Old Bailey Proceedings, 13th January 1819.
Reference Number: 18190113
Reference Number: f18190113-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace Oyer and Terminer, AND Gaol Delivery for the City of London, AND ALSO The Gaol Delivery For the County of Middlesex, HELD AT Justice Hall, in the Old Bailey; ON WEDNESDAY, 13th of JANUARY, 1819, and following Days;

Being the Second Session in the Mayoralty of THE RIGHT HON. JOHN ATKINS , LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

Taken in Short-Hand by H. BUCKLER, Basinghall Street, (BY AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON.)

London:

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED, FOR H. BUCKLER, BY T. BOOTH, 31, St. Andrew's Hill, Doctors' Commons.

1819.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX.

Before the Right Honourable JOHN ATKINS , Esq. LORD MAYOR of the City of London; Sir George Sowley Holroyd , Knt., one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir James Burrough , Knt., one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir John Perring , Bart.; Sir Charles Flower , Bart.; Sir Claudius Stephen Hunter, Bart.; George Scholey , Esq., and Samuel Birch , Esq. Aldermen of the said City; Sir John Silvester , Bart., D. C. L. Recorder of the said City; Sir Matthew Bloxham , Knt., and William Heygate , Esq., Aldermen of the said City, Newman Knowlys , Esq. Common Sergeant of the said City, his Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of the Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

London Jury.

William Hughes ,

John Bourne ,

William H. Atkinson ,

William Blackman ,

John Ellis ,

Thomas Daniel Dunn ,

John Dynes ,

Ebenezer Taylor ,

Philip Jacob ,

Joseph Mather ,

Thomas Clarke ,

John Slaymaker .

First Middlesex Jury.

William Bird ,

John Watkins ,

William Bryan ,

John Strickland ,

John Benjamin Cole ,

John Guyet ,

George Cooke ,

George Millet ,

Benjamin Bartlett ,

Richard Howels ,

William Colly ,

John Gregory .

Second Middlesex Jury.

John Fowell ,

William Chalton ,

Thomas Cocket ,

William Roberts ,

Joseph Purden ,

John Browne ,

George Dobson ,

Jacob Blake ,

William Faulkner ,

Thomas Freer ,

Charles Stone ,

William Pike .

SESSIONS HOUSE, OLD BAILEY, JANUARY 13, 1819.

ATKINS, MAYOR. SECOND SESSION.

Reference Number: t18190113-1

161. JOHN LYNCH , WILLIAM MARTIN , and ROBERT SELBY were indicted for feloniously assaulting Benjamin Heakes , on the King's highway, on the 22d of December , at St. John the Evangelist, Westminster, putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, one hat, value 3 s., and 4 s. 6 d. in monies numbered, his property .

BENJAMIN HEAKES . I am a groom , but have not lived with anybody lately. On the 27th of December I spent the evening at a public-house in Beak-street, Piccadilly, near Park-lane, with my brother. I left about eleven o'clock at night, and went home alone - I lodge in Old Pye-street, Westminster , with Mr. Silverside. I went home, knocked, and tried the door, and found it bolted - I was rather intoxicated. My house is separated from Silverside's, it is over it. I then went to his door, and asked him to open it, he spoke to me through the door, and said he could not open my door, as his was a separate house. Two men then came up to me, and asked me to go and have something to drink. I told them I did not want any. One of them came on each side of me; the one on the left side took 4 s. 6 d. out of my left-hand breeches pocket. I know I had that money in my pocket.

Q. How came you to let him take it - A. I could not prevent it; at the time he took it another man came up, and stopped my mouth.

Q. Did the other take the money before the man stopped your mouth - A. At the time they were rifling me, the other man came up, put his left hand before my mouth, and his right at the back of my head - neither of them took hold of my arms.

Q. Then you might have resisted - A. As soon as they got my money the man who stopped my mouth took my hat off. I then collared one of them, I do not know which it was. I tore the collar of his coat off, called for assistance, and kept fast hold of him - we both came down together, and he got away, there was no struggling at the time my hat was taken off, he merely let go my head, and took my hat off with both hands. The other two stood on each side of me.

Q. Do you know any of the prisoners - A. only Lynch - I knew him before.

Q. As you were intoxicated cannot you be mistaken - A. No. It was a very foggy night, but there was a lamp opposite my landlord's door - I could see the men by the light of the lamp. Lynch was the man who took my hat and put his hand over my mouth, and behind my head.

Q. Why could you not resist - A. The two men standing on each side, and the other man coming up, and putting his hand before my mouth prevented me from resisting or calling out - I cannot swear to the other man.

LYNCH. Q. How do you know it was me - A. I live in Westminster, and he has been pointed out to me several times before with other men. I have seen him several times, I have been in his company several times, and am sure he is the man. I could see him distinctly.

WILLIAM EATWELL . I am a watchman. On the 22d of December I was on my beat, at the corner of Pear-street, Westminster. On this night I saw the three prisoners together, I knew them before, they passed me a little before twelve o'clock, and went down Pear-street towards Pye-street - the prosecutor lives in a court, which joins Pye-street. The prosecutor had passed me a few minutes before, and went the same way. I was walking backward and forwards, and saw the three prisoners go up to him - the fog was just cleared off. I was about fifty yards from them, and saw them cross the road and go up towards him. I heard them dancing on the ground, but could not hear what they said.

Q. Did they all go up to him together - A. All three went towards him together - they were abreast. I heard the call of watch, ran back to my box to fetch my lanthorn, went to the place, and found the prosecutor, but none of the prisoners; I could see nobody else - I saw no more of the prisoners. I am certain they are the men who went up to him. They came out of a door next to my box, I was standing at my box at the time, and had seen them go into the house.

Q. Did you see the prosecutor when the men went up to him - A. I saw him at his door, which is about two yards down the court. I saw him go into the court, beard him knock, and then saw the men go into the court after him - I could not see him at the time.

SELBY. Q. Is the court a thoroughfare - how could we get away - A. There is a low wall at the bottom of the court, people often get over it - they could then escape. It is not above a foot higher than I am; there are holes in the wall which serve for steps - they can get over very easy.

COURT. Q. How long might it be before you got to the court - A. Five or six minutes - they might have escaped into a house in the court - the prosecutor gave me a piece of a coat. When the prisoners passed me Martin had a coat under his arm.

BENJAMIN HEAKES re-examined. Q. When they attacked you, were you in the court or in the street - A. I was in the street, about two yards from the court - it was a foggy night, but the fog had gone off a little.

Q. Which way did the men go - A. I stood at the end of the court; one of them came into the court, the other ran into No. 1 or 2 in the court - this was after the robbery. I believe the other two ran down Pye-street in a different direction to the watch-box, but I am not positive. I tore a piece of one man's coat off, the man had the coat on, not under his arm - the watchman came up in about five or six minutes.

LYNCH. Q. Where have you been in my company - A. At two public-houses at Westminster - I never said that I did not know you.

BENJAMIN TIMBRELL . I am a constable. I received information of the robbery, and apprehended Lynch. I fetched the prosecutor to the watch-house, and he immediately said in the prisoner's presence, that he was the man who robbed him. I took him to the office, and then went and apprehended Selby - Heakes gave me a pair of pantaloons, which he said he wore at the time.

JAMES GILLMORE . I am an officer of Queen-square. On the 23d of December I and Cooper apprehended Martin at the Crown public-house, Pye-street, about twelve o'clock in the day, he had no coat on then - none of the prisoners' coats were torn when they were taken.

JOSEPH COOPER. I am an officer. I went with Gillmore, and took Martin - the prosecutor did not know him.

LYNCH'S Defence. I went to the public-house, to get some beer, and was taken - the prosecutor said he did not know me, he was drunk. The magistrate ordered him out of the office for three hours, he then came in, and swore to me. My mother gave him 9 s. to make it up, and he dined with my friends on Christmas day.

SELBY'S Defence. I and Martin were drinking together, Lynch came in, and we all came out together - I had only twenty yards to go to my house. I did not go as far as where the robbery was committed.

BENJAMIN HEAKES re-examined. Lynch's mother came several times to ask me not to appear against them, and offered to make it up; I refused and said it was not in my hands. They sent a man named Roberts to me, he said he would make every thing up to me. I said 15 s. would not satisfy me. He then threw down 9 s., and left the room. After he had left I took it up to buy a hat and pantaloons - I never dined with any of their friends.

J. LYNCH - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 16.

W. MARTIN - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 25.

R. SELBY - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 20.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

Reference Number: t18190113-2

162. PATRICK LYNCH , THOMAS LYNCH , WILLIAM LYNCH , WILLIAM MURRAY , and JAMES MACKINTOSH were indicted for feloniously assaulting Sarah Priestley on the King's highway, on the 18th of December , at St. John the Evangelist, Westminster , putting her in fear, and taking from her person and against her will, one handkerchief, value 6 d., and 20 s. 6 d. in monies numbered , her property.

SARAH PRIESTLEY . I am a single woman , and live in Old Pye-street. On the 18th of December, about ten minutes before twelve o'clock at night, I was in Old Pye-street , standing at the door of No. 51. I saw nearly twenty young men come out of the Crown public-house - they all came out together, some went up one passage, and some up another. As I was going through the passage to go up stairs, two young men met me, and both struck me twice on the neck with their hands at my door. A great many others stood round the door; William Lynch was one of the men who struck me, I did not know him before - it was moonlight, and there was a lamp over the door, so that I could see him, and am sure he is one of them, he struck me on the head - three of them struck me, but I do not know the other two. I had 20 s, 6 d. in a handkerchief in my hand, one of them said if I did not give them the money they would kill me; they were all together at the time - I had not been at the Crown.

Q. What else passed - A. One of them took my money and handkerchief out of my hand, and another held me the while, they all went away. I called the watchman. William Lynch returned, and struck me on the head twice with a stick - this was after the money was taken. The blow knocked me down; my head was very bad for a fortnight or three weeks after.

Q. At the time William Lynch returned and struck you, the others were gone - A. Yes - I am sure he was the man; I do not know who took the money. I remained on the ground till the watchman came, I was then carried up stairs. All the five prisoners were there - I am sure they were all five there, when I was attacked at the door, and the money demanded - it was quite light.

Q. How soon after did you see any of them again - A. Next day at the office - I did not notice the others so much as William Lynch , but know the other four were there. Next morning a young woman picked my handkerchief up at the door, and brought it to me - the money was not in it then.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. What business are you - A. None at all, I have been at home with my friends until lately - I had money when I came to town, which supported me.

Q. Were you not an unfortunate girl - A. No. I did not know the prisoners before, I had not been drinking with them that night, and was never in the public-house in my life. I cannot say how they knew that I had money, I had told nobody of it. I received it in Tothill-street, of a gentleman who is butler to Lord Grenville. I met him there about eight o'clock, he asked me what I did in town, and gave me the money to go home again. I was in a public-house with him till near this time, and received the money of him as I left the house - I was never in any other public-house.

Q. They said that if you did not deliver the money they would take your life - A. They said if I did not deliver what money I had they would. I saw them next morning at Queen-square Office.

Q. Did you not then say that thirty persons were round

the door - A. I said about twenty. I should know the man who took the money if I saw him - it was neither of the prisoners.

Q. What did the prisoners do before the money was taken - A. Two men struck me, it was neither of the prisoners. After they took my money I called out that they were thieves. William Lynch returned, struck me, and knocked me down. The prisoners all stood at the bar together at the office, I said they were the five men.

Q. How soon afterwards did you go to see them in Tothill-fields - A. I did go, and Mackintosh said if I would not go against them, they would give me the money - they had sent to me twice before I went. Maria Bolton persuaded me to go and see what they wanted. Their mother had been, and offered me the money.

Q. Did you not say at Tothill-fields that you was going to be married, and wanted the money to get your things out of pledge - A. No, I said I did not wish to appear against them, if I was not obliged. They asked me to take the money. I said I did not know whether I dare take it.

Q. Were you knocked down in your own passage or at the street door - A. At the street door - it is an open door, and all the lodgers go in. I was only part inside the door when I was struck - they stood round the door.

THOMAS LYNCH . Q. Did you not say at the office, that you never saw me at all - A. No.

COURT. Q. Did the gentleman owe you the money - A. No, he was a friend of my father's. He wished me to go and take something to drink - I did not receive the money for anything. I came to town to see a friend, and was going to return. The money was tied in the corner of my handkerchief, anybody could see the handkerchief.

WILLIAM EATWELL . I am a watchman. I heard a noise in the passage a little before twelve o'clock; there are two passages which go into the court. I heard the prosecutrix call out, and heard both blows, but only saw the last struck - there were a great many men in the passage. The prosecutrix fell on the ground, and the blood was running from her head. I went to spring my rattle, as there were so many, when two of them fell on beating me with a stick, another gave me three blows with a poker - they broke my lanthorn in the passage. I do not know who struck me, I cut the man with my cutlass, but have not seen him since.

Q. Did you see the prisoners - A. I saw all of them except Mackintosh, outside the door of the house. I am sure they were there. I knew them before, two of them struck me several times. I could not lift my arm up, they all kept beating me until some more watchmen came, they then ran away - there was about twenty of them. Next day I went with the officers, and took the five prisoners, they all live in the neighbourhood. I went to the prosecutrix, she laid in the passage, and while the men were standing round, she said she had been robbed of 20 s. 6 d.

Cross-examined. It was moonlight, I could see half through the passage. I could not see who struck the prosecutrix there were so many round.

Q. Where were the four men you saw - A. They stood outside, and the prosecutrix laid outside the door. When I was struck they all told the man to give it to me well.

Q. Then you are sure it was neither of the four prisoners who struck the prosecutrix - A. I do not know who struck her - she lives in a lodging-house - there are married women, and girls of the town live there. I saw the prisoners distinctly, and know several of the others by sight.

JAMES GILLMORE . I am an officer. On Saturday, the 19th of December, about twelve o'clock in the morning, the prosecutrix came to the office, and gave information. I and Cooper went to the Crown, public-house, in Pye-street - the watchman pointed out Patrick Lynch to us first; we took him to the office. We then went to William Lynch 's lodging, and found him in bed - the prosecutrix said he was the man who struck her, and that Patrick Lynch was there, but did not strike her. I then returned to William Lynch 's house, and took Thomas Lynch - I then went again to the Crown, public-house, and took Murray there. As we went with the prosecutrix to Pye-street, we passed Mackintosh, with two others - the prosecutrix did not observe him. I called to her, and asked if she knew any of them? she said Yes; Mackintosh was the man who tried to get her shawl off, but did not succeed - I took him; she said nothing about the other two. She afterwards saw the prisoners at the office, and knew them all.

Cross-examined, Q. You took them to her one by one - A. I believe she had only seen William Lynch before; she was not with me when I took the others. She passed Mackintosh, with two other men, and did not notice them - I am certain she did not see them.

JOSEPH COOPER . I assisted Gillmore in taking the prisoners - he has spoken correctly. The prosecutrix saw them all at the office, and said she knew them all.

BENJAMIN TIMBRELL . I was with Gilmore, and took the prisoners.

ROBERT GREENHILL . The prosecutrix was given into my custody by the magistrate, to appear against the prisoners.

PATRICK LYNCH 'S Defence. I was in bed at ten o'clock that night. The prosecutrix said at the office that she never saw me.

MACKINTOSH'S Defence. I can prove I was in Covent-garden at the time.

SARAH PRIESTLEY re-examined. They tried to get my shawl off, but could not. The money could not have fallen from my hand - I saw it taken. The man who took it put it into his bosom. I had not walked above a quarter of a mile from where I received it.

MARY LYNCH . I am the mother of the three prisoners, Lynch's, and live in St. John's-lane, Westminster. The night before my son, Patrick, was taken, he came home about ten o'clock; and did not go out till the next morning, as the door was locked, and the key laid on the table in my bed-room. I was in bed before they came in.

Q. How do you know when they came in then - A. They did come in.

WILLIAM WALKER . I am a hackney-coachman, and live in Wesminster. On the 18th of December, a little before twelve o'clock at night, I was under the Piazza, in Covent-garden; I saw the prisoner, Mackintosh, there, and went with him to Belshaw's wine-vaults at the corner of the Piazza - he came out from Drury-lane.

Q. How do you know it was the 18th - A. It was on Friday night, about a week before Christmas; he was

taken up the next day for this robbery. We parted about a quarter after twelve o'clock - he went towards Orchard-street, Westminster where he lived.

P. LYNCH - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 20.

T. LYNCH - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 22.

W. LYNCH - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 24.

W. MURRAY - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 18.

J. MACKINTOSH - NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18190113-3

163. THOMAS WEBB was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of December , at Stanwell , two cows, price 18 l. , the property of the Earl of Waldegrave .

WILLIAM KEMPSTER . I am cow-keeper to the Earl of Waldegrave, who has a house and lands at Twickenham, Middlesex . On the 15th of December, about six o'clock in the evening, I saw all his cows safe in the meadows, there were six of them. Next morning, about six o'clock I found two of them were gone. I saw them about two o'clock the same day at Twickenham, in the care of Richard Barnard,

EDWARD MERRICK . I am a farmer, and live at Stanwell. About eight o'clock in the morning of the 16th of December, I saw the prisoner in the Stanwell road, driving two cows. I asked him where he was going with them? he said they were for sale, and the price was 26 l. I offered him 12 l.; and after a little hesitation, he agreed to take 12 l. I told him to bring them into Mr. Stevens's straw-yard - he said he would, and went there with me. When he got there, Stevens asked him where he got the cows from? he said they belonged to his father-in-law, Webb, of Colnbrook. I left him there, and went to Hounslow, returned, and found him at the Swan, public-house, at Stanwell. Stevens had been and returned from Colnbrook. In consequence of what Stevens said, I ordered Sexton to take the prisoner in charge.

SAMUEL STEVENS . On the 16th of December Merrick and the prisoner came to my straw-yard with two cows. The prisoner said his father-in-law gave him the cows; that he lived at Colnbrook, and was a milkman. I went there to inquire, but could find no person of that name.

Q. Before you went there, did you tell the prisoner to go and get some beer - A. Yes, and gave him 6 d. I told him to go to the public-house, and wait there while I got the money to pay him for the cows. When I returned, I found him at the public-house, and charged him with stealing the cows. He denied it, and still persisted that he had them from his father-in-law at Colnbrook - the constable was in the room. I told him to take the prisoner to Sir John Gibbons , the magistrate, which he did, and he was sent to Bow-street for examination.

RICHARD BARNARD . I was at work for Stevens, and took the prisoner into custody at the public-house. He got up and went away, I followed, and fetched him back. He appeared to be going out of the village.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS Q. You went to inquire for Webb at Colnbrook - A. Yes, he said his father-in-law's name was Webb, and that his own name was Wright - it is a large place, I did not go to every house.

DAVID LEWZEY . I am a headborough. I had the prisoner in charge. In the road from the public-house to Sir John Gibbons, I said it was evident they were stolen - Merrick said he might as well say whose they were. He said he had taken them from Lady Howe's himself, but not with any intention of stealing them, but to bring them back as strayed property, that he might get a few shillings to get a bit of bread - he said that he took them about four o'clock in the morning.

THOMAS SEXTON . I am a constable. I know nothing more than the last witness.

SAMUEL KING . I was present when the prisoner was examined at Bow-street, and took a note of what he stated - three other men were taken up on the charge, and examined in the prisoner's presence - they were in custody a week or ten days - (reads), he said

"At four o'clock on Wednesday morning, he received the cows in Twickenham-lane". I believe it was thought he would be a witness for the Crown against them - he was not sworn - the other men were discharged.

Cross-examined. Q. Were you present during the whole of the examination - A. During the whole of this examination I was - I believe I was present all the time.

WILLIAM SMITH . I am a carter. On the 16th of December, about one o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner driving two cows at Gutter Bridge, about a mile from Lord Waldegrave's, and in a direction from there.

WILLIAM KEMPSTER re-examined. The cows are Lord Waldegrave's property.

JOHN SMITH . I am secretary to the Earl of Waldegrave, who lost the cows. The field opposite to the one they were stolen from belongs to Baroness Howe.

Prisoner's Defence. I found the cows on the highway between one and two o'clock in the morning, and drove them to Stanwell.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 22.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

Reference Number: t18190113-4

164. CHARLES WORMBECK was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of December , two shirts, value 1 l.; four yards of cloth, value 3 l.; four yards of kerseymere, value 2 l., and one table-cloth, value 5 s., the goods of George Morrell , in his dwelling-house .

GEORGE MORRELL . I am a tailor , and live in Panton-street, Haymarket . I missed the articles stated in the indictment at different times. On the 15th of December, I went to the prisoner's lodgings with the officer, and found the duplicates of the property sewed in the seam of his coat, except that for the shirts, which was on the shelf. He said he was sorry for it. He was my journeyman .

JAMES GILLMORE . I am an officer. I went to the prisoner's house - he denied the robbery. I found the duplicates in his coat lining.

GEORGE BAKER . I am servant to Mr. Turner, who is a pawnbroker. On the 14th of December, the prisoner pledged a shirt with me for 7 s., in the name of Hill, and on the 26th another shirt.

THOMAS JONES . I am servant to Mr. Temple, who is a pawnbroker, and lives in Panton-street. A table-cloth was pledged with me for 3 s. - by the prisoner, I believe.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 28.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Confined One Year .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18190113-5

165. PATRICK STANTON was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of December , one coat, value 3 l., the goods of John M'Alister , in the dwelling-house of Henry Molloy .

PETER CAMPBELL . I am a waiter at the Grosvenor coffee-house , kept by Henry Molloy . On the 26th of December, about half-past three o'clock in the afternoon, I saw the coffee-room door shut rather quick. I went out, and saw the head of a man through the glass. When I got to the corner of Grosvenor-street, I saw two men together, about twenty yards off, one of them had a white greatcoat. Knowing that I had one of that description in my care for Mr. M'Alister, I ran back and missed it off a seat in the coffee-room. I pursued, and saw the prisoner with it - the other man had it first, he ran away; the prisoner did not run, but walked quick. I took him, and asked him where he got the coat? He said a gentleman gave it to him - he refused to go back with me.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A gentleman gave it to me to hold.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

Reference Number: t18190113-6

166. ELIZA CHAMBERS was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of December , thirty yards of ribbon, value 7 s. , the goods of Clarkson Palmer .

DAVID DAVIES . I am servant to Mr. Clarkson Palmer, an haberdasher , who lives at London Bridge . On the 26th of December, between six and seven o'clock in the evening the prisoner came to the shop, and asked to look at some ribbon. I shewed her a drawer of ribbon. She concealed one piece in her pocket, and asked for some narrower than the others - I showed her some more, and saw her take another piece out of that drawer, and put it into her pocket - she bought one yard of twopenny ribbon. I asked her to step back into the warehouse, as I wanted to speak to her. She immediately ran out, I pursued, and brought her back. I sent for an officer, who searched her, but could not find them - they were found on the ground near the spot where I took her. I saw her conceal them - another woman stood close to her, but did not appear concerned with her - she remained in the shop, and bought some goods.

HENRY MURRAY. I am shopman to Mr. Palmer. I saw the ribbon found in the road, at the spot where I saw Davies scuffling with the prisoner.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. When I got to the door, he said I had got the ribbon. I went back with him directly - I had none. In about half an hour a man brought it back, and said he found it.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190113-7

167. THOMAS BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of December , one handkerchief, value 1 s., the property of James Pryce , from his person .

JAMES PRYCE. I am a druggist . On the 28th of December, between twelve and one o'clock in the morning, I was in Holborn, between Ely-place and Hatton-garden , waiting for a friend, and felt a catch at my pocket; I missed my handkerchief, turned round, and saw the prisoner, about two yards off with his hand in his breeches-pocket. I went up to him, and asked him what he had? He said,

"it is mine". I pulled his hand out of his pocket, and found my handkerchief there - I gave him in charge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I picked it up.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190113-8

168. CHARLES CARROLL was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of December , thirty-two printed bound books, value 5 l., and fourteen other books, value 14 s. , the property of Stanley Goddard .

ANTHONY HARRISON . I am a marshalman of the City. On the 13th of December Mr. Goddard sent for me, and said he was robbed of a quantity of books out of his library - the prisoner worked for him. I went, and searched his lodgings in St. John-street, Clerkenwell, and found fourteen unbound books, which the prosecutor claimed. The prisoner said he had stolen them, and sold some to Simmon, in Barbican, and said he did it through distress. I found some duplicates of books on him, which the pawnbrokers gave up.

EDWARD SIMMONS . I am a bookseller, and live in Barbican. I bought nine volumes of Pope's works, and four other volumes of the prisoner, at different times.

ELIZA FOWLER . I live with Mr. Simmons. On the 1st of December I bought six volumes of Natural History of the prisoner for 8 s.

JOHN DOWDING . I am a bookseller, and live in Newgate-street. I bought eight volumes of Smollett's History of England of the prisoner, for 16 s. - he said his father left them to him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I should insult the Court by denying the charge, I was in great distress. Some alteration having been made in a work which Mr. Goddard employed me upon, threw me out of work for six weeks, which plunged me into great distress, business having been bad for three years.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Confined Three Months .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190113-9

169. WILLIAM ALLEN was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of January, one piece of Irish linen, value 25 s. , the property of Charles Courtail , Thomas Harrison and John Tiplady .

JOHN OLLEY . I am porter to Charles Courtail , Thomas Harrison, and John Tiplady , who are Irish factors , and live in Love-lane. On the 6th of June, about two o'clock I heard a noise of paper rustling, turned round, saw the door open, and heard somebody going out of the passage. I followed into the street, and saw the prisoner with a piece of Irish linen under his arm. I ran up, and asked him where he got it? He made no answer. I said he must come back. I took him back, he asked me to let him go, I refused, and he struck me - I gave him in charge. The officer has the property - he is not here. I am certain it is ours - it was taken off the top of a box.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought it - it is not theirs.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190113-10

170. LEWIS ABRAHAMS and MARY TAFT were indicted for stealing, on the 23d of, December , one trunk, value 22 s. and 126 pair of shoes, value 27 l. , the goods of John Cooper Gotch .

THOMAS WARNER . I am carman to Mr. John Cooper Gotch , who is a shoemaker , and lives in Long-acre. On the 23d of December I was going across Finsbury-square, about a quarter past five o'clock in the evening, with eight trunks of shoes in my cart. Just as I got into Crown-street I saw a man in the act of taking a trunk out of the cart, I called out Stop thief! he then threw it down in the road, and ran off - I do not know the man.

JOHN FORRESTER . I am an officer. I was informed of the robbery - the shoes were described to me. On the 28th of December I was passing a pawnbroker's shop in Houndsditch, was called in, and found the prisoner, Taft, pledging one pair, which corresponded with the description I had received. I asked how she came by them? She said she had robbed her master, Mr. Abrahams of Camomile-street, who is the male prisoner, she said her master had more. I went there, found him in the counting-house, and asked if he had lost any shoes? He said he had got shoes, but did not know that he had lost any - there was a quantity in the counting-house, which corresponded with the others. I told him he must excuse me, but the property was stolen. He said I must be mistaken; I said they corresponded with the description I had received. He said he knew the gentleman whom he had them of very well. I told him he had only got to prove that before a magistrate, and all would be right. Both the prisoners told me who brought them - they agreed in the account. I went to the man's house, and found he had left. I found 123 pair of shoes in Abraham's house - I found no trunk.

Cross-examined by MR. ARABIN. Q. No man could conduct himself better than he did - A. No - he said he bought them fairly, he told me the man's name. I cannot had the man nor another suspected of the robbery - the shoes laid openly in his counting-house.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

ABRAHAM'S Defence. I leave my case to my counsel.

JOSEPH PHILLIPS . I am a glass merchant, and live in High Holborn. On the 23d of December, about three or four o'clock, the prisoner Abrahams came to my house, dined, and drank tea with me, we went to the theatre together, and left between eleven and twelve o'clock. He is a general merchant, and a relation of mine.

JOSEPH BATES . I am foreman to Mr. Phillips. I saw Abrahams at my master's house two days before Christmas - he dined there, and at seven o'clock he sent me with a note to his wife.

Q. How came you to remember the day - A. He gave me 1 s. - I had a crate to pack up that day.

Q. You pack up crates every day - A. Yes.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190113-11

171. THOMAS FOSTER was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of January , one handkerchief, value 1 s., the property of Joseph Copeland Bell , from his person .

JOSEPH COPELAND BELL. On the 12th of January, about six o'clock in the evening I was in Cheapside . There was a crowd round a print-shop. I moved towards the road to pass, and thought I felt a catch at my coat-pocket, I turned round, and saw the prisoner scrambling my handkerchief in his hand, he had got it out of my pocket - two other boys were with him. I seized him, and he passed it to one of them. I laid hold of him, and he passed it to the third boy. In trying to take him I lost the other, but never let the prisoner go.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

THOMAS SPARKS . I took the prisoner in charge, but found nothing on him. He said he did not know the boys who were with him.

GUILTY . Aged 13.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190113-12

172. JAMES SHEPPARD was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of December , one wrapper, value 1 s.; one piece of cloth, containing twenty-seven yards, value 27 l., and one piece of cloth, containing twenty yards, value 25 l. , the property of Sampson Bailey .

SAMPSON BAILEY. I am clerk to Tanner and Balis, who keeps the Saracen's Head , Friday-street. On the 31st of December, about three o'clock, I sent Edward Tickner to Hatton-garden, with a truck, which contained two ends of black cloth.

EDWARD TICKNER . I went to Mr. Thompson's, Hatton-garden with the goods, they refused to take them in. On my return I put the truss down to rest myself on Holborn Bridge. The prisoner came up, and asked me where I was going with it? I said to Cheapside. He said he was going that way, and asked me if he should carry it a little way. I let him take it up, he carried it as far as Newgate-street, and then met another man, who stopped him and said

"Ah, Jack, is that you?" and asked him to go and have a glass of gin. They turned down a street to a gin shop, and put the truss down at the door - they asked me several times to go in, and take a glass, but I refused, took the truss up, and came on with it. I had not gone far before they overtook me again. The prisoner said he was going to Cheapside, and would take it a little further for me, he took it off my shoulder, put it down, and told the other to take it up, which he did, and gave the prisoner his hat to carry. Just before we got to Ivy-lane another man came, and almost knocked me backwards, by running against me, then held up his fist, and said

"Mind who you are shoving". I never saw the man with the truss afterwards. I am certain the prisoner is the man who took it off my shoulder, and gave it to him.

Q. When did you see him again - A. He was taken the same evening. When the other man went away with the truss, I asked the prisoner if he saw which way he ran? He said he would go with me to see if he could find him. He ran down Ivy-lane and Paternoster-row with me; when we came to Lovell's-court, he ran up there, and pretended to look after him, I went up too. He ran out before me, shut the gate, and ran away, I opened the gate, ran out, and called Stop thief! and Mr. Murdoch stopped him.

JOHN MURDOCH. I was in Newgate-street about half-past five o'clock in the afternoon, and heard the cry of Stop thief! the prisoner ran by me with a hat in his hand,

I followed, and took him in Bagnio-court - he dropped the hat in the kennel - he had his own hat on. I took him to the Saracen's Head.

Prisoner's Defence. I met the man in Smithfield, he said he had been pushed down; I offered to carry the truss - he met a man in Newgate-street, and took him to a gin-shop. He gave me the man's hat to carry, and helped the truss on his head - he missed the man, I ran to look for him, and was taken.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190113-13

173. DOMINGO ROBINO was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of December , one 1 l. bank note , the property of Lord Berresford .

LORD BERRESFORD . Since my arrival in England six months ago, I have frequently missed notes and silver out of my pockets - I counted my money several times at night, and missed some next morning. On the 8th of December I had ten 1 l. notes in my pocket, the numbers of which I took on a piece of paper, which I put in a book, in my bed-room, and left the notes with the other money in my pocket rolled up. In the morning, after dressing, the prisoner gave me my clothes, and in going down stairs I missed a note. I sent to Mr. Daker, the magistrate of Marlborough-street, Foy came; I gave him the numbers of the notes, and pointed out the one I missed - it was the third note in the roll. The prisoner was called into the room, and I asked him if he had got any money? he had told me the lay before that he had none. He appeared surprised; I repeated the question, and desired him to put on the table all the money he had. He then took from his pocket several pieces of gold foreign coin. I asked him if he had any more money? He said No. I then asked him if he had any bank notes or paper money of any kind? He said No. I then pointed Foy out to him, said he was an officer, and told him to mind what he was about, for if he denied it, and was found to have money it would go very much against him - he continued to deny it. I told him it was the same if he had it on his person, in his room, or anywhere else - he still denied having anything else. Foy then said he must search him, which he did, and found a piece of paper rolled up in his breeches pocket, on opening it he made a snatch at it, and said

"Oh no! Oh no!" Foy found the note in it which I had lost.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. How long had he been in your Lordship's employ - A. Nine years, and served me with fidelity - I took him into my service in a foreign country - he came to England with me in July last.

COLONEL WATSON. I was present with Lord Berresford, and confirm what he has said.

GEORGE FOY . I am an officer. I was sent for, his Lordship has given a correct account of what passed. I found the note in the prisoner's right-hand breeches-pocket - it corresponded with the number which his Lordship said he had lost.

LORD BERRESFORD re-examined. It is the number of the note that I lost - the outside note was not taken.

Prisoner's Defence. My master is a very humane and charitable gentleman. I found the paper on the carpet, and waited till his Lordship was disengaged to return it - I was asked for paper-money, and in the confusion I said I had none.

GUILTY . Aged 36.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190113-14

174. WILLIAM BENWELL was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of January , seven silver spoons, value 4 l., and three table-spoons, value 3 l., the goods of Edward Strettle , in his dwelling-house .

EDWARD STRETTLE . I am an Irish barrister , and live at Hampton, in Middlesex. On the 4th of November I hired the prisoner as a servant , and on the 4th of November I put my plate into his possession. About the 4th of January I hired another servant, not intending to discharge him, some circumstances however induced me to suspect him. I told him as another servant was coming, it would be proper to look at the plate - he produced it and in calling it over I missed three table-spoons, and asked him where they were? He said they should be there, as he had counted them two days ago. I said they must be produced, as it had a bad appearance. On searching further I missed the property stated in the indictment. I said he must produce them; he looked about him, and then left the room - I heard him walking about, and then it ceased. I called the servant, and found he had left the house. About six o'clock in the evening I was informed he had returned; I sent privately for a constable; when he came I went and found the prisoner by the kitchen fire, I asked him for the things, he put his hand into his pocket, and pulled out several of them, saying, here they are all, but one desert and two egg-spoons, which are still in pawn - I gave him in charge. He fell on his knees, and intreated forgiveness, saying, that it was the necessitous situation of his wife that induced him to commit the offence. I told him that public justice required that I should not connive at it.

Cross-examined by MR. NORRIS. Q. He left your house, returned, and gave you most of it, and before the magistrate he gave you the duplicates of the rest - A. Yes - his wife was in the hospital, lying in.

THOMAS MILLBURN. I am a constable. I was sent for, and found the prisoner in the kitchen, he produced the plate, and said 1 l s. would replace the rest - I took him in charge.

ANN APPLETON . I am the prosecutor's cook. The prisoner came into the kitchen - he wanted to go to another part of the house before the constable came, but I prevented him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I am a married man; I did not want my master to know it, and being in distress, my wife

being on the point of lying in, I pledged the things, meaning to redeem them when I received my wages.

GUILTY. Aged 18.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Recommended to Mercy. Confined Six Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

Reference Number: t18190113-15

175. JOHN DOWDING was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Isaac Joseph , about ten o'clock in the forenoon of the 18th of December , at St. Martin's in the Fields , (he and other persons being therein.) and stealing therein ten rings, value 6 l., and five brooches, value 30 s. , his property.

ISAAC JOSEPH . I am a salesman , and live in Drury-lane . On the 18th of December, about ten o'clock in the morning, I went into my parlour to breakfast, and saw the prisoner and another man walking backwards and forwards for a quarter of an hour, looking in at my window - I thought by the shade that he was pointing at the window. I got up, went out, and found my window cut, part of a pane of glass taken out, and some rings and brooches gone, which had been put in the window that morning. I went out to look for him, and caught him to the corner of Russell-court, coming towards my house again with the other man. I collared, brought him back, and said

"He was a fine fellow to cut my window, at that time of day." He said, I have got nothing, and you can not do anything with me, but if you will let me go, I will get the property back again for you. I took him towards Bow-street, met Ellis, and gave him in charge. I was in my house with my family - I lost ten rings, worth 5 l., and five brooches, worth 40 s..

JAMES ELLIS . I am an officer. The prisoner was given into my charge. I searched him, and found six rings, and one brooch in his left-hand waistcoat pocket - also a gimlet, and a knife.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I saw a man running - he threw them away, and I picked them up.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 19.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18190113-16

176. VINCENT RUSSELL was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of January , at Wilsdon , one sheep, price 40 s. , the property of James Tomlinson .

SECOND COUNT, for wilfully and feloniously killing a sheep, price 40 s., the property of James Tomlinson , with intent to steal the carcase of the same.

JAMES TOMLINSON . I am a publican , and live at Neesden. I have some land in the parish of Wilsden, Middlesex, round the village - I had some sheep there. On Saturday evening, the 2d of January between four and five o'clock, I examined, and found them all right. On Sunday morning, between nine and ten o'clock, I missed one. I searched round the field, and found the place where it had been stuck, there were marks of blood, and footsteps where it had been caught in the corner of the field. I traced the blood and footsteps over hedges and ditches to Shade-green, which is near the prisoner's house - it appeared to be the footsteps of only one person. I searched the house of a man named Mason, but found nothing. I searched Tilbuy's house - he gave us information. We went over to Wells's house, while we were there, we saw a woman come out of the prisoner's house with three joints of mutton - it was his wife.

Q. When was this - A. On the Sunday, towards the evening, just before dark. She dropped one joint as she went along, and threw the other two into a ditch, at the end of the house. I examined the ditch, and found two joints there, and the other which she had dropped - the constable went into the house. Next morning, we found the skin of a sheep in the privy - it appeared to have been killed seven or eight days. We found another skin on the adjoining premises, which is the skin of my sheep - it was buried in a bank; we also found the paunch of the sheep there - they appeared quite fresh, and must have been killed on the Sunday morning, or late on Saturday; it was marked R - I knew it to be the skin of my sheep; I compared them with the mutton which the prisoner's wife threw into the ditch, and they corresponded with the skin. The prisoner was not at home.

Cross-examined by MR. NORRIS. The prisoner was not at home. I am sure the skin was mine.

JOSEPH FINCH . I am a farmer, and live at Wilsden. The prisoner occupies a cottage of mine. On Saturday the 2d of January, I was with him - he was employed almost all day, moving some mould, and taking it off a bank, and throwing it into a ditch. The sheep-skin was found among the mould which he had been moving on the Saturday afternoon.

THOMAS TOWYORD . I am a constable. I was with Mr. Tomlinson, and examined Wells's premises. In consequence of information, I was going to the prisoner's house and saw his wife standing at Wells's door, which I had mistaken for the prisoner's, and went in there - they are both under the same roof. I afterwards went to the prisoner's apartment, and found two joints of mutton hanging on a nail over the bed - they did not appear to be concealed - the prisoner was not at home. I went and saw Tomlinson in the ditch with two joints of mutton - I did not see him take them out. I was with him next morning, and saw the skin found in the bank; I compared it with the mutton found in the ditch and in the house, and it all appeared to belong to the same sheep. I took the prisoner into custody on Sunday evening on the adjoining premises, when he came home, and asked him how he came by the mutton? he said he had it sent to him as a present from his friends.

Prisoner's Defence. As I came from Tomlinson's house on the 3d of January, I got over a gate, saw something laying there, and heard somebody go through the hedge. I found it was meat, brought it home, and said I would not cook it to-morrow, and that if any owner came they should have it. It is clear, that if I had committed the robbery, I should not have concealed the skin in the mould, as I was going to work there next day.

JOSEPH FINCH re-examined. The mould would not have to be moved again.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 32.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

Reference Number: t18190113-17

177. JAMES WILKINS and JOHN BAKER were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Edward Wheatley , about nine clock in the night of the 23d of December , at Fulham , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, one cushion, value 1 s., and 50 pins, value 4 l. , his property.

EDWARD WHEATLEY , JUN. I live in King-street, Hammersmith with my father, who is a watchmaker - it is his dwelling-house, and in the parish of Fulham. On the 23d of December, a few minutes before nine o'clock in the evening, I left the shop, and went into the next room. I heard a crash at the shop-window, as if the glass was broken in. I instantly ran out of the door - (it was a few minutes after nine o'clock) - and heard somebody cry

"There he goes!" and saw a man running with a drab-coloured coat on; he was immediately joined by another man, who came from one side of the road - they ran together, I followed them as far as Plough and Harrow-lane, which is not one hundred yards from our house. I turned down the lane after them - I followed them out of that into a narrow lane, then into Sound-lane - when they got down there they stopped; I went to them. One of them said,

"Halloo, mate! have you lost your way?" I said,

"No, I have not lost my way, but you are the persons who have broken our window." One said they had broken no window, for they had just come from Brentford. The other laughed, and said

"It is not us." I asked them to go back with me - Baker said he should not go back with me, but asked me to go with them, and they would show me where they lived. I said I was without my hat, and should go no further. Baker took off his hat, and offered it to me, I said I should not take it, and then came away. When I got to the top of the lane, I called out,

"I know your name is Baker, and I shall have you to-morrow" - I knew him before. The other man was the prisoner, Wilkins; he is a watchman. I am sure he was the other man.

Cross-examined by MR. NORRIS. Q. This was a very foggy evening - A. It was foggy. They ran down the lane between two hedges.

Q. Might they not have got through the gaps - A. It is possible.

EDWARD WHEATLEY . I am the father of the last witness. I was at work at the shopboard - the windows were fastened. About nine o'clock a violent blow came at the window, it was smashed in all at once; one pane was broken - I could see no person. When I got up my son had gone out. I went to the window immediately, and missed a cushion, with a great many gold and stone pins, which were stuck in it - I had seen them there that evening. I have seen one of the pins since in the possession of Eliza Mascall - I gave it to the constable. I never found the cushion.

JOSEPH BURNHAM . I live at Hammersmith. On the 23d of December, about nine o'clock in the evening, I was opposite Mr. Wheatley's shop, and saw a man dash his elbow through the window - I only saw one man. I crossed over to Mr. Wheatley's immediately. I was about twenty yards from the man, and saw him take something, but could not see what it was - it was the prisoner, Wilkins, I knew him before - he is the watchman; he ran away across the road. I had been used to see him before, and am sure he is the man. I saw no person with him.

Cross-examined. He crossed opposite. It was foggy. There were two windows with lights in them - I saw his face. I have seen him in Hammersmith before.

ELIZA MASCALL . I live at Chiswick. On the 24th of December, about half-past twelve, I was in Sound-lane, coming from Hammersmith Church, and found a gold pin, which I took to Mr. Wheatley.

EDWARD EDGSON . I am a constable. I apprehended Baker the same evening (the 23d of December) about nine o'clock in a narrow passage, within three doors of his own house, talking to a man in the passage - Wheatley was with me, and gave him in charge. I told him he must go to the cage with me; he swore he would not go that night, and threw the knife down which he had in his hand. I went to collar him, and he struck me - I had charged him with the robbery. He told Wheatley, jun. that he did not know how many pins he had lost, nor the value of them. On the Thursday morning, about ten o'clock, I took Wilkins at Hammersmith - he was a watchman of Hammersmith at that time, and on duty the night of the robbery - his beat was rather below the prosecutor's house - I believe Sound-lane is in his beat. I charged him with the robbery; he denied it, and said he had been to Brentford that night. Wheatley gave me the pin.

(Pin produced and sworn to.)

EDWARD WHEATLEY , JUN. re-examined. When I ran out I saw one man first, he was about thirty yards from the house. I never lost sight of him, except in turning the corner. I am certain that I came up to the same persons that I followed down the lane.

JAMES STARBUCK . I keep a public-house at Hammersmith, about one hundred yards from the prosecutor's. On the 23d of December, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, the two prisoners came to my house together, treated a woman with a glass of gin, and went out directly - they had nothing themselves.

THOMAS HUMPHRIES . I saw the prisoners together about a quarter before nine o'clock next door but one to the prosecutor's house - they were standing still, talking to each other - they must have seen me. I know them to be the men.

WILKINS'S Defence. I leave it to my counsel.

BAKER'S Defence. About five o'clock, on the night of the robbery, I was going to see if we could get a job to run and light the coaches, it being very foggy - we could get nothing to do. As we were returning home we had some beer at Hammersmith; we met a girl, and gave her a glass of gin. I left Wilkins at the public-house, at the corner of Plough and Harrow-lane, with her. I returned, and overtook Wilkins in Sound-lane. Wheatley came up, and said he suspected we had broken his father's window, as we were the first men he overtook, and he had been told we had ran down the lane. He asked me my name, and where I lived? I told him to follow me home, and offered him my hat. I was taken up at supper-time, and refused to go, as the constable had no warrant - I never struck him.

EDWARD WHEATLEY , JUN. re-examined. I never lost sight of them, except in turning the corner. I am certain

they are the men who ran from my father's house. When Baker was taken, he threatened that he would either attack me or my father's premises, and cautioned me to take care.

WILKINS - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 26.

BAKER - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 35.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18190113-18

178. DURHAM SHARPE was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of November , at Christ Church , sixty-two yards of sarsnet, value 6 l., the property of George Harris , in the dwelling-house of William Bishop .

LUCY BISHOP . I am the wife of William Bishop , we rent a one pair front room of William Atfield , who lives next door in Wheeler-street - there are other lodgers in the house, it is in the parish of Christ Church, Spitalfields . The prisoner lodged in the same room with us for a fortnight. We gave him his lodging as he was out of employ. On the 14th of November I had a quantity of black twilled sarsnet to work on, it was in the room on the night of the 13th - he slept in the same room with us, he got up about four o'clock. I got up about half-past four, and missed the sarsnet; I had seen it safe at ten o'clock the night before; we were working it for Mr. George Harris , the materials were his - the prisoner never returned. About a fortnight after I found sixteen yards of the sarsnet at the pawnbroker's, and am sure it was part of that which I lost.

CHARLES HYNDS . I am shopman to Mr. Turner, who is a pawnbroker, and lives in Brydges-street, Covent-garden. On the 14th of November, the prisoner brought sixteen yards of sarsnet, which he wanted to pledge. I asked him who it belonged to? He said to his aunt. I told him to go and fetch her. He went away and did not return until the Tuesday following, and then brought a woman who he said was his aunt; she wanted to know why I stopped the sarsnet. I said I was sure it did not belong to him. She said she would go to Bow-street, and make us deliver it up to her - they both went away. I heard nothing more until the prisoner was in custody - I kept the silk, and have had it ever since.

GEORGE HARRIS . I am a silk manufacturer, and live in Fort-street, Spital-square, Bishop lives near me - his house is in the parish of Christ Church, Middlesex, it goes by that name only. I employed Bishop to make the sarsnet for me, it is my property, I have no doubt but that produced is part of the same, it corresponded with the part at home where it had been cut; sixty-two yards had been cut from it - it cost me 2 s. 6 d. a yard.

LUCY BISHOP re-examined. It is part of the piece I lost - I know it by my work.

JAMES NEVILLE . I apprehended the prisoner in Dog-row, Bethnal-green, as I was desired to take him if I saw him. I told him I took him for robbing the prosecutrix of the work out of the loom, and asked him what he had done with it? He said two men met him in Islington-fields, and took it from him, and that he took it in an unguarded moment.

Prisoner. I beg for mercy.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 26.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

Reference Number: t18190113-19

179. EDWARD STEPHENSON and EDWARD CHARSLEY were indicted for stealing, on the 28th of November , one box, value, 4 s., and 18 lbs. of candles, value 18 s., the goods of Sarah Addington , privately in her shop .

PETER FEULOW . On the 28th of November, about half-past five o'clock the prisoners were brought into Mrs. Sarah Addington 's shop, in Tottenham-court-road. I was in the shop myself, and saw Shepherd with the box of candles in his hand - Charsley was behind him.

EDWARD DIXON . I was in the street, and saw the two prisoners looking in at the window; Charsley said,

"There is a chance." Stephenson went into the shop, took up the box of candles, and walked out with them - nobody was in the shop. Charsley was in the act of taking the box of him, when I seized and took them both into the shop. I called out several times, and Feulow came.

E. STEPHENSON. - GUILTY. Aged 14.

E. CHARSLEY. - GUILTY. Aged 17.

Of stealing, but not privately .

Confined Six Months , and Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18190113-20

180. WILLIAM CARR was indicted for that he, on the 11th of January , at St. Luke, Chelsea , feloniously, wilfully, maliciously, and unlawfully did point and level a certain blunderbuss, loaded with gunpowder and leaden shot, at one William Billingsley , a subject of our Lord the king, and did feloniously, &c. attempt, by drawing the trigger of the said blunderbuss, so loaded as aforesaid, to discharge the same at and against the said William Billingsley , with intent in so doing, feloniously, wilfully, and of his malice aforethought, to kill, and murder him .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating the prisoner's intent to be to disable him.

THIRD COUNT, the same, only stating his intent to be to do him some grievous bodily harm.

WILLIAM BILLINGSLEY . I am in the employ of Messrs. Colvill, who are nurserymen , in the King's-road, Chelsea . I sleep on the premises to protect the property. On Monday night, the 11th of January I was sleeping there, I had a blunderbuss which I had charged a fortnight before with shot, No. 3 and gunpowder, and primed it. About three o'clock in the morning I heard a man in the carpenter's shop, in the premises, which awoke me. I got up, took the blunderbuss in my hand, went to the door, and met the prisoner. I collared him, and told him to stop, or I would shoot him, as he was my prisoner. He took hold of the blunderbuss, and a scuffle ensued between us, in which we both fell to the ground - and by seizing me by the throat, and other means he got the blunderbuss from me, and stepping back a few paces, he levelled it at me and pulled the trigger. It flashed in the pan, but did not go off.

Q. Was it the flash of the flint only - A. Yes the priming did not flash. He turned round, and ran away, I followed him, and called to him three times to throw the blunderbuss down. He ran, until he came to some pales, and then threw it over the pales into the high road. I caught him again as he was trying to make his escape over the pales.

Q. How soon after did you find the blunderbuss - A. The watchman brought it to me a few minutes after he threw it away - Mr. Colville, jun. took it into his possession till the morning - he then went with it to the watch-house; I went with him.

Q. Was anything done with it in your presence - A. It was fired off accidentally that day at Queen-square office by a butcher's boy, I was present. I produce a specimen of the shot with which it was loaded.

RICHARD MAYBANK . I am an officer. I produce the blunderbuss - it was discharged by accident in a room at the office - the shot went into the wainscot. It appeared to me to be shot - I believe it flew back. I examined the wainscot, and found a hole in it about the width of the muzzle; the hole was not through. There appeared to be little holes from the shot within the large hole. I have not ascertained whether there was any shot in the wood - the mark was not there before.

COURT. Q. Might not the mark be from the wadding - A. There were small holes, as if it were shot - it was fired about two feet from the mark. It must have been something hard, to have made the impression in the wainscot. I believe it is a deal wainscot.

Q. Might it not have been something that rebounded - - A. It might. It was brought to me at the watch-house by Billingsley, about ten o'clock in the morning. I took it to the office, and had it in sight until it went off. No person could have loaded it while I had it. I suppose the powder must have shook into the pan.

WILLIAM BILLINGSLEY re-examined. I always keep the key of my room, and never leave it open. No person could get at the blunderbuss after I loaded it. Nobody had been in my room during the last fortnight. I make my bed myself, and always lock the door. I go into the room to my meals, and live there by myself.

Q. Do you not go out sometimes without locking the door - A. Never. I loaded and primed the blunderbuss myself. My room is on the ground-floor in the garden - the window is left open sometimes. It has only two panes of glass - a boy could not get in. I am certain he levelled it at me. I primed it when I loaded it, and did not examine it afterwards.

JOHN M'BRIDE. I am a watchman. On Monday morning I heard the cry of murder in Mr. Colvill's grounds. I went to the spot as soon as possible, and saw M'Cabe, the watchman, coming towards me, and stopped him. I saw the blunderbuss in the road. A watchman, who is not here, came off Chelsea Common, and picked it up - it was in his possession. I went away. M'cabe was present.

WILLIAM M'CABE. I am a watchman. I saw the blunderbuss lying in the road - another watchman picked it up. Mr. Colvill came, and he gave it to him in my presence. It was out of my sight for five minutes before Colvill came. I returned, and saw it still in the watchman's possession, and saw him give it Mr. Colvill.

JAMES COLVILL , JUN. I came up, and found the blunderbuss in the possession of Barnet, a watchman of Sloane-square. The prisoner, M'Cabe, and my man were there. The watchman gave the blunderbuss to me - the pan was open and the hammer down. I took it, and kept it in my bed-room till nine o'clock the next morning, as I went to bed again. In the morning I brought it down myself, and took it into the breakfast parlour, and then took it to the watch-house. It was out of my sight about a quarter of an hour, in a room in the nursery.

Q. Any one could have got at it then - A. I do not know - I cannot say exactly where I left it. Billingsley brought it to the watch-house. I did not see it discharged. I found some shot on the ground. I got to the office about eleven o'clock - it was then gone off - the room was full of smoke. Maybank was in the room.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going into the country to get work, and got over the fence for a necessary purpose. I went across the place, and the prosecutor said he would shoot me if I did not stop. We fell, and in the fall I heard the trigger snap - I ran and threw it away, to prevent his doing me any harm. I never pointed it at him.

GUILTY. Aged 25.

Of levelling the piece at the prosecutor with a malicious intent; the Jury stated it to be their opinion that it was loaded but not primed.

This case was reserved for the opinion of the Twelve Judges, on the question, whether as the piece was not primed, the offence came within the meaning of the Act .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

Reference Number: t18190113-21

181. THOMAS GILLETT was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of January , 105 lbs. of rope stuff, value 12 s. , the goods of Thomas Wilson and Allen Mason .

ALLEN MASON . I am a wharfinger , in partnership with Thomas Wilson , at Brooks Wharf, Upper Thames-street . On Saturday last, the 9th of January, about six o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner pass the warehouse door with the rope on his back, instead of taking it to the water-side. He turned up a lane, I followed, brought him back, and gave him in charge. He was not in our service.

JAMES WHITE . I am a warehouseman. I saw the prisoner with the rope.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was employed to carry it.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Six Months .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190113-22

182. ROBERT JACKSON was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of December , one cask, value 1 s., and 36 lbs. of mustard, value 19 s. , the goods of William Dowling .

WILLIAM DOWLING . I am a grocer , and live in King-street, Tower-hill . On the 29th of December, about half-past six o'clock in the evening, I lost a cask of mustard, which stood outside the shop near the door. Next morning, the officer brought it to me - I knew it to be the same.

EDWARD ROBERTS . I am a patrol. On the 29th of December, about seven o'clock in the evening, I stopped the prisoner at the corner of Duke-street, Aldgate. I asked him what he had got? he said it was mustard, which a man gave him on Tower-hill to carry to Sun-street, Bishopsgate, and was to give him 6 d. I took him into custody, and next morning I found it belonged to Mr. Dowling.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. Defence. A man gave it to me to carry.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190113-23

183. RICHARD KINSLER was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of December , one book, value 6 s. , the goods of Edward Simmons .

EDWARD SIMMONS , JUN. I am the son of Edward Simmons , who is a bookseller , and lives in Barbican. I was in the shop, and was informed the prisoner had taken a book. I pursued, and took him about one hundred yards from the house, and found the book under his coat. He said, he begged my pardon, but he quite forgot to come in and pay for it, but he would pay me double the value if I would let him go. I gave him in charge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I was in great distress.

GUILTY . Aged 32.

Confined Three Months .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190113-24

184. THOMAS HALFORD was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of December , one handkerchief, value 3 s., the goods of John Henderson , from his person .

JOHN HENDERSON. I am a clerk out of employ . On Tuesday, the 15th of December, I was in the Old Bailey , with a young man at the execution, a few minutes after eight o'clock in the morning - we were in the crowd. I felt a hand come out of my pocket, turned round, and saw the prisoner immediately behind me, and charged him with attempting to pick my pocket - he denied it. I saw him concealing something in his hands. I laid hold of one arm, pulled his hands asunder, and found my handkerchief in his hand. I collared him, called for an officer, and gave him in charge.

THOMAS PRESTIGE . I am an officer. I was attending the execution - the prosecutor called for an officer, I went up, and he gave the prisoner in charge, with the handkerchief.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190113-25

185. DANIEL DAVIS was indicted for embezzling one 20 l., two 2 l., and four 1 l. bank notes, and 7 s. 6 d., the monies of Thomas May , his master .

THOMAS MAY , I keep the Plough public-house , in Smithfield; I deal in pigs , the prisoner was my servant . I entrusted him to sell my pigs, and to take the money for them. He sold eight pigs to Mr. Ord, of Broad-way, Deptford, for 27 l. 7 s. 6 d. He received 2 l. on Tuesday, as a deposit, which he gave me; On Monday, he received 25 l. 7 s. 6 d., and absconded.

Cross-examined by MR. REYNOLDS. Q. Had the prisoner any interest in the pigs - A. No, he was my servant, and had no profit in them.

Q. What were the terms on which he lived with you - A. He owed me a sum of 2 l. 15 s.; I gave him his board and lodging. He was not to have any wages until he had worked the score out.

Q. Did you not offer to settle it if he gave you the amount - A. No. A person came, and offered to settle it; I said I was not authorized to do its - I have received no part of the money.

ROBERT ORD . I am a butcher. I bought eight pigs late in the afternoon of the 27th of November of the prisoner, at Smithfield. I gave him 2 l., and said I would fetch them on Monday, and pay the rest, which was 25 l. 7 s. 6 d. On Monday I met him at the Bell, and paid him 25 l. 5 s. for the pigs, and 2 s. 6 d. for their keep. I gave him a 20 l. note, and I believe two 2 l. and a 1 l. note, and 7 s. 6 d. in silver.

Prisoner's Defence. I never was his servant.

ROBERT JOHNSON . I am a cowkeeper, About a month after this happened the prosecutor said, if the prisoner could get anybody to pay the money, he would make it up, and that he meant to take him as a partner.

THOMAS MAY re-examined. I never offered to make it up - I refused.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190113-26

186. JOHN KNIGHT was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of January , one basket, called a flat, value 2 s. 6 d.; 38 lbs. of butter, value 2 l. 16 s., and one cloth, value 1 s. , the property of John Strickland the elder , and John Strickland the younger .

JOHN STRICKLAND. I am a chesemonger , and live in Newgate-market, in partnership with my son John. On the 4th of January, about seven or eight o'clock in the evening, the flat of butter was on the pavement, before the window; I ordered Perkins to watch; soon after he called for assistance, and the prisoner was secured.

JOHN PERKINS . I was set to watch, and saw the prisoner about. I suspected him, and saw him take the flat of butter on his shoulder. I collared him, and asked him where he was going with it? He said to the cart. I said

"What cart?" He said

"Come and see." He immediately went to the place, and threw it down where he took it from, and tried to escape; I collared him, and called for assistance - Geary helped me to secure him.

JOSEPH GEARY . I am a butcher. I saw the prisoner take the flat of butter on his shoulder, and go away with it - Perkins spoke to him, he then put it down again, and tried to escape; we detained him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A countryman let the flat fall, I picked it up, put it on another flat, and was taken.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190113-27

187. HENRY HART was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of November , 14 lbs. of printed paper, value 4 s. 8 d. , the property of George Bramwell .

MR. GEORGE BRAMWELL . I am a solicitor , and have chambers in Paper-buildinge, Temple ; the prisoner had been my porter for two years. I had a quantity of printed paper, in loose sheets in a room, where I deposit papers, and other things. I received information, and found my papers lessened very much. I sent for an officer, who

took the prisoner, as I suspected him, and charged him with it; he said he had taken some, but others were concerned in it. I found part of the paper I missed at Oram's - It could not be mistaken for waste paper, as it was carefully tied up.

JOSEPH ORAM . I am a cheesemonger; I bought the paper of the prisoner, he said it was old papers of members of Parliament, that they had been employed upon them and the clerks had sent him to sell them - he was in the habit of bringing me old briefs.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I do not remember taking them.

GUILTY . Aged 37.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190113-28

188. JOHN LADD was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of December , one jar, value 7 s., and 2 lbs. of snuff, value 12 s. , the property of Patrick Daly O'Shaughnessy .

THERESA CRANE . I live with my father, Patrick Daly O'Shaughnessy, who keeps a snuff shop in Beak-street, Golden-square . On the 28th of December, between five and six o'clock in the evening, I was sitting in the parlour, saw the prisoner come into the shop, take the jar of snuff out of the window, and run out with it. I ran after him, called out Stop thief! he threw the jar down at the bottom of the street, and broke it. He was caught in Wild-street, and brought back. I never lost sight of him - I knew him before. The jar was half full of snuff.

MARY ANN SARR . I live in the same house. I was in the shop, and saw the prisoner take the jar; the cover of it was picked up when he broke the jar.

Prisoner's Defence. I heard the cry, and saw a boy pass me, ran after him, and was taken myself.

GUILTY .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190113-29

189. JAMES WILLIS was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of December , one tea-tray, value 6 s. , the goods of John Davis .

JOHN DAVIS . I am a salesman , and live in Oxford-street . On the 15th of December, about half-past five o'clock, as I sat in the parlour, opposite the shop-door, I heard a noise at the door, as if something snapped. I went into the shop, missed the tray, and saw the prisoner running across the road with it - I followed him up Holles-street. He turned round, saw me, and threw it down - I took it to the office. He cut it down. He could not see how it was fastened without kneeling down, and going inside the shop. Another boy was with him, who got away.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190113-30

190. JAMES KNIGHT , JOHN GREEN , JOHN JONES , THOMAS GROSVENER , and WILLIAM SIZE JOHNSON were severally and separately indicted for feloniously having forged bank notes in their possession, knowing them to be forged .

To which indictment they severally pleaded

GUILTY .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

Reference Number: t18190113-31

191. JAMES KNIGHT , JOHN GREEN , JOHN JONES , THOMAS GROSVENER , and WILLIAM SIZE JOHNSON were again indicted for feloniously and knowingly disposing of and putting away forged bank notes .

MR. REYNOLDS, on the part of the Governor and Company of the Bank of England, declined offering any evidence.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

Reference Number: t18190113-32

192. GEORGE HOLLINGTON was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of December , one watch, value 4 l., the property of Bernard Farrell , in the dwelling-house of Samuel Baker .

BERNARD FARRELL . I am journeyman to Samuel Baker , who is a baker , and lives in Hope-street, Spitalfields . On the 22d of December, while I was out, my watch was stolen from the bakehouse, where it hung.

SUSANNAH BAKER . I am the wife of Samuel Baker . The prisoner came about ten o'clock in the morning with some potatoes to be baked. He came again in a few minutes, and said he wanted to put a few more to them. He went into the bakehouse, and was there alone. Farrel came home, and missed his watch. I waited all the evening for the prisoner to fetch his potatoes, but he never came.

JAMES HARRIS . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Whitechapel. On the 22d of December, about three o'clock in the afternoon, Roswell pledged the watch - it is not worth more than 35 s.

RICHARD ROSWELL . On the 22d of December I was at a public-house in Whitechapel, the prisoner was there - I knew him before. He pulled out the watch, and said it was a family one - he gave it to a man who was with him to pledge. The man was called away, and the prisoner gave it to me. I pledged it at Harris's.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 25.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Confined Six Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18190113-33

193. WILLIAM PITT was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of December , at St. Clement's Dane , two coats, value 3 l., the property of James Holywell , in his dwelling-house .

JAMES HOLYWELL . I am a tailor , and live in Pickett-street, Temple-bar , in the parish of St. Clement's Dane, Middlesex. On the 30th of December, between eight and nine o'clock in the morning, the prisoner was brought into my shop by Eames, with two coats; he asked me in the prisoner's presence, if they were mine?

They were, I had not missed them, as I was engaged with a customer; they were taken from off the counter at the further end of the shop; I had put them there not an hour before, and was in the shop all the morning. A young man came in, and wanted a waistcoat; while I was engaged with him, a person might come in, and take the coats without my seeing them. The prisoner said it was his first offence, and begged of me to let him go - I gave him in charge. I only rent the lower part of the house, and sleep there - the landlord does not live in the house. One coat cost me 2 l. 10 s., and the other was worth 7 s. or 8 s.

JAMES EAMES . On the 30th of December, about a quarter before nine o'clock in the morning, I was passing along the Strand, and saw the prisoner come out of the prosecutor's shop in a very suspicious manner, stopping down with the coats under his arm. I suspected he had stolen them, followed him, and told him to take them back from where he took them. He asked for what? came back with me, and said I might take them back myself; just before he got to the door he threw them down. I collared him, picked them up, and took them into the shop with him; I merely pushed him into the shop, and asked the prosecutor if he had lost anything? I gave them to him, and said the prisoner had taken them - I then left the shop.

Q. Was anybody with him - A. There was a man near him - I live with my father, who is a coachmaster.

JAMES HOWES. I took the prisoner and coats in charge at the prosecutor's.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I never begged the prosecutor's pardon; I saw a boy come out of the shop, and drop them - I never touched them.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 17.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

Reference Number: t18190113-34

194. RANDALL RISLEY and THOMAS LAWRENCE were indicted for stealing, on the 10th of December , at Edmonton , one mare, price 4 l. , the property of John Whitbread and Samuel Whitbread .

RICHARD MORRISON . I am bailiff to Messrs. John and Samuel Whitbread , who have a farm at Tanner's-end , near Edmonton, Middlesex. On the 9th of December, I saw the mare safe in the field, opposite the house, just before dark, and missed it at six o'clock next morning - it belonged to them both. John Carter afterwards gave me information, and I appointed to meet him next morning. I found the poney at Dew's livery stables, Shoreditch - it was brought home on the 11th. Carter showed it me; it is Messrs. Whitbreads'. The prisoners were apprehended next day or the day after.

JOHN CARTER . I live in the Hackney-road, about six or seven miles from Messrs. Whitbreads'. I know the prisoners perfectly well. They came to me together, on the 10th of December, about eight o'clock in the morning, with a mare poney. Risley called me by name, and said his father had sent them to change the poney away for a larger one, as it was too small for him; I knew him before - Lawrence said he only came with him for company. I showed him two horses which I had, and said I did not like to have anything to do with it unless his father came; he said his father was busy in the garden, and could not come, but he trusted to my generosity to do justice. He went away, returned, and said it was all right, for his father came honestly by it, and gave 5 l. for it in Smithfield; I detained the poney - nothing more passed. I went to look for his father at Ponder's-end, Enfield Wash, as he gave me that direction. I could not find him there - I have never found his father out. As I returned, I heard a poney had been lost, and gave information to Morrison - I delivered the poney to him next morning.

Q. Did he leave it with you willingly - A. He wanted me to let him have it again, to fetch his father - I refused.

JOSEPH WEBSTER . I live in the Hackney-road, about three hundred yards from Carter - he sent for me, and I found the prisoners at his house, about half-past eight o'clock in the morning, with a mare poney; it stood at the door. I asked Risley where he brought it from? He said they came from Ponder's-end - he said his father lived there, and had sent him to exchange it for a larger, as it was too small, that his father was busy, and could not come - Carter detained it.

THOMAS AUSTIN . I am constable of Edmonton. On Saturday morning, the 12th of December, I apprehended the prisoners, and took them before the magistrate on the Monday, charged with this offence. I know the magistrate's hand-writing - (looks at the examination) - this is it. No threats or promises were held out to them. I saw the magistrate sign it, and I witnessed it - it was read over to both the prisoners, I then saw them put their marks to it - (read). -

"Middlesex to wit.

"R. Risley being charged with stealing a poney from Mr. Whitbread's on Thursday morning, at Edmonton - that his companion, Thomas Lawrence , and himself, had been together ever since Sunday, the 6th of December, sleeping in sheds. On Sunday night they stole a donkey from Mr. Waithman's field. On Wednesday they slept under Mr. Whitbread's hay-stack. Next morning they took the poney from the cow-yard, and rode it to Carter's, who offered him 12 s. and his poney in exchange. He stopped it, and they left.

"R. RISLEY." - X his mark.

" THOMAS LAWRENCE says, he was with Risley, and slept under the hay-stack. He caught a brown poney in the field, and having promised me a new suit of clothes if I would go to town with him, he rode the poney away near town, and offered to change it for a larger with a man, who said it was stolen, and detained it while he fetched his father - we came away. Risley left me at Ponder's-end, and I have not seen him since.

"T. LAWRENCE." - X his mark.

"Taken before me, E. R. MORES."

RISLEY - GUILTY. - DEATH . Aged 17.

Recommended to Mercy .

LAWRENCE - NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

Reference Number: t18190113-35

195. JOHN COOPER was indicted for that he, on the 6th of November , with a certain pistol loaded with gunpowder and leaden bullet, feloniously, wilfully, and maliciously did shoot at George Dale , with intent to kill and murder him .

SECOND AND THIRD COUNTS, the same, only stating the prisoner's intent to be to maim and disable him, and do him some grievous bodily harm.

FOURTH COUNT, the same, only omitting to state the intent.

CHARLES BISHOP . I am an attorney, and attesting witness to the assignment of the effects of Henry Goberts , a bankrupt, to Thomas Atkinson , William Shepherd , and John Riley - I saw it executed by the commissioners (read).

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You are solicitor under the commission - A. Yes; Mr. Wright, of Quality-court, was messenger; he never took possession under the assignment.

Q. Was the prisoner or Mr. Gurney examined before the commissioners - A. The prisoner was; I asked them for a warrant to take possession of the effects; they said it rested in the discretion of the messenger.

JOHN DALE . I keep a horse and cart; I was employed by Mr. Riley, one of the assignees, to accompany him to No. 20, Nelson-square, Stoke Newington. On the 6th of November, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, I went with him, and rang at the bell. No answer being made, I got leave to go through the next house, and entered at the back door, which was open; I found a man, in a sailor's dress, cleaning knives in the back kitchen; the prisoner came down with a pistol in each hand, asked my name, and what authority I had there? I told him that I was regaining possession by a deed of assignment to the assignees. He asked where the authority was? I took the assignment from under my waistcoat, and showed it to him; he said I must give it to him; I said I must not part with it, nor would I, but if he would come down stairs, and lay the pistols down like a gentleman, I would read it to him - he was on the stairs, and I was on the kitchen floor. He said if I did not give it to him he would blow my brains out; I told him he certainly must, for I would not give it up to him - he then went up stairs. I then went, and beckoned to Riley, and he came in the same way that I did. As soon as he entered, the prisoner came down again, and was in conversation with him for a quarter of an hour; he said he had bought the things. Riley told him to act like a gentleman, and anything he could prove belonged to him, he should have.

Q. How long after this was it that he attempted to fire at you - A. He was talking about our going out for about ten minutes, and said he was master of the house, and that it became every man to defend his castle - he presented a pistol in his right hand, and fired it at me.

Q. Did he say anything to the man in the kitchen - A. He called out to him, Oliver, to come up - he did not go up; he immediately took an aim, and fired as quick as he could - he stood about seven stairs up, and I was about a yard from the bottom; I put my arm up, and felt something strike my wrist, which numbed my arm from my fingers to my elbow - I received no further injury then. He immediately presented the other pistol in his left hand, and fired it, he said nothing - I felt nothing from that - I found a mark on the kitchen door next day.

Q. After the pistols were fired what was done - A. He ran up into the parlour, Riley and I pursued him - we entered the parlour, he then presented a naked sword at me; I hit his arm up, and Riley knocked it out of his hand with the tongs.

Q. Did you offer him any personal violence before he fired at you - A. No, nor did I touch anything in the house - he was taken before the magistrate, and admitted to bail, being charged only with an assault; my coat and waistcoat were quite unbuttoned when he fired - next morning I found a ball in my left-hand waistcoat-pocket, which I produce; I showed it to my father, and accompanied him to the kitchen, and only found a graze on the door, apparently with a pistol ball, in the direction which he fired the second pistol.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. How do you live - A. By my horse and cart, at the Cock and Magpie, Kingsland; Riley asked me to go with him, and gave me the assignment.

Q. How many pistols had you in your hand - A. None, I had one in my side-pocket, but not in my hand; I had put it there to be repaired - it was empty. The kitchen door stood on my left-hand, Riley was behind me; the graze was at the top of the under panel of the door. He took a deliberate aim at me - he was about four yards from me.

Q. Did you tell the magistrate about anything striking against your arm - A. Yes, there was no hole in my coat; the skin was grazed, and my shirt was a little bloody; Riley knocked the prisoner down, after he had attacked me with the sword - some blood came from his head - we afterwards took him out of the house.

Q. Do you ever go by the name of Barlow - A. No; some people call me so, as it is my father-in-law's name.

MR. ALLEY. Q. Did you present any pistol at the prisoner - A. No; he got his head cut, by Riley forcing the sword from him - he threw both the pistols on the table.

JOHN RILEY . I am one of the assignees, and live in Finsbury-place. I never saw the prisoner until I went to the house with Dale to regain possession. Dale got through the next house; I remained in front, and saw Cooper in the parlour, he moved his hand at me, as if to say he would not come to the door. I went round, and entered in at the back; Cooper came down with a pistol in each hand, about five minutes after, stationed himself about the sixth stair, and demanded of me my authority for being there; Dale handed me the assignment, I showed it to the prisoner, requested him to lay down his pistols, and I would read it to him, and if he could prove that any of the property belonged to him, he should have it; Dale stood between the stairs and the kitchen door. Cooper took an aim at him; seeing the flash, and hearing the explosion, I ran to the kitchen fire, and took up the tongs - before I came to the door, the second pistol was fired.

Q. How were the pistols pointed - A. Downward, in the direction Dale stood; he retreated up into the parlour, and we followed, When I entered into the parlour, he was making a cut at Dale with the sabre; I knocked it out of his hands with the tongs, and cut his head, which produced blood.

Q. Did Dale produce any pistol - A. No; no violence whatever was offered to the prisoner, except what I did with the tongs.

Cross-examined. Q. Who directed this prosecution - A. The assignees, George Dale , and I gave the instructions - The assignees are to pay the expenses.

Q. How did you pick up Dale - A. I went to the Cock and Magpye, public-house, and inquired for somebody to regain possession; the landlady recommended Dale to me - he was there, and I agreed with him to go.

Q. Why do you say regain possession, did you suppose force wanted to be used - A. Yes; Cooper asked me up into the parlour to read the assignment; I said I could not, but if he would come down, I would read it to him.

Q. Dale said nothing to him - Q. Cooper d - d his eyes, and Dale did the same - he showed me the mark in his arm.

Q. How soon after the ball was found, did you see Cooper - A. About a fortnight after, at Battle Bridge.

COURT. Q. What did the mark in the kitchen door appear to be - A. From a ball, there were two marks; one goes downward, as if the ball had fallen in a slanting direction.

HENRY GOTRIDGE . I am the bankrupt. Before my bankruptcy, the house in Nelson-square was mine.

Q. Had you any property in that house - A. I should think I had not; it is furnished, and I think Mr. Gurney was in possession of the furniture. There was a piano-forte and some wine in the house, which certainly were mine.

Cross-examined, Q. You had a great deal of money transaction with Mr. Gurney - A. Yes; I gave him possession of my furniture two months before my bankruptcy. I was out of possession then, but was allowed to be in the house with my family, as a favour.

SARAH VARLEY . I live with the prisoner as his servant, and was in the house when this happened. The prisoner told me two or three days before, that if I went to his closet, not to touch the pistol case as they were loaded, for fear they should go off.

Prisoner's Defence. I believe I am not of a vicious disposition; Dale entered the house with a pistol in his hand - I heard a noise, came down, and asked him why he was there? He produced his pistol, and said that was his authority. I then went up stairs, and got my pistols, which I had got at a distress for rent. I supposed that I had a right to the property, as I had paid for it; he took hold of my pistol. Dale d - d my eyes, presented his pistol at me, and turned his head on one side, as if he thought I should fire at him; I found the assignee there. One of them was armed with a crow-bar, and the other with the tongs; he said he would knock me down. I presented my pistols, and told Dale that if he did not remove his pistol, I would fire; he pulled the trigger of his pistol, but it did not go off. I then fired mine, but held it in a direction that it should not hurt him - the balls were so loose in, that they both fell out, and I picked them up. When Dale was at the office, he said if they had been loaded they must have killed him - I was bailed. An indictment was found against me at Clerkenwell, but I did not get out of the way; they said if I did not come to their terms, they would capitally indict me - I should not have fired if Dale had not presented his pistol at me. I had written to Mr. Gurney to tell him, that if they came I would give them plenty of powder to frighten them, but would not hurt them.

WILLIAM HERRITAGE, clerk to the magistrates of Worship-street, was called on the prisoner's behalf, and read the deposition of Dale, which exactly agreed with his evidence.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18190113-36

196. THOMAS WEATHERLEY was indicted for feloniously assaulting Samuel Burrows , on the King's highway, putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, one half-crown, and 2 s. , his property.

SAMUEL BURROWS . I have lately been in the wine trade . On Saturday fortnight, about half-past seven o'clock at night, the prisoner accosted me at Temple-bar, said he was in distress, had nothing to eat, or anywhere to lay his head. I told him I had no money, and could give him none. I went into a shop in Fleet-street, and on coming out he accosted me as before; I gave him five-pence or seven-pence, and as I passed down Fleet-street I was surprised to find him following me, he repeated the same tale, and said he was sure I could give him more money; he kept following me, and pushing his arms against me. I could not get rid of him, and asked him for what I was to give him money? he said gentlemen had given him money when he asked, and I could if I liked - and he dare say I could; and that a quaker gave him 14 s. a few nights before. He kept elbowing me, standing in my way, and repeating this story. I became alarmed. He said he certainly must and would have money - that I must give him what I had, and meet him next day in St. Paul's church-yard, and bring him a 1 l. note. I gave him 4 s. 6 d., and promised to meet him there at ten o'clock the following day. I was taken very ill, and confined to my bed for three or four days. It was my intention to have given information to the Lord Mayor, with a description of his person. I came to town on the 8th of June, from the Hackney-road, and called on my solicitor at the Royal Exchange, he not being at home, I went down Cheapside to buy some things, the prisoner came up to me, and said I was the very person he had been looking for, that he would have money, and would follow me to hell, but what he would have money. I told him I had several places to call at. He continued following me, pushing and elbowing me, and threatening me in the same manner. I then went into a public-house, opposite the Mansion-house, to find an officer, but none was to be found; he still kept following me, and said I had got a watch, and he would have it. I said I had got no watch, but I had got the duplicate of one. He asked if it was a valuable one - I said it was. He said that would do for him, and I gave it to him; he then said he would not leave me until I could procure some money. I then went to my solicitors', Messrs. Draper and Bird, Exchange Chambers - he remained on the stairs. I sent for an officer, who took him, and found the duplicate upon him.

COURT. Q. He accused you of nothing - A. No. I parted with the money under the impression of fear.

Q. What fear - A. That he would charge me with an abominable offence - he hinted at it.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190113-37

197. ANN ARNOLD was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of December , at St. Bridget, alias St. Bride , one watch, value 1 l.; two candlesticks, value 1 l.; two teaspoons, value 4 s.; one tea-caddy, value 10 s.; one scarf, value 1 l.; one shawl, value 1 l.; three petticoats, value s; two gowns, value 1 l., and one 5 l. bank note, the property of Thomas Peacock , in his dwelling-house .

THOMAS PEACOCK . I am a pocket-book maker , and live in Hanging Sword-alley, Fleet-street, in the parish of St. Bride . I rent the house. The prisoner lived six weeks as servant with me, but was paid no wages - she was a relation of my wife's - we took her in out of charity, as she was in distress. On Sunday, the 13th of December, I left her in care of the house, while I and my wife went to Great Queen-street chapel, Lincoln's Inn-fields; we left the house about eleven o'clock, returned about one, found the prisoner had left the house, and missed the property stated in the indictment. On Monday morning I found her in custody of an officer, went, and saw her and the property at Worship-street office.

SOPHIA PEACOCK . I am the wife of the last witness. The prisoner is my half-sister. I have known her from her infancy. We took her into the house on the 28th of October, she remained six weeks with us, and conducted herself in a becoming manner. On Sunday, the 13th of December, I went to chapel with my husband, leaving her at home with my child, which was between ten and eleven months old. I returned, found the child on the bed, and the prisoner gone - nobody else was in the house. I missed a great deal of wearing apparel, with my watch, a 5 l. note, and other things. Next morning I heard she was in custody, and saw my things before the magistrate.

GEORGE POUND . I keep the Royal Oak, public-house, Pitfield-street, Hoxton. On Sunday, the 13th of December, about a quarter after one o'clock, I gave the prisoner change for a 5 l. note, with four 1 l. notes, and 1 l. in silver. I am sure she is the person. I knew her before.

THOMAS GARTON . I am an officer. On the 14th of December I received information, and apprehended the prisoner about ten o'clock in the morning; I asked her if she had not lived in Fleet-street? she said, Yes. I then asked her if she did not leave her master on Sunday? she said Yes. I told her I took her on suspicion of robbing him. I took her into a room, and proceeded to search her; she opened her right hand, there was two 1 l. notes, and 17 s. in it. I asked her where she changed the 5 l. note? she said at Mr. Pound's, the Royal Oak, Pitfield-street. I then asked her where the other property was? She put her hand into her pocket, gave me the watch, and said she would go with me to her grandfather's, who lived at the Royal Oak, and there was the rest of the property. I went there with her, and found her grandfather lived there. She delivered all the property up to me there that was lost, except the rest of the change of the 5 l. note. She had given her grandfather 8 s. Pound said he changed the 5 l. note for her - I took her to the office. I have the 5 l. note, the candlestick, watch, spoons and a purse. The rest of the property was delivered up before the magistrate.

GEORGE POUND . I know it to be the note I received from the prisoner by the mark.

SOPHIA PEACOCK . It is my note - I know it by the name of Mrs. Brown being on it. The rest of the things are ours.

Prisoner. I throw myself on the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY. - DEATH . Aged 25.

Recommended to Mercy .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190113-38

198. JOHN ROBERTS was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of January , one wrapper, value 6 d., and 28 lbs. of tea, value 10 l. , the goods of Thomas Holah , John Johnson , John Stanton , Thomas Jeanes Holah , and Joseph Johnson .

JOHN PHILLIPS . I am clerk to Messrs. Holah and Co. - the firm is rightly set out in the indictment - they are wholesale tea-dealers , and live in Nicholas-lane. On the 5th of January I delivered a truss of tea to the carter, directed to Mr. Thompson, of Walsal, to take to the Axe Inn, Aldermanbury .

EBENEZER REDMEAD . I am a warehouseman, and live in Lad-lane. On the 5th of January, about one o'clock, I was in Aldermanbury, and saw the prisoner drag a truss of tea from a cart, which stood at the Axe Inn, fully loaded - he passed me, and went up Three Nun-court - I suspected him from his manner. I saw the carter come up the Axe gateway, and told him. I took care of the cart while he ran in pursuit. He returned in about ten minutes, and said he had taken the man with the tea, and had given him in charge.

CHARLES VAISEY . I am the carman. I was at the Axe Inn, with the tea in the cart. I went up the yard to see if there was room to drive up, and returned in two minutes. Redmead came, and said a man had taken the truss. I pursued, and overtook him in Basinghall-street, about twenty yards beyond Coopers' Hall, with the truss on his shoulder. I asked him where he got it from? he said a man gave it him to carry. I took him into the Justice-room in Guildhall-yard.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was out of employ .

GUILTY . Aged 38.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190113-39

199. ANN DARTER was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of January , one waistcoat, value 10 s.; one watch, value 3 l.; one seal, value 6 d.; one key, value 4 d., and one ribbon, value 2 d., the goods of Richard Hughes , in his dwelling-house .

RICHARD HUGHES . I am a porter , and live in Northumberland-place, Sun-street . I know nothing of the prisoner.

ELIZA SMITH . I am housekeeper to Hughes. The prisoner used to come to assist me as I was ill. On the 2d of January, about ten o'clock at night, I went into the yard; the prisoner left, and said she would call on Monday. Hughes came home, and missed the watch. Nobody but the prisoner had been in the house. I saw the watch hanging up at a quarter before ten o'clock.

JOSEPH WALTER . I am an officer. On the 12th of January the prisoner came to the watch-house, saying she was locked out. I thought she answered the description

I had received, and detained her. She said she took the waistcoat, and pledged it in the City-road - (I got it from the pawnbroker's) - but said she knew nothing of the watch.

(Waistcoat produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I only took the waistcoat.

GUILTY. Aged 24.

Of stealing to the value of 10 s. only .

Fined One Shilling , and Discharged.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190113-40

200. AMBROSE BOHOM was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of December , one coach-glass, value 1 l. , the property of Michael Foveux .

JOHN LEXTON . I am coachman to Mr. Michael Foveux . On the 21st of December the landaulet stood at Drury-lane Theatre . I lost both the glasses, and found one glass with both the frames.

THOMAS PORTER . My master is a porter in Covent-garden. I was going to a public-house with him, and saw the prisoner and another boy talking together. My master laid hold of the prisoner, and asked him what he had there? - he immediately dropped the glass from under his coat. My master asked him what it was? he said it was nothing of his. I picked it up. He stooped to put it down, so as not to break it.

JAMES BETHELL . I am a beadle. I went and found both the frames on the spot where the prisoner was taken.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I saw a boy put something down and run off - I went up, and was charged with being concerned.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190113-41

201. JOHN ADAMS was indicted for that he, on the 14th of November , at St. James, Clerkenwell , feloniously did dispose of and put away, a certain forged and counterfeit bank note for payment of 5 l. (setting it forth, No. 17,250, dated the 15th of October, 1818, signed J. Lambert, with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England , he well knowing it to be forged and counterfeit, against the statute .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating the forged instrument to be a promissory note for payment of money instead of a bank note.

THIRD AND FOURTH COUNTS, the same, only stating the prisoner's intention to be to defraud George Hopkinson .

GEORGE HOPKINSON . I am a tea-dealer and grocer , and live in Henrietta-street, Covent-garden. On Saturday, the 14th of November, about half-past six o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came to my shop, dressed as a porter, and asked for a pound of 8 s. black tea for Mr. Robinson, of Monday's Coffee-house. He said Mr. Robinson sent him for the tea on trial, and if he liked it he would have more of it. (Monday's coffee-house is in Maiden-lane, Covent-garden.) I served him. He offered me a 5 l. bank note. I wrote Mr. Robinson's name on it, partly with black ink, then took a red-ink pen, and wrote

"Robinson. Monday's Coffee-house, 14: 11: 18 - (looks at a note) - this is it.

Q. During the time he was with you, did he have any conversation with you - A. Yes, he asked me if I knew of a situation for his brother. who had come from the country, and Mr. Robinson had permitted him to live at his house to help him. He said he himself was a porter there. I gave him the change, put the note into my tin case, and paid it to my bankers - it was returned to me about ten days after as forged.

Q. Did you afterwards make any inquiry at Monday's Coffee-house - A. Yes, the same day that the note was returned - I could hear nothing of the prisoner. Mr. Robinson showed me all his porters - the prisoner was not among them.

ROBERT ROBINSON . I am the landlord of Monday's Coffee-house, Maiden-lane, Covent-garden - I have been there above eight years, and was so on the 14th of November last. The prisoner never was my porter, nor was there ever any brother of his in my house. I did not send him to buy any tea anywhere, or give him a 5 l. note for any purpose whatever. He was never in my service.

JOHN BARCLAY . I am a grocer, and live in St. Martin's-lane. On the 14th of November, the prisoner came to my shop about half-past five o'clock in the evening, and asked for a pound of 8 s. black tea for Mr. Wells. I served him. He laid down a 5 l. note; I looked at it, perceived it was forged, and asked him what name I should put on it? He said Mr. Wells, Northumberland Coffee-house, Charing-cross. I then said it was a forged one, and sent my young man, George Rose , down to Mr. Wells to know if he had sent a person for a pound of tea. The prisoner remained about two minutes, and then said he might as well go after him; I kept the note, and tea, and gave him no change; he went out, and never returned for it. (looks at a note.) - this is it; it has my writing on it. I never saw him again until he was in custody - he was dressed as a porter.

GEORGE ROSE . I am shopman to Mr. Barclay. The prisoner came to the shop for a pound of 8 s. tea and laid a 5 l. note down - we were busy at the time. I afterwards went by my master's direction, to Northumberland Coffee-house, Charing-cross, to inquire about him, but could hear nothing of him.

JOHN WELLS . I keep the Northumberland Coffee-house; the prisoner was never my porter - I did not send him to buy any tea, or give him a 5 l. note for any purpose whatever. I know him by sight; I believe he worked at Old Slaughter's Coffee-house, St. Martin's-lane, when I was waiter there.

MATTHEW SHOWSMITH . I keep a grocer's shop, in St. Martin's-lane. On Thursday evening, the 19th of November, the prisoner came to my shop, and asked me if I knew Mr. Godfrey, of the Rainbow Coffee-house? I told him I did. He asked me if I had seen him that evening? I said I had not. He looked round the shop, turned round again, and said, this must be the shop, and asked for a pound of 8 s. tea, I served him; he then tendered me a 5 l. note - I wrote Mr. Godfrey's name and address on it.

Q. How came you to do that - A. He asked for the tea for him, and I served him; he then told me to put the price of the tea on the paper, and put paid, as Mr. Godfrey was very particular - I knew Mr. Godfrey was particular, and had his things done in that way. I gave him the change, and he left. Next day I tendered the note in payment, and it was objected to, upon which I sent to Mr. Godfrey, but could learn nothing of the prisoner - (looks at a note) - this is it, it has the address on it.

JOSEPH GODFREY . I keep the Rainbow Coffee-house, King-street, Covent-garden, and did so on the 19th of November. I do not know the prisoner - he was never in my service; I never sent him for tea, nor gave him a 5 l. note, for any purpose.

VALENTINE BLENCOWE. I am servant to Messrs. Yockneys, who are grocers and tea-dealers, and live in Bedford-street, Covent-garden. On the 19th of November, about seven o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came to my master's shop, dressed as a porter, and asked for a pound of tea for New Slaughter's Coffee-house; it came to 8 s., I served him; he tendered me a 5 l. note, I wrote Mr. Ruddel, Slaughter's Hotel, 19, 11, 18, and gave him the change - (looks at a note) - this is it.

JOHN RUDDEL . I keep the New Slaughter's Coffee-house, St. Martin's-lane, and did so on the 19th of November; I never saw the prisoner before this day, and know nothing of him - I never sent him to buy any tea, or gave him a 5 l. note.

JOHN ANDERSON. I am a grocer, and live in St. Martin's-lane. The prisoner came to my shop on the 19th of November, and bought a pound of 7 s. tea - I served him; he paid me a 5 l. bank note. I observed it was signed Charles Phillips , and thought it looked like the signing clerk's hand-writing. I saw the name of Foss, Nassau-street on it; I pointed to it, and asked him if that was his address - he nodded. I gave him change, and he went away. I had other customers in the shop - I put the note in a drawer near the till, by itself. When I was at leisure I wrote Coates on it, that I should know the note again, as I thought him like a person of that name. - (looks at one) - this is it; I made inquiry at Nassau-street two or three times, but could find nobody of the name of Foss.

JOHN LEES . I am an inspector of bank notes to the Bank, and have been so above twenty years; experience enables me to distinguish good notes from bad. The Bank use a particular sort of paper. I have been in the daily habit of seeing the paper, and have seen an immense quantity of it - it is my business - I am acquainted with the character and texture of it, likewise the engraving, and the signatures of the different signing clerks - there is a watermark made in the fabric of the paper - (looks at the note uttered to Hopkinson) - it is not a genuine bank note - it is not bank paper, but an imitation of it; there is an imitation of the water-mark, which is put on after the paper is made. It is thinner than bank paper, and has a different appearance altogether; it is not the impression of the bank plate - the date line is engraved, but in a genuine note it is printed. It is signed J. Lambert, but is not his signature; I know it well, and am in the daily habit of seeing it. The other four notes are the same in every respect, and impressed from the same plate, the same date, and two of them are the same signatures. They are all different numbers, but the numbers consist of the same figures, 12,750, but are transposed - the numbers are printed.

Q. Do the bank ever use two notes of the same number and date - A. I believe it has happened - I have known three or four instances of it, it is not the practice, and is very unusual, and must arise from inattention to the machinery.

JAMES LAMBERT . I am a cashier of the Bank. Notes of 5 l., and upwards, are signed only by cashiers. The note uttered to Hopkinson is not my signature - here are two others bearing my signature, but I am certain they are not signed by me - no other person of my name is authorized to sign 5 l. notes.

(The note was here put in and read.)

Prisoner's Defence. I went to Anderson's, and did not know the note was forged. I gave a false address, as I was out of a situation, and had been refused change, as I could not give a satisfactory address.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 25.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

Reference Number: t18190113-42

202. EDWARD DENT was indicted for, that he, on the 18th of December , at St. Mary le Bow , feloniously did dispose of, and put away a certain forged and counterfeit bank note, for payment of 1 l. (setting it forth, No. 71,251, dated 13th of August, 1818, signed C. Tabor), with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England , he well knowing it to be forged and counterfeited, against the statute .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only calling the forged instrument a promissory note for payment of money, instead of a bank note.

JOHN SHOBEL . I live at No. 6, Lamb's-street, Borough, and am a paper-stainer, in the employ of Messrs. Heath, Ashness and Co. Queen-street, Cheapside; I have been employed by them two years; they had two boys in their service.

Q. In consequence of suspicion that fell upon those boys, did you make any application to them - A. I communicated my suspicions to my master, and had some conversation with Lucas, who was one of them; I went with him to the Angel Inn, Fleet-market, and saw the prisoner, Dent, there - I only saw him then.

Q. When did Lucas introduce him to you - A. At the latter end of November, at the Rose, four or five days after I had seen him at the Angel. I was sitting at the Rose, Lucas introduced me to the prisoner, I directed him to ask the prisoner to let me have a note; he whispered to the prisoner, Lucas turned round to me again, and asked for 6 s., which I gave him. Dent went out with Lucas.

Q. How came you to ask Lucas if the prisoner could furnish you with a 1 l. note - A. By my master's direction, and the direction of the Bank. I was directed by my master to find out where the boys got some notes which we suspected they were dealing with, and I made application to the prisoner, through Lucas.

Q. Did they return - A. Yes; Dent came and sat down. Nothing passed - he never spoke to me then - Lucas came and put a 1 l. note into my hand, across the table - both sat at the same table. I put it into my waistcoat-pocket.

Next morning I took it to the Bank, and marked it - (looks at one) - this is it, it has his name on it.

Q. When did you see the prisoner again - A. On the 8th of December, I saw him go into the Rose, by accident - he frequented the house; he asked me if I had done it up? by which I understood, whether I had passed the note I took of Lucas. I said, Yes. He then asked if I wanted another? I said, Yes. He said,

"then come along with me." I went with him to the pig-market, in Smithfield; he told me to wait there till he came back, and asked me for 6 s. which I gave him. He was gone about a quarter of an hour, returned, and put a 1 l. note into my hand - I put it into my pocket - I had no other. Next morning I took it to the Bank, and marked it - (looks at one) - this is it; and has

"Dent, December 8, 1818, I. S." on it, it is my writing.

Q. When did you see him again - A. I saw him several times between the 8th and 12th. He asked me if I had done it? I said I had not yet. He then asked when I thought I should want any more? I said not for a day or two - we parted. On Saturday evening, the 12th, between eight and nine o'clock, I was sitting at the Rose, he came in; I told him that Eliza Denham , who lived with him, was in the watch-house for disorderly conduct to the watchman. He asked me to go with him to the watch-house, which I did, and she was liberated. We then crossed Smithfield; in the way he asked me if I wanted any? I said I would take one, and if I got that off I would come back for another. We went towards Cloth-fair - he told me to stop at the turning going up Cloth-fair, and asked for the money - I gave him 6 s. They went up Cloth-fair together. In about a quarter of an hour, or twenty minutes, he returned and put a note into my hand, which I put into my right-hand waistcoat-pocket. He asked me where I was going to pass it? I said I did not know yet, but I must go and look for a place; he then said I will tell you where there is a sure place, and asked me if I knew Whitecross-street; he went with me to St. John-street, and directed me to Whitecross-street, to a grocer's. I went through a back place, by a dead wall, which led me to Aldersgate-street; he said it was a little grocer's shop, opposite to a sheep's head shop - I could find no such place. I went to Mr. Lamb's, grocer, in Whitecross-street, bought some sugar, and paid a good 1 l. note for it.

Q. Why did you go there - A. To make him believe I had been, as I was to return for another note. I had kept the note he gave me in a separate pocket until I got home, when I locked it up. I took it on Monday morning to the Bank, and marked it - (looks at one) - this is it. I marked E. D., for the prisoner's name, 12th December, 1818.

Q. You went back to the Rose - A. Yes, and saw the prisoner in the passage; he asked if I had done it? I said Yes, and I wanted another. He asked me to go into the tap-room, which I did - There were several people there. He asked me for the money, I gave him 6 s. He turned round to Eliza Denham , and said,

"you may as well go and fetch one, as me;" and gave her the key - he spoke in a low tone. She took the key, and went. She returned in about ten minutes to the tap-room, and said somebody wanted me outside; she followed me into the room, put the note into my hand, and said it was the best out of a score. I put it into another pocket, separate from the other, it was about half-past ten o'clock, and marked it at the Bank, on the Monday morning - looks at one) - this is it. It has

"E. D. ten o'clock;" which means Eliza Denham . On the Monday following, between twelve and one o'clock, I saw him again at the Rose; he asked me if I had done it? I told him I was obliged to lose it. Meaning that I was obliged to leave it in the person's hands where I attempted to pass it, and not return for it. I told him it was rubbed and disfigured so - (looks at one) - this is it; the numbers were rubbed in this manner when I received it. He asked me when I should want any more? I said, in a day or two - he said he was going into the country. I did not see him again until the next week, when I saw him in Smithfield. He asked me if I should want any more? I said,

"Not for myself, but I knew a person who wanted half a score." He asked me if it was sure? I told him it was. He asked me what he would give? - I said I did not know, but I had told the person I gave 6 s. a piece for forged notes. He told me to ask him what he would give - I left him, and saw him again the same day at the Rose, in Smithfield. He asked me what the person said? I said he would give 5 s. 6 d. - he told me to see if he would not give 5 s. 9 d.; I said he stuck out for 5 s. 6 d., and asked him if I should get the money, if he was agreeable to take it. We appointed to meet at the Flying Horse, Charterhouse-lane, next day. I communicated to the Bank what had passed between us.

Q. Had you these conversations with him of your own accord, or by direction - A. By direction of the Bank and Mr. Heath, who introduced me to the Bank.

Q. Who do you mean by communicating to the Bank - A. Mr. Rooker. We met at the Flying Horse about a quarter after one o'clock. He came and asked, in a low tone of voice, if I had the money? Mr. Freeman, the inspector, stood by the fire, reading the newspaper at the time - it had been planned that he should be there. I told him I had got the money, but could not pay him without a receipt. I spoke loud, that Mr. Freeman should hear me. Dent said,

"Very well." I took the money out of my pocket, and gave him a 1 l. note and 35 s. in silver, and named the amount, 2 l. 15 s., loud enough to be heard. He said, if I would go with him he would give me a receipt - he could be heard. We went out - he said he did not like the Flying Horse, because Long Tom, the officer, lived near there, and he would show me a sure house. He took me to the Travellers' Inn, Long-lane - it is a very dark tap-room, with a window that looks into a back court. When I got there I told him I should not go in then - he appointed to meet me there, and said he would fetch them by half-past two o'clock. I then went and told Foy what had passed. I went to the Travellers' Inn, and waited there till four o'clock - he did not come. I waited about twenty minutes longer, and then went to the Rose, and found him there. He told me he had not got them, and asked me if I should want them before six o'clock? I said I wanted them as soon as I could have them - he said he would bring them at six o'clock. I said I would stop at the Rose till six - he went out, I remained there. At half-past six o'clock, he came and told me somebody wanted me - I followed him out. He put a small paper parcel into my hand, and said there were but five, and the next day I should have the other five and to meet him at

the Travellers' Inn at half-past twelve - we parted. I kept the parcel in my hand, and went to the Crown tavern, on Clerkenwell-green, where Freeman and Foy were. I opened it, counted five 1 l. notes, marked them, and gave them to Freeman - (looks at the notes) - these are them. Next day, at half-past twelve o'clock, I went to the Travellers' Inn; he came in soon after, and asked me if I was going? I said Yes - he went out, I followed. He went up an alley close by the inn, and put something into my hand wrapped up, and said, that the half-score were of no use to me, as they would not pay my expenses. I had told him we (meaning I and the other person) were going into the country with them. He said it would not pay my expenses under fifteen or twenty. I said I would see what I could do with the other person, to see if he would take any more. He said

"Do," and we parted. I put the paper into my pocket, took it to the Bank and marked it - (looks at five notes) - these are them.

Q. Did you see Dent again - A. Yes, on Monday, the 21st, at the Rose; he asked me what the man said? I told him I would get what money I could, to get mine. He asked me how many? I said I could not tell, but I would be sure to bring the money on the 22d, and said I did not like the Travellers' Inn, as I saw a gentleman there in boots - I had seen no gentleman there, but told him so because I did not want to go there again; he said

"Go to the Fox and Anchor, Charterhouse-lane, and wait there until I come to you." Next day I went there about half-past twelve, and he came there soon after; we went out together - he took me up the same court, and said he did not like that house, on account of an officer, and said I had better go to the Travellers' Inn. I said I did not like that house, but if he liked I would walk round Charterhouse-square; he said

"No, go to the Fox and Anchor, and wait there until I come to you." I went with him to the door, and watched him out of sight; I then went up to Foy, under the archway in Charter-house-square; he sent me to tell Plank, who was at the Flying Horse, which I did, and I went out of the way until I heard he was taken - I had told them which way he was most likely to come, and to keep a sharp eye on the Fox and Anchor - he was to bring me five more notes then; I had given him a 1 l. note, and 7 s. for them, the last time that I saw him.

Q. Had you any transactions with him, except by the direction of your master, and the Bank - A. None at all, Mr. Rooker furnished me with the money for dealing, and Freeman gave me the last note.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Nobody but yourself was present - A. No, except at one transaction at the Flying Horse, Mr. Freeman was present.

Q. What were you brought up to - A. I have been at sea above twenty years - I went of my own accord.

Q. Were you ever transported - A. Never, the last six years that I was at sea, I was in the King's service, on board the Rambler, and other ships.

COURT. Q. Is there any circumstance in your life to raise a suspicion of your being transported - A. None whatever - I served last in the Caledonia.

JOSHUA FREEMAN . I am an inspector of bank notes. I have seen the last witness two or three times. On the 18th of December, I gave him 2 l. 15 s., to buy ten 1 l. notes at 5 s. 6 d. each of the prisoner, Dent. At a quarter after one o'clock I went to the Flying Horse, as he had informed me of an intended meeting there - he and two or three other people were there; I was in the tap-room, and took the newspaper from Shobel, and stood by the fire. About half-past one o'clock, the prisoner came in, and sat down by Shobel.

Q. Did you see or hear anything pass between them - A. I heard Shobel ask him if he had got a receipt, for as the sum came to above 2 l. he should want one - Shobel counted out 2 l. 15 s. loud enough for any one in the room to hear it. In about a minute after Dent said, if you will come with me I will give you a receipt - they went out together.

Q. In the course of the evening did you see Shobel again - A. At seven o'clock I saw him by appointment at the Crown Tavern, Clerkenwell-green - he had a parcel in his hand which he opened; it contained five 1 l. forged notes; I made him mark them before he gave them to me - I also marked them myself - (looks at some) - these are them. On the 19th of December, he came to me at the Bank, and produced five 1 l. forged notes, I made him mark them, and marked them myself - (looks at some) - these are them.

JOHN FOY . I am an officer of Marlborough-street. I was employed to assist in detecting the prisoner - I know Shobel, on the 22nd of December he was supplied with 1 l. 7 s. 6 d. to buy forged notes, by the direction of Mr. Rooker. I watched in Charterhouse-square from twelve until one o'clock, with Plank, and Thomas Foy , my brother, to watch and apprehend the prisoner - Shobel brought me information when I was under the Charterhouse School gateway, in consequence of which I staid there, and sent Plank, and Thomas Foy to the square. In about half an hour the prisoner passed the gate of the the square, and walked towards Charterhouse-lane - I knew his person, and followed him a short distance, and at the gateway Thomas Foy and Plank seized and apprehended him; they took him to the Flying Horse, in Charterhouse-lane, which is kept by Ellis - they went in before me, I followed immediately into the tap-room, where they had him in custody. Hawkins was searching the prisoner, and took a piece of paper out of his pocket, he gave it to me, and I marked it - (looks at it) - this is it. I asked the landlord for a private room to take the prisoner into; he showed us into a back-parlour; we went in together with the landlord - nobody else was there but us; I observed that nothing was on the floor - I always do before I search a prisoner - there was nothing. I searched the prisoner, he had overalls on; I felt something hard near his knee, on his thigh. I unbuttoned his overalls, they buttoned all the way down, and then a small paper parcel fell out of them on the floor. The prisoner put his heels on it, and drew them together, so as to confine the parcel - it fell at his feet. I took it from under his feet, and asked him where he got it, and what it was? He said he knew nothing of it, it did not belong to him, but he observed something laying on the the floor when he came into room, and he put his foot on it. I opened it, and found five 1 l, notes folded together, and ten others rolled up, and tied round with a piece of thread, separated from the five - there was also a 5 l. note folded up separate; all of them were enclosed within a piece of brown paper - (looks at

them) - these are the same, they are all marked by me, and this is the paper they were in. I saw Thomas Foy take four 1 l. notes from his fob, which were given him again; he said something about them, but I do not exactly know what. He had also 28 s. in silver which was returned to him. Plank gave me the paper found in his pocket. I asked the prisoner where he got it? He said he found it in the square that morning.

Cross-examined. Q. Who was in the room when the parcel was found on the floor - A. Thomas Foy , Plank, the landlord, the prisoner, and myself. It could not have fallen from anybody but the prisoner. I felt it in his clothes, and saw it fall from him.

SAMUEL PLANK . I am an officer. I attended with Foy on the 22nd of December. I was placed at the Flying Horse, public-house, opposite the Fox and Anchor, and saw Dent go into the Fox and Anchor, and in about two minutes he came out, and looked to the right and left - then Shobel came out after him - they went down the street into the court together. I lost sight of them for two or three minutes; I then saw Dent come up the street, towards the square, and in about two minutes I saw Shobel, he gave me information. I went to the gate of the square, saw the prisoner come across the square, and pass Foy - I took him. He was taken into the public-house. I took a small paper from his left-hand waistcoat-pocket in the tap-room, and gave it to John Foy . I led the prisoner into the private room, with the other officers. I was the first that entered the room. I looked round the floor, to ascertain that nothing was on the floor, as I always do, and there was nothing there. I saw him searched, but did not see where the parcel came from. I saw Foy stoop down, push his feet aside, and take it from under his feet. (I had turned round at that moment to look into the passage) - I saw the parcel under his feet. John Foy asked him if he had any more money about him? he either said,

"I keep my good notes in my fob," or,

"There are good notes in my fob" - I am certain he used the word good. I heard him say he found the paper in the square.

THOMAS FOY . I am an officer. I was present, assisted in taking the prisoner, and was there when he was searched. I looked on the floor, and no parcel was there when I went into the room. I did not see where the parcel fell from, as I held his hands - I saw my brother pick it off the floor. My brother asked him if he had any more notes about him? he said he had got good notes in his fob - I took the good notes from his fob.

THOMAS ELLIS. I am landlord of the Flying Horse, public-house, in Charterhouse-lane. On the 18th of December I saw the prisoner at my house; I afterwards saw him in the company of Shobel - they went out together. On Friday, the 22d of December, the prisoner was brought to my house in the custody of Plank, Thomas Foy , and John Foy , and taken into the tap-room - they then asked for a private room, I showed them into one, and went in with them. I had been in the room five minutes before, there was no parcel on the floor then - nobody went into the room after till the prisoner was taken in. When they went in, I looked round the room, there was nothing there. The officers were searching the prisoner. I heard something drop on the floor, I immediately looked, and saw a small paper parcel on the floor - it was afterwards opened, and contained sixteen 1 l. notes, and a 5 l. note. The officer asked him what it was? he would not answer. He asked him if he had any more notes about him? he said he kept the good notes in his fob. A paper was found in his waistcoat pocket, which he said he found in the square.

MR. WILLIAM THOMAS HEATH . I am one of the firm of Heath, Ashness, and Co. Queen-street, Cheapside, we are paper-stainers. Shobel has been near three years in our service, and would have been now, if he had not been engaged in this business - he will be in our service again. In consequence of what occurred in my house I give him directions to detect persons uttering forged notes. I afterwards reported to the Bank every particular from day to day - he was employed by me for that purpose. I know the history of his life, and am certain he never was transported.

JURY. Q. What character had you with him - A. I referred to the parish books, and found he was a parishioner - I took him before the Lord Mayor, and had him bound over to me. He was very industrious, and quite worked himself into my favour. I found him very honest and grateful. I became acquainted with him by his applying for relief when I was churchwarden. I consider him an honest man, and shall employ him again.

JOHN LEES. I am an inspector of bank notes - (examines the note set out in the indictment) - it is forged - it is not bank paper. It has an apparent water-mark, which is put on after the paper is made, by pressure. It is not the Bank plate. The date line is engraved - in a genuine note it is printed. It is not C. Tabor's signature - I have known his signature many years. The letters No. before the number are engraved - in a genuine note they are printed. The whole of the twenty-nine 1 l. notes are forged in every respect, and off the same plate; they are different numbers, and are not genuine in one single instance, and are not the signatures of the signing clerks - they are signed Stock, Tabor, Conset, Lowe, and R. Clough. They are different numbers, but every number consists of the same set of figures, viz. 12570, but transposed. The 5 l. note is forged in all respects, and has the same figures in the number. The paper found in the prisoners pocket has the name of A. Consett five times on it, and A. C. several times - it has also R. Clough wrote on it. They are imitations of their hands.

Cross-examined. Q. Can you tell when a water-mark is made on one paper, and put on in another - A. Yes, I have seen it done in a common manufactory - these are made by pressure. My knowledge is not from practice but from theory. I have a general knowledge of engraving, so as to say whether notes are worked off one plate, and can say all these 1 l. notes are off the same plate.

CHARLES TABOR . I am signing clerk of 1 l. notes at the Bank, and have been so for six years - there is no other of my name - the note has not my signature to it. There are six others bearing my name - none of them are my signature.

(The note was then put in and read.)

Prisoner's Defence. I stand here innocent of the charge. I never sold a note. The evidence of Shobel is false - he has often applied to me to get him forged notes, I refused. He said he had been transported. I found the paper in the square. They found nothing on me. They

took me into the parlour, where there were pipes, glasses, and tobacco, as if somebody had been there. The officer picked the parcel up, and said,

"This is what we want." I said it did not belong to me. At the office they said they did not see me drop it, but they had every reason to suppose I did. It is a conspiracy to take my life away.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 18.

London Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18190113-43

203. THOMAS ALLEN was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of December , one shirt, value 5 s.; two handkerchiefs, value 4 s., and one pair of stockings, value 2 s. , the goods of Robert Slade .

JAMES WEST . I live in Upper Marylebone-street. I took a bundle, containing the articles stated in the indictment, to the Red Lion Inn stables, Cockspur-street , to be taken to Robert Slade , at Stockwell. Mr. Barratt's groom was to fetch it from there. I gave it to Probett.

STEPHEN PROBETT . I am hostler at the Red Lion stables. On the 28th of November West gave me the bundle; I put it in the desk in the counting-house - the prisoner was our under hostler - we have each a key of the counting-house; it is always kept locked - it was lost. I inquired of the prisoner about it; he said he knew nothing of it. In consequence of what Paterson said, I found a shirt and a pair of stockings at the prisoner's lodgings which the prosecutor claimed. About a fortnight after, I saw a handkerchief found in the prisoner's trunk, which the prosecutor also claimed. He was eleven years in my master's service.

JAMES PATERSON . I am under hostler at the yard. My wife washes for the prisoner. I asked him for his linen, he said it was tied up in his box, and told me to go and get it, which I did, this shirt and stockings were among it.

JOSEPH COOPER . I am an officer. I went to the prisoner's room with Probett, and found the prosecutor's handkerchief behind an old turn-up bedstead. Probett found a neck handkerchief.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined Six Months , and Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18190113-44

204. EDWARD WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of December , one handkerchief, value 4 s., the property of William Monkman , from his person .

WILLIAM MONKMAN . I am master of the ship Alfred . On the 10th of December, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, I was in East Smithfield with Mr. Watson, and felt something touch my pocket - I turned round, and saw the prisoner with my handkerchief in his hand. I immediately laid hold of him - he begged for mercy. I gave him in charge.

Prisoner. Q. Was I not picking it up from the kennel - A. No.

MICHAEL WATSON . I am a bookseller, and live at Wapping. I was with Mr. Monkman. I saw the handkerchief drop from the prisoner, and picked it up. The prisoner was not stooping.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was stooping to pick it up.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18190113-45

205. WILLIAM CALLAGHAN was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of December , one quilt, value 5 s., the goods of William Newman ; two gowns, value 13 s.; one spencer, value 8 s., one apron, value 6 d., the goods of Hannah Carney ; and one gown, value 8 s. , the goods of Winnifred Carney .

WILLIAM NEWMAN . I live at the Hope, public-house, Smithfield-bars . On the 22d of December, about eleven o'clock, Carney informed me the property was gone. I had seen the prisoner in the tap-room about ten o'clock that morning - the tap-room door leads to the stairs; the property was taken from the second-floor. About two o'clock I met him in Jewin-street, with a bundle under his arm. I told him I did not see him go out in the morning. He asked me for something to drink - I said if he would go home with me I would give him some. We walked together to Cloth-fair; he ran down a passage into Smithfield. I called Stop thief! - he was stopped before I lost sight of him. I took him to the Bear and Ragged Staff, examined the bundle, and found it contained the property stated in the indictment, except the quilt, the duplicate of which was found on him.

HANNAH CARNEY . I am servant to Mr. Newman . I went up stairs about eleven o'clock, missed the things, and found them in the bundle when the prisoner was taken.

DAVID M'COMBIE. I am an officer. I heard the cry, and stopped the prisoner, who was running with the bundle.

HENRY THOMSON. I am servant to Mr. Brown, who is a pawnbroker, and lives in Fetter-lane. About twelve o'clock the prisoner pledged the quilt.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I was in great distress.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18190113-46

206. THOMAS THOMPSON and ROBERT ROSE were indicted for stealing, on the 31st of December , the sum of 10 s., in copper monies, numbered, the monies of Susanah Pinherio , from the person of Charles William Russell .

CHARLES WILLIAM RUSSELL . I am fourteen years of age, and am servant to Susanah Pinherio, who is a tobacconist , and lives in Whitechapel. On the 31st of December, about half-past three o'clock in the afternoon, my mistress and I were walking along the pavement in Houndsditch ; I had two 5 s. papers of halfpence in a basket - one was tied up in brown paper, and the other in a piece of newspaper; my mistress was just before me. Three boys came round me, making a noise like a parcel of dogs, they lifted up the lid of the basket, and took one 5 s. paper out, which was tied up in brown paper; another boy took the other; I did not see who took them, but am sure the prisoners are two of the boys - the other boy was taller. Rose and the tall boy ran down Houndsditch, and I called out Stop thief! My mistress caught the prisoner, tore his coat, and took him into a clothes shop - the officer found a few halfpence on him; I saw Rose at the Mansion-house the next day, and am sure he is one of them.

Cross-examined by MR, ADOLPHUS. Q. Rose was looking in at the Mansion-house window next day, and

was brought in - A. Yes, and I said he was the boy, who took the first paper. They went away, returned, and then took the other; I do not know that Rose was one of the three who took the halfpence - I saw him before they were taken.

SUSANAH PINHFRIO. I am a widow ; I was in Houndsditch with my boy; I put the papers of halfpence into his basket. As soon as I came out of my house, which is about two hundred yards from Houndsditch, some boys hustled me - I will not be certain that the prisoners were then among them. When we were in Houndsditch they hustled me again, I turned round, and saw the prisoner take the printed paper of halfpence out of the basket, and give it to another boy, whom I do not know; I seized the prisoner, and never let him go until I had given him in charge - I think Rose was one of the party.

JOHN STOCK . I am a constable; I was sent for, and took Thompson - a printed paper with 4 s. 6 d. in copper was picked up by a person.

THOMPSON'S Defence. The lady let me go, to run after the boys.

- RAMSAY. I know Rose. I was in Aldgate, and saw two or three boys running away - Rose was not among them.

T. THOMPSON - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Life .

ROSE - NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18190113-47

207. JAMEL M'FARLANE was indicted for embezzlement .

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18190113-48

208. JOHN WILLETT was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of October , at St. Sepulchre's , nineteen sheep, price 40 l. , the property of William Preston and Charles Preston .

WILLIAM PRESTON , ESQ. I live at Sewardston, in Essex. My brother Charles and I are joint proprietors of the sheep. On the 30th of October, about four o'clock in the afternoon, my man, Thomas Johnson , informed me that my sheep were gone; I went into the field, found the lock of the gate broken, and found the sheep gone - great violence must have been used to break the lock. I made inquiry next day of Mr. Hebb, who is a salesman in Smithfield. I lost nineteen sheep, which were worth 40 l. There was no gap in the field, from whence they could have strayed.

MR. WILLIAM HEBB . I am a sheep salesman at Smithfield-market; I know the prisoner. On Friday, the 30th of October last, about seven o'clock in the morning, he applied to me to sell 19 sheep for him; they were marked P in a circle. He said they belonged to Mr. Parish, a relation of his; in consequence of which I sold them for him to Mr. Fletcher, in the open market, for 46 s. each; they came to 43 l. 1 s. 4 d., deducting my commission, which was 8 d. on each.

Cross-examined by MR. ARABIN. I first knew him on the 14th of September - I am certain he is the man, who ordered me to sell them.

Q. Some hundred of sheep are brought to you in a day - A. Yes; I am sure he is the man, he spoke to me once or twice in the day, before I had sold them.

JOHN ROBINSON . I am servant to Mr. Hebb. On the 30th of October, the prisoner brought nineteen sheep, just as it got daylight, for my master to sell; they were marked P in a circle. I penned them, and they were sold to Mr. Fletcher. I delivered them to him, and have since seen them in his possession.

Cross-examined. I have seen a great many sheep marked P,

THOMAS JOHNSON . I am the prosecutors' bailiff. On the 29th of October, between one and two o'clock in the afternoon, I saw all the sheep safe in my masters' field, at Sewardston, about ten miles from Shoreditch; there were 39 of them marked P in a circle. Next day between one and two o'clock I went into the field, and missed nineteen of them; I looked round the field, but could not find them; I did not examine the lock of the gate. I have since seen them at Mr. Fletcher's; they are the same that were stolen. The fences were in good condition; they could not have got out.

Cross-examined. I locked the sheep up; Fletcher lives at Erith, in Kent; I knew the sheep to be my masters' - I do not speak of them altogether by the mark, though I marked them myself; I should know two or three of them without the mark - I saw them two days after they were stolen.

WILLIAM HALL . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner at Smithfield.

WILLIAM PRESTON , ESQ. re-examined. I saw the sheep at Fletcher's, and knew them to be mine, one in particular, it being a remarkable one.

Prisoner's Defence. I leave it to my counsel.

GUILTY. - DEATH . Aged 42.

Recommended to mercy .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18190113-49

209. FRANCIS WOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of January , one portmanteau, value 4 s.; six shirts, value 30 s.; six waistcoats, value 30 s.; two coats, value 2 l.; four pair of shoes, value 20 s.; two pair of gaiters, value 5 s.; six pair of stockings, value 12 s., and eight handkerchiefs, value 20 s. , the property of Robert Davis .

ROBERT DAVIS . I am servant to Mr. Doherty . On the 7th of January, between one and two o'clock in the day, I was by the side of Hyde Park , called Rotten-row ; the portmanteau was behind the carriage - I lost it.

STEPHEN BIRD . I am a bricklayer. I was going through Hyde Park; just as I got to the gate I saw the prisoner peeping from under the rail into the horse-road. When I came up I found he was sitting on the portmanteau. I passed on till I came to the barracks, and there saw the carriage, with the strings hanging to it, as if the portmanteau had been taken from it, and informed the

post-boy of it - he got off, and missed it. I was on horseback - I rode back to Stanhope-street gate, and saw the prisoner trying to get it on his shoulder - I got over the rail, and took him. There were two others just before him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. It was given to me to carry.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190113-50

210. THOMAS WATSON was indicted for that he, on the 12th of December , at St. Mary le Bow , feloniously did dispose of, and put away a certain forged and counterfeit bank note, for payment of 1 l. (setting it forth, No. 75112, dated the 12th of September, 1818, signed, R. Clough), with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England , he well knowing it to be forged and counterfeited, against the statute .

SECOND COUNT, for feloniously offering to John Relfe , a like forged bank note, with the like intent, he well knowing it to be forged.

THIRD AND FOURTH COUNTS, the same, only calling the forged instrument a promissory note for payment of money, instead of a bank note.

FOUR OTHER COUNTS, the same, only stating the prisoner's intent to be to defraud John Relfe .

JOHN RELFE . I am a grocer , and live in Gracechurch-street. About the end of November, a person came to my shop, who I believe to be the prisoner, he bought one ounce of black tea, one ounce of green, and half a pound of sugar, which came to 1 s. 6 d.; he was served, and paid me a 1 l. bank note. I asked him for his address? He said Mr. Marchant, Ingram-court, Fenchurch-street, which I wrote on the note, and gave him change - (looks at one) - this is it. I paid it to my bankers, and it was returned to me two days after as forged. I went to Mr. Marchant's, and he showed me his lads, but I could not discover any of them to be the boy who brought me the note.

Q. What happened on the 12th of December - A. About three o'clock in the afternoon the prisoner came to the shop - I am certain it was him. As soon as he entered the threshold of my door, the impression upon my mind was, that he was the boy who had given me a forged note a fortnight before, which I have spoken of. I thought I would see what he wanted, and if he paid me a note, I would notice him. He asked for two ounces of 8 s. black tea, and one pound of 9 d. sugar; I served him - it came to 1 s. 9 d.; he then presented me a 1 l. bank note. I took my pen, and said,

"Now my lad, what name shall I put on here?" He said Mr. Watson, No. 5, Bell-yard, Gracechurch-street. I then took my hat, took hold of his hand, and said,

"I know you are telling me a great falsehood, for a fortnight before you brought me one of a different address, and now my man, you and I will go to Bell-yard together." I went to Bell-yard with him, the house that is called No. 5, having no number on it, there was a difficulty in finding it - it was the fifth house, and went in the direction as they were marked - it is the Excise Permit Office. When we got opposite to it, I said, we have passed No. 5, the prisoner said No, it is further on, and took me into the George and Vulture Tavern, George-yard, Lombard-street - Bell-yard communicates with George-yard. I asked for the landlord, and asked him, in the prisoner's presence, if he had any knowledge of the prisoner? He said No. I then asked him if he had any knowledge of the note? He said No. 1 then related the circumstance to him, and asked him to let me see the waiters - they came; there were two or three; I asked them if they had any knowledge of the prisoner - they said No - the prisoner said nothing; the landlord reproved him very severely, and as we went out, he said he found it. I returned home with him, left him in charge of my shopman, and went for an officer. On my return I found him in charge of Sheppard, at my house.

Q. Did he then give any account of himself - A. He said his name was Williams, and he had either a brother, or friend, who was a silversmith, and lived in Smithfield - I think he mentioned a number, but I do not know what; he said he found it at the top of Lombard-street - it was a very wet day, and the note was quite clean - he was given in charge of Sheppard. I then went to the inspector's office at the bank, and marked the note there,

"Watson, No. 5, Bell-yard, Gracechurch-street" - it was never out of my possession until I had marked it, except in the hands of Draper, whom I had fetched, his master, and Sheppard, but I never lost sight of it, and am certain I marked the note that he offered me - (looks at one) - this is it. The inspector returned with me to my house to the prisoner, and asked him his name? He said Williams.

Cross-examined by MR. WALFORD. Q. Can you undertake to say that the man who passed the note a fortnight before, represented himself as coming from Marchant, or that his name was Marchant - A. As coming from him; Marchant showed me two young men, and said he had another, who was out; the second time he represented himself, as being sent by Watson - there is about twelve houses in Bell-yard; I could find no such person. I understood him to say he got it from the George and Vulture; it looks into Bell-yard.

Q. A person might suppose it to be there - A. No. I had told him it was forged, and the constable had arrived when he said he found it - he was alarmed.

MR. REYNOLDS. Q. When you said you had passed No. 5, what did he say - A. He said further on, and took me to the George and Vulture; the landlord and waiters denied giving it to him; he did not say he took it of anybody else. When he first mentioned Bell-yard he did not say the George and Vulture - the George and Vulture cannot be considered as in Bell-yard.

Q. When he came out of the George and Vulture, did he propose going to any other house in Bell-yard, to find out any other person - A. No; the constable was sent for - I said I thought it was forged, he then said he found it.

SAMUEL SHEPPARD . I am a constable. On the 12th of December, I was fetched to the prosecutor's house, and took the prisoner into custody; I searched, but found nothing on him. I asked him his name? He said it was Williams; I asked him where he got the note? He said he found it in Bell-yard, and that he lived with his brother, who kept a silversmith's shop, No. 15, Smithfield - the streets were very wet and dirty on that day. I took him

towards Giltspur-street Compter? he asked me where I was going to take him to? I said I was going to take him to Smithfield, to his friend's. He smiled very jocularly, and said

"It is no use taking me there." I took him to the Compter, then went to No. 15, Smithfield, and found it was a private house. I looked round Smithfield for a silversmith's shop, but there was no such a shop.

Cross-examined. Q. He knew you was a constable - - A. Yes. You can go from Lombard-street to Bell-yard, but you must go through the George and Vulture and St. Michael's-alley. He said he had just found it in Bell-yard.

JAMES DELLAMORE . I live at No. 15, West Smithfield, and did so all December last - my house is a private one. There is no silversmith's shop there. I have no lodgers, nor is any silversmith's business carried on there. No person of the name of Williams or Watson live there. I do not know the prisoner, or his family.

JOHN LEES . I am an inspector of bank notes. It is my business to discover genuine notes from forged - (examines the note uttered on the 12th of December) - it is forged in every respect. It is not the bank paper nor water-mark - it has the imitation of one, which is done afterwards, by pressure; in a genuine not it is made in the paper. The date line is engraved - in a genuine note it is stereotype. It purports to be signed by R. Clough - we have a cashier of that name; he is not a signer of small notes - he was once, but was not at the time this is dated - it is not his hand-writing; I have known it for years. The letters No. are engraved - in a genuine note they are printed. The first note paid to the prosecutor is also forged in every respect, the same as the other, and the same plate and signature - one is 75112, the other 75052. In neither of these numbers do the figures 34689 occur. The dates are different. Clough was not a signing clerk at the date of either of them.

JURY. Q. If they are both off the same plate, how can the dates be different - A. I suppose the date line may be done with a slip plate, which is run into the plate - it can be done so.

Q. I believe you do things with the greatest accuracy at the Bank - it is almost impossible to make a mistake. Look at this note - (handing one) - A. It is what I have often seen before; it has no signature, but is a genuine note.

MR. REYNOLDS. Q. Have you ever seen plates with a slip line for the date - A. I think I have.

Cross-examined. Q. Is there any appearance of a slip-line being used - A. No. I am not aware that it would make a difference - it would be easier to stamp a note without a slip.

Q. Have you not known forgeries so executed that they have been received at the Bank - A. I have; they have been passed by the inspector.

MR. REYNOLDS. Q. The slip-plate merely contains the date - the impression could make no difference in the appearance of it - A. I should think not.

Q. How many instances of forged notes having been passed at the Bank, have you known - A. Several. Some of them were, new and some worn.

Q. Have you the least doubt about these two notes - A. None whatever.

ROGER CLOUGH . I was a signer of small notes. I was not so on the 13th of August, 1818 - I ceased to sign small notes a few days before that, but I did sign them on the 13th and 14th of August.

Q. Did you sign any on the 12th of September - A. No - (looks at the notes) - one is dated the 13th of August, the other the 12th of September - neither of them are my signature. There is a similarity to my writing, but are not mine. I signed up to the 14th of August; I was then appointed cashier, and signed only 5 l. notes and upwards.

WILLIAM MARCHANT . I live in Ingram-court, Fenchurch-street, and am a printer. The prisoner never was in my service - I do not know him. I did not send him to Mr. Relfe's shop for any purpose whatever.

Cross-examined. I have a great many young men in my employ - I sent none of them there to buy anything.

(The note was then put in and read.)

Prisoner's Defence. Shobel, who gave evidence against Dent, gave me the notes.

GUILTY. - DEATH , Aged 15.

Recommended to Mercy .

London Jury, before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

Reference Number: t18190113-51

211. DOROTHY NEAVES was indicted for that she, on the 24th of December , at St. James, Clerkenwell , feloniously did dispose of, and put away, a certain forged and counterfeit bank note, for payment of 1 l. (setting it forth, No. 57201, dated, August, 13, 1818, Signed A. Consett), with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England , she well knowing it to be forged and counterfeited, against the statute .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating the forged instrument to be a promissory note for payment of money, instead of a bank note.

THIRD AND FOURTH COUNTS, the same, only stating the prisoner's intent to be to defraud Joseph Shillcock .

JOSEPH SHILLCOCK . I am a grocer , and live at Nos. 106 and 107, St. John-street, Smithfield. On the 24th of December, at half-past eight o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came to my shop, and bought cheese, butter, and sugar, which came to about 3 s., and tendered me a 1 l. bank note. I asked her her name and address? she said

"Jones, No. 1, Great Saffron-hill." I gave her the change, and she went away. I wrote her name,

"Jones, 24:12:18" on the note, in her presence - (looks at one) - this is it; it has the address in my own hand-writing.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. This was Christmas Eve, of course you was very busy - A. Yes, and had a great many people in the shop; I always mark my notes. I paid it away on the 26th of December to Mr. West, of Shoreditch. It was returned to me on the Tuesday or Wednesday following, as forged, with four others. I suppose 30 or 40 notes were taken that night. The prisoner was taken the latter end of the week. Three persons serve in my shop. I marked the note and put it into my pocket, I did not mix it with others. I am certain she is the woman.

JURY. Q. How came you to put this particular note into your pocket - A. I am not accustomed to serve in the

shop. I only took this note, and put it into my pocket. I was then serving in the shop by myself.

WILLIAM VINCENT . On the 24th of December I lived at No. 1, Great Saffron-hill - the prisoner did not live there, nor any man or woman of the name of Jones.

Cross-examined. There is only one No. 1.

SARAH LATTIMER . I keep the house, No. 18, Radnor-street, Bath-street, St. Luke's. The prisoner lived there on the 24th of December, and had lived there from the 17th. She said her name was Size. She was apprehended at my apartments the beginning of this year.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you know that she was living from her friends, perhaps improperly, and for that reason went by another name - A. I do not know it. My house is above a mile from Great Saffron-hill.

GEORGE BROWN . I am a publican, and live in Golden-lane, St. Luke's. The prisoner has often been at my house three or four times a day. I knew her by the name of Johnson.

Q. Did she ever pay you a note - A. She came one day and changed a note; it was very new, and had no mark on it at all. I do not think she bought anything. I wrote

"Mrs. Johnson, No. 72, Golden-lane," on it, as a man named Johnson, who lived with her, told me that was her name. It was afterwards returned to me as forged. I inquired, and found she had moved. I saw her again at the police office, in custody - (looks at a note) - this is it. I paid it away twice after I received it.

Q. How could you pay it away twice - A. I paid it away, received it again the same evening in change, and paid it away in giving change for a 10 l. or 15 l. note. I have known the prisoner about eleven weeks - she never offered me any other note. The man she lived with once paid me one - I wrote the same direction on it; I do not know where that is. The person I paid the note to is not here - his name is Shooter. I received it before Christmas, for I paid it to him on the 12th of December. I did not ask the prisoner for any name, but wrote that on it - (looks at a note) - it is the note I took of the prisoner. I wrote the name and address as soon as I took it of her.

EDWARD RICKARD . I am shopman to Messrs. Outhwaite and Greathead, who are grocers, and live in Lamb-street, Spitalfields. On the 12th of December, about two or three o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner bought grocery amounting to about 2 s., and paid a 1 l. bank note. I asked her for her address - she said

"Mrs. Stewart, No. 6, Brick-lane," which I wrote on the note, with the date - (looks at one) - this is it. It was returned in about a week. I inquired at No. 6, Brick-lane, but could learn nothing of her.

Cross-examined. Q. Did she wear a large bonnet - A. Yes, with green ribbons.

Q. You were told the woman who passed the note was in custody - A. Yes, it was about three weeks after. I am sure she is the woman.

JOHN BROWN. I keep a grocer's shop, No. 6, Brick-lane, and lived there on the 12th of December. I do not know the prisoner. I never saw her to my knowledge.

WILLIAM HERITAGE . I am clerk to the magistrates of Worship-street, and was officiating as such when the charge was brought against the prisoner. What she said was taken down in writing. Neither threats nor promises were held out to her - she spoke voluntarily. I read it over to her, she read it herself, said it was all correct, and signed it. The deposition of George Brown was read over to her, She said - (reads) -

"I never changed or paid a note to Mr. Brown in my life." After the examination of the other witness, in reply to Rickard's evidence, she said she never paid away or changed a bank note with any person since March last. It was read over to her, and she signed it.

Cross-examined. Q. Did she not say notes of her own - A. No. I took it down correctly.

JOHN LEES . I am an inspector of Bank notes - (looks at the note) - it is forged. It is not Bank paper, plate, nor A. Consett's writing. There is the appearance of a watermark, which is impressed. The other notes are also forged, and of the same description with the last, and off the same plate. The date-line is different. The only way I can account for that is by a small plate being slid in with the date, or the 13th of August being burnished out, and another date inserted in the original plate. The numbers are stamped as they are in a genuine note, but the letters No. is engraved - in a genuine note it is printed. One is signed Tabor - it is not his hand-writing; the other is signed A. Jones - there is no such person a signing clerk.

JURY. Q. You say there is no signing clerk of the name of A. Jones; I have a paper in my hand, which states, that at an examination before the Lord Mayor, the clerk to the Solicitor of the Bank said that there was no signing clerk of the name of Middleton - I have three notes in my hand signed Middleton - A. We have no signing clerk of the name of Jones; there is a clerk named Middleton.

MR. JAMES ROOKER . I remember the circumstance, and am the person who made the observation. The note then in question was signed Meddleton, with the letter e instead of an i, and without any christian name. The clerk's name is Middleton.

(Note put in and read.)

Prisoner's Defence. I am not the person.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 20.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18190113-52

212. DAVID O'HARA was indicted for feloniously having a forged bank note in his possession for the payment of 1 l., he well knowing it to be forged .

JOHN WALSH . I keep the Red Lion, public-house, in Drury-lane. In the latter end of October last, about eight o'clock at night, the prisoner came to my house, and called for a glass of gin and water - he asked me if I could give him change for a 1 l. note? I said I believed I could. While I was making the gin and water, he said he would go for a friend of his, and laid the note on the end of the counter, and went out. I took it up in his absence, and put it into my pocket. I am sure it is the same note he paid me. I had two others in my pocket, they were single.

Q. How can you distinguish one from the other - A. It was the last I put in. He returned in about half an hour, or more, alone. I then took it out of my pocket - I know it was that he gave me, because it was the uppermost.

Q. Have you any doubt of its being the same - A. I had not at that time, but I have since doubted it, as I think I might have mixed them. I asked him where his friend Reghan was? as he said he was going to fetch

him - he said he was not at home, but he had been looking for him. I told him his grog was cold, and made him another glass - he had 18 d. to pay. I took the note out, and asked him if he lived in Short's-gardens? he said he did. I asked him his name? I understood him to say,

" Daniel Hearne ." He spoke quick, and I was busy - I might have mistaken him. I wrote it on the note, and put

"Reghan's friend" on it in his presence - (looks at the note) - this is the note I have been speaking of.

COURT. Q. You put it into your pocket with two others - A. Yes; not recollecting that I had others there. I cannot swear whether it is the one he paid me or not.

WILLIAM MOODY . I keep the Three Tuns, public-house, in Belton-street, Long-acre. On the 31st of October, the prisoner came to my house, and asked me if I could give him change for a 1 l. note? I looked at him, and knew him by sight, but did not know his name or address. I said I did not think I could. He then said he lodged at Mr. Gillett's, No. 13, Short's-gardens, which is about 20 yards from my house. I then changed it - (looks at one) - this is it. I asked him his name, and understood him to say

"Arnet," or

"Harnett," which my wife wrote on it in his presence. I found he lodged where he said.

Prisoner. Q. Did I not say

"David O'Hara" - A. I will not be certain, as several people were about; I was busy.

JOHN FOY . I am an officer of Marlborough-street. I saw the prisoner after he was in custody. He said he got the notes from a man who said he found them in the City; but fearing they might be advertised and stopped, the man did not like to pass them, and he bought four of him at 6 s. each, at two different times, not knowing them to be forged. He knew the man's person but not his name, and he appeared to have about a hundred notes.

Prisoner. Q. Did I not say I destroyed two of them, when I found they were bad - A. I think he did.

JOHN LEES . I am an inspector of the Bank. The notes are both forged in every respect, are both off one plate, and are not the signatures of Tabor and Stock.

CHARLES TABOR . I am signing clerk of the Bank. The note is not signed by me.

(The note was then put in and read.)

Prisoner's Defence. I bought them of a man, supposing them to be good, as he said he found them, and was afraid to pass them, as they had been advertised. He was taken up two days after, for forgery, and I destroyed the other two.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

Reference Number: t18190113-53

213. DAVID O'HARA was again indicted for feloniously disposing of and putting away a forged bank note, with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England .

No evidence.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

Reference Number: t18190113-54

214. WILLIAM HARVEY WASLEY and JAMES HOW were indicted for sodomy .

MR. ADOLPHUS, on the part of the prosecution, declined offering any evidence.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18190113-55

215. MARY CUMBERLAND was indicted for stealing on the 24th of October , in the dwelling-house of Jeffery Curtis, 3 l. 15 s., in monies numbered; one guinea, and one 1 l. bank note , the property of Eliza Fletcher .

ELIZA FLETCHER . I keep a mangle , and live in Robin Hood-court, Shoe-lane . On the 24th of October, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, I received this money from Mrs. Clarke, at the Star and Garter, public-house, Old Bailey, which I took home and locked up. About seven o'clock I called at the Star and Garter, and saw the prisoner there. Mrs. Clarke asked me, in her presence, if I had taken care of my money? I said I had locked it up in my box. I told the prisoner I had drawn a guinea in gold. I left, returned in about an hour, and found her still there. She asked me to let her go home, and sleep with me, as she was tired, and had a long way to go - she went home with me about half-past ten o'clock - I took 2 s. 6 d. out of my box, and gave it to her to fetch some supper; I showed her the guinea. She said,

"The sight of gold was good for sore eyes," and returned it to me again. She got some beef, and I then gave her 1 s. to get three half pints of beer; she stopped a long time, and then returned; I told her that I thought she was lost: she said she had met a friend. I asked her for the change two or three times, and she said she would give it to me by-and-by - we went to bed. I locked the door myself, and asked her to put the candle out; she wanted it to be kept alight - I agreed to it. She only pulled off her gown, and took one bone out of her stays, nothing else. About half-past four o'clock I awoke, missed her, and found the candle gone. At daylight I found the key of my box in a different place to where I left it - the box was shut, but not locked, and the money all gone. I got an officer, but could not find her at her lodgings - she was taken on the 30th of December.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. I suppose you never walked the streets for money - A. No; I was never taken up for a robbery.

Q. You was never in custody of a watchman, or any one else - A. Never.

Q. Did you not say that it was not a guinea that you lost, but a new gold coin - A. The prisoner said it was a new coin.

ELIZA CURTIS . My husband keeps a tailor's shop in Prujean-square, where the prosecutrix lodges. On the 24th of October I met her and the prisoner on the stairs; I went into the room, and she asked the prisoner to fetch her some beef, unlocked her box, and took out a guinea, put it in again, and gave the prisoner half-a-crown, she returned in about half an hour. Fletcher asked for the change four times, but the prisoner made her no answer, She gave her 1 s. to get some beer, and I went away - next morning the prosecutrix missed her money.

Cross-examined. Q. How long had the prosecutrix lodged with you - A. Fourteen or fifteen months - she left me before Christmas.

Q. Why - A. About a week before she went away, she brought a man home with her at night, and he gave her in charge, saying, she had robbed him of a 1 l. note - he afterwards found he had got his money.

WILLIAM OWEN . On the 30th of December, I apprehended the prisoner in Portpool-lane.

Prisoner's Defence. I leave it to my counsel.

THOMAS GOODWIN . I am a watchman of St. Sepulchre's; I know the prosecutrix; my beat is in the Old Bailey, she was given in my charge for calling out Stop thief! after a gentleman, nine weeks ago, about twelve o'clock at night; she charged him with robbing her of 5 s.; he offered to be searched, and no such money was found on him - the constable of the night discharged him.

Q. When did you have her again - A. On the 23d of November last, I was calling twelve o'clock, and was fetched to Mr. Curtis's house; there was a cry of murder, and great disorder in the house; Curtis found the door open. We found her, and a sailor there; Mr. Curtis gave them both in charge. The man charged her with robbing him of a 1 l. note - they were discharged before the Alderman, I know the prosecutrix is a common prostitute, and very much addicted to drink.

LYDIA HUDSON . I know the prosecutrix; she told me that she had lost 1 l. in silver; I have known her two years - she is an unfortunate woman.

COURT. Q. What are you - A. I keep house for a man.

Q, You are an unfortunate woman I suppose - A. I do not go out now - I have left it off a year.

ELIZA WOODMAN . I am the prisoner's sister, and am a married woman; my husband is a brush-maker, and lives in Russell-court, Drury-lane. The prosecutrix called on me, and said my sister had robbed her of 5 l. 16 s. all in silver, except a new gold coin, and unless the money was brought forward, she would hang her. I saw my sister, and called on the prosecutrix at Curtis's; Mrs. Curtis said the prosecutrix was so drunk that night that she wanted to go out with my sister, but she persuaded her not to go, fearing that if she got down stairs, she should not be able to get her up again.

ELIZA CURTIS re-examined. The last witness came to my house; I never told her anything of the kind; they were both perfectly sober - the prosecutrix did not offer to go out.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190113-56

216. JAMES DYTON was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of January , part of a piece of handkerchiefs, containing six, value 39 s. , the property of Rhoda Wilson .

THOMAS YOUNG . I am shopman to Mrs. Rhoda Wilson , who is a silk mercer , and lives in the Minories . On the 7th of January, about two o'clock in the afternoon, a woman came into the shop to look at some handkerchiefs; she made choice of a piece out of the window, which Mrs. Wilson showed her; she asked to see others. While Mrs. Wilson turned to get some, I saw the prisoner creep in the door-way, and snatch the handkerchiefs off the counter; Mrs. Wilson turned, saw his head, cried out, and he threw them on the floor; I ran after him, and brought him back - he took them off the counter.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190113-57

217. JAMES ELLISTON was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of January , 1 lb. 20 z. of tea, value 3 s. , the property of the United Company of Merchants of England trading to the East Indies .

WILLIAM IRONS . I am a labourer to the East India Company. On the first of January, about ten o'clock, I heard a noise in the adjoining room, went in, and saw the prisoner on a pile of wood, drawing tea out of a chest - he had no business in that room; I said nothing to him. He asked me if I had found an old pair of shoes, which he had put there? I said No. He went into the passage with me and then returned; I followed gently, and heard him rattling the tea in the store-room; I returned to the passage, and pretended not to notice him, He came to me, and said,

"I have been endeavouring to get some rest, but cannot, I am so full of pain, I will go and get half a pint of beer." I told Mr. Lines, who was coming up at the time - the prisoner then passed us, and Mr. Lines charged him with it. He denied it, and offered to be searched. I went away.

JOSEPH HINDS. I am an assistant elder to the East India Company; Irons gave me information. I stopped the prisoner, and, told him I understood he had tea about him, he said he had none, and was willing to be searched; Lines came up, pulled off his hat, and found 1 lb. 20 z. of tea concealed in a dirty bag, like the lining of his hat; the chest contained the same sort of tea - about that quantity was missing. He said he was sorry for it.

JOHN LINES. I searched the prisoner's hat, and found the tea there.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 50.

Recommended to Mercy .

Confined Six Months .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190113-58

218. THOMAS NEWMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of December , 1 lb. 5 ounces of silk, value 30 s. , the property of the United Company of Merchants trading to the East Indies .

WILLIAM BETTIE . I am assistant elder at the East India Bengal warehouse, New-street, Bishopsgate , the prisoner was a labourer there, and employed to open bales of silk. On the 10th of December I was in the office, and saw him pass into the yard; as he went down the steps I saw silk between his breeches and his apron - I told Pope to wait there till he returned; Pope then desired him to walk in to Mr. Ackroyd, the elder, who asked him for the skein of silk which he had in his possession; he said he had none. Ackroyd said he had, and desired he would give it him. After a little hesitation, he took a skein out of his pocket, and said he meant to return it. Ackroyd asked him if he had any more? he said No. Shires was sent for, and found in all nineteen skeins on him - four of which were were fastened with thread to a button of his breeches, and suspended between his thighs.

WILLIAM SHIRES . I am a commodore. I searched the prisoner, and found five skeins of silk in each of his breeches pockets, and five in his left-hand jacket pocket, and four suspended between his thighs.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was looking for some wood, and

found the silk - it is a common rule when we find anything to secrete it about us. I was going to return it.

GUILTY . Aged 39.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190113-59

219. JOHN ROE was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of January , one pair of sheets, value 6 s., and one blanket, value 6 s., the goods of Joseph Brooks , in a lodging-room .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only not stating them to be in a lodging-room.

JOSEPH BROOKS . I keep the Roebuck, public-house, Duke-street, Aldgate . On the 9th of January, about four o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner came to my house, and asked if he could sleep there. I let him a lodging for the night - he paid me sixpence for the bed. In the morning, about half-past seven o'clock, he left, my servant missed the sheets and blanket; Lee took him, brought him back, and found them under his waistcoat. I gave him in charge.

EDWARD LEE . I lodge with Brooks. I saw the prisoner go out, followed him down the street, overtook, and brought him back. He pulled the sheets out of his pocket, and the blanket from under his waistcoat.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 44.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190113-60

220. GEORGE TAYLOR was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of January , one handkerchief, value 3 s. the goods of Abraham Aron , from his person .

ABRAHAM ARON . On the 16th of January, I was in Newgate-street , between twelve and one o'clock in the day, walking arm-in-arm with a gentleman, and felt a hand in my pocket - I turned round, and saw the prisoner with my handkerchief in his hand; I left the gentleman, took him, and took the handkerchief out of his hand - he had ran into the road. I brought him on the pavement again. Nobody but him was near me.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

EDWARD RENNY . I was with the prosecutor; he left me, and I saw him take the handkerchief out of the prisoner's hand.

Prisoner's Defence. It was thrown against me.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190113-61

221. GEORGE FISHER and WILLIAM HUMMERSTON were indicted for that they, on the 23d of December , at Hornsey , about one o'clock in the night in a garden-ground belonging to William Johnson , feloniously did break fifty shrubs, value 20 s., his property, in the said garden-ground standing and being, against the statute.

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating that they did spoil instead of break.

THIRD COUNT, the same as the first, omitting the word break, and substituting the word destroy.

FOURTH COUNT, the same as the first, only substituting the word steal, instead of break.

FOUR OTHER COUNTS, the same, only stating them to be growing in a certain enclosed ground, instead of a garden.

THOMAS BREWER . I am gardener to Mr. William Johnson , who lives at Muswell-hill, Hornsey; he had a quantity of shrubs in the pleasure ground, which is fenced all round. On the 23d of November, at seven o'clock at night, I saw them all safe; next morning I found a quantity of holly, saffrons, Rhoda bendrams, and other evergreens, cut and taken away. About eight o'clock the officer came, and produced shrubs of this description they had been partly cut, and then torn away; those produced tallied exactly with what were left, and I am certain are part of those lost; they will never return again to their proper maturity. The damage done was upwards of 20 s. The prisoners lived at Highgate.

THOMAS IZARD . I am a patrol. On the 23d of December, a little after one o'clock in the morning, I was with Davenport, and met the prisoners in Coney Hatch-lane with two bundles of holly and other evergreens - one had his bundle on his head, and the other on his shoulder, with a pole. Fisher said he brought it from Hadley, and threw his bundle down, and said he would carry it no further. I asked them whom they had it from? they said they had it from a gardener, and gave 2 s. 6 d. for it. I have been a gardener myself, and told them I was sure no gardener would ever presume to cut such shrubs as those. Hummerston told Fisher he had better take his bundle up, and go along with it, which he did, and we put them into the cage. They said they had stolen them, but they did not say where from. I found a knife on each of them - one was a gardener's knife, was all green, and appeared to have been fresh used; the other was a shoemaker's knife - there was a notch in each knife, which being compared with the shrubs, agreed with it. I have no doubt but they were cut with those knives. No gardener would cut such shrubs as those. I shewed them to Brewer, and they tallied with the trees.

THOMAS BREWER re-examined. The pole is my master's, and laid just by the holly.

WILLIAM DAVENPORT . I was with Izard; he has spoken correctly.

The prisoners pleaded distress.

FISHER - GUILTY . Aged 45.

HUMMURSTON - GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190113-62

222. GEORGE CHARD and JOSEPH BLANCHARD were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Burls , on the night of the 1st of November , at St. Marylebone , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, one brooch, value 5 l.; one snuff-box, value 3 l.; one watch, value 4 l.; one seal, value 1 l.; one watch-key, value 5 s.; one purse, value 2 s.; one ladle, value 1 l.; one tea-spoon, value 7 s.; one pair of sugar-tongs, value 1 l.; one smelling-bottle, value

2 s.; one pair of scissars, value 1 s.; two thimbles, value 2 s., and 18 s., in monies numbered , his property.

WILLIAM VICKERY . I am servant to Mr. Burls. On the night of the 25th of October, I went to bed about eleven o'clock; I was the last up, and am certain all the house was fastened up, the stair case window, on the first floor was shut down. I came down about half-past seven o'clock in the morning, and found the upper sash half way down, also footmarks on the window and in the house; there was a ladder outside, standing up against the window - anybody could then get in and out. I went into the front parlour, and found the shutter half-way open, so that they had been in the parlour.

Cross-examined by MR. WALFORD. The staircase window is twelve feet from the ground. It had been daylight sometime before I got up - I saw no appearance of a candle having been used.

WILLIAM BURLS, Esq. I rent a house in Gloucester-place, in the parish of St. Marylebone. When I came down in the morning, I found my silver snuff-box gone, which I had left in the parlour the night before; also a pair of spectacles, and a brooch; a work-box was emptied, and the contents gone. I missed a lady's gold watch, and a green net purse, with a clasp, from my wife's dressing-room, which joins our bed-room on the second floor; there was about 18 s. in the purse - I had seen them there when I went to bed. The thieves must have passed through my bed-room, to get to the dressing-room. I then went into the drawing-room, on the first floor, missed some packs of cards, and all the articles stated in the indictment, which are worth considerably more than 40 s.; the brooch was found at a pawnbroker's in the neighbourhood; I have also seen some of the silver, broken up - the robbery was committed on Saturday night, or Sunday morning.

JAMES GIDEON . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Stafford-street, St Marylebone, about a quarter of a mile from the prosecutor's. On the 29th of October, between eight and nine o'clock in the morning, the prisoner Chard came and offered a small gold brooch set with brilliants, in pledge for 5 s. I asked him whose it was? he said it was his own. I asked him where he got it? he said he bought it of a man at a public-house for 7 s., but he was informed that it was worth two or three times that money. I suspected him, and sent for a constable, who came; I showed him the brooch, which appeared to answer the description of one in a handbill which I had received before; I showed the constable the handbill, in the prisoner's presence, and went with him, and the prisoner to Mr. Burls; we produced the brooch, which he claimed; I left him in charge of the constable. I produce some silver, which appears to be part of the articles of a lady's work-box; here are two silver thimbles, and a silver purse-spring, with part of the purse. About an hour after I had stopped Chard, Jones came to sell them. I observed a green thread and tassel hanging to the purse-spring, which I pulled off; I weighed it, and gave her 2 s. for it. In the course of the day I got a fresh handbill, and thought they might be part of the property, and sent for Coates. I believe I sold Blanchard the pantaloons found at Jones's lodgings, about a week before the robbery - there is my mark on them.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he not say a man named Clark sold him the brooch - A. He mentioned no name - he did not describe the man.

RICHARD COATES . I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner Chard, and took him to Mr. Burls with Gideon - as we went along, I asked him where he got the brooch? he said he bought it of a young man, named Clark, who had been a gentleman's servant, and that he had known him some years. I asked him where he lived? he said he did not know; I told him that was very strange, as he had known him so long; he said if he was let go, he dare say he could find him himself; I told him that was impossible, took him to Mr. Burls, and produced the brooch. About seven o'clock in the evening, Gideon sent for me again, and produced some silver, which answered the description in the handbill; he told me who he bought it of, and went with me and Smith to Jones's lodgings, No, 28. Mitcham-street, and took her into custody there; I searched the place, and found two packs of cards in a drawer; as soon as she saw me take them out, she put a pair of scissars into my hand - I found nothing else there, except a pair of trowsers, and other clothes.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he not describe Clark - A. He said he was taller than himself, and I believe he said he wore a light coat; I went to two or three houses to find Clark, but could find no such person as he had described - Blanchard absconded, and was never heard of, until last Tuesday - I took him on Wednesday morning at Chelsea.

WILLIAM SELLERS . I am a constable, and was with Coates on the 13th of January, when he took Blanchard, in Exeter-court, Chelsea; I asked him if he knew what I took him for? he said Yes, he had kept himself close, and he should liked to have known the fate of Chard before he was apprehended.

RICHARD SMITH . I am a constable. I was with Coates, and took Chard at Mr. Gideon's, he has given a correct account; Chard said he was pledging the brooch for money to take him to the fight at Moulsey Hurst, and that he was to meet the young man who sold him the brooch, in the Edgware-road, to go to the fight together. I afterwards went with Gideon and Coates to Jones's lodgings, and found two packs of cards, a pair of scissars, and some wearing apparel. I produce two neck-handkerchiefs, two silk handkerchiefs, a sheet, a pair of new boots, a pair of pantaloons, and a waistcoat.

Cross-examined. He said he was to meet the man that morning - we did not go to the Edgware-road to look for him; we made several attempts to find Clark, after the prisoner's examination, but could never hear of him - we went several miles into the country, to look for Blanchard, but could never find him.

DEBORAH BOX . I live at No. 28, Mitcham-street, Lisson-green. I know the prisoner Blanchard; I have seen him come seven or eight times to see Eliza Jones , who lodges with me; the last week he dressed, and undressed himself at the house, and left his dirty clothes with her - Jones was taken up on a Thursday; I saw Blanchard there the Saturday before that, but not after.

ELIZA JONES . I was taken up for this robbery on a Thursday - Chard had been taken up that morning. I know Blanchard - he used to come backwards and forwards frequently, from September, until I was taken. I

had seen him on the Saturday evening that this robbery was committed - he left me about ten o'clock; I saw him on the Sunday afternoon, then on the Monday morning, and every day. I got the scissars from Blanchard, that I gave to Coates, either on the Sunday or Monday. I sold the silver to Gideon, and broke it up. Chard gave it to me on the Sunday or Monday. There was part of the clasp of a purse, which was either green or brown. After he had given them to me, he said that he wished me not to keep any of them, and so I broke them up and sold them; I showed them to him the morning that I sold them in the evening, in the same state they are in now. The clothes found at my lodgings are his; he had them sometime before the robbery.

Q. Did he say why he wished you to sell them - A. On the evening before Chard was taken, I saw Blanchard with the brooch, he took it away, saying it was part which belonged to what I had got, and he did not wish me to keep the things he had given me, any more than he wished to keep the brooch himself; I destroyed every thing he gave me, except what is now produced - he gave no reason why I was to destroy them, only that there was something in the papers about them, that he did not like. I know nothing of Chard.

WILLIAM BURLS re-examined. The brooch is mine; I have had it three years, and wear it myself - I know the scissars, the clasp, and the thimbles.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you not say that you suspected a man, who you saw with your servant the day before - A. No, when he said the brooch was given to him by a servant I asked him to describe him? he said he was a little man - I had occasionally seen a man in the Mews, but he was a large lusty man.

BLANCHARD'S Defence. It is useless pretending that I am entirely ignorant of it, I will explain every thing. On the night of the robbery, I was coming from the play, and met Clark, went with him to Gloucester-place, and waited while he got over the wall, and returned with the things which were taken to my lodgings. In the morning he went away, took most of the things, and left those that were found at my lodgings. In a few days I met him, and he told me to keep out of the way, as a young man, who he gave the brooch to, was apprehended.

WILLIAM WADDINGTON . I am a journeyman carpenter, and live in the Edgeware-road. Chard lodged with me at the time he was taken up, and for two months before. On the Saturday before he was taken, he came home at half-past ten o'clock, and went to bed. I saw him come in - he sleeps in the next room to me. He did not go out until seven in the morning - if he had I must have known it, as he must pass through my room.

Cross-examined by MR. ARABIN. I live about half a mile from the prosecutor. My wife sleeps in the same room with me, and knows this as well as myself - she is not here. I did not go before the magistrate to tell this, as I was not sent for. He was never out later than half-past ten o'clock.

BLANCHARD - GUILTY. - DEATH . Aged 16.

Of stealing, in the dwelling-house, but not of breaking and entering in the night-time .

CHARD - NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

Reference Number: t18190113-63

223. DANIEL M'VEY was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Joseph Wilford Parkins , about eight o'clock at night of the 4th of February , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, one diamond ring, value 150 l.; one pearl breast-pin, value 6 l.; two bunches of pearls, value 116 l.; 66 pieces of foreign gold coin, value 57 l. 8 s.; one hunting frock, value 4 l. 4 s.; one pair of breeches, value 1 l., and 4 l. 4 s. in monies numbered , his property.

The prosecutor stating his name to be WILFRED, instead of WILFORD, the prisoner was, on this indictment,

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18190113-64

224. JOHN FLEMING was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Nathaniel Roach , about twelve o'clock at noon of the 7th of January , at St. Mary, Stoke Newington (no person being therein), and burglariously stealing therein, three pair of boots, value 40 s.; two pair of shoes, value 5 s.; one pinafore, value 1 d.; one table-cloth, value 6 d.; two handkerchiefs. value 6 d.; 15 caps, value 3 s.; one shirt, value 1 d.; three neck-cloths, value 18 d.; one apron, value 6 d., and one pair of boot-trees, value 5 s. , his property.

NATHANIEL ROACH . I live in the parish of Stoke Newington. On the 7th of January, I went out between ten and eleven o'clock in the morning, and fastened the house up quite safe. I secured the window with a nail, and saw all the articles stated in the indictment safe in the house when I left. One pair of boots were almost new, and worth above 10 s. - there were two pair of shoes also, worth 10 s. I was the last person in the house. In consequence of information which I received, I returned home between twelve and one o'clock - I was the first person that got home. I found the door and window open; the window was broken, and the nail with which it was fastened laid under it. All the drawers were opened, and the property taken out.

WILLIAM CLARK . I am a journeyman baker. On the 7th of January, between twelve and one o'clock, I saw a donkey, with a pannier on his back, come out of the lane where the prosecutor's house is. I saw the prisoner come out of the house with a pair of top-boots in his hand; he ran down the lane as soon as he saw me. When I had got about a hundred yards he returned, and went after the donkey. There was another man with the donkey - they came down the street, towards the town, which leads to the common. I saw a bundle in the pannier, and gave the alarm, but could not follow.

Prisoner. Q. Why did you not stop me - A. They ran from me. I am sure the prisoner is the man - I gave the alarm. In about ten minutes a man stopped me, and wanted to detain me.

JOHN BROMLEY . I am a journeyman baker, and live at Stoke Newington. About half-past twelve o'clock of the 7th of January, I saw the prisoner by the engine-house, with a companion and a donkey. The prisoner stopped the donkey, and covered the bundle over in the pannier with some hay. It was about a quarter of a mile from the prosecutor's house, and leading to the common.

JOHN WORKMAN . I am beadle of Stoke Newington. I heard the alarm, received information, and went in pursuit. I saw the prisoner running on Newington Common, and followed him across a field - he went through a brook into a garden, and was taken there. I asked him where the things were? he said they were in a ditch at the bottom of the lane. I sent a man, who was a stranger, there for them - he brought the pannier, with the property in it, to the Three Crowns, public-house, in the prisoner's presence - the prisoner said nothing about them.

ZACHARIAH WORMWELL . I am servant to Mr. Bond, of Church-street, Stoke Newington. I saw the prisoner on the roof of a cow-house, making his way into the kitchen-garden. I took him; he begged of me to let him go.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was employed to drive the donkey. I heard two men call Stop thief! and ran away, but was taken. It was full a mile from the prosecutor's house.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 21.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18190113-65

225. JOSHUA ALEXANDER was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Robert Barber , about one o'clock in the afternoon of the 1st of January , at St. John, Hackney , (no person being therein), and feloniously stealing therein, one great-coat, value 20 s. and one handkerchief, value 2 s. , his property.

JOHN LAWRENCE . I am journeyman to Robert Barber , who is a painter and glazier , and lives at Clapton , in the parish of St. John, Hackney. On the 1st of January, about one o'clock, I left the shop, which is part of the dwelling-house, and went to dinner. I shut the street-door, locked it, and took the key with me - I left nobody in the house. I returned in about twenty minutes, found the street-door forced open, and the prisoner in the shop, in custody of Joseph Mason , with a great-coat in his possession, which I had left hanging in the passage when I went out.

JOSEPH MASON . I am a journeyman painter. On the 1st of January I was at work at Mr. Carter's, which is next door to the prosecutor's, and saw the prisoner come out of his house, about twenty minutes after one o'clock, with a great-coat on his back - he was wearing it. I ran to the prosecutor's door, pushed it open, and gave the alarm, but nobody was in the house - the door was just put to. The lock was still locked, though the door was open. I pursued and collared the prisoner. He said,

"Don't collar me - take the great-coat, and I will give you my quills to let me go." (He had a bundle of quills with him). I had not seen him before he went into the house. I took him back to the shop with the great-coat on his back. There was nobody in the house. He took the coat off, and put it on the counter. Lawrence came in, and I sent him for his master - he fetched him. The coat was given to the beadle with the prisoner.

ROBERT BARBER . My house is in the parish of St. John, Hackney. I was sent for, and found the prisoner in the shop, in custody. Mason said, in the prisoner's presence, that he saw him come from the shop with the great-coat on his back. Suspected he had something that did not belong to him, pursued him, and brought him back. The prisoner said nothing. I gave him in charge.

JOHN GARVA . I am a beadle. The prisoner and coat were given into my charge. There was a handkerchief in the pocket.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I beg for mercy.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 18.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

Reference Number: t18190113-66

226. WILLIAM JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of January , at St. George, Bloomsbury , one timepiece, value 5 l., the property of William John Law , Esq. , in his dwelling-house .

MARGARET BRUNTON . I am servant to William John Law , Esq., who lives in Russell-street , Bloomsbury, in the parish of St. George. On the 2d of January, about eleven o'clock in the morning, two men came for a pianoforte, which was on the ground-floor. I took them into the back parlour for it, and left the street-door open. I followed the men out, and immediately missed the clock off the mantle-piece in the front parlour - I saw the footmarks where the clock had stood - I had seen it safe just before. There was time for a man to go in and take it while we were in the back parlour. I ran to the door, and told the people of the robbery. The men could not take it; I was with them all the time. I saw the clock at the watch-house about a week after.

SAMUEL FURZEMAN . I am an officer. On Saturday, the 2d of January, I saw the prisoner and another man in Castle-street, about a quarter before two o'clock - they went up Nottingham-court, which is about a quarter of a mile from the prosecutor's house - the prisoner was carrying the clock, concealed in an apron. I laid hold of him, and asked him where he got it? he said a gentleman gave it to him at Charing-cross to carry to Holborn. I took the prisoner, and my brother took the other. I advertised the clock, and no owner coming for it in the course of a week, the men were discharged. I afterwards showed the clock to Brunton. On the Wednesday following my brother brought Jones into the watch-house, between eleven and twelve o'clock at night. I cannot find his companion.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JAMES TUTMAN . I am a clock-maker. I repaired this clock for the prosecutor very lately - it is worth five or six guineas.

Prisoner's Defence. A gentleman got out of a coach at Charing-cross, and called for a porter - he asked me to carry the clock, and said he would follow me. I thought he was behind me when I was taken.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 20.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18190113-67

227. CHARLES HEWITT was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Edmund Jacobs , about eight o'clock in the night of the 14th January , at St. Margaret, Westminster , with an intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, one watch, value 20 s. , the property of the said Edmund Jacobs .

EDMUND JACOBS. I am a watch-maker , and rent the

shop and parlour at No. 86, York-street , in the parish of St. Margaret, Westminster; I sleep there. The landlord does not live in the house - there are other lodgers - the shop door opens into the passage. On the 24th of January, about eight o'clock at night, I saw a man break a whole square of glass in the window, put his hand in, and take a watch out at the same instant, all at one blow. I saw his face by the light of a lamp which I had burning, and took particular notice of him. I am sure the prisoner is the man. He took a watch which hung in the window; I immediately seized my pen-knife, and attempted to cut his hand, to prevent his taking it - I do not know whether I cut it or not; I got hold of the chain, as he held the watch - the chain broke, and he got the watch. I have never seen it since. My wife tried to open the door and go out, but somebody held it with a string. The daylight was quite gone.

ELEANOR STEVENS. I am near eleven years old, and live in Gardiner's-lane, York-street. Last Thursday night, about eight o'clock, I saw the prisoner running as hard as he could, in a direction from Jacobs's shop; I did not see him at the shop; Jacobs was running after him - he was about twenty yards from the shop; I am certain it was the prisoner. I saw his face by the light from a woman's stall. He was about two yards from me. I am sure he is the man.

EDMUND JACOBS re-examined. As soon as he got off, I ran after him; the door opened very well then. I saw Stevens; he ran by her - I am certain he is the man - the watch is worth 27 s. There was a string tied to the handle of the door.

MARY MACKENZIE . I was going past Mr. Jacob's window, about ten minutes before eight o'clock, and looked if I could see Mrs. Jacobs through the window. I saw the prisoner looking through the window - he appeared to be looking at Mr. Jacobs, who was at work. The lamp in the window threw a great light on his face, and there was another light from the shop opposite - I am certain he is the man. I saw his face distinctly. I did not stop two minutes, and left him there.

BENJAMIN TIMBRELL . I am constable of St. Margaret's, Westminster. I apprehended the prisoner on the 15th of January, at the Crown, Pye-street; I found nothing on him. When he was examined, I saw a cut on his finger; it appeared to be from a knife. Jacobs gave him in charge.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in company with a man from half-past five o'clock till near ten on the 14th.

WILLIAM USHER . I am a shoemaker. I made the prisoner a pair of shoes. Last Monday week, he paid me six shillings; he called upon me on Thursday, at my mother's house, Bernard-square, Waterloo-road, and paid me the rest. I was with him from half-past five, till ten o'clock; my sister was present when he came.

Q. Where did he pay you the money - A. At the Spanish Patriot, New Cut; we got there about six o'clock, and remained in the tap-room till half-past ten.

Q. How came you to go there - A. I took him there, as I generally use the house - we each paid our share, and Thomas Blake , who was with us nearly all the time, paid his part - the landlord and landlady saw us there.

Q. The landlord, landlady, and Blake saw him there, but neither of them are here - A. No.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 19.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

Reference Number: t18190113-68

228. JOHN DRISCOLL and PETER SULLIVAN were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Joseph Peppercorn , about one o'clock in the night of the 15th of January , at St. Mary Matfelon, alias Whitechapel ; with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein the sum of 2 s. 7 d. in monies numbered , his property.

JOSEPH PEPPERCORN . I keep a British wine shop , in Rosemary-lane . On the 15th of January, I shut up my house and went to bed at half-past twelve o'clock at night. About one o'clock I was alarmed by a knocking at the door, and somebody calling for some hot wine; I called out of the window that I could not serve them, and went to bed again. In about five minutes I was alarmed again by a knocking; I did not get up immediately, but in about a quarter of an hour, as it continued, I got up; and observed two persons standing outside; I did not know them. In about five minutes the watchman came - I went down stairs, and found three or four watchmen in the shop. Three staples of the door were drawn out, which I had fastened safe the night before; I found the till taken out of its place, three sixpences and 1 s. 2 d. in copper, gone. The till lay on the floor.

THOMAS GEORGE . I am a watchman of Aldgate. On the 15th of January, about one o'clock at night, I saw the two prisoners and two others in Rosemary-lane, near the house; they passed my box, and turned up a turning opposite my box. I went round to cry one o'clock; turned up a turning, put my lanthorn behind me, and went into a dark court to watch them - and saw them all four come down the turning where they went up, and go towards the prosecutor's house. They stopped about the door, walking backwards and forwards, until half-past one o'clock. I am certain the prisoners were two of them. They were tossing halfpence with each other under the gas-lamp, which is over the prosecutor's door - I did not see them do anything to the house; I went away, called the hour, put my lanthorn in my box, and went there again. I slipped up the street, keeping close to the houses, and stood at the corner of Derby-street; I saw Sullivan leave the other three, and come down on the opposite side. I then saw one of them standing at the prosecutor's door watching; he saw me, immediately turned round, and said, there is the watchman; Driscoll, and another young man bounced out of the house, and ran across the street; all three of them ran into Blue Anchor-yard. I went over to the house and found it open - the staple was drawn, and the till laying on the floor; I heard the patrol call - we both went in together, and the prosecutor came down. I took Sullivan about two o'clock the next morning, coming by my box, and pretending to be in liquor; Driscoll was taken next day about ten o'clock - I have known him two years, and am sure he is the man.

JAMES SYMONDS . I am a patrol. George called me, I went to the prosecutor's house, and found the till on the floor, and a ring by the side of it, near the till, which I

produce. It must have taken great force to open the door.

HENRIETTA PEPPERCORN . I am the prosecutors wife. The prisoner, Sullivan, has been at our house three times. On the Thursday before the robbery he had a ring in his hand, and offered it to me for sale; it was exactly like the one produced - but I will not swear this is the same. I believe it to be so. I refused buying it, as I noticed it, and told him it was not gold.

Prisoner SULLIVAN. Q. Was it not a sailor who offered it to you - A. No; nobody was in the place but him.

THOMAS HARRISON . I apprehended Driscoll about eleven o'clock next morning, in White's-yard, Rosemary-lane.

DRISCOLL'S Defence. I was at home before one o'clock that morning. I am not able to run.

SULLIVAN'S Defence. I did not offer the ring to the woman.

DRISCOLL - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 24.

SULLIVAN - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 24.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18190113-69

229. JAMES THORPE was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of January , one coat, value 5 s. the property of John Williams .

JOHN WILLIAMS . I am servant to Mr. Eneky, a wine-merchant . On the 14th of January, about five o'clock in the afternoon, I went into a house in Jewry-street for some empty bottles, leaving my coat in the cart, which stood at the door. I came out in about five minutes, and missed the coat, went with Hawkins immediately, and found the prisoner coming out of Rosemary-lane with two others. I heard them say,

"separate." One of the men who was with him, stood at the door when I went in - my coat was brown. I have never found it.

JAMES HAWKINS . I am servant to Mr. Lambert, Jewry-street. I saw the prisoner lurking about the cart, then saw him go and take the coat out. I went to see for the driver - he came out - I told him. The prisoner went towards Rosemary-lane. I went for an officer, but could not get one. Williams and I followed, and saw the prisoner coming out of a court leading to Rosemary-lane with two others; one of whom I saw lurking about with him, and was with him when he took it. Immediately as they saw us, I heard them say to each other,

"separate." They parted. The prisoner walked a little way - I took him. I am sure he is the man - I knew him before.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing of it.

GUILTY . Aged 33.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18190113-70

230. HANNAH CURRELL was indicted for unlawfully procuring four pieces of counterfeit money, of the likeness and similitude of good shillings, with intent to utter the same .

CHRISTIAN DAVIS . I live with Mr. Sinclair, who is a pastry-cook, and lives in Gracechurch-street. On the 23d of December, the prisoner came to the shop about five o'clock in the afternoon, threw down 1 s., and took up two 1 d. buns. I gave her change, and put the shilling with five or six others in the till. The one she paid me was quite new, the rest were all dirty. Stephens came in, and I gave him the same shilling.

JOHN STEPHENS . I am constable of Bishopsgate. I saw the prisoner and Mary- Ann Brown , between Sinclair's shop and a chymist's; something passed from one to the other. The prisoner then went into Sinclair's shop. I went in, and Davis gave me the shilling. As I came out, Brown came against me as if she was going into the shop; she then turned and went to the prisoner. I saw Mr. Brown at his door - we followed them - I took Mary Ann Brown , and he took the prisoner. I searched them. Before that, one of them dropped a bad shilling; we found four bad shillings in an area, in a piece of paper - the prisoner had two good shillings, and 6 d. in copper about her.

JAMES BROWN . I am a fishmonger. I took the prisoner, and heard something drop from her as we went over the grating; nobody was near enough to drop it but her. We afterwards went and found it was four counterfeit shillings in a piece of paper.

MR. CALEB EDWARD POWEL . I am an assistant to the Solicitor of the Mint. The shilling found at Sinclair's and the four found in the area, are all counterfeits, and off the same dye.

Prisoner's Defence. I took the shillings for good.

Confined One Year .

GUILTY . Aged 50.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190113-71

231. ISAAC LEVY was indicted for a misdemeanor .

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190113-72

232. WILLIAM JACKLIN and THOMAS LEE were indicted for unlawfully attempting to break into the dwelling-house of John Monk , with intent to enter the same, and steal the goods therein .

JOHN MONK . I keep the tap at the Bolt in Tun Inn , Fleet-street; my dwelling-house is in Boar's Head-court , where I sleep. On the 11th of December, about seven o'clock in the evening, I was in the tap; Archer gave me information, I went to the house, found nobody there, and placed Mary Martin in the house; Archer came again at eight o'clock, I went there, saw the prisoner Lee, turn from the door, and look round the court; I passed him, and found Jacklin at the door - I saw him pull something out of the lock, and put it into his left hand breeches pocket, Lee came up, and I seized them both. Jacklin resisted very much, and asked what he had done? I told him he was trying to break into my house, and had been watched ever since six o'clock - I took him into the tap. Before the officer came he put his hand into his left-hand breeches pocket, and dropped a key on his boot, and then gave it a kick. I picked it up.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. It was moonlight. I was about six yards from Jacklin. I am sure he pulled the key from his pocket.

Cross-examined by MR. NORTON. Lee was looking round the corner.

JOHN ARCHER . I am a waiter at the Bolt in Tun. A little before seven o'clock I saw the prisoner, Jacklin, go from Monk's door, and informed Monk of it; he went with me, and several others, and examined the door,

which was safe. About half-past seven I was going out, saw Jacklin leave the door again, and put something into his pocket. I watched him, and followed him into Fleet-street, to the corner of Water-lane, where he stopped and conversed with Lee, I crossed over to watch, and saw them return towards the court together - Jacklin went down the court, and Lee went further up Fleet-street, towards Bouverie-street. I crossed again, went to Monk's tap, and informed him. We went out, and saw Lee peeping round the corner, towards Boar's Head-court, looking towards the Bolt in Tun yard. Monk went between them, and asked Jacklin what he was about? he tried to strike him. I called the watch, and they were taken.

Cross-examined. There is a key-hole in the door, and a gas-lamp at the entrance of the court.

EDWARD FLOODGATE . I live at Chertsey. I was in town, and lodged at the Bolt in Tun. Archer came in, and gave information. I went out, and saw the prisoners in Monk's custody. Jacklin resisted very much; I laid hold of Lee, he was quiet. They were taken to the tap - Jacklin followed behind - we sat down in a box with Lee, I thought I observed him drop something under the table, Jacklin was fighting at the time, so that I could not ascertain exactly. As soon as the officer secured him I found a bag, containing three skeleton keys, and on searching further I found a single skeleton key; Lee put his hand under the table, which made me suspect he was getting rid of something.

Cross-examined by MR. NORTON. Q. It was foggy - A. It was dark. Lee had not been in that part of the room where I found the single skeleton key. There were several people in the room.

MARY MARTIN . I was at Monk's house, up one pair of stairs; I heard the lock rattle, as if a key was put in, about eight o'clock, I came down, thinking it was my master, and asked, twice, who was there, but received no answer. I put the chain up, and staid in the passage; in a short time I thought I heard somebody go from the door - they came back in a few minutes - my master came, and took them.

JAMES MOORE . I am a plumber, and live at Frome. I was at the Bolt in Tun. I went with Monk to the other end of the court, and saw Jacklin pull something out of the lock, and put into his pocket - it sounded like a key - Monk seized them both. I held Jacklin, and took him to the tap; he resisted very much, and pulled something out of his left-hand breeches pocket, it was picked up - it was a skeleton key. I saw him drop it.

THOMAS BRANSCOMB . I am a constable. I was sent for to the tap, and took the prisoners into custody. Jacklin's arms were pinioned. The picklock keys were delivered to me.

WILLIAM JACKSON . I am a patrol. I heard the cry, and saw Monk with Lee in custody. Jacklin was brought into the tap-room. Monk gave me the key which Jacklin had dropped.

MESSRS. ANDREWS and NORTON addressed the Jury on behalf of the prisoners.

JACKLIN - GUILTY . Aged 56.

Confined Two Years , and publicly Whipped .

LEE - GUILTY . Aged 37.

Confined One Year , and publicly Whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190113-73

233. GEORGE TOMLINSON was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of November , one portmanteau, value 2 s.; one pouch, value 10 s.; one belt, value 5 s., and one sabretash, value 10 s. , the property of Charles Webb Dance , Esq.

JOSEPH WILKINSON . I am servant to Colonel Charles Webb Dance, of the 79th regiment . On the 29th of November he was ordered on military duty to Windsor; I packed these things in the portmanteau, at his apartments, York-street, Portman-square, and left them in the riding school, at the barracks, King-street, Golden-square, at a quarter after ten o'clock at night, about eleven next morning it was brought to the barracks by Corporal France .

JOHN MITCHELL . I am a corporal of the 79th regiment. The prisoner was in the same regiment. On the 29th of November, at eleven o'clock, I put him on sentry at the front gate of the barracks - he was to remain sentry until one o'clock, but would be on guard until ten o'clock in the morning - the guard was stationed in the guard-room in the yard - no person could get out of the front gate without his knowing it. There was another sentry at the back gate.

Cross-examined by MR. WALFORD. Q. Where is the key of the riding school kept - A. In the orderly room, which is not locked, anybody could not get in. I relieved him off sentry at one o'clock; he lodged in Seymour mews. He could have gone there, and returned in about a quarter of an hour.

JOSEPH MUNDAY . I am a watchman. On the 29th of November I was on duty in Seymour mews, which is a quarter of a mile from the barracks. I saw a soldier going down with something on his shoulder. I do not know what it was, it looked like a box, and was about the size of that produced.

Q. Who was that person - A. The prisoner, I knew him before. I saw him come back, and suspected him to be the same man, and told him it was not a right time to bring a box down, he said they were in a hurry to go to Windsor - I saw no other soldier. He had no box with him then. I was a quarter before one o'clock when he returned, not when he passed.

Cross-examined. Q. How was he dressed - A. He had regimentals on; it was about a quarter before one o'clock when I saw him with the trunk. I did not know him then - he returned in about five minutes.

JOHN MITCHELL re-examined. I went round to see if the men were on guard about a quarter before twelve o'clock, the prisoner was then on duty. It is uncertain when I go round again. The relief was called on exactly at one o'clock.

THOMAS FRANCE . I am a corporal. I went to the barrack-yard, about eight o'clock on the Monday morning that the portmanteau was missed. I examined the list to see who was on guard that night; I suspected the prisoner, and went to search the stables in Seymour mews, where he had the care of his master's horse. Lieutenant Greaves is his master - the stables are rented by the regiment; only his master's horse stood there - the prisoner did not

sleep there. We found the portmanteau in the loft over the stable, covered over with hay - we broke the doors open; the prisoner occupied the loft at the time. I took it to the barracks, and shewed it to the watchman, in the prisoner's presence, between ten and eleven o'clock.

Cross-examined. There were only the prisoner's and his master's horses kept there, that I know. I found two dead rabbits in the loft.

JOHN DIBBLE . I am a corporal. I was with France, and found the portmanteau. The prisoner had the care of the stable.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent. The corporal had the key of the gate.

JOHN MITCHELL re-examined. I had the key of the gate - he could not get out at the gate. He might get away without getting out of the gate, as many have done, without being seen by the sentry - the wall is not high.

- I am a coachman. I saw two men take their horses out of that stable about eight o'clock on the Monday morning. The prisoner had the care of the loft. There were two keys to the stable door, which hung up for the men to take. They were soldiers.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190113-74

234. GEORGE WIGGINS was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of December , 250 lbs. of potatoes, value 12 s, and one sack, value 1 s. , the property of William White .

SAMUEL GREEN MORISON . I manage Mr. William White 's farm at Edmonton, the prisoner was in his service. A man, named Head, lived about a quarter of a mile off. There was a quantity of potatoes in the barn, which was boarded. Foster is our private watchman, and bought to come on duty at nine o'clock at night, and leave at five in the morning. On Sunday, the 13th of December, I was in town, but returned at night. On Monday morning Foster gave me information. I found three boards of the barn had been pulled down and put up again - there was room to get in and take the potatoes out. On the 15th of December I went with Austin, and took the prisoner. He said it was the first time he had robbed his master, out Deller often had.

Cross-examined by MR. REYNOLDS. Deller was in my master's service. He never was discharged to my knowledge.

GEORGE DELLER . I live with Mr. White, and have one so four years - I attend the pigs. On Sunday, the 13th of December, about half-past six o'clock in the morning, I went on the premises to feed the pigs. I was in the privy, and heard a noise against my master's he potatoe-barn. I went to the door, and saw the prisoner come out of the window of the barn. I saw him half fill a sack with potatoes. I then saw a man, named James Head, put out another half-sack - Head lifted one sack on the prisoner's shoulder. I went up to them, and said,

"Who is here? - is it you, George? Is it all right?" He said Yes. I said,

"It is right enough for me, if it is for you." He said,

"Here is a shilling for you." I said,

"I don't want your shillings." He said Take it," which I did, and put it into my pocket. They then took the potatoes over the place. Head went back his quantity, and put both of them on the wood-stack, out ten yards from the barn - they then took them into the road, and then into a field where Wiggins had been hedging the day before, and put them under some wood which they had cut up for the hedge. It was moonlight. I went and told the watchman.

Q. When did you tell the watchman - A. About nine o'clock at night. Nobody was at home before that - my master was absent - I told nobody of it before. The watchman and I went to the field - I showed him the potatoes. We watched them all night, until seven o'clock in the morning - nobody came for them - in about three hours after they were gone. They must have broken the boards down to get at the barn, as the doors were locked and bolted. I saw Wiggins stick the boards up again as I was in the privy.

Cross-examined. Q. How long was he in putting the boards up - A. About five minutes. I watched them after I received the shilling. I returned to the privy again to watch them. I knew the prisoner well.

Q. The full moon was on the 12th, at four o'clock in the morning - it would be down much sooner than when they came - A. It was full moonlight. The privy is about ten yards from the barn.

Q. Was you at White's house during the day - A. Yes, and saw the maid. I inquired for the bailiff. I did not think it right to tell the maid.

Q. After you left off watching, what became of you - A. I went to bed. I did not move them.

Q. Were you not surprised at Wiggins's giving you a shilling - A. I was afraid of Head, which made me take it, as he had several times threatened to shoot me when I was watching in the fields. I was once discharged from my place for a week, as the foreman and I fell out - I do not remember what it was about. Wiggins came to his work as usual, and was taken.

THOMAS FOSTER . I am Mr. White's private watchman. I go on duty at nine o'clock at night, and leave at five in the morning. On Sunday, at nine o'clock, Deller came and told me what had happened. I went with him to the field, and found two sacks of potatoes under the wood - there were about 2 1/2 cwt. of potatoes. One of the sacks was marked like my master's. We watched all night; nobody came for them.

Cross-examined. A man could not carry both sacks at once.

THOMAS AUSTIN . I am a constable. On the 16th of December I apprehended the prisoner at work, and took him before the magistrate. As we went along, he said it was the first time that he had robbed his master, but that it was not the first time that Deller had.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Confined Six Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190113-75

235. JAMES BROWN and THOMAS EBBS were indicted for stealing, on the 8th of January , 5 lbs. of lead, value 1 s. 6 d., the property of Thomas Wilson , Esq. , and fixed to a certain dwelling-house belonging to him , against the statute.

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating the lead to be fixed to a building.

THOMAS WILSON , ESQ. I have a house at Hadley, Middlesex ,

which has been empty sometime. I lost seven or eight hundred weight of lead, and set people to watch.

JOSEPH HARVEY . I am a carpenter. I and Male were set to watch the house. On Friday night, the 8th of January, about half-past ten o'clock, I was in the room opposite the lead-flats. I stood at the window sometime, and saw the two prisoners on the flat, taking up the lead - they could not see me. I opened the window, went out to them, and called Male to assist me. Brown said to Ebbs,

"D - n it, we're done!" I ordered them into the room - they came in, and surrendered themselves. I gave them in charge. A great deal of lead was torn off and taken up - one piece was rolled up. I had a full view of the flat, and saw them move the lead. I found a ladder, which led up to the flat - it was not my master's.

Cross-examined by MR. ARABIN. I am sure I saw them take the lead up. It rained hard - they said they came there for shelter.

JAMES MALE . I was with Harvey, and saw the prisoners come up the ladder on to the lead - I was in a different room to Harvey, and called to him; I assisted in securing them. Ebbs seized Harvey's gun - I said if he did not let it go I would shoot him. The ladder has since been claimed. I could not see them do anything to the lead where I was; they got out of my sight.

FREDERICK PROPSTRING . I am a constable - the prisoners were given into my charge that night. I found a cord, a bag, some snares, and two knives on them. The lead appeared part cut, and matched the place exactly.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

BROWN's Defence. I had not been on the leads a minute.

BROWN - GUILTY . Aged 29.

EBBS - GUILTY . Aged 29.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190113-76

236. WILLIAM CARR was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of January , five saws, value 17 s.; five planes, value 15 s.; two screw-drivers, value 2 s.; six chisels, value 4 s.; one bore, value 1 s.; one gouge, value 1 s.; one awl, value 1 d.; one pair of compasses, value 6 d.; one axe, value 2 s. 6 d., and one glue-pot, value 2 s. 6 d., the goods of Robert Barrett , and fifty yards of sash-line, value 2 s. 6 d. , the goods of James Colville , the elder , and James Colville , the younger .

ROBERT BARRETT . I am a carpenter , and work at Messrs. Colvilles', who live in King's-road, Chelsea . On the 9th of January. about half-past five o'clock, I left all my tools in the shop, in the middle of the garden, and locked the door. On Monday morning I found the door broken open, and the articles stated in the indictment gone.

WILLIAM BILLINGSLEY . I am servant to Mr. Colville, and sleep in the shop. On the 11th of January, between two and three o'clock in the morning, I was disturbed by a noise in the carpenters' shop. I got up, and saw the prisoner there, taking the tools off the bench; I went down to meet him at the door with a loaded blunderbuss in my hand - I found great difficulty in taking him; I collared him in the shop - he had broken it open with a chisel; I found the chisel near the door. He made a desperate resistance, and both fell to the ground - he got the blunderbuss from me. I at last secured him, returned to the tool-house, and found his hat there.

RICHARD MAYBANK . I am a constable. I went to the tool-house, found the tools outside the door and a crowbar, which fitted the marks on the door.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I never had them in my hand.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

(See No. 180.)

Judgment Respited .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190113-77

237. JOSEPH CUTLER was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of December , ten live tame fowls, price 20 s, the property of John Final Cook , and seven live tame rabbits, price 7 s , the property of Edwin Cook .

JOHN FINAL COOK . I am a carpenter , and live at Heston ; the fowls and rabbits were in an outhouse. On the 27th of December, at night, it was broken open, and the fowls gone.

EDWIN COOK . I lost my rabbits out of the place next to the fowls - I had locked them up at eight o'clock the night before, and missed them at five the next morning.

THOMAS BRANSGROVE . I am a publican. On the 24th of December, between four and five o'clock in the morning, I was at Acton with Mr. Bailey - it was dark, and foggy; I heard somebody coming on. We stopped opposite the Red Lion, and two men came opposite us, one had a bag on his back - the prisoner had a basket. I crossed over to them, and asked the man what was in the bag, as I saw it was something alive; he said they were hares. I asked him where he got them? he said out of the country. I put my hand into the prisoner's basket, found feathers, and asked him if he had got pheasants? he said

"Yes, and a few fowls." I asked him if he got them from the same place? he said Yes. I collared the other man, and told him he must go with us, to see what he had got. I had not got ten yards when the prisoner passed me on the road, in Bailey's custody. He got from him, and ran by me. I gave the other man to Bailey and collared him. The other man then got from Bailey. I kept hold of the prisoner, took him to my house, searched him, and found a flint, a gimlet, and three or four pieces of raw beef in his waistcoat pocket. I asked him if that was to stop the dogs from barking? - he made no answer. I found nine hens and a cock, dead, and a small liver, in his basket. There were seven live rabbits in the other man's bag.

JOHN FINAL COOK . I know them to be mine.

Prisoner's Defence. The other man asked me to help him with them - I did not know what it was.

GUILTY . Aged 60.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190113-78

238. JOHN BAKER was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of George Hubbard , about three o'clock in the afternoon on the 10th of October (Tabiatha his wife being therein), and stealing therein, six gowns, value 2 l. 10 s.; one gown and skirt, value 9 s.; one bible, value 6 s; one handkerchief, value 2 s; two shawls, value 4 s; one petticoat, value 4 s., and one quilt, value 12 s. , the property of Joseph Knowles .

JOSEPH KNOWLES . I lodged with George Hubbard, in Queen-street, Chelsea . On the 10th of October, my apartments were broken open and robbed. The prisoner worked for my master, and ran away on the 12th. I never saw him again till the Tuesday week; I then collared him - he struck me two or three times. With great perseverance I got him to a public-house, and gave him in charge.

MARY KNOWLES . I am the wife of the last witness. I went out on the 10th of October about eleven o'clock; I returned about three, and found the door broken open, and the articles stated in the indictment gone. We live in the first floor. I found some of my things had been pledged and redeemed at Mount's.

ROBERT WILKIE . I am a labourer at Millbank. Last Tuesday week I heard the call of stop thief; I saw the prisoner strike Knowles a violent blow on his mouth - I assisted in securing him.

ROBERT FOX. I am servant to Mr. Mount, who is a pawnbroker, and lives in York-street. On the 10th of October, the prisoner pledged with me, six gowns, a quilt, two shawls, and a handkerchief. They were afterwards redeemed by another person.

TABIATHA HUBBARD. I am the wife of George Hubbard . Knowles and his wife lodged with us. On the 10th of October, I was at home all day. I heard a strange step coming down stairs, went to see who it was, and saw the back of a man going out at the back door, which goes into the street; I went up and found the room in great confusion. Sometime afterwards, the prosecutrix came home and said she had been robbed. I told her, a tall man with a blue apron went out - I thought it might be her husband. The man was the same size as the prisoner. He appeared to have a fustian jacket on.

JOSEPH KNOWLES . I know the prisoner wore a blue apron and a fustian jacket.

Prisoner's Defence. I lived with the prosecutrix three days before this happened, and met her the Sunday after; she said nothing about it.

MARY KNOWLES re-examined. I was not with him. He was taken into custody at Mr. Lyn's office; and said if I would not hurt him, he would pay me 2 l. out of his first pension. The officer and him persuaded me to make it up. The officer said he thought I might do it, as I had not been before a magistrate. He gave the officer 2 l. and the officer gave me 30 s. - I do not know his name - When I got home, my husband said I had done wrong.

TABIATHA HUBBARD. The prosecutrix was attending a sick woman at the time, and could not be living with the prisoner - I never saw any harm of her.

GUILTY. Aged 28.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only, but not of breaking and entering .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190113-79

239. JOHN SMITH was indicted for stealing on the 10th of December , sixteen yards of cotton, value 18 s. , the property of Thomas Cooper Barlow .

DRAKE SEWELL . I am shopman to Thomas Cooper Barlow , who is a linen-draper . On the 10th of December, about one o'clock, I was standing in the shop, and saw a man come to the door, reach a piece of print from the inside, and throw it to the prisoner. I pursued him about a hundred and fifty yards, and took him with it wrapped up in his apron. I brought him back, and gave him in charge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190113-80

240. ROBERT BROCKLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of December , 20 lbs. of lead, value 2 s. the property of George Constable , and fixed to his dwelling-house .

GEORGE CONSTABLE . I am a book-binder . I live at No. 4, James-street, Haymarket, in the parish of St. Martins . On the 17th of December, about a quarter before nine o'clock at night, I was rung for down from my workshop, and found Puddy and his wife at the door, who informed me that they had seen three men force open the front of the wooden trunk, and carry off part of the leaden pipe. I found six or seven feet of the pipe gone - it was fastened to the house by hold fasts.

Cross-examined by Mr. ADOLPHUS. It was a foggy night, but the fog was cleared off a good deal; I could see across the street very well.

JOHN PUDDY . I am a shoemaker. I was coming from work about a quarter before nine o'clock, and met the prisoner and two men in James-street, Haymarket. I passed them, turned round, and saw them go up to the spout. a gentleman passed them - the prisoner crossed the road and returned again to them; a gentleman passed them again - the prisoner crossed the street again, went back, and I saw them take the pipe from the wall, and go across the road with it. I went to meet them and passed them some distance. When they saw me, they stopped under a dead wall; I passed them again - they still stood under the wall with the pipe. I went towards my house, met my wife, turned back and met the tallest man of the three; then met the prisoner. His brother stood in Oxendon-street with the pipe on his shoulder. I went and told the prosecutor that three men had stolen his pipe, and I knew them very well; I knew them before - I am sure the prisoner was one of them. He was taken next morning.

Q. Why did you not take them that night - A. I could not find a constable. I knew the prisoner and his brother before, by seeing them about the street; the other man was a stranger, but I knew him by sight.

Cross-examined. Q. You left them in the street with the pipe - A. Yes; to give information to the prosecutor. I live in St. Martin's-street, Liecester-fields. I am positive the prisoner is one of them. There was a lamp over the door. I have done work for his brother. He fetched his shoes away. I did not carry them home. I do not know where they live.

ANN PUDDY . I was going over to the Haymarket, and met my husband at the corner of the street. He said there was a lead pipe coming down the street, and told me to watch where it went to. I saw the prisoner's brother take it on his shoulder, into No. 50, Whitcombe-street, four doors from James-street. The prisoner and another man assisted in taking it in. The prisoner stood at the door while the other two went in, and then

followed them in - he came out and walked up and down for about half an hour. I went over, looked through the window and saw the lead in the shop - it is an old iron shop. I am positive the prisoner is the man - I have known him a long while about the neighbourhood. His mother used to keep a house behind the Haymarket.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you walk up and down Whitcombe-street for half an hour - A. Yes; the watchman called nine o'clock. I did not give him in charge. The house has only a shop door, which is kept open. I saw a woman in the shop. The house was searched next day between ten and eleven - the lead was not found.

ROBERT EDWARDS . I am a constable. On the 18th of December, I went with a search-warrant to an old iron shop, No. 50, Whitcombe-street, but found no lead. I apprehended the prisoner in the back room, first floor. Mrs. Winship keeps the house.

Prisoner's Defence. I leave it to my counsel.

JAMES BRADISH . I am a brush-maker. On the 17th of December, I was in the prisoner's company at the Porcupine, Newport-street. I met him there about three minutes before nine o'clock, and remained with him till after ten. He was never out of the house all the time.

COURT. Q. Were you intimate with him - A. Only by seeing him at the house. I go there every evening. I get 15 s. a week.

Q. How do you know what night it was - A. It was foggy.

- WINSHIP. I live at No. 50, Whitcombe-street, the prisoner lodged there. On the 17th of December, I was in the shop all the evening. He came home about seven o'clock, went out between eight and nine - I did not see him come in again. I was in the shop at nine o'clock - he was never in my shop in his life. There is a passage separate from the shop - he never brought any lead in the shop. I was out next day when the officer came. Nobody brought any lead into the shop that night.

COURT. Q. You keep an old iron shop - A. No; I deal in rags and phials.

ROBERT EDWARDS re-examined. When I went to search for the lead, the last witness said she was out of the house till past nine that night. I found a pint and a quart pot concealed under her bed.

JOHN PUDDY . I heard her say she was out till past nine, and that her shop was shut up.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190113-81

241. JAMES POTTS was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of December , one coat, value 7 s. , the property of Mark Dellow .

MARK DELLOW . I am a farmer's servant . On the 28th of December, about two o'clock I was in the Mile End-road ; my coat was in the cart with two hair-cloths over it. I saw the prisoner by the cart - I had to deliver a parcel in Bow Common-lane. When I returned, I missed my coat, and found it at the watch-house.

JAMES WHEELER . I am a hostler. I was at the Coach and Horses public-house, and saw the prisoner go by with the coat; I called to him - he ran faster. He was stopped.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Six Months , and Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190113-82

242. JOHN WILLIAMS was indicted for obtaining 17 s. in monies numbered, from Charles Lenox , under false pretences .

CHARLES LENOX . I live at the Bell, in Bell-yard, Grace-church-street ; George Woolford carries goods from Blackwall; I was in the habit of paying for goods that he ordered, and afterward received the money from him. On the 25th of November, about ten o'clock in the morning, the prisoner came, and brought a two gallon bottle, and asked me if the Blackwall carrier called at my house? I said Yes; he said he had a two-gallon bottle of oil for him. I asked him if he had ordered it? he said Yes, and gave me a bill of it - (reads) -

"Mr. Cook, bought of William Slater two gallons of sperm oil, 17 s. Received, WILLIAM SLATER ." He said he would call in the evening for the money. I said I would not trouble him to call again, and tendered him a 1 l. note; he gave me 3 s., and went away - I gave Woolford's servant the bottle. Next day I saw it opened; it contained nothing but water.

THOMAS WOOLFORD . I am nephew to George Woolford . The bottle was given to me - I took it to my uncle.

GEORGE WOOLFORD . I keep the Blackwall and Poplar errand-cart. I am in the habit of buying goods for customers and taking them down. I had no orders for sperm oil - I never dealt with Mr. Slater in Fish-street-hill. On the 25th of November, my nephew brought me a bottle down - I delivered it to Mr. Cook, at the King's Arms - he refused to receive it, having given me no orders for it. I sent it back just as I received it.

CHARLES LENOX re-examined. When I found it out, I went to No. 17, Old Fish-street-hill - no such person as Slater lived there - it is a private house.

WILLIAM SMITH . I apprehended the prisoner on the 27th of November, and found two bills on him filled up in the same way.

Prisoner's Defence. I met a man at Westminster, who said he could assist me, as I was out of work - he used to send me with the things. I was to meet him at Whitehall-yard, to give him the money. He said he sold by commission.

GUILTY .

Publicly Whipped , and Discharged.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190113-83

243. WILLIAM HOLDING was indicted for a misdemeanor .

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190113-84

244. THOMAS SMITH was indicted for perjury .

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190113-85

245. JAMES THOMPSON was indicted for that he, on the 11th of December , feloniously and maliciously did, by menaces, and in a forcible manner, demand money of Thomas Cawkwell , with a felonious intent to rob him, and his money from his person, and against his will, feloniously and violently to steal .

THOMAS CAWKWELL. I live at Hoddesdon, in Hertfordshire. On the 11th of December, at half-past ten o'clock at night, I met the prisoner on this side the Cock, at Edmonton ; he told me to stop, I said

"For what?" he said,

" Your money!" - he spoke plainly, I could hear him distinctly. He collared me, and said,

"I will have your money, or I will blow your brains out, for I have a pistol." He did not produce one. I collared him, struggled with him, and said I wanted money as bad as he did; that I had a 1 l. note, and he should have half of it - I showed it to him. I looked in his face, and said,

"I thought you was an Irishman, but I see you are an Englishman, and shall have part of it. If you will go with me I will give you some beer, and will join you for the note. He refused going to Edmonton, but at last he did - we went to the Bell public-house, the landlord pushed us out. When we got out he said,

"D - n you, what do you mean by asking for the landlord? if I thought you meant to betray me I would mill you directly." I said,

"If I meant to betray you I could have done it before now." We then went to a watchman, and asked for a house - he directed us to one - we could not find it. I met another watchman, and gave him in charge.

THOMAS WHITE . I am a watchman. The prosecutor gave the prisoner into my charge. I could not understand a word that he said.

(The prisoner was unable to make a defence, having lost his tongue at Algiers.)

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190113-86

246. MARY MARTIN was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of December , one tea-kettle, value 10 s. , the goods of Thomas Griffiths .

GEORGE WATKINS . I am a painter. I was returning from work, and saw the prisoner go up the prosecutor's passage, at Knightsbridge. I followed her - she turned round and saw me. I went into the prosecutor's house, and saw her take the kettle from the yard. I secured her with it.

JAMES GRIFFITHS . I am the brother of Thomas Griffiths . The passage leads into our yard. I saw Watkins take the kettle from the prisoner.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 48.

Confined Three Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190113-87

247. JOHN MILLER was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of January , one hat, value 17 s. , the property of William Whitehead .

JOSEPH BAILEY . I am fourteen years of age, and apprentice to William Whitehead , who is a chimney-sweeper , and lives in Great Ayliff-street. On the 2d of January, about six o'clock at night, the prisoner took my hat off my head, gave it to two others, and all three ran off with it. My master bought the hat, and gave it to me to wear. He clothes me, as I am his apprentice. He was stopped.

WILLIAM WHITEHEAD . I bought the hat for the boy. I was bound to find him clothes.

COURT. Then the hat is Bailey's.

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190113-88

248. MARIA BAILEY was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of January , one shirt, value 3 s. , the property of James Ivory .

DORCAS IVORY. I am the wife of James Ivory , we live in Jew's-row, Chelsea - the prisoner was at my house. She went out, saying she was going to speak to her mother - soon after, I missed the shirt out of a box.

ELIZA ANGEL . I saw the prisoner come out of the prosecutor's passage, and went with her to Thompson's, where she pledged the shirt.

JOHN TURNER . I am servant to Mr. Thompson, pawnbroker - the prisoner pledged the shirt with me for 3 s.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I am very sorry for it.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Judgment Respited .

Sent to the Refuge.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190113-89

249. JAMES SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of December , one basket, value 2 s.; 12 shirts, value 10 l.; 15 cravats, value 30 s.; six pair of stockings, value 12 s.; three handkerchiefs, value 15 s.; five tablecloths, value 3 l.; 13 towels, value 8 s.; four aprons, value 8 s.; two collars, value 2 s.; two caps, value 2 s.; one counterpane, value 30 s., and one wrapper, value 1 s. , the property of John Mander .

JOHN MANDER . I am a carpenter , and live in Reeves's-place, Hoxton. On the 29th of December, at half-past ten o'clock in the morning, I sent the prisoner, who was plying as a porter, with a basket containing the articles stated in the indictment. I helped them on his head at Paul-street, Finsbury-square, where I work, and sent them to my wife, who is a laundress; I knew him well before. I went home at one o'clock, and found he had not been. I had given him a direction in writing, and he said he knew where it was. I gave information at Worship-street, and found part of them - he never brought any of them to my house. On the Thursday following he was taken.

JAMES HOWELL . I am servant to Mr. Fleming, who is a pawnbroker. On the 29th of December, about two o'clock, the prisoner's wife pledged two shirts with me for 13 s., in the name of Smith.

CHARLES POOR . I am apprentice to Mr. Peart, a pawnbroker, Whitechapel. On 29th of December four shirts were pledged with me for 25 s., in the name of Gregson, by a woman, whom the prisoner called his wife.

WILLIAM SOWERBY . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Cable-street, Whitechapel. On the 29th of December, about one o'clock. I took a table-cloth and two shirts in pledge for 1 l., by a person, whom the prisoner afterwards said was his wife.

HOWARD LEWIS . I am a clothes-salesman, and live in Cable-street, Whitechapel. On the 29th of December, in the afternoon, the prisoner came to my shop, and offered to sell me three duplicates of the articles produced. I suspected him, and left him in the shop, under pretence of going to examine them, but I got an officer. When I got back he was gone. He returned in about ten minutes, and was secured.

Prisoner. Q. Were you not tried here - A. Yes, and acquitted.

FRANCIS FREEMAN. I am an officer. I took the prisoner at Lewis's house, and found the direction on him which the prosecutor had given him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. Being pressed for money, I was driven to it.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190113-90

250. THOMAS RICE was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of December , one hat, value 3 s., the property of William Hawtin , from the person of Henry Hawtin .

HENRY HAWTIN . I am turned thirteen years of age, and am the son of William Hawtin, who is a coal-porter - I live with him, he supports me. On the 19th of December, about a quarter before seven o'clock in the evening, I was in Norton Falgate , going home - I had been on an errand for Mr. Sheals, who is my master. I sleep at my father's, and he supports me in victuals and clothes. I was running behind a hackney-coach, two boys shoved me against the coach, I told them to go away - they said very bad words. I left the coach, and was walking on the footpath, the prisoner came to me, took my hat off my head, gave it to another boy, and told him to run away with it - I am sure the prisoner took it; they were the two boys who pushed me against the coach; the other ran away - I have never got my hat. I followed the prisoner for my hat into a dark passage; he then beat me, and said he had not got it. I followed him into Spital-square, where a gentleman collared him, as I informed him of it. I gave him in charge. My father bought the hat for me.

BENJAMIN BEAVIS . I am a headborough. I heard the last witness crying. A gentleman collared the prisoner, I took him in charge. He said, if I would let him go he would find the boy.

Prisoner's Defence. Five or six of us were behind the coach - some of them took the hat off his head.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Judgment Respited .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190113-91

251. EARNEST FERDINAND GRAFT was indicted for embezzling the sum of 5 l. 5 s., which he had received on account of Peter Wall , his master .

PETER WALL . I am a boot maker , and live at Charingcross; the prisoner was my errand-boy . I employed him to receive money on my account, and as he received it, he ought to have brought it to me. I had wrote to Mr. Comyn, who is a customer, and lives in Meclinburg-square for an account of 5 l. 5 s.; I asked the prisoner if he had received it? He said Mr. Comyn was in the country, and had not paid it - he never paid it to me - (looks at a receipt) - it is the prisoner's hand-writing - I had no other person in my employ - he had 14 s. per week.

Prisoner. Q. Did I not pay you the money - A. Never.

MR. EDWARD RICHARD COMYN . I deal with the prosecutor; I owed him 5 l. 5 s. On the 7th of November, I was applied to for it; I gave my clerk the money to pay the man who brought the note - the clerk brought me a bill, and receipt.

CHARLES CONDEN . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner - he said he had paid the money to his master.

Prisoner's Defence. I received the money, and gave it to my master - he was rather intoxicated, which is very common - he discharged me when he was drunk.

PETER WALL re-examined. He left me on the 13th of December - I did not find out that the money was received until after that.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Six Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190113-92

252. DAVID MORGAN was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of January , from the person of James Davis , one pocket-book, value 2 s., and one 1 l. bank note , his property.

JAMES DAVIS . I am a builder , and live in Dorset-street, Manchester-square. On the 2d of January, between eleven and twelve o'clock. I was in St. James's Park - the prisoner and another had followed me from Knightsbridge, all in an instant the other man took my pocket-book, and the prisoner snatched at my watch, but did not succeed - it was a foggy evening. I met the prisoner the same evening in Oxford-street, and gave him in charge, but will not positively say he is the man.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190113-93

253. JAMES HAWS was indicted for stealing on the 14th of December , one watch, value 2 l. 10 s.; one chain, value 10 s.; one key, value 1 s., and one seal, value 5 s., the goods of John Manning , from his person .

JOHN MANNING . On the 14th of December, I was at the entrance of Covent Garden theatre , going in before the performance began - the prisoner was just before me; there was an immense crowd. I requested the prisoner to go forward, instead of which he turned on one side; as I was passing I felt my watch drawn from my pocket; I immediately collared him, and charged him with it; he said he had not got it, and would stand search. I called for an officer, and gave him in charge. After the crowd had passed, Donaldson, the officer found the watch in the pay-box - the prisoner was close to me when I lost it - the crowd was all on my left.

Cross-examined. I was going in at the front. There was an attempt to rescue him.

GEORGE DONALDSON . I am constable of the theatre. I was called for, and found the prisoner in the prosecutor's custody, close to the money taker's place - the money take gave me the watch; the glass was broken - I found a piece of glass close to the prisoner.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190113-94

254. MARY JACOBS was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of December , one water-bottle, value 9 d.; six wineglasses, value 3 s.; four custard-cups, value 2 s.; one decanter, value 1 s.; nine egg-cups, value 4 s. 6 d.; three liquor-bottles,

value 8 s.; one soap-glass, value 6 d., and twelve dishes, value 16 s. , the goods of Solomon Isaacs ; and JEREMIAH ELLIOT , MARY MASSEY , SUSAN LETTIS , REBECCA WILLIAMS , and SARAH BRADLEY were indicted for feloniously receiving different parts and parcels of the said goods, they well knowing them to have been stolen .

SOLOMON ISAACS . I am a glass-dealer , and live in Clipstone-street, Marylebone . The prisoner, Jacobs, was my servant , and lived eighteen months with me. I have missed a quantity of glass within the last twelvemonths. On the 3d of December, a man named Jenkins, gave me information; in consequence of which I and Martin went to the prisoner, Lettis's, and found three liquor-bottles, and three wine-glasses. I then went to Elliott's, and found six egg-cups, a decanter, and a soup-dish; I found three eggcups at Massey's, and a custard-cup at Bradley's. I then went to Williams's, and found a water-bottle, and three wine-glasses. I went home, and in the evening Jacobs was requested to take my child out as usual - she said she was going up stairs to fetch her bonnet; while she was up stairs, Martin went out; Jacobs then came down, and went out without her bonnet; we followed her into Bradley's shop; she put the child on the counter, took three custard-cups from some part of her person, and put them on the counter. Martin went into the shop, she fell on her knees, and begged for mercy, saying it was her first offence. I got an officer, and took him to the shop, where the property was found - they were ordered to appear on the thursday, and were committed.

Cross-examined by MR ADOLPHUS. Q. How many ladies lodge in the house, besides your own family - A. None. I never let lodgings to ladies. I was never in custody in my life.

Q. Were you ever in this Court before - A. Never, except to hear a trial - I am sure of it.

Q. Have you never stood at that bar - A. No, I was never tried. I was charged with housebreaking, but was not tried.

Q, Were you ever in custody - A. I believe I was one night in a watch-house.

Q. Were you not taken into custody for housebreaking - A. No, it was a woman, who was an acquaintance of a person in the country - I do not know her name.

Q. On your oath was you not tried here before, with Julia George , for I have the record in Court - A. I was not. I do not know her. A woman was taken up with me; we went before the Justice at Edmonton - it was twelve or fourteen years ago; I was brought up here the same day to the bar, and acquitted, no trial took place - it was all the same day.

Q. How many days were you in Newgate before you were brought to trial - A. I do not know whether it was three days or ten.

Q. Were you ever convicted of keeping a house of ill fame - A. Yes, about twelve years ago - I was imprisoned three months for it.

Q. Then how dare you say you was never in custody on any charge - A. Being a tradesman I thought it not fit to mention here.

COURT. Q. How long is it since you was tried here - A. Twelve or fourteen years.

Q. You was charged with burglary - A. I suppose so; I was taken to the watch-house - and then to Clerkenwell prison.

Q. Where were you imprisoned for keeping a disorderly house - A. In Tothill-fields.

Q. You swore you was never in custody in your life - A. I did say so - I found property at other houses.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Have you not told your creditors, that you cannot settle with them until you have settled with these persons - A. No.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. You found the things publicly exposed in Elliot's shop - A. Yes.

CHARLES PURFORD . I am constable of Marylebone. On the 3d of December I accompanied the prosecutor to Bradley's, who keeps a rag and phial shop in Buckingham-place. I found Jacobs in the shop, and three custard-cups laying on the counter; I asked Bradley if she had bought anything of the girl before? she said she had bought one custard-cup before, for twopence halfpenny. Isaacs then took me to Williams's, in Cirencester-place, Titchfield-street; I found three wine-glasses, and a bottle there; we found three liquor-bottles at Lettis's, in Fitzroy-market. From thence we went to Elliott's, who keeps a chandlers' shop, and found six egg-cups, a decanter, and a soap-dish in the window - the other three prisoners keep rag and phial shops.

MOSES MARTIN . I am a paper-hanger. On the 3d of December Isaacs called on me, and I went with him to Elliott's; I told him I wanted a quantity of plain glass to cut; he said he wished I had been there before, for he could have saved me from 20, to 30 per cent. in buying glass elsewhere instead of him. I asked him for some laperne-dishes; he said he had some, but he got them out of the house immemediately, for he sold them to some Jews; he told me who the Jews were, and I went to them, and found eleven laperne-dishes. I went with Isaacs to the other prisoners' houses, and found part of the property - I returned to his house. In the evening Jacobs was sent out with the child; I saw her come out without her bonnet and followed her to Bradley's shop; I saw her take a handkerchief out of her pocket - Bradley opened it, and there was custard-cups in it. I went into the shop, and took her.

ELIZA LEVY . I live in Tyler-street, Golden-square, and keep a wholesale glass shop - I know Elliott has lived in a respectable way for a number of years - he keeps a small glass and earthenware shop. I bought eleven lapern-saucers of him; he said he bought them at a sale.

WILLIAM JENKINS . I keep a bottle-shop, in George-street, Portland-place; the prisoner Jacobs came, and offered to sell me some glass; I asked her who they belonged to? she said they were her mother's; she took them out of her pockets - I did not like to buy them, and said they would not suit me. She went away, and came again in about a month with some more - she had a child in her arms each time. I found out where she lived, and informed the prosecutor.

JACOBS - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

ELLIOTT, MASSEY, LETTIS, WILLIAMS, And BRADLEY,

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190113-95

255. JOHN JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of January , one brass moulding, value 4 l. , the the property of John Ewer Poole .

JOHN EWER POOLE . I am a tobacconist , and live in New Bond-street . On the 11th of January, I was called down from tea, and missed the brass moulding from the window. I went to Gee's-court; there are several old iron shops there, but could not find it. As I returned, I found the prisoner in custody in the shop, with the moulding broken up. I put him into a coach - he called to somebody in the crowd, to go to the White Hart, public-house, Drury-lane, and tell them he was taken.

WILLIAM F. MORLEY . I am Mr. Poole's nephew. On the 11th of January, I saw the prisoner take the moulding from the window and go away with it. I am sure he is the man - I gave the alarm - our boy went in pursuit.

THOMAS WHITE . I was crossing from Prince's-street to Hanover-square, and saw the prisoner stop and put something down - I heard it rattle. He went on - as soon as I turned the corner of the square, I met Folkard; he asked if I had met a man with some brass - I returned with him to the spot, and found the prisoner there, stooping again. When he heard us, he got up and was going away. Falkard called out Stop! he immediately stopped, and asked what was the matter? we took him, with the brass, to the prosecutor's. I am sure he is the man who put it there. He put it close to the railing of the garden.

HENRY FOLKARD . I am apprentice to Mr. Huntly, who lives next door to Mr. Poole. On the 11th of January, about six o'clock in the evening, I heard a noise as if something had struck against the brass. I ran out, and met White in Hanover-square; he said he had seen a man put something through the rails. We went and found the prisoner at the spot.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I saw two men lay it down, and I went to see what it was.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Six Months , and Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190113-96

256. GEORGE GROOM was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of December , 4 lbs. of pork, value 3 s. , the property of Edmund Roach .

The prosecutor did not appear.

ACQUITTED

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190113-97

257. JAMES FITZGERALD was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of December , one umbrella, value 7 s. , the property of James Wakeman .

JOHN TEEVAN . I am errand boy to James Wakeman , who is an umbrella-maker , and lives in Oxford-street . On the 9th of December, I was standing in the shop and saw an umbrella rise off the came which they hung on; I ran out and saw the prisoner with it in his hand. I called out Stop thief! He was stopped at the end of Chapel-street and dropped it. I never lost sight of him. It was a very rainy night, and the street was very clear.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I run after the thief, and was taken myself.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Confined Three Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190113-98

258. WILLIAM FRANCIS was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of December , one jacket, value 5 s.; one coat, value 10 s.; two waistcoats, value 5 s,; two pair of breeches, value 5 s.; four handkerchiefs, value 4 s.; one razor, value 2 s.; one box, value 3 s.; one pair of boots, value 30 s.; one pair of shoes, value 13 s., and one 1 l. bank note , the property of Charles Powell .

CHARLES POWELL . On the 3d of December I came to town, and went to the Black Horse, George-street, and saw the prisoner there, who had been a play-mate of mine, I asked him if I could leave my things at the bar till to-morrow? he said they never took things in, but I might leave them at his lodgings. He took me there, and gave my things in care of Sarah Rose - we returned to the public house. We then went to Eaton's wine shop in Broad-street; I offered a 1 l. note there, but could not get it changed. The prisoner took it from me, said he would go and get change if I would stop there ten minutes - he did not return. I went to Rose, and found he had fetched my clothes away. Next morning, I found him at Westminster with part of them on his back.

SARAH ROSE . I live at No. 9, George-street. The prisoner lodged with me; he brought the prosecutor to my house with the clothes - he said they were his brother's, and was not to give them to any body but him. He afterwards came and fetched them away.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Confined Six Months and Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190113-99

259. ARCHIBALD DUNKIN was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of December , one set of cart harness, value 30 s.. and one sack, value 3 s. , the property of William Lovett .

WILLIAM LOVETT . I am a broker , and live in the Hackney-road . On the 29th of December, between four and five o'clock in the morning, I heard a noise, got up and went down stairs - found my stable door open, and the prisoner standing in one corner. My cart harness had been moved from where it hung, and put into a sack. I asked what he wanted there? he made no answer; I sent for the watchman, who took him. He must have got over a fence nine feet high. I had fastened the stable door. The horse's feet were tied.

THOMAS PINNOCK . I am a watchman. I was sent for, and took the prisoner in charge in the stable. I thought he was drunk at first - I afterwards thought he was insane.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I found the stable-door open and went in. I tied the horse's feet that he might not kick me while I laid down.

ABRAHAM LEVY , I am a wholesale slopseller, and live in Nightingale-lane. The prisoner's father is a respectble merchant at Plymouth. I believe him to be insane.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190113-100

260. EDWARD COOK was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of December , nine shirts, value 5 l., the property of Robert Burroughs , from the person of Eliza Burroughs .

ELIZA BURROUGHS . I am the wife of Robert Burroughs . who is a carpenter . On the 22d of December, at two o'clock in the afternoon, I was in Brick-lane, Spitalfields ,

with nine shirts in a bundle under my arm. They were snatched from me from behind by the prisoner and another man who was with him. As they pulled the bundle away, it came open; one got part, and the other got the rest. I followed them down Playhouse-yard calling, stop thief! When I got some distance, I found six of them on the ground, and the prisoner secured.

JANE DYER . I was in Brick-lane, and saw two men coming towards me; the prisoner snatched the bundle from the prosecutrix; the other man picked up three shirts, which he dropped - they ran away - I am sure he is the man, he pushed me away, and took the bundle.

JOHN MASTERMAN . On the 22d of December I was returning from dinner - it was a foggy day; I heard the cry of Stop thief! and saw the prisoner and another running with something under his arm; I seized the prisoner - he dropped the shirts; Burroughs came up, and gave him in charge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was running with the woman, and was taken.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190113-101

261. GEORGE BUCKMAN and WILLIAM BODGER were indicted for stealing, on the 22d of December ' two loaves of bread, value 2 s. , the property of John Haines .

THOMAS HOLLIDAY . I live in Edmonton workhouse. I was at the window about eleven o'clock. While the baker was gone into Mr. Moree's. I saw Buckman take two loaves out of his basket, and give them to Bodger, who ran off with them.

JOHN HAINES . I am a journeyman baker, and live at Edmonton. I went into Mr. More's with my bread. The prisoners were sliding on the pond - Holliday informed me they had taken two loaves. I had them taken next day.

BUCKMAN - GUILTY . Aged 13.

BODGER - GUILTY . Aged 14.

Whipped and Discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190113-102

262. MARY LEWIS was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of January , one snuff-box, value 8 s., the property of Joseph Myers , from his person .

JOSEPH MYERS . I am a pencil-maker . On the 12th of January, about one o'clock at night, I met the prisoner in Drury-lane - I was intoxicated, and went home to Parker-street with her. As we entered the house I took out my snuff-box - she instantly snatched it out of my hand, and tried to blow the candle out. I asked for my box, and two women came up and demanded 2 s. I ran down stairs, and called the watch, who came, and found her in bed in another room.

WILLIAM REDDING . I am a watchman. I heard the alarm, and went to No. 5, Parker-street. I found the prisoner in bed, but could not find the box.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190113-103

263. SARAH MARSDEN was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of January , one watch, value 25 s., and one piece of ribbon, value 1 d. , the property of John Furse .

JOHN FURSE . I live in Wentworth-street, Whitechapel . The prisoner was employed to clean my house - I left her alone about one o'clock, returned in about half an hour, and missed her and the watch. I met her in Shoreditch, and secured her, she then gave me the duplicate of it, took me to the pawnbroker's, and redeemed it herself.

GEORGE KNIGHT . On the 4th of January the prisoner pledged the watch with me.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Fined One Shilling , and Discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190113-104

264. JOHN HARTSHORN was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of December , three shirts, value 9 s.; three pair of drawers, value 5 s.; eight pair of stockings, value 8 s., and one handkerchief, value 6 d., the goods of Frederick Waugh , from the person of Sarah Hedley .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating them to be the property of Robert Hedley .

SARAH HEDLEY . I am a laundress . On the 18th of December, about half-past nine o'clock at night, I was in High-street, St. Giles's , three doors on the other side of St. Giles's church, and had the articles stated in the indictment in a bundle. The prisoner stood at the end of Dudley-court. I saw him plainly by the light of the lamp before he took it. He came up the court, and snatched the bundle from my arm. I called out Watch! ran after him, lost sight of him at the end of the court, and did not see him until he was at the watch-house, but am sure he is the man.

JOHN FRENCH . I am a watchman, and heard the cry of Stop thief! in Dudley-court, and went towards the court; the prisoner ran out, with several people pursuing him - I saw the things on the pavement in Denmark-street. I passed them, and stopped him by the church - he lost one of his shoes in running. The prosecutrix came to the watch-house in about ten minutes, saw the prisoner with four or five others, and picked him out herself.

JOHN STEEL . I am a watchman. I was standing opposite Dudley-court, in Crown-street, and saw the prisoner come down the court with the bundle under his arm. I sprung my rattle and pursued. Somebody said,

"It is only fun, don't pursue him." I saw him throw the bundle down in Denmark-street, I picked it up. I am sure the prisoner is the man that I saw with the bundle.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was never in the court.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190113-105

265. WILLIAM GUNNELL was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of January , one butt-rope, value 10 s., and one iron hook, value 1 s. , the property of John Trueman Villebois , Henry Villebois , Sampson Hanbury , Thomas Fowell Buxton , Thomas Butts Aveling , Thomas Marlborough Pryor , and Robert Pryor .

THOMAS WEBBER . I am watchman to Messrs. Hanbury and Co. On the 7th of January, about seven o'clock, I saw the prisoner come out of the gate with a bag under his arm, stopped him, and found the butt-rope and hook in the sack - he said he found it in the street.

THOMAS DIBBEN . I am clerk to the prosecutors. The firm is rightly set out in the indictment. The prisoner was formerly in our service.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I had been two days without eating any thing.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190113-106

266. MICHAEL DONOVAN was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of December , one coat, value 30 s. , the property of John Cox , Esq.

WILLIAM HILL . I am footman to John Cox , Esq., who lives in Caroline-place . On the 15th of December, at nine o'clock in the morning, the coat hung in the passage. Peacock gave the alarm, and pointed the prisoner out to me - I went out, and took him in Mecklenburgh-square. I found the coat by the rails.

ANN PEACOCK . I am servant to Mr. Cox. I saw the prisoner come into the passage and run out with the coat. I sent Hill out, and he seized him. The door was left open for the maid to clean the passage.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I did not take it.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190113-107

267. WILLIAM FIDGETT was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of December , one handkerchief, value 4 s., the goods of Richard Abrahams , from his person .

RICHARD ADRAHAMS . I am a pawnbroker , and live in Tothill-street. On the 6th of December, about eleven o'clock in the morning, I was at the Horse Guards ; I could not get through, as the soldiers were in the yard - there was a great crowd. I put my hand to my pocket, and felt my handkerchief drawn out by my hand, turned round, collared the prisoner, and another man in a smock frock, and said,

"One of you have taken my handkerchief!" - they both denied it. I held them both, and Cole said, the prisoner had got it. I let the other go. The prisoner made use of bad language, and was going to strike him. Cole seized him, and found the handkerchief in his hand - I saw it fall from his hand - I think the other man took it. There were two more with him, who used bad language to me.

WILLIAM COLE . I am a currier. I was close to Mr. Abrahams, and saw the handkerchief between the prisoner's fingers. The prosecutor turned round, I said the prisoner had it - he immediately dropped it, and said I was a liar, and ought to have my h - dy head knocked off. Two or three others were with him. He tried to strike me.

EDWARD WELCH . I am a currier. I was standing at the Horse Guards, just behind Abrahams, and close to the prisoner. Abrahams accused the prisoner and another man with stealing his handkerchief - the prisoner turned round, and I saw it fall from him - it could have fallen from nobody else.

HENRY BETTS . I am a constable. I saw a crowd, found the prisoner in custody, and took him. There was a man in a smock-frock followed us to the watch-house. Very bad expressions passed between them. There were thirty or forty in the gang, or I would have taken him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. Cole beat me, and said he would get something by it. I am innocent.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190113-108

268. JAMES ELLIS was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of December , one coat, value 10 s., the goods of Thomas Wilson .

THOMAS WILSON . I live in Queen-street, Tower-hill . I heard somebody go out of my shop, missed the coat, went out, and saw the prisoner come out of the passage with the coat on his back - I stopped him. He had a jacket under his arm. He said he bought the coat. I had seen it ten minutes before.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I bought it.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Confined Two Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190113-109

269. JAMES DESERT was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of December , fifty yards of silk, value 22 l. , the goods of Samuel Desert .

SAMUEL DESERT. I am a journeyman weaver , and work for Mr. Christmas. I live in Pelham-street, Mile End . The prisoner is my brother - I employed him to work. On the 29th of December, about eleven o'clock in the morning, I was absent from home, and left the silk in the loom with him, in the first-floor. I returned about five o'clock, and missed him, and the silk. He never returned - he did not tell me he was going. On the Saturday after I found him in George-street, Whitechapel, and charged him with it - he denied it, and said I could not swear that he did take it. He used to sleep at my house. I have never found it. I had been told that somebody wanted me at No. 50, Wheeler-street - I went there, but found it was not true.

JANE DESERT . My husband went out, and left me at home; I went out about two o'clock, leaving the prisoner at the loom; I returned about four, he was gone - the silk was safe; he came home, and said my husband was wanted at No. 50, Wheeler-street, I went to fetch him, and when we came home the prisoner and the silk were gone.

Prisoner's Defence. He gave me warning, and I left.

SAMUEL DESERT re-examined. I never gave him warning. He did some work bad, and I told him I must put him on a different sort if he could not do it better.

- I am landlord of the house; the prosecutor lodged with me, nobody else. I have three children. I was at home all day - the prisoner called to me, between four and five o'clock, and desired my boy to shut the door after him, which he did.

GUILTY. Aged 23.

Recommend to Mercy .

Confined Six Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190113-110

270. JOHN DELAFON was indicted for stealing, on 26th of December , one brooch, value 30 s. , the property of Charles William Twort .

CHARLES WILLIAM TWORT . I am a labourer to the East India Company , and live in Sugar-loaf-court, Minories , the prisoner lodged with me. On the 26th of December I slept with him, as a friend slept with my wife. I went out in the morning, leaving my brooch sticking in my handkerchief in his room, on the table; I left him, and his son, who is ten years of age, in the room. I returned at two o'clock, and missed it. I saw the prisoner at night, and asked him about it - he denied knowing anything about it. I gave him in charge. Next day I saw my brooch at Cooper's.

THOMAS COOPER . I keep the White Hart, at Ratcliff. I was at my next door neighbour's, who is a watch-maker, the prisoner's son came in, produced the brooch, and asked if it was gold - the prisoner stopped at the door - I came out. He told me that the boy had found it in the street; I offered the boy 5 s. for it; the boy went to the prisoner, and spoke to him, came back, and said his father said I should have it for 7 s., which I gave him - they went away together.

JOHN STONE . I am a constable; I took the prisoner in charge - he denied it, but afterwards said he did take it, and his son should show me where it was - his son was present, and took me to Cooper.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant,

Reference Number: t18190113-111

271. WILLIAM PERKINS was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of December , 56 lbs. of lead, value 4 s., the property of Henry Fletcher and Joseph Fletcher , and fixed to a certain building of theirs .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only omitting to state that it was fixed to a building.

JOSEPH FLETCHER . I am in partnership with my brother Henry. I bought some premises at Poplar, which I agreed to pull down.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. I have another partner, but he has nothing to do with these premises.

FRANCIS FAIRBAIRN . I am a Thames Police constable. On the 4th of December I was on duty near the Docks, about a quarter before five o'clock in the morning, and saw the prisoner come out of the prosecutor's premises with two cans; I asked him what was there? he said nothing. I found 56 lbs. of lead in them. He said it was only a little, which it was customary to take to get some beer.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not know what was in the cans.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Confined Six Months , and Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18190113-112

272. JOHN WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of December , 26 lbs. of lead, value 2 s., the property of Henry Fletcher and Joseph Fletcher , and fixed to a certain building of theirs .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only omitting to state that it was fixed to a building.

JOHN CRICK . I am Messrs. Fletchers' watchman. On the 4th of December I stopped the prisoner at the gate, with 26 lbs. of lead in a smock frock under his arm - he said he did not know what it was.

JOSEPH FLETCHER . I am in partnership with my brother Henry - the prisoner worked on the premises.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I found it at the foot of the stairs.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined Six Months , and Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190113-113

273. WILLIAM LITTLE was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of December , 26 lbs. of lead, value 2 s. , the property of Henry Fletcher and Joseph Fletcher .

JOSEPH FLETCHER . I am in partnership with my brother Henry - the premises were ours.

FRANCIS FAIRBAIRN . I stopped the prisoner about two minutes after I had taken Perkins. I found 26 lbs. of lead, in a can, which was in his hand. He said he did not know what it was, or how he got the can.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged. 42.

Confined Six Months , and Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190113-114

274. JOHN TYLER and HENRY NICHOLLS were indicted for stealing, on the 9th of December , four sacks, value 10 s., and ten bushels of wheat, value 4 l. , the property of George Nutman and James Nutman .

DANIEL GODFREY . I am servant to Messrs. George and James Nutman , who are corn-chandlers , and live at Enfield . The prisoner, Tyler, worked in the barn , and lived within half a mile of our granary; the prisoner Nicholls lived within three door of him, and worked at the farm. On the 9th of December, about eight o'clock in the morning, I found the barn broken open - the lock had been forced off; I had locked it the night before, and left thirteen sacks of wheat in the chaff there, and a quantity loose about the floor. I missed four sacks of wheat in the chaff, which would produce ten bushels of wheat; there were foot marks of above two persons in the granary - I traced them into Nicholls's yard, which leads to both houses - I traced them to both houses; the shoes of one man had iron tips on them, but one was only half-tipt, as if it had been broken - they appeared to be the mark of one man; the other man had no particular marks. I have since seen a pair of shoes in possession of Mead; they corresponded exactly with the marks of the tips; I tried them with several, and have no doubt but they were the shoes that made them. I went with the constable to search Tyler's house between twelve and one o'clock that day, and found a sack there with loose chaff in it, also some chaff, and kernels of wheat on the floor. I then went to Nicholls, forced open the door, but found nobody there; I found about two sacks of loose chaff on the floor, in the sleeping-room; it appeared to have been lately separated from the

wheat - it was scattered as if it had been sifted. The four sacks of wheat would produce two sacks of chaff; we found no sacks there.

Cross-examined by MR. ARABIN. Q. Can you say whether the marks were made at night or in the evening when they left work - A. The marks appeared fresh - there were marks where they appeared to have rested.

Q. Might they not have gleaned it - A. If wheat is gleaned, it is generally taken to the mill immediately, and not kept until December.

MR. ANDREWS. Q. Had Nicholls any business in the granary - A. No, it is in the orchard close to the house - they came to work at six o'clock the next morning; I found four sieves and a pan, at Nicholls's.

JOHN MEAD . I went with Godfrey, and found a sack on the bed, at Tyler's, and a little loose corn about, but not more than might have fell from his shoes. I then went to Nicholls's, and found the loose chaff in the house. I afterwards apprehended both the prisoners; Nicholls said if Godfrey did not mind what he was about, he would do for him. I afterwards found two sacks concealed in a wood, between the granary and the prisoners' houses.

JOHN BISHOP . I am servant to Messrs. Nutman. I left the sack found at Tyler's in the barn where he was threshing; I left it there on the Thursday before the robbery. The sacks are taken out of the barn and put in the granary, every night - it was empty then. It has the cornfactor's name on it.

Cross-examined. There were thirteen other sacks in the barn.

JOHN MEAD re-examined. I produce the shoes which I took off Nicholls's feet. I did not compare them with the mark.

DANIEL GODFREY . I compared them with the footmarks, and they fitted exactly. There were no empty sacks in the granary.

Cross-examined. I did not put the shoes on the impression - I judge from my sight.

SAMUEL ABBOTT . I am a miller, and live at Waltham Abbey. On the 8th of December, about eight o'clock in the morning, Nicholls came to me with eight bushels of wheat to be ground. Poor people generally bring gleaned wheat about a month after the harvest, but some keep it later.

Cross-examined. I have some gleaned wheat in the mill now.

GEORGE NUTMAN. I can swear to the sack found at Tyler's. The day after Nicholls was committed, he said Godfrey had sworn false against him, and he would do for him if he got free.

TYLER'S Defence. I borrowed the sack of my next door neighbour.

NICHOLLS - GUILTY . Aged 27.

Transported for Seven Years .

TYLER - NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190113-115

275. BENJAMIN BEAVINGTON and JOHN TEMPLAR was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of January , one bridle, value 30 s. , the property of Henry Pickworth and William John Pickworth .

WILLIAM JOHN PICKWORTH . I am a coal-merchant , and am in partnership with my brother Henry; we live in Great Scotland-yard. The bridle was taken off the horse's head in the street.

JOHN FURZEMAN. I am a constable. I stopped the prisoner in George-street, St. Giles's, about seven o'clock in the evening on the 5th of January, with the bridle tied up in two aprons; Beavington was carrying it. I asked what he had got? he said it was a bridle which they had picked up in Berners-street; I detained them. Next morning, I found it belonged to Messrs. Pickworths. The prisoners were in company together. Templar ran away immediately as I took Beavington.

THOMAS SMITH . I am carman to the prosecutors. I drove one team, and Collins drove another. The bridle was taken off the horse's head while we were in a house in Nassau-street for ten minutes. It was fastened round another horse's head - it could not have got off by accident.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

BEAVINGTON'S Defence. It was given to me to sell.

TEMPLAR'S Defence. I was not with him.

BEAVINGTON - GUILTY . Aged 15.

TEMPLAR - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190113-116

276. JAMES BAILEY and THOMAS SIMPSON were indicted for stealing on the 18th of December , 7 lbs. of pork, value 6 s. , the property of Elisha Knight .

ELISHA KNIGHT . I am a cheesemonger and porkman , and live in Pleasant-row, Pentonville . On the 18th of December, the pork was stolen between seven and eight o'clock at night.

BENJAMIN FORT . My father keeps a haberdasher's shop, ten doors from Knight's. I was out on an errand, and saw the prisoner, Simpson, walking backwards and forwards by Knight's door; I crossed over to watch, and saw him put his foot in the shop, and take the pork out of the window; he went about two doors further, then Bailey crossed the road, as if he had something under his coat. I knew them before.

JOSEPH CADBY . I am a constable; Fort described the prisoners to me, and told me their names - next morning, I took them.

SIMPSON - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

BAILEY - NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190113-117

277. JOHN COLLINS was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of January , one watch, value 20 s., the property of Robert William Staggels , from his person .

ROBERT WILLIAM STAGGELS . On the 6th of January, about three o'clock in the afternoon, I was in the Strand , standing to look at the twelvth-cakes in Mr. Carpenter's shop; I felt something drawn from my pocket, and immediately missed my watch. I turned round, and saw the prisoner shoving something into his breeches; I pursued, and caught him in the street, leading to Waterloo Bridge. I asked him for my watch, he immediately gave it to me, and then said he never had it. I gave him in charge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I never saw the watch.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190113-118

278. JOHN WOODEN was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of January , one bed, value 5 l.; one bolster, value 3 s., and two window curtains, value 2 s.; the property of Benjamin Probert , in a lodging-room .

ELIZA PROBERT . I am the wife of Benjamin Probert ; we live at Poplar . On the 31st of December, I let the prisoner a furnished lodging, at 4 s. 6 d. per week. On the 5th of January they left without notice; I missed these things which were let with the lodging. Two days after, I saw the prisoner going into a house in Ratcliff-square, and saw my curtains at the window. I got an officer.

ROBERT WILLIAMS . I am a constable; Probert fetched me. I found the curtains hanging in the window; the prisoner said he had sold the feathers at different times, out of the bed and bolster.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was in distress.

GUILTY . Aged 47.

Confined Three Months , and Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190113-119

279. JOHN ROBINS was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of January , one candle mould frame, value 3 s., and twelve candles, value 1 s. , the property of William Palmer .

WILLIAM PALMER . I am a tallow-chandler , and live in Chandos-street, Covent Garden . On the 14th of January, about half-past six o'clock, the moulds stood outside the door, to cool, with nine others. The officer came and said he had stopped a man with it. I had seen it safe five minutes before.

JOSEPH CHAMPION . I am an officer, and was in Bedford-court; the prisoner ran by me with the mould, I secured him, and asked him where he got it; he said, that was nothing to me, and threw it down. I took him to the office - he said he found it in Chandos-street.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I found it.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Confined Three Months , and Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190113-120

280. WILLIAM M'GLASHON was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of November , one time-piece, value 10 s. , the property of Thomas Davis .

THOMAS DAVIS . I am a corn dealer ; the prisoner is a dancing-master , and was in the habit of coming to my house, to teach my child to dance. I lost the time-piece off my sideboard. In consequence of something else, I got an officer, searched his lodgings, and found the duplicate of the time-piece among other property. I had told him several times that I lost the time-piece.

JAMES DORWARD . I am shopman to Mr. Davis; the prisoner used to come in the counting-house, to play with us, and put out the light to shew us tricks. On the 28th of December, he sent two of us up stairs, and two down stairs; when he went away, my master missed 30 or 40 s., There was nobody in the counting-house but the prisoner.

HENRY HOWARD. I am an officer; I found the duplicate at the prisoner's lodgings, with some keys belonging to the prisoner, and some pick-lock keys.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. As I was going home, I found a letter, containing two duplicates; one was for the timepiece, and the other for a diamond. I never thought it belonged to the prosecutor - I have lost nearly 1000 l. which reduced me to distress, but I never wronged the prosecutor.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Confined Six Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190113-121

281. JOHN M'NALTY was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of December , one hat, value 2 s., the property of James Vickers , from his person .

The prosecutor did not appear.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190113-122

282. ANN GENTRY was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of October , three table-cloths, value 12 s.; one napkin, value 3 s.; one handkerchief, value 6 d. , the property of Solomon Harris .

SOLOMON HARRIS . I am a butcher ; I live in Middlesex-street, Whitechapel . The prisoner was my charwoman - I lost several articles at different times, I suspected her, and sent for an officer, who found a handkerchief on her. I found the other things at the pawnbroker's.

WILLIAM BELSHAM . I am a pawnbroker. On the 17th of October, the 4th, 11th, and 14th of November, the prisoner pledged four table-cloths with me, one on each day.

ROBERT COMBES . I am an officer. I took the prisoner into custody, and found a pocket-handkerchief, with the prosecutor's name on it, in her bed-room. She said I should find no duplicates. I found the property at the pawnbroker's.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I was in distress.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190113-123

283. JAMES FRANCIS was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of December , one pair of boots, value 10 s., and one pair of shoes, value 4 s. , the goods of William Lee .

WILLIAM LEE . I am a shoemaker , and live at Wapping-wall . On the 30th of December, about seven o'clock at night, I was informed I had been robbed. The prisoner was brought in with the boots under his arm.

JAMES WAFER . I am a seaman. I had watched the prisoner and another man, several nights, lurking about. On the 30th of December I was watching, saw the other man go into the shop, take the boots, and give them to the prisoner. He went in again, reached over the counter, and took a pair of shoes. I collared them both - the other man dropped the shoes and got away. I took the prisoner into the shop with the boots under his arm.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190113-124

284. WILLIAM CLAY was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of December , six pieces of mahogany, value 5 s.,

and one piece of cedar, value 3 d. , the goods of Edmund Stolworthy .

EDMUND STOLWORTHY. I am a cabinet-maker , and live in Answell-street, Hatton-garden . On the 19th of December a girl came into the counting-house, and informed me that a man had drawn some wood from under my gate - she described him to me. I said it must be one of my sawyers , and took her into another timber-yard - she pointed the prisoner out there from two or three others. I told him he had been robbing me - he denied it. He brought me a piece of cedar, and said he only took it for firewood. I went to his lodgings, and found the mahogany in a cupboard. He begged forgiveness. He could get 8 s. a day at work.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

ANN LANGDON . I saw the prisoner drawing the mahogany from under the gate.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Confined Six Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190113-125

285. THOMAS TOWELL was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of December , 27 yards of printed cotton, value 27 s. , the goods of Thomas Craig .

JOHN DOYLEY . I am shopman to Thomas Craig , who is a linen-draper , and lives in Oxford-street . On the 23d of December, Jilkes alarmed me. I ran out, turned the corner, and saw the prisoner with two pieces of print - he threw them down, and I collared him. They were taken from the door, inside the shop.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN JILKES . I was selling fruit opposite Mr. Craig's door. I saw the prisoner and two others lurking about the door - one of them took the print, and gave it to the prisoner - he was secured.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Three Months , and Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190113-126

286. CLARA TICKNER was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of January , one watch, value 3 l.; one chain, value 1 l.; three seals, value 3 l.; one key, value 2 s., and one shirt-pin, value 6 d., the property of Robert Fletcher , from his person .

ROBERT FLETCHER . I am clerk at a banking-house in the city . On the 12th of January, a little after twelve o'clock at night, I was in the Strand with a friend, and met the prisoner and another woman - we went up a court, and in about five minutes she left me very abruptly, which made me suspect her. I felt, and missed my watch. We detained the other girl, and took her to the watch-house. I described the prisoner to the watchman, and in about half an hour she was brought in with the watch. My shirt-pin was also taken.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not give it to me - A. No; I had money about me.

ROBERT GREAVES. I was with Mr. Fletcher. The prisoner and another girl accosted the prosecutor - she walked up Round-court with him - I stood in the Strand with the other girl. In about five minutes I went up the court, and met him coming down - he said he missed his watch. The prisoner was taken in about half an hour.

TIMOTHY RYAN . I am a watchman. The prosecutor described the prisoner to me - I found her at the corner of Chandos-street with another girl - she saw me, and ran off. I secured her in St. Martin's-lane, and found the watch and pin in her hand, inside her glove.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. He gave me the watch to pledge for 10 s., as he had no money.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190113-127

287. ISABELLA SETAN, alias CLARKE , was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of January , 46 s. in monies numbered, the monies of Daniel James , from his person .

DANIEL JAMES . I am a soldier in the 1st Regiment of Guards . On the 12th of January, I met the prisoner in Holborn, between eleven and twelve o'clock at night - I went with her to a house in Charles-street, Drury-lane ; she said the room was her own. In the night she left me. I missed 46 s. out of my pocket. Next day I met her, and gave her in charge - she denied it. When we got to the watch-house, she said she robbed me of 5 s., and gave part of it to another woman. The landlord of the public-house where I took her gave me four half-crowns and a new crown-piece. I had lost one crown-piece and ten half-crowns.

PATRICK CRAWLEY . I am a watchman. I took the prisoner at the Three Compasses, public-house, in Drury-lane. I found two half-crowns, a 6 d., and 8 d. on her. She said she gave some of the money to another girl. We took the other girl up. The prisoner said she gave her the regulars, which she said meant half the money. The girl said she had only half-a crown. Another girl occupied the room.

GEORGE BRADLEY . I am landlord of the Three Compasses. On the 13th of January, about eleven o'clock in the morning, the prisoner came in and had some gin, went out, returned, had some more gin, and gave me two half-crowns - she threw two others out of her bosom. She afterwards treated a man, and paid me a crown piece - I refused to change it - she was rather fresh. In the afternoon I heard she was taken.

Prisoner's Defence. I never saw the prosecutor.

GUILTY . Aged 33.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190113-128

288. DANIEL SEARCH was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of December , one basket, value 3 s. , the property of William Grosse .

WILLIAM GROSSE . I am a basket-maker , and live in High Holborn . On the 31st of December, about eight o'clock at night, I missed a basket which hung on a string inside my door.

JOHN GAY . On the 31st of December, about eight o'clock at night, I was in company with Owen and Thompson, going to Oxford-street, Thompson pointed the prisoner out with two others; I followed him, saw him attempt several gentlemens' pockets, and try to take things from shop doors, but could not. They went to the corner

of Oxford-street, then turned down Holborn again. One of them went away with a girl. The prisoner and the other went to the prosecutor's, and attempted four times to take a basket. I saw the prisoner take out a penknife, and cut a string which fastened the basket to a nail, then take it off the nail, and give it to the other - both crossed the road; Owen and I secured the prisoner - the other ran away, and threw the basket down.

WILLIAM OWEN. I saw the prisoner and two others at the corner of Field-lane; they attempted several shops and gentlemens' pockets; the prisoner cut the basket from the door, and gave it to the other. Gay went after him, and took him; some of them ran across, and knocked me down. I had watched them for two hours and a half.

THOMAS THOMPSON . I was present, and saw the prisoner with two others; I concealed myself, as they knew me.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I had no knife.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190113-129

289. THOMAS RIX was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of January , one shew-board, value 9 s., and one iron bar, value 1 s. , the property of James Weller Wickham .

MARY WICKHAM. I am the wife of James Weller Wickham , and am a milk woman. On the 5th of January the sign-board hung at the door, I missed it about eight o'clock in the morning, heard the alarm, went out, and saw the prisoner with it. I collared him in Charlotte-street, with it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I was in distress.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Three Months , and Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190113-130

290. ANN NORTON was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of January , from the person of Robert Elliot , one pair of drawers, value 2 s., and two 1 l. bank notes , his property.

ROBERT ELLIOT . I am a pork-butcher , and live in Gray's Inn-lane. On the 7th of January I met the prisoner at St. Giles's; I went home with her to Charles-street, Drury-lane , between twelve and one o'clock at night. A man came into the room, and gave me a violent blow; the prisoner immediately threw the poker at me. I dressed myself, put my drawers into my bosom, and was going down stairs - they followed me; the prisoner forced my coat open, and took the drawers out; the two 1 l. notes were in a pocket in them - we were struggling at the door for them - two watchman came, and took her.

JOSEPH TRIMBEY . I am a watchman. On the 7th of January I went to the house, and found the prisoner, and the prosecutor struggling for the drawers - he got them from her, and gave them to me.

Prisoner's Defence. He gave me 3 s. 7 d., and afterwards asked me for it again; I refused, and he struck me several times; I said I would give him in charge, he ran down stairs, I followed, and called the watch.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder

Reference Number: t18190113-131

291. EDWARD MITCHELL was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of December , one coat, value 25 s. , the property of Thomas Peters .

JOHN GEE . I am a butcher, and live at Cowcross; I saw the prisoner go behind the Highgate errand-cart, and try to cut the baskets away; he left it, and went to Thomas Peters 's cart, followed it, and tried to cut a hamper away; he then jumped on the shaft, and took a great coat out - Owen and I took him. The prosecutor claimed the coat in the prisoner's presence, at the watch-house.

WILLIAM OWEN . I saw the prisoner in company with another, about a quarter before six o'clock, in St. John-street; he tried the cart, then turned round, and followed the prosecutor's cart - the man was leading his horse, as it was a foggy night; I saw the prisoner take the coat out of the cart, and secured him with it - he said it was his own. The prosecutor came to the watch-house, and claimed it in the the prisoner's presence - he described the coat.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190113-132

292. ANN MOAT was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of November , one bed, value 2 l., and one sheet, value 2 s., the property of Thomas Gosling , in a lodging-room .

SARAH GOSLING . I am the wife of Thomas Gosling . who is a tide-waiter , and lives in Old Gravel-lane . On the 21st of November, I let the prisoner a furnished room, at 4 s. per week; she took possession about eight o'clock in the morning, and in half an hour she packed up my bed and sheet, and went away with them. I found them at Garrad's.

FRANCIS GARRAD . I am a pawnbroker, and live at Ratcliff-highway. On the 21st of November the prisoner pledged the bed with me.

THOMAS HART . I am a constable. I took the prisoner into custody, and found the duplicate upon her.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 38.

Confined One Year .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190113-133

293, JAMES HALEY, alias DANIEL SULLIVAN , was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of January , one saddle, value 15 s. , the property of William Sheldrake .

WILLIAM SHELDRAKE . I live in Cumberland-row, Battle-bridge . On the 7th of January I was at work in the shop, and heard the stirrup-irons rattle against the window, went out, and missed the saddle. I saw four boys together, the prisoner was the last of them, and was in the act of throwing the saddle into a passage; I secured him, and asked what he was going to do with the saddle? he appeared ignorant of it - Coulton came up, and said he saw the prisoner take it, and throw it out of his hand. I took him in charge, being a constable.

WILLIAM COULTON . I live opposite the prosecutor's. I saw four persons lurking about his shop for half an hour - the prisoner was one; I saw him take the saddle; I went out, and saw him throw it into the passage, as he saw me.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. Two men gave it to me to hold while they tied it up, and then told me to run. I threw it down.

GUILTY , Aged 17.

Confined Six Months , and Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190113-134

294. MARTHA GEORGE was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of December , one petticoat, value 2 s. 6 d. , the goods of Eve Nathan , widow .

EVE NATHAN . I live with my mother, whose name is Eve; she is a widow, and keep a clothes shop , in Golden-lane . The prisoner came in, looked at a petticoat, and asked the price of me, I told her it was not to be sold. She asked if I had any pieces of patchwork to sell; I went to fetch some, when I returned she was gone, and I missed the petticoat. I had seen her before, and am sure she is the woman.

JOHN BARRETT . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Bridgewater-gardens. On the 14th of December the prisoner pledged the petticoat with me for 1 s.; about half an hour after the officer brought her to me.

GEORGE TWEEDY . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner. She said she supposed I wanted the petticoat, that she had pledged it, and destroyed the duplicate. She took me to Barrett's.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I am very sorry.

GUILTY . Aged 33.

Confined One Month .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190113-135

295. CHARLES GOLDING was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of December , one time-piece, value 20 s. , the goods of John Sears ; and JOSEPH STEVENS was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, he well knowing it to have been stolen .

PENELOPE SEARS . I am the wife of John Sears , and live in Ashby-street, St. Pancras . I sell childrens' toys. On the 9th of December, about half-past ten o'clock in the morning, I missed the time-piece off the mantle-piece on the ground floor - I was absent in the next room for about five minutes, then missed it. I found it at Hatton-garden Office about twelve o'clock; the prisoners were in custody.

JAMES GOODHALL . I am a boot-maker, and live at Pentonville. On the 9th of December, about a quarter before eleven o'clock, I saw the prisoner, Stevens, standing in Collier-street, where I live - it is a quarter of a mile from the prosecutor's; soon after I saw Golding come up, and give him the time-piece. I knew Stevens before. I got Cam, he went with me, and took them. I laid hold of Golding, and said I wanted the time-piece which he gave to Stevens; he said he knew nothing about it. I gave him to Cam, went after Stevens, and took him getting over a bank into a field, near White Conduit House, with the time-piece. He threw it down as he got over. I secured him, and picked it up.

THOMAS CAM . I am a constable. Goodhall pointed the prisoners out to me at the corner of Wellington-street. He gave Golding to me, he ran and followed Stevens, jumped over into the burial-ground, and secured him with the time-piece. I was in sight of him. Goodhall brought Stevens to me.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GOLDING'S Defence. It was given to me.

GOLDING - GUILTY . Aged 14.

Confined Six Months , and Whipped .

STEVENS - GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190113-136

296. MATTHIAS DRISCOLL and ROBERT CHAMLAIN were indicted for stealing, on the 11th of January , one pair of half-boots, value 3 s. 6 d. , the property of Thomas Ashton .

THOMAS ASHTON . I am a shoe-maker , and live in Parker-street, Drury-lane. On the 11th of January, I left my boots with Allen, who is my comrade, at the King's Arms, public-house .

ROBERT ALLEN . I am in the same regiment with the prosecutor; he left a pair of half boots with me - he makes them. The prisoners and two other young men came into the tap-room, and wanted to fight with me and another man, I refused; the other man fought with him, they went out, and I missed the boots from my side. I got an officer and found the prisoners at No. 3. Parker-street, a few doors off. The boots stood on a chair in the room.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Before the fight began, did you observe Chamlain with a bundle - A. He brought no bundle in; they came back about two hours after they went away. Driscoll was stopped - he said he was discharged from the regiment. The boots were not like soldiers boots.

GEORGE DUDGEON . I am in the same regiment as Allen. The four men came in, I fought with one of them; the prisoners came back again, and said they would fight with the soldiers. I went with the constable, and found the boots in the room.

Cross-examined. I am certain Chamlain had no bundle.

WILLIAM PAYNE . I am a constable; I went to the prisoner's house, the boots were in a chair; Driscoll pushed me down and ran ran off. I followed and took him.

Cross-examined. Chamlain said he took them by mistake.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

DRISCOLL'S Defence. Chamlain went to the house with a pair of boots under his arm; as he was drunk, he must have taken these up in a mistake.

CHAMLAIN'S Defence. I was drunk; one of them began fighting. I took the boots up in mistake for my own.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190113-137

297. JOHN DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of December , eight pair of stockings, value 16 s. , the property of Robert Romanis .

ROBERT ROMANIS . I am a hosier , and live in Cheapside . On the 14th of December, about six o'clock in the evening, I lost eight pair of stockings.

THOMAS MILLER . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Golden-lane, On the 14th of December, about eight o'clock in the evening, the prisoner brought two pair of stockings to pledge; I questioned him about them, and told him two pair had been pledged just before; he said he had sent

them by his brother, and he lived in Playhouse-yard. I went to get an officer; as I returned, I heard the cry of stop thief! I found him in custody; some duplicates were found upon him, one was in the name of Fitzgerald. He had promised to stop till I returned.

HENRY PEACHEY . I am a pawnbroker. On the 14th of December, about seven o'clock in the evening, two pair of stockings were pledged with me by a person - not the prisoner.

FREDERICK EDWARDS . The prisoner pledged two pair of stockings with me, about eight o'clock.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I pledged them; I had them from John Fitzgerald , who has absconded; he gave me the duplicates for my trouble.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Fined One Shilling , and Discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190113-138

298. HENRY MAIDMENT was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of January , one bullocks tongue, value 5 s. , the property of Thomas Chettle ; and MARY KELLY was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing it to have been stolen .

THOMAS WALLIS . I am servant to Thomas Chettle, who lives in Clare-market ; I lost a bullock's tongue from the shop board; I saw one that was found at Kelly's, but cannot say it is the same.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190113-139

299. WILLIAM CATON and WILLIAM CORSTER was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of December , one pair of shoes, value 4 s. 9 d. , the property of John Gibbons .

SAMUEL GIBBONS . I am the son of John Gibbons , who lives in Holywell-street , On the 5th of December, between eight and nine o'clock at night, the prisoners came into the shop, and asked for a pair of high shoes; I shewed several pairs, none would suit, and they went out. I saw something under Caton's coat - they separated, I followed him; when I got about twenty or thirty yards, I heard him call

"Bill," nobody came; he saw me, ran up Hollywell-lane, and threw the shoes under a cellar window - I took him, and picked the shoes up. I knew him before, as he went to school with me.

THOMAS WALTER . The prisoners were given to me in charge; Corster had been taken before. Caton said he took them, and meant to pledge them to pay for his lodging.

CORSTER'S Defence. I was at home at the time.

CATON - GUILTY . Aged 14.

Confined Three Months , and Whipped .

CORSTER - NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190113-140

300. ELIZA CLOCK was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of December , one sheet, value 4 s. , the property of Jesse Dawes .

SARAH DAWES . I am the wife of Jesse Dawes , and live in Laystall-street, Spitalfields . On the 31st of December the sheet was in a tub in an out-house - I missed it. A person must come through the passage to take it.

JANE DAVIS . I live on Saffron-hill. On the 31st of December, between six and seven o'clock at night, I found the prisoner in my yard, and gave her in charge. She had the sheet under her arm, quite wet.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I found it.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Confined Three Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190113-141

301. HENRY NICHOLS was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of December , one shawl, value 8 s. , the goods of William Pickett .

WILLIAM PICKETT. I am a linen-draper , and live at Ratcliffe-terrace, Goswell-street-road . The prisoner came to the shop, and asked to look at some pins, which he had been about in the morning. I turned round to reach them, and saw him make a snatch at some shawls, but did not succeed. I showed him some pins, and turned round for some others - he then took a shawl from the window, and put it under his apron - I secured him, and saw him drop it. He was searched, and 3 1/2 d. found in his pockets. The pins would have come to 5 s. 10 d.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I did not take it.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190113-142

302. EDWARD GURNEY was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of December , at St. Marylebone , 17 lbs. of lead, value 3 s., belonging to John Lankson , and fixed to a certain dwelling-house of his , against the statute.

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating it to be fixed to a building of his.

JOHN LANKSON . I had a house in Buckingham-place, Fitzroy-square , Marylebone, but did not live there at the time of the robbery - it was empty. On the 29th of December, about half-past five o'clock in the afternoon, I went to shew the house to a gentleman. While he was gone for a light, I went to open the street-door, pulled the key out, and found I could not open it. When the light came I looked into the key-hole, and found there was a key inside. I knocked at the door three or four times very loud - several persons came round. Some of them said there were two persons running across the roof of the house. I went into the next house, got over the wall, and into my own yard - I found the yard-door open. When I got on the back-door landing-place, two men made their escape out of the street-door. I ran to the door, and called out Stop thief! the prisoner was brought back in about two minutes by Woodward and Smith. I went on the roof, and found the lead which covered the top of the door taken off, doubled up, and left on the party-wall. I saw it compared with the place, and am certain it is the lead - they had pulled the nails out, and taken it away. I found a sack on the garret landing-place.

The key in the lock was the key of the door; I had left it with Mrs. Johns to show the premises.

JAMES WOODWARD. I am a tailor, and live in Fitzroy-place. I was going up Buckingham-place, and saw several people standing about the prosecutor's house - the prosecutor was knocking at the door - I looked up to the roof, and saw a person walking in the front gutter. I told the prosecutor, who went through the next house. Presently afterwards, the street-door opened rom within. I saw the prisoner, and Salmon, come out. I pursued and took the prisoner - I never lost sight of him - he ran very fast. I brought him back, and gave him in charge.

JOHN SMITH . I was near the house, and saw the prosecutor trying to get into the house. The street-door opened, Gurney and Salmon ran out - I pursued with Woodward, and saw Gurney stopped - he was never out of my sight.

WILLIAM HILL. I am a locksmith. I bought a key of three boys - they afterwards came, and bought it of me again. It was shewn to me at the office - it proved to be one of the keys of the prosecutor's house.

RICHARD COATES . I am a constable. The prisoners were given into my charge. In about a minute Salmon came to the watch-house door; I secured him, and found a pair of pincers on him - I also found a pen-knife and a pack of cards on the prisoner. I went to the house, found the nails had been drawn out, and the lead entirely moved away - it fitted exactly, and weighed 17 lbs. There had been an attempt to take more.

Prisoner's Defence. I ran with the rest, and was taken.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190113-143

303. WILLIAM PRICE was indicted for embezzling the sum of 4 s. 4 d., which he had received on account of Thomas Mills , his master .

THOMAS MILLS . I keep the Gate-house public-house , in the Hampstead-road - the prisoner was my pot-boy , and received the scores of the customers. I discharged him on the 6th of January. Mr. Egerton owed me 4 s. 4 d., I asked the prisoner, the night before he left, if it was paid? he said it was not - he never accounted to me for it.

SUSAN CASTLES . I am servant to Mr. Egerton. On the 5th of January I paid the prisoner 4 s. 4 d. which my master owed to Mr. Mills.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Whipped , and Discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190113-144

304. MATTHEW SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of December , two breechings, value 30 s. , the property of James Wingfield .

JAMES WINGFIELD . I am a saddler , and live in Long-lane. In October I took two sets of harness to Sadler's Repository, Goswell-street , for sale. On the 8th of January I went to Miller's shop, in Cowcross - he asked me to buy some breechings; I had not time to look at them - I afterwards went for them, found they were my own, and part of the harness I left at Sadler's.

WILLIAM MILLER . I am a saddler, and live at Cow-cross. I bought trifling things of the prisoner. I bought the breechings of him about two months ago for 14 s. He said he lived in Baldwin's-gardens, and was a groom.

SAMUEL GRAY . I live at Mr. Sadler's Repository. In October last the prisoner worked in the yard with me.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A coachman in Cow-cross asked me to sell them.

GUILTY . Aged 43.

Whipped and Discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190113-145

305. SAMUEL BENNETT was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of December , six knives and six forks, value 6 s. , the property of Richard Long .

RICHARD LONG . I am a cutler , and live in High Holborn. On the 29th of December, the prisoner came and desired six knives and forks, to be sent to a public-house in Kingsgate-street. He did not bargain for them for himself. I sent Perry with them - he brought the prisoner back.

HENRY PERRY . I am servant to Mr. Long. He sent me with the prisoner to take the knives and forks. When we got out I asked him where they were going to? He said they were going to some young people, who had just set up in business, and he would take me there. He said my master had allowed him 2 s. 6 d. for getting their custom, and I was not to say a word about it to the people. He took me up a passage leading from Holborn into Hyde-street, gave me 6 d., and told me to go into the front door of the Bull's Head, public-house, as that was the house - I was to call for a pint of beer, give him the knives, and he would take them in at the side-door, to prevent suspicion of our coming together - I gave them to him. I stood at the corner of the house to watch. Instead of going in at the side-door, he ran down the passage into Holborn. I pursued, and took him at the corner of Newton-street. He resisted - I took him back.

GUILTY . Aged 48.

Publicly Whipped , and Discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190113-146

306. HENRY DYER was in indicted for that he on the 28th of November , with a certain offensive weapon, (to wit,) a stick, which he in his right hand held, and had in and upon Samuel Thorpe , unlawfully, maliciously, and feloniously did make an assault, with intent to rob him, and his monies from his person, and against his will, violently and feloniously to steal ,

FOUR OTHER COUNTS, the same, only varying the manner of laying the charge.

The particulars of this case are of too indelicate a nature for publication.

(See page 59, last Session.)

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18190113-147

307. JAMES SIMON was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of December , 112 lbs of rope, value 8 s , the goods of William Campbell Laidler , Robert Skipsey Laidler and John Martindale .

WILLIAM CAMPBELL LAIDLER . I am in partnership with Robert Skipsey Laidler , and John Martindale ; we

are shipowners . We lost the rope from the Skipsey - the prisoner came a voyage in the ship, but was paid off a few days before.

JOHN SWINGLAND. I am a patrol of St George's in the East. On the 21st of December, about half-past five o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner standing at the door of an old iron shop with the rope; he said he was going to sell it when the people got up. I got assistance from the Thames Police, then returned, and took him with it.

JAMES EVANS . I went with Swingland, and found the prisoner with the rope at the door of the shop; he said it was old rope, which he had from the Skipsey - the prosecutor claimed it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 37.

Confined Six Months , and Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190113-148

308. HENRY WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of January , 3 lbs. of soap, value 3 s. , the property of Isaac Firth .

JOHN WOODCOCK . I am shopman to Isaac Firth , who is a grocer , and lives in East Smithfield ; the prisoner came into the shop, and went out; he came in again, and took a cake of soap, covered it over with his apron; I followed, and secured him - he dropped it.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Confined Fourteen Days .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190113-149

309. RICHARD KERR was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of January , one coat, value 6 l. , the property of John Henry Kolbe .

JOHN HENRY KOLBE . My father is a tailor , and lives in Church-street, Soho. On the 9th of January, about eleven o'clock at night, I stopped at the Star and Crown public-house, Westminster , and left my coat over my horse's head - I had a chaise standing at the door; I saw the prisoner go out, and suspected him - I went out, and missed my coat.

HENRY BETTS . I am a constable; I took the prisoner in charge for another offence - there are two other witnesses, who are not here.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190113-150

310. WILLIAM JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of January , one telescope, value 20 s. , the property of Thomas Wilson .

SIMON TIPPLE . I am porter to Mr. Thomas Wilson , who is an auctioneer . I was employed to get a sale ready at Camden-town; the prisoner came in, and examined the books - I saw him take the telescope out of the room; I followed him, and charged him with stealing it - he denied it, and ran off; I followed, secured him, and found it in his pocket.

Cross-examined by MR. ARABIN. He bears an excellent character.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was in great distress.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Fined One Shilling , and Discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190113-151

311. GEORGE HARDING and ROBERT DAWSON were indicted for stealing, on the 15th of January , three planes, value 10 s.: one saw, value 2 s., and 3 lbs. of candles, value 2 s. , the goods of John Vidler and Finch Vidler .

BENJAMIN WALTER . I manage Messrs. John and Finch Vidler's business, they are coach proprietors ; the prisoners were in their service. On the 15th of January I missed them, and found them concealed in the cellar of the next house - a hole had been cut from our cellar into that. The property was within three yards of Harding, tied up in canvas ready to be taken away.

Cross-examined by MR. ARABIN. Q. What led you to go there - A. I had missed the prisoners before, and found them there.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

HARDING'S Defence. The tools are quite out of my line.

HARDING. - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Whipped and Discharged.

DAWSON. - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Fined One Shilling , and Discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190113-152

312. SARAH GILBERT was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of December , one gold ring, value 5 s. , the property of William Fann .

The prosecutor did not appear

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190113-153

313. PATRICK LYONSON LEE was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of October , one saddle, value 5 s., and one bridle, value 1 s. , the goods of John Hodgson .

JOHN HODGSON . I am a grazier . On the 12th of October, about eight o'clock in the morning the saddle and bridle was taken off my horse at Smithfield .

THOMAS ALLEN . On the 12th of October, between twelve and one o'clock, I met the prisoner on Saffron-hill with three others; he offered to sell me the saddle for 7 s. I asked him the lowest price? he said 5 s. - suspecting him, I took him in charge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. It is my first offence.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Confined One Month .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18190113-154

314. RICHARD BAKER and JOHN LEE were indicted for stealing, on the 1st of November , one pair of scales, value 8 s.; two tea-urns, value 10 s.; one tea-pot, value 2 s.; seventy rings, value 2 s.; seventy hooks, value 2 s.; seventy turnbuckles, value 2 s., and one basket, value 3 d. , the property of Edward Phillips ; and SAMUEL HINTON , and ELEANOR, his wife , were indicted for feloniously receiving the same, they well knowing them to have been stolen , against the statute.

EDWARD PHILLIPS. I am an ironmonger , and live in Sloane-street, Knightsbridge . On the 1st of November at night I left my shop safe, and missed these things in the morning.

HENRY PHILLIPS . I am son of the last witness. On the 1st of November, about half-past eight o'clock in the morning, I went from my father's house to the shop, and found the doors forced open, and the property stated in the indictment gone; we heard nothing of it till a fortnight

after, when the father of the witness, Munton, informed me where they were sold. I went to a shop kept by the prisoners, Hinton, in Peter-street, Wardour-street, and found a pair of copper scales hanging in the window, a tea-urn on the table, and four papers of brass goods; the officer went backwards in the passage, and found a basket with some flask, and old copper in it - they both denied knowing anything of it, and said they never saw it - I am sure the property is ours. I know one of the papers of brass goods - the paper being a particular sort.

ELIZA GRIFFITHS . I live in South-place, Knightsbridge. On the 31st of October, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, I saw four persons go up to Mr. Phillips's shop, and look through the keyhole - one of them came to me, and bought a pennyworth of apples - they went about twenty yards off, and whispered to each other, then returned, and went up the yard, to the back of Mr. Phillips's premises - I saw them looking in at the window - they were standing about all the evening, but I saw nothing particular; I left them there about ten o'clock - Baker bought the apples, and gave them to Lee - Munton was with them; I knew them before - I am sure there was four of them.

Cross-examined by MR. ADULPHUS. They lived in the neighbourhood.

RICHARD MUNTON . On Saturday, the 31st of October, about six o'clock in the evening, Baker, Lee, and I met together in Exeter-street, Sloane-street, Lee said he should like to go into Mr. Phillips's shop - Baker and I agreed to it. We went about eleven o'clock at night, and all three set our backs against the doors, and burst them open. Lee and I went inside, Baker stood outside - we took two tea-urns, a pair of copper scales, a tea-pot, and several brass articles, put them on a table at the back of the shop, we came out, shutting the doors, and met Baker in front of the house; we went towards Hyde-park corner for two hours, then we all three came back to Phillips's shop. I went in at the back door, and handed all the things out to Baker and Lee, they put them into a basket which we found at the back of the shop, and concealed them in a ditch in a field at the back of Knightsbridge; Lee said he would take us to a place where they would buy them of us; we all three went together to Peter-street, Wardour-street, and knocked at Hinton's door - he keeps a marine store shop - we received no answer, and came away. Lee and Baker went home to their lodgings. I went to mine, but could not get in, it was about three o'clock in the morning. I walked about until near six o'clock, then went and called Lee. We called Baker, went to the field, and got the things - we took them to Hinton's, Lee went in, Baker and I waited outside. Lee called me in with the things; I took them into the parlour behind the shop, and put them on the table. Hinton and his wife were there. I and Lee came out.

Q. What did you do with the things - A. Left them there; there was no agreement about them; Lee said he would call again that morning - I heard no conversation about them. I was hardly two minutes there. When we got to the bottom of Princes-street I left them, and went home. I met Lee and Baker about eleven o'clock, they gave me 2 s., and I went home.

Q. Did you not think that a small portion of your profits - A. Yes, but I said nothing. I met them a few days after - they ill-used me. I never saw them afterwards.

Q. What did you do with yourselves from six o'clock until eleven - A. We walked round about Sloane-street, went up to the shop, and looked into it between seven and eight o'clock. Baker bought some apples of Mrs. Griffiths, and gave some to Lee. I am sure there was only three of us. We looked into the shop, both front and back. They told me that they got 8 s. for the things.

Q. Who did you tell this to afterwards - A. To Mrs. Phillips, and told her where the things were. I was going to enter into the American service.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Where did you live at the time - A. In the New-road, Knightsbridge. I went to school for two years, then I turned thief. Lee and Baker lodged in Exeter-buildings. We got to Hinton's about seven o'clock.

Q. Who did you see there - A. Mr. and Mrs. Hinton, and a little girl, were the only persons there. The prisoners beat me afterwards.

Q. Then you said you would be revenged - A. No; I thought it would be best to leave their company, and told Phillips of it.

RICHARD SMITHERS . I am a constable of Bow-street. On the 25th of November Phillips, Westcoat, and I went to execute a search-warrant at Hinton's house. I saw Mrs. Hinton, and asked her if her husband was within? she said No, but she expected him in every minute. I asked her if she had bought a tea-urn, copper scales, and those sort of things? she said there was a tea-urn and some scales. I went in - the tea-urn was on the table; Phillips claimed it, and the scales, which hung in the window. Four papers of brass-work laid in the window, for sale as I suppose - it was an old-iron shop. I told her there was another tea-urn and a tea-pot, which came with those - she said she had bought nothing else but these. On searching further, I found the basket, with some boxes, in the passage, brought it into the shop, and Phillips claimed it. I asked her how she came by it? she said she did not know how it came there, unless the children might have had it to play with in the street. I asked her if she thought she should know the person who brought them if she saw them? she said she thought she should. Her husband came in, and said he was a harness-maker, and did not deal in the shop, but his wife did, and that he did not buy them. I found some new harness up stairs, he said he made it. We took them to the magistrate, and he was set at liberty until we could find the prisoners. On the 27th of November I went to Exeter-buildings, and found the prisoners at their lodgings - they live about five doors apart. I apprehended Munton the same day on board the Cyrus, at Limehouse-hole.

Cross examined. Q. It was a broker's shop - A. Yes. The things were exposed for sale. The scales are not perfect.

WILLIAM WESTCOAT . I went with Smithers - he has spoken correctly.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

SAMUEL HINTON 'S Defence. I know nothing of it.

ELEANOR HINTON 'S Defence. I bought some of one man, and gave him 14 s. for them - I never saw Munton.

WILLIAM HINTON . I am the prisoner's son. My father is a harness-maker , and my mother keeps a broker's shop ;

I am a harness-maker, and work for Messrs. Windsor and Co., Long-acre. I was at home at the time the iron and scales were brought to the house - it was on a Sunday morning in November, between nine and ten o'clock - only one person brought them; it was neither of the prisoners, nor Munton. The man said he was a labourer, and had done some jobs for a person who was going out of town, who said these things were of no use to him, and that he had given them to him as a recompense for his labour. My mother said she would not buy them, as it was Sunday. He pleaded great distress, and said his wife and family were almost starving, and by my persuasion my mother bought them. He asked 1 l. - she gave him 14 s. 6 d. He brought them in his arms openly; they were not in a basket.

Q. What did he bring - A. A pair of scales, a coffee-urn, and some papers of brass.

CHARLES HINTON . I am brother to the last witness, and apprentice to Messrs. Watson, coach-makers, Long-acre. On Sunday morning, between nine and ten o'clock, my brother and I were at home, and another person; an elderly man, in a working jacket and an apron, brought the things on his arms, or in his apron, it was the scales and tea-urn - he wanted my mother to buy them; she said she did not like to buy them on the Sabbath. He said he was in distress, and my brother persuaded her to buy them. He asked 1 l. for them - she gave him 14 s. 6 d.

JOHN DWYER . I am a harness-maker, and live in Ogle-street. On Sunday morning, between nine and ten o'clock, I was at Hinton's house, and saw the person come in to sell the things - it was neither of the prisoners, or Munton; I had carried a harness home, which I had been sewing. Mrs. Minton was up stairs - I was waiting for my money; when she came down, the man said he was in distress, and she was persuaded to buy them; he said his master told him to clean the place out, and what rubbish there was he might have. She gave 14 s. 6 d. for them.

RICHARD MUNTON re-examined. When I went in I saw Mr. and Mrs. Hinton, and a little girl, nobody else.

BAKER - GUILTY . Aged 18.

LEE - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

ELIZA HINTON - GUILTY. Aged 42.

Recommended to Mercy .

Confined One Year .

JAMES HINTON - NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.


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