bed-side, on the floor; I went to her, and saw a quantity of blood under her and near her. She said the prisoner pulled her out of bed, that she fell on her back, and was much hurt. He was on the landing-place and could hear, but made no answer. She said she supposed it would bring on labour, and told me to shut the door and not let him in, as the floor was not in a fit state to be seen. I put her on the bed, the blood then increased very much. I called the landlady up. The prisoner was going down stairs before me, I hurried him down. Mrs. Gardener and I went up, the blood still kept increasing. She died in about three-quarters of an hour.

Q. Was the prisoner in the room before she died - A. Yes. She fainted; he came into the room with some liquor, and said,

"Come here, old woman, here is something to drink." He wanted to put the bottle to her month. I took it from him, and said she was dying, and that after he had ill-used her it was a poor recompence to make her drunk. He cried over her, tore his hair, and said he would not leave her. He appeared uneasy about her. The landlady brought the watchman; he said he would

not go with him, he would stay with his old woman - they took him away.

Q. While he was in the room did his wife say what had happened - A. No. He was in liquor.

ELIZA GARDENER . I live in the house, and was called in. The prisoner went out of the street-door. I saw the deceased, as Kinsley described, bleeding very much. I fetched the watchman and beadle. The prisoner was then sitting on the bed, crying over her. He said she was a hard-working woman, and had been carrying heavy loads to Covent-garden. She was speechles. He said he had done nothing amiss to her. The beadle said he must go with him; he said he would not leave his old woman. They persuaded him to go with them for the doctor. We called Mr. Burgess up, they took the prisoner to the watch-house. The prisoner always said she fell by the side of the bed, and he never knew she had received any harm until Kinsley came with a light. I know she was a passionate woman.

JOHN KENDRICK . I am a beadle. I was called to the house, and found the deceased speechless; the prisoner was leaning over her crying, and appeared distressed. There was a great deal of blood on the floor. I took him into custody.

JOHN SKEFFINGTON . I am a watchman. I was called in; the prisoner said he had done nothing to her.

JOSEPH BURGESS . I am a surgeon. I was fetched to the deceased; she was alive, but speechless, and dying, apparently, from the loss of blood - she was near her time. The impression on my mind was that she was flooding to death from the rupture of vessels within. I examined her for the purpose of delivering her, but found it impossible. I could discover no external bruise whatever. On opening her I observed a small fissure, or opening, near the urethra, which communicated with a branch of a large blood-vessel, from which the blood had discharged. She died from the loss of blood. At that advanced period of pregnancy the vessels are much extended, a blow or fall might have ruptured it, but I think not without one or other of them.

Q. It does happen at times - A. Yes, great exertions all day, and strong passion will do it, but I should rather attribute it to a blow or fall.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been drinking with my shopmates, she came to the public-house, and drank with us, we then went and bought different articles. She went home, and I stopped with a friend. I went home about a quarter before one o'clock, she was abed in her clothes, and began to blow me up for sing out. I said,

"If you blow me up I will go and walk the streets all night." My little boy said,

"Don't go, father" - I hit him a slap. She said,

"D - n you, don't murder him!" She jumped out of bed, and fell against the bedstead. I did not think she was hurt until the woman came up; I then went and got her some liquor. They said I must go to the watch-house; she held out her hand, and said,

"Tom, don't go with them."

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18200112-44

252. WILLIAM FRITH was indicted for that he, about the hour of eight o'clock in the night of the 18th of December , at St. John, the Baptist upon Wallbrook , the dwelling-house of Francis Gregg , Esq . there situate, feloniously and burglariously did break, and in the same dwelling-house, feloniously and burglariously did steal, 34 silver spoons, value 34 l., the goods of the Master and Wardens of the Guild or Fraternity of the Body of Christ of the Skinners of London ; 30 silver table forks, value 37 l.; 12 silver desert forks, value 9 l.; 12 silver table-spoons, value 14 l. 14 s.; eleven silver desert-spoons, value 7 l. 10 s.; nine silver tea-spoons, value 3 l. 10 s.; four silver salt-spoons, value 1 l.; one silver urn, value 80 l.; one silver pepper-stand, value 2 l, 12 s.; one pair of sugar-tongs, value 16 s.; one soup-ladle, value 6 s.; three gold mourning rings, value 1 l. 10 s.; one ivory scent-box, value 1 s.; five guineas; two half guineas; three seven shilling-pieces; one shilling; 90 l. in other monies numbered; one 40 l. Bank note, and 100 Bank notes for payment of and value 400 l., his property.

For the Prosecution, MR. ADOLPHUS.

FRANCIS GREGG , ESQ. I am a solicitor, and clerk to the Skinners' Company ; by virtue of my office I have a house on Dowgate-hill, in the parish of St. John the Baptist, Wallbrook - it is my own dwelling-house. I have a desk in my office, of which I keep the key myself, and in a drawer of that desk, of which I keep the key, are kept the keys of my own and the Company's iron chests, and other places where I keep my property. The company is designated right in the indictment.

Q. In your iron chest did you usually keep money - A. Yes, there was above 400 l. in Bank notes, also some guineas and half guineas, some foreign gold coins and seven shilling-pieces; there was also three mourning rings and a small ivory scent-box, all in the iron chest.

Q. In the Skinners Companys' iron chest, was there any plate belonging to them - A. A great deal; there was also a good deal of my plate in the pantry, such as silver spoons and forks, which were in use. I had a large silver cup or urn, which was presented to my father by the Company - it had an inscription on it; my father left it to me. It was kept in a red leather case in my dressing-room, up one pair of stairs, next to the pantry - it was under lock and key.

Q. Was the prisoner ever in your service - A. Yes, for six or seven years - he has left me about five or six years. I procured him a place in the Customs, which he left about a year ago. He had a complete knowledge of my premises, and knew where I kept my valuable property.

Q. Were you out of town on the 18th of December - A. I left town about twelve o'clock that morning. I arrived in town next day, and found every thing gone. The drawer, in which I keep my keys, was opened, and all the property mentioned in the indictment gone. I lost above 700 l. worth of property. The lock was wrenched off the urn-case, and the urn gone.

Q. In consequence of a message, did you afterwards see the prisoner at Coldbath-fields - A. I did, on Wednesday or Thursday after Christmas day. I neither threatened or promised him. I did not speak a word to him. I had never objected to his visiting my house.

ELIZABETH BARNES , I have the care of the prosecutor's house when the family are out of town. On the 18th of December they were all out of town, except my master

and the young gentlemen; they went that day. The prisoner frequently called at the house as an old servant of the family. On the 18th of December he came about noon, and asked if my master was going out of town? I told him the whole family were going except myself and Jane Newberry - we were left in the house alone that night.

Q. How long did he stay - A. Till about one o'clock - he left about an hour after. He said we need not let him out, for he could do that himself. He went up stairs and did not return, to my knowledge.

Q. At any time in the night did you think you heard any thing - A. As we went up stairs to bed about ten o'clock, Newberry observed that she heard a noise which she imputed to a strange cat; I did not hear it, and thought nothing of it, as she was timid; I shut up the house in the evening after dark, as usual - several persons came in the evening, but none but what I let out. The last person I let out was at about half-past nine o'clock. I then carefully shut all the doors and double locked and bolted them. I arose about twenty minutes after eight o'clock in the morning, and took a parcel to Gracechurch-street for the stage to take to my master's country-house at Case Orton. When I went out I found the doors on the single lock, but Newberry was up before me, so I thought she might have opened them, and did not notice it. A little after ten o'clock Newberry went into my master's office to clean it, as was usual on a Sunday morning; she called me, and I, observed some gold coin lying on the desk, and a key lying on some papers on the desk. My master's iron chest was open, and some canvas bags lying on the floor, empty. I immediately suspected thieves had been in the house, went up to the pantry where the plate is kept in a drawer, and found the drawer empty - the plate was all gone.

Q. Did you know whether it was there just before - A. I had not seen it that day. I went to my master's dressing room, and found the case which had the urn in it standing in the middle of the floor empty - I knew there was an urn in that case. I went down to a drawer in the kitchen where I had money for the use of the house, and found 4 l. in notes and 25 s. in silver and copper all gone; there was a red mark on one of them, which I had received from Sarah Mills , one of the servants - I cannot swear to it; I also missed a pound and a half of tea from the drawer. I then went into the cellar where the Company's plate-chest is kept, and found it open - I did not know what it contained. There were some things left.

JANE NEWBERRY . I was in the house with Barnes that night. As I was going to bed, about ten o'clock, I thought I heard a noise - it was like one of the hall chairs moving. I got up about eight o'clock in the morning, and did not open the street door before Barnes went out - nobody else was in the house. After breakfast I went to clean my master's office, and found the office door wide open, which I had locked at nine o'clock the night before. After Mr. M'Daniel had left the house, I had locked it, and left the key in it. On opening the shutters I found some gold lying on the desk, and papers scattered about, which was not so the overnight. I called Barnes, who came and saw the iron chest open. I have heard her account, and it is correct as she has stated it. There was no appearance of violence on my master's door, or the street door.

GREGORY EMERY . I am butler to Mr. Gregg; I had a silver urn in my list of plate, but never saw it - I had been nine months in his service. I left the house about noon on the 18th of December with my master - I had the care of the plate up to that time; he had the articles enumerated in the indictment, and two dozen and nine large table-spoons of the Skinners' Company. I went to town, on the Sunday in consequence of information of the robbery; I got there before my master - all the things were gone. I guess their value to be from 150 l. to 200 l. Nothing has been found that I can speak to.

WILLIAM SALMON . I am an officer of Middlesex. In consequence of the robbery, I was employed to go to the prisoner's house, No. 10, Nelson's-terrace, Hackney-road, on Monday, the 20th of December, about three o'clock in the afternoon. It consists of two rooms; I found an old woman below, he lives next door. The prisoner was in the upper room, on the bed, and appeared to be asleep; he was dressed. I ordered him to get up; the house is his. He got up and asked me what I wanted? I said I had a warrant to search his place, and would search him first. In his right-hand breeches-pocket I found two guineas in gold, 1 ls., and two sixpences. I asked him where he got the guineas? He said they were his own, and he had had them for several years. On searching him downwards, I found a guinea of George the First on the floor, and asked him if it was his? He said No, it was a plaything which his wife had given the child - Mr. M'Daniel was with me. I called the prisoner's wife up, and asked her if the guinea belonged to her? - he must have heard me. She said No; the prisoner then slipped by the side of me and went down stairs. I followed and secured him immediately, took him back and searched the room, but found nothing else there them. I took him down, searched the room below, and found two new pieces of stuff for gowns, and about eight yards of new flannel. I asked his wife, in his hearing, if they were hers? and where she bought them? She said she bought them on Saturday at a shop in Shoreditch. I told her that she must have bought them on Monday, but she insisted that it was Saturday, and said she would not tell me the shop she bought them at, but I must find it out - Mr. M'Daniel was in a small yard, belonging to the house, at this time; he brought a small canvas bag in, and said, in the prisoner's presence,

"Here is something, I have found this under the tiles over the privy.". I asked him if he had examined it? He said he had not, and I opened it in the presence of them all; it contained two guineas, two half guineas, three seven shilling-pieces, three gold mourning rings, and an oval ivory scent-box. I asked the prisoner if they belonged to him? He said No, he knew nothing about them. I took him before J. E. Conant, Esq., that night, and after a slight examination he was committed.

Q. When did you go to his house again - A. Some few days after - his wife was in custody at the time; Eliza Grew , who is present, had the care of the house. In the chimney-piece of the upper room, between two bricks, I found two guineas and two half guineas in a small piece of paper - Mr. M'Daniel was present. I have kept them ever since.

JOHN M'DANIEL . I am clerk to Mr. Gregg. On Saturday,

the 18th of December, I left the office about eight o'clock in the evening; I gave Elizabeth a parcel to take to the stage in the morning, and told her I was going - Newberry opened the door to receive the parcel, and I went away; there is a door between the office and the house. I am certain I closed the door - it has a spring lock, and cannot be opened from the office side without a key - I pushed it to, and tried it; it merely communicates between the house and the office. After that I pulled the office door to which leads into the passage; I shut that, and tried it - it was quite fast. I then came to the hall gate, which has a spring lock, pulled that to, and tried it - it was fast.

Q. That is the outer door of the whole of Skinners' Hall - A. Yes, and after that there is an iron gate, which I pulled to - any one can open that, but you cannot get into the house without opening three strong doors, all of which were secured with spring locks. Any one can get out of the house with ease, but nobody can get in - there is no keyhole outside, so that the lock cannot be picked. Nobody can get in without force.

Q. On Monday did you accompany Salmon to the prisoner's house - A. Yes, he has stated correctly what passed - I went into the yard, and looked under the files of the privy, put my finger into a small hole, and pulled out a bag, which I took in immediately, and did not open it, till Salmon did in the prisoner's and his wife's presence. It contained three mourning rings, a scent-box, some guineas, and some smaller gold.

ELIZABETH GREW . I live at No. 9, Nelson's-terrace, next door to where the prisoner lived. On Sunday, the the 19th of December, the prisoner's wife called me in and paid me 1 s. for sprats, which she had bought of me in the course of the week. The prisoner gave me a guinea to fetch some liquor; I brought a pint of gin, and gave the change to his wife. On that Monday, before I got the gin, she gave me four half guineas to go to a pawnbroker's, in the Minories, to redeem some bombasin. The pawnbroker refused them as being light, and said he would take them at 9 s. each - the prisoner was taken up while I was gone.

Q. Next day, did the prisoner's wife give you any money - A. On Tuesday I went to wash for her; she gave me half a guinea to fetch liquor, which I did, and gave her the change. On the day she was taken into custody, which was on the Monday after Christmas-day, she gave me a guinea to go to Mitchell's, in Hackney-road, to redeem two table-cloths and a sheet, which were pledged for 12 s. I redeemed them, and gave her the change. I never pledged for her. After she was taken I was left in care of the house and child, by Mr. M'Daniel. While I was in the house, no one ever came into it but my mother, who came to sleep with me.

Q. Did you know any thing of the guineas being concealed among the bricks - A. No; the officer came and found some on the Thursday evening.

JOHN HALL . I am servant to Mr. Mitchell, who is a pawnbroker, and lives in Hackney-road. I have known the prisoner and his wife about six months; they very often came to our house to pledge and redeem - they pledged for various amounts. I have known them pledge for 5 s., and lower. The highest I recollect was a silver watch for 25 s. Grew redeemed a sheet and table-cloth for 12 s., and gave me a guinea for that purpose.

SAMUEL FISHER . I am shopman to Mr. Cater, who is a linen-draper, and lives in Finsbury-place. I know the prisoner's wife; I saw her once - she bought eight yards of flannel, eight yards of stuff, which, I believe, was purple, and four yards and three-quarters of plaid, on Monday, the 20th of December; they came to 37 s. 9 d., she gave me a 1 l. note and a guinea, which I gave to Mr. Cater. He afterwards gave the same note to Salmon; I have seen it since in his possession, it is the note I took of her - (looks at one produced by Salmon) - it is the same, I am positive, by the name on the back, which I wrote with pencil at the time it was paid. There is a sufficient trace for me to know it - I put my initials on it.

MR. M'DANIEL. My initials are on the note in red ink; it must have been in my possession. I cannot say what I did with it. I am frequently in the habit of receiving drafts for the prosecutor.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Then, my Lord, I will withdraw this note from the prosecution.

WILLIAM SALMON re-examined. I produce the mourning-rings and scent-box, which Mr. M'Daniel found in the tiles of the privy, and gave to me.

MR. GREGG re-examined. I know the rings - one is my father's mourning-ring, the others are my wife's mother and a sister. The scent-box is mine, and was in the iron chest.

MR. WILLIAM ADKINS . I am Governor of the House of Correction, Coldbath-fields, the prisoner was in my custody. On the 30th of December the turnkey brought me a message, in consequence of which I sent for Mr. Gregg, who came - he and I saw him in my house. No promise, threat, or inducement whatever was held out to him. I said,

"Here is Mr. Gregg." The prisoner then said,

"I wish to make a full confession respecting the robbery" - he was in my custody for this robbery. He said, that on the Saturday of the robbery he went to the prosecutor's house in the morning, and came away at one o'clock in the day. He said the robbery was committed by him, and a man named John William Kemp ; that he had known Kemp sometime, and that Kemp had frequently asked him to rob his master, but he never could make up his mind to do it until that time. He said he went on Saturday night to Mr. Gregg's between seven and eight o'clock, got over the iron gate, and went through the yard down to the passage door, which was shut - he lifted up the latch, went in, and concealed himself in the house until after the servants were gone to bed, he then let in Kemp, who proceeded to break open the drawers. I asked him what he broke them open with? he said with a piece of iron, rather bent at one end, but he did not recollect what he called it. I said,

"Did he call it a jemmy?" he said Yes. He said Kemp opened a drawer, and took some keys which belonged to the iron chest; that they proceeded to another room, where there was an urn, and after he had got the urn Kemp went away with it and some other things to Kemp's house, No. 7, Gibraltar-row, St. George's-fields. I asked him how long Kemp was away before he returned? he said about an hour; that he came back, he let him in again, and they proceeded to take away the

plate and other things; that they left the house a little after twelve o'clock, and took a coach in Cheapside to go to Kemp's house. They stopped in Blackfriars-road to get some rum, and then went to Kemp's house with the property - he had more rum there, and came home. He said he brought away from Kemp's, I think, nine or ten guineas, and that the gold which was found on him, the gold he had parted with, and the gold and the rings that were found, were part of the property stolen from Mr. Gregg's. He was asked about the notes, he said that was all he had - that the rest was left at Kemp's. I think he said he never saw any notes. Kemp was apprehended that day, and discharged.

MR. GREGG re-examined. I have heard this account; it is perfectly correct.

JOHN M'DANIEL re-examined. On the 30th of December I was in the yard of the House of Correction, Mr. Gregg was in the Governor's house, the prisoner was coming out of the house, and met me in the yard. He said,

"Well, Mr. M'Daniel, I have told the whole truth, I have confessed to all." I said I was glad to hear it; he immediately replied,

"I hope Mr. Gregg will grant me a free pardon - do you think he will?" I said it was impossible for me to say. I then asked him what had become of all the property?

Q. Did you promise him any thing - A. No; he said he had mentioned the name of the party who had it. I asked him if he had remained in the house from the time he was there in the afternoon of the Saturday? he said, No, he came in the evening, about seven o'clock; that he came into the passage leading to the office, and got over the iron gate, and tore his coat in getting over; that he then crossed the yard, went to the area steps, found the kitchen door shut, and opened it, but did not shut it again; he went up stairs, and secreted himself in the house until the servants were gone to bed; he then let in Kemp, and they effected the robbery.

JURY. Q. I thought you said it was impossible for any one to get in after you left - A. The time he spoke of was full an hour before I left, and before the house was fastened.

Prisoner's Defence (written). My Lord, and Gentlemen of the Jury, I do not pretend to deny the charge, but beg leave to state the inducing cause to commit so base an act. About nine years ago I became acquainted with a person of the name of Kemp, whom I understood to have some property, and also acted as an attorney at law, and during that time I have occasionally spent the evening with him at some public-house. Many times, during that period, he has very urgently solicited me to rob my master's house, and by repeated persuasion I at last unfortunately complied, for which I feel the greatest remorse and contrition. After we had committed the robbery we went to Kemp's house, sent for liquor, and we drank together until I was made quite insensible. Kemp kept all the property, except that found on my person and premises. The robbery was done on the 18th of December, on Saturday night. I was to have met Kemp on the following Thursday, but I was taken up on the Monday previous, consequently I cannot assist my prosecutor in the recovery of his property, which I am very sorry for. I sincerely beg the forgiveness of my prosecutor, and for the mercy of this Court.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 30.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200112-45

FOURTH DAY, SATURDAY, JANUARY 15.

253. SAMUEL DEAN was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of December , one goose, value 6 s. , the goods of John Wright .

JOHN WRIGHT . I am a cheesemonger and poulterer , and live in Lamb-street, Spitalfields . On the 23d of December, about nine o'clock at night, four dead geese laid in my window. I was cutting some bacon, and heard the cry of Stop thief! I ran towards the door, two boys said a boy had stolen a goose from my window, and that he was coming towards the door again. I collared the prisoner, they said that was him. I asked him how he came to take the goose? he said he did not. The patrol came by, and I gave him in charge; he then said he had 3 s. in his pocket, if I would take that and send to his father, he would pay the rest for the goose - I said I would do no such thing. One of his comrades picked the goose up after he threw it down, and ran off with it.

JOHN DILLON . My master keeps a potatoe-warehouse in Spitalfields. Baxter and I were going up Lamb-street, and saw the prisoner take the goose from the window, and throw it down at the corner of the street; he then turned round, and ran over the way, we followed him. He said,

"What is the matter?" I said,

"You took the goose;" he said it was not him. We collared him, and gave him to the prosecutor. Another boy picked the goose up.

MORRIS BAXTER . I was with Dillon, and saw the prisoner take the goose off the window, and throw it down at the corner. We collared him - I am sure he is the boy.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing of it.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18200112-46

254. MICHAEL FOGARTY was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of December , one hat, value 9 s. , the goods of Thomas North .

ISAAC NORTH . I am shopman to Thomas North , who is a hatter , and lives in Holborn . On the 15th of December, about five o'clock in the evening, a person stepped into the shop, and took a hat off the rail - he kept his face towards the street. I pursued him up Featherstone-buildings, and lost him; I found the prisoner at Eagle-street watch-house with it. I believe him to be the man by his make, shape, and dress.

JOHN WADE . I was coming up Featherstone-buildings, heard the alarm, and stopped the prisoner; who was running with the hat.

CURTIS CROFTON . I saw Wade secure the prisoner; he threw the hat behind him - a person picked it up, and was going off with it. I took it from him.

Prisoner's Defence. A man knocked me down, and swore I took the hat.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Confined One Month , and Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18200112-47

255. HENRY WICKS was indicted for that he, on the 2d of November , at St. Mary le Bow , feloniously did dispose of and put away a certain forged and counterfeit Bank note, which is as followeth: (setting it forth, No. 51772, for payment of 10 l., dated September 22, 1819, signed F. Kensall,) with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England , he well knowing it to be forged and counterfeit .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only calling it a promissory note for the payment of money, instead of a Bank note.

TWO OTHER COUNTS, the same, only stating the prisoner's intent to be to defraud one John William Greaves .

The prisoner pleaded

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 21.

Before Messrs. Justices Burrough and Holroyd.

Reference Number: t18200112-48

256. WILLIAM PALEY was indicted for that he, on the 28th of September , at St. James, Clerkenwell , feloniously did dispose of and put away, a certain forged and counterfeit Bank note for the payment of 5 l. - (setting it forth, No. 7255, dated July 5, 1819. Signed R. Clough) - with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England , he well knowing it to be forged and counterfeit .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only calling it a promissory note for the payment of money, instead of a Bank note.

THIRD AND FOURTH COUNTS, the same, only stating his intent to be to defraud one Joseph Aldridge .

After the Jury were charged with the prisoner, and the case against him partly opened by Mr. Reynolds, he stated his wish to withdraw his plea of Not Guilty to this indictment, and to plead Guilty. The Court asked Mr. Reynolds if he objected to the Jury being discharged of the prisoner, and for him to plead Guilty? Mr. Reynolds replied, that he did not object, but at the same time he wished it to be understood that it was without any communication with the prosecutors. The Learned Recorder reminded him that if he pleaded Guilty it would be his duty to report him from the deposition made against him before the Magistrate, without any circumstance in extenuation or mitigation of his offence. The Learned Judge enquired if this application had been suggested to the prisoner by any one, and he replied that it had not. The Jury were accordingly discharged of the prisoner, who pleaded,

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 28.

Before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

Reference Number: t18200112-49

257. WILLIAM SAUL was indicted for that he, on the 18th of December , at St. James, Clerkenwell , feloniously did dispose of and put away, a certain forged and counterfeit Bank note, for the payment of 1 l. - (Setting it forth No. 17750, dated October, 5, 1819. Signed E. Staple) - with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England , he well knowing it to be forged and counterfeit .

SECOND COUNT, for feloniously offering to one George Best , a like forged and counterfeit Bank note, with the like intent, knowing it to be forged.

THIRD AND FOURTH COUNTS, the same, only calling it a promissory note for the payment of money instead of a Bank note.

FOUR OTHER COUNTS, the same, only stating his intent to be to defraud the said George Best .

For the Prosecution, MESSRS. REYNOLDS and BOLLAND.

GEORGE BEST . I am a cheesemonger , and live in Goodge-street, Tottenham-court-road. On the 18th of December, between ten and eleven o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came to my shop, and bought a piece of pork, which came to 2 s. 4 d. He tendered me a 1 l. note. I took it up, looked at it, and said,

"Pray, Sir, where did you get this note?" He immediately said,

"If you don't like it here is another." I said,

"I like this note perfectly well, and you as well - I shall take both you and the note." The moment I spoke he bolted out, through fourteen or fifteen people, who were in the shop; there was an immediate cry of stop thief! and four or five people pursued him out of the shop. Welch, my man, was among them.

Q. How was he dressed - A. He had a great coat and a close coat, and an umbrella in his hand; when he was brought back to the shop he had only his close coat on, and his great coat was across his shoulder or under his arm - he had no umbrella then. I gave him in charge, and the watchman said he would take him into the parlour to search him, but he said he would not be searched without a warrant.

Q. When he gave you the note, what did you do with it - A. I put it between my lips, kept it there until he was brought back, and then wrote my own name and address on it - (looks at one) - this is it.

JURY. Q. By what means did you ascertain it to be forged - A. Because I have been a great sufferer. I have taken 45 l. in forged notes. I suspected this by the paper - it was like some I had taken.

JAMES EATON . I am a shoemaker. On the 18th of December, about half-past ten o'clock at night, I was passing along Windmill-street, Tottenham-court-road, and heard the cry of Stop thief! in John-street, which leads into Windmill-street, and is about two minutes walk from Goodge-street. I arrived at the corner of John-street, and saw the prisoner run out from St. John-street towards Charlotte-street - he had no coat on at all, but was in his shirt-sleeves. I ran after him, collared him, and to the best of my recollection he asked me what I collared him for? I said he would presently see. In a few minutes Mr. Best's man and some others arrived. I took him down John-street, and we met some people with two coats, which the prisoner claimed as his, and insisted on putting one of them on - he took the other under his arm. I took him back to the shop; he asked for his umbrella, but none was produced - the watchman was called in, and attempted to search him, but he refused to be searched without a warrant; we took him to Pancras watch-house, Cleveland-mews. The constable of the night asked him what his name was? He said,

"That is nothing to you, I'll tell your master" - he gave no account of himself in my hearing. I and Howard, the constable, went to the spot where I took him, and found two half crowns and 1 s. lying on the curb there - it was good money. I suppose twenty

minutes had elapsed after I had seized him, before we got there.

HENRY HOWARD . I am constable of St. Pancras. I took the prisoner, searched him, and found a good 1 l. note on him. He at first refused to be searched, and said I had no authority; I said I should do it without authority; he refused to give me either his name or address. Eaton pointed out the spot where he took him. I found a good shilling there, and Eaton found more money.

THOMAS GLOVER . I am an inspector of Bank notes, and have been so twenty-six years. The note is forged in every respect; it is not the impression of the Bank, nor the hand-writing of E. Staple, whose signature it purports to bear. The Bank water-mark is made in the paper, but this is done after.

JURY. Q. How do you ascertain that - A. By experience. The Bank paper has a different feel, and is different altogether.

(The note was then put in and read.)

Prisoner's Defence. I went there to buy pork, pulled two notes out and gave his wife one; she gave it to Best to look at, and said she believed it to be good - I had another. He said he should detain that and me. I ran out, as I could not bear the thoughts of a watch-house, and a man caught me. They wanted to search me; I said the watchman might, but he did not offer. I had no coat on when I was taken to the watch-house, I said I would tell my name when Best came, which I did. I gave my right name and address, I did not know the note was forged, and had no silver about me.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 20.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

Reference Number: t18200112-50

258. SARAH WICKS and ANN PITCHER were indicted for that they, on the 21st of December , at St. James, Clerkenwell , feloniously did dispose of and put away a certain forged and counterfeit Bank note, for the payment of 1 l - (setting it forth No. 60546, dated Nov. 26, 1819. Signed J. Vantiv) - with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England , they well knowing it to be forged and counterfeit .

SECOND COUNT, for offering to one Thomas Scaife , a like forged note, with the like intent, knowing it to be forged.

THIRD AND FOURTH COUNTS, the same, only calling it a promissory note for the payment of money, instead of a Bank note.

FOUR OTHER COUNTS, the same, only stating their intent to be to defraud Samuel Hoskins .

Counsel as before.

THOMAS SCAIFE . I live with Mr. Hoskins, in High-street, Shadwell. On the 21st of December, about three o'clock, or a little after, the prisoners came to the shop, and asked to look at some Irish linen? They both looked at it and spoke about it; they bought three yards of that, and three yards of print, which came to 6 s. 6 d. together. Wicks laid down a 1 l. note to pay for them. I asked her name and address? and she gave me,

"Powell, 2, Church-street, St. George's, Shadwell," which I immediately wrote on the note with a pencil, and gave it to William Curtis , our boy, to get change. He went out, returned, and went into the parlour to Mr. Hoskins - he brought no change - (looks at the note) - this is it. It has the pencil writing on the face. I afterwards wrote it in ink at the office on the examination. It is the note Wicks paid me that day.

Prisoner PITCHER. Q. Did I stand close to her when she gave her address? Did I not stand close to the door - She stood close by her and both spoke and acted together - they both acted in the purchase. When the note was put on the counter she was gone to the door, but she returned directly, before I had finished taking the address.

Q. How far was she from Wicks - A. About three or four yards - the note laid on the counter, and I was writing on it. I do not think she was present when Wicks paid me the note, but when she gave me the address she was, She was not a moment at the door - the note was paid while she went to the door. She must have seen it when I was writing on it, as she stood where she did before, and saw me give it to the boy to get change. When the boy returned Mr. Hoskins came out of the parlour, asked her whether she could pay for the things? and asked them where they got the note? - it was said that it was suspected to be a bad one; I did not hear what else passed. Wicks asked for the goods when they came into the shop.

WILLIAM CURTIS . I am apprentice to the prosecutor, and remember the prisoners coming to the shop - they made a purchase. Scaife gave me a 1 l. note to get change. I took it out to a person, named Butler, but did not get it changed there. I took it to two other places, and at last to Mr. Dorvell's young man - they did not change it because it was forged. I took it to Mr. Dorvell, himself, who gave his opinion that it was forged, and accompanied me to my master's. I went into the parlour to Mr. Hoskins, and gave him the note; he went into the shop to Mr. Dorvell, where the prisoners were. I did not lose sight of the note until I brought it back.

SAMUEL HOSKINS . I live at No. 222, High-street, Shadwell. William Curtis brought a note into the parlour to me, I immediately went into the shop, and asked the prisoners where they got it? Wicks said she got it last night from a gentleman. I asked her the gentleman's name? She said she did not know. I then asked them both where they came from? They both said they lived in Black Lion-court, Tooley-street, or No. 29, Morgan's-lane, which I wrote on the note - this is it - (looking at it) - Pitcher said the place was called by both names. I wrote it on the note, and said it was a pity Wicks had given a false address, as I saw my young man's writing on the back,

"Powell, Church-street, St. George's." Pitcher then said it was a pity she had given a false address. I asked them if they had any more of these notes about them? and if they were willing to be searched? Pitcher said,

"I don't care who searches me," and turned out her pockets - there was nothing in them but a key, that I saw. I said I would detain the note, and if it proved to be a good one in the morning, I would give them the change, but if it was bad they would hear further from me. Pitcher went away and never returned. Wicks remained a little, then sidled out of the shop, and went away, leaving the note with me.

Prisoner PITCHER. Q. You asked me if I could send for some one to pay for the goods. I went out to pledge for them - A. I cannot say I recollect it - it might be.

GEORGE DORVELL . I live at No. 215, High-street, Shadwell, and am a linen-draper. Curtis brought me a note. In consequence of suspicions I had of it I went to the prosecutor's, and found the prisoners in the shop; the prosecutor came from the parlour, and I told him, in their presence and hearing, that the note was forged. He said it was a pitty she had given a wrong address, and wished them to leave the note. I said I had no doubt but they were common utterers. The prosecutor took the address from Pitcher, and detained the note. Pitcher said she would go out and pledge her ring, and pay for the goods; she went out, and in a little while after Wicks followed her; I followed Wicks out. When she got to the door she did not not know which way to turn, but looked one way and then the other, as if for the other prisoner. I directed her towards my own house, being determined to apprehend her. As we were going along Pitcher came out of a pawnbroker's within one door of my own, and they joined company together immediately. I asked them to step into my shop, as I wished to have some conversation with them. I then sent for an officer, and had them apprehended.

Q. Did you have any conversation with them - A. I had - Wicks said she got it from a man with whom she had been in the habit of cohabiting - they did not know I had sent for an officer. I wrote on a piece of paper,

"Go for Hewitt," gave it to my boy, and said,

"Go for Jackson, and see if my hat is done.

Prisoner PITCHER. Q. Did you know me before - A. I have seen her at the shop about two years ago - I cannot say I have had dealings with her.

SARAH SIMONS . My husband lives in Ratcliff-highway, and is a haberdasher; our shop is about ten minutes walk from the prosecutor's. On the 21st of December, before three o'clock, the prisoners came to my shop - it was nearer three than two. Wicks asked for womens' stockings; Pitcher stood by her. They both looked at them, and bought two pair at 18 d. each.

Q. Who purchased - A. Both looked at them, and talked about them, respecting whether they were large enough. Wicks produced a 1 l. bank note - Pitcher stood by her at the time. I asked Wicks for the address? and she gave me

"Mrs. Smart, No. 2, Fort-place, Bermondsey" I should imagine it was in Pitcher's hearing.

Q. On Wicks giving you the address did Pitcher make any remark - A. No. I wrote on the note before them - this is it - (looking at it) - Pitcher was persuading Wicks to buy a stuff dress, but she said she could not afford it that day, and she would call again. I gave 17 s. in change - I believe Wicks took it; one of them took the stockings away.

Prisoner PITCHER. Q. Did I not stand at the door the while - A. Not the whole of the time. They came in together, and talked about the stockings; Pitcher afterwards went to the door, and returned; the door is a very few yards from where Wicks stood. She was scarcely a moment at the door, she only looked at some stuffs, came back before the address was given, and was present when it was given.

THOMAS HOWARD . I live with William Sharman , who is a linen-draper, and lives at Ratcliff-highway. On the 21st of December, between two and three o'clock, the prisoners came and looked at some stuffs at the door. I went to the door, and asked them to come in? which they did; one of them bought four yards and a half, or four yards and a quarter, of stuff. Both looked at it and both agreed to purchase; to the best of my recollection I delivered the stuff to Pitcher - the person to whom I gave the stuff, paid me for it with a 1 l. note; it came to 6 s., and I gave the change to the same person - I believe it was Pitcher; I did not ask for a name or address, as I had not the least suspicion of its being forged. I gave it to William Sharman and saw no more of it; our house is about twenty doors from Simons's; we deal in Irish and stockings. They could have bought both at our house if they chose. I do not know whether the note was bad or not.

Prisoner PITCHER. Q. Will you swear I gave you the note - A. Yes, and I asked you to buy a cloth shawl? but you said you could not - Did I think you had been on the highway? I said,

"You are on the highway now."

WILLIAM HEWITT . I am am an officer of Shadwell. I was sent for to the prosecutor's, and found the prisoners there. I searched them, and found two half-crowns, 1 s., and 6 d. in copper on Pitcher; also a duplicate for 6 s. I saw Morris search Wicks, but nothing was found on her - there was no silver, stockings, black stuff, linen, or any thing. There is no such street as Church-street, St. George's - I have known the parish twenty years.

MICHAEL MORRIS . I am an officer. I went with the last witness to the prosecutor's, and searched Wicks; I found nothing on her but a knife and the ring of an umbrella, no silver or goods.

CHARLES STANLEY . I am collector of St. George's district, and have been so ten years. There is no Church-street, but there is a Church-road. I do not know the prisoners, and never knew them to live there - there are sixty or seventy houses. I collected from them all formerly. I live within a quarter of a mile from the place, and never knew them.

JOHN HENFREY . I live at No. 2, Fort-place, Bermondsey. On the 21st of December, no Mrs. Smart lived there, or either of the prisoners.

RICHARD WALKER . I live at another No. 2, Fort-place, Bermondsey, no Mrs. Smart lived there, nor either of the prisoners.

ELIZA TERRY . I live at No. 2, George-road, near Fort-place - it is in a line with it. In December last neither of the prisoners, nor any Mrs. Smart lived there.

THOMAS GLOVER . I am an inspector of Bank notes. The note is forged in all its parts, paper, plate, and signature, and is not Vantiv's signature, which it purports to be. The water-mark is put in after the paper is made. The other note is forged in every respect; both are impressed from the same plate, and both dated the same.

JAMES VANTIV . I am a signing-clerk at the Bank, of 1 l. and 2 l. notes. There is no other of my name. This is not my signature.

(The note was then put in and read.)

PITCHER'S Defence. Wicks lodged with me. On the morning it rained, she asked me to purchase some things. I said I was going to Blackwall, she said that road would do. We bought the stockings, and afterwards some black

stuff. She met a person she knew, and I left them together; she gave her the bundle, and paid her some money, as she said. When I saw her pay another note, I said,

"Sarah, where did you get all these notes?" She said,

"I got them last night from a gentleman."

WICKS - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 21.

PITCHER - NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18200112-51

259. JAMES GAFFNEY was indicted for that he, on the 3d of January , at St. James, Clerkenwell , feloniously did dispose of and put away a certain forged Bank note for payment of 1 l. (setting it forth, No. 75112, dated 22d June, 1819), with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England , he well knowing it to be forged and counterfeit .

SECOND COUNT, for feloniously offering to Mary Stephens a like forged note, with the like intent.

THIRD AND FOURTH COUNTS, the same, only calling it a promissory note for payment of money, instead of Bank note.

FOUR OTHER COUNTS, the same, only stating his intent to be to defraud James Poor .

Counsel as before.

JAMES POOR . I keep the Barley Mow, public-house, Drury-lane . On the 3d of January, about eight o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came to my house with two other men; he said he wanted something to drink, if I could change a note - they ordered three glasses of gin; the prisoner gave a note to my bar-maid, who immediately handed it to me. I asked his name and address; he said

"Wilson, Clare-market." I asked what part of Clare-market? he said,

"No 12, Haughton-street;" which I wrote on the note - (looks at it) - this is it. I said it was a bad one, and asked him where he got it? he said he had it from his master, in Chancery-lane, and wanted it back again. I said I should detain him and the note, but if he had taken it of his master he would be in no danger; he refused to tell what part of Chancery-lane his master lived in. Dallas, the street-keeper, came in and detained him till Edwards came. He borrowed sixpence of one of the men, to pay for the gin he had had. He wanted at first to go away, but Dallas prevented him.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. When he went to Bow-street he told you who he was - A. Yes.

ALEXANDER DALLAS . I am the street-keeper. I went into Poor's house, and saw the prisoner and two more with three glasses of gin at the bar; the prisoner handed a 1 l. note to the bar-maid, she gave it to Poor, who asked his name and address - he said,

"Wilson, Haughton-street, Clare-market;" which Poor wrote on the note, and said it was bad; he said he had it from his master, in Chancery-lane. He wanted to go away, saying, he must see about it. I said he must not go, and asked Poor if he had sent for anybody - he said he had. The prisoner then seemed very impatient, said the person was not coming, and he should go; and asked what right I had to stop him. I collared him, said I was an officer, and if he offered to stir I would knock him down. Edwards came in, and we took him to Bow-street. The prisoner asked one of the men to pay for the gin, which he did, with sixpence.

Cross-examined. Q. Was he drunk - A. He appeared perfectly sober. He said at Bow-street, that he had sixpence in his pocket.

THOMAS EDWARDS . I am an officer. I was called in to Poor's, and took the prisoner in charge. I asked him where he got that note? he said,

"What is that to you? I shan't tell you where I got it." I took him before the Magistrate. He said he would tell the Magistrate where he got it. I searched him seven or eight hours after, and found only a penny on him.

ANN WHITING . I live at No. 12, Haughton-street, Clare-market; the prisoner never lived there - I do not know him.

WILLIAM WOOD . I am clerk to the magistrates of Bow-street. I remember the prisoner being examined there, and took down what he said - he said it voluntarily; it was read over to him, and he said it was correct - (reads). The prisoner says,

"This afternoon I picked up a woman's pocket in Drury-lane - it contained a 1 l. note and a 5 s. piece. I changed the 5 s. piece at the Sun, public-house, in Clare-market, and spent 4 s. 6 d. Two women were there, and Smith, a master-butcher, went with me to the prosecutor's - he was going to treat me; I thought I would treat him, as he had treated me several times. There was a thimble and a needle in the pocket, which I threw away."

THOMAS GLOVER . I am an inspector of Bank notes. The note is forged in every respect, and is not Stock's signature.

NATHANIEL STOCK . I am a signing clerk. The note is not signed by me.

(The note was then put in and read.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was intoxicated. I thought the person who lost the note would have come forward, which made me give a false address.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

Reference Number: t18200112-52

260. ANN ELIZA HARWOOD was indicted for that she, on the 18th of December , feloniously did dispose of and put away a counterfeit and forged Bank note (setting it forth, 1 l. No. 11772, dated October 5, 1819, signed A. Consett,) with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England , she knowing it to be forged .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating it to be a promissory note for payment of money instead of a Bank note.

TWO OTHER COUNTS, stating her intent to be defraud Richard Slayton .

ANN SLAYTON . I am wife of Richard Slayton , he is a grocer , in Leather-lane, Holborn . On the 18th of December, between seven and nine o'clock, the prisoner came, and bought tea and sugar, which came to 2 s. 2 d., and paid me a 1 l. note. I asked her her name? she said,

"Hawkes, No. 59, Baldwin's-gardens," which I wrote on it. (Looks at one) - this is it. I had not sufficient change to give her, and went next door, to Mrs. Odel, who gave me the change, and put my name on it. I returned, gave the prisoner the change, and she went away. Mrs. Odell returned it to me on the Monday. I then went to No. 59, Baldwin's-gardens, which is a public-house. I found a Mrs. Hawkins, at a barber's shop, No. 56, they said they

knew nothing of her - the publican had referred me there. I know her by her person and dress; she had a black bonnet with the red shawl she has now. I have seen the things found at her lodgings. The coffee appears to be the same I sold her. Our mill grinds much finer than others. The other parcels are exactly of the description and weight I sold her. I am positive she is the woman.

CHARLES READ . I am an assistant at Hatton-garden office. Mrs. Slayton described the prisoner's person to me - I and Thompson found her at No. 15, Bell-court, Gray's Inn-lane - she answered the description given me; another woman was with her. I took them both to the prosecutrix's shop, she selected the prisoner without hesitation. She denied ever having been at the shop, or having seen the prosecutrix.

Prisoner. Q. Did Hawkins's son say I was the woman - A. Yes; he went to shew me where she lived.

JURY. Q. If she answered the description, why did you take the women - A. Because they were both in the room.

THOMAS THOMPSON . I am a constable. I went to the prisoner's room with Read. I found some plums, sugar, and coffee, tied up in the cupboard. She said the room belonged to her, and that the other woman and a man who was there had come to tea with her.

RICHARD GOSS . I am a cooper, and live at No. 59, Baldwin's-gardens, the prisoner never lodged there, nor any person named Hawkins.

ANN HAWKINS . I live at No. 56, Baldwin's-gardens. I never sent the prisoner with any note. She lived two years and a half in the next room to me about twelve months ago. Her name is Turner - she lived with a man of that name. I never knew her by any other.

THOMAS GLOVER . I am an inspector of Bank notes. The note is forged in every respect, and badly executed.

ALEXANDER CONSETT . I am a signing clerk - the note is not my signature.

(The note was put in and read.)

Prisoner's Defence. I am not the person. I never saw the prosecutrix. The other woman was not taken into custody. I asked her to go with me, and she did.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18200112-53

261. JOHN POOL was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Butteriss , about eight o'clock in the forenoon of the 25th of December , at St. Dunstan's, Stepney , (no person being therein,) and stealing therein, two shirts, value 10 s.; three coats, value 6 l.; four handkerchiefs, value 20 s.: seven stockings, value 3 s., and one hundred pieces of copper coin, value 4 s.. his property .

WILLIAM BUTTERISS . I am a cow-keeper , and live in Charles-street, Mile End, New Town. On Saturday morning, the 25th of December, about half-past seven o'clock, I and my wife and son left the house to go out with milk. I locked the door, and put the key in my pocket - I left nobody in the house. I do not know what parish it is in. I returned about a quarter after nine o'clock, and found the back door broken open - it was bolted inside when I left. I missed the property stated in the indictment. There was 7 l. or 8 l. in copper and silver, and 5 s. or 6 s. in old halfpence, which I had put by in an old stocking - I had not seen them for a week or two - they were in a chest of drawers, which I always kept locked, and kept the key. I saw the drawer safe that morning. I also lost a knife.

Cross-examined by MR. BOLLAND. Q. When had you seen the knife and copper - A. Not for several weeks. My son got home before me, and was crying out that we were robbed.

MOSES FORTUNE . I am an officer. The prosecutor's house is in the parish of Stepney. I apprehended the prisoner on Christmas Day about eleven o'clock in the morning, and found a silk handkerchief in his hat, and an old stocking in his pocket, containing 104 old halfpence; he had thirty penny pieces and 7 d. in new halfpence, loose in his pocket, also a knife, which the prosecutor claimed. I received information, and apprehended the prisoner at his father's, in Hare-street-fields, about a quarter of a mile from the prosecutor's. The handkerchief was in his hat, which was on the table. He was asleep by the fire. He said the hat was his.

WILLIAM BUTTERISS re-examined. I know the handkerchief and stocking - it is a remarkable stocking. I also know the knife by a piece being broken off the end. I will not swear to the handkerchief, as there is no mark on it.

Prisoner's Defence. I leave it to my Counsel.

GUILTY. - DEATH . Aged 19.

Recommended to Mercy .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

Reference Number: t18200112-54

262. JOHN LOMER was indicted for feloniously assaulting Jane Cox on the King's highway, on the 28th of December , at St. Botolph Without, Bishopsgate , putting her in fear, and taking from her person, and against her will, two shirts, value 1 l. 10 s.; one table-cloth. value 7 s.; two hand-towels, value 3 s.; one toilet-cloth, value 2 s. 6 d.; two pair of stockings, value 1 s., and four handkerchiefs, value 4 s., the goods of Joseph Richard Judkins ; - five shirts, value 2 l. 10 s.; five shifts, value 1 l. 15 s.; three night-shifts, value 15 s.; six handkerchiefs, value 6 s.; six towels, value 12 s., and six pair of stockings, value 12 s., the goods of John Barlow ; - two shirts, value 1 l. 10 s., and six cravats, value 10 s., the goods of Henry William Faber .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating them to be the property of the said Jane Cox .

JANE COX . I am a laundress , and live at Bethnal-green. On the 28th of December, a few minutes before five o'clock in the evening, I received the articles stated in the indictment from Messrs. Judkins, Faber, and Barlow - the lamps were just being lit. I was at the corner of Skinner-street and Bishopsgate-streets, alone, and had all this linen wrapped in a damask table-cloth. All in a moment I saw three men; one of them came, knocked me down, and made an attempt to take my bundle. I thought I had better lose my life than that, and kept hold of it. In a moment one of the others came, dragged me some little way along, and got it from me - the third stood by my side, while I was screaming out as hard as I was able. He said,

"What is the matter, mistress, can I assist you?" I saw a woman standing by my side, I thought she would

assist me, but all three went off, and she went with them. I saw the man who had the bundle turn the corner with it.

Q. While they were taking you bundle did you observe the features of any of them - A. The one who dragged me - I had my eye on him until he got it, which was sometime - it was that prisoner at the bar I am positively certain; I looked at him very attentively. It was very light, the snow was on the ground, and they were lighting the lamps. I could see him plainly. They all got away.

Q. When did you next see the prisoner - A. Next day, at the Mansion-house. I knew a person was taken, but I did not know which. When I saw him at the Mansion-house he was mixed with other people - I pointed him out, and have not the least doubt of his being the man who dragged me and got my bundle from me.

Q. After he got your bundle had you much view of him - A. I saw him running in the middle of the road with it, and saw him turn down the top of Skinner-street. I have found none of my property.

Prisoner. Q. After you made an alarm, did no one come to your assistance - A. Mary Langley ; she did not ask me if I could identify any of them. I went to where they said he lodged, and being told there was a very low set there, I said I did not think I could swear to any of them, as I was afraid to speak there. Nobody was produced to me there as the person.

MARY LANGLEY . I live in Angel-alley, Bishopsgate-street. I was coming up Skinner-street; there was much snow on the ground, it gave a light. I had just got round from Angel-passage, and saw three chaps running along, one of them had a large bundle, which appeared to be covered with something like a table-cloth. I passed them as they ran, they were close to me - I knew their persons before; the prisoner was one, and he had the bundle in his possession, I think, under his arm - he lived right opposite me, I see him often. Thomas Carr is one of the others - he is a tall man, and has been out of the way ever since. There was another, a short man, whom I do not not know - they ran past me. I heard somebody calling, as I thought, Stop thief! I went up, and saw the prosecutrix in the middle of the road, crying out that she was robbed. I told her I had seen three young chaps with a bundle, I saw no woman near them. I directed her to Lomer's lodgings, and went with her there - he was not at home; I did not go in with her. I gave information to Gregory. Next morning, I was sweeping my room, the prisoner came up, and knocked at the door, I opened it, and asked him what he wanted? He said,

"Mrs. Langley, what do you say I robbed a woman?" I told him to go about his business, or I would kick him down stairs. He said he would not go, but would deliver himself up to my husband, who is a watchman. I told my husband to take him then if he would not go, and he took him. I was present when the prosecutrix saw him at the Mansion-house, standing among twenty or thirty others - she said,

"You villain, you are the person who took my bundle!" I had not pointed him out, nor given her any intimation of his being the man.

Q. Did you see him that night, after he ran away with the bundle - A. No.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not see me in Bishopsgate-street at near five o'clock that night - A. No.

Q. Was I not talking to some people at the corner of Primrose-alley, and you spoke to me - A. No, I did not see him before or after. I saw him run down the alley with the bundle. There appeared to be a table-cloth round the bundle.

JANE COX re-examined. I did not see Langley at the Mansion-house before I pointed the prisoner out. She did not point him out at all.

HANNAH HOWES . I live with James Richard Judkins , in Bishopsgate-street. I gave Mrs. Cox a bundle about five o'clock, it contained the articles stated in the indictment, as his. She had another bundle.

MARY PUGH . I am servant to Mr. John Barlow , who lives in Bishopsgate-street, opposite Mr. Judkins. I delivered Mrs. Cox the articles stated in the indictment as his, about five o'clock.

JOSEPH GREGORY . I am a constable of Bishopsgate. On the 28th of December, about half-past five o'clock, I was informed that Cox had been robbed. I saw her with Langley. Next morning, her husband brought the prisoner to me. I told him I must take him to the Mansion-house, he said he was very willing to go. I was present when Cox first saw him at the Mansion-house, mixed with other people. She spoke to him immediately, without his being pointed out.

Prisoner. Q. Was she not in the Justice-room when you brought me in - A. No.

Prisoner's Defence. When I went home I was told I was charged with robbing a woman, and that Langley had given information of it; Next morning I went and asked her why she charged me with it? she used bad language, and said she knew nothing of me. I told her husband I would go to any office, and gave myself up to him. When I got to the Mansion-house I had my liberty in and out until the prosecutrix came. I am innocent. I saw Langley in the evening - she interfered with company I was with. She said I was a thief, and she would seek some way to take my life. It is through family affairs.

JURY to LANGLEY. Q. How long have you known the prisoner - A. He lived near me about two years; we were not acquainted. I never threatened him. He has told me he would murder me, and has knocked me down. I have told him if he did not let me alone I would serve him out some day. I have interfered with him when I have seen him do that which was not right.

JURY to GREGORY. Q. Was the prisoner permitted to go in and out at the Mansion-house - A. I left him in charge of Dayer, the officer, and when I returned I found he had the liberty of the outer room. I think he might have got out if he had tried.

ALICE EBBS . I live in Sugar Loaf-court, Angel-alley; the prisoner has lived in the neighbourhood four years. I was coming by the George, public-house on Tuesday night, which was the night of the robbery - I heard Langey say John Lomer was the man who robbed the woman. The prosecutrix said she did not know who it was, whether it was Lomer or not, but that three men had done it. I have heard Langley say she would hang or transport Lomer, if it was in her power. I live a good step from the prisoner now.

Q. Do you live in Sugar Loaf-court at this time - A. Yes; I have lived there these six months, or more. When I lived near him he lodged at his mother's.

Q. You live in the same alley with the prisoner now - A. Yes.

Q. What did you mean by saying you lived a good way off - A. It was a great many yards off.

JANE COX re-examined. The officer told me a man was taken up - he did not tell me his name.

JOSEPH GREGORY re-examined. I informed her a man was apprehended. I do not recollect that I told her his name.

GUILTY. - DEATH . Aged 22.

Recommended to Mercy .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200112-55

263. WILLIAM WHATELY was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of December , one handkerchief, value 3 s., the goods of John Barry , the younger, from his person .

JOHN BARRY . I live in the Minories with my father, whose name is John, he is a silk-mercer. On the 9th of December, about two o'clock in the afternoon, I was in Bishopsgate-street , about five or six doors down - they were taking in ice at Messrs. Hoffman's, the pastry-cooks, which obstructed the passage. I felt something going out of my pocket. I immediately put my hand to my side, and found my handkerchief gone; I turned round, and saw the prisoner alone, he pushed through the crowd, from me - he caught my eye, and began to run, which excited my suspicion. I ran after him; he kept turning his head round, and increased his pace - we were both in the middle of the road. He ran into Leadenhall-street, and into the market where the stages stand. I there saw him throw the handkerchief down, and caught it as it fell - he was secured without my losing sight of him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200112-56

264. THOMAS WINDERBANK was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of December , 4 lbs. of tea, value 1 l. 12 s., the goods of William West , from the person of Thomas Chapel .

THOMAS CHAPEL . I am apprentice to William West , who is a grocer , and lives in Fetter-lane . On the 7th of December, between six and eight o'clock in the evening, I was taking 4 lbs of tea to Mr. Curtis, at the Three Tuns inn, Fetter-lane, I saw the prisoner, who said he came from Mr. Curtis, and they were waiting for the tea - he said I must give it to him, and go back for 6 lbs. of eight-penny sugar. I gave it to him, went back, returned with the sugar, and found they knew nothing of him. I never saw the tea again - I am sure the prisoner is the man. The person who ordered the tea resembled him, but I am not certain it was him.

FRANCIS CARTER . I keep the Three Tuns. I never dealt with West, and did not expect the tea or sugar. I never saw the prisoner until he was apprehended.

GEORGE WEST . A man, whom I believe to be the prisoner, ordered the tea, but I am not certain.

Prisoner's Defence. If the last witness had been as cautious as the other, he would know me. He has certainly made a mistake.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200112-57

265. JOHN FURZMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of December , one handkerchief, value 2 s., the goods of George Douglas Woodfall , from his person .

GEORGE DOUGLAS WOODFALL . I live in Dean's-yard, and am clerk to Mr. Swain. On the 6th of December, about four o'clock, in the afternoon, I was in Fleet-street , and felt my handkerchief go out of my pocket, turned round, and saw the prisoner about twenty-four yards from me - two others ran down the Temple, but I secured the prisoner; the handkerchief has never been found. He said he had not taken it; he was nearer to me than the other boys. Nothing was found on him.

HENRY GRIFFITHS . I live in Haughton-street, Clare-market with Mr, Chivers, and am thirteen years of age. I was about four yards from the prosecutor; the prisoner was first, and two others behind him. The prisoner put his hand into the prosecutor's pocket, pulled the handkerchief out, and put it behind him. One of the boys took it from him, and ran by the pastry-cook's, then whistled and the other followed him down the Temple; the prosecutor caught hold of the prisoner. The people interupted me, and said I had better not say I saw it, as he would be put in prison, and so I did not like to tell at first. He was searched in a public-house, and the beadle was going to let him go, but I told what I had seen, as I thought it bad for him to be guilty of such a thing. I am sure I saw it.

THOMAS SMITH . I am a constable. I saw the prosecutor secure the prisoner, took him in charge, and searched him in the Rainbow, public-house. The last witness stopped me, and told me all about it.

Prisoner Defence. The gentleman said he had lost his handkerchief, and I was the person who had taken it. I said I was not. I was taken to the Rainbow public-house, and in about a quarter of an hour, a woman pushed the boy in, who said he could tell about it.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200112-58

266. THOMAS JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of January , one handkerchief, value 2 s., the goods of George Fan , from his person .

GEORGE FAN. I am an optician , and live in Great Sutton-street, Clerkenwell. On the 3d of January, about two o'clock, I was in Giltspur-street , and heard a person call behind me, turned round, and saw the prisoner run across the road. The officer laid hold of him, and asked me to assist him? I went across, and saw the prisoner throw my handkerchief from under his coat - I did not feel it go. I had used it in Smithfield.

JOHN FORBES . I am constable of St. Sepulchre. I was in Giltspur-street, and saw Mr. Fan coming towards me, the prisoner and another lad following him close by - the other appeared not fifteen or sixteen years old. As they passed me the lad had the prosecutor's coat in one hand, and the other in the pocket. The prisoner was close by - I saw the handkerchief pass from the lad to the prisoner - they parted. I pursued the prisoner, and secured him

about twenty yards off. He threw the handkerchief down, and Fan picked it up.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. As I was crossing from the Compter the officer took me, and charged me with it. I saw the handkerchief on the pavement. I am innocent.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined Three Months , and Whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200112-59

267. ROBERT CORDERY was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of January , three yards and a half of flannel, value 6 s.; half a yard of sattin, value 2 s.; eight yards of silk trimming, value 2 s.; one yard of black cloth, value 10 s.; two pair of silk stockings, value 10 s., and one waistcoat, value 12 s. , the goods of Joseph Hargrave .

JOSEPH HARGRAVE . I keep the Ipswich Arms, Inn, Cullum-street, Fenchurch-street . A parcel containing this property, I had received myself, and put into the warehouse, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon; it was directed to Mr. Wilson, Sawbridgeworth. The prisoner was brought back with it. He is quite a stranger.

THOMAS CROSBY . I am a constable. I was sent for to take charge of the prisoner and parcel.

THOMAS KING . I am porter to Mr. Hargrave. I saw the prisoner going out of the gateway with a parcel, and called to him that he had got a parcel which did not belong to him - he made no answer. I told him to come back, but he hastened his pace, and ran down Cullum-street. I pursued, and stopped him in Fenchurch-street, just by Ironmongers' Hall, with it. I never lost sight of him - he dropped it as I collared him.

Prisoner. Q. Did you see me drop it - A. Yes, my attention was directed more to the parcel than to him.

WILLIAM BROOMHEAD . I was paying the prosecutor some money in the warehouse. As I came out I saw the prisoner under the gateway with the parcel. King said it was not his, and I assisted in pursuing him, - he was secured.

Prisoner Q. Did you see me with it - A, Yes, and I saw him drop it. I am positive he is the man.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was going home, and saw the people running in Fenchurch-street by Cullum-street. A young man stopped me and said I was the man. I was never in the office in my life. They said they thought I was the person, but the Lord Mayor said,

"Be positive," and they said I was the man.

GUILTY . Aged 31.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200112-60

FIFTH DAY, MONDAY, JANUARY 17.

268. ROBERT SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of October , 48 lbs. of lead, value 8 s., the property John Wilson and William Cutbush , and fixed to a building of theirs .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating it to belong to Thomas Wilson , and fixed to a building of his.

JOHN WILSON. I am a builder . My brother Thomas has a house in Tyson-street, Spafields . On the 20th of October, about seven o'clock in the evening, Satchell fetched me to the house, and said he suspected some one was robbing it. I went with him and some others, and found the prisoner walking backwards and forwards before the house. I sent some men up, and they found Pig, (who was convicted the following Session) in the building. The instant he was secured I called out for them to detain the prisoner - we took them to the watch-house. We found a piece of lead thrown down, and another piece rolled up ready to be thrown down. The prisoner said at the watch-house that they had both been there on Monday previous, and taken lead, which they had sold and shared the money between them. He said he borrowed an apron at a public-house in Gray's Inn-lane to conceal it in. He was too ill to be tried last Session.

WILLIAM SATCHELL . On the 20th of October, about seven o'clock in the evening, I was standing at my door, and saw the prisoner lurking about the building - I watched him for about an hour; he remarked to several persons who passed that it was a dirty place. I went to the back of my house, heard a noise on the roof, and heard something fall through the building. I ran forward, and passed the prisoner, who made the same observation to me about the place. I saw Pig on the roof, and ran and informed Wilson. As we were walking towards the buildings the prisoner walked quickly towards us, and I said,

"There is the man who was lurking about." I left him in Wilson's custody, and went on the roof - Pig was secured in the chimney. The prisoner said at the watch-house that they had both been there on the Monday, took lead off, and sold it to a man in Portpool-lane for 8 1/2 d. An apron was found in his pocket, and a piece of paper with these words on it,

"It is time to be off." He said he gave it that night to Pig, meaning it was time to go and rob the building.

RICHARD WILSON . I was sent for, took the prisoner, and found Pig under the roof by the side of the chimney. He cried,

"Stop the old man below, he brought me here." The lead was fixed on the building. I matched it next morning.

Prisoner's Defence. A person on the premises engaged me to go with him; he said he had been assisting a plumber and wanted to fetch some cuttings. I lent him my apron, and he desired me to come into the building. I said,

"Why should I come in? I think you are after no good - it is an untimely hour." The gentlemen stopped me, and they brought Pig down, who had been stealing lead as I suspected.

GUILTY Aged 67.

Confined Six Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18200112-61

269. CHRISTOPHER CRANE and ISAAC CRANE were indicted for stealing, on the 5th of December , 3 lbs. of cheese, value 3 s.; 1 lb. of pork, value 6 d.; twelve ounces of butter, value 1 s.; one bason. value 2 d., and two plates, value 3 d. , the goods of Peter Mere Latham , Esq .

RICHARD BEDUS . I am servant to Dr . Peter Mere Latham , who lives in Gower-street, Bedford-square . On the 5th of December, these things were all safe in the larder at the back of the house - next morning I found the larder stripped of every thing. I traced a man's foot round the garden, over the wall, and into the mews.

SAMUEL FURZEMAN . On the 5th of December, about eight o'clock in the morning, I was in Seven Dials, and saw the two prisoners coming out of Earl-street - I knew them before; they had a bag and a basket. I stopped them at the corner of Belton-street, and asked them what they had got? They said a little victuals. I took them to a public-house, and found it was the articles stated in the indictment. I went to Isaac Crane 's house, and there found a piece of sage cheese, and between 1 and 2 lbs. of lead. Christopher Crane said his father was innocent, for he only helped him to carry it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

CHRISTOPHER CRANE 'S Defence. I had it from my mother, met my father in Oxford-street, and asked him to carry it.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18200112-62

270. THOMAS WARD and RICHARD BRADLEY were indicted for feloniously assaulting Thomas Hall , on the King's highway, on the 20th of December , at St. George, putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, one watch, value 4 l.; one key, value 8 s.; one seal, value 12 s., and one piece of ribbon, value 1 d., his property .

THOMAS HALL . I am master of the ship, Brompton . On Monday night, the 20th of December, about ten o'clock, as I was standing in the Commercial-road , near the end of Dock-street, four men passed me - I did not see them till they were alongside of me; it was not very dark, Ward came against my right side with his left arm, and with his left hand he took my watch from my fob, and I immediately seized him.

Q. Was any force used to you before - A. Yes, all four came against me with violence before he got my watch. I seized Ward, and said,

"You rascal you have taken my watch" - I tried to take it from him, but one of them, a tall man, rushed forward, and took it from him; the tall man turned to make off with it, but I kept Ward in my left hand, and seized the man who was going away with it with my right, by the skirts of his coat; he made off, dragging me after him, and I called out,

"Give me my watch." At that instant Bradley hove himself on my left shoulder, and by the weight of him on my shoulder, and having hold of the other, I was forced on the ground. Bradley attempted to rescue Ward, but as I recovered from my fall, I immediately caught hold of them both again, and held them - I was waiting for a friend. I called out for him, and he and the watchman came up instantly. I never let them go till I gave them in charge; Bradley had tried to rescue Ward as I was trying to secure the other man who got off with my watch. It was worth 8 l. together.

ELIZABETH REED . I am a single woman, and live in Dock-street, Commercial-road. On Monday, the 20th of December, about a quarter after ten o'clock, I saw a gentleman standing at the top of Dock-street - I did not see his face, and do not know him. I saw some men pass me, whom I never saw before, and do not know.

Q. Did they go towards where the prosecutor stood - A. I cannot say; I took no more notice. I heard the gentleman say,

"You villain! where is my watch?" Before that two men walked across the road. I know nothing more.

JOSEPH SAUNDERS . I am a watchman. On hearing the cry I went up; Hall had hold of Ward, and his friend had hold of Bradley. We took them to the watch-house.

JOHN SHRIER . I was constable of the night. The prisoners were brought to the watch-house by the prosecutor, his friend, and Saunders. He gave the same account in the presence of the prisoners that he has now done. They said they knew nothing of the watch.

WARD'S Defence. I was going to Sutton-street, and these men took me. I am innocent.

BRADLEY'S Defence. I saw the gentleman holding Ward, and he gave me in charge.

WARD - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 18.

BRADLEY - GUILTY . - DEATH Aged 20.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

Reference Number: t18200112-63

271. SAMUEL TURNER was indicted for feloniously assaulting Jane Smith , on the King's highway, on the 15th of December , putting her in fear, and taking from her person and against her will, one shawl, value 2 s., the goods of Samuel Smith .

JANE SMITH. I am the wife of Samuel Smith . On the 15th of December, in the evening, I was at a public-house in the Mile End-road , and saw the prisoner and another man there - they left before I did. I left about ten o'clock, and when I came up to the turnpike, the prisoner came up to me, struck me, and took my shawl - three men and two women were with him. I cannot say the prisoner was one, but one of the men came up struck me, and ran away. The woman struck me several times, and said,

"If you say that man took your shawl, I will have your life." A short man came up, and said,

"I took your shawl." I said,

"No, the man is gone over there." I cried out Stop thief! and a watchman came up, who took me to the toll-house. I afterwards saw the prisoner standing with the others, and the patrol took him - it was the prisoner. There was a strong light from the lamps.

EDWARD PAGE . I am a patrol. The prosecutrix pointed the prisoner out to me, and I took him. He was standing with three other men, and two girls. The prosecutrix had been drinking, but knew what she was about.

Prisoner's Defence. I never touched her. She was intoxicated, and could not stand.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

Reference Number: t18200112-64

272. CHARLES MILES was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of James Alexander , about seven o'clock in the night of the 10th of January , at St. Luke, with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, one tea-caddy, value 10 s.; one looking-glass, value 20 s., and one thimble, value 2 s., his property .

MARY ALEXANDER . I am the wife of James Alexander ;

we live at No. 2, West-place, Bath-street, City-road, St. Luke's ; he keeps the whole house. Last Monday evening these things were in the parlour, the glass hung in the room, the tea-caddy was on a table under the glass, and the thimble on the mantle-piece. Between six and seven o'clock in the evening, after dark, a knock came at the door, my sister-in-law went to the door, I heard a cry of thieves, went into the parlour in a minutes, and missed these things - the looking-glass was only taken from its place, and put on a chair by the window, which was up, and the blinds open. I had seen them in the parlour an an hour or two before. The tea-caddy was worth 10 s. The parlour-window was shut, and the shutters shut outside, but not fastened. I did not see the shutters shut, but about half-past five o'clock I saw the window close down - I do not think that it was fastened, it was then dark; the things were then safe, and the looking-glass hanging up. The officer produced my thimble.

THOMAS BRADFORD . I am a constable. I was on duty in John's-row, and as we came to the prosecutrix's window, about a quarter before seven o'clock, a woman cried out

"There is somebody jumped out of the window." I went immediately to the window, a man stood there, whom I thought belonged to the woman; he pulled the prisoner out of the window, and said,

"You rascal, here is one of them;" he was in the parlour. The man then ran away. The prisoner ran to the paling, and five or six people secured him, while we pursued the man. On my return I searched him, and found this thimble at his feet, it dropped from him.

JOHN TWEEDY . I am a constable. I was with Bradford; his account his perfectly correct. I found the glass on the chair.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was walking along, kicked the thimble, picked it up, and put it into my pocket, it fell out of my pocket as it had a hole in it. I was not in the house.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 15.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

Reference Number: t18200112-65

274. JAMES ROBINSON was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of January , at Tottenham, one mare, price 2 l., and five fowls, price 6 d. , the property of Anthony Aldridge .

ANTHONY ALDRIDGE . I live at Tottenham, near the High Cross . Last Friday evening I left my mare in a field opposite my house - the fences were entire, and the gate to, but not locked; there is a footpath through the field. I saw her safe there between eight and nine at night. I kept my poultry in the piggery, adjoining the stable, in the field - it is boarded round; I had not seen the fowls later than noon. The watchman called me up about half-past five o'clock, and informed me he thought my property was at Stamford-hill. I ran up to the turnpike, which is about a mile from my house, and the turnpike man shewed me my fowls in a sack. I knew them to be mine - they were then dead; one had its head pulled off, the others were wrenched. My mare was also at the gate, with my bridle on, also a horse-cloth, and a whip, which was in the stable when I saw it last. I know the mare to be mine. The stable-door was not locked.

JAMES GUEST . I was on duty at Stamford-hill. I am collector of the weighing tolls. On the 15th of January, at half-past four o'clock in the morning, the prisoner came to the gate with a horse, wanted to go through, and said he had only a penny - the toll is 3 d. I refused to let him through; he pretended to call after a man, as his master, but nobody answered. I saw a sack across the horse's back, felt something warm in it, and pulled it out - they were five fowls, just killed. I then collared him, and my companion went for a watchman, who took him.

Q. What did he say - A. He said his master had gone on, that the mare belonged to Mr. Russell, and that the person who had employed him, and had gone on, told him if they would not let him through, to say Mr. Russell, of Edmonton, would pay in the course of the day. Alddridge came up soon after, he saw the fowls and the mare, and claimed them.

Prisoner. Q. Did I not speak to a man - A. I did not hear him, nor see him go up to any one. He was going towards town.

WILLIAM LAWRENCE . I am a watchman just by Stamford-hill gate, on the Tottenham side. I saw the prisoner and another man go by together; the other was twenty or thirty yards before the prisoner. I did not hear them speak.

Q. Whether they were companions or not you could not tell - A. No. The prisoner was leading the horse by the bridle - a sack was across the horse. I said,

"Good morning," but I do not think he answered me. The other man said,

"Good morning," and the prisoner began coughing - I had no suspicion then. A few minutes after Guest called me up, and gave charge of him; I saw nothing of the other man then. There were five fowls in the sack.

WILLIAM ANDREWS . I am watchman of Stamford-hill, on the London side of the turnpike. About half-past four o'clock I went to the turnpike for a light, and found that they had got the prisoner in custody. I took him to Tottenham cage; the prosecutor has the mare. I saw no other man on the other side of the turnpike.

THOMAS AUSTIN . I am constable of Edmonton. I conveyed the prisoner to Newgate, and delivered the mare to Aldridge. I produce the fowls and sack.

ANTHONY ALDRIDGE . The fowls are mine, and the sack was in my stable. The mare was returned to me, and is mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I was out of work, and was obliged to walk about, having no place to sleep at. About four o'clock I met a man at Tottenham-cross, he asked if I was out of work, and said if I would lead the horse to the White Hart, at Shoreditch, he would give me 1 s.; he gave me a penny to pay the turnpike, and told me to say, if any one asked about the horse, that it belonged to Mr. Russell, of Edmonton.

GUILTY. - DEATH . Aged 21.

Recommended to Mercy .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200112-66

275. JAQUES ALEXANDRE CARROL and ALEXANDRE VILLEMONT were indicted (by virtue of a Special Commission) for feloniously importing and bringing into the island of Mauritius , the said island being in the

occupation and possession of our Lord the King, 200 persons, whose names are unknown, for the purpose of their being sold, transferred, used, and dealt with as slaves .

For the Prosecution, THE SOLICITOR GENERAL, MESSRS. REYNOLDS and LITTLEDALE.

MR. CHARLES BENTHAM . I am a midshipman on board his Majesty's ship Liverpool, which is stationed off the Mauritius for the purpose of detecting slave-dealing. On the 2d of July we were off Mapoor, which is part of the coast, and extends eight miles. On the morning of the 3d, a little before day-light, I was informed a vessel was in sight. I went to the mount, and observed her with my spy-glass; she was the Jenne Adolphe - I had seen that vessel before, and knew her perfectly well - she was a small ship of about one hundred and fifty tons; she appeared to be going to land off Mauritius. Her mizen topsail was aback. She was as close to the reef as she could safely be. I suspected her, and disguised the boat. After I found her in a favourable position I left my station, and went out to chase her in my boat - I came up to her about twelve o'clock; she was steering W. N. W. off the land. I boarded her, and asked the captain for the logbook; he said it was washed overboard on the 23d of last month. I asked him for his papers, and what cargo he had? he said it had been bullocks. The papers were produced, they were in French. He said the bullocks had been thrown overboard likewise on the 23d, as it blew hard, and he had split his mizen; that he had come from Tamatave (which is in the island of Madagascar) and was going to Bourbon.

Q. Was the vessel steering in a direction for Bourbon - A. It was then; but in coming from Tamatave to Bourbon she would not come to the Mauritius. I examined the vessel - she did not appear to me to be a vessel fit for carrying bullocks, from the peculiarity of her build; she was too small between decks. I do not think they could have stood upright. The breed of bullocks at Madagascar appear to be larger than in this country - they are taller, and have a hump. They are the buffalo bullocks. I never saw any others there.

Q. Was there any appearance of bullocks having been in the ship - A. Not the least. I saw no soil - they make a great dirt on board a ship. There were eleven tubs or kids on board; the vessel had only ten men on board. The tubs and kids were more than sufficient for that complement of men. There were some particles of rice in one or two of them, as if men had been fed out of them. She was brought to anchor, and the following day the same crew were on board. I found twenty-two pair of handcuffs, and three hammers for clenching the irons, under the captain's bed-place, in the lower bed-place. The crew were sent on board our frigate. General Downing is Governor of the Mauritius; it is in our possession. I do not know the prisoner, Carrol.

Cross-examined by MR. CURWOOD. Q. Do you understand French - A. A little - I cannot read French papers fluently. Neither of the prisoners were on board. I had several interpreters on board the vessel. She was ship-rigged, which is unusual for a ship of one hundred and fifty tons. She was only laying to; she might have made more away if she pleased.

Q. Did you say before the Magistrate that the vessel was unmanageable - A. That was two hours after I took possession of her; it was in consequence of their being very little wind. A cargo of bullocks would be very inconvenient on board this vessel.

Q. If she met with bad weather she would be more likely to throw them overboard - A. My opinion is, that it would be better to let them remain as ballast, for she must have taken her hatches off to throw them overboard. The captain said there were seventy bullocks - they would not roll about much. The vessel was not at all adapted for cattle. It could not have been driven up there by the the wind, there was a trade-wind blowing there; she would have been driven to the Cape of Good Hope. We have hurricanes, but they had passed before.

Q. Is it not common for a ship to lose her reckoning after a hurricane - A. Certainly. I saw no slaves on board. I do not know that the irons were rusty - they might corrode in half an hour.

Cross-examined by MR. PLATT. Q. In that district there is a commandant and police - A. I do not know it. There are officers all round the Mauritius, for the purpose of preventing the traffic. The vessel was very near the reef. I gave information to the Governor. No slave was found to my knowledge. It was moderate weather on the 2d and 3d of June - I was always able to go out in the boat. I do not think the vessel could carry bullocks; I will not say it could not.

Q. Can you say the bullocks at Madagascar are all of the buffalo kind - A. I have seen a cargo of three hundred landed, and they were all of the buffalo kind, and imported from Madagascar.

Q. The vessel did not appear to have contained bullocks - A. No, she had no stalls nor ring-bolts to fasten the bullocks to. It is usual to make cattle fast when they go to sea.

MR. REYNOLDS. Q. Have you any recollection of there having been a hurricane - A. We experienced a hurricane before, but at that time this ship was in harbour - this was before April; she had not sailed from Port Louis then. The hurricane months are about the equinox. The vessel had not the slightest appearance of having suffered from a hurricane.

JAMES CLANDOMIN (through an interpreter). I was servant to Mons. Carrol, in the Mauritius, and embarked from there with him to go to Bourbon - I had been his servant about a month before that. We landed at Bourbon, and remained there two months; we were three days on our passage. We then went to Tamatave, in Madagascar, and were six days in our passage; we went ashore, and Mons. Carrol went up the country - I remained at Tamatave; he was absent two months, and then returned to Tamatave with about fifty blacks; they remained at Tamatave two days, and were then embarked on board Le Jeune Adolphe. About one hundred and fifty more were brought down, and were all embarked together. Mons. Carrol came on board next day, and we immediately set sail for the Mauritius. When we got about two leagues from land, at the Mauritius, the boats of Mons. Villemont came out to us in the night; he was in one of them, and came on board the vessel. The blacks were all put into two pinnaces; the prisoners and I went with them - I was

in the same pinnace with Carrol. We landed at Mapoor, in the Mauritius - Villemont landed the blacks; they were first taken to his house, which is about a quarter of a league from where we landed - I went there afterwards, and saw them there; they remained there about a quarter of an hour, Carrol was there. Villemont took the blacks away afterwards. I remained at Villemont's - Carrol was ill at the time. He was taken up very soon after.

Q. Did you afterwards go to Port Louis - A. Yes; I was interrogated there. Villemont was there; I pointed him out.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Were you a freeman or a slave - A. A freeman. I was six months in his service. I was not in prison before I went into his service. I was never in prison, except after this inquiry began. I did not know Villemont before.

Q. How many men were there on board Le Jeune Adolphe - A. Ten sailors. There were eight white men in all; three were common sailors. The first time I was interrogated, I said Carrol had been to Tamatave to traffic in blacks.

Q. Why did they put you in prison there - A. Because the Judge knew I was Carrol's servant.

Q. Had not Carrol been ill at Madagascar - A. Yes. A sea voyage was advised for the recovery of his health. We were about half an hour landing the negroes. The pinnaces took the whole two hundred at one trip. As soon as the pinnaces came near the ship they began to count the blacks. I put Carrol's trunk in the pinnace.

Q. Had not your own father put you in prison - A. No. The Judge sent two officers with me. They seized Villemont's pinnace; I shewed them his house. Villemont was at Port Louis, I saw him there.

Q. Had you ever seen Villemont except on that night, and when you saw him at Port Louis - A. No.

MR. SOLICITOR GENERAL. Q. You saw Villemont on board the vessel - A. Yes, and afterwards saw him in the cabin; I also saw him at his own house. I am sure he is the person.

COURT. Q. In what way were the fifty slaves brought to Tamatave - A. Carrol and a free man brought them, they were chained. The hundred and fifty were also brought chained, and kept chained till they were put on board, they were free on board. The hold was secured at night by an iron bar; the men were armed. The men were in the hold, and the women in the cabin; they were allowed to come on deck in the daytime, twelve at a time. There were more children than grown persons; they landed in good health. We had been a month at sea.

The prisoner, CARROL, put in a very long written defence, giving an account of different voyages in which he had been engaged, and stating that Clandomir had been convicted of robbing the trunk of a passenger in a vessel in 1818, and in order to avoid punishment he told the captain M. Villemont's clerk (Mr. Pilot), had called him a rascal and a rogue, and on the captain saying that he should take him into the presence of Mr. Pilot, that Clandomir came and told Mr. Pilot that the captain was coming to quarrel with them; he then ran away; he was afterwards arrested, and begged forgiveness; that he afterwards took Clandomir into his service at the request of his father. (The only part relating to this charge is as follows:) - At the end of March I re-embarked on board Le Jenne Adolphe, from Bourbon for Tamatave. I fell ill of the Madagascar fever after my arrival, and embarked again on board the same vessel, bound for Bourbon, and laden with bullocks. We had dreadful weather, which caused the loss of our cargo, and were driven in sight of the Mauritius. I was sent to Port Louis for advice, being exceedingly ill. The day after my arrival I was taken before the Commissary General, and was sent to the hospital. Clandomir had the impudence, during our passage to England, to come to me in the night, ask a thousand pardons, and to make excuses for the false depositions he had made, assuring me he would make one quite contrary in London. It is impossible to land two hundred blacks, without being seen by the police, who are exceedingly vigilant. Search was made, but none were found, because none existed.

VILLEMONT'S Defence (written). At the time stated I was at a considerable distance from my residence. On the 2d of July I dined, supped, and slept at the house of Mons. Le Grand - I left his house next morning, and proceeded towards home, having promised them my pinnace to go to Round Island; my pinnace was not in a fit state, and I borrowed one from them. On the morning of the 7th I went to Port Louis, and next day received a letter from my wife, informing me that eight persons, guided by a Mulatto, had been at my house and had seized my pinnace, and that which I had borrowed. I returned, and went to the police to be informed of the reason; I was then arrested. I appeal to any one whether it was likely that two hundred negroes could have been landed, without any trace being left, in an island so strictly guarded as the Mauritius. I solemnly protest my innocence. I could have escaped when I heard the charge, but I preferred surrendering myself into the hands of justice.

CARROL - GUILTY .

VILLEMONT - GUILTY .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18200112-67

276. JOHN RYAN was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of December , two glasses, value 2 s. , the goods of William Sterling .

WILLIAM STERLING . I keep the Angel Inn, Fleet-market . On the 22d of December, about eight o'clock in the morning, the prisoner came in, and had a glass of beer and a glass of gin. About an hour after he left I was sent for to the Golden Lion, public-house, Smithfield, and found him there with two glasses, which were mine - one has my name and sign on it. He fell on his knees, and begged forgiveness.

JOHN MAYNE . I keep the Golden Lion. On the 22d of December, about eleven o'clock in the morning, the prisoner came in and offered me a dram-glass for sale; I found Sterling's name on it. He said a person in Fleet-street gave it to him with four bottles of wine. I sent for Sterling, who claimed it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Fined One Shilling , and Discharged.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200112-68

277. LEWIS GOULDIN was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of January , two bars of iron, value 6 s. , the goods of Robert Maser , William Crawshay , William Crawshay , Jun., and William Routh .

ROBERT MASER . I am in partnership with Messrs. William Crawshay , William Crawshay , Jun., and Robert Routh ; we are wholesale ironmonger s, and live in Upper Thames-street . The prisoner had been in our service many years, and left about six months ago. On the 13th of January, about seven o'clock in the evening, I found him in the custody of Guest, with two bars of iron. He pleaded distress, which I think was true. Our gates were open.

JOHN GUEST . I am a constable. I was going to look at the craft, and met the prisoner coming up with two bars of iron out of the prosecutors' yard.

Prisoner. I beg forgiveness.

GUILTY . Age 2

Fined One Shilling , and Discharged.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200112-69

278. WILLIAM BOND was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of January , two seals, value 5 s.; two watch-keys, value 2 s. 6 d., and part of watch-chain, value 2 s. 6 d., the goods of John Morris , from his person .

JOHN MORRIS . I live in Loman's-street, Borough, and am a smith . On Friday last, about three o'clock in the afternoon, I was coming into the City, and was very near the watch-house on this side of the bridge; the prisoner came up, laid hold of my chain, and tried to get my watch out, but the chain broke; he got that with two seals and a key. I laid hold of the tail of his coat; he stooped to get under a coach. I kept hold of him, and we both fell together; Salmon and others came to my assistance. I dropped a coat from under my arm, and somebody ran off with it. He had a gang with him - I am certain it was him. I never let him go,

JOHN SALMON . I am warder of London Bridge ; I was at the watch-house door - there was a mob. The prosecutor brought the prisoner to the door.

Prisoner's Defence. The man laid hold of me, and tore my coat. I am innocent.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200112-70

279. JOSEPH OULDS and FRANCIS WRIGHT were indicted for stealing, on the 14th of December , one handkerchief, value 4 s., the goods of a certain person unknown, from his person .

WILLIAM COULTON . I am a carver and gilder, and live in Batchelor's-row, Battle Bridge. On the 14th of December, about half-past eleven o'clock, I saw the prisoners in Fetter-lane . I was carrying some things at some distance behind them, and observed them following a gentleman. I saw Wright take a handkerchief from the gentleman's pocket, who did not perceive it. He gave it to Oulds, who put it into his hat.

Q. How far off was you - A. About twenty yards, on the opposite side of the way. I delivered my things in Fetter-lane, and went after them in less than three minutes. The gentleman turned down a street directly, so that I could not tell him. I went after the prisoners, passed them both, and saw them offering a handkerchief for sale up a court in Leather-lane, about five minutes after; it was of a dark colour, and so was this. Wright was standing at the the top of the gateway, while Oulds was holding it to a man in his hat, part in and part out - they were up a turning under a gateway. I said nothing, but ran to Hatton-garden Office, it being near. I met Cadby, who returned with me - they were then gone. We went to Saffron-hill, saw Oulds come down the hill, and go into a cook-shop. I said he was one, and Cadby went in, and took the handkerchief out of his hat - he then said as we had taken him, he would tell us where the other was, and took us to a house at the corner of Caroline-court, where we found Wright in the taproom - I do not know who the gentleman was.

JOSEPH CADBY . I went with Coulton to Leather-lane, but the prisoners were gone; we saw Oulds turn into an eating-house on Saffron-hill, and found a handkerchief in his hat, with two others; he took us to a public-house, where we found Wright. I cannot find the gentleman.

OULDS'S Defence. Coulton says the gentleman went down a street - at Guildhall he said he went down a court. He said it was the first turning he went down, but it was the second.

WRIGHT'S Defence. I met Oulds in Nevill's-court, Fetter-lane. A young man gave him a handkerchief. He went up a court, and shewed it to a man.

OULDS - GUILTY . Aged 16.

WRIGHT - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200112-71

280. ROBERT SMITH and WILLIAM LLOYD were indicted for a conspiracy .

For the Prosecution, MR. ADOLPHUS.

THOMAS MARSH . I am shopman to Mr. Roland Hunter , who is a bookseller, and lives in St. Paul's Church-yard. On the 8th of November Smith came to our shop. and enquired the price of Hume and Smollett's History of England? for Captain Cater. I told him 5 l. 17 s. and asked him if I should write it on a piece of paper? He said Yes, and so I did - Captain Cater is well known at our house as a customer. On the 8th of January he came again and delivered me a letter; he wished to take the books with him. I said we had not got them bound, but had them in boards, which I would send by him, but as Captain Cater wished to have them bound, I thought it better to let him know before I sent them in boards. I then wrote a note to Captain Cater, and delivered it to Smith, who said he had been in his employ for three weeks, and he was not sure but that he should be taken as a regular servant. He left with the note, and when Mr. Hunter came home I shewed him the letter that I had received. I never saw Lloyd.

Letter read,

Captain Cater's compliments to Mr. Huater, will feel himself obliged if he will send by bearer, Hume and Smollett's History of England, bound, as I want it for a particular friend, to send into the country on Monday morning.

January 8, Union-place, New-road.

MR. ROWLAND HUNTER. I saw the letter which has just been read, on the 8th of January. I know Captain Cater very well. The moment I saw it I was satisfied that it was neither his writing or style. On Monday, the 10th, Lloyd came to my shop, and said he came from Captain Cater to see the books. I asked him what books? He said Hume and Smollett's History of England, and I shewed them to him in boards. He asked the price? I told him 5 l. 4 s.; he said Mrs. Cater had received a note, stating the price at 5 l. 17 s. I asked him from what house she received it? He said,

"This house, some time back." I examined the catalogue, and found that the preceeding edition had been published at 9 s. a volume, and this at 8 s. He said Captain Cater was his uncle, and that he would let me know farther about it. In the evening Smith came and said he was come for the books for Captain Cater. I asked him what books? He said Hume and Smollett's History of England. I asked him if he had brought a note from the Captain? - it was usual for him to send one for what books he wanted; he said he had not, but that a gentleman had called about them - nobody but Lloyd had called. I then delivered him the books with a bill of parcels, by his desire, and he took them away. I had provided a constable outside to apprehend him.

CAPTAIN HENRY CATER . I live in Union-place, New-road; Lloyd was my servant about three or four years ago - he is no relation to me; I do not know Smith. I never employed either of them to go to Mr. Hunter's - the letter is not my writing. I have every reason to believe it to be Lloyd's.

WILLIAM PRESTIGE . I apprehended Lloyd in Mortimer-street, Marylebone.

WILLIAM READ . I apprehended Smith within a yard of Mr. Hunter's door, with the books and bill under his arm.

SMITH'S Defence. Lloyd gave me the letter to fetch the books.

LLOYD'S Defence. I gave him the letter, but it was not my writing.

SMITH - GUILTY .

LLOYD - GUILTY .

Confined Six Months .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200112-72

281. THOMAS BAKER was indicted for a libel .

The parties in this case consented to withdraw a Juror.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200112-73

SIXTH DAY, TUESDAY, JANUARY 18.

282 FRANCIS RUSH was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of October , one shirt value 4 s.; one hat, value 3 s. 6 d., and two pair of stockings, value 5 s. , the goods of Patrick Clynes .

MARGARET CLYNES . I am wife of Patrick Clynes , who is a labourer , and lives in Hopkins's-street, St. James's ; the things were in our room on the second floor; the prisoner lodged on the same floor for five weeks - I let him a bed. On the 27th of October, after my husband was gone out, he got up, and went down stairs with his shoes off. I saw him take my husband's hat after he had put his own on, and asked him what he took it for? He made no answer, but ran off with that and the stockings under his arm - I missed the other things. He was apprehended about five weeks after.

ELIZA FITZGERALD . I live in Crown-court, Pall Mall, and keep a chandler's shop. The prisoner called on me about five weeks ago, brought a green bag and a hat, and asked me to put them by for him - he said he would call for them in half an hour, but did not. It contained a pair of shoes, a handkerchief, and a hat. The prosecutrix claimed the hat.

THOMAS GOOK . I am an officer. About five weeks after the robbery the prisoner was brought to the watch-house on this charge - he denied it, and said he never saw the hat. I got it from Fitzgerald's, and shewed it to him - he then said he took it away for safety.

PATRICK CLYNES . The hat is mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I took it by mistake, left it at Fitzgerald's, and bought a paper cap instead.

GUILTY . Aged 28

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200112-74

283. WILLIAM COLLINS was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of December , one ham, value 16 s. , the goods of Robert Marriott .

ROBERT MARRIOTT . I am a cheesemonger , and live in Wilson-street, Finsbury . On the 18th of December, about four o'clock, a person asked me if I had lost a ham? I looked, and it was gone from the door. I went out, and saw the prisoner running with it under his arm. When I got within a few yards of him he threw it down. I secured him without losing sight of him. A stranger picked the ham up.

JAMES HOLLAND . I am a carter. I saw the prisoner take the ham, and told the prosecutor.

JOSEPH WALTERS . I took the prisoner in charge. He pleaded distress. I went to his lodgings, which had the appearance of great distress.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I have six children, and was in great distress.

GUILTY . Aged 45.

Fined One Shilling , and Discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200112-75

284. THOMAS BOWERS was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of December , one whittle, value 5 s.; one piece of cotton, value 2 d., and one pocket-book, value 2 d., the goods of Catharine Kealy ; and one gown, value 8 s., the goods of Mary Brenan .

CATHARINE KEALY . I keep the White Horse, public-house, South Audley-street ; Mary Brenan is my sister, and lives with me - these things were in our bedroom. On the 16th of December, she gave an alarm that a man had run down stairs, and my brother ran after him - I saw the cotton and gown at the watch-house. A person could go through the passage from the street door. The pocket-book was taken off the drawers, and my sister's gown was taken out of them.

THOMAS BRENAN . I am brother to the last witness - my sister gave an alarm. I went out, and saw the prisoner across the road, about fifty yards off, running very fast. I pursued, calling Stop thief! and he was stopped by two men, as he turned the corner of Mount-street. I saw a whittle and gown on the ground. I asked him what he had done with the things? He said he knew nothing of it - he was taken to the watch-house. A stranger picked the gown, whittle, and cotton up.

WILLIAM CROSS . I am thirteen years of age. I saw the prisoner come quickly out of the White Horse, public-house, with his coat buttoned - he ran; there was a cry of Stop thief! after him; I ran, and saw the red whittle hang down between his legs. I saw him drop it at the corner of Mount-street - I am certain of it. He was secured without my losing sight of him.

TOBIAS SMITH . I am labourer. I was turning the corner of Mount-street, and heard the alarm, turned round, and saw the prisoner running in the middle of the road. I stopped him - he threw open his great coat, and dropped the whittle.

JOHN LUX . I am a beadle. The prisoner was brought to the watch-house, and I searched him, but found nothing on him. I found the pocket-book in the privy of the watch-house, which the prosecutrix claimed - he must have dropped it, for nobody else was there.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was inquiring for lodgings, saw a mob, and ran with the others, but was stopped by two men, who said I dropped the property.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200112-76

285. WILLIAM ADNUM was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of December , one watch, value 30 s.; one chain, value 1 s.; one seal, value 10 s., and one key, value 2 s., the goods of William Pardoe , from his person .

WILLIAM PARDOE . On the 14th of December, I was at the corner of Pitt's-place, Drury-lane , about eleven o'clock at night; the prisoner came across to me from the court, snatched my watch and ran down the court again. The watchman laid hold of him, and he threw it in the area - he is the man. I did not lose sight of him.

PATRICK CARMODY . I am watchman of Great Wild-street. I heard the cry of Stop thief! looked up Pitt's-place, and saw the prisoner running as fast as he could. When he got to the bottom I collared him, and asked him what was the matter? He replied,

"Nothing - there is a row in Drury-lane, and I want to get out of it." I took him up the court about twenty yards, when he upset me, knocked me down, and my lanthorn broke. I pulled him down with me, and still held him. When I got up I heard something jingle under my feet. The prosecutor immediately came up, and said he had been robbed of his watch by the prisoner; I picked the watch up in the area where we fell. I was taking him to the watch-house, and when we got to Wild-street he said,

"Let the old fool go to hell, he has got his watch. I will give you something handsome to let me go, as it will be a serious job to me - I want to fly and be off." He put 6 s. 6 d. into my hand, but I kept hold of him and the money, and took him to the watch-house.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. He searched me before the watch was thrown down, and found nothing on me - he took 6 s. 6 d. from me.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18200112-77

286. HENRY STEPHENS was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of December , one shirt, value 2 s. , the goods of James Carter .

ELIZA CARTER . I am the wife of James Carter , who is butcher , and lives in Brick-lane . I lost this shirt from Abbott's-place, Brick-lane; it hung out to dry.

WILLIAM CLITHEROW . About twelve o'clock, on the 16th of December, I saw the prisoner and another young man, going down Abbot's-court, I suspected them, and secured the prisoner as he was getting over Carter's palings with the shirt.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I went down the court, and found it was no thoroughfare. I was picking something up, and Clitherow said I stole it.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Confined Six Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18200112-78

287. MARY PALMER and MARGARET HAYES were indicted for stealing, on the 14th of December , 23 yards of cotton, value 1 l. 3 s. , the goods of Samuel Cater .

SAMUEL CATER . I am a linen-draper , and live in Finsbury-place . On the 14th of December, about five o'clock in the evening, the prisoners came and bought three small quantities of muslim, which came to 11 1/2 d. While they were looking at them I saw Hayes drawing a piece of print under her shawl - she dropped it on the floor, then sat on a chair, picked it up, and put it under her whittle. After they went out of the first door of the shop, I said I wanted to speak to them, she then dropped it from under her whittle. I sent for an officer, and detained them. They came in together. Hayes bought one of the articles which Palmer paid for. They bought each article separately, had them wrapped up, and paid for them separately.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

PALMER'S Defence. I did not know she had taken any thing.

HAYES's Defence. The gentleman said I had taken a shawl - I told him to search me. He picked up the shawl from the other side of the counter.

PALMER - NOT GUILTY .

HAYES - GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18200112-79

288. WILLIAM HOWARD was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of January , one coat, value 6 s. , the goods of Robert M'Carthy .

ROBERT M'CARTHY. I am servant to Mr. Sharp, who is

a publican, and lives in South Portland-mews . On the 3d of January, about nine o'clock in the morning, my coat was stolen off the table.

THOMAS RICE . I am hostler to Mr. Lucas. I was at breakfast in the house, saw the prisoner take the coat off the table, and go out with it - I pursued, and secured him with it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I was in liquor.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Confined One Month , and Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18200112-80

289. JOHN ROBERTSON was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of June , one mare, price 40 l. , the property of James Richards .

JAMES RICHARDS . I am a livery-stable keeper , and live in Oxford-street . On the 4th of June, about the middle of the day, I agreed to let the prisoner the mare at 12 s. a day. I saw him - he hired it. My man was unwilling to let it at that price, and applied to me; I agreed to let it for that. I have not seen it since.

Q. Did you see him go away with it - A. He went away with it, but not on it. My man lead it away. He said he was going to Stanmore, and mentioned the Abercorn Arms. He did not return with it. I went there next day, but could not find her.

Q. When did you next see the prisoner - A. I saw him at Reading on the 24th of July. I had some hesitation at first in charging him with it. He said his name was Hanley, that he was not in the habit of hiring horses, and that I must be deceived in supposing him to be the man. I have not the slightest hesitation of it.

Q. How came you not to lay hold of him, as you were convinced he was the person - I enquired of the landlord of the house, who said he was a commercial traveller, and he thought I must be deceived. I still believed him to be the man, and got from him the address of the house in town which he said he travelled for - I have it here - (reads) -

"Mr. Hanley, at Messrs. Potts, Bora." I saw him write it. In consequence of this, and the landlord's assertion, I pursued him no farther. I went to the house of Messrs. Potts, vinegar-merchants, in the Borough, and could not find him there. It was the only house of that name I could find. He had stated that it was a vinegar house, and every body knew it.

Q. When did you see him again - A. I met him in Quebec-street, Marylebone, within the last fortnight. I told him I considered him to be a person indebted to me, and that he had given me a false address when I saw him at Reading - he denied ever having been at Reading. I insisted on having his name and address; he said his name was John Robertson , and that he lived at Bloomfield Cottage, Regent's Canal. I walked with him to my house, and questioned my lad, Patrick - he, at the moment, said he was in doubt. He said he had so little view of him that he could not say whether he was or was not the man. I sent my man with him to Bloomfield Cottage, and followed myself. I found he lived at a cottage, at the back of the Junction Canal. I wished for a reference - he took me to Mrs. Botelas, No. 37, King-street, Edgeware-road. I was not satisfied, and gave him in charge. The person who hired the mare gave me the name of Vincent, No. 42, Upper Berkley-street. I went there the following morning, but could find no such person.

Q. How long were you with him at Reading - A. I saw him three times in the course of the morning, and was about five minutes with him. On my oath, I have not the least doubt of his being the person I saw at Reading.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. Have you, in your walks about town, seen a person very like the prisoner - A. I cannot say I have. A man living where the prisoner does would be often in Oxford-street.

Q. You never met the prisoner, nor any one like him, except at Reading - A. No. I once saw a man in Oxford-street, whom I supposed to be the man. I looked at him, but then doubted, so I did not like to take him. This was after the affair at Reading. When I met the prisoner he gave me his direction, which I found to be right.

Q. On the 24th of July you saw a man at Reading, who gave you the address, why not apprehend him - A. It was in consequence of what the landlord said.

Q. Did not his giving of a different address excite your suspicion, if you had no doubt of his being the person - A. I had such an account of him as led me astray. I was not sure of him at Reading.

Q. Why are you sure now - A. Because circumstances have transpired since his giving the false address. I did not know him absolutely to be the person at Reading, but I have had proof of it now from further intercourse with him. When be hired the mare he had top-boots and spurs on. I do not think he wore powder. He was dressed nearly the same at Reading. It was at the sign of the George.

GEORGE HARTLEY . I am servant to Mr. Richards. On the 4th of June a person came to me, and asked if my master had got a horse to hire? I called the hostler. I did not see him again. The prisoner is the man, I am positive. I was not present when the horse was taken away.

Q. Did you ever see him again - A. Not until he was taken up, I then saw him accidentally in the yard. I was not desired to look at him - I was sure he was the man; I did not say so. No conversation passed between us then.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. You had a momentary view of the man in June, and swear he is the person - A. I did not hear the other hostler say he was not sure of it. He had a pair of very shabby top-boots and spurs on. I do not know whether he had powder or not.

ALEXANDER PATRICK . I am the head hostler. I was called out to the man - he said he wanted a chesnut mare. To the best of my recollection the prisoner is the man, but I cannot speak with certainty. On his going off with the mare I asked him when he thought of returning? he said about eight or nine o'clock in the evening, and that he was going to Stanmore. On the 4th of January I saw him and Mr. Richards standing in the yard, and was asked if he was the person? I said I could not say with certainty whether he was or was not.

Q. Had you ever seen a man like the prisoner between these times - A. I saw a man in Oxford-street, whom I believe to be the prisoner, and followed him about half a

mile. I thought he was the person, but did not like to act on my own opinion. I think this was in August.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You saw the man to whom he applied - A. Yes, he called me to him. I went with the man who hired the horse to the farrier's, and was there while the shoe was adjusting. I should think I was ten minutes or a quarter of an hour with him. He had a bright mixture coat, kerseymere breeches, and shabby top-boots and spurs. He had no wig nor powder I am sure - he had his own black hair and rather full whiskers.

Q. You accompanied the prisoner to his own house - A. Yes; Mr. Richards followed. The prisoner took me to his house himself, and said if we were not satisfied he would take us to a lady with whom he had lodged, and took us to Mrs. Botelas's; he also took us to Mr. Mitchell, his landlord, next door. He went with us voluntarily to Mrs. Botelas - it was his own proposal.

WILLIAM THORPE . I am hostler at the Angel Inn, at Reading: I am positive I have seen the prisoner twice at Reading. He once put up at the Angel, and I saw him in the yard when he did not put up there. On the 24th of July I saw Richards at Reading - that was the day I met the prisoner in the yard. He asked me how I did, and how master and mistress were? We were talking together about five minutes. He slept at our house on Sunday, the 14th of March, preceding; he came about nine o'clock in the evening, and left between two and three next afternoon. He came on a black mare; I sold the mare for him for 10 l., I also sold the saddle and bridle.

Q. Then you had a good view of him - A. Yes. I cannot possibly be mistaken; I am positively sure he is the man. I saw him again at Marlborough-street, and was sure of it.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You was examined before the Mayor of Reading. Was the time you sold the horse for him the first time you ever saw him - A. I believe I had seen him once before, about a year ago. I sold the mare to one Shelley. Mr. Jenkins claimed it before the Mayor.

Q. Did you not tell the Mayor that you sold Shelley a black horse two years before - A. Yes; I said I had seen the prisoner twice before.

Q. Did you not say you had seen him frequently - A. I do not believe I did. When I saw him in March he did not wear powder - he had a brown coat, top-boots, and, I believe, light-coloured kerseymere breeches. He had his own black hair. He was dressed much the same in July.

JAMES RICHARDS re-examined. I saw him at Reading about nine o'clock in the morning, it was on a Saturday.

Prisoner's Defence (written). Till now, I have through life maintained an irreproachable character. I was five years in the house of a respectable merchant, who procured me a situation in the Bank, where I was five years more, when my father remitted me a sum of money to go into business; I then left my situation, and joined a gentleman in partnership. About two years proved it did not answer, and by mutual consent it was dissolved. I then lived a retired life on my property, and took lodgings in King-street - I remained there from November, 1818. till August, 1819, and then took a small cottage by the Grand Junction Canal. I was going home when the prosecutor accosted me, saying he had seen me at Reading; I declared I was never there in my life - he was not satisfied. I walked up Oxford-street, he followed, and asked me to walk to his stables, which I did. I gave him my name and address; he wished one of his men to accompany me, to see if it was right, I made no objection, and the man found my statement quite correct. I informed him my landlord lived next door, he went, and appeared satisfied. My dinner was then ready, but I thought it necessary to leave no suspicion, and referred him to King-street. He left. I thought it would be more satisfactory for me to accompany him, and I did so. On our way, we met Richards and the constable, and all went to Mrs. Botelas's - she informed them that I had never slept out of her house while I lodged there. Richards still insisted that he had seen me at Reading, in July, 1819, and gave me in charge. When first I came to town I had my head shaved by the advice of a friend, as my own hair was, in fact, wool. I then wore a powdered wig, and continued to do so till within two months, I have always kept my head shaved, and have only within the last two months gone without my wig. I solemnly protest my innocence. I was never on horsback since I left my native country. It will, doubtless, appear strange, that so many witnesses should identify me. I call my Eternal Judge to witness that I am innocent.

MARGARET ANN BOTELAS . I live at No. 37, King-street, West, Bryanstone-square. My husband is a courier under Government; the prisoner and his wife lodged in my house; they came on the 2d of November, 1818, and continued till the 7th of August, 1819.

Q. During that time did he ever sleep out of your house - A. I am confident he did not, nor was he ever absent long enough to go a journey of eighty miles - he could not have gone to Reading. He was a man of exceedingly regular habits, and lived extremely moderate. I never heard him talk of horses.

Q. Was it possible he could have been at Reading on the 14th of March or the 24th of July - A. I am confident he was not, for I had a daughter unwell at the time, and he came into the room every morning to enquire after her.

Q. Did any thing occur on the 4th of June - A. I have brought to mind that he came that morning to my daughter, she had been talking about going to see the guns fired. I asked him if he was going? he said No, he must go to get Billing, in Clipstone-street, Fitzroy-square, to present a bill that was due. He always wore a powdered wig, I never saw him without - his hair was always kept close.

COURT. Q. What age is your daughter - A. She was twenty years of age; she is now dead.

JOHN STEVENSON . I lodged in the same house with the prisoner, at Mrs. Botelas's, from November, 1818, until August, 1819, and was intimate with him - I used to spend almost every evening with him. I slept out on the 29th or 30th of May. I can positively say that he was never out twelve hours together - I cannot speak to these two nights. He was very frugal. We frequently went to the Gloucester coffee-house of an evening. He generally had nothing but a pint of porter. He has worn a powdered

wig ever since I have known him, except within the last two months. His head was bald.

COURT. Q. Was his wig black - A. No, my Lord, it was brown; it was always powdered till within the last two months.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did you ever know him on horseback - A. Never. He has told me he was never on horseback but once, and that was in Jamaica. I never knew him have top-boots of spurs. There is an old pair of top-boots at the cottage, which he used when digging in his garden; he told me had had them nine years.

ELIZA CONNELL . My mother lodges at Mrs. Botalas's, and did so when the prisoner lodged there - we came in December, 1818. We were in the habit of seeing him and his wife every day. It was impossible he could have gone a journey of eighty miles without our knowing it. He always wore powder.

BENJAMIN MITCHELL . I am proprietor of the cottage in which the prisoner lived - I live next door myself. He took it on the 20th of July. Some repairs were wanting, which were to be done at his expence. He came repeatedly to see the cottage, almost every day. He was not absent so long as to go to Reading. After he came to the cottage, which was on the 7th of August, I have seen him every day.

SEBASTIAN GAHAGEN . I am a sculptor, and live in King-street, opposite Mrs. Botelas, and could see over his dressing-room from my study. He generally dressed himself between ten and eleven o'clock. I was in the habit of seeing him daily.

MR. AUGUSTUS MANNING . I am a solicitor.

Q. Have you lately had occasion to know a person very much resembling the prisoner - A. Providing the prisoner wore black hair and long whiskers, I never saw so great a resemblance - any person might mistake one for the other. He was sent out of the country in the last China fleet, by my advice - he is an East Indian; I saw him several times last summer. I returned from Paris the latter end of August, and have not seen him since.

Q. How came you to see the prisoner - A. Hearing he was a man of colour, I went to the prison yesterday - the features are remarkably strong. People of colour resemble each other a good deal.

MR. AUGUSTUS MANNING , JUN. I have heard the account my father has given, and quite agree with it. I was in the habit of seeing the person. I think if the prisoner had black hair and black whiskers he might be fairly mistaken for the person.

MR. ABRAHAM WATSON RUTHERFORD . I am a merchant, and reside at Stamford-hill. My firm are agents to the prisoner's father - he was educated at Scotland. I have known him ever since 1806. When he first came he wore his own wool, but when we procured him a situation in the Bank he wore a powdered wig.

CHARLES CURTIS , ESQ. I live in Portland-place. I first knew the prisoner in 1815. I believe him to be a respectable honest man. He was introduced at our banking-house, and I believe he has a small balance in our hands now.

MR. WEBB. I am a surgeon, and have been intimate with the prisoner seven years. I never saw him without powder and a wig. I know his hand-writing (looks at the direction given at Reading) - it is not a bit like it. He was well educated, and would not spell Borough, Bora.

- JEGGINS. I am clerk to Rutherford and Co. I remember the prisoner's hand-writing, and am sure the direction is not his writing. When I first knew him he wore his own black wool. I suggested his shaving his head - he wore a wig after that, continually.

MR. ROBERT PATTEN . I am solicitor engaged for the prisoner, and know his writing, the direction is not his.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200112-81

290. JOHN ROBERTSON was again indicted for stealing, on the 3d of December , one mare, price 10 l.; one saddle, value 2 l., and one bridle, value 1 l. , the property of William Thompson .

LYDIA THOMPSON. My husband lives in Crescent-mews, Burton-crescent . On the 3d of December a person hired a horse at our stable, I was in the stable - the prisoner is the man. I never saw him before. He said he was going to Barnet. I let him have a brown mare - he was to return it the same day. He never returned it.

Q. When did you see the prisoner - A. At Marlborough-street, on the 7th of January. The man's hair was black. I never saw him with his hat off.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you hear the last trial - A. Yes.

Q. And yet you venture to swear he is the man - A. Yes.

WILLIAM THOMAS YEOELL . I am hostler to Mr. Thompson. I saddled the mare for the prisoner - he is the man. He had olive coloured breeches, top boots, and spurs on.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200112-82

291. JOHN ROBERTSON was again indicted for stealing, on the 30th of September, 1818 , one mare, price 25 l. , the property of William Austin .

WILLIAM AUSTIN . I am a stable-keeper , and live in Windmill-street, Haymarket . On the 30th of September, 1818, a mare was hired of me, and never returned; the prisoner had one on the 24th of September, which he returned. I can speak with certainty that the prisoner is the person.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. Have you not said he had a black eye on the 24th - A. Yes, it was given by the mare knocking up her head on the 24th.

MR. MANNING. On the 25th of September I paid the prisoner some money; he had no appearance of a black eye then.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200112-83

292. JOHN ROBERTSON was again indicted for stealing, on the 20th of August, 1817 , one gelding, price 40 l. , the property of John Anderson .

MR. ANDERSON. My Lord, I do not wish the case to proceed.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200112-84

293. THOMAS PHILLIPS was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of December , two waistcoat pieces, value 5 s.; one bed-tick, value 7 s., and five curtains, value 5 s. , the goods of Samuel Holmes .

ELEANOR HOLMES . I am the wife of Samuel Holmes ; we live at Bethnal-green, and have an empty house in Globe-fields ; on the 11th of December these things were taken out of the house. On Sunday a person came and informed me that the house had been robbed, in consequence of which I went there, found the window open and the things gone; I saw the prisoner in custody about a fortnight ago - the things were produced. I had seen the prisoner in Regent-street on the 18th of December, with a large bundle.

JOHN CROSS . I live at Mile End. I have two waistcoat pieces which were pledged at our shop on the 13th of December, by a female, in the name of Ann Webb .

JOHN GIBSON . On Monday morning I met the prisoner in Hackney-road, and told him that he was suspected of the robbery. He said he found a bundle containing these things about two hundred yards from Globe-fields. I took him to Holmes, and they claimed every thing. He said if they were theirs he would bring them back, and they said if he did he should have a free pardon.

JAMES HARRIS . I am pawnbroker, and live in Whitechapel-road. A bed-tick was pledged with me for 2 s., and a curtain for 2 s., by a woman, in the name of John Phillips , Mile End. The prisoner pledged the bed-tick.

ROBERT CHRISTIAN I am a constable. I took the prisoner in charge, and found duplicates of all the property on him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Six Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant,

Reference Number: t18200112-85

294. JAMES HAWARD was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of December , two sheets, value 14 s.; two tablecloths, value 12; one apron, value 1 s.; two shifts, value 5 s., and one petticoat, value 2 s. , the goods of Rees Griffiths .

AMELIA GRIFFITHS . I am the wife of Rees Griffiths , who is an oilman , and lives in Paddington-street, Marylebone . On the 29th of December, about seven o'clock in the evening, these things hung in the yard at the back of the house to dry. The lines were cut down and the things taken.

JAMES FRANCE . On the 29th of December I saw the prisoner with another lad coming out of my house in Dorset-street - the prisoner's mother lives in my house. About three weeks before that, I lost a pair of sheets from the passage, since which I always watched him, and on the 29th of December, about eight o'clock, I heard him come. I ran up, and saw him and another boy with each a bundle - they ran out in great haste without shutting the door. I ran up the area steps, followed them, and when they got about fifty yards two girls ran from the other side of the street, and took the bundles from them; they then went on as fast as they could, and the girls crossed over. I overtook the girls, and took the bundles from them, as I suspected he had been robbing his mother who was not a home. I asked the girls what they had got there? They said it was nothing to me, and I had no business with it. The prisoner then came across, and said I had no business with them, for they were his and not mine, and he would go back and shew me that they were his; he said he would follow me home. I took them back, and found that it was wet linen, very much frozen, and with the pins sticking in them - they were torn off the line. Next morning the prosecutrix claimed them. The prisoner said he tied them up in two bundles because one would not hold them all.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I picked them up.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18200112-86

295. ESTHER HEWITT was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of December , 200 yards of linen, value 10 l.; one pair of boots, value 1 s., and one table-cloth, value 4 s. , the goods of Aaron Sammell , John Sammell , and George Sammell .

For the Prosecution, MR. BARRY.

JOHN SAMMELL . I am in partnership with Aaron Sammell , and George Sammell ; we are wholesale shoe manufactures and leather-dressers , and live in Hatton-garden ; the prisoner was our servant . On the 30th of December I had information that a piece of linen had been offered for sale, and saw it at Jobbins's - it belonged to a box of sixty pieces, which was in the front warehouse. I sent for Limbric, who took the prisoner in charge - she had lived about four years with us as cook, and had no business in the warehouse, but she could get there. I saw duplicates of other property found on her - it was principally linen. She said the property pledged in the duplicates were her master's.

HENRY JOBBINS . I am a baker. A piece of linen was left at my house with my wife, who is not able to attend. I know the prisoner.

JOHN LIMBRIC . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner, examined her, and found a great quantity of duplicates on her - a great many were for linen; she begged for mercy, and said she would not tell what induced her to do it; that she pledged the things herself, and they were her master's. Jobbins gave me some linen, which she said she took from her master.

WILLIAM SUCH . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Fleet-market. I have some linen, wearing apparel, and a pair of shoes, which were pledged at different times, by a woman, named Hewitt, No. 34, Cursitor-street - they were pledged on the 25th of March, the 10th of June, and the 20th of July. The prisoner has pledged things at our house. I cannot say she pledged these things - the duplicates are mine.

THOMAS HUDE . I am servant to Mr. Parkins, who is a pawnbroker, and lives in Skinner-street. I have three remnants and one piece of linen, which were pledged with me on the 29th of January, the 4th of June, the 18th of September, and the 5th of October, in different names - I do not know the prisoner. My master took them in - the duplicates are ours.

HENRY THOMPSON . I live in Fetter-lane. I produce three remnants and one piece of linen, and a remnant of

diaper, which were pledged with me on the 13th of July, the 3d of May, the 17th of February, and the 17th of September, in the name of Hewitt - I have no recollection of the prisoner. The duplicates are ours.

JOHN FLOWER . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Shoe-lane. I have two pieces and two remnants, which were pledged with me on the 5th and 12th of May, the 5th of June, and the 24th of September, by a woman - to the best of my recollection it was the prisoner. I have seen her repeatedly.

WILLIAM HAWKESLEY . I am a pawnbroker, and live at Holborn-bars. I have two pieces of linen pledged with me - the person who took them in has left me. The duplicates corresponded.

WILLIAM STEVENS . I have a remnant of linen and a table-cloth, which were pledged with me - the person who took them in has left. The duplicate is mine.

WILLIAM MAXWELL . I am a pawnbroker. I have a piece of linen and two remnants, pledged on the 8th of January, 1819. The person who took them in has left.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18200112-87

296. WILLIAM HOLDSWORTH was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of December , one whittle, value 2 s. 6 d., the goods of Ann Bevan , from her person .

ANN BEVAN . On Sunday, the 19th of December, between six and seven o'clock in the evening, as I was going down Mount-pleasant three boy s met me, turned back, and followed me. I ran, and they ran after me; one of them gave me a slight blow on the head, and took my shawl away; I called out Stop thief! but did not see any one stop him. I ran after him, but lost sight of him. I was telling some people, and saw the prisoner coming towards me. I laid hold of him, and said,

"This is the boy" - I am sure he is the boy who took my shawl, and struck me.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. It was done in an instant - A. No, they followed me, and I turned back and looked at them - my shawl was produced. I am servant to Mrs. Finikin, Gray's Inn-lane.

JOHN TOZER . I heard the cry of Stop thief! in Great Bath-street, and saw the prisoner running in the middle of the road; he saw me running, and dropped the shawl. I secured him, and brought him back to Bevan, who claimed the shawl, and said the prisoner took it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18200112-88

297. WILLIAM HILL was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of December , one coat, value 8 s. , the goods of Neal Arnatt .

GEORGE JORDAN . I am groom to Mr. Neal Arnatt . On the 19th of December, between ten and eleven o'clock in the morning, the coat was in the stable, in Tavistock-mews . I left the door ajar and went to the next stable but one. I saw the prisoner run from my stable-door with the coat. He ran into Charlotte-street, and was secured with it.

SAMUEL GARWOOD . As I was coming from the mews, Jordan called out that the prisoner had stolen a coat. I followed him, and secured him in Charlotte-street with the coat.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I was distressed.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18200112-89

298. WILLIAM PETLEY was indicted for wilful and corrupt perjury on the trial of Eliza Dillon, alias Horgan , at the delivery of the goal (of Our Lord the King) of Newgate , on the 27th of October last .

For the Prosecution, MR. ARABIN.

The record of the Conviction of Dillon was produced.

HENRY BUCKLER . I am short-hand-writer to the Court, and took notes of the trial of Dillon. When his Lordship had nearly, or quite, summed up the evidence to the Jury, the defendant presented himself as a witness on behalf of the then prisoner - her Counsel had left the Court. I took down in short-hand what he said - (reads).

Q. What are you - A. an independent man, and live at Wander, in Derbyshire. Q. Do you live on your fortune there - A. Yes. Q. Are you a housekeeper - A. I am not. Q. Whom do you live with - A. I lodge with a person of the name of James Frost , who is a farmer. Q. In the town of Wander - A. Yes. Q. How long have you lodged with him - A. At different times for several years. Q. Have you a constant residence there - A. When I am in the country, but I am frequently in London. Q. What is your business in London - A. Nothing particular. Q. What brings you to London - A. My own pleasure. Q. How long do you stay - A. Sometimes longer and sometimes shorter. Q. Where do you live in London - A. At the British coffee-house, Castle-court, Strand. Q. What do you know of this - A. I have known the prisoner a length of time - for two years. Q. Where did she live - A. In Compton-street when I first knew her. Q. Where lately - A. In Pitt's-place. I visited her there, and have been in her company when I have had serious sums of money, and never lost any; and on the night of the 2d of September, or rather on the morning of the 3d, between two and three o'clock, in the morning, I was in her company. Q. Where - A. In the neighbourhood of Smithfield. Q. Where did you join her - A. In Fleet-market - I met her. Q. What time did you meet her - A. Between two and three o'clock. Q. Where did you go to - A. We walked up Cow-lane to Smithfield. Q. Where did you leave her - A. In fact I did not leave her - I did not go into the public-house with her. Q. Where did you leave her - A. At the top of Cow-lane; in fact she left me, for a dirty sort of a woman came up to her, and I declined going into the public-house with her. Q. Perhaps you would know the woman if you saw her - A. Yes. Q. Perhaps you had seen her living at the same house - A. No.

(The witness, Hannah Eagleton , was here ordered to stand up).

Q. Is that the woman you mean - A. Yes, but she was much dirtier than she is now, and was very tipsy - very

drunk. Q. Did you remonstrate with the prisoner for joining company with her - A. I did. Q. Where did you go - A. I waited outside the house. She came out to me. Q. Did she come out to you - A. She did, and I walked up Holborn with her. Q. Then she was not in company with any one - A. Not except myself and the woman. Q. Then you walked away with her - A. Yes. Q. Perhaps you was the person who went into the wine vaults with her - A. No. Q. Where was the woman afterwards - A. She joined us in Holborn. Q. What! were you wandering about all night with her - A. Yes. Q. Did you see Mr. Browning - A. I did not. Q. Did you see Warberton - A. I did not. Q. Look at them both - (he did so) - A. I did not see them. Q. How long did the woman remain in the public-house before she joined you again - A. Not more than ten minutes. Q. And excepting the time she was in the public-house you was always in her company - A. I was always in her company. Q. Until what time - A. Till near seven o'clock. Q. Then she could not have been with Browning or Warberton - A. Not without my seeing them. Q. Did you see them - A. I did not. Q. Then you mean to swear that this woman was not in company with Browning or Warberton after she came out of the public-house - A. I do. Q. Here are three witnesses who have positively sworn it, I put you on your guard, where did you go with her all this time - A. Walked in different parts of the street. Q. Then you were walking with her from three o'clock until seven - A. Yes. Q. You did not go into any house - A. No. Q. What time did the drunken woman join you again - A. I should think between six and seven o'clock. Q. Had the prisoner any notes with her - A. She asked me for some money when I first saw her, going up Cow-lane. Q Were you drunk or sober at that time - A. Sober. Q. What money had you about you at that time - A. Probably 10 l. Q. Don't tell me probably, do you mean to say you had 10 l. - A. Yes. Q. How was it - A. In separate notes, Bank and country notes. That day I received three Cambridge 1 l. Bank notes from the person where I lodge. Q. Of whom - A. Of Charles Holder , who keeps the British coffee-house. Q. What did you receive of him - A. Three Cambridge and three Bank notes. Q. Which Cambridge bank - A. Mortlock's notes. Q. What did you receive them of him for - A. In change for a 10 l. Bank of England. Q. What time did you get this change - A. On the morning of the 2d of September. Q. He is here, is he not - A. I do not know. Q. Where did you sleep last night - A. At his house. Q. You knew what you were coming here for - A. Yes. Q. Did you desire him to come here - A. I did not. Q. What other change had you for the 10 l. note - A. I paid him his bill, which was nearly 4 l. Q. How was the rest made up - A. Three 1 l. Bank notes, and three Cambridge notes. Q. What did you give the prisoner - A. She asked me for some money, and I gave her a 1 l. note. Q. What was that - A. A Cambridge note. Q. And only one - A. Only one. She then told me she owed a small sum, and that was not sufficient, and I gave her another 1 l. note, which was a Bank of England note. Q. She had no money about her at that time - A. She said she had none. Q. When you left her at six o'clock in the morning, so far as you learnt from her, she had only these two notes, which you gave her - A. She had not. Q. Have you been here, and heard the whole evidence - A. I have not. Q. When did you come in - A. When you was reading the evidence over. Q. What became of you afterwards? Have you been at the British coffee-house ever since - A. Yes. Q. Have you retired from business - A. I have. Q. What were you - A. A grocer. Q. Where - A. In Nottingham. Q. How long were you in trade - A. I did not set up in trade - I was an apprentice. Q. You did not get your fortune by being an apprentice - A. I had a fortune left me by my uncle. Q. What was your uncle's name - A. Williams. Q. You have lived on that fortune ever since - A. I have. Q. What age are you - A. Twenty-six. Q. Were you at the Bank in Lothbury - A. I was not. Q. Did you go to the Bank with the prisoner, and purchase stock - A. I did not. Q. Did she ever shew you the Bank receipt for the stock - A. She did not. Q. How often have you been to see her since the 3d of September - A. I have not been since. Q. How came you here - A. I heard of this business. Q. Did you not hear of it till after she was committed - A. I did not.

(He was then Cross-examined by MR. BALLENTINE.)

Q. What public-house did you go to with her - A. I went to none. Q. What public-house did she go to - A. The corner of Cow-lane. Q. Do you know the sign - A. I do not. It is the corner of Cow-lane and Smithfield. Q. Are there any ladies kept at this coffee-house - A. There are not. Q. What sort of a coffee-house is it - A. Very respectable. Q. Ladies visit it well as gentleman - A. I never saw any. Q. On your oath is it not a brothel - A. It is not.

HENRY BROWNING . I am a horse-dealer, and live at Burnwell, near Cambridge. On the 2d of September I was in London, and went to Smithfield the night before the fair, with a Mr. Warberton and Captain O'Conner; we we went into a public-house at the corner of Cow-lane between three and four o'clock on the morning of the 3d of September - O'Connor is gone to France. When we went into the house Dillon was standing up before the counter in the taproom; I saw Eagleton sitting in the same room behind her. I had 203 l. 1 s. in notes in a canvass purse in my left hand breeches-pocket. We staid in the house about ten or fifteen minutes, and all three came out together.

Q. Previous to your going out had Dillon and you any conversation - A. She asked me for something to drink; I observed by her brogue that she was Irish, and referred her to Captain O'Connor, as her countryman - he has but one arm. He treated her - I was perfectly sober. We all three came out together, left Dillon in the house, and had got about thirty yards down Cow-lane, towards Fleet-market - I was outside of the three, about thirty yards from the door. Dillon came up, put her hand on me, and asked me to go with her? in the manner a woman of the town would.

Q. How long had you been walking that thirty yards - As fast as we could, we did not stop; I refused to go, but she windled about me, and I stepped into a court on the right hand side of the lane. I talked to her; she returned with me, and walked down Cow-lane to Holborn Bridge with me. I there met a person whom I knew, and as soon as I stopped to speak to him she left, without

speaking, and I saw no more of her. Before I got to the White Horse, public-house, Fetter-lane, I discovered that all my notes and bag were gone. I did not see her afterwards until she was in the watch-house on the 15th or 16th of the same month; the notes were traced to Messrs. Jones and Loyd's. 200 l. was of Sir John Mortlock 's, Schrine, and Co., and two were of Mortlock's and Sons, and a one guinea Newmarket note.

Q. What time did you part with her - A. I think it must be after four o'clock.

COURT. Q. How many notes were there in all - A. Thirty-three - they formed a considerable bundle.

Q. From the time she joined you until you parted with her, could any man have been in her company - A. He could not. I never saw the defendant in my life - it is impossible he could have been with her.

HANNAH EAGLETON . I was examined in October on Dillon's trial - I lived at No. 4, Pitt's-place, with her. On the night of the 2d of September I was at the top of Cow-lane with her in a public-house; one door opens into Cow-lane, and the other into Smithfield. We were there a good bit before Mr. Browning came in with Mr. Warberton and a gentleman with one arm. They did not stay many minutes before Dillon asked Browning for something to drink; he refused, and referred her to her countryman, the gentleman with one arm. Browning and his two friends left the house, she went out directly after them, and I followed her directly - she was talking to them; then Mr. Browning and she went down the first turning - she told me to stop there until they came out.

Q. Was the defendant there - A. No; I never saw him till I saw him at Guildhall.

Q. Are you sure he had not joined her company at that time - A. He had not. I was with her in her house all day, and remained with her until nine o'clock in the morning.

Q. From the time she came out of the turning, down to nine o'clock in the morning, was that man ever near you, or in sight - A. Never, that I am quite sure of. I did not leave her a single moment till nine o'clock in the morning. When Mr. Browning and she came out of the court they went on to the bottom, towards Fleet-market together. A gentleman began to talk to him, and she came back to me, shewed me the purse, said she had picked his pocket of a bag, and told me to run, for we should both be hung if we were caught - the bag had a string to it. We ran through a number of courts and places till past six o'clock, then went into Frith's, and got something to drink.

Q. Did you see what was in the bag - A. She threw the bag away in Shoe-lane, and kept the notes; it was a large roll of notes. She paid Mr. Frith 9 s. or 10 s. which she owed him, with a Cambridge 1 l. note. She shewed me a Newmarket guinea note. I went to another public-house with her, and never quitted her a moment till nine o'clock. The prisoner was never in her company.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Do you know a man named Duggan - A. I have seen him drinking with her.

JOSEPH FRITH . I keep a wine-vaults at the corner of Middle-row, Holborn. On the morning of the 3d of September, about seven o'clock, Eagleton and Dillon came in - Dillon paid me 11 s. or 12 s. with a Cambridge 1 l. note, Mortlock and Sons' bank. They had a little gin and milk to drink, and went out. I observed a similar note in her hand, and a roll of notes closely folded up; they appeared to be country notes from their texture. The defendant was not with her - there was a shorter stouter man with them; it was a very different man altogether from him.

HANNAH EAGLETON re-examined. That man joined us about five o'clock.

MR. BARRY addressed the Jury on behalf of the defendant - he stated that he could not ask a verdict of acquittal at their hands, but the best thing he could do would be to apply to the mercy of the Court, as he was informed the defendant had been made the dupe of a man named Duggan, whom Eagleton had said, on her cross-examination, she had seen with Dillon. He would deliver in a statement, written by the defendant himself, and leave him to the mercy of the Court - (read).

"My Lord, and Gentlemen of the Jury, I beg leave to state that my father has carried on an extensive business in the town of Derby, for upwards of forty years, as malt-ster, miller, and grocer, and in his service I continued till he unfortunately became a bankrupt, by becoming security for a friend, and I was consequently obliged to leave Derby in pursuit of a situation. I came up to London, took lodgings at Mr. Corderoy's, in the Strand, and was there for months, until the little money I had was spent, and I was in debt upwards of 5 l. for my lodgings. My landlord became very importunate for his rent, and told me I must either pay or leave, and detained my clothes for his demand. I had now been in London nine months, without being able to get a situation, having been necessitated to pledge my watch, to draw on my existence at one meal per day, and was in great distress. One morning, as I was taking breakfast at a coffee-shop, I became acquainted with one Alder, and making known my situation to him, he offered me a lodging at his house; but humble indeed, as it was, a bed of straw, even this was preferable to the treatment of my own lodging, and which I thankfully accepted. I had been here but a short time before I became a dupe to my landlord and his friends, two of which, viz. Connell and Connor, came to his house in Castle-court, Strand. One day in September he stated that a woman, a tenant of Duggans's, was accused of a robbery of which she was innocent, and that he was afraid she would be found guilty, owing to a gentleman (Mr. William Petlay ,) being abroad, in whose company she was at the time the robbery was committed. Connel said if Petlay had been in town he could have proved an alibi very clearly, and that it would be a very grievous thing for the woman to be convicted innocently. In farther conversation, they said this Mr. William Petlay was a country gentleman, and very like myself, so much so, that on their first seeing me they thought I had been the very person. Soon after, they invited myself, and Alder my landlord, to drink with them at their friend's house (Mr. Roach) who keeps the Black Horse, public-house, in Wild-street. We met them several times; the conversation always turned on this woman - they said she was innocent, and that there would not be the least harm in any one personating the said Mr. Petlay, which would be the only means of saving her from being transported. They all agreed that I was

the only person to do it, as I was so very like Mr. Petlay, and that they, Duggan and Connell, were to come forward, and substantiate what I had stated, but they took care not to appear. All the parties were entire strangers to me before the present transaction. Being totally unacquainted with the nature of Courts of Law, and its being a crime of such magnitude, and from what they said, believing the woman to be innocent, I agreed to personate Mr. William Petlay at their solicitations, partly as a return for my landlord's kindness in supplying me with food and lodging, and from their promising to get me a good situation. I beg to state, that my name is Francis Robotham , and that I have supported an industrious, honest character up to the present time. I am now very conscious of the crime I have committed, for which I have already suffered three months imprisonment in a dreary prison. I now throw myself wholly on the mercy of the Court, and this being the first time I ever offended against the laws of my country, I hope and trust the Court will award a lenient punishment."

ISAAC PARSEY . I live in Sydney's-alley, Leicester-square, and am a dealer in thread lace. I have known the defendant four or five years - his real name is Francis Robotham ; he came to town in search of a situation - he told me he lived at No. 349, Strand, I saw him there.

MR. ARABIN. Q. Not at the British Coffee-house - A. No. I have lent him money.

COURT. Q. If he had told you he meant to come home, and swear he was independent, and lived at the British Coffee-house, you would have told him not to come - A. Certainly.

ELIZA READ . I live in Leicester-square. I know the prisoner, he was in distress - I have relieved him.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Confined One Year , to stand in the Pillory for One Hour , and then to be Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200112-90

299. JOHN CHARLES CUTHBERT was indicted for perjury .

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200112-91

SEVENTH DAY, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 19.

300. RICHARD ALLEN was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of December , one pair of boots, value 4 s. , the goods of John Davis .

JOHN DAVIS . I live in Cromer-street, Brunswick-square . On Chrismas Day, between eight and nine o'clock in the morning, I was in the parlour, and thought I heard a noise in the shop - I turned round, and saw the prisoner going out of the door with something in his apron. I secured him, and took the boots from him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I took them to the door to look at.

GUILTY Aged 52.

Confined Three Months , and Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200112-92

301. THOMAS BARTON was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of December , three sow pigs, price 9 l., and one barrow pig, price 6 l. , the property of William Greaves and Edward Kelly .

EDWARD KELLY . I am in partnership with William Greaves ; we are scavenger s, and live at Paddington - we had four pigs in our yard, which is walled round. On the 24th of December I was coming out of the counting-house, and met Gordon, who asked me if we had sold our pigs? I said No. He then said there was a cove gone along with them. We went and saw the prisoner driving them about a quarter of a mile off; he turned them across Paddington-green, we went into a public-house to watch him. When he came opposite the house the largest pig ran away, and as he could not overtake it he went on with the other three - we secured him. He said,

"D - n the fellow, do you think I am going to steal your pigs." They were ours.

WILLIAM GORDON . I am a farmer, and live at Paddington; I saw the prisoner come out of the prosecutors' yard with the pigs before him. He drove them about twenty yards; I followed him with Kelly, and secured him. He gave a boy a penny to help him drive them - he was alone at first.

JOSEPH HOLMES . On the 24th of December, about half-past twelve o'clock, the prisoner came by Paddington church with four pigs. They wanted to turn back, and he offered me a penny to help him drive them.

WILLIAM COATES . I took the prisoner in charge, and found 30 s. 6 d. on him.

Prisoner's Defence. I was out of employ; the pigs ran on the pavement. I took no notice of them.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200112-93

302. WILLIAM BRETT and WILLIAM WOODCOCK were indicted for stealing, on the 6th of January , one handkerchief, value 2 s., the goods of a man unknown, from his person .

CHARLES READ . I am assistant at Hatton-garden. On the 6th of January, about six o'clock in the evening, I and the witnesses were in the Strand , and saw the prisoners and another following a gentleman towards Charing-cross. I saw Brett take a handkerchief half out of the gentleman's pocket; the gentleman turned round, and they fell back, then followed him as far as Somerset House. I there saw Brett forward, and the other two covering him, and saw him take the handkerchief out, and give it to Woodcock; I was on the opposite side - the gentleman did not perceive it - all three separated. I went and told the gentleman, and he missed his handkerchief; Thompson shewed it to him, and he claimed it. He said he was a solicitor in the country and could not attend - he would not give us his name or direction.

THOMAS THOMPSON . I am an officer. I was with Read, and saw the prisoners and another following the gentleman; I sent Read forward and kept back myself, supposing they would know me. Before they got to Somerset House I saw Brett close on the gentleman, and the other two covering him - I could not see what he did. Immediately after that Woodcock ran towards me in the middle of the road, fell down and dropped it; the gentleman

came back and claimed it, but would not give his name - they appeared clumsy at the business.

CHARLES JONES . I was with the witnesses, and saw the prisoners and another following a gentleman. I saw Brett lay hold of the handkerchief twice, but he did not get it out; I again saw him reach his hand towards the gentleman, but a coach passing I saw no more. I secured him immediately.

BRETT - GUILTY . Aged 18.

WOODCOCK - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200112-94

303. GEORGE ARMSTRONG was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of December , three bushels of coals, value 3 s. , the goods of John Charrington , Daniel Cloves , Sen., and Daniel Cloves , Jun.

The prisoner pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 67.

Fined One Shilling , and Discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200112-95

304. JOHN SIRETT was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of October , two table-spoons, value 16 s.; two salt-cellars, value 14 s.; one cream-pot, value 10 s.; one pepper-castor, value 5 s., and five tea-stoons, value 10 s., the goods of John Preedy , in his dwelling-house .

ANN PREEDY . I am the wife of John Preedy , who lives in Turnham-mews, Chiswick . On Friday, the 2d of November, I missed all this property out of a box in my bedroom, which was not locked - they were stolen on the 29th of October. I found two table-spoons in pledge at Brentford, and saw the rest at Bow-street on the 11th of January - the prisoner was in custody. He came to lodge with me in September, and left on the 29th of October - he might have taken them at different times. He left without notice.

JOHN KENDREW . I live with Mr. Nicholls, who is a pawnbroker, and lives at Brentford. On the 29th of October a man pledged two table-spoons with me.

JOHN BOYCE . I am shopman to Mr. Forrester, who is a pawnbroker, and lives in Blackfriars-road. On the 1st of November, the prisoner pledged a pair of silver salts with me for 14 s. - there was a crest on them, which he said was his family crest.

JAMES HUNT . I am shopman to Mr. Archbut, who is a pawnbroker, and lives in Blackfriars-road. On the 17th of November, a pepper-castor and cream-jug were pledged with me in the name of John Sirett . I do not know the person.

CHARLES GAMMON . I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner on the 3d of January, at a public-house by the Cobourg Theatre. He said he did it from distress, and meant to redeem them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 25.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200112-96

305. JAMES HICKS and RICHARD HICKS were indicted for stealing, on the 6th of December , at Laleham, two heifers, price 14 l. , the property of Charles Thomas Mohon .

CHARLES THOMAS MOHON . I am a farmer , residing at Laleham , about twenty miles from London. I had nine or ten heifers at grass in my field - some of them were my neighbour's. On Saturday, the 4th of December, about noon, I saw them safe in the field; on the following Tuesday, the 7th, I missed three; two of them were my own, and the field is mine - it was in a good state of repair on the Saturday. They had been grazing together two or three weeks, and my two had been bred together.

Q. That being the case, they would not separate very easily - A. No. I consider them worth about 10 l. a piece. The prisoner, James Hicks , was a pauper in our workhouse at the time, and had been so sometime. Richard is a labourer, and lived at Staines, about two miles from Laleham, and William lived at Laleham - he is a labourer, and received alms from the parish. The three heifers have been returned to me by Mr. Vorley.

WILLIAM VORLEY . I am a salesman of Smithfield. On the 6th of December, three heifers were brought to me for sale by Clements, in the name of Taylor. He came to me in the morning, and asked me to sell them for him, which I did about two o'clock. They produced 26 l. 8 s., deducting my commission, which was 6 s. I said I should not pay him unless he brought some document to satisfy me that they were his property - I saw nobody with him.

Q. Did he come next morning with any authority - A. Yes, about ten o'clock he brought me this letter. A man was with him whom I do not know - (read) -

"December 6, 1819. Sir, This is to inform you, that Thomas Taylor knows this property to be his own. Joseph Newman , Cranford Bridge." I was present when James Milner , my clerk paid him the money. I saw the money paid to him.

JAMES MILNER . I am clerk in the house of Mr. Jones, of Smithfield. On Tuesday, the 7th of December, I paid Clements 26 l. 8 s. in Bank notes, on the verbal order of Mr. Vorley. There was one 20 l. note, No. 12833, October 8, 1819; No. 13321, 5 l., October 21, 1819; and No. 68364, 1 l., October 27, (I do not know the year), and 8 s. in silver.

RICHARD CLEMENTS . On the 5th of December I lived at Brentford End - I know the prisoners. On the Monday morning that the beast were sold Richard Hicks came to me about twenty minutes after four o'clock - I was abed, and he called me up. I came down, opened the door, and asked him what was the matter? He said,

"I have three things which I am going to take to town, and if you will go with me I will satisfy you for your trouble" - he had nothing with him then.

Q. How far was he from Laleham - A. About nine miles. I told him to go on, and I would overtake him - he went on directly. I followed, and overtook him by the soldiers' house, near Gunnersbury-lane, in the main road - he was then driving three heifers before him.

Q. Had you any conversation with him - A. None, till we got to the bottom of Fleet-market. He then said,

"We will divide them, and take two to one salesman and

one to another." We tried to divide the beast, but they would go together, and we drove them to the end of the market - it was then seven or half-past seven o'clock. He then dropped back, and told me to go on and put them into a salesman's hands to sell them.

Q. He was not to appear at the sale - A. No. I put them into Mr. Vorley's hands for sale. After they were tied up he came before them, and remained there nearly all day. I went away for about an hour and a half or two hours, then returned, and he told me what had been bid for them. I did not tell Mr. Vorley that the prisoner was waiting. Mr. Vorley sold them about two o'clock, and I waited there till then, then went and asked him if he would settle for them? He said he was not going to the office just then, but he was going soon, and he would settle for them. He said in about ten minutes that he could not pay the money unless I brought somebody to vouch for them - Richard Hicks was not near enough to hear it; I gave him the name of Thomas Taylor , Cranford. I returned and told Hicks what had passed; he said nothing then, and we went home; he went into my house, had some refreshment, and then went home.

Q. Is he a relation of your's - A. Yes, I married his sister. He is a labourer, and so is the prisoner, James, who is his father.

COURT. Q. You must have known he could not be honestly possessed of the beast - A. I did not know it. On the Tuesday morning I was gathering mushrooms, and met Richard and William just by the turnpike at Smallborough-green. William asked me where I was going? (he is not in custody). I said I was going to get some champignons. William asked me to go back with them, said he had got a letter, and that every thing was right. I said if he had got the letter he could do very well without me, but he said,

"You may as well return and go back with me," and I did.

Q. How could he do without you - A. As he had the letter. I went with him to Vorley's office, and Richard waited outside. I and William went in; William gave me the letter, and I gave it to the clerk, who said he could not pay me on that letter unless I brought some person forward who knew me. I said I did not know who I could bring. He said if I would go out perhaps Mr. Vorley would soon be in; we came out, and all three crossed the market together, and met Mr. Vorley. I told him I had brought a note, and that William had come with me to say all was right.

Q. Did William and Richard speak to Mr. Vorley - A. William did, but I do not know what he said - we returned to the office. William and I went in, and Richard staid without. Vorley looked at the letter, spoke to the clerk, and after some little time told him to pay me the money. He gave me a 20 l., a 5 l., and a 1 l. note, and 8 s. in silver; we came out, and Richard joined us at the door; we went to the Bank, and they waited outside while I went in and changed the 20 l. note; I could not write, and got a gentleman to write

" Thomas Taylor , Cranford" on it; the clerk changed it for twenty 1 l. notes, I then returned to Richard and William and we went home. We took some refreshment at a public-house at Hyde Park, and there William said,

"What will satisfy you for your trouble?" I said,

"What you please" - Richard, who was close by, heard it; William said,

"Will 5 l. satisfy you?" and I said Yes. He told me to take 5 l. from the money, and return them the rest - I had the money up to that time. I kept five of the 1 l. notes, and returned them sixteen 1 l. and a 5 l. note. Richard said,

"William have you got right?" He said,

"Yes, 21 l." We spent 4 s. 6 d. out of the 8 s., and I kept the other 3 s. 6 d.

Q. After this did they say any thing respecting the money - A. William said the 21 l. was to be divided into three parts - James was not present then; he did not say between whom it was to be divided. Then Richard told me how it had been done; he said he called William up, and they both went to Mr. Mohon's field, and that their father stood in the road; that they were bringing two heifers, out but the third would follow, and then they all three drove the three heifers till they got to the powder mills at Hounslow, then William and James went back, and Richard brought them forward - he said they only meant to take two, but the third would follow.

JURY. Q. How long before Richard called you up had you seen him - A. I met him on Hounslow Heath the Friday before; I live nine miles from him - I made no plan to steal them; they never mentioned it to me.

HANNAH CLEMENTS . I am the wife of Richard Clements . I recollect his being called up about four o'clock on the Monday morning, about a fortnight before he was taken up. He went down, I did not hear the persons speak to him; there was something like dirt flung at the window, he got up and went out, and returned about five or six o'clock in the evening. I cannot say who called him up. He went out next day, about six o'clock in the morning, and took his basket to get champignons. He generally went down the Hounslow road for them. He did not come home before the evening; nobody returned with him. I did not see any of my brothers that evening.

JURY. Q. Did you expect him home before he returned - A. I expected him about two o'clock with the champignons, as he used to do.

MR. VORLEY re-examined. Q. On the second day, where did Clements meet you - A. In the market, near the office. I do not know that any one was with him then - there was a man in the office with him.

WILLIAM HIGMAN . I am in the Pay-Clerks' Office in the Bank. I produce a 20 l. note, No. 12833, dated 8th October, 1819; I got it from Mr. Wragg. I can positively say Clements is the man who brought it, from a circumstance that transpired. Wragg asked him what profession he was? he gave his name as Taylor, of Cranford, and said he was a labourer.

"T. Taylor, Cranford," was written on it, and Wragg wrote

"labourer." I paid him twenty 1 l. notes for it. The following notes were among those I paid him:-Nos. 52943 and 52944, dated 4th November; 73157, 8th November; 45051 and 12284, October 23; 40877, October 25; 76018 and 25462, October 27; 76235, October 28; 15073 and 32640, October 30, 1819; also Nos. 37736, September 29; 70115, November 4; 61895, November 2, and 33118, October 18. The four last have since been paid into the Bank.

THOMAS WRAGG . I am a pay-clerk in the Bank. This 20 l. note was presented for payment on the 7th of December - I believe Clements to be the person who presented

it.

" Thomas Taylor , Cranford-bridge," was on it when it was exchanged, but I do not know that it was when it was first presented. On my looking at the man, it occurred to me that he was not respectable enough to be in the habit of having 20 l. notes. I asked him what he was? he said he was a labourer, and I wrote

"labourer" on it.

GEORGE RUTHVEN . I am an officer. On the 18th of December I searched Clements's house at Brentford. I found four 1 l. notes in a tea-caddy - I produce them; they are Nos. 73157, November 8, 1819; 15073, October 30; 45051, October 23, and 76018, October 27 - all 1819. I have not been able to apprehend William Hicks . I apprehended Richard at Staines, on the 17th of December, standing at his own door, near the market-place. I told him there was a 1 l. note paid into the Bank, which had come through his hands to his father, and it was forged. I shewed him a note, but not that I was speaking of. He said he had not seen his father for four or five weeks; that he had given his father a note, but that he received it from the Bank of England, in change for a 5 l. or a 10 l. note, he did not know which. I said if he had so received it, he had better meet me with his father and explain it. I went with him to his father. In going along he said he had some more notes in his pocket, which he had received at the same time. I asked him to shew them to me, to see if the numbers corresponded. I then saw he had six 1 l. notes. Just as we got into Staines, I asked him about the note he got change for, he said it was a 5 l.; that he had been to London as guard to Creswell's waggon on the Monday, returned on Tuesday night, and changed a 5 l. note for Mr. Creswell; that he received 1 l. out of it, which 1 l. he gave to his father. I told him it must have been more than a 5 l. note, for I saw six in his hand. He immediately put his hand into his pocket and said,

"No, you are mistaken, there are but four" - he shewed me four. I said,

"Well, then, I am mistaken." I got him into a house, searched him, and took four from him, which I produce. Here are Nos. 76235, October 28; 25462, October 27; 52943 and 52944, November 4, 1819. I did not then find that he had two others.

Q. After that what happened - A. I left him custody, and in the course of the evening he denied having any more notes about him; I again searched him, and found a 1 l. note loose in his side coat pocket, at the bottom, as a piece of waste paper - it was No. 12284, October 23, 1819. Next morning I saw him, and asked if he was in the same mind? he said, No, he would tell the whole truth. I neither threatened nor promised him. He then said he was coming to London on a Tuesday, to the Board of St. George's, Hanover-square, to receive an allowance which he had from that parish; that he met his brother William, and told him he had no money; that his brother said,

"I am going into the City to receive some money, and if you will wait till I return I will give you some." That he waited about Hyde Park Corner till his brother returned, and he gave him ten new 1 l. notes. I told him he must have known how they were got, for he knew his brother was receiving alms from the parish. He said he did not know, nor did he ask him. I then asked who was with him? he said nobody was with him for sometime. I said it was of no use to tell me so, for I knew there was another with him. He then said there was; that Richard Clements was with him, in consequence of which I apprehended him.

GEORGE NELMES . I am a watchman of Brentford End. Clements is a labourer, and a neighbour of mine. On the 6th of December, about four o'clock in the morning, three beast came by me; a man drove them, I did not know him; he asked the time? I told him, and he went off. I saw Clements coming from his own house about half an hour after, he was going towards London, I did not speak to him. I live five or six doors from him, and have known him four or five years.

ELIZABETH IRESON . I am mistress of the poor-house at Laleham - the prisoner, James, is a pauper there. In December he slept in the poor-house, that was his home. He was out all night on the 5th of December, and returned about a quarter before eight o'clock on Monday morning. We had a person very ill in labour three or four night before; he said he could not sleep in the house on account of the noise - I gave him leave to be out, but he slept there afterwards. He frequently slept out without leave.

FREDERICK WILLATTS . My father keeps a grocer's shop at Chertsey, about two or three miles from Laleham. I produce a 5 l. note, which I received from a Mrs. Hicks; she lived at Laleham. I never saw her before - it is No. 13321, dated October 21.

CHARLOTTE VERREY . I live at Laleham, my husband is a baker and grocer; the family of the Hicks's deal at our shop. On the 11th of December I received a 1 l. note from Rebecca Hicks , the wife of John Hicks , and daughter-in-law to James - this is it - (looking at it) - No. 32640, October 30, 1819; I put her name on it at the time.

REBECCA HICKS . I am married to John Hicks , one of the sons of James. On the 11th of December I changed a 1 l. note with Verrey. I do not know the note; I received it from the prisoner, James Hicks , to get change; I was to give the change to him.

Prisoner JAMES HICKS . Q. Did your husband borrow it - A. Not to my knowledge.

GEORGE DEXTER . I am a corn-chandler, and live at Staines. On the 10th of December I took a 1 l. note from the prisoner, James, and wrote his name on it. The note, No. 70115, 4th November, produced from the Bank, is it.

SAMUEL LUSH . I am a publican, live at Laleham, and am employed by the Post-Office to deliver letters. On the 17th of December Richard Hicks paid me a 1 l. note to give to his wife, who lives at Staines - I wrote his name and the date on it, but did not give it her; I detained it in consequence of information - here it is - (producing it) - No. 40877, October 25, 1819.

JAMES HICKS'S Defence. I am innocent. I know nothing of it, and never saw it.

RICHARD HICKS 'S Defence. I was going to London to my parish, and met my brother with three beast before him; he asked me if I was going to London? I said Yes. He told me to take them to Clements, and he would take them to Smithfield and sell them. I took them to him, and called him up in the morning; he overtook me on the road, and took them into the market. When we came back he told me to tell my brother to come up next day, which I did. He called me up next morning - I had to go to my parish again, and went to town with him, but he never mentioned where he got the cattle from. As we came

back he gave me these ten notes. I owed my father some money, which I had of him in the summer, and gave him one of the notes. I know nothing of the cattle.

JAMES HICKS - NOT GUILTY .

RICH. HICKS - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 28.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200112-97

306. DUGGAN DANIELS was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of December , one bonnet, value 9 s., and one apron, value 6 d. , the property of John Francis .

PATIENCE FRANCIS . I am wife of John Francis ; we live in Bell-yard, Drury-lane . On the 18th of December, about half-past eleven o'clock in the morning, I was cleaning my room, and had my back towards the door, the prisoner came, and took my bonnet and apron off the box. I was turning round, saw something go out of the door, and missed them. I went to the door, and saw the prisoner with them in his hand. He said,

"Is this your bonnet?" I said Yes. He said he had lost such a bonnet as that, and was in search of it. I asked him if he had got a a search-warrant? he laughed at me - I took it from him. The lodgers came down and detained him. I ran down, and fastened the street-door. I then asked him if he knew any person in the house? he said No. The people of the house said,

"Don't let him go, for we have been robbed before, and dare say he is the person." He gave no reason for coming there. The street-door was latched, not locked.

Prisoner. Q. Did you see me in the room - A. He was on the landing-place. He could not get away, for he was surrounded by women.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. My sister-in-law, who lives at Knightsbridge, was robbed of a bonnet. I was hunting for it; a woman, whom I do not know, sent me up there, and said it was there. I knocked at the door twice. I took the bonnet in my hand to look at it. It is my wife's bonnet.

GUILTY . Aged 37.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200112-98

307. HARRIET COLE was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of December , two shawls, value 1 l. , the goods of James Syms .

There being no evidence against the prisoner but her own confession, which was extorted, she was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18200112-99

308. JOHN CHINNERY was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of December , one saw, value 2 s. , the goods of Thomas Clewlow .

THOMAS CLEWLOW . I am a butcher , and live in Wilstead-street, Somers' Town . On the 31st of December, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, I was returning home, and saw the prisoner coming out of my shop on his hands and knees - I laid hold of him and said

"What have you taken?" he said it was the saw, and pleaded distress.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Confined One Month .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18200112-100

309. WILLIAM SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of December , one bedstead, value 30 s. , the goods of Richard Bentley .

RICHARD BENTLEY . I am an upholder , and live in Tottenham-court-road . On the 6th of December, between five and six o'clock, I was at the door, and saw the prisoner come by - he was my journeyman , but had not been at work that day - a bedstead was stolen from the shop soon after; he went to work next day. I told him I had lost a bedstead, and that he had been hanging about all day. I went with him after some bed furniture which he had lost. He took me to a woman in Pulteney-street, she said he had not got it. He then took me to the Cock, public-house - the landlord said he had brought a bedstead there, and two men sold it in Castle-street.

JOHN GRANT . I am a furniture-broker, and live in Castle-street. I bought the bedstead of the prisoner. Bentley afterwards saw and claimed it.

Prisoner's Defence. Another man asked me to sell it.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Confined One Month , and Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18200112-101

310. SOPHIA CHEW was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of January , two spoons, value 4 s. , the goods of Elizabeth Lipscombe .

ELIZABETH LIPSCOMBE . I lodge in Rock-row, Lisson-grove . On the 6th of January, between ten and eleven o'clock in the morning, I lost these spoons - the prisoner's parents live next door. I found one spoon at the pawnbroker's.

JAMES ROSS . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Paddington-street. On the 6th of January the prisoner pledged a spoon with me.

CHARLES JENKINS . On the 6th of January I bought a broken spoon and a sixpence of the prisoner, as old silver.

JOHN MARTIN . I took the prisoner in charge. She told me where she sold the spoon.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 19.

Judgment Respited .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18200112-102

311. THOMAS BROWN and EDWARD PLUMMER were indicted for stealing, on the 24th of December , 10 s. in copper monies numbered , the monies of Henry Rickett .

HENRY RICKETT . I am a grocer , and live in Shoreditch . On the 24th of December, about five or six o'clock in the evening, the prisoners came, in company with a man, who asked for a pennyworth of candied lemon-peel. The moment they went out Walters entered, and said they had taken two or three papers of copper off my desk; I ran out, took the prisoners, and gave them in charge - the other escaped. I found nothing on them. They came in and went out together, and stood by the desk.

FRANCIS WALTERS . I was looking through the window, and saw three boys - one bigger than the prisoners stood talking to Rickett at the desk, which joins the counter. Brown put his hand up, took one paper of halfpence, and gave them to the biggest boy; he then turned back and took another parcel, which I thought he put into his

pocket. Plummer shoved him out of the way, and went into the same place, but whether he took any or not I cannot say. I saw them take two parcels.

BROWN - GUILTY . Aged 16.

PLUMMER - GUILTY . Aged 15.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

312. THOMAS BROWN and EDWARD PLUMMER were again indicted for stealing, on the 24th of December , three handkerchiefs, value 3 s. 6 d. , the goods of Richard Osborne and Ann Osborne .

MARIA ABSALOM . I am shopwoman to Richard and Ann Osborne , who are haberdasher s, and live in Shoreditch . Three handkerchiefs were stolen from the shop.

JOSEPH DAVIES . I took the prisoners in charge at Rickett's, and found the handkerchiefs in his shop, on the spot where they were detained, and in a part of the shop where the customers do not go.

HENRY RICKETT. I placed the prisoners in a separate part of the shop.

BROWN - GUILTY .

PLUMMER - GUILTY .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18200112-103

313. JAMES SUMMERS was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of January , two sheets, value 5 s., and one blanket, value 5 s., the goods of Thomas Pink , in a lodging-room.

ELIZA PINK . I am wife of Thomas Pink , who is a carpenter , and lives in Gloucester-street, Shoreditch . I let the prisoner a two-pair of stairs room, furnished, at 3 s. a week - he paid very regularly while he was in work. He got more work, and said he would pay me. He came home late on Saturday night; I did not see him again till I saw him at Worship-street. I had missed a blanket and two sheets off his bed - I found them in pledge.

THOMAS JONES . I am a pawnbroker. On the 16th of December the prisoner pledged a sheet and a carpenter's role with me for 3 s.

LEVY TOBIAS . I am a pawnbroker. On the 24th of December the prisoner pledged a blanket with me for 18 d.

WILLIAM JOHNSON . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner for stealing a great-coat. I searched his lodgings, and among some cinders I found some particles of the duplicates, which, apparently, had been destroyed.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I was in distress.

GUILTY . Aged 48.

Confined One Month .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18200112-104

314. JOSEPH WOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of December , one pair of breeches, value 13 s. , the goods of John Morrison .

WILLIAM HENRY RYDER . I am foreman to John Morrison , who is a tailor , and lives at Norton Falgate . On the 17th of December the breeches hung at the door; I was informed they were stolen, ran out, and secured the prisoner with them.

WILLIAM FLINT . I was coming by, stopped the prisoner, and found a pair of stockings in his hat.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A stranger gave them to me.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18200112-105

315. DENNIS M'CARTHY was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of December , from the person of Mary Gilman , widow , one pocket-book, value 6 d.; eight sixpences, and one 1 l. Bank note, her property .

MARY GILMAN . I am a widow. On the 28th of December, between eight and nine o'clock at night, I was at the White Bear, Lambeth-street , the prisoner sat on my right side for sometime - the pocket-book, with the money, was in my right-hand pocket. I did not feel him take it, but when he went out I missed it. I knew him before - he is a sail-cloth weaver , and worked where I did. He did not return to the house. I was sober. I called there to see a woman whom he lived with.

JOHN BOUTLE . I am street-keeper of Whitechapel. On the 28th of December, about half-past nine o'clock, I was going down Rosemary-lane, heard a noise at a public-house, and went to see what was the matter; the landlord was disputing with the prisoner about some liquor, because he could not give him change for a 1 l. note - I said I could give him change, which I did, and asked him his name? he said Brown, No. 74, Lambeth-street, next door to the White Bear. I went to the White Bear with him to have a pint of porter - I enquired of the landlord if he knew him? he said he lived next door, and that his name was M'Carthy. I then suspected the note was forged, and took him to the watch-house. While I was there a man came and told me to detain him for robbing the prosecutrix - she came to identify the note.

WILLIAM SPRAY . I and the prisoner went to the White Bear; he sat by the side of the prosecutrix. I am sure I saw him fumbling at her right-hand pocket. He always went by the name of M'Carthy.

SIMON SOLOMONS . I was at the watch-house when the prisoner was brought there. He asked to go into the yard. He called the prosecutrix out, and said,

"If you will hold your tongue you shall have your pocket-book in half an hour." In about three-quarters of an hour afterwards he said he knew nothing about it.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18200112-106

316. THOMAS MILLER was indicted for stealing, on 7th of December , two blankets, value 5 s., one sheet, value 18 d., the goods of John Rogers , in a lodging-room, and twenty books, value 20 s., his property .

JOHN ROGERS. I live at Old Brentford - the prisoner lodged at my house, and paid 2 s. a week. He had a bed to himself, On the 6th of December I missed a blanket and sheet off his bed; I asked him about them, he said they were there when he came down. Next morning I missed the books; I then took him to Mr. Lees, where I found the books; Lees said he bought them of him, The prisoner then said he pledged the blanket and sheet at Nicholls's, and said I should find the duplicate in his bedroom drawer, which I did.

JOHN LEES . I deal in old books. I bought the books of the prisoner, at four or five different times.

WILLIAM GOWER . I am a constable. The prisoner told me where to find the duplicate. He bore a good character before.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 47.

Confined Two Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200112-107

317. MICHAEL MORAN was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of December , two deal boards, value 4 s. , the goods of Samuel Kell .

JOSEPH RENSHAW . I am servant to Samuel Kell , who is a carpenter , and lives in Red Lion-street, Holborn . On the 11th of December, about six o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner come out of Mr. Kell's buildings with two boards on his shoulder; he ran down Gray's Inn-lane, and up Laystall-street. I got Read to secure him.

EDWARD READ . I am an officer. I received information from Renshaw, and secured the prisoner with the deals; he said,

"What would not a man do that had no victuals?"

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I was distressed. The witness has sworn falsely.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Confined Three Months and Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200112-108

318. THOMAS HARVEY was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of December , one puncheon, value 1 l. the goods of William Churchill .

WILLIAM HOUSLEY . I am servant to Mr. Wm. Churchill, who is a wine-merchant at Islington . On the 28th of December, about five o'clock in the afternoon, I put this puncheon out of the cart into the road, and went to put the horse away; I returned in about half an hour, and missed it. I traced it through the snow by the marks where it had been rolled, to Sadler's Wells, and found it at Beale's, at six o'clock.

JAMES BEALE . I am a cooper, and live in Cow-cross. I bought the puncheon of the prisoner for 1 l. between five and six o'clock in the evening of the 28th of December. I knew him before. He said he brought it from Walworth in a distiller's cart. It was dirty, as if it had been rolled.

Prisoner's Defence. I saw a man in Smithfield with it, and bought it of him for 18 s.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Fined One Shilling , and Discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200112-109

319. THOMAS HARRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of December , one set of fire-irons, value 15 s. , the goods of Joseph Coales .

JOSEPH COALES . I am an ironmonger , and live in Vine-street . My boy alarmed me about three o'clock, and I missed the fire-irons from the door.

JOSEPH COALES , JUN. I saw the prisoner take the irons from the door, I ran out, but lost sight of him, I caught sight of him again, and my father secured him him with them in Fox-court.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I was distressed.

GUILTY. Aged 19.

Judgment Respited .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200112-110

320. WILLIAM HOWELL was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of December , eleven handkerchiefs, value 15 s. , the goods of Thomas Saundby .

EDWARD EWARD . I am servant to Thomas Saundby , who is a linen-draper , and lives in High Holborn . On the 7th of December, about six o'clock in the evening, I was standing in the door-way, and saw some handkerchiefs move; in a minute or two I went to the door, missed them, and saw the prisoner running over the road with them dragging on the ground. I ran after him, calling stop thief! He was stopped in Brownlow-street, and dropped them.

SAMUEL SPEARING . I was coming down Brownlow-street, heard the cry, and saw the prisoner drop the handkerchiefs. A gentleman caught him. I am sure he is the man.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I ran with the mob, and was stopped, but am innocent.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Three Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200112-111

321. THOMAS GOSTELLOW and WILLIAM HATHAWAY were indicted for stealing, on the 11th of January , three hatbands, value 8 s.; one brooch, value 4 s.; one pair of boot-hooks, value 1 s., and four ounces of wire, value 6 d. the goods of Andrew Lipman Phillips .

ANDREW LIPMAN PHILLIPS . I am a salesman , and live in North-street, Manchester-square . On the 11th of January, between nine and ten o'clock in the morning, I was in the parlour behind the shop, and heard a rattling at the window, went out, and observed three persons at the window - one of them had his hands through, removing the things - the glass had been broken an evening or two before - the other two enclosed him to prevent his being seen. I went to the door, the bell rang, and at that instant they all ran away. I pursued them closely, one escaped, but the other two were taken without my losing sight of them; they were the prisoners. Nothing was found on them. On my return I missed the articles stated in the indictment, which were safe just before.

FRANCES PHILLIPS . I am the daughter of the last witness. I heard a noise at the window, and saw the prisoners and another, one of them had his hands through the window, taking the things. I picked up the wire, which I saw fall from them as they ran, about twenty yards from the shop.

JOHN COOK . I keep a coalshed in Little Brownlow-street, close by. I heard the alarm, and saw the prisoners pass my door; I saw them stopped, and assisted to take them to the watch-house.

(Wire produced and sworn to.)

GOSTELLOW'S Defence. As we passed the door, the gentleman called Stop thief! a man ran from the window, we pursued him, and they took us.

HATHAWAY'S Defence. I can say no more.

GOSTELLOW - GUILTY . Aged 17.

HATHAWAY * - GUILTY . Aged 17.

* Hathaway is the same prisoner who was tried on the Eighth Day by the name of Bridges.

(See No. 332)

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200112-112

322. WILLIAM DAMUS was indicted for stealing on the 8th of January , two pair of trowsers, value 12 s. , the goods of George Baker .

GEORGE BAKER . I am a hosier , and live in Dukes-row, Pimlico . I saw the prisoner take these trowsers from inside the door; I immediately went after him, he dropped them, and I secured him six doors off.

WILLIAM WRIGHT . I am a bootmaker, and live opposite Mr. Baker. I saw the prisoner take the trowsers - he dropped them, and I picked them up.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Confined Six Months , and Publicly Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200112-113

323 JAMES KEARNEY was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of December , from the person of Jean Baptiste Lebeau , one hat, value 5 s., and three 1 l. Bank notes, his property .

JEAN BAPTISTE LEBEAU (through an interpreter). I was servant to the Chevalier Ruspini, who lives in Pall Mall. I met the prisoner in Pall Mall about seven o'clock one evening; he said he was in distress, and asked me to assist him. I gave him 18 d. - he then took me to Jackson's in St. Martin's-lane, I there gave him a 1 l. note. I waited there three-quarters of an hour with him; he then took me to a public-house in Covent Garden , made me drunk there, took me up stairs, and put me to bed himself. I was so drunk I do not know what happened after - he did not sleep with me. In the morning, when I awoke, four 1 l. notes and my hat were gone. He had left his old hat behind.

Prisoner. Q. Did not the landlord shew you up to bed as well as me - A. No. I had seen the prisoner at Canterbury three weeks before.

BENJAMIN RICHARDSON . I am in the Coldstream regiment of Guards; the prisoner belongs to the 19th regiment. I have known the prosecutor about a month; he came to me on the 21st or 22d of December, and said a soldier had robbed him of three 1 l. notes and his hat, at the Russell coffee-house, under the Piazza, Covent Garden; he described him to me, I went with him to find him out, and between six and seven o'clock in the evening, I took the prisoner under the Piazza, Lebeau was with me, and pointed him out. He said he had the man's money, but he meant to come back and give it to him again. He had the hat on his head. Lebeau said he had given him 18 d. to get a lodging, and 1 l. to buy a jacket. Only 10 s. was found on him.

GEORGE DAVIS . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner in Covent Garden, on this charge; he was intoxicated then. The prosecutor gave him in charge. He had the prosecutor's had on - it was better than his own.

CHARLES BOLTON . I assisted in apprehending the prisoner; he only left a regimental cap at the hotel.

(Hat produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200112-114

324. URIAH AUSTIN was indicted for embezzlement .

RICHARD POTTER . I keep the Royal George, George-street, Sloane-square ; the prisoner was in my employ, and entrusted to receive money for me - I sent him out with beer; Elizabeth Smith is a customer of mine; I received nothing from him on her account since the 15th of July . On the 25th of August he asked me to make out her bill, which was 2 l. - I gave it to him. From the 15th of July to the 11th of December, he had two pots of beer put down to her every day. He ought to pay me the money as he received it.

ELIZABETH SMITH . I live in South-street, Sloane-square , and deal with Potter for beer; the prisoner brought it, and I paid him for it constantly as he brought it if I had change, if not I paid him the next time. The most I paid him at a time was 3 s. or 4 s.

Q. From the 15th of July to the 19th of December did you take beer of him - A. Constantly twice a day, and always paid him for it. I generally paid him 5 1/2 d. a day.

RICHARD POTTER re-examined. From the 15th of July to the 19th of December he was put down two pots of beer every day to Smith, and never paid me a farthing. He got intoxicated when he was going out with the beer, and I told him to take the lanthorn, and I would carry the beer, but he said he could carry it. When I came to Mrs. Smith's they put the money into my hand, upon which I was surprised, thinking she owed me above 3 l. The prisoner put the lanthorn down, and started off immediately. I secured him on the following Monday.

Prisoner's Defence. I meant to pay it, but was taken in by a man.

GUILTY . Aged 47.

Confined Six Months , and Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200112-115

325. SUSAN WARD was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of January , two sheets, value 5 s.; two blankets, value 6 s.; two bed-ticks, value 1 l., and two curtains, value 6 d., the goods of John Sitwell , in a lodging-room .

ISABELLA SITWELL . I am the wife of John Sitwell , who lives in James-street, Grosvenor-square ; I let the prisoner a first floor room, furnished, at 5 s. 6 d. per week - these things were let with the lodgings; she was six weeks with me. When she went out I went up and found nothing left but the bedstead and chairs; the feathers were taken out of the tick, and every thing gone - she owed me three weeks rent. A little girl lived with her.

WILLIAM PAILE . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Oxford-street. I have two blankets, which were pledged with me on the 13th and 20th of December for 1 s. each; two bed-ticks and a sheet were pledged by a little girl, also two sheets, which I think the prisoner pledged on the 16th of December.

ANN HARRISON . I am fourteen years of age. The prisoner employed me to pledge the things at Paile's, and a sheet at Mulcasters's - I nursed her child.

JOHN WHITAKER . I am shopman to Mr. Mulcaster, who is a pawnbroker, and lives in Charles-street. I have a sheet, which was pledged by Harrison on the 6th of December, and another on the 17th, by a woman.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN MARTIN . I apprehended the prisoner. Her room was stripped.

Prisoner. I was in great distress.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Confined Six Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200112-116

EIGHTH DAY, THURSDAY, JANUARY 20.

326. JOSEPH MUNDAY was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of January , two chairs, value 10 s. , the goods of William Savage .

WILLIAM SAVAGE . I am a broker , and live at Whitechapel . On the 10th of January the chairs were taken from under my window. I had seen them safe half an hour before.

EDWARD HOGGS . I saw the prisoner take the chairs, ran after him, called Stop thief! and he threw them down. A butcher stopped him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I was out of work.

GUILTY. Aged 20.

Judgment Respited .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200112-117

327. JAMES DARLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of December , two pair of pantaloons, value 30 s.; one waistcoat, value 10 s.; one shoe, value 4 s.; and one handkerchief, value 6 s. , the goods of John Varley .

JOHN VARLEY . I am a wine cooper , and live in Vine-street, Grosvenor-square ; these things were in my bedroom, and I missed them at different times. There is a counting-house at the bottom of the stairs - the door is open in the daytime.

AUGUSTUS BARD . I live at Hammersmith; my uncle lodges at Varley's. On the 24th of December I was standing on the second floor stair-case, saw the prisoner come up stairs, and ask for the clergyman who lived on the second floor? he was told he was not at home, and he said he would call again in about a quarter of an hour; Mrs. Varley suspected him, and I watched him from the opposite room. In about twenty minutes he came up stairs gently, and went into Varley's bedroom without knocking at the clergyman's door; he took a pair of shoes, and was disturbed by Miss Varley coming up stairs. As he was coming out of the room, I saw him putting the shoes into his pocket, stopped him immediately, and found one on him - he threw the other under the bed.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200112-118

328. MICHAEL BYRNE was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of December , 82 lbs. of lead, value 10 s., the goods of our Lord the King , and fixed to a building of his .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating it to be the property of William Martin , Thomas Hyde Ripley , and Jeremy Jepson Ripley , and fixed to a building of theirs.

For the Prosecution, MR. BOLLAND.

FREDERICK READ . I am the son of Thomas Read ; he lives at No. 10, Scotland-yard , which belongs to the Crown. Owing to the improvements going on there, he had moved into another house; we were in the habit of resorting there for water. On the 19th of December, about half-past seven o'clock, I went there and observed nothing; I went again about ten o'clock, and observed half the skylight broken away. I got outside the cistern to see what had been done, and found the leaden pipe, which led from the cistern to the water-closet, torn away, and the gutter adjoining also taken away. I found the pipe in the gutter and other sheet lead which covered the framing of the skylight on a shed adjoining the house. I went and informed my father, and we returned with Hurst; I shewed them the lead, and remained there while they went up stairs; in a moment or two they called me, I ran up, and found the prisoner in their custody - the lead appeared to be fresh cut.

THOMAS READ . I am messenger to the Office of Woods and Forests, and live in Scotland-yard. On Sunday, the 19th of December, my son fetched me and Hurst to the house, where we found the lead as he has stated - it was quite fresh cut; I had seen it safe the Wednesday before. I went up stairs into the first room where the butler's pantry was, and pushed the door; it was twice pushed against me, but I made a third attempt, pushed it open, and found the prisoner there with a chisel in his hand. He attempted to get out of the window, but I collared him - he said nothing; the sink was half prized up - it was quite fresh done. I matched the lead, and it fitted.

GEORGE HURST . I have heard Read's account - it is correct.

WILLIAM WALLIS , I took the prisoner in charge. The chisel appeared to have been cutting lead.

WILLIAM NETTLETON . I found the prisoner in custody at the watch-house. He had almost succeded in breaking out, for he had broken about a dozen bricks out of the wall. I found a knife on him, which he had used.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. As I was passing the house a man said he would give me 18 d. to watch it - I sat in the pantry, being sleepy, and somebody came and stole my coat.

GUILTY Aged 46.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200112-119

329. JOHN HEPWORTH was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of December , two calf-skins, value 2 l.; fourteen

calf butts, value 8 l.; twenty-four calf shoulders, value 3 l., and four pair of calf legs, value 23 s. , the goods of Evan Roberts and Jonathan Fussall ; and EDWARD SINCLAIR was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, knowing them to have been stolen .

For the Prosecution, MR. ADOLPHUS.

EVAN ROBERTS . I am a leather-dresser , and am in partnership with Jonathan Fussall ; Hepworth had been seven or eight months in our employ as a journeyman . In consequence of what I observed, I called him into the parlour, charged him with the robbery, and took him to Worship-street. He said the goods were at Sinclair's - I had missed a calf butt that day. The week before we missed two calf skins, and fourteen calf butts, which are inferior parts of leather. I had also missed calf legs and shoulders.

Cross-examined by MR. BOLLAND. Q. How long had you known Hepworth - A. About ten years; he was foreman to Mr. Ware, of St. John-street, and after that he was a master currier.

Q. Is it the custom of your trade to hawk leather about - A. Many do it.

GEORGE LOMAS . I am servant to the prosecutor. On the 21st of December, about four o'clock, I went down stairs to fetch candles, brought them up, and put them on the table to work. I missed an apron, went into the waxing room, and saw Hepworth standing up about a foot from the table - there was nothing on the table then; about an hour before there were six calf butts laying before him - he had a large bulk under his apron. I asked him if my apron was there? He said No, and as I drew nearer, he kept shuffling round to keep his front from me. I returned to my work, was not satisfied, went back to the waxing room again, and saw his apron turned aside - his waistcoat was unbuttoned, and he was buttoning up his breeches - he went out. I recollected the calf butts that I had put there to see if any one would take them, and immediately communicated it to my master - Hepworth was apprehended next morning.

JAMES KENNEDY . I am an officer. On the 21st of December, in consequence of information, I went to Sinclair's to search for stolen leather - he is a shoemaker, and lives in Whitecross-street. I said I had a warrant to search his house, and he asked me what for? I said for stolen leather, and asked him if he had bought any the day before of a man? - he said he had. I asked him to produce it? He was cutting up some, and said,

"This is the skin I bought last night about six o'clock;" he said he had a knowledge of the man although he did not know his name, but that he should know it if he heard it. I mentioned no name, for I did not know it. He said the man lived in Leonard-square or Paul-street, about two years ago. Mr. Roberts, Jun. was with me, and claimed the leather. I asked him what he gave for the skin? - he said 14 s. Mr. Roberts looked for some private marks which he said were on it, but he could not find them. Sinclair said he believed there was a mark on it, but he had cut it off for a binding, and had sent it out. He sent out to a journeyman to send him back some work that he had sent out that morning; some was brought, but the mark was not found on it. On searching farther there was part of another skin which Roberts claimed. He took us into the parlour to shew us what skins he had there, and shewed us a number which Roberts could not speak to. He then took some boot legs from the top of a press, which Roberts claimed.

COURT. Q. He shewed you every thing - A. He did. Perhaps we should not have found them if he had not produced them. He said he bought the boot legs of the same man at 5 s. or 5 s. 6 d. a pair.

Cross-examined by MR. ARABIN. Q. He answered every question without the least hesitation - A. He did, and produced the leather.

MR. ADOLPHUS. My Lord, after this evidence, I will not for one moment longer hold this case over Sinclair's head.

The Jury here acquitted Sinclair, and MR. ADOLPHUS called into the witnesses' box,

EDWARD SINCLAIR . I received a piece of leather the night before from Hepworth. I bought it fairly, supposing him to be a dealer in leather. I had dealt with him when he lived in Paul-street; it is usual in the trade for men to call with leather. I have bought three or four lots of him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

HEPWORTH'S Defence. I sold him two skins, and one butt.

HEPWORTH - GUILTY . Aged 35.

Confined Three Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200112-120

330. ANTONIA DU COIN was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of December , seventeen pieces of sole leather, value 1 l.; one pair of boot legs, value 6 s., and 30 pieces of leather, value 15 s. , the goods of William Roe ; and HERBERT SCANDRET was indicted for feloniously receiving twelve pieces of leather, value 5 s., and ten pieces of sole leather, value 10 s., part and parcel of the said goods, knowing them to have been stolen .

WILLIAM ROE . I am a currier and leather-cutter , and live in Air-street, Piccadilly ; Du Coin has been in my service nearly three years - He is a Spaniard, and was articled with a premium for three years - Scandret was my journeyman . I frequently missed property, and in consequence of what Susan Fostick told me, I went into Du Coin's bedroom, and saw leather soles in his drawer - they had no business there; I immediately employed Plank. He came to my house in the evening, and waited in my dining-room until Du Coin usually went out, which was about half-past eight o'clock; he did not go out as usual, but went up to the dining room to supper. I told him I had long suspected him of robbing me, and was certain he had. Plank asked him about the leather that was found in the drawer? He denied having any, or knowing any thing about it. Plank told him he had been in the next room, knew what he had been about, and asked him what he had done with the leather that was in the drawer? He said he had taken it from the drawer, and put it under his bed; we went to the bedroom, turned up the bed, and pulled it out. The officer asked him what he was going to do with it? he said he was going to take them to Scandret. Plank asked him whether he had taken any to him before? He said on the Tuesday he had taken him four pieces of sole leather, that Scandret sold it, and they divided the

money. We went to search Scandret's apartments in Eden-court, Swallow-street, where we found him at home - he denied having a bit of my property in his possession. Plank searched, and when he came to a place where there was some, he said there was some there, and that it was my property. Plank asked him if he had any more? he said he had not a bit more; as soon as Plank came to where there was some more, he said there was some and it was mine. Plank found some in three different places, which Scandret said was all mine, fell on his knees, and asked me to forgive him; we took him to my house where Du Coin was. When he got there he agreed that Du Coin had brought him four pieces of sole leather, which he sold for 6 s. - they must have been good to sell at that. He said he gave Du Coin 3 s., and Du Coin spent 6 d.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. Du Coin was bound to you with a premium of 150 guineas - A. Yes; I was to board him. Scandret worked at my house every day, and could steal himself if he liked.

SUSAN FOSTICK . I am servant to Mr. Roe. I saw something in Du Coin's drawer, which I told my master of.

SAMUEL PLANK . I am an officer. I have heard the prosecutor's account; it is correct. I found some leather in Du Coin's drawer, and some in several places in Scandret's apartments. He said he had nothing belonging to his master, but when we went into the back room he said we should find two pieces there, and more in a box, that it was the prosecutor's, and it was all he had. I asked him how he came by it? He made no answer, but went into the other room, and threw himself at his master's feet - I took him into custody, and then took him to Mr. Roe's. In our way I told him Du Coin had been robbing Mr. Roe, that he had been receiving the leather which he had stolen, and asked him if Du Coin had ever visited him? he having told me that he used to go to his house to drink tea. He said No, he never did. I took him into the room where I had left Du Coin in custody, and asked Du Coin, in his presence, what he was going to do with the leather he had taken from under his bed? He said it was to be taken up into the shop early in the morning for Scandret to take out. I asked him when he carried any to Scandret before? He said the night before last he carried four pair of soles to his house, that Scandret sold them and gave him 2 s. Scandret interrupted him, and said,

"It is false, you had 3 s., and I had 3 s. - I sold them for 6 s., and you spent 6 d. out of your 3 s." I asked Du Coin how long they had been in the practice of taking goods away in that manner? he said about six months, and that it was done to supply them with money for gin and beer in the shop, and that he sometimes took a larger quantity and sometimes a smaller. Scandret said that had been the case, but not to the quantity Du Coin had stated, and that a man named Clack first began it.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. This was about property found at the prosecutor's house - A. No, they both agreed about the four pieces of sole leather.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

DU COIN - GUILTY . Aged 21.

SCANDRET - GUILTY . Aged 45.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18200112-121

331. FRANCOIS GERARD was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of September, in the 60th year of our Lord the King , two watches, value 40 l. , the goods of John George Fearn and Joseph Littler .

COURT. The 60th year of the King has not arrived, therefore this indictment is not good.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury (Half Foreigners), before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18200112-122

332. JOHN BUTLER , WILLIAM BAILEY , and WILLIAM BRIDGES were indicted for stealing, on the 9th of December , one spoon, value 2 s., and one cream-jug, value 4 s. , the property of Thomas Johnson .

SARAH RAGSHAW . I am servant to Mr. Thomas Johnson , who lives in York-street, Baker-street, Portman-square . On the 9th of December, about half-past two o'clock in the afternoon, I put these things, with the breakfast things, in the housekeeper's room, in front of the house - the area gate was left open. A painter, who works opposite, came down and asked me if I had lost any thing? I then went into the room, and missed the cream jug and spoon. He said the persons went down the mews by the side of the house. I went after them, and found the three prisoners together in the New Road. I said,

"Young men, you are wanted at No. 19, York-street, where you have just come from." They said they did not know where it was. I said I would shew them. Butler instantly ran away - the other two said they would go back with me. They turned down North-place and ran away. I called Stop thief, and pursued - a gentleman came up, and Bailey was taken. I had him brought back to the house; he at first denied it, but afterwards said he had not got the property, but Bridges had it, and that he lived in Gee's-court, Oxford-street - I gave him in charge. I am sure all the three prisoners were together. About half-past six o'clock that evening Marrebow brought the property home to us.

JOHN MARREBOW . I am eleven years of age. I was going along Oxford-street, Bridges gave me the things and a penny, and told me to take them home to Johnson's house, and say they were the things which were stolen from there that afternoon. I did so, and was detained.

TIMOTHY KIRKMAN . I am an officer. On the 9th of December I was sent for, and took Bailey. He took me to a coffee-shop in Gee's-court, where I found Butler. I apprehended Bridges last night.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

BUTLER'S Defence. I was in York-street; the witness came with the things, and gave them to Bridges.

BAILEY'S Defence. The witness went into the house, and threw the milk in the fire.

BRIDGES' Defence. I was at the prosecutor's in the mews; the others ran away and I ran too. In the afternoon I met Marrebow; he said they were stolen, and I gave them to him to take home.

BUTLER - GUILTY . Aged 17.

BAILEY - GUILTY . Aged 19.

BRIDGES * - GUILTY Aged 17.

* Bridges is the same person who was tried before by the name of Hathaway.

(See No. 321.)

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18200112-123

333. JAMES WARREN was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of January , 18 bushels of turnips, value 2 l. , the goods of Benjamin Brook .

BENJAMIN BROOK . I am a farmer . I bought these turnips of Mr. Gladwin. On the 10th of January they were stolen from his field. They were drawn.

HENRY SLAUGHTER . I am watchman in Barton-lane, Ealing. On the 10th of January I was calling two o'clock, a cart came towards me, the prisoner was driving it. I asked him what he had got in it? he said hog potatoes, that he was going to London, and had brought them from Southall. I asked him why he came that road? he said Brentford was a better road than to go through Hanwell. He hesitated, and said his master was coming up - I told him to stop his horse till his master came up. He said,

"Now, now, we shall all be transported!" He got up in the cart, put his feet on the tail-board, broke it to pieces, and threw out six sacks of turnips on the ground. I said if he touched the cart again I would shoot him - he ran away. He gave me the name of James Warren , Brentford, which was on the cart. I applied to the Magistrate. The next morning he came and claimed the cart, and a woman claimed the horse. They were taken to the Magistrate, and I told him the prisoner was the man who drove the cart - I am sure of it.

JURY. Q. Was it moonlight - A. No. I held my lanthorn in his face for twenty minutes. He offered me money to let him go.

JAMES FOWLER. I am servant to Brook. I drew the turnips, and laid them on the land, on Saturday, the 8th of January, about five o'clock - on Monday morning they were gone. The field was in Barton-lane. I found them at Slaughter's, and knew them by the mark of the tool I got them up with.

WILLIAM DENYER . I am a watchman. About twenty minutes past two o'clock Slaughter sprang his rattle, I ran up, the prisoner was gone then. Next morning he came to Slaughter's, and owned the cart - he was detained. The cart was stopped about a quarter of a mile from the field.

Prisoner's Defence. My cart was being repaired at Turnham-green, it stood out on the Common. On Monday I heard a cart was detained with my name on it, and went and claimed it.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18200112-124

334. MICHAEL MACK was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of January , 11 lbs. of cheese, value 5 s. , the goods of Richard Walkington and George Walkington .

GEORGE WALKINGTON . I am in partnership with Richard Walkington ; we are cheesemonger s, and live in Drury-lane .

CHARLES READ . On the 7th of January, between seven and eight o'clock at night, I was with the other witnesses, and saw the prisoner and two more watching Messrs. Walkingtons' shop. In about a quarter of an hour we saw one of them take half a cheese and give it to the prisoner - all three ran different ways. I pursued the others, but was thrown down and my hat knocked off. I am sure the prisoner is one of them.

THOMAS THOMPSON . I was with Read, watching the prisoner and two more. One of them reached in, took the cheese off a pile, and gave it to the prisoner, who stood ready to receive it. I secured him with it.

JOHN SHORTER . I saw a boy take the cheese and hand it to the prisoner.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18200112-125

335. JONAS KNOWLES was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of January , one basket, value 1 s.; one linen cloth, value 6 d., and 24 lbs. of butter, value 30 s. , the goods of John Sykes .

HUDSON GIMBER . I am book-keeper to Mr. John Sykes , who keeps the Golden Lion-yard, St. John-street ; the prisoner was carter to Mr. Payne, of Pimlico. He drove up the yard, I came out of the counting-house, and shewed him his master's flat of butter - I told him there was only one flat for his master; he said

"Only one!" I said No, and returned to the counting-house. After he took his butter, I paid him for some flats and cloths he had brought back. My master came and said he had two flats in his cart; I went down the yard and saw them.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. There were several flats about - A. Yes. I told him there was but one for him. They are marked with the owners' names on them.

JAMES THOMPSON . I am hostler at the inn. I was concealed in the loft to watch, as we had been robbed before. I saw Gimber shew the prisoner his flat, and said there was but one for him. Gimber returned to the office, the prisoner kept watching him; as soon as he had got into the office, he snatched one of the other flats of butter up, and threw it into his cart directly; he then took up his own in great haste, put that in, and drew his cart down to the office door. The flats were about four yards apart. I followed him into the street, collared him, and told him he must go no further, for he had something in his cart which did not belong to him. He asked me what I collared him for? and asked if he had made any mistake in taking butter, if so, he was sorry for it, and I might take it back. I said he should go no further, and I should not take it out till the officer came. Thompson came, and took him to the watch-house. The flat was directed to High-street, Borough.

Cross-examined. Q. He said if there was a mistake he was sorry for it - A. Yes. He had brought two empty flats back. It was early in the morning. His own flat stood alone, and was shewn to him.

THOMAS THOMPSON . I am an officer. The prosecutor employed me to look out of a morning. I advised them to put each person's butter separate, and shew every man his own. I was out in the street, the hostler called me, and gave the prisoner in charge. It was break of day.

Prisoner's Defence. I took it by mistake. The boy said

"Here is your butter" - he did not say what quantity.

- PAYNE. I am the prisoner's master, and was at the office at his examination. Gimber swore that he hallooed to the prisoner before he got out of the yard, and asked him how many flats he had, and he said two.

HUDSON GIMBER re-examined. I swore no such thing; it did not happen.

THOMAS THOMPSON re-examined. Q. I was present at the examination - he did not say he hallooed to the prisoner, and asked him how many flats he had.

GUILTY .

Confined Fourteen Days .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18200112-126

336. WALTER NEARY was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of December , one tea-chest, value 20 s. , the goods of Thomas Selby .

For the Prosecution, MR. ADOLPHUS.

JOHN BURTON HIGGIN . I am in the employ of of Messrs. Brace and Thomas Selby . On the 22d of December, between eleven and twelve o'clock, I was going from Surry-street to the Temple, and passing Mr. Selby's house in Howard-street , I saw the prisoner leaning on the window-cill, which was open. Just as I passed he stooped down, and brought out the tea-chest - I immediately caught hold of him and took it from him. He said he hoped I would forgive him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Fined One Shilling , and Discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18200112-127

337. JOHN WALLIS was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of January , one watch, value 30 s., and one jacket, value 5 s. , the property of John Lester .

JOHN LESTER . I am a brazier , and live in Orchard-street, Ratcliff . On the 4th of January I went out, and was drinking with some friends - I forgot to take the key out of my door. I returned home about twelve o'clock. Next morning, when I awoke, I missed my watch and jacket - in about three days Brown found them. The house was empty; I was taking care of the fixtures.

FRANCIS GARRATT . I am a pawnbroker. On the 5th of January the prisoner pledged the watch with me for 2 l.

JOHN FIELD . I am a pawnbroker, and live at Shadwell. On the 5th of January the prisoner pledged a jacket with me for 3 s.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. He gave them to me to pledge.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined One Month , and Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18200112-128

338. JOHN DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of January , three live tame geese, price 30 s. , the property of John Taylor .

HENRY ISHMAEL . On the 3d of January, as I was coming from Staines, the prisoner overtook me; he said he was going after a four-horse team that came from Farnham - he had a bundle. I remembered that no team passed, and suspected him. I asked him what he had in his bundle? he said he had a couple of geese. I examined it, and found he had two geese in a smock-frock; they were quite warm. I asked him where he got them from? he said from Farnham. I said that was impossible, he must have stolen them in the neighbourhood. He said a man gave them to him at Egham - he could not tell who the man was; I detained him. I found they belonged to Taylor.

JOHN TAYLOR . I live at Staines , and am a horse-patrol . The geese are mine, and were stolen from a shed in front of my house - it was not locked.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined One Month , and Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200112-129

339. JOHN SHEEN was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of January , one coat, value 28 s. , the goods of Joseph Lazarus Lawrence .

JOSEPH LAZARUS LAWRENCE . I keep a sale shop in Brydges-street, Covent-garden . On the 5th of January, between five and six o'clock in the evening, I missed a coat from the window. In an instant I ran out, and saw a person running with it under his arm; I lost him. Next day I found it in pledge.

WILLIAM MORLEY . I keep a clothes shop on Saffron-hill; the prisoner came to my house, and asked me to buy the ticket of the coat. I went to the pawnbroker's, and he detained the money for it until I got the man. Next morning the prisoner came, and I told him the coat was stopped. He went to the pawnbroker's with me, and was detained.

SAMUEL SKELTON . I am servant to Mr. Newberry, who is a pawnbroker, and lives in Drury-lane. On the 5th of January the prisoner pledged a coat with me in the name of Jones, Hart-street.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I pledged it for a person who lodged with me.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Confined One Month and Whipped

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18200112-130

340. MARY REVLET was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of January , 10 s. 6 d. in monies numbered, the monies of John Smith , from his person .

JOHN SMITH . I am a horse-dealer , and live in Yorkshire. On the 14th of January I received my pension at Greenwich, and went into the Scotch Arms, public-house, New Round-court, Strand , about ten o'clock at night, where I fell asleep. As I was afterwards going out the prisoner was sitting in a chair, and pulled me down upon her knee - we both fell over together. I got up, and missed my money, but whether she took it or not I cannot tell, nor am I sure she is the woman. I had 18 s. before I fell asleep; they fetched me to give her in charge, and I did. Some money was found on her, which I cannot swear to.

GEORGE GLASIER . I was constable of the night; the prisoner was brought to the watch-house, and I found only 4 s. 6 d. on her; she said she had no more. I afterwards found two half-crowns and 5 s. 6 d. in her hand, which the prosecutor claimed, as he said he was paid in new money.

Prisoner's Defence. I had the money from a gentleman.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18200112-131

341. ABEL PRIOR was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of January , one hat, value 4 s. , the goods of Richard Holman .

RICHARD HOLMAN . I am a hatter , and live in Crown-street, Finsbury . On the 13th of January, about seven o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner and another lad walking backwards and forwards about the window. I watched them, went to the other side of the shop, saw the prisoner come in, and take a hat off the hook. I ran out and secured him - he was walking with the other lad, who dropped the hat. I picked it up, and took the prisoner back, who said if I would forgive him he would never do the like again.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The other took it - he wanted me to take it for him, but I would not.

GUILTY Aged 15.

Fined One Shilling , and Discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18200112-132

342. WILLIAM MILLER was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of December , one truck, value 5 l. , the goods of James Duffield .

JAMES DUFFIELD . I am a baker , and live in Norfolk-street, Stepney ; my truck was outside the window. About six o'clock in the evening I heard it rattle, ran out, and secured the prisoner about seventy yards off with it.

RICHARD WARD . I am Duffield's servant. I secured the prisoner with the truck.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in liquor. A man offered me half a pint of gin to move it away.

GUILTY . Aged 33.

Confined Two Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200112-133

343. WILLIAM JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of December , one pair of boots, value 3 s., and one watch, value 10 s., the goods of Daniel Tesnor ; one pair of boots, value 3 s.; two pair of trowsers, value 6 s.; one bed, value 10 s., and one pillow, value 3 s., the goods of Joachim Gurr .

JOHN COMMANDER . I am watchman of Limehouse. On the 20th of December the prisoner was brought to the watch-house, and I found two pair of trowsers on him, which Gurr claimed. I also found a pillow and a bed at Walter's.

JOSEPH ADAMS . I am a constable. On the 19th of December, in the evening, the prosecutors informed me, through an interpreter, that the prisoner had enticed them from their ship, and robbed them. They afterwards brought him to the watch-house themselves.

JOHN TODD . On the 17th of December the prisoner pledged a watch with me for 7 s., and on the following Monday Tesnor claimed it. On the 18th he pledged a pair of boots, which Gurr claimed.

DANIEL TESNOR (through an interpreter). The prisoner enticed us from our ship, and asked me to shew him my watch; he took us to a house kept by Marshall, in Gill-street . I shewed to him, and he took it from me - I did not give him leave to pledge it; I saw him take it into the shop, but did not know what he was going to do with it. When he came out I asked him what he had done with it? He said he had pawned it, but I should soon have it again - I said I could not help it; he took a pair of boots from me without leave. On the 18th of December he took us to the Borough, and said he could get us a ship. He gave us a false pass, and left us there at a public-house at nine o'clock at night; Gurr was with me. Three days before that, he took us to lodge at Marshall's.

JOACHIM GURR . The prisoner came on board our ship, took us ashore, and said he had got a ship for us. On Monday I missed my trowsers and bed from the lodgings - I never gave him leave to take them. I afterwards found him in the street with my trowsers on; I found my bed at Walter's, who is a dealer in marine stores.

(Property produced and sworn to)

Prisoner's Defence. I meant to redeem them.

GUILTY . Aged 34.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200112-134

344. WILLIAM JONES and WILLIAM CLARK were indicted for stealing, on the 30th of December , one handkerchief, value 3 s., the goods of a man unknown, from his person .

CHARLES READ . I am assistant at Hatton-garden. About six o'clock in the evening of the 30th of December, I was in company with Thompson, and saw the prisoners with a smaller boy in the Strand; we watched them about a quarter of an hour. They followed a gentleman and lady into Fleet-street, then turned up Chancery-lane after a gentleman. I saw the smaller one attempt to pick the gentleman's pocket - the prisoners closed up to hide him. I saw him take a handkerchief from the gentleman's pocket by Sergeant's Inn , and immediately give it to Clark - the gentleman did not perceive it; they saw us, and all three ran away. I could not inform the gentleman without losing them; I caught Jones in Bell-yard, Carey-street, about a hundred yards off, in Middlesex - Thompson secured Clark. They picked the gentleman's pocket within four yards of the Inn gate, which is in the County. Jones said he picked it up.

THOMAS THOMPSON . I am a constable. I was with Read, and watched the prisoners in company with another - we saw them attempt one or two gentlemen's pockets. They followed a gentleman up Chancery-lane, and after they had got about two hundred yards up, I saw them close upon him - they fell back directly, and ran away. I followed, and as Clark got into Bell-yard, I saw him hold it up to the others, and laugh - Read seized the others, but Clark got away. I followed him to Temple-bar, and there saw him drop the handkerchief. I secured him - he said he had just picked it up.

JONES'S Defence. I was going with Clark to get a situation; he kicked a handkerchief before him in Bell-yard, and a little boy cried,

"Halves." Thompson seized me.

CLARK'S Defence. I ran away as I thought it might be stolen.

JONES - GUILTY . Aged 17.

CLARK - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200112-135

345. GEORGE WILSON was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of December , sixteen fathoms of rope, value 30 s. , the goods of George Bunyon .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating it to be the property of John Latimer , Robert John Bunyon , and Donald M'Leod .

For the Prosecution, MR. ARABIN.

ROBERT MARSTON . I am a Thames Police officer. On the 16th of December, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, I met the prisoner near Limehouse Hole, about a quarter of a mile from the City Canal, carrying a rug on his shoulder, which drew my suspicion, and I asked him where he got it? he said a man gave it to him at Mill-wall - it contained rope. I asked him where he was going to take it to? he said nowhere particular - the rope was in three strands, and each strand of a length; it had been untwisted. Next morning I found the ship, Providence, had been robbed of her hawser. On the 18th of December I searched a field adjoining the canal where the vessel had been fastened, and there found the bit of a hawser, which tallied with that found on the prisoner. It weighs 121 lbs., and is eight fathoms long.

WILLIAM WALTON HAYNES . I am chief mate of the ship, Providence, which laid in the City Canal . On the 16th of December she was moored with a hawser - eight fathoms of it was cut away. Next day Marston produced one to me which corresponded. I have no doubt of its belonging to the ship. George Bunyon is captain of the ship.

FREDERICK TOSSETT . I am second officer of the Providence. The hawser corresponded in quantity and quality. I have no doubt of its being the same.

Prisoner's Defence. A man gave me the rope to carry - he said he would meet me, and pay me for carrying it.

GUILTY . Aged 29.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200112-136

346. HENRY EADES was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of January , one coat, value 14 s. , the goods of Richard Hitching .

RICHARD HITCHING . I live in Great Wild-street, Lincoln's Inn-fields . I lost my coat from my bedroom, on the second floor. The the prisoner worked for my master, but did not sleep in the house. I found him in custody at Bow-street, with it.

Cross-examined by MR. ARABIN. Q. Did he ever pawn the coat for you - A. Twice. I did not tell him to pawn it this time.

JAMES HOPPER . I am apprentice to Mr. Gideon, who is a pawnbroker, and lives in Stanhope-street. On the 7th of January the prisoner pledged the coat with me.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I have been in the habit of pledging the coat for him - I gave him the money.

RICHARD HITCHING re-examined. He did not give me the money.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Fined One Shilling , and Discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200112-137

347. RICHARD GRIFFIN was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of January , three gross of curtain rings, value 9 s.; one gross of screw hooks, value 8 s., and ten pair of brass hinges, value 3 s. , the goods of Henry Dimond .

HENRY DIMOND . I am an ironmonger , and live in West-street, Smithfield . On the 11th of January, about two o'clock in the morning, I saw these things safe; I had set up all night to finish them. Next morning my little boy came and said some of them were taken. I ran down, caught hold of the prisoner, and found them all on him. He was very drunk. He came to buy a rule.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I was very tipsy.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Whipped and Discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200112-138

348. JOHN DEVINE was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of January , one wheelbarrow, value 10 s. , the goods of Thomas Elliott .

THOMAS ELLIOTT . I live in John's-row, St. Luke's , and am a green-grocer . On the 12th of January the wheelbarrow was in my yard; the prisoner lived in my house. I missed it at eight o'clock in the evening. Two days after, I was going up Golden-lane, and saw a boy wheeling it with some coals - he said his father bought it two days before; he took me to Poole's.

WILLIAM POOLE . I live in Playhouse-yard - the prisoner worked for me only two days; I bought the barrow of him, he said it was his uncle's.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined One Month .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18200112-139

349. ANDREW STONE , THOMAS CROSS , and BENJAMIN JOHNSON were indicted for stealing, on the 30th of November , two live tame pigs, price 50 s. , the property of John Jones .

WILLIAM CLARK . I am servant to John Jones , who is a timber-merchant , and lives at Limehouse-hole . He kept three pigs in his yard, they ran about the street in the daytime. On the 30th of November, about two o'clock, I saw them; missed them about half-past three, and found them at Badcock's on the Saturday following. The prisoner, Cross, lived in the neighbourhood, and is a labourer .

HUGH BADCOCK . I am a butcher, and live in New Road, St. George's in the East, about a quarter of a mile from the prosecutor's. Cross and Johnson came to my house about eight o'clock in the morning of the 1st of December; they said they had two pigs to sell; that they were obliged to bring them off the premises the over-night, to prevent their being seized for rent. They took me five or six doors from my house to see the pigs, I there saw Stone and the pigs - he said nothing about them, but after I had agreed for them he said he would lend a hand to drive them to my house. I made the agreement with Cross, he said he was the owner. I gave one of them 2 s. earnest, and said if they would wait two hours I would pay for them. Three or four days after, Jones and his servant saw and claimed them. I was to give 50 s. for them.

MICHAEL MORRIS . I am an officer of Shadwell. On the 1st of December I received information that the three prisoners had two pigs in their possession - I found them at Badcock's. I apprehended Stone on the 1st of December - he lived in the house where the pigs were found; he

said he knew nothing about them, but that Cross had left them there. The house is let out in different tenements. Cross came to the office when Stone was examined, and I secured him at the door - he said he knew nothing about them. I found Johnson on the Sunday following - he said he would tell the Magistrate all about it. The prosecutor had the pigs returned.

CROSS'S Defence. I met a man with them, and was to give him 2 l. for them.

JOHNSON'S Defence. I met Cross, and told Badcock he wanted to sell three pigs, as he promised me something for my trouble.

STONE'S Defence. The man asked me if I knew where they could lodge the pigs? my landlord gave him leave to put them there.

CROSS - GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

JOHNSON - NOT GUILTY .

STONE - NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: o18200112-1

Ann Wells , page 50

Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: o18200112-2

James Stroud , 50 Charlotte Jones , 66 Frederick Westover , 70 Edward Imber , 88

Fined One Shilling and Discharged, being admitted into the Refuge for the Destitute.

Reference Number: s18200112-1

NINTH DAY, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 21.

The Court met to pass sentence on the several prisoners convicted, and

ADJOURNED TO WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 1820.

The following Prisoners, on whom the Judgment of the Court was Respited last Session, were sentenced as follows:

Reference Number: s18200112-1

Ann Wells , page 50

Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: s18200112-1

James Stroud , 50 Charlotte Jones , 66 Frederick Westover , 70 Edward Imber , 88

Fined One Shilling and Discharged, being admitted into the Refuge for the Destitute.


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