Old Bailey Proceedings, 21st April 1819.
Reference Number: 18190421
Reference Number: f18190421-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace Oyer and Terminer, AND Goal Delivery for the City of London, AND ALSO The Goal Delivery For the County of Middlesex, HELD AT Justice Hall, in the Old Bailey; ON WEDNESDAY, 21st of APRIL, 1819, and following Days;

Being the Fourth Session in the Mayoralty of THE RIGHT HON. JOHN ATKINS , LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

Taken in Short-Hand by H. BUCKLER, Basinghall Street, (BY AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON.)

London:

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED, FOR H. BUCKLER, BY T. BOOTH, 31, St. Andrew's Hill, Doctors' Commons.

1819.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX.

Before the Right Honourable JOHN ATKINS , Esq. LORD MAYOR of the City of London; Sir George Wood , Knt., one of the Barons of his Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir James Allan Park , Knt., one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir Richard Carr Glyn , Bart.; Sir John Perring , Bart.; Sir William Leighton , Knt.; Thomas Smith , Esq.; Joshua Jonathan Smith , Esq.; Sir Claudius Stephen Hunter , Bart.; Sir William Domville , Bart. Aldermen of the said City; Sir John Silvester , Bart., D. C. L. Recorder of the said City; John Thomas Thorp , Esq., Alderman of the said City, Newman Knowlys , Esq. Common Sergeant of the said City, and John Vaillant , Esq., his Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of the Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

London Jury.

William Parkinson ,

George Tierney ,

John Rowe ,

William Pepperill ,

Stephen Gibbs ,

Thomas Newby ,

William Higgins ,

William Walker ,

Charles Webster ,

John Parteridge ,

Walter Payne ,

Jonathan Dawson .

1st Middlesex Jury.

Joseph Bell ,

Thomas Holdgate ,

William Bogie ,

James Winfield ,

Thomas Moon ,

Joseph Flogdell ,

Peter Brown ,

William Chappell ,

John Bannister ,

James Moyes ,

Francis Nicholls ,

John Stunt .

2d Middlesex Jury.

James Riekie ,

Benjamin Payne ,

Isaac Hill ,

James Cowdroy ,

James M'Whinnie ,

Edward Stringer ,

William Clunie ,

Robert Bancks ,

John Davies ,

Thomas Thompson ,

William Moore ,

Jonathan Fentum .

3d Middlesex Jury.

William Marriott ,

John Brooks ,

William Ward ,

William Parkin ,

John Griffin ,

George Palmer ,

Nathaniel Hutchins ,

John Hawley ,

Thomas Cood ,

Thomas Ball ,

Thomas Day ,

George Barclay .

4th Middlesex Jury

Robert Eady ,

Francis Corster ,

John Knight ,

William Ashton ,

Edward Corn ,

Richard Morton ,

John Haigh ,

Jessee Middleton ,

Edward Allen ,

Abraham Burstall ,

Thomas Goodhall ,

Michael Longstaff .

SESSIONS HOUSE, OLD BAILEY, APRIL 21, 1819.

ATKINS, MAYOR. FOURTH SESSION.

Reference Number: t18190421-1

501. ROBERT M'BRIDE was indicted for feloniously assaulting John Burt , on the King's highway, at St. Margaret, Westminster , on the 19th of January , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, one watch, value 30 s.; two seals, value 6 d., and one pocket-book, value 1 s. , his property.

JOHN BURT . I live in Gardiner's-lane, York-street, Westminster. On the 19th of January I was at the Blue Anchor, public-house, York-street, the prisoner came in with two others, and sat down by me - they tried several times to pick my pocket. My wife came in and asked me if I was going home; they would not let me out. I went round the table, and went out - they followed me. When I got under the gateway of Gardiner's-lane they surrounded me, pushed me against the wall, unbuttoned my coat, and took my watch and pocket-book out - they swore at me, and ran off. The other two, which were Frost and Armfield, were convicted last Sessions. I am certain the prisoner was one of them.

Cross-examined by MR. ARABIN. I noticed them particularly.

RODERIC M'DONALD. My father keeps the public-house. I saw the prisoner there with two others, they set by Burt, and followed him out; Burt returned in about five minutess, and said he was robbed. When they were in the house the prisoner came to me and asked if Burt was a pensioner - it was the last day for paying the Chelsea pensioners.

ELIZA BURT . I went to fetch my husband, Armfield was sitting with him - my husband had been drinking a little, but knew what he was about. Armfield went out of the door with him, I followed them, and Frost and the prisoner followed me immediately - they all stopped and robbed my husband under the gateway - they laid hold of his arms, unbuttoned his coat, took his watch, and then ran away. We returned to the public-house and gave information.

Cross-examined. It was under a dark gateway. My husband was sensible.

JOHN BURT re-examined. I felt them draw my watch out.

JAMES GILLMOR . On the 25th of March I apprehended the prisoner in St. Giles's. He told me I could say one thing for him, which was, that he had behaved well to me whenever I had taken him.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

Reference Number: t18190421-2

502. GEORGE LAWFORD was indicted for feloniously assaulting Thomas Gadd , on the King's highway, at Enfield , on the 26th of December , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, one tobacco-box, value 1 s., and the sum of 18 s. in monies numbered , his property.

THOMAS GADD . I am servant to Mr. George Idle , who lives at Enfield. On Saturday, the 26th of December, about seven o'clock in the evening, I was about a quarter of a mile from my master's house, returning home from Southgate - I was walking by myself, and had a lanthorn in my hand. I was in the middle of the road, the prisoner overtook me, I wished him a good night before he came up, as I knew him before - he lived at Enfield with his father, another man was with him. He came up behind me, turned round, and seized me by the throat, the other man came up immediately, and picked my pocket of eighteen shillings in silver, and a tobacco-box; as soon as he seized me the other man took my lanthorn from me, and put the light out. I had an opportunity of seeing the prisoner's face before the light was put out. I did not call him by his name when I spoke to him.

Q. After they robbed you what did they do - A. They pushed me back, and went away. I did not know the other man. On the Monday following, about seven o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner at a public-house at East Barnet, in custody of Haines; his sister told me he was taken, and I found him there. He was searched in my presence, and three snares and 2 s. 6 d. were found on him.

Cross-examined by MR. ARABIN. Q. Do you live with Mr. Idle still - A. Yes. I knew the prisoner before, and he knew me. I went to the public-house at East Barnet the same evening to look for him, but he was not there.

Q. Had you not seen him, and never accused him of the robbery - A. No; he was taken at a public-house, at Rickmansworth, by Foster.

COURT. Q. When did you see him in custody at Rickmansworth - A. About a month ago.

Q. When you saw him at the public-house, at East Barnet, on the Monday evening, did you charge him with robbing you - A. No; I had told the constable to apprehend him. He was taken to Cheshunt, and put in the cage.

Q. When did you hear he was out of custody - A. I do not know.

STEWART PORTER . I am a constable. On the 28th of December I was at Cheshunt, when Gadd applied to the magistrate for a warrant, I and Champness went to apprehend the prisoner; we found him at the Cat, public-house, at East Barnet, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening; I told him we took him on suspicion of robbing Gadd - he said nothing then. We searched him, and found three snares and a half-crown on him - Gadd came in. I told the prisoner we wanted his partner, Holdridge. He said if I would go back with him he would take me to where I could find him. I went to a place called Bone, but could not find him; we put the prisoner in the cage. The magistrate committed him to Newgate. Gadd understood the magistrate was to let him know when to appear and prefer the bill, and he did not attend - no bill was found. The prisoner was indicted last Sessions, when he was not in custody.

THOMAS GADD re-examined. Q. Why did you not prefer a bill against the prisoner in January - A. I thought the officer was to let me know when to appear - I am certain the prisoner is the man who seized me by the throat. I heard his companion's name was Holdridge.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 20.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park,

Reference Number: t18190421-3

503. JOSEPH BECK was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of January , 15 s., in monies numbered , the property of Phebus Grigg .

The prosecutor did not appear

NOT GUILTY.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

Reference Number: t18190421-4

504. JOHN SANDYFORD and HENRY NICHOLSON were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Sarah Whitmore , widow , about eight o'clock in the night of the 10th of March , at St. John the Evangelist, Westminster , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, one sheet, value 2 s., her property; six gowns, value 3 l.; four petticoats, value 10 s.; two scarfs, value 3 l.; four handkerchiefs, value 2 s.; two shifts, value 2 s.; one apron, value 6 d.; one pair of pockets, value 6 d.; three pair of shoes, value 2 s., and four pair of stockings, value 2 s. , the property of Lucy Newman , spinster.

LUCY NEWMAN. I am servant to Mrs. Sarah Whitmore , who lives at No. 13, College-street , Westminster - she is a widow. On the 10th of March, the house was all fastened up. About half-past eight o'clock at night I heard the alarm, ran up stairs, into the garret, found my trunk open, and missed the articles stated in the indictment, out of it. I found the window open - it had been shut down before, but was not fastened; the persons must have pushed the window up, to get in. The whole of the property is worth 10 l.; I had been in the room, about half-past three o'clock in the afternoon. The thieves must have come in at the window - you can go from one house to the other; I saw my things next day at the office.

CHARLES JUDE. On the evening of the 10th of March, in consequence of information, I went to an empty house, No. 15, Colledge-street, Westminster, which is one door from the prosecutrix's; I tried to get in, but could not, and heard somebody talking inside. I went through the next house, and got over the wall, into the yard of the empty house. I found the yard-door of the empty house open. I went towards the street-door, found it bolted at the top and bottom, the lock taken off, and laying in the middle of the passage. I got a light, and at the bottom of the stairs I found the property tied up in a handkerchief - I found nobody in the house. Gillmor, Lavender, and two or three more officers were with me.

JAMES GILLMOR . On the 10th of March, I went with Dew, and saw the prisoner, Nicholson, get over a wall into No. 15. I got over the wall of No. 13 myself, and saw a man drop from the garden-wall of No. 15, into the garden of No. 16. I then saw Nicholson drop from the wall of No. 15, into No. 16 - it was dark, but I had a candle; there is a parapet runs along the houses. I got into the garden of the empty house, and saw the figure of a man drop from a wall, into Cowley-street; I also saw the trees shake towards Barton-street. Two soldiers came to our assistance, and got over the wall of No. 16,; I saw one pick up a bundle and a stick, which he delivered to me. I gave information, and the next day Cooper brought the prisoners to the office; Sandyford had been taken the same night, by the watchman. I observed that a pearl button was off the knee of Nicholson's breeches. A few nights before the robbery, I saw both the prisoners together in King-street; each of them had a stick, like that found in the garden. I stopped them, and asked them where they were going? Another stick was delivered to me, by Tribe, with a small crow, and a pair of mens' shoes; he found them in the garden of No. 16, where I saw Nicholson drop. The prosecutrix's house, is in the parish of St. John the Evangelist, Westminster.

Prisoner NICHOLSON. Q. Why did you not take me, when you passed me in New Pye-street, that night, about a quarter after nine o'clock - A. I did not see him, I was not there at that time. I was there about half-past nine o'clock looking for him.

JOHN MOLD . I am a watchman; I was on my beat. I went to No. 1, Cowley-street, which is about forty or fifty yards from Whitmore's, and found the back of the privy broken open. I told the woman, who was there to watch, and she called me soon after. I went, and found the privy fast; I opened it, and found Sandyford there - it was about a quarter before nine o'clock; he must have got over the wall to get into the privy. I had searched it about ten minutes before, and he was not there then.

Prisoner SANDYFORD. Q. Was the door of the house open - A. No, it was fastened and chained.

JOHN TRIBE . I am servant to Mr. Pace, who lives next door to the empty house. I heard the alarm, ran into the garden, and saw a man on the roof of the tool-house. My master called me back to mind the thieves did not run down off the roof of the house. A few minutes after, I

heard that one was taken; I went into the garden, and found a stick and a crow-bar. I also found a pair of shoes on the roof of the tool-house, where I had seen the man. He was the same size as Nicholson, and had the same kind of clothes on as he had at the office - I did not see his face.

JOHN CHURCHILL. I lived in the empty house before his. Hearing of the robbery, I went to the house, and found Gillmor there. Next morning I went to Pace's, and found a pearl button on the roof of his tool-house, among some leaves, which I have kept ever since. I went to Queen-square Office, and found Nicholson had the same sort of buttons on his breeches, and one was off. I cut another off, and produce them to shew they are the same. That found on the tool-house was without a shank - there was no shank left on his breeches.

JOSEPH COOPER . I apprehended Nicholson next morning, at the Crown public-house, in Pye-street; he denied the charge. A button was off the left knee of his breeches.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

SANDYFORD'S Defence. I was returning from Millbank, and went into the privy for a necessary purpose; the watchman came, and I shut the door to. I am innocent.

JOHN MOLE re-examined. Nobody could have got through the door to the privy.

NICHOLSON'S Defence. Gillmor has openly declared he would have my life. He has before this paid people to come here, to give evidence against me - I am innocent.

JAMES GILLMOR re-examined. I never said I would have his life, or any thing of the kind, nor did I ever pay people to give evidence against him. I have been sixteen years in my office, and defy the world to say I have said so.

NICHOLSON - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 25.

SANDYFORD - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 17.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18190421-5

505. JOHN JONES was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Groves , about eight o'clock in the night of the 28th of March , at St. John, the Evangelist, Westminster , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, five blankets, value 1 l.; two sheets, value 12 s.; one pair of boots, value 1 l.; one counterpane, value 2 s., and one shawl, value 1 s. , his property.

ELIZABETH GROVES . I am the wife of John Groves , who is a hackney coachman , and lives in Stretton-ground , in the parish of St. John the Evangelist, Westminster - he rents the whole house. The prisoner's father and mother lodged with me - they had two rooms on my first-floor. On Sunday, the 28th of March, I went out about a quarter before one o'clock, and bolted the parlour shutters with two bolts. I locked the room-door, and the street-door was shut - I left the prisoner's father and mother in the house. I returned about twenty minutes before eight o'clock at night, it was quite dark; I tried to open the street-door, but could not. A woman came by, and said she heard a smash of glass; I looked, and found the shutters had been opened, and the glass, and frame broken. I called out to Mumford that I had been robbed; he came with a light, and I saw the prisoner in the room. He said,

"Mrs. Groves, don't be alarmed, it is only me;" I unlocked the room-door, and he was taken into custody. The articles stated in the indictment were all tied up in the blanket, and laid at the foot of the bed, ready to be taken away - the sheets and blankets were taken off the bed. The property is worth above 4 l. - the prisoner's father is a coalheaver; they had lodged about six months with me. They were not at home - they did not come home until twelve o'clock that night.

JAMES WALLIS . On the 28th of March I went home with Groves about a quarter before eight o'clock at night - it was quite dark - she tried to unlock the door; a lady came by, and said, she heard a great smash of glass. We went to the window, and found the shutter forced open, and the window broken; I found a piece of a poker stuck in the door, I pulled it out, and then unlocked the door - we found the prisoner in the room; nobody came to the house until the officer came. I saw the bundle, tied in a blanket, at the foot of the bed - Mumford brought a candle.

BENJAMIN MUMFORD . I live next door to Groves; she called me. I went to her window with a light, found the shutters open, and the window broken. Somebody said that a man was in the room; I got a poker, went to the window, and saw the prisoner standing in the room. I put my hand through the window, and collared him, then got in at the window, and held him in the room, until the door was unlocked - the officer came. The bundle was at the foot of the bed - Pople took it.

GEORGE HARPER. I was at Mumford's house on this night; about twenty minutes before eight o'clock I heard glass smash, it appeard to be the window of the next house breaking - it was dark. In about ten minutes I heard Mrs. Groves call out that she was robbed, I immediately ran down to the parlour window, the shutters were open, and the glass and frame broken. My daughter brought me down a lamp, and I saw the prisoner in the room and the bundle. Mumford secured him.

ALFRED POPLE . I am an officer. I went to the house, and found the bundle by the parlour window - the prisoner was in the room, in Mumford's custody. I produce the poker which was put in the door, also a piece of the window-frame. The marks on the frame and shutter correspond with the poker.

THOMAS LEAR. I was passing by the house about half-past six o'clock, and saw the prisoner at the door - it was then light - he was trying the door with a key; he did not open it. I stopped to look at him; he saw me, crossed over, and looked up at the first-floor window. I left. I returned about eight o'clock, and met a little boy, who said there were thieves in the house. I found it broken open, and saw the prisoner there.

JOHN BIDY . I live about fifteen yards from the prosecutor's. I heard the alarm, and found the prisoner in Mumford's custody. Next day, as he was going before the magistrate, I heard a man say to him,

" Jack Jones ;" he said,

"who is there?" the man said

"Bob, the baker." The man said,

"stick to what I told you, and you will get through it."

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I went out, returned about seven o'clock, and saw two men standing at the window - they opened the shutters, and another man jumped out; I pursued, but could not catch them. I returned, saw the window

broken, and got in to see if any more were in the room; I sat down till Mrs. Groves came, and told her not to be alarmed.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 25.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

Reference Number: t18190421-6

506. EDWARD GIBBS was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Robert Smith , about eight o'clock in the night of the 1st of March , at St. James, Westminster , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein one coat, value 2 l., the goods of David Amey ; one coat, value 10 s., the goods of Luke Bew ; one coat, value 12 s., the goods of Robert Trimnell ; one pair of breeches, value 10 s., and one waistcoat, value 5 s. , the goods of John Fitch .

ELIZABETH SMITH . I live in Swallow-street, St. James', and am the wife of Robert Smith , who is a wine-porter . Amey, Bew, Fitch, and Trimnell, are postboys , and lodge in my first-floor front room - all sleep in the same room, in two beds. On the 1st of March, about half-past three o'clock in the afternoon, I made their beds, locked the door, and hung the key up in the shop; I keep a chandler's shop. The coats hung in the room; every thing was safe then. There is a passage leading to the stairs, without going through the shop; the door was left open till eleven o'clock. About eight o'clock I was alarmed, and found the staple of the lock forced aside; the staple was inside the door - it was dark. The prisoner's father and mother lodge with me; he himself lives about 100 yards off - each of the men have a key to the room. I missed all the things.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. Is there any communication between the shop and the passage - A. Yes, there is a door.

DAVID AMEY . I am a postboy, and lodge with the prosecutor. I left my room about half-past twelve o'clock in the morning, my things were then safe. I returned, and missed my coat, which was worth 25 s.

LUKE BEW . I lodge in the room. I returned with Amey, and missed my coat, which was worth 10 s.

JOHN FITCH . I lodge in the room; I left it safe about nine o'clock in the morning. I returned about a quarter after eight, and missed a pair of breeches, a waistcoat, and a handkerchief, which were worth 19 s.

ROBERT TRIMNELL . I left my room about ten o'clock, returned at night, and missed a coat worth 12 s.

JEREMIAH MAIDMENT . I am a patrol. On the 1st of March, I went into the Duke of Newcastle, public-house, Eagle-street, Seven Dials, about ten o'clock at night. The prisoner came in with another man, each had a bundle. I detained them, and examined the bundles, which contained the articles stated in the indictment.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. - DEATH . Aged 24.

Of stealing in the dwelling-house, but not of burglariously breaking and entering .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18190421-7

507. WILLIAM DEXTER was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of February , at St. George, Hanover-square , one watch, value 30 s.; one seal, value 10 s.; one key, value 1 s.; one coat, value 12 s.; one jacket, value 7 s.; two waistcoats, value 11 s.; one pair of braces, value 6 d.; one pair of breeches, value 12 s., and 4 s. in monies numbered, the property of Richard Nightingale , in the dwelling-house of Henry Dorman .

HENRY DORMAN . I keep the Sun, public-house, Chapel-street, Grosvenor-place, St. George's, Hanover-square . On the 3d of February, Nightingale slept at my house; the prisoner also slept there, but in a different room. I rose at six o'clock the next morning, found the door open, and the prisoner absconded. I went to bed at twelve o'clock, every thing was safe then. I was the last person up at night, and rose the first in the morning. Nightingale came down, and alarmed me; the prisoner left a coat and waistcoat behind him, which he formerly wore. He had been in the Lock Hospital in the name of White - he gave the name of Dexter at the office.

RICHARD NIGHTINGALE . I am a coachman. On the 3d of February, I slept at Dorman's house; I went to bed about eleven o'clock, got up about half-past six, and missed the property stated in the indictment, which were worth above 3 l. I went down, and informed Dorman. I have found my braces and waistcoat in possession of Pople, nothing else. I had no lock to my door.

ALFRED POPLE . I am an officer. I searched the prisoner in Tothil-fields, where he was committed on this charge. I found a waistcoat, and a pair of braces on him - he had turned the facing of the waistcoat under his coat, so that I could not see that he had one on.

THOMAS WHITING . I heard of this robbery about the latter end of February. On Saturday I was in Covent-garden at the time of the election. I saw the prisoner in the crowd, and gave him in charge, as I knew he was suspected of this robbery - he had the waistcoat and braces on at the time. I described the waistcoat to the prosecutor, and he said it must be his. Next morning I took the prisoner to Tothill-fields, he had no waistcoat on that I could see.

MARY DORMAN . I am the landlord's daughter. On the 3d of February, the prisoner slept at our house; he went to bed between nine and ten o'clock. He left his coat and waistcoat behind him when he went away; he had worn them the day before. He paid for his bed every night.

(The waistcoat and braces produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. They are mine.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 39.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

Reference Number: t18190421-8

508. STEPHEN VICKERS was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Edward Gale , at the parish of St. Luke, Chelsea , about four o'clock in the night of the 4th of April , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein 40 lbs. of mutton, value 38 s.; 16 lbs. of beef, value 13 s., and one knife, value 18 s. , the property of Edward Deeley .

EDWARD DEELEY . I am a butcher , and lodge in Earl-street , Chelsea, at Edward Gale 's house. On the 4th of April I got up about seven o'clock, found my shutters broken open, and 60 lbs. of meat gone. I found it at the watch-house - I keep the house.

Cross-examined by MR. ARABIN. I knew the meat again.

WILLIAM M'CABE. I am a watchman at Chelsea. About half-past four o'clock in the morning I heard a rattle sprung; the prisoner came towards me, and I stopped him. Two persons said, in his presence, that he threw a bundle into an area. I took him back, and found a bag in the area, containing the meat.

JAMES BALL . I saw the prisoner coming down Sloane-street, followed him, and saw him throw the bag over into an area. I told M'Cabe, and took the meat out of the area.

RICHARD MAYBANK . I am a constable. The prisoner was brought to the watch-house. I asked him where he lived? he said he had no home.

Prisoner's Defence. They did not find the meat on me.

GUILTY. Aged 50.

Of stealing only .

Confined Six Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18190421-9

509. GEORGE SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of February , twenty-four pair of stockings, value 2 l. , the goods of John Rogers and Richard Shaw ; and JOHN MIDDLETON was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, knowing them to have been stolen .

RICHARD SHAW . I am in partnership with John Rogers . We are hosiers , and live at Nottingham. On the 22d of February, I was in town, and put up at the Cross Keys, Wood-street . I saw these goods packed in a bag at the time; Burt sewed the bag up. About half-past six o'clock in the evening, they were put in the gallery, until Boots had an opportunity of taking them. About an hour after the prisoner, Smith, was taken, and told me he took the stockings out of the bag, and sold two dozen pair; there were two papers in the bag, and each contained two dozen pair. I went with the officer to Middleton's lodgings, at a court in Cannon-street, the night after Smith was taken, and found the property in two boxes.

ROBERT SANDERSON . I am foreman to Mr. Hall, at the Cross Keys. On the 22d of February I was going up stairs to the hayloft, and met Smith coming down stairs, from the gallery, with a paper parcel under his arm, like stockings; he was in my employ. I told the porter of it - Middleton was our porter.

THOMAS BURT . I am Boots at the Inn. Shaw delivered me the goods to take to Oxford-street. I put them in the gallery, while I went on an errand.

ZACHARIAH HILL . I am porter to Mr. Lodge, Oxford-street. Mr. Shaw sent us the stockings; two dozen pair were deficient.

JOHN STOCKS. I am an officer. On the 23d of February, I was fetched to the Cross Keys, and found the two prisoners in custody. We searched them, and found a key in Middleton's pocket, which he said was the key of his box, at his lodgings. We went there, and found two dozen pair of stockings in the box. He told us that we should find them there, and Smith told us that Middleton had got them.

MIDDLETON'S Defence. Smith brought them to me in Cheapside, and asked me to take care of them, as he had found them; next day I was taken, and told this to the officer.

RICHARD SHAW . Nothing of the kind passed.

SMITH - GUILTY . Aged 25.

MIDDLETON - GUILTY . Aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190421-10

510. CHARLES THOMPSON and WILLIAM GUYER were indicted for stealing, on the 2d of March , one pair of shoes, value 5 s. , the goods of Alexander Wilson .

THOMAS VINCENT . I am shopman to Alexander Wilson , who is a shoemaker , and lives on Holborn-hill . On the 2d of March, about eleven o'clock in the morning, the prisoners came to buy a pair of shoes for Thompson; while I was attending to Thompson I saw Guyer take two pair off the shelf, and put one pair into his pocket; he then said,

"We will go into the lane below, and see if we can get a second-hand pair." I told my master, and he sent for an officer, who came as Thompson was trying his shoe on - he stopped them as they were going out, and found the shoes in Guyer's pocket.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

THOMPSON'S Defence. I was trying a pair. I did not take them.

GUYER'S Defence. I took them unknown to Thompson.

GUYER - GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

THOMPSON - NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190421-11

511. CATHERINE M'CABE was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of March , one coat, value 30 s. , the goods of John Park .

JOHN PARK . I am an engraver , and live in Aldersgate-street . On the 17th of March, I heard something fall in my first-floor bed-room, I went down, and found the prisoner standing by the table. I fastened her in the room, and got an officer. We went up stairs, and found her on the floor with the coat on her back, and all the bedclothes on the floor. She appeared rather intoxicated; she said she was travelling from Colnbrook.

WILLIAM TAYLOR . I am an officer. I found the prisoner in the room, under the clothes, and the coat on her back. She had wrapped herself in the blankets; she struck me, and gave me a bloody nose.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was drunk.

GUILTY . Aged 54.

Confined One Year .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190421-12

512. THOMAS COLVIN was indicted for stealing on the 14th of April , one handkerchief, value 3 s., the goods of James Gaisford , from his person .

JAMES GAISFORD . On Wednesday evening last, about nine o'clock, I was on Holborn Bridge . I felt somebody at my pocket, turned round, and seized the prisoner with my handkerchief in his hand - there was another boy with him.

WILLIAM SHUTER . The prisoner was brought to the

watch-house; he said he did not know how he got the handkerchief.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I beg for mercy.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190421-13

513. MARGARET CLARKE was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of March , 8 1/2 yards of lace, value 19 s. , the goods of George Vipond .

THOMAS TEASDALE . I am shopman to Mr. George Vipond , who is a linen-draper , and lives on Ludgate-hill . On the 30th of March, about twelve o'clock in the morning, the prisoner came to the shop, and wanted to match a piece of lace; Mr. Vipond was serving two customers at the time - we could not match the lace. I showed her some more; she put her silk handkerchief on the counter, and shook it several times, which made me suspect her. I took the lace-box away, and showed her several cards of lace, and one loose piece - she did not like them. I turned to get more, from the window, but kept my eye on her, and saw her take a piece of lace off the counter very quick, and put it into her shawl. I turned round, and missed the loose piece of lace. She said she would call some other day, and wanted to be going. She went to the door, and looked at something there. She kept moving her hand about her pocket; I thought she was putting it in, and let her go out, then took her by the arms, and brought her back. I sent for a constable, who came and searched her, but found nothing on her. The lace was produced by my brother, who said he found it where she stood. She bought a yard of edging, which came to 3 1/2 d.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. How long was she in the shop - A. About a quarter of an hour. I held her hands down, to prevent her throwing any thing away while I had got her.

JOSEPH TEASDALE . I found the lace on the floor, after the prisoner was taken into the back-room; it was not there before she passed.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I never had the lace.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190421-14

514. ABRAHAM MORRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of March , one tea-spoon, value 1 s. , the goods of Richard Wright .

HENRY PIERCE . I am waiter to Mr. Richard Wright , who keeps the Four Swans tavern , Bishopsgate-street . On the 4th of March, between three and four o'clock, the prisoner came to the coffee-room, and had a glass of rum and water; I took him a silver tea-spoon with it - he paid me for it. He went out, and took the spoon with him. I ran out, overtook him on the opposite side of the way, and he gave me the spoon from up his sleeve.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was in distress.

GUILTY . Aged 52.

Confined Two Months .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190421-15

515. THOMAS GARDINER was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of February , 5 1/2 coach-wheel tiers, value 2 l. 10 s. , the property of Thomas William Leathwick .

THOMAS WILLIAM LEATHWICK . I am a coachmaker , and live in Aldersgate-street; the prisoner was my labourer , but not at this time. On the 24th of February, I missed these tiers, and found them at Newman's. I had the prisoner secured.

SAMUEL NEWMAN . I keep an old iron-shop, in Cow-cross. The prisoner sold me the tiers on the 23d of February; he said they were his own, and told me where he lived.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I did not sell him those.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190421-16

516. JOHN BOWEN was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of March , one bottle, value 1 s.. and two gallons of rum, value 1 l. 14 s. , the property of Nicholas Dennys and James Sheppard .

NICHOLAS DENNYS . I am a wine-merchant , and live in Crutched-friars; I am in partnership with James Sheppard . On the 27th of March the prisoner came to the counting-house, and produced a paper, which he stated to be an order from Messrs. Vardon and Son, Gracechurch-street, for two gallons of rum. As I did not know him, I told my clerk to tell him it should be sent, but we must get a permit. He went away, returned in a few minutes, and said Mr. Vardon was in a great hurry, was waiting to take it in his carriage into the country, and we need not wait to get a permit. I said we must for our own security, but the rum should be there immediately - he went away. The porter was sent with the rum, he got it from the porter.

MR. HUGH JAMES VARDON . I live in Gracechurch-street; the prisoner was once our servant. The order was not sent by any one in our service. I never authorized him to fetch the rum. He left me on the 11th of March.

FRANCIS ROLPH . I am porter to the prosecutors. I was taking the rum to Mr. Vardon's, the prisoner came up to me in Billiter-square, said he had been three times after it, and he would take it. Knowing him to be the man who brought the order, I delivered it to him.

JOHN CLARKE . On the 27th of March I stopped the prisoner in Union-street, with the rum on his shoulder.

(Bottle sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was out of employ .

GUILTY . Aged 36.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190421-17

517. JANE GRIFFIN was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of March , one watch, value 30 s. , the property of Henry Fosbrook .

HENRY FOSBROOK . I am a hostler , and live in Prince's-court, Moor-lane . The prisoner was employed to assist my wife to wash. I lost my watch out of my drawer, and found it in pledge at Walter's.

JOHN WALTER . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Goswell-street. The prisoner pledged the watch with me.

JOHN WALTER . I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner; she said as she had made the bed she must lay on it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was intoxicated.

GUILTY . Aged 43.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190421-18

518. RICHARD HILL was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of March , 8 lbs. of bacon, value 5 s. , the property of Thomas Brown .

CHARLES BROWN . I am servant to Thomas Brown , who is a cheesemonger , and lives in Grafton-street. On the 29th of March, about eight o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner take the bacon from outside the window. I followed, and secured him - he dropped it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was in great distress.

GUILTY. Aged 15.

Judgment Respited .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190421-19

519. SARAH COLLINS was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of March , one watch, value 1 l.; one ribbon, value 1 d., and one seal, value 6 d., the goods of James Adlard , from his person .

JAMES ADLARD. I am a tailor , and live at Pimlico. On the 15th of March, about eleven o'clock at night, I turned out of Pall-Mall , to go into the Park , in my way home. Three men came along, who appeared in a bustle; I made way for them - they just brushed me. At that time the prisoner caught hold of my right arm, and asked me to go with her? I said,

"No - I have no money, it is money you want, and not me;" she said I had got a trifle. By this time we had got through the narrow entrance, by the chapel, she let go my arm, as I thought to leave me, and then snatched my watch, and ran off to the men, as hard as she could; I followed her, she was stopped by a guard. I saw the men push her,; my watch was not found, but I am certain she snatched it. I never lost sight of her.

Prisoner's Defence. He wanted me to go with him, I refused, and he called Stop thief!

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190421-20

520. GEORGE FERRIES was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Mead , about four o'clock in the afternoon, of the 23d of February , at St. Giles's in the Fields (he and others of his family being therein), and stealing therein six pencil cases, value 4 s. , his property.

WILLIAM MEAD . I am a jeweller , and live in Great Queen-street, Lincoln's-inn-fields , in the parish of St Giles's. On the 23d of February, between four and five o'clock in the afternoon, my daughter called me out of the back-shop to the front. I found a pane of glass broken, and quite out; it had been cracked sometime before, but was quite safe before this. I missed the articles stated in the indictment out of the window, which are worth about 5 s. The prisoner was brought into the shop in a very few minutes by Taylor, who produced them, also two pair of knee-buckles, and two fruit-knives, which were mine, but I had not missed them.

JOHN TAYLOR . I live in Great Queen-street, about six doors, from Mr. Mead. On the 23d of February, between four and five o'clock in the afternoon, I saw three boys run by my shop. Suspecting them, I pursued, and overtook them in Drury-lane; the prisoner was one - I saw him put his hand into his pocket as he was running. I secured him, and took six pencil cases out of his pocket; I took him to the shop, and gave them to Mead. While I stood with the prisoner, a woman came up, and gave me two pair of silver buckles, and two silver double-bladed fruit-knives, which she said were thrown into a passage; she shewed me the passage, which was between the shop, and where I took him - the other boys got away in the crowd. I had seen them lurking about the shop all the afternoon, which made me suspect them.

Prisoner. Q. Did I not pick them up - A. No, I was close behind him, and must have seen it if he did. It was a very dirty day, and they were quite clean. He had a dark green ragged coat on, and a ragged apron.

WILLIAM HENRY PARTRIDGE. I live in Orange-street, Red-Lion-square. I was passing Mead's shop, between four and five o'clock in the afternoon, and saw three boys close together, leaning on the window-ledge of his shop; I passed them, and turned back to look at them. One of them turned and saw me; he informed the rest, and then all turned round, and ran away. The middle one took his hand out of a hole in the glass, which was large enough to admit his arm; he had a great quantity of silver articles in his hand. The other two snatched them out of his hand, and all three ran off together. I only saw their backs, and will not swear the prisoner was one; when he was taken he had a blue ragged coat on, and a short ragged apron, the dress that one of them had. I saw him at the watch-house that day, he had the same dress on then, which enables me to say he is one of them. It was one of the others that took the things out of the window; they were all acting together - I saw some pencil cases taken out. I had seen the prisoner about a week before, in company with the boy who put his hand into the window, he had the same dress on. I think his coat was blue, but it was so dirty that I could hardly judge. I knew his dress when I saw him at the watch-house.

THOMAS COOK . I am an officer. The prisoner was given into my charge by Mead, with the property.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I saw the boys running along, and picked the things up.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 15.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

Reference Number: t18190421-21

521. GEORGE GWATKINS was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of

Thomas Henry Deakin , about seven o'clock in the night of the 14th of March , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, four gowns, value 6 s.; two pincloths, value 6 d.; one pair of stays, value 6 d.; one sheet, value 1 s., and two waistcoats, value 3 s., his property .

THOMAS HENRY DEAKIN. I live in Kingsland-road . On Sunday, the 14th of March, I went to take a walk with my wife between two and three o'clock in the afternoon. We returned about seven o'clock in the evening - it was nearly dark. I tried, but could not unlock the door, as there was something in the lock; I tried again, and the key went in all of a sudden, when two men opened the door, and ran out. I instantly seized them both - the prisoner was one; he struck me on the head with something which cut my head through my hat. Both hit me several times; the blow stunned me, and the blood ran dow my face, I staggered, caught hold of the wall, and they ran off. The prisoner turned round, and said

"He is done for." I instantly recovered myself, and pursued. A man caught the prisoner, and I immediately seized him, and brought him back to my house. On my taking him back, he dropped a telescope, which was mine; I had left it on the table. He also dropped a dark lanthorn - I lost the articles stated in the indictment.

Cross-examined by MR. PLATT. Q. Where did he drop the telescope - A. At the door.

ELLEN DEAKIN. I went out with my husband. I followed the men, who rushed out of the house; they blew the candle out. The prisoner was never out of my sight, until he was taken - I am certain he was one of them; they struck my husband on the head. All the drawers were broken open and emptied, and the articles stated in the indictment gone.

JOSHUA ARMSTRONG . I am an officer. I examined the house, and found it completely sacked from top to bottom, and every thing tied up, ready to be taken away. It must have taken a long time to do it.

GUILTY. Aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

Of stealing only .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18190421-22

522. JOSEPH EDMONDS was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of March , at St Mary, Islington , 50 yards of carpet, value 6 l., the property of Daniel Edward Colston , in his dwelling-house .

DANIEL EDWARD COLSTON . I am an upholsterer , and live in Duncan-place, City-road, in the parish of St. Mary, Islington . On the 31st of March, about ten o'clock, the carpet was safe; the prisoner was brought back with it between one and two o'clock - it is worth above 6 l. I knew nothing of the transaction.

ELIZABETH MONEY . I am servant to Mr. Colston. On the 31st of March, between one and two o'clock in the day, a person rang at the bell; I opened the door, and found the prisoner there. He asked if we wanted a hand in the upholstery line? I never saw him before; I told him I would go and ask. I went out of the shop into the private passage, leaving the prisoner alone in the shop. I called to my master, who was in the yard, and he told me to tell the man to leave his address. When I came back the prisoner was gone, and I missed a piece of carpet, which was safe when I left the shop, on a set of dining-tables. I ran out, turned the corner, and saw the prisoner with the carpet on his shoulder; he was stopped by Porter before I got up; I had not called out. When I got up, he took the carpet off his shoulder with his hands, and said he would take it back. I left him with Porter, and ran back to tell my master.

JOSEPH PORTER . I keep a fruiterer's shop opposite the prosecutor's. On the 31st of March, I heard a man had stolen a piece of carpet, and saw the prisoner turning the corner with it, running! I followed him, and secured him with it on his shoulder. He brought it back, and put it in the prosecutor's shop.

FRANCIS FAGAN . I am an officer. I took the prisoner into custody.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 28.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

Reference Number: t18190421-23

523. ELIZABETH EDWARDS and CAROLINE SMEED were indicted for stealing, on the 10th of April , two pair of ear-rings, value 44 s., the property of Samuel Jefferson , privately in his shop .

JANE LOXLEY. I assist in Mr. Samuel Jefferson 's shop, he is a jeweller , and lives in St. Martin's-court . On the 10th of April, between five and six o'clock, the prisoners came to the shop, and desired to look at the glass of earrings; I put it on the counter. While Edwards was looking at them, Smeed broke a glass on the counter, about three quarters of a yard from the rings. She asked what it came to, offered a 1 l. note, and paid 6 s. for it - Mrs. Jefferson gave her change. Immediately after the glass was broken, we missed two pair of ear-rings out of the case which Edwards was looking at. I said I was certain they were there half an hour before. She said it was unpleasant that it should happen while she was in the shop; she ordered things amounting to 5 l. 14 s. She selected some-before, and some after this. She said she had no money, but wished the things to be sent to No. 28, New-street, Minories, to Mr. E. Jones, and left 2 s. as a deposit. The circumstances altogether made me suspect them, and I said it was very strange. They said did I suspect them? I said it was a delicate thing to suspect a customer, but I must acknowledge that I could not help it. Mrs. Jefferson said if they suffered our man to take the goods with them, and they paid for them, if they lived where they said they did, it would clear our suspicions; the man went with them - they neither consented or refused. He brought them back in about half an hour; they said they came back, being disappointed in receiving some money in the Strand. We again spoke of the ear-rings; Edwards said,

"If you suspect me, search me," but they both felt themselves hurt, and much insulted. They gave me 1 l. more as a deposit on the things ordered, and then went away. In about ten minutes Gook, the officer, brought Smeed back, and produced a paper. I said it was a paper on which the lowest pair of ear-rings were. He turned to Smeed, and said,

"Now where are the ear-rings?" He then took a handkerchief from her hand, and in one corner were both pair tied up. Edwards was brought back by Glasborough, but nothing was found on her. We afterwards

missed three more pair of ear-rings, which have never been found.

MRS. FRANCES JEFFERSON . I was in the shop, Loxley has spoken correctly. I did not see them taken, but I thought I saw Edwards put her hand towards her pocket, which made me suspect her.

WILLIAM GLOVER . I am porter to Mr. Jefferson. I went after the prisoners; they turned into Castle-street, not towards the Minories - they turned back into Cecil-court. I stopped them in Cecil-court, and asked them to come back? they asked what for, and said they knew where they were going to, and went into Charles-street, stopped there, and one said to the other, that she had money, and could pay for the things if it was agreeable. They gave me 10 s. in the street, and said I might depend upon it they should come for the things. I followed them down Castle-street to the Admiralty Office; they went into the office, came out in a few minutes, and said the gentleman they was going to receive some money of, had been gone half an hour, and they could not receive it till Monday, and if I would bring them on Monday, they would pay for them. I said I should be much obliged to them to go back to the shop, which they did; and as I came up Castle-street, I saw Gook, the constable, and gave him a signal to follow me. I told him to wait at the door - the prisoners went into the shop.

THOMAS GOOK . I am a constable. I saw the prisoners go into the shop with Glover, and come out, I followed. They turned backwards and forwards, up different streets. They turned into a public-house in Green-street, and I left Glasborough to watch, while I returned to the prosecutor's to learn the particulars. As I returned I met Smeed alone; Glasborough was following her. He put a paper into my hand. I took hold of her, and said,

"Now where are the ear-rings?" she said she had not got them, and knew nothing about them. She appeared to be shuffling with her left hand; I told her to hold it still. I took her back to the shop, and Loxley identified the paper - I found the ear-rings in the corner of her handkerchief. I sent Glasborough for Edwards - he brought her in five minutes.

THOMAS GLASBOROUGH . I was left to watch the prisoners at the public-house in Green-street - they called for half a pint of beer; Smeed came out in a minute, and I followed her. About the middle of Castle-street, she tore something from the middle of a paper, and threw the paper down. I picked it up, and gave it to Gook, whom I met. I returned and found Edwards still in the public-house, drinking; I took her back to the shop.

MRS. FRANCES JEFFERSON re-examined. I knew the paper - it has my hand-writing on it.

EDWARDS'S Defence. I know nothing of the rings.

SMEED'S Defence. I am a foreigner; I went with my husband, who is in the German Legion, to receive his pension. I drank too much, and went with Edwards, who persuaded me to go and buy some shoes, and after that to the prosecutor's. I leant on the counter, and broke a glass. I left the shop, taking a handkerchief, which I thought was mine, not knowing what it contained - it was Edwards's handkerchief.

JANE LOXLEY re-examined. Smeed had a basket in her hand - I did not see the handkerchief.

MRS. FRANCES JEFFERSON re-examined. I thought I saw the same handkerchief in her hand at the time the glass was broken, but I am not certain.

EDWARDS - GUILTY. Aged 34.

SMEED - GUILTY. Aged 44.

Of stealing, but not privately .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18190421-24

524. ELIZABETH EDWARDS and CAROLINE SMEED were again indicted for stealing, on the 10th of April , at St. Martin's in the Fields , three pair of women's shoes, value 20 s., the goods of Thomas Rodwell , privately in his shop .

ELLEN WATTS . I am shopwoman to Mr. Thomas Rodwell , who is a shoemaker , and lives at the corner of St. Martin's-court and Castle-street , in the parish of St. Martin's in the Fields. On the 10th of April, about five o'clock in the afternoon, the two prisoners came into the shop - Edwards asked for some childrens' shoes, she bought a pair for 4 s. 9 d. - Smeed was with her. The prisoner, Edwards, gave me two half-crowns and three-pence, I gave her 6 d. Edwards sported some frivolous conversation, which I noticed - they went away together. About nine o'clock the same evening, Gook, the constable, brought the children's shoes to me which Edwards had bought - I knew them to be those which I had sold her. About twenty minutes after ten o'clock, Gook came again with a basket, which contained three other pair of shoes, which I knew to be ours by the private mark - they were on a shelf at the back of the shop; I had dusted them that morning - I had not sold them; they were worth 1 l. Edwards was quite away from that part of the shop, but Smeed was not. No person was in the shop but the prisoners and myself. They did not appear to be intoxicated.

THOMAS GOOK . I found a pair of children's boots in the prisoner, Edwards's, pocket, when I took her on the other charge. I asked Edwards where she lived? she said, at No. 18, New-street, St. James's - she did not say she lived in the Minories. I went there to inquire, and found she did not live there. I knew her before, and was certain she did not live there. I found the basket at the watch-house in her possession - there were three pairs of shoes in it. Smeed had been committed before this. I went to Rodwell's.

THOMAS GLASBOROUGH. Smeed had the basket when I first saw them. I do not know how it got into Edwards's possession.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

EDWARDS'S Defence. Smeed gave me the basket at the watch-house when I was discharged.

SMEED'S Defence. The basket is mine - it was empty when I was taken.

EDWARDS - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 34.

SMEED - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 44.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18190421-25

525. JOHN HARRIS and CHARLES ELLIOTT were indicted for feloniously assaulting Robert Rowland Willan , on the King's highway, on the 4th of April , at St. Mary, Islington , putting him in fear, and taking from his

person, and against his will, one watch, value 5 l.; one seal, value 16 s., and one watch-key, value 4 s. his property .

ROBERT ROWLAND WILLAN . I am a mason , and live in Pierpoint-lane, Islington. On Sunday evening, the 4th of April, I was at the Nag's Head, Islington, with George Hill - we had a glass of gin each, and left the house ten minutes before ten o'clock - we had not staid in the house above two minutes. Immediately we came out of the house, Hill was knocked down by a gang of about a dozen men, who were coming along as we came out. I went to pick him up - they came up, and asked me what I had to do with it? One of them knocked me down, and I immediately missed my watch out of my fob. I took one of them into custody, and gave him in charge to the watchman - it was Elliott - they took him to the watch-house. They knocked me down first. The watchman came up, and assisted me in securing him. The rest of the gang ran off, and did not attempt to rescue him. I did not see the prisoner, Harris, among them. The gang all assisted each other, and were of the same party. They attacked me on the pavement, hustled me about, and knocked me down. My watch was safe just before. It had a key and seal to it.

GEORGE HILL . I am a bricklayer. I was in company with Willan. We called at the Nag's Head, had a glass of gin each, and came out directly. When we got about three steps from the door, we were met by a gang of ten or a dozen men - they pushed against my left shoulder. I made way for them to pass, and said,

"Halloo, my lads, what is that for?" Immediately as I said the words, I was knocked down. Willan came to my assistance, picked up my hat, put it on my head, and helped me up. The prisoner, Harris, came up to Willan, and shoved him back - I saw him draw his hand off. Willan immediately said,

"George, I have lost my watch!" I know Harris to be the man by his dress and his hair. He had a light drab great-coat on, and a small-brimmed hat. Next morning I sent Willan to Lack to give information and to describe him. He was apprehended with two others that morning. I went to the Nag's Head and saw him in custody of Lack, and pointed him out from two other immediately. I said,

"This is the man who had the watch" - he said,

"So help me G - d, you are wrong!" I am sure he is the man - I took particular notice of him. He said he was elsewhere that night.

Cross-examined by MR. BOLLAND. I had been with Willan all day - we only drank a glass of gin. We had a pot of half-and-half at another house in the afternoon, Harris drove the prosecutor back, face to face, several paces.

Q. Then he had a better opportunity of observing him than you had - A. They were close together. I saw no watch in his hand, but the moment I saw Harris draw his hand up Willan said he had lost his watch. He was apprehended next day at the very spot where the robbery was committed, and said he was in Drury-lane at the time.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not say at the office that you was drunk - A. No.

SAMUEL LACK . I am a constable of Bow-street. I received information, and went in search of the prisoner, Harris. On Monday, the 5th of April, between nine and ten o'clock in the morning, I saw him about two hundred yards from the watch-house, in company with another man, they were leaning against some railing, talking together. I watched them till they got near the watch-house - they then joined a third man. Harris left them, and sat himself down on the railing of the watch-house, close to the door. I sent for Willan and Hill. All three were then coming down together from the watch-house. I followed them into the Nag's Head - I then told them that I took them into custody, and put them into the tap-room. The landlord, the man-servant, and another person were there. Willan and Hill came; I told them to go into the room, and see if there was anybody there they knew - I followed them in. Hill instantly said,

"This is the man who robbed Willan of his watch" - pointing to the prisoner, Harris. They both said they did not know the other men, and they went away - I kept Harris. I had told him he was suspected of robbing a man of his watch the night before. He asked me what time? I said I did not know. He said he was at home and in bed at ten o'clock, in Drury-lane; and if he had been guilty of the robbery, he would have seen me b - d before I should have taken him.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he say he was at home going to bed, or that he was in bed - A. I do not know.

HARRIS'S Defence. I can prove I was not near the place.

ELLIOTT'S Defence. I was returning home, and saw the mob - the prosecutor laid hold of me, struck me, and gave me in charge. He was very much intoxicated.

WILLIAM OWENS . I live in Dudley-court, Silver-street, Falcon-square, and am writing-clerk to a surveyor. I know Harris by sight. On Sunday, the 4th of April, I went to Mr. Branden's, who lodges at No. 8, Charles-street, Drury-lane, for some money which he owed me - I saw Harris there, sitting in a chair by the fireside - it was about quarter of an hour or twenty minutes before ten o'clock when I got there - I was there about five minutes, I went straight home, and got there about twenty minutes after ten. I have no doubt of his being the man who was there. I went to Clerkenwell prison on Tuesday morning to see him, and am sure he is the man.

JAMES WHITE . I am servant to Mr. Foster, who keeps the Coach and Horses, public-house, in Drury-lane. I know Harris by sight - he lodges in that neighbourhood. I serve beer at his lodgings, No. 8, Charles-street. On Sunday, the 4th of April, about ten o'clock at night, I took some beer to that house - it was Palm Sunday. I saw Harris sitting reading a book by the fireside - it was within a minute or two of ten o'clock.

COURT. Q. What reason have you for knowing that it was that night - A. It being Palm Sunday. I have seen him on other nights.

HARRIS - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 21.

ELLIOTT - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 22.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

Reference Number: t18190421-26

526. RICHARD CHAPMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of March , at St. George , one milk-pot, value 20 s.; four table-spoons, value 40 s.; six tea-spoons, value 20 s. two salt-spoons, value 2 s.; one pair of sugar-tongs, value 3 s.; one brooch, value 2 s.; one handkerchief, value 2 s.; two shawls, value 3 s.; one gown, value

3 s., and two cloaks, value 3 s., the goods of Edward Cable , in the dwelling-house of Robert Chapman .

EDWARD CABLE . I am a labourer at the London Docks . On the 15th of March, I lived at Robert Chapman 's house, in the parish of St. George in the East - he is the prisoner's father; I rented two rooms there. I went to work about half-past seven o'clock in the morning; I always left my room in charge of his father and mother. I returned, between four and five o'clock, found a drawer in my bed-room open, and missed the articles stated in the indictment, which are worth 15 l.

GEORGE HENRY IVE . I am servant to Mr. Beecham, who is a pawnbroker, and lives in Holborn. On the 15th of March, about five o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner pledged a milk-pot with me for 1 l., in the name of Cunningham - I am certain he is the man.

ALEXANDER MILNE . I am shopman to Mr. Fleming, who is a pawnbroker, and lives in Newgate-street. On the 15th of March, about four o'clock, the prisoner pledged two table-spoons with me, for 1 l. (they are worth 24 s.) in the name of Cunningham. I am sure he is the man.

JOHN BENNETT . I am apprentice to Mr. Brooks, who is a pawnbroker, and lives in High-street, St. Giles's. On the the 15th of March, about the middle of the day, a gown was pledged with me in the name of Cunningham, for 7 s. I believe the prisoner to be the man.

RICHARD REEVE . I am a marshalman. I apprehended the prisoner at a brothel on the 16th of March, at ten o'clock at night, in Prior's-place, Dover-street, Borough. I found six tea-spoons, two silver salt-spoons, and a pair of sugar-tongs in his breeches-pocket.

GEORGE WELFARE . I assisted in securing the prisoner, and found duplicates of the property produced, on him; I also found a brooch on him. As I was taking him to the Compter, I told him there were other things missing; he gave me the handkerchief off his neck, and said it belonged to them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I beg for mercy.

GUILTY. - DEATH . Aged 18.

Recommended to Mercy .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18190421-27

527. DANIEL FRANCIS REEVES was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Benjamin Blakesley , about one o'clock in the night of the 4th of March , in the parish of St. John the Evangelist , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein one umbrella, value 3 s.; one pocket-book, value 1 s.; one pair of scissars, value 2 s.; one comb, value 1 s.; two knives, value 2 s.; twelve brass scutcheons, value 1 s; one brass hook, value 1 d., and the sum of 1 l. 10 s. 4 d., in monies numbered, his property .

BENJAMIN BLAKESLEY . I am a packing-case-maker , and rent a house, No. 47, Friday-street , in the parish of St. John the Evangelist. On Thursday the 4th of March, I went to bed about twelve o'clock - the doors and windows were all fast. I was awoke about three o'clock in the morning, before daylight, and found the cellar-door forced open; there were the marks of an instrument by the bolt, which was wrenched up - it was not so the night before. I found the counting-house had been entered by a pane of glass being taken out, and the lock of the counting-house-door picked withinside. The pane of glass was large enough for a man to get through; every thing was safe the night before. The prisoner was apprehended two days after; he had formerly lived with me as errand-boy, but did not sleep in the house.

GEORGE JERWOOD . I am constable of Bread-street. On the 4th of March I was on duty as night constable; between three and four o'clock, the patrol informed me that the prosecutor's cellar-door was open. I went and found it so; anybody could then enter the house. We alarmed the house, and went into the cellar to look for the thief, but could find nobody there. I found a pen and ink and a bayonet in the cellar, and on the privy I found a piece of candle, which appeared lately to have been put out. I lit it, and searched further, and by the door of the wine cellar I found a chisel; this door had been attempted, and the marks matched the chisel. I went up to the counting-house, and found a pane of glass broken, sufficient for a man's body to enter; there was an iron chest in the cupboard, which appeared to have been attempted, and by it I found a hammer, which had been broken, and a punch. A screw was forced out of the door of the chest, and driven in; a person must have been a long time about it - it was quite dark when I went in. Two drawers in the counting-house were also broken open, and a door, which enclosed a nest of small drawers. Mr. Blakesley missed some silver, and some halfpence; he could not say how much; he missed a silk umbrella, and a deal box, containing two soldiers jackets. On Saturday, the 6th of March, I apprehended the prisoner in Dover-street, Blackfriars-road, about seven o'clock in the evening. He asked me what I took him for? I said Mr. Blakesley wanted to speak to him; I took a silk umbrella out of his hand, which Blakesley claimed. I found 2 s. on him, seventeen scutcheons, and a hook, which were also claimed.

CHRISTMAS WINTER. I am a watchman; the prosecutor's house is in my beat. I came on duty about nine o'clock, and examined the doors and shutters of all the premises; every thing was then safe. I examined every thing again at two o'clock, and all were safe - I left my beat at four. About a quarter after three, the prisoner came to me in Friday-street, and asked me if I could tell him where to get a coach. A coachman had put down a fare at the Saracen's Head at the time. It was about 100 yards from the prosecutor's door; I told him there was one, and called the coachman. He asked where it was to go to? the prisoner told him to turn, and go to the bottom of Little Friday-street, and he would go and get his box - I never saw him before but I noticed him particularly; his back was very white, as if he had been against a wall. I suspected him, and thought I would get my lanthorn, and see where he got the box from. While I was getting my lanthorn I lost sight of him, but I had taken the number of the coach - it was 377. I went down Little Friday-street with the coach; the driver asked where the man was who wanted the coach? while I was talking to him, the prisoner came from behind me; I had my back towards the prosecutor's house - he came out of there. He said to the coachman

"it is not this corner of Friday-street, it is the other, which is next to Bread-street." He went away with the coach - St. Paul's clock struck half-past three. I went and called

the hour, and examined all the doors, but not the lower shutters. I came back to the corner of Watling-street, and saw the cellar-door wide open. It must have been broken open before that.

Q. Did you see the prisoner come out of the prosecutor's door - A. No, but he came from the door. I gave the alarm at the watch-house, as I found the cellar-door forced - Jerwood came down; they had entered by forcing the cellar open. There was a little narrow passage by the wine-cellar, which would have whitened a man's coat, if he had been there. I found the premises as Jerwood has stated. I described the prisoner to Mr. Blakesley, and searched for him on the Saturday morning. I found the coachman, and he told me where he drove him to, and went with me and Tulley to look for him. Tulley told me if he spoke to a man, and called him

"Danny," I was to notice if he was the man. We met the prisoner in Dover-street; Tully called him

"Danny," I was positive he was the man that I saw - he was secured. I went up to him, and asked him if he knew me? he said,

"Who are you?" I said

"don't you recollect seeing me yesterday morning, between three and four o'clock, in Friday-street?" he made no answer - he had an umbrella in his hand. I saw the things found on him.

HENRY EAST. I am a coachman, and drive No. 377. On Friday morning, I was in Friday-street, and saw the last witness; he looked at my number. I heard a man asking him if he could get a coach. The man ordered me to follow him down the street, which I did, to the end of Little Friday-street. I waited there about five minutes, and then he said it was the other end - the prisoner is the man, I am confident. He went away, and came again presently with a box on his shoulder; I noticed that the back of his coat was dusty and white, as if he had been rubbing against a wall. He directed me to Francis-street, Westminster-road, by the Bridge and the Obelisk. As we were going along the Blackfriars-road, he pulled the string, and told me to set him down at the next turning beyond Dover-street; he got out there, and I saw him go through a passage into Dover-street - he left the box in the coach. He returned, and asked me what I would take him to Peckham for? we could not agree about it, and he ordered me to Francis-street again. In going along he ordered me to drive to the Coburg Theatre; he got out at the corner of the Theatre, walked some distance, and called me to follow him with the coach; he took the box out, and left me near the Theatre - I had a good opportunity of observing him. He afterwards came back, and rode on the box with me to Dover-street; I had a full view of his person - I cannot be mistaken. Next day I showed the constable the different places I drove him to.

JOHN TULLEY . I work for the prosecutor, and know the prisoner. He was discharged about three years ago. I heard of the burglary the next morning, and the description of the man, and went after the prisoner; we found him in Dover-street - Winter saw him, and remembered him. I spoke to him, and Winter said he was the man that he saw in Friday-street; I gave him in charge, and told him that my master wanted to speak to him. When we got out of Dover-street, I told him he was suspected of breaking the house open - he said nothing to the charge. He asked me to let him have some drink; we went into a house in Fleet-market, and he had some rum and water; I did not see any thing drop from him. I went away, and on my return was told he had dropped a pocket-book.

JOHN HARMER . On Saturday evening, about a quarter after eight o'clock, I saw the prisoner in custody at the Artichoke, in Fleet-market - he passed me as he was going out; the constable had hold of him at the time. He put his head close to mine, and asked me to pick up a pocketbook, which he had dropped - it was just behind him - the persons who held him, could not hear him, I should think. I picked it up as soon as he was gone out, and kept it until Sunday evening, I then heard of the charge, and delivered it to Mr. Blakesley. He described every thing that it contained, before he saw it; I then delivered it to him.

MR. BLAKESLEY re-examined. I am certain the umbrella is mine, I saw it safe in the counting-house the day of the robbery. There are seventeen scutcheons and the brass hook, the same pattern as those I lost, but I will not swear to them; they are the same pattern as those which are left behind. They were in the nest of drawers in the counting-house, which has a door to cover them, and which was broken open. The pocket-book is mine, and was taken out of a drawer under the desk, which was forced. Harmer brought it to me on Sunday. I know it by the contents, which are a map, papers, and other things, which are mine. There are papers in it which are not mine - they have writing upon them which appear to be the prisoner's hand-writing, as far as I can judge, and a discharge from the army, in the prisoner's name. I have heard he was in the army.

Prisoner. I throw myself on the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 21.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190421-28

528. CHARLOTTE GRIFFITHS was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of April , 164 yards of fustian, value 14 l. 16 s.; ten yards of pocketing, value 15 s.; eleven yards of cotton, value 1 l. 16 s.; twenty-five yards of cotton, value 30 s.; thirty-seven yards of velveteen, value 3 l., and ten yards of cotton velvet, value 30 s. , the goods of George Frederick Barry .

ANN BARRY . I am the wife of George Frederick Barry, who lives in Cloth-fair , and is a piecebroker . On the 15th of April I left my shop in care of the prisoner - her father lodged in my second-floor. I returned, measured my goods, and found eight yards and a half of cotton cut off a piece, only three yards were left - I had sold none of it. I accused her of it, she strongly denied it. A friend of mine came, I told her I had been robbed, and it must be the prisoner, she made no reply, but ran up stairs. I called her father down. Her father and I went to Rich's in consequence of what she said, but found nothing there.

Q. Did you afterwards go there with an officer - A. Yes, in the evening, and found a quantity of patent cord and fustians of different qualities, which appeared like my goods. I had lost such goods. Next day I went again with the officer, and found a great deal of pocketing, and the black glazed cotton - it was cut up in different quantities - I could not swear to it. I found some velveteen, which I knew to be my husband's. I am positive of part of it.

Cross-examined by MR. BOLLAND. Q. How old is the prisoner - A. Fifteen years; her father and my husband were acquainted, they are both tailors. The prisoner was not my servant, she attended the shop as a friend. I remember my husband making a charge against her.

Q. And you said she was an innocent virtuous girl, and that he was drunk - A. Never.

Q. Have not your husband's creditors charged him and you with wasting their property in eating and drinking - A. Never. My husband was not addicted to drink, nor I, except in the medium way.

Q. What do call the medium way - A. Taking a little porter at dinner, nothing else.

Q. Was he in the habit of pawning goods - A. Sometimes we pledged them until we could redeem them. We have pledged at Hill's, and at Lucock and Fryet's - I do not know Drakes's or Acton's.

Q. Did you send the prisoner to pledge things for you - A. Yes. We have been in business nine or ten months. We have paid one creditor something.

Q. Have any of your husband's creditors given him notice that they intend to oppose his getting out under the Insolvent Act - A. No.

MR. PLATT. Q. Did you pledge these things with Rich - A. No.

ELLEN COTTERILL . My husband is a spectacle-maker, and lives in Portpool-lane. I called on Ann Barry - I followed the prisoner up stairs, and asked her if she knew any thing of the property? she said No.

THOMAS KINGSLEY . I am an officer. I went with Barry to Rich's shop, and found fourteen yards of fustian and other things - Ireland was present, and took an account of it. Rich's son measured them in my presence.

Cross-examined. Ireland is a friend of Barry's.

Q. Rich could have moved the things which you found the second time, if he had come by them improperly - A. Yes.

JOHN IRELAND . I am an agent of the Insolvent Debtors' Court, and an accountant - I make up the petitions and schedules for the prisoners. I went with the constable to Rich's, and found the articles stated in the indictment.

Cross-examined. Q. What had you to do with it - A. I called on Mrs. Barry with a message from her husband, and heard of the robbery - I am his agent. I recommended Mrs. Barry to go to Rich's. I was to make out Barry's accounts.

JOSEPH RICH . I am a tailor, and live in Cloth-fair. On the 14th of April Barry came with the constable to my house, and took some property which I bought of the prisoner, who said she came from Mrs. Barry. I told them there was more, they came again next day, and took more things, all of which I got from the prisoner. I had sent my son several times to watch her when she brought things, and he watched her into Barry's shop, which is about twenty doors from my house.

Cross-examined. Q. Barry was in distress, and you thought they came from him - A. Yes. Ireland said to me,

"I am more a man of the world than you are; I would have made away with the goods if I had been you." I told him I would not for my life.

MR. PLATT. Q. You was very ready to give up the goods - A. Yes. Ireland stopped with me on the Thursday - I asked him how the business was to be done? he said he took fees from both parties.

Prisoner's Defence. I had a great many things given me not to tell that I ever sold any goods out of the shop. She told me, if I confessed that I had sold any thing for them, she would tear my liver out, and I said I sold them, as I was afraid of her threats. Last Tuesday week I sold Rich eight yards of cotton for 6 s. - his son saw me give Mrs. Barry the money.

ANDREW KING . I am a journeyman tailor. On Christmas eve Mrs. Barry talked to me - we had some gin together. She said she expected in a little time she should be better off; for if she could get her things home her shop would hardly hold them.

Q. Where from - A. I thought she meant from pledge, I have seen her drunk twice. She once quarrelled with her husband - they settled it by getting drunk together. The prisoner and her father lived in the house.

STEPHEN GRIFFITHS . I am the prisoner's father. About three months ago Mr. Barry complained to me that my daughter spent more money than I could afford - next morning he was arrested. I asked Mrs. Barry what her husband meant? she said he was drunk, and she knew she was as good and virtuous a girl as ever breathed.

GEORGE MILLS . I live at Stretton-ground, Westminster. On the day before Easter Sunday, I went to the prosecutrix's house to take some straps - she had no money to pay for them. She threw the prisoner down a piece of cloth and said,

"Take this, and get 6 s." - the girl took the cloth I said I would call again, which I did in three-quarters of an hour - there was 6 s. for me then. I said they came to 8 d. more; she said she would pay it next time.

MR. PLATT. Q. How much cloth was it - A. A large piece. The girl said,

"Where am I to go?" Mrs. Barry said

"You know."

JOSEPH GIRRARD . I am a journeyman tailor. I know Barry and his shop. There has been very little stock in it for the last three weeks. There are not twenty yards of goods there altogether.

RUBEN ASTLEY . I am a warehouseman, and live in Mumford-court, Milk-street. Barry got 99 l. in my debt - he is in prison. I have been to the shop four or five times a week, before and since he was in prison. I do not suppose there were twenty yards of any one thing there, except a piece of flannel and some velveteen - his stock was diminished every time I went there. I have seen Ireland there once or twice. Once, when I was passing, I saw two or three friends with Mrs. Barry - the bottles and glasses were on the counter. I have seen this twice.

MATTHEW WILLIAM HILL . I am servant to Mr. Forrester, who is a pawnbroker, and lives in Aldersgate-street. On the 10th of April the prisoner pledged a piece of brown cloth with me for 7 s., in the name of Griffiths, Cloth-fair. I always understood she came from there.

THOMAS RICH . I am the son of Joseph Rich . The prisoner was in the habit of coming to the shop. By my father's direction I followed her into Barry's shop, and once I saw her pay Mrs. Barry 6 s. for goods which she sold at our shop.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190421-29

529. JAMES OAKEY was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of February , 40 lbs. of beef, value 20 s.; one glass bottle, value 3 d.; one quart of elder wine, value 1 s.; two 2 l. bank notes, and 10 s. in monies numbered, the goods and monies of Benjamin Hanson and Mary Davis ; one basket, value 1 s., the goods of the said Benjamin Hanson ; one handkerchief, value 2 s. 6 d., and one basket, value 5 s. , the goods of the said Mary Davis .

GEORGE COLLINS . I am servant to Mr. Hanson, who lives in Botolph-lane. I put 40 lbs. of beef into a basket, to go to Walthamstow - I also put a small basket in which Miss Davis gave me. I afterwards took them to the White Horse, London-wall, and put them into the box behind Mr. Hanson's chaise. When the prisoner was taken I saw the same basket and beef in Paternoster-row.

BENJAMIN HANSON . I live in Botolph-lane, and have a farm at Walthamstow, in partnership with Miss Davis - the beef is our's.

MARY DAVIS . On the 26th of February, I gave Collins a small basket, which contained two 2 l. bank notes and some silver, which belonged to us both - there was also a bottle of elder wine in the basket. When I got to Walthamstow Church I found the box forced open, and the things taken out. Every thing was safe at half-past seven o'clock, when I left the inn.

JOHN BARRS . I am superintendant of the watch, of Christ Church, Middlesex. On the 23d of April, about ten minutes past seven o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner and another man at the corner of a court in Wheeler-street, Spitalfields, looking over a basket, as I thought, to see what it contained. I followed them about four hundred yards into Crispin-street, Paternoster-row, and asked Oakey what he had got there? I took him to a public-house, and asked him how he came by the things? he said he bought them of a man for 10 s. as he returned from Smithfield - it contained the beef, wine, and handkerchief. I collared him, and took him to the watch-house. He put up his fist, cut me across the eye, and said he would go no further - I secured him at last; he made a great resistance.

Prisoner's Defence. I was returning from Smithfield, and bought the things for 10 s. The constable would not show me his authority, and so I resisted.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190421-30

530. GEORGE WILSON , ELIZABETH BUSH , WILLIAM ROGERS , ELIZA RHODES , JULIA GEORGE , DANIEL DALY , THOMAS CORNWELL , WILLIAM CLARKE , JOHN NOON , THOMAS ARNOLD , GEORGE SEVERN , DAVID O'HARA , JOSEPH BRANCH , and JOHN MURPHY , were severally and separately indicted for having forged bank notes in their possession, knowing them to be forged .

To which indictments they severally pleaded

GUILTY.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

Reference Number: t18190421-31

531. GEORGE WILSON , ELIZABETH BUSH , WILLIAM ROGERS , ELIZA RHODES , JULIA GEORGE , DANIEL DALY , THOMAS CORNWELL , WILLIAM CLARKE , JOHN NOON , THOMAS ARNOLD , GEORGE SEVERN , DAVID O'HARA , JOSEPH BRANCH , and JOHN MURPHY , were again severally and separately indicted for disposing of and putting away forged bank notes, knowing them to be forged .

MR. REYNOLDS, on the part of the Governor and Company of the Bank of England, declined offering any evidence, and the prisoners were

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

Reference Number: t18190421-32

532. GEORGE GIDDENS and THOMAS TOWNSEND were indicted for the wilful murder of William Matthews .

FREDERICK PROPSTRING . I am constable of Hadley. On the 9th of March, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, I saw the prisoner, Giddens, in the yard of the Green Man, at Barnet. He said that he had met with a great accident, that he had run over a child at Hadley-green , and he believed it was dead; in consequence of which, I went to the spot, and found the child lying there, dead, in a house - its friends had taken it up; the Green Man is about half a mile from where the accident happened - it is in Middlesex . The child's name was William Matthews ; it was three or four years old.

WILLIAM COX . I was filling a drift cart in the road, between two and three o'clock, and saw three chaises coming along towards Barnet; they were a very little way from each other. The one that did the accident was going at a very moderate pace, the other two drove faster, and passed it. There was a gentleman in each of the chaises.

Q. Were they driving faster than the usual pace - A. After the accident they mended their pace, as the rattling of one chaise passing the other appeared to frighten the horse of the chaise that did the accident; the horse glanced off; I did not see the child till after it was picked up. When the chaise came up to me, I heard the gentleman in the two first halloo out, and then the postboys mended their pace; the other chaise pulled up directly the accident happened. I held the horse, while the gentlemen got out, and the chaise went on for a surgeon. I stopped till Mr. Booth, the surgeon came; I saw Evans take the child up, and take it to a house opposite the road, where the child belonged to; Giddens drove the chaise that rode over the child - the spot where the accident happened was about two yards from the side of the road, but when the horse took fright it turned quite off; it appeared to me to be going at a very proper pace. Both the gentleman and the postboy got assistance immediately.

MATTHEW COX . I saw the chaise pass as I stood at my own door. A man named Veals drove one, he passed Giddens, who was going at a moderate pace - Veals got by about twenty or thirty yards. Then Townsend's chaise was passing Giddens's, and Giddens's horse threw out of the road, and ran against the child - it knocked it down. I ran over, and Evans picked the child up; it was carried to its grandmother's house just by, and left in her care.

It was hurt about the head; Evans tried to sit it on its feet, but it could not stand.

COURT. Q. Did it appear to you that Giddens was driving improperly - A. No, he was driving at a steady pace, as he ought to do - it appeared to me to be quite an accident. Veals drove one of the chaises, and Townsend the other - they were going faster than the prisoner's.

PHILIP EDRIDGE . I live at Hadley. I saw Giddens driving at a steady pace of seven or eight miles an hour; the other two passed him, and drove very fast - they appeared to be racing. I saw the chaise standing in the road, and William Cox holding the horse, after the accident.

HENRY LANOY HUNTER, ESQ. I was passing in the road on horseback, when the accident happened, and saw three chaises coming towards me, some of them were driving very hard; I got a little out of the road, in order to let them pass, and saw one of them drive over the child, but cannot take upon me to say that it was one of those that were driving fast. Immediately after the accident I rode into Barnet for a surgeon, another man ran by the side of my horse all the way. I sent the man for a surgeon, and Mr. Booth immediately went in the chaise that caused the accident.

Q. Did you see the horse startled - A. I did not mark that circumstance - I should think the men were not driving very hard.

DAVID EVANS . I did not see the accident. I ran and picked the child up, who was laying in the road; it could not stand, and was very bloody. It died in about three quarters of an hour, and was very much bruised.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

Reference Number: t18190421-33

533. EDWARD FELTON was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of March , one bank post bill, for payment of and value 20 l., the property of John Sayers Key , in the dwelling-house of Matthew Wood , Esq.

JOHN SAYERS KEY . I am servant to Mr. Alderman Wood; the prisoner is a shoemaker . On the 13th of February, he brought me some work home, which came to 10 s.; he was in the pantry. I gave him a note out of my box, and he gave me 10 s. in change - I believe it was a 1 l. note that I gave him. About a week or ten days after he brought me some more work home, which came to 10 s. I paid him another 1 l. note - I looked at it of course - I had several other notes in my box of different amounts. There was a 20 l., a 10 l., and a 5 l. He went out for change, and gave me 9 s. 6 d., or 10 s.

Q. While you was paying him this last note, were you called away - A. I am not certain whether it was the first or the last time that I was called away by the ringing of the bell. I went up, leaving him in the pantry, and my box open. I returned in about five or six minutes, and he was still there.

Q. Had you seen the 20 l. note between the first and the last time - A. I am not certain; I often went to this box, as it was my clothes box. On the 4th of March I missed it, and got the number of it from Messrs. Pagets, the bankers; it was paid me last May. I went to the prisoner, and told him of it; he said he had not seen it, nor had he got it. I asked him if I had made a mistake in giving him a 20 l. note instead of a 1 l.? he said No.

Q. Then at that time you doubted whether you had given it to him or not - A. I looked at the note that I gave him, but I thought he would not own it if he had stolen it. I asked him what he did with the note that I paid him? he said he did not know, he might have paid it to his currier. I went to a person named Hill, a tailor, in Regent's-mews; after that I went with my master to the prisoner. My master asked him if he knew any thing of a 20 l. bank post bill? he said No, he did not. My master questioned him more closely, and told him that he knew he had been out with Hill one evening to buy some things, and asked him if he knew what money Hill changed? he said at first that he did not exactly, but it might be a large note, and that he did not receive any part of the money. He continued to deny it until he got to the office. He said as he was going to the office that Hill had said that he had taken the note of a coachman or a groom, and mentioned the name of the lady the person lived with.

Cross-examined by MR. BOLLAND. Q. You missed the note about nine days after he had been to you - A. Yes, I only know the number by what was told me at the bankers - I got the number of six notes which they paid me.

COURT. Q. How did you know which of the six it was - A. By the other five coming in before - I never dealt with Hill. I paid no money to anybody but the prisoner, or opened my box in the presence of any one else.

Q. Did you never leave your box open - A. When I missed the note my box was locked, but the asp not put in; it was in that state two or three days. I traced the note to Hill.

MATTHEW WOOD , ESQ. I live in South Moulton-street. I went to the prisoner's stall, which is next to Hill's stall, in the Mews. I asked him if he had not changed a 20 l. post bill? he said he never saw any such thing. I asked him if he had not lent Hill 3 l. or 4 l.? he said some month or two ago he had lent him money. I asked him if he had not been out with Hill to make some purchases? he said he frequently went with him. We then asked him if he had not been to Vigo-lane with him? he said he did not know where Vigo-lane was. I told him where it stood; he then recollected, and after persisting that he had not been present at the passing of a 20 l. bank post bill, I told him I was certain he had been at Bedward's shop, and had changed a 20 l. bill. He then said he was present, that Hill changed it, and he purchased a waistcoat-piece, and Hill purchased several articles, and took all the change. I then gave him in charge.

THOMAS EVANS . I am servant to Mr. Bedward, woollen-draper, Vigo-lane. I know the person of the prisoner, and believe it was him that was with Hill on the 25th of February - Hill laid out 2 l. 17 s. - there was a waistcoat among the things. I tied them all up together. Hill took the parcel, and gave me a 20 l. bank post bill, which I believe he took from his pocket, but I am not sure.

JOHN SAYER KEYS . I got this note from the Bank, it has my late mistress's hand-writing on it, by which I know it has passed through my hands; she endorsed the six notes, and paid them all to me, I paid the others away at Penzance. I went to the Bank on the 10th, but did not get this note there then.

THOMAS EVANS re-examined. It is the note I received from Hill, the prisoner was close to him when he paid it, and

said he would have a waistcoat - Hill ordered me to cut one off - I had seen the prisoner with him before. I gave him seventeen 1 l. notes, and 3 s. in silver. I had received them all at French's, whose name I put on them.

Cross-examined. I generally change notes at French's. Bishop brought me a note which has French's name on it, in my writing - I will not say it is that I paid Hill.

ROBERT DAWES . I am a publican. I produce a 1 l. note which I took of the prisoner's brother, about the 17th of March; he is a butterman, and lives in Park-street; he deposited 22 l. in my hands in case the prisoner got off - this is one of them. It was on the morning before the second examination.

Cross-examined. It was deposited with me that the prosecutor should not be a loser.

EDWARD HILL . I am a tailor. I passed a 20 l. note at Bedward's, which I got from the prisoner to get changed, he gave it to me while I was in Bedward's shop, and I gave him the change. The waistcoat was bought for him.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing of it.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18190421-34

534. JOSEPH SOLOMONS was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Henry Brown , at Stepney , about twelve o'clock at noon of the 27th of December (no person being therein), and stealing one 200 l. bank note his property .

HENRY BROWN . I am a master in the Navy , and live in Heath-street, Stepney . On Sunday the 27th of March, I went church, returned about one o'clock, found my back door open, and the front door only single-locked - I had double-locked it at eleven o'clock, when I went out. All the drawers were out, and the property thrown about; a 200 l. bank note, forty-two small notes, and some plate and clothes taken away. I have found nothing but the 200 l. note.

Cross-examined by MR. ARABIN. I stopped payment of the 200 l. note. I got the number of it from the banker's the same morning - I did not see it again for eleven weeks.

GEORGE DYER. I am a clerk in the Accountant's Office in the Bank. On the 16th of March, about four o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner presented a 200 l. note to be examined, which is necessary before it would be changed. I found payment had been stopped by Brown. I asked him who he brought it from? he said he brought it from Mr. Phillips - pointing to the name and direction in front of the note. It being past the hours of business, the Secretary was gone; I told him to leave it till the morning, which he did, and went away rather displeased. Next morning he came, and I sent him to the Secretary's office.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. I asked him where he brought it from? he said from Mr. Phillips (pointing to the name). I told him it was a stopped note, and that he must come again in the morning.

CHARLES CHRISTMAS . I am an inspector of bank notes. On the 18th of March I saw the prisoner in the Secretary's office, he had been there before. He said he received the note from Mr. Phillips, No. 13, St. Mary Axe - he said his name was Joseph Solomons , and he lived in Cock and Hoop-yard.

MICHAEL MORRIS . I am an officer. On Thursday, the 18th of March I took the prisoner into my custody at the Bank. I went to No. 13, Bury-street, no such person as Phillips lived there. I found a person at No. 25, who called himself Jonathan Phillips . The prisoner said he took the note in payment for 137 l. worth of jewellery, of a person who, he believed, was gone to Ireland.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he not say it was a ready-money transaction - A. Yes; he said the man referred him to No. 13, St. Mary Axe - that he met him in the street promiscuously. I found that the prisoner lived where he said. He was out on bail four or five days, and came to the second examination.

Q. Did not Mr. Christmas ask the prisoner from whom he received the note - A. I understood him to ask where he got it - he asked him where he brought it from?

CHARLES CHRISTMAS re-examined. I asked him from whom he received it.

HENRY BROWN re-examined. It is the note I lost.

Prisoner's Defence. I received it in payment for 137 l. worth of jewellery, from Mr. Phillips - he travels for himself in Ireland - I have done business with him in Ireland. He said his address was No. 13, St. Mary Axe. This was on the 15th of March. I called at the Bank two or three times afterwards, and was informed it was stopped.

COLEMAN LEVY . I am sexton of the New Synagogue, Leadenhall-street. On the 21st of December I buried the prisoner's mother, she had lived in Still-alley, Houndsditch. It is the custom to have prayers every morning and evening for seven days in the room the deceased died in. The near relatives always confine themselves in the house during the seven days. I attended the prayers every day - the prisoner always appeared very ill; he was obliged to be held up to repeat a certain prayer. I was there on Sunday, the 27th of December, it was the last time of the prayers; he was present, and appeared to be worse than before.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. You cannot remember how many persons attended - A. No, I have not got my book. There are always ten people present at the prayers.

HYMAN COHEN . I am a tailor. The prisoner's mother died in the Christmas week. I called several times in the course of the seven days to see the family, the prisoner was always there. His father told me to come at the expiration of the seven days, to make the boys some clothes. I called there on Sunday to measure them - the prisoner said he was ill, and could not stand to be measured; this was about ten o'clock in the morning. I called again about twelve, and found him on the bed. The house is nearly two miles from Stepney Church.

Cross-examined. Q. Where did you go after you called at ten o'clock - A. Home.

Q. Were you at the funeral - Q. I cannot exactly recollect, I go to so many.

ANN HARDWICKE . In December last I attended the prisoner's mother as nurse, and was there when she died. She was buried the next day, which was Monday. The family sat seven days on the ground on account of the mother's death. The prisoner attended his mother's funeral. He was never out of the house from the time of her death

until I left, which was near a fortnight after the funeral. He could not be absent on the 27th.

Cross-examined. The prisoner attended the funeral, which was in Whitechapel. I believe he was obliged to attend. He went in a coach, and returned in one - he was very ill.

ABRAHAM SHANNON . I am a surgeon, &c. I attended the prisoner's mother - she died the latter end of December. After the death of a parent, it is the custom of the family to keep together, and say prayers for seven days; they must not absent themselves. I called at the house during the seven days, on account of the prisoner's indisposition; he was in a general state of debility, and has been a diseased man for three or four years. He was not able to stand, or even attend to the compulsory duties of the day.

Q. Could he have walked two miles seven days after his mother's death - A. It was impossible.

Cross-examined. Q. Were you there every day - A. No, my son, or assistant, attended occasionally. The prisoner lived in Cock and Hoop-yard.

Q. When did you attend his mother last - A. I really cannot say. I am so taken up with one branch of my profession that I seldom went - my son mostly went.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18190421-35

535. JOHN SMITH and OWEN SMITH were indicted for stealing, on the 5th of April , at St. Botolph without Aldgate , in the dwelling-house of Barney Lopes , twenty-seven watches, value 30 l.; one silver cup, value 30 s.; fifteen spoons, value 4 l.; one coral, value 18 d.; one pair of buckles, value 5 s.; seven pieces of foreign silver coin, value 21 s.; one piece of foreign gold coin, value 6 s.; one iron chest, value 30 s.; one 7 s. piece; two 50 l., two 20 l., three 10 l., and three 5 l. bank notes , his property.

ANN LOPES . I am the wife of Barney Lopes , we live in Nightingale-lane , in the parish of St. Botolph without Aldgate. On Monday, the 5th of April, about half-past one o'clock in the afternoon, I saw the iron chest safe in the bed-room, which is on the first-floor, my husband keeps the key of the chest - the prisoner, John Smith , lodged with us, I do not know the other man - we had several other lodgers. About half-past one o'clock John Smith came in and asked me to go and pledge a shirt for him; an old man, named Parsons, was in the house with me, nobody else at that time except him and John Smith . I was gone about a quarter of an hour. As I went out I locked the staircase door, and asked Smith to mind the passage while I was gone; when I returned Smith was not there, Parsons was at home. In consequence of what was told me I went up and missed the iron chest. I went out with Eleanor Walters , and found my chest about ten minutes after at No. 2, Russell-court, Blue Anchor-yard, Rosemary-lane, about five minutes walk from our house, in a room up stairs - my husband was with me; he took it to the office, and opened it in my presence. There was a pocket-book and a good many notes in it.

JOHN SMITH . Q. Have I not sent you out before to pledge, when I had money in your husband's hands - A. He sent me to pledge only once before.

BARNEY LOPES . I am husband of the last witness. On the 5th of April, about half-past nine o'clock in the morning, I went out, leaving the notes, watches, and other things stated in the indictment, in the chest; I came home about half-past one or two, met my wife, and went with her to No. 2, Russell-court, up two pair of stairs, and found my iron chest under the bed in the back room - some boys and men took us there - it had a canvas bag over it. I got two men to carry it to Lambeth-street Office. The prisoner, John Smith , was taken that day. I did not owe him any money. I found all my property in the chest.

JOHN SMITH . Q. Did I not pay 20 l. into your hands - A. Yes, about four months ago, to keep for him; I paid him back every halfpenny.

ELEANOR WATERS . I live on the ground-floor of Lopes's house. I saw John Smith coming down stairs about half-past one o'clock, he had nothing then; I went out backwards, returned, and saw two men in the back cellar, carrying something out - one of them said,

"pretty poll." I thought it was a birdcage, but it appeared very heavy indeed, as they went out of the passage; they went out at the front door - it was covered over with canvas.

Q. Did you know them - A. I cannot say; Mr. Lopes was out at the time; when he came in I told him what I had seen. I did not see Owen Smith . I cannot say that he was not one of the two men, as the place was dark. I did not see their faces.

JAMES PARSONS . I remember Lopes going out on an errand for Smith, I was the only person in the house, John Smith then came in, and asked me to fetch him half a pound of tripe, no person was with him; I was gone about ten minutes for it - when I returned Mrs. Lopes was not at home. I saw no more of John Smith .

JAMES DAWSON . On the 5th of April I was at the toll-house at the London Docks; about half-past one or two o'clock I saw two men come by with something covered with a canvas bag, each had hold of a handle, it was very heavy, they could hardly carry it. I watched them into No. 2, Russell-court, Blue Anchor-yard. I saw John Smith and a tall man take it into the house, with the bag on it - the tall man asked what I was looking at. I said, nothing. I did not see John Smith carrying it - he took it in - the tall man is not here; he stood at the door; John Smith and him appeared to be waiting for it at the door.

Q. Where did you first see John Smith - A. Coming up along with the chest - he was behind it. I did not see which way he went, but he got to the door before the men got up with it.

ANN KEMP. I sell fruit in the street. On the 5th of April I was at the end of Cooper's-row, near the toll-house of the London Docks, and saw Owen Smith , and another man carrying the chest; I saw under it that it was a chest like that which is produced - it appeared heavy. I did not notice the other man; they went towards Russell-court; it was between one and two o'clock. I knew Owen Smith before; I did not observe John Smith .

ANN ATKINS. I live at No. 2, Russel-court; Mr. Long keeps the house; it is let out in tenements. I saw the prisoner, John Smith , go up stairs between one and two o'clock in the day the chest was stolen. He and James Ennis , who keeps the room, were going up; I heard a great lumbering up stairs, opened my room-door, and

saw them. John Smith turned round, and said shut the door, or something like that; I could not understand him. He said,

"Shut your door, there is nothing for you, my maid." They had something heavy carrying up stairs - something like canvas was thrown over it. It appeared the same size as the chest produced. Lopes and Osborne came in about a quarter of an hour, and took the chest away. Smith turned round to speak to me; his back was towards me before.

SMITH. Q. Was not the chest carried up by two men, having a handle at each end - A. They were going up sideways.

JOHN SHAW . I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner, Owen Smith , on the 9th of April.

THOMAS OSBORNE . I apprehended John Smith on the 5th of April, about two o'clock the day of the robbery, and produce the chest, which was brought from No. 2, Russell-court. Lopes had the key, and opened the chest at the office.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN SMITH 'S Defence. The prosecutor came to me, and offered me 11 l. to say nothing about the watches, as people would come and claim the property - it is not his.

BARNEY LOPES re-examined. The chest, and contents are mine; I keep a lodging-house for seaman; when they go away in my debt they leave watches with me as a security. They are all labelled with the persons names, and what they owe me.

JOHN SMITH - GUILTY. - DEATH . Aged 25.

Recommended to Mercy .

OWEN SMITH - NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18190421-36

536. WILLIAM MOORE was indicted for embezzlement .

The prisoner pleaded

GUILTY .

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190421-37

537. JAMES BENFORD was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of March , two half crowns , the property of James Gregory and John Burder .

JAMES GREGORY . I am a wine merchant , in partnership with John Burder . On the 8th of March I marked two half crowns, and gave them to Edwards. The prisoner was our servant . I gave him an opportunity of going to the till, and about ten minutes called him into the counting-house. I asked him if he had any half crowns about him? he said he had none. I said I was certain he had; he then produced two, and I knew them to be the same.

ROBERT EDWARDS . I put the marked half crowns into the till. The prisoner came in soon after; he was called into the counting-house - he produced two, which were the same.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Fined One Shilling , and Discharged.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190421-38

538. JAMES WOODWARD was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of April , one rule, value 3 s., and one spoke shave, value 6 s. , the goods of George Natt .

GEORGE NATT . I am a carpenter ; I was repairing a building in Smithfield - the prisoner worked for me; on the 3d of April I discharged him. On Monday he came for his tools, as he was going out I found my rule in his basket, brought him back, and found the spoke shave in his pocket.

Cross-examined by MR. CURWOOD. There was no dispute about wages.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent.

JAMES PRICE . I am in the employ of the prosecutor; the prisoner refused to work unless he paid him more wages.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190421-39

539. RICHARD ROBERTS was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of April , one coat, value 5 s. , the goods of William Payton .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating it to be the property of John George Brewer .

ANN PAYTON. My husband is a tailor , and lives in Cursitor-street, Chancery-lane - his name is William. On the 7th of April, about half-past eight o'clock in the morning, I went into the kitchen, and on my return found the street-door open, and a man looking in. I shut the door, and found the prisoner in the parlour with the coat; I collared him, screamed out, and Mr. Fitch, our lodger, came and took him.

WILLIAM FITCH. Mrs. Payton called me; I ran, and and took the coat from the prisoner. He said he wanted Mr. Jones; he did not live there. He afterwards said he wanted Mr. Davis.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190421-40

540. JOHN BERRY was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of February , one handkerchief, value 4 s. 6 d., the goods of Thomas Coulson , from his person .

THOMAS COULSON . On the 23d of February, about eleven o'clock at night, I was in Newgate-street , going towards Cheapside. At the top of Warwick-lane I felt a pull at my pocket, turned round, and saw four men runing. Two ran down Warwick-lane, one up, and the other down Newgate-street. I followed the two down Warwick-lane, suspecting one of them had picked my pocket. I had not followed them above fifty yards, before I saw a handkerchief in one of their hands. I called out Stop thief! and at the entrance of Warwick-square he was stopped by the watchman - it was the prisoner. He said he had not got it, nor did he pick my pocket, and I might search him. I said he must have thrown it down very near that place; I went back a few yards, and found it on the ground. I never lost sight of him after I saw it in his hand.

ROBERT MORRIS . I am a watchman. I heard the cry, saw the prisoner running towards me, and stopped him, he asked me what I wanted; the prosecutor came up, and asked him for his handkerchief? he said he had not got

it, nor did he know any thing about it. The prosecutor found it just by.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190421-41

541. SARAH EPWARTH was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of February , one flat-iron, value 4 d.; one blanket, value 2 s.; one pillow, value 2 s.; one rug, value 4 s.; two sheets, value 3 s.; one set of fire-irons, value 3 s., and one candlestick, value 1 s., the goods of Richard Hughes , in a lodging-room .

RICHARD HUGHES. I am a porter , and live in Northumberland-place, Sun-street . I let the prisoner a top-room, furnished, at 4 s. 6 d. a week, about Christmas. On the 6th of March, I found her in bed, quite tipsey, and missed the things stated in the indictment.

EDWARD WOOD . I am a pawnbroker. The prisoner pledged an iron, a pillow, two sheets, and a blanket with me, at different times.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I intended to redeem them.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Confined Two Months .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190421-42

542. WILLIAM OSBAND was indicted for feloniously receiving, on the 29th of January , three pieces of Irish linen, value 5 l. 18 s,; ten yards of bombazeen, value 1 l.; one shawl, value 15 s.; five yards of black sarsnet, value 24 s.; seven yards of silk plaid gingham, value 15 s.; four pieces of muslin, value 17 l. 8 s.; one handkerchief, value 4 s. 6 d.; three pieces of cambric, value 21 s.; one shawl, value 15 s.; half a yard of kerseymere, value 4 s.; two bottles, value 6 d., and three pints of wine, value 9 s. 6 d., the property of Stephen Eaton Eland , of which James Ellliott was at the Session holden in February last, convicted of stealing, he well knowing them to have been feloniously stolen .

(The record of the conviction of James Elliott was put in and read.)

STEPHEN EATON ELAND. I prosecuted James Elliott here in February Session - he was convicted. On the 30th of January I missed these goods, and went with an officer to a person's house of the name of Macintosh, where I found the prisoner at work; I asked him if he had received any goods from Elliott, my servant? he denied it for sometime, but on pressing him further, he said he had received them. I gave him in charge. He said they were at his lodgings, which were a few doors off. We went with him, and found the articles stated in the indictment in his box.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. He said if he had known that Elliott had stolen them, he would not have taken them in.

JOHN FORRESTER , JUN. I am an officer. On the 30th of January I apprehended Elliott, and went with Mr. Eland to Macintosh's, where we found the prisoner at work, as a tailor. Mr. Eland gave him in charge, and accused him of receiving the things from Elliott; he denied it for sometime, and seemed much alarmed. Macintosh said,

"if you have any thing belonging to Mr. Eland, you had better show them where it is." We went to his lodgings, which were about two doors from Macintosh's, went up to the room where he lodged, and he unlocked his box - he took the key out of his pocket, and in the box I found the articles stated in the indictment.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

MR. ELAND re-examined. I live at the corner of Sun-court; my back window looks into the court, where the prisoner lodged.

Prisoner's Defence. Elliott brought them to me to take care of. I thought they were his own.

GUILTY .

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190421-43

543. WILLIAM KNIGHT was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of February , one shirt, value 5 s., the goods of John Edwards ; one coat, value 5 s.; one waistcoat, value 2 s., and one handkerchief, value 1 s. , the goods of Thomas King .

JOHN EDWARDS . I am a drummer . I was quartered at the Coach and Horses, Frith-street, Soho - the prisoner slept in the same room. I lost the shirt on the 22d of February, and on the 25th I found the prisoner at the office with my shirt on his back.

THOMAS KING . I am potboy at the house, and slept with the prisoner. I lost my things out of my box on the 22d of February; the prisoner left the lodging, and never returned. I found him at the hustings in Covent-garden.

RICHARD PHEASANT . I am a tailor. On the 22d of February I bought a coat and waistcoat of the prisoner.

JAMES TABER . On the 25th of February I apprehended the prisoner in Covent-garden. He said he sold the coat and waistcoat to Pheasant.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190421-44

544. ROBERT WEST was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of March , two spoons, value 6 s. , the property of William M'Donald .

SARAH M'DONALD. I am the wife of William M'Donald, who is a printer ; we live in Craven-street, Strand . On the 12th of March my servant left the area gate open, and these spoons were stolen out of the kitchen; somebody must have come down the area, and took them.

JOHN MARTIN . On the 12th of March I saw the prisoner, and another boy, go down the street, with apples in his hand - my master had had his windows cut twice, which made me watch them - the prisoner went lower down the street than the other. I lost them, and afterwards saw them in the Strand; the prisoner crossed over, and sat on some steps - a man took him; I saw the spoon hanging under his coat, and told the man of it; the prisoner

immediately pulled the spoon out of his pocket and ran away; a gentleman stopped him. I am certain he is the boy.

GEORGE DONALDSON . On the 11th of March I saw a mob, and took the prisoner in charge; a spoon was given to me, and another dropped from him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I found them.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190421-45

545. NICHOLAS BENIGNE ABLIN was indicted for that he, at the time of committing the felonies and offences in the first Eight Counts of this indictment, was a person employed and under the Post Office of Great Britain, in certain business relating to the said Office, that is, in sorting letters and packets brought to the General Post Office , (to wit) at St. Mary Woolnoth ; and that on the 7th of December , at the said parish, a certain letter then lately before sent by the post from the city of York to the said General Post Office, to be from thence sent by the post for and to be delivered to a certain person at Paris (i.e.) to one Henry Hudson , and containing one 20 l. bank note, came to his hands and possession while he was so employed; and that he, on the same day, being so employed, feloniously did secrete the said letter, containing the said bank note, it being in force, and the property of Robert Sympson , against the statute.

SECOND COUNT. For stealing the said bank note from and out of the said letter.

THIRD AND FOURTH COUNTS, the same as the two former, only stating it to be for secreting a packet, and for stealing the said bank note out of a packet instead of a letter.

FOUR OTHER COUNTS, the same as the four former, only stating the note to be the property of the said Henry Hudson .

NINTH COUNT. For stealing from and out of a certain Post-office, a certain other letter, then lately before sent from the city of York to the said General Post Office, to be from thence sent by the post for and to be delivered to a certain person at Paris (to wit) the said Henry Hudson , and one other letter, against the statute.

TENTH COUNT, the same as the Ninth, only stating it to be for stealing a packet instead of a letter, and one other packet.

ROBERT SYMPSON , ESQ. I live at Middlethorpe Hall, in the county of York. On Saturday, the 5th of December last, I inclosed a 20 l. bank note in a letter - I took the number of it, it was

"7451, dated 1st June, 1818" - (looks at one) - this is it; it has the name of Henry Bland written upon it; I saw him put his name upon it at my request before I inclosed it, in case of any accident. I inclosed this note in a letter, which I sealed and directed to Mr. Henry Hudson , Paris - (I forget the name of the street). I carried this letter to the post-office at York myself, and delivered it into the hands of one of the persons at the window of the office - I knew him by sight; it was Tesseyman. I paid him the postage as a double letter.

JOHN TESSEYMAN . I am a clerk in the post-office at York, On the 5th of December I received a letter from Mr. Simpson; I took double postage for it, as he said it contained a bill - it was to go to Paris.

JOHN GOURLEY . I am a clerk in the post-office at York; it was my duty to make up letters for London. On the 5th of December all the letters were regularly put into the London bag, which was sealed, and delivered to the mail-guard. A letter for Paris would be put into the London bag, and would arrive at the post-office in London on the 7th of December. I have no reason for supposing that it did not arrive.

ROBERT WATTS . I am presiding officer in the Inland Office in London. The prisoner was employed there on the morning of the 7th of December; it was his particular duty to open the York bag.

Q. What was he in the office - A. A sorter. He opened the bag that morning, and then sorted them. Letters put into the York bag on the 5th of December, would arrive in due course on the 7th.

Q. What time in the morning would the prisoner finish his duty - A. About ten o'clock; he would then leave the office. It was his duty to sort the York letters. The paid letters are particularly examined, because the deputy is charged with the amount of them. It was his immediate duty, when he opened the bag, to sort the paid letters in that bag.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. I consider him a sorter.

ANN COFFYNE . I have known the prisoner two years and a half - I have not known what he was above a year. My husband is a Frenchman, and is not in any trade here, I was servant in a family in Wood-street before I married him. I went abroad with them, and there became acquainted with him.

Q. What did the prisoner tell you he was - A. A clerk in the Post-office.

Q. In December, did you purchase a pelisse of Mr. Swift, in Houndsditch - A. Yes, on Monday, the 7th of December; I paid a 20 l. bank note for it, which I received of the prisoner at Mr. Baverstock's, who keeps the Angel and Crown, public-house, opposite Whitechapel church; I met him there by appointment, about one o'clock that day. He gave me the note, and told me to buy myself a pelisse.

Q. The prisoner is deaf; when you met him at Baver-stock's, did you converse with him, or did he write - A. He wrote on a piece of paper, that I was to buy myself a pelisse, not to exceed 3 l., and to give the name of Mrs. Gray, No. 24, White Lion-street, Pentonville. I was to meet him again at Longman's, the Grapes, public-house, in Aldgate Church-passage - he wrote all this down. I then left him, went to Swift's, bought a pelisse, and paid the same 20 l. note he gave me - (looks at D. C. Swift) - that is the person I paid it to. The pelisse came to 2 l. 15 s., I received 17 l. 5 s. in change. They asked me my name, and I gave the name and address as he told me.

Q. How did Swift get you the 17 l. 5 s. - A. I waited while the man went for change. I then went to Longman's, met the prisoner there, and gave him the same notes and money I received from Swift - I think they were all 1 l. notes, but I am sure some were. I wrote the name on the note - (looks at it) - this is it; it has,

"Mrs. Gray, No. 24, White Lion-street, Pentonville," on it, in my own handwriting. I was acquainted with the prisoner until he was taken up, and had no difference with him.

Q. What occasioned you to come forward - A. My own

safety. I found there was a hand-bill out respecting a person answering my description - I came forward voluntarily, and gave this account.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. You live with your husband - A. I do; he is not a man of property. I have a great deal of work, and support him in a great part. He is ill, and incapable of working. He used to have supplies from his father in France. We live in Upper Thames-street with my mother.

Q. You lived with Mrs. Johnston - A. Yes, before we went to Thames-street.

Q. Did not Johnston tell you she would not keep you any longer - A. No; we left in consequence of her leaving town.

Q. You say you came forward to save yourself - there is also a reward - A. Yes, I think it is 50 l. I do not know how long the prisoner was in custody before I came forward. I attended two examinations. I do not know Levy's.

Q. Then you never lived at Levy's, in Devonshire-court - A. No.

Q. Pray were you ever at any other public-office but Bow-street - A. No.

Q. You was never at the Mansion-house - A. I may have been there - I was never in prison.

Q. Take care. Do you mean to swear you never was confined on any charge yourself - A. Yes.

Q. On the oath you have taken were you not a prisoner in the House of Correction - A. For one month; it was for pledging things from a ready-furnished lodging.

Q. How came you to say you was never in prison - A. I did not recollect it. I was sent there from Lambeth-street.

A. Then you was at a police-office, besides Bow-street and the Mansion-house - A. Yes.

Q. What became of the pelisse - A. I pledged it. It was discovered by the officers.

Q. Was the prisoner a married man - A. I did not know it when I first became acquainted with him - I learnt it about twelve months after.

MR. GURNEY. Q. Was any discovery made respecting the pelisse until you came forward and mentioned it - A. No. I communicated it to Mr. Parkin, the solicitor to the Post-office.

(MR. GURNEY here exhibited the hand-bill, offering the witness a reward to come forward and prove who she received the note of. The reward was not upon the prisoner's conviction.)

DEAN CHARLES SWIFT . I manage the business of Mr. Matthew Swift , who is a tailor, and lives in Houndsditch. In the early part of December, a woman came and purchased a blue pelisse, which came to 2 l. 15 s. - I do not remember her person. She paid me a 20 l. note. I sent James Dalton , our shopman, to the Bank to get it changed. I first desired the woman to write on the note, which I saw her do, and put my initials to it - (looks at it) - there are my initials on it - it has been through my hands. I delivered it to Dalton, with the writing on it, to take it to the Bank; he returned with the change, and I gave the woman 17 l. 5 s. with the same notes Dalton brought me, with 5 s. - I think they were all 1 l. notes.

Cross-examined. I usually ask people to indorse notes.

JAMES DALTON . I am shopman to Mr. Swift. The last witness gave me a 20 l. note to take to the Bank, which I did, got small notes for it, and took him back the same notes. I cannot speak to the date or time of the day.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you take any other 20 l. note that day - A. No.

CHARLES EDWARD WALLER . I am a clerk in the Bank - (looks at the 20 l. note) - I changed this note on Monday, the 7th of December, about the middle of the day, in the name of Charles Swift , Houndsditch. I gave twenty 1 l. notes for it, among which were, No. 10001, dated 15th Sept. 1818, and 75214, 24th Sept. 1818.

Cross-examined. Mr. Williams entered them, and I called them over; they had been in circulation before. I never saw two notes of the same number and date.

JOHN WILLIAMS . I made the entry, and checked them with Waller.

JAMES VAUGHAN . I keep a public-house in Hackney-road. I know the prisoner - (looks at Nos. 10001 and 75214) - I took these two notes of him on the evening of the 7th, or the morning of the 8th of December, and wrote his name and my initials on them at the same time.

Cross-examined. I paid them away, and saw them again in February. I paid them away on the 8th of December to Mr. Watts; and on the 6th I had no notes in my possession.

GEORGE BAVERSTOCK . I keep the Angel and Crown, public-house, opposite Whitechapel church; I have kept it thirteen years - I know the prisoner well; he used to come often to read the Times newspaper. There was a lady with him at times - (looks at Coffyne) - I cannot swear that is her.

Q. What do you believe - A. I have no recollection of her, upon my honour.

Q. On your oath, can you form any belief as to her being the woman who was with him at your house - A. I do not, upon my honour. I cannot swear positively to her; she may be the woman.

Q. Do you believe it - A. I might believe it.

Q. Did you say she was the woman at Bow-street - A. No, they only passed in my passage.

JAMES LONGMAN . I keep the Grapes, public-house, in Church-passage, Aldgate, and have kept it two years. I have seen the prisoner many times, and he has been at my house with Coffyne several times.

WILLIAM HENRY GREIG . I have been acquainted with the prisoner two years and a half. When he was in the House of Correction on this charge, I visited him there, I accompanied his sister to Mrs. Coffyne's.

Q. Did the prisoner request you to go anywhere - A. He merely said,

"Go, and see what can be done with Mrs. Coffyne." I went with his sister to her house; she went in, but I did not.

Prisoner's Defence. In consequence of the infirmity under which I labour, it is impossible for me to make the defence which I otherwise should, therefore I shall leave it to my Counsel.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 32.

London Jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

Reference Number: t18190421-46

546. THOMAS JEFFCOTT was indicted for that he, at the time of committing the several felonies and offences in the first Eight Counts mentioned, was employed by and under the Post Office of Great Britain, in charging letters and packets brought to the said office , and that on the 16th of October, 1818 , a certain letter came into his hands and possession to be sent by the Post, for and to be delivered to one Edward Whitely , at Bury, in Lancashire, containing one bank post bill for payment of 30 l., and two 10 l. bank notes came into his possession, he being so employed, and that he feloniously did secrete and steal the said letter containing the said bank post bill and bank notes , the property of Thomas Hurst .

EIGHT OTHER COUNTS, varying the manner of laying the charge.

JOHN ANGUS . I am clerk to Messrs. Longman, Hurst and Co., Paternoster-row. On the 16th of October, I delivered Mr. Hurst a 30 l. bank post bill, and two 10 l. bank notes, Nos. 1325, and 1326, both dated September 8,1818 - (looks at No. 1326) - this is one.

Cross-examined by MR. JARVIS. I am the cashier of the house. Bartholomew Gill , my assistant, received the notes from the Bank.

MR. THOMAS HURST . I a am partner in the firm of Longman and Co. On the 16th of October, I had occasion to send some money in the country on my own account. I got a 30 l. bank post bill, and two 10 l. notes from Angus, which I enclosed in a letter directed to my nephew, Edward Whiteley , Bury, Lancashire. I sealed it, and put it in the box about four o'clock to go by the post.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. - I drew the money out of the partnership account; any of our servants can have access to the box - another person might possibly get at it, but not conveniently. The box is behind a glass partition. A customer at the entrance to the warehouse, could not come at that part.

JOHN BOUSFIELD . I am porter to Messrs. Longman and Co. On the 16th of October I took the letters out of the box, and delivered them to the postman when he called - I remember that one was directed to Edward Whiteley , Bury, Lancashire.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. How long have you lived there - A. About fourteen years; this is the first letter that I saw directed to that place; the letter-box is out of sight of the door. We have ten, twenty, or more letters in a day.

Q. When was your attention drawn to this - A. A few days after.

COURT. Q. The bellman does not take them out of the box - A. No. I do, and give them to him. There is a counter and a glass partition between him and the box.

MR. THOMAS HURST . My nephew had lately gone to that address. I may have written to him there before. I heard about five days after that the letter had not arrived.

MATTHEW ATKINSON . I am a postman. In October last my district was in Paternoster-row. I call every evening at Longman's for letters, which I put into my bag, and deliver at the Post-office the same evening. My bag is locked, and the key kept at the Post-office - the letters are put through a slit.

Cross-examined by MR. JARVIS. Q. How long have you been a bellman - A. Seventeen years; I have had this walk two years, and call every evening at Longman's. I generally receive the letters from Bousfield; I have taken them out of the box myself, when they have been busy.

Q. It is impossible to get a letter out of your bag - A. I will not say that.

SAMUEL HURST . I am check clerk at the letter carriers office, Paternoster-row district. On the 16th of October I received the ringing bag from Atkinson; I keep the keys. I opened it, and emptied the letters into a basket, they were then conveyed from one part of the office to the other.

ROBERT WATTS . I am one of the presidents of the Inland Office. On the 16th of October, in the evening, the prisoner was on duty - his particular duty was to charge the letters in the Norwich division - he exclusively managed that division. A letter to Bury, in Lancashire, would not necessarily go to him. It was frequently his habit, as well as others to go to the sorting table, and help themselves - he would have an opportunity of taking letters out of the general mass. It sometimes happens that a letter for Bury, Lancashire, goes to the Norwich division, as there is Bury, St. Edmonds, if it came to him it was his duty to put it in the blind letter-box to be sorted again.

Cross-examined by MR. JARVIS. Q. There is not a separate basket for each bag - A. No; the prisoner had an aperture to himself in a recess. There are twenty sorters.

Q. What distance was the prisoner from where the Bury, in Lancashire, letters could be put - A. Almost the length of the room.

Q. The prisoner went occasionally to the sorting table - A. Yes, particularly at the early part of the evening, as the messengers do not attend then. I do not mean to blame him for it, it is a matter of praise - letters are often missorted.

THOMAS WINCH . I am employed in the Post office. On the 16th of October I made up the Bury, Lancashire, bag - it was made up in the regular way.

JAMES HOLBROW . I assisted Winch to make up the Bury, Lancashire, bag - he puts them in the bag; Gember ties it, and I seal it.

SAMUEL GIMBER . I assisted in making up the bag.

HENRY WHITEHEAD . I am postmaster of Bury, Lancashire; the London mail of the 16th of October, duly arrived on the 18th, sealed in the usual way. A letter from Mr. Whitley, at the Reverend Mr. Bushby's, would be delivered unless it was sent for.

JAMES WHITEHEAD . I am letter carrier at the Post-office, Bury, Lancashire. On the 8th of October I delivered all the letters that I received to the different places they were directed to.

Cross-examined by MR. JARVIS. I know Mr. Bushby - I usually take his letters, he sometimes send for them.

MR. EDWARD WHITELEY . I was at Bury, Lancashire, in October last; I never received the letter containing the property - I expected it.

HARRY ADKINS . I am a Bow-street officer. On the 29th of January I was sent for to the Post-office, and went

with the prisoner to his lodgings in Norfolk-street, Strand. I found he occupied a second floor, unfurnished - he said he paid sixty-five guineas a year for it, and that his salary was 200 l. or guineas. He said he had no other income. I met Mr. Parkin there, and found some new and old furniture there, and a considerable quantity of new. I found about 217 l. in bank notes in his drawer, in different parcels, among them was a 10 l. note, No. 1326, February 8,1818 - (looks at it) - this is it. I was told he had taken something out of his drawer unperceived by me; I seized his hand, and took two gold seals out. As I was taking them out, he said,

"It is of no use, I have done wrong - I am guilty *."

* This witness was examined at considerable length, and deposed the same as on the prisoner's second trial, Page 225. It is presumed useless to state it here.

MR. HUGH PARKINS . I am solicitor to the Post Office. Adkins and I were at the prisoner's lodgings when they were searched, and the notes found. The prisoner said

"I have done wrong - I am guilty." The note in question was found in the drawer.

The prisoner put in a written defence.

See No. 554.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18190421-47

547. THOMAS MAID was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of April , eight brass fender feet, value 1 l. , the goods of Richard Peachey and John Peachey .

GEORGE MAWLEY . I am apprentice to Richard and John Peachey , who are ironmongers , and live in Hanover-street . On the 2d of April the prisoner came to the shop, and asked for a brad-awl; I saw him take the feet, and put them into his pocket. Mann followed him, and took them from him.

CHARLES MANN . I am porter to Messrs. Peachey. I followed the prisoner out, and found the fender feet in his pocket.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was in liquor.

GUILTY . Aged 29.

Confined Two Months , and Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190421-48

548. JOHN ROBERTS was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of March , 15 lbs. of salt, value 5 s. , the property of Edmund Shannon .

CATHARINE SHANNON . I am the wife of Edmund Shannon , and live in Oxford-buildings . On the 23d of March, about half-past eleven o'clock at night, I saw the prisoner come into the shop, and take the salt off the counter, and run off with it; I followed him, and he was stopped in about five minutes - I saw him throw it down.

ALEXANDER FRAZIER . I am a watchman. I heard the cry, and seized the prisoner.

RICHARD COATES . I took the prisoner in charge; he said it was ginger, and not salt.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Confined Six Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190421-49

549. ELIZA STEWART was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of March , nine silver spoons, value 3 l., and one pair of sugar-tongs, value 10 s., the goods of Eliza Griffiths widow , in her dwelling-house .

ELIZA GRIFFITHS . I am a widow, and live in Henrietta-street, Manchester-square ; the prisoner lodged with me once, but not at this time. On Thursday, the 5th of March, about ten o'clock in the morning, I missed these things; they were safe two days before - I am not certain that the door was locked. I found them at the pawnbrokers; the prisoner came to my house on the Thursday. I gave her leave to cook her dinner there. I went out, and when I returned she was gone, and I missed the property.

EDWARD HULL . I am servant to Mr. Harris, who is a pawnbroker. and lives in Tottenham-court-road. I have a pair of sugar-tongs, five tea-spoons, and two salt-spoons, which the prisoner pledged on the 4th of March, in the afternoon, in the name of Jordan, Mortimer-street.

JOHN WHITAKER . I am shopman to Mr. Dobree, who is a pawnbroker, and lives in Oxford-street. On the 4th of March the prisoner pledged a pair of table-spoons with me, in the name of Grimstone.

RICHARD COATES . I am a constable. On the 6th of March I apprehended the prisoner; she said she knew nothing about Griffith's things. I had not mentioned them to her.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I gave the prosecutrix and her children a dinner - I never saw the spoons.

GUILTY. Aged 44.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Confined Six Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190421-50

550. THOMAS MILLS was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of March , at St Dunstan's, Stepney , in the dwelling-house of the Reverend Thomas Barneby , clerk, one brooch, value 2 s., and one 10 l. bank note , the property of James Handcocks .

FRANCES WHITEHOUSE . I am servant to the Reverend Thomas Barneby, who lives at Stepney-green , in the parish of St. Dunstan, Stepney. On the 31st of March, between eleven and twelve o'clock in the day, I was going out of the kitchen and observed the door open. I went up stairs, and saw some drawers open in a spare room. I came down and told the cook there was somebody in the house; I went a second time to the top of the house, heard some drawers opening, ran down, and gave the alarm. I got Cuthbert, then went up stairs, and found the prisoner under James Handcock 's bed; Cuthbert laid hold of him, and brought him down. I went for a constable, and when he was searched a 10 l. bank note was found in his jacket pocket. I found four 1 l. notes under the bed, and Handcock claimed them all; the prisoner did not contradict him - he was quite sober.

GEORGE CUTHBERT . In consequence of information I received from the last witness, I went to the prosecutor's house, and found the drawers open in the first-floor bedroom. I found the prisoner in the garret, under Handcock's bed, lying on his side, with his shoes in his hand. I asked him what brought him there, he said, to lay down. I brought him down, the constable searched him, and found a 10 l. note in his right-hand waistcoat pocket. I went up to the room again, and found four 1 l. notes under the

bed. Handcock claimed all five notes. The top drawer was open in that room.

ROBERT CHRISTIAN . I am headborough of Mile End. I was sent for, and took the prisoner in charge - I found a 10 l. bank note on him. I went up stairs and saw the four 1 l. notes found. I locked him up, and in consequence of information I searched him again at the watch-house, and found a gold brooch, rolled up in the flap of his shirt. The prosecutor claimed the brooch and notes, the prisoner made no answer. I went back again, and found a pocket-book under the drawers, and two notes under a chair, in the room where he was taken.

JAMES HANDCOCKS . I am servant to Mr. Barneby. I was sent for, came home, and missed my pocket-book out of my top drawer - it contained a 10 l. and six 1 l. notes. The pocket-book produced is the same, I had put it under a shirt in the top drawer. The 10 l. note is mine, it has my writing on it. The brooch is mine. The prisoner was quite a stranger to me.

GUILTY. - DEATH . Aged 17.

Recommended to Mercy .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190421-51

551. JOHN SOLLY was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of March , two pair of breeches, value 30 s.; two hats, value 10 s.; one shirt, value 7 s., and one gown, value 12 s., the goods of John Spencer , in his dwelling-house .

ELIZA SPENCER . I am the wife of John Spencer ; we live at Blackwall . On the 22d of March the prisoner came to lodge with me, he went to bed at ten o'clock, came down about five next morning, and said he should return to breakfast - he never returned. I got up and missed this property out of the room he slept in. He was taken about a fortnight after. I am certain he is the man.

PETER PETERSON . I am a seaman. I was looking for work, and saw a man come out of the prosecutor's house at six o'clock in the morning, about four weeks ago - he was dressed like the prisoner.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190421-52

552. ALEXANDER YEAMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of February , one pepper-caster, value 1 l.; one cream-pot, value 30 s.; one fork, value 30 s.; one table-spoon, value 30 s.; four tea-spoons, value 1 l., and one egg-cup, value 6 s. , the property of William Nugent Comyn .

WILLIAM NUGENT COMYN . The prisoner was valet to a gentleman who lodged in my house. In February I missed the plate, and found it at the pawnbrokers'.

JAMES BEARDWELL . I am a pawnbroker. A tablespoon, tea-spoon, pepper-caster, and milk-pot were pledged with me by a woman, who, I believe, to be the prisoner's wife.

JAMES BENDALL . I am a pawnbroker, in Marylebone-street. Two tea-spoons, an egg-cup, and a table-spoon, were pledged with me by a woman.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190421-53

553. GEORGE CLARKE was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of February , one coat, value 3 l. , the property of Charles Edmund Nugent , Esq.

RICHARD WALKER . I am coachman to Charles Edmund Nugent , Esq. On the 27th of February I was at Kew-green , about eight o'clock, putting my horses up to wait for my master, and missed my coat from the carriage. I had seen the prisoner by the carriage just before.

GOODMAN DAVIS. I am shopman to Mr. Saunders, Holywell-street, Strand. About half-past ten o'clock in the morning, on the 27th of February, the prisoner came to sell the coat - he asked four guineas for it; he then offered it to me for 2 l. 15 s. I said I thought it was not his, and asked him how long he had worn it. He said, a long time. He then said,

"give me the coat, and let me be off." I refused. He took me to a house in Water-lane, where he said he was known. I could hear nothing satisfactory, and gave him in charge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I bought the coat as I was coming up.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190421-54

554. THOMAS JEFFCOTT was again indicted for that he, at the time of committing the several felonies in the first eight counts of the indictment mentioned, he was a person employed by, and under the Post Office of Great Britain, in certain business relating to the said office (i.e.) in charging letters and packets, brought to the General Post Office in London , and that on the 10th of September , at St. Mary Woolnoth , a certain letter then lately put into the said General Post Office, to be sent by the Post for, and to be delivered to a certain person at Little Stonham in Suffolk (i.e.) to one James Richard Vernon , containing one 10 l. bank note, came to his hands and possession, being such person so employed as aforesaid, and that he on the same day and parish aforesaid, feloniously did secrete and steal the said letter, containing the said bank note , the property of William Tassie .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating it to be for stealing the said bank note from and out of the said letter, instead of secreting the said letter.

THIRD AND FOURTH COUNTS, the same as the two former, only charging the prisoner with secreting a packet, and stealing from and out of a packet, instead of a letter.

FOUR OTHER COUNTS, like the four former, only stating the said bank note to be the property of James Richard Vernon .

NINTH COUNT, for stealing two letters from and out of the General Post Office.

TENTH COUNT, for stealing two packets from and out of the General Post Office.

MR. WILLIAM TASSIE . I live in Leicester-square. On Monday, the 10th of September last, I had occasion to send a 10 l. bank note to the Rev. J. Vernon, at Mr. Gooding's, Little Stonham, Suffolk. I wrote him a letter, and inclosed the note, which I received from Messrs. Wrights', the bankers, in Henrietta-street, Covent-garden. I wrote their names and address on it, with my initials, and took the number of it - (looks at one) - this is it, it has that

written on it, and is No. 3548. I sealed the letter with wax, and directed it to the Rev. J. R. Vernon, Mr. Gooding's, Little Stonham, Suffolk. I sent my apprentice, Henry Laing , with it to the post-office, about the middle of the day. On Thursday I was informed that it had not arrived.

Cross-examined by MR. JARVIS. Q. Did you receive the note yourself from Wright's - A. I did, in payment of a check; it is dated 11th of August, 1818, I did not take the date. I received another 10 l. note, which I indorsed also. I told the boy to pay the postage, and gave him the money for a double letter.

Q. There is Marsham and Wells wrote on it, was it so when you received it - A. I cannot tell.

MR. REYNOLDS. Q. When did you receive the check - A. I think it was the day before. It was drawn by Sir Henry Inglefield ; the amount was 20 l.

COURT. Q. Are you certain you put the note you speak of in that letter - A. I am.

HENRY LAING . I am apprentice to Mr. Tassie. On the 10th of September my master gave me a double letter to carry to the post-office; I took it to the receiving-house in Princes-street, which is kept by Mr. Laing, a tobacconist. I gave it to John Goodes in the shop, and paid 1 s. 6 d. for it, which is double postage.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. My attention was called to it in two or three days by its not arriving. I do not carry letters to the post-office every day.

JOHN GOODES . On the 10th of September I lived with Mr. Laing, who keeps the receiving-house in Princes-street. The letters that day were sent to the General Post-office in the usual course.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Does any one assist you in the shop - A. Sometimes, but I am a great deal alone. The paid letters are put in a desk with the money - it is left open; it is fixed in the window - it is open to my master, myself, and another shopman. The paid bag goes away by itself. It appears by a memorandum, which I have in my own writing, that there were fifteen paid letters that day, two of which were 18 d. each. This is kept as a check between my master and the office; the entry is two for 3 s., which is 18 d. each. The double postage to Stonham is 18 d.

COURT. Q. The postman who comes with the bell has a bag which is locked, and has a slit in it for paid and unpaid letters - A. Yes, he receives them at five o'clock; those that come after go by a messenger. I make the letters up in a bag, and put the paid by themselves - a messenger calls for them, and takes them to the Post-office. I believe I sealed the bag that night, as the book is made up by me. I always seal the bag when I enter the letters.

JURY. Q. Do you make any distinction between letters that contain money and other paid letters - A. If I know it contains money, I advise the person to take it to Lombard-street, but I ask no questions about letters.

JOHN PRICE MADDER . I am in the employ of the Post-office, it is part of my duty to receive the bags from the receiving-houses. On the 10th of September I did not receive the Princes-street bag.

JOHN TULLIDER . I am a messenger. On the 10th of September I received the Princes-street bags - they were sealed and unbroken. I took them into the Post-office.

Cross-examined by MR. JARVIS. Q. Are you a bellman - A. No. I did not fetch it from Princes-street, I received it at the Post-office in Lombard-street; they are put through the window in the Paid Letter-office, where I stand, and open the paid bags.

Q. Are the paid bags brought to you by the bellman or by a messenger - A. There are messengers in the Post-office, whose duty it is to collect the bags from the districts.

COURT. Q. Have you any doubt that you received the paid letter bag that day - A. I have not.

MR. JARVIS. Q. You know Madder - A. Yes; he receives them as I do, he does not fetch them. I do not know who the messenger was who brought them, but he is still in the employ of the Post-office.

Q. You cannot swear that any paid letters came that day from Princes-street - A. I cannot.

COURT. Q. If it did come on that day you put it in the regular course - A. Yes. If it did not come it was Hanson's duty to report it.

ISAAC MICHAEL HANSON . I am a window-man at the Post-office. I was on duty on the 10th of September - it was my duty to receive the paid letters from the receiving offices, tax them, and pass them over. I remember receiving the Princes-street bag that day.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. I have a book in which I make an entry of paid letters.

WILLIAM PEMBERTON . I am a letter-carrier. On the 10th of September I find by the book I have signed that I was on duty. The bags came from Princes-street in their proper sealed state - I examined them particularly. It is my duty.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. I could tell by the book who brought the bag. There is only one receiving-house in the district. The paid letters come in a bag by themselves.

HENRY GODDARD . I am a letter-carrier at the Post-office. On the 10th of September it was my duty to seal the Little Stonham bag. Another person puts the letters in.

Cross-examined by MR. JARVIS. Q. Are you assisted by any one - A. Not in sealing. One person holds the bag, another ties, and I seal it. All that I can say is, that I sealed all the bags which were given over to me. I cannot say this was among them. The paid and unpaid letters are put in the same bag - whether they are tied together or separate, I cannot say. Sometimes letters that come late are put in loose.

MR. BOLLAND. Q. One man holds the bag - A. Yes. Both his hands are engaged in holding it.

ABRAHAM YOUNG . I tied the bag that Goddard sealed. I use both hands in tying.

MR. JOSEPH WARD . I put the letters in the bags that Goddard sealed. I put them in the Stonham bag.

Cross-examined by MR. JARVIS. Q. Do you mean to say you remember the particular bag - A. No. I fill forty or fifty bags every night.

COURT. Q. If you had omitted to put the Stonham letters in, would you have had a complaint about it - A. Certainly. There was no complaint.

JAMES BEVAN . I am postmaster of Little Stonham, Suffolk. The bag made up on the 10th of September arrived in course on the morning of the 11th, in its proper

sealed state. I know the Rev. J. Vernon. I cannot say whether any letters arrived that day for him. Sarah Haynes is the carrier. If there was one, she ought to deliver it, unless he sent for it.

Cross-examined by MR. JARVIS. Q. Do you keep an account of the paid letters that come from town - A. No. I cannot say whether any paid letter did or did not arrive. We have letters every day.

SARAH HAYNES . On the 11th of September I delivered all the letters which came to Little Stonham. I delivered all the letters which I received.

REV. JAMES RICHARD VERNON . I reside at Little Stonham. On the 11th of September I received no letter from Mr. Tassie. I expected one from him, with a remittance, and apprised him of its non-arrival.

Cross-examined by MR. JARVIS. Q. You reside with Mr. Gooding - A. Yes; he lives in the village. I always wait for my letters, I do not fetch them. I do not think Gooding fetched them. His son never brought me any. I made inquiry at the Post-office about it. The money was Mr. Tassie's property.

ROBERT WATTS . I am one of the Presidents of the Post-office, Lombard-street. The prisoner was a charger of letters, attached to the Norwich division. It was a general practice in the early part of the evening for him to resort to the sorting table for letters, but not late in the evening - he could not do it then.

Q. Could he do it when the letters came from the receiving-houses - A. Certainly; Little Stonham is in the Ipswich division, which is immediately attached to his division. Unpaid letters come sooner to hand than paid, as they go through a more tedious process; but paid, unpaid, and franked letters, all go to the sorting table, and through his hands; and it frequently happens that letters are mis-sorted, particularly those of the Ipswich division, are more likely to be mixed with the Norwich than any others. The prisoner was on duty on the night of the 10th of September.

Cross-examined by MR. JARVIS. Q. The clerks sit in a long room - A. Yes; the entrance is at the north. My chair is at the other end. Paid letters are brought by a messenger from the receiving houses, in a bag, which is sealed. The paid bags are taken out and given to Mr. Hanson, he opens them, and checks the letters - if there is any irregularity he must report it. Adams, the messenger, takes them to be stamped, they are then put before three or four persons, who sort them at a table some distance from the prisoner, and then put into their respective boxes, and taken to the different divisions, at one of which the prisoner attended. This letter ought to have been put to the Ipswich division, but mistakes often happen.

Q. The prisoner sat in a recess - A. There was a partition between him and the Ipswich division. Unless the letters were mis-sorted, I do not think he could get them from the Ipswich division. The messengers carry them in their arms in rows not tied up, they may occasionally drop. nobody but the clerks have access to the sorting table; I believe the prisoner had been twenty years in the office - his salary was 200 l. a year, and about 10 l. in emoluments.

MR. GURNEY. Q. How was his salary paid - A. Quarterly, by a check on the Bank. He has had 200 l. a year ever since 1814.

Q. You say Ipswich letters are more likely to be missorted to the Norwich division than any other - A. Yes, because some of the Suffolk letters go to the Norwich division - it takes one man to arrange the mis-sorted letters out of the blind box.

ZACHARIAH LEATE . I am messenger to the Post Office. On the 10th of September I received the letters from the receiving-house, Princes-street, and delivered the bag safe and sealed, at the Post Office, at half-past five o'clock. I know it by having signed the book.

MR. HANSON. I look at the receiver's bill made up by Goodes, there is 15 s. 5 d. charged for paid letters - I checked the letters and found it right.

JOHN GOODES . It is the receiver's bill made by me, the two 18 d. letters are included in it.

MR. HUGH PARKIN . I am solicitor to the Post Office. On the 29th of January I saw the prisoner at the the Post Office about half-past eight o'clock in the morning - Frances and Adkins were present. I stated to him that he was suspected of secreting letters containing remitances, and asked him if he had any objection to his apartments being searched? he said No. Adkins was directed by me to proceed with him there. I and Frances went in a coach and met him at the door in Norfolk-street. We were all in the room together, and commenced an examination of his furniture and other things. Adkins looked into his drawers in the bed-room, and I saw him find six or seven parcels of notes. I asked the prisoner where he had received them from? he gave some answer about the first and second parcel. He said one parcel was his salary; in answer to another he hesitated, and said,

"I have done wrong - I am guilty." More notes were found about the same time; I desired him to take a chair. I cast up the amount of the notes - it was 217 l., and consisted of 10 l., 5 l., and 1 l. notes. He said one parcel was his salary, that was 23 l. I have ascertained that is true. There was a 10 l. note among that 23 l.

Cross-examined. by MR. JARVIS. Q. You staid till he had done his duty before you told him of your suspicions - A. Yes, he was searched carefully there - we got to his lodgings a little after nine o'clock. I did not repeat the charge there. Frances and Churchill went to his lodgings with me. It is the second floor - there is a back and front room, besides a small room where his bed is. We partly searched the front room first; the prisoner appeared anxious to go into the bed-room, while Adkins was taking the things out of a cupboard - Adkins called him back - he did not go into the bed-room. I was taking a memorandum of what was found, and looking over receipts.

Q. Were there any receipts for plate - A. No, when they went into the bed-room I accompanied them - the prisoner was present, he stood by the door in the bed-room.

Q. Are you positive any notes had been found, before he made the statement you mentioned - A. I am, I was nearer to the prisoner than Adkins; he said that he received one parcel of notes from a friend.

Q. You have had notice to produce the plate here - A. I have.

Q. Did the prisoner on his examination, make any

any declaration, or did he deny it - A. He was not asked whether it was true or not.

MR. GURNEY. Q. On Adkins stating what he said, did the prisoner deny it, or say that Adkins had mistaken him - A. He did not, I am perfectly clear respecting the words he uttered on finding the notes.

MR. JARVIS. Q. Did he say the words,

"It is no use" - A. He certainly might have said so; I do not remember the words exactly, but I am perfectly clear about the other words.

HARRY ADKINS. I am an officer of Bow-street, I was at the Post-office when the prisoner was first accused. Mr. Stow first told him there had been several robberies of letters in his department, containing money; this was repeated by Mr. Parkin, who said, it was necessary he should be inquired of about them; he said he had no objection. He was asked whether he had any objection to be searched? he said No. I searched him minutely. He was then asked if he had any objection to having his lodgings searched? he said No. I was then ordered to accompany him there - we walked. He took me to No. 26, Norfolk-street, Strand - he said nothing in the way.

Q. Did you learn from him what his salary was - A. At his lodging Mr. Parkin asked him what it was? I understood him to say 200 l. or guineas. He said he had no other income besides his salary. While I was searching the front room he pretended many times that he wanted something out of the bed-room - he went once or twice into the bedroom; I followed him, and brought him back, and told him that I could not permit him to go there till the other rooms were searched. I found a quantity of glass and furniture in the front room, and a mirror, large chimney-glass, chairs, and sofa. I then searched the middle room, there was a pianoforte, and a large dining-table, which would dine thirty people, and apparently new carpets to fit both rooms; I then searched the bed-room - we all went in together, the prisoner, Mr. Parkin, Francis and myself - neither of them went in before this. I searched two small drawers at the top of a chest, and found a quantity of packs of new cards; the next drawer was opened, which contained linen, table-cloths and sheets - Mr. Parkin assisted me in looking over that. I found six or seven separate parcels of notes in that drawer.

Q. Was any thing said to the prisoner about them - A. Mr. Parkin questioned him about them - the notes were found very near together. After one of the rolls were found, Francis said the prisoner had taken something out of the drawer. I immediately turned round, and said,

"Mr. Jeffcott, what have you got in your hand?" Mr. Parkin and Francis were then in the room. He turned his face towards the door; as I was taking the seals out of his hand he was much agitated, and said in a faint voice,

"It is of no use, I have done wrong - I am guilty." I am positive these were the words. I continued to search, and found more notes - he appeared more agitated, and Mr. Parkin requested him to take a chair. I found more notes in a pen-case - he appeared more agitated, and said,

"Oh dear!" and turned away. I marked the notes that were found - (looks at the 10 l. note,) - this is one of them.

Cross-examined by MR. JARVIS. Q. How long were you searching the rooms before you went into the bed-room - A. I should think it was an hour and a half, if not two hours. Some bills of parcels were found. The prisoner was within a yard or two of me - he could not move without my observing him. He went into the bed-room once or twice, I went with him. Mr. Parkin was writing at the time at some distance - he could not see him.

Q. How many parcels of notes were found before he made the declaration you speak of - A. I cannot tell, but I think one was found.

Q. You will not swear you found any of the notes before he made the declaration - A. I think Mr. Parkin pointed out the roll before he made the declaration. I will not swear it, but my belief is, that the first were found. I did not attend to it so particularly as Mr. Parkin was there. It was not necessary to force the seals from him.

Q. What did the prisoner take out of the drawer - A. Two ladies' gold seals, they were separate. I did not see him take them out. His first words,

"It is of no use," were very faint indeed, as he was turning at the time - his back was towards Mr. Parkin.

Q. These words were said at the time the seals were taken - A. Yes.

COURT. Q. Are you sure of these words - A. I have not the least doubt of it.

JONIAH FRANCIS. I am a clerk in the Post-office. I accampanied Mr. Parkin on the 29th of January to the prisoner's lodgings. I was in the back room at the time the drawer was searched. I observed the prisoner take something out of the drawer, and communicated it to Mr. Parkin and Adkins, who immediately said,

"You have something in your hand, give it to me;" upon which the prisoner immediately gave him a paper containing two gold seals. Nothing farther transpired relative to that fact. Prior to that, I believe one parcel of notes was found - a second parcel was found afterwards.

Q. Did the prisoner say any thing at any time - A. On the discovery of the first parcel Mr. Parkin asked him how he came by it? he said one parcel was his salary; but whether that applied to the first or second parcel I cannot say. The same question was asked about the second - his answer was, that it belonged to a friend, or was given him by a friend, I cannot say which. Upon the discovery of the third parcel, Mr. Parkin stood between me and the prisoner - Adkins was at that time continuing his search at the further end of the drawer. A similar question was put to the prisoner, he faultered, was considerably agitated, and apparently at a loss for an answer. He then, in an under tone of voice said,

"It is of no use - I am guilty," or

"I confess I am guilty;" but Mr. Parkin standing between me and him, I cannot say which he said. I took an account of the bank notes that were found. The 23 l. received for his salary was distinct. One of them was a 10 l. note, dated the 8th December, 1818 - the salaries are paid on the 5th of January. Among the other notes, there were twelve of 10 l. each. The 10 l. note, No. 3548, dated 11th August, 1818, was in the third parcel.

Cross-examined by MR. JARVIS. Q. You saw him take the seals - A. Yes. I was quite near enough to hear any thing he might say at that time.

Q. He said nothing at that time - A. If he had I certainly must have heard him. I believe one parcel had been found at that time.

Q. Had any question been asked relative to the notes

at that time - A. Certainly; he was asked how he came by them? and gave ready answers. He made the declaration on the discovery of the third parcel. I believe only one parcel was found when the seals were delivered up, I remember the words,

"It is of no use;" it was part of the sentence; but whether at the conclusion or beginning I cannot say. I do not remember his saying

"I have done wrong." It is possible that I might not hear the whole of the sentence, but what I have said I am certain he did say.

Q. When the notes were found in the pen-case, did he turn round and say,

"Oh dear!" - A. I remember he was very much agitated, and spoke in a low tone.

JOHN BODEN . I am clerk in the Receiver General's Office at the Post-office, and draw the drafts on the Bank for the prisoner's salary. On the 19th of October I paid him a draft for 55 l., which was 2 l. 10 s. too much. On the 11th of January I paid him 52 l. 10 s.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. Did he not receive a gratuity of 60 l. once - A. He may have had that sum as an arrear, not as a gratuity.

WILLIAM EVERINGHAM . I am a clerk in the Bank. I paid a person 55 l. for the Post-office; who it was I do not know, but it was the only sum I paid on the 19th of October.

JAMES JOHN BOQUET . I am a clerk in the Bank - (looks at the draft) - I entered the notes paid for the draft of 55 l. On the 19th of October I paid two 10 l. notes, No. 12839 and 12840, both dated the 11th of September, and thirty-five 1 l. notes for the check,

WILLIAM WATTS . The check is the prisoner's handwriting; also this order paid in January.

- TAYLOR. I am a clerk in the Bank. On the 11th of January 52 l. 10 s. was paid; Mr. Field posted the notes.

- FIELD. I am a clerk in the Bank. I posted the notes in payment for the check. The two 10 l. notes - Nos. 18660 and 18661, both dated the 8th December, 1818, and thirty-two 1 l. notes, among which are Nos. 26012 to 26023.

Prisoner's Defence (written). From what passed at Bow-street, I was prepared to expect Adkins would give the evidence which he has. I do not mean to impute to him an intention of giving false testimony, though I most positively assert that no such words as he swears to ever escaped my lips. I was told I was suspected, and was willing to be searched. I gave all my keys to Mr. Parkin. My apartments were neatly but not expensively furnished. Every thing was pulled about. A small seal was falling, and to prevent its being injured I caught it. Adkins was called; he seized my hand, and asked me what I was concealing. Conscious of my innocence, this quite unmanned me. I left the bed-room, and said," You are to act as you think proper, I am not a guilty man." Those were my words. I had received 23 l. of the money for my salary. With respect to the rest of the evidence, it would apply to any one in the Post-office. The letter would not come into my hands in the regular course. I was employed in the Norwich division only, and it is next to impossible that it should come to me, except by mistake, and then it might pass through the hands of a hundred persons, and there is the greatest similarity between a letter containing an inclosure, and a single one, and five or six thousand pass through the office every evening. I do most confidently hope that you will consider that some time has elapsed between the time the note was stolen, and when it was found in my possession. The seal was a present from a merchant. As to the money, I have had a salary for years of 200 l. - there can be nothing extraordinary in that. The plate was mostly bought with 60 l. given me by the Post-office. The whole of my furniture, including plate, will not realize 200 l. I paid 70 l. for my lodging, for which I was waited upon. Sometime since I was selected to accept the situation of President in the office, which I declined.

HENRY ROBERT PLAUD . I am a merchant in the city. I occasionally go abroad. I have known the prisoner twelve years; I have been in town twelve and eighteen months together. I was intimately acquainted with the prisoner, and visited him at his lodgings in Norfolk-street - he has lived there three years. A greater part of his furniture was there when he first came. I remember the mirror, pianoforte, and chimney glass, ever since he has been there. I have seen the necessary plate on the table when I have dined there.

HARRY ADKINS re-examined. I produce the plate. Here is a silver tea-pot, sugar-bason, cream-jug, two soup-ladles, four gravy-spoons, two of them new, a fish-slice, four sauce-ladles, twenty-four tea-spoons, a pair of sugar-tongs, sugar-sifter, ten salt-spoons, one mustard-spoon, and a punch-ladle, all silver; an opera-glass, telescope, and kaleidoscope. Some of the plate has his initials on it.

MR. PLAUD re-examined. I have seen plate of this description when I have dined there; I believe I gave him the opera-glass myself, eight or ten years ago. I remember seeing some cut glass at his lodgings ever since he was there; he is a single man. He bore a good character.

MR. GURNEY. Q. What parties have you dined with at his apartments - A. Only three or four persons; I never saw two soup-ladles, or four gravy-spoons, or twenty-four tea-spoons, nor ten salt-spoons. I was there four or five weeks before he was taken up.

Q. Whether all the articles found at his lodgings on the 29th of January, were there when you was, I suppose you cannot say - A. No, I only came to England in October.

COURT. Q. Had you dined with him in this particular lodging before you went abroad - A. I believe I had.

MARY M'BETH. I live in Norfolk-street. The prisoner lodged three years and more with me - his furniture was his own.

Q. What do you think it is worth - A. Not 100 l.; he has had it ever since he came there - he had this plate when he came. He was always very careful of it; he kept it in silver paper, and cleaned it himself.

MR. REYNOLDS. Q. Do you include the chimney-glass in the 100 l. - A. No, that is worth about 10 l.; the mirror is worth about 3 1/2 guineas. I heard that he bought it at a sale very cheap - he has had it a long time.

Q. Was he in the habit of having dinner and supper parties - A. I believe about four times since he came to my house, he has had small parties of six or eight to dinner, and his brother might drop in two or three times a month - he did not have supper or tea parties. I have

known him eight months at a time, and not a soul with him. He did not stay out at night - my man servant told me so. He never had card parties - I never saw any cards in his apartments - my servant waited on him.

MR. SEVESTER. I am a jeweller, and live in New Bond-street. I have known the prisoner fourteen years; I am not in the habit of visiting him. The value of the plate in my judgment, on a rough sketch, is not worth above 75, or 80 guineas - it all appears to have been used. The tea-pot is a fashion of about ten years standing. The sugar-bason, cream-pot, or punch-ladles, are by no means modern. The second-hand value is about 20 l. less. The prisoner bore an excellent character.

MR. BOLLAND. Q. Did he buy any of the plate of you - A. None.

- TIPPEN. I live in Richmond's-buildings, Dean-street, Soho. I know the prisoner. Here are three seals on a ring among his plate. I made one of them for him sixteen years ago.

MR. REYNOLDS. Q. What are the others worth - A. About 2 1/2 guineas each - they are modern jewellery. Here are five more seals, nearly new and modern, worth about 10 l., he bought none of me, except the old fashioned one.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 35.

London Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18190421-55

555. JOHN IRWING was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of March , one gown, value 13 s., the goods of Mary Youd , spinster ; and one handkerchief, value 5 s., the goods of Thomas Moore , from the person of Frances Moore .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating them to be the property of Frances Moore .

FRANCES MOORE . I am the daughter of Thomas Moore . On the 9th of March, about seven o'clock in the evening, I was in Princes-street, Coventry-street , walking with Mary Forest , the prisoner came, and snatched my bundle, which contained the things; he ran down George-yard with it - Forest pursued, and took him. I am certain he is the man.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. It was just dark - I saw his face.

MARY FOREST. I was with Moore. I saw the prisoner run with the bundle, which he took from her; I pursued and kept him in sight until he ran into the Horse and Dolphin public-house. A person who heard me call secured him in the privy - we have never found the bundle - I am sure he is the man.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Confined Six Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190421-56

556. WILLIAM LAWRENCE was indicted for embezzlement .

JAMES CLEMENTS . I am a cheesemonger , and live in Pickett-street, Temple-bar. The prisoner was my porter , and entrusted to receive money for me. He never paid me 5 s., which he received of Mr. Cook.

JOHN COOK . I am a fruiterer. I paid the prisoner 5 s. on the 29th of March, for Mr. Clements. He gave me a receipt.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Fined One Shilling , and Discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190421-57

557. JOHN JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of March , from the person of Richard Dudman , one pocketbook, value 1 s. 6 d., and one 1 l. bank note , his property.

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating the note to be the property of John Coventry .

RICHARD DUDMAN . I am servant to Mr. John Coventry , who lives on Ludgate-hill. On the 19th of March, I stopped to look in Tegg's shop, at the corner of Honey-lane-market , and heard the officer call out,

"Who has lost a book?" I immediately missed my pocket-book from my left-hand coat-pocket. I turned round, and saw the officer with it in one hand, and the prisoner in the other - several people were looking into the shop - the note was my master's.

JOHN LEWIS . I am an officer. I saw the prisoner and another in company at Johnston's print-shop, in Cheapside. They attempted several gentlemen's pockets, who were looking in at the window. They then walked to Tegg's, returned to Johnston's, and then to Tegg's again. I then saw the prisoner come out of the mob. I crossed over, and saw the pocket-book in his hand, trying to put it in his left-hand coat-pocket - he could not get it in. He then put it in the right pocket. I collared him, he tried to get it out. I took it from him, and asked who had lost it? Dudman claimed it. I found a very handsome snuffbox on him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I found it.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190421-58

558. GEORGE WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of March , one brass ring, value 1 s. , the goods of Ebenezer Johnston and William Johnston .

RICHARD EDE MARSHALL . I am apprentice to Ebenezer and William Johnston , who are ironmongers , and live in Bishopsgate-street . On the 11th of March we lost the handle off our door. I put another on, and the next night that was taken.

RICHARD KEPPLE . I am a watchman. On the 12th of March, about a quarter after twelve o'clock at night, I saw the prisoner against a door, and asked him what he was doing there? he said, Nothing. I said he must go to the watch-house. He dropped down on the pavement as we went along, and pulled the handles of three doors out of his pocket - we found several more on him, which were missing off several doors in the street.

JOHN FIELD . I was constable of the night. I found the latches of ten doors on the prisoner, one of which belonged to Mr. Johnston's door - there had been between thirty and forty stolen in two nights. I found a small crow on him.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190421-59

559. THOMAS BUTCHER was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of February , one handkerchief, value 5 s., the goods of Allen Taylor , from his person .

ALLEN TAYLOR . On the 27th of February, between

three and four o'clock in the afternoon I was passing in Bridge-street, Blackfriars , and felt something at my pocket; I turned round, and collared the prisoner with my handkerchief in his hand. He threw it down, and I gave him in charge - two or three others were with him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I picked it up.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190421-60

560. JOSEPH LAWRENCE and THOMAS TOPLEY were indicted for stealing, on the 25th of March , one handkerchief, value 2 s., the goods of Henry Hart , from his person .

HENRY HART . On the 25th of March, about eleven o'clock, I was in Cheapside - there was a little stoppage. As I was making my way through, somebody touched me on the shoulder, and I saw two persons with each a man in custody. Stone had my handkerchief, which I missed.

JOSEPH STONE . I am an officer. On the 25th of March I was with Lewis in Cheapside - a horse was laying in the street, which caused a crowd. I saw the two prisoners and another person following the prosecutor; I let them go by me, and as they were passing I saw Lawrence take the handkerchief from Hart's pocket. I collared him, and took it from him - Lewis took Topley. I am certain they were in company. I saw them talking together.

JOHN LEWIS . I was with Stone, and secured Topley.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

LAWRENCE'S Defence. The other man is innocent.

LAWRENCE - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Life .

TOPLEY - NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190421-61

561. MERRY WEBBERLY was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of March , one sheet, value 2 s., and one pillow, value 3 s., the goods of James Butler , in a lodging-room .

MARY BUTLER . I am the wife of James Butler . We keep the George and Dragon, public-house , Angel-alley, Bishopsgate-street . I let the prisoner a two pair room, furnished. He remained there from Tuesday till Friday, when I gave him in charge for running up a reckoning at my house; he brought about thirty men there, who he represented as a society of shoemakers, who were striking for wages; they run up a score of 4 l. 5 s. - he said the secretary would pay every thing. I went up stairs, and missed these things out of his room.

WILLIAM TALKARD. I am a pawnbroker. On the 22d of March, a woman pledged a sheet and pillow with me.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing of this.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190421-62

562. THOMAS HARRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of February , one wicker basket, value 2 s., and six dozen bottles, value 20 s. , the goods of Richard Westbrook and William West Jones .

WILLIAM WEST JONES. I am in partnership with Richard Westbrook , and live in Upper Thames-street, On the 27th of February some bottles were to be carried from a barge to our warehouse - the barge laid near All-hallows-stairs, 158 prickles were to be brought - they each contained six dozen bottles. We lost two prickles.

JAMES ROWEN . I am the prosecutor's foreman. I employed the prisoner to assist in carrying these bottles from the barge to the warehouse - eight men were employed, the prisoner was one. I observed that he missed his turn, which made me suspect him. I saw him return, and asked him why he was absent? he said he went for a shovel. 158 prickles were delivered from the barge, but only 156 brought to the warehouse.

JOHN COMBS , ESQ. I am a Common Councilman. About half-past three o'clock in the afternoon I was going home, and saw the prisoner in Chequer-yard with a prickle of bottles. I was landing bottles at the same time, which induced me to watch him, as he was walking fast. I followed him over Dowgate-hill into Elbow-lane, which is considerably out of the way to the prosecutor's warehouse, which is in Thames-street.

Prisoner. Q. What dress had I on - A. Either a black or dark coat - I have no doubt of his being the man - I knew him well, being in the habit of employing him.

Prisoner's Defence. I deny being in Chequer-yard. I took the bottles to the warehouse.

GUILTY . Aged 43.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190421-63

563. NICHOLAS M'CORMAC was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of February , one wicker basket, value 2 s., and six dozen bottles, value 20 s. , the goods of Richard Westbrook and William West Jones .

JAMES ROWAN . I am foreman to Richard Westbrook and William West Jones. The prisoner was employed to assist in carrying 158 prickles of bottles from a barge to the warehouse . He absconded, missed two turns, and came to me in a great perspiration, and said he had been for some beer.

JAMES FLANNAGAN . I am the prosecutor's servant. I saw the prisoner in Bush-lane; he turned into Chequer-yard, with a basket of bottles on his knot.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190421-64

564. JOHN REYNOLDS was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of March , two saws, value 7 s. , the goods of John Smith .

JOHN SMITH . I am a carpenter , and live in Old Fish-street. On the 17th of March I was fetched from dinner, and found the prisoner in custody with the saws. I found another in his coat pocket.

GEORGE PAYNE . I live next door to Smith. I saw a man come out of his shop, and followed him, but lost sight of him. I stopped the prisoner in the street with the saws.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 60.

Confined Six Months , and Whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190421-65

565. THOMAS PHILLIPS was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of March , one table-cloth, value 3 s.; one pinafore, value 6 d., and one salt-cellar, value 6 d., the goods of Richard Norman ; two caps, value 2 s.; one gown, value 2 s.; six aprons, value 2 s.; one petticoat, value 2 s., and two shawls, value 5 s. , the goods of Caroline Edmead .

CAROLINE EDMEAD . I am servant to Mr. Richard Norman , who lives in Broad-court, Long-acre - he is a performer at Covent-garden Theatre . On the 10th of March, about five o'clock in the afternoon, the street-door was left open. I went up stairs, and as I came down I found the prisoner in the yard, and a woman secreted behind the kitchen-door. I called out - she told me not to be frightened, for she came for Mrs. Williams; no such person lived there, I found the articles stated in the indictment tied in a bundle, and on the floor. She denied having touched them - they were both secured.

JOHN EDWARDS . I keep the house. I secured the prisoner in the passage coming from the yard. Soon after I saw the woman coming up stairs - she said she came for Mrs. Williams, a dress-maker.

EMANUEL EMANUEL . I was at Norman's, in the dining-room. Hearing a noise below I went down, and saw the prisoner and a woman - I minded the door, while Norman went for a constable; the prisoner came to the door, and tried to escape. I found the bundle on the floor, and the clean and dirty linen thrown together. The prisoner said,

"I don't care, you cannot lag us this time, you found nothing on us."

SAMUEL LACK , I am an officer. I went to the prosecutor's house. Edmead said two thieves were in the house. I found the prisoner in the yard, and the woman on the stairs - he knew me. I found a remnant of silk in the crown of his hat. He said to the woman,

"They can't hurt us. for they found nothing on us - Mr. Lack, you won't lag (transport) us this time."

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I went to the yard for a necessary purpose.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190421-66

566. WILLIAM JENNINGS was indicted for the wilful murder of Mary Ann Condon .

MARY CONDON . I am the mother of the deceased, Mary Ann Condon . I sell soup under the Piazza, in Covent-garden. The prisoner came to my house at three o'clock one morning about Christmas, I charged him with stealing a water-cock, and forbid his coming any more - this was about the 14th of January. Next morning, about seven o'clock, he brought me some coal under the Piazza, he said it was composition coal, and was like the Kilkenny coal, which would make a nice fire without smoke. He emptied the charcoal out of my box, and put it in there - there was about a man's hatful of it. He went away. I took it home about ten o'clock, and put a piece about the size of an egg on the fire; Mary Ann Condon and Mary Ann Cormac were near the fire at the time, also myself, and my son Thomas. The moment it was put on the fire it exploded, made a great report, and set every thing on fire; it burnt my face, apron, and shawl - it struck the children on the face, hands, and arms. Cormac was taken to the hospital immediately, with Condon. Cormac lived from Thursday until the Saturday, and then died. My daughter lived near six weeks after. I do not know what the ingredients were. The rest of it burnt in the basket. A spark caught the basket, which was near the fire, and all blew up.

Q. Do you think he meant to injure you - A. No.

- BURGESS. I am surgeon of St. Giles's workhouse, where the deceased, Condon, was. I saw her every day. She was burnt shockingly - nearly her whole body was burnt; she died in the workhouse on the 24th of February, which was six or seven weeks after the accident. She was in great pain all the time, and in my judgment the burning was the cause of her death. It produced so much debility and weakness that she was exhausted.

Prisoner's Defence. I thought it was patent coal.

GUILTY. Aged 33.

Of Manslaughter only .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18190421-67

567. GEORGE PRICE was indicted, for that he, on the 9th of February , at St. James, Clerkenwell , feloniously did dispose of and put away a forged and counterfeit bank note (setting it forth, No. 2157, 19 November, 1818, 20 l. signed J. D. Capel), with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England , he well knowing it to be forged and counterfeited, against the statute .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only calling the forged instrument a promissory note for payment of money, instead of a bank note.

TWO OTHER COUNTS, the same, only stating his intent to be to defraud Edward Wood , William Wood , and Leonard Phillips .

WILLIAM WOOD . I am a coal-merchant , in partnership with Edward Wood and Leonard Phillips , we live in Northumberland-street, Strand. On the 9th of February, about half-past eight o'clock in the morning, I was alone in the counting-house, the prisoner came in and asked if I would send a chaldron of coals for his master, Mr. Williams, who had taken lodgings at Mr. Jackson's, No. 7, Newman-street, Oxford-street. I asked him if we had ever sent any there before? He said No; but his master had ordered him to go down to the waterside, and it made no difference where he went to. I said I could send them, and asked him if I should write a receipt for them? he said Yes - he was going to pay for them if I could give him change for a 20 l. note, and if I could not he must go to the Bank for it. He then pulled out a 20 l. note; I looked at it, and then wrote him a receipt, first asking him how far the men were to carry the coals, in order to charge for the shooting; he said they were to be shot through a hole in the street. They came

to 2 l. 17 s. 6 d. I gave him a receipt (looks at a 20 l. note). This is the note he gave me, it has

"Williams, 9 - 2 - 19" on it, which I wrote about two hours after, but I kept it separate in my pocket. I desired him to follow me up to my dwelling-house, as I had no change - he did so, and stood in the passage while I went up stairs for it; I came down, gave him the change, and asked him if it was right - he said it was; I opened the door, and he went out, requesting I would be sure to let them be of the best quality.

Q. How was he dressed - A. With a large frock coat, straight front, with yellow buttons, corderoy breeches, and top boots, as if he was a groom. We sent the coals by Gower - they came back again.

Cross-examined by MR. BROADRICK. Q. When did you see him afterwards - A. About three weeks, or a month. I took the name in my book at the time. I wrote on the note in two hours after; I discovered it was forged in two hours after. I remember the man well, and have no doubt of his being the same.

COURT. Q. When were the coals returned - A. About half an hour after I discovered the note to be forged.

LEWIS GUINIGAT . I am servant to Mr. Wood. On the 9th of February, about half-past eight o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner in the hall - he was dressed in a long brown frock coat and top boots; he was very clean. He was there when I went up stairs, and when I came down again - I noticed him particularly not knowing him. He came into the hall - I am certain he is the man.

Cross-examined. I did not see him for three weeks after; but I heard at dinner-time that my master had taken a forged note, which called my attention to the man.

JOSEPH GOWER . I am carman to Mr. Wood. On the 9th of February I went to No. 7, Newman-street, Oxford-street, with a chaldron of coals, to Mr. Williams - the maid-servant told me that no such person lived there, and refused to take them in.

JOHN JACKSON . On the 9th of February, I occupied No. 7, Newman-street; my name is on the door. I do not let lodgings, and had no lodgers of the name of Williams. I never saw the prisoner, nor did I order any coals of Mr. Wood.

WILLIAM BENT . I am a coal-merchant, at Cannon Wharf, Parliament-street. On the 9th of February, early in the morning, the prisoner came to my counting-house, dressed in a brown coat, with large gilt buttons, striped waistcoat, corderoy breeches, and top boots - I have no doubt of the prisoner being the person. He said he came to order a chaldron of coals for Mr. Williams, at Mr. Jackson's, No. 7, Newman-street, Oxford-street. I asked him if Mr. Williams had had coals of us before? he said his master was only just come to town, and had taken lodgings at Mr. Jackson's. I asked him who sent him to my wharf? he said he was directed to the water-side, and knowing my wharf by coming by at times, he came there. I made some objections to sending coals to a total stranger, which he endeavoured to remove, and said, if I would write him a receipt, he would pay me. As I was taking out a stamp, he said,

"You of course can give me change for a 20 l. note," which I objected to, and said I would send the change with the coals. He said it was not material, as his master had ordered him to go to the Bank if I could not give him change. I intended to send the coals in the course of the day, but did not, in consequence of what I heard from Mr. Wood. The prisoner came to my wharf soon after eight o'clock. It is five or ten minutes walk from Northumberland-street.

Cross-examined. Q. Will you swear he is the man - A. I have no doubt of it, but I will not take upon myself to swear to him. I had a very transitory view of his person, but my attention was called to the circumstance the same morning.

FRANCIS PARSONS . I am carman to Mr. Bent. The prisoner is the man who came the beginning or about the middle of February - I was by the warehouse door at the time. He had a long frock coat on, top boots, and corderoy breeches - he appeared like a groom. He asked me the way to Mr. Bent's office to order some coals? I directed him, and saw him go in; Simpson was with me.

Cross-examined. I took particular notice of him; he stood still, and looked me full in the face. I made a remark to Simpson about his dress and appearance after he was gone by.

WILLIAM SIMPSON . I am a coal-meter. On the 9th of February I saw the prisoner come down Bent's yard a little after eight o'clock in the morning. I was standing in the yard with Parsons, and took particular notice of him. He was dressed in a brown frock coat, yellow buttons, light corded breeches, and top boots. He inquired of us if it was a coal-wharf? I said it was, and showed him the counting-house - I saw him go in and come out again in five or six minutes, and asked him if he had seen anybody there? he said he had. The same evening, or next morning, I heard something from Mr. Wood, which called the circumstance to my mind. I am certain of his person. I did not see him again till about the middle of March, at Marlborough-street, and knew him again immediately. We both took particular notice of him, and spoke to each other about him.

WILLIAM LITTLE . I am clerk to Messrs. Thompson and Monkhouse, coal-merchants, Blackfriars. On the 21st of January, about five o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came to the wharf, went into the counting-house, and asked if we could send him a chaldron of coals the following morning? I said we could, and asked him who they were for? he said they were for his master, Mr. Smith, at Mr. Leighton's, No. 17, Albemarle-street, Piccadilly. I told him he must have made a mistake, for we did not serve them. He said he had not made a mistake, for he meant to pay for them. I asked him if I was to make a bill and receipt? he said Yes. I was alone; he gave me a 20 l. note - I said I could not give him change, but if he would step with me to Mr. Monkhouse's dwelling-house, very likely he might give change. Just as we were going, Mr. Monkhouse came into the counting-house, it was candle-light. I told him what had passed. He asked my opinion of the note? I had looked at it, and told him I thought it was a good one - it was quite new. Mr. Monkhouse turned to the prisoner, and said he hoped he was not giving him a bad note. He said his master gave him the 20 l. note to buy a chaldron of coals and other things that morning, and gave him no particular orders where to go; that his master was a single gentleman, and lived at No. 1, Albany, Piccadilly; that his mother was

coming to town the following morning, and that he had taken apartments for her at Mr. Leighton's, No. 16, Albemarle-street, where the coals were to be sent to. Mr. Monkhouse wrote Mr. Smith and the residence on the note before he gave him the change - (looks at one) - this is it. He was dressed in a straight brown coat, gilt buttons, top boots, and I think a striped waistcoat, and had a stick in his hand - he appeared to be a groom. I sent Hart with the coals the next morning - they came back.

Cross-examined. He was about ten minutes with me. I have no doubt of his person.

JONATHAN MONKHOUSE . I am in partnership with William Thompson , Earl-street, Blackfriars. I believe the prisoner to be the man who came on the 21st of January. I met him coming out of the door with my clerk to get change. I went in with them - the prisoner stood at my elbow; my clerk had the bill and receipt in his hand. The prisoner handed me the note, I examined it by the candle, and handed it in to my clerk for his opinion - he said he had no reason to doubt it. I told the prisoner forged notes were frequent, and I hoped he was not giving me a bad one. He said it was given him by his master for him to buy coals and other things, in the City. I asked him why he came to me? he said he came promiscuously, that his master's name was Mr. Smith, No. 1, Albany, and the coals were for his master's mother, who was coming to town next morning, and he had taken her lodgings at No. 16, Albemarle-street, where the coals where ordered. I wrote the address and name on the note in his presence (looks at one), this is it. I gave him 17 l. 2 s. 6 d. deducting 2 l. 17 s. 6 d. He was dressed in a brown groom's coat, buttoned close up - I did not notice the rest of his dress. I sent the coals next morning, they came back. Nobody called for the 2 l. 17 s. 6 d.

Cross-examined. Q. You will not swear positive to him - A. I will not, but I have no doubt of him.

JOHN HART . I am carman to Messrs. Monkhouse and Co. On the 22d of January I took the coals to No. 16, Albemarle-street; my direction was to

"Mrs. Smith, at Mr. Leighton's." I could find no such person lived there. I could find no such person in the street.

MR. THOMAS LUXMORE . I am steward of the Albany. The houses are lettered from A up to L, which represents the staircases, which are divided into different stories and chambers. No person of the name of Smith lived at No. 1 in any of them, on the 21st of January last. Mr. Newman Smith lived in letter 1. No. 2, and had lived there upwards of six months. He was the only Mr. Smith there at the time.

NEWMAN SMITH, ESQ. I lived at No. 2, in letter I, in January last. The prisoner was not my servant. I do not know him.

JOHN LAYCON . I live at No. 16, Albemarle-street. I have lived there three years, my name is on the door. Nobody of the name of Smith or Leighton, lived there. I never ordered any coals of Thompson and Co. I never saw the prisoner before.

COURT. Q. Had you any reason to expect a person to your house to lodge - A. Lord O'Neil lodged with me; I had no other lodger, nor expected any.

JOHN FOY . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner on the 14th of March, in the passage of No. 7, Peter-street, Cow-cross; he said he lodged there, and that his name was Thomas Williams . I told him he was suspected of uttering forged notes - he said he had none in his possession.

SARAH HESSEY . I keep the house, No. 7, Peter-street, Cow-cross. The prisoner lodged with me at the time he was apprehended. On the 16th of January I let the room to his wife; he came on the 17th, and remained there until he was taken up. He went by the name of Garrett.

COURT. Q. How used he to dress - A. Very clean and neat; he used to wear a dark green coat, and sometimes a blue one.

Cross-examined. I understood him to be a porter. I used to call him Garrett - he never objected to it.

THOMAS GLOVER. I am an inspector of bank notes (looks at the note uttered to Mr. Wood), it is forged in every respect; it is not the bank plate, paper, or the signature of J. D. Capel; it is a very bad imitation of his writing. The water-mark appears to be impressed. The other is also forged in every respect; both appear to be off the same plate and paper - it is signed

"R. Law." There is no cashier of that name. There is Robert Low , but he does not sign 20 l. notes.

Cross-examined. I have seen the water-mark made in a genuine note.

JAMES DURNFORD CAPEL . I am a cashier in the Bank, and sign 5 l. notes, and upwards. The note is not signed by me - it bears no resemblance to my hand.

ROBERT LOW. I only sign 1 l. and 2 l. notes. The note signed Low, is not my writing.

(The note was here put in and read.)

Prisoner's Defence. I never had a 20 l. note in my hands. I am not the person.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 20.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18190421-68

568. SUSANNAH TAVERNER and WILLIAM TAVERNER were indicted for feloniously having in their custody and possession three forged notes for the payment of 5 l. each, they well knowing them to be forged .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating it to be for having one of the said forged notes in their possession.

THIRD COUNT. For having the said notes in a certain dwelling-house of their's.

FOURTH COUNT, stating it to be a lodging instead of a dwelling-house.

FIFTH COUNT, stating it to be in a certain apartment.

SIXTH, SEVENTH, AND EIGHTH COUNTS, stating them to be the dwelling-house, lodging and apartments belonging to the said Susannah Taverner .

NINTH, TENTH, and ELEVENTH COUNTS, stating them to belong to the said William Taverner .

JOSEPH MAYO . I am guard to the old Prince of Wales Birmingham coach, which goes from the George and Blue Boar, Holborn. On the 4th of April, the prisoner, William Taverner , went inside - he has lost a leg, which made me notice him - he took his place for Stratford upon Avon. When he got into the coach, he said he was going to Beerley-cross, which is a public-house four miles and a half from Stratford - I put him down there on the 5th of April, about half-past seven o'clock in the morning; William Kitchener , a blind man, and his wife keep the house.

I went on to Birmingham, which is seventeen miles and a half further. I returned the same evening, and reached Beerley-cross between eight and nine o'clock. Mrs. Kitchener called out, and said she had a passenger and parcel for me. William Taverner got in, and wished the people good night. The landlady gave me a frail-basket, which I put into the coach. The boy gave me 2 d., and told me to be sure and get it booked at the first place I came to, which I did at Stratford upon Avon - I saw the name of Ward on it. We arrived at the White Horse cellar about half-past seven o'clock on Tuesday, the 6th of April, and put Taverner down there - the coach and parcel went on to the Blue Boar; I then saw the parcels were all right according to the weigh-bill. I delivered the parcel with the rest to the book-keeper. I took particular notice of it, as I had a suspicion about it. I afterwards pointed it out to Iles, the porter. It was directed to Mrs. Ward, in Clerkenwell - I do not recollect the street.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. The woman of the house gave me the parcel. My suspicions arose from the place it came from, and I told Iles to take notice where he went to.

JAMES ILES . I am a porter at the George and Blue Boar - I deliver the parcels. On the 6th of April I assisted in unloading the coach. The guard directed my attention to a basket, directed to Mrs. Ward, No. 41, Compton-street, St. John-street, Clerkenwell - it was fastened with strings. In consequence of what Mayo said to me, I was induced to undo one corner of it. I got one hand in, and felt something like a fowl with feathers on - on putting my hand a little further, I felt a paper parcel; I then undid it a little more, pulled the parcel out, and opened it - it was folded up. It contained bank notes. One bundle contained five notes not tied up; what the other contained I do not know - this was at the Robin Hood , public-house, in Holborn. I immediately told the landlord, and showed it to him - I then took it to Mr. C. Ibbertson, who was my master, gave him the basket we had undone there, and found six rolls of notes tied up in one parcel. Mr. Ibberson, another gentleman, and myself, then went to the Bank, and left the basket locked up in Mr. Ibbertson's private office. Sometime after, Mr. Ibbertson called me, and told me to pack the basket up as before, which I did in his presence, and put the notes in again. I went with my cart as usual - Foy and Mr. Milton followed me to Compton-street. I stopped short of the door, and was pulling the basket out of the cart - I had not time to knock at the door, before the female prisoner came out, putting a smile on her countenance. I went up to her with the basket under my arm, and said,

"Mrs. Ward, is this right?" and looking at the direction -

"Yes," she said,

"my name is Ward." I said,

"I have a basket for you, which comes to 2 s. 2 d." She gave me 2 s. 6 d., and said,

"Give me 4 d." I had given her the basket. I said I had no halfpence - she said,

"Never mind the halfpence, keep them." I said,

"Good woman, I don't want them," and gave her the 6 d. back, upon which she turned her head towards the door, and said,

"William, have you any halfpence?" a man's voice said,

"No, I have not." She put her hand into her own pocket, and gave me 2 1/2 d. I took it, and went away. Before I left the door, Foy came up and went in. It is a private house.

Cross-examined. by MR. ALLEY. Q. Were you authorized to open parcels - A. No. I did not tell my master or the book-keeper that I meant to open it. I told the landlord of the Robin Hood . I have been four years in my place.

Q. I suppose you did not put the paper parcel there yourself - A. No. The Robin Hood is about ten doors from our inn.

MR. REYNOLDS. Q. Had the guard told you of any suspicious he had - A. Yes, and I told the landlord of the public-house before I opened it. I had delivered a parcel at that house on the 27th of March, addressed to William Taverner, in his own name - I delivered it to him. When I found this parcel directed to the same place it created my suspicion.

WILLIAM SELL. I keep the Robin Hood , public-house, in Holborn. On the 6th of April Iles came to my house with a basket - I knew he was porter at the George and Blue Boar. He communicated his suspicions about the basket, and said he should like to satisfy his curiosity, for the guard had told him there was something wrong in it. He went into the back-room - I was busy at the time. In five or six minutes he called me. There were five or six parcels of bank notes, and one loose parcel, which contained 5 l. notes - the others were tied up. I said,

"Put them into the basket, and go and tell your master," which he immediately did.

Cross-examined by MR. LOVETT. He said he should like to go in with me and open it.

CHRISTAIN IBBERTSON, JUN. I am book-keeper at the George and Blue Boar. On the 6th of April Mayo called my attention to a basket directed to Mrs. Ward, Compton-street, Clerkenwell - it came by the Birmingham coach, and was put ready for Iles to deliver.

CHRISTAIN IBBERTSON. I keep the George and Blue Boar Inn. On the 6th of April Iles brought me a basket, it contained a couple of fowls, and some rolls of bank notes. I locked part of them up, and took the rest to the Bank. They were replaced, and the basket sewed up - Iles was to deliver it. He has been five or six years in our service.

JOHN FOY . I am an officer. On the 6th of April I had direction, went to the George and Blue Boar, and saw the basket, it was sewed up. Iles took it, I followed, and saw him stop rather short of the house, and deliver it to a person. As he was leaving the door I went up, and saw the female prisoner in the passage with the basket under her arm - Milton followed me into the passage. I said,

"What have you got there, Mrs. Taverner?" she made no answer, but went into the parlour, and threw the basket on the floor - the male prisoner was there. I asked her what it contained? she said she did not know. I asked her where it came from, and who it belonged to? she said she did not know. I asked her what she paid for it? she said 2 s. 3 d. she believed. I said,

"You would not have paid for it unless you knew who it belonged to, I should think." She said an acquaintance of her's called on her about a fortnight before, to request she might have a parcel directed there for her, and her name was Ward. I asked her where she was to be found, and where she lived? she said she did not know. I asked her when the person was to call for it? she said she did not know - perhaps tomorrow. I cut it open, and showed them the contents -

they denied all knowledge of it; the male prisoner was sitting at the table. The basket contained 496 1 l. and 19 5 l. notes - (examines them) - these are them; I marked them all before I parted with them. When I was up stairs, I asked the woman if she had any lodgers? she said she had a young woman and her father, of the name of Card. I asked her if she had any lodger of the name of Ward? she said she had not, nor never had. I said it was very strange she could give no account of Mrs. Ward - she said she never saw her in her life. Mr. Milton said,

"How is that? why you said she was an acquaintance, and called on you a fortnight ago." She said,

"I never saw her in my life." He said,

"How did she procure leave to have the parcel directed here?" she said she received a letter from her about a week ago, asking permission, but she had destroyed the letter.

Cross-examined by MR. LOVETT. Q. Where did you first give your evidence - A. At the Office. I made a deposition, which was read over at the time in the presence of the prisoners and their Counsel - I said it was true.

MR. BOLLAND. Q. Were you examined in the usual manner before the magistrate - A. Yes.

ROBERT MILTON . I am an inspector at the Bank. I went to Mr. Ibbertson, and saw the basket and its contents. I followed the cart with Foy, who has given a correct account of the transaction.

ROBERT BAKER , ESQ. I am a magistrate at Marlborough-street Office. The prisoners were examined before me on the 6th of April, and were asked what they had to say? - (reads) - Sarah Taverner said,

"That the person desired her to let the parcel be left; that she did not know who he was, or where he lived." (I had asked her where he lived, supposing it to be a man, and she adopted my conclusion of its being a man.) William Taverner said,

"He went on Sunday to Colnbrook-fair, and came back that morning (Tuesday) - that he left Colnbrook between eight and ten o'clock, and was sat down in Piccadilly." On the 13th, Sarah Taverner said the person who desired the parcel might be left, was a woman.

THOMAS CHANDLER . I live in Bow-lane, and am the proprietor of the house, No. 41, Compton-street. The prisoners came to live there between Midsummer and Michaelmas last. I received the rent from William Taverner , and gave the receipts in his mother's name.

THOMAS GLOVER . I am an inspector of bank notes. The whole of the notes are forged in every respect. The 5 l. notes are signed Draper, but they are not his signature. All the 1 l. notes are off the same plate.

SAMUEL DRAPER . I am signing clerk of 1 l. and 2 l. notes only. The 5 l. notes are not my signature.

(The notes were then put in read.)

Prisoner's Defence - (written.) Sarah Taverner rented the house, and had a friend named Ward, who, about the latter end of March, leaving town, and having been in habits of the closest friendship with her, applied to her to have the parcel left with her. The prisoner, William Taverner , had just returned from a journey into the country, where he had been to buy horses, and was apprehended. Sarah Taverner never denied knowing Mrs. Ward, and that they had no knowledge of the contents of the basket.

S. TAVERNER - GUILTY . Aged 51.

W. TAVERNER - GUILTY . Aged 31.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18190421-69

569. JAMES CLARK was indicted for feloniously having a forging bank note for payment of 5 l. in his possession, he knowing it to be forged .

MARTHA ORAM . I am the wife of James Oram , who keeps the Lincoln's Inn coffee-house, in the Strand. On the 13th of April the prisoner came into our house with another man, who went away; between five and six o'clock Limbrick came in, the prisoner endeavoured to pass him, but he seized him; the prisoner looked confused, and threw a parcel into the bar, I took it up, and threw into the passage again. They were scuffling together.

JOHN LIMBRICK . I am an officer of Hatton-garden. I was with Read at the Lincoln's Inn coffee-house; we sat down and had a pint of beer, and saw the prisoner there, reading the newspaper, and leering under his hat at us; I went out, returned in less than a minute, and saw him coming out of the tap-room - he seemed very much confused, looked at me, and went towards the bar. I saw a paper parcel in his hand, he appeared to throw it on the ground, but whether he threw it into the bar or not, I cannot say; it was done while I turned my head to call Read - I saw it lying in the passage, and seeing him going to the back of the premises, I laid hold of him; he immediately threw a small parcel down the privy, which was at the end of the passage. I brought him back, picked up the parcel in the passage, and delivered it to Read. I waited at the privy till Edmonds came, I let him down, and he brought up a parcel which I opened, it contained five 1 l. notes. The parcel found in the passage contained four parcels, each containing twenty 1 l. notes, and ten 1 l. notes in another; and a small bag, containing twelve 2 l., ten 5 l., and six 1 l. notes, all of which I marked (looks at them) - these are them. Those found in the privy have names written upon them, and were folded up separately; the rest are new.

ROBERT EDMONDS . I am a chimney-sweeper. On the 13th of April I was sent for to Oram's, went down the privy, and brought a paper parcel up, which I delivered to Limbrick. It laid at the top of the soil.

JAMES ORAM . I keep the house. I saw the boy bring the parcel out of the privy and deliver it to Limbrick - it contained five 1 l. notes.

WILLIAM READ . I was with Limbrick. He has spoken correctly.

THOMAS GLOVER . These notes are all forged in every respect. The 5 l. notes are all off one plate, and the ones are also off one plate.

SAMUEL DRAPER . I am a signing clerk at the Bank, but do not sign 5 l. notes. The notes are not my signing. Several of them purport to be signed by me.

(The notes were here put in and read.)

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18190421-70

570. CHARLES WRIGHT was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Christopher Wilkinson , about four o'clock in the night of the 17th of March , at Allhallows on London-wall , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, 80 lbs. of tea, value 40 l. , his property.

CHRISTOPHER WILKINSON . I am a wholesale tea-dealer , and live at No. 5, Wormwood-street , London-wall. On the 17th of March my house was broken open - I was out of town at the time.

ANN WILKINSON . I am the wife of the last witness. On the 17th of March I was at home; I was the last person that went to bed - the house was made fast. About half-past five o'clock on Thursday morning I was awoke by the servant telling me some persons were ringing the street-door bell; I desired her to put her head out of window to see what it was. She then told me the watchman said there were thieves in the house. I dressed myself, went down stairs with her, and took the keys of the warehouse in my hand. I found a bag of tea in the passage, another in the warehouse, and an empty bag in the warehouse.

Q. How did they get access to the warehouse - A. A hole was made in the cellar, which was not there a week before - the wine-cellar, warehouse, and counting-house doors were forced open, also the counting-house desk. The street-door had been opened wide - it was not forced; the bars were taken down. My husband keeps the house, it is in the parish of Allhallows - the warehouse is part of the dwelling-house.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. It was not dark at half-past five o'clock - A. We struck a light, but it was light enough to see a man's countenance - I did not see the house closed the night before.

ROBERT GADBURY . I am a watchman. On the 17th of March, I was on duty, and examined Mr. Wilkinson's door - I found it completely fast. In the morning, about five o'clock, I was going my rounds again - I tried the prosecutor's door again, and found it on the latch. I pushed it open, and found three men inside the door - the prisoner was one. I endeavoured to hold the door to until I could get assistance - two men rushed out upon me, but I collared the prisoner inside the door, and never quitted him till I got him to the watch-house - he is the man. The name of the parish is Allhallows, London-wall.

Cross-examined. It was just getting light. I can swear to one of the others if I saw him again.

JOHN BRADY . I am an officer of Broad-street Ward. On the 18th of March, between five and six o'clock in the morning, the prisoner was brought to the watch-house by one of the watchmen, who charged him with housebreaking. I searched him, and in his possession found six skeleton keys, two other regular keys, a phosphorus bottle, a gimlet, and a large knife.

JOSEPH TURNER . I am a watchman. I went to Gadbury's assistance, and saw him struggling with the prisoner; I went up, laid hold of him, and took him to the watch-house.

JOHN CROKER . I am an officer. On the 18th of March, between five and six o'clock in the morning, the prisoner was brought to the watch-house - I was there. Harrington and I went immeditately to search the house, leaving the prisoner at the watch-house. We met Mrs. Wilkinson coming out of the cellar; we went into the cellar, and found a hole in the wall, between the prosecutor's house and the next, which is uninhabited; it is a very thick wall, and would certainly take some time to break through it - it must have taken half or three parts of the night. We went into the warehouse, and found the tea scattered about, and some in bags; we weighed them separately, tied them up, and sealed them. One bag weighed 38 lbs. and the other 42 lbs. - we searched all over the house but found nothing. I ascended the wall of the adjoining empty house with a little assistance, and got in at the first-floor back window; I went down into the cellar, and saw the bricks where they had broken through the wall into the prosecutor's house - the empty house is at the corner of Union-court.

Cross-examined. Q, Was the next house under repair, or untenanted - A. Untenanted; it might have been broken in the day for what I know. It is a party-wall, and very thick - the hole was large enough for the prisoner to get through; I found no bolts there.

JOHN HARRINGTON . I am an officer. On the 18th of March, a little after five o'clock in the morning, I left the watch-house, and was going round the ward, and met Gadbury and Turner in Broad-street with the prisoner. I returned to the watch-house with them, and after leaving him in custody I and Croker went to the prosecutor's house, and met Mrs. Wilkinson coming out of the cellar. We found a breach made in the wall that divided the house from the empty house - it was a brick wall about eighteen inches thick; it was more than one brick thick. We then went up into the warehouse, found two bags with tea in them, and one empty bag. One bag contained 38 lbs. and the other 42 lbs., and tied up. We found nobody up stairs.

Cross-examined. I think the prisoner could get through the hole.

PETER LEE . I am a watchman of Bishopsgate Ward. I heard a call for assistance, and found the prisoner in custody of two watchmen - they had been struggling. Gadbury sent me into the prosecutor's house; a bag of tea stood by the door, and a hat laid by the side of it. There was an empty bag there, and another bag full, not tied up. Three or four chests of tea appeared to be broken open.

MR. WILKINSON. The bags are not mine - tea is not kept in bags.

Prisoner's Defence. I saw a parcel lay on the step of the door, picked it up, and the watchman instantly seized me. The parcel contained implements for housebreaking.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 32.

London Jury; before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190421-71

571. SARAH EVANS was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of April , one dress, value 20 s. , the property of Edward Smith and James Smith .

BENJAMIN BUTTERS . I am servant to Messrs. Edward and James Smith , Houndsditch. On the 16th of April the prisoner came to sell a gown, I refused to buy it; she went out; in about ten minutes I was informed a dress had been taken, I ran out to follow her, but lost her.

ABRAHAM DOUGHTON . I am a porter. I was opposite Messrs. Smiths, and saw the prisoner take the dress from

the door; she came over to me, and asked the way to Rosemary-lane, and offered me sixpence to sell it. I told Mr. Smith.

SEPTIMUS SADLER . I am a pawnbroker. On the 16th of April a woman brought the dress to pledge, it having a private mark, I suspected her; she went out and brought the prisoner in, she said she had it from her; the prisoner said it was her's, and asked why I detained it. I gave her in charge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 46.

Confined Three Months .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190421-72

572. WILLIAM BUSHNELL was indicted for stealing on the 7th of March , one waistcoat, value 3 s.; one pair of trowsers, value 1 s.; three handkerchiefs, value 14 s. 6 d.; and one shirt, value 5 s., the goods of Thomas Cook ; one jacket, value 8 s.; one pair of trowsers, value 6 s.; two pair of stockings, value 1 s., and two shirts, value 3 s., the goods of Allen Wyatt , in a barge on the Navigable River of Thames .

THOMAS COOK . I am a bargeman . On Sunday morning, the 7th of March, I missed my things out of my chest, which was in the hatches - the prisoner worked on the barge. I apprehended him that night at Westminster, at a public-house, and found a bundle under the table where he sat, containing the property.

ALLEN WYATT . I was master of the barge . I lost my things also.

JOHN BROWN. On the 7th of March, about eleven o'clock at night, I was sent for, and took the prisoner in charge. I found a jacket, waistcoat, trowsers, and handkerchief in the bundle. He said he sold the rest on Bow-common.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I beg for mercy.

GUILTY. Aged 28.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Confined Three Months .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190421-73

573. RICHARD STANTON was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Joseph Leaver , about one o'clock at night, on the 16th of March , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, one time-piece, value 3 l,; twelve handkerchiefs, 24 s.; three tea-spoons, value 6 s.; one pair of sugar-tongs, value 3 s., and 1 l. 6 s., in monies numbered , his property; and MARY STANTON was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, knowing them to have been stolen .

JOSEPH LEAVER . I am a coal-merchant, and live in Charles-street, Bridgewater-square. On the 17th of March, my cellar window was broken open - the thieves must then have got a ladder, and opened the back door, and so have entered the house; the property was taken out of the wash-house. The male prisoner worked for me.

THOMAS HEDGER . I am a beadle. I examined the prosecutor's premises, and found they had been forced open. About nine o'clock next morning I saw the male prisoner and two men standing together - I suspected them, and took him and Smith into custody - Smith gave information of the robbery - I then watched Mary Stanton , apprehended her, and found three silverspoons and a handkerchief on her.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190421-74

574. JOHN GRAY was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of March , five printed bound books, value 30 s. , the property of John Anderson and John Centlivres Chase .

JOHN CENTLIVRES CHASE . I am a medical bookseller ; and am in partnership with John Anderson ; we live in Smithfield. On the 23d of March, I lost these books - the prisoner was brought into the shop with them.

JOHN BOTELER . I am shopman to Mr. Hill, who is a pawnbroker, and lives in Turnmill-street. On the 23d of March the prisoner pledged three books with me; he came again in the afternoon with more. I suspected him found the prosecutor's name in them, and detained him - he said he found them in a coach.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 48.

Confined Three Months .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190421-75

575. THOMAS BRADBURY was indicted for that he, on the 9th of February , at St. James, Clerkenwell , feloniously did dispose of and put away, a certain forged and counterfeit bank note - (setting it forth No. 1388, 1 l., dated November 21, 1818. Signed S. Draper,) - with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England , he well knowing the same to be forged and counterfeited , against the Statute.

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating the forged instrument to be a promissory note for payment of money, instead of a bank note.

TWO OTHER COUNTS, the same, only stating his intent to be to defraud Mary Newman .

JANE MONRO . I am niece of Mary Newman , who is a corn-chandler , and lives in Ray-street, Clerkenwell . On the 9th of February, about two o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner came to my aunt's shop, and asked for a truss of hay and half a bushel of chaff; they came to 5 s. 1 1/2 d. - my aunt served him. He produced a 1 l. bank note to her; she asked him for his address? he said he could not write himself; she gave it to me, and I said I would write it for him. He said his name was Brown, and he lived at No. 22, Willan-row - it is nearly opposite our house; I wrote it on the note, He said he took it of Mr. Burgess; I wrote Burgess on it also - (looks at one) - this is it, it has that on it, with M. N. my aunt's initials., A day or two afterwards I discovered that it was forged and went to Willan-row - there are only fourteen houses in it, and no No. 22.

MARY NEWMAN . I am Monro's aunt. The prisoner

had been to my shop once or twice before - I am sure he is the man. He came for a truss of hay, and half a bushel of chaff, which came to 5 s. 1 1/2 d. - I served him. He paid me a 1 l. bank note, and said he could not write; I told my niece to put his name on it. He gave the name of Brown, No. 22, Willan-place, which she wrote on it in my presence - I do not remember his saying who he had it from - he went away.

MARY ANN NEATE . I am the daughter of John Neat , who is a corn-chandler, and lives at No. 87, Old-street. In the beginning of February, about the middle of the day, the prisoner came to our shop, and asked for half a bushel of split beans. He said he came from Mrs. Crampton - we have a customer of that name; the beans came to 3 s. - I served him. He paid me a 1 l. note; I gave him the change, and he went away. I put the note in the till.

Q. Are you able to say whether there was any other note there at the time - A. Not to the best of my knowledge. I unlocked the till and put it in - I saw no other there. I locked it again, and hung the key up, behind the counter. My father came home in about half an hour - my mother serves in the shop. I had been out of the shop, leaving her there - nobody but us was in the shop until my father came home. I then told him what had happened, saw him open the till, and take out the note, and write Mrs. Crampton on it - (looks at it) - this is it. It has Mrs. Crampton on it in his hand-writing.

Q. From the time the prisoner paid you the note till your father opened the till, had you put any other note there - A. No, no other customer had been while I was there.

COURT. Q. Did he say where Mrs. Crampton lived - A. No, I supposed it to be our customer, as we had one of that name.

JOHN NEATE . I am a corn-chandler, and live in Old-street. One morning, the beginning of February, I came home. My daughter said she had taken a 1 l. note; I opened the till, and found only one there. I wrote Mrs. Crampton, I. N. on it directly, as she told me to write that - (looks at it) - this is it. I paid it away to Mr. Mason, who is a hay salesman. It was returned to me a fortnight after as forged. I made inquiry about it. Mrs. Crampton was a customer of mine.

HANNAH NEATE . I am the wife of the last witness - I and my daughter attend the shop. I will not be positive to the prisoner's being the man who came to the shop - he is very much like him. I think it is him.

Q. Was his head bound up as it is now - A. I did not observe it.

Q. A person however came - A. Yes, and gave my daughter a 1 l. note for the beans, which she put into the till - nobody but her and myself was in the shop, or had access to the till, until my husband returned. I cannot say whether she opened the till, but I am certain I neither put a note in or took one out.

THOMAS HOW . I am the son of Jeremiah Howe , who lives at No. 90, St. John-street, Clerkenwell, and is a corn-chandler. On the 9th of February, the prisoner came to my father's shop about six o'clock in the evening, for a truss of hay - I and my brother were in the counting-house - it was quite dark. I asked my brother to get a lanthorn to show him up to the loft to get the hay; the shop was light. He threw the hay down, and came down himself - my brother followed him with the lanthorn. The hay came to 5 s.; he paid me a 1 l. note for it in the shop. I asked him for his name; he said,

"Bradbury, Smithfield-bars," which I wrote on it, with my initials, and the date - (looks at one,) - this is it; it has my initials on it; I gave him 15 s., and he went away. He had his hat on, and a great-coat - I am certain he is the man; I had seen him several times before. I am certain he gave me that name and address; I also entered it on a piece of paper, which we keep in the shop as a check.

THOMAS VANN . I am an officer. I and Armstrong apprehended the prisoner, on the 15th of February, in Pewter Platter-yard, St. John-street - his father lived in Bagnio-court, Shoe-lane. I do not know where the prisoner lived.

WILLIAM HERITAGE . I am clerk to the magistrate of Worship-street Office. I was present when the prisoner was examined; he made a voluntary statement, which I took down. I read it to him, and he signed it - Mr. Swabey, the magistrate also signed it - (looks at it) - this is it, it has the prisoner's mark to it, and the magistrate's signature; I witnessed it. The magistrate told him several times to be cautious of what he was doing.

Prisoner. Q. Was the magistrate with me when I signed it - A. Yes.

THOMAS VANN re-examined. I was present when the prisoner put his mark to the deposition - the magistrate was there at the time.

JOSHUA ARMSTRONG . I was present at the prisoner's examination. The magistrate cautioned him, and told him to retire and consider before he signed it - he was cautioned more than ten times, and I cautioned him myself - (read.) -

"The prisoner, T. Bradbury, voluntarily says, I live at No. 2, Bagnio-court, Shoe-lane, Holborn, and keep a horse, which I let out to hire. Having accumulated 4 l. in silver for the use of my horse, on a Sunday evening, about five weeks ago I went to Mr. Phillips, Coach and Horses, Warner-street, Clerkenwell, and asked him to give me four 1 l. notes for it, which he did; S. Greenwood, a horse-dealer was present - he lives just by. About three days ago I paid one of these notes to Thomas How , St. John-street, for a truss of hay; I paid another to a crockery shop in Wilderness-row, for straw. About a week ago I paid one to Phillips, and on Tuesday last I paid another to How, but I gave my address, Shoe-lane, No, 2, Bagnio-court to the young man in the shop; the same young man gave me the change, and delivered me the hay - I never paid Thomas How any note on Tuesday evening last, or gave him any address whatever. The four notes are the only ones I have had for two months before, and the same I received from Phillips."

RICHARD PHILLIPS . I am landlord of the Coach and Horses, public-house, Ray-street, Clerkenwell. I had known the prisoner a fortnight before he changed the notes. On Sunday, I believe it was the 17th of January, he brought 4 l. in silver, and asked me to give him notes for it? I accordingly gave him four 1 l. bank notes for it - I always write the person's name that I receive notes of on them - it is my invariable custom. The notes I paid him must have had my writing on them of the names of persons I received them of - I always indorse them myself. I paid him the four notes myself - (examining those produced) - neither of these, I am certain, have ever

been through my hands, nor did I ever pay any of them to him - I always look at them when I pay them away, to see they are indorsed. When I am absent my people tell me who they take them of, and I indorse them myself.

THOMAS GLOVER . I am an inspector of bank notes - (examining the note in the indictment) - it is forged in every respect, and is not Draper's writing; paper and every thing else are forged; the other two are also forged in every respect. All these appear to be the same paper, and off the same plate. One is signed Draper, and another Hogsflesh, they are not like their signatures; all three appear to be written by the same hand - there is an appearance of a water-mark, which is put on afterwards.

SAMUEL DRAPER . I am a signing clerk of 1 l. and 2 l. notes - there is no other of my name - (examining the note) - it is not my writing; here is another with my name, but it is not my writing.

(The note was then put in and read.)

Prisoner's Defence. A person gave me the notes for the use of my horse.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 16.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190421-76

576. JAMES GILLMAN was indicted for embezzlement .

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190421-77

577. CHRISTIANA MORRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of April , two sheets, value 10 s.; two tablecloths, value 1 l.; eight yards of printed cotton, value 8 s.; three handkerchiefs, value 3 s.; one night-gown, value 1 s.; one spencer, value 1 s.; one pair of stockings, value 1 s.; one scarf, value 1 s., and one table-spoon, value 6 s., the goods of Robert Lyon , in his dwelling-house .

BARBARA LYON . I am the wife of Robert Lyon , who is a dyer , and lives in Clapton-street, Hackney . On Tuesday night, the 2d of April, about dusk, the prisoner came to me as a servant , and on Thursday she got very drunk; next day I gave her warning; as she was going out I observed something white hanging out of her pocket-hole. I went after her, had her brought back, and sent for a constable, who searched her, and found the articles stated in the indictment on her.

RICHARD YATES . I am a constable. On the 2d of April I was sent for to Lyons's, searched the prisoner, and found the property on her, wrapped round her body and arms. She had no pockets on.

JOHN HOWE . I am a baker. I saw the prisoner coming along, and asked her how she came to leave her place? I saw a hole in one of her stockings, and something hanging out, I asked what it was - she said it was nothing, only a spoon she was going to get repaired for her mistress. She pulled it out, which made the whole larger, and threw it away. I took her back, and kept her till the officer came.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I resign myself to the mercy of the Court. I took the things to carry me to Scotland, to my friends.

GUILTY. Aged 24.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190421-78

578. DANIEL BRISTOW was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of March , one bushel of oats, value 4 s.; one bushel of chaff, value 8 d., and half a truss of clover, value 2 s. , the property of William Parkins and John Thompson .

WILLIAM DUNFORD . I am watchman to the prosecutors, who live in the Adelphi. On the 13th of March, between seven and nine o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner at the wharf - he came twice a week for the dung. I saw him bring a barrow of dung out of the stable, and under the dung was a sack of chaff, beans and corn; he went on the opposite side of the cart to me, shot it in, and covered it with dung - he then brought part of a truss of hay out, and put it on the fore part of the cart. As he was going away I told him I saw him take something, which he denied - he said he had taken the hay. I told him the sack was in the cart, and if he did not get it down I would have the cart unloaded. He said if that was the case he would get it down, which he did. I took him to the prosecutors. He said it was his first offence.

JOHN GRIFFITHS . I am horse-keeper to the prosecutors. About two hours before the clover hay was taken I put a piece of paper in it to mark it. I found it in the hay when the prisoner was taken.

JOHN THOMPSON . I am in partnership with William Parkins ; the prisoner was brought to me - he begged for mercy.

Prisoner's Defence. I beg for mercy. I have six children.

GUILTY .

Confined Six Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190421-79

579. WILLIAM GROVES was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of February , four bushels of oats, value 14 s.; two trusses of hay, value 8 s.; half of a bushel of beans, value 2 s., and three bushels and a half of chaff, value 4 s. , the goods of William Parkins and John Thompson ; and WILLIAM THOMS was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing them to have been stolen .

WILLIAM INSON . I am a labourer. On the 27th of February, between five and six o'clock in the morning, I was going down the Adelphi , looking for a job, and saw Groves go into the prosecutors' warehouse, and bring out a sack of oats on his back - he took them down the ride - Thoms's horse and cart were waiting there. Groves beckoned to his own boy, the boy beckoned to him, and then went into Thoms's stable with Groves; they could not get the sack untied, Groves said

"why don't you make haste" - they cut the string, and emptied the sack into a large thing which was there; they then came out, and went away. Soon after Groves brought another sack, and put it into a dark place there; he then laid hold of one end and Thoms took the other, and both carried it into Thoms's stable. Groves told Thoms he must have the empty sack, Thoms said you shall have it bye-and-bye. Groves said,

"if I can get the sack back, I can get another skin." He went into the stable. I saw Thoms carry a truss of meadow hay into his stable, but who he had it from I do not know. He pulled a piece out, and gave it to his horse - he then locked the stable door, and went away.

Cross-examined by MR. BOLLAND. Q. Did you ever

live with the prosecutors - A. Once; they discharged me Thoms was about a hundred yards off, with his cart. I told the watchman of it in the evening. I went to his house, but I could not find him before.

JOHN THOMPSON . I am in partnership with William Parkins . On the 27th of February the watchman told me of the robbery; next morning we went to Thoms's stable, and saw a quantity of chaff, corn and beans, mixed - about seven bushels altogether, and about two trusses of meadow hay, it was remarkable old hay, and very full of flower, like mine. I compared the chaff and beans with mine, and believe them to be mine. Groves was my servant.

WILLIAM DUNFORD . I am the prosecutors' watchman. On the 27th of February Inson gave me information - I told the prosecutors next day, and assisted in searching Thoms's stable. I told him he was my prisoner, he asked for what? I told him he was concerned in stealing some hay, clover, and other things from the prosecutors' stable. I was going to touch a truss of hay on my right hand, Thoms said,

"if that truss on my left hand belongs to Thompson, the other does not." I took eight bushels of chaff, beans, and oats - part of them were in a tub, and the rest in a box. I compared them with the prosecutors' - they appear the same.

THOMS' Defence. It is a spiteful piece of business. I buy my hay.

GROVES - GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined Six Months .

THOMS - GUILTY . Aged 55.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190421-80

580. JOHN STEWART was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Michael Quin , about five o'clock in the afternoon, on the 11th of April , at Lincoln's Inn (no person being therein), and stealing two pair of sheets, value 1 l., and six spoons, value 10 s. , his property.

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating the house to be the dwelling-house of Joseph Quin , and the goods to be his property.

THIRD COUNT, the same, only stating it to be the dwelling-house of Michael Joseph Quin , and the goods to be his property.

MR. HENRY MILBOURNE . I live at No. 21, Old-buildings, Lincoln's Inn, on the same landing-place with Mr. Quin. On Sunday, the 11th of April, I had been in my chambers the greatest part of the day. Between four and five o'clock in the afternoon, I heard a noise at my door, or on the landing-place, like some one forcing or wrenching my outer door, which was shut; I thought it was some person coming in to see if anybody was there. In a few minutes I went to the door, looked through the letter-hole, and saw the prisoner at the door, dressed in a brown coat and nankeen pantaloons - he was within three feet of the door, and had a stick in his hand - I opened the door; he had then got about the third step going down - the door is close to the steps. I asked him what he wanted? he said he wanted Mr. Jordan (there is a gentleman of that name). I said,

"What! who?" he then said Mr. Gardiner.

"I said,

"What, on a Sunday!" he made no further answer. As soon as he went down, I shut the door, and looked through a little window which commands a view of the court, and saw him go through the passage by the Hall. I examined my door, and observed marks of an instrument on it, as if it had been attempted to be broken open.

Q. How long after this did you hear somebody on the stair-case again? In about a quarter of an hour I heard somebody on the staircase, which turned out to be Mr. Quin's laundress. I went out to her, and found Mr. Quin's door broken, and very much damaged. I asked her if any one had attempted the chambers? At that moment she heard a noise in the chambers, and cried out that she heard them, and they were getting out on the leads - she had opened Mr. Quin's outer door, and was going up to his inner door. She came down, and went for her husband; I remained on the staircase - nobody passed me down stairs before she returned, which was in about five minutes; I then went into the chambers, and found a stick at the side of the bottom door. Every thing was pulled out on the the floor in great confusion. It is a similar stick to that I saw the prisoner with. I am certain he is the man I saw at the door.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. I am not a lawyer. The noise ceased the moment I opened my inner door. My chambers are quite separate from Mr. Quin's.

ANN GOUGH . I am laundress to Mr. Quin, whose chambers are at No. 21, Old-square, Lincoln's Inn - they are the upper chambers, and have two doors. After opening the outer doors; there is a flight of stairs to go up to the inner door. Mr. Quin went out about eleven o'clock in the morning, I remained at the chambers till one, and then left. Everything was safe and in order - I locked them up, and locked the inner door. I returned a little after five o'clock, and saw Mr. Milbourne. I put the key into Mr. Quin's outer door, but found it already unlocked; the lock was not taken off, but the door was open. I found a stick inside the door, it did not belong to Mr. Quin, and was not there when I left at one o'clock. I went up the stairs, found the inner door ajar, all the drawers open, and the things laying on the floor. There were shirts, and sheets off the bed, a great-coat, and also a pair of clean sheets.

Q. Did you hear any thing in the chambers - A. The moment I spoke to Mr. Milbourne, I heard footsteps up stairs in the chambers - I ran down directly to fetch my husband. The catch of the latch of the inner door was forced off. There is a window opens from the chambers on to the leads - I do not know whether I left it shut, but there was an iron bar over it; when I got there the window was open, and the iron bar taken down. Anybody could get out, and get on the leads of Lincoln's Inn. Mr. Quin sleeps in the chambers.

WILLIAM GREGORY . I am a tailor, and live at No. 48, Southampton-buildings. On Sunday, the 11th of April, I met Mrs. Gough making an alarm in Chancery-lane. I immediately crossed into Lincoln's Inn, and looking up to the top of the chambers, I saw the prisoner on the cock-loft of No. 21 or 22, dressed in a dark snuff-coloured coat and nankeen trowsers. I watched him until he got over No. 24, then lost sight of him. I saw him soon afterwards in custody - he is the man.

WALTER GOUGH . I am porter of Lincoln's Inn; my

wife alarmed me, I went to No. 21, Mr. Quin's chambers, found the drawers forced open, and every thing on the floor - there were three different parcels packed up ready to be taken away. The window which leads to the leads was open, the bar taken down, and the padlock which fastened it, was forced off. I got out, and passing over the roofs of No. 22 and 23, I saw the prisoner behind the chimney of No. 24. I made up to the chimney - there is a round tower there; he was not there - he was gone. I went straight on as far as the Baptist chambers, kept there and sent for assistance, as I knew he must pass me - Oakes and Ackhurst came. I sent them down Chancery-lane into the Baptist chambers, and found the prisoner concealed in the cock-loft; I saw him coming down the steps of the cock-loft - he is the man that I saw.

Cross-examined. Nobody could have got on the roof, except through Mr. Quin's chambers.

JOHN OAKES . I am badge-porter of Lincoln's Inn. In consequence of this alarm I went to the Baptist chambers, got out upon the roof, which communicates with No. 24, and went to the cock-loft; the outer door in the gutter I found open, with the nails of the bolt drawn, and the iron bent, as if it had been forced open - this would be necessary for any person to have got in. I called to Ackhurst for a light, which came; I opened the trap-door, and found the prisoner in the loft, at the further end, drawing himself up as close as he could to the tiles. We asked him to come out? he said,

"Don't make any alarm, and I will go with you quietly enough" - nobody else was on the roof.

Cross-examined. Q. The different chambers lead to the roof - A. Yes.

THOMAS ACKHURST . I went on the roof with Oakes, through the Baptist chambers, and found the trapdoor fastened by somebody inside. I got a ladder, and got over the parapet to the door of the cock-loft; I got a light, and tried to open the trap-door - it opened then quite easy. I found the prisoner in the corner, twisted up in as small a compass as he could. The loft was very dirty.

JAMES BAKER . I am constable of Lincoln's Inn. I searched the prisoner, but found nothing particular on him. A crow-bar was given to me next morning, which I tried to Mr. Quin's door, and it corresponded exactly with the marks, as if it had been used to the door; it also corresponded with the marks on Mr. Milbourne's, and Mr. Jordan's doors, which were on the same stair-case. The stick was given to me, which was found on the stair-case.

Cross-examined. The crow was found on the stair-case of No. 10, which is about seven houses off.

MR. HENRY MILBOURNE re-examined. The stick is very much like the one the prisoner had, but I will not swear to it.

MR. MICHAEL JOSEPH QUIN . I live at No. 21, Lincoln's Inn. I left at twelve o'clock, and came home again about six. I found several persons in my chambers, all in confusion; the drawers and several presses broken open, and several articles removed from my presses to the floor. I found a pair of clean sheets behind the door, and the dirty ones, and my great coat on the floor, which I hung up behind the door. I missed six plated spoons - my coat and the sheets are worth 2 l.

MR. LANE. I am steward of Lincoln's Inn. It is extra parochial, and in the county of Middlesex.

Prisoner's Defence. I went to see a young man, who lived with Mr. Jordan; he was not at home. The gentleman spoke to me, and I went away, and was going through Chichester-rents; a woman asked me to go up stairs and go on the roof as she thought some one was there. I saw nobody, and went into the loft, seeing the door open - the woman's name is Brown.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 40.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190421-81

581. WILLIAM DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of March , four bridle-bits, value 18 s., and two leather reins, value 20 s. , the goods of Alexander Wylly , Esq.

THOMAS GARDNER . I am coachman to Alexander Wylly , Esq., who lives in Orchard-street . On the 17th of March, the prisoner was recommended to me to assist in cleaning harness - I was with him about two hours, and then left the mews. He asked me to give him a few halfpence to get some victuals, I gave him 2 s. 6 d. I returned in about an hour, he was gone - I missed two reins and four bridle-bits, and found him in David-street. He said if I would say nothing he would get them.

WILLIAM JEE . I am coachman to Mr. Hall. I assisted Gardner to put the harness together, every thing was then right. I lent the prisoner a sponge and oil-brush to clean them with - when I returned he was gone with them, the other things were missing.

RICHARD SCOTCHMER. I am a groom. I saw the prisoner come out of the yard with the reins and bits in his hand on the 17th of March, between two and three o'clock in the afternoon. I am sure he is the man.

Prisoner's Defence. I went to sleep, as I had been drinking; when I awoke the bits were gone.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190421-82

582. JOHN BRYANT was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of February , at St. George, Bloomsbury , three ounces of gold filings and cuttings, value 5 l., and one ounce of gold wire, value 2 l., the property of Frederick Humbert , in his dwelling-house .

FREDERICK HUMBERT . I am a goldwatch-case-maker , and live at No. 21, Hyde-street , Bloomsbury; I keep the house, which is in the parish of St. George - the prisoner was my errand-boy. On the 27th of February, I prepared some gold filings and turnings to melt on the Monday following, and left them in my workshop. On the Sunday morning I went up to the workshop, and found a quantity gone. I began to suspect the prisoner, and had him apprehended on the Monday. I got an officer, who searched him, and found the gold upon him, in four parcels - we found a key in his box, which opened my shop-door.

JOHN DAVIS . I am an officer. I went with the prosecutor, searched the prisoner, and found a quantity of gold upon him. I found a quantity of gold wire in his breeches pocket, and gold filings and cuttings in his jacket-pocket, and a crucible with gold mixed with pearl-ash ready to be melted, in his jacket-pocket. I asked him how he got into

his master's shop? he cried, and said there was a key in his box at his lodgings, which opened the shop-door. I went and found it there. The house is in the parish of St. George, Bloomsbury.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence - (written.) - I fully acknowledge my fault, and humbly implore the mercy of the Court. I lost my mother three years ago - my father is since dead. It is with the greatest pain and reluctance I am obliged to stir up the ashes of my deceased parents, and expose their vices; but when I know I can only attribute my present perilous situation to the profligate examples set me in my infancy, I cannot forbear calling their faults in question, as some excuse for my early depravity, which, under any other circumstance, I should blush to mention. My father for several years kept a Little Go, where I had the opportunity of witnessing the worst of vices and characters. At my poor mother's decease, my father introduced a prostitute to his home, who lived in the house until his death. He was in prison for the lottery several times, and suffered great distress during his imprisonment, which excited my affection and pity, and induced me to pilfer my master to supply his wants. This offence was continued at intervals through the bad company my father encouraged me to keep, which has at length brought me to this melancholy situation. This is the naked truth and history of my unfortunate life, and I humbly hope for mercy.

GUILTY. - DEATH . Aged 18.

Strongly recommended to Mercy .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190421-83

583. BENJAMIN BLAKE was indicted for that he, on the 28th of November, 1814, at St. Leonard, Shoreditch, did marry one Eleanor Haynes , spinster , and that afterward (to wit) on the 1st of February last, at St. Andrew's , feloniously did marry Phillis Adams , his former wife being still alive .

PHILLIS ADAMS . On the 1st of February last, I was married to the prisoner at St. Andrew's church. I was servant to Mrs. Nailer, who lives in Somers'-town. The prisoner had been courting me seven years, and never told me he was married. He represented himself as a carpenter ; I had saved a little money in my service. We lived nine weeks together - we took a coal-shed, which I minded. I was informed he had been married, and had him apprehended.

MARY ANN TURPIN. I live in Gloucester-street, Hoxton. I was present at church when Adams was married to the prisoner.

WILLIAM LEMMINGTON . My father was clerk of St. Leonard, Shoreditch - he is now dead. I produce the register of the marriage of Benjamin Blake to Eleanor Haynes , on the 28th of November, 1814. It is signed by the clergyman - my father has witnessed it.

JOSEPH LEE . I live in Angel-alley, Bishopsgate-street. I know Eleanor Haynes . I was present at her marriage with the prisoner, and gave her away at Shoreditch church - I witnessed the marriage in the book.

THOMAS GOODING . I am a patrol of Bow-street. I apprehended the prisoner, and told him I took him for marrying two wives, who were now living, and showed him the direction where his first wife lived,

"Messrs. Barlow and Co., Marsh-gate." I told him his first wife lived there - he nodded, but made no answer.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Confined One Year .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190421-84

584. GEORGE BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of March , 20 bags, value 15 s. , the goods of Jacob George Wrench and John Wrench .

WILLIAM MILLER GOAD . I am servant to Messrs. John and Jacob George Wrench , who are seedsmen , and live in Lower Thames-street; the prisoner was in their service about a year ago. On the 10th of March I found him at Aldgate watch-house, with 20 bags, 19 of which are our's. Some of them had never been used. He lived then with Messrs. Childs in our street, and occasionally came to our shop from them. We sell bags with the seed, but some of these are new.

Cross-examined by MR. NORTON. I have sometimes left bags at Messrs. Child's with seed.

JOHN FORRESTER , JUN. On the 9th of March, about nine o'clock in the evening, I stopped the prisoner by Aldgate church, with a bag on his back; I asked him what it was? he said it was pease, which he had bought of his master to feed hogs - I detained him; the bag contained pease. I went to No. 6, Charlotte-court, where he said he lodged, and found twenty bags, which the prosecutors claimed.

Cross-examined. Q. He said they came from Mr. Field - A. Yes.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190421-85

585. GEORGE BROWN was again indicted for stealing, on the 9th of March , one bushel of pease, value 6 s., and two bags, value 3 s. 6 d. , the goods of Isaac Field and George Child .

JOHN FORRESTER , JUN. When I stopped the prisoner, he had these pease in a sack on his back. He said he bought them of Messrs. Field and Child, his masters. I sent for Mr. Child. Before he came the prisoner told me he did not buy them, but a person had, and he was going to leave them near Whitechapel church till called for. I found twenty-two other bags at his house, which the prosecutors claimed.

JOHN GILCHRIST . I am servant to Messrs. Field and Child, the prisoner was in their service. I found him at the watch-house with a bushel of pease. He said Mr. Brown the foreman, told him the pease were ordered. I found twenty-two bags at his house, one of which I can swear to.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I took the bag one wet day to put over my shoulder.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190421-86

586. WILLIAM MASON was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of April , 8 lbs. of suet, value 5 s. , the goods of John Lock .

JOHN LOCK. I am a butcher , and live in Newgate-market . On the 14th of April I missed some suet; the prisoner was brought to me - I found it on him.

SAMUEL MATTHEWS . I am a butcher, and live next door to the prosecutor. On the 14th of April, about nine o'clock, I saw the prisoner go into Lock's slaughter-house, and come out again, putting something under his smock-frock - I followed and secured him at the top of Warwick-lane; I found the suet on him - he asked me to let him go.

GUILTY . Aged 41.

Confined Two Months , and publicly Whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190421-87

587. WILLIAM SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of March , one handkerchief, value 2 s., the goods of William Stephens , from his person .

The prisoner was detected in attempting to commit the felony, for which the Court ordered him to be detained, but on this indictment he was.

ACQUITTED .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190421-88

588. ANN STEWART was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of March , 36 yards of ribbon, 5 s. , the goods of Wynn Ellis and William Brown .

MR. WYNN ELLIS . I am in partnership with William Brown , we are haberdashers , and live on Ludgate-hill . On the 1st of March, about half-past three o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner was brought into the shop; I saw her drop a piece of ribbon from under her clothes, which I knew to be mine - I had seen her in the shop before.

WILLIAM CLARK . I am shopman to the prosecutors. The prisoner came to the shop, and asked for some narrow satin ribbon - I showed her a drawer, she bought three separate quarters of yards, which came in all to 2 d. While I was cutting it off, I saw her take a piece out of the drawer and put it into her pocket. As soon as she got to the door I told Mr. Ellis - she was brought back immediately, and I saw the ribbon fall from her.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 13.

Judgment Respited .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190421-89

589. JOHN JONES was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Bery Cole , about eight o'clock in the night of the 24th of April , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing two watch-keys, value 6 s. , his property.

JOHN BERY COLE. I am a jeweller , and live in Barbican . On the 24th of April, about a quarter before eight o'clock at night, I was writing at the back of the shop, and heard a great bustle in the street - I went out, and found the prisoner in custody. My window was broken, and five or six gold keys taken out of a tray - the window had been broken before, but was mended and quite secure; the putty was cut away. We had lit candles above an hour.

THOMAS CLARK . I live next door to Mr. Cole. About a quarter before eight o'clock on Saturday evening, as I stood at my door, I observed three men huddled close together at Cole's window - I watched them, and could see distinctly what they were doing, as I was above them. There were lamps in the window, and I have a gas-light over my door. The prisoner was the middle man. I observed him busy at the second pane of glass, he was hooking something out with a piece of brass wire. I went up and collared him, the other two immediately ran away. He struck me, and made my lip bleed. At the time I took him, he was in the act of hooking the things out with the wire.

GUILTY. Aged 18.

Of stealing, but not of breaking and entering .

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190421-90

590. JOHN KING and WILLIAM RUSSELL were indicted for stealing, on the 24th of March , seventeen live tame fowls, price 20 s , the property of Thomas Gladwin .

THOMAS GLADWIN . I am a farmer , and live at Norwood, near Southall . On the 22d of March, about six o'clock in the evening. I saw all my poultry safe in the hen-house; next morning they were all gone - I lost seventeen fowls; I saw them the same morning, with the prisoners in custody, and am certain they were mine; they had then just been killed.

JAMES CURTIS . I am a labourer, and live at Perry Vale. On the 22d of March, about half-past six o'clock in the morning, the prisoners passed me, between Merton and Green-bridge, going towards town, with a sack, which appeared heavy - they were looking about. I watched them for an hour and a half, and went and told Hawkins - we stopped them, and asked what they had got? they said it was corn for their horses. Russell had a sack with corn and pease. King had the seventeen dead fowls in his sack - they were quite warm.

CALEB HAWKINS . I work for Mr. Amer Curtis. I went up to the prisoners, and asked them what they had got? Russell had two sacks with pease - King had the seventeen fowls in his sack, and they both said it was corn, and tried to hinder us from looking into them. King was going to defend himself, and said a bargeman had given him the fowls to put into a boat - we secured them. It was about five miles from the prosecutor's.

RUSSELL'S Defence. I know nothing of them.

RUSSELL - GUILTY . Aged 20.

KING - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190421-91

591. WILLIAM PETTS was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of November , one gelding, price 3 l. , the property of William Stevens .

WILLIAM STEVENS . I live opposite Bencroft's almshouse, Mile End, and am a beast-jobber . On Wednesday, the 10th of November, about ten o'clock at night, I saw my gelding safe in the field, next morning I missed it. The field is not fenced all round. On Friday I found it at

Deptford, and the prisoner in custody. He lived near me.

WILLIAM CROUCH . I am an officer of Deptford. On the 12th of November Lewis fetched me to a public-house - I saw the prisoner come out of the stable where the horse was; he went towards Greenwich, I took him into custody. He said he brought it from the Bricklayers' Arms, and that he kept it there. He could not describe the landlord to me. The prosecutor claimed the horse.

JOSEPH LEWIS . I live on Blackheath-hill. The prisoner offered to sell me the gelding for 2 l. 10 s. - he said he lived in the Kent-road, and had lived there fourteen or fifteen months. I suspected him and got Crouch; the prisoner ran away - a man secured him.

Prisoner's Defence. A man asked me to take the horse to Mr. Brannion, who keeps a potatoe-warehouse at Deptford - he wrote down the direction on a paper. When I took it there they had just bought one. I went to the Rising Sun, public-house, the boy asked me if it was for sale? I told him it was, and he brought Lewis to me to buy it. I understood the man to say he lived at the Bricklayers' Arms.

CROUCH re-examined. There is no such a person as Brannion, who keeps a potatoe-warehouse at Deptford - the prisoner never showed me the direction.

JOSEPH LEWIS re-examined. The prisoner said he took it to Woolwich to sell, but the party had bought one.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190421-92

592. ROBERT PICKETT and JAMES VICKERS were indicted for stealing, on the 25th of January , 28 lbs. of liquorice root, value 18 s. , the property of John Biggs .

JOHN BIGGS . I am a gardener at Covent-garden-market . The prisoner worked for me at my garden, at Barnes, where I grow liquorice root. I have lost a great deal at different times.

WILLIAM GRIMLEY . I keep a herb shop in Covent-garden-market. On the 25th of January, Leary brought me about 28 lbs. of liquorice root to sell. From the manner it was cut, and the small quantity, I suspected it was stolen - in consequence of what he said I kept it, and showed it to Biggs, who claimed it.

HENRY LEARY . I am a porter at Billingsgate. On the 25th of January, I saw Pickett there - I had carried loads for him before. He gave me this liquorice root to go and sell it, and told me there were 28 lbs. of it. He went to Gracechurch-street with me, and waited outside while I went into a shop to sell it - they would not buy so small a quantity. I said I would go and sell it in Covent-garden-market, which he consented to - I took it to Mr. Grimley, The prisoner told me to ask 1 s. a pound, but to take 10 d. I left it at Mr. Grimley's, returned, and told Pickett it was stopped on suspicion of its being stolen; he said

"Oh, never mind that!" I said,

"Come up to Covent-garden-market, and you will get it." He said he was going home, and would call himself, and not trouble me to go with him. The next day I went to Brentford to find him, but he had absconded.

JAMES BUTLER . I am an herbalist. Grimley sent for me, and I said the liquorice was Biggs's - it was cut in a different way to what the trade would cut it.

RICHARD LIMBRICK . On the 27th of February, I went with Leary to Brentford to apprehend Pickett, but he had absconded; he was brought to Bow-street on the 10th of March.

JOHN BIGGS re-examined. Vickers was at work for me, when he heard that Pickett was apprehended he absconded, in consequence of which I had him taken. I am sure the liquorice is mine.

PICKETT'S Defence. Vickers gave it to me to sell; I asked him how he got it? he would not tell me.

VICKERS'S Defence. I asked Pickett to take it to market for me.

PICKETT - GUILTY . Aged 63,

VICKERS - GUILTY . Aged 32.

Confined Two Months , and Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190421-93

593. RICHARD BUSVINE was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of March , one hat, value 15 s. , the goods of Christopher Swann .

CHRISTOPHER SWANN . I live at Nottingham. On the 12th of March I was attending a Committee at the House of Commons , and put my hat in the window of the committee-room; it was brought to me about five minutes after - it was quite new, and cost me a guinea and a half. The prisoner's hat was worth nothing.

JOHN PRATT . I am messenger of the House of Commons. I saw the prisoner go into the committee-room, and come out again with a hat in his hand; he had left his own behind him. He ran down stairs into the street - I followed him, and asked him whose hat he had got? he turned it up, and said,

"God bless me! I have made a mistake, and taken a wrong hat." He had gone thirty or forty yards, but had not put it on - the lining was quite clean. I took him back, and found his own hat in the room, which was quite greasy and dirty.

Prisoner's Defence. I took it by mistake.

GUILTY . Aged 39.

Whipped , and Discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190421-94

594. WILLIAM THOMPSON and JOHN ABBOTT were indicted for stealing, on the 27th of March , one handkerchief, value 3 s., the goods of William Clark , from his person .

WILLIAM CLARK , ESQ. I live at Forrest-hill. On the 27th of March, about two o'clock in the day, I was in Chancery-lane . I turned round, and found the two prisoners close to me; suspecting them, I put my hand to my pocket, and missed my handkerchief. I took hold of Thompson, and between the two I saw the handkerchief drop - they were close together - Thompson got away. I called to him to stop, but he still ran. I secured him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JAMES BARRATT JUDKINS . I live in the City-road. I was in Chancery-lane, and saw the two prisoners close to Mr. Clark, which excited my suspicious. Mr. Clark seized Thompson, and the handkerchief dropped from one of them. Abbott ran off into Bream's-buildings; I pursued, and brought him back. Thompson also escaped into Carey-street, but was brought back.

THOMPSON'S Defence. The gentleman let me go to take Abbott.

THOMPSON - GUILTY . Aged 14.

ABBOTT - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190421-95

595. MARGARET PATERSON was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of March , at St. Pancras , in the dwelling-house of William Gordon , one watch, value 16 l.; one chain, value 4 l.; one key, value 5 s.; seven rings, value 40 s.; five pair of ear-rings, value 40 s.; six brooches, value 3 l.; eight buttons, value 8 s.; one cross, value 1 l.; one clasp, value 2 s.; two purses, value 5 s.; one box, value 1 s.; one parasol, value 5 s.; two yards of sarsnet, value 10 s.; one yard of mode, value 5 s.; five remnants of silk, value 5 s.; six petticoats, value 30 s.; seven shifts, value 56 s.; one shirt, value 10 s.; one pair of stockings, value 5 s.; two spencers, value 40 s.; one 20 l., one 5 l., and seventeen 1 l. bank notes , his property.

WILLIAM GORDON . I live in Grafton-street, Fitzroy-square , in the parish of St. Pancras - I rent the house, the prisoner was my servant of all work . On Thursday, the 25th of March, I had a few friends to tea with me, and at seven o'clock I left the house to see two ladies off by the coach at Charing-cross. I returned about nine o'clock, the prisoner was then gone - I did not know she was going. I missed the property stated in the indictment out of my bed-room drawers, and a box of trinkets out of a tea-caddy, which was in my wardrobe - I had seen it all safe two days before; the prisoner never returned. Next morning I gave information at Bow-street, went with the officer, and found her on the Saturday at Ashby de la Zouch, in Leicestershire. I asked her where the 20 l. note was? she said it was all in her bundle. The officer searched her, found the watch in her bosom, and all the property stated in the indictment either in the bundle or about her person.

JANE GORDON . I am the wife of the last witness. The prisoner left the house entirely without my knowledge. I missed all the property from my bed-room the same night; she had access to the bed-room - I had no other servant. She took her own clothes with her. The property was all brought back afterwards. I had left my keys in the bedroom - every drawer was opened. She went out of the area-gate, and left it open. I had taken her in only twelve days before out of charity.

THOMAS GOODING . I am a Bow-street officer. I went, and overtook the prisoner at Ashby de la Zouch, with a bundle containing the property. The gold watch was in her bosom.

Prisoner. I leave it to the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY. - DEATH . Aged 19.

Recommended to Mercy .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190421-96

596. RICHARD DAY was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of April , one coat, value 2 l.; one waistcoat, value 10 s., and one pair of trowsers, value 30 s., the goods of George James Day , in the dwelling-house of Cornelius Risby .

GEORGE JAMES DAY . I am a coach-plater , and live in Plummer's-court, St. Giles's - the prisoner is my brother . On the 12th of April, I went out about six o'clock in the morning, locked my door, and left him in bed. I returned about ten o'clock, found my box broken open, and missed these things. My door was still locked, but there had been a hole in the wainscot for some time - it was large enough to admit a man. Six days after I went with the officer, and apprehended the prisoner at the Black Dog, public-house, Drury-lane - he had my trowsers on.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not see me before you apprehended me - A. Yes, I saw him the same evening at Bow-street. He said he wished to give himself up, or he should make away with himself. I applied to a man to take him - he said as it was a family affair we had better make it up.

CORNELIUS RISBY . I keep the house. On the 7th of April, about seven o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came in, and went up stairs. He came down soon after, and told me to tell his brother, he should be in in a few minutes - he never returned.

GUILTY. Aged 23.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190421-97

597. JOHN COOPER was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Hewson , about three o'clock in the afternoon, on the 27th of March , at St. Pancras , (no person being therein,) and stealing four gowns, value 2 l., and two handkerchiefs, value 8 s. , his property.

JOHN HEWSON . I am a coachman , and live at Kentish-town, in the parish of St. Pancras ; I keep the house. On the 27th of March, my wife and I were taking care of a house in Fitzroy-place; we left nobody in our own house - we had not given it up. A woman sent a girl to give me information; I went, and found my cottage-door open. I informed Mr. Pool, and he said he saw a man and a boy going over the fields; I followed them, and saw two men, one with a long dark coat, the other appeared like a soldier. I went up to the man in a dark coat, and took a bundle from him, saying,

"These things belong to my wife." I went to strike him; he fell on the ground, and said to the soldier,

"Return me my money." The soldier then gave him two half crowns - it was the prisoner. We returned back. As we were going along I said to the prisoner,

"If you will assure me here is all my property, I will forgive you." He said there was. I told him to run; he said he was lame and could not. We went to a public-house, and an officer was sent for; I immediately gave him in charge. I do not know how he got into the house - I found my bundle on him.

AMELIA HEWSON . I am the wife of the last witness. I fastened the house up at half-past twelve o'clock - nobody was in it then. I locked it; I am certain it was fastened, but did not double-lock it.

MATTHEW MERTON . I am a soldier. On the 27th of March I was at the Vine, public-house, in Kentish-town, I saw the prisoner, and a boy, with a bundle in his apron - I suspected it was stolen; part of a gown hung out of the

apron. He went towards Islington, I followed him. As soon as he saw me he began running, I ran after him, and seized him, the other got away. I could not call for assistance. He laid himself down, and would not walk - I said I would not handle him; he then got up, and gave me 5 s. to pay for some beer - I took it to get him forward, as I could not get assistance. We met the prosecutor, I then told him he had got the bundle and was in my custody. He offered me a guinea to let him go, but I insisted on keeping him.

JOHN HENSON . On Saturday, the 27th of March, about six o'clock, I was sent for, and took the prisoner in charge with the things. I asked him how he came to do it? he said the other man, who had got away went into the house and he received the things. I found 21 s. on him; he said the soldier wanted him to give him a guinea and two silk handkerchiefs, but he would not, but he gave him 5 s., which he returned.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I am a porter in the market. I met a boy in the fields, and walked with him. When we came to a gentleman's house he left me, brought the bundle out, and said it was his master's; he asked me to carry it in my apron. I took it innocently; the soldier came up, and asked what it was? I said it was nothing to him; he said it was stolen, and he knew where it came from - the boy ran away. The soldier said if I gave him a guinea he would let me go; I gave him 5 s., and he told me to run - the prosecutor came up.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 19.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190421-98

598. ISAAC ROBINSON was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of January , in the dwelling-house of Joseph Rice , one 20 l. bank note his property.

JOSEPH RICE . I am a publican , and keep the Stone Kitchen, in the Tower . On the 20th of January I missed a 20 l. and a 10 l. note, out of my bureau - I could not discover how it was gone - the prisoner was my servant . On the 16th of March he asked leave to go out; when he went I saw he had every thing new on, which made me suspect him; he came home at night, and said he had been robbed of four 1 l. notes. I asked him how he came by that money? he said he had received 5 l. from his friends. I asked him to produce the letter it came in; he hesitated and said he would not, and then said it came in a basket. A day or two after I had his box searched. He asked why I did so. I took him into the next room, and asked him to account for the money that he bought the clothes with - he could not within 15 l. or 20 l. He afterwards said he found the notes sticking to the heel of his boot at the top of the stairs, paid the 20 l. note to Nowland for making his boots, and got the change; and that he paid the 10 l. note to Harrison for clothes. I do not know what parish the place is in.

JOHN HARRISON . I am a tailor, and live in New Compton-street. On the 31st of January I made the prisoner a suit of clothes - he paid me a 10 l. note. I paid it away to Arnold.

SUSAN ARNOLD . I received a 10 l. note from Harrison, this is it (looks at a note). I wrote my name on it.

GEORGE DYER . I produce the 10 l. note from the Bank.

JAMES NOWLAND . I am a bootmaker, and live in Clement's-lane, Temple-bar. I made the prisoner a pair of boots. He paid me a 20 l. note, which I paid away.

JOSEPH RICE . The 10 l. note has my writing on it.

Prisoner's Defence. I found them sticking to the heel of my shoe.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined Six Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190421-99

599. JOHN WHEELER was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of April , twenty-eight yards of cotton, value 2 l. 16 s., the goods of John Piggott , in his dwelling-house .

JOHN PIGGOTT . I am an upholsterer , and live in Judd-street, Brunswick-square . On the 12th of April I lost this cotton. The prisoner was brought into the shop with it, about ten o'clock in the morning.

CHARLES MOTTRAM . I am a silk-mercer. I was coming up Judd-street, on the 12th of April, about ten o'clock in the morning, and saw the prisoner look into Mr. Piggott's shop twice, the third time he went in, came out, quickly, with something under his coat, and ran down Speldhurst-street. I pursued, calling out Stop thief! he immediately dropped a piece of furniture from under his coat. I secured him, and delivered him and the furniture to Mr. Piggott.

REBECCA HENDERSON . I saw the prisoner go into the shop, come out with the piece of furniture under his coat, and run down Speldhurst-street. Mr. Mottram stopped him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was in distress.

GUILTY. Aged 21.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190421-100

600. JOHN BIRD , THOMAS WILLIAMS , and CHARLES SUTTON were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Samuel Evans , about eight o'clock at night, on the 28th of March , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, two silver spoons, value 2 l.; two sheets, value 10 s.; six yards of linen, value 10 s.; one napkin, value 2 s.; one pillow-case, value 1 s.; one towel, value 1 s.; one gown, value 5 s., and one gown skirt, value 18 d. , his property.

SAMUEL EVANS . I am a brushmaker , and live in Grove-street, Commercial-road . On Sunday evening, the 28th of March, I went out about six o'clock, returned at eight, and found the front door only single locked - I had double locked it. The back door was forced open. Every thing that was moveable was packed up, ready to be taken away - one of the bundles was tied up in a silk handkerchief, which does not belong to me. Every thing was moved from my bed-room down to the parlour. I had fastened the house up before I went out.

THOMAS MILLS . I am a Revenue officer. I live at No. 3, two doors from the prosecutor's; a little after seven o'clock, I heard a noise at the palings of my yard, I went out, when somebody called out that there was a thief

getting into my yard; just at that moment the prisoner, Sutton, jumped down - he came over the paling, and broke part of it down to get over; I laid hold of him, and gave him to the patrol. He came as if from the prosecutor's.

THOMAS SMITH . I am a tailor, and live at No. 9, Grove-street. I was informed that thieves were in Evans's house. I went, knocked at his door, and in a few minutes heard them running down stairs; Sutton was taken soon after. Two persons opened the front door, and Williams ran out. I collared him, and took him to the watch-house.

HANNAH SKELTON . About seven o'clock in the evening, I was sitting at my parlour window, and saw a man go and knock at Evans's door - nobody answered - he went away, and came again in about half an hour, as it was getting dusk, and knocked again - there were three of them then; I got up, went to my door, and missed them all at once, but soon after I saw a light through the parlour shutters in the house - I then saw a light in the bed-room. I went to the public-house, and told the landlord. Some gentlemen went to the house.

RICHARD JONES . On the 28th of March I was sitting next door to Evans's, and heard that thieves had broken into his house; I immediately went to the spot, and in a little while two men opened the door and rushed out, one of which I secured - it was Bird.

FRANCIS JACKSON . On the 28th of March the prisoners were given into my charge at the watch-house. I searched them - on Bird I found a bundle of matches and a key; on Williams I found a piece of dry liver, to quiet the dogs, and a strap to hold dogs in. Sutton had no handkerchief round his neck. I went to the prosecutor's house, and found the things packed up. The bolt was forced off the back door.

DANIEL FILBY . I live at No. 4, Grove-street. I heard the alarm, went to the back of the premises, and saw Sutton getting over the wall. I saw Bird lying on the top of the wall, I got on the wall, and he ran into Evans's house again. I ran into house, and when I got into the passage I saw them open the front door and run out. I followed them into the street - they were both secured.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. It was not dark.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

BIRD - GUILTY. Aged 23.

WILLIAMS - GUILTY. Aged 18.

SUTTON - GUILTY. Aged 20.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190421-101

601. THOMAS BREAN , CHARLES HOLLIDAY , and JOHN MUNT were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Stubbing , about nine o'clock at night, on the 24th of April , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein six yards of lace, value 6 s. , his property.

HANNAH STUBBING . I am the wife of William Stubbing ; we live in the Colonade, Brunswick-square . On the 24th of April, about half-past eight o'clock in the evening, I was returning home, and saw the prisoner, Brian, run from my window. I found a pane of glass, broken, and a wire put through - six yards of lace were gone. Brian came by in about half an hour - I searched him, but found nothing on him.

WILLIAM STUBBING . I went with Salmon to apprehend the prisoners; we took Brian first - he cried, and said he would tell all about it, that Holloway, and Jack the sweep (meaning Munt), took the lace. I then took Holloway; he said he met Brian, and they all went together - that he stood two or three doors off while Brian took the lace, that Brian tore it to pieces, threw part of it into the garden of the square, and trampled the rest in the kennel. I went and found a piece there.

WILLIAM SALMON . I was with Stubbing. He has spoken correctly.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190421-102

602. UDEN JOSEPH was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house or William Wrighton , about four o'clock in the afternoon of the 24th of March (no person being therein), and stealing three sheets, value 7 s. 6 d.; two shirt-bodies, value 7 s.; four pair of stockings, value 4 s.; three pair of shoes, value 8 s.; two knives, value 1 s., and one petticoat, value 18 d. , his property.

WILLIAM WRIGHTON . I lodge at Harrow in Mr. Hope's house, - he lives in it. On the 24th of March, I lost this property - it was found on the prisoner.

ANN WRIGHTON . I am the wife of the last witness. On the 24th of March, about nine o'clock in the morning, I went out, and returned about five o'clock in the afternoon. I found the window and door broken open - my drawers also forced open, and all this property gone. I had locked every thing up before I went out.

WILLIAM GREENHILL . I am a farmer. On the 24th of March, I was going to Harrow, and met the prisoner. I heard the cry of Stop thief! and was asked if I had met anybody? I returned and overtook him on the Harrow-road with a bundle on his back, containing the property.

THOMAS HODSDEN . I pursued after the prisoner, secured him with the bundle, and found the prosecutor's shoes on his feet - he had left his own in the house.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I met a man, who gave me the bundle.

GUILTY. Aged 31.

Of stealing, but not of breaking and entering .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190421-103

603. MARY COVENTRY was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of March , one napkin, value 1 s. 6 d., the goods of Susannah Mascall , and one sheet, value 12 s. , the goods of Richard Mascall .

SUSANNAH MASCALL . I live in Stonecutter-street . On the 13th of March, about three o'clock in the afternoon, I caught the prisoner running out of my garret, with the sheet and napkin in her arms - she had taken them off the line. I gave her in charge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 57.

Confined Three Months .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190421-104

604. WILLIAM JESSOP was indicted for stealing; on the 27th of April , one rule, value 1 s. , the goods of William Hobcraft .

WILLIAM HOBCRAFT . I am a rule-maker , and live in Whitecross-street . On the 27th of April, between eight and nine o'clock in the morning, I was at the back of my shop, and saw the prisoner put his hand through a broken pane of glass, which I had secured with paper - he took a rule out. The glass was safe half an hour before. I went out and seized him with his arm in the window - he had taken the rule off the nail.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was looking at the window.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190421-105

605. MARY ANN WILLIAMS and MARY CLIFFORD were indicted for stealing, on the 3d of April , one watch, value 1 l.; one key, value 2 d.; two handkerchiefs. value 1 s.; one shirt, value 8 s., and one hat, value 2 s. 6 d. , the goods of Thomas Lindsay .

The prosecutor did not appear

NOT GUILTY.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190421-106

606. JAMES MERTON and JAMES JOHNSTONE were indicted for a misdemeanour

The prisoners pleaded

GUILTY .

Confined One Week .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190421-107

607. MATTHEW PRIOR was indicted for a misdemeanour .

ROBERT WILD . I am servant to Mr. Richard Bousfield , Samuel Bousfield , and Samuel Favel . On the 24th of February, the prisoner came to our shop, in Lower Thames-street, and produced an order, which he said came from Mrs. Piper, who is a customer of ours, and lives at Lewisham. The order was for one velveteen jacket, thirteen pearl buttons, one pair of velveteen breeches, and twelve pearl buttons - I delivered them to him. On the 14th of March he brought another order, for a corderoy jacket and breeches, which I packed up ready for him.

RICHARD MAYO . I am the prosecutor's servant. I delivered to the prisoner the second order.

ELIZABETH PIPER . I live at Lewisham, Kent. The prisoner's father is the carrier. I never sent him with this order - it is not written by me. I never received the things.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Publicly Whipped , and Discharged.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190421-108

608. CHARLLOTTE LEWIS was indicted for a misdemeanour .

RICHARD HAZARD . I am clerk of St. Margaret, Fish-street. The prisoner was a pauper in the work-house . On the 3d of March, she came to me, and produced a letter, purporting to come from her uncle, inviting her to come to Manchester to live with him, and he would support her. I observed that it had no postmark on it - she said her cousin brought it. Next day I gave her two petticoats, a pair of shoes and stockings, and a shawl - she said she should want 20 s. to pay her expences on the road; I told her I must see her cousin. She brought a countryman, and introduced him to me as her cousin - I then gave her 1 l. She came to me again on the 20th in a most wretched state. I took her before the Lord Mayor, and found the clothes that I gave her at the pawnbrokers in town.

MICHAEL CHIPPING . I am a pauper in the workhouse. I know the man that the prisoner produced as her cousin - he is not so. He persuaded her to write the letter; she did not go to Manchester, but she went to Crayford in Kent, with me, the other man and his wife - she then returned to the workhouse.

Prisoners' Defence. I got the clothes in order to do better, but was obliged to return.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Confined Three Months .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190421-109

609. WILLIAM NEWMAN was indicted for obtaining two vices, value 2 l. 3 s., from John Bonner , the goods of John Hillman and Samuel Outram Bacon , under false pretences .

JOHN BONNER . I am servant to Messrs. John Hillman and Samuel Outram Bacon , who are ironmongers , and live in Foster-lane . On the 13th of February, the prisoner came to the shop and said, he came from Mr. Barber for two standing vices - we used often to supply Mr. Barber with vices. He produced this order - (reads.)

"For D. Barber, one standing vice, 40 lbs., one ditto 30 lbs., J. Stubbs." I knew Mr. Barber had a man named Stubbs, and I delivered him the vices, which are worth 43 s.

DAVID BARBER . I am an ironmonger, and live in Wood-street - I often send to Messrs. Hillman and Co. for goods. On the 12th of February, Richard Stubbs was in my service, at my other shop at Rotherhithe. I never sent the prisoner for the vices - the order is not Stubbs's writing. I believe it to be the prisoner's writing - he was in my service about a year ago.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190421-110

610. JOHN SMITH was indicted for a misdemeanour .

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190421-111

611. GEORGE SOANES was indicted for obtaining the sum of 4 s., from Orlando Warren , under false pretences .

ORLANDO WARREN. I am a mariner , and live at Yarmouth. On the 3d of March, I saw the prisoner at the Red House, Lower Thames-street. He said he was a townsman of mine, and was master of the brig Samuel , which was lying at Blackwall, that he had all foreigners on board, was going to discharge the crew, and if I was above twenty-one years old he would take me as mate. After that, he said he had got a 10 l. note, but could not get it changed, and asked me to lend him 3 s. or 4 s., and he would

give me a 1 l. note as soon as he got change. I understood he was to give it to me in advance for wages - I lent him 4 s., believing what he said. A certificate of my being twenty-one years old was drawn up by Mr. Baraclough, a Custom House officer. Next day I went to inquire after the ship, as he said it was moved down to the Dublin Chain - I could find no such ship. The prisoner was at Harding's public-house, and I gave him in charge. He got 16 s. from me altogether.

THOMAS HARDING . I keep the Red House, the prisoner had a bed there. He told me he had just left his ship, the Samuel, which was laden with oranges from St. Michael's. I afterwards gave him in charge.

JOSEPH DAVIES . I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner - I found nothing on him, except the agreement between him and Warren to go out as mate.

Prisoner. I was in distress.

GUILTY . Aged 29.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190421-112

612. WILLIAM COVE was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of March , 20 lbs. of rope, value 4 s., and four thimbles, value 1 s. , the goods of George Marshal .

The prisoner pleaded

GUILTY. Aged 44.

Confined Six Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190421-113

613. HENRY DART and MARY ANN GRIFFITHS were indicted for feloniously having in their custody and possession three forged and counterfeit bank notes, they well knowing them to be forged .

THIRD AND FOURTH COUNTS. For having the said forged notes in certain lodgings or apartments of their's.

FIFTH AND SIXTH COUNTS, stating the lodgings or apartments to belong to the said Henry Dart .

SEVENTH AND EIGHTH COUNTS, stating the lodgings or apartments to belong to the said Mary Ann Griffiths .

THOMAS THOMPSON . I am a constable. On the 17th of April, at two o'clock, in consequence of information I received, I and Forbes went to No. 3, Nag's Head-court, Golden-lane, and saw the landlady; I asked for Mr. and Mrs. Dart, she said they were up stairs in the first-floor front room, and immediately called, out

"Mrs. Dart!" I ran up stairs, and took hold of the door, which was just opened. I went in and found the prisoners and two other men there. I told Dart that I had information that he was dealing in and selling forged bank notes, and was come to search the house - he made me no answer; none of them said any thing. I began to search about the room - Forbes watched the door. While I was looking in the cupboard, one of the men got up to go. I searched the two men, but found nothing on them, and they went away. I observed a little wooden box under the bed, and asked Dart whose box it was? he said he did not know, it was left there by a person. I asked him the person's name, and if he could give me any account of him? they both said they knew nothing about him, he was a stranger to them. I asked Dart for the key, he said he had not got it, and knew nothing about it. I asked him several times for it, he said he had not got it. I said,

"Then I will break it open," and laid hold of the poker to do so. He was sitting on a chair, he then moved himself, and sat on the window-frame, sitting half out of the window. He pushed the window up a little higher - his head, and part of his body were then out. I desired Forbes to lay hold of him. I forced the box-lid open, and there found twenty-two forged bank notes, all loose about the box - I marked them. I also found a pocket-book in the box, and a few old rags and stockings. In the pocket-book were found three bank notes, apparently unfinished, and some sparring tickets for the benefit of young Crawley. The moment he saw them, he said,

"They are my property!" and two affidavits of pawnbrokers' duplicates. These are the notes I first found - (looking at them) - and these are the three notes which I found in the pocket-book - they have no date line. One of the affidavits is signed Dart, and the other has the mark of M. A. Dart. I took the prisoners, box and all, to the watch-house.

Q. Did you afterwards return - A. Yes. The landlady gave me a key, which she said she found. Next day she delivered me another key - they both of them fitted the lock of the box.

JOHN FORBES . I was with the last witness - his statement is correct.

ELIZABETH BUCK . I live at No. 3, Nag's Head-court Golden-lane - the two prisoners lodged there eight days - the male prisoner took the lodging, it was furnished. I was in the room making the bed, at the time they brought their things in - the woman and a little boy came first; the boy brought the box on his head. I think it is the one produced - it is the same size, colour, and appearance - to the best of my judgment it is the same - I saw no other box but that; they lived together.

Q. Do you remember the officers coming on the 17th - A. Yes; they went up stairs, and took the prisoners away about two o'clock. After they were gone, about three o'clock, I had occasion to go to the dust-hole, which is immediately under the window of the prisoner's room, and found a key laying lightly on the top of the dust - it might easily have been dropped from his window. Mrs. Jeffrey, who lodged in the opposite room to the prisoners, was in their room with me. I saw her pick up a key from under the ashes of the grate. I gave them both to Thompson.

MARY JEFFREY . I lodge in the house, and remember the prisoners being apprehended. I went into their room afterwards, and found a key under the grate, which I gave to Mrs. Buck.

THOMAS GLOVER . I am an inspector of bank notes. The three notes set out in the indictment are all forged in every respect, paper, plate, ink and signature, and the other nineteen are also forged in every respect, and of the same description as the others, are off the same plate, and have never been in circulation. The three notes found in the pocket-book are also forged as far as they are manufactured - they are of a different description to the others. The date line is not filled up.

SAMUEL LEET . I am a signing clerk of the Bank. One of the notes has my name to it, but is not my writing. Here are seven others purporting to be signed by me, but they are not my writing.

ROBERT LANE . I am a signing clerk. Three of the notes purport to have my signature - they are not my writing.

GEORGE GOODING . I am a signing clerk. Eleven of the notes purport to be signed by me, but are not my signature.

DART - GUILTY . Aged 22.

GRIFFITHS - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190421-114

614. BARTHOLOMEW BROUGHTON was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Lomas , about two o'clock in the night of the 31st of December , at St. Andrew, Holborn , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, one 100 l., four 10 l., and five 5 l. bank notes , the property of George Shufflebotham , against the statute.

GEORGE SHUFFLEBOTHAM . I live at Macclesfield. I came to town on the 26th of December, and put up at the White Horse, Fetter-lane - Mr. Lomas keeps the house. On the 31st of December I received a 100 l. and two 5 l. notes of my brother. I went to bed about twelve o'clock at night, having upwards of 200 l. in bank notes in my pocket, among which was this 100 l. note. The servant came in, and took away the candle, I saw her go out. My notes were in an inside coat-pocket, which I put on a chair by the bedside - they were in a pocket-book. I got up about eight o'clock, and in about half an hour I found I had lost my money. I immediately made it known at the inn. I have since seen the 100 l. note which I lost.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. What time did you receive it - A. About four o'clock. I did not pay it away, and I am certain that my pocket-book was in my pocket when I went to bed, as I particularly noticed it - the girl shut the door.

THOMAS SHUFFLEBOTHAM . I paid my brother a 100 l. bank note, which I received that day at Messrs. Hankeys', it was No. 19151; I received two at Messrs. Hankeys'. I had the other in my possession next day.

WILLIAM HENRY WRIGHT . I am a clerk to Messrs. Hankeys'. On the 31st of December I paid the last witness two 100 l. notes. I find by my book they were Nos. 19151 and 19069, dated 11th December, 1818.

ANN MURRELL . I am servant at the White Horse, in Fetter-lane. I attended the prosecutor, took away his candle, and shut the door after me - he slept in No. 21. I know the prisoner - he is the same gentleman that I attended that night - he slept in No. 24. The rooms are both in the same gallery - there are two rooms between them.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you know the prisoner before - A. No. I showed him into the room, and turned the bed down while he was there. The prosecutor went to bed about ten minutes after twelve o'clock. I am sure the lock of his door caught, I tried it after me. The prisoner went to bed after him.

JAMES EGINGTON. I am porter at the inn. On the night in question I attended the prisoner, and took off his boots - I am sure he is the man. He went by the name of Colonel Best.

Cross-examined. Q. How often did you see him - A. I saw him in bed on the 24th; I also saw him on the 21st. He asked me to fetch his luggage out of the office - I asked him what name? he said Colonel Best. I inquired, and found none was come, I told him so - he said,

"Very well."

JOHN KIMBELL . I am shopman to Mr. Burge, who is an optician, and lives in Piccadilly. On the 1st of January the prisoner came to the shop, and purchased a sextant, which came to sixteen guineas. I told him it was necessary to adjust it before he took it away, which I said would take about an hour. He gave me a 100 l. note, and I gave him the change, which I got from Mr. Burge - there was a 40 l. note among the change. I directly gave Mr. Burge the 100 l. note that the prisoner gave me. I asked his name and address, he said it was Capt. Wishead, Hatchett's hotel. He left the sextant, called in about three hours after in a hackney-coach for it, and took it away. I told him I wished to keep it a little longer. He said he was going off immediately, and could not wait. It was perfect.

Cross-examined. I have no doubt whatever of his being the man.

MATTHEW BURGE . I am optician. I live in Piccadilly, On the 1st of January I gave Kimbell change for a 100 l. note, No. 19151, 11th December, 1818. I gave him a 40 l. note amongst the change. On the 22d of February I sent the note to Messrs. Herries, my bankers. I have since seen it.

Cross-examined. I did not see the prisoner.

CHARLES EDWARD WALLER . I am a clerk in the Bank. I produce a 100 l. note, which was paid in there.

WILLIAM HENRY WRIGHT . It is one of the notes that I paid to the prosecutor's brother.

HENRY TAYLOR . I am head waiter at the White Horse Inn, Mr. James Lomas keeps the house - it is in the parish of St. Andrew, Holborn.

Prisoner. I leave it to the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY. - DEATH . Aged 35.

Recommended to Mercy .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190421-115

615. WILLIAM AMBROSE was indicted for that he, on the 24th of July , at Edgware , with a certain pistol, loaded with gunpowder and small stones, feloniously wilfully, maliciously, and unlawfully did shoot at Richard Vine , a subject of our Lord the King, with intent in so doing feloniously, wilfully, and of his malice aforethought, to kill and murder him , against the statute.

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating his intent to be to disable the said Richard Vine .

THIRD COUNT, the same, only stating his intent to be to do the said Richard Vine some grievous bodily harm.

RICHARD VINE . I am a higgler , and live at Walterdale. On the 24th of July I was travelling with my horse and cart in the Edgware-road, between Edgware and Stanmore , it was about twelve o'clock at night, or a little after - I was about nine miles from London, but in Middlesex . My son was in the cart with me, asleep.

It was a very bright moonlight night. As I was going along the road the prisoner and another man were coming along facing me, as if about to pass me, they were on the near side of me; I had seen them about twenty or thirty yards before they came up. I had full time to see them. When they came up the prisoner stopped right before me, about three-quarters of a yard off, he up with his arms, and shot me directly. I had full time to observe his countenance, had a full sight of his face, and could pick him out from among a hundred. I was wounded in my right eye. I called directly to my son, and said

"Jack, get up, I am shot." They then ran away, and I saw no more of them. I am certain the prisoner is the man - I will swear to him, and nobody else. I cannot swear to the other man, I had not a sight of him. I did not see what was in the prisoner's hand.

Q. How long ago was it since you saw the prisoner again - A. About Christmas time I went to Hertford goal, and saw the prisoner there; Mr. Wilson, the goaler, said to the prisoners,

"All of you come out." Twenty or thirty men came out, and I picked the prisoner out immediately. I became blind for sometime after I was shot. The man was half a yard or three-quarters of a yard from me - he put both his hands out.

Prisoner. Q. Where did you first know me - A. Never before that night. Nobody described him to me before I saw him in the goal. I never accused any other man of it.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you attend Watford-market - A. Yes; I never saw him there.

COURT. Q. Did you look after the prisoner - A. I was blind, but I looked after him as soon as I got my sight.

JOHN VINE . I am the son of the last witness. I was in the cart when the pistol was fired. I heard my father call out,

"Come here, John, for I am shot." I saw the flash of the pistol, and got out of the cart to help my father - he was covered all over with blood. I led him with assistance to Mr. Foote, the surgeon. We had cherries and apples in the cart.

WILLIAM FOOTE . I am a surgeon, and live at Edgware. I was called up about twelve o'clock at night, to attend Vine. I found him wounded in the face, and a great quantity of powder in his eye - I took a quantity out. I found several lacerated wounds in his forehead, as if from a pistol shot - he was very bloody from top to bottom. I washed him. I attended him for a month, and in the course of that time I extracted several small pebbles, which I gave him - (looks at some) - these are them.

Q. Suppose a man to become suddenly blind from an accident, would the last object he saw make a deep impression upon him - A. I should think it would, from the circumstance of a person's fainting, they remember what happened immediately before they fainted, but nothing at the time.

WILLIAM PLUMER WILLSON . I am keeper of Hertford goal. I remember the prosecutor coming down to me just after Christmas, about two months before the Assizes - the prisoner was in custody at the time. He asked if I had not a man there charged with shooting another man? I told him I had - he wished to see the man. I told him I could not point him out, but I would call all the men out of the same yard, and if he saw him he might point him out. I should think between twenty and thirty men came out of the room, the prosecutor immediately pointed the prisoner out as being the man who shot him. The prisoner was committed to me from Watford, on the 31st of August - nobody pointed him out to the prosecutor; he had not the slightest intimation from anybody of his being the man.

Prisoner. Q. Was I not double-ironed at the time - A. Yes, but I am sure the prosecutor did not know that he was ironed till after he pointed him out.

Prisoner's Defence. I have a witness to call.

CHARLES GRIFFIN . I am a labourer, and live at Watford, in Hertfordshire. The prisoner is a shoemaker; he lodged and slept with me near a twelvemonth - his sister kept the house, her name is Amey Ambrose.

Q. When did you go to lodge there - A. In December, 1815, and remained there three years. I never knew him do any misdemeanour.

Q. Was he there last December - A. Yes - No, he was not.

Q. Where was he - A. He was in custody, and acquitted from the bar at Hertford, for a misdemeanour that he did not do.

Q. What was the misdemeanour - A. For the same thing.

Q. What is the same thing - A. I do not know; but on the 24th of July he was at home with me, very ill in bed.

Q. Who else is here to prove that - A. I can get nobody to prove it but myself.

Q. His sister could prove it - A. She was here, but is gone home, not knowing when the trial would come on. We lodged in Watford-place.

Q. What makes you remember the day - A. Because I had a letter from his wife to go down to Godalmin, on the 22d.

Q. When did you first hear of his being charged with shooting Vine - A. In August - in July I heard it. On the 24th of July I heard that very thing. I heard his sister say so.

Q. You mean to say, that in July you heard this man shot Vine - A. I heard some man had shot him.

Q. In July you heard that Vine had been shot - A. Yes, on the 24th of July.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. When was you last in Court as a witness for him - A. (hesitating) Never.

Q. Nor for any other man - A. Yes, for another man, who was charged with housebreaking. I proved he was with me at the time.

Q. That man's name was Edward Harker - A. Yes; it was two years ago next Assizes; the prisoner's sister attended also at that time to prove an alibi.

Q. You swore on that occasion, that you left him at home at six o'clock in the morning in the month of January, and that it was then daylight - A. Yes, that man also lived and slept with me.

Q. Now you swear that the prisoner never committed any misdemeanour; how long ago is it since he was transported - A. He had six years at the Hulks.

Q. Do you not know that he was in prison at Hertford twelve months, besides, for another offence - A. He was in custody for shooting at a man.

MR. FOOTE re-examined. The prosecutor was confined to his house three weeks or a month; it was six or eight weeks before he recovered sufficiently to go to town.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 30.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190421-116

616. JOHN MILES was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of February , at St. John, Hackney , one cow; price 10 l. , the property of Robert Savill .

ELIZABETH SAVILL . I am the daughter of Robert Savill , who lives at Laytonstone, Epping Forest. About the 9th or 10th of February, I missed the cow off the Forest - she did not come home as usual with the other; we had two. The other came home to be milked; this was dry. I could hear nothing of her.

JOHN EYLES . I am patrol of St. John, Hackney. On the 12th of February, about half-past four o'clock in the morning, the prisoner came to me in Grove-street, Hackney, and asked me what o'clock it was? I told him; he had a cow with him. He asked the nearest way to Kingsland? I told him, and walked with him to Hackney; he said he should know his way then. I asked him where he brought the cow from? he said, from one

"Farmer Benton , of Rainham;" that he brought her from home, and he was obliged to go back for a halter to tie her head down - her head was tied down to her leg; he said he was going to Mr. Bellows, a cow farmer, at Kingsland, and he ought to have been there before now, as it ought to have been milked; he said he worked for Mr. Bellows twelve or fourteen years ago. I knew Mr. Bellows kept a good many cows about fourteen years ago, but not then. I observed that the cow was tied down with a small string instead of a halter, and that she was dry. As we were going along, I asked him where the calf was? he said it had been gone six or seven weeks - we had then got near the watch-house; I collared him, and took him in. I found that the cow was very heavy in calf - about seven months gone. Rainham is above twelve miles from where I met him. I sent to Bellows, and in consequence of what he said, I detained the prisoner.

WILLIAM FULLBROOK . I am patrol of Hackney. I was with Eyles; he has spoken correctly.

JOHN GARVA . I am constable of Hackney. On the 12th of February, the two patrols brought the prisoner to the watch-house on suspicion of stealing the cow. I sent a man to Mr. Bellows, and then detained him. Elizabeth Savill saw the cow, and claimed it.

ELIZABETH SAVILL re-examined. On the 25th of February, I saw the cow, and knew her directly.

Prisoner's Defence. I was hired to drive the cow to Mr. Bellows for 2 s., at Stratford. The man lived at Rainham - I came through Ilford.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 38.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190421-117

617. PETER PONSONBY was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of April , at St. Andrew, Holborn , two coats, value 5 s.; four waistcoats, value 20 s.; one pair of pantaloons, value 5 s.; two shirts, value 6 s., and three handkerchiefs, value 6 s., the goods of Richard Gabb , in the dwelling-house of William Gabb .

RICHARD GABB . I live at the Goat, public-house, in Tash-street, Gray's Inn-lane . My father, William Gabb, keeps the house; it is in the parish of St. Andrew, Holborn . I lodged in the back room, and the prisoner in the front room. On the evening of Easter Monday he absconded from his lodgings. Next morning I went to my box, found it broken open, and all my clothes gone. I suspected him, made inquiry, and found most of my things at the pawnbroker's. The prisoner was apprehended about a week after. He passed as a tailor.

WILLIAM GIBSON . I am a pawnbroker. I have a coat, a pair of trowsers, and three waistcoats, which were pledged with me - I only took the coat in. The prisoner is the man who pledged it on the 13th of April - my master, Mr. Ramsay, took the others in. On the Thursday following a man came to redeem one of the articles. I gave him in charge - it was not the prisoner.

WILLIAM WAINWRIGHT . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner.

WILLIAM THISSELTON . I am an officer of Hatton-garden. When the prisoner was apprehended I asked him what he had done with the rest of Gabb's things? he said he pledged the other coat at Aldgate - I went there and found it.

RICHARD GABB . The coats and waistcoats are mine. and are worth 4 l. together.

Prisoner's Defence. A man gave them to me in the public-house.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 18.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190421-118

618. THOMAS BROMLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of April , at St. Leonard, Shoreditch fifteen yards of flannel, value 36 s. 10 d., the goods of John Finch , privately in his shop .

JOHN FINCH . I am a haberdasher , and live in Allerton-street, New Hoxton . On Saturday morning, the 24th of April, I lost this flannel - I did not see it taken.

MARY FINCH . I live with my father. The prisoner came into the shop to know the price of a handkerchief, which I showed him. While he was looking at it, a sweep came and said he was desired to sweep the chimney - he went into the parlour, and took the kettle off the fire. I opened the parlour door to call my father down; while I was outside the parlour door, the prisoner took the flannel. I saw him turning the corner of East-row, with the flannel in his hand; I ran after him, and saw him drop it - it was picked up by Mr. Lowe, and given to me; he pursued and took the prisoner - I am certain he is the man. I did not see him take it.

ROBERT LOWE . I was at the corner of Plummer's-row, about a quarter before eight o'clock in the morning, and saw the prisoner come down East-row, with a roll of flannel under his coat; I heard a cry of Stop thief! Just before that the prisoner passed me, and said,

"It is all right, master." I called out Stop thief! he dropped the flannel, and I picked it up. Taylor tried to stop him; he ran towards the City-road, was taken at the end of Cornwall-street, and brought back to me - I am sure he is the man. I gave Finch the property.

SAMUEL TAYLOR , On the 24th of April, about a quarter before eight o'clock in the morning, I was coming down

East-row, and heard the cry of Stop thief! I immediately turned myself, and saw the prisoner running - he dropped a roll of flannel from under his coat. I put myself ready to stop him, but he turned, and ran towards the City-road. I pursued him, calling Stop thief! he was stopped; I ran, and took hold of one side of him. He said it was all right, and if I would let him go, he would never do so again. Finch's daughter said he was the man - we took him back to the house, and sent for an officer.

SAMUEL LINES . I collared the prisoner as he was running across the City-road.

JAMES TAYLOR . I am a constable. I took the prisoner in charge - he said he was out of employ.

JOHN FINCH re-examined. The flannel is mine, and cost me 36 s. 10 d.

Prisoner's Defence. I saw a man running, and the flannel on the ground; I picked it up, and walked away with it.

GUILTY . - DEATH Aged 18.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190421-119

619. LOUISA ANDERSON was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of March , one watch, value 1 l.; one seal, value 2 d.; one key, value 2 d.; one purse, value 1 d., and the sum of 11 s. in monies numbered, the property of William Phipps , from his person .

WILLIAM PHIPPS . I am a servant . On Sunday, the 4th of March, about half-past eight o'clock at night, I met the prisoner in Oxford-street, near the Pantheon. I walked to the corner of Dean-street, she followed me; we went into a public-house, and had a pint of beer, in a short time I fell asleep in the tap-room, as I had been walking from the country, and was tired; the landlord awoke me, and asked me if I had lost any thing? when I missed my watch from my fob, and my money from my pocket - he produced my watch, and I claimed it - I was quite sober.

ROBERT HOWARD . I was constable of the night. About half-past eleven o'clock at night Cook brought the prisoner to the watch-house, she said the man was her husband; I said I would go and see if he was or not. I went to the Black Horse, public-house, and found the prosecutor coming out - he went to the watch-house and claimed the watch - he said she was not his wife. I found 1 s. 6 d. on her. I found a bag lying in the sand-box, where she sat; Phipps said it was the purse his money was in. I put her in with another woman, she sent out half a crown to buy bread and cheese. I fetched her out, searched her again, and found half a crown and some halfpence upon her.

JOHN COOK . I keep the Black Horse, public-horse, in Oxford-street. I went out about nine o'clock, returned in an hour, and was informed that a woman had robbed a man in the tap-room; I went in and asked the prisoner what she had to do with the prosecutor, who was asleep? she said he was her husband, and told me to walk out, for it was nothing to me. I told her she had better give up the watch and property, or I would call the watchman. I called him, and told her to leave the watch with me till the morning - she gave me the watch, but not the money, as she said it was her own. I awoke Phipps, he missed his watch and money, and said she was not his wife. We took her to the watch-house.

EDWARD HUDD . I was in the house, having some beer, and saw the prisoner pulling the prosecutor about I did not see her take any thing.

Prisoner's Defence. He let the watch fall, and I picked it up.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190421-120

620. WILLIAM SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of March , one pair of boots, value 4 s. , the goods of John Puckeridge .

JOHN PUCKERIDGE . I live in Wardour-street . On the 3d of March three men stole a pair of boots from my window; I ran out, the prisoner was stopped by a man, who is not here. I do not know that he was one of them.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190421-121

621. GEORGE SMEE was indicted for obtaining from Benjamin Churchill two 5 l. and sixteen 1 l. bank notes, and 2 s. 2 d. in monies numbered, the property of John Cross , under false pretences .

BENJAMIN CHURCHILL . I am clerk to Mr. John Cross , who is a meat-salesman , in Leadenhall-market; he was in the habit of receiving meat for sale from William Appleford and Hannah Peacock , of Coggleshall, by Ruffle's waggon. On the 13th of October we received meat from them both. George Smith was Ruffle's servant, I never saw the prisoner with the waggon. Appleford's meat produced 21 l. 2 s. and the other 5 l. About eleven o'clock in the morning, after market hours, the prisoner came, and said he had called for Ruffle's money. I asked whose money? he said, Mrs. Peacock's and Mr. Appleford's. Seeing him a stranger, I asked him where his fellow-servant was? He said, poor fellow, he has met with a very bad accident, for on Sunday one of the ropes of the waggon broke, which made the horse go on, and one of the wheels passed over his body; and on his return home, no doubt, he should find him dead. I then paid him two 5 l. and sixteen 1 l. notes, and 2 s. 2 d. He said he had lived upwards of four years with Ruffle. I asked him if he knew Collins, who had just left Ruffle? he said, Yes; and Mr. Ruffle was extremely sorry that he had left. About a fortnight after I saw him in custody.

JOHN RUFFLE . I am a carrier from Coggleshall to town; Appleford and Peacock employ me. On the 13th of October, in the morning, two packs of meat were conveyed from each of them to Cross - the prisoner was not my servant, but a perfect stranger. I never authorized him to receive the money from Cross, and he never paid it to me.

GEORGE SMITH . I am waggoner to Mr. Ruffle. On the 12th of October I left Coggleshall at six o'clock, with this meat in my waggon; I fell in with the prisoner at Boreham, he walked as far as Chelmsford with me, then went with a cart, and joined me again near Brentwood. I supped there, and then went on to town. He went into the cart, joined me again at Romford, and came to town with me, on a horse which I had behind my waggon. I had told him the meat was going to Cross; he assisted

me in taking it out, and heard me tell the porters to take it there. He never paid me the money for the meat, nor did I authorize him to go for it. I met with no accident on Sunday. I afterwards applied to Cross for the money, and found the prisoner had received it. They described him, and I found him out.

Prisoner's Defence. I was on the other side of the water at the time the money was received.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190421-122

622. JOHN WELLS was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of March , two bed-curtains, value 10 s.; one valance, value 2 s., and two sheets, value 8 s., the property of Edward Oaker , in a lodging-room .

MARY OAKER . I am the wife of Edward Oaker , we live at Fulham . On the 25th of March the prisoner's wife took a furnished apartment at our house at 4 s. a week - the prisoner came soon after; they did not stop above half an hour. Soon after, I heard the door shut - I went up, I found their room-door locked; it is the second floor. I could see through the crevice of the door that the vallance was cut off and gone - they had borrowed a knife of me. I broke the door open, and missed the articles stated in the indictment. The prisoner was secured in about an hour, with the valance round his body, and the curtains and sheets in a bundle.

HENRY WILLIAM RICHMOND . I live near Oaker. Hearing she had been robbed, I went after the prisoner, and stopped him with the things in the King's-road, about a mile from the prosecutor's house - his wife was with him, and had the bundle. I asked him what he had in the bundle? he said, nothing but his own property. He refused to let me see what it contained. Assistance came; he then said I should have the things. The bundle contained the sheets and curtains. I found the valance twisted round his body, under his smock-frock.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 50.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190421-123

623. ELIZABETH BARTRAM was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of April , one bedstead, value 10 s.; one looking-glass, value 1 s.; three chairs, value 4 s.; two pieces of baize, value 1 s.; one tea-board, value 1 s.; one stove, value 5 s.; one pair of tongs, value 6 d.; one bolster, value 5 s.; one pair of bellows, value 6 d.; one bed, value 2 l., and one set of bed furniture, value 5 s., the goods of Charles Whitroe , in a lodging-room .

SARAH WHITROE . I am the wife of Charles Whitroe , we live in Great Peter-street, Westminster - the prisoner lodged five weeks with us in a one-pair back-room, furnished; the articles stated in the indictment were let with the lodging. On the 3d of April I went up to her to ask for rent - I pushed the door open, she pushed it against me. I found all the furniture gone - the stove was torn out of the fixture. She said she was coming to tell me that the thieves had stolen it all. She ran into the street, I followed and overtook her. She then took me to where she had sold them all. They are worth above 4 l.

MARY LUKE . I live in Great Chapel-street, and am servant to Mr. Hill, who is a salesman. On the 22d of March I bought some bed furniture of the prisoner.

SARAH SEDGWICK . I am a charwoman. Between the 22d of March and the 2d of April, I bought two pieces of baize, three chairs, and a fender, of the prisoner.

MARY CUSIC . I keep a broker's shop. I bought a blanket, quilt, and stove of the prisoner - she said they were her own.

ANN RICE . I keep a broker's shop in New Pye-street. I bought the tongs, poker, shovel, and bolster of the prisoner.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I intended to redeem them.

GUILTY . Aged 36.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190421-124

624. WILLIAM WASHBROOK was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of April , one cap, value 6 s. , the goods of Henry Pickford .

HENRY PICKFORD . I am a hatter , and live in St. Giles's . On the 11th of April, about twelve o'clock at night, the prisoner was brought back with this cap.

URIAH LEWIS. I was at the prosecutor's, and saw the prisoner looking at some hats at the door. He followed me into the shop, and I saw him take a cap from the window, and run out directly - I followed and took him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I had been drinking, and was looking at the cap. I thought it would suit my child, and turned round to show it to my wife - the man took me as I returned with it.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190421-125

625. HENRY THORNGATE was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of March , one stove, value 6 s., the goods of William Redfearn ; and 9 lbs. of lead, value 3 s., belonging to William City , and fixed to a certain building of his .

WILLIAM CITY . The Virginia Planter in Gate-street, Spitalfields , belongs to me - it was untenanted; Ring occasionally looked after it - he had been a tenant in it. About two yards of the water-pipe was cut away.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not offer me 20 l. to get possession of the premises - A. Never.

WILLIAM REDFEARN . I once occupied the Virginia Planter , and left a stove behind me, on the 24th of March.

Prisoner. Q. Do you know the real landlord of the house - A. I paid my rent to Mr. City.

CHARLES COULTON . I keep the White Swan, Gate-street. On the 27th of March, about seven o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner and two men at the Virginia Planter - a smith was forcing the door. In about ten minutes I saw Henry come out with a stove on his back; he carried it to his own house; I did not know any thing was wrong. I told the neighbours the prisoner was doing wrong by taking away the property.

THOMAS HENRY. I keep a horse and cart to move furniture.

I was passing the house and saw the prisoner; he said he should have a job for me soon - I went in. He showed me the stove, and asked me to buy it - I knew him before. I said it was not in my way; he told me to take it to my house, and if we could not agree about it, he would take it away. I took it home - he helped it on my shoulder.

JAMES JOHNSON . I live next door to the Virginia Planter . I saw the prisoner there between six and seven o'clock in the morning - I got in at the window. He said,

"Don't you think that Ring had better take three guineas for the possession, rather than have nothing at all?" - Ring and Morris were walking about at the time. He said he would take the house down, and clear the corner, so that one should not laugh at the other, and there were nine more that he would have down. I kept in possession and the prisoner also, until City went to the office - the prisoner stopped till the officers came.

WILLIAM RING . I was employed to keep possession of the house, and left on the 26th of March. On the 27th I saw the prisoner there; as soon as he saw me, he ran into the house and shut the door - City came soon after. The prisoner called to him that it was all right, for he was authorised by Combe and Delafield to do this - he said he would give me three guineas to give up possession - I knew him before. He staid in the house for the officers to come.

JOSHUA ARMSTRONG . I am an officer - City came to the office to make a complaint against the prisoner. I went and took him - he went willingly.

Prisoner's Defence. It is a malicious prosecution. The man who kept the house employed me to sell the liquor off. I found he was going on badly, and told the distiller of it. Combe and Delafield sold every thing up under the Sheriff, and employed me to get possession.

WILLIAM RING . The prisoner was keeping possession. I was arrested at the suit of the distiller.

WILLIAM WEST . I keep an academy at Stepney-green. On the 25th of March I was at the Queen's Head, Dog-row. City came, saw the prisoner there, and told him he would give him 20 l. to get possession of the Virginia Planter , and that he must call upon him at ten o'clock that night.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. Was the prisoner an acquaintance of your's - A. No. I was drinking with him.

Q. Did not Armstrong come to your house to search for stolen goods - A. Never.

ISAAC HOWARD . I was present on the 25th of March. City and the prisoner were in conversation together - they talked about getting possession of the house. City went home, and fetched a lease or deed.

JOSHUA ARMSTRONG re-examined. I know West. I have been to his house for corn that was stolen from Messrs. Rhodes, and found it there - he then lived at Cambridge Barn with his father.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190421-126

626. DAVID MULKIN was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of February , one coat, value 50 s. , the property of Christopher Edward Lefray .

GEORGE COOK . I am servant to Mr. Christopher Edward Lefray . On the 25th of March, I had a coat in my possession, and gave it to Drewell, the carrier. On the Saturday following I found it at the office.

WILLIAM DREWELL . I am the Hendon carrier. Cook gave me the coat; I put it into my cart, and carried it into the Temple to Mr. Lefray. I took it out of the cart, and put it on the horse with three other coats, at the corner of Elm-court. I saw the prisoner with two other sailors, lurking about - it was about three o'clock in the afternoon. I lost the coat.

ROBERT DREWELL . I was with my brother. The coat was put into the cart at Camden-town. I lost it while I left the cart to carry the goods up to Mr. Lefray's chambers.

DAVID DAVIS . I am a salesman, and live in West Smithfield. On the 25th of March, about half-past four o'clock, the prisoner came to our shop, and wanted to sell the coat for 17 s. I asked him how he got it? he said it belonged to a sailor. I detained him, and took him to the watch-house.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was in distress.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190421-127

627. EDWARD MEARS was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of March , 5 lbs. of pepper, value 5 s. , the goods of the London Dock Company .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be the property of some person unknown.

WILLIAM CLARE . I am constable of the Thames Police. On the 27th of March, about half-past six o'clock in the morning, I stopped the prisoner at the gate of the Docks, and asked him what he had got in his hat? he said, nothing at all. I took it off, and he then said he had a little pepper. I took him into custody, and found a night cap tied round his body, with 5 lbs. of pepper in it.

Cross-examined by MR. ARABIN. Q. He had been in his barge all night - A. Yes, it was laden with pepper.

Prisoner's Defence. It was sweepings.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Fined One Shilling , and Discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190421-128

628. EVAN JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of October , 2 lbs. of leaf tobacco, value 1 s. , the property of the London Dock Company .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be the property of certain persons unknown.

JAMES SLATER . I am a Thames Police officer. On the 25th of April, between four and five o'clock, I stopped the prisoner at the West India Dock gate, as he was leaving

work - he had a handkerchief in his hand; I found there was a small piece of tobacco in it. I took him into custody, searched him, and found a handkerchief tied round his back, under his clothes - it contained tobacco. I found more in his breeches - there were 2 lbs. in all. I found two pieces in his shoe, and more in his neck-handkerchief.

Prisoner's Defence. I took it for my own use.

GUILTY . Aged 33.

Confined Three Months , and Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190421-129

629. JAMES HOLLIS and SAMUEL JOHNSON were indicted for stealing, on the 31st of March , two live tame rabbits, price 5 s. , the property of John Final Cook .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating them to belong to Edwin Cook .

JOHN FINAL COOK . I am a carpenter and live at Heston . On the 1st of April, I found the prisoner in custody with two rabbits, which my son lost.

EDWIN COOK . I keep rabbits. I lost two of them on the night of the 31st of March, out of the shed in the backyard - they were safe at eight o'clock at night. Next morning, I saw them before the Justice, and knew them to be mine.

BENJAMIN NICHOLLS . I am beadle of Heston. On the 1st of April, about one o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoners in the London road, coming from towards Mr. Cook's; Hollis had an empty sack on his back, and Johnson had a bag with the rabbits. I detained them, and took them to the cage. They said they were given to them in town to carry to Johnson's master, at Chertsey.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

HOLLIS'S Defence. I know nothing of them.

JOHNSON'S Defence. I bought them in Oxford-road.

HOLLIS - GUILTY . Aged 45.

JOHNSON - GUILTY . Aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190421-130

630. ROBERT LOOSELEY was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of March , five trusses of hay, value 1 l. , the goods of Simon Pearce .

SIMON PEARCE . I am a farmer , and live at Heston. I lost the hay from Harlington , which is two miles from Heston.

JOHN ROBERTS . I am Mr. Pearce's haybinder. On the 25th of March I bound thirty-one trusses of hay - I left them safe about half-past seven o'clock at night, next morning, about four o'clock, I missed five trusses. I know the prisoner - he is a hawker, and keeps a horse and cart. The hay was in a meadow. The rick was fenced round.

THOMAS WHITE . I am a hawker, and live at Winchmore-hill. On the 26th of March I was coming up with a load of goods, between Gerrard's-cross and Beaconsfield, and met the prisoner, between eight and nine o'clock in the morning, with five trusses of hay in his cart. I heard Pearce had lost some, and told him of it. He found his hay at the prisoner's house at Beaconsfield.

GEORGE CALEY . On the 25th of March I saw the prisoner at Heston between three and four o'clock in the afternoon - I overtook him again between eight and nine o'clock that night, in the road leading from Heston to Harlington, and spoke to him, he had his cart with him; he was about two miles from Pearce's hay-rick, and was going towards Beaconsfield.

SIMON PEARCE re-examined. Harlington is between Heston and Beaconsfield. On the 27th of March, in consequence of what I heard, I went to Beaconsfield with my haybinder and a constable, and found four of the trusses of hay in the prisoner's shed where his horse stood, the other was loose - the horse was eating part of it at the time; we took him into custody. He said he bought it at Croydon, in Surry. I am sure the hay is mine.

JOHN ROBINS. I went to the prisoner's house, and found four trusses of hay, and part of a loose truss in his stable. It was my master's hay, and the same I lost.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought the hay.

GUILTY . Aged 48.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190421-131

631. THOMAS KING was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of March , one coat, value 10 s. , the property of William Bode .

ELIZABETH FOULGER . I am servant to Mr. William Bode , who lives in Percy-street . On the 10th of March I was cleaning the door, and went down for some water - I returned in less than a minute, saw footmarks in the passage, and missed the coat off the nail in the passage. I went to the door, and saw the prisoner come out of the next house with the coat on. I told him he had been into No. 35, and taken my master's coat - he asked me how I dared to say so? He came back with me, threw the coat off in the passage, and said he insisted on seeing my master, and he would send for a constable, and have me taken up. I sent for a constable, who took him to the watch-house.

WILLIAM SHEPPARD . I am a constable. I took the prisoner in charge. He made his escape from Marlborough-street, and Furzeman afterwards retook him. I am sure he is the man.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190421-132

632. DAVID BOWERMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of February , one bridle, value 18 d. , the property of John Hodsdon .

JOHN HODSDON , JUN. My father is a farmer , and lives at Harrow . On the 12th of February the stable-window was entered, the door unfastened, and the saddle, bridle, and three collars stolen. I received information, and sent for an officer, who took the prisoner, and found the bridle on him.

GEORGE WATSON . I drive a team. I was coming to town with a load of hay, and saw the prisoner by the side of the road, he asked me if I would carry a sack for him? it was about four o'clock in the morning. I asked him what was in the sack? he said it was a saddle, bridle, and collar. I said I did not like to carry such things, and

asked him if he had stolen them? he said No, he was going to take them home, as a farmer had borrowed them. I gave information.

JOHN WALES . I am a constable. I went to the prisoner's house in Bell-street, Edgeware-road, and found the bridle. I could not find the prisoner till the 25th of March, when Sellers took him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I found them in a bush near Paddington.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190421-133

633. JOSEPH GIBBS was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of March , one shawl, value 30 s. , the goods of James Giles Newton .

JAMES GILES NEWTON . I am a linen-draper , and live in Leicester-square . On the 20th of March Bond told me he suspected the prisoner, who was my shopman . I called him up stairs, and told him I suspected he had something about him which did not belong to him - he was going to leave me that day. He consented for me to see his trunk; he threw his clothes out of the trunk on to the bed, and on returning them I held up a coat, and found something bulky in the pocket. I asked him what it was? he replied,

"A shawl of your's." I had him sent to Bow-street.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. I believe this was his only offence. I had a good character with him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 27.

Recommended to Mercy.

Fined One Shilling , and Discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190421-134

634. JAMES CUDLAND , JOHN SHANNON , JAMES JACKSON , and JOHN SMITH were indicted for stealing, on the 22d of February , 6 lbs. of lead, value 1 s. 3 d., belonging to Andrew Sturt , and fixed to a dwelling-house of his .

ANDREW STURT . I have two houses in Vincent-square, Tothill-fields . I lost the lead off the top of the door.

WILLIAM MATTHEW BRITTAIN . I went to the prosecutor's house, and found about fourteen yards of lead taken away. I compared some that the officer gave me with the place, and cannot say that it fitted.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190421-135

635. GEORGE TITMARSH was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of March , one watch, value 30 s., the property of Alexander Stewart , from his person .

ALEXANDER STEWART . I am a labourer . On the 30th of March, about twelve o'clock at night, I was talking to a friend in the Haymarket , a person came up, snatched my watch out, and ran away with it. I do not know who it was - he got way. Two days after, the prisoner was detained on offering it to pledge.

JOHN BENTON . I am a pawnbroker, and live in High Holborn. On the 2d of April, about ten o'clock in the morning, the prosecutor described his watch to me, and about twelve the prisoner offered it to pledge - I detained him. He said he bought it of a man at the coach-stand in Oxford-street, and borrowed 1 l. of a man to buy it, whom he could bring forward.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I bought the watch.

WILLIAM DUNN . I am a hackney coachman, and so is the prisoner. I was at the stand in Oxford-street on the 30th of March, in the evening, and saw the prisoner talking to a tall man; he said he was going to buy a watch of him, and borrowed 1 l. of me to do so.

WILLIAM BUDGE . I am a coachman. I saw the prisoner bargaining for the watch.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190421-136

636. JOHN ROBINSON was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of March , one shirt, value 2 s.; one petticoat, value 6 d.; two aprons, value 6 d., and one pincloth, value 6 d. , the goods of Joseph Munday .

ELIZA MUNDAY . I am the wife of Joseph Munday , who is a salesman , and lives in Cable-street . On the 18th of March, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, I saw a tall man lean over the counter, and take the things out of the window - I got up and pursued him. He was brought back with them.

EMANUEL SOLOMON . I was standing at my door, heard the cry of Stop thief! saw the prisoner running, and stopped him. I found the articles stated in the indictment on him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 35.

Confined Six Months , and Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190421-137

637. FRANCES ROBINSON was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of February , one bed, value 15 s.; one bolster, value 3 s.; two blankets, value 8 s.; two sheets, value 5 s.; one saucepan, value 1 s.; one pair of bellows, value 1 s.; one counterpane, value 2 s., and one shovel, value 6 d., the goods of Edward Wilde , in a lodging-room .

MARY WILDE . I am the wife of Edward Wilde , we live in Featherstone-street, City-road. I let the prisoner a lodging at No. 10, James's-court on the 18th of January, on the first floor, furnished, at 4 s. 6 d. a week - she continued there till the 1st of February, I then asked her for my rent; she said I should have it presently. I went again on the Monday, and asked her if all the things were in the room? she said Yes, but would not let me go in to see - she ran up the court. I had the door forced open, and found all the articles stated in the indictment gone - the room was stripped of every thing; she never returned. I met her in Petticoat-lane on the 9th of February, and took hold of her arm; she beat me, and called to some persons, who tried to rescue her, but I kept my hold, and gave her in charge.

Prisoner. Q. Do you not let the houses out to bad girls - A. No. The prisoner is a prostitute, but I did not know it till after she had left.

CHRISTOPHER BENNETT . I lodge with the prosecutor. On the 1st of February I saw the prisoner go out. I heard something soon after, and had the door broken open.

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutrix keeps a bad house.

GUILTY . Aged 35.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190421-138

638. JOSEPH POTTER was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of April , one blanket, value 5 s. , the goods of John Schoeneck .

ANN SCHOENECK . I am the wife of John Schoeneck , we live at Shadwell . On the 6th of April I lost a blanket off the line in the yard, about three o'clock in the afternoon.

ELIZABETH CARPENTER . On the 6th of April, between two and three o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner came to a public-house in Shadwell, and sent me to pledge the blanket at Smellie's, which I did and gave him the money.

WILLIAM SMELLIE . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Ratcliff-highway. Carpenter pledged the blanket with me, for 3 s. 6 d.

JOHN BROWN. I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner, and found 2 s. on him. He said it was part of the money the blanket was pledged for.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Confined Six Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190421-139

639. GEORGE PAGE was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of February, 1817 , one chest, value 1 s.; 60 lbs. of tea, value 20 l.; one box, value 1 s.; 100 lemons, value 10 s.; one peck of nuts, value 6 s., and one peck of chesnuts, value 5 s. , the goods of William Mack and John Mack .

JEREMIAH AVES . I am a carrier from Norwich to London. On the 8th of February, 1817, I left town with my waggon, and on the 9th, between one and two o'clock in the morning, I heard something fall off the waggon - I was then near Tottenham. I put the tilt up, saw my goods uncovered, and three men ran away from the waggon - two ran towards Stamford-hill, and the other to Edmonton. I sent my man after the other two. He called me - I went back, the men were gone. I returned to the waggon, and found I had lost a chest of tea, a box of lemons, and two bags of nuts. I told the watchman what had happened. When I got to Norwich I heard two men had been taken, but they had escaped. On the 13th of February last I saw the prisoner in the Kingsland-road, and told him he was my prisoner for stealing the things. He said his mother gave him 30 s. to make it up, which was not the case. I knew him before - he used to assist my fellow-servant to drive the waggon. I did not see him that night. I never saw him after the robbery till this time. I had been told he was the man.

WILLIAM GREEN . I am a watchman at Edmonton. Aves told me what had happened that night, and about a quarter after three o'clock in the morning the prisoner, and a man named Bell, were coming down the road with a chest of tea - the prisoner had about five pecks of tea in his smock-frock. They had broken the chest open, and the other man had got the chest on his back. I asked them where they were going to? they said they were guards to to the waggon, that somebody had cut the ropes, and got the tea off, and they were going to take it to the waggon. I followed them to the next watchman. - Page ran away with his load - I kept Bell, and locked him and the tea up. We followed the prisoner through the fields, found him behind a haystack, and put him in the cage, and on Sunday night he was rescued out of it. I found a chest of lemons next morning, in consequence of what Piper told me. I am positive the prisoner is the man - I should know him again from a hundred. I could never find him till now.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not lay hold of me in the field, instead of behind a haystack - A. He ran from the haystack.

WILLIAM HUTCHINSON . On the 17th of January last I took the prisoner into custody at the White Hart, public-house, Kingsland-road.

WILLIAM PIPER . I am a labourer, and live at Edmonton. When the prisoner was in the cage about two years ago, he told me he had robbed the waggon of the box of lemons, and a bag of nuts, and told me where he had concealed them. I told the constable, and we went next morning and found them.

Prisoner's Defence. I have seen the man since - he said nothing about it.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190421-140

640. MARY ANN O'NEIL was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of April , one looking-glass, value 18 d., and one coverlid, value 18 d., the goods of William Bazely , in a lodging-room .

WILLIAM BAZELY . I live in Stewart's-rents, Drury-lane . I let the prisoner a two-pair back-room, furnished. I gave her warning, but could not get her out. My room was nearly stripped of every thing. Her husband absconded on the 30th of March, after that the prisoner stole these things.

GEORGE BENTON . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Holborn. On the 31st of March the prisoner pledged the coverlid and looking-glass with me - she said they were her own.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GEORGE NEWPORT . I took the prisoner in charge - she gave me the duplicates.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in distress - my husband has left me.

GUILTY . Aged 31.

Confined Six Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190421-141

641. SAMUEL LOWNDES was indicted for that he, on the 20th of January , at Paddington , had in his custody and possession, a bill of exchange, which was as follows, (i.e.)

3731, 20 0 0.

London, January, 16, 1819.

Two months after date, pay to my order, twenty pounds, for value received.

SAMUEL LOWNDES ,

To MR. EDWARD OWEN , Knutsford, Farmer.

upon which was and is a false, forged, and counterfeit acceptance thereof, which is as follows (i.e.) accepted,

his mark X, Edward Owen , payable at No. 3, Staining-lane, Wood-street; afterwards (to wit), on the same day, at the same parish aforesaid, feloniously did utter and publish as true, the said forged acceptance of the said bill of exchange, well knowing the same to be forged and counterfeited, with intent to defraud Christopher Hall , against the Statute.

CHRISTOPHER HALL . I am a tailor , and live at No. 31, Queen-street, Bryanstone-square - I know the prisoner. I first saw him about the 7th of January; he came to me with his brother James, who had before ordered a blue coat, waistcoat, a pair of breeches, and a pair of drawers, and to take them to No. 46, Shouldham-street, The prisoner said,

"Make the clothes, I am a housekeeper, and live at No. 46, in Shouldham-street, Edgware-road," and that he would pay me on the delivery of them. I made them, and took them there on the 19th of January, about eight o'clock in the evening - I saw the prisoner's wife, and James, his brother there, and left the things. His wife said,

"Can you give change for a 20 l. note," showing it to me; I said I could not give her change. I said I would try what I could do in the morning, and see if I could get her change. She said,

"Do, for my husband wants some clothes in the morning." In the course of the morning of the 20th, I borrowed the money of Mr. Twining, my draper, and went to No. 46, Shouldham-street, with my little boy, and saw the prisoner, and his wife.

Q. Now state distinctly what passed - A. The prisoner's wife said,

"Have you brought the change?" I said,

"Yes, I have." She showed me a folded note, which I took to be the same I had seen the night before. I then put my hand into my pocket, and took out 13 l. 6 s. 6 d., and gave it to her - the clothes came to 6 l. 13 s. 6 d. The moment she gave me the note, I gave it to my son - I did not look at it. I told him to take it home to his mother, as quick as he could, as I had promised to send the 20 l. note to Mr. Twining. I then stopped to measure the prisoner. My son returned while I was there, and said,

"Father, mother wants you immediately." - the prisoner was present. I then went home, and my wife showed me this paper - (looking at the bill) - this is it. I said I was deceived, for I thought it was a bank note for 20 l. I went back immediately to the house, and saw the prisoner's wife; the prisoner was gone. I did not get my money; I went to the house six or seven times that day, but did not see the prisoner. He came to me with his wife about eight o'clock the same evening, and said the promissory note was as good as the Bank. I produced it, and he said it was as good as the Bank; that he knew Edward Owen , and that he had taken many promissory notes the same as that of him, that he was a farmer at Knutsford, and always paid when due, and that he had dealings with him, in coals, corn, and different articles.

Q. The bill was made payable at No. 3, Staining-lane, Wood-street - A. Yes, he requested me to go there, where I should have proper satisfaction, and if not, he would see what he could do in giving me the change again. I asked him the name of the person in Staining-lane? he said he did not know the name, or any thing of the people there. The bill was due on the 19th of March - my wife went with the bill. When she returned with it, I went to Shouldham-street, and found they were gone.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You dealt with her brother for the clothes - A. Yes; the prisoner's wife offered me the 20 l. note in the presence of James Lowndes - I had no change; the prisoner was not there then. He owed me nothing then, but he ordered me to make the clothes, or I should not have done it.

Q. Where did James Lowndes live - A. With his brother in Shouldham-street. I did not look at the note the woman held out - it was folded up - it did not come into my hands, as I could not give change.

Q. The second time she gave you the note - A. Yes, and I gave it to my son. I believe it to be the same that she offered me at first - I was in a hurry.

Q. Where was the prisoner at the time - A. He was talking to my son, and looking at his writing-books - he was a yard or two off. He said nothing.

Q. He came at seven o'clock in the evening of his own accord - A. After my going to him six or seven times.

Q. He said he would see what he could do to get the change back from his brother - A. No.

Q. After you had satisfied yourself by enquiry at Staining-lane, you measured his children for clothes - A. Yes; but they paid ready money, I would not leave them without. I took them home about a week before the bill became due; I do not think I went to the house at any other time.

JAMES HALL . I took my mother the same paper that my father gave me at the prisoner's.

MARTHA HALL . I am the prosecutor's wife. My son brought me this paper (looking at the bill). I was present when the prisoner came at night - he asked me to go to Staining-lane; I went, found a person there who called himself Stone, and showed him the bill - from what he said I was satisfied it would be paid.

Q. On the 19th of March, when it became due, did you take it to Staining-lane again - A. No, I paid it to Mr. Twining. I went there on the 22d, and found they were all gone - nobody was there. The person had left the warehouse.

JOHN HARRIS . I presented the bill when it became due, at No. 3, Staining-lane, Wood-street, on the 19th of March; I found a gentleman there, he said there were no effects for it. It was not paid.

JONATHAN DAKER . I keep the post-office at Knutsford, in Cheshire - I have been post-master between eight and nine years, and have lived there seventeen years, or within five miles of Knutsford for thirty-seven years - my situation enables me to know the persons who live there, as all the letters go through my hands. I never knew a person of the name of Edward Owen , a farmer, living there. I made every enquiry in my power before I came away, and could not hear of any person of that name - there was no such person.

Cross-examined. Q. If a man lived there seven years, and had had no letter, you would not know him - A. I think I must know him if he had no letter.

Q. Is it a custom in the country, that if a man takes a farm he does not take possession till the end of May - A. It is; the old tenant holds it till the 1st of May.

(The bill was then put in and read - see Indictment.)

Prisoner's Defence. I shall give a faithful narrative of

the transaction between myself and the acceptor of the bill. A short time before I came to town, I sold Owen a horse - he then lived near Manchester. I came to town, and wrote him to remit me the money. While I was in company with Carter I met Owen, and asked him for the money. He said he had just taken a farm at Knutsford, and had no objection to my drawing a note on him at two months, and promised to pay it when due. He wanted it made payable at Messrs. Jones, Lloyd's and Co., but he had no account there. I said I dare say Chadwick would let it be made payable at his counting-house, which he did, and Owen made his mark to the bill. I left the bill at home, to be paid to any one I owed money to, and my wife gave it to the prosecutor instead of giving him money. I have every reason to believe Owen has an interest in a farm at Knutsford, or occupies one himself. He has deceived me by making it payable at a house he did not know. I am innocent.

JAMES CHADWICK . This bill and acceptance, all but the mark, is my hand-writing - I drew it by desire of the prisoner in Mr. Key's shop, who is a stationer, in Coleman-street, where we bought the stamp. The prisoner fetched a man into the shop to accept the bill.

Q. How long before had you seen these two persons together - A. About a fortnight before. The prisoner told me the man's name in his presence. I did not speak to the man myself.

Q. Did the man who made the mark see and know what you wrote - A. I do not know. He was in the shop, and made his mark after I wrote it - I showed him where to make his mark. Nothing was said about meeting the bill. I had taken a small warehouse at this time at No. 3, Staining-lane.

Q. How came the bill to be made payable at your house - A. I met the prisoner in Cheapside - he asked me if I did not remember one Lowndes? I said it was thirteen years since I had seen him. In consequence of what he said, I let it be made payable at my house, as he said he would see it paid. After two or three solicitations, I agreed to it.

Cross-examined by MR. REYNOLDS. Q. What are you - A. A broker in the Manchester line. I sell goods on commission. I took the place in Staining-lane in December, for six months certain.

Q. The time is not up yet, are you carrying on business there now - A. No, in fact I did not use this place at all; I found it inconvenient, and told Mr. Stone to tell the people I would not keep it. I received some goods in there - they remained there about a week.

Q. Will you swear the goods did not come in in the morning and go out in the evening - A. Yes, I will. My warehouse was a small room. I have not paid the rent, as there are some fixtures; when they bring in their bill I shall pay it.

Q. Did Mr. Stone attend at the warehouse for you - A. He did - I knew nothing of Owen.

Q. Did you give Stone authority to give any answer about Owen - A. I told him to say Lowndes had told me it was sure to be paid.

COURT. Q. The prisoner wished to have the bill made payable at your house - it was not Owen's desire - A. No; I have seen no other bills of Owen's; I now live at a private house on Stamford-hill - I do not use any warehouse now. I took the warehouse to receive goods, but I found it did not answer.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. How do you sell your goods - A. By pattern.

Q. You took the warehouse for six months, which are not expired - A. I think I took it for twelve months; they know where to find me, and have not applied for the rent.

COURT. Q. You took it for six or twelve months, and have left it entirely - A. Yes. I am not a sworn-broker.

JESSEE CARTER. I now live at Holloway. I know the prisoner - I do not know Owen. In January last I was in Coleman-street with Chadwick, I believe the prisoner was with us; it was the first time I ever saw him; he asked Chadwick to draw a bill for him on a person named Owen; we went into Key's shop and bought a stamp; Chadwick drew the bill, the prisoner being a bad writer - the prisoner put his name on it. Owen said he could not write - it was accepted with his mark. Owen said he would make it payable at a banker's. He was asked if he kept cash there? he said

"No, but I shall have it there when it comes due." The prisoner then, I believe, asked leave to have it made payable at Chadwick's warehouse, which was done.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you know Chadwick - A. I have known him many years; he once kept the Duke Humphrey, public-house, in Earl-street, about eight years ago; after that, I believe, he kept the Waterman's Arms, at the foot of Westminster Bridge. I was never at his warehouse in Staining-lane.

COURT. Q. How long had you known Owen - A. I did not know him, the man called himself Owen.

Q. Then Chadwick must have heard him say so - A. He said his name was Owen.

THOMAS KEYS . I am a stationer, and live in Coleman-street. In January last I remember the prisoner, Chadwick, and Carter coming to my shop; before I left them they asked permission to draw a bill in the shop - I did not notice them. I observed, that after Chadwick drew the bill, the prisoner called a person into the shop, asked him some questions, and then asked him to put his name on the bill, which he did.

Cross-examined. The man was in the shop half a minute, not more; he seemed very awkward and very unwilling; he did not mention his name.

Q. The whole thing was manufactured before he was called in - A. Yes.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You did not attend to what was going on - A. Not exactly; I had no interest in it - some questions were asked him about where it was to be made payable. I have some faint recollection about it being made payable at a banker's, and afterwards it was made payable somewhere else.

COURT. Q. Did this man take any part in it - A. He scarcely said a word while in the shop - he followed their direction; he did not come in with them. They looked about a good bit before they found him; they thought they had lost him, at last they beckoned him over.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 30.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190421-142

642. BAZILLA LESBON was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of April , sixteen pair of stockings, value 22 s.; thirteen worsted comforters, value 13 s., and one Guernsey frock, value 2 s. , the goods of David Moses .

ABIGAL MOSES. I am the wife of David Moses ; we keep a slop-shop in Parson's-street, Ratcliff-highway . On the 6th of April, about five o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner came into the shop, and asked if the master of the shop was in the way? I said, No, and went into the parlour. Soon after I met him coming into the shop; he went behind the counter, and ran out with these things. I gave the alarm, he ran, and dropped a good many, but was stopped with the rest under his arm.

WILLIAM OAKLEY . I am a patrol. I heard the alarm, and stopped the prisoner with the things; he refused to give them up, saying they were his own.

HENRY MOSES . I am an officer. I took the prisoner to the watch-house; he said he intended to return the things.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutor pulled me into his shop when I had been drinking, and persuaded me to buy clothes, and exchange my own for worse - he imposed upon me, and compelled me to buy the things. I went and told Mr. Jacobs, and he told the prosecutor it was a shame. I thought if I took these, they would return me my own.

ABIGAL MOSES re-examined. I never saw the prisoner before the robbery.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Confined One Month .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190421-143

643. JAMES LLOYD was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of March , one glass decanter, value 2 s. 6 d. , the goods of William Gibbs .

ANN GIBBS . I am the wife of William Gibbs , who is a broker , and lives in Bream's-buildings, Chancery-lane . On the 6th of March, I saw the prisoner take this decanter from the shopboard; I followed him. He ran off, and set it down - he was secured.

PHILIP HUDULL . I am a printer, and live at Walworth. I saw the prisoner take the decanter, and followed him; he put it down, and ran into a house. I secured him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY Aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190421-144

644. MARY JACOBS was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of March , one watch, value 3 l., the property of Joseph Lewther , from his person .

The prosecutor did not appear

NOT GUILTY.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190421-145

645. GEORGE HARVEY and WILLIAM COX were indicted for stealing, on the 1st of April , one pair of boots, value 3 s. , the goods of Charles James Bradley .

AMELIA BRADLEY . I am the wife of Charles James Bradley, who is a shoemaker , and lives in Kingsland-road . On the 1st of April, about eleven o'clock in the morning, the boots hung at the window, outside. I missed them - the prisoners were brought back in a few minutes with them.

THOMAS THOMPSON . I am an officer. I saw Harvey lurking about the shop window; Cox was on the other side, opposite the door - Harvey went up to the shop, then crossed over, and spoke to Cox; they then sat down on the bench of the public-house, and talked together. Harvey then went over again - Cox stood opposite the door with his hat in his hand, as I thought making a motion to Harvey when nobody was in the shop. Harvey then went to the window, took a pair of boots, and ran away; Cox walked away in the same direction. I stopped Harvey - he dropped the boots, and threw an open knife away. Another person secured Cox immediately - he struggled a good deal.

RICHARD LOVEJOY . I was with Thompson, and observed the prisoners together. Cox sat at the public-house opposite the prosecutor's - Harvey went and sat down by him. He then went over, cut the boots down, and ran away with them. I collared him.

JOHN PAVEY . I was with Thompson, and saw Harvey lurking about, and then take the boots; they were acting together.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Cox's Defence. I know nothing about it.

HARVEY - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

COX - NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190421-146

646. HENRY HUDALL was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of March , one waistcoat, value 3 s. , the goods of Jeremiah Lewis .

JEREMIAH LEWIS . I am a slopseller , and live in High-street, Shadwell . On the 24th of March, about half-past five o'clock in the afternoon, I was called down, and found the prisoner in the shop, charged with stealing the waistcoat, which he denied. I found it under his coat.

HENRY FRASS . I am servant to Mr. Lewis; the prisoner came into the shop, and looked at some waistcoats. I missed one, and called Mr. Lewis down, who found it behind his coat. It was one of those that I had been showing him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The boy asked me to go in and look at some waistcoats - Lewis came and took one out of my hand, as I was looking at it.

GUILTY . Aged 44.

Confined Six Months , and Publicly Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190421-147

647. JAMES GAY was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of March , one handkerchief, value 2 s., the goods of James Lowndes , from his person .

MR. JAMES LOWNDES . I am a muslin manufacturer , and live in Watling-street. On the 16th of March, about eight o'clock in the evening, I was in Wych-street ; A person came up, and said my pocket had been picked. I immediately missed my handkerchief, which Thompson produced - he had the prisoner in custody.

THOMAS THOMPSON. I am an officer. I was in Wych-street, and saw Mr. Lowndes there, and the prisoner and another in company following him. I watched them about 150 yards - the other appeared most active; the prisoner was covering him. The other took something out of the prosecutor's pocket, and gave it to the prisoner, who concealed it in his bosom. I seized him, and took the handkerchief out, and sent a person to inform Mr. Lowndes - he claimed it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

CHARLES JONES . I was with Thompson, and saw the prisoner following Mr. Lowndes. A signal passed between them, and the handkerchief was taken.

Prisoner. It is my first offence.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190421-148

648. MARY GREEN and MARY ANN DAVIS were indicted for stealing, on the 28th of March , one watch, value 10 l.; two seals, value 30 s.; one chain, value 30 s., and one key, value 3 s., the goods of William Alcock , from his person .

WILLIAM ALCOCK . I live in Allen-street, Clerkenwell, and am a watchmaker . On the 28th of March, about half-past eleven o'clock, I met the prisoner at a coffee-shop in Golden-lane, and gave them 6 d. to pay for their coffee. They asked me what o'clock it was? I pulled out my watch and told them. They followed me, and took me home to Lamb's-buildings, Bunhill-row . I went up stairs with them; Davis asked what o'clock it was? I said it was just twelve o'clock, and I must be going home. They then took the candle, and went down stairs; I attempted to go but Green seized me by the coat, and took my watch; Davis came up, and received it of her. I kept Green, but have never found my watch - I saw her give it to Davis; I kept Green in the room all night, and in the morning I gave her in charge - I could not get assistance before. Davis was taken three nights after.

JOSEPH PRINCE . I am an officer of St. Luke's. The prisoner gave Green into my charge; Davis keeps the house; I apprehended her on the Wednesday.

GREEN'S Defence. I was in liquor, and he detained me as I was leaving him.

DAVIS'S Defence. I never went into the room after I left him.

GREEN - GUILTY . Aged 18.

DAVIS - GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190421-149

649. WILLIAM COX and JAMES GREEN were indicted for stealing, on the 5th of March , 14 lbs of feathers, value 12 s., and one bag, value 1 s. , the goods of Thomas Lack .

WILLIAM LACK . I am the son of William Lack , who is a poulterer; Green was our servant , and Cox occasionally worked for us. On the 5th of March, I found some feathers in the stable, which ought to have been in the loft - they were concealed under the manger. I went again in the afternoon, and found them removed behind a cart. I went to watch about eight o'clock, and saw Green bring them out of the stable and put them down - Cox came and took them. He was carrying them away, and North seized him.

THOMAS NORTH . I am a publican. I went to watch, and saw Green put the feathers down; Cox took them up, and put them on his shoulder. We secured them both.

Cox's Defence. I did not know they belonged to his master.

COX - GUILTY . Aged 19.

GREEN - GUILTY . Aged 30.

Confined One Month .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190421-150

650. JOHN WARD was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of March , four shifts, value 30 s.; two gowns, value 20 s., and one shawl, value 6 s. , the goods of William Partridge .

MARY PARTRIDGE . I am the wife of William Partridge who lives in Frances-street, Chelsea-common ; I am a laundress. On the 9th of March, these things hung in the drying ground, which has a wall round it five or six feet high. I saw them safe about four o'clock in the afternoon, and missed them about seven o'clock in the evening; next morning I found the prisoner in custody with them.

JAMES KERR . I am a patrol. On the 9th of March, about seven o'clock in the evening, the prisoner ran by me in Sloane-street, with a bundle under his arm. I stopped him, hearing the alarm, and found three shifts in the bundle - they were then wet; he said they were his own. A shift was picked up in the way he ran.

WILLIAM JARMAN . I am a constable. I saw the prisoner with another, on Chelsea-common, talking about a bull-bait; the prisoner had a bundle, and the other appeared bulky, I desired to know what they had been about? the other struck at me with his stick, but I guarded the blow off with one arm, and with my other hand unbuttoned his coat, when out fell a shawl, a shift, a gown and a clothes peg - both ran off while I was picking them up. The prisoner still kept his bundle, and Kerr stopped him without my losing sight of him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190421-151

651. THOMAS HAYNES was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of February , one iron pipe, value 10 s., and 150 lbs of other iron pipe, value 10 s. , the goods of the Company of Proprietors of the West Middlesex Water-Works .

JOHN GRAHAM . I am a builder. The West Middlesex Water Company keep these pipes at the end of Gower-street . On the 23d of February, just at dark, I saw the prisoner there, dressed in dirty trowsers, and a long coat, which was tucked up; he stood by the side of the pipe,

which was outside the railing, but was not there half an hour before - he looked about, and then walked away behind a heap of stones, and let his coat down; he then returned to the pipe. I and my man followed him; he put his hand to the pipe, then saw us, and walked away - we secured him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I could not get the pipe over the railing.

NOT GUILTY .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190421-152

652. THOMAS COCK was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of March , 30 lbs. of hay, value 3 s. , the property of Joseph Allen .

JOSEPH ALLEN . I am a farmer, and live at Hillingdon ; the prisoner lived about one mile from me. On the 13th of March, about seven o'clock in the evening, I was in my bean field, and observed some black clover hay scattered about, and some gone - it was very much burnt. I missed part of two trusses from my turnip field; I traced it to the prisoner's stables, by its being scattered in the road, where I found some, which his horses were eating, and more in his bed-room - it was burnt like mine; I believe it to be mine. I compared it with the bulk.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. If you saw it at York, would you swear to it - A. No.

JOHN BROWN. I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner.

MR. THOMAS WALFORD . I am a solicitor. I know the magistrate's hand-writing, who signed the prisoner's examination - this is it - (reads.) -

"The prisoner says he put the hay in his mother's house, and that he bought it fourteen days before of a bargeman at Brentford Bridge."

NOT GUILTY .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190421-153

653. JAMES FRAZIER was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of March , one waistcoat, value 3 s., and one pair of breeches, value 10 s., the goods of Benjamin Hillias Weedon ; one box, value 3 d.; six bassoon reeds, value 6 d., and one pair of stockings, value 1 s. , the goods of Robert Bennett .

BENJAMIN HILLIAS WEEDON . I am a shoemaker , and live at the Goat, public-house, at Brentford ; the prisoner lodged there, in the same room; I lost these things out of my box, and found the prisoner in custody next day with them.

ROBERT BENNETT . I lodge at the Goat, public-house. I lost these thing out of my box, which was open. I took the prisoner that evening, and found the things on him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN BARFOOT . I am a pawnbroker. The prisoner pledged the waistcoat with me.

WILLIAM CAMP . I am a pawnbroker, The prisoner pledged a pair of breeches with me.

Prisoner. I beg for mercy.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Two Months , and Whipped .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190421-154

654. JOHN BURT was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of March , one case of surgical instruments, value 25 s., and one cupping instrument, value 14 s. , the goods of David Aitkin .

DAVID AITKEN . I am a surgeon , and live at Kingsland . On the 27th of March, about nine o'clock in the morning, the prisoner called on me for advice; he left and promised to return, but never did. I missed the instruments immediately he left, he was stopped offering them for sale.

JOHN ROBINSON . I am a surgical instrument maker, and live at Kingsland. On the 27th of March, about eleven o'clock in the morning, a woman offered me a cupping instrument for sale. She took us to the prisoner, who delivered up the case of instruments.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Whipped and Discharged.

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190421-155

655. JAMES DEAN was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of April , eleven live tame fowls, price 20 s. , the property of Michael Fowler .

SOPHIA FOWLER. I am the wife of Michael Fowler ; we live at Little Bushey . On the 5th of April, during the night, my hen-house was broken open, and eleven fowls stolen; I saw them at the watch-house, and knew them well. I had seen them safe at nine o'clock at night.

EDWARD HERRIS . I am watchman of Marylebone. On the 6th of April, about half-past five o'clock in the morning, I stopped the prisoner with the fowls; he said he brought them from Hampstead, for Mr. Martin, who was a bricklayer, and lived in Cato-street; I took him to the watch-house. He had ten hens, all dead, in his bag. Mrs. Fowler claimed them.

GUILTY . Aged 49.

Transported for Seven Years .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190421-156

656. RICHARD KING was indicted for embezzlement .

NOT GUILTY .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190421-157

657. JOHN GORDON was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of March , one hat, value 1 s., the goods of Edmund Strickland ; one hat, value 1 s., the goods of Peter Hallard ; one hat, value 1 s., the goods of Benjamin Crippingdale ; one hat, value 1 s., the goods of Benjamin Bosson ; and one cap, value 1 s. , the goods of Jonah Crippingdale ,

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating them to be the property of Samuel Gilson .

SAMUEL GILSON . I am a schoolmaster , and live at Poplar . On the 13th of March, these hats were taken from the school-room - they belonged to the different boys .

THOMAS DRUMMOND . My father is office-keeper of Shadwell. On the 13th of March, about a quarter after six o'clock in the morning, I met the prisoner in the Commercial-road, heavily loaded, and asked him what he had got? he said he was moving, and the things were his own. I said I must see what they were - he put them down; the first bundle contained these hats - another had canvas, and

the other had meat in it. He said the hats belonged to his lodger's children - I secured him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I found them.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190421-158

658. GEORGE SHAW was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of March , ten awls, value 2 s.; two pair of pincers, value 1 s.; one file, value 6 d., and one leather apron, value 18 d. , the goods of Joseph Anthony .

JOSEPH ANTHONY . I am a shoemaker , and have a stall in Queen Ann-street, Cavendish-square . On the 10th of March, at night, my stall was broken open, and the things taken.

JOSEPH ACCLESHAW . I am a watchman. On the 10th of March, about two o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner and another crossing the street from the stall, I met them again at half-past two o'clock at the same place - the prisoner had something under his apron - I found the stall forced open, returned and secured him; he put the things down.

THOMAS CHIPMAN . I am a watchman. The prisoner was secured in Vere-street; I found the tools lying within a yard of him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I met a man, who asked me to take hold of the things.

NOT GUILTY .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190421-159

659. ANN SHORTER was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of March , 7 s., in monies numbered, the property of Henry Pace , from his person .

HENRY PACE . I am a green-grocer, and live in Oxford-street. On the 19th of March, about half-past two o'clock in the morning, I had been attending a party at the Red Lion, Cavendish-square , and met the prisoner. She began pulling me about; as soon as I got from her, I felt my pocket, and found only 2 s. 6 d., there - I had 9 s. 6 d. I immediately charged her with robbing me; she declared she had not got a halfpenny about her. I was taking her to the watch-house, but she declared she would go no further; the watchman came, and took her to the watch-house. I had been no where with her.

RICHARD COATES . I am a constable. I took the prisoner in charge; I searched her, but found nothing. I asked her if she had any thing in her mouth? she said she had not. I heard something rattle against her teeth, opened her mouth, and a half crown, and 4 s. 6 d. dropped out; she said it was the money that she had robbed him of.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190421-160

660. JOHN M'DERMOT was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of March , 43 lbs. of lead, value 9 s., the property of William Adcock , and fixed to his dwelling-house .

The prosecutor did not appear

NOT GUILTY.

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190421-161

661. DANIEL MACKINTOSH was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of March , one blanket, value 6 s. , the goods of John Carrington .

ANN CARRINGTON . I am the wife of John Carrington , who is a carpenter . On the 29th of March, about three o'clock in the afternoon, I stopped the prisoner in the passage with the blanket, which he had taken from the bedroom. I called out, a neighbour came to my assistance, and secured him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 62.

Confined Six Months .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190421-162

662. THOMAS LEYTON was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of March , one cheese, value 6 s. , the goods of James West .

THOMAS WEST . I am shopman to my brother, James West , who is a cheesemonger , and lives in Oxford-street . On the 23d of March, about half-past eight o'clock in the evening, I saw a person take the cheese off a pile, which stood at the door. I ran out, and saw the person who stole it give it to the prisoner - I secured him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A person gave it me to carry.

GUILTY Aged 17.

Confined Two Months .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190421-163

663. THOMAS LEAVER was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of April , one pound of butter, value 18 d. , the goods of John Elsworth .

WILLIAM WATSON . I am shopman to John Elsworth, who is a cheesemonger . On the 12th of April the prisoner came for a pennyworth of cheese - he said it was not rotten enough, and went out. I missed the butter, ran out, and found him with it in his apron.

GUILTY . Aged 55.

Confined One Month .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190421-164

664. JAMES HARRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of March , one coat, value 10 s. , the goods of Devie Robertson .

JOHN JOHNSON . I am servant to Mr. Devie Robertson, who is a wine-merchant , and lives in Bedford-square . On the 31st of March, about five o'clock in the evening, I saw a man in the area and sent him away. He beckoned to a man, who I believe to be the prisoner. In about ten minutes I heard the area-door open, went to see what it was, and saw the prisoner with the great-coat on his arm, which he had taken from the servants' hall - I gave him in charge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 29.

Transported for Seven Years .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190421-165

665. JOSEPH HOCKERDAY was indicted for embezzlement .

NOT GUILTY .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190421-166

666. JOHN GRAY was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of March , one ham, value 3 s. , the goods of James West .

THOMAS WEST . I am shopman to my brother, James West , who is a cheesemonger , and lives in Oxford-street . I was at tea, heard the alarm, missed the ham, ran out, and secured the prisoner with it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Fined One Shilling , and Discharged.

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190421-167

667. JOHN BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of March , 48 lbs. of lead, value 6 s., the goods of Charles Outhwaite , and fixed to a certain building of his .

CHARLES OUTHWAITE . I am a carpenter , and live in Burr-street, Aldgate . On the 29th of March, in the night, the lead was stripped off the roof of my workshop - it was brought to me; I fitted it to the place, and it matched exactly. This is the fourth time I have been robbed.

THOMAS OSBORNE . I am a headborough of Aldgate parish. On the 29th of March, about eight o'clock in the evening, I met the prisoner coming up East Smithfield, with the lead on his back. He said he was going to sell it, and that two strange men gave it to him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I hope you will hang me.

GUILTY . Aged 48.

Transported for Seven Years .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190421-168

668. CHARLES BUCKINGHAM was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of March , one handkerchief, value 3 s., the goods of William Read Wilson , from his person .

WILLIAM READ WILSON . I am a plane-maker . On the 10th of March, about half-past eight o'clock in the evening, I was in Drury-lane with Leech. When we were opposite Russell-court , a gang of four or five persons surrounded us - Leech said, "Your pocket is picked!" and pointed the prisoner out. I secured him, and took him to Bow-street - the handkerchief was not found.

JOHN LEECH. I was with Wilson, and saw the prisoner take the handkerchief from his pocket, and immediately give it to another boy. I never lost sight of him until he was taken. I am certain he took it. There were four or five of them.

Prisoner's Defence. He found nothing on me.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Life .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190421-169

669. MARIA SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of March , four yards of linen, value 8 s. , the goods of Thomas Riley .

JOHN SCOTCHFORD VINER . I am apprentice to Thomas Riley , who is a linen-draper , and lives in Oxford-street . On the 23d of March the prisoner came and looked at some cotton stockings, she did not like them; and as she was going out I saw the linen under her arm. I called to her, she ran out, I pursued, secured, and took it from her.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190421-170

670. THOMAS KEDGELL was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of February , one coat, value 30 s. , the goods of Robert Clarke .

The prosecutor did not appear .

NOT GUILTY.

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190421-171

671. THOMAS RHINE was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of April , one whip, value 10 s. , the goods of William Allford .

WILLIAM ALLFORD . I am drayman to Messrs. Read and Abbott . On the 12th of April, about nine o'clock, I was in Church-lane, Whitechapel , and lost my whip off the dray while I was in the house.

THOMAS HENDRY . I am a carpenter. I saw the prisoner take the whip off the dray, and cross over with it. I pursued, calling Stop thief - he was stopped, threw it down, and I picked it up.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 38.

Confined Two Months , and Whipped .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190421-172

672. JOHN SOLLY was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of March , one pair of pantaloons, value 3 s., and one bible, value 4 s., the goods of George Warrener Dore ; and one sheet, value 5 s., the goods of Thomas Pitcher , in a lodging-room .

HANNAH PITCHER . I am the wife of Thomas Pitcher, who is a postman , and lives in Backchurch-lane, Whitechapel . On the 16th of March I let the prisoner a furnished lodging, at 2 s. 6 d. a week. He breakfasted with me next morning, and said he should return at four o'clock - he never returned. I missed this property. When he went out, he brought the key to me. I am certain nobody went into the room till I missed the property.

Prisoner's Defence. I took nothing.

NOT GUILTY .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190421-173

673. WILLIAM TATE was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of April , two candlesticks, value 20 s. , the goods of Edward Lloyd Williams , Esq.

SARAH WOOLFORD . I am servant to Edward Lloyd Williams , Esq., who lives in Keppel-street . On the 9th of April, between nine and ten o'clock in the morning, I was coming down the kitchen stairs, and saw the boy go up the area steps. He ran away, I followed, and caught him in Holborn - I found the candlesticks under his coat, which were taken off our dresser.

JOHN KENDRICK . I am a beadle. I saw the prisoner running in Broad-street, and Woolford stopped him. I came up, and found the candlesticks under his coat.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Fourth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190421-174

674. GEORGE COLLIER was indicted for embezzling one shilling and two sixpences , which he had received on account of William Walrond , his employer .

WILLIAM WALROND . I am a cheesemonger , and live in Oxford-street; the prisoner was my shopman , and entrusted to receive money for me. I suspected him, and on the 27th of January I requested Mr. Jones to mark some money, and lay it out at my shop. The prisoner got up the first in the morning, opened the shop, and served the customers - he was the only person in the shop. I watched him up stairs; he was in the act of pulling off his coat - I seized him by the arm in his own room, and found 7 s. in silver and copper, which he acknowledged he had taken out of the till, and begged I would not prosecute him.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Did you give Mr. Jones the money to lay out - A. No, it was his own. I had left a shilling in the till the night before; he did not say he meant to put the money into the till.

JOHN JONES . I am a grocer, and live in Oxford-street. I sent a stranger with one shilling and two sixpences to the prosecutor's shop, to buy butter. The messenger brought the butter back. I saw the same money soon after in the hands of the constable - (looks at the money) - this is the money I marked. I wrote Tom, Ned, and Jack on it.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Fourth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190421-175

675. MARTHA BYATT was indicted for unlawfully putting off to one Cecilia Willis , seven pieces of counterfeit money, resembling shillings, at and for a lower rate than the same by their denomination did import and were counterfeited for (i.e.) for the sum of 2 s. 7 1/2 d. , against the Statute.

CECILIA WILLIS . I am a widow , and live in Ship-yard, Temple-bar - I am a tailoress by trade. I made a communication to Armstrong and Gleed, and it was arranged that I should meet the prisoner at the Crown, public-house, in High-street, St. Giles's, at a quarter before twelve o'clock; I told them this, and they took me to the Three Compasses public-house, in Holborn, and searched me. I had 4 s. 6 d. on me, which Armstrong marked and returned to me - the officers followed me. In going along, I met the prisoner by St. Giles's church , and asked her if she had got any shillings? she said Yes, and asked me how many I wanted? I said half a score; she said she had got only seven. I asked her how much they came to? she said 2 s. 7 1/2 d. - she gave them to me, and I gave her the money. I put my hand to my bonnet, as a signal to the officers, who came and took her into custody. They searched me immediately, and found the seven shillings she had sold me. I was taken away in one coach, and she in another.

JOHN ARMSTRONG . I am an officer of Worship-street, and have been so forty years. On the 25th of February I met Willis at the corner of Queen-street, Lincoln's Inn-fields, my son and Gleed were with me. We took Willis to the Three Compasses, she was searched; I saw my son mark her money. We sent her on and watched her. I saw her join the prisoner by St. Giles's church; they returned into Compton-street - the prisoner went into a house, and staid a few minutes, Willis remained in the street. The prisoner came out, and they joined company. When they had walked about twenty yards the signal was given - we took the prisoner into custody, and found the money we had marked on her.

JOSHUA ARMSTRONG . I am officer. I searched Willis, and found two shillings, three sixpences, and ten-pence in copper on her, at the Three Compasses. I marked the silver - she had no other money about her. I told her when she met the prisoner and had dealt with her, to put her hand to her bonnet as a signal. We followed her to St. Giles's church; the prisoner met her; they returned to Compton-street - the prisoner went into a shop, and Willis staid at the door - the prisoner came out, and they walked about twenty yards together. I saw Willis give something to the prisoner, who immediately returned something to her. Willis gave the signal; I ran and caught hold of her right hand - she dropped some silver, which Gleed picked up; it fell through my hand. I said,

"What have you got there?" Gleed took a parcel from her - it contained counterfeit shillings. I asked her where she got them from? she said from the prisoner - the prisoner said she knew nothing about them. She would not tell me where she lived.

Cross-examined by MR. ARABIN. Q. Did you take Willis's boots off - A. No, I felt them, and am certain she did not put her hand to them, as I had her in sight all the while.

BARNARD GLEED . I am an officer. I saw the money fall from the prisoner, and picked it up; I also took the shillings from Willis's right hand, and produce them - it is the same money I saw Armstrong mark. I picked up two shillings, a sixpence, and one penny. Willis was never out of my sight - it was impossible for anybody to hand any thing to her.

MR. CALEB EDWARD POWELL . I am an assistant to the Solicitor of the Mint. The shillings are all counterfeit, are off the same die, and have never been in circulation.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent.

GUILTY . Aged 35.

Confined One Year .

Fourth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190421-176

676. WILLIAM CHAMBERLAIN and RICHARD FACEY were indicted for stealing, on the 1st of February , two swans, value 20 s., and two cygnets, value 10 s., belonging to and the goods of our Lord the King , being pinioned and marked with a mark, which the swans of the King are marked with .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating them to belong to the Master, Wardens and Freemen of Commonalty of the mystery of Vintners of the City of London , and to be marked with their mark.

THIRD COUNT, the same, only stating them to belong to the Wardens and Commonalty of the mystery of Dyers of the City of London , and to be marked with their mark.

FOURTH COUNT, the same, only stating them to belong to certain persons unknown, and to be marked.

JOHN AMOS KEMP . I am a fisherman. I was with my son and my father on the River Thames, on the 1st of

February, about seven o'clock in the evening, near Teddington. My father was in the punt, and we were ashore near Crowlake ait. I have known Chamberlain eight years, and Facey four years. Two men, who I believe to be the prisoners (but am not certain), were in a wherry; they went into Crowlake ait , there was one swan on the ait under half a year old, I heard them crash on the water with a staff, as if they hit at something, and then heard a swan cry. Two or three minutes after I heard the same crash, and the swan cried again. I was right opposite to them. I left my father and son to listen to what they were at. I was five minutes there, and then heard them strike a third time, but did not hear the swan scream then - as they had a wherry they could go faster than us, and so we directed our course up the river to Hampton Court bridge. My father and I got out, and sent my son in the punt up to a summer-house below the lock, and left him there. About half an hour afterwards I returned to the punt, my son showed me cygnet lying about twenty yards from the waterside, in a little hole in a field adjoining the banks of the Thames, and about two miles from the ait - it was about half a year old, it was dead, but warm. I had seen that cygnet alive that day, in Crowlake ait - there was no other there for a fortnight before.

Cross-examined by MR. BROADRIC. Q. When did you fight with Facey - A. I had no fight with him; I hit him twice, and so I did Chamberlain. The moon shone very bright that night. I will not swear the prisoners were in the wherry. Crowlake ait is on the Middlesex side of the water.

SAMUEL KEMP . I was with my father and grandfather in the punt near Crowlake ait. I saw two persons in the wherry - we were about forty or fifty yards off. I cannot speak to the men. I heard a splash in the water, and then heard a swan scream once - I heard the splash twice. It was a moonlight night. My father went ashore. I then saw the persons row the boat opposite to Hampton Court lock.

Q. Was it the same boat you saw before - A. I cannot say; I only saw one that I know. I saw one of them get ashore opposite Hampton Court, on the Middlesex side - he had something with him like a swan - he went to the wherry again, and they went away. I went ashore, and found a cygnet, dead, in a hollow of the field. I knew both the prisoners before.

Q. From the opportunity you had of observing the wherry, what do you believe - A. I believe them to be the men. Chamberlain lived at Twickenham. I showed my father the cygnet.

Q. Were any of the swans bred at your uncle's - A. They were.

Cross-examined. Q. You could not tell whether you saw the same wherry the second time - A. I cannot.

WILLIAM BOULTON . I am apprentice to Mrs. Ann Brown . On the 1st of February I was near the river, on the tow path opposite Long Ditton, which is between Crowlake ait and Hampton Court bridge. I first saw the Kemps go up in their punt - I knew them before. I have known the prisoners about a year. In about half an hour I saw a wherry go up in the same course - there was one man in the wherry, and two others - the prisoners were towing it. Chamberlain spoke to me, he said,

"Halloo, Bill!" I said halloo! too - he was towing.

Q. Who was the other man that was assisting him - A. I did not notice, he held his head down, and did not speak. After they went down I went to the waterside to look into their boat, when I went to their boat they went faster. I saw something in the boat's stern, it struck me it might be a swan, it appeared like one. As I went to the boat they started out further in the river. A great many swans had been missing from the river.

Cross-examined. It might be a man's jacket you saw - A. It might, it was after eight o'clock.

MR. ALLEY. Q. How far was it from Crowlake ait - A. About half a mile; they were going against the stream; the towing path is about a mile from Hampton Court bridge. I was close to Chamberlain. They passed me.

JOHN KEMP . I am a fisherman. I had the care of the swans, and bred them - there was a brood of four young ones and two old ones at the ait; the young ones would be about six months old in February; they cannot fly till they are a year old, and never leave the old ones till then. When they went into the water they remained at Crowlake ait I saw all six of them a fortnight after Christmas. I missed three young and two old ones, one was left by itself, it was hurt when it was young; I saw that safe about the latter end of January, which was ten days before the prisoners were taken up. All the swans had been taken away before they were apprehended. I missed eight or ten.

Q. They swam about - A. Yes, but they do not go far from home.

THOMAS PAGE . I am stageman and swan marker to the Vintners' Company. The swans belong to the King, the Dyers and Vintners Companies - nobody else have a right to keep swans on the River. I occasionally go and look at them, and saw them all safe about Christmas - there were thirty-two on the river; I missed the whole about the 12th of February, from Twickenham to Hampton Court bridge every swan in that neighbourhood was taken off the river. On the 26th of February I went with the officer to Chamberlain's lodgings at Twickenham, we found him and his wife there; he was asked what he had done with the skins of the swans he had killed - he said he had no swan skins. We searched the room, and in the cupboard I saw a swan's quill - Bishop pulled it out. He was asked where he got it? he said he did not know, he had never seen it before, it must have been in his lodgings before he took them. In another cupboard in the same room we found the skin of a cygnet, about six months old. He was asked where he got that, his wife and himself both answered at the same time, that they found it. They were asked where, and both answered at the same time,

"in Holborn." I asked at what time it was found, one answered in the day, and the other at night. I said, why, what do you mean by that? the prisoner said,

"Why, it was neither day nor night, it was twilight." He was taken into custody, and brought to town. A few days before I was at his lodgings, I was going up the river, and found the carcases of four swans, skinned, and lying on the edge of the river at Richmond - two young and two old; a sack was lying by them. I cut the beaks off, and know by the marks on them, that two belong to the King and two to the Dyers Company.

COURT. Q. When you go to mark them, you and the King's officer go together - A. Yes, the King's officer and the Dyers' officer go with me; if there is a brood of five, the cock claims three, and the hen two; if it is even, we share alike. I should think, by the size of the bird that was killed on Crowlake ait, that this skin corresponds with it. I mean the bird that was found at Hampton Court. They never stray after they have paired. Four swans would be worth 11 l. They were marked and pinioned.

JURY. Q. Was the skin fresher when you found it than it is now - A. It was.

THOMAS BROMLEY . I was in the House of Correction when Chamberlain was confined there, in the same room with him. I was detained to be a witness at Kingston. which I did, and am now at large. While I was there I asked Chamberlain what he was detained for? he said it was knocking down a swan or swans, and asked if I thought they would let a man swear to him, by seeing him over the water. He said he was taken through a fisherman, who he had previously had some words with - he did not mention his name. He said his master had been to him, and told him that the fisherman had been to him, and told about knocking down the swans; and his master told him not to be afraid, for if he got into any trouble he would assist him in getting out of it. He said he saw a man on the water, who spoke to him, on the night of the robbery as I suppose; and that the officers afterwards came to his house, and took him; that they found a swan skin and a quill in his house; that they took him to a public-house, and gave him some beef steaks and beer, but he could neither eat nor drink. I asked if the fisherman was there? he said, I believe that he was. I asked if any one else was there? he said he thought he saw a man who he had sold a skin to, but he was not certain, as he could not look him in the face, but he thought it was him by his watch-chain. I asked if he was afraid of any other skins being found? he said No, for they were sold at such a place as they could not have a thought of looking for them. I asked him if any other persons were concerned with him at the time he was seen on the water? he said his master and his mate were with him. I asked him if his mate was taken, whether he would not say any thing against him? he said he was not afraid of that, for he knew he would sooner suffer death first.

THOMAS PAGE re-examined. The swans were all marked. I cannot swear this identical cygnet was marked - the whole brood were marked at Christmas. When I saw them the cygnets were marked

"Dyers Company."

NOT GUILTY .

Fourth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190421-177

677. WILLIAM COOK was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of March , 5 s. in copper monies numbered , the property of David Henderson .

DAVID HENDERSON . I am a baker , and live at Bromley ; the prisoner was my journeyman . On the 17th of March he called my little boy away as he was lighting the parlour fire, when the boy's back was turned, he took a 5 s. paper of halfpence off the sideboard. My wife called out, I went to her assistance, the prisoner ran up stairs to get out of the window, but could not - I secured him. He gave me the key of his box, I found a pair of pistols in it, both loaded with slugs, cocked and primed. He said they were to shoot birds with.

SUSAN HENDERSON . I am the wife of the prosecutor. On the 17th of March, between five and six o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner come into of the parlour, and take a 5 s. paper of halfpence off the sideboard. I asked him what he wanted? he said to see the clock. I collared him, and called for assistance. He dropped the halfpence on the mat at the parlour door.

Prisoner's Defence. I went to see what o'clock it was, and touched nothing. There was a paper of halfpence at the door, my mistress said I dropped it.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Fourth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190421-178

678. EVAN THOMAS was indicted for stealing, on 2d of February , two yards and a quarter of silk serge, value 10 s. 7 d. , the property of James Milne and George Reid ; and TEMPLE SNAITH was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, he well knowing it to have been stolen .

GEORGE REID . I am a tailor , and in partnership with James Milne ; we live in Lower Grosvenor-street ; the prisoner was our foreman , and had lived twenty-four years with us. On the 2d of February, about one o'clock, I marked a piece of silk serge, which measured about forty yards, and left it in the drawer - I left the prisoner in the shop; I returned about half-past two, and found some of it cut off. In the evening I went to Snaith's shop, looked at some pieces of serge, and bought one yard and a quarter of him, which I knew to be mine by the mark. On the Thursday following I marked another piece, and missed some of it about the same time - I afterwards saw it in the officer's possession. I afterwards saw Thomas, he said he had not been to Snaith's for twelve months; at last he said he was there.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. My other men had no access to the room.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. Did not Snaith attend voluntarily before the magistrate - A. Yes, and he has surrendered here to-day.

WILLIAM DICKENS . I am the prosecutors' clerk. On 4th of February I went with Plank, and stationed myself at the corner of King-street - I had a view of Snaith's house, which is in King-street. In about ten minutes I saw Thomas cross the street, and go into Snaith's shop. We went round a little way, and then went into the shop, Plank told Snaith that a tailor in the neighbourhood had been robbed repeatedly, and he suspected the stolen goods were sold to him. I saw a piece of serge on the counter with our private mark on it, and told Plank that that was the piece which had been stolen that day. He said he could not tell who he bought it off, as so many people came to his shop it was impossible for him to say when he bought it. Plank said, "you must know, the person has not gone out above ten minutes." He said he did not think he should know the man again.

SAMUEL PLANK . I am an officer. I was with Dickens, and saw the prisoner, Thomas, came out of the prosecutors', and followed him to Snaith's. I went in myself in

about five minutes, he was then gone; I asked Snaith if he had bought any silk serge? he said he sometimes bought such things, but not very lately. I described the dress and height of the prisoner; he said no such person had been to his shop, and he did not know such a person. Dickens claimed the serge which was on the counter; Snaith said he did not know who he bought it of. He said it was impossible for him to know any body, and he had something else to do besides looking at their persons. I was desirous of fetching Thomas, but he said it was of no use. I took Snaith into custody. I afterwards took Thomas to the office - Snaith denied all knowledge of him. Thomas said he took the serge, and sold it to Snaith. Snaith made no answer.

SNAITH'S Defence. I buy and sell things every day.

THOMAS - GUILTY . Aged 47.

SNAITH - GUILTY . Aged 46.

Confined Six Months .

Fourth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190421-179

679. JOHN THOMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of March , one pair of shoes, value 9 s. 6 d. the goods of George Clarke .

JANE CLARKE . I am the wife of George Clarke , who is a shoemaker , and lives in St. John-street . The shoes were fastened to a wire outside the door. I saw the prisoner take them down, and put them under his coat; I then laid hold of him, brought him back, and took the shoes from under his coat.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Confined Six Months , and Whipped .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190421-180

ANN WHITE was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of March , one watch, value 20 s. , the goods of Judith Martindale .

ELIZA MARTINDALE . I am the daughter of Judith Martindale , who lives in Henry-street, Pentonville - the prisoner was our washerwoman . On the 5th of March, about ten o'clock, she came, and asked me if my mother would want her? I told her we had employed somebody else; the watch was on the mantle-piece. I left her in the room about five minutes, when I returned I found she was gone without waiting for me, and missed the watch.

WILLIAM HAYES . I am a salesman, and live in Sparrow-corner, Minories. On the 5th of March, about one o'clock, a man called me over, and asked me if I wanted to buy a watch? I bought it of the prisoner for 14 s. The prosecutrix claimed it.

WILLIAM LACK . On the 5th of March, about twelve o'clock at night, I apprehended the prisoner. She took me to Mr. Hayes, where she had sold the watch.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Confined Three Months .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant,

Reference Number: t18190421-181

681. JOHN SHORT was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of March , one bell-line, value 5 s. , the goods of John Isaac Cross .

WILLIAM MOSS . I am apprentice to John Isaac Cross , who is an ivory-turner . On the 11th of March, soon after seven o'clock at night, I heard somebody breaking the glass in the window, and found a large piece of glass pulled out. I went to the door, and saw the prisoner and two other boys walk away from the window. I went on the opposite side to watch, and saw them return, and rattle the things about - the dog came out, and drove them away. I went and shut the dog up, then returned to watch again, and saw the same three return - the prisoner put his hand through the broken pane. I ran over, and collared him with the bell-pull in his hand. He had taken it from the place where it hung.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was looking at the window.

GUILTY. Aged 13.

Recommended to Mercy.

Judgment Respited .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190421-182

682. GEORGE TISBURY was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of April , one gown, value 5 s. , the goods of Ann Rayfield .

The prosecutrix did not appear

NOT GUILTY.

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190421-183

683. CHARLOTTE SOUL was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of March , three napkins, value 6 d., and a shoulder of mutton, value 5 s. 6 d. , the property of James Smith .

JAMES SMITH. I am a schoolmaster , and live in William-street, Marylebone . On the 15th of March, I found the prisoner in my passage, with three napkins, and a shoulder of mutton - she was quite a stranger.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I did not intend to steal them.

GUILTY . Aged 48.

Confined Two Months .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190421-184

684. JOHN FREDERICK and JAMES HANSON were indicted for stealing, on the 16th of March , eleven handkerchiefs, value 5 s. 6 d. , the property of Charles Frederick Hains ,

CHARLES FREDERICK HAINS . I am a linen-draper , and live in Ratcliff-highway . On the 16th of March, about half-past ten o'clock in the morning, I lost these handkerchiefs from the door-post.

WILLIAM POULTER . I am a plumber, and live next door to Hains. I saw two persons pulling the handkerchiefs from the iron; I called out, and they ran away with them; I was at a window, and could not follow them. I did not see their faces.

JACOB DENNIS THOMAS . I am a rugmaker, and live in Bluegate-fields, near the prosecutor's. I saw the two prisoners and another run by - in about two minutes I heard the alarm. All three came down the street again between eleven and twelve o'clock; Phillips was the other man - I knew them. Seeing me, they made a stop, and went back; in a few minutes they returned, and were going up a court by the side of my house. I stopped Frederick; but the others got away.

HOWARD LEWIS . I am a clothes salesman, and live in Cable-street. On the 22d of March, an officer came with a woman to search my house, and found three handkerchiefs in the window and one hanging in the shop; I believe the prisoner, Frederick, to be the person, who sold them to me, but am not certain - it was either on the 16th of March, or a day or two after; I gave him 4 s. for them. He had them in a bundle with other things; they were quite new, and not worn.

Q. Did you not ask how he came by them - A. He said he wanted to sell them to pay his passage to Gravesend.

HYAM ISAACS. I am a slop-seller, and live in Cable-street. On the 16th of March, between twelve and one o'clock in the day, the prisoner, Hanson, offered me eleven handkerchiefs for sale for 14 s., all in one piece; I refused to buy them. He pressed me, and I bought three for 2 s. 6 d. - they were afterwards claimed.

JOHN MURRANT . I am an officer. I found three handkerchiefs at Isaacs's, and four more at Lewis's. On the 19th of March I apprehended Hanson and Phillips.

WILLIAM PHILLIPS . I have known the prisoners three weeks, and was with them. Hanson pulled the handkerchiefs down, and Frederick put them under his coat; we ran away, and went to Isaacs in about a quarter of an hour - Hanson went into the shop to sell them; we two stood outside, He came out and said Isaacs would only give 9 d. a piece - they were all in one piece; he said there were only eight of them. Frederick went back with them, and returned with eight; they said there were only eight, and they would not sell any. They took the eight to Lewis, and said they sold them there for 6 s. 6 d., and gave me 2 s. 2 d. as my share. As we were going along Bluegate-fields Frederick was taken.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

FREDERICK - GUILTY . Aged 19.

HANSON - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190421-185

685. HENRY LEE was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of March , twenty-three table-cloths, value 10 l. , the goods of John Morris ; and BENJAMIN HENRY was indicted for feloniously receiving, eighteen of the said table-cloths, he well knowing them to have been stolen .

JOHN BURLETON . My wife is a laundress, and works for Mr. John Morris , who lives in Oxford-street; we live at East Acton. On the 25th of March, I was returning from town, with the table-cloths in my cart to wash. When I got home I missed twenty-three out of a bundle, which contained forty-seven - I think they were taken near Acton. Next day I saw one at Wise's, the pawnbroker - the mark was picked out. We found three more at Lee's lodgings; his wife was there; I left town about half-past six o'clock in the evening, and got to Acton a little after eight.

MARY KEITH . I am housekeeper to Mr. John Morris , who keeps an hotel in Oxford-street. I looked out forty-seven table-cloths for Burleton to wash - twenty-three were missing. I saw two at the office, and another, which was torn. I know one by the mark.

JAMES BRADLEY CHAMBERLAIN . I am servant to Mr. Wise, who is a pawnbroker, and lives in Broad-street, St. Giles's. On the 26th of March, Mary Hall pledged a table-cloth with me, in the name of Ann Lovel , about ten o'clock in the morning.

MARY HALL . I lodged in Buckeridge-street - I was in distress, and did needlework; I have known Lee near a twelvemonth. I was at Lee's appartments, No. 29, Tower street, Seven Dials; he only lodged there two days - his wife lived with him; I used to go to clean up the place. On the 26th of March, I got there about seven o'clock in the morning; Mrs. Lee desired me to pick the mark out of a table-cloth - the prisoner was present; one of the marks was N, I do not remember the other. While I picked the mark out of that, Mrs. Lee picked out the mark of two others - I saw twenty-two table-cloths there. Henry came in between ten and eleven o'clock in the morning, and looked at eighteen of them; Lee asked 4 l. for them? he examined them, and offered 2 l. 15 s. for them, which was agreed to, and he took them away. He said he was a dealer in oranges - he staid about an hour.

Q. What became of those you took the marks out of - A. Mrs. Lee sent me to pledge one at Wise's - the prisoner was present; I pledged it in the name of Lovel, which was her maiden name - I knew she pledged things in that name; I got 6 s. for it, and gave her the duplicate. After I returned I heard the prisoner say, he was going to take 1 l. 7 s. 6 d. to William Davis , which was his share; I have seen William Davis at Mrs. Lee's aunt's. Mrs. Lee's sister took me from there to No. 4, Bainbridge-street, where she lived, and then the officers found me, and I told them all about it.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. I thought I was doing wrong by picking the marks out, but I was glad to do any thing, as I was distressed.

SAMUEL FURZEMAN , I am a constable. On the 26th of March, I received information, and went to Bainbridge-street, about half-past eight o'clock in the morning, and found Hall at Lee's mother's house, where his wife's sister lived; the girl directed me to Lee's lodgings, No. 29, Tower-street. I went there about a quarter after nine o'clock, in the one-pair front-room, and found four or five Gipsies there. I sat down, and in two or three minutes, Lee's wife came running into the room, put her hands together, and said to her father,

"For God's sake, put away the table-cloths, for Furzeman has taken the girl." I shut the door, and called out of the window for Kendrick, and the prosecutor to come up. I searched the room, and found three dirty table-cloths in a drawer - Lee's wife claimed them. I took her, with her father and brother-in-law, to the office - they were discharged. About a fortnight after Lee was taken into custody at Bow-street; I had been looking for him without success; I found them both in custody on another charge. They were brought to Marlborough-street, and Hall pointed them out.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN KENDRICK . I am a beadle. I was present with Furzeman - he has spoken correctly.

LEE'S Defence. I found them by Baywater turnpike.

LEE - GUILTY . Aged. 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

HENRY - GUILTY . Aged. 22.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190421-186

686. JOHN MEYER , ESTHER MEYER , ANDREW JOHNSON , and CHARLOTTE JOHNSON were indicted for stealing, on the 9th of January , one kitchen range, value 50 s.; one water-cask, value 2 s.; one brass cock, value 1 s.; two pair of blinds, value 40 s.; one shopboard, value 60 s.; one iron vice, value 5 s.; one nest of drawers, value 3 s.; four window bins, value 20 s., and two shelves, value 10 s., the goods of George Ferry , and 15 lbs. of lead, his property, and fixed to a building .

The prosecutor having let the property with a house, as fixtures, for which Meyer was to pay, the prisoners were

ACQUITTED .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190421-187

687. PATRICK KEELING was indicted for stealing, 70 lbs. of lead, value 13 s. , the property of his Majesty .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating it to be the property of Osborne Markham , Esq.

JAMES ELLIS . I am a patrol of Bow-street. On the 20th of April, about eight o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner in Grosvenor-row, Chelsea, with Campbell, who was carrying the lead; they stopped about a dozen yards from an old iron-shop in Turk's-row. I went up, and asked them where they brought it from? they both said from York barracks - the prisoner said he was going to sell it; I took them back to the barracks. The prisoner admitted that he had taken it from the black hole, and employed Campbell to carry it.

ARCHIBALD CAMPBELL . I am cook at York Hospital. The prisoner came and fetched me from a public-house into the barrack yard, and told me to follow him with the lead.

JOHN BRAGG . I am barrack-sergeant. The prisoner kept the keys of the different stores, and had access to them - he had a house adjoining the stores, where the lead was.

Prisoner's Defence. I lost an arm in the army, and was recommended to this situation by several Officers.

GUILTY. Aged 50.

Recommended to Mercy .

Fined One Shilling , and Discharged.

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190421-188

688. JESSE CHAMPION and WILLIAM AUSTIN were indicted for stealing, on the 20th of March , one butter-flat, value 1 s., and 66 lbs. of butter, value 5 l. , the property of William Kent .

WILLIAM KENT . I carry butter about the country . On the 20th of March I was bringing a flat of butter to town, and called at Mr. Goring's shop at Staines , about half-past seven o'clock in the evening, and left my cart at the door. I remained there about a quarter of an hour, returned to my cart, and when I got about half a mile I missed the butter. I returned, and informed Goring. The prisoners had a cart, which stood behind mine while I was in his shop. We both went in pursuit of them, and overtook them at the Duke's Head, public-house, at Bedfont; the butter stood against the wheel of their cart. There was a third man, whom the patrol pursued - Champion said the man's name was Frank Morgan ; I have seen that man carrying salmon about. The prisoners did not attempt to run away.

JOHN GORING . I am a butcher. Kent came to my shop - he afterwards returned, said he had lost his butter, and thought it was in the prisoners' cart, they had been to my shop in company. I took my horse, and overtook them first at the Duke's Head - the butter was lodged on the wheel of their cart. Champion lifted it out, and Austin received it. I laid hold of one, and when Kent came up he took the other. It was Champion's cart.

Cross-examined by MR. WALFORD. Q. How far was it from your house - Q. About three miles. They said somebody asked them to carry it. There was a third man, who ran away.

COURT. Q. You saw the third man - A. Yes; he was at my door when the others were at my shop - they were in company. I did not see the third man when I got to Bedfont. The patrol pursued in consequence of what the prisoners said.

CHAMPION'S Defence. I was going to market - Austin asked me to take him up, which I did. As we returned we stopped to buy some meat. Just as we passed the Angel and Crown, Thompson called to me about some pigs; while I was talking to him Frank Morgan came and asked me to carry a flat to the Duke's Head, and offered me a shilling and half a gallon of beer. When we got there, he took the flat, went in, paid for the beer, and gave me a shilling. He heard some horses coming, and ran away, leaving the flat by the wheel.

AUSTIN'S Defence. Morgan came and asked us to carry the flat.

CLARK THOMPSON . I am a market-gardener, and live at Staines. I had been dealing with Champion for some pigs. On the 20th of March, about seven o'clock in the evening, I stopped him opposite the Angel and Crown, at Staines, and asked him if he meant to have the pigs - while I was talking to him, a man came up with the flat on his shoulder, and asked him to take it for him to Bedfont, for a shilling and part of a gallon of beer - the man got in with it, and they drove away.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. What time was it - A. It could not be half-past seven o'clock. I had seen the man before - they did not appear to know him. I heard of the robbery next morning.

COURT. Q. When did you tell the prisoner's friends you could prove this - Q. About a fortnight ago - I did not tell the magistrate.

JOHN DINGLEY . I am a patrol. I met the prisoner, Campion's, cart, with three men in it, about half-past seven o'clock, on the 20th of March, they were going towards Bedfont. In about three minutes after I met Goring, went back with him, and found the cart opposite the public-house - the prisoners were then in the cart; the third man was gone, and the butter stood by the cart wheel. I asked where the third man was? a by-stander said he had ran up the road. I pursued, but did not catch a sight of him. The prisoners did not attempt to escape - they said the butter belonged to another man.

Cross-examined. I did not know the other man - the prisoners called him Frank. The foot patrol went to look after the man. I have not known Champion seven years.

NOT GUILTY .

Third Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18190421-189

689. JOHN MORTON was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of April , one bag, value 1 s., and 18 lbs. of tea, value 6 l. , the goods of Thomas Pickford , Matthew Pickford , Zachariah Langton , Joseph Baxendale , and Charles Inman .

JOHN WRIGHT . I am clerk to Messrs. Thomas Pickford , Matthew Pickford , Zachariah Langton , Joseph Baxendale , and Charles Inman , who are carriers , at Paddington.

WILLIAM ARTHUR . I am porter to Messrs. Gordon and Johnson, who are tea-dealers, and live in Cannon-street. On the 17th of April I sewed 18 lb. of tea up in a bag, which was directed to Mr. Oldham, Burslem, Staffordshire. I took it to the Castle, in Wood-street, it was booked to go by the waggon.

WILLIAM ANDREWS . I am clerk at the prosecutor's receiving-wharf at Paddington. On the 19th of April this canvas bag, directed to Mr. Oldham; Burslem, was brought to the wharf; it weighed 18 lbs., and was to go by the Liberty boat. The prisoner was afterwards taken, and asked what he did with it? He said he knew nothing about it.

MOSES OWEN . I am boatman of the Liberty. I put the bag on board, the prisoner was employed as boatman - I went away about a quarter of an hour - I returned between six and seven o'clock in the evening, and it was gone. I had left Little on board. As I returned, I met the prisoner in another boat, going from the Liberty, with something under his frock, about the bulk of the bag - I did not suspect him. When I got on board, Little gave me information, and I missed the bag, went in pursuit of the prisoner, and found him at the White Lion, public-house, and took him into the counting-house.

GEORGE LITTLE . I am boatman of the Liberty. After Owen was gone, the prisoner came on board - I saw him fetch the bag from the farther end of the barge, and take it to the Manchester boat. I told Owen; I said nothing to him.

Prisoner's Defence. If he had seen me take it, would he not have said something?

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Third Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18190421-190

690. ANN M'DORMACK was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of April , two handkerchiefs, value 12 s. , the goods of Joseph Edmund Walker .

JOSEPH EDMUND WALKER . I am a goldsmith , and live in George-row, City-road; the prisoner was my servant . I missed two handkerchiefs. The prisoner got tipsey - I suspected her, had her searched, and the duplicate of a handkerchief was found on her; it was the same pattern as that I lost. There was no mark on it.

JAMES WISKHEARD . I am servant to Mr. Ross, who is a pawnbroker. The prisoner pledged the handkerchief with me, for 2 s. 6 d.

NOT GUILTY .

Third Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18190421-191

691. PETER WRIGHT was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of March , one handkerchief, value 4 s., the goods of Thomas Hewett , from his person .

CORNELIUS BOWER . I am an officer of St. Giles's . On the 28th of March, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I saw the prisoner, with four other men, come out of a wine-vaults at the end of Plumtree-street, I followed them. Hewett and his brother went past me and the prosecutor. When they got to High-street , I saw one of the four take the handkerchief out of the pocket of the person on the left, which was Thomas Hewett . The prisoner stepped into the road with the handkerchief in his hand, and was in the act of putting it into his bosom when I collared him - the others got away. I called to the prosecutor who turned round and claimed the handkerchief.

THOMAS HEWETT . I am a publican. I was walking in Plumtree-street with my brother, Bowers called us - he had the prisoner in custody, and produced my handkerchief, which I had missed.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I picked it up off the curb.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Life .

Third Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18190421-192

692. ANN WILDEY and ELIZABETH WILLIAMS were indicted for stealing, on the 31st of March , four pair of stockings, value 6 s. , the goods of John Lovegrove .

JOHN LOVEGROVE . I am a haberdasher , and live in Whitechapel-road. On the 31st of March, in consequence of information, I went with Day and Davis, found the prisoners in Montague-street, and gave them in charge. I had put three dozen pair of stockings in my window that morning, and in about ten minutes after I missed twelve pair. Four pair were brought to me in the afternoon by Fortune, which are of the same description as those which I lost.

JOSEPH BOURTON . I live two doors from Lovegrove. On the 31st of March, a little after eight o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoners (both of whom I knew before), looking in at his window. Williams went in soon after, and came out with a bundle, which appeared to be stockings, she gave them to Wildey, who walked away with it under her shawl. She went into the shop again. I ran into the shop, and asked if they had lost any stockings? the little girl then missed them - Williams was not in the shop then. I and the prosecutor went in pursuit, but could not find them. I knew them both well.

MARIA DAY . I am sister-in-law to the prosecutor, and serve in the shop. On the morning of the 31st of March, Lovegrove put the stockings in the window. Williams came into the shop three minutes after, and asked the price of the ribbon, which lay at the further end of the window - the stockings were next the door. I did not understand which ribbon she meant. She said she would go and point it out, which she did, and came in again. I showed them to her, and while I turned to get others, she went out, and said she would call again. I had seen them safe in the window before she came in. Nobody but herself came into the shop till I missed the stockings. I knew the prisoners before.

Cross-examined by MR. NORTON. I saw the prisoner speaking together.

MOSES FORTUNE . I am an officer of Lambeth-street. On the 31st of March the prisoners were brought to the office - after that I went to a house in Elger-street, Essex-street, Whitechapel. The street-door was open. I went up to the first floor, and found the door locked - I looked through the key-hole, and saw two pair of stockings on the floor, and two pair in a chair. I broke the door open, and took them. Wildey said she lodged there.

ISAAC DAVIS . I apprehended the prisoners on another charge, and found the key of the door on Wildey. I know nothing of this case.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you not say, that if you could do for the prisoners you would - A. No. They offered me two guineas not to appear against them.

WILDEY'S Defence. I sent Williams to ask the price of the ribbon. Davis said he would transport me if he could.

WILLIAMS'S Defence. Other people were in the shop at the time.

MARIA DAY re-examined. Nobody else was in the shop.

JOSEPH BOURTON re-examined. When I said they were the women, they said they were in bed at the time.

WILDEY - GUILTY . Aged 28.

WILLIAMS - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Third Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18190421-193

693. JOHN WILLIAMS , JOHN MILLER , and THOMAS CRAWLEY were indicted for stealing, on the 18th of March , one handkerchief, value 4 s. , the goods of Elizabeth Hayman , widow .

HANNAH FIELD . I am shopwoman to Elizabeth Hayman , who is a widow, and keeps a clothes shop in Tabernacle-walk . One of the prisoners came into the shop, I do not know which, and asked if I sold tape? I said No. He went out, and I missed the handkerchief in a few minutes.

GEORGE CHAMBERS . I am a type-founder. On the 10th of March I was going along Tabernacle-walk, and saw the three prisoners together in company - they walked very slow. I passed them, and heard Miller say,

"there is one in the window." I watched, and saw them go to the prosecutor's shop, and look in, they then passed - Williams came back, went into the shop, and stopped there two minutes; I saw him come out with the silk handkerchief in his hand, he ran off down a street, I ran round another street to meet him, through a court - immediately as I got into the court, the other two prisoners ran against me. I followed them up Paul-street into Clifton-street, and saw them looking into a corn-chandler's window; I passed them, and went into a shop to watch them. I saw Crawley doing something to his breeches - they then passed the corn-chandler's three times, one went in and the other two followed. I went in, and found nobody in the shop but a little girl - I shut them all in together - they wanted to get out, but I would not let them. In a few minutes I sent for a constable, who took them. They were searched, and the handkerchief found in Crawley's breeches - he had joined them in Clifton-street.

FRANCIS BARTON . I am an officer. I searched Crawley, and found the handkerchief in his breeches.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

CRAWLEY'S Defence. I bought it of a Jew.

WILLIAMS - GUILTY . Aged 19.

MILLER - GUILTY . Aged 17.

CRAWLEY - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190421-194

694. WILLIAM POTTER was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of April , one pair of trowsers, value 10 s. , the goods of Simon Latter .

WILLIAM BRACK . I am a pawnbroker. On the 12th of April I was in Simon Latter 's shop, somebody said a pair of trowsers was stolen from the door, I ran out, and saw the prisoner and another man run down Castle-street. The trowsers were thrown down, and I picked them up.

JAMES TURKEY . I saw a man take the trowsers from the door, and give them to the prisoner, who run off with them. I called out Stop thief! The prisoner was secured.

THOMAS MOULTON . I was passing the shop, and saw the prisoner run away with the trowsers - he dropped them, and I secured him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Six Months , and Whipped .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190421-195

695. GEORGE PERRY was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of March , two bushels of chaff, beans, and grains, mixed, value 2 s. , the property of John Gardner , and JOHN PURSER was indicted for feloniously receiving the same .

JOHN GARDNER . I am a cowkeeper , and live at Mile End ; Perry was my carter . I suspected he had stolen the corn which I allowed my horses. On the 2d of March, after he left work, I broke his bin open, and put several pieces of brown paper with the corn, mixed them up together, and fastened the bin again; next morning I went to where I suspected he was going to sell it, and saw him come and call very loud to his horses, which I thought was a signal; I then saw Purser come with an empty sack, he held the sack open, and Perry shot the corn into it, out of his own sack. I followed Purser home to his house up to his loft, he came down with part of the corn in the sack, and threw it into his cart. I secured him - he begged of me to think of his family. I then went and secured Perry. I examined the corn, and found my labels in it.

Cross-examined by MR. ARABIN. He ought to have fed the horses before that.

THOMAS PRIDMORE . I am a constable. I took the prisoners in charge, and found the labels in the corn.

JOHN GARDNER re-examined. They are the papers I put in.

PERRY'S Defence. I spilt a little corn, and Purser picked it up.

PURSER'S Defence. He spilt it, and I asked him if he was going to pick it up, he said No.

PERRY - GUILTY . Aged 43.

PURSER - GUILTY . Aged 38.

Confined Three Months .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190421-196

696. GEORGE PEARCE was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of February , eight pieces of wood, value 18 d., the property of Thomas Benson , and 10 lbs. of paint, value 5 s. , the property of James Eaton .

THOMAS BENSON . I am a builder ; the prisoner was watchman at a chapel I was building at Bethnal-green . On the 25th of February I went to his house, in Princes-court, Turk-street, and found some pieces of wood which were taken from the chapel - he denied taking them.

JAMES ARMITAGE . I was employed at the chapel. We missed a quantity of paint, went to the prisoner's lodgings, and found some of it.

JAMES EATON . I was painting the chapel, went to the prisoner's lodgings, and found some of the same colour.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was employed at two houses in the Borough, and was allowed the spare wood.

- WEIR. I am a builder, and live at Mile End. I employed the prisoner to pull down some buildings in Tooley-street, and allowed him the old, and the ends of new wood.

COURT. Q. Would you allow him such wood as this - A. Not without leave; it would be of little use for any thing, except for plugs. He was not allowed to take paint.

JEREMIAH PAYNE . I live in Elizabeth-street, Hackney. The prisoner was employed at the buildings in Tooley-street. I frequently gave him leave to take ends of wood.

NOT GUILTY .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190421-197

697. FREDERICK WILLIAM BUTTNER was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of March , four gallons of rum, value 15 s. , the property of John Cox , Frederick Heisch , and Philip Jacob Heisch .

BERNHAND HEBELER. I am clerk to Messrs. John Cox , Fredeirick Heisch, and Philip Jacob Heisch . In the month of March last they shipped forty-nine puncheons of rum for exportation, on board the Alliance, for Dantzic - the captain sailed three weeks ago. Six puncheons have been seized and detained.

EDWARD YORK . I am an officer of the Excise. On the 8th of March. I attended the filling of forty-nine puncheons of rum in the West India Docks - they were numbered. I remember them being filled. No. 7, contained 119 gallons; No. 11, contained 112 gallons; No. 28, contained 111 gallons; No. 32, contained 113 gallons; No. 33, contained 114 gallons, and No. 41, contained 110 gallons. I find this by referring to my books.

SAMUEL LEWIS . I am an Excise watchman. On the 8th of March the rum was in my care from three o'clock in the afternoon until twelve o'clock the next day; it was put on board in the same state as I received it - there were no spiles in the puncheons then.

THOMAS GLAYHORNE . I had the rum in my care during the night. The puncheons were not spiled, as there was no appearance of leaking.

JOHN HARDING . I am an Excise inspector on the River Thames. In consequence of information which I received, on the 17th of March I went on board the Alliance, and gauged the puncheons Nos. 7, 11, 28, 32, 33, and 41, were deficient; in all thirty-four gallons were deficient. I seized the rum on account of the deficiency. They did not appear to have leaked at all. There were spiles in four or five of them.

ANDREAS DAVID PERSCHKY . I was cabin-boy on board the Alliance - the prisoner was mate. I remember the puncheons of rum being shipped on board, some of them were seized.

Q. Before any of them were seized, had you and the prisoner any thing to do with them - A. Yes, the mate told me to go down into the hold and fetch some rum, I said I would not go; he said if I did not he would flog me. The captain was not on board at the time, and the prisoner had the command of the ship. He went, pulled a key from his pocket, and took a half-anker - he got down into the hold, and called me down; I went down, he took a gimlet from his pocket, and bored a hole in the top and side of one of the casks - he made me hold the half-anker, and half filled it - he took about two gallons. He then went and gave the people some work on the top of the vessel, that they might not come down to see him. He then came down and put spiles in the top and side of the puncheon.

Q. Did you go to more than one puncheon at once - A. He filled the half-anker out of two puncheons that day, and gave it to me through the hole, to put in his birth where he sleeps. He afterwards told me that he had sold the rum to a man in a boat, for 28 s. I told the captain of it.

Q. How many days before he was taken up did you take the first quantity of rum - A. I do not know; I was on board when he was taken - it was two or three days before he was taken up. Nobody charged me with stealing it. I told the captain of it two or three days after, on the same day that Gatty came on board; I was with him, and told him.

COURT. Q. Did you spill much in taking it - A. A great deal.

JOHN GOTTY . I am surveyor of the Thames Police. On the 20th of March I apprehended the prisoner on board the Alliance. The last witness went into the cabin with me. I saw the prisoner, and asked the boy, in his presence, which way they got the rum out of the hold? he pointed to the scuttle, and said they got it up that way; and that they put it in an half-anker. I asked him what they did with it? he said they put it in the mate's cabin. I turned to the prisoner, and asked him what he said to it? He speaks English distinctly. He said it was all true. I asked him what he did with it, whether he took it to the shore, or whether anybody got it away? He said a man came on board and fetched it. I asked him what the man gave him for it? He said 28 s. for three half-ankers, which is about twelve gallons. The captain gave me the information. The prisoner went with me to find the man whom he said had bought it.

JOHN FELL . I am clerk to the Magistrates at the Thames Police Office. I remember the prisoner being examined. He appeared to understand English very well, and spoke it very well. I took down what he said - neither threats or promises were held out to him - (reads)

"A man came three or four times on board to sell stockings, waistcoats, breeches and knives, and asked me

several times if I had any spirits or tobacco to sell. When we were loading rum he came sometimes on board, and said I should try to get some rum to sell him. I had a half-anker on board, I filled that out of the hold, and sold it to him. He fetched it. Another day he brought an empty one, and I sold him a full one. He a third time brought an empty half-anker - I filled that, and sold it to him. He asked for some more, but I would not let him have any more. He gave me 28 s. for each half-anker. The man to whom I sold the rum is a Swede, and I know he is a patrol. I have seen him in Ratcliff-highway about eleven or twelve o'clock at night."

Prisoner's Defence. The cabin-boy told me that there has been more rum taken since.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Confined One Year .

Fourth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190421-198

698. JOHN WEST SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of February , three napkins, value 9 s., and one cloth, value 1 s. , the property of Richard Hill .

CHRISTIAN GAMMON . I am constable of Hammersmith - Richard Hill, Esq. is a magistrate ; the prisoner was once his footman . I went to his lodgings, in Cremel's-buildings, and found three napkins and a cloth; he was in custody at the time. He said he knew nothing about them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

NOT GUILTY .

Fourth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190421-199

699. ANN MUNDAY and ANN WOOD were indicted for stealing, on the 26th of February , nine yards of cotton, value 10 s. , the property of William James and Richard James .

RICHARD JAMES . I am a linen-draper , and am in partnership with my brother William; we live in Middle-row, Holborn . On the 26th of March, about eleven o'clock in the morning, the prisoners came to the shop together, and looked at some printed cottons; Wood looked at those which I was showing them, while Munday was looking at some in the window. I observed Munday take a piece of print from the window, bring it to the side of the counter, and give it to Wood under the top of the counter - Wood put it under her pelisse. They said they did not like the prints, and asked to look at a common blue one - they bought a quarter of a yard, which came to 4 d. They were then going away, but my brother jumped over the counter, seized Wood, and took her to the other end of the shop. As she went she dropped the print; Munday attempted to get away, but was stopped at the door. We gave them both in charge.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Our counter is three feet high.

WILLIAM READ . I am an officer. I took the prisoners in charge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

MUNDAY'S Defence. We never saw it.

MUNDAY - GUILTY . Aged 22.

WOOD - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Fourth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190421-200

700. GEORGE DONALD was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of March , from the person of David Briggs , one pocket-book, value 1 d.; 7 s. in monies numbered, and a 1 l. bank note , his property.

DAVID BRIGGS . I am a canal digger , and live at the Flying Horse, Hackney-road. On the 28th of March, about three o'clock in the afternoon, I was drinking with the prisoner and some more at the Two Sawyers, public-house, in the Minories; the prisoner and I then went to a cook-shop, from there - I was tired - he took me to his lodgings near the Tower - my pocket-book was then safe. I fell asleep on his bed, awoke about ten o'clock, and found he was gone; I missed my pocket-book and money. I found him that night at a house in Wentworth-street, and gave him in charge; about 1 l. in silver, and the duplicate of a coat was found on him, with my marriage certificate.

Cross-examined by MR. ARABIN. I was quite sober.

JOHN PARTRIDGE. I am a constable. The prisoner was brought to the watch-house; I went to the house in Wentworth-street, and found the prosecutor's pocket-book in a bundle which the prisoner claimed; I also found his marriage certificate torn up in the room, and several other papers.

Prisoner's Defence. I was discharged from the Foot Guards . I was with the prosecutor, he got drunk and gave me his pocket-book to take care of - being drunk I took his papers to light my pipe.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Confined One Year .

Fourth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190421-201

701. JOHN MOORE was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of March , 10 lbs. of iron, value 1 s., and 30 lbs. of rope, value 2 s. , the goods of John Edmeads .

JOHN EDMEADS . I am a broker , and live in White Lion-street, Spitalfields . On the 1st of March, I saw the prisoner climbing over my gates; I secured him. He had my iron and rope in a bag.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Whipped and Discharged.

Fourth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190421-202

702. JAMES LANE was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of March , one bed, value 10 s. , the property of Hyam Isaacs .

HYAM ISAACS. I am a slopseller , and live in Cable-street. This bed was stolen from my house in Hyam's-buildings , which was uninhabited. I saw the bed safe there on the 4th of March, about five o'clock in the afternoon, and missed it next morning; the shutters were forced open, and every thing belonging to the bed taken.

JOHN MARSHALL . I am a watchman of Whitechapel. On the 4th of March, a little before ten o'clock, the prisoner

passed me in Rosemary-lane, with the bed on his back. I crossed over, and asked him where he brought it from? he said from Angel-gardens, and he was going to take it to Tower-hill, but he could not tell to what part - he said he was going to make a little money of it. Next morning the prosecutor claimed it.

ISAAC DAVIS . I am a constable. I took the prisoner in charge - he said the bed was his own.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A man asked me to carry it to Tower-hill.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Fourth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190421-203

703. WILLIAM BARTLETT was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of April , one tin can, value 2 s.; two gallons of oil, value 6 s.; 4 lbs. of rape seed, value 10 d., and one sack, value 18 d. , the property of Charles Lockyer Curtoys and Nathaniel Matthew .

THOMAS HICKLEY . I am foreman to Messrs. Charles Lockyer Curtoys and Nathaniel Matthew , who are millers , and live at Tottenham ; the prisoner was in their service as a grinder . On Saturday night, the 4th of April, he was discharged. I heard he was in custody, and weighed two sacks of rape seed, which he had access to, and found each sack 4 lbs. short of what they weighed on the 2 d - 4 lbs. were found on the prisoner.

JOHN EYLES . I am a patrol of Hackney. On the 4th of April, about half-past five o'clock in the morning, I stopped the prisoner in Kingsland-road, about two miles from the prosecutors', when I approached him, he turned up a yard to avoid me; he had a can slung across his shoulder, and a sack before him to balance it. I asked him what he had got; he said some oil, and that he had been working on board an oil barge, and brought it from there; I took him to the watch-house, and found that he had been discharged from the prosecutors' the night before.

WILLIAM FULLBROOK . I am a patrol of Hackney. I was with Eyles; he has spoken correctly, The prisoner was searched, and about two quarts of rape seed was found in his pocket.,

JOHN GARVA . I was constable of the night. The prisoner was brought to the watch-house; I searched him and found the seed in his pocket; I found another small can in his waistcoat pocket full of oil, and made to fit the pocket.

(Sack sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 58.

Transported for Seven Years .

Fourth Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18190421-204

704. WILLIAM LANE was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of March , eight live tame rabbits, price 8 s. , the goods of Thomas Dyson .

THOMAS NASH . I lodge at Thomas Dyson 's, who is a shoemaker , and lives at Hackney ; he keeps rabbits in a shed at the front of his house - it is inclosed within a fence. On the 10th of March, about six o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner climb over the fence to get out into the road - I knew him before; he lived near us. I called out Stop thief! and followed him over the pales; he had something before him in his smock-frock. I saw the rabbits running about the road immediately as I got over - I stopped to pick them up. Truman brought the prisoner back in less than two minutes; I am sure he is the man; I saw the shed safe the night before - the staple was drawn.

RICHARD CROXTON . I live at Hackney. About six o'clock in the morning, I heard the cry of Stop thief! and saw the prisoner jump over the fence, with a bag in his left hand; he ran off, carrying the bag a few paces, he then caught hold of the bottom, and turned the rabbits out of it. I secured him without losing sight of him - he observed me, and wanted to get away.

THOMAS DYSON . I had eight rabbits in my shed, which I locked up the night before - they are mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I never had them.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Fourth Middlesex Jury, before J Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18190421-205

705. PATRICK HAGAN was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of March , one tub, value 4 s., four yards of baize, value 1 s., the goods of John Philpot ; and 60 lbs. of lead, value 10 s., belonging to him, and fixed to his dwelling house .

JOHN PHILPOT . I am a Navy Agent , and live at No. 3, Hermitage-place, Islington-road ; the prisoner was employed as my gardener . On the 21st of March, between six and eight o'clock in the evening, this lead was taken from the roof of my water-closet, at the back of the house.

JOHN DONALDSON . I am a shoemaker, and live at Walworth. I have a house next door to the prosecutor's, which was stripped of its lead on the 17th of March. On Sunday, the 21st, I went to examine my premises, about a quarter before seven o'clock - the lead was then safe on the prosecutor's premises. Soon after I heard the dog bark, and a call of

"Watch." I ran out, and found the prisoner in Thompson's custody; I found the lead tied in a handkerchief on the roof of the kitchen of No. 1, and compared it with the water-closet, and it fitted exactly.

JOHN THOMPSON . I live with Mr. Philpot. Hearing the dog bark, I went into the garden, and walked slowly to the bottom; on my return I observed the figure of a man passing from the water-closet of No. 2, on to the premises of No. 1; I gave the alarm, and opened the back garden gate - I had to climb over a gate to get there. I saw the prisoner get over the wall, and drop at the corner of Mr. Eaves's house into a recess. I found him there, collared him, and dragged him out of the recess; he had no handkerchief on his neck; the lead was found in a handkerchief similar to what he used to wear. A small piece of lead was found on Eaves's premises, just where he climbed up to get over the wall. We went to his house, were we found the prosecutor's tub.

WILLIAM PARR . I am servant to Mr. Eaves, who lives at No. 1, Hermitage-place, Islington-road. On the 21st of March, about six o'clock in the evening, I was sitting in my master's room, and saw the prisoner pass once or twice. In about half an hour I saw him pass again towards the prosecutor's premises. About three minutes

after I went out, and saw him getting over the wall, which leads to the prosecutor's privy; when I got up to him he turned his back. I saw no more till I heard the call of

"Watch." I immediately ran out, and saw a gentleman securing him as he was getting off the wall - he had no business on the wall; I know him to be the same man. He had a handkerchief round his neck when I first saw him - he had none when he was taken.

JOSEPH CADBY . I am a constable. On the 21st of March, I received the prisoner in custody; I found nothing on him. I matched the lead to the place, and it fitted exactly. I went to his lodgings at No. 8, College-street, Cow-cross, and found the tub and the green baize.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing of it.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Transported for Seven Years .

Fourth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190421-206

706. JAMES GORDON was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of April , one brass water-cock plug, with an iron spindle, value 50 s. , the goods of Walter Hunter and William English .

WALTER HUNTER . I am an engineer , and am in partnership with William English ; we live at Bow, Middlesex ; the prisoner had been five years in our service, and was discharged in January. On the 13th of April we missed this plug.

JAMES BROWN . I am a watchman. On the 13th of April, about two o'clock in the morning, I met the prisoner coming up a small alley, near the prosecutors'. I asked him what he had got on his shoulder? he said it was something heavy which he had found. I secured him, and found it was this plug.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I found it in the alley - it is a malicious prosecution of Brown's.

GUILTY . Aged 54.

Transported for Seven Years .

Fourth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190421-207

707. MARY WRIGHT was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of April , one tub, value 3 s. , the goods of James Beal .

JAMES BEAL . I am a cooper , and live at Cow-cross . On the 20th of April, I sold this tub, which stood before my door. While I was taking the person's address, it was stolen; I ran out, and secured the prisoner with it in Red Lion-alley.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A woman asked me to carry it.

GUILTY . Aged 36.

Confined Three Months .

Fourth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190421-208

708. FORTUNE GUILLOIS was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of January , two sheets, value 20 s.; one pair of trowsers, value 10 s., and two pair of stockings, value 4 s. , the goods of Charles Watkins .

CHARLES WATKINS . I live in Compton-street, and am a servant out of place . About the 2d of January I met the prisoner in Compton-street - he asked me if I wanted a situation on board a ship? I said Yes. He showed me where his father lived, and said he would get me a place, as he knew a Captain who would take me. He kept on in this way about a week, and said he would get my things washed, in order to go before the Captain. He persuaded me to let him have them washed, and I gave them to him for that purpose. Next day I asked him if they were done? he said he could not be bothered with me, and left. I never could find him. I had given him these things to get washed as my mother was ill. He said he would give me the trowsers out of the bundle before I left him. He afterwards said he would give them to me in the morning. In about a week I met him, and asked him for them - he promised to meet me next day, but he never came. I have never got a single thing back. I found him in custody at Bow-street.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent. I supplied him with victuals and money.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Fourth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190421-209

709. MARY EVANS was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of March , one bolster, value 10 s., and one bolster case, value 6 d. , the goods of John Patten .

MARY PATTEN . I am the wife of John Patten , we live in Oxford-street . On the 25th of March I saw the prisoner run out of our house with the bolster, which she took off the bed up stairs. My son secured her.

FREDERICK PATTEN . I am the prosecutor's son. I ran after the prisoner, and brought her back with the bolster in her lap. She dropped it, and wanted me to let her go.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was insensible at the time.

GUILTY . Aged 41.

Confined One Year .

Fourth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190421-210

710. SOPHIA CLARK was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of April , one pair of ear-rings, value 10 s. , the property of Caroline Welsly , spinster .

CAROLINE WELSLY . I live at Mrs. Martin's, No. 43, Thornhaugh-street , the prisoner lived servant there. I lost my ear-rings. The prisoner left her place very suddenly. On the Monday following I had her box searched, and they were found in it.

CHARLES JEFFBIES . On the 10th of April I searched the prisoner's box, and found these ear-rings, wrapped up in a piece of cloth.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I went to live there, but found it was a bad house, and immediately gave warning. They refused to let me go, and beat me. I had them apprehended for an assault, and this is done to prevent my appearing against them. The ear-rings are mine.

CAROLINE WELSLY . She knew it was a bad house before she came.

NOT GUILTY .

Fourth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190421-211

711. SOPHIA CLARK was again indicted for stealing, on the 1st of March , one pair of boots, value 7 s., and one pair of shoes, value 4 s. , the goods of Robert Bryant .

ROBERT BRYANT . I am a shoemaker , and live in Tottenham-court-road . In February the prisoner lived with me as servant , and left about the middle of March. On the 10th of March Mrs. Martin, the landlady of the house last mentioned, called on me. I went to her house, and saw my boots. After she was examined she told me she took the boots, but nothing else.

CHARLES JEFFRIES . I found the boots in the prisoner's box, quite new.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I bought the boots.

NOT GUILTY .

Fourth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190421-212

712. WILLIAM BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of April , one watch, value 4 l., and two seals, value 1 l., the property of William Holden , from his person .

WILLIAM HOLDEN . I am a plumber . On the 12th of April, about half-past eleven o'clock at night, as I was returning from Stepney, I was surrounded by a gang, the prisoner was one - he ran against me, and drew my watch out - I collared him as he was doing it. He gave the watch to another. As I was taking him to the watch-house, the gang came and splashed me all over with mud. I never let him go. I have traced the watch to a pawnbroker's.

JAMES STOWE . I was constable of the night. I searched the prisoner, and found nothing but a counterfeit shilling on him.

ALEXANDER INNES BURGESS. I am a pawnbroker, and live in Crown-street, Finsbury-square. On the 13th of April the watch was pledged with me in the name of Thomas Stone .

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was not near the prosecutor.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Life .

Fourth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190421-213

713. THOMAS BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of April , one coach-glass, value 5 s. , the property of John Ayrton Paris .

JOHN MATTHEWS . I am coachman to Dr. John Ayrton Paris . On the 11th of April, about eight o'clock in the evening, I locked the coach up in Beaumont-mews , next morning, about seven o'clock, I found the stable door broken open, and one glass gone. I found the prisoner in custody with it.

RICHARD YOUNG . I am a helper in Mr. Crawford's stables, in Wimpole-street. On the 12th of April I called the coachman at a quarter before five o'clock, then went and stood at the corner of Bowling-green-lane, and saw the prisoner coming down Beaumont-mews, with the coach-glasses under his arm. I called the watchman - he ran away to the corner of Great Chesterfield-street, and there laid it down. I saw him at Marlborough-street about eleven o'clock, and am sure he is the man.

WILLIAM TWADLING . I am a watchman. I was locking up my box at the corner of Great Chesterfield-street, heard the call of watch, and saw the prisoner running out of Great Chesterfield-street, down Welbeck-street. I called out, and he was stopped. I never lost sight of him.

WILLIAM CROOK . I am a watchman. I heard the alarm, and stopped the prisoner, who was running. I found a knife on him.

SAMUEL BRITTEN . I heard the cry, and picked the two coach-glasses off a flat railing.

RICHARD YOUNGMAN . I saw the prisoner lay the glasses down.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing of them.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Fourth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190421-214

714. THOMAS BROWN was again indicted for stealing, on the 12th of April , one coach-glass, value 5 s. , the property of George Jenkins .

WILLIAM STROUD . I had the care of George Jenkins's coach. His glass was taken out of the same mews.

RICHARD YOUNGMAN . I saw the prisoner lay the glasses down at the same time with the others.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

Fourth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190421-215

715. THOMAS ABDY was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of April , 10 pair of braces, value 3 s. 4 d. , the goods of Thomas Boucher .

DAVID STROUD . I am shopman to Thomas Boucher , who is a hosier , and lives in Middle-row, Holborn . On the 8th of April, at night, a bundle of braces were stolen from the door.

RICHARD JACKSON . I am a watchman. Between ten and eleven o'clock at night, I saw the prisoner looking at the braces. I went round my beat, and then watched him for a quarter of an hour. At last I saw him take them, and secured him immediately with them. No money was found on him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I picked them up.

GUILTY. Aged 17.

Judgment Respited .

Fourth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190421-216

716. JOHN ATHERLEY and JOHN KING were indicted for stealing, on the 18th of April , two sacks, value 6 s. , the goods of James Surry and John Surry .

JAMES NEWMAN . I am carman to Messrs. James and John Surry , of Hackney . On Saturday night, about half-past ten o'clock, I came home; next morning I missed the sacks out of the waggon.

JOHN EYLES . I am a patrol. On the 18th of April, about five o'clock in the morning, I stopped the prisoners, who were together at Hackney. Atherley was carrying a load, and King was following close behind. I secured Atherley, and asked him what he had got? he said they were old sacks that he had picked up. King said he picked them off a dunghill, at Woodford. I took them to the watch-house, and found Surry's name on them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

ATHERLEY'S Defence. We found them.

ATHERLEY - GUILTY . Aged 20.

KING - GUILTY . Aged 26.

Confined Three Months , and Whipped .

Fourth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190421-217

717. WILLIAM HOME was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of April , one watch, value 12 s.; one seal, value 6 d., and one key, value 2 d., the property of Henry Adcock , from his person .

HENRY ADCOCK . On the 17th of April, about twelve o'clock in the day, while the funeral procession of the late Colonel Herries was passing, I got on the step of a door at the corner of Quality-court, Chancery-lane . I had not been there many minutes before a person sprang from the crowd, and seized two men who were in front of me. Immediately upon his seizing them, I heard something fall on the pavement, and the breaking of glass. I looked down, and saw my watch lying there. I stooped to pick it up, but before I could reach it, the person who had seized the men had let one of them go, and picked it up. I claimed it, and assisted in taking the prisoner, who was the other, to the office. I did not feel it go.

JAMES HANLEY . I am a constable of St. Luke's. I went down Chancery-lane with the procession, and observed a man (not the prisoner) with the watch in his hand. I saw him turn his back to the procession, and reach the watch over to the prisoner, who took it, and concealed it under his coat. I seized them both, and heard the watch drop. I let the other go, and picked it up at the prisoner's feet - the other man ran away, and got off. I never let the prisoner go. I am sure I saw him receive the watch.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I stopped to look at the funeral, and the gentleman took me.

GUILTY . Aged 38.

Transported for Life .

Fourth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190421-218

718. FREDERICK HILL was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of April , nine sacks, value 3 s. , the goods of Thomas Rhodes and William Rhodes .

ABRAHAM MILES . I am foreman to Messrs. Thomas and William Rhodes , who are brickmakers . On the 5th of April we lost these sacks.

WILLIAM CHURCHILL . I am an officer. On the 5th of April, about half-past eight o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner with the sacks, and asked him where he got them? he said,

"Out of Rhodes's brick-field" - I took him to the watch-house. There were five other boys with him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

THOMAS EAGLES . The prisoner was brought to the watch-house. He said the other boys told him he could get half a crown for them, and he took them.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Whipped and Discharged.

Fourth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190421-219

719. ELIZABETH FARRELL was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of January , at St. Botolph, Without Aldgate , one 20 l. bank note, the property of Mary Ann Bellenger , in her dwelling-house .

MARY ANN BELLENGER . I am a widow , and keep a grocer's shop in Upper East Smithfield , in the parish of St. Botolph, Without Aldgate - I keep the house. Between the 13th and 15th of January I missed a 20 l. bank note out of my cash-box - I immediately sent to the Bank to stop the payment. I heard nothing of it until the 1st of April, when I received notice from the Bank. My own hand-writing was on the back of it. It was traced to a linen-draper's in the Minories. The prisoner officiated as my servant , in the room of her sister, who was ill.

GEORGE DYER . I am a clerk in the Bank. I produce the note for 20 l. No. 6937, dated 7th of November, 1818.

JOHN LANGDON . I am shopman to Mr. Fryers, who is a linen-draper, and lives in the Minories. The prisoner came to the shop one evening, about the latter end of February, and laid out a few pounds - she paid for the articles in small notes. She came again the next evening, laid out some more, and received change for this note. I am sure she is the person. She gave me the name of

"Jones, No. 10, East Smithfield;" which I wrote on it. I am certain it is the note.

JOHN SHAW . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner on Thursday, the 8th of April, at her mother's house, in Brown Bear-alley, East Smithfield. I told her what I took her for - she strongly denied it. I said it was useless, for I knew where the note was changed, and asked her where the things were which she had bought with it? I found some of them at her sister's, and part at her mother's - I produce them.

JOHN LANGDON re-examined. Part of these things are what I sold the prisoner the night before.

MARY ANN BELLENGER re-examined. It is the note I lost - I took it of Messrs. Williams and Co., Birchin-lane. It has my writing on it. It was taken from my cash-box.

Cross-examined by MR. LOVET. The note had been in my possession above three weeks. The prisoner lived in the house, and did her sister's work.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 17.

Recommended to Mercy .

Fourth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190421-220

720. DENNIS CONNAUGHTON was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of March , two planes, value 4 s., and three chisels, value 2 s. , the goods of Richard Powell .

RICHARD POWELL . I am a carpenter . On the 18th of March, while I was at dinner, I lost these tools out of a house in Goswell-street-road , where I was at work - the prisoner worked there as a bricklayer's labourer. He was discharged that day, which made me suspect him.

ELIZA STRINGER . I keep an old iron-shop in Turnmill-street. On the 18th of March I bought a plane and a chisel of the prisoner.

ANN STRINGER . I am the daughter of the last witness. I bought a plane, two chisels, and a pair of pincers of the prisoner.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent. Stringer buys stolen goods.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

Fourth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190421-221

721. EDWARD WALLWORK and LEWIS MORGAN were indicted for stealing, on the 15th of April , 26 yards of linen, value 2 l. 18 s. 6 d. , the goods of James Martin .

JAMES HAWTHORN . I am shopman to Mr. James Martin , who is a linen-draper , and lives in Judd-street, Brunswick-square . On the 15th of April, Wallwork came to the shop about ten o'clock in the morning, and desired to look at some Irish linen - I showed him two pieces, he asked me if I could send them for a friend to look at? I tied two pieces up, and took them with him myself. He took me to a public-house in Leigh-street, kept by Mrs. Churchill. He desired me to sit down in the parlour, which I did, and presently the prisoner, Morgan, came in; both of them looked at the linen, after that Wallwork left the room. Morgan then wished me to recommend him the best piece of the two - I recommended that at the highest price; he said he would have it, but he must have some French cambric for frills - he wished me to fetch him two or three lengths to look at. I went home for them, leaving the linen he had chosen with him. I returned immediately with the cambric, and found they were both gone with the linen. The landlady said they were gone out with it, and that Morgan had it under his arm. I ran out, caught sight of them, and secured them both together in Gower-street - Morgan had the cloth. He said he was going to show it to the person who was to make his shirts. I gave them in charge.

JAMES SMITH . I am an officer. I took the prisoners into custody. I found only 4 d. on Wallwork, and nothing on Morgan.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

WALLWORK'S Defence. I thought I had 3 l. in my pocket, but found I had not, and was going to fetch some money.

MORGAN'S Defence. We were going to fetch the money.

WALLWORK - GUILTY . Aged 43.

MORGAN - GUILTY . Aged 43.

Transported for Seven Years .

Fourth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190421-222

722. WILLIAM GIBBS was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of April , one table-spoon, value 10 s.; three teaspoons, value 12 s., and one pair of stockings, value 1 s. , the property of John Sweetland .

JOHN SWEETLAND . I am a baker , and live in John-street , the prisoner was my servant . I lost these things, and found the duplicates in his box.

WILLIAM GAFTON . I am a pawnbroker. The prisoner pledged a table-spoon and a tea-spoon with me.

WILLIAM WERLETT . I am a pawnbroker. The prisoner pledged two sheets and two spoons with me.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

HENRY HOWARD . I took the prisoner into custody. He said he had got into bad company, and had been gambling.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Whipped and Discharged.

Fourth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190421-223

723. GEORGE SMITH and GEORGE BOWEN were indicted for stealing, on the 13th of March , eight knives, value 2 s.; five forks, value 6 d.; one steel, value 6 d., and one pair of boots, value 1 s. , the goods of Jacob Anns .

JACOB ANNS . I am clerk to Messrs. Barclay, Perkins and Co. On the 13th of March at night, I lost these things out of my area in Harrison-street, Gray's Inn-lane .

WILLIAM SMITH . On the 13th of March, about five o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoners coming up Elm-street - Bowen had a bundle, which contained these things; Smith had the boots in his pocket.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

BOWEN's Defence. A man gave them us to carry.

SMITH - GUILTY . Aged 14.

BOWEN - GUILTY . Aged 15.

Confined Three Months , and Whipped .

Fourth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190421-224

724. SARAH STOCK was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of April , one shift, value 1 s.; two petticoats, value 3 s.; three handkerchiefs, value 6 s.; one yard of cotton, value 3 s., and one book, value 3 s. , the goods of Thomas Delarne .

THOMAS DELARNE . I live in Crown-street, Shoreditch ; the prisoner was my servant . On the 17th of April I missed these things, and sent for a constable, who found the duplicates of them in her box.

ANTONIO BELDATTE . I am shopman to Mr. Faulkner, who is a pawnbroker. The prisoner pledged the articles stated in the indictment with me, at different times.

FRANCIS BARBER . I searched her box, and found sixty-seven duplicates in it, some of which relate to the property.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 34.

Confined Two Months .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190421-225

725. PETER MILLER was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of April , one coat, value 15 s. , the goods of Edward Maxwell .

EDWARD CARD . I am apprentice to Edward Maxwell , who is a slopseller , and lives at Stepney . On the 22d of April, about five o'clock in the afternoon. I missed this coat from the door - I received information, ran out, and found the prisoner with the coat down an alley close to the shop.

JOHN ROBINSON . I live opposite Maxwell. I saw the prisoner take the coat and run down an alley - he was secured.

JOHN KENT . I assisted in securing the prisoner.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A man gave it to me to hold.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Whipped and Discharged.

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190421-226

726. FRANCIS ROBERTSON was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of February , two pails, value 3 s. , the property of William Hunt .

ANN HUNT . I am the wife of William Hunt , we live in Well-street, Poplar . On the 20th of February, about

seven o'clock in the evening, the pails were taken from the yard - the door had been left open. I found them at Rouse's.

JANE MATTHEWS . I live with Mr. Rouse, who is a broker, and lives at Poplar. On the 20th of February I bought these two pails of the prisoner. On the Saturday following he brought two others, and I detained him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Whipped and Discharged.

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190421-227

727. EDWARD BERRY was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of February , six live tame rabbits, price 3 s. , the property of Thomas Bruce .

The prosecutor did not appear .

NOT GUILTY.

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190421-228

728. ELIZA PRICE was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of March , one watch, value 6 l.; one chain, value 2 l.; three seals, value 35 s.; one key, value 5 s.; one handkerchief, value 2 s.; 10 s., in monies numbered, and one 15 l. bank note, the property of George Page , from his person; and WILLIAM HAMERTON was indicted for feloniously receiving, harbouring, and maintaining the said Eliza Price , knowing her to have committed the said felony .

GEORGE PAGE . I am an attorney . On the 1st of March I dined at a coffee-house in the Strand, about four o'clock - I was alone and very much intoxicated. After I left I remember being in Long-acre, in my way home to my dwelling-house, at Camden-town. About this time I was so overcome tha