Old Bailey Proceedings, 27th October 1819.
Reference Number: 18191027
Reference Number: f18191027-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace Oyer and Terminer, AND Gaol Delivery for the City of London, AND ALSO The Gaol Delivery For the County of Middlesex, HELD AT Justice Hall, in the Old Bailey; ON WEDNESDAY, 27th of OCTOBER, 1819, and following Days;

Being the Eighth Session in the Mayoralty of THE RIGHT HON. JOHN ATKINS , LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

Taken in Short-Hand by H. BUCKLER, Basinghall Street, (BY AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON.)

London:

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED, FOR H. BUCKLER, BY T. BOOTH, 31, St. Andrew's Hill, Doctors' Commons.

1819.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX.

Before the Right Honourable JOHN ATKINS , Esq. LORD MAYOR of the City of London; Sir George Wood , Knt., one of the Barons of his Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir James Allan Park , Knt., one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir Richard Carr Glyn , Bart.; Sir William Leighton , Knt.; Sir John Eamer , Knt.; Thomas Smith , Esq.; Samuel Birch , Esq. Aldermen of the said City; Sir John Silvester , Bart., D.C.L. Recorder of the said City; Christopher Magnay , Esq., and John Thomas Thorp , Esq., Aldermen of the said City, Newman Knowlys , Esq. Common Sergeant of the said City, and John Vaillant , Esq., his Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of the Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

London Jury.

Richard Ellis ,

James Hoppe ,

William Crockett ,

George Langford ,

John Annis ,

John Burgess ,

William Gill ,

John Kelly ,

Thomas Snape ,

George Thompson ,

William Tillyer ,

Thomas Bruff .

First Middlesex Jury.

George Buckham ,

William Burridge ,

William Yarnton ,

Thomas Aldin ,

Benjamin Rolph ,

Leonard Tierney ,

John Sheppard ,

Joseph Wright ,

Richard Thompson ,

James Revel ,

Richard Hazel ,

George Wilson .

Second Middlesex Jury.

Thomas Edmonds ,

Isaac Postlethwaite ,

Philip Peplar ,

William Harris ,

Abel Foulkes ,

James Cherton ,

John Archer ,

Edward Ottey ,

Charles Inderwick ,

William Moore ,

David Nicholas ,

John Willoughby .

SESSIONS HOUSE, OLD BAILEY, OCTOBER 27, 1819.

ATKINS, MAYOR. EIGHTH SESSION.

Reference Number: t18191027-1

1379. EMMA DAVIS and ANN SMITH were indicted for feloniously assaulting William Walton , on the King's highway, on the 16th of October , at St. Martin in the Fields , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, three 1 l. Bank notes , his property.

WILLIAM WALTON . I am a copper-plate printer , and live in Denmark-court, in the Strand. On Saturday, the 16th of October, about half-past ten o'clock at night, I met the two prisoners at the end of Buckingham-street, Strand - they came up to me, one laid hold of each arm, and requested something to drink; they asked me to go and treat them, I said I would not. They wanted me to walk round the corner with them, I said I would not, for I was going home; I had no sooner said the words than one let go my arm, the other held my arm - they immediately gave me a push on my left side, and I fell on my right side.

Q. Was it a hard push - A. Very hard; I immediately missed three 1 l. notes out of my pocket, and laid hold of Smith - the other was running off; I followed her, holding Smith, laid hold of her by the arm, and requested her to give me back the three 1 l. notes which she had stolen from me. She said she had got none of my money, and used very bad expressions. I immediately called the watchman, Donovan, he came, and took them in charge.

Q. Did you feel either of their hands in your pocket - A. No, but I think their hands must have been in my pocket at the time they shoved me - the money was in my right-hand breeches-pocket - it was safe just before they attacked me. I had my hand in my pocket just before, and felt it; I pulled my hand out of my pocket when they laid hold of me. I did not button my pocket up, it was then safe.

Q. Might they not have fallen out - A. No, a piece of writing paper was in my pocket with them, and that was there afterwards.

JEREMIAH DONOVAN . I am a watchman of St. Martin's in the Fields. About half-past ten o'clock, or near eleven, Walton called me, and gave charge of the two prisoners for robbing him of three 1 l. notes. They walked quietly with me till they came to the churchyard, then Davis put a paper into my hand, and told me to keep it. When I got to the watch-house I gave it to Richard, he opened it in my presence, it was three 1 l. notes, not folded in any thing.

WILLIAM RICHARD . I was constable of the night. Donovan gave me three 1 l. notes; Walton claimed them, and said Shillitoe was written on them. I produce them.

WILLIAM WALTON re-examined. They are mine, and have Shillitoe on them - I took them of him that night, and wrote his name on them before I lost them, and wrote it again at the watch-house.

DAVIS'S Defence. Smith knows nothing of it.

SMITH'S Defence. I was only passing by, and was given in charge.

DAVIS - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 20.

SMITH - NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

Reference Number: t18191027-2

1380. ANN PEARSON was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of September , at St. Mary, Islington , one pepper-castor, value 1 l.; two watches, value 5 l.; seven silver spoons, value 3 l.; one ring, value 10 s.; one shawl, value 5 s.; one scarf, value 1 l., and one table-cloth, value 2 s., the property of Robert Dunell , in his dwelling-house .

MARTHA DUNELL . I am the wife of Robert Dunell ; we live at No. 3, Barnsbury-lane, Islington , and keep the house. The prisoner came into our service on the 15th of September, and on the 28th, about half-past four o'clock, she asked to go out to purchase a few articles, and never returned. She had given me no notice - and at five we missed the articles stated in the indictment. We had a very good character with her.

Q. What part of the house were the things in - A. The plate and table-cloth were in the kitchen; the scarf, shawl, and watches were in the bed-room. I saw all the plate safe at one o'clock, at dinner. I saw the watches safe within a day or two, and the shawl on Saturday, the 25th. On the Friday following I saw the prisoner at the Rainbow, public-house, at the top of our street. She surrendered herself to a constable there.

REBECCA POSTANCE . I live in Feathers-court, Gray's Inn-lane. My husband is a brass-founder. I have known the prisoner about four years - she lived three months at the corner of our court, and used to see men. On the 28th of September, about half-past five o'clock in the evening, she came to my house, and asked me if I could

pawn a table-cloth for her? She produced it to me, and I pledged it at Beauchamp's, at Holborn Bars, for 2 s.

Q. Did she produce any thing else - A. Yes, a shawl and scarf, which I pledged for her. She said she had some plate which she wished to sell out and out.

Q. As you knew her before, did you ask her how she got them - A. I asked her if they were own? she said they were her husband's.

Q. Did you pawn the things all at one place - A No, my Lord; I pawned the shawl for 5 s., and scarf for 8 s., the next day at Lee and Morritt's. I gave her the money.

Q. Did she show you the plate - A. No, my Lord; I saw a pepper-box in her hand on the 28th - she slept at my house that night. She was out all the next day. I went out with her to buy a box.

Q. Did you not go to a public-house with her - A. Yes, on the Tuesday evening, about seven o'clock, we went to a young man there, she asked him if he would buy a watch? he said he had no money to buy it. Another man, who sat there, got up, touched her on the shoulder, and she went out with him - she returned in about a minute, and called me out. I and the young man who I was talking to, went with her and the other man to Walton's-court, she then gave a small bundle of things to the other man, he went away with it, returned in about a quarter of an hour, and called her aside - she told him to go back, and take it. What he said to her I do not know. He went, and returned in about five minutes, and gave her some silver - I heard it rattle. We went and had something to drink at another public-house, she paid for it, and we all parted. She went back to my house, and slept there.

Q. Is the man here - A. No, nor the man whom I knew. I do not know where he lives, his name is John Condon , and he is a pavior. I saw him last week.

ROBERT BROWN . I am a constable. I took Condon into custody, and have since seen him, and told him several times to come here; he was bound over, but is not here. On the Friday following the prosecutor sent for me to the Rainbow - I found the prisoner there - Mr. Dunell was asking her about the property, and said if she would give up the receivers and the property, he would forgive her.

ROBERT DUNELL . The prisoner sent for me to the public-house, and expressed her contrition for what she had done.

Q. Had you made any promise or threat to her - A. I had told a man that if she would give up the property, and the receivers, I would forgive her, and that man brought her to me at the public-house; she said she would accompany me to a house in Holborn. I went with her to Postance's, and on Postance's person we found four duplicates. I went to the pawnbroker's, and found a table-cloth pledged at Beauchamp's in Holborn.

ROBERT BROWN re-examined. I went to the pawnbrokers with Mr. Dunell after we had got the duplicates, and found a shawl at Lee and Morritt's, a ring at Fleming's, and a scarf at Cotterell's

JAMES FRANKLIN . I am shopman to Mr. Flemming, who is a pawnbroker, and lives in Fleet-market. On the 29th of September I took a ring in pledge of a man in the name of Smith.

Q. Were you applied to about it - A The officer requested us to attend at Worship-street office about a week or ten days ago. I did not go as we are frequently desired to attend, and then are not wanted.

JOHN POWELL , I am shopman to Mr. Cotterell, who is a pawnbroker. I have a scarf pledged with me by Postance for 13 s., in the name of Brown, on the 29th of September. I never saw her before.

Q. When did the constable come to you - A. A few days after, and requested us to attend at the office next day. I made a memorandum of it, but it quite slipped my memory.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner made no defence.

GUILTY. - DEATH .

Recommended to Mercy .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18191027-3

1381. JOHN WOOLLIS was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of October , ten yards of carpet, value 30 s., the property of Richard Langford , privately in his shop .

RICHARD LANGFORD . I am a carpet manufacturer at Charing-cross. I have only a warehouse there. On the 18th of October I lost ten yards of stair carpet from my shop - it was within five feet of the door. I was out at the time.

RICHARD MORTLOCK . I live in Poppin's-court, Fleet-street . On the 18th of October, about twelve o'clock, I was standing in the street, close to the prosecutor's door, and saw the prisoner come out of the prosecutor's shop with a roll of carpet under his arm. I stood at the boot-shop next door. He asked me if Mr. Wilson was within? I told him I knew nothing about it. He said,

"Never mind, I'll inquire a few doors higher up." He went to the corner of Craig's-court, and ran up there, I followed him, as I thought he had stolen the carpet. The court is not a thoroughfore, and he was obliged to return. I told Chapman to watch him. I ran to the prosecutor's to ask if they had lost any carpeting. I saw the shopman, and told him, he and I came out; Chapman secured the prisoner, and brought him back to the shop. An officer was sent for, who took him, and the carpet, which I saw taken from him. He had it under his arm.

ROBERT CHAPMAN . I pursued the prisoner, as I saw him run down Craig's-court with the carpet; he returned, I lost him, caught sight of him again, and secured him in King-street, Covent-garden, with the carpet under his arm. I took him back to the prosecutor's. I did not see him come out of the shop.

CHARLES DEW . I took the prisoner and the carpet in charge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A man gave it to me to hold, and when I was taken he went over the way.

GUILTY. Aged 19.

Of stealing, but not privately .

Confined One Year .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

Reference Number: t18191027-4

1382. JOHN DAVIS was indicted for feloniously assaulting Samuel Ward on the King's highway, on the 11th of October , putting him in fear, and taking from his

person, and against his will, one pocket-book, value 6 d., and 7 s. 6 d. in monies numbered , his property.

SAMUEL WARD . I am a sawyer . On the 11th of October, about twelve o'clock at night, I left a friend's house, where I had spent the evening.

Q. Were you sober - A. Yes, my Lord, we had four pots of porter among five of us. I went to Drury-lane, and there asked a woman the nearest way to Charing-cross. I was alone. The prisoner and another man came up, and said to the woman, What does he want? I said I wanted to be directed the nearest way to Charing-cross. They said they were going that way themselves, and should be there in a few minutes. One caught hold of each arm. I walked a very few paces with them before I told them I required no leading, but if they would direct me I would treat them with a pot of porter for their trouble. They wanted the porter, I saw a public-house door open, stepped in, and called for a pot; the landlord said it was too late, and he would not draw it. They both requested some gin, I would not give them any, and immediately stepped out of the door - they followed - the prisoner took my right arm and the other my left; we proceeded a little way down the street, and came to Brydges-street , the other man asked me if I was going to give them a gin? I said, No; he swore, and immediately the prisoner gave me a violent push on my shoulder, which forced me on the ground; the moment I was down the prisoner took a black leather pocket-book from my pocket - they cut it out, for the pocket was sound before, and I found it cut, and the pocket still buttoned. The other man put his hand into my other pocket, but it had nothing in it. I pursued the prisoner down Brydges-street, my foot slipped, and I fell again. I called out Stop thief! I was not more than forty yards behind the prisoner, and saw Smithers take him.

Q. Did you ever lose sight of him - A. No, the street was very light - it was a moonlight night; I never saw him before - I had walked thirty or forty yards with him. The public-house was below Long-acre - he was not running when Smithers took him.

Q. Did you not know the way to Charing-cross - A. If it had been daylight I should have known it; I think the other man ran a different way. I am certain the prisoner is the man - he was never out of my sight - he did not run above a hundred yards.

RICHARD SMITHERS . I belong to Bow-street. On the 11th of October, about half-past twelve o'clock at night, I was going down Brydges-street, when I came to Exeter-street I heard somebody fall, and saw the prisoner running from the prosecutor, who called out Stop thief! - it was very light; I was not ten yards from him - he was running, but when he saw me he stopped and walked. When I came within a few yards of him, he himself called out Stop thief! I said,

"I think you are the man." He said No, he was gone up the street. I told him that I could see nobody else in the street - there was nobody else in the street. The prosecutor came up, and said he was the man - I found only 6 d. on him.

Prisoner's Defence. On the night of the robbery I was returning from the Coburg Theatre, and heard the cry of Stop thief! A man ran out of a court on the right-hand side, I followed him, and Smithers collared me.

RICHARD SMITHERS re-examined. There was nobody else in the street, except two or three girls - the prisoner came right across the street from where the prosecutor fell, at the corner of White Hart-yard.

Q. Was the prosecutor sober - A. I thought him rather fresh, but it might have been his agitation. He knew what he was about, and could run very well.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18191027-5

1383. WILLIAM NICHOLLS was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Wormick , about eight o'clock at night, on the 12th of October , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, one trunk, value 2 s.; three shirts, value 6 s.; four waistcoats, value 4 s.; two sheets, value 6 s.; two pair of breeches, value 7 s.; one pair of pantaloons, value 3 s., and 3 l. 10 s. , in monies numbered, his property.

WILLIAM WORMICK . I am a gardener , and live in Pelham-street, Mile End . I have a room on the second-floor in Mr. Abbott's house; he does not live in it - it is let out in tenements. On the 11th of October I locked my room, and left it about five o'clock in the evening, and went into it again about nine o'clock, to drink tea with Hall. I left nobody in the room.

Q. It was daylight when you left your room - A. Yes. I left my trunk in the room, also a kitten; between seven and eight o'clock the kitten came up stairs. I then came down, and found my room-door open, and a false key in the door, which I could not get out - it was dark. I missed my trunk, containing the articles stated in the indictment, and 3 l. or 4 l. in copper and silver - there were five or six half-crowns. I have recovered my trunk, a hat, two or three bags, a pair of gaiters, and a key. I did not know the prisoner.

JAMES JONQUAY . I am eleven years of age; I know the prosecutor's lodgings. On Tuesday night, the 12th of October, between seven and eight o'clock, I saw six men standing by my mother's shutters, opposite the prosecutor's - Nightingale was one, and the prisoner another; I do not know the others. The prisoner came up to me and said,

"Come, come! where is my staff?" I knew him before - they crossed over; the lamplighter came by. The prisoner said to Nightgale and another one,

"Now is the time." They went and looked in at the prosecutor's street-door, which was open, and then went into the corner. I was looking at the others a little while, and then saw Nightingale lift something on his shoulder - they were between the two doors.

Q. What two doors - A. The prosecutor's door and the next house.

Q. What did he lift on his shoulder - A. It was like a post, only thicker - I thought it was something for a bonfire; it was like a trunk, about a yard long. I followed them to the alley; he went down the alley with it on his shoulder, and whistled. The prisoner and four others went with him - the others went round the street, and all met together in the alley. Next day I saw the prisoner coming out of the Ben Johnson , public-house, in Pelham-street. I saw them all together there, playing at cards; they were the same persons that I had seen the night before - the prisoner was among them. I had heard of the

robbery that night, and informed Attfield that they were there, and he went. I pointed the prisoner out, and he took him - the others got away.

Prisoner. Q. Was I playing cards with the rest - A. Yes, he was looking over the settle. I told the constable they were all there, but they all got away except the prisoner.

WILLIAM FRANKS . I am headborough of Mile End. I and Attfield went with the boy to the Ben Johnson , public-house. He pointed the prisoner out - there were about twelve people in the room.

WILLIAM ATTFIELD . I am an officer. I went with Franks and the boy, who pointed the prisoner out - several of them were playing at cards; the prisoner was looking at them. I took him to the office, then searched him, and found five half-crowns and 12 s. in silver, on him - he said he had saved it up by working overtime at winding quills. I believe the other five persons have been out of the way ever since - they were not in the house with him. I took the prisoner.

WILLIAM FRANKS re-examined. I had information that the trunk was left in Air-street-fields on the night of the robbery. I went next morning, and found it at the King and Queen, public-house, Air-street; I found the hat and bags at Bethnal-green workhouse - I do not know how they came there.

WILLIAM WORMICK re-examined. The trunk and things are mine. I cannot swear to the money.

Prisoner's Defence. On Wednesday night I was abed by eight o'clock. Next morning I went to the warehouse, but my work was not come from the dyer's, so I went to the public-house, and was taken.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

Reference Number: t18191027-6

1384. WILLIAM SAWARD was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of September , in the dwelling-house of Joyce Chatterton , one gold neck-chain, value 1 l.; one medal, value 6 d., and four 1 l. bank notes , the property of Mary Morgan .

MARY MORGAN . On the 25th of September I lodged at Mrs. Chatterton's, at Kingsland ; the prisoner also lodged there - he is a printer ; my trunk is kept in the sitting-room. He saw me lock up my trunk at night, with the articles stated in the indictment in it, and four 1 l. notes - I put the key in my pocket. Next morning, about half-past five o'clock, I went out with him and the landlady - he went back, and said he would get his breakfast; I got back between eight and nine o'clock, found my trunk open, and missed all this property, with a letter directed to me - they were all wrapped up together; I saw the prisoner at the house about twelve o'clock, and gave him in charge on the Monday following. The constable searched him, and found my letter on him, also some pieces of black ribbon, which I knew to be mine.

Prisoner. Q. What made you suspect me - A. When I locked my box, he asked me if I would take 10 l. for the box.

Q. Was not the first ground of your suspicions from going to a cunning man - A. No, I suspected him the moment I missed the property.

GEORGE RUTTERFORTH . I am a headborough. I took the prisoner in charge on the 4th of October, and found a paper with a few ends of black ribbon on him. Morgan gave me three pieces of a letter - one of them might have dropped from him - I picked it off the floor. She gave me the medal at the office.

MARY MORGAN re-examined. The constable took the piece of letter out of his pocket - that one piece is part of the letter; the landlady gave me the medal afterwards. It is mine - I remember locking it up.

JOYCE CHATTERTON . I am a widow, and live at Hackney - I keep the house. I found the medal in the prisoner's bed, between the two sheets, on the Thursday after the Saturday that the prosecutrix had been robbed; my little boy, who is six years of age, slept with him. My mother lives in the house - she is seventy-five years of age; nobody else lives there. The prisoner went out with us, returned back, and overtook us again in a short time. It appeared imposible to me that he could then have broken the box open.

Prisoner's Defence. On the evening of the 1st of October, I met a man, who had formerly kept company with the prosecutrix. I said a little against her; she heard of it, and said she would be revenged on me. I went out with them, left them, and overtook them again immediately. I met a fellow-workman, and went to work with him. I went home to breakfast, and the landlady's mother said she believed the prosecutrix's box had been broken open,

MARY MORGAN re-examined. I never said so.

Prisoner to GEORGE RUTTERFORTH . Q. I asked you to look at my great coat, and the prosecutrix said it was of no use - A. No.

Q. While you was searching me, she said,

"Here is my property," taking up the black ribbons - A. I found the ribbon on his person. I believe she said a song-book, which was found on him, was in her box at the time of the robbery.

- STRINGFELLOW. I work with the prisoner at Mr. Rutt's printing office. I saw that song-book in his possession about a fortnight before the robbery, and told him I should like to copy one song out of it - it was,

"Love among the Roses," which is on the top of the leaf.

GEORGE RUTTERFORTH re-examined. I shewed the last witness all the pieces of the song-book which the prosecutrix gave me, and produce them now.

- STRINGFELLOW. My Lord, I now remember it was,

"Time is on the Wing." On Saturday morning I met the prisoner in Hobson's brick-field - a young man, named Johnson, was with him. I told him that was not his way to the printing office; he said he had been with his landlady to market. We went to the office together, and about a quarter before eight o'clock he said he should go and get his breakfast - he returned in about ten minutes.

JOYCE CHATTERTON re-examined. He went out with us, and followed us, after going back - he went about half a mile with us, then went back with his fellow-workman. Mr. Rutt's is about one hundred yards from my house - he used to come home to breakfast about eight o'clock. He came several times, and asked if we had found out the robbery.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18191027-7

1385. DAVID MORGAN and JOSEPH BROOKS were indicted for stealing, on the 21st of September , one watch, value 30 s.; one coat, value 1 l.; one hat, value 1 l.; one handkerchief, value 7 s.; two waistcoats, value 13 s.; one pair of shoes, value 4 s., and one pair of braces, value 6 d. , the property of William Coleman .

WILLIAM COLEMAN . I am a labourer , and live in Love-grove, Fleet-market . On the 21st of September I went to bed at eleven o'clock - I hung my watch at the head of my bed, and my coat by the bed-side. About an hour after my landlord informed me I had been robbed - I immediately missed them. Both the prisoners lodged in the same room with me. Brooks had left the night before. I went to my box, and missed the other things stated in the indictment, and my hat from the kitchen - the prisoners were brought to me. Carpenter found my braces, and my shoes on Brooks's feet, also duplicates of the other property.

JAMES CARPENTER . I am cellarman to a wine-merchant. On the 22d of September I heard of the robbery, and on the 24th, as I was going through the Tower, I met the prisoners, seized them both, and took them to the prosecutor, at Mr. Enderby's, Paul's Wharf. I found duplicates for a hat, watch, and two waistcoats on Brooks - the shoes were on his feet. I found nothing on Morgan.

JAMES ALFORD . I am an officer. I searched the prisoners, and found four duplicates on Brooks, also a pair of shoes and braces. He said he knew nothing about them.

MARY CONNELLY . The prisoners lodged with me. Brooks left on the Monday. I went out for some coals, leaving him at home, and on my return he was gone. Morgan went out in the afternoon, came home between eleven and twelve o'clock at night, pulled his shoes off at the bottom of the stairs, and went to bed. In about a quarter of an hour after he came down, unlocked the cellar-door, and went out - the prosecutor missed his property.

Q. Brooks left in the afternoon - A. Yes.

- . I am a pawnbroker. On the 22d of September a hat was pledged with me by a woman, in the name of Morgan - the duplicate is that I gave her.

ROBERT KENNEDY . I live in Clare-street, Clare-market. I have two waistcoats pledged with me.

ARTHUR PRICE . I am a pawnbroker. I produce a watch which was pledged with me. I gave the prosecutor the duplicate produced.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner MORGAN. I have nothing to say.

BROOKS'S Defence. I left the morning before the robbery. Morgan brought the duplicates to me, and said he brought them from Manchester.

MORGAN - GUILTY . Aged 16.

BROOKS - GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191027-8

1386. HENRY WHITEHEAD was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of September , one piece of cambric, containing seven yards, value 39 s. , the property of William Cook .

WILLIAM COOK . I am a linen-draper , and live in Cheapside . I lost a piece of cambric.

JOHN THOMAS ABBENETT . I am packer to Mr. Cook. On the 6th of September, about three o'clock in the afternoon, I went into the cellar to fetch some wrappers - we had a cask of cyder came in three or four days before, which leaked; I moved it to see if it had stopped leaking. On moving it from the wall, I found a small paper parcel behind it, which contained a piece of French cambric - I put it in the paper, placed it where I found it, and put the cask back again. Another man informed Mr. Joll, the clerk. The servants had access to the cellar - it joins the warehouse.

GEORGE JOLL . I am clerk to Mr. Cook. On Monday night, the 6th of September, I had information that the parcel was found in the cellar, the porter shewed it to me. I looked at it, put it in the same place again, and came up stairs. In about ten minutes I went there again to look at it, and found it had no number on it, I then marked it, and put it in the same place. Next morning Mr. James Cook was informed of it; he desired us to watch who took it. Just after one o'clock the prisoner went into the cellar, and remained there sometime; on his coming up I went down, and found it was gone - I called the porter to examine the place also. On returning to the warehouse the prisoner was gone out - I informed Mr. Cook.

Cross-examined by MR. WALFORD. Q. There was no mark on it until you put it on - A. No.

JOHN GOODBURN . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Bishopsgate-street. On the 7th of September, in the afternoon, the prisoner brought a piece of cambric, and pledged it for 30 s. - Mr. Joll claimed it. I am sure he is the person.

MR. JOLL. We lost this piece of cambric - I noticed it in the cellar.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191027-9

1387. JOSEPH LONNON was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of October , 30 yards of floor-cloth, value 5 l., and one mat, value 6 d. , the property of Timothy William Barker , James Thomas Barker , and Joseph Gough .

GEORGE HARKER . I am warehouseman to Messrs. Timothy William Barker , James Thomas Barker , and Joseph Gough , who are brush-manufacturers and warehousemen . These goods ought to have come to us, but did not.

JAMES BROOKS . I am a carman. On the 25th of October I received this truss from the Steel-yard, Upper Thames-street, from Mr. Drew's warehouse, between two and three o'clock, to carry to Messrs. Barkers' - it was taken out of my cart in Basinghall-street ; it was produced in five minutes after - I knew it to be the same; the officer had the prisoner also.

WILLIAM DRINKWATER . I am an officer. Between two and three o'clock I went to the privy at the back of Guildhall, while I was there this truss was thrown against the door. When I came out two gentleman said a man in a smock-frock had thrown it there. While they were talking to me I saw the prisoner in the yard, he came from Basinghall-street. The gentlemen said,

"That is the man who brought it here!" The moment they spoke, he turned back and ran away - I called Stop thief! and followed him into Church-passage, Basinghall-street - a person

stopped him there. I took him back, and when I came into Basinghall-street he said,

"That is the cart - a man in a velveteen jacket gave it to me out of that cart to carry for him." I took him to where the truss was - the gentlemen were there, and said they would follow me, but did not. I saw no man in a velveteen jacket. It was Brooks's cart.

JOHN HARKER . On Monday afternoon, between two and three o'clock, I was in Basinghall-street, heard the cry of Stop thief, and saw the prisoner running very fast - I collared him; he said,

"Pray let me go, I was only going to take it into Cheapside for a man." I said,

"Where is the man?" he said,

"I have lost him all at once." Drinkwater came up and took him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A man dressed in a velveteen jacket stood by the horse, and asked me to take it to Cheapside; he gave it me out of the cart, and said he would follow me. I could not find the way through the passage, he told me to put it behind the door and follow him - I did so and lost him. I returned to the yard, the officer called Stop thief, and being afraid, I ran away,

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18191027-10

1388. GEORGE DRAKEFORD was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of October , one silver cup, value 3 l. 10 s.; 11 table-spoons, value 4 l.; one marrow-spoon, value 10 s.; two salt-spoons, value 2 s. 6 d.; nine tea-spoons, value 14 s.; six table-cloths, value 1 l.; one counterpane, value 10 s., and three sheets, value 14 s. , the property of Joseph Perryman .

JOSEPH PERRYMAN . I am a druggist , and live in Camomile-street. On Wednesday last I missed all these things. I had discharged the prisoner from my service about three weeks before that. About February last I lived in Bow-lane, the prisoner assisted me to pack a package containing this property, and moved it to Mr. Graves's, in Philpot-lane - in about six weeks it was removed from there to King-street, and then to St. Mary Axe. About a week ago I found it, and missed all this plate and linen. Suspicion fell on the prisoner, I gave him in charge, and told him if he would make a full confession I would forgive him. I found part of it in pledge at Mitchell's, in St. Mary Axe - the prisoner said he had destroyed all the duplicates.

Cross-examined by MR. WALFORD. Q. Did you open the box between February and October - A. No, it had been in several places.

JUDITH CHARD . Mr. Perryman gave me directions to examine his linen, which I did - he had lost some sheets and table-linen.

SARAH MORRIS . The prisoner used to come and see me sometimes. He went away last Thursday, and next morning, on opening my table-drawer, I found three or four duplicates, which the officer has got.

Q. What are you - A. An unfortunate girl - I have known him six months.

Cross-examined. Q. Was you in the habit of encouraging that young boy to come to you - did you know in whose employ he was - A. No.

CHARLES WHITE . I am servant to Mr. Mitchell, who is a pawnbroker, and lives in St. Mary Axe. I have a silver cup pledged with me on the 23d of May, eleven tablespoons on the 19th of April, two sheets on the 4th of May, three table-cloths on the 14th of May, eleven teaspoons on the 20th of April, a marrow and two salt-spoons on the 22d of April, and a counterpane on the 10th of May - one was pledged in the name of Eliza, and the others in the name of John Perry . I cannot exactly say whom I took them in of.

Q. Cannot you say who pledged them - A. I did not take them all in.

Q. Have you any doubt of it - A. I cannot say - I should be sorry to say unless I was perfectly satisfied.

JOHN JONES . I am a pawnbroker, and live in London-road. I have a table-cloth pledged with me on the 18th of May, by a female.

RICHARD JOHN BOYCE . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Warwick-row, Blackfriars-road. I have a sheet and table-cloth pledged with me on the 13th of May, for 1 l.

THOMAS BRANDSCOMB . On the 21st of October I was sent for by Mr. Perryman, to take the prisoner on suspicion of stealing this property. The prosecutor accused him of it, but he strongly denied it. Mr. Perryman then said if he would acknowledge taking them, he would forgive him; he did not acknowledge it that night, and I took him to the Compter. Next morning when I went to the Compter to him, I saw Morris, whom I understood was his sister. When the prisoner came out he said he would confess to me - he said he had pledged the prosecutor's property in St. Mary Axe, but not the whole of it. I took him to the Mansion House, and the prosecutor got from him a list of the things which he said he had pledged there - he was remanded until the Monday following; Morris turned out not to be his sister, and the prosecutor gave her in charge. She said if I would go over the water with her, she would give up all that she knew about the robbery; she gave me the duplicates out of a drawer - one was for a table-cloth pledged for 3 s. She took me to a pawnbroker's in Blackfriars-road, where the sheet and table-cloths were pledged; she said the duplicates of them were burnt, and gave me four duplicates of property pledged in St. Mary Axe.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 17.

Recommended to Mercy .

Confined Three Months .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191027-11

1389. JOHN SCOTT was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of October , 14 lbs. of twine, value 3 s,; two pair of broom-heads, value 5 s.; twelve brushes, value 15 s.; three ounces of Prussian blue, value 10 d., and half a pound of mineral green, value 6 d. , the property of Timothy William Barker , James Thomas Barker , and Joseph Gough .

TIMOTHY WILLIAM BARKER . I am a calenderer , and live in Gracechurch-street; I am in partnership with James Thomas Barker and Joseph Gough . On the 8th of October I was told by our porter, that he had followed the prisoner, who was also a porter , out of the shop, carrying a bag, which he shewed to me; it contained about 14 lbs. of twine. We sent for an officer, and

took him before the Lord Mayor, who recommended our searching the prisoner's house. We then weighed our bag in which the twine is kept, and found near 2 cwt. deficient.

HENRY WHITE . I am foreman to Mr. Barker. On the morning of the 8th of October I was told the prisoner had gone out with a parcel; I followed him, brought him back to the shop, and asked him what he had in the bag which he had with him? He answered, Nothing. On examining it I found it contained 14 lbs. of string. I showed it to my master.

CHARLES KILLICK . I am the prosecutor's servant. I have often seen Scott go out with bundles under his arm, when my master went to breakfast. I informed the apprentice of it. One day he was coming out of the cellar with a parcel, and saw my master coming from the counting-house, he threw it down stairs, but as soon as my master went to breakfast he brought it up, and went out with it. I informed the foreman of it on Friday morning when he went out, and he fetched him back.

HENRY TURNPENNY . I am an officer. On the 8th of October I was sent for to Messrs. Barkers', and took the prisoner in charge for stealing a parcel of twine. I took him before the Lord Mayor, and he was remanded. He said he lived at No. 1, Osborne-street, Bermondsey - I could not find him there. As I returned I found he lived at No. 1, Salisbury-lane. I went to the house, and told his wife I wanted some brushes, she said she had no brushes there whatever. I searched, and found a quantity of twine, and the rest of the property stated in the indictment.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. It is my first offence. I have had charge of the house several Sundays, and every thing was found safe.

GUILTY . Aged 29.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191027-12

1390. MARY ALLEN was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of September , seven tea-spoons, value 24 s.; two table-spoons, value 24 s.; two table-cloths, value 3 s.; one night-gown, value 2 s., and two towels, value 2 s. 6 d. , the property of Joseph Walker .

JOSEPH WALKER . I am a bedding manufacturer , and live at Aldgate ; the prisoner was employed as my feather-dresser . While she was with us my mother was taken ill, and wanting some assistance in her chamber, we took the prisoner to assist in the house. She continued in that capacity for ten or fourteen days, and then absconded - we then missed this property. Suspicion fell on her, we sought her in every direction, and in ten days we took her. She was taken to the Mansion House, and confessed stealing the things. We found some at the pawnbrokers. She said she pledged seven spoons with Robinson, but he says he has not received them.

JOHN GOODBURN . I am servant to Mr. Robinson, who is a pawnbroker, and lives in Bishopsgate-street. I have two table-spoons, which the prisoner pledged with me.

Q. Is that all, where are the tea-spoons - A. I have never been able to find them; she said before the Lord Mayor, that she pledged them at the same time, but no such things were pledged.

Q. Did you buy them - A. No, I shewed Mr. Walker my book.

THOMAS WOOLSTENHOLD . I am servant to Mr. Barker, who is a pawnbroker, and lives in Aldgate High-street. I have a table-cloth pledged for 18 d., and two others for 1 s. each; a towel for 6 d.; a bed-gown for 1 s., and a pillow-case for 6 d., on the 6th and 8th of September. The prisoner pledged the pillow-case and table-cloth. I did not take the others in.

MR. WALKER re-examined. I cannot identify any of them - we lost such things. I only rely on the prisoner's confession.

Q. Have you seen Robinson's book - A. I glanced over it as it laid on the counter, with the figures upside down, and that he objected to.

GUILTY . Aged 44.

Confined Six Months .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191027-13

1391. JOSEPH ALLWRIGHT was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of October , one watch, value 4 l.; one seal, value 2 l.; one key, value 5 s., and one piece of ribbon, value 1 d., the goods of Edward Cockerton , from his person .

EDWARD COCKERTON . On Sunday, the 3d of October, between six and seven o'clock in the evening, I was in Aldersgate-street, at the corner of Long-lane ; I was hustled by two or three persons all at once - the prisoner was right facing me, he put his hand before me, and drew my watch out in a moment; I said I was robbed of my watch, and started after him, and came close up to him - he was stopped just he had got round the corner, and brought back to the public-house at the corner. I never lost sight of him. I am sure he is the man. I have never recovered my watch.

THOMAS TURNER . I am an officer. I heard the cry of Stop thief! and stopped the prisoner; I searched him, but found no watch.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going home, ran across the road from a coach, and a man collared me.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191027-14

1392. CHARLES BROUGHTON was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of October , one pair of boots, value 4 s. , the goods of George Paul .

GEORGE PAUL . I am a shoemaker , and live in York-street, Westminster . On the 2d of October, about half-past ten o'clock in the morning, I was standing at my window, outside of my door, talking to a person, and saw a soldier run into my shop - I have two serjeants lodge with me, and thinking he might be going to them, I had no suspicion. I saw him come out again, and thought he

had not had time to have gone up to the serjeants. I looked, and missed a pair of boots off my counter, I ran out, and called out "Soldier!" two or three times - he took no notice of me. It was the prisoner. I ran after him, and asked him what he did in that shop? he said he went in to sell an old black petticoat. I said I was sure it was no such thing, and wanted to see what he had got in the petticoat - he would not let me. I pulled it from him, and found my boots wrapped up in it. I brought him back, and gave him in charge.

ROBERT SAVAGE . I am a serjeant, and live in the prosecutor's house. I heard a noise, went down, and saw the prosecutor with the prisoner and boots in custody.

ALFRED POPLE . I am an officer of Queen-square. I took the prisoner in charge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence I have been six years in my regiment, and never did any thing of the kind before. Drunkenness caused me to do it.

GUILTY . Aged 42.

Fined One Shilling , and Discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191027-15

1393. JAMES TUCKER was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of September , 10 lbs. of lead, value 2 s. , the property of Richard Watts .

RICHARD WATTS . I am a printer , and live in Crown-court, Temple-bar . On the 30th of September, at seven o'clock in the evening, I was going from the door of my private house, and saw a person at the door of my workshop. I called out,

"Who is that? what is your business?" the answer was,

"I am waiting for the boy from Water-lane." I said

"What boy?" he said

"Tucker, the boy from Water-lane." On going up to him, I found an ill-looking young man, quite a stranger to me, it was the witness, Jackson - I suspected him, asked his business, and at the same time saw a bundle at his feet, which I found to be tea-lead - it immediately occurred to me that it was part of a quantity of tea-lead delivered the preceding day, which had been deposited in the inner room to make stereotype plates. I rang the office-bell, and at the same time collared him. I desired them to secure the person inside the office, which they did - the prisoner was inside the office, he was the bookbinder's boy, and was in the habit of coming to my office at the latter end of every month for monthly publications. Having secured both, while I stood outside the door I desired the lead in the inner-room to be weighed - it was deficient 10 lbs., which was the quantity I found lying at the door. I asked the prisoner why he had gone up to my manufactory, contrary to the order I had given him? We took them to Bow-street. On our way there, finding Jackson worked at Bell's office, I called there, and while they were speaking to him about it he acknowledged it. The lead was like that left behind.

WILLIAM FLETCHER . On the 30th of September, about seven o'clock in the evening, the bell of Mr. Watts's printing-office was rang; the little girl opened the door, came back, and said Tucker was waiting for some books for his master - I did not go down to him immediately. Soon after I was going down, and he came up stairs to me - he had been ordered never to come up. I told him there was nothing ready. Soon after this the girl came and said I must come down, for the lead had been stolen. I found Tucker down there, and the prosecutor had Jackson.

WILLIAM JACKSON . The prisoner met me at St. Clement's Church, and asked me to go to the prosecutor's house, I refused; he went to the door, and rang the bell, the girl opened it, and he went in and shut it. In about ten minutes he opened the door, and threw the lead out to me.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Three Months , and Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191027-16

1394. JOHN BROOKER and JOHN COX were indicted for stealing, on the 7th of October , five spoons, value 3 l.; one sauce-ladle, value 20 s., and two waiters, value 5 s., the property of William Walter , Esq. , in his dwelling-house .

WILLIAM WALTER , ESQ. I live in Devonshire-place, Marylebone . I know nothing of the robbery.

ELIZA BULLEN . I am the prosecutor's housemaid. On the 7th of October, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, I was sitting in the back-kitchen - the butler's pantry is in front - I heard a rattling of spoons, went to the area, and saw the prisoner, Brooker, at the top of the area-steps, within the rails; I ran up the steps, and called out Stop thief! I pursued him, and lost sight only as he turned the corner. I followed him till he was caught - he was not out of my sight two minutes.

Q. Was he running - A. When I called out he began to run. Several persons came round when he was taken. I do not know who stopped him.

CHARLES HODGES . I am servant to Mr. Walter. On the day of the robbery I left the plate stated in the indictment, on two small japanned waiters, about ten minutes after three o'clock, ready to lay the cloth.

Q. Could they be seen from the street - A. No, my Lord. The area-gate is generally shut, but not fastened. The door of the house could be opened outside - it was shut, but not fastened. I went out, and on my return I found the articles stated in the indictment gone.

CHARLES SEYMOUR . I am a shoemaker. On the 7th of October, a little before four o'clock, I was going up Wimpole-street, and saw the prisoner, Brooker, down an area there, talking to a footman - I had no suspicion of him, and went on about my business, and saw Cox standing about, I then thought something not right was going on. I watched, and saw Brooker leave the footman, and join Cox. I went down Weymouth-street, and as I returned up Devonshire-street, I saw Cox and two or three more waiting at the corner of Devonshire-place (not one hundred yards from the prosecutor's). I live at No. 6, Devonshire-place. I rang the bell to go in, and saw Brooker come out of Mr. Walter's area, with something under his coat. I was going after him, and saw the girl come out of the area and cry Stop him! he then ran, I followed him round the corner into Beaumont-street, and he was there taken - I never lost sight of him. I saw him stopped

and searched - a few halfpence and a knife were found on him.

Q. Did you see Cox at the time - A. Yes, he came up, and tried to rescue him; when I saw that I secured Cox. Nothing particular was found on him. There were one or two more, who escaped.

Q. Was Brooker close to Cox, or the others, before he was taken - A. I cannot say.

FDEDERICK TABOR. I am a builder. I was in Beaumont-street on the 7th of October, about four o'clock, heard the cry of Stop thief, and saw Brooker running, with something under his coat. I pursued, and when I got a short distance he dropped something, which on passing I observed to be plate. I did not stop to pick it up, but followed him about a hundred yards down the street - he was stopped by another man. As I returned with him Long brought me part of the plate - I had not lost sight of it. Lloyd brought me some more - I delivered the prisoner to him, and took the whole of the plate, gave it to a hair-dresser in the street, who carried it before me into his house.

CHARLES LONG . On the 7th of October I was in Beaumont-street, and saw Brooker at the corner of the street. Bullen was behind him. Lloyd stopped him about ten yards down the street - he then pulled his coat, unbuttoned it, and the plate fell out. I picked up three tablespoons, a sauce-ladle, and a waiter, and gave it to Tabor.

EDWARD LLOYD . I was in Beaumont-street, heard the cry of Stop thief, and saw Brooker running; I crossed the street and stopped him - he dropped the plate; Cox endeavoured to rescue him.

Q. What did he do - A. He forced himself in, jumped on my shoulder, and tried to push our arms from where we held him. I kept fast hold, and saw Brooker throw the plate about the street. I picked up a desert and salt-spoon, and a japanned waiter, and gave them to Tabor.

WILLIAM CHESTERMAN. I am a constable. Tabor sent for me, and gave the prisoners and plate into my charge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAM HULFACRE . I am the prosecutor's coachman. I saw the prisoners in custody, and went to the watch-house with Cox. He said he would serve me out, and would mark me.

THOMAS NORMAN . I live in Devonshire-place. I was walking there, and as I turned the corner of Beaumont-street I saw the boy pick up the plate, and Cox try to get away. He asked me what I wanted, called me a b - g - r, and knocked me down.

FREDERICK TABOR re-examined. I forced Brooker into a house, and asked what could induce him to do it? he said he was a poor unfortunate lad out of work, and had a good character up to this time, and that he was sorry for what he had done. He made no resistance.

RICHARD COATES . I am a constable. I received the prisoners in charge, and asked Cox how he came to knock the servant down? he said he would kick her ****** out.

BROOKER'S Defence. Cox is innocent. I was in distress.

COX'S Defence. A man with a cart in Oxford-street, asked me if I wanted a job? he gave me a great deal to drink, and I was in liquor. As I returned I rushed in among the mob, but did not intend any harm.

RICHARD COATES re-examined. Cox might have been drinking, he seemed flurried, but not drunk; he knew quite well what he was about.

CHARLES SEYMOUR re-examined. When I saw him at the corner he did not appear drunk at all.

BROOKER - GUILTY. Aged 25.

COX - GUILTY. Aged 30.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18191027-17

1395. JOHN REEDY was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of October , fifty yards of dowlas, value 3 l., the property of Charles Thomas Brooks , in his dwelling-house .

THOMAS HUGHES . I am shopman to Mr. Charles Thomas Brooks , who has two shops, one at No. 2 , and another at No. 47, Duke-street, Manchester-square ; he lets the upper part of No. 2, out - two of his servants sleep in the room behind the shop. On the 22d of October I was at No. 2, a person came and gave me information; I then missed a piece of dowlas, which I had seen in the shop not ten minutes before. I ran out, and met the prisoner by Barratt's-court with a piece under his great coat. I took it from him, and said I did not think it belonged to him - he said it did. I was going to collar him, but he up with his fist, and threatened to strike me. He ran away, but I pursued and secured him; I took him to the watch-house with the linen. I think I have seen him about the window - it was taken off a pile of goods near the door.

HENRY HARPER . I assisted in apprehending the prisoner in Marylebone-lane, and saw Hughes take the dowlas from him. The prisoner ran away, I followed him, and caught him about two hundred yards from the prosecutor's, without losing sight of him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming down Wigmore-street, and picked it up.

EDWARD HEALEY . I was coming along Duke-street, and saw two persons coming towards me; they crossed over, and I crossed with them. I suspected them, turned back, and saw one of them had crossed again. I saw a person take something from the prosecutor's shop, and run off to the right with it; I gave information at the other shop, which is about twenty yards off. The man was like the prisoner, but I cannot positively swear to him.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18191027-18

1396. JOHN HINES was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of October , two shirts, value 12 s.; three waistcoats, value 12 s., and one pair of pantaloons, value 6 s. , the property of Thomas Swan .

THOMAS SWAN . I live at the Coach and Horses, public-house, in Chapel-street, Westminster . On the 7th of October, about six o'clock in the evening, in consequence of an alarm, I went into the yard, saw the prisoner there, and immediately collared him; I asked him what he

wanted there - I put my hand under his coat, and pulled out my shirt, then took him to the threshold of the door, and charged Lees, a soldier, to assist me, and we took him into the taproom - he dropped another shirt. I picked it up, and sent for an officer, who took him into custody. He was searched, and three waistcoats found on him - they were then wet, as he had taken them off the line.

Q. How did he get into the yard - A. He came through the house. He said he had agreed to buy the lot as they hung on the lines for 5 s. 6 d., and was waiting for his friend. Nobody was in the yard.

WILLIAM MILLS . I am a constable; the prisoner was delivered to me. I found three waistcoats and two pair of pantaloons on him, some of which Swan claimed.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I had been drinking, and met a man, who said he was a discharged soldier; he borrowed 11 s. 9 d. of me, which he lost at cards. He took me to Swan's yard, gave me the things, and told me to stop there till he came.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Confined One Year .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18191027-19

1397. JOHN CHURCH was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Timmons , about eleven o'clock in the forenoon of the 2d of October , at St. Matthew, Bethnal-green (Louisa his wife, and others of his family being therein), and stealing two spoons, value 6 s. , his property.

SARAH KADY . I am servant to Mr. William Timmons , who lives in Ponderson's-place, Bethnal-green-road - he keeps the house. On the 2d of October, between ten and eleven o'clock, I brought the tea-things from my mistress's breakfast-table, and placed them on a table under the kitchen-window; there is a garden before the house two or three yards long - any one can open the gate - the kitchen-window is even with the ground; a person in the garden can put their hands in at the window. I left the things there, and went up stairs on other business. In about half an hour I heard a noise as if something was at the window, and in consequence of information from Maria Palmer I went to look, and missed two silver tea-spoons, which were there when I went away. I found the window half open. I am sure I left it shut down close.

Q. Was it fastened - A. No, my Lord, it is a sash-window. I do not know the value of the spoons.

Q. Had you seen the prisoner at all - A. No my Lord. Before I missed the spoons I was in the parlour, and saw a man come into the garden with apples in his hand - that was not the prisoner; I saw him go out at the gate, and did not see him do any thing at the window. As soon as I missed the spoons, I went out and saw the prisoner in Pott-street, which is about five minutes walk from our house - he was then with the other man. I had not seen them together before. They turned down at the bottom where there is no thoroughfare. As they returned I collared the other man, and told him to stand still, for he had been robbing; the prisoner heard it and immediately walked away. The other man desired me to let him go; he lifted up his hand to strike me, and I let him go.

Q. Where did the prisoner go to - A. He walked up the street, and Lloyd, the officer, took him, but found nothing on him, except some money. My mistress was up in the bed-room at the time; I saw her go up - she could not come down without my seeing or hearing her - she did not go out. I was out of the house about two minutes in pursuit of the men.

MARIA PALMER . I live opposite the prosecutor. I saw the prisoner and another young man going along the Bethnal-green-road; I saw the prisoner take four apples out of his pocket. He opened Mr. Timmons's gate, and went through the garden to the kitchen-window - it was the prisoner at the bar; I saw him push the window open. He immediately went out of the garden to the other young man, who was waiting for him; when he got to him he clapped his hands together as a signal, and gave him the four apples. Then the other young man went to the kitchen-window with them, put his hand in, and brought something out, which shone like silver - I immediately went over and told the servant. They both went down Pott-street. The man put the silver into his bosom.

Q. Did the prisoner appear to join him when he came out - A. Yes, they went away together - he was about twenty yards from him when he took the spoons out of the window.

Q. You did not see Mrs. Timmons at the time - A. I saw her up stairs in her room through the window; I do not think they saw me. I saw only four apples. They had neither basket, donkey, or cart.

JAMES LLOYD . I am a special constable; the prosecutor's house is in the parish of of St. Matthew, Bethnal-green. I was called to take the prisoner, and gave him to another constable while I went to look for the other man. The prisoner said he had never been near the house.

SARAH KADY re-examined. Q. You collared the other man - A. Yes, I saw him and the prisoner talking together. My mistress's name is Louisa. I have heard my master call her so, and she has answered to it.

Prisoner's Defence. About nine o'clock I came from Shoreditch - I came down Bethnal-green-road. A young man had a dog which I thought was mine, and crossed to see it. I went down the street for a necessary purpose, and turned up again, when the constable laid hold of me, and asked me what I had been doing.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 20.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18191027-20

1398. MICHAEL HARPER was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of October , one umbrella, value 5 s. , the property of James Wakeman .

JAMES WAKEMAN . I am an umbrella maker , and live in Oxford-street . On Saturday, the 2d of October, about half-past ten o'clock at night, I was in the parlour behind my shop, and heard my boy cry out Stop thief! I ran out - he was pursuing the prisoner. I saw the prisoner strike him, and knock him down. I pursued him, and the watchman stopped him before I got up to him; he threw the umbrella down - it was picked up and put into the shop by a stranger while I was pursuing him; I did not see it in his hands, but am sure he is the person who knocked my boy down.

WILLIAM GOULSTON . On Saturday evening I was at the shop, and saw the prisoner and another at the window, about half-past ten o'clock, upon looking up I saw the prisoner take an umbrella, which hung up about two feet from the door; he ran away with it, and I called Stop thief! - he hid himself in a space by the next house, which is a china shop. I caught hold of him, but he struck me about the head, knocked me down, and ran off - the umbrella was thrown down between two of them; they were together. I arose, picked it up, and took it into the shop. I found him at the watch-house in about a quarter of an hour, and knew him - I am sure he is the man.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not tell the magistrate that you could not swear to me, and your master told you that you would get into a hobble if you did not - A. No.

SAMUEL HAWKINS . I am a constable. About half-past ten o'clock the prisoner was brought in by Mr. Wakeman and two watchmen. Mr. Wakeman fetched the boy and umbrella, and the boy said he was the man whom he saw take it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN CONNER . I am a watchman. I apprehended the prisoner; Mr. Wakeman said he was the man. I heard the cry, and saw the mob - he got from the mob, and I took him.

JOHN ASSETT . I am a watchman. I assisted in taking the prisoner to the watch-house.

Prisoner's Defence. I am charged with stealing an umbrella of the value of 5 s., the price marked on it was 7 s. 6 d. I was going along, the lad called Stop thief! and I struck him.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

Reference Number: t18191027-21

1399. JOSEPH BROWN and FRANCIS WEARING were indicted for stealing, on the 22d of September , four combs, value 2 s.; six brushes, value 3 s.; one shoe-horn, value 6 d.; one drinking-horn, value 6 d., and one Tunbridge-ware box, value 1 d. , the property of William Cowdry .

WILLIAM COWDRY . I am a brush manufacturer and warehouseman , and live in the Strand ; the prisoner, Wearing, was our errand-boy and servant ; he had been about six months with us - I do not know Brown. Johannah Lawrence was our servant; she had been about five weeks with us - I was absent at Godstone, where I have a house; I returned home on the 16th of September. On the 18th, in consequence of what West, my clerk, told me, I made enquiry, and searched Wearing's box, who slept at my house. I asked him to let me see his box, and he opened it for me, in which I found a hair and a toothbrush, also a large key - the brushes had been used a little. My firm opinion is that they are mine, from a particular mark. He acknowledged they were mine, and said he intended to return them to the place, from where he took them.

JOHN WEST . I am in the employ of Mr. Cowdry, and was with him when he found the brushes in Wearing's box; there is a stamped mark on the hair-brush, by which I know it to be his. He found the key, and took the brushes out of the drawer - I never saw Brown at the house.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. The stamp on it denotes that it was made by the prosecutor - A. Yes. I could not say that it had not been sold, if he had not said that he took it.

SARAH BONNER. I live at No. 35, Crown-street, Soho. Brown lodged at my house for six or seven weeks until he was apprehended; he kept bad hours, and said the reason was that he was employed at Vauxhall-gardens; he had a trunk. He asked me once for the key of my street-door, which I lent to him, but never got it again.

GEORGE DONALDSON . I am an officer. I produce a key, which I found on Brown at the watch-house, also a trunk that I found at the last witness's house, in the two pair back-room.

SARAH BONNER re-examined. It is the key of my house - he slept in the two pair back-room. He slept out sometimes.

GEORGE DONALDSON re-examined. On the 21st of September Mr. Cowdry brought Brown to Covent-garden watch-house. I found the box in his room, which I opened with a key, and found seven brushes, a drinking-horn, a shoe-horn, three combs, and a little box. One of the combs has been used.

Cross-examined. Q. You searched the house of Wearing's mother - A. Yes, but found nothing.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Brown's Defence. The young woman, Lawrence, came to my lodgings, and brought her mistress's clothes to dress in, to go with me to the Theatre. She also brought a bundle, and while I was in the yard, cleaning my boots, these things were put into my box, which was locked, and the key taken away.

BROWN - GUILTY . Aged 31.

Transported for Seven Years .

WEARING - NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18191027-22

1400. ANN SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of July , one trunk, value 5 s.; two pelisses, value 30.; four gowns, value 30 s.; five pair of stockings, value 5 s.; two shawls, value 2 l.; two veils, value 1 l.; three brooches, value 1 l.; one opera-glass, value 7 s., and one nutmeg-grater, value 5 s. , the property of Jane Byerly .

MRS. JANE BYERLY . I live in Lower Belgrave-place; the prisoner was my charwoman . On Saturday, the 24th of July, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I gave her my trunk to take to Mr. Hill's, who is a glover, and lives at No. 8, Cockspur-street, as the Brighton coach was to take me up there. On Monday she returned about six o'clock, and said she had delivered it at the private door of No. 8. I asked her who took it in? She said a young gentleman. The box was directed with my name as a passenger to Brighton; it contained the articles stated in the indictment, which were worth 20 l. at the least. On Monday I went there to go by the coach, and Mr. Hill asked me for the trunk; I said I had sent it on Saturday. I found that it had not taken been there - Mr. Hill's son was the only person in the house. In consequence of this I did not go to Brighton, but went in search of the prisoner; I got a warrant. She was taken on the 15th of October on another

charge; I found her at Queen-square office. I have seen my two brooches since in the possession of the pawnbroker - I have recovered nothing else.

GEORGE HILL . I live with my father in Cockspur-street; no other young gentleman lives in the house. On Saturday, the 24th of July, no trunk whatever was delivered that I know of - none was delivered to me. There are ten people in the house, but my father and myself are the only men - the prisoner did not come to the house. When Mrs. Byerly came, enquiry was made for the trunk, but none could be found; my mother was going to Brighton with her.

CHARLES JOHNSON . I am shopman to Mr. Mount, who is a pawnbroker, and lives in York-street, Westminster. On the 13th of September the prisoner pledged two brooches with me for 10 s., in the name of Ann Smith; I am sure she is the woman. I have seen her at our shop before.

BENJAMIN TURNBULL . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner, and found the duplicates of the brooches on her.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 29.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

Reference Number: t18191027-23

1401. THOMAS WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of September , four pair of shoes, value 10 s., and one pair of boots, value 2 s. , the property of Thomas Meredith , the elder .

THOMAS MEREDITH . I am a shoemaker , and live in Orange-street, St. Martin's in the Fields ; I occupy the kitchen, and have boots and shoes there; there is a staircase from the street to the kitchen. On the 28th of September, about half-past nine o'clock at night, I shut the flap, but left the door open, and went for a pot of porter. When I came back I saw the prisoner on the stairs, taking the shoes off the nails, which hung by the kitchen-door - he had got over the flap. I saw him take four pair of shoes and one pair of boots; he turned to come up again, but I pushed him into the kitchen, and he fell with the shoes under him. I secured him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18191027-24

1402. CHARLES BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of October , two coats, value 4 l. , the property of Robert Evans .

EDWARD WHITE . I am sixteen years old, and live at a livery-stables at Pimlico - Robert Evans lives in Charles-street, Covent-garden , and keeps his chaise at Smith and King's livery-stables. On the 14th of October, about a quarter after seven o'clock, I took his chaise to him, and his two coats, which hung over the gig. I was placing the coats right when Mr. Evans came in - I observed the prisoner at the door of a public-house, two doors from Mr. Evans's, smoking his pipe. I got out of the chaise, and went to the horse's head, I then had my back to the great-coats; the horse's head was towards the public-house. The prisoner passed me, and in a moment after I turned my head, and saw the coats were gone. I rang the bell; Mr. Evans scolded me, gave me 6 d., and drove off. I then went round to York-street, which is only two doors from Mr. Evans's. As soon as I got into York-street, I saw the prisoner standing against the News-office, in Brydges-street. While he stood there, a man in a long coat, apparently a coachman, went up to him, and they talked together. At last Brown saw me, and they both went down Brydges-street together. I followed them down into the Strand, through several courts, towards Temple-bar - they came to a court, then the prisoner set off running - I ran after him, and said,

"You have stolen two of my master's coats." He immediately collared me, and said,

"D - n your eyes, what are you following me for?" and knocked me down in the middle of the road - he struck me on the ear. He set off running as hard as he could; I got up and ran after him, calling Stop thief! he ran down Swan-yard, and went into a house there. I lost him, came back, and a gentleman said he was in the house. I stationed a man at the door, while Racket went with me to Bow-street for an officer, and I gave him the 6 d. which Mr. Evans gave me. I got Holyland, who searched the house, but could not find him. I went for Mr. Corderoy, who went into the house, got a light, and went into the cellar. I saw one of the coats on the floor, at the bottom of the stairs. I went a little farther, found a little door in the cellar, opened it, and found the prisoner there, sitting on the privy, as if he was fast asleep - I found nothing more. As we went out of the house we were surrounded by about twenty girls, who endeavoured to rescue the prisoner from the constable. The prisoner hit the constable with all his force on the nose, and made it bleed. He did not get away.

ROBERT EVANS . I live in Charles-street. The boy brought me the chaise; I was out, returned about seven o'clock, and found him at the door with the gig and two great-coats. About three minutes after I got in, he knocked at the door, and said the coats were missed. I was obliged to go into the country, and sent him to look for the thief.

THOMAS RACKET . I am in the Coldstream Guards, and live in Swan-yard. I saw the prisoner come into the yard about half-past seven o'clock, with a drab coat hanging over his arm. He knocked at the door, a young woman on the outside had a key and let him in; the door was shut immediately. In about a minute after, I saw White run past the house - I did not speak him to then. He returned, was crying, and said a young man had stolen his master's great-coats. I told him he was gone into that house. I accompanied him to Bow-street, and got a constable. I stood at the door, while they went to search the house. Nobody came in or went out until the prisoner was taken.

FRANCIS HOLYLAND . I am a patrol. I went to the house in Swan-yard, searched it, and found nothing up stairs. I got a light, went into the cellar, found the coat at the bottom of the stairs in the cellar, and the prisoner in the privy there, sitting as if he was asleep. The moment the boy opened the door he said he was the man. I secured him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The boy's word is not to be taken. A young man came to see me in Tothil-fields prison, and

the boy said he was the man who stole the coats - he was taken into custody, but proved where he was, and was discharged.

EDWARD WHITE re-examined. I never charged any other man with it. I said the other person was the man who was in conversation with him.

FRANCIS HOLYLAND re-examined. I was present at Tothil-fields. The boy described another man, who attempted to stop him in the street - he always said the prisoner was the man.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18191027-25

1403. THOMAS JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of October , 29 pieces of calico, containing 450 yards, value 27 l., and one wrapper, value 1 s. 10 d. , the goods of Peter Halliday Turner and Charles Johnson

The prisoner pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18191027-26

1404. JOHN DIGBY was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of October , one carcase of a sheep, value 38 s. , the goods of Michael Scales .

MICHAEL SCALES. I am a butcher , and live in Aldgate High-street . On Saturday, the 16th of October, about eight o'clock in the morning, I missed the carcase of a sheep which hung in my shop.

WILLIAM WHITEHEAD . I am servant to Mr. Scales. On Saturday morning, the 16th of October, I saw the prisoner come into the shop, and take the carcase of a sheep - he occasionally did portering business for us - I thought he was ordered to take it, and did not go after him. In about three quarters of an hour the man who had bought that sheep came for it. I saw the prisoner a few minutes after, and got an officer, who took him between eight and nine o'clock. My master charged him with taking it, he denied it - I am sure I saw him take it.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Mr. Scales hung them there, to be sent for by the persons who bought them - A. Yes; the prisoner was employed by persons to load their carts.

Q. Mr. Drury often employed the prisoner to fetch carcases for him - A. The prisoner denied taking it.

Q. Did he not say Drury sent him for it - A. Yes, but he took two. I apprehended him where he always stands for employment.

JOHN FORRESTER . I apprehended the prisoner, and charged him with stealing the carcase of a sheep - he said he was waiting there for a constable to come and take him, as he understood he was suspected of taking it. He said he took one, thought it was the wrong one, and weighed it.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent.

JURY to WHITEHEAD. Q. Did you see him take two carcases - A. Yes. Drury had bought only one. We hung the first one on the scale, to see if it was right. I asked him if he had taken another, to hear if he would say he had. The last sheep he took was Drury's, that was weighed.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18191027-27

1405. GEORGE BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of October , five deal boards, value 7 s. , the goods of Henry Peto .

WILLIAM TURNER . I am servant to Mr. Henry Peto , who is a builder ; these beards were taken from the yard in Little Britain about five o'clock - I saw the prisoner going out of the yard with the five deal boards on his shoulder; he was a stranger. I stopped him in Bartholomew-close with them - I asked him what he was going to do with them? he said,

"For God's sake, let me go!" I gave him in charge.

JOHN CLINTON . I took the prisoner in charge. He said he lived in Philip-lane, and afterwards said it was in Crown-street, Soho.

Prisoner's Defence. I have been a long time out of work, and in extreme distress. I was a cabinet-maker, and in consequence of the badness of the trade and want of employment, and having a wife and three children, was in great distress - all my furniture was also seized.

GUILTY . Aged 32.

Confined Three Weeks .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18191027-28

1406. WILLIAM DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of September , two pair of trowsers, value 1 l. , the goods of William Mott .

WILLIAM MOTT . I am a clothes-salesman , and live in Bishopsgate-street, City . On the 28th of September the trowsers hung at the door, partly secured by a string, and pinned. Between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, I saw them go from the door, immediately ran out, and saw the prisoner running with them at the corner of Skinner-street, and stopped him with them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I was in great distress.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Fined One Shilling , and Discharged.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18191027-29

1407. GEORGE IRELAND was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of September , one handkerchief, value 1 s., the property of John Swan , from his person .

JOHN SWAN . I am a King's officer , and live in Richmond-place. On the 27th of September, between two and three o'clock in the afternoon, I was in Thames-street , a person called to me, and told me my handkerchief was gone; I felt and missed it. The prisoner ran past me, into Gracechurch-street, and up Globe-court, which has no thoroughfare. He was stopped, and the handkerchief produced, which I knew to be mine.

MARY GILL . I live in Globe-court. The prisoner walked slowly up the court, took a handkerchief from his bosom, and put it behind a water-butt - he was stopped in about a minute; I told them where the handkerchief was, and Mr. Swan claimed it. The prisoner had nobody with him.

EBENEZER BRAIN . I am a shoemaker. On the 27th of September, about three o'clock in the afternoon, I was near the end of Lower Thames-street, and saw the prisoner in company with two boys older than himself - I saw

the prisoner take the handkerchief out of the prosecutor's pocket, I immediately called out,

"Sir, your pocket is picked!" The other two ran different ways, the prisoner ran up Globe-court, I followed and secured him. Mrs. Gill was at her window, and said,

"There is the handkerchief, I saw him put it there" - it was produced by a stranger - the prosecutor claimed it. He said,

"I did not take it" - I said,

"Don't deny it, for I saw you take it."

THOMAS SALMON . I took the prisoner in charge - I searched him and found another silk handkerchief; he said it was his own, and that he gave 3 s. 6 d. for it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. Two boys ran by, and threw it in my face.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18191027-30

1408. JAMES PRICE was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of October , one watch-chain, value 2 l.; one seal, value 1 l., and one key, value 6 d., the property of John Kew , from his person .

MR. JOHN KEW . I am a wine-merchant , and live in Parliament-street. Yesterday, about twelve o'clock at noon, I was passing from Clifford's Inn to Sergeant's Inn - as I went through the passage the prisoner pushed violently against me; I immediately said,

"What do you mean by that?" He could have passed without interrupting me. Immediately as he pushed against me I felt a violent tug at my watch - he got my chain and seals. I said,

"You scoundrel, you have got my watch!" he immediately ran away, I followed - he was never ten yards from me. I called Stop thief! a gentleman named Burfoot stopped him; I came up and collared him - I never lost sight of him; nobody but him was near me. My fob was buttoned; I found he had broken the chain. We took him to the porter's lodge to search him, they were not found on him. Mr. Kay afterwards found them, and produced them.

HENRY ROBERT BURFOOT . I am clerk to my brother, who is a solicitor in the Temple. I was passing from Sergeants' Inn to Clifford's Inn, reading a letter - I heard the cry of Stop thief, turned round, and saw the prisoner running - the prosecutor called out Stop thief; no other persons were in view but them. I seized him; he said,

"Why do you do that? I have done no harm - you will choke me." I kept my hold; Mr. Kew came up, and said he had robbed him of his watch - we were about fifty yards from the porter's lodge. I said we had better search him; we took him into the lodge, where we searched him, but found nothing on him. The watch-chain was brought by Mr. Kay - it was broken from the watch.

JOHN KAY . I live in Charles-street, Blackfriars-road. I was coming through Clifford's Inn yesterday, heard Mr. Kew crying Stop thief, and found the prisoner in custody of Burfoot. I went with them into the lodge; I afterwards went to look for the chain, and found it put in a corner under the gateway, about ten yards from where I first saw Mr. Kew - I delivered it to him at the lodge.

SAMUEL HARRISON . I took the prisoner in charge, and found 4 s. 6 d. on him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18191027-31

1409. JOHN BARKER and JOHN DIXON were indicted for stealing, on the 11th of October , one waistcoat, value 2 s. , the property of William Kersay .

WILLIAM KERSAY . I live in King-street, Cloth-fair , and am a tailor and salesman . On the 11th of October, about nine o'clock in the morning, this waistcoat was pinned at the door. I went out, returned about a quarter before one, and it was gone. I found Barker in custody, Dixon was taken that evening. They were strangers to me. I have never found the waistcoat.

ELIZA KERSAY . I was left at home, and saw Barker unpin the waistcoat, and give it to Dixon. I am sure they are the persons; it was about a quarter before one o'clock, I was looking at them through the window; Dixon ran away with it, and Barker came into the shop. I should think he must have seen me. I sent for an officer, who took him.

Q. Did he stay till the officer came - A. Yes, and said he would leave all his clothes until he got the waistcoat back, and that he did not know Dixon was going to run away with it. He did not attempt to get from me. I saw Dixon at Guildhall next day, and am sure he was the person.

WILLIAM AMPHLETT . I am a watchman. I saw the prisoners looking at the clothes, and think they must have seen me. Barker unpinned the waistcoat, Dixon held his apron, Barker said

"Run!" and then Dixon ran off. I went towards Barker, and he went into the shop directly. I told the prosecutrix to detain him while I fetched an officer, which I did in about ten minutes or a quarter of an hour. I am sure Dixon is the other man.

JOSEPH LUMLEY . I am an officer. Amphlett fetched me to take charge of Barker. At ten o'clock that night I took Dixon at the Bear and Ragged Staff yard, and asked him where the waistcoat was? he said he sold it to a Jew in the street, for 8 d. I found nothing on him.

BARKER'S Defence. I was passing the shop, and unpinned the waistcoat to look at it, I gave it to Dixon while I went into the shop, and he ran off with it; I did not know he was going to take it.

BARKER - GUILTY . Aged 16.

DIXON - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined One Month , and Whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18191027-32

1410. THOMAS KING was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of September , one pair of shoes, value 4 s. 6 d. , the goods of Alexander Wilson .

THOMAS VINCENT . I am shopman to Mr. Alexander Wilson, who is a shoemaker , and lives on Holborn-hill . On the 27th of September, between five and six o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner came into the shop in company with another person, to change a pair of ladies' shoes which that person had bought; while I was changing them I missed a pair of ladies' shoes. The other person

was a customer. I put a pair in paper for the person. After that the person bought a pair of boots for 6 s., which I also put in paper - they were both together. I then said I missed a pair of shoes, and must send for an officer, as they went out of the shop the officer stopped them both, and found the shoes on King. They were not wrapped in paper.

Q. Had the prisoner asked for any shoes - A. No, my Lord, he only came in with the other person; they were found in his inside pocket. He said he did not know how they came there.

Cross-examined by MR. ARABIN. Q. The other person was a customer - A. He had bought things before.

GEORGE CORBY . I am a beadle. I was sent for, and took charge of the men. I searched them both. I found nothing on the other but what he had bought, which was wrapped in paper. I found the shoes in the prisoner's inside coat-pocket, not in paper. I asked him how he came by them? He said he did not know.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. My Lord, I met the young man on Holborn-hill, he asked me to go with him; I waited in the shop while he changed the shoes, he gave me a pair, and said,

"Have the goodness to put this in your pocket, for mine is full." I did so, and thought he had paid for them.

GUILTY. Aged 21.

Recommended to Mercy .

Fined One Shilling , and Discharged.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18191027-33

1411. PETER SHORT was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of September , 3 lbs. of juice, value 4 s. 6 d. , the property of Charles Garrett .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating it to be the property of John Addinell , Francis Milner , and William Wyld .

CHARLES GARRETT . I am clerk to Mr. Lewis , Mincing-lane; I was employed to take care of his property for John Addinell , Francis Milner , and William Wyld , who are his assignees . The prisoner was employed in the warehouse where the juice was. On the evening of the 24th of September, when I shut the doors, I suspected some juice had been taken out of the chest, next morning, when the prisoner came to work, I set a person to watch him; he gave me information about ten o'clock, and I followed the prisoner to a public-house in Tower-street, and saw the juice in his pocket. I charged him with stealing it; he said he had no intention of stealing it, for he did not know what to do with it, and he hoped I would let him go, as he had no idea of making money of it. I took him back, and found three chests had been robbed of juice. We lost near 60 lbs.

JOSEPH DAVIS . I took the prisoner in charge. He said he did it through distress, for the person who employed him had not paid him.

Prisoner's Defence. I found it lying on the stairs, and put it into my pocket, being rather intoxicated. I was wounded in Egypt with General Abercromby , and when I get in liquor I do not know what I am about.

GUILTY . Aged 49.

Fined One Shilling , and Discharged.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18191027-34

1412. WILLIAM PRIOR and WILLIAM TROTTER were indicted for stealing, on the 5th of October , 74 lbs. of lead, value 12 s. , the property of the Right Honourable Arrabella Countess De Grey , widow .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating it to be the property of the Right Honourable Thomas Philip Weddell , Lord Grantham .

THIRD COUNT, the same, only stating it to be the property of certain persons unknown.

JOSEPH TURNER . I am a bricklayer, and work for Mr. Pool. On Tuesday, the 28th of September, about half-past seven o'clock in the morning, I was working at Lord Hardwick's, went to the privy of Lord Grantham, and saw the loft door over the privy open - I thought I saw something like lead. When I returned from breakfast, I examined the loft, and found it was lead. I took it from there, with the assistance of one of Mr. King's men, and put it into Lord Hardwick's stables. I afterwards, by Mr. King's direction, returned the lead to the place where I found it.

JAMES KING . I am a plumber, and live in Rupert-street, Haymarket, While I was at work at Lady De Grey's, one of my men informed me that some lead had been found in the loft over Lord Grantham's privy, and been put in Lord Hardwick's stables; I assisted in removing it to the loft, and watched with my man and lad. I set my lad to watch through a small hole; we waited there nearly two hours. About ten minutes after eight o'clock the lad said three men were coming down the mews. I rushed out, and secured Prior; the man and the lad secured Trotter - it was in Badman's-mews. When I rushed upon them they dropped something; we found the lead was gone out of the loft, and two pieces in a sack, and one piece out of the sack on the ground just by them; I compared it with the other lead - it tallied with the water-pipe. I assisted in fixing it at Lady De Grey's.

THOMAS GALPINE . I am apprentice to Mr. King. I was watching with him, and have heard his evidence - it is correct. I saw three men come down the mews - the prisoners are two of them. I and the other man secured Trotter.

WILLIAM GIBBONS . I am gardener to Mr. King. I was on the watch, and saw the men come down the mews - they were stopped. My master's evidence is correct.

GEORGE OWEN . I am a constable; the prisoners were given into my custody with the lead; I compared it with the premises - some pieces were left under the holdfasts in the wall - it exactly corresponded with them.

PRIOR'S Defence. We went down the yard - I did not see the lead.

TROTTER'S Defence. We had no concern in it.

PRIOR - GUILTY . Aged 18.

TROTTER - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191027-35

1413. JOHN HOLMESBY was indicted for the wilful murder of Ann, his wife .

ESTHER SURRY (in continuation). I am a widow, and live at Homerton. In September last I lived in the same house with the prisoner. It was the house of his wife's father, whose name is Sole.

Q. Do you remember the prisoner and his wife going out together at the latter end of September - A. Yes. They went to town on the 28th of September - they went out together.

Prisoner. That is false, for we did not go out together.

ESTHER SURRY . They went out together about three o'clock, and returned to the house again about half-past five; I did not take much notice whether they both came in together or not.

Q. Where did you first see them together - A. The first time of my seeing them, was when I opened the door, and saw somebody talking by the stile, which is facing the house. This was about half-past seven o'clock, as near as I can guess.

Q. Was there one or two persons talking - A. Two; the prisoner was one - his wife stood by the gate; I did not see her when I first came out. The prisoner went across the road, and staid talking by the gate to her, and a man who stood by the side of her - they stood talking there near a quarter of an hour; the prisoner and his wife then came into the house, and the man went away.

Q. Do you know that man - A. He is a man, whom the prisoner was jealous of; I think his name is Lawrence. I heard the prisoner say he had caught him with her that night.

COURT. Q. When did the prisoner say this - A. When he came in doors.

Q. Did he say at what time he caught him with her - A. No.

Q. Before they went in did you hear any thing else pass between the prisoner and his wife - A. I heard him call her a w - h - e, and tell her that she had been with this man. She said he was a liar; they had a few words after they came into the house - he called her a w - h - e, and she called him a liar. He asked her if she would go to bed? and she said, Yes. They both went into the bedroom, and I thought they were going to bed. She went to bed, and he undressed himself to go to bed to her - I was in the next room.

Q. How many rooms are there in the house - A. Two below stairs, and one above, My Lord - he and his wife sleep in one bed below stairs, the children, and the prisoner's father-in-law sleep in the other room. His father-in-law is a watchman - he was on the watch at the time.

Q. Who are the children - A. A little boy and girl, who are the prisoner's wife's brother and sister. I was in the room, going to sleep that night with the children. The prisoner came out of his wife's room, and sat himself on the bed where the children were; he asked me if I was going to bed? I said I believed I should. He then went into his bed-room, came out, and sat himself on the bed again.

Q. When he came back the second time, was he dressed or undressed - A. Undressed. He sat himself on the bed, and said are you going to bed to the children? I then heard his wife say,

"I will get up." He went back into his room, and presently after I heard a blow.

Q. What sort of a blow was it - A. I thought it was with his fist, by the sound. I got up and went to the door - the little boy, who was in the same room that I was, hallooed out,

"Murder!" I went to the door, the prisoner came out with an axe in his hand, and said, if the boy hallooed out murder again he would murder him - he went back to the bed-room.

Q. Before you saw him come out with the axe, you heard one or more blows - A. One. He went back into his wife's room, and while he was there, I heard her halloo out, very faintly - I thought she said,

"Lord have mercy upon me!" I think I heard her say so three times. The prisoner came out, and said he had done for her, and he should be hung. He asked the boy where his father's money was? he said he did not know, The prisoner said he wanted money, and money he would have. He took a chisel out of a box, and broke open his father-in-law's box with it, which stood in the room, and took some money out. After that, he asked me for the pen and ink, and wrote two notes - he got the paper out of the baker's book. I was sitting in a chair by the back-door; he brought the axe, held it up to me, and said if either of us spoke a word we should be dead; he said he would go out at the back-door, and listen if he heard us speaking - he went out with the axe in his hand. I gave the alarm over the way to Colleson, at the Crooked Billet, public-house, as soon as I possibly could. It was a moonlight night.

Cross-examined by MR. CURWOOD. Q. What relation are you to the unfortunate woman - A. None, I merely lodged there. They went out together about a quarter before three o'clock, and said they were going to town together.

Q. You do not know that they continued together all the while - A. No. I next saw them about half-past seven o'clock - it was then dark. They were talking with another man on the other side of the road.

Q. There is a cow-house near where you heard them talking - A. Just across the field. A very little way from where I heard them talking; I heard some of the conversation - it was in an angry tone.

Q. Did you not hear enough to know that the prisoner was accusing his wife that he had caught her in the act of wh - edom in this cow-house - Q. Yes. I do not know that he mentioned Lawrence's name.

COURT. Q. Tell us the words he said - A. My Lord, he said he had caught her in the fact along with this man. The prisoner shoved her into the house angrily.

Cross-examined by MR. CURWOOD. Q. After he was in the room with her he came out two or three times; was it not with great agitation of manner - A. He seemed very uneasy, and I heard him say he took her pocket up to see what money was in it.

Q. Did you hear her say she was dragged into the cow-house by the man - A. She said she was carried in. The prisoner said if she would swear a rape against the man, he would take him to Worship-street - she said she would not do it.

Q. Did she not add that she loved that man's little finger better than her husband's whole body - A. I did not hear it. When he came out of the room the second time, she said she would get up.

Q. Did you not also hear her say that she would go to the other man - A. No.

Q. Though you could not hear all the conversation, did you hear enough to know it was the continuation of the same angry conversation down to the time the blow was given - A. Yes.

THOMAS SOLE . I am turned twelve years of age. I am brother to the prisoner's wife, who was killed. I was at home about half-past seven o'clock, when my sister and the prisoner came home.

Q. Which room was you in - A. In the front room, where I sleep - I was up. I went to bed about a quarter of an hour after they came home. My little sister was in bed with me; Mrs. Surry was in my bed-room. My father was gone out to watch.

Q. When they came home, did you hear them say any thing to each other - A. Yes; the prisoner and his wife went into the back-room where they sleep - they said nothing then; they both came out into our bed-room again. The prisoner said,

"I am going to Newington to buy a pair of shoes;" they then went out together. Before they went out they were playing together, pushing one another, and kissing each other.

Q. How long had they been married - A. Three years. I went to bed after they went out; I was asleep when they returned. They were jangling, and awoke me; they were then in my room.

Q. Now tell us all that passed - A. He then went out at the back-door, and said to his wife,

"Don't go to make away with yourself." Mrs. Surry said,

"No, she won't go to make away with herself" - they were both at the back-door at the time - she went to the door with him. Then my sister came in, and sat by the fire in my room; the prisoner afterwards came in and said,

"Are not you coming to bed?" she said,

"Yes, and are not you coming and all?" he said,

"Yes, I am coming to bed directly" - she then went to bed. He undressed himself; I saw them go into their room - I could see into their room, and saw him undress himself. He did not go into bed, but came out again into my room, he then went and looked all the house three times.

Q. How do you mean - A. He went all round the under room, as if to look for the axe; he went to the cupboard under the stairs, where the axe was.

Q. Did he take any thing away - A. I did not see; he then came to my bed and sat down.

Q. How do you know the axe was there that night - A. My father had used it that night to chop some wood, and put it there. My sister asked the prisoner if he was coming to bed? he said,

"No, I am going to sleep with the children." She said,

"I shall get up then" - he said,

"No, no, don't get up, I will come to bed to you." Then he went in and out of my room to her two or three times.

Q, What next - A. He came out and went in again. I then heard him hit her very hard - then he hit her again; I got out of bed, hallooed out Murder! and saw the axe over his shoulder, as if he was going to hit her again. He then came out to me and said,

"You d - d young rascal, if you offer to call out Murder again I will serve you the same." He then came into the room where I sleep, and said,

"I have done for her!"

Q. Did he say any thing else - A. He came to Mrs. Surry and me, and said,

"If you offer to stir or move I will serve you the same." He then went into the room where the deceased was, put on his stockings and breeches, went out, and said to me,

"Tom, where is your father's money?" I said,

"For God's sake don't take father's money, because he has got to pay his men." He then said,

"If you offer to stir or move I'll serve you the same." He sat down on my bed, then went and fetched father's box, in which he keeps his tools, took out a chisel, opened father's box with it, and took out a 1 l. note - he put his hand in again, and took something else out, but I could not see what. He then put on his jacket and shoes, went out at the back-door and said,

"I will stay out here and listen, and if you stir or move I will be the death of you." He went away. Mrs. Surry and I went into Mr. Twigg's house next door, directly, and gave the alarm.

COURT. Q. What was your sister's name - A. Ann.

Cross-examined by MR. NORTON. Q. What time did your sister and the prisoner go out first - A. About three o'clock; they had been together all day - he did not go to work as it rained; he was a bricklayer's labourer. They were very good friends before they went out.

Q. Before they went out to buy the shoes they were kissing and playing together - A. Yes. I was in bed when they returned.

Q. Was it a violent noise when they came in - A. No; the least thing awakes me. He was scolding her, and was very angry.

Q. You heard about her going with another man - A. I heard a little about that, but not much. The prisoner went in and out of the bed-room, and from one part of the room to the other. The head of their bed is close against the door; I sleep by the side; the door does not shut close.

Q. They had words in the bed-room - A. Yes, they were always quarrelling. He once turned her out of doors. They had a few words before he came out of the bed-room.

Q. Recollect yourself; do not you remember her saying she loved the other man's little finger better than his whole body - A. No, I heard nothing of the kind. She said she would get up if he did not come to bed.

Q. What were the words they had in the bed-room - A. He took her pocket away, and she said,

"You shan't have the money, it is my father's." I heard nothing about any other man.

Q. Did not the prisoner say,

"I have been the death of her?" - A. No, he said

"I have done for her."

MR. ALLEY. Q. Did she not desire him to come to bed, and he said he would - A. Yes, they were then quiet with each other.

ROBERT PRESCOTT . I am a constable. About ten o'clock of the night in question, I remember an alarm being given. I went to the house, Mr. Colleson's servant-boy went with me, but did not go into the house. I found a little girl in bed in the other room; I found Mrs. Surry in the next house.

Q. How did you find things in the house - A. When I first opened the door I found two puddles of blood near the door. I turned my eye on the right side, and saw the deceased lying on her back on the bed - she was quite dead. I had a light. On the right side of the bed there

was a great deal of congealed blood - there was the mark of her head in it. She was quite naked, except part of her shift being over her breast. The surgeon afterwards saw her. I found an axe in the room, which I produce - it was between the two doors, just over the threshold of the door where the children sleep. There was a great deal of blood on the back part of the head of it - there was none on the edge.

THOMAS SOLE re-examined. It is my father's axe; he had cut wood with it that night; it was in the cupboard under the stairs. I saw my father put it there.

MR. WILLIAM BAILEY . I am a surgeon; I saw the deceased. There was a wound on the back part of her head, another on the forehead, near the left eye, and another on the temple. The wound on the back part of the head must have been made with a blunt instrument, there was a violent concussion; the others appeared to have been made by some sharp instrument - I should suppose that on the temple to be made with a knife.

Q. According to your judgment, what was the occasion of her death - A. Evidently the blow on the temple; it perforated quite into the brain. There was a compound fracture of the jaw in two places.

COURT. Q. Might it have been done with the axe - A. The blow on the back of the head might have been done with the back of it.

Q. Could the other wounds be made with the edge of it - A. I think it impossible, for the axe is large and thick. The wounds appear to be more a stab than a cut.

Q. The jaw was fractured in two places - A. I should think that to be done with the axe. I certainly think some sharp instrument besides the axe had been used.

Q. Might not the cut be made with the edge of the axe - A. It could not have been cut that depth.

Q. Were the bruises which you think were done with the axe sufficient to cause her death - A. There is no doubt of it; the violence of the blow on the back of the head would break the jaw.

GEORGE RUTHVEN. I am an officer. I found the prisoner at Sandwich - he was delivered into my custody there; I accompanied him to town.

Q. On the road, without any promise or threat on your part, did he say any thing on the subject - A. He said, that sometime previous his wife went out for a pail of water; she need not have been gone half a minute, but she was gone half an hour. He suspected something, and in the morning he found some cow-dung on her bonnet. That on the evening of the murder he went out to buy some shoes; she wanted to leave him, and sent him to purchase the shoes - on his return he saw she was not in the house, and went to the public-house, she was not there; he went to a cow-hovel just by, looked in, heard a breathing, and saw something white, he went in, put his left knee on the man, and his left hand on her breast; that the man got from her, and was going along by the stile, she kissed him, and wanted to fondle over him (the prisoner) but he told her to go about her business; but previous to that, he said, when he put his hand on her, she said,

"Is that you, John?" he said it was, and she said she was forced in there by the man, and he said if she would swear that he would forgive her - they both walked to the stile, she wanted to kiss him, but he told her to go away; that they went home, and she said the man forced her into the cow-house, and he said if she would swear that he would forgive her, but she said No, she would see him d - d first, for that she loved that man's little finger better than his whole body. He was going to strike her, but she said if he did she would send him to prison, and there he might rot; that was too much for him, and he up with the axe and struck her, and she said,

"Oh you rogue!"

Cross-examined by MR. CURWOOD. Q. He had surrendered - A. He had.

Prisoner's Defence. On the Monday, the day before I saw my wife in the evening, she went out for a pail of water, and had no occasion to be gone above a few minutes, she was gone a long while; when she came back I chastised her for it, knowing she had been guilty of what has been stated. She came back and said,

"I am going for Rumble's clothes to mangle." I thought to myself that she was going after some of her men, as she had acquaintance with several. She was gone a long while - I went out to the gate, looked towards the left, but did not see her. I suspected she was gone to the cow-hovel - I went that way, and saw Lawrence, (whom I afterwards caught in the act of adultery), I did not then know any thing was between them. She came running from the cow-hovel; I told her she had been after no good, and if I caught her she would not like it. She said I might be d - d, and she would do as she pleased. On the Tuesday morning, being wet, I stopped at home till three or four o'clock. I said,

"My dear, I am going to town to buy a pair of shoes, and you may as well walk me" - she wanted to pledge some things to get money. I said,

"You may as well walk with me." She said,

"Indeed I shall not, I shall ride up with one of the coachmen." (She was very intimate with several of the coachmen, and I believe they did as they liked with her). She started off about half an hour before me, we did not go out together; I was to meet her by Shoreditch church - instead of meeting her there, I wandered about a long while, and met her coming with a girl from towards Bishopsgate church. I asked her why she deceived me so for? I should have gone back for nothing if I had missed her. She said,

"And if you had, you would only have had your walk for nothing." I said,

"Will you go with me and buy the shoes?" she said

"No, you may go where you like, I shall go home." She turned back, and said she would go with me. We went to some shoe-shops - I bought none. I said I must go to a man in Globe-fields, who owed me some money - she went home. I could not get the money, and went straight home. I thought she might have been home full two hours before me, but she did not return until almost dark. I asked her where she had been? she would not satisfy me. I said,

"It is pretty goings on, for you to gad about, and not let me know where you go; if I was to do it how uneasy you would be." She said she did not care, she should do as she liked. We had tea, and had words all the while. She said, as I had not got my shoes I might as well go to Newington. I said there was none there that would suit; she said there were some that would do for me, and my father-in-law said I might get them near the church. When I got there I found no such shop or place. Her being anxious for me

to go arose my suspicion. I made all the haste back I could. On my return I opened the gate gently, looked through a crack in the shutter, and thinking she was not at home, I went to the coach-yard, as she was there almost every evening. I then went to the public-house, to see if she was with one Coulson, the hostler, whom I once caught with her at Edmonton - I then thought of the cow-dung I had found on her bonnet. I then went to the cow-hovel softly, put my ear to the door, and heard a panting for breath - (Here the prisoner minutely described the situation in which he found his wife with John Lawrence ). She said,

"I hope you will forgive me, John, for who can I live with better than my dear husband?" I used several bad expressions, and said I would forgive her. She said the man forced her there. I said to the man,

"Did you or did you not do so?" he said he did. I said,

"I will freely forgive you, my dear, if you will swear a rape against him at Worship-street. The man then escaped about twenty yards across the field - we came up to him again. She said to me,

"You may be d - d, I don't care for you. I love his little finger better than your whole body." The man said it was all his fault, and went away. I got her something to drink, and said she should go home immediately, until I had made up my mind about leaving her - it was all in the heat of passion. I got her some gin and peppermint, and told her the man might go, for I knew where to find him, and would have him up to-morrow. I took her to the gate, and certainly used bad language to her, and said I would forgive her if she would live with him or Ben Fricker , or who she liked. She said,

"there is Mr. Pearson going by, and he well knows what I am." I told her to go in doors, she swore she would not - I pushed her in, and told Surry of the adultery - she said she pitied me. After that she got up and cried, and went into the yard very much enraged. I said,

"Don't make away with yourself, we will part peaceably." She came in and said,

"Don't think I am going to make away with myself for such a d - d **** as you." I said,

"Don't use that language, or you shall feel for it." She went to bed, and asked if I was coming? I said I did not know that I should, for I might as well have a prostitute. She said if I did not come to bed, she would get up, and go to the man she loved. I said I would come to bed if she would appear against the man at Worship-street; she said she would not, for he had treated her well. I went in and out of the room in a great rage; she was exclaiming the bitterest oaths. I went to her, and said I would come to bed if she would not use such language. She said,

"You may be d - d, for I don't care for you." At last she said,

"As you have struck me, you shall lay in prison and rot." I said,

"Say that again!" she said it, the axe laid by, I took it up and struck her once; she said,

"You *****!" I struck her two or three times. After that was done I put on my clothes, and moved her to the right side of the bed, kissed her, and said,

"God bless you, my dear; you was once my comfort, I have been the death of you, and you will be the death of me." I came into the room, the boy was crying Murder! I said

"Say nothing, or I shall be the death of you all." I asked him where his father's money was? for money I must have, in order that I might have time to repent for what I have done. I took the chisel to open the box, it was not locked. I took a 1 l. note out, and asked Surry for a pen and ink; I told her to say nothing, that I might not be detected yet, and I dare say I should soon be caught, for I dearly loved the girl, and should not he happy. I wrote on a piece of paper,

" Benjamin Fricker and John Lawrence ;" with their directions, and made my escape. The boy says I took the axe, and said, if they spoke I would beat them to death, but I did not. I escaped, and afterwards surrendered myself

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 25.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

Reference Number: t18191027-36

1414. THOMAS LOFT was charged on the Coroner's Inquisition only for the wilful murder of Ann Jackson .

MR. ALLEY (for the prosecution), stated, that the deceased was found with a knife in her thigh, in her master's kitchen, at Charing-cross ; that she was taken to the hospital, and the account she gave of the transaction was, that she had fallen off a table while cleaning the kitchen window, and the knife stuck into her thigh. It was however extraordinary, that the window had not been cleaned, and if she intended to do it, her getting on a table would put it out of her power so to do. She had also declared, that the prisoner had nothing to do with it. The Coroner's Jury had, however, found a verdict against him; but he (Mr. Alley), had no evidence to prove that he was ever near the house, or in any way whatever to connect him with the transaction. Under all these circumstances, he deemed it entirely useless to offer any evidence.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18191027-37

1415. WILLIAM TURNBULL , EDWARD MOORE , GEORGE WILLIAMSON , JOHN BUTLER HEWSON , HANNAH GREEN , WILLIAM JONES , JOHN GREEN , THOMAS DOBBINS , DANIEL PRING , ISAAC TITTERTON , JOHN WEBSTER , BENJAMIN JOHNSON , WILLIAM JACKSON , JOHN BAILEY , and MARY ANN CROFT were severally and separately indicted for having in their possession forged and counterfeit Bank notes, knowing them to be forged .

To which indictment they severally and separately pleaded

GUILTY.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Before Mr. Baron Wood and Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18191027-38

1416. WILLIAM TURNBULL , EDWARD MOORE , GEORGE WILLIAMSON , JOHN BUTLER HEWSON , HANNAH GREEN , WILLIAM JONES JOHN GREEN , THOMAS DOBBINS , DANIEL PRING , ISAAC TITTERTON , JOHN WEBSTER , BENJAMIN JOHNSON , WILLIAM JACKSON , JOHN BAILEY , and MARY ANN CROFT were again indicted for disposing of and putting away forged Bank notes, knowing them to be forged .

MR. SERGEANT BOSANQUET, on behalf of the Governor and Company of the Bank of England, declined offering any evidence.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18191027-39

1417. JANE COOK was indicted for that she, on the 30th of July , wilfully and maliciously did set fire to a certain house belonging to John Campbell , Esq.

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating that she intended to injure the said John Campbell .

THIRD COUNT, the same as the first, only with intent to injure William Cunliffe Shaw , and others of the liege subjects of our Lord the King.

GEORGE WILKINSON . I am a coachman, and live in Adamson-street, Bryanstone-square. On the 3d of October I was standing at my door, from which I can see No. 69, Seymour-place , on Sunday morning, about ten minutes past seven o'clock I saw it on fire; the flames came out of the first floor window. I went with others into the house to get the servant out - a gentleman went down the area and opened the street door; I and several others rushed in, and searched every place we safely could. We searched in the back-parlour, but saw no person there, only a bed; we afterwards went there again, and saw the prisoner moving her head from under the bed-clothes in a state of great insensibility; several of us spoke to her, but she made no answer - she had only her shift on; the corner of the bed and bedstead were on fire. We took her to the opposite house, No. 14, returned, and immediately brought her bed over for her to lay on, then went to the house, and assisted in getting the furniture out.

Q. Where did the fire come from - A. From the staircase - it burnt downwards. I went over to see the prisoner.

COURT. Q. During the time you was carrying her over, did she return to a state of sensibility - A. I perceived an alteration, but on my return from moving the furniture, which was about two hours, I found a great alteration in her; she talked rationally, but was a little convulsed at times. I asked her if she knew in what way the fire happened? She said she was the person who was guilty, and did not wish for any thing but to suffer. I asked her how she could think of committing such a dreadful crime? She said her friends had all turned their backs upon her, that her character was blasted, and she had no remedy whatever to get rid of her enemies but by being burnt in the flames. I asked her if she had been ill-advised by any one to do it? She said No, she was the person who had done it, and that she did not wish to lay the blame upon any other.

Q. Did any person come in while this was going forward - A. Yes, a lady whom she had formerly lived with. She exclaimed,

"Oh Jane!" The prisoner wept, and said she was guilty. I asked her which way she set fire to the house? She said by cutting the sheets, and setting fire to them in the back kitchen, that she got up about three o'clock in the morning, and took some laudanum and Holland's out of her master's cellaret, and about five o'clock in the morning she retired to bed.

Cross-examined by MR. CURWOOD. Q. You did not at first find her in the bed - A. No, the blankets were rolled over her. She seemed to me to talk rational; she said she set two sheets on fire in the back kitchen, there was no appearance of the fire ascending up - it could not be so for there was no fire below whatever. She had three or four scratches on her throat, as if she had attempted to make away with herself.

MR. JOHN NORTH . I am a surgeon, and live at No. 74, Seymour-place; I was called in to attend to the prisoner. I found her in the front parlour of No. 14, wrapped up in a blanket; she was then in convulsions, which subsided in a minute or two. She then became convulsed again, and was in a considerable agitation; I was told that she had been burnt, but I found that was not the case. I examined her throat, and found that she had attempted to cut it - the wounds were comparatively trifling, so that they did not excite my attention particularly - there were two or three scratches on it. I left her, and in the course of two hours went to her again, and found her comparatively tranquil; she was still in a state of agitation, but not convulsed. A man said, in her hearing, that she had confessed every thing. I asked her if it was true that she had set fire to the house? and she said it was. I asked her what could be her inducement to commit such a crime? She replied that her character had been destroyed by a parcel of rubbish - that was her expression. From what I heard, I asked her if a soldier was connected with her? She distinctly and positively answered No; but in the course of the conversation she said she could not speak the truth for fear of ruining people. I gathered from her general insinuations, that she had been ill-treated by her husband.

Q. Did she account for the wounds in her throat - A. She told me she had attempted to cut her throat with her master's razor; from the nature of the wounds it was evident that they had been inflicted by some sharp instrument - she said she had taken laudanum, and from her description of the quantity, I should suppose it to be about a table-spoonful.

Q. Is that likely to kill - A. It depends upon the constitution, and whether the person is used to take it. She was moved to the Westminster Infirmary.

Cross-examined. Q. Her conversation was very incoherent - A. Very. It is impossible for me to form an opinion as to the mind of a person, who had met with such an accident as she had. I certainly should not pronounce her a person of sound mind.

WILLIAM FREDERICK GOODYER . I am apothecary to the Marylebone Infirmary. On Sunday the 3d of October the prisoner was brought there. I had a little conversation with her, but her answers were exceedingly inconsistent, and unintelligible.

Q. Would such effects be produced by strong opiates - A. It might; she was very sick, and vomited, which was of a dark colour; I could not ascertain what it was as it was mixed with bile. She never appeared in a collected state, except on a few points - she talked a great deal of nonsence.

Q. Did she say any thing about this circumstance - A. She seemed to have an apathy to the conversation, and said she set fire to the house.

Cross-examined. A. You had conversation with her several times - A. Yes, at least a dozen. I have no doubt she was insane while she was in the infirmary.

Q. After the effect of the laudanum was gone off, a person of sane mind would resume her reason - A. Yes, but as the effect went off, the derangement developed itself - it is common for insane persons to know what they have been about. Persons are insane on different points; her conversation throughout was that of an insane person.

COURT. Q. Could you judge whether the insanity had continued any time - A. I should judge it had been of

long duration; it was a melancholy derangement, which comes on gradually.

FRANCIS STOW . I live at Mill-hill-mews, Webber-street. I have known the prisoner ten months; her conduct was distinct and orderly. I paid her her board wages on account of Mr. John Campbell ; I believe he is on the Continent - he went on the 24th of August. When he is in town he resides at No. 69, Seymour-place; the prisoner was his servant in the house, and the only one.

Q. After you heard of this, did you go to her - A. I saw her on the Monday morning after the fire, at the infirmary. She told me that she had set fire to the house, and was uneasy in her mind.

Q. You searched the house, and found none of the property stolen - A. A fortnight before the fire happened I examined the house - she had confessed to me at the Infirmary that she had made away with some of the property, and mentioned three different shops where she had pawned it. I saw some of the goods there. I found a cream-pot, a bible, and a pair of sugar-tongs at Flint's; she said there were two ten-spoons, and a sheet at Monk-house's, in Chandler-street. I went there; they did not own to me that they had them. I went to another shop in Crawford-street, but found nothing.

THOMAS WEBB. I am surgeon of the House of Correction, Coldbath-fields. On the 8th of October I saw the prisoner there, and almost every day till now. I saw nothing from her coming to her leaving, that led me to consider her mind the least effected. She left on Wednesday last.

Q. What was her condition when she came in - A. She was a good deal debilitated in her system.

SAMUEL OWEN . I am clerk to Mr. Branstone, solicitor to the late Mrs. Stapleford, of 69, Seymour-place, Bryanston-square. I produce the probate of her will, bequeathing this house to John G. Campbell . Probate was granted to John Graham Campbell . I produce Mrs. Stapleford's policy.

RICHARD ATKINS . I am clerk to the Sun Fire Office. I saw this policy executed.

Prisoner's Defence. I leave my case to my counsel.

ANN PAYNE . I have known the prisoner two years and a half, and knew her when she kept Mr. Campbell's house. I saw her four days before the fire; her manner of talking was very incoherent, saying, that every body were her enemies; she was very much distressed in her mind, and said she should make away with herself - she particularly mentioned the ill-treatment of her husband, and said she should never see him again. I did not think her in her right mind by any means.

GEORGE WILKINSON re-examined. Q. Did you leave the house between the first and second time of your going into the parlour - A. No, my Lord, I only went down stairs. I found the parlour door shut when I first went; there was a smoke in the room when I first entered - the room was dark.

The Jury believing the prisoner to be insane, found her

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18191027-40

1418. JOHN WARD was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of October , one trunk, value 5 s. , the goods of Robert Griffiths .

ROBERT GRIFFITHS. I am a trunk-maker , and live in Mark-lane . On the 12th of October, between twelve and one o'clock, I put the trunk on the cellar-window, outside my door. I went out about four o'clock in the afternoon, returned in about five minutes after, and found the prisoner in custody for stealing it.

GRIFFITH GRIFFITHS . I am the prosecutor's brother. On the 12th of October, about five o'clock in the afternoon, I saw the prisoner take the trunk, and walk down Mark-lane with it. I sent the apprentice after him. and he brought him back with it.

JOHN DAVIS . I took the prisoner in charge. He said he was employed by a gentleman to carry it to Tower-hill for 6 d.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was employed to carry it.

GUILTY . Aged 49.

Whipped and Discharged.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18191027-41

1419. THOMAS ADAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of October , one watch, value 4 l., and two seals, value 1 l., the goods of Peter Owen , from his person .

PETER OWEN . I am a labourer , and live in Red Lion-street, Spitalfields. On the 26th of October, between eight and nine o'clock at night, I was in Bishopsgate-street, near Union-street , when the prisoner came up, and asked me what it was o'clock - he was quite a stranger. I pulled my watch out; he made a snatch at it, and cut the ribbon with some instrument; I had the seals in my hand. He got the watch, and ran off with it. In struggling for it I lost my seals also. He got from me, and I tried to stop him - he was stopped about ten yards from me by the constable, who took the watch from him. I have not found the seals - he was alone; I never lost sight of him.

JOSEPH GREGORY . I am a constable. On the 26th of October, about twenty minutes before nine o'clock, I was on duty in Bishopsgate-street, near Artillery-lane, heard the cry of Stop thief! and saw the prisoner running towards me; I ran and stopped him - another young man also laid hold of him. The prosecutor came up in about a minute, and said the prisoner had robbed him of his watch. I endeavoured to search him, but he had the watch in his right hand, and held it at a distance from me, with his hand stretched out. I told him to give it to me, but he at first refused; I took it out of his hand, but did not find the seals - part of the ribbon hung to the watch. I took him to the watch-house - he said nothing; I found only a halfpenny on him - I never saw him before. On taking him to the Compter I searched his foraging cap, and found a razor concealed in it - he is a soldier.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I met the prosecutor in Houndsditch, and he asked me to go and drink with him. We went to the Nag's Head, public-house, and had a pint of beer and a pint of gin. He went up a court with me, and I asked him the time? - he took his watch out. The wicked thought came to my mind at that moment, to cut the ribbon, and take the watch, which I did. I throw myself on the mercy of the Court.

PETER OWEN re-examined. I was not in his company or drinking with him. I went into no public-house where he was, to my knowledge.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Three Months .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18191027-42

1420. JAMES STAINES was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of October , one box, value 2 s.; eight shifts, value 30 s.; eleven shirts, value 4 l. 12 s. 6 d.; one frock, value 3 s.; two aprons, value 1 s.; seven petticoats, value 14 s.; five sheets, value 50 s.; three pillow-cases, value 18 d.; one table-cloth, value 4 s.; five handkerchiefs, value 1 s.; one pocket-book, value 6 d.; two breakfast-cloths, value 4 s., and one waistcoat, value 18 d. , the property of Charles Cropley .

CHARLES CROPLEY . I am a gardener , and live at Walthamstow - my wife is a laundress. On the 16th of October, about a quarter after seven o'clock in the evening, my cart stood at No. 26 Fenchurch-street , with a box in it, containing the articles stated in the indictment, which my wife had washed. I had delivered a box there, and had to deliver another at the opposite house. I left the cart with a child under eight years of age, standing at the horse's head; I told the child to take care of the cart, and I should return in a few minutes; I went from there to Tower-street to deliver a basket - I was gone about seven minutes. When I returned I perceived the child was gone away, and saw a crowd about fifteen yards from the cart - a gentleman told me that a box had been taken from my cart. I found the things taken out of the cart, and the hind part let down, which was not so when I left it. I went to the crowd, and and found the child standing over the box, which I had left in the cart, crying. The prisoner was in custody - he was a stranger. He was charged with stealing the box, and taken to the watch-house. The box is here.

GEORGE CLITHEROW . I am a butcher, and live in Paul's-alley, Aldersgate-street. I was in Fenchurch-street on Saturday evening, about a quarter-past seven o'clock, and saw three men looking into the prosecutor's cart - a little boy stood by the horse's head; I am certain the prisoner was one of them. I suspected them and went a few yards off to watch - I saw them look into the cart again. I then saw the prisoner go up to the boy at the horse's head and speak to him - he was there about a minute. I then saw the child leave him at the horse's head, and go across the road. I heard the patrol coming, and told him my suspicions; he watched with me. I crossed over, left the patrol on the other side, and saw the prisoner let down the tailboard of the cart - the other two were standing by. I saw the prisoner take the box out of the cart, and when he got about fifteen or twenty yards off with it, I took hold of him; the patrol came up and took him. He said that a gentleman had given him the box to carry for him - that could not be true, as I saw him take it out. I left him with the patrol, and found the child about a dozen yards off, crying. Cropley came up in about two or three minutes, and claimed the box.

THOMAS MAINE . I am eight years of age. I went to London with Cropley; he went away, leaving me in care of the cart, at the horse's head. Three thieves spoke to me - the prisoner was one of them. He asked me if I would go for a penny roll, and said he would give me a halfpenny for my trouble; he gave me three halfpence. I was to go to the baker's shop over the road.

Q. Who was to take care of the cart while you went - A. He said he would mind the horses' head, I did not got to the baker's, but kept walking sideways, and saw him take the box out of the cart. I then ran back and hallooed - he was stopped with it.

Prisoner. Q. When you saw me at the watch-house, did you not say I was not the person, who sent you away. - A. No, he is the man.

Q. Did not a man give you sixpence to say I was the person - A. No, I said he was the man, then a person gave me sixpence for telling the truth. I am certain he is the man.

JUHN JNDD. I am a patrol. Clitherow informed me that he suspected some persons wanted to rob the cart; I kept on one side, and he on the other; I saw the prisoner go round the cart and look into it. He then went and undid the tail, took the box out, and went off with it. I secured him about fifteen yards from the cart - Clitherow came up at the time. The box contained wearing apparel.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. As I was going up Fenchurch-street, a man stopped me, and asked me to help him out of the cart with it. I was lifting it on his shoulder when they took me - the man ran away. I was not three yards from cart.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18191027-43

1421. JOHN EARL was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of October , two seals, value 20 s., and one key, value 1 s., the goods of John Watts , from his person .

JOHN WATTS . I am a stock-broker , and live in Angel-court, Throgmorton-street; my seals were tied by a ribbon to my watch, On the 1st of October, about a quarter after three o'clock, I was in the Poultry, by the King's Arms tavern ; five or six people stood there, looking at the state of the poll. I was passing through the crowd - the prisoner was coming in another direction, so as to meet me. I felt him hustle against me, which I thought might arise merely from the crowd, but as he was hustling against me, I felt his hand go from my fob. I looked down, and perceived that the ribbon had been cut, and the seals were gone - no other hand was near my fob but the prisoner's. I turned to catch hold of him - he was near me, but in consequence of two ladies being in the way, I could not secure him. I immediately called out Stop thief! and he turned the corner of Charlotte-row. I followed him, and saw him throw the seals down an area, and the scissars also, but the scissars hung on the rail. He was secured within twenty yards of that place, and was never out of my sight. The seals were delivered to me from the area by the gentleman of the house, and on coming back I found the remainder of the ribbon on the pavement, which had been cut off.

JAMES CARPENTER . I am a constable. I came up and secured the prisoner; I took him back a few yards. The prosecutor charged him with the robbery, and delivered the seals to me, with the ribbon - the prisoner said he knew nothing about it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The gentleman happened to stop me, but I know nothing of it.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18191027-44

1422, MARY JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of October , two sheets, value 10 s.; one pair of trowsers, value 3 s.; one handkerchief, value 3 s.; one tablecloth, value 3 s.; four quarts of Port wine, value 16 s.; one quart of white wine, value 4 s., and five bottles, value 1 s. , the property of Edward Bridger .

EDWARD BRIDGER . The prisoner was my servant , and lived about ten weeks with me. On the 15th of October, after dinner, I heard a noise in the kitchen, as if something had fallen down. I went down and found all the dishes and things broken and thrown about, and the prisoner in a state of intoxication. She kept her bed-room door locked, which created my suspicion; I asked her for the key, which she refused. I sent for one of the Marshal's men, who came and found a number of duplicates on her - next day, the articles stated in the indictment were produced at the Mansion House. We went to her bedroom, and in the bed, between the sheets and blankets, were five bottles of wine. We went down to the cellar to see how she could get it, and found the brick-work had been taken away - an iron heater laid by. The lock had been forced back. I had heard her come from the cellar and go to her bed-room three or four times that morning. She came into my service on the 2d of August, without a character.

WILLIAM BRAND . I am a Marshal's man. I was sent for to take the prisoner in charge. I told her to empty her pockets, which she did, and I found some duplicates, two of which related to the property. I found the wine in her bed. The brick-work of the cellar was broken away.

WILLIAM LACK . I am servant to Mr. Guest, who is a pawnbroker, and lives in Fleet-market. I have a pair of nankeen trowsers and a handkerchief, which I took in pledge for 5 s., on the 25th of August, from the prisoner. Brand produced the duplicates.

SOMERVILLE TELFER. I am shopman to Mr. Blackburn, who is a pawnbroker, and lives on Great Saffron-hill. On the 20th of August, I took two sheets and a table-cloth in pledge of the prisoner for 8 s. I am sure she is the person.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 55.

Confined One Year .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18191027-45

1423. WILLIAM JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of October , one handkerchief, value 4 s., the goods of Charles Whitherby , from his person .

MR. CHARLES WHITHERBY . I live in Birchin-lane. On the 13th of October, about a quarter before twelve o'clock at noon, I was in Coleman-street , walking very fast. I came to a crowd before a picture shop, which resisted my progress; I fell, and a person came close against me - my attention was directed to him, and I saw my handkerchief pass from him. I saw the prisoner attempting to conceal it behind him, and saw it drop from him. I immediately seized him, and he said it was not him - I saw another boy near him. I took him to Guildhall myself; he persisted in his innocence till he got halfway to Guildhall, then began crying, and said I had no business to take him. He was very insolent indeed.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN CARLISLE . I took the prisoner in charge.

Prisoner's Defence. Two boys were behind him, who took the handkerchief from his pocket. It passed me, and he collared me.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18191027-46

1424. ANTHONY LEWIS was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of October , sixteen yards of cloth, value 4 l. , the goods of James Dudderidge .

JAMES DUDDERIDGE . I am a slop-seller , and live in the Minories . On the 23d of October this cloth was within three feet of my door, inside. It was safe about twenty minutes before six o'clock, and it was gone shortly after. I found the prisoner in custody with it soon after. He is a stranger.

ROBERT CARTER . I am a wholesale clothes salesman, and live in the Minories. I was crossing America-square on the 23d of October, between five and six o'clock in the evening, and observed the prisoner with the piece of cloth by a private door, about thirty yards from the prosecutor's. I suspected him, went back, and asked him what he was going to do there? He said he was going to leave the cloth at that house. I asked him if he had knocked at the door? He said he had knocked twice; I then knocked for him. The servant said he had not knocked before. An officer was sent for, who took him into custody.

FRANCIS KINNERSLEY. I took the prisoner and cloth in charge, and found it belonged to the prosecutor. The prisoner said a person gave it to him to carry.

GUILTY . Aged 32.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18191027-47

1423. ROBERT OLIVER was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of October , one handkerchief, value 2 s., the goods of Thomas Harper , from his person .

MR. THOMAS HARPER . I live in Cowper's-court, Cornhill. On the 12th of October, about a quarter after twelve o'clock in the day, I was in Lower Thames-street , and felt myself hustled by two boys bigger than the prisoner, one on each side - the prisoner was behind them. As soon as I turned round, the other two ran down Botolph wharf. I found the prisoner with my handkerchief in his hand, secured him, and gave him in custody at the Mansion House.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. There was a parcel of boys before me; the gentleman turned round, and they ran away. He

struck me, and said,

"Look at the handkerchief at your feet." He did not take it out of my hand.

MR. THOMAS HARPER . I took it out of his hand.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18191027-48

1426. THOMAS BAKER was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of September , one pocket-book, value 1 s.; 16 s., in monies numbered; thirty-three 1 l. Bank notes, and one bill of exchange for payment of 33 l. 16 s. 6 d. , the property of Robert Hutchinson .

ROBERT HUTCHINSON . I am a currier , and live in Frith-street, Soho. On the 27th of September I gave the prisoner (who had been my porter for two months), my pocket-book, which had a bill for 33 l. 16 s. 6 d., drawn by Sir Thomas Mausten on Messrs. Hoares. I sent him about four o'clock to receive the money for the bill - he absconded. I found him in custody by an advertisement, offering a reward.

Q. The pocket-book had only the bill in it - A. Only the bill, my Lord. I told him to put the notes that he received for the bill into the pocket-book. I had him taken a fortnight or three weeks after.

WILLIAM DODD . I am cashier to Messrs. Hoares. On the 27th of September I paid the bill for 33 l. 16 s. 6 d.; the prisoner wrote a receipt for it. I produce it.

ROBERT HUTCHINSON re-examined. It is the bill I sent him with. He went from my house alone; the receipt is in his name. I do not know that it is his handwriting.

WILLIAM CRAIG . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner at the sign of the Bag of Nails, public-house, Pimlico, on the 9th of October, and told him I had taken him for robbing his master; he said he got into bad company, and lost the greatest part of the money that night, and that he was afraid to return. I found only 1 s. on him.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not intend to abscond. I met two or three lads, stopped with them, lost the money, and was afraid to go home.

COURT. The bill was not stolen, and as to the notes, they were embezzled. The only question relates to the pocket-book.

GUILTY. Aged 20.

Of stealing the pocket-book only .

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18191027-49

FOURTH DAY, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 30.

Reference Number: t18191027-50

1427. LEWIS GREEN and WILLIAM FARMER were indicted for stealing, on the 2d of October , one watch-chain, value 5 l.; two seals, value 5 l., and one key, value 10 s., the goods of John Prior , from his person ,

MR. JOHN PRIOR . On the 2d of October, about two o'clock in the afternoon, I was near the Belvidere at Pentonville , walking on the footpath. I was all of a sudden stopped and hustled by a gang of fellows; they shoved me up against the palings - there was an immense crowd waiting to see an air-balloon go off. I was not among the crowd, but was surrounded in a moment, and felt a tug at my watch. I then went back to my chaise, which I had left in the road at a little distance, and inquired for a constable, who came. I told him I had lost my watch, which I at first thought I had; soon after I found my watch was left behind, but my chain and seals gone - I have no distinct recollection of any of the men. I gave the officer my address, and a few days after I was sent for to Worship-street Office.

JAMES M'MURDO. On the 2d of October, between two and three o'clock, I was standing by some palings by the Belvidere, and saw a gang of fellows hustling every gentleman that passed. As soon as the prosecutor got out of his chaise, before he could hardly get on the pavement, the prisoner, Green, gave him a shove. Some more fellows came round him, and I saw Green snatch something from the prosecutor's fob, and go away - I cannot say what it was. The prosecutor thought at that moment that he had lost his watch, and said so; the rest of the gang kept the prosecutor in conversation, and said he was gone that way, but I saw him go the other way. As soon as the prosecutor got from the gang, I got down and said, if I saw the man I should know him again - I went down the road a little way, but could not see him. When I came back to where I was before, I saw the prisoner return to the gang. The officer then came to me, and I went with him to point the prisoners out.

Q. How do you know the other man - A. I saw him in the gang. Green held up his finger to him, and said,

"Here, Bill." I had been on the palings, watching them, for about half an hour, and am sure they are the men - I suppose there were about twenty in the gang. When Green beckoned to Farmer, immediately turned and went to him.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. There were a great many collected to see the balloon - A. Yes. Green beckoned to Farmer before he took the chain - he stood close to Farmer.

Q. Then he need not have beckoned to him - A. His head was turned another way. It was done in an instant.

THOMAS VAN . I am an officer. On the 2d of October I and Gleed were in Pentonville-road; the prosecutor was in his chaise - some persons told him we were officers. He then said he had lost his watch-chain and seals. I told him to give me his address, and if I heard any thing of it, I would let him know. Just after that, M'Murdo came up, and said he would show me the two men who had robbed this gentleman. We went about eight or ten yards into the crowd, and he pointed the prisoners out. We took them and searched them, but found nothing on them.

The prisoners left their case to their counsel.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191027-51

1428. JOHN TRAPP was indicted for stealing one 50 l. and one 40 l. Bank notes , the property of Fenton Thomas Lambert .

To which indictment the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY. Aged 44.

Transported for Seven Years .

Before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18191027-52

1429. JOHN TRAPP was again indicted for that he, being employed by and under the Post Office in sorting letters and packets brought to the said Post Office in London , a certain letter sent from Halifax, to be delivered to Thomas Fuller , containing one 50 l. and one 40 l. Bank notes, came to his custody and possession whilst so employed, and that he feloniously did secrete and steal the said letter, containing the said notes , the property of Fenton Thomas Lambert .

EIGHT OTHER COUNTS, the same, only varying the manner of laying the charge.

MR. GURNEY (on behalf of the prosecution). My Lords, in this case, with your permission, I shall offer no evidence, the prisoner having pleaded guilty to the minor charge, and on account of particular circumstances we think ourselves justified in abandoning this capital charge.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18191027-53

1430. JOHN BOOTH was indicted for that he, at the time of committing the several felonies in the first eight Counts of this indictment mentioned, was a person employed by and under the Post Office of Great Britain, in certain business relating to the said office, that is to say, in charging letters and packets brought to the General Post Office in London , at St. Mary Woolnoth , and that on the 24th of November , at the parish aforesaid, a certain letter then lately put into the said General Post Office, to be sent by the post for and to be delivered to a certain person at Saint Mary Cray, in the county of Kent, that is to say, to Thomas Weller , containing therein one bank note for the payment of 5 l., and value 5 l., came to his hands and possession whilst he was so employed; and that he, on the same day, at the parish aforesaid, feloniously did secrete the said letter, containing the said bank note, the same being in force, and being the property of Thomas Glover , against the statute .

SECOND COUNT, the same as the First Count, only for stealing the bank note from and out of a letter.

THIRD AND FOURTH COUNTS, the same as the First and Second, only for secreting and stealing a packet, and for stealing from and out of a packet, instead of a letter.

FIFTH, SIXTH, SEVENTH, AND EIGHTH COUNTS, the same, only stating the bank notes to be the property of Thomas Weller .

NINTH COUNT, for stealing from and out of a certain Post Office (to wit), the General Post Office, a certain other letter, then lately before put into the said Post Office, to be sent by the post of Great Britain (to wit), by the post from the said General Post Office, for and to be delivered to a certain person at Saint Mary Cray aforesaid (to wit), the said Thomas Weller , and one other letter.

TENTH COUNT, for stealing from and out of the Post Office a packet instead of a letter, and one other packet.

THOMAS GLOVER . I hold a situation in the Bank of England . On the 24th of November, 1818, I had occasion to send a 5 l. Bank note to Mr. Thomas Weller , at St. Mary Cray, Kent. It was No. 6518, dated October 10, 1818, signed J. Field. I made this memorandum at the time.

Q. Look at this note, and see if it is the one - A. It is the same note, and has my hand-writing on it - here is Rooker, 17 - 11 - 18, T. G. in my own hand-writing. I had received it of him on the 17th of November, 1818. T G are my initials.

Q. The note is now cancelled - A. Yes, it has since returned to the Bank - it was perfect when I sent it. I enclosed it in a letter, sealed it, and paid the postage of it myself, at the General Post Office, Lombard-street.

WILLIAM EDE . I am a clerk at the General Post Office. The Foot's Cray bag was made up by me on the 24th of November, and went regularly - that bag carries the St. Mary Cray letters; the bag was sent that night. The Foot's Cray Post Office delivers the Chisselhurst and St. Mary's Cray letters.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Have you any particular reason for saying that it went that evening - A. My name is signed to the book that evening, as having sent the bag regularly.

SUSANNAH GRAVETT . I am the wife of Richard Gravett , who is post-master of Foot's Cray. The Foot's Cray bag comes to Chisselhurst, and generally arrives about eleven o'clock at night.

Q. Do you remember the bag coming that night - A. Not more than any other night.

Q. Have you missed a bag within the last twelve months - A. No, nor ever. The bag is opened on the following morning by myself; I give the letters to Thornton, the postman. Foot's Cray is three miles from the Post Office.

Cross-examined. Q. How long has your husband had the office - A. Eighteen years.

JAMES THORNTON . I am letter-carrier at St. Mary Cray, and was so on the 25th of November, 1818. I received the letters as usual. Mr. Thomas Weller lives in my district - I know him very well.

Q. If any letter had been in the bag for him that morning, you would have known where to have delivered it to him - A. Yes.

Cross-examined. Q. Is it not usual for people to send for their letters - A. A few persons near the office do. Mr. Weller lives near three miles from the office - it is upwards of two miles; I believe he is not in the habit of sending for his letters. He is the parish-clerk.

THOMAS WELLER . In November, 1818, I lived at St. Mary Cray. On the 25th of November I received no letter from Mr. Glover containing a 5 l. bank note; I expected one from him about that time. I never sent to the Post Office for a letter in my life.

Cross-examined. Q. How many in family have you - A. Nine. I never sent any of them for letters; I have no particular recollection of the 25th of November, but am certain such a letter never arrived; I was out at labour when it should have come. I was at home in the evening. I have no reason to believe that any of my family received it.

COURT. Q. How soon did you know that the letter had been sent - A. Mr. Glover wrote to me two or three days after about it, which brought it to my attention. I wrote to him that I had not received it.

MR. ROBERT THOMAS SEARLES . I am president of the Inland division at the General Post Office. On the 24th of November, 1818, the prisoner was employed in the Post Office as a charger of letters; he was on duty that evening. He was in the Dover division.

Q. The letters are faced, stamped, charged, and sorted all in one large room - A. Yes, for the whole kingdom. Facing, is turning them on their faces, they then are stamped with the date of the month and year, and then taken to tables, and sorted for different places.

Q. Then all the persons that are round the room for the purpose of charging go to the sorting table to take their letters - A. Occasionally; there are boxes all round the room where the chargers sit. Messengers take them, or the chargers fetch them from the sorting table.

Q. Is this a correct plan of the office - A. It is - (looking at it).

(The plan was then handed to the Jury.)

Q. Is it in the power of any of the chargers to secrete a letter belonging to his own division, or any other - A. It is in their power. It occasionally happens that a charger finds a letter in his place, which does not belong to his division, and each sorter has what is called a blind box, to put the mis-sorted letters in, and they are then resorted.

Q. This letter ought to have gone to the Rye division - A. Yes, it could more naturally be mis-sorted to the Dover division than any other.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. There are a great many men employed in that room - A. A great many - this letter did not belong to the prisoner's division; he would not have received it into his division if it had been sorted correctly. The charger occasionally goes to the sorting table, and has an opportunity of taking any letter.

Q. How do you know the prisoner was in attendance that night - A. I refer to the attendance book, which I keep myself, and find that he was in attendance that evening - his name is signed by himself in this book as being in attendance, and countersigned by me. He leaves the office at eight o'clock.

SARAH FRANCIS . In November last I lived at No. 25, in Flint-street, Blackfriars-road, nearly opposite the Magdalen Hospital. I have known the prisoner, unfortunately, four or five years. I did not know his name or residence.

Q. In November last, did he call on you - A. Yes, on a Wednesday evening, between eight and nine o'clock at night, About half an hour after he came he gave me a 5 l. bank note to change, and told me to buy any thing to drink. I went to Mr. Hicks, who keeps the Bell, public-house, in Friar-street, and applied to Mary Ann Bridgeman for change. I saw her take a pen and ink in her hand when I gave her the note, but did not see her write. She gave me the change, which I took to the prisoner with the liquor.

Q. Did he make any purchase of you that evening - A. Yes, he bought a pug dog of me that evening for 1 l.

Q. Sometime after, did a gentleman call upon you from the Bank about the note - A. Yes, with Mr. Hicks - I think it was on the Saturday before Christmas day - I did not then know the prisoner's name or residence. After that I saw him go by the top of Flint-street, and told him that a gentleman from the Bank, had told me to send for Mr. Hicks whenever he came again. He told me he had been extremely ill - he appeared ill, and I told him I thought it might be his death to be taken by surprise for passing a forged note, which I then supposed it to be. He said he was very much obliged to me for not doing it, and that he would behave like a man of honour, and come and pay me the note on Friday week, but he never did. I did not see him again until I saw him at the Post Office on the 9th of August - he was then taken into custody. I was ordered to attend there.

Q. Were any other persons in the room when you saw him at the Post Office - A. Yes, a number of other gentlemen - about a dozen, I should think. I knew him again. He has called on me a great many times in the course of the last three years.

Q. Have you seen your pug dog since - A. Yes, Vickery shewed it to me. I knew it again, and the dog knew me.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. You say, unfortunately, you have known the prisoner four years - A. Yes, I often had money from him - he made me a present out of that 5 l. note. Nobody was present when he gave it to me.

Q. Had you a 5 l. note from any other person about that time - A. No. I have not seen any of the notes that I got in change for it.

A. Then you know nothing to ascertain that he gave you the note, except your own statement - A. No. I often change notes at that public-house. I have changed 5 l. notes more than once for gentlemen.

Q. Was it not odd that you should ask money for the dog - A. I told him it was promised, and he asked me how much I was to have for it? I said 1 l., and he gave me a 1 l. note for it - it was quite a pup.

Q. How often had the prisoner seen you with it - A. Never before to my knowledge; he had seen me with other dogs.

COURT. Q. How long before had you seen him at your lodgings, was it after the dog was pupped - A. No, my Lord.

MR. GURNEY. Q. Did you give Bridgeman the same note he gave you - A. Yes, I had received no other from any one about that time, and had no other.

MARY ANN BRIDGEMAN . On the 25th of November I lived at the Bell, in Friar-street. I knew Francis then, and long before.

Q. Look at this note, and say if you received it of her - A. Yes, I received it of her on the 25th of November - here is my writing on it.

"November 25, Mrs. Francis, 25, Flint-street." I have not put the year. I wrote this at the time I received it. I always mark the notes before the people leave the house.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you changed any other 5 l. notes that day - A. No, I had one brought in while she was standing there, but I could not change it, and never had it in my hand, I am sure. I was obliged to give 1 l. in silver for this note.

Q. How soon after did you see this note again - A. Near Christmas.

COURT. Q. Did you give Francis any 1 l. notes - A. Yes, four 1 l. notes, and the rest in silver.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. Have you often changed notes for her - A. Yes, I think I did not change her any other 5 l. note afterwards, because she was ill.

JOHN VICKERY . I am an officer. On the 9th of August, at night, I apprehended the prisoner at the Post Office, and went with him to his lodgings in Prince's-square, Kennington, and found a small pug dog there, with a black face, running about the house. I did not ask him whose it was. Francis saw it at Bow-street.

MR. THOMAS GLOVER . I am an inspector at the Bank, and have been so for twenty-six years. The note was a good one when I sent it - it is now cancelled.

Prisoner. I have nothing to say, my Lord.

GUILTY. - DEATH . Aged 33.

Recommended to mercy .

London Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18191027-54

1431. JOHN BOOTH was again indicted for that he, at the time of committing the several felonies in the first eight Counts of this indictment mentioned, was a person employed by and under the Post Office of Great Britain, in certain business relating to the said office, that is to say, in charging letters and packets brought to the General Post Office in London , at Saint Mary Woolnoth, and that on the 9th of August , a certain letter then lately before brought to the said General Post Office, to be from thence sent by the post, for and to be delivered to a certain person at Wrestlingworth, near Potton, in the county of Bedford, that is to say, to William Knapp , containing therein one half part of one bank note for payment of 10 l., value 10 l., and one other half part of one other bank note for payment of 10 l., value 10 l., came to his hands and possession whilst he was so employed; and that he, on the same day, at the parish aforesaid, feloniously did secrete the said letter, containing the said two half parts of the said bank notes, the said bank notes being in force, and the property of Thomas Ryder , against the statute , &c.

SECOND COUNT, the same as the First Count, only for stealing the half parts of the said bank notes from and out of a letter.

THIRD AND FOURTH COUNTS, the same as the First and Second, only for secreting and stealing a packet, and for stealing from and out of a packet instead of a letter.

FIFTH, SIXTH, SEVENTH, AND EIGHTH COUNTS, the same, only stating the half parts of the said bank notes to be the property of William Knapp .

FOUR OTHER COUNTS, the same as the four first, only omitting to state the value.

FOUR OTHER COUNTS, the same as the Fifth, Sixth, Seventh, and Eighth, only omitting to state the value.

SEVENTEENTH COUNT, for stealing from and out of the General Post Office, a certain other letter, then lately before brought to the said General Post Office, to be from thence by the post, for and to be delivered to a certain person at Wrestlingworth, near Potton, in the county of Bedford (to wit), the said William Knapp , and one other letter.

EIGHTEENTH COUNT, for stealing from and out of the Post Office a packet instead of a letter, and one other packet.

JOHN WILLIAM RYDER . I am clerk to Mr. Thomas Ryder , Lincoln's Inn. On the 9th of August last, by his directions, I enclosed the halves of two 10 l. bank notes in a letter; I have the two other halves, which were sent on the 5th, and duly received. I got them from Mr. Knapp, to whom they were directed.

Q. Look at this letter - A. This is the letter I wrote on the 9th, directed to Mr. Knapp, Wreslingworth, near Potton, Bedfordshire. I enclosed two halves of 10 l. notes in this letter - No. 2292, dated 16th of July, 1819; and the other No. 19002, dated 30th of June, 1819. I wafered the letter, and carried it to the receiving office in Chancery-lane, myself.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. They were halves of notes - A. Yes.

JOHN ANTHONY . I live in Chancery-lane; there is a General Post receiving office at my house. On the evening of the 9th of August I made up the bag as usual, and dispatched it.

COURT. Q. The bellman comes to you - A. Yes, I sent the bag, sealed, to the Post Office, at five o'clock.

SAMUEL HURST . I am check clerk of the receivers' bags, in the General Post Office. On the evening of the 9th of August I received the Chancery-lane bag as usual.

DANIEL STOWE , ESQ. I am superintendent president at the General Post Office. On the 9th of August the prisoner was employed in the Post Office, as a charger of letters, and had an opportunity of taking any letter brought to the office that night.

Q. In consequence of suspicion which arose, was he on the evening of the 9th of August brought into your office - A. He was, and Vickery searched him.

Q. Look at this letter - A. It was found in his pocket, it was then wafered, and had not been opened; it had the stamp of that night on it, and contained the halves of two 10 l. notes, which it does now - I saw them marked. Mr. Parkins asked him how he became possessed of it? I think he gave no answer.

Cross-examined. Q. It could not have come into his hands in the course of his employment - A. Any letter might come into his hands in the course of his employ; he was a charger of letters. This has not been charged.

Q. Can you undertake to say it came into his possession in the course of his employment - A. No doubt of it. It is stamped, and ought to have been charged. He was brought into my office between seven and eight o'clock. The letters go at eight.

COURT. Q. The stamping is done before it comes to the charger - A. Yes, my Lord; but the stamping is a proof that it came into the General Post Office - they are stamped in our office.

Q. Is a person who is skilled in letters, able to tell whether they have bank notes in them - A. It is our duty to look at the letters, to see if bank notes are in them. We have a strong lamp, with a reflector, and by holding a letter under that lamp we can see, without any difficulty, whether they have an inclosure or not - this would be charged a treble letter. It is the duty of the charger to ascertain that.

Q. Probably, when a charger saw it, he would not be

able to tell whether there were one or two notes - A. It requires experience.

(The notes were then put in and read, Nos. 19002, dated 30th of June, 1819, and 2292 dated 16th of July, 1819.)

JOHN VICKERY . On the evening of the 9th of August, I apprehended the prisoner at the outside of the Inland office, and took him into Mr. Stowe's office. I desired him to produce what he had about him; he took from his pocket this letter (looks at it), it was opened in his presence, and contained the halves of two 10 l. notes, which it does now; he was asked by Mr. Parkins, how he came by it - he made no reply.

Prisoner. I have nothing to say.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 33.

London Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18191027-55

1432. JOHN MARKHAM was indicted for sodomy .

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 26.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

Reference Number: t18191027-56

1433. STEPHEN THOMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of October , one ewe sheep, price 2 l. , the property of William Bottomley .

SECOND COUNT, for wilfully and feloniously killing the said sheep, with intent to steal the whole carcase.

WILLIAM CUFLEY . I am patrol of Enfield . On the 1st of October, between two and three o'clock in the morning, I met the prisoner in New-lane, Enfield - it was moonlight; he was coming in a direction from his own house. I asked him what he had got? took a shovel from him, and asked him what mark was on in it? He said

"Robinson;" and asked me not to take it away. I took it from him, and while we were talking I saw a person go by on the other side of the hedge, within eight and nine yards of us - he had something on his head. The field is higher ground than the road; he passed by a low part of the hedge by which means I saw him. I left the prisoner to go after him, expecting to meet him in the gap - I could not find him, but when I got into the field, I saw a sack lying forty or fifty yards from where I saw the man - it contained flesh. I gave it to my comrade, and immediately went in pursuit of the prisoner; I came up with him about a hundred and fifty yards off, going into his own yard. I told him that I had found a sack, and thought he must know something about it, which obliged me to take him into custody. He then threw down a bag, which contained a sheep's pluck and a chisel. I asked him who it was on the other side of the hedge? He said he knew nothing about him. He begged very hard to be let go, and said he had a large family, who were starving.

Q. Was the bag that he threw down, the same that he had when you first saw him - Q. Yes, my Lord - I did not take notice whether it was warm or cold. Spencer came up with the bag that was found in the field, and we took it to my house; I found it was the carcase of a sheep, wrapped up in a smock-frock. I afterwards went to Mr. Bottomley, and found a sheep's skin in a wood, in some bushes - it was marked. There was a mark of blood on it, just by where the sheep had been killed, and hung on a tree.

Q. Was the skin shewn to Hackett - A. He was with me when I found it. I saw it compared with the carcase - the trotters were left in the skin; they appeared to correspond - it was slaughtered very well. The shovel, which he said belonged to Robinson, was marked W W. I do not know the other man.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not tell the magistrate that you saw two men run away - A. No.

JOHN SPENCER . I was with Cufley; the prisoner had a shovel and a small bag - he said the shovel belonged to Mr. Robinson. I caught a glimpse of some person on the other side of the hedge, with a sack on his head. We took the shovel from the prisoner, and let him go with the bag. We then went to the field and found a bag containing meat, but I did not particularly notice it then. I was left with it, and came up with Cufley just by the prisoner's door - he had secured him; he begged to be let go. Cufley then had a little bag in his hand; we took both the bags to his house; the bag in the field contained the carcase of a sheep. I then went to the wood, which was three miles from where we found the sack - we found the skin there. I have been a butcher five years; the sheep appeared to have been slaughtered very well. I saw it compared with the skin, and they corresponded. There was a bit of skin left on the carcase, which matched with a hole in the skin.

Q. How did you compare the pluck - A. That is very difficult. I put it inside, and laid the windpipe to the head, but it is impossible to speak to it. The carcase was hot, and the pluck warm - the pluck would cool sooner than the carcase. The prisoner is not a butcher. I have known him five years.

Q. None but a butcher could cut up a sheep in that way - A. No, my Lord; we found the bag nearer the prisoner's house than where we met him - he was not coming from it, but going towards it. The other man was going towards the prisoner's house.

WILLIAM HACKETT . I am servant to Mr. William Bottomley, and look after his sheep. On Friday morning, a little before six o'clock, Cufley came to me. I then counted my sheep, missed one, and went to a wood with him, about forty yards from where our sheep are kept, and found the skin. There were marks on it where the sheep had been killed, and hung on a tree to dress; the skin is marked W B, which is my master's mark - it was a ewe; we could not tell how long it had been killed - I took it home - they were all safe at six o'clock the night before. I compared it with the carcase which Cufley shewed me, and every thing appeared to correspond. A bit of skin was left on the carcase, which also matched; I cannot say whether the pluck agreed. New-lane is about two miles from my master's.

Prisoner's Defence. I went to gather mushrooms, and found a bag and a shovel against the gate; I told the constable that it was not Robinson's. He overtook me again, and said he had found the carcase.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18191027-57

1434. STEPHEN THOMPSON was again indicted for stealing, on the 1st of October , one shovel, value 2 s. , the goods of William Williams .

WILLIAM WILLIAMS . I am a farmer, and live at Enfield . On the 1st of October Cufley produced a shovel to me that was mine. I had put it in the yard about seven o'clock the evening before, and saw the man put it into a waggon that was to go to town; the prisoner had no business with it - I had not lent it to any one.

HENRY WILLIAMS. I am son of the last witness; the shovel was missing. That morning when I got up to go to town I missed two; they must have been taken between seven and eleven o'clock that night. The yard gate was not fastened.

WILLIAM CUFLEY . I met the prisoner in New-lane, and took the shovel from him. He said it was Robinson's, and had his mark on it. I took it from him, and at daylight I discovered W W on it. I then took it to Mr. Williams.

Prisoner's Defence. I said it was not Robinson's. I found the shovel in the field with the bag.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Confined Six Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18191027-58

1435. ROBERT COLLIS , JAMES MARGETT , and CHARLES WATKINS was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Manning , about eleven o'clock in the forenoon of the 16th of September ( James Cheesewright and others being therein), and stealing therein six handkerchiefs, value 40 s. , his property.

JOHN MANNING . I live in High Holborn . On the 16th of September, between eleven and one o'clock in the morning, I lost these handkerchiefs - I was not at home at the time. I went with Furzeman and found the prisoner, Watkins, in custody at the watch-house; he said he did not do it, but he knew who did. In consequence of what he said, I went in search of the boys, but did not then find them. I went to Mrs. Wasman's, in Vine-street, Chandos-street. I went up to the first floor, saw a woman there, and asked leave to search the house? She refused at first, because I had no warrant. I went to Bow-street for one, but the magistrate was gone; I returned and told the officer so. He applied to her a second time, and she said he might search, but we found nothing. About eight o'clock in the evening, the officer and I went to the one shilling gallery of the Cobourg Theatre, and there secured the other two prisoners.

SUSAN PYKE . One Wednesday in September I was crossing from Drury-lane to Museum-street, about half-past eleven o'clock in the morning, opposite Mr. Manning's, and saw a little boy, standing with his back against a post, opposite his house - it rained very hard; he had no hat on. I walked a little further, and saw the prisoner, Watkins; he gave a whistle, and the little boy ran up to him - they both stood before me. Watkins said something to him, which I did not hear; the child said to him,

"They have not been out." Watkins told the child to keep his post, and then the child went back to the post. Watkins kept a few paces before me, and whistled again, two boys, apparently of a height, came up to him. I left them talking together, went back to see what it all meant, and saw them round Mr. Manning's shop; I went in and told the shopman of it. The boys' backs were towards me - I do not know the other prisoners.

BENJAMIN STROUD . I am shopman to Mr. Manning. On Thursday morning, about half-past eleven o'clock, the last witness came to the shop, and gave me information. She went to the door, and pointed to Watkins, who was smoking a pipe and leaning on a post. She said our house was beset by that man, and some boys. I went into the shop, and asked Cheesewright, the shopman, if we had lost any thing? He immediately went to the window, and found a pane of glass cut out, and lying in the window as if it had been pushed in, and six silk handkerchiefs gone. The glass was safe when I opened the shop at seven o'clock in the morning - the handkerchiefs were of a chocolate colour.

JAMES CHEESEWRIGHT. I am shopman to the prosecutor. On the 16th of September I was in the adjoining shop when the information was given that the window was cut. I was called in, and found a piece of silk handkerchiefs gone, which I had put there that morning, exactly opposite the pane which was cut and pushed in - the glass had been newly put in; the handkerchiefs were not put two inches from the glass. I then went out, and observed Watkins at the opposite corner. His noticing us made me suspect him.

SAMUEL FURZEMAN . I am a constable. On the 16th of September, I took Watkins about one o'clock, at Seven Dials, and asked him where he was at half-past eleven? he made no reply. I then asked him what he was doing at the corner of Museum-street? he said he was there - I took him to the watch-house. I fetched Mr. Manning to the watch-house, and in consequence of information which I had received from Watkins, I went in search of Collis and Margett. About a quarter after four o'clock in the afternoon Cook came up to me, and in consequence of his information, Manning, myself, and him went to an iron-shop kept by Mrs. Wasman, and asked her if she had bought any handkerchiefs that morning? she said, No. I said,

"Have the goodness to let me search, I have no warrant." - she refused. I sent Mr. Manning for a warrant, he returned in a quarter of an hour, she then let me search. I found nothing, nor did I expect it, for I had left her husband down stairs all the while. I then went to the Cobourg Theatre, and took the two other prisoners.

JOHN COOK . I live at No. 3, Rose-court, Crown-street, Soho - I know Collis and Margett. On Thursday morning, the 16th of September, about ten o'clock, or a little after, I was in Seven Dials with others; Collis and Margett came up with some things in a blue apron - they called two or three more lads away. Margett had something in a blue apron under his arm. He spoke to one of the young lads who stood there, and said he had seen Long Jerry (there is a constable whom they call by that name) - that Jerry was coming by them, looked very hard at them, and that he (Margett) said,

"I must go and put this on, or my father will blow me up." They then went off to get breakfast, as they said.

Q. Did you see what was in the apron - A. Not then. I met them in Compton-street about twenty minutes after eleven o'clock, they asked me where I was going? I said I was going home. They asked me to go with them to

Chandos-street. They went up Long-acre into Angel-alley, and there shewed me the handkerchiefs - they took me into a necessary to shew them to me; there were five in one piece, and one by itself - they were chocolate-colour, and about a yard and a quarter square. They then began to run, and told me to run too, as they were in a hurry. They then went to Vine-street - Margett took them into an old iron-shop, kept by Mrs. Wasman. He staid there near a quarter of an hour, then came down, and said the lady only offered him 16 s. for the six. Collis said,

"D - n it! we must not take that - we can get more by pledging them." Margett said,

"We had better take it, or we shall get caught with them." He went up, and remained there about five minutes; he then came down and said she had given him 17 s. for the handkerchiefs, and one for himself to do what he liked with.

Q. What was done with the money - A. Margett gave 8 s. 6 d. to Collis, who gave me 2 d.. I suspected they had stolen the handkerchiefs, and asked them if they had done so? they would not tell me for a long while, at last they said they had taken them out of a linen-draper's window, but did not say where - Margett then gave me 2 d. also. He went to a shop and got dinner, and Collis went and bought a hat in Broad-street, St. Giles's; they then left him, and Margett bought a pair of boots in Monmouth-street; he then went and bought two laces for his boots. A woman came up to Collis, and told him not to come near Seven Dials, for Watkins was taken - they then went away. Collis said,

"D - n it, that is right! - Watkins is taken up for us, and we shall get through it." One William Riley then came up, and said Watkins was taken. They asked him to go to the Theatre, and said they would pay half-price for him - they asked me to come, and said they would save me a seat. I left them, met Furzeman, and told him, as I thought I might be suspected, having been with them. Collis, Margett, and Riley went to the Cobourg Theatre that evening, and were taken.

GEORGE HART . I am servant to Mr. Pickford. On the 16th of September Collis, Margett, and another person came into our shop in Broad-street, St. Giles's, and said they wanted a hat - they bought one for 6 s. I believe Collis had it fitted on.

SARAH SIMPSON . I live in Monmouth-street. On the 16th of September three boys came to me between eleven and two o'clock, and bought a pair of boots for 1 s. 2 d. - I did not notice them.

MARGETT'S Defence. I was at home at the time.

WATKINS'S Defence. I had no hand in it.

RICHARD MARGETT . I am the prisoner Margett's father, and live in George-street, Bloomsbury.

Q. Where was he on the 16th of September - A. At home to breakfast on the day of the robbery; he went out at ten o'clock in the morning, I do not know what became of him afterwards.

MARY MARGETT . I am his mother. He went out at ten o'clock, and did not return all day.

COLLIS - GUILTY. Aged 15.

MARGETT - GUILTY. Aged 15.

Of stealing only , Confined Six Months , and Whipped .

WATKINS - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Six Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

Reference Number: t18191027-59

1436. JOHN FREDERICK MEISNER was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of October , one waistcoat, value 5 s. , the goods of William Hatch .

WILLIAM HATCH . I am a salesman , and live in the Minories . On the 7th of October I was called from dinner, and found the prisoner handling a coat on a clothes-horse inside the shop - he went towards the door. Supposing him a customer I tapped him on the shoulder, and asked him what he wanted? I brought him into the middle of the shop, my young man charged him with having a waistcoat under his jacket - it was found on him. I asked him why he took it? he said it was pretty, and he thought he should like it. He had left the shop without my knowing he had it. I spoke English to him, he understood me perfectly well.

GEORGE RIDLEY . I am servant to Mr. Hatch. On the 7th of October I saw the prisoner take the waistcoat off the horse, and conceal it under his jacket - I ran down stairs, secured him, and found it under his jacket

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 69.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury (Half Foreigners), before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18191027-60

1437. ELIZA DILLING , alias DILLON, alias BRIDGET HORGAN , was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of September , from the person of Henry Browning , one canvas bag, value 1 d.; ten 10 l.; twenty 5 l.; two 1 l.; one 1 l. 1 s. promissory notes; ten 10 l.; twenty 5 l.; two 1 l.; and one 1 l. 1 s. bills of exchange , his property.

SECOND COUNT, stating them to be stamped papers.

THIRD COUNT, for stealing thirty-three pieces of paper, duly stamped as required by the statute in that case made and provided, value 2 l. 3 s. 9 d., the property of Henry Browning .

HENRY BROWNING . I live at Cambridge. On the morning of the 2d of September, between three and four o'clock, I went into a public-house at the corner of Cow-lane, Smithfield - the business was just beginning. I then had 203 l. 1 s. in notes - there were ten 10 l. and twenty 5 l. Cambridge Bank; two 1 l. Cambridge Old Bank, and a guinea note of the Newmarket Bank.

Q. Have you ever seen the prisoner before - A. She was standing in the public-house when I went in. I had not been in more than two minutes before she accosted me, and asked for something to drink. I found from her talk that she was Irish - I refused to give her any, telling her she had better ask her countryman, Captain O'Connor, who was with me - I believe he gave her a glass, if not two; then he and I, and Mr. Warburton, left the house together. Bryan was sitting on a seat behind the prisoner, among the drovers of the market - she appeared to be a woman of the town. The prisoner followed us out; it was getting daylight. We had got about twenty yards down Cow-lane , and were going towards the White Horse, Fetter-lane - I was on the outside of them. The prisoner asked me to go home with her - I would not. I felt her feeling about my person - my notes were in a canvas purse in my left-hand breeches-pocket. She took me up a small court on the right side of the lane; my companions

stopped at the end of the court. We stopped there not more than five minutes.

Q. What passed between you - A. She felt about my person several times. We came all the way down Cow-lane together, and were together about ten minutes after we left the house. She left me at the bottom of Holborn-hill; I there met a person whom I knew, got into conversation with him, and she disappeared. I saw no more of her.

Q. When did you miss your notes - A. In about half an hour after. I walked back with the person to Cow-lane again, without suspecting any thing. I had been in communication with nobody but that person and the prisoner, until I missed them.

Q. In what way had you known that person - A. I had met him before. I am positive I had my notes when I was in the public-house. I was perfectly sober.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. You was not acquainted with her before - A. Never till that morning. I am a married man. I met no other woman but her - there was nobody in company with her at the time.

Q. I understand you went to see the fair proclaimed - A. I intended to see it. I did not take the numbers of the notes.

Q. Had you been drinking - A. No, I had not taken a bottle of wine from dinner-time till then. I had not been to bed, I had been to Astley's.

Q. Had you been in a little row before this - A. There was a dispute between two gentlemen and a coachman two hours before. We went in a coach from the White Horse - two other gentlemen came in another coach. The other coachman wanted 6 s., there was a scuffle between them; the gentleman was taken into custody.

Q. Did you not pretend that you was a special constable, and would take care of the man; then take him to the end of the street and let him go - A. No, I did not.

Q. Did not the man escape - A. No.

Q. Did you go to the watch-house - A. They took Mr. Candler to the watch-house. He resisted, and we persuaded him to go.

Q. The notes made a large bundle - A. Yes; they were in my left-hand breeches pocket; thirty were in a roll, and the other three by the side of them - they were all in the bag, and the bag rolled round. I did not feel them taken from me.

Q. Where were you and she together - A. I went into a little court on the right-hand side of Cow-lane, as you go to Fleet-market. She followed me out of the house.

Q. You and she separated from them - A. Yes, they stood at the end of the court. I met no other girls before I missed my money. The bag was never found.

Q. You advertised the property as lost - A. Yes. It is impossible that I could have dropped it.

COURT. Q. Are you sure the bundle of notes were in your pocket when you entered the public-house - A. It was, my Lord. The dispute with the coachman was two hours before that.

Q. Are you sure it was in your pocket when you left the public-house - A. Nobody touched me in the public-house.

Q. Did the prisoner, when she left you, ask for any money - A. No. She left without taking leave of me.

Q. Did you perceive her feel about your person after you left the court - A. No, my Lord.

GEORGE WARBEUTON . On the 2d of September last, at night, I went to Smithfield with the prosecutor; there was a row in the street about a hackney-coach. I did not hear him represent himself as a special constable. I went to the public-house in Cow-lane with him, and remained there about ten minutes; I observed the prisoner there, and am sure of her person; Hannah Bryant was there also. I, the prosecutor, and O'Connor all three came away together. I saw the prisoner take hold of Mr. Browning's arm in Cow-lane, we went on. I saw them turn up a passage by themselves. The prosecutor was sober.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you been with him all the evening - A. I met him after he came from Astley's. I do not recollect whether I dined him with that day; we did not sup together.

Q. After you left Astley's, where did you go - A. To the White Horse, and from thence to Smithfield. The prosecutor was not at all drunk. We talked with no girls; we went in a coach to the fair.

Q. What had you to drink - A. I had nothing; O'Connor gave the prisoner something to drink. I never saw the prosecutor's money.

Q. Do you mean to persist in saying, he did not tell the watchman he would take care of Candler, and then let him escape - A. I did not hear him.

COURT. Q. Did the prisoner come out of the house with Browning - A. She followed him out, and came up to him immediately.

Q. How far is the passage from the public-house - A. Perhaps fifty yards. We stopped a few minutes for the prosecutor, and then went away; he did not overtake us.

HANNAH EAGLETON. I have gone by the name of Bryant and Manley. I and a man named Manley lived at No. 4, Pitt's-place, Drury-lane - the prisoner also lived there with her daughter, who is fifteen or sixteen years old. I have known the prisoner three or four months.

Q. On the evening of the 2d of September did you and she go out together - A. We went to see Lady Holland's mob; we were about there until two or three o'clock in the morning, then went to a public-house at the top of Cow-lane, and saw Mr. Browning there with three or four more friends, and a gentleman with one arm.

MR. BROWNING. Captain O'Connor has but one arm.

HANNAH EAGLETON (in contination). The prisoner asked the prosecutor to treat her, he referred her to the Captain. They staid no great while; she followed them out - I came out directly after her, and followed; she went up the first turning on the right in Cow-lane with Mr. Browning.

Q. Before the prisoner went with him did she say any thing to you - A. She desired me to stay at the top of the court till she came back - I staid there for twenty minutes or half an hour; she came out of the court then, and the gentleman went over the road. She said,

"I have picked his pocket!" and shewed me a bundle in a bag, and two half-crowns. She said,

"You b - g - r, if you don't run we shall both be hung!" We ran through courts and places until daylight; we went to the bottom of Holborn, by the church, and she there stripped the bag of the notes, put them into her pocket, and threw the bag down in the

street in Shoe-lane. She shewed me one of the notes in particular, it was a Newmarket guinea note, with the number torn off at the bottom - I told her it was of no use. She said she had plenty more in her possession, enough to support us for five weeks.

Q. Where did you then go - A. We walked about; it rained very hard; we went about till near six o'clock, and then went to a wine vaults at the end of Gray's Inn-lane, in Holborn; I should know the landlord if I saw him; we went in with a man whom I do not know - he was not in our company, he only went in at the same time. The landlord served us; the prisoner said she wished to pay him 9 s. or 10 s. which she owed him. The stranger treated me with a glass of liquor, and she had something to drink. I did not see the money she paid the landlord.

Q. From the time your left your house what had you to drink - A. Not above two glasses of spirits. We then went to a public-house in Drury-lane, and had two or three glasses each there to drink; then the man that I lived with found me there, and took me home.

Cross-examined. Q. You told the Lord Mayor that man was your husband - A. I acknowledge him as my husband.

Q. Do you know Mr. Milstone, in Berkshire - A. No. I never went by that name. I was once married.

Q. What was the name of the man who married you - A. Perju; he left me. I have now come from Clerkenwell prison.

Q. What were you there for - A. For a few words. I am not there on a charge of felony.

Q. On a charge of attempting to murder a man; for cutting and stabbing, and feloniously wounding a man - A. No, the man was tipsy, and the knife fell out of his hand. He does not charge me with doing it. I have been in custody a month; I was let out on bail. I was only examined once.

Q. You was not committed to prison for robbing the prosecutor - A. No, I was not taken into custody for that, neither was I charged with aiding and assisting in robbing him. I go by the name of Bryant Manley .

Q. The man you live with was not with you - A. No; I went out unknown to him.

Q. You staid half an hour or twenty minutes at the top of the court, waiting for the prisoner - A. Yes. I did not rob the prosecutor.

Q. How came she to tell you to run, or you would both be hung - A. She said if we were both caught together, we should. She said she took the two half-crowns from him.

Q. Can you read - Q. Yes.

Q. She shewed you the notes, and among them you saw a Newmarket note - A. Yes; after that. She shewed me the whole of the notes in Shoe-lane.

Q. Did you not swear that in that ane you saw a Newmarket guinea note - A. I did see it in Shoe-lane.

Q. Did she give it you to look at - A. I had it in my hand.

Q. Did you read it - A. Yes.

Q. On your oath, did you not say to the magistrate that you never read it - A. I did not; I read it several days afterwards, for I saw it in her possession several days afterwards.

Q. Did you not tell the magistrate, that the first time you saw the Newmarket note was at her own place, in the presence of her daughter - A. No.

Q. What reward was offered - A. I do not know. I did not give this information for the sake of the reward.

Q. What is the reward - A. Fifty pounds, I believe; but I did not lay the information; I never saw the handbills. I did not know there was a reward, until after I was taken. A woman laid the information. I told the officer the truth - I had mentioned it before. I did not know of the reward until she was taken to Guildhall. I was taken to Hatton-garden twice with her before that, about it. I was never out with her before that night.

MR. BOLLAND. Q. Before you was taken up about killing a man unknown, had you been before the magistrate about the prisoner - A. Yes, Manley is the man I am charged with stabbing; he is here.

COURT. Q. How far did they go together after they came out of the court - A. He went off down the lane as he came out - the prisoner did not follow him any further.

HENRY BROWNING re-examined. Q. When you came out of the court, where did you first miss her - A. Near the end of Fleet-market.

JAMES BRYANT MANLEY. I live at No. 4, Pitt's-place, Drury-lane; the prisoner lived in the same house, in the one pair front room.

Q. Do you remember the morning of the 3d of September - A. Yes, I saw my wife and the prisoner together at the Black Dog, public-house, Drury-lane, between eight and nine o'clock in the morning - in my opinion they were both drunk. The prisoner's daughter lived with her.

Q. Did her daughter say any thing to you in the presence of the prisoner - A. Yes, her daughter shewed me a Newmarket guinea note. I said it was a bad one, because there was no number on it - it was torn where the number should be. The prisoner told me to hold my noise, for she had plenty more - this was the same day. I saw it again next day.

Cross-examined. Q. That was the day they were drunk - A. Yes, I do not exactly know what time I got up that morning. To the best of my opinion I went to look for her at the public-house between eight and nine o'clock.

Q. On your oath, did she not come home by herself - A. She did not, I fetched her home, and told her she ought to be house at work - she went home.

Q. Where did you see the Newmarket note - A. The first day I saw it in her daughter's hand in my room, next day I saw it in the prisoner's room, in her daughter's hand - it was the same that I had seen before,; to the best of my opinion it was torn in the same place - one guinea was written on it. It was torn at the corner.

JOSEPH FIRTH . I keep a wine vaults, the sign of the George, at the end of Middle-row, opposite Gray's Inn-lane; I have known the prisoner five or seven years - she frequented my house. In September last she owed me some money. On the 3d of September, near seven o'clock, in the morning, she came with the witness, Eagleton, and a man; she had two or three glasses of liquor - Eagleton had a glass of liquor, which the man treated her with. The prisoner owed me 10 s. or 11 s.; she gave me a Cambridge 1 l. Bank note, Mortlock's Bank. I saw a roll of notes in her possession, and one was loose,

which was similar to the one she gave me. The roll was bulky.

JAMES WOOD . I am cashier in Messrs. Jones, Loyd, and Co's. banking-house, Lothbury; Mortlock, of Cambridge, banks at our house. On the 14th of September, 130 l. of their notes were brought to our house. I refer to my book, there were ten 5 l. and eight 10 l. notes. I gave forty 1 l. notes, Nos. 73656 and 73695 were among them, dated August 17, 1819. I also gave four 10 l. notes, Nos. 17472 to 17475, dated August 23, 1819, and one 50 l., No. 4866, dated August 20, 1819.

THOMAS LUCAS, JUN. I transact business for my father, who is a stock-broker. On Tuesday, the 14th of September, I was in the Rotunda, the porter called me to the prisoner - I am sure she is the person; a man was with her. She said she wanted to put 100 l. in the Bank - I asked her what stock? she did not appear to understand the business, and left me in a great hurry - she came back in about five minutes, and said she would do it. I told her 104 l. would buy 100 l. 5 per cent.; she consented. I bought of James Hawtic ; the amount was 104 l. 5 s. and 2 s. 6 d. commission.

Q. Who paid you for it - A. I do not know, either me or my brother took the money; I gave her the stock receipt, and she went away. I saw the receipt in the possession of Read on the Saturday after.

A. What name did she tell you to enter it in - A. Horgan Bridget; the person who was with her said,

"That is not your name," and she said, No, it was Bridget Horgan . I am sure she is the person.

MICHAEL LUCAS . I am brother to the last witness. On the 14th of September I was with him; the prisoner said her name was Horgan Bridget - I am sure she is the person. To the best of my recollection, the man who was with her took the notes from the prisoner's handkerchief, counted them out, put them on the desk, and I took them. I paid the notes to Edward Cuell, with other notes, which were very trifling. I remember there was a 50 l. note, and some 10 l. among the notes, but how many I cannot tell.

EDWARD CUELL . I am clerk to Mr. Hawtie. I received some notes from the last witness - about 120 l. I gave them to Mr. Toms, who is Mr. Hawtie's partner. I wrote Lucas on them.

MR. JAMES TOMS . I remember Cuell paying me about 120 l. in notes, on the 14th of September - he wrote on them by my desire. I paid them into Ladbroke's.

FRANCIS WHITE . I am clerk to Messrs. Ladbroke and Co. I find by my book that among other notes, No. 4866, dated August 20, 1819, 50 l. was paid in; there were twenty-six 10 l. notes, of which I do not know the numbers, but they were all pinned together and sent to the Bank. The 50 l. note was re-issued to a person for a draft drawn by T. and F. Raster.

GEORGE DYER . I am a clerk in the Bank. I produce a 50 l. note, No. 4866, dated August 20, 1819; also four 10 l. Nos. 17472 to 17475, dated August 23, 1819. The four 10 l. notes were paid in by Ladbroke's on the 14th of September, pinned in a bundle with some others. The 50 l. note was brought in the same day by a person named Galley, of Austin Friars.

EDWARD CUELL re-examined. My hand-writing is on all the notes. They are five of the notes that I received from Lucas.

EDWARD READ . I am an officer of Hatton-garden. On the 18th of September I went to No. 4, Pitt's-place, apprehended the prisoner, and found two 1 l. Bank notes on her, Nos. 73687 and 73675, dated August 17, 1819. I produce them, also a Bank stock receipt for 100 l., which I found in a drawer in the front room on the first floor. I also found a quantity of new clothes, new gowns, and pieces of flannel; also two pair of silk stockings, all new. The gowns were not made up.

WILLIAM SCOTT . I am the landlord of No. 4, Pitt's-place; the prisoner was my tenant - she had the one pair front room, furnished, at 6 s. per week. She came about the latter end of July.

Q. About the 3d of September, did you see any thing in the room more than usual - A. About a week or a fortnight after, I saw she had furniture in the room which did not belong to me. On the 3d of September she came in very much in liquor between ten and eleven o'clock at night. Her daughter paid me a 1 l. note and 7 s.; she said she would lend me 40 l. or 50 l. if I liked - she produced no money. Her daughter told her not to bother me.

JAMES WOOD re-examined. The notes 73675 and 73687, are two of the notes that I paid, in exchange for the Cambridge notes, on the 14th of September.

Prisoner's Defence. I am quite innocent. I have a great deal of money from gentlemen. I can prove that I had a great deal of money before the prosecutor lost his - I went to the Bank with a friend. I can prove that I had had the clothes a month before; I have had money in the stocks several times. The stock-broker could not spell my name right. If I had stolen it I should not have put it into the Bank; as to the woman who has sworn against me, she had on my gown at the time; I never saw the prosecutor in my life. I have witnesses to call.

JAMES WILLIAMS . I am watchman of St. Sepulchre. On the 3d of September I had been calling the hour of one, when a chariot came to the Bull's Head, public-house, with two gentlemen; the coachman let them out, and charged them 6 s. 6 d. or 8 s. 6 d. for driving them from Fetter-lane, and waiting for them. The gentlemen said if he did not like to take 18 d. he might go and be b - g - d. He said he would take them to the Compter, and they said they would go. He opened the coach-door for them, but they refused to go in. Another coach drove up with Browning and others. The coachman called for an officer; Browning ran up, took hold of the man with his left arm, and said,

"I am an officer, I take him in charge." He took him to Long-lane, and then shoved him adrift. The coachman said he gave me charge of him; I followed the man up Duke-street, and there laid hold of him. Browning tried to stop me from taking him; I sprang my rattle, assistance came, and I took him to the watch-house. Browning followed us to the watch-house with a man named O'Connor. I told the coachman to state his charge, which he did - he was rather in liquor. The gentleman, whom the coachman gave in charge, pulled out a handful of notes, and gave the constable of the night a 1 l. note to pay the fare. I desired the constable of the night to take Browning in charge for acting as an officer. Browning was in liquor.

COURT. Q. Do you mean to swear Browning was in liquor - A. I do, and after a long time the man wanted to

give charge of him for threatening him, and pushing him about - they were turned out of the watch-house. I went to Smithfield-bars to take the number of the chariot. I said I should report the constable of the night to somebody else, for not taking charge.

Q. Did you ever see the prisoner - A. No, but when I sprang my rattle there was a crowd. I do not know how far Browning went.

Q. How came they to find you out - A. I happened to be at Guildhall at the time of the examination.

WILLIAM PETLEY , I am an independent man, and live on my fortune at Wander, in Derbyshire. I am not a housekeeper, but lodge with a person named James Frost , who is a farmer.

Q. How long have you lodged with him - A. At different times, for several years. I reside there when I am in the country, but I am frequently in London.

Q. What is your business in London - A. My own pleasure. I sometimes stay longer and sometimes shorter.

Q, Where do you live in London - A. At the British coffee-house, Castle-court, Strand. I have known the prisoner two years. She lived in Compton-street when I first knew her, but lately in Pitt's-place; I visited her there, and have been in her company when I have had serious sums of money, and never lost any. On the night of the 2d of September, or rather on the morning of the 3d, between two and three o'clock, I was in her company in the neighbourhood of Smithfield.

Q. Where did you join her - A. I met her in Fleet-market, between two and three o'clock - we walked up Cow-lane, to Smithfield.

Q. Where did you leave her - A. In fact I did not leave her. I did not go into the public-house with her.

Q. Where did you leave her - A. At the top of Cow-lane; in fact, she left me, for a dirty sort of a woman came up to her, and I declined going into the public-house with her. I should know the woman again.

Q. Perhaps you had seen her living in the same house with her - A. No.

(Eagleton was ordered to stand up.)

Q Is that the woman you mean - A. Yes; but she was much dirtier than she is now, and was very tipsy - very drunk.

Q. Did you remonstrate with the prisoner for joining company with her - A. I did.

Q. Where did you go - A. I waited outside the house; she come out to me, and I walked up Holborn with her.

Q. Then she was not in company with any one - A. Not except myself and the woman. I walked away with her.

Q. Perhaps you was the person who went into the wine vaults with her - A. No; the woman joined us in Holborn.

Q. Were you wandering about all night with her - A. Yes; I did not see Mr. Browing or Warburton (looks at them) - I did not see them.

Q. How long did the woman remain in the public-house before she joined you again - A. Not more than ten minutes.

Q. And, excepting the time she was in the public-house, you was always in her company - A. I was always in her company until near seven o'clock.

Q. Then she could not have been with Browning or Warburton - A. Not without my seeing them - I did not see them.

Q. Then you mean to swear that this woman was not in company with Browning or Warburton, after she came out of the public-house - A. I do.

Q. Here are three witnesses who have positively sworn it, and I put you on your guard; where did you go with her all this time - A. Walked in different parts of the street.

Q. From three till seven o'clock - A. Yes, we did not go into any house.

Q, What time did the drunken woman join you again - A. I should think between six and seven o'clock.

Q. Had the prisoner any notes with her - A. She asked me for some money, when I first saw her going up Cow-lane. I was sober.

Q. What money had you about you at that time - A. Probably 10 l.

Q. Do not tell me probably, do you mean to say you had 10 l. - A. Yes; it was in country and Bank notes. That day I had received three Cambridge 1 l. bank notes from Charles Holder , who keeps the British Coffee-house, where I lodge. I received three Cambridge, and three Bank notes.

Q. Which Cambridge bank - A. Mortlock's. I received them in change for a 10 l. Bank of England note, on the morning of the 2d of September. I do not know whether he is here.

Q. Where did you sleep last night - A. At his house.

Q. You knew what you were coming here for - A. Yes; I did not desire him to come. I paid him his bill, which came to nearly 4 l. out of the 10 l. note.

Q. What did you give the prisoner - A. She asked me for some money, and I gave her a 1 l. Cambridge Bank note.

Q. And only one - A. Only one; she then told me she owed a small sum, and that was not sufficient; I then gave her a 1 l. Bank of England note. She said she had no money then.

Q. When you left her at six o'clock in the morning, as far as you learnt from her, she had only these two notes which you gave her - A. She had not.

Q. Have you been here and heard the whole evidence - A. I have not. I came in when you was reading the evidence over.

Q. What became of you afterwards; have you been at the British Coffee-house ever since - A. Yes. I have retired from business; I was a grocer at Nottingham. I did not set up in trade - I was an apprentice. I had a fortune left me by my uncle, whose name was Williams. I have lived on that fortune ever since. I am twenty-six years of age.

Q. Were you at the banker's in Lothbury - A. I was not.

Q. Did you go to the Bank with the prisoner, and purchase stock - A. I did not; she did not shew me the stock receipt. I have not been to see her since the 3d of September.

Q. How came you here - A. I heard of this business after she was committed.

Cross-examined by MR. BALLENTINE. Q. What public-house did you go to with her - A. I went to none. She went to the public-house at the corner of Cow-lane and Smithfield.

Q. Are there any ladies kept at this coffee-house - A.

There is not; it is a very respectable house. I never saw any ladies there.

Q. On your oath, is it not a common brothel - A. It is not.

MR. BROWNING re-examined. Q. Was that man in company with the woman when you was - A. No; he could not have been in her company from the time she joined me till she left me; it is impossible. I positively swear he never was with her at that time.

MR. WARBURTON re-examined. Q. Was that man in company with the prisoner, or near Browning, from the time she left the public-house till you left them at the end of the passage - A. He was not; he could not have been without my seeing him.

HANNAH EAGLETON re-examined. Q. Do you know that man - A. No; I never saw him in company with the prisoner at all. I never saw him in my life. I was not drunk when I was with her.

Q. Was any man in your company at the time you joined the prisoner - A. No.

Q. How long before you went into the liquor-shop opposite Gray's Inn-lane, did the man join you - A. Not many minutes. It was not this man.

JOSEPH FIRTH re-examined. Q. At the time the two women came into the shop, did Bryant appear intoxicated - A. I thought she was rather so; that was at seven o'clock in the morning. Petley is not the man who came in with them. I never saw him in my life. The man was much older than him.

GUILTY . Aged 34.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

(The witness Petley, was committed by the COURT for perjury.)

Reference Number: t18191027-61

1438. JAMES STUBBS was indicted for that he, on the 30th of September , at St. James, Clerkenwell , feloniously did dispose of and put away a certain forged and counterfeit Bank note (setting it forth, No. 27572, 1 l. dated July 5, 1819), with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England , he well knowing it to be forged and counterfeit .

SECOND COUNT, for feloniously offering to one Edward Smith a like forged and counterfeit Bank note, with the like intent, he well knowing it be forged.

THIRD AND FOURTH COUNTS, the same, only calling the forged instrument a promissory note instead of a Bank note.

FIFTH, SIXTH, AND SEVENTH COUNTS, the same, only stating his intent to be to defraud the said Edward Smith .

EDWARD SMITH . I keep the Spread Eagle , Charles-street, Middlesex Hospital. I know the prisoner. I first saw him one day at the latter end of August, he brought a bottle, and asked for half a pint of rum - I drew it; he said he must have change for a 1 l. note, or he could not pay me. He gave me quite a new note, as if it had just come from the Bank. I gave him 18 s. 6 d. and 4 d. in halfpence. He took the silver and rum, and went away as quick as possible, leaving the 4 d. on the counter.

Q. Did you ask who he was - A. Yes, before I changed the note I asked his name and residence? he said his name was Johnson, and he lived at No. 12, Pitt-street, which is by Charlotte-street, about 200 yards from my house. He said,

"Pitt-street, close by" - I wrote it on the front of the note, in his presence. This is the note - (looking at it). - His going away in that manner, and leaving the 4 d. behind, gave me a suspicion that the note was a bad one, and I wrote the name and address again on the back of it, to be sure of it. It was paid away, and afterwards returned to me from the Bank, stamped forged.

Q. Did you see him again - A. On the 30th of September, about seven o'clock in the evening, he came again, and called for half a pint of rum, he had a bottle. I began to draw it, and he observed to me that he could not pay for it unless I gave him change for a 1 l. note, I told him I could not, and on looking at him, I recognized him to be the man who brought me the first note I just spoke of - it had been returned then.

Q. What did you then do - A. I put my hand in my pocket, pulled out some silver, and said I could give him change. I asked him for the note, he produced and gave it to me - I looked at it, and saw it was one of the same sort he gave me before - it was quite new. I asked him his name and address? he told me it was Jones, No. 4, Charlotte-court; I gave him a pen and ink, laid the note on my book, and asked him to write his name and address on it, he did so, this is it - (looking at it) - it has

"R. Jones, 4, Charlotte-court;" he wrote it. There is such a place about a hundred yards from me.

Q. This note looks newer than the other - A. They were both alike with regard to newness when I took them. The first went into circulation.

Q. On his writing his name and address what happened - A. I told him it was a forged note - he said I need not take it without I liked. I sent my brother-in-law, Robert Palmer , to inquire if there was such a person at No. 4, Charlotte-court; the prisoner said he would go with him, and shew him the house; I said

"No, I shall detain you until my brother-in-law returns." My brother went, came back, and said in his presence, there was no such person. It was dark; I had lit the gas. I sent my brother for a watchman, the watch was not on. I sent him for a constable, he could not find one; we then agreed to take him ourselves to the watch-house. I went out first, the prisoner followed; I laid hold of his left arm, some others followed behind. He had not got many paces before he threw his arm up, got away, and ran away. I followed, calling Stop thief! the others followed; he ran as far as Newman-street, and ran into the arms of the watchman, who stopped him.

Q. What became of the bottle - A. I heard it break.

Cross-examined by MR. ARABIN. Q. More than a month elapsed between his first and second coming - A. It might be a little more than a month. I do not do a great deal of business; I see many persons. I observed his countenance the first time. I gave the note to my wife.

Q. I suppose people often go into a public-house and leave their change - A. Mistakes may occur.

Q. When he came on the 30th of September did you not ask him to write on the note the person's name whom he took it of - A. No such thing; I asked him to write his own name and address.

Q. Was no part of the name of Stubbs wrote on it - A. There is an S. which is scratched out. It appears as if he began to write Charlotte with an S.

JOSEPH USHER . I am a watchman. I stopped the prisoner as he ran down Newman-street; Mr. Smith came up in less than two minutes, and identified him as the man. I took him to the watch-house.

THOMAS BAGG . I am the occupier of No. 12, Pitt-street, near Middlesex Hospital, and have been so seventeen years. The prisoner is a total stranger to me, and never lodged there. I never sent him to change any note.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you any lodgers - A. Only a female and her daughter, who have lived twelve years with me. There is no other No. 12, nor any other Pitt-street near there; I do not know any whatever.

WILLIAM SMITH . I am occupier of No. 4, Charlotte-court, Middlesex Hospital; I have lived there seven years, and my family have lived there fifty-two years. The prisoner did not live at my house, I have no knowledge of him whatever, and never sent him to change a note.

THOMAS GLOVER . I am an inspector of Bank notes at the Bank, and have been so twenty-seven years. The notes are both forged in every respect. That set out in the indictment is signed S. Leete, and is not his hand-writing; the other is signed E. Staple, but is not his writing.

STEPHEN LEETE . I am a signer of 1 l. and 2 l. notes; the signature is not my writing, and there is no other signing clerk of my name.

(The note was then put in and read.)

Prisoner's Defence. My Lord, and Gentlemen of the Jury. - Never having been in so awful a situation before, I am incapable of making such a defence as the nature of my case requires. I request you will hear the following statement of the fact: - On this evening I admit being at the prosecutor's and tendering the note, but as to the guilty knowledge of its being forged, I solemnly deny. I took it in the regular way of business of a person who gave me his address -

"R. Jones, No. 4, Charlotte-court;" for making a coat. This, I trust, will account for my calling at the prosecutor's house, so far from home, as I knew they might send for Jones if the note was not genuine. I had met the man in Holborn on the Friday before I went to Smith's, and appointed to meet him this night, at his lodgings. I did not intend to defraud Smith, although I am arraigned on this scandalous charge. Looking at the back of the note, and preceding the C you will find S. I had began to write my own name, but it occurred to me that the person had not endorsed it, but he told me to put that name on it. The hasty conduct of the landlord prevented my putting my own name on it, for when he took it from me, he held it before the candle, and asked me to write on it. I asked if I was to write my own name, or the person's whom I took it of; he gave me a pen, and I wrote the name of the person I had it of, and intended also to write my own. I asked him for some ink, but he took the note and pen up, and said,

"Jones! this note is bad!" I said,

"Then do not take it." He sent to see if the address was correct; I told him it was the person I took it of, and that I would go and see if the man was there, he detained me. The man returned, and said there was no such person. While the man was gone for the watchman and constable, the prosecutor told me he had taken two notes of me before, had passed them, and that one was come back. I must leave it to the Jury to say if they think me a man who supports himself in this way. I am wrongfully brought here. The prosecutor says he refused the second note, why did he not detain me then? He gave a statement on a piece of paper, and the attorney, or somebody, has corrected him when they thought him wrong - I hope you will conclude that his statement is groundless. He has said nothing about the middle note here, but it will be found in his deposition. As to my attempting to escape, I must appeal to you, who are husband and fathers as well as me, when a man is charged with what he is certain is false, would you not attempt to escape? I would sooner lose 10 l. than lay in prison one night. I have a wife and four children, and endeavoured to live honestly. I am a tailor, and work being slack, I tried to get jobs for myself. I made no false pretences with the note, nor did I intend to defraud the prosecutor. I know nothing of the first note, and was never in his house before. To see a man's life sworn away is shocking. He never asked me to write my own name, but I intended so to do.

MR. BARON WOOD . Prisoner, I have referred to the prosecutor's deposition, and find he swore exactly what he has now.

EDWARD SMITH re-examined. He said his name was Jones, not that he received it of Jones. I did not desire him to write the name of the person of whom he had it.

JURY. Q. Did you ask him where he got the note - A. No; he did not say he received it of Jones until my brother returned.

GUILTY. - DEATH . Aged 29.

Strongly Recommended to Mercy .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

Reference Number: t18191027-62

1439. THOMAS M'DERMOT was indicted for that he, on the 12th of October , at St. James, Clerkenwell , feloniously did dispose of and put away a certain forged and counterfeit Bank note (setting it forth, No. 9939, 1 l. dated 11th August, signed S. Draper) with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England , he well knowing it to be forged and counterfeit .

SECOND COUNT, for feloniously offering to William Bullock a like forged and counterfeit Bank note, with the like intent, he well knowing it to have been forged.

THIRD AND FOURTH COUNTS, the same, only calling the forged instrument a promissory note instead of a Bank note.

FIFTH, SIXTH, SEVENTH, AND EIGHTH COUNTS, the same, only stating his intent to be to defraud one Zachariah Senier .

WILLIAM BULLOCK . I am shopman to Zachariah Senier , who is a linen-draper , and lives in Great Portland-street. On Tuesday, the 12th of October, the prisoner

came to my master's shop between two and three o'clock, and said he wanted some calico to repair a shirt or shirts; he shewed me the shirt he had on. I found a piece which measured two yards. He said he would not mind taking a remnant if I put it low - I agreed for 1 s. 9 d. He took out a 1 l. Bank note, I examined it, and thought it looked like a bad one.

Q. Did you see any thing written on it - A. I saw W. B. on the back in large letters, and I thought the signature of Draper to the note was more scrawling than he in general writes. Mr. Senier and Mr. Denbigh were at dinner; I knocked at the wainscot, Mr. Denbigh came down.

Q. Before he came down had you said any thing to the prisoner - A. I asked his name? he gave me a short name of one syllable, which began with a B - it sounded to me like Blain.

Q. Are you sure it was not M'Dermot - A. Quite sure. Mr. Denbigh came down; I told him, in the hearing of the prisoner, that he had given me the note. I presented the note to Mr. Denbigh, and said I believed it to be bad - Mr. Denbigh also said he thought it to be bad; he took it up to Mr. Senier. I was left below with the prisoner. While Mr. Denbigh was gone, I asked him where he had taken it? he said, at No. 47, Harley-street, that Lady Page Turner owed him 1 l., and he had received it of her servant an hour before. Mr. Denbigh and Mr. Senier came down - Mr. Senier had the note in his hand, said he thought it bad, and asked him if he knew where he had taken it? he said he had taken it at No. 47, Harley-street, at Lady Page Turner's. Mr. Senier said,

"If you have taken it of Lady Page Turner, of course you will get another for it if it is bad." Mr. Senier asked him his name? he gave it as before, in a mumbling manner, but it was the same sound, though he did not speak so distinctly.

Q. Mr. Senier told him Lady Page Turner would give him another, what then - A. Mr. Senier said,

"My young man (meaning me) had better go with you, to see if you have taken it there." He said

"Very well." Mr. Senier gave me the note, and I put it into my waistcoat pocket - I had no other. He and I went to 47, Harley-street. When we got to Harley-street he asked me for the note - he had asked me for it several times before he came to the door - he said it was his, and he would have it; I refused to give it up - we were then at 49, within two doors of 47. He stopped, and asked me if I was going to give it up? I told him if it was a good one he should have it. I then laid hold of his arm, and walked up to the door of 47 - he himself rang the bell. The man-servant came to the door, I asked him if Lady Page Turner lived there? he said No. I then told him the circumstance in the prisoner's hearing - the prisoner never asked for any one there.

Q. What did the servant say - A. The servant said that he had not been there, and he knew nothing of him. I then turned to him, and asked him how he could tell such falsities? He then said he did not tell me he had taken it No. 47, Harley-street. I said that could not be denied, because he had said it in the presence of Mr. Senier, Mr. Denbigh, and myself. We left - he then kept demanding the note until we came to Cavendish-square.

Q. Do you recollect his saying any thing about a letter - A. When I asked him how he could tell such falsities, he said he had not told me he took it there, but that he had received it in a letter from Lady Page Turner, and that it said,

"47, Harley-street." When he got to Cavendish-square, he said he would not go back with me, for he owed Mr. Senier nothing, that he had done him no injury, and there was no occasion for him to return. Instead of going on the pavement he went out towards the rails, I went with him towards Oxford-street, he then stopped, and said he would go no further, and that he would have the note. He then collared me - I told him from his conduct I believed he knew the note to be forged when he offered it.

Q. Did he make any answer - A. He said he would be d - d if he would not make me give it up. I laid hold of him by the arm, and said I would neither let him nor the note go. When he collared me I was afraid he was going to strike me, and called for help - no person was passing. He seemed frightened, walked a few paces towards Mortimer-street, and before we got out of the square he stopped again, and swore he would go no further. I then interrupted a gentleman who was passing, told him the circumstance, and shewed him the note; he said he thought it a bad one. I told him to mind that the prisoner did not snatch it. The gentleman said he must return with me. Several persons came round - the gentleman returned me the note - it was never out of my sight.

Q. You got home at last - A. Yes. I gave the note to Mr. Denbigh, and told him in the prisoner's presence what had passed. I called Mr. Senier down, he proposed that the prisoner should go with me and Mr. Denbigh to the Bank - the prisoner said he was obliged to be home by appointment by four o'clock, and could not go.

Q. Did he say where his home was - A. He said somewhere about Grosvenor-square - he had told me on the road that he lived in Grosvenor-street. Mr. Senier proposed his going to Marlborough-street. The prisoner had before said that he was a respectable man, and well known in that neighbourhood - Mr. Senier said if it was so it would not detain him long at Marlborough-street. He then seemed much disturbed, and said he would satisfy Mr. Senier in any way if he would set him at liberty. Mr. Senier went to Marlborough-street and got Plank.

Q. When you went to Harley-street what did you learn about Lady Page Turner, in the prisoner's hearing - A. The man said she had not lived there for two years, but I understood that she had formerly lived there.

Q. Did you mark the note - A. When the officer came he asked me if I had marked it? I said No, but I knew it by W. B. being on it. I then marked it - (looks at one) - this it. When the officer came, he said he had taken it of a man named Paterson, over Westminster Bridge. The officer asked him if he knew the name of the street? he said No, he should know the house if he saw it.

DAVID DENBIGH . I am shopman and brother-in-law to Mr. Senier. Bullock called me down, I saw the prisoner in the shop. Bullock gave me the note, I looked at it, and said in the prisoner's hearing, that I believed it to be bad. I took it up to Mr. Senier, who was at dinner; he came down with me, having the note in his hand. He asked the prisoner where he had taken it? he said he took

it at No. 47, Harley-street, of Lady Page Turner, that day - he said he took it of her servant. Mr. Senier said if he took it there, and it was bad, she would give him another, and proposed Bullock's going to 47, Harley-street, to inquire. They went together - the note was given to Bullock. As soon as they returned, Bullock related to me that Lady Page Turner had not lived there for two years, and that the prisoner had demanded the note to be given up to him - that the prisoner had collared him in Cavendish-square, and insisted on its being given up - that he wanted to get from him, and Bullock laid hold of him, calling out for help; the prisoner then seemed afraid, came on a few paces, then stopped and would go no further; that a gentleman who was passing by came to assist him; he shewed the gentleman the note, who said it was bad, that several persons came round, and they brought the prisoner back.

Q. After he had stated this had you any conversation with the prisoner - A. Mr. Senier then proposed his going to the Bank with me; he said he had an engagement at four o'clock, and should not he back in time. It was then proposed to go to Marlborough-street. Mr. Senier then fetched an officer unknown to him. Bullock gave the note up to me. I took it and put it in my pocket; in a short time I took it out, got a pen and ink, and asked the prisoner his name he said, as there had been so much to do about it he should not tell me. Plank came.

Q. Did you hear the prisoner tell him where he took the note - A. Plank asked him where he had taken it? He said he took it of Paterson, over Westminster Bridge. Plank made a memorandum of it. This is the note (looks at one).

ZACHARIAH SENIER . I keep the shop in Portland-street, and remember the prisoner being there. I came down stairs, and found him and Bullock in the shop. Denbigh had shewn me the note up stairs, and given it to me. I came down, and gave the same note to Bullock, told the prisoner I suspected it to be forged, and inquired where he took it. I believe he said,

"I took it of Lady Page Turner." I took very little notice, not expecting to be called here. He said he took it in Harley-street; I proposed that Bullock should go there to ascertain if he took it there. They went, and returned. Bullock related what passed.

GEORGE PORTER . I am servant at No. 47, Harley-street. Mr. Droz lives there now, and has lived there for two years. I have lived four years with him; and Lady Page Turner has not lived there since we have. On the 12th of October the prisoner and Bullock came to the house.

Q. Did you pay the prisoner a 1 l. note for Lady Page Turner, your master, or yourself - A. Never. I never saw him before to my knowledge. I heard Bullock give his evidence - it is correct.

COURT. Q. Did the prisoner say you was not the servant, but some other was - A. No, my Lord; I do not remember his speaking to me. We have another man servant, but he was out on that day. I said I had not paid him the note - he made no answer.

WILLIAM BULLOCK re-examined. He did not say he received it of any other servant at that house.

SAMUEL PLANK . I am an officer. I took the prisoner into custody at the prosecutor's. I took him into a room to search him. I first called him by his name, M'Dermot, and asked him how his wife was, and if he knew me. He said, Yes. I found nothing about him. I asked him where he lived, he said, at No. 4, Reeve's-mews, Grosvenor-square. I asked him where he had taken the note; he told me took it of a man named Paterson, over at Lambeth, but he did not know the street, or the house.

Prisoner. Q. Did I not tell you Paterson was a servant, who did live with Lady Page Turner - A. After I left the house he told me Paterson had once lived with her.

Q. Did I not tell you I lived at No. 24, Reeve's-mews with Lynch, and you said you knew him very well - A. He never said so. I do not know Lynch. I said I knew Reeve's-mews very well. He said at the prosecutor's house that he lived in Reeve's-mews.

SAMUEL BOATWRIGHT . I live at No. 4, Reeve's-mews, Grosvenor-square, and have lived there between thirty and forty years; the prisoner did not live there - I have no knowledge of him.

THOMAS GLOVER . I am an inspector of Bank notes. The note is forged in every respect, plate, signature, and every thing. It is not the signature of Draper.

SAMUEL DRAPER . I am a signing clerk at the Bank. There is no other of my name. The signature is not my writing.

(The note was here put in and read.)

Prisoner's Defence. I went to buy the calico, and offered a note; he recognized it as bad. I said I took it of a servant who lived with Lady Page Turner, not an hour and a half ago. He said,

"Where does she live?" I said she used to live in Harley-street. I went there, and coming back, demanded the note of him; a gentleman said I had better go back to the shop. He told his master a great deal more than was true - I did not collar him. They asked me to go to the Bank with them - I said it was late. An officer came, and I told him that I lived at Lynch's, No. 24, Reves's-mews, and that I got the note of Paterson. I did not know it was bad.

WILLIAM BULLOCK re-examined. Q. Are you sure he said that Lady Page Turner lived there, or that she had lived there - A. He said he took the note not half an hour before at No. 47, Harley-street, of Lady Page Turner's servant.

GUILTY. - DEATH . Aged 26.

Recommended to Mercy .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18191027-63

1440. JAMES HARRISON was indicted for feloniously disposing of and putting away a 1 l. forged Bank note, with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England , he well knowing it to be forged .

SECOND COUNT, for feloniously offering to Eleanor Bolding , a like forged Bank note, with the like intent, he well knowing it to be forged.

THIRD AND FOURTH COUNTS, the same, only calling it a promissory note for payment of money, instead of a Bank note.

FIFTH, SIXTH, SEVENTH, AND EIGHTH COUNTS, the same, only stating his intent to be to defraud Thomas Bolding .

ELEANOR BOLDING . I am the wife of Thomas Bolding , who is a haberdasher and lives in Clipstone-street, Fitzroy-square. On the 9th of October, about half-past one o'clock, the prisoner came and purchased a silk handkerchief, which came to 6 s.; he put it into his pocket, and offered me a 1 l. Bank note. I asked him his address? he said,

"Harrison, Cockspur-street." I asked him what number? and he said No. 5. I thought the note did not look like a good one, and took it to my husband, who was at dinner in the back room; he gave his opinion on it, and then took it to a neighbour - I had written the name and address on it before I gave it to him; I am sure he said No. 5, Cockspur-street. I told him I had sent out for change, but he said he was rather in a hurry, and wanted to go to Portland-place, and that he would call for the change as he returned. I refused to let him take the handkerchief, as I said I thought it might not be good; he left the handkerchief and went away, but was brought back by my husband and Mr. Savage, in about ten minutes - he offered to give me another note, but I refused to take it. Savage told him it was a bad note. Then he said I had taken the wrong address, for it was No. 1, Cannon-street - I do not recollect that he said where Cannon-street was. I told him that I understood him No. 5, Cockspur-street - he denied telling me so.

Q. Have you any doubt that he said No. 5, Cockspur- - A. Not any.

Prisoner. Q. When I said you had taken the wrong address, you seemed agitated, went into the parlour, and said you did not know whether I said Cannon-street - A. I did not. When he came back, he asked me what address I had written on it? I said No. 5, Cockspur-street. He said I had put it wrong, for it was No. 1, Cannon-street.

THOMAS BOLDING . I am the husband of the last witness. On the 9th of October she gave me the note, and I took it to a neighbour to see if it was good; the prisoner was in the shop when I went out - I did not hear the conversation between him and my wife; when I returned he was gone. I went after him with Savage, whom I had taken the note to. I overtook him in Norton-street, shewed him the note, and asked him if he had paid it. Savage held it, and told him that he had put the address on it, Harrison, No. 5, Cockspur-street. He said that was wrong, for he had not given that address, but had given No. 1, Cannon-street. We said he had better go back to the shop, which he did, and insisted that he had given No. 1, Cannon-street; I believe he requested us to go there with him. I asked him if he knew any person in the neighbourhood? He said he knew a Mr. Emerson - I knew Emerson - he is a coal-merchant. I said if he would go over to the public-house, I would fetch him. I then got a constable, who went with me to the prisoner in the tap-room. Emerson came, and I asked him if he knew the prisoner; he looked at him for a moment, and then said,

"I know you, Yes, your name is Payne;" the prisoner said,

"No, my name is Harrison." Emerson said,

"That be d - d, you was married by the name of Jack Payne to my wife's sister." I gave him in charge of the constable.

Prisoner. Q. Did I not wish you to go to my residence - A. He said so, but I said I could not lose my time, and asked him if he knew any one in the neighbourhood?

Q. Did I not offer to satisfy you for your time - A. I do not recollect it - I will not swear he did not. Norton-street is in the way to Portland-place.

JOHN SAVAGE . I am a baker. I accompanied Mr. Bolding to follow the prisoner, and stopped him. I shewed him the note, and said it was not a good one - he said he would give another for it. He went back with us to the shop, and then denied giving the address that was on the note. Mr. Bolding's son was in the shop, and said what his mother put on the note was true. The prisoner said he gave No. 1, Cannon-street - the boy said,

"No, you did not, it was No. 5, Cockspur-street." The prisoner denied it, and insisted that he said No. 1, Cannon-street; the boy is about twelve years of age. The prisoner wanted us to go with him, but we said we could not, and it would be better to send for a constable; we sent for one, who took him. Previous to that, Bolding had sent for Emerson to the public-house. He told the prisoner his name was Payne, and said,

"You rascal, you ought to be ashamed to send for me;" some altercation took place between them. He offered to satisfy us for going home with him - I refused.

THOMAS CLARK . I am a constable. I was sent for, and took the prisoner in charge. I found a pocket-book on him containing a 5 l. country bank flash note, and a good 1 l. note.

THOMAS INSTONE . I live at No. 5, Cockspur-street, and have lived there eighteen years. I have no knowledge whatever of the prisoner - he never lodged with me.

THOMAS GLOVER . I am an inspector of Bank notes. This note is forged in every respect, and is not Tabor's signature, which it purports to bear.

CHARLES TABOR . I am a signing clerk at the Bank. There is no other signing clerk of my name - the note is not signed by me.

(The note was then put in and read.)

Prisoner's Defence. When I lived with General Harrison, he was in the habit of giving me old clothes; a man whom I had several times sold clothes to, was coming by a public-house near where I live, and I sold him a coat, waistcoat, and a pair of pantaloons for 17 s.; he gave me a 1 l. note. As I was going to Portland-place, I went in and bought this handkerchief. I waited above half an hour for change, then took the handkerchief from my pocket, and said I would call as I returned. When I got a little distance from the house two men came up, and asked me about the note - they said it was a bad one. I said I had got another, and perhaps that was bad too; I shewed it to them - they said it was a good one, and returned it to me. I told them where I lived, and asked them to go home with me - they took me to Marlborough-street office. They have since been where I said, and found that I did live there - I am innocent. I sent for my brother-in-law, but he does not like me, and would hang me if he could - it is him that has brought me here.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

Reference Number: t18191027-64

1441. RICHARD JENNINGS was indicted for feloniously disposing of and putting away, a forged and counterfeit

1 l. Bank note, with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England , he well knowing it to be forged .

SECOND COUNT, for feloniously offering to Thomas Harrison , a like forged Bank note, with the like intent, he well knowing it to be forged.

THIRD AND FOURTH COUNTS, the same, only calling it a promissory note, instead of a Bank note.

FOUR OTHER COUNTS, the same, only stating his intent to be to defraud Joseph West .

THOMAS HARRISON . I am sixteen years of age, and am apprentice to Joseph West , who is a hosier and haberdasher , and lives in Newport-street, Soho. On the 6th of October, between three and four o'clock, the prisoner came to the shop, and bought three yards and three quarters of flannel, at 18 d per yard. I sold him a pair of Angola stockings for 1 s. 9 d., which came together to 7 s. 4 1/2 d. He gave me a 1 l. note; I asked him his name and address? He said

" James Turner , No. 9, Ironmonger-row, Old-street;" which I wrote on the note with my initials - this is it - (looking at it.) - I then took it to my master, and asked him if it was a good one? He did not like it, and came from the counting-house to the prisoner with it - I did not give him change.

JOSEPH WEST . The last witness is my apprentice; he brought me the note. I thought it was bad, ran into the shop, and asked the prisoner if he had got another? He said, No; he said he took it in the way of trade. I said,

"If so, I suppose you know of whom you took it." He said he should know the man if he saw him again, but he did not know where to find him - he said he sold the man some glass beads for it. I told him I suspected it was a bad one, and should detain it until he brought me good money for the things. He went away, and I went to No. 9, Ironmonger-row, which is at least a mile and a half from my house, but found that no such person lived there. I inquired at several houses in the neighbourhood, but could find no such person. I then went to No. 9 Ironmonger-street, which is just by there, but could find nobody who knew him - I had left orders at home to detain him if he should come again. On my return I found him in the shop - he said I have brought you the money for the goods. I said, Let me see, where did you say you lived? He said, I lived over at Walworth. I said, that is not the address which you gave on the note. He said, No, I work at No. 9, Ironmonger-row, and am to be found there every day. I said I believe Ironmonger-row is only a short street; he said it was. I then said, I presume there is only one No. 9? he said there was not. I said, what sort of a house - is it a shop? He said it was a private house, and he had worked there eighteen months on his own account. I said, I suppose the person you took the note of came to your manufactory to purchase the goods? He said, No, he did not. I said, I suppose you took the goods to him, and know where he lives? He said, No, I met him accidentally at a house in Petticoat-lane.

Q. Did he say who kept the house in Ironmonger-row - A. I asked him - he said, Robins. I said, I now suspect that what you have told me is all false. He said, No, it is not; I will go to Ironmonger-row with you, if you like. I said, he need not do that for I had just come from making inquiry there, and the house you describe as No. 9, and a private house, is a shoemaker's shop, and the person's name who keeps it, is Baker. He had said he worked on the first floor. I sent for an officer, and gave him in charge. I told him he had given a false address. He said his reason for giving a false address, was, that he was a glass bead maker, and was obliged to pay the Excise duties, and he could not get a living by it if he did.

WILLIAM HOUSE . The premises, No. 9, Ironmonger-row, belong to me. I let it out in tenements. Robins, a shoemaker, lives in the lower part of it, he has the shop; a tailor lives in a room up stairs, and a woman has the garret; the other part is unlet. I have no glass bead maker living there, and know nothing of the prisoner. There is no person named Baker lives there.

JOSEPH WEST re-examined. I thought that Baker kept the shop, as that name was over the door.

WILLIAM HOUSE re-examined. I was there a few nights ago. I never saw Baker over the door - it may be. I never knew a person of that name live there.

THOMAS ROBINS . I am a shoemaker, and live at No. 9, Ironmonger-row; I have lived there fourteen months. I never saw the prisoner before; there is no glass bead maker there. About four months ago one lived in the garret, his name was Matthews, or Matthias. My name is not over the door, nor Baker. I believe a shoemaker had it before me.

Q. Did the bead maker employ any men - A. He had a lad or two sometimes, about twelve or fourteen years of age.

THOMAS GLOVER . I am an inspector of Bank notes. The notes are forged in every respect, paper, plate, and signature; it is not Staple's signature.

EDWARD STAPLE . I am a signing clerk at the Bank. The note is not signed by me.

(The note was here put in and read.)

Prisoner's Defence. Three parts of what West has said is false. I took the note between Whitechapel church and Petticoat-lane, of a Jew pedlar, and sold him twelve dozen beads for a guinea. He said he should return to the Jolly Gardeners in about three weeks, and should want more. I told West that I lived at No. 9, Ironmonger-row, but gave him no name. He took the note into another shop to ask a gentleman's opinion; the gentleman came over with West, and said he thought it was a bad one, but if I brought the money I should have the note. I returned with the money, and waited until the boy fetched West. I said I must acknowledge giving a false address, for I was a poor man, and under the Excise laws. I said I lived at Dailey's, No. 5, Prior's-place, East-lane, Walworth.

ELIZABETH DAILEY . The prisoner is my husband's apprentice. My husband is a glass bead maker, and lives at No. 5, Prior's-place, East-lane, Walworth. The prisoner was prevented from working with my husband by the Excise officers. My husband was taken away at the same time. This was about three months before the 14th of May. We are under the Excise laws.

JOSEPH WEST re-examined. When I returned, the prisoner said he took it at a house in Petticoat-lane, for some beads. I did go to ask a neighbour's opinion of the note, but he did not come over with me.

THOMAS HARRISON re-examined. The prisoner did not give me name of Dailey, or any thing like it. I heard nothing of Prior's-place, East-lane, Walworth.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18191027-65

1442. JOHN MOORE was indicted for that he, on the 18th of September , feloniously, knowingly, and unlawfully had in his custody and possession divers (to wit), three 1 l. forged notes, he knowing them to be forged .

WILLIAM SELLERS . I am a constable. On the 18th of September, I was in company with Coates, and in consequence of information which I had received, we went to watch the prisoner. We went to the Blue Lion, Gray's Inn-lane, between nine and ten o'clock in the morning, I placed myself in the house, and Coates went up Guildford-street. I saw the prisoner come down Guildford-street, and go into the field near Bagnigge Wells, when he got near the middle of the field I callared him, and told him I wanted him; and seeing he had a brown paper parcel in his right hand, I told Coates to lay hold of it - he immediately threw it away. I kept hold of him - Coates also collared him, and we led him to the parcel, and picked it up; he exclaimed

"I am sold!" We took him to the Blue Lion, opened the parcel there, in his presence, and found it contained two 10 l. and one 20 l. Bank of England note, and a 10 l. Dover note. I marked them all, in his presence; these are them (looks at them). He did not tell me how he got them.

Prisoner. Q. Do you know Mr. Herbert - A. Yes.

RICHARD COATES . I am a constable, and was with Sellers. I saw the prisoner coming down Guildford-street; he crossed to the field by Bagnigge Wells; I kept close behind him, and Sellers caught hold of him - he threw the parcel from his hand, and exclaimed,

"I am sold, it is a dead plant!" I suppose he meant it was planted on him. I collared him, Sellers picked it up. We took him to the Blue Lion. The parcel contained a 20 l. and two 10 l. Bank of England notes, and a 10 l. Dover note. I marked them - those produced are them.

THOMAS GLOVER . I am an inspector of Bank notes. The Bank notes are all three forged in every respect, and are not the signatures of the clerks they purport to bear. The two 10 l. notes are impressed from the same plate.

JAMES LAMBERT . I am a cashier in the Bank, and authorized to sign 10 l. notes. This signature on these notes is not my writing.

CHARLES PHILLIPS . I am a cashier in the Bank, and authorized to sign 10 l. notes. The note signed C. Phillips is not my signature.

JAMES DUNFORD CAPEL . I am a cashier, and sign 20 l. notes. This note is not signed by me.

SAMUEL MACKEY . I am clerk at Mr. Fector's bank, at Dover, and fill-up all their notes; this note is a forgery entirely. It is not Mr. Fector's signature.

JOHN BAYTON . I am entering clerk to Mr. Fector. The note is forged in every respect. It is not entered by me.

(The notes were here put in and read.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was in company with Herbert the night before, he sent me to meet a gentleman, and the gentleman gave me the parcel; I was to meet him in Bagnigge Wells. The parcel fell from my hand. I said I was sold, conceiving something was wrong. The man who sent me for the parcel was opposite at the time; Sellers said he was one of my palls. I said he belonged to the parcel - they did not try to stop him.

WILLIAM SELLERS re-examined. Herbert stood at the door - he said nothing to me about him. He was not with him when he was in Guildford-street.

GUILTY . Aged 39.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18191027-66

1443. ANN SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of October , at St. Sepulchre , three seals, value 40 s., the property of William Davis , privately in his shop .

SARAH DAVIS . I am the wife of William Davis , who is a jeweller and silversmith , and lives in Newgate-street . On the 1st October, between four and five o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner came to the shop, I was attending there; she asked to look at some gold seals - she stood at the counter, and had a white handkerchief in her hand. I shewed her a great number of seals in a tray, she examined many of them, and said they were too high a price - they were from a guinea and a half to three guineas; there was a great number at all prices - I believe the lowest she asked the price of was a guinea and a half. She said she was sorry for having given me so much trouble, and declined purchasing - she was going away.

Q. Did you suspect her - A. From the manner in which she pulled the seals about I suspected she had one in her handkerchief, which was still in her hand. I went between her and the door, shut the door, opened her hand, and discovered three gold seals in her handkerchief, which were my husband's property. Before I opened her hand she asked me why I stopped her? I said, because she had got my property. I opened her hand, and found them; she then begged of me to let her go; I refused, and sent for a constable.

Cross-examined by MR. WALFORD. Q. Your counter is made with a glass upon it, so as to leave but a small place to put goods on - A. It is. I rather think her handkerchief was on the counter, but I cannot say. I shewed her a good many seals.

Q. Did the seal hang from the handkerchief - A. I saw a small part of it out of the handkerchief.

WILLIAM DAVIS . I live at No. 124, Newgate-street, in the parish of St. Sepulchre. I was not at home that evening. I returned between eight and nine o'clock, and found the prisoner in custody. I have no partner.

Cross-examined. Q. I believe you found she was of highly respectable connections - A. Yes, and bore an excellent character.

RICHARD WILLETTS . I am an officer. I was called upon to take the prisoner into custody at Mr. Davis's shop. Mrs. Davis said, in her hearing, that she had stolen three fine gold seals, and that she had taken them out of her handkerchief. I took her into custody, searched her, and found half a crown and 1 s. on her, in a chain purse. Mrs. Davis gave me the seals, which I produce.

MRS. DAVIS re-examined. These are them; they are

worth five or six guineas. Nobody was in the shop but myself.

Prisoner's Defence. I am perfectly innocent. I do not know how the seals came into my handkerchief - I cannot account for it. I merely went in to ask the price, not intending to buy, as I had not sufficient money.

GUILTY. - DEATH . Aged 33.

Recommended to Mercy .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18191027-67

1444. CHARLES TURNLEY and CHARLES CROWDER were indicted for that they, on the 29th of September , about eleven o'clock at night, the dwelling-house of John Fox feloniously and burglariously did break and enter, with intent to steal ; and WILLIAM MEEKE for feloniously inciting, &c. the said Charles Turnley and Charles Crowder the burglary and felony aforesaid to do and commit against the Statute .

JOHN FOX, ESQ. I live in Bridewell Precinct , the back of my premises are in Edmund-street, there is a gate there. Meeke was my coachman. In September last my family were at Peckham - only myself and two maid-servants were left in town. I generally went to Peckham every evening, and the coachman went with me. My iron safe is under the kitchen-stairs; I keep my plate there.

Q. Had you information that your house was to be attacked - A. Yes. On the 28th of September I was informed of it by Sellers, applied to the Lord Mayor, and had officers put in the house. I left town about seven o'clock, Meeke drove me. The house was not attacked that night. The officers came again next day, and Meeke drove me to Peckham about seven o'clock that evening also.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. What day of the week was the 28th - A. Tuesday.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. On the morning of the 28th of Sellers mentioned it to you - A. Yes, about twelve o'clock. Meeke drove me out of town that evening - he was not employed that day until then - he drove me to town about ten o'clock next morning. I believe he then drove the carriage to Islington to fetch my daughters; they came about one o'clock, and he drove me to Peckham about seven.

WILLIAM SELLERS . I am deputy watch-house keeper of Marylebone. On Monday, the 27th of September, William Herbert informed me that Mr. Fox's house was to be robbed; I informed Mr. Fox next morning. It was not robbed that night. I saw Herbert again at the New Inn, in the Old Bailey, on the 29th of September, about one o'clock, he told me it would be done that night, and I informed Mr. Fox.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Did you know Herbert - A. Yes, since last April. He was introduced to me by Mr. Minet Fector, a banker of Dover, at a house in John-street, Adelphi. I have had interviews with him at different times since. He told me he lived in Johnson's-street, Somers'-town, but I never went there.

Q. Did you hear Mr. Humphries ask him where he lived when he was before the Lord Mayor - A. No.

Q. You was a witness against Cashman and Weller, who were executed for Bank forgery - A. Yes. I am a witness for the Bank when they employ me. I was not a witness against Edwards at Croydon. I was examined before the Justice on the charge.

MR. BOLLAND. Q. Has Herbert been in the habit of giving you information since you knew him - A. He has.

WILLIAM HERBERT . I have been a gentleman's servant; my last master was Major Overshall - we used to travel; this was five or six months ago. Since that I have lived in Pancras-road.

Q. When you first left your master where did you live - A. At Loughton, with a farmer, who is an acquaintance of mine. I then returned to the New-road, St. Pancras, and lived there.

Q. When did you become acquainted with the prisoners - A. About three or four months ago. I first met Meeke and Turnley at the Lion in the Wood, public-house, near Mr. Fox's; they were drinking with a man named Moore *, whom I knew before. Moore and I began drinking together. Turnley and Meeke were in the same parlour. Moore asked me, in their presence, if I would be in a good thing? I said I must know what it was. He said Meeke, Mr. Fox's coachman, had agreed with Turnley to rob his master's premises; then Meeke said he had taken Turnley into the premises, to look at the iron chest that stood under the stairs, to take the dimensions of the key-hole, to see if he could open it without a key, and if not, to make one to it. Moore said Turnley was a smith. They appointed for Meeke to take the key of Turnley which he was to make, at ten o'clock in the morning, after he returned from Peckham, to see if it would fit, and return it to Turnley in the afternoon. Meeke told me he expected there were 600 l. or 700 l. in value in the chest, and that he had given them directions where to find the plate and wearing apparel, and other valuable things, after they had been to the chest.

* See No. 1442.

Q. Did you see the key - A. Yes, when we met at different places - it was a flat iron key, and was waxed over at different times, when it was given to the coachman to make a mark of the wards. Meeke told Turnley at one time that he thought the key would nearly fit, and he wished to take Turnley in to try it himself. After that Turnley was out of the way, which prevented it. I did not see either of the prisoners again until the 27th of September, I then met Meeke by chance in Bridge-street, about ten or eleven o'clock in the morning; he said he heard Turnley was at liberty, and asked me to meet him at the King's Head, in Thames-street, at twelve o'clock that day, and Turnley also, if I should see him. I met him by himself; he said he had heard from Meeke, and was to meet him at the Crown and Sugar-loaf, in Fleet-street, at four o'clock. He said the family were coming home in a few days, and the job must be done if I meant to be in it - I said I would consider further about it, and meet them at four o'clock. I went at four to the Crown and Sugar-loaf, and saw Turnley and Meeke there. Meeke said he had lost his friend Moore, and there must be another one, and a good one. Turnley said he had got another, named Charles Crowder , who was a good one, and he was at the door. Meeke said somebody should keep the servant-girls quiet - Turnley said they should be muzzled. Meeke said they must be muzzled, or murdered, rather

than allow them to give the alarm, and he would find out whether they both slept together. They appointed to meet again at the same house on Tuesday, at three or four o'clock in the afternoon.

Q. Did you see Crowder that day - A. I saw him and Turnley walking together; he was not called in. I went and informed Sellers that it was fixed to be the next night - they were to fix the hour when they met again. I met them about four o'clock next day in the tap room - it was on the 28th.

Q. How was the conversation managed - A. A good deal of conversation took place in the yard, and we walked in the street, as other people came into the room. I first saw them at the Crown and Sugar-loaf; Crowder and Turnley came first, and Meeke after them. They wanted me to go into the premises with the coachman, and to open the hatch-door at eleven o'clock that night, while they went to fetch their things. I refused, until I had made myself better acquainted whether I should be safe or not. I did not see them again till the Wednesday, which was the next day.

Q. Before that, did you make yourself acquainted whether you should be safe - A. Yes, I applied to Sellers. I saw them again on the Wednesday, at the Cross Keys, near Blackfriars Bridge. Turnley and Meeke were in the house, Crowder stood outside. Only a few words passed then; they came into the street, and wanted to know if I would go inside and undo the hatch-door, and if not somebody else would. I agreed to it, and we all four walked to the Glazier's Arms, in Water-lane - we went together, but as Crowder arranged the business with Turnley, he kept a little behind. We drank a pot of porter, and I agreed to go to the stable with the coachman, it was then five o'clock - we parted. Turnley and Crowder went off, and told me they should go for their tools. I and the coachman went to Mr. Fox's stables; the back of the premises open into a small street. Meeke told me to lay down in the hay-stall, I did so, and he shook the hay over me with a fork, and begged me not to disappoint in letting Turnley and Crowder in. He said I should hear the carriage go out in the course of a few minutes, and then I should hear the servant girl fasten the back gate after him.

COURT. Q. Was the back gate between the stable and the house - A. The gate was outside; it completely shut me in. I think it was about a quarter or twenty minutes after five o'clock when I heard the carriage go out - the servant girls were to fasten the gate. One of them wished the coachman good night and pleasant dreams, and in coming through the stable one of them said,

"The hay seems to lay high here, as if some one might be under" - they passed on, and took no further notice. I laid there till I heard the watchman call eleven, and then heard a knock against the hatch-door - I got up and opened it - the key was in. Turnley and Crowder came in, and went up to the loft. I heard a door unbolt, which let them down by steps into the yard. I heard Turnley go down the yard and undo the stable-door, which goes from the stable into the yard - this was the door the girls had fastened. Crowder then went out of the stable into the yard to Turnley - it is only about three steps from the stable. I stood outside the door, and saw them lift up the kitchen window - they found the shutter bolted, which Meeke had told them was very seldom bolted. Crowder took the steps from the loft, and set them against the back parlour window, Turnley went up the steps, and lifted up the window; it appeared to lift very easy. He got his head and shoulders in, felt round with his hand, put his head out again, and asked for the darkey, which meant the dark-lanthorn; Crowder handed it to him, and he put the lanthorn in. His head was in, but not so far as before.

Q. Was there any blind to the window - A. I saw none. He perceived somebody, as he called out

"Oh!" and sprang from the steps - he and Crowder both ran off together; I also left the premises directly. The officers knew I was in the stable, and Sellers told me they were to be in the house.

Q. Why did you run away - A. I thought I had no right to stop by myself.

Cross-examined by MR. PLATT. Q. How came you to run away - A. Because they should not suspect that I gave the information. I went before the magistrate directly they were apprehended.

Q. Will you swear it was not a fortnight after - A. No. I did not know where they lived. I did not intend the house should be robbed. Moore told me their names, and I told Sellers.

Q. Who did you live with before you went to Major Overshall - A. I lived at home in a public-house for three years, in a public-house at Harwich.

Q. Did you not get into trouble at Bury St. Edmonds - A. No, I was not in prison there.

Q. What address did you give the magistrate where to find you - A. No. 26, Pancras-road. I had lived there five or six months. I believe Sellers was by at the time; I do not know whether he heard it. I have been living on money saved from servitude.

Q. Have you ever gone by any other name - A. I never denied my name. I have been called other names, but never gave myself any other. I believe I told Sellers I lived in Pancras-road.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. How long have you known Sellers - A. Five or six months. I first saw him at a public-house next to Marylebone watch-house.

Q. How did you get acquainted with him - A. By drinking over a pot of porter. It was before this affair was talked of. I had no other business with him than this.

Q. Were you not introduced to him by a gentleman - A. No.

Q. Do you know Mr. Fector, of Dover - A. I have seen him - he did not introduce me to Sellers I had some business with Mr. Fector, but Sellers was not present.

Q. Did you ever see Mr. Fector and Sellers together - A. Yes, at Mr. Fector's house in the Adelphi. What he was I did not know. I had seen Sellers before.

Q. Was Moore an acquaintance of yours - A. I had spoken to him; we were not intimate. I had seen Meeke with Moore before they proposed the burglary. I defy any one to prove dishonesty against me. It went off while Moore was in trouble.

Q. In all this time did you mention it to Mr. Fox or Sellers

- No, I considered it useless, until the time was appointed. I spoke of it three days before the 29th.

Q. You met Moore by accident, and it was proposed that Crowder should be one of the party - A. Yes, that afternoon, I saw Sellers at the New Inn, in the Old Bailey, and told him what was going to happen, for him to tell Mr. Fox. I knew the officers were in the room, but did not know who they were.

Q. You did not attempt to stop either of them, but ran off yourself - A. Yes.

Q. Why not go to the magistrate, and tell their names - A. I was not asked to go. I told Sellers.

Q. Did you ever live in Johnson's-court or place - A- I do not know such a place. I might tell Sellers Johnson's-place, near Johnson-street; I told him I was going to live there about a week ago, after I had given the information, as I thought it best to move.

Q. You did not tell him so in April - A. No, for I did not live there.

MR. BOLLAND. Q. Did you go before the Lord Mayor before you were sent for - A. No, it was in the hands of the officer. I only saw Sellers once at Mr. Fector's.

CLARA FRASER . On the 29th of September I lived servant with Mr. Fox On the morning of that day, I saw Meeke in the kitchen; after putting his horses up he came and sat in a chair as usual, and said he did not know what was the matter with him, but he had got a pain in his side; he went into the yard, and said nothing more to me, but came in and out frequently. In the afternoon I went up to my master's bed room - he came up; he had nothing to do there, and never came there before. I went into the next room, which is the childrens' bed room; he came in and asked me if my fellow-servant and I slept together there? - When he slept in town he slept in the room over it. I told him we were going to sleep together that night. He asked me if we were going to sleep up stairs? I said Yes - that was the room adjoining his. He went up stairs, and I saw him come down stairs with a bed winch in his hand - he took it down stairs.

Q. When did you see him again - A. I was sitting at tea about five o'clock - he was at dinner at the same table. He said I seemed sleepy, and had not slept well that night - I said I had not slept very well, and my fellow-servant said she had not, for she had had the headach. He said that was because we sat up so late, and as we had not slept well we had better go to bed at ten o'clock; he went to get his horses ready about six o'clock - the carriage went away about half-past six o'clock. My fellow-servant and I went to lock the gate, she wished him a good night, and pleasant dreams. I staid by the stable-door, while she fastened the coach-house-door - we go through the stable to the house; some hay laid in the stable. I said to my fellow-servant,

"Suppose he should be here" - it seemed as if some person was lying underneath; I had heard that the house was to be robbed. I fastened the door between the stable and the house, then went into the workshop to see if anybody was there, but found nobody; I went into the house, and fastened the kitchen-door; my fellow-servant fastened the kitchen-window; I saw next morning that it was fast, which is not usual. We both went to bed about half-past ten o'clock - the officers came before that. I heard a noise about ten o'clock when we were at supper. It came from the back-kitchen, and was like a window opening.

Q. How long have you lived there - A. Nine months; I once saw Moore with Meeke at the back of the house, about a fortnight or three weeks before Moore was taken up - Meeke told me Moore was taken up.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Had not Moore's sister lived in the house as servant - A. Not while I lived there.

Q. Meeke was not the wisest man you ever saw - A. No.

ELIZA SUTER . I am servant to Mr. Fox. On the 29th of September the coachman left the house with the carriage about half-past six o'clock. I and Fraser locked the yard gate; I wished Meeke a good night and pleasant dreams. As we returned through the stable, Clara said the hay was very high, and looked as if some one was underneath - I kicked it, and it seemed as if some one was underneath; we fastened the gate between the stable and the house. I went into the kitchen, let my master out, and fastened the house up; I fastened the kitchen shutters, which are not generally fastened - the officers came about nine o'clock; we went to bed just before eleven. Moore came to the house about six or seven weeks ago for a letter from his sister.

ROBERT DARE . I am a City officer. On the 28th of September, by direction of Mr. Wontner, I attended with Drinkwater and Forrester at Mr. Fox's house; we watched there, but nobody came that night. On the 29th, about nine o'clock at night, we three went again, with Brown, and placed ourselves in the back-parlour. About half-past eleven or a quarter to twelve o'clock, we heard a noise as if some one was in the house, and saw a man come down the back steps, leading from the loft into the yard adjoining the house, then heard a noise like a window being let down - the kitchen window was let down and pulled up again; we then heard something go like a bolt. A very little time after that, the window of the room we were in was raised up, and the person who was at the window raised the Venetian blind up - it was a man. Nearly all his body was then put in; he leaned on the table under the window, and looked round the room - we had no light; it was not a dark night - I could see his form; he had a dark coat on, gilt buttons, and light breeches. I lost him for a moment as he drew back, but he returned in a moment with a dark lanthorn. He came up the ladder again, put the light into the room, and the moment he drew his hand back, Brown cut at him with a cutlass; he cried out,

"Oh Lord!" and dropped from the ladder. I ran out at the front door to go round and secure them, but they had escaped - the doors were all open behind. I apprehended Meeke next morning in the stable, took him to his master, and then before the Lord Mayor. After he had been examined the second time, he said if the Lord Mayor would let him have an hour's conversation with me, he would tell me more than ever I knew. I said I did not wish to hear any thing he had to say - he said he particularly wished it. I said if he made any disclosure to me, it should be before a witness, for I would not hear it without - he agreed to that. I took him to Drinkwater, and we went into a private room in a public-house at the corner of Huggin-lane - we neither threatened or promised

him. He said he had had dealings with a man, named Moore, who asked him if he did not want money? He said he did, and Moore said it might easily be had, for it would be a good thing to rob his master's house, that he should be in it, and whack along with the others - he said he agreed for it to be done. He then burst into tears, and said,

"Oh good God? what a dilemma I have placed myself in - I will tell you no more." We took him to the Compter, and as we went up stairs to the lockup-room, he said if I would go in, he would tell me the whole particulars. I went into his room - his wife was there crying, and he burst out crying. I left him, returned and said,

"If you have any thing to say, say it." He leaned over the bed, and said,

"I'll be d - d if I split, I'll be hung first."

Q. Could you see the man better when he brought the lanthorn - A. No, not so well - it was a man exactly like Turnley, but I should not like to swear to him. I saw him the morning he was apprehended, when he was dressed apparently as the man was at the window. We found the loft ladder placed under the window.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. When were Crowder and Turnley taken - A. I think about the 6th of October - I did not wish to get information from him. I asked the Lord Mayor if it was right to hear what he said? The Lord Mayor said if he wished to disclose his mind, I might hear it, but he did not like to hear any thing from him.

WILLIAM DRINKWATER . I attended at the prosecutor's house with my brother officers, on the 28th of September - we went the following night about nine o'clock. About a quarter before twelve o'clock we heard the back kitchen window go up, and then down. I heard voices of more than one person, but could not hear what they said. Then a man pushed up the window where we sat - most all his body came into the room; he appeared to be dressed in a blue coat, yellow buttons, a dark waistcoat, and light breeches; he was a tall slim man - he leaned across the table, withdrew himself, went back, and produced a lanthorn; he held it in the room, looked round, and withdrew himself directly. Brown made a cut at him - he made some exclamation, and disappeared in a moment. My brother officers ran round, and found he was gone.

Q. How had he got up - A. By a ladder from the stable. When Turnley was apprehended he was dressed like the man. Crowder was taken the same night. I was present with Meeke and Dyer, at a public-house at the corner of Huggin-lane. He said he had some dealings with Moore, and that he was a smuggler. This man asked him if he did not want money? and said he knew of a good thing, and that was to rob his master, and he should be in it, and have his whack of it. He then burst out crying, and said,

"What have I done! I'll say no more."

JOHN BROWN. I saw a man come in at the window, with a blue coat and yellow buttons - I struck at him; he called out either

"My God!" or

"O Lord!" He fell from the ladder and escaped.

JOHN FORRESTER . I was with the officers, and saw a man put part of his body into the window - he had a dark coat and metal buttons. I cannot swear to him.

ANTHONY HARRISON . I am a City officer. On the 6th of October I apprehended Crowder at the Rose and Crown public-house, in Goswell-street, and apprehended Turnley at his lodgings in Clerkenwell. I found a skeleton key in his coat-pocket, and on the mantle-shelf I found a key with wax on it.

MR. FOX re-examined. The key does not correspond with my iron chest at all - the hole would not go on the pipe.

The prisoners all declared their innocence.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18191027-68

1445. JOHN WALL was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of September , two shillings and two sixpences , the monies of William Pocknell .

Mr. Pocknell stating the money to be the property of himself and partner, William Porter , the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18191027-69

1446. JOHN MORTON was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of September , from the person of Robert Owen Jones , one pocket-book, value 6 d., one 10 l., and fourteen 1 l. Bank notes , his property.

MR. ROBERT OWEN JONES . I am a solicitor . On the 30th of September, about two o'clock, I went into a saleroom in Hunter-street . I had my pocket-book, containing a 10 l. and fourteen 1 l. Bank notes. I stood near the end of the table, and in about a quarter of an hour I felt a sudden grasp and pressure at my coat-pocket - I immediately felt, and missed my pocket-book - my coat was cut. The crowd being very great, I ran down to the street-door, got the porter, Bloss, to lock it, and then got a constable. I went up to the room, as I went up stairs I met Haltom, who delivered me my pocket-book, with the money in it. I saw the prisoner in the room; a penknife was found on him. The book was also cut in cutting the pocket.

Prisoner. Q. When you was at Hatton-garden, did you not instruct Bloss what to say - A. I believe I corrected him in a statement about myself. He said I ran up stairs with him, I was rather behind. I gave him a shilling for his time.

SAMUEL BLOSS . I am a porter at auctions. Mr. Jones came to me, I left him at the door, and went up to the auction room - the prisoner was standing against the folding doors. I saw him shuffling his hands about behind him, and kept my eye on him while the officer was sent for. I saw him draw a pocket-book from behind his coat, and throw it behind the door. Haltom picked it up, and took it down to Mr. Jones.

Prisoner. Q. You said at the office you saw the book in my hand - A. Yes, I saw him throw it from behind him. He was laid hold of immediately.

LEWES HALTOM. I am a porter, and was at the sale. I saw the prisoner coming down the stairs, but the door being shut, he returned. I had made it known in the room that the robbery had been committed; he came back, and stood against the folding doors. I kept my eye on him - he moved. I said to myself, perhaps he has dropped the book. I looked, picked it up from behind the door, and gave it the prosecutor. A penknife was found on him.

GUILTY . Aged 44.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18191027-70

1447. ANN WILSON was indicted for feloniously assaulting Hendrick Hoffman , on the King's highway, on the 10th of October , putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, one watch, value 2 l.; one pocket-book, value 1 s.; one 5 l., and five 1 l. Bank notes , his property.

HENDRICK HOFFMAN. I am a sailor . On the 10th of October I left my ship, which laid at Millwall, went ashore, and went up Ratcliff-highway, about seven o'clock in the evening, to pay some money to a man. I went into a public-house with him and my shipmate, and staid there about three-quarters of an hour; I was not in liquor. I could not drink any thing as I had got the toothache. I went out, and sat on a step opposite the house, holding my face; a woman came up, who asked me if I was ill, and if she could help me? I said it was no business of her's, and she went away - it was then near ten o'clock; we were close to a gas lamp. I looked at her, she came back again to me, and said my shipmate wanted me - I had left him in the house. I stood up, and supposing I might have missed him, I said,

"Where is he?" She said,

"Come along," and laid hold of my right arm; we walked a little way. I said,

"I don't see him, I dare say he is in the house." She said,

"Come along, and you will soon see him." We did not walk much farther before she laid hold of my watch-chain, pulled my watch out, and ran away with it as fast as she could. I sung out,

"Stop thief! she has robbed me of my watch." I had hardly sung out, before I received a severe blow on the left side of my head, from a stick behind me. I twisted round, and received another on my shoulder, which broke my collar-bone - I have been in the hospital ever since. I fell down, rose again, and received another blow on the left side of my ribs; I fell again, and could not sing out or draw my breath. Two or three men came up, pulled my pocket-book out of my waistcoat-pocket, took all the silver I had, and dragged me round the corner of Old Gravel-lane - only the men were there then.

Q. Is the prisoner the woman who robbed you of your watch - A. Yes, my Lord, I have no doubt of it - I did know her before. There were a 5 l. and five 1 l. notes in my pocket-book, which I lost.

Prisoner. Q. Will you swear that you was not tipsy - A. I was not - she forced my watch out. It was not with my consent that she took hold of my arm.

WILLIAM PAXMAN. I am a watchman of New Gravel-lane. On Sunday evening, the 10th of October, I was turning from Elbow-lane to New Gravel-lane, and heard the cry of,

"Stop thief! I have lost my watch." I went towards the cry, and found the prosecutor lying in the middle of the road. I saw two men run away, sprang my rattle, and the watchman on the next beat stopped one of the men; we took him to the top of the lane, and the prosecutor said a woman had taken his watch - the prisoner was then standing at the top of the lane. I took hold of the man, and the other watchman took her; we took both to the watch-house, but found nothing on them. There was a third person, whom we did not catch.

WILLIAM STEVENS . I am a watchman in the neighbourhood. I heard the cry of of Stop thief! and saw the man, Strickbury, close at my elbows. He saw my lanthorn, and tried to pass me. I caught him, and gave him to Paxman; a boy pointed the prisoner out to me, and I took her.

JOSEPH M'CARTHY. I am near thirteen years of age, and live in King-street, Gravel-lane. On Sunday night, about ten o'clock, I was sitting at my mother's door, heard this man cry Stop thief! and saw the prisoner pass the door; she stopped on the other side of the way. I saw her give a watch into a man's hand. and heard her say,

"Don't cry, dont say any thing;" the man went down the lane, and she remained there - this was after the watchman had sprung his rattle. I saw Stevens, and told him what I had seen; he took her to the watch-house. I am sure she is the woman who gave the watch to the man, for I saw her face.

PETER PAGE . I saw the prosecutor sitting on the step of a door, and saw the prisoner speak to him - I am certain it was her; I took particular notice of her - I thought she was his wife. I saw him after he had been robbed, and the side of his head was bloody. I saw her take hold of his arm, and persuade him to go with her; the streets are lit with gas. I am sure she is the woman.

Prisoner. Q. Was the prosecutor drunk - A. He was leaning on his hand. I at first thought he was drunk, but afterwards found he had the toothache.

Prisoner's Defence. I was returning from the Fox and Grapes, public-house, saw the prosecutor sitting on a step, very sick, and the watchman told him to go on, but I persuaded him to take a coach. Several men came up, and said if I did not go away they would knock my brains out.

HENDRICK HOFFMAN re-examined. She pulled my watch out in a moment. I strove to get hold of her arm, but she got off.

GUILTY. Aged 22.

Of stealing from the person, but not with force and violence .

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18191027-71

1448. THOMAS WILDISH was indicted for that he, on the 28th of Day of August , at St. James, Clerkenwell , feloniously did falsely make, forge, and counterfeit, and cause and procure to be falsely made, forged, and counterfeited, and willingly act and assist in the false making,

forging, and counterfeiting a certain promissory note for the payment of money , the tenor of which is as followeth:

No. A. 1264.

No. A. 1264.

I promise to pay on demand, to Mr. John Pembroke , or bearer, 10 l. here, or at Messrs. Smith, Payne, and Smith's, in London.

Dover Bank, 18th Day of July, 1817. For Minet Fector, and Co.

I. M. F. & Co. 10.

J. B. FECTOR.

Entered John Boyton .

with intent to defraud John Minet Fector .

SECOND COUNT, for feloniously uttering and publishing as true, a like false, forged, and counterfeit promissory note, with a like intention, he well knowing the same to be false, forged, and counterfeited.

THIRD AND FOURTH COUNTS, the same, only stating the prisoner's intent to be to defraud Samuel Smith , George Smith , John Smith , Abel Smith , Samuel George Smith , and George Robert Smith .

FIFTH AND SIXTH COUNTS, the same, only stating his intent to be to defraud one William John Anderson .

ELIZABETH ANDERSON . I am the wife of William John Anderson , who is a straw hat manufacturer , and lives at No. 224 High Holborn. On Thursday, the 28th of August, about seven o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came to our shop, asked for a straw bonnet, and begged me to recommend him a good one. I looked him out one, which came to 23 s., and a box for 2 s. He said it was for a friend at Dover, and if it was not a good one, he should very likely be laughed at - he gave me a 10 l. Dover note. I said I should prefer a Bank of England note; he said,

"We prefer the Dover notes to the Bank of England." Having been at Dover, I knew Fector's house to be respectable; I did not know the prisoner - he gave me the note, and then Mr. Anderson just came home from a journey. I asked the prisoner his name and address? and he gave it to me as,

" Thomas Williams , York hotel, Dover." He said he was waiter there. I wrote all this on the note, with my initials, before I gave it to my husband. This is the note - (looking at it) - I then handed it to my husband, went up stairs, gave him the purse, and he gave the prisoner 8 l. 15 s. Mr. Anderson put a string on the box, then the prisoner directed it, and went away with it. I have no doubt of his being the person - the gas was lit in the shop.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Had you any other persons in the shop - A. Some of the young people, also a lady and gentleman. My attention was called to the note on the Saturday. I said then I should know the man - I should know him any where; he did not give me the name of Wildish. When he gave me the address, he said,

"I am living as waiter there, and you had better put that on the note;" which I did. I had no other country note - our house is in Middlesex.

WILLIAM JOHN ANDERSON . I am the husband of the last witness. On the 28th of August, about seven o'clock in the evening, I returned from Norwich - there are three gas lights in the shop, which were lit; the prisoner is the man that I tied a bonnet up in a box for - I had some conversation with him. He walked into the shop after me, and asked my wife for a bonnet - she took several out of the window. He asked her to recommend him a good one; he bought one for 23 s. I asked him if trade was brisk at Dover? He said Yes, Dover was brisk, but Kent was very flat. He then offered my wife a 10 l. Dover note; she asked him for a Bank note, but he said they preferred Dover notes. She asked him for his name and address; he said,

" Thomas Williams , York hotel," which she wrote - he then said,

"You may say, waiter, for I live as waiter there." Mrs. Anderson went up stairs, brought me down the purse, and I gave the prisoner 8 l. 15 s. myself. I had seen the note, and put it into the purse, from which I took the money; I saw it was a Dover note - we had no other country note. I wished to direct the box for him, but he said No, he would do it himself. He appeared to write on it, but I did not see what he wrote - I am positive he is the man. I have no partner.

BENJAMIN TIFFIN . In August last, I lived at the York hotel, Dover, as book-keeper, and principal waiter; I have lived there four years and a half. The prisoner did not live there on the 28th of August, or at any other time, either as waiter or in any other capacity. I do not know him.

ELIZABETH CUBISON . I am the wife of Richard Cubison , who is a straw hat manufacturer, and lives in Oxford-street. On Wednesday, the 1st of September, about eight o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came to our shop - we have gas lights. He asked for a straw bonnet; I took one out of the window, which he approved of. He asked for a box, which I got for him - they came to 1 l. 8 s. together. He gave me a 10 l. Dover note; I asked him for his name and address? He said if I would give him a pen and ink he would write it himself - (looks at one) - this is it; here is,

"Mr. Thompson, Snargate-street, Dover," which I wrote on it. I gave him 8 l. 12 s. in change.

Q. Had you any conversation with him - A. I took the note up, read it, and said,

"Snargate-street; do you know any person there of the name of Marsh?" he replied

"Yes, there are two of them." I said, they were relations of mine. He said,

"I am going there, have you any commands?" I said No. He took the box, said

"Good evening," and went away. I put the note in the desk with others, but I had no other country notes whatever. I gave it to my husband next morning with other money.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You have no doubt of his being the man - A. No hesitation whatever.

ELEANOR HOLLAND . I am assistant to the last witness. On the 1st of September I remember the prisoner coming to the shop, and being supplied with a bonnet and box - he paid a 10 l. Dover note. I heard her ask his address; he asked for a pen and ink, which she gave him, and he wrote his name on it. I am certain he is the man.

ROBERT ESSEX . I am a jeweller, and live in the Strand. On Wednesday, the 8th of September, about eleven o'clock in the morning, the prisoner came to my shop; he wanted a pair of table-spoons, I served him; he selected a pair at 1 l. 18 s. He gave me a 10 l. Dover note, I gave him 8 l. 2 s. in change, requested him to write his name and address on the back of it, and gave him a pen. He wrote in my presence,

" Charles Webster , saddler, Milton, Kent." I put the note in the till with others - I had no other country note. It remained in my possession until Monday morning. This is the note (looking at it). I have no doubt of his person.

RICHARD HODGE . I am servant of Mr. Craig, who is a linen-draper, and lives in Oxford-street. On the 10th of September, about nine o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came to our shop - our lights were lit. He bought a shawl for two guineas, and paid me a Dover 10 l. note; I gave it to Mr. Pike, the clerk, and received the change from him, which I gave to the prisoner. I did not mark the note. It was payable at Smith, Payne and Smith's. I am certain the prisoner is the man.

EDMUND PIKE . On the evening of the 10th of September I found a 10 l. note in the till. I do not exactly remember receiving it from Hodge. We had no other Dover note. I kept the key of the till all that day.

Q. Was it your hand that put the note in the till - A. I cannot say. The till is in the desk where I sit; it is not kept locked. If I am not there any one may get change. I found the note in the till, and observed

"Johnson, Snargate-street," on the front of it, and

" Thomas Webb , Deal," on the back.

Q. Did you ever see a 10 l. Dover note before - A. Not to my recollection. I paid the note away on the 14th to Mr. Woolrich, Old Change. We had other country notes, but not Dover. This is the note (looking at it).

HENRY WOOLRICH . I am a warehouseman, and live in Old Change. I received a 10 l. Dover note from Pike, and marked it - this is it (looking at it). I put T. C. for the initials of Craig, and the amount I received, 101 l. and 14 - 9.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Was there any other Dover note - A. I believe not.

SARAH JONES . I live at No. 110, Goswell-street, and lived there on the 1st of September. The prisoner came to lodge with me on the 1st of September, and remained with me for ten days afterwards. He went by the name of Wildish.

SAMUEL MACKIE . I am clerk to Mr. John Minet Fector , banker, of Dover - he has no partner. I am the filling-up clerk, and the only one. We make our notes payable to Pembroke, and draw on Messrs. Smith, Payne and Smith - we number the notes. That uttered to Anderson is forged in every respect; it is not Mr. Fector's signature - the filling-up is not my writing. Boyton is the entering clerk, it is not his writing.

Q. Was any note of that number issued that day - A. There is such a number of that date, that is a 20 l. note, but no 10 l. of that date. The other notes are also forged in all their parts. I write the word Pembroke on the notes, it is not printed - the engraver leaves no tracing for it.

JOHN BOYTON . I am entering clerk at Mr. Fector's bank, he has no partner. The notes are forged; the writing is not mine. I enter the particulars of every note myself; such a note as this was never issued - the other three are forged, they are not off the plate of the house. The word Pembroke is engraved in these notes, in ours it is written. In all these notes there are tracing lines for the names, which is not the case in ours.

THOMAS GREENHALL . I am cashier to Messrs. Smith, Payne and Co. The firm is Samuel Smith , George Smith , John Smith , Abel Smith , Samuel George Smith , and George Robert Smith .

(The note was here put in and read.)

Prisoner. I leave my case to my Counsel.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 25.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18191027-72

1448. BARNARD DEAN was indicted for bigamy .

The indictment stating the prisoner's first wife to have been a spinster before he married her, and it being proved that she was a widow, the prisoner was on this indictment.

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18191027-73

1449. CATHERINE HARRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of October , one watch, value 5 l., the property of Caroline Harris , spinster , and one scarf, value 15 s., the property of George Smith , in his dwelling-house .

GEORGE SMITH . I am a breeches-maker , and live at No. 37, Leicester-square ; I have known Caroline Harris a long time; she occasionally comes to my house on a visit. On the evening of the 27th of October I answered the prisoner's knock at the door - she informed me that she had engaged with my wife to become her servant - I let her in and questioned her. She said my wife had had a very good character with her. I said, as my wife was not in the way, it would be necessary that I should have some character of her; she said I should have one in the morning. I shewed her the kitchen, and told her she might remain that night, and if her character suited she might remain as our servant. In the course of half an hour I requested her to attend to the fire on the second floor, and sent my brother William to No. 17, Queen-street, Soho-square, to Caroline Harris , desiring to see her on some business - this was about a quarter before nine o'clock in the evening. I was then engaged for some time, and in about half an hour I understood Caroline Harris was come, and asked my brother if candles were in the second floor, where she was? finding there were none, I went to the kitchen, and asked the prisoner what name I was to call her? she said, Kitty. I gave her candles to take to Caroline Harris on the second floor - I saw her move as if she was going there. I then considered that I had occasion to speak to Caroline Harris in my parlour, went part of the way up stairs and called her down to the parlour to me; she immediately came down, and at that moment the prisoner was going up - Caroline Harris and myself were in the parlour about six minutes; we then went into the second floor room, Caroline Harris immediately laid her hand on her basket, which she had brought with her, and missed her watch. I told her to go to her lodgings, and see if she had not left it there by accident. She requested me not to allow the prisoner to leave the house until she returned. She went, and I went into the kitchen, and told the prisoner the lady had missed something (but did not say what), and she must not leave the house until she returned; she made no reply. I went into my shop, and in about five minutes the prisoner came to me with a small trunk which she had brought, and her keys, and said I might search it and her person, for she wished to go; I declined it, saying she must wait the return of the lady. My brother returned with Caroline Harris , and stated, in the prisoner's hearing, that the watch was not there, and she must have lost it in my house. My brother fetched Pepper - he searched the prisoner, and found a pocket-book on her with some duplicates, one of which was for the scarf.

Q. She could not have left the house after you let her in - A. No, my Lord. The watch was found in the shop, close to where the prisoner stood for two hours - my brother was in the shop with her.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. Where is your wife - A. At Mr. Warburton's, at Bethnal-green - she went there that night about seven o'clock - she had been drinking before she went there.

Q. You occasionally send her there - A. Never before; she had been at Chelsea. I have no knowledge of the prisoner.

Q. Have you any other house in the neighbourhood - A. The adjoining house. I keep no servants.

Q. Who is Caroline Harris - A. A female, whose father I knew very well; he is lately dead, and was a respectable butcher in Oxford-market.

Q. It was odd you should send for her at that time of night - A. It was requisite I should have some one to take care of my house. She remained there that night.

Q. Do not you know the prisoner was in the house before you let her in - A. I knew somebody had been with my wife.

Q. Did you not see her there - A. I saw her in the parlour with my wife at five o'clock. She had been several times in the house.

Q. Will you swear that the prisoner had not complained to your wife about you, before your wife was sent away - A. I never heard of it.

CAROLINE HARRIS . I am a single woman, and live in Queen-street, Soho; I have been long acquainted with Smith and his wife when quite a child.

Q. Have you been acquainted with her lately - A. No, not exactly - not to speak to her; I did not visit her.

Q. Did you visit Mr. Smith - A. Yes, occasionally. On the evening of the 27th of October his brother came for me, I got there about nine o'clock; I went into his shop, sat there about five minutes, and then went to the second floor by his brother's desire. My gold watch was in a pair of slippers, which were in my basket. I put the basket on the left side of the fire-place, on the ground, in the second floor. As the prisoner was coming up stairs with the candles Mr. Smith called me down; she had not got into the room before he called me - I was down stairs five or six minutes with him. I met the prisoner at the foot of the stairs as I went up - I am sure she did not come into the room while I was there. Mr. Smith went up with me, and in about five minutes I missed my watch - the slippers remained. Smith told me to go home and look for it, I did so, and told him not to permit her to leave until I returned. I found I had brought it, returned, and found the prisoner in the shop. I asked her for the watch, she said she had not got it. A constable was sent for - it was found about two hours afterwards. I was in the kitchen when it was found.

Q. Did you buy it, or was it a present - A. A present.

EDMUND PEPPER . I was sent for, took the prisoner up stairs, searched her, and found the duplicate of the scarf, pledged that day for 15 s. On coming down stairs Smith's brother found the watch, which Caroline Harris claimed - William Smith and Caroline Harris were down stairs.

WILLIAM SMITH . I am brother to George Smith . I fetched Caroline Harris to my brother's - she lodged at my house - I returned home. Soon afterwards she came, and said she had lost her watch; I returned to my brother's with her and found the prisoner there. I got Pepper. I was in the shop, the prisoner stood by the cutting-board. I was left alone with her, and told her it was evident she had it, and if she gave it up it would be better. She fell on her knees, and begged I would do what I could for her - she picked it up from behind the chest and gave it to me. I called my brother and Harris up - Harris claimed it.

CAROLINE HARRIS . The watch is mine. Smith was not in the shop when I came in, nor any of the workmen.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18191027-74

1450. WILLIAM LANE was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of October , two gowns, value 10 s.; one petticoat, value 2 s.; one table-cloth, value 2 s.; two towels, value 1 s.; two waistcoats, value 2 s.; one pair of stockings, value 1 s.; one pair of gaiters, value 2 s.; one night-gown, value 1 s.; one pair of braces, value 6 d.; one bonnet, value 2 s.; one frill, value 1 s.; one shawl, value 5 s.; one watch, value 40 s.; one shaving-box, value 6 d.; two razors, value 1 s., and one bottle, value 2 d., the goods of James Lockie , in his dwelling-house .

JAMES LOCKIE . I live in Heath-row, at Harmondsworth , and am a farmer's labourer . On the 25th of October, about five o'clock in the morning. I left my house - my watch hung on the mantle-piece - I have had it three years, it cost me 2 l. The prisoner lodged in my house. I took him in out of charity; I left him in the house, and on my return he was gone, and also all this property. I did not see him again until last Friday.

ELIZA LOCKIE . I am wife of the last witness. On the 25th of October I went out about two o'clock, and left the prisoner alone in the house, the things were then safe - he had lived there eleven days. I returned about half-past three, he was then gone, and all this property was missing - he had not said he was going. He was taken up next day.

WILLIAM PARROTT . I am a farmer, and live at Harmondsworth, the prosecutor is my labourer, I also employed the prisoner. On the 25th of October I heard Lockie's goods were stolen, and on the 26th I saw the prisoner in Moorfields with two bundles; my brother was with me, and stopped him. I said,

"William! how came you here?" he gave me no answer.

JOHN WRIGHT . I am a Bow-street officer. I was with Parrott. We stopped the prisoner with two bundles which contained this property.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 23.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Confined Eight Months , and Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18191027-75

1451. JAMES BLACKBURN was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of September , one gelding, price 4 l.; one set of cart harness, value 7 s., and one coat, value 5 s. , the property of William Gibbard .

WILLIAM GIBBARD . I live at Low Layton, Essex. On the 14th of September, about half-past seven o'clock in the evening, I was in Kingsland-road with my horse and

cart, coming towards town - I had to call at the Swan, in Kingsland-road at eight o'clock; I did not know the house, and turned my horse's head towards Edmonton , drove up to the turnpike gate , got out, and went into a shop to inquire for the Swan. I was not in there above half a minute, when I came out my horse and cart were gone - it was quite dark. The turnpike-man told me which way it was gone. I set off, and when I came to the Lamb, public-house, about a quarter of a mile off, there was a disturbance and a fight; I found my horse and cart in the crowd - my great-coat was gone out of the cart; I claimed the cart. I saw the prisoner seven days afterwards at Wansted. I have not found the coat. When I found the cart, a man said the person who drove it, had driven against a gentleman's horse, and killed it. The horse laid dead in the road.

GEORGE LEAL . I am a salesman. On the 14th of September, about twenty minutes past seven o'clock in the evening, I was on horseback in Kingsland-road, and saw the prisoner gallopping with the cart and gelding, about two hundred yards on this side the turnpike - I will not swear it was the prisoner. I called to the man to keep on the right side of the road. The cart ran against my horse, and ran the shafts into it. I laid hold of the horse, and wished to take the number of the cart, the man objected. I drew it to the light, the prisoner got out and said he would fetch the owner. Soon afterwards the prosecutor claimed it.

WILLIAM GIBBARD re-examined. I had left the prisoner in the cart while I went to make the inquiry. He has never returned me the coat. When I took him, I asked him why he ran away? he said he was afraid of being milled.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been drinking very hard - the prosecutor gave me a lift in his cart; he left me asleep in it. I awoke and found him gone, I turned round, drove to the Lamb, and met with this accident. I said I would fetch the master, but he was not in the public-house.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18191027-76

1452. ROBERT FOOT was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of October , 230 lbs. of soap, value 7 l., the property of John Raymond and Mead Raymond , in a lighter in the Port of London , the same being a port of entry and discharge .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating it to be the property of Thomas Hawes and Benjamin Hawes .

MEAD RAYMOND . I am in partnership with John Raymond ; we are lightermen and wharfingers . The prisoner was in our employ. On the 16th of October, between eleven and twelve o'clock in the day, two men, named Joyce and Emmett, were employed to take 500 cases of soap in the Castlereagh lighter - the prisoner had the care of the lighter while they were taking it in; he had brought up a barge of tallow to Hawes's wharf before I left. I left him in charge of the soap; they were to get it from the wharf that day if the tide would serve, but it would not. I saw the prisoner again between eight and nine o'clock in the evening, in my counting-house, in Clink-street, Bankside. I then paid him his wages, and gave him a document. I told him to take charge of the lighter, and go the next day to the West India Docks. I told him Emmett and Callaghan would assist him. I ordered the prisoner to go into the Docks, and not quit the lighter, day or night, to make the delivery good, and bring the receipt to me. Callaghan was to keep charge until Monday morning, the 18th.

Q. Did you see the 500 cases put on board the barge - A. No, I saw twenty-nine put on board - they were all brought there; each parcel was made up in boxes, and tape tied round them, and sealed with the Excise seal. Each case contained 56 lbs,

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. The prisoner was to conduct the lighter from where she received her cargo, till he delivered the goods - A. Yes, he took charge of her at two o'clock in the morning; till that time Mr. Hawes's watchman had the care of her. He was to deliver the cargo on board the New Felix, at the West India Docks.

THOMAS CHESTERMAN . I am a labourer to Messrs. Thomas and Benjamin Hawes . I remember 500 cases of soap being put into the lighter - I lowered them all into the lighter myself; they were all perfect and unbroken. One might have had the top broken off. The prisoner was present at the latter part of the delivery - he assisted in taking them in.

CHARLES CALLAGHAN . I am a labourer to Messrs. J. and M. Raymond. About half-past two o'clock in the morning, I took charge of the lighter with the prisoner and Emmett - we went together - it was dark. We got to the Docks gate between four and five o'clock in the morning, it was Sunday; we made her fast there, and about six o'clock the prisoner and Emmett went away together, and left me on board. My master had ordered me to come home at daylight on Monday morning. Foot had promised to come at twelve o'clock to take her into the Docks - he did not, and I conveyed her into the Docks, made her fast, and stopped there till Monday morning, then locked the cabin, and went home. I left nobody with her. I took the key of the hatches to Mr. Raymond's clerk.

Cross-examined. Q. No harm could come to the soap in her passage - A. No, it was under lock and key; the prisoner had not the key, he left it with me when he went on shore. There was no soap in the cabin. I did not see them take any soap.

Q. How many times did you go ashore on Sunday - A. Not at all. I took my provision in a basket. I did not go out of sight of the barge.

THOMAS CROWER . I am a Custom House officer. I was an board the New Felix on Monday, the 16th of October, and saw the soap delivered from the Castlereagh barge on Tuesday. The prisoner was in the barge, he and I kept tally to see that the boxes were right; one was broken, and appeared to be light - I had it put aside till the mate saw it; several others were light, but were not stowed away. The mate inquired of the prisoner the cause; he said he dare say some had been taken out to make the scale balance. The mate said he would not sign the receipt till he inquired further.

HENRY WEBB . I am a constable, and was stationed in

the West India Docks. On the 19th of October, in consequence of what I heard, I went to the lighter Castlereagh, about two o'clock in the afternoon - the prisoner was present - Fairbairns and Turton, the mate, were with me. I went down into the hold, and forward, in a locker, I found twenty-two cakes of soap, also a quantity of cakes on a beam under the hatches. I handed it up to Fairbairns, and said to the prisoner, whoever took it had a mind to have plenty. He said he was glad it was found, for he should have been accused of taking it. There were seventy-eight cakes in all.

Cross-examined. Q. All the boxes had been delivered - A. Yes.

FRANCIS FAIRBAIRNS . I was present when the soap was found - it weighed 231 lbs. It was not covered with any thing.

Cross-examined. Q. Could it have been placed there when the cargo was stowed - A. Yes.

RICHARD BETTS . I am an Excise inspector. On the 20th of October I went on board the New Felix. The 500 boxes of soap were produced - fifteen of them had been opened. The Excise seal was broken.

JOHN HALL. I attended the weighing of the fifteen boxes; the deficiency was 256 lbs. in all.

WILLIAM EMMETT . I was on board the Castlereagh lighter, and loaded the 500 cases of soap; I went with her to the West India Docks with the prisoner and Callaghan. I left the lighter as soon as we got down, as I was ordered to do. I left Callaghan there. Nothing was taken then.

Cross-examined. Q, How long did you stay away after the loading - A. About ten hours; during which time it was under the care of Messrs. Hawes' watchman. The hatches and tarpauling were down, but not fastened; she was in the same state when I went to take care of her.

Prisoner's Defence. At two o'clock in the morning we went to take the lighter down - she drifted to the next wharf; we left Callaghan in charge, as I was to fetch more craft. On Monday morning I went and found Callaghan gone. I know nothing about the deficiency.

MEAD RAYMOND re-examined. Q. When the lighter gets to the Docks, is it under the Excise lock - A. They have nothing to do with it. Callaghan was ordered to return at six o'clock on Monday morning.

CHARLES CALLAGHAN re-examined. Q. I locked the cabin-hatch, not the hatches, they have no lock.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18191027-77

1453. WILLIAM DUFFEY was indicted for embezzling 6 d. , which he had received on account of his master , Richard West .

RICHARD WEST . I am a Chelsea coach-master ; the prisoner was my servant - he was employed and entrusted to receive money. He carried out and delivered different parcels that came by the coaches. On the 22d of August he took a parcel out to deliver to Mrs. Evans.

SUSAN EVANS . I live in Ranelagh-walk. On the 22d of August the prisoner delivered me a parcel from the prosecutor's house, and charged me 3 s. 6 d. for it, which I gave him.

RICHARD WEST re-examined. The prisoner only accounted to me for 3 s. - we had paid out 2 s. 6 d. - 6 d. was charged for carriage, and 6 d. for porterage. He had a bill made out for 3 s. 6 d.

THOMAS WILLIAM EMANS . I am bookkeeper; the prisoner only accounted to me for 3 s.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191027-78

1454. THOMAS BANKS was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of September , two jars, value 1 s.; 2 lbs. of preserved ginger, value 10 s.; 2 lbs. of Guava jelly, value 10 s., and one shell, value 5 s. , the property of John Nelson .

JOHN NELSON . I am steward of the West India ship Victoria . On the 10th of September I was walking in the Strand, and met a man, who asked me where I came from? I said I came from Barbadoes. He asked me to go to a public-house with him, and have a glass of beer? I went, and he called for a pot of beer. The prisoner came in, and asked him if any one was in the room? He said he had given somebody a 5 l. note, and the person had ran away with it, but he did not mind that, for he had got plenty more. He pulled out a pocket-book, and wished me to play a game with him for one guinea - I said I had no money. He asked me what I had got to sell? I told him I had got some sweetmeats to sell, and he said he would buy them. I left him in the house, went home, and fetched two jars of sweetmeats and a shell - when the prisoner first came into the house he pretended to be tipsy. I left the things on the table, and the prisoner in the house, while the other man went to shew me where he lived. I went about a dozen yards, came back again, and the prisoner was gone off with them; I did not see him again until I met him in Fleet-street; I caught hold of him, and asked him for his address? He knocked my hand from him, and another man who was with him, gave me an address, No. 13, Shire-lane, Temple-bar - I could not find him there. I afterwards saw him in custody.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. What house did you go to - A. The Three Horse Shoes, public-house, St. Clements - the prisoner did not play with me; he said he would buy the preserves. I live in Tooke's-court, Carey-street; I understood him that he would pay me directly - he said he would give me a guinea jar - I have not seen my friend since; I did not mean him to have them unless he paid me for them - I did not mean that he should have them on trust.

MARGARET LAIRD . My husband keeps the public-house. On the 10th of September, a friend of the prosecutor's came into the house with him - the prisoner went into the parlour, and pretended to be in liquor. The young man asked the prosecutor if he would leave his jars with the prisoner while he went and shewed him where he lived - the prosecutor went out with him. I was coming down stairs, and saw the prisoner go out with the jars in his hand; I tapped him on the shoulder, and asked him for a paper of mine, which he had taken that morning - he seemed agitated, and said he knew nothing of it. I told him I always thought him a suspicious character, and wished he would not come to my house. In about five minutes the prosecutor returned and missed his jars; he did not know the man, but the other man had accosted him

in the street, saying, that he knew him. I told him to leave his address, and when I saw the prisoner again I would send for him. About three weeks after, the man brought the prisoner in very much in liquor; I was at the door, and saw the prosecutor looking for him - I charged him with stealing the jars. I am sure he is the man - I saw him take them.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you know whose jars they were - A. No, or I should not have let him go - he was always bringing drunken men to my house, and when company were there, he would never stop.

JOHN LANGFORD . On the 30th of September Laird gave the prisoner into my charge.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought them of him for 1 l.; his friend met me at the door, and took them from me, saying, that I had not paid for them.

GUILTY . Aged 53.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191027-79

1455. GEORGE EVANS was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of October , one coat, value 30 s., and one waistcoat, value 10 s., the goods of William Moss Gregory , from the person of Francis Gunn .

WILLIAM MOSS GREGORY . On Saturday, the 2d of October, I sent Gunn to Paddington for this coat and waistcoat.

FRANCIS GUNN . I am servant to Mr. Gregory . I was sent to Paddington for my master's coat and waistcoat; as I was going along the prisoner came behind me, and snatched them from under my arm - I immediately called out Stop thief! and Davis stopped him. I am sure he is the boy; I never lost sight of him.

JOHN DAVIS . I was in Baldwin's-gardens, and saw the prisoner running; I tripped him up, and he dropped the bundle containing the coat and waistcoat.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined Three Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191027-80

1456. JAMES SARGENT was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of October , two gowns, value 6 s.; two frocks, value 2 s.; one shirt, value 7 s.; three cravats. value 2 s., and two sheets, value 10 s. , the property of James Flattery .

JAMES FLATTERY . I am a servant , and live in Bull Inn-court, Strand . On the 15th of October, my wife and I went out, and left the key with the prisoner who lodged in the house; we intended to sleep that night at my master's, at Whitechapel, which he knew; my master was not at home, so we returned at half-past nine o'clock that night, went up stairs, and saw a light in the bed room, but the door was locked.

MARGARET FLATTERY . I am the wife of the last witness. I returned with my husband, found the sheets taken off the bed, two boxes broken open, and these things stolen - we kept it silent for about an hour, the prisoner then came, unlocked the door, and went into the room. He was secured coming out of my bed room door, and the constable found the duplicates of my property on him. A young man brought him to lodge with me as a stranger, instead of which he was his uncle.

WALTER PRENDERGAST . I am a porter. I was with the prosecutor, and found the boxes broken open. I concealed myself in the front room, and about half-past ten o'clock, the prisoner and another man came in - a noise was made; the prisoner ran out, and I secured him at the door. He said he was sorry for it, and would give every thing up.

ARTHUR PRICE . I am servant to Mr. Wise, who is a pawnbroker, and lives in Long-lane. I have two sheets, a frock, and a bed-gown, pledged with me on the 16th of October, by a woman. I gave her the duplicates now produced.

WILLIAM RICHARDS . I was constable of the night. The prisoner was brought to the watch-house, and I found the duplicates on him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I was in distress.

GUILTY . Aged 37.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191027-81

1457. WILLIAM GREEN was indicted for stealing on the 23d of October , from the person of Thomas Fossey , one pocket-book, value 1 s.; one 10 l., and two 1 l. Bank notes , his property.

THOMAS FOSSEY . On the 23d of October, about twelve o'clock at noon, I was in Parliament-street, Westminster , felt some one at my left-hand coat-pocket, turned round, and observed my pocket-book in the hands of the prisoner - I secured him, and he dropped it; as I was stooping to pick it up he ran away. I picked it up, followed him, and secured him without losing sight of him. I took him to Queen-square.

MARIA WADHAM . I was with Fossey; he turned suddenly round. I looked round, and saw the pocketbook in the prisoner's hand.

JOHN SILVESTER . I am a grocer, and live in Queen-street. I was in Parliament-street, saw the prisoner put his hand into the prosecutor's pocket, and take the book out. I assisted in taking him to the office, and found a fork on him, turned three different ways like hooks.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was waiting for a coach to pass, and the prosecutor laid hold of me - I never touched his book. Three young men were before me.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191027-82

1458. RICHARD HOWARD was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of October , one jacket, value 10 s.; one waistcoat, value 8 s., and one pair of trowsers, value 14 s. , the property of William Jenkins .

WILLIAM JENKINS . On the 2d of October I lodged at Poplar ; the prisoner lodged there also - I lost these things out of my trunk. He came home next day, and I charged him with it; he said he had taken them, and sold the duplicates. I gave him in charge; there was no lock on my chest - I was present, and heard him say that he had seen a black man take them. At last I offered him a 1 l. note to say where they were. He then said he had taken the things and pledged them.

THOMAS FARRAR . On Saturday evening, the 4th of October, the prisoner came to Mr. Hart's shop, who is a salesman. He said he was in distress, and sold me the duplicates of the property - I let him have 3 s. on them then, and was to give him 7 s. more when I had seen the things - they were in pledge for 23 s. I redeemed them - he never came for the 7 s.

JOHN POWELL . I was sent for, and took the prisoner into custody; he said he had pledged the clothes at Cliff's - I went there, and found them redeemed.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutor was not present when my master was talking to me.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Confined Six Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191027-83

1459. THOMAS NEELAND , GEORGE WIGGLEDOM , and EDWARD HARMER were indicted for stealing, on the 19th of October , five live tame pigeons, price 3 s.; three live tame ducks, price 3 s., and one live tame fowl, price 2 s. , the property of Elijah Forsyth .

ELIJAH FORSYTH . I live at Muswell-hill, Hornsey . On the 19th of October, about seven o'clock in the morning, I went into my yard, and missed five pigeons, three ducks, and a fowl, which were safe about six o'clock the evening before. The ducks and fowls were generally in the yard.

WILLIAM DAVENPORT . I am a Bow-street patrol. On the 19th of October, about four o'clock in the morning, I was on the top of Muswell-hill, with Izard and Brooks, leading to Finchley-common, and saw the three prisoners coming along the road. A few yards before I got up to them, I saw two of their hands move, and something go from them - Brooks and I went to the ditch. I found two small pigeons in a small bag, in the ditch, and Brooks found one pigeon - we secured the prisoners; Izard pulled a pair of pigeons out of Neeland's pocket, who said he was going to fly them home to Essex as soon as he got work; they said they were going to Winchmore-hill. The ducks were found next morning.

Prisoner HARMER. Q. Did I throw any thing away - A. I do not know. They were all in company.

THOMAS IZARD . I am a patrol. I was with Davenport, and met the prisoners - they threw something into the ditch. I searched Neeland, and found two live pigeons in his pocket; he said he had brought them from Essex, and was going to fly them home - their wings were cut. They could not fly.

WILLIAM CHARLES BROOKS . I was with Izard, and saw Neeland throw something into the ditch. I found a live pigeon there, and secured him. I found a knife on him, which was bloody. There was a fourth man in company.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

HARMER'S Defence. I was only in their company half an hour.

NEELAND - GUILTY . Aged 26

WIGGLEDOM - GUILTY . Aged 18.

HARMER - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191027-84

1460. JAMES NORRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of September , one hat, value 15 s., the property of William Knowles , from his person .

WILLIAM KNOWLES . On the 28th of September, between twelve and one o'clock in the morning, I was in George-street, Bloomsbury ; my friend and I went to the Maidenhead, public-house , to have a glass of liquor, and on coming out on the step of the door, the prisoner came behind me and took my hat off my head. I turned round, and collared him with it in his hand - my handkerchief dropped out of it; I took him into the public-house. He gave the hat to another person behind him, who ran out of the back door with it; the prisoner tried to get away, and got as far as the back door. We got the watchman, who secured him; the door was fastened and all the lights put out. Just as the lights were knocked out, the watchman came in with his lanthorn - I never let him go.

JOHN CURLING . I came out of the house with Knowles - the prisoner came and snatched his hat off. I am sure he is the man.

LEWIS ROBERTS . I am a watchman. I was called into the house, and took the prisoner The back door leads into a yard that goes into the street.

Prisoner's Defence. It was not me.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191027-85

1461. MARY PEARKES was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of July , three yards of linen, value 10 s., and half a yard of cambric, value 5 s. , the property of Robert Roberts .

MARY ANN ROBERTS . I am the wife of Robert Roberts , who keeps a stall in Covent Garden-market ; we live in Milford-lane, Strand - I keep a chandler's shop there. On the 23d of July the prisoner was in my parlour, somebody came into my shop, and while I was serving them, she passed me, said she would return in a moment, and went out. I went into the parlour, and missed this property.

Q. Why not take her up before - A. We did, but she got out of the watch-house, and we could not find her till now. She promised to return it, and so I did not tell my husband until lately - nobody else but her could have taken it.

Prisoner. Q, Did you not give me this shirt - (producing one) - A. No, that is it - I can swear to it.

JOHN BLEKSLEY . On the 18th of September the prisoner was given into my charge; she said her name was not Pearkes - I said,

"How can you say so?" She then said, that she said it was not Pears - she said she had the shirt.

Prisoner's Defence. The watch-house-keeper was asleep - they were not minding their duty, and so I walked out. the prosecutrix gave me the shirt to make - I lived a week in her kitchen, but she charged me with having a false key, so I left her, and she charged me with this robbery.

MARY ANN ROBERTS re-examined. She did not lodge in my kitchen - I did not give her the shirt to make.

GUILTY . Aged 48.

Confined Six Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder,

Reference Number: t18191027-86

1462. CORNELIUS BRYAN was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of October , seven handkerchiefs, value 16 s., the property of Thomas Barnwell , Esq. , and one handkerchief, value 4 s. , the property of George Squib .

MARGARET SQUIB . I am wife of George Squib ; I am servant to Thomas Barnwell , Esq., who lives at No. 5, Nottingham-place, New Road . On Saturday, the 2d of October, about five minutes before one o'clock, I left these handkerchiefs safe on the dresser in the kitchen; I came down in about ten minutes, and missed them - I found them at Marlborough-street, where the prisoner was in custody.

JOHN FRANCIS . I live at Mr. Williams's, High-street, Marylebone. On the 2d of October, about one o'clock, I was serving beer about Marylebone-place, and saw the prisoner and another in company in Devonshire-place; I went home, and saw them again about five minutes after one o'clock in Nottingham-place, one on each side of the street, looking down all the areas - they both came to the corner, and were in conversation together. The prisoner went down the area of No. 5, and came up with something under his coat, the other stood at the corner of the street - I left them. About three o'clock I heard of the robbery, and told what I had seen. I saw the prisoner in custody on the Monday; he is the man, on my oath.

JOHN HOARE . I am a porter, and live in Wardour-street. On the 2d of October I was passing in Nottingham-place, and saw the prisoner and another together; one said to the other,

"He is not coming!" I then watched them - they had black-lead pencils and sealing-wax for sale. They went as far as Berner-street, I then observed the prisoner was bulky, and stopped them both. I found six handkerchiefs under the other man's coat; he got away, and I kept the prisoner. Squib afterwards claimed them.

Prisoner. Q. Do you live in Wardour-street - A. Yes, at No. 11; there are two houses of that number.

SAMUEL PLANK . I am an officer of Marlborough-street. I know Hoare lives in Wardour-street. I was in Newman-street, saw the prisoner coming along very fast, and stopped him. He said he had done nothing, and begged of me to let him go. I took him back, Hoare said he was one of them, and I took him charge - I found a bundle of pencils on him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I went down a few areas to sell pencils. I saw a man in velveteen trowsers, and asked him if he wanted any? he said he did not; I went away. At the end of the street I passed the witnesses, why did they not take me then if they suspected me? I came to Berner-street, and the young man was in the witness's custody; he saw me, and let him go.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18191027-87

1463. JOHN LEAPER was indicted for embezzling a 1 l. Bank note, and 18 s., which he had received on account of his master , Nevill Smart .

NEVILL SMART. I am a farmer , and live at Finchley, the prisoner was my servant ; I entrusted him to sell and receive money for me. On the 30th of July I sent him to sell half a load of hay, he returned in the evening, very much intoxicated, and said he would see me another time. I was engaged, and did not ask him for the money - he absconded that night, and was apprehended in October. I did not see him before. He neither brought me the hay nor the money.

WILLIAM MORGAN . I live at Holloway. I bought half a load of hay of the prisoner for 1 l. 18 s. I believe I gave him two 1 l. notes, but am certain I paid him a 1 l. note. I knew it was Smart's hay, and that he was his servant.

JAMES FROST . I had a warrant against the prisoner on the 9th of August, and on the 9th of October Read brought him to me.

CHARLES READ . I am an assistant at Hatton-garden. I found the prisoner at the White Hart, at Battle-bridge; I told him the charge, and he said he was guilty.

Prisoner. I was intoxicated, and lost the money.

GUILTY . Aged 48.

Confined Six Months , and Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18191027-88

1464. JAMES RUSSELL was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of October , 48 silver forks, value 45 l.; four knives, value 2 l.; and four other forks, value 2 l. , the property of Thomas Tremlett and John Thomas Leslie .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating them to be the property of John Kidder .

JOHN THOMAS LESLIE . I am an engraver , in partnership with Thomas Tremlett ; we live at No. 15, Oxendon-street, Leicester-square. On Wednesday, the 6th of October, I received the articles stated in the indictment from Mr. John Kidder , of the Strand, to engrave; the following day they were applied for by a person whom I did not see. The person spoke through a speaking-pipe in the passage, which comes into the shop up stairs. I sent Brooks down to him to say they were not done.

Q. Then the person must be acquainted with your shop, and know the manner of speaking - A. I should suppose so. A second application was made about an hour after in the same manner; I then sent Walker down to say they should be sent directly, as they were not quite ready. I sent Brooks home with the whole of them about a quarter of an hour after. I have never recovered them.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. The person asked for Mr. Kidder's things - A. Yes. I have no knowledge of the prisoner whatever.

WILLIAM BROOKS . I am apprentice to the last witness - I know the prisoner. I first saw him on Wednesday, the 6th of October, in my master's passage, between one and two o'clock. I was sent down to tell him Mr. Kidder's things were not quite done, but that they should be done and sent directly - I told him so. He said he had come from Mr. Kidder, he then went away. I was with him a few minutes.

Q. When did you see him again - A. About half-past three o'clock; I saw him in Castle-street, Leicester-fields, I was taking the things home to Mr. Kidder's. He came rather behind me, and asked if I had got those things of Mr.

Kidder's? I recollected him to be the person who came to the shop; I am quite sure the prisoner is that person - I have no doubt of it at all. He said he had just been again to my master's for them, and if I would give them to him he would take them. I gave them to him, and he turned up Castle-street.

Q. That was a contrary direction to the Strand - A. Yes; I asked him where he was going to take them to? he said,

"Why, to Mr. Kidder's, but I must call first in St. Martin's-lane." I thought then that I had done wrong in parting with them, as I had never seen him at Kidder's. He had a long brown coat on, black handkerchief, and Hessian boots. I let him go, thinking he might be some one in the trade - I did not suspect he was a thief.

Q. When did you next see him - A. On the Sunday afternoon, at Mr. Crow's curds-and-whey house in the Park, he was in custody there. I was sent for to see if he was the person; I knew him directly, I am quite sure of him.

Cross-examined. Q. You first saw him in the passage, is that a light place - A. It is light enough to see who a person is. The pipe is in the passage. He said he had come for Mr. Kidder's things - he did not say what was to be engraved upon them. I left him instantly, and saw the same person afterwards in the street. I had the things in leather and in a paper parcel, in a bag.

Q. Could you know a tradesman of your own by the manner of his carrying the bag - A. We carry them on our shoulder, and so did he.

COURT. Q. Did you give a description of his person - A. Yes, my Lord, I immediately described him at Bow-street.

JOHN WALKER . I am apprentice to Mr. Leslie. I first saw the prisoner at our house on Wednesday, the 6th of October, between two and three o'clock. I went down to answer the pipe, and found him in the passage; I asked him which order of Kidder's he wanted? he seemed confused, and did not appear to know what order we had. He asked for those things of Mr. Kidder's, and desired they might be sent down directly. I asked him what order? he said the order that was most forward was to be sent, and said,

"You know." The forks were the forwardest order. He said he would tell Mr. Kidder, and if they were not sent Kidder would come himself in ten minutes for them, for Kidder was very angry that they were not sent, and that he would tell him he saw the boy out of the door coming with them. He was about two minutes with me - the things were sent directly.

Q. Are you sure he is the man who spoke to you in the passage - A. I am. I saw him on the Saturday morning in the Park, and watched him into the Strand. I ran home for Brooks to identify him, leaving a young man to watch him. I found Brooks was not at home, returned, and saw him farther down, near the New Church; he stopped at Mr. Foster's, a silversmith, in the Strand, looking in at the window, and another young man with him. I thought he knew he was being watched. As soon as our eyes were off him, he ran up a court in the Strand, nearly opposite Somerset House - he was walking gently until he came to Foster's, he then ran, his companion remained. I told Jackson to watch him, while I went in pursuit of the prisoner, but could not find him. I went into the Park on the Sunday morning, a little after ten o'clock, with another young man, followed the soldiers to Knightsbridge, saw the prisoner at the barracks, and took him into custody; we lodged him at Crow's, by the Stable-yard gate. He asked what we took him for? I would not tell him. I fetched Brooks to him. I have no doubt whatever of his being the man, nor never had any.

Cross-examined. Q. The first time he was with you was only a minute or two - A. Yes; I never saw him before. I think he saw me in the Park on Saturday.

ANN BEACH . I am servant to Mr. Leslie. On Wednesday, the 6th of October, I saw the prisoner at my master's house a little after one o'clock. He rang the bell, and I opened the door to him. I am sure he is the man I saw there.

Q. Did you open the door to him the second time - A. Yes, it was him both times. I saw him in custody on the Monday; as soon as I saw him I was sure he was the man - I have no doubt of it.

Cross-examined. Q. You only saw him as you opened the door - A. I saw him call up the pipe - he went to the pipe of his own accord.

JOHN KIDDER . I am a silversmith , and live in the Strand. I took four dozen forks to be engraved, I never sent the prisoner for them; I never received them - he is a perfect stranger.

EDMUND PEPPER . I am a constable. I took the prisoner into custody.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent.

WILLIAM BURRY . I am a painter and glazier, and live at Stretton-ground; I work with Mr. Cobbet, of Bedford-street, Covent-garden. I know the prisoner and his mother, we have been brought up children together. He has been an attorney's clerk in Air-street - he was never in the silversmith business.

Q. On the Wednesday before he was taken up do you know any thing of him - A. Yes, I met him between twelve and one o'clock in New Tothil-street; we had a pint of beer together at the Wheatsheaf, and staid there until one, I then went within a stone's throw of Stretton-ground with him, where he lives.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. Where were you at work at that time - A. At the Horse Guards. I go to dinner at twelve o'clock, and return at one. I had been working there about six weeks. I generally get refreshments near to where I work.

Q. How did it happen that on that Wednesday you should go all the way to Stretton-ground - A. I was not very well, and was persuaded to get bled.

Q. Do you mean to swear you were bled within that hour - A. No; I went to Mr. Mount, a doctor, his shop-man persuaded me not to be bled. I dined at the public-house where we went.

JURY. Q. Did you ever know Mount bleed any one - A. I do not know. I was persuaded to go to him. I had been to his shop to get salts before.

MR. ALLEY. Q. Was you ever bled in your life - A. Never. I heard the prisoner was apprehended on the Sunday - I was not in the Strand with him on Saturday. I did not see him on the Saturday until after seven o'clock in the evening, I then saw him at his own house; I had left work at half-past five o'clock. I was with him on Sunday,

when he was taken. I saw Watkins at the milk-house. I went to the watch-house with him, and heard the charge made against him - I attended before the magistrate next day; I did not give this account there - I believe I did not go into the office.

Q. When the charge was made against him at the watch-house, I suppose you told the young man you was in his company at the time, and that it could not be - A. Yes, I did. I think it was this young man, but will not be sure.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Whether Mount is in the practice of bleeding you do not know - A. No; I think I attended at the Justice's three times.

COURT. Q. You say he was in the employ of an attorney in Air-street; was he out of employ at the time - A. Yes, my Lord, he has been out of employ twelve months - that is the last place he was in.

ELIZA GARNHAM . I go out washing and ironing, and lodge with the prisoner's mother, at No. 27, Stretton-ground, Westminster - I have lodged there seven years.

Q. Do you remember the Wednesday before the Sunday that he was taken up - A. Yes, I remember meeting him, about one o'clock, at the corner of the street where his mother lives - I believe it had not struck one; he had turned into the street, I supposed he was going home to dinner; I was also going home, but did not go the way he did.

Q. Did you see him afterwards - A. I heard him, but did not see him. His mother keeps the lower parlours and the kitchen.

Q. Did he get in before you - A. Yes. I had an errand, which kept me out ten minutes or a quarter of an hour. I heard his voice in the garden, towards the back-door. They dine about one; he generally dines with her. I was up stairs. I do not remember hearing him again.

Cross-examined. Q. How does he get his livelihood - A. He has been an attorney's clerk three or four years ago. I do not think he has done any thing since, except keeping his mother's books. I do not think I spoke when I met him. I live in the first floor - the dining-room is just below me.

Q. You heard his voice, what was he talking about - A. His mother has a favourite dog; he was either scolding or coaxing it.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You saw him a little before one o'clock going towards the house, and about ten minutes after heard him speaking to the dog - A. Yes. His mother does a good deal of business; she generally keeps six women.

Q. The prisoner's business was to set the linen down and put the price to it - A. That is all.

ELIZA GREENFIELD . I live at Mrs. M'Dowell's, New Peter-street.

Q. Do you know any thing of the Wednesday before the Sunday that the prisoner was taken up. - A. Yes; I cooked his dinner, and he eat it at his mother's house. I cooked his dinner between twelve and one o'clock; to the best of my recollection, he came home about twenty minutes after one - he dined with his mother. He was at dinner till about two, I think, and remained at home till half-past four o'clock, to the best of my knowledge - he was never out of doors all this time. His mother and I had tea together, but whether he had tea with us or not I do not recollect. He went out at half-past four o'clock.

Q. Were you employed there all day - A. From eleven o'clock. I attended three times at Marlborough-street.

Cross-examined. Q. Was the reason you were not examined at Marlborough-street, that the prosecutor's attorney told you the magistrate would not hear his witnesses - A. I heard nothing of the kind. We were told so at the second examination.

Q. Is his mother fond of cats - A. She keeps none; there are several in the house.

Q. Do you remember his making a noise at a cat, if he had, would the last witness have heard it - A. She might; I do not remember the circumstance. I do not recollect any noise being made.

Q. He did not come home until twenty minutes past one o'clock - A. No, I am quite positive of that.

Q. What makes you positive - A. One of the women went out to work; I asked her the time, she said it was twenty minutes past one.

Q. Then it was impossible he could have come home at one - A. He might, but I did not see him.

COURT. Q. I understood you to say it was twenty minutes after one o'clock when he did come - A. He might have been in another room, that was the time he came into his mother's room.

Q. Did you not positively swear you was sure that was the time he came home - A. Yes, I did.

MR. ALLEY. Q. Do you remember his making a noise at a cat there - A. No.

Q. If there had been any noise with a cat, or any other animal, you would have heard it - A. I cannot say; I did not dine with them. I live less than a quarter of a mile off.

COURT. Q. When did you get your dinner - A. I had none; it is seldom I have any. I sometimes have nothing from breakfast till tea. I left the house about ten o'clock at night.

MR. ALLEY. Q. Did you drink any spirits or porter at all - A. No, neither, that day. I fetched them a pot of porter that day in an earthen jug, from the Two Brewers, opposite his mother's. There were two women washing down stairs.

Q. And so you neither drank beer nor spirits, nor eat any thing that day - A. I suppose I drank a glass of spirits between five and six o'clock. I had a glass between five and six.

Q. What had they for dinner - A. Stewed eels. His mother does not like cooking, and so I cook for her frequently.

Q. Was there any ironing going on that day - A. No, none at all; we were starching the linen, and did nothing else. I am constantly employed by the prisoner's mother in ironing and starching. I am not there every day.

Q. You are quite sure there was no noise that could be heard up stairs - A. None that I heard.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Do you derive your knowledge of him only from what the woman told you when she came in - A. Only from that - we have no clock.

Q. Does the prisoner's mother keep a dog - A. She does. I do not remember the prisoner either scolding or coaxing it - if it had been so, Garnham might have heard it.

Q. Where was you starching - A. In his mother's apartment. I do both ironing and starching - starching is part of the preparation for ironing.

COURT. Q. How was the prisoner employed - A. After dinner he was reading to himself - his mother only keeps one dog, which is a little brown one - I drank tea with her about four o'clock; I think he did not drink tea with us, but he was at home at tea-time - he sometimes takes milk instead of tea. He was reading the fourth volume of the Children of the Abbey, which I had brought him to read from my daughter, three or four days before; his mother knew I had brought it there.

Q. How was his mother employed between dinner and tea - A. Washing down below with the women - I was up stairs; I am quite sure of that. I cooked the dinner in the same room where they eat it.

A. And in the same room you were starching the linen - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know William Burry - A. I have a small acquaintance with him - he knew the prisoner; I do not know where he lives. I did not see him any part of the day on Wednesday; I was at work there on the Saturday the prisoner was taken.

Q. Did he dine at home then - A. Please to let me recollect - (hesitaling) - I cannot say.

Q. Did you cook the dinner on Saturday - A. I did not, nor on Friday, Thursday, Tuesday, or Monday.

Q. How came you to cook it on Wednesday - A. His mother was busy in helping the women at work.

Q. I suppose there is a great deal to be done on Monday and Tuesday - A. On Monday we go into the City, and on Tuesday I have to go to Oxford-road for linen; we begin working on Monday night. The linen is not ready to be starched until Wednesday. If the weather is dull, we dry the linen in the house - Wednesday was a dull day.

Q. What sort of weather was Monday and Tuesday - A. I cannot recollect.

Q. What makes you recollect Wednesday was dull - A. I was ill, and wanted to take some medicine, but it being cold I put it off - and in fact I have not taken it yet.

Q. Was the prisoner at home or out on Saturday - A. I cannot tell.

Q. How late did you stay at his mother's on Saturday - A. It was eleven o'clock - I cannot say whether he was at home on Saturday or not; I did not leave before eleven o'clock. I am positive I did not see Burry on Saturday.

Q. What makes you remember cooking the dinner on Wednesday as you frequently did it - A. Because my mistress said she was glad I had come, as she had got eels for dinner and did not like to clean them. I had dressed eels for her before.

Q. When was it that anybody spoke to you about the prisoner being at home on the Wednesday - A. On the Sunday he was taken, his mother sent for me, and told me that she had heard her son was in trouble - she did not then tell me what it was about.

Q. When did she tell you - A. About nine o'clock at night - we went to the watch-house together; she saw her son and spoke to him. I did not hear the discourse between them, but as we were going home, she told me that her son had been impeached for getting articles - I did not hear what they were. We went to Marlborough-street on Monday.

Q. Who first mentioned Wednesday to you - A. I will recollect a little - I think it was Mr. Price, the solicitor.

Q. When did he first mentioned Wednesday to you - A. Whether it was Monday or Thursday I cannot tell. I heard him mention to the prisoner's mother that it was on Wednesday that this happened.

Q. When did you first mention that you knew he was at home - A. On the Monday.

Q. When did you first hear that he was taken up for any thing done on Wednesday - A. On Monday - I believe his mother told me, and it being such a short time from the Wednesday to the Monday, I remembered it.

Q. Did you tell his mother that you remembered it, or did she say you did - A. I do not recollect.

ELIZA RUSSELL . I am the prisoner's mother. He lived with Mr. Pike, in Air-street, two years - Mr. Pike is now dead; he has been out of his employ two years, since which he has assisted me - I am a laundress, and work for families in Parliament-street, Oxford-street, and the City. My son assisted me with his pen and in carrying out linen - he was taken up on Sunday; I saw him that evening at St. James's watch-house at nine o'clock. Greenfield went with me - she assisted me in ironing.

Q. Does that include any thing besides merely passing the iron backward and forward - A. Merely that. She comes to me every Wednesday to iron - she irons and plaits shirts. I always starch them myself ready for her to iron.

Q. On the Wednesday before the Sunday your son was apprehended, was she employed by you - A. She was, she came about ten o'clock.

Q. Do you keep a dog - A. No, but there is one in the house, which is Eliza Garnham 's. It is a large rough dog - brown and white.

Q. Was your son out on Wednesday - A. He was out a little while in the morning; he came home about one o'clock - he came home by himself. Greenfield was with me - my son dined with me; we had stewed eels, nothing else. Greenfield cooked them in the front parlour, which is the same room where we dined and worked - she did not dine with us; it might be about a quarter past one o'clock - we were about half an hour at dinner.

Q. What did your son do after dinner - A. He sat down, reading a book, the best part of the afternoon; he went out about half-past four o'clock, and returned about ten o'clock at night - he drank tea with me before he went out. Greenfield drank tea with us. I went to the justice on Monday with Greenfield, Garnham, and Burry; I was in the room, but nothing was said to me - the others were not in the room. My son was never in the employ of a silversmith or engraver.

Cross-examined. Q. Greenfield comes only on Wednesday - A. That is the first day of the week she comes - she stays all the rest of the week if I have sufficient work for

her. I do the starching in the room where she irons - I allow my son eighteen pence a week for pocket-money.

Q. He carries out the linen and fetches it - A. Yes, if it is not too heavy. I have a man to fetch it, and my son assists.

Q. If he cannot bring it all, who do you send for it - A. I have a horse and cart, which a man drives - Greenfield had none of our dinner.

Q. Did she go home to dinner that day - A. Yes, about twelve o'clock, and returned at half-past twelve.

Q. Had you any women washing that day - A. Yes, two below stairs.

Q. Greenfield never brought any novels to your house - A. Not that I know of - my son read to himself. I believe he cut his own bread and butter at tea.

JURY. Q. You say you employ a horse and cart, and a man, and your son assists in getting the linen; does any one else fetch it - A. Sometimes a woman - Greenfield has fetched it at different times. I do not recollect that she fetched any that week.

COURT. Q. Where does your son get books - A. There are books about the house, which I have had in former days. I believe Greenfield has once or twice brought him books - I do not know what book he was reading.

Q. What occasion have you for a horse and cart - A. To fetch the linen from the City. I employ women to fetch it nearer home.

Q. Was Burry with your son on the Wednesday - A. When he came home he said that he had seen him in the street.

Q. He did not say that he had drank with him - A. No, he was not at my house that day.

Q. Did you see him at your house between the Wednesday and Sunday - A. No.

Q. Where did you get your beer from at dinner - A. From the Two Brewers, public-house, in our street; I sent a little boy to order it - I am sure of it - he ordered them to bring it.

Q. Who brought it to you - A. I suppose the pot-boy did.

Q. Are you sure you did not send Greenfield for it - A. She often fetched it - I cannot be positive, but I think I sent for it that day; I suppose I took it at the door myself. Greenfield cooked the dinner, because I was busy in starching the linen, and preparing it for ironing. I was attending to the washing and drying all that day - I did not wash myself.

Q. How was Greenfield employed before dinner - A. In cleaning the eels and making up the fire; she did nothing else before dinner.

Q. Did she do any thing else but iron after dinner - A. No. I starched and prepared it myself.

Q. Do you know where your son was on Saturday - A. He was out and in, and chiefly about the house. I believe he went out about eleven o'clock in the morning, and came home between eleven and twelve, for I had something for him to do. He did not go out again till between four and five o'clock - not before.

Q. Did Greenfield go to the watch-house with you - A. Yes, she was present, and heard the conversation between us.

Q. When did you first see Mr. Price on this business - A. On the Wednesday after the Sunday. He went to Marlborough-street on Thursday with me, but he was not there on Monday.

Q. Did you tell Greenfield that your son was charged with doing this on Wednesday - A. I think I did.

Q. Does she cook for you more frequent than you do yourself - A. Yes.

JURY. Q. How is your son generally dressed - A. As he is now. He has an old brown great coat, but no boots - he never wore them.

WILLIAM BURY re-examined. Q. You saw nothing of the prisoner on Wednesday, except when you came from dinner - A. No.

Q. Did you not represent that you knew he was hard at work all that day - A. Yes, I knew him to be at work for his mother.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18191027-89

1465. WILLIAM ROE and JOHN BENGEY were indicted for stealing, on the 2d of October , one frock, value 4 s. and one shirt, value 4 s. , the goods of James Davis .

JAMES DAVIS . I am a shopkeeper , and live at Enfield. On the 2d of October, Cracknel and Ovenhall came to me between five and six o'clock in the evening - it was not dark; I then missed a smockfrock and a shirt off the line at the door - they hung against the wall, In consequence of what they said, I took Roe at the King's Arms, public-house, near my house; the constable was with me. He was put in the watch-house, but got out next morning by breaking a hole through the brick wall; he was taken a week after. I have not found my property.

THOMAS CRACKNELL . I am a shoemaker, and live at Enfield; I know both the prisoners - they are labourers ; Bengey lived with Mr. Wheelwright. On the 2d of October I was with Overshall, and saw the prisoners in company together - they had been together all day. I saw Roe go up to Mr. Davis's shop-door, and take, as I thought, a piece of cloth from the side of the door; Bengey stood close by against a post - Roe walked round towards the prosecutor's back yard, and Bengey followed him. They then returned to the door, took something which I thought was cloth, and went back again - I am sure they are the men - I knew them well before. They are natives of the place.

Q. Why not stop them at the time - A. They are such desperate characters that I was afraid. I went and informed Davis almost immediately.

JAMES OVENHALL . I was with Cracknell - I live two doors from Davis. The prisoners came up together. Roe spoke to Bengey, and then drew up to Davis's shop-door - some things hung outside. Roe took something, which I supposed to be cloth, then went round the corner, and in the course of a few minutes they returned and took something else - Bengey went round the corner with him both times. It was light. I informed Davis where they were gone. I am sure they are the men. I did not attack them because I knew them.

WILLIAM ANDREWS . I am constable of Enfield. I took Roe on the 2d of October, and put him in the cage - next morning I found he had broken out through the wall. Ambrose

brought him to me eight days afterwards. I had been told to look after Bengey.

ROBERT AMBROSE . I am a watchman. On the 9th of October I saw the prisoners together in the Forest. I afterwards apprehended them together at Enfield.

ROE'S Defence. I was drunk, and a man assisted me to break out of the cage. I know nothing of it.

BENGEY'S Defence. I was not with him.

ROE - GUILTY . Aged 25.

BENGEY - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191027-90

1466. WILLIAM ATKINS was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of October , one handkerchief, value 2 s., the property of Archibald Montgomery Campbell , from his person .

MR. ARCHIBALD MONTGOMERY CAMPBELL . On Saturday, the 30th of October, about one o'clock at noon, I was in Cecil-court ; when I was at the end of the court a person called out,

"They have picked your pocket, Sir!" I put my hand down, and missed my handkerchief. I turned round, the prisoner was close at my left side. The people said,

"He has got your handkerchief." I put my hand into his jacket, and it fell from it. Another person said,

"It is at your feet." I looked, and saw it behind the prisoner, on the ground; Nicholson seized him.

ALEXANDER NICHOLSON . I was in Cecil-court. Four persons were following the prosecutor, who had his umbrella up. A person observed to me that they were after no good. As soon as the prosecutor came to the end of the court, the prisoner went up to him and took his handkerchief out - I collared him, and called to the prosecutor, the others ran off. I put my hand to the prisoner's breast, and the handkerchief was gone - I found it on the ground.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The gentleman's handkerchief fell out of his pocket.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191027-91

1467. GEORGE TURNER and SAMUEL BULLARD were indicted for stealing, on the 12th of October , 100 lbs. of lead, value 24 s., the property of John Gill , and fixed to a certain building of his .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating it to be the property of Thomas Coutts , Esq. , and fixed to a certain building of his.

JOHN GILL . I am employed by Thomas Coutts , Esq., to build a cottage adjoining his house - it was nearly finished; it was an octagon roof; the lead-work was put on the hips. On Sunday morning, the 11th of October, I went round the cottage, every thing was then safe. On Tuesday, the 12th of October, I went with some men to measure the work, and found the lead taken from the cottage and building attached to it - it was torn from the nails; next day it was produced by Davis. I compared it with the roof, it corresponded exactly, every hole fitted the nails - about two hundred weight was taken. Bullard has been in Mr. Coutt's service two years.

JOHN DAVIS . I am an officer. On the 13th of October, about eleven o'clock in the morning, I was near Fitzroy-square, and saw Bullard going along Clipstone-street, very heavily laden; I followed him round to Chalton-street, into an old iron-shop. Immediately he went in he put down this basket, with the lead in a bag; I went up to him and found it was lead - I handcuffed him. The woman of the shop exclaimed,

"Why do you bring your lead here, to get me into trouble?" - this was before it was opened. While I was handcuffing him, Turner came by with another quantity of lead. Seeing me there, he made the best of his way down the street as fast as he could - he knew me. I left a man in charge with Bullard in the shop, followed, and came up with him. I said,

"What. Turner! are you in it again? you know my handcuffs will fit you." He said,

"Mr. Davis, I found this." I called a coach, and took them both to the office with the lead. It was afterwards compared, and fitted nail by nail to the building. I found a pair of silver spoons on Turner; he said he brought them from sea with him - they have been claimed.

TURNER'S Defence. I found the lead in a bag when I was out mushrooming.

BULLARD'S Defence. I can prove I was in bed all that night.

JOHN DAVIS re-examined. I took them about three miles from the house; they were in a great perspiration.

WILLIAM PICKETT . I am watchman of Kentish Town. Bullard lives in the neighbourhood, the other lives in the alley behind him. Bullard came over to me, and told me to call him at five o'clock to get mushrooms. He did not go out of his house until between five and six, as I was on duty.

MR. ALLEY. Q. What distance from Mr. Coutts's do they live - A. About twenty minutes' walk.

TURNER - GUILTY . Aged 40.

BULLARD - GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191027-92

1468. MARGARET RYAN was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of October , 24 yards of muslin, value 1 l. 16 s. , the goods of Joshua Craig .

GEORGE CRYER . I am shopman to Joshua Craig , who is a linen-draper , and lives in High Holborn . On the 4th of October, about five o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner came in at the doorway - being busy, I paid no attention to her. In two or three minutes the servant gave me information. I went out, and saw the prisoner turn into the next shop; I went up to her, and said,

"You have got a piece of stolen goods" - she turned round, and said she had not. I found this muslin under her shawl - she held it so tight I could not take it from her. I took her back, and gave her in charge.

EMMA HITCHEN . I am servant to Mr. Craig. I was coming down stairs to call the young men to tea, and saw the prisoner come to the counter, which was covered with goods, she slipped a piece of muslin under her arm - I informed Cryer, who secured her.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Confined Three Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191027-93

1469. THOMAS RICHARDS and GEORGE FRENCH were indicted for stealing, on the 5th of October , 5 lbs. of beef, value 4 s. , the property of Thomas Seabrook .

THOMAS SEABROOK . I am a butcher , and live on Harrow-road, Paddington . On the 5th of October, about half-past eleven o'clock in the morning, the prisoners and two others passed my door, they all stopped. French took a piece of beef off the hook, and gave it to another, whom we have not caught, and all ran away together - I followed; the other dropped the meat, he was caught, but got away; I caught the prisoners. I had caught Richards attempting to take some once before.

WILLIAM HUMPHRIES . I apprehended Debenhall, the witness, in Bell-street.

THOMAS DEBENHALL , I was a gentleman's servant, but have been out of place a long time. French was going by the shop, and said it was a good speck, and he would have a piece of beef; I was with them; there were four of us together. I said I would have no concern in it. French immediately took the beef, and gave it to the boy who is not taken.

RICHARDS'S Defence. I saw the people running; I ran, and was taken.

RICHARDS - GUILTY . Aged 18.

FRENCH - GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191027-94

1470. MATTHEW WALKER was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of October , from the person of William Monk , one pocket-book, value 1 s., one 5 l. and four l. Bank notes , his property.

WILLIAM MONK . I am a mariner . On the 9th of October, about eleven o'clock, I was on Tower-hill, coming from Walworth ; one man came before me and another behind, and said,

"D - n you, go on!" - they pulled my coat open, and took my pocket-book out; I did not see them.

FRANCES HEATH . I was going over Tower-hill last Saturday three weeks, and met the prisoner and another man; they pushed Monk about, and said,

"D - n you, go on!" He tried to get from them. His jacket flew open, the prisoner put his hand into his left-hand pocket, and took his pocket-book out. I went up and told him he had lost something, he missed his pocket-book. I told him I knew the man quite well by his lurking about Rosemary-lane. I went down Rosemary-lane with the prosecutor to look for him, but could not find him until the following Saturday, when I saw him in Rosemary-lane, and followed him into Bishopsgate-street; I there met Forrester, who took him. I am sure he is the man.

Cross-examined. Q. Are you related to the prisoner - A. No; I only know him by seeing him lurking about. My mother never quarrelled with him. I do not know where he lived. I live in Priest-alley, Tower-hill; the robbery was in Postern-row.

JOHN THOMPSON . I am an officer. The last witness and her husband came to me, and said a man had been robbed on Tower-hill of a pocket-book; she described the prisoner to me. I thought I knew him, but could not find him.

JOHN FORRESTER . I was in Aldgate High-street; the woman came up, asked if I was an officer, and desired me to take charge of the prisoner for robbing a pensioner on Tower-hill. I said I knew the case, for I was looking after one of the men. I told her to keep back, for it was not safe to apprehend him there - he was in Petticoat-lane. I followed him to Bishopsgate, and told him I wanted him. The woman came into the public-house, and gave the same account she has now.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing of it. The woman's mother and I quarrelled, and she said she would be revenged on me. I never saw the woman before in my life.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191027-95

1471. CHARLES SMITH was indicted for uttering counterfeit shillings, and having another in his possession at the same time .

The prisoner pleaded

GUILTY .

Confined One Year , and to find Sureties for Two Years more.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18191027-96

1472. WILLIAM FIELD FIDLER was indicted for embezzling the sum of 7 l. 13 s., which he had received on account of George Lay Hale and William Drain , his masters .

GEORGE LAY HALE. I am in partnership with William Drain ; we are spice-merchants , and live in Little East Cheap - the prisoner came into our service about eighteen months ago; a few months after that, I entrusted him to receive money on our account. Mr. Hagger, of Oxford-street, owed us 7 l. 13 s. I sent Norman, my shopman, round with some unpaid bills. About twenty days after the 22d of August, I inquired if the prisoner had received this debt? he said he had. He should have accounted for it on the Saturday after he received it, he never did account for it.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. You told him if he would confess and give security, nothing should happen - A. No. I spoke to him on the Friday following about it. He enters in a book what he receives - I have his book here, Hagger's name is not in it; he paid me no money after the 27th. On the Friday, when he came, I asked him if he had received it? he said,

"I did." I said,

"Why did you not account for it?" he said,

"I will explain it;" he said he would write it down. I handed him a pen and ink, he did not write. I told him I was going round to the customers, and should be sorry to apply for money which had been received; he said he wished to go with me. We went out together - I said,

"Now explain it;" he said,

"Don't you recollect my losing my pocketbook?" I said that was in February last. He said that in that pocket-book he lost 59 l., which he had received. I said,

"Of whom did you receive it?" he said he had it down in a book. He went home and brought me a book, which had several sums of money in it, but not this. He said he received one person's money, and paid for it by another, but that could not be the case.

Q. How long after that did he remain in your service - A. Not an hour; I suffered him to go about his business, to clear himself if he could, not to procure security. He was at large three weeks, during which time I requested

him to come to me, but he would not, and I had him secured.

Q. What sum had he received - A. Sixty or seventy pounds. If I had found he had received the money, and lost it, I should have considered him unfortunate.

JOHN HAGGER . I live in Oxford-street. On the 27th of August I paid the prisoner 7 l. 13 s. on account of Messrs. Hale and Drain - I gave him 7 l. in notes and the rest in silver. About three weeks afterwards another servant applied for it - I produced the memorandum the prisoner gave me - it was on a Saturday.

JOHN NORMAN . I am collecting clerk to the prosecutors. In September last Mr. Hale sent me to Mr. Hagger for 7 l. 13 s. - I found it had been paid before.

Cross-examined. Q. Was there not an account opened in the ledger to the prisoner - A. I never saw it.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18191027-97

1473. MARY ANN JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of October , half a bushel of apples, value 3 s. , the goods of Samuel Jacobs .

SAMUEL JACOBS . I am a fruit-salesman in Fleet-market , the prisoner used to attend the market. On the 19th of October I lost a basket of apples from my stand, about half-past seven o'clock in the morning.

GEORGE ROOK . I am a green-grocer, and live at Islington. I was buying some fruit of Jacobs, and saw a woman like the prisoner come up, and turn a sieve of apples into her own basket - she left the sieve behind.

JAMES DAVIS . I am Jacob's servant. I missed the apples, and went to Bell-alley, Turnmill-street. While I was there the prisoner came into the room - I found some baskets there.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18191027-98

1474. THOMAS FARRELL was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of October , one handkerchief, value 18 d. , the property of Richard Griffin .

The prosecutor did not appear .

NOT GUILTY.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18191027-99

1475. MARY CONEY was indicted for a misdemeanour .

ELIZA HAWKES . I am wife of George Hawkes , who is a baker, and lives in Broadway, Blackfriars. On the 22d of October, about seven o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came into the shop, and asked for a half-quartern loaf, which came to 5 1/2 d., she offered me a shilling, which I refused, telling her it was very bad, and that if she came into my shop again I would send her to prison. Two officers came in with a woman named Brown - the shilling she offered me fell down from the counter, and they picked it up.

JOHN CLINTON . I am a constable. On the 22d of October I was in Aldersgate-street, and saw the prisoner within two doors of Spooner's shop, the cheesemonger - a woman named Brown was in his shop; Mr. Spooner was rubbing a shilling on marble. I went in, and had some conversation with him; the prisoner was walking backwards and forwards, and looking towards the window. Brown came out, and joined the prisoner immediately. I followed them to St. Martin's le Grand; they stopped, and looked in at several shops. I met Allen; we followed them to Warwick-lane; they stopped in a dark place there, and had some conversation together. Brown went into a baker's shop, and bought a penny roll, the prisoner waited for her about twenty yards off; they joined again, and I followed them to Broadway, Blackfriars - they stopped at the corner of Shoemaker-row, opposite Hawkes's shop, the prisoner went in, Allen followed her, and I seized Brown by both hands, and took her into the shop. In crossing the road I felt a bag in her left hand - she threw something from her right hand, which sounded like bad coin. I found a bad shilling in her pocket, and three good shillings, and three sixpences concealed in a bag - the good shillings were separate. I then searched the prisoner, and found 1 s. 1 d. in copper on her. I also found a bad shilling where I heard the money drop; I think more fell. I found about a quarter of a pound of soap on her, which had never been used. The bill was thrown out against Brown.

HENRY ALLEN . I met Clinton in Newgate-street - his account is correct. The prisoner went into Hawkes's, I went in after her, and saw a shilling fall from the counter, it was picked up, and given to me. I produce it, as also one shilling found on Brown.

JOHN SPOONER . I am a cheesemonger, and live in Aldersgate-street. On the 22d of October, Brown came into my shop, bought a quarter of a pound of butter, and offered me a counterfeit shilling, which I refused. She went away, leaving the butter. Clinton came in in a minute after.

MR. CALEB EDWARD POWELL . I am assistant to the Solicitor to the Mint. The shillings are both counterfeit; they are merely washed - that found in the shop is also counterfeit, and all off the same dye.

Prisoner's Defence. My husband sent me home the 18 d. in copper and the shillings. I laid out 5 d., and was going to take the 13 d. to a woman I owed it to. I do not know Brown.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Confined One Year , and to find Sureties for Two Years more.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18191027-100

1476. WILLIAM MOOREHOUSE STONEY was indicted for unlawfully, and by false pretences, obtaining three 1 l. Bank notes, and 40 s. from John Campbell , with intent to defraud him thereof .

JOHN CAMPBELL . I lodge at Whitechapel. In July last I came to town from Scotland. On the 23d of September I was walking with Richardson, and saw the prisoner at the Obelisk in the Borough. Richardson went over, spoke to him, and in about five minutes he beckoned me over - I went, and Richardson said, this gentleman, Mr. Stoney, thought he had interest to get me a place in the Customs; I said I should be much obliged to him if he would. We all three walked together along Blackfriars-road, and went into a public-house. He said he should

go to the Custom House and see his friend, and that we were to meet him again at the Twelve Bells, public-house, Bride-lane, at twelve o'clock. We went, and he came soon after, said he had seen his friend at the Custom House, and there were two vacancies as tide-waiters, and if I would pay 35 l., I might have one of them; I said I was agreeable. He said 5 l. was to be advanced immediately for stamps, and 10 l. was to be paid when I was sworn in. I said it would be more convenient to pay the whole 30 l. by instalments - he said he would see if his friend would do that; we all three walked together to the Custom House, parted there, and appointed to meet at half-past two o'clock, in Miles-lane, Cannon-street, at a public-house, to give him the 5 l. - I went in the mean time to Whitechapel to procure the 5 l,; we met in Miles-lane. I had only got 3 l. 12 s. - it was three 1 l. notes, and the rest in silver; he said his friend agreed to take it by instalments. I said I was sorry I could not get all the 5 l.; he said if it could not be advanced I should lose the situation, as the vacancy must be filled up. I proposed to pledge my watch, which I did for two guineas - I got two 1 l. notes and 2 s.; the prisoner waited outside until I came out, we then went to Miles-lane, and he said it would be necessary to have a certificate, stating my age and where I was born, and said he should fetch me a written agreement from the Secretary of the Customs, and then I should give him the 5 l. He went away and returned in about a quarter of an hour with the agreement - this is it - (looking at it). On receiving this, I gave him three 1 l. notes and 2 l. in silver; he went away, saying, he was going to the Custom House to pay the money. He returned and said he had received half a crown for his trouble - he shewed it to me, and said we should have some dinner with it. We went to a cook-shop, and dined there, then went to a public-house, where I treated, and we parted.

Q. Were you to meet him again - A. Yes, next day, at eleven o'clock in the morning, in Miles-lane, and he was then to introduce me to his friend at the Custom House. I met him there, and he said he had been to the Custom House, that the Secretary was busy with the Commissioners, and I could not see him. We met there again, at one o'clock, he said he had seen his friend, and that it was all right. We was not to meet again until the Tuesday, for me to be sworn into office, at eleven o'clock - we met then. He left us there, and went to the Custom House to see if all was ready; he returned in about twenty minutes, and said my certificate was not come up from Dunbar, but to a certainty it would be settled on the Thursday following - we were to meet on Thursday. We went, but received a note from the prisoner - (looks at it) - this is it.

Q. He met you on Friday in consequence of the letter - A. Yes, and asked if we had received his note? I said, Yes, we had - we all three went to the Custom House together; we waited in the hall while he went up. In about ten minutes he returned, saying, the Secretary, Mr. Delavaud, was busy, and could not be seen, but we should should see him in half an hour; we waited half an hour. The prisoner then went to the Custom House again, came out again in about twenty minutes, with a letter in his hand, and said he was to carry it to the Lords of the Treasury Office, Westminster, to see if my warrant was signed. As we were walking towards the Treasury, he opened the letter, and read it in a low tone. It signified that if the warrant was ready, to give it to the bearer, and was signed J. Delavaud. Richardson and I waited at a public-house while he went to deliver the letter. He returned in about half an hour, and said he saw the warrant lying before them, but it was not signed, that some of the Lords were expected that morning, and it would then be sent down to the Custom House signed.

Q. Where did you go then - A. To the Custom House - he said he should go and tell his friend what had passed, and we parted; we met on Saturday, between eleven and twelve o'clock, in Miles-lane. He went to the Custom House to see if the warrant was come, returned, and said it was not, but Mr. Delavaud was going to the Treasury, and would bring it down in his pocket that afternoon - we parted. I received a note from him on Saturday evening, saying, that he wished to see us at nine o'clock on Sunday morning in Miles-lane. I went by myself, and asked him if he had seen his friend? He said he had, and that my warrant was come down, and that I should be sworn in on the Tuesday following, which was the 5th of October; I was to meet him then in Miles-lane. I went, but he did not come.

Q. At all these meetings you had something to eat and drink - A. Generally, and all at my expence. Finding he did not come, I went and inquired for Mr. Rentor, and found that he had not been to the Custom House for a fortnight - I never got my appointment. I accidentally met the prisoner in Little East Cheap on the Thursday following. He said if I would wait at Miles-lane, he would run to the Custom House and see if it was ready - I said I would go with him. I saw him go into the messenger's room; he returned in about five minutes, and said as sure as his name was Stoney, I should be sworn in in half an hour. I got two officers, and gave him in charge.

JAMES RICHARDSON . I live in Church-lane, Whitechapel, and was present with the last witness at the different interviews between him and the prisoner - he has spoken correctly; I saw him give the prisoner three 1 l. notes and 2 l. in silver. The prisoner gave him the agreement.

Agreement and letter referred to.

Memorandum, September 23, 1819.

By way of security to John Campbell , who is to be appointed a tide-waiter in the Customs, at a salary of 35 l. per annum, and 5 s. 6 d. daily, for every day he shall be on actual duty, to commence from the day he shall be sworn in; and in consideration thereof, the said John Campbell agrees to pay the sum of 5 l.: and a further sum of 30 l., by quarterly payments of 7 l. 10 s. each payment, to be paid out of his salary as it becomes due; and any further sum for any charges is not to be allowed or expected. The warrant to be ready on Tuesday next, and the appointment to take place on that day. Signed

G. DELAVAUD

Note referred to.

Mr. Rentor's compliments to Mr. Stoney, not seeing him at home, thought it best to leave this, to say the certificate was arrived from Dunbar, and he will be wanted on Thursday, certainly.

Mr. Stoney's compliments to Mr. Campbell, the above note was left last night. Mr. C. must have patience and keep himself quiet till then. Mr. S. has to meet a person in the Commercial-road.

GEORGE DELAVAUD , ESQ. I am Secretary to the Board of Customs; the memorandum is not my signature - I know nothing of the business. The prisoner is quite a stranger to me.

JEREMIAH JEPSON RIPLEY . I am clerk in the Secretary of the Customs Office, and have been so eleven years. The appointment of tide-waiters pass through our office; no person, named Campbell, was appointed this year - no fee is given to officers for appointments. The prisoner is quite a stranger.

Prisoner's Defence. As the parties have stated, I accidentally met Richardson; he said he had a job I could make a few pounds of, as he knew I could get situations if I liked. I said I would inquire of a person who I thought was in the Custom House, and could get those things which I had tried for myself, but for the want of money I could not. I applied to him, and he told me what to do - I told them as he instructed me; I had no interest in it. I spent ten days in going backwards and forwards; the man kept amusing me, and would not see them. He ordered me to meet him in the long-room, and I was going there when I was apprehended. I paid him the 5 l., and he gave me the memorandum.

GUILTY .

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18191027-101

1477. PHILIP JAMES PLUMMER was was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of October , one 10 l., five 5 l., seventeen 2 l., and one 1 l. promissory notes , the property of John Wingrave .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating them to the property of James Humphries .

JOHN WINGRAVE . I live at Luton, in Bedfordshire. On the 13th of October I enclosed the notes in a parcel, with a draft for 20 l. I sealed the parcel with three seals, and sent it by the Luton Blucher coach to London - my daughter delivered it to the coach - they were Luton bank notes; I saw two of them last Monday, they were brought into the Luton bank that day; there was

"Birdseye," written on each of them, which I had observed when I put them in the parcel. It was directed to George Dickens , No. 6, White Lion-street, Norton Falgate. I have seen the prisoner in town about a year and a half ago.

MARY WILLINGBACK . I am servant to James Humphries , who keeps the Half-Moon, public-house, in Carthusian-street. Last Thursday fortnight, between eleven and twelve o'clock, the prisoner came and asked if Clark had brought a parcel for Mr. Dickens. Clark is coachman of the Blucher coach. I looked among the parcels, and told him there was none. My mistress said it was in the till, and I gave it to him from the till. I saw him at Worship-street office on the Wednesday following, and am certain he is the person.

SAMUEL MATTHEWS . I am clerk to Sir John Perring and Co. bankers, Cornhill. On the morning of the robbery I paid the prisoner 70 l. in exchange for one 10 l., five 5 l., seventeen 2 l., and one 1 l. Luton notes. I am sure he is the person, because he presented the parcel of notes. I counted them, and asked him the amount - he said 65 l. I counted them a second time, and made them 70 l. again. I asked him where he brought them from? I think he said from a person in St. John-street. I said I made them 70 l., and gave them to him to count; he said again he made them only 65 l. I handed them over to my fellow-cashier, he made them 70 l., and I paid him. This fixed my attention to him, and I am certain he is the man. He was dressed like an hostler.

GEORGE DICKENS . I live at No. 6, White Lion-street, Norton Falgate. I expected a remittance from Mr. Wingrave - it never came. The prisoner was never in my employ. I have known him about two years; he knew Wingrave and I had business together. I never authorized him to call for the parcel; I sent my lad for it on the 14th, at three o'clock, and it was gone. 8 l. in Bank notes, and 19 s., were found on the prisoner when he was taken,

BARNARD GLEED . I am an officer. On Tuesday last I apprehended the prisoner at Cheltenham, in the street; he knew me directly, and called me by my name. I took him into the Crown, public-house, and told him I came from town to apprehend him, for that parcel. I asked him to give me what notes he had got - he gave me eight 1 l. Bank notes from his pocket, a silver watch, and a gold key. He said a chap of the name of Handsome Billy had taken him to Oxford, and robbed him of 34 l.; that the watch was bought with part of the money, and as soon as I got to town I should pull Handsome Billy, for he was with him when he got the parcel. I asked him what he had done with the 20 l. bill, he said he had thrown it away, I know Handsome Billy.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not make me intoxicated before I said any thing - A. No, he was quite sober, we gave him nothing till afterwards. I only gave him a glass of rum as he got on the coach to come to town.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18191027-102

1478. JAMES MACNAB was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of October , one handkerchief, value 5 s., the property of John Gray , from the person of a child unknown .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating it to belong to the said child.

GEORGE TAYLOR . I am constable of Clerkenwell. On Monday, the 4th of October, a balloon was to be let off at the Belvidere; it did not go off, and the mountebanks came into the Islington fields , which occasioned a crowd; a woman was there with a child in her arms, looking at the horses, and during this time the prisoner untied the handkerchief from the child's neck, and pulled it gradually off. I secured him. The woman is not here; she claimed the handkerchief, and tried to pull it from me, but I would not let her have it. I do not know the child's name, the mother's name is Gray.

JOSEPH CADBY . I was in the fields, and seized the prisoner when he took the handkerchief off the child's neck.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant,

Reference Number: t18191027-103

1479. DENNIS DONOVAN was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of September , three brass caps, value 12 s. , the goods of Margaret Craven , widow , John Craven , and Dennis Shutt .

MR. DENNIS SHUTT . I am in partnership with Margaret Craven , widow, and John Craven . We are sugar-bakers , and live in Nelson-street, Whitechapel ; these brass caps belong to the pipes. On the 23d of September I missed seven. The prisoner was employed by the builder on the premises , which had been consumed by fire.

JOHN HENRY DINES . I am foreman to Mr. Cubit, the builder; the prisoner was employed in the building. I found three brass caps taken off the pipes, and concealed in the lower part of the building. I set Connelly to watch; and in consequence of what he said, I followed the prisoner out, stopped him in Nelson-street, and charged him with taking these caps - he denied it; I found them under his clothes, next his skin; another was found in his hat at the office. They fitted the pipes.

THOMAS CONNELLY . I was desired to watch. I found the caps were gone, and informed Mr. Dines.

ROBERT COOMBS . I took the prisoner in charge, and found a cap in his hat; two others were taken from him. I fitted them to the pipes.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I found them among the rubbish.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Six Months , and Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18191027-104

1480. JOSEPH TAYLOR was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of October , two live tame fowls, price 2 s. , the property of John Ackis .

JOHN ACKIS . I am a whitesmith , and live in Long-alley, Moorfields . Last Friday was a week, between seven and eight o'clock in the morning, my boy cried out that two men had run away with my fowls; he said he knew one of the men. I dressed myself, went in pursuit, and found the prisoner in company with five others, at the corner of Worship-street - the boy said he was the man. I went up, and asked him how he could rob me? he called me a bad name, and said he would knock my head off. I collared him, he tried to get away - he then said he would pay me for the fowls. I said if he had robbed me, I dare say he had some grits in his pocket; he immediately pulled some grits out, and threw them all about the watch-house. The officer found one of my fowls in his breeches.

WILLIAM LONG . I am servant to Mr. Ackis. The prisoner was enticing the fowls down the court with grits. I saw him put them under his coat. I knew him before.

Prisoner's Defence. They flew up, and I caught them.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191027-105

1481. WILLIAM SINFIELD was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of October , one pair of boots, value 6 s. , the goods of John Reeve and Joseph Reeve .

JOSEPH REEVE . I am in partnership with John Reeve ; we are shoemakers , and live in High Holborn . On the 7th of October, about half-past eight o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came to the door, and took a pair of boots off the nail; I secured him about ten yards from the door, and took them from under his apron.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I saw three men drop them.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Three Months , and Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191027-106

1482. JAMES STRACHAN was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of September , four books, value 10 s. , the property of Francis Maserers .

ROBERT BARRACK . I am servant to Francis Maserers , Esq. In September, while my master was at Reigate, his man met with an accident, and I was sent for to Reigate to assist him, at the same time a servant was sent to take care of the chambers. I returned to the chambers on the 23d of September, and the woman told me my nephew had been there. I was very sorry to hear it, knowing him to be a bad character; I suspected he had robbed the premises. The prisoner is my nephew. Next day on examining, I missed several books. I went immediately and found him at his mother's, I charged him with stealing them, he could not deny it. He said he had taken them, and took me to the pawnbroker's where he had pledged them. I found four books there.

HENRY THREDDER . I am servant to Mr. Baxter, who is a pawnbroker, and lives in High Holborn. On the 22d of September the prisoner pledged four books with me, for 10 s.

Prisoner's Defence. I called on my uncle to borrow money; not finding him at home I took the books instead of money.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191027-107

1483. ANN SCOTT was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of September , two yards of lace, value 4 s. 6 d. , the property of Benjamin Williams .

BENJAMIN WILLIAMS . I am a haberdasher , and live at No. 92, Whitechapel-road . On the 23d of September, about one o'clock, the prisoner came into the shop, and purchased some calico of my shopman, which came to 4 1/2 d. She then looked at some lace, which was shewn to her from the window, and asked the young man if he could not shew her some out of a box? he got the box up so to do. I then attempted to serve her myself, and shewed her a number of pieces; when we came to the one in question she took it out of the box herself, folded it in its present form, and laid it on the counter by the side of the box; then took another piece out, asked the price, and how much it measured; she said it was too much for her, and she would decline taking any, and said if I would put the calico in paper, she would pay for it. I stooped to get a piece of paper from under the counter, and then rose and missed the lace. I made no observation about it then, but endeavoured to persuade her to buy a piece of lace - she declined it, as she thought she could purchase some cheaper, which would suit her purpose. I suffered her to

go near the shop door, and then said to her,

"I will thank you to let me look in your hand, I think you have something which does not belong to you." She opened her hand, and the lace now produced was in it. I talked to her for sometime on the nature of her offence, and gave her in charge.

Q. Did you know her before - A. She was in my shop the evening previous.

Cross-examined by MR. CURWOOD. Q. She had a bundle in her hand - A. She had. She could not have took the lace up with the bundle. There were a number of loose pieces on the counter, she must have reached over to get this, her parcel did not lay near it. I found she had a good character.

Q. Did you not want 40 l. to make it up - A. No, 40,000 l. should never move me from a principal of justice.

MR. CURWOOD called on the prisoner's behalf,

MARTHA EVANS . The prosecutor called on me on Wednesday week, told me he had been to Hick's Hall, and he believed the bill would be found against Mrs. Scott. I told him I was very sorry for it, and asked him what I was to do? He told me, as we did not wish our friends to know it -

Q. Are you a relation of her's - A. Yes. He said the best way we could do, would be to acquaint three or four of our friends, and by that means raise 40 l. to prevent it; and then he should not be obliged to appear against her.

Q. That was for his recognizance - A. I suppose so. He said Mr. Scott had better call on him.

Q. You are her sister - A. Yes, she is a perfectly honest character.

COURT. Q. This 40 l. he wanted after he had been before the Grand Jury - A. He had expressed a wish to have it before.

Q. Did he call on you before - A. No, I called on him.

BENJAMIN WILLIAMS re-examined. The prisoner's husband and sister have been repeatedly to me, to know what I could do in it. I said the law was not in my hands, I would recommend her to mercy, and all they could do was to pay me 40 l. for not appearing against her, as I must forfeit that. I undervalued the lace, not to make it capital.

GUILTY. Aged 21.

Recommended to Mercy .

Fined One Shilling , and Discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191027-108

1484. JOHN PERKINS was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of October , seven shawls, value 20 s.; two shirts, value 8 s.; one pair of stockings, value 1 s., and one nightcap, value 2 d. , the property of John Wright .

JOHN WRIGHT . I am a labourer , and live at Brompton. On the 5th of October I left a bundle, containing these things, at the bar of the Marquis of Granby, public-house , at three o'clock in the afternoon, I went there at six, and they were gone.

CHARLES GAMMON . I am constable of Kensington. On the 5th of October, about nine o'clock in the evening, I was sent for to the Roebuck, and saw the prisoner with these things before him, offering them for sale; he would not satisfy me how he came by them, and I took him into custody. Next morning I went to him, he said he took them from the front of a postchaise. The prosecutor claimed them. I took him to the office, he then said another man took them out of the bar, and gave them to him to sell.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I met a man who took me into the house.

GUILTY . Aged 42.

Confined Six Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191027-109

1485. JAMES M'CARROL was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of October , two coats, value 34 s. , the goods of William Dawson .

WILLIAM DAWSON . I am commander of a West India ship . On the 11th of October I missed a coat from the cabin; the prisoner was an apprentice on board the ship . I inquired for it, and he said it was down below, under the cabin; he went down, searched for it some time, and then said he had taken it ashore one rainy night, and forgot to bring it back - he said he took it to the lodging-house. I desired the other apprentice to go to the lodging-house for it; the prisoner said he would go, but I said he should not. He then said it was not there, it was at Briggs's; I missed other things, suspected him, and gave him in charge. I went with him to Briggs's, and found the coat hanging up there with another old one of mine; he said he took them ashore on Sunday last to look decent. Briggs told him that he said they were given to him by a passenger in the ship.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not tell me to take it ashore - A. Never.

MARGARET BRIGGS . I live at No. 44, North-street; the prisoner brought me a great coat first, and a blue one three or four days after; he said a passenger on board gave them to him - he asked permission to leave them with me, and said he would take them on board. The prosecutor afterwards saw and claimed them.

JOSEPH HARDING . I am an officer. I took the prisoner in charge, went to Briggs's, and found the coats, which the prosecutor claimed.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I did not intend to steal them. I took them ashore one rainy night.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined Six Months , and Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191027-110

1486. MARY HUGHES was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of October , from the person of Thomas Edwards , five 1 l, Bank note , his property.

The prosecutor did not appear.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191027-111

1487. JOSEPH HARDING was indicted for embezzlement .

JAMES GIBSON . I am a baker , and live in High-street, Clerkenwell; the prisoner was my journeyman , and entrusted to receive money for me. Elizabeth Larnham was a customer of mine, and owed me 1 l. 5 s. It was the prisoner's duty to receive it, but he never paid me the money.

ELIZABETH LARNHAM . I deal with Gibson. In August last, I paid the prisoner a 1 l. note and 5 s. for his master - this is the bill - here is a receipt to it. There was a halfpenny deficient, which he said did not signify.

MARY GIBSON . I am the prosecutor's mother. About the 16th of August the prisoner asked me for Mrs. Larnham's bill. I told him I would not give it to him until his master came home, which would be on the Tuesday following. I always receive the money, He never paid it to me, I am certain.

Prisoner's Defence. I paid her the money, and she said she would put it by till Mr. Gibson returned.

GEORGE TAYLOR . I apprehended the prisoner; he tried to throw me down, in order to escape, and said,

"For God's sake don't take me! I have done wrong."

GUILTY . Aged 36.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191027-112

1488. JAMES NAIL was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of October , one watch, value 2 l.; one seal, value 10 s., and one key, value 5 s., the goods of James Nicholls , from his person .

JAMES NICHOLLS . On Saturday night, the 16th of October, I was at the Key, public-house, Bell-street, Marylebone , between seven and eight o'clock in the evening. In about an hour I fell asleep, and when I awoke I missed my watch - I was very sober. The prisoner was in the house all the evening; he was not in my company.

CHARLES CROCKETT . I was at the Key, public-house, having a pot of beer, a few minutes after ten o'clock, and sat in the box with the prosecutor; a man named Windred sat on the right, between him and me - the prisoner and one Barrett, sat on the opposite side with another man; I saw them whispering together, and pointing over to Nicholls. Nail jumped over the settle, and sat down by the side of the prosecutor, who was asleep. He first shook his waistcoat-pocket, then forced his hand into his breeches-pocket, drew something out, and put it into his breast; Windred laid himself along the settle to prevent my seeing - Nail went over to his companions again, and they ran out of the house. I sat there about ten minutes, then the prosecutor awoke and missed his watch; I was afraid to speak then, so I went outside of the house, and told the company that I saw the prisoner do it - I did not see what he took. The officer was sent for.

RICHARD COATES . The prosecutor came to me about ten o'clock that night, and said he had been robbed of his watch. I went with him, and called the prisoner and Barrett out of the house; the prosecutor said a man had seen him do it, but he was not there - I then let him go. I stopped and had a glass of beer while the prosecutor went and fetched Crockett, who said he saw the prisoner draw something from the prosecutor's breeches, and put it into his bosom. I took him into custody, but found nothing on him. I did not search Barrett.

Prisoner's Defence. He offered to make it up.

WILLIAM WINDRED . I was at the Key, public-house, and sat in the box with Nicholls.

Q. You sat between him and Crockett - A. I sat within one or two of Nicholls, and never saw Nail in the box all the while I was there, which was half an hour.

Q. Did you not endeavour to cover him - A. No, nobody moved while I was there - the prisoner did not move.

Q. What time did you go there - A. At half-past seven o'clock, and staid an hour and a half - Nicholls went away while I was there. He was asleep until he missed his property.

Q. Somebody must have been near enough to take it - A. I took no notice.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191027-113

1489. JOHN CASHBOLD was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of October , 28 lbs. of lead, value 5 s., the property of Sarah Key , widow, and fixed to her dwelling-house .

SARAH KEY . I am a coachmaker , and live in Goswell-street . About nine days ago I lost this lead from a gutter inside the house; it carried the water through the shop to the gutter, in Glasshouse-yard - it is fixed. Six feet of it was taken away.

JOHN LONNON . I rent the cellar in the prosecutrix's house - I am a smith. I lost several tools, and found the lead cut off the pipe; the prisoner used often come to assist me; he came two nights before that, and stood in the corner where the lead was taken from - we agreed to watch him. Next night he came as usual, took a coffee-pot, and said he was going for water; he went to the water-butt, then went to the corner above the shop - it was dark; he went away, saying,

"Good night." We instantly went after him, and secured him in an old iron shop, where he had sold the lead for 9 1/2 d. It was safe when he came, and missed immediately after he went.

JOSEPH PRINCE . I am an officer. I was set to watch the place, saw the prisoner go in, and come out again; they said he had got it. I lost him, and went another way to an old iron shop in Bridgewater-gardens, and found him there; he had just received 9 1/2 d. for the lead, which was in the scale - the woman refused to produce it. I found a knife on him, with which he said he cut the lead, and that he did it through distress - the money was in his hand. I told him to give the lead up, but the woman said I should not have it.

Prisoner. I throw myself on your mercy.

GUILTY . Aged 29.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191027-114

1490. MARGARET CRAWLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of October , one shirt, value 3 s. , the property of Jeremiah Malone .

JEREMIAH MALONE . I am a labourer , and lodge in Stewart's-rents, Drury-lane . On the 23d of October I lost a shirt; the prisoner lodged in the same house. The officer searched her apartments on another charge, and found my shirt on her.

JOHN ESHELBY . I am a constable. I took the prisoner into custody in Russell-street, and found the shirt in her hand - it was wet as if it had just come out of the washing-tub. She said she found it in the street.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I found it on the bannisters. I did not know who lost it.

GUILTY . Aged 42.

Confined Six Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191027-115

1491. MARGARET CRAWLEY was again indicted for stealing, one coat, value 30 s. , the goods of Patrick Reardon .

PATRICK REARDON . I lodge in the same house as the prisoner, and lost my coat, but never found it.

CATHARINE HAYES . The prisoner sent me out for some gin; I heard my mistress down stairs, ran up again, and met the prisoner on the stairs with a coat - she told me to tell my mistress that I was going for milk.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191027-116

1492. JOHN CONNER was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of October , two iron vices, value 21 s. , the property of Thomas Harrison .

THOMAS HARRISON . I am a smith . On the 15th of October my place was broken open, and two iron vices stolen. I found one of them at a broker's shop in Monmouth-court.

JANE HARRISON . I locked the cellar on the 15th of October, and next morning it was broken open. The prisoner worked for my husband some times.

FRANCIS MURRAY . On the 19th of October, I went with the prosecutor and his wife, to Oakley's, in Monmouth-court, where we found the vice. The same day I went to No. 21, St. Andrew's-street, and found the prisoner concealed behind his bed; they would not open the door, but we broke it open. I found another man in the room - he did not charge that man with it.

JOHN OAKLEY . I am a smith, and live in Monmouth-court. On Monday, the 18th of October, I bought this vice of Price, who lives at my house, for 6 s. Harrison claimed it about two hours after.

GEORGE PRICE . I am a cabinet maker, and lodge with Oakley. On Monday, the 18th of October, I bought the vice of the prisoner for 5 s., and sold it for 6 s. I have known him twelve months; he is a tinman - another man was with him.

Q. Where did you buy it - A. In the prisoner's room, No. 21, St. Andrew's-street - I put the money on the table - the other man took part of it up and looked at it. I do not know who took the rest.

Prisoner's Defence. It was brought into my room by a man who asked me to buy it; I sent for Price, who bought it, and the man took the 5 s. up. At night they told me it was stolen, and I had better find the man, which I did, and took him to my room, but the officer took me, and let him go.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191027-117

1493. MARY BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of June , one watch, value 2 l., and one seal, value 3 s., the goods of James Rice , from his person .

JAMES RICE . On the 9th of June, about twenty minutes before two o'clock in the morning, I was in Crown-street, Finsbury-square - I am a watchman, and was on duty. The prisoner ran up to me, and said,

"How do you do, Mr. Rice?" I said

"I was very well." She then said,

"How does your wife do?" I said she was very ill, and at the point of death; she followed me down the street to the top of Long-alley . I put my lanthorn on my box - she stood still; I told her to go about her business, and not stand there. A coach came by, and she said there was a coach - I told her to go about her business. The moment the coach passed she ran against me, and took the watch out of my fob - I was suspicious of her; I had known her seven years. I pursued her immediately, but she escaped. Next day I went to look for her, and found that she lodged at No. 5, Cowheel-alley, Whitecross-street. I charged her with stealing my watch, but she denied it. I said,

"You know you took it in a moment." She said,

"Well I did take it in a moment, for if I have business to do I don't take half an hour to do it." The mistress of the house said,

"Give the old man his watch" - she said she had not got it; she would not tell me where she had pawned it. I fetched an officer, returned, and she was gone. I was not able to find her until the 12th of October, when she was taken.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing of it. I met him that night, and asked him how he did. Next morning I met him, and he asked me about it. I said I knew nothing of it.

GUILTY . Aged 35.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191027-118

1494. JOHN LLOYD was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of August , 23 lbs. of silk, value 60 l. , the goods of John Bredel and Philip Chabot .

PHILIP CHABOT . I am a dyer , and am in partnership with John Bredel ; we live in Fashion-street, Spitalfields ; the prisoner had left our service about six weeks before this robbery. On Tuesday morning, the 3d of August, I found that we had lost between 20 and 30 lbs. of silk - some raw and some boiled; it was taken from a closet in our skeining-room. On examination, I found that the premises had been entered by the churchyard-wall, which joins the back of them - they must have entered our loft to go to the skeining-room door, which was in the dye-house; they had endeavoured to force the door open - the key of this door had usually been hung up at a distant part of the dye-house, which the prisoner knew, but it was not there that night. After failing in their attempt to open the door, it appears that they must have returned up stairs and taken out some four inch brick-work, which made an opening into a room over the skeining-room, where there is a flap-door communicating with it, which is not always locked; the key of the closet was in the foreman's desk in the skeining-room. This desk was wrenched open, the key of the closet taken out, and opened with it - the closet was not forced open, but all this silk was taken out of it. Next morning, when the people came to work, they discovered the loss, and on looking round, one of them found an old coat of the prisoner's in the lower part of the premises, where the door had first been attempted. I have never found the silk.

JEREMIAH BADHAM . I am in the prosecutor's employ I have the care of all the silk. The silk in question was locked up in the closet on the evening of the 2d of August; I put the key of the closet in my desk in the same

room - I had the key of the desk in my possession. In the morning I found the place had been entered and robbed. On examination, I found they had taken down a board, got into the loft, and broken a four-inch wall, and got through the trap-door into the skeining-room. My desk was broken open to get the key of the closet, as I found the key in the closet, which was not broken open. It must have been some one who knew the premises. I saw the coat which was found, it is the prisoner's. We lost about 30 lbs. of silk.

CHARLES BRETT . On the 2d of August, about ten minutes past six o'clock in the morning, I found the coat in the dye-house, about three yards from the skeining-room door; I took it up, and carried it into the skeining-room directly - all the men recognized it as the prisoner's - this is it - (looking at it) I knew it by a mark on it, which is particular. It was not there the night before.

SAMUEL MILLINER . The prisoner lodged at my house four weeks and a few days. On Saturday he did not come home all night; on Sunday evening he came home with his great coat on; I said,

"What! have you taken to your great-coat this warm weather?" he said

"Yes, it is a coat I work in in cold weather to do cold jobs." When he got up on Monday morning, he took the coat away on his arm. I did not see him again for five weeks after. The coat produced is the one. I did not know he was going to leave.

Q. What day of the month was it - A. It was the Saturday night before the robbery was committed. He came home on Sunday evening about nine o'clock.

Prisoner. Q. How do you know the coat to be mine - - A. By the colour.

ROBERT HICKMAN . I remember the day of the robbery - I saw the prisoner the morning before at a public-house, he had the coat produced, on the table; I am certain it is the same. I asked him what he was going to do with it? he said to work in it. I shewed him this mark on it.

BENJAMIN BALIS . I saw the prisoner at the public-house with this coat. I know it by having seen him wear it.

JOHN DAVIS . On the 30th of September I apprehended the prisoner in Spitalfields.

Prisoner's Defence. I left my coat and shoes in the dye-house when I left their employ. One of the men has been discharged since for dishonesty - it is a plan among them to throw it on me.

WILLIAM FARREL . I am a weaver, and lodge in Widegate-alley. On the 2d of August the prisoner lodged with me, and on the Saturday before that. On the Tuesday morning, at half-past five o'clock, I took him out with me; he then went into the country for a fortnight.

Cross-examined by MR. CURWOOD. Q. You mean to swear he slept at your house on Saturday night - A. Yes, and Monday night.

Q. Where was he on Sunday night - A. I do not know.

GUILTY . Aged 35.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191027-119

1495. SARAH BYRN was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of April , one gown, value 4 s. , the goods of William Hitchins .

MARY HITCHINS . I take in mangling. On the 10th of April I lost a gown out of my room, and found it last Wednesday fortnight on Sarah Pannal 's back, I knew it to be mine. The prisoner used to bring things to be mangled.

SARAH PANNAL . The prisoner gave me the duplicate of the gown; it was pledged at Murray's for 4 s.

THOMAS HARRIS . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner; she said she gave a person 4 d. for the duplicate of the gown, but did not know where the person lived.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I bought the duplicate of a woman who formerly lived in Dean-street.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191027-120

1496. MARY ANN WILLIAMS , JOHN KENNY , and JAMES DAVIS were indicted for stealing, on the 20th of August , from the person of Thomas Dyer , one pocketbook, value 1 s., and sixteen 1 l. Bank notes , his property.

THOMAS DYER . I am a cow-dealer , and live at Bromley, in Kent. On the 20th of August I met with the prisoner, Williams, in Smithfield, about seven o'clock; she took me to Kenny's house, No. 3, Swan-yard, Strand . As I was going up stairs I felt my pocket-book safe in my pocket, it contained sixteen 1 l. Bank notes, and five of the Ryegate Bank. I awoke about six o'clock in the morning, and found my pocket-book gone - she was still with me. She assisted me in searching about the room, but I could not find it. I offered her 5 l. to return it, she declared her innocence. I am certain it was safe when I went there. I was rather in liquor, but not insensible.

JOSEPH GREEN . I am a patrol of the Strand. About ten or eleven o'clock on the 20th of August I heard a noise up Swan-yard, and found Kenny and another man had been quarrelling; Kenny was at his door, I requested him to go in, which he did. In the morning I heard the same noise again, went up, and found Kenny and Davis quarrelling. I said,

"Why it is not long ago since I separated you, and you are at it again! I shall take you to the watch-house as disorderly," which I did. Davis laid hold of Kenny, and said he would not let him go until he had got his money back, for he had robbed him of a pocketbook and 21 l., which was in Kenny's house. Kenny wished me to go in and search, I did not - they had both been drinking. Davis knew what he was about, but Kenny was rather more in liquor. I told Davis to be careful of what he said, for it was a serious thing to charge a man with robbing him - he still persisted in it, and I took them both to the watch-house, where he gave charge to that effect. On Saturday morning I took Kenny to Bow-street, the Magistrate asked Davis if he charged Kenny with robbing him? he said he was in liquor, and could not say whether it was him or not, but he had been robbed of it. The Magistrate discharged the complaint.

ELIZABETH JONES . On the 20th of August I saw Davis standing at Kenny's door with Kenny's coat on; after that I saw Williams come down stairs to go for some oysters; she crossed, and went to the oyster-stall, and had some opened, Davis followed her. She told him she was going for some bread and cheese - he said,

"Now you had better let me go and do the trick." She said,

"No, it is a man I

have known many years, and I will not have it done." When she came back he said,

"You might as well have let me done it;" she said No, and went up stairs. I saw no more of her. About two o'clock in the morning Kenny and Davis were fighting. It was the night of the robbery.

ANN SMITH . I am servant to Mr. Williams, who keeps the Swan, in Swan-yard. On the night of the 20th of August I went out to get some gin, and on coming back I saw Davis and Kenny standing under the lamp, counting some money. I heard Davis say there was 21 l. He had a pocket-book and the notes in his hand - this was between eleven and twelve o'clock - I saw them again at one o'clock; Davis had then changed coats with Kenny; they were drinking together at the top of Swan-yard with several girls. Between three and four o'clock I saw them fighting in Swan-yard. Davis charged Kenny with robbing him of a pocket-book and 21 l. I believe they went to the watch-house.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. You was up all night - A. Yes, it is a night-house.

Q. When did you go before the Magistrate - A. On the 18th of September, I think - I was not sent for before.

SAMUEL DICKENS . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoners. I searched Kenny's house on the 11th of September, but found nothing. The notes have never been found.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191027-121

1497. GEORGE BRAY was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of August , one shirt, value 5 s.; three shifts, value 3 s.; six handkerchiefs, value 3 s.; one table-cloth, value 18 d.; one apron, value 1 s., and one collar, value 9 d. , the property of Augustine Stanley .

MARY STANLEY . I am the wife of Augustine Stanley. On the 4th of August, in the afternoon, my linen hung in my garden to dry. I was in the yard ten minutes before five o'clock, the door was bolted, and the things safe; in a few minutes a young man told me I had been robbed of my linen. I went into the yard, found the door open, and my linen gone out of a basket, and one shirt was taken off the line, which I had pinned on. The lad took me to a field-gate, and I saw the prisoner running; Blain followed and secured him at Bagnigge Wells; he was brought back to my yard, I opened his apron, and took the linen out.

WILLIAM CURTAIN . I was looking out of window, and saw the prisoner take a shirt off the line, and put it in his apron; he then went under the hatch-way - I informed a man of it - I saw him go down the field, I ran out, and the other witness secured him.

CHARLES BLAIN . I secured the prisoner, and brought him back with a quantity of damp linen in his apron. Another person was with him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Three Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191027-122

1498. ANTHONY ASLAT was indicted for perjury .

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18191027-123

1499. RICHARD BUTLER was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of October , one watch, value 30 s.; one key, value 2 d., and one piece of ribbon, value 1 d., the property of George Gaywood , from his person .

GEORGE GAYWOOD . I am a carter . On the 3d of October, between six and seven o'clock in the morning, I was in town; just as I came out of the door of the Coach and Horses, public-house, Whitechapel , I was surrounded by six or eight, or more persons. I do not know any of them - a girl kept dancing before me. They hustled me; I lost my watch unknown to me - I missed it a few minutes afterwards. It was safe just before. In about half an hour I saw the constable, he found it on the prisoner, who was in custody.

JOHN BURRELL . I am waiter at the Coach and Horses. On Saturday morning, the 3d of October, I saw the prisoner, with half a dozen others, the prosecutor got outside the door, a girl accosted him, and kept dancing round him, when six or seven pickpockets surrounded him - one of them drew the watch out of his pocket, the prisoner ran and received it from him, and then ran away with it. I went for an officer, and described him to the officer; in the meantime he came up in a different dress. I laid hold of him, and gave him to the officer. I saw the watch taken from his right hand pocket. He resisted being searched.

Prisoner. Q. What clothes did I change - A. A blue apron and corded breeches.

Q. Did not the officer ask if I was the man - A. No.

WILLIAM LYON . I am headborough of Whitechapel. Burrell described the man to me; the prisoner came in at the door, I thought he answered the description, and said

"Look at this man;" he came out, and said,

"That is the man." I secured him, and said I must search you, for this man has been robbed of his watch. He resisted terribly. After a great deal of resistance I searched him, and found the watch in his right-hand breeches-pocket.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was drinking in the house, a man came in in a hurry, put the watch into my hand, and said,

"Hold this a few minutes, for I am going to fight." I left the house to get shaved, when I returned the officer asked the potboy if I was the man? he said, Yes. He asked me if had a watch? I said I have, but it is not mine, I have come back to give it to the man who gave it to me. I pulled it out, and he took it. I did not resist.

GEORGE GAYWOOD re-examined. I did not give it to him.

GUILTY . Aged 32.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18191027-124

1500. THOMAS BARRETT was indicted for that he, on the 26th of July , with a certain offensive weapon (to wit, a knife), upon Edward Kelly , unlawfully, maliciously and feloniously did make an assault, with a felonious intent to rob him, and his money from his person and against his will feloniously and violently to steal .

EDWARD KELLY . I am lessee of the turnpike gates at Paddington . On the 26th of July, between six and seven o'clock in the evening, I was close by Kilburn gate - it was the first day of West End fair - I went to collect my money from the different gates, and stood there waiting for the receiver to make up his money, seven men came up in a cart, Henley, who was convicted last Session, was one, one Griffiths, and the prisoner was another. As I stood against the post, Henley struck me over the head with a stick, which cut my hat through with the blow - my head was cut in two places; my hat came over my eyes. They jumped out of the cart, pulled me about, and almost choked me; some of them tried to get my watch out, but could not, because my fob was twisted. I had about 322 l. in my pocket-book, and put my hand on it to secure it, then the prisoner and Griffiths came up to me, one of them cut my finger, which was on my pocket-book - they must have had a knife; I think they meant to cut my pocket. I hallooed out for assistance. I could neither move nor stir, I was confined so close against the post - assistance came, they were overpowered, jumped into the cart, and went off. It was broad daylight. As they were going off, one of them said,

"You b - gg - r, you shall never live to transport another man for stealing iron." I had prosecuted a man for stealing iron, who was transported. I have not the least doubt of the prisoner being one of them. I knew him before, he lived near me.

Cross-examined by MR. ARABIN. Q. He must have known that you knew him - A. I think so. I know two or three more of them.

Q. I believe, at the office, or somewhere else, you said to him.

"I know nothing of you, I cannot say you was one of them." - A. Never.

JURY. Q. Did you never see him from that time till he was taken - A. Never. I did not know where he lived then. The day after the 27th, I was going to the gate, as before, saw him in the road, and ran after him - he got away. I seized Griffiths, and he also got away. The prisoner was taken three weeks ago.

RICHARD COATES . I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner in Bell-street, going into the Key, public-house, in the Edgware-road.

Q. Did you know where he lived - A. Yes. I heard of this charge on the 27th, and have been twenty times after him - he had absconded. I knew Griffiths well, and have often seen him in the prisoner's company. I had seen Henley and all of them in the cart, on the day of the robbery, at a quarter after seven o'clock, about a mile from the gate, coming from the fair. I know the whole gang.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18191027-125

1501. ARTHUR ELLINGTON and JAMES DUNN were indicted for stealing, on the 28th of September , one chest, value 6 d., and 80 lbs. of tea, value 20 l. , the goods of Robert Matthews .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating it belong to Joseph Chadwell .

ROBERT MATTHEWS . I am a grocer , and live in Jermyn-street, St. James's, Ellington occasionally did porter's work for me, the other prisoner is a stranger. On the 28th of September, about eight or nine o'clock in the morning, I sent Ellington to fetch a chest of tea from the East-India warehouse, Crutched-friars, and to take it to Mr. Chadwell, who lives in Sloane-street, as I had sold it to him. He said he could not take it to Mr. Chadwell before six o'clock in the evening, but that he would be sure to take it by that time - he was to take it there from the warehouse. About eleven o'clock that night two officers came and informed me that it had been stolen. I saw it next morning at Worship-street; the tea had then been emptied into a bag, and weighed 5 lbs. short. The number of the chest was the same I ordered him to fetch; the permit was with it. Mr. Moffatt was my broker.

Cross-examined by MR. ARABIN. Q. What was it worth per pound - A. 6 s. 8 d.; I was to receive that.

JOHN HICKMAN . I am servant to the East-India Company. On the 28th of September, about eleven o'clock in the morning, Ellington came alone, and asked me to look for a paper in the name of Joseph Chadwell . I went and looked for the paper, it was not there. I asked him who was the broker that was to clear the tea? he said Mr. Moffatt - he appeared in great haste. I said,

"You had better step up to the broker, and see if he has cleared the chest." He went out of the yard, returned in about five or six minutes with a piece of paper, with the number of the chest on it - it was the proper paper. He said,

"Is this number down for delivery?" I found one of that number, and delivered it to him, and he took it out of the yard on his knot - he was alone. I saw the same chest next day at the office, where both the prisoners were in custody.

ANTHONY MOLLOY . I keep the Crispin, public-house, in Grub-street, St. Luke's, Dunn lodged with me. On the 28th of September, between six and seven o'clock in the morning, Ellington came to my house, Dunn let him in. I went up stairs, and saw no more of them until between one and two o'clock, when Dunn came in with Mary Toy , and had half a pint of gin in a bottle; he paid for it, and she took it away - he remained there. After that, both the prisoners came to my house together, and had something to eat and drink.

Q. Did you see any chest of tea - A. No, my Lord; Dunn asked me to lend him 1 l., which I did in silver. He then shewed me a sample of tea, which he said he had to sell - Ellington was not then present; I had known him to have coffee, but never knew him to have tea to sell before, He asked me if I could assist him in the sale of it? and said he had 80 lbs. I said I would have nothing to do with it - this was about three or four o'clock; they both went out, but I do not know whether they both left exactly together. I afterwards went to look for Dunn, and found him at No. 1, Crown-court, Grub-street - Ellington was not with him; Dunn quarelled with me, and I left him. When I returned I found Ellington at my house; Dunn came in very much in liquor - they were both in liquor, and I sent for an officer.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you allow them to run up a score at your house for eating and drinking - A. About 8 s. I lent Dunn 1 l. before the tea was mentioned.

Q. You did not advance it on tea or coffee - A. No, they talked about the tea.

Q. Did you not say you thought 3 s. a pound a fair price - A. No, I should think it worth 3 s. in the East-India Company's warehouse.

Q. Did you calculate what the whole would come to - A. No; I said something about 17 l. I informed the officers myself about it.

Q. Did you not complain of an assault - A. I might. I told the officers I suspected they had stolen the tea, and shewed them where it was.

Q. How did you know where it was - A. I heard them say it was in the house in Crown-court.

Q. Did you say what you thought the tea worth - A. I do not recollect - A. I might have said it was worth 3 s. or 4 s., 10 s. 6 d., or a guinea.

Q. You did not know the officer had got sound of it, and say,

"Now, as I have not got a bargain, I'll sell you like a bullock" - A. I do not know; I might have said so.

Q. You know a little of the trade - A. Very little. I have worked in a tea warehouse about three months. I have been five years in the service, but only occasionally employed in the warehouse for about three months.

WILLIAM ALDUS . I am a constable of St. Luke's. On the 28th of September Molloy came and gave me information about the tea; I found the prisoners at his house between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, and took them to the watch-house. On Ellington I found a permit for the tea, the same number as that on the chest; on Dunn I found about half an ounce of tea, which appeared to be the same sort as that in the chest. Next morning I and Bee went to No. 1, Crown-court, in consequence of information from Molloy, and there found 80 lbs. of tea sewed up in a sack in the one-pair room - I found the chest broken up in different parts of the room; I put it together; it was not quite entire, but the number was perfect, and corresponded with the permit - it was No. 13,804. Lane keeps the house. The prisoners were both drunk, particularly Ellington.

ROBERT MATTHEWS re-examined. It is the chest which was to have gone to Mr. Chadwell.

JOHN BEE . I am a constable. I went with Aldus to the house, and found the tea and part of the chest. Molloy had informed me that it was either at No. 1, or lower down.

MARY TOY . I lodge at No. 1, Crown-court, in the first floor; I have known Dunn many years. On the 28th of September, between one and two o'clock, he brought a chest of tea covered over with a sack, Ellington was with him - it was in the shape of a chest; they put it in the sack. The constable fetched it away next morning. The prisoners had half a pint of gin, I had a glass with them.

Cross-examined. Q. Molloy did not come to the lodging, and have a glass himself - A. Yes, and paid for it himself - I do not know that he saw the tea. Ellington had sewed it up in a sack before he came.

ELLINGTON'S Defence. Molloy told the Magistrate that I pitched the chest on a block, went to get a pint of beer, and in the mean time it was stolen. I was very tipsey, and could not carry it. He advanced me 1 l., and said,

"That is for the chest."

DUNN'S Defence. The men called on me in the morning; Molloy called me, I got up and let them both in - I afterwards found Ellington in the tap-room, and he went to the warehouse for the chest. I met him in Moorfields, he said he must trouble me to carry it, I assisted him with it to Crown-court; we both went to Molloy, he agreed to give 17 l. 5 s. for the tea, and 1 l. was paid to Ellington towards it; I had no dealings with it. As to the sample which was found on me, I bought it in Holborn on the Saturday before.

ELLINGTON - GUILTY . Aged 24.

Confined Three Months .

DUNN - GUILTY . Aged 40.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18191027-126

1502. JOHN WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of October , one pair of breeches, value 8 s. , the property of John Adams .

HENRY PALMER . I am servant to John Adams , who is a salesman , and lives in High Holborn . On the 23d of October, about four o'clock in the afternoon, my master was cleaning the windows inside, a pair of breeches was taken from the outside of the window - he sent me out, and I caught the prisoner at the window with them inside his coat - he said he did not take them. My master desired me to fetch a constable, the prisoner immediately escaped across the way, I followed and caught him about 200 yards off, he was running; I never lost sight of him.

JAMES FURZEMAN . I am an assistant to my brother, who is a constable; the prisoner and breeches were given into my charge - he said he took them through distress.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I had eat nothing for two days, except a roll, and was in extreme distress.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Fined One Shilling , and Discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18191027-127

1503. THOMAS NORMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of October , one handkerchief, value 7 s., and three shirts, value 18 s. , the property of James Polworth .

JAMES POLWORTH . I am servant to William Mason , who is a baker, and lives in Upper Chalton-street, Fitzroy-square. On the 27th of October, between eleven and twelve o'clock, I pitched my basket at the corner of North-street, Charlotte-street ; these shirts were tied in a handkerchief, and put into the basket under the loaves - it could be seen by a person looking into the basket. I went to a customer at the top of the street, and as I returned I saw the prisoner take the bundle out of the basket and run away with it - I was about a stone's throw from him. He ran from me, I pursued him directly; he turned into John-street - I called Stop thief! another person also pursued. I saw him drop the bundle in Chapel-street, he was then about thirty yards from me - Osborn secured him; I picked the bundle up. I am sure he is the boy.

Cross-examined by MR. ARABIN. Q. Your basket was open - A. It was laid down sideways - he could not see into it without lifting it up. I lost sight of him for a moment.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN OSBORN . I am a baker, and live with Mr. Roberts, in John-street, I heard a cry of Stop thief! pursued immediately, and saw the prisoner and another lad

coming round the corner, both running, and the prosecutor calling Stop thief! I was very near them. The prisoner threw the bundle out of his apron, I pursued him across Tottenham-court-road, calling Stop thief! I never lost sight of him until he was stopped by two young men. I am sure he is the boy.

JAMES RICHARDS . I am a constable. The prisoner was given into my charge.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you know him - A. I have seen him frequently - I never knew him in trouble before.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going up John-street, a lad gave me the bundle to carry. They cried Stop thief! and did not take the lad but seized me.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined One Month , and Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18191027-128

1504. JAMES WEIGHT was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of October , one crupper, value 2 s., and two horse-boots, value 3 d. , the property of John William Briant and William Henry Briant .

JOHN WILLIAM BRIANT . I am in partnership with William Henry Briant ; we are wharfingers and coal-merchants , at Wapping . On the 22d of October, about one o'clock, the crupper hung in the back-room leading from the wharf to the counting-house. I missed it about three o'clock, and asked him if he had seen it? he said he had not. Between six and seven Judd came and desired me to attend next day at the Thames Police Office, which I did, and found the prisoner in custody, with the crupper and two horse-boots, which were mine, He was our servant, and worked three years with us at 24 s. per week. I had not seen the boots for some time.

WILLIAM JUDD . I am a Thames Police officer. On the 22d of October, about six o'clock in the evening, I was with Beech and two others, and saw the prisoner go up Church-street, with something concealed under his greatcoat; I asked him what he had got? he said a piece of harness, and that he worked for Briant. While we were examining it Beech said it was a crupper - the prisoner immediately ran away as hard as he could. I pursued and secured him, without losing sight of him. As he ran he tried to pull his great-coat off.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I was in liquor and did wrong, which I am sorry for.

GUILTY . Aged 46.

Confined One Month .

First Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18191027-129

1505. ELIZABETH TURNER was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of October , two tea-spoons, value 3 s. , the property of Joseph Levi .

JOSEPH LEVI . I live with my father-in-law, Solomon Joseph , at Wapping-wall ; he is a salesman - I am his servant , the prisoner was also his servant . On the 8th of October two spoons were missing - one was mine, the other my father's. I came home, and my wife told me she had given the prisoner in charge.

DIANA LEVI . I am wife of the last witness. The beginning of October being our holiday-time, my mother brought down a quantity of her best spoons; after tea I told the prisoner to be careful and wash them, and bring them up with the tea-things - I thought she brought them all up, but did not count them. A day or two afterwards we missed two common ones - one was engraved, that was my husband's; I could not find it, told the prisoner I had missed them, and asked what she had done with them? she said,

"I hope you don't think I have taken them" - I said they must be in the house, she immediately ran out of the house. I put on my bonnet, ran out, and overtook her near her own house, which is on Dock-hill - she only chaired for us. I told her it was plain she had taken them, and asked her what she had done with them? She took me to Fleming's, where I found my father's spoon, but not ours.

DAVID FLEMING . I am a watch-maker and jeweller. On the 4th of October, about nine o'clock in the morning the prisoner came and asked me if I bought old silver, as her mother had some to sell? In the course of the day the brought me an old shilling; next day I bought a spoon of her. On the Thursday following, which was the 7th of October, she brought another; I gave her 1 s. 3 d. for each of them. Mrs. Levi and the prisoner came afterwards, and I shewed her one. I had sent the first off with other old silver. I do not know whether it was engraved with a cypher, it was engraved round the edges.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18191027-130

1506. WILLIAM SHEEN and JAMES SULLIVAN were indicted for stealing, on the 7th of October , 109 lbs. of lead, value 9 s. , the property of John Saunders .

JAMES HERLING . I am a labourer, and live at Hendon. On Thursday, the 7th of October, between seven and eight o'clock, I was coming across the fields to breakfast, and was informed that three men were gone up with some lead. Two persons asked me to pursue with them; I ran to Gould's-green, and caught sight of the prisoners and another man, who were walking - I ran after them; they went on about half a mile farther before I overtook them. When I got within twenty yards of them, they saw me; two of them turned over the heath, and I caught the other, which was Sullivan; he had about 28 lbs. of lead - it appeared to be the piece of a cistern. I asked him where he got it from? He said from the building beyond, pointing behind him - I had passed no buildings. I secured him, and took him to the watch-house with the lead - he did not resist; he said he wanted victuals. I know Sheen was with him, for I saw him only twenty yards before me. I think I should know the third man, but he was rather before Sheen.

WILLIAM PIGGOT . I am a labourer, and work at Hampstead. On the 7th of October, I was going to work at Mr. Gamble's, who is a baker, and lives at the top of Hampstead, and was informed that a man desired me to cross the common after some men, who had robbed somebody - I could see nobody, but he pointed where I was to go to; I pursued, and caught sight of Sheen, who was running about a quarter of a mile off; I overtook him near Kentish-town - he ran all the way; several others were in pursuit. I took him to Hampstead watch-house, and there found Sullivan and the last witness.

Q. When you caught Sheen, what did he say - A. He said he had not done any thing - nothing was found on him. He was alone when I first saw him. People were pursuing him.

JOHN HARREL . I am rentor of Hampstead Heath. On the 7th of October, as I was crossing the heath, a man came up and pointed two men out to me; while he was speaking, I saw them both stoop down. and each take up a parcel of something very heavy - they were about a hundred and fifty yards off - I could not tell what it was. They walked off, and I walked with the man about a hundred and fifty yards; they saw us following them, and both set off running - they ran about two hundred yards with the lead, which was wrapped up in haybands. I heard the people cry out that they had thrown the lead into the ditch; I had then lost sight of them, and did not see them again. I called to my men to pursue them, returned, and found two parcels of lead in the ditch, wrapped up in hay-bands - I cannot say they were the same that I saw the men with - I do not know either of the men. In the afternoon I found about 6 lbs. of lead on the spot they had passed - I did not see them by the ditch, but they must have passed it. I afterwards saw the prisoner's at the watch-house, and sent the man to Maddock's with the lead.

THOMAS HUNT . I am constable of Hampstead. The lead was delivered to me by Maddocks, who was a constable of the night; the prisoners were at the watch-house. They said they did it through distress. I now produce it.

JAMES HERLING re-examined. This is the piece I took from Sullivan.

JOHN SAUNDERS . I live at Stanmore Park. I lost a leaden cistern, which stood under my water-cock in the yard; it was between two and three feet long - this is the same size and shape. It was safe on the 5th of October, and all gone on the 6th; I missed it about seven o'clock in the morning. I live about five miles from Hendon. The cistern was in a wooden case; it fits the holes where it was nailed.

SULLIVAN'S Defence. I was looking for work.

SULLIVAN - GUILTY . Aged 21.

SHEEN - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq..

Reference Number: t18191027-131

1507. JOHN HANCOCK was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of October , one handkerchief, value 2 s. the goods of John Frederick Pike , from his person .

MR. JOHN FREDERICK PIKE . I am a sugar-baker , and live in Bedford-square. On the 6th of October, about half-past nine o'clock in the morning, I was in Featherstone-street, City-road , and thought I heard footsteps behind me. I felt my pocket, and missed my handkerchief, turned round, and saw the prisoner retreating a few paces from me; he was stopped by a man, with the handkerchief in his hand - I took it out of his hand myself; he made some resistance. I took him into custody, called for an officer, and gave him in charge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was going up the street, saw it laying on the ground, and picked it up. The gentleman tore my shirt and waistcoat.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18191027-132

1508. ROBERT SWINBANK was indicted stealing, on the 5th of October , one jacket, value 7 s.; one waistcoat, value 10 s.; one pair of trowsers, value 1 s.; two stockings, value 9 d.; two shoes, value 6 d., and one hat, value 1 s., the goods of James Doeg ; one boat, value 2 l., and two oars, value 10 s. , the property of Edward Holding .

JAMES DOEG . I am a ship carpenter . On Monday, the 4th of October, my clothes were on board the ship, Contest , which laid at Limehouse Hole Tier ; I lost the articles stated in the indictment out of the steerage. I took them off about ten o'clock at night to go to bed, and missed them at six o'clock in the morning when I awoke; I sleep on board - the prisoner did not belong to the ship; I never saw him before - he must have had a boat to get to the ship. I saw them on Friday at the Thames Police Office, where the prisoner was in custody. The thief left an old hat and pair of Stockings behind him.

EDWARD HOLDING . I am owner of a wherry - I do not know the prisoner. On the 4th of October, about six o'clock at night, my wherry was safe at Pelican-stairs. About six o'clock in the morning, I went to the stairs, and missed it and two oars also - it had been chained to the others; the padlock was easily opened. I found it at the office that morning; I never authorized the prisoner to use it.

JAMES CRAIGE . I am a Thames Police officer. On the 5th of October I stopped the prisoner near Limehouse Quay, in a boat with two oars; he had a bag; containing eight sheets, and other articles - he was wearing Doeg's things. I hailed the boat, and told him to stop - nobody but him was in it. He left the boat, and ran over three barges; but I followed, and secured him without losing sight of him. I have found an owner for the sheets.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I hailed a boat, but no boatman being there, I took one myself.

GUILTY Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18191027-133

1509. MARY MOLLOY was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of October , one box, value 1 d., and 10 s. in monies numbered , the property of Robert Aird .

ROBERT AIRD . I am a coachmaker , and live in Sun-yard, Smithfield . On the 2d of October I had a box in my chest, containing 10 s.; there was a crown and two half crown pieces - the chest was on the ground floor. I met the prisoner in Sun-yard, between twelve and one o'clock at night, and asked her for a person whom I knew; she asked me for some drink, and I took her to my lodgings, went to my chest, took out 1 s., and gave it to her to fetch a pot of beer - she brought the change back. When I awoke in the morning she was gone, also two half crowns, a crown piece, and some duplicates; I had left the key of

my chest in my pocket - the prisoner was taken that evening. I saw my box and duplicates, but have not found the money.

THOMAS OSBORNE . I apprehended the prisoner in East Smithfield; she put her right hand into her pocket, and produced the box and seven duplicates, which the prosecutor claimed. She did not say how she got them.

Prisoner's Defence. I met him, and he asked me if I had seen such a woman. He took me to a bad house, and gave me the box and tickets for stopping with him.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18191027-134

1510. MARY LEE was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of October , five pieces of ribbon, value 10 s. , the property of John Collier .

JOHN TOMS . I am shopman to Mr. John Collier , who is a haberdasher , and lives in Titchborne-street, Golden-square . On the 16th of October, about four o'clock in the afternoon, Mr. Green's shopman came in with two pieces of ribbon, and asked if they were ours? I said, Yes, I knew them. I went with him to his shop, and saw the prisoner; I recollected immediately that she had been to our shop a few minutes before - she knew me, and began to cry. I claimed the ribbons. She had bought some ribbon of us, which came to 5 d., and changed half a crown.

JAMES NUNN . I am shopman to Mr. Green, who is a haberdasher, and lives in Marylebone-street, Golden-square - Titchborne-street runs in a line with it. The prisoner came into the shop between four and five o'clock in the afternoon, and asked for some ribbon; I put the drawer before her, and she chose one, which was 4 d. per yard, and had 1 1/4 yard cut, then chose another at 5 d. yard, and had 1 1/4 yard of that. While I was cutting it, I thought I saw her take a piece out of the drawer, and asked her if there was any thing else? She seemed confused, which made me suspect her. She then said she wanted a yard of two-penny galloon. I spoke to my fellow-shopmen, we secured her, and found a piece under her shawl. I went round the counter, felt her pocket, and found it was nearly full. We got the servant-maid to search her, who found seven pieces of ribbon in her pocket, five of which were ours. Mr. Collier claimed the other two.

THOMAS GOOK . I am an officer. I took the prisoner in charge, and found several remnants of ribbon on her, and a bad shilling.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 48.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191027-135

1511. WILLIAM JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of October , one tea-kettle, value 2 s. 6 d. , the property of John Walker .

HENRY WALKER . I am the son of John Walker , who keeps a broker's shop . I missed a kettle from the door, I ran out and seized the prisoner with it in his apron. He said

"Let me go."

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I was distressed.

GUILTY Aged 57.

Confined One Month .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191027-136

1512. ELIZABETH HUGHES was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of October , four candlesticks, value 8 s. , the property of William Collinson .

WILLIAM COLLINSON . I am a publican . Between the 6th and 9th of September, the prisoner came to me with Mrs. M'Gilvray's compliments, and begged me to lend her two pair of candlesticks, as she was going to have a large party. I gave them to her, but they were not returned. I applied for them, and found she had not been sent for them.

ANN PEGG . I am a dealer in marine stores. A person sold me four old candlesticks. I do not know the prisoner.

BARNARD GLEED . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner. She said she sold them to Pegg.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191027-137

1513. JAMES FYBUS was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of October , one pump, value 12 s. , the property of John Rossiter .

JOHN ROSSITER . I am a painter and glazier . I live in Clarence-place, Hackney-road . On the 16th of October I lost a pump. I do not know how it was taken.

BARNARD GLEED . I am an officer. On the 16th of October, between one and two o'clock in the day, I was going over Friar's-mount, and met the prisoner with the pump on his shoulders, in company with another young chap. As soon as the other saw me he ran away. I caught hold of the prisoner with the pump; he said he found it in Crabtree-row, which is close to the prosecutor's.

Prisoner's Defence. I found it in Crabtree-row, in the middle of the road.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191027-138

1514. SAMUEL DOVER was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of October , one ass, price 2 l. , the property of Peter Clutterbuck .

BENJAMIN ISAACS . I am a labourer at Great Stanmore. I had the care of Mr. Peter Clutterbuck 's ass. On the 4th of October, till four in the afternoon, I had her at work, and turned her into the field at half-past four in the afternoon, at five the next morning it was gone.

THOMAS MYERS . I am a watchman. About twelve o'clock at night on the 4th of October, two men came by with an ass, one rode on it. I asked where they came from? The prisoner, who was one of them, said he had been to Finchley to fetch it from grass, where it had been two months. I took him to the watch-house; the other ran away.

BENJAMIN ISAACS re-examined. I know the ass to be Mr. Clutterbuck's.

Prisoner's Defence. When I was in town, two young men came and asked me to go with them to fetch the ass. They fetched it from a farm-house; the watchman asked who it belonged to? the other man said he brought it from grass.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191027-139

1515. JAMES DAVEY was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of September , two decanters, value 5 s. , the goods of James Hughes .

JAMES HUGHES . I am a chinaman , and live in Princes-row, St. Giles's . My decanters stood on the counter in the shop. On the 27th of September, about nine o'clock in the morning, while I was at breakfast, a neighbour came in and alarmed me - I missed the decanters; he directed me down Compton-street; I went out, and found the prisoner in White Lion-court with them.

MARY CORNER . I live next door to the prosecutor. I saw two boys standing at the door, peeping; soon after I saw them pass my shop with the decanters; I alarmed Hughes, and told him which way the boys went - they secured the prisoner with the decanters. He stood at the door, waiting for the little boy to come out.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A boy asked me to carry them.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191027-140

1516. BENJAMIN CRISP and WILLIAM BRANCH were indicted for stealing, on the 9th of October , 30 lbs. of lead, value 5 s.; one coat, value 1 s.; one brass cock, value 6 d., and one blanket, value 2 s. , the property of George Vanheson .

GEORGE VANHESON . I am a manufacturing chymist , and live in York-row, Hackney-road . On Friday evening, the 8th of October, I locked up the manufactory door myself, and left the lead hanging on a wooden rail; there is one part of the manufactory which I occasionally leave open to chrystalize saltpetre - in that part the lead hung. In the morning when I got up I found a lead light forced completely out of the window, leaving an aperture sufficiently large to admit a good sized boy; he could then unbolt the back door, and get to the wash-house, from where I lost a cane basket, and an old coat. On looking round I perceived a pane of glass broken directly under the fastening of the counting-house window, which was not so when I went to bed - it appeared they had endeavoured to undo the fastening, but the brass work was corroded, and they could not. On further examination, I found they had entered the cellar. I missed the brass cock of the cyder cask. I gave an alarm about the neighbourhood, and on Saturday found the prisoner in custody with the property.

THOMAS PINNOCK . I am a watchman. On Saturday morning, the 9th of October, between three and four o'clock, I was on a back wharf at the back of the prosecutor's premises, and saw the two prisoners running with a basket; I stopped them, and asked them what they had got? one said they did not know, for they found it on London Bridge, and were going to Haggerstone; the other said, No, we are going to Blackfriars-road. I took them both to the watch-house. One had hold of each handle of the basket; it contained the articles stated in the indictment.

CRISP'S Defence. He is trying to swear my life away.

CRISP - GUILTY. Aged 12.

BRANCH - GUILTY. Aged 10.

Judgment Respited .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191027-141

1517. WILLIAM BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of August , two blankets, value 3 s. , the property of William Nott .

WILLIAM NOTT . I keep a chandler's shop , in Dock-street, East Smithfield , On the 18th of August I missed two blankets out of a cupboard, which was locked, in the same room where the prisoner slept; I charged him with stealing them, as he had the key of the room.

HENRY LEIGHTON . I put the blankets into the cupboard. Nobody but the prisoner was entrusted with the key of the room. I found them at Seabeck's

CAUSTEN SEABECK. I am a labourer. My wife bought a blanket of the prisoner - he asked 2 s. for it. I gave him 2 s. for it myself. Next morning he sold me another for 1 s.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. Another man gave them to me to sell.

GUILTY . Aged 35.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191027-142

1518. JAMES ANDERSON was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of October , one cloak, value 7 s.; one tablecloth, 3 s.; one handkerchief, value 1 s.; one petticoat, value 3 s.; one shirt, value 3 s., and one book, value 3 s. , the the goods of Mark Quinn .

MARY QUINN . I am the wife of Mark Quinn ; the prisoner lodged at our house three weeks. On the 14th of October I left him in care of the house, and told him I should not return until the evening. When I came home at night he had broken the box open, and taken out the articles stated in the indictment - he had also broken open the drawers, and taken out two handkerchiefs. He had absconded.

SAMUEL SAUNDERS . I apprehended the prisoner; he said he knew nothing of it. Three days after he told me that he knew the person who did it. I apprehended the man, but the magistrate discharged him, as the pawnbroker swore to the prisoner.

WILLIAM HENRY BAYFIELD . I am a pawnbroker. I have a table-cloth and a shirt, which the prisoner pledged with me on the 14th of October.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I knew nothing of the robbery at the time it was committed. I met a man coming out of the house, persuaded him, to put the things back, but he would not, so I took them from him; but finding the box was broken open, I thought it would be useless, and I should be suspected, therefore not being able to put the things in their proper places I assisted in disposing of them. It was through distress - I had not even the necessaries of life. My father has banished me and my mother from his house, and allows me 5 s. 6 d. per week. He wishes me to be sent out of the country, and refuses to give me a character.

GUILTY. Aged 20.

Recommended to Mercy.

Judgment Respited .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191027-143

1519. WILLIAM MAY was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of September , one handkerchief, value 5 d., the goods of Edward L. Leake , from his person .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be the property of a man unknown.

GEORGE TITTERTON . I keep a floor-cloth warehouse in High Holborn. On the 17th of September, about nine o'clock at night, I was coming down Great Queen-street, Lincoln's Inn-fields , and observed the prisoner and another following a lady and gentleman. Presently I saw the prisoner take a handkerchief from the gentleman's pocket. I immediately went up, told him of it, and pointed the men out; I secured the prisoner, and took him to Bow-street. The gentleman took the handkerchief out of his breast. He gave me his name as Edward L. Leak , and sent me a note, which was signed by that name. I afterwards saw him, and he said he wrote the note to say that he could not attend, as he was going to Dublin.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191027-144

1520. JOHN MORRIS was indicted for embezzlement .

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18191027-145

1521. JOHN BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of August , three shirts, value 12 s., and three pair of stockings, value 8 s. , the goods of John Goldsmith .

JOHN GOLDSMITH . I am in the service of the Bishop of Winchester . I expected a parcel from my wife at Farnham, on the 17th of August; it was these things, which were to come to me, with other articles for the Bishop, in the same basket. They never arrived.

FAITH GOLDSMITH . On the 16th of August I put three shirts and four pair of stockings into a small basket, for my husband. I gave them to John Barnard to be put into the hamper that was to be sent to the Bishop's residence in town - it was to go by Lamport's waggon, which goes through Brentford. I saw some of them at Hatton-garden about ten days after, when Smith and Wilson were in custody - they were tried and convicted last Session. I saw all the things, and the basket in which I packed them - it was a small flat one.

WILLIAM TYLER . I am a market gardener, and live at Brentford, in the parish of Isleworth. On the 17th of August, about half-past three o'clock in the morning, I was going by Gunnersbury-lane, and saw Smith and Wilson, (who were convicted last Session), in a cart with the prisoner. I am sure of his person.

Q. Do you speak with certainty - A. I have not the least doubt of his being the man - they were in a green open chaise cart, in the main road, about one hundred yards on the London side of Gunnersbury-lane - I noticed them in the cart; Smith and Wilson jumped out, and one got on each side of the cart; I, myself, was in a cart at the time, and saw a large bundle in their cart, in a large bag. They appeared to get out to do something to the harness - the horse's head was towards London; the prisoner remained in the cart; I stopped just opposite the cart, and noticed them; one of them came round to me, and I touched my horse to go on, but still observed them. I went on to Mr. Streams, and spoke to him; when they saw me stop there, they got up into the cart, turned round, and went up Gunnersbury-lane, towards, Hanger-hill - they turned to the right instead of going over the hill, still keeping their pace. They turned to the right, down a place where there was no thoroughfare, but finding they could go no farther, two of them got out, and took the large bag with them. The prisoner remained in the cart.

Q. Had you observed any thing before they took the bag - A. As they went along I saw them cut a little frail-basket, and throw it into a ditch, in the lane; I had not called out to them, but only pursued them. I saw Smith and Wilson return from the field with the bag, and get into the cart again - I stood at a distance in the lane. I was afraid to go up to them by myself, as Wilson and Smith had threatened to murder me if I came near them. They got up into the cart, turned, and came towards me to the top of a bye lane; four or five of us tried to stop them, but could not - a young man with a reaping-hook tried to stop them, but they struck him with a stick, and cut his cheek, which made the blood run very much. They then went over Hanger-hill, and I followed them by myself, for two or three others would go no farther. I followed them up the hill, then Smith and Wilson got out, and came after me, swore they would murder me, and said so to several others - I went over the hill after them. Three or four reapers at the top of the hill, followed with their hooks in their hands; we pursued, and secured Smith and Wilson, but the prisoner remained in the cart, went on a few yards, and then stopped; Smith made use of very bad language. I sent for Streams, who said the man was dangerously hurt, and they were fearful that he would not live.

Q. What became of the prisoner - A. He went on with the cart, turned round, passed us, and kept before us until we came to the Ealing Arms - we left him there.

Q. How came you to leave him - A. We did not then know any thing had taken place, but their having done mischief to a man - we did not then know any thing was stolen. The prisoners were in my sight near an hour and a half - I have not the least doubt of him.

Q. When did you observe the things that were taken in the field - A. I described the bag to Piper, and saw it nine days afterwards. I saw the frail-basket about eight days afterwards.

Q. When did you next see the prisoner - A. In this Court, when Smith and Wilson were tried. I then recollected him, and he was secured.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. You was passing in the road, going to market - A. Yes, I heard they had assaulted a man, and pursued them.

Q. You believe the prisoner to be the man, and, perhaps, will die with that belief in your mind - A. Yes.

Q. Since he has been committed, have you not said it was a hard thing to swear to a man, and you should be sorry to swear to him - A. I told Mr. Burgess, when he came to me, that I should be sorry to swear to the young man. Burgess said I had sworn to an innocent man, and was to go and see another man, named Ingram, to see if he was not the man. I did not go, because I had no occasion so to do.

Q. The man you took to be the prisoner sat the greatest part of the time in this Court - A. Yes. He was dressed in a fustian jacket. The Bell, public-house, at Ealing, is near half a mile from where I pursued the cart.

COURT. Q. You refused to go to see Ingram, believing you was correct in the man you spoke to - A. Yes, my Lord.

GEORGE BRADLEY . I drive the Farnham waggon. A hamper was delivered to me to be taken to the Bishop of Winchester's - I received it from Mr. Lamport's servant. It was safe when I was at Hounslow, about twelve o'clock at night; when I got to the White Horse Cellar it was gone - it was taken from the side of the waggon.

Q. Did you get as far as Gunnersbury-lane before daylight - A. Yes.

JOHN BARNARD . I am gardener to the Bishop of Winchester. I put the frail-basket into the hamper myself, and delivered it to the waggon-office.

SAMUEL SMITH . I am a constable. The shirts, stockings, and frail-basket were delivered to me at the Magistrate's, at Brentford. Piper found them - he is not here.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAM TYLER re-examined. It is the basket I saw thrown away.

- STREAMS. I keep the Coach and Horses, public-house, on Smallborough-green. I assisted in taking Smith and Wilson. I saw Smith and the other man (not Wilson) drink at my pump.

Q. Who was the other man - A. I do not know; I do not believe the prisoner to be the person. It was on the 17th of August, about half-past two o'clock in the morning. In a few minutes I heard some blows; I got up, left my house, and went towards Brentford, and back again, before I could find the prisoners.

Q. When did you see Tyler - A. About three o'clock, before I got into Brentford; I afterwards saw him beyond Gunnersbury-lane, he spoke to me; I then observed three men in a cart.

Q. Was the prisoner one of them - A. I do not think he was - I cannot positively swear to him. I took the man in the cart to be smaller than him - I think the prisoner is not the man. I did not pursue the cart. Tyler brought Smith and Wilson to my house; I had pursued them up Gunnersbury-lane - the cart drove very fast. Smith and Wilson were taken before I got up to them; I had seen them come out of the lane. People attempted to stop them but could not - they struck a person on the cheek.

Q. When they were taken, did you see the man in the cart - A. Yes; I had been in sight twenty minutes. I believe the prisoner is not the man; I thought the man considerably taller. I did not see him on the ground - I was on horseback.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you afterwards see the third man at the Bell, at Ealing - A. No, I was not in Court when the prisoner was taken, nor did I see him at the office - I did not see him until yesterday.

Prisoner's Defence. I leave it to my Counsel.

JOSHUA ARMSTRONG . I was directed to go in pursuit of the third man for this robbery. The prisoner is not the man I was sent after.

THOMAS VANN . I am an officer. I went with Armstrong after the third man. The prisoner is not the man we went after.

WILLIAM WILLIAMS . I keep the Bell, public-house, at Ealing. On the 17th of August I remember one man coming to my house, which is close to the common, about a quarter after five o'clock in the morning - he was in a little market-cart. He was dressed in a fustian jacket. The prisoner is not the man - he was not like the prisoner.

COURT. Q. How many carts come that way you cannot tell; all that you know is, that the man who stopped at your house was not the prisoner - A. That is all.

WILLIAM COX . I am a carpenter, and live at Hanwell. On the 17th of August, about half-past five o'clock in the morning, I was out; I did not see Tyler; I heard of the men being pursued at the Bell - I stood there twenty minutes, or half an hour; a man was at the door when I went in, it was not the prisoner.

COURT. Q. How far is the Bell from where Smith and Wilson were taken - A. About a mile.

JOHN BURGESS . I served Tyler with a paper, directing him to go and see Ingram. On the 8th of October I served another on the Lord Mayor, begging means might be taken to apprehend Ingram.

COURT. Q. This was in consequence of information you received from two men who were convicted of felony - A. Yes, my Lord, but I had it from another source. I saw Smith and Wilson in Newgate.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18191027-146

1522. JOHN BROWN was again indicted for stealing, on the 16th of August , 300 willow squares, value 3 l. , the property of Edward West .

EDWARD WEST . On Monday, the 16th of August I delivered these willow squares to Willam Pook, son of the Reading waggoner, directed to Mr. Wright, Fore-street, Cripplegate - they were in a canvas bag, packed in five-dozen rolls; the waggon was robbed of them. I saw them about a week after, when Smith and Wilson were in custody at Brentford. I know nothing of the prisoner.

WILLIAM POOK , JUN. I received the package from West, between nine and ten o'clock on Monday night, at Castle-street, Reading, and delivered it to my father.

WILLIAM POOK . I drive the Reading waggon. I received the parcel, and put it in the waggon. I left between nine and ten o'clock in the morning. I stopped at the White Horse, at Hounslow, about twelve o'clock on Monday night, for about ten minutes, the bag was then safe, it was about the middle of the waggon - I missed it between Hounslow and Smallborough-green gate - a hole was cut in the tilt of the waggon, and the bag stolen. I had a driver with me and a woman passenger.

WILLIAM TYLER . I know nothing about this, except what I related on the former trial.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18191027-147

1523. RICHARD HARDING was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of October , 18 lbs. of lead, value 2 s., belonging to George Beck , and fixed to his dwelling-house .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only not stating it to be fixed.

GEORGE CROMER . I live in Cromer-street, Bryanstone-square.

On the 19th of October I missed part of the gutter-pipe from my house, it was cut off - I saw it safe a week before. The house is my property, and situated in Mansfield-place .

SARAH WARDEN . I keep an old-iron shop, No. 13, Hampstead-road. On the 19th of October, between seven and eight o'clock in the morning, the prisoner came to me, alone, and brought four pieces of lead-pipe, which weighed 18 lbs.; it was very dirty, and appeared to have been cut and laid in a ditch, it smelt very badly. He said he found it in a ditch, and offered it for sale.

Q. Did you ask where the ditch was - A. No. He frequently brought old rags to sell for his father. I asked if his father sent him? he said No. I told him to send his father to me. He went away directly, leaving the lead, and never returned. I gave it to Davis next morning, and told him who brought it - he was taken up next day.

JOHN THOMPSON . I am a plumber. On the 22d of May I put the lead on the house, over the water-butt, in an exposed situation; I afterwards saw it in the custody of Davis.

Q. Can you say the lead you saw in custody of Davis was part of the pipe - A. The colour was much altered - it could never have got so black; if it had been stolen and laid in a ditch, that might alter its appearance. I fitted it to the pipe, and it made up the deficiency - it was the same size.

JOHN DAVIS . The lead was delivered to me by Warden. I saw it applied to the pipe, it fitted exactly in every part. It was not cut exactly even - it fitted also to the ball cock; I have no doubt of its being part of the pipe. I took the prisoner about an hour afterwards. I had the lead, and told him I wanted him; he looked at me, and said,

"That lead I found in a ditch."

JOHN SMITH . I am an officer. I was with Davis, and saw the lead compared, it fitted exactly.

Prisoner's Defence. I found it in a ditch.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18191027-148

1524. JAMES DORMER was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of June , 12 lbs. of lead, value 1 s., and 10 lbs. of copper, value 12 s., the property of Thomas Richardson , deceased , and fixed to a building of his .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating it to belong to George James Lock , and fixed to a building of his.

JAMES SALTER . I am a market gardener, and live at North End, Fulham; I know Mr. Richardson's house - it is at Fullham . Between twelve and one o'clock, as I was going to market, I went to call a man up, who said he had heard a noise by Mr. Richardson's. I went across the garden, and saw the prisoner and Bolton there - I knew them before; I saw them drop off Richardson's wall. As soon as Bolton dropped, I saw him pick up a sheet of copper, and run up my father's garden with it, (which joins Mr. Richardson's premises), and the prisoner went away with the ladder that they had used to get over the wall with, which is about fourteen feet high. I ran after him, but he dropped the ladder, and got from me - he had nothing but the ladder. I followed Bolton so close, that he dropped the copper, and got away. I continued watching, but saw no traces of them.

SARAH ROWLAND . I am servant to Mr. Thomas Richardson . On Saturday, the 5th of June, I got up between six and seven o'clock in the morning. My sister, who lives at Salter's, came and told me what had happened; I went out, and unlocked the gate. Salter came in and found the tools; the lead and copper had been forced off our privy, and the privy adjoining, which belonged to Mr. George James Lock . Part of it was stolen before, but some was taken that night.

JAMES SALTER re-examined. I found a holdfast, some pincers, a crow-bar, and a knife.

JAMES SHARP . I am a carter. I was coming down the garden, and heard somebody on Mr. Richardson's privy, between twelve and one o'clock in the morning, of the 5th of June. I went close up, and looked at them over a wall for about five minutes; it was the prisoner and Joseph Bolton - I knew them before; the prisoner lived about one hundred yards from Richardson's. They ran away, and I saw Bolton drop the copper; we have not found him since - they threw the lead and copper down; I picked part of it up, and then went to market with my master's cart. The prisoner never came to his lodgings after that night, that I could hear of. I did not go to look for him.

ISAAC HAWKINS . I am a patrol. I apprehended the prisoner near the Wheat Sheaf, public-house, Percey's-green, Walham-green, on the 23d of September; I had been informed of the robbery some time before, and looked after the prisoner. I endeavoured to find him at his parents' - he was coming from there when I took him. I asked him if his name was Dormer? He said it was not - he had some victuals in his apron. I asked him if he knew any thing of this concern? he denied it - Salter delivered me the copper. I had often passed his street - he was there. I cannot find Bolton.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was never in the place, for as this happened on a Saturday, I stopped to work, nobody offered to detain me. I went home on Sunday, a brick-maker asked me to go to Cowley to work; I went, and continued there all the Summer - the first morning I came home I was taken.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18191027-149

1525. JAMES BARTER was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of October , one time-piece, value 8 s. , the goods of John Roach .

JOHN ROACH . I am a shoemaker , and live in St. Thomas-street, St. George's in the East . I lost a timepiece from my kitchen on the ground floor. The prisoner was acquainted with a lodger of mine. On the 14th of October, about a quarter past three o'clock, I saw him sitting on a chair under the timepiece. I went into the yard, returned in about ten minutes, the prisoner was then gone. I missed the timepiece about twenty minutes past four o'clock; I found it at Shadwell Office on the 16th,

and knew it - he was in custody. Before this I went to him, and told him if he had pledged it, he had better give me the ticket - he strongly denied it several times; I gave him in charge, and he was taken to Poplar watch-house. I saw him searched, and the duplicate found in the lining of his hat, pledged at Castles's, Ratcliff-highway.

JAMES MARLOW . I am shopman to Mr. Castles. I took the timepiece in pledge of the prisoner, for 4 s., on the 14th of October, between six and seven o'clock in the evening. I had seen him before.

MICHAEL MORRIS . I went to the watch-house about half an hour after the prisoner was there. Some of the people gave me the duplicate.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Three Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18191027-150

1526. WILLIAM BEALTON and GEORGE RAWLINS were indicted for stealing, on the 19th of October , two bed-casters, value 18 d. , the goods of John Taylor .

JOHN TAYLOR . I am a broker , and live in Charterhouse-lane, Middlesex . On the 19th of October I went out between nine and ten o'clock, returned in about a quarter of an hour, and found a mob round my door, with the prisoners in custody, and the bed-castors.

THOMAS THOMPSON . I am a constable. I saw the prisoners loitering about the street, watched them, and saw Bealton go up to Taylor's shop window, put his hand over, and take a castor off the counter, he immediately came and gave it to Rawlins, who was waiting; he returned, got another, and brought that also to him. They walked to the square, I secured them, and took the casters from Rawlins; I took them back - Taylor soon after came home, and claimed them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

BEALTON'S Defence. I picked them off the pavement.

RAWLINS'S Defence. I was coming along, the young man came and asked what it was o'clock, and I was taken.

BEALTON - GUILTY . Aged 19.

RAWLINS - GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18191027-151

1527. WILLIAM CHEESEMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of October , one warming-pan, value 4 s. , the property of Ann Holden , widow , and John Penley .

ANN HOLDEN . I am a broker , and live in Brooks-mews, Bagnigge Wells , and am in partnership with John Penley . On the 26th of October, about a quarter after five o'clock in the afternoon, as I stood at the door, I saw the prisoner look at the warming-pan, which hung at the door post - he took it down deliberately, and walked away with it. I was looking at him, but as several things hung at the door. I went out to see what he had taken. I told the young man he had taken something - we went after him, and he was brought back. I saw him put the warming-pan down.

JOHN IZARD . I was sent after the prisoner, and stopped him about twenty yards off; I saw him drop the warming-pan, and run away. I secured him. It was picked up by somebody else.

HENRY HUTCHINS . I was sent for, and took the prisoner in charge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was crossing the field, and laid down, when the gentleman laid hold of me.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18191027-152

1528. JOHN MARTIN was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Elizabeth Holder , widow , about six o'clock in the afternoon of the 2d of October , at St. Marylebone , (she and other persons being therein), and stealing therein one gown, value 10 s., and one handkerchief, value 6 d. , her property.

ELIZABETH HOLDER . I am a widow, and live at No. 18, Nassau-street , in the parish of St. Marylebone. On the 2d of October, about six o'clock in the evening, I was standing in the back parlour, looking over some papers, at a chest of drawers, which stood rather behind the parlour door. I am quite sure the street door was quite closed - I rent the house. I was standing very still, and heard a little noise like the hustling of clothes; I turned a little aside to see what it was. I heard no more, saw nothing, and returned to look over my papers. In about a minute I heard the same noise again; I then stood so as to see the passage, and saw a gown drawn from the table in the room where I was, into the passage. I went to the parlour door, and saw the prisoner in the passage, with the gown on his arm; he had got about half way along the passage. I ran forward and laid hold of him, he dropped the gown, and struck me several times with great violence to prevent my holding him. I was extremely hurt; it was with difficulty I could move my arm for several days afterwards - he struck me with his fist, and dragged me towards the street door in trying to get out - it was then pushed too, but not fast; it opens by a small key from without. I screamed out Murder! several times. There are only a widow lady (who is a lodger), my daughter, and a female servant in the house. The widow has the first floor; she was in the garret at the time - my daughter was in the kitchen with the servant.

Q. In the situation in which you were, if any of the inhabitants of the house had opened the door must you have heard them - A. I must. Two minutes before that, I came out of the kitchen myself, and if the door had not then been shut I must have observed it. The kitchen stairs are close to the street door. My screams brought my daughter and the servant up; the prisoner had by this time dragged me to the step of the door; but before that, as I was screaming and struggling with him, a young man pushed the door open, came into the passage, and asked what was the matter? - I knew nothing of him. I told him the prisoner had attempted to rob the house, and I supposed he was come to assist him, as I thought he was an accomplice - he said no more, but instantly left, leaving the street door open about half way. The prisoner turned himself round towards the door, gave a violent pull, and pulled me out of doors across the street - he continued striking me all the while; I still kept my hold.

When he had got me on the step of the door, my daughter and the servant came up and rose an alarm, A young man came up, and secured him before I let him go. I did not see him searched.

Q. What had you lost - A. The handkerchief was pinned to the gown, and were taken together. The gown was worth 10 s., and the handkerchief 6 d. It was not dark, I had not lit my candle.

CAROLINE HOLDER . I am daughter of the last witness. I was in the house for two hours before. Mrs. Marer lodged in the house; neither she nor the servant had been out all the afternoon - she was in the garret at the time of the alarm. I heard my mother scream Murder! several times. I ran up, and saw the prisoner, who had hold of her, on the step of the street door, she was standing still then; he immediately pulled her across the street. Assistance came, who secured him. I saw him strike her several times - I had never seen him before. The gown had been dropped in the passage when I came up. I was at the watch-house when he was searched, nothing was found on him. Before he got to the watch-house, two men came up, said they were constables, and would take him to the watch-house. When they came to the top of Wardour-street they let him go, and said,

"Go it!" - I should know one of them. The prisoner was never out of my sight until he was secured again, and taken to the watch-house.

MARK GIBBS . I live next door to the prosecutrix. I was standing at my door about six o'clock on the evening of the robbery, and saw Mrs. Holder and the prisoner come from her door, scuffling together, into the middle of the road; she kept hold of him, and called Murder and Stop thief! I ran and broke her from him, as he was beating her all the time over the shoulders. I collared him, and he knocked me down. He is a very strong man, and struck me with very great violence; he struck me several times afterwards. While I had hold of him two young men came up - one said he was an officer, he was well dressed, the other had an apron on; they both laid hold of him, pretending to be officers.; I laid hold of his collar too, and pushed him along as well as I could, he tried to get away. When he got to the bottom of Berner-street, opposite Wardour-street, they said

"Go it!" he got away, and the two men absconded directly - I should know one of them again. I laid hold of the prisoner again myself, without losing sight of him. I saw him searched at the watch-house. A knife, 8 s. 6 d., and some lancets were found on him.

THOMAS SAVAGE . I am a constable. About half-past six o'clock in the evening of the 2d of October, I was sent for to the watch-house, and took charge of the prisoner. I found 8 s. 6 d., six surgeon's lancets, and a knife on him. He was in a great perspiration, as if he had been struggling a good deal. He was brought in by several persons, one of whom he kicked a great deal, and scratched him so as to draw blood. He had no hat on when he was brought in - one was produced, which he denied being his.

Prisoner's Defence. My Lord, I had been to Lisson-grove with two pairs of boots, and had received 11 s. for repairing them; a man who lives next door to me went with me. I spent 2 s. 6 d., and as we came through this street, being both tipsey, he said,

"Here is a brothel, come in, and we will have a lark." The hall door was open about three inches; I went into the front parlour, saw nobody there or in the back parlour; I said,

"Let us go away" - he said

"No, we will have a lark; I was robbed here last Saturday night of 13 s." The lady came out and caught me in the hall; I had no gown or any thing else at the time.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 38.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18191027-153

1529. JOHN JACKSON was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of October , 6 lbs. of indigo, value 43 s.; seven ounces of cream of tartar, value 5 d., and eight ounces of soap, value 5 d. , the property of Thomas Hughes .

THOMAS HUGHES . I am a dyer , and live in Bunhill-row . The prisoner was my servant , and lived about three years with me. In consequence of information which I received, I directed Smith, the watchman, to notice him; from the information which he gave me, on the 18th of October I examined two fire-places, between six and seven o'clock in the evening, and discovered a bag containing about 6 lbs. of indigo in one fire-place, and in the other two pieces of cream of tartar, about half a pound each, worth 9 d., and a piece of soap. The indigo was of considerable value - they were concealed there. I marked the soap and cream of tartar, and replaced them there. Next day, when the prisoner was leaving work, Armstrong searched him in my presence; he was asked if he had any thing about him belonging to his master? he said, No, twice over. Armstrong found the two pieces of marked tartar on him, but not the soap. He begged for mercy, and said it was the first he had ever taken. I went to the bag of indigo, and found near half of it gone.

Cross-examined by MR. ARABIN. Q. You found it in the fire-place on the 18th - A. Yes, and found it on him on the 19th - it was worth 5 d. He afterwards said he took it as a medicine for his son. I did not know his son was ill. He had no business to take it without leave.

JAMES SMITH . I am a watchman, employed by the prosecutor. On the 18th of October, about ten minutes after six o'clock in the evening, I was on the premises; I went into the back shop, heard the prisoner overhead, called to him twice, but received no answer. I then returned from the further end of the shop, and at the top of the ladder, which leads into the drying room, I saw the prisoner; before I could speak to him, he said he wanted to see me concerning his blue vat.

Q, Were the men allowed to be in that part of the premises at that time of night - A. No; I followed him into the dyehouse - he had a dark coloured bag in his hand, with something in it. When he was in the woollen dye-house he attempted to put it down on the left hand side; he then took the bag up, and said,

"I will go and see if the fire is out;" in about three minutes he returned without the bag, and went away. I told my master. I went with my master and the clerk to the stokehole, where the prisoner had been, and found the cream of tartar and soap - I brought it up to my master.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you ever know a man stop after that time - A. Certainly.

JOSHUA ARMSTRONG . I am an officer of Worship-street. On Tuesday the 19th of October, I searched the

prisoner, and found the cream of tartar. I took him into the parlour, and asked him if he had any thing belonging to his master? he said No. When I found it, he admitted taking it, and said it was for his child.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I took the tartar, but nothing else.

GUILTY Aged 59.

Confined Two Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18191027-154

1530. MICHAEL BURKE and HALLAWAY JAGER were indicted for stealing, on the 12th of October , one watch, value 20 s. , the goods of George Foredice .

MARGARET DUSON . I am a widow. On the 12th of October, a watch, which belonged to George Foredice , hung upon my mantle-piece.

JANE DUSON . I am the daughter of the last witness; my mother gave both the prisoners a lodging - Jager came in about six o'clock in the evening. I went out to shut the shutters, he followed me out, and asked if Burke had been home? I said, No. About a quarter after six o'clock I missed the watch - I saw it safe about ten minutes before Jager came in; nobody but myself had been in the room until I missed it. My mother went to the pawnbrokers, and about half-past eight o'clock, the young man came to say that they had stopped the watch.

WILLIAM SAVAGE . I am a pawnbroker. The prisoners brought the watch to pledge, and I stopped them with it, as the prosecutrix had described it to me.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

BURKE - GUILTY. Aged 30.

JAGER - GUILTY. Aged 17.

Judgment Respited .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18191027-155

1531. SAMUEL BROOKS was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of October , two table-cloths, value 40 s.; two sheets, value 5 s.; one pair of drawers, value 6 d.; three gowns, value 5 s.; one handkerchief, value 1 s.; one towel, value 1 s.; one waistcoat, value 1 s.; one pair of trowsers, value 3 s.; one dress, value 2 s.; one frock, value 6 d.; eleven cloths value 18 d.; eleven stockings, value 2 s., and three pinafores, value 3 s. , the property of George Joseph Payne .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating them to be the property of Abraham Slater .

ABRAHAM SLATER . I am a labourer . On the 4th of October, early in the morning, I lost these things from a cart, in the One Barn, Edgware-road - it is a farm-yard; I had brought the bundle in a cart from Kilburn; it belonged to Mr. Payne. I went into the barn about five minutes, returned, and the bundle was gone out of the cart. It was about five o'clock in the morning.

JAMES SATERSWITH . I was coming from Hampstead to go to work; the prisoner jumped over a hedge, with a bundle of linen, and wished me good morning; I went on about fifty yards, and then thought he had not come honestly by it; I went back with a companion, took him into custody, and took these things from him - he said he picked them up. It was about three fields from the One Barn.

WILLIAM STANTON . I was going along, and saw the prisoner over a hedge; I afterwards followed, and secured him with the bundle - it was about half-past five o'clock in the morning. He said he was looking for work.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

BENJAMIN DYMOND . I took the prisoner in charge.

Prisoner's Defence. I found the things on a heap in a wood, and asked some man if they belonged to him? He said they did not. I said I would go and see if they belonged to Weller.

GUILTY . Aged 32.

Confined Six Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191027-156

1532. THOMAS ROACH was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of October , 10 lbs. of lead, value 18 d., and 5 lbs. of nails, value 2 s. , the property of William Hedge .

WILLIAM HEDGE . I am a builder ; the prisoner was my servant , and employed to lock up the yard after the men had left. On the 4th of October, about eight o'clock in the evening, having missed property several times, I suspected him; I lost the lead out of my yard, and the nails out of my office. I had marked the lead before.

SAMUEL FURZEMAN . I am an officer. I was applied to by the prosecutor, to watch the prisoner on Friday night. I saw him come out, apparently loaded, but lost him that night; I went again on Monday, and stopped him in Dean-street, found two pieces of lead in his breeches, and the nails in his hat, He had just come out of the premises.

JAMES FURZEMAN . I am an officer. I was with my brother, and found the nails in the prisoner's hat.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 32.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191027-157

1533. WILLIAM COOPER was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of October , one live tame fowl, price 2 s. , the property of George Mackley .

GEORGE MACKLEY . I am a broker, and keep fowls ; I live in Union-yard, Shoreditch . On the Tuesday before the robbery I lost one, and on the Saturday I lost six. On the 3d of October, my boy said that a strange man had gone into the privy. I went into the yard, and saw some crumbs of bread thrown from the privy to entice them in; at last one fowl went into the privy, and the prisoner shut the door. Soon after, he came out of the privy, and I went after him, brought him back, and Francis took the fowl out of his breeches.

HENRY FRANCIS . I saw the prosecutor lay hold of the prisoner round the waist, and I laid hold of the flap of his coat. He got his hand down, unbuttoned his breeches, and out sprung a fowl.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191027-158

1534. ROBERT FLETCHER was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of October , one coat, value 25 s., and one gaiter, value 1 s. , the property of John Newberry .

JOHN NEWBERRY . I am a clothes salesman , and live in Monmouth-street ; the coat and gaiters hung in the shop; about half-past six o'clock in the evening, I saw the

prisoner take the coat from the door, ran out, and secured him. He had thrown it down.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191027-159

1535. GEORGE GARDE was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of October , 72 lbs. of lead, value 30 s., belonging to William Ward , and fixed to a building of his .

SAMUEL PRENDERGRASS . I am a constable. On the 25th of October I was in the New-road, and saw the prisoner with a sack on his back; Maynard, who was with him, told him I was coming, and he dropped the lead. I took it up, and left it at a butcher's shop, pursued, and came up to the prisoner, who was in a court in Homer-street; he saw me, ran away to some buildings, and was secured. I know him to be the man - he once worked for me.

WILLIAM WARD . This lead was fixed to a building of mine, adjoining Alfred-cottages, Marylebone . I fitted the lead to the gutters, and it corresponded.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I picked it up. Maynard was with me.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191027-160

1536. GEORGE MAYNARD was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of October , 72 lbs. of lead, value 30 s., belonging to William Ward , and fixed to a building of his .

SAMUEL PRENDERGRASS . On the 25th of October, I met the prisoner and Garde in the New-road - Garde had the lead; the prisoner knew me, and told Garde I was coming, who dropped the lead, and the prisoner got away. I was looking after him some time, and at last found him in custody at the watch-house. I knew him perfectly well before.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was with Garde, and saw a sack against a door. He asked me to lift it on his shoulder, and said he would take it to the watch-house.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191027-161

1537. GEORGE MARTIN was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of October , one snuff-box, value 20 s., the goods of Lewis Gordon , from his person .

LEWIS GORDON . On the 2d of October, between five and six o'clock in the afternoon, I left home with a gentleman, and went into White Conduit-fields - a balloon was to go off; the mountebanks were exhibiting. As we were going towards them there was a fight in the field, which continued about twenty minutes - my friend parted with me. After that was over he came to me, and said he had lost his handkerchief. I felt my pocket, and said mine was safe; I felt farther, and missed my snuff-box - I found a hole cut in my waistcoat-pocket, and the box gone. Soon after that I heard they were taking up a great many pickpockets, went to the mob, and informed the officer - my snuff-box was produced; they took the prisoner to the Belvidere. It had a cut in it, which proves that it was cut from my pocket.

EDWARD READ . I am an officer. On the 2d of October, I was in the fields, and observed several pickpockets. I took the prisoner and another man into custody, and found the snuff-box on the prisoner.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I saw a person throw it away, and found it by the side of a ditch.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191027-162

1538. JOHN ROACH was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of October , one table-cloth, value 15 s. , the goods of Sarah Wooller ,

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating it to be the property of John Clymer .

ELIZA CLYMER . I am a laundress, and live in Compton-street, St. Giles's ; the prisoner came into the wash-house - the table-cloth was there then - he was the only person, who came there that day. I missed it in less than five minutes after he had left, and have never found it. I had him apprehended that evening - he denied all knowledge of it.

MARY OFFORD . I was standing at my door, and saw the prisoner go down with his own clothes to be washed - he came out with his hand in his bosom, as if he had something there.

THOMAS SAUNDERS . I am a watchman. On the 28th of October, Mrs. Clymer came to me. I went, and took the prisoner in a coffee-shop, but found nothing on him.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191027-163

1539. CHARLES TOMS was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of February , one bushel of oats, value 4 s. , the goods of Henry Smithers .

HENRY SMITHERS . I am a carman , On the 2d of February I saw the prisoner go out of my gate with a bag on his back; I ran after him and collared him; he ran about ten yards round the corner, threw the bag into a waggon, laughed, and ran away. I never saw him again until I took him at Stangate. I went to several places after him, but could not find him - he was my servant four or five years. I found a bushel of oats in the bag; he took it out of my yard. I produce a sample of the bulk.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. Did he not keep corn of his own there - A. No.

Prisoner's Defence. I had some old junk in the bag when he collared me.

GUILTY . Aged 39.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191027-164

1540. EDWARD PLUMMER and CHARLES HAINES were indicted for stealing, on the 25th of October , one watch, value 20 s. , the goods of James Hales .

The prosecutor did not appear .

NOT GUILTY.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191027-165

1541. RICHARD TAYLOR was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of October , one pair of shoes, value 2 s. , the goods of Thomas Hare Wills .

THOMAS HARE WILLS . I keep a saleshop in Jerusalem-passage, Clerkenwell . On the 6th of October the prisoner came into my shop; I was in the back parlour, heard somebody, and saw the prisoner go out of the door - I asked him what he wanted? I understood him to say,

"Do you want to buy any list shoes?" On turning round, I saw he had something under his coat, and found a pair of shoes under it. I took him into the back parlour; he begged for mercy.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I bought them before I came to his shop.

GUILTY . Aged 34.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191027-166

1542. WILLIAMS EVANS was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of October , one jacket, value 10 s.; one pair of trowsers, value 5 s.; one waistcoat, value 2 s., and one shirt, value 2 s. , the goods of David Howell .

The prosecutor did not appear.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191027-167

1543. JOHN GIBBONS and JOHN BUCKLEY were indicted for stealing, on the 28th of October , one handkerchief, value 2 s. 6 d., the property of Charles Streetley , from his person .

The prosecutor did not appear.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191027-168

1544. RICHARD HURLSTON was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of October , one shawl, value 14 s., and one curtain, value 1 s. , the goods of Sophia Klint , widow.

CHARLES MARTIN . I am a watchman. On the 20th of October, between one and two o'clock in the morning, I met the prisoner and another man; the prisoner said,

"I'll be b - g - d if I don't put this over my shoulders now." I took hold of him, and asked him where he got the things from? - he had the curtain and shawl; he said he found them. The other escaped.

SOPHIA KLINT . On the 2d of October, about half-past eleven o'clock at night, I lost these things off the banisters of my stairs. I had not seen the prisoner at the house.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was drinking; I picked it up, and thought it was a waistcoat.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191027-169

1545. WILLIAM LEWIS was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of October , one waistcoat, value 1 s., and one handkerchief, value 18 d. , the property of William Chandler .

WILLIAM CHANDLER . I am tapboy at the Stag, public-house , Castle-lane . On the 29th of October, at night, the bell rang, I went up, and found the prisoner in my room, brought him down, and found the handkerchief and waistcoat under his jacket.

THOMAS BEGENT . On the 29th of October, about eight o'clock in the evening, I was in the taproom, and heard the bell ring up stairs, which rings when the door is opened. I went up with the servant, found the prisoner in the room, behind the door, and asked what brought him there? he said he was looking for his comrade; I said he had no business in the bed-room, and brought him down stairs - he pulled the waistcoat from under his jacket. I said he had something else, he then pulled the handkerchief out.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY Aged 33.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191027-170

1546. GEORGE PIG was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of October , 48 lbs. of lead, value 8 s., belonging to John Wilson and William Cutbush , and fixed to a building of theirs .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating it to belong to Thomas Wilson .

THOMAS WILSON . I am a builder . On the 28th of October, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, Satchell informed me some men were on the top of my house; I immediately got some men, searched the house, and found the prisoner concealed just under the roof. He had thrown a piece of lead off, and more was rolled up ready to be thrown off - we secured him. He acknowledged having been there on the Monday night previous, and had taken an immense quantity. I saw the lead, and knew it to be mine. Two hundred and fifty houses have been built there, all of which have been robbed of lead within the last two years.

RICHARD WILSON . I saw the prisoner in the top story, just under the roof, concealed by the side of the chimney.

Prisoner. It is my first offence.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191027-171

1547. THOMAS SHANNON was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of October , one tea-caddy, value 8 s. , the property of Samuel Greenwood .

AGNES GREENWOOD . I am the wife of Samuel Greenwood ; the tea-caddy stood on a chair under the window. On Friday last I saw the prisoner come and take it out of the chair; I ran to the door, but could not see him until I got to the end of the street, I then saw him running with it under his arm. I called out Stop thief! he set it down on some wood, and ran on, but was stopped. I am sure he is the man.

HENRY SMITH . I heard the cry, and saw the prisoner put the caddy on a log - I caught him, and brought him back.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Three Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18191027-172

1548. WILLIAM GREEN , GEORGE GREEN , and BENJAMIN LAWRENCE were indicted for stealing, on the 7th of October , one handkerchief, value 3 s., the goods of a man unknown, from his person .

THOMAS THOMPSON . I am an officer. On the 7th of October, in the evening, I was in the Strand, and saw the three prisoners in company together; suspecting them, I watched, and saw them follow several gentlemen - they attempted to pick their pockets. I followed them until

they had got through Clare-market, following a lady and gentleman. When they got into the market, I saw George Green go up to the gentleman, and draw the handkerchief a little way out of his pocket - the others were covering him. They followed him into Russell-court, Drury-lane , where I saw William Green take the handkerchief quite out of the gentleman's pocket; I immediately took him into custody, and took the handkerchief out of his hand - the others were secured. I stopped the gentleman, and he gave me his direction, but did not attend before the Magistrate. I summoned him, and he afterwards attended, but refused to swear to the handkerchief. I saw it taken out of his pocket.

CHARLES JONES . I was with Thompson, and saw the prisoners following the gentleman in Clare-market - George Green drew the handkerchief out a little way, in Clare-street; I followed them to Russell-court, and then William Green took it quite out. I seized George Green and Lawrence - I am certain they were all three together. I knew them well, and saw them together all the way.

JOSEPH CHARLES . I was with the witnesses, and followed the prisoners. I saw Green and Lawrence attempt several people's pockets. I afterwards secured George Green.

WILLIAM MORRIS . I was constable of the night, and took the prisoners in charge.

WILLIAM GREEN 'S Defence. I was walking through the passage, and picked the handkerchief up; the officer collared me. The other two did not know that I had it. The gentleman said he did not know whether he had lost it or not.

GEORGE GREEN 'S Defence. It is false. I never touched it.

W. GREEN - GUILTY . Aged 19.

G. GREEN - GUILTY . Aged 18.

W. LAWRENCE - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.


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