Old Bailey Proceedings, 26th May 1819.
Reference Number: 18190526
Reference Number: f18190526-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace Oyer and Terminer, AND Gaol Delivery for the City of London, AND ALSO The Gaol Delivery For the County of Middlesex, HELD AT Justice Hall, in the Old Bailey; ON WEDNESDAY, 26th of MAY, 1819, and following Days;

Being the Fifth Session in the Mayoralty of THE RIGHT HON. JOHN ATKINS , LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

Taken in Short-Hand by H. BUCKLER, Basinghall Street, (BY AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON.)

London:

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED, FOR H. BUCKLER, BY T. BOOTH, 31, St. Andrew's Hill, Doctors' Commons.

1819.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX.

Before the Right Honourable JOHN ATKINS , Esq. LORD MAYOR of the City of London; Sir John Bayley , Knt. one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir William Garrow , Knt., one of the Barons of his Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir William Leighton , Knt.; John Ansley , Esq.; Christopher Smith , Esq.; Sir Claudius Stephen Hunter , Bart., Matthew Wood , Esq., Aldermen of the said City; Sir John Silvester , Bart., D.C.L. Recorder of the said City; Richard Rothwell , Esq.; Robert Waithman , Esq., Aldermen of the said City, Newman Knowlys , Esq. Common Sergeant of the said City, and John Vaillant , Esq., his Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of the Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

London Jury.

John William Norrie ,

Richard Hutchinson ,

Edward Briggs ,

John Wilt ,

James Bramwell ,

George Nightingale ,

Warman Thorn ,

Richard Clarke ,

Adam Hamilton ,

Samuel Ridley ,

Evan Evans ,

John Scholefield .

First Middlesex Jury.

William Ward ,

Nathaniel Bellingham ,

John Hale Wright ,

George Jeremy ,

John Moss ,

George Boothman ,

Charles William Beard ,

Joseph Mills ,

John Whiteley ,

Robert Burkitt ,

Thomas Cornock ,

Thomas Knowles .

Second Middlesex Jury.

John Aiken ,

William Partridge ,

Miles Linton ,

Henry Nelson ,

John Cox ,

George Baker ,

George Mason ,

William West ,

Joseph Brian ,

Robert Davis ,

John Gibbs ,

Jonathan Jones .

SESSIONS HOUSE, OLD BAILEY, MAY 26, 1819.

ATKINS, MAYOR. FIFTH SESSION.

Reference Number: t18190526-1

769. PATRICK M'COURT , JOHN BREEZE , ROBERT RHODES , and MICHAEL EAGAN were indicted for stealing, on the 22d of April , at Heston, in the dwelling-house of our Lord the King, one trunk, value 5 s.; one box, value 6 d.; one watch, value 4 l.; two seals, value 40 s.; one ring, value 5 s.; one key, value 6 d.; one pair of gloves, value 1 s.; one handkerchief, value 1 s.; the sum of 15 s. in monies numbered, one 10 l., two 5 l., and sixteen 1 l. bank notes, and two promissory notes for the payment of and value 1 l. each , the property of Thomas Endfield .

MARY ENDFIELD . I am the wife of Thomas Endfield , who is a corporal in the Lancers . He was quartered at Hounslow barracks . On the 21st of April, about ten o'clock at night, I went to bed, my husband's box was then safe under the bed, and locked - it contained wearing apparel, and the articles stated in the indictment. The notes were in a small box inside the large box - they were all bank notes, except two 1 l. notes. There were six half-crowns tied up in the corner of a handkerchief. In the course of the next morning, in consequence of an alarm, I went and found my trunk in the passage, broken open, and all these things gone, except two 1 l. notes - the wearing apparel was left. I saw the watch a week or nine days after. There were one 10 l., two 5 l., and sixteen 1 l. bank notes.

DAVID ANDERSON . I was in the Army, and am now a prisoner, on suspicion of being a deserter. On the 30th of April, between eleven and twelve o'clock at night, I was confined in the guard-house, at Hounslow, the prisoners, M'Court and Rhodes, came into the black-hole where I was, they were on duty, and did not know I was there - there was no light there. I heard M'Court say to Rhodes, that he took the box out of the room - he did not say whose box, or what room; he said he took 48 l. out of the box, and he was afraid if there were any more in the mess they would be found out.

Q. Had he said any thing before that - A. Not that I heard. He said he took the money, and told Rhodes to meet him at the Travellers' Friend, and then they would divide. After that he was going out, I rose up, they heard me - M'Court came, and said,

"Who is that?" I said it was me. He said he supposed I heard what had passed between him and Rhodes, and I should not want for any thing while I was there. I then went into the guard-room. Next day I went out with the sergeant, and mentioned this to him.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. How long were you in the black-hole - A. Forty days. I was never in confinement before. The guard is informed if there are any prisoners, but they did not know that I was in the black-hole, as I sometimes slept in the guard-room, which is separate; you go out of doors into a passage to go to the guard-room. The prisoners were on guard, but not on sentry - they were relieved next day; I told what I heard the next time they came on guard, which, I believe, was next day. I told them I had not heard what had passed, as I was afraid they would ill-use me. He said he would knock me on the head if told what I had heard. I told the sergeant when he came.

COURT. Q. You generally sleep in the guard-room - A. Yes; if they had been in the guard-room, and had seen I was not there, they would have known I was in the black-hole, but not otherwise.

THOMAS LLOYD . I am sergeant major of the regiment. Mrs. Endfield reported the robbery to me - their room is in the barracks. On that night the prisoners' duty was to be in the barracks. I searched the whole regiment - nothing was discovered. The prisoner, M'Court, belonged to Enfield's troop. Anderson had been in the black-hole about thirty-two days - he reported to me what had passed.

Q. When was that - A. I cannot speak to the day, it was some few days after the robbery. In consequence of his information on the morning of the 5th of May, I was ordered to take Rhodes into custody, and found two 5 l. and two 1 l. bank notes in his pocket, concealed in an old glove. He pulled it out, I asked him what it was? he said it was nothing. I seized his hand, and found the money in the glove, which I gave to Glanville. On the same morning I searched M'Court, and found a 1 l. bank note, and two half-crowns concealed in the turn-up leather of his dress cap. Next morning I went to him, when he was in custody, and told him if he would confess this, it would be the means of saving his life. He told me there was some property in Captain Mortray 's stable, under the corn-bin. I went, and found a 10 l. and two 1 l. bank notes there that morning, and a silver hunting watch, two gold scals, a gold key, a pair of womens' gloves, an old doe-skin glove, and a silk handkerchief. As I returned

out of the stable I met Sergeant Gannon coming with Breeze to the stable.

Q. Before that, what passed between you and Eagan - A. On the 6th of May I told him it would be better to tell the truth; he said his wife had got 12 l. I got it from her, and gave all the property to Glanville. They have been seven years in the regiment.

WILLIAM GANNON . I am a sergeant in the Lancers. On the 6th of May I had some conversation with Breeze; he told me the money was in Captain Mortray 's stable. I took him there to show me where it was, and met Glanville near the stable; I understood the money was found, and did not take Breeze in. He did not say what part of the stable it was in.

WILLIAM GLANVILLE . I am adjutant in the regiment. On the 21st of April M'Court was on guard, the others were in the barracks; Breeze was groom to Captain Mortray . Endfield was on duty at Reigate, his wife was in the barracks - the prisoners could all have access to her room. Anderson was in confinement. On the morning of the 5th of May Lloyd gave me two 5 l. and one 1 l. bank notes, and one 1 l. Staines note, found on Rhodes - the same morning he gave me a 1 l. bank note found on M'Court. Next morning he gave me 11 l. in notes, and 1 l. in silver, which he got from Eagan's wife; and in the afternoon he gave me 12 l., a watch, a pair of gloves, and a handkerchief. I was present when these were found in Captain Mortray 's stable, under the corn-bin. One or two other officers have their horses in the stables. They are not kept locked in general.

Cross-examined. Endfield's room is under the common roof of the barracks. The barrack-master does not live under the same roof.

THOMAS ENDFIELD . I am the prosecutor. I had seen the property safe about three days before it was taken; there was 50 l. in the box - 48 l. was taken out. The property is all mine. I knew one of the 10 l. notes by the name of Sergeant Major Glynn being on it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

MR. JAMES HARMER . I know Hounslow barracks, they are in the parish of Heston.

M'COURT - GUILTY. - DEATH . Aged 22.

RHODES - GUILTY. - DEATH . Aged 28.

Recommended to Mercy .

BREEZE - NOT GUILTY ,

EAGAN - NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18190526-2

770. WILLIAM BROWN was indicted for feloniously assaulting Edward Jones , on the King's highway, on the 9th of May , and taking from his person, and against his will, one watch, value 4 l.; one chain, value 30 s.; two seals, value 2 l., and one key, value 5 s. , his property.

EDWARD JONES . I work at a glass-cutter's in Fleet-street. On the 9th of May, about ten o'clock at night, I was in Beauchamp-street, Brooks-market , and met the prisoner; he made a snatch at my watch, and took it out; I kept hold of the seals and chain, it broke, and he went off with the watch, and part of the chain. I cried out Stop thief! and followed him; I never lost sight of him - he stumbled, and was secured in less than two minutes. My watch was found immediately.

CHARLES BYE . I am a plater, and live in Beauchamp-street. I was at my door, and heard the alarm, ran out, and saw a young man take the prisoner as he stumbled; I saw him throw something away, and heard glass break; I looked down, and found the watch - the case laid a little way off, I picked it up.

RICHARD HATTON . I am a beadle. I took the prisoner in charge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I had been drinking, and was going out of a friend's house; I supposed I must have laid there until I was taken.

GUILTY. Aged 21.

Of stealing from the person, but not with force and violence .

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow .

Reference Number: t18190526-3

771. GEORGE CARTWRIGHT was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Matthew Pope , about five o'clock in the forenoon of the 17th of April , and stealing therein, two coats, value 3 l.; two pair of breeches, value 30 s.; three waistcoats, value 1 l.; two shirts, value 8 s.; four handkerchiefs, value 5 s.; three rings, value 5 l.; two table-spoons, value 1 l., and twelve tea-spoons, value 1 l. , his property.

MATTHEW POPE . I live in Horseferry-road, Westminster . On the 17th of April my house was fastened up at night: I was alarmed about four o'clock in the morning, and found my parlour window open; the drawers and bureau were broken open, and a quantity of things taken out; I found several of the things at the watch-house about eight o'clock.

JAMES GILMORE . I am an officer. On the 17th of April, about five o'clock in the morning, I was called up, went to Pope's, and found the window broken open. In consequence of what Dempsey said, I went to look for the prisoner, but could not find him until the 15th of May, when I saw him with two others, but did not think proper to take him. I took him on the 19th.

JOHN DEMPSEY . I am a watchman. On the 17th of April, I saw the prisoner coming up Duck-lane with two bundles - another man was with him. I put my hand on the bundle, and asked the prisoner what he had got there? he looked me in the face, and both ran off different ways; I sprung my rattle, and two watchmen came to my assistance; the prisoner ran into Duck-yard, and got off. I had seen him two or three times, but never had a view of his features before. I saw him again three weeks after - he was then dressed differently. I am sure he is the same man. I described him to Gilmore.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I have a witness to call.

CATHARINE BUTCHER . I live in Short's-gardens, Drury-lane. I lodge with the prisoner, and sleep in the room with him and his wife. On the 16th of April, about half-past nine o'clock at night, he came home to supper, and did not go out till about six o'clock the next morning. I was awake before five o'clock - I am certain of it.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18190526-4

772. MATTHEW HOARE was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of May , one saddle, value 15 s., and one bridle,

value 5 s., the goods of Thomas Holder , privately in the stable of Thomas Willan .

THOMAS HOLDER. I work for Thomas Willan , who is a farmer , and lives at Acton . On the 5th of May, in the morning, I missed the bridle and saddle; the stable was not locked. I had used them the morning before

JOHN DUNN . I am a watchman. On the 5th of May, about half-past two o'clock in the morning, I met the prisoner in the Harrow-road, with the bridle and saddle, and a spade in a bag; he said he came from Willan's, in the Regent's Park; I was going to take him there. He then stopped, and said it was of no use, for he had stolen them from a farm about six miles off.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 27.

Of stealing to the value of 4 s. 10 d. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow .

Reference Number: t18190526-5

773. SUSANNAH VANDERSTEIN was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of May , one 10 l., bank note , the property of John Claxton .

JOHN CLAXTON . I am a seaman , and live at Shadwell . On the 14th of May, I lost a 10 l. note out of my trunk, which I received of Captain Price. The prisoner lived in the same house.

JAMES PRICE . I am captain of a merchant vessel. On the 12th of May, I paid Claxton a 10 l. note, which I had received from the Bank that day.

JAMES MILLER . I am a pay clerk at the Bank. I paid Price four 10 l. notes on the 12th of May. No. 4953, dated April 22, 1819, was among them.

JOHN HAINES . I am a Thames Police officer. On the 14th of May, Claxton informed me of the robbery, and said he had lost his trunk - the prisoner's husband kept the house. She denied all knowledge of it; she said he had taken his chest and trunk away in a coach. I was sent for to the house again soon after, and the trunk was produced on the table - Claxton had a plane in his hand and a bunch of keys; he unlocked the trunk and missed the 10 l. note; I took the prisoner into another room, and told her that I must search her very particularly. She then took a 10 l. note from her pocket, and said it was a 1 l. note which she had found in the room the night before; it was No. 4953, dated April 22, 1819.

JOHN CLAXTON re-examined. I had taken my chest away in the morning, but left my trunk behind. Before I fetched Haines, I asked her for my trunk - she said I had taken it away; after Haines left, she herself produced the trunk to me; I had left a plane in it, which I found in a woman's hand in the house. The prisoner had a bunch of keys in her hand; I took them from her, and found that one of them opened my trunk.

Cross-examined by MR. ARABIN. I had been drinking a little, but was not intoxicated - I did not open my trunk.

Prisoner's Defence. He was drunk the night before, opened his trunk, and then threw all his things into the middle of the room.

GUILTY . Aged 33.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18190526-6

774. CATHARINE OLDSLIGIER was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of May , one table-cloth, value 2 s.; one frock, value 3 s., and one petticoat, value 3 s. , the goods of John Springett .

OLIVIA CARTER . I am servant to John Springett , who keeps a public-house in Grosvenor-row, Chelsea . On the 12th of May, these things hung in the yard to dry. I saw the prisoner in the yard, and suspected she was going to the privy; I afterwards missed these things. I knew the prisoner before, and am sure she is the woman.

RICHARD MAYBANK . I am a constable. On the 12th of May, I searched the prisoner at her lodgings, and found the property in her pocket.

JOHN DUFFY . I was with Maybank. The prisoner's pockets fell off, and we found these things in them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow .

Reference Number: t18190526-7

775. ANN LANGTON , ELIZA GORDON , and JANE STEWART were indicted for stealing, on the 14th of May , from the person of Jeremiah Briggs , eighteen 1 l. bank notes , his property.

JEREMIAH BRIGGS . I am a butcher , and live at Halifax. On the 14th of May I was in town, and changed a 20 l. note at the Bank. In the evening I got into company with the prisoners, Langton and Gordon, and went to a house with them; I was in liquor. Langton took me to another house. I believe my money was stolen in the first house.

WILLIAM EVERINGHAM . I am a clerk in the Bank. On the 14th of May I gave the prosecutor twenty 1 l. notes for a 20 l. note - they were numbered from 36292 to 36311, and all dated 29th April, 1819.

GEORGE BARBER . I am servant to Mr. Morley, who is a linen-draper, and lives in Whitechapel. On the 15th of May Langton and Gordon bought some things at our shop, and paid me a 1 l. note, No. 36303, dated 29th of April, 1819.

GEORGE WILSON . I am a haberdasher, and live in Whitechapel. On the 15th of May Gordon and Langton paid me two 1 l. notes, No. 36308 and 36310.

ROBERT COOMBS . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoners, and found two 1 l. notes, Nos. 36311 and 36292. I found three 1 l. notes on Gordon, Nos. 36309, 36304, and 36306.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. The prosecutor called you to assist him - A. Yes. He said he did not know any of the women, for he was so drunk, and that he gave several notes to the women to get him a supper. One of the houses he was at was No. 12, Albion-street.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18190526-8

776. JOHN SMITH , alias SCANLON , was indicted for feloniously assaulting Catherine Aubertin , spinster , on the King's highway, at St. Mary le Bow , on the 1st of May , putting her in fear, and taking from her person, and against her will, one pocket-book, value 6 d.; two 10 l., and four 1 l. bank notes , her property.

MISS CATHERINE AUBERTIN . I live at Barnstead, in Surry. On Saturday, the 1st of May, about half-past

two o'clock in the afternoon, I was in town with my sister, and went to Mr. Garton's shop in Cheapside; he deals in cotton. I paid a 5 l. note there, and received four 1 l. notes and some silver in change. I put the notes into my pocket-book, with two 10 l. notes, which I had brought from home - they were marked on the back with the word

"Bank," and my own name. Soon after we left Garton's, we crossed over on the Bow-church side, and were going towards Bread-street - I held my pocket-book in my hand. Very soon after we passed Bow church, some person caught at my pocket-book - I held it fast; they did not succeed for sometime. I held it fast for a small space of time; it was then taken from me by pulling and twisting it from me - I was nearly turned round before I let it go. I made all the resistance I could, and held it with both hands - it was taken forcibly from me.

Q. Did you see the prisoner - A. Yes; the instant he took it from me, I saw him, and followed him with my eye. I saw him take the pocket-book out of my hand - he ran towards Bow church, then crossed, and dodged between the coaches. I pointed him out to a gentleman who passed me, and he followed him. I saw my pocket-book and notes again at Guildhall.

COURT. Q. He struggled with you to get it - A. Yes; I saw the prisoner the moment he got it. He is the person who took it - I have not the least doubt of it.

HENRY DAVIES . I am a carrier. On the 1st of May I was going along Cheapside, a gentleman passed me, crying

"Stop thief! the fellow has taken the lady's pocketbook from her!" I observed the gentleman look across the way towards the coaches, by which I supposed the prisoner had run through the coaches. I ran across the road, and saw the prisoner making towards Lawrence-lane. I overtook him in Lawrence-lane, and said,

"I suppose you are the person who has taken the pocket-book from the lady." He said he would strike me if I came near him. Two or three young men came up at the time. I ran to the Castle, public-house, expecting to find an officer, but did not. I ran back, and found the young men still following him. I came up - he threatened to strike me again, and said he would fight me; I did not choose to fight. I followed him to the corner of Aldermanbury, and there collared him. He struck me in the face - the others assisted in securing him, and we delivered him to Nickson at St. Lawrence bench. I am sure he is the man.

THOMAS HUGHES . I am a warehouseman, and live in Lawrence-lane. I heard the alarm, and saw the prisoner scuffling with Davies. I followed, and never lost sight of him till he was secured. I gave him in charge of Nickson - he is the man.

ROBERT NICKSON . I am an officer. I took charge of the prisoner by Hughes's order. I searched him, and found a pocket-book in his right-hand pocket, with four 1 l. notes in it. When he saw me find them, he said,

"Let us share it; the lady will not come forward." I examined it further, and found two 10 l. notes in it - I produce them.

MR. RICHARD PLATT . I live in Cateaton-street. I saw the prisoner in the lock-up room, and the notes found on him. He wished the officer to share the money with him.

WILLIAM ALLEN . I am shopman to Mr. Garton. I remember the prosecutrix coming to my master's shop on the 1st of May, and paid me a 5 l. note. I gave her four 1 l. notes and some silver - (looks at the four 1 l. notes) - these are the same. Miss Garton marked them.

MISS AUBERTIN. The pocket-book is mine, and the two 10 l. notes - they are marked in my own name.

Prisoner's Defence. I was walking down Cheapside, and met the lady. I saw the pocket-book lay on the pavement.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 37.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190526-9

777. EDWARD MORRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of May , one rummer glass, value 1 s., and one spoon, value 1 s. , the goods of William Baggs .

WILLIAM BAGGS . I am waiter at the sign of the Mansion-house in the Poultry . On the 6th of May the prisoner came into the parlour, and had a glass of porter. I was informed he had put a glass and spoon into his pocket, and followed him out. I told him he had my property in his pocket, he gave me the glass.

JOHN BROWN. I am an officer. I was passing at the time, and saw Baggs take the glass from the prisoner - I took him into the house, and found the spoon in his coat pocket; I also found another glass, a brush, and two case knives on him, which he could give no account of.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was intoxicated.

GUILTY . Aged 71.

Confined Six Months .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190526-10

778. JOHN WARD was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of May , 23 pair of stockings, value 30 s. , the goods of Henry Kipling .

BENJAMIN BALDWIN . I am shopman to Robert Kipling , who is a hosier, and lives in the Poultry . On Saturday evening, about half-past eight o'clock, I saw the prisoner lurking about the door for sometime; while I was busy serving a customer, I saw him make a snatch, and take away two parcels of stockings - he ran across the road, and up Grocers'-hall-court; I pursued, calling Stop thief! he turned round, saw me, and dropped them. I picked them up, and followed him up Dove-court - the officer stopped him without my losing sight of him - I am positive he is the man.

ROBERT ARTHUR TUCKER . I was at the end of Dove-court, and saw the prisoner running very fast; he was stopped. I took hold of him; Baldwin came up, and said he was the thief. He wanted me to let him go, and begged for mercy. I told him it was useless to beg pardon if he had done nothing - he still begged for mercy.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190526-11

779. JOHN KELLY was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of May , one shawl, value 7 s., the goods of Sarah Jackson , and one coat, value 3 l., the goods of Hannah Redfearn , widow , in her dwelling-house .

HANNAH REDFEARN . I keep the Green Dragon, public-house , in Bishopsgate-street . On the 10th of May, about

three o'clock, the prisoner came, and had a pint of beer in the tap-room. I sent the girl for some water, when she returned she called out, I went and found the prisoner on the stairs - she was pulling her shawl from between his coat and waistcoat. He begged for mercy, and was secured immediately.

SARAH JACKSON . I am servant to Mrs. Redfearn. I met the prisoner on the stairs; he pulled the coat from under his own, laid it on the stairs, and said he had got nothing else. I saw my own shawl on the other side, and took it from him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I have been seventeen years in the King's service. I went up stairs by mistake, being in liquor.

GUILTY. Aged 40.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Confined Six Months .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190526-12

780. ROBERT SHELLY was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of April , 140 yards of satin, value 30 l., the goods of Stephen Wilson and Thomas Wilson , in the dwelling-house of the said Thomas Wilson .

GEORGE CROW . I am servant to Messrs. Todd and Co., who are haberdashers, and live in Fore-street. I know Hurst - I believe he is a weaver in Spitalfields. On the 27th of April I bought a piece of blue and a piece of white satin of him. I gave him 3 s. a yard for the blue, and 3 s. 3 d. for the other; they came to 22 l. together.

Q. Is not that an under price - A. It is a fair trader's price - I buy them for that every day. After I had bought them, on seeing the marks, I knew them to be Mr. Wilson's, and informed him of it - I told him who I bought them of. I have known Hurst some years.

MR. THOMAS WILSON . On the 28th of April I went to Messrs. Todds', and saw the two pieces of satin, which are mine. I find by my books that they were never sold. The prisoner was in the habit of coming to our house during the whole of April, to collect cotton to dye, for Mr. Summers. The satins cost me 31 l. - I should not sell them for that. My brother Stephen is my partner.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. They might have been sold, and not entered - A. It is possible. This book is a copy from the waste-book.

COURT. Q. What is the blue piece worth a yard - A. I should not sell it under 5 s., and the white at 5 s. 6 d. There would be a discount of 10 or 12 1/2 per cent. taken from that, which would make the blue 4 s. 6 d. and the white 4 s. 11 d.

THOMAS HURST . I am a ribbon-weaver - I manufacture for myself, and sell goods. On the 23d of April the prisoner came, and asked me if I could find him a purchaser for a piece of blue satin? I told him to leave it, as I was going into the City next day, and would take it with me. On the 27th he brought me a piece of white satin, and that afternoon I sold them both to Crow for 22 l. Inquiry was afterwards made about them, and I immediately said the prisoner brought them to me. I went with Armstrong and pointed him out. He said he knew nothing about it.

Cross-examined. Q. How long have you been a ribbon-weaver - A. Thirty-four years. Crow fixed the price of the satin. The prisoner told me not to take less than 3 s.

Q. Have not you yourself been tried here - A. Yes. I have been at Messrs. Wilson's once.

COURT. Q. Crow knew you was a ribbon-weaver - A. Yes. I never made satin.

HANNAH HURST . I am the last witness's daughter. On the 23d of April the prisoner came to my father's house with a bag on his shoulder, which was nearly full. On the 27th he came again with another bag. I saw the blue satin on the counter after he left - it was not there half an hour before.

- SUMMERS. I am a dyer. The prisoner was in my employ - he frequently went to Messrs. Wilsons' to collect and deliver goods.

JOHN ARMSTRONG . I am an officer. On the 28th of April I went with Mr. Wilson and Hurst to Summers's - he pointed the prisoner out.

Cross-examined. Q. How often have you seen Hurst - A. I apprehended him on a charge which was tried here; and I once searched his house for some silk which was lost - he accounted for that.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190526-13

781. THOMAS MITCHELL was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of April , 24 lbs. of salmon, value 2 l. 9 s., and one tub, value 6 d. , the property of James Lynn .

JOHN BROWN. I am servant to Mr. James Lynn , who is a fishmonger , and lives in Fleet-street. On the 30th of April I was at Billingsgate , with two kits of salmon in my cart, a little boy came and said a man had taken one - I went in pursuit, and caught the prisoner in Botolph-lane with it on his head - he said he bought it.

WILLIAM MACKEY . I am an officer. I took the prisoner in charge about six o'clock in the morning.

JOHN BATHAN . I saw the prisoner take the kit of salmon out of the cart, and run up the lane, he was brought back. I never lost sight of him.

(Kit produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A man gave it me to carry.

GUILTY . Aged 39.

Confined Six Months , and Whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190526-14

782. DANIEL LOVETT was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of May , one pair of breeches, value 3 s.; one jacket, value 10 s.; one shawl, value 2 s.; one waistcoat, value 2 s., and one gown, value 2 s. , the goods of James Smith .

JAMES SMITH . I have the care of a house belonging to Mr. Turner, of Great Ealing. On the 17th of May I was at work in the garden, and heard the cry of Stop thief! I turned myself round, and saw the prisoner running; I pursued, and saw a woman pick up my breeches by the hedge,

the prisoner was secured soon after. I am certain he is the man. I saw the things under his arm.

WILLIAM JORDAN . I am a labourer. I was coming out of the garden, and heard the dog making a noise - I then heard the privy door shut; the prisoner jumped out of the prosecutor's window, I caught hold of him, and asked what business he had there? he said he had been looking for work, and that his mate was in the privy. He broke from me; they followed him, calling Stop thief! I lost sight of him, as he ran through a hedge. I met a woman, she pointed him out - we ran up a lane, came up, and surrounded him; I am certain he is the man. The house had not been left open - he had climbed up a pear-tree which grows round the house, to get in at the window.

CHARLOTTE NORRIS . On the 17th of May, about five o'clock in the afternoon, I was coming through a footpath in the garden, and saw the prisoner running - he dropped a pair of breeches, I picked them up; Smith looked over the hedge, and claimed them.

HENRY MEARS . I was in my father's garden, and heard the cry of Stop thief! from Mr. Sellier's field, saw the prisoner jump over the fence into my father's garden, and fall on his knees; he jumped up again, and rushed through the hedge into Nashburn's garden. When he got near the hedge, I saw him draw something light from under his jacket. Norris pointed him out to me; he ran against her, and almost knocked her down.

GEORGE GARVA . I am a constable. I took the prisoner and breeches in charge; I found the other things tied up in a bundle in the middle of the room, ready to be carried away. The window is eleven feet from the ground.

Prisoner's Defence. I went to the house to look for work, and did not come out of the window.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190526-15

783. ELIZA CLARKE was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of April , two shoulders of lamb, value 7 s.; one apron, value 6 d; one gown-body, value 3 s., and three hooks, value 6 d. , the goods of Thomas Whelpdale .

ANN WHELPDALE . I am the wife of Thomas Whelpdale ; we live in Turnmill-street . On the 13th of April, about eight o'clock in the evening, I missed several things from my yard. I bolted the door and went into the shop; in about a quarter of an hour I heard somebody going out, found the prisoner in the passage, and took these things from under her shawl, which were all safe about a quarter of an hour before. I gave her in charge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 50.

Confined two Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18190526-16

784. ELEANOR HATTON was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of May , one watch, value 5 l.; one seal, value 7 s; one key, value 3 d., one ribbon, value 2 d.; five gowns, value 18 d.; one scarf, value 6 s.; one curtain, value 5 s.; three table-cloths, value 7 s.; one sheet, value 3 s. 6 d.; two shifts, value 4 s. 6 d.; two handkerchiefs, value 18 d., and six napkins, value 2 s., the goods of James Leach , in his dwelling-house .

JAMES LEACH . I live in Thunnel-square, Bethnal-green ; the prisoner had been my servant for about two months - she did not sleep in the house. On Saturday, the 3d of May, I missed the articles stated in the indictment out of a drawer which was not locked; she came on Monday, as usual, and I told her of it; she said she knew nothing of it.

JOHN LESTER . I am apprentice to Mr. Manger, who is a pawnbroker, and lives in Wood-street, Spitalfields. On the 24th of April, the prisoner pledged a sheet with me for 4 s.

THOMAS PETER . I am servant to Mr. Sowerby, who is a pawnbroker, and lives in Brick-lane. On the 30th of April, the prisoner pledged a watch with me for 30 s. She also pledged an apron, four gowns, a bed-curtain, and a frock at different times.

WILLIAM GODBURN . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Paternoster-row, Spitalfields. A table-cloth was pledged with me, by a woman, whom I do not know.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I beg for mercy on account of my three fatherless children.

GUILTY. Aged 47.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Confined One Year .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow .

Reference Number: t18190526-17

785. JAMES WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of April , one coat, value 20 s.; three shirts, value 20 s.; three handkerchiefs, value 9 s., and one pair of breeches, value 10 s, the goods of James Bugg , in the dwelling-house of George Henry Ward , Esq.

JAMES BUGG . I am groom to George Henry Ward , Esq. , who lives in Harley-street . I sleep in the room over the stable. On the 26th of April I came home about eleven o'clock at night, and missed all these things - I had left them all safe at seven o'clock. A person could get in at the loft door. In about half an hour I saw a handkerchief and pair of stockings found in the next stable. The prisoner was helper there, and had the key of it. I took him to Marlborough-street. As we were going a gentleman said he had dropped something - I found another of my handkerchiefs on the pavement. I picked up some pieces of paper which the prisoner dropped at the office.

GEORGE BAKER . I am shopman to Mr. Turner, who is a pawnbroker, and lives in Brewer-street, Golden-square. On the 27th of April, about twelve o'clock in the morning, I took a shirt in pledge of a man about the prisoner's size - it might have been him.

SAMUEL PLANK . I am an officer. The prosecutor brought the prisoner to the office - I found him sitting on a seat in the office; there were two or three small pieces of paper under his feet, the prosecutor picked them up. I found some other pieces in the lining of his waistcoat. On putting them all together, I found they made the duplicate of a shirt pledged that day at Turner's. He denied all knowledge of the pieces being in the lining of his waistcoat.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GEORGE BAKER . The pieces compose the duplicate of the shirt.

GUILTY. Aged 26.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18190526-18

786. MARY WALTERS and MARY FORD were indicted for stealing, on the 12th of May , 26 yards of linen, value 2 l., the goods of James Sawyer , privately in his shop .

JAMES SAWYER. I am a linen-draper , and live on Spencer-terrace, Goswell-street-road . On the 12th of May, between six and eight o'clock in the evening, the prisoners came into the shop together, and asked to look at some gown prints; I was serving a customer, and told them to wait - I afterwards showed them some prints, and they fixed upon one. Ford looked confused, which made me suspect them. They asked me to take 18 d. off the print. I went round the counter, and told Ford to move from the counter, which she did. Walters stumbled against my foot, and a piece of linen fell from under her petticoats; she was then about half a yard from the counter. I am certain it fell from her person; she had a shawl on; she said she was never caught in the act before. I gave them in charge. The gown they chose would come to 7 s. 4 d.

Prisoner WALTERS. Q. Did it not fall off the counter - A. No, it fell from her petticoats.

WILLIAM VANLIN . I am a constable. I took the prisoners in charge - I found only 18 d. on Ford, and 2 1/2 d. on Walters.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

WALTERS' Defence. It must have slipped down.

FORD'S Defence. I was to pay for the print when they sent it home. The linen must have fallen off the counter.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow.

Reference Number: t18190526-19

787. CHARLES GREEN was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Toynbee (he and others being therein), about four o'clock in the forenoon of the 13th of May , and stealing therein, 40 yards of cotton, value 30 s. , his property.

WILLIAM TOYNBEE . I am a tailor , and live at Bromley . On the 13th of May, about half-past four o'clock in the morning, I was alarmed, and found my shop broken open. The bolt had been wrenched off the back door - it was quite light then. I cannot say whether it was broken open before or after daylight. I missed three pieces of cotton and other things - I found the cotton at the watch-house.

JOHN SCHRIER . I am a constable of Mile End. On the 13th of May, about four o'clock in the morning, I secured the prisoner with a bundle, which contained three pieces of cotton - he said he was going to carry them to Mr. Piggot, of Stratford, and had brought them from his master, Mr. Lewis, at the end of Well-street. I sent a carman to Lewis; he returned, and said, in the prisoner's presence, that Lewis said he had not sent a person out with any bundle; the prisoner then said he found the things in Stepney church-yard, by the pump.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I found them behind the pump.

GUILTY. Aged. 18.

Of stealing, but not of breaking and entering .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18190526-20

788. JOHN BURGESS was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Miles , (he and other persons being therein), about four o'clock in the forenoon of the 1st of May , at St. Andrew, Holborn , and stealing therein 5 s. in copper monies numbered , his property.

SARAH MILES . I am the daughter of John Miles, who keeps a sheep's-head shop on Great Saffron-hill . On the 30th of April, I went to bed at twelve o'clock, leaving a 5 s. paper of copper in a desk in the parlour behind the shop. I fastened the window-shutter up close - it is an inner shutter. Between four and five o'clock in the morning I got up, found the window wide open, the shutter down, and the money gone - the prisoner was standing in the shop. I had left the key in the desk.

JOHN MILES . I am the father of the last witness. On Saturday morning, the 1st of May, I heard a rumbling in the parlour, got up, came down, and found the prisoner standing with the parlour-door in his hand. I knew him before, and asked him how he came there? he said he came there to sleep. The window was wide open, and the desk a little up. I found the paper of halfpence in his pocket, which I had seen in the desk the night before. He tried to escape, but I held him. I never gave him leave to sleep there. I saw him the night before near my premises.

JOHN BARNLEY . I took the prisoner and money in charge.

SARAH MILES re-examined. I believe it to be the same paper - I tied it up myself.

Prisoner. I beg for mercy. I was intoxicated, and am very sorry for it.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 20.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow .

Reference Number: t18190526-21

789. EDWARD CRANE was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of February , two sheets, value 12 s. , the goods of Thomas Brown .

THOMAS BROWN . I am servant to Mr. Turner, who lives in Fitzroy-place, New Road . On the 11th of February I lost two sheets from the back of my house, where they hung to dry - I saw them again at the latter end of March. A person might get over the wall into the yard.

JANE PRIEST . I live in George-street, Hampstead-road. I lived in Crane's house at Camden Town - I lived there three or four months. About the end of March last I sold the prisoner a pair of breeches for 5 s.; he said if I would meet him at night he would give me the money. I saw him a few evenings after - he said he had not got the money, but he had got the duplicate of a pair of sheets, which I should have for 3 s., and he would give me the other 2 s. as soon as he could. I did not give him a positive answer, but he left the ticket with me till he could pay me; he said they were his, and that they were a very nice pair. I gave the ticket to Davis; this is it - (looking at it.)

Prisoner. Q. Did you not say that Davis was to pay you so much a day to false swear yourself - A. No.

WILLIAM GAFTON . I am servant to Mr. Dobree, who is a pawnbroker, and lives in Charlotte-street, Fitzroy-square. This pair of sheets were pledged at our shop, I did not take them in. The duplicate produced is the one given for them. I have the counterpart. They were pledged on the 11th of February, in the name of Leslie.

JOHN DAVIS . The duplicate was delivered to me by Jane Priest . I have known the prisoner two years, and never had any words with him.

CHARLOTTE LESLIE . (This witness refused to be sworn, and was recommitted - see page 279 last Session.)

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I never took any thing.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190526-22

790. HENRY JOHNSON and JOHN OWEN were indicted for stealing, on the 30th of April , one pail, value 1 s.; one copper kettle, value 2 s.; one saucepan, value 1 s., and one sack, value 3 s. , the goods of Thomas Weekley .

THOMAS WEEKLEY . I am a gardener , and live at Shepherd's Bush . On the 1st of May, about half-past four o'clock in the morning, I missed these things out of my garden; they were safe the night before.

RICHARD LIMBRICK . I am an officer. On the 1st of May, between two and three o'clock in the morning, I met the prisoners at Kensington Gravel-pits; Johnson had the sack with the kettle and saucepan, and Owen had the pail; they said they bought them at Paddington the day before, and had used them at the fair. Johnson said the sack belonged to Owen - Owen said there was no name on it. I found the prosecutor's name written on it in large characters.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

OWEN'S Defence. I overtook Johnson with them.

JOHNSON - GUILTY . Aged. 23.

OWEN - GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow .

Reference Number: t18190526-23

791. CORNELIUS HOGAN was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of May , 59 yards of satin, value 10 l., the property of Thomas Godwin , from the person of William Robinson .

WILLIAM ROBINSON . I am apprentice to Thomas Godwin . On the 3d of May, about nine o'clock in the evening, I was crossing Covent-garden market , with fifty-nine yards of satin, which I had brought from Albemarle-street, it was drawn quickly from under my arm - I turned round, and saw the prisoner running off with it - he threw it down, and Aldridge stopped him; he was never out of my sight.

JAMES ALDRIDGE . I heard the alarm, saw the prisoner throw it down, and secured him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. It is useless to deny it.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Confined One Year .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190526-24

792. WILLIAM IVE was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of May , five pennyweights and eight grains of gold, value 8 s.; eight pennyweights and twelve grains of gold solder, value 5 s., and one guage-plate, value 2 s. , the goods of Benjamin Pilkington .

BENJAMIN PILKINGTON . I am a jeweller , and live in Coppice-row, Clerkenwell - the prisoner was my apprentice ; he slept out of the house. In consequence of suspicion, I went to his lodgings in White Hart-court, Long-acre, and found this gold and solder in a small box, inside his trunk, which was open; he said the trunk was his. Next day I showed him the box, and asked him if he knew any thing of it? he said he did not. I knew the piece of gold to be mine as it has the mark of my mill on it, which is particular.

Cross-examined by MR. NORRIS. Q. He was a turnover apprentice - A. Yes.

WILLIAM WAINWRIGHT . I am a constable. I took the prisoner in charge, and found four pieces of gold cuttings in his pocket.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

HANNAH CARTERIDGE . I live in White Hart-court; the prisoner lodged in my kitchen. His master took a small box out of his trunk.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Fined One Shilling , and Discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow .

Reference Number: t18190526-25

793. HANNAH HOPWOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of May , one handkerchief, value 1 s.; three knives, value 6 d.; five forks, value 6 d.; one scarf, value 10 s.; one gown, value 3 s.; one shawl, value 7 s., and one towel, value 6 d. , the goods of Mary Ann Rudall , widow .

MARY ANN RUDALL . I am a widow; the prisoner was my servant . On the 18th of May I missed several things, and discharged her. I afterwards went to Finsbury-market, and found these things there - she said they were not mine.

WILLIAM ALFIELD . I went with Rudall, and found these things.

Prisoner's Defence. I think the housemaid put them into my box.

GUILTY . Aged 45.

Confined Three Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18190526-26

794. GEORGE HANKINSON was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of May , thirty knives, value 25 s.; four pair of scissars, value 4 s; six knife handles, value 6 d., and two shevehooks, value 1 s. , the goods of James Moore .

JAMES MOORE . I live in Oxford-street , and am a cutler ; the prisoner was employed to paint my house. I lost some things, searched his lodgings on the 18th of May, and found all these things. He was apprehended that day, and some duplicates found on him.

WILLIAM WAINWRIGHT . I am an officer. I found the things in the prisoner's box, and four duplicates on him.

JOHN WALTER . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Goswell-street-road. The prisoner pledged six knives with me.

HENRY M'DONALD. I am a pawnbroker and live at Battle Bridge. On the 17th of May, the prisoner pledged six knives with me.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I was in great distress.

GUILTY. Aged 28.

Recommended to Mercy .

Confined One Month .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow

Reference Number: t18190526-27

795. WILLIAM DUNN was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of May , two coats, value 36 s. , the property of William Wells .

ROBERT JEFFERSON . I am servant to Mr. William Wells , On the 19th of May, I saw the prisoner running up the area-steps with the two coats under his arm. He was stopped at the top of the steps with them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A man offered me 2 s. to fetch them up.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined One Year .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18190526-28

796. SAMUEL ASHTON was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of May , one saddle, value 3 l, , the goods of Henry Busby .

HENRY BUSBY . I am a hatter , and have a stable in Davis Mews . On the 5th of May, at night, my saddle was safe - I missed it the next morning.

JOHN COOPER . I am a watchman of St. George's. On the 5th of May, about twelve o'clock at night, I saw the prisoner run across the mews with the saddle on his back. I collared him, and he dropped a key, which he said was the key of his door. I found two other keys in his pocket.

WILLIAM JENNINGS , I am an officer. I saw the prisoner throw the saddle down an area. As he was struggling with Cooper, he dropped a key. Two other keys were found on him, one of which is a skeleton key, and opens the stable door.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I found the saddle on a dunghill.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow .

Reference Number: t18190526-29

797. JANE CRISP was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of May , two blankets, value 5 s.; two sheets, value 5 s.; one candlestick, value 1 s.; one pail, value 2 s.; one tub, value 1 s.; one pillow, value 3 s., and one bolster, value 5 s., the goods of John Redfearn , in a lodging-room .

JOHN REDFEARN . I keep the Old Rum Puncheon, public-house , Rose and Crown-court, Moorfields . The prisoner took a furnished room of me; I missed these things out of her room - the duplicates of them were found on her.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

EDWARD WOOD . I am shopman to Mr. Falcon, who is a pawnbroker, and lives in Sun-street. The prisoner pledged all these things with me between the 31st of March and the 19th of April.

Prisoner's Defence. I meant to redeem them.

GUILTY . Aged 48.

Confined One Month .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18190526-30

798. ELIZA DOUGLAS was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of April , one handkerchief, value 3 s. , the goods of Edward Freshwater .

MARY FRESHWATER . I am the wife of Edward Freshwater ; we live in Howland-street. The prisoner was employed to fetch and carry linen for me. On the 26th of April she brought Mr. Parkinson's linen; on comparing it with the inventory I found a handkerchief short. I told her of it, and she said she would speak to the servant.

MARY JEFFERSON . I am servant to Mr. Parkinson. I delivered the linen to the prisoner - there were two handkerchiefs.

JOHN DYE . I am servant to Mr. Williams, who is a pawnbroker. on the 27th of April, I took a handkerchief in pledge of the prisoner.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I have three fatherless children.

GUILTY . Aged 43.

Confined Six Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow .

Reference Number: t18190526-31

799. ANN HERITAGE was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of May , five yards of calico, value 6 s. , the goods of George Dowse .

ANN DOWSE . I am the wife of George Dowse , who lives in Grub-street ; the prisoner lodged in the same house; she came into my room, and took a piece of calico up - I told her to put it down, and she did; I afterwards missed it. She was in and out the room several times - I occasionally went down stairs. I asked her what she had done with it? she said I should have it if I would be quiet.

SUSAN THOMPSON . I lodge in the house. I saw the prisoner come out of the room, and put the calico under her apron.

JOSEPH FISHER . I am shopman to Mr. Whitaker, who is a pawnbroker. On the 17th of May the prisoner, pledged the calico for 2 s. 7 d. in the name of Mary Thompson , Grubb-street - I knew her before.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I had been drinking with the prosecutrix.

SILAS FULK . I am landlord of the house. The prosecutrix and the prisoner were drinking together; the prosecutrix gave her something to pledge - they afterwards quarrelled together.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18190526-32

800. EDWARD ANGEL was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of May , part of a printed book, called volume 2 d of Fielding's Works, value 1 s.; three other printed books, called the Dairyman's Daughter, value 3 d.; two printed books, called the Juvenile Reader, value 1 s.; sixteen newspapers, called the Literary Gazette, value 5 s.; one printed work, called Mangnall's Historical Questions, value 5 s.; fifty sheets of other printed papers, value 3 s., and 4 lbs. of treacle, value 1 s. , the goods of Thomas Bensley and Joseph Bensley .

SECOND COUNT, for stealing fifty sheets of paper, value 3 s., their property.

MR. JOSEPH BENSLEY . I am in partnership with Thomas Bensley ; we are printers , and live in Bolt-court, Fleet-street ; the prisoner was our under warehouseman .

We repeatedly missed complete works and parts of works, which induced us to suspect him. On the 7th of May we searched his drawer in the warehouse, and found two copies of the first volume of Fielding's Works, as far as printed, two copies of the Juvenile Reader, and others in an incomplete state - they had no business there. I sent for an officer, who went to search his lodgings.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. How long had he lived with you - A. Eleven years - the works had not been sent to the booksellers'.

THOMAS SMITH . I am a constable. I searched the prisoner's lodgings with Matthews, and found these things.

ROGER MATTHEWS . I accompanied Smith to the prisoner's lodgings, and found these works, with a quantity of tracts and printed paper.

Cross-examined. Q. Some of these sheets are damaged - A. Some are.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Confined Six Months .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190526-33

801. CHARLES LEWIS was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of May , one great coat, value 10 s. , the goods of George Kershaw .

GEORGE KERSHAW . I am a grocer , and live at Rumford. On the 25th of May, about one o'clock, I went to Mr. White's oil-shop, Aldgate, High-street , leaving my coat on the cart at the door. Having lost a coat twice before, I kept my eye on the cart, and saw the prisoner and another man; the other man took the coat out of the cart and gave it to the prisoner - he pulled at it twice before he got it. I ran out and secured the prisoner with it on his arm - I gave him in charge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190526-34

802. CATHERINE HANLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of May , two half-crowns and one sixpence, the monies of Joseph Dynam , from his person .

JOSEPH DYNAM . On the 4th of May, about twelve o'clock at night, I was crossing Smithfield , and met the prisoner, she asked me to go home with her - I refused; we had then got to the middle of the sheep-pens - she ran her hand into my breeches-pocket, in which I had five shillings, two half-crowns, and a sixpence; I felt her hand leaving my pocket, and by the light of the moon I saw the half-crowns in her hand - she ran into the sheep-pens, and shut the gates; I at last secured her, and missed two half-crowns. She said she would give me the money, she however did not. I called the watchman, and gave her in charge. The money was found on her.

JAMES GRAHAM . I was constable of the night. I searched the prisoner, and found two half-crowns and a sixpence on her, with 9 s. in her purse.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent.

GUILTY . Aged 31.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190526-35

803. JOHN KEYS was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of May , one watch, value 2 l.; one chain, value 2 d., and two keys, value 2 d. , the goods of James Hood .

JAMES HOOD . I am a baker . On the 3d of May, about one o'clock in the day, the prisoner came into my shop, I went down to the bakehouse with him to look for half a crown, which he said he had dropped - we could not find it. In looking for it he put the candle out, I went up to get another light, leaving him in the bakehouse - my watch hung there then; before I returned with the light he came up stairs, saying he had not found it, but if I found it I could give it to him. I went down stairs, missed my watch, and ran up directly - he had then got out of the shop, and was running away, I pursued, calling Stop thief! a man attempted to stop him, he pushed by him, but was secured without my losing sight of him. I am certain he is the man. He was brought back, and the officer searched him in the back room. We found the watch on a sack of raspins close to where he stood.

THOMAS DAWSON. I am a baker. I saw the prisoner leave the shop. Hood missed his watch, I ran after the prisoner, and brought him back; about an hour after the watch was found on a sack of raspins close to where he stood.

HANNAH TODD . I found the watch on the sack of raspins.

DANIEL TURNER . I am an officer. I searched the prisoner, but found nothing on him. The watch was afterwards given to me.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. They found nothing on me.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined One Year .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190526-36

804. SARAH BLAKELEY and JANE BROWN were indicted for stealing, on the 20th of May , at St. Botolph, Without Bishopsgate , 17 yards of printed cotton, value 25 s., the goods of John Warren Nott , privately in his shop .

JOHN HARDING . I am constable of Bishopsgate Ward. On Thursday, the 20th of May, about two o'clock in the afternoon, I received information of the two prisoners coming out of a linen-draper's shop. Blakeley was seen by a woman to put something under her apron after she came out. They turned down Catherine-wheel-alley, leading to Petticoat-lane. I immediately went after them, and overtook them in conversation together. Blakeley had a basket before her, and was lifting something up underneath it. I asked her what she had got under her apron? she said she had nothing. I put my hand to her apron, and found the print under it. Brown walked a little forward - I called to a young man who was there to bring her back, which he did. I never lost sight of her, and am sure she is the woman who was with Blakeley. I searched her, and found a piece of cotton on her, which she had bought at the prosecutor's shop. I took her back to Mr. Nott's shop, and asked him if he had lost anything? he said, No, not that he knew of. I produced the piece of cotton to him, with the mark and ticket on it - he claimed it directly, and said he had not sold it. I also produced the piece which I found upon Brown - he said he had sold it to her.

JOHN WARREN NOTT . I am a linen-draper , and live in Bishopsgate-street Without. The prisoners came to my shop together on the 20th of May, I sold them a small bit of print for 2 s. - I do not know which bought it, they were together. The officer brought them back in about ten minutes after, with this piece of print, which is my property. It is marked in two places with my private mark, and the number of yards. It is worth 24 s.

Q. When they were in the shop had you observed any thing - A. I was informed they were suspicious characters while they were in the shop, and came forward to take notice of them, but saw them take nothing, though I was on the watch.

BLAKELEY'S Defence. A man gave me some liquor to carry it.

BROWN'S Defence. I know nothing of it.

BLAKELEY - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 46.

BROWN - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 27.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190526-37

805. CHARLES WINGFIELD was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of April , two bill-cases, value 5 s.; 5 s. in monies numbered; one bill of exchange for payment of and value 469 l. 18 s. 11 d., and six 1 l. bank notes , the property of William Palmer and Robert King .

MR. ROBERT KING . I am in partnership with William Palmer ; we are brokers in Colonial produce - our office is in Mincing-lane , On the 16th of April, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, I left the office, and went on Change; I sent my boy to Fenchurch-street, requesting he would lock the door leading into the passage, and hang the key up in a place known to ourselves - I shut the front-door, and went away. I returned about six o'clock, and remained in the office until seven. The boy then told me he could not find the bill-cases which had been left in the office behind the desk - I looked myself, but could not find them. We had handbills printed, offering a reward of fifty guineas. The prisoner was afterwards apprehended.

THOMAS STEVENSON . I live with my father, who is a wine and spirit broker, and lives in Great Tower-street; the prisoner was his errand-boy. One morning when I came to town, he took the two bill-cases in question, out of a drawer, and said,

"See Thomas, what I found yesterday on St. Dunstan's-hill as I was going home." I asked him if he had shown them to his father, and what they contained? he said,

"I have not, nor have I opened them, for I was so agitated when I found them that I knew not what to do; they are too large to go in my pocket, and I did not like to carry them home in my hand, so I returned to the counting-house, and put them in this drawer." I said he should have spoken to his father about them; and have them advertised, and said he had better speak to him as soon as possible, for if they were found upon him he might be hung; he said he knew that, and he should have spoken to him, but he had not seen him, and he was thinking of speaking to my father when he came in, which I desired him to do, and said if he liked I would mention it myself; he said I might, but afterwards that he had better state the facts himself - I told him to do as he pleased. He then opened the cases, and showed me the contents, which were a bill for 496 l. 18 s. 11 d., a 1 l. bank note, some silver and copper, some coffee warrants, and memorandums; he tied the cases up, and replaced them in the drawer. My father came in shortly after but did not stop long. When he was gone I asked him why he had not spoken to him? he said he saw no occasion for troubling my father, and had rather speak to his father, which he intended to do as soon as he got home, and he would go with him directly to the newspaper office, and have them advertised without any further delay. Next day he said they were advertised. I looked into the Times, and said it was not there; he said he knew it was not there, but it was in the the Morning Advertiser, or Chronicle, I do not remember which. I said I wondered his father had not advertised it in some other papers, as it was so large an amount. He said his father looked upon that paper as being generally perused throughout the City, and thought it sufficient; he said,

"To-morrow I will tell you the result." On the morrow he informed me that he and his father had been to Messrs. Palmer and King, and restored them the cases. I asked him if they gave him any thing? he said,

"No, my father would not allow me to accept any recompence, saying it was my duty to restore the property," and said there was property in the cases to the amount of 300 l. or 400 l. in bank notes, and that the gentleman suspected that the person or persons who robbed them had taken the notes out, overlooked this 1 l. note, and thrown the cases away, that some person might find them, and thence bear a suspicion of knowing something of the other property; and said

"the gentlemen were fully satisfied with respect to my knowing nothing of it, were extremely obliged to my father for his trouble, and would willingly have given me some recompence, if he would have allowed him to accept it. My father has desired me to mention this circumstance to no person, for as the other property is not yet recovered, people may conjecture, by my finding the cases, that I know something of it, but as I told it to you in the first instance, and promised to tell you the result, so I have, but I earnestly entreat you not to mention it to your father or anybody, for you see how the case stands. My father does not wish it to get wind for it is a very unpleasant affair, and might bring suspicion on my family."

Q. You do not remember the day this took place - A. No. My father had been robbed, and I was looking in the cupboard to see if I could discover any thing, when I found these two bill-cases - this was on the 3d of May, which was a long time after this conversation took place - it might be three weeks or more after. I immediately spoke to my father on the subject, and he went to the prosecutors'.

JOSEPH MARTIN . I am an officer. On the 7th of May. I went with Mr. King to the prisoner's father's house, in Alfred-place, Kent-road, and took the prisoner into custody. I searched him but found nothing on him.

MR. WILLIAM PALMER . Mr. Stevenson showed me the cases, and we claimed them; we searched Mr. Stevenson's privy, and found part of the warrants, which were in the cases. There were 6 l. in the cases when we left them - we have never recovered the bill.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190526-38

806. PATRICK NEAL was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of May , 164 lbs. of lead, value 2 l., the property of Caroline Lewis , spinster , and fixed to a certain building of her's .

CHARLES WARMAN . I am a carpenter. On the 10th of May, about twelve o'clock at night, I was awoke by some dirt falling down the chimney of my bed-room; I heard a noise in the yard, and got up; as I was lifting up the window I saw some lead thrown down. I called Williams and sent him and the watchman to the back of the premises, where the lead was thrown from. I went into my house, dressed myself, and saw the prisoner cross the roof of four houses; I secured him under a stack of chimnies; we took him back through my own house - he was very resolute, and threatened to throw us off the roof. When more assistance came, we took him down, and gave him in charge. I found 164 lbs. of lead thrown down at the back of the premises - it had been cut off the roof of an unfinished house, which belonged to Caroline Lewis - I compared it with the house.

WILLIAM WILLIAMS . I went on the roof, and secured the prisoner.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190526-39

807. HAMILTON ROSS , JAMES SHAW , MICHAEL MULLEN , DAVID SHARPE , GEORGE YOUNG , JOHN MOORE , LYDIA HOGAN and JOHN MARTIN were severally and separately indicted for having in their custody and possession, forged bank notes, they well knowing them to be forged .

To which indictments the prisoners pleaded.

GUILTY .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Before Messrs. Justice Bayley and Mr. Baron Garrow .

Reference Number: t18190526-40

808. HAMILTON ROSS , JAMES SHAW , MICHAEL MULLEN , DAVID SHARPE , GEORGE YOUNG , JOHN MOORE , LYDIA HOGAN and JOHN MARTIN were again severally and separately indicted for uttering forged bank notes, knowing them to be forged .

MR. REYNOLDS, on the part of the Governor and Company of the Bank of England, declined offering any evidence.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18190526-41

809. CHARLES RENNETT was indicted for that he, on the 8th of November , a certain male child, named Joseph Charles Horsley , under the age of ten years (to wit,) about the age of three years, son of Joseph Horsley and Sarah Elizabeth his wife , maliciously, feloniously, by fraud did lead, take, and carry away, with intent to deprive them, the said parents of the child, of the possession of the said child, by concealing and detaining it from them its parents, against the Statute .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating that the child was taken, decoyed, and enticed away, instead of being taken, lead, and carried away.

THIRD AND FOURTH COUNTS, the same as the two former, only stating the prisoner's intent to deprive one Elizabeth Holebrook , spinster , having the lawful care and charge of the said child, of the possession of the said child, by concealing and detaining it from her, so having the lawful care and charge of the said child, against the Statute.

MR. JOSEPH HORSLEY . My wife's name is Sarah Elizabeth ; we were married on the 26th of April, 1813, two years before the child in question was born - we have four children. On Sunday, the 8th of November, I entrusted two of my children, Joseph Charles and Sarah Elizabeth , with Elizabeth Holebrook , the maid-servant - the boy was three years and a half old - she took them out in a little chaise about two o'clock in the afternoon, she was to return at four o'clock; we dine at five - she should have been home before that; she did not return.

Q. When did you next see her - A. On the Monday evening, at Bow-street.

Q. Did you discover any thing of your children before that - A. On the Monday evening I found the child, Sarah Elizabeth , at a public-house kept by Mrs. Bailey.

Q. Did you, in consequence of any suggestion, go to France to discover the prisoner - A. Yes; I sat off on Thursday, the 12th of November, accompanied by a friend and an officer. We went by Dover to Calais, in consequence of what we learnt; from thence we proceeded through Holland, and discovered the prisoner at Braak, in Germany, under the surveillance of - , at the hotel; I saw Mr. Macnamara there.

Q. When you saw the prisoner did any thing pass - A. On his seeing me he exclaimed

"Oh God! Oh God!" in great agony, and put his hand to his face. I remained in the room; he threw himself on the floor, embraced my legs, and implored mercy. I then left the room without making any reply.

Q. Did you afterwards see the child - A. I did, at the house of Mr. Macnamara, the Consul; it was the male child I had lost - (looks at the letter). I have seen the prisoner write, and believe it to be his hand-writing - (looks at a passport, signed S. Reynolds) - it does not appear like his usual writing, but I believe it to be his.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. You have known the prisoner many years - A. I have known him six years. Since I have been married, I believe I have seen him about three times. He is my wife's first-cousin.

Q. Were you permitted to have possession of the child immediately on discovering it - A. I was not; I was told it was necessary I should identify the prisoner as the person who was named in the warrant, and I went to see him for that purpose, and that only.

Q. Had you not learnt, before you went to the prisoner, that it was necessary there should be some proof of your being the father of the child - A. It was intimated.

Q. Was it not for the purpose of getting that admitted

that you went to the prisoner - A. It was not, on my oath. I think the child was kept from me six days.

Q. Was it not restored to you at last by the prisoner's means - A. I am not aware that it was. It was determined that I should see the child without speaking to it, in the presence of the Government officers, the Consul, and others, and the child was to recognize me. This ceremony was gone through; the child was not then immediately restored to me.

Q. Was it not by the prisoner's means you got possession of the child much earlier than you should otherwise - A. I am not aware of it. He confessed it was mine without hesitation; I did not apply to him to do so.

Q. Did you not tell him that if he rendered you the assistance which the forms of that country required, you would render him every assistance you could here - A. On my oath I did not. I found the child none the worse in health for his journey; his clothes were rather coarse.

Q. How long was it from the time you lost it until it was restored to you - A. A little more than a fortnight. Holebrook was between sixteen and seventeen years old; she had lived a little more than two years with us.

MR. ALLEY. Q. Have you any doubt of the child being yours - A. No. The child came into the room, looked at two or three persons, and then at me; he gave a sort of hysteric laugh, and cried,

"Oh, papa! Oh, papa! my dear papa!" He recognized his mother and the whole of the family when he came home.

ELIZABETH HOLEBOOK . In November last I was servant to Mr. Horsley. I first became acquainted with the prisoner about two months before this circumstance. I got acquainted with him by walking out with the children.

Q. Did he propose to marry you - A. Yes, about a week before the 8th of November. He went by the name of George Faulkner .

Q. On Sunday, the 8th of November, were you out with the children - A. Yes, and saw the prisoner in Canonbury-lane. He accompanied me to Smithfield, as far as the hospital; we arrived there about three o'clock. He said he was going to his brother's, to see if his brother's luggage was ready to take to Birmingham, as he and his brother were going there in a post-chaise - I had the children with me. He returned in about an hour, and said a coach was ready, by which I must go to Birmingham, and he would meet me there that night. He said he had taken a place for me in the name of Jackson, and gave me 2 l. I went to take the coach.

Q. Did he accompany you any part of the way - A. I left him opposite the Saracen's Head, Snow-hill, with the two children. I had the key of my master's house with me; I told him to take the key and children home, he said he would.

Q. What passed before you asked him to take them home? had you expressed a wish to go with them yourself - A. Yes, and he said he would take them home himself.

Q. When did you arrive at Birmingham - A. On the Monday afternoon, at five o'clock; I did not find the prisoner there - I did not see him again until he was in custody at Bow-street. I returned to town on the Wednesday, about three o'clock, and told Mr. Oldershaw what had passed.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. He left you at the Hospital-gate with the children - A. Yes, and returned and helped me to the Saracen's Head.

(The letter referred to was then put in and read, as follows:)

"MUCH INJURED SIR, - I scarcely know in what words to address you, and I tremble lest the moment you discover the hand-writing of one who has so injured you, you in your indignation should tear it to pieces. My own griefs it would ill become me to speak of to you, for they are caused by the wrong I have done you; but I intreat you to consider my poor mother - you know she is an affectionate one, and that I am bringing her with sorrow to her grave. There is also a wife and a beloved infant, for whose well-being I am necessary. Let these considerations operate upon you, for in punishing my crime you must infallibly bring misery on them. Through your mercy I might yet become a creditable member of society; for while I write this I call God to witness, that through the remainder of my life I will act in an upright way, and will, by my unceasing industry, (through your mercy) support myself and family, and be a comfort to my now wretched mother in her old age. O Sir, do not deprive me of the happiness I may yet give and receive. Most sincerely do I (or may I never hereafter be forgiven my sins) repent of my cruel conduct. I blush for myself, and only dare hope to obtain forgiveness from your being a parent and a son, and having the feelings of those ties. That you may prosper in life is not more ardently wished by any than by

"Your afflicted and repentant servant,

" CHARLES RENNETT .

"I beseech you ease my anxiety by a reply, and for God's sake let it be a merciful one."

Prisoner's Defence. My Lords, and Gentlemen of the Jury - Permit me to solicit you attention to an unfortunate young man, who wishes to state, as briefly as possible, the peculiar circumstances of his case. The course pursued by my prosecutor and his friends, who through the medium of the press, have branded me with the most gross and dishonourable epithets, renders it necessary for me most respectfully to intreat that you, gentlemen of the Jury, will take heed lest, unconsciously, you give a verdict under the influence of a mind tinctured with prejudice.

I have, as it were, been hunted down and stigmatized as the worst of human beings - described as a wretch devoid of feeling - one whom every parent ought to detest. Were I that infamous person, I should at this painful moment shrink from your sight, but, with the indulgence of the Court, I shall relate facts which, I trust, will induce you to cast back upon my accuser part of the odium he has industriously endeavoured to bring upon me - facts which, I feel convinced, will place the crime with which I stand charged in a different point of view.

You have heard the evidence in support of the offence imputed to me, but you are strangers to the injustice and oppression under which I have suffered. Let me intreat you, my Lord, and gentlemen of the Jury, to listen to a persecuted, much-wronged individual, and decide with that mercy and liberality which so eminently characterizes a British Court of Justice. I am the grandson of Mr. Charles Rennett , late of the Inner Temple. In the course of his extensive and respectable practice he realized a considerable fortune. He possessed several estates real and personal, independent of money in the funds, to the amount of several thousand pounds. The principal freehold estate

(of the estimated value of 20,000 l.) situate in and including the manor of Wesmeon, in the county of Southampton, was given, under my grandfather's will, to trustees in trust for my father (the only son and heir of his body). He amply provided for his other children out of the remaining estate and funded property. At his decease, my father entered into possession of the estate bequeathed to him, and continued in the enjoyment of it up to the time of his death, which happened at an early period. He left a widow, a daughter, and myself - from that time I date all my miseries. Mr. Charles Dignum , the singer, had married my aunt, the sister of my father, who was executrix under my grandfather's will, and trustee of the estate bequeathed to my father, who at the time of the testator's decease was under age; upon her death, Mr. Dignum, as her legal representative, acted as sole trustee. My father, several years previous to his decease, was of an imbecile mind and dcoiliated constitution; he made a will in 1805, giving the whole of his property to his wife, his daughter, and myself, naming his wife executrix, and two respectable gentlemen his executors.

This distribution of property not meeting the views of Mr. Dignum, he, in 1809, in concert with Mr. James Agar , of Hare-court, Temple, a man known to my grandfather by being often at his table. Taking advantage of my father's mental weakness, they got him to sign, at Agar's chambers, a paper, previously prepared by Mr. Agar, which gave all his real estate equally between my sister, himself, and Agar's illegitimate child. His personal estate was given to a prostitute, who had been Dignum's servant, and then cohabited with my father. They named her executrix and themselves executors, leaving his wife now unprovided for. This scandalous will answered a double purpose - in the first place, it was calculated to increase my difficulties in recovering my birthright, the seizure of which was then in contemplation, as my father's decease was an event supposed to be not very far distant - Secondly, in case I ultimately succeeded in obtaining my birthright, it might afford a comfortable provision for Agar's illegitimate offspring. My father died, surrounded by his wife and children, under the impression that he had provided for his family by the will made in 1805, the only one known by them to be in existence, he himself (such was his mental incapacity!) having no trace in his mind of the will (if it deserves the name) made in 1809.

Judge of our astonishment and indignation when this villainous document was produced and read to us at Agar's chambers - Dignum acted alone as executor. After paying the tribute of crocodile tears to the memory of his departed brother, and vowing that he would be the friend of the widow and children, his first act was to lay claim to and take possession of the family estate; he then put up to sale all the personal property left by my father, including every article of furniture, which having accomplished, the widow and children were turned out of doors, to do the best they could for themselves.

The property included the residue of a lease of some houses in Grafton-court, the deeds thereof being in Dignum's possession, which, on being put up for sale, found no bidders, it being stated that the securities were lost; Dignum, the executor, became the purchaser at one-fourth of the value. Whenever I endeavoured to remonstrate with him on the injustice and cruelty of depriving me of my birthright, he stopped me by tauntingly asking me why I did not take legal steps for the recovery of it? well knowing, in addition to my being under age, and without a guardian, that I had not the means of purchasing the necessaries of life, much less to defray the expences of law proceedings. He knew he ought to have given me possession as heir at law; independent of which, it was his legal as well as moral duty, as trustee, to institute a suit in a Court of Equity, if he doubted my right to the property. After a lapse of about five years, I applied to a solicitor, who, at first, warmly advocated my cause; but, after a meeting held at the chambers of my prosecutor's legal adviser, he became the solicitor of my prosecutor, who, about this time (he being in humble circumstances) married Dignum's daughter. Five years had then elapsed since my father's death, during which, my poor aged mother and myself underwent all the miseries attendant on the lowest state of poverty. Dignum, taking advantage of my distressed condition, proposed to me, that if I would give a release to my claim on the estate, he would use his interest to procure me a situation in the East India House, or some office under Government - I indignantly rejected the proposal. Sunk in poverty, and despairing of the restitution of my right, I had no resource but to propose to these oppressors to receive a small compensation for my claim. The business was negociated by my prosecutor on behalf of himself, Dignum, and a Miss Faruell, who also claimed an interest in the property. Every circumstance that appeared calculated to bring me into an acceptance of their own terms, was eagerly laid hold of by my prosecutor. My father's will of 1809, my poverty, and consequent incapacity of prosecuting vigorously with legal proceedings, were coutrasted with their ability to protract the suit for a number of years, which Mr. Horsley assured me it was their determination to do if we could not come to terms. Thus situated, I was reduced to the deplorable necessity of disposing of my title to an estate, for a sum not amounting to one-half the proceeds thereof received by my oppressors since my father's death.

Under all these afflictions, they would yet have enjoyed peaceable possession of the property, had not their subsequent injustice have worked me almost to a state of frenzy. Miss Farnell, the young lady before alluded to, was left an infant orphan under my father's roof. I looked forward to her giving a proof of her gratitude to her benefactor in the person of his widow or children, particularly as she was unmarried, and had no near relatives. - she was at this time in the last stage of a fatal disorder. On the day of the compromise, she told my sister she was very unhappy, she had not a friend in the world, and had ever lamented losing the protection of her uncle Rennett - no one had ever treated her with kindness but him. Mrs. Horsley used her very ill, and she wished to alter the distribution of her property, but had no power to follow her own inclination. The following day she signed a will, leaving her property (except some gift to charity) to Dignum, Horsley, my prosecutor, and the illegitimate son of James Agar . She died a few days after signing the will. Dignum, the executor appointed thereto, sent a letter to my sister, stating that she was remembered by the testatrix, who had left her twelve yards of black ribbon - the rest of

the family, he said, were not named. The whole of this property, amounting to several thousand pounds, was derived from my grandfather.

Can it be credited that this young lady (laying under the greatest obligations to my father, and which she always readily admitted, and after what had passed between her and my sister the day previous to her signing this will), would, if left to the exercise of a free will, have so disposed of her property. Could she, then on the brink of eternity, be capable of acting such a cruel, ungrateful and deceptive part? most assuredly not. It is too revolting to common sense to suppose it.

This last act of avaricious villainy inflamed me to an excess I cannot describe, and finally urged me to commit the offence which has brought me into my present unhappy situation.

My Lord, and gentlemen of the Jury - here I entreat you to feel for my wrongs; repeated injuries too often goad and drive men to the commission of crime - such has been the case with me. I am sensible of having done wrong. Reflection, which brings conviction to the mind, has shewn me my error; but I hope and trust, when the provocation is considered with the act, you will say the offence is deprived of that false glare and enormity the prosecutor and his friends have given it.

This case differs from all others that have hitherto occupied the attention of a British Court of Criminal Justice. A series of private injuries have given birth to a public crime. Not possessing sufficient command to submit to the wrongs inflicted by my prosecutor and his friends, I have committed an act which gives my prosecutor an opportunity he will not let slip, of completing the ruin he has so successfully began, unless shielded by the mercy of those whom I now have the honour of addressing.

The parental care and kindness that the child which accompanied me experienced, proves that I am not that abandoned hard-hearted wretch which the prosecutor has described me. By voluntarily acknowledging him to be the father of the child, I enabled him to obtain immediate possession of him, and return to England, which he could not otherwise have done. I made every reparation in my power, and received in return his promise (in writing) of mercy.

I thought my prosecutor sincere in his profession of mercy. At Bow-street he pretended that he gave the promise under the idea that my offence was punishable with death. Can such ignorance of the punishment of my offence be credited, in one whom it so essentially concerned? is it not more reasonable to infer that he subsequently regretted giving the promise, and wished to avoid it? His endeavour to explain it away, however, destroys the effect intended, for it proves that he did not give it as a promise of mercy; and his repenting of it does not make it less a promise. I have only to add, that I have suffered six months confinement, five of which I have been in a foreign country, and that a beloved infant has perished in a prison, where its mother was taken on suspicion of being an accomplice.

Relying on your candour, I throw myself upon your most humane consideration.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18190526-42

810. SAMUEL VIALS was indicted for manslaughter .

WILLIAM COX . I am a gardener, and live at Hadley. On the 9th of March I was on Hadley-common, and saw three chaises coming along, one drove faster than the others, and as it passed the other two it made the horse turn short off, and one of the chaises, drove over a child - the prisoner drove one of the chaises, but not that that occasioned the accident - it was an accident, and nothing else.

MATTHEW COX . I saw this accident. Two chaises were driving at a steady pace, another, which the prisoner drove, passed them, one of the horses took fright, and ran over the child, which was killed on the spot.

PHILLIP EDRIDGE . I was present. It was nothing but an accident.

(See page 212, last Session.)

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow .

Reference Number: t18190526-43

811. JAMES KENT and WILLIAM KNIGHT were indicted for feloniously assaulting William Walker on the King's highway, on the 25th of April , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, one watch, value 50 s.; two seals, value 3 l., and one key, value 6 d. , his property.

WILLIAM WALKER . I am a journeyman tin-plate worker . On Sunday evening, the 25th of April, about a quarter after ten o'clock, I was at the corner of Hanover-street and Swallow-street , with Bowman. I had been drinking, but knew what I was about. Three men came up against me, and pushed me against the pump - we both fell; one of them came on each side of me, and pretended to pick me up, they held me while the other took my watch out. I pursued the man across Hanover-square, he got away - Kent is the man who robbed me; there was a good light from the lamps, I could see him plainly. I saw him in custody on the Saturday following.

Cross-examined. Q. How long had you an opportunity of observing him - A. About two minutes. I will positively swear to him.

JOHN BOWMAN . I was with Walker. Three men shoved against us - we were thrown down. The man who took Walker's watch ran away, he followed him, but lost him; the other two kept me back from following. Knight was one of them - I have no doubt of it; I saw him again a week after.

GEORGE GROVES . I am apprentice to Mr. Prossor, in Swallow-street. I went to school with Knight about seven years ago. On the 25th of April, about twenty minutes after ten o'clock at night, I saw him and Kent together, with two others, standing at Mr. Burt's gateway, in Swallow-street, some distance from Hanover-street - they were with Walker and Bowman - Walker sat down on the stones, and the four wanted to lift him up, and said they would fetch him a coach for a pint of beer. Walker and Bowman walked away together - both appeared to have been drinking, but they were able to walk. Soon after this I was going into my master's house, they passed me, one of them said they had hit him a crack of the eye. I ran away. I saw three of them running. Knight spoke to me that evening in the public-house.

JOHN BOWMAN re-examined. I do not remember seeing

the prisoners till they came up to us. I saw three men in Swallow-street.

WILLIAM WALKER re-examined. I remember seeing three men in Swallow-street - Kent was one of them.

SAMUEL FURZEMAN . I apprehended the prisoners.

KENT'S Defence. I can prove I was not there.

MARY BURNETT . I lodged in the same house with Kent, in Church-street, St. Giles's. On a Sunday, about a month ago, I went to his mother's about a quarter before ten o'clock at night, for some radishes, and saw him undressing to go to bed.

MARY WILLIAMS . I am a nurse, and live in Church-street, St. Giles's. Last Sunday month, about eleven o'clock at night, I went to Kent's mother for some water, and saw him in bed.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18190526-44

812. HANNAH DOWLING was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of April , at Edmonton , one ring, value 8 s. 6 d., the goods of Joseph Brooks , privately in his shop .

ELIZABETH BROOKS . I am the wife of Joseph Brooks , who lives in Goswell-street - I live at Edmonton for the benefit of my health, and keep a jeweller's shop there, on my husband's account - I serve in the shop by myself. On Saturday, the 3d of April, the prisoner came in with a girl about fourteen years of age - they asked to see some rings, marked 4 s. 6 d.; I showed her a tray with five in it. She chose one, and asked to see more. I showed her another tray with sixteen rings in it. She turned round to the girl and said,

"Have you got the pound note?" The girl said,

"No, the young woman has got it outside - they both went out; the prisoner said she would be in again in a few minutes. I counted the rings, and missed one, went out, and saw the two and another female with them - the stranger left them, and went up a lane; they had been about two minutes together, and could have passed any thing from one to the other. I went to them, and said I had lost a ring; the prisoner said she had not got it; they offered to go to be searched. I said,

"That is of no use, you have delivered it to the other woman." They insisted on going back. The girl began to strip; I said it is no of use, and threatened to send for a constable; the prisoner fell on her knees and begged for mercy - she said she had two babes at home, and if I would go with her she would pay me for the ring, rather than have a piece of work - she said it was about a quarter of an hour's walk. I set out with them, and went about four miles, to this side of Kingsland turnpike - A dray was coming along. The drayman said,

"Are you going to town?" the prisoner said Yes, jumped upon the dray, whispered to the man, and he rode off with her - the girl ran away. I got on a coach that was passing, and overtook them; she got off the dray and ran away; I followed, and overtook her; she said she would pay for it, and took me to a house where she endeavoured to borrow the money; the woman said she had got none. She went out of another door of the house, and went away. I saw her again about six weeks after, and am sure she is the woman. I have never got the ring.

BARNARD GLEED . I am an officer. On Sunday, the 18th of April, I apprehended the prisoner on another charge.

Prisoner's Defence. I went in to buy a ring, found I had not got the money, and went out to the woman to get it - she was gone. I saw three women standing, and asked them if they had seen her? the lady came, and I returned with her; I was frightened, and said I would pay for it. I was afraid to tell her that I lived in town, thinking she would put me in prison. I know nothing of the ring.

GUILTY . - DEATH Aged 22.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow .

Reference Number: t18190526-45

813. HANNAH DOWLING was again indicted for stealing, on the 18th of April , one whittle, value 10 s., and one gown, value 5 s. , the property of Mary Stafford .

MARY STAFFORD . I live in Wentworth-street . The prisoner lodged in the next room to me. I was ill in bed, she came into my room, and took my gown off my bed, and my whittle from under my head, and said that she was going to put them in the chair. When I got up they were gone.

BARNARD GLEED . On the 18th of April, between eight and nine o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner at the Blue Hart, with the whittle; next morning I apprehended her.

Prisoner's Defence. I borrowed it.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow .

Reference Number: t18190526-46

814. JAMES BRUCE was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of May, 7 lbs. of sugar , the property of the West India Dock Company .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be the property of John Plumer , William Wilson and Charles James Fox Combe .

FRANCIS TAMBOURNS . I am a Thames Police constable. On the 18th of May I was stationed at the entrance of the West India Import Dock; I stopped the prisoner going out in the evening with a canvas bag under his coat, with 7 lbs. of Sugar in it. He said he found it in the bag, on board the ship Fortitude, No. 2. I went to the warehouse, No. 2, but could find no sugar of that quality. I went to No. 11, and found several casks of sugar, which corresponded with it. The cask was marked I B No. 20.

WALPOLE ROBERTS. I am clerk to Messrs. John Plumer , William Wilson , and Charles James Fox Combe . They had sugars in the West India Docks, one cask was marked I B No. 20.

Prisoner's Defence. It is customary to take a bit of sugar on leaving work.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Confined One Year .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18190526-47

815. JOHN M'DERMOT was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of May , 41 lbs. of lead, value 8 s. 6 d., the property of Joseph Goding , and fixed to a certain building of his .

JOSEPH GODING . I have some unfinished houses in Chapel-street, Westminster - I live two doors from them. On the 3d of May, in the afternoon I went to one of the houses, a person came out of the door, get over the wall, and run into Dean-street; he ran as hard as he could, and held his pockets up - he was secured.

WILLIAM HITCHCOCK . I am servant to Mr. Goding. I went on the roof of the house, found some lead torn off, and two large pieces laying on the rafters ready to be carried away.

BRYAN NEAL . I heard the alarm, and saw the prisoner running along Dean-street - I secured him in Paris-place. He threw some lead out of his pocket on the dung-hill.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

RICHARD JONES . I saw the prisoner running - he threw the lead away.

JOHN BLUE . I am a plumber. I had laid the gutters down only a week before; I compared the lead with the roof, and it fitted exactly. It weighs 41 lbs.

Prisoner's Defence. I went there to look for work, and picked the lead up in the house; I saw nobody there, and left.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow .

Reference Number: t18190526-48

816. RICHARD SPENCER was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of May , 12 lbs. of bacon, value 6 s. , the goods of John Alfrey .

JOHN ALFREY . I am a cheesemonger , and live in Richmond-street, St. James's . On the 5th of May I was in my parlour; I heard an alarm, ran out, and met Richmond bringing the prisoner back with a piece of bacon as large as he could carry in his apron - the shop-door was left open.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN RICHMOND . I live in Prince's-street. I saw the prisoner lurking about with five others; one of them took an apron out of his hat, and tied it round the prisoner, who then went into the prosecutor's shop, and came out with the bacon in his apron - I collared him, and brought him back.

Prisoner's Defence. It was given to me.

GUILTY . Aged 11.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow .

Reference Number: t18190526-49

817. WILLIAM TROTTER and ROBERT POLLARD were indicted for that they on the 10th of May , 60 lbs. of lead, value 7 s., belonging to John Lewis , and fixed to a certain building of his, feloniously did cut, with intent to steal the same , against the Statute.

WILLIAM PRICE . I am a sawyer. On the 10th of May I was at work at a house in Connaught-place ; I heard a noise and found a ladder leading to the roof. I found the prisoners on the roof rolling up the lead - they had not separated it. I secured them.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow .

Reference Number: t18190526-50

818. WILLIAM BLAND was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of May , one book, value 8 s. , the property of John Wilton .

MARY ANN WILTON . I am the wife of John Wilton , who lives in Bedford-street, Bedford-row . On the 10th of May, I saw the prisoner reach his hand inside the window, and take a book; he turned from the window, put it under his coat, and went away. I stopped him, he gave it to me, and begged my pardon - he was two doors from the shop.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I only turned a little from the door.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18190526-51

819. CHARLES DAY and WILLIAM HAWKINS were indicted for stealing, on the 29th of April , one shawl, value 3 s. , the goods of Jane Read , spinster .

JANE READ . I live in Brick-lane . On the 29th of April, between four and five o'clock I saw the prisoner, Hawkins, passing down Brick-lane several times - I had a shawl hanging by the door, and fastened with six pins. While I was stooping down to pick up a needle, it was torn down. I found it at the pawnbroker's the same evening.

THOMAS MILLER . I am a pawnbroker. On the 29th of April, about seven o'clock in the evening, Day brought the shawl to pledge - I knew him before. After he was gone I thought it might be the prosecutrix's, and I sent for her.

JOHN TWEEDY . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner, Day, and in consequence of what he said I took Hawkins.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

DAY'S Defence. Hawkins gave it to me to pledge.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow .

Reference Number: t18190526-52

820. JOHN ENGLISH was indicted for stealing, on 25th of May , one waistcoat, value 2 s.; two waistcoat pieces, value 15 s., and one handkerchief, value 1 s., the goods of William Kennington , from the person of Sarah, his wife .

SARAH KENNINGTON . I am the wife of William Kennington . On the 25th of May, about half-past nine o'clock in the evening, I was going up Hatton-garden with these things tied up in a silk handkerchief; just at the corner of Charles-street some one came behind and snatched it from me. I saw a man running down Charles-street towards Field-lane with it; I called out Stop thief! and he dropped it. I found the prisoner in custody at the watch-house in about twenty minutes.

THOMAS BURKE . I am a watchman. I saw the prisoner running in the middle of the road with the bundle - he dropped it. I picked it up and stopped him in Kirby-street.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18190526-53

821. GEORGE HARDEN was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of May , two jackets, value 3 s., two pair of breeches, value 2 s.; one gaiter, value 3 d., and one razor, value 3 d. , the goods of James Hood .

ISABELLA HOOD. I am the wife of James Hood ; we keep a shop at Brompton , but do not live there. On the 15th of May it was fastened up about nine o'clock at night.

The next morning, between four and five o'clock the watchman alarmed me.

BENJAMIN SKELDING . I am a watchman. About a quarter past two o'clock I was going my rounds, and saw the prisoner with two others by Hood's shop. When I came close I saw them lifting a window-board up at the next house. I secured the prisoner - the others got away. He said he knew his sentence, and they could only give him six months. I took him to the watch-house, returned to the shop, and found the door broken open.

TIMOTHY WESTWICK . I searched the prisoner at the watch-house, and found a razor, and two knives in his pocket. I went to Hood's and found the door forced apparently by a crow-bar. I found the jackets and an apron by the door.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought the razor.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow .

Reference Number: t18190526-54

822. MARY HOY was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of May , four 1 l. bank notes, the property of Sampson Cook , from his person .

SAMPSON COOK. I am a seaman . On the 21st of May, I saw the prisoner standing at a door in Bluegate-fields . I went up stairs, and pulled four 1 l. notes out of my pocket - she snatched them out of my hand and ran away. I never saw her again until the Friday, when I found her at the same house. I am sure she is the woman.

Prisoner's Defence. I am not the person who went up stairs with the prosecutor; I went up after he said he had been robbed. He afterwards came to the house, and pointed me out instead of the right girl.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined One Year .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow .

Reference Number: t18190526-55

823. SAMUEL JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of April , one pair of boots, value 18 d. , the goods of John Birket .

ANN BIRKET . I am the wife of John Birket , who is a broker ,. On the 29th of April I was in a room behind the shop; I turned round, saw the prisoner, and asked him what he wanted? he said he wanted a skillet. He ran away, and I brought him back with the boots under his arm.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 37.

Confined Six Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow .

Reference Number: t18190526-56

824. SAMUEL SAYER was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of May , one pair of boots, value 25 s. , the goods of James Anderson and Ratcliff Luzmore .

RATCLIFF LUZMORE. I am a bootmaker , and live in Great Tower-street - I am in partnership with James Anderson . On the 21st of May, about half-past eight o'clock in the morning, I was at work at the back of the shop, turned round and saw the prisoner taking a pair of boots off the seat. I followed him down Harp-lane, and called to a person to stop him, which he did; I saw him drop the boots, and gave him in charge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOSEPH DAVIS . I took the prisoner in charge - he refused to give me his name.

GUILTY . Aged 13.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190526-57

825. DAVID AUSTIN was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of May , one brooch, value 7 s., the goods of Sarah Gilbert , from her person .

SARAH GILBERT . On the 10th of May, about half-past ten o'clock in the evening, I had been out on an errand - I returned and stood at my master's door in Aldersgate-street ; the prisoner and another passed by. He took me by the arm, and asked me if the family were at home? I said,

"Yes." He said,

"No, mistress is in the country." I said,

"No, they are at home, and I will thank you to let me go," for I was afraid I should break a glass pipe, which I had in my hand; he put his hand round my neck, and took my brooch; I seized him, and held him till the watchman came and took him - we could not find the brooch - he wished to pay for it at the watch-house, but my master would not let me take the money. I am sure it was safe before he took hold of me.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Had you not been walking with him - A. No, I was unlocking the door to go in; he did not say he meant to kiss me.

JOHN TUCK . I am a watchman. I came up and took the prisoner into custody.

Prisoner's Defence. I accosted her about twenty yards from the door, she said she could not stop; I caught her round the neck, intending to kiss her, she pulled from me. I must have caught her brooch in my handkerchief, I suppose.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190526-58

826. JOHN SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of April , one skittle-ball, value 6 s. , the property of Thomas Kingley .

THOMAS KINGLEY . I am a turner , and live in Long-lane . On the 30th of April, between eight and nine o'clock, a woman was passing my shop-door, and told me something was taken out of my shop-window. I went in pursuit with my two sons, turned towards Aldersgate-street, ran back again, and heard my son say,

"I have got him!" When I came up, I found he had the prisoner in custody with the skittle-ball, which was missing out of the window.

HENRY KINGLEY . I met our apprentice, and ran after the man to the top of Long-lane, saw the prisoner down Hare-court. Just as he turned, I saw him stoop down; my brother picked the skittle-ball up from between his legs. A man stopped him - I am sure he is the man.

WILLIAM KINGLEY . I went in pursuit, and saw the prisoner with the ball under his coat. I followed him down Aldersgate-street, up Hare-court, where he stopped, put the ball down, and ran away; I picked it up. My brother collared him at the end of the lane. I am sure he is the man.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190526-59

826. SAMUEL SOLOMONS was indicted for robbing on the King's highway, Roderick M'Leod , Doctor in Divinity , on the 5th of May , at St. James, Duke's-place , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, one gold watch chain, value 4 l.; two seals, value 28 s., and one key, value 10 s. , his property.

DR. RODERICK M'LEOD. On Wednesday evening, the 5th of May, I was walking from Bow, to my own house at Westminster - I got to Aldgate church about eleven o'clock, and was walking slowly along. A young man, whom I believe to be the prisoner, came right up against me at the corner of Mitre-street ; it was a very clear moonlight night; I looked in his face to judge whether he really meant to do me any violence, and the innocent appearance he put on prevented my suspecting any harm of him. He made so many apologies for stopping me in my way, that it put me off my guard entirely; I said there was no occasion for any apology; I endeavoured to make way for him, and to pass him. In making that effort to pass him, I felt a violent snatch, and thought my watch, seals and chain and all were gone. I immediately called out Stop thief! and pursued the man. When I got a little way I came in front of the watch-house; the constable of the night met me, and asked me to step in until the watchman and beadle, who were in pursuit of the man, came back. I went in, and in a few minutes one of the watchmen brought a young man in whom he had caught; I told him that was not the man who stopped me, and therefore I could not give him in charge. In a few minutes after, Fawcett, the beadle, came in with a hat in his hand, and said the man had got away but he had knocked off his hat; I left my address at the watch-house and proceeded home. On Wednesday, the 14th of May, I was requested to appear before the Lord Mayor,; when the prisoner was produced the features of his countenance made such an impression on me from what I have stated, that I said I felt no hesitation in saying I believed him to be the man who stopped me. From the observation that I made at the time, he is the man, I have not the most distant doubt of it. I have neither recovered the seals or chain; the chain broke off at the ring, and the watch was left.

Q. Was it so light on the 5th of May, as to enable you to know his person again on the 11th - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. All this was done at one snatch - A. I felt nothing until it was snatched - there was no struggle or resistance on my part - it was about eleven o'clock, it might be a few minutes after, but I cannot tell. I have no doubt in my own mind of the prisoner's being the man, but I am not infallible - he kept saying,

"Sir, I am very sorry I stopped you." I saw him all that time. There was another man there, who asked me if I had lost any thing?

WILLIAM FAWCETT . I am beadle of St. James, Dukes-place. Just after eleven o'clock - it was gone eleven, I was in the watch-house, and heard the cry of Stop thief; I immediately went out - there were several men running about and the watchmen. One man had slipped through the dark court into Duke's-place; when I got there he was about a hundred yards before me; I pursued him from there, to the end of Winfield-street, Petticoat-lane; I there made a blow at him, intending to knock him down, I was not quite near enough to him, but knocked his hat off, and then lost him. On Tuesday following, the 11th, I saw the prisoner and took him - I suspect him very much to be the man I had pursued.

Q. How came you to take him - A. I did not see him till the Monday after, and then he gave me the slip; I saw him again on Tuesday, and took him - I did not know him before, except by seeing him about the street. I took him believing him to be the same man, and informed the prosecutor.

Cross-examined. Q. What time was it - A. It had just gone eleven o'clock; he was just before me - I did not see his full face. I saw him on the 10th, at the Roebuck, public-house, Duke's-place, about half-past seven o'clock at night - Winfield-street is a good way from there; he just came in and went out again - I am confident he saw me; I said nothing to him. Next night, about seven o'clock, I saw him there again - another man was taken on the night of the robbery but not by me. I knew the prisoner before by sight.

Prisoner's Defence. I can prove that I was not there at eleven o'clock at night.

JUDITH ABRAHAMS . I live in Camomile-street. The prisoner lodged with me; he is a tailor. On Wednesday evening, the 5th of May, he came home about eight o'clock - he went out about half an hour after and returned about ten o'clock to supper, and supped with Mr. Abrahams, myself, Mr. Shannon, and one Solomons - we all sat down together to supper about five minutes after ten o'clock; we had fish and sallad for supper. The prisoner left the room, about half-past ten o'clock, and went up to bed - he sleeps on the second floor; we supped on the first-floor. I heard him go into his bed-room.

Q. Where do you sleep - A. In the next room to the prisoner. I went to bed a little after eleven o'clock, and he was in his room then for I heard him cough; he could not have gone out from the time he came in until I went to bed, or I must have heard him. He sleeps in the front room, and we supped in the front room. Mr. Shannon went away about eleven o'clock; Eliza Sinclair let him out; she brought me the key about a quarter past eleven o'clock, and it was not out of my possession until the morning.

Q. Where is your husband - A. In the country, on particular business - Solomon is not here; he is about thirteen years old.

COURT. Q. What relation is the prisoner to you - A. He is my husband's uncle - my husband is a merchant.

Q. When did he go out of town - A. On Saturday last; he is gone to Walton on Thames, and it is uncertain when he will return.

Q. Did you attend before the Lord Mayor, when the prisoner was taken up - A. No, I was out walking at the time; I do not know whether my husband went; young Solomon lives in Field-lane.

Q. What makes you remember so well that it was Wednesday the 5th - A. On account of Shannon and the young man supping with me. I did not hear of the robbery till the 11th.

PHILIP SHANNON . I am a butcher, and live in Duke-street, Aldgate, On Wednesday, the 5th of May, I supped at Mrs. Abrahams'; the prisoner, a young man, named

Soloman, Mr. and Mrs. Abrahams supped with us; we sat down to supper a little after ten o'clock - the prisoner came in about five minutes before we sat down; we had fish and sallad. I went away about a quarter after eleven - the watchman had just gone eleven. The prisoner went to bed about ten or twenty minutes before I left - I heard him go up stairs.

Q. Are the stairs so situated that if he had come down you must have heard him - A. Yes, the stairs are right opposite the door; we supped in the kitchen, which is on the first-floor.

COURT. Q. How is it you are so positive about the day - A. Abrahams wanted me to put in my name to justify for him that day, and it is the only night that I have supped there lately. I heard of the robbery the next day, but did not hear who was accused of it - I think the watchman told me there had been a robbery.

ELIZABETH SINCLAIR . I am servant to Mr. Abrahams. On the 5th of May, my master and mistress, Shannon, the prisoner, and Solomon supped there; they began supper about a quarter after ten o'clock - they had fried fish, and sallads; the prisoner lodged there.

Q. Did you see the prisoner go up stairs to go to bed - A. Yes, about half-past ten o'clock. I let Shannon out about eleven o'clock, and took the keys up to my master, my mistress was there.

Q. Where is Abrahams now - A. On particular business.

Q. In town or the country - A. In town - I saw him to-day at his own house - I saw him this morning.

Q. I mean your master - A. Yes, he slept at home last night.

COURT. Q. Did you fry the fish that night or was it cold - A. Cold; they supped in the parlour, the kitchen is next to the parlour - it is at the back of the house, and the parlour in front; the prisoner sleeps in the front-room - the stairs are facing the kitchen-door, and not the parlour-door - they cannot see a person come down stairs in the parlour. I lock the door every night, and take the key into the bed-room to my master.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 24.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190526-60

827. NATHANIEL CRUDGE was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of April , from the person of John Erskine Douglas , Esq. , one pocket-book, value 2 s.; four 10 l., seven 5 l., and five 1 l. bank notes , his property.

REAR ADMIRAL JOHN ERSKINE DOUGLAS. I live in Cavendish-square, the prisoner was my servant . On the 15th of April I had been taking a walk. I returned home about six o'clock in the evening; my pocket-book, with above 80 l. in it, was in the pocket of my pantaloons. I had received this money at Coutts's, the bankers. The prisoner assisted me off with my pantaloons. Immediately after they were off, I told him to hand them to me, for I had left my pocket-book in them. He immediately replied,

"There is no pocket-book here, Sir." I said,

"I told you to hand me my pantaloons, I did not desire you to search for the pocket-book." He gave them to me, and I missed it. Next morning I had the notes stopped at the Bank; I afterwards saw a 5 l. note there with the prisoner's name on it - I think it was his writing. I afterwards got an officer, who searched, and found my pocket-book, with 65 l. in it, wrapped up in a parcel, in a small closet where the prisoner kept his clothes. The prisoner said it was not my pocket-book, for he had found it in the area - I said that was impossible, for he knew it was mine, as he had been in the habit of seeing it two or three times every day.

Cross-examined-by MR. ARABIN. I have several servants.

COURT. Q. Before you missed it had anybody but the prisoner been in the room - A. No; it must have been taken after my pantaloons were off.

RICHARD SMITHERS . I am an officer. I found the pocketbook in the closet - it contained four 10 l., five 5 l. bank notes, a quarter of a lottery ticket, and a memorandum of bank stock.

(Pocket-book produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I found it in the area.

GUILTY. Aged 30.

Of stealing, but not from the person .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18190526-61

828. EDWARD SHRIBBS was indicted for that he, on the 22d of April , at St. James, Clerkenwell , feloniously did dispose of and put away, a certain forged and counterfeit bank note, (setting it forth, No. 71072, 1 l. dated 16th of March, 1819, signed C. Tabor,) with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England , he well knowing it to be forged and counterfeited , against the Statute.

SECOND COUNT, the same, only calling it a promissory note for payment of money, instead of a bank note.

THIRD AND FOURTH COUNTS, the same, only stating his intent to be to defraud John Fox .

WILLIAM KELLEHER . I am shopman to Mr. John Fox , who is a grocer , and lives at No. 92, Charlotte-street, Fitzroy-square. On Thursday, the 22d of April, about ten minutes before nine o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came to our shop, bought two ounces of tea and a pound of moist sugar, and paid me a 1 l. bank note. I asked him his name? he said Mr. Hewett - I asked him where? he said No. 2, Phipps-court, Tottenham-court-road, and that he was a painter and glazier. I had not sufficient change in the till, and took the note into the parlour to my master, leaving him in the shop. I returned with my master, who gave him the rest of the change, which was 18 s. 3 d. in all, out of the cash-box. I wrote the name and address on the note - (looks at one) - this it; it has that name and address on it, and my initials - he went away. My master was not satisfied with the note; I pulled off my apron, and went after him, crossed the way, and lost him immediately - he had not been out of the shop above a minute and a half. I went and inquired for Phipps-court, but could find no such place. I returned and told my master, shut up shop, and went out again towards Oxford-street. As I

was crossing in Oxford-street, I saw a man put his hand to his mouth, and call out

"Oh!" then crossed over to the prisoner at the corner of Charles-street and Oxford-street - they joined company together; I followed them, and between Chapel-street and Wardour-street I saw the other man give something to the prisoner; they went on as far as a cheesemonger's shop in Oxford-street; the prisoner went into the shop, I passed them; he came out in half a minute - the other man was on the opposite side; they joined company again at the corner of Wardour-street, and went down there. I inquired for a watchman. I saw them looking into another shop, they went on farther. At last I saw a watchman at the corner of Little Pulteney-street, I then laid hold of the prisoner, the other man ran off. The prisoner was taken to St. James's watch-house.

Q. Did you hear him say anything - A. He said he was not the man. As we were going to the watch-house I said,

"Ought you not to be ashamed of yourself for seeing me in the shop, and passing to me such a note?" he said,

"Why did you not take the right man?"

Cross-examined by MR. ARABIN. Q. Did he not say

"I am not the right man - A. No; he said,

"Why not take the right man?" No person was in the shop when he came in. I had had very few customers that evening. I am sure he is the man. I took him about forty minutes after he left the shop. I did not find the change, nor the tea and sugar on him.

COURT. Q. Had you ever the least doubt of his being the man - A. Never, I suspected him when he was in the shop, as he held his head down under his hat while we were looking at the note, which made me take particular notice of him.

WALTER EARINGTON . I am a watchman. The last witness came to me, I took the prisoner in charge, and conveyed him to the watch-house. As we were going along, he said,

"Why did you not take the right person?" I saw another man with the prisoner at the time he was taken. The last witness said,

"There is another of them!" I sprang my rattle - he said he could swear to this man; the other ran off immediately.

EDMUND PEPPER . I was constable of the night. The prisoner was brought to the watch-house. I searched him, and found a duplicate, two snuff-boxes, and 1 s. on him - there was no other money, nor any tea or sugar. He gave me his address,

" Edward Shribbs , No. 12, Peartree-court, Shoreditch."

RALPH MADDOX . I am a tax-collector of the Tottenham-court-road district. I have no court nor alley whatever in my district - there is no Phipps-court, place, or alley there.

BENJAMIN BROWN . I am a tax-collector in that district. There is no Phipps-court, place, alley, or lane, in that district.

HENRY ANSELL . I am a tax collector in that district. There is no Phipps-court, lane, or alley in that street.

Cross-examined. Q. Is not Tottenham-court-road considered to extend to Hampstead - A. No, only to the New Road.

CHARLES GREEN . I live at No. 12, Peartree-court, Shoreditch; the prisoner lived there on the 22d of April last, and went by the name of Edward Shribbs .

THOMAS GLOVER . I am an inspector of bank notes - (looks at the note). - It is forged in every respect, paper, plate, and every thing else, and is not Tabor's writing.

CHARLES TABOR . I am a signing clerk at the Bank - there is no other of my name. The signature is not mine - it is something like my writing.

(The note was then put in and read.)

Prisoner's Defence. I am not guilty.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 20.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow .

Reference Number: t18190526-62

829. THOMAS PORTER was indicted for feloniously having in his custody and possession three forged bank notes for payment of 1 l. each, well knowing them to be forged .

JOHN FOY . I am an officer of Marlborough-street. On the 19th of May I was in company with Thomas Foy, Freeman, and Harrison, and saw the prisoner in Ivy-lane. He came into Paternoster-row; Harrison and Thomas Foy seized him. We took him into Chapter Coffee-house-court, and told him he was suspected of passing forged notes, and asked what money he had about him? he said he had none, and repeated it over and over again. We proceeded to search him, he struggled very much; I thought it necessary to handcuff him, and while I was so doing, he endeavoured to put his left-hand into his right-hand waistcoat pocket, Harrison and Thomas Foy prevented him. When he was handcuffed, I found in his right-hand waistcoat pocket six or 7 s. in silver, and three 1 l. forged notes, rolled up, and tied round with a piece of worsted. On taking them out, before I opened them, I asked him what they were, and where he got them from? he said he did not know what they were, or any thing about them. I said,

"They are forged notes" - he said,

"I hope not." I asked him who he had them from? he said it was no matter. He was taken to the Compter. I marked the notes, and gave them to Mr. Freeman. He gave no account of them before the magistrate.

Cross-examined by MR. ARABIN. Q. Did he not say a woman gave them to him to keep, and he did not know the contents - A. No. There was a woman near him, with a bundle of asparagus under her arm. He said,

"I don't care what you do with me, so that you let the woman go." We searched her found nothing on her, and let her go. He swore that the woman should go - we would not let her go till we had searched her.

ANTHONY HARRISON . I am a marshalsman. I was with Foy - he has given a correct account. He did not say the woman gave them to him.

JOSHUA FREEMAN . I am an inspector of bank notes. I was present, and confirm the statement of Foy. I marked the notes - (looks at them) - these are them; they are all forged.

THOMAS GLOVER . I am an inspector of bank notes. The notes are forged in every respect.

CHARLES WATTS . I am signing clerk at the Bank. The notes purport to be signed by me, but are not my writing.

Prisoner's Defence. The woman gave me the bundle, tied up, to keep for her till she returned from market. She gave them to me to sell me.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18190526-63

830. ELIZABETH DAVIS was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Robert Meyrick , about seven o'clock in the forenoon of the 27th of May (he and others of his family being therein), and stealing four pictures, his property; one gown, value 5 s.; one petticoat, value 3 s.; one pair of trowsers, value 5 s.; three night-gowns, value 3 s.; three night-caps, value 1 s.; two neckcloths, value 1 s.; two pair of stockings, value 1 s.; three aprons, value 1 s.; one shift, value 4 s., and one tea-kettle, value 2 s. , the goods of George Augustus Dicey .

ROBERT MEYRICK . I live in Margaret-street, Spa-fields - Dicey lives in my house. On the 27th of May, about seven o'clock in the morning, my daughter knocked at my door, and said there were thieves in the house. I went down, found the kitchen window down, two drawers open, and the articles stated in the indictment gone; they were all safe the night before. In about half an hour I found the prisoner concealed in the privy in the yard, which is walled round six feet high. She must have got over the wall. All the property was found on the floor of the privy - she said she put them there. My lodgers have a key, and let themselves in after I go to bed.

GEORGE AUGUSTUS DICEY . I lodge in the house. About half-past seven o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner getting over the wall - she had put two pans to climb on. I seized her, and said,

"You have taken my clothes;" she said,

"I have not, they are in the privy" - I found them there. An alarm had been made at seven o'clock.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 19.

Of stealing, but not of breaking and entering .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow .

Reference Number: t18190526-64

831. JOHN HARPER was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Pearson , about eleven o'clock in the forenoon of the 16th of May (he and others being therein), and stealing therein, three mangling-cloths, value 2 s., and one waistcoat, value 1 s., his property; two gowns, value 10 s.; two frocks, value 5 s.; four petticoats, value 5 s.; one pair of stockings, value 2 s.; six napkins, value 6 s.; two bed-gowns, value 5 s.; three aprons, value 18 d., and one handkerchief, value 1 s., the goods of John Lovelock ; five pin-cloths, value 2 s.; two bed-gowns, value 2 s.; two skirts, value 1 s., and three aprons, value 18 d. , the goods of John Summerfield .

JOHN PEARSON . I live in Little White Lion-street, St. Giles's , and take in mangling . On Sunday, the 16th of May, between ten and eleven o'clock, I went up stairs, and locked the mangling room up; it is down stairs - there is a side door, which I fastened with a wooden-peg. About one o'clock I went down, found the door unpegged, and all the things gone. I suppose somebody must have reached over an open window which is over the door, and pulled the peg out. Next night I found part of the things at the watch-house.

SAMUEL FURZEMAN . I am an officer of St. Giles's. On the 16th of May, between twelve and one o'clock in the day, I met the prisoner in Queen-street, Seven Dials, with a bundle containing all these things; he was coming in a direction from White Lion-street. He said he got them from his wife at Plymouth, last Friday.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I have been fifteen years in the King's service, and lost a finger at Flushing. I was in distress, and wish to be sent out of the country.

GUILTY. Aged 31.

Of stealing, but not of breaking and entering .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18190526-65

832. WILLIAM PRICE and DANIEL PORTER were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Edward Hastings , (no person being therein) about eight o'clock in the forenoon of the 17th of May and stealing therein one watch, value 3 l., and 9 d. in monies numbered , his property.

EDWARD HASTINGS . I live in Horns-alley, Liquor-pond-street . On the 17th of May, in the morning, I went to the corner of the alley - I am sure I shut the door after me. I returned in about five minutes, and saw the prisoner, Porter, come out of the yard before my door, Price stood at the gate - something passed from one to the other. I went into my house, missed my watch off the shelf, ran into the alley, found Porter coming out of the next house, and charged him with taking my watch, he denied it. I found Price at the bottom of the stairs in that house. I am sure they are the same boys. Ann Rice produced my watch to me. I kept Price.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

ANN RICE . I live next door to Hastings. I found the watch on my stairs. Both the prisoners were strangers to me, and had no business in my house.

WILLIAM READ . I apprehended Porter.

PRICE'S Defence. I went to Rice's to buy dogs' meat.

POTTER'S Defence. I was on an errand.

PRICE - GUILTY. Aged 15.

PORTER - GUILTY. Aged 16.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only, but not of breaking and entering .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow .

Reference Number: t18190526-66

833. JUDITH BRYAN was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of May , at St. Mary le Strand , in the dwelling-house of George Ramscar , seven spoons, value 10 s.; two shirts, value 4 s.; one pelisse, value 10 s.; two gowns, value 10 s.; two yards of flannel, value 1 s.; four frocks, value 2 s.; one bed-gown, value 6 d.; two shifts, value 2 s.; one petticoat, value 1 s.; one yard of printed cotton, value 1 s.; one handkerchief, value 1 s.; one stocking, value 6 d.; the sum of 19 s. 6 d. in monies numbered, and one 2 l. and three 1 l. bank notes , the property of Samuel Kelly .

MARGARET RAMSCAR . I am the wife of George Ramscar ; we live at No. 19, Swan-yard , in the parish of St. Mary le Strand. Samuel Kelly and his wife lodge in the two-pair front room. The prisoner was a stranger. On the 1st of May I saw her on the landing-place close to Kelly's room door, she had a bundle of clothes in her hand, the padlock of Kelly's door, some keys, and oranges. I stopped her and sent for an officer. I and Mrs. Jacobs

searched her, as she would not let the officer. As she was dressing herself again she went close against the wall, I pulled her into the middle of the room, when a 2 l. and three 1 l. bank notes, with 19 s. 6 d. in silver, in a purse, fell from her. I picked it up, and gave it to the officer. The bundle was given to Snowsell.

SAMUEL KELLY . I sell fruit. On the 1st of May I went out about half-past three o'clock in the afternoon, locked my door, and padlocked it also. I heard an alarm, came home directly, and found the prisoner in custody - she had a bundle containing my clothes. I found the door locked, but the padlock was forced off; keys were found on her which fitted my door. I sent for an officer. I saw the keys tried with the lock, and they opened it. I went to my chest, and missed a 2 l., three 1 l. bank notes, and 19 s. 6 d. in silver. I had put no mark on them.

SARAH WHITE . I lodge in the first-floor. I met the prisoner on the landing-place - I stopped her, took the bundle from her, and gave it to Mrs. Ramscar.

SARAH JACOBS . I assisted in searching the prisoner. I found the padlock under her stocking, tied to her knee, and gave it to Carter.

JOHN SNOWSELL . I am an officer. I took the prisoner and property in charge. I went to her lodging, and found a gown, a frock, and a piece of flannel, belonging to the prosecutor, which must have been taken at another time.

ROBERT CARTER . I am a constable. I received the padlock from Jacobs.

MRS. KELLY. It is the padlock of our door - I have the key. I went out at half-past three o'clock, and left all these things safe - The money was safe in a purse in the chest. When I returned, I found the chest broken open, and nothing left whatever. I have seen the prisoner in the market at times.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I was very much distressed.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 23.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18190526-67

833. JOHN SHEARING and JOHN GREEN were indicted for stealing, on the 21st of March , at Great Stanmore , one gelding, price 7 l. , the property of Thomas Christmas .

THOMAS CHRISTMAS . I am a coachmaker , and live in the parish of Great Stanmore. I had a gelding in Stanmore Marsh ; I saw it safe on Sunday morning, the 21st of March, and missed it that evening. I saw it again on the 30th in possession of Stiles, and am certain it is the same that I lost - I had had it about a year and a half, and know it by several marks. It is worth 7 l.

SARAH THOMPSON . I live in Stanmore Marsh, my husband is a labourer. On Sunday, the 21st of March, about three o'clock in the afternoon, I saw three men take the gelding off the marsh - the prisoners are two of them; I have not the least doubt of it - they were all on foot. One caught it by the head, the other walked round and examined it, and the third sat down. They led it off the green into the road by its head, then let go its head, struck it with a stick, and drove it up a lane which leads to Kingsbury and other places - they were five minutes in my sight.

Cross-examined. Q. The prisoners were strangers - A. Yes. I saw them a fortnight after at Union Hall, among other people, and have not the least doubt of them. They were not pointed out to me.

WILLIAM STILES . I am a broom-dealer, and live in the Borough-road. On the 28th of March the prisoner, Shearing, came to me, and asked me if I wanted to buy a horse, and requested me to go to the Obelisk livery-stables to look at it - he said it belonged to Green, who was with him. I knew Shearing before, and asked him if he knew Green? he said Yes; that he knew the man well - that his father and him kept an errand-cart, and he used to turn it out into the field, but now he was obliged to sell it, as he had quarrelled with his father - Green did not hear that. I went to the stable; Shearing showed me the horse, and asked 6 l. for it - I gave them 4 l.; I laid the money down, Green was there, and took it up.

Q. Did Green treat the horse as if it was his - A. He took the money for it, and gave Shearing a 1 l. note to pay the hostler the expences. I gave Shearing a shilling for his trouble. In about two hours I heard something, and gave information. Christmas saw the horse, and claimed it.

Cross-examined. Q. Green did not hear the conversation about the money - A. No. I cannot swear which took the money up.

COURT. Q. Who gave the 1 l. note to the other to pay the expences - A. Green gave Shearing one of the notes I put down. I think the expences were 10 s. - I believe the charge is 2 s. a night; it had nothing but hay.

SHEARING'S Defence. I was at a public-house at Stanmore, walking about, and never saw the horse until I came to town.

GREEN'S Defence. I was on the dunghill on the common for an hour and a half. I came to town, and met Shearing and another man, who asked me to go and sell the horse for them - I went to the witness Stiles.

SHEARING - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 27.

GREEN - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 25.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow .

Reference Number: t18190526-68

834. CHARLOTTE WORNUM , widow , and CHARLOTTE WORNUM , spinster , were indicted for stealing, on the 26th of April , four sheets, value 20 s.; 10 shirts, value 50 s.; 27 pair of stockings, value 12 s.; 26 towels, value 10 s., and one handkerchief, value 1 s., the property of Henry Wynyard , Esq. , in his dwelling-house .

ANN CARTER . I am servant to General Henry Wynyard , who lives in Upper Brook-street, Grosvenor-square ; the elder prisoner had the charge of my master's house during his absence from town, which was from the 21st of June to the 6th of May - her daughter was to be with her; on our return we missed this property, which had been locked up.

JOHN KINDELL CHEESE . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Chandler-street, Grosvenor-square. I have a quantity of articles which were pledged by the younger prisoner - she said she lived in James-street.

GEORGE PICKETT . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Duke-street. I have twenty-four towels, thirteen pair of stockings, and a handkerchief, which the younger prisoner pledged with me in the name of King. She sometimes

gave her address in South-street, and sometimes in James-street.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN WALE . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoners at the Green Man and Still, public-house, in Coppice-row, on the 12th of May - the elder prisoner denied all knowledge of the transaction; the other said she took the things, and told where she had pledged them. She said she got at them by the key of a door in the house.

C. WORNUM, spinster - GUILTY. Aged 13.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

C. WORNUM, widow - NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18190526-69

835. JOHN JONES and JOHN MERRIMAN were indicted for stealing, on the 29th of April , one ass, price 50 s. , the property of William Davy .

WILLIAM DAVY . I am a costermonger , and live in Old Pye-street, Westminster. On Thursday, the 29th of April, about six o'clock, I turned my ass out in Lord Grosvenor's orchard, Milbank-row - next morning, about seven o'clock, I missed it, and saw it again on the 3d of May at White's; I am sure it is mine. The prisoners lived near me - they knew the ass was mine; Merriman has often seen me at work with it.

JAMES WHITE. I live in Kent-street, Borough, my father is a horse-boiler. On Thursday evening, between seven and eight o'clock, the prisoners brought the ass to my father, and asked him to buy it. Jones spoke - he asked 1 l. for it; my father offered him 14 s. They went away, returned in about three minutes, and both said they must have 16 s., and that he should have it; they took the money, and both said they would bring one or two more on Friday - they said they lived in Fox-buildings, Kent-street. I afterwards found it was false.

MERRIMAN'S Defence. A man on Westminster-bridge gave me 2 s. to sell it.

JONES - GUILTY . Aged 14.

MERRIMAN - GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18190526-70

836. WILLIAM SCOTT was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of May , two jackets, value 7 s., and one knife, value 6 d. , the goods of Thomas Deards .

THOMAS DEARDS . On the 13th of May, at night, I lost my jackets out of Charrington's brewhouse, and found them at Hendrick's. The prisoner worked at the brew-house about seven months before.

HENRY HENDRICKS . I keep a slop-shop at Stratford. On the 13th of May, about eleven o'clock in the morning, the prisoner bartered the two jackets with me for a pair of shoes.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Two Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18190526-71

837. ELIZABETH STINTON was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of May , 10 lbs. of beef, value 7 s. , the property of William Chatterton .

SARAH CHATTERTON . I am the wife of William Chatterton . On the 1st of May, between eight and nine o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner take this beef, and secured her with it - she begged of me to let her go.

GUILTY . Aged 39.

Confined One Year .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18190526-72

838. JOHN WALTERS was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of May , one coat, value 25 s. , the goods of Thomas Tilley .

THOMAS TILLEY . On the 18th of May I was riding through Islington in my chaise, and missed my coat off the chaise; I turned round, and saw the prisoner with it - I called Stop thief! and he was taken with it. It could not have fallen out.

JAMES SMITH . I saw Mr. Tilley driving through Islington, heard the alarm, and saw the prisoner running a short distance from the chaise; he was secured, and threw the coat down.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18190526-73

839. AMELIA SHEPHERD was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of May , from the person of John Jenkins , one watch, value 30 s.; one key, value 1 s.; one handkerchief, value 2 s., and nine 1 l. bank notes , his property.

JOHN JENKINS . I live near Newport, upon my property. On the 5th of May I was in town, met the prisoner, and went to Wilkinson's-court, Westminster , with her. I put my pocket-book and watch under the pillow. I awoke about four o'clock, and missed my property. The prisoner was also gone, and had locked me in the room. The pocket-book contained nine 1 l. bank notes. I saw the prisoner in custody at Queen-square on the 15th of May.

Prisoner. Q. Was you sober - A. Yes. I was very tired, as I had been three days and nights on my journey from Cardigan.

CHARLES DEW . I am an officer. On the 14th of May I apprehended the prisoner in Cockspur-street, and told her I supposed she was aware what I took her for; she said she supposed it was for robbing the gentleman. I asked her what she had done with the watch? she said she had sold it for 15 s. to two young men, who stood by as she came out of the house where she had robbed the prosecutor.

Prisoner's Defence. I went with the gentleman; he was so tipsey he could scarcely stand. He was in company with several other girls.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18190526-74

840. MATTEO MUZZIOTI was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of April , two gold seals, value 6 l., the goods of Samuel Jones , privately in his shop .

SAMUEL JONES . I am a jeweller , and live in Cheapside .

On the 16th or 17th of April, about ten o'clock in the morning, the prisoner came to my shop; two persons beside myself were in the shop. I showed him a tray of gold seals, he selected two, and then produced some Napoleons in payment. We could not agree about the price that was to be allowed for them - he spoke to me in French, a lady interpreted between us. He appeared not to understand, and intimated that he would bring a friend who understood English; he then left the shop. Next day I saw him before the Alderman at Guildhall. About a week after he had been apprehended my two seals were produced at one of his examinations. I am certain they are part of the stock I had when he came into my shop; I showed them to him. He bought nothing.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. I cannot say when I saw them last.

WILLIAM BRAND . I am a marshalsman. On the 22d of April I found these two seals at the prisoner's lodgings, Thiott's hotel, in Bucklersbury, in the two pair of stairs front room. I found some coin in the same room, which I delivered to him by the magistrate's order - he received it.

Cross-examined. Q. You cannot say whether he received it as his own, or as a gift - A. No.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190526-75

841. MATTEO MUZZIOTI was again indicted for stealing, on the 16th of April , three handkerchiefs, value 18 s., the goods of William Kipling , privately in his shop .

JOHN WICKSTEED . I am shopman to Mr. Kipling, who is a hosier , and lives in Cheapside . On the 16th of April, about three o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner came to the shop - I was engaged with a gentleman; Mrs. Kipling and her brother were behind the counter - the prisoner spoke in French, I understood him. He asked to look at some black silk handkerchiefs; I directed him to go to Mrs. Kipling, but told him in French that we kept no black handkerchiefs, but had plenty of coloured; he went to Mrs. Kipling, and she showed him several coloured ones. After pulling them about for sometime, he objected to the colour, and said he wanted some with more blue in them; my customer left, and I then bent all my attention to him. He offered 12 s. for two, which we refused - at last we agreed for 12 s. 6 d.; he pulled out a double Napoleon, I think, and wrote on a piece of paper that it was worth from 35 s. to 38 s. - I thought it was worth 33 s. 3 d. Mrs. Kipling's brother went to the jeweller's, and brought word that it was worth 34 s. - I said we could not take his money. He desired they might be put by, and he would bring a person in the evening or next day, who understood English; he left the shop, and in about five or ten minutes we missed three silk handkerchiefs - no other customer had come in in the mean time - he never called again. I saw him the following week at Guildhall, and the handkerchiefs were produced; I had the other four in my possession, and they corresponded exactly - the piece contained seven.

Cross-examined. It was not a very common pattern - I have no private mark on them.

WILLIAM BRAND . I found these three handkerchiefs in the same room at Thiott's hotel - they match the piece notch for notch. I also found in the same room a certificate of the arrival of Matteo Muzzeoti at Dover, with a description of his person.

Cross-examined. I do not know that he lodged there.

GEORGE UNDERHILL . I live at Thoitt's hotel; the prisoner arrived there on the morning of the 15th of April; he had the back-room on the second-floor. He had two portmanteaus.

Cross-examined. Q. Foreigners associate a good deal together - A. Yes. We have several there.

WILLIAM BRAND re-examined. I consider it a front-room - the window faces towards the north. I thought by the winding of the stair-case that it looked into Bucklersbury.

GEORGE UNDERHILL re-examined. That description does not apply to the prisoner's room.

CHARLES HERDSFIELD . I was with Brand, and found the handkerchiefs.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190526-76

842. MATTEO MUZZIOTI was again indicted for stealing, on the 16th of April , two handkerchiefs, value 8 s. , the goods of Joseph Morris .

JOSEPH MORRIS . I am a linen-draper , and live at the end of Fleet-market . On the 15th or 16th of April, the prisoner came into the shop about four o'clock in the afternoon, and asked me for some silk handkerchiefs in French - I understood him sufficiently; my young man served him - he is not here. He pulled the handkerchiefs about a good deal, and said he wanted a particular colour; my man showed him a variety, and told him they were 6 s. each. He pulled out an India handkerchief, and put it on the counter; I heard the conversation - it was in French. He offered a foreign silver coin, but I refused to take it without knowing the value, and told my man to go and inquire at a silversmith's; he said in broken English,

"No, me will go and fetch proper coin." He left his own handkerchief on the counter, returned in about three minutes, and asked for it; I gave it him. My young man asked him if he would take the handkerchiefs. He said,

"How much?" he told him again 6 s. He said he would only give 5 s., and ran out of the shop in a great hurry. The next week Brand produced my two handkerchiefs to me, which were on the counter when he was there - they are worth 4 s. each.

Cross-examined. I did not miss them until I saw them in Brand's possession.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAM BRAND . I found these handkerchiefs at Thoitt's hotel in a two-pair of stairs room.

GUILTY.

Of stealing to the value of 4 s. 10 d. only .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190526-77

843. MATTEO MUZZIOTI was again indicted for stealing, on the 17th of April , at St. Peter, West Cheap , two silk handkerchiefs, value 13 s., the goods of William Wells , privately in his shop .

WILLIAM WELLS . I live at No. 124, Cheapside , in the parish of St. Peter, West Cheap. On Saturday, the 17th of April, between ten and eleven o'clock in the morning, the prisoner came to my shop, and pointed to some silk handkerchiefs which laid in the window. He made signs, and touched a coloured handkerchief which he had on his neck. I supposed he wanted something of that pattern - nobody but myself was in the shop. I took a parcel out of the drawer, laid it on the counter, and showed him several different patterns; one handkerchief in particular I remember opening, thinking it might strike his attention - he fixed upon two others; he asked the price in French, I told him 15 s. the two - he held up his hand, and said sancho, by which I understood he meant 5 s. I shook my head, meaning I would not sell them for that. He took a purse from his pocket, and produced gold and silver foreign pieces - he produced a double Napoleon, put it in my hand, and made signs for a pen and ink to let me know the value. I gave him a pencil - he wrote down 35 s. as the value. He offered me 11 s. for them, I refused to take it; he bought nothing, and left the shop. He put his hat on one part of the counter and his handkerchief on another, about half a yard off; he took up his handkerchief, shook it, and then went away.

Q. Did he shake his hat - A. No. I threw the handkerchiefs promiscuously into the drawer. About half an hour after, a neighbour came in to make inquiry; I went immediately to Guildhall, and saw two handkerchiefs which belonged to me; I am certain one of them was on the counter when he was there, I particularly showed it to him; and the other was in the shop the evening before when I shut up. My young man came into the shop while he was writing the value of the Napoleon, and staid till he left. They are worth 13 s.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did you go to Guildhall the same day - A. Yes, about twelve o'clock the same morning. I knew him immediately. I did not suspect him.

CHARLES HERDSFIELD . On the 17th of April, about a quarter past eleven o'clock in the morning, the prisoner was brought to the justice-room, and given into my charge. I found two handkerchiefs in his right-hand coat pocket, which the prosecutor afterwards saw and claimed.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner *. I leave my case to my counsel.

* The prisoner being a foreigner, the evidence was communicated to him by an interpreter in every case.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 37.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190526-78

844. JAMES JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of May , 1 1/4 lb. of tapioca, value 2 s. 6 d. , the property of William Moorhouse .

WILLIAM MOORHOUSE . I am a surgeon and apothecary , and live at Aldgate ; the prisoner was in my service. On Saturday, the 1st of May, in the evening, I found a parcel of tapioca secreted under a press-bedstead in the back-parlour; the prisoner's great-coat hung over it - he used to go home every Saturday night. Having lost considerable property, I retired as if to go to bed, and gave the prisoner leave to go home - I had prepared an officer ready. Immediately as the prisoner left the house I found the parcel gone. I went and joined Forrester, followed the prisoner, and took him at his own door - I found the parcel of tapioca on him.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. The prisoner lived nearly three years with you as a confidential assistant - A. Yes; he visited my patients - I attended his wife gratuitously.

Q. Was it not customary to let him have necessaries in the medicine way - A. Not without permission; he said he took it for the use of his family.

Q. He was about setting up business for himself - A. I never heard of it till after he was in custody. I had given him notice to leave.

JOHN FORRESTER . I went with the prosecutor, and took the prisoner at his own door. He gave me the tapioca and some syrup, which the prosecutor claimed. He was not taken into custody for several days after.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I leave my case to my counsel.

GUILTY. Aged 38.

Recommended to Mercy .

Fined One Shilling , and Discharged.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190526-79

845. JOHN BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of April , one pewter quart pot, value 14 d., and one pewter pint pot, value 8 d. , the goods of William Parkhouse .

WILLIAM PARKHOUSE . I keep the sign of the Mail Coach , Sherbourn-lane . On the 27th of April, M'Guier brought the pots to me.

THOMAS M'GUIER. On the 27th of April, between two and three o'clock in the afternoon, I met the prisoner in Coleman-street with these pots under his coat; I followed him to London-wall - a boy about twelve years of age was with him. I then went up, and asked the prisoner what he had got under his coat? he answered, Nothing. I took the pots from under his coat; he then said a man gave them to him in Lombard-street to get stretched - they did not want stretching. I took him to the Compter.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A boy asked me to carry them.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined One Year , and Publicly Whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190526-80

846. JAMES RYAN was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of May , one cruet-stand, value 3 l., and one tea-pot, value 1 s., the goods of Daniel Curling , Esq. , in his dwelling-house .

WILLIAM BELL . I am servant to Daniel Curling , Esq. who lives in Tavistock-place . On the 17th of May, about four o'clock, in the afternoon, I was putting the things on the tray for dinner, and missed the silver cruet-stand, and

metal tea-pot - they were safe at eight o'clock in the morning in the pantry. A person could get them by going down the area steps, as the pantry is close to the kitchen-door.

SAMUEL FURZEMAN . I am an officer. On the 7th of May, about eleven o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner coming down Plumtree-street; he turned into King-street, and ran through Middle-row. I took hold of him, and asked him what he had got in his handkerchief? I pulled it aside, and saw it was plate tied up. He said a man in Bedford-square gave it to him to carry. I took him before the magistrate.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A man gave them to me to carry. I saw what it was, and did not know what to do, and was running home to ask what to do with them. Furzeman took me; I pointed the man out to him, but he would not take him.

SAMUEL FURZEMAN re-examined. He did not point the man out.

GUILTY. Aged 17.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190526-81

847. WILLIAM WILSON was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of May , one handkerchief, value 4 s., the goods of Thomas Moore , from the person of Frances Moore , his wife .

The prosecutrix did not appear .

NOT GUILTY.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190526-82

848. WILLIAM REDFORD was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of April , one keg, value 2 s., and six quarts of gin, value 18 s. , the property of James Brown ; and THOMAS WOOD and HENRY NICHOLLS were indicted for feloniously receiving the same, they well knowing it to have been stolen .

RUTH BROWN . I am the daughter of James Brown , who keeps the White Swan, public-house , at Tottenham ; Redford was out servant . On the 27th of April, in the evening, he asked for the key of the beer-cellar to draw some beer - my sister told him to take it; he also took the key of the spirit-cellar. He was gone longer than he ought, and I called him up - he made no answer; he came up soon after with his candle out. I asked him why he put it out? he said it fell out - he smelt very strong of liquor and went out with his beer. We found a two gallon cask nearly full of gin on the stairs, and the key of the spirit-cellar in the door which was open. He had spilt a quantity of gin about in filling the small cask out of the large one.

Q. When he returned from serving the beer, what did he do - A. He went down, brought the small cask up, and took it out the back way as fast as he could; my sister followed him, and I went out the front way to meet him - it was dark; somebody was there ready to receive it, but I could not see who it was. He then ran into the stable, and shut the door in my sister's face.

HARRIET BROWN . I followed the prisoner out. My sister has spoken correctly.

EDWARD FIDLER . I am a constable. I apprehended Redford the same night, and in consequence of what he said I took Wood - he took me to Nicholls's-house, where I found it; Nicholls got up and gave it to me. Wood said he dare not take it into his mother's house, and so he took it to Nicholls's.

(Cask produced and sworn to.)

REDFORD'S Defence. I gave the gin to George Nicholls to take to Wood. He said his mother would not let him have it, but Nicholls would mind it for me.

WOOD'S Defence. The boy asked me to mind it, but I refused, and said Nicholls would.

NICHOLLS'S Defence. He asked me to mind it for him till morning.

REDFORD - GUILTY . Aged 14.

Whipped and Discharged.

WOOD - NOT GUILTY .

NICHOLLS - NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190526-83

849. JOB NICHOLAS was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of May , three 1 l. bank notes, the property of Aley M'Aley , in the dwelling-house of John Christian .

ALEY M'ALEY. I am a seaman , and live in John Christian 's house, who lives in Red Cross-street - he only rents three rooms in the house. On the 1st of May, between one and two o'clock I went out, leaving three notes wrapped up in a piece of paper in my tobacco-pouch, which was in my jacket-pocket - I left my jacket on the bed. When I returned I missed my money, and told the prisoner of it; he said nobody had been in but him, and he had not taken it. I afterwards had him taken up and the money was found on him; I had received the notes from Mr. Clarkson - the prisoner knew I had the money.

THOMAS HARRISON . I am a headborough. I took the prisoner into custody, and found three 1 l. notes in his shoes.

JOHN SHAW . The prisoner was given into my charge; the notes were found in his shoes. He said he did not know they were there.

MR. WILLIAM GEERING CLARKSON . I am a Proctor of Doctors' Commons. I paid the prosecutor these notes on the 29th of April.

Prisoner's Defence. The landlord of the house searched me, the money was not in my shoes then. I do not know how it came there.

GUILTY. Aged 20.

Of stealing, but not in a dwelling-house .

Confined Six Months , and Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190526-84

850. CHARLES ROBINSON was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of May , three pewter pint pots, value 3 s. , the goods of James Hiorns .

JAMES HIORNS . I keep the sign of the City of Quebec , in Oxford-street . I lost these pots.

WILLIAM BROWN . I am a tailor. On the 14th of May, the prisoner came opposite to my house in Bryanstone-street, between eight and nine o'clock in the morning, and sat himself down at the step of a door where two pots stood - he pretended to be untying his stocking; he saw me and walked away. In about an hour he returned, and sat there again - another pot had been added to them. I

peeped under the blind, saw him take the three pots, and put them into an old basket. I followed him, calling out Stop thief! he dropped the basket, and Jeffcott picked them up while I secured him.

WILLIAM JEFFCOTT . I work for Hiorns. I picked the pots up.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I was in distress.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Confined Six Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190526-85

851. CORNELIUS PHILLIPS was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of May , 150 lbs. of lead, value 20 s., belonging to David Sage , and fixed to a certain building of his .

DAVID SAGE . I am a publican , and live in White Conduit-street. On the 22d of May, I lost this lead from the gutters of two houses, which belong to me - it was brought to me; I compared it with the building, and it fitted exactly in every part.

WILLIAM BRITTON . I am a watchman. On the 22d of May, about five o'clock in the morning, I was going home, and saw the prisoner and two others coming down the road; I stopped till they came opposite to me. The middle man then threw some lead down and ran away - the prisoner was the first man, and had the greatest part of the lead in a bag; he threw it down and ran. I pursued him and a man stopped him. He threw himself down; I collared him, and took him to the watch-house.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I met two men in the Back Road, Islington, who gave me the lead to carry.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190526-86

852. WILLIAM JACKSON was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of May , 6 s. in monies numbered , the property of Edward Toplis , the elder .

EDWARD TOPLIS , JUN. My father is a tobacconist , and lives at Shoreditch . On the 24th of May, about seven o'clock in the morning, I was in the warehouse, which joins the shop, and saw somebody behind the counter; I went in and found the prisoner there, with his hand behind his coat. I asked him what he had taken? he answered, Nothing. I pulled his coat aside and found a 5 s. paper of halfpence concealed between his legs - there is a mark on the paper. My father gave him in charge.

JOHN SAWREY . I took the prisoner in charge, and found thirty-nine farthings on him; a shilling dropped from his pantaloons.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190526-87

853. REBECCA JACKSON was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of April , two shifts, value 10 s.; one shirt, value 5 s., and one handkerchief, value 2 s. , the property of Amey Ann Herring , widow .

AMEY ANN HERRING. I am a widow, and live in Paradise-street, Tabernacle-walk ; the prisoner lodged with me. I lost these things out of my trunk, and found them in pledge in her name.

JOHN DAVIS . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Tabernacle-walk. I have two shifts, a shirt, and a handkerchief, which the prisoner pledged with me.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I beg for mercy.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Confined Six Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190526-88

854. RICHARD GREEN was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of April , one shirt, value 1 s.; two coats, value 1 l.; one jacket, value 2 s.; one pair of breeches, value 1 s.; one umbrella, value 2 s., and one hat value 5 s. , the property of John Dent , Esq.

EDWARD SWINDALL . I am butler to John Dent , Esq., who lives in Harper-street, May-fair . The prisoner was ladies' footman . On the 12th of April I missed some of my master's linen, called all the servants together, and searched their boxes, but found nothing; I then told them I must examine the linen on their persons - the prisoner objected to it; I insisted on searching him, and found my master's shirt on his back, marked J. D. The other articles are his livery, which he could not produce. He resisted being searched.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I had only one shirt, and put this on till I could get it washed. I did not intend to steal it.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190526-89

855. JOHN CAULTON was indicted for that he, on the 19th of September, 1799, at St. Mary le Strand, did marry one Mary Bigland , widow , and that he afterwards (to wit), on the 3d of February, 1818 , at St. Pancras , feloniously did marry Margaret Evans , spinster , the said Mary, his wife, being then living .

REV. JOHN JOSEPH ELLIS . I produce the register of marriages at the parish church of St. Mary le Strand, by which I find, that on the 19th of September 1799, John Caulton married Mary Bigland , widow - it is signed by the parties.

WILLIAM BIGLAND . I am the son of Mary Bigland , who is now Mrs. Caulton; the signature to the register is my mother's writing. I know she lived with the prisoner as his wife. I believe the signature to be the prisoner's I served my time to him. I saw my mother eighteen months ago.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. I believe it to be my mother's hand-writing.

SAMUEL FOSTER . I know the prisoner - the register is signed by him. I know Mrs. Caulton, who was Mrs. Bigland, I saw her on the 6th of March, 1818; I am certain it was that day, as I made a memorandum of it. I had some conversation with her respecting a debt which was due to me.

Cross-examined. I have not seen her since; she said she had not seen her husband for sometime, and did not wish to see him again.

REV. WILLIAM PHELOPE . I am curate of St. Pancras. I produce the register of marriages. I turn to the 3d of February, 1818, and find that John Caulton married Margaret Evans , by license. I performed the ceremony.

MARGARET EVANS . I know the prisoner. I was married to him on the 3d of February, 1818, at St. Pancras church. I signed this entry in the register, and saw him sign it - he left me on the 2d of March. I have seen his former wife since that. We were in furnished lodgings. My friends intended giving me some property, but they thought they would wait to see how he behaved to me.

Cross-examined. Q. How was he introduced to you - A. I first met him in the public street, where I was waiting for a female friend - it rained, and he held an umbrella over me. I would not allow him to see me home, but he would not leave me till I promised to meet him. I promised, in order to get rid of him, but did not meet him.

Q. When was your next interview - A. By chance, in the street - he spoke to me. Our courtship continued about six months. I made no inquiry about him. He obtained no money from me, he only took my watch when he left; I have since got it back from the pawnbroker's. He wanted me to mortgage a house which will come to me at my mother's death.

GUILTY . Aged 41.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190526-90

856. MARY DALY was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of May , three seals, value 3 l., and one ring, value 1 l., the property of William Harding , from his person .

WILLIAM HARDING . I am a jeweller , and live in Upper Charlotte-street, Fitzroy-square. On the 3d of May, about half-past twelve o'clock at night, I was going down Compton-street with my brother - I left him at the corner of Castle-street , the prisoner came up, put her hand into my waistcoat-pocket, and took three seals and a ring out - I had not spoken to her. She ran off, I stopped her, and she returned them to me. I never saw her before.

GEORGE DAVIS . I am a watchman. I heard the cry, and seized the prisoner. She gave the prosecutor the seals, and I took her.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. He gave them to me instead of money.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190526-91

857. JAMES CARNEY was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of March , one coat, value 2 l. , the property of William Simpson .

WILLIAM SIMPSON . I am a salesman , and live in Castle-street, Leicester-square . On the 3d of March I lost a coat from the shop door; the next week I found it Beacham's auction rooms.

SAMUEL SKELTON . I live in Drury-lane. On the 3d of March I bought the coat of the prisoner for 2 l.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined Six Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190526-92

858. GEORGE BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of April , three tea-spoons, value 15 s. , the property of Daniel Pidding .

EMILY GRAY . I am servant to Daniel Pidding , who is a confectioner , and lives in Stower-street, Bedford-square . On the 25th of April, between nine and ten o'clock at night, three boys came into the shop, and asked for some jellies - I gave them three spoons to eat them with; before they had finished eating them all three ran away with the spoons, leaving the jellies behind. Reeve, the witness, was one of them; I know him well, but cannot speak to the prisoner.

SAMUEL REEVE . I lived at Mr. Adam's, public-house, in Tottenham-court-road. On Sunday night, about half-past nine o'clock, the prisoner, I, and Lyfield went into the pastry cook's shop, and asked for three six penny jellies - the lady gave us two, and said she had no more; we asked for three spoons, Lyfield ran out with the spoon, the prisoner followed him, and I ran out too. Each had a spoon. Brown took mine from me in Greek-street, and took them to the Black Dog and Still, Short's-gardens, and gave them to Mrs. Wild.

WILLIAM RICHARDSON . I am a constable. On the 26th of April, about three o'clock in the afternoon, I went to the prosecutor's and took Reeve in charge; he said he was guilty, and that Brown and Lyfield were concerned with him, and the spoons were taken to Wild's. I went there, and she gave them to me.

ANN WILD . I live at the Black Dog and Still. I received the spoons from the prisoner. I am certain he is the man. He asked me to take care of them for him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I met the boy, he asked me to take care of them, as he was afraid of losing them. I took them to Wild.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190526-93

859. MARIA CADD and SARAH STAMP were indicted for stealing, on the 7th of May , twenty-nine rabbit skins, value 15 s. , the goods of Jacob Harris .

JACOB HARRIS . I am a furrier , and live in Peter-street, Cow-cross ; Cadd lodged in my second-floor. On the 7th of May my daughter called me up stairs, I found twenty-nine rabbit skins in Cadd's room. Stamp was there. I gave them both in charge.

RACHAEL HARRIS . I went up stairs, and saw Cadd putting some skins into Stamp's apron; when she saw me she told her to go in - she threw the skins behind the door. Stamp said Cadd told her to put them in her apron.

WILLIAM READ . I am an officer. I found the skins in Cadd's room.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

CADD'S Defence. I know nothing about them.

STAMP'S Defence. I picked them up.

CADD - GUILTY . Aged 45.

STAMP - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Six Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190526-94

860. JANE FREEMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of May , one scarf, value 18 s. , the goods of Joseph Craig .

THOMAS SNOW . I am shopman to Mr. Joseph Craig , who is a linen-draper , and lives in Holborn . On the 5th of May, about eleven o'clock in the morning, the prisoner came to look at some scarfs, she bought none, and went out; I suspected she had taken one, and followed her a few doors off, she then took it from under her arm, and put it in her basket. I charged her with it, she begged for mercy. I took her back, and gave her in charge.

Cross-examined by MR. ARABIN. Q. She immediately told you who she was, and where she lived - A. She did.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 20.

Recommended to Mercy .

Fined One Shilling , and Discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190526-95

861. MICHAEL LAMBERT and WILLIAM CLARK were indicted for stealing, on the 23d of May , one handkerchief, value 2 s., the property of a certain man unknown, from his person .

HENRY HOWARD . I am an officer. On the 23d of May I was attending Percy Chapel , between eight and nine o'clock in the evening. While the congregation were singing, I observed the prisoners make a stop at the chapel-door - they went in. I saw them put their hands into several gentlemen's pockets, but took nothing out. As the congregation were coming out, I saw Clark attempt to take a gentleman's watch; after that they attempted several gentlemen's pockets. They were walking away, and I took them both into custody. As they were going to the watch-house one of them threw a handkerchief away.

CHARLES COX . I was playing in Russell-mews, and saw Howard and the beadle taking the prisoners to the watch-house. I saw Lambert throw a handkerchief away; I picked it up, and gave it to Howard.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. I never was in prison, nor did I know the prisoners.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190526-96

862. JAMES GURNEY was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of May , 3 lbs. of tobacco, value 14 s. , the goods of Alexander Gordon .

ALEXANDER GORDON. I am a tobacco and snuff-manufacturer , and live in High Holborn , the prisoner worked for me, I suspected him. On the 25th of May, about five o'clock in the afternoon, I concealed myself in a dark cellar, looked through a crack into the front cellar where he worked, and saw him pick up a parcel of shag tobacco; he then stuffed it into the crown of his hat, put it on his head several times, to try how it fitted, and put a round piece of paper to cover it. He then took his neck handkerchief off, filled that full, padded it out like a stiffener, and tied it round his neck, and then went up to the shop - I followed, got between him and the door, and ordered him into the parlour, instead of which he ran down into the cellar. I followed - he was then taking the tobacco out of his hat. He gave me a violent shove, and threw it out of his hat, and a parcel out of his breeches. He then ran up stairs - my wife endeavoured to stop him; he gave her a shove - I followed and seized him, he made a great resistance. I gave him in charge; he wished me to forgive him.

EDWARD READ . I took the prisoner into custody, and found the tobacco in his neck handkerchief. I found a parcel in the cellar, and another on the stairs.

Prisoner. I was in distress.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190526-97

863. MARY GREEN was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of April , one shirt, value 15 s. , the goods of John Shepherd .

MARTHA SMITH . I am a laundress. On the 30th of April the prisoner came and asked me if the shirts were done from the next street, as the gentleman wanted one immediately? I said they were not. In about a minute she returned, and told me to do the best one, as he was going out; I gave it to her. She asked me how long the others would be? I said, about a quarter of an hour. The shirt belonged to Mr. John Shepherd .

ROBERT SMITH . I am the husband of the last witness. I went to Mr. Shepherd - in consequence of what I heard I went to look for the prisoner, and secured her in the street with the shirt under her shawl.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I was in distress.

GUILTY . Aged 29.

Confined Three Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190526-98

864. JOSEPH GRIMES was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of May , one live tame rabbit, price 3 s. , the property of Jonathan Bush .

JONATHAN BUSH . I am a baker , and live in Noble-street, Goswell-street . On the 24th of March, at night, I lost a rabbit out of my yard.

JOSEPH PRINCE . I am an officer. On the 24th of May I received information, and found the prisoner at his father's house in Crown-court, Bell-alley, Goswell-street. There was a live rabbit and two fowls in the room, and another rabbit, which had been skinned. He said a man gave them to him over a high wall. He made his escape out of the room.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I never went into the yard.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190526-99

865. THOMAS ATKINSON was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of May , one coat, value 14 s. , the goods of Bernard Fletcher .

BERNARD FLETCHER . I am a salesman , and live in Whitecross-street . On the 11th of May, about ten o'clock at night, I heard the cry of Stop thief! found the line at my door cut, and a coat gone.

SAMUEL SAUNDERS . I am an officer. I saw the prisoner take something from Fletcher's door; I followed him through several courts, crying Stop thief! - he was

secured. I ran back in the way he had run, and found the coat - I saw it in his hand as he ran.

JOHN PULSE . I am an officer. I assisted in securing the prisoner.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190526-100

866. WILLIAM HOLLEWELL was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of May , two trowels, value 5 s. ,the goods of William Best .

WILLIAM BEST . I am a broker , and live at Somers' Town . I lost these trowels out of my shop.

ISAAC MERCHANT . I am an undertaker. On the 12th of May I saw the prisoner come out of Best's shop with the trowels, go down a passage, and put them under his coat; he ran off as fast as he could - I secured him with them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

PETER WHITEHAIR . I am a beadle. I took the prisoner in charge, and found two very good pillow-cases on him, which are claimed.

GUILTY . Aged 47.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190526-101

867. JAMES LANE was indicted for, stealing, on the 3d of May , 18 lbs. of lead, value 2 s. 6 d., the property of John Wensley , and fixed to his dwelling-house .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating it to be fixed to a building of his.

JOHN WENSLEY . I am a cow-keeper , and live in White's-yard, Saffron-hill . On the 3d of May I received information, and found my gutters completely stripped of the lead, and part off the next house. It was afterwards brought to me; I fitted it to the gutters, and it corresponded exactly.

JOHN HAWES . I am a watchman of Saffron-hill. About two o'clock in the morning of the 3d of May I met the prisoner coming up Red Lion-court with the lead; I went up to him, and he threw it down. I sprang my rattle, but he got away - I knew him before, and am sure he is the boy. On the Sunday following I saw him; he ran off, but I secured him in a cellar in Field-lane.

ROBERT LINDSEY . I heard the rattle sprung, and picked the lead up. The prisoner ran into an empty house - he must have got out the back way.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190526-102

868. THOMAS LIGHT was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of May , one case of drawing instruments, value 5 s. , the goods of William Plunkett .

WILLIAM PLUNKETT . I am a timber-merchant , and live in the Commercial-road . On the night of the 21st of May, my case of drawing-instruments were left in the counting-house - at three o'clock in the morning the watchman alarmed me; I found the prisoner in custody - the case of instruments were found in the yard. I found the counting-house door and desk broken open. They had tried to open the iron safe, but did not succeed. An instrument was left behind.

RICHARD WALFORD . I am a watchman. I heard a great noise in Mr. Plunkett's yard, but could see nobody. At half-past two o'clock I heard somebody in his counting-house, and looking towards the door, saw the prisoner creeping out under the gate on his hands and knees; two men lay concealed under the paling - I sprang my rattle, and kept the prisoner in sight till my fellow-watchman took him - the others got away.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

RICHARD READ . I heard the rattle sprung, and caught the prisoner, who was running by me.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190526-103

869. THOMAS MILKIN was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of May , 70 lbs. of eels, value 2 l., and one sack, value 1 s. 6 d. , the property of William Malcolm and Russell Brown .

WILLIAM MALCOLM . I am a fisherman , and live at Chiswick. On the 1st of May, at night, I left my eels in the well of my boat, there were about 70 lbs. - the boat and all were taken away in the night. Next morning I found the boat at Putney. All the eels were taken out, and ten planks in the boat's well knocked in; the rudder and sculls were thrown overboard - a sack was also taken.

RUSSELL BROWN . I am in partnership with Malcolm. Our boat and all were taken away. Next morning I got a search-warrant, and found the sack in a cupboard in the prisoner's house - it was all over slime, as if eels had been in it.

CHARLES GAMON . I am an officer. I went to the prisoner's house at Hammersmith, he was not at home. I told his wife my business; she put her back against a cupboard, and said I should not search her house. I found the sack in that cupboard. She ran up stairs, I followed her, and found a very large eel-pie there; there was also a quantity of eel-skins and guts in a dish.

(Sack produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190526-104

870. JOHN IRELAND was indicted for unlawfully uttering, and causing and procuring to be uttered, a forged paper writing, purporting to be an authority for the discharge of George Atchison , a prisoner in the debtors' prison for London and Middlesex, with intent to obtain the discharge of the said George Atchison .

MR. GEORGE HUMPHRIES . I am deputy Custos Brevium of the Court of Common Pleas. I produce two writs, one at the suit of Samuel Stock for 63 l. 13 s., the other at the suit of Robert Cressey for 65 l. 3 s. 6 d., against George Atchison.

THOMAS GRAYSON . I am an officer to the Sheriffs of London and Middlesex. George Atchison was arrested under these two suits, and taken to the New Prison.

THOMAS DOUGLAS . I am clerk to Mr. John Thatcher , who is the keeper of the New Prison, Whitecross-street. George Atchison was a prisoner within the walls, at the suit of these persons, on the 14th of May, on the London side.

GEORGE ATCHISON . I am a prisoner for debt, and have been so for three years - I was in the New Prison, Whitecross-street, on the 14th of May, on these two suits. I employed the prisoner to procure my discharge; I was to give him 8 l.; I gave him 2 l. to begin with, and was to give him the remainder on or before going out. I never applied to the Insolvent Debtors' Court.

Q. Then, if an order was procured by him for your discharge in that Court, it was without your authority - A. Yes. The 14th of May he brought me a paper, and said it was my discharge - he told me to give it to a messenger to take to Mr. Shannon's office for a scrutatus, and to bring the paper and scrutatus back. I told him I could not get a messenger; he found Bannister on the Middlesex side, and sent him into the conversation-room to me, and desired me to go up, and deliver the paper to him, which I did. He waited for Bannister's return, said he thought he had been a long time, and went away. I delivered the paper to Bannister between one and two o'clock, he returned about seven.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. A. What did you employ the prisoner for - A. To supersede one action, and to compromise the other. He called again the next day.

WILLIAM BANNISTER . I am one of the messengers to the New Prison. On the 14th of May the prisoner said a person wanted me in the conversation-room to do a message - I went to Atchison there, he gave me a paper to go and get his discharge; I took it to Mr. Shannon's office in the prison, and received a paper back called a scrutatus, with the paper I took - it was two o'clock, they said I could not get it done until five. I went to the Secondaries Office, in Coleman-street, about five o'clock, and gave the papers to Mr. Hudson; they told me to call again at seven, which I did, and was told to call again at eleven o'clock next morning, which I did and was detained. I had not seen Ireland in the mean time. I left the papers with Mr. Hudson.

JAMES SHANNON . I am a clerk in the Sheriff's Court, and have an office in the prison. On the 14th of May Bannister delivered me this paper for the discharge of George Atchison ; I returned him the same paper, with a scrutatus.

Q. If any discharge from the Insolvent Debtors' Court had been produced to you, should you have had the means of knowing whether the person had applied to that Court or not - A. No.

JAMES HUDSON . I am in the Secondaries Office. On the 14th of May Bannister brought this discharge and scrutatus from Shannon's office. I looked at the signature, and told him to call again at seven o'clock; in the mean time I went to Messrs. Brace and Selby, who had applied to be attornies for the plaintiffs - I took the discharge with me, and from the information I received there, I told Bannister to call again in the morning.

Q. If the scrutatus had been brought, accompanied by the discharge from the Insolvent Debtors' Court, without the other discharge, should you have discharged the defendant - A. Yes. The attorney's name was not spelt right, which created my suspicion.

HENRY TURNPENNY . I am an officer. On the 15th of May I apprehended the prisoner at Whitecross-street prison. One of the papers found on him is a discharge from the Insolvent Debtors' Court.

WILLIAM DOLLEROY . I am clerk to Messrs. Brace and Selby, who live in King-street, Covent-garden. The discharge signed Bracey is not their signature, nor any one in their office.

WILLIAM CLARKSON . I am a receiver in the Insolvent Debtors' Court. The paper found on the prisoner is not the discharge of that Court. I believe the body of it to be the prisoner's writing. It is not the signature of the chief clerk - he is my father.

HENRY EVERARD HALL . I am in the Town Clerk's Office. I produce the record of the choice of John Roberts, Esq. and Samuel Gwynn , D. L. for Sheriffs, and Philip Wyatt Crowther , Esq. and Samuel Collingridge , Esq. as Secondaries.

(The several documents were then put in and read.)

GUILTY .

Confined Two Months .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190526-105

871. ANN EDWARDS was indicted for uttering, on the 8th of May , one counterfeit shilling, and at the same time having two other counterfeit shillings in her possession .

THOMAS PEARCE . I keep a ham and beef shop, in Broadway, Blackfriars. On the 8th of May the prisoner came to my shop, and asked for two ounces of ham, which came to 3 1/2 d.; she gave me a bad shilling, which I kept, and asked her if she had any more money about her? she said she had not. Two other bad shillings, wrapped up in separate papers, were found on her.

JAMES SNOW . I am a beadle. Pearce called me into his shop, and showed me a bad shilling. I asked the prisoner if she had any more? she said No. I found two other bad shillings among a number of pieces of paper, which appeared to have had shillings in them.

MR. CALEB EDWARD POWELL . I am an assistant to the Solicitor of the Mint. The three shillings are all counterfeit, and of the same die - they are merely washed.

Prisoner's Defence. I took them for good.

GUILTY .

Confined One Year , and to find Sureties for Two Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190526-106

872. GEORGE NOTTAGE was indicted for perjury .

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190526-107

873. WILLIAM MILLNER was indicted for gross, wilful, and corrupt perjury .

WILLIAM GOUGH . I am deputy filacer of the Court of Common Pleas. I produce the bail-piece, in which William Millner , of No. 4, South-street, West-square, Lambeth, whitesmith, was bail for the defendant in the cause of John Prosser against William Rodney Chambers . He was sworn; I administered the oath to him before Mr. Justice Richardson, at his chambers, in Sergeants' Inn - the prisoner is the person.

WILLIAM GIMBER . I am a City officer. The whole of Sergeants' Inn is in the City.

JOHN HENDERSON . I am clerk to Messrs. Denton and Barker, the plaintiff's attornies. I attended at Mr. Justice Richardson's chambers to oppose the prisoner as bail. He said that he had then moved to No. 4, South-street; that

who lives in Broad-street, Bloomsbury. I removed the prisoner's furniture into his house No. 4, South-street before Michaelmas, from No. 4, Rose-street, Covent-garden - it was not worth half fifty guineas; there was a bed, bedstead, and some smiths' tools. I moved no furniture from

- I was at his house, and there were as many fixtures as I would have given 20 l. for.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Were not you and he bail together - A. Never. I was never bail, but in one action, and that was a year and a half ago.

Q. You was indicted here last Sessions - A. Yes, but I was honourably acquitted.

Prisoner's Defence. I never swore that I lived at Hall's - I had sixty guineas in ready money.

GUILTY .

To stand in and upon the Pillory for one Hour, opposite Newgate , and to be Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190526-108

874. EDWARD MACEY and SAMUEL DENNISON were indicted for stealing, on the 10th of May , one pocketbook, value 6 d., and 4 s. in monies numbered, the property of John Lemon , from his person .

JOHN LEMON . On the 10th of May, about nine o'clock at night, I was turning out of Ratcliff-highway into Old Gravel-lane - I had taken my pocket-book out of my pocket; the prisoners rushed upon me, and Macey snatched it out of my hand. I made a spring and caught hold of them, Dennison put his foot in the way, and tripped me up - I fell on the pavement. I called Stop thief! rose up, and pursued the party; they ran into the arms of two officers, who secured them. I never lost sight of them, and am sure they are the men - the pocket-book was found on Macey.

THOMAS ALLEN . I am an officer. I was with Summers heard the cry of Stop thief! and saw several persons running. I first took Macey and then Dennison, who were running - they were about fifteen yards apart; the prosecutor came up in about a minute, and said they had got his pocket-book. We took them to the watch-house, and the pocket-book was found on Macey.

WILLIAM SUMMERS . I was with Allen. We had been watching the prisoners sometime; I heard the alarm, and found them in his custody. I found the pocket-book on Macey.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

MACEY'S Defence. A man dropped it, and I picked it up.

MACEY - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Life .

DENNISON - NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190526-109

875. GEORGE BROOKES was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of April , two pieces of nankeen, value 7 l. 10 s.; four pieces of dimity, value 9 l.; nine pieces of fustian, value 39 l.; thirty-five pieces of calico, value 39 l.; sixteen pieces of gingham, value 20 l., and four pieces of linen, value 14 l. , the property of Richard Worster and Matthew Stubbs .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating them to be the property of Edward Bartlett .

RICHARD HARRISON . I am clerk to Messrs. Richard Worster and Matthew Stubbs , who have a booking office at the Rose inn, Smithfield. I received two bales of goods from Slater, which were to go to the Paddington canal - they were forwarded on the 15th of April, by the waggon. They were directed to Edward Bartlett , Brackley, Buckinghamshire.

JOHN SLATER . I sent these goods stated in the indictment to the last witness, directed to Edward Bartlett ; they were pillow fustians and nankeens. They are worth about 90 l. I have since seen part of them.

GEORGE HOLT . I am agent to the prosecutors'; the two bales of goods in question were delivered at the wharf, and put into the warehouse on the Paddington wharf, with other goods - it was locked. There are three doors, which are fastened inside, and locked. On the 20th, as we were going to put them in the boat, we missed them; I immediately gave information of it all over the neighbourhood, and handbills were printed. The prisoner lived opposite our wharf. On the 26th, about six o'clock in the evening, I went to his house with Woodbury, he met us on the wharf, and seemed very white and confused. Woodbury asked him how many carts he had in the yard? - he keeps the wharf - he said he had one cart. Woodbury asked him if he had heard of the robbery? he said,

"No, what robbery?" Woodbury said,

"have you not heard of the robbery over at Stubbs and Worster's, about some pieces of nankeens and things, that have been stolen." He seemed very much agitated, and said he had found some pieces in the dunghill. We asked him where they were? he said in his house. He consented to our going into his house. We began to search, he pointed to a box full of pieces of nankeen and pillow fustians, and said

"There is what I found." There were two boards laid by the side of the box, which would make a cover to it - it would then be a complete package; a saw also laid with the boards, as if it was ready to be packed up. The officer asked to search the stable? he said he had not got the key. The officer said he would break it open. He then said he thought he could find a key that would open it. I then perceived a piece of pillow fustian lying in the bed. I said

"what is that? there is another piece there." He

"yes, there is a piece there." Woodbury said if that is the case I must search the house, and immediately went to the bed, turned the clothes down, and found another piece of fustian in the bed. We found nine of the wrappers. He said he found them on Sunday morning, and had told nobody of it. It was very wet on Saturday night and Sunday morning, the goods appeared a little dusty, but nothing like dung or wet in the least. The box did not belong to us.

Cross-examined by MR. ARABIN. Q. They were soiled - A. Yes, they would get that by moving about. He said there was a little dung scattered over them - there was a dunghill on the wharf. We found nothing in the stable. I had seen the goods in our warehouse. Either me or my nephew received them.

WILLIAM WOODBURY . I am a patrol of Bow-street. I went to the prisoner's house with the last witness. On Monday the 26th of April, about six o'clock in the evening,

and saw him coming out of the door; I asked him how many carts he had in his yard - he said one. I asked him where it stood - he appeared confused, and pointed to a place where it did not stand. He knew I was an officer. I asked him if he had heard any thing of the robbery which had been committed on the opposite side of the water? he said,

"No, what robbery?" I said,

"Not heard of the robbery at Worster and Stubbs's, opposite you?" He said No, again. I said, if you know nothing of the robbery, do you know any thing of nankeens and corderoys? he said Yes, he had got some of them. I said then shew me where they are. He took me into his house, and pointed to a box in the middle of the room. I asked him if that was what he found? he said Yes. I said

"is this all you found, you did not find them in this box, for they were lost in wrappers." He said he found them in the box. I asked where, he said in the yard, in the dunghill, on the Sunday morning. I asked if he had got the key of the stable - he said No. In going out Holt saw a piece of fustian under the bed. I asked the prisoner why he did not tell me he had got it there, and if he found that in the dunghill - he said Yes. I turned down the bed clothes, and found another piece in the bed - he never told me it was there. He said he found that in the dunghill also, and that he found them all in the box. The box was quite full without these two pieces - it would not hold them. I asked him who he had told that he found the property, and if he had told the carter or clerk of the wharf? he said No, he had told nobody. Bills had been posted about, and I had given them about the neighbourhood. The outside of the box was quite dry. There were two pieces of wood laid by it, which appeared just sawed - they quite fitted the box - there was sawdust about. Next evening I went and found several picklock keys.

Cross-examined. He said he had told nobody whatever, that he had found them.

Q. Since the prisoner's confinement has there not been more goods found in the neighbourhood - A. Yes.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was throwing the night soil up in the yard, stuck my fork against the box, and pulled it out; I went to the Horse and Sack, mentioned it, and inquired if they knew who had lost any thing? they said No. I heard nothing more until the witnesses came; I showed it to them, and said there were more pieces in the bed.

STEPHEN MEREDITH . I am a labourer; the prisoner was taken up on Monday evening - I had seen him on the Sunday morning. He came into the Horse and Sack, public-house, in the Harrow-road, Paddington - Mary Humphries was there at the time; she is ill now. He said that he had found some linen and things in a box among the horse-dung, and if I heard who had lost such things to let him know.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. Did he show you the things - A. No. I live at Parry's-place, about two hundred yards from the prosecutor's; I did not hear of the robbery - the landlord was present. I did not tell this to the magistrate or to anybody.

WILLIAM DOVE . I am a brick-maker; the prisoner was in my employ, and has lived sixteen years with me - he lives at the wharf; the wharf gates are open all night. There was a large dunghill in the yard for the purpose of being mixed with the night soil.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. Did you ask if the officers found any potatoes in the prisoner's house - A. A. No, I said I had lost some.

JOHN BALL . I am clerk and foreman to Mr. Dove; I confirm his statement respecting the wharf. I saw the prisoner find the keys in the night soil.

Q. On your solemn oath did you see him find the keys - A. I did, on my solemn oath. I borrowed one of them about five months ago to pick a lock of my own drawers - they were fastened together when he found them, I believe. He shovelled them out of the night soil.

Q. How long before the robbery - A. About two years ago.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. Where do you live - A. At No. 9, Lisson-green, North. I have been there nineteen years.

Q. You had heard of the robbery - A. No, I had not. I came from dinner, turned into the public-house, saw the bill up, and went to the wharf.

Q. On your oath did you not know of the robbery before Monday - A. On my oath I did not - positively I did not know of it till the the middle of the day on Monday.

Q. You swear positively that you never heard or knew of the robbery till the middle of the day that the prisoner was apprehended - A. I did not, on my oath.

Q. On the oath you have taken have you never said to any body, that you gave the prisoner information of the robbery being committed on the wharf, before he was apprehended - A. Never in my life. I never told him so.

Q. You never told anybody that you said so to him - A. Never in my life, for I never knew of it.

Q. Look at Holt, and say on your oath, did you not tell him that you informed the prisoner that a robbery had been committed before he was taken - A. No, I did not on my oath, for I did not know of it.

Q. Do you know Woodbury - A. Yes.

Q. Did you not tell him - A. I did not.

Q. Did you not tell Woodbury, the officer, that you informed the prisoner before he was taken into custody that the robbery had been committed - A. On my oath I did not.

Q. Had you ever seen these goods before the prisoner was taken into custody - A. Never.

Q. And two years ago I am to understand that you saw the prisoner shovel the picklock keys out of the night soil - A. I think it was as long as that - they are steel, and will not canker in the soil so soon as iron.

COURT. Q. The keys you say are made of steel - A. I believe so.

GEORGE HOLT re-examined. Q. Did the last witness, or did he not tell you he had informed the prisoner before he was taken into custody that the robbery had been committed - A. Yes, he did, he said he told him, and he was very much surprised that he should conceal them; he said he told him of the very great robbery which had been committed at Worster and Stubbs, and he was surprised that he should conceal them after he had found them, as he informed him himself of it.

Cross-examined by MR. ARABIN. Q. When did this occur - A. On Tuesday morning - the next morning after

the prisoner was apprehended. I think it was about nine o'clock.

Q. It was known in the neighbourhood that the prisoner was taken up - A. I believe it was.

Q. Mr. Ball was about the neighbourhood that morning - A. He is the person I am speaking of - he was not before the magistrate.

Q. Was anybody else present but you and the officer - A. No. not in conversation with us - it was on the wharf, near the prisoner's house.

Q. It came out in the course of conversation - A. Yes he expressed his great surprise that he had concealed it and had said nothing about it.

WILLIAM WOODBURY re-examined. Q. Did you hear Ball say at any time, that he told the prisoner before he was apprehended of the robbery which had been committed at the prosecutors' - A. He said before the prisoner was apprehended, that he had said to Brooks, what a robbery had been committed on the opposite side, at the prosecutors' wharf.

Q. Did he say it was before the prisoner was apprehended or after - A. He did not say which, nor was he asked the question.

Q. When did he say this - A. On the Tuesday after the prisoner was taken up - he was standing on Dove's wharf, opposite the prosecutors'.

Cross-examined by MR. ARABIN. Q. He did not say whether he told the prisoner before or after he was taken up - A. I did not understand which.

GUILTY . Aged 45.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190526-110

876. ROBERT EDNEY was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of April , three pair of pistols, value 3 l., the goods of Thomas Hewson , in his dwelling-house .

THOMAS HEWSON . I am a gunmaker , and live in Piccadilly . On the 27th of April, about seven o'clock in the evening, I was at the back of the shop; my son was going out, and said the shop-window was broken, and the person, who did it was walking away; I went out and laid hold of the prisoner - my son pointed him out to me - he had got about five doors off. I charged him with it; he denied it, and at that instant Thompson came up and said,

"This is him - I saw him do it." I sent for a constable, who found a knife and some wire on him. I lost three odd pistols out of the window.

EDWARD HEWSON . I am the son of the last witness. I was going out and saw the prisoner come off the step of the next door; I looked round, saw the glass cut, and a pistol laying half out. I informed my father, who went out, and took the prisoner. I am sure he is the boy - the window is close to where he stood.

JAMES THOMPSON . I was passing Mr. Hewson's, saw the prisoner on the steps, and the window cut; his hand was on the pistol, in the act of throwing it out when he perceived me. He came down from the steps, and ran by to the corner of Air-street; Mr. Hewson came out and took him - my eyes were never off him. I am sure he is the boy - there was another boy about two yards from him, whom I did not see after the prisoner was taken.

HENRY ROBINSON . I am a constable. I took the prisoner, and found a knife, and some wire with a hook to it, on him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The wire is bell-wire.

GUILTY. Aged 17.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190526-111

877. RACHAEL MITCHELL was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of April , two sheets, value 6 s.; two blankets value 7 s., and one counterpane, value 3 s., the goods of Richard Fallshaw , in a lodging-room .

RICHARD FALLSHAW . I live in Playhouse-yard, White Cross-street . On the 20th of March, I let the prisoner a room at 4 s. 6 d. a week. On the 10th of April she left, and I missed these things. I had her apprehended about a week after.

JOSEPH NORTHOVER . I am a broker. Clifford sold me a blanket.

JANE CLIFFORD . The prisoner gave me the blanket to sell for her. I sold it to Northover.

WILLIAM PARTRIDGE . I apprehended the prisoner. Her husband brought her to me - she said her husband was innocent.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Confined Three Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190526-112

378. WILLIAM MILLER and CHARLES ROWLEY were indicted for stealing, on the 17th of May , 52 lbs. of lead, the property of Benjamin George Hodges , Esq. , and fixed to his dwelling-house .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating it be fixed to a certain building.

WILLIAM GOODENOUGH . I am a constable of St. John's. On the 17th of May, between nine and ten o'clock at night, I was in company with the landlord of a public-house, talking at the door, the prisoner, Miller, passed us with a bag at his back - I followed and asked him what he had got in the bag? he replied it was his own property. I said,

"It is lead, where did you get it from?" he made no answer. I collared him; he dropped the bag on my toes, and got away for about five minutes, I then secured him, took him into the public-house, and asked him how he came by it? he said a man gave him 1 s. to carry it to Dartmouth-street. I said,

"You have taken it from Mr. Hodges's house, for I saw it put on this very day." I left him in charge, went to Mr. Hodges's house, and found the lead gone. I had seen the two prisoners together between six and seven o'clock that night. A man was with Miller when I stopped him.

JOHN ROYLE . I am a plumber. I fixed this lead to Mr. Benjamin George Hodges 's house that very day - I know it to be the same lead.

BENJAMIN TIMBRELL. I was constable of the night. Goodenough brought Miller into the watch-house, and said a man in a blue coat and yellow waistcoat had run away. I had seen Rowley with Miller before, and as I was taking Miller to the office, he stood at the door, and I took him.

MILLER - GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

ROWLEY - NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190526-113

879. JANE OSBORNE and MARY ANN FURZE were indicted for stealing, on the 25th of May , from the person of John Clark , five 1 l. bank notes , his property.

JOHN CLARK . I am a gentleman's servant . On the 25th of May, between two and three o'clock in the afternoon, I was in Wentworth-street, Whitechapel, at Mr. Walker's, who keeps a hair-dresser's shop - the prisoner, Osborne. came in, and said she had known me for three years past; I said she knew nothing of me. She began crying, and I gave her a shilling to go and fetch something to drink. She began making a disturbance, and in order to keep peace in the house, I took her to a public-house close by, and called for a shillingsworth of gin and water; I changed a 1 l. note to pay for it. She then prevailed on me to go to a house kept by the prisoner, Furze - I paid 1 s. for a room. In about half an hour Furze came up stairs, knocked at the door, burst it open, and sat down in the room. Osborne thrust her hand into my breeches-pocket, took out five 1 l. notes, and gave them to Furze. Two other women came into the room directly. I went to Lambeth-street, and fetched an officer; we found the house empty. Next morning I found the prisoners in custody. I have never found the notes. I am certain they are the women.

SAMUEL WILSON . I was constable of the night. On the 25th of May I found Osborne at the watch-house; she wanted to give Furze in charge for robbing her of four 1 l. notes - I afterwards went and took her.

OSBORNE - GUILTY . Aged 26.

FURZE - GUILTY . Aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190526-114

880. THOMAS POWERS was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of April , one gown, value 5 s. , the goods of Sarah Sharp .

SARAH SHARP . I am servant at a public-house at Battle-bridge . On the 29th of April I lost my gown out of the wash-house. A constable brought the prisoner in with it.

CONSTANTINE WATTS . I am servant at the house. I saw the prisoner come out of the yard with the gown under his coat. I followed him into the field; he said he would knock me down. I secured him, and gave him in charge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. It is my first offence.

GUILTY . Aged 61.

Confined Three Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190526-115

881. WILLIAM WOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of March , one coat, value 30 s. , the goods of Benjamin Haswell .

MARY ANN HASWELL . I am the daughter of Benjamin Haswell , who is a cooper . The prisoner came to the house, and said my father had sent him for his great-coat. I knew him before. I told him he had no great-coat, and asked if he meant the coat that was made out of the great-coat? he said Yes, and I gave it to him.

BENJAMIN HASWELL . I had not seen the prisoner that day, nor did I send him for the coat.

JOHN DAVIS . I am servant to Mr. Walker, who is a pawnbroker, and lives in Tabernacle-walk. The prisoner pledged the coat with me on the 16th of March.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. It is useless to deny it. I was out of work, and almost starving.

GUILTY . Aged 43.

Confined Two Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190526-116

882. THOMAS STANLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of May , one pair of shoes, value 3 s. , the goods of Samuel Lewis .

SAMUEL LEWIS . I am a slopseller , and live in Shadwell. On the 19th of May, about ten o'clock, a man came into the shop to look at some shoes - another man, who appeared to belong to him, stood at the door. The man at the door said go the rig, twice. In about a minute I went out, and saw the prisoner about two doors off, concealing a pair of shoes under his apron. I collared him, and the other two ran away.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I found them.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Confined Six Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190526-117

883. STEPHEN WAGSTAFF was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of May , two sacks, value 3 s., and three pieces of carpeting, value 6 d. , the goods of John White .

JOHN WHITE . I am a publican , and live in Park-street, Marylebone . On the 2d of May, about twelve o'clock at night, Howard called me up - I missed some sacks and pieces of carpets off my outhouse, and found them at the watch-house.

EDWARD MORTON . I am a watchman. On the 2d of May, about twelve o'clock at night, I stopped the prisoner in the New Road with the sacks; he said he was going to Brook-green Fair with them - I took him to the watch-house.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Three Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190526-118

884. THOMAS WILMORE was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of May , two 5 l. and eight 1 l. bank notes , the property of Uriah Bryant .

URIAH BRYANT. I am a tinman , and live in Beech-street, Barbican . On the 5th of May the prisoner bought several things at my shop, which were to be sent to No. 91, Moffat-street, City Road. He came again on the 10th, and had other things, which came altogether to 12 l. 1 s. 8 d. He told me to come on Thursday morning, the 14th of May, at ten o'clock, and he would pay me. I went, and he was out. I was told to call again at three, which I did; I called again at nine o'clock; and saw him. He said,

"I cannot settle your bill, unless you change me a 30 l. note," I said I could; he then said he could not settle with me until the next morning at ten o'clock. I went again - he put me off till three, I then saw him in his back parlour - he asked me if I had got change for the 30 l. note? I said Yes. He told me to write the receipt. He took out his pocket-book, and said,

"I have not got my 30 l. note here, I must go up stairs for it." I had put two 5 l. and eight 1 l.

notes on his table with the receipt. He took them up, and went up stairs with them. At the same time his shoemaker, who was there, left the room - I remained alone. Instead of returning into the parlour to me, he ran straight out of the house. I followed, and saw him run out of the side-door of the Crown and Sceptre, public-house - I stopped him, and asked him for his 30 l. or my 18 l. He said,

"My good fellow, you shall have your 30 l. note in fifteen minutes, if you will go with me to the King of Prussia, public-house." I went and waited about twenty minutes; he sent for somebody, the person returned, and said he was not at home - I waited there an hour. I had occasion to leave the place for about a minute; on my return I found he was gone. I ran to his house and several other places, and in about half an hour I found him in the garden of the King of Prussia; I asked him for my 18 l. - he said,

"My good fellow, you are frightened at your own shadow! it is of no use for you to have your 18 l., you will have the whole presently." He had a bill for 29 l. in his hand, and said if he were to give me this bill he should be under an arrest. He put it on the table, I said,

"That is of no use to me." I returned with him to the Crown and Sceptre. I saw a friend, and beckoned him over. I got an officer, and gave him in charge. He was searched at Worship-street, after a great resistance - my notes and receipt were found on him, but no 30 l. note.

Q. Had you agreed to take any thing in exchange for the 18 l. but the 30 l. note - A. Nothing.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did he not give you the bill - A. No. I had no idea of discounting the bill for him. I did not take it up. I neither drank nor sat down with him.

THOMAS RHODES . I am an officer. I was sent for to the Crown, public-house, in Moffat-street, and went to the prisoner's house in Moffat-street; I told him I had been sent for to apprehend him for robbing Mr. Bryant; he asked me to produce my authority. I produced my staff - he asked for my warrant. I said I had none. He threatened me, and pushed me out of the house. I went for assistance - he came into the public-house, and I took him into custody, and took him to the office; he resisted very much, and said, as there was no magistrate on the bench he would not be searched, and what he had about him was his own. I at last searched him, with assistance, and found a pocket-book, with twenty-eight duplicates, a bill of exchange for 29 l. 14 s., and Bryant's receipt for 12 l., in it.

JOSHUA ARMSTRONG . I am an officer of Worship-street. I assisted in searching the prisoner, and found two 5 l. and eight 1 l. notes in his fob.

URIAH BRIANT . I can swear to one of the notes.

Prisoner's Defence. My wife bought some goods of him, I afterwards went, he took me into his parlour, and we agreed to go out on Sunday in a chaise. He said he would discount me a bill, I called, told him the bill was ready, he came, and I gave it to him; we drank tea together, and while we were at tea the officer came, and I was taken to the office.

GUILTY . Aged 31.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190526-119

885. GABRIEL SWAN was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of April , 12 lbs. of metal bolts and nails, value 8 s. , the goods of William Curling , George Frederick Young , William Young , and Jesse Curling .

THOMAS CARTER . I am foreman to Messrs. Curling and Co., who are ship-builders , at Poplar; the prisoner was in their employ as ship's store-keeper . On the 27th of April, as he was leaving the yard to go to dinner, I observed something suspicious in his apron; I stopped him, and took a bolt from his pocket. I took him to Mr. Curling, who made him unload. He produced from his person about 12 lbs. of copper bolts and nails and mixed metals, I asked him what could induce him to do it? he said he wanted to obtain money to purchase a jacket. He had 24 s. a week.

MR. WILLIAM CURLING . I am in partnership with George Frederick Young , William Young , and Jesse Curling . I never empowered the prisoner to take the things away.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 58.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190526-120

886. WILLIAM MILLER was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of May , one cart-pad, value 1 s.; one band, value 1 s.; one pair of reins, value 2 s.; one bridle, value 2 s., and one collar, value 1 s. , the goods of Elizabeth Fidgen .

JOHN WALLIS . I am hostler to Elizabeth Fidgen , who keeps the yard the Limehouse stage goes from . On the 25th of May these things were stolen from the yard.

JOHN SPIRES . I was constable of the night at Mile End. About four o'clock in the morning of the 25th of May the prisoner passed the watch-house with these things. I asked him where he got them from? he said a gentleman gave them to him to carry - I believe he was intoxicated. He said he was going to Bow - he turned the wrong way. I secured him, and he threw them down.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Confined Six Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190526-121

887. JOHN MATTHEW GUTCH was indicted for two libels .

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190526-122

888. JOHN GODLIMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of March , four shirts, value 30 s., and two shifts, value 10 s. , the goods of Joseph Lush .

ELIZABETH LUSH . I am the wife of Joseph Lush , am a laundress, and live at Feltham . On the 31st of March, about seven o'clock, I missed these things, which hung before the house to dry. I found some of them in possession of Scurr.

DANIEL SCURR . I am a pawnbroker, and live at Twickenham. On the 7th of May the prisoner brought three shirts and a shift to pledge - he said his father sent him with them, and that they were his father's; I detained him; I and the constable took him to Feltham. When he

got about half way he made his escape - I pursued him a considerable distance; he was secured. I am certain he is the man.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I found the bundle.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Three Months , and Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190526-123

889. SAMUEL LUCAS was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of May , eight bushels of coals, value 10 s. , the property of Sarah Wright , widow , and William Consett Wright .

WILLIAM ISBESTER. I am a Thames Police constable. On the 13th of May, about five o'clock in the morning, I observed the prisoner and another on board a barge, which laid at Bell Wharf tier on the Middlesex side ; they took coals out in a basket, and put them into their boat - they then got into the boat. I pursued them to the next tier; they then jumped out of the boat, ran over the tier, and got on board one of the ships; I secured the prisoner without losing sight of him; I found about ten bushels of coals in the boat - the name of of the barge is Tommy. The prisoner offered me his watch to let him go.

WILLIAM CONSETT WRIGHT. I am in partnership with Sarah Wright ; the coals in the Tommy are our's. Those found in the prisoner's boat were of the same description.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Three Months , and Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190526-124

890. THOMAS CLARK was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of May , three pewter pots, value 6 s. , the goods of Thomas Collins .

THOMAS COLLINS . I keep the Pitt's Head, public-house , Little Stanhope-street, May-fair . On the 26th of May, about five o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner had half a pint of beer in the tap-room. About half an hour after I found him in the privy with two pots concealed under his waistcoat - he dropped one in the privy. I gave him in charge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 45.

Confined Six Months , and Publicly Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190526-125

891. THOMAS OXFORD MULLUSH and WILLIAM PRICE were indicted for stealing, on the 18th of May , two saws, value 10 s., the property of William Earp ; and 100 lbs. of lead, value 20 s., the property of William Cracroft , and fixed to a certain building of his .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating the lead to be fixed to a dwelling-house of the said William Cracroft .

WILLIAM NORTH . I am a builder, and live at Westminster; I was repairing the house No. 2, Smith-square, Westminster , for William Cracroft . On the 18th of May, between twelve and one o'clock, we missed the leaden sink, which had been fixed. It was taken while the men were at dinner.

WILLIAM EARP . I was at work at the building, and lost two saws - the sink was also missed. I saw my saws and the sink at Bow-street the next day.

MARGARET COKELY . I live in Vine-street, Chandos-street. On the 18th of May, between twelve and one o'clock, Mullush came in, and asked if he might leave two saws in my shop for about five minutes - he did not return until the officer brought him. About ten minutes after Price brought the leaden sink.

Prisoner PRICE. Q. Did not you cover the sink over with rags yourself - A. No.

JAMES MOORE . I am an officer. I took Price in Cokely's passage; I had seen the prisoners together with the lead and saws at Whitehall. I took the sink to the house, and it fitted exactly.

JOHN ESHELBY . I am a constable. I saw the prisoners with the lead and saws. I saw Mullush go to Cokely's, and secured him as he came out.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

MULLUSH'S Defence. I picked them up.

PRICE'S Defence. I say the same.

MULLUSH - GUILTY . Aged 26.

PRICE - GUILTY . Aged 33.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190526-126

892. MARY JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of May , one counterpane, value 10 s., and one blanket, value 5 s. , the goods of Thomas Jordan .

THOMAS JORDAN . I keep an hotel in St. James-street . On the 11th of May, about three o'clock in the afternoon, the waiter brought the prisoner to me with these things, which were taken from a small room at the back of the house.

JOSEPH BERKENHEAD . I am a waiter. I was going up stairs, and saw the prisoner leave the passage of the upper rooms with a large bundle in her apron, and another in her hand; I followed her out of the house to the corner of Park-place, then stopped and asked her what she had been doing in the house? she said she had been to get some washing from Mr. Charles. I said,

"You have got a blanket and counterpane, where did you get them?" she said from the top of the street, and she was going to take them to be washed. I brought her back.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 32.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190526-127

893. WILLIAM BELL was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of May , 34 lbs. of mixed metal, value 25 s. 6 d. the property of Mary Glascott , widow , and George Minshaw Glascott .

GEORGE MINSHAW GLASCOTT . I am a brass-founder , and live in Whitechapel - I am in partnership with Mary Glascott , widow; the prisoner was in our employ. On the 13th of May, we lost some metal, and set my brother to watch. In consequence of what he told me, about seven o'clock in the evening, as the prisoner was leaving work, I desired him to give me what metal he had about him; he said he had none. I searched him and found one piece weighing about 2 lbs. I gave him in charge, went to his house, and found about 30 lbs. of mixed metal, which is mine.

THOMAS GLASCOTT . I watched the prisoner through a hole adjoining the factory; about seven o'clock I saw him put something in his breeches.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN GRIFFITHS . I found the metal at the prisoner's house.

Prisoner. I am very sorry.

GUILTY . Aged 38.

Confined Two Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190526-128

894. WILLIAM THUMWOOD , JOSEPH LEE , and JOSEPH HAMBLIN were indicted for stealing, on the 19th of May , ten live tame rabbits, price 20 s. , the property of James Leak .

The prosecutor did not appear .

NOT GUILTY.

First Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18190526-129

895. RICHARD SHIPPEN was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of May , two rugs, value 16 s.,; one saddle, value 12 s.; one martingale, value 6 s., and two bridles, value 9 s. , the property of Owen Williams , Esq.

GEORGE SHACKLE . I am groom to Owen Williams , Esq. The carriage stood at livery, at George-yard, Duke-street, Grosvenor-square ; the things were stolen from the stable on the night of the 10th of May.

WILLIAM SPENDLOVE . I am a dealer in harness, and live in Crawford-street. On the 13th of May I was informed a man had some harness to sell, and went to the prisoner at the Castle, public-house, in Chapel-street, and told him that I had been informed that he had got some bridles and saddles to sell; he said,

"I have; I don't think they are altogether right - they are crossed," which I understood to mean stolen; he said he had let a man have 1 l. on them - I said I would buy them. He took me to a cottage in Bell-street, near the Edgware-road - the saddle laid on the floor. He went towards the window, lifted up a board in the floor, and pulled out two new rugs, two bridles and a martingale; he put the rugs back again and put the board over. I said they were not good enough for me, and if he had any better another time I would buy them. We came away and left the things there without replacing them.

Q. Who let you into the cottage - A. He let himself in with a key, and locked the door again when he went away. We parted, and I gave information to Shackle; on the Sunday morning I went with him and the constable. I left them in the street, went to the cottage, and asked for Shippen; they said he was in bed, but they would call him. The prisoner looked out of the window, and said,

"I will be down directly." I said I had a customer for the things - he said he had not got them, but they were at a house just by in a bag - we went to a house a few yards off, and he brought the bag out. We went to the Castle, public-house, and sat down in the harbour; he was in the act of pulling them out, when Wales came in and asked him whose property it was? he said it was his.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. A man named Hazlewood sent you to the prisoner - A. Yes. The board was sawed out of the floor. The place was not like a scuttle.

JOHN WALES I am an officer. I went in search of the prisoner with Spendlove; he fetched him out and took him to the Castle, public-house. I followed them, and asked the prisoner what he had got there? he said they were that man's, pointing to Spendlove - Spendlove said he was about buying them of the prisoner. The prisoner then said they were his, and he had let a man have 1 l. on them, and he had not seen him since. The bag contained the articles stated in the indictment.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I let a man have 1 l. on them for en minutes - he never returned.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18190526-130

896. WILLIAM BAUCH was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of May , from the person of Charles Gray , one hat, value 2 s.; 10 s. in monies numbered, three 10 l., three 5 l., and one 1 l. bank note , his property.

CHARLES GRAY . I am a seaman . On the 24th of May, I was at the Ship, public-house, Shadwell . I laid my head down on the table, and fell asleep with my hands under my head; the prisoner sat on my right side on the same bench. I had 46 l. and about 8 s. in a small bag. I had been paid off that day - there were 5 l. and 10 l. notes among the money. I had just come from Portsmouth - my hat was on the table before me. I was awoke by feeling the prisoner draw his hand out of my pocket - I heard money jingle when he put it into his own pocket. I missed my bag of notes and silver; I seized him, he escaped from me, and got outside the door. I had taken my bag of money from his waistcoat-pocket before that. I got an officer, he went and secured him, and found my hat on his head, and my discharge in his pocket.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q, What time had you come to town that morning - A. At eight o'clock. I was not drunk. I knew what I was about.

WILLIAM HEWITT . I am an officer of Shadwell; the prosecutor fetched me about one o'clock - I went to the public-house with him, we met the prisoner coming from the house, the prosecutor said he was the man who had robbed him, and he had got his hat on now; he said he had taken his bag of money from him. I found his discharge in the prisoner's waistcoat-pocket, and 9 s. He said he did not know how it came there. I had great difficulty in securing him. The prosecutor knew what he was about.

Prisoner's Defence. I do not know how the discharge got there - the money was my own.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18190526-131

897. JOHN WELLS and GEORGE WELLS were indicted for stealing, on the 28th of May , eight bushels of oats, value 23 s. , the property of William Allen .

WILLIAM ALLEN . I am a horse-dealer , and live in Colchester-street, Whitechapel ; the prisoners lived behind my yard. On the 28th of May I lost about three quarters of oats out of my stable.

JOHN PARTRIDGE . I am an officer. The prisoners were brought to the watch-house about four o'clock in the morning

of the 28th of May, with three sacks of oats. I found three keys on John Wells , one of which opened Allen's front gate - on George Wells I found a key, which opened the loft where the oats were kept.

JOHN DANGATE. I am a watchman. On Friday, the 28th of May, at half-past two o'clock in the morning, Dorkin called me to his assistance - I went into the prosecutor's lower yard, found nobody there, and returned to the upper yard. I got on the roof of an outhouse, then on the gutter-spout of Allen's stable, and found the prisoner, George Wells , who was in the act of throwing a sack of oats over. I called to Dorkin that I had found one. He went round by the end of the stable, where I saw John Wells in the act of drawing one of the sacks into the stable - we took them to the watch-house.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. It was quite light.

EPHRAIM DORKIN . I was informed that somebody was in the prosecutor's stable, and called Dangate; he took George Wells on the roof. I went round, saw John Wells dropping down from the building, and collared him. He said,

"Stop, I will make it up with you;" and said he would give me 2 l. to say nothing about it - I said I would not take a bribe. We took them both to the watch-house.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

J. WELLS - GUILTY . Aged 28.

G. WELLS - GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190526-132

898. SARAH WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of April , one watch, value 10 s. , the property of Sarah George , widow .

SARAH GEORGE . I am a widow, and live in Little Warner-street . On the 30th of April, the prisoner came and asked me to make a shirt for her. I left her in the room, returned, and found she was gone - I missed my watch off the mantle-piece soon after. Nobody but the prisoner had been in the room - I had her apprehended.

JOHN HEAD . I am a pawnbroker. On the 30th of April the prisoner pledged the watch with me.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 29.

Confined One Year .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190526-133

899. SUSAN BECKETT was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of May , one pair of shoes, value 8 s. , the goods of Alexander Cowan .

CATHERINE COWAN . I am the wife of Alexander Cowan , who is a shoemaker , and lives in Holywell-street . On the 7th of May the prisoner came into my service - next day she appeared bulky, and I found the shoes on her.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined One Month .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190526-134

900. JOHN DOWLING was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of May , 2 lbs. of pewter, value 10 d., and half an ounce of silver, value 2 s. 5 d. , the goods of Michael Rook .

MICHAEL ROOK . I am a silversmith ; the prisoner is my apprentice . I lost some silver. I do not know who took it.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190526-135

901. WILLIAM DAWES was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of May , one table-spoon, value 10 s. , the goods of Lepman Polack .

LEPMAN POLACK. I am a tailor , and live in Mansell-street, Goodman's-fields . On the 25th of May the prisoner came to my house, and asked for some clothes for Mr. Jacobs; my sister called me down - I told him to send Mr. Jacobs himself for them. About three-quarters of an hour after he was gone I received information, and then missed the table-spoon off the beaufet. I went to a coffee-shop in Church-street with an officer, took him into custody, and asked him for the spoon; he said he gave it to Jacobs - he then pulled it out of his breeches-pocket.

SAMUEL MILLER . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner, and saw him give the spoon to the prosecutor.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190526-136

902. WILLIAM DUNN was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of May , six live tame geese, value 1 l. , the goods of William Nicholls .

WILLIAM NICHOLLS . I live in Harrow-road . On the 27th of May, about six o'clock in the morning, I found my place broken open, and six geese taken away. Two locks were broken off the door.

WILLIAM OWEN . I am an officer. About half-past four o'clock in the morning of the 27th of May, I stopped the prisoner in Holborn with the geese in a hamper. He said he brought them from the Plough and Pinner. I could find no such house, and took him to the watch-house.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A man asked me to carry them.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190526-137

903. MARY JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of March , one table-cloth, value 1 s., one petticoat, value 2 s., and one handkerchief, value 6 d. , the goods of William Hodges .

CHARLES HODGES . I am the wife of William Hodges , we live at Bethnal-green . I hired the prisoner as a weekly servant . When she had been in my house about four hours she went out the back way; I missed my things. On the 24th of May I met her and secured her - she said she had pledged my things.

Prisoner. I was in distress.

GUILTY. Aged 16.

Judgment Respited .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190526-138

904. MARY SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of May , one coat, value 7 s.; two petticoats, value 2 s., and one frock, value 1 s. , the goods of Thomas Stevens .

MARY ANN STEVENS . I am the wife of Thomas Stevens . On the 9th of May, about half-past three o'clock in the afternoon, I was alarmed, and found the prisoner in custody with these things in her apron, which she had taken from the kitchen.

ELIZA ELLIOTT . I saw the prisoner going out with these things in her apron, and stopped her.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I was in distress.

GUILTY . Aged 50.

Confined One Year .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190526-139

965. WILLIAM RAVEN was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Hewson , about three o'clock in the afternoon of the 27th of March , (no person being therein), and stealing four gowns, value 2 l., and two handkerchiefs, value 8 s. , his property.

JOHN HEWSON . I live at Kentish Town . On the 27th of March I was informed my cottage-door was open - I went down and found it so. I went over the fields, saw two men, and overtook them. I never saw the prisoner, nor do I know any thing of him.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.


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