Old Bailey Proceedings, 1st December 1819.
Reference Number: 18191201
Reference Number: f18191201-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace Oyer and Terminer, AND Gaol Delivery for the City of London, AND ALSO The Gaol Delivery For the County of Middlesex, HELD AT Justice Hall, in the Old Bailey; ON WEDNESDAY, 1st of DECEMBER, 1819, and following Days;

Being the First Session in the Mayoralty of THE RIGHT HON. GEORGE BRIDGES , LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

Taken in Short-Hand by H. BUCKLER, Basinghall Street, (BY AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON.)

London:

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED, FOR H. BUCKLER, BY T. BOOTH, 31, St. Andrew's Hill, Doctors' Commons.

1819.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX.

Before the Right Honourable GEORGE BRIDGES , Esq. LORD MAYOR of the City of London; Sir John Bayly , Knt., one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir William Garrow , Knt., one of the Barons of his Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir John Eamer , Knt.; Sir William Leighton , Knt.; John Ansley , Esq.; Sir Claudius Stephen Hunter , Bart.; Matthew Wood , Esq.; Christopher Smith , Esq., Alderman of the said City; Sir John Silvester , Bart., D.C.L. Recorder of the said City; William Heygate , Esq.. and Robert Albion Cox , Alderman of the said City, Newman Knowlys , Esq. Common Sergeant of the said City, and John Vaillant , Esq., his Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of the Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

London Jury.

William Selwell ,

Caleb Moore ,

Henry Vincent ,

John Vedy ,

Thomas Brown ,

Edward Cain ,

John Symmons ,

Thomas Kennedy ,

William Reeve ,

William West ,

Thomas Kemp ,

George Thisslewood .

First Middlesex Jury.

Thomas Moss ,

James Elstead ,

Charles Barber ,

Thomas Wayland ,

William Abbott ,

Stephen Bird ,

Samuel Kingston ,

Childern Shoulbridge ,

John Beddington ,

John Bedford ,

John Lunn ,

Edward Brees .

Second Middlesex Jury.

William Cousins ,

Benjamin Plowman ,

John Thresher ,

Henry Cullingham ,

James Evans ,

Henry Richman ,

Francis Pearce ,

Thomas Baker ,

Thomas Andrews ,

John Wright ,

John Alsop ,

James Pulpart .

SESSIONS HOUSE, OLD BAILEY, DECEMBER 1, 1819.

BRIDGES, MAYOR. FIRST SESSION.

Reference Number: t18191201-1

1. HENRY WILLIAM BULL , FREDERICK BULL , SAMUEL GEORGE , and JOHN GOMM were indicted for stealing, on the 21st of October , from the person of Henry Joll , one bill of exchange for payment of and value 100 l. , his property.

Counsel for the prosecution, MR. BARRY.

HENRY JOLL . I am a carpenter and builder , and live at No. 11, Dunstan's-place, Ratcliff. I had a bill of exchange, drawn by John Crawley for 100 l. on and accepted by Henry William Bull , who, I believe, is a partner with the other prisoner, Frederick Bull , at No. 21, Holles-street, Cavendish-square. On the 21st of October, between four and five o'clock in the afternoon, I went there by myself - I first saw the prisoner, John Gomm ; he said he was clerk to Mr. Bull , and asked my business? I asked him if he was managing clerk? he said he could do the business I required. I had the bill in my hand, and asked him if that was the acceptance of Mr. Bull? he said he believed it was, but that Mr. Bull was at his mother's, and if I could wait a few minutes he would call him. I went into the back office, with the bill in my possession, and he went out. When Mr. Henry William Bull (on whom the bill was drawn) arrived, he walked into the front office; I followed him, he asked my business? I told him I came to ask him, by desire of the persons I was going to pay this bill to, if it was his acceptance? I had the bill in my hand, and told him the persons wished me to ask whether it was his acceptance, as the drawer was then a prisoner in the Fleet. I held it open before him, for him to see if it was his hand-writing - nobody else was in that office. He desired me to turn it to look at the endorsement, which I did. He asked me to turn it again, I did so, and while I was holding it, he made a snatch at it, took it from me, and immediately ran into the clerk's office, I followed him as quick as possible. He took a sheet of paper, as if to copy the bill, but did not do it. He then ran or walked very fast into the front office, I followed him - he desired John Gomm to go for his brother Frederick, who came in less than a minute - at this time Henry Bull went again into the clerk's office, which is the back office, I followed him; Frederick Bull then got between me and him. Henry Bull delivered the bill into Frederick's hands, who very quickly folded it up in his hand. I immediately took Frederick round the waist, and endeavoured to get it from him, when I was attacked by Henry Bull , the acceptor. A scuffle ensued - then their two clerks, Gomm and George, joined them in holding me fast. Frederick Bull broke from my grasp with the bill, and immediately put it into the fire. I struggled hard to get to the fire to rescue it, but the other three held me, while Frederick Bull took up the tongs and struck at me with them to prevent my getting at the fire. The bill was quite consumed, he put a cinder over it - I then indicted them.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. Do you mean to say you carry on business as a builder now - A. When I have business in hand - I built last Summer. I live in the hamlet of Ratcliff. Crawley is now dead.

Q. Had he taken the benefit of the Insolvent Act before you got the bill from him - A. I do not know.

Q. Was he in prison before that - A. I do not know; I never saw him five times in my life - I did not know he was a prisoner, I knew he was an uncertificated bankrupt.

Q. Were you to take the bill by way of discount, or for goods - A. I had discounted it.

Q. Before you went to inquire if the acceptance was genuine - A. No; I had been to Marsh's, the banker, in Berner-street, where it was made payable, to inquire - they said Mr. Henry Bull had an account open there.

COURT. Q. You inquired if it was their acceptance - A. No; I did not shew them the bill, it was not then in my possession. When I called I did not know whether the signature was genuine or not - this was on the 3d of September.

MR. ALLEY. Q. Were you building at that time - A. I was not, but I was under engagements to build.

Q. Are you a housekeeper - A. No, I lodge with my father-in-law, who belongs to the Excise - I keep no banker. I gave 71 l. in cash and some odd shillings for the bill, and a promissory note on Frederick Thomas for the balance; Frederick Thomas was present when I paid the money, he is my brother-in-law. I gave the money to Crawley.

Q. At the time notice of trial was served on you, did you lodge where you say you do - A. I was out of town last September; I was served with a notice the other day,

I then lodged at the same place. Henry Bull served me with the notice.

Q. When he brought you the notice, did you not refuse to take it, and say you would not receive any notice of trial - A. No.

Q. On your oath, did you not turn him out of the room, and refuse to receive any notice, and he was obliged to put it under the door - A. No, I did not turn him out - he put it under the door.

Q. Had he not been in the room - A. Yes, and said he came to serve me with notice of trial.

COURT. Q. Then he was put out - A. No, my Lord, he went down to call a person up, and I shut the door upon him. The notice was at last put under the door.

MR. ALLEY. Q. With an order stating that it was served by order of the King's Bench - A. No, there was no order. The prisoners have surrendered to-day.

Q. Do you not know they have sought after you before the last Session, to serve you with notice of trial - A. I heard so.

Q. Do you not know they endeavoured to find you out, to serve you with notice of trial last Session - A. I have since heard they did, but I understood they could not give me notice last Session, and I knew Crawley was ill and could not come, and I did not want to trouble them to take them into custody.

Q. Did you not go with an officer to the house - A. I did, as they told my attorney a falsehood, that they had surrendered. I went before a Magistrate.

Q. Were the prisoners summoned before the Magistrate to answer your complaint - A. No, I applied to Mr. Birnie, he told me to apply at Marlborough-street, which I did, and was told the Grand Jury would soon sit, and it would be a pity to trouble them before.

Q. Have you ever taken the benefit of the Insolvent Act yourself - A. I have, between two and three years ago - it is two years and two or three months ago.

COURT. Q. What did you pay - A. I do not know.

Q. Have you paid any thing - A. I do not know; I had nothing to give up. This 71 l. was my own money.

Q. Why not pay your creditors - A. It was lent me by my father; I considered it as mine when he lent it me.

MR. ALLEY. Q. Did not these gentlemen tell you they had been swindled out of this bill and 2000 l. by Crawley, and from your manner they considered you as a coadjutor, and would not give it up, but would give you a copy - A. They did not; they said the bill was got from their hands by some unfair way.

Q. On your oath, did not one of the defendants offer you a copy of the bill - A. No, neither of them, nor any thing like it.

Q. You said one of them took a paper in his hand; was it not to make a copy of the bill - A. He appeared as if he was about to copy it.

Q. That there may be no misunderstanding, were you not told you should have a copy of the bill at that time - A. I was not.

Q. Were you not told that if you had advanced any money on the bill, it should be paid you - A. I was not, moreover, I desired Mr. Thomas to call upon Bull next day, which he did.

Q. Which of the clerks did you first see - A. John Gomm ; the other clerk assisted in holding me after the bill was taken. The clerks did nothing till after the bill was taken - no other person was present whatever.

Q. Then you included them all in the indictment, that they might have no witnesses - No answer.

Q. When you went with the bill, did you not refuse to give your name - A. I did not.

Q. Did you not say that you had the bill from Mr. Joll, instead of saying that you was Joll yourself - A. No, I did not; they asked who Joll was.

Q. How came they to ask you who he was - A. I never heard them say so - I I did not say I was Joll at first.

Q. How came they to ask - A. They know best - I had not mentioned the name to them before. They asked where Joll lived? I said in the Hamlet of Ratcliffe.

Q. Did you not say Joll was the person from whom you had it - A. I did not.

Q. Pray have you ever paid a single sixpence to your creditors since you was discharged - A. Yes.

Q. For debts due antecedant to your taking the benefit of the Act - A. I allow some in the way of business. I have done work for part of the old debts.

Q. I see by your schedule, that you gave 300 l. as the amount of debts against you, and state that you had 8 l. 15 s., the greatest part of which was spent in prison - A. You can tell better than I can. My father was a creditor for rent.

Q. Who did you have the 71 l. from - A. From my father - I have been a builder several years, both at Plymouth and London.

Q. You style yourself a ship-carpenter, joiner, and undertaker - A. I am so.

Q. You did not then describe yourself as a builder - A. I did not then - I built houses then. A carpenter is a builder.

Q. Before I sit down I will repeat my question. On the solemn oath you have taken, did not one or either of the defendants tell you that you should have a copy of the bill - A. They did not in any way whatever.

Q. Were you not told that if you had advanced money on it, the sum you advanced should be given to you - A. I was not.

Q. Do you recollect going afterwards to arrest these gentlemen - A. To take them into custody.

Q. Did you not then say to them, that if they would give you a sum of money, you would not prosecute them - A. I did not, but Frederick Bull offered me 120 l. not to proceed.

Q. That you swear - A. I do.

MR. BARRY. Q. I find by your schedule that the amount of your debts were 270 l. - A. Yes, and debts due to me near 80 l.

Q. You desired Mr. Thomas, your attorney, to call on the prisoners next day - A. I did.

MR. ALLEY. Q. Have you received the County sixpences - A. I have, it is sixpence per day. That was not from my creditors.

COURT. Q. Crawley was in the Fleet - A. Yes, my Lord. I was not in the Fleet - I was in the Marshalsea. I had endorsed the bill before I took it to Bulls', which was on the 21st of October.

Q. How came you not to try the case last Session - A. On account of the illness of Crawley, as I thought he would be a material witness; he was not at Bulls'.

Q. Do you know what day you went before the Grand Jury - A. On the Friday-week following. The 21st was Thursday.

Q. Then you went before the Grand Jury in November, quite at the end of the Session - A. Quite at the end of the Session. I went out of town on the Tuesday morning following.

Q. Before you went out of town, had you heard that the prisoners were desirous of having this tried - A. I had not.

Q. Did the clerks know Frederick Bull had got the bill before they interfered - A. They saw the transaction - they did not see him take the bill, because they were in the other office.

Q. Did they know he had got it - A. They must have seen it. I and Frederick were struggling - Henry assisted him; he laid hold of me a few minutes before George and Gomm did. It was a very few minutes altogether.

Q. Now I ask you again, had either George or Gomm an opportunity of seeing the bill after you came into the back office - A. They certainly had an opportunity, but whether they saw it or not, I cannot say. I lived in Dunstan's-place at the time.

Q. Had you no jobs in hand then - A. I had not. I had had very little to do for two months before. I have a wife and child, whom I was maintaining at that time.

Q. When were you last at work - A. In Lucas-street, building two houses; I continued building them up to within about four months of this time. I built them for Mr. Vince. I was paid for them at different times, a considerable time before the 21st of of October.

FREDERICK THOMAS . I am an attorney, and live at No. 11, Dunstan'-place, Ratcliff, and am brother-in-law to the prosecutor.

Q. Do you know what consideration was given by him for the bill of 100 l. - A. Yes, there was 71 l. and a few shillings paid in cash to Crawley, also his own note of hand for 25 l.

Q. Did you at any time call upon the prisoners at the instance of the prosecutor - A. I did on the 22d of October. I met Henry Bull at the door, and enquired for Mr. Bull, not knowing him; he returned through the passage, and went into the front room, where Frederick Bull was sitting. I told Mr. Henry Bull , in Frederick's presence that I waited on him from Mr. Henry Joll respecting a 100 l. acceptance of his, which he had detained from Mr. Joll last night. He hesitated, and then said,

"We should not have done so, had we known the source from whence Mr. Joll obtained it" - or the means by which he obtained it, I do not know which. I then wished to gain from them an admission of the violence that had been used, but he evaded every question I put to him, and said,

"I shall neither admit or deny any thing."

Q. Did you tell them your profession - A. Yes. As I was going out, Mr. Henry Bull was also going out, he made use of the expression of the polluted source from whence the bill was obtained. He said that it came from a polluted source, and that Mr. Joll must have known that it came from a polluted source - from the jaws of the Fleet Prison. I told him he must trace the pollution back to himself, as it was him that gave credit to the bill by his signature - he made no reply.

Cross-examined by MR. WALFORD. Q. When was the 71 l. advanced to Crawley - A. On the 2d or 3d of September, in my office - Crawley was present.

Q. How came he there? He was a prisoner in the Fleet at that time, was he not - A. No, I knew him; I knew he was an uncertificated bankrupt. I did not know him to be in goal at that time.

Q. Where had you seen him before the money was advanced - A. At my office on business; he was a defendant in several actions - he was a client of mine. The bill was drawn by him, and made payable to his order.

Q. I take it for granted that you would know his handwriting - A. No, I never saw him write. I never saw his signature.

Q. How long after this money was advanced, was Crawley arrested, and taken to prison - A. About ten days after. I introduced him to Joll.

Q. Joll being your brother-in-law, you knew perfectly well at all times where he lived - A. He was frequently out of the way because his circumstances were embarrased.

Q. Was he embarrased in October, at the time this bill was found - A. He was in August and September, but not in October - he was not out of the way, to avoid his creditors, when this indictment was preferred. I knew mostly where to find him.

Q. Do you remember inquiry being made after him for the purpose of serving him with notice of trial in October - A. I do. I did not know where he was then. When he was at home he lived where I do. He did not come home sometimes for a week.

Q. Did he go to Chatham about that time - A. I believe he did; he told me he was going to purchase some bricks; it was the morning of the day Mr. Harmer's clerk called on me. I told him he might safely go, as I intended to move the Court to put the trial off on account of Crawley's illness. I did not know what part of Chatham he was gone to.

Q. Did you tell Mr. Harmer's clerk he was gone to Chatham - A. I told him he was gone into Kent, and mentioned several places. Chatham was one that I mentioned.

Q. That you swear - A. I do.

Q. These gentlemen attended last Session to surrender and take their trials - A. They did; I believe the Session lasted a week after that. I received notice on Tuesday that they would surrender on Thursday, and on Wednesday I received a notice very late, saying they would attend that evening.

Q. What day of the week did you apply to put off the trial - A. I made no application.

COURT. Q. Did you tell Mr. Harmer's clerk that you meant to apply to put it off - A. No.

Q. When you went to Mr. Henry Bull , did he not admit that he took the note from Joll - A. He certainly did not deny it, but there was hesitation; he said he should not have done so. -

Q. He admitted having taken it - A. Certainly he did; he did not deny the acceptance being his.

Q. You saw the 71 l. advanced, what did Crawley do with it - A. He took it away.

Q. I suppose it did not occur to you that the endorsement of an uncertificated bankrupt was worth nothing - A. No, it did not.

Q. What interest was Joll to have for advancing the money - A. Crawley was a man of extensive connections, and I thought it would be in his power to do Joll good.

Q. How many actions had he against him - A. Four or five, I believe.

Q. You did not think it would be a better application of his money to pay his creditors - A. No.

WILLIAM UNDERWOOD . I am a woollen-draper, and live at the corner of Vere-street, in Oxford-street.

Q. Do you remember going to Messrs. Bulls' in October - A. Yes, in consequence of a note I received from Frederick Bull , I went and found him in great agitation. He introduced me to the prosecutor, who was there - it was towards the latter end of October. He said the prosecutor was the person who held a bill of Crawley's, and had brought some constables to take him into custody. He said,

"For God's sake lend me a check, will you?" for I had rather give 500 l. than be conveyed to Newgate - they are going to take me to Newgate." I said I should do no such thing, and asked him if he would compound felony with a set of villains?

Q. Who did you mean - A. Crawley in particular - I knew him to be an infamous character; I meant him and Joll - Mr. Joll seemed offended, and said,

"What do you mean?" I said I was sure the Grand Jury would not have found the bill if he had not perjured himself. Bull was still agitated, and said he would do any thing rather than be dragged to Newgate. I said,

"Nonsense! they can't drag you to Newgate." I then said to Joll,

"Pray, Mr. Joll, what consideration have you given for the bill? because you were told before, if you had given a fair consideration for the bill Mr. Bull would have paid you the amount." His answer was, that he had given the money for the bill, and all he wanted was his right. I said,

"Pray what is the amount you gave for the bill?" he said,

"71 l." I said,

"Did you pay it in Bank notes?" he said,

"Part in Bank notes, and part in other money." I said,

"What became of the 29 l. remaining?" he said that was for premium. I then said it was a strange business, and I was certain that rascal, Crawley, was at the bottom of it, and said,

"You have seen Crawley lately, have you not?" he rather hesitated, and said he had not seen him. I said,

"You have written to him" - he said, Yes, he had. I asked him what was the purport of the note? he said, to ask respecting Messrs. Bull, and he had received an answer that they were very respectable. During this time the passage door opened, the officer was inside; I called him, and said I wanted to see the warrant. He shuffled and said,

"I have got the warrant here, but I don't know who the prisoner is." I asked to see the warrant; he said something about arranging - he did not pull the warrant out. At last he produced a paper, which was signed D. Williams, of the Thames Police Office, to take the prisoners into custody. I said,

"Then, Bull, all you have got to do is to go to prison, and meet it like a man." His mother came in; he said,

"Mother, do pay the money for me!" she said he had been robbed enough by the whole gang, and would not. The officer said they must go before a Magistrate first. We were going to the Magistrate's, Bull went up to fetch something down - the officer stood at the door - Bull went out, and I did not see him again. The officer said,

"We shall find him." I said,

"Yes, you will find him - all you want is to extort money." They went away without taking him.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You stated to Joll, that at the time of taking the bill, Bull had offered to pay him what he advanced on it - A. Yes; he did not deny its having passed. The prisoners are my brothers-in-law, Crawley has made them a dupe. I have had dealings with Crawley at times.

NOT GUILTY .

It is but justice to the prisoners to state, that the learned Judge observed, that though they had acted imprudently in destroying the bill, they certainly were free from any criminal motive.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayly.

Reference Number: t18191201-2

2. ROBERT MILES , BAT PHILLIPS , and HENRY TOWN were indicted for burglariously breaking, and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Douglas Forrest and Elizabeth Forrest , spinster , about two o'clock in the night, of the 12th of November , at St. Mary Abbotts, Kensington , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, nine gallons of brandy, value 9 l.; six gallons of rum, value 4 l.; one cask, value 5 s., and two bottles, value 2 s. , their property.

THOMAS MAYOR . I am servant to Mr. Thomas Douglas Forrest ; he and his sister keep the Swan tavern , in Sloane-street. On the night of the 12th of November I was the last person up, and made every thing secure between one and two o'clock; the tap is part of the dwelling-house - it joins it, but is not under the same roof - you can go from the house to it without going into the street; there is an inner communication, I left the doors fast. I got up first about half-past seven o'clock next morning - it was then daylight.

Q. Had you heard any noise in the night - A. No, my Lord. On getting up, I found a chair which I had put against the door, removed to the other side of the taproom, and two folding doors, which open into the yard, were open - I had fastened them the night before. I went to my master, and he got the Exciseman.

THOMAS DOUGLAS FORREST . I am in partnership with my sister, Elizabeth; we keep the Swan tavern. Mayor alarmed me, and I got up, found the folding doors a little way open, and the cellar-window wide open; the doors are fastened by a bolt, and in one of the doors there is a little wicket; they must have turned the button of that wicket, then put their hands in, and opened the bolts. I found that I had lost nine gallons of brandy and six gallons of rum, worth about 13 l. or 14 l. together, also a cask out of the yard. They could get the cask without coming through the tap, but they must have got over the gates.

Q. Did you afterwards go any where with Snowsell - A. Yes, on the 16th of November, about a quarter after seven o'clock in the morning, we went to No. 13, Exeter-street, Sloane-street, into a back room on the ground floor,

and found the prisoners there; two of them were abed, and the other up. We found the cask under the bed, which had been taken from my yard; it had contained beer when I lost it, but I then found it smelt strong of brandy; we also found an iron crow. We saw one stone in the kitchen, which was very loose, and upon being lifted up, we found two large and one small stone bottles under a sack - they contained brandy, which agreed in strength and flavour with mine; I have every reason to believe that it was mine. I saw the cask the day before the robbery; the bottles are not mine.

JOHN SNOWSELL . I am a patrol. In consequence of information I accompanied Forrest to this place, about seven o'clock in the morning, and found all the prisoners in the stone kitchen - I knew them before, and told them I wanted them about some brandy, which had been lost from the Swan, in Sloane-street; they said they knew nothing about it. I asked them if any thing was under the bed? They said No. I turned it up, and found the cask which I had seen in the prosecutor's yard before, and said

"This is the cask - where is the liquor?" They said they knew nothing of it, I took them to the watch-house, returned to the room, and found an iron crow near the fireplace, almost under the grate. I sounded the stones of the floor, and found a large one, about two feet wide, which sounded very hollow. I pulled it up, and found under a sack, three stone bottles full of brandy, and a pail with a little jug in it, which also had brandy. I found about five gallons of brandy in all - there was a little in the cask.

Prisoner MILES. Q. Do you not know that my father uses the crow in his business - A. I know his father; he is a stone mason, but they do not use such crows as this; it is too large.

JOSEPH TAPP . I am servant to Mrs. Hughes, who lives in Queen's-buildings, Knightsbridge, about fourteen doors from Sloane-street. On a Saturday morning, about six o'clock, three men passed my mistress's house; two were dressed in light jackets, and one in a brown coat. They went towards the prosecutor's, and as they passed me they whispered, which made me suspect them; I followed them past my mistress's shop door, they had nothing with them at that time, and then returned. They came back in about ten minutes, and the man in a brown coat had a cask on his shoulder; the other two said,

"Come down here." They then went down a court - they were the same men that passed me before. The cask was the size of that produced.

Q. How soon after did you see the prisoners in custody - A. On the Tuesday following; their dress and size corresponded with the men I saw. I did not see their faces - it was a very dark morning; I had given information to Snowsell.

(Cask produced and sworn to.)

MILES'S Defence. On Saturday morning, about ten minutes after six o'clock, I was going to Covent-garden to buy apples, and saw the cask laying down at Knights-bridge. I and this young man went over, and took it to his lodgings; it was half full of brandy. I kept it three days, then borrowed two bottles, emptied it and put it under the stones for safety. The other prisoner happened to be in our room when we were taken.

PHILLIPS'S Defence. I have nothing more to say - we two were together.

TOWN'S Defence. I went to call them up, and laid down on the bed until they were ready; Snowsell said I was not wanted. I carried the barrel to the watch-house, and they took me.

MILES - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 18

PHILLIPS - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 16.

TOWN - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 19.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow .

Reference Number: t18191201-3

3. JOHN SMITH and WILLIAM MOORE were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Robert Gregory Dendy , about seven o'clock in the night of the 13th of November , at Hampton , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein twenty-three yards of corderoy, value 3 l.; eighteen yards of flannel, value 2 l.; twenty yards of woollen cord, value 7 l., and two waistcoat-pieces, value 30 s. , his property.

ROBERT GREGORY DENDY . I am a tailor , and rent a house in the parish of Hampton, Middlesex ; my shop is part of the house, and fronts the street. On the 13th of November, about seven o'clock in the evening, my wife called me down, I found a pane of glass taken out of the window, and missed a roll of patent woollen cord, worth 7 l., and a roll of corderoy, worth 3 l. - almost the whole pane was taken out; the things could be got through the hole, they were opposite the pane. I saw the pane half an hour or twenty minutes before, it was whole then - it was dark. I also missed a roll of flannel, containing about eighteen yards, which cost three shillings a yard, and two waistcoat-pieces, about three yards each.

Q. When did you see the things again - A. On Monday the 22d. I saw all the patent cord in possession of Welfare and Reeve, it was then cut into two pieces, also about twelve yards of the corderoy, and about a yard and a half of one of the waistcoat pieces.

GEORGE WELFARE . I am an officer of the Town Hall, in the Borough. On Sunday, the 14th of November, about one o'clock at noon, I saw the prisoner, Moore, in New-street, Borough, with something under his arm, wrapped in a green baize; I suspected and pursued him - he saw me and ran away; I did not call to him as I was ill. He was walking quietly along when I first saw him. He met three more, who nodded to him, to inform him I was coming. He walked to the corner, and then ran. I saw him go in at a door down the yard of a livery-stable, by the Obelisk turnpike gate.

Q. Are there any houses there - A. There is a house, and some rooms which are occupied as a coffee-shop - I did not see which he went into - the yard is no thoroughfare. I went into the house, then went into a bed-room on the opposite side of the yard, up one pair of stairs, and found two pieces of cloth and the green baize lying by the side of the bed. I do not know who the room belonged to.

Q. Could you find the prisoner - A. Not there; I searched the house all over. The green baize was like that I saw him with, and about the same size.

Q. Did you observe whether the baize was fastened when he had it - A. It was loose - I saw the corners hanging down; I have had them ever since. It was a fine day.

I took the cloth with me, and went to Richard Reeve to assist me. At two o'clock we met the prisoner, Smith, in company with one West, in James-street, they were walking together. West saw us, and turned round, Smith came on to meet us. Observing he was rather bulky I stopped him, and found a roll of cloth wrapped round him, under his coat; I took him into custody, and have had the cloth ever since.

JAMES HONEYMAN . I am a leather-seller. On Sunday, the 14th of November, about one o'clock, I saw Moore; he came into my room, No. 1, Obelisk livery-stables, which is up the yard; he had a bundle, which was not tied up. He asked me if Mr. Dyer (who frequents the rooms) was there? he was not there; he asked me if he might leave a parcel for him, which he did.

Q. How long did it remain there - A. A very short time - I took it up to a bed-room across the yard, up one pair of stairs, and laid it on the bed - I did not see what it contained.

Q. From the bulk and weight, might it have contained these things - A. I thought it was bigger than them; it was large enough to hold them. As I came across the yard I saw Welfare - this was three or four minutes after I carried it up; he appeared to be going up the bed-room stairs, I did not know what he was going up for. I have not been into the bed-room since.

RICHARD REEVE . I know nothing more about these two prisoners. I pursued West, he got away, and dropped a waistcoat-piece.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

SMITH'S Defence. I was coming past Dover-street, some men were gambling. A genteel man asked me if I had no money? I said No. He said,

" Carry this into the Borough for me, and I will give you 2 s." I said I would. He said,

"Roll it round you, or else I can carry it myself." I rolled it round me and met the officer - he asked me what I had got there? I said,

"Corderoy, and I had it from that man." He did not offer to go after the man; none of them went after the man.

MOORE'S Defence. I was coming along by the Obelisk, with a green baize bag containing my Sunday's clothes. I went into Honeyman's, and saw some young men give him some of that stuff for their breakfast. After that Honeyman offered 4 l. 10 s. for some more of it - a young man went out, and brought some more in in a green baize.

GEORGE WELFARE re-examined. I asked him what he had got? he said it was no odds to me. He was going to strike me.

SMITH - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 17.

MOORE - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 16.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayly.

Reference Number: t18191201-4

4. JAMES TOMKINS was indicted for feloniously assaulting Elizabeth Pedley , spinster , on the King's highway, on the 7th of November , at St. Leonard, Shoreditch , putting her in fear, and taking from her person, and against her will, one shawl, value 20 s. , her property.

ELIZABETH PEDLEY . I am a spinster . On Sunday, the 7th of November, about six o'clock in the evening, I was passing from Finsbury-market into Clipstone-street , with my brother, John Pedley , James Kendrick , and Harriet Percival ; we were going to chapel, and walking very fast. The prisoner and three other boys followed after us, saying to my brother,

"What are you going to do with these young women?" my brother made no answer, but looked back. One of them, who looked like a sweep, hit my brother; I turned round, and one of them pulled my shawl, which was pinned with a blanket-pin.

Q. That resisted his pulling - A. Yes, it pulled me down; the shawl was torn off, the pin of which remained in my breast. My brother, who was behind me, ran after the prisoner, who pulled it, I followed after them, and called Stop thief! he was stopped by a stranger. I saw him stopped - the shawl was picked up and given to me.

Prisoner. Q. Did I pull the shawl off - A. He was the one who ran off with it - I cannot say whether he took it.

JOHN PEDLEY . I am brother of the last witness. I was walking with my sister, and saw the prisoner take the shawl from her.

Q. Did it come off at the first snatch - A. No, my Lord, he pulled at it for half a minute and pulled her down. He ran away with it, I pursued, and saw him stopped - I saw him throw the shawl down; I picked it up and gave it to her. He was given into the charge of Clark.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not say at Worship-street you could not say it was me - A. No, I said I saw him do it.

WILLIAM CLARK . I am an officer. The prisoner was given into my custody - the prosecutrix gave me the shawl.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 16.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayly.

Reference Number: t18191201-5

5. JAMES DAVIES was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of October , at St. Matthew, Bethnal-green , in the dwelling-house of Anthony Pratt , two 40 l. Bank notes , his property.

ANTHONY PRATT . I am a renter of tolls , and live in a private house, in the parish of St. Matthew, Bethnal-green; the prisoner was in the habit of coming to my house to pay his addresses to my niece. On the 9th of October he was there - I had two 40 l. Bank notes in my bureau in the back parlour; he was often there, and was left in the room alone that evening I understand, but I was not at home.

ESTHER PRATT . I am niece to the last witness, the prisoner visited me for some time. On the evening of the 9th of October he came about half-past eight o'clock, and remained there for about three hours - he was in the back parlour, I was with him part of the time, my aunt was with us - he was left in the room alone part of the time. I knew of nothing wrong until after he had left.

Q. When were the notes missed - A. My uncle missed them next morning.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not inform me that they were not missed until next evening - A. I do not remember mentioning it to him.

ANN PRATT . I am the prosecutor's sister, and aunt to the last witness, I had received these notes of Mr. Reeves

on the 8th of October, and given them to my brother in the evening; I saw him put them into his bureau. The prisoner was there on the evening of the 9th, and was left alone in the back parlour, about a quarter of an hour or twenty minutes.

Prisoner. Q. Have you not often said that you did not know where your brother deposited the notes - A. Never.

Q. Have you not repeatedly said that your brother burnt them by mistake - A. I said I supposed he must have lost or burnt them, as they vanished in a mysterious way.

CHARLES BOLTON . I am in the East India Company's employ, and am a Bow-street patrol also. I have known the prisoner a long time, and lately he has made a different appearance to what he used - he dressed better, and had money. I heard that the prosecutor had lost two 40 l. notes, and on the 12th of October I had information from Avery.

RICHARD AVERY . I am in the East India Company's employ, and have known the prisoner some years; he is a labourer in the Company's employ - by trade he is a shoemaker. On a Monday morning, early in October (I do not know the date), I met him going to the warehouse; some conversation passed. He said he had broken a blood-vessel, and had been into Buckinghamshire for his health, and that he had had a horse made him a present of, which he sold for 40 l.; he produced two 40 l. notes, shewed them to me, and said he meant to buy stock in the 3 per Cents. I know nothing more, but hearing of this affair, I mentioned it.

Prisoner. Q. Did you see the notes - A. I saw one in his hand, what the other was I do not know; but he said they were two 40 l. notes.

THOMAS HEDGES . I am in the Company's warehouse. I saw two 40 l. notes in the prisoner's possession; he said he had sold a horse for 35 l. and given 5 l. in change for one; he was going out to buy stock. I asked him if he was not afraid to carry so much about him? He said he was going to deposit them in the Bank.

Prisoner. Q. You never saw the notes - A. I did; they were two 40 l., notes, and he said so too.

GEORGE DYER . I am a clerk in the Bank; I have two 40 l. notes, one dated September 9. 1819 - it came into the Bank on the 14th of October, and the other on the 12th; I did not pay them - one was paid in by a banker. I also produce four 10 l. notes. One is No. 7252.

CHARLES EDWARD WALLER . I am a clerk in the Bank, and produce my book, by which it appears that on the 12th of October I gave four 10 l, notes, No. 7252, to No. 7255, dated September 9, for a 40 l. note.

ROBERT SMITH . I am a silversmith, and live at No. 16, Norton Falgate; I know the prisoner. On the 14th of October, he called upon me, and bought articles amounting to 32 s.; he tendered me a 10 l. note. I gave him the change, and wrote his name on the back - (looks at No. 7252) - this is it; I put Davis on it - I knew him before.

JOHN ADELBERT LAWRENCE MOUCHET . My father is a stock-broker; I was with my father, and have some recollection of the prisoner. On the 12th of October, either my father or me, purchased 50 l. Navy 5 per Cents for him, which came to 51 l. 18 s. 9 d. He described himself as James Davis , Ely-place, King Edward-street, Mile End, New Town, gentleman. He paid me a 20 l., three 10 l., and two 1 l. notes; my father marked one of them, and I know his hand-writing - (looks at No. 7254, dated September 9, 1819) - this is one of them.

WILLIAM REEVES . I am a labourer in the East India House; I know Pratt. I paid two 40 l. notes to him on the 8th of October; I should know them - (looks at them) these are the two.

ANTHONY PRATT re-examined. The two 40 l. notes I spoke of, are what I received from Reeves - my sister received them of him for silver. I missed them on the evening of the 10th; I had not seen them after the 8th, when I put them into the bureau. I keep the key myself - nobody but myself had access to them. The lock was safe as before - my key opened it easily.

Q. Had any one access to the room except your sister and niece - A. Nobody. I know the notes by W. R. being on the backs, which I had observed on them before I lost them - I have no doubt of them.

ANN PRATT re-examined. I gave my brother the same notes I received from Reeves. I looked at them myself, they are the same. Nobody but my brother had the means of opening the bureau.

Q. Was anybody, except the prisoner, in the room alone on the 9th - A. No, my Lord.

Prisoner. Q. Had not Mrs. Baxter, the charwoman, been there on Saturday - A. Yes, she was not there alone - she still works for me. I was in the house all that day.

Prisoner's Defence. I am perfectly innocent of stealing the notes out of the bureau - I never opened it in my life, nor did I ever see the notes. The money I paid I received from a man who owed it to me; he is gone to to America.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 23.

Recommended to Mercy .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow .

Reference Number: t18191201-6

6. WILLIAM FIELDER and CHARLES ELLIS were indicted for that they, on the 19th of October, feloniously did falsely make, forge, and counterfeit a certain order for payment of money , as follows:

No. 500.

London, 19th Oct. 1819.

Messrs. DRUMMOND, pay JOHN COWING or Bearer, One Hundred Pounds.

100 l.

J. F. TUSTIN.

with intent to defraud John Frederick Tustin .

SECOND COUNT, for feloniously uttering and publishing the same as true, with the like intent, knowing it to be forged.

THIRD AND FOURTH COUNTS, the same, only stating it to be with intent to defraud Andrew Barclay Drummond , John Drummond , Charles Drummond , Henry Drummond , and Andrew Mortimer Drummond .

Counsel for the Prosecution, MR. BOLLAND.

JOSEPH SANDERS . I am cashier at Messrs. Drummonds' house, who are bankers ; Mr. J. F. Tustin is a customer of theirs. On the 19th of October I paid a draft for 100 l., purporting to be drawn on them; I cannot speak to the identity of the person or persons to whom I paid it. I have an entry that it was paid to a person named John Cowing , by which I know it was a man - I have no knowledge

of the prisoners. I paid a 50 l., three 10 l., and four 5 l. notes for it, This is the draft - (looking at it.)

RALPH PRICE , ESQ. I am in the firm of Sir Charles Price and Company, my family reside at Sydenham; Fielder was my footman; he was in the habit of paying money for me, and rendering an account.

COURT. Q. From any thing you saw before this, have you any recollection of his hand-writing - A. Only from what I have seen.

Q. Have you a belief whose hand-writing this draft is - A. I have a faint belief. When I first saw the draft I said,

"I think this is (Fielder) my footman's hand-writing;" but I never saw him write.

Q. Have you paid accounts which he presented to you - A. I have paid small accounts, such as turnpikes, and other small things. He left me on the 22d of October; my family were at Sydenham then. He asked my leave on Monday to go to town on Tuesday, the 19th, and to stay till Wednesday, which I gave him; he returned on Wednesday night. On the Thursday morning, after I left home, he left my service without saying a word.

Cross-examined by MR. BROADRICK. Q. You have a very faint impression of its being his hand-writing - A. Yes. He was with me on the 20th, at night; I do not know what time he went on the 19th. He lived four months with me. I had every reason to think him a good character.

MR. BOLLAND having no further proof of the handwriting, declined proceeding further.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow .

Reference Number: t18191201-7

7. JOHN KELLY was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of November , one coat, value 5 l., the property of the Reverend Augustus Cox , in the dwelling-house of George Mayer .

JOSEPH IMPEY . I am servant to Mr. Cox, who lives in George Meyer 's house, at Hackney . Mr. Cox's christian name is Frederick, he has another name, which I do not know; he is a minister ; he is in the country now. On the 16th of November, at a quarter past eleven o'clock in the morning, I brushed his coat, and hung it on the banisters in the hall; I missed it about half-past twelve, and saw it next day in possession of the constable; it was nearly new, and worth 8 l. The prisoner is a stranger. The house is Mr. Meyer's, who is abroad. He rents the whole house, and has five servants there. The gates are always left unfastened.

THOMAS GOODMAN . I am an officer of Hackney; I have lived there twenty years, and have known Mr. Cox eight years; his christian names are Frederick Augustus . On the 16th of November, a little before eleven o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner with the coat in Church-street, Hackney, about a quarter of a mile from the prosecutors', he had it rolled up under his arm. I suspected him, followed him, and said,

"What have you got?" he said it was a coat, which he had brought from a clergyman's, who was a lodger at a gentleman's house, at Clapton, and was going to take it to his master, who was a tailor, and lived in Whitechapel, to get it cut shorter in the back. I told him to go back with me, and shew where he took it from; he refused, and said he would take me to where he was going - I took him to the watch-house. When he got half-way he said he would go no further. I pulled him on, he then said,

"I did not bring it from where I told you, I found it in the church-yard." I asked him why he told me that? he said he thought I should not detain him.

Cross-examined by MR. BROADRICK. Q. Did the prosecutor tell you his name - A. Yes, I have heard him answer to it since the prisoner was taken. The prisoner said he took it from a clergyman, and mentioned some name.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming across Hackney church-yard, and saw the coat lying between two tombstones, I picked it up, and put it under my arm, and the officer stopped me. I told him where I found it, and offered to shew him the place - the lamplighter saw me pick it up. I did not say I brought it from any house.

GUILTY. Aged 18.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Whipped and Discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayly.

Reference Number: t18191201-8

8. MARY BRYAN was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of November , five ounces of silk, value 12 s., and four yards of silk twist, value 4 d., the goods of Joseph Tassie , privately in his shop .

SOPHIA TASSIE . I am wife of Joseph Tassie , who is a tailor , and lives in King-street, Soho . On the 6th of November, between one and two o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner came to the shop, and had small articles of silk and twist, which came to 3 s. 5 d. - I put them in a parcel. While I was making the bill she asked for six yards of tape, which I gave her. She would not let me put it in the parcel, but said she would do it herself. She said she had not sufficient money, and would leave the parcel - she went out. I missed five ounces of silk and four yards and a half of twist. I applied to Jones, he and I overtook her; she said she knew nothing of me, and had not been to my shop. She took us to Normanton's; he afterwards produced some black silk. The prisoner took some silk out of her pocket which I had lost.

WILLIAM JONES . I am a constable. The prosecutrix applied to me, I found the prisoner in New-street, Covent-garden, and told her she had taken some silk from Tassie, she denied it, then said she had left it at Normanton's, and took us there. I asked him if he had bought any silk of her? he said he had not. The prisoner produced some coloured silk from her pocket. I afterwards went to Normanton's again, and recovered some black silk.

WILLIAM NORMANTON . I am a shoemaker. The prisoner came to my shop about half an hour before the constable brought her; she sold me some black silk, which I afterwards gave to the constable.

Q. You at first said she sold you none - A. I understood them to mean coloured silk.

JOSEPH TASSIE . The coloured silk is mine, and worth 4 s., I will not swear to the black.

Prisoner's Defence. (written). I have four small children, and my husband is out of employ. I was induced

by dire want to commit the offence, not being able to give my children bread.

GUILTY. Aged 25.

Of stealing to the value of 4 s. 10 d. only .

Confined Five Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow .

Reference Number: t18191201-9

9. ISAAC STEPHENS was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of November , 3 3/4 lbs. of metal, value 8 s. , the property of Keziah Botten , Robert Gilman , and Thomas Botten .

ROBERT GILMAN . I am in partnership with Keziah and Thomas Botten , we are brass-founders , and live in Shoe-lane, Holborn , the prisoner was a labourer in our employ. On the 4th of November, about half-past one o'clock in the afternoon, while the men were gone to dinner, this metal was stolen.

WILLIAM SMITH . I am a labourer, and in the employ of the prosecutors. On the 4th of November, about half-past one o'clock, I saw the prisoner take the metal out of his box, and put it in his pocket; I informed Mr. Gilman, who sent for Corby, the officer, who secured him as he was going to dinner; he brought him back, and found 3 3/4 lbs. of metal in his pocket.

GEORGE CORBY . I am an officer. I was sent for by the prosecutors, and watched the prisoner out about two o'clock; I stopped him, and said, your master suspects you have got metal; he said,

"I have got some, and am sorry for it." I took him back, and found 3 3/4 lbs. of metal in his breeches pocket.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 42.

Confined Six Months .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191201-10

10. HENRY WESTERMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of November , one watch, value 2 l., the goods of Joseph Pegram , from his person .

JOSEPH PEGRAM . On the 12th of November, in the evening, I was coming down Holborn Hill , and all of a sudden I was rather hustled, when I got near Fleet-market I felt, and missed my watch; I went on about my business, and advertised it next day. I do not know any of those who hustled me.

JAMES SPURLING . I am a pawnbroker, and live on Snow Hill. On Saturday, the 12th of November, the prisoner offered me this watch in pledge for 50 s. I said I could not lend so much, but observed to him that it was a very good watch; he offered to sell it to me, but I declined buying it, and asked him what he gave for it? He said 40 s. I said I was surprised at his buying it so cheap, and asked him if he knew the value of it? He said No, went away, and pledged it Page's, in Liquorpond-street. The printed bill came in soon afterwards, and I recollected the prisoner having it. He afterwards brought the watch to me again; Page's duplicate was on it then. I told him I believed it to be a stolen one, stopped it, and asked him if he knew of whom he bought it? He said Yes, and as he was watchman of our parish, I let him go to look for the person. He never returned.

WILLIAM SHUTER . I am an officer. I took the prisoner into custody, on the 16th, about a quarter after eleven o'clock at night. I found nothing on him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I bought it for 2 l.

(See Second Day.)

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191201-11

11. HENRY THATCHER was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of November , one wrapper, value 6 d., and two blankets, value 3 l. 2 s. , the property of Thomas Purden and William Kent .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating them to be the property of Richard Parker .

THOMAS PURDEN . I keep the New Inn, Old Bailey . On Friday, the 19th of November, between seven and eight o'clock in the morning, Richard Parker 's waggon stood in the Old Bailey; it was loaded too high to go in at the gate, so that we were under the necessity of taking some of the goods off; among the rest was a small parcel, No. 1, which came from John Early , Jun, Whitney, and was directed to Mr. Bell, Tower Royal; I had it in my hand, and it being a small parcel, I threw it into the waggon again. I was called down the yard, left the waggoner in charge, and during my absence he went away. I am in partnership with William Kent .

JOHN BELTON . I am a machine sawyer. On the 19th of November I was coming to town, and passing up the Old Bailey I saw a waggon, partly unloaded, a few yards from the gateway of the New Inn. I saw the prisoner close to me, thought he had no business to be standing there, and passed on about thirty or forty yards, then stopped a few minutes, and saw him put his feet on the wheel, remove some straw, and take this bundle or package out; he immediately left the waggon, Before he had well got his foot on the pavement (four or five persons were passing at the time) he walked in the middle of them till he got opposite Fleet-lane, where he went down. I gave an alarm at the New Inn, and told them that the waggon had been robbed. I took the porters down Fleet-lane, and in the first turning to the right, which is Seacoal-lane, I pointed the prisoner out to them; they secured him, took him back to the Old Bailey, and from there to the Compter. I am sure he is the man.

Q. Did the four or five persons seem connected with him - A. I thought so. They screened him.

JOHN COTMORE . I am hostler at the New Inn. I pursued after the prisoner, and took him with the property on his shoulder.

CHARLES EDWARDS . I assisted in taking the prisoner with the bale of goods. I belong to the Inn.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming up the Old Bailey, and met a man, apparently a waggoner, who said he would give me 1 s. to carry it to Seacoal-lane.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191201-12

12. JOHN HENLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of November , two seals, value 2 l. 10 s.; part of a watch-chain, value 6 d., and one key, value 6 d., the goods of Lambert Wood , from his person .

LAMBERT WOOD . On Tuesday, the 23d of November, about ten minutes before seven o'clock in the evening, I was in Fountain-court, Aldermanbury , going to the Court of Requests; there is a passage leading from the Baptist Head coffee-house, to Guildhall Yard . At the entrance of the small passage the prisoner met me, I was going to let him pass, but he came before me, pushed me into the open court, and laid hold of my watch-chain with both his hands. I applied my hand to my fob to prevent my watch coming out, and it being a large one it would not come out, but he broke the chain, and immediately ran off with part of that and two seals; some persons were at the end of the court, I told them to stop him, but a man gave him encouragement, and said,

"Run on! Run on!" I called out,

"Stop thief! for he has robbed me of my watch;" he was seized, and I asked him for my watch? as I thought that was also gone, but he said he had not got it. I then asked him for my seals? but he said he had not got them. He was taken to the office; my property was not found. He is the boy who took them, I am positive - he was secured in less than two minutes.

Cross-examined by MR. WALFORD. Q. You hardly saw him - A. Yes, he was some time trying to get my watch; he was in the open part of the court, and ran to Aldermanbury; he was stopped opposite the gateway. I have no doubt but the other man received them of him.

RICHARD KIRBY . I am an officer. I was at the end of Lad-lane, heard the cry, stepped round the corner, and saw the prisoner come out of Fountain-court. I secured him; there were two or three people there. The prosecutor came up, and asked him for his watch and seals? then said,

"Here is my watch, give me my seals." I searched him, but found nothing on him.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191201-13

13. THOMAS WALTER was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of November , one table-spoon, value 15 s., and one tea-spoon, value 5 s. , the goods of George Anderton .

ANN ANDERTON . I am the wife of George Anderton , who is a pastry-cook , and lives in Leadenhall-street . On Wednesday, the 17th of November, about three o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner came in, and asked for a bason of soup, which I gave him; it came to 1 s.; he asked to be trusted. When he came out he paid me for it; the shopwoman ran in to see if the spoon was there, and said it was gone. I instantly ran after him, caught him, and desired him to give me the spoon, which he did immediately, and I gave him in charge of a constable, who took him to the Compter.

Q. What spoon did he give you - A. A table and a teaspoon; the tea-spoon laid on a table in the room, and he had the table-spoon to eat his soup with.

SELINA HOSKEIN . I am servant to the last witness; the prisoner came into the shop, and had a bason of soup. About ten minutes after that he asked for trust; I went into the back parlour, and asked Mrs. Anderton to trust him, as he said he knew her. She went into the soup-room, said she did not know him, and waited till he came out of the room; he then said he had found 1 s. to pay for it. As I came out of the parlour I saw him take the tablespoon, and immediately told Mrs. Anderton, who ran after him, and asked him for it. He gave it to her, and Plaistowe took him.

WILLIAM PLAISTOWE . I am an officer. I was sent for, and found the prosecutrix with the prisoner in Billiter-lane, close by the shop; she had the spoons, and gave them to me. I took him to the shop, and searched him, but found nothing on him. She gave me three spoons that he had given to her - two of them were her's.

ANN ANDERTON re-examined. He gave me two table and one tea-spoon. Two of them belong to me.

Prisoner's Defence. I was driven to it by distress; having been out of a situation a long time I was driven to the rash act. I hope you will have compassion on me, it being my first offence.

GUILTY.

Recommended to Mercy .

Fined One Shilling , and Discharged.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191201-14

14. WILLIAM GOODEY was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of November , one pair of breeches, value 1 l.; one jacket, value 10 s.; one shirt, value 1 s.; one waistcoat, value 11 s., and one snuff-box, value 1 s. the goods of Robert Smith .

ROBERT SMITH . I am porter at the Bull and Mouth, Inn , and live in Shaftsbury-place, Aldersgate-street . On the 2d of November, about eleven o'clock in the morning, the prisoner went into my room with me; I fell asleep, and these things were taken away, I awoke in about two hours. I found them at Guildhall.

WILLIAM JONES . I live at the Adam and Eve, public-house, Jewin-street; the prisoner came into my house with a Jewess; he had a bundle of clothes tied up in a handkerchief, which he untied, and offered to her for sale. It struck me, by the appearance of the clothes, that he had not come honestly by them, and I fetched an officer, told him the circumstance, and he took him into custody.

JOHN CLINTON . I am an officer. On the 2d of November I was in Jewin-street; Jones called me into his taproom, and I found the prisoner there with the bundle before him. I asked him what he was going to do with the things? He said he was going to sell them. I told him he had better keep them, but he said he should do as he liked with his own property. I said by the appearance of the clothes they did not suit his person, for they belonged to a shorter man, and the waistcoat belonged to some livery servant - he said they were his own. I turned, and saw there was a Jewess in the taproom, with a pair of velveteen breeches in her hand, which Jones said he had given to her. I searched the prisoner, and found nothing on him but a snuff-box in his hat, representing a double-barrelled pistol. I took him to the Bull and Mouth, Inn, where these things were claimed.

MARY TAYLOR . The prosecutor lodges with me. On the 2d of November, about eleven o'clock in the morning, he came home, brought the prisoner with him, and went into his apartment. He had not been there five or six minutes, before the prisoner came down, and said,

"It is awkward for me Ma'am, for I am quite a stranger here; Mrs. Smith (meaning the prosecutor's wife) is my sister."

He then said his poor mother laid on her death bed, that the prosecutor had been drinking, and was laying on the bed - he asked me where they got their beer from? I said I rather thought it was opposite the Castle and Falcon, tavern, in Aldersgate-street. I knew of whom they had it, but I found he had had enough, as he staggered and fell against the wainscot of the passage. He went out for the beer, came back with some a few minutes after, and went up stairs. He came down again in five or six minutes with a bundle in his left hand, and a pair of boots in his right hand, which I had seen Smith wearing a a few days before - I let him go away. About an hour after a person came from the officer, and asked for the prosecutor. I went up, and found him laying on the bed fast asleep - he was drunk. He missed his things.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 36.

Confined Three Months .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191201-15

15. JOHN LOMER was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of November , one pocket-book, value 6 d., and one handkerchief, value 3 s., the goods of Benjamin Bunbury , from his person .

BENJAMIN BUNBURY , ESQ. On the 23d of November, about one o'clock, as the Prince Regent was going to the Parliament House, I was in the Park , and was hustled; as soon as I came out of the crowd a gentleman said he thought I had had my pocket picked, I felt - I missed my handkerchief and memorandum-book. I do not know who took them.

THOMAS THOMPSON . I was in the Park, and saw the prisoner, in company with several other suspicious characters; I watched them, and saw them surround the prosecutor just as the Prince was coming, one of them made a snatch at his watch; as the gentleman turned round to see the procession, they all hustled him together, a moment after that I saw the prisoner come running from the prosecutor with something concealed under his waistcoat - I stopped him, and found this small book and silk handkerchief under his waistcoat. I could not find the prosecutor then, but a direction in the book enabled me to find him.

CHARLES READ . I am an officer. I was in the Park, and saw the prisoner with several more hustle the gentleman; in about five minutes the prisoner ran from him with something tucked under his waistcoat. It was a silk handkerchief and a book.

JOSEPH CHARLES . I was with the witnesses, and know nothing more.

Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I picked them up under the peoples' feet. The pocket-book was in the handkerchief. I never looked at it. I asked several gentlemen if they had lost it.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191201-16

16. STEPHEN READ was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of November , from the person of George Jackson , one 10 l., and six 1 l. Bank notes , his property.

GEORGE JACKSON . On the evening of the 14th of November, there was a house on fire in Charlotte-street, St. Pancras ; living in the neighbourhood, I went about half-past ten o'clock to ascertain if it was out. When I got nearly opposite the house, there was suddenly a great rush, apparently of pick-pockets; I was suddenly lifted off my feet above the persons' shoulders, and completely carried by them, at that moment I felt a hand at my right hand pocket, being determined to secure it, I gave no alarm, but forced my hand down, and took hold of a hand in my pocket, then cried out, loudly, some one was robbing me, his hand is in my pocket, and I have hold of it; the persons round me said,

"Hold him fast;" which I did, and said,

"Gentlemen, stand round me, or the thief will be rescued." Some respectable persons were nearer to me than the gang - they were hustled with me. I found it was the prisoner's hand, they laid hold of him. A gentleman who had hold of him, said his hand was full of paper; he found my 16 l. in his hand, and the gentleman handed it over to me. I never let his hand go until I collared him. There were one 10 l. and six 1 l. notes. I produce them, and know them to be mine.

Prisoner's Defence. The paper was on my arm. I did not take it out of his pocket.

GUILTY Aged 16.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191201-17

17. WILLIAM CONNOR was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of November , at Hayes , one silver skewer, value 7 s.; two silver pepper-boxes, value 1 l.; two silver butter-boats, value 2 l.; two silver cups, value 3 l.; twenty-three silver spoons, value 5 l. 10 s.; twelve silver forks, value 6 l.; one silver wine-strainer, value 2 l.; three silver ladles, value 3 l., and one marrow-spoon, value 10 s., the property of John Jones , in his dwelling-house .

Counsel for the prosecution, MR. NORTON.

MR. JOHN JONES . I live at Norwood Green , in the parish of Hayes, Middlesex - I live there on my fortune; the prisoner was my livery-servant , and had the sole care of all my plate. I missed none of it until information was given me about it by my brother-in-law.

Q. Had you seen any of it within a day or two - A. Part of it was in daily use.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Did you hire him yourself - A. No, my brother-in-law hired him; he lived four weeks with me.

THOMAS BUTLER . I am a carrier in the service of Mr. Chad. I go round Norwood and Southall to collect parcels. Last Tuesday week, at night, I received a box from the prisoner, he told me to tell my master to leave it as soon as he got into town - there was a direction on it - I cannot read; it was corded up. I took it home, and afterwards saw it in my master's possession, it was then open. It was about a foot and a half long, and one foot wide - it was heavy.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you recollect that you had orders from the prisoner to take it to Mr. Bevan's - A. No. I

know Mr. Bevan, he is a relation of the prosecutor, and lives in Oxford-street. I delivered the box to my master; I did not see it opened, I saw it when it was open. I never carried a parcel for the prisoner to Mr. Bevan.

COURT. Q. Where did the prisoner give it to you - A. At his master's, in the pantry.

GEORGE CHAD . I am a carrier from Hanwell and Norwood. Butler delivered me a box, which I produce. I took it in doors and opened it, having some suspicion - it was nailed with three nails; it contained a marrow-spoon, twelve silver forks, and a variety of silver articles, also a shirt and four stockings. I took nothing out of it excepting some broken victuals - it contains every thing that was then in it but the victuals; it was directed to Mrs. Connor, No. 13, Gray-street, Manchester-square, London. I came to town immediately, and informed Mr. Bevan. The prisoner was apprehended. I am sure it is the same box.

Cross-examined. Q. Your curiosity induced you to open it - A. Yes. A shoemaker, and another person, who are my next-door neighbours, were present when I opened it. It was about eight o'clock in the evening. I live two miles and a half from Mr. Jones's. I left the box at my house. I went to town at four o'clock next morning, and informed Mr. Bevan; he came to my house and examined it - I did not think it proper to go to Mr. Jones. I had taken a box to Gray-street from the prisoner on the Tuesday before that, which was very heavy. I took two boxes before.

THOMAS BUTLER re-examined. This is the direction that was on the box when the prisoner delivered it to me.

MR. WALTER BEVAN . I am brother-in-law to Mr. Jones. Chad fetched me; I went to his house and saw the box - I took an inventory of the articles; it is now in the same state, and contains the articles stated in the indictment.

Cross-examined. Q. I believe you hired the prisoner - A. I did, and received a very good character with him. I hired him in the name of Condell - he now says his name is Connor. I received a verbal character from a person calling himself Captain Graham; I cannot find him now.

MR. JONES. The plate in the box is all my property, it contains the articles stated in the indictment - there are seventy-nine ounces altogether, and worth above 21 l. - one silver cup weighs one pound.

Prisoner's Defence. I have nothing to say. I sent the plate to my wife, to have it taken to Mr. Bevan to be taken care of.

MR. JONES re-examined. I never authorized the prisoner to send my plate away, nor did I know of its being sent. He had made a false alarm that thieves had beset the house.

COURT. Q. There was no occurrence in your family to render it necessary to send the plate away - A. No, my Lord.

MR. WALTER BEVAN re-examined. When the prisoner was apprehended he pretended that Mr. Jones's daughter ordered him to send it away; I disproved that - he then said the housekeeper authorized him - that was disproved also.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 32.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18191201-18

18. ROBERT TURNER was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Peter Williamson , about three o'clock in the night of the 11th of November , at St. Marylebone , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, two casks, value 10 s.; one bottle, value 3 d.; six quarts of brandy, value 30 s.; six gallons of rum, value 4 l., and one quart of cloves, value 1 s. , his property.

PETER WILLIAMSON , I keep the Swan, public-house , in George-street, Portland Chapel . On Thursday night, the 11th of November, I was the last person up, and secured the premises all myself; I went to bed about twelve o'clock at night, and got up about eight o'clock in the morning - I had heard nothing in the night. When I got up, I found the lock of my spirit cellar-door had been forced open - it opened into the beer cellar.

Q. How had they got to it - A. By first getting into the beer cellar, which communicates with the street, by a flap that was bolted inside when I went to bed; I found it unbolted, and a little injury done to one side of the flap, by which means an instrument might be put through, and the bolt pushed aside; they could then get into the beer cellar, and force the lock of the spirit cellar-door. I missed a small cag of rum, and went immediately to the watch-house. I was sent from there to Marlborough-street, and found the prisoner under examination, and the cag of rum there - I knew it to be mine. I had received it from Read and Thompson, in the City; my name was chalked on it, and No. 44 was also on it, which agrees with my invoice. I also lost some cloves, and a quantity of brandy and rum. I do not know the prisoner.

PETER CRAIG . I am cellarman to Messrs. Neville, Read and Co., who are wine and brandy merchants. I filled the cask, and saw the invoice sent with it to the prosecutor's. I know the cask to be the same.

RICHARD LEE . I am a watchman; my beat is about one hundred and fifty yards from the prosecutor's house. About half-past four o'clock in the morning, I was in Great Portland-street, and crossed over the road to the prisoner, who had the cag. I asked him what he had got? He said he came from Somers'-town, and was going to the Green Man and Still, coach office, with it. I followed him by the Green Man and Still, then secured him, and he threw it down. I took him to the watch-house with it - it contained six gallons of rum.

PETER WILLIAMSON re-examined. It is the cask that I lost.

PETER CRAIG re-examined. It is the cask that I filled and sealed. The cost price is 4 l. 19 s.

Prisoner. I have no defence to make.

GUILTY . - DEATH Aged 24.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow .

Reference Number: t18191201-19

19. JOSEPH STILL and JOSEPH BUSH were indicted for stealing, on the 2d of November , at Paddington, thirteen sheep, price 30 l. , the property of William Dexter .

Counsel for the prosecution MR. NORTON.

ANN BONES . I live at Paddington. On the 1st of November I took in thirteen sheep, which belonged to Mr. Dexter - a drover brought them; I knew them to be Dexter's, for I had received sheep of him before. My man,

Charles Sheppard , put them into a field. On the 2d of November I saw Bush and another man, whom I have no doubt was Still; I could not swear to Still at the office - he was very dirty.

Q. What passed between you - A. I went to my door, and saw them at my man's door - it was about an hour before dusk. I asked them what they wanted? I saw them plainly - they looked at one another a little, and then said they wanted my man; I told them he was in the shed with my husband, then shut the door, and saw no more of them. We had no other sheep but Dexter's thirteen; they were delivered in the name of Dexter.

Cross-examined by MR. CURWOOD. Q. The drover who brought them said they were Dexter's - A. Yes; the men came about five o'clock - I have no doubt of Still being the other man.

Prisoner BUSH. Q. At the office you said you could not swear to me - A. I swore to him immediately, and said he tried to hide his face, so that I saw his side face only, but I had seen him a great many times before.

CHARLES SHEPPARD . I live at Paddington, and am servant to John Harris . On Monday night, about five o'clock, I saw thirteen sheep, which were delivered by a drover in Mr. Dexter's name. On Tuesday night, as I was sitting by the fire, two men came up to the window; I am sure Bush was one of them, the other man was short and thick; they asked me for Mr. Dexter's sheep? I did not know either of them before. I said,

"They are in the pen, go and take them." I went in, sat by the fire again, and saw no more. Next morning I found the sheep were gone.

Cross-examined. Q. What time was this - A. About half-past five or six o'clock - it was nearly dusk then; I only knew Bush. I live in a cottage with my father, opposite Bones.

Prisoner BUSH. Q. Did you see me take them away - A. No. I saw them go up to the pen. I am sure he was one.

COURT. Q. Was the other man like Still - A. Yes, my Lord, it might have been him - I did not see the marks on the sheep.

SARAH M'GREGOR. I lodge at No. 3, Hamilton-row, Battle Bridge. On the 2d of November, about eight o'clock in the evening, a knock came at the door, and I let Warren in - he keeps a green shop at the house; I sent my daughter for the key of the shop-door. Very soon after some sheep were driven in - Bush stood at the door; they were driven through the passage into a shed at the back of the house.

Q. Who was with them - A. I saw Bush - nobody was with him then; he had either a stick or whip in his hand - I do not know who drove them; I saw the sheep when I was at my window up stairs, but when I went down to open the door, Bush and Warren stood at the door; I let Warren in at the street-door, and sent my daughter for the key of the shop-door, which was brought - they could not open the shop. Bush said to Warren,

"Push your foot against the door" - I said,

"You must not do that." I tried to open it with the key, and while I was doing so, I saw Still. The sheep were then in the shed.

Q. Are you sure of the person of Still - A. Yes, I saw them at the house that day between eleven and twelve o'clock - they lunched there; Still went into the shed with his pocket full of skewers - I went to bed between eleven and twelve o'clock, Still and his wife were then in the back parlour, with Warren - Bush was in the shed.

Q. Did you see the sheep next morning - A. They all hung up in the shed; I never counted them, either at night or in the morning - they were skinned. There were two halves, and the rest carcases. The halves were part of two sheep, which had been cut across.

Cross-examined. Q. What are you - A. My husband is a musician. Warren absconded the night the sheep came. Still visited him.

Q. Bush and Warren drove them in - A. I let Warren in, Still came in afterwards. He frequently came to visit Warren.

MR. NORTON. Q. How long after the sheep came did Still come - A. About a quarter of an hour; he went through the passage with the skewers in his pockets. I do not know what business he is.

COURT. Q. What sized man is Warren - A. A middle size, and thin - about the height of Bush; he is an old man, and rather stoops. Still and Bush both lunched there - about eleven o'clock they all went out together. I did not see them again until they all came back.

ELIZABETH M'GREGOR. I am daughter of the last witness. On the 2d of November, in the evening, I went to fetch the key, when I came out Bush stood at the door with a whip in his hand, there were no sheep at the door, nor had any been brought in then - they were brought in in my absence. I went into the shed about half-past eight o'clock, and saw a man skinning the sheep - he has not been found - Bush was holding the candle to him; a boy was also in the shed. Still, his wife, and Warren were in the parlour. I counted the sheep next morning, there were eleven whole ones, and two hind parts. Still sent me for two pots of beer, which I fetched; he asked me to take a pint into the shed to the man; I did, and then saw Bush there - I saw no more.

Cross-examined. Q. You never saw Still in the shed slaughtering the sheep - A. No. Still visited Warren. I never saw his wife there before.

MR. NORTON. Q. Did you see Still in the shed - A. Yes, after I had carried in the beer, he had his coat off; his back was towards me - he was doing nothing. His coat was on when I saw him in the parlour.

COURT. Q. Did you see him come in at first - A. Yes; he had his right-hand pocket full of large skewers.

RICHARD CRICK . I live at No. 2, Field's-place, Battle-bridge, opposite M'Gregor's house. I am a butcher. On the 2d of November, about eight o'clock at night, I saw some sheep, Bush and Warren were with them; a sheep ran away from the door, I saw Bush run and fetch it back. Warren and Bush drove them in. I thought they were going to open a butcher's shop. In the morning I saw the shop opened as before; I went into the shed about eight o'clock, and saw thirteen whole sheep hanging up, dead. I afterwards saw Bush at the office. I went and informed Cadby, and at night eleven sheep, and two pair of hind-quarters were brought to my house.

ELIZABETH M'GREGOR re-examined. I saw Bush carry one part of a sheep away, and the man who skinned them carried the other.

GEORGE TAYLOR . I am an officer of Clerkenwell. I went to No. 3, Hamilton-row, on Wednesday, the 3d of November, about five o'clock in the afternoon, and found eleven whole sheep, and two hind halves, but no skins. I carried them over to Crick's. I and Read apprehended Still between six and seven o'clock that night. I was going to the office with Elizabeth M'Gregor, about a quarter before eight o'clock, and took Bush in a field, he pretended to be easing himself. We told them both what they were taken for. I did not ask where the skins were. Mr. Dexter afterwards saw the carcases in my presence. When I took Still he said he knew nothing of the sheep. I understood he rented the stable of No. 3 - he said he did not rent it.

JOSEPH CADBY . I had information, and went with Read.

WILLIAM READ . I went with a search-warrant, and found eleven whole sheep, and two hind halves.

WILLIAM DEXTER . I am a butcher, and live in Paddington-street, Marylebone. On the 1st of November I sent thirteen sheep to Bones' to graze. I sent them by a Smithfield drover - he is an old man, near fifty; four of them were Lincolnshire wethers, and nine were half-bred - they were ewes and wethers. I do not exactly know how many of each.

Q. Did you afterwards see the carcases - A. Yes, at Hatton-garden. I saw eleven sheep, and two pair of hind-quarters. Four of them were Lincolnshire wethers, the other nine are half-bred. About three of them are ewes, and the rest wethers.

Q. Can you form any judgment whether they were yours - A. I have no doubt in my own mind; I bought them on the Monday, and had handled them all. I had bought ten of the Lincolnshire in all - these four corresponded in weight with those I had killed before; each weighed from eleven to twelve stone, and so did these - the nine were a part of a lot of twenty-five. I had killed sixteen, which weighed from eight to nine stone each, and so did the carcases that were found; I saw them at the office on Friday, the 5th of November.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you know a half-bred sheep when the skin is off - A. Certainly, by the make of them.

ANN BONES re-examined. Q. Had the man who came with Bush the appearance of an elderly man - A. No, I did not notice whether he stooped or not.

CHARLES SHEPPARD re-examined. Q. Did you go out with the two men - A. No, I waited at the window - I only saw them at the window. The man who was with Bush had not the appearance of an elderly man, and did not stoop.

STILL'S Defence. On Tuesday, the 2d of November, I went into the country to purchase potatoes, which Warren agreed to purchase again. On my return I stopped at the Plough, public-house, Kelsal-green; Mr. Clancey was there, and Mr. Pollard, who is a butcher, and resides in Marylebone-lane. I waited there till about half-past six o'clock in the evening, and enquired if I could purchase any potatoes, then went to Mr. Bell's, Westmoreland Arms, public-house, Manchester-street, Manchester-square, staid there till nearly eight o'clock, and drank several glasses of brandy and water with some friends there, then proceeded home to my stable, No. 8, Smith's-place, Skinner-street, Somers'-town - it was then about nine o'clock. I cleaned my horse, put it up for the night, and then said to my wife,

"I shall go to Warren, and tell him I have bought no potatoes." She said,

"You had better take those skewers which you promised to Mr. Warren," which I accordingly did; when I got to the house it was nearly ten o'clock - I found both the doors open, and went into the parlour to Warren; he had a pot of beer by his side. I told him I could buy no potatoes, and sat down; he wished me to lend him 1 s. to get some beer, and I gave the girl one to fetch some; he sent most of it backwards. I staid there till near eleven o'clock, then went home and went to bed. I saw no more of Warren.

BUSH'S Defence. I was at Edwards's, who keeps the Plough, public-house, Kelsal-green, from four o'clock till about a quarter after six; I then walked home to Edgware-road, at the corner of Connell-place, where my mother lives - it was then about seven o'clock. I was coming down Battle Bridge, and saw Warren, who had some sheep at the door, and asked me to lend him a hand with them. I helped him into the yard with them, and went down to Smithfield, called as I came back, and he asked me to hold the light to the man in the shed, which I did for half an hour, and then went away, got home about eleven o'clock, and did not see Warren or Still afterwards. When I was taken into custody, I was returning from West-street, Smithfield; a gentleman asked me where Still was? I said I did not know, for I had not seen him since last night. He took me to the office; he did not collar me - I did not attempt to run away. Sheppard said at the office that the other man was pock-marked.

HENRY BELL . My father keeps the Westmoreland Arms, George-street, Manchester-square. I saw Still at my father's house on Tuesday evening, the 2d of November, I believe - I am sure it was on the 2d of November; it was about seven o'clock in the evening. He continued there about an hour.

Q. Had he been there to your knowledge before seven o'clock - A. It might be before; I saw him there at seven o'clock.

MR. NORTON. Q. Did he frequent your house - A. Yes, for upwards of two years. He kept a mare.

JOHN ASHTON . I was at the Westmoreland Arms on Tuesday evening, the 2d of November, in George-street, Manchester-square; I know Still. I saw him come in near seven o'clock, he staid there till within a few minutes of eight.

MR. NORTON. Q. He wore a brown great coat - A. Yes, and a striped waistcoat. I believe it was the same he has on now.

JOHN BARNARD . I am a hatter, and live in South-street, Manchester-square. On Tuesday evening, the 2d of November, I was at the Westmoreland Arms, and remember Still coming in; I spoke to him; it was about eight o'clock that I saw him at the bar; I did not see him come in. I saw him come into the parlour, about eight o'clock, or a few minutes before; it was not ten minutes before eight. I got there myself about seven.

Q. He had been at the bar before you saw him - A. Yes, he came into the room where I was, about ten minutes before eight o'clock.

MR. NORTON. Q. Did he ride away or walk - A. I cannot say. I rented a stable of him.

ANN BONES re-examined. I do not know whether the man with Bush had a great coat on.

CHARLES SHEPPARD re-examined. I did not tell the Magistrate the other man was pock-marked.

WILLIAM READ re-examined. I do not remember Sheppard saying so. Somebody stated it.

SARAH CLANCEY . I live at No. 11, South Burton-mews, Burton Crescent; I have lived there twelve months next January; my husband lives there, and works with a horse and cart - I have been married three years. I have known Still ever since I have been married to Mr. Clancey. I came here with the prisoner's wife.

Q. What are you come to state - A. Nothing.

JOHN CLANCEY . I live in North Burton-mews, have lived there eleven months, and am a horse-dealer. I have a three-stall stable there, but I can conveniently put five or six horses in it.

Q. Do you follow any other business but that of a horse-dealer - A. No. I have no horses now; I had one last Saturday morning.

Q. Have you any cart - A. Yes, I keep it to shew horses in generally.

Q. Are you married - A. No. I have no relation lives with me. There is no person of the same name in the mews.

Q. Who did you come here with this morning - A. I came by myself, and with nobody else. I did not come with the prisoner's wife.

Q. Is there nobody passing as your wife - A. Yes; her name is Sarah; she is no relation to the prisoner, nor am I.

Q. Where were you last Tuesday fortnight - A. At Kelsal-green, to the best of my knowledge. I believe it was on a Tuesday.

Q. Some Tuesday you were at Kelsal-green, but you are not sure what Tuesday it was - A. Not positive; I was there. It was the Plough, I believe I have been there two or three times. Still and Bush were there.

Q. Anybody else - A. I cannot say that I knew any of the others. I was in my cart by myself.

Q. Did you go with them, or find them there - A. I found them there. I got there at a quarter or half-past three o'clock, and staid, to the best of my knowledge, nearly an hour. We all three came away together.

Q. What, in your cart! - A. No, I came in my own cart. We all three left at the same time; nobody came with me.

Prisoner STILL. I walked.

JOHN CLANCEY (examination continued). Q. Did you come straight home - A. No, I stopped at the White Lion, Paddington, for an hour and a half, or an hour and a quarter.

Q. How far is Kelsal-green from Paddington - A. I suppose about four miles. I then went to Mr. Bell's; I got there, to the best of my knowledge, at seven o'clock, or a quarter past.

Q. Did you see anybody at the White Lion that you knew - A. I saw Joseph Still there, he came in just as I got into the house, and stopped as long as I did; Bush was there also.

Q. Did Bush come in with Still - A. I did not exactly notice. We all three came away together. I came away a little before them.

Q. Where did you see them again - A. At Bell's; Still followed me in his cart to Bell's.

Q. Had he his cart down at Kelsal-green - A. Yes; I believe they both came away together from Kelsal-green in his cart; but it was a dark night, and I drove at a smart pace. They came into the White Lion pretty nearly as soon as I did, and staid there all the while I was there.

Q. You went first to Bell's - A. Yes; he was close after me; he was at the door nearly as soon as I was. Bush was not in the cart with him then, I did not see Bush at Bell's. I was not long driving from the White Lion to Bell's.

Q. Five or ten minutes - A. I should suppose so, or a little more.

Q. Who did you see at the White Lion that you knew - A. Bush, Still, and King. I do not know Warren at all.

Q. Was anybody in their company at Kelsal-green - A. There were several in the house. Nobody came into the White Lion with them that I know; the room was full. I do not know the landlord's name, I go there occasionally.

Q. What was your business at Kelsal-green - A. There was a bull-bait. I got there about three o'clock.

Q. Have you been out of town at all since - A. No. I did not attend before the Magistrate.

Q. Was you not applied to - A. No, it was not considered of any importance.

Q. You knew Still was taken up - A. Not till the Sunday following, about half-past three o'clock; his wife came to my house and told me.

Q. You did not see Still and Bush riding in the cart - A. Yes, I saw them in their cart riding before they got to the White Lion. I saw no one in the cart with them.

STILL - GUILTY. - DEATH .

Recommended to Mercy .

BUSH - GUILTY . - DEATH .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayly.

Reference Number: t18191201-20

20. DANIEL WOODFALL was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Richard Smith , about five o'clock in the night of the 17th of November , at Norton Falgate , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, two caps, value 3 d.; one frill. value 1 d., and one towell, value 1 d. , the goods of Catherine Collis .

CATHERINE COLLIS . I am servant to Mr. Richard Smith , who is a silk manufacturer , and lives in White Lion-street , Norton Falgate. On the 17th of November I was the last person up, and went to bed about eleven o'clock; I had been washing a little - my things were wet, and hung on a line; I fastened every door, and shut the windows, but did not fasten them. The kitchen is under ground, and has a sash window, but the fastening is broken - I am certain that I shut it and drew the curtain; there was no shutter. In the morning I found the window still shut, but the curtain drawn aside, and the things taken off the

line - I have since seen them. The beadle came about seven o'clock.

THOMAS HARST . I am a watchman. Mr. Smith's house is on my beat. On the night of the 17th of November, a little before five o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner stooping down at the kitchen window - it was quite dark. He was stooping down, passing a stick inside the window, and dragging something out. I went up to him, and he went away, but I followed him, and secured him with the stick in the hand - he broke a book off it, and threw it on the ground before I took him; he still had the end of the stick, which I produce - it is two sticks tied together. I also produce the book which he threw away. I took him to the watch-house.

Prisoner. Q. Did you see me pull any thing out of the window - A. I saw him putting the thing in and out.

BENJAMIN BEAVIS . I was constable of the night; the prisoner was brought to the watch-house by Harst. I searched him, and found a cap, a frill, and a towel on him, which were wet. I then went to the house, found the top sash of the window down, and another cap hanging on the sash; it appeared to have been dropped in coming out. I found a net on him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. When she was at Worship-street she said she could not swear to them, as there were no marks on them. I passed the watchman, but had no stick with me; he followed me, and I picked the stick up; he came after me, but I did not know that he was going to meddle with me - he said you are one of these fishermen that go about, and took me to the watch-house. He said he saw me stooping, and after that I heard them talking. They said Mr. Smith would not prosecute, and they must do it themselves. He then said he thought that I stooped.

CATHARINE COLLIS re-examined. I said they were like mine, and the same make - none of them are my work. Every thing was safe, excepting what are now produced.

GUILTY. - DEATH . Aged 62.

Recommended to Mercy .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow .

Reference Number: t18191201-21

21. SAMUEL JORDAN , MARY JORDAN , JANE PARKER , JOHN CHURCHILL , WILLIAM WELDON , and MARTIN MURRAY were indicted for that they, on the 21st of November , upon James M'Ginnis , feloniously, wilfully, and maliciously did make an assault, and with a certain sharp instrument did strike, stab, and cut him in and upon his breast, with intent of their malice aforethought to kill and murder him .

TWO OTHER COUNTS, the same, only stating their intent to be to disable or do him some grievous bodily harm.

JAMES M'GINNIS. I am a carpenter, out of work , and live in Chequer-alley, Wood's-place; the prisoners all live at No. 3, Camlet-court, Grub-street. On Sunday night week Murray and Parker came to my lodgings about ten o'clock - I was abed; they called out opposite the window, and said Mr. Jordan had some business with me - I said I was coming. I put on my clothes, and went out to them; they were waiting for me by a little gate at a distance - they took me into Jordan's house.

Q. You went willingly - A. Yes, my Lord, they behaved like friends, sat me in a chair by the fire, and talked to me a great while like friends. Marray and Parker told me that Jordan wanted to settle with me about my money - I had an attachment against him from the Court of Requests.

Q. They talked friendly with you for sometime - A. Yes, then Churchill put a red rag over my mouth - they covered my mouth and nose. I then felt Weldon come and give me one stab; I received three more, but I do not know who from. All the stabs were on the bony part of my breast - they did not go any great depth.

Q. You say Weldon gave you one stab - A. Yes, I knew his voice - he was opposite me. I heard Mary Jordan talking, and have no doubt but it was her who gave me the others, but I do not know. They found me bleeding, brought a sponge to do the blood away, and laid a wet cloth over that; they then threw me down into the cellar, and tied my hands behind me - after throwing me down they tied them as tight as they could, then laid me on my face, and said when the last of the blood was out I should be dead.

Q. How long did you continue in the cellar - A. I fainted away, and am not able to say, but I think I was there a little before twelve o'clock.

Q. How did you get away - A. They said I was dead. Churchill gave me a kick on my shoulder, with which I was very bad, and then went out. Murray came down, turned me over, and said,

"Are yon alive?" then struck me on the ribs, and said I was dead. Mary Jordan said,

"You will see he is not, unless his throat is cut;" Murray said I was, and that I had no business there any more. He rose me up, and dragged me up by my coat. Churchill and Weldon dragged me out of the cellar. When I heard them talking about my throat being cut, I pretended to be dead; they rifled my pockets of every thing - of all my papers, and Parker crammed them down my throat with a stick - I heard a noise of water coming in. They washed the rag that was over the sponge, and put it into my pocket with the sponge. They carried me through part of Grub-street, and turned me into a court there - my feet and hands were tied; I felt a rope on my feet as they laid me down, which broke from my legs by my struggling. I was stiffened with cold, and cannot tell how long I laid there. The watchman found me there, and I was taken to the hospital; I was informed that they would wait to see if I stood there, and I stood still. I heard the watchman coming, and made as much noise as I could; he and others came, cut the ropes from my hands, and took me to the watch-house. I told them the rope which tied my legs was broken at the end of the court, and they went and found it there.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You knew very well where they lived - A. Yes, I lodged with them about three weeks before I went to where I now live. I left on account of a dispute with them.

Q. In consequence of this dispute you was put in prison - A. Yes, but I had the first warrant against him. I was tried at Clerkenwell - it was done to prevent my appearing in Court; I was only in prison seven days, as the gentlemen found out that it was false. I never said that I would be revenged, and have them all in a string for it.

Q. Do you know Kirby and Griffin - A. Yes, they would hang me if they could - I know Molloy; I never

said so to either of them - they swore any thing against me, but the Magistrate knew them, and would not believe them. They threw me right down the cellar - it hurt me very much, and I was bruised; I went to the hospital that night, and came out two days ago.

Q. How soon after did you try to make your escape from the hospital - A. The doctor told me that I should be discharged next day, I called for my shoes and stockings, but could not get them.

Q. The nurse removed your shoes and stockings to prevent your escaping, and so you ran away without them - I did, and two of the gentlemen followed me. I said I would not come back. One of the gentlemen said I should catch cold, and so I went in.

Q. You were taken to the House of Correction since that - A. The officer thought I was going away, in order not to appear here, and I was taken there. He has the rag that was found in my pocket.

Q. Did you halloo out - A. No, I could not when I heard about my throat being cut - they took me a great way from their house; I do not know how long I remained in the court. I was carried out a little before twelve o'clock, and the watchman found me there a little after twelve.

COURT. Q. Were all the persons in the room when you received the stabs - A. I cannot tell, for they were going in and out - my eyes and mouth were bound up. Samuel Jordan was in bed, and they bid him get up, but he said he would have nothing to do with it - I did not hear him encourage the others. I heard Mrs. Jordan's voice when they were stabbing me; she could have prevented it if she liked. I heard neither Jordan or Parker say any thing to encourage them. Churchill covered me with the rag, which they took from my own pocket.

GEORGE HARNESS DEAN. I am assistant to Mr. Blundell, who is a surgeon, and lives in Chiswell-street. On the morning of the 22d of November I was called out of bed by the watchman, about two o'clock, and saw M'Ginnis at the watch-house very faint and weak. I examined his breast, and found a wound, also one or two scratches, not deserving the name of wounds.

Q. Where was the wound - A. On the right side of the breast - it was a very superficial wound, by no means likely to be attended with any danger; there was no chance of its being mortal - it was on the bone, in a part not at all dangerous. It was not likely to disable him or do him any grievous bodily harm.

The Court here informed the Jury, that the charge could not be substantiated, as the wounds were not likely to produce grievous bodily harm, but were inflicted on a part of the breast the least dangerous.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayly.

Reference Number: t18191201-22

22. THOMAS BURCHALL was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of November , one watch, value 40 s., the goods of Emanuel Russell , from his person .

EMANUEL RUSSELL . I am a porter , and live in Great Hertford-street, St. Luke's. On Friday evening, the 12th of November, I was at the corner of George-yard, Whitechapel , carrying four chairs on my head; the prisoner came up, snatched my watch from me, and held it in my face. He turned up George-yard, and I followed him about twenty yards, then lost sight of him. I gave information to Lyon at nine o'clock, and described the prisoner to him. I saw him in custody on the Monday following, and am certain he is the person. There was a strong gas light close by.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not go into the Cross Keys, public-house, and point out another person as the man who had robbed you - A. No, I said that man was not so stout. I never said any other person was the man. I never had any doubt of the prisoner being the man.

WILLIAM LYON , I am a headborough of Whitechapel. I received information of this robbery about nine o'clock on Friday evening, The prosecutor described the man to me, in consequence of which I apprehended the prisoner; I knew him before.

Prisoner. Q. Do you know any thing wrong of me - A. I do not know him to be a common thief, but he is along with a gang. I took the prosecutor to a house that evening, which thieves use. The first house I took him to there were about thirty, but he said the person was not there. I took him to another house, pointed out a man to him, and said,

"Is he any thing like that man?" He said he was not so stout; he never charged any one with it but the prisoner, and the moment he saw him he identified him.

Prisoner's Defence. The person who did the robbery is now in custody. I was at home from half-past five o'clock till eleven. I wrote to witnesses to come, but they have not, as I have no money to satisfy them. If I was not innocent I could have got away after I was taken.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow.

Reference Number: t18191201-23

23. HENRY HUGHES was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of November , one ring, value 10 s. , the property of Samuel Green .

FRANCES GREEN . I am the wife of Samuel Green, who is a tailor , and lives in Margaret-street, Hackney . On Saturday, the 6th of November, I went out about a quarter before eight o'clock; as I went out I let the prisoner in, he lodged with me once - I left him with my son, who is sixteen years old. I saw my wedding ring safe in a glass on the mantle-piece of the room where they were. I came home about half-past ten o'clock, and in a few minutes I missed it - I found a brass one in the glass in its stead. My ring was stamped with S. G. in the inside. On the 24th of November the prisoner's father came with a man named May - they said they came to talk about the ring. May asked where the glass stood, I shewed him. He went to the mantle-shelf, and was not there a minute before he found the ring in a crevice behind the mantle-shelf. I had looked there numbers of times for it, and am certain it was not there. I had got some small moulds out of that crevice, and am certain it was not there.

Cross-examined by MR. BROADRICK. Q. The prisoner was an acquaintance of yours - A. Yes. The crevice is not the depth of the ring. The man's father had lived in the house - he said he came to look for the ring. I had looked several times before he did, and am certain it was

not there. I had put a piece of paper in the crevice four days before. The brass ring was on the mantle-piece, but at some distance from the glass.

JOHN GREEN . I am son of the last witness. The prisoner came to see me about eight o'clock, and stopped till a quarter past nine - we were in the room were the ring was - I left him alone about ten minutes. Nobody but us were there until my mother returned, except the girl, who came in for a broom, she did not stop. I searched the crevice, and am sure the ring was not there.

THOMAS RIDETT . I am a navigator. The prisoner lives a few doors from me. On Saturday, the 6th of November, between nine and ten o'clock, he shewed me a ring, and said he found it at Homerton. I saw an S inside it. I went to him at the lock-up house in Worship-street, and called to him through the key-hole. I knew his voice. I said,

"Are you there, Harry?" he said,

"I am - don't you know any thing about it." I should know the ring again; that produced is it - I know it by the S.

Prisoner's Defence. I was never near the mantle-piece.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined One Month .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayly.

Reference Number: t18191201-24

24. HENRY WESTERMAN was again indicted for stealing, on the 22d of September , one watch, value 3 l., and one key, value 7 s. , the property of James Gordon Mathers .

JAMES GORDON MATHERS . On the 22d of September, about seven o'clock in the evening, I was returning along Holborn from the City - At Furnival's Inn I took my watch out to see the time, and when I came to the top of Gray's Inn-lane my progress was obstructed by a person, who appeared to be endeavouring to turn the corner, another person pressed violently behind me - I disengaged myself from them and crossed the lane. I felt, and missed my watch, and have no hesitation in believing it was stolen at that time and place. I did not observe any of the persons.

WILLIAM MAXWELL . I am a pawnbroker, and live on Snowhill. On the 22d of September, to the best of my belief, between twelve and three o'clock, the prisoner's wife brought me a silver watch, five gold keys and three seals, for which she requested the loan of 4 l. - I advanced three guineas, and gave her a duplicate.

Q. How do you know she was his wife - A. She occasionally came to the shop with him as his wife. I do not know whether the prisoner was with her at the time or not. I produced this watch, among others, before the Magistrate, and the prosecutor claimed it.

Cross-examined by MR. ARABIN. You have no reason to say he was with her - A. No; I cannot say positively that he was.

WILLIAM SHUTER . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner on another charge - I found nothing on him. I took his wife at the same time, and found thirty duplicates on her. He was detained, and the different watches and things advertised. On Friday the prosecutor claimed this watch. I found no duplicate of this watch on him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I bought it of a mechanic named Johnson, who was out of work.

(See Number 10.)

GUILTY . Aged 36.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191201-25

25. MOSES ASHWELL was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of November , 100 lbs. of onion seed, value 20 l.; one coat, value 3 l., and three sacks, value 9 s. , the goods of Benjamin Moore and John Moore .

JOHN MOORE . I am a gardener , in partnership with Benjamin Moore ; we live at Sandy, in Bedfordshire . On Sunday, the 16th of November, our shop was broken into, and robbed of about 100 lbs. of onion-seed, a box coat, three sacks, and other things. I thought it would be offered for sale in London, and wrote to four seedsmen to inform them, and described it. Last Wednesday I received a letter from Mr. Child, and came to town on the Thursday night.

GEORGE CHILD . I live in Lower Thames-street. I received a letter from the prosecutor, describing the seed, and begging me to stop it if offered for sale. On Monday week last, the prisoner brought a small sample of onion-seed, and from the description Mr. Moore had given me of the sample, I considered it to be his. I told the prisoner to bring the bulk, and I would take it - he brought it. I told him I did not much like it, and should not pay him for it until he came to town again. He said he came from Sandy, in Bedfordshire - that he should be in town on the Thursday following, and he would call for the money. He brought me thirty-eight pounds; but previous to this he wanted to take it away or have his money. When he found I would not do that he consented to leave it. He left, and I desired my clerk to write to Mr. Moore, and request him to be in town on Thursday. On Thurday Mr. Moore came, and left an officer at our house. Between one and two o'clock the prisoner called for the money - Mr. Moore was waiting in the neighbourhood - the officer went to inform him he was come; he came, and saw the prisoner in our counting-house; he said he knew him, and he was the man he suspected to have committed the robbery. I questioned him about the seed before I sent for the prosecutor - he told me he grew the seed, and that his name was Samuel Brown .

MR. MOORE. When I came to Mr. Child they showed me the seed, I knew it to be mine. I got a constable, and waited till the prisoner came, then went to the shop, and found him in the counting-house. He is a native of Sandy, I know him well - his name is Moses Ashwell ; he is of no business. I asked him how he came by the seed? he said it was no business of mine. I ordered the constable to take him. I have found neither the coat nor sacks. I knew the seed perfectly well - it was put to dry under a tile building - some mortar broke off and went on it; it has still the white mortar among it - it is not fit for sale. On my oath, I have not the least doubt of its being mine. It is worth 4 s. a pound. I also know the bag.

WILLIAM BUXTON . I apprehended the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought it at Newgate-market.

GUILTY Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191201-26

26. MATTHEW WILD was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of November , one handkerchief, value 3 s., the property of Martin Foster , from his person .

MARTIN FOSTER . On the 20th of November, about seven o'clock in the evening, I was going up Fleet-street , in company with my brother - I found somebody behind, trying at my coat pocket. I turned very sharp round, and found the prisoner close behind, with my handkerchief in his hand, he immediately let it fall. I collared him, took him into a shop close by, and sent for a constable.

Prisoner. Q. Was not another man walking before me - A. There was a set of fellows round about. I laid hold of nobody but him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. Another young man threw it down.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191201-27

27. WILLIAM GREENWOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of November , four pieces of printed calico, containing 112 yards, value 3 l. 12 s. , the goods of Richard Hodgson , Thomas Raw , and Machin Lake .

RICHARD HODGSON . I am a Manchester warehouseman , in partnership with Thomas Raw and Machin Lake, we live at No. 103, Cheapside . On the 20th of November, between nine and ten o'clock in the morning, I was alone in the counting-house, and saw a person carrying some blue printed calico on his shoulder along the passage, by the side of the counting-house, from the warehouse to the street - he turned towards King-street - I followed, and collared him about twenty yards from our door, and asked where he got those goods? he said a person had given them to him. I brought him back with the prints on his shoulder. We found he had four pieces, which were ours - It was the prisoner.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191201-28

28. JAMES LEWIS was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of November , one watch, value 3 l.; one piece of ribbon value 1 d., and one key, value 5 s., the property of Thomas Sharp , from his person .

THOMAS SHARP . On Tuesday, the 9th of November, about four o'clock, I was going along Cheapside , and felt as if some person was pulling my watch out of my pocket - I turned round, and saw it in the hands of the prisoner; he let it fall on the pavement. I immediately took hold of him with one hand, and picked it up with the other. I took him across the street into a shop - two gentlemen came in, and we took him to the watch-house.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming through a mob in Queen-street, and saw a crowd round the prosecutor, he was speaking to some women. I said,

"Take care, or you will lose something." At that moment the watch fell, and he took hold of me. He said he could not say he saw it in my hand, and if it was not me it was somebody else.

THOMAS SHARP re-examined. I never said so. He asked me if I could swear he took it? I said I could not, but I could swear it was in his hand.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191201-29

29. JOHN JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of November , one handkerchief, value 1 s., the property of Robert Strickland , from his person .

ROBERT STRICKLAND . On Friday morning last I was standing in the Old Bailey at the execution - the four men were just being cut down. A person came behind me, and asked if I had lost any thing? I said,

"Not that I know of." He said,

"A man has just picked your pocket." I felt, and missed my handkerchief. He said he could shew me the man, and immediately pointed the prisoner out to me. I seized him, and charged him with picking my pocket, he denied it; but at that moment I saw him open his coat, take the handkerchief from under it, and drop it down. We secured him, and gave him in charge.

THOMAS DOYLE . I am an officer. I was at the execution, took the prisoner in charge, and found another white handkerchief under his jacket, marked

"Knowles."

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. It was never in my possession.

GUILTY . Aged 39.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191201-30

30. FRANCIS RUSH was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of November , two shirts, value 3 s. , the property of Mary Duce .

MARY DUCE . I am a widow . On the 3d of November I stood in Rosemary-lane to sell these shirts - the prisoner came up, and asked if I had got a good shirt to sell? I shewed him one; he asked to look at the other, I gave it him. He asked what I wanted for them? I said 3 s. 6 d. for the two. He told me to pin them up lightly, I did so. He took them out of my hand, put them under his arm, and went towards the public-house, as I thought, to pay me. He said he was going to the second shop round the corner - he ran off. I pursued him; he gave me a punch with his elbow, and I fell. I called out Stop thief! he was stopped about half way down the Minories. It was between six and seven o'clock in the evening, after fair-time.

JOSEPH STONE . I am an officer. The prisoner was stopped in the Minories between six and seven o'clock in the evening, and given into my charge - he had the shirts under his arm; he said he bought them of the woman for 3 s.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I paid her 3 s. for them. I nearly lost my life in the place after paying for them.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Whipped , and Discharged.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191201-31

31. WILLIAM CARNEY and EDWARD WALKER were indicted for stealing, on the 11th of November , one handkerchief, value 4 s., the property of Thomas Rutherford , from his person .

THOMAS RUTHERFORD . On the 11th of November, I believe it was about three o'clock, I was near the top of Ludgate-street , and was called to by a gentleman behind me to stop two men who were walking in front of me; I stopped Walker, who was the foremost one. The gentleman had a handkerchief in his hand, which was mine. He had Carney by the collar. We put them into a coach, with another one, who escaped out of the coach. We took the prisoners to the Compter. I had no idea how they got my handkerchief.

Cross-examined. by MR. WALFORD. Q. It might have dropped out - A. For what I know - my pocket was very loose.

JOHN CHAUNE . In the afternoon of the 11th of November I was going down Ludgate-street, and saw two young men on the other side of the street - from their appearance and manner I thought they were pickpockets. I turned back to watch them, and saw by their motions they were going to attempt to pick the prosecutor's pocket. Presently I saw one of them with his hand in Mr. Rutherford's pocket, I cannot say which it was. I instantly started across the street to secure them, and met Carney coming out from between two coaches, which stood by the pavement - he was one of them; he was putting on his hat, which was off before. I saw him putting the handkerchief into his hat. I collared him, and took his hat from his hand - he struggled to get from me, but did not succeed. I dragged him into St. Paul's Church-yard after the other two, and got some gentlemen to secure them. I am sure they were all three connected - Walker was one of them.

Cross-examined. Q. The coaches were between them - A. Yes, they stood still. I saw them pick his pocket - I think the man who escaped did it. The other men kept on the same side.

JOHN HODGSON . I am an officer. I took the prisoners to the Compter.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

CARNEY'S Defence. I was going up Ludgate-street by myself - two or three young men were before me. I do not know who threw the handkerchief down, but I saw it between the coaches, and picked it up. I said I had just picked it up.

WALKER'S Defence. The prosecutor came, and collared me - I know nothing of it.

CARNEY - GUILTY . Aged 17.

WALKER - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191201-32

32. ISAAC WOOLF was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of November , 19 s. in monies numbered, the property of Isaac Moffett , from his person .

The prosecutor did not appear .

NOT GUILTY.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191201-33

33. MARY KEMMING was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of November , fifty yards of ribbon, value 1 l. 12 s. , the goods of John Frazer , the elder .

JOHN FRAZER . I am the son of John Frazer , who is a haberdasher , and lives in Sloane-street, Chelsea . On the 25th of November, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I had been to wait on some customers in the neighbourhood, and on my return I found the prisoner in the shop - she had a ribbon drawer before her, with a quantity of ribbons out. I went round the counter, and spoke to her; she told me there was none in that drawer that she liked. I showed her another, which contained various pieces, and from that drawer she took this piece, with her handkerchief; she then asked to see some plaid ribbons, and from that drawer she took two pieces. During this time she had bought ribbons amounting to 1 l. 16 s. 3 d.; she tendered me 18 d., saying, she would call again. I asked her name? she said it was Clements, and said she had a sister living in the neighbourhood, and she would call as she came back. I said 18 d. was but a small deposit to leave on so large an amount, and would she be sure and call? she said she was going to drink tea with her sister, and wanted some handkerchiefs, and would be sure to call. She was about to leave the shop, I took her by the right arm into the back parlour, in passing from the shop to the parlour, she threw two pieces of ribbon out of her pocket. I then told her to take the remainder out of her pocket; she said she had nothing. On searching her person I found nothing in her pocket, but 12 s. 8 d. in her purse, and another purse, which contained duplicates. I found another piece under the chair on which she sat. I saw her take them all three. I sent for an officer, but he found nothing more. Her husband was outside the window, looking through, I seized him, but found nothing on him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I did not take it.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191201-34

34. JAMES MOORE , THOMAS JACKSON , STEPHEN DOBBINS , GEORGE HOLTON , RICHARD CARR , WILLIAM VEAL , CHARLES HAYNES , JAMES MURTOUGH , and GEORGE LUCAS were severally and separately indicted for having in their custody and possession, forged Bank of England notes, they well knowing them to be forged .

To which indictments the prisoner severally pleaded

GUILTY .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Before Messrs. Justice Bayly and Baron Garrow .

Reference Number: t18191201-35

35. JAMES MOORE , THOMAS JACKSON , STEPHEN DOBBINS , GEORGE HOLTON , RICHARD CARR , WILLIAM VEAL , CHARLES HAYNES , JAMES MURTOUGH , and GEORGE LUCAS were again indicted for uttering forged notes, knowing them to be

forged, with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England .

MR. REYNOLDS, on the part of the Governor and Company of the Bank of England, declined offering any evidence.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Messrs. Justice Bayly and Baron Garrow .

Reference Number: t18191201-36

36. SAMUEL JACKSON was indicted for feloniously killing and slaying John Stratford .

Counsel for the prosecution, MR. BOLLAND.

SARAH STRATFORD . I am eight years of age. On Friday, the 12th of November, my mother sent me to take my little brother John a walk - he was eighteen months old. I was carrying him up Old-street, and as I was crossing the road, a horse came full gallop, and knocked the baby out of my arms - the prisoner rode the horse, he still went on as fast as before. My little brother's eye was cut - he was bloody, but was alive when I took him up; he lived three days. The people took him to Doctor Jackson's.

Cross-examined by MR. CURWOOD. Q. Did you see the horse coming - A. No; I was frightened when it came up - I did not drop my brother, but the horse knocked him out of my arms.

Q. Did you say you dropped him - A. No. I know Mrs. Mullen, I met her as I was going home, and told her to take the baby home to my mother. I did not tell her that I dropped it out of my arms from fright. I told her the horse knocked it out of my arms.

Q. Do you remember meeting Mrs. Branegan the day you was examined before the Coroner - A. No, I did not see her that day. My father did not tell me what to say.

WILLIAM KEMBLE . I am clerk to Mr. Pocock, of St. Bride's wharf. On the 12th of November, I was in Old-street, and saw the prisoner there - I knew him by sight before. I saw him riding furiously along, full gallop, without a saddle - he had a bridle I believe. I first saw him about forty yards from the turnpike; he passed through the turnpike at the same rate, without stopping to pay - I was about two hundred yards from him at first. The last witness who was just examined, was crossing, and had just passed the locked gate with the infant in her arms. The prisoner's horse struck the little girl, and forced the infant out of her arms.

Q. Are you sure the horse struck it - A. Yes. I called to the prisoner several times to stop, before he passed me - he would not stop; I called to him after, he had looked round, and must have seen the child, lying there. He saw himself pursued and called to, but still rode on, but an alarm being given, and seeing that he must be stopped, he at last pulled up. I went up, and laid hold of his bridle - another person came up, and joined me. I said it was a pity there was not an officer at hand to give him in charge. The person said he was an officer, and I gave him in charge - he got off his horse, and I told him he had rode over a child. He treated it with the greatest indifference, and said,

"Don't make a fuss, it can't be helped" - he was very much intoxicated; I left him in charge. The child was taken into a doctor's.

Q. When first you saw him, was the horse gallopping - A. It was. I swear the horse struck against the child; the road being wide, I could see what happened four hundred yards off; the horse struck the girl, which caused her to drop it. If a waggon had been passing he must have dashed the horse to pieces.

Q. If it was a restive horse, might it not have run away with him - A. Certainly, but he had an opportunity of stopping it, for finding he was pursued, and that it would be useless to ride any farther, he pulled the horse in momentarily.

MR. BOLLAND. Q. Did you see the horse ride away with him - A. No.

COURT. Q. When he passed you did he appear to be trying to stop, or encouraging the horse to go on - A. Encouraging the horse to go on.

ANN WILKINS . I am the wife of John Wilkins , who lives in Whitecross-street. As I was in Old-street Road, sitting by the turnpike, on the other side of the way, I heard a horse coming violently along; as soon as it came through the gate, I heard somebody cry,

"Halloo!" I immediately turned round, and saw two children lying in the road - Sarah Stratford was one of them, I believe; the man on the horse was close to the children then. He cut his horse with a whip or stick, and made away as fast as ever he could.

JAMES WEBB . I keep the turnpike gate. On Friday, the 12th of November, between one and two o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner came gallopping through the gate - he had paid the toll that morning; I knew him - he passed through with speed. The little girl was crossing with her brother from Brick-lane to Golden-lane. They were about five or six yards from the gate.

Q. Could he see them - A. Yes, there was nothing to prevent his seeing them - there was no building in the way. When he was near to them, he cried out,

"Halloo!" He saw them within a yard of him - the face of the horse knocked the little one out of the girl's arms. I did not perceive what part of the horse struck her.

Cross-examined. The gate is on the left side of the road, and the tollhouse on the right. The children were crossing from the left.

MARY PAULDEN . I am the wife of Richard Paulden , who lives in Old-street. I was on the pavement, close to my door, about forty yards from the turnpike; my attention was drawn by hearing my landlady scream. I looked, and saw the horse - both the children fell; the person was going fast. I was so shocked that I saw no more. I afterwards saw the child pick the infant up - it was covered with mud, and the blood poured from its side. The prisoner rode the horse.

THOMAS JACKSON . I am a surgeon and apothecary, and live in Old-street. On Friday, the 12th of November, about two o'clock, in the afternoon, the little boy was brought to my house in a state of insensibility. I examined him. There was extravasated blood, and a bruise over the right eye, on the side of the temple; I attended him till he died. From the time it was brought into my shop it remained in that insensibility. On the Monday its right side became completely paralysed, and the next day it died. I attended it at the father's house, Silver-street, Bridgewater-gardens.

The body was opened, and there was an extensive inflamation on the surface of the brain, and a portion of matter.

Q. What was the cause of its death - A. The contusion in consequence of the blow - there was a large quantity of of water in the ventricles of the brain, but in my judgment it died from the contusion.

Cross-examined. Q. The child had a water head, that was a disease independent of the blow - A. Yes. I impute the death to the contusion. The prisoner was brought to my shop on the day of the accident, and said if I would do every thing that was necessary, he would pay me.

ROBERT STRATFORD . I am the father of the child; it died at my house, in Silver-street, Bridgewater-gardens, Cripplegate. It is in the City.

Prisoner's Defence. They say I was in liquor, and that is a falsity; in the next place they say I did not endeavour to stop the mare, which I did immediately, as soon as I could.

JOHN MASON . I bought the mare of the prisoner; it is restive at times, and at this time it was very fresh, for she had done no work for a month. I bought her of him in the market a few minutes after twelve o'clock that day, before the accident - he was sober then.

COURT. Q. It was without a saddle - A. Yes. He had a snaffle bridle. I do not think the prisoner was used to riding.

JOHN HARCOURT . I am a cowkeeper. I saw the prisoner in Smithfield about twelve o'clock - he was sober then. I once saw the mare in harness, and it was restive then.

GUILTY . Aged 35.

Confined Six Months , and fined 1 s.

London Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayly.

Reference Number: t18191201-37

37. BENJAMIN SMITH was indicted for feloniously killing and slaying Richard Sylvester .

JOSIAH PAWNEY. I live with my parents in Sidney-grove, City-road. On a Saturday, the latter end of October, between ten and eleven o'clock in the morning, I was in the City-road, and saw a stage coach gallopping up the road - the name of Morris was on it; another was behind it with the word Times on it - that was also running.

Q. Were they racing - A. No, but the hindermost one was gallopping to come even with the other, just at the crossing by the New River ; it was passing on the left side, and knocked a man down, who stood in the road with his broom to sweep it - it was Morris's coach. The Times went on, but this coach stopped immediately; the prisoner drove it. The road is wide enough for three carriages to pass.

Q. What became of the man - A. He bled at the top of the eye. The prisoner got down, picked him up, and assisted in putting him into a coach; he was taken to the hospital. I saw him afterwards when I was examined before the Coroner - he was then dead.

Q. At what distance did you see the prisoner gallopping - A. Just by. He pulled up as soon as the man was knocked down.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Did you know the man - A. I have often seen him. I do not know whether he was deaf, or whether his sight was bad - he was lame. I have no reason to suppose he was drunk.

SAMUEL COX . I am a fruiterer. I stood at my door and saw the Times coach - the other passed from behind it - the old man went to get away from the Times, and fell; whether the horse knocked him down or not, I cannot say, but the hindermost coach was endeavouring to pass the Times, and drove on the man. The prisoner drove it. They were both Paddington coaches.

Q. If the prisoner kept in the line behind the Times, would he have gone clear of the man - A. Yes; three carriages might pass in the road. The prisoner got down immediately, led the man to the railings, and sat him down. Some gentlemen came round, the prisoner called a coach, gave the man 5 s. and the coachman 5 s. and said nothing should be wanted. I do not know the deceased's christian name.

WILLIAM EDWARDS . I am waterman at the coach stand. I got a coach, and the deceased was conveyed to the hospital. I knew Sylvester near twelve months; he was rather lame on one side. I do not know his christian name.

MR. HENRY PARKER . I am a surgeon. On a Saturday morning the deceased was brought to the hospital; there was an extensive laceration of the scalp, and the bone left completely bare; he had also a contusion of the collar bone, a contusion on the eye, and a considerable injury was done to the chest. He lived until the 24th of November, and then died. The accident itself was serious, and I should apprehend dangerous in any case, but his constitution was much impaired by intemperance and age. I have no hesitation in saying, be died from the injury; but at the same time the same extent of injury might not have occasioned the death of an individual younger, and one whose constitution was better - he was deaf and lame. The injury was likely to be occasioned by a stage-coach coming against him. He came to the hospital by the name of Richard Sylvester , and died there.

Cross-examined. Q. Was his sight impaired - A. Probably it was. He was much impaired in his system.

Prisoner's Defence. I had rather a restive horse on the near side - I did not see the man until I was close to him. I hallood to him, but before I could stop my horses they knocked him down. When I was on him I was afraid stop till I passed - I then got off, and afforded him all the assistance I could. and am seriously concerned, but I could not avoid it. I was not gallopping. I had been endeavouring to overtake the Times that it might not take up my passengers at the Blue Coat Boy.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow .

Reference Number: t18191201-38

38. RICHARD HUDSON was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of George Richardson , about two o'clock in the night of the 11th of November , at St. Mary Abbotts, Kensington , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, 97 knives, value 8 l., and 97 forks, value 8 l., his property .

GEORGE RICHARDSON . I live at No. 49, High-street , St. Mary Abbotts, Kensington; I rent the house, and am a cutler . On the 11th of November I came home as the

watchman was going one o'clock at night, between Thursday and Friday. I saw three men on the opposite side of the way; I did not know them, and do not know whether the prisoner was one or not. I am always in the habit of trying the bar of my shutters, which I did, and found it was all right. I have six shutters, and a bar runs across them all, it was safe. I heard nothing till between six and seven o'clock, when my wife alarmed me. I went down in about a quarter of an hour, it was then past seven. The shutters had been taken down by my servant. I found eight dozen of ivory-handled knives and forks gone from the front of the window, a pane was broken - I suppose they had been drawn through that pane. On Saturday, the 13th of November, I saw two dozen and a half of knives and forks at Marlborough-street, and two dozen of table knives and forks, and a pair of fancy buck carvers, which I had lost - the two dozen and a half were in the hands of the pawnbroker, the others the officer had - they are my own make.

JOHN BROWN. I am servant to Mr. Baker, who is a pawnbroker, and lives in High Holborn. On Friday, the 12th of November, between one and two o'clock in the day, the prisoner came in, and offered to pledge two dozen of knives and forks, I asked him whose they were? he said they belonged to a person outside the door, who had sent him in. I immediately ordered the apprentice to shut the street-door - the prisoner seemed very much confused, and wished two or three times to go out to find the person whom, he said, had sent him in. I would not let him. I sent for an officer; he was taken into custody, and searched in my presence, and in his pocket were found two wires, one of which had a sharp hook at the end.

Q. Can you judge the purport of them - A. They are calculated to draw any thing out of a shop through the window - I know no honest purpose to which they are applicable. While I was gone to Marlborough-street, two dozen of knives and forks were found in the same box in which the prisoner had stood. He was not half an hour in the shop; they were found within an hour after he left. A woman who came in found them, she is not here.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. The boxes are private - A. Yes, he came into a private box - it was there I secured him. I would not let him go out, fearing he might escape.

Q. Did he not desire Mr. Barker to go out and look for the person - A. He did.

Prisoner. Q. Did I not write to Mr. Barker to inquire for the woman who found them, and stop her - A. He received such a letter.

COURT. Q. Did he bring large or small knives - A. One dozen of large and one dozen of small.

Prisoner. Q. Do you remember my saying I refused to take them of the man, but he said he could not take them in, as he was a ruler in the King's Bench, and had broken his rule - A. He said they belonged to a man who was a ruler in the King's Bench.

WILLIAM BEATON . I shut up the prosecutor's shop at nine o'clock; the window and shutters were all right then. I went there nearly at seven o'clock in the morning, it was then light - I found the bar rose up out of its place, and one shutter wrenched over the other - I was obliged to have the assistance of three men to get it down. The window was broken and the knives gone.

JOHN FURZEMAN . I am an officer. I took the prisoner and knives in custody from Brown. I found the wire in his pocket, which is used to hook things out of shop windows. He behaved very civil - I never handcuffed him till I got him to the office.

JAMES FURZEMAN . I was with my brother - he has spoken correctly.

GEORGE RICHARDSON re-examined. The knives and forks are mine. The large ones are worth 44 s. a dozen, and the others 36 s. I had sold none of this pattern.

Prisoner's Defence. I received the property, and did not know it was stolen. As to the wire, I can answer that charge by a person I used part of it for in mending a jack-towel roller and umbrella. I went to the next-door neighbour, and borrowed a hammer and file to break the wire off - I rolled it up, and put it into my pocket. If I had intended to dispose of the knives I should never have said they belonged to another person, I should have carried them a great way off. The prosecutor said the knives had been rubbed.

GEORGE RICHARDSON re-examined. They have been rubbed, but never used.

SARAH WICKWORTH . The prisoner used the wire to put up a jack-towel of mine. I live at No. 29, Kensington Gravelpits. He put up the towel on a Thursday, about a month ago.

Q. Are you sure it was so much as a month ago - A. I believe so; he is a currier - he is no relation of mine. I have known him nine months. He has slept in my house for these last four months. He put the wire at each end of the roller - he said he bought it in town.

Q. Are you a single woman - A. Yes. The prisoner slept in the first floor, I slept on the second. I am independent. I do not know of his having any knives, or cleaning any. He had been out of business some months, and boarded with me, on a promise of payment when he was able. I have known him by name nine years, and personally more than twelve months.

Q. Do you remember the day he was taken up - A. I do; it is three weeks ago - I believe he had been using the wire the week before that. When I first saw him in town he was a leather-shaver, and worked for Mr. Tales, of Bermondsey. I went there to see him with a friend, when I first came to town.

Prisoner. The small wire was for the purpose of mending an umbrella.

SARAH WICKWORTH re-examined. He had put the small wire on the top of an umbrella.

COURT. Q. Do you remember the Thursday night before he was taken up - A. Yes, my Lord.

Q. What time did he come in - A. Nearly upon seven o'clock, and went to bed about ten. I went to bed at the same time, as soon as I had fastened the house. I locked it, and took the key into my own room, which was also locked.

Q. How do the windows of the lower room fasten - A. With a bolt fastened to the shutter. I locked the parlour, and took the key of that into my room also. The back door has a bolt, but no lock - it leads into a small yard which communicates with other houses. There is a garden at the end of it, paled round, it leads to a back way.

Q. A person can get over the pales - A. Yes.

Q. How can you be sure he did not get up and go out while you was asleep - A. I had the key. There is a lock to his room. I always take the key of his door up stairs myself. There are only three rooms in the house.

Q. Then he was locked in - A. He was locked in - I had the key of his door. My sister slept in the room with me.

Q. What kind of a window is there to his room - A. There is a sash window back and front, nearly as high as I can reach from the ground.

Prisoner. There are three rooms, the parlour and two bed rooms - the bed room stairs come into the parlour. I could not get to the back door, as the parlour door was locked. As to the property, it is not likely that a person who got it honestly would give it to me to dispose of - no doubt they stole it. I have tried all I could to make a discovery on the subject. I am really innocent, I call God to witness it. I had no motive - every prospect in life was before me. I could have a hundred pounds if I asked for it. There is a case which will shortly come before the Court, where a person was waylaid into a public-house. Folly is no crime - I have suffered for it.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 32.

Of stealing in the dwelling-house, but not of the burglary .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayly.

Reference Number: t18191201-39

39. DAVID CHOAT was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of November , at Edmonton , one mare, price 15 l. , the property of William Cobbett .

Counsel for the prosecution, MR. ARABIN.

WILLIAM COBBETT . I am a farmer , and live at Edmonton; the prisoner was in trust of a house adjoining mine, and knew my premises. On Sunday, the 21st of November, I had a sorrel mare - she was there in the evening. I missed her next morning, and sent Allen and Gibson in search. Gibson brought her back on Saturday - she was worth 15 l.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Did you know his father was ill at that time in Surry - A. No.

JAMES ALLEN . I am servant to Mr. Cobbett. On Monday morning, about six o'clock, I missed the mare, and went with Gibson to find the thief - I knew the prisoner before. I met him just by the White Lion, public-house, at Sapswell, on the Thursday following, in the afternoon; he was coming towards London. I said,

"That is the man!" Gibson secured him, and left him with me. I asked him if he knew any thing of my master's mare? He said Yes, he took her down into the country with him, within about a mile and a half of his father's. He said he took her out of my master's yard between eight and nine o'clock on Sunday night. He said he came down the road by the public-house, that would be through Wormley.

Cross-examined. Q. The mare was found where he said it was - A. Yes, he said he was going to see his father, and gave that as a reason for taking her.

COURT. Q. Did he say he meant to bring the mare back - A. No, my Lord, we met him at Sapswell, thirty-two miles from where we found the mare.

JOSEPH GIBSON . I am a constable. In consequence of suspicion, I went with Allen in pursuit of the prisoner; we went to Wormley, and on Thursday we went on the road to Sapswell, and found the prisoner there. I jumped out of the chaise, and collared him - he was going towards town, quite a different road from the Edmonton road. I said,

"You are my prisoner;" he said,

"I don't know that." I asked him what he had done with Cobbett's mare? He said he knew nothing of it; Allen was then in the cart, and in hearing. I afterwards left him with Allen. I found the mare at the Red Lion, public-house, at Callow, Rattan, Suffolk, within a mile and a half of his father's. I knew his father lived there; I brought the mare back, and knew her to belong to Cobbett - she is here to day. I attended before Mr. Mores, the Magistrate; and saw him write and sign this paper; I also saw the prisoner put his mark to it. No promise or threat was used to him; it was taken from his own mouth, and read over to him - Rattan is about fifty-six miles, and Wormley eight from Edmonton - (read).

"The prisoner being asked if he is Guilty or Not Guilty, says,

'I am Guilty, I took the mare on Sunday night from Cobbett's stable, rode away to Suffolk, about sixty miles, and stopped at Buckeridge for refreshment, and said, I was going to Cambridge, stopped about five miles from Cambridge, and said I was going to a clergyman with the mare. I rode across the country, and proceeded to Rattan, put up at the Red Lion, and told them it was my master's, Richard Gibson . I then went to my father's, stopped there, and said nothing about the mare. I was going to bring it home, and was afraid I should be apprehended with it. I was apprehended in coming home.'

DAVID CHOAT , X his mark."

WILLIAM NICHOLLS . I was on duty at Wormley turnpike on Sunday evening, the 21st of November, the prisoner came through the gate at twenty-five minutes after two o'clock, on a mare; I saw the mare brought back by Gibson - it is the same mare. I asked him to pay the toll, he threw a halter down, and said,

"I will pay you as I come back, I shall not be gone above half an hour; I am going for some hay." I am sure he is the man.

JAMES ALLEN re-examined. Nicholls gave me the halter, it is my master's, and was lost the night the mare was taken - it was a cart mare. The stable was not locked.

GUILTY. - DEATH Aged 18

Recommended to Mercy .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayly.

Reference Number: t18191201-40

40. JOHN FULLER was indicted for feloniously assaulting John Fry , on the 10th of November , at St. Margaret, Westminster , putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, the sum of 10 s. in monies numbered, and a 1 l. Bank note , his property.

The money in question had been obtained from the prosecutor under a threat from the prisoner, of charging him with an unnatural crime. The particulars are by far too indelicate for publication.

GUILTY. Aged 23.

Judgment Respited .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow .

Reference Number: t18191201-41

41. JOHN HICKS was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of November , four towels, value 4 s.; two yards of diaper, value 3 s.; six yards of cotton, value 5 s.; fifteen yards of sheeting, value 1 l. 4 s.; two yards of calico, value 1 s. 3 d.; six pair of stockings, value 8 s. 6 d.; five yards of flannel, value 10 s.; four table-cloths, value 12 s. 6 d.; four yards of linen, value 6 s., and thirteen yards of stuff, value 19 s. 9 d. , the goods of Philip Harris .

PHILIP HARRIS. I am a brass-founder , and live in Change-court, Burleigh-street, Strand. On the 3d of November I sent my boy, Richardson, for a parcel of goods which my wife had purchased.

ELIZA HARRIS . I am the wife of the last witness. I sent the boy to fetch the things from Inman's.

EDWARD MATT . I am a linen-draper. On the 3d of November I sold Mrs. Harris a parcel of goods, and delivered them at Inman's, in Blackman-street, Borough. On the 8th they were produced before the Magistrate; part of them had my mark on them - they were the same that I sold.

ELIZA INMAN . I live in Blackman-street; my husband is a tin-plate worker. The parcels were sent to our house, and I delivered them to Richard Richardson .

RICHARD RICHARDSON . I am Mr. Harris's errand-boy. I went to Inman's about half-past four o'clock, and got the parcel. As I was returning I met the prisoner on the middle of London Bridge; he asked me where I was going? and I told him. He said he was going to Arundel-street, Strand, and would shew me a nearer way than I was going. He took me through Lombard-street, and when we got to Cornhill he asked me to have some beer? he took me up a court to a public-house, and as I was going in at the door, he took the bundle off my head, and laid it on the taproom table, called for a pint of beer, and sent me for half a pound of black pudding; when I returned he was gone with the bundle. On the Monday following, I saw him crying matches at the top of a court, knew him again, and fetched my master, who secured him. I am certain he is the person. I observed him particularly.

HENRY LOFERSHOW . I am a butcher. On Monday, the 3d of November, I was at the Dolphin, public-house, in Milk-street, Cheapside; the prisoner came in with the boy, put the bundle on the table, and sent the boy out. He went out himself, returned, and said,

"Waiter, I have called for a pint of beer two or three times, but I will have a glass of gin instead" - I saw him take the bundle off the table, and go out with it. About two or three minutes after the boy came in, and inquired for a man with a bundle - he said the man had got his bundle. On the Monday following, Mr. Harris fetched me to his house; I saw the prisoner there, and am sure he is the man,

WILLIAM HARRISON . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Brick-lane, Spitalfields. On the 4th of November, about four o'clock in the afternoon, a woman, named Ann Hicks , pledged a remnant of cotton for 3 s. 6 d.

JAMES HOLLEHOME . I am a pawnbroker. I have two table-cloths, a piece of stuff, and a piece of linen, which were pledged with me by a man and a woman, on the 6th of November, between six and eight o'clock. I believe the prisoner to be the man.

FRANCIS SOMES . I am a pawnbroker. I have a remnant of linen pledged with me for 4 s., and four towels for 3 s. The prisoner and a woman pledged the towels on the 3d of November, between five and eight o'clock.

CHARLES POPE . I am a pawnbroker. I have a remnant of cloth, and a table-cloth pledged with me on the 4th of November, between five and six o'clock, by the prisoner and a woman.

WILLIAM JEFFERSON . I am an officer. On the 8th of November, I took the prisoner in charge; he denied the charge, and said he lodged at No. 1, Fleur-de-lis-street, Brick-lane. I went there, told his wife what I came for, and she immediately attempted to throw some duplicates on the fire, but I seized her hand, and took them from her; they related to the property produced. I searched her, and found other duplicates of her own property. In the room I found a quantity of linen, and two pair of black worsted, and a pair of black silk stockings, and a piece of wrapper - they were taken before the Alderman. She was discharged on producing a certificate of her marriage to the prisoner.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I have a wife and family in great distress; I have been thirty-five years in the Navy, and have suffered many hardships. I have served under Lord Howe, Sir H. Parker, Lord Nelson, and Sir S. Smith, and have received severe wounds, which at times render me insensible.

GUILTY . Aged 58.

Confined Three Months .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191201-42

42. THOMAS SEATON was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of November , 9 lbs. of beef, value 5 s. , the property of Quinton Gale .

QUINTON GALE . I am a butcher , and live in Newgate-market . On Saturday evening, the 13th of November, while we were very busy, the prisoner came and took half a round of beef from the back of the shop, which weighed 9 1/4 lbs. - he got out of the shop. A woman informed my man, who brought him back with it. We also found 5 lbs. of bacon, a loin of lamb, and another small piece of beef on him.

CHARLES PHILLIPS . I am servant to Mr. Gale. I was serving the customers, and saw the prisoner pass behind me - I suspected him. As I turned to look after him, a woman said he had got some meat out of the shop - I pursued, and secured him five or six yards from the shop. I found the half-round of beef on him, and the other meat. He said it did not belong to me; I said it did, and that he must go back - he said he would not, and fell down. He said,

"You have got your meat, you may now let me go."

GUILTY . Aged 70.

Confined One Year .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191201-43

43. CHARLES PRINGLE was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of November , four handkerchiefs, value 1 s. , the goods of Benjamin Acocks .

MARY ACOCKS . I am wife of Benjamin Acocks , who is a coal-merchant - I keep a ready-made linen warehouse in Newgate-street . On the 7th of November, about six o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came to the shop, and asked to look at some handkerchiefs which laid in the window. I handed them to him, he took them in his hand to look at them, said they were too dear, and wished for some at a lower price. I turned round to a glass case behind me, to reach some, he opened the street-door, and ran out with the handkerchiefs. I called the servant down, ran after him, and told a man to stop him - he was stopped. He dropped two handkerchiefs, and two others were found on him.

JOHN STEPHENS . I heard the cry of Stop thief! and saw the prisoner running, I followed and overtook him. I took two handkerchiefs out of his hand.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not say at the office that you took them out of my bosom - A. No; his hand was against his bosom.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. Your Lordship is aware of the unfortunate circumstances in which I was placed before this. I had made every endeavour to obtain employment, but it was ineffectual.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191201-44

44. JOSEPH CRUMPTON was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of October , 18 lbs. of butter, value 17 s.; one basket, value 1 s., and one cloth, value 6 d. , the goods of Charles Dean .

JOHN DISCOMBE . I am servant to Mr. Dean, who is a salesman in Newgate-market . On the 30th of October, about four o'clock in the morning, a flat of butter was stolen from outside the door, in the market - Parker brought the prisoner back with it.

WILLIAM PARKER . I am porter to Mr. Bowles, who is a poultry salesman in Newgate-market. I saw the prisoner go from the prosecutor's shop with the flat of butter on his back - I followed, took it from him, and brought him back.

(Flat produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A porter asked me to carry it to the end of the street for him.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Confined Six Months , and Whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191201-45

45. EDWARD HUGO was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of November , eight printed bound books, value 30 s. , the property of Thomas Keys .

THOMAS KEYS . I am a bookseller , and live in Coleman-street . On the 4th of November, between seven and nine o'clock in the evening, my shop window was broken, and about 40 s. worth of books stolen out. Some days afterwards, the officer produced one, which I knew to be mine.

ROBERT DRAKE . I am a bookseller, and live in Long-lane. On the 5th of November, about half-past eight o'clock in the morning, the prisoner brought me a volume of Langhall's Plutarch, and asked if I would purchase them? I said I would if he had the whole - there are eight volumes in all. He went away, and returned in half an hour with the remainder. I asked him whose they were? he said they were not his, but a young man's, named Hawkes, who lived in Old-street. He asked 15 s. for them - I asked him if he could not take 8 s. I said I had no change, but our lad should fetch some. In the mean time an officer, whom I had sent for, came - I told him the circumstance, and he was taken into my room. The officer and my boy went out, and brought in two more men - the prisoner said neither of them was Hawkes, and they knew nothing about it.

WILLIAM HAYES . I am servant to Mr. Drake. I went for an officer; I then went into the shop - my master sent me for change merely under pretence. I saw two or three more on the opposite side, whom I had often seen about there at night. I told them I could not get change - they said,

"What, is your master going to have the books?" I said Yes. They said I could get change at the ham and beef shop. I afterwards shewed them both to the officer, who took them.

GEORGE HAZLEWOOD WORRAL . I am an officer. Drake sent for me. The prisoner gave me two or three different accounts - the boy shewed me the lads opposite, and I took them into custody. About a week afterwards I found the books belonged to Mr. Keys.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A young man brought them to me to sell for him. William Hawkes , of Brick-lane, gave them to me.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Six Months , and Whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191201-46

46. JOHN BALLARD was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of November , one box, value 6 s., and three squares of glass, value 8 s. , the goods of Charles Atwood and Thomas Oak Smith .

GEORGE ALLAN . I am Carman to Messrs. Charles Atwood and Thomas Oak Smith, who are glass-manufacturers , and live in Bridge-street, Blackfriars. On Saturday, the 27th of November, about twelve o'clock, I had two crates of glass and three boxes in my caravan. I left a box in Warwick-lane, I then proceeded to the Cross Keys, in Wood-street, Cheapside - I found there was a stoppage at the end of Bread-street, which hindered my going down with the caravan. A man stood against the wall, and said I could not go down. I said I would take the box and leave it, and asked him to mind the horse that it did not go any further. I left two crates and a box in the caravan - I took the other box to the coach-office; and when I got within a dozen yards of the corner of Wood-street, coming to Cheapside, I saw the prisoner take the box from the caravan, put it on his shoulder, and walk outside the caravan in the road. I collared him on the pavement, about a dozen yards from the horse. I had asked him what he was going to do with the box? he said a person had hired him to carry it. I said that was impossible, for I saw him take it out of the caravan, and put it on his shoulder. Another man took the box off his shoulder. He said,

"Now, as you have got your property, why can't you let me go?" I said,

"Had you made your escape with this glass you did not care if I had lost my place, and died in a workhouse." Worrall took him.

THOMAS ANDERSON . I waited at the corner of Wood-street, there was a stoppage there - the carman asked me to look to his horse. I saw two crates and a box in the caravan. He ran up Wood-street - I missed a box, and ran after the carman, and saw him secure the prisoner with the box on his shoulder - I took it off and put it in the caravan. I did not see it taken.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. There was a stoppage - A. I saw nobody give the prisoner any directions.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was hired to carry it to the Blue Boar, Whitechapel.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191201-47

46. MARY WATTS and MARY DAVIS were indicted for stealing, on the 24th of November , one purse, value 2 d.; one 5 l. and two 1 l. Bank notes, the property of Charles Wolin , from his person .

CHARLES WOLIN . On the 24th of November, about eleven o'clock at night, I had been a little intoxicated in the afternoon, and in the evening, instead of going to Blackwall I went down Bishopsgate-street, and there met the prisoner, Mary Davis - she took me to a house in Still-alley, Houndsditch . I went up stairs, and sat down - I was going to stay some short time, and gave her 6 s.; after that she asked me to give her something to drink, I gave her money to get it with - she then went below. She then asked me for something to eat, and again for something to drink - I gave her money, but never had any thing myself after the first time. Watts came up with her bonnet and shawl on, and asked if she was not the person who was in the room before? I said No, the other was the one I came in with. An elderly woman came up and stirred the fire. Seeing three women in the room I was going to make off. As I was going away the old woman hustled me - the prisoners were in the room then. The old woman took a purse out of my pocket, which contained one 5 l. and two 1 l. notes. I made the best of my way down stairs, and as soon as I got out gave Mary Davis in charge to the watchman.

TOBIAS LOVE . The prosecutor came to the watch-house, and said he had been robbed - he was intoxicated, but not insensible. I took him to Still-alley, he pointed the house out to me, and I went in. He said Davis was the girl he went in with, and that Watts came up and pretended to be the girl. The watchman said,

"You have charged a woman of the name of Nathan with robbing you before." Mrs. Nathan lives in the court, nearly opposite - he said she was not the woman. He gave charge of Davis. The Lord Mayor desired me to fetch Watts. We cannot find the old woman. I do not know who it was, if it was not Nathan.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191201-48

47. WILLIAM GUYETT was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of November , one handkerchief, value 2 s. 6 d., the property of John White , the younger , from the person of John White , the elder .

JOHN WHITE . On the 9th of November I was standing at the corner of Earl-street with two females - a man tapped me on the shoulder, and said the prisoner had taken a handkerchief from my pocket. The man instantly laid hold of him, and I saw the handkerchief drop from between his legs.

JAMES BLANDFORD . I was standing at the corner of Earl-street about three o'clock, as the Lord Mayor's procession was landing. I observed the prisoner, with three or four more lads, looking at different peoples' pockets, but saw him take nothing. He then went towards Mr. White, who was standing with two females. I saw two lads, one at each of his pockets. I saw the prisoner draw his hand from the prosecutor's pocket, and attempt to put the handkerchief into his coat-pocket - I immediately collared him, and informed Mr. White. He looked round - I saw the handkerchief on the ground, and picked it up.

THOMAS MILLS . I was at the corner of Earl-street, and saw the prisoner, with four or five more, attempt several pockets. I saw him take a handkerchief out of Mr. White's pocket and put it into his own - the last witness secured him, and he dropped it; he also dropped another handkerchief, which I picked up. I secured him, and found five more on him.

Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191201-49

48. ALEXANDER MACPHERSON was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of November , one coat, value 20 s , the property of Samuel Frith .

SAMUEL FRITH . I am in the Excise . My coat was in the hammock in the forecastle of a ship. On the 27th of November, about one o'clock, the boy called me, and I found the prisoner at the Dock-gate with it on his back.

JOHN ROSS . I belong to the ship, which laid in the London Docks . I went into the forecastle, and saw the prisoner there - as soon as I went down he ran up - I saw the great coat on his back. I ran after him, stopped him at the gate, and gave him in charge to the watchman. He was a stranger.

THOMAS BOLTON . I am gate-keeper. Ross brought the prisoner to me - I found the coat on his back.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I did not intend to steal it. I was robbed of 2 l. 10 s. the day before, and went there, being in distress, to get some meat.

GUILTY . Aged 32.

Confined Six Months , and Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191201-50

49. EDWARD VOSS , and DENNIS KEATON were indicted for that they, on the 6th of September, at St. James, Clerkenwell, feloniously did dispose of and put away, a certain forged and counterfeit Bank note - (setting it forth, No. 75720, 5 l., dated September, 22, 1819, signed J. Kensall) - with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England , they well knowing the same to be forged and counterfeit .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating the forged instrument to be a promissory note for the payment of money, instead of a Bank note.

TWO OTHER COUNTS, the same, only stating their intent to be to defraud Robert Lawrence .

Counsel for the prosecution, MR. SERGEANT BOSANQUET, MR. REYNOLDS and MR. BOLLAND.

CATHARINE HUMBLETON . I am servant to Robert Lawrence , who keeps the Red Lion, public-house , at Hampton. On Sunday, the 26th of September, about two o'clock, the two prisoners came in a one horse chaise, with a woman - the chaise drove up to the door. Keaton came in, and asked if his master could dine there that day? I said Yes, and he went out again. All three came in, and were shewn into a room, where they ordered dinner - I laid the cloth, and waited on them at dinner; they all three dined together. Directly after dinner they ordered the bill, which I took them - the amount was 14 s. 3 d. The prisoner, Voss, gave me a 5 l. Bank of England note, and told me to take the bill.

Q. How was he dressed - A. As a naval officer, in a uniform coat. I took the note to my master, who was outside the door, and asked him if I should ask the name? He said, No, he wished he had a hundred of them. I gave him the note, and he gave me four 1 l. notes, and 4 s. 9 d. in change, which I gave to Voss; he gave me 1 s., and ordered the horse to be put to. They went away - they staid there about an hour and a half.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Do you swear they are the same persons, though they are differently dressed - A. Yes, I am sure they are the same - we had not much company that day. I gave the note to my master - he had no other note in his hand; he stood at the street door; I saw him give the note to my mistress at the bar. I do not know what she did with it.

ROBERT LAWRENCE . I keep the Red Lion, public-house, at Hampton, in Middlesex. On Sunday, the 26th of September, I saw the prisoners at my house with a young woman - they dined there. I went into the room once while they were at dinner - they were all sitting down to dinner.

Q. Did you receive any note from your servant - A. Yes, a 5 l. Bank note. I looked at it to see if it was good, approved of it, and gave it to my wife to write on, which she did in my presence. I know her hand-writing - this is it - (looking at it) - it has,

" Stranger, P W L , September 26, 1819." She returned me the note, and I saw that she had written that on it; I gave the change to my servant. The party went away a very little time after. My wife now lays in.

Cross-examined. Q. You told your servant it was a good note - A. I said I wished I had a hundred of them - I thought it was a good one. My wife did not go to the till; I did not compare it with another note. I had no other 5 l. note.

COURT. Q. Did you part with it - A. I paid it to Meux and Co., my brewers, on the Wednesday following; it was returned to me as forged that day month, when the clerk came to collect again. My wife took no other 5 l. note that day.

Q. Did you pay the brewer any other 5 l. note - A. I am not certain.

ANN MORTIMORE . I keep the Boston Arms, public-house, at Turnham Green, in Middlesex. On Sunday, the 26th of September, about four or five o'clock in the afternoon - I cannot exactly say the time, the prisoner, Voss, I am certain, came in a one horse chaise with another young man, and a young woman.

Q. You are not certain as to the other lad - A. No, I think it was the same, but cannot swear to him, Two men came up, at the same time; one of them said,

"This young man (meaning Voss) has fallen out, and hurt his arm." Voss said he had hurt his arm, and wished to have something to rub it with - the party went into my parlour together; I took him some vinegar, and rubbed his arm myself. He called for some brandy and water, which he had, he then ordered each of the other men a glass of rum. He said

"Give each of these men a bottle of rum," I said,

"Why, I dare say they don't desire a bottle of rum each." He said,

"Yes, give them each a bottle of rum, for I don't wish any one to do any thing for me without being paid for it." I gave them each a bottle; the reckoning came to about 10 s. 8 d. Voss came to the bar, and gave me a 5 l. note. I said,

"Sir, I have not got change in the house for a 5 l. note." He said,

"You must get me change, for I have no small change to pay you." I then called my man, Stephens, who held the horse at the door, and told him to go to Mr. Ward's, my baker, for change. I gave him the note, and he brought the change. I put it on the counter, and Voss took it up.

- Q. Did you ask his name and address - A. I gave him a pen and ink to write, but whether he did or not, I do not know - they then went away; the note came back to me as forged. Voss was dressed in a midshipman's uniform.

Cross-examined. Q. What did you do with it after it was brought back - A. I gave it to Mr. Christmas. I am sure Voss is the man, who wore the naval uniform. The other two men were not at the bar when he gave me the note. I can swear Voss was the man.

MR. BOLLAND. Q. You rubbed his arm - A. Yes; he took his coat off - I noticed his coat. I talked very little to him.

COURT. Q. Which way did the chaise come - A. The Brompton Road way, which would be the way from Hampton.

JAMES STEPHENS . I am servant to the last witness. On the 26th of September I remember the prisoners coming, I can swear to Voss, but not to the other; Voss was in a midshipman's dress, the other was a lad the same size as Keaton - to the best of my knowledge he is the person, but I will not swear to him; a young woman was in the chaise with them. Two men came up at the same time. The party went into the parlour, and I held the horse.

Q. Did your mistress call you in - A. Yes. When Voss came to the bar to pay her, she called me, and gave me a 5 l. note, which I carried to Mr. Ward - it was the same note, and he gave me change.

JOHN WARD . I am a baker, and live at Turnham Green. I remember Stephens coming to my house to change the note - (looks at it) - this is it. I wrote on it,

"Mrs. Mortimore, September 26, 1819" - I wrote this on it at the time I received it. I took no other note that day.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you any other 5 l. note that day - A. I cannot say. I wrote on it the moment I received it.

WILLIAM ROBERT READER . I keep the Three Pigeons,

public-house, at Stratford Green. On the 30th of September I remember Voss coming to my house with another young man, whom I cannot swear to - he was the same size as Keaton.

Q. Are you sure it was not Keaton - A. I have every reason to believe he is the same person - I have no doubt but he is the same; they came between two and four o'clock in a one horse chaise. Voss was dressed in a naval uniform. When they first drew up to the door, the younger one got out, and asked me if I sold wine? I said Yes. Voss got out, and went into the parlour - both came into the house. Voss asked for a bottle of Port and one of sherry, which I served - it came to 12 s. 9 d. with the bottles. Voss offered me a 5 l. note, which he took out of a pocket-book. I said I was not sure whether I could change it; the young one took the wine, and I went to get change.

Q. When you said you was not sure whether you could give change, what did he say - A. He said,

"Can you change a 15 l. note I then?" - I saw another note with the 5 l. note. I asked him for his address; he gave me,

"Mr. Wilson, near the stairs, Blackwall" - (looks at a note) - this is it; I wrote that on it; I gave him the change, and nothing more passed. He said he should want four bottles more as he returned, but I saw no more of him. I wrote on it in his presence.

Cross-examined. Q. When he gave you the note, the lad was not by - A. No, he was putting the wine into the chaise.

Q. You cannot speak with certainty to the young one - A. I have no doubt of him from his size and appearance.

Q. Is it not from hearing circumstances from witnesses, rather than from your own observation that you say he is the man - A. No, it is entirely from my own observation. I will not swear to him, but I entertain no doubt - he was not by when I gave Voss the change.

GEORGE JUDGE. I am waiter at the Angel, public-house, at Ilford, kept by Mrs. Ashmole; it is nine miles from the Three Pigeons, public-house - I know Voss. On the 30th of September I saw him with a lad.

Q. Look at the other prisoner - what is your belief - A. He is about the same size. I cannot say whether he is or is not the other.

Q. Where did you see Voss - A. At the Angel, at Ilford, in the street - I stood at the gateway. They came up together in a one horse chaise, from the London way; they went a little way by the gateway, and then stopped - it was between three and four o'clock, as near as I can guess; Voss was dressed as a naval officer. He turned his head round, and said,

"Waiter, can I have any thing to eat here?" I said,

"Yes, you can." He said,

"You had better draw the chaise into the yard" - I said,

"Yes, it will be safer there" - they did so. Voss got out, and I shewed him into a room up stairs; the lad dined with him there. I asked Voss if he would have hot or cold? He said he should like a nice rump steak, and I ordered it. He rang the bell, and told me to send the lad up stairs, which I did; he rang the bell afterwards, and ordered a bottle of wine, which I took him - they then had their dinner, and a pot of ale; the reckoning came to 11 s. Voss gave me a 5 l. note, which I took to my mistress immediately, and she gave me three 1 l. notes, and 1 l. 9 s. in silver. I took it up to him, and he gave me 1 s., followed me down stairs, and drove towards London. They were there about three quarters of an hour.

Cross-examined. Q. You put no name on it - A. No. The young man acted as servant, and attended the gig - he was in the room when I took the change, and when the note was paid. They both came down stairs together.

SARAH ASHMOLE . I keep the Angel, at Ilford. On the 30th of September, I remember the last witness bringing a 5 l. note into the bar to me to change; I had seen two gentlemen pass the bar, but did not know them - the reckoning came to 11 s. I put the note in the till, and gave him the change; I locked the till - it was about half-past three o'clock. I had no other 5 l. note then, and took no other that day. I took it out at night, took it up stairs for safety, and brought it down again the next morning; I had no other 5 l. note. Next day Mr. Christmas called upon me, and I shewed him the same note, marked it while he was present, and he took it. This is it - (looking at it).

Cross-examined. Q. Do you mean you had no other 5 l. note that day - A. Not Bank of England; I had a 5 l. Romford note. I did not mark it till I saw Mr. Christmas.

ANN STOKES . My father keeps the Green Gate, at Plaistow.

Q. Did either of the prisoner's come to your father's house - A. Yes, both of them. I only know Voss; another was with him, about the same size as Keaton - Voss was dressed in a naval uniform. The boy asked if we sold wine? I said we did - they came in a gig. Voss then got out, came into the bar, and asked for two bottles of wine, which came to 13 s. 8 d. - the boy did not come into the house. He paid me a 5 l. note; I examined it - I was some time at the bar. He came out of the parlour, and I told him I was fearful I could not change it. He said it was a very good one, that I need not be afraid, for he had it at the Bank that morning; that satisfied me, and I changed it. I took it up stairs immediately, and put it into the drawer, out of which I took some other notes to give him change. I laid the note on the top, locked the drawer, came down, and gave him the change. They went away.

Q. Some time after that you had some information - A. Two persons came the same day, and asked me if I had changed a note? I said Yes, and sent my sister, Louisa, to fetch it down - I gave her the key. She brought me a 5 l. note down, and it was examined.

Q. Did you write on it - A. Yes, an hour after; I never lost sight of it, and am sure it is the note my sister brought me. This is it - (looking at it). I wrote on it,

"Stranger, September 30, A S." I then sent after the prisoners, but could not have them overtaken.

Cross-examined. Q. How many 5 l. notes had you - A. I do not think I had any; I rubbed the note when Voss stood at the door. I thought him a suspicious character, and rubbed it.

Q. Perhaps you always rub them - A. Sometimes, not always - (the note had the appearance of having been rubbed).

LOUISA STOKES . My sister sent me up stairs to bring the top note down, which I did - it was a 5 l. note. I gave it to her immediately.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you notice whether the next note was a 5 l. or 1 l. - A. I did not.

MABEL COBLEY . I am the wife of Thomas Cobley , who keeps the Abbey Arms , at Plaistow; the prisoners both came to our house on the 30th of September; both came to my door in a single horse chaise, about five o'clock. Voss was dressed in a uniform.

Q. How was the other dressed - A. I cannot particularly say. I noticed his features more than his dress; he appeared like a servant to Voss. Voss asked for a bottle of Port wine and one of sherry, which I gave to him, and told him not to shake it. He said that was of no consequence, and put it into the seat of the chaise; he was at the door with a little pocket-book in his hand, and appeared to have more notes. I saw a 20 l. and a 5 l. note - he gave me the 5 l. note, and I gave him the change. I threw the note on the table, and asked a friend, who was in the bar, what he thought of it? He thought it a good one. I marked it September 30., and blotted it - (looks at it) - this is is it; it has,

"September 30, M. Cobley," in my hand-writing - I gave it to Mr. Christmas, the Bank inspector. I am positive it was never out of my sight.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you not send your servant with it to a neighbour to ask if it was good - A. No, it was never out of my sight until I marked it.

COURT. Q. Look at the lesser boy, and say if you think him the other one - A. I have not the smallest doubt; I took particular notice of them both. I wrote on the note directly.

Q. Was Keaton by at the time Voss paid you - A. They were both at the door. I think he must have seen him pay me, and have seen me give change. He was not attending to the gig, for the hostler was minding that.

HARRIET HODGSON. I keep the Britannia, at Limehouse. On the 30th of September, Voss, I am certain, came to my house with another - I do not speak positively to Keaton, It was a lad very much like him - they were in a one horse chaise. About six o'clock in the evening, they passed the door a very little way, then came back and got out; the horse's head was towards London. Both came in, and asked if I had any good wine? I said I had. Voss ordered a bottle of white and one of red; he paid me a 5 l. note - the lad was out of doors, when he paid me. I called to my sister for a pen and ink, and asked him his name? He said he was lame in his right hand, for he had hurt it, and requested me to write it. I asked him his name again? He said,

"Brown, No. 15, Oxford Road." I handed the note to my sister, and saw her write that on it. This is it - (looking at it) - they then went away. I know of no Oxford Road, East.

EMMA DENT . I am Mrs. Hodgson's sister, and live with her; I remember two person's coming. The largest asked for two bottles of wine - they came in a single horse chaise on the 30th of September, about six o'clock in the evening; my sister gave him the wine, and he paid her a 5 l. note. She asked him his name and address? and he gave her,

"Brown, No. 15, Oxford Road," which I wrote on it. This is it - (looking at it) - it is in my handwriting,

"Mr. Brown, No. 15, Oxford Road. H. Hodgson, 30 - 8." I put 8 instead of 9, but I am certain it was in September.

STEPHEN HANWORTH. I am servant to Mrs. Hodgson. On the 30th of September, I remember Voss coming in a chaise with another young lad about the same size as Keaton. Voss asked if my mistress sold wine? and I said Yes. He went to the bar window, and asked for two bottles of wine; my mistress served him - he brought them to the door, and said,

"Here, Jack, take these two bottles." He took them in the chaise, and put them in a case made on purpose.

Q. Did you see the inside of the chaise - A. Yes, it seemed to be a tin case for bottles; he had several bottles in it - there might be about a dozen. They went away.

ISABELLA PARNELL. I am the wife of James Parnell , who keeps the Fir Tree, public-house, in Church-lane, Whitechapel. On the 30th of September I remember Voss coming in a naval uniform - he came in a chaise about a quarter before seven o'clock in the evening; I did not see the chaise or the boy. I first saw Voss in the bar, and heard him call out,

"Jack! drive up" - it was dark. Voss came and stood at the bar, and asked for a bottle of Port wine and one of sherry - they came to 13 s. 6 d. He was served, and said if it was approved of, he would send his servant for some more to-morrow; he paid me a 5 l. note, took she bottles in his hand, called out,

"Jack," and said he was stupid, and would not come in. He went to the door with the wine himself. I asked him for his address? and he gave me,

" William Davis , No. 15, Tower-hill," which I wrote on it. I wrote, Mr. Davis, and immediately after that, I wrote William Davis - (looks at one) - this is it, it has

"Mr. Davis, No. 15, Tower-hill," and after that

" William Davis , September 30." I gave him the change and he went away.

Cross-examined. Q. The young man remained at the door with the chaise - Q. Yes, it was dark - I never saw him.

JOSEPH EDWARDS . I am shopman to James Bramwell who is a hatter, and lives at No. 146, Leadenhall-street. On the 30th of September, I remember two men coming to my master's shop - I am positive to the short one, Keaton I have no doubt of the other - he was dressed in a naval uniform; they came with a horse and gig, about seven o'clock in the evening, or a little after; the one in the uniform spoke first. He wanted a silk hat, and I fitted him He then called the young one by some christian name, and he came in. Voss told me to fit him with one too. I wished to persuade him to have a beaver one, but he said they only wanted it for a Sunday or two, while on shore and would have a silk one - I fitted Keaton. The elder one took a pocket-book out of his pocket, and gave me a 5 l. Bank note - he had another note, which I think was a 50 l.; he gave me the 5 l. note. I immediately took it to Mr. Shuttleworth, who is a neighbour, and he gave me four 1 l. notes, and 1 l. in silver for it. I returned, and gave the elder one two 1 l. notes, and 1 l. in silver. I gave Keaton the two hats, and he put them into the gig.

JOHN FOY . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoners, and took a hat off Keaton's head, on the 4th of November, at his examination, which I produce.

JOSEPH EDWARDS re-examined. It is the hat I sold Keaton.

Cross-examined. Q. Both the hats were paid for out of the 5 l. note - A. Yes; Keaton was in the shop when I gave the change, and when the 5 l. note was paid.

CHARLES SHUTTLEWORTH . I live within six doors of Bramwell. On the 30th of September, about ten minutes

after seven o'clock, I received a 5 l. note from Edwards. I marked it immediately - (looks at it) - this is it; it has

"I. B. September 30," on it; which I wrote when he brought it to me, before I mixed it. It was in my possesion until the 16th of October.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you receive any other note from him that day - A. Certainly not.

CHARLES COX . I am a tailor, and live in St. Martin's-lane. On a Thursday in September - I think it was the 30th, about half-past six o'clock in the evening, the prisoner, Voss, and a lad about the same size as Keaton, came to me - I am sure Voss was one. He ordered a superfine blue coat, a black kerseymere waistcoat, and a pair of blue trowsers; they were for the lad. I measured him, and the clothes were to be ready on the Friday evening.

Q. Do you remember the day of the month - A. I cannot be positive, but it was on a Thursday at the latter end of September. I got the clothes ready on the Friday; they came to six guineas; the two prisoners came for them. They waited in the shop about a quarter of an hour - I cannot say whether they had any conversation. Voss gave me a 5 l. note and 6 s. in silver, and the lad gave me a 1 l. note. They took the clothes away with them.

Q. How did they come - A. I believe they walked; I gave my wife the 5 l. note, and did not mark it. She was by my side I think, and I gave it to her. She put it into a bag in my bureau, but I did not see her.

JOHN FOY re-examined. I produce a coat and waistcoat, which I took from Keaton on the 4th of November.

CHARLES COX re-examined. I can swear to them as being made for that order at my house.

Cross-examined. Q. Voss gave you the note - A. Yes. The boy gave me the 1 l. note. To the best of my knowledge, Voss said to him,

"Come, let us see what you have got." I had told them what they would come to, when they ordered them.

CECELIA COX . I am the wife of the last witness. I can speak positively to Voss coming with another person. I rather think Keaton is the same, but cannot say exactly. They came the last day in September.

Q. How long ago was it - A. Two months, and the last day of the month. About six o'clock they came, and ordered a suit of clothes - the little one was measured for them. I was there the next day, Friday, when they paid for them. Voss gave Cox a 5 l. note and 6 s., and the little one gave him a 1 l. note. I took them, and put them into a canvas bag, which I put into the bureau; I had no other 5 l. note in the house - I stood by Mr. Cox, and saw him take it of Voss. I took it of him. It was taken out of the bureau on Saturday, and I paid it to William Giddens 's, our foreman.

Cross-examined. Q. The 1 l. note was good - A. It has not been back.

COURT. Q. Did they walk to your house - A. They walked. It was dark when they came to order them - it was six o'clock, they walked then.

Q. How long had you lit your candles - A. About an hour.

Q. Do you remember what time it becomes dark on the last day of September - A. We do not light candles till it is quite dark, and we had lit them, I think, about an hour. We had lit them both in the sitting-room and workshop. I think it gets dark between four and five o'clock.

Q. Why, the sun does not set till near six - A. We do not light them till it is quite dark.

CHARLES COX re-examined. I cannot say whether we had lit candles when they came the first night.

WILLIAM GIDDENS . I am foreman at Mr. Cox's, which is within one house of the Strand. On Saturday, the 2d of October, Mrs. Cox gave me a 5 l. note, I paid it to Mr. Bohn, the landlord of the Percy Arms , to pay the men. I can swear to the coat produced being made at our house, by the collar - it was made in a hurry. We had a coarse collar made up for a coat, and I took off the coarse top and put on a fine cover, that it might suit this coat and be done to the time.

Cross-examined. Q. How long had you the note before you paid it - A. Five or ten minutes. I had no other 5 l. note. The clothes were to be delivered on the Friday before the Saturday that I received it.

CHRISTIAN BOHN . I keep the Percy Arms , St. Martin's-lane. I received this note - (looks at it) - from Giddens on the 2d of October. I have wrote Cox, 10 - 2 - 19. I marked it immediately.

RUBEN OAKSHOT . I am a shoemaker, and live at Chatham. On the 6th of October I remember Keaton coming to my shop about half-past seven o'clock in the evening; he was dressed in a naval uniform. While he was there, I saw Voss looking through the window; he was dressed in a blue great coat, buttoned very close round his throat, and appeared as if he was examining the shoes through the window, while I was serving Keaton. From his appearance I judged him to be a master's mate.

Q. What did Keaton ask for - A. A pair of boots - I had none to fit him; he then asked for a pair of shoes, I fitted him with them. He gave me a 5 l. Bank note, I requested him to write his name on it, he said he could not write. I asked his name and address? he told me his name was Johnson, and he belonged to the Royal frigate, which I wrote on the note before him - (looks at it). I wrote,

"Mr. Johnson, Royal frigate, R. O." I afterwards wrote the rest of my name. The shoes came to 8 s. 6 d. I gave him the change.

JOHN EVEREST . I produce a pair of shoes found in a bundle.

RUBEN OAKSHOT re-examined. They are those I sold him, and have my name and residence at full length.

Cross-examined. Q. Voss was not in the shop - A. No.

HENRY SKERRINGTON . I am a jeweller, and live at Shadwell. On Wednesday evening, the 6th of October, about seven o'clock, Keaton came alone to my shop, dressed in a great coat over a midshipman's uniform, it was a dark blue coat - he pointed to the gold seals in the window, and desired to see them, I took them out; he fixed upon one at the price of 1 l. He took a red memorandum-book out of his pocket, and from between the leaves he gave me a 5 l. Bank note. I said I hoped it was a good one - he said he should be very sorry if it was not. I held it up to the light, told him I must send it out for change, and asked him to put his name on the back - he said he could neither write nor read. I said, if he would tell me his name I would write it on the back. He said his name

was Edward Stewart , which I wrote, and asked what ship he belonged to? he said,

"To the Royal frigate" - this is it - (looks at it) - I wrote it the instant he gave it to me. - (Everest here produced a gold seal). I know this to be the seal I sold him. I had had it in my shop some years.

Cross-examined. Q. Who did you hand the note to - A. I gave it to a young woman in my shop to get change, it was not out of my hand before I marked it.

JOHN MANLEY . I am a silversmith, and live at Chatham. The prisoner, Keaton, came to my shop in midshipman's clothes on Wednesday, the 6th of October, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening. -

Q. Had he a great coat on - A. I think not. He asked to look at some watch-keys - I shewed him some gilt ones, he said,

"These are not gold." I fetched him some gold ones, and said some of them came pretty high; he said he did not mind, if they were good. He picked out one with an amethyst in it, which came to 16 s. 6 d. He took out a little book, I think, and gave me a 5 l. note - I held it up to the candle, and thought it a good one; there was no writing on it. I said I believed it was good, that I had no change, but my girl should go to the next door for it. I gave Eliza Cave the note, she went, and brought me back 1 l. in silver. I said,

"I gave you a 5 l. note!" - she returned, and brought the remainder. I gave him 4 l. in change, and he went away. (Everest here produced a key) - It is the key I sold him.

Cross-examined. Q. You gave Cave the same note he gave you - A. Yes.

ELIZA CAVE . I am a servant to the last witness. I remember Keaton coming to my master's shop. My master gave me a note - (I did not look at it) - but took it to Miss Pignall, and brought, by mistake, 1 l. back - I asked her for 1 l. I went afterwards and rectified it.

MARY PIGNALL . On the 6th of October the last witness came to me, I gave her change for a 5 l. note, which I put into the till - there was no other 5 l. note there. I took it almost directly, and my brother marked it.

Cross-examined. Q. How came you only to give her 1 l. - A. I did not exactly look at it. I was sure she had given me a 5 l. note, because I had nothing but 1 l. notes in the till before.

GEORGE PIGNALL . I marked this note; I wrote

"Manley" on it. I received it from my sister on the 6th of October.

JOHN HOMAN . I am a linen-draper, and live on St. Margaret's Bank, Rochester. On the 6th of October Keaton came and bought some silk handkerchiefs of me; he paid me a 5 l. note, which I put into the till - nobody but my wife and I have access to the till - I did not mark it. I asked him when he was going to sail? he said in about a fortnight, and that the ship laid in the dockyard. About an hour after, I took the note out of my till and put it into my pocket. There was no other there at that time. I marked it at Gravesend - this is it - (looks at it).

Q. In consequence of suspicions, did you not go in search of the prisoners that evening - A. Yes, about an hour after I took it. I went through different towns, and made inquiry. I went to Gravesend, and found the two prisoners in bed together at the Three Daws, about a quarter after twelve o'clock - the landlord was gone to bed also.

Q. When you went into the room where they were in bed was Everest with you - He was in the house. The landlord, and a man whom I got, were with me. We found three beds in the room, the two prisoners were in one bed. Only one bed was unoccupied, and on that spare bed the naval uniform laid.

Q. Was any thing said to them about the uniform - A. Both denied it, and said they had never seen it, nor wore such a thing. After searching the clothes they dressed themselves.

Q. When they had dressed themselves were their clothes complete - A. No. Voss dressed himself without a waistcoat; he said the uniform waistcoat was not his. Without that, there was only one waistcoat between them. They had both dark blue great coats. Keaton had a blue coat over his uniform when he came to my shop. We found in the midshipman's coat pocket two guineas and three seven-shilling pieces - we also found in the pantaloons pockets 14 s. in one and 18 s. in the other; also a gold seal and a key. Each of them had pantaloons, and there was silver in each. I do not know which had the key and seal. Voss afterwards claimed the gold, and got it away from us. We made them undress two or three times, but could not find it. In a bundle on the table we found the handkerchiefs I sold to Keaton.

Q. Did you examine the bed in which they laid - A. Yes, and under the feather-bed, in the middle of the sacking, there was a pocket-book, the same sort as that which Keaton had in my shop. We found eighteen 1 l. local and Bank notes in it, and by the side of the pocket-book was another roll of notes, folded into three parts, about the size of the pocket-book. I think there were eight 1 l. notes, and outside the eight were two 5 l. notes - I took them into my possession, put them into my hat, and put my hat on my head for security. I desired the prisoners to wait while we marked the notes, that there might be no confusion. I believe I omitted marking eight of the notes in consequence of what Keaton did.

Q. What was done with the two 5 l. notes - A. I had them inside my hat, which was on the top of the bureau; Voss immediately walked behind the landlord, made a snatch over my head, caught the two 5 l. notes up, and put them in his mouth. We immediately seized him by the throat, to prevent his swallowing them - he gave a gulp and said they were gone. He said,

"You can't blame me for what I have done - you may do your best," or

"your worst" - I do not know which. I told him he had done the worst thing he could. I gave the property to Everest. (Looks at two fragments of notes) - these are parts of the two I found under the bed, and which I saw him put into his mouth.

Cross-examined. Q. You went for the purpose of apprehending them - A. No. They denied that the clothes belonged to them. I believe I said I was positive they were the clothes I saw them in. I was determined to bring them to justice.

Q. Did you not say it would be better if they told the whole truth - A. I do not remember it.

ANN HOMAN . I am wife of the last witness. I did not go to the till on the 6th of October.

JOHN EVEREST re-examined. I am a constable of Gravesend. I went with Mr. Homan to the Three Daws;

we went into the bed-room. The account he has given is correct. I produce two silk handkerchiefs, a pair of shoes, a pair of gloves, two silver watches, three keys, and two seals on one of them, and a watch and chain without; also a ring, two guineas, another seal, a brooch, a key, and 18 s. in silver.

Q. We have heard about the notes that were found - A. Here are twenty-five 1 l. notes - seventeen in one parcel and eight in another, and two 5 l. notes. I marked them. Voss seized them - the last witness's account is correct - (looks at two 5 l. notes) - they are those I marked, and which Voss put into his mouth. Rivers gave them to me next morning, about eight o'clock, at the Three Daws. I took the prisoners from the Three Daws to prison, about half-past one o'clock in the morning of the 7th - I took them along High-street.

SOLOMON RIVERS . I keep the Three Daws, at Gravesend. On the 6th of October the prisoners came to my house, and asked for a bed. Voss, to the best of my recollection, had the uniform on. Wybrow gave me two 5 l. notes, which I gave to Everest.

THOMAS WYBROW . I picked up a paper in High-street, Gravesend, on the 7th of October, about half-past six o'clock in the morning, about half-way between the Three Daws and the prison - I gave it to Rivers.

ELIZA EVANS . I am servant to Mr. Rivers. The prisoners came to the house about six o'clock - Voss had the uniform coat on then.

HENRY MOSS . I keep a tailor's shop in Cranborne-passage, Leicester-square. On the 27th of August last the prisoner, Voss, came to my shop by himself, and asked me what I would make him a uniform coat for? I said 4 l. - he said it was to be a midshipman's uniform. I said the waistcoat would be 16 s. He was going out, came back, and was measured - he gave me the name of Thomas Davies . I asked him if he was in a ship in commission? he said he was on board the tender, and was going with the Rhine frigate. I made it for him, and was very particular in making it. The coat produced I have every reason to believe to be it. My foreman made half of it. I have the fellow-button in my hand. I am sure he is the person.

Cross-examined. Q. I only saw him on taking the order.

RICHARD HORNER . I am foreman to Moss, and remember the prisoner coming to the shop. I made half of the uniform coat for him - (looking at it) - this is it. He came for it on the Tuesday evening following, and asked for Mr. Moss, he was not at home. He asked if the coat was done? I said it was, and asked him to try it on - he said he could not, for he had fallen down the hatchway. His arm was in a sling. He asked me to take a pocket-book out of his pocket, which I did, and laid it on the counter; he took a 5 l. note out and gave me - I marked it; this is it - (looking at it). He would not have the coat tied up, as he said he was going to his Lieutenant, who lived close by.

NATHANIEL DOWNES . I am a tailor, and live in Moor-street, Soho. On the 30th of August Voss ordered two pair of trowsers, and three waistcoats; one waistcoat was blue, and was to have anchor buttons. They were to be ready on the 1st of September. He came for them, but they were not quite ready, and he waited half an hour while they were finished; the price was 5 l. 8 s. - he had left 3 s. as a deposit. He had his arm in a sling, and I could not try them on. He asked me to put my hand into his left hand pocket, and take a pocket-book out? which I did; he gave me a 5 l. note, and said his uncle was Mr. Wilson, who resided in the Tower, and had a situation under Government. I marked the note - this is it - (looking at it) - it has

"Mr. Wilson" on it, according to his direction. The uniform waistcoat is that which I made him.

THOMAS GLOVER . I am an inspector of Bank notes at the Bank, and have been so twenty-seven years. The note uttered to Humbleton is forged in every respect; it bears the name of Kelsal, but is not his hand-writing. The other fourteen are all forged in every respect, all impressions from the same plate, and all the same filling-up; they are not all the same signature, but appear to be signed in the same hand-writing. Here are two more, which were uttered to Moss and Downes; they are forged in every respect, and are not Cluff's signature, which they purport to bear.

FRANCIS KELSAL . I am a cashier at the Bank, and sign 5 l. notes; the note is not my signature. Here are several others purporting to be signed by me, none of which have my signature.

(The note was here put in and read.)

VOSS'S Defence. I have nothing to say farther, than that I uttered the notes, not knowing them to be forged.

KEATON'S Defence. I am guilty of uttering them, not knowing them to be forged.

CATHARINE HUMBLETON re-examined. Q. Was Keaton in the room when you received the note - A. All three were there - he saw me give Voss the change.

VOSS - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 18

KEATON - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 17.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayly.

Reference Number: t18191201-51

51. MARTHA LUCAS was indicted for that she, on the 20th of November , at St. James, Clerkenwell , feloniously did dispose of and put away, a certain forged and counterfeit Bank note - (setting it forth, No. 63376, 1 l., dated July 10, 1819. Signed W. Wadle.) - with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England , she well knowing it to be forged and counterfeited .

SECOND COUNT, The same, only calling the forged instrument a promissory note for the payment of money, instead of a Bank note.

THIRD AND FOURTH COUNTS, the same, only stating the prisoner's intent to be to defraud one Joseph Forster .

Counsel for the prosecution, as before.

JOSEPH FORSTER . I am a grocer , and live in Chiswell-street, Middlesex . The prisoner came to my shop on the 20th of November, about seven or eight o'clock in the evening - my wife was present. She bought a few articles, and offered my wife a 1 l. Bank note. My wife gave it to me to look at, and asked if I thought it was a good one? I did not notice it, being in a hurry, said I thought it would do, and told her to ask the name and address. She gave,

" Mary Penn , No. 14, Brick-lane." My wife asked her if it was Brick-lane, Old-street? She said Yes, had her change, and went away.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Did you watch her out - A. No; I observed nobody at the door - I never saw her in company with a man except at the Police Office. My wife gave me the note. I saw her again on the Tuesday following, and am sure she is the woman.

MARY FORSTER . I am the wife of the last witness, and remember the prisoner coming to the shop in the evening of the 20th of November - I have every reason to believe her to be the woman, She bought a few articles, amounting to a few shillings, and gave me a note, which I wrote upon. This is it - (looking at it) - I wrote upon it,

" Mary Penn , No. 14, Brick-lane." We asked her if it was Brick-lane, Old-street? and she said Yes.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you see a man with her - A. No, she was quite alone. I do not know that she is married - I have heard that there is a man named Lucas in the prison.

THOMAS CAGILL . I live at No. 14, Brick-lane, Old-street. I do not know the prisoner; I have lived there three years next Christmas. The prisoner never lodged with me.

SAMUEL RICHARDS . There are two houses No. 14 in Brick-lane. I live at the other, and have lived there six months. I have no female lodges with me; the prisoner did not lodge with me - I do not know her.

MARIA DAVENPORT . I live at No. 14, Silver-street, Clerkenwell. On the 12th of November, the prisoner came with a man, and took a lodging at my house. They lived there till the 20th of November.

Cross-examined. Q. They cohabited together then as man and wife - A. The man gave the name of Lucas.

COURT. Q. You never saw them at your house after the 20th - A. No, I expected them, but they never came. I saw the same man in Newgate.

WILLIAM MASTERS . I am a pork butcher, and live in St. John-street, Clerkenwell. The prisoner and a man came to my shop on the 20th of November, about ten o'clock at night, and bought a leg of pork - the prisoner was the spokeswoman - it came to 5 s. 8 d.; the man paid me a 1 l. note. I took it, and said I would go to my neighbour and get change. Just as I got out Foy met me. I took the note to my neighbour, came back immediately, and asked for their name and address? the prisoner said,

" Joseph Lucas , No. 13, Blewet's-buildings, opposite the White Horse, Fetter-lane;" she spelt it for me, said they had lived there two years, and were very well known. I wrote that on the note - this is it (looking at it.) Foy came, and asked to look at the note, I gave it to him, and he took them into custody - he found 10 s. 6 d. on the man, and 5 s. 8 d. on the prisoner.

Cross-examined. The man is now in Newgate.

THOMAS FOY . I took the prisoner and man into custody. The man said, in the prisoner's presence, that they lived in Cowcross - she did not deny it. I found a key on the prisoner, which opened the lodgings at Davenport's. I found 10 s. 6 d. on the man, and 8 s. on the woman.

THOMAS GLOVER . I am an inspector of Bank notes. The notes are both forged in all their parts. The signature is not Wade's. Both are impressed from the same plate, and same water-mark.

THOMAS WADE . I am a signing clerk. The note is not my signature. It appears to be signed Wadle - there is no clerk of that name - it is not my writing.

(The note was then put in and read.)

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing of it. I had it from my husband, and acted under his direction.

SARAH WOOD . I am the prisoner's mother; she is married, and her husband is in Newgate; he was examined with her at Marlborough-street. They lived together.

COURT. Q. Where did they live at the latter end of November - A. In Old-street. I cannot say where they lived on the 20th. I never knew them to live in Brick-lane or Blewet's-buildings.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 27.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow .

Reference Number: t18191201-52

52. GEORGE DAWSON was indicted for that he, on the 20th of November , at St. James, Clerkenwell , feloniously did dispose of and put away a certain forged and counterfeit Bank note (setting it forth, No. 17257, 1 l. dated September 22, 1819, signed S. Leate), with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England , he well knowing the same to be forged and counterfeited .

SECOND COUNT, for feloniously offering to one Charles Bourne Brind , a like forged and counterfeit Bank note, with a like intent, knowing it to be forged and counterfeit.

THIRD AND FOURTH COUNTS, the same, only calling the forged instrument a promissory note for payment of money, instead of a Bank note.

FIFTH, SIXTH, SEVENTH AND EIGHTH COUNTS, the same, only stating the prisoner's intent to be to defraud one Thomas Buckthorp .

Counsel for the prosecution, as before.

CHARLES BOURNE BRIND . I am shopman to Mr. Buckthorp , who is a grocer , and lives in Spencer-terrace, Goswell-street-road . On Saturday, the 20th of November, about one o'clock in the day, the prisoner came to the shop, and said he wanted some stuff for children, but he did not know the name of it. I asked him if it was semolina? he said he believed it was - he had one pound, which came to 1 s. 4 d., and tendered me a 1 l. Bank note. I asked him who it was for? he said it was for William Greaves , Esq., No. 15, Guildford-street. He was dressed as a gentleman's servant, with a linen jacket on. I wrote the name and address on it, and put it into the till - (looks at one) - this is it. My master was behind the counter. I found we had not change enough in the till, and asked Mr. Buckthorp for some silver. The prisoner then said he might as well take the tea from our shop. He had a quarter of a pound of 10 s. tea, and a pound of sugar, which came to 4 s. 7 d. together. My master gave me the silver, and I gave the prisoner the change. My master then took the note out of the till, and said he did not like it - the prisoner took it out of his hands, and said he did not see where the deficiency was; he asked Mr. Buckthorp how he could tell? - my master said he was satisfied it was a bad one, and that he should not let it go out of his possession. He took it out of the prisoner's hands, and asked what Mr. Greaves was? he at first said he was

a gentleman - my master asked him afterwards, and he said he was an East India merchant. He then asked him where his counting-house was? he said in Lothbury, but he did not know the number - that the cook had taken the note of a butcher in Guildford-street, and upon my suggestion, Mr. Buckthorp went out with him to see if the address was right - they returned in five or ten minutes.

THOMAS BUCKTHORP . I have heard the account given by the last witness, it is correct. I left the shop with the prisoner - we went down Spencer-street; I then thought he wished to get from me. I said,

"Do you live with Mr. Greaves?" he said he did, but had not lived long there. He appeared to be trying to get from me - I collared him, and said,

"You do not live with Mr. Greaves," he said he did. I said,

"I am sure you do not." He caught hold of the iron rails and said,

"Pray let me go, and I will tell you." I said he should not, and took hold of him. Two men, who were standing by, refused to assist me. I took him back to my shop - several of my neighbours asked me to let them see the note. I never lost sight of it - they gave the note into my hands. The prisoner arose, made a snatch at it, and put it into his mouth. My lad, who was by, made a snatch at it, pulled a piece off, and said,

"I have got the number!" Mr. King, who stood by, caught hold of him by the throat, and we wrenched the note out of his mouth; the prisoner caught hold of it with his hand, I got it from him, pasted it together, and gave him in charge. I marked the note. He was searched, and four keys, 2 3/4 d., and a piece of leather found on him. This is the note - (looking at it).

Prisoner. Q. Did I attempt to run from you in the street - A. He was going to run when he was nearly at the end of Spencer-street.

THOMAS BURNIGE . I am a constable. I went to Mr. Buckthorp's shop on the 20th of November; the prisoner was there, scuffing very violently - Mr. Buckthorp said,

"I have got it!" I found it was a forged note - he gave the prisoner in charge. I asked him how he got the note? he refused to give any account of it. I took him away, and in going to the office I asked him if he had ever lived at No. 15, Guildford-street? he said he had not. I asked him where he got the note? he said he had been out of place, and sold his clothes for it, and that he lived at No. 5, Hemlock-court, Carey-street. I asked him where he sold the clothes? he said he sold them to a man in the street. I asked him if it was a Jew? he said he could not tell.

JAMES KING . I am a baker, and was at Mr. Buckthorp's. I assisted in taking the note out of the prisoner's mouth, and gave the two parts to Mr. Buckthorp - I saw him put them together.

DAVID VALENTINE . I live at Mr. Buckthorp's. I took part of the note out of the prisoner's mouth.

ANN FEARON . I live at No. 15, Guildford-street. No Mr. Greaves lives there - the prisoner did not live there in November. There is only one No. 15.

ANN LEICESTER . My husband keeps the Duke of Leicester public-house, Clement's-lane, Clare-market. On the 13th of November the prisoner came to our house, I knew him before. He and another person had liquor, which came to 2 s. 5 d.; he gave me a 1 l. note, I said I did not like it - he held it up to the lamp, and desired me to look at the watermark. I was not satisfied, and desired him to endorse it. He put

" William Williams , No. 7, Cow-lane, Smithfield," on it - (looks at it) - this is it. I remarked to him that that was not his name - he asked me what was his name? I told him he went by the names of Watson and Hunt. He said it was of no consequence what name he went by, Williams was his name.

Prisoner. Q. Have I been at your house since I paid you the note - A. On the Monday evening after; it was returned to me that afternoon. We sent for an officer to detain him, but he would not take him. He was there a long while.

THOMAS GLOVER . I am an inspector of Bank notes. The note is forged in every respect, and is not Leate's signature - the other is also forged in every respect, and is not the signature of N. Stock - they appear to be impressed from the same plate and manufacture in every respect, and are of the same date.

STEPHEN LEATE . I am a signing clerk. The signature is not my writing, or any clerk of the Bank.

(The note was here put in and read.)

Prisoner's Defence. When I went to the grocer's for the tea and semolina, I did not conceive I had a right to put my name on the note, but thought I might put any other as well as my own; I did not know that was a breach of the law - I did not know it was forged. He said he would compare it with another - I asked him where the deficiency was? he shewed me, and held them both in his hand; I could have taken them both from him if I had been inclined. Does it appear likely that I should stand close to the door. and not have run away rather than subject myself to a prison. He said he would go with me - I knew I had given a false address, and did not like to go with him. I did not attempt to run - he says he thought I was going to run; if I had wished to run he could not have detained me, for the men would not assist him. When we returned to the shop it was full of people. I sat down - he shewed the note to a gentleman, and said he would give me in charge. I thought rather than go to prison, as I had formed a dreadful idea of a prison - to avoid it I snatched the note, and thought I had a right to destroy it as it was my own. I never had a Bank note in my life but what cost me 20 s., or labour to that amount. I have no connexion with men who traffic in notes, though I have been locked up fourteen days with men who boast of their robberies. They use every means to get notes into the hands of unwary persons - if I have been so unfortunate I cannot help it. One morning I met a man, and sold the two coats for 1 l., he went with me to Field-lane; when we came to Furnival's Inn, he said,

"There is a man I know, you had better sell them to him," which I did - I expected him here. It appears to me that he and the man are connected - his name is Arthur Hibbens .

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 29.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayly.

Reference Number: t18191201-53

53. HENRY PEERS was indicted for sacrilegiously and burglariously breaking and entering the parish church of St. Martin, Ludgate , about five o'clock in the night of the 31st of October , with intent to steal, and sacrilegiously

and burglariously stealing therein, six brass ornaments, value 18 s., and two candle branches, value 12 s., the property of Thomas Abbott Green and William Patten , churchwardens of the said parish.

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating them to be the property of the inhabitants of the said parish .

ROBERT HUGGARD . I am a porter, and live in King-street, Drury-lane. On Monday morning, the 1st of November, about four o'olock, I was coming up Ludgate-hill - it was dark. I came by the church, and perceived the prisoner standing at the door, which was open; he was alone. I cast my eye upon him, passed on six or eight yards, and then thought proper to turn back; he was then coming over the iron gate, which is outside the door - the gate was fastened. As soon as he jumped down, he stumbled, and I laid hold of him; two large brass knobs fell from him, on the pavement, and I picked them up. He had a good many things in his pockets and hat.

Q. When they were put together did they make any brass ornaments - A. Yes, my Lord; he cried out to me to let him go. I said I would not, and called Walker, the watchman, who assisted in securing him. We took him to the watch-house, and I left him there with the articles - he was quite a stranger to me.

RICHARD WALKER . I am watchman of Ludgate-hill. On the morning of the 1st of November, I was crying four o'clock down Pilgrim-street, nearly opposite the church - it was quite dark. The man cried,

"Watch!" I went across, and laid hold of the prisoner, whom Huggard was holding, close by the iron gate of the church - the iron gate was locked. I took him to the watch-house, and the constable took him to the Compter. I saw Harris take a green bag with a bottle in it, some matches, some brass work, three keys, a screw-driver, and a chisel were also found in it. Some brass was found in his breeches, waistcoat, and coat-pockets.

JAMES SNOW . I am beadle of St. Martin, Ludgate. I was in the church on the 31st of October, until about twenty minutes after four o'clock in the afternoon. I was not the last person there; I bolted the doors myself, and always do, but the sexton locks them after me.

Q. Was any service performed after that time - A. No, my Lord. Nobody had any business there afterwards - when I left, the ornaments of the church, and the candle branches were all in their proper places. I left them safe. The iron gates were double locked, and are about four feet from the ground. About a quarter after four o'clock the next morning the watchman called me up - I live in Creed-lane. I went over to the church, and found the door open - it did not appear to have been forced. I unlocked the gate, and went in.

Q. How had the persons got entry into the church? Had the lock been picked - A. No. My opinion is, that it must have been done by some person, who had concealed himself inside. No person could by any means, have entered from without; when I got to the porch, I found the door open, and the bolts drawn. I missed six brass knobs belonging to the churchwardens' pew, which were in their proper state before, and two more from the organ loft, worth about 18 s. I also missed two candle branches from the reader's, and two from the clerk's desk. I found the knobs and candle branches at the watch-house, which I am sure belong to the church. The candle branches were worth 10 s.

REES HARRIS . I am constable of Farringdon Ward. I was at the watch-house when the prisoner was brought in, and assisted him in unloading himself from the heavier brass. He was loaded with candle branches and knobs in his different pockets. The heaviest were brought in by the watchman. I took him to the Compter, then found the brass work, seven keys, a handle with two beds to fit in the screw-driver, and a chisel. On searching the church, I found a saw answering to them. I found a box, which produces instantaneous light, a bottle of vitriol, and some matches; also a small hand-vice, a long chisel, a broken spike-bit, and a pen-knife, He said he had secreted himself there, for he was much distressed, and did not know what to do.

THOMAS ABBOTT GREEN , ESQ. On the 1st of November I was churchwarden of St. Martin, Ludgate; Mr. Patten is the other. I do not know his christian name - I had not seen the ornaments early before.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. It is a separate parish.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JAMES SNOW re-examined. I know Mr. Patten's name is William.

Prisoner's Defence. My Lord, it is the first time during my life, of twenty-eight years, that I have had the painful task of standing before a Judge and Jury. My situation is more distressing, having been brought up in a religious way, and having a mother now far advanced in years, who at present is unacquainted with my melancholy situation; she must know it, and I fear it will break her heart. I have likewise a wife and child who are ignorant of it. About five years ago I engaged in business at Bristol with 15000 l., and through the distress of the times, in four years I was under the necessity of calling my creditors together, and paid them 15 s. in the pound. I came to town for a situation, and remained out of one for some time, but at last engaged with Mr. Thompson, who is an ironmonger in Oxford-street. I was trusted with considerable sums of money, and the keys of the till, but many of my creditors not being satisfied with the dividends, applied to me for more, which produced a dispute between Mr. Thompson and me, and occasioned me not to do my duty to him as I ought. He was satisfied with my honesty, and will speak to my character. If any mercy can be shewn me, I hope this will be taken into consideration.

GUILTY. - DEATH Aged 28.

Of sacrilegiously stealing, but not of breaking and entering .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18191201-54

54. CHARLES TAYLOR was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of November , one watch, value 2 l.; one chain, value 6 d.; one seal, value 6 d., and one key, value 3 d., the goods of Henry Thompson , from his person .

HENRY THOMPSON . I live in Hartshorn-court, Cornhill, and work for Mr. Alderman Birch. On the 13th of November, between eight and nine o'clock at night, I was going home from work, and met the prisoner just under the wall of Golden-lane brewhouse - he was alone; my watch was safe then. He pretended to be in liquor, and

staggered against me; I made way for him but he would come against me. He folded his hands round my waist, hugged me, and held me about a minute, then made off with my seals - he went off very well then. I missed my watch, and immediately followed, and secured him; he made a shuffle, upon which some girls came up, and scratched and kicked me - they hurt me very much, and rescued him, but I never lost sight of him. A witness laid hold of him; I have not found my watch - the women went away. He said at the watch-house that he would mark me, and said he had never seen me. When he laid hold of me I thought he was drunk.

JOHN FILMORE . I am a brazier, and live in Paul's-alley, Cripplegate. On the 13th of November, between eight and nine o'clock at night, I was going up Golden-lane, heard the cry of Stop thief! went up the court, and the prosecutor said he had been robbed of his watch by the prisoner - two women were trying to rescue him from the prosecutor. As I took him down Golden-lane to have him searched, one of the women said,

"Come home, he is no officer. You shan't take my husband." I shoved the woman away from him; he got from the prosecutor, and I secured him before he got out of my sight - we took him to the watch-house; he said there that he would mark the prosecutor. The women appeared to be loose women - they never came again.

GEORGE PAGE . I took the prisoner in charge, but found nothing on him.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in liquor, and ran against him - he was with two women. He charged me with robbing him, but I never touched him.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18191201-55

55. JOHN MEAD was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of November , one piece of printed cotton, containing twenty-eight yards, value 19 s. , the property of John Blackmore and Allen Lambert .

JOHN BLACKMORE . I am in partnership with Allen Lambert ; we live in Friday-street, and are wholesale linen-drapers . On the 12th of November, about twelve o'clock in the morning, as I was sitting in the counting-house, which is about twelve yards from the door, a person opened the warehouse door, and I heard the bell ring; I saw a boy's face, he offered apples to sell; I said I wanted none - nobody was in the warehouse. He pressed me to buy some, but I gave him a sharp denial, and he went away immediately. Next day a person brought a piece of cotton to me, and I then missed it - it has my private mark on it, and contains twenty-eight yards. I do not know that the prisoner is the boy.

CHARLES STAPLES . I am a constable, On the 12th of November, about twelve o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner alone in Little Bell-alley, London-wall - he had nothing with him then that I could see; I knew him. He saw me looking at him, and instantly ran away - he knew I was a constable before. I went across Moorfields after him, took him at the corner of Catherine-wheel-alley, and told him that I believed him to be a thief. At that time he had a rough great coat on, and the piece of printed cotton buttoned up under his coat. I went to different warehouses, and found the prosecutor, who claimed it. The prisoner said he picked it up in Moorfields.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I picked it up in Moorfields.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18191201-56

56. JOHN COCKLING was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of November , one watch, value 3 l. 3 s.; two seals, value 1 l., and one key, value 6 s., the goods of Henry Knight , from his person .

HENRY KNIGHT . I was coachman to a gentleman at Brompton , but am now out of place . On the 1st of November, between five and six o'clock in the evening, I was going up Snow-hill , and was met by eight or ten men coming in great fury down the street. They came against me, shoved me off the pavement, and the prisoner ran out, snatched my watch from me - the case of the watch fell in the street. I caught the watch in my hand as he had hold of the seals. He kept pulling them, and tried to pull the watch from me, but finding I was going to lay hold of him; he ran into the middle of the street - I was close to him; he turned round to join the gang again. I still pursued him, called Stop thief! and he was secured by two witness - I never lost sight of him. We took him down the King's Arms gateway; the gang came round, and I received several blows on my head from them - we shut the gates and secured him. I was afraid to pick up the case as the gang was round - I have never recovered it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

EDWARD ALDRIDGE . I am a shoemaker, and live in St. John-street. I was coming down Snow-hill, and saw the gang coming from Smithfield - they were running down - several people were robbed. I collared one of them, but he got away. I followed him, and nearly opposite Fleet-market, at the corner of the King's Arms gate I saw the prosecutor - the prisoner was one of the gang. Knight was pursuing him, and calling Stop thief! - his finger was within two inches of him; he ran on the pavement, and I collared him. We were instantly surrounded by the gang, who tried to rescue him, but several people came and assisted us - the gang left. Knight had the watch, and charged the prisoner with stealing it. We took him to the Compter.

HENRY STRICKLAND . I am clerk to Messrs. Clark, Boyd and Co. I was going up Cow-lane between five and six o'clock in the evening, and was met by a gang of about ten persons - I was robbed of my watch by three of them; they then proceeded towards Holborn, I followed them, and when they got to the bottom of Snow-hill I heard a cry of Stop thief! saw the prisoners running in the middle of the road, and assisted in securing him. He resisted, but when he found people round he surrendered. Knight charged him with the robbery, he denied it.

THOMAS PIKE . I am a constable. I was in my house in Cow-lane, heard the alarm, ran after the mob, and saw Knight pursuing the prisoner - he turned, I secured him,

and took him down the gateway - he denied it. Several of the gang struck us.

Prisoner's Defence. I never saw them until they took me.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18191201-57

57. HANNAH COLLINS was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of October , one quart pewter pot, value 2 s. , the goods of John Mayne .

JOHN MAYNE . I keep the Golden Lion , at the corner of Cow-lane, Smithfield . On the 30th of October, between eleven and twelve o'clock at night, as we were shutting up, the prisoner came in with another woman, and had a quartern of rum - they drank it out of a measure at the bar; some pots stood on the counter within their reach; I left the bar for a moment, on my return I observed them watching me very attentively. I suspected them, and observed the other had a hand concealed under her cloak - they both had large cloaks. I left my sister in the bar, and went round to the front door; they came out, I followed them into St. John's-court, they secreted themselves behind a waggon, watched sometime there, and went down an entrance into West-street. I told the watchman I suspected they had stolen a pot, he followed, asked them for it, and found it under the prisoner's cloak. They said, as we had got the pot we ought to let them go. The other was discharged.

ROGER HOGAN . I am a watchman. I saw the prisoner and another woman in St. John's-court, Mayne gave me information, I told them they were suspected of stealing a quart pot, and found it in the prisoner's hand, under her cloak. They asked him to look it over.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The other woman called for a pot of porter, she took the pot out, and gave it to me to hold whilst she put her cloak over her head.

JOHN MAYNE re-examined. They had no beer.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Two Months .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18191201-58

58. JAMES GOLDIE and WILLIAM ORAM were indicted for stealing, on the 25th of November , one handkerchief, value 3 s., the goods of William Harrison , Esq. from his person .

WILLIAM HARRISON , ESQ. I am one of his Majesty's Counsel, and live in Lincoln's Inn Fields. On the 25th of November, about six o'clock in the evening, I was coming up the Strand , a little before I came to Exeter Change an officer asked if my pocket had not been picked; I felt, and said I did not perceive that I had lost any thing, and walked on. I was asked again, and gave the same answer. When I came nearly opposite Wellington-street the officer produced a handkerchief, and begged I would look at it in a shop - it was mine, and was in my pocket when I left home. I found the prisoners in custody.

THOMAS THOMPSON . I am an officer of St. Sepulchre. On the 25th of November I was in the Strand, about six o'clock in the evening, and saw the two prisoners, in company with another, at the end of a court in the narrow part of the Strand; I went into a passage opposite to watch them, Mr. Harrison came in a direction towards the City, and passed the court where they stood, immediately all three came out, and followed him closely. I saw Goldie put his hand into Mr. Harrison's pocket, the other two covering him - he took a hankerchief out, and gave it to Oram. I immediately seized them. Read, who was with me, took Oram, and charged him with having the handkerchief; he said he had just picked it up - at first he denied having it. Read took the other. I sent a watchman after Mr. Harrison. I then went up to him myself, and he claimed the handkerchief.

CHARLES READ . I was with Thompson, and saw the prisoners, with a third person, in the court, they followed Mr. Harrison. I saw Goldie go between them - the others covered him - Thompson was nearer than me; I could not see what they did. I laid hold of Oram, the other two ran away. I seized Goldie about fifty yards off - I never lost sight of him.

GOLDIE'S Defence. I saw a mob, ran across the road; they collared me, and took me into a shop. The gentleman cannot say whether he dropped it or not. The officer said there were four of us in company.

ORAM'S Defence. I was coming along the Strand, in the scuffle I picked up a handkerchief, and put into my my pocket. I stood still to see who had lost it.

GOLDIE - GUILTY . Aged 18.

ORAM - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18191201-59

59. WILLIAM HENRY CLARK was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of November , one snuff-box, value 15 s., the property of Henry Sanford , Esq. , from his person .

Counsel for the prosecution, MR. ALLEY.

HENRY SANFORD , Esq. On the 12th November I was at Covent-garden Theatre , and sat in the front row of the stage box - I had a silver gilt snuff-box in my pocket. - In consequence of what the officer said I felt and missed it from my outside coat pocket - it was produced to me - I had not observed the prisoner.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. You cannot say you did not miss it - A. No. I am sure I had it in the box.

JAMES WILLIAM BRANDON . On the night in question I looked through the door of the box between ten and eleven o'clock, and saw the prisoner sitting behind Mr. Sanford, who was in the front seat - he was dressed very well indeed. I observed him with his hand at Mr. Sanford's pocket, and saw him feeling the pocket - he had his hat before him; in about ten minutes I looked through again, saw a penknife in his hand, and desired Donaldson to take him in at a private door and search him.

Cross-examined. Q. Are you sure he is the boy - A. I have no doubt of it - he was on the second row - a

gentleman sat by his side - he held his hat on this side - the gentleman could not see him.

GEORGE DONALDSON . I am an officer. In consequence of the information I received I took the prisoner into custody as he came out of the box; he cried out,

"What have I done?" He drew back into a corner. I found a penknife on him. Townsend was there.

JOHN TOWNSEND . I assisted in apprehending the prisoner - he fell back into a corner. I heard something drop from him, and found the box at his heels. I have no doubt but he dropped it. He was in the lobby. It could not have fell from any one else.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. Six or eight people were there, for the curtain had just fallen.

GEORGE DONALDSON re-examined. Nobody else was near the corner.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18191201-60

60. WILLIAM TAPPER was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of October , at St. Clement Danes , in the dwelling-house of Samuel Gasson , one pocket-book, value 1 s., one 10 l., six 5 l., and ten 1 l. Bank notes , his property.

SAMUEL GASSON . I keep the Sun , in Devereux-court, Strand . On Sunday, the 24th of October, my pocketbook was in the till in the bar. The prisoner frequented my house for eight or nine weeks, and called himself a shoemaker . He had access to the bar, and was very familiar with me. I never saw him in the bar; only my wife and I had access to the till. The pocket-book contained about 54 l.; there was one 10 l., six 5 l., and ten 1 l. notes. I missed it about half-past eleven or twelve o'clock, when I went to bed. The prisoner had come to the house about half-past nine o'clock in the morning, and stopped till half-past twelve o'clock. He did not come afterwards I believe. I have recovered some of the notes. On the Saturday following I went to a public-house in Essex-street, where he lodged, and saw him sitting in the parlour, talking to some friends. I shut the parlour door, called Edwards and Baker; I turned round and saw him run from the parlour towards the cellar. The officers came in.

WILLIAM BROWN EDWARDS . I am an officer of Hatton-garden. On the 30th of October, in consequence of receiving information, I went after the prisoner, and apprehended him; found nothing on him but four crown pieces.

SOPHIA KERSLAKE . I live at the Crown, public-house, Essex-street. The prisoner lodged about eight weeks at my father's house. On Saturday the 30th October, the officers came; the prisoner was in the parlour. I saw him run from the parlour across the yard to the cellar, to the place where the notes were afterwards found; he was not there more than a minute, and returned shortly; the officers came in in two minutes and took him. The property was found on the Monday following. I saw them come in with a light, and go down to where the prisoner had been.

Q. Is the yard enclosed where the cellar is? - A. It is, and belongs to my father's premises only; persons could not get to it without going through our house.

JAMES BAKER . On Saturday, the 30th of October, I went with the prosecutor and Edwards to the Crown, public-house, and met the prisoner coming out of the yard, took hold of him, and said I wanted him for Mr. Gasson's felony; he seemed agitated. I got a light and went down to the privy. On the Monday I went there again, took a light, and in the cellar, by the right-hand side of the water-closet, on a beam, I found a bundle of Bank notes, which I produce. I showed them to the prosecutor, and he claimed them.

Q. Did you see Kerslake at the place - A. Yes; she stated where he ran down. The yard is enclosed, and only belongs to that house.

SAMUEL GASSON re-examined. The notes are mine. Here is a 5 l. note which I took of a gentleman's servant that morning. They all have my name on them, and were in the pocket-book when it was stolen; it contained about 57 l., here is 27 l.

Prisoner Q. At the examination you said you lost them between eleven and twelve o'clock, and then said you did not miss them till between five and six o'clock in the evening - A. No; I said I missed them about twelve o'clock at night, but must have lost them about one, as I had then locked the till, and it was not unlocked till I went to bed. I concluded it must have been taken before I locked the till.

Q. When I was in the parlour was I not on my feet going away - A. No; he was sitting in the parlour with his legs across the seat; he saw me; I ran to call the officers, and before I had got a very little distance, I saw him pull the door open and run out.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing of it. I was in the habit of going to his house; I was there on the Sunday; almost as soon as I came in his wife gave me the baby to mind. I nursed it till about one o'clock, then went home to dinner, and did not go there again. I was there on Monday morning; I was ill in my bowels, and had a glass of white wine. I was there on the Monday, Tuesday, and Thursday. Friday I was ill, and kept at home. On Saturday I was taken as I was going to the vault. There are thirteen lodgers in the house who have access to it.

SAMUEL GASSON re-examined. He had a pint of cold porter before he had the wine. On the Tuesday he came dressed in new boots or shoes.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 32.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow .

Reference Number: t18191201-61

61. JOHN JONES and WALTER ELLIS were indicted for feloniously assaulting Thomas Prowse , the younger , on the King's highway, on the 11th of November , at St. Luke , putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, one watch, value 20 s., one key, value 6 d., and one ribbon value 1 d. , his property.

THOMAS PROWSE , JUN. I am apprentice to my father, who is a musical instrumentmaker , and lives in Wedlock-street, St. Luke's. On the 11th of November, between eight and nine o'clock in the evening, I was going along Helmet-row - three young men came out of Mitchell-street

- Ellis took me by the shoulder and pushed me into the middle of the road, while the other two took my watch from me.

Q. Was it with violence - A. Yes; he forced me into the middle of the road. I am certain he is the man; I saw him in custody seven or eight days after.

Q. Were you then certain he was the person - A. No; I had some doubt about it at that moment. When I went to Hicks's Hall I was certain of it.

Q. Look at him now, and say if you doubt it - A. No; the more I look at him the more I am convinced he is the person. I do not know the other.

Prisoner ELLIS Q. I asked you at Worship-street what you swore to me by, but you gave me no answer - A. He did, and I made him no answer, as I thought it not particular. I did not swear to him then. I had seen him that evening before in Whitecross-street; I have often seen him before.

COURT. Q. Was your reason for not swearing to him that you doubted it - A. I was rather fearful. I am quite sure he is the person. My watch was safe two minutes before.

JOHN ASTON . I am foreman to Messrs. Lucock and Fryet, who are pawnbrokers, and live in Whitecross-street. On the 12th of November the prisoner, Jones, pledged a watch for 12 s., in the name of Davis - I did not know him before, but am certain he is the person. I described him to the officer; the officer brought him to me to know if he was the man - he said he did not pawn it. I afterwards heard him say a man, who appeared to be a butcher, gave him 2 s. to pawn it.

WILLIAM PROWSE . I am the prosecutor's brother, and was with him at the time. Three young men came out of Mitchell-street, Ellis pushed him into the middle of the road - I had seen him several times before; he was up and down Whitecross-street several times every day - I am sure he is the person. He pushed him into the road, I followed them - they hustled him about - he missed his watch. We pursued, but it was useless.

THOMAS VANN . I am a constable of Worship-street. In consequence of information Aston gave me, I apprehended Jones, on the 18th of October, in Whitecross-street. I said I took him on suspicion of being concerned in the robbery of a watch, he said he knew nothing about it. I took him to Aston, he said he was the man. He told the Magistrate a butcher gave him 2 s. to pledge it. Three nights afterwards I stopped Ellis; they were brought up together two days after, and the prosecutor identified Ellis.

ELLIS'S Defence. I never saw the two lads till I saw them at the office.

JONES'S Defence. A butcher gave me 2 s. to pledge it - I described him to my parents, they cannot find him.

THOMAS VANN re-examined. A butcher went afterwards to redeem the watch - he was brought to the prosecutor, and he could say nothing to him.

JONES - NOT GUILTY .

ELLIS - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 17.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow .

Reference Number: t18191201-62

52. JOHN MULDOON was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Joseph Read about ten o'clock at night of the 27th of November , at St. Leonard, Shoreditch , with intent to steal .

JOSEPH READ . I live in Shepherd and Shepherdess-walk, City-road , and am a steel-worker - I keep the house, only myself and family live there. On Saturday night, the 27th of November, I went to bed with my wife about half-past nine o'clock, I made the house perfectly secure, and about a quarter after ten I heard the latch of the middle-room door move, as if some one attempted to open it. The house is all on one floor; my shop is behind the two rooms, before which is the parlour and sleeping-room. I laid still, and heard a noise, as if some one was feeling their way in the passage - I whispered to my wife, but she was asleep. A chair stood in the middle of the room adjoining the bed-room; this obstructed his passage, and knocked against the door, which awoke my wife. She said,

"What is that! get up." Any one must have heard us. I got off the bedstead, and at that time the person knocked down a three-legged stool, on which laid some iron and steel, that awoke one of the children. I opened the door, got the poker, and as soon as I got into the workshop he was gone. I found the window and door open, and the lathe broken down. He must have trod on the lathe to get out of the window. I went to the front door, but saw no one. I went in again, struck a light in the bed-room, and heard some persons talking in front. I went to the door and saw Birch - the prisoner was in custody of a watchman. I dressed myself, and went to the watch-house with them. The prisoner said,

"You have lost nothing, have you?" I said No. He said,

"You did not see me in your house" - I said No, and asked him how he could have entered the house? he said

"I was in the garden, I acknowledge, but I was not in your house." I said if he had been in the garden he had been in the house. I went into a field by the side of the gardens; Birch pointed to a place in the fence - we traced footmarks from there to where he escaped. It was a frosty night - one footmark was black and the other white. I knew what made the black one, because in getting out over the lathe he had put his foot on some charcoal dust. I am positive the person in the gardens must have been in the house, as the footmarks were directly from the fence to the window, and back again.

Q. Could you observe whether they were the footmarks of more than one person - A. Only one person, from and to the window - it appeared he had got in at the window. It is a casement window, and I am certain it was shut, and quite safe when I went to bed. I tried to open it myself without any thing, and could not.

JOHN BIRCH . I am Sergeant at Mace of the City, and live within three doors of Read - my house is down a passage behind his. About ten o'clock at night I was going home, and saw three men, whom I suspected, close to Read's premises. I went home then, returned to fetch some porter, and saw them again standing by his premises. They saw me, and turned to the railings, as if for a necessary purpose. As I returned with my porter, two of them came towards me, and went swiftly by me. I said,

"You are after no good; if the watchman was here I would give you in charge." I turned my head, and saw the prisoner jump out of the prosecutor's garden into a field, then into a gentleman's garden, and into the passage where I took him.

Q. How near was he to Read's window when you first saw him - A. About six yards. I saw him get over the palings, which are seven feet high. I lost sight of him, and found him secreted under a corner. My dog barked, my wife opened the door, called me, and I took him. He said he had mistaken his way, and he thought it was a thoroughfare. I told him he must have known it was not, for my gate was locked when I went out, and I found it locked when I returned. At the watch-house he said to Read,

"When you go home examine if you have lost any thing." He said the other two had been playing with him, and had thrown his hat over. I saw the footsteps, and traced a person plainly to and from the house. It was a moonlight night.

Prisoner's Defence. I and two lads had been to see the Canal - I stopped for a necessary purpose - one of them threw my hat over the pales; they called out

"Stop him!" as I got over the pales - the man knocked me down for it, and said he would knock his pistol down my throat if he had it; I said I came with no bad intent.

JOHN BIRCH re-examined. I did not knock him down. He wanted to stop, and I drove him along.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 18.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow .

Reference Number: t18191201-63

63. PETER RAINER was indicted for stealing, on the 2d December , at Chiswick , one gelding, price 10 l.; one saddle, value 5 s., and one bridle, value 2 s., the goods of John Marlin ; one whip, value 1 s., and the sum of 4 s., in monies numbered , the property of William Walker .

WILLIAM WALKER . I am the driver of a post-chaise for John Marlin , who keeps the White Hart, public-house , at Bagshot. On Wednesday, the 1st of December, about ten o'clock, I drove from Bagshot to Farnham. The prisoner came into the Bush, public-house, at Farnham, and asked for a bed; I had stopped there for refreshment as I returned home; they objected to let him have the bed, and said they never took servants in without their masters were with them. He went down the town, and I drove away. I rode to the end of the town outside; he jumped up behind at the end of the town, and rode about a mile - I did not object to it. I then took two men up to take to Faruborough, he then came in front of the chaise, and said he would give me 1 s. 6 d. to take him to the White Hart, public-house, at Bagshot; he got in with the other two men. I drove to the Tumbledown Dick, public-house, at Farnborough; the two men got out, and I rode on with the prisoner. I asked him for the fare; he said he would not pay me till he got to the White Hart. I drove on with him; I was outside when I came to Rushey Bottom, which is two miles and a half from Bagshot; he let down the blinds and said

"Stop! let me out." I said,

"I was going to stop a little farther on;" he jumped out, caught hold of the horse's head, stopped them, told me to get off the dickey, and said

"Deliver your money or I will have your life." He presented a brace of pistols at my head. I delivered him three shillings and three sixpences, one was a crooked one. I said he might have the silver if he would let me have my purse. He kept the pistols at my head, and said he would blow my brains out. I gave him the purse; he said,

"Now I want that horse, take it out of the chaise, and put the saddle on;" I did so. He said,

"Give me the whip out;" I did so; the horse kept kicking; I gave him my short whip, and he mounted the horse and rode off. As he was going off he turned round; I got into the chaise after the whip; he put the pistols in at the window, but said nothing. I drove on to a little house with one horse, and left the chaise with a man. The coach came by; the guard jumped on my other horse and rode after him; he was apprehended at Turnham-green. I found my master's horse, bridle, saddle, and my whip there. I am sure he is the man.

Prisoner Q. I had no pistols; are you sure of that - A. Yes; he presented them to my head.

Q. Did I snap them at you - A. No.

Q. I took the horse, but I took no money of you - A. Yes, you took three shillings and three sixpences.

ANDREW MURRELL . I am a bricklayer. I was coming from home, and heard a piece of work between the prisoner and another at Turnham-green; he said he had not stolen a horse; I caught hold of his horse; he dismounted and then went into the Packhorse, public-house. He went through the passage into the yard, climbed over the wall into a common, and then into a field. I kept looking after him about the privy and places, but could not find him; the people said he had scaled the wall. I got a horse, went after him, and caught him in the field about half a mile from the Packhorse. I believe the other man took the horse.

Q. That person was the guard - A. He was on the other horse. I brought the prisoner back to the Packhorse.

Prisoner Q. You never collared me - A. Yes; I collared him; he said let go. I said I will, and will see you righted if you will go with me.

CHARLES GAMMON . I am a constable of Kensington. I was sent for to the Packhorse, public-house, and took the prisoner into custody. I found about a quarter of a pound of gunpowder, some shot, and two pieces of black crape on him, but no pistols. I also found one crooked and one bad sixpence on him, which the prosecutor says are his. I have brought the horse to the New Inn; I was present when Walker saw and claimed it. A whip was given to me. I asked him how he could do such a thing? he appeared careless about it.

WILLIAM WALKER . I saw the horse in the possession of Gammon on Saturday night; it is my master's property, and the horse I spoke of; the saddle and bridle were with it.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not take the horse with any bad intention, nor had I the powder with a bad intent; I had no weapon, and took nothing from the man. I told him to give me the horse, and he did.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 19.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow .

Reference Number: t18191201-64

64. JOSEPH MOORE was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of James Pitcher , about ten o'clock at night, on the 10th of September , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein one coat, value 5 s.; one bed, value 5 l.; one quilt, value 3 s.;

one carpet, value 2 l., and one line, value 2 d. , his property.

JAMES PITCHER . In September last I lived in Richard-street, Commercial-road . I was a grocer , but shut up the shop as it did not answer, and lived in the house at the time. On the 10th of September I went out about eight o'clock at night, and made the house secure. It was dark then. I returned between eleven and twelve o'clock; I found the window open, the garden-pots taken down from the window, and the cups and saucers moved from one part of the table to the other; I missed the articles stated in the indictment; part of the clothes-line was cut from the garden.

Q. Did you know the prisoner before - A. I spoke to him about three weeks before - that is all. On the 29th of October I went with Attfield to the prisoner's room, and under his bed, sewed up in a bundle, I found the coat. He had let me two rooms in the same house with him. I had lived there seven weeks before I found the goods.

Prisoner Q. Was you not with me from a quarter before nine till half-past eleven o'clock in the evening you was robbed - A. I was at his house, and left him about seven o'clock. I drank tea with him, went home, and came out again. He was never in my house but once.

COURT. Q. What led you to search his bed after being seven weeks in his house - A. I missed other property.

Prisoner Q. Did you not sleep with me - A. Never.

Q. Do you know Trapp who robbed the Post Office - A. Yes; I knew him about seven weeks before he was convicted, in consequence of a cousin of mine who was in the Post Office. I never saw him in the prisoner's house. I had passed a 50 l. note for him at the Bank. The Solicitor of the Post Office sent for me. I went, and he said he should not want me.

Q. Was you not locked in my room when the Bow-street runners came - A. I was in my own apartment in his house; they only came to desire me to attend the Solicitor.

WILLIAM MILLER . - I am a patrol. On the night of the robbery Pitcher called me, and said he had been robbed of a bed and carpet. The window was open.

WILLIAM ATTFIELD . I am an officer. I went with Pitcher to the prisoner's house on the 29th of October, to search for other property, and found four or five old sheets sewed together, and a coat in them. The prosecutor said that is the coat that was taken from my house in Richard-street. I also found two pieces of clothes line, which he said were taken at the same time. I found neither the carpet or bed. The prisoner stated these things before the Magistrate which he has now done. The Magistrate committed him from day to day to bring evidence, and offered him any one to go any where for him; he brought nobody forward.

(Coat produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was not with him till half-past eleven o'clock.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow .

Reference Number: t18191201-65

65. PETER HUGHES was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of November , thirty-seven yards of flannel, value 20 s., the property of George Minton , privately in his shop .

GEORGE MINTON . I am a hosier and draper , and live in Ratcliff Highway . On the 27th of November, about eight o'clock at night, we missed a piece of flannel from about two yards inside the glass, when we were very busy.

FRANCIS JACKSON . I am beadle of St. George's. On the 27th of November, about seven o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner with the flannel under his arm. I suspected him, stopped him, and asked him where he bought it? He said at a shop in the Commercial-road - he could not tell me what shop. I took him to the watch-house, and he there said he bought it of a man in the road for 14 s., and said he did not know how many yards there were for he bought it in the lump. I found it belonged to Mr. Minton.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 32.

Of stealing, but not privately .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow .

Reference Number: t18191201-66

66. JOHN RAMSEY was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of October , one pair of reins, value 2 s. , the goods of Aristides Franklin Mornay , John Wray , the younger , and Henry Septimus Hyde Wollaston .

ARISTIDES FRANKLIN MORNAY. I am a manufacturer of Roman cement , and am in partnership with Henry Septimus Hyde Wallaston , and John Wray , Jun.; we lost a pair of reins some time before Midsummer. The prisoner was our foreman .

JOSEPH BASS . I was the prosecutor's carman; I left the reins in the cart in the yard when I had done work - I and all the men left the yard together, leaving the prisoner behind. Next morning I missed the reins; - I ought to have put them into the stable. I asked the prisoner if he knew any thing about them? He said he did not, and told me to hold my tongue, for somebody had hid them, and they would be found; after that the prisoner and I had a dispute about putting some casks into a cart, which were too heavy for me - I said I would not do it. He was angry, and went and told my master that I had lost the reins. Next morning Mr. Mornay asked me about them, and I said I dare say the puppy had dragged them away - 8 s. was stopped out of my wages for them, but I applied to the Magistrate, and it was paid to me - I was discharged. On the 28th of October, I was at my father's, and saw the prisoner drive his cart by; I knew the reins on the horses by the girt buckle - I went out, examined them, and knew them. I told my father, then went to the collar maker, and he said they were the reins. I went with somebody after him to Bethnal Green, found him there unloading his goods, and asked him to deliver up to me Mr. Mornay's reins. He said he had none, and ran away with the cart. He said they were not Mornay's, for he had bought them at Mr. Blacket's sale. He afterwards said that he bought them of a man in a long brimmed hat.

Cross-examined by MR. ARABIN. Q. You thought the Newfoundland dog had taken them away - A. Yes.

ROBERT SELF . I am headborough of St. Ann's. Hopson and Bass came to me on the 28th of October, and I followed the prisoner to Church-street, Bethnal Green, where he was unloading his cart of household goods. Bass went and asked the prisoner for the reins; he took them in his

hand, and said he bought them at Blacket's sale - he said Bromley and Ward sold them. I took him in charge, and as we went by Bromley and Ward's he turned in there. The clerk examined the books, and found that no reins had been sold. He then said he bought them of a man in a long brimmed hat, the next day, when he went to fetch his goods, the gentleman said if he would say what goods he had bought, he could perhaps find the man out. He then said that he did not know that he had bought any. He at first said he gave 3 s. for them, and then 4 s.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I bought them at a public yard, where there is a sale every day. I left him with a good character. I drive by his premises every day, and live close by.

GUILTY . Aged 39.

Confined Six Weeks .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow .

Reference Number: t18191201-67

67. THOMAS IRELAND was indicted for a rape .

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow .

Reference Number: t18191201-68

68. WILLIAM BATTEN was indicted for stealing on the 24th of November . 30 lbs. of bacon, value 12 s., the goods of Henry Long , privately in his shop .

HENRY LONG . I live in King-street, Seven Dials , and sell bacon . On the 23d of November, about half-past six o'clock in the evening, I turned my head, and saw a person run out of my shop with a side of bacon. I pursued him through several streets, and stopped him with it on his shoulder - he threw it down, and ran off, but was stopped - it was the prisoner. I never lost sight of him. I had not seen him in the shop.

WILLIAM MANN . I heard the alarm, went to my door, and secured the prisoner. He fell down, and said,

"I am a poor fellow - the bacon was given to me."

RICHARD WICKS . I took the prisoner in charge. He said a man gave it to him, and he supposed he should get lagged for it.

Prisoner's Defence. A man gave it to me.

GUILTY. Aged 25.

Of stealing, but not privately .

Confined Six Weeks .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow .

Reference Number: t18191201-69

69. DANIEL CONNEL and THOMAS CATON were indicted for feloniously assaulting John Walker , on the King's highway, on the 1st of December, putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, one watch, value 5 l.; one chain, value 20 s.; two seals, value 20 s., and one key, value 1 s. , his property.

The prosecutor did not appear .

NOT GUILTY.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow .

Reference Number: t18191201-70

70. JANE M'DONALD was indicted for bigamy .

No evidence.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow .

Reference Number: t18191201-71

71. THOMAS WILSON , GEORGE HILL , and CHARLES PRATT were indicted for stealing, on the 31st of October , one coat, value 2 s. , the property of Thomas Morris .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating it to be the property of Matthew Collins .

Counsel for the Prosecution, MR. ARABIN.

MARY WILKINSON . I am servant to Mr. Collins, who keeps a public-house at Edmonton. On the 31st of October, the prisoners, Wilson and Hill, came in with Samuel Wilson ; they called for a pot of beer, and sat down. A great coat hung on the back of the settle, which belonged to Thomas Morris - Pratt came in in about a quarter of an hour. After he had drank with them out of a bottle, and given the bottle to Thomas Wilson , I heard a bustle - they leaned their backs against the seat. I got up to see what it was, and saw them in the act of sitting down. I saw Samuel Wilson with the coat - he put it under the opposite settle. I told my master of it, and before I had hardly spoken, Samuel Wilson went out with it. My master called out to him to stop, for it was not his coat, and he threw it down. Thomas Wilson said he knew nothing of the man. I said he was his brother, but he said he had never seen him before - I knew they were brothers. The officer came and took them.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. What evening was it - A. Sunday. Nobody but the hostler was in the taproom, and he was asleep.

Q. Was it what they call a lark - A. It did not appear so - the prisoners remained in the taproom.

MATTHEW COLLINS . I keep the public-house. I saw the prisoners all in company together in the taproom. I heard a bustle, came out of the parlour, and asked what was the matter? My wife said, in their hearing, that the man had taken Morris's coat off the settle. I was going to take hold of Samuel Wilson , but he escaped out of the door - I called to him to stop, but he did not. I went into the taproom, and said,

"You are olever men, you and your party." They used very bad language, and said they knew nothing of the coat, nor did they know it was there. Thomas Wilson said he never saw Samuel Wilson before in his life. I desired them to go home, and not be guilty of the like again. They used more bad language, and threatened my life. As they would not go, I gave them in charge,

Cross-examined. I knew the Wilson were brothers. I never saw Hill and Pratt in company with Wilson before.

THOMAS AUSTIN . I assisted in taking the prisoners into custody. Thomas Wilson insisted on Samuel Wilson not being his brother - he said before the Magistrate that he was his brother. Pratt said he was going to give Wilson sixpence, which he owed him, and that they were going to spend it there.

GEORGE WALLIS . I apprehended Thomas Wilson . He said he would not go to the watch-house, and when the other two came up, he tried to escape from me. Pratt did escape, and was not found until Tuesday week, when he was apprehended at Bow.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow .

Reference Number: t18191201-72

72. WILLIAM TWEEDLE was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of November , one jacket, value 5 s. , the goods William Hone .

WILLIAM HONE . I am a shipwright , and live at Wapping. On the 20th of November I lost my jacket from Messrs. Dawsons' loft, at Limehouse Bridge .

EDWARD STAGG . I am foreman in the dockyard to which Hone belongs. I saw the prisoner in the yard, suspected him, and watched him. I was called away, and lost him, but at last found him concealed under a floor of the loft, with the jacket, about ten yards from where it was taken from. I collared him. He said he had got nothing.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAM FARRINGTON . I found the prisoner under the loft with the jacket.

Prisoner's Defence. I went to the dock to see a Captain. The property was not found on me.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Confined Six Weeks and Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow .

Reference Number: t18191201-73

73. WILLIAM ROBERTS was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of November , one watch, value 25 s.; two seals, value 1 l., and one watch key, value 5 s., the goods of Edward Nelson , from his person .

EDWARD NELSON . I am a boot closer , and live in King-street, Soho. On the 8th of November, I was passing down Drury-lane with Sarah Benham . The prisoner and two others pushed suddenly against me; he snatched my watch, and ran down a court with it. I pursued, and secured him without losing sight of him - he said he had not got it. I felt it in his coat pocket, and took it from him - the other two escaped.

SARAH BENHAM . I was with Nelson. Three persons came up, and the prisoner took his watch. He secured the prisoner, and took it from him before I lost sight of him.

RICHARD HARRIS . I am a patrol. The prosecutor gave the prisoner into my custody.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Fourteen Years

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow .

Reference Number: t18191201-74

74. WILLIAM WEBSTER was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of November , thirteen pieces of leather, value 10 s. , the goods of William Armstrong .

WILLIAM ARMSTRONG . I am a leather-seller , and live in Brook-street, Holborn . On the 3d of November, about ten o'clock in the morning, the prisoner came, asked to see a piece of dressed leather, and bought a small quantity. We have some drawers of leather on the opposite side. I had two or three customers in front of the counter, he was at the drawer, helping himself. What he bought came to 13 d., he paid 7 d., said he had no more, and that he would call for it - he went away. As soon as he shut the door I opened it; he ran off as hard as he could. I followed, caught him, and found thirteen pieces of leather between his trowsers and shirt; they where all marked.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow .

Reference Number: t18191201-75

75. JOHN WIGGINS was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of November , one coat, value 3 l. , the property of John Leffen .

JOHN LEFFEN . I am a baker , and live in Shepherdess-lane, City-road , my coat was stolen off the parlour door, adjoining the shop - it was produced in half an hour by Bradford.

RICHARD CONSTANTINE . I am a milkman, and live next door to Leffen. I was passing his door, and saw the prisoner and another opposite; I noticed them. About five minutes after I heard of the robbery, and told the prosecutor if he went across the City-road he would find them. I am sure the prisoner is one of them.

THOMAS BRADFORD . I am a headborough of St. Luke's. I was in Peerless-row, and saw the coat rumpled up under the prisoner's arm; I asked him where he got it? he said two boys dropped it and he picked it up - I found it was the prosecutor's.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I saw two lads running; one of them dropped it, and I picked it up, thinking a reward would be offered.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow .

Reference Number: t18191201-76

76. JAMES MOBBS was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of November , one sheet, value 6 s., the property of Thomas Moulder , from the person of Eleanor , his wife .

ELEANOR MOULDER . I am wife of Thomas Moulder , and live in White Horse-court, Whitecross-street. I was carrying a basket of linen to Mr. Turner's, some boys ran after me in Whitecross-street ; the prisoner put his hand over my arm and took a sheet - he was secured directly. I knew him before. It was between five and six o'clock in the evening.

THOMAS BRADFORD . I stood in the street; the prisoner and several others passed me - he called to me by a nickname. Two minutes after, I heard a cry of Stop thief! and saw him running with a bundle, Fallshaw stopped him in Playhouse-yard - he got from under his arms, and I stopped him.

RICHARD FALLSHAW . I am an officer. I saw the prisoner throw the sheet down.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Whipped and Discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow .

Reference Number: t18191201-77

77. THOMAS WEBB was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of November , one handkerchief, value 5 s., the property of Charles Cock , from his person .

CHARLES COCK . I am clerk to Messrs. Baldwin and Co., Paternoster-row. On the 9th of November, about three o'clock in the afternoon, I was in St. Paul's Church-yard , standing close to a hackney-coach, at the time the Lord Mayor's procession was going by; the crowd being great I could not get through, and waited for it to pass. I felt a hand in my pocket, turned round, and saw my handkerchief in the prisoner's hand - I collared him, and took it from him.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not see me pick it up - A. No, he could not, the crowd was so great.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I saw it on the ground, and picked it up.

GUILTY . Aged 67.

Confined Three Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18191201-78

78. THOMAS FEARBY was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of November , one 2 l. and two 1 l. Bank notes , the property of David Williams .

The prosecutor did not appear .

NOT GUILTY.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18191201-79

79. SAMUEL POWELL was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of August , four yards and a half of cambric, value 30 s. , the property of William Cook and Thomas Davies .

Counsel for the prosecution, MR. ADOLPHUS.

THOMAS DAVIES . I am in partnership with William Cook , we live at Aldgate, in the City ; the prisoner came into our service on the 23d of June. In consequence of what Mr. Davies told me, I thought it necessary to keep my eye upon him, and from what I had observed I demanded the keys of his boxes. We went up stairs, and opened his trunk - nothing was there; we went to a second, there was a shawl and a piece of calico. Seeing the shawl I went to lay hold of it, he snatched it out of my hand, threw the piece of calico on the bed, and asked if the calico was my property? During the time I was examining it, he drew the private mark off the shawl - it was a piece of paper gummed on. I said,

"I must see what you have got in your hand, for you have torn the mark off the shawl." I went to lay hold of him, to get the mark from him, he put it in his mouth and swallowed it, then threw the shawl on the bed, and said,

"Whose property is that now, Sir?" I sent for a constable, who took him away, and returned with his keys. We searched his boxes, and found sixty-seven duplicates, one of which related to the cambric; I have since seen it, it has my private mark on it - I had not missed it, as I had not taken stock after Christmas.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. I suppose you do not take off the private mark when you sell goods - A. No.

TOBIAS LOVE . I am a constable. I searched the prisoner's box, and found sixty-seven duplicates; he gave me the key - one was for the cambric.

SEPTIMUS SADLER . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Bishopsgate-street. On the 28th of August a piece of cambric was pledged with me in the name of John Page , Paradise-street - the duplicate applies to it. I cannot say who pledged it. I do not know the prisoner.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY .

(See No. 95).

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18191201-80

80. JAMES BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of November , one hat, value 5 s. , the goods of George Payne .

THOMAS DUGGIN . I am servant to George Payne , who is a hatter , and lives in Newgate-street . On the 27th of November I was in the counting-house, behind the shop, talking with Mr. Payne, I turned my eye towards the door, and saw the prisoner take a hat off a rail, which is fixed inside the door-post - I immediately ran after him, lost sight of him, and saw him again in Bull-head-court, which is no thoroughfare; he went up to the darkest corner, I seized him, and found the hat in his hand - he went back quietly.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I kicked against it under the window.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined Three Months .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18191201-81

81. WILLIAM NICHOLLS , Sen. and WILLIAM NICHOLLS , Jun. , were indicted for stealing, on the 5th of November , one half-crown, one sixpence, and four halfpence , the monies of William Smith .

JOHN BRYDON . I am servant to Mr. Smith, who is a wholesale confectioner , and lives in Cripplegate , the prisoners were in his service as porters , but did not sleep in the house. On the 5th of November, between seven and eight o'clock in the morning, I saw the elder prisoner open the desk, and take something out - money was kept there; the other prisoner was not in the room. I immediately called the elder prisoner from the warehouse, where the desk was, into the counting-house, and charged him with taking silver from the desk, which he most positively denied, and said he was willing to be searched, which was done. No silver was found on him, but four halfpence, which I knew to be the prosecutor's, as I had marked them about eleven o'clock the night previous, and put them into the desk - it is always left unlocked; there was still 3 s. missing. We found a half-crown and a sixpence on the younger prisoner five or ten minutes after - the elder prisoner is his father.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. How long had he lived with your master - A. Upwards of eleven years, and bore a good character.

WILLIAM NICHOLLS - GUILTY . Aged 39.

Of stealing to the value of 2 d. only .

Confined Three Months .

WILLIAM NICHOLLS , Jun. - NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18191201-82

82. HENRY BURFORD was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of November , seven ounces of silver, value 25 s. , the property of William Bennett .

WILLIAM BENNETT . I am a working silversmith , and live in Bartholomew-close ; the prisoner is my apprentice , and worked in the shop with the men.

WILLIAM READ . I am an officer. I went to Mr. Bennett's, to take charge of another of his servants, on the 18th of November; I searched that lad, and found silver in his possession. In consequence of what he told me, I went after the prisoner - he came back between ten and eleven o'clock in the morning, I told him he had his master's

property about him, he denied it. I took a bag out of his jacket pocket, containing a quantity of bar silver. Before he was examined I asked him what he did with it? he said he had sold it at an old iron shop in White Lion-street, and sold some there on Saturday.

WILLIAM BENNETT re-examined. The silver is what I gave my men to work up; it weighs seven ounces. The lad's name is Powell.

Prisoner's Defence. I was tempted to take it.

GUILTY Aged 19.

Fined One Shilling , and Discharged.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18191201-83

83. WILLIAM SOUTER was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of November , one shovel, value 3 s. , the goods of Benjamin Robinson .

BENJAMIN GOODMAN . I live with Benjamin Robinson , who is a coach-master , and lives in Angel-street, St. Martin's le Grand . On the 25th of November, between four and five o'clock in the afternoon, I saw the prisoner come into the yard, and try to open the stable-door, he could not, and went out with the shovel, which he took off the dung-heap, I followed and stopped him with it on his shoulder - I said it was my master's; he said,

"If it is, take it." I brought him back, and gave him in charge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I kicked against it outside the gate.

GUILTY Aged 46.

Confined Three Months , and Whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18191201-84

84. THOMAS POWELL was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of November , three ounces of silver, value 12 s. , the property of William Bennett .

WILLIAM READ . I went to Mr. Bennett's by order of the Magistrate, saw the prisoner there, and told him I came about his picking a gentleman's pocket in Holborn. I searched him, and in his pocket found this silver dross - he said he supposed there were about four ounces, that he took it from his master, and that the other prisoner had nine ounces in his pocket. He told me where he had sold some more.

WILLIAM BENNETT . The prisoner was my errand-boy . It is the silver my men work on.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Fined One Shilling , and Discharged.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18191201-85

85. MOSES FONSECA was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of November , one handkerchief, value 3 s., the property of Robert Easto , from his person .

ROBERT EASTO , I am a tea-dealer , and live in Tooley-street, Borough. On the 9th of November, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I was in King-street, Cheapside , while the Lord Mayor's procession was passing - I stood there about five minutes. The officer came to me with a handkerchief, and asked me if it was mine? it was so - it was safe five minutes before. There was a great crowd. I do not know when he took it. The prisoner was laid hold of.

JAMES HANLEY . I am a constable. I was in King-street as the procession was passing; I saw the prisoner, with two other lads - I saw him with his arm between two gentlemen who stood together, one of whom was the prosecutor - he appeared to have his arm round Mr. Easto's body; he turned his head, and spoke to the two lads, they immediately closed and hid him from my view. I stepped forward, and the moment I came up I saw a silk handkerchief in the prisoner's hand, he was handing it to one of the other two. I seized him and one of the lads - the lad, I think, threw the handkerchief on the pavement. I told Mr. Easto, he claimed it. The lad got away as I stopped to pick it up, but I kept hold of the prisoner.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18191201-86

86. THOMAS ABDAY was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of November , one loaf of bread, value 5 d. , the property of Henry How .

HENRY HOW . I am journeyman, to Mrs. Wright, who is a baker , and lives in Fore-street. On the 3d of November, I pitched my basket at the corner of Whitecross-street and Fore-street , and went home for another loaf. I returned in about a minute - I had left nineteen quarten loaves and a half, in quantity, in the basket. I missed nothing then, and went on serving my customers, returned to the shop, and found the prisoner in custody, then counted my bread, and missed half a quartern loaf.

JOHN CARLISLE. I am a constable. I was in Fore-street, opposite the end of Whitecross-street, and saw the prisoner in company with another - How's basket was pitched at the corner. The prisoner's companion was looking at the basket, but he saw me, and left. I followed the prisoner, and took half a quartern loaf from under his jacket - I saw him take it out of the basket. I took him to Guildhall, and then waited at the shop until How returned.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Three Months .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18191201-87

87. RICHARD JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of November , two pair of boots, value 6 s. , the property of James Tuffield .

The prisoner pleaded

GUILTY.

Confined Three Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18191201-88

88. SAMUEL JOSEPH was indicted for stealing, on the 29th October , two carriage glasses, value 20 s. , the property of Lionel Lukin , William Beech , and George Howard .

RICHARD THORNTON . I am foreman to the prosecutors, who are coachmakers , and live in Long-acre . On the 29th of October, about eight o'clock in the morning, I went to the back of the workshop and found the padlocks were taken off the door which led to Castle-street. I looked among the carriages and found the door of one open, and both the glasses gone - the strings were left hanging to the door; they were safe at eight o'clock the night before. Next morning I heard two glasses had been stopped at Covent-garden watch-house. I went there, took the strings with me, and found they matched the part left on the carriage, they were my masters' property. The prisoner was in custody. The padlocks were wrenched off. Mr. Beech lives on the premises.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. You never saw the prisoner on the premises - A. No.

PRINCE DALTON. I am an apprentice to Lionel Lukin , William Beech , and John Howard . I have been their apprentice three years and a half. I and three others entered the premises on the 28th of October, about twelve o'clock at night. I lived next door. I wrenched the lock off. The prisoner, Thomas Smithers , and another whom I do not know, were with me; we opened the gate, after wrenching the lock off.

Q. Were those persons by when you wrenched the lock - A. No; I wrenched it off before they came, to be in readiness for them.

Q. Did you plan the robbery - A. No; Thomas Smithers planned it. I do not know where he is. When they came up two glasses were taken from the carriage. I cut off one string and Smithers the other. I took them out of the premises, and the prisoner carried them away. I went with him; we were both stopped at two o'clock; he had the glasses; I got away as soon as they laid hold of him.

Cross-examined. Q. Was not the prisoner in the street when they were taken - A, No; we were all four on the premises. I was in custody about five weeks.

Q. You swore at Bow-street that the prisoner was concerned in nothing but this, but the others were - A. Yes.

JOHN HAYES . I am a watchman. About a quarter before two o'clock I stopped the prisoner at the corner of Southampton-street and Maiden-lane with the glasses; a person was walking by his side, who ran away.

JAMES CROWE . I am a watchman of Maiden-lane. The prisoner and others passed me; when they saw me following them they hastened their pace. I called to Hayes to stop the prisoner - the others ran away.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I met Dalton at a singing club; he asked me to carry the glasses - I did so; the watchman stopped me, and he ran away.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18191201-89

89. HENRY VINCENT was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of October , one box, value 2 s., and 70 lbs. of candles, value 2 l. , the property of Thomas Lindsey Holland and Thomas Elborough .

THOMAS ELBOROUGH . I am a tallow-chandler , and in partnership with Thomas Lindsey Holland ; we live in South Audley-street . The prisoner was our carman . He left us in March. On Sunday, the 14th of November, about six o'clock, the bell rang - I went down. Elliot, who slept in the shop, said he had found the shop door wide open, and that he had lost property. I said it was very strange. Nothing passed till the Tuesday following, which was the 17th of November. When the Excise officers came they asked if I had heard of a box of candles which was at Marlborough-street? I found the box and candles at Mr. Pain's, in Tom's-court, Duke-street, Grosvenor-square, and knew them to be mine by the hand-writing on the box, in chalk. Mr. Pain said it was left there some time before by a man who was to call for it again, but that he did not call.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Mr. Pain is a stranger to you - A. Yes.

JAMES PAIN. I am a shoemaker, and live in Tom's-court, Duke-street, Grosvenor-square. On the 24th of October, about eight o'clock in the morning, my wife went into the yard; she came in and said there was a box in the yard which appeared to be a tallow-chandler's box - my boy went into the yard and brought it in. I untied the cord and opened it, and found it full of candles. Just as got it open a boy came and said he knew who it belonged to. I kept the box. I then went to two tallow-chandlers, but could not find the owner. About a quarter before eleven o'clock that morning, which was Sunday, the prisoner came to my house, opened the door, went into the yard, and then went up stairs. I do not know which room he went into. He came down, knocked at my door, and asked if I had not got a box which was left in the yard? I said I had, and asked if it belonged to him? He said Yes. I asked him how he came to put it in my yard, for I might be taken up for receiving stolen goods? He said nothing particular. I said,

"Young man, give me your name and address, and if it is all right you shall have the box." He said he lived at No. 71, Lower Sloane-street, Chelsea. I told him I would go and see. I went and found it was a private house. They said they had no lodgers. I went to different tallow-chandlers, but could not find the owner. They said they would make it known in the trade. On the 16th of November the prosecutor saw the box at my house, he and his man claimed it. I am sure the prisoner is the man who came for it. He acknowledged it himself when the constable took him, and said the young man who slept in the shop gave it him to take out.

ROGER MILLS . I am journeyman to the prosecutor. On the 16th of November I was sent to Mr. Pain's house, and examined the box of candles. The moment I saw it I knew it to be my master's property. I also knew the candles.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GEORGE PAIN . I am son of James Pain . On Sunday morning, the 24th of October, about eight o'clock, my mother said there was a box of candles in the yard, I went and brought them in. The prisoner called for them.

JOSEPH JARVIS . I live with Mr. Pain. About half-past seven o'clock in the morning the prisoner brought the box, and said he would give me threepence to mind it till nine o'clock. I am sure he is the man.

JAMES THRESHER . I am a tallow-chandler, and live at No. 137, Sloane-street. The prisoner slept in the same bed with me. He was absent on the night of the 23d of October. He lived there.

JOHN ELLIOT. I sleep in the prosecutor's shop. On the 24th of October, at night, the box of candles were stolen. I found the bolt of the door pushed back in the morning; I know it was fastened the night before. I myself lost 1 l. 2 s. 6 d. in half-crowns out of my breeches pocket, and a 1 l. note from my box. I did not give the prisoner the box.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. I have known him four years. I have lived twelve months with the prosecutor. I found the door open about half-past six o'clock. I lost a 1 l. note before that. I sleep close by the door at the end of the counter. The box of candles were in the cellar.

Q. You was charged with the robbery yourself - A. Yes, and lost my place through it. I had not seen the prisoner for six weeks before. I have lost the use of my right ear, and if I lay on my left I do not hear.

Q. Had you any other residence - A. I boarded at the prisoner's brother's, in Bird-street, Manchester-square. I keep my things at my master's, and live with my master now. I have got my place again.

Prisoner's Defence. John Elliot met me in Grosvenor-square, and asked me to call at his lodgings. I went between five and six o'clock, and pulled the bell - he came to the door, asked me to wait, he gave me the box, and asked me to carry it to Duke-street, Grosvenor-square, and he would meet me. He did not come. I took it to Tom's-court. About eleven o'clock he sent me for it. I did not wish my master to hear of it; I gave a false address. Elliot said he would call himself on Monday for it. I went to Woolwich, after giving my master notice. When Elliot was in prison he offered me a bribe if I would take every thing upon myself, in consequence of which he got acquitted.

GEORGE PAIN re-examined. John Elliot did not come for it.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191201-90

90. JAMES STROUD was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of September , one handkerchief, value 5 s., the property of John Deykes , from his person .

JOHN DEYKES . On the 22d of September, about one o'clock in the day, I was in Holborn, near the end of Chancery-lane , and felt a pull at my pocket; I turned round, and saw the prisoner with my handkerchief in his hand.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I stopped to buy a pennyworth of apples. Somebody threw the handkerchief in my face, I took it off and threw it down.

GUILTY. Aged 15.

Judgment Respited .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191201-91

91. THOMAS CLARK was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of November , three shirts, value 3 s.; three shifts, value 5 s.; five aprons, value 5 s.; one pinafore, value 1 s.; one table-cloth, value 6 d.; one handkerchief, value 6 d., and two frills, value 5 s. , the property of Samuel Bird .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating them to be the property of Elizabeth Collis .

ELIZABETH COLLIS . I am a laundress , and live at Camden-town. On the 3d of November, about six o'clock in the evening, I had these clothes in my cart, and lost them out of the cart about six o'clock in the evening at Hampstead . It was the only bundle I had. The other things were in bags. It laid on the top of the bags.

HENRY TOOLEY . I am a horse-patrol of Hampstead. On the 8th of November, about six o'clock in the evening, I perceived the prisoner running with a bundle of linen on the Hampstead-road. I followed and secured him.

MARY BIRD . The property is mine. I cannot say it did not fall out of the cart. It was an open cart. I have had a bundle fall out unknown to me as I pulled up round the corner.

Prisoner's Defence. I found the bundle in the road, and was taking it to the turnpike.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191201-93

92. ANN WELLS was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of November , one coat, value 4 s.; one waistcoat, value 2 s., and one pair of trowsers, value 1 s. , the property of William Charles Hall .

WILLIAM CHARLES HALL . I am a glass-cutter , and live in Fashion-street, Bethnal-green . The prisoner lived a fortnight with me as servant . When I returned home on the 6th of November she was gone. I missed the things, and about half-past seven o'clock at night I met her in Shoreditch, and found a duplicate of them on her.

JOHN KILLINGWORTH . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Brick-lane. On the 6th of November, between six and seven o'clock in the evening, the prisoner pledged the things with me; she said her mother sent her.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 13.

Judgment Respited .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191201-94

93. JOHN NORTH was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of November , 30 lbs. of rope, value 18 d. , the goods of Alexander Gibbon and John Gibbon .

BARTHOLOMEW GINYER . I am foreman to Messrs. Alexander and John Gibbons . On the 25th of November I lost the rope from the yard, and found the prisoner in custody with it.

JOSEPH GALLOWAY . I am an officer. On the 25th of November I stopped the prisoner in Whitehorse-street, Stepney with the rope - he said it belonged to a barge, I said it was not his. He threw it down, and said

"You may take it" - I took him. He then said he took it from the prosecutors' premises, and begged of me to let him go as he was in distress, and had had nothing to eat all day - I found 2 s. 10 1/2 d. on him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was in distress - the money was to pay my lodging.

GUILTY . Aged 61.

Confined One Year .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191201-95

94. THOMAS NOAH was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of November , two coach-springs, value 25 s. , the property of William Bignall .

SAMUEL BIGNALL . I keep the Swan stable-yard, in Tothil-street; the prisoner was a spring-maker, and worked at a shop in the yard. I wanted him to alter these springs - we could not agree about it, and I would not have them done. Some time after I missed them, and charged him with taking them; he said he knew nothing of them.

ROBERT RICKEY . I am a hackney-man. The prisoner came to me, and said he had a pair of springs to sell, I said I did not want any, he said they would suit me. I bought them of him for 25 s.

JOHN JOHNSON . I know the prosecutor lost the springs, and that the prisoner had them in his shop.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I bought them at Mr. Parkes's. I am a jobbing smith, and mend springs for hackney coaches.

JOHN KING . I am porter to Messrs. Parkes and Co., who are ironmongers, and live in Broad-street, Bloomsbury. The prisoner used to buy springs there - I cannot say he bought these.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191201-96

95. SAMUEL POWELL was again indicted for stealing, on the 5th of December , seven yards of cambric, value 30 s. , the goods of Matthew Halling , John Pearce , and Edward Stone .

Counsel for the prosecution, MR. ADOLPHUS.

EDWARD STONE . I am in partnership with Matthew Halling and John Pearce . We live at Numbers 10 and 11, Cockspur-street; the prisoner was in our service; he had 35 l. a-year at first, and then 40 l., and boarded in the house. He came in April, 1817, and left us on the 9th of December, 1818, and went into the employ of Davis and Cook.

Q. Did you miss any cambric - A. No, our concern is very large. On the 8th of November Davis and Cook sent for me. A pawnbroker's duplicate was produced, which led me to Lightfoot's, where I found a piece of cambric with my private mark on it. I never authorized him to take it. He never bought a piece.

Cross-examined by MR. ARABIN. Q. Do you never sell cambric with a private mark on it - A. Yes; I never sold him any; my partners may for what I know. It was not found for nine months after he left.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did you settle with him when he went away - A. No; he did not say how he came by it.

TOBIAS LOVE . I am an officer. I was sent for by Messrs. Davis and Co. to search the prisoner's box. He gave me a bunch of keys. I found sixty-seven duplicates in his box, one of which referred to the cambric pledged at Mr. Lightfoot's, dated the 5th of December 1818. He gave no account of it.

WILLIAM CURLAKE . I am servant to Mr. Lightfoot, who is a pawnbroker. The duplicate is one of our house. I took the cambric in pledge of a man, but cannot remember who.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

MR. DAVIS. The prisoner came into my service on the 23d of June, from Mr. Shews, of Aldgate.

(See No. 85.)

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18191201-97

96. GEORGE ARCHER and JOHN WILSON were indicted for stealing, on the 6th of November , one pair of breeches, value 10 s. , the property of John Davidson .

JOHN DAVIDSON . I live in John-street, Back-road, Islington . On the 6th of November, about half past nine o'clock in the morning, Bilham and the constable brought a pair of breeches to me, which were mine, and were in my parlour the evening before, in a chair near the window. He said he had taken the prisoners.

THOMAS HARDING BILHAM . On the 6th of November, about half-past nine o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoners, with a third person, looking into the prosecutor's window, and saw Archer receive a pair of breeches from the third person, who stood outside the place. I had been watching a quarter of an hour. I immediately went out and seized them - Wilson was in company with them. I took them to the watch-house, the other escaped.

THOMAS FALKNER . I am an officer. I took the prisoners in custody. I had seen them in company with Moore the day before.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

ARCHER'S Defence. I was passing the door, a lad inside the pales threw the breeches over; they fell on my shoulder, and I took them.

WILSON'S Defence. I was on the other side of the way, crossed to see what was the matter, and was taken.

ARCHER - GUILTY . Aged 17.

WILSON - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191201-98

97. SARAH KIRTLAND was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of October , one watch, value 30 s., and one key, value 2 d., the property of James Day , from his person .

JAMES DAY . On the 28th of October, about a quarter after nine o'clock in the evening, I met the prisoner in Holborn with another woman, they accosted me, and asked for something to drink; I said No, for I was going to Aldgate. When I was in Brook-street they wanted me to go with them, I said I could not, and turned down a court to get out of their way. The prisoner took my watch out, and gave it to another woman. I held her - the people said,

"Let her go!" She struck me with force; I still held her. The watchman came up, and I gave her in charge. As we went along she said if I did not keep off she would fetch me down. I did not intend to go any where with her. I was sober.

THOMAS EDMUNDS . I am a watchman. I was in Brook-street, heard the cry in Fox-court , and saw the prosecutor, who had hold of the prisoner, and gave her in charge for robbing him of his watch and giving it to another girl.

Prisoner's Defence. I saw a mob, and went to see what was the matter - the prosecutor was being ill-used by some men, I persuaded him to come away, and he gave me in charge.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191201-99

98. JAMES MILLER , WILLIAM HOWARD , MARY CAMPBELL , ELIZABETH SMITH , and HANNAH BARKER were indicted for feloniously assaulting Robert Arnott , on the 13th of November , at St. Martin in the Fields , putting him in fear and taking from his person and against his will, two handkerchiefs, value 4 s., and 18 s. in monies numbered , his property.

ROBERT ARNOTT . On Saturday, the 13th of November, about twelve o'clock at night, as I was coming along the Strand, towards Vine-street, the prisoner, Barker, persuaded me to go with her into a parlour in Vine-street, Chandos-street ; through a great deal of persuasion she got me in there, and asked me for half a crown to drink - I refused. She then cried out Murder! in the room - she had locked the room door, and in a few minutes the other prisoners forced the door open; as soon as Howard got into the room, he struck me a blow on my mouth, which loosened one of my teeth. I fell on my knees from the blow, and Miller struck me on the head - I fell, it cut my hat. Howard put one of his hands into my breeches pocket, then Miller and Howard both struck me, and the women assisted in holding me while they robbed me of my money. Howard took the money out of my pocket - they took 18 s. in silver. I cried out for assistance to the watchman, who forced the street door open, and came in - as soon as he forced the door open the prisoners all ran up two pair of stairs. I ran up with the watchman, and gave them all in charge; they took a handkerchief from my neck and one from my pocket - they took them by force - I am sure it was all the prisoners; Smith and Campbell were more active than the woman who took me in.

Prisoner BARKER. Q. Will you swear I took you in - A. Yes.

Prisoner SMITH. Q. Am not I the woman who met you in Chandos-street - A. No; they were all in the room in a gang ready for me. I was sober. I had walked all the way from Bishopsgate-street.

TIMOTHY RYAN . I am a watchman. On the 14th of November, about one o'clock in the morning, I was at the corner of Chandos-street, St. Martin's-lane, and heard a rattle spring at the corner of Vine-street. I went into Vine-street. I heard the cry of Murder! I got close to the door, and called to them to open it; there was no answer. I forced it open and got inside. The prosecutor came up with his lip cut, and said he had been struck, knocked down, and robbed of some money and his handkerchief off his neck and another handkerchief. I asked him where they were? he said they were gone up stairs. We put a watchman at the door. I went up stairs with the prosecutor and another watchman, and found all the prisoners up stairs in the two pair of stairs room, except Barker, who was at the top of the stairs. The prosecutor pointed the two men out, and said the women had assisted in robbing him. He said Howard first struck him, and Miller next.

Q. Did he say which woman he went in with - A. No, my Lord, I got more watchmen to assist me, and took all the five prisoners to the watch-house.

Prisoner MILLER. Q. When you came up, was I dressed or not - A. His coat was off - he had time to do that, for I was five or ten minutes at the door before I could get in.

ROBERT BOURK . I am a watchman of Vine-street. After one o'clock in the morning, I heard the cry of Murder! in the house, sprang my rattle, and placed the next watchman to me at the door, to let nobody in or out until I got assistance. I went into the house, and found the prosecutor, who told me they were gone up stairs. I went up with him, and met Barker at the top of the stairs all over wet - she was crying. I thought they had been ill-using her, as she was wet, and standing on the stairs. I took them all into custody.

Prisoner SMITH. Q. Did you charge us with the robbery - A. Arnott charged them with the robbery next day, but not that night.

THOMAS RYAN re-examined. As soon as I went into the room he pointed them out, and said they had robbed him.

WILLIAM NETTLETON . I was constable of the night. The prisoners were brought to the watch-house. The prosecutor charged the two men with knocking him down and robbing him of 18 s., and two handkerchiefs - the watchman charged the women with making a riot. Next morning the prosecutor charged them with aiding and assisting.

Prisoner SMITH. Q. Did not the prosecutor say that Mary Platt brought him to the house - A. No, he said he was looking for Mary Platt .

MILLER'S Defence. I lodged at this house. On Saturday night, the 13th of October, I received my wages, and was with my companions till near twelve o'clock; I got intoxicated, went home, and went to bed that instant - I never saw the prosecutor. I was roused out of my bed by hearing the noise. I never saw the other man till I got to the watch-house.

HOWARD'S Defence. I had received 25 s., and had a pint of beer. About a quarter after twelve o'clock I heard the cry down the street, and went into the house to see what was the matter. Some women were quarrelling on the stairs, covered with water - I told them not to pull each other about. While I was talking to them. the prosecutor came up with the watchman and gave us in charge - he gave the girls in charge for being disorderly.

BARKER'S Defence. I was with some young women till half-past twelve o'clock at night up stairs. I live at No. 3; this is No. 5. Smith had been quarrelling with Campbell, and said she would have her spite of her. She forced the door open and struck her on the breast, and called watch. The watchman came up, and sent for the prosecutor, who said the men had robbed him of 18 s. and a handkerchief. He went to the watch-house and charged the men only with the robbery. No others

were mentioned, for he said he had been in company with Platt. On Monday he told the Magistrate I took him into the house.

CAMPBELL'S Defence. I never saw the prosecutor there till he came into the room with the watchman.

SMITH'S Defence. I was going along Vine-street for a pot of beer; the man called after me. I said I was going for some beer. He followed me into the public-house, and drank the beer. I went to the door with him; he offered me 2 s. I said that was not sufficient. He said he had no more. He went into the parlour, and asked me to stop with him a few minutes for 2 s. 6 d., which I agreed to. I left him in a few minutes. I never saw him again till he came up with the watchman about an hour after. The watchman seeing me in a row said,

"Go and fetch the baker; I dare say these are the men who have robbed him." We were taken to the watch-house. The constable of the night said,

"Let the women go;" the watchman said,

"No, I give them in charge for making a noise in the house." heard nothing about a handkerchief. It is an open house.

ROBERT ARNOTT re-examined. I never found my handkerchief. All the women were in the room, and assisted in robbing me.

MILLER - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 35.

HOWARD - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 19.

CAMPBELL - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 23.

SMITH - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 24.

BARKER - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 22.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191201-100

99. CHARLES HOLT was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of November , one watch chain, value 1 s.; one seal, value 6 s., and one ring, value 2 s., the goods of James Plush , from his person .

JAMES PLUSH . Early in November I was at the corner of Southampton-buildings, Chancery-lane , about twelve o'clock at night; the prisoner came up to me, caught hold of my seals and chain, tore them from my watch, and ran off with them. I called out Stop thief! and he was stopped at the corner of Lincoln's Inn Gate - the watchman found them. I had lost sight of him, but am sure he is the man.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Did he appear to be sober - A. I cannot say, it was so momentarily - I received no blow. I had spent my evening at the London Tavern. I have inquired and found that the prisoner has respectable parents.

WILLIAM SHIELDS . I am a watchman. I was on duty at the corner of Cursitor-street, about twelve o'clock, and heard a rattle spring, crossed the road by Lincoln's Inn Gate, and saw the prisoner jammed against the wall by a gentleman with an umbrella; I secured him, and the gentleman left. - I searched him but found nothing on him. I took him to the watch-house. I found the chain within about twelve yards from where I took the prisoner, by the railings at the back of Old-square,

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I had been with a party, drank a great deal of wine, and was very much intoxicated. I realy cannot say what I did.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191201-101

100. CHARLES HATCH was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of November , one bed, value 1 l.; one bolster, value 3 s.; two sheets, value 4 s., and one blanket, value 4 s., the goods of Christian Olson , in a lodging-room .

DINAH OLSON . I am the wife of Christian Olson, who lives in Queen-street, Ratcliff-cross . The prisoner and his wife lodged eight weeks with me in the back parlour, at 5 s. per week - these things were let with the lodgings; they came on the 11th of November. On the 19th I suspected all was not right, as I had not seen the prisoner for two days. I told his wife that I wished to see if all was right, but instead of taking me into the room she got out of the door, and ran away - I secured her, and gave her in charge. She then said all was not right, I went in and missed these things. She said her husband had taken them out about six o'clock that morning. I have not found them.

JESSE CUTTS . I am a headborough. I apprehended the prisoner about eleven o'clock. He said he took all the things, and sold the two sheets in Gravel-lane, and that he sold the bolster and blanket near Smithfield, for 6 s. Next day an officer was sent with him to find the place out, but he could not or would not shew him.

Prisoner's Defence. I was not in the house for two days.

GUILTY . Aged 31.

Confined One Year , and Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191201-102

101. WILLIAM GOODWIN was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of November , one cheese, value 13 s. , the property of Josiah Burnham .

JOSIAH BURNHAM . I am a cheesemonger , and live at No. 43. Great Titchfield-street . On the 3d of November, I was coming home, and saw the prisoner trying my door. Suspecting him, I went in at the other side of the house, and watched him. I saw him go in and take the cheese out, then secured him about two doors off with it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 57.

Confined Six Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191201-103

102, WILLIAM BARNETT and ANN BOULTON were indicted for stealing, on the 22d of November , two saws, value 15 s.; one oil-stone, value 6 s.; five chisels, value 5 s.; one gouge, value 6 d.; one rag-stone, value 9 d., and one basket, value 2 s. , the property of William Brummage ,

WILLIAM BRUMMAGE . I am a carpenter . On the 22d of November my tools were in a loft, over a stable, in Cadogan-place . I went to dinner about twelve o'clock, and left them lying about there, returned before one, and missed them. I applied to Maybank, and we found a saw at Morrit's and one at Wright's. We apprehended the prisoners the same evening, and found a chisel and two rag-stones on the mantle-piece where they lodged together, in Gardener's-lane. I knew nothing of them.

JAMES STONE . I am a carpenter. I went to dinner, and when I came back I found a stone mason's bag against the door. The tools were gone.

RICHARD DOZEL . I am servant to Mr. Wright, who is a pawnbroker, and lives in Tothill-street. On the 22d of November, about three or four o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner, Ann Boulton , pledged a saw with me.

ROBERT FOX. I am servant to Mr. Morrit, who is a pawnbroker, and lives in York-street, Westminster. On the 22d of November, the female prisoner pledged a saw with me. I am sure she is the woman.

WILLIAM NEED . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Bridge Road, Lambeth. On the 23d of November, I took a saw in pledge from the male prisoner.

WILLIAM WHITEHEAD . I am a builder. On the 22d of November, about half-past twelve o'clock, I was going down Little Cadogan-place - the prosecutor is my workman. I saw a man like the prisoner with a basket of tools at his back, hanging on an axe. He was about two hundred yards from the stable, where the tools were stolen from. I was going to Westminster, and as I returned I met Brummage and Stoat, who said they had lost their tools. I described the man to them, and sent them to Maybank, who, from that description, found him - nobody was with him.

CHARLES DEW . I am a constable of Queen-square. Maybank gave me a description of the man, and I went to No. 28, Gardener's-lane, where I found the female prisoner in bed, and Barnett sitting by the fire; I said I wanted them on suspicion of felony, and on telling Barnett that I was going to search him, he took a duplicate out of his breeches pocket, and threw it into the fire, but I snatched it off, and gave it to Pople - it was for the saw pledged at Need's. On searching the premises, I found an iron chisel, two rag-stones, and a quantity of other duplicates - one was for a pair of silver spoons. The prisoner, Boulton, cohabited with the man, who is married, and has got a family.

ALFRED POPLE . I was with Dew, and produce the duplicate.

BARNETT'S Defence. The woman met a short stout man in Tothill-street, who said he was a carpenter out of work, and sold her three saws. I was at Camberwell at the time, and on my return she asked me to pledge one.

BOULTON'S Defence. The man is correct. He reprimanded me for buying them.

BARNETT - GUILTY . Aged 43.

BOULTON - GUILTY . Aged 39.

Confined One Year .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191201-104

103. WILLIAM BLACKWELL was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of November , one coat, value 2 l. , the goods of Richard Rynes Floyd .

RICHARD RYNES FLOYD. I am a seaman on board the hulk, Sampson , lying at Woolwich . On Sunday, the 7th of November, the prisoner came alongside in a wherry, and asked permission to come on board till the tide turned - he remained on board two or three hours. Between twelve and one o'clock I took my coat off, laid it on the table, and put on my jacket - the prisoner was passing backwards and forwards. He said he was apprenticed to Mr. Giles, the waterman, which proved to be wrong; he left the ship unknown to any one. I followed him to Shadwell, and with the assistance of his brother, I found him at a green stall. He said if we would both go with him, he would get the coat. He cried and said it was close by.

JOHN BROWN. The prisoner was brought to me. He took me to Ellis's, in Rosemary-lane, and said he sold it there, but Ellis said he had not, and I might search. I never found it.

WILLIAM FITZSIMMONS . I was in Charles-street on Sunday night. The prisoner gave me twopence to take a walk with him. He took the coat to the shop, and asked the gentleman to give him 3 s. for it? He said he would give him 2 s., and a penny for me to go away - he left it there. We went home, and I got him a lodging.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Fined One Shilling , and Discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191201-105

104. WILLIAM SCOTT was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of November , 20 lbs. of feathers, value 40 s.; one bed-tick. value 2 s. 6 d.; one blanket, value 5 s., and one candlestick, value 1 s., the goods of Samuel Clark , in a lodging-room .

ELIZA CLARK . I am the wife of Samuel Clark , and live at Pimlico . The prisoner lodged nine or ten weeks with us, in a room furnished, at 2 s. 6 d. per week; he after. wards had more conveniences, and paid 3 s. per week. These things were let with the lodgings - the prisoner is a shoemaker. On the 13th of November we missed them; he took about 28 lbs. of feathers out of the bed, also the blanket and candlestick - his wife lodged with him. He had not left the lodgings - he owed 7 s.

EMMA CLARK . I took up two blankets and a coverlid, and gave them to the prisoner when he came to the lodging - they were afterwards missed.

Prisoner's Defence. I left them in the lodgings.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191201-106

105. DANIEL GILBERT was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of November , one poker, value 1 s.; one pair of tongs, value 1 s., and one shovel, value 1 s. , the goods of Peter Lee .

PETER LEE . I keep the Yorkshire Stingo, public-house , in Gray's Inn-lane . On the 27th of November, between eleven and twelve o'clock at night, the prisoner came to my house, and had half a pint of beer in the parlour - a gentleman was in the parlour at the time. As soon as the gentleman left, not liking my customer, I went to see what he was about, and told him I wanted to shut up. He said he would not be more than a few minutes, and I returned to the bar. He came out apparently in a great hurry, and from his manner I thought he must have committed a robbery - I followed him out. When he thought he was out of sight, he stopped, and stooped down. I went up to him, and asked him if he had lost any thing? he said No. He was feeling about his trowsers. I said,

"What have you got there?" He said,

"Nothing at all" - I heard something jink inside, as if he had fetters on. The flap of his coat went aside, and there was the top of the tongs and shovel sticking out of his trowsers - the poker fell on the pavement, and I collared him. He begged to be let go - I gave him in charge

WILLIAM MURPHY . I am a watchman. Lee called for assistance. The poker fell from his coat.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I was in the greatest distress.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Confined One Month .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191201-107

106. WILLIAM BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of November , two pewter quart pots, value 2 s. , the goods of Samuel Smith .

SAMUEL SMITH . I keep the Coach and Horses, public-house , Eld-street, Berkley-square . On the 5th of November these pots were taken off the horse on my premises. Blake called me, I ran down the mews, and secured the prisoner with them in his pocket. His pockets were large enough to hold three quart pots in each.

JOHN BLAKE . The landlord had missed pots before. I watched them on the stand at the door, and saw the prisoner come and take two pots. I informed Smith, who secured him with them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 62.

Confined Two Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191201-108

107. MICHAEL DILLON was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of November , one watch, value 12 l.; two broken seals, value 5 s.; one key, value 3 d., and one ribbon, value 1 d., the property of Hugh Roberts , from his person .

HUGH ROBERTS . I am a silk manufacturer , and live in Red cross-square, Cripplegate. On the 21st of November, between eight and nine o'clock, I was walking on the other side of Fleet-street, and this side of Water-lane, returning from St. Dunstan's church ; I felt a great pluck, and my watch was gone in an instant. I saw the prisoner close before me; I saw him plainly by the gas light - nobody else was near enough to have done it but him; he immediately ran up Crown-court. I pursued, but did not overtake him, and turned into Hanging Sword-alley. I missed him in an instant, and did not see him again that night. I turned back, and found there was a court leading to the river. On the Sunday following I went to the public-house at the corner of that court, to see if there was any door leading into that court, and while I was there the prisoner came out - I knew him instantly, and am certain he is the man who snatched my watch. I could distinguish his features very plainly.

Q. Did you secure him - A. No, my Lord, but I followed him across the road, and down Water-lane; he then turned up a court on the right side of the way, which goes into Bouverie-street - he went into a house in that court. He came out in about two minutes, and went into Bouverie-street; I still followed him close, and when he got to the open place he saw me, came up, and asked me why I followed him? I said,

"I think I know you - I have seen you before. What is your name?" He said it was Dillon, and he could get a character; I did not wish him to know what I followed him for, and went away - he said something very impudent. I lost him for a short time, went into Fleet-street, and saw him coming up Water-lane - I did not take him then, as I was afraid. Next day I stated the case at the Mansion House, and Herdsfield apprehended him on the Wednesday. I have no doubt of his being the man, who snatched my watch.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. You saw no person in particular but the prisoner - A. He came against my side, and took by watch. I did not look for him in the week.

Q. Did you speak to any one when you lost your watch - A. No.

THOMAS HERDSFIELD . I am a constable. I had information of this robbery, and on the morning of the 1st of December, I saw the prisoner coming out of Mr. Mason's seed shop, in Fleet-street. I knew him before, took him as he crossed the street, and told him I wanted him for robbing a gentleman of his watch. He said he thought it very curious as the gentleman had seen him before, that he did not take him himself. As I was going down Ludgate-hill - I was walking by the side of him, but had not got hold of him, I saw the prosecutor, who immediately said,

"That is the person, who robbed me of my watch" - I believe the prisoner said he must be mistaken. I found nothing particular on him.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did you tell him the gentleman had seen him since the watch was taken - A. I believe I did. He then said, if the gentleman saw me why did he not take me. I went to his house with him down a court in Water-lane; he lived there with his mother.

Prisoner's Defence. On the Sunday after the robbery I was coming up Water-lane, and went into a public-house with two young men - I met the prosecutor as I came out, he took particular notice of me, and followed me to my door. I came out in a few minutes, and saw him at the corner. I asked him why he followed me? he said he was not following me, and wanted nothing of me - he went away. I walked about there. He said he knew nothing of me and left. I met him again at the top of Water-lane. On the Saturday night after he was robbed, I was coming up Crown-court, he was talking to some persons, and said he should call it the thieving court as long as he lived.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18191201-109

108. JOHN MAUDE was indicted for bigamy .

Counsel for the prosecution, MR. ADOLPHUS.

GEORGE SELBY . I am vestry clerk of St. James's, Clerkenwell. I produce a copy from the register of the church at Leeds - I compared it with the register myself; it was the certificate of the marriage of John Maude to Harriet Wisht , on the 20th of December, 1807 - (read).

HANNAH FURBANK . I am mother of Harriet Wisht , and live at Leeds - the prisoner courted my daughter; I did not accompany them to be married; I consented, and know they went - they afterwards lived together as man and wife for thirteen years, and had seven children, six of whom are living, and are with my daughter, on the parish of Clerkenwell. The prisoner is a swansdown weaver , my daughter is a pipe-trimmer. He behaved very well to

her until about two years and a half ago, when he left her - she then lived at Leeds.

ESTHER BARRETT . I was servant to Mr. Smith, who is a tea-dealer, and lives in Aldersgate-street. I was married to the prisoner on the 19th of July, 1818, at St. Nicholas Cole Abbey - I had been acquainted with him four months. He represented himself as a batchelor - he lived with me until he was apprehended. He was schoolmaster in Clerkenwell. I have a child by him, which the parish take care of.

Prisoner. I throw myself on the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY . Aged 36.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18191201-110

109. REBECCA JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of November , two handkerchiefs, value 2 s. , the goods of Joseph Pearey .

JOSEPH PEAREY . I am a lace-dealer , and live on Holborn-hill . On the 4th of November, about six o'clock in the evening, I was called into the shop; I found the prisoner in custody of an officer, who produced two handkerchiefs, which he said he found upon her; I then missed two from my door, which were safe just before.

ALEXANDER ANDERSON . I am a constable. I saw the prisoner looking into Mr. Pearey's window - I passed, kept my eye on her, and saw her snatch something from inside the door, and run into the middle of the road. I pursued, and took her in the middle of the road. I said,

"What have you got here?" she said,

"For God's sake don't take me! I will give you the handkerchiefs" - I found them under her shawl, the prosecutor claimed them. She fell on her knees, and begged for mercy.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Confined One Year .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18191201-111

110. MARY HALL was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of November , one watch, value 3 l.; one chain, value 3 d.; one seal, value 1 l., and one key, value 2 s., the property of James Fogg , from his person .

JAMES FOGG . I live on board the Thames Police vessel, which is moored off Queenhithe - I am an officer. On the 30th of November, about half-past ten o'clock at night, I was at the top of Fleet-market , going towards home; the prisoner came up, and asked me if I would give her any thing to drink? I refused. She took hold of my arm, and kept hold of it till I had crossed the market, then two more girls came up, and asked me to go with them - the prisoner quitted my arm and came in front, the other two came, one on each side. The prisoner pulled my watch out, and ran up a dark court; I followed but lost her. I do not know what became of the other two - I think I saw one of them come down the court, but am not certain - this was on the Tuesday. On Friday I met her again about the same spot, and am quite sure she is the same person. I asked her for the watch she had taken from me on Tuesday; she said she had never seen me nor the watch. I said if she did not give it to me I would take her to the Compter. She still denied it, and I took her into custody. I was sober.

CHARLES BUCKINGHAM . I am a glazier, and live in Princes-street, Barbican; I am the prosecutor's uncle. He had come with me from Hertford, and was sober when he left my house. About a quarter past ten o'clock at night he returned, and said his watch was stolen. On Friday night I was with him, and saw the prisoner at the corner of Fleet-market. He went after her; I came up - he was eight or ten yards from her when he first saw her. She denied it, and I assisted in taking her to the Compter.

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutor stood at the corner. I do remember seeing him on the evening of the robbery. He was in liquor - two women who stood there knew him well.

GUILTY .

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18191201-112

111. JOHN JONES and JOHN ANDERSON were indicted for a misdemeanor .

Counsel for the prosecution, MR. ARABIN.

MR. JOHN HICKMAN BARNES . I reside in the Temple; my chambers are No. 2, Garden-row. I have a view of the stair-case of No. 10, Crown Office-court. On the 27th of September, about five o'clock in the evening, I observed two persons at the door of Mr. Squires's chambers; they appeared to be using force and violence to the door. I went and informed Lancely, one of the porters in the Temple. I could not discover who the prisoners were.

JOHN LANCELEY . I am porter of the Middle Temple. I received information from Mr. Barnes, and went to No. 10, Crown Office-court, Inner Temple , and found the prisoners on the first floor, and asked them what business they had there? Anderson said he brought a letter from his master to Mr. Robinson - that name was over the door. Jones said he was out of place, and had accompanied him. Hitchin searched Anderson, and found a large crow-bar in his coat pocket - they were taken to the Compter. I there found inside Jones's trowsers, a crow-bar, five skeleton door keys, and four smaller ones. I returned from the Compter, went up immediately to Mr. Squires's chambers, which is on the third floor, and found the door broken in a number of places in the pannels and edge - it had been attempted to be broken open; the crow-bar, on being applied to the marks, corresponded. The chambers had not been entered. The lock had been attempted and injured; the laundress could not open it with the key.

JOHN HITCHIN . I am porter of the Inner Temple. I was present when the prisoners were found on the staircase on the first floor. I searched Anderson, and found a crow-bar, a large empty bag in his pocket handkerchief, three keys, and a pen-knife - the keys are for drawers. I fitted the crow to the door, the marks tallied with several of the impressions. The centre pannel was nearly pushed out. I felt Jones down, felt something and told Lanceley to search him. Something rattled in his trowsers - I saw the things found on him at the Compter.

WILLIAM HILLYARD . I am a watchman of the Temple. I went with the last witnesses, and saw the door had been attempted.

JOSEPH DYE . I live with Mr. Down, who is a locksmith. I examined the lock, it had been attempted with a false key; it was injured.

ANDERSON - GUILTY .

JONES - GUILTY .

Publicly Whipped , and Confined One Year .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18191201-113

112. JOHN JONES and JOHN ANDERSON were again indicted for a like offence .

The evidence in this case was precisely the same. The chambers of Francis Gregg , Esq. , on the second floor of the same staircase, had been attempted at the same time. The prisoners were both found

GUILTY .

Again Publicly Whipped , and Confined One Year longer.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18191201-114

113. HENRY FARLAND was indicted for a misdemeanor .

WILLIAM VAUGHAN . I am in partnership with William Thomas Heath , George Ashness , and Benjamin Coveney ; we are wholesale stationers , and live in Queen-street, Cheapside. On the 20th of October the prisoner came to the warehouse, and produced this order - (read).

"Three reams of superfine thick laid post, for Messrs. Darton,

"Harvey, and Darton, 55, Gracechurch-street.

" WILLIAM REEVES ."

"20th October, 1819.

I delivered him the superfine paper and he went away. They came to 5 l. 2 s. I afterwards discovered it was forged.

WILLIAM REEVES . I am warehouseman to Samuel Darton and Joseph Harvey . The order is forged. I never sent the prisoner to get the paper. He lived with Messrs. Darton and Co. two or three years ago, and knew I was in the habit of giving orders.

Prisoner. I was in extreme distress. It is the first time I was ever tempted to deviate from the laws of honesty.

GUILTY .

Confined Six Months .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18191201-115

114. RICHARD CHAPMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of November , 7 lbs. of sugar, value 7 s.; 19 ounces of tea, value 11 s.; 2 lbs. of soap, value 18 d., and ten nutmegs, value 10 d. , the property of Frederick Sparrow .

Counsel for the prosecution, MR. ANDREWS.

FREDERICK SPARROW . I am a tea-dealer and grocer , and live on Ludgate-hill . The prisoner came into my service on the 2d of August, and lodged in the house. I discharged him; he asked me to give him a quarter's wages, which I did; at the same time he wished to go out at six o'clock; I gave him leave to do, and told him he must return by eleven o'clock. He said he could not, and would not come home that night. He came early in the morning. About a week afterwards he behaved impudent, and I discharged him. He left me on the 23d of November; he had sent his box away the day before.

Q. Did you go to Mrs. Dolton's, where the prisoner lodged - A. I did about a week after, on missing some of cocoa. She lives in Colville-yard, Windmill-street, Haymarket. I there searched his box, which I had seen in my house, and understood it to be his - it was locked. I found a piece of sugar, weighing 7 lbs.; a paper bag of tea, weighing about 9 ounces; 2 1/2 lbs. of soap, and ten nutmegs. I knew them all to be my property. There is my name chalked on the sugar, and on the paper there is a piece of an East India catalogue under the blue paper which has my writing on it. The tea is gunpowder tea, and is the same quality as mine; I know the bag. I went in pursuit of the prisoner with the officer that day; we found him at Bell's, in the Haymarket. I told him I had lost this property, and wished him to shew me where his lodgings were. He said in Windmill-street. The officer asked him to go and shew us his box; he agreed at first, then hesitated, and said he did not see any reason why he should go. The officer said he should take him if he would not. We went out together, and as soon as he got out he ran as hard as he could. We pursued with several others - he was taken about a mile off. We took him to Bow-street. The officer searched him, and found two keys and two nutmegs in his pocket. The officer again asked him, where his lodgings were? He said,

"Here!" We were then in a public-house. One of the keys opened his box.

Cross-examined by MR. ARABIN. Q. You would have sold the sugar with the mark on it - A. Yes. I did not see his box brought into my house. I never sold any thing to him. Another man slept in the room with the prisoner.

SARAH DOLTON . I live in Colville-yard, Windmill-street. I pointed out the box to the prosecutor and the officer. I was not at home when it was brought to my house; I had not seen it before they came. Four men lodged in the room with the prisoner, and there were seven boxes. I never saw the prisoner go to the box.

Q. How came you to point out the box to the prosecutor and the officer - A. Because it was at the foot of the prisoner's bed.

GEORGE DONALDSON . I am a constable. I went with Mr. Sparrow to the prisoner's lodgings. We met Mrs. Dolton at her own room door. In consequence of what passed between us we went to this box - it was locked. I took these things out. Before that I found two keys on the prisoner - one of them opened the box as well as any key could.

Cross-examined. Q. It was a common key - A. Yes.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18191201-116

115. JOHN GREEN and JOHN MARTIN were indicted for stealing, on the 27th of November , one cap, value 1 s.;

four yards of cotton, value, 4 s., and one child's gown, value 1 s. , the goods of Thomas Greenley .

SUSAN GREENLEY . I am the wife of Thomas Greenley, who is an ironmonger , at Bow. I sell haberdashery. On the 27th of November I lost these things out of the shop-window - they laid together. I was in the shop when they were taken.

HENRY SAUNDERS . I am a headborough, and live at Bow. On the 27th of November, between eleven and twelve o'clock in the day, I stood at my door and saw the prisoners cross the road. I suspected and watched them by Mrs. Greenley's shop; when both returned, Green went in - Martin watched at the window; Green came out, and both went away together. I went into the shop, and then pursued and secured them at Bromley, both walking together. They had been out of my sight. Martin threw a parcel into a ditch, which I picked up - it was the frock and cotton. I found the cap in Green's pocket.

GREEN'S Defence. I picked the cap up.

GREEN - GUILTY . Aged 17.

MARTIN - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18191201-117

116. JOHN JACKSON was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of December , one jacket, value 1 l., and one pair of trowsers, value 1 l. , the property of Barwise Thompson .

BARWISE THOMPSON. I am an apprentice to the brig Hutton . On the 6th of December, between ten and eleven o'clock in the morning, I went down the forecastle and saw the prisoner there. He turned his back, and asked me if one Mr. Walker was in the ship? I said no such person belonged to the ship. The brig was moored close in shore, and there was a plank from the shore to her. I collared him, brought him up the ladder, and called the mate, who came and took him from me. We found he had my jacket on under his own, and my trowsers also under his own. They were in my chest before - it was not locked. I gave him in charge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. Distress drove me to it.

GUILTY . Aged 44.

Confined Six Months , and Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18191201-118

117. JOHN PHILPOT and JOHN AMER , were indicted for stealing, on the 23d of November , 100 lbs. of lead, value 10 s., the goods of His Majesty , and fixed in a fence belonging to him .

Counsel for the Prosecution, MR. ALLEY.

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be fixed to a building.

GEORGE SLADE . I am a labourer to the Trust at Hampton Court Palace . A pump was stolen from the mews on Sunday, the 28th of November, in the morning, which belonged to the King. I saw it again on Tuesday. The prisoners were then in custody, with a cart; John Philpot 's name was on the cart - it was his.

JOHN MARTIN . I am a plumber, and employed at the works at Hampton Court. I compared the pump with the part remaining - it matched exactly. I took the remaining piece from the ground, and matched it in the cart. It was fixed against the fence.

GEORGE MASTERS. I was employed to watch the place where the pump was concealed, which was behind a hay-rick in a meadow, about three hundred yards from where it was stolen. On Tuesday, about a quarter before five o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoners and two other persons come in a cart; one get out of the cart, went to the place, returned to the cart, and then drove on. I followed and stopped it in less than five minutes. I found the prisoners in the cart with this pump and five other pumps - it weighed 100 lbs. I secured them.

PHILPOT - GUILTY . Aged 33.

AMER - GUILTY . Aged 34.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18191201-119

118. SAMUEL DEAN was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Holmes , about nine o'clock at night, on the 29th of November , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, two pair of stays, value 18 s. , his property.

JOHN HOLMES . I live in Featherstone-street, City-road . On the 29th of November I had seven pair of stays inside the shop window. I saw them safe a little after seven o'clock - the window was sound then. I went into the shop again a little before nine o'clock, and found the bottom pane of glass broken, and two pair gone; a third pair was doubled up ready to be taken away. My shop door was fast at seven o'clock, and I found it still fast. I had been in the back room adjoining the shop all the time. I did not hear the glass break.

WILLIAM HOLMES . I am brother to the prosecutor, and lodge in the same house. I put a candle on the counter about half-past seven o'clock in the evening, and sat in the back room with my brother. I went into the shop at eight o'clock to my box, staid there till about a quarter before nine o'clock, and then heard somebody at the window; I looked round and saw a person's hat. I stooped down that they might not see me, and ran to the door, opened it quick, and saw the prisoner's arm thrust through the window. I caught hold of him as he took it out, and said,

"I have caught you at it now, have I?"

Q. Was any other person with him - A. No. He wanted to know what I had caught him at. I brought him into the shop, he had nothing in his hand - nobody was near him - I could see from one end of the street to the other. The property was never found.

WILLIAM PATRICK . I am a constable. I took the prisoner in charge. He said he knew nothing about it. I found nothing on him.

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutor said at Worship-street that I cut the glass.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18191201-120

119. THOMAS MEDCALFE was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of November , 17 lbs. of steel, value 6 s., and 10 lbs. of iron, value 2 s. , the property of James Furdon and Thomas Wells Powers .

JAMES FURDON . I am in partnership with Thomas Wills Powers . We are coachsmiths - the prisoner was our servant . On the 12th of November, about half-past five

o'clock, I ordered William Wood to conceal himself in the loft over where the prisoner worked, and to watch him. He earns from 30 s. to 35 s. a week.

WILLIAM WOOD. I am the prosecutor's servant. On the 19th of November I was concealed in the loft over where the prisoner worked, and saw him load himself with steel and iron. I was watching two hours; he only went out once. He kept on working, loaded himself, and went out about a quarter after seven o'clock. I got down, ran round to the front and stopped him opposite Newton-street, Holborn. I brought him back. When he got about half way, he said,

"For God's sake don't take me." I had not told him what I took him for. I collared him and took him to the counting-house. Mr. Furdon and I took him to the watch-house. He was searched there, and the steel and iron found on him; they were all my master's property, and what he loaded himself with. He made the pieces of iron hot, threw them in the water, and then put it about him.

JOHN FURZEMAN . I went to the prisoner in the watch-house. I searched him, and found the steel all round him, inside his shirt, and the iron in his coat pocket.

GUILTY . Aged 37.

Confined Six Months and Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18191201-121

120. JAMES SULLIVAN was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of November , one tea-pot, value 6 s.; one silver cream-jug, value 1 l.; one pair of sugar-tongs, value 5 s., and one tea-spoon, value 3 s. , the property of Samuel Barrack .

MARY BARRACK . I am the wife of Samuel Barrack , and live in Rolls-building, Fetter-lane . On the 22d of November, at half-past eight o'clock, these things were placed on the table for breakfast, in the front parlour. Soon after nine o'clock they were gone. The outer door is left open, but there is a middle door, which was shut. The officer afterwards brought them.

JAMES BAKER . I am a constable of Lincoln's Inn. In my way through Rolls-buildings, a little before nine o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner in company with another person. I watched and saw the prisoner go into the prosecutor's house, and come out again in about a minute. I went through the Yorkshire Grey, public-house, and he passed me. I followed and stopped him, took him into a hair-dresser's shop, found the tea-pot under his coat, and in his pockets a silver cream-jug, sugar-tongs, and spoon. The other ran away.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A person asked me to carry them.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191201-122

121. BENJAMIN SWATMAN and SARAH SWATMAN were indicted for stealing, on the 23d of November , 62 napkins, value 5 l.; 57 table-cloths, value 8 l.; 10 dishes, value 3 s.; 58 plates, value 10 s.; eight knives, value 1 s.; six forks, value 6 d.; five candlesticks, value 3 s.; 87 sheets, value 30 l.; 33 towels, value 20 s.; 17 pillow-cases, value 17 s.; 14 blankets, value 20 s., and eight yards of linen, value 8 s. , the goods of John Hatchett , Nathaniel Beard , and Shirley David Beare ; CHARLES MITCHELL and SARAH MITCHELL were indicted for feloniously receiving 23 table-cloths, value 3 l. 10 s.; 26 napkins, value 2 l.; six dishes, value 2 s.; 29 plates, value 3 s.; four knives, value 6 d.; four forks, value 4 d., and two candlesticks, value 1 s., part of the said goods, they well knowing them to have been stolen ; and JAMES ALDERSON and ESTHER SWATMAN were indicted for feloniously receiving 22 sheets, value 8 l.; 33 towels, value 20 s.; three dishes, value 1 s.; 13 pillow-cases, value 18 s.; 32 table-cloths, value 4 l. 10 s., and four blankets, value 20 s., being the other part of the said goods so, as aforesaid, feloniously stolen, they well knowing them to have been stolen .

Counsel for the Prosecution, MESSRS. ALLEY and BROADRICK.

Mr. NATHANIEL BEARD . I am in partnership with John Hatchett and Shirley David Beare . We keep Hatchett's Hotel, in Piccadilly . The partnership commenced on the 29th of September last.

Cross-examined by MR. WALFORD. Q. Before the 29th of September it was in other hands - A. Yes.

ESTHER LEE . I am a laundress, employed to wash for the prosecutors, and live in Fulham-road. The prisoner Sarah Swatman , was employed to fetch the linen , and take it home. Her husband occasionally assisted.

Cross-examined by MR. WALFORD. Q. How often did it come - A. Every day, more or less. The husband and wife never came together. Sometimes we have thirty sheets and fifty or sixty table-cloths - it depends on the number of customers in the house.

ELIZA WILLIAMS . It was part of my duty at the prosecutors to give out the linen to be washed. Sarah Swatman used to fetch it - she reckoned it, and I put down what she told me there was. I made out the bill according to what she said there was; I depended on her. When it was returned I reckoned it with the bill, and found the quantity stated in the bill exact. What more she took I cannot say.

Cross-examined by MR. WALFORD. Q. Did you never count it yourself - A. No, except when her husband came, I then always counted it. She generally came - they never came together.

SAMUEL PLANK . I am an officer of Marlborough-street. I was sent to inquire about the property. In consequence of information I went towards Hatchett's house, in High-street, Kensington, on Tuesday, the 23d of November, with Chester, the waiter at the hotel. In the way we met Sarah Swatman ; Chester asked her where she had been? She said to Brompton. I asked her if she had not been to her son, Mitchell, at Kensington? She said, No. I asked her again - she denied it a second time. I then asked her who she had been to at Bromptom? I said I must know the person's name. She refused to tell. I took her into custody, and took her to her son Mitchell's. Before we got there she acknowledged she had been to him. She went to the door, and entered the house. She first went up stairs, and met Charles Mitchell coming down the garret stairs. I told him to go back, and we all went into the room together. I asked him if that was his

lodgings? He said it was. I asked for his wife? He said she was out, and he did not know when she would return. I asked him if he had been that day to Mr. Kimber's, the pawnbroker, at Knightsbridge? He said he had not, and never was there in his life. I said that was not true, and I must search him, which I did, and found nothing about him. I proceeded to search the room, and on my putting my hand upon a tin box which was on the mantle-piece, he made a snatch at it, and said there were notes in it. There was some little confusion, and on his endeavouring to get it from me the candle was knocked out. I procured another light. While I was examing the contents he escaped out of the room - it is a narrow staircase. I pursued him; he threw a garden-pot off the window, which fell between him and me. I fell over it - he got out and shut the door; I could not get out.

Q. What did you find in the box - A. Two duplicates of Mr. Kimber's, at Knightsbridge, dated that day, the 23d of November: one for a table-cloth, pledged for 14 s., shillings, in the name of John Wilson , No. 4, Queen-street, Oxford-street; the other for six table-cloths, pledged for 12 s., in the same name and address. I then brought Sarah Swatman away. I returned to the lodgings afterwards, and made a further search. I found three other duplicates in a box in a drawer. I also found twenty-six towels, nine of them marked

"Hatchett's Hotel;" four table-cloths, one marked and one with the mark cut out, and two without marks. Seven ends of table-cloths, which had been cut off, some marked, and nine ends of sheets, some of them marked in the same way; six blue and white dishes, twenty-nine plates, four knives and forks, and two candlesticks, all of which Chester immediately claimed. I took the woman to Marlborough-street, in the first instance, and asked how her son came by the property? She said,

"You may find my son, and find it out as you can." I asked her if she had not a daughter living at Chelsea, who went by the name of Alderson? She said she had, but refused to tell me where.

Q. That night you went to Chelsea - A. Yes, at eleven o'clock, and found Esther Swatman in a room at No. 6, Cumberland-street, Chelsea. She is the woman I called Alderson; I thought she was married - he was not there. I found her abed in the front parlour. She opened the door when I knocked. I asked her where her husband was? She said he was not at home. On my looking round the room she burst out crying, and said,

"I know what you are come for - the things are all here, they were brought here by my father and mother this morning before it was well light" (pointing to a large chest and bundle). The sheets on the bed were marked

"E. S." I asked if they were her's? She said,

"No, they are your's, they were brought here by my mother." Chester was with me I found several napkins and towels, with the same initials. She said they were not her's, but were brought by her mother. Chester looked round the room, and found a quantity of earthenware corresponding with the other. She said,

"That is your's too, they were brought by my mother, with the exception of one dish." There was a tin candlestick there.

Q. What did you find in the boxes and bundle - A. Twenty-two sheets, fifteen of them marked

"Hatchett's Hotel, Piccadilly," two marked

"E. S.", and four without marks; thirty-four table-cloths, twenty-four marked

"Hatchett's Hotel," two

"E. S.", and the rest unmarked; forty-three napkins, thirty-six unmarked, and seven marked

"E. S."; twenty-six towels, marked

"Hatchett's Hotel;" thirteen pillow-cases, three marked, four with the marks cut out, and three marked

"E. S."; six blankets, four of them marked. There were seventy ends of sheets cut off, most of them marked

"Hatchett's Hotel;" fifteen ends of towels, some of them marked; six pieces of stair-carpet, seventeen dishes, twenty-nine plates, a cup and saucer, twenty-four knives, and eight forks, all of which Chester claimed. I asked her again where her husband was? She said he was afraid to sleep at home, for fear he should be apprehended; at last she told me where to find him.

Q. Did you, in consequence of her information, go to No. 15, Gray's-buildings, Duke-street, Manchester-square - A, Yes, about one o'clock at night, and found Alderson in bed there. I awoke him, and asked his name? After a little time he said it was Alderson. I asked if that was his lodgings? He said Yes. I said, Have you any other lodging? He said No - that he always slept there, and was not married. I asked him if he had any lodgings at No. 6, Cumberland-street, Chelsea? He said No, he did not know it. I then said,

"You have a lodging there, and are married. I have found a great deal of stolen property in your room, and you must dress yourself and go with me to account how you came by it." He said,

"Well, that is the truth; I have a lodging there, and live with a woman named Swatman. I know the property you mention was there - it was brought by her father and mother this morning before it was well light; they knocked at the window; I got up and helped them in with it. I am sorry I did not tell you the truth, but my reasons for leaving the lodgings was, I thought if you came and found me and the things there I should be apprehended." I put him in the watch-house.

Q. Did you proceed anywhere else - A. About three o'clock, Chester, Whales, and I went to Mitchell's mother's house, in King's Road, World's End, Chelsea. Whales placed himself at the back of the house to prevent an escape, and I knocked at the door; the mother looked out, and I told her my business, but she refused to come down and let me in. I then said I must break in. I heard a noise at the back, got over the rails, and found Mitchell in the custody of Whales - we took him into the house through the window. He then wished very much to be forgiven, and said he had told me what was not true, and that he had been that evening to Kimber's, the pawnbroker - she also said,

"You found other property of Mr. Hatchett's in my room, and all I have pledged, and all you found there, was brought by my wife's mother." His wife, Sarah Mitchell , was there, and joined him in the same declaration - I put them into a coach, and proceeded to Chelsea, to the elder Swatman's house; they live at No. I, Strathmore-place; I there found Benjamin Swatman , took him into custody, and asked him where his sons and daughters lived? He said he had a son and daughter at Kensington, named Mitchell. I asked him if he had not a son and daughter, named Alderson? He said he had, that they lived somewhere in town, but he could not tell where.

I asked him if they did not live at Chelsea; He said, No, he was sure they did not, and that he had not seen any thing of them for several days. I took him to the coach where they were, and asked him if he knew them? He said,

"Yes, they are my son and daughter, Mitchell." I said to them,

"Your father declares he knew nothing about it." She cried, and said,

"Father, it is no use denying it." I put him into a separate watch-house from them, and the next morning on my fetching him to the office, I told him what I had found at his daughter, Alderson's, in Cumberland-street. He said,

"It is no use my denying it any longer. I did help to take the things there, but did not know what they were." I said,

"You must have known what they were, for the chest weighed 2 cwt., and there were many more loose about the chest - he declined saying any thing more. I searched his lodgings, and found six dishes, nine plates, three tin candlesticks, four knives, and two forks - Chester claimed them.

Cross-examined by MR. ARABIN. Q. Alderson cohabits with Swatman - A. Yes, I know his father is a respectable man, and lives in the same buildings where I found him. I knew him before, and never suspected him. Esther Swatman from the beginning to the end never told me an untruth.

Cross-examined by MR. WALFORD. Q. You say Benjamin Swatman declined saying any thing more; Did you ask him any thing else - A. Yes. I said he must know what was in the box - he was silent.

THOMAS CHESTER . I am head waiter at Hatchett's Hotel. I accompanied Plank to all the places, his account is perfectly correct - the property is the prosecutor's. They used to fetch the linen in a wheelbarrow.

Cross-examined by MR. WALFORD. Q. Was the man or woman employed in any thing but taking the linen away - A. No. I never saw the man in the house - the woman had the privilege of going all over the house. The linen was kept in a different place from the knives and forks.

Q. Had you seen any one particular thing since the 29th of September - A. I cannot say.

MR. BROADRICK. Q. Are any of the things marked Hatchett and Co. - A. Yes. The things were marked so after this firm commenced, and not before. The linen is also marked the same.

LAUNCELOT WILD . I live with Mr. Wells, who is a pawnbroker, and lives at Chelsea; the prisoner, Charles Mitchell , brought two table-cloths to me. On holding them up to the light, I discovered a sort of a patch at one corner; it immediately occured to me that it was a mark defaced. I took no notice, but laid it down, and said,

"Whose are these?" He said they were his, and his name was Smith. I then observed that the other was marked in the same way, and said,

"What mark is this?" He said it was on them when he bought them second-hand at a shop. I said,

"What occasion had you to hide the mark if that was the case?" Before he replied, I saw the word,

"Hotel," on it. I went into he parlour with it to speak to Mr. Wells, and while I was speaking to him the prisoner left, leaving them behind him - I had advanced nothing on them. I have every reason to believe he is the man. On the Sunday following, in consequence of information, I called upon Mr. Hatchett. The marks were covered over with pipe-clay.

HENRY POWELL . I am shopman to Mr. Kimber, who is a pawnbroker, and lives at Knightsbridge. The prisoner, Sarah Mitchell, pledged six table-cloths at my shop, on the 29th of October, in the name of Mary Mitchell ; she had also pledged six on the 19th for 12 s, in the name of Elizabeth Mitchell . On the 23d of November Charles Mitchell came to pay the interest on them. I thought it suspicious that he should pay it so soon, and after he was gone I opened them, and found there had been Hatchett's hotel marked on them. I informed Mr. Hatchett.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

BENJAMIN SWATMAN 'S Defence. My wife asked me to carry them to my daughter's, and I did.

SARAH SWATMAN 'S Defence. I am guilty of some of it, but my family are innocent.

CHARLES MITCHELL 'S Defence. I courted Sarah Swatman . Her mother asked me several times if I was inclined to marry her? I said I was, but I was not able to get her decent lodgings. She said,

"Don't mention that, you shall never take my daughter into bare walls." I thought she meant to furnish a place, agreed to marry her, and took a house next door to Mrs. Swatman's, for her to put the articles in - I thought it was improper to ask her where she got them. I took the things as a present. We were then married, and at different times various other things were brought, which I thought was to set us decently in order - this is how I came by the things. I call the Omnipotent to witness that I did not know they were stolen. I took their boy, to learn him to read and write to prevent him from wandering about the streets, and the mother said all the broken victuals that she got from Mr. Hatchett's should be sent for him. It came at different times wrapped in table-cloths.

SARAH MITCHELL 'S Defence. I was in distress, took them out of the drawer, and pledged them when my husband was out of work.

JAMES ALDERSON 'S Defence. On Saturday fortnight, between five and six o'clock in the morning, a knock came at my window - it was Mrs. Swatman. I went to the door, and Mr. and Mrs. Swatman stood there with a large chest. I asked what was the matter? She said,

"We are going to move, let me put this in your passage" - they took it into the parlour, and said they would fetch it. I went to work. In the course of the day I understood she brought two bundles, and begged of her daughter not to let me know. In the evening her daughter came to me, and said the things had been stolen, and they were all ruined. We went home, and they told us two gentlemen had been there - Esther said I had better sleep out. I took her advice, and slept at my father's. Just before Esther laid in, her mother sent the sheets and table-cloths.

ESTHER SWATMAN 'S Defence. My mother and father brought the things. Those marked in my own name, my mother had given to me.

B. SWATMAN - NOT GUILTY .

J. ALDERSON - NOT GUILTY .

S. SWATMAN - GUILTY . Aged 55.

C. MITCHELL - GUILTY . Aged 25.

S. MITCHELL - GUILTY . Aged. 23.

E. SWATMAN - GUILTY . Aged. 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191201-123

122. ALEXANDER LONG was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of November , one seal, value 10 s. , the goods of Thomas Layton .

JACOB VALENTINE. I am a salesman, and live in Wardour-street, Soho . On the 5th of November, several of my neighbours came and said four men were lurking about my shop, and I took my coats in which hung at the door. I went to the door afterwards, and saw them still in the street. I went out, informed my neighbours, and saw the prisoner standing at the window of Mr. Layton, the pawnbroker . I went into his shop, and told the young man that two of them stood at his window. He turned round, and said they had cut the window, and had almost got a seal - this was between twelve and one o'clock in the day; the other young man said he had got it. I opened the door, ran out, and secured the prisoner about four yards from the door, and said,

"Halloo! my lad, you have got a seal." He said he had got no seal, and then dropped it behind him. I took him back to the shop.

THOMAS STEPHENS . I am shopman to Mr. Layton. On the 6th of November, between twelve and one o'clock in the day, Valentine came into the shop - we keep two shops. I went into the next shop, saw the window broken at the corner of the pane, and a lad standing by the side; in a few minutes the prisoner came and put his finger through the broken pane, and took the seal out - I told Valentine, and he ran out. I followed, and saw the seal drop from the prisoner's hand.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY Aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191201-124

123. ROBERT EVANS was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of November , three loaves of bread, value 18 d. , the goods of James Greig .

JAMES GREIG . I am a baker , and live on Phoenix-terrace, Back-road, Islington. On the 13th of November, between one and two o'clock, I left my basket opposite Trafalgar-street , while I went to a customer - on my return I missed three loaves, received information, and followed the prisoner into Moffat-street, and secured him there with the loaves in his arms. I asked him why he stole my bread? he said,

"You are a liar - what is it you want with me, you b - g - r?" He would not return them to me, but took and tore them to pieces - I brought him back. The people came round and said

"You are caught at last!" His mother came up and said,

"Don't let him go, for he has robbed me of every thing" - she begged of me to prosecute him.

GEORGE BROWN . I saw the prisoner take the bread out of the basket as I was in the City-road; I knew him and watched him - he saw me watching him, and went and took it out.

HENRY SMITH . I saw Greig secure the prisoner - he used bad language. A gang of young thieves came round, and wanted to rescue him. His mother came up and said,

"Don't let him go; he robs me daily and hourly." He said he would not go to the office without an officer; one came by, and took him.

Prisoner's Defence. My mother turned me out of doors; I had eat nothing for two days. She has no regard for me, and what was I to do?

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191201-125

124. ELEANOR BRYAN and SARAH WILLIAMS were indicted for stealing, on the 29th of November , one watch, value 2 l.; one chain, value 1 l.; three seals, value 2 l., and one pair of spectacles, value 1 l., the goods of Thomas Prior , from his person .

THOMAS PRIOR . I am agent to a Tin Company in Cornwall . On the 29th of November, about eight o'clock in the evening, I was in Whitechapel , going home; the prisoner, Bryan, accosted me with a tale of distress, and asked me to relieve her - I said I would have nothing to do with her. She said, if I would come to her lodgings, she would shew me her distressed state, which would move me to relieve her. She took me to a room on the second floor in Charlotte-yard ; she opened the door - I saw it was a miserable place, and had no furniture; I gave her a shilling - immediately upon which Williams came with a similar tale. I began to think I was in a dangerous situation, and gave her 18 d. Immediately after, a Mulatto came, blew the candle out, laid hold of me, threw me on the floor, and robbed me of my watch and appendages and other things - they decamped immediately. I found my cane and spectacles in the room. I was not there three minutes. I was sober.

JOHN PARTRIDGE . The prosecutor came to the watch-house about nine o'clock, and said he had been robbed in Charlotte-yard, Black Horse-yard. I went there with him, but they had all left. He found his cane and spectacles on the bed. About one o'clock Bryan and a man came to the house, and were brought to the watch-house. She said it was not her but Williams, and a man named Jones. The watchman then went out, and brought Williams in - the prosecutor swore to them at Lambeth-street next day.

BRYAN'S Defence. I know nothing of it.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191201-126

125. THOMAS BROOM , THOMAS HARRISON , and RICHARD BROOKS were indicted for stealing eight books, value 48 l.; 2000 sheets of printed paper, value 48 l.; two other books, value 30 s., and 136 sheets of printed paper, value 30 s. , the property of Thomas Norton Longman , Thomas Hurst , Owen Rees , Cosmo Orme , and Thomas Brown .

For the Prosecution, MESSRS. BOLLAND and ADOLPHUS.

MR. THOMAS BROWN . I am in partnership with Thomas Norton Longman, Thomas Hurst , Owen Rees , and Cosmo Orme; we are booksellers , and live in Paternoster-row - we have a warehouse in Shoemaker-row, Blackfriars, and are publishers of Todd's Johnson's Dictionary, in four volumes quarto, with a portrait of Dr. Johnson, engraved by Holl, on purpose for this edition. We are responsible for this work until it is issued to the proprietors. We also had a number of copies of Robinson's Scripture Characters

at that warehouse. We had a large stock of each at both places.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. Is not the senior man in your house always taken in as a partner - A. We have no partner but those I have mentioned.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. How long have Robinson's Scripture Characters been published - A. This edition has been published two years. Todd's Johnson was completed in July, 1818 - the sale price is 8 l. 5 s.

Q. Do you not know that copies of it have been in the trade more than six months - A. Not many; some have.

Q. Can you swear to the loss of any copies - A. Yes; I can swear to the loss of twenty copies complete, with title-pages and engravings, fit for binding.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. This edition was published in eleven parts - A. Yes; at one guinea each to the public. Many booksellers are interested in the work. Nobody sold them in parts but us.

Q. Since all the parts have been completed, have you issued a great number in four volumes to the trade - A. Not a great number. They were all quite perfect. In order to hinder a depreciation of the work, we had agreed that each proprietor might return them to us if they had not a sale for them, and receive 7 l. 8 s. 6 d.

THOMAS HUNTSMAN . I am clerk to Messrs. Longman and Co. Todd's Johnson was under my care, at the warehouse in Shoemaker-row. I took stock in June, 1819; there was no deficiency then.

Q. In consequence of what took place, was the stock of Johnson, and Robinson's Scripture Characters, taken in October - A. Yes; I then missed twenty complete copies of Todd's Johnson, with portraits and titles - fifteen copies complete, but wanting the portraits; and five more copies, wanting seven numbers and the portrait. There were two of Part II. and five of Part XI. wanted.

Q. What was wanted of Robinson's Scripture Characters - A. Twelve copies complete, and four volumes unbound. It is my business to issue orders for the delivery of them. I had given orders for twenty-five of Parts VIII., X., and XI. - that was all; no order was given for any perfect copy. I gave no order for the delivery of Robinson's Scripture Characters.

Q. Are you acquainted with the copies which the house deliver - A. Particularly; none were delivered without the particular portrait engraved by Holl.

Q. Did you accompany Harrison any where - A. Yes, on the 23d of October we went to Brooks's house; he was not at home - he came home while we there. Harrison, the officer, asked him where he obtained the copies of Johnson which he had been selling? he said he had them from a respectable tradesman, and then said he had them from a respectable housekeeper - that did not satisfy the officer; he then said from Longman and Co. The officer told him the felony rested on his shoulder until he could remove it, for these gentlemen (pointing to me and Bamfield), come from Messrs. Longman's. He hesitated, and then said he had them from Mr. Broom, who kept the Goat's Head, in Cloth-fair. The officer said he must do his duty, and examine for the property. In the mean time I told Brooks I conceived he must be only the agent, and Broom the middle-man, and that I should be obliged if he would give me further information, and point out the person who stole the property. I said I considered he had been made a tool of. He said,

"You know as well as I do." I said I should be sorry to name any person on suspicion, but I should be glad if he would name the party; he said, your own man did it. I said, do you mean William Stewart ? he said, Yes, I do. I pressed him for further information, and he said Harrison was in it. Harrison, the prisoner, was not present. I and Harrison, the Marshal's man, then took him to the Goat; on arriving at the corner of Long-lane, we remembered that we could not identify Broom, and went back for Brooks to identify him; I saw Stewart, who had been our porter, coming out of Broom's door; I took hold of him by the elbow, and said,

"William, have you been taking a glass of beer?" He said,

"Yes, I have been waiting at home, expecting you." We took him into the house with Brooks, and there found the prisoners Harrison and Broom; the Marshal's man put them all into the bar, and said he had called in consequence of their selling Johnson's dictionary - Harrison and Broom said they knew nothing about it. Harrison requested to go home to make some arrangements, I and Forrester accompanied him; we found some of our property there. We took him to Giltspur-street Compter.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. You told Brooks you considered him as an agent - A. I did; I considered him tool at that time. I believe he was employed in the sale and purchase of books in trifling way. Broom has dealt in books many years.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. What you mean by a tool is, that he was not employed in stealing the books, but in selling them - A. I did; I never saw Broom at our premises.

Q. On the 19th of June you state every thing was safe - A. At Midsummer.

Q. Do you mean that none of the publication had been circulated in the legitimate course of trade, before you missed these - A. There was.

Q. Were there one hundred copies circulated in the world - A. Possibly there might. I will not swear there was or was not three hundred. I do not think there was - there might he two hundred.

Q. You believed Brooks could not have stolen them, but received them from other person - A. I did. Stewart had been discharged a few weeks previous to this.

Q. Was he not dismissed for roguery - A. I cannot say that; he was dismissed under unpleasant suspicions. He was examined before the Justice when the prisoners were committed. He was once charged with taking a book up and putting it down.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Was it not stated to the Lord Mayor that Stewart had stolen one book - A. I said so - that was overlooked.

Q. Was he charged in this felony with the other prisoners - A. He was, but not indicted. He helped to cart this particular work to the warehouse.

Q. Is the entry under your care - A. No, under the care of Bartrum.

Q. Did you yourself examine the stock, and miss the copies - A. I did not. I checked the stock book, examined the papers of the stock, and found them right - I did not count the books. On the 22d or 23d of October the stock was taken by Whitthorne.

MR. BOLLAND. Q. In June you issued orders for certain books, but for no perfect copies - A. Yes. The Lord Mayor discharged Stewart. The warehouse is merely a depot for works, which we send for when we want them. Sometimes we send there twice a day, and not again, possibly, for a fortnight.

COURT. Q. When the stock was taken in June, were you present - A. No; I received the report from Whitthorne. I was not present in October neither. I have taken stock myself within this few days, to ascertain if his account in October was correct, and found it was so. I found two parts less missing than he stated.

JAMES WHITTHORNE . I am a warehouseman to the prosecutor. In June last I took the stock at the warehouse, in Shoemaker-row; Todd's Johnson was packed in a part of the warehouse by itself - it was all correct. What had been issued was marked off from a former account.

Q. Did you in October observe any thing about the warehouse - A. On Saturday, the 23d of October, I went and found the door left open - it should have been shut. There was a bundle, containing two copies of the dictionary just inside the door, down stairs - it ought to have been up stairs. I took stock that day, and missed some. I took stock again on Monday morning, the 25th, particularly, and missed twenty complete copies with the title page and portrait, ready to be bound, fifteen copies wanting the portrait, and five other copies wanting eight odd parts.

Q. How were Robinson's Scripture Characters - A. Twelve complete sets were gone. Mr. Huntsman always made out delivery orders - there had been no order for a complete copy of that work between October and June. None were taken out to my knowledge in that interval.

Cross-examined by MR. ARABIN. Q. You speak of some account by which you take stock - A. The account agrees with what had been delivered; no work can be delivered out of the warehouse without an order. Huntsman had access to the warehouse - Stewart had an opportunity of stealing the books if he liked, he could get the key. He was taken before the Lord Mayor with the prisoners, and was discharged - he is not here.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Do one or two persons take stock - A. A person writes down, while I count how many remaining copies there are, then we check it with the former account, and see if it agrees with those which are marked of.

JAMES BAIN . I am a bookseller, and live in Castle-street, Leicester-fields - I know Brooks. On the 31st of May he came to my house, and on or about the 10th of July, the 12th, 16th and the 31st of August or the 1st of September, and the 22d or 23d of September. On the 31st of August or the 1st of September, I bought two copies of Todd's Johnson of him.

Q. When did you buy the copy you have to produce - A. I really do not know, for we buy them very often in sheets. I bought eight copies of him.

COURT. Q. What did you buy of him on the 31st of August or the 1st of September - A. Two copies - I have known him three or four years as a dealer in books. The first copy he brought was in eleven parts, and the remainder in quires unfolded - one copy had no portrait, and he procured one to suit it. The others I believe were perfect.

Q. What did you do with the copy that he brought a portrait to - A. I sent it to Miller's to be bound - he bound it and returned it. I delivered that copy to Bamfield on his coming to my house - he bought it of me. I gave Brooks 6 l. 15 s. for the first copy - I paid him 10 l. for two copies on the 1st of September. The average price of the whole was five guineas and a half, in ready money.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. Did you not think that a fair price - A. I certainly did. Brooks dealt in books.

Q. Was not he like yourself and other tradesman, likely to buy them fairly from persons who brought them as shareholders - A. Certainly.

Q. We are told that two hundred copies had been issued before the loss; had you seen several about in the trade - A. Yes, it was nothing uncommon to see them. I received them in sheets, and that is the regular way in which they were sold. Shareholders have been in the shop at the time the books were sold by Brooks, and to whom I mentioned the circumstance.

Q. One copy had no portrait. I presume the portraits are delivered loose, and not pasted in - A. No, they are stuck in the sheets. Books are very commonly delivered imperfect.

Cross-examined by MR. ARABIN. Q. You cannot say on which of the days you mentioned you bought this copy of him - A. It must have been either in July or September. I did not know 7 l. 8 s. 6 d. was the return the prosecutors made for the copies.

MR. BOLLAED. Q. Is it probable that a new work may be delivered without the portrait - A. It was as likely as any other work; I would not buy it without the portrait. I afterwards found a duplicate portrait in another book. The shareholders knew I gave five guineas and a half for it. Mr. Read. of Charing-cross, was one.

JOHN MILLER . I am a bookbinder, and live in Maiden-lane, Covent-garden. I received a copy of Todd's Johnson from Bain. I bound it in Russia, and gilt leaves - my son did part of it. I sent the same book back.

BUONAPARTE MILLER. I am apprentice to my father. I saw the same book sent back to Bain.

THOMAS BAMFIELD . I received a copy of Todd's Johnson from Mr. Bain, I produce the first volume. I am in the prosecutor's service.

Q. Here is a portrait loose, and one bound up - A. Yes, this is the one that ought to be bound with it: the one bound with it, is published by Baldwin, of Newgate-street. It is an old portrait.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. When was that loose portrait procured - A. After I had received the other from Bain.

Q. Do you mean to swear that it ought to have gone with this particular book - A. No.

CHARLES BALDWIN . I am a bookseller, and live in Newgate-street. I am in possession of some of the copies of the portrait of Dr. Johnson - that in the book produced is one from the plate of which I have several. The prisoner, Brooks, bought two of me on the 20th and 22d of July.

GEORGE YAP . I keep the Monmouth Head, public-house, in Castle-street, Leicester-square; about one hundred yards from Bain's house.

Q. Do you remember Brooks being at your house when Broom was there - A. Yes, on one occasion, four or five months ago, Brooks came in first, and a short time after Broom came in with a large paper parcel - they joined company together. I cannot tell what became of the parcel.

Q. Who took it out - A. I cannot tell. I was busy, and not present when they went out. I had seen them together once before at my house - I have also seen Harrison there. I do not know whether he has been there with them or not; I rather think it was before the parcel was brought.

ANTHONY HARRISON . I am a Marshal's man. On searching the prisoners I found a memorandum. I cannot tell on which, but I rather think it was in Brooks's pocket.

THOMAS BAMFIELD re-examined. I saw Harrison take the memorandum from Brooks's pocket, in consequence of which I found out several of the parties the books were sold to.

BROOKS'S Defence. My Lord and Gentlemen of the Jury. About the latter end of July I called at Broom's on business, he being a general dealer in books; he wished me to sell ten copies of Todd's Johnson for him, as I had a more extensive connexion than he had; he charged 5 l. and all that I could obtain more I was to have - I sold them in about a month. He said his friend had more, which must be either sold or pledged, as his friend wanted money to go into the country - I sold about twenty-five copies in all. Carlisle bought four copies, for which I took his note. Now was it likely that if a man had participated in the robbery he would have taken a bill with the articles mentioned in the body of it. I am well aware that there is no certainty where a bill gets, and it might get into the hands of Messrs. Longman. It has been stated that I sold them so low that I could not have honestly obtained them. It is a fair inferrence that if I can buy Rees's Encyclopedia at 9 s. 6 d. a part, which is published at one guinea, that this work should also sell low. I did not hesitate to give up the party I received them of. I always thought Broom a respectable man.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18191201-127

126. WILLIAM ALLEN was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of November , one watch, value 1 l.; one chain, value 6 d., and two keys, value 2 d. , the goods of Patrick Carmody .

PATRICK CARMODY . I am a watchman of St. Giles's . On the 30th of November, about half-past twelve o'clock in the day, I was going to bed, and hung my watch over the mantle-piece; the prisoner lodged in the back room adjoining - he was dining in my room when I went to bed. About one o'clock my wife came and said the watch was gone; I missed it and the prisoner; while I was dressing myself two men went after him, and brought him back - he denied it. We searched him, and found it in his side pocket.

NICHOLAS MADDEN . I went after the prisoner, and took him in Russell-street, Covent-garden, brought him back, and found the watch in his side pocket.

SAMUEL LACK . I took the prisoner in charge, and found three skeleton keys on him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Six Months , and Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18191201-128

127. GEORGE WOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of September , one saddle, value 30 s., and one bridle, value 10 s. , the goods of Humphry Potter .

HUMPHRY POTTER. I am a carman , and live in Dean-street, Lower East Smithfield. On the 29th of September, I was returning from Romford, and stopped at a public-house in the Mile End-road ; the prisoner offered to take my horse home for me - he had done jobs for me before, and I let him; the bridle and saddle were on the horse. I found the horse in the stable, but no bridle or saddle - my stable is in White Horse-yard, Rosemary-lane; the prisoner absconded. I could not find him until the 11th of November, when I met him, and gave him in charge; he offered me 1 l. to make it up, said he took them home for safety, and that he got knocked down, and robbed of them.

JOHN CLIFTON . I am a watchman. I took the prisoner in charge - I had been to his lodgings in Swan-yard, but could not find him, I went there on the 11th of November, and when he saw me he shut the door to. I secured him.

Prisoner's Defence. I told him the next morning that I took them home for safety.

HUMPHRY POTTER re-examined. I did not see him next morning.

THOMAS HANSON . I am a beadle. I received the prisoner in charge. He said he was taken into the Two Brewers, public-house, and robbed of them.

GUILTY . Aged 61.

Confined Two Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18191201-129

128. PETER SHARP was indicted for embezzlement .

For the Prosecution, MR. WALFORD.

WILLIAM HARRISON . I deal with Mr. Wilson. On the 3d of August, 1818, I paid the prisoner 5 s. 6 d. for a cask of beer. I produce his receipt which he gave me.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. I paid him money almost every Monday.

GEORGE WILSON . I am a brewer , and live in Bett-street, Ratcliff-highway; the prisoner was my foreman from the 27th of December 1816, up to the 1st of May last - he received money for the beer he delivered. He regularly took a book out to make entries of what he delivered, and the money paid to him, which he was to pay to me every night. I refer to his book, and find no entry of the 3d of August - it was not paid to me, if it had it would have been in the book - every thing he paid me was entered there. On the 21st of August last I found it had been paid - he was then out of my employ.

Q. Soon after he left you did you find many accounts paid - A. Yes, I sent different accounts round, and had about fifty people at once come to say they did not owe me a farthing; I went through all my accounts, and had him apprehended. He was protected by a warrant of attorney which I granted; we agreed that he should give an exact account of what he had received, and for the sake of his wife and family I was to forgive him. An account was made out on his behalf by Mr. Bell, an attorney - the amount was 46 l. 5 s.

Q. That warrant of attorney came down to August 1818 - A. Yes, and beyond that, it contained an account of different sums alledged by him to have been received from various customers. It was produced as an account of all he had defrauded me of - this 5 s. 6 d., was not in that account.

Cross-examined. Q. When you took the concern you found the prisoner in the service - A. Yes, I have heard that he had been there twelve or fourteen years - he had been near three years with me. I kept an account of what beer was delivered to him.

Q. You must have known what he owed you - A. No, I considered the money not brought by him as owing by the customers; I received an instalment of 3 l. on the warrant of attorney - I never gave him a character to any one. Several people came about his character, and I told them what he had done.

MR. WALFORD. Q. You did not discover Mr. Harrison's debt till afterwards - A. No, I saw the warrant of attorney produced before the Magistrate, but never had it. Bell would not give it up to me.

Prisoner's Defence. When I left Mr. Wilson he had six weeks to examine his accounts. He had a warrant of attorney for the whole, which cleared every thing up to the 9th of June. He very often made mistakes in summoning people who owed him nothing.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18191201-130

129. THOMAS MYERS was indicted for burglariously breaking and enteaing the dwelling-house of Robert Needham , about two o'clock in the night of the 21st of June, 1818 , and stealing therein, eighty rings, value 20 l.; six spoons, value 5 l.; one snuffer-tray, value 10 s.; thirty-six seals, value 30 l.; twenty watch-keys, value 3 l., and twenty brooches, value 5 l. , his property.

ROBERT NEEDHAM . I am a jeweller , and live in Sloane-street, Chelsea . On the 21st of June, 1818, about seven o'clock in the morning, a neighbour rang the bell; I got up, found the party-wall broken through, and found a hole large enough for a man to get into my house; it was secure when I went to bed - the next house was empty. I missed the articles stated in the indictment from my shop-window, which were worth 130 l.. I saw none of them till last April, when eight rings and the snuffer-stand were produced by Goff.

Cross-examined by MR. ARABIN. Q. You came down after daylight - A. Yes.

GEOBGE GOFF, I am a constable of Lambeth. On the 29th of February last, in consequence of information, I went to No. 4, King-street, Snow's-fields, found the prisoner's wife there, and inquired for her husband? She said he was at Maidstone, in custody. I took her into custody, and locked the room up. Next morning I went there and found eight gold rings and the snuffer-stand, which the prosecutor claimed in April.

Q. Did you know how long the prisoner had been in custody at Maidstone - A. From August, 1818.

Cross-examined. Q. Was he not there for passing bad money - A. I was told it was for horse stealing. I was told he had never lived in the house where I found the property.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18191201-131

130. ROSINA LASELLINA was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of October , one shawl, value 18 d. , the property of Ann Donnelly .

ANN DONNELLY . I am bar-maid to Mr. Bunyer. On the 31st of October, at half-past seven o'clock in the morning, my shawl was taken from my room - the prisoner slept in the house that night; she had been brought in by the Overseers of the parish. About nine o'clock I missed it - she was gone out. The hostler went out and brought her back in about twenty minutes with the shawl in her bundle. She had no business in my room.

JOHN BUNYER . I keep the Bull and Butcher Inn. The prisoner was brought in by the Overseers in a dying state. My servant missed a shawl. I sent the hostler after her. She declared she had nothing - the servant found the shawl on her.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY Aged 39.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18191201-132

131. THOMAS EVANS was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of November , seventy-two yards of canvas, value 1 l. 16 s. , the goods of Thomas Lay .

THOMAS PRALL . I am shopman to Thomas Lay , who is a linen-draper , and lives in Tottenham Court-road . On the 30th of November, about seven o'clock in the evening, a stranger called, and asked me if I had lost any goods from the door? on looking I missed a piece of canvas from inside the door. He said a boy had been stopped with it in Crown-street - I found them at Coley's house.

RICHARD COLEY . I was told a boy was in Crown-street with a roll of canvas; I stopped the prisoner, who stood leaning his elbow on it - it was on the ground. I asked him if it was his? he said Yes - he would not say where he got it; I took him - the prosecutor claimed it at my house.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 13.

Confined Three Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18191201-133

132. CHARLOTTE JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of November , 10 shirts, value 50 s.; eight handkerchiefs, value 14 s.; three pair of stockings, value 3 s.; one shift, value 2 s., and one petticoat, value 2 s., the goods of Benjamin Crump , from the person of Ann Crump , the younger .

SECOND COUNT, for stealing seven shirts, value 35 s.;

one petticoat, value 2 s.; three pair of stockings, value 3 s., and one shift, value 2 s., the goods of William Walker ; one shirt, value 5 s., and six handkerchiefs, value 12 s., the goods of George Walker , from the person of the said Ann Crump .

ANN CRUMP . I am wife of Benjamin Crump , and am a laundress. On the 3d of November I sent my daughter for these things from Mr. Walker.

ANN CRUMP , JUN. On the 3d of November, between twelve and one o'clock, I was going along Winchester-street, the prisoner came up, and asked me what I had got under my arm? She asked me what I had done to my arm? I said I had broken it - she said,

"O my God, what a job!" she kept talking to me until we got to the turnpike, she then told me to go and knock at a door in the street facing the bar; she pointed the house out to me, said it was a private house, and that the servant would come to the door, and I was to ask for Mrs. Clark - she said she would hold my bundle, and wait at the end of the street. I found it was a shop, and not a private house, and came back, she was gone with the bundle. I am sure she is the woman. I saw her again next day.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS, Q. How long was she talking to you - A. About a quarter of an hour. She had a striped pink gown, red shawl, straw bonnet, and red ear-rings - she had a ring on her finger. I am between eleven and twelve years of age. I never saw her before.

DAVID TRAIL . I am shopman to Mr. Purse, who is a pawnbroker, and lives at London Wall. On the 3d of November, about half-past one o'clock, the prisoner pledged two shirts for 13 s.

BENNET WALKER. On the 3d of November I gave Ann Crump a bundle of linen.

ANN CRUMP re-examined. Next day I was going round to the pawnbrokers with the child, and just by Water-lane she said

"There is the woman!" she was with two others. I laid hold of her and said,

"You are the woman who robbed my child." She said,

"Don't make a noise; I will go any where with you." She told one of the girls to take her bundle - I said,

"No, it is mine." The officer found it contained the stockings and more of my things.

ROBERT WETHERILT . I am an officer. I took the prisoner; the prosecutrix claimed the bundle.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 18.

Judgment Respited .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191201-134

133. JAMES HOLMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of November , the sum of 8 s. in monies numbered, the monies of Jacob Thomas , from his person .

JACOB THOMAS . On the 13th of November, about half-past six o'clock in the evening, I was going into Drury-lane Theatre with my two nephews. I was within three feet of the pay-place; the prisoner was on my right, he pressed against my nephew; I desired him to walk in, he said he should presently. I heard some silver drop, and found my right-hand pocket turned inside out - I told the check-taker of it. I saw the prisoner afterwards at Bow-street, and am sure he is the person who was on my right hand - he was close to the wall.

Q. Why not take him then - A. There was a pressure at the time. I did not like to interfere.

Q. Was any one near enough to take it but him - A. Several were behind, but I had my great-coat on.

Cross-examined by MR. ARABIN. Q. You cannot say he committed the offence - A. I will not swear it. The passage was so narrow, it will not admit more than two persons abreast.

RICHARD SMITHERS . I am a constable of Bow-street. I was on duty in the theatre, and in the pit entrance several persons cried out that they were robbed. Mr. Ellis pointed a man out to me, whom I took. The prosecutor described the prisoner as the man who robbed him. He came into the theatre again in about an hour, he was pointed out, and I took him.

WILLIAM NETTLETON . I assisted in taking the prisoner to the watch-house - I found nothing on him.

Prisoner's Defence. I merely made room for the people to pass, as I had not got my money ready.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191201-135

134. BARNARD DEAN was indicted for bigamy .

For the Prosecution, MR. ADOLPHUS.

JOHN HARRISON . I am parish clerk of St. George, Bloomsbury. I produce the register of the 14th of April, 1817, by which I find Barnard Dean was married to Eleanor Morgan , by banns - he put his mark to it.

ELIZABETH CONNOR . I find my signature to the register. I saw the prisoner married to Morgan - he is the man. I saw his wife last week. Nobody else was present.

WILLIAM BRICE . I am parish clerk of Islington. I produce the register of that parish. On the 12th of September, 1819 , it appears that Barnard Dean , batchelor, was married to Mary Ann Cox , spinster , by banns. I remember his person - the prisoner is the man. I saw the ceremony performed, and gave her away.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. We had another marriage at the same time.

MARY ANN COX . I was married to the prisoner at Islington . I knew him about three weeks. He had the banns published. We were married at nine o'clock, and about half-past twelve his former wife came and claimed him, I surrendered him immediately,

Prisoner's Defence. I was not married to Morgan, she passed as my wife, but Connor will swear any thing. I lived with her four months.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191201-136

135. SARAH EDWARDS was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of November , four yards of calimanco, value 3 s. , the goods of Sarah Edwards .

SARAH EDWARDS . I keep a clothes-shop in North-street, Middlesex Hospital . On the 29th of November, about four o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner came, and asked to see a pair of boots, which were in the window, I handed them to her, they were too large - she asked to see a pair of shoes, I turned to reach them; she had a tea-caddy in

her hand, which she put on the counter. On my turning again she had put it under her shawl. She walked out, saying the shoes would not do - she had not looked at them. Ransom, who was in the shop, said he saw her put something under her shawl. I looked, and missed a piece of stuff; she went out. A girl said she was gone towards Charlotte-street - I could not see her. On my return I found her in the watch-house with the stuff.

WILLIAM RANSOM. I lodge with the prosecutrix. I went out, and found the prisoner struggling in the street with the prosecutrix's daughter, who had the stuff. The prisoner charged her with stealing it. I gave her in custody.

MARY CARTER . I live within four doors of Edwards. The prisoner brought the stuff into my shop and offered to sell it for 4 s. She was intoxicated - I would not buy it. A little girl said the prosecutrix had lost a piece of stuff. I told her which way she was gone, and she went in pursuit of her. While she was gone I saw the prisoner come up Cumberland-street again to the next house to me; she offered it for sale there. I went to the prosecutrix's daughter, who tried to take it from her, she would not let her have it - I took it from her. She said I stole it from her, and was very insolent.

ELIZA EDWARDS , I saw the prisoner with the stuff under her arm; she would not give it to me, but said I wanted to steal it, and that I had stolen her shawl.

JOHN WALES . I am an officer. I was passing, and secured the prisoner.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Confined Six Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191201-137

136. JAMES WILLIAMS and WILLIAM SHIPPY were indicted for stealing, on the 4th of November , one pair of stockings, value 2 s. 6 d. , the property of John Swears .

JOHN WITHERS . I am shopman to John Swears , who is a hosier , in New-street, Covent-garden . On the 4th of November, about seven o'clock in the evening, two constables brought the prisoners in, and produced a pair of stockings, which had been taken off the stool inside the door. I did not see them taken.

THOMAS GOOK . Between seven and eight o'clock in the evening I saw the prisoners and another standing near the prosecutor's door, concealed in a dark corner by the window - nobody near could see them. I watched about twenty minutes, and saw Williams snatch something from inside the door. I saw some stockings come out in his hand. I pointed the prisoners out to Glassborough, while I followed the third, but he escaped.

THOMAS GLASSBOROUGH. I was with Gook, and saw the prisoners and another standing at a private door by the wine-vaults; in about twenty minutes the third one went by. Williams took the stockings, and Shippy took them from him and put them into his hat. I secured them both. Shippy pulled his hat off, and threw the stockings on the area rails. A gentleman took them up and gave them to me.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

SHIPPY'S Defence. I picked them up.

WILLIAMS - GUILTY . Aged 14.

SHIPPY - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191201-138

137. WILLIAM SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of November , one carpet, value 15 s., and seven yards of oil-cloth, value 5 s. , the property of Hannah Bell , widow .

JANE MORGAN . I am servant to Hannah Bell , who is a widow, and lived at No. 4, Wellington-place, Commercial-road . About three weeks ago the carpet and oilcloth were stolen from the house. Mrs. Bell had left them in the house, to be taken as fixtures. Two chimney-classes, the carpets of three rooms, and the copper were also stolen. I was passing a broker's shop and saw the carpet of one of the rooms and the oil-cloth, which I knew.

ANN WOOD . On Monday, the 15th of November, I was in Mrs. Bell's house, and saw all the property safe; next day I missed them. On the Friday following the copper was stolen.

JOSIAH WHITAKER . I am a broker, and live in Gloucester-street, Commercial-road. On the 16th of November, between one and two o'clock, the prisoner brought the floor-cloth - a woman came with him, who brought the carpet. The woman asked me to buy them - she wanted 2 l. for them; I offered her 28 s. for them both. They consulted together, and said I should have them. The prisoner said he was hired as a porter to bring them.

ELIZA SWEETSTONE . I was present when the man and woman brought the things to my master's. The woman wanted 2 l. for them. They went outside the door. She asked the prisoner if he was agreeable to take it? He said, No. They came in again, and she asked if he would take 28 s.? He said Yes, he was agreeable. They went out. On the Thursday following the prisoner came and asked my master to buy a stove, and he detained him. I am certain the woman consulted him about taking the money. I was in the shop at the time, and my master was in the back room.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I knew the woman three years ago. I was out of employ; she said she would employ me to carry loads, as her husband bought things at sales. I took several things to this man's shop before for her. I was not consulted about the price - it was her husband. They have absconded.

ELIZA SWEETSTONE re-examined. Nobody was present but the prisoner and the woman. She consulted him. He had been before with the same woman.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191201-139

138. JOHN OWEN was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of December , one coat, value 30 s. , the property of Albion Walter Lewer .

ALBION WALTER LEWER. On the 3d of December, about a quarter past nine o'clock at night, my horse and

chaise stood at the Suttling House, Horse Guards , in the care of a man. My coat was on the horse - it was stolen while I was in the house.

THOMAS HAINES . I am a waterman at the coach-stand, Whitehall. I heard an alarm of Stop thief! I looked round and saw a man running fast with a great coat under his arm. In attempting to pass him I caught hold of the arm of it; he threw it down, and I picked it up. I did not know him.

ROBERT DAUNCEY. I am a fruiterer. I saw two men come from the Horse Guards; one of them kept the prosecutor's man in conversation. I saw the prisoner advance and snatch at the coat twice; the third time he completely got it off, put it under his left arm and ran. I called Stop thief! and went after him. He passed the coach and threw the coat against the wheel. I was on one side of the stand, and he on the other. I knocked my hat against the pole of the coach, and could not take him. I still followed and secured him, and brought him back three or four yards. He asked me where the gentleman was that owned the coat? I said I would shew him. I took him over to Mr. Child's. I have every reason to believe him to be the man who took it. I did not lose sight of him after he dropped the coat. I was close to him. He turned back and met me. I collared him.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. The coaches were between you? Yes; I came round the first coach; several other people were pursuing him. He asked me who the coat belonged to before I mentioned it. It was a moonlight night.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I heard the alarm, saw about two hundred running, and run with them. I was tired, turned back, and met the witness half way, close to Whitehall-place. He said,

"You are the man who stole the coat, and that he saw me take it off the horse." I asked him where the gentleman was that belonged to the coat? I was locked up with the soldiers till the prosecutor came. When taken before the Magistrate, he said he was knocked down by the pole of the coach. He said the man took it from the off side; if so he must have passed the servant. If I took it he must have seen me through the horses.

ROBERT DAUNCEY re-examined. He took it from the road side of the horses. I am sure I saw him take it.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191201-140

139. JOHN LE COY was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of November , one loaf of bread, value 9 d.; eight ounces of butter, value 6 d., and eight ounces of sugar, value 4 d. , the goods of Eliza Lister , widow .

ELIZA LISTER . I keep a chandler's-shop in Wellington-street, St. Luke's . On the 16th of November the prisoner came and asked for these things. Thompson served him. I was sitting in the back parlour, and coughed; he started up; I went in and weighed the sugar myself. He went to the door several times, and whistled, then asked for half an ounce of 8 s. tea. While she was weighing it he run out with the things. I pursued; a gentleman stopped him. I said,

"If you was a poor man, and asked for it, I would give it you." He said,

"Good woman, let me go."

MARY THOMPSON . The prisoner came to the shop between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, and asked for these things, which I put on the counter. Mrs. Lister came and weighed the tea; he ran out with them. She caught him. He was brought back.

JAMES RIDDLE . I took him into custody. He said he had eaten nothing for two days.

Prisoner's Defence. I was distressed.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Confined Six Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191201-141

140. MARY KELLY was indicted for stealing. on the 31st of October , from the person of Josiah Batt , one coat, value 10 s.; one hat, value 14 s., and one 2 l. and three 1 l. Bank notes , his property.

The prosecutor did not appear .

NOT GUILTY.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191201-142

141. JEREMIAH GURRING was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of November , from the person of William Thompson , five 1 l. Bank notes , his property.

The prosecutor did not appear .

NOT GUILTY.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191201-143

142. JAMES DIX was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of November , one portmanteau, value 2 s.; two pair of breeches, value 2 s.; six brushes, value 18 d.; one bed-winch, value 18 d.; one tea-pot, value 1 s.; one set of chimney ornaments, value 18 d.; one coat, value 20 s.; one pair of shoes, value 2 s., and one table cover, value 2 s. , the pro- goods of Joseph Brearley .

The prosecutor did not appear .

NOT GUILTY.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191201-144

143. SAMUEL BRIGHT was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of November , one handkerchief, value 3 s., the goods of Thomas Hamilton , from his person .

MR. THOMAS HAMILTON . On the 23d of November, about half-past two o'clock, I was in St. James's Park as the Prince Regent was returning from the House of Lords. I lost my handkerchief from my pocket, but cannot say how it went.

THOMAS THOMPSON . I was on duty in the Park on the 23d of November. The prosecutor was in company with another gentleman. I saw the prisoner go behind him and take a silk handkerchief out of his pocket. I seized him and took it from his hand. He seemed very sorry for it. I never saw a man feel so much for what he had done - he was alone - I never saw him before.

CHARLES READ . I was with Thompson, and saw the prisoner take the handkerchief.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 38.

Fined One Shilling , and Discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191201-145

144. JAMES WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of November , one looking-glass, value 20 s. , the goods of Samuel Lince .

SAMUEL LINCE . I keep the Coachmakers' Arms, public-house , Long-acre. On the 25th of November, I was in the bar - the prisoner came in. I saw him go out with the looking-glass. I went out, and called Stop thief! he dropped it immediately, and I secured him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN NEWMAN . I am an officer. I heard the cry of Stop thief! and saw the prisoner running; he fell down. I secured him, and he begged for mercy.

Prisoner's Defence. I was not in the house.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191201-146

145. JOSEPH WOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of November , one shawl, value 9 s. , the property of Richard Vaughan .

RICHARD VAUGHAN . I am a linen-draper , and live at Bethnal-green . On the 12th of November I saw the shawls at the window shake, and missed one from the window close to the door. I saw the prisoner running down the street; I pursued him, and secured him about one hundred and twenty yards off. I found the shawl close to where I took him. Nobody else was running.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. Another one ran by me.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191201-147

146. BLANCHARD WILKINS was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of November , two baskets, value 5 s. , the goods of Joseph Story .

JOSEPH STOREY . I am a fruiterer in Fleet-market . I lost my baskets out of the market during the night of the 12th of November.

JOHN BARNLEY . On the 12th of November I was sent to search the prisoner's premises for lead that was stolen that morning. I found these two baskets there, and took the prisoner to the watch-house. I found they belonged to Storey.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. Some years ago I lost my senses. My father died in Bethlam. At the full and change of the moon I am affected in my mind, and do not know what I do. I went into Fleet-market for some bread, and came home with the baskets. I do not know how I got them.

GUILTY . Aged 55.

Fined One Shilling , and Discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191201-148

147. FREDERICK WESTOVER was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of November , one hat, value 5 s. , the property of Bernard Fletcher .

BERNARD FLETCHER . I am a salesman , and live in Whitecross-street . I know nothing of the matter.

THOMAS HAYCOCK. On the 11th of November, about six o'clock in the evening, I met the prisoner in Shoreditch, with this hat over his leather cap. I asked him where he got it? He said it was his brother's. I inquired at different shops, returned to him, and he said he stole it from a porter in Play-house-yard, in Whitecross-court. He was alone.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A boy took it and gave it to me; he told me to run away with it.

GUILTY. Aged 9.

Judgment Respited .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191201-149

148. GEORGE WILSON was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of November , one shawl, value 4 s. the property of Daniel Hartshorn .

ELIZA HARTSHORN . I am the wife of Daniel Hartshorn , who is a milkman . On Friday, between eleven and twelve o'clock in the day, the prisoner came in with another boy to the front parlour; one of them put his hand to the window and called to the other; they opened the door and came in. The prisoner asked for a halfpennyworth of milk. He threw down the halfpenny with violence - it fell on the floor. He said it was fallen down. I said

"Pick it up." He pretended to look for it, and said he could not find it, and told me to pick it up. He asked the other boy if he had a halfpenny? He said he had not. He told the other to look for it - he found it, and said,

"Give me the milk." While I was serving him I kept my eye upon them, and before he had drank the milk my shawl and the other boy were gone. I seized the prisoner directly.

GEORGE GOODLUCK . I took the prisoner in charge. I searched him with great trouble, and found three halfpence on him.

WILLIAM DULWICH . I was standing at the door and saw the two boys walking and talking. The other boy looked through the window and called the prisoner. Both went in; soon after, the other ran out with the shawl. I had not the presence of mind to follow him. He tucked the shawl under his coat. They were in conversation together before they went in.

Prisoner's Defence. I went in for a halfpenny-worth of milk - the halfpenny fell out of my hand - I stooped to pick it up; the woman said I took the shawl.

GUILTY . Aged 13.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191201-150

149. ELIZA WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of November , one 10 l. Bank note , the property of John Angus .

JOHN ANGUS . I am a cook on board a ship . On the 19th of November I received my pay, and stopped at the prisoner's house that night, in Blue Coat-fields . I gave her a 10 l., a 5 l., and two 1 l. notes to take care of till the morning, as I was too late to go home. Next morning she gave me the money-bag. I can neither read nor write, She said,

"Here is a ten, a five, and a two." I went to the barber's to ask if it was right. He said there was no 10 l. among them. She had given me three ones and a five. I am sure I gave a 10 l. I made her a present of 35 s. in silver. She returned the other notes. I have known her eleven years.

HENRY DEWDNEY . I am Superintendant of the office where the prosecutor's ship was paid off. I paid him a 10 l., a 5 l., and two 1 l. notes, and told him to take care of

them. The two 1 l. notes produced are part of what I paid him, but the other was never in our office.

MICHAEL MINES . I took the prisoner into custody. I found a 1 l. note on her and 5 s. or 6 s.

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutor said he had received 17 l. I told him to take care of it. He gave me some silver and two rupees to take care of, and in the morning he asked me for the 10 l. note. He gave me no notes. I told him to fetch an officer.

GUILTY . Aged 39.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191201-151

150. JOHN JAMES SIDDON was indicted for embezzlement .

WILLIAM MOORE . I am a blind-maker , and live in Bedford-place, Commercial-road; the prisoner was my man, employed and entrusted to receive money for me - he took the work home. Last Friday week he took some work to Mr. Pledger's and was to receive 2 l. 11 s. - he never brought the money to me. I sent a bill and receipt with it, but he made out another, and returned me mine.

THOMAS PLEDGER . I deal with Moore. On the 27th of November the prisoner brought the goods to me; I paid him two 1 l. notes and 5 s., and took his receipt for the bill. He signed the receipt,

"Moore."

Prisoner's Defence. I have been ill a long time, but against the doctor's advice I continued in the business to the prosecutor's advantage. I was led through the insinuations of his son, to commit the error. He said he was in, distress, upon which I let him have 7 s. 6 d., and could not make it up.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191201-152

151. HENRY SAMUELS was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of November , two sheets, value 7 s. , the goods of John Norton .

JOHN LOWTHER . I am a broker; John Norton lodged with me - this sheet was bleaching. The prisoner was in the habit of doing jobs for me.

RICHARD COATES . I am an officer. On the 4th of November, between six and seven o'clock in the evening, I was in the Edgware-road, and saw the prisoner coming along with a bundle under his arm - knowing him, I suspected it did not belong to him. When he came near me I turned round, and looked him full in the face. Immediately he saw me he threw the bundle down, and ran off, but I followed him about a hundred yards and took him. He said he was going to take them to the mangle. I took him to the watch-house, and found they belonged to Norton of the Harrow-road.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I picked them up at the prosetor's house, and was taking them to him.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191201-153

152. WILLIAM SPRIGGS was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of November , seven yards of linen, value 10 s.; one cap, value 3 d; one curtain, value 1 d.; one pair of stockings, value 2 d.; one pair of shoes, value 1 d., and one towel, value 2 d. , the goods of John Jones .

JOHN JONES. I am a waggoner . On the 17th of November, between two and three o'clock in the day, these things were stolen from a little box, which was fixed to my waggon, with other parcels in it, while my horses were eating at the George Inn, Hammersmith .

THOMAS SOUTHEN . I am hostler at the George Inn; the prisoner followed the waggon. He said he had a sack of flour in it - he came into the stable, and helped it to feed the horses; he kept hanging about the stable - he went to the tail of the waggon and looked in; I asked him what he wanted? but he made no answer. Soon after that he lifted up the lid of the box, took this parcel out, put it under his smock-frock, and ran down a lane. I followed him about a quarter of a mile - when I came nearly up to him he threw the bundle down. We caught him, and he said,

"Let me go, and I will go back with you." He said if we did not loose him, he would soon do for us, and twenty such as us, and if he could get his hands at liberty he would do it - I gave him in charge. He said he hoped that it would transport him, as he was tired of the country.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOSEPH WHITTICKS . I saw Southen with the prisoner in custody. He said if we would loose him he would do for us, and that he wished to be transported.

Prisoner's Defence. The man had nothing to do with taking me.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191201-154

153. JOHN HENRY OATES was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of November , four bookbinders' tools, value 15 s. , the property of Thomas Dewdley .

THOMAS DEWDLEY . I am a bookbinder , and live in Charter House-lane . On the 30th of November, about eleven o'clock, the prisoner came from his master for some books; they were not done, and he waited for them till about one o'clock. During that time I left him alone, and about two hours after he was gone I missed these tools. I went and charged him with it - he denied it, but at last gave me the duplicate.

JOHN DENSEA . I am a pawnbroker. The tools were pledged with me, but not by the prisoner. The duplicate is mine.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Whipped and Discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191201-155

154. FREDERICK MULLER was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of November , four filtering-cloths, value 12 s., and 14 lbs of sugar, value 9 s. , the goods of Robert Sutton and William Davis .

WILLIAM MORSE . I am labourer to Robert Sutton and William Davis , who are sugar refiners , and live in Lemon-street, Whitechapel . On the 7th of November I was going from work, and saw the prisoner walking from the filtering-house to the cellar, with something under his arm. I went there, and found a quantity of sugar laid under a

mould - I put something in it that I might know it again. I got an officer, concealed myself, and in about an hour I saw the prisoner fetch it away and carry it into the street. We followed him, and the officer found some sugar in his pockets, and also in a bundle.

GEORGE BUSH . I watched the prisoner out with the property.

WILLIAM FOSTER . I am an officer. I watched the prisoner out with a bundle. He said it was sugar, and that he took it from his master. I found sugar in each of his pockets, and a lump in his hat. I found the filtering-cloths at Harrison's.

LOUISA HARRISON . The prisoner brought the cloths to me. I asked him where he got them? He said it was nothing to me.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Confined Six Weeks .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191201-156

155. WILLIAM LEWZEY was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of November , one box, value 8 s.; four shifts, value 13 s.; three yards of linen, value 9 s.; three yards of lace, value 6 s.; three petticoats, value 4 s.; nine gowns, value 5 l. 11 s.; three pair of stockings, value 4 s.; twelve aprons, value 12 s.; one curtain, value 5 s.; three books, value 10 s.; three handkerchiefs, value 9 s.; and one iron, value 3 s. , the goods of Ann Maria Jones .

ANN MARIA JONES . On the 18th of November, I left my place, at Mr. Williams's, at Stepney-green, and left my box at the green-grocer's, at the corner of Stepney-green till next day, and then being recommended by that woman, I employed the prisoner to carry it to Pentonville - I agreed to give him 2 s. 6 d., and said I would go with him. We set out; he met his brother, and asked him the nearest way. He walked very slow, and took very long rests - I told him to walk his pace. He then rested on a post for near a quarter of an hour - it being very cold, I and my sister walked on, but not perceiving him behind we went back. When he saw us he came on, and carried it as far as the Hackney-road, rested a long time, and then carried it about ten minutes longer, and sat down at a public-house door in the Hackney-road. Being very cold I gave him a pint of beer, and directed him to bring it to No. 6, Suffolk-street, Pentonville - I told him three times, then left him, and went on. Not finding him come I went as far as Finsbury-square, but could get no tidings of the box; I went to Stepney-green that evening - he had not returned. Next morning I gave information at the office, and he was apprehended on Saturday - this was on Thursday. I found two gowns, an apron, and a handkerchief at the pawnbroker's - that is all I have found - I am sure the prisoner is the man.

FRANCES JONES . I was with my sister. The prisoner is the man.

WILLIAM PURSEY . I am a schoolmaster, and live at No. 56, Church-street, Mile End. On the 18th of November the prisoner brought a box to my house, and asked to leave it till he went home to tea. He came about eight o'clock, and said he wanted something out of it; he brought a young man with him, who he said was brother to the young woman that belonged to it. He said it was too late to take it home, but she wanted some things - he took it away next morning. I knew him before; his father is a respectable hair-dresser, and his brother once lodged with me.

JAMES STONE . I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner on Sunday evening, the 21st of November. I found a prayer-book and bible at the pawnbroker's, and more things at Henry's, in Whitechapel.

WILLIAM BELCHER . I am servant to Mr. Brice, pawnbroker, Wentworth-street, Whitechapel. On the 20th of November the prisoner pledged the prayer-book and bible.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I went into a public-house, and when I came out it was gone.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191201-157

156. THOMAS BROOM , THOMAS HARRISON , and RICHARD BROOKS were again indicted for stealing, on the 17th of July , four books, value 20 l.; and 2000 sheets of printed paper, value 20 l. , the property of Thomas Norton Longman , Thomas Hurst , Owen Rees , Cosmo Orme , and Thomas Brown .

For the Prosecution, MESSRS. BOLLAND and ADOLPHUS.

MESSRS. THOMAS BROWN , THOMAS HUNTSMAN , and JAMES WHITTHORNE gave the same evidence as on the former trial, which it is presumed unnecessary to recapitulate.

JOHN CARLISLE . I am a bookseller, and live at No. 121, Holborn.

Q. Did you at any time buy four copies of Todd's Johnson of the prisoner Brooks - A. I cannot say that it was on the 17th of July. Here is the bill which I gave in payment. I bought them of Brooks.

Q. Had all the copies the portrait - A. Three of them had it - one was deficient. I sold two. I have the one that wants the portrait, and produce it now - it was in quires, I sent it to be bound.

Q. At the time you bought it of him had it the portrait - A. I cannot say - I only examined one.

Q. I believe the day the bill became due you could not take it up - A. No. While it laid unpaid, a person called, whom I believe to be Harrison, but cannot be positive - he called the evening it was due; I paid it afterwards. I gave the bill to Brooks - (bill read).

17th July, 1818.

Two months after date I promise to pay Richard Brooks 17 l. for value received.

JOHN CARLISLE .

Endorsed, RICHARD BROOKS and THOMAS BROOM .

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. This is a promissory note to Brooks - A. Yes; he endorsed it. It might pass into anybody's hands afterwards. I sent two of the books to my bookbinder's. I only examined one, which I found correct.

Q. You would not have bought them if you had thought them incorrect - A. No. When they came back I looked at the binding and put them on the shelves.

Q. When did you discover the want of a portrait - A. I think on the 1st of November.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Were you a proprietor or shareholder - A. No.

MR. BOLLAND. Q. Look at that book, and say if there

was ever a portrait in it - A. No, there is no appearance of any being taken out.

JOHN CASTLE . I am clerk to Saul and Saddington, who are wine and brandy merchants - Broom dealt at our house. I took the bill produced, in payment, of him. When he offered it I looked at the endorsement of Brooks, and asked who he was? he said Brooks had nothing to do in point of payment, that he had nothing to do with the bill, and was only employed to sell the goods for it. He said he had employed Brooks to sell the goods, and he had nothing to do with the payment, and if we took it we must look to him (Broom) or the drawer for payment, and not to Brooks. The money has been received for it.

Q. Was it honoured when due - A. Not exactly on the day. I went to Broom about it, and told him I was sorry the bill I had received of him was not paid. He said it would be paid he had no doubt, for the house was respectable, and I had better go and inquire about it.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. He was a customer, and well known - A. He was. I knew where he lived. I had dealt about twelve months with him.

JOHN YOUNG . I am in the employ of the Sheriff of Middlesex - I know Brooks and Broom; I have known Broom many years, and have been in the habit of seeing him at the Three Tuns, in Brook-street, Holborn. I have frequently seen him with a bundle. I have seen Brooks go out with the bundles, leaving Broom there, and then return to Broom without any thing. I did not observe who brought the bundles in. I have seen Brooks bring silver, and pay it to Broom, and have seen Broom return part to him again. I think it was about the month of August.

ELIZA BRITANNIA SHARPE . I lived at the Three Tuns, public-house, Brook-street, Holborn, last summer, and have seen Brooks and Broom there several times - they brought in their parcels and sat there. I think Brooks went out, and came back to Broom.

Q. Did the person who went out take any thing with him - A. He took the parcels out. I once saw one of them open on the table - they appeared to be the sheets of a book; I observed it was a very good type. My first husband was a bookseller. I saw them several times at the house. I think it was in July and August.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. It is a public-house - A. Yes. I am related to the person who keeps it, and am sometimes there for a month together.

BROOKS'S Defence. I was only an agent in the business.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18191201-158

157. WILLIAM LISTER was indicted for a misdemeanor .

For the Prosecution, MR. BOLLAND.

GEORGE TENNANT . I am in partnership with George Bangley and William Nott ; we are wholesale stationers - Mr. Hand is a customer of ours. On the 18th of October the prisoner produced an order to me, in consequence of which I delivered him two bundles of royal hand paper, worth 4 l. 7 s., and he went away with it. I did not know him. - (Order read).

Messrs. Bangley and Co., please to let the bearer have two bundles of royal hand for JOHN HAND.

No. 9, Fore-street, Cripplegate.

WILLIAM MOORE .

JOHN HAND . I live in Fore-street, Cripplegate. I never had a person of the name of William Moore in my service. I never saw the prisoner until I saw him in custody. The paper was not brought to me.

MR. ALLEY (for the prisoner) said he was desired to state that the prisoner met a man, who sent him with the order.

GUILTY .

Publicly Whipped and Discharged.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18191201-159

188. MARGARET SULLIVAN was indicted for a misdemeanor .

For the Prosecution, MESSRS. REYNOLDS and BOLLAND.

ROBERT SIMS . I keep the King of Denmark, public-house, in the Old Bailey. On the 22d of November, about six o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came and had a glass of gin, she gave me 1 s.; I examined it, and said it was bad, she said she had no more. I asked her where she took it? she gave me no answer, and said she lived at home. I sent for an officer, who examined her handkerchief - I let her go. She said she was a poor woman, and worked in Covent-garden market . I said I would give her the shilling next day, if she brought another for it. I gave it to Worrall.

HARRIET WRIGHT . I am bar-maid at Mr. Dawson's, King's Head, public-house, Smithfield. On the 22d of November, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came and asked for a glass of gin, she gave me a shilling, which I saw was bad, and shewed it to my master - it was never out of my sight. She was asked if she had any more money? she said she had not. I gave it to the officer.

JOHN HARKER . I am a constable. On the 22d of November I was sent for to Mr. Dawson's to take the prisoner in charge, and asked her if she had any money about her? she said she had not. I took her to the Compter, and there Worrall searched her; he found two bad shillings in her bosom, wrapped in paper. Wright gave me a shilling, which I produce.

HAZLEWOOD WORRALL. I searched the prisoner at the Compter, and found two bad shillings in her bosom enclosed in a paper. Sims gave me a shilling.

MR. CALEB EDWARD POWEL . I am assistant to the Solicitor of the Mint. The four shillings are all counterfeits, and off the same die - they are merely washed.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked them up.

GUILTY .

Confined One Year , and to find Sureties for Two Years more.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18191201-160

159. JAMES TELCAMP was indicted for a misdemeanor .

Counsel as before.

THOMAS WOOD . I am servant to Samuel Tunnecliffe , who keeps the King's Arms, public-house , at the corner of Acorn-street, Bishopsgate-street . On the 1st of December the prisoner came and had a glass of gin, which came to three halfpence farthing - he presented half a crown, I gave him 2 s. 4 1/2 d. in change; he then asked for a biscuit. While I turned to get one he pushed a bad

shilling towards me, it was not the one I gave him. I am sure I heard it ring - it was bad. My master came out and said it was not the shilling I gave him. My master took two shillings, the good and bad one, and insisted on his giving up the other good shilling which I gave him. He ran to the door, my master secured him, and sent for an officer. Before the officer came I observed him shuffling with his hands behind him, close to a cask. Sheppard came, and took him into the parlour. I stooped behind the cask, and found a bag, which I offered to Sheppard, Mr. Parry took and kept it sometime, and then gave it to Sheppard.

Prisoner. Q. Did I wish to have either of them changed - A. No, but he pushed a shilling towards me, which I had not given him.

SAMUEL TUNNECLIFFE . I keep the King's Arms, and have frequently seen the prisoner at my house. I was at the back of the bar when Wood served him. I heard the sound of a bad shilling, immediately went out, and charged him with passing a bad shilling, telling him he had frequently served me that trick - he denied it. I said I was determined to have him searched. He ran to the door, I secured him, and took him into my back parlour, Moore brought in the bag, which contained five bad shillings. I took the 2 s. off the counter myself; one was good, and the other base, and gave them to Sheppard. Some good silver, consisting of a half-crown, a shilling, and some sixpences were found on him.

Prisoner. Q. Could I drop the bag without your seeing me - A. He had his hands behind him, between the counter and the rum-puncheon.

JOSEPH PARRY . I am a publican, and live in Holywell-street. I was at the prosecutor's; the bag was given to me - I gave it to Sheppard in the same state in which I received it.

SAMUEL SHEPPARD . I am a constable. I was fetched to the prosecutor's. I found eight sixpences, one shilling, and a half-crown on the prisoner, all good, and 2 s. 4 1/2 d. in copper. Parry gave me a bag, containing five counterfeit shillings - I received a good and bad shilling from the prosecutor.

MR. CALEB EDWARD POWEL . The five shillings and the other one are counterfeit - all six are off the same die, and appear not to have been in circulation.

Prisoner's Defence. I could not have changed the shilling. I should have put both in my pocket, if he had not said one was bad. My hands were never behind me. I know nothing of the bag.

GUILTY .

Confined One Year , and to find Sureties for Two Years more.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18191201-161

160. CHARLES WOODGATE and JOHN PRICE were indicted for stealing, on the 23d of July , one box, value 1 s., and two pair of boots, value 20 s. , the goods of John Showers .

JOHN SHOWERS . I am Apothecary to the Forces . On the 23d of July I sent these things to Mr. Gray's, in Oxford-street, and never saw them afterwards.

JOHN GRAY . I am a horse-dealer, and live in Oxford-street. Mr. Showers's box and boots were in my right-hand parlour. I saw them safe on Saturday, the 18th of July, I then left town.

SAMUEL HAMILTON . I am servant to Mr. Gray. I saw the box in the passage after it came by the coach. I saw it safe between five and six o'clock in the evening of the 18th of July. I never saw the prisoners about the premises.

SAMUEL PLANK . I am an officer. I found a pair of boots at Mrs. Prickett's, No. 4, Southampton-street, Holborn, in custody of a woman named Crossley - Price was apprehended in her company. Woodgate was apprehended on the 15th of October.

MR. SHOWERS. I will not swear to the boots.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18191201-162

161. CHARLES WOODGATE and JOHN PRICE were again indicted for stealing, on the 23d of July , two coats, value 3 l. , the goods of Charles Gray .

CHARLES GRAY . On Saturday night I went out of town, returned on Monday or Tuesday morning, and missed two coats from my yard. The gates are open in the day-time.

SAMUEL HAMILTON . I am servant to Mr. Gray. On the 21st of July I missed the coats - I saw them both the night before, after the gates were shut.

JAMES WHITE . I am servant to Mr. Gray. I saw the prisoners in the yard about half-past five o'clock - I was in the stable, about twenty yards off. I knew them before - I had worked with Price. Price took one coat off the carriage and Woodgate took the other. I did not stop them.

Q. You consented to the theft - A. No. I did not follow them, nor tell my fellow-servants about it. I informed Mr. Gray of it. I was taken up, and come from gaol now.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18191201-163

162. DAVID CHOAT , THOMAS WILSON , JOHN HILL , and WILLIAM JOYCE were indicted for stealing, on the 23d of October , 300 lbs. of lead, the goods of Mary Bowles , widow , and fixed to a building of hers .

MR. ARABIN, for the prosecution, stated that he had no evidence to bring the charge home to the prisoners.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18191201-164

163. DAVID CHOAT , JOHN HILL , and WILLIAM JOYCE were again indicted for stealing, on the 6th of November , 1000 lbs. of lead, value 4 l. , the goods of Mary Bowles , widow

No evidence.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18191201-165

164. RICHARD HARBOUR was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of November , eleven pair of stockings, value 5 l.; ten yards of lace, value 30 s.; sixteen yards of ribbon, value 16 s.; eight silk handkerchiefs, value 32 s., and one yard of silk, value 6 s. , the goods of Joseph Todd , James Morrison , and John Edward Todd ; and FRANCES SMITH was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, knowing them to have been stolen .

For the Prosecution, MR. ADOLPHUS.

MR. JAMES MORRISON . I am in partnership with Joseph and John Edward Todd ; we are haberdashers , residing in Fore-street, Cripplegate , and generally employ above one hundred servants. The prisoner Harbour, had been our shopman about two months. He slept in the shop, and occasionally carried out parcels. I do not know his wages.

Q. Had he power to dispose of your stock in any way as his own - A, Certainly not. Mr. Hamilton came to our house and put some tickets into my hand, which are our private marks, they have been on our goods, and are used in our shop. They apply to no other goods but silk stockings. When I first saw them I discovered them to be the marks of silk stockings.

WILLIAM HAMILTON. I am a carpenter and chair-maker, and lodge in Clement's-lane, in the same house with the prisoner Smith; she lodged on the first floor and I in the attic story. I was five weeks in the house, and dieted with her during that time. She was there when I came.

Q. Did you ever see the prisoner, Harbour, there - A. Yes, several times in her room. She represented him as her cousin, who had just come from Wales. On the 11th of October, about eleven o'clock, I came home for a tool. I have one room on the attic, which has no door but the door at the lobby; the key of that door was left with the prisoner Smith. I knocked at her door, but did not speak; I received no answer, but thought I heard a noise inside. The door was shut; there were two frames on the stairs which had no glass in them; I looked through them and saw Harbour give her two pieces of Bandana silk handkerchiefs. I went out to the bottom of the lane, and looked in at a picture shop till I thought he was gone. I then returned, and knocked at her door for the key. She gave it to me directly. Her door was then wide open, and only she was there. I had been away about twenty-five minutes. When I was coming down with the tool she said,

"Come in, my cousin Richard was here just now, and I will shew you what a handsome present he has brought me." She opened a little box, which I had made for her, and shewed me fourteen silk handkerchiefs, and said,

"These were in two pieces a while ago, seven in each piece; and he gave me two pair of silk stockings, which I popped, and got 5 s. a pair on them, at Harris's, in the Strand; and Mr. Burgess, the clerk, said, if I had one hundred pair he would buy them all of me." I went away, and did not come home till about seven o'clock in the evening. Her husband and one John Williams , a tailor, were there then. I asked for a piece of candle to light me to bed. I wanted to know if Williams or her husband could know any thing of the handkerchiefs or not; and as I went up stairs I put the candle out, stopped on the stairs, looked into her room, and saw her open the box, and shew them the handkerchiefs, I heard her say she had received them from Richard. They always called him Richard only.

Q. Did you afterwards see Richard and her together - A. On the 24th, which was Sunday, about eleven o'clock, I was coming out of her room - her husband and her were there, and a strange man, a carpenter. Richard Harbour was coming in as I went out. As I went up stairs I looked in, and saw him salute Mrs. Smith, and asked for John Williams , the tailor - her husband was present; she said Williams was up stairs finishing a jacket. He said I will go up to see him. She went up and shewed him the room. I was in my own room and could hear what passed. She stopped a few minutes, and then went down. I heard her send her husband out for apples; he asked the other man to go with him, and he did. She ran up stairs and asked Richard to come down, for there was nobody there. I went down to this window, saw Richard take a paper out of his hat, and another from inside his coat next to his shirt and waistcoat. He asked Smith to give him the scissars to cut the marks off, saying,

"Here is eleven pair of silk stockings." She said,

"What price are they marked?" He said they sold for 11 s. in the shop. He left her in about twenty minutes. She called me down stairs that day, said her cousin, Richard, had made her a handsome present of eleven pair of silk stockings, and shewed them to me. I said he must be situated in a great way, must be in a large shop, and was beginning trade very soon. I said I had heard in my country of Bow-street officers, who were called

"Blood-hounds," and she had better take care what she was doing, for he was a young man. She said,

"Oh, let Tafiy alone for that." When he left on the Sunday, he said,

"I will be here at eleven o'clock to-morrow." It was my determination from the first to find out where he came from. I saw him there on the Tuesday, about eleven o'clock, and saw him take three papers of black and white silk stockings out. He said he wanted a little money; and she said,

"I will go and spout a couple of pair." She went out, and returned in about twenty minutes. He remained there till she returned with her little girl, who is eight or nine years old. She desired the little girl to lock the door and keep the key, if any one came to say her mother was out, and had got the key. While she was out Richard kept looking at his watch and papers. When she returned she gave him some money - how much I do not know. She afterwards told me he had brought twenty-four pair of stockings.

Q. Did you find out how he was employed - A. This went on for about five weeks. She called me down, and shewed me four pair of silk stockings with clocks; she wanted me to take up a board in the floor to put them under. I said, perhaps the officers might come in and catch me about it, and I should be thought as bad as her. She said she had thought of a better plan - she would spout them for a little, as she did not mean to stay long in London, and the rats might get them there. One day after he brought some stockings, he said he would bring no more, for a young man was discharged that day. She said, " Why, you said it was impossible to find it out, for you was put into the shop to sleep, as a greenhorn, and it was impossible for you to have any acquaintance." I had

heard him say that myself one day, and that he got up in the night and took them.

Q. How did you find him out - A. She always came down to let him out. On Saturday, the 13th, I went out as he was going out, and followed him to Messrs. Todds', in Fore-street.

Q. Had you before that got any cards - A. Yes; the first day when he brought the eleven pair of stockings he cut off the marks, and they fell on the carpet by the bed-side. After he was gone she called me, and the first thing I did was to pick up the bits of cards, and put them into my pocket. When I found where he lived, I gave them to Mr. Morrison, and informed him of every thing. I am positive they are the marks I saw cut from the stockings.

Q. Did she at any time ask you to do any thing with some marks - A. On the 27th, I saw Richard give her three pair of black silk stockings. He said,

"I am in a hurry, and cannot cut the marks off, as I am going with a person to Russell-square, and have left him in the baker's-shop while I ran here." When he was gone she came up stairs and went into a room next to where I was at work; she had a white bundle. She said,

"My cousin, Richard, has brought me a handsome present." I saw twenty-four pair of black silk stockings. She said they were marked 15 s. a pair. I said there was no such mark. She asked me to cut off the marks. I was going to do it with my chisel. She said I should dirt them, and she would go down and do it herself. I went down also. She sat in her room and desired her daughter to call up the landlord of the house. I had seen her shew them to the landlord always when Richard brought them. She represented him to the landlord as her brother.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. Have you no other name than William Hamilton - A. Yes, I have taken another name for the last three weeks, in consequence of this woman, as I was informed her husband was determined to kill me if he saw me. I told Mr. Morrison to write to me by the name of Welch. I did not give that name to avoid being drawn for the militia.

Q. Do you know Mr. Morgan - A. My father died when I was four years old, and my mother married Morgan. I served my time to him, and am better known by that name in my own country.

Q. You swore at Bow-street your name was Hamilton, but the name you was known by in your country was Welch - A. Yes. If you had 4000 l. a-year you would change your name, as I changed mine for the sake of my life.

Q. Do you know Hamilton, who was tried at Cork - A. No. I was never tried in my life.

Q. Did you not leave Cork because you was tried there and lost your character - A. No, for I have been there lately, and bought provisions, pork and bacon, about a year ago. If you were at me till to-morrow morning you will get nothing from me but the truth. I staid in this country about six weeks, then returned, and was shipwrecked.

Q. You saw this business going on for five weeks - you knew where the Police officers were - A. Yes, I went to them. They said they could do nothing in it.

Q. Was not the hole covered with paper and a curtain - A. For the first fortnight there was no curtain, after that there was one; I could put my finger through and draw it aside. I have told nothing that I saw after the curtain was up. I never fell out with Smith till the first week she came to Clement's-lane.

Q. On your oath, was you not jealous of her on account of a Captain that came to her - A. No, I never was jealous of her. She never lent me money - I lent her some when her husband was taken up.

Q. You bought her some ear-rings - A. I did not. When I finished my work at Messrs. Poynters, in the City, I laid out 5 l. 15 s. in things to take to my country, and laid them under my bed. I bought her no ear-rings, but she took them from me.

Q. On your oath, did you not charge her at Bow-street with being too intimate with a Captain - A. On my oath, No. I never saw any misconduct in her till she came to Clement's-lane. I told the Magistrate of some indecency between her and the other prisoner.

Q. Was not the silk stockings found under your bed - A. No, I never had any.

Q. You had ear-rings - A. Yes, and nine ladies' silk handkerchiefs, which I bought and paid for; here is the bill of them - (producing it).

Q. Have you not said you never would have told a word of what you stated if she had lent you a 1 l. note on the day she was taken up - A. I never did to any one.

PETER YOUNG . I am the prosecutors' servant. In consequence of information from William Hamilton I searched the prisoner, Harbour's, box; he opened it himself. I found property in it such as is sold in our shop. There were three silk handkerchiefs, two pair of silk stockings, and other things. I had not missed them.

JAMES HARLEY . I am shopman to Messrs. Todd. I missed nine or ten pair of black silk stockings ten or twelve days before this discovery took place.

JAMES ELLIS . I am a patrol of Bow-street. I searched the prisoner Smith's lodgings in Clement's-lane, and found this ribbon, five pieces of lace, and a parcel of duplicates in a butter-pot in the cupboard. I also found some silk handkerchiefs.

WILLIAM WESTCOAT . I am a patrol, of Bow-street. I searched Smith's lodgings. She threw herself on the bed and began to cry. Between the bed and sacking I found six silk handkerchiefs, separated.

ALEXANDER M'BETH. I am foreman to Mr. Cameron, pawnbroker, in the Strand. On the 28th of October, the prisoner, Smith, pledged two pair of black silk stockings for 10 s., in my presence. She had been there two or three times before.

ABRAHAM HARRIS . I am a pawnbroker, and live in the Strand. The prisoner, Smith, pledged three pair of black silk stockings with me on the 25th and 28th of October, in the name of Ann Smith .

GEORGE YOUNG . I am shopman to Mr. Gray, who is a pawnbroker, and lives in Fleet-street. I have every reason to believe the prisoner, Smith, to be the person who pledged two pair of black silk stockings for 8 s., on the 28th of October, in the name of Smith.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

HARBOUR'S Defence. I am totally innocent.

SMITH'S Defence. Hamilton gave me all the stockings

that were pledged. He says false to swear my life away.

CATHARINE BUNCE . I am a widow, and live in New Round-court, Strand. I heard William Hamilton say several times, that if Smith gave him a 1 l. note he would not prosecute her.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Where did you hear this - A. At Bow-street, when they were committed.

Q. Have you a daughter named Ann - A. Yes, she lives with me.

Q. The officer found some silk stockings at her lodgings - A. No, only handkerchiefs and ribbon. She had them to make for Smith.

ELIZA HOOPER . I live at No. 10, Lumley-court, Strand. My husband is a carpenter. I heard Hamilton say, if the woman had given him 1 l. he would not appear against her.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Where was this - A. At my house. I never heard it at Bow-street - it was after they were committed.

HARBOUR - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

SMITH - GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18191201-166

165. MOSES LYONS was indicted for putting off twenty counterfeit shillings, at and for a lower rate than the same by their denomination did import and were counterfeited for, (i.e.) for 5 s.

For the Prosecution, MR. REYNOLDS.

JESSE WILLIAMS . I am a coach lace weaver. I have known the prisoner from the 19th of November.

Q. Were you employed by Maidment in any transaction with him - A. Yes, to buy half a score of bad shillings of him. I first saw him on the 19th of November, and appointed to meet him on the 22d.

Q. Previous to meeting him that day, did you see the Furzemans - A. Yes, they searched me, and gave me a half crown, one shilling, two sixpences, three penny-pieces, and six halfpence; I had no other money - this was about nine o'clock in the morning. I was to meet the prisoner at the bottom of George-street about nine o'clock. I went about half-past nine o'clock, and met him standing on the crossing - both the Furzemans were there. He said he had kept me late - I said Yes. He said,

"Are you ready for me?" I said Yes, and we walked up George-street. When we had got about three parts up the street, he asked me for the money? I gave him the money that they gave me, and he gave me 20 s. wrapped in a piece of paper. We walked up the street a little way, and I gave a signal to the officers that I had got them - they came up to us. Samuel Furzeman took me, and John Furzeman took the prisoner. They took us into a public-house in Thornhaugh-street, and searched us both.

COURT. Q. Had you agreed for the price before - A. Yes, I had agreed to give him 5 s. for a score of counterfeit shillings.

SAMUEL FURZEMAN . I am a constable. I had a communication with the last witness. On the 22d of November I gave him a half crown, a shilling, two sixpences, and 6 d. in copper, which I had marked - he had no other money; the account he has given is correct. I seized him, and told my brother to seize the prisoner by both hands. I found twenty counterfeit shillings in Williams's pocket, wrapped up seperate, having a piece of paper between every 5 s. I found no other money on him. I then searched the prisoner, and found the money I had marked and given to Williams on him, also 1 s. 6 d. and 2 1/2 d. mixed together, but not marked.

COURT. Q. You gave him the money on purpose to make the purchase - A. I did, my Lord.

JOHN FURZEMAN . I was with my brother - his account is correct. I saw the prisoner jink the money he received to see if it was good.

JEREMIAH MAIDMENT. I am a constable. I directed Williams to do as he has stated.

MR. CALEB EDWARD POWELL . I am assistant to the Solicitor of the Mint. The twenty shillings are all counterfeit and off the same die.

GUILTY Aged 19.

Confined One Year .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191201-167

166. ELIZABETH GAZE was indicted for stealing on the 14th of November , two boxes, value 3 s.; four spoons, value 20 s.; one cup, value 2 d.; one saucer, value 1 d.; one spoon, value 4 s.; five yards of cotton, value 10 s.; three towels, value 1 s.; five stockings, value 3 s., and two books, value 4 s. , the goods of William George Wilmot .

For the Prosecution, MR. BARRY.

WILLIAM GEORGE WILMOT . I keep a cheesemonger's shop in Charlotte-street, Fitzroy-square; the prisoner was my servant, and had lived sixteen months with me as servant and housekeeper - I am a single man .

Q. Did you keep any other servant - A. A very short part of the time - the prisoner was servant of all work. I left them in care of my house in September when I myself was absent. I afterwards disposed of my house and furniture. Some time before November I lost many articles of linen, such as pillow-cases, neck-handkerchiefs, and shirts. About the beginning of November I began to suspect that the prisoner was dishonest, but took no notice, having matters of importance to call my attention, as I was about selling my house at that time. About the 14th or 16th of November, I missed two salt, one mustard, and a table-spoon. I communicated it to Mr. Want.

Q. Did you communicate it to the prisoner - A. I did, and in reply she told me. in the presence of Mr. and Mrs. Want, and Miss Butler, that when she engaged with me, she did not engage to pay for losses. I took no farther notice then, but sold my house, and gave possession to Mr. Arnot, who was of the same business a myself. The prisoner was not in the house then.

Q. Were her boxes in the house - A. I believe they were, but I never saw them. The morning after I had given possession of the house to Arnot, I called and told him that I had sold the furniture to Mr. Want. He then handed me over these spoons, which I had missed some days before; he said he had taken them from a small box, which he conceived to be the prisoner's, and to the best of my recollection I had mentioned to him that I had lost them.

Q. Did you lose two boxes - A. I lost various articles, but do not know the extent.

Q. Did you at last take the prisoner before the Magistrate - A. I did. She was to have called upon me next morning to take away her boxes. She was to have gone to Want's house, in Russell-place, for them.

Q. Where did you first see her afterwards - A. At Marlborough-street. I lost printed furniture, two books, and other articles. I made a complaint there.

Q. On that occasion I believe the Magistrate dismissed the complaint - A. Yes. I went again before the Magistrate, and she was committed,

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. How long have you been in business in Charlotte-street - A. To the best of my recollection about three years - the prisoner had lived sixteen months with me.

Q. You knew that though she was a servant, she was a girl very respectably connected - A. I did not. Caroline Johnson lived part of the time with me - she is here.

Q. You have not brought her here - A. I have not; she lived two months with me, to the best of my recollection. I had been unfortunate in business.

Q. Was the furniture given over to Want for the benefit of your creditors - A. When speaking of being unfortunate, I do not admit of being unfortunate then. I mean fourteen months before, when I called my creditors together.

Q. When you gave up business was it in consequence of being unfortunate - A. It was in consequence of believing that I could do better out of business.

Q. Did you give up your property to your creditors - A. I did not.

Q. You sold it to Want - A. I did not.

A. I believe you had been arrested on the morning of the 15th of November - A. Possibly.

Q. Was not you arrested in bed that morning, or has it happened so often that that you do not remember it - A. It happened more than once.

Q. Did you not leave the house then for two days with the prisoner and another person in it - A. I do not recollect it.

COURT. Q. Do you recollect quitting your house for one day - A. I never left my house for six hours.

Q. There cannot be any doubt in your mind; which am I to take as an answer - A. I was arrested I know, but do not remember the date.

MR. ALLEY. Q. Was you not taken out of your bed - A. I do not recollect that.

Q. Were you not indebted to the prisoner 15 l. or 16 l. at that time for wages - A. I was not, on my oath.

Q. What did you owe her - A. To the best of my recollection 10 l. or 11 l.

Q. On your solemn oath, did not you and Want offer a joint promissory note, at two months, for the 15 l. claimed as her wages, if she would not proceed in an action - A. I have no recollection of it. It was not offered by me.

Q. Has not Want told you it was offered to her - A. In our joint names? No. No one offered it to her by my advice.

Q. Was it offered by Want - A. As he tells me. This was before I charged her with felony.

Q. Do you recollect coming home after you was arrested, and the prisoner came and asked you for her wages, and you committed an assault upon her - A. I do not recollect it. On my oath I did not assault her; she took me to Bow-street, and charged me with assaulting her. I was ordered to find security to appear at the last Clerkenwell Sessions. Want was my bail.

Q. Last Session you was to find bail, and you had her in custody so that she should not appear against you - A. It was not for that.

Q. Was it not several days after she made the charge against you, that you charged her with the felony - A. It was not. I believe she charged me with the assault on the 15th or 16th of November.

COURT. Q. When did you charge her with the felony - A. To the best of my recollection about the 20th of November.

MR. ALLEY. Q. You have sworn you did not assault her, on the oath I ask you, when Clark, the officer, took you into custody, did you not tell him you was sorry you had beat her, for she was a very excellent servant - A. I did not.

Q. Did you not charge her at Marlborough-street with the robbery of a shoehorn - A. Not on the first charge.

Q. Now on your oath, was not that the property of another person - A. On my oath I believe it to be mine. I did not charge her with stealing an old pair of trowsers. There was a pair produced - it was not proved that they belonged to Mr. Slim.

Q. She was examined first on a Thursday - A. I believe she was.

Q. Was she not detained on a representation that you was in the country - A. I cannot tell what passed in my absence. I attended the first examination, which I believe was on Saturday. On my return to Dr. Want's, where I resided, he told me he had taken her up, I believe on the Thursday.

Q. Do you not know from Dr. Want that the examination was put off from Thursday to Saturday, on the ground of your being in the country, which was false - A. I believe it was. I gave evidence on Saturday, and she was dismissed. She was taken up on this present charge on the Monday following, to the best of my recollection. Her box had been removed from my house to Want's.

Q. When she was discharged she left her box where it was - A. At the watch-house.

Q. On your solemn oath, do not you know that Want opened her box with a key which he provided himself - A. On my oath he did not. The constable had keys, with which I believe he opened it at the watch-house. I do not believe it was opened by his key or mine.

Q. You say you suspected her long before, why not charge her with the robbery when she charged you with the assault - A. I had a multiplicity of things to attend to. I do not know how it was that I did not; though I had reason to suspect her I had not proof then, and did not chuse to go further in the matter.

Q. When she was taken up on the second charge, the Magistrate said she should be admitted to bail, and you resisted it - A. The magistrate put it to me, and I said she must not.

Q. Here are two boxes in the indictment, which belong to a dressing-case, and are like tea-caddies - A. They may bear some resemblance. I do not know that she drank her tea with the cup and saucer - the spoon is mine.

Q. What are the stockings - A. There are three lamb's wool and four cotton, to the best of my recollection.

Q. She was acquitted by the Magistrate, and might have had her box from the watch-house, but did not - A. No. she was not present when it was opened - the property was all found in her box at the watch-house. The constable was present when it was found.

Q. Before her box was taken to the watch-house it laid two or three days at Want's house - A. I am told so. It was at his house three or four days while I lodged there - she was not there then. I did not charge her with stealing the spoons at the first examination. I did not know they were lost.

COURT. Q. Why not inform the Magistrate about the spoons - A. I did not then wish to prosecute her.

Q. Then why charge her with stealing any thing - A. I missed several things.

JOHN WANT . I am a surgeon, and live in Russell-place, Charlotte-street; I know the prisoner and the prosecutor. He sold me part of the furniture in his house; I went to superintend the removing, and took Mary Butler with me - we saw the prisoner there. I went up stairs, and Miss Butler went into the kitchen. I went down soon after, and saw the prisoner there - I was surprised at seeing her there, knowing the circumstances under which she was discharged; this was on the 20th - she was discharged on the 16th. I mentioned my suspicions to Miss Butler that she was after no good; she appeared to be rummaging about the kitchen, and we determined to speak to Arnot to send her out of the house. He was up stairs; I informed him of my suspicions, and told him Wilmot had lost various articles, and Mr. Arnot was aware of the spoons that had been lost. He said,

"If you think it right to send her away do it." I went down, and expostulated with her on the impropriety of her being there when she had been discharged. She said she would not go without her boxes, and wanted to send for a constable to remove them. I said,

"No, they shall not go without Mr. Wilmot's permission." I was induced to say that in consequence of having seen in her hand, a pie-dish wrapt up ready for removal, and a table-cloth, which I supposed was going away - it was by her box. I took the table-cloth away from the conviction that she was going to remove it, and saw it was marked W. After some altercation the boxes were taken up, and examined in the presence of Miss Butler, Arnot, myself, and the prisoner; there were two boxes, and three or four little bundles; a variety of articles were taken out, and put into a bundle, which appeared to be Wilmot's property, as they were marked W. - they were put by until Wilmot made his appearance. On the following day the boxes were removed to my house.

Q. You took out what you conceived to be Wilmot's - A. Yes, and other things, which we thought were her's, but what she said were her's we left. The boxes were received by him, with the furniture, but not by my desire. A few days after - I do not know the time exactly, the prisoner applied to me in the morning for her boxes. In the mean time Wilmot had stated, that as far as he had seen the contents of the bundle, they were his, from the particular circumstances were stated with respect to the stockings and other articles, and he said he would have her taken to Marlborough-street. The boxes and bundle were brought into the parlour in her presence; she opened the bundle. The table-cloth which was taken from her had been put into the bundle in moving.

COURT. Q. That was put in by you - A. I cannot say who put it in - it was mentioned to her that there was no intention to charge her with it. She took out the tablecloth, a piece of printed furniture, and a pair of pantaloons, which she said were her master's. She afterwards went out for a coach, to remove them from my house. Wilmot had desired me to get a constable. We sent for one, followed the coach, and took her to Marlborough-street. The constable took the box, bundles, and all to the watch-house. I asked what we were to do, as the prosecutor was not there? The watch-house-keeper said we had better take her to the Magistrate for his opinion. We did so, and the Magistrate remanded her till the prosecutor could appear. This was Thursday.

Q. Where was Wilmot then - A. He was gone into the City, I believe, on business.

Q. By what authority was she taken up at all - A. By Wilmot's authority.

COURT. Q. Wilmot and you appeared on Saturday - A. Yes; and on hearing us the Magistrate discharged her.

MR. BARRY. Q. She was apprehended and brought before the same Magistrate on Monday - A. Yes, on that occasion she was committed.

COURT. Q. Her boxes and all were before the Magistrate on the Saturday - A. Yes. A new charge was made on Monday.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Are you a surgeon and apothecary - A. Yes. I have been long acquainted with Wilmot.

Q. Are you in the habit of bailing each other - A. He never bailed me. I have bailed him, perhaps three times, for civil actions. We did not accommodate each other with bills.

Q. On your oath, has not Mr. Jeffries, the chief clerk of the Common Pleas, a bill of yours now in his possession - A. I will explain that. Dyer is the drawer, and I am the endorser. It is six months over due.

Q. Are there any more bills out, jointly issued by you two - A. I think I may venture to swear not, but you take me by surprise.

Q. You bought Wilmot's furniture - A. Yes; I gave him about 98 l. for it, and paid him in money about the time Arnot took possession - it is now in my house in Clarendon-square. I had no bill of sale. I was at Bow-street when the prisoner charged the prosecutor with an assault - it was about the 14th of November. I do not recollect the date that we made the charge against her.

Q. How long before that was he arrested at the suit of the girl - A. In the evening Wilmot requested me to see the girl. I saw her, and gave her 10 s. She was surrounded by a party, who persuaded her to say the 10 s. was given her as part of her wages, and not in discharge of the assault. Wilmot was not present. I advised him to put in bail, and put in no answer. The robbery was not committed for three or four days after.

Q. Did she go to the prosecutor's after the charge was made at Bow-street - A. Wilmot went to the door and bolted her out.

Q. Her boxes were locked in and she out - A. Yes. I think Arnot took possession three or four days after that.

Q. She had no access to her boxes - Miss Butler and Mrs. Want were there - A. No; she was confined to her bed. I believe the greater part of the things were taken out. She said the boxes of the dressing-case were hers.

Q. On your oath, were they produced before Miss Butler - A. They were.

Q. Why not state to the Justice that the property was found in her possession - A. I did not then know they were Wilmot's. She stated so confidently they belonged to her tea-caddy - they were not mentioned to the Magistrate till the Monday.

Q. Did Want swear to a shoehorn - A. I did not hear him swear positively to that.

Q. When she was discharged on Saturday, were you not told that you and Want should be indicted for a conspiracy in bringing her there - A. Certainly we were told so by the attorney.

Q. On your oath, did not the prisoner (when you offered her to take her boxes away) say she would not take them till she could have all her property - A. I believe solemnly that she was not offered.

Q. Will you swear it did not pass - A. I cannot recollect. I did not see her boxes from the time they came to my house till she called.

Q. Who gave her 2 s. to get a coach - A. I did. I wished to ascertain where her residence was, but could not. I had not asked her, but I suspected she would not tell me. I did not put a man into the coach with her - I sent Jones to follow it.

Q. Who ran after the coach with a pair of pantaloons in his hand - A. Not me. I believe the constable carried them. I desired him to take the pantaloons and the printed furniture which she had left behind.

Q. Had you been to the watch-house between the Saturday and Monday - A. No. I had no key that would open her box.

Q. Did you not go to Mr. Jeffries about the bill, and tell him the girl was discharged, though fifty pair of stockings were found in her possession - A. I do not recollect the precise number. I will not swear I did not, but I think not. There was a considerable quantity of stockings marked

"W." I am sure there were thirty stockings.

Q. If any one had said there were only five single stockings of one sort and four of the other, it is an untruth - A. I should think he had stated an untruth.

Q. On your oath, when the girl had arrested Mr. Wilmot, did you not propose to give her your joint acceptance for 15 l., to put an end to it - A. No, not at the time of the assault. When the warrant was issued, she said she only wished her wages. I pointed out to her the impropriety of taking her master to Bow-street, and said, if that was all she wanted I would see her wages paid. She was surrounded by persons, who said they would have good security for the wages. I said I would undertake to see furniture put into her possession. On the night of the final examination she attended at my house about her wages; and it was distinctly understood that she should have them in a few days. I said I would give her a bill of exchange for the wages. 13 l. was at first named. She afterwards claimed 15 l. - it was to be my own bill. I recollected nothing about a joint bill. Wilmot did not know of it. Some of the persons round said, they knew nothing of me; and I said she should have furniture. I do not believe he assaulted her.

HENRY ARNOT . I succeeded the prosecutor in the house in Charlotte-street. I bought it of him, and was in possession of it after he left. The prisoner was not in the house then - her boxes were. I found the spoons in a small straw work cabinet belonging to the prisoner. I gave them to Mr. Wilmot. I found them on the Tuesday morning when I took possession.

Q. Were you present afterwards when the prisoner's boxes were searched - A. Yes; the prisoner, Miss Butler, and Want were present. Those things, which Want and Butler considered doubtful, were put aside. The boxes remained in my possession till Monday, when the men took them with Want's things.

Cross-examined by Mr. ALLEY. Q. Whatever was found, was found before the examination at Malborough-street - A. Yes, they had the opportunity of charging her with the spoons then.

COURT. Q. The cabinet was not locked - A. No, it stood in the kitchen window. Want ordered me not to let her have the boxes.

Q. Do you remember Want inquiring if they could charge her with stealing cheese - A. Want asked my shop-man if the cheese could be sworn to.

MARY BUTLER . I was present at Arnot's when the boxes were opened. I heard Wilmot had complained of losses, and seeing a quantity of stockings marked

"W." I examined them, and thought they were too many for one person to possess.

JOHN WALES . I am an officer of Marlborough-street. On Monday, the 29th of November, I examined the prisoner's boxes at St. Pancras watch-house, Cleveland-mews. Wilmot and Want were present, and part of the time Jones, the watch-house-keeper. I produce the things I found; they were produced before the Magistrate. I have also a basket, which was given me to-day by Want.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. The prisoner was absent - A. Yes. I found the boxes in the watch-house; I do not know how they came there.

WILLIAM GEORGE WILMOT re-examined. The printed furniture is mine; and the two boxes belong to the dressing-case, which they fit. The stockings I know by being marked

"W." Here is a pair of silk stockings, which I believe to be mine; I suppose the prisoner has worn them, or given them to some one to wear for her. Some of them are not marked. The five I swear to, to the best of my belief. Here is a corkscrew, which appears to be mine, and a shoehorn, which, to the best of my belief, I swear to be mine; and some waste paper, which I believe to be mine.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. She was discharged by the Magistrate for the cotton - A. No, nor the stockings.

Q. You certainly would not wear such old stockings as those - A. Yes, under boots. I never gave her any. I did not put them into her box. She was to have 14 l. a year.

Q. Who mended your stockings - A. The washerwoman, I suppose.

Prisoner's Defence. I never put the boxes into my box, they were two little boxes which I used to keep my tea and sugar in. Two silver spoons were lost while I was there, and I said I would pay for them. My master said I had nothing to pay for them.

THOMAS SLIM . I am a cheesemonger. The shoehorn is mine. I will take my oath of it, by this mark. I left it at the prosecutor's when I left his place. The prisoner was his servant. I remember his giving her old stockings, aprons, and other things, at different times. She has requested me to ask for her wages; and since I have left she has come crying to me, saying she had no bread to eat for two days together.

MR. BARRY. Q. Where do you live - A. At No. 11, Tottenham-street. I lived thirteen months with the prosecutor - he paid me my wages. I have not seen the horn since I left till to-day. There was no other in the house - Wilmot always used mine.

THOMAS TATTEN . I was clerk to Wilmot. Here are a pair of pantaloons, which were produced at the office; they are mine.

- . I am a constable. These are the pantaloons I received from Wilmot - they were produced on the table at Marlborough-street, and I put them into the bundle.

MR. BARRY. Q. How did the witness get them - A. They were given to him two days ago.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191201-168

167. THOMAS PECK was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of November , 3 lbs. of pepper, value 6 s. , the goods of Joseph Turnley , Sen. , and Joseph Turnley , Jun.

JOSEPH TURNLEY , SEN. I am in partnership with Joseph Turnley, Jun.; we are lightermen . On the 11th of November I directed another man, who has escaped, to take fifty bags of pepper in a boat. The same evening I sent the prisoner to assist in conveying them to the Sermaphore ship - it was loaded from Bow Creek. The other man was a watchman.

Cross-examined by MR. BROADRICK. Q. The prisoner continued in your service until he was taken - A. Yes. He was to navigate the barge.

JAMES ATTWOOD. I am an Excise watchman. On the 11th of November, in the evening, I was sent for to take charge of the bags of pepper. Next morning, I was coming up the River, and missed the men from the oars; the prisoner and another had both left. I went aft, and immediately Peck came forward. I saw the other sewing up a bag of pepper, and a parcel of loose pepper was in a handkerchief by his side - I took it from him, put it by my side, and kept alongside the bag. The watchman called to Peck to help move the bag, which he did. When I came up to the ship I went to shew it to the superior officer, and took the prisoner with me.

Q. Where was you when you missed them from their oars - A. I was forward, in the same barges; they were all together. Peck came forward on seeing me.

Cross-examined. Q. Where was the barge when you went to her - A. At Bow Creek. It was not a wet night then. I heard the oars cease when we were about the lower part of Limehouse - they both ceased together. I went aft directly, and met the prisoner coming forward. The other man said he was only going to take a little pepper for his own use. The prisoner remained in the barge with me. He did not go to the superior officer with me. I cannot find the watchman.

WILLIAM HURST . I am an Excise officer. On the morning of the 12th of November Attwood came, and brought the bag of pepper. I went with Peck to ascertain the weight of the bag - I brought it ashore. I found the inner bag had a slit in it about two inches long, and found it was 8 lbs. deficient. The prisoner came ashore with me.

Cross-examined. Q. He remained with you during the investigation - A. Yes.

ROBERT MARSTON . I received information from Hurst, and apprehended the prisoner at Ratcliff-highway. I said I supposed he knew what I wanted him for; he said Yes, but he was innocent.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191201-169

168. FRANCIS BEE was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of November , eight scarfs, value 11 l.; three shawls, value 3 l., and one pair of stockings, value 7 s. , the goods of Patrick Fox .

For the Prosecution, MR. ARABIN.

PATRICK FOX. I lodged with the prisoner from the 15th to the 27th of November. I went out, and left my parcels all safe, next morning I missed all these things, out of the parcels, which were tied up as before. I ran down and said I had been robbed, and did not know what to do. He said he would have no fuss in his house, and put me in fear. I was obliged to go away. I had him apprehended - the Magistrate told him to look for my property. I called once or twice about it - he always gave surly answers.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191201-170

169. MATTHEW BUTLER was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of November , 210 lbs. of lead, value 1 l. 15 s. , the goods of William Ward .

WILLIAM WARD. I am a painter and glazier , and live in Blenheim-street, Oxford-street. I was employed to do some plumbing at Alfred Cottages, Marylebone . On the 15th of November the lead was on the premises, next day it was gone.

SAMUEL PRENDERGRASS . I am an officer. I received information that the premises had been robbed; I suspected the workmen, and got information that Bond and Butler had been seen together that night - I took them into custody; they were navigators. I found a piece of lead in the Regency Canal, where Bond said it was.

GEORGE BOND. I am a navigator. On Tuesday night Butler came to me at a public-house, and asked me if I would go with him for a bit of lead? I said I did not mind. We went to the buildings - there were two long rolls and one short one lying by the coach-house; he took a long piece, carried it to the side of the canal, about a

hundred yards from the place, and buried it. He returned, took the short piece, and sold it for 7 s. - I had 3 s. 6 d. of it.

EDWARD ROBERT STIVERS . I delivered the lead on the premises - it was stolen.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191201-171

170. ISAAC WILLIS and THOMAS BAKER were indicted for stealing, on the 1st of December , one copper pot, value 3 s. , the goods of Luke Byrne .

LUKE BYRNE . I keep a public-house in Long-alley, Moorfields . On the 1st of December, about nine o'clock in the morning, the pot was stolen from the tap-room; nobody but the prisoners were there.

CATHERINE CURLEY . I am servant at the house. The pot was in the tap-room, on the hearth, nobody but the prisoners were there - I missed it in about ten minutes. The prisoners emptied some water out of it, and put it into a saucepan, in which I had boiled some fish for them. I left them, and on my return Willis was gone.

WILLIAM CORNFORTH . I was coming down Long-alley, and saw Willis come out with the copper pot in his hand, and go up Rose and Crown-court.

WILLIS - GUILTY . Aged 26.

Confined Six Months .

BAKER - NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191201-172

171. MICHAEL ROACH was indicted for stealing on the 24th of November , 2 lbs. of bacon, value 2 s. , the goods of William Dowlman .

JAMES HOLLAND . I am shopman to Mr. Dowlman, who is a cheesemonger , and lives in Drury-lane . On the 24th of November, about twelve o'clock in the day, while I was serving a person, the prisoner came in, pulled the bacon about, and went out; I followed and secured him with a piece in his hand.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was taking it to my landlady to cook.

GUILTY . Aged 52.

Confined One Month .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191201-173

172. JOHN LILLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of September , one bed, value 2 l.; two bolsters, value 10 s.; two pillows, value 5 s.; two sheets, value 7 s.; five blankets, value 30 s.; one looking-glass, value 1 l.; two counterpanes, value 15 s., and one set of fire-irons, value 6 s., the goods of Edward Hutchings , in a lodging-room .

EDWARD HUTCHINGS . I live in Middlesex-street, Somers'-town. I let the prisoner a furnished lodging, at 6 s. a week; he was there near a quarter, I received no money of him. He said he had money coming from an estate in Scotland, and when that was sold he would pay me. He left, and I found every thing was gone, except a bedstead, two chairs, and a table - the articles stated in the indictment were taken away, which were let with the lodging.

CHARLOTTE HUTCHINGS . I know all the things were in the room when the prisoner took it. I have only found the curtains and sheets.

RICHARD INGSTON . I am a pawnbroker. I have a sheet and curtain, which I took in pledge from the prisoner on the 9th of July.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. Mrs. Hutchings sent me to pledge the things for her.

GUILTY . Aged 36.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191201-174

173. ANN JENKINS was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of December , 7 lbs. of cheese, value 3 s. , the goods of William Price .

WILLIAM PRICE . I am a poulterer , and live in Lamb's Conduit-passage . On the 1st of December, about eleven o'clock in the morning, the prisoner came to the shop with another woman, who inquired the price of eggs. While she was being served the prisoner walked out, with her hands under her apron - I missed a piece of cheese. I followed, and took the cheese from her.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I was in distress.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Confined Six Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191201-175

174. THOMAS JOINER was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of November , two pewter pots, value 18 d. , the goods of William Allen .

WILLIAM ALLEN . I keep a public-house in Upper Berkeley-street . On the 16th of November I saw the prisoner take a pint pot from the area steps, and run off with it in his bag. I followed, he took it out of the bag, and threw it down - I secured him.

THOMAS MARTIN . I took him in charge, and found a long string on him, with a hook to it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Confined One Year .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191201-176

175. WILLIAM LLOYD BURLETON was indicted for a misdemeanor .

ROBERT PAIN . I am shopman to Messrs. Robert and Richard Lloyd , tobacconists , Holborn-hill. On the 8th of November the prisoner came to our shop, and brought a note from his father, who is a customer of ours, and is a tobacconist in Gravel-lane. I have a paper, which he presented to Mr. Lloyd; it is an order for 6 lbs. of shag and 6 lbs. of cut tobacco - I delivered it to him. It was worth 2 l. 18 s.; he took it away. I saw him in custody at Guildhall afterwards, and know him to be the person.

HERBERT LLOYD BURLETON . I am a tobacconist, and live in Gravel-lane, and deal with the prosecutors. I never sent the prisoner there at any time for tobacco. He never brought it to me. He is my son.

Prisoner's Defence. I was never in the shop.

RICHARD LLOYD . The prisoner gave me the note; I am certain he is the person - I knew him before. He represented

himself to be the son of Herbert Burleton . I have seen him at his father's shop.

GUILTY .

Confined One Year .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18191201-177

176. JOHN DAVIS was indicted for a misdemeanor .

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18191201-178

177. SOLOMON JEFFERIES was indicted for a misdemeanor .

For the Prosecution, MR. ALLEY.

WILLIAM MILLS . I am in the employ of Alexander Purse , pawnbroker , London Wall . On the 3d of November the prisoner called in the morning to know if we advanced money on woollen cloth? I said we did. He came about an hour or two after with two pieces of woollen cloth (as I thought) under his arm - the number of the cloth was on the paper, and the length marked - it was forty yards. I opened the paper, and unrolled it about a quarter of a yard, and examined the quality of the cloth. I asked him the quantity? he said about forty yards; that he himself was the manufacturer, that his name was John Clark , and his manufactory was at Frome. I asked him how much would answer his present purpose? he said about 6 l. would be quite sufficient - he warranted each to measure forty yards at least, and said he made and measured them. I did not measure them, as if they had been of that length they would have been worth more. I advanced him six 1 l. notes on the two pieces.

Q. In consequence of his coming again, had you occasion to examine these cloths - A. Yes. I unrolled a piece, and found the first four or five yards was cloth, then three yards of green baize, and under that a hollow wooden cylinder. The cloth and baize were worth 23 s. It had the appearance of a roll of cloth, list was fastened at each end to give it that appearance.

Cross-examined by MR. WALFORD. Q. Do you advance money without measuring things - A. Frequently. He did not say he was sent by any one with it.

MR. WALFORD stated to the Jury, that he was instructed to inform them that the prisoner had been made the dupe of another person, he being a stranger to the tricks of town.

GUILTY .

Publicly Whipped and Discharged.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18191201-179

178. ISAAC DAVIS was indicted for a misdemeanor .

For the Prosecution, MR. WALFORD.

RICHARD BROWN . I am porter to Messrs. Willan and Co., who are carriers. On the 9th of June I stopped at No. 9, King-street with my cart, to deliver five trusses at Mr. Cash's. There was a truss of blue cloth on the copse, which had been brought to town by the waggon - it was near two large trusses and could not be easily got out. I was getting a large truss into Mr. Cash's, and as I had got it on my knee, I turned round, and saw the prisoner pulling the truss out of the cart. I laid hold of him directly.

Cross-examined by MR. ARABIN. Q. Was the street clear - A. Yes. The prisoner was dressed like a dandy. The truss was worth 15 l.

WILLIAM JOHNSON . I keep the Castle, public-house, in King-street, nearly opposite Cash's; I saw the cart stop there, and saw two men lurking about it - one was in the path and the other in the road.

Q. Was either of them the prisoner - A. I cannot exactly say, One of them was pushing this truss up with his hands - he was in front of the cart; the other stood in the middle of the road. I saw him push it twice; every time the waggoner came out they withdrew, and got into a doorway to conceal themselves. The waggoner went in again; the shortest was pulling the truss. The waggoner came out, seized him, and threw him into the passage. The prisoner is one of the two I saw before - I ran across directly.

Cross-examined. Q. You was several doors off - A. About five doors - it was about seven o'clock in the evening. There was no puppy in the cart.

GUILTY .

Confined One Year and Publicly Whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18191201-180

179. ANTHONY ASLAT and PHILIP RICHARDS were indicted for conspiracy .

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18191201-181

180. WILLIAM DEER was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of November , two shirts, value 14 s. , the goods of Frances Deer , widow .

FRANCES DEER . I live in Bath-buildings, Hoxton , and am a laundress ; the prisoner is my son , and lived with me. I prosecute him with the intent of keeping him from bad company. On the 10th of November a shirt was taken from my bed room, and on the 16th another. They belonged to Mr. Wilks.

JOHN GARROD . I live with Mr. Stevens, who is a pawnbroker, and lives in Shoreditch. On the 10th of November the prisoner pledged a shirt with me for 7 s. - I knew him before; he had been several times before. On the 16th another was pledged.

Prisoner. Q. Will you swear to my person - A. Yes, he pledged them in the name of Wells.

GEORGE GOODLUCK. I am headborough of Shoreditch. I apprehended the prisoner on Saturday fortnight, at his mother's, and found the two duplicates on him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I took them to get money to buy fruit to sell, and intended to get them out again.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined Six Months , and Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18191201-182

181. THOMAS DEVENHALL was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of November , 5 lbs. of soap, value 3 s. , the goods of John Dyson .

JOHN DYSON . I am a grocer , and live in High-street, Marylebone . On the 12th of November, about six o'clock, the soap was on a counter about two yards inside the shop. I saw a boy, named Watts, come in, and look round - I was in the counting-house, and could not be seen. He returned in about a quarter of an hour. I turned round a moment, and he took the soap; I saw him going out with it under his arm, pursued him, and to the best of my knowledge, I saw the prisoner running on the other side - he had a coat on like the prisoner. I secured Watts about three hundred yards off, with the soap, and took him to the watch-house - the prisoner was taken the next day.

RICHARD COATES . I am a constable. I was in High-street, and saw the prisoner and Watts very near Dyson's shop. Next morning I found Watts at the watch-house, and in consequence of information I went after the prisoner, and saw him in Stafford-street, Lisson-green. He knew me, turned his head, and ran up two or three streets. I told him I wanted him for stealing soap the night before, and said,

"Why, I thought you had had enough of it last Session." He said,

"Why, I must do something, I cannot starve." The Magistrate admitted Watts as an evidence.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

THOMAS WATTS . I live at Bowman's-buildings with my father - the prisoner lived next door. I was coming from work, and stole the soap - the prisoner was with me; he stood close by the door ready to take it.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18191201-183

182. HENRY CHARLES MORRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of November , from the person of Michael Sullivan , ten 1 l. Bank notes , his property.

MICHAEL SULLIVAN . I am a poulterer , and live in Clement's-lane. On the 1st of November, about half-past five o'clock in the afternoon, I was at the corner of Wych-street, walking towards Newcastle-street ; I had ten 1 l. notes in my left hand breeches pocket - there was a mob of people - It was the day of the meeting. I went round the corner to let the mob pass - some people surrounded me, and I found the prisoner's hand in my pocket - he had hold of the notes; the button was cut from my pocket. I took his hand out of my pocket.

Q. Were the notes in his hand when you took it out - A. Yes, I kept hold of him. The mob dragged me into the Fountain passage, and knocked me down; I saw him hand my notes over to a companion - I never got them again. I never lost sight of the prisoner until he was secured.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Which way were the mob coming - A. Up Wych-street, across Newcastle-street; I was knocked down by two of them after I had laid hold of him. I got up immediately, and collared him again. I charged nobody else with it.

Q. When he stopped you he desired you to go into the public-house with him - A. Never, the mob dragged me into the passage - I cried out Murder! The publican opened the door to let them in, and they called for beer. I sat with them to prevent the prisoner from getting away, and sent for an officer; I told the officer that I saw him give the notes to another man, who ran down the street. I should know that man again.

Q. Did you go before the Magistrate - A. I went before Mr. Hicks that evening - this was Monday. He was to come and have another hearing on Thursday; he appeared there, and Mr. Birnie told his clerk to tell me to go to Hicks's Hall to the Grand Jury - the prisoner was let go then.

Q. He was discharged by the Magistrate, and you had him taken up the night before last on a Judge's warrant - A. I had him taken up - he was at his own house. He gave his address to the Magistrate.

Q. Did you take any witnesses to the Magistrate - A. No, that was the reason he was discharged. I have witnesses to-day.

COURT. Q. Have you got the constable here who apprehended the prisoner - A. No, they wanted to make money of me.

MR. BARRY. Q. Did Rock go before the Grand Jury with you - A. No, he is quite a gentleman. I never found him till yesterday; he then gave me his card. He saw me robbed, but was afraid to speak.

Q. How soon after you was robbed did you see Rock - A. Not till Yesterday. I met him in the street the night before last - he did not come to my house.

CHARLES ROCK . I am a builder, and live in Angel-court, Strand. I do not know Sullivan, only by seeing him selling fowls about - I have seen him about the neighbourhood for ten or twelve years. I was coming home on the 1st of November, and saw a crowd towards the bottom of Newcastle-street. Sullivan cried out Murder! - he had hold of the prisoner's hand, and said he had robbed him of ten 1 l. notes. They went into the Fountain, public-house - I did not see any body strike him. I could not get into the public-house for the crowd, and so went home.

Q. Did you tell the man where he could find you - A. I left my name at the Fountain, in case I should be wanted to give evidence. His wife called at my house yesterday, and begged I would come down. I did not know the prisoner before, but I am sure he is the man. I saw no notes in his hand. I only know Sullivan had hold of him.

COURT. Q. The man's wife called at your house last night - A. Either his wife called last night or the night before.

Q. Have you ever spoken to the prosecutor in the street since the robbery - A. No; I have seen him about the street but never inquired of him about it.

Q. Have you never been at Serjeant's Inn - A. Yes. I never bailed a man in my life.

Q. You did not see Sullivan the night before last - A. No.

Prisoner. I leave my case to my Counsel.

GEORGE MORRIS . I live at Walthamstow, on my property, at my uncle's, who keeps a boarding-school. The prisoner is my brother. I was with him on the 1st of November. We dined together at a chop-house in Drury-lane, and staid there till twenty minutes before six o'clock, and were then going home to tea to my mother's, in Brunswick-street, Blackfriars-road, where my brother lives. We were arm-in-arm, got to the top of Wych-street, and saw a great number of people collected. We went up, and

before we came close to the crowd I heard a man crying, or rather bellowing,

"I am robbed." He appeared to be raising off the ground, covered with mud and blood. We were endeavouring to get out of the way; he instantly put his hand out and caught hold of my brother, saying,

"You have robbed me!" My brother said,

"If you think I have, send for an officer and search me." We entered the public-house at the corner - I do not know the sign, the man followed.

Q. Did he continue his hold - A. He did not. He persisted in charging my brother with robbing him, and said,

"If you will give me the 10 l. I will not send for an officer, and you may go about your business." My brother said,

"No, send for the officer, I insist on being searched." We went into a private room, remained till the officer came, and were both searched; nothing was found on us. We were tied together, taken to Bow-street, and examined. The man appeared at first, to say, he had been collecting money at the west end of the town. We had only one witness, who was a young man, and in the crowd. The Magistrate told the prosecutor he must make a mistake. He appeared very drunk. My brother gave his true address to the Magistrate, and was desired to attend again. We went again on the Thursday following; Mr. Birnie was present. The prosecutor said he had seen Mr. Birnie at the Finsbury Meeting - the charge was dismissed. He has since preferred a bill against my brother. I am positive the prisoner could not have committed the robbery without my knowledge, and I am sure he did not.

MICHAEL SULLIVAN re-examined. I had only drank one pint and a half of beer that day.

JOHN ROBERTS . I am shopman to Mr. Sage, a liquor-merchant, who lives in Clare-market. Sullivan generally has a stall under our window, and brings us notes to investigate. I saw him on the Monday after this happened; I cannot say whether he was drunk or not. On the day of the examination he charged me with not giving him the notes.

NOT GUILTY .

It is proper to notice, that the Court observed the prisoner left the bar with his character unimpeached.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18191201-184

183. JAMES DERMOT was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of November , one handkerchief, value 2 s., the goods of Richard Powis , from his person .

RICHARD POWIS . I am a watchmaker , and live in Rosamond-street, Clerkenwell. On the 17th of November, between five and six o'clock, I was in Clare-street . A man in a smock-frock said a man had stolen my handkerchief - he had hold of the prisoner - it was Thompson. I felt, and missed it - it was in my pocket five minutes before. Thompson took it from the prisoner.

THOMAS THOMPSON . I am an officer. I was at the corner of Clare-market, and saw the prisoner with two more. I suspected, and watched them. They followed Mr. Powis; one took a handkerchief out of his pocket and handed it to the prisoner, who was behind with the other, covering him. I seized the prisoner and took it from him. I was dressed in a round frock.

JOHN CHARD . I am a brush-maker, and live in Charter House-lane. I was with Thompson, and saw the prisoner and two others. One of them took the handkerchief from the prosecutor's pocket, and gave it to the prisoner.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I saw two young men take it and throw it down. I picked it up and went to give it to the gentleman.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18191201-185

184. DANIEL CALLAGAN was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of November , one cart, value 50 s. , the property of James Chiswell .

JAMES CHISWELL . I live in Lucas-street, Commercial-road . My cart stood by the side of my shop, without a horse, on the 26th of November, about ten o'clock at night, as I could not get it locked up that night. The pot-boy came and gave me information, I ran out, and found the prisoner had dragged it about a hundred and fifty yards down the street. I called the patrol, who took him into custody. He had run with the cart up to his knees in mud.

THOMAS NODIN . I am a patrol. I heard the alarm, and saw the prisoner dragging the cart away. He saw me, and let go of the shaft. I stopped him without losing sight of him.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in liquor.

GUILTY . Aged 29.

Whipped , and Discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18191201-186

185. THOMAS CREW was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of October , 1 lb. of gunpowder, value 4 s. , the goods of William Gillmore Harvey and Stephen Henry Grueber ; and THOMAS GOLDSBY was indicted for receiving the same, knowing it to be stolen .

For the Prosecution, MR. ALLEY.

MR. WILLIAM GILLMORE HARVEY. I am in partnership with Stephen Henry Grueber ; we are gunpowder-manufacturers at Twickenham-common. Crew was employed at the works . In consequence of suspicion he was taken into custody. I was present at his examination before the Magistrate, when he made this voluntary confession and signed it - (read).

The prisoner says, about a month ago he stole 2 lbs. of gunpowder from his master, and sold it to Thomas Goldsby , hostler at the house of Burford, at Twickenham; and further states, that he has, at several other times, stolen other parcels of powder.

BENJAMIN NICHOLLS , I am a constable. I searched the stable at the house where Goldsby lives, the Coach and Horses, public-house, at Twickenham, and among the hay in the loft I found three different parcels of gunpowder and 2 lbs. in a canister. He said it belonged to him, and he gave 18 d. a pound for it to the prisoner Crew.

Cross-examined by MR. WALFORD. Q. He made no secret of it - A. No.

WILLIAM GILLMORE HARVEY re-examined. I have examined and proved the powder - it is our composition - it is not finished.

Cross-examined. Q. A person not skilled in it would not know it was not complete - A. No. We do not allow our servants to sell powder at the common price; other mills allow their servants to sell it. I understand some sell it at 18 d. a pound.

CREW - GUILTY . Aged 44.

Confined Three Months .

GOLDSBY - NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191201-187

186. HANNAH HITCHIN was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of November , one whittle, value 12 s., and three pieces of cotton, value 6 d. , the goods of Joshua Craig .

JOSHUA CRAIG . I am a linen-draper , and live in High Holborn . The prisoner was my servant . When I came home in the evening I found a shawl on the table, the fringe had been cut off, and a binding put on. I discovered my private mark on the end of the border. I sent for an officer, and found a gown in her box, and a piece of cotton of the same pattern. She said the boy gave it to her.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. When did she say the boy gave it to her - A. At the office. I have four shopmen.

Q. She said she bought the shawl of Mr. Jones - A. Yes; he is not here. I send goods out with my private mark on them. The print has my mark on it.

WILLIAM READ . I was sent for on the 8th of November. The prosecutor gave the prisoner into my charge for stealing a whittle. I found a gown in her room, which the prosecutor claimed. I also found a remnant of cotton to match it in her box.

GEORGE PRIOR. The prisoner said I gave her the print. On my oath, I never did.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you hear her say so - A. Yes; she said I took it out of the shop, and gave it to her at seven o'clock in the morning. The shop has not been open so early as seven o'clock for the last two months. I never sold her the shawl in my life. I sleep in the shop. I never gave her any thing.

Prisoner's Defence. I am confident he gave me the print with others. I bought the shawl of Mr. Jones, in Tottenham-court-road.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191201-188

187. SARAH COUGHLIN was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of November , one pair of slippers, value 4 s. , the goods of John Chapman .

FRANCES CHAPMAN . I am the wife of John Chapman , who is a shoemaker , and lives in Church-street, Mile-end . On the 15th of November, about two o'clock, the prisoner came for a pair of double-soled boots - we had none. She then looked at some shoes. She asked the price of a quantity, and then went out with some slippers. I ran after her, but having the child in my arms I could not catch her. Two women were brought back, neither of whom was her. I am sure she took them.

SAMUEL DOBSON . I took the two girls. They said it was Sarah Coughlin that took them, and she was gone to pawn them. I secured her by Mr. Haines's, the pawnbroker. I took her to the watch-house - her mother came to her, and said,

"Sarah, did you take them?" She said,

"Yes, I did, and none of your snivelling here." She said she threw them into a pond.

Prisoner's Defence. I said I did not take them. The other girls got me to go in for them.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined Six Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191201-189

188. WILLIAM WATTS was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of November , one tea-caddy, value 15 s. , the goods of Samuel House .

SAMUEL HOUSE . I am a broker , and live at Knights-bridge. On the 29th of November, my man went into the shop, and secured the prisoner with the caddy.

GEORGE NICHOLLS . I was talking to my master, and saw somebody in the shop; I ran up, and saw the prisoner leave the shop with the caddy. I secured him with it under his coat.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 35.

Confined Six Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191201-190

189. JOHN WILLIAMSON was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of November , one pair of shoes, value 6 s. , the goods of George Smith .

GEORGE SMITH . I am a shoemaker , and live in Ray-street, Clerkenwell . On the 25th of November, the prisoner came to buy a pair of shoes; while my son was serving him I saw him put a pair into his pocket. I charged him with it - he pulled them out, and said they fell in.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 60.

Confined Six Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191201-191

190. JOHN THOMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of December , three salt-cellars, value 3 s. , the goods of George Blakeway .

GEORGE BLAKEWAY . I am a glass-manufacturer , and live in the Strand . On the 1st of December, about two o'clock, as my servant returned from dinner, he called me out. I found the prisoner in the shop; he had put two salts in his hat and another in his pocket. I sent for a constable, who found them there.

JOHN VIALLS . I am shopman to the prosecutor. As I returned from dinner I found the prisoner in the shop, and missed some salt-cellars off the shelves. I asked him what he wanted? He made no answer. I saw the salts in his pocket. The constable found them on him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I was in distress.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191201-192

191. JOHN SIMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of November , 20 s. in monies numbered, and nine 1 l. Bank-notes , the monies of John Lawes .

JOHN LAWES . I keep the Mulberry Tree, public-house , Mulberry-street, Commercial-road . On the 15th of November, the prisoner came and asked me to give him change for a 10 l. note; we were in complete confusion at the time, having had a very large fire in the neighbourhood. I took him nine 1 l. notes, and one pound in silver. He asked me what he owed? - it was 3 s. He had half a pint of gin, which I took into the parlour with the notes. I put the notes and silver down, which he counted, and said,

"Allow me to leave this bundle in the bar, and I will call and pay your score."

Q. Did he give you a 10 l. note - A. He did not - it was a neglect of mine, certainly. I immediately sent to his father's, who lives at No. 11, in our street, and inquired if he was there? He was not, and had not been there. I saw no more of him till the Saturday following, when I gave him into custody. I am certain he never put down the 10 l. note, or left the bundle at the bar.

Cross-examined by MR. WALFORD. Q. You expected a 10 l. note - A. Certainly. My house was full of firemen, and he took advantage of it.

FRANCIS FREEMAN . I took the prisoner in charge. As he went to the office he said he received the money of the prosecutor, and had no 10 l. note at the time at all.

Prisoner's Defence. I asked for change for a 10 l. note, I had ordered a tailor to bring me a suit of clothes to the house, and Lawes saw me pay him 2 l. 15 s. I left a 10 l. note on the table.

JOHN LAWES re-examined. I supposed he had a 10 l. note when he asked for change. It did not strike me that he had not given me the note till my wife asked me for it.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191201-193

192. JOHN SIMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of November , one handkerchief, value 2 s., the goods of a man unknown , from his person .

JOHN FURZEMAN . On the 8th of November, I was in Broad-street, Bloomsbury, at the corner of Dyot-street . I saw the prisoner and two others following two gentlemen, who were arm-in-arm. I saw the prisoner take a handkerchief out of one of their pockets. I secured him, and he threw it away - the gentleman held him while I picked it up. The gentleman gave him to me - he fell down in the road - I took him up; he cut me, and knocked my hat off. I lost a silk handkerchief out of my hat. Twenty or thirty thieves came round - nobody would assist me; I, however, secured him. He said it was his birth-day.

JOHN GILL . I was in Broad-street, and saw two gentlemen leaving the crowd, saying,

"D - n it, let him go, he has stolen my handkerchief." I went up, and saw Furzeman on the ground, and the prisoner beating him. There were above one hundred people around, and nobody would help. I assisted to take him to the watch-house.

Prisoner's Defence. The handkerchief is mine - it fell out of my hat.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191201-194

193. WILLIAM OLIVER was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of November , one brass mortar, value 10 s. , the goods of John Simmonds .

JOHN SIMMONDS . I am a broker , and live in Old-street . On the 23d of November I saw two boys walking by my shop - I saw the prisoner take the mortar; I ran out, and secured him with it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191201-195

194. SAMUEL WATKINS was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of November , 12 pair of stockings, value 18 s. the goods of Samuel Everingham .

GEORGE EVERINGHAM . I am son of Samuel Everingham , who is a hosier , and lives in Oxford-street . On the 24th of November, about three o'clock in the afternoon, the stockings were on a railing inside the door. A woman said a boy had stolen them. I ran out, and in about half an hour Bridgood brought the prisoner back with them.

WILLIAM BRIDGOOD . I was in Berwick-street. The prisoner passed me, with the bundle under his coat - a woman cried out Stop thief! I pursued him into Rathbone-place - he was stopped, and dropped the stockings. I took them up, and brought him back to the prosecutor's.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191201-196

195. EDWARD WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of November , seven handkerchiefs, value 8 s. , the goods of David Evans .

DAVID EVANS . I am a linen-draper , and live in St. John-street . On the 27th of November, between seven and eight o'clock, the prisoner came in, and took these handkerchiefs from inside the shop. Thompson brought him back with them in about a quarter of an hour.

THOMAS THOMPSON. I received information from the patrol, went into St. John-street, and saw the prisoner go into the prosecutor's passage, and take the handkerchiefs. I pursued, he threw them down, and I secured him.

WILLIAM READ . I was with Thompson, and picked the handkerchiefs up when the prisoner threw them down. He went into another shop before that.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I was distressed.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Six Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191201-197

196. GEORGE THOMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of December , one coat, value 1 l.; one handkerchief, value 3 s., and one pair of gloves, value 6 d. , the goods of John Fox .

JOHN FOX. I am clerk to Messrs. Dawbarn and Son , Gate-street, Lincoln's Inn-fields. On the 3d of December, about three o'clock, I left my coat in the warehouse, and at half-past seven I missed it. The prisoner had been

there from the work-house - I thought it must be him. I went and charged him with it - he said he had pledged it.

JOHN WATSON . I am a pawnbroker. On the 3d of December, the prisoner pledged a coat and handkerchief at my master's, Mr. Hodges, Drury-lane.

JOSEPH IVORY . I took the prisoner in charge - he said he pledged them. I found a letter addressed to Mr. Fox in his pocket.

GUILTY . Aged 35.

Confined Three Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191201-198

197. SAMUEL REEVES was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of December , 7 lbs. of beef, value 4 s. , the goods of Amos Hempson .

AMOS HEMPSON . I am a butcher , and live in Chenies-street . On Saturday morning I found the prisoner in custody with the beef.

JOHN ERRINGTON . I was standing in my shop, opposite the prosecutor's, about eleven o'clock in the morning, and saw the prisoner and another run from the prosecutor's with the beef. I secured him in Thornhaugh-street, and had seen him let the beef fall. I brought him back, and made him pick it up.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Whipped and Discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191201-199

198. SARAH JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of November , one cloak, value 6 s. , the goods of James Williams .

MARY WILLIAMS . I am the wife of James Williams . On the 15th of November, the prisoner came to my house, stopped till night, and then left - I missed my cloak next day. I found her out, and asked her how she could take it? she behaved very indecent.

JOHN MATTHEWS . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Whitecross-street. On the 15th of November, about eight o'clock in the evening, the prisoner pledged the cloak with me.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. She lent it to me. I pledged it, and meant to redeem it.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined One Month .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191201-200

199. CHARLES HOLMES was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of December , 30 engravers's tools, value 20 s., the goods of Alexander Findlay , and 10 engraver's tools, value 5 s. , the goods of John Duce .

ALEXANDER FINDLAY . I am an engraver , and live in Merlin's-place, Clerkenwell . On Monday morning, the 5th of December, I found my workshop, which is in the yard, had been broken open, and all the tools gone. They could pass through an adjoining building into my yard. Five of the tools were found on the roof of the adjoining building. Next day I found the prisoner at the office with them - part were mine, and part Mr. Duce's.

THOMAS MARTIN . I am an officer. The watchman brought the prisoner to the watch-house with the tools in his hand. I searched him, and found the prosecutor's box and eye-glass, and a piece of copper in his pocket.

RICHARD DALY . I am a watchman. On Monday morning, at two o'clock, the prisoner passed me with a bundle, I asked him what he had got? he said they were tools, which belonged to his master, and I might look at them. I took him to the watch-house.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was sleeping on a brick-kiln, the watchman sent me away, and as I got down I kicked against the tools. I said I found them.

GUILTY Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191201-201

200. WILLIAM HART , WILLIAM JACKSON , and WILLIAM SNELLWOOD were indicted for stealing, on the 2d of December , one firkin, value 1 s., and 60 lbs. of butter, value 60 s. , the goods of Henry William Brooks .

HENRY WILLIAM BROOKS . I am a cheesemonger , and live in Baldwin-street, City Road . On the 2d of December, about half-past seven o'clock in the evening, I was weighing ten firkins of butter, and lost one out of the shop.

THOMAS POTTS . I was in Baldwin-street, and saw the three prisoners standing near the prosecutor's door - I ran out, and stood by the hospital, opposite Brooks's, as I thought they were after no good, and saw one of them take the firkin and lift it up - all three went together. I followed them to No. 29, George's-row, John's-row. I am sure the prisoners are the three men. Two of them carried it - they changed with each other.

JAMES TAYLOR . About nine o'clock I went, by direction of the last witness, to No. 29, George's-row, and found the three prisoners smoking their pipes in the back room. I found the firkin of butter in the yard in a shed, covered over with another tub.

THOMAS EDWARDS . I went to the house which the boy, Potts, shewed us, and found the prisoners smoking their pipes, and the firkin of butter in the shed, covered with a tub.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

HART'S Defence. We went to the house with three unfortunate girls. While we were there the men came about the firkin.

HART - GUILTY . Aged 18.

JACKSON - GUILTY . Aged 19.

SNELLWOOD - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191201-202

201. ROBERT HUNT , EDWARD IMBER , and HENRY WRIGHT were indicted for stealing, on the 12th of November , two silver tea-spoons, value 4 s. , the goods of John Sanders .

MARY SANDERS . I am the wife of John Sanders , who is a gardener , and lives in London-fields, Hackney . On the 12th of November, about eight o'clock, the prisoners, Imber, Hunt, and another, who has escaped, came into the shop to buy fruit. They noticed the clock that was in the

shop, and Hunt and the other went up to it - the spoons were just by it. They bought an apple and left the shop. I missed the spoons directly, went after them with my husband, overtook them in a few minutes with Wright, and gave them in charge.

JOHN GARVA. I am a constable of Hackney. I was informed the boys had stolen the spoons, and went out. I secured Wright, the other two were about fifty yards off; I secured them, but could not find the fourth. I found the spoons in Wright's hat.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

WRIGHT'S Defence. A young man sold them to me for 6 d. I never saw the boys. I put them into my hat, as my pockets had holes.

HUNT - GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

IMBER - GUILTY. Aged 13.

Judgment Respited .

WRIGHT - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined One Year .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191201-203

203. WILLIAM HOOPER and ZACHARIAH CASSIMERE were indicted for stealing, on the 1st of December , one coat, value 5 s. , the goods of Thomas Moorson .

THOMAS MOORSON . I sell apples and fish in the street , and live in Pancras-lane . On the 1st of December, between eight and nine o'clock in the morning, I hung my coat on the door - I missed it about three o'clock.

JOHN SMITH . On the 1st of December, between nine and ten o'clock, I saw the prisoners at the Elephant and Castle, public-house, Camden-town, coming towards Battle-bridge. Knowing Cassimere, I followed them to the Wheatsheaf, they parted there. I missed them, they joined again - I lost sight of them, and in a few minutes they came down Maiden-lane - Cassimere had the coat under his arm. I secured them, and told them I had been watching them for half an hour. Cassimere said he knew nothing of it.

CASSIMERE'S Defence. I picked it up.

HOOPER'S Defence. I know nothing of it.

HOOPER - NOT GUILTY .

CASSIMERE - GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191201-204

204. WILLIAM HAWARD was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of October , two sheets, value 8 s., the goods of Catharine Leaton , in a lodging-room .

CATHARINE LEATON . I am a widow , and keep the White Hart, public-house , in Windmill-street, Tottenham-court-road . I let the prisoner a room - he slept in a room where there were two other beds; he had a bed to himself, and was to pay 1 s. per night. He took it on the 25th of October for one night. Next morning he sent the two men who slept in the room after situations, as they were out of employ - they found no situations were wanted. As he was going out I sent the servant up to see if all was safe, and as he went out, she said the sheets were gone. I ran after him, but lost him - he was taken that day.

WILLIAM SHEPPARD . I am constable of St. Pancras. The prosecutrix gave me information, and I traced the prisoner to the Hole in the Wall, public-house, in Chancery-lane. I went there about eleven o'clock in the morning, he came in in about an hour after - I took him in charge. He then said he had pledged the sheets in Greek-street, Soho, and had made away with the duplicate. I went to the pawnbroker's, who produced them at the office.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I told him I had a purse in pledge - I know nothing of them.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191201-205

205. EDWARD FULLER and JOHN RAYNER were indicted for stealing on the 1st of December , two live pigs, price 5 l. , the property of James Pagett .

ELIZA PAGETT . I am the wife of James Pagett , who is a carpenter , and lives in Rowland's-gardens, Stepney-green ; we had two pigs about seven months old. On Wednesday, the 1st of December, about eight o'clock in the evening, my neighbour alarmed me, and said my pigsty was on fire, and the pigs gone. I went out to prevent the fire as fast as I possibly could, and found a pot of brimstone, a bag which had some brimstone in it, and a sack outside - some bushes were burning in it; we had secured the sty with two large nails, and the store-pig was parted from the other - they broke it open in both places.

JOSEPH LEER . On the 1st of December, I saw the prisoners driving the pigs at the top of Union-place, Stepney-green - they wanted to turn them towards Mile End-road. I saw Mrs. Paget putting the fire out, and told her I had seen two men driving the pigs. I ran towards the White Horse, public-house, and saw the two pigs in the Mile End-road - Fuller was with them then. He said he knew they were Mrs. Pagett's, and he was going to take them home.

JOHN MAYON . I saw the prisoners driving the pigs on Stepney-green - they were driving them from Pagett's; the pigs ran towards the watch-house. Fuller ran after them, turned them back, and called to Rayner to turn them towards the Mile End-road. I am sure they are the men.

JAMES HOLLYHOLMES . I am a watchman. About ten minutes after eight o'clock I heard a disturbance, and went to the prosecutrix. She produced the two men to me, and said Fuller had been taking the pigs, and told me to take him to the watch-house - he said nobody else was concerned with him. Next day he said Rayner and Bree were with him, and said where they lived; the Magistrate discharged Bree. Fuller said they meant to have had the pigs a week before.

JOHN SCHRIER . Fuller was brought to the watch-house, and charged with driving the pigs from the house - he denied it, but Mayon and others said he was one of them. I asked him who the others were? but he said nobody was with him, and he was not the person. He said he was going to buy a hat, that he had been to Bethnal-green, and was going to Pagett's to tell her son about some work. I asked him what direction he went from Bethnal-green to Pagett's? He said he turned round by Langley's, the builder. Next day, before his mother, myself, and the coachman, he owned it, and said Jemmy and Dick were with him; he took us, and shewed us where to

find Rayner - I took him. Fuller stood by, and said that was him; Rayner struggled to get from the watchman. I secured him, and afterwards took Bree, but the witnesses could not identify Bree.

FULLER'S Defence. I overheard two men say that Dempsey, in the Commercial-road, wanted men, and thought I would go and tell Pagett's son. As we were crossing the road we saw the pigs there, and were taking them home to Pagett's; the people said we were not to go off so easy. Rayner being frightened ran away.

RAYNER'S Defence. I met Fuller in crossing the road, and we ran after the pigs.

FULLER - GUILTY . Aged 17.

RAYNER - GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191201-206

206. JOHN DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of November , one coat, value 50 s., the goods of John Watts , from his person .

JOHN WATTS. I am clerk at Miller's wharf , Hermitage-stairs. On the 30th of November I was out with a friend, and drank rather freely. As I was coming home, the prisoner and another attacked me in Rosemary-lane , took my great coat off, and ran away with it - it was about eleven o'clock at night. I cannot say it was him.

JOHN WARD . I was in Rosemary-lane about half-past eleven o'clock at night, and saw Watts lying on the ground at the corner, very drunk. I said it was a pity but what somebody knew where he lived. The prisoner came up with another, looked him in the face, and said they knew where he lived; they got him up and took him up Dock-street. I said I did not think they knew him. They said they did, that he was a cabinet-maker, and lived in Dock-street. I ran up Dock-street, and saw the prisoner running with the prosecutor's coat, and the other with his hat - I am sure he is the man.

THOMAS FISHER . I am watchman of White's-yard, Rosemary-lane. I was sitting in my box about half-past eleven o'clock, and saw the prisoner and another man run into White's-yard - they seemed very much confused. I secured the prisoner as he ran up a court where there was no thoroughfare, and said,

"What have you got here?" He said it was his coat. I said I must take him to the watch-house - he wrenched himself from me, and ran away. I called out Stop thief! and the watchman made a blow at him. We secured him without losing sight of him.

JOHN MARSHALL . I am a watchman, I heard the rattle spring, and saw the prisoner and another running. I went down White's-yard to meet them, secured the prisoner in Dock-street, and found this coat about twenty yards from him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The watchman dropped the coat, I picked it up, and went up the court to my lodgings.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined Six Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191201-207

207. THOMAS DORGAN