Old Bailey Proceedings, 17th February 1819.
Reference Number: 18190217
Reference Number: f18190217-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace Oyer and Terminer, AND Gaol Delivery for the City of London, AND ALSO The Gaol Delivery For the County of Middlesex, HELD AT Justice Hall, in the Old Bailey; ON WEDNESDAY, 17th of FEBRUARY, 1819, and following Days;

Being the Third Session in the Mayoralty of THE RIGHT HON. JOHN ATKINS , LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

Taken in Short-Hand by H. BUCKLER, Basinghall Street, (BY AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON.)

London:

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED, FOR H. BUCKLER, BY T. BOOTH, 31, St. Andrew's Hill, Doctors' Commons.

1819.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX.

Before the Right Honourable JOHN ATKINS , Esq. LORD MAYOR of the City of London; Sir Robert Graham , Knt., one of the Barons of his Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Samuel Draper Best , Esq. one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of King's Bench; John Richardson , Esq. one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir William Curtis , Bart.; Sir James Shaw , Bart.; Sir Claudius Stephen Hunter , Bart.; Christopher Smith , Esq.; Sir William Domville , Bart. Alderman of the said City; Sir John Silvester , Bart., D. C. L. Recorder of the said City; Robert Albion Cox , Esq. and Richard Rothwell , Esq., Alderman of the said City, Newman Knowlys , Esq. Common Sergeant of the said City, and John Vaillant , Esq., his Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of the Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

London Jury.

Thomas L. Terry ,

John M'Clough ,

James Waterloo ,

John Potts ,

Standley Goddard ,

Robert Johnstone ,

Joseph Brooks ,

John Taylor ,

Matthew Elwall ,

John Barnes ,

Daniel Deacon ,

Henry Banner .

First Middlesex Jury.

William Ansted ,

Frederick Breamer ,

Charles Randall ,

William Abercrombie ,

James Ford ,

John Shaw ,

John Jones ,

Samuel Baker ,

William Smart ,

William Jackson ,

Thomas M'Gill ,

Benjamin Phillips .

Second Middlesex Jury.

George Cullum ,

Thomas Leathhart ,

John Jefferey ,

James Hay ,

William Thorn ,

William Wilson ,

Thomas Yates ,

Joseph Evans ,

Samuel Bennett ,

John Lark ,

John Charles Matthews ,

Thomas Davis .

SESSIONS HOUSE, OLD BAILEY, FEBRUARY 17, 1819.

ATKINS, MAYOR. THIRD SESSION.

Reference Number: t18190217-1

315. WILLIAM SALMON was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of December , 17 lbs of lead, value 8 s., belonging to John Lankson , and fixed to a dwelling-house of his .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating it to be fixed to a certain building of his.

JOHN LANKSON . On the 29th of December, about half-past six o'clock in the evening, I went to show a gentleman a house of mine, in Buckingham-place, Fitzroy-square ; the gentleman went over the way to get a light while I went to open the door - I could not get the key into the hole. When the light came, I found a key inside; I knocked at the door, very hard, several times. A mob came round, and said somebody was running across the roof; I went through the next house, and found my yard-door open; I then saw my street-door opened, and two boys run out I ran to the door, and cried out Stop thief! Several persons pursued, and Gurney, who was convicted last Session, was brought back - the prisoner came to the watch-house, and was taken. I returned to the house, and found a quantity of lead taken off the roof, from the gutter, by the trap-door - it was fixed; the whole of the gutter was taken away, rolled up, and put on the party-wall; I took it to the watch-house. I afterwards compared it with the gutter, and it fitted exactly. The key had been left with Mrs. Johns, to show the house.

JAMES WOODWARD . I was going up Buckingham-place, and saw several people round the house; I saw two boys run across the roof, told the prosecutor, and he went through the next house into his own; I then saw two boys run out of the house - I pursued, and took one, named Gurney, who was convicted last Session - the prisoner was the other, I am certain of it; he came to the watch-house about five minutes after, and enquired for a boy, named Gurney, who was taken for some lead - the constable searched him, and found a pair of pincers on him.

RICHARD COATES . I am a constable. I was at the watch-house, Gurney was given into my custody; after I had locked him up, I went to the watch-house door - there was a number of people standing there; the prisoner came up to me, and asked if there was not a boy brought there for stealing of lead? I saw his hands were very black and wet, as if he had been handling something - I took him in to Gurney, and asked him if he knew him? he hesitated at first, and then said he did. I then said I thought he was concerned with him - he said he knew nothing of the robbery; I searched him - he was very unwilling to be searched. I found a pair of pincers in his coat-pocket, which appeared soiled, as if they had been pulling lead up. I was going to lock him up, when he began crying, and said he would tell me all about it, and that he, Gurney, and another boy, named Johns, went to the house about seven days before, to steal the copper and bells, but found they had been taken away; that they went again on the 29th to steal the lead from the gutters, and used the pincers to draw the nails out - I compared the lead to the place, and it fitted exactly.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A person sent me to enquire for Gurney, Coates wiped my hands across Gurney's, and said they are both alike, we shall make money of them.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined Three Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18190217-2

316. JOHN MOODY was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of December , 6 lbs of beef, value 3 s. , the property of George Tappin .

GEORGE TAPPIN . I am a butcher , and live in Great Queen-street, Drury-lane . On the 29th of December, in the afternoon I lost a piece of beef from my shop - the prisoner was secured with it. I knew it to be mine.

JOSEPH GOMMERSALL . I am a tobacconist, and live next door to Tappin; I heard the alarm, and secured the prisoner opposite my house, with the beef under his arm, wrapped in a sack; the prosecutor saw it, and claimed it - two men followed him, and said they saw him buy it.

GEORGE HONEY . I am the prosecutor's servant; I saw the prisoner come out of the house with the beef under his arm; I asked him for it; he said he had bought it - Gommersall secured him.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Three Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Best.

Reference Number: t18190217-3

317. JOSEPH WILKS and JOHN BAREFOOT were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the

dwelling-house of William Wray , about two o'clock in the night of the 30th of January , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, one pair of shoes, value 5 s.; one salt-spoon, value 4 s.; one pair of knee-buckles, value 5 s., and 13 lbs. of mutton, value 6 s. , his property.

WILLIAM WRAY. I am a tin-plate worker , and live in High Holborn . On the 31st of January, about two o'clock in the morning, I was alarmed, came down, and found my bureau broken open, which was in the kitchen, behind the shop - there is a yard behind the kitchen, and another door opens out of the kitchen into Mr. Hopkins's yard. I missed the articles stated in the indictment - I found Wilks in custody at the watch-house.

MARY ANN WALKER. I am servant to Mr. Wray; I sleep in the kitchen. I went to bed before my mistress, and am not certain whether the door was fastened; at two o'clock I was disturbed, and found two men in the kitchen - it was the prisoners; Barefoot was at the bureau, searched the papers over; he had a small piece of candle in his hand - Wilks stood about a yard and a half from him, between the bureau and the door; I saw them plainly, and am sure they are the persons. I asked them what they did there? they told me to hold my noise, and called me a great fool; I said I would not, and knocked against the wainscot to alarm a young man who slept in the next house - they then began to make their escape; before that Barefoot asked me where my master kept his money? I told him to go about his business, and made the alarm - they went out of the door, which leads into Hopkins's yard - both the doors were open; they were shut when I went to bed. I followed them, and made the alarm; the watchman took them - they ran towards Holborn.

SARAH WRAY . I am the wife of William Wray . I went to bed last on the night of the 30th of January; I shut the door which leads into our yard - it shuts with a spring-lock. I always try the doors after me, but do not know that I did on this night.

ROBERT APPLETON. I am a watchman in Holborn. About ten minutes after two o'clock, the prisoner, Wilks, came and lit his pipe at my box; while he was lighting it, Barefoot came out of Eagle-street - he turned round to see if Wilks had got a light, and both went down Red Lion-street together. In about ten minutes I went and cried the half hour in the direction they had taken; I went towards Hopkins's gate, and saw them both come out of the wicket-gate together - I seized Wilks, and he immediately dropped the boots and shoes. I sprung my rattle - Quar came to my assistance, and picked them up. Barefoot ran across the street, and through a court - I am positive he is the man - he was close to me - the street is lit with gas.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN QUAR . I am a watchman; my box is at the corner of Dean-street. I went to assist Appleton, and picked the boots and shoes up.

JOHN LIMBRICK . I am an officer - the servant described Barefoot to me, and I apprehended him on the 10th of February, at Walker's-court, St. Giles's. I knocked at the door, and asked for Barefoot? he denied his name; I went in, and took him. Wilks sent me a letter, and I went to him in Newgate; he said it was the first time that he ever did any wrong, and that he was concerned with Barefoot in breaking the house open - he told me where to find Barefoot.

WILKS'S Defence. A man passed me - the watchman called out Stop thief! and the man threw the boots down by my side.

WILKS - GUILTY. Aged 19.

BAREFOOT - GUILTY. Aged 25.

Of stealing, but not of breaking and entering .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Richardson.

Reference Number: t18190217-4

318. ISAAC COOK was indicted for feloniously assaulting John Franklin , in a certain field near the King's highway, on the 3d of February , at St. Pancras , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, one watch, value 30 s.; one umbrella, value 8 s., and 1 s. 6 d. in monies numbered , his property.

JOHN FRANKLIN . I am a journeyman colour-maker , and live in Little College-street, Camden-town. On the 3d of February, between ten and eleven o'clock at night, I was crossing the fields from Somers-town to Camden-town , to go home - it was a moonlight night - I was stopped by two men; one put his hand to my mouth, and the other to the back of my head - it was the prisoner; I am sure he is the man. I could not cry out - he held me in this manner, while the other man came behind me, and took the watch out of my fob, my umbrella from under my arm, and 1 s. 6 d. in silver from my pocket, they then ran off across the fields; the prisoner ran towards Somers-town; I do not know which way the other ran. I immediately called out Murder! and Stop thief! as loud as I could - I was alarmed. Mr. Gliddon came by at the time, and seized the prisoner. He was taken to the watch-house, and searched. None of my property was found on him - the other man took it.

Prisoner. Q. How can you swear to me? you said I came behind you - A. He came sideways of me; whether he came from behind or not I cannot say. I could not see his features at the time, but immediately that he got from me I pursued, and never lost sight of him until Gliddon took him. From the time he left me till I came up to him was not above five minutes. No other person was near - he was never out of my sight.

THOMAS GLIDDON . I was crossing the fields on the night of the robbery, between ten and eleven o'clock, heard a person crying Stop thief! and Murder! and saw two persons running, one was in pursuit of the other - it was a bright moonlight night; the man who was running away made towards Somers-town, in the field, not in the pathway. I ran in a direction to intercept him, and stopped him at the back of the houses in Somers-town. I did not lay hold of him, I only detained him against the fence; the prosecutor came up in about two minutes, and immediately said he was one of the two who had robbed him of his watch and umbrella, and emptied his breeches-pockets, which were turned inside-out - he had some marks of violence about his face and nose. I took the prisoner, and some watchmen and others came up, and took him from me. When I first stopped him, I asked him what he had been doing? he said,

"Nothing, Sir." I said,

"You have been committing some robbery, and I

shall keep you until this person comes up." He said nothing more.

Prisoner. Q. Which way was I running - A. As if from Camden-town.

Q. Did I not say I would stop - A. Yes.

Prisoner's Defence. I was crossing the fields, heard the cry, and was afraid the gentleman would knock me down - I made off, thinking he was the robber.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 22.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18190217-5

319. CHARLES SKINNER was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of January , 28 lbs. of soap, value 26 s., the goods of Alexander Macrae and Edmund Macrae , privately in their shop .

WILLIAM TIDLEY . I am servant to Messrs. Alexander and Edmund Macrae , who live in Whitechapel . On the 8th of January I packed up 28 lbs. of soap, and directed it to James Lake, Shadwell - I afterwards missed it out of the shop. Bowtle brought it to me on the Wednesday following - I knew it by the direction. Three or four other men serve in the shop.

JAMES BOWTLE . I am a street-keeper. On Saturday evening, about eight o'clock, I stopped the prisoner in Rosemary-lane with the soap. He said he was carrying it from Mr. Norton's, White's-yard. I was taking him there, and he ran away. I knew him before, and saw him in Newgate about a fortnight after.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A gentleman gave it to me to carry.

GUILTY. Aged 20.

Of stealing, but not privately

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Best.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18190217-6

320. DANIEL M'VEY was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Joseph Wilfred Parkins , about seven o'clock in the night of the 5th of February, 1818 , at St. Marylebone , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, one diamond ring, value 150 l.; one pearl breast-pin, value 6 l.; two bunches of pearls, value 116 l.; one gold button set with pearls, value 2 l.; one hunting-frock, value 2 l.; one pair of breeches, value 1 l.; five yards of plush, value 2 l. 10 s.; 64 pieces of foreign gold coin, value 56 l. 16 s., and 3 l. in monies numbered , his property.

JOSEPH WILFRED PARKINS, ESQ. I live in Riding House-lane , St. Marylebone. On the 5th of February, in the morning, I left my house for two or three days, and went into Hampshire on particular business. I left my house in the care of Edward Parry , who was my groom - there was no other servant left except the prisoner, whom I ordered to take a horse down to Egham that morning, for Sir Francis Burdett to attend the hunt, which was next day. He had been a helper in my service about a month. Before he took the horse, he was to take a bundle of papers to my agent in Threadneedle-street, to be sent to India - he was also to take an animal called a Macaw to Exeter Change, to be taken care of for me. After giving him these orders, I sent for Parry, and informed him that I expected a gentleman to call with a post-chaise for me, and to tell him he would find me in Somerset-street. Parry was to remain in the house till I returned. The prisoner did not sleep there, except of a wet night; he had slept there two or three times, as he lived at Pimlico - he was not an in-door servant.

Q. Did you give him permission to sleep in the house while you were away - A. No; I did not expect he would he in town, as I sent him to Egham to wait for Sir Francis Burdett . I left the key of the house with Parry, as he was a regular in-door servant - I left town that morning. Before the post-chaise called for me in Somerset-street, and while I was at breakfast there, the prisoner came to me from Sir Francis Burdett ; he said he had delivered him a note which I gave him for Sir Francis, and told him to deliver it at St. James's-place. I then told him to attend to my orders about the papers, take the animal, and then take the horse for Sir Francis Burdett . The prisoner came into my service on the 7th of January - he told me he was in great distress, and wanted clothes and every necessary. I never saw him with a watch.

Q. When you returned to town did you see him - A. No. I left town on Thursday morning, returned late on Saturday night, and found he had entirely left me. He had given me no notice, nor had I in any way discharged him. In consequence of information which I received, I searched for valuable property which I had recently brought from abroad, and missed the property stated in the indictment, which was all safe in a bureau when I left town. The gold coin consisted of a quantity of Napoleons, Louis-d'ors, and fourteen large Portugal coins worth four hundred rials each, nine pagodas, and an antique gold coin.

Q. Had you any particular article of wearing apparel in your possession - A. I had a hunting-frock of a particular make, it was as good as new, I never gave it away. I missed that, with a pair of plush breeches, and a piece of plush out of a chest which had two locks on it - they were locked, and the keys were in a drawer, were the valuable property was. The property which I lost cost me between 400 l. and 500 l. Parry remained in the house.

Q. Upon this you had a very long pursuit after the prisoner - A. Yes; I went to Ireland, and secured him at a house in a village there - I found the hunting-frock and breeches in his bundle. I asked him where his bundle of clothes was? he said they were in his bed-room. I had the bundle brought down, he said it was his; I took them into my possession - they were then very dirty, and appeared to have been worn. I had received a letter from him. I asked him how he came by the clothes? as I did not then know I had lost them. He said he got them out of a trunk, the key of which he found in the drawer, and that he found the key of that drawer in a writing-desk drawer - I did not know I had left it there, but I found a key in the house afterwards which opened the drawer, it was not mine. I asked him how he could behave in such a manner towards me? he said it was not him. I asked him why he went away then? he said he had gone away, but that was his misfortune. A gold Napoleon was produced by the constable. He said he brought it from Gibraltar. He admitted the house had been robbed, but threw the blame on Parry. I desired him to be cautious in charging others, as I had examined Parry very minutely, and found him innocent of it in my opinion. He then said I owed him five or six days wages, and wanted payment. I told

him that was nothing, compared to the loss I had been at. He said I had hung and transported thirty servants, and that I was a very notorious character. I left him with the constable, and went to the port, to arrange for his passage to England, as they would not put him in prison. On my return to the constable's house, I found the prisoner had got away. I returned to England - this was in February or March. I heard nothing more of him till last September. In consequence of what I heard, I went to Dumfries, in Scotland, and afterwards found he had been taken in Ireland again. I found him in custody last November, took him in Down, and brought him to London.

Q. In the way did any thing happen - A. He made a very great resistance in Ireland gaol - I was obliged to have a soldier to come to town with him. When we were between Downpatrick and Belfast, he said I had been an excellent master to him. The soldier asked him how he could serve his master so, and that he would be hung for it? he said he should not, for he did not care for that, as it was not the first time he had forfeited his life, and he was lucky. He then asked the name of a lady, who, he said, came to my house in my absence, and rummaged my drawers, and said she might have stolen the things as well as him. When we got to the Peacock, at Islington, I put him by the fire-side while I went for a coach. On my return he had seized the poker, and swore he would destroy my soul, and send me to hell before he was hung. I handcuffed him, and took him to the watch-house, from thence to Hatton-garden, and afterwards to Marlborough-street, where he was committed. I have found none of my property, except the frock and breeches.

Cross-examined by MR. ARABIN. Q. How long before had you seen the frock - A. In the week before, I dare say. I had seen the diamond ring three or four days before. I have no female servant. I always sleep in the house.

Q. I believe you have accused servants of robbing you before - A. Never, except one.

Q. You say he escaped from the constable - I believe you had a dispute with the constable about a reward - A. No, nothing of the kind. I never tried to get him to confess. He was a soldier.

Q. Is it extraordinary for a soldier to have a Napoleon - A. When he came to me he represented himself as greatly distressed, and without clothes - he was obliged to borrow money.

COURT. Q. Was he engaged to serve you by the week - A. Yes; his wages were due on Saturday. There were five or six days due to him.

Q. What sort of a house is your's - A. I am the owner. There are stables and a coach-house on the ground-floor, and five rooms above. There are two keys, one of which I took out of town with me, and Parry had the other. There is a side passage from the door, which leads up to the rooms. The property was in a chamber up stairs, adjoining my sitting-room, where I keep all my trunks.

EDWARD PARRY . On the 4th of February I and the prisoner were in the service of Mr. Parkins. My master went out of town between nine and ten o'clock in the morning, and gave me orders to take care of the property - the prisoner was not present then. My duty was in the stable and in the house - I had a great deal to do in the stable. My master gave me no orders to go to Threadneedle-street. About three o'clock a man came to the stable, and asked the prisoner if he had taken the letters to Threadneedle-street? he said they were not gone, as he had been to see for them, and they were not ready. The man asked the prisoner to take them, he said he would not, for he was going to Egham with two hunting-horses; the man then asked me to take them; I said I had no orders from my master to take them, and I was a stranger in that part of the town - the prisoner said,

"You must take them, as I cannot." The man begged of me to go, and I agreed to it. The man said he would go with me, to put me in the way. We sat out between four and five o'clock, and left the prisoner in the stable cleaning the horse he had brought home. I went up stairs into the house, changed my dress, returned to the man, told him I was ready, and came down stairs with the man. I locked the door, the windows and every thing were safe, and put the key in my pocket. I asked the prisoner if I should leave it with him or take it? he said I should take it, as he was going to Egham, and did not know whether he should return at night. I went to Threadneedle-street, and returned about eleven o'clock at night, having met a friend in Holborn. When I got back I let myself in, and found the door as I left it. I found M'Vey and the hostler up stairs. I saw the prisoner at the top of the stairs with a light in his hand; he asked me where I had been so long? and said that while I was out the house had been robbed. The hostler then came to the head of the stairs and said,

"Now you are come I will go." I let him out, returned to the prisoner, and found him in the sitting-room. A mattress had been brought down and put on the floor - he said he was going to sleep there. I asked him if he missed any of my master's property? he said it was no matter to me whether he missed anything or not. I said I was going to the public-house to get some beer, and asked him if I should get him any? he said No; and if I had been at home the house would not have been robbed. I went to the public-house, returned in about a quarter of an hour, and found the prisoner lying on the mattress in the sitting-room - he slept there all night. I went up stairs with my friend, whom I fetched from the public-house, as I was afraid to sleep there by myself - next morning I let my friend out. The horses were not taken to Egham.

Q. What did you do next morning - A. I went to the stable, and saw the horses were all safe, but missed my master's dog. I met the prisoner on the stairs, and asked him what had become of the dog? he said he took it out the evening before, and lost it, and after looking for it a great while, he returned, found the horses at a livery stable, and took them back to the stable; that he then found the back-window open, and on going into the yard, he found the shutter had been lifted up - he then went back to tell the hostler of the livery stable, that the house was robbed, and brought him back to see if anybody was in the house - that they got lights; the hostler brought a ladder, and he got in at the window, sent the servant home, and half an hour after he had searched every room except that next to his master's sitting-room, when he got a matress to sleep on, and a man bounced out of this room, and ran into the pantry; that he shot the man as he ran, and was sure he had hurt him very severely, for he fell, and groaned very much; that the man got out at the back sash-window,

the same as he got in at; I suppose it is fourteen feet from the ground. He said he shot at him while he was getting through the window.

Q. Would a man on getting out of that window, get into a private yard - A. Yes, it is enclosed by buildings - he must get into my master's passage, and then into the street - there was a door in the yard which is not locked. He said he came to the window, and called watch, but none came; that he then ran to the window, and jumped out after the man, but he got away.

Q. Did you look into the yard to see if there was any blood - A. Yes, I looked next day, there was nothing of the kind in any part. He said he got the watchman's light, but could not find the man, and then went to the livery stable to ask if the hostler might come, and stop with him until his fellow-servant returned.

Q. At what time that day, which was Friday, did he go out - A. About eleven or twelve o'clock; he said he should return in two hours - he returned about seven o'clock, and asked me to go to the public-house and get some beer with him and a friend, which I did - a man named Andrew Ward was drinking there with him. I returned in a quarter of an hour; the prisoner said he should come home in about five minutes, as he was going to see his friend a little way - he never returned, I never saw him again until he was in Newgate.

Q. When did you see him with a watch - A. Not till that Friday - it was a good silver watch. I asked him how long he had had it? he said a long while, but it had been at Chelsea to be repaired - this was before he went to the public-house.

Q. Do you know whether he was short of money or not - A. He borrowed 4 s. of me on Thursday morning to pay his expences to Egham, as he had forgot to ask his master.

Cross-examined by MR. NORRIS. Q. Are you in Mr. Parkins's service now - A. No, I have left him about a year - I lived about four weeks with him.

Q. Who was it that came about the letter - A. His name is Lindsey - he was no acquaintance of mine - I did not take him up stairs; he followed me up; I met my friend William Eatwell . I fetched him from the public-house when I found what had happened, and he slept with me.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did you leave the house of your own accord, or by the desire of the prisoner - A. By desire of the prisoner. Lindsey waited in the sitting-room, while I changed my clothes - he was out of my sight.

JOHN BRENT. I am hostler to Mr. Hains, who lives in Riding-house-lane. On Thursday, the 5th of February, between seven and eight o'clock, the prisoner came to me, and said he was locked out, and could not get in, that the windows were left open, and he thought the house would be robbed, and he wanted to go home to sleep with his wife, at Pimlico; I told him by no means to do so, but get a ladder, and get in at the window. I went and found the casement open - it opens into the yard; I believe it is the room which is used as a kitchen. We got a ladder, and the prisoner got in at the window, which was open - I gave him a light, and left him - I took the ladder away with me. When he got into the house, he said he thought all was safe. In about an hour after I heard the report of a pistol, and my wife went to the gate; there was a cry of Watch! I heard Mr. Parkins's house was robbed. My mistress sent me there. I went, and found another ladder placed on the wall, against the same window; I got in at the window, and saw the prisoner; he wished me to go all over the house with him, which I did, and could see nobody. I asked him if he thought anything was lost? he could not tell, but there was a man burst out of the room as he got into bed, struck him on the head, and wished him good night; that he took a pistol off the shelf, and fired at him. After we had searched, he said,

"Now we will go to bed." I said I should do no such thing, for I would have a fire lit, and sit up there all night - Parry came to the door, and let himself in; the prisoner said the house had been robbed through his not being there - I wished them good night. I looked immediately to see if there was any blood, as he said he was sure he had wounded the man, but could see none; some persons were collected out of doors.

Cross-examined by MR. ARABIN. Q. You heard the report of the pistol - A. Yes, and went there. Parry knocked at the door; the prisoner said

"You have got the key, let yourself in. I saw no other ladder in the yard when I went there with him - both parts of the window were wide open.

FREDERICK SCHUTTE . I am a tailor, and live in Riding-house-lane. On the night in question my attention was drawn to the house from eight till ten o'clock. I went out about eight o'clock, and saw Mr. Parkins's back-window open; it looks towards our street-door, the passage leading to Mr. Parkins's door, leads to ours also. I thought it was extraordinary for the window to be open - there was a great light inside; I heard the rattling of something being moved. About ten o'clock I was going to bed, heard the report of a pistol, and ran out immediately; the prisoner called out

"Run to the bottom of the gate, I have shot a man." I ran to the gate - it is a very heavy gate, and was just ajar - it was not sufficiently open for a man to run out. I called for a watchman who came; the prisoner said the man jumped out, and came on the stones, and that he must have shot him in the back; he said

"Let us look if we cannot find some marks of blood;" there was none, which there must have been if the man had fell as he said. He said the man he had shot had on white trowsers and jacket, but no hat.

Q. Where was he at this time - A. He had climbed down out of the window, which was open, and come on the pavement into our garden; he had just jumped down when he called me - there is a partition to the stable, which would assist a man in getting down from the window, it is slanting, and about six or seven feet high. He said the man came across the room as he was going to bed, and said good night, and he instantly took Mr. Parkins's pistol, and fired at him. He afterwards said the man laid six or seven minutes on the stones, which was impossible, for I got out half a minute after I heard the report.

Q. What happened next day - A. About ten or eleven o'clock he came to our house, and said he was afraid Parry was the robber, for he had come with his head tied up, his jacket on, and his back appeared to be swelled. He came again about two o'clock, and said twelve or thirteen men had come to the stable, and Parry was gone off with

them. He said he told Parry to take off his jacket to clean the horses, but he would not. I never saw him after.

Q. When did you see Parry - A. Two or three days after, I think, on the Sunday, he then appeared as he always did - I could see nothing on his back.

COURT. Q. You ran out immediately on hearing the report - A. Yes, and came to the spot immediately, the prisoner was then getting down from the window.

JAMES M'CARTY. I am watchman of Riding-house-lane. I heard the report of the pistol - I was then on the other side of the way, opposite. I saw nobody run out of the house; nobody could run out without my seeing them, it was impossible - nobody came out whatever. I heard watch called, ran to the spot, and met a man at the door; he said somebody had been there, and told me to go in - I went into the passage and sprang my rattle. The prisoner said he had shot a man, and he was sure there must be blood in the passage - there was none. I am sure no man came out.

Cross-examined by MR. ARABIN. Q. Did you know where the report came from - A. Not exactly. I could see the door from where I was. I heard the report.

ANDREW WARD . I am a pensioner of the 26th regiment of foot. I know the prisoner. I met him on a Friday early in February last, I believe it was the 6th. I met him between six and seven o'clock in the evening, at Chelsea, by the Orange Coffee-house. I went to the Hart, public-house, and had two pints of beer with him - we went towards Pimlico. He said he was going to Ireland that night - I said,

"Why should you leave your master?" he said there was a woman with child by him, and his master threatened to put him in prison if he did not take her out of the country. I went on with him till we came to a watchmaker's shop, opposite the Bag of Nails, public-house, at Pimlico; he told me to stop till he came out - he came out in about half an hour, and said he had been in for his watch. We went to the Gun tavern, and had a glass of rum each. He then gave me 4 s., and told me to call on his wife, and tell her he would send for her as soon as he got to Ireland. He paid for every thing. He said I might help him out of town with his bundles - I said I would. We went to the George, and had a pot of beer; he told me to wait there while he fetched his fellow-servant. It was about a quarter after eight o'clock when he brought Parry in.

Q. Was there any appearance of Parry's back being hurt then - A. No. We sat there, and had another pot of beer, and some bread and cheese. The prisoner asked Parry for the key a bit - he got it, and went out for a quarter of an hour; when he came back he appeared uneasy. We came out, he wished Parry a good night, and said he would be back directly. We then went to the Swan, public-house. He said to a man, who appeared to be the landlord,

"Give me that bundle - you have often told me what Mr. Parkins was, and I am going to leave him to-night." We had a glass of gin each. I went a little way with him, and carried his bundle. When he got to the road, he inquired for Highgate. We had half a pint of gin at a public-house - a man came in, and sat by the prisoner's side; he pulled out the watch, and told the man he had bought it, and gave four or five guineas for it. He then pulled a large ring out of his pocket, told the man it was a diamond ring, and that he bought it for his sister; it appeared a large diamond. The man said,

"It is a large ring, I don't think it is all gold" - the prisoner said,

"It is; I bought it as such, and am going to carry it home to my sister." He put it into his pocket, and pulled out a bunch of pearls in a cluster, and said,

"I have bought these also for my sister" - there appeared a great many of them. The man said they were very nice things, but he did not know the value of them. He inquired for a lodging at Highgate, but could get none. He got a bed at the White Lion, public-house, at Finchley, and ordered the coach in the morning to carry him to Liverpool. I stopped there, and had some beer. As I was going away, he gave me 6 s. - I left him there, and saw no more of him. When he was at the public-house, he pulled out some bank notes, and said,

"Ward, I have plenty of money!" The bundle was pretty heavy.

Cross-examined by MR. NORRIS. Q. You was taken up for this robbery - A. Yes; the man who took me told me I was implicated in it - I told this story.

Q. He made no secret of leaving his master's service - A. No; he told Parry he was going to return.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Were you examined at Hicks's Hall, or put to the bar as a prisoner - A. I was taken to the office, there was nobody there. Mr. Parkins never charged me with the robbery.

COURT. Q. Did you ever hear him say how his master treated him - A. He told me it was a good place. When he went into the silversmith's, he said,

"I have been in there for my watch."

PETER MUNGO KNIGHT . I am apprentice to Mr. Magene, of Prince's-row, Pimlico, opposite the Bag of Nails public-house. In February last the prisoner came to our shop - I am pretty sure he is the man, but will not be positive - it was in the evening. I do not remember what day of the week it was. He asked me if I bought old gold coin? my master said, sometimes. He produced a small Indian piece; my master said he did not know the value of it - he urged distress, and my master agreed to buy it. Next evening he brought several others, there were some Napoleons and pagodas - my master bought 9 l. or 10 l. worth. He received a silver watch, and I believe, a gilt chain and seal, and the rest in notes - I believe the watch was valued at 50 s. He produced a bunch of pearls, which he said he was going to give to his sister. He left no watch to be repaired, but bought one. When he came the second day, he said he had got a place, and was going out with Lord Cochrane.

Cross-examined by MR. ARABIN. Q. You are not certain of his being the man - A. I believe him to be the man.

COURT. Q. Did you inquire how he got the property - A. He said he was a soldier, and come from abroad - he was very shabbily dressed; it is very common for soldiers to bring these things.

THOMAS WHITELOCK . I am the prosecutor's servant; I produce the frock and breeches.

JOSEPH WILFRED PARKINS , ESQ. re-examined. They are mine, and the same that I found on the prisoner.

EDWARD PARRY re-examined. Q. What room does this window belong to - A. A little pantry, which joins my master's sitting-room - it was shut and bolted inside when

I went out. One of the panes, I think, was broken, so that a person could put their hand through and undoe it - it was not dark when I went out.

Prisoner's Defence. I was at York barracks, Chelsea, and engaged with the prosecutor. I got some money at Cox and Greenwood's to take me to Ireland, and they desired me to go home with it - my master had engaged another servant; he was always bringing his servants into trouble, which made me anxious to get away. I gave him notice on Tuesday evening of my wish to leave him when the week was out; he refused to give me the testimonials of my character, which were in his possession. On the Thursday morning he was going out of town, he sent me with a letter to Sir Francis Burdett , and told me to send Parry with the papers to Threadneedle-street. I found two strange men in the room with Perry; he said they were come to buy the old coach; he went out with them, and did not return until eleven o'clock in the morning. He then went with the papers, and returned about half-past nine o'clock at night; before he returned I saw the back-window open; I got Brent to bring a ladder, and help me into the house. I had not been long a-bed, when a man ran by me as I lay on the floor; I fired at him with the prosecutor's pistol, and called Stop thief! he jumped out of the window upon the wall - I thought he was either hurt by the fall or wounded with the pistol. I called Watch! no one came to my assistance, and he escaped - the watchman came at last. I got Brent to come and stop with me till Parry came home, which he did in about half an hour, and called out

"Dan, open the door!" I was surprised he should know I was in the house; he was drunk. Next day I got everything ready for my departure for Ireland - I was four days at home, when I was taken by a constable. The prosecutor had given me the coat and breeches; he said if he could get no more of his property, he would swear to them - the constable taking him for a madman, would not hold me in custody. I have been in the habit of going to and from Gibraltar for nearly seven years, by which means I became possessed of a quantity of foreign coins. I was afterward apprehended again, and the prosecutor brought me to London. I was treated most cruelly on my journey.

JOSEPH WILFRED PARKINS, ESQ. re-examined. Q. You have heard this defence; did he give you notice to leave you on Saturday - A. It is untrue; not a word of his defence relating to me is true - Parry was not ordered to take the papers.

Q. Did you give him the coat and breeches - A. Certainly not; I would not have parted with them on any account.

EDWARD PARRY re-examined. I received no orders to carry the papers.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 27.

Of stealing in a dwelling-house, but not of burglariously breaking and entering .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Richardson.

Reference Number: t18190217-7

321. CHARLES POWELL , HANNAH POWELL , and SARAH POWELL were indicted for stealing, on the 9th of January , at St. Botolph, without Aldersgate , one 15 l., two 20 l., and five 5 l. bank notes, the property of William Gough , in his dwelling-house .

WILLIAM GOUGH. I am a cane-mounter , and live in Aldersgate-buildings, Aldersgate-street , in the parish of St. Botolph Without. I keep the house. Sarah Powell was my servant , the other prisoners are her father and mother . On Saturday evening, the 9th of January, I missed the notes stated in the indictment out of my box; I had seen them safe the day before. At half-past eleven o'clock I found a key in the box, it was open - I looked into it, and missed them. I went to the watch-house, and got an officer, who came up and saw it. I then went to Charles Powell 's house, Arthur-street, Goswell-street; the prisoner, Charles, refused our entrance - we could not get in. Nothing more was done until the 23d, when I was sent for to the Black Horse, public-house, Aldersgate-street, to see a 5 l. note, which I knew to be mine. The three prisoners were sent for - Sarah Powell was still in my service - I gave them all in charge of an officer. We went to Charles Powell 's house, and found some new linen goods there.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Have you any lodgers - A. Two; I have no errand-boy. The box was in my bed-room. I never saw the father or mother in my house. The girl never left me till I had her taken up - I had told her that I had lost the money; she was going to leave, as she had met with an accident, but did not. She had lived three or four months with me. Her parents had no access to the house, to my knowledge.

WILLIAM STEVENS . I am beadle and constable of the parish. The prosecutor's house is in the City. On Saturday, the 23d of January, between nine and ten o'clock at night, I was at the Black Horse, public-house, the prisoner, Hannah Powell , had half a pint of beer, she asked for change for a note, which she handed to the landlady, who said,

"Do you know what note you have given me, it is a 5 l. note?" She then gave it to me, and said Mr. Gough, of Aldersgate-buildings, had lost considerable property about a fortnight before. The prisoner appeared confused. Mr. Gough was sent for. The prisoner said she would soon make all right. She went out, and returned with the male prisoner. Gough and myself were looking at the note. The male prisoner came in, and asked for it - Gough having claimed it, I thought it proper not to part with it; there was some little confusion by people coming in; I took them into my house, which is three doors off. I took their names down, and a description of the notes. Sarah Powell was sent for to my house; when she came I asked Gough about the property; he said Sarah was his servant. The prisoner, Charles Powell , declared that he had no knowledge of it. I gave them to the constable of the night.

JOHANNAH HUTCHINSON. I keep the Black Horse, in Aldersgate-street. On the 23d of January Hannah Powell came and had half a pint of beer; she then gave me a note for change. I looked at it, and asked her if she knew what note she had given me? she said

"Never mind, give me change." I told her I could not, and sent for Gough to come and look at it; he said it was one of those that he had lost. She then went out, and said she dare say it would be all right, and she would return in a few minutes; instead of her returning, her husband came and asked for the note as it was his property. I told Gough that was Mr. Powell,

and his wife had been to change the note - they left my house.

JOHN CLINTON . On the 9th of January I was Ward Officer of Aldersgate. Mr. Gough came to the watch-house, and informed me he had been robbed of 60 l; I went to his house, and he showed me the box with the key in the lock; being a wrong key, it had turned one of the wards, and I was obliged to take the lock off to get the key out. In consequence of what he said I went to Powell's house to examine Sarah Powell ; she was at her father's. Another lodger let us in at the street-door, but they would not let us into the room where they lived; we knocked for three quarters of an hour before we got any answer. Charles Powell then asked what we wanted? we told him we wanted his daughter, that her master was there and wanted to speak to her; the girl answered that she was sure her master was not there. Gough spoke, she knew his voice, and said directly

"That is my master, I have done nothing;" and began to cry - I heard her cry, and heard her mother whisper to her to lay still and hold her tongue. The father at last agreed to open the door, but his wife insisted that he should not; we then came away, as we could not get it open. On the 23d a woman fetched me from the watch-house to a public-house in Aldersgate-street; when I got there I was informed they were gone to the watch-house, through the Bars; I went there, and took them to our watch-house. I searched the mother, and found a watch, the key of a room, and 2 s. 9 d. on her; I searched the prisoner, Sarah, and found the key of her own box on her - I took them to the Compter. I then went back to the prisoner, Charles Powell 's house - he was not in custody. I knocked violently at the door, took the key, and opened it. He started upon us, to know who it was that opened his premises. On searching, I found two new shawls, a pair of cotton stockings, two pieces of lace, and a pair of gloves all new, in a drawer. I took him to the Compter with them. On the Monday following, which was the 25th, I found out where these things had been bought; we found thirty or forty duplicates on the woman, one of which was for a shawl pledged for 8 s.; I got it from the pawnbroker's - I have the note, which Stevens gave me.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. What time did you go to his house on the 9th - A. Between eleven and twelve o'clock at night, they were in bed; we did not get admittance. Gough did not send for me to search the girl at his house. I went again on the 23d, between eleven and twelve o'clock.

WILLIAM HOOLE . I am clerk to the Bank of England. I produce a 10 l. note, which was paid in there by Hammersley and Co., dated August 14, 1818.

JOHN TIERNEY . I am shopman to Mr. Sheppard, who is a linen-draper, and lives in Aldersgate-street. On Saturday, the 9th of January, the two female prisoners came to our shop, and bought two cloth shawls, one silk shawl, and several others, amounting to between 3 l. and 4 l.; the mother presented me a 10 l. note, and I gave her change; I put it into the till. The mother gave me the address after I had put it into the till; she said,

"Mrs. Powell, No. 11, Goswell-street;" which I wrote on a piece of paper, instead of the note - I cannot swear to the note; there is no mark of mine on it, nor is there any mark on the shawls found at the lodgings. I know the silk one is of the same pattern as that I sold them - the other two are the same sort as I sold them. I cannot say whether they are the same or not.

JOHANNAH HUTCHINGSON re-examined. I gave Stevens the same note that I received from the prisoner, Hannah Powell , it was marked Pocklington and Lacy, and so is this. There is no doubt of its being the same.

WILLIAM STEVENS re-examined. It is the note I received from Hutchingson; I wrote my name and address on it, I also took the number and date.

WILLIAM GOUGH re-examined. It is one of the 5 l. notes that I lost from my box - it has my hand-writing on it.

Cross-examined. Q. When did you write

"W. Gough" on it - A. On the 23d of January, at the watch-house; there is Pocklington and Lacy written in my hand-writing. I took six 5 l. notes of them, and marked the name on all: I lost them all. I discovered the robbery about half-past eleven o'clock at night - the girl was at my house all day, and went home at night.

Q. Was she out of the house all day - A. No, except on errands. She came as usual every day till she was taken.

COURT. Q. How came you to keep her in your service if you suspected her - A. I kept her to see what I could find out.

C. POWELL - NOT GUILTY .

H. POWELL - GUILTY. - DEATH . Aged 40.

S. POWELL - GUILTY. - DEATH . Aged 13.

Recommended to Mercy .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190217-8

322. ROBERT ABBOTT was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of January , one handkerchief, value 6 s., the property of George Henry Robins , from his person .

GEORGE HENRY ROBINS . On the 19th of January, about twelve o'clock in the day, I was walking down Holborn-hill , and thought I felt something at my pocket; I immediately felt, and missed my handkerchief. I looked round, and saw the prisoner crossing the way; I pursued, and charged him with it - he denied it, but appeared so confused, and doubled his coat up, that I was induced to pull it open, and found my handkerchief inside. I immediately took him to the Compter.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190217-9

323. JOHN BARKER was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of February , six wine-glasses, value 5 s.; one pepper-box, value 5 s., and one d'oyley, value 1 s. , the property of John Frederick Kay and Daniel Kay .

MR. DANIEL KAY . I keep the Albion tavern , Aldersgate-street , and am in partnership with John Frederick Kay , the prisoner was employed as an occasional waiter . On the 12th of February, a little before one o'clock at night, the waiters who had been employed that day, were assembled together to be paid - as they stood together, a wine-glass fell on the floor from among them - they all declared that it fell from the prisoner; I gave him in charge. Just as he got outside the door, I put my hand to his pocket, and perceived there were some other glasses there - he was taken to the watch-house. Four wineglasses were found in his coat-pocket, and two others in

his breeches; a pepper-box and d'oyley, with sugar and wax-candles in it, were also found in his breeches.

JOHN WILLIAM BRANCH . I am a constable. I took the prisoner in charge, found the property on him, and a silk handkerchief, which he said was not his own.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was in liquor.

GUILTY . Aged 46.

Confined Three Months .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190217-10

324. ROBERT SMITH and JOHN HEATH were indicted for stealing, on the 6th of February , one handkerchief, value 5 s., the property of Henry Furze , from his person .

HENRY FURZE . On the 6th of February, about one o'clock in the day, I was in Prince's-street, by the Bank , and was rather hustled. I put my hand to my pocket, my handkerchief was then safe. I crossed Cornhill, got upon the boards by a board, and felt a person give my pocket a twitch, I turned round, and the prisoner, Smith, immediately jumped into the middle of the road. I called out Stop thief! and was pursuing him - a gentleman pointed to Heath, and said he had got the property. I pursued, and took Smith at the end of the Old Jury - I never lost sight of him. A gentleman came up, and said he saw him hand it to his accomplice. I never found it.

JOHN CASSIDAY . I was coming from Birchin-lane, and saw Smith hand the handkerchief to Heath, who immediately put it into his bosom. I pointed him out to the prosecutor, and said he had it from Smith. He pursued Smith; I also pursued him. I am sure Heath is the man.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Heath was not taken until next day.

BENJAMIN LEADBEATER . I am a marshalman. I was in Cornhill - the prosecutor pointed Smith out to me. I stopped him. Next day I received information of Heath, and took him at Saffron-hill.

SMITH - GUILTY . Aged 17.

HEATH - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190217-11

325. THOMAS WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of January , at St. Clement Danes , 166 handkerchiefs, value 20 l., the goods of John Banister , in his dwelling-house .

JOHN BANISTER . I am a hosier , and keep the house, No. 98, Strand , in the parish of St. Clement Danes. On the 27th of January, about eight o'clock in the morning. I was called down, and found the prisoner in custody, with 166 handkerchiefs tied up together; they are worth 20 l. He said he had never done any thing of the kind before, and begged forgiveness.

ROBERT SWEATMAN . I am shopman to Mr. Banister. On Wednesday morning, the 27th of January, about eight o'clock, I was sweeping the door - the prisoner went into the shop, unperceived by me, and took a parcel of handkerchiefs off the counter. Just as he got out I stopped him with them, and asked him what he was going to do with them? he said he had been sent for them. I asked him who sent him? he said he did not know, nor what he was going to do with them; that the person who sent him had met him in the street. I secured him, and called Mr. Banister, who gave him in charge.

SAMUEL SIMONS . I am a constable. I took the prisoner and bundle in charge at the prosecutor's shop.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 18.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190217-12

326. WILLIAM ADAMS was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Lake , about seven o'clock at night of the 21st of January , and burglariously stealing therein, one flute, value 18 d.; two packs of cards, value 10 d., and one purse, value 1 d. , his property.

SARAH LAKE . I am the wife of William Lake, and keep a stationer's shop. On the 22d of January, in the morning, I missed these things out of the window, and found a pane of glass had been pushed in - I had put them there the morning before. The window had been broken before, and I put a piece of glass over the broken part, and fastened it with putty.

SAMUEL SLOWMAN. I am constable of Enfield. On the 26th of January, in the evening, Spinie was given into my custody - he gave me information, the prisoner was taken and brought to me. He said he pushed the glass in, and took the things out.

- MEAD. I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner - he ran away immediately he saw me - I took him to Slowman. He said the cards were at home - he returned home and brought them down to me. He said he sold the flute to South for a pair of shoes, and gave the purse to a woman.

JOHN SOUTH . I bought the flute of the prisoner, and gave him a pair of shoes for it.

WILLIAM PINNOCK . I bought a pack of cards of the prisoner.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I found them.

GUILTY Aged 16.

Of stealing only, but not of breaking and entering .

Confined Three Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18190217-13

327. WILLIAM BRENAN was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of February , at St. Dunstan, Stepney , 14 pieces of foreign silver coin, value 3 l., and 16 s. in monies numbered, the property of John Nelson , in the dwelling-house of Henry Benson .

JOHN NELSON . I am a sailor , and lodge in Henry Benson 's house, at Ratcliffe-cross . On Friday night, the 6th of February, I lost fourteen Spanish dollars, worth 4 s. 8 d. each, and 16 s. out of my chest, which was locked - the prisoner slept in the same room with me. I missed them

at half-past six o'clock. This key of my trunk was in my pocket - I found it there still. The prisoner was taken next day at the Black Horse, public-house, New Gravel-lane. I took him to my lodgings, and said,

"My good lad, I suppose you have robbed me - you have money now, and had none before." He then struck me - I sent for an officer, who took him in charge. He was very drunk when he was taken. I know he was very poor before I was robbed.

THOMAS KELLOW . I am a fisherman. On the 6th of February, about half-past eight o'clock in the morning, I was at Limehouse Corner, the prisoner came, and asked me if I knew anybody who would buy some Spanish dollars? I took him to Mr. Dickens, a pawnbroker, at Limehouse. He unbuttoned his belt, and pulled out six Spanish dollars - he said he had some quarter dollars, and pulled them out - I found they were four or five English half-crowns. He put them into his belt, and sold the six dollars to the pawnbroker for 4 s. 6 d. each. He bought a pair of shoes, two cotton handkerchiefs, and about four yards of canvas there. He came out, and gave me a shilling for my trouble. He took the things, and left them at the Barley Mow, public-house, at Limehouse. He then bought a pair of pumps at a shoemaker's shop; he met a blind man, and bought a pair of garters of him. We then went to the Indian Arms - I left him there. I am sure he is the man.

JOSEPH ROSIER . I am shopman to Mr. Dickens, pawnbroker. On the morning of the 6th of February the prisoner came with the last witness to our shop. He pulled a belt from round his body, and said he had some Spanish dollars to sell - I bought six of him, at 4 s. 6 d. each, which I produce. He produced six or seven half-crowns, which he called quarter-dollars. He bought a pair of shoes, two cotton handkerchiefs, and four yards of canvas.

JOHN NELSON re-examined. I know one of the dollars by a salt-water mark. I cannot swear to the others. I lost fourteen.

JOHN BROWN. I am an officer. I was sent for on the 6th of February to a house of ill fame to apprehend a man whom the prisoner charged with robbing him of sixteen dollars. In the afternoon, the prosecutor sent for me to take the prisoner into custody. As we were going before the magistrate, I neither threatened or promised the prisoner, he said he was sorry for it, that it was a drunken job, and he took them in a frolic. I found the pumps at the India Arms, and the other things at the Barley Mow.

JOSEPH ROSIER . I believe these to be the things that I sold him - I can swear to the canvas, but not to the shoes or handkerchiefs.

Prisoner's Defence. he said he would make it up for 2 l. - it was done by me in drunkeness.

GUILTY. - DEATH . Aged 29.

Recommended to Mercy .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Best.

Reference Number: t18190217-14

328. JOHN CLOSE and ROBERT HINES was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of February , at St. Luke, Chelsea , one silver mustard-pot, value 2 l.; twelve silver spoons, value 3 l.; one pair of sugar-tongs, value 10 s; one silver cream-jug, value 5 l., and one silver sugar-dish, value 2 l. 10 s., the goods of Charles Poulet Rushworth , in his dwelling-house .

MARGARET AXSON . I was servant to Mr. Charles Poulet Rushworth , who lives in Lower Cadogan-place, Chelsea . On the 4th of February I went out to get a chimney-sweeper - I was going to Mr. Morris - I met the two prisoners in the street, and asked who they swept for? they said, for Mr. Morris. I asked again, and they said for Matthew Morris . I then desired them to tell Morris to send two men next morning to sweep our chimnies, and told them to come at six o'clock - they came at six o'clock, and the footman, John Field , let them in. I heard them come. I met Field on the stairs, and he said he had let them in. I went down, and met Hines standing in the passage, I asked him if he was the only one - he said the other was down stairs. I went down, found Close there, and they both went into the kitchen with me. I stood there while they swept the kitchen chimney, and observed that their cloth was very bad, and would not do for the drawing-room chimney; they said they would fetch another before they swept that, but their master was very busy when they came out, and the cloths were in use. Close came down the chimney - I found afterwards that he could not have been up, as they never took off the fan of the jack, and he could not go up without taking it off. He came down much sooner than I expected, and I told him he had not been to the top - he said he had; Hines also said Close had been to the top. I took them into the butler's pantry to sweep it, it has a cupboard in it where the plate is kept. I stood there while they swept that chimney also. I went out with the housemaid to shake a green cloth, and left them in the pantry. I was not absent three minutes. I returned into the pantry, and met Hines coming out; he said he was going for a better cloth. I told him to make haste. He said he would return in five minutes. He went out, left Close there, and never returned. I sent Close after him in about five minutes - he seemed anxious to go to fetch him; he proposed going himself before I proposed sending him. They never returned. The plate that was lost weighed above 1 lb., and was worth more than 5 l.

Q. When you went to shake the cloth, where was Close - A. In the chimney. When I came back he was come down, and in the pantry - they had gathered up the soot and ashes while I was away. I am certain I was not absent above three minutes. The footman came down a very few minutes after they were gone.

JOHN FIELD . I was footman to Mr. Rushworth. On the 5th of February I had the care of the plate, and kept it in a cupboard in the pantry. I let the two boys into the house on the morning of the robbery - I do not know that they were the prisoners, they were about the size of the prisoners. I went up stairs, and did not return till after they left. I went into the pantry soon after, opened the cupboard door, and immediately missed the plate - I had left the key in the door the night before; I found it in the door, and the lock was locked. I missed the articles stated in the indictment - I dare say they weighed a pound together. I observed black finger-marks inside the cupboard-door, they appeared sooty. I had seen the plate safe, and

counted it the night before. I went to Morris's to look after the boys.

MARGARET AXSON re-examined. I went into the pantry when the plate was missed, and observed the prints of black feet round the cupboard. The floor of the pantry was whitened with pipe-clay. I opened the cupboard-door, and saw the prints of two black fingers inside the door, which is painted white. The plate was taken off the shelf. I could see the footmarks were of a person with his face towards the door - the toe was towards the cupboard - they appeared to be the marks of only one person.

MATTHEW MORRIS. I am a chimney-sweeper, and live at Chelsea. The prisoners are not in my employ, nor never were - I never knew them. The prosecutor's house is in the parish of St. Luke, Chelsea - I live in the same parish.

RICHARD MAYBANK . I am a constable. I received information of the prisoners. I examined the prosecutor's house about seven o'clock that morning, and saw the marks of feet going from the fire-place to the cupboard - the floor being white. The cook described the prisoners to me; I could not find them till last Saturday, when I found them in Cadogan-place, sweeping chimnies in another gentleman's house. I apprehended them, and took them to Axson - she said they were the boys.

HINES'S Defence. I know nothing about it.

CLOSE - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 17.

HINES - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 19.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Richardson.

Reference Number: t18190217-15

329. JANE MILLS was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of February , at St. Luke, Chelsea , in the dwelling-house of Thomas George , the sum of 2 l. 10 s. in monies numbered; one box, value 1 s.; three gowns, value 10 s.; three aprons, value 3 s.; two pair of stockings, value 2 s.; one shawl, value 10 s.; two handkerchiefs, value 1 s., and three 1 l. bank notes , the property of Thomas Banks .

SUSAN BANKS. I am the wife of Thomas Banks . On the 11th of February last we lodged with my son-in-law, Thomas George ; it is his house, and in the parish of St. Luke, Chelsea. I am a nurse; I always lodge there when I am out of place. I keep my box there, under the bedstead in the front parlour, where George sleeps. The articles stated in the indictment were in the box, and three 1 l. bank notes - the prisoner lodged in the back-parlour - she had lodged there three weeks. She left the house on the 11th of February, and said she was going to the Brentford stage at the top of Sloane-street, to get a parcel - I did not understand that she was going away for good. She returned the same day, went out again about a quarter before one o'clock, and never returned. I missed my box about a quarter of an hour after she was gone.

Q. How long before had you opened it - A. A little before she went away, every thing was then safe. The three notes were put by themselves, in a little dice-box in the large box. I opened the dice-box, and saw the notes safe a quarter of an hour before she left - I did not see her go out. The box was small. Mr. George came home about six o'clock in the evening, and went to Brentford after her.

THOMAS GEORGE . I am son-in-law of the last witness. I keep the house, which is in the parish of St. Luke, Chelsea. The prisoner lodged with me for three weeks before she left. I was absent when she went away. When I came home about six o'clock, I heard what had happened - I had left the house about six o'clock in the morning. I went to Brentford, as I heard the prisoner had a sister there - I did not find her there. On the Saturday evening I found her on the top of the Chelsea stage, in Piccadilly, coming to town. She saw me, and turned her head away. I went to the side of the coach, and said,

"You are the person I want - come down, will you?" she then came down, and I took her. She asked me what I wanted with her? I told her she was my prisoner. She went quietly with me at first, and then struggled. I told her she should go, and told a person who stood by what was the matter. She denied doing any such thing. I took her to St. James's watch-house, and gave her to an officer, who searched and found a pair of stockings on her, which I claimed as my mother-in-law's - she did not deny it. I took her to Marlborough-street - she said the trunk was at her house, No. 10, Cross-street, Chelsea, where she had lodged since she left me. She went there with me and the officer. The officer called me into the house to see if the trunk was mine - it was in a room on the first floor; the prisoner said it was the box she took. The officer gave them to me at the office on the Monday - we opened it at her lodgings, and searched it particularly. Some of the things were gone, the notes were gone. I am certain it is my mother's box, I have mended it myself. She had a handkerchief in her hand when I took her, which is the prosecutrix's.

MARY GEORGE. I remember the prisoner going out - I did not see her go. My husband is a carpenter. I had, I believe, two 1 l. notes, and about 1 l. in silver, rolled up in my mother's box, in a pocket handkerchief. I did not look into the box after I put it there.

SUSAN BANKS re-examined. I saw my daughter's money safe in the handkerchief on the Saturday night before the robbery - there was a 1 l. note and some silver. I took 1 l. in silver out, and put in a note for it - there were 10 s. or 15 s. besides. I left two 1 l. notes and the silver in it. I saw the handkerchief safe on the Thursday when I went to the box, but did not open it. The box and all the things are mine.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 21.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18190217-16

330. MARTIN SHEEN was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Joseph West , about eight o'clock in the night of the 26th of January , at St. Anne, Westminster , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, three handkerchiefs, value 12 s. , his property.

JOSEPH WEST . I am a hosier and haberdasher , and rent a house in Little Newport-street , St. Ann's, Westminster. I know the prisoner - I have frequently seen him about the neighbourhood, and in my shop, before this. On the 26th of January, about half-past six o'clock at night, I was going out, it was then dark. I saw the prisoner, in company with two others, on the opposite side of the way, standing at the corner of Lime-street, looking over towards my shop. My window having been frequently cut, I suspected them, returned, and cautioned my young man to be on the look out. I went away, called on the constable, and told him. I returned home about ten o'clock, found

my window broken, and the property taken. I saw the prisoner at the watch-house - he denied it.

Cross-examined by MR. NORTON. Q. Was not the window broken at the time - A. There were several cracks, but no hole in it. My goods were tied to a tape, and that tape tied to a bell, to give notice. I saw the window a minute before I went out, it was cracked, but had no hole in it. It would require a small degree of force to push it in.

HAMMOND WEBB . I am a constable. I had been at the prosecutor's house, watching, for fourteen nights. On the 26th of January I was there, and stationed myself in the house, behind two rolls of green baize, so that I could see what passed at the window. I saw the prisoner come to the window three times in the course of five minutes. He came close to the window the first time, put his hand against the square of glass, and went away; he came a second time, put his hand against the glass again, and I saw a piece fall in. He went away, came again a third time, put his hand into the window, through the hole where the glass fell in, and began taking the handkerchiefs. When I saw his hand in I went out and took him. Just as I got to the door the bell rang, as the handkerchiefs were tied to a tape, which was fastened to the bell. I ran out, and saw the handkerchiefs hanging out of the hole - he had pulled three handkerchiefs through the hole - he was then about two yards from me, walking away very deliberately. I secured him immediately, and took him into the shop. I am sure he is the man who put his hand in and took them out. He could not have got them away without breaking the tape. He said he knew nothing about it.

Cross-examined. The glass dropped when he put his hand against the window; it had been starred six different nights, in six different places - the glass was whole, and not loose - I examined it everynight, there was no hole in it; the piece would not have fallen out by putting a hand against it, if it had not been for the place he cut that night. There are five gas lights in the shop, and one over the window. I was within three yards of the prisoner.

JOHN LONGSTAFF . I am shopman to Mr. West. I fastened the handkerchiefs to the tape, and then to the bell. The handkerchiefs were my master's property. I have frequently seen the prisoner lurking about the street, but I did not see him that night till he was taken. I heard the bell ring as Webb ran out.

THOMAS HARRISON . I am shopman to Mr. West. About half-past eight o'clock in the evening I went to the window to take the things out, and saw the prisoner standing near the window, looking down at it, where it was cut. I had seen the pane of glass at twilight, it had been cut then, but was not cut across as it was when I saw him looking in; I kept my eye upon him for about half a minute, and while I turned my head round to what I was doing the bell rang, I looked up, and saw him spring from the window, I still kept my eye on him, and never lost sight of him until he was taken. I went out of the door - he looked hard at me. I am sure he is the person.

Cross-examined. There were only silk handkerchiefs in that part of the window.

Prisoner's Defence. I stopped to look at a crowd, and the constable took me.

GUILTY. - DEATH . Aged 19.

Recommended to Mercy .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Best.

Reference Number: t18190217-17

331. WILLIAM SERJEANT was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Harris , at six o'clock in the night of the 1st of February , at St. Clement Danes , with intent the goods and chattels in the said dwelling-house, feloniously and burglariously to steal .

MARY ANDREWS . On the night of the 1st of February, I was by Mr. Harris's, who keeps a linen-draper's shop , in Picket-street, Temple-bar ; I was going into the shop, and saw two boys standing against the window; the prisoner was one of them - I had seen him before; I saw him with both his hands inside a pane of glass, which was cut, pulling some goods out of the window; they were nearly out, part of them was through the hole. I took hold of him, when he put his hands into his pocket, and said I did not cut the glass: I said he was taking the things out of the window. The other boy said to him, bolt, and immediately ran across the street. I took the prisoner into the shop, and gave him to the shopman - the window was cut before I went up. The other boy was pushing the glass out of the way while the prisoner took the goods out. Both of them had their hands through the window.

THOMAS PHILLIPS . I am shopman to Mr. George Harris , who is a linen-draper, and lives in the parish of St. Clement Danes; I came into the shop just as Andrews brought the prisoner in. I had looked at the window about half an hour before; it was then dark - the pane was then entire, and not cracked; it had been fresh put in that morning, as it was cut the Saturday before, and three nights running. I observed that a piece of handkerchief had been moved, and drawn close to the square that was cut - there was about twelve of them; the glass was cut out four inches wide and eighteen long. I took the prisoner from Andrews, and as I took him through the passage he dropped a small wire with a hook to it; part of the handkerchiefs were through the hole - they are worth 14 s. the piece of glass laid inside the window.

JOHN LANGFIELD . Phillips gave me the wire, which I produce.

Prisoner's Defence. I stopped to look in at the window, and the woman took me.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 15.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Richardson.

Reference Number: t18190217-18

332. JAMES REED and GEORGE NUTTER were indicted for stealing, on the 10th of February , at All Saints, Poplar , one chest, value 12 s.; one box, value 1 s.; one quadrant, value 2 l.; four shirts, value 10 s.; four pair of trowsers, value 15 s.; two razors, value 2 s.; one book, value 5 s.; two jackets, value 10 s.; one cap, value 1 s., and one blanket, value 1 s., the property of Cornelius Ryan , in the dwelling-house of Charles Cutts .

CORNELIUS RYAN . I am a mariner ; the prisoner, Reed, and I had been working on board an East India ship; we left it, and came ashore on the 10th of February - I had a chest and a bag with me. He said he would show me a

house where I could leave them safe; he took me about eight o'clock in the morning to the Coopers' Arms, at Poplar, which is kept by Charles Cutts ; they contained the articles stated in the indictment; I left them there. I saw Nutter in custody with two of my razors, and some papers, which were in my chest, before I knew they were gone. I went to the Coopers' Arms, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, and found my chest and hag were gone. I never gave either of the prisoners authority to take them from there.

REED. Q. Did I not leave my things there at the same time - A. He left a hammock; another man went with Reed and me; we took them to Cutts.

NANCY CUTTS . My husband, whose name is Charles, keeps the Coopers' Arms. On the 10th of February Reed came with two other men, whom I do not know - I do not remember the prosecutor; they brought the chest and bag about eight o'clock in the morning, the chest was left in the passage, and the bag in the back-room. About four o'clock in the afternoon of the same day, the two prisoners came to fetch them - they were both very tipsey; I was at the bar; Reed asked me for them - Nutter was behind him. I told him to take them; Nutter took the chest, and Reed took the bag - Reed went out first, and Nutter followed. I thought they were Reed's.

THOMAS HARRISON . I am constable of Aldgate, the prosecutor brought Nutter to the watch-house about half-past eight o'clock in the evening, and said he suspected he had robbed him; he said he found a paper on him which he kept as a journal of the ship, and that Nutter was looking at it in the public-house. I searched him, and found a draft, for 11 l., payable at ninety days on him, a pair of razors in a case, two duplicates, a piece of a broken sixpence, and a shaving-brush. He said he was employed by a person who he did not know to fetch the things from Poplar, and the man gave them to him - he could not tell where he took them to.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

REED'S Defence. We both left our things there; I was intoxicated, and went for my things - I do not know whether I brought more than my own away or not; I fell down with them, and lost them. Nutter took the box.

NUTTER'S Defence. Reed said he had a chest and bag, and wanted a man to help him; I went with him, he took the bag, and I followed him with the chest. He told me to leave them at a house in Shadwell, and gave me these things for my trouble.

REED - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 28.

NUTTER - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 26.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18190217-19

333. JOHN SHIELDS was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of February , one pair of boots, value 14 s.; one great coat value, 2 l. 10 s., and one hat, value 1 l., the property of John Anderson , in his dwelling-house .

JOHN ANDERSON . I occupy some stables in Gray's Inn-lane; my hostler sleeps there. Between four and five o'clock in the morning, on the 8th of February, he brought the prisoner to me with the property; the prisoner formerly worked for me - he was wearing the things.

THOMAS COOK . I am hostler to John Anderson . On the 8th of February, about four o'clock in the morning, I found the prisoner in the counting-house with the coat, hat, and one boot on; he was putting the other boot on; I took him to my master with the things on - he had picked the lock of the gate to get in.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 28.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Best.

Reference Number: t18190217-20

334. ELIZA HOY was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of January , two table-spoons, value 10 s.; two teaspoons, value 7 s.; two pair of sheets, value 20 s.; one blanket, value 6 d., and two tea-cloths, value 6 d. , the goods of Henry Sanford .

HENRY SANFORD . I am an ironmonger , and live in Bishopsgate-street ; the prisoner was my housekeeper ; I missed some property, and suspected her. On the 16th of January I sent for Sapwell, and had her searched; he found the duplicates of the property on her.

RICHARD P. HIGHAN . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Bishopsgate-street. On the 3d of December, the prisoner pledged a pair of sheets with me, and on the 4th of December she pledged another pair; she said her brother had absconded in a deranged state, and she wanted the money to advertise him.

THOMAS COX . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Houndsditch. On the 8th of January, the prisoner pledged four spoons with me.

THOMAS SAPWELL . I am an officer. On the 16th of January, I searched the prisoner's box, and found duplicates of the property, with two tea-cloths, and an ironing-cloth.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I meant to redeem them.

GUILTY . Aged 56.

Confined Two Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190217-21

335. JOHN HUGAL was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of February , 20 lbs. of candles, value 10 s.; four boxes, value 8 s., and one basket, value 2 s. , the property of Phineas Patershall and James Law Jones .

JAMES LAW JONES. I am a tallow-chandler , and am in partnership with Phineas Patershall , and live in Fenchurch-street ; the prisoner had lived five years with us, as a servant . On Sunday morning, about eight o'clock, Harding fetched me to Aldgate watch-house; I found the prisoner and his daughter there, with a quantity of candles; I said

"This is wholesale dealing, where did you get them from." He said,

"Out of your stock, Sir." We then went to his house, in Hackney-road, and found a quantity of candles, which I believe to be ours, and some of them I can swear to; also two boxes of ours.

JAMES HARDING . I am constable of Aldgate. On Sunday morning, about seven o'clock, I was standing in Hartshorn-alley, Fenchurch-street, and saw the prisoner at the corner of Northumberland-alley, and a little girl following him with a basket; she returned soon after, and I followed her into Leadenhall-street, took hold of her arm, and asked

her what she had got in the basket; she screamed out,

"You must not look here, Sir." I found it contained five bundles of candles. I took her across to the watch-house, and asked her if it was her father that she followed down the alley? she said Yes. I went down the alley, and found the prisoner in the prosecutor's stable, cleaning the horse. I collared him, and said I had just stopped his daughter with five bundles of candles in a basket; he said,

"For G-d's sake, have mercy, I have a wife and a large family." I said his master must know of it; I took him to the watch-house, his daughter began crying. I went to his house, and found a basket containing eight parcels of candles, some boxes, broken up, and the other articles, which the prosecutor claimed,

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 34.

Recommended to Mercy .

Confined Three Months .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190217-22

336. CHARLES SELLIS was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of January , one handkerchief, value 1 s., the goods of Edward Penny , from his person .

EDWARD PENNY . On the 21st of January I was in Lombard-street between eleven and twelve o'clock in the day, a little boy came up, and said my pocket had been picked - I missed my handkerchief. An officer came up immediately, with my handkerchief, and the prisoner in custody.

JOSEPH STONE . I am an officer. On the 21st of January, I was coming down Lombard-street, and saw the prisoner, in company with another person, attempt to pick Mr. Penny's pocket. After walking some distance, the other person drew the handkerchief out, and gave it to the prisoner, they separated - as soon as I took the prisoner the other ran off. I sent a boy to inform Penny. I took the handkerchief out of the prisoner's hand, and Penny claimed it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The other man threw it into my bosom - I took it out, and Stone took me.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190217-23

337. THOMAS WOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of January , one handkerchief, value 5 s., the goods of William Compson , from his person .

WILLIAM COMPSON . On the 22d of January, between four and five o'clock in the afternoon, I was at the end of Watling-street, near St. Paul's Church-yard , walking with a friend, and felt something at my pocket, I put my hand down, and missed my handkerchief, turned round, and saw the prisoner behind me, with my handkerchief in his hand; I took it from him, collared him, and charged him with picking my pocket. He denied it, and said he picked it up. I said that was not true, and I must give him in charge. He requested I would walk down the street with him, where he could get a character - I did so, but he could not point out the house. I gave him in charge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I was in distress.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190217-24

338. WILLIAM LEWIS and JOHN PERCIVAL were indicted for stealing, on the 31st of January , one handkerchief, value 3 s., the property of Samuel Little , from his person .

SAMUEL LITTLE . On the 31st of January, about six o'clock in the evening, I was in Long-acre - I was stopped by an officer, who asked me if I had lost a handkerchief? I felt, and missed it. He told me to follow him. We ran about sixty yards; he overtook Percival before I got up. When I came up I saw the handkerchief drop from Percival - we took him to the Compter.

JOHN WARREN . On Sunday evening, the 31st of January, I saw the two prisoners attempt several gentlemens' pockets in a crowd - they then followed Little into Long-acre. I saw Lewis put his hand into Little's pocket, take the handkerchief out, and give it to Percival - they turned back. I asked Little if he had not lost his handkerchief? he said Yes - I told him to follow me. I seized Percival; he said he did not take it, and immediately dropped it. Lewis went away. I knew where he lived, and went and took him about twenty minutes after.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

LEWIS'S Defence. I had been at home three hours when I was taken.

LEWIS - GUILTY . Aged 19.

PERCIVAL - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190217-25

339. GEORGE NEWTON was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of February, 1818 , one great-coat, value 20 s. , the property of Samuel Newman .

SAMUEL NEWMAN . I was an East-India labourer , but am now a pensioner . On the 3d of February, 1818, I was on duty at the East India Company's warehouse, in Crutched-friars , as gate-keeper - the prisoner came up to my box, caught hold of my hand, and said,

"How are you? how do you do?" I said I did not know him. He said,

"You must know me, but you forget, I was a letter-man here once, and worked in the building - my name is Williams. I am just come from the East Indies, in the Moffat, and have a few things in a cart here, if you will be kind enough to lend me an old great coat, to lay over them for five minutes." I said I had no old coat - he said

"Give me any old bit of a thing, and I will leave you a 5 l. note as security." He pulled out a pocket-book. I had an old coat of my own under the Company's coat - I took off the Company's coat to give him the under one; he took hold of the Company's coat, and said,

"This will do." I said,

"No, you must not touch that, it is the Company's coat" - he ran off with it, putting down a piece of paper, which he called a 5 l. note. It struck me so much I could not stir for half a minute. When I came to myself I went to the bottom of the yard to look for him, but could see neither him nor the coat. I returned to look for

the 5 l. note, and found it was an old duplicate, out of date. He never returned. I had to replace the coat. On the 3d of February, 1819, I saw the prisoner at the Mansion-house, and knew him again. I had not seen him before.

JOSEPH ALLINGHAM . I am a constable. On the 2d of February I took the prisoner on another charge. The prosecutor saw him at the Justice-room, and made this charge - he had not a word to say for himself.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190217-26

340. JOHN CROW was indicted for embezzling, on the 23d of November , the sum of 3 s. 10 d. in copper monies numbered, which he received on account of Flather Appleyard, his master .

FLATHER APPLEYARD. I am a dealer in newspapers , and live in Duke-street, Adelphi, the prisoner was my servant , he delivered newspapers for me, and received the money for them. On the 23d of November Mr. Buxton owed me 3 s. 10 d. - the prisoner absconded that day, and never gave me the money.

JOHN BUXTON . I keep the Horse Shoe, public-house, in Titchborn-street. On the 23d of November I paid the prisoner 3 s. 10 d. in copper, for newspapers.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Confined Three Months .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190217-27

341. WILLIAM CONNOR , JOHN JACKSON , and FRANCIS BERRY were indicted for feloniously having forged notes in their possession, knowing them to be forged .

The prisoners pleaded

GUILTY .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18190217-28

342. WILLIAM CONNOR , JOHN JACKSON , and FRANCIS BERRY were again severally and separately indicted for feloniously disposing of and putting away forged notes, knowing them to be forged, with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England .

MR. SERGEANT BOSANQUET, on the part of the Governor and Company of the Bank of England, declined offering any evidence.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18190217-29

343. GEORGE PAGE was indicted for that he, on the 15th of August , having had a commission of bankruptcy awarded and issued against him, directed to Henry Revell Reynolds, Robert Joseph Chambers , William Conant , Richard Richards , Esqs. and Joshua Hickey , Gent., did not at any time within the space of forty-two days subject himself to be examined from time to time on oath, and make full disclosure of his effects, to the said commission, or the major part of them, in the said commission named, with intent to defraud his creditors, against the statute .

ROBERT CORFE . I was shopman to the prisoner; I went to him in May, 1817, and remained with him until April, 1818; he was a silk mercer , and was constantly in the shop, buying and selling.

Q. Did he carry on trade during the whole of that time - A. I believe the sale of his goods took place in March or April.

JOHN BESTOW . In 1817 I was foreman to Messrs. Samuel Edenborough , John Nevill White , and Hugh Edenborough , who are in the lace trade; I went out to get orders from customers, and in the course of my walks called on the prisoner; he purchased my masters' goods through me to the amount of about 500 l. I commenced selling, him goods in September, until the end of October, or November - we gave three months credit. I regular took a porter round with me every morning, he carried the box, and I delivered the goods, as I sold them to him - Payment would be due in February.

Cross-examined by MR. SERGEANT COPLEY. Q. Did you deal with Thomas Page - A. No; the payments were not made to me - I know nothing about any payments being made at all. An account had been opened with him before I came into my masters' employ.

Q. You never had any conversation with the prisoner about the terms of credit - A. Yes; I cannot recollect the time or the conversation exactly - it was in the shop; Mr. White had done business with him before this firm existed; he said to me, I suppose the credit is the same as when it was only White; I told him the credit was the same with Edenborough, White and Edenborough as it was with White, for when I entered my masters' service they told me their credit was three months.

MR. ALLEY. Q. You did not give three months credit on every lot of goods - A. No, it was a regular quarterly account; that was understood between us, and the accounts were sent regularly to him every quarter.

AMBROSE PARISH . I am a clerk in the Clerk of the Papers office, at the King's Bench prison; the prisoner first came into our custody on the 15th of May, 1818, under the commitment of Mr. Justice Holroyd.

JOHN TILLEARD. I know this document to be Mr. Justice Holroyd's hand-writing. - (The writ of Habeas Corpus, upon which the prisoner was committed to the King's Bench, and the return, was then put in, and read. The return was endorsed as follows -

"The within-named George Page is hereupon committed to the custody of the Marshal, for want of bail, and with the causes herein mentioned." The return stated a warrant of Mr. Birnie's, upon which the prisoner had been apprehended; also two commitments of the commissioners, under a former commission.)

AMBROSE PARISH re-examined, He remained in custody from the 15th of May, 1818, until the 22d of January, 1819.

MR. SERGEANT COPLEY. Q. He was not discharged from any cause enumerated in that document - A. No.

JOHN TILLEARD . I am clerk to the solicitor under the commission; I produce the commission of bankruptcy awarded against George Page , dated 15th of August, 1818, directed to Henry Revell Reynolds, Robert Joseph Chambers , William Conant , Richard Richards , Esqs., and Joseph Hickey , gent.

Q. Did any part of the commissioners meet after that - A. Yes; they first met on the 22d of August at the Baptist's Head coffee-house; Messrs. Reynolds, Chambers and Hickey were present, they qualified themselves by taking the usual oaths to each other; they then took the deposition of the petitioning creditor's debt, and signed the adjucation of bankruptcy; the act of bankruptcy was, that he had lain in prison for two months - the commissioners qualification was signed in my presence, and I witnessed it.

Q. Was any order made for notice of the proceedings being given to the prisoner - A. Yes; he was summoned to appear personally on the 29th of August, the 19th of September, and the 3d of October, at Guildhall, at twelve o'clock, to make a full disclosure of his estate and effects. I produce the Gazette of the 22d of August, 1818, which contains notice of the bankruptcy - (read) - The commissioners met at Guildhall on the 29th of August; the bankrupt did not attend there that day.

Q. Did he meet the commissioners any where else that day - A. Yes; he was brought before them at a private meeting at the Baptist's Head coffee-house, but refused to take the oath. The commissioners asked him to take the oath, and were half an hour or an hour endeavouring to persuade him to take the book - he refused, and was not examined.

SAMUEL JOSEPH WATKINS . I was one of the messengers under the commission; I produce a copy of the notice to surrender; I served the prisoner with the original one, which was signed by the commissioners - Mr. Billing's clerk prepared it. I compared the copy with the original notice, which I gave into the prisoner's own hands, at the King's Bench prison, on the 22d of August 1818. I have no doubt of the original being signed by the commissioners.

Cross-examined by MR. SERGEANT COPLEY. Q. Did you examine it yourself with the one you gave him - A. Yes; I saw the hand-writing was the same as the one I produce - they are both signed by the commissioners; I know their hand-writing, and believe it to be theirs - I did not see it signed.

JOHN TILLEARD re-examined. Q. The prisoner refused to be sworn at the private meeting; did you attend at the next meeting on the 22d of August - A. Yes; the prisoner did not attend then; the next meeting was on the 19th of September at Guildhall - he did not attend.

Q. Did he attend the third meeting on the 3d of October - A. Yes; he was brought up by a warrant from the King's Bench. He was sworn. I have his examination of that day (reads.)

Guildhall, London, 3rd October. George Page , on his oath, saith, he surrenders to the commission, and the following questions being put to him, to which he gave the answers hereinafter mentioned. - Q. What property have you in your possession - A. I am really not prepared to state. Q. Have you five hundred pounds in your possession, or under your control - A. I am going to petition the Lord Chancellor, or proceed at law, to supersede the commission, which I have good reason to think is an illegal one. If the decision is against me, of course I shall answer. Q. You are required immediately to state whether you have the 500 l. or not - A. I am wholly unprepared to enter into any examination at present. Q. You are not required to state the whole of your account; the only question is, Have you the 500 l. in your possession, or under your control - A. I can only answer as before. Q. Do you decline to give any further answer respecting the 500 l. - A. I do; but I beg to be understood that I do not decline answering from any intention to retain property which my creditors may be entitled to, or to evade the claims of justice, but that it is my intention, under legal advice which I have received, to contest the validity of the commission which has been issued against me.

(Signed)

GEORGE PAGE .

Of the last answers, the words,

"I do," were the prisoner's, the rest were framed for him by his counsel, with leave of the commissioners.

Q. After Middlesex Term, was any meeting held - A. On the 7th of November he was brought to Guildhall.

Q. Up to the forty-second day had he made any other disclosure, except what you have read - A. None - (the witness here read the prisoner's examination of the 7th of November.)

Guildhall, London, 7th November. George Page , upon his oath, states the following answers to the questions hereafter stated. - Q. Will you now give any further account of your estate and effects than you gave in your former examination - A. I am not prepared to give any further account at present. Q. Have you 500 l. in your possession, or under your control - A. I can only answer as I did before, that until the validity of the commission is determined, I cannot give any further answer. Q. You are required immediately to state whether you have the 500 l. in your possession, or under your control - A. I cannot answer that at present. Q. Do you refuse to answer that, because you intend to try the validity of the commission - A. I refuse to answer generally till the validity of the commission is tried. Q. Do you decline to give any further answer respecting the 500 l. enquired about in your former examination - A. I do decline at present. Q. Do you refuse to give any answer respecting some plate purchased of Mr. Robins, of Covent-garden - A. I do.

(Signed)

GEORGE PAGE .

Q. On the 28th of November was he brought up, and examined again - A. Yes, he was sworn. I have the proceedings of that day (reads.)

Guildhall, London, 28th November. George Page being sworn, and examined on his oath, states the following answers to the questions hereafter stated - We think to right to apprize you, that you are bound, under the peril of committing a capital felony, now to disclose and discover all your effects, real and personal; and that you may be aware of your duty, you are called upon to hear the clause in the Act of Parliament now read to you (which was read accordingly); and having now heard the said clause In the Act of Parliament read, you are called upon to disclose and discover your effects, real and personal - A I am wholly unprepared, not having had any notice of the meeting, nor having any opportunity of seeing my legal adviser. I am not enabled to enter into any examination. Q. You have had the notice required by Act of Parliament, you attended on the 3d of October, being the day on which you by statute were required to make such discovery and disclosure, you were brought before the Commissioners again on the 7th of November, why then are you not now prepared to make such discovery and disclosure - A. I did not suppose

that I should be under the necessity of entering into any explanation, until the validity of the commission is determined. Q. Do you mean that you refuse to make such discovery and disclosure, until the validity of the commission is determined: or do you wish for any time to enable you forthwith to make such discovery and disclosure, as we think it proper to apprize you you are bound forthwith to do - A. I beg further time. Q. Do you mean that you beg for further time to make such discovery and disclosure, or that you may try the validity of the commission - A. I beg for further time, to enable me to make an account out. Q. If this meeting is adjourned for a week, will you, at the expiration of this week, make out the best account you are able - A. That is a time in which I should not be able to do any thing scarcely. Q. Will you now discover or disclose any part of your estate and effects - A. I am wholly unprepared. Q. We wish you to understand that we do not now ask you to discover or disclose the whole of your estate and effects, if you are unable so to do, but we repeat the question, Will you now discover or disclose any part of your estate or effects - A. Before I give any further answer to that I beg to see my counsel. Q. Time has been so often given you without success, that we must again repeat the question, Will you now discover or disclose any part of your estate or effects - A. I cannot at present, still I request it may be fully understood, that I by no means decline answering at present, from any intention to withhold property which others may be entitled to, neither do I wish to evade the claims of justice, but it is my intention, under legal advice which I have received, to contest the validity of the commission before a Jury, which has been issued against me, and for which purpose I have given my solicitor directions to commence a suit. Q. Was there not a sale on your premises the latter end of March last - A. Yes. Q. For how many days did the sale continue - A. Altogether three days. Did you not receive, after the second day's sale, the sum of 800 l. on some, and what other sum of money - A. It might be something of that kind, but I cannot say exactly. Q. Where is that money which you so received - A. I am not prepared to give an account at the present time. Q. Is it in your possession or under your control - A. I cannot answer it at the present time. Q. When you say you cannot answer it at the present time, do you mean that you are unable to say whether you are possessed, or have the control of this sum, or do you mean to say that you decline to answer the question, or have you any other meaning - A. I do decline for the present. Q. Did you not, after the third day's sale, receive a further sum of about 800 l. - A. I don't recollect the sum. Q. Did you not, after the third day's sale, receive a further sum of upwards of 500 l. - A. I did receive a sum of money, and it might probably be that amount. Q. Is that further sum of money in your possession, or under your control - A. I beg leave to decline answering for the present. Q. Such leave cannot and is not now given you, and you are now called upon to answer the question - A. I am not prepared to answer that for the present. Q. When you say that you are unprepared, do you mean to say you are unable or decline to answer - A. I do decline for the present. Q. Are you unable to answer that question - A. I am unable to give a particular account. Q. You are not asked to give a particular account; you are asked whether that sum is in your possession, or under your control - A. I should wish to see my solicitor before I enter into any further answer. Q. Was not your stock in trade valued, early in the present year, under prime cost, at the sum of 8000 l. and upwards - A. I believe the Accountant did make it somewhere near that amount. Q. Was not such stock sold off in the month of March last - A. It was thereabouts, I believe. Q. What sum did you actually receive from the produce of such sale - A. I do not recollect. Q. Did you not receive upwards of 3000 l. - A. Certainly not. Q. Did you not receive upwards of 2000 l. - A. I cannot say now. Q. Will you say you did not receive that sum - A. I cannot tell. Q. Where is the money you did receive; is it in your possession, or under your control - A. I beg leave to decline further explanation at the present. Q. Leave is not given you, and you are called upon now to answer the question - A. I must beg leave to see my advisers before I say more. Q. Do you then refuse to answer the question - A. I do decline at present.

(Signed)

GEORGE PAGE .

Q. Was the prisoner attended by counsel - A. Yes; he was never refused counsel - Mr. Adolphus attended him on the third examination only.

Q. Do you remember attending before Mr. Justice Abbott - A. Yes, on the 4th of June; the prisoner's solicitor Mr. Rogers, Jun. attended for him. Mr. Justice Abbott made an order on that occasion for Mr. Adams to attend at his chambers at six o'clock, to show cause why the prisoner should not be discharged from the commitments of the commissioners, and the warrant. I served the prisoner with the notice to produce the order made by Mr. Justice Abbott.

JOHN WARRINGTON ROGERS, JUN. I am a solicitor employed by the prisoner.

Q. Did you get a subpoena to produce the original order made by Mr. Justice Abbott - A. I have it, and will produce it if the Court think fit - I produce it - (read) -

"I do order that George Page be discharged from custody as to the commitment of the commissioners, and the warrant of Mr. Birnie, dated 4th of January, 1818.

Q. Look at this letter, whose hand-writing is it - A. It is the hand-writing of a clerk in our office - it applies to another order - (read).

Sir - If the same anxiety existed to discharge Mr. Page, as procured and continued his illegal and unjust imprisonment, he would have been released on Saturday, when all the Commissioners were in town. You are well aware that an instrument, signed by only two commissioners is of no use, and we are advised it is in the power of the Commissioners to release Mr. Page, without further trouble or expense; we will, however, attend the Judge, and give every assistance in our power to release Mr. Page, as he considers every hour's imprisonment a great aggravation, and it is to be hoped a day will come when this oppressed individual will have justice done him. A petition was yesterday presented to the Lord Chancellor for a habeas corpus, and you will be served this day with a copy.

ROGERS AND SON.

To MR. G. ADAMS May 13, 1818.

(Mr. Justice Holroyd's order for the prisoner to be brought up to be discharged from the commitments of the commissioners, in consequence of the first commission being superseded, was then put in and read, dated May, 14, 1818.)

MR. SERGEANT COPLEY. Q. When was the order that you produced, obtained - A. It was drawn up on the 5th of June; the term ended on the 10th of June.

Q. Did Mr. Tilleard attend on that occasion - A. Yes, and said he had no objection to the order. Mr. Justice Holroyd requested him to attend the Judge, or sign on the back of the order that he had no objection to it, both of which he refused to do. I, in consequence attended before Mr. Justice Abbot, made an affidavit of the service,

stated what had passed between me and Mr. Tilleard, and obtained the order.

Q. Was that order ever made a rule of Court - A. No, it was not proceeded on, nor made a rule of Court, in consequence of an opinion which I obtained from Mr. Cullen, whom I consulted on the prisoner's behalf.

Q. Was that opinion taken by the prisoner's desire, to govern his conduct - A. It was, and I communicated that opinion to him.

Q. When was you employed as solicitor for the prisoner - A. In January, 1818, my father was employed and interfered respecting the prisoner's proposition to his creditors. I first interfered in the month of April.

Q. The verdict in the prisoner's favour was on the 9th of May, on the 19th of that month was any offer made to his creditors - A. Yes, I advised him to make a proposal to his creditors, and a circular letter was sent round to them.

Q. Did the prisoner instruct you to bring any action to try the validity of the present commission - A. Yes, it was determined early in November that an action should be brought.

Q. What was the reason why it was not immediately brought - A. It was considered as a local action against the commissioners, and the imprisonment being in Surry, it was thought proper to bring the action in Surry. There was a consultation under the first commission, with two gentleman of the Bar, and it was thought by them that it was a local action, and therefore I acted on that opinion in the second action. I could not proceed to trial until the Spring Assizes, and I brought the action sufficiently early for that purpose. I commenced proceedings on the 12th of January, as far as I am able to judge, it was determined to bring it on then. I exercised my own judgment as to when it was to be brought, and did not consult the prisoner. I engaged counsel to attend him at his third meeting, to guide him as to the conduct he was to pursue.

MR. ALLEY. Q. Do you mean to swear that counsel advised him not to answer - A. I do not know, I was not there. We thought it important that we should not advise Mr. Page.

Q. Whom did you consult about laying the action - A. Mr. Sergeant Onslow and Mr. Barlow.

Q. The commissioners' commitment was to Newgate - A. Yes, there were two actions brought against the commissioners, one was for Middlesex, and the other for the commitment at the Baptist Head, it was thought proper to lay the venue where it took place.

Q. Does that apply to the first or second commission - A. To both; it was in consequence of 42 Geo. III . c. 85.

Q. If you were advised to bring it in London. how came you to bring it in Surry - A. We were not advised to bring it in London; the consultation was on the first commission.

Q. Then the answers you have been giving apply to former actions, which were never proceeded on - A. We have not been to trial yet; they were brought after the first verdict.

Q. On your oath, did you bring the last action in consequence of the advice of any counsel - A. No, I took the opinion I had received, on the first commission, thinking it applied to the second also.

Q. Do you not know that the commitment in the first case, on which you received the advice of the learned Sergeant, was in the King's Bench prison - A. No, I believe you will find it was in Newgate.

Q. Was any act done by the commissioners except in Middlesex or London - A. No; I know of none; we considered the imprisonment in Surry.

COURT. Q. What is the act charged in the action now pending - A. For the commitment by the commissioners, the first time he was brought before them, and for the imprisonment in the King's Bench. He was brought from the King's Bench to be examined, and taken back there.

AMBROSE PARISH re-examined. Q. Have you any commitment of the prisoner on the 29th of August, 1818 - A. I have - it is the commitment to Newgate - I produce it.

MR. SERGEANT COPLEY. Q. He was brought to the King's Bench under that commitment - A. Yes.

MR. H. EDENBOROUGH. I am one of the petitioning creditors; I attended the meeting of the prisoner's creditors, in the early part of January 1818, at the Baptist's Head coffee-house; the prisoner was in an anti-room waiting. He came in before his creditors - Mr. Rogers, Sen. attended in his behalf; an account of his effects was produced, of which I took a copy.

(read).

LOSSES AND EXPENSES. - Going in, 100 l. Bad debts, 1,500 l. Lost by sale of goods to Smith, Islington, 3,000 l. Ditto Foster, Robins, Machin, and Eddes, 380 l. Ditto by exchange of lace, 60 l. Cash lent Murt, 90 l. Ditto by forged notes, 80 l. Lost by goods sold in shop, 350 l. By goods stolen in the shop 400 l. Rent and taxes, 270 l. Law Expenses, 120 l. House Expenses, 400 l. Wages, 140 l. Personal Expenses, 170 l. - Total, 7,060. Stock in hand, 9,525 l.

Q. At that meeting were the amount of the prisoner's debts stated - A. Yes; Mr. Rogers undertook to say that they did not exceed 13,000 l. The creditors requested Mr. Rogers to withdraw, while they considered the statement; the prisoner was then called in; 5 s. in the pound was offered on his brother's security, and his own note for 1 s. 6 d. - making together 6 s. 6 d. in the pound; it was calculated that that was not half of what he made there were assets to pay, and the offer was not accepted. He had been in business about fifteen months. I called on him two or three times, with the other creditors, to induce him to make a better offer - he said he could make no better offer than he had done. He said he kept no books. He was asked to produce bills of parcels, they were not forthcoming. Corfe, the shopman, said in his presence that the goods were ticked off when they came in, and the bills were afterwards destroyed. The prisoner did not contradict it. I believe this was in the shop.

Q. Were all the goods furnished to him such articles as he dealt in - A. Yes; he dealt considerably in lace.

Cross-examined by MR. SERGEANT COPLEY. Q. Did he not say that he could not obtain security for more than 5 s. - A. Yes.

Q. Did he not say, I will give you so much in the pound, or you shall take all the effects on giving me a release - A. Yes, the proposition was made, but on this condition, that he would not give up the property unless every individual creditor had signed the release, and it would be impossible to get the signature of every creditor.

Q. Was it not proposed that an execution which was in the house, for the stock taken of his brother, should be withdrawn for the benefit of the creditors - A. Mr. Rogers said, he thought if the creditors would accede to the proposal, it might possibly be done. I think he said he would try to persuade Thomas Page to forego the execution. He made out that he had 9,525 l. to pay 13,000 l.

Q. How was his stock taken - A. At prime-cost, and those articles that were depreciated in value were rated under prime-cost.

Q. Did he not offer to give up the stock to his creditors after the commission was set aside - A. A circular letter was sent round, and Rogers and Son desired to have a meeting, but the creditors would not meet him, considering the proposition so fraudulent. This was after the trial, to the best of my recollection.

MR. SERGEANT BOSANQUET. Q. The circular letters were dated May 19 - this was a long while after the property was all sold by auction - A. I believe it was. My brother was assignee under the first commission. There was not a halfpenny to be got on the 14th of May - none of his property was to be got at.

Q. What were the terms upon which he proposed to give up all his property - A. He said he would not give up a farthing until every individual creditor had signed his release. It was suggested to him that he should deliver up the property to three or four of his principal creditors, but as many creditors lived in the country it would be impossible to get them all to sign.

COURT. Q. Suppose they did not all sign, what was to be done - A. We promised to endeavour to get them to sign, but as he refused the offer, no further proposition took place.

Q. Did he insist that delivering up all his property would be an act of bankruptcy - A. No.

MR. SERGEANT COPLEY. Q. Did you accompany Mr. Adams to the prisoner with a deed - A. Yes.

Q. Was it stated to Mr. Page that Mr. Rogers had approved of that deed on his part - A. I do not recollect that it was. He said he could not sign it until he had consulted his solicitor.

WILLIAM EVERINGHAM . I am a clerk in the Bank. I produce forty-two notes, amounting in all to 610 l.; they were brought into the bank by a person describing himself as George Malm , No. 22, Marsham-street, Westminster, on the 20th of April, 1818. Two notes, of 300 l. each, one 25 l., and the rest in small notes were delivered out for them. There were some smaller notes, which made the amount 650 l. The person who brought them in wrote on them - I took them in myself.

MR. SERGEANT COPLEY. Q. Do you mean to say the person wrote it in your presence - A. Certainly not, they came to me with the address on them - only the last note of the bundle is signed.

ROBERT CORFE re-examined. Q. When did the execution commence - A. In the month of March - I believe it was the latter end of the month - there were three days sale, with intervals between them.

Q. When was the last day's sale - A. Full a fortnight after the first day.

Q. When the sale was over, who received the money - A. Mr. Eddes or his clerk.

Q Can you tell what was the amount of the first day's sale - A. No, I never heard the prisoner say, nor did I ever hear any person say what was received or what became of it.

Q. Who received the amount of the second day's sale - A. I received part of it, about 800 l. was received in all - I paid it to the prisoner. The third day about the same sum was received - I paid that also to the prisoner, in his own house - (looks at a 100 l. note, being one of those produced from the Bank.)

Q. Whose hand-writing is George Malm on that note - A. I cannot say; I know the prisoner's hand-writing. I was with him about ten months, and have frequently seen him write.

Q. Were you examined before the commissioners - A. Yes.

Q. Whose hand-writing do you believe it to be - A. The question was almost extorted from me, and I said it bore a similarity to George Page 's hand-writing, but I never saw him write so bad.

Q. On your oath do you or do you not believe it to be his - A. My belief is that it bears a similarity.

Q. Is it such a similarity, that you believe it to be his - A. I should rather believe it was; I paid him the same note that is now produced. Every thing was sold off that was on the premises, both stock and furniture.

Q. Look at the notes, do you see any of them you paid to him among them - A. Here are two 40 l., three 20 l., a 15 l., a 10 l., and a 5 l. note, all of which have gone through my hands - they have my mark on them, and are the notes that I paid him.

Q. Did he receive any money himself from the sale - A. Not that I know of.

MR. SERGEANT COPLEY. Q. Did not the sale commence under an execution - A, Yes; the amount of the levy was 800 l. The prisoner succeeded his brother in the business, and took the stock at a valuation. The execution was to secure his brother payment for the stock.

COURT. Q. Then why was not the money paid to the Sheriff - A. The produce of the sale was more than the levy - the business was put an end to by the execution, and the second and third day's sale was for his own benefit.

GEORGE HENRY MALM . I live at No. 22, Marsham-street, Westminster; I have seen the prisoner occasionally for some years - I only had a slight acquaintance with him. I am in the habit of paying large notes into the Bank; I did not pay these notes into the Bank; none of them ever went through my hands, as I always mark my notes - the note has not my hand-writing.

THOMAS EDDES I am an auctioneer. I was employed to sell the prisoner's stock on the 26th of March; I only sold the first day. The produce of what I sold, was, 1241 l. 10 s. 3 d. I paid the sheriff 798 l. 11 s., rent, 90 l., and other things. After all the claims were discharged, the prisoner received 263 l. 13 s. 5 d. out of the first day's sale.

JOHN MUSGRAVE. I am a merchant; in January 1818, I valued the prisoner's stock, according to my judgment, and the value of the day, at 8,200 l. I valued it at what it was worth to sell to a customer. I presume that I valued it probably at 12, per cent. under prime cost.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Who employed you to value it - A. Mr. Rogers, in order to submit it to the creditors - I gave Mr. Rogers the statement.

Prisoner. I leave my defence entirely to my counsel.

The opinion given by Mr. Cullen, on the 6th of June, 1818, that the prisoner could not commit an act of bankruptcy by laying in prison, while he was in custody under a criminal warrant, also a circular letter, sent by the prisoner to his creditors, offering them the produce of the sale of his stock upon having a release, dated May, 19, 1818, was put in and read.

GUILTY. Aged 36.

This case is reserved for the opinion of the twelve Judges .

The point for decision has not been ascertained precisely.

London Jury, before Mr. Justice Best.

Reference Number: t18190217-30

344. THOMAS BUCK was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of February , nineteen dozen tooth-brushes, value 4 l.; six dozen tooth-brush-handles, value 9 s.; four ounces of hair, value 8 d., and one ounce of wire, value 2 d. , the property of Thomas Goodluck .

THOMAS GOODLUCK . I am a tooth-brush-maker , and live in Hatton-garden ; the prisoner was my apprentice ; I missed a quantity of tooth-brushes and materials; I received information from a person named Saunders, and went to his lodgings on Saffron-hill, and found a quantity of my brushes, and some hair, which I knew to be mine; she then took me to a house in Round-court, Saffron-hill; I found Ann Smith at work there. When I returned the prisoner had absconded; he used to board with me. I missed a quantity more, which I had put in the drawer that day.

WILLIAM WAINWRIGHT . I am an officer of Hatton-garden. On the 11th of February I apprehended the prisoner; I asked him why he did not return? he said he was afraid his master would prosecute him.

ANN SMITH . I live in Round-court, and close toothbrushes. I received nine dozen tooth-brushes, to complete, about a week before Christmas, for a person at Mr. Jaters'; next day the prisoner came to enquire if I had got them - and told me to get them done by Sunday, and he would call, and pay me; I finished seven dozen by Sunday. The prisoner called, paid for them, and took them away with him. Before I finished the rest he brought me more - he found the hair and handles. On the 3d of February I gave Goodluck six dozen, which the prisoner brought to me.

ELIZA JATERS . I am a brush-maker, and live in New-square. About seven weeks ago the prisoner came to me and asked me to draw some tooth-brushes for a person named Hill, who lived in Castle-street; I told him I could not draw; he left about nine dozen - Smith fetched them away; he afterwards asked me to finish some for Mr. Hill. On the 30th of January, Smith brought me some, which I cave to Goodluck.

THOMAS MILWOOD . I sell tooth-brushes, and live in Lockhart's-court, Saffron-hill. On the 26th of December the prisoner brought me about a gross and a half of toothbrushes. He said he lived in Fletcher's-row, Islington. I was to sell them to the shops, and gave him 3 s. 6 d. a dozen, and was to get what I could for myself - I paid him about 1 l. The prosecutor came to me, and I gave him half a gross, which were left - the prisoner said he made them himself.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I made them myself.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190217-31

345. ELIZABETH NEALE was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Henry Evans , about three o'clock in the afternoon of the 22d of January , at the liberty of the Rolls , (Margaret his wife being therein) and feloniously stealing therein, three gowns, value 12 s.; three bed-gowns, value 2 s.; two petticoats, value 1 s. 6 d.; one handkerchief, value 1 s.; two rollers, 2 d.; one spencer, 18 d.; one table-cloth, value 18 d.; one pillow-case, value 6 d.; one napkin, value 3 d.; seven child's shirts, value 3 s. 6 d.; one habit-shirt, value 6 d.; 12 caps, value 3 s.; one frock-body, value 4 d.; one tippet, value 2 d., and one sheet, value 3 s. , the property of William Attridge .

ELIZABETH ATTRIDGE . I am the wife of William Atteridge , who is a cabinet-maker , and lives in White's-alley, Chancery-lane , in the second floor of Henry Evans 's house. On the 22d of January I was nursing a person on the first floor. I left my room about three o'clock in the afternoon, locked the door, and left nobody in the room. I returned to my room a little after four o'clock, and found the door open - it had been opened with my own key, which I had put on a shelf on the landing-place. I found my boxes open, they were shut when I left the room. I missed the articles stated in the indictment out of them; they were worth 23 s. I found them the same day, with the prisoner in custody. She was quite a stranger to me.

MARGARET EVANS . I am the wife of Henry Evans , he rents the house, which is in the liberty of the Rolls, Attridge lodges with us - the prisoner is quite a stranger. On the 22d January I came home at half-past two o'clock, and did not go out after - I am sure I came home as early as that. About twenty minutes after three o'clock I saw the prisoner come into the house, and go up stairs - I have other lodgers. In about twenty minutes she came down and went out. As she passed the parlour window I saw she had a large bundle in her lap, and a hat-box in her hand - she brought nothing in. I suspected her, and gave the alarm - my street-door was open. I described her to Haston, and we both went after her. She was taken at the corner of New-street, Shoe-lane, with the property; she was brought back, and the prosecutrix claimed it. I asked her what she had done with the hat-box which was in her hand? she said she had none.

JOHN HASTON . I lodge with Evans, and am a labourer to the East India Company. Mrs. Evans alarmed me. I first saw the prisoner in Fetter-lane, and stopped her with the bundle, but not the hat-box. The prosecutrix claimed the property.

THOMAS PRICE . I am a constable. I took the prisoner in charge, with the bundle.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I beg for mercy - I was in distress.

GUILTY. - DEATH . Aged 38.

Recommended to Mercy .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190217-32

346. JOHN CALVERT was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of January , one horse, price 2 l.; one cart, value 2 l., and 600 bundles of wood, value 15 s. 6 d. , the property of William Squires .

JAMES SQUIRES . I am the brother of William Squires . I was out with his horse and cart, selling wood. I left the cart in the Strand , while I went down a court to deliver some wood, returned in five minutes, and missed the horse and cart. I afterwards saw them in possession of West. The prisoner was quite a stranger.

WILLIAM WEST . Squires is my brother-in-law. About half-past three o'clock in the afternoon of the 23d of January, I met the prisoner leading the horse and cart by St. Giles's; I collared him, and asked him what he was going to do with them? he said he was going to sell the wood, and take the cart home with the money - there were 350 bundles of wood missing.

Prisoner's Defence. I found the horse and cart in Tottenham-court-road. I thought if I sold the wood I should get something for taking it home.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190217-33

347. WILLIAM WESTON was indicted for stealing. on the 19th of January , one handkerchief, value 3 s., the property of William Edward Powell , from his person .

WILLIAM EDWARD POWELL , ESQ. On the 19th of January, about twelve o'clock at night, I was in New-street , returning from Somerset-place; I felt something at my pocket, put my hand down, and missed my handkerchief. I turned round, and saw two people on my left - one got off the pavement, and the prisoner went into the middle of the street, with something like my handkerchief in his hand. I charged him with taking it; he denied it, and I seized him. He put his hand behind him - I turned him round, and he let my handkerchief fall. I picked it up, and gave him in charge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I never had it.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190217-34

348. WILLIAM CLARK was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of February , one jacket, value 12 s.; one Guernsey frock, value 3 s.; one pair of trowsers, value 4 s.; one flannel shirt, value 2 s., and one neckcloth, value 6 d. , the property of Alexander Snowdon .

ALEXANDER SNOWDON . I am a seaman . On the 6th of February I lost the things from my bed-room, at the Teignmouth Castle, public-house . I was ill at the time.

JOSEPH EBLEY . I am a carpenter. I saw the prisoner come out of the public-house, and the landlord following him, calling Stop thief! I stopped him, and saw him drop the property.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 50.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190217-35

349. OWEN CLANCEY was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of February , from the person of Richard Jennings , one pocket-book, value 10 d.; one buckle, value 2 s., and one 1 l. bank note , his property.

RICHARD JENNINGS . I am a servant . On the 3d of February the prisoner and I were drinking together at the Queen's Head, public-house, at Knightsbridge . We both got drunk, and I fell asleep. When I awoke I missed the property - the prisoner was gone - we were both drunk together. I might have given it to him - I will not swear I did not.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Best.

Reference Number: t18190217-36

350. PHILLIPPE CADAY, alias PHILLIBERT , ARMAND CLERENSAC and JOSEPH ANN TRESGROSSE were indicted for that they, being persons in the Island of Mauritius , without the United kingdom of Great Briton and Island, the said island being at and before the time of committing the said felony hereinafter-mentioned, in the possession, and occupation of our Lord the King, on the 24th of February, 1818 , at the said island feloniously did import and bring, and did assist in the importing and bringing into the said island, for the purpose of their being sold, transferred, and used, and dealt with as slaves, divers, to wit, ninety-two persons, whose names are unknown, who had been removed and carried away from a certain part of Africa, called Mosambique, for the purpose before-mentioned, against the statute .

GEORGE ISAAC BRADLEY . In February, 1818, I was midshipman of the Magician frigate, which was stationed at the Island of Mauritius - we laid off port Jacutos. On the 21st of February, about two o'clock in the afternoon, we perceived a schooner standing off and in Suriac, which is a harbour of the island - the wind was against us; Mr. Evans, the master, ordered Mr. Jarrat, another midshipman, and myself, to go over land to intercept the schooner - we went with a party of seamen - we had to go eight miles. We got to Suriac about half-past four o'clock, and saw her endeavouring to get out of port, in so doing she ran on the reef of the rocks; we all boarded her, and found twelve or thirteen persons on board, among whom were the three prisoners - Phillibert appeared to be the master, and the other two mates. Phillibert gave the papers to Mr. Jarrat, and said they kept no log-book - they spoke in French. I went into the hold to examine the vessel.

Q. How was it fitted up - A. With a loose deck, or platform, about four feet from the upper deck; there was no cargo on board, except water. I examined three of the casks, two of which were filled with salt water. There were above twenty casks on board, which was much more than sufficient to supply twelve men.

COURT. Q. How did the ship appear to be fitted up - A. For the slave trade. The schooner went down before

we left her. On the 24th of February we searched a storehouse close to the bank of the river, and found yards and sails, and about a dozen pair of shackles, or irons, of different sizes, as if for women and boys; they were taken on board our frigate.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. How long before you boarded the schooner did you first see her - A. About an hour and a half, or two hours; she was about three miles off at sea, when we first saw her.

Q. Could they have landed 92 slaves without your knowing it - A. I do not think they could, it would take a long time. I was never on board but one slaveship that had no moveable deck. There was not room enough to carry bullocks. The storehouse belonged to Madam Munroe, who has, I believe, about four hundred slaves. The island is about nine months voyage from here. We brought the prisoners home with us.

MR. REYNOLDS. Q. What ship did you return in - A. The Prince Regent merchant ship. The prisoners were treated kindly on the voyage.

JOHN STANTON . I was a seaman on board the Magician. I was one of the party on board the tender, on the 21st of February, we were directed to go by land to intercept the schooner - our party consisted of nine. When we got to Suriac we separated, one party went in a boat to go on board her, the other went on the hill, to fire into her. I went on the hill.

Q. What did you fire into her for - A. She tried to get out, and struck on a reef of rocks. We boarded her, and saw the three prisoners there, and eight or nine sailors - the prisoners appeared to be officers. The schooner went down in about half an hour.

Q. When did you next see the prisoners - A. In confinement at the hospital of Port Louis. After the schooner was wrecked I went on board, and brought some spars and tackle away, and took them to Munroe's storehouse, where I found about thirty-six bags of stuff, like rice, and a bag of irons, large and small - they appeared to be for peoples' legs.

Cross-examined. I found the things at the storehouse the first time that I went, which was the day after the schooner went down.

COURT. Q. Did you compare the tackle you brought from the schooner with that in the storehouse - A. Yes, they were the tackle of the same ship.

LISE VICTORINE (through an interpreter). I was slave to Madam Lebrun, who lived at the Hermitage, at the Mauritius.

Q. Do you remember a quantity of blacks being brought to your mistress's - A. Yes, the prisoners and Le Tountaine came with them, and two or three sailors - they were put in the storehouse - there were men, women, and two or three children. They remained in the storehouse about three days. They could not speak French. There had been a hurricane in the island.

Q. How long did the prisoners remain there - A. About three days; they lodged in mistress's house. They went out with about half the blacks, and returned with them, the same day, and put them into the storehouse again.

Q. Do you know Monsieur Cavilla - A. Yes, Quanto was his servant; they came in while the prisoners were there, and brought the provisions and clothes with them for the new blacks; they both slept at mistress's house that night.

Q. Do you remember a party of soldiers coming at night to the house while the prisoners and blacks were there - A. Yes, about three days after the blacks arrived, Cavilla and Quanto were also there - the soldiers were not admitted. Madam Lebrun said she would not open the door unless the Commissary came; he came next morning with Mr. Campbell, and the door was opened. The prisoners, Quanto and Clerensac, were marched away with the blacks - some of the blacks were left, as they were ill. I never saw the prisoners at my mistress's house before. Polydore, who is my husband, came to see me while the blacks were there.

Cross-examined. The prisoners came at the time of the hurricane - A. Yes, the hurricane began on the last Saturday in February, on which day the prisoners came - it lasted two days. My husband is his mother's property - he lived about five leagues from the Hermitage; he came on the Monday, and saw the blacks - he did not ask me about them.

Q. Where is Cavilla - A. He died in prison in the Isle of France.

Q. Has not your husband been made free in consequence of the information he gave - A. Yes.

FREDERICK POLYDORE . In February last I lived with my mother in the Isle of France, Victorine is my wife; I went to Madam Lebrun's, to see her, on Saturday - the prisoners were there. I walked about the yard, and saw the storehouse full of blacks. Cavilla asked me what I wanted with the blacks. I remained there till the next day, and then went and gave information to the captain of one of his Majesty's ships. The Governor sent me with Captain Campbell and some soldiers, to Madam Lebrun's house, we got there between ten and eleven o'clock at night. The soldiers surrounded the place where the blacks were.

Q. Did you speak to any of the blacks - A. It was impossible, they could not hear me. I know they were Mosambique blacks.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you any conversation with your wife about them - A. None. I first went there on a Monday.

Q. Did you not say you gave information against Cavilla because he had ill-treated you - A. I did say so.

Q. Did you not say you was promised a hundred dollars for the information - A. No, nobody ever made that promise. I did not know the prisoners before.

MR. CHARLES MACKENZIE CAMPBELL . I am a Lieutenant in the Bourbon Regiment. I was at the Mauritius, as aid-de-camp to Gen. Hall, the Governor. The island was in his Majesty's possession. On the 3d of March I received orders from General Hall, and went to a plantation occupied by Madame Lebrun, with a detachment of the 22d regiment. I went from the Governor's country residence at Redwhee, we had seven miles to go. Corporal Clarkson and Walter Bailey were part of the detachment - Pollydore went with us as a guide, by the Governor's order. We arrived about eleven o'clock at night. He pointed out a wooden building, and two small huts about fifteen paces from the building. I divided my detachment into two

parties, and surrounded the wooden building with one, and the huts with the other. I had a lanthorn with me - I went into the huts, and found both of them filled with blacks; there were seventy-two men and boys, and seven women and girls - the greatest part of them were naked. Besides these, there was one dead, another dying, two were covered with the small-pox, and nine were so very weak that I could not remove them - they could neither stand nor move. The greatest part of them were covered with the itch. They appeared quite astonished when the soldiers surrounded the huts; they came up to us, and examined our clothes and arms - they appeared quite savage - they were Mosambique blacks. I spoke to them in the Creole French, which is the language we talk to the blacks in the Mauritius, they did not understand us, nor could I understand them. I am positive they were newly imported. I secured the huts for the night, and then went to the building, knocked at the door, and requested admission - a woman's voice answered, that she was alone, with her two daughters, and would not open the door at that time of night. I desired the soldiers not to allow a single person to escape from the house. I then went about the plantation, and found a hut some distance from the principal building, with eight or nine blacks in it - I spoke to them in French, they answered. They must have been sometime in the island, or they could not have understood the language. I returned to my detachment, and remained there till morning.

Q. Did you see any boilers near the huts - A. I saw three large iron boilers before the doors of the huts, which are generally used to boil victuals for a number of blacks - one of them had something like a decoction, which they generally give the blacks for the itch. Next morning, about eleven o'clock, Mr. Casso, the Magistrate, came in a palanquin. As soon as they heard the noise which the bearers of the palanquin make, they opened the windows and threw the doors open, which Mr. Casso and myself entered, and found the three prisoners, Cavilla and Quanto, Madam Lebrun, her two daughters, and Victorine. I shewed my orders to Mr. Casso, and told him I was to take the persons prisoners to Redwhee; he requested I would leave M. Cavilla behind with Madam Lebrun - I consented, as he said he would be responsible. I then took the prisoners, seventy-two of the blacks, and Quanto, to Redwhee. I left twenty-one negroes behind, as they were not able to march. Madam Lebrun's house is twenty-two miles from Suriac, and is in a large forest.

Cross-examined. Q. Is not the island governed according to the terms of the capitulation - A. I should think so. I had not been a fortnight on the island. Madagascar is five or six days' voyage from the island. The slaves on the island are constantly in the habit of seeing soldiers.

Q. What day of the week did you go to Madam Lebrun's - A. On Tuesday - the hurricane had subsided on Sunday.

Q. Is there a road from Suriac to Madam Lebrun's - A. Yes. There could be no difficulty in getting there in twelve hours.

Q. When were the prisoners put on board to be brought there - A. On the 24th of April; we arrived on the 14th of January.

MR. ATTORNEY GENERAL. Q. After you arrived, you went before a magistrate, and then before the Privy Council - A. Yes.

JOHN CLARKSON. I am a corporal of the 22d Regiment of Foot, and was one of the detachment, with Lieutenant Campbell, at Madam Lebrun's house; the prisoners were in the house; we took them to Redwhee. I saw ninety-two blacks in the huts.

WALTER BAILEY . I am a private in the 22d Regiment of Foot. I went to Madam Lebrun's; the prisoners were there, and ninety-two blacks in the huts.

PHILLIBERT and TRESGROSSE jointly put in an exceeding long written Defence, in which they stated that the ship was laden with a cargo of forty-eight oxen, which they lost in consequence of the severe weather, and the vessel was run ashore; the sailors came on board, and they delivered their papers, and advised them to sure themselves, as the vessel was sinking. They came ashore and lost their way, but meeting Clerensac, he took them to Lebrun's as they were fatigued; they meant to continue their journey next day, but the roads were so very bad, in consequence of the hurricanes and rains; that the soldiers surrounded the house and secured them. (The defence then went on to complain of ill usage in the island, and denying all knowledge of the blacks.)

CLERENSAC'S Defence. Two days after the hurricane, I met the two prisoners, who appeared fatigued; I took them to Lebrun's - we found Cavilla there. The house was surrounded by soldiers that night, and next morning we were taken prisoners.

- QUANTO. I am a native of the Isle of France. I was at Madam Lebrun's house when the soldiers came - the prisoners came there that evening alone - they brought no negroes - I never was there before; I cannot tell whether they were there before or not. I was brought to England as a prisoner with them, and discharged by the Privy Council.

MR. ATTORNEY GENERAL. Q. You was Cavilla's servant; what quantity of provisions did you carry that day to Madame Lebrun's - there was some rice. I went to conduct some old negroes there.

PHILLIBERT - GUILTY . Aged 26.

CLERENSAC - GUILTY . Aged 22.

TRESGROSSE - GUILTY . Aged 25.

Confined Three Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18190217-37

351. JAMES NELSON was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of February , eighty-six pair of stockings, value 5 l. 13 s., and twenty-four caps, value 23 s., the goods of Thomas Price , in his dwelling-house .

MATTHEW PRICE . I am servant to my brother Thomas, who is a linen-draper , and lives in Tothill-street . On the 6th of February, about half-past six o'clock in the evening the prisoner and another man came, and asked to look at some silk handkerchiefs; while I was talking to the other man, the prisoner took up a bundle of caps and stockings and ran out with them; I pursued, and took the bundle

out of his hand, but he escaped. I saw him again in two days after, at Queen-square office, and am certain he is the man.

RICHARD MUNDAY . I apprehended the prisoner.

NOT GUILTY

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190217-38

352. WILLIAM JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of January , value 3 s., the property of James Clarke , from his person .

JAMES CLARKE . I am servant to Mr. Sutton , who lives in Mortimor-street. On the 25th of January, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I was in Tottenham-court-road - some men had been fighting; I stopped to look at them for about five minutes, I felt something pull at my pocket, and saw the prisoner go from me; I saw the corner of my handkerchief as he put it under his great-coat. I followed him, and saw him take it from his coat, and put it into his pocket. I secured him, and he gave it to me. He told me to say nothing about it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I found it.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190217-39

353. GEORGE HAYCROFT and DAVID HATFIELD were indicted for stealing, on the 14th of February , one handkerchief, value 2 s., the property of James Cross , from his person .

JAMES CROSS . I live in Castle-street, Holborn. On Sunday night, between eight and nine o'clock, I was in Mitre-court, Ely-place, coming out of Ely Chapel with a gentleman; I felt a pull at my pocket, and immediately missed my handkerchief; I turned round, seized both the prisoners, and charged them with it; one said he did not take it, and the other that he had not got it. When we got to Hatton-garden, I saw Hatfield drop it between his legs - he picked it up again, and said,

"What is this," and dropped it again, - I gave them in charge.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Nobody was near enough to do it but the prisoners.

JOHN BARNLEY . I am a constable. I took the prisoners in charge; I had seen them in company together at St. Andrew's Church about ten minutes before.

HATFIELD'S Defence. The handkerchief was a yard from me.

HATFIELD - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined Three Months , and Whipped .

HAYCROFT - GUILTY . Aged 15.

Confined Six Months , and Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190217-40

354. GEORGE THOMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of January , one handkerchief, value 2 s., the property of Roger Dawson , from his person .

ROGER DAWSON . On the 25th of January, about eleven o'clock in the morning, I was walking down West-street, Chick-lane ; I felt a tread upon my heel, turned round, and missed my handkerchief. I saw two boys following me - the prisoner was the last; I saw something under his jacket, collared him, and found it was my handkerchief - I gave him in charge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I found it.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190217-41

355. JOHN WILLIAMS and WILLIAM JONES were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Joseph Hawkins , about seven o'clock in the night of the 12th of February , at St. Sepulchre , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, two handkerchiefs, value 10 s. , his property.

WILLIAM DRAKEFORD . I am servant to Mr. Joseph Hawkins , who is a linen-draper , and lives in St. John-street , in the parish of St. Sepulchre. On the 12th of February, about half-past six o'clock at night, I was in the shop - it was quite dark - the lamps had been lit above an hour. Thompson came in, and said he had got two boys for breaking our window, and had taken them to the watch-house - we knew nothing of it ourselves. I had seen the window in the morning, one pane was cracked quite across, from side to side, but the glass was quite fast, and not at all likely to come out - the crack had been there for near a month. When Thompson came in I went out, and found the pane broke and cracked all over - one piece was out; I had not been in the shop ten minutes before Thompson came in - I did not hear it break - it might have been broken before I went in. I observed the handkerchief hanging about half a yard out of the window - one part inside and the other out; they were full a yard from the window when I saw them before. There was a piece of cloth behind the glass, which prevented them from coming quite out; there was a quantity of glass in the window, when we cleared the things away.

THOMAS THOMPSON . I am constable of St. Sepulchre's. On the 12th of February, between six and seven o'clock at night - it was quite dark, I was informed there were some suspicious persons in St. John-street, I went there with Morgan, the patrol. I saw the two prisoners there in company with another, (who had an umbrella,) against the prosecutor's shop - I was in a house on the opposite side of the street. I saw them all three go up close to the window - they appeared to be covering each other, so that nobody should notice them - the middle man appeared to be doing something to the glass; I do not know whether it was the other man or the prisoner Williams; they all immediately left the window, and crossed over to my side of the way - nobody had given any alarm. They joined, went back to the window again, and still appeared to be employed as before; somebody came by, who appeared to look at them; they all left the window again, and crossed over to my side. They repeated it three or four times. At last I saw Jones go up to the window by himself; I saw him put his left hand into the window,

and pull something - he remained there about a minute; they crossed over the way, and saw me knocking at a shop-door; Jones looked at me, and crossed over immediately, as I suspected, to give the others a signal that I was watching. I followed, got on the opposite side, and collared both, as they appeared to be making off; Williams made a desperate resistance, and got from me. I called for assistance, and the patrol stopped him in the middle of the road, before he got out of my sight; I put them in the watch-house, which is about 150 yards off, and returned directly to Mr. Hawkins - I could not have been gone above two or three minutes. When I came back I observed the glass had been broken - the putty appeared to have been cut with a small knife; there was a piece of glass quite out, and taken away; a small piece of glass was left sticking to the putty. Drakefield said two handkerchiefs had been taken out - I did not see them.

HENRY MORGAN . I am a patrol. I was coming down St. John-street, about half-past five o'clock, and saw the prisoners looking in at several shop-windows; I watched them. At last they went up to the prosecutor's window. I gave Thompson information, and we both went to the shop - it was then about a quarter before six o'clock - you could not distinguish a man's features by the natural light - the lamps were lit in the street and shops. I saw the prisoner, Jones, with two others go up to Hawkins's shop; I then saw the man with the umbrella push the corner pane of glass with his hand; then all three went from the window up the street. I went and called Thompson to my assistance - we went and found them at the window, Jones was in the middle pushing the glass with his hand. Two persons went into the shop; the three prisoners immediately crossed over the way; Jones came and stood before me, looking me full in the face, the other two stopped. Directly Jones saw me, he went and spoke to them, and they all went away together. They came down St. John-street again, went to the window, and I saw Williams pulling at something. I went down the street, and stood at the end of Swan-alley, and saw all three at the window. Jones walked away, and crossed to where Thompson was hiding himself - a waggon came by, and I saw no more until Thompson called out, tyo, which is my watch-ward; I crossed over, and saw Thompson had hold of the two prisoners; Williams struck him and got away, another patrol came by, and struck him with a stick; I seized him, and immediately took him to the watch-house. I went to the window, and saw two handkerchiefs hanging out of the broken place - it was near seven o'clock when we took them.

WILLIAM DRAKEFORD re-examined. I took two handkerchiefs in, and afterwards heard that two more were hanging out, I pulled them in; I did not notice the window after the morning - it was then quite safe, just as I had seen it for a month before.

HENRY J. BIGNALL . On Friday, the 12th of February, at full half-past six o'clock in the evening, I was coming out of Swan-alley into St. John-street; Thomson stood at the end of the passage; he pointed three men out to me at Hawkins's shop - they were the prisoners, and another who had an umbrella over his shoulder; he desired me to go beyond them, and assist in securing them if they went from the shop. I went directly opposite to them, about 15 yards off on the other side - all three stood abreast the window, the middle one seemed to put his hand to the window - at that time a person hastily passed by, he has hastily took his hand from the window, and rose it to his face. I distinctly saw a piece of glass in his hand, about as big as my four fingers. All three instantly walked from the window up the street, crossed over, and came close by me. I heard the alarm, and afterwards saw them at the watch-house. Williams had an apron on when he came to the watch-house, he doubled it round him; and I think the man who rose the glass to his head had an apron on.

WILLIAM PAYNE . I am the watch-house keeper. The prisoners were brought to me - I think Williams had no apron on, Jones had one. I found a comb on Jones. Before Williams was searched he sat down on a form; soon after, I took a candle, and under the form I found a knife, exactly under where he sat. I went next day to look at the window; it appeared as if a knife had been run down between the frame and the glass - nobody had been in the watch-house before this. I cannot say the knife was not there before.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAMS'S Defence. Two lads were brought to the watch-house soon after us to look at us; they said it was a taller man than me, and that he had a blue coat on.

JONES'S Defence. I was coming down the street, and was taken.

WILLIAMS - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 31.

JONES - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 17.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18190217-42

356. MARTIN WARD was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of February , at Isleworth , one sheep, price 4 l. , the property of Samuel Keene .

SECOND COUNT, for feloniously killing a sheep, price 4 l., the property of Samuel Keene, with intent to steal the whole carcase of the same.

SAMUEL KEENE . I am a butcher , and live at Hounslow. I have a field in Heston parish. On Saturday, the 13th of February, I had ten sheep safe in my field; on Monday morning I was informed one was lost; I went and found the whole carcase of a sheep at Payne's shop, the butcher - it was hot; the watchman, Hall, shewed it to me; it appeared to be very badly cut up. I went to my field, and found the skin. I am sure it was the skin of my sheep. The carcase was compared with it - I am certain the carcase belonged to the skin. The head was left in the skin, and so were the feet. The bones of the legs corresponded. The prisoner said he found it in his road from Colnbrook.

WILLIAM HALL . I am a watchman. On the 15th of February, about three o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner at Hounslow, with a bag on his back, and asked him where he came from? he said from Colnbrook, and he was going to London; I asked him what he had got there? he said it was only a few blankets which he was going to take to his wife. I told him to put them down for me to see them - he did so, and said,

"Watchman, I have only got a bit of meat, which I found in the road; I have got the price of a glass, you may as well take it,

and let me go." I secured him, and took the bag to a butcher's shop, where Keene saw it; there was the carcase of a sheep in the bag - it was quite warm.

WILLIAM CRANAGE. I missed the sheep, and gave the prosecutor information.

SAMUEL KEENE re-examined. It was worth 4 l.

Prisoner's Defence. I got it in the road.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 32.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Best.

Reference Number: t18190217-43

357. JOHN DAVIS was indicted for feloniously assaulting Daniel Wolfford , on the King's highway, on the 30th of January , at St. Giles's in the Fields , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, one pair of breeches, value 16 s., and one waistcoat, value 8 s. , the goods of John Wells .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating them to be the goods of James Wolfford .

DANIEL WOLFFORD . I am twelve years old. On the 30th of January, I was going along Tottenham-court-road , about a quarter after ten o'clock at night, I had a pair of breeches and a waistcoat tied up in a handkerchief - they belonged to John Wells ; the prisoner met me, and asked me to hold three pence for him, I took it, and held it while he tied his shoe. I told him to go a little to the light - he did so. I told him to take the three pence, for I was in a hurry. He did so, and immediately hit me a violent blow with his fist in my face, took my bundle, and ran off. I called Stop thief! and he dropped it - the watchman came and secured him. I came up, and picked up my bundle - he was never out of my sight till he was taken; he only ran about twenty yards. I gave him in charge. A crowd came round, which prevented his running away.

WILLIAM WILLIAMS . I am a watchman of Tottenham-court-road. I heard the boy cry Stop thief! and went to his assistance - a great many persons were coming up. I saw the prisoner; he was stopped by a gentleman before I came up; I took him in charge. There was a great crowd, who endeavoured to rescue the prisoner. The prosecutor gave me the bundle.

WILLIAM RICE . I am a watchman. On the 30th of January I was on duty, heard the cry of Stop thief! came up with Williams, and secured the prisoner. The people were round him, which prevented his running away.

CHARLES DEVARNEJOUL . I assisted in taking the prisoner to the watch-house. The prosecutor said he had 3 d. in his hand - we opened his hand, and found 3 d. there.

Prisoner's Defence. I was pursuing the man, and was stopped myself.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 25.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Richardson.

Reference Number: t18190217-44

358. WILLIAM JENNINGS was indicted for the wilful murder of Mary Ann Cormack .

MARY CONDON . I live in Stewart's-rents, Mary Ann Cormack was under my care - she was about two years and seven months old. I first saw the prisoner about a fortnight before Cormack died; he came to me under the Piazza, at Covent-garden, where I sell soup in the morning - I keep a fire there to keep it warm, He told me that I lost my customers by not coming earlier; I said I could not get my boys up to help me out sooner; he said he would help me any morning; I told him where I lived. Next morning he came and helped me to market - he came three mornings running; I gave him his breakfast for his trouble. On the third morning I missed a brass cock from my water-but; I did not see him again until the night before the child was burnt - he then came. I asked him what brought him back to my place the last time that he left? I told him the cock was stolen, and I thought it was him; he said he returned for his stick, and he did not know what to do with a brass cock - I told him to come no more. Next morning, about seven o'clock, he came to me in the market, and said he had got some composition coal for me; I said I never heard of such coal; he said it was what gentlemen burnt in their parlours, as it made no smoke, and was like Kilkenny coal, and that it would make up a fine fire without any smoke. I told him to put it in my basket; he emptied my charcoal, and put it in my basket - there was about a hatfull of it in one lump; he had it in a butter-flat - he behaved as usual, and I gave him a bason of soup.

Q. What was the stuff like - A. It was black, it did not shine like coal, it was soft, and not heavy. I went home about ten o'clock, and took it with me. I put the fire which I brought from market into the grate; Mary Ann Cormack was in the room, and a little girl nursing her; also my son Thomas. I put the basket about half a yard from the fireplace, and put a little piece of the stuff, which I broke off, about the size of a hen's egg on the fire; the moment I laid it on, it went off with the greatest report, and flew all about the place; it caught the rest in the basket which went off immediately, caught the childrens clothes, and mine was all on fire in a moment - our clothes were all blazing. Mary Ann Cormack was carried to the hospital immediately. The paint was all blistered off the wainscot.

Q. What was the smell like - A. I was so frightened I cannot tell. My eyelashes were burnt. Cormack died two days after.

Prisoner. Q. Had you any reason to suppose I meant to injure any one - A. No.

DAVID CONDON . I am the son of Mary Condon . The prisoner assisted my mother three mornings to go to market. After he went the third morning he came back - I asked him what brought him back? he said he came for his stick - I told him to look for it; he said,

"Never mind it," and went out. When I went to work I left him standing at the street-door, he would not go away. When I came home I heard the water-cock was stolen. I was in the room when the explosion took place. My mother has spoken correctly.

THOMAS CONDON . On the night before the accident happened I was at home, the prisoner came about six o'clock, my mother asked him where he had been ever since? he said he had cut his hand. She said the water-cock was missing the morning he was there, and told him never to come again. I went to market next morning with my mother, he came and brought the stuff she has spoken about. I was in the room when it blew up. My eye was much burnt. The deceased was much also burnt.

WILLIAM CORMACK . I was father of the deceased. I was in the room the night the prisoner came; I told him

I dare say he knew what to do with a brass cock as well as anybody, that I did not like his looks, and if it was my place I would soon hand him out.

ROBERT CONDON . I am brother-in-law to Mary Condon . I went to apprehend the prisoner on Sunday, the 17th of January, in Covent-garden-market - he struggled to get from me. When I told him I wanted him to go to Stewart's-rents to clear up the point he was accused of, he said he was willing to go.

MR. HERBERT MAYO . I am house-surgeon of Middlesex Hospital. The deceased was brought in on the 14th of January, she was considerably burnt, principally about the limbs. She lived about forty-eight hours, and died with the symptoms usual after considerable burning - there is no doubt of that being the cause of her death.

Prisoner's Defence. I found the coal in the Strand; it appeared to be patent coal. I knew nothing of the accident until I had got before the magistrate.

GUILTY. Aged 33.

Confined Three Months .

Of Manslaughter only .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18190217-45

358. JOHN ROYAL was indicted for that he, on the 6th of December , with a certain pistol, loaded with gunpowder, and a leaden bullet, feloniously, wilfully, maliciously and unlawfully, did shoot at William Fleet , a subject of our Lord the King, with intent to kill, and murder him .

TWO OTHER COUNTS, the same, only stating the prisoner's intent to be to disable him, and do him some grevous bodily harm.

THOMAS WILLIAM GITTENS . I live in Baham-street, Camden-town; the prisoner lived in a cottage at Hampstead. I have had two relations under my care for some years, named Emily and Eliza Neysmith . In the early part of November Eliza left my house; I afterwards found she was at the prisoner's house, and I went to him on the subject. I asked him if he had made the young lady his wife? - he made a bow, but said nothing. I asked him again - he said he was not accustomed to answer questions put to him in that kind of way. I then appealed to Eliza, who was present, and asked her if she had been in that house ever since she left mine, which was about ten days; she cried a great deal, and said she had. I said

"Are you married?" She was going to answer me, but looked at the prisoner, and he said,

"You must ask me any questions you have to ask." I then told her she had left her home, and was gone into the paths of wretchedness and misery, and that the villain who had now got her, would keep her a few months, and then return her upon my hands - she was then just turned sixteen years of age. I then told the prisoner he had been the means of making two unfortunate orphans completely unhappy, in separating them in this kind of way, and requested her immediately to leave the villain; she still cried, and said I cannot leave him. The prisoner observed that it was impossible for me to say that they were not married, and that no one should put their feet between Eliza and him. I requested her again to leave him and go home with me, telling her, that as long as I had a home it should be her's, while she remained in the paths of virtue - I was very warm. The prisoner arose, and seemed to put himself in a posture of defence between her and me - I suppose he thought I was going to take her away. He said,

"If you get her away, I will be the death of you;" and that he would give me satisfaction at any time, or any other gentleman that would come to him. I thought he might mean money, and told him money would be no satisfaction to me, and I disdained his purse; he said sneeringly,

"I have no purse, I keep my money in my pocket." He pointed to the door, and said he did not wish to see me, and he was sure Eliza did not. He then said he felt for Emily, her sister and that she might be under his roof with Eliza, and then the sisters could be comfortable together; he made a great many promises to Emily, who was with me, that he would be her father and protector, and that he would give every satisfactory answer to her if I would leave the room. I went out, leaving Emily there, and he said I should not come in again. Emily soon after joined me, and we went away together.

Q. Did Eliza come home after this - A. Yes, on Monday, I think, and remained till the Sunday week following, which was twelve days. The day after she returned I heard that he had called, and promised her any recompence. I went to him, and asked him if he would marry her? for nothing else would be a compensation for the injury done; he said he could not marry, for he was under a 600 l. bond not to marry, and that he never intended, nor ever would marry her. I told him her father was a man as high in rank as himself, under his Majesty, and that the young ladies had been brought up quite different to what he imagined, seeing them in an humble situation with me. Her father was a purser in the Navy. He then said he could not be accountable for his conduct in seducing her, for if it was the daughter of the Prince Regent, or the first Lord of the Admiralty, it would be the same thing to him - nothing more particular passed; Eliza left me again in about twelve days. I requested Fleet to go with Emily to his house.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. The prisoner offered no violence to you - A No; he said if I got her away he would be the death of me - he was an officer, and has

lost a leg and an arm. I am a married man. I told the prisoner the young women were relations of mine.

MISS EMILY NEYSMITH . I have a sister named Eliza, we lived together with Mr. Gittens. In consequence of Eliza going away, I went with Mr. Gittens to the prisoner's cottage, and saw her with him. There was some conversation between the prisoner and Mr. Gittens, after which he left the room. The prisoner then desired me to take a chair, and said he would tell me the particulars, and not to make myself uneasy; I asked him if he had married my sister? he smiled, and asked me if I did not think it equally solemn to be married in that house, as to go to church? I said certainly, if by a proper person; he said soldiers never went to church to be married - nothing more particular passed; I went out, and went home with Mr. Gittens.

Q. After your sister returned, and went away again, did you miss any thing - A. I missed a letter, and went with Fleet to the prisoner's cottage about half-past six o'clock in the evening; I knocked at the door, and heard Captain Royal say he would answer the door himself; he requested to know who was there. I said my name was Neysmith; he said he did not know such a name or such a person. I said I had merely come for a letter, which my sister had taken away in her box, as I supposed, by mistake. He said my sister was gone to Dover, and he had got no letter of mine. He asked me if I was alone? I said yes, in hopes I should obtain the letter, upon which Fleet said,

"No - she is not alone." The prisoner immediately said,

"It is that villiain Gittens, I will shoot him, and send him home without a leg, or a wing." I said it was not Gittens - it was Fleet. He said Fleet or Gittens he did not care for he would shoot them, or twenty more. I heard him go up stairs, and call for his pistols - he opened the window, and said,

"Now I am ready," put the pistol out of the window and fired - I was at the door; it was not fired towards me - Fleet was by the garden railings. He called for more powder and ball, came down, and said if I did not go from the door, he would pepper me also - I went away very much alarmed.

Cross-examined. Q. Fleet was never at the prisoner's before - A. No, he merely went to protect me. The letter I wanted, entitled me and my sister to a small pension - I do not suppose he meant to injure me.

WILLIAM FLEET . I went with Miss Emily Neysmith to the prisoner's house, she has spoken correctly; she said she was alone - I said I was with her. He said

"d - n me, it is that d - d villain and blackguard, Gittens, and d - n me if I don't shoot him." She said it is not Gittens, it is Fleet. He said,

"D - n Fleet, or Gittens, or twenty more, I will shoot them," and called for his pistols; he went up stairs, and I went to the footpath. He opened the window, fired, and said,

"Did that touch you - if not I have another that will" - I could not see in what direction it was pointed; there was a loud report - I heard no noise of ball.

COURT. The conduct of the prisoner is certainly very improper, but this case does not come within the meaning of the Act.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Best.

Reference Number: t18190217-46

359. JOSEPH POPE was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of January , seven 10 l. and fourteen 1 l. bank notes, the property of William Stocken and John Stocken , in the dwelling-house of John Richards and George Wilson .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating them to be the property of Oliver Stocken .

OLIVER STOCKEN . I am employed to collect money for my father , who is a brewer. On the 25th of January I went to Mr. Wilson's shop, in St. Martin's-court, to order a book, about twelve o'clock - the prisoner was there serving customers. I took out my pocket-book when I was there, and laid it on the counter, it contained seven 10 l. and fourteen 1 l. notes. I went away, and in about twenty minutes I missed my pocket-book. I returned to the shop - the prisoner was not there - I informed the people I had lost it; he came in in about half an hour. Mr. Richards asked him if he had seen it? he said he had not. About a week after, Gatty produced a 10 l. note to me, which I knew to be one of those I had lost.

JAMES GATTY . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Tooley-street, Borough. On the 29th of January, about ten o'clock in the morning, the prisoner bought a pair of plated candlesticks and snuffers and stand of me, and paid me a 10 l. note. I know he is the man.

GEORGE WILSON . The prisoner was our shopman. I asked him if he had seen the pocket-book? he said he had not. When he was apprehended he sent for me, said he did take it off the counter, and paid a 10 l. note in Tooley-street - that he changed the remainder of the notes, bought into the Funds, and threw some checks and bills which were in the book over Blackfriars-bridge.

OLIVER STOCKEN . The 10 l. note is mine.

GUILTY. Aged 22.

Of stealing, but not in a dwelling-house .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Richardson.

Reference Number: t18190217-47

360. HENRY DOWLING was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of February , one gold seal, value 15 s. , the property of Joseph York Hatton .

JOSEPH YORK HATTON . I am a jeweller , and live in Thames-street . On the 11th of February, about three o'clock in the afternoon, I was in the parlour behind my shop, the prisoner came in, and asked to see some seals, my wife was attending to him; she showed him a tray, which contained eight dozen. He asked for a blood-stone seal, saying it was for a very fine engraving. I went into the shop to inform him what were the best stones for engraving. I returned into the parlour, and heard him say,

"I will take this - it is 30 s., is it not? You must send it to Tower-street." My wife answered,

"Oh, send it!" I said,

"Certainly, Sir, we will send it," as he appeared a gentleman. My wife then said,

"Sir, you have got another seal in your other hand," which he held down by his side. He then lifted up his hand, and said,

"I hope, Madam, you did not think I meant to steal your seal!" - it was in his left hand. It was a red cornelian seal, not the sort that he enquired for. He stood at the rail, not at the counter. He asked me if I wished to search him? I said, No, but I would take the liberty of walking to Tower-street with him. With some reluctance he took me to Tower-street, to a respectable boot-maker's shop - I asked him if he

lodged there? the master said No. I asked him if he would pay 30 s. for him if I sent an article there? he said,

"Certainly not," and said he had not seen him for five years before. He gave me his name, and said he was a surgeon. Mr. Helmsley, the boot-maker, said,

"You had better tell the truth at once - you know you have been in two or three different situations since you was a surgeon. He then said he was in no employ at present, and that

"the seal was for Mr. Charles." I gave him in charge. There was only 1 d. and a duplicate found on him.

Cross-examined by MR. ARABIN. Q. Have you not since found he has been a surgeon - A. Yes. He produced the seal immediately my wife charged him with it. Mr. Hemsley offered to pay me for the seal - I refused.

ELIZABETH YORK HATTON . I am the wife of the last witness. The prisoner came into the shop, and asked for a blood-stone seal, he said he wanted it for a fine engraving, and asked which was best. Mr. Hatton came out and gave his opinion - he fixed on one, and told me to send it to Tower-street. I asked him for the seal which he had in his left hand; he then lifted up his hand, and it was in it - he said he hoped I did not think he was going to steal it. Mr. Hatton took it out of his hand before he could deliver it to me.

JAMES ROWE . I am an apprentice to Mr. Hatton. I saw the prisoner take the seal out of the tray, and put it into his left hand.

THOMAS HEMSLEY . I am a boot-maker, and live in Tower-street. Hatton brought the prisoner to my shop, he did not live there. I said, I thought he could not be guilty of such a thing, and offered to pay for the seal, the prosecutor refused. If he had come to me, and said he had ordered a seal to my house, I should most likely have paid for it.

Prisoner's Defence. I only asked for one single seal, she handed the tray over the railing. I held one in my hand, which was certainly lower than the tray, as the tray was nearly up to my chin. I did not think to replace it immediately. I told the prosecutor if he would go with me I would pay him.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190217-48

361. GEORGE SIBLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of January , two bushels of wheat, value 20 s. , the property of Joseph Trumper .

JOSEPH TRUMPER . I am a farmer , and live at Harefield . The prisoner was my servant , he was employed to clean 10 sacks of wheat. On the 13th of January he left work about four o'clock, and brought the key home as usual - I kept it in my bed-room. Next morning he came to work at half-past six o'clock, which was rather earlier than usual. I gave him the key, he returned in about five minutes, and asked me if I had been in the barn since he left? I said No. He said there was a sack of wheat stolen - I went to the barn, found it was so, and told him to clean up another sack in its place - I did not suspect him. I sent him round to the mills with samples of the wheat, and told him if he found any that corresponded with it to give notice of it - he said it was the sack that he had cleaned up last. While he was gone to the mills, I searched, and found the sack, with about two bushels of wheat, in the calves' pen in the cow-house, covered with hay - the rest must have been taken away - I left it there. I did not tell the prisoner of it, but watched in the evening, with my nephew and brother. The prisoner left work between four and five o'clock, I gave him no orders to watch. I went to watch about half-past five o'clock, came back to the house for my gun, returned in about five minutes, and found the sack had been removed about three yards in my absence. I went away about seven, leaving my cousin to watch, and heard the prisoner was taken. His house was afterwards searched - six bushels of flour, and a peck and a half of wheat, were found there.

Cross-examined by MR. ARABIN. Q. You offered a reward of three guineas to find out the thief - A. I believe I did. The prisoner did not say he found the wheat concealed, and wanted to detect the thief for the reward. It was not gleaned wheat that was found in the prisoner's house, it was threshed and cleaned.

EDWARD TRUMPER . I am the prosecutor's cousin. I watched while he was gone into the house, and heard a rustling noise in the calf-pen - the door of the rick-yard was open. I was within three yards of it. I heard a man walking softly out of the cowhouse, and being quite dark in the cowhouse, I could not see him - he rushed out of the door, and I endeavoured to lay hold of him, I could then see his dress. About a minute after I found the prisoner in the rick-yard, under the haystack, within ten yards of the cowhouse door - he stood up under the haystack, and was dressed the same as the man that ran out. I have not the least doubt of his being the same man - I found nobody but him there. It was about half-past seven o'clock - he had no business there. I collared him, and said, Now I have got you, you must go with me. He said,

"I am ready to go; you may think I stole the wheat out of the barn, by my being here; I have been watching these two hours." He had not been set to watch, nor was he in a situation to watch - he could not see the cowhouse door from where he was.

Cross-examined. I could see all over the yard, it is paled in; he could not have been there two hours without our seeing him, and he must have heard us.

WILLIAM TRUMPER. I am brother to the prosecutor. I assisted in taking the prisoner behind the haystack - he had a ladder before him to conceal himself - his body was concealed. I ran against him, and did not see him; he did not call out until he was taken.

WILLIAM HAYNES . I am a constable. I searched the prisoner's premises, and found about six bushels of flour, and about a peck of wheat.

EDWARD TRUMPER re-examined, I compared the wheat with the bulk, it is the same sort that is in the sack.

GUILTY . Aged 29.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190217-49

362. JAMES DOWDON was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of January . one bee hive, value 18 d., and 6 lbs. of honey, value 9 s. , the property of James Heath .

JAMES HEATH . I live at Longford . I lost a bee hive with the honey. I had the prisoner taken up, as he was seen eating some in a ditch.

JOHN TELLYER . I saw the prisoner in a ditch with three honeycombs.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190217-50

363. SUSANNAH FEASEY and MARY KNIGHT was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of February , one gown, value 2 s., and two handkerchiefs, value 2 s., the property of Elizabeth Sunshine ; one shirt, value 6 d., the property of the Mayor, Commonalty, and Citizens of the City of London, Governors of the Possessions, Revenues, and Goods of the Hospitals of Edward King of England, the 6th, of Christ's Hospital, and St. Thomas, the Apostle ; one handkerchief, value 2 s., the property of William Apthorp ; one handkerchief, value 2 s., the property of John Lomas ; eight handkerchiefs, value 6 s., the property of Peter Bews , and one handkerchief, value 2 s. , the property of Joseph Henderson .

JOSEPH HOSKINS . I am Superintendant of the female department of the Refuge for the Destitute, Shoreditch; the two prisoners were inmates there. Feasey came in in June, and Knight in January; I believe, they were both sent by the Lord Mayor - one was employed in the needle-room, and the other in the school, only to learn to read. On Wednesday, the 17th of February, between nine and ten o'clock, I was informed of their absence, and of the loss of a quantity of silk handkerchiefs. On searching the premises, ineffectually, for sometime, I watched in the street, and saw the prisoner, Feasey, jump over a gate of the premises belonging to our neighbour; I secured her, went over the gate into the neighbour's premises, and found the prisoner, Knight. I brought her into the house, and was informed that the property in question was in the yard where they jumped over from. I went there with a candle, and found it in the neighbour's yard.

Q. How did they get over - A. They got over at the end of the committee-room, by means of a short ladder - they must have got on each other's shoulders to get up - they must then have gone over the tiles, and dropped down near the front of the house.

ELIZABETH SUNSHINE . I am a matron of the Refuge for the Destitue. I saw Mr. Hoskins come out of the adjoining premises, with the bundle. I can swear to the gown and two handkerchiefs. I believe they were all in my care.

ANN HAWKINS . I am also a matron in the Refuge. I know this property was under my care to wash.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

FEASEY'S Defence. I was at school all day; at night, when we were going to prayer, Smith and Felton were going to run away, and had got the clothes, Knight came and asked me to run away with them, I said I would, but I knew nothing about the clothes.

KNIGHT'S Defence. Felton and Smith had the clothes, they took them as they were going to run away - they left them behind, and went to bed.

FEASEY - GUILTY . Aged 13.

KNIGHT - GUILTY . Aged 13.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190217-51

364. ELIZABETH PATCHING was indicted for feloniously breaking, and entering the dwelling-house of James Hodges , about twelve o'clock at noon, on the 26th of January , at St. Dunstan's, Stepney (Elizabeth his wife, being therein), and stealing therein, one jacket, value 16 s; one pair of trowsers, value 17 s.; two night-gowns, value 4 s.; three shirts, value 7 s. 6 d.; three pair of socks, value 2 s.; four night-caps, value 4 s., and two frills, value 4 s. , his property.

ELIZABETH HODGES . I am the wife of James Hodges , who is clerk to a wine and brandy merchant ; we live in Swan-place, Mile End , in the parish of Stepney. On the 26th of January, at twelve o'clock in the day, I was in the house; I left the articles stated in the indictment on the table under the window in the front parlour, which was shut close down. I returned to the room about a quarter before one o'clock, found the window open and the things gone - there is a small garden before the house; the gate and the street-door were both shut - there were footmarks on a bed under the window, where they had stood. About half an hour after I went to Mr. Christie's, who is a pawnbroker, and lives in Whitechapel, I found my jacket and trowsers there - I know nothing of the prisoner.

CHARLES POPE . I am servant to Mr. Christie, who is a pawnbroker. On the 26th of January, between two and three o'clock, the prisoner pledged a boy's suit of clothes for 12 s. with me. About an hour after Elizabeth Hodges came to enquire after her things, I showed them to her, and she claimed them. I have known the prisoner two years - she used our shop, and is a girl of the town. The officer came to me, and as I was describing her to him, she passed the door - he took her.

FRANCIS FREEMAN . I am an officer; the prosecutor's house is in the parish of St. Dunstan's, Stepney. On the 26th of January, the prosecutrix came to our office, said she was robbed, and took me to Christie's, they said the prisoner had just passed - I went out, and took her; they said she was the person. I then took her to her lodgings in George-yard - she pulled out a key, and unlocked the door. I saw a large box, and asked her for the key - she gave it to me, I there found the duplicate of the clothes. She said she met a woman in the street whom she drank with, and she asked her to pledge them. I found the rest of the things stated in the indictment behind her box - it was about three o'clock in the afternoon.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I met a woman, who asked me to pledge the clothes - she left the rest in my room until she should call for them.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 25.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190217-52

365. WILLIAM GREEN was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of January , at St. James's, Westminster , in the

dwelling-house of William Stevens , one trunk, value 2 s.; one pair of candlesticks, value 20 s.; one pair of snuffers, value 10 s.; one silver tea-pot, value 5 l.; one milk-pot, value 2 l.; one mustard-pot, value 2 l.; 36 silver spoons, value 17 l.; one punch-ladle, value 5 s.; one watch, value 3 l.; one watch-chain, value 2 s.; four seals, value 1 l.; one watch-key, value 1 s.; five rings, value 15 l.; two snuffboxes, value 10 s.; two tooth-picks, value 5 s.; one fruit-knife, value 5 s.; two brooches, value 20 l.; one necklace, value 4 l.; one pair of clasps, value 3 l.; one pearl sprig, value 12 l.; three crosses, value 5 l.; one scent-box, value 2 s.; 7 l. 6 s. in monies numbered; twenty-one 1 l. banknotes; one promissory note for payment of and value 100 l., and one other promissory note for payment of and value 50 l. , his property.

FRANCES STEVENS . I am the wife of William Stevens , who is a publican , and lives in Marsham-street, Carnaby-market , in the parish of St. James, Westminster, we keep the whole house - the prisoner was quite a stranger to me. On Friday evening, the 22d of January, between eight o'clock, and twenty minutes after I was setting in the bar, I thought I heard a noise up stairs, took the candle off the table, went into the passage, and listened for a short time at the foot of the stairs - I did not hear any more noise. I turned round, opened the tap-room door, and called Robert Barber , who was sitting there; he did not come, but my two servants, who were in the tap-room, said,

"What is the matter, mistress?" and the maid-servant came out. In the mean time the prisoner came down stairs. I stood with my back against a pair of folding doors in the passage, he came up to me; I said to him,

"Where have you been?" he said,

"Up stairs." I said,

"Where to?" he said,

"In the two pair." I said,

"Who to in the two pair?" He either said it was no consequence, or it was no business of mine. I put the candle on a counter on my right side, collared him, and said,

"You shall not go till you have told me who you have been to." In the mean time the servant girl had come out of the tap-room into the passage; she likewise laid hold of him, and said,

"Oh, mistress, he is a thief!" I called out to Mark Hooper , who was sitting in the tap-room, he came out, and laid hold of him - the bustle and confusion became general. A young man, who lodged up stairs, came down - he fell over something on the first landing-place, and called out,

"Here is a table left in the passage!" By that time the prisoner was taken into the tap-room. I told them to hold him fast, and sent the maid up stairs to see if my room was safe - she ran up, and in less than a minute called out,

"Mistress, here is your room-door open, and the club-box standing in the passage!" I ran up, and found it standing on the landing-place - it was removed from my side of the bed, where it always stood, and on to the landing-place. I ran into my room, and missed a small red trunk, with its contents, which was the plate - they were gone entirely. On the bed I found a small Tunbridge-ware box, which was emptied of its contents, which were a watch, a picture, necklace and lockets, and my husband's will, which was thrown on the bed with it. I then went down stairs, and said I was robbed. In the mean time Hooper had searched the prisoner in the tap-room, and found ten skeleton keys, a dark-lanthorn, an iron crow-bar, and a phosphorus bottle. He was brought into the bar, stripped, and searched further; a skeleton and a picklock key were found on him, with 1 s. 2 1/2 d. None of my property was found. There were marks of the iron crow-bar on the club-box, as if he had attempted to open it - it had not been opened. There was another club-box in the room, which had marks of the crow-bar on it. I sent to Marlborough-street for an officer.

Cross-examined by MR. ARABIN. I had not been in my bed-room after half-past three o'clock. We have a great many lodgers in the house. None of the property was found on the prisoner. Hearing a noise created my suspicion. I have found none of the property.

COURT. Q. Persons going up and down stairs would not have created your suspicion - A. No, it was the noise. I lost all the plate stated in the indictment out of the red box, and have never recovered it. The money was in the club-box.

JOHN HEARN . I am steward of the benefit society - the box is their's - it was left in the prosecutor's care. It had no crow-marks on it when I left it - it has several now.

MARK HOOPER . I was at the prosecutor's house - I went there about twenty minutes after seven o'clock, and saw a man very much like the prisoner, standing at the door as I went into the tap-room; he stood outside the house. I went out again in about ten minutes - he still stood there. Dean asked me what that man was looking over at the house for? I told him it was nothing to him, and to come in and have some beer. We went in, and was there until a quarter after eight o'clock. Mrs. Stevens came to the door, and called out Bob Barber - she then called Mary, and said she believed there was somebody in her bed-room. I went into the passage shortly after, and saw Mrs. Stevens, the prisoner was coming along the passage from the stairs - she and Mary laid hold of him. I got behind them, to prevent his getting out of the street-door - I collared him, and told him to come into the tap-room if he had done nothing amiss - he said he would not. I told him if he was the d-v-l he should come in. I pulled him in, and sent out to Mrs. Stevens, to go up and see if she had lost any thing. While they were gone up stairs he tried to make his escape. I threw him down by the fire-place; he then said,

"Don't ill use me." I told him if he offered to move again I would knock his brains out. I then sat down by him, and took hold of his right-hand coat pocket, in which I found the crow-bar. Mrs. Stevens came in, and said she was robbed. I then searched him, and found a dark lanthorn in his left-hand coat-pocket, and took ten skeleton keys and a crow-bar out of his right-hand coat pocket. We afterwards took him into the bar, stripped him, and found another skeleton and a picklock key, with a phosphorus bottle and matches. Jeffries came in, handcuffed him, and took him to the watch-house.

CHARLES JEFFRIES . I am an officer. I took the prisoner into custody. I tried the crow-bar to the bed-room door, where it was opened, it exactly fitted. The door had been wrenched open; as the partition was thin it gave way - the crow-bar fitted it at both ends.

MARY CROWDER . I am the prosecutrix's servant. I assisted in seizing the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming by the house, and

met a person who asked me to take refreshment; I went in, and had something. He said he had a friend up stairs - I went up with him. He asked me to take the things into my possession. I know nothing of the robbery.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 46.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190217-53

366. JOHN FROST and GEORGE ARMFIELD were indicted for feloniously assaulting John Burt , on the King's highway, on the 19th of January , at St. Margaret, Westmister , putting him in in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, one watch, value 30 s.; two seals, value 6 d., and one pocket-book, value 1 s. , his property.

JOHN BURT . I have been a servant, but am now a collector . On Tuesday night, the 19th of January, about half-past ten o'clock, I was at the corner of Gardiner's-lane, York-street, Westminster, where I live - I was going home. I went into the Blue Anchor public-house, about eight o'clock, and had a pint of beer; the two prisoners and another came in, and sat by my side - while they sat by me, I thought once or twice that they were trying to pick my pocket - they could not do it; as soon as my wife called for me I went home with her - the two prisoners and the other followed me. Armfield was on one side, and Frost was behind with M'Bride, who is not in custody. Armfield got hold of my arm, and said he wanted to see me home; my wife told him to let me alone; I had been drinking, but was perfectly sensible. The moment I turned to go into Gardiner's-lane - it is a dark gateway - I had not gone two steps before they surrounded me - one got hold of one arm and the other the other; they took my stick from me, laid hold of me, unbuttoned my coat, and took my pocketbook out of my pocket; they then took my watch, and ran away immediately as fast as they could, down York-street - I then went back to the house, and told the landlord that I had been robbed by the three men, who came out with me. I informed the officer, and then went home - I am sure they were the same persons who were in the public-house with me - I was there a long time with them. I have never found my property.

Prisoner FROST. Q. Did you not say at the office, that you could not swear to me - A. No.

ELIZABETH BURT . I am the wife of John Burt . I called at the public-house for him, and was going home with him - the three men who were in the house followed him out - I am sure the prisoners are two of them. Just as we got to the gateway, and turned the corner, the three men surrounded him; he said he was robbed - it did not last a minute; they immediately went up York-street as fast as they could go. We returned to the public-house, and told them he was robbed, then went to a public-house at the corner of Queen-square, where the officers are, and gave information. I am sure it was the three men who followed us out.

RODERICK M'DONALD. My father keeps the public-house. I was at home on the 19th of January; I saw the two prisoners and M'Bride, sitting by the side of Burt - I knew Frost before; I did not know Armfield before, but am certain he was one; Burt and his wife went out. and Armfield said he would see him home - Frost and the other went out with him. I saw Armfield try two or three times to rob Burt in the house. Next morning I saw Frost go into a house; I went and told Burt, and he went and took him.

ARMFIELD. Q. When you saw me try to rob him why did you not speak - A. My father was not at home.

JAMES GILLMORE . I am an officer. On the 20th of January Frost was given into my charge, by a man named Green. In consequence of what he said, I went to the Crown, in Pye-street, where I expected to find Armfield and M'Bride together. Before I had got within fifty yards of the house, an acquaintance of Armfield's saw me, and ran immediately into the house, so that when I got there I could find neither. I went several times to Armfield's lodgings, but could not find him - he was afterwards taken to Bow-street, and given into my charge.

FROST'S Defence. the morning I was taken, the prosecutor called me aside, and said he would not prosecute me if I had a few pounds to make it up.

JOHN BURT re-examined. It is false.

ARMFIELD'S Defence. I am innocent - he said at the first examinations he could not swear to me. He was so drunk at the third examination, that he wanted to swear to me, but the magistrate would not let him.

FROST - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 17.

ARMFIELD - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 24.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190217-54

367. JOHN MAHON was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of February , one coat, value 10 s.; one waistcoat, value 4 s.; one pair of trowsers, value 10 s.; one shirt, value 2 s.; one seal, value 2 s.; one chain, value 2 s.; one key, value 6 d.; one pair of pumps, value 6 d.; and 15 s. in monies numbered, the property of William Ladds ; one coat, value 7 s.; one pair of trowsers, value 5 s.; one shirt, value 2 s.; and one pair of shoes, value 4 s., the property of John Ladds ; and one coat, value 10 s.; one waistcoat, value 6 s.; one pair of pantaloons, value 12 s., and one handkerchief, value 8 s., the property of William Grearson , in the dwelling-house of George Ladds .

WILLIAM LADDS . I am clerk to Mr. Shepherd, who is an attorney . I live with my father, George Ladds , who is a pump maker, and lives in Gilbert-street, Bloomsbury. On the 2d of February my box was broken open, and my things taken out. The prisoner lodged with my mother.

ELIZA LADDS . I am the wife of George Ladds . The prisoner lodged with me - he slept with my sons. On the 2d of February, about four o'clock in the afternoon, he came home, and went up stairs; he came down soon after, and asked for alight, as he said he had a job to do, and was going to light the fire - he went up again. I heard the window open soon after, and the street-door shut; he came in again and went up stairs, came down again about six o'clock, and went out with a bundle. I went up stairs, saw there was no fire, but found my sons' boxes open, and the property gone. I got a constable, and found him smoking his pipe, about seven o'clock, in White Lion-street, Oxford-street; he had my son's coat, waistcoat, trowsers, and neck-handkerchief on - he was wearing them; I also found my son's seal, chain, and 1 l. 15 s. 6 d. on him. He said the money was my son's, and he took it out of the box. He afterwards told me he had pledged some of the things at Turner's.

WILLIAM MATHEWS . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Stanhope-street, Clare-market. On the 2d of February the prisoner pledged a coat, waistcoat, and a pair of trowsers, with me.

THOMAS TAYLOR . I am a constable. I went with the prosecutrix, and took the prisoner.

CHARLES WINDERS . I am shopman to Mr. Turner, who is a pawnbroker, and lives in Bridge-street. On the 2d of February the prisoner pledged a suit of clothes with me.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I beg for mercy.

GUILTY. Aged 24.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Confined Six Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190217-55

368. JAMES CHERITON was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Henry Spicer , about seven o'clock in the night of the 22d of January , at St. Margaret, Westminster , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, two watches, value 6 l. , his property.

HENRY SPICER . I am a watchmaker , and lodge in York-street , in the parish of St. Margaret, Westminster. On the 22d of January, about half-past seven o'clock in the evening, I was sitting in my own front parlour, which is used as a shop. The house was let out in lodgings; the landlord lives in a separate house. I heard a window break; turned round immediately and saw the prisoner draw the wire out on which the watches were suspended, with both hands, it was fastened by a screw about six inches from the window; the screw was completely torn out; the other end remained fast; part of the wire was completely out in the street. I got up immediately he attempted to take the watches off the wire. I put my left hand through the window, and saved some of them. The prisoner, after standing about two minutes before the window, left it. My wife ran to the street-door, hearing the window break. She could not get out; it was fastened outside by a piece of string. The prisoner left the window. I went to the door, and found it was fastened outside, but by pulling very hard I opened it. The prisoner ran across the road; I saw no more of him that night. I ran across up Blue Anchor-yard, but could see nothing of him. I returned, and found my wife had picked up two watches and a watchcase from under the window. I immediately went to Queen-square Police Office, gave information, and returned home. I found I had lost a small gold watch, and an old silver one; the outside case of the silver one was found in the street. I went out with the officers, but could not see the prisoner.

Q. Had you an opportunity of seeing him - A. Yes; there was a candle close to the wire; I am certain he is the man. There were two candles and a gas-light opposite. I am certain he is the man. The next morning as I was sitting at work, the prisoner passed by with another man. I said there is the man who robbed me. I went out and followed him for two hours and a half to different places. I was afraid he would get away if I attempted to take him. I got a neighbour to assist me, and we secured him, and took him to Queen-square. I have never found the watches.

Cross-examined by Mr. ANDREWS. I live and sleep in the house.

Q. Did you describe the man to the officers - A. Yes; to Gillmore and another man. He was dressed in a blue coat, with gilt buttons; he had white stockings on and breeches. Next morning he was dressed in the same, except having trowsers on. He was taken at the end of York-street and James-street.

Q. Did he come off a hackney coach - A. No.

JAMES FRANCIS MEADOWS . I live in Gardiner's-lane, and work with my father, who sells sweetmeats about the streets. I was going past the prosecutor's window about half past seven o'clock that evening, and saw the prisoner dash his hands through the window. I am certain he is the man; he took two watches from the window, grasped hold of them, and then ran across the road as fast as he could, down Blue Anchor-yard. I am certain he is the man; I took notice of him.

Cross-examined. Q. What was you doing - A. Going on an errand. I stopped to look at him. I went before the justice a fortnight after.

Q. Who told you to go before the justice - A. A little girl, who went to Mr. Spicer, and told him I knew it was the prisoner - I said so a fortnight after; he had a long blue coat on, with breeches and white stockings. I am eleven years old.

HENRY SPICER re-examined. I did not take the last witness before the magistrate at first, as I did not know he had seen him.

Cross-examined. Q. Was not Mrs. Jacobs a witness before the magistrate for you - A. No; she came to me, and said she saw the man about my door, and would swear to him - she came across, and said the prisoner was the man who was about the door - she was not examined at the first examination. She was sent for twice at the second examination, and at last came. They gave her the book to be sworn, and she said she did not think he was the man.

Q. Did not the magistrate adjourn the examination, to give you an opportunity to produce another witness - A. Yes, and I produced Jacobs.

HENRY BETTS . I am a constable. I received information on the night of the robbery from Spicer, and went out with two other constables and the prosecutor, till about half-past twelve o'clock that night. I searched several public-houses, where had characters resort, in hopes of finding the man, but did not. Next day I was informed the prisoner was in custody. Gillmore gave him to me.

Prisoner's Defence. I am perfectly innocent.

JAMES HAYDON. I drive a hackney coach for my brother, who keeps No. 587 - he lives opposite Tothill-fields prison; I live at Westminster. I have known the prisoner two years.

Q. Has he any thing remarkable about his legs - A. He wore trowsers, because both his legs are bandy - I never knew him wear any thing else. He generally wore laced shoes. In January I met with an accident, and employed the prisoner to assist me. He went with me, to get up and down off the box, as I could not - he rode behind. He first began to work for me on Wednesday night, the 20th of January - he was out with me on Wednesday and Thursday nights; he left me about six o'clock on Friday

morning, and had been with me both nights. I parted with him at Charing-cross. I never heard of his being tried here - he has borne a good character ever since I have known him.

COURT. Q. What is your brother's name - A. Esau Haydon - it is a night coach; I go out at six o'clock at night, and come home at six o'clock in the morning; those are the regular hours for a night coach.

Q. Then you stay out twelve hours - A. Yes, and sometimes fifteen. I generally come home about nine o'clock. My brother has two pair of plates and three coaches - he only works two in the day, and the other at night.

Q. If you go out regularly the other must come home regularly, or you cannot get the plates - A. We do not go out till the other comes home; sometimes sooner, sometimes later, and sometimes not at all; then I stop at home.

Q. If that is the case, how can you say he was with you on the 20th - A. He was with me; I recollect it by his being taken up. I attended before the justice, but was not examined, they would not let me speak. He was not with me on the night of the robbery.

Q. You never heard of his being tried - A. No, I never heard that he was tried last June - I am certain of it.

SARAH ANN CHERITON . I am the prisoner's sister. My father lives in Duck-lane, Westminster, near Stretton-ground; my brother lived with my father ever since he was born; he always sleeps there when he is at home. He was taken up on Saturday, the 23d of January.

Q. Where had he been the night before - A. In bed; he had been out with Haydon on the Wednesday and Thursday nights, he came home about six o'clock on Friday morning; I was a-bed at the time, he came up into my mother's room, my mother struck a light and gave it to him - I sleep with her; he lit the fire, and then went to bed in the one pair back-room, which joins ours - his brother John was in bed at the time.

Q. What time did the prisoner get up again - A. He never rose till about eight o'clock that night; I then went up to awake him for me to make the bed, that my father and brother John might go to bed - they sleep in the same bed - the prisoner was then a-bed, I called him twice before I awoke him - he merely got out of bed, but put no clothes on; my sister Emma assisted me in making the bed - he got in again. I took him up some tea and bread and butter afterwards - he was then in bed; I did not go to bed until between one and two o'clock on Saturday morning - I did not see him after I took him the tea; I am certain he did not go out that night. I got up at eight o'clock in the morning, he was then up and dressed, at breakfast with my mother.

Q. Was the key left in the street-door - A. Yes; nobody could go out without my hearing them, it is impossible. The room where I work is on the ground-floor, under the room he sleeps in; the foot of the stairs come to the room door, which is always open.

Q. Your brother has a defect in his legs - A. Yes. Ever since he left the Blue-coat School, he has constantly worn long trowsers, with high shoes or half-boots - he never in his life wore breeches and white stockings; he did wear a blue coat with gilt buttons. He was in bed at the time of the robbery.

COURT. Q. What is the matter with his legs - A. He was rather bow-legged, they are getting much better than they were. He was brought up to the brush-making business, he has latterly been a hackney-coachman, and drove for Mr. Morris. He very seldom drove a night-coach.

Q. He came home at six o'clock in the morning - A. Yes, and laid till six the next morning. He had nothing to eat but a little tea and bread and butter.

Q. Did he ever lay in bed so long at any other time - A. Not so much. He was not well; he was over-fatigued, and felt himself very poorly next morning.

Q. You never heard of any thing happening at any time - A. Yes, there was something in this Court - he was indicted for house-breaking, and had eleven persons to prove he was as innocent of that as he is of this.

Q. All his friends, and Haydon, knew he was charged with the offence before - A. Yes; he had twenty-two witnesses - eleven were to prove facts, but not one of them was asked a question.

JAMES CHERITON . I am the prisoner's father, and am hostler to Mr. Morris. On the 20th and 21st of January, the prisoner was out with Haydon and his coach; he came home on Tuesday morning about six o'clock - I let him in, as I was going out to my employ - he sleeps in the same bed with me and John; he was lighting the fire as I went out; he went to bed before he had any breakfast as he was tired. I came home about half-past seven o'clock that evening, he was then in bed. I usually go to bed about eight o'clock, or half-past eight, I went to bed to him about five minutes after eight.

Q. Had anybody been to make the bed before that - A. My eldest and youngest daughter, they also took him up some tea; he had been a-bed all day. I remained in bed with him until six o'clock in the morning - he was never out of bed. I am troubled with a complaint, and do not rest half the night - I went to work, and after dinner heard he was taken.

Q. Did you go before the magistrate to tell what you knew - A. No, I did not hear of it until after the first examination; I went to the second examination, but was not allowed to speak. My son always wore loose pantaloons down to his ankles, and high shoes - his legs are rather crooked.

COURT. Q. What is the matter with his legs - A. He is rather weak-ankled and bow-legged.

Q. You swear he laid in bed from between six and seven o'clock in the morning till six o'clock the next morning, without taking a morsel of any thing, except a little tea and bread and butter - A. Yes.

JOHN CHERITON . The prisoner is my brother. He was out on Wednesday and Thursday nights with Haydon, came home on Friday morning at six o'clock, and came to bed to me at seven - I got up at half-past seven, leaving him in bed; I then went to school. When I came home in the evening he was in bed - he had a bason of tea and two slices of bread and butter, which my eldest sister took up to him. He got up at six o'clock next morning, and not before. My little sister and him made the bed, and my father went to bed to him. I never knew him wear breeches.

ELIZA CHERITON . I am the prisoner's sister. On Friday morning, the 22d of January, I was not up when he

came home. I heard him knock at the door, about half-past six o'clock in the morning; he was at home and in bed all day. My father came home about eight o'clock at night.

Q. What time does your father usually go to bed - A. About nine or ten o'clock; he went to bed that night a little after eight; my brother was then in bed - he was only out of bed once, and that was to have it made. Next morning, a little after eight o'clock, I found him up. He always wore trowsers.

COURT. Q. He was never away - A. Never; I am quite sure he never once slept away from home during the last two years.

Q. He was never absent a month - A. Not to my knowledge - that is as true as all that I have sworn.

Q. Was he never in confinement - A. Yes, he was absent then.

EMMA CHERITON . On the Friday before my brother was taken up he was in bed all day, because he had been out with Haydon two nights. My father came home about half-past seven o'clock; he then got out of bed for me to make it, and got in again. My father went to bed a little after eight o'clock - I did not see him again till he got up.

SARAH CHERITON . I am the prisoner's mother. He lived at home. He came home on the 22d of January, which was Friday morning - I did not see him before he went to bed. He was at home and in bed all day on Friday. My husband came home about eight o'clock at night, Emma went up to make the bed - some tea was sent up to the prisoner. My husband went to bed about half-past eight o'clock; the prisoner was then at home and in bed. I went up to bed about eleven, and saw him still in bed.

Q. He was at home from the time he came home on Friday morning until Saturday morning - A. That I swear. I work at a mangle, in a room close to the street-door; the room-door is never shut, it is fastened back - I can see everybody that passes in the passage. He could not go out without my knowing it. He usually wore a blue coat, trowsers, and high shoes, which lace up.

COURT. Q. Was you not uneasy that he should be in bed so long without any refreshment, and after being out all night - A. I have a large family; my time is occupied with my work. He has often been in bed all day. He was tried here before, and all my family were witnesses then, except myself, but none were examined, except to character.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 19.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190217-56

369. BENJAMIN CADBY was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of February , one coat, value 5 l., the property of Sir John Graham Moore , Knight, Commander of the Bath , in his dwelling-house .

JAMES GOODALL . I am coachman to Sir John Graham Moore, who is Knight Commander of the Bath, and is one of the Lords of the Admiralty ; he lives in the Admiralty-yard . The great coat hung across a chair in the servants' hall; I left the hall about two minutes, returned, and missed it; the door being left open, I thought somebody had been down - I saw a person run out of the yard, I pursued, but lost him for sometime. I saw the prisoner in Scotland-yard with the coat; I attempted to stop him, and he dropped it - he was afterwards stopped.

JOHN BROWN. I was in Scotland-yard, and saw the prisoner running with the coat; he dropped it, and was immediately stopped.

JAMES READ . I am a labourer. I stopped the prisoner.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 17.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Confined Three Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190217-57

370. JAMES LOCKHART was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of February , 31 printed bound books, value 2 s. , the goods of George Barlow and John Burford Foxwell .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating them to be the property of George Barlow .

JOSEPH HEDLEY . I am an agent to Messrs. George Barlow and John Burford Foxwell , who are assignees to the estate of Arthur Spear , who lived at Sambrook-house, Basinghall-street . The prisoner was employed to paint the house .

JOSEPH CROWTHER . I am warehouseman to Mr. George Barlow . I was in possession of the property. On the 16th of February I found some books at Sowerby's, the pawnbroker, which I knew to belong to the estate of Mr. Arthur Spear , they were kept in the office - the prisoner painted the office door, and had access to them.

MATTHEW KEITH MOSS . I am servant to Mr. Sowerby, who is a pawnbroker, and lives in Chiswell-street. On the 6th of February the prisoner pledged thirty-one printed books with me; he said he brought them for Mr. Degrave, of Basinghall-street. Two of them have Mr. Spear's name on them.

JOSEPH MAXTON . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner in Coleman-street, and found the duplicates of the books in his fob.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 50.

Confined Six Months .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190217-58

371. MARY JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of January , two sheets, value 14 s.; two towels, value 3 s., and one pillow-case, value 3 s. , the goods of Susannah Jewell .

SUSANNAH JEWELL . I keep the Castle and Falcon tap , the prisoner was my servant . On the 28th of January, about six o'clock in the evening, I gave her leave to go out - she returned in a minute, and went out again. Stringle gave me information; I went next door, and found her there with a bundle containing these things - the key of my bed-room was found on her. I have my washing done at home.

WILLIAM STRINGLE . I am servant to John Davis, and live next door to the prosecutrix. On the 28th of January, about five o'clock in the evening, as I went into the shop I saw the prisoner go out of it. I saw her put a bundle on the counter, I found the property in it - she said she was going to take them to be washed, had forgot

something, and left them while she went back. She came in again, I detained her, and sent for Mrs. Jewell.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I took them to be washed, fearing my mistress would be angry that they were not washed. I did not know I had the key.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Confined One Year .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190217-59

372. THOMAS JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of February , one wooden packing-case, value 4 s. 6 d.; six bottles, value 1 s. 6 d.; six pints of the essence of shrimps, value 19 s. 6 d.; 12 other bottles, value 3 s.; 12 pints of capers, value 1 l. 19 s.; 12 other bottles, value 3 s., and 12 pints of olives, value 18 s. , the goods of Henry Dyatt .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating them to be the property of Dudley Cookes and William Waller .

JOHN HARRISON . I am clerk to Dudley Cookes and William Waller , who are lightermen . I know nothing of the case.

JAMES BARNES . I am labourer to Mr. Hall. On the 3d of February I saw the prisoner on Custom-house Quay, he took a case, which Mr. Hall delivered to me - he was going up the quay, towards Thames-street, with it. I told Mr. Hall of it, who brought him back.

JOHN HALL . Barnes gave me information. I went in pursuit of the prisoner, and saw him with the case, he had just put it down, it was close by his legs. He was secured before I came up.

JOSEPH WILLIAM KING. I am a constable. I took the prisoner. I saw him going up the gateway with the case - it contained the articles stated in the indictment.

SAMUEL SWANTON . I am porter of the quay. I saw the prisoner with the case and secured him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A gentleman told me to carry it for him. I was stopped, told him I was employed to carry it, and pointed out the man.

SAMUEL SWANTON . He said nothing of the kind.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190217-60

373. JAMES ELLIOTT and WILLIAM OSBAND were indicted for stealing, on the 29th of January , three pieces of Irish linen, containing 77 yards, value 5 l. 18 s.; 10 yards of bombazeen, value 1 l.; one shawl, value 15 s.; five yards of black sarsnet, value 24 s.; seven yards of silk plaid gingham, value 15 s.; four pieces of muslin, containing 14 yards, value 17 s. 8 d.; one handkerchief, value 4 s. 6 d.; three pieces of cambric, containing two yards and a half, value 21 s.; one shawl, called a whittle, value 15 s.; half a yard of kerseymere, value 4 s.; two bottles, value 6 d., and three pints of wine, value 9 s. 6 d., the goods of Stephen Eaton Eland , in his dwelling-house .

STEPHEN EATON ELAND . I am a linen-draper , and live in Aldgate High-street, the prisoner, Elliott, was my servant ; Osband is a stranger to me. On the 29th of January I missed a piece of French cambric - I accused Elliott of robbing me, which he denied for a considerable time, but afterwards said he had stolen that and several other articles, of which he gave me an account - he said he had delivered them over to Osband. I went with an officer to the house of one Mackintosh, in Sun-court, which is by the side of my house, and took Osband there. I charged him with receiving the goods from my servants - he denied it for sometime, then said he had done it, and took me and the officer to his lodgings, three or four doors off, and in his box we found the articles stated in the indictment - I knew them all to be my property. I never saw Osband in the house. I dare say the things were taken at different times.

Prisoner ELLIOTT. Q. Did you not extort a confession from me by promising pardon - A. I did not. I believe I said if he hoped for mercy from above I would recommend him to confess - I never promised him forgiveness. I found the things in consequence of what he said.

JOHN FORRESTER , JUN. I am an officer. The prosecutor gave Elliott into my charge - he said Osband had the things. We found Osband, he denied having them but at last took us to his lodgings, and pointed them out in his box.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

ELLIOTT'S Defence. (Written.) I am a native of Nottingham. Having lost my parents, I came to town, in hopes of obtaining a situation, through my brother, who was a wine-merchant. I lost my brother, was led into bad company, and in an evil moment I was led to commit the offence.

ELLIOTT - GUILTY. Aged 18.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

OSBAND - NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190217-61

374. JAMES ELLIOTT and WILLIAM OSBAND were again indicted for stealing, on the 29th of January , six yards of cambric, value 1 l. 18 s. , the goods of Stephen Eaton Eland .

STEPHEN EATON ELAND . I also found this cambric in the possession of Osband - Elliott said he stole it from me.

ELLIOTT - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

OSBAND - NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190217-62

375. JOHN CASE was indicted for embezzlement .

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190217-63

376. MICHAEL GRAY and DENNIS SWEENEY were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Joseph Fairey , about one o'clock in the afternoon of the 27th of January (he and other persons

being therein), and stealing therein 24 knives, value 30 s. , his property.

JOSEPH FAIREY . I am a mathematical instrument-maker , and live at Ratcliff-highway . On the 27th of January, about one o'clock, I had a piece of glass broken out of my window, and three or four dozen of knives taken out - the hole was large enough for a man to put his hand in. I had seen it safe about an hour before.

MARY BROOKES . I live nearly opposite Mr. Fairey. On the 27th of January, between twelve and one o'clock, I saw the prisoner, Gray, take the knives out of a paper, and put them into Sweeney's apron - he held them while Gray went for more. He returned in two or three minutes, took more out of a paper, put them into Sweeney's apron, and went over a third time for more - I did not see where they got them from. My house is about a hundred yards from the prosecutor's. Gray returned in about two minutes with more - they then saw me looking at them, and removed themselves from there into Prince's-square. I looked out at my door, and saw Sweeney come up the court again - he thought I was watching them, put the knives under his jacket, and then went round the other way. Thinking they came out of the pawnbroker's shop, I went in, and asked him if he had lost any such things? he said No. The prisoners left the court, and I saw no more of them. I am sure they are the boys; nobody else was with them. They threw the papers away - Fairey picked up one. Next morning Gray was brought to me; I was asked if he was one of them? I am certain he is.

JOSEPH FAIREY re-examined. The paper has my mark on it - it contained the knives; I have never recovered them. The window had been cracked some days before, but nothing to speak of.

WILLIAM SUMMERS . I am an officer. On the 28th of January, Gray was given into my charge; he said he had not got the knives, but Sweeny had them, and sold them for 2 s. 6 d., and gave him 6 d. He described Sweeny to me; I searched for him, and found him in custody at Union Hall, for a similar offence.

GRAY - GUILTY. Aged 10.

SWEENEY - GUILTY. Aged 10.

Of stealing, but not of breaking and entering .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190217-64

377. WILLIAM BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of January , 6 lbs. of lard, value 6 s. , the goods of Thomas Smyth .

THOMAS SMYTH . I keep a chandler's-shop in James-street, Grosvenor-square . On the 23d of January, about ten o'clock at night, I saw the prisoner walking before my shop-window; I watched him for a quarter of an hour, saw him put his hand into the window, and take the lard; I ran out, and secured him with it, without losing sight of him - he threw it down.

THOMAS FRANCIS LEE . I am a watchman. I stopped the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. It was thrown down at my feet.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Confined One Month , and Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18190217-65

378. HENRY LEE was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of February , one truck-body, value 20 s. , the goods of Nicholas Bullwinkle .

NICHOLAS BULLWINKLE. I am a cheesemonger , and live in Whitechapel-road . On the 3d of February, at night, I lost my truck-body, which had been chained up. On the 8th of February. I was sent for, and found it in the possession of the prisoner in Queen Ann-street; he said it was his, and that he bought it in Smithfield for 10 s. It had fresh wheels on it, also a fresh bottom and sides. I asked him to go with me to Mr. Bolton's, who had repaired it for me - he went willingly with me. I let him go as the constable was not at home, and found him at home about two hours after, at his mother's, where he lived.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18190217-66

379. CHARLES HUBBARD , THOMAS JONES , and THOMAS RANDALL were indicted for stealing, on the 20th of January , one watch, value 20 s.; two bottles, value 2 s; two quarts of brandy, value 10 s., two quarts of gin, value 6 s. , the property of John Nitch .

JOHN NITCH . I keep a public-house in High Holborn . On the 20th of January, I went to bed about twelve o'clock at night; I was called up by the watchman, found the cellar doors open, and a trap-door, which leads from my shop to the cellar, also open - nothing was broken. It was all safe when I went to bed. We went into the cellar, found the brandy, rum, and gin casks all left running - they were thirty gallon casks; there was a gallon bottle under the rum cask. I suppose about six gallons of rum, five of brandy, and seven or eight of gin were gone. There are also cocks leading from these casks into the bar - these were also left running; a stone bottle, full of rum, was left on the cellar steps, which was not there when I went to bed; they all hung up empty the night before. One bottle full of gin stood on the window, and another half full, was on the floor - my name is on all my bottles. I missed 4 s. in copper, 1 s. 6 d. in silver, and a metal watch, out of the till.

Q. How could they get into the cellar - A. I cannot think how, unless they concealed themselves under a bow-window in the cellar the night before, which they could easily do without my seeing them - they could then open the doors inside. About seven o'clock that morning I found the three prisoners at St. Giles's watch-house - my watch, and two bottles were produced to me, one contained rum, and the other gin. I know they were in the house the night before.

SAMUEL CRANE . I keep a coffee-shop in Broad-street, St. Giles's. On the 20th of January, between five and six o'clock in the morning, the three prisoners came to my house with the two bottles produced - they paid me 8 1/2 d. in copper; Hubbard pulled the watch out of his pocket, and handed it to the rest - they examined it; Jones and Randall each carried the bottles out - they remained in my house about ten minutes. One went to the door, looked out, and said to the other

"Come - it is all right," and all three went out. I suspected them, and went and told Mahoney, the watchman; I watched them into another

coffee-shop in Bowles-yard, about twenty yards off - they were taken soon after. I am sure they are the men.

JOHN MAHONEY . I am a watchman of St. Giles's. On Wednesday morning, the 20th of January, Crane gave me information, and I found the prisoners in a coffee-shop, at the corner of Bowles-yard; they had two bottles between their legs. As we were taking them to the watch-house, Hubbard took the watch out of his pocket and threw it down an area - I saw a woman pick it up. I did not see it thrown away, but when we got to the watch-house, Cuthbert said he saw it thrown away; we went back, and found it in the area - the bottles were between Randall and Jones.

HENRY CUTHBETT . I am a patrol of St. Giles's. I was at the door of the coffee-shop with Gates - Mahoney came; we went in and took the prisoners - the stone bottles were under the seat where they sat - I took Jones. As we were going along Smart's-buildings, I heard something drop from him into the area - it jingled - nobody but him could have dropped it; I said there was something dropped - he said it was only a piece of bread and butter. I took him to the watch-house, returned to the area, and found the watch there. Mahoney was before us with the other two.

HUBBARD'S Defence. I was returning from the play, saw a man run away, and I picked up the bottles and watch.

JONES'S Defence. I met Hubbard and Randall, and went to the coffee-shop with them.

RANDALL'S Defence. I met Jones, and afterwards met Hubbard - he said he found the things.

HUBBARD - GUILTY . Aged 19.

JONES - GUILTY . Aged 17.

RANDALL - GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18190217-67

380. SUSAN JENKINS was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of January , one shirt, value 12 s. , the property of Richard Bowstock .

MARTHA BOWSTOCK . I am the wife of Richard Bowstock , we live in King-street, Seven Dials ; the shirt hung up three pair of stairs. On the 29th of January Johnstone called me, and said he had taken it from the prisoner, who was in the passage.

BENJAMIN JOHNSTONE . I live in the house. About seven o'clock in the evening I found the prisoner in the passage, detained her, and took the shirt from under her arm.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A woman sent me to fetch it.

GUILTY . Aged 43.

Confined Six Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18190217-68

381. ELEANOR JANETT was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of February , one quart pot, value 18 d. , the goods of Joseph Bennett .

JOSEPH BENNETT . I keep the Globe, public-house , in Titchfield-street . I found the prisoner in custody at my house.

FREDERICK HATLEY . I am a constable. On the 1st of February, about half-past eight o'clock in the morning, I stopped the prisoner, about twenty yards from the prosecutor's house, with the pot under her clothes.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Confined Six Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18190217-69

382. WILLIAM PENNY was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of January , one coat, value 10 s. , the goods of George Edwards .

ELIZA WILLIS , My husband is a shipwright, and lives in Ocean-street, Stepney . On the 23d of January, about half-past one o'clock I was at my window, and saw a man take the coat off the prosecutor's cart, while he was gone into a house with some coals; he came out in about half a minute, and I gave the alarm - the man ran up the street. I cannot say the prisoner is the man.

GEORGE EDWARDS . I drive a coal cart for Mr. Cane. I was delivering coals in Ocean-street, and left my coat on the cart; Willis alarmed me, I missed it, and saw the prisoner running with it - he dropped it just before I got up. I secured him, before I lost sight of him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A man dropped it.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18190217-70

383. JOHN WILLIAMSON was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of February , four shoes, value 10 s. , the goods of James Hughes .

JAMES HUGHES . I am a shoemaker , and live in Red Lion-street, Holborn . On the 13th of February, the prisoner came to the shop, about ten o'clock in the morning, while I was busy. He tried on several pair, but bought none; after he was gone I missed two odd shoes - he came again in about two hours, I set my boy to watch him; he said he was putting a shoe in his pocket; he immediately took a pair out. I found the two odd shoes I missed before in his bundle.

GEORGE GREVEY . I am servant to the prosecutor. I was in the back-room watching, and saw the prisoner put the shoes into his pocket.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. Distress drove me to it.

GUILTY . Aged 58.

Confined Six Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190217-71

384. JOHN WARREN was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of February , 14 lbs. of beef, value 7 s. the property of Edward Henderson .

EDWARD HENDERSON . I am a butcher , live on Cock-hill ; the beef was stolen from my shop, the prisoner was brought back with it.

EDWARD HAWLEY . On the 1st of February I saw the prisoner run across the road from the prosecutor's shop. My father secured him with the beef.

JOHN HAWLEY . I pursued the prisoner, who was running; I secured him; another boy was with him who had the beef. The prisoner said it was the first piece of beef he had ever stolen.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined Three Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190217-72

385. JAMES DORAN was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of February , at St. Margaret, Westminster , one mare, price 50 l.; one saddle, value 2 l., and one bridle, value 1 l. , the property of George Wynne .

GEORGE WYNNE . - I am a stationer , and live in Pater-noster-row. I had a mare to dispose of, she was worth 50 l. On Monday the 15th of February, the prisoner called on me; he said he had seen my mare, that he liked her, and wished to have two day's trial; the price, 55 guineas, was mentioned to him, he said that was rather high. I told him two day's trial was out of the question; I had not known him before, He asked what trial I would allow, I said I was going to ride out myself on another horse, and if he would accompany me he was welcome to any fair trial. We rode out together, and first went to Tattersall's, as he wished to meet a friend there, whom he wanted to see her. He went into Tattersall's, gave a person the mare to hold, returned in about five minutes, and stated that his friend had been there, but was gone. We then rode into Hyde Park, he said he wished a friend of his in Gloucester-place to see her; I offered to accompany him, he observed that it was very late, he would not detain me, and he would either bring the mare back himself, or send her by his servant. It was about four o'clock. I said I wished him to bring her back himself, as his servant might over-ride her. He brought her home that evening, I saw him, and he observed to me, that he had been disappointed in not finding his friend in Gloucester-place at home; that he wished his friend to see her before he bought her, and asked if I would send her up to Parliament-street for his friend to see. He had given me his card the same day, it was

"J. Doran, 28, Parliament-street." I said his friend had better come and see her in my stable. He said he could not come there. I at last agreed to send her to No. 28, Parliament-street, to Mr. Young's. He asked what was the lowest price I would take? I said 50 l.

Q. Did you ever intend to part with it without the money - A. Never, it was understood to be for ready money. I did not tell him so, but he was a stranger to me. Next day I sent the mare by John Churchman , who is my brother's groom, to deliver it to the prisoner, to show his friend.

Q. When was the mare to be returned to you - A. It was understood that he was not to keep her out all night. I told the groom to knock at the door, and ask if Mr. Doran lived there? and to say, if he liked to ride her he might. It was a little before three o'clock when he took her. I have never seen her since, nor have I been paid for her. My bridle and saddle were on the mare. The prisoner was apprehended on the Thursday, about twelve o'clock, and a little before four o'clock on that day the bridle and saddle were returned to me - I did not intend to sell the bridle and saddle. Before he was apprehended I went to No. 28, Parliament-street, and found he did not live there.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. On Monday, at four o'clock, he took her to go to his friend - A. Yes; he returned her a little after five o'clock. I never intended to sell either the bridle or saddle.

Q. If the groom had brought you back the money for the mare, you would have been satisfied with that - A. I should have put it in my pocket certainly.

MR. ALLEY. Q. Your servant had no authority to sell it, nor had you sold it yourself - A. No, certainly I did not mean to trust him, as I did not know him.

JOHN CHURCHMAN. I am groom to the prosecutor's brother. On Tuesday, the 16th of February, I took the mare to Mr. Young's, No. 28, Parliament-street; the clerk came out, and said the prisoner was not there, but would return there in a few minutes. I walked the mare up and down, and in a few minutes the prisoner came to me from towards Westminster Abbey; I told him he might make a trial of the mare if he liked, and show it to his friend in Gloucester-place. I said nothing more to him. He got on the mare, and said he would take care to return it by half-past four o'clock in the afternoon - she was not returned; I have never seen her since.

Cross-examined. Q. Tell us exactly the words that passed - A. I said my master said he might take her to his friend in Gloucester-place. He said he would either return the mare at half-past four o'clock, or a note to say that he would keep her.

WILLIAM YOUNG . I am Secretary to the Commissioners of the Land Tax, and live at No. 28, Parliament-street. I occupy the whole house; the prisoner did not live there at the time the horse was taken, nor do I know where he did live. He is the son of a respectable man in Bristol. He has been clerk to Messrs. Smithers and Sard, in St. Martin's-lane.

Cross-examined. I have known him two years. He has been in my employ for six weeks; he left me about a fortnight before the 15th of February.

Q. Had he not permission from you to have letters and messages addressed to your house - A. It was only letters from a Mr. Sard that were addressed to my house, not messages. He occasionally called to see if there was any letter.

MR. ALLEY. Q. He had no liberty to give a card, as it being the place where he could be found - A. No, he did not live there - it was two years ago since he lived there; he was clerk there three weeks before.

GEORGE WYNNE re-examined. After he was committed, he said in my hearing that he had sold the horse.

Prisoner's Defence. I wished to purchase the mare, and act honestly, but had not time.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 23.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190217-73

386. MARY WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of January , one 1 l. bank note, the property of Thomas Adcock , from his person .

THOMAS ADCOCK . On the 30th of January, about ten o'clock at night, I met the prisoner in Whitechapel; I went to her room in George-yard . I pulled out my purse, to give her 1 s., and a 1 l. note fell out; she snatched it out of my hand, and would not return it, but ran down stairs - the watchman took her - I have never got it.

WILLIAM NEWMAN . I stopped the prisoner, but did not find the note.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190217-74

387. VALENTINE WOOD was indicted for stealing, the 26th of January , one sheet, value 9 s., the property of Joseph Smith , in a lodging-room .

JOSEPH SMITH . I keep the Lord Nelson, public-house , King-street, Tower-hill . On the 25th of January, I let the prisoner a bed for the night. Next morning, about nine o'clock, he came down, and called for a glass of gin, but went out without drinking it. My wife called out that the sheets were gone - I secured him, and found it inside his waistcoat.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 43.

Confined Three Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190217-75

388. JOHN WILSON was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of February , one coat, value 20 s. , the property of William Warren .

The prosecutor stating his name to be Warner, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190217-76

389. JOHN THOMAS was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of January , one jacket, value 5 s. , the property of James Harper .

JAMES HARPER . I am a shipwright . On the 20th of January I lost my jacket from the saw-pit - I had seen the prisoner in the yard.

JOHN BROWN. I am an officer. On the 20th of January, about ten o'clock in the morning, I stopped the prisoner in High-street, Shadwell, with the jacket under his arm; knowing him before, I asked him where he got it? he said his shipmate gave it to him at Limehouse, to take on board a ship at the London Docks. I asked him if there was any thing in the pockets? he said No. I found a tobacco-box there - Harper claimed it.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190217-77

390. CHARLES SKINNER and GEORGE WILSON were indicted for stealing, on the 30th of January , 31 lbs. of beef, value 16 s. , the property of Thomas Mitson .

THOMAS MITSON . I am a butcher , and live at Aldgate . I had 61 1/4 lbs. of beef hanging at my door - part of it was stolen while I was serving a customer. I found the prisoners at the watch-house about ten minutes after, with it.

JOHN SHAW . I am constable of Aldgate. I was on Tower-hill, about six o'clock, and saw a scuffle there; I found the prisoner, Wilson, in custody of an officer, making a great resistance - the mob wanted to rescue him; Skinner was in custody of another officer. When Wilson saw me, he said he knew me, and would go quietly with me - Skinner had the beef tied up in his great coat; Wilson said he was going to take it to his father - I locked them up; the prosecutor claimed it. While they were in the watch-house they changed jackets - Wilson claimed that the beef was tied in, and said that a gentleman gave him a few halfpence to carry it.

GEORGE TAYLOR . I an officer. On the 30th of January I and Cadby were on Tower-hill, and saw Skinner with something on his shoulder; I suspected them as they seemed in a hurry. I heard Skinner say to Wilson,

"Come along, Jack." I said what have you got there? he said,

"A bit of meat which my father has bought," and he was going to Catherine-wheel-alley with it. I laid hold of him; Skinner said,

"Take it, and let me go - say no more about it - you are welcome to it;" I secured him; Cadby took Wilson - they tried to rescue him.

JOSEPH CADBY . I took Wilson - a struggle ensued - Shaw came up, and he then went quietly.

SKINNER'S Defence. A man asked me to carry it.

SKINNER - GUILTY . Aged 20.

WILSON - GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190217-78

391. JOHN ROBERTS was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Samuel Stone , about six o'clock in the night of the 9th of January , at St. Mary, the Virgin, Aldermanbury , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, two pieces of Welch flannel, containing 290 yards, value 40 l. , his property.

SAMUEL STONE . I live in Aldermanbury, in the parish of St. Mary, the Virgin; I let out the warehouse, which are under the same roof as my house. On Saturday, the 9th of January, the house was secured at eleven o'clock, when I went to bed - I sleep in the house. I did not discover that the house had been robbed until Monday morning, when I went down with Mr. Evans, and found one of the rails over his warehouse door had been cut, by which means a person could unbolt the door, and get over the top-door into the warehouse; it must have been broken open on the Saturday night, because the front-door was not opened at all on the Sunday. I came home about half-past five o'clock on the Saturday evening, and saw a man standing in the passage - it was dark; I asked him what he wanted? he said he wanted to see Mr. Evans; I went up stairs and left him. I went out again about six o'clock - there was nobody in the passage then; the street-door was put to, but not shut.

JOHN EVANS . I deal in Welch flannels, and occupy a warehouse in Stone's house. On Saturday, about five o'clock I left my warehouse in the care of my brother William - every thing was then safe. I returned on Monday morning, and missed two pieces of flannel, containing about 146 yards each - it was worth 40 l. I found a piece at Mr. Purse's, London-wall that night. On the 19th of January I saw the prisoner in Aldersgate-street; I laid hold of him, and said he was the man who had robbed my warehouse - he denied it. I gave him in charge of Taylor, who took him to the Compter; 13 s. 6 d., and three knives were found on him - one was a very strong knife. The prisoner had been to me on the 7th of January, and brought an order for some flannels - I gave him 6 s. as a reward. I afterwards thought it was not a genuine order - I made no appointment to meet him on Saturday.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Did you give him the 6 s. all at one time - A. No, but I am certain I gave it all to him before the Saturday.

WILLIAM EVANS . My brother left me in charge of his warehouse. A few minutes after my brother was gone I locked the door, took the key, and left - every thing was then safe; the warehouse is on the ground-floor. We both went there together, and missed the flannel.

Q. How could they have got in - A. A piece of the

railing over the door was cut, a hand could then be put in, and the bolt drawn aside - the bolt was drawn from the upper door - there is one door over the other. I have since seen a piece of the flannel. On Saturday, after securing the warehouse, I came out, and shut the passage-door also; I saw the prisoner by the door, he asked me if I had shut up for the night? I said Yes; I went away, leaving him there - I knew him before.

Cross-examined. You go through Stone's passage to the warehouse.

WILLIAM MILL . I am servant to Mr. Purse, who is a pawnbroker, and lives in London-wall. On the 9th of January, a little after six o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came and said he wanted some money to take up a bill, and wished to pledge two pieces of flannel, which he produced. I advanced him 10 l. on one piece; he gave me the name of Thompson - I am certain he is the man - I took notice of him. Evans claimed it on Monday.

LOUISA WITHINGTON . I am servant to Mr. Stone. I saw the prisoner in the passage about five o'clock, or a little after. I asked him what he wanted? he said Mr. Evans; I said he was not there, he said he knew that - I was cleaning the stairs. He kept walking up and down, as if he was waiting for somebody - I went up stairs, leaving him in the passage - I am sure he is the man; it was nearly dark. A person must come into the passage to cut the door. I came down, and told him if he wanted Mr. Evans he must go to his lodgings - he said Mr. Evans had made an appointment to meet him at six o'clock, and he would wait for him - I left him in the passage. My master went out a little after six o'clock; I went down soon after, and found the street-door open.

WILLIAM BRAND . I am a marshalman. I was informed of the robbery on the Monday, and went to see the premises. I found the warehouse had been entered by a wooden bar being cut, and a little bolt over the door unbolted - the door is inside the passage. A large knife was found on the prisoner; the cuts appeared to be with a knife with scratches - I cut another piece with the knife, it made the same scratches.

Cross-examined. The door has another door over it to let large loads out; it is in fact the same door as has rails in it.

WILLIAM TAYLOR . I am an officer. Evans gave the prisoner into my charge. I found three knives on him, one was a large one.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I got the two pieces of flannel from a man named Thomas, who comes from Montgomery - I sell them on commission. I pledged one, and gave the duplicate to Thomas. I called at Evans's warehouse by appointment, at half-past four o'clock - he said he was busy, and told me to call in half an hour. I called at five o'clock, waited there till six, and then went away.

GUILTY. - DEATH . Aged 42.

Of stealing in the dwelling-house, but not of burglariously breaking and entering .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190217-79

392. JOHN DAWSEY was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of February , one handkerchief, value 5 s., the property of Thomas Taylor , from his person .

THOMAS TAYLOR . I am a coal-merchant , and live in Millman-street, Bedford-row. On the 9th of February, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I was crossing from the end of Fleet-market , and felt something touch my pocket - I immediately missed my handkerchief, turned round, and saw the prisoner going very quick from me, and concealing something in his bosom. I pursued, calling out Stop thief, and saw him throw the handkerchief down; he was stopped in the middle of the road - I never lost sight of him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. Two boys dropped it, and I picked it up.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190217-80

393. JOHN DAYER was indicted for bigamy .

JANE ROBERTS . I am sister to Ann Roberts . On the 23d of August last I was present at the prisoner's marriage with my sister at St. George's, Hanover-square - I saw the marriage ceremony performed. She is now alive, and in Court. The prisoner is the man.

JOHN STANLEY . I am clerk at St. George's, Hanover-square. It appears by our register that John Dayer and Ann Roberts were married by banns on the 23d of August, 1818, in the presence of Jane Roberts and Maria Barham .

ELIZA JANE BAKER . I was present at the prisoner's marriage on the 19th of October last; he was married to Ann Baker , at New Brentford Church. I am sure he is the man.

FRANCIS DYER . I am clerk of New Brentford Church, in the parish of Hanwell. I produce the register, by which it appears that John Dayer was married to Ann Baker on the 19th of October, 1818, by banns.

Prisoner's Defence. I never saw my first wife after I left the church.

JANE ROBERTS. He left her at one o'clock on the day they were married - they never lived together.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Confined One Month .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190217-81

394. JAMES DAY was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of February , one scarf, value 10 s.; one pair of stockings, value 4 s. 6 d.; one pair of gloves, value 1 s.; one pair of shoes, value 2 s. 6 d.; one necklace, value 8 s.; one brooch, value 7 s.; one comb, value 6 d.; two pieces of net, value 8 s., and two yards of lace, value 11 s., the property of Margaret Peake , spinster , from her person .

MISS MARGARET PEAKE. On the 4th of February, about three o'clock in the afternoon, I was walking in the Lower-road, Islington, on my way to Newington-green , the prisoner and another person were standing at the corner of a street, they came up to me, and snatched a parcel

out of my hand, containing the articles stated in the indictment; they immediately ran across the street together with it, towards the Shepherd and Shepherdess fields - I followed them. The first persons I met were Mr. Green and Mr. Carr; I informed them, they pursued them across the field, and, I believe, took the parcel from the prisoner - I am certain he was one of them. I never lost sight of him except for a moment.

MR. JOHN CLEVELAND GREEN. On the 4th of February, I met Miss Peake, who said she had been robbed by two boys - the prisoner and another were pointed out to me. I immediately followed and overtook the prisoner with the bundle in his hand. He struggled, I threw him down; Carr came up and secured him - the other got away.

GEORGE CARR . I met the prosecutrix - I pursued the boys and secured the prisoner with the bundle.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A gentleman gave it to me to carry.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190217-82

395. JOHN KNIGHT was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of January , one butter-flat, value 3 s., and 28 lbs. of butter, value 2 l. , the goods of William Codgbrook and Henry Knighton , and GEORGE WOOLLEY was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, he well knowing them to be stolen .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating them to be the property of James Lamb .

WILLIAM LINETT . I am a waggoner. On the 30th of January I lost a flat of butter out of my waggon, in St. John-street, about four o'clock in the morning - I had come from Milton Earnest in Bedfordshire. I hired the prisoner, Knight, to assist me in driving the waggon from Hatfield; I had seen him before - I had two waggons. When we got to Holloway, he left us, and drove another waggon - I did not know but he was in the waggon till I got to Islington. I saw no more of him till I got to Newgate-market. I missed the flat when I got to the George Inn, Smithfield.

JOSEPH LEE . I am a watchman of St. John's, Clerkenwell. On the 30th of January, about a quarter before six o'clock in the morning, the prisoner, Knight, passed me at the end of Parson's-alley, St. John's-lane, close against St. John's-gate, with a flat of butter; he put it down by the side of the Jerusalem tavern, St. John's-gate - I said there was nobody up; he asked me what time I thought they would be up? I said about half-past six o'clock, and asked him if it was for Mrs. Walters, who keeps the house? he said,

"No, I am going to leave it here for a man who used to be in your box." I asked him if the man's name was Woolley? he said

"Yes, I have brought it for him, but I don't know what to do with it as he is not here, and I want to go back to Holloway with my waggon, but will you take care of it till he comes, or the woman of the public-house gets up?" He left it with me. As soon as the public-house was open I put it in there, and said it belonged to Woolley. When I went to the watch-house I saw Woolley there, and told him - I went over to the public-house with him. He put his foot on it, and said it was all right, and he knew where to take it to. I left him.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. Knight said he brought it from the country - A. Yes. Poor people often have butter from the country to sell in town.

THOMAS THOMPSON. I am an officer. I was informed the butter was lost, and apprehended Knight. He denied it several times - at last he said,

"I own I had lump of it, and sold it to an old woman." I said he must tell where the other was. He said

"There was another man in company with me; he took it out of the waggon, and sat it down by the Bull public-house door, and I took it away from the door to a watchman." I asked him where the watchman's box was? he said,

"He used to stand in the box at the corner of Parson's-alley, but now he stands in St. John-street." He said he had seen him in the morning, as he came down with the waggon, and he asked him if he had got anything for him? I desired him to go with me. I went to Woolley's house about seven o'clock that evening, and found him at home. I said,

"I am come to know about that flat of butter which you had last Saturday morning." He said,

"Oh, the flat of butter, do you?" I said,

"What have you done with it? he said,

"The waggoner and I sold it" - then said

"No, I did not sell it, the waggoner did;" and after that he said he had sold it. I asked him where? he took me to Aylesbury-street, where I found the flat - he had sold six lumps there.

(Flat sworn to.)

CHARLES CHARLTON . I live in Aylesbury-street. I know the prisoner, Woolley; he called and asked me if I wanted half a dozen lumps of butter; having known him for sometime, I bought them of him for 15 s., that was 15 d. per pound - it was fresh butter. He brought it in the flat.

Cross-examined. He said he had it from a waggoner, and was to have it every week. I used to employ him.

COURT. Q. What is he - A. He does any thing to earn sixpence - he had no employ that I know of - he was in distress. The market price was 15 1/2 d.

HARRY TAYLOR . I am guard to the waggon. The flat of butter belonged to James Lamb , who lives at Milton - it contained fifteen lumps.

KNIGHT'S Defence. I did not take it from the waggon. Woolley paid me 14 d. a pound for it.

WOOLLEY'S Defence. About five o'clock in the morning Knight passed me in St. John-street, and asked me if I knew anybody who dealt in butter? I said, yes, if he had got it honestly. He afterwards informed me that some was left for me. I did not know it was stolen. I sold nine lumps of it, and kept the rest for my family.

KNIGHT - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

WOOLLEY - GUILTY . Aged 30,

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190217-83

396. HYAM ALEXANDER and JOHN PHILLIPS were indicted for stealing, on the 16th of February , from the person of the Right Honourable Thomas Lord Foley , one watch, value 50 l.; three seals, value 5 l.; two keys

value 10 s.; one pocket-book, value 1 s., and one 10 l., one 5 l., and one 1 l. bank note , his property.

THE RIGHT HONOURABLE THOMAS LORD FOLEY. On the 16th of February, about five o'clock, I went to the hustings, Covent Garden - there was a considerable mob there. I got near the centre, in front of the hustings, and was hustled; a party rushed on both sides - one arm was held up, and the other quite close to me - the two prisoners were near me. As soon as I could get my hand down, I found my watch was gone; I got out of the mob, and found my pocket-book was also gone - both my great, and under coat were cut through to the pocket. It was a gold watch, and cost me eighty guineas; I had a 10 l. a 5 l., and a 1 l. note in my pocket-book - I have never recovered it. While I was examining my coat Mason came up, and with his assistance Alexander was immediately apprehended, and taken to Bow-street - my right arm was held up. I felt no particular pressure till the prisoners came up.

Cross-examined by MR. ARABIN. Sir Francis Burdet was speaking - my pocket-book was safe before I went into the crowd. I was about five minutes in the crowd.

WILLIAM MASON . I am shopman to Mr. Jepp, who lives in New Bond-street - I was in the crowd. I saw the prisoners, and some others close to his Lordship; they were all in company together, hustling round his Lordship. I saw Alexander put his hand into his Lordship's pocket; I watched them for ten minutes, and then saw one of them put his hand into the other gentleman's pocket, who was with his Lordship - there was nothing in his pocket. The gentleman turned round, and laughed at them; I heard Alexander say to Phillips,

"Why don't you make haste." I am sure they were in company; Phillips had been feeling me just before his Lordship came into the crowd. I followed his Lordship out of the crowd, saw him examining his pockets, and told him. I got King and Shaw, the officers, and took Alexander - Phillips escaped, Next day I went into the crowd, with the officers, and took Phillips there; he was then with two or three others, hustling people - a very small knife was found on him.

Cross-examined. I do not not know when the robbery was committed. His Lordship might have passed several thieves in the crowd.

CHARLES LEWIS . I am a gentleman's servant. I was at the hustings, and saw the two prisoners, and another behind his Lordship; I thought they were about no good. The moment his Lordship went away, Phillips and the other man spoke to Alexander - he was taken - I pointed him out.

WILLIAM KING . I am a constable. I assisted in apprehending Alexander - next day I took Phillips.

JAMES BARTLETT . I am a watch-house-keeper; I found a very small knife on Phillips.

ALEXANDER - GUILTY . Aged 22.

PHILLIPS - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190217-84

397. THOMAS DRUMMER was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of January , one handkerchief, value 3 s., the property of James Abbott , from the person of William Abbott .

WILLIAM ABBOTT . I am eight years of age. In January last, the prisoner and another boy met me at the corner of Feathers-court, Drury-lane , about ten o'clock in the morning; they said they would give me two birds and a cage, if I would lend them my handkerchief to fetch them in. I took the handkerchief off my neck, to put it into my hat; the prisoner took it, and ran off - I am certain it was him - I did not know him before.

Cross-examined by MR. ARABIN, They asked me to lend it to them.

EDWARD LUMBLEY. I am an officer. The prosecutor's father sent for me; I found the prisoner in bed - he said he had sold the handkerchief in Seven Dials.

CATHARINE NEWBY. I live in Moor-street, Compton-street. I bought the handkerchief of the prisoner for 2 s. 6 d. - he took it off his neck, and sold it to me.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Whipped , and Discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190217-85

398. GEORGE RAYBIN was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of February , four live tame geese, price 20 s. , the property of Thomas Warren .

THOMAS WARREN . I am a publican , and live at South Mimms . On the 12th of February, I lost my four geese, about half-past eleven o'clock at night - the place was broken into.

THOMAS CHESHIRE. On the 12th of February, about half-past eleven o'clock, I was at Warren's, - he said the geese were stolen. I received information, and saw the prisoner about fifty yards off; he ran away, and we followed him through three fields; we took him in the third field, and found three geese in the first field, where he ran from - they were in a great coat, which had a live hen in the pocket; they were on the spot, where he started from - he had concealed himself in a ditch. I found a direction in his pocket-book, with a packing-needle - there were two others walking about the house.

WILLIAM CRAWFIELD . I lodge at Warren's; the waggoner said somebody was stealing the geese, and that a man ran by him in the yard, and dropped one; I ran down, told Warren, went into the yard, and picked up a goose. I pursued after the prisoner; he was close to the farm; two other men were by the farm, they enquired for a waggon to take them to town - the prisoner was behind them. I asked him who he was? he immediately ran off, and we followed him through three fields; three of the geese were found just where he started from - they were dead.

FRANCIS ELLIS . I was at Warren's; two men enquired about a waggon; I saw the prisoner coming behind them - he turned back, and ran away; we followed, and took him in a ditch. Tilson said he was the man whom he saw drop the goose.

SAMUEL TILSON . I am a waggoner. I saw the prisoner in the yard, he dropped a goose - I am sure he is the man. He ran away when he saw me, but was secured.

THOMAS WARREN re-examined. The geese are mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I was laying in the ditch to rest.

GUILTY . Aged 45.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190217-86

399. THOMAS SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of January , two shovels, value 2 s. 6 d. , the goods of Samuel Shelly .

JOHN SMITH . I am foreman to Mr. Samuel Shelly , who is an ironmonger , and lives in Whitechapel . On the 30th of January I lost the shovels from the shop.

JOSEPH CADBY . I am an officer. I stopped the prisoner, with the shovels, in Leman-street. He said that he bought them, and afterwards, that he found them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Confined Three Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190217-87

400. FREDERICK SMITH was indicted for stealing on the 8th of February , two saws, value 7 s. , the goods of Thomas Moore .

THOMAS MOORE . I am a carpenter , and live in East Smithfield . On the 7th of February I saw the prisoner at my door - I went out and shut the door; in about ten minutes I was fetched back, and found him in custody with one of the saws.

ROBERT ROBERTS . I am a constable. I received information, and secured the prisoner just by the house, with the two saws.

JOHNSON SELWOOD . I saw the prisoner get over the stallboard into the shop, and come out again with two saws under his coat. I told Roberts, who secured him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I saw a man drop them, and I picked them up.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190217-88

401. FRANCES ROBINSON was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of February , one bed, value 1 l.; one bolster, value 4 s.; two sheets, value 6 s.; two blankets, value 8 s.; one counterpane, value 3 s.; one pair of bellows, value 2 s.; one pail, value 2 s.; one broom, value 8 d.; one shovel, value 6 d., and one saucepan, value 2 s. , the property of Edward Wilde .

These articles being let to the prisoner with a ready-furnished lodging, and she not being indicted under that statute, she was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190217-89

402. CHARLES PRICE was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of January , one basket, value 2 s., and seven loaves of bread, value 6 d. , the property of Alexander Stephenson .

The prosecutor did not appear.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190217-90

403. WILLIAM PECKHAM was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of February , 2 lbs. of soap, value 2 s. , the property of Barthold Johannis Justus Wyett .

THOMAS WYETT . I am son of Barthold Johannis Justus Wyett, who is a wholesale perfumer and soapmaker , and lives in Maria-row, Tower-hill. On the 12th of February, I was coming down stairs, about eight o'clock in the evening, and saw the prisoner run into the shop, and take a bar of soap. I called my cousin, who secured him with it under his arm.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

THOMAS HARRISON. I took the prisoner into custody. He said he found the soap; the soap was quite clean - it was a dirty day.

Prisoner's Defence. I found it under a window.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190217-91

404. MARGARET MACK was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of January , one sheet, value 10 s. , the property of William Harvey .

WILLIAM HARVEY . I keep a public-house in Wild-street, Lincoln's Inn-fields . On Saturday evening, the 30th of January, I lost two sheets, two table cloths, and two shifts, off the clothes horse in my parlour. I found a sheet at Webb's.

THOMAS WEBB . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Brydges-street, Covent-garden. On the 30th of January, the prisoner pledged a sheet with me for 5 s. On Friday she came to pledge a gown, and I detained her.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A man asked me to pledge it.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190217-92

405. JOHN KEEN was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of January , 95 lbs. of beef, value 2 l. 5 s. , the property of Jonathan Collins .

JONATHAN COLLINS . I am a butcher , and live in Great Turnstile; the prisoner came to me, and ordered a buttock and a thick flank of beef, and said if I would send my man with it to the Constitution, public-house, Covent-garden, he would pay him. I told the man not to leave it without the money.

EDWARD CLARKE . I went with the prisoner to carry the beef. He took me into the Green Dragon, public-house, gave me a pint of beer, and asked me to lift him up with the tray - another man lifted it up; he said he was going to take it to the Constitution to get the money, and would return directly. I waited two hours - he never returned. I then went to Mr. Tucker's, in Long-acre, where he said he lived, but found it was false.

JAMES KENNEDY . On the 25th of January I was told to follow the prisoner and another man, who had the buttock of beef, not the flank. I took them both. Collins claimed the beef.

ROBERT INGRAM . On the 25th of January the prisoner went into a public-house, and offered the beef for sale at 8 d. per pound - I bought the flank of him.

JOHN SCOTT . I was in Covent-garden, the prisoner offered me a pot of beer to carry the meat, which I did - he offered it for sale in James-street - we were both taken.

JONATHAN COLLINS . I am certain the beef was mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I intended to pay for it.

GUILTY - Aged 35.

Confined Six Months , and Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190217-93

406. ROBERT JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of January , one copper pot, value 7 s. , the property of James Fort , the elder .

JAMES FORT , JUN. I am the son of James Fort , who is an ironmonger , and lives at Battle-bridge . On the 22d of January, I saw the prisoner and another man lurking about the shop - the other man took the pot and gave it to the prisoner; I secured him with it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 35.

Confined Six Months , and Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190217-94

407. WILLIAM HILL was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of February , one pair of shoes, value 3 s. , the goods of James Corss .

JAMES CORSS . I live in Shoreditch . On the 6th of February, I missed a pair of shoes from my door. The prisoner was pointed out to me - I followed, secured him, and asked him for the shoes which he had stolen, he denied it; I took him to the shop, and found them in the area.

SUSAN HIBBERT . I saw the prisoner take the shoes, and told the prosecutor - the prisoner threw them into the area.

(Property produced a d sworn to.)

Prisoner. I was in distress.

GUILTY . Aged 32.

Confined One Month , and Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190217-95

408. THOMAS HUGHES was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of February , two hams, value 36 s. , the goods of William Stidolph .

WILLIAM STIDOLPH . I am a cheesemonger , and live in High Holborn . On the 8th of February, between six and seven o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner come down the shop, and take two hams off the shelf - I pursued, secured him, and brought him back with them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 52.

Confined Three Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190217-96

409. MARTHA HUDSON was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of February , one tub, value 3 s. , the goods of George Tomlinson .

GEORGE TOMLINSON . I am a cooper , and live in Charles-street, Hatton-garden . On the 1st of February, between twelve and one o'clock, my tub stood under the window; about one o'clock I saw the prisoner take it up, and go towards Leather-lane - I followed and secured her.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I never touched it.

GUILTY . Aged 44.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190217-97

410. WILLIAM FINCH was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of January , one sheet, value 3 s., the property of Nathaniel Skuse , in a lodging-room, and two other sheets, value 6 s. , his property.

JOHN LEE . I am servant to Nathaniel Skuse , who keeps a lodging-house in Wentworth-street, Whitechapel . I let the prisoner a bed at 3 d. per night; he lodged five weeks with me. On the 24th of January I missed a sheet off his bed and two off another bed. Nathan brought the prisoner to me with the sheets.

NATHANIEL NATHAN . I am a salesman. The prisoner came to me to sell the sheet - I asked him if he knew what name was on it? he said No. I showed it to him, and said it must come from a lodging-house; he said he bought it a month ago.

JAMES LOW. The prisoner was given into my charge. I found one sheet in his bosom, and another round his body.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I was out of employ .

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined One Month .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190217-98

411. WILLIAM CHEESEMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of January , one jacket, value 2 s., and one pair of trowsers, value 2 s. , the goods of Frederick West .

FREDERICK WEST . I am a salesman , and live in Wilstead-street, Somers-town . On the morning of the 19th of January I missed a suit of clothes - I found them soon after exposed for sale in Little Russell-street.

THOMAS BOWER . I am an officer. The prisoner was described to me by Martha Stapleton - I took him the same evening.

MARTHA STAPLETON . I bought the clothes of the prisoner; he said they were his mother's.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Six Months , and Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190217-99

412. THOMAS BLACKETER was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of February , one coat, value 5 l. , the property of William Moorhouse .

WILLIAM MOORHOUSE . I am a surgeon , and live in Aldgate High-street. On the 2d of February, between seven and eight o'clock, my coat was taken off my gig, in Church-street, Spitalfields .

ABRAHAM SHUTTLEWORTH . I am servant to Mr. Moorhouse. I was looking after the gig, and saw the prisoner come on the dark side, and take the coat off - I followed him, calling Stop thief! he was stopped, and threw the coat down. I never lost sight of him.

JAMES WARD . I saw the prisoner run from the gig with the coat - he dropped it, and was secured.

JOHN GRIFFITHS . On the 2d of February I heard the cry of Stop thief! saw the prisoner running, and stopped him - he was the first person who was running.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I ran after the thief and was stopped.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Judgment Respited .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190217-100

413. THOMAS ALLSOP was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of February , two sheets, value 9 s., the property of John Baskerville , in a lodging-room, and three gowns, value 12 s. , his property.

JOHN BASKERVILLE . I am a publican , and live in Great Windmill-street, Haymarket , the prisoner lodged three weeks with me - I let him a bed-room, furnished, at 4 s. per week, I boarded and lodged him - he never paid me any thing, except part of the first week. On the 6th of February he left me - not returning in the evening I went up, and found the door locked and the key gone - I forced it open, missed the sheets off the bed, and three gowns, which had been given to his wife to repair. I received a letter from him, saying he was under the necessity of going to Croydon before he could settle his business. His wife left with him.

JOHN HARRIS . I am a pawnbroker. On the 23d of January the prisoner pledged a sheet with me, and on the 5th of February three gowns. I am certain he is the man.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I did not intend to rob the prosecutor.

GUILTY . Aged 48.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190217-101

414. MATTHEW TILLYER was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of December , five cherry-tree boards, value 9 s. , the goods of Joseph Bowers , and WILLIAM BEST was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, knowing them to have been stolen .

JOSEPH BOWERS . I am a carpenter , and live at Harlington . On the 23d of December I lost five cherry-tree boards out of my garden - on the 5th of February I found them at Musto's, and knew them to be mine.

WILLIAM MUSTO . I am a wheelwright. The prisoner, Best, brought me the boards about the middle of January, to repair a truck with. I said they were too good, he then offered to sell them.

JOHN COTTERILL . I am a constable. I took Best into custody; he said he had them from Tillyer - I took Tillyer, and he denied it.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190217-102

415. JAMES ANDERSON was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of January , one apron, value 2 s.; two pair of scissars, value 2 s., and one pair of curling-irons, value 1 s., the goods of Edward Ring , from his person .

EDWARD RING . I am a hair-dresser , and live in Charles-court. On the 25th of January, about nine o'clock at night, I was in Newport-street , a mob was collected; I went up, stood there about two minutes, and missed my apron and things out of my pocket - the prisoner was immediately secured with them.

WILLIAM HODGKISSON . I was passing along Newport-street, and saw the prisoner put his hand into Ring's pocket, and take something out, which I thought was a handkerchief. I told the prosecutor, and secured him. I saw him give the things to another person in the crowd.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190217-103

416. JOHN JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of February , 8 lbs. of beef, value 5 s. 4 d. , the goods of James Bird .

JAMES BIRD . I am a butcher , and live in Hart-street, Mark-lane . On the 4th of February I was at the back of the shop, and saw the prisoner take a piece of beef off the board, and run off - I pursued, and secured him, he threw it down.

Prisoner. I was in distress.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Judgment Respited .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190217-104

417. MARK FORSTER was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of February , one hat, value 4 s , the property of Robert Franks .

THOMAS ELFORD . I am servant to Mr. Robert Franks , who is a hatter , and lives in Barbican . The prisoner was brought into our shop, about twenty minutes after one o'clock, with the hat on his head - I had not missed it before, but did then.

GEORGE THORPE . I live opposite to Mr. Franks. I saw the prisoner lurking about his door - he had no hat on. I watched, saw him take one, and run off. I pursued, and took him with it on his head.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190217-105

418. JOHN KNIGHT was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of February , one gold seal, value 3 l., and one key, value 6 d., the property of Richard Elsam , from his person .

RICHARD ELSAM . I live in Fleet-street. On the 16th of February, about eight o'clock in the evening, I had been drinking with a friend, and was walking towards Temple-bar with him, near Chancery-lane . While I was in conversation with him I felt a tug at my watch, put my hand to my fob, and missed my seal, and key; almost at the same instant a boy rushed by me; I turned round, and saw the prisoner with him, within a yard or two of me. I I collared him, and took him to the door of Mr. North's shop, one of the shopmen opened the door; I took him in, and charged him with stealing the seal, which he positively denied. He said he was the son of a gentlewoman, living in Coleman-street. I desired him to deliver up the seal; he said he was not the person, who took it. A lady came into the shop, and said, in his presence, that she saw him cut it off. He said she must be mistaken, for he had not got it - it was afterwards found by Mr. North's door, in the area, where I first detained him - a knife was also found in the door-way, where he was detained - my seal and key were cut from the ribbon.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. He passed me on my right hand.

MARY SHAW . I live in Duke-street, Lincolns Inn-fields - my husband is a compositor. I saw the prisoner come from behind me, and push between me, and Mr. Elsam - nobody else was between us. He made a stop for a moment, and then made a motion like a snatch with his arm, and walked on very fast. I immediately took hold of his arm, and assisted in taking him into the shop, which was not above two or three yards off - nobody was near enough to take it but him, nor could any one have dropped it but him.

Cross-examined. The prisoner's back was close against me. I saw him make a snatch, and then rush over - we took him across the area.

JOHN MURTHWHAITE . I am in Mr. North's service. I found the seal and key in the area.

WILLIAM DAVIS . I am a patrol. I found a knife in the doorway, within a few inches of the area.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was getting out of a crowd, and was taken.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190217-106

419. ANN POCOCK was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of January , three pieces of ribbon, value 16 s. , the property of Thomas Stevens .

WILLIAM DRAYTON . I am apprentice to Mr. Thomas Stevens , who is a haberdasher , and lives at Aldgate . On the 16th of January, between nine and ten o'clock at night, the prisoner came into the shop, and asked to look at some silk love ribbon; I put a drawer before her, and she chose one. While I was cutting her a yard, which came to 6 d., I saw her take a piece, and put it into her pocket. She then asked for black sarsnet ribbon; I showed her a drawer, and while I was cutting that, which came to 5 d., I saw her take two pieces, and put into her pocket. I sent privately for an officer, he stopped her as she was going out, and took her up stairs. I then charged her with it, and she delivered them up - there was fifty-six yards in all.

TOBIAS LOVE . I am a constable. I took the prisoner; she produced two pieces of ribbon, and then produced another, on being asked for it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Judgment Respited .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190217-107

420. JOHN LONDON was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of January , one handkerchief, value 4 s., the property of Frederick Balaam , from his person .

FREDERICK BALAAM . I am a linen-draper , and live in Southampton-row. On the 28th of January, between nine and ten o'clock in the morning, I was in Skinner-street ; a person called to me, and produced my handkerchief; I then missed it - the prisoner was in custody.

HENRY JAMES PITTS . I am a boot and shoemaker, and live in Peter-street, St. John-street. I was in Skinner-street, and observed the prisoner with a boy about ten years old, following the prosecutor very close. I saw the boy draw the handkerchief from the prosecutor's pocket, and give it to the prisoner; he turned back, and I seized him with it in his hand; I told the prosecutor who took it. The prisoner said it flew into his hands. I am certain they were in concert together.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I saw it laying by the wall of the church, and picked it up, looked round for the owner, and was taken.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190217-108

421. WILLIAM BINGLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of February , one wooden tub, value 1 s., and 70 lbs. of butter, value 2 l. 10 s. the property of Peter Halliday Turner and Charles Johnson .

JOHN JOHNSON . I am servant to Peter Halliday Turner and Charles Johnson , who carry goods on the canal . On the 5th of February the firkin of butter was stolen.

JAMES BISHOP . I was employed to take 120 firkins of butter, in a waggon, from Paddington-wharf to the warehouse in London Wall. I examined the waggon when I was in Smithfield, they were all safe then. I got to the warehouse about a quarter before six, and missed one.

WILLIAM BRAND . I am a marshalmen. On the 6th of February, about six in the evening, I saw the prisoner in Whitecross-street, with the firkin of butter on his shoulder. I followed him through several courts into Golden-lane. A person was following him, which increased my suspicion; that person seeing me made off. I stopped the prisoner in Golden-lane, and asked him what he had got; I asked him if he had any bill of parcels; he said he had no bill, but a man got him to carry it, and he brought it from a man at a public-house door in Petticoat-lane, and he was to give him 1 s. for his trouble; the man's name was Davis, and he was to take it to Mr. Elliston, Bull-alley, Golden-lane. I took him there, but could find no such person. I advertised the butter; and found the owner.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. - A man gave me 1 s. to carry it.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined Six Months , and Whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190217-109

422. MARY ANN SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of February , two half-crowns, two shillings, and two sixpences, the monies of William Pitt , from his person .

WILLIAM PITT . I am a carman , and live in Timber-street. On the 14th of February, about one o'clock in the morning - I had been at the public-house ever since eleven - the prisoner came up to me in the Old Change , and asked me to give her something to drink - I refused; she put her hand into my pocket, pulled my money out, and ran off - the watchman stopped her.

BARTHOLOMEW SCANDLIN . I am a watchman. I saw the prosecutor, and another man go into the Queen's Head, public-house - they came out about twelve o'clock; I watched them into Little Carter-lane. About one o'clock I heard the prosecutor call out, and saw the prisoner running in St. Paul's Church-yard; I secured her, and found two half-crowns, two sixpences, and two shillings, in her hand - I think she said he gave them to her.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going on an errand - the money was my own.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190217-110

423. CHARLES CURTIS was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of February , 23 lbs of rope, value 2 s. , the property of Richard Snell , the elder , John Robins , Richard Snell , the younger , and William Snell .

RICHARD SNELL , JUN. I am in partnership with Richard

Snell, John Robins, and William Snell ; we keep the White Bear Inn, Basinghall-street . On the 18th of February, about nine o'clock in the morning, I met the Gloucestershire waggon (which had just left our inn), in Cripplegate , and saw the prisoner take the rope from it; I asked him where he got it? he said a man gave it to him. I told him to take it back to the inn - it must have been concealed in the waggon to be taken away.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Confined One Month .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190217-111

424. GEORGE MASON was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of January , four sheets, value 1 l., and one apron, value 6 d. , the goods of Mary Lewis , widow .

ELIZA ROBINSON . I live in Craven-street, Hoxton , with Mary Lewis , who is a widow - the sheets, and apron were in a back-room in the house. On the 18th of January about ten o'clock in the morning, the officer brought them to me - I had not missed them before - I have often seen the prisoner about the house; his sister was the servant.

THOMAS GARTON . I am an officer of Worship-street. On the 18th of January, about ten o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner and two Jews together in Worship-street - the Jews had each a bag - the prisoner appeared to be bargaining with them; they saw me, and parted immediately, as they knew me; the prisoner also knew me - I secured him. He had four sheets, and an apron; I asked him where he got them? he said they were his own, and that he lived at No. 17, Craven-street. I asked him if he kept the house? he said No. He then said he had a sister, who lived servant there, and he had been concealed in the night-house all Saturday and Sunday, when he went into the back-room, and took the things - I went to the prosecutrix, and she claimed them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant

Reference Number: t18190217-112

425. THOMAS RICE was indicted for that he, on the 4th of February , 50 lbs. of lead, value 6 s., belonging to Charles Warren , Esq. and fixed to his dwelling-house, feloniously did rip, with intent to steal the same .

WILLIAM HOLLANDS . I am servant to Charles Warren , Esq., who lives in Bedford-square . On the 4th of February, about half-past six o'clock in the evening, I went into the area, and found one part of the pipe separated from the other, but not taken away - it was bending over the rails in the front area. I went into the dining-room to watch, and in about three minutes I saw a short man by the rails, apparently watching, he beckoned to the prisoner, who came on the steps of the next house, stood on the scraper, which would enable him to reach the pipe; I spoke to him, he jumped off the steps, and ran off - I followed, and secured him in Charlotte-street. I never lost sight of him. The pipe was separated from the house.

Cross-examined by MR. ARABIN. I am certain he is the man.

JAMES FURZEMAN . I am an officer. The prisoner was brought to the watch-house. I found a knife on him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190217-113

426. JAMES WALKER and WILLIAM SPIKEMAN were indicted for stealing, on the 16th of February , one handkerchief, value 10 d., the property of Henry James Lloyd , Esq. from his person .

HENRYJAMES LLOYD, ESQ. I live in Gloucester-place. On the 16th of February, about twelve o'clock at night, I was coming from Covent-Garden Theatre , crossing from James-street, into Covent-garden , my handkerchief was in my coat-pocket, and heard a quick step following me, which afterwards increased, as if the person was coming nearer. I looked round, and saw one of the prisoners, I do not know which, reaching his hand to a person behind him - I saw my handkerchief on the ground which the other person was picking up. I seized the person which was nearest to me, and took the other as he passed me, with my handkerchief - they were the prisoners - they were close to each other. I gave them in charge. Nobody was near enough to take it but them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

WALKER'S Defence. I saw the handkerchief on the pavement, picked it up, and gave it to the gentleman.

SPIKEMAN'S Defence. Several women were round the prosecutor.

WALKER - GUILTY . Aged 24.

SPIKEMAN - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190217-114

427. EDWARD LAWRENCE COLLMAN was indicted for embezzling the sum of 4 l. 4 s. 6 d., which he had received on account of Thomas Lewis and Charles Lewis , his masters .

CHARLES LEWIS . I am a dyer, in partnership with Thomas Lewis ; we live in Oxendon-street - the prisoner was our servant about seven months. He was entrusted to receive money for us, and ought to have delivered it every evening to William Rutland - he absconded in September. M. A. Peach was a customer of ours - he never paid me 4 l. 4 s. 6 d. for her.

MARY ANN PEACH . I paid the prisoner 5 l. 11 s. 6 d. on account of his masters, on the 19th of May; I gave him a 5 l. note, and the rest in silver. I produce the receipt, which I saw him write (read).

WILLIAM RUTLAND . I am the prosecutor's clerk. Miss Peach owed 5 l. 14 s. On the 16th of June the prisoner paid me 1 l. 7 s. in part, he said he had received it on account - he never paid me any more.

Prisoner's Defence. I thought I should be able to make the money up.

GUILTY . Aged 29.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190217-115

428. JONATHAN WOODWARD was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of January , two trusses of hay, value 5 s. , the property of William Smith , Esq.

THOMAS FULLER . I am haybinder to William Smith , Esq., who lives at Hammersmith. On the 25th of January I tied up a load of hay and two trusses over, and took them into the carthouse - next morning I missed them. I afterwards went to Whitby's, the Bald Faced Stag, in the Edgware-road, and found them - the load was gone to town - the carter's name was Bush. The prisoner was a stranger. I knew the hay by the bands. I apprehended the prisoner at work on the road.

THOMAS WHITBY . I am hostler at the Bald Faced Stag, the prisoner sold me two trusses of hay, at 2 s. a truss, on the 26th of January. When I heard it was stolen I told my master, and the prisoner was taken. I feed the horses at the door.

DAVID JOHNSTON . I am bailiff to Mr. Smith. - The hay is his. I saw the prisoner sign his examination before the magistrate (read)

"The prisoner says he did steal two trusses, carried them to the Bald Faced Stag, and sold them to Whitby."

Prisoner's Defence. I was in distress. The hostler said if I got the hay he would buy it of me. He gave me the money before I brought it.

THOMAS WHITBY re-examined. I never persuaded him to do it.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Confined Six Months , and Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190217-116

429. JOSEPH WILDGOOSE was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of January , three saucepans, value 4 s.; one pair of scales, value 2 s.; one pair of boots, value 2 s., and one book, value 1 s. , the property of Charles Turner .

CHARLES TURNER . I am a shoemaker , and live in Red Lion-passage, Cloth-fair. On the 22d of January I lost these things. The prisoner lodged with me. I charged him with it. He took me to where he had sold them. I found them there.

ELIZA STRINGER . I keep an old iron shop in Turnmill-street. On the 21st of January the prisoner sold me three saucepans. He said he was selling them for a poor woman who was in distress.

WILLIAM THOMAS . I live in St. John-street. I bought the scales of the prisoner.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I have given the prosecutor more than the value of them. He promised to take no notice.

CHARLES TURNER . It is false.

GUILTY . Aged 71.

Confined One Year .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190217-117

430. THOMAS STEVENS was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of February , one barn-cloth, value 8 s. , the property of Henry Marnham .

HENRY MARNHAM . I am a farmer , and live at Acton . On the night of the 13th of February I lost a barn-cloth out of my barn - I lost twenty bushels of wheat at the same time.

JOHN WILLIAMSON . I am a constable. About four o'clock in the morning I took the prisoner in charge at the watch-house, and found a tinder-box, steel, and a claw hammer on him.

JOHN GOSS . I am a watchman of Acton. On Saturday morning, the 14th of February, about four o'clock, I saw the prisoner with the cloth - he said he bought it a month ago for 4 s.; I secured him.

(Property produced and sworn to. )

Prisoner's Defence. I carry the tinder-box to light my pipe with.

GUILTY . Aged 60.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190217-118

431. CHARLOTTE WALL was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of January , one bed-tick, value 8 s.; one bolster, value 6 s.; one pillow, value 3 s.; one looking-glass, value 3 s.; one carpet, value 5 s.; two window curtains, value 2 s.; three blankets, value 20 s.; two sheets, value 5 s.; one pillow-case, value 6 d., and one counterpane, value 4 s., the property of Mary Joye , widow , in a lodging-room .

MARY JOYE . I live in Baldwin-street, St. Luke's . On the 6th of December I let the prisoner my two-pair front room, furnished, at 6 s. a week. She said her husband was out of the way for debt, and she had 50 l. a year from the East India House. On the 16th of January, I found she had robbed her lodgings - she said she had been out a little way to pledge her bed-tick; that her 50 l. would be due next day, and she would pay me all - I had lent her 9 s. She went out again; I thought she was gone for good. I saw some feathers on my oil-cloth. I went up stairs, and found a candle on the landing-place, stuck in a bottle. I went out, and met her - I said I was ruined. She brought me back - I sent for an officer, who took her. I went up to the room, missed the bed, and every thing except the mattress and bedstead; she had taken the articles stated in the indictment. She said she had sold the feathers to Myers. I am a widow, with two children. She came to me by the name of Parsons - her real name is Wall.

THOMAS BROOKS . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Whitecross-street. I have a blanket, bed-tick, bolster, pillow, head-cloth, curtains, and a looking-glass. The prisoner pledged the bed-tick with me; I bought the duplicates of the rest of her, as I had known her several years.

RACHAEL MYERS . I keep an old clothes-shop in Bath-street, City-road. I bought two sheets, a blanket, counterpane, pillow-case, and two window-curtains of the prisoner at different times. I bought no feathers of her, I never saw them. She brought some in a bag - I said they were not in my way.

JAMES TAYLOR . I am an officer. The prisoner was given into my charge. The duplicate of the bed-tick was in her room - it had been pledged that evening.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I throw myself on the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190217-119

432. CHARLES TIDSWELL , JOSEPH WOTTEN , and JOHN TURNER were indicted, for that they unlawfully, maliciously, and feloniously did, by menaces, and in a forcible and violent manner, demand three pieces of silk, value 60 l., the property of Stephen Wilson and Thomas Wilson , of and from William Taylor , with intent to rob him, and the said goods from his person violently and feloniously to steal .

WILLIAM TAYLOR . I am servant to Messrs. Stephen and Thomas Wilson . On the 11th of February, between four and five o'clock in the afternoon, I was passing St. Giles's church, Wotten struck me violently on the face; some others came behind me, and took my parcel from under my arm, it contained three pieces of silk. I called for assistance - they ran off, and did not get the property. They said nothing whatever to me.

COURT. Then there was no demand made.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190217-120

433. THOMAS SUTTON was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of January 15 s. 2 d. in monies numbered , the monies of Richard Crick .

RICHARD CRICK . I am a butcher , and live at Battle-bridge. On the 23d of January a boy ordered a shoulder of mutton, to be sent to Mr. Spicer's, No. 7, Charlotte-street. I sent my son with it - he returned for change for a 1 l. note, which I gave him. He returned with the mutton, but not the money.

JOSEPH CRICK . I went with the meat. I met the prisoner - he asked me if I was going to No. 7, and said the mutton would do, and I must get change for a 1 l. note, and get the bone broken. I returned, and met him again - he took the change. When I got to the house I found no mutton had been ordered. It was a dark night, but I am sure he is the man.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190217-121

434. JAMES REEVES and WILLIAM WRIGHT were indicted for stealing, on the 8th of February , two decanters, value 7 s. , the property of Elizabeth Moxon Gledhill .

ELIZABETH MOXON GLEDHILL . I keep a glass-shop in Ship-alley, Whitecross-street . On the 8th of February, I lost two decanters.

WILLIAM WRIGHT . I am a cutler. On the 8th of February, about ten o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoners pass my house, and watched them. Reeves turned back, and went into Gledhill's shop, took two decanters out of the window, and came out - I followed him; he saw me, and put one decanter on the ground. I collared him. Wright was looking in at the window while Reeves was taking them - they were together. Reeves had the other decanter under his coat.

WRIGHT - GUILTY . Aged 17.

REEVES - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Three Months , and Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190217-122

435. JOHN PETERS and JOHN LUKIN were indicted for stealing, on the 28th of January , one plank of mahogany, value 8 l. , the property of William Smith .

WILLIAM SMITH . I am a timber-merchant , and live in the Curtain-road . On the 28th of January, about two o'clock, I went out, my mahogany was safe in the yard then. About half-past eight o'clock I returned - it was brought back on a truck.

WILLIAM STAFFORD . I am foreman to Mr. Smith. About eight o'clock Dawson alarmed me. I immediately unlocked the gate, and heard a truck go out of the gateway - I followed, and overtook it in Holywell-lane, with the mahogany on it; three men were with it. I took one, the others ran away. He said the other two men employed him to drag it - it was Bryant; I do not know the other two.

SARAH DAWSON . I was passing Mr. Smith's; a man asked me what time the sawyers left work? I said at seven or eight o'clock. When I returned, I saw three men at the gateway lifting the wood on the truck. I do not know them. I informed the foreman.

JOHN BRYANT . I was looking in at a shop-window in Shoreditch - the prisoner, Peters, came and asked me if I wanted a job? I said Yes. Lukin joined him, they said they would give me one, and took me to Smith's timberyard - there was a truck under the shed; I assisted them in putting the mahogany on the truck. They told me to go the head of the truck and draw, which I did. When we got to Holywell-lane I was taken. I did not know them before.

Cross-examined by MR. ARABIN. Q. I suppose you are quite innocent - A. Yes; they are the thieves.

MARY MACKLEY . I live in New Inn-yard, Curtain-road. On the 28th of January, about half-past six o'clock, a genteel man came to borrow our truck for half an hour, to carry some things into the City-road - he called for it about seven o'clock. I cannot swear to them - Peters is like him.

Q. You saw him twice - A. Yes. He knocked at the door; my little girl opened it. He did not come into the room - he gave me 6 d. as a deposit.

Q. Then you must have been nearer to him than you describe - A. I did not look at him.

JAMES KENNEDY . I am an officer. Bryant was given into my charge. He gave me the same account he has given now. The prisoners were apprehended, he said they were the men - he was admitted as an evidence.

THOMAS WALKER . I am an officer. On the 31st of January I took Lukin at the Sun, public-house, in Swan-yard, Shoreditch. He made a great resistance - my coat and shirt were torn to pieces.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190217-123

436. WILLIAM MERRIDAY was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of January , one coat, value 2 l. , the property of Isaac Powell .

ISSAC POWELL. I keep a glass coach . On Sunday, the 29th of January, my coat hung in the harness-room in the stable, at the Ship tavern, at Tottenham - I put it there about one o'clock, and locked the room up; the prisoner was in the stable at the time. About six o'clock I found the door broken open and the coat gone.

GEORGE MILLER . I was standing by the stable, and saw the prisoner leaning over the pales, and looking round

the yard; he stood there a few minutes, then left, and went towards the stable, and came through the gateway with a large coat rumpled up loosely. I went round to meet him, but could see nothing of him - I am certain I saw him with the coat; I knew him before.

WILLIAM WARNER . The prisoner was taken at Southgate, and given into my charge on the 28th. He said he sold the coat in Holywell-lane.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190217-124

437. EMANUEL MYERS was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of February 6 s. 6 d., in monies numbered, the monies of John Edwards , from his person .

JOHN EDWARDS . On the 15th of February, about three o'clock I was at the hustings, Covent Garden-market , standing opposite them. I was surrounded by a gang, and carried away into the middle of the mob; I kept my hands down to protect my watch - the prisoner was one of them; I kept my eye on him, and felt his hand in my pocket. I said,

"You scoundrel take your hand out." I was then hustled ten times more than before - they pressed against me with their elbows, and I was almost choaked; one of them took my hat off. I was then quite of my feet, and felt a hand working my watch about - I had twisted it round, so that they could not get it out; both my pockets were turned inside-out.

JAMES SCOTT . I am a piano-forte-maker. I was at the hustings; the gang were round the prosecutor; he said he was robbed. I saw his pockets turned inside-out - he was pulled about a great deal; he pointed the prisoner out. I secured him, and took him to Bow-street; he was searched - he had three handkerchiefs round his neck - one of them had a 1 l. note in it; two snuffboxes, and a cotton handkerchief were found on him - the gang tried to rescue him.

WILLIAM MASON . I was at the hustings, and saw the prisoner with several others hustling the prosecutor, who was quite exhausted, so that he could not walk - I am sure the prisoner was one of them.

Prisoner's Defence. The evidence is false.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190217-125

438. THOMAS JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of February , one shawl, value 14 s. , the goods of John Brown .

WILLIAM SHEWSMITH . I am shopman to Mr. John Brown, who is a linen-draper , and lives at the corner of Parliament-street - I sleep in the shop. On the 2d of February, about ten minutes after seven o'clock in the morning, I was getting up, and heard a crack at the window; I went round the shop, but could perceive nothing. I got down again, and heard it crack the second time. I rose up, and saw the prisoner at the window; I went round to the private door, and saw the prisoner cutting the glass - he walked to and fro, and in the mean time I unfastened the door. He came to the window again, pushed the glass in, and drew a shawl out - I opened the door, and seized him with it, I took him into the shop; he threw it on the counter, and said he did not do it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN SHAW . I took the prisoner in charge; I found a knife on him with three instruments in it - it was marked with putty.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190217-126

439. GEORGE HYLAND and THOMAS HYLAND were indicted for stealing, on the 17th of January , one handkerchief, value 2 s. 6 d., the property of Collis Belsham , from his person .

COLLIS BELSHAM. I am a shoemaker . On the 17th of January, about seven o'clock in the evening, I was at the New Chapel, City-road ; my handkerchief was in my hat, which I held in my hand - the prisoners came in. Soon after I felt something at my hat, but paid no attention to it, as I thought it was somebody passing by. The prisoner Thomas went away; I then missed my handkerchief, followed him, and charged him with it. He said the other boy picked it up, and gave it to him; I secured them - it could not have fallen out of my hat.

EDWARD SIMMONS . I was at the chapel, and found the handkerchief in the prisoner Thomas's pocket. He said his brother gave it to him. His brother said he picked it up from off the ground.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GEORGE HYLAND 'S Defence. I picked it up, and told my brother to take it home.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190217-127

440. WILLIAM HAINES was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of February , two sheets, value 10 s. , the property of James Clark .

JOHN STEVENHEAD . I am servant to James Clark , who keeps the Camden Head , Camden-town . On the 11th of February, the prisoner slept at our house; next morning, about seven o'clock I stopped him as he was going out, and found two sheets round his body.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 32.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190217-128

441. STEPHEN HICKLING was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of February , one looking-glass, value 15 s.; two pillows, value 4 s.; one bolster, value 4 s.; two blankets, value 4 s.; one quilt, value 2 s., and one picture, value 5 s., the goods of Stephen Sanderson , in a lodging-room .

JANE SANDERSON . I am the wife of Stephen Sanderson , who lives in Butler-street, Spitalfields ; I let the prisoner the front-parlour, furnished, at 5 s. per week; he came on the 8th of February, on the 10th I found he was gone. I forced the door open, and missed the articles stated in the indictment.

JOHN BUGG . I am servant to Mr. Salmon, who is a pawnbroker, and lives in Brick-lane. On the 10th of

February, about eight o'clock in the morning, the prisoner pledged a looking-glass with me.

THOMAS CRANFIELD . I am a pawnbroker; the prisoner pledged a quilt with me.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190217-129

442. JOHN HARLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of February , one handkerchief, value 2 s., the property of Hugh Donald Cameron Douglas , from his person .

HUGH DONALD CAMERON DOUGLAS . On the 3d of February, between six and seven o'clock in the evening, I was in High-street, St. Giles's, I noticed the prisoner and another person following me for sometime; just as I crossed Denmark-street a person said,

"the man has taken something out of your pocket." I immediately ran and collared the prisoner, who was pointed out to me - I saw the handkerchief in his hand; he threw it down, and said he had not got it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190217-130

443. GEORGE GORDON was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of January , one watch, value 3 l., the property of Tante Frederick Myer , from his person .

TANTE FREDERICK MYER. I live in Duncan-street, Whitechapel. On the 20th of February, between nine and ten o'clock at night, I was walking along Whitechapel with a friend, the prisoner ran against me, and took my watch out - I laid hold of him, and took it from him, as he was handing it to another person - it was all done in a moment.

- CLARK. I was with the prosecutor, and saw the prisoner take the watch. He was secured as he was giving it to another.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190217-131

444. SAMUEL CROKER was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of February , one tea-tray, value 2 s. 6 d. , the goods of William Sweeting .

WILLIAM SWEETING . I live in Denmark-street, St. Giles's . I lost a tea-tray.

SAMUEL FLEETWOOD . I live opposite to the prosecutor. I saw the prisoner lurking about, and watched him for about ten minutes; I then saw him take the tray from the door, and secured him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 12.

Judgment respited .

First Middlesex Jury, Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190217-132

445. JOHN BUTLER was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of January , one shoe, value 5 s., the property of James Connell , for his person .

JAMES CONNELL . I live in Dudley-court, Soho. I was in Oxford-street , and stopped to look at a crowd, I felt something touch my pocket, and missed the shoe out of it - the prisoner was close to me - I collared him, it was close at his feet; it might have fallen from other persons. He struck me and ran away. He was secured.

GEORGE BLACKET . I was behind the prosecutor, and saw the shoe drop, as I thought, from the prisoner, but am not certain.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190217-133

446. EDWARD HURLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of February , one handkerchief, value 2 s., the goods of John Armitage Brown , from his person .

JOHN ARMITAGE BROWN. I live at Camberwell. On the 19th of February, about eleven o'clock in the morning, I was in St. Paul's Church-yard , and felt a motion at my coat-pocket, I turned round, and saw two boys, the prisoner was one, he had my handkerchief in his hand. I pursued him, calling Stop thief! he dropped it; I picked it up, and he was secured. I am certain he is the boy.

JOSEPH DAVIS . I am an officer. I was in St. Paul's Church-yard, and heard the alarm; the prisoner was given into my charge. He said the other boy took it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 12.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190217-134

447. JOHN MEEK was indicted for stealing on the 21st of November , one pound and a half of silk, value 4 l. , the property of John Cooke , John Cook , the younger , and Thomas Pickard Warren .

JOHN COOK , JUN. I am in partnership with my uncle, John Cook , and Thomas Pickard Warren; we are silk-manufacturers , and live in Crown-court, Cheapside. The prisoner had been four years in our service, at a salary of 2 l. a-week, with other advantages.

JOHN NEWBON . I am a weaver in the employ of Cook and Co. In December last I went to the warehouse for work, the prisoner gave me about a pound and a half of puce silk to get warped, and make into velvet; he told me if I could get it done that day in time, to bring it to the warehouse, if not, to bring it to his house. I could not get it done; I took part of it to his house. I went to Mile End that evening, it was weighed to me; I took it away again. On Monday I took the rest to him at the warehouse - he weighed it, and I took it back, he told me to make it into velvet - this was about five weeks before Christmas. He came, and told me to bring it to his house when it was finished, if I could not get it done before Christmas, as he did not wish it to be entered to the year's account. He said he did not wish Mr. Warren or Mr. Cook to see it. I took it to his house after Christmas - he was not at home - he paid me for it at the warehouse. I took the bobbins to the warehouse. My wife afterwards told this to a man named Gredus.

JOHN COOK re-examined. Mr. Warren told the prisoner

about five weeks before Christmas, not to have any more velvet made. On the 12th of February Gredus gave me information, I sent for the prisoner, and charged him with having made away with this piece of goods; he hung down his head, and said nothing for sometime; I said he had better tell all about it, for there was the man who had made it. He then said he had made away with it, that it was his first offence, that he would ask our pardon, and pay double the price for it, if we would forgive him; I said I could hear nothing of the kind. He said he had sold it in Petticoat-lane, and he thought he could take us to the house - he afterwards said he could not. I sent for a constable - he went down stairs twice to make his escape - I went after him, called out Stop thief! and he was stopped in Bow Church-yard. When he delivered out silk, he ought to enter it in a book, and what was made of it when it returned - there was no entry whatever of it.

Cross-examined by MR. ARABIN. Q. He was your foreman - A. Yes. He ought not to give silk out, without being ordered.

THOMAS PICKARD WARREN. I am one of the firm. About the middle of November, Newbon finished a quantity of velvet; I then observed to the prisoner that we should have no occasion for any more. I saw some ends of silk, which Newbon produced - they exactly corresponded with the silk. I examined the account, and found a deficiency of 1 1/2 lbs of puce silk. There is no entry of money paid to Newbon for the silk.

Prisoner's Defence. I can prove who I received the silk of.

JONATHAN JOHNSON . I am a silver plater, and live in Waterloo-street, St. Luke's. I was a silk manufacturer. About the middle of November I delivered the prisoner one pound six ounces of puce silk to warp, and about one pound two ounces undyed, to make into a piece of puce velvet. He returned it to me, manufactured, about the beginning of January. I am certain nobody can swear to the shade of silk after it is manufactured. I have brought a sample of what I gave him - I think it agrees with the ends of the silk produced.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. When did you leave off being a silk manufacturer - A. About two years ago. I have had this silk ever since - I then lived at Macclesfield. I became acquainted with the prisoner at the Dog, public-house, in Widegate-alley. I gave him the silk at a public-house in Old Bethlem.

Q. When did the prisoner send for you - A. Last Monday - a friend of his lit on me at the Dog. I exchanged the velvet for some silver with a stranger. I wanted to sell the silver - I said I had a piece of velvet, and would swap with him. There were twenty-eight yards of velvet I got it at the rate of 15 s. 6 d. each yard. I do not know the quantity of plate.

GUILTY . Aged 42.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190217-135

448. JOHN MACKENZIE was indicted for that he, on the 7th of February , wilfully, maliciously, and unlawfully, did make an assault upon George Delmar , and did stab him, with intent to kill and murder him .

TWO OTHER COUNTS, the same, only stating his intent to be to maim and disable him, or do him some grievous bodily harm.

GEORGE DELMAR . I am a mariner , and live in Brown's-buildings, Rosemary-lane . On the 7th of February, between seven and eight o'clock at night, I went to the Ship and Star, public-house , and had a pint of beer, which I put on the chimney-piece. In about ten minutes the prisoner came in. We had quarrelled about a fortnight before. I said,

"Mackenzie, you and I have had some words - let us have a pot of beer, and make it up." He said,

"No, you d - d rascal, begone out of my presence - I will never drink with you, or any d - d rascal like you." I stood at the end of the table where he sat - I did not move. He got up, and told me to begone directly - I did not stir. He got up with a knife which he had in his hand, eating some bread and meat, and stabbed me in the left side of my head, close to my eye; it penetrated to the bone. I was so weak I was not able to do any thing for myself. I said nothing more to him than that which I have stated. As soon as he stabbed me he put the knife into his left hand, and then struck me with his fist. He got me down on the floor, and began beating me. I was taken to my lodgings, and was confined to my bed three days. He afterwards said he was sorry he did not rip my g - ts out, and if he had had a pistol in his hand he would have shot me.

WILLIAM SCOTT . I am a shoemaker, and live in Brown's-buildings. I went to the public-house about six o'clock. The prosecutor had been drinking, but was sensible. He asked if Mackenzie was there? - he was not then come. He went out about three minutes. Before he returned the prisoner came in. The prosecutor came in, went to him, and said,

"We have quarrelled - you are a Scotchman, and I am an Irishman, let us have a pot of beer, and make it up." The prisoner said,

"No, I'll never drink with such an Irish rascal as you are - go away!" he did not go then. He rose from his seat with a knife in his hand, and stabbed him in the side of his head. The prosecutor said he was stabbed. I told the prisoner to put the knife out of his hand, or he would commit murder. He put it into his left hand, and then struck him on the left breast with his fist. He fell - the blood ran rapidly. I went for the landlord, he was not in the bar. I returned, and found the prisoner beating the prosecutor more like a savage than any thing else - he could not see for the blood. I seized the prisoner, and said,

"For shame, countryman! for using the man so." He said he was sorry he had not ripped his g - ts out, and that if he had had a pistol he would have shot him. I washed the prosecutor as well as I could. The prisoner went out of the tap-room.

Q. In what state was the prosecutor - A. The blood ran very fast from him. I got a surgeon next morning. I slept with him three or four nights, but he groaned so I was obliged to move.

CHARLES MATTHEWS . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner on the Monday, at the same public-house - it was the day after this happened. I told him I had a warrant against him for assaulting the prosecutor - he said he had been expecting it; the prosecutor was with me, and asked him to drink - he then appeared friendly. The prosecutor's wound appeared very bad.

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutor came in, and asked where that b - d - y Scotchman was? It being Sunday I wished to be quiet, and take no notice of him. He came to me, and used very bad and threatening language, and began sparring at me. He struck me twice, and knocked my bone out of my hand. I went to strike him, and the knife touched his head. He got me down, and fell himself. I did not wish to give him in charge for the assault, and took it all quietly.

JOHN DOWER . I lodged at the Ship and Star. Delmar came in about seven o'clock - he made use of very bad expressions, and asked where Mackenzie, the barber, was? and said he would kick *** out. A man named Leonard was there, and said the prisoner was a quiet man. He said,

"You rascal, are you taking his part? I will serve you as I will him." He was quite drunk - he struck Leonard twice; he then went out, and while he was absent the prisoner came in. The prosecutor came in, swearing bitter oaths, and struck him on the mouth. The prisoner, in the heat of passion, rose up, and struck at him with a clasp-knife in his hand, and said,

"Let me alone - let me have my supper comfortably."

Q. What was the effect of the blow - A. It cut him, I suppose.

Q. Do you only suppose it - A. I saw the wound afterwards. He staggered back, and said he was cut - the blood ran profusely. I asked him to let me wash him - he said,

"No, I will immediately have my revenge!" pulled off his coat, and stripped to fight. He did not then appear to be hurt the least in the world. The landlord came in, and wanted to part them.

MICHAEL SHEAN . I live in Rosemary-lane. I was at the house, sitting in the box with the prisoner. The prosecutor came in, brought a dog under his arm, and enquired for

"that d - d rascal, Mackenzie."

Q. Did any thing happen before the prisoner came in - - A. There was a man named Leonard - the prosecutor threatened him. The prosecutor said to the prisoner,

"You are a b - d - y Scotchman, and I am Irish; get up and resent that;" and struck him in the face - the prisoner then struck him.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190217-136

449. FREDERICK FASTIBAND was indicted for obtaining one quartern loaf, value 1 s., from Jane Moss , under false pretences .

JANE MOSS . I serve in Samuel Stacey 's shop, who is a baker . The prisoner came in, and asked for a quartern loaf; he said he came for it from Banks's, the sugar-baker, in Distaff-lane, and was to take it as a sample to show the men, as they were going to change their baker, and they paid every Saturday night. I afterwards found he did not live there. He never paid for it.

GEORGE CROSS . I am servant to Mr. Banks. The prisoner was not in his employ, nor never brought the loaf.

GUILTY . Aged 32.

Publicly Whipped , and Discharged.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190217-137

450. WILLIAM GOUGH was indicted for embezzlement .

The prisoner pleaded

GUILTY.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190217-138

451. JOHN BLIGHTON and JOHN JONES were indicted for stealing, on the 2d of February , two shirts, value 10 s. , the goods of Jacob Lambert .

MARY LAMBERT . I am the wife of Jacob Lambert , who is a shoemaker , and lives at Camden-town . On the 2d of February I lost two shirts out of my garden, where they hung to dry.

JOHN SMITH . I am a Bow-street patrol. On the 2d of February, about five o'clock in the evening, the prisoners passed me, between Kentish Town and Camden Town; Jones had a bundle, which he gave to Blighton, who tried to put in his hat. I sent Davis after them; he brought me the bundle, which contained the two shirts - they were wet.

JOHN DAVIS . I am an officer. I took the prisoners; Blighton had the bundle.

(Property produced and sworn to. )

BLIGHTON'S Defence. I found them in a field.

BLIGHTON - GUILTY . Aged 13.

Confined Six Months , and Whipped .

JONES - GUILTY . Aged 14.

Whipped and Discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190217-139

452. PATRICK DABBS was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of January , two handkerchiefs, value 3 s. , the property of Joseph Wilson .

JOSEPH WILSON . I am the son of Joseph Wilson , who is a hosier , and lives in Shoreditch. On the 18th of January, about a quarter past ten o'clock at night, the prisoner came to sell some printing letters, I refused to buy any. I turned round, and saw him drawing his hand off the counter, where the handkerchiefs lay. Jones stopped him, and took them out of his bosom.

EVAN JONES . I am in the prosecutor's service. The prisoner came in to sell some letters as I was locking up. As he went out I stopped him, and found two handkerchiefs in his bosom.

(Property produced and sworn to. )

Prisoner's Defence. I took them up to look at. He took them out of my hand.

GUILTY . Aged 54.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190217-140

453. WILLIAM SMART was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of January , six blankets, value 1 l. 4 s., and two rugs, value 6 s. , the goods of the overseers of the poor, for the time being, of the parish of All Saints, Poplar .

PETER VERDETT . I am a pauper in the workhouse, of All Saints, Poplar - the prisoner was a pauper there; he ran away on the 19th of January. On the 21st, between

six and seven o'clock in the evening I saw him up stairs in No. 1 Ward, which is a sleeping-room, taking the blankets off the bed, and folding them up - I took him into custody. He got into the room, by putting a plank across the shore, and getting in the back way - it was a heavy plank, and would take two men to carry it.

MARTHA HYDE . I was in the workhouse-yard, and saw a man's arms out of the window, throwing the blankets out of the room - he threw six pair, and two rugs out; I gave information, and the prisoner was taken in the room.

THOMAS HOWARD . I am master of the workhouse; the prisoner was a pauper; he left on the 19th of January without notice - on the 21st he was taken in the house.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 29.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190217-141

454. CHARLES WHITMARSH was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of February , one pair of shoes, value 3 s. 6 d. , the goods of John Perry .

JOHN PERRY . I am a shoemaker, and live at Brentford - the prisoner was my servant. I lost a pair of shoes.

JOHN BURFORD . On the 19th of October, I bought a pair of shoes of the prisoner, and paid him 2 s. 6 d. for them - I am a pawnbroker.

GUILTY . Aged 41.

Fined One Shilling , and Discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190217-142

455. WILLIAM WATSON was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of January , one trunk, value 20 s. , the goods of John James .

JOHN JAMES , JUN. I live with my father, in Coventry-street - he is a trunkmaker . On the 15th of January, about eight o'clock at night I missed a trunk.

WILLIAM GODFREY. I am an officer. On the 15th of January, about eight o'clock in the evening, I stopped the prisoner in George-street, St. Giles's, with the trunk; he said it was his own, and he brought it from his mother's.

(Property produced and sworn to. )

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Whipped and Discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190217-143

456. ANN SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of January , one sheet, value 5 s.; two pillow-cases, value 18 d., and one frock, value 18 d. , the goods of Israal Ottolanglie .

AMELIA OTTOLANGLIE . I am the wife of Israel Ottolanglie. On the 24th of January, the prisoner came into our service - next day I missed this property. When she went to bed she dropped two duplicates, I picked them up, and found they related to my property; next morning I gave her in charge. She said she took them, but she was rather tipsey.

LEWIS FURNEAUX . I am servant to Mr. Hanes, who is a pawnbroker, and lives in Drury-lane. On the 25th of January, the prisoner pledged a sheet, two pillow-cases, and a frock with me.

THOMAS GOODING. I am an officer. I took the prisoner; she said she would redeem the things.

(Property produced and sworn to. )

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutor keeps a house of ill-fame.

GUILTY . Aged 33.

Confined One Year .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190217-144

457. JOHN HUTTON was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of February , seven pair of wool-cards, value 30 s. , the goods of George Fairburn .

GEORGE FAIRBURN . I am a wire-drawer, and wool-card maker , and live in Compton-street, Clerkenwell. On the 1st of February, I missed a parcel of wool-cards; I went to Giles, and asked him to go to Smithfield with me, to ask the prisoner if he had taken any away or not. We went, and found him at his workshop, in the pig-market - he was a carpenter . I asked him if he had any cards of mine? he said No. I said

"Are you sure of that." He said

"I am sure I have no cards, belonging to any one." Giles then said,

"Have you robbed Mr. Fairburn of any cards." He said,

"No; me rob Mr. Fairburn - I would sooner loose my last drop of blood, than rob him." He said he was sure he had no cards belonging to me - I remained with him, while Giles went for an officer. Harker, the officer, asked him if he had any? he said No. The officer then asked whose chest is this? he said it was his; the officer told him to open it, to let him see if there was any cards in it; he said he could not, for he had not got the key. Harker pulled out a hand-cuff; and said,

"If you do not let us look into it, I must take you to the Compter, box and all, and I can get the box open there." Seeing the hand-cuffs, he asked to speak to me, and said,

"I have some cards in my box, but I will show you how I got them." He opened a trap-door, and said,

"I got them out of here last Sunday - Mr. Fell put them here." The trap-door leads to Fell's room. He said he put them into his chest to secure them for me. Harker said he had better open the chest, and let us see them - he said the officer might break it open - the prisoner took the screw-driver, and broke it open himself, and there were seven pair of wool-cards. He was taken to the Compter, and gave Cameron the key of a chest, at his lodgings, in Air-street-hill, and said he would find three or four more pair there. I went to his lodgings, and found seven pair more of cards in the chest, and other things belonging to me.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. You employed the prisoner to make you a frame - A. Yes, it was not finished I - never authorized the prisoner to take the cards. I sold some to a man, named Marshall, but they were a different sort - I never sold anybody any of this sort.

THOMAS GILES . I went to the prisoner with Fairburn, and asked him if he had any of his property? he said No, and rather than rob Fairburn, he would part with the last drop of his blood; I asked him to open the chest? he said he would not, but I might break it open; I said I would not, but it would be a satisfaction to Fairburn to see if any of his cards were there - he said he would not. I got an officer. He denied having any cards whatever, in the box. The officer produced the hand-cuffs, and said he must take

him to the Compter, box and all. He then broke the box open himself, and seven pair of cards were taken out - seven pair more were found at his lodgings on Air-street-hill.

JOH HARKER. I am an officer. On the 1st of February I was fetched to the prisoner's workshop; I asked him if he had any of Mr. Fairburn's property? he said, No, he had none, I then saw a chest in the room, and asked him to open it? he said he had not got the key; I said if he did not open it, I must take him to the Compter - he afterwards broke it open, and I found seven pair of wool-cards there - I took him to the Compter. He then gave Cameron a key, and said there was more of Fairburn's cards at his lodgings, at No. 14, Air-street Hill. We went there, and found in the bed room seven pair of wool-cards in a chest - two were smaller than the rest.

CHARLES CAMERON . I am an engine-maker. On the 1st of February I went to the prisoner's shop, and Giles charged him with stealing the cards, seven pair were found in his chest. He was taken to the Compter, and he gave me the key of a chest at his lodgings, in Air-street Hill. We went there, and found seven pair more.

CHARLES BROWN. I am an officer. I went to the prisoner's lodgings in Air-street Hill, and found seven pair of wool-cards there.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOSEPH GANT . I am a wheelwright. I went to Marshall's manufactory - the cards on his engine are 4 1/2 inches wide, these are only 3 1/2 wide.

GUILTY . Aged 46.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190217-145

458. SAMUEL SHIRLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of January , one gallon of gin, value 10 s. , the goods of Richard Gardner .

RICHARD GARDNER . I keep the Wheatsheaf, public-house , in Pancras-road - the prisoner was billetted there, he belongs to the First Regiment of Guards . On the 28th of January he rose up early in the morning, got into my cellar, and got tipsey - he left the gin-cask running. I went up and found him in bed with three bottles of gin. He said he was very sorry, and begged forgiveness.

GUILTY . Aged 33.

Confined Three Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190217-146

459. JOHN SHORDY was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of January , four yards of painted carpet, value 12 s. , the goods of John Smith .

JOHN SMITH . I am a broker , and live in Bird-street, Grosvenor-square . On the 16th of January, in the morning, the carpet was taken from the front of my shop. In the afternoon the prisoner was pointed out to me, and I took him. He said he sold the carpet for 5 s. in Gee's-court. I went, and found it in a cellar there occupied by three sweeps.

JOHN PARISH . I saw the prisoner coming up the street with the carpet on his shoulder - I knew him before. In the afternoon Smith took him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Six Months , and Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190217-147

460. EDWARD LOGAN was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of February , two pair of shoes, value 6 s. , the property of John Phillips .

JOHN PHILLIPS . I am a shoemaker , and live in James-street, Manchester-square . On the 1st of February I lost the shoes from my window.

THOMAS SIMMONS . I was sitting in Phillips's back-parlour, his daughter called out - I looked through the window, saw the prisoner take the shoes, and put them under his jacket. I followed him down a sweep's cellar in Gee's-court. He said if he had known I had been behind him he would have murdered me.

MARY PHILLIPS . I am the prosecutor's daughter. I saw the prisoner at the window, and called out.

WILLIAM SELLERS . I apprehended the prisoner, but did not find the shoes.

Prisoner's Defence. They were my father's shoes.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190217-148

461. JOHN HINKS was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of January , 20 lbs. of lead, value 2 s. 6 d., belonging to Robert Dillon , and fixed to his dwelling-house .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating it to be fixed to a certain building of his.

SAMUEL LAHEE . I am an house-agent. Mr. Robert Dillon has some premises in China-walk, Chelsea . They had been robbed of lead, and I set a watch. The lead was fixed to his house.

JOSEPH ATKINSON . I am a watchman. I was watching the premises on the 22d of January, and saw the prisoner come on the top of the lead flat over the shop. He stripped the lead off, and I immediately seized him with it in his hand. He had separated a great deal of it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190217-149

462. WILLIAM HOWARD was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of February , 9 lbs. of lard, value 8 s. , the property of George Best .

GEORGE BEST . I am a cheesemonger , and live in George-street . Having lost some lard from my window, I marked another piece, and set a watch - in about ten minutes the prisoner was secured with it.

GEORGE WELCH . On the 10th of February I was watching my master's window, saw the prisoner take the lard, and run off - I followed and secured him with it.

ELIZA BEST . I was at a neighbour's door, and saw the prisoner take the lard - he threw it down, and was taken.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Six Months , and Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190217-150

463. GEORGE HAINES was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of February , one round frock, value 5 s., and one pair of breeches, value 5 s., the goods of John Wilkinson ; one handkerchief, value 6 d., and one bag, value 6 d. , the goods of James Hester .

JOHN WILKINSON . I am carman to Mr. Burrows , at Harrow . On the 7th of February I left my things up stairs - I left the prisoner on the premises alone. When I came home at night they were gone.

JAMES HESTER . I am also carman to Mr. Burrows. I lost my things out of the same room, while I was gone to church.

RICHARD GOSS . I am a watchman of Acton. I stopped the prisoner between four and five o'clock, with a bag and a handkerchief, containing the things - he said they were his own.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I found them among the hay.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined One Year .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190217-151

464. GEORGE DODD and DANIEL LYNCH were indicted for stealing, on the 7th of February , one watch, value 3 l.; one seal, value 1 l., and one chain, value 6 d., the property of James Rowe , from his person .

JAMES ROWE . I am a labourer in the East India-house , and live in Fetter-lane. On Sunday, the 7th of February, I was at the White Hart, public-house, White Hart-yard, Drury-lane . My breeches were cut, and my watch taken out about nine o'clock in the morning, while I was asleep. I had been up all night - I work as a baker at night .

Q. How came you up all night - A. I had been to see a friend, and could not get in after ten o'clock. I fell asleep in the tap-room, and do not know who robbed me. When I awoke I found Lynch at the bar, and demanded a search. He said it was not him that sat by my side, it was Dodd - Dodd was not there then - I gave Lynch in charge. My watch was safe before I went to sleep. I had waited at a coffee-house all night, being locked out.

THOMAS VAUGHAN . I am a tailor. I was in the taproom between nine and ten o'clock on Sunday morning, and saw the prosecutor leaning against the fire-place, fast asleep. The prisoner, Dodd, sat by his side, with his two hands rummaging about the waistband of Rowe's breeches Lynch was sitting at the end of the table, to prevent the people from seeing what Dodd was about; he was looking at him. As soon as I took notice of Dodd, he jumped up and left the room - Lynch jumped off the table immediately to follow him. I caught hold of him, as he was the last, and said,

"Stop, my good fellow! you are not gone yet." He turned round quick, and said,

"D - n you, what do you want with me? The landlord and myself awoke the prosecutor - he found his breeches cut, and missed his watch. Lynch said it was not him who cut off his fob, it was Dodd. Maidment came and took Lynch.

Cross-examined by MR. ARABIN. I am certain Dodd is the man.

JEREMIAH MAIDMENT . I am an officer. I was sent for and took Lynch. I took Dodd three days after.

DODD'S Defence. I am innocent.

DODD - GUILTY . Aged 22.

LYNCH - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190217-152

465. HENRY COX was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of January , 14 lbs. of ham, value 18 s. , the goods of Stephen Shirley .

WILLIAM READ . I lodge with Mr. Shirley, who is a fishmonger , and lives in Oxford-street . On the 27th of January, about six o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner come into the shop and take the ham; I pursued, and overtook him with it - he threw it down.

WILLIAM SELLERS . I am an officer. I saw the prisoner running with the ham, and assisted in securing him.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Three Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190217-153

466. JAMES BIRD was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of January , 150 lbs. of potatoes, value 7 s. , the goods of James Young and Richard Whittle .

RICHARD WHITTLE . I am a salesman in Covent-garden-market . On the 30th of January, about seven o'clock in the morning, I was walking outside my premises, saw my back-door open, and one of my servants come out with a sack of potatoes - the prisoner appeared to be waiting for him; he had a donkey and hampers. He took something out of the hampers, my servant shot the potatoes in, the prisoner covered them with the hay, and my servant went away. The prisoner was going away - I went up, and asked him what was in the hampers? he said,

"Nothing at all." I removed the hay and found the potatoes; he said he bought them - I asked him of whom? he then said he supposed somebody had put them in. I took the potatoes from him, and pushed him and my servant away, as I was busy. The prisoner returned, and demanded the hamper - I gave him in charge. I cannot find my servant.

GUILTY . Aged 69.

Confined Six Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190217-154

467. WILLIAM BELL was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of February , two live tame fowls, price 5 s. , the property of Charles Consins .

CHARLES COUSINS . I am a cheesemonger , and live in Francis-street, Tottenham-court-road . On the 8th of February, about twelve o'clock at night, I was alarmed, got up, and missed two fowls out of the hen-house in my yard. I saw a man getting over the wall. I went to the street-door to call the watchman. The prisoner stood just below the door, I collared him. He used very improper language, and threw off his great-coat, and in one of his pockets I found one of my fowls just killed. The man who was in the yard got away. I found the other fowl by the shop-door. I knew them to be mine. The prisoner was wearing the coat.

WILLIAM KING . I am a watchman. Cousins gave the prisoner into my charge. About a dozen men came round - he asked if none of them would take his part?

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190217-155

468. ANN CARTER was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of February , 18 yards of cotton, value 20 s. , the goods of Evan Thomas .

JOHN KYLE. I am shopman to Evan Thomas , who is a linen-draper , and lives in Ratcliff-highway. On the 4th of February, about seven o'clock in the evening, the prisoner and another girl came in and looked at some prints. The prisoner sat down - none would please them. I missed a piece. The prisoner went towards the door - I took hold of her, and she dropped the print.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Confined Three Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190217-156

469. JOHN CROFT was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of February , 29 lbs. of beef, value 14 s. , the goods of James Minns .

JAMES MINNS . I am a butcher , and live at Chelsea . On the 13th of February, about five o'clock in the evening, the prisoner bought three loins of mutton of me - he said he lived next door, and would call for them presently; he came in about half an hour after, and while my back was turned he ran out with a large piece of beef; I followed and took him with it. He said he bought it of me, and paid for it - I never sold it to him. I gave him in charge.

JOHN BOSBURY . I live next door to the prosecutor. More meat was found at the prisoner's house.

WILLIAM JAMES . I saw the prisoner run out with the beef.

GUILTY . Aged 51.

Confined Six Months , and Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190217-157

470. WILLIAM COOMBES was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of February , 20 lbs. of lead, value 4 s., belonging to William Bignal , and fixed to his dwelling-house .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating it to be fixed to a building.

THOMAS GELDING . I am a watchman of Lincoln's Inn-fields . On the 6th of February, about nine o'clock at night, I saw the prisoner go into Mr. William Bignal's court-yard, and get over the area. Knowing the house was empty, I went up, and saw him cutting the lead, secured him with it, and took him to the watch-house. He was down the area full an hour. I found a knife on him. The lead was separated.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190217-158

471. FRANCISCO MORI was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of February , one sheet, value 7 s.; one pair of trowsers, value 5 s., and one head-cloth, value 5 s. , the goods of Thomas Smith Watts .

ELIZA WATTS . I am the wife of Thomas Smith Watts , who keeps the Yorkshire Grey public-house , Eagle-street, Red Lion-square - the prisoner lodged there. I found I had been robbed of plate to a considerable amount, and these things also. On Sunday the 14th of February, I and concealed myself in my bed-room, from nine o'clock in the morning, until two in the afternoon; I then heard somebody try the door, and unlock it; the prisoner entered the room, took a bunch of keys off the table, and tried to open the box, out of which the plate had been stolen - they would not open it. He put them on the table, and then went and rummaged the bed, but one of my children coming up stairs, he instantly went out of the room, exclaiming,

"Oh G - d!" I came from under the bed, followed him into his own room, which was on the same floor, and said,

"You villain, I have caught you!" - he made no answer. I called my husband up, and he was secured. I went to his bed-room, and found a purse, which the prisoner claimed - it contained three duplicates and a gold watch.

HENRY LONG. I am an officer. I was sent for, and took the prisoner - I found nothing on him. I found a purse on his bed, containing a gold watch and three duplicates, he said they were his. The duplicates related to the articles stated in the indictment, which were pledged at Townsend's. I took him to the watch-house. I laid the duplicates on the table then, and missed them all at once, purse, money, and all - he stood by. The purse was afterwards found in the privy. He had no money when he came in; he afterwards spent 2 s. 6 d.

WILLIAM DUTTON TOWNSEND . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Little Russell-street. The prisoner pledged the sheet and trowsers with me in the name of Francisco.

ALFRED WRAY . I am servant to Mr. Townsend. The prisoner pledged the head-cloth with me for 5 s.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. They are mine.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190217-159

472. MARY PERKINS was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of February , one sheet, value 3 s.; one pair of boots, value 4 s.; one shawl, value 3 s.; one body and skirt, value 1 s., and one whittle, value 4 s. , the property of James Barber .

MARY BARBER . I am the wife of James Barber , who is a rag merchant , and lives in St. John-street ; the prisoner was my servant - she left me, and I missed these things. I afterwards met her, and found the shawl on her back - she said she had pledged the rest.

- . I am a pawnbroker. I have a shawl and a pair of boots, which were pledged with me.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Three Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190217-160

473. WILLIAM WATSON was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of February , one pair of shoes, value 6 s. , the goods of Benjamin Pocock .

BENJAMIN POCOCK . I am a shoemaker , and live in Shoreditch . On the 18th of February I saw the prisoner come into my shop, take the shoes, and run off - I seized him, and gave him in charge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined Three Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190217-161

474. JOHN TRACEY was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of January , 3 lbs. of sugar, value 18 d. , the property of William Hawley .

WILLIAM HAWLEY . I am a grocer , and live in the Commercial-road , the prisoner was my carman . I sent him into the cellar, then went down myself, and saw him come from a hogshead of sugar - he took his hands out of his pockets, which made me suspect him. I charged him with it, he denied it, and turned his pockets out. I felt something in his breeches, and found three pounds of sugar there in a bag. He ran away, I followed and secured him.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Whipped , and Discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190217-162

475. GEORGE WALKER was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of January , two books, value 2 s. , the goods of William Simmons .

WILLIAM SIMMONS . I am a bookseller , and live in Bath-street, City-road . On the 21st of January, about five o'clock in the evening, I lost two books from my stall - two boys were pointed out to me; I took one, he had nothing. In about a quarter of an hour the prisoner was brought to me with the books.

THOMAS THOMPSON . I was in St. John-street, and stopped the prisoner, who was running with the books under his arm. He said he bought them - the prosecutor claimed them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Whipped and Discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190217-163

476. WILLIAM PRENDERGAST was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of January , 12 lbs. of lead, value 2 s., belonging to the Committee of the Parish of St. Giles in the Fields, and St. George, Bloomsbury , and fixed to a certain building of their's, and one fixture (i.e.), one brass cock, value 18 d., belonging to them, and fixed to the said building .

THOMAS MOSELEY . I am surveyor to the Committee of St. Giles's and St. George's, Bloomsbury. The lead was stripped off their cistern, and the brass cock taken away - the prisoner was employed on the premises. On the 29th of January, soon after he left work, the lead was produced to me - I saw it fitted to the cistern.

THOMAS CHURM . I am a plumber. I fitted the lead to the cistern; it is the same.

WILLIAM SOLOMON . On the 29th of January, about ten minutes before five o'clock, I stopped the prisoner in Broad-street, St. Giles's, with the lead pipe in a cloth, and the cock under his waistcoat.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Whipped and Discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190217-164

477. RICHARD MONTAGUE was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of February , one waistcoat, value 5 s. , the goods of James Parkin .

JAMES PARKIN . I am carman to Mr. Timmings. On the 18th of February I was loading a cart in Hanway-yard , and missed my coat off the shafts. I received information, ran after the prisoner, and took him in Bond-street - he dropped the coat.

DAVID NIBBS . I am a shoemaker. I saw the prisoner take the coat.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I was in distress.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Judgment Respited .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190217-165

478. JOHN MOORE was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of January , 11 metal cocks, value 5 s. , the goods of Mary Glascott , widow , and George Minshaw Glascott .

GEORGE MINSHAW GLASCOTT . I am a brass-founder , in partnership with Mary Glascott . The prisoner was employed as a painter on our premises. A man came to sell me a quantity of metal, which, upon examination, I found to be my own. He took me to Ramsay's, where I found eleven brass cocks, which are mine.

MARY RAMSAY . I live in Back Church-lane. On the 27th of January the prisoner sold me the cocks as old metal.

JOHN GRIFFITHS . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner - he said he took the cocks.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Whipped and Discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190217-166

479. SAMUEL CLEMENTS and JAMES LANE were indicted for stealing, on the 26th of January , one chaff-box, value 7 s.; one chaff-knife, value 3 s., and one truss of hay, value 2 s. , the goods of John Hammack and James Hammack .

JOHN HAMMACK . I am a carpenter and builder , and am in partnership with my brother James; we live at Shadwell. The prisoner Lane had been my servant , but was discharged. On the 16th of January, these things were stolen from the hay-loft.

WILLIAM JACKSON . I am the prosecutors' servant. About half-past seven o'clock I saw the things safe in the loft - the gates were fastened. About ten o'clock I was sent for, found two trusses of hay gone, and the chaff-box moved away to the gate.

ELIZA WEEKS. I am the prosecutors' servant. About nine o'clock at night I was going down stairs, and heard a noise like persons attempting the gate. I went into the yard, and saw two men trying to open the large gates to get out with the things - they had got the little gate open, but it would not let the hay out; they were trying to force it out. When they saw me, one ran out, and shut the door; the other had a difficulty to open it, by which means I could see his face, and am certain it was Clements - I had a candle. I ran out, and called Stop thief! he was stopped, and brought back in about two minutes.

RICHARD LEFTWICK . I was passing the prosecutors', and heard a woman cry

"Thieves!" from the yard; I saw two men rush out of the gate, pursued, and stopped Clements a few yards off; the chaff-box, and hay stood by the gate - I brought him back.

JOHN GOVUE . I live at a butcher's, next door to the prosecutors'. I was standing at the door, heard the cry of

"Thieves!" and saw a man run across into Shadwell-market - it was Lane; I never saw him before - I only observed his face.

ROBERT WILLIAMS . I am an officer. I was sent for, and took Clements; I apprehended Lane next morning - he denied it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

CLEMENTS'S Defence. I was passing the gate, and was taken.

CLEMENTS - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

LANE - NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190217-167

480. FRANCIS TICTUM was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of January , one wooden bowl, value 2 d., and 1 l. 2 s., in monies numbered , the goods and monies of George Wilson .

GEORGE WILSON . I am a baker , and live in New Compton-street ; the bowl was taken off the shelf, with 1 l. 2 s., all in silver in it.

WILLIAM JONES . I am an officer. On the 15th of January, between nine and ten o'clock in the evening, I was passing the prosecutor's, and saw the prisoner, in company with three others, and watched them; one went into the shop, and came out again, then the largest boy lifted the prisoner up to look over the window. In about two minutes I saw the prisoner go in upon his hands and knees, he went round the counter, got up, and took the bowl off the shelf. I crossed over, went in, and took him, as he was coming round the counter with the bowl before him; the others ran away - there was 22 s. in in it.

Prisoner's Defence. I never touched it.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190217-168

481. JOHN BURGESS was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of January , one saw, value 4 s. , the goods of William Weston .

The prosecutor's name being Westway, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190217-169

482. JAMES DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of January , two books, value 18 d. , the goods of John Duncombe .

JOHN DUNCOMBE . I am a bookseller , and live in Little Queen-street, Holborn. On the 23d of January, I saw the prisoner take the books from my window, and stopped him with them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Fined One Shilling , and Discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190217-170

483. JAMES MACNAMARA was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of January , one pair of shoes, value 2 s. 6 d. , the goods of Edward Gibson

EDWARD GIBSON . I am a mariner . On the 11th of January I was intoxicated; the watchman advised me to go to St. George's watch-house for safety. In the course of the evening the prisoner was brought in; I went to sleep, and in the morning I found I had a pair of old shoes on, which were not mine - they were worn out. The prisoner had been discharged, and in the afternoon he came back for a knife which he had left; I then claimed the shoes on his feet, as I knew them to be mine - he refused to give them to me, and ran away. On the 16th he was secured, and my shoes found on his feet.

FRANCIS JACKSON . I am the watch-house-keeper. The prosecutor was at the watch-house very much intoxicated - the prisoner was in the same room with him - he was taken to the office. After he went the prosecutor missed his shoes; he found a very different pair on, and quite unlike to those he came in. The prisoner was afterwards brought in with the shoes on his feet, which the prosecutor claimed - they answered the description he gave me.

THOMAS REPPETT . I am a watchman. On the 12th of January, between two and three o'clock in the morning, the prisoner was brought to my box for a robbery - he was discharged by the justice. Next morning, the prosecutor told me to take him if I saw him, and on the 16th, about one o'clock in the morning, I found him, and took him to the watch-house - the shoes were taken off his feet, which Gibson claimed.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner made a most indecent Defence.

GUILTY . Aged 33.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190217-171

484. JOHN KETTLE was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of January , one iron vice, value 5 s. , the property of William Thomas .

MARY THOMAS . I am the wife of William Thomas , who is a tool broker , and lives in St. John-street . The prisoner came and asked the price of a vice; I told him 6 s. - he went out, and I went to a potatoe shop. As I stood there I saw him take the vice out of the window - I pursued, but lost him. I went to our other shop on Saffron-hill, and in about a minute, he came in to offer the vice for sale there - he saw me, and ran out - I followed him, and secured him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutor is a receiver of stolen goods.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Whipped and Discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190217-172

485. ZACHARIAH PHILLIPS was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of February , two seals value 3 l.; one ring, value 10 s; one watch key, value 8 s., and part of a watch chain, value 2 s., the goods of Richard Fairlam , from his person .

RICHARD FAIRLAM . I keep the Bird in Hand, public-house , Oxford-street. On the 8th of February, about twelve o'clock at night, I was in High-street, St. Giles's , returning home - I was quite sober. About fifty yards before I came to the church, a man came on my right

side, laid hold of my seals, and attempted to draw my watch out; I put my hand to it. The chain broke, and he got off with the seals, key, and part of the chain - he ran up a gateway. I called the watchman, two came, and said it would be useless to follow him if he was gone up there - I did not see his face at all, and do not know the man. Next day Moss produced three seals and a key to me, with the other property, which is not mine - they had been cleaned at Sowerby's the week before.

MATTHEW HEATH MOSS . I am a pawnbroker. On the 9th of February, about two o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner came to my master's shop, Mr. Sowerby's, in Chiswell-street, and offered to pledge a silver watch, three seals, a gold and a metal key, which were fastened to the watch by a ribbon - he wanted 3 l. 10 s. on them. Upon looking at them I thought two of the seals were the prosecutor's property - he was an intimate friend of my master's - I had often seen them. I asked him how long he had had them? he said he had had them six weeks, and had redeemed them from Barker's, in Shoreditch. This induced me to look more particularly at them, and I was positive they were the prosecutor's seals - I had not heard that he had been robbed - I told him that could not be true; he then said he bought them that morning of a groom, and he knew him and the house he used, that he gave 55 s. for the watch and two seals, and 7 s. for the other seal. I detained him, and got an officer. He said he bought them that morning, before the officer came - he told the officer he bought them of a groom.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Had you sold the prosecutor the seals - A. No. I sold him the key.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I bought them that morning. At the time of the robbery I was in company until half-past one o'clock in the morning.

AUZEL BENJAMIN. I sell glass and plated articles, and live in Bedford-court, Catharine-street. On the 8th of February, between five and six o'clock in the evening, the prisoner bought a frame of me - it was silver edged, with glasses - I have known him three years. He gave me three guineas for it, and I gave him a receipt - (looks at one) - this is it; I was at tea at the time - his wife came with him. My wife asked them to take tea, and they stopped till very near half-past one o'clock in the morning.

Q. Why stop so long - A. The ladies were playing at whist. The prisoner, his wife, Eve, and Martha Benjamin played.

Q. Was it any particular day in your family - A. I think it was my birth-day, but am not positively sure - he was not out until he went home at half-past one. The watchman was going one, when young Miss Myers got up, and said she was going home - they stopped to have another game. He went out with Miss Myers to see her home.

COURT. Q. Did you expect them that day - A. No - he lives at the back of my house, I believe they call it Swan-yard, where he lives - we did not visit - I was never at his house. He has been to me merely to ask me how I did - I did not play at whist myself.

Q. You do not keep a shop - A. No; the frame was bought up stairs; nobody was in the room but him and me when he bought it.

Q. You wrote the receipt all at one time, I suppose - A. Yes, with the same pen and ink. I put some water to the ink as I had not enough. I am not certain whether Miss Myers played at whist or not.

Q. Look at the receipt again, and tell me whether the figures 1819, above the date, were written at the same time, and with the same pen - A. I will swear to it. I dare say I mended my pen to write the figures - I will swear I mended my pen at the latter end. I packed up the cruets - he tied them in his handkerchief up stairs. I never had any dealings with him before in my life.

Q. Then nobody had an opportunity of seeing the cruets, or admiring them - A. Miss Myers saw them. I do not know whether he showed them to her. I was there all the time.

Q. When did you hear he was taken up on this charge - A. What, for this offence? I cannot rightly tell.

Q. When did you hear he was taken up - A. (hesitating) Last week - I cannot tell - it was last week.

Q. When did you see Mrs. Phillips after he was taken up. I think it was last week, but I will not be sure whether it was last week or the week before. I was subpoened here the day before yesterday. They did not play for money, for I am sure my wife would not.

MARTHA BENJAMIN . I am the wife of the last witness. On the 8th of February the prisoner and his wife came to our house to purchase a set of cruets - Miss Myers, Eve Benjamin , and myself, were at tea with my husband at the time - they left about half-past one o'clock in the morning - we asked them to tea out of politeness. We took a hand at cards; Miss Myers and my husband did not play. The prisoner was never out of the house till half-past one o'clock.

COURT. Q. How long had Miss Myers been in before the prisoner - A. About half an hour. We played at whist for 2 d. a game.

Q. Was it a handsome frame - A. Yes. After the prisoner bought it he showed it to us, and asked if we did not think it handsome? He showed it to us before we sat down to cards, we all looked at it; he put it on the table. He opened the paper and showed it us, then papered it up again. He bought it up stairs, when we were not present.

Q. When did you first hear the prisoner was taken up - A. Mrs. Phillips came to us; I will not be sure whether it was the next day, or the day after, and told us, and I told my husband. It was either on Tuesday or Wednesday.

Q. Did she say you must recollect they were in your company - A. Yes, she asked me to have the goodness to come up and speak to the truth about his being at my house at the time; I said it was a thing I did not like - but I was subpoened to come about a week ago.

Q. You told your husband of the prisoner being in custody the same day his wife informed you - A. Yes, I told him when she came to me; the prisoner has bought things at different times of my husband, to take into the country. My husband keeps books, and puts down what he sells, day by day. We had cold beef for supper.

AUZEL BENJAMIN re-examined. Q. Where do you keep

the account book your wife speaks of - A. I have only a memorandum book. I did not enter it in that book. I think I have an entry of it here (producing his pocketbook).

Q. Do you mean to say you keep no other book than this - A. I keep a twopenny memorandum book.

Q. There is no entry for several leaves before or after this, is this the way you keep your accounts - A. I do not keep a regular book.

EVE BENJAMIN. I am sister-in-law to Auzel Benjamin. On the 8th of February I was at his house, Myers called there while we were at tea, the prisoner and his wife came in to buy a frame, they were asked to tea - we afterwards played at cards till the watchman went past one o'clock; we went home at half-past one - the prisoner was in the room all the time.

COURT. Q. Was it a silver gilt frame - A. No, a plated one, silver plated, I am certain. I saw it in the prisoner's hand; he opened the paper, Benjamin said he gave three guineas for it. I saw it standing on the drawers.

Q. When did you hear the prisoner was taken up - A. On the following evening I told his wife if I could be of any service to him by speaking the truth, I would, and so I have come here.

HANNAH MYERS . I live in Eagle-court, Strand. On the 8th of February I was at Benjamin's house; while we were at tea the prisoner and his wife came in on business - they were asked to take tea, and did - the prisoner bought a cruet frame - I saw it standing by the drawers - I think it was covered up, but I could see it was a frame. They played at cards after tea, I did not play - they played till one o'clock; I then said I had an aged mother, and nobody to protect her but me and I must go. They played another game, and we all left at half-past one o'clock.

COURT. Q. Did you hear Eve Benjamin say what a handsome frame it was - A. No; nor did I hear what was given for it.

Q, When did you first hear Phillips was taken up - A. A day or two after; his wife asked me to come and speak the truth; I said it was disagreeable, and I could not think of going - she sent me a subpoena.

GUILTY . Aged 51.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190217-173

486. JOHN JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of February , 10 lbs. of lead, value 2 s., and two brass cocks, value 4 s., the property of John Fowler ; one pail, value 1 s.; one dish, value 1 s., and one pair of stockings, value 1 s. , the property of William Wilkinson .

JOHN FOWLER . I am a labourer , and live at Stratford . The lead and cocks were fixed to my premises.

WILLIAM WILKINSON . I live next door to Fowler. On the 13th of February, about six o'clock in the morning, I missed my things out of the wash-house - somebody had got over the wall and taken them.

ANTHONY THOMPSON . I am an officer. On the 13th of February, about seven o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner by Bow Church, followed him to the end of Globe-lane, and then stopped him with the pail, which contained the property stated in the indictment.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 60.

Confined One Year .

First Middlesex Jury, Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190217-174

487. JOHN READ was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of February , one jar, value 2 s., and 12 lbs. of honey, value 18 s. , the goods of William Foster .

WILLIAM FOSTER . I am a grocer , and live in Middlesex-street, Somers-town. On the 18th of February I lost a jar of honey.

ROBERT STRICKLAND . I live opposite the prosecutor. On Thursday evening, about half-past seven o'clock at night, I saw four young chaps standing together next door - the prisoner was one; I saw him cross over to a baker's, and then to Foster's - he stood at the window. One of the others went in to buy something, in the mean time the prisoner stepped in, and took the jar of honey out - I overtook him immediately with it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190217-175

488. ANN SMALLMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of February , the sum of 8 s. in copper monies numbered , the monies of James Murray .

ELIZABETH MURRAY . I am the wife of James Murray , who is a shoemaker , and lives in Dudley-court, St. Giles's . I had 8 s. in copper, which was in a tin cover behind the counter. I saw the prisoner come from behind the counter when I was in the back-room. I stopped her in the shop, and took the money out of her hand - she was a stranger.

Prisoner's Defence. I was intoxicated.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190217-176

489. THOMAS BURGOYNE was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of February , the sum of 5 s., in copper monies numbered , the monies of Peter Sharp .

PETER SHARP . I am a labourer . On the 1st of February I was delivering some beer in the Commercial-road . When I returned, the prisoner was brought back by Ives. I missed 5 s. in copper out of the dray-box.

JAMES IVES . I am a butcher. I saw the prisoner take a 5 s. paper of halfpence out of the dray-box and hand it to another boy - he came back again to the dray. I immediately got off the block on which I sat, and he ran away - I secured him in about eight minutes in Cable-street. I am certain he is the boy.

Prisoner's Defence. I never saw the dray.

GUILTY . Aged 13.

Judgment Respited .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190217-177

490. ELIZA SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of January , one shirt-body, value 5 s. , the goods of Richard Franklin .

JANES FRANKLIN. I am the wife of Richard Franklin , we live in Lilly-street, Saffron-hill . On the 27th of January I left my room about a minute, returned, and missed a shirt-body.

JOHN BOTELER . I am shopman to Mr. Hill, who is a pawnbroker, and lives in Turnmill-street. On the 27th of January the prisoner pledged the shirt-body with me for 2 s. - Franklin came and claimed it. Next day the prisoner came to borrow a shilling more; I detained her.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was asked to pledge it.

GUILTY . Aged 47.

Confined One Year .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190217-178

491. JOHN BRYANT was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of February , two bushels of beans, value 14 s. , the goods of Thomas Dancer .

THOMAS DANCER . I live at Southgate , and am a coach-master , the prisoner was three years in my service. For sometime past I observed my horses look very thin, which induced me to suspect him - I never locked my corn up. The prisoner was brought to me by Auty, with two bushels and a half of beans. I told him he was a pretty rascal; he said,

"Yes, master, I am indeed. I have done for myself now, and the d - I must have tempted me to do it.

"I asked him several times to tell me who it was that received them. He said, No; if he had a hundred necks, he would be hung by them all first. I compared the beans with mine, they are the same. He had the care of them.

JOSEPH AUTY . I am a patrol. On the 16th of February, about half-past eleven o'clock at night, I and Cook were on duty on Mr. Dancer's premises - two persons came along from the stables; Cook wished them a good night - nobody answered, which excited my suspicion. I followed, and overtook the prisoner with a sack on his head, which contained the beans. He begged hard to be let go, saying it was his first offence.

Prisoner's Defence. I found them in the road.

GUILTY . Aged 38.

Confined One Month , and Publicly Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190217-179

492. THOMAS HUNT was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of January , two shirts, value 7 s.; five handkerchiefs, value 8 s., and one pair of shoes, value 2 s. , the goods of Thomas Wearing .

THOMAS WEARING . I lodge in Chapman-street - the prisoner slept in the same room with me. I missed the articles stated in the indictment, and found he had got them. We used to lend each other things. I do not think he meant to steal them.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190217-180

493. JOHN CARTER was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of February , 6 lbs. of mutton, value 3 s. , the property of Joseph James .

JOSEPH JAMES . I am a butcher , and live on Great Saffron-hill . The prisoner was brought back to my shop with the meat.

WILLIAM SMITH . I live next door to Mr. James. On the 19th of February, about seven o'clock in the evening, I saw three young men together, the prisoner came from the prosecutor's shop with a shoulder of mutton under his coat. I secured him, the others ran off.

Prisoner's Defence. The man is false.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Fined One Shilling , and Discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190217-181

494. EDWARD HAWKINS was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of February , one watch, value 2 l.; one chain, value 6 d.; two seals, value 6 d., and one key, value 2 d., the goods of John Bland . from his person .

JOHN BLAND . I am a piece-broker , and live in White Horse-yard, Drury-lane. On the 19th of February, about five o'clock in the afternoon, I was before the hustings, Covent-garden , and was hustled by a gang of pickpockets - the prisoner was one. I put my hand to my fob, to secure my watch; they rose my hand, and took it out. As soon as my hands were at liberty I seized the prisoner - I am certain he was acting with them - he had his hands behind him then. Some persons came to my assistance, and kept hold of him.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS, You went there out of curiosity - A. Yes - I am sure he is one of them.

THOMAS FRANKLIN . I live in Queen-street, Grosvenor-square. I was close by the prosecutor, at the hustings - I saw several persons pulling him, and lifting his arms up. I saw the prisoner pull the watch right out of his fob; I saw the chain in his hand. I was pushed from him.

JAMES NICHOLLS . I live at Chelsea. I was at the hustings, near the prosecutor; I heard him say he had been robbed, and laid hold of the prisoner.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190217-182

495. CATHARINE JUDE was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of February , one watch, value 6 l.; one seal, value 1 l., and three keys, value 10 s., the goods of George Todd , from his person .

GEORGE TODD . I am a tailor , and live in Meard's-court, Wardour-street. On the 14th of February, between three and four o'clock in the morning, I had been with some friends, and on leaving them, I went to a coffee-shop, in Wych-street - I was quite sober; the prisoner came in, and sat down. I gave her some coffee, and then went to No. 10, Charles-street with her. I got up between eight and nine o'clock; she was still in the room - I missed my watch - the door was bolted inside; she denied taking it; the landlord and landlady also said they knew nothing about it. On examining I found a hole in the wainscot, over the head of the bed - it communicates with the landlord's bed-room; any thing could be slipped through; there was a matting behind to receive any thing. I put my watch under the pillow safe at night.

PATRICK CRAWLEY . I am a watchman. The prosecutor

informed me of the robbery, and I took the prisoner in charge; she denied it. I saw the hole in the wainscot, property might be put through it.

RICHARD JONES . I am landlord of the house. I never saw the watch - I have two or three women in the house.

Prisoner's Defence. I never saw the watch.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190217-183

496. JOSEPH KNOTT was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of February , one flute, value 18 d.; one pair of shoes, value 1 s.; one looking-glass, value 1 s.; one pair of trowsers, value 4 s., and one hat, value 4 s. , the property of William Hockerday .

WILLIAM HOCKERDAY . I live at Deptford ; the prisoner lodged there. On the 16th of February he left the house, and never returned. I missed my property at the same. time. He had given notice that he was going.

JAMES CAMPER . I am a pawnbroker. On the 16th of February the prisoner pledged a flute with me - I live at Ratcliff.

JOHN LINES . I am beadle of Limehouse. I apprehended the prisoner at Limehouse. He said he took the things to a house in Limehouse. I went and found them there.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 45.

Fined One Shilling , and Discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190217-184

497. WILLIAM THOMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of February , one shawl, value 5 s., the property of Julia Ann M'Keever , from her person .

MISS JULIA ANN M'KEEVER. I live near Rochester. On the 21st of February I was going along Upper Berkeley-street , about eight o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came behind me, put both his hands up, took my shawl off, and ran away with it. I called Stop thief! and he was stopped before he was out of my sight. He dropped the shawl before he was stopped.

RICHARD JENKINS . I am a watchman. My box is at the bottom of Berkeley-street. I heard the cry of stop thief, and saw the prisoner crossing the street, about twenty yards off - he dropped the shawl. I secured him, and never lost sight of him. The prosecutrix came up immediately.

HENRY FROST . I am a watchman. I was at the corner of Adam-street, heard the cry, and saw the prisoner running not three yards from the prosecutrix; he dropped the shawl, and I picked it up.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A boy threw it on my shoulder, and said,

"Run." I threw it down.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190217-185

498. JOHN THOMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of February , three pewter pots, value 2 s. , the property of Robert Agnew .

ROBERT AGNEW . I keep the Devonshire Arms, public-house , in Duke-street, Portland Chapel. The prisoner was brought to me with three pots, which were taken from No. 15, Edward-street.

WILLIAM UNWIN . I am a carman. I saw the prisoner go under a gateway in Edward-street with three pots, he put them under his apron, which made me suspect him. I followed him past the prosecutor's house, and then stopped him. He said he was going to take them to the public-house - he had passed it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 49.

Confined One Year , and Publicly Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190217-186

499. JAMES HOWE was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of January , one shawl, value 7 s., and one handkerchief, value 6 d., the property of Mary Ann Myers , from her person .

The prosecutrix not appearing , the prisoner was

ACQUITTED.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190217-187

500. THOMAS JENNINGS was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of February , one handkerchief, value 4 d., and five pieces of leather, value 1 s. 2 d. , the goods of Joshua Wren .

JOSHUA WREN . I am a shoemaker , the prisoner was my apprentice . On Sunday, the 21st of February, he asked leave to go out - I gave him leave. I suspected him, and as he was going out I called him back, and asked him for a handkerchief which he had taken sometime before, he denied it. I searched him, and found the handkerchief in his breeches, and the leather in his pockets. I asked him who induced him to rob me? he refused to tell me.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: o18190217-1

MR. BARON GRAHAM gave judgment in the following cases, reserved for the consideration of the Twelve Judges: -

THE KING against WILLIAM CARR , convicted of maliciously shooting at William Billingsley (see page 180). This case was reserved on the question,

"Whether, as the piece was not primed, it was sufficiently loaded to come within the meaning of the Act?" The Judges were of opinion that it was not, and therefore the prisoner was not rightly convicted.

THE KING against ROBERT TAYLOR , convicted of feloniously, wilfully, and maliciously cutting down 121 trees. The Jury stated their opinion that the trees were not actually destroyed. The question was,

"Whether there was that destruction which came within the meaning of the Act?" The Judges were of opinion that there was, and that the prisoner was rightly convicted .


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