Old Bailey Proceedings, 2nd December 1818.
Reference Number: 18181202
Reference Number: f18181202-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace Oyer and Terminer, AND Gaol Delivery for the City of London, AND ALSO The Gaol Delivery For the County of Middlesex, HELD AT Justice Hall, in the Old Bailey; ON WEDNESDAY, 2nd of DECEMBER, 1818, and following Days;

Being the First Session in the Mayoralty of THE RIGHT HON. JOHN ATKINS , LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

Taken in Short-Hand by H. BUCKLER, Basinghall Street, (BY AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON.)

London:

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED, FOR H. BUCKLER, BY T. BOOTH, 31, St. Andrew's Hill, Doctors' Commons.

1818.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX.

Before the Right Honourable JOHN ATKINS , Esq. LORD MAYOR of the City of London; Sir George Wood , Knt., one of the Barons of his Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir George Sowley Holroyd , Knt., one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of King's Bench; John Ansley , Esq.; Sir Claudius Stephen Hunter , Bart.; Matthew Wood , Esq.; Sir William Leighton , Knt., and Christopher Smith , Esq., Aldermen of the said City; Sir John Silvester , Bart., D. C. L. Recorder of the said City; George Bridges , Esq., and Robert Waithman , Esq., Aldermen of the said City, Newman Knowlys , Esq. Common Sergeant of the said City, and John Vaillant , Esq., his Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

London Jury.

Samuel Knight ,

James Beck ,

James French ,

James Bisset ,

William Phelps ,

James Grant ,

Benjamin Clarke ,

Stephen Curtis ,

Robert Appleton ,

Samuel Pope ,

George Barnard ,

John A. Brown .

First Middlesex Jury.

George Radburn ,

George Kemp ,

Thomas Marsh ,

William Green ,

Samuel Betteley ,

Henry Hales ,

John Moore ,

James Turner ,

James Maiden ,

Thomas Harrison ,

Thomas Stunt ,

James Mason .

Second Middlesex Jury.

Edward Wilkinson ,

George Gould ,

William Abbot ,

James Windus ,

James Alderman ,

Benjamin Bright ,

Jeremiah Blunt ,

Robert Haughton ,

John Lynch ,

Joseph Hale Miller ,

John Williams ,

Robert Hughes .

SESSIONS HOUSE, OLD BAILEY, DECEMBER 3, 1818.

ATKINS, MAYOR. FIRST SESSION.

Reference Number: t18181202-1

1. THOMAS PEARKS was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of David Page , about five o'clock in the forenoon of the 25th of May , at St. James, Westminster, he and other persons being therein, and stealing therein two silver spoons, value 20 s., his property .

DAVID PAGE . I live in Bridle-lane, St. James's, Westminster - I occupy the house. On the 25th of May last, my house was broken open.

Q. By what means - A. The flap of the kitchen window was lifted up, and the staple of the bolt drawn - anybody could then get into the house. I lost two silver spoons, worth 1 l., which had been used the day before - I found them in the possession of Needham. He gave them to me - I produce them - they are mine, and have my initials on them - they are worth 20 s. I saw the window fastened in the course of the day.

SARAH WILTSHIRE . I am the prosecutor's servant. On Sunday, the 24th of May, in the afternoon, I left the spoons safe at three o'clock, in the kitchen. I was there about eight o'clock in the evening, the window was then fast. I went to bed about ten o'clock.

Prisoner. Q. How was it fastened - A. the bolt went into the staple - I am sure it was fastened. My master, and all the family, slept in the house that night.

JAMES BOOTH . I am a watchman. On Sunday morning, the 25th of May, about half-past five o'clock, I was passing the prosecutor's house - the kitchen window was then fast. I saw through the railings that there were two silver spoons, in some dirty dishes there; about a quarter of an hour after, I found the staple drawn, and the window forced open - the spoons were gone. Before this I had met the prisoner and another boy coming down the lane, about twenty paces from the prosecutor's house - coming towards it - I said nothing to them. When I found the window broken open, I suspected them. I went in pursuit, and overtook the prisoner in Golden-square, I took him to the watch-house, and found two silver table-spoons on him, which were delivered to Needham.

JURY. Q. How did you see the spoons - A. It is a wooden flap with bars to it - I saw them through the bars.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The flap was open when I went to it.

GUILTY. - DEATH . Aged 16.

Recommended to Mercy .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18181202-2

2. ROBERT PARSONS was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Robert Needham , about seven o'clock in the night of the 28th of November , at St. Luke, Chelsea, with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, six silver forks, value 5 l., his property .

ROBERT NEEDHAM . I am a silversmith , and rent a house in the parish of St. Luke, Chelsea . On the 28th of September, about seven o'clock in the evening, I was writing at the counter, and heard a violent crash at the window. I found the window broken, and saw something had been taken out - I ran to the door, and heard the call of Stop thief!. The prisoner was almost immediately brought from over the way, in the custody of Yapp - I did not see him taken. Yapp produced six silver forks, which were mine. I was writing by the window just before it was broken, and opposite the pane that was broken - the pane was broken large enough for a man to put his hand in. I saw no hand put in - they could not have been taken without putting his hand in - they were taken off the wire where they hung, and are worth 5 l.

GEORGE YAPP . I am a shoemaker, and live near the prosecutor's. On the 28th of September, about seven o'clock in the evening, I was standing at the corner of Exeter-street, which is about five doors from the prosecutor's, on the opposite side of the way. I heard glass break, and saw the prisoner run-across the road, from the spot, with something white in his hand - I endeavoured to stop him, but did not succeed till he got into Exeter-street, I then caught hold of his coat; he fell down, and I fell over him. I took six forks from under him, and gave them to Mr. Debney immediately before I got up - it was quite dark, with assistance I took him back to Mr. Needham - Debney went with us, and took the forks - I did not see the prisoner break the glass, but he ran from where it was broken.

CLEMENT DEBNEY . A little before seven o'clock in the evening, I heard the window break, turned round, and saw a man running in the road, calling, Stop thief!.

I turned round, and pursued the man, who was running very fast in the middle of the road, from where I heard the crash. Yapp overtook him first, the prisoner slipped and he fell over him - I came up and Yapp said, here are the spoons, they were forks, as he thought they were spoons - the prisoner was laying on them. Yapp took the forks, and gave them to me - we took the prisoner to the prosecutor, and he claimed them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

RICHARD MAYBANK . I was constable of the night. The prisoner was brought to the watch-house, and I found a sharp pointed knife on him.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in Sloane-street about half-past six o'clock. I came up to the prosecutor's house, heard the window crack, and saw a man start across the street. I called out Stop thief! and pursued to take him - I fell down, and saw the man throw something down, I stopped to pick them up, and the witness fell on me.

GEORGE YAPP . I saw no man running but the prisoner.

CLEMENT DEBNEY re-examined. Nobody was running but the prisoner.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 23.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

Reference Number: t18181202-3

3. JOHN CORDEROY and GEORGE WOOD were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Thorley , about two o'clock in the night of the 28th of October , at St. Leonard, Shoreditch; with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, thirteen music books, value 1 l. 10 s.; one mirror-glass, value 4 l.; twelve pictures, value 15 l.; two lustres, value 1 l.; one fender, value 10 s.; one set of cruets, value 30 s.; one teapot, value 1 l.; four salt-holders, value 16 s.; one mustard-pot, value 8 s.; five shirts, value 1 l. 15 s.; one liquor-frame, and three bottles, value 1 l. 3 s.; one timepiece-stand, value 8 s.; one mug, value 3 s.; one handkerchief, value 2 s.; two half handkerchiefs, value 2 s.; twelve buttons, value 6 d.; ten yards, of corderoy, value 15 s.; and one pair of drawers, value 1 s., his property; three shifts, value 5 s.; five napkins, value 5 s., and three caps, value 5 s., the goods of Ann Reeves , widow .

THOMAS THORLEY . I am an auctioneer , and rent a house in Thunel-square, Hoxton, in the parish of St. Leonard, Shoreditch . On the 28th of October I got up about eight o'clock in the morning, and found my house broken open - it had then been light two hours.

Q. How was it broken open - A. They cut the window shutters, put a hand in, and opened the sash. I missed the articles stated in the indictment, which were worth above 35 l. I saw the house fastened up late the evening before, and all the property safe. I have two little dogs, they barked violently about three o'clock in the morning - it did not alarm me, as they often bark. I have found none of my property, except two paintings.

ANN REEVES . I live in the prosecutor's house. On Tuesday night, the 27th of October I fastened all the doors and windows. I went into the parlour the first in the morning, a few minutes after eight o'clock, found the window shutters wide open, and the property gone - I found a hat in the parlour. I lost three shifts, three caps, two napkins, and a towel, which were worth 1 l., out of the parlour. I have since seen my shifts, and napkins I found a lamp-burner, and some matches on the piano, in the same parlour, and a chisel in the window.

THOMAS WALKER . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Tabernacle-walk. On Thursday, the 29th of October, about five o'clock in the evening, Ann Reeves informed me of the robbery. I left the shop immediately after, and in about five minutes, my servant came, and said a person had offered a picture, answering the description in the bill, which she had given me. I went into the shop, and found Corderoy there - he produced the picture, and asked four or five shillings on it. I stooped down to take up the printed bill, as soon as he saw me rise with it in my hand, and begin to read it, he ran away. I sent two of my young men to pursue him, in about a quarter of an hour they brought him back. I then sent for an officer - he was searched by Attfield, in my presence, and in the lining of his pantaloons were found, two duplicates of three shift, among others. The picture was two cows, and a milkmaid.

VARDEN WOOD HARROP . I live in Tabernacle-square, about five hundred yards from the prosecutor's. On the 29th of October, I was in my shop, and heard the cry of Stop thief! I turned my head, and saw the prisoner Corderoy, running by my house - several people were pursuing him. I ran out, and took him in Willow-walk. He said it was only a fight, and asked me to let him go - I refused. A mob of about twenty men interrupted us - I secured him - the prisoner Wood was one of them. Some people came to my assistance - I kept hold of him. I am certain Wood was one of them, by his voice, dress and size. I was struck by three or four different people - I believe he was one who struck me. I took Corderoy to Walker's, and gave him in charge of Attfield.

WILLIAM HENRY ROGERS . I am shopman to Mr. Hyatt, a pawnbroker, who lives in Bishopsgate-street. On the 28th of October, about twelve o'clock in the morning, three shifts were pledged with me by a woman, in the name of Mary Smith , Hollywell-lane. I gave her a duplicate - that found on Corderey is the one I gave her.

THOMAS BLACKBURN . I am shopman to Mr. Miller, who is a pawnbroker. On the 29th of October, about three o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner Wood, pledged a painting with me for three shillings, in the name of John Stevens . I am certain he is the man.

BARNARD GLEED . I am an officer. On the 28th of October, the morning of the robbery, I went to Thorley's house, and examined it. I found the outside window shutter in the parlour had twenty or thirty holes bored with a gimblet - a piece was taken out, large enough for me to get my hand in - there was a broken square of glass, through which they might undo the catch, and open the window - Reeves gave me a hat, which they had left behind them. I have no doubt but it belonged to Corderoy - I used to see him every day, and believe it to be his. She also gave me the burner of a lamp, it appeared to have been burning that night. It was taken out of a lamp, at the door of the King's Head public-house, near the prosecutor's house. She also gave me a chisel, and two phosphorus matches, one of which had been lit. On Friday, October the 29th, about five o'clock in the afternoon, I met the prisoner Corderoy, close to my house, with a

bundle under his arm. I went into a public-house to deliver a parcel which I had, when I came out he was gone. In about half an hour I went to the office, and found him in the custody of Attfield. I then went to a house in Greengate-garden, Hackney-road, where both the prisoners lived together - I knew Corderoy lived there. I knocked at the door, but nobody was at home. I broke it open, and found a gimblet in the cupboard, which fitted the holes in the shutter. I found five skelleton, one picklock, and one droplatch key. I also found a piece of painting, of some shipping, cut to pieces, which the prosecutor claimed. Also part of a gilt frame, three napkins, a shirt, a handkerchief, the knob of a brass fender, a pair of drawers, and twelve plaited buttons. As I returned, I met the prisoner Wood, going towards the house. I stopped him, and said,

"Your name is George". He said it was not. I said, I was sure it was, and asked him where he lived?. He said, in Wentworth-street. I asked him if he knew Jack Corderoy ? - he said Yes. I told him, I took him on suspicion of breaking into Mr. Thorley's house, in company with Corderoy - he said he knew nothing about it. I searched him, and found a white half-handkerchief in his hat, marked T H. He said it was his own - the prosecutor claimed it.

WILLIAM ATTFIELD . On the 29th of October, I went to Walker's, took Corderoy in charge, and found eight duplicates in the knees of his breeches. One was for the painting, pledged on the 29th of October, in the name of Mary Stevens . Another was for three shifts, pledged on the 28th, in the name of Ann Smith . I asked him if he had a handkerchief in his pocket? - he said No. I found one there, which the prosecutor claimed. He said he lived with his brother, in the Hackney-road - I went to his brother, and found it was not true.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

CORDEROY'S Defence. I met a man and woman, and bought the things of them. I went to pledge the picture - the man took up the bill, which frightened me, and I ran away.

WOOD'S Defence. I saw him buy the things, and pledged a picture for him.

CORDEROY - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 20.

WOOD - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 20

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18181202-4

4. GEORGE MASON was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of October , one mare, price 11 l.; one saddle, value 30 s., and one bridle, value 10 s. , the property of James Starkie .

JAMES STARKIE . I am a chymist , and live in the Strand . On the 6th of October the prisoner was brought to my house, by a man named Smith, to buy my mare - he offered me a 10 l. note for it; he agreed to give me 11 l. for it if I would grant him three days trial; he said it was for his father, who lived at Whitford, near Ware, in Hertfordshire. I agreed to let him have three days trial if he would let me have 11 l. He requested me to lend him the bridle and saddle, which he was to return in three days. When I expected the money he gave me a bill for 20 l.; I expressed a doubt about it, upon which he referred me to Mr. Kell, who lived a few doors off. My stable is contiguous to the house. I called out of the window to the servant to put on the saddle and bridle, and told the prisoner to go round to the stable; in the intermediate time I went to Mr. Kell to make inquiry about the bill, which was not satisfactory; on my return I found the prisoner gone with the horse, saddle, and bridle. I gave him no authority whatever to take it away.

COURT. Q. Did you say you was going to inquire about the bill - A. No.

Cross-examined by MR. REYNOLDS. Q. Did you know Smith - A. No; he had called two or three times before.

Q. You ordered the servant to saddle and bridle it, and told the prisoner to go round to the stable - A. Yes; intending it to be ready.

Q. If you had got the money for the bill, you would have been content to part with the horse - A. I was aware I could not get the money, the bill was not endorsed. I found that out afterwards. I was not gone above three minutes to Mr. Kell's. I intended when I returned, to tell the prisoner whether I would take the bill or not.

Q. On his giving you the bill, you told the servant to saddle the mare, and told the prisoner to go round to the stable - A. I did. The bill was due on the 20th of November, I did not present it - the money was offered to me before it was due, but after the prisoner was apprehended.

Re-examined by MR. ARABIN. Q. When was he apprehended - A. Near a month after - he never called for the change. I met him in the Old Bailey, and asked him if his name was not Mason - he said it was. I had an officer with me, and gave him in charge for felony. He said,

"Felony! what felony?" and asked who I was. I said you remember having a horse of me, I live in the Strand. He said he remembered buying it. I told him he would find it something besides buying. My saddle and bridle were sent to me after his apprehension. I have since seen the mare.

JOHN SMITH . I am servant to Mr. Starkie. My master ordered me to saddle the mare, he gave no other orders. The prisoner came into the stable, and girted it on; he said he had agreed that he should have it, and that it was for his father; that he made no doubt but it would suit, and if it did, when he returned to settle for her he would give me 5 s. He rode off with it. I saw it again last Saturday in possession of Moore; and am certain it is master's by a mark on the right thigh.

Cross-examined. Q. You let him take it out of the stable - A. Yes, from what he said to me - he said he had agreed to buy it. I should not have let him have it if my master had not ordered me to saddle it, by that I thought it was all correct.

JOHN HARDWICKE . I am a butcher, and live in Clare-market. About six weeks or two months ago I bought a bay mare of the prisoner, for 6 l., it had No. 14 marked on the right side of the thigh - I thought it had been branded. I sold her three days after for ten guineas and a half, at Dixon's Repository. She was in harness when the prisoner brought her to me.

THOMAS LEERS . I am clerk to Mr. Dixon, who keeps the Repository, in Barbican. On the 9th of October Hardwicke's mare was sold there to Mr. Moore, of Shadwell. for 11 l. 6 s.

Prisoner's Defence. When I gave the prosecutor the bill he never said where he was going, but said,

"very well, go round to the stable, and take the horse," and ordered the servant to let me have it. I tried it before the prosecutor's door afterwards.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

Reference Number: t18181202-5

5. THOMAS GEORGE was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of November , one coat, value 4 l., the goods of James Cooper , in his dwelling-house .

JAMES COOPER . I live in New-street, Covent-garden . On the 24th of November, between six and seven o'clock in the evening, I was sitting at the back of my shop, a boy came in and said a man had run out with a coat; I ran out, saw the prisoner running, and called out Stop thief! he was stopped in Great Newport-street, by Morgan. The coat has never been found - it was worth 4 l.

WILLIAM MORGAN . I saw the prisoner running, and stopped him, at the corner of Newport-street; he threw the coat to another man just by Slaughter's coffee-house - the man went away with it.

WILLIAM JARVIS . I saw the prisoner come out of Mr. Cooper's shop with the coat.

Prisoner's Defence. I never had it; they took me as I stood by the pork shop.

GUILTY. Aged 39.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18181202-6

6. BARNET SOLOMONS was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of June , one cask, value 1 s., and 16 lbs. of mustard, value 1 l. , the goods of Edward Jackson , Edward Dampier , and Thomas Shackleton .

THOMAS SHACKLETON . I am in partnership with Edward Jackson and Edward Dampier ; we are mustard maker s, and live in Primrose-street, Bishopsgate. About six years ago I sent out some mustard in a cart, which Rowland drove - it was stolen.

Q. How came you not to prosecute before - A. We preferred an indictment against the prisoner, but could not find him.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. He surrendered last Sessions to take his trial - A. Yes.

RICHARD ROWLAND . I am the prosecutors' carman. The cask was taken out of the cart in Whitechapel , while I was minding the horse, as I returned I met a boy with it, and detained him; I am sure it was the cask that I lost.

EDWARD DAVIS . I am a ward-beadle. On the 1st of June, 1812, I found the last witness with a cask of mustard under his arm, and a little boy, about eleven years old, in his custody, who was crying. Rowland said he had stolen the mustard; the child said he had not, and asked me to fetch his father, who was the prisoner, and that he lived in Still-alley. I went there, and found the prisoner standing by the fire. I asked him where his son was, he said he had just sent him out to Mr. Vincent's with a barrel of mustard. I told him the mustard had been stolen within the last half hour; he said that was a lie, for he had had it in his house ever since Monday. I said he must go with me. As we went along, he said he could not think why I had such a spite against him. I told him he knew why; he said,

"don't you think I am a better judge than to send it out if it was not all right." I took him to my house, where the boy was. The prisoner asked leave to go into the yard; he passed through my back parlour, where the cask was, he took it up, and said if they will swear to this, they will swear to anything. The officer took him away; he afterwards absconded, and was never heard of. I have been looking for him several times, but could not find him.

Cross-examined. Q. Has not the prisoner been about the town for the last three years - A. I believe he has; when I went to his house he did not appear ill. He had his shoes and hat on.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The charge is entirely false. Davis asked if my boy was at school, I said I hoped he was - I found he was in custody, and told them to let him go, and take me; he told me to attend before the magistrate. A Jew, who owes me a spite, told Davis to do his duty, and take me, as I was indicted; hearing this I surrendered.

ABRAHAM SANNON . I am a surgeon. At the time the prisoner was taken up for this offence I had been attending him for a fracture in his leg; he could not even walk away with a barrel of mustard, it was impossible.

ELIZA DAVIS . I was the prisoner's servant. I remember Davis coming to the house, the prisoner had not been out all that day.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181202-7

7. WILLIAM BRYAN was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of July , one coat, value 30 s.; three waistcoats, value 21 s.; three jackets, value 21 s.; two pair of trowsers, value 30 s.; one pair of gloves, value 1 s.; three pair of shoes, value 15 s,; three shirts, value 10 s. 6 d.; seven pair of stockings, value 10 s. 6 d.; twelve neck-handkerchiefs, value 24 s.; three pocket-handkerchiefs, value 4 s.; four aprons, value 4 s.; one pair of drawers, value 2 s., and one razor, value 1 s., the goods of William Eager ; and one coat, value 3 l., the goods of Alice Hoffman .

CHARLES BLACKESLEY . I am clerk to Messrs. Hoffman and Son, who live in Bishopsgate-street. I employed the prisoner to carry the articles stated in the indictment from Tower-stairs, to Bishopsgate-street. As we came up Gracechurch-street he ran away with them - I turned round, and missed him. I was informed he was gone towards Leadenhall-market - I followed and gave the alarm. He was taken in Lime-street. They belong to Mr. Eager.

JAMES FARREL . I am a constable. On the 15th of July I was in Leadenhall-market, about half-past eight o'clock, the prisoner ran by me with a great coat and a bag on his shoulder. I pursued, heard the cry of Stop thief! and stopped him. The bag contained the property.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The Sessions before last, I was committed for this offence, and discharged - no bill was found against me. On the 15th of November I was apprehended again.

WILLIAM EAGER . I came too late to prefer the bill before the Grand Jury.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181202-8

8. MICHAEL SWAIN and WILLIAM BROWN were indicted for stealing, on the 6th of November , one handkerchief, value 5 s., the goods of James Harmer , from his person .

MR. JAMES HARMER . On the 6th of November, a little before seven o'clock, as I was passing down Holborn-hill , near Ely-place, I felt a slight touch at my right hand pocket, where my handkerchief was - I was near the curb. The prisoner, Brown, passed me on the outside. I found my handkerchief safe, I took no notice of him, but walked on - I kept feeling if my handkerchief was safe. When I came within a few yards of Giltspur-street, by St. Sepulchre's church, I felt something touch my pocket again - I felt, and missed my handkerchief. I immediately turned round, and saw the prisoner Brown, close to me, and two men close to him, covering him - all three were in motion, with their hands moving. I seized all three, and said,

"one or the other of you has got my handkerchief, give it to me". They all denied it - I said I would take them to the watch-house, and give them all in charge, as I was certain one of them had it. The two men became violent, and said they would not go to the watch-house, as they knew nothing about it. I looked on the ground, and saw my handkerchief lying there - there was nobody but the prisoners and myself near. The two men got from me - I kept hold of Brown, and picked up my handkerchief - I tried to take hold of the two men, but they retreated. One or two persons came up, I asked their assistance - they got as far as Giltspur-street. I called out Stop thief! and saw one of them stopped, about fifty or sixty yards off, on the pavement - it was Swain - the other kept in the middle of the road, and got away. I went up to Swain, and found a man lying on the ground, and Swain holding him, and saying,

"This is him, I have got him" - he was holding Attfield, and said he was the man. I took him to the Compter with Brown.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN ATTFIELD . I am horse-keeper at the Saracen's Head Inn, Snow-hill. I heard the prosecutor call Stop thief! and immediately laid hold of Swain, who was running. He immediately tripped me up, threw me under him, and called out

"I have got him. Here he is." The prosecutor came up, and took him to the Compter.

SWAIN'S Defence. The prosecutor said one of us had got his handkerchief. I told him to search me - he let me go, I ran away, and refused to go to the Compter - the last witness took me.

BROWN'S Defence. I was not coming the same way as the other men.

SWAIN - GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Life .

BROWN - GUILTY . Aged 16

Confined Six Months , and Whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181202-9

9. WILLIAM TIBBITS was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of November , one cask, value 2 s.; two gallons of gin, value 1 l.; two shirts, value 10 s.; two pairs of sheets, value 3 l.; eight handkerchiefs, value 12 s., and one waistcoat, value 2 s. 6 d. , the goods of John Slack .

JOHN SLACK . I am a stage coachman , and live at the Belle Sauvage. On the 3d of November, Mr. Preston's carter, from Sewardstone, came into the tap with the prisoner, in the morning, and asked me to send what dirty linen I had to Sewardstone, with two gallons of gin. I gave the linen to the carter, and said I would bring the gin myself to the George Inn, Smithfield - the carter went away with the prisoner and the linen. About half an hour after, the prisoner came in, and asked for the gin. I said I would bring it directly - he offered to carry it. I said he might carry it, but I should go with him. I saw it left in the bar with the linen, and gave the prisoner, a pot of beer for his trouble. He then said he was servant to Mr. Preston, and had lived two years with him. I said I had never seen him, and did not know him in the country - as I had lived there. He said he had been at a farm of Mr. Preston's, about three or four miles from Sewardstone, but as Mr. Preston had nineteen sheep stolen, he was taken to the other farm to look after them, and that he was going home to Sewardstone with a load of dung, and the other carter was going home empty - that he could not get home till he returned, as he had one of his horses. He and I went to the corner of the Old Bailey together, to meet the carter. He said the carter had ordered him to stop there till he came, and he would send him to me. I left him there, and in about an hour the carter came to say the things were gone from the George, and that the girl had delivered them to the man, who brought the gin with me. I said it was his fellow-servant. He said he had never seen him before. I said they were concerned together, and if they were not found, he should pay for them - I have never found them.

LOUISA PARRATT . I am a servant at the George-tap, Smithfield. On the 3d of November, Mr Preston's servant gave me a bundle of dirty linen, soon after Tibbets, and the prosecutor came with two gallons of gin. Slack gave him a pot of beer. Soon after the prisoner came back, and said that George, who was Mr. Preston's servant, was in a hurry, and I was to give the things to him. He said he had lived two years with Mr. Preston - I gave him the bundle and gin. Soon after the regular carter came for them - he said he knew nothing of the prisoner.

GEORGE READ . I am Mr. Preston's carter. I met the prisoner in Giltspur-street, he asked me where I was going - I had a parcel under my arm - he asked me to let him carry it - I would not. I let him carry the empty cagg to Slack's - he went in with me - he went to the George Inn door with me. When I left the linen he said he was horse-keeper at the George. I met him one day afterwards, and secured him, and found the things were gone from the George - he never lived with my master.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181202-10

10. JAMES STRADLING was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of November , the carcase of a sheep, value 1 l. 16 s. , the property of Richard Stanbury and Benjamin Stanbury .

BENJAMIN STANBURY . I keep the White Hart, in the Borough , in partnership with my brother Richard. Six carcases of sheep were sent to me from Maidstone, and I sent them to Mr. Fountain, of Newgate-street, for sale.

SAMUEL ELLIOT . I am the prosecutors' errand boy. I was minding the cart with the sheep, in Paternoster-row , on the 27th of November; the prisoner came up and said, the man in a smock-frock had sent him for a sheep. He took one on his shoulder and went away with it. I am sure he is the man. Bosworth came soon after, and said he had not sent him for it.

GEORGE BOSWORTH . I am carman to the prosecutors. I left the cart in Paternoster-row, and took one sheep into the market; when I returned I missed one. I sent nobody for it.

THOMAS WRIGHT . I was in Newgate-market. The car-man told me he had lost a sheep. I inquired about it, and found the prisoner in custody of my fellow-servant.

JAMES BROWN . I am fellow-servant with Wright. I found the prisoner in Bridge-street with the sheep. I went up to him and said he had stolen it. He immediately threw it off his shoulder and tried to run off. The constable took him about six yards off.

JOHN SINGLETON . I am an officer. On the 27th of November, between eight and nine o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner come out of Earl-street into Bridge-street, with the carcase of a sheep. Brown called out

"Stop thief!" he then threw it off his shoulder and tried to escape. I took him.

Prisoner's Defence. A man employed me to carry it. I did not take it from the cart,

GUILTY . Aged 43.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181202-11

11. WILLIAM BENNETT was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of November , one piece of handkerchiefs, value 30 s. the goods of James Palmer and Samuel Hough .

JOHN MILLNER . I am servant to the prosecutors, James Palmer and Samuel Hough , who are haberdasher s, and live in Cornhill . On the 14th of November, about nine o'clock in the morning, as I came into the shop, a man was looking at some handkerchiefs. Miss Gould called me, and said he had run away with one piece. I pursued, calling out

"Stop thief!" He was taken in Broad-street.

MARY GOULD . I am shopwoman to the prosecutors. The prisoner came into the shop, and asked for a particular pattern handkerchief. I showed him some different; he objected to the price. When I was folding up one piece, he took up a piece and ran off. I gave the alarm, and he was brought back.

CHARLES IRELAND . On the 14th of November, about half-past nine o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner run down Threadneedle-street, with his right arm under his coat. He appeared agitated. I heard the cry of

"Stop thief!" and stopped him. Just before I got to him I saw him draw his hand out and throw the piece of handkerchiefs down.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181202-12

12. WILLIAM SUTTON , JOHN MORRIS , JAMES MULLENS , RICHARD BRODERICK , and WILLIAM DAVIS were severally and separately indicted for feloniously having forged notes in their possession, knowing them to be forged ; to which they severally pleaded

GUILTY .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181202-13

13. HENRY HARVEY was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of November , one basket, value 2 s. , the goods of James Crump .

WILLIAM VANLENT . I am constable of Clerkenwell. On the 21st of November I was passing along Goswell-street-road , and saw the prisoner and another person looking about Crump's window. I watched them and saw the prisoner go into the shop and come out in about three minutes, with a basket in his hand. When he got a little way off he began to run. I went into the shop, found they had missed a basket, pursued, and took him down a gateway with it. He threw the basket down, and tried to get away.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181202-14

14. GEORGE PRIDEAUX and THOMAS FAULKNER were indicted for that they, on the 8th of June , feloniously did falsely make, forge, and counterfeit a certain receipt for money, i.e. 100 l. 9 s. 1 d. with intent to defraud Edward Adolphus, Duke of Somerset ; George John, Earl Spencer ; John Julius Angerstein , and John Drummond .

SECOND COUNT. For feloniously uttering and publishing the same as true, with the like intent, knowing it to be forged.

JOSEPH UNWIN . I have come from the Clerk of the Peace's office, Clerkenwell. This bank is enrolled there, entitled

"The Provident Institution for Savings, established at 13, Panton-street, Haymarket."

ROBERT PARROTT . I am actuary of the Savings Bank instituted at the west end of the town. The trustees are Edward Adolphus , Duke of Somerset; George John, Earl Spencer ; John Julius Angerstein , and John Drummond . They were appointed at a general meeting of the society, of which I have the minute.

Q. Did you, as actuary of the society, receive any money of a benefit club - A. On the 18th of April I received 100 l. from two persons, for the benefit society entitled

"The Horse Shoe Fund." The money was received in the names of Thomas Prideaux and James Ing , as trustees for that society. I gave them a depositor's book as a receipt for the money, and made a duplicate of the entry.

Q. If the depositors want to draw their money out, what

is the rule - A. They are to give a week's notice of their intention, and produce the book on giving notice, and on receiving the money. On the 13th of May a person came to give me notice, and produced the book.

Q. Do you believe either of the prisoners to be that person - A. I cannot say either of them are. On the 8th of June two persons came and produced the society deposit-book, in which I made an entry, denoting that the principal sum was received, and the interest due upon it. I wrote a receipt, and got both of them to sign it in my presence. This is it (producing it). I paid the money in two 50 l. bank notes, Nos. 170, dated 22d July, 1817, and 12,393, May 15, 1818.

Q. Do you remember either of the prisoners - A. I have a knowledge of them both; but cannot say whether upon this occasion or not.

WILLIAM HOOLE . I am a clerk in the Bank. I produce two 50 l. notes, Nos. 170, dated 22d July, 1817, and 12,393, 15th May, 1818, which were paid into the Bank.

Mr. PARROT. They are the notes I paid on this occasion, and have both my hand-writing on them. They have Nos. 2819 and 2834 on them, by which I know I paid this money out of money I had received that day; if I had not they would have been paid into the banker's.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. How many 50 l. notes had you at the time the receipt was written - A. Five. I did not enter the numbers of the notes I paid for this receipt.

Q. You have produced the minute-book of the society, is that the only book in which the appointment of officers is registered - A. It is.

Q. The minute says, " Resolved, That these persons be requested to allow their names to be added to the list of trustees - A. Yes; a list had been printed without the names of the trustees. There were no other trustees. The word

"added" is superfluous. I do not know the names of the Duke of Somerset.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You appoint the trustees and officers at a general meeting - A. Yes; I made out a list of them, and these persons were requested to allow their names to be added to that list as trustees, the minutes should be

"that they be requested to allow their names to be added to the list as trustees."

Q. On the day you paid the money you had five 50 l. notes - A. Yes; two of them I paid to Messrs. Drummond, one to a Mr. Bray, and the other two, I am certain, were paid for this receipt.

Mr. RUSH. I am clerk to Messrs. Drummonds. On the 8th of June the actuary paid two 50 l. notes into our hands, Nos. 17,782, and 9,099. He paid no other 50 l. note.

MR. PARROT. I do not know the number of the note I paid to Bray.

EDWARD DOGHERTY . I am a member of the Horse Shoe club. Joseph Ing was secretary, and Thomas Prideaux , and the prisoner, George Prideaux , steward s in April last. Our money was kept in a strong box, with three separate locks. The stewards have each a key, and the landlord keeps the other. All three must be present at the opening of the box. It is kept at the Princess Charlotte, in Swallow-street, where the club is held.

Q. When were the stewards changed - A. About the 18th of April. Robert Dixon and Thomas Blake then became stewards.

Q. When the money was deposited at the saving bank, did you see any book - A. Yes; it was produced at the next meeting of the club by James Ing, who had deposited the money; Thomas Prideaux saw it put into the box, and locked it up with three keys. At that time the prisoner had one key, his father another, and the landlord the other.

Q. Did you afterwards look for the book - A. Yes; on the 22d of June, which was a club night, I looked all over the box and found the club articles put in instead of the book. Next morning I went to Prideaux's father to make inquiry, and saw Thomas Faulkner there. Nothing particular passed. I did not see the prisoner, Prideaux, for a long time after.

Q. Did he ever say why he had been out of the way - A. Yes; the beginning of June we were talking at the club about the loss of the 100 l., somebody asked what he had been out of the way for? he said it was on account of a bastard child. I afterwards saw him at the saving bank, in Panton-street; he said the mother of the child that he was out of the way for, was Jane Cleveland , who lived at a cottage, near the Buffalo's Head, in the New-road. I went there that night, and found a woman named Maria Grub there, but nobody of the name he said. We had a public dinner at Bayswater, on the 11th of May, George Prideaux was steward then, but his father was not.

Cross-examined by MR. CURWOOD. The prisoner, Faulkner, was a member three or four years ago.

ROBERT RADDON . I am landlord of the public-house where the club used to meet, and had a key of the box. In April last the prisoner, Prideaux, had one. I do not know who had the other. George Prideaux and the other steward came to me on a Sunday, and asked me to leave the box unlocked, for them to get money to pay for the dinner at Bayswater.

Q. Do you remember George Prideaux coming with his father's key - A. Yes; he had another person with him. I opened my lock and left them there. I do not know who the other man was.

Cross-examined by MR. CURWOOD. All the members have access to the box on club nights.

GEORGE CLAYTON . I am a member of the club. The prisoner, Prideaux, was one steward, and William Black was the other. On Whit-Sunday, the 10th of May, I called at the Princess Charlotte, to ask for some tickets for the dinner. I saw the prisoner, Prideaux, come out of the parlour, with James Ing , the secretary. They went up stairs with the landlord; I followed. Prideaux tried to open the box, and broke one key in the lock. He then tried to pick it with a nail. I left, and did not see it opened.

Cross-examined. Q. What did he want it opened for - A. To get a ticket out for the dinner for me.

JAMES HIDES . I am a member of the club. I saw the depositor's book put into the box at the meeting. It could not be got at without taking out the cash-box.

Q. Were you present when the box was open one club night - A. Yes; the box was going to be shut, the prisoner, Prideaux, stood on my right. I was going to put the money-box in, and said

"Let us see if that book is all right," and put my hand in to take it out. He laid

hold of my arm and said,

"Let that book alone; there will be a bother about that bye and bye." I saw a book there, but did not take it out.

Cross-examined. Q. Were you present when the book was brought from the institution - A. Yes; it was like the book I saw on the 18th of May in the box.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. When the book was brought, was it handed about - A. Yes; anybody might see it that liked. There was no other book on the table.

MR. FRANCIS TOWNSEND . I am Windsor Herald. The Duke of Somerset's names are Edward Adolphus , Duke of Somerset, and Earl Spencer 's, John, Earl Spencer .

ROBERT DIXON . I am a farrier. The prisoner Prideaux, worked in the same shop with me. On the 8th of June he came early in the morning, and left at eight o'clock, saying that he was ill; he returned to work on the 10th. I am a member of the club, and remember the book being brought from the bank, and am certain the same book was put into the box. I know Ing's handwriting (looks at the receipt) - in my judgment, it is not his hand-writing.

WILLIAM JOHN BEARD . I know Thomas Prideaux 's hand-writing (looks at the receipt) - I do not believe this to be his hand-writing.

JOHN THORPE . I am messenger of Marylebone parish. On the 29th of August, 1817, a woman, named Maria Grub , swore herself pregnant by the prisoner Prideaux - she lived in a cottage next to the Buffalo's Head, public-house, New-road; his mother paid the parish 5 l. before September, 1817, and he was relieved from any further trouble about it.

WILLIAM SALTER . I am servant to Mr. Littler. About five or six months ago I met the prisoner, Faulkner, and another man, at the corner of Whitcombe-street, he said he was going to draw 100 l. out of the savings bank, just above and he would give me 1 l. to go with him. I said I would go if I could do him any good. When we got to Panton-street, opposite the saving bank, it was not open. We stepped into the road, he then said one of the stewards of the society was ill, and he wanted me to sign his name - I have forgot the name he mentioned. I told him I would not do it for 500 l. I left him.

Cross-examined. Q. When did you give this account - A. I was having a horse shod, they were speaking of the business, and I mentioned it.

THOMAS STREET . I am a farrier, and live at Streatham. The prisoner, Faulkner, lived with me two years ago (looking at the two notes), there is

"Jones, Oxford-street;" on the back of them, which I think is his handwriting, it resembles it. He wrote a great deal for me.

Cross-examined. Q. Is your belief strong or weak - A. The length of time that has elapsed, weakens my belief. From the knowledge of the transaction, and from my recollection of his writing, I think it is his.

Q. If you had seen it in a letter, should you say it was his - A. No.

WILLIAM GREEN . I am pay-clerk of the Bank. On the 8th of June I gave one hundred 1 l. notes in exchange for the two 50 l. notes. I changed them in the name of Jones. Among the notes I paid for them were Nos. 43,910, 20th February, 1818, and 61,302, 6th May, 1818.

EBENEZER ALLNUTT . I am servant to Mr. Mulcaster, a pawnbroker. On the 9th of June the prisoner (Faulkner's) wife paid me a 1 l. note, No. 43,910. I produce it.

JANE WINGFIELD . I live in Brown-street. The prisoner, Faulkner, lodged with me. On the 9th of June he paid me a 1 l. note, No. 61,302, for rent. His daughter gave it to me.

EDWARD FULLER . I am a farrier, and live in James-street, Oxford-road. On the 9th of June, about eight o'clock in the morning, I met Faulkner in Oxford-street. He said he had called on me, and asked me to go to Ascot races. I met him by agreement in half an hour after. He produced a handful of bank notes, and said he could carry more money in his pockets by walking about, than others could do by hard work.

BENJAMIN SMITH . I am a member of the club. On the 11th of July, after the robbery was discovered, Faulkner told me, that if the Horse Shoe Fund advertised the book, he would find it for 10 l., or less.

FAULKNER'S Defence. I have not been a member for four years, and had no access to the club-room. At the time the money was drawn, I was not able to walk. It is a conspiracy against me.

ANDREW ARNOLD . I am a bricklayer. On the 8th of June I saw the prisoner, Prideaux, ill in bed, at his mother's house. I went there about half-past nine o'clock in the morning. I was ill myself, and understood he could cure me. I was in his bed-room about an hour, I then went into his mother's room, dined, and drank tea there, and left at five o'clock in the afternoon. He was in bed all the time. He could not come out of the bed-room without going through the room where I was.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Where was it - A. In Princes-street, Phoenix-mews, Oxford-road. I saw nobody there but his mother - his father came in to his meals.

Q. Who dined with you - A. His mother, father, and two small children.

Q. How do you know it was the 8th of June - A. I was going into the country, but was taken ill; nobody came in that I remember.

Q. While you was there did anybody converse with you, except his father and mother - A. Nobody. I went for some medicine.

JAMES WILLIAMS . On the 9th of June, I had some business to do for Prideaux's father. I went there about eight o'clock in the morning, and saw the prisoner in the shop about half-past eight - he appeared ill. I went there again about twelve o'clock, and staid there till half-past one - he was in bed in the adjoining room.

Cross-examined. Q. Who was in the room - A. Mrs. Prideaux, and one of the children.

Q. If any other person had been there all the time, you must have known it - A. I cannot say.

Q. Do you know Arnold - A. I saw him here to day, and last Sessions.

Q. Did you ever see him before - A. No.

Q. If he had been in the room, you must have seen him - A. He might be - I cannot say.

Q. Will you venture to swear that he could be in the room without your seeing him - A. I declare I cannot say whether he was there or not.

THOMAS ING PRIDEAUX . I am the prisoner's sister. On

the 8th of June he was very ill, and kept his bed all day - he came home between eight and nine o'clock in the morning, and did not go out after - I was working in the sitting room all day. Williams came in about twelve, and did not go out till three.

Cross-examined. Williams dined with us.

Q. Who was at dinner - A. Williams, Arnold, my mother, sister, and two brothers, all dined together.

Q. Did Williams and Arnold talk together - A. Not much - Arnold was an acquaintance of my brother's, and used to come backwards and forwards - he had not been recommended to him that day.

Q. Arnold and Williams talked together - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember the people of the club coming for your brother when he was away - A. Yes: when I heard he was suspected, I sent for him, and he came.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18181202-15

15. JAMES GREEN was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of November , one handkerchief, value 2 s., the goods of William Augustine Huggins , from his person .

WILLIAM AUGUSTINE HUGGINS . On the 27th of November, between twelve and one o'clock in the day, I was in Sweetings-alley, Cornhill - I felt something at my pocket, turned round, and saw the prisoner - he asked what I was looking at. I missed my handkerchief, and followed him about thirty yards - I took it from under his coat, and gave him in charge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181202-16

16. WILLIAM DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of November , five knives, value 7 s., and six forks, value 6 s. , the goods of Robert Benjamin Kay .

JOHN MONTGOMERY . I am a chimney sweeper . The prisoner, and I were employed at the Castle and Falcon, Aldersgate-street - we went into the cellar for some ashes, and I saw him put the knives and forks in a sack - he carried them home to Huggin-lane.

MR. ROBERT BENJAMIN KAY . I keep the Castle and Falcon . On the 17th of November, Vaugh, the officer, brought some knives and forks to me, which were mine - the prisoner had been sweeping my chimnies the week before.

JOHN VAUGH . I am an officer. Kernot, the prisoner's master, fetched me. I stopped the prisoner by Coachmakers' Hall, with a sack of soot. I searched his box at his master's, and found the knives and forks in it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I found them in the cellar.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181202-17

17. MARY MURRAY was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of November , one watch, value 3 l.; one chain, value 1 s., and one key, value 6 d., the goods of James Hillier , from his person .

JAMES HILLIER . On the 24th of November, at twelve o'clock at night, the prisoner caught hold of my arm, pulled me into a court in Golden-lane , and asked me to go with her - I refused. She then pulled my watch out, and ran into a house - the watchman came up the court, and went away again - I did not tell him. I afterwards fetched him, and took the prisoner in the room - I have never found the watch.

Q. Was you sober - A. I had been drinking.

Prisoner's Defence. I never touched him.

NOT GUILTY

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181202-18

18. CHARLES COWDLE was indicted for feloniously assaulting Joseph Titchew Mortimer , on the King's highway, on the 24th of November , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, one watch, value 4 l. 4 s.; one seal, value 30 s.; two keys, value 15 s. 4 d., and one ribbon, value 2 d., his property .

JOSEPH TITCHEW MORTIMER . I keep the Cock, public-house , in Love-lane, Billingsgate. On the 24th of November, between eight and nine o'clock in the evening, I was in Gracechurch-street , the prisoner came up to me, laid hold of both my hands, and said,

"how are you, shipmate?" He held me for a few seconds, and then gave a signal for two others to come up; they came, and he slipped aside, the other two ran against me, and one of them took my watch - I turned round, and pursued the two as far as a tobacconist's shop, finding I could not take them, I turned, and ran up Leadenhall-street, and took the prisoner by the East India House. I am certain he is the man.

Q. Did they strike you - A. No, they ran violently against me.

Q. What signal did he give - A. He called out to them.

SARAH MORTIMER . I am the prosecutor's wife. Last Sunday night a tall man brought the watch to me, and said he hoped we should give up further proceedings.

Prisoner's Defence. I met the prosecutor, and was talking to him; we had been at sea two years together. Two men came and took his watch - I pursued after them.

JOSEPH TITCHEW MORTIMER re-examined. I had seen the prisoner five or six years ago, at a house which I kept in St. Martin's-le-grand. He did not run to assist me - he ran the other way.

GUILTY. Aged 20.

Of stealing from the person only .

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181202-19

19. ELIZABETH ASHLEY , THOMAS ASHLEY , and LEWIS TYNDALE were indicted for stealing, on the 14th of November , the sum of 3 l. in copper monies numbered , the property of Samuel Cock .

SAMUEL COCK . I keep an apple warehouse in Botolph-passage . On the 14th of November, about twelve o'clock in the morning, the three prisoners came into my warehouse, Elizabeth Ashley asked the price of several baskets of apples, which attracted my attention; while she was there, the other two took away the money, which was in a bag on a basket - I did not see it taken; I missed it, and

she ran away, I pursued and took her, but found nothing on her. I saw it safe two minutes before they came in.

WILLIAM THISSLETON . I am an officer of Hatton-garden. I was informed of the robbery, and took Thomas Ashley , at his lodgings.

EDMUND READ . I took Tyndale; and found an apron and a pair of shoes on Thomas Ashley .

STEPHEN GREEN . I am a shoemaker, and live in Brick-lane, St. Luke's. On the 14th of November, between twelve and one o'clock, the two male prisoners each bought a pair of boots of me, which came to 12 s., they paid me 6 s. in copper, and changed a 1 l. note to pay the rest.

RICHARD BOTHEROYD . I keep a public-house at the corner of Beech-street. On the 14th of November, between twelve and one o'clock, the two male prisoners came in with a young woman, and had twopenny-worth of rum - they said they had been selling apples, had taken a quantity of copper, and asked me to take it of them. They counted me out 1 l. 4 s. I gave them a 1 l. note, and 3 s. in silver.

NORRIS HOPKINS . I am servant to Mr. Franks, Beech-street, Barbican. On the 11th of November, about one o'clock, I sold the male prisoners a hat each, they came to 12 s. 6 d.; they paid me in copper, which they took out of a girl's apron, who was with them.

ELIZABETH ASHLEY 'S Defence. I was not with the others. I went to buy apples.

THOMAS ASHLEY 'S Defence. I sold a donkey for 25 s., and was paid in copper.

E. ASHLEY - NOT GUILTY .

T. ASHLEY - GUILTY . Aged 19.

TYNDALE - GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181202-20

20. CHARLES RICHARD LEE was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of November , two pair of shoes, value 5 s. , the goods of John Marchant .

JOHN MARCHANT . I am a shoemaker , and live in Field-lane . I had fifty pair of shoes in my back warehouse; I lost several pair. I found the asp of the padlock drawn. I suspected the prisoner, who was my lodger's son, and went for an officer; when I returned I was informed that the prisoner was gone to Mr. Burnett's with two pair - I went and found my shoes there.

JOHN SIKES . I am a shoemaker. On the 3d of November, while the prosecutor was gone for an officer, I saw the prisoner come out of the warehouse with some shoes in a bag, and watched him into Burnett's shop.

JAMES BURNETT . I am a shoemaker, and live in Field-lane. The prisoner sold me two pair of shoes for 3 s. 9 d. He said his father sent him with them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. Burnett told me he would buy as many as I could bring.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Confined Three Months , and Whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181202-21

21. HENRY TIFFIN was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of November , one watch, value 28 l.; two seals, value 9 l.; one key, value 6 s.; one ring, value 10 s. 6 d.; one ribbon, value 1 d.; one pocket-book, value 2 s.; one bill of exchange for payment of and value 26 l., and five 1 l. bank notes, the property of Lewis Lane Pittman Mortimer , from his person .

MR. LEWIS LANE PITTMAN MORTIMER . I am a merchant , and live in Bush-lane. On the 20th of November, about eleven o'clock at night, I was in Cornhill , I had been to Messrs. Willis and Co.'s, my bankers, to offer my assistance, as there was a fire near their premises; I was standing on the curb, near one of the engines, about eight persons pressed me very much; I suspected them, and kept my hand to my watch and pocket-book; they drove me into the middle of the footpath with great violence, and nearly lifted me off my feet; I took my hands from my pockets to push them back, my pocket-book was in my left-hand breeches pocket, at that moment I felt a tug at my watch, and saw the prisoner's hand leave my fob; I collared him, and charged him with the robbery, I immediately received several severe blows in my face, which were repeated several times; finding they did not make me let go, one of them seized my wrist with his teeth, grasped my thumb, and bent that back, repeating the blows in my face - I called for assistance, and soon after two officers came and took him to the watch-house - he was searched, but nothing found on him. I lost my watch and seals, and my pocket-book, which contained five 1 l. notes, and a bill for 26 l. I have never seen any of the property since.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. There was not any crowd where I stood.

THOMAS LENO . On the 9th of November I paid a draft drawn by Shanks - four of the notes are the same I paid for it. I am clerk to Messrs. Smith and Co.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181202-22

22. WILLIAM MATTINGLY was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of November , at Hillingdon, one gelding, price 50 l. the property of William Brown ; and one gelding, price 24 l., the property of John Washbourne .

JOHN SADDLER . I am servant to Mr. William Brown , of Chisrelton, Wiltshire . I had the care of his brown gelding. I saw it safe the 3d of November, which was Tuesday - I dressed it, and fastened it in the stable between eight or nine o'clock at night. Next morning I found the door ajar, and the horse gone.

SAMUEL FRY . I am servant to Mr. John Washbourne , of Overton, Wiltshire , about two miles from Mr. Brown's. I left his horse safe about eight o'clock at night, and fastened it in the stable - it was early in November - I do not remember the day. Next morning, about five o'clock, I found the stable-door wide open, and the horse gone.

JOHN WELDALE KNOLLYS , ESQ. I live at Uxbridge. On Wednesday, the 4th of November, about twelve o'clock,

at noon, I met the prisoner at Uxbridge, at this end of the town, which is in Middlesex. I was in my gig with Mr. Norton - the prisoner was riding a brown gelding, and leading a roan gelding - each of them were in halter, and not saddled. I wanted to buy a roan horse, and asked if they were for sale? he said Yes. The roan horse was too small for me, and I declined buying it. He said the price of the brown horse, was 25 guineas, or 40 l. for the two. I said to Mr. Norton, in the prisoner's presence, that the brown horse was worth all the money. Mr. Norton asked where he brought them from? He said from Tilekiln Farm, near Oxford, and that he was taking them to London to sell, but to no particular place. From the price he asked, and his general conduct, Mr. Norton immediately charged him with stealing them; the prisoner said if he thought so, he was willing to leave them with him. He said he had been detained at Beaconsfield the night before on suspicion, but was released by the magistrate. Mr. Norton offered to give him the price for the horses, and lodge the money in the Bank, and if he found his story correct, he would pay him. He followed us to Mr. Norton's house - as soon as he got there, he loosed the roan horse, and gallopped away on the brown one. We pursued, and took him - he was stopped in a lane which he ran down, at the gate, which was locked. He got off the horse then, and ran over two fields - I got on the horse, overtook him, and brought him back to Uxbridge. I neither promised or threatened him - I asked him whom the horses belonged to?. He said,

"As soon as I get out of the croud, I will tell you." I took him to Mr. Norton's house. He then said the brown horse belonged to Mr. Brown, of Chesrelton, and the roan horse to Mr. Washbourne, of Overton - I gave him in custody.

Q. What was done with the horses - A. They were put in Mr. Norton's stables, and sworn to by the prosecutors, and their servants.

JOHN HOLDEN . I am groom to Mr. Norton, of Uxbridge. On the 4th of November, two horses were delivered to my care - one was a roan, and the other a bay gelding - Mr. Brown, and Mr. Washbourne, saw them on Friday.

JOHN BROWN . I am the son of William Brown . I received information, and went to Uxbridge, after our horse, which we missed on Tuesday morning - I saw it at Mr. Norton's stables, and knew it to be my father's - I had seen it safe on the Sunday. The prisoner lived in our neighbourhood, and knew the premises very well.

Cross-examined by MR. BOLLAND. Q. I believe he has been a grocer and baker at Abingdon - A. Yes, he failed - he was afterwards assistant overseer of the parish.

WILLIAM BROWN . I am the owner of the horse. Saddler gave me information of it on Wednesday - I had put it in the stable myself, on Monday, the 2d of November, about four o'clock in the afternoon. I missed it next day. I sent my son to look at it - it was brought home on Sunday - I knew it to be mine. I live sixty miles from Uxbridge - the prisoner knew my premises very well - he used to call at my house sometimes.

JOHN WASHBOURNE . I live at Overton, in Wiltshire, and am the owner of the roan horse, which I missed on Monday evening, the 2d of November, about eleven o'clock at night. I had seen it safe on Sunday morning about eleven o'clock. On the 4th of November, I received information, and went to Uxbridge - I saw it at Mr. Norton's stables - the groom shewed it to me. I am certain it is mine. The prisoner knew my premises well.

GUILTY. - DEATH . Aged 33.

Recommended to Mercy .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

Reference Number: t18181202-23

23. WILLIAM KING and HENRY TOWNSEND were indicted for feloniously having forged notes in their possession, knowing them to be forged .

The prisoners pleaded

GUILTY .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18181202-24

24. JOHN WILLIAMS was indicted for that he on the 12th of November , at St. Mary-le-Bow , feloniously did dispose of and put away a certain forged and counterfeit bank note (setting it forth, No. 21,527, dated August 13, 1818, 1 l. signed C. Tabor), with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England , he well knowing it to be forged and counterfeited .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating the forged instrument to be a promisory note for payment of money, instead of a bank note.

WILLIAM UNDERWOOD . I have been used to work for a calico printer, I first saw the prisoner on the 28th of October, but did not speak to him - I first spoke to him on the 7th of November.

Q, Before that, had you been employed to do anything with respect to him - A. Yes, I was employed by Sellers, Coates, and Furzeman, to buy forged notes of him - they are constables of St. Giles's.

Q. Where did you go on the 7th of November - A. To the Coach and Horses, Charles-street, Drury-lane.

Q. Before this had anybody named the prisoner to you, as connected with forged notes - A. Yes - I saw John Dye , and the prisoner both there together - I went out of the taproom, and Dye followed me.

Q. Did anything pass between you and Dye before you saw the prisoner - A. No, Dye followed me out - the prisoner was not present. I afterwards told him what Dye had said.

Q. Then you may tell us what you told the prisoner, that Dye had told you - A I asked Dye if he had seen Jolly, meaning, Joseph Stanley - Dye said No, he was sure he was done, and if you want any at any time, we will serve you. I understood him to mean, the prisoner and he would serve me. Dye told me to call John Williams out, which I did, and Dye went away,

Q. What passed between you and the prisoner - A. The first that I said to him, was, that I had agreed with Dye to take one at 7 s. 6 d. He said very well. I gave him 7 s. 6 d. He then told me to meet him at Blackfriars-bridge, at three o'clock - we separated. I met him at three o'clock on the middle of Blackfriars-bridge - on the right hand side going from the City.

Q. What passed - A. He said I could not have it till five o'clock, and to meet him under the dead wall of Waterloo-bridge. I went there at five o'clock - he came about half-past five - he put a note towards me, and said, catch hold - I took it. He then asked if I should want any more that night. I said No, but I would take five 1 l. notes, on Monday, and I would be at the Coach and Horses about

ten or eleven o'clock on Monday. We parted. I went home, and opened the parcel which he gave me, it contained a 1 l. bank note. I marked it that night, and took it to Sellers next morning. He and I went to the Bank to Mr. Rooker on Monday, and I believe Sellers gave it to him (looks at one), this is it.

Q. You was to meet him on Monday; before you met him was any more money given you - A. Yes. Sellers gave me 1 l. 15 s., about an hour before I met him, to purchase five 1 l. forged notes of Williams - I had been informed that if I took five, I could have them at 7 s. each. I went to the Coach and Horses - in about half an hour Dye came in - I gave him the money which I had received of Sellers - about ten minutes after I saw the prisoner there. He and Dye went out of the taproom together, and I followed them - Dye said to the prisoner, he wants five 1 l. notes, (meaning me) - that it was all right, and he had got the money. The prisoner then told me to go on Waterloo-bridge, and he would follow me. I went out and saw the prisoner almost directly as I got into Drury-lane. We walked a little way together, and then he stopped talking to somebody. I went on into the Strand - he then overtook me, and we went over Waterloo-bridge together - we went to a public-house, called the Hero of Waterloo. He said I had better wait there while he fetched them, and he should be gone about half an hour - he did not go into the house with me. I went in and waited about half an hour, and he returned - I was sitting in the taproom, having a pint of beer. He sat down a few minutes, and then asked if I would walk - I said Yes - we walked into the Waterloo-road. He then asked when I should want any more. I said I would take ten 1 l. notes on Thursday.

Q. Did you give any reason for it - A. I told him I was going to Kingston on Friday, where I thought I could pass them; he them told me to meet him at the Green Man, Kent-street, Borough, at nine o'clock on Thursday morning, and he would have them there. He then put five 1 l. notes into my hand - we were then in the Waterloo road; we parted. I took the notes to the Woolpack, in Gravel-lane, to Mr. Freeman, the bank inspector. I had appointed to meet him there.

Q. Did you mark the five 1 l. notes - A. Yes, in about twenty minutes after I had them (looks at five), these are them; this was on the 9th of November.

Q. You was to meet him at nine o'clock in the morning on Thursday the 12th, did you receive any money from anybody - A. Yes; on Thursday morning Sellers gave me 2 l. 10 s. in silver, and a 1 l. note, to buy ten forged 1 l. notes of the prisoner. I had told him that I had agreed to meet the prisoner. At nine o'clock on Thursday morning, I went to the Green Man, into the tap-room.

Q. Was anybody there - A. Yes, William Coates , the son of the constable; in a few minutes the prisoner came in and sat down by me - Coates was almost facing us; the prisoner asked me if I had got the money, he spoke in a very low voice. I said, Yes. He said he wanted it. I gave him the 1 l. note first, and the 50 s. afterwards - he put it into his pocket without counting it; he then said I could not have them until six o'clock at night, in Monument-yard. I said very well. He went away directly. I went and told the three constables.

Q. Did you go to Monument-yard that evening - A. Yes, about five minutes before six, the prisoner came to me as the clock struck; he spoke first, and said come on, and asked if I had any one with me? I said, No, not a soul. He then asked when I should want any more? I said I should want five on the Monday. We walked out of Monument-yard, up Pudding-lane, through George-lane, into Botolph-lane, he there put ten 1 l. notes into my hand, and wished me a good night - we parted; he ran up towards Little Eastcheap.

Q. Did you then see anybody - A. Yes, I met Sellers and Furzeman, just at the corner of George-lane - I had not then received the notes a minute - the constables pursued the prisoner. I went immediately to the Bank, and marked the notes at the solicitor's office there, in the presence of Mr. Jeffries, who is one of the clerks (looks at ten), these are the same.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Nobody was present that knew anything of it but you - A. Not that I know.

Q. Have you been a witness before in a case of this kind - A. Never in my life, not in Court.

Q. Have you been a witness before in any case of this kind - A. I have twice, and not more; it was against Edwards and a woman who lived with him; they are not tried.

Q. Was you a witness before the justice against Cashman - A. No, I had nothing to do with it.

Q. How long have you left off calico printing - A. About seven months; I have been a porter in Thames-street, and worked in different calico grounds. I was in the coal trade about three months ago; I worked for my cousin, who was master, and had a shop in Northampton-street, Clerkenwell; he also carried on business in Gravel-lane - nowhere else that I know.

Q. Do you mean to swear that he never carried on business elsewhere, and you with him - A. I think I can; not in the coal trade; he was once a lawyer's clerk, in the Temple.

Q. Have you any warrants out against you for poaching - A. Not that I know. I live at No. 17, Pitt's-place, Maid-lane, Bankside, and have lived there nearly three months.

Q. How long have you taken up this trade that you are in to day - A. The 28th of October was the first time.

Q. During that time, you have only met the prisoner, and Edwards and his wife - A. There was another man, named Strandley.

Q. Was anybody present, the first time you met the prisoner - A. Not that I know.

Q. The second time were any present - A. Only two I believe - I did not know them, but I heard them call the prisoner by name.

Q. Did Coates hear what passed at the Green Man - A. He was in one corner of the room, and we in another. When the prisoner came in, I said,

"How are you, my bonny." I do not think he could hear anything else.

Re-examined by MR. REYNOLDS. Q. Did the two persons at the public-house appear to know the prisoner - A. Yes - they spoke to him, and called him by his name.

JOSHUA FREEMAN . I am an inspector of bank notes. In consequence of the information I received on the 9th of November, I went to a house in Drury-lane, opposite Charles-street, and could see every body that came up and

and down Charles-street - I know Underwood and the prisoner - I saw Underwood come out of Charles-street, into Drury-lane, alone; the prisoner joined him, and they walked together nearly as far as Craven-buildings - one or two people spoke to the prisoner, and Underwood walked on to the Strand - the prisoner joined him in the Strand - they walked together as far as Catherine-street, opposite the Bridge - I saw them there for the last time. Several people were about, it being Lord Mayor's day, and I lost them in the last crowd.

Q. Did you see Underwood again that day - A. I met him by agreement at the Woolpack, in Gravel-lane, he gave me five 1 l. forged notes, which he marked in my presence - I also marked them (looks at five), these are them.

WILLIAM COATES . I am the son of Richard Coates , who is a constable. On the 12th of November, about nine o'clock in the morning, I went to the Green Man, Kent-street, by direction of the solicitor of the Bank. I went into the taproom, nobody was there then - in about five minutes Underwood came in - in about five minutes more the prisoner came in, and went up to Underwood, who said

"How are you, my Bonny." The prisoner went to him, and said,

"O! Good morning." They sat down, and began whispering to each other. I could not hear what they said. I saw Underwood give something to the prisoner, and heard the sound of silver rattling at the time.

Q. Did they stay any time together - A. A very few minutes, they whispered together, the prisoner then got up, wished him good morning, and went out, leaving Underwood in the house.

Cross-examined by MR. BROADRICK. Q. You are employed by the Bank, what are you to have for it - A. Nothing that I know of - I expected to be paid for my loss of time.

WILLIAM SELLERS . I am constable of Marylebone. I was directed by the solicitor to the Bank to look after persons uttering forged notes. I gave Underwood 7 s. 6 d., on the 7th of November, and he brought me a 1 l. forged note on the 8th (looks at one), this is it. On the 9th of November I gave him. 35 s. to buy five more forged notes, which were not delivered to me.

Q. Did you give him any more - A. On the 12th I gave him a 1 l. note, and 2 l. 10 s. in silver, to buy ten more forged notes.

Q. In consequence of information from him, did you go anywhere on that day - A. Yes, I went into Monument-yard with Furzeman and Coates, at six o'clock in the evening - I saw Underwood there; the prisoner joined him, they walked into Pudding-lane, through George-lane, and then into Botolph-lane, I lost sight of them as they turned the corner; in less than a minute I met Underwood, in George-lane; in consequence of what he said I pursued the prisoner, and found him about five minutes after seven o'clock that evening, at the Coach and Horses, Charles-street, Drury-lane. Next day Underwood gave me ten 1 l. notes (looks at some), these are them.

Cross-examined by MR. BROADRICK. Q. How long have you had Underwood in your pay - A. He was never in my pay, he was employed by the solicitor of the Bank. I did not point him out to them.

Q. When did you first know him - A. On the 17th of August.

SAMUEL FURZEMAN . I am a constable. I know Underwood; in consequence of directions, he was employed on the 12th of November to go to the prisoner. I went with Sellers and Coates to Monument-yard, at six o'clock in the evening. As the clock struck I saw the prisoner and Underwood come out of Monument-yard into Pudding-lane, followed them into George-lane, but lost sight of them as they turned into Botolph-lane; in about a minute I saw Underwood again, and pursued after the prisoner, but lost him. I found him at the Coach and Horse, about seven o'clock.

Cross-examined. Q. Were all three of you there - A. Yes; Underwood was employed by the Bank.

Q. Who introduced him to the Bank - A. Sellers and I.

Q. How came you to select him - A. Sellers selected him, I knew nothing of him before.

RICHARD COATES . I am constable of Marylebone. I was in Monument-yard on the 12th of November, with the two last witnesses, and saw Underwood go into Monument-yard - it was a dark night - I did not see the prisoner. I was in a grocer's shop, to watch the prisoner into the yard, but did not see him. I afterwards took him at the Coach and Horses.

JOHN CHALMERS . I am a shoemaker, and live at 167, High Holborn. About the latter end of September the prisoner bought a pair of shoes at my shop, which came to about 8 s. 6 d.; he paid me a 1 l. note; I asked his name and address, he gave me

"Edwards, Rickmansworth;" which I wrote on the note in his presence (looks at one), this is it.

Cross-examined. I have no doubt whatever of his being the man.

THOMAS GLOVER . I am an inspector of bank notes, and have been so upwards of twenty-five years. I am enabled to judge of the character of notes (looks at the note set forth in the indictment, uttered with others on the 12th), it is forged in every respect, paper, plate, and signature; it is not C. Tabor's signature, nor is it signed by any person authorized to sign bank notes; the other nine uttered at the same time, are all forged, and of the same description, struck from the same plate, and filled up alike - they are the same manufacture throughout (looks at five sold to Underwood on the 9th of November), they are all forged, and the same in every respect. (Looks at the one sold on the 7th) It is forged, and of the same description and plate as the others. The one uttered to Mr. Chalmers is also forged, and of the same description as the other sixteen in every respect; I mean they are the same plate and paper, and signed by the same person, but not the same signature.

Cross-examined by MR. NORTON. Q. Used you to be longer at first in examining notes than now - A. It certainly wants experience. I was never mistaken in a note.

(The note was then put in and read. See Indictment.)

MR. GLOVER re-examined. The water-mark in bank notes is made at the time the paper is made, but this note has a representation of a water-mark, which is made afterwards by pressure. In a genuine note the line containing the date, and the word London, is printed in stereotype,

and in a different ink, in these notes it is engraved in the plate.

Prisoner. I leave my case to my counsel.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18181202-25

25. WILLIAM CONNOR was indicted for that he, on the 19th of November , at St. James, Clerkenwell , feloniously did dispose of and put away a certain forged and counterfeit bank note, (setting it forth, No. 21,175, 1 l. dated Sept. 12, 1818, signed C. Tabor), knowing it to be forged and counterfeited, with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only calling the forged instrument a promissory note for payment of money, instead of a bank note.

THIRD AND FOURTH COUNTS, the same, only stating the prisoner's intent to be to defraud William Hutchinson .

WILLIAM HUTCHINSON . I am a cheesemonger , and live in St. John-street, Middlesex . On the 19th of November, about half-past eight o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came to my shop, I was writing at the desk in the counting-house, the shopman was serving. I thought the prisoner came in a curious kind of way, he appeared very careless, and, as I thought intoxicated. He said,

"Will you let me have two pounds of cheese, and one pound of bacon." I came into the shop, by that time my man had cut him two pounds of cheese, he threw down a 1 l. note; I took it up, and immediately knew it to be forged, and asked his name, he said

"Walker." I asked his master's name, he said it was Matthews, who lived at 35, Sutton-street. I told him I thought it was not a good note, and I could not give him change, and asked if he knew where he got it; he said of his master; I said I would go with him to his master. I wrote his name and his master's name and address upon the note - (looks at one.) - This is it. He said he would go with me. We went out immediately. I kept the note in my hand. We went to 35, Sutton-street. He wished me to walk first; I would not, but said I would walk behind. As we went along I communicated my suspicions to a watchman who stood in the street. I still kept the prisoner in sight; he was walking on before. When we got to 35, Sutton-street, he knocked at the door, a little girl opened it, he went in first, I followed; he went up to Mr. Matthews and spoke to him. I could not hear what he said.

Q. Did Matthews say anything to him - A. Nothing that I could hear. He saw me behind the prisoner, turned round, and asked my business. I asked if he knew that young man; he said he did. I asked if the man's name was Walker? He said No, it was William Connor , and he had been apprenticed to him. I asked if he had sent him to my shop for anything? He said No, he had not. I produced the note, and said I believed it was forged, and I would not give change for it, but if Matthews sent him for the goods, I would send them home, I told him that the prisoner said he took the note of his master. The prisoner heard all that passed. Matthews said, you had better go to his present master. I told the prisoner it was great impudence to bring me into a strange house, where he did not live. I turned round, saying

"It is of no use stopping here," when Matthews's daughter called out

"Oh, dear! he has got a knife, and is going to stab you." I turned round, and seized him by the the right hand, his left was then under his apron; we were looking for the knife, and he struck me a violent blow on my head. The girl said she saw the knife glitter in his hand. I got behind him, threw him on the stairs, and said I would not leave him till I got the knife. The constables came in at that time. I told them what had happened. They were going to search him. He fought desperately, but was secured at last. Bell found the knife in his breeches. It was a clasp knife, open.

Prisoner. Q. Did I present the knife to you - A. Not that I saw.

BENJAMIN MATTHEWS . I am a watchcase-maker, and live at No. 35, Little Sutton-street, Clerkenwell. The prisoner and Hutchinson came to me. The prisoner came up to me and said, in a low tone of voice,

"Say my name is Walker." I said nothing to him, but seeing Hutchinson come in, I asked his business. He asked if I knew the prisoner. I said Yes. He asked if I knew his name. I said it was William Connor , and that he had been apprenticed to me nineteen years ago, from St. Andrew's workhouse, and that he must go by that name, as it was the name he was bound by. Hutchinson said he said his name was Walker, and how could he go by that name? The prisoner said he went by that name, as he did not like an Irish name. Hutchinson produced a bank note, which I returned to him, and said that he was not my servant, but he was articled to Mr. Knight, of Gee-street, and he should go there, and not come to me. He had left me about five months. While I was giving Hutchinson the direction, my daughter called out that he had got a knife, and asked if he was going to stab her father? This alarmed me. I said,

"If you have got a knife deliver it up." I caught hold of his arm, the patrols came in at that instant. I told the prosecutor to hold his right arm and search for the knife.

Q. Did he make any resistance on being searched - A. Not the least then; the knife was found open in his breeches.

Q. When was the resistance made - A. When they were going to take him to the watch-house. The patrols threw him on the stairs to tie his legs and hands, as he would not go quietly. They loosed his legs and led him away to the watch-house with his arms tied.

MARY MATTHEWS . I am daughter of the last witness. I remember the prisoner coming with Hutchinson to my father's. I saw him draw a knife out of his pocket, with his left hand. It was open. The blade was not pointed to any one. I said

"William, you have got a knife in your hand!" He said

"I have not, Miss. I at last said

"Father! he has got a knife, and is going to stab you!" He then put it under his apron. The patrols came and took him.

THOMAS BELL . I am a patrol of St. Sepulchre's. On the 19th of November I was on duty in St. John-street, about a quarter past eight o'clock. Mr. Hutchinson came by with the prisoner. Hutchinson held his hand out, and said to me,

"I have got a smasher," which means a passer of bad money. I and Warner followed him to No. 35, Sutton-street. He and the prisoner went in. We staid rather behind, and listened at the parlour window, and the

street door. I heard a faint scream, and something about stabbing, but could not tell what it was. We knocked at the door, were let in, and found Hutchinson standing in the passage, very much agitated, with the prisoner. We began to search the prisoner; they held his hands. I found the knife in the left thigh of his breeches, inside; it was open. We were going to secure his hands. He started back, and struck me a violent blow in the face. I collared him. He began kicking, striking, and beating me, and made a great resistance, and said, no b - y watchman should ever take him. We secured and took him to the watch-house. Immediately as we got out, we were assailed by a mob, who came out of a public-house opposite, and began to kick and strike us, to rescue him. He was resisting at the time himself. After a resistance of an hour and a half, we at last got him to the watch-house. Warner was present all the time.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not cut me with a cutlass, which made me strike you - A. No. I broke a stick about him in the street, as he resisted very much.

- WARNER. I have heard Bell give his evidence. It is very correct. He did not use any violence to him until the attempt was made to rescue him. The prisoner hit him first. This was in the street.

WILLIAM KNIGHT . I am a watch-maker, and live in Gee-street. The prisoner came to me early in last May. I employed him. He articled himself to me on the 26th of May, and worked till the 1st of November, when he left me. He afterwards returned, and left me again. I knew nothing of him when he was taken up. I never sent him with a note to Hutchinson.

WILLIAM TODD . My father keeps a cheesemonger's shop, in St. Martin's-le-Grand. On the 7th of November the prisoner came to the shop for some butter and cheese, and paid me a 1 l. note. I asked his name and address; he gave me Mr. Walker, No. 35, Little Sutton-street. I marked the note in his presence - (looks at one.) - This is it. I paid it away. It was returned to me on the 14th. I went to No. 35, Little Sutton-street, but could not find him.

SARAH SLEIGHTON . My husband keeps a grocer's shop in Leather-lane. On Friday, the 13th of November, the prisoner came to the shop for two ounces of tea, and one pound of sugar. He paid me a 1 l. note, and I gave him the change. I asked his name and address. He said Atkinson, No. 3, Baldwin's-Gardens. My son was present, and wrote it on the note, in the prisoner's presence - (looks at one.) - This is the note. I paid it away next day. It was returned to me on Tuesday as forged. I inquired at No. 3, Baldwin's-Gardens, but could find no such person there.

THOMAS SLEIGHTON . I am the son of the last witness. On the 13th of November the prisoner came into the shop and bought some things. He paid a 1 l. note, and gave his address as Atkinson, No. 3, Baldwin's-gardens, which I wrote on it - (looks at one.) - This is it.

MARTHA TODD . My husband keeps a chandler's shop, in Clerkenwell. On the 16th of November the prisoner bought a quartern loaf and some cheese, at our shop, and paid a 1 l. note. I asked him who he took it of? He said he had just took it of his employer. I gave him a pen and ink, and desired him to put the name on it, which he did in my presence. He wrote William - , but I could not see the other name. I gave him change, and gave the note to my husband - (looks at one.) - This is it.

THOMAS TODD . I am the husband of the last witness. The prisoner came to the shop, and paid my wife a 1 l. note, she gave it to me after the prisoner had endorsed it. I locked it up, and afterwards paid it to Mrs. Marsh. The prisoner said he took it of his employer, a Mr. Woolmer - (looks at one.) - This is it.

ANN MARSH . I am a baker. I received a 1 l. note from Todd, on the 17th of November, and wrote his name on it - (looks at it.) - This is it.

EDWIN HILL . I am an apothecary, and live in St. John-street. The prisoner came to my shop about the 6th of November, and had some medicine, which came to a shilling. He tendered me a 1 l. note. I asked who he took it of? He said of Mr. Woolmer, Sutton-street. I suspected it, and refused to give him change, and said unless Woolmer said he had given him the note, I should detain it, and sent my servant with the prisoner to Woolmer's, who I knew. He returned without the prisoner. He never came for the note - (looks at one.) - This is it. I marked it before I parted with it.

SAMUEL LORING . I live with Mr. Hill. He sent me to Woolmer's, with the prisoner. He ran away from me immediately as we got out.

THOMAS GLOVER . I am an inspector of bank notes to the Bank of England - (examining the notes.) - The note uttered to Hutchinson is forged in paper, plate, ink, and signature. It is not C. Tabor's hand-writing. There is the appearance of a water-mark, but it is not a watermark. That uttered to William Todd is forged in every respect, and off the same plate and paper as the last. It is not Clough's hand-writing, That uttered to Sleighton is forged in every respect, and of the same description, plate, and paper. It is not J. Pearson's hand-writing. Those uttered to Martha Todd and Edwin Hill are both forged in every respect, and of the same description exactly, and are not Consett's hand-writing.

(The note was then put in and read.)

THOMAS GLOVER re-examined. (Looking at the notes.) I know Tabor's hand-writing well. I have been acquainted with it several years. I have often seen him write, and can take upon myself to say, on my belief, it is not his hand-writing; it is something like it; but it is not his. That uttered to Todd has Clough's name to it. I have known his writing several years. I have often seen him write and sign notes, and can judge well of it. I have not the least doubt of its not being his writing. That uttered to Hill and Mrs. Todd are signed A. Consett. I have frequently seen him write, and have often seen notes signed by him. It is not his hand-writing. Here is another, signed Pearson; he has been a long time a signing clerk in the Bank. I know his writing well. It is not his.

Q. Is any clerk in the Bank authorized to sign notes on such paper as this - A. I know the Bank paper; they never use such paper as this. It has the water-mark put in afterwards. The Bank notes have the water-mark in the regular manufacture of the paper. The clerks have no authority to sign anything but genuine paper.

JURY. Q. Have there not been instances where the inspectors

of the Bank have differed in opinion respecting good or bad notes - A. Not to my knowledge.

JURY to MATTHEWS. Q. Did the prisoner learn to write - A. He can write very well - (looks at the note uttered to Mrs. Todd.) - Here is William Howard on it; it is not like the writing I have seen him write. I cannot say whether it is his or not.

MARTHA TODD . I saw him write it.

Prisoner's Defence. If the patrols had not used me as they did, I should not have done what I did.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

Reference Number: t18181202-26

26. SARAH GREEN was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of November , two pewter pint pots, value 2 s. , the goods of Henry Parry .

HENRY PARRY . I keep the Woolpack public-house, in Peters-alley, Cornhill . On the 4th of November Allingham brought two pots to me which were mine.

NOAH DAVIS . I am Parry's servant. On the 4th of November, about eleven o'clock in the morning, the prisoner had half a pint of beer in the passage, where the pots were taken from him.

JOSEPH ALLINGHAM . I am a constable. The prisoner was given into my charge at the Lion and Key public-house, Thames-street. Hinkley, who keeps the house, gave me a flannel petticoat, containing several pots, among which were two which Parry claimed.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18181202-27

27. WILLIAM MANN was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of November , one coat, value 1 l.; two pair of pantaloons, value 15 s.; one brooch, value 10 s., and two rings, value 10 s. , the goods of Peter Rainer .

PETER RAINER . I am a mariner . My things were in a chest, which was locked, on board the ship Hastings, which laid at Blackwall . I had left the ship off Sussex. On the 16th of November I met the prisoner in St. Paul's church-yard, with the articles stated in the indictment. He was wearing them. He had come from the Isle of France in our ship. I asked him how he came by them? He said he would tell me, but I must not think anything of it. I told him I should think of it. He took me to Kershaw's. He said he broke open my chest, and took them out. I afterwards went to the ship and missed these things and others. I gave him in charge.

ELIZA KERSHAW . I live at Wapping. The prisoner lodged with me. He first came on the 15th of November, and brought a chest with him which Rainer claims. It was unlocked, but had a cord round it. I saw him take a pair of pantaloons and a coat from it.

JOHN RICHARDSON . I am a constable. I took the prisoner in charge. Rainer claimed the clothes, brooch, and rings he had on. He said if we went to his lodging, we should find the rest of the property. He took us to Kershaw's. Rainer claimed the chest. The prisoner said he gave the other things to Kershaw. She said she returned them to the chest.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was shipwrecked, and taken up by the ship. The prosecutor and I shared clothes and money with each other. I went ashore, leaving the chest safe; on Saturday I went on board and found it empty. I told the prosecutor what had happened; he said the ship was seized, and told me to get his things ashore. I broke it open to shew the officers.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined Six Months , and Whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18181202-28

28. GEORGE ENNES was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of October , two sheets, value 9 s.; three blankets, value 20 s.; one curtain, value 3 s., and one tea-caddy, value 1 s., the goods of Arabella White , in a lodging-room .

ARABELLA WHITE . I live in Upper Thames-street . I let the prisoner a two-pair back room, furnished, at 3 s. 6 d. per week, he left me in three days, with the articles stated in the indictment, which were let with the lodging. I met him about five weeks after in Fleet-market, and said he was very cruel to rob me; he said he was sorry for it, and that he had pawned part, and sold the rest. I gave him in charge. I have never found the property.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined Six Months , and Whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18181202-29

29. EDWARD SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of November , one snuff-box, value 1 s., the goods of Henry Whitlock , from his person .

HENRY WHITLOCK . I am a coachmaker , and live at Turnham-green. On the 9th of November, I was in Bridge-street , just as the procession of the Lord Mayor had passed, a gentleman asked me if I had lost anything, I immediately missed my snuff-box out of my pocket, which was safe five minutes before. The gentleman pointed the prisoner out to me, and said he was the man - he was alone. I went up to him, and charged him with taking my snuff-box. He denied it, and gave it to me, saying somebody must have put it into his hand, but how, he did not know - I gave him in charge.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. I believe you know him, he was in great distress - A. I have heard so - I have heard he was a teacher of languages.

JOHN THOMPSON . I am a constable. I was on duty in Bridge-street; a gentleman pointed the prisoner out. I was close to him; the prosecutor charged the prisoner with taking his snuff-box, which he denied, and then produced it - the prosecutor claimed it; I took him into custody, and found four handkerchiefs, two in his waistcoat pocket, and several duplicates, a 1 l. note, two sixpences, and a bad shilling on him. Two other handkerchiefs were either in his breeches or breeches-pocket.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. As I was coming from the bridge there was a crash, I saw the box fall, and took it up; the prosecutor demanded it. I said, is this your's, and gave it to him - the handkerchiefs were my own.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18181202-30

30. SARAH FORRESTER was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of November , one handkerchief, value 2 s., the goods of Auguste Dalmas , from his person .

AUGUSTE DALMAS. I live in Church-row, St. Pancras, and am an agent . On the 13th of November, about half-past four o'clock in the afternoon. I was passing Johnson's library, Cheapside , looking at some prints in the window - I felt something go from my pocket, and missed my handkerchief. I turned round, and saw the prisoner, who was a stranger to me, and looked under her cloak, but did not see my handkerchief - nobody else being near, I suspected, and followed her towards the Bank, and saw by the motion of her arms that she was putting something into her pocket. At the corner of Bartholomew-lane, I saw her draw her hand from her cloak - I thought she was making a motion to somebody, a boy came to her, but did not speak to her. She went about half way down the lane, crossed over, and looked round. I went to her, and said, My good woman, you have got my handkerchief, and you had better give it back to me. She said she had not got it, and I might search her. I said I was sure of it, and if she gave it up, I would take no further notice. She still denied it, and said I was welcome to search. I said I had no power to search her myself, but I should send for an officer. She said I was welcome. I ordered her to walk before me to the Rose and Crown, Broad-street - I followed very close; when she got in, I begged of her to give it up to prevent any further trouble - she still denied it. I sent for an officer, he took her into a room up one pair of stairs, while he was searching her right hand pocket, I saw it fall from her petticoats, half of it was still in her clothes, she still denied it - it was mine.

JOHN FLEET . I am an officer. I was sent for, and the prosecutor charged the prisoner with picking his pocket. I searched her, and found two handkerchiefs in her right hand pocket - I saw the prosecutor's handkerchief under her clothes, it must have dropped from her, for nobody was near her.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I found it in the street.

GUILTY . Aged 62.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18181202-31

31. THOMAS DANIELS was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of November , one mare, price 10 l.; one cart, value 6 l.; one set of harness, value 1 l.; one cloth, value 9 s., and 400 lbs. of beef, value 10 l. , the property of Henry Lofty and John Lofty .

HENRY LOFTY . I am a butcher , and in partnership with my brother John. On the 10th of November, my cart and mare, stood in Gracechurch-street , near Leadenhall-market, it had the carcase of an ox in it, which I carried out of the market - I missed it about twelve o'clock - The mare and cart were brought back to my house at Bermondsey, part of the beef and cloth had been taken out - the two fore-quarters were left.

JOHN SAVAGE . I live in Ropemaker-street, Moorfields about eight o'clock in the morning, I saw a man drive the horse and cart into my street, the man took two hind-quarters of an ox out, I do not know who he was, he took them into Scott's shop, in Type-street, and the cart drove away. I suspected something, and sent my son to see what name was on the cart, and I informed the prosecutor - I did not see the name on it myself.

ELIZA SCOTT . My father keeps a green-grocer's shop in Type-street. On the 10th of November, about eight o'clock in the morning, a man brought some meat there - I believe it was the prisoner, he asked if he might leave it there, I called up stairs to my mother, she did not object, and he left it. He called again between twelve and one o'clock for it.

STEPHEN SCOTT . I keep the shop, I did not see the meat left, but the prisoner is the man who called for it.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18181202-33

32. WILLIAM ROSE was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of November , one cart, value 5 l. , the goods of Thomas Richards .

THOMAS RICHARDS . I am a potatoe dealer , and live in Vere-street, Clare-market . My cart was in an open shed opposite my house. On the 1st of November, about seven o'clock in the morning, I was called up, and found it gone.

WILLIAM DUNFORD . I am private watchman of the Adelphi. I heard a great noise coming down Durham-street, leading from the Strand, between six and seven o'clock in the morning. I went to the archway, and saw three men coming with a cart without a horse, I asked one of them who it belonged to, the prisoner said it belonged to Jones, and he was going to call him up. I said I should take them into custody; the men immediately ran up the street, the prisoner and another man ran towards the wharfs - I could not see them till I got to the water-side. I then struck at them, and the prisoner fell - I took him, the other got away. The prisoner said the men asked him to push the cart.

EDWARD LLOYD . I saw the cart drive down the archway; the prisoner was one of the men - it had the prosecutor's name on it.

Prisoner's Defence. The men asked me to help them to push it.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181202-34

33. JOHN DYE was indicted for feloniously disposing of and putting away a certain forged and counterfeit bank note for payment of 1 l. he knowing it to be forged, with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England .

MR. SERGEANT BOSANQUET on the part of the Governor and Company of the Bank, declined offering any evidence.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

Reference Number: t18181202-35

34. WILLIAM HOWARD was indicted, for that he, on the 25th of November , at St. Mary-le-Bow , feloniously did dispose of and put away a certain forged and counterfeit bank note (setting it forth, No. 77,115, 1 l. dated 12th September, 1818, signed N. Stock), with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England , he knowing it to be forged and counterfeited .

SECOND COUNT, for feloniously offering to Elizabeth Macpherson , a like forged note, with the like intent, knowing it to be forged.

THIRD AND FOURTH COUNTS, the same, only calling the forged instrument a promissory note for payment of money, instead of a bank note.

FOUR OTHER COUNTS, the same, only stating his intent to be to defraud David Macpherson .

ELIZA MACPHERSON . I am the wife of David Macpherson , who is a haberdasher and hosier , and lives in Newgate-street . On the 25th of November, about seven o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came to our shop, and bought two pair of worsted stockings, which came to 4 s.; he tendered me a 1 l. note, I thought it was not good, and kept it in my hand, I sent a little boy, named Newman, with it, to ask the opinion of Mr. Frost, next door, he brought it back to me - I do not know whether the prisoner heard him tell me that Mr. Frost thought it was not good. I then asked the prisoner where he took the note? He said he had it from his master. I did not like to give him change, or let him have the goods, and sent Newman into Mr. Berrie's with it, to inquire his opinion - he lives six or seven doors from me. While the boy was gone the prisoner said it was detaining him strangely. He went towards the door, staid there a minute or two, and then went away, saying he would return in two minutes.

Q. How soon after he left did Newman return - A. In about five minutes, with the note - Berrie and Gill, the officer, came in with him, or immediately after, Newman gave me the note. The prisoner was brought back to the shop. I then marked the note in his presence, before I parted with it.

Q. Had you observed any mark on it when it was given to you - A. Yes, I observed the names of

"Jones, Aldersgate-street," and

"Glover, Bull-and-Mouth-street," on it, when he gave it to me, before I had parted with it (looks at one); I am sure it is the same note that he gave me, and the one Newman brought back. I marked D M 25-11-18, on it.

Q. How long after the prisoner left was he brought back - A. In about a quarter of an hour, or twenty minutes, in custody.

COURT. Q. He waited till the boy returned from Frost's - A. Yes; he was at the counter, near enough to hear the boy say Frost thought it was bad - he did not speak very loud.

Prisoner. Q. After the note was first sent out, did you not return it to me, and asked if I wished it to be sent out again, and I said I did - A. Yes.

CHARLES NEWMAN . I lived with Mr. Macpherson. On the 25th of November the prisoner came to the shop, my mistress gave me a note, which I took to Frost, he looked at it and returned it to me; I brought it back to my mistress, and told her what Frost said. It was never out of my sight. The prisoner was still there.

Q. Do you think he could hear what you said - A. I do not know, I was on the other side of the counter, and he was opposite to me; I neither spoke very low nor very loud. My mistress sent me out again, I went and shewed it to Mr. Berrie's shopman, he gave it to Mr. Berrie - I did not lose sight of it; Mr. Berrie kept it in his hand, came out with me, and went to Mr. Payne's, he gave me the note there, and I returned it to my mistress.

Q. Had you noticed it before you took it out - A. I saw

"Jones, Aldersgate-street," and

"Glover, Bull-and-Mouth-street," on it (looks at one) - this is it.

JOHN FROST . I live next door to the prosecutor. Newman brought a note to me between six and seven o'clock in the evening, on the 25th of November, I looked at it, and returned it to him again (looks at one), this is it. About five minutes after I went to Macpherson's, the prisoner was there, leaning on the counter. I said to Mrs. Macpherson, that I hoped she had not taken the note, as in my opinion, it was forged. The prisoner could hear it - no other person was present, the boy was not in the shop - the prisoner said it was his note, and that he had it of his master. I told him my opinion was, that it was bad. I went home, leaving him and Mrs. Macpherson in the shop.

Q. What was the next thing - A. In a few minutes I went to the shop again, and found Gill and Berrie there, but not the prisoner. I went home, returned again in a few minutes, and saw the prisoner crossing from a bookseller's shop on the opposite side of the way; he looked into the shop, and as soon as he saw Gill and Berrie he ran away as hard as he could - I pursued, and gave the alarm; he turned down St. Martin's-le-grand, and I lost him.

Prisoner. Q. Did I look into the prosecutor's shop, or your's - A. He looked into prosecutor's shop, and ran away.

JOHN JABEZ BERRIE . I am a grocer, and live in Newgate-street. On the evening of the 25th of November, Newman came to my shop with a note, he handed it to my man, who handed it to me, to know if it was good. I gave my opinion that it was bad. I noticed

"Glover, Bull-and-Mouth-street," and

"Jones, Aldersgate-street," on it (looks at it), this is it. I returned it to Newman, and took him next door to Mr. Payne's, he sent for an officer. I left Newman at Payne's, and went myself to see if I could see the person who had offered the note - I saw nobody but Mrs. Macpherson in the shop, and returned to Payne's - Gill, the officer, came, and we went back with the boy to Macpherson's.

Q. When you were in the shop, did anybody look in at the window - A. A short time after we got in, Frost said

"there is the man looking in at the door." I then saw the prisoner at the door, which was open - he ran off. I, Frost, and Gill, pursued him. He ran down Saint Martin's-le-grand, up Queen's Head-passage, and was there taken. On coming up to him, after he was taken, he said

"What do you want with me?" I do not know who took him. I believe I came up to him as soon as any one. I took him to Macpherson's. He was asked there who he took the note of - he said he knew the person who he took it of. I then asked him to put his name and address on it, and I believe Mrs. Macpherson handed him a pen and ink for that purpose. He said, why did I ask that question, that was nothing to me, and he should not

write his name and address on it. I believe Mrs. Macpherson had also asked him to do it - the officer searched him, and found one shilling on him. He was asked where he lived, and refused to say - he was taken to the Compter, he gave the name of Jones there - I think he said William Jones . At Guildhall he gave his name as Howard.

THOMAS GILL . I am ward-beadle of Farringdon Within. On the 25th of November, I was sent for to Mr. Payne's, I then went to Mr. Macpherson's with Berrie and Payne, and found Mrs. Macpherson, a boy, and Frost there. While we were talking, Frost went to the door, and said here he is, I ran out first, and saw him on the opposite side of the way. I came up to him, and found he was taken - I brought him back to the shop, searched, and found one shilling in his fob. I asked where he lived, he said it was not material to me. I asked Mrs. Macpherson if she had asked him - he said she had not, and I had no business to ask - Mrs. Macpherson gave me the note. This is it (looks at it) - I took him to the Compter - he gave the name as Jones, there, and when he was at Guildhall he gave his name as Jones. I said why don't you give your right name - He then said it was Howard.

THOMAS GLOVER . I am an inspector of bank notes, (looks at the note,) it is forged - it is not impressed on Bank paper - such paper is never used by the Bank. This has the appearance of a water-mark, which is produced after the paper is made, which is not the case with the Bank paper, the engraving is not off any plate used by the Bank. The line with London and the date, appears to be engraved; in a genuine note it is printed in stereotype. It purports to be signed by N. Stock, but it is not his signature, as I have been acquainted with it for years.

NATHANIEL STOCK . I am a signing clerk of the Bank - there is no other signing clerk of my name - the note is not signed by me.

(The note was then put in, and read. See indictment.)

Prisoner's Defence. My reason for giving the name of Jones was, as I had been in the Compter upon a bastardy warrant. I was out on bail, and was fearful of being taken up for it. The officer asked my name - the prosecutrix said she should not ask me, therefore I would not give it, and ran away, being fearful that if I was acquitted on this charge, I should be taken up for b - st - dy.

MR. JOHN TEAGUE . I am Governor of the House of Correction for the City. The prisoner was in my custody two or three months ago on a charge of b - st - dy in the name of Howard, he was liberated on his own recognizance - he was liable to be taken up if he did not appear the following sessions.

MR. CLARKE produced the prisoner's recognizance, by which it appeared that if he did not appear at the sessions, held on the 26th of October, his recognizance would be forfeited.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18181202-36

35. JAMES EGERTON was indicted for feloniously assaulting James Randall on the 17th of November , at St. Marylebone , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, one coat, value 1 l. 1 s., and sixpence in monies numbered, his property .

JAMES RANDALL . I am under butler to Mr. Osborne, who lives in Manchester-square - I have lived about ten months with him. On Whit-Monday, after coming from Covent-garden Theatre, I went into a public-house, in Little Russel-street , to have a pint of beer; the prisoner was sitting there - he came near to me, and said, he thought he knew me. I asked him where, he said at Bath - I said I had been at Bath about four years ago, but I never recollected seeing him before. I said I was a servant, he said, he was also a servant out of place, and asked me to give him something to drink. I called for a pot of ale and paid for it - we drank it, and I left him there. The next time that I saw him, was about three months after, I met him accidentally in Bond-street, he asked me if I would give him anything to drink; I told him he was already tipsy, and did not want any more. He said he was in great need of something, and I gave him a glass of gin. I saw no more of him until the 17th of November.

Q. State distinctly what passed then - A. On the 17th of November, about a quarter past six o'clock in the evening, I was shutting up my master's dining-room shutters, and two men passed the door with the prisoner - I did not know that he knew where I lived. The prisoner returned, and rang at the door, I suppose he must have seen me - I went to the door. He asked if a person of the name of Randall lived there.

Q. Did he know your name before - A. Not that I know; I had not told him, I said there was; he asked if I was the person. I said I was the person; he said then he wanted 5 l. of me - I asked him what demand he had on me for 5 l. He said he was in great distress, and money he wanted, and money he would have, and that of me. I said I had not got 5 l., or half that sum - he desired me then to get him 1 l. I said I had not got 1 l., he said if I had not got the money, I had the means to raise it. I told him I had no means to raise it. He then called me a b - y thundering b - g - r, and said if I did not instantly get it him, he would instantly dish me. He said that he would go in to my master, and ruin my character, and that he would swear to my master that I wanted to take diabolical liberties with him. I told him I had nothing but my character to depend upon for my living. He said that he knew, and if I valued my character more than a 1 l. note, I must stand by consequence. I again said I had no money to give him. He then hit my breeches-pocket, and said he heard money gingle there, and desired me to give him what I had got, which I did - it was 1 s., and some halfpence.

Q. What was it induced you to give him that money - A. Under the idea of being charged with a diabolical act, which I feared would ruin my character - I was afraid of losing my character.

Q. Had you any fear of your person - A. No. I was afraid of losing my place.

Q. Had you any fear that he would go in to your master, and make the charge against you if you did not give it him - A. Yes - I was not afraid of being taken up for it.

Q. What else did he say - A. On my giving him the money, he said you have got a watch - I said if I had, I should not give it to him - I had not got it about me. He desired me to go down and get some of my master's plate. I said I should not make away with my master's

property. He said he knew I had some clothes - I said I had only one suit out of livery. He said he did not care what I had got, but money he would have or the value of it before he left the house, I then went down, and got him a blue frock-coat, which I gave him and he went away with it.

Q. What induced you to give him the coat - A. The same cause I stated before - I was down stairs about five minutes getting the coat.

Q. Did you see any of your fellow-servants during that time - A. No - I did not go to consult them, I was so agitated at the time, and a party of gentlemen were coming to dinner - I had not a minute to spare, when I took him the coat. He said he would pawn it, and return me the duplicate, nothing more passed - he went away, and was joined by his two companions, who were in Manchester-street.

Q. On the following evening, while you was waiting at dinner, was there a ring at the bell - A. Yes, I was called out, and saw one of the people who accompanied the prisoner the night before. He said something to me - I answered him. I went outside the door, and saw the prisoner - in about a minute he said he had brought the duplicate of my coat, but he should not leave it until he had got a 1 l. note. I told him I had no money, and I should charge the first watchman who came by, with him. He said he did not care a d - n for the watchman or me either, and he was not going to be frightened. He then entered the door, and said he would be d - d if he would not remain there until I got him some money. I shut the inner door, and left him in the hall, between the street, and the inner door - the street door was open. I returned, and waited at dinner - in about an hour after, I went up and found him still there in the hall - he asked if I had got the money, I told him No. He said he was not going to be humbugged. I said if he would go out with me, I would see if I could get some for him. I then went out, and saw two persons standing at the corner of Manchester-street - my master's house is at the corner of the street. On my coming out, they went one way, and the prisoner, and I went together to Marshall-street, Carnaby-market. Not finding my acquaintance at home, I called upon Harrison, in Shepherd's-court, Brook-street, I saw him - I left the prisoner at the door. I came out in about two minutes, and found him waiting at the door - he asked me if I had got the money. I said, I had not got it, I could not, nor would not get it. When we got into Brook-street, he put himself in a posture before me, and said, d - n me, if you move until you have given me the money, and that he would go home to the house and blow up, if I did not instantly give him the money - I thought he meant he would go to my master's house. He said if he did not go himself, he would send one of his companions.

Q. At this time were any persons at hand - A. Two soldiers were passing at the time. They stopped, and asked what he wanted with me. I said he wanted money - one of them said something to him, which I did not hear - one went and got a watchman, and advised me to have him taken up - the prisoner said something, which I did not hear, and the watchman took him. I went to the watch-house, in Mount-street, with him.

Q. In going from Brook-street to Mount-street, did he say anything - A. I could not hear. A great mob were collected, and they were some way before me.

JURY. Q. What did you go so far with him for - A. To consult some person what I had better do. I saw Harrison who advised me to have him taken up, which I did immediately.

COURT. Q. Had you ever seen him before you met him at the public-house - A. Never. I am quite certain I never had any communication, or spoke to him before; nor have I had any communication whatever with him of any kind, except what I have mentioned; nor have I seen him at any other times. His threat was falsely to charge me with what I have stated.

WILLIAM NABB . I am a private in the second regiment of Guards. On the 18th of November, about ten minutes after eight o'clock in the evening, I was passing at the corner of Brook-street, leading into Grosvenor-square, and heard the prisoner making use of very improper words to Randall. Nobody else was within hearing at that time. I said to the prisoner,

"Is that the way you speak to any person in the street?". He said,

"Go along. I want to have nothing to say to you." I told him if that was the case, if he was speaking to me in that manner, I would take other methods with him. I told Randall he had better go along with me, as I was going towards Knightsbridge barracks; he appeared willing to go, and came a few paces with me, the prisoner immediately stopped him, and said,

"You are not going to go off in that manner, Randall. I want some money; I know you have some money, and a 1 l. note I must have." Randall said he had no 1 l. note to give him. The prisoner said he knew where Randall lived, and he would go and blow up there. I turned round and saw a watchman coming, with a gentleman, towards me. I gave him in charge. He went on towards Grosvenor-square, in the custody of myself and the watchman, a little way, when the prisoner said to the watchman,

"This is not the man I have demanded the money of (meaning me); it is the other man. Let me go." Randall was following. I suppose he meant Randall, nobody else was by. I said,

"No; watchman do your duty, and I will go with you to the watch-house." We took him there. When we got there, the prosecutor said the prisoner had pledged a coat of his; he heard it, and produced the duplicate, and offered it to Randall. I said

"Do not take it. Give it to the constable," which was done.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not come out of the house in the court, with Randall, in coloured clothes - A. No; I came quite accidentally. I did not know the prosecutor.

COURT. Q. Were you in your regimentals - A. No. I had every thing on, except my regimental coat and hat.

Q. What were the words you heard at first - A. He was only swearing at him.

JOHN HAWKINS . I am in the third regiment of Guards. On the 18th of November, a little after eight o'clock, I came across Grosvenor-square by accident. I heard a noise, and found the prisoner speaking to the prosecutor. They were strangers to me. I heard the prisoner say to the prosecutor,

"D - n you, give me some money, for I am not going to stand here all day. I know where you live, and I will follow you home, if you do not give it to me now, and then I shall get it." I said to him,

"That is very rough usage to give to a gentleman in the street;"

and told the prosecutor, if I was him, I would give him in charge of a watchman. There was none by at the time. The prisoner stood with his arms before him, and put himself in a posture. I thought he was going to strike me or the prosecutor. I put my hand up and pushed him back. He said he had nothing to do with such a blackguard as me. The watchman came directly and I went away.

Q. How were you dressed - A. I had white trowsers and my drill jacket on.

WILLIAM WORTHY . I am a watchman. On Wednesday night, the 18th of November, a little after eight o'clock, I saw the prisoner nearly at the corner of Upper Brook-street and Grosvenor-square, the prosecutor and two soldiers were there also, and some more persons round.

Q. What was the prisoner doing - A. He stood with his back against the railing. I heard one of the people say,

"You are a d - d scoundrel, and ought to be given in charge of the watch." As soon as I got up, I asked what was the matter? Nabb, I believe, who was one of the soldiers, ordered me take him in charge. I laid hold of his arm. He went on with me towards Mount-street watch-house. As we went along the square he said

"What business have you with me? I did not ask you for anything, nor demand any thing of you." That was all he said.

Q. Did not somebody make an answer to it - A. Not that I heard. The prosecutor gave him in charge at the watch-house, for wanting to extort money from him, by pretending to lay a diabolical charge against him. The prisoner produced a duplicate to the prosecutor.

Q. Did anybody say anything to induce him to give it - A. Not that I know. I heard nothing said. It was given to the constable of the night by request of the prosecutor, and some other people that were present.

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutor met me in Covent-Garden, and asked if I had not been at Bath? I said I left there in February last, and had lived with Mrs. Jackson there. He said he knew her very well. He took me to a public-house. We came out at one o'clock. He asked me to walk down the Strand with him. I said I should be locked out if I did. He took me to Manchester-square, where he lived. I slept there in the servants' hall till the morning, and breakfasted with him and the cook. It rained, and I stopped there till one o'clock. He invited me to drink tea with him. I met him again in Fitzroy-square; after that in Bond-street, and, about two months ago I met him in Oxford-street. He said if I wanted 10 s. at any time he would give it to me. I went to him on this evening, and asked him to lend me a 1 l. note. He said he had not got it, but he should have it in a few days, as he was going to leave his place, which he has. He lent me his coat to pledge. I was to return him the ticket. Another person pledged it, and I took him the duplicate. He said if I would wait till he had done dinner, he would get me the remainder of the 1 l, I walked to a house with him, he went in and returned out of the house with the soldier. He said he wanted to go home. I asked him for the note he promised me. He called the watch, and gave me in charge. I never charged him with anything like what he has said.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 31.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

Reference Number: t18181202-37

36. ROBERT TAYLOR . was indicted for that he, on the 8th of October , at Acton , unlawfully, maliciously, and feloniously did cut down one hundred and twenty-one trees, value 20 l., belonging to Samuel Knevett , and growing a garden belonging to him for profit , against the statute.

SECOND COUNT, the same, only omitting the words did cut down, and stating that he did destroy.

THIRD and FOURTH COUNTS, the same as first and second, only stating that the said trees were growing in a certain orchard belonging to the said Samuel Knevett , instead of a garden.

FIFTH and SIXTH COUNTS, the same, only stating, that the said trees were growing in a certain plantation, belonging to the said Samuel Knevett .

SAMUEL KNEVETT . I am a gardener at Acton. My garden lies at the back of Turnban-green, in the parish of Acton. The prisoner has been several years in my service as labouring gardener and watchman . On the 8th of October, between eleven and twelve o'clock in the morning, I discharged him for getting drunk with my other men. I had no words with him. My men usually leave work at six o'clock in the evening. About an hour after the prisoner was discharged I saw my trees all standing and safe. I have three or four thousand fruit trees growing there for profit.

Q. When did you discover anything wrong - A. Between eight and nine the next morning I went into the ground and found about fifty apple and pear trees cut down in one place; they were cut within a foot of the ground, apparently with a billhook.

Q. Could you form any opinion whether they had been recently cut - A. They appeared to have been cut six or seven hours. Next day I found seventy more in another part of the garden, cut down in the same way. They all laid on the ground as they had fell, and were quite destroyed - they would not grow again. The trees were my own - I had planted most of them myself. I gave information, and had another man apprehended.

Q. Did you plant any of those trees that were cut down - A. No, my brother did. I took the ground and bought the stock of him. All the property was mine.

Cross-examined by Mr. ARABIN. Q. The prisoner worked for you and your brother upwards of forty years - A. No. I believe he has been in the family twenty-five years. I turned him off for getting drunk two days before - he was not drunk at the time I turned him off.

Q. You would not let a malicious and ill-disposed person be in his situation - A. Not if I had known it. He bore the character of a quiet man. My brother has no interest in the ground; I grow the trees to produce fruit, I do not sell the young trees.

Q. Were they cut above the graft - A. Most of them were cut below the graft. They were from four to six feet high in the stem.

Q. Did you particularly examine them, so as to able to swear whether they were cut above or below the graft - A. I will swear that forty of the apple trees were cut below the graft - I buy them ready grafted.

Q. Did you examine the trees to see where they were grafted - A. These particular apple trees I had examined in particular.

Q. If they were cut above the graft, would they not, in the course of time, break out and bear fruit - A. I cannot say; I doubt whether they would, as I have cut them above the graft, and they did not bear. If the trees bear fruit again, they will not be quite destroyed, certainly, but they will be destroyed for many years. Some trees will break out again and bear fruit, and some may not.

Q. Suppose they are cut below the graft, will not the plumb stalk, or whatever they are grafted in, break out - A. If they do not get the canker they would be more likely to break out than before. If they were grafted on wild stocks they will break out again and flourish.

Q. These wild stocks growing up and flourishing, can be again grafted - A. Yes, if they shoot.

Q. You can use those trees again which were cut down, as grafts - A. If they live I can.

MR. ANDREWS. Q. Is it your opinion that they will or will not shoot - A. I have no doubt but some of them will shoot, but I have great doubts whether they will all shoot.

Q. Supposing they can be made productive, what time will it be before they can return you any profit - A. Five or six years - they produced profit before they were cut down. Some were cut below and some above the graft - part of them were the choicest apples; these were cut below the graft, as they were double grafted.

Q. Do you consider a fruit tree cut off below the graft, destroyed - A. The upper graft is quite destroyed.

Q. Are any of these cut below the first graft - A. I do not know, I am not confident; some of them have the stem of the graft, and some are wild.

Q. If a tree is double grafted, and you cut the second graft and leave part of the first on the wild stock, will it not produce apples - A. Yes, if it should break out - some will break out, and some will not.

JAMES HITCHCOCK . I am the prosecutor's gardener; the prisoner was discharged from his service. About seven o'clock the next morning I went into the grounds to work, and found a great many of the pear-trees cut down, some were haggled off, and some cut clear; they appeared to have been cut with a sharp instrument; two days after I found a great many apple trees cut down in the same way - I believe they were single grafted, but I do not know. Some were cut two feet from the ground, and some not above one. There were footmarks, as if somebody had got over the ditch - I do not know whether they were the marks of one or more persons.

Q. Do you think any of the trees will grow again, so as to produce fruit - A. They will grow again, but I think they will be longer coming than if new ones were planted.

JAMES GALLETLY . I am a gardener, but not in the prosecutor's employ. I heard some mischief had been done to his garden. On Thursday night, the 8th of October, about a quarter before eight o'clock, I was coming from work, I passed his grounds, and saw the prisoner under the prosecutor's new wall, he had a sack on his back, which appeared to have something in it, and a greatcoat thrown over the sack - I thought he was going to his watching, as usual - he was going towards the prosecutor's garden. I wished him a good night.

Cross-examined, Q. You met him in the public road - A. Yes.

JOHN HILLS . I am a smith, and live in Bradbury-lane. On the 8th of October, about five o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner bought a billhook of me, which came to 2 s. 6 d.; he said he wanted a good one, and picked one out - he told me to go and grind it up very sharp for him. He said he would call and pay for it on Sunday.

THOMAS POTTS . I am a constable. On Saturday evening, the 10th of October, I apprehended the prisoner near the Packhorse, at Turnham-green, within two hundred yards of his own house. I went to his house, and found an old billhook there; I searched further, and found another, concealed behind some firewood, by the side of the fireplace. I found another very good one, concealed under the staircase, among some more firewood. That found by the fire-place, appeared as if it had been cutting green wood - it was soiled with the sap of wood; the other two were very good and sharp. I was going to get a conveyance to take him to town, he asked me where I was going to take him? I said, to Clerkenwell. He said it was a bad job. I said it was. He said I acknowledge I was in the grounds that night, and took some greens, but I did not know what I did.

Cross-examined. I told him what I took him for. The wood that the billhooks were concealed in was sawed, some of it as thick as my thigh.

GEORGE RUTHVEN . I am an officer. I was sent for to search the prisoner's house, with Hills, on the 10th of October. I found two billhooks, one was very good, it was concealed in the chimney corner, with a sack, and a great deal of wood, over it - it appeared as if it had some sap or moisture on it. I produce it. I went on the Monday following, and found another. Just before I left the prisoner at the watch-house in town, I said to him,

"Why you have admitted taking the greens out of the garden?" as I had been informed, he had - I asked him if he knew anything about the trees, and said it was a sad thing. I said nothing more - I neither threatened or promised him, he said No. I said

"Why you have admitted taking the greens out of the same ground." He said, Yes, he did take them. I said

"You got out of such a gap into such a lane." He said Yes, he did. I asked him if he remembered his foot slipping? he, said No. I asked him if he had not spilt some greens in getting over? He said he had. He then said he was not distressed, that he had got a good bit of money at home, and if I would make it right with Mr. Knevett, I should have the money. I told him if he would give me 100 l. I would not take it. Next morning he repeated what he had said about the money, but denied having taken the greens out of the ground.

JAMES HITCHCOCK re-examined. When I went to the garden next morning, there was a few cabbage-leaves strewed about towards the lane, where the foot-marks were.

SAMUEL ATTWELL . I am a labourer. In October, last I was out of employ - I met the prisoner on the 8th, near the Star and Garter, at Brentford, about half-past three o'clock in the afternoon. I knew he worked for the prosecutor - I asked if he could tell me of any work. He said he could not, for he was after a job himself, that he and his partner were both discharged from Mr. Knevett's, for getting drunk, and he would be d - d if he would not be revenged, for he did not mind cutting every bl - dy tree about the place - I made him no answer - this was in the street.

Cross-examined. We talked loud - I told this story to the Grand Jury.

MR. ARABIN contended on the prisoner's behalf, that there was not that actual destruction of the trees, as came within the meaning of the Act; for an actual destruction of root and branch was necessary. That the words

"Shall cut down, or otherwise destroy;" meant that there must be an actual destruction of the thing itself.

GUILTY. Aged 61.

Recommended to Mercy.

The Jury, on being asked if they thought the trees were cut down, so as to be totally destroyed, said, that they considered that they were not destroyed.

[ This case was reserved for the opinion of the twelve Judges, on the point argued .]

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18181202-38

37. JOHN NEWTON was indicted for unlawfully obtaining goods, value 46 l. 2 s. 7 d. the property of Joseph Todd , William Morison , and John Edward Todd , under false pretences .

The prisoner pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 38.

Confined One Year .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18181202-39

38. CHARLES WATKINS was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of November , one seal, value 3 l., the goods of Francis Jones , in his dwelling house .

JOHN LINDSAY . I am servant to Francis Jones , who is a jeweller , and lives in Cornhill . On the 23d of November, the prisoner came to the shop with a ring, which he said he wished to have repaired. He asked to look at some seals. I shewed him a tray of seals. He agreed to take two, which came to 7 l.; and they were laid aside for him. He took up another between his finger and thumb, and I saw him at the same time, with his little finger put one into the palm of his hand: he then had his right hand across his left arm, with the seal in his hand. The one which he took with his finger and thumb he gave to me, and asked the price of it, keeping the other concealed in his hand. He then said he would give me the 5 l. which he had agreed to leave as a deposit for the two seals, and put his hand into his breeches pocket. When I saw him do that, I removed the tray of seals away, and went round the counter, and told him, he had got a seal in his breeches pocket. He said, if he had, it must have dropped out of the sleeve of his coat. I said, I saw how it had been done, and desired he would deliver it up. He produced it, and laid it on the glass case, in the presence of Captain Baker, who had come in. I put it in the tray with the others, and said it was a fortunate thing for him that Mr. Jones was not in the way, or he would be prosecuted. In consequence of what Captain Baker said, I sent for an officer, gave him in charge, and gave him the same seal that he returned to me.

Cross-examined by Mr. POLLOCK. Q. How many seals were in the tray - A. Great many. I believe I gave the officer the same seal.

JOHN VALENTINE BAKER . I have been captain of an East India ship. I went to the prosecutor's shop, and heard Lindsay charge the prisoner with stealing the seal. The prisoner said, if he had got it, it must have gone into his pocket by the cuff of his coat. I advised him to feel for it; he did so, and drew it out. I saw Lindsay put it in the tray. I myself took it out, and gave it to the constable. It is the same. I had never lost sight of it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 22.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18181202-40

39. SARAH GREEN was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of November , one pewter pint pot, value 1 s. the goods of William Lane .

WILLIAM LANE . I keep the Red Lion, Butcher-hall-lane . On the 4th of November, between one and two o'clock, the prisoner came to my house. I served her with half a pint of porter in the passage where the pots were. I left her in the passage. When I returned, she was gone. The officer brought some pots to my house, at six o'clock, one of which was mine. I had not missed it.

JOHN ALLINGHAM . I am a constable. I took the prisoner in charge at Hinkley's, for stealing his pots. Some pots were taken from her before I came, one of which Lane claimed.

JAMES HINKLEY . I keep the Lion and Key, Thames street. About three o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner came and had half a pint of beer, which she drank in front of the bar, where my pots stood. I heard one fall between her and the box; it must have fallen from her. I picked it up, and found a bundle on her arm, under her shawl; I found it was four pints and one quart pot, belonging to different persons. There was flannel between them to prevent their making a noise. I gave her in charge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A person gave me the bundle to hold while she went a little way.

GUILTY . Aged 65.

Confined One Year .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18181202-41

40. WILLIAM CUNNINGHAM and JAMES HERBERT were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Nowland , about four o'clock in the afternoon, on the 27th of October , and stealing therein one coat, value 3 l. 5 s.; three waistcoats, value 28 s.; one pair of silk stockings, value 6 s.; one pair of breeches, value 20 s.; one pair of drawers, value 2 s. 6 d.; two handkerchiefs, value 12 s.; three waistcoats, value 10 s. 6 d.; five handkerchiefs, value 8 s.; eight pair of stockings, value 17 s.; two great coats, value 4 l. 5 s.; two shirts, value 1 l. 2 s. four gowns, value 2 l. 18 s.; four petticoats, value 1 l. 12 s.; three shawls. value 1 l. 8 s. 6 d.; one table-cloth, value 10 s.; one quilt, value 10 s.; two towels, value 1 s., and one half yard of ribbon, value 6 d., his property .

JOHN NOWLAND . I live in Red Bull-court, Grubb-street , on the ground floor. The owner does not live in the house. On the 27th of October, at half-past eight in the morning, I went out, and left my wife at home. I returned about ten minutes after six in the evening, found my wife out (she sells apples in the street), and the door of my room broken open - the staple was drawn. I found my box broken open, and all this property gone. I have only found one handkerchief.

MARY NOWLAND . I am the wife of last witness. I went out at half-past nine in the morning, locked the door, and all the property was then safe. Most of it was in a chest which had the key left in it; the things were worth 30 l. My husband came home first, and discovered the robbery. I have seen nothing since, except a handkerchief, which I found in a cradle in the prisoner Herbert's room, where the officer took him. The prisoner, Cunningham's, father lived in the room over me, he used to come to see him often. The morning we were robbed, Cunningham passed three or four times, while I was in the cellar, he was in the house, and asked me what o'clock it was. He passed me at the time I was locking my door. When he asked the time, I told him it was nine; he said,

"Oh, I am too late." Instead of going to work he went up stairs and staid with his father. The next day he absconded - He afterward surrendered himself.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Did he not board with his father - A. Not that I know.

MARY LAWRENCE . I live in Whitecross-street, Moorfields. On the 27th October I was coming out of Lion-court, Grubb-street, about five o'clock in the afternoon, it was near Nowland's house. I saw Herbert pass me with a great quantity of men and women's clothes hanging loose on his arm. He came in a direction from the prosecutor's. I followed him into Chiswell-street, I missed him for a moment, and caught sight of him again; Cunningham was then with him, helping him up with the clothes. I said to Cunningham, how careless that man has got the clothes, he said, Yes, and looked confused. I said, It is Mr. Cunningham, he said, Yes. Herbert crossed over, and endeavoured to put the things up himself. I said again, he is carrying them very careless; Cunningham said, he is just at home. Cunningham walked on by my side, I turned round and missed him, he was stooping down rubbing his legs. Herbert went up Whitecross-street. Cunningham staid and watched me, to see where I was going. I stood against a post to see if he followed Herbert, which he did; he kept a little distance behind him. I lost them in Whitecross-street, I saw the glimpse of a red cloak among the things. I also saw a piece of blue chequered cotton, and the knees of a pair of breeches among the things.

Cross-examined. Q. You first saw Cunningham in Chiswell-street - A. Yes, helping the man up with the things. I did not know the prosecutrix before. Cunningham lodged with my sister-in-law.

Q. Why did you not attend the first and second examinations - A. He sent to me not to attend.

JOHN CONWAY . I am a shoemaker, and live in Grubb-street. On the Saturday before the robbery, Cunningham asked if I would go and crack a crib with him, he said there was a great booty of men and women's apparel, and the place that was to be cracked was in his mother's house. I refused.

Cross-examined. I have been confined one week in Tothillfields, and was discharged without being tried.

ELIZA KELLY . I live in Red Bull-alley. On the 27th of October, about half-past four in the morning, I was opposite the court, and saw Cunningham go and speak to his father in the street. His father told him that his mother was not at home, but soon would be. He went towards the house.

HENRY TURNPENNY . I am a City patrol - I heard of the robbery. I apprehended Herbert at his fathers house, on the 25th of November - his wife was in the room - the prosecutrix was with me. I saw her take the handkerchief out of the cradle, Lawrence said, Herbert was the man she saw take the clothes - Cunningham surrendered himself on the Monday after the robbery.

Cross-examined. Cunningham was once discharged by the Lord Mayor, and taken again.

(Handkerchief produced, and sworn to.)

CUNNINGHAM'S Defence. I can prove I was elsewhere at the time.

HERBERT'S Defence. I can prove where I was at the time of the robbery - it is all spite and malice against me. Lawrence at first said it was Sullivan.

THOMAS CUFLIN , I am a shoemaker, and live in Panton-street, Haymarket; Cunningham has been five or six months in my service, I would not believe him on his oath, as he robbed me - I preferred a bill against him, and the Grand Jury threw it out.

- MANTS. I am a merchant. I was before the Lord Mayor, and heard Lawrence declare that Sullivan was the man who had the bundle - I took down what she said. She said she saw Cunningham helping Sullivan up with the things.

COURT. Q. What merchant are you - A. I am head clerk to Marriot and Son.

Q. Then you call yourself a merchant - A. It may be incorrect - I have employed Herbert to mend shoes.

MARY LAWRENCE re-examined. I never said Sullivan was the man who had the things - he was taken on suspicion. I said positively, he was not the man.

ELIZA BURNETT . I live in Bud-street, Lambeth. The prisoner Herbert lives on the second floor in our house, I was in the room, when Mrs. Nowland took the handkerchief, and claimed it. I had seen it about Herbert's child's neck two months before - I have often tied it on myself - Herbert himself has also worn it.

EPHRAIM HOBBS . I am a leather-dresser, and live in Lamb-alley, Bermondsey. On the 29th of October, about eleven o'clock in the morning, Herbert came to me, and I gave him fifty skins to dress - he took them home.

ELIAS ANDREWS . I am in the leather business, and live at Bermondsey. On the 27th of October, I saw Herbert, about three o'clock in the afternoon, at the Royal Oak, Bermondsey-street. I stopped with him there till six o'clock, I then went home with him to his house, in West-square, and stopped with him till half-past nine - Harris, and Morgan were with us. He had some skins, which he said had just been given him by Hobbs.

Q. Hobbs says he gave them to him at eleven o'clock - A. He said they were just given to him.

JOHN HAINES . I live in Kent-street. I was with the prisoner, on the 27th of October.

Q. How do you know that was the day - A. Because the robbery was committed that day - it was the Tuesday after St. Crispin's day - the prisoner's wife told me so. I and Andrews were in his company that day, from three till six o'clock, the prisoner had a bundle of leather - Hobbs lives about a mile from the Royal Oak.

- MORGAN. I saw Herbert at the Royal Oak, on the 27th of October.

Q. How do you know it was the 27th of October - A, By my publican's bill, I drank with the prisoner - he asked me to get him a job of leather-dressing, I recommended him to go to Hobbs.

Q. Did he say he had got some from there - A. No - He had no skins with him at half-past two o'clock.

HENRY SHORTER . On the 27th of October, I was in Whitecross-street prison, the prisoner Cunningham, came there a little before three o'clock, and remained there till after five - he received some money from Thompson there.

WINIFRED JONES . On the 27th of October, I saw Cunningham come out of his mother's court, at three o'clock, he said he was going to Whitecross-street prison, I appointed to meet him at five o'clock, at the corner of Whitecross-street - I did meet him at five o'clock.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18181202-42

41. CATHARINE DEVEREUX was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of November , three sheets, value 15 s. , the goods of Andrew White .

SARAH WHITE . I am the wife of Andrew White , who is a shoemaker . I was nurse at the Middlesex Hospital , the prisoner's child was there - she remained with it. On the 3d of November, I carried nine sheets up three pair of stairs, to be washed, about one o'clock. At two o'clock, I went to give them in, and found only six. I am accountable for them.

HANNAH WHITE . I am nurse at the Middlesex Hospital - the prisoner's child was in my ward, she had leave to stop with it by day and night - it was ill about three weeks, on the 3d of November it was ordered to go out. On this day the prisoner helped me to carry a bundle of sheets to the wash. About one o'clock, she went down again into the ward with me - the sheets were missed about two o'clock. At half-past four, I was informed the prisoner was in custody - she had taken the child home and returned for her things - two of the sheets were produced.

RICHARD SKEATS . I am a brewer's servant. On the 3d of November, my fellow-servant called me, and I saw the prisoner cutting some marks off the sheets, when she had done, she rolled them up, and went away. I lost her, but am sure she is the woman.

DANIEL WOOLLER , I am a watchman. I was fetched, and saw the prisoner go into Mr. Tate's, the pawnbroker's, she there dropped the marks she had cut off the sheets, and we took her into custody - she made three attempts to get away.

EDWARD JACKSON , I am a constable. Wooller fetched me - I took the prisoner in a shop, in Cambridge-street, with the sheets in her possession, and the marks cut out. I found them on the ground.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. Andrews gave them to me, in Oxford-street.

GUILTY . Aged 32.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181202-43

42. JOHN WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously disposing of and putting away a 1 l. forged note, with intent to defraud the Governor, and Company of the Bank of England , he knowing it to be forged and counterfeited .

SEVERAL OTHER COUNTS, varying the manner of laying the charge.

MR. SERGEANT BOSANQUET on the part of the Governor and Company of the Bank of England, declined offering any evidence.

(See No. 24.)

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18181202-44

43. LORENZO NETTERVILLE was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of October , one coat, value 30 s.; three shirts, value 9 s.; nine cravats, value 4 s.; four waistcoats, value 10 s., and one pair of breeches value 2 s.; the goods of Frederick Chamier , Esq .; and one shirt, value 2 s.; one pair of stockings, value 6 d.; one pair of drawers, value 2 s.; one waistcoat, value 3 s.; the goods of John Chamier , Esq . in his dwelling-house.

HENRY CROSS . I am servant to John Chamier , Esq. who lives in Grosvenor-place . The prisoner was employed as a journeyman to paint the house ; he left on the 19th of October. On the 31st we missed the property stated in the indictment. My master's were kept in the drawers on the third floor, the others were in a closet on the ground floor. I do not know when they were taken. On my missing them I went to Mr. Eagan the prisoner's master, and informed him that I suspected the prisoner, and in consequence of what he told me, I had the prisoner apprehended that day, and found two shirts on his back, which were Mr. F. Chamier's; also a cravat, a pair of stockings, and a pair of drawers, which were my master's. We found three or four duplicates on him, which he said were for part of the property stolen, and told us where they were pledged. Some of the things were pledged at Bath; he said he had been there.

MARY EAGAN . I am the wife of John Eagan . The prisoner slept at our house. On the 31st of October, I went into his room and took a cravat out of his coat pocket while he was asleep, which the prosecutor claimed. The officer afterward took him.

GEORGE POWELL . I am an officer of Queen-square. I apprehended the prisoner at a public-house, in the Haymarket, I found two shirts on his back, a cravat and two duplicates in his pocket, relating to the property - one was for the articles pledged at Rochford's, and the other was for a great coat pledged at Bath - he said they were the prosecutor's property, and he pledged it there.

JOHN RICHARDS . I am servant to Mr. Rochford, who is a pawnbroker, and lives in St. James's-street. On the 27th of October, the prisoner pledged a coat, seven handkerchiefs, seven pair of hose, a pair of breeches, and two shirts, for 1 l. 5 s., in the name of Kelly.

HANNAH PARKER . I am Mr. Chamier's servant. I saw the property safe on the 11th of October. All the men had left then, except the prisoner.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I bought them of a man in the street for 3 l. 14 s.

GUILTY. Aged 21.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18181202-45

44. RICHARD EVANS was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of November , at St. Giles's in the Fields, 5 lbs. of fur, value 3 l. 15 s., the goods of Robert Hankes , in his dwelling-house .

ROBERT HANKES . I live in High Holborn, in the parish of St. Giles in the Fields, Middlesex . My shop is part of my dwelling-house. On Thursday, the 19th of November, I came down stairs and found the prisoner in the shop, in my son's custody. I asked what was the matter? He said, in the prisoner's hearing, that two men came into the shop; one of them asked what he would charge for dressing an old hat. The prisoner stood behind his companion, where the bags of fur were. He concealed a bag of fur, and walked out of the shop with it. My son said he ran after him, and brought him in with the fur. The prisoner said nothing to it. I took him in charge, and sent my son for an officer, who took him to the watch-house. The bag was covered with dirt, as if it had fallen in the dirt. It was worth 3 l. 15 s. - I had paid that for it that morning. I knew the bag by the mark. They are all marked the same way.

WILLIAM HANKES . I live with my father. On the 19th of November, between twelve and one o'clock, the prisoner came to the shop with another man, who pulled off his hat and asked what I should charge for dressing it? I said one shilling. He asked several questions. While we were in conversation the prisoner walked out of the shop. He had a loose great coat over his left arm. I missed the fur immediately. I saw it there when they came in. I went to the door, and saw the prisoner crossing the road; his companion ran to the door with me, and called out

"Jem!" two or three times. I overtook the prisoner in the middle of the road, crossing towards a street nearly opposite. I collared him, and asked him for the fur. He said he had none. I said I was sure he had, and was going to lift up his coat, and he immediately dropped it. It was concealed under his coat. I picked it up and took it into the shop, with him. Nobody but him and his companion had been in the shop. I am certain he is the man. My father was called down. I told him what had passed. I sent for a constable, who took him.

SAMUEL FURZEMAN . I am a constable. I was going by, and took the prisoner into custody.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 26.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

Reference Number: t18181202-46

45. MARTHA BALDRY was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of August , one scarf, value 30 s.; one gown, value 30 s.; two yards of sarsnet, value 8 s., the goods of Paul Rider , in his dwelling-house .

PAUL RIDER . I keep a public-house in the parish of St. Leonard, Shoreditch . The prisoner occasionally waited at my house . On the 1st of August she came about four o'clock, and left about six. In about an hour afterwards I missed the property stated in the indictment. I suspected her, and went in pursuit of her. I went to her lodgings in John's-row, City-road, next morning, and took her.

WILLIAM ATTFIELD . On the 7th of August I took the prisoner, at her lodgings. I was obliged to get in at the window. I found her in bed. She took me to a house in Waterloo-street, St. Luke's, and told a woman named Chandler to give me the gown, which she did, out of a drawer. I found the duplicate of the scarf in her pocket. The pawnbroker is not here.

GUILTY. Aged 21.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Confined Six Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18181202-47

46. GEORGE BELFOUR and JAMES LOWE were indicted for stealing, on the 24th of October , at St. Mary-le-bone , two coats, value 5 l., the goods of Thomas Cussans , in his dwelling-house .

EDWARD COOPER . On Saturday, the 24th of October, between four and five o'clock, I was in Harley-street , and saw the prisoner, Belfour, come out of the door of No. 68, with another boy , who had two large brown coats under his arm. They were doubled up carelessly. They turned up Queen Ann-street. As soon as they turned the corner they set off running. They ran about two hundred yards, and met a tall boy, with a light rough great coat on, who took the coats of them. I believe it was Lowe, but am not certain. He buttoned them up in his coat, and they all ran into Lamb's-place together; two men were running after them. One man stopped the two who were pursuing and asked what they were running after those boys for, as they had got nothing of their's. The boys then run off different ways. I knew Belfour before, by sight, and am sure I saw him come out of the house.

GEORGE ROYALS . I am servant to Mr. Thomas Cussans , who lives at No. 68, Harley-street, it is his dwelling-house, and is in the parish of St. Mary-le-bone. On Saturday, the 24th of October, about a quarter past four o'clock in the afternoon, Mary Butler rang at the bell, and gave me some information. I then missed two brown great coats of my master's out of the hall; one was quite new, and worth about 40 s. The other was half worn out. They were worth above 5 l. together. I had seen them hanging in the hall half an hour before. They have never been found. We also lost a paper parcel off the kitchen stairs.

MARY BUTLER . I was at No. 6, Harley-street, opposite the prosecutor's, looking out of the parlour window, about a quarter past four o'clock in the afternoon, and saw three boys sitting on the steps of No. 69. I believe Belfour to be one, the other I am not certain of. There was a larger boy with them, in a light rough great coat. He appeared about the size of Lowe. I saw Belfour and the other boy go down the area steps of No. 68. The tall boy got up and walked on, and stopped near No. 67. Immediately after that, Belfour and the other came up out of the area;

Belfour had a brown paper parcel, and gave it to the tall boy. They all crossed the road together, and went down Queen Ann-street. Belfour and the other boy returned in about two minutes, on the other side of the way, without the parcel. I then came out and went up against them. I am sure Belfour was one. I had followed a woman, whom I had seen come out of No. 68, to tell her of it, but was obliged to go back. After that I saw them come out of the same house, with a large bundle; it was dark brown coats. The other boy carried them. A milkman and another man ran after them.

BELFOUR. Q. Did you not say, you could not swear to me, but from my jacket - A. No. I said he had a light jacket on. The magistrate sent to his lodgings, a fustian jacket was brought, I said I believed it was the one.

JOHN WYATT . I am an officer. I was informed of the robbery. A few days after I met the prisoners together in James's-street. I followed them and took Belfour, but not having information of Lowe, I did not take him I fetched Cooper, and he immediately said he was the boy. Lowe had a light rough great coat on when I saw him.

BELFOUR'S Defence. I was on the Pagoda-bridge, in the Park, at the time of the robbery.

LOWE'S Defence. I was at work elsewhere at the time.

ROBERT MALONEY . I am a shoemaker. Lowe was apprenticed to me. I live in Swallow-street. He was at home, hard at work, on the 24th of October, all day, until ten o'clock at night. I know it, as I promised him 3 s. to spend on St. Crispin's day, which was next day, if he staid at his work. He had his meals with me.

ELEANOR MALONEY . I am the wife of the last witness. I know Lowe was at home all day, as my husband promised him 4 s. if he worked hard that day.

BELFOUR - GUILTY. - DEATH . Aged 13.

Recommended to Mercy .

LOWE - NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

Reference Number: t18181202-48

47. CHARLES ARNOLD was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of November , one watch, value 5 l., the goods of Benjamin Groves , in his dwelling-house .

ELIZA GROVES . I am the wife of Benjamin Groves , and live in North-street, Whitechapel . On the 21st of November, about ten o'clock in the morning, I was in the back room, turned round to go into the front room, and saw two men run out. I immediately missed the watch from over the fire-place. I ran out, but lost sight of them. I am certain the prisoner was one, he was afterwards brought back-I have not found the watch.

WILLIAM TASKETT . I am a headborough. I saw the prisoner running from the prosecutor's house. He ran into a house down an alley. I fetched him out, and found nothing on him.

Prisoner's Defence. I was running home.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18181202-49

48. HENRY BOULTON was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of November , nine yards of lace, value 30 s.; two caps, value 20 s., and one frill, value 2 s., the goods of Job Barker , in his dwelling-house .

JOB BARKER. I am a laceman , and live in Holborn . The prisoner was my porter . On the 28th of November, I found a cap and frill folded up in paper and put in a closet, which created my suspicions. He slept in the premises to take care of them. The same evening, after the shop was shut, I looked through the shutter, and saw him go to the glass cases, and take the lace boxes. Next morning I got an officer, watched him out, and stopped him in Lincoln's-inn-fields, as he was going towards my other house, in the Strand. I asked him for the key of the shop, he gave it to me. I told him to wait till I returned. I went to the shop, and found the cap and frill were gone from the closet. I returned, and asked him what he had done with the cap and frill, he said he had got them. I asked what business he had with them, he said he was going to give them to his sister. I beckoned to the officer, who came and took him, and found the frill, cap, and nine yards of lace on him. He said, he was sorry for it, and he never took anything before.

Cross-examined by MR. ARABIN. Q. He might have taken them at different times - A. Yes.

MARY WILLIAMS . I am the prosecutor's shopwoman. I saw the prisoner go to the cupboard. I had seen the cap and frill there before. I put all the lace away before the shop was shut.

SAMUEL DICKONS . I am a constable. I took the prisoner in charge, and found the property on him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 18.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Confined Six Months , and Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

Reference Number: t18181202-50

49. JOHN REDMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of November , six hats, value 4 l. 10 s. the goods of Thomas Wolrich Stansfield and Hatton Hamer Stansfield .

WILLIAM BALLANTINE . I am foreman to Messrs. T. W. Stansfield and H. H. Stansfield. The prisoner was their apprentice . In November last, in consequence of information, I saw some hats which were found in Nelson-street, Bermondsey. In consequence of what passed from the prisoner, I applied to George Brown , and went to Duncliff's, on the 19th of November, and the hats were found there that day.

Cross-examined by MR. WALFORD. Q. Will you swear you ever saw those hats in your master's stock-A. I will swear they were originally his property. We have missed hats.

GEORGE BROWN . I am the son of Thomas Brown ; my father was in the prosecutor's service. In November last, the prisoner gave me six hats. My father and I were going home; the prisoner called me back, and said he had got some hats; he fetched six, and told me to run on; then he ran after me, took them from me, and carried them himself to my father's house, and told me to take them to-morrow morning to Duncliff's, (he gave me 2 s.) which I did, and Duncliff gave me 2 l. 8 s. for them, of his own accord - I did not ask him for any money. I gave it to my mother, and the prisoner came for it afterward, and she gave it to him - The hats were unfinished. My father and the prisoner both told me to take them there. I took hats there once or twice.

THOMAS BRANSCOMBE . I am an officer. I and Martin took the witness Brown's father into custody.

JOSEPH MARTIN . I am an officer. I went to Duncliff's, in the Borough, with Branscombe, Balentine, Brown, and Mr. Stanfield and found about eight hats there. I apprehended the prisoner.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOSEPH NEEDHAM . I keep the Three Tuns, public-house, in Coleman-street. On the 18th of November, the prisoner paid me two 1 l. notes, both of which were marked A. D. and M. D. in separate places.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Fined One Shilling , and Discharged.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181202-51

50. THOMAS WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of November , one handkerchief, value 1 s., the goods of Hugh James Vardon , from his person .

HUGH JAMES VARDON . On the 9th of November, I had taken my brother, who is lame, to see the Lord Mayor's procession. We were in Cheapside , and had just passed Queen-street, about half-past four o'clock. There was a great crowd, and we were in the middle of the road. I walked backwards to make way for my brother. I put my hand to my pocket, and found my handkerchief safe. I had scarcely taken my hand away, before somebody called out,

"Catch him, he has got it." I turned round, and saw the prisoner with my handkerchief in his hand. I secured him, with a gentleman's assistance.

EDWARD MATTHEWS . I was passing up Cheapside as the the procession was returning. I heard somebody say, He has got it in his hand, I turned round, and saw the prisoner with the handkerchief in a hand, which the prosecutor claimed.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I found it.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181202-52

51. HENRY KING was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of November , two shifts, value 2 s., and two shirts, value 4 s. , the goods of James Murray .

JAMES MURRAY . I am a pewterer , and live in Bridgewater-gardens . On the 13th of November, about five o'clock in the evening, the clothes hung in the room. I heard footsteps in the passage, and missed them. I went to the street-door, and saw the prisoner with a bundle under his jacket, I tapped him on the shoulder, and asked if he had not got something of mine. He said, No. I took the bundle from him, which contained my shirts and shifts. He said he was in distress, and took them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined Six Months , and Whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181202-53

52. THOMAS BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of October , one piece of worsted stuff, called durant, value 38 s. , the goods of David Stansfield , (since deceased) Thomas Wolrich Stansfield and William Stansfield .

JOSEPH BURDETT . In October I was warehouseman to Messrs. David Stanfield , Thomas Wolrich Stansfield , and William Stansfield . David Stansfield is since dead. They keep a stuff warehouse . Their premises join the hat warehouse of Messrs. Thomas Wolrich Stansfield and William Stansfield , in Lothbury , where the prisoner was employed. There is an internal communication all day with the two premises. On the 31st of August, when we took stock, we had two pieces of durant. About the 3d of November we missed a piece. We had sold none.

Cross-examined by MR. WALFORD. The prisoner had no business in the stuff warehouse.

JOSEPH MARTIN . I am an officer. On the 19th of November, I searched the prisoner's, premises, and found two duplicates of the stuff among others. He said, he lived at Messrs. John Stansfields .

WILLIAM SMITH . I am a pawnbroker. On the 22d of October, fourteen yards of durant was pledged with me, in the name of John Brown, London-wall. I do not know who by. The duplicate found on the prisoner is the one I gave.

BENJAMIN BROWN . I am servant to Mr. Purse, London-wall. On the 22d of October fourteen yards of stuff were pledged with me, by a woman of the name of Ann Rrown , Bell-alley. The duplicate found is mine.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 38.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181202-54

53. MARY HOLGROVE was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of December , nineteen yards of bombazet, value 28 s. , the goods of Hugh Jones .

HUGH JONES . I am a linen-draper , and live in Gracechurch-street . On the 1st of December, about two o'clock, a boy came to the door, and said, a woman had taken a piece of stuff. My man ran out, and brought the prisoner back with it.

JOSEPH BARNETT . I was selling oranges in Gracechurch-street, and saw prisoner take the stuff from the prosecutor's door, I went and told him, and the man came out. We followed her to Leadenhall-market, and brought her back with it. The prosecutor told her to go about her business; she said, she would not.

CHARLES SPELT . I am the prosecutor's porter. I went out, followed the prisoner, and took her in Leadenhall-market, with the stuff under her apron. She said, a man gave it to her in Gracechurch-street.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I met a man in the market, who gave it to me to hold.

GUILTY . Aged 38.

Confined One Month .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181202-55

54. CHARLES CLARK was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of November, eight pounds and a half of soap , the goods of Mary Edmunds and George Aylett .

MARY EDMUNDS . I am in partnership with George Aylett . We keep an oil-shop in Bevis-marks . On the 30th of November, between eight and nine o'clock in the evening, the prisoner ran into the shop, took the soap off the

counter in the middle of the shop, and ran out. I followed and called out, Stop thief! He was taken on the other side of the way.

JOSEPH HYAMS . I heard the prosecutor call out. The prisoner ran against me with the soap, and I stopped him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181202-56

55. JOLEPH ANDERSON was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of November , one handkerchief, value 3 s., the goods of Thomas Thompson , from his person .

THOMAS THOMPSON . On the 7th of November, in the morning, I was coming out of a narrow court into Birchin-lane , and thought somebody pressed against me. I saw my handkerchief pass from one man's hand to another. turned round, and saw the prisoner stuffing it into his breeches. I collared him, and gave him in charge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181202-57

56. JOSEPH MASON was indicted for feloniously assaulting Levi Bassett , on the King's highway, on the 7th of November , at St. James's, Westminster , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, two seals, value 30 s.; two watch keys, value 13 s., and one ring, value 5 s., his property .

LEVI BASSETT . I am a porter , and live at No. 8, Clifford-street. On the 7th of November, between ten and a quarter-past ten o'clock at night, I was in Chapel-court - four or five people were walking close after me. As I went through the passage into Swallow-street , one of them struck me a very heavy blow, under the ear - it was the prisoner. He then snatched at my watch, the ribbon broke, and he ran off with the seals - I ran after him, calling, Stop thief! and never lost sight of him, till the watchman caught him - I am certain he is the man. I have never found my seals.

Cross-examined by MR. ARABIN. Q. It was all done in a minute - A. Yes, he struck me first, and then immediately took my seals - he did not run two hundred yards before he was taken - he turned the corner of Swallow-street, but I never lost sight of him.

JURY, Q. Did you fall from the blow - A. No, because the wall prevented my falling.

ROBERT NEEDHAM . I am constable of St. James's. I was in Swallow-street, about ten o'clock, heard the cry of Stop thief! and immediately ran to the place, and at the end of Beak-street, I found several persons - the prosecutor was one, he said he had been robbed in Chapel-court - I asked which man had robbed him? He pointed to the prisoner, and with the assistance of the watchman I took him to the watch-house, searched him there, but found none of the property on him.

PATRICK MURRY . I am a watchman. I was in Swallow-street, calling ten o'clock, heard the cry of Stop thief! and saw the prisoner running in the middle of the street, I ran across, and took him - he attempted to get away, but could not. The prosecutor came up, and said he was the man who had robbed him of his seals and key - he was not above five or six yards behind the prisoner, when I took him. I found nothing on him. The prisoner said he had struck him, but did not take his seals.

Cross-examined. Q. When did he own that he had struck him - A. Both at the watch-house, and at the office.

Prisoner's Defence. I was returning from Knights-bridge, as I came through the court, there were several men together - I passed them. They were quarrelling, and I returned to see what was the matter; the prosecutor seized me and charged me with the robbery, I pushed him away, and said it was false, went away, and the watchman took me.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 18.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181202-58

57. CHARLOTTE HILL was indicted for feloniously killing and slaying Martha Puarells .

MR. ALLEY stated that in this case, he could not prove that the deceased died from the usage of the prisoner, and would offer no evidence

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181202-59

58. SARAH THWAITES was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Joseph Simpson , about eight o'clock in the forenoon of the 3d of November , at St. Dunstan's, Stepney (he and others being therein), and stealing therein, one watch, value 2 l.; one chain, value 1 s.; one seal, value 6 d., and two keys, value 6 d., the goods of Josiah Allen .

SARAH ALLEN . I am the wife of Josiah Allen , who lives at No. 15, Pelham-street, Mile End, in the parish of Stepney - Joseph Simpson is the landlord of the house, and lives in it, we have the front-room on the ground floor - the prisoner lived in the front-room first floor, over me. On the 3d of November, about half-past seven o'clock in the morning, I put my watch safe in a little box, on the table by my bed side, and then went out, double-locked the door, and put a nail over the latch - my husband went out before me. I returned about a quarter after eight o'clock, and found the door locked, but the staple drawn out, and the nail also drawn out from over the latch - anybody could draw the nail out - it could not easily be seen - I could not find it. My husband had not come home. I found the staple lying on the ground, and the little box lying on the ground, and my husband's watch gone - it was silver. The prisoner had been in my room the day before, and asked what o'clock it was, I took the watch out of the box, and said it wanted a quarter to eight - she saw me put the watch back into the box. When I missed it, I ran up to her, and asked if she had heard anybody break into my room. She said

"Oh dear, Mrs. Allen, No, that I have not" - she was in bed. She got up, and persuaded me not to go to any pawnbroker's, as she said, she once lost a pair of sheets, and went to

look for them, but could never find them, and it would be useless going to any pawnbroker's. She lived only in the house nine days - Simpson was at home at the time. The prisoner is a married woman, but her husband did not live with her.

JOSIAH ALLEN . I am the last witness's husband, and am servant to Messrs. Trueman and Hanbury, brewers. The watch is mine - I have had it three years and a half, and gave four guineas for it. It is worth above 2 l.

JAMES PARKER . I live at No. 2, Pelham-street, close to Allen. I am a weaver, and work for Messrs. Jeffreys and Cox, St. Paul's Church-yard. On the 3d of November, I went there, and found the prisoner at the scales, waiting for work. I had known her about seven months. She passed me and went to the door, returned and called me out, and said it would be a long while before it came to my turn to served, as several people were waiting. She desired I would ask what colour her cane was to be, as she wanted to go out for half a day's work, and asked me bring it home for her. I said I would. I went and had a pint of beer with her, at the Swan with Two Necks. She then said she had a watch which belonged to her first husband, and if I would buy it, I should have it for 30 s. I said I would give her 10 s. then, and 1 l. next week. She gave it to me. It was then half-past eleven o'clock. When I got home, I heard of the robbery. I shewed the prosecutor the watch, and he claimed it.

JOHN CROSSWELL . I am a constable. On the 3d of November, about eight o'clock in the evening, I took the prisoner into custody, at her lodgings. I searched, and found 6 s. 2 d. on her. I asked how she got it, she said it was part of the money she sold the watch for. I asked how she got possession of the watch; she said she met an old woman picking up bones in the street, and she gave her the watch to pledge for her. I asked her why she did not pawn it; she said she went to one pawnbroker's, where she saw the prosecutor, and turned out again. I asked her what became of the old woman; she said, when she came out she was gone, and she saw no more of her.

JOSIAH ALLEN re-examined. I went to a pawnbroker's shop that morning, at the bottom of Sun-street, Bishopsgate-street. I did not see the prisoner come there. My street-door is sometimes open; it has a spring lock, and the room-door is close to the street-door.

SARAH ALLEN . When I went out in the morning I left the street-door shut - it is a spring lock. When I came home I found it shut as I had left it. Nobody could open it without a key. I took the key with me, and got in with it when I returned.

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutrix returned about half-past eight o'clock, and gave me the watch, and told me to sell it as she wanted money. Her sister is now living with my husband; this is done to keep me away from him; they tried to get me to utter forged notes.

JOHN CROSSWELL . I am certain that she said, a woman who was picking up bones in the street, gave it to her.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 45.

Second Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18181202-60

59. RICHARD LEWIS and WILLIAM BALDOCK were indicted for feloniously assaulting Hushai Jones , on the King's highway, on the 2d of November , at St. Mary Matfellon, alias Whitechapel, putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, one hat, value 12 s., and one handkerchief, value 2 s., his property .

HUSHAI JONES. I am a diamond-cutter , and live in Collingwood-street, Mile End-road. About two o'clock in the morning of the 3d of November I was returning home from Bishopsgate-street, where I had been at a public-house, with a friend. I was quite sober. As I passed Baker's-row, opposite the London Hospital , I received a very violent blow in the back part of my neck, with a fist. I had heard nobody near me; the place was very dark. They must have come out of some concealed place.

Q. What was the effect of the blow - A. It knocked me down. I immediately tried to raise myself up, and a person took my hat off with both hands, as I was getting up; I immediately caught hold of the coat of the person who took my hat off. I am sure it was the same person. I then saw another person standing by his side. I called out and they tried to escape. I kept hold of the coat, and the man dragged me along the pavement for six or seven yards, as I held the coat. He then got away, leaving part of his coat in my hands. I saw him and the other man turn down Baker's-row, and down two other turnings. I followed them all the way, calling

"Stop thief! Watch!" and

"Murder!" My handkerchief was in my hat. I still kept them in sight, except while they turned the corner. I ran against a post, which disabled me from following them so fast. They had got back into Whitechapel-road again. I thought I saw one of them run across, and I followed him across, and still pursued. He ran down a street close to the hospital. I thought they both ran down there. When I got about five yards down the street the watchman brought Lewis to me, and asked if that was the man I was pursuing? He was much out of breath. I had no opportunity of observing his features, but by his stature I judged him to be one of them. The watchman said he was running when he was stopped, and I gave him in charge. I entirely lost the other man. I went with Lewis and the watchman to Whitechapel watch-house, while he was being searched a watchman came in, and said there was a prisoner at Mile End watch-house, with his coat torn. I had kept the part of the coat in my hand all the time, and went to Mile End, New-town, watch-house, and found Baldock there. I did not know his face; his person corresponded in shape and size with the man; his coat was torn; it was the same colour as the piece. I did not compare it, as he acknowledged it was part of his coat. It was torn in the same place. I have the coat and piece here. He was taken to Whitechapel watch-house. My hat was found the next day, by Stephens. The blow did not hurt me much. They did not strike me afterwards.

Cross-examined by MR. ARABIN. Q. Was you quite sober - A. Quite. It was a dark night. I lost sight of them. I think they are the men by their stature. I felt both the man's hands on my head.

JOHN SALTER . I am a watchman. On the 3d of November, about half-past two o'clock in the morning, I was on my beat in Turner-street, and heard a violent cry of

"Stop thief!" I ran to the end of Mount-street, but saw nothing; as I returned I saw the prisoner, Lewis, turn the corner of Mount-street very quick. He was running. I called to him to stop - he kept running hard. I stopped

him about thirty yards further. The prosecutor was about thirty yards off, in Turner-street; he came up in less than two minutes, and said, from the prisoner's height and appearance, he believed he was one of them, but he could not swear to his features. He gave him in charge. The prisoner was very much out of breath, as if he had ran a great deal. The prosecutor was without his hat. We took the prisoner to Whitechapel watch-house.

ROBERT FISHER . I am constable of the night of Whitechapel watch-house. On the 3d of November I was sent for to Mile End, New-town, watch-house, and found Baldock there. The prosecutor went with me, and had the piece of coat in his hand. When the prisoner was before the magistrate I compared it with the coat he had on; it matched exactly. The prisoner said it was part of his coat. I took him to our watch-house.

WILLIAM SAMUEL STEPHENS. I am a lamp-lighter. On the 3d of November, about a quarter before three o'clock, I was lighting some lamps nearly opposite the London Hospital, near the end of Baker's-row. I found a hat and a handkerchief on the ground, which I took to the watch-house. They told me to take it to Lambeth-street, which I did, two days after, and the prosecutor swore to it.

BALDOCK'S Defence. I heard the prosecutor call

"Stop thief!" he turned round and caught hold of my coat, it tore, he ran from me, and I followed him for the piece of my coat. I lost him, and ran against two watchman who took me.

LEWIS'S Defence. I was drinking with the other prisoner, but know nothing of him.

BALDOCK - GUILTY. - DEATH . Aged 20.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury and Prosecutor .

LEWIS - NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18181202-61

60. ROBERT THROWER was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of November , at St. Martin's in the Fields, one clock, value 3 l.; three coats, value 50 s.; one pair of breeches, value 6 s.; two pair of trowsers, value 10 s.; three pair of stockings, value 3 s.; four shirts, value 20 s.; two sheets, value 8 s.; one table-cloth, value 6 s.; seven yards of calico, value 4 s.; two waistcoats, value 5 s.; two watches, value 20 s., and five spoons, value 10 s., the goods of Joseph Braidley , in his dwelling-house .

JOSEPH BRAIDLEY. I keep a pork-shop , at No. 73, St. Martin's-lane, in the parish of St. Martin's in the Fields . I keep the house. On the 24th of November, in the morning, while I was dressing, my servant came up and said, somebody had been in the shop; I went down and found the tills had been opened, and I missed a clock out of the parlour, all my clothes out of the drawers, and the rest of the property mentioned in the indictment. I sent for an officer, who examined the premises, and said it must have been done by somebody who knew the way of the house. There was no appearance of outward violence. I have a lodger, who is a salesman at Covent-Garden market; he goes out very early, and leaves the door on the lock, unbolted; anybody might come in who had got a key.

WILLIAM KILNER . On the 24th of November I came down stairs about seven o'clock, and opened the door which leads from the stairs to the shop; I found the trapdoor open. I unfastened the shutters, and when I came to the shop-door I found it shut, but neither locked nor bolted, it was put too. Nobody could open it from the outside. I sent the servant to inform my master.

HOWARD LEWIS . I am a clothes salesman, and live in Cable-street, Whitechapel. On Thursday, the 26th of November, the prisoner offered a pair of trowsers, two waistcoats, and a handkerchief, for sale. I questioned him to know if they were his own property. I suspected him, took him to Lambeth-street Office, and gave him in charge of Griffiths, who found five tea-spoons in his pocket. When he was before the magistrate he confessed to robbing the house, and said where it was.

JOHN GRIFFITHS . I am an officer of Lambeth-street. The prisoner was given into my charge by Lewis, on the 26th of November, in the morning. I searched him, and found five silver tea-spoons in his breeches-pocket. He was taken before the magistrate that day, and charged on suspicion of this robbery, and committed until the Thursday following. After he left the office he said, if I went with him, he would show me where all the property was, but he could not tell me without going with me. The magistrate gave me leave to put him in the watch-house that night. I put him in a coach next morning, he ordered it to drive to the Obelisk in St. George's-fields; when he got there he ordered it to drive on, and he would point out where it was to stop, and told him to turn to South-street, Lambeth; when we got there, he desired him to stop at the Marquis Wellesley public-house, kept by Cribb; we went in there. I took him into the passage, and asked the landlord if he knew him? He said Yes. I asked him to show me the room where he lodged. Before he took me up stairs, he produced a clock, which he said the prisoner had left in the bar; the prisoner acknowledged leaving it there. We went up two pair of stairs into his room, as soon as we got into the room the prisoner stooped down himself, and pulled a bundle from under the bed, and said that was part of the property, and if I would open the closet, I should see a box, where all the rest was. I found all the property stated in the indictment there. Three legs of pork were packed up with the clothes, which the prosecutor claimed. I took him to the office, with the property.

JOSEPH BRAIDLEY . The things offered to Lewis, and the other things found at his lodgings, are all mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I lodged in the prosecutor's house for two years. I was afterwards distressed, and went to the work-house. The overseers wanted me to go out, and I left the work-house, leaving my child behind me. Seeing the street-door open, I was tempted to commit the robbery.

JOSEPH BRAIDLEY . He left me about three months before.

GUILTY. - DEATH .

Recommended to Mercy .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181202-62

61. GEORGE WILLIAM HANDY was indicted for that he, on the 28th of November , at St. Ann's, Limehouse, being in the dwelling-house of John Spice , there situated, did steal one coat, value 1 s., his property;

and one shirt, value 1 s.; and one pair of trowsers, value 2 s., the goods of John Hammond ; and that he, having committed the felony aforesaid, about the hour of twelve o'clock in the night of the same day, the same dwelling-house did burglariously break, and get out of the same .

JOHN SPICE. I have been a mariner , but now keep a house, No. 24, Queen-street, in the parish of St. Ann, Limehouse . The prisoner lodged about three weeks with me. On the 28th of November, at twelve o'clock in the forenoon, I told him that I could keep him no longer, and my wife gave him a few halfpence to leave the house, and take his things. The same evening, it being dusk, he came in and concealed himself, privately, in the backroom. I keep a green-shop. At twelve o'clock an alarm was given; I came down, and went into the shop, and found the shutter down, and missed a great coat, and 5 s. in halfpence. I found the coat at Shadwell office. I had seen it hanging on a nail, about half-past nine o'clock, before I went to bed, the door was then shut. I could find nobody in the house.

JOHN HAMMOND . I lodge in the house. I lost a pair of trowsers, a shirt, and a Dutch frock. The trowsers and shirt were in a chest the night before. I did not see the frock that day. I found them at the office.

WILLIAM ALDRIDGE . I am a watchman of Ratcliffe. On Sunday, the 29th of November, about two o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner on the opposite side of the way, with a coat on his arm. I crossed over to him; he saw me. and ran about twenty yards up the street. I then took him. I also saw some things in his breast, and asked how he got them? He said they were his own. I took him to the watch-house.

JOHN KINDON . I was constable of the night. The prisoner and the property were brought to the watch-house. I found a pair of trowsers and a shirt, stuffed in his bosom. I asked whose they were? - He said they were his own. I then found a coat, which he said was the captain's wife's. I afterwards heard of the robbery, and sent for the prosecutor, who said that the prisoner had lodged with him, and broke out of the house, and claimed the property.

JOHN SPICE re-examined. The coat is mine. The shutter was opened from the inside. The prisoner often fastened the shutters for me.

JOHN HAMMOND . The other things are mine.

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutor got all my money, which was 6 l.; he then turned me out of doors, which induced me to commit the offence, being in distress.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 20.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181202-63

62. ANN MAYNARD was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of James Moore , about twelve o'clock in the night of the 3d of November , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein 480 table knives, value 40 l.; 480 table forks, value 20 l.; 180 penknives, value 50 l.; 96 pair of scissors, value 6 l.; 48 pair of snuffers, value 12 l.; 18 carving-knives, value 3 l.; 18 carving-forks, value 1 l., and 36 corkscrews, value 5 l., his property .

JAMES MOORE . I am a working cutler , and live in Oxford-street . On the 3d of November, about ten o'clock at night, I left my shop fastened, as usual, and went to bed. I came down stairs next morning, about half-past eight o'clock, and found the door unlocked, and the shop stripped of all the property; the drop-latch on the door was stuffed with paper, to prevent its falling; this was on Wednesday. I heard nothing of the property until Saturday, when Aston produced a penknife to me, which I knew to be mine.

JOHN ASTON . I am servant to Locock and Fryat, pawnbrokers, Whitecross-street. On the 7th of November the prisoner pledged a penknife for 4 s. I suspected it was stolen, in consequence of a hand-bill, and ran out after her, but could not find her. On Sunday morning I went to the prosecutor, who claimed the knife. On the 20th of November the prisoner brought six table-knives and forks and a steel to pledge. I gave her in charge.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. She gave her name as Mary Stevens , Old-street. I have heard that she was living with a man of that name.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

HARRIOTT HEATH (witness for the prisoner). I am the prisoner's sister, and live in Brick-lane. From the last day of October to the 6th of November she slept with me every night, and was never out between ten o'clock at night and nine o'clock the next morning. I know it, because our father came to town, and she came to my house to see him.

GUILTY. Aged 21.

Of stealing, but not of breaking and entering .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181202-64

63. JOHN MOON was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of November , at St. Paul's, Covent-garden, in the dwelling-house of Jonas White and James Hewitt , one 5 l. bank-note, the property of James Jerkins .

JAMES HEWITT . I and Jonas White , are the proprietors of the Old Hummums, Covent-garden, which is in the parish of St. Paul's, Covent-garden . We both live there.

JAMES JERKINS . I am chamberlain at the Old Hummums . On Sunday the 29th of November, in the evening, I went up stairs, at eight o'clock, and left the prisoner, who was a gentleman's servant , sitting in the servants' hall. I told him to tell the porter, that I was gone up stairs. I was called down by the female servant. When I got into the passage, Mr. Hewitt told me to go to my bureau and see if I missed anything. I had left the keys hanging in the lock of a cupboard, in the servant's hall. I took my key out of the cupboard, and went to my bureau, which stood in the back passage, not in the servant's hall. I put the key in the bureau, and found it was already unlocked. I immediately missed a 5 l. bank-note, which I had left laying open in the bureau, and a 1 l. note under it. I came back to Mr. Hewitt, and said I missed a 5 l. note. He immediately turned round to the prisoner, and said, he must insist on searching him. The prisoner began to pull his things out of his pockets. He at last pulled his hand out of his coat pocket, clenched. Mr. Hewitt laid hold of it, and said, I must see what you have got there. He opened his hand, and took a 5 l. note out of it. He looked at the back of the note, and read the name of

"Ambrose, 29th of November," on it. I am sure it was my note. I had given one of the waiters change for it at

half-past ten o'clock that day. The waiter shewed me that name on it, when he gave it to me.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. I only know the note by having seen the name on it. The 1 l. note was left.

FRANCIS WICKS . I am waiter at the tavern. On the 29th of November, I gave the note to Jerkins. I took it of Ambrose that day, to get change, and wrote his name on it.

MR. HEWITT. I took the note out of the prisoner's hand. I produce it.

MARY TINKLER . I am housemaid at the tavern. On the 29th of November, I saw the prisoner going towards the bureau. A few minutes before, I had heard keys rattle; and about two minutes afterward, I heard the flap of the bureau shut. I took a candle, and met the prisoner, coming from the bureau, and told Mr. Hewitt.

WILLIAM SHIRES . I am a constable. On Sunday evening the prosecutor fetched me, and gave the prisoner in charge.

Prisoner's Defence. I went to see what time it was. turned round, and took the note up just by the bureau, and returned to the bureau, finding what it was, lifted the lap up, put it in my pocket, and then met Tinkler. I had heard her say, she would injure me, all she could, as I had interfered in a quarrel between her and the servants.

MR. HEWITT. He told me he brought the note from Harrowgate.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 25.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181202-65

64. HERBERT DICKINSON was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of October , five printed bound books, value l., the goods of John Rodwell and John Martin , in the dwelling-house of the said John Rodwell .

JOHN RODWELL . I am a bookseller , and live in New Bond-street , and am in partnership with John Martin . On the 27th of October, about seven o'clock in the evening, when I came home, I was informed, a man was stopped with these books in his possession. I found four of them at the pawnbroker's. I had not missed them.

CHARLES KELL . I am shopman to Mr. Christie, a pawnbroker, in Whitechapel. On the 20th of October, the prisoner pledged a Petrarch, 1522, for 2 s.

GEORGE BAKER . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Brewer-street, Golden-square. On the 27th of October, the prisoner came to pledge Young's Night Thoughts for s. Thinking it worth more money, I gave him in charge of Plank. He then produced three more foreign ooks.

SAMUEL PLANK . I took the prisoner into custody, and found the duplicate of the book, pledged at Christe's, on him. He said a man named Williams gave it to him, but he did not know who he was.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I met a man in Covent-garden; he said he would get me a situation. He said he was a inder, and he took me to the prosecutor's. Next morning I met him, and he gave me these books to pledge. On the 27th of October, I met him again; he brought the ooks out of the prosecutor's, and gave them to me.

GUILTY. Aged 25.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Confined Six Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181202-66

65. WILLIAM GRANT was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of November , in the dwelling-house of Robert Whiting , one purse, value 6 d.; two rings, value 8 s.; one pair of bracelets, value 5 s.; 5 s. in monies numbered and two 1 l. notes, the goods and monies of William Brown .

MARY ANN BROWN . I am the wife of William Brown , who is a ship carpenter , and is in the East Indies. I live in Pancras-street, Tottenham-court-road . I was at my father's, Robert Whiting 's house, which is in the same street. The prisoner was employed there to set a bed-room stove. I went out of the room, and left my purse on the bed. He came down soon after, and said he was done. I thought it was impossible for him to have finished it in so short a time. I went up, and found it was done, but did not then think of my purse. In about a quarter of an hour after, I went up, and missed it. I sent for him, and he said he had not got it. He lived in the house, and nobody but him had been in the room.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Do you know Mr. Skinner - A. I should know him if I saw him. I never told him, that I suspected my own sister.

JEREMIAH MAIDMENT . I am a constable. Brown informed me of the robbery. I took the prisoner to the watch-house. I received information from his mother, and found the purse stuffed in the brickwork of the area. I charged him with it; he denied it; but afterwards said he took it, and put it there. It contained a 1 l. note, and 5 s.

Prisoner. I leave my case to my counsel.

JAMES SKINNER . I live in Dukes-row, Burton-crescent. The prosecutrix told me, that she suspected her sister more than the prisoner, as she had lost gowns before, which her sister had pledged. This was after the prisoner was committed.

GUILTY. Aged 17.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Fined One Shilling , and Discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181202-67

66. JOHN PIDGEON was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Abraham Borradaile , about twelve o'clock, on the night of the 7th of November , at Saint Gabriel Fenchurch, with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein two keys, value 1 s., and thirty 1 l. Bank notes, the property of the said Abraham Borradaile , William Borradaile , John Watson Borradaile , Isaac Harrison , and George Ravenhill .

ABRAHAM BORRADAILE . I rent a house in Fenchurch-street, in the parish of St. Gabriel . I am the only master of the house. The prisoner had been my servant about twelve months ago. On Saturday night, the 7th of November, the house was broken open. I was in the country at that time. I came to town on Monday morning, about eleven o'clock. I found no marks of violence on any part of the house. There were marks of violence on the adjoining counting-house, which joins the same building, and is part of the warehouse. I found the drawer of the counting-house desk broken open. The money deposited there belonged to us. The prisoner was apprehended about a week after. I saw him at the Mansion-House. He begged to speak to me in private, and then said he was

the guilty person, and begged I would be lenient with him. I neither threatened or promised him. He said he wished to be sent to the Penitentiary, if he was cast for transportation, and that he would tell me how he did it. I told him he deserved no favour. He said, that on Saturday night, the 7th of November, after coming and talking to some workmen in the warehouse, he went into the front yard, and shut the warehouse door after him, and concealed himself among some piles of hats and puncheons in the yard; and when all was quiet, he got on the shed in the yard, and in at the dining-room window, walked down stairs into the kitchen, and took the keys of the warehouse and counting-house from where they hung in the kitchen, opened the doors, and went and broke open the desk, and took the money out, but did not count it; and that he got out the same way he went in. The yard is shut up at night. The money that was kept in the drawer, belongs to the firm, which is myself, William and John Watson Borradaile , Isaac Harrison , and George Ravenhill .

THOMAS BORRADAILE WILKINSON . I locked up the counting-house and warehouse, at a quarter after eight o'clock, and hung the keys up in the kitchen, on Saturday night. The desk was then safe. I had received forty-five 1 l. notes, and 5 l. in silver, that afternoon, from the bankers', and gave it to William Potter . On Monday morning the drawer of the desk appeared to have been forced open.

WILLIAM POTTER . I am clerk to the prosecutors. I had put about 30 l. and some silver in the drawer, when I left the counting-house - the drawer was all safe then. I had received part of it from Wilkinson. I had the key. On Monday morning I found it forced open.

JOSEPH MARTIN . I am an officer. On the 16th of November, I took the prisoner, at the King's Arms, Bishopsgate Church-yard. I told him he was suspected of robbing Messrs. Borradaile, as he had been seen with a great deal of money lately, which rose the suspicion. He said he had received 15 l. 15 s., from a man, who owed it to him. I told him if he could account for it, I would not detain him, and I would go anywhere with him to find the man. He said he was gone to sea. I searched him at the Mansion House, and found eight 1 l. notes, and 17 s. in silver, on him. I then went to his lodgings, which he directed me to, and found a great many new clothes, which he told me he had bought with the money he took out of the desk.

CHARLES WHITE . I am clerk to Messrs. Sikes, Snaith, and Co., who are the prosecutors' bankers (looking at the notes). These are eight of the notes which I paid for a cheque, for them.

Prisoner. I beg for mercy.

GUILTY. - DEATH . Aged 28.

Recommended to mercy .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18181202-68

67. CORNELIUS MOSELY was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of December , one handkerchief, value 1 s., the goods of George Pollard , from his person .

GEORGE POLLARD . I am shopman to Mr. Cleobury. On Sunday afternoon, about ten minutes after four o'clock, I was just under the pulpit of St. Paul's church , coming out, I felt a twitch at my pocket, put my hand behind me, and felt my handkerchief in a man's hand - it was the prisoner. I laid hold of his arm, held it up, and took the handkerchief from him. I took him out of the church, and gave him in charge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. There was a push among the congregation - I suppose part of his handkerchief must be out; you may depend upon it, another person took it out. I being next to him, he took me.

GUILTY . Aged 34.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18181202-69

68. HANNAH FELTON was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of December , one piece of bombazeen, containing sixty yards, value 7 l., the property of John Abraham Thompson , privately in his warehouse .

JOHN ABRAHAM THOMPSON . I am a warehouseman , and live in Bull Head-court, Newgate-street . On Monday morning, the 7th of December, seeing the prisoner in the court, I watched her, saw her go into my warehouse, and come out with a piece of bombazeen, which she put under her apron. I followed her, she dropped it, and I took it up - it is worth 7 l. - she ran off very fast with it. There was nobody in the warehouse.

JOHN MURDOCK . I saw the prisoner drop the bombazeen, and stopped her.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A gentleman sent me for it.

GUILTY . Aged 11.

Of stealing, but not privately. Judgment respited .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18181202-70

69. ROBERT TUCK was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of November , 3 lbs. of rags, value 1 s., the property of a certain person or persons unknown .

ROBERT LOGSDON . I am a patrol. On the 19th of November, about half-past five o'clock in the evening, I was at the end of Watling-street , a cart was passing loaded with rags. I saw the prisoner and two men there; I concealed myself to watch - two of them were taking the rags out of a hole in the bag, and putting them into the prisoner's apron; I went up to them, one saw me, and ran away with the other. The prisoner went into Size-lane - I took him there, folding the rags up. I never lost sight of him. I cannot find out who the cart belonged to.

Prisoner's Defence. I found them by the waterside.

GUILTY . Aged 39.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18181202-71

70. GEORGE DEAN was indicted for that he, on the 23d of November , unlawfully did put his right hand into one of the pockets of a coat belonging to Charles Comerford , which he then had and wore on his person, with intent to steal one handkerchief, value 2 s., his property, then being in his pocket .

MR. CHARLES COMERFORD . I am a solicitor , and live in Bedford-place, Russell-square . On the 23d of November I was going towards Clifford's Inn, and felt a tug at my right hand pocket, turned round, and saw the prisoner

with one end of my handkerchief in his hand, the other end was in my pocket. I collared him, and gave him in charge.

GUILTY .

Publicly Whipped , and Discharged.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18181202-72

71. JOHN SMITH was indicted for a misdemeanour .

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18181202-73

72. JOHN BURKE was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of November , in the dwelling-house of Edmund Farrow Bourke , one brooch, value 1 s., two 10 l., one 5 l., four 2 l., and seven 1 l. bank notes, the property of Peter White .

PETER WHITE . I am coachman to Edmund Farrow Bourke , Esq. who has apartments in the Albany; my bank notes were in a box in the stable, at North Brook mews . On the 7th of November, in the evening, I found my box unlocked, and the property gone - I believe I had left it locked. The groom, and the prisoner, who had been in my master's service three months before, slept in the next room.

Cross-examined by MR. BROADRICK. Q. The prisoner had left your master's service - A. Yes; but he slept there, as he was out of place.

GEORGE MAIN . I am groom to Mr. Bourke. About five days before the prisoner was apprehended, I went to White's box for a piece of cloth, and found a handful of notes there; the prisoner was present, and said, " put them in again, and say nothing to the coachman, or he will think we have been rumaging his box." I did so. There was nothing but rubbish kept in the box.

Cross-examined. Q. What was in the box - A. Old stocking and things. One of the hinges was off.

JOHN FURZEMAN . I am a constable. On the 10th of November I took the prisoner into custody with a coat under his arm. As I was going to search him at the watch-house my brother found two 10 l., two 5 l., and a 1 l. note, on him.

LEWIS ROBERTS . I was with Furzeman. I saw the prisoner pull something from his pocket. The notes were found in his hand. He said they were his own.

SAMUEL FURZEMAN . The prisoner was brought to the watch-house; I searched him, and saw him take something out of his pocket - he was going to throw it away - I took hold of him, and took the notes out of his hand. He was apprehended on suspicion of stealing the coat.

PETER WHITE re-examined. I know one of the 10 l. notes, by the name of Smith being on it.

Prisoner's Defence. He could not swear to the notes at the office.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant

Reference Number: t18181202-74

73. SARAH GREGORY was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of November , one bed, value 20 s.; one sheet, value 3 s.; two hats, value 2 s., and one coat, value 5 s. , the goods of John Thomas .

JOHN THOMAS . I am a shoemaker , and live in James-street, Manchester-square . I went out, when I returned home these things were missing out of my back kitchen. The prisoner lodged two years with me, and was moving that day. I had her apprehended on suspicion of the robbery, and went to the lodging she had taken in Nowel's-court, and found my property in a box which I had seen her carry out that day. I found all these things, except a coat, which was pledged in Oxford-street. As she was going to the watch-house she dropped twenty-seven duplicates, some of which related to the property.

CHARLES PROCTOR . I am the prosecutor's apprentice. I missed my things, and the other apprentice missed his hat. As the prisoner was going to the watch-house I saw her drop the duplicates. I asked her what she had done with my coat? she said she had pledged it at Dobree's - I found it there. The duplicate was with the rest.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutor's son-in-law gave them to me.

GUILTY . Aged 43.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181202-75

73. WILLIAM SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of November , at St. Paul's, Shadwell, two watches, value 7 l., the goods of Louis Leplastrier the elder, and Louis Leplastrier the younger, privately in their shop .

LOUIS LEPLASTRIER , SEN. I am a watch and clockmaker , and live in High-street, Shadwell , in partnership with my son Louis. On the 28th of November, about three o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner came to our shop, and wanted to look at two or three watches; I took him two or three down. He wished to see two or three more; I handed him three or four more out of the window, one of them he appeared to like very much - it was capped and seconds - the price was eight guineas. After he had looked at it, he pointed to another in the window, and desired it might be taken down to look at saying, he thought it would do for his mate, if it came to 4 l. or 5 l. He said his ship was going to be paid at the sign of the Cape of Good Hope, in the Commercial-road, in about an hour, that two or three more of his shipmates wanted watches, and he would bring them. I took the watch down that he pointed at, and before I could put it on the counter with the rest, be pointed at my regular, in a very sharp way, saying,

"It is not so late as that, is it?" He hurried out of the shop instantly. I then went to return the watches to the window, and missed the capped and jewelled one. I looked again in the window, as I thought it not possible that he could have taken it, as I only had my eye off him while I looked at the clock, I however I found it was gone, and another as well, which I had shewn him, worth three guineas. I told my son, he went out one way, and I the other. I went to the Cape of Good Hope, public-house, but found no ship was going to be paid there. I heard nothing more until Tuesday morning, December the 1st when I called on Edwards; he shewed

me a watch, which I immediately recognized - it was the best watch. He said if I would call at three o'clock, the man who left it, would be there. I got an officer from Shadwell Office, and waited there until the prisoner came, we then seized him, and took him into the back-room. The officer searched, and found the duplicate of a watch on him, pledged in the Commercial-road for 15 s. - it was not mine, He had got the watch which he had left at Edwards, as he asked for it when he came. I have only recovered the best watch.

JAMES EDWARDS . I live in the Commercial-road, near the London Docks. On Monday morning, the 30th of November, the prisoner brought me a stop and seconds watch, capped and jewelled. He said it stopped, and wanted me to alter it. I said if he would bring it early the next morning, I would do it by three o'clock in the afternoon. He took it away, and brought it again next morning, and said he would call between three and four o'clock in the afternoon for it. Between eleven and twelve o'clock Mr. Leplastrier came to caution me against a man of colour, who had stolen two watches from him. I asked what sort of watches they were? He said one was stop and seconds, capped and jewelled. I took the watch out of my case and he claimed it. He came again in the afternoon with an officer, and waited for the prisoner, who came. I gave him the watch, and the officer took him.

JOHN BROWN . I am an officer. On the 1st of December, I went with Mr. Leplastrier to Mr. Edwards's. The prisoner came in, and Mr. Edwards delivered him the watch. I took it from him, and found the duplicate of another watch on him. I asked him where he lived? He said at Mrs. Axley's, at Limehouse. I could find no such person.

DANIEL CORKER . I live at No. 18, Commercial-road. On the 30th of November, the prisoner came to my shop, and asked the price of a watch. I shewed him one, he said he wanted it for a mate, whom he expected in directly - he shewed me a watch with Mr. Leplastrier's name on it - it was like the one produced.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I leave myself to the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 21.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181202-76

74. JOHN FELLOWS was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Morgan , about three o'clock in the night of the 9th of November , at St. Mary-le-Strand, with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein three tea-chests, value 5 l., and two looking-glasses, value 2 l. 15 s., his property .

JOHN DURHAM . I am foreman in the upholstery business, to Mr. Thomas Morgan , who is an upholsterer and cabinet-maker , and lives in Catharine-street, in the Strand, in the parish of St. Mary-le-Strand - the prisoner had lived seven years with him, as porter , and was discharged in January last.

JOHN MILLER . I am porter to Mr. Morgan. The window of the back warehouse looks into Helmet-court, which is at the back of the premises. On the 9th of November when the men left work, I fastened that window by an iron bar, outside - it had a pin through it, which was fastened with a key - I slept on the premises that night, but heard no alarm. Job Webster, went to the window the first, about five minutes before seven o'clock in the morning - it was not daylight. He called me to look at the window, I found a square of glass broken, and the shutter not quite close; the bar was broke at the staple end, and hung by the pin, there was a little iron poker laying inside the window, by which I suppose it must have been done - I had a candle with me - it was not light enough to see without.

Q. When the pane of glass was removed, was there room enough for a man's body to have got in - A. There was. I missed two or three looking glasses, off a chest of drawers. I did not miss the tea-chests.

JOB WEBSTER . I am porter to Mr. Morgan. I went to the window about seven o'clock in the morning - the day was breaking. I was the first that went there, I found a pane of glass broken, the shutter up, but the bar broken and hanging down by the head of the pin - there was room enough for a man to get through the broken glass, There were fourteen or twenty inches room - the window did not open.

THOMAS WALL . I am clerk to Mr. Morgan (looking at three tea-chests, and two glasses produced), they are Mr. Morgan's property, and were on his premises that night - they are worth 9 or 10 l. together, one of the tea-chests is worth three guineas. I missed them in the morning.

JAMES BENDALL . I am servant to Mr. Chardals, a pawnbroker, who lives in James-street, Golden-square. On the 10th of November, the prisoner brought all the property produced to our shop - I am sure he is the man. I gave him a duplicate, and lent him 3 l. 10 s., on them. He gave the name of Evans, and brought this note with him, (reads.)

"Gentlemen - Will you be so good as to lend my servant 5 l. 10 s., for the loan of these things, which he has, as I am short of money. For Brown, George-street, Golden-square. Joseph Evans , servant."

JOSEPH WALTON . I am clerk to Mr. Morgan. When the prisoner was apprehended, I neither threatened or promised him. He told me that on the night of the 9th of November, he broke into the premises. I asked how he he did it? He said by wrenching the bar off, and breaking a square of glass.

GUILTY . - DEATH , Aged 24.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181202-77

75. WALTER DUGGAN was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of November , four cut glass salt-cellars, value 18 s., the goods of George Franklin , privately in his shop .

JOHN RUMFITT . I am shopman to George Franklin , who is a glass and chinaman , and lives in St. Martin's-lane . On the 26th of November, about eight o'clock I went to the back of the shop - I turned round, saw the prisoner, and asked what he wanted, he asked for Mr. James, a tailor. I said he had taken something off the place, pointing to where I missed the salt-cellars, he said

he had taken nothing. I found the four salt-cellars, one in each pocket.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 17.

Of stealing, but not privately .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181202-78

76. RICHARD TRACEY was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of November , one watch, value 4 l., and one brooch, value 10 s., the property of William Pinnock , in the dwelling-house of the said William Pinnock and Samuel Maunder .

WILLIAM PINNOCK . I am a bookseller , in partnership with Samuel Maunder ; we live in the Strand . On the 10th of November I lost a watch and brooch, and on the 13th I found them at Mr. Dobree's. I know nothing of the prisoner.

SAMUEL MARKS . I live in Peter-street, Soho. On the 11th of November, about three o'clock, the prisoner called at my house with the watch and brooch, and asked if I would buy them - he wanted 2 l. 5 s. for them, together; I offered him 2 l. He went away, and returned in about five minutes, saying, he was going out of town, and I should have them for 2 l. I asked him if they were his own? he said they were. I also bought three live fowls of him - he said he would call for the money for the fowls next day, but he did not. On Friday I pledged the watch at Dobree's, for 30 s. On the 13th he came for the money for the fowls, and was taken.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. What do you deal in - A. Clothes, and every thing in an honest way. I never bought watches before. He brought the fowls about an hour before he brought the watch.

Q. You had been in trouble about it - A. I was taken up for it. The pawnbrokers have known me nineteen years. I told the officer the prisoner was coming, and he took him.

JURY. Q. How long ago is it since you was tried for keeping a bad house - A. About a year.

JOHN BAGULEY . I am shopman to Mr. Dobree, Oxford-street. On the 13th of November, Marks pledged the watch with me. I have known him twelve years.

Cross-examined. Q. Had he pawned watches before with you - A. He has pledged his own.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. It is a conspiracy instituted by the Jew to clear himself. I went to his house to see a person, and I was taken.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181202-79

77. CHARLES SADLER was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of November , one violin, value 15 s., the goods of Thomas Vincent , privately in his shop .

THOMAS VINCENT . I keep a general sale shop in High Holborn . On the 4th of November, just as I had lit my lights, I turned my back to walk towards the parlour, on turning round again I saw three people in the shop; it was the prisoner in custody of two persons whom I knew. They produced the violin, which I had hung over the door not three minutes before.

JAMES FURZEMAN. I was crossing Holborn when I saw the prisoner go into the shop. He came out and touched a young man with the violin who was looking in at the window. I took him.

JAMES BALL . I was with Furzeman. The prisoner passed me with the violin. Furzeman took him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 21.

Of stealing, but not privately .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181202-80

78. ROBERT BEEDAM was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of December , at St. George's, in the dwelling-house of Joseph Wheeler , one wooden till value 6 d.; the sum of 1 l. 11 s. 2 d., in monies numbered, and two 1 l. bank notes, his property .

LETITIA WHEELER . I am the wife of Joseph Wheeler , who is a labourer , and lives in Duke-street, St. George's, East - I keep a green-grocer's shop. On Saturday night, the 3d of December, I went into the back-room, I heard a noise, ran into the shop, and saw the prisoner draw the till from the counter, and run away with it. I followed, him, calling out Stop thief! into Philip-street, where he was taken by West - he dropped the till before he was taken - I did not see him drop it, It contained 4 l., as near as I can guess; I was very near to him - I never saw him before - we rent the house.

JOSEPH WEST . I am a butcher. On Saturday evening, between seven and eight o'clock, I saw the prisoner pass my house, with the till under his arm, and heard a noise soon after, of people inquiring where he was gone - I made after him, and stopped him, he threw the till down, just as I laid hold of him. The till contained a 1 l. note, 1 l. 8 s. 6 d. in silver, and 2 s. 10 1/2 d. in copper. It was picked up.

LETITIA WHEELER re-examined. The till is mine, I know the note - there was another, which is lost.

GUILTY. - DEATH . Aged 18.

Recommended to Mercy .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181202-81

79. JAMES FIELD was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of November , one coat, value 6 s. , the goods of William Field .

WILLIAM FIELD , I am a tobacco and snuff-maker , and live in Bridgewater-street, Bridgewater-gardens . On the 3d of November I borrowed this coat to go to Westminster - the prisoner went and returned with me. I took it off, and put it on the back of the chair, the prisoner pushed me away, and ran off with it, I ran out, but could not find him. Next day I had him taken.

JOHN POWEL . The prisoner lives next door to me. He sold me the coat for two shillings. He asked me if I would return it to him the next day if he gave me 2 s. 6 d. - I said I would.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was intoxicated, and forgot where I left it.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Confined Two Months , and Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181202-82

80. WILLIAM NEWTON was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of November , two bonnets, value 16 s. , the goods of Harriet Robinson , spinster .

HARRIET ROBINSON. I am a bonnet-maker . On the 6th of November, I was sitting at work in the back-parlour heard a noise, looked up, and saw the prisoner taking the bonnets out of the window - he ran away with two. I followed him to Mile End-road. He threw them down, and I picked them up - he was stopped - I am sure he is the man.

MARY ROBINSON . I am mother of the prosecutrix. I ran out, and saw the prisoner with his hand in the window, taking the bonnets. A man stopped him - he was never out of my sight.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

HENRY BROWN . I stopped the prisoner.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181202-83

81. JOHN TURFEY was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of November , 8 lbs of lead, value 4 s., the property of George Harrison and Henry Harrison , and fixed to their dwelling-house .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating it to be fixed to a building of theirs.

WILLIAM ALLPRESS . I am agent to George and Henry Harrison, and live in Bryanston-square, Marylebone , next door to them. I was sitting in my house, about eight o'clock in the evening, and heard a knocking. I got the key, and called the watchman. We went down the area where we found the prisoner, he had just cut the lead off some pipe which comes from the street, he was sitting on a brick in the area, and the pipe was laying by him - he said he did it through distress.

GEORGE STRANGE . I took the prisoner to the watch-house, and found a knife broke in half on him, which he said he cut the lead with.

Prisoner. I was in distress.

GUILTY . Aged 36.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181202-84

82. PATRICK BIRMINGHAM was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of November , one 1 l., and one 2 l. bank note , the property of John Sharp .

JOHN SHARP . I am a bricklayer , and live in Devonshire-street, Marylebone - the prisoner worked for me. On the 14th of November, I took him to Mr. Wiggin's, public-house, where I changed a 5 l. note for a 2 l., and three 1 l. notes. I went into the tap-room and paid the prisoner his wages, which was 14 s. 2 d.; he asked me to lend him a 1 l. note, and to stop the remainder of the change the next week, which I did, and put the other notes into my pocket-book in his presence. We left there, and parted at the corner of High-street. I went to Mr. Sharpe's, the butcher, and changed a 1 l. note there. I am positive I then had a 2 l. and a 1 l. note in my pocket-book, which I put in my pocket, and went home. On the Sunday I only went out to the baker's, and had the same coat on, and my pocket-book in my pocket. Nobody could have taken it out then. On Monday the prisoner came to work. I did not go out that day till after dinner; we then both went to do a job in Park-street . I pulled my coat off there, and put it on the kitchen dresser; my pocket-book was there safe. I went into the front area, leaving the prisoner alone in the kitchen. I then went on the roof of the house. We came home. I missed my notes, and my daughter gave me some information. I went to the manager, and found a bill there, which I had also lost out of my pocket-book. Next morning I went to the prisoner's lodgings. He was gone. I met him coming, and gave him in charge. He denied it. The constable was going to search him; he put his hand into his pocket and threw some paper like notes into the fire. The other part of the 2 l. note was found in his pocket.

AMELIA SHARPE . I am the prosecutor's niece. I saw the prisoner go across the yard and put something into the manager.

FREDERICK ATLEY . I was constable of the night. I was with Mr. Sharpe, and saw the prisoner come out of his house, secured, and took him to the watch-house. He sat down in a chair. I said he must be searched. He got up and told me stop, as he had something in his pocket which he wished nobody to see but me. He began rumbling in his pocket, pulled part of a note out, and threw it in the fire. I pulled the other half out of his pocket.

JOHN SHARPE re-examined. I knew it by the writing on it.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing of it.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181202-85

83. SARAH HARDING was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of November , five gowns, value 40 s.; three petticoats, value 8 s.; one shawl, value 4 s.; two pair of gloves, value 1 s.; one yard of cotton, value 6 d.; two salt-holders, value 3 s.; one box, value 2 s.; one pair of snuffers and tray, value 4 s.; one pair of sugar-tongs, value 1 s.; five tea-spoons, value 1 s., and 9 s. in monies numbered , the goods and monies of George Perkins ; and JOHN STEVENSON was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, he well knowing them to be stolen .

GEORGE PERKINS . I live in Lisson-street, Bethnal-green . On the 5th of November I went out about two o'clock in the afternoon, and returned about four, when I was informed by my servant, Sarah Harding , the prisoner's daughter, that the house had been robbed. I sent for an officer.

SARAH HARDING . I lived servant with the prosecutor nine days. On the 5th of November, while he was out, the prisoner, who is my mother, came about three o'clock, and asked if my mistress was at home? I said No. She came in and asked if there was any rooms up stairs? I said Yes. She asked where the stairs were? I showed them to her, and asked what she wanted? She went up; I heard her open the drawers. I shut the street-door, went up, and asked what she was doing? She said nothing particular. She took every thing out of the drawers, tied them up, and came down with them. I told her when mistress came home she would know it. She ran away

with them. I went over the way and told the Gentleman that somebody had come in and robbed the house. The Gentleman went over the house, said he could see nobody there, and staid until my mistress came home.

Q. Did you tell him it was your mother - A. Not at first. Mistress asked me who it was? I at first said I did not know. She said if I did not tell, she would send for an officer, and have me and my mother taken up. She still kept asking me. I said I did not know. Master sent for an officer. He came and asked me. I said I did not know. He said if I did not tell directly, he would take me to the watch-house. I then told him my mother had come in, and robbed the house. He went and took her up.

Q. Are you sure it was her - A. Yes. I did not like to tell at first. The prisoner, Stevenson, is my grandfather. He came to my mother's to tea that afternoon. I am between thirteen and fourteen years of age.

WILLIAM HARRISON . I am a constable. On the 5th of November the prosecutor fetched me. I asked the girl who had robbed the house? She said she did not know the person, but it was a man. I said she had better tell me who it was, and where they lived. She said if I would give her till the morning, they should be returned. In about ten minutes she said her mother had been and robbed the house. I went and told her mother she had been robbing Mr. Perkins. She denied any knowledge of it. She said they should be returned next day. She then asked if I would forgive her robbing the place if she told where the things were? I said I could make no promise of the kind. She said they were not in the house, she had given them to a man, but she did not know who he was, or where he lived, but she would find him to-morrow morning. She took me to Wapping, workhouse, and said a man in there, named Stevenson, had got them. I went in, the prisoner, Stevenson, was brought to me. On searching him I found the whole of the property, except the five gowns, and a snuffer-tray, about his person. He said he knew nothing about them, never had them, and persisted in it for half an hour. I said I must take him for the robbery. He then said he would show me where the rest of the things were. He took me to a man in East Smithfield, where I found them. He asked the man for the things he had left there.

THOMAS DWYER . I am a sawyer. The prisoner, Stevenson, gave me a bundle at a public-house, told me to take it home, and if his daughter came, to give it to her. In about an hour afterwards the officer came for it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

HARDING'S Defence. I did it through distress.

STEVENSON'S Defence. I dined with my daughter. As I was going home, she gave me the things.

HARDING - GUILTY . Aged 33.

Confined Six Months .

STEVENSON - NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181202-86

84. WILLIAM MAYCOCK was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of November , 18 lbs. of hemp, value 9 s. , the goods of Samuel Tull .

SAMUEL TULL . I am a rope maker , and live in Fenchurch-street; my manufactory is in Globe-lane, Mile End . On the 25th of November, I was fetched to the watch-house, and found the hemp and the prisoner there. He had worked for me, but not at that time.

BENJAMIN HARRIS. I am a watchman. I stopped the prisoner about five o'clock in the morning, at the corner of Crispin-street, with the bundle. I asked him what it was. He said it was clothes, which he was going to take to the Bell Inn, Holborn. I found it was hemp, and took him to the watch-house.

THOMAS HART . I was constable of the night. The prisoner was brought to the watch-house. He said he met a man named Bryant, near Stepney church, who gave him the hemp to spin. I locked him up. He then took about ten skeins from under his clothes, and said his father worked for Mr. Tull, in Globe-lane. I sent Harris to Mr. Tull, who claimed it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. It was given to me.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181202-88

85. JOHN ELLIS was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of November , two saws, value 7 s; one turnscrew, value 1 s.; one center-bit stock, value 12 s., the goods of John Adams ; one saw, value 3 s., the goods of Samuel Watkins ; one jacket, value 2 s., the goods John Skinner , and one jacket, value 1 s., the goods of Isaac Russell .

JOHN ADAMS . I am a carpenter . I was working at a house in Holborn, opposite Southampton-buildings . On the 25th of November, I left work at five o'clock, and left my tools there. I returned next morning, and missed them.

SAMUEL WATKINS . I am a carpenter . I also lost my tools from the building, and found them at the office.

ISAAC RUSSELL . I lost my jacket from the building.

MORRIS WELCH . I am a watchman. About three o'clock in the morning. I was near the building, and heard a man jump down, I looked round, and saw the prisoner standing against the board. He saw me, and ran away. I secured him, and found the articles stated in the indictment on him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was in great distress.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Whipped and Discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18181202-89

86. ANDREW NEWMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of November , one time-piece, value 5 s. , the goods of Thomas Hugall .

MARY HUGALL . I am the wife of Thomas Hugall . We keep a lodging-house at Poplar . On the 12th of November I was in the kitchen, and heard somebody in the parlour, I ran up, and saw the prisoner rush out of the street-door. I missed the time-piece. I overtook him - he appeared bulky. He got away from me, and I lost sight of him, but he was stopped. I am certain he is the man. The time-piece has never been found.

MR. CLARKE. I am an headborough. The prisoner was given in my charge, and offered to pay for the time-piece. He said he would pay for it in a week.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18181202-90

87. JAMES HENRY FOREMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of November , seventeen half-crowns, value 2 l. 2 s. 6 d. , the monies of William Juggins .

WILLIAM JUGGINS . I am a cheesemonger , and live in James-street, Long Acre . The prisoner was my servant . On the 20th of November, at half-past ten o'clock at night, I found he was gone to bed without laying the wood for the fire, which he ought to have done. In consequence of what I was told, I went to his bed; he slept in the shop. He appeared to be asleep. I found half a crown on the bed. I searched his pockets, and found another half-crown and a sixpenny pamphlet, which appeared to be new. I called to him, and asked him how he came by it. He said he bought it. I asked him how he came by the money. He said he found it on Westminster bridge. I gave him 2 s. per week for a quarter of a year. I had not paid him his wages. He told me a few nights before, that he was obliged to leave his hat at Waterloo bridge, as he had no money to pay the toll. He said he knew nothing of the half-crown which was on the bed. I asked him how he got the one in his pocket. He then said he took them both that day. I went up stairs to his trunk, which was open, and found, in his presence, fifteen more half-crowns, wraped in two rags. He begged forgiveness, and said he would never do so again, and that he took them out of the till last week. I had only missed one that night.

SAMUEL DICKONS . I am a constable. I took the prisoner in charge. He said he took the half-crowns out of the till, and begged for mercy.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18181202-91

88. SILAS GOODWIN was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of November , one hat, value 9 s.; one waistcoat, value 4 s., and one pair of trowsers, value 10 s. , the goods of Benjamin Chamberlain .

BENJAMIN CHAMBERLAIN . I am a seaman . The articles stated in the indictment were mine, and were pledged at Murray's, in East Smithfield. On the 20th of November I was drinking with the prisoner at the Old George public-house, Tower-hill with two more soldier s. I had the duplicate in a letter which was in my trowsers pocket. After the prisoner was gone, I found my pocket cut, and the letter and duplicate gone. I went to the pawnbroker's to stop the property, and it was shut up. I went again the next morning, and found the prisoner was detained there.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not give me the duplicate for treating you - A. No. He did treat us. I had been there all day was in liquor, but knew what I was about.

JOHN ANNIS . I am a pawnbroker. On the 21st of November, these things were pledged with me. I do not know who by.

WILLIAM SAVAGE . I am servant to Mr. Murray, a pawnbroker. On the 19th of November the prosecutor pledged the things with me for 1 l. Next day, about twelve o'clock, the prisoner redeemed them. He said he redeemed them for his brother. The prosecutor came in the evening, I told him a soldier had redeemed them. The prisoner afterward came and pledged the hat again. He came to redeem it, and the prosecutor came in, who gave him in charge.

JOHN SHAW . I am a constable. I took the prisoner in charge. He said he gave the prosecutor 10 s. for the duplicate, on Tower-hill. He said at the watch-house, that the prosecutor gave it to him. He said he had not seen the letter. I found it on him with 1 l. 12 s. 6 d. in money, which he said he sold the things for.

ALEXANDER HARRAWELL . I am landlord of the house. The prisoner and prosecutor were there at seven o'clock in the evening with other soldiers. I thought they were both intoxicated. The prisoner paid for all, and left before the prosecutor. I heard nothing of the robbery for four days. The prosecutor wanted to sleep at my house.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. He gave me the duplicate for what I paid for him.

JAMES LOCKHEAD . I am in the 3d regiment of Guards. I was in the prisoner's and prosecutor's company, with six others, all day. The prisoner paid for all, and gave Chamberlain some money. Chamberlain gave him a duplicate about eight o'clock in the evening. They were both in liquor. When the constable took the prisoner, he passed me with him in custody. I asked a soldier to take my arms, and Shaw told me what he was taken for. I said I saw it given to him.

JOHN SHAW re-examined. He spoke to the prisoner, but said nothing to me.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181202-92

89. MARY MARTIN was indicted for stealing, on the 21st October , one cloak, value 20 s. , the goods of John Dawson .

ANN DAWSON . I am the wife of John Dawson , and live in Cooper's-court, Goswell-street . On the 21st of October I missed the cloak out of a box on the top of my bed. The prisoner lodged with me, and left me on the 5th of September. I saw it safe on the 10th of September.

JOHN WALTERS . I am servant to Mr. Fothergill, pawnbroker, Aldersgate-street. On the 19th of September, a man pledged the cloak for 4 s.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18181202-93

90. ANN ROBINSON was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of October , one bed, value 2 l.; three blankets, value 7 s.; one curtain, value 2 s.; one iron, value 6 d., and one knife and fork, value 2 s., the goods of Isaac Snowsell , in a lodging-room .

SARAH SNOWSELL . I am the wife of Isaac Snowsell , and live in Grays-inn-lane . On the 29th of October I let the prisoner a furnished lodging. She left in about a week after without notice, and I missed these things.

SARAH SNOWSELL . I am the daughter of the last witness. I went up, and missed the curtain. The prisoner said she would give it up in three minutes. Instead of which, she absconded. None of the property has been found.

Prisoner's Defence. When I left, every thing was safe. There was a ladder which led up to my window.

THOMAS SNOWSELL . The bed could not be got out of the window. There was a ladder there, as the house was being repaired.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18181202-94

91. WILLIAM SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of November , one round frock, value 10 s. , the goods of Nehemiah Dell .

NEHEMIAH DELL. I am a labourer . I had just come from the country on the 26th of October, and was inquiring for work in Kingsland road. The prisoner came up and asked if I wanted work. I said I did. He said his master wanted a man, and would give 25 s. per week. He then took me towards Whitechapel to go to his master, and as we went on, he said his master once had a horse-keeper who was thrown out of a waggon by his round frock, and killed, and that I had better pull mine off, or his master would not hire me. I did so, he took it, and immediately ran away with it. I followed, but lost him. I went and inquired for him where he said his master lived, but found it was false. I afterward met him in Kingsland-road, and gave him in charge. He said he had pledged the frock, and gave me the duplicate.

CHARLES PURRATT . I am servant to Mr. Stevenson, pawnbroker, Whitechapel. On the 26th of October, the prisoner pledged the frock with me, for 4 s.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Publicly Whipped , and Discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18181202-95

92. CAROLINE SANDYFORD was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of November , from the person of Edward Knight , five 1 l. bank notes, his property .

EDWARD KNIGHT . I am clerk to my father, who is a solicitor , and lives at Kensington. On the 7th of November I met the prisoner in Piccadilly . She asked me to go home with her, but I refused. She asked for some drink - we walked about twenty yards together, and turned down a street. I had five 1 l. notes in my left hand breeches pocket, on which side she was. I stopped in the street with her, and gave her 6 d. I then left her.

Q. Did any familiarity pass between you - A. No. She put her hand to my waistcoat pocket, and said I might as well give her a 1 s. I left her, suspecting nothing. I was going to sleep at the Hummums that night. When I got to the corner of Bond-street, I put my hand into my pocket, and missed my notes; this was on Saturday. I found her at Queen-square on Tuesday. I had described her to the watchman that night. I have since seen my notes, and know four of them which are marked. I am positive she is the woman.

THOMAS PACE . I am an officer. I took the prisoner into custody on the Monday, at her lodgings, in Duck-lane, Westminster, and asked her if she was not in Piccadilly on Saturday night. She said she was. I asked her for the 5 l. note she had taken from the gentleman. I understood it was a 5 l. note. She said she knew nothing of it. I made her get up, and I left the room. When she was dressed, I went in, and searched the room, but could find nothing. I took her and her mother to the office. I then said I was not satisfied. I took the key of the room from the mother, returned and searched again, - as I came out, I observed the screw of the lock to be loose. The lock fell off when I touched it, and I found the four 1 l. notes in it, wrapped in a silk handkerchief. I went to the office and told her I had found the notes. The mother then said, in her presence, that she had changed a 1 l. note at Hill's. I went there with the others. It was produced to me, and the prosecutor claimed it. It is not here. I have the other four.

EDWARD KNIGHT re-examined. I know one by the name of Arnold, and the other has Bellamy on it. I believe the other two are mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in company with two gentlemen, that night, the prosecutor, may be one of them. I found the notes on the ground, in Piccadilly, and my mother being in the habit of drinking, I concealed them in the lock from her.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18181202-96

93. ANN LAWSON and MARY BARLOW were indicted for stealing, on the 12th of November , from the person of John Cheesman , one 20 l., one 10 l., three 5 l. and six 1 l. bank notes, his property .

JOHN CHEESMAN . I am a carpenter , and live at Low Layton. On the 12th of November I came to London; in the evening about ten o'clock, I was coming down Shoreditch , and met the prisoner opposite Long-lane, they caught me round the waist. I had been drinking, but was not at all intoxicated. I had about me, at that time, one 20 l., one 10 l., three 5 l., and six 1 l. bank notes in my left hand breeches pocket. They asked me to go with them, but I refused. I thought they intended to rob me of my watch, and put my hand to my fob to hold it. My left hand was up and my right on my fob. I pushed them and endeavoured to get away, but they kept fast hold of me until I got near to an alley. I endeavoured to get away, and dragged them with me. I had spoke to no other woman that night. They drew me up the alley by force. A little way up, I found the hand of one of them (I do not know which) in that pocket which contained the notes. I put my hand down to prevent her, and said,

"You wretches, you have robbed me;" they then dropped part of the notes. I picked them up, put them into my pocket, and caught hold of them; they began swearing, and endeavoured to get away. They tore my coat, shirt, and handkerchief. A watchman was coming, and I told him to take them in custody. He took them to the watch-house. When I got there, I desired a gentleman, whom I knew, and who came, seeing the bustle, to examine the notes. The 20 l. note was gone. I had given him the particulars of them. I returned to the alley, but could not find it there. Payment was stopped at the Bank. The number of the note was 15,968, and dated 31st of July, 1818.

LAWSON. Q. When you was at the watch-house, did you not say you had lost a 10 l. and a 20 l. note - A. No.

GEORGE LONDON . I am a watchman. On the 12th of November, about half-past ten o'clock at night, I was on my beat,

and heard a noise. I came up, and found the prisoners had got hold of the prosecutor - other persons were standing round. I rescued him from them, and he said they had robbed him of bank-notes, but he could not tell to what amount. He appeared quite sober. I took them to the watch-house. When we got there, he described what notes he had, and gave them to a gentleman to examine, whom he knew. He said there were 51 l. in all. There were 20 l. missing. We went to see for it, but without success. They were searched, but nothing found on them belonging to Cheesman.

LAWSON. Q. Did Cheesman have hold of us, or we of him - A. You had hold of him.

SAMUEL BEASLEY . I was constable of the night. I heard Cheesman say he had 51 l. about him. We searched the women, but found nothing on them. They said they were innocent, and did not fear, for they had done nothing. We could not find the notes.

LAWSON'S Defence. We were going home and met the prosecutor, who was intoxicated. He pushed us up the court. He instantly stooped and picked up something. He said we had robbed him. I called the watchman. The reason his coat was torn was, he wanted to run away when the watchman came, and I endeavoured to keep him. He then charged us with robbing him.

BARLOW'S Defence. He was intoxicated, and pushed us up the alley. He said he had been with other girls. We would not speak to him. Nothing was found on us.

JURY to CHEESMAN. Q. What time had you occasion to look at the notes, so as to be certain you had them - A. I was in Soho-square at five o'clock, and pulled them out there.

LAWSON - GUILTY . Aged 18.

BARLOW - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18181202-97

94. WILLIAM HOWARD was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of November , 100 lbs. of lead, the goods of William Hobson , jun. and fixed to a certain building of his .

SAMUEL JOHNSTON . I am coachman to Mr. William Hobson , jun. who lives at Tottenham . On the 6th of November, in the night, some of the lead-covering of the stable was stolen. The stable is about five hundred yards from the dwelling-house. On the 12th more was taken, and more on the 22d. It was all taken from the same outhouse. I saw the last quantity on the day before. After we missed that stolen on the 12th, we thought proper to watch. On the morning of the 22d of November, between five and six o'clock, Wood was watching, and called me. I went round into the main road, and met the prisoner with the lead on his shoulder, about a quarter of a mile from the road. I laid hold of him, and told him to stop, or I would blow his brains back. He surrendered. We took him out. The lead produced was taken from the coach-house; it appeared fresh cut. We took him to the constable's.

THOMAS WOOD . I am gardener to Mr. Hobson. We were watching on the 22d of November, and about five o'clock I saw a man on the top of the stable, taking the lead off. I told my fellow-servant; he went into the main road, and came upon him close by it, with the lead on his shoulder. It was not light. He gave no account of himself. We had not seen him before. We took him to the constable.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAM GOODACRE. I am a constable. The prisoner and the lead was brought to me. He said he was caught in the act, and would not deny it.

Prisoner's Defence. I beg for mercy.

GUILTY . Aged 38.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18181202-98

95. WILLIAM SIMMS was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of November , two live tame fowls, value 6 s. , the property of Frances Gray .

No evidence appearing, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Reference Number: t18181202-99

96. JOHN REED , STEPHEN REED and HENRY BERRY were indicted for stealing, on the 11th of November , 12 lbs of beef, value 5 s. , the property of Gabriel Woodham .

GABRIEL WOODHAM . I am a butcher , and live in Chatham-place, Somers'-town . On the 11th of November, I was sitting in the back-room of my shop - Charles Kendall , butcher, was standing opposite, he informed me that I was robbed of some meat, I looked round, and thought I missed nothing - I was in the shop five minutes before. My man was in the slaughterhouse killing a sheep, and brought it to hang up. About ten minutes after, the constable brought the meat - I knew it to be mine - it was a leg of mutton, and a piece of beef.

CORNELIUS CRASTER . I am a constable. I met the two Reeds running very fast, suspecting them, I watched them. John Reed ran down a place where there is no thoroughfare, the other Reed ran by me. John Reed had a bundle, I laid hold of him, and asked him what he had got? he said Nothing. I said he had got meat, and asked how he came by it. He begged for mercy, and said he found it. I took him to the watch-house, and returning, I met Stephen Reed - he asked me what was the matter? I told him I knew him to be the same boy who ran by me in company with another - he got away, I called to a man to secure him, which he did. I took them both to the watch-house, and the meat to the owner of it.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181202-100

97. JOSEPH MARTIN was indicted for feloniously putting off twenty pieces of counterfeit coin, made of the likeness of a good and lawful shilling, at and for a lower rate than the same did by their denomination import, and were counterfeited for .

EDWIN NICHOLLS . I am a fishmonger, and live at Rumford. I became acquainted with two men, named Hanchett and Clarke. They made a communication to me, which I informed Mr. Wood, the overseer, of. I saw Mr. Storey. I went to town with Hanchett and Clarke, left Rumford on Sunday night, about eleven o'clock, and walked all the way. I arrived at the Green Man, and Bell, Darkhouse-lane, with them about three o'clock.

We then went to Mr. Ford's, the Tiltboat, and remained there half an hour at breakfast - it was then near six o'clock. They accompanied me to the market, to buy some fish. I returned to the Green Man and Bell, and left my fish there about seven o'clock, then went with them to Petticoat-lane . Hanchett said the people whom we were to see, were not up. At eight o'clock I saw the prisoner standing outside a house in Petticoat-lane. He said to Hanchett, have you sold all your blackberries? He said Yes. Martin put his finger to his nose. Hanchett then put his finger across his mouth. The prisoner, and Hanchett crossed over, about twenty yards from me, and appeared in conversation. We crossed over, and all four went into a court, which Hanchett called the Gaff, The prisoner then asked me how much money I wanted? I said 2 l. worth. Clarke said he would have half a score. and Hanchett said, he would have a score - the prisoner went away. Hanchett said, he had made the agreement with him, and that I was to give 2 l. for 100, that is 5 s. for 20 s. The prisoner returned in about five minutes, with a great quantity of shillings, and gave me five score. I I gave him a 1 l. note. He said that was not enough by 5 s. I said I wanted some half-crowns, but he would have the 5 s. first. I then gave him a score of bad shillings back - I had then only four score. Clarke said he would have half a score - the prisoner said, why not have a score. Clarke said he had not money enough. I asked how much he wanted? He said 1 s. 6 d. Martin gave him 20 s. - He then gave Hanchett a score, he paid him 5 s. for them. The prisoner then went across the road to get some sixpences, and half crowns. He beckened to us, and we all went over into a court - he told us to stay there; he returned with the sixpences, and said he could not let us have the half crowns then.

Q. When you had finished dealing, where did you go to - A. Clarke, Hanchett, and I walked to Stratford, got on the Harwich coach, and went to Rumford - we got down at the Sun public-house. kept by Marshall, we went into the taproom, and called for a pot of egg-hot - I paid two bad shillings for it, I had informed Mr. Wood that we would call there. We called for another pot, for which I paid two more bad shillings. A woman tapped at the window, I went out to see what she wanted - she was gone - Hanchett and Clarke were alarmed, ran out, and said they were going to make away with the money. I laid hold of them, took them into the taproom, and made them sit down. Mr. Wood came in, followed by Turk, and Adams, who took them into custody. I gave Mr. Wood ninety-six shillings, and eighty-three sixpences.

Cross-examined by MR. WALFORD. Q. What part of Petticoat-lane, is the Gaff - A. It is in Spitalfields.

Q. How long have you lived at Rumford - A. Nine months - I knew Hanchett and Clarke, by seeing them about for three months, but have not been acquainted with them above a fortnight. I used to walk to town, to buy my fish, and have met them coming up with mushrooms, two or three times in the week - I do not expect to be paid for this.

WILLIAM WOOD . I am a shoemaker, and overseer of Rumford. Nicholls informed me of a proposal being made to him by Hanchett. I sent him to inform Mr. Story It was agreed he should go to town with Clark and Hanchett and to return to the Sun public-house. On the 23d I informed Marshall that they were coming, and told him to take what counterfeit money they offered to him, also to send and let us know when they came, which he did about eleven o'clock. I sent him to Mr. Story, and Adams. When I got to the Sun I saw a woman tapping at the window, saying something was the matter. I drove her away, went in, and found Nicholls standing over Clark and Hanchett, insisting that they should not leave. As soon as I saw Mr. Adams, I seized Hanchett by the wrist, and Adams took Clark. We took them both into the front parlour - Mr. Story came in, and they were searched. Nicholls gave me ninety-four shillings, and eighty-three sixpences, which I produce, with four shillings which Marshall gave me.

Cross-examined. I have known Hanchett all his life. He is a labourer. The money was out of my sight while Mr. Talbot had it.

EDWARD TALBOT , ESQ. My father is a magistrate of Essex. Mr. Wood produced the money - I returned the same to him again.

WILLIAM FINCH . I found 20 s. on Clark, which I gave to Mr. Story.

WASEY STOREY , ESQ. I am under sheriff, and clerk to the magistrate. Nicholls, and Mr. Wood gave me information of Hanchet, and Clark. I ordered them to take the steps they have - I received the money.

JAMES FORD . I keep the Tiltboat, at Billingsgate. Nicholls was at my house about a fortnight ago, at half-past five o'clock in the morning, with two persons, whom I do not know, I believe it to be Hanchett, and Clarke.

WILLIAM MARSHALL . My sister keeps the Sun public-house at Rumford - I manage it for her. I knew Clark, and Hanchett. They came to my house on the 23d of November, about eleven o'clock, by the Harwich coach, and had two pots of egg-hot. Nicholls paid me two bad shillings for it both times (looks at them) these are them. I marked them.

MR. CALEB EDWARD POWEL . I am an assistant to the solicitor of the Mint (examining the shillings), they are all counterfeit, of the same die, and have never been in circulation.

GUILTY . Aged 39.

Confined One Year .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181202-101

98. RICHARD HANCHETT was indicted for that he, on the 23d of November , unlawfully did take and receive from one Joseph Martin twenty pieces of false and counterfeit milled money, each of the likeness and similitude of a good shilling, the same not being cut in pieces, at and for a lower rate than by their denomination they did import and were counterfeited for (i.e.) for 5 s.

EDWIN NICHOLLS . The prisoner lives at Rumford. I got acquainted with him as I was coming to town. He said he could put me into a good thing, where I could pass money, and get a good bit of bread. He was to supply me with counterfeit money, to pass in the way of trade. I told Mr. Wood and Mr. Story. On the 22d of November I walked to town with him. We went to two public-houses, and then into Petticoat-lane. Martin then asked Hanchett

if he had sold all his blackberries? He had told me when he introduced me to the man, he should tell him I was his brother, and had just come out of Maidstone jail, and was coming the queer. Martin made a sign to him. I asked the prisoner the meaning of it? He said it was to know if I was a nose, and his answer meant that I was a good fellow. After this, he and Martin walked together in conversation. When I got to the Gaff, which is a court where the Jews meet, Martin asked how many I wanted. I said 2 l. He served me. I asked the prisoner what I was to pay. He said 5 s. a score, and afterwards served Clarke and the prisoner with a score. Martin went across, and beckoned to us. After that we went to Rumford, to the Sun public-house. I paid four bad shillings for two pots of egg-hot. They attempted to get away. I stopped them, and the constable took them.

WILLIAM WOOD . The prisoner lives at Rumford. I directed Nicholls to go to town with him and Clarke. On the Monday I went to the Sun, and took the prisoner there. He was searched, and resisted very much.

WASEY STORY, ESQ. I am Under-Sheriff of Essex. Nicholls gave me information. I advised him to take those steps, as a great deal of bad money had been circulated at Rumford. I found twenty bad shillings on different parts of the prisoner's person.

MR. C. E. POWELL (examining the money) - It is all counterfeit, of the same die, and has never been in circulation.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Confined One Year .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181202-102

99. JAMES CLARKE was indicted for a like offence .

EDWIN NICHOLLS . I became acquainted with the prisoner. Hanchett introduced him to me. The prisoner said

"You want some mashey." Hanchett said I was a ganger. Hanchett said

"I know you come the queer together." Hanchett said a ganger was a fool. I asked Clarke if he did any thing in it. He said Yes. He had been at Leightonstone, and passed nineteen bad shillings, and pulled one out and gave it to me. I gave it Mr. Wood. Next day I went to town with them. We went into two houses, and then to Petticoat-lane. Martin stood outside the Horns public-house, and asked Hanchett if he had sold all his blackberries. Some signals passed between them. We went to the Gaff. The prisoner bought twenty counterfeit shillings of Martin. He paid 3 s. 6 d. of his own money, and I lent him 1 s. 6 d. We returned to the Sun public-house at Rumford, and had some egg-hot which I paid four bad shillings for. A woman tapped at the window; they tried to escape. I secured them.

WILLIAM FINCH . I searched the prisoner, and found twenty shillings upon him.

MR. C. E. POWELL. They are all counterfeits.

GUILTY .

Confined One Year .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181202-103

100. ANN REEVES was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of November , one ring, value 5 s. the goods of Francis Cotton .

JOHN WHITE DUNNING . I am servant to Francis Cotton , who is a pawnbroker . On the 23d of November the prisoner came to the shop, and asked to look at a gold ring. I showed her one; she said it was too small; she put it on her finger with the string on; she said it hurt her; she pulled it off with her teeth, and said it was too tight, and gave me another out of her mouth, which was brass. I am certain it was not the one I gave her. I immediately charged her with taking the gold ring, and giving me a brass one. I sent for an officer, who searched her, and found the gold ring on her, with the string to it.

THOMAS MANCE . I am a constable. I was sent for to Mr. Cotton's, who produced a brass ring. I asked the prisoner where the gold ring was? She repeatedly denied having any ring. I took her into a back room, and asked her to give me her pockets. She said she would not; but she would empty them, which she pretended to do. I was not satisfied. At last I made her give me her pockets, and the gold ring fell out.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I had a ring in my pocket, which I bought of a woman. I was rather in liquor, and did not know which I gave him.

GUILTY . Aged 42.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181202-104

101. MARY RAMSAY was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of November , 11 lbs. of bacon, value 4 s. , the goods of Henry Assender .

HENRY ASSENDER . I am a cheesemonger , and live in Whitechapel-road . On the 7th of November, between nine and ten o'clock at night, the prisoner came to my shop. I was very busy. She waited about ten minutes; the bacon was near to her. While my head was turned, she went out, and I missed it. I could not follow her. On the Monday morning she came again for some butter; I said nothing to her, but got a warrant and searched her house. She produced the bacon, and said she had taken it.

ROBERT COOMBES . I am an officer. I went to the prisoner's house. She said she hoped I would not let the prosecutor hurt her. She opened a door under the stairs, and gave me the bacon.

Prisoner's Defence. I had it given to me.

GUILTY . Aged 34.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181202-105

102. PETER RILEY was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of November , one sack, value 4 s. and three bushels of onions, value 1 l. , the goods of Thomas Abbott .

THOMAS ABBOTT . I am a salesman at Covent-Garden market . I had nine sacks of onions packed together. I lost one sack. The prisoner is a porter in the market .

PATRICK CRAWLEY . I am a watchman. On the 21st of November, about one o'clock in the morning, a watchman in Brownlow-street called to me, and said a man was going down the Coal-yard with a sack. I went and overtook the prisoner, asked what he had got in the sack? He said it was waste onions, that he was going to take to his

master's stable in the Coal-yard. The patrol came up, and asked who his master was? He said it was Mr. Stockbridge. He dropped the sack, and we took him to the watch-house.

DENNIS ASHWORTH . I am a patrol of Covent-Garden. On the 21st of November, about half-past twelve o'clock at night, I saw the prisoner crossing the street with a sack, just by where they were taken from. I asked him what it was? He said it was onions, that he was going to take them to his master's stable, and if he did not take them home, he should not get his wages. Knowing he worked in the market, I let him go.

JOHN DENZELL . I am a patrol of St. Giles's. Crawley called me. I found the prisoner in the Coal-yard. He tried to get away, and dropped the onions.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I leave it to the Court.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181202-106

103. MARY PRICE and ELIZABETH MASH were indicted for stealing, on the 19th of November, from the person of Francis Lutz , one pocket-book, value 1 s.; one pair of scissars, value 1 s.; four silver medals, value 2 s.; one sovereign, and two 1 l. bank notes, his property .

FRANCIS LUTZ (through an interpreter). I have been an officer in the Austrian service . On the 19th of November, about twelve o'clock at night, I met the two prisoners in Cranbourne-alley. They took hold of me, and took me into a passage, and made signs that they wanted something to drink. They then took me into a house, in Porto-Bello-passage, Lisle-street . I saw it was not a public-house, and would not stop. They came out with me, and threw me against a wall; Mash put her hand into my pocket, took out my pocket-book, and put it behind her. I wanted to take it from her, but she threw it away. I went to pick it up; they knocked me down. Whilst I was down, I lost my hat. They ran off, one one way, and the other another. I pursued Price, and took her. I called for assistance; the watchman came and took her to the watch-house.

Q. Are you certain they are the women - A. I am certain of Price; she took it out of my pocket. I never lost sight of her. I have not found my property.

MATTHEW DILLMAN . I am a watchman. I heard a noise in Ryder's-court, and found Lutz holding Price. He gave the account he has now given. He had stopped her there, and gave her in charge. I can speak German, and understood what he said. I know both the prisoners; they are always about there together, at every hour in the night. Mash was afterwards taken.

CHARLOTTE SMITHERS . I am servant to Mr. Dobree, who keeps a company-house, at No. 4, Porto-Bello-passage. I know the prisoners; they are the two women who came with the prosecutor, between twelve and one o'clock at night, on the 19th of November. They did not stop. I am certain they are the two. I knew Mash before.

HAMMOND WEBB . I am a constable. About half-past twelve o'clock Price was brought to the watch-house with Lutz. I found nothing on her. The prosecutor took me to the house in Porto-Bello-passage. In consequence of the description they gave me of the girls, I took Mash on Monday morning. The prosecutor described her very exactly.

PRICE'S Defence. I was in Nassau-street. The prosecutor seized me, and the watchman took me.

MASH'S Defence, I know nothing of it.

PRICE - GUILTY . Aged 19.

MASH - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181202-107

104. JOHN PHENIX was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of November , one wheelbarrow, value 10 s. , the goods of William Plummer .

WILLIAM PLUMMER . I keep a coalshed in Lamb's Conduit-passage . On the 30th of November, about six o'clock in the evening, I went into a room behind my shop, a neighbour came and asked if I had lost my barrow, I then missed it, ran out and overtook the prisoner in Red Lion-square with it on his head, collared him, and charged him with stealing it, he said he was going to take it to a gentleman in Queen-square. I took him to the watch-house.

CHARLES DIXON . I am a constable. The prisoner was brought to the watch-house. He said if he was forgiven he would do so no more.

GUILTY . Aged 45.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181202-108

105. GEORGE KEMP was indicted for embezzling one 2 l. and sixteen 1 l. bank notes, the property of William Bourne , his master .

WILLIAM BOURNE . I am a baker , and live in Avery-street, Chelsea. The prisoner was my servant , and was entrusted to receive money for me. On Friday, the 9th of October, I sent him with some change to Mr. Thompson, who lives at Chelsea - he used to send me notes for it. The prisoner did not return with the money as soon as I expected, and I went to know the reason; I was informed he had got the money, and was gone. I could not find him, returned home, and found his clothes were gone also. I gave information, and on the 16th of November he was brought to Town, from Wiltshire. He ought to have brought me 18 l., which he never did; I asked what he had done with it; he said he lost it. My house is not above 400 yards from Thompson's.

CHARLES DANIEL LOVEDAY . I am servant to Mr. Thompson, pawnbroker, Grosvenor-row, Chelsea. On the 7th of October, the prisoner brought 6 l. from the prosecutor's, and on the 9th, he brought 5 l. in copper, and 7 l. in silver; I gave him sixteen 1 l. and one 2 l. bank notes, to take to his master - it was about the middle of the day.

JOSEPH THOMPSON . I live in Grosvenor-row. On the 7th of October, the prisoner brought some change to me, and on the 9th he brought 12 l., which made 18 l. together - Loveday gave him the notes. In about twenty minutes after, the prosecutor came, I said his servant had got the money.

WILLIAM KING . I am an officer. On the 14th of November, I went to Melksham, found the prisoner in the cage there, and brought him to town on the 16th.

Prisoner's Defence. I lost the money, and was afraid to go back.

GUILTY . Aged 29.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181202-109

106. MARIA BYASS was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of November , one 1 l. bank note, the property of Michael Clancey , from his person .

MICHAEL CLANCEY . I am a labourer , and live in Golden-lane. Between twelve and one o'clock at night, I went home with the prisoner, and took out 1 s., which was wrapped in a 1 l. note. She laid hold of the note, her husband came from behind the door, and turned me out. I went to the watchman, but he refused to take her, unless I brought her out. I gave her in charge - I believe she thought 1 s. was not enough.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18181202-110

107. WILLIAM GREEN was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of November , 40 lbs. of lead, value 9 s., the goods of James Hunter , and fixed to his dwelling-house .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating it to be fixed to a building, instead of a dwelling-house.

STEPHEN CHALLEN . I was in care of Mr. James Hunter 's house, No. 14, Euston-square, St. Pancras . On Wednesday, the 18th of November, about nine o'clock in the morning. I missed the lead from off the portico over the door, which was twelve feet from the ground. Next morning it was brought by the watchman, who had the prisoner in custody. It was fitted to the portico, and corresponded exactly.

JOHN BEETON . I am a watchman; the prosecutor's house is opposite to one that I watch. About eight o'clock at night, I saw the prisoner, in company with another, going past the house No. 13, which I watch. The prisoner had three pieces of lead in an old basket. I asked what it was, he dropped it, and they ran away in different directions. I followed and took the prisoner, without losing sight of him - I picked up the lead.

GEORGE SQUIB . I saw the lead fitted, it weighed 50 lbs. There was about 4 Cwt. cut off. I found the rest, concealed under ground, within 20 yards of the spot.

WILLIAM AUDLEY . I saw the prisoner lurking about the premises with two more. The lead found on the prisoner, with the rest that was found, made the exact quantity cut.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing of it.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18181202-111

108. CHARLES GILBERT was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of November , 4 s. 10 1/2 d. in monies numbered, the monies of Charles Fordhim , from his person .

The prosecutor did not appear.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18181202-112

109. EDWARD ELLIOTT was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of November, one coat, value 2 l. , the goods of William Wright .

WILLIAM WRIGHT . I am a tailor , and live in Stacy-street, Compton-street . On the 10th of November I saw the prisoner take my coat from the door; I called out

"Stop thief," and he was secured.

JOHN HORSMAN . I am a tailor. I heard the alarm, ran out, and took the prisoner - he dropped the coat - I never lost sight of him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Confined Two Months , and Publicly Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18181202-113

110. MARY DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of November , one pair of boots, value 4 s. 6 d. , the goods of Richard Darvill .

RICHARD DARVILL . I live at Cock-hill, Ratcliffe . On the 9th of November, the prisoner came in with a pair of boots, which she said she bought of me, and they did not wear well; she dropped one, stooped to pick it up, and I saw another pair under her shawl; I took them from her - I saw they were mine. She said she had got them at Mr. Clarke's, just by. I had shewed them to a lady not two minutes before. I told her to go about her business, but she refused, and I gave her in charge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I beg for mercy.

GUILTY . Aged 33.

Fine One Shilling , and Discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18181202-114

111. ANN DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of November , one table, value 10 s. , the goods of William Boden .

WILLIAM BODEN . I am a broker , and live in Ray-street, Clerkenwell . The table was at the door; I saw the prisoner take it under her arm, and walk away - I stopped her on Mutton-hill with it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A man told me to help him with it.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Fined One Shilling , and Discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18181202-115

112. SAMUEL DAVIES was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of November , one horse-cloth, value 2 s.; one pair of reins, value 3 s., and one hood, value 4 s. , the goods of Charles Fincham and Edward Fincham .

CHARLES FINCHAM . I am in partnership with my brother Edward; we are tea-dealers. On the 18th of November, at night, these things were taken from our stables, in Ram's Mews, King-street, Westminster .

WILLIAM WHITEHOUSE . I am the prosecutor's carman. On the 18th of November, after eight at night, I locked the stable up; every thing was then safe. About six o'clock in the morning, I found the window broken; anybody could then get in. I missed the articles stated in the indictment, and found them at Queen-square next day, and the prisoner in custody.

JAMES SPEED . I am watchman of King-street; my box is opposite the mews. Between eleven and twelve o'clock

at night I found the mews gates shut, which is not usual, as I always close them myself at one. I opened them, and the prisoner came out with these things under his arm. I stopped him, and asked him what it was; he said it was some pieces of old horse-cloths that were given to him, he could not tell by whom. I found the prosecutor's stable window broken; anybody could then get in.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GEORGE MILLARD . I searched the prisoner at the watch-house, and found the reins tied round his body, under his coat.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in distress.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18181202-116

113. MARIA BISHOP was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of October , one watch, value 2 l.; one chain, value 1 s.; one seal, value 6 d.; two keys, value 6 d., and 15 s., in monies numbered, the goods and monies of John Dempsey , from his person .

JOHN DEMPSEY . I am a seaman . On the 20th of October, about ten o'clock at night, the prisoner stopped me in Whitechapel-road - I was not quite sober. I took her to a public-house, then went to her room in Blackhorse-yard - we drank some gin there, which she went out for - my watch was then safe. She returned, and sat close to me while we were drinking - she took my watch, and money out without my knowing it. As soon as I got out I missed it. I returned, but could not find her - she was taken a week after.

JOHN RICHARDS . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Brick-lane. I took the watch in pledge, in the name of Bishop, the prisoner was in the shop at the time - I will not say she pledged it.

WILLIAM FOSTER . I took the prisoner in charge, but found nothing on her. Next morning she produced the ticket, voluntarily, and said he gave it to her.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. He was very tipsy, and told me to keep the watch till he could get some money.

LYDIA MULLINS . I live in Blackhorse-yard; I was with the prosecutor all day - he was very drunk - he only had a few shillings when I left him.

ELIZA CLARK . I live in George-street; I saw the prosecutor very drunk that night.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18181202-117

114. JOHN BROOK was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of November , five spades, value 15 s. , the goods of William Vaughan .

WILLIAM VAUGHAN . I am a farmer , and live at Ealing . On the night of the 16th of November the spades were left in my warehouse, I missed them next morning, and found the prisoner at Turnham-green, in custody, with them.

JOSEPH HALL . I am a watchman. I stopped the prisoner at Turnham-green, about twelve o'clock at night, with five spades. He said he brought them from France, and they were the King's stores.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 29.

Confined Two Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18181202-118

115. SIMON BENJAMIN was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of November , one watch, value 2 l.; one seal, value 2 s., and one key, value 1 d., the goods of John Simpson , from his person .

JOHN SIMPSON . I am a seaman , and live at Walworth. On the 6th of November, I left the George tavern, Back-lane, between eight and nine o'clock, rather intoxicated - Walker and Wass were with me. As I came down Old Gravel-lane I felt somebody snatch my watch, I called out that I had lost it - I was then knocked down, and heard the alarm of Stop thief! given. I found my watch at the office next day.

ANN WALKER . I live in Hilliard's-court, Old Gravel-lane - I am the prosecutor's sister, and was returning from the tavern with him - we met Wass. Two men met us just by the Dispensary, and offered to assist me home with him - I believe the prisoner was one of them, I declined it. We walked on for about three minutes, then a man pushed me backwards, by running against me, snatched the watch from the prosecutor, and ran off. I followed, crying Stop thief! I returned to the prosecutor, found him on the ground, and got him up - the prisoner was taken that night.

MARY WASS . I was with Walker, assisting the prosecutor home. Two men offered to assist her which Walker declined - we crossed over with him. Soon after Walker was pushed off the pavement, and the prosecutor's watch snatched from his pocket. He called out that it was gone. Stop thief! was called - I will not swear to the man. The prisoner was stopped that night, and the watch produced next day.

WILLIAM KING . I am a cabinet-maker. I was going along Pennington-street, about thirty yards from the spot, and saw the prisoner running along by the side of the Dock wall, heard the cry, pursued and overtook him about thirty yards farther - I never lost sight of him. The patrol came up, and we took him back - Walker said he was the man. I thought he might have dropped the watch, I went to the spot where I took him. I found it there, just where I first laid hold of him, and he broke from me - nobody else was running.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JONAS WINSON . I am a patrol. I heard the cry, and saw the prisoner running very fast, and King close after him - nobody else was running. He broke from King, who took him again. I took him to the watch-house, and asked him why he ran? He said he had knocked a man down in the lane - he afterwards said he pushed him down. I said there was no occasion to run for that - he said there was great occasion, and he had lost his own money by running so hard. I took him back, and Walker said he was the man who knocked her brother down, and took his watch; he made no answer. I went with King, and found the watch where he first caught him.

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutor pushed against me, I shoved him again, and he fell - the women called out Stop thief! I stopped to be taken, and said a drunken man

pushed me - he let me go, and as I went away he took me again.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant

Reference Number: t18181202-119

116. THOMAS WILLIAM BRADY was indicted for stealing, on the 15th July , two books of prints, value 4 l., and eleven prints, value 1 l. , the goods of William Johnstone White ; and ELIZABETH BRADY was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, she well knowing them to have been stolen .

WILLIAM JOHNSTONE WHITE . I am a book and print se ller, and live in Brownlow-street, Holborn . The male prisoner was my servant , and lived about nine months with me - I lost a great deal of property while he was with me, among others, Smith's Antiquities, which cost me 1 l. 8 s., one book of prints, and some very valuable prints torn out, worth 3 l. 16 s. Two or there months before I had him taken up, I spoke to him particularly about a book of prints, which cost me 8 l., I told him I had been robbed; he said somebody must have come in at the door, and taken it out, or that some of the customers must have stolen it, as a gentleman had examined them a short time before, other books were taken afterwards. I then had new locks put on my shop door - the prisoner slept at his sister's. I told him I suspected the maid-servant, and set him to watch. I locked the shop, and fastened every thing up myself at night, and every morning before, I came down, I gave him the key to open it. I lost those things after I made this regulation. The prisoner represented to me that he thought the shop had been opened by a false key in the night, and property taken. He took me to the back shelves, and shewed me the books in a deranged state, and said he left them in perfect order the night before - this continued till he was apprehended. About the 12th of August I told him that I suspected him, and I was convinced that nobody but one who was well acquainted with my property could have done it, and he was the thief, for it could be nobody else. He strongly denied it, but afterwards burst into tears, and said,

"I have been tempted to rob you, but never did." He named two persons, who he said had threatened his life if he did not rob me, that they came to the private door, and would not go away until he gave them property, that he did give them property, and they sold it - he received only 8 s. as his part of the booty, and said he was compelled to do it from fear, there being above forty in the gang, that he had fought with them to prevent their forcing him to rob me, but his honest disposition had so triumphed over their temptations, as they wanted him to part with my money, but he did not.

Q. How soon after did you discover these books - A. About three weeks after he was taken, I went to Mr. Shirly's, by accident, and found them there - I am certain they are mine - they have my private mark on them.

EMMA BRADY . I am sister to the prisoners, my brother lived with the prosecutor, I lived with my sister before she removed to Holborn-hill . I saw my brother bring some books to her house, they were taken out and sold - my brother lived in Baldwin's-gardens.

Q. Who carried them out - A. Sometimes my sister Bella, and sometimes Betsey, the prisoner.

Q. Do you remember any books being burnt - A. Yes, the night my brother was taken up, and ran away from the officers. He came to my sister's in Union-court, and told her of it. She said she would have none of the books there, and then my brother burnt them - there were six books, she asked him to burn them - an alarm was made in the court by the fire; the people asked what was blazing in the room. My sister said she was warming a bit of meat - it was not so.

Q. Was you ever employed by her to do anything to the books - A. Yes, she sometimes told me to rub the marks out of the corners of them, when the books were sold she brought home the money, and the prisoners shared it between them.

ELIZABETH BRADY . Q. Was it not letters that were burnt - A. No; books.

GEORGE SHIRLEY . I live in Wilderness-row, St. John-street, and am a print-seller. The prosecutor came to my house the latter end of August. I produced the Sea Ports, of France - I had parted with Smith's Antiquities, but got them back for him. I received them from the prisoner, Elizabeth Brady , about the latter end of August. I asked her where she got them, and refused to buy them till I went to her lodgings, in Charles-street, Hatton-garden - she said they belonged to her brother, who was a clerk, the house was very respectable. I gave her 15 s. for each of them.

THOMAS WILLIAM BRADY 's Defence. My wages were not sufficient. I took them, and got my sister to sell them - she had none of the money.

ELIZABETH BRADY 's Defence. My brother brought a bag to the lodgings, and said they were books he had bought at a sale - it was twelve months ago, we then lived in Furnival's Inn. One day he told me to sell one, as he had lost some of his master's money, and wanted to make it up.

T. W. BRADY - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

E. BRADY - GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18181202-120

117. WILLIAM POTTER was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of November , three sets of harness, value 10 l., and six collars, value 3 l. , the goods of Thomas James .

THOMAS PARKER . I am servant to Mr Thomas James , who is a horse-dealer , and lives in North-street, Old-street-road . On the 28th of November, we had some harnes stolen and six horse's collars. We heard nothing of the prisoner until the 20th of November - we saw the harness at Wilford's shop that day, I recognized it, as part of that stolen. They were cut up to change their appearance; I found the lock broken open, by which means they obtained it.

Cross-examined by MR. WALFORD. The harness I saw,

was his, made up with some more. It was decreased in value, by being cut up.

JAMES WILFORD . I am a sadler. On the 24th of November, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, I bought some harness of John Staines ; directly I saw it, I knew it to be some that I had made. I looked at it in the morning, and found it was what Mr. James bought of me. I sent to him - he came and examined it - it was all joined together.

Cross-examined. I deal much in second-hand harness; if odd bits came to my hand, I should make them up.

COURT. Q. Some part of it was not your make - A. No. That excited my suspicion, Mr. James having informed me of his loss. The part added was older than that which was mine - it had been mixed.

JOHN SMITH . I am servant to Mr. Dixon, of Barbican. About a week before the prisoner was taken, I bought some harness of him; I gave him 3 l. 5 s.; it was just in the same state as now. The first purchase I made was a few days before he was taken; the last lot I bought of him I gave him 2 l. for, and told him to take it to the prosecutor's shop, for sale.

Cross-examined. He is an harness maker; I have bought three different sets of harness of him - he knew I was going to take it to some public repository for sale.

Re-examined by MR. ALLEY. I sent them to Ibingford's for sale. The prisoner told me of no alteration in it since it came into his possession; this was about a week before he was taken.

JOHN ARMSTRONG . I am an officer. In consequence of the directions I received, I went to search the prisoner's house, in Burton-crescent, Lambeth-road, on the 26th of November, about four o'clock in the afternoon - there was no appearance of a sadler's shop outside. His wife came down, and denied him to me; I went into the back room on the same floor, and saw him; he denied having three sets of harness and seven collars; which I was sent to search for. Parker went with me, and found the harness produced, in different parts of his shop, just in the same state as now - the collars hung up; he was behind the door which, being shut, concealed him. He then asked me to let him put on a clean shirt; I told him I must go with him; he then said he would be d - d if I did - I took him.

Cross-examined. It was a small room, and looked like a harness shop; he never told me who sold it him, nor did he refer me to any house in Whitechapel-road.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

PARKER. There is an addition to the materials which was not there when stolen. The harness which was found in the prisoner's house was cut in pieces - they were nearly new when I lost them - they wanted no repairs - Wilford made them for my master. They were two sets of harness stolen, and part of another which are now made three.

JAMES WHITFIELD . I made one set for Mr. James, last May, which would require no alterations. The one they made was only part taken away; inferior leather is applied to it.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent of the charge. About three weeks ago, a man called on me, and asked me to buy the harness produced; I agreed with him to give him 6 l. for them; I paid 1 l. then, and gave him the other 5 l. a little time after, in the presence of Smith, my journeyman. They were in pieces when I bought them. I made them up, and sold them to Smith, a servant of Mr. Dixon's, which I should not have done, had I known them to be stolen.

MARTHA LOTTEN . I am a married woman, and live in the upper part of the prisoner's house, I remember his being taken up; a few days before that, I saw a little cart, in the early part of the day, at the door, there was some pieces of leather, of different lengths, in it; I called the prisoner, who was in the cellar, and said,

"Your work comes in by horse-loads." It was a short dark man who brought it - it was several bits of harness like those produced. I have lodged eight or nine weeks there - the prisoner was a man of regular habits. The tail of the cart was close to the door, to let it out - it was a small cart.

JOHN SMITH . In November last I worked for the prisoner - I took work home to do. One Monday morning I saw a man come for money for harness, which then laid about the room; he asked for 5 l., which was paid in my presence; he was a short dark man - I was employed to make them into sets.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. Were you present when it was bought - A. No; it is nearly two mile from his house to mine - I often go three or four times a day. I then came for materials to complete a back-band - I then saw the man - I wanted nothing else. I stopped half an hour, but sometimes I stopped an hour - my master had nothing to do but to give it me. The man was there when I got in - he only wanted the 5 l. - I cannot tell what kept him. He signed in my master's book for 5 l., having previously signed in it for 1 l. I saw him put his mark in my master's book - I should know his mark - I have never seen the book since. I never attended his examination, but should if I had been required. I did attend, but was not called.

Re-examined by MR. WALFORD. I did not hear what the witness said when my master bought it. I looked to see what sort of a bargain it was, but it would have taken a little time to examine it.

COURT. Q. Did you not ask who the man was - A. No; and my master never told me. I was never applied to, to inquire about the man. He told me the man lived in Whitechapel-road. I swear the man's direction is wrote down in the book, my master wrote it; I saw it written,

" John Rich , Whitechapel-road," either 24 or 25; I read it - I swear positively, I read it. I have not been there, because I thought nothing of it; I cannot say whether my master keeps one book or more; it was a long narrow book - my work was not entered there. I lived at No. 23, Upper Marsh, Lambeth, then, and live there still, I did not observe the leather in pieces, nor whether they were good or bad. The leather put to it was nearly as good as the original part, I do not think it was quite so good. I was there half an hour, and saw the money paid - he came for it; all this passed, while I was there. They did not converse - I do not know how long he staid - he said nothing after he received the money.

MARTHA LOTTEN re-examined. The book that Smith alludes to, I swear I have seen in his hand since.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18181202-121

118. JAMES POTTER was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of November , two bushels of wheat, value 27 s. , the goods of Thomas Chandler , the elder.

THOMAS CHANDLER . I am a farmer , and live at White Webbs, Enfield . The prisoner was my labourer - he had been two or three months threshing of wheat. On the 22d of November, which was Sunday, I found a sack of wheat, laying in a ditch, a little way from where he had been working - it was tied up, with some bushes and an oak bough put over it - I examined it, and it appeared to be my wheat - I took some of it to compare with the bulk, and covered the rest over as before. About five o'clock I and my son went to watch who would come for it. In about an hour the prisoner and another man came; the other man took it out of the ditch, and threw it over the hedge to the prisoner, who carried it across the field to the road; we followed them near the hedge, to avoid being seen, they went down the road for a quarter of a mile. When we got to the bridge we were obliged to go on the gravel; I suppose they heard us, for the man threw the wheat off his shoulder; I walked up to them, and said,

"Halloo! my lads;" the other man said,

"Halloo!" and ran on the other side of the prisoner, and got away. I then said,

"Halloo! Potter," he said,

"Halloo! master;" I then said, you are a pretty sort of a fellow, are you not, he said, how? I said, what did you do down in my field just now, he said, I was not in your field, I lit on this young man in the road, and he went off, leaving the sack - I was afraid to take them. Next morning the prisoner came to the door to work, and said, Master, do you not mean to give us any more for threshing that wheat, I said, No, I think it is as much as any one gives; he then went to work. I sent for a constable, he was taken, and ran away. I fetched him back. Before the constable came he appeared very uneasy, and kept looking out. I went into the barn and talked to him to engage his attention. I have compared the wheat in the sack with the bulk, and am certain it is mine. There is some foreign barley, and black and white oats in it that agrees with mine.

THOMAS CHANDLER , JUN. I am the prosecutor's son. I went to the field to watch, with my father, at five o'clock. In about an hour the prisoner and another man came. The other man got over the hedge, took the wheat out, and handed it over to the prisoner. They crossed the field; we followed them till they got to the bridge. They then heard us, the other man threw the sack off his shoulder. They had shifted it before. Father called to them, and asked the prisoner what he did at the field? He said he had not been there. The wheat appears to me to be the same. I have compared it. I am certain the prisoner was one of them.

SAMUEL SLOWMAN . I am a constable of Enfield. The prisoner was given in my charge. I am a farmer, and have compared the wheat; it agrees exactly with the bulk. I produce it.

ELIZA HOLDSWORTH . I am Chandler's servant. On Saturday, the 21st of November, the prisoner came to me in the cow-house. He had been absent from work some days before, He asked if master was at home? I told him that master and mistress were gone to town. He left me and went to the barn, where the wheat was kept. I saw Livermore at the barn with him; he was working there. The prisoner came again in the evening, and went to the barn, returned to the house, and wished my young mistress good night.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181202-122

119. MICHAEL LIVERMORE was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of November , two pecks of wheat, value 5 s. , the goods of Thomas Chandler , the elder.

THOMAS CHANDLER . I am a farmer , and live at Enfield . The prisoner was one of my thrasher s; he has worked five years for me. After I took him, I got a warrant and searched the prisoner's premises. Slowman brought me half a bushel of wheat, which I compared with my bulk; it is the same. The prisoner told the magistrate, that his wife and family gleaned it; if that was the case, there would be no mixture in it. He worked for me at the time. I had been to town on the Saturday.

Cross-examined by MR. WALFORD. It is a very unusual thing for foreign barley and oats to be together. His family live two miles off. I have not the least doubt of its being taken from the bulk.

ELIZA HOLDSWORTH . On the 21st of November my master and mistress went to town. The prisoner was working in the barn. Potter came in the morning and went to the prisoner, and remained above an hour with him.

SAMUEL SLOWMAN . On Monday, the 27th of November I went to the prisoner's house, found the wheat, and about half a sack of flour, and four bushels of bran. The wheat was in the bed-room. It is not gleaned wheat. It agrees with the bulk.

Prisoner's Defence. It is gleaned wheat.

GUILTY . Aged 50.

Confined One Year .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181202-123

120. CATHARINE RUTTER was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of November , one tablecloth, value 15 s., and one petticoat, value 2 s. , the goods of Elizabeth Shepherd , widow .

ELIZABETH SHEPHERD . I am a widow, and live at Islington , and take in washing . On the 12th of November I wrapped these things up with others, and laid them on the mangle. The prisoner came and asked if I was at home; I went into the yard, and left my child in care of the room. I sent the things home, and was informed they were not all there. I suspected the prisoner, as nobody had been to the door but her. I went to her room, and asked if she knew where they were? She said I might be d - d. On the 6th of November I found them at Sowerby's the pawnbroker.

MARY SHEPHERD . I am the daughter of last witness. I was in care of the room. The prisoner came in; I did not see her do anything. She lived next door to us.

JAMES WOOD . I am servant to Mr. Sowerby, pawnbroker, St. John-street. On the 12th of November the prisoner pledged the table-cloth and petticoat with me, about seven o'clock in the evening.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was in distress.

ELIZABETH SHEPHERD . She was very well off.

GUILTY . Aged 41.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181202-124

121. ANN SMITH and ANN DENURE were indicted for stealing, on the 24th of November , eighteen yards of gingham, value 15 s. , the goods of John Cox .

ISAAC LONGRIGGE . I am shopman to John Cox , linen-draper , St. John-street . On the 24th of November, in the evening, the prisoner Denure came to the shop, with another girl; they were looking at a print. I suspected them. Smith then came in and bought a yard of calico, and went out with it, speaking to the others. I watched the two girls to the door, and saw Denure deliver something to Smith, I stopped them, and found a piece of gingham on Smith. I gave them in charge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

SMITH'S Defence. I saw a woman drop it, and I picked it up.

SMITH - GUILTY . Aged 17.

DENURE - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181202-125

122. CUTHBERT RAMSHAW was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of October , one piece of woolen cloth, value 5 s., the property of the Governors and Directors of the Poor of the parish of St. James, Westminster .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating it to be the property of James Horwood .

JAMES HORWOOD . I am master of St. James's workhouse . The prisoner was a pauper there. I employed him to cut out six boy's jackets, and left the room a short time. About a quarter after one o'clock he was brought back to me by Hindmarsh, who produced a piece of cloth, which he said he found under his arm. The prisoner said it was for facings for the jackets. He had no occasion to take any out. He worked in the house. The cloth was in my care. I compared it with the piece; it tallied.

GEORGE HINDMARSH . I am gate-keeper to the workhouse. I stopped the prisoner at the gate, as he appeared bulky, and found the cloth in his breast.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 56.

Confined Three Months , and Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181202-126

123. SARAH BALL was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of June , four table-cloths, value 3 l., and one one shirt, value 6 s. , the goods of Samuel Pepys Cockerill .

ANN DEAN . I am servant to S. P. Cockerill. The prisoner was our washerwoman . We lost these things at different times, and discharged her on suspicion.

JAMES GIDGEON . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Stafford-street, Lisson-green. On the 15th of June a tablecloth was pledged in the prisoner's name. On the 21st another in the name of Church. On the 21st of May ano- in her own name and address. On the 31st of October another in the name of Holmes, Charles-street. I do not know who pledged them.

JOHN THORPE . I am a plasterer. Two months ago the prisoner offered me a shirt for sale. She said it was Indian cloth, made by the blacks. I gave her 6 s. for it. On the 31st of October I saw her searched, and a quantity of duplicates found under her stays, and more in her bureau; in all fifty-eight duplicates were found.

RICHARD COATES . I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner on another charge, and asked her for the duplicates. She said she had some in her bureau, and she had no others. I found a great quantity there. I searched her person, saw her hand in her pocket-hole, and between her stays and her body I found a glove containing forty-eight duplicates, four of which related to these table-cloths. She said they belonged to a kept woman, in Mortimer-street, who gave them to her to pledge. I detained them for her to bring the woman, to say they were her property, between the Saturday and Monday she absconded. On the 15th of November I took her at Battersea. She said they were the prosecutor's.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 39.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181202-127

124. JOSEPH ANDREWS was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of November , one shirt, value 3 s., and one pair of trowsers, value 4 s., the goods of James Ponton ; and one shirt, value 3 s., the goods of John Veitch .

SARAH VEITCH . I am the wife of John Veitch , who is a carpenter , and had the care of the house, No. 67, Gloucester-place; the steps come into York-street . These things hung in the area, I missed them about two o'clock, ran up the steps. The prisoner was brought back with it.

ABRAHAM ACKROYD . I am a mason. I was at work in Gloucester-place, and saw the prisoner and another man come out of York-street; the other man had a bundle. Veitch said she had lost her linen. I followed, caught hold of the prisoner, and took him back. The other man had left him. The prisoner said he had nothing belonging to anybody.

WILLIAM ROBINS . I am a constable. I took the prisoner in charge, and found the property under his smock-frock.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A man brought it to me. I was alarmed and ran away.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Whipped , and Discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18181202-128

125. CHARLES WAKELIN was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of September , three blankets, value 18 s., and one sheet, value 4 s., the goods of Martha Pugh , in a lodging-room .

MARTHA PUGH . I live in Gee-street, Goswell-street . I let the prisoner a furnished room in June last. He left on the 2d of September, without giving notice. I went up, and found his wife had locked herself in the room. She let me in. I asked if all was right? She said No; that those things were missing. I found it was so, and found the duplicates in the bureau.

WILLIAM TUCK . I am servant to Mr. Fleming, pawnbroker,

who lives in Fleet-market. Two blankets were pledged with me in September, in the name of Brown; I do not know by whom.

JAMES PEACHEY . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Goswell-street. On the 1st of September, a sheet was pledged with me, in the prisoner's name.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JAMES HARRADEN . I took the prisoner into custody, he was at work. He desired me to tell the prosecutrix, that he would work as hard as he could to satisfy her. I found no money on him.

Prisoner's Defence. They were pledged unknown to me.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18181202-129

126. EDWARD ROUSE was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of November , one box, value 6 d.; one bible, value 1 s.; two shifts, value 2 s.; four aprons, value 1 s.; five caps, value 1 s.; three handkerchiefs, value 1 s.; one petticoat, value 18 d.; two pair of shoes, value 2 s., and one sampler, value 6 d. , the goods of Mary Oulds , spinster .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating them to be the property of John Oulds .

JOHN OULDS . I am a carter at the King's Arms, Holborn-bridge. My daughter's box contained the property stated in the indictment, which was in my cart. I stopped at the end of May's-buildings, St. Martin's-lane - it was safe then. I went into a shop on the opposite side of the way, leaving an old man, named Dawson, in the cart; I returned in about five minutes, and saw the prisoner go between two coaches, get on the wheel, and take something out of the cart. I seized him as he stepped off the cart with the box; he broke away, but I stopped him immediately, without losing sight of him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I saw it lay by the cart, and picked it up.

GUILTY . Aged 34.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18181202-130

127. WILLIAM READ was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of November , three pair of corsetts, value 27 s. , the goods of Charles Cheesman .

CHRISTIAN CHEESMAN . I am the wife of Charles Cheesman , who is a staymaker , and live in Holywell-street, Strand , On the 24th of November, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I was alarmed by a quantity of stays falling from the door, inside the shop. I ran out immediately, and saw two young men and the prisoner running together; the prisoner had three pair of corsetts. I caught him immediately, he dropped one pair; I gave him in charge - I missed three pair - the other men got off.

SIMON SIMMONS . I was standing at my window, in Hollywell-street, I saw the prisoner running, and the prosecutrix following. He was secured; he got away, but I took him again.

JAMES HITCHER . I took the prisoner in charge, he was very impudent, and said two boys threw them upon him.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18181202-131

128. NICHOLAS PARKER was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of November , one watch, value 25 s.; one chain, value 6 d., and one key, value 2 d. , the goods of George Gymer .

GEORGE GYMER . I am a shoemaker , and live in Worship-street . On the 20th of November, I slept with the prisoner; I awoke about seven o'clock, and missed him and my watch.

MARIA CATTEMORE . I am a shoe-binder. On the 20th of November, about four o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner came to me, very much intoxicated; he dropped the duplicate of the watch in my room; he came again about eight o'clock, and asked if he had dropped it - he was then sober.

THOMAS CREARY . I am a pawnbroker. The prisoner pledged the watch with me.

THOMAS VAN . I took the prisoner in charge; he said he pledged the watch, the prosecutor should have it again.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I meant to redeem it.

GUILTY . Aged 45.

Fined One Shilling , and Discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18181202-132

129. SARAH PERRY was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of November , two shifts, value 6 s.; two pair of pillowcases, value 8 s., and five napkins, value 5 s. , the goods of Eunice Pike .

EUNICE PIKE . I am a milliner , and live in Duke-street, Smithfield . On the 11th of November, about seven o'clock in the evening, these things were taken out of my parlour. Next day the prisoner was detected offering them in pledge - she is a stranger.

ELIZA CHANK . I live with Miss Pike; I put the things in the back parlour, I went down stairs, and when I returned, they were gone.

JAMES WOOD . I am servant to Mr. Sowerby. About four o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner came in, and offered four pillow-cases, and five napkins, in pledge. I asked whose they were, she said she bought them of a lady; I asked the name, she said that was of no consequence, and that I need not take them in if I did not like. I detained her - the prosecutrix came and claimed them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

ROBERT UPSAL . I am a pawnbroker. The prisoner pledged two shifts with me.

Prisoner's Defence. I found them.

GUILTY . Aged 42.

Confined Three Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18181202-133

130. ROBERT PALMER was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of October , one box, value 6 d.; two blankets, value 1 s.; two petticoats, value 2 s.; three gowns, value 3 s.; two caps, value 10 s.; two frocks, value 4 s.; six shirts, value 3 s.; two jackets, value 4 s., and sixteen napkins, value 10 s. , the goods of John Butcher .

CATHARINE BUTCHER . I am the wife of John Butcher , and live in Montague-mews , he is coachman to Mr. Laws. The articles stated in the indictment, were in a box, in the housekeeper's room, down the area. On the 3d of October, between twelve and one o'clock, I went into the

kitchen, and as I sat at dinner, I heard somebody in the passage, I got up, and saw Boston in the passage; he asked if that was my box, for he had brought it back; I said, Yes; he asked if the prisoner was my son - he had stopped him; I said I had no son, and gave him in charge.

JOHN BOSTON . I am apprentice to Mr. Hall, a coach-maker, in Eagle-street. I was passing the end of Montague-street, Russell-square, and observed the prisoner and another man, lurking about. The prisoner was looking down several areas; I saw him go down an area, and return - they went further; his companion sat on the step, and the prisoner went down the area of No. 27; I crossed the road, and got assistance; he came up with the box under his arm; I laid hold of him, and asked what he had got, he said he had got them from his mother; the other got away. A gentleman who assisted me, took him down the area; while he was looking for the person, the prisoner came up again; I pursued, and took him. I also took the other boy, but let him go to secure the prisoner.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I never had it; I was coming down the street, and this man took me.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18181202-134

131. HENRY OAKLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of November , one watch, value 5 l.; one seal, value 10 s., and one key, value 2 d., the goods of Dominick Conner , from his person .

DOMINICK CONNER. I am a tailor . On the 2d of November, about half-past ten o'clock at night, I was going home, and was within a few yards of my own door, in Greek-street , when a man tapped me on the shoulder, and asked if he should see me home - I was quite sober - I said, No, I wanted no assistance - I was just at home; he then ran across the street, and splashed my stockings; I told him he should not do that; he repeated the words over again; and while he was talking, the prisoner came up, pulled my watch out of my fob, and ran away. I followed him through Blackhorse-yard, into Tottenham-court-road, but lost sight of him there; he afterwards was taken. I am certain he is the man, I have known him for many years.

MARY GILLY . I was at the corner of Blackhorse-yard. I saw the prisoner come out of the yard, and run down Tottenham-court-road. He was afterwards stopped.

WILLIAM SHEPPARD . I am an officer, and heard of the robbery. On the Wednesday night I found the prisoner at a public-house, in Tottenham-court-road, and took him. The watch has not been found.

Prisoner's Defence. It is a conspiracy against my liberty, I was at a public-house at the time.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181202-135

132. WILLIAM JONES was indicted, for that he on the 19th of November , at St. James's, Clerkenwell , feloniously had in his custody and possession, a certain forged and counterfeit bank note. (Setting it forth, No. 27,115, 1 l. September 12,1818. Signed C. Tabor) he well knowing it to be forged and counterfeited against the statute.

WILLIAM HANKES . I am the son of Robert Hankes , who is a hatter, and lives in Holborn. On the 19th of November, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came to our shop, and bought a hat, which came to 9 s.; he tendered a 1 l. bank note; I suspected it, and asked his name and address; he wrote

" George Clay , Eagle-street," on it, which is nearly opposite to us; this is the note. (looking at it.) I intimated my suspicions to my father, who came into the shop, and asked for a pen and ink to write the prisoner's address; the prisoner said he had already written it. My father seeing no number, asked him what number it was, he said 15; my father then desired me to go to No. 15, Eagle-street; the prisoner said he would go with me, and shew me; my father said No, he would detain him till I returned. I went and made enquiry, but found he was not known there; I re- returned, and found him in my father's custody. He was taken to the watch-house.

Prisoner. Q. You say you gave the note to your father, was not a little girl sent to get change for it? I gave the note to my father myself.

ROBERT HANKES . I am the father of the last witness. On the evening of the 19th of November, my little girl called me down, when I found the prisoner in the shop; I got between him and the door, and asked for a pen and ink, the note being put into my hands by my son; I did not know that any address had been written on it, and asked the prisoner for his address, he said he had written it on the note; I looked at it, and saw there were two endorsements on it, and asked what address it was, he said, George Clay , Eagle-street; I saw there was no number, and asked what number, he said 15; I told my son to go immediately to No. 15, and see if such a person lived there; the prisoner offered to go and shew him where it was; I told the prisoner No, my son could find it out - that it was a forged note, and he should stop till my son returned; my son then left.

Q. On your telling him, he must stop till your son returned, what passed - A. He said he did not see that I had any right to detain him if he had a forged note in his possession; I said that may be, but I shall do it now, until my son returns; if there is such a person lives there, it may be all right; he then said if I would go with him, (and mentioned some name, which I do not recollect) he would show me where he took the note; I said I should go no where with him yet; we remained about half a minute in silence; he then said, you shall not detain me, for I will go; I said he should not; he attempted to pass by me to go out, I collared him, but having so much glass about the shop, I did not like to have a scuffle, and he forced himself on the pavement in the street, I having hold of him all the while; he then began striking me as hard as he could in my face, with both hands, and I was obliged to let go to defend myself; I knocked him down in the kennel, and as he endeavoured to get up, I made a grasp to lay hold of him again; he got from under my

arm, and ran down Holborn; I pursued, calling out

"Stop thief!" as close as I could; he ran two or three hundred yards, before anybody offered to stop him. A watchman named Banning, who was near Chancery-lane, put his hand out to stop him, and threw him down; I came up, collared, and took him back to my house, and sent for a constable; just as I returned, my son came back, and said in his presence, that no such person lived in Eagle-street; I told him I knew that very well, for I had had a good proof of it - I gave him in charge. (looks at the note) This is it - it has my writing on it.

Q. Was the scuffle hard - A. Yes, it drew blood from my chin, and tore my shirt and handkerchief.

ANN GREGG . I am the wife of William Gregg , who lives at No. 15, Eagle-street, Holborn. I first came there on the 9th of November - I had the key a fortnight before. The prisoner never lived there - I do not know him.

DENNIS BANNING . I am a watchman. On the 19th of November I was on duty in Holborn, heard the cry of Stop thief! and saw Hankes pursuing the prisoner - I made a grasp at him, he ran against my hand, and fell. I assisted Mr. Hankes in taking him back to his shop.

GEORGE NEWPORT . I am constable of St. Giles's. On the 19th of November, Hankes gave the prisoner into my charge - I took him to St. Giles's watch-house.

SAMUEL FURZEMAN . I am constable of St. Giles's watch-house. On the 19th of November last, I came to the watch-house with Ball - the prisoner was brought in just before I got there, I went to search him. While I was searching him, Newport came in, and asked for a knife, that the prisoner had got about him. I took the knife from him, and gave it to Newport. The prisoner then asked me to go either to No. 4, or 5, Parker-street, Drury-lane, to his wife, he said he lived there, in the back parlour. I asked him what name? He said William Jones , ask for Jones. I and Newport went, and found a woman there - we searched the room, but found nothing. I returned to the watch-house, and found Ball standing at the at the door. We all went in, and told the prisoner his wife was coming. I asked him where he got the note from? He said, it was nothing to me, and he should not tell me, for he would not bring four or five more people into it.

Q. Had you said anything to him before about the note - A. Not a word. I asked him what was his reason for giving a false addres? He burst out crying, and said he knew it was a bad one, and he should go for life,

JAMES BALL . I am a milkman, and live in Smart's-buildings. I went to the watch-house with Furzeman, he and Newport went in, searched the prisoner, and took something from him. They then went away, as I understood to search his lodgings - I remained at the door till they returned. Furzeman, and I went in, Newport went away - the prisoner had been locked in the watch-house. We went in, and Furzeman asked him where he got the note? He said he knew where he got it, but he would not bring four or five more people into it, for he knew it was a bad one, and he must be punished for it.

Q. Did you hear him say anything about going for life - A. No. I went out soon after.

Prisoner. Q. You say you are a milkman - you are Furzeman's cadee, and go about to swear men's lives away - A. I am a milkman.

THOMAS EVANS . I am shopman to Mr. Eddels, who is a hosier, and glover, and lives in Coventry-street. On the 5th of November, the prisoner came to my master's shop, and bought a cravat, which came to 4 s. He tendered me a 1 l. note, which I sent to Mr. Eddels by his nephew, Mr. Eddels came into the shop - before this the prisoner had written his name and address on the note, (looks at one) this is it, it has Mr. James Boycer , No. 22, George-street, Adelphi on it. Mr Eddels asked him if that was his own name? He said it was his master's, and that his own name was James Johnstone . Mr. Eddels then wrote James Johnstone on it.

JAMES EDDELS . I am the master of the last witness. On the 5th of November, my nephew John brought this note to me (looks at it.) I came into the shop with it, and asked the prisoner to write his name and address on it. He wrote Mr. Boycer, No. 22, George-street, Adelphi. I asked him if that was his address? He said it was his master's, and that he came from his master for the cravat. I asked his name? He said it was James Johnstone , which I wrote on the note, and begged of him to wait while I sent to see if the address was correct. He said he could not wait, but I might send someone with him. I told him I thought the note was bad - he had then got to the door. I sent my nephew, John Eddels with him - I kept the note and cravat. In about a quarter of an hour my nephew returned, but the prisoner never called for the note or cravat.

JOHN EDDELS . I am nephew to the last witness. I gave my uncle the note which Evans gave me, he desired me to go with the prisoner, to see if the address was correct. I had heard him give it as No. 22, George-street, Adelphi. I went a little way towards George-street with him. He desired me to go back, and said he would send Mr. Boycer, his master, to-morrow morning for the note. I went a little farther with him, and he said he would knock me down, if I did not go back, he then ran off. I pursued calling Stop thief! He got away.

JOHN LEES . I am an inspector of bank notes, at the Bank of England, and have been so above twenty years (examining the note uttered to Mr. Hankes.) it is forged, the paper is not that used by the bank. The water-mark is put on after the paper is made, the Bank water-mark is made with the paper. It is not the Bank plate, the line with the date appears to be engraved, in a genuine note it stereotype. It purports to be signed C. Tabor. I have known him ever since I have been in the Bank, and believe it not to be his writing. I have no doubt of its being forged. (looks at that uttered to Eddels), it is forged in every respect like the other, and is not R. Clough's hand-writing, he did not sign small notes at this period. The notes are both off the same plate.

Examined by a JUROR. Q. Are there any other means of knowing a forged note, besides those you have expressed - A. There is another particular in this note, the letters No, before the number, is engraved in the plate, which is not the case in a genuine note; there are no other means which I have of proving it to be forged to the jury, except from my general knowledge. It is forged from what I have stated, and from having seen a great many of these notes.

Q. Is it not possible for other people besides the Bank, to use stereotype - A. Certainly.

Q. You say in a genuine note the water-mark is made in the paper, have you ever seen it made - A. I have seen the paper.

Q. Have you ever seen a bank note made from the first process - A. I have seen the paper before and after it was impressed, and before it was filled up.

Q. Have not inspectors, and other clerks of the Bank, received forged notes, and paid them, being deceived by them - A. Yes; that has happened.

Q. Have they not also rejected genuine notes as forged - A. There was one instance of the kind in my recollection, and I am not positive as to another; it was a very old note, in a very mutilated state, with a quantity of paper pasted on the back.

Q. Do the Bank ever alter their plates - A. They have altered them several times.

Q. When the paper is delivered out to the work people to be printed, is it counted out to them - A. I cannot tell, nor do I know whether the work people are searched after it is printed.

MR. SERGEANT BOSANQUET. Q. Are the two notes on Bank paper - A. No.

CHARLES TABOB . I am a signing clerk at the Bank, and was so on the 12th of September, there is no other signing clerk of my name. I have been so five years (looks at the note,) this was never signed by me.

JURY. Q. Is your signature so regular and uniform, that you can always know your own writing - A. Yes, I sometimes sign a thousand notes a day.

Q. Have you never seen your hand-writing so well imitated, as to baffle your judgement - A. I never have.

(The note was then put in, and read. See Indictment.)

Prisoner's Defence. I leave it to the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18181202-136

133. WILLIAM JONES was again indicted for feloniously disposing of, and putting away a 1 l. forged and counterfeit bank note, knowing it to be forged, with intent to defraud the Governor, and Company of the Bank of England .

MR. SERGEANT BOSANQUET on the part of the Governor and Company of the Bank of England, declined offering any evidence.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

Reference Number: t18181202-137

134. WILLIAM DAVIS was indicted for a like offence .

No evidence.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

Reference Number: t18181202-138

135. WILLIAM CLARKER was indicted for feloniniously having a forged bank note, for payment of 1 l. in his possession, he knowing it to be forged .

ELIZA MACKLIN . I am the wife of Matthew Maclin , who is a grocer, and lives in Baldwin-street, St. Luke's . On the 6th of November, between eleven and twelve o'clock in the morning, the prisoner came to our shop, and said he wanted a little tea and sugar, as his wife had been put to bed that morning, and could not come herself, but she dealt at my shop, and asked him to come, as she thought I would give him change, knowing her to deal with me. I served him with the tea sugar, and other things amounting to about 2 s. He then gave me a 1 l. bank note. I rather hesitated, not liking to give him change, and asked his name, which he said was Cummings, No. 2, Baldwin's-court, I wrote it on the note, with my husband's initials, this is it. (looking at one.) I gave him change, and he went away. I paid the note away that evening, and it was returned to me from the Bank.

Prisoner. Q. How can you swear to me - A. I am quite sure he is the man, he was near half an hour there, as I sent out for change, but did not send his note out. I noticed him particularly - he said he was a blacksmith, and worked in Holborn.

MATTHEW MACKLIN . I am the husband of the last witness, the note was returned to me from the Bank, in consequence of which I went to inquire for Cummings, at Baldwin's-court, and could find no such person - I went to every house there.

THOMAS VAN . I am a constable of St. Luke's. I made inquiry for a person named Cummings, in Baldwin's-court, a few days after the prisoner was apprehended, which was on the 27th of November. I enquired at every house there, but could find no person of that name.

ELIZA PEMBERTON . I am the wife of William Pemberton , who is a chandler, and lives in Ironmonger-street, St. Luke's. On the 4th or 5th of November the prisoner came to our shop, and bought half an ounce of tobacco, for which he paid twopence-halfpenny. While I was weighing it, he looked at a hock of bacon, and asked the price; he said his wife had been looking at it the night before, but she had no money, and he was come to fetch it. I said I thought it was wrong, for I had no hock cut out of the side, and I refused to cut it. He said he thought he was right, that it was a hind hock, and he was to give sixpence halfpenny a pound for it. He said his wife was ill, and could not come out for it, and that it was too late for him to come that night when he came home. He then bought some tea and sugar, which came to between two and three shillings, and gave me a 1 l. note. I asked his name and address? He said William Cleaver , No. 5, Richmond-street; which I wrote on the note, I spelt it Ritchmond, (looks at the note.) this is it. I gave him the change, and he went away.

Q. The note is tore at the corner, did you pay it away - A. My husband paid it at the Post office - it came back about three days after. My husband tore it about a week after in a passion, as I had taken two.

Prisoner. Q. Can you take upon yourself to say I am the man - A. I can, I have no doubt of it - he was about ten minutes in the shop. I observed him particularly, being afraid to give him change. I went to No. 5, Richmond-street in about a week after I took the note, no such person lived there.

WILLIAM PEMBERTON . I am the husband of the last witness. I paid the note away, and it came back to me as forged. I was vexed at having taken two bad ones, and tore it. I do not know what became of the other piece.

ISAAC RUSSELL . I live at No. 5, Richmond-street, St. Luke's. The prisoner does not live there, nor did I ever know anything of him.

JOHN LUCAS. I am a boot and shoemaker, and live in Paternoster-row, Spitalfields. I have seen the prisoner at my shop several times. On the 1st of August he came and bought a pair of shoes. He paid me a 1 l. note, and I gave him 12 s. in change. He said he had come to give me a turn as I had been a customer of his. I asked him his name, he said it was

"Clark, 17, Clerkenwell-close;" which I wrote on the note; and also wrote

"gaiter man," as I had several times bought gaiters of him (looks at a note). This is it.

JOHN LEES . I am an inspector of bank notes, and have been so above twenty years (looks at the note uttered to Macklin), it is forged in every respect, and is not bank paper; the bank notes have the water-mark made in the paper while it is in a liquid state, this paper is not so; it is not the bank plate, nor is it the signature of E. Staple. I have known his writing for many years. The line with the date appears to be engraved, in a genuine note it is printed in stereotype. That uttered to Pemberton is also forged in every respect - it is a different note from the other; there is the remains of the name of William Collier - there was a signing clerk of that name many years ago - he has been dead some years; there was no clerk of that name at the time it is dated. That uttered to Lucas is also forged in every respect, and is not Pearson's signature.

JURY. Q. The note is torn and dirty; is it not possible that a note may be so torn, dirted, written upon, and blotted, and perhaps chemical stuff dropped on it, so as for you not to see the characteristic features - A. This note is not so torn as to prevent my seeing that it is not bank paper.

Q. In other cases is it not so - A. I have never seen any so worn as not to be able to discover them; they may sometimes require a little closer inspection.

EDWARD STAPLE . I am a signing-clerk at the Bank. I am certain the signature to the note is not my writing.

SARAH EGLINTON . I live at No. 2, Baldwin's-court, Baldwin's-street. I lived there on the 6th of November last, the prisoner did not live there - I do not know him. Nobody of the name of Cummins lived there.

(The note was then put in and read. See Indictment.)

Prisoner's Defence. I have nothing to say. The people have sworn false.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

Reference Number: t18181202-139

136. WILLIAM CLARKER was again indicted for feloniously disposing of, and putting away a certain forged and counterfeit bank note, for payment of 1 l., he knowing it to be forged .

No evidence.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18181202-140

137. WILLIAM SUTTON , JAMES MULLINS , HENRY TOWNSEND and JOHN MORRIS were indicted for like offences .

(See No. 12.)

No evidence.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18181202-141

138. ANN MOAT was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of November , three sheets, value 14 s., the goods of William Jackson , in a lodging-room .

CHARLOTTE JACKSON . I am the wife of William Jackson , and live in Wentworth-street, Spitalfields . On the 1st of November the prisoner took a lodging at my house, with her husband. She took it by the night, and came several nights - nobody but her slept in the room; she slept there on the 20th, and let herself out about half-past ten o'clock in the morning; I missed a sheet soon after - they were taken at different times. On the 31st of November, I met her, and charged her with it - I gave her in charge; the duplicate was found on her; she said it was mine - I redeemed it.

THOMAS HART . I am a constable. I took the prisoner in charge, and found several duplicates on her, one of which was for the sheet - I got it from the pawnbrokers.

GUILTY . Aged 38.

Confined One Month .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18181202-142

139. ANN MOODY was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of November , one yard and three quarters of woollen cloth, value 10 s.; one handkerchief, value 4 s., and one widgeon, value 1 s. , the goods of George Foster .

CHARLOTTE FOSTER . I am the wife of George Foster , a coachman , who lives in Vere-street, Clare-market. On the 30th of November, about half-past five o'clock in the evening, I went to a public-house to have some beer, I sat down with my child in my arms; there was music and dancing in the room, I turned round to look at it, and the prisoner walked out with my bundle, which she took from my side. Ann Taylor said she saw her go out with it; we went to King-street, where she lived, and called her down; she denied it, but the charwoman came and told her, that she saw her go out with it. I went for an officer, and when I returned, I found she had delivered it to my sister.

MARY TAYLOR . I was cleaning at the Sugar-loaf, public-house, King-street, Drury-lane , and saw the prisoner go out with the bundle; I went to her, and she denied it; but I told her that I would swear I saw her take it out. Foster went for an officer, she then said she would give it to nobody but White.

MARY WHITE , I am the prosecutrix's sister, and was at the public-house; my sister had a bundle, which laid by her side; we were looking at the dancing, and missed the bundle. Taylor said she saw the prisoner go out with it; we went to her room, and charged her with it, but she denied it. While my sister was gone for an officer, she brought it down to me.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. She gave it to me to mind.

JOHN MOODY . I live with the prisoner, but am not married to her. I was in the public-house; we were dancing together with White and her sister. Doubleday was there - we had been on the loose all day.

Q. Going from one public-house to another, getting drunk - A. Yes. I sent the prisoner home to fetch a piece of bacon; Mrs. White then said she had taken her bundle, and they followed her. They gave the prisoner the child to hold, while they danced.

CHARLOTTE FOSTER . I did not dance with them.

MARY WHITE . I did not dance. Moody pulled me up to dance, but I refused - the prisoner never had the child to hold.

GUILTY . Aged 33.

Confined Six Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181202-143

140. CATHARINE MURPHY was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of September , one coat, value 20 s., and one pair of trowsers, value 10 s., the goods of William Kelly ; and one gown, value 5 s., the good of John Kenny .

JUDITH KENNY . I am the wife of John Kenny , and live in Bowling-green-alley . On the 9th of September, about eight o'clock in the morning, the prisoner came to my room - I was in bed; I saw her put something into my milkpot, and asked what it was, she said it was some receipts; when I got up, I missed my gown, with Kelly's trowsers and coat - I found the duplicates of them in the milkpot. She came to my room two months after - I was then laying in, and could not stop her; she said she would bring all my things back at five o'clock; I followed her to a house in Field-lane - she had told the woman of the house not to let anybody in; the woman turned her out. I got an officer, but he refused to take her till I brought the duplicates; she was afterwards secured, and said that I lent her husband the things to pawn, which is false, for he was in Newgate at the time.

WILLIAM KELLY . I live in Golden-lane. I left my things in care of the prosecutrix, while I was in the country; I afterwards saw the prisoner, and told her she had taken them; she said she had, and would redeem them.

JOHN WALKER . I am shopman to Mr. Matthews, a pawnbroker, in Whitecross-street. On the 9th of September, the trowsers and coat were pledged with me for 19 s., in the name of Kenny, and on the 23rd of October, the gown. I have so often received these very things in pledge, from Kenny and persons that she has sent, that I do not know who pledged them this time.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. Kelly gave them to me to pledge, to raise 1 l. for my husband. The prosecutrix told me to put the duplicate in the milkpot.

WILLIAM KELLY . My things were never pledged before.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181202-144

141. HENRY KEY was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of December , one silver spoon, value 5 s. , the goods of William Hamilton , Esq .

The prosecutor did not appear.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181202-145

142. WILLIAM JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of November , one jacket, value 6 s.; one pair of trowsers, value 5 s.; one pair of stockings, value 2 s., and one pair of shoes, value 6 s. , the goods of Henry Akers .

HENRY AKERS . I am second mate of a West India ship . The prisoner came home in the ship with me, and was paid off after we arrived. On the 26th of November, he came to me, and said he was in great distress, and had nothing to eat for four or five days; he said he would be glad if I would get him employment, and that he would work a few days for his victuals. The captain refused to take him, but at last, by my pleading hard for him, he did take him; I had before told him to go to work, and that I would pay him if the captain would not; in the evening I told the boy to shew him his bed, which he did, and I went ashore and left him there. In the morning, I returned, and found my chest broken open, my clothes were taken out and he gone; he had left his old jacket, shoes and stockings behind. I went ashore to look for him, but could not find him. On the 4th of December, I met him in Ratcliffe highway, he hung his head on seeing me; I collared him, and asked what he had done with my property? he said he had sold them in Rosemary-lane, except the trowsers, jacket, shoes, and stockings, which were on his back; I gave him in charge at the watch-house - I knew the things to be mine.

JAMES TAYLOR . I am a patrol, and took the prisoner in charge; he said he took the prosecutor's clothes, and had some of them on his back, but had sold the rest to a Jew in Rosemary lane; he said the prosecutor had been a good friend to him, and he deserved whatever might come to him.

Prisoner's Defence. He told me to put the trowsers on, I found the jacket among some rubbish; I know nothing of the rest.

GUILTY . Aged 35.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181202-146

143. ISAAC HOLMES was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of November , one pair of pantaloons, value 30 s. , the goods of John Wells .

JOHN WELLS . I am a tailor , and live in High-street, St. Giles's . On the 28th of November, about nine o'clock in the evening, the pantaloons hung at my window; the alarm was given, I ran to the door, found the prisoner there, and the pantaloons by his side.

JEREMIAH MAIDMENT . I am a Bow-street officer. I was coming by, and heard a cry of Stop thief; I saw the prisoner come out of the prosecutor's door, I seized him, and he dropped the trowsers.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was never in the shop.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181202-147

144. JEREMIAH HALEY was indicted, for that he, on the 29th of November , with a certain offensive weapon, (to wit, a stick) which he in his right hand had and held, in and upon Samuel Thorpe , unlawfully, maliciously, and feloniously, did make an assault, with a felonious intent the monies of the said Samuel Thorpe , from his person, and against his will, feloniously and violently, to steal , against the statute.

SECOND COUNT. For unlawfully, and in a forcible and violent manner, demanding his monies, with intent to rob him of his monies, from his person, and against his will, feloniously and violently to steal, against the statute.

The particulars of this case are of too indelicate a nature for publication.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18181202-148

145. AARON HUNT was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of November , one ham, value 10 s. , the goods of George Quantock .

GEORGE QUANTOCK . I am a cheesemonger , and live in Brick-lane . On the 20th of November, the ham stood by the door; I was informed it was gone, and ran out; the prisoner was pointed out to me, he was running, and I lost him - he was afterwards taken. I never found the ham.

MARY KELLY . I was sitting with some fruit next door to the prosecutor's, and saw the prisoner at the prosecutor's window; I knew him before I turned round. A person said he had taken something; I saw him take the ham, and run out of the shop - he was stopped, and brought back.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Whipped and Discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18181202-149

146. WILLIAM HARDY and ROBERT PLATT were indicted for stealing, on the 3d of December , five snuffboxes, value 6 s. , the goods of Patrick Daley O'Shanghnessy .

THERESA CRANE . I live in Beake-street, Golden-square . The prosecutor is my father, and lives there - the business is mine - the property in the shop is my father's. My opposite neighbour came over, and told me to follow the prisoners which I did, and saw Fisher take Hardy - I knew Platt before.

JOHN FISHER . I am a tailor, and live opposite to Crane. I was at my window, and saw Hardy go into the shop, and take some snuff-boxes, Platt was walking about, but as soon as Hardy came out, he went in. I ran down stairs, but they both got out of sight before I could get out. I told Crane what I had seen, I pursued, and caught sight of them in Marylebone-street, they were then together. I collared Hardy, and Platt ran off; I asked Hardy for the boxes - he had two in his hand; Crane came up, and claimed them; he said he was going to sell one to his friend, which was Platt. Haig pursued, and took Platt; at the time he ran away I picked up three more boxes by the side of Hardy.

JOHN HAIG . I was with Fisher, and saw Platt looking in at the window; I pursued and never lost sight of them - I took Platt.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

PLATT'S Defence. Hardy asked me to bring the boxes, he was collared, and I ran away.

HARDY - GUILTY . Aged 22.

Fined One Shilling , and Discharged.

PLATT - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined Three Months , and Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18181202-150

147. SARAH WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of December , 2 lbs. of butter, value 2 s., and 4 lbs. of pork, value 2 s. the goods of Thomas Wells .

THOMAS WELLS. I keep a pork-shop , in Sloane-street, Knightsbridge . On the 3d of December the prisoner came to the shop and bought some bacon. When she was gone I missed a piece of pork which she had been inquiring about. I overtook her about 100 yards off. I found the pork and butter on her.

JAMES DURHAM . I was in the shop, and saw the prisoner take the butter. I thought she had bought it.

Prisoner's Defence. I was rather drunk.

GUILTY . Aged 29.

Confined Three Weeks .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18181202-151

148. GEORGE CROW was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of November , three bridles, value 30 s., and one rein, value 4 s. , the goods of William Harding .

WILLIAM HARDING . I live in Hanway-street, Tottenham-court-road , and am hostler to John Miller . About eight o'clock in the morning, the prisoner came into the stable. We went and had some beer at a public-house; I left him there, returned, and as I was in the loft I saw the prisoner come out of the stable, with the bridle. I ran after him and gave him in charge. He said he was going to pawn them for a pot of beer.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. It was only a drunken frolic.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Whipped , and Discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18181202-152

149. THOMAS BALDWICK was indicted for stealing on the 10th of November , four pair of stockings, value 1 l. 14 s.; one pair of drawers, value 3 s.; five handkerchiefs, value 1 l.; 18 d. in monies numbered, and fifteen 1 l. bank notes , the property of Richard Munn .

RICHARD MUNN . I am a hosier , and live in Great Russel-street, Covent-Garden. On the 10th of November, about nine o'clock, the porter of the New Hummums came over and desired I would send some fine cotton, and black and white silk stockings, to a gentleman there. I took them myself; the porter showed me into a bed-room, where I found the prisoner; he ordered a pair of cotton, at 4 s. 6 d. and a pair of black silk, at 15 s.; he did not approve of the white silk stockings. I said I had more. He desired I would bring them, with some drawers. I went home, returned with them, and sold him a pair of drawers, at 4 s., and a pair of white silk stockings, at 13 s. He asked for change for a 20 l. note. I went home for change, returned with it and some handkerchiefs, which he ordered. I knocked at his bed-room door, which he opened. I gave him in fifteen 1 l. notes, and 18 s. which, with the things, would make the amount. He said he was dressing, and I must wait for the note. I waited close outside the door for five minutes, he then asked me to walk in, and told me to wait a moment while he stepped to the water-closet. He had neither hat nor coat on. He did not return. The same night I saw him in company with two women and took him in the passage of the Sans Pareil Theatre. He was searched at

the watch-house, and a pair of stockings and 7 l. found on him, which I knew to be mine. I never found the rest.

THOMAS MAYHEW . I took the prisoner in charge, and found 7 l. 16 s. on him.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18181202-153

150. JOHM RUTTER was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of November , one cheese, value 10 s. the goods of some person or persons unknown .

WILLIAM NICHOLLS . I am a constable of Bow-street. On the 20th of November, about eight o'clock at night, the prisoner and two others passed me, by the Admiralty. I suspected them, and turned back, as I thought they were following a cart. I followed them into Pall-Mall . One of his companions went behind the cart, and tried to take something out, but did not succeed. He returned to the other two, they walked on about 200 yards, following the cart; the prisoner then went behind the cart and lifted something over the tail-board; I could not see what it was; he returned to his companions with it under his arm. Wright and I went up, laid hold of him, and found the cheese under his arm. The others immediately ran away. He dropped the cheese and resisted very much. I lost the cart, and do not know who it belonged to.

JOHN WRIGHT . I was with Nicholls, and we took the prisoner with the cheese. I could not overtake the cart.

Prisoner's Defence. I found it on the road.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18181202-154

151. JOSEPH AVERY and SARAH SCOCART were indicted for stealing, on the 30th of November , from the person of Thomas Johnson , the sum of 3 l. 10 s. in monies numbered, two 5 l. and seven 1 l. bank notes, his property .

THOMAS JOHNSON . I am a seaman . On the 9th of November I came to town from Chatham. The coach stopped at Charing-Cross , between nine and ten o'clock at night. I met Avery at the coach; he assisted in getting the baggage off the coach. He said that he was a hackney coachman, and it was a common rule to pay him for getting the things off the coach. The coach was full of my shipmates. There were nine of us. I gave him 8 s. for us all. I said I was thirsty, and wished I had some beer. He showed me where I could get some. I parted with my shipmates, I do not know where he took me. I am a stranger in town. He said he wanted a supper; I treated him, and gave him more beer and a glass of gin. I took a bag of silver out of my pocket, to pay for the gin. There was about 4 l. in it; the reckoning came to 18 d. He then took me to another place; we sat very close together. I put my hand to my pocket, and pulled out my notes, and counted them; there were two 5 l. and seven 1 l. bank notes. I rolled them up in a piece of canvas, and put them into my left-hand waistcoat pocket. I asked him for some tobacco. He said he had none. I bought 6 d. worth, and put it in my pocket, on the top of my money. A woman who sat on the opposite side, told me to look in my pocket, and see if I had lost anything. I then missed my money, and said I was ruined. I looked round and missed him and the women who were there. I went out with the woman to look for him, and found him at a house and asked how he could leave me in a strange place? I sent for a watchman. Two women were with him when he was with me, they were stooping down. I asked Avery for a glass of gin; he immediately ran into the street. I followed, calling out Stop thief! and came up to him. He was stopped by the watchman. I gave him in charge. The money was not found. I was neither drunk nor sober.

Q. How long had you been with him - A. I met him at ten o'clock, he left me at twelve. I am sure he is the man. He sat on my left side. The two women sat close to him; 23 s. was found on him. I do not know where we met the women. The prisoner Soccart was one of them, and sat next to him.

SCOCART. Q. Were any women with him when you met him - A. At the second public-house; and I found the same women with him when we took him. My tobacco was found on him.

MARIA FREEMAN . I saw the prosecutor and Avery come into the Black Dog, and call for a pint of beer. I sat opposite to them. They called for another pint. Avery told me that the black man had plenty of money. The prosecutor then took his notes out, counted them, wrapped them in canvas, and put them in his inside jacket-pocket. Avery said, if I would get them from the man, I should share them with him. I said I did not understand him. He then crossed from the side where I was and sat by the prosecutor, and appeared whispering to him. He put his hand into his pocket, took the notes out, and put them into his own great-coat pocket. I told the prosecutor he was robbed, and he fell into a passion with me for saying so, and would not look into his pockets. He went out with Avery, the two women, and me to a cook-shop; we then went to Long-acre, and had something to drink. The prosecutor had his silver then. I told him he was robbed, and if he did not take care the man would be gone. Avery immediately called him down Hanway-street and spoke to him, we walked on. Avery and the two women left. I said to the prosecutor,

"If you feel in your pockets, you may depend upon it, you have no money." He put his hand into his pocket and missed his notes and silver, and said he was ruined. I said I would assist him. The watchman hearing him say he was robbed, took me into custody to the Coal-yard watch-house, as being concerned with them. I am sure I saw Avery put his hand into his pocket. Seocart was in his company; I did not see her do anything.

MARY ANN NUGENT . The prisoners, I and Mellon went in with the prosecutor and Freeman to get something to drink. We could find no public-house open till we came to the Ship in Covent-Garden. We had a glass of gin. The prosecutor asked Freeman to look for a watchman; while she was gone, he ran away, and the two girls ran another way. I saw them dividing the money at the Ship. It appeared to be notes and silver. The watchman took Avery to the watch-house.

JAMES BARTLETT . I am a constable. Avery was brought to me on the 30th of November. I found 23 s. on him. It was about one o'clock in the morning. He denied the

robbery. I found some tobacco in his pocket, which the the prosecutor claimed.

AVERY'S Defence. I took them to the Ship.

SCOCART'S Defence. Nugent cannot say what money we were dividing.

AVERY - GUILTY . Aged 28.

SCOCART - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181202-155

152. JAMES DERMOT was indicted for that he, on the 2d of December , 10 lbs. of lead, value 1 s. 6 d. the goods of John James , and fixed to his dwelling-house, feloniously did cut and rip, with intent to steal .

SECOND COUNT. For stealing the said lead.

JOHN JAMES . I live in White Hart-yard, Drury-lane . On the 2d of December, about eleven o'clock in the morning, I was informed somebody was on my roof, stealing lead, and sent my man up. I sent to Bow-street and got two officers, who took the prisoner into custody. About 9 lbs. of lead were cut off my gutter, which was afterwards compared with the rest.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Who was taken - A. The prisoner and one Reynolds. They were taken coming out of the next house. I do not know that the prisoner lived there.

JOHN MANNING . I am a carpenter. I was working up stairs in a house opposite the prosecutor's, and saw the prisoner standing on the gutters, shifting the tiles with one hand and the lead with the other. I at first thought he was employed there. I went down stairs, returned, and saw him rolling the lead up, and informed the prosecutor. He was gone when I went up again. I am positive he is the man.

Cross-examined. I was about forty feet from him.

Q. This was the day of her Majesty's funeral - did you not hear that pigeons were to be set flying as a signal of the arrival of the procession at Windsor - A. No.

THOMAS GOODING . I am a patrol of Bow-street. I was sent for and took the prisoner and another, who were coming out of the next house, which was a public-house. I went on the roof of the next house, and got on the prosecutor's roof through the loft. I found a small axe in the loft, which appeared muddy, and four pieces of lead, rolled up in a corner; the edges were bright, as if it was fresh cut; it fitted the gutter.

Prisoner's Defence. I was on the roof, seeing the pigeons fly; some dirt was in the gutter.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18181202-156

153. SARAH HARPER was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of September , one watch, value 2 l.; one ribbon, value 1 d., and one key, value 6 d., the goods of Joseph Lotcho , from his person .

JOSEPH LOTCHO . I am a dyer , and live in Essex-street, Whitechapel. On the 6th of September, about six o'clock in the evening I met the prisoner in Sun-yard , and went home with her. I was intoxicated, and do not remember what passed, I lost my watch. I gave her no money.

MARY CHRISTIAN . The prisoner came to my house about five o'clock in the afternoon, and gave me a watch to take care of for her - she said it was her own.

Prisoner. Q. Have you not seen me with it long before - A. I have seen her with a watch, but do not know whether it is this or not.

JAMES NEWMAN . I keep the Sun public-house. The prosecutor was drinking at my house. I heard of the robbery. Christian gave me the watch, which the prosecutor claimed. I asked him how he got it? He said the prisoner gave him the duplicate of it. I never saw him with a watch, but I have seen the prisoner wearing. this very watch for sometime before. I have often wound it up for her.

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutor cohabited with me - the watch is mine. I pawned it, and he wanted to buy the duplicate, but I would not let him - he afterwards saw me with it, and wanted it.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18181202-157

154. THOMAS WHEELER was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of December , one pocket-book, value 6 d.; 3 d. in monies numbered, and a 1 l. bank note , the property of Thomas Loney .

AMELIA LONEY . I am the wife of Thomas Loney , and live in Park-street, Marylebone. On the 5th of December I went into a shop in Davies-street, Oxford-street . I laid my pocket-book on the stool, the prisoner came in, and went out. The shopman immediately said he had taken my pocket-book. I missed it, ran out, and overtook him in South Moulton-street, he denied it - Pyeall took him. I then saw him throw my pocket-book from him - I knew it to be mine, by its contents.

SAMUEL PYEALL . I am an officer. The prisoner ran by me, I followed him, and the prosecutrix came up at the end of South Moulton-street. I saw him drop the pocket-book, which the prosecutrix claimed - it contained a 1 l. note.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I did take it.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Confined One Month .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18181202-158

155. RALPH COOPER was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of November , forty-eight bottles, and ten gallons of wine, value 12 l. , the property of William Tulford .

MR. WILLIAM TULFORD . I live at No. 9, Colebrook-terrace, Islington . On the 31st of October I went out of town, and left my premises quite secure - I had been in the wine-cellar that morning, and it was quite safe. I returned on the 6th of November, in the evening, went to the cellar, found the wine disturbed, two dozen of Port, and two dozen of red Bronte were gone. The Bronte had my hand-writing on the corks. I afterwards saw the

necks and corks in them, of two bottles of Bronte - my hand-writing was on the corks.

Cross-examined by MR DOWLING. I left my wife and two female servants at home.

MARY KITE . I am the prosecutor's servant, On the 2d of November, about seven o'clock in the morning, I found the cellar broken open, a hole was made in the wall large enough for a man to get in and out - it was safe the night before. I saw a small cask of gin standing by the side of the road, a bottle of wine was also found there.

HANNAH CUTHBERT . I am servant at the Gun public-house, Islington, about two hundred yards from the prosecutor's. On Sunday, the 1st of November, the prisoner and two other men came in about eleven o'clock in the morning - they left about seven o'clock in the evening, and returned about a quarter before nine - they called for a corkscrew, I gave it to Edwards, who was with the prisoner. I knew him before, they used the house. They were in a private room drinking red wine out of large tumblers. They remained there till about eleven o'clock, and then my master turned them out very tipsey,

GEORGE FISHER . I am a watchman. My beat is about two hundred yards from the prosecutor's house. On Monday morning, between one and two o'clock, I was on Islington-green. and saw the prisoner lying on the ground dead drunk - he could neither speak nor stir. I found two bottles with their necks broken off, one laid on one side of him, and the other about a yard from him. I took him to the watch-house with them, and in the morning he was let go, as we had not heard of the robbery.

MR. WILLIAM TULFORD re-examined. They are two of the bottles that I lost - they have a triangular cross, and B on them.

CHARLES TUCKETT . I am a watchman. A few nights before the robbery, at a quarter after one o'clock at night, I saw the prisoner and two more near the prosecutor's house, Edward's was one, they had two large dogs with them. I heard the leaves rustle by the place where the cellar was afterwards broken. I went on the terrace steps and found Edwards there apparently asleep - the prisoner was with him. I asked them what business they had there? He said they had been to Mr. Tulford's, I said they had never knocked or rang, for if they had I must have heard them - he said they had been there.

GUILTY . Aged 45.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18181202-159

156. JOHN KINGSTON was indicted for that he, on the 19th of September , at St. James's, Clerkenwell , feloniously, knowingly, and without lawful excuse, had in his custody and possession, a certain forged and counterfeit bank note, he well knowing it to be forged and counterfeited , against the statute.

RAPHAEL ROMANEL . I am an auctioneer, and live at No. 194, Strand. On Saturday the 9th of September, about eight o'clock at night, the prisoner came into my auction-room, dressed in fireman's clothes - the sale was going on; he bought sportman's knife with eight instruments, for 3 s. 6 d. - he was with another man; the prisoner tendered me a 1 l. note; I looked at it, and rather suspected it I addressed myself to them both, and said put your name and address on it; I thought the prisoner endorsed it, but am rather doubtful which of them it was - I gave the note to the prisoner.

Q. Was a name and address put on it - A. Yes. Not by the prisoner, but by the other man, who was dressed in waterman's clothes, and came in with the prisoner, and was with him all the time, and went out with him.

Q. To whom did the you give the note - A. I presented it to the prisoner, but the other took it out of my hand, and put the name and address on it, and said they were well known in the neighbourhood, that they (speaking of both) belonged to the Hand-in-Hand fire-office, and had taken the note there; the prisoner said nothing - he did not have the note in his hand.

Q. It was given to you by the prisoner - A. Yes.

Q. Upon the other man giving this account, did the prisoner make any answer or observation - A. Not any. The other man wrote on the note; (looks at one) this is it, it has Hand-in-Hand Fire-office, Mr. Kingston, Lombard-street, Fleet-street, on it.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. Were you selling yourself - A. No, I was taking money; it is not uncommon for people to come in together; I make every person sign their names on the note they pay - I paid this note away.

Q. You suspected it - A. Yes; I could not tell whether it was good or not - it was refused. I paid it that evening to Hooper, in the Strand, who keeps an eating-house - did not tell him I suspected it.

Q. How many notes did you take that night - A. Eight or nine. I always make everybody put their address on it; I saw the prisoner about seven weeks after, in custody. I am sure he is the man.

Q. I presume you was told the man was in custody, who paid you the note - A. Nothing of the kind was said.

Q. Who applied to you to go to the office - A. I went to the Hand-in-Hand Fire-office; they told me to go to the firemen, which I did, and was told he was in custody; I went to the Bank, and found it was so. They told me to go to the office, and see if he was the man - I saw him at Marlborough-street, with others.

MR. REYNOLDS. Q. You paid the note that night to Hooper - A. Yes, I had been in the habit of lunching there for a year before; he knew me perfectly well, and where I lived, and has changed upwards of twenty notes for me.

Q. Hooper's name was on it - A. Yes, he put it on, and I wrote my name Romanel, 194, Strand; and wrote the address on it when I paid it to him, in his presence. I received no other note with this address on.

Q. Who took the change for the note - A. The prisoner. I am certain of it.

JURY. Q. I understood you to say you knew the note had been refused, and yet you paid it away - A. Yes, I sent my man over to the baker's to get change, and they said they did not like the note; I did not know it was bad; he knew me, and could find me, which he did - I did not tell him I suspected it.

THOMAS BARRATT . I am town messenger at the Hand-in-Hand Fire-office; the prisoner was not their servant on the 19th of September last, he was in their service six years ago, but not later.

CHARLES MASTERS . I am collecter of the watch-rate to

the precinct of Whitefriars, and live in Temple-lane, Lombard-street, which leads from Fleet-street to Temple-lane, and is my district; there are about eighteen houses in it. I know every housekeeper, and have a general knowledge of the inhabitants, it being a small place; the prisoner did not live there, nor anybody of that name. I have been well acquainted with him for thirty years, and can say he did not live there - I do not know where he did live.

JOHN WAKELEY . I am a cheesemonger, and live at No. 61, Upper East Smithfield. On the 23d July, about three or four o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner came to my shop, and bought a piece of bacon, which came to about 2 s. 1 1/2 d.; he offered me a 1 l. note; I looked at it, and saw it was different from all other notes I had ever taken, and told him I had no change, and asked what I should do, he said he did not know. I had observed the name of Mackey on the right-hand side of the ONE, wrote very bad with a thick pen, which I should know again. I went out with it, under a pretence of getting change, and sent a neighbour's man for an officer. I shewed the note to a man named Moses, but it did not go out of my possession; his man, Haggerty, got an officer. He was standing at my door, and in the presence of the prisoner, I gave him the note, and told him to get change for it, but I had directed him to get an officer; the officer soon returned with the note in his hand, and took the prisoner. (looks at a note) This is it, it is marked Mackey, Baldwin-street, City-road, on it, which I particularly noticed. When it came back, I put my name on it; he was searched in my parlour, and some silver was found on him - more than sufficient to pay for the bacon.

Cross-examined. Q. I suppose you have often got change for a note, when you have had silver - A. Yes. I put a mark on the note, in my house - I had given it to Haggerty first.

JOHN HAGGERTY . I am servant to Mr. Moses, who lives opposite Wakeley. I went to the door, and Wakeley gave me a note, which I gave to Hyde, the officer.

DENNIS HYDE . I am an officer of East Smithfield. Haggerty brought me a note, (looks at one) this is it. I went to Wakeley, and took the prisoner. I gave Wakeley the note, but kept my eye on it, while he put his mark on it - he returned it to me. I found 5 s. and some halfpence on the prisoner, and asked him where he got the note, he said he got the note from two sailors, whom he took from Gravesend, to carry on board an East Indiaman; I asked his name and residence, he said he had no residence, for he lived on board a barge, that he had no fixed barge, but used to lay on board barges.

JOHN HATCH . I am a lighterman, and live at Fulham. I have known the prisoner twenty-five years. About the middle of September, I saw him at the Bells, public-house, at Fulham - I was having some beer with some friends; he came up to me with another man, and said, will you give me some beer? I told him to drink; he said he had got a barge of coals lying at Wandsworth, and if I would come down, he would give me some coals; after that we went in doors, and he asked me to give him change for a 1 l. note - he gave me one; I went to the landlord and got change for it, which I gave to the prisoner. We then had half a pint of gin together; I frequented the house, but never changed a note there before nor since; the landlord returned me the note afterwards, and I gave it to Mr. Lees - I have not paid the landlord the value of it.

Cross-examined. Q. On your oath do not you expect the bank will pay it for you on the conviction of this man - A. I expect they will pay me the 20 s.

Q. If you do not fix it on somebody else, you must be responsible yourself - A. Yes. The men who were with me are not here. I have lived at Fulham thirty-five years.

Q. Have you ever been away from Fulham at any time - A. No. I was at sea six months.

Q. Did you not go out of the way, being charged with stealing timber - A. No, no such charge was ever made against me, to my knowledge. I have lived at Fulham constantly for the last six years. The note was returned to me, by the landlord, six days after; I saw him write on it - I did not mark it; I believe he wrote my name on it.

MR. SERGEANT BOSANQUET. How long is it since you went to sea - A. Thirty-six years ago. I belonged to the waterman's company.

Q. Have you had any promise made to you of being paid anything for this prosecution by the Bank - A. No.

Q. Do you expect to be paid for anything but your attendance - A. I expect to be paid for the note.

MR. ALLEY. Q. Do you know Mr. Quintum - A. Yes, he lived at Fulham, and was a lighterman; I worked for him about eighteen years.

Q. Did you absent yourself from his service for eighteen months - No. I was absent about six months, and that was a year and an half ago.

Q. I thought you said you was never away from Fulham, except when you went to sea - A. I was still at Fulham, he and I felt out. On my oath it was not about stealing timber, there never was any charge against me about timber.

MR. SERGEANT BOSANQUET. Q. After you left him, were you received back again - Yes, to work with the same craft, but with his servant.

WILLIAM EVANS . In September last, I kept the Eight Bells, public-house, at Fulham, I saw the prisoner there about the middle of September. Hatch brought me a 1 l. note to change, and I gave him the change, the prisoner sat close to him at the time; I wrote Hatch, waterman, Fulham, on the note, before I gave change; (looks at one) this is it; I never changed any other for Hatch; he took the change up, and went out. I did not know the prisoner before, and would not have given him change.

SUSAN HARRISON . My husband keeps the Crown and Anchor, Seven Dials. On the 3d of November, the prisoner came to the house with two others, they stood in the lobby of the bar; one of the other men had a glass of peppermint - they spoke together, the others had nothing. The other man tendered a 1 l. note, and the prisoner stood close to him at the time; the other man said he wished to have change, or he could not pay me; I said I could not give change, but would go and ask my husband if he had any. I went to him in the parlour, and Furzeman, the constable, was there; I took the note to him, he gave his opinion on it; I returned to the man who gave it to me - the prisoner and the others were still there. I told the man, in their hearing, that I thought it was a bad one, and returned it to him - he made no answer; Furzeman was in the lobby at the time, he took the note out of the man's hand, and

asked him where he got it, he said from his master; Furzeman then gave it to me, and my husband marked it, in my presence; (looks at one) this is it, it has his hand-writing on it.

THOMAS HARRISON . I keep the Crown and Anchor. On the 3d of November, my wife brought me a 1 l. note into the parlour, where Furzeman and I was; I followed her into the bar, took the note out of her hand, and wrote my name on it. Furzeman and Hearne then took the prisoner, and two others, into custody. The prisoner resisted, and said the first b - g - r that attempted to search him he would kick *****. Above 1 l. in silver was found on him.

Cross-examined. Q. He did not pass the note - A. No. Nothing but silver was found on him.

SAMUEL FURZEMAN . I am a constable, and was at the public-house when the prisoner, and two others, were taken; I searched Dent, who was one of them, and found about 5 l. in silver on him; the prisoner would not let me search him, but he was afterwards searched. Nothing was found on the man who passed the note. There is such a parish as St. James.

JOHN HEARNE . I searched the prisoner, and found 1 l. 4 s. in silver, on him - he made a great resistance.

Cross-examined. Q. Dent was discharged by the magistrate - A. Yes. The solicitor for the Bank attended there.

JOHN LEES . I am an inspector of bank notes, and have been so above twenty years. (looks at the note uttered to R. Romanel.)

Q. Does your experience enable you to say whether it is genuine or forged - A. It is forged; the paper is not used by the Bank, and it has not the Bank water-mark; there is an imitation of one, but it is not a water-mark, it has not got the waving lines, like the Bank paper; the words Bank of England, and One, are made in the fabric of the paper, but it is not so in this; there is an imitation of it, which is done, I believe, by pressure and composition - There are various ways by which it may be done. The line containing London and the date is engraved, and done with engraving ink; in a genuine note it is stereotyped, and with printing ink. It purports to be signed by P. Lister; we have a signing-clerk of that name, I have know him ever since I have been in the Bank, and know his hand-writing - it is not his signature. In this note the letters No before the number are engraved, but in a genuine note they are stereotyped. (looks at that paid to Wakeley) It is forged, and a very bad imitation; it is the name in every respect with the other, but not off the same plate; the paper, plate, and signature, are all forged. The plate line appears to have had something passed over it, to give it the appearance of stereotype. (looks at that changed by Hatch) It is forged in every respect, and of the same description as the last, and off the same plate; anybody may ascertain that. (looks at that offered to Harison) It is forged in every respect, and of the same description as the first note, off the same plate, and the numbers are also the same.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. You have been twenty years an inspector, no doubt your experience is very great; I do not suppose you have ever met with any notes, in which you have been deceived - A. I have not. once did many years ago.

Q. There have been a great many notes paid by the Bank within the last year, which have afterwards been discovered to be forged - A. There has been several.

Q. Sixty or seventy - A. I do not know that. The bank-paper is made in Hampshire. There is nobody here from the manufactory. I was never there myself.

Q. Then you cannot tell how the water-mark is made, except what you hear from others - A. No. I speak from the inspection I have had. I see the paper at the Bank.

Q. How do you know it came from the manufactory - A. I have seen it delivered, and have seen the thing the water-mark is done with. I never saw it used.

Q. Did you ever compare the note with the bank plate - A. No. They have many plates. I can safely say, from my experience, that it is not a water-mark. I am certain, as far as my judgment goes, that it is not the signature of Lister.

MR. SERGEANT BOSANQUET. Q. You have been twenty years an inspector, during which time you have become well acquainted with the bank paper and plates - A. Yes, and am in the daily habit of seeing thousands of notes both before and after they are impressed.

Q. Looking at the notes, and bearing in your mind your recollection of the character of the paper and plates, have you the least doubt of their not being genuine - A. None whatever.

Q. In the instances you have mentioned of forged notes having been paid at the Bank, have the attention of the inspectors been called to them, or is it from the neglect of their not being called to see them - A. Generally from neglect. If an inspector pays a forged note, he is obliged to lose it himself.

Q. Have you any difficulty in distinguishing these notes from genuine ones - A. None whatever.

COURT. Q. Your notes are made agreeable to Act of Parliament - A. Yes.

PETER LISTER . I am one of the clerks authorized to sign bank notes. I was ill in September, and signed no notes on the 12th. I am certain the note is not my handwriting. It is not the character of my hand-writing.

Cross-examined. Q. Suppose a good note was issued without a name to it; such things have been done - A. Yes.

Q. If one escaped without a signature, and it was shown to you afterwards with your name to it, would you undertake to swear that it was not your hand-writing, knowing it to be a genuine note - A. I have sworn it is not my writing.

MR. SERGEANT BOSANQUET. Q. If you had seen this signature at the bottom of a letter, or anywhere else, should you have said it was not your hand-writing - A. I should have known it was not my hand-writing. I am certain it is not my writing.

Q. Should you have known this if you had seen it on any other instrument - A. I think I should.

COURT. Q. If a genuine note had gone out unsigned, and your name afterwards put to it, and your attention was called to it, should you have known if it was your own signature or not - A I should have known it.

A JUROR to MR. LEES. Q. Has an instance ever occurred that a genuine note has been rejected and stamped as forged - A. I told you, Sir, on Monday, that it had. It

was a very old note, very much worn, and pasted at the back, as I stated before, and was rejected by a young inspector. If it had been properly looked at I think it would have been discovered.

Q. I asked you if you ever saw the water-mark made, and I think you said Yes - A. I never said so. I have seen the moulds from which they have been made.

Q. Was you ever a paper-maker, engraver, or worked on stereotype - A. No.

Q. I think on Monday you admitted that there were private marks, and that the public would not be benefitted by their being known - A. There are private marks.

(The Note was then put in and read.)

Prisoner's Defence. I did not know the note to be forged, and was never in Romanel's shop.

GUILTY .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18181202-160

157. JEREMIAH HEFFERT was indicted for feloniously and willingly, on the 3d of November , at St. James Clerkenwell , and without lawful excuse, having in his possession and custody a forged and counterfeit bank note for payment of 1 l. knowing it to be forged .

SUSAN HARRISON . I am the wife of Thomas Harrison , who keeps the Crown and Anchor, King-street, Seven Dials, St. Giles's, Middlesex. On Tuesday the 3d of November, between eight and nine o'clock at night, the prisoner came to our shop, with Kingston and another. They came into the lobby of the bar; he asked me for a glass of peppermint. I served him; it came to 3 d. He laid a 1 l. bank note on the counter, and I said I had not got change, but would go and ask if my husband had any. He asked the others if they would have any thing; they gave no answer. I took the note into the parlour where my husband was with Furzeman and Hearn. I showed Furzeman the note; he gave his opinion about it. I returned to the bar, gave it to the prisoner, and told him I thought it was not good. He made no answer. Furzeman was then in the lobby, and took it out of his hand, and asked where he got it? He mentioned a name, which I do not recollect. Furzeman gave me the note, I gave it to my husband, who marked it in my presence - (looks at it.) - This is it.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. The prisoner had no opportunity to destroy it.

THOMAS HARRISON . My wife brought the note into the parlour. I went to the bar. She afterwards gave it to me - (looks at it.) - This is it.

SAMUEL FURZEMAN . I am a constable of St. Giles's. On the 3d of November I was in the parlour of the public-house, with Hearn and Harrison. Mrs. Harrison brought a 1 l. note to me; I examined it, gave my opinion on it, then went to the bar, found the prisoner, Kingston, and a man named Dent. I went up to the bar-door, Dent turned round and was going away rather quick; I stopped him, and told him to go back. Mrs. Harrison then returned the note to the prisoner, and told him it was a bad one. I asked him for it, he directly handed it to me; I then handed it to Harrison, and told him to mark it. I also marked it, and then asked the prisoner where he got it; he said he got it from his master, Mr. Pocock, Whitefriars. I searched him. He held his arms for me to search him - I found nothing on him; I also searched Dent, who had a bundle of paper under his arms, and found 5 l. 2 s. 6 d. in silver, on him, and a good 1 l. note. I asked where he lived, he said anywhere when he had got money; at that time Kingston was swearing he would not be searched by anybody; I reasoned with him for about a minute before I attempted to lay hold of him. I then held him down while Hearne searched him; he found 24 s. on him - we took him to the watch-house. I then asked the prisoner where he lived, he also said any where when he had got money. I asked Dent again where he lived, he said in West-street, West Smithfield, and that he had the silver from a gentleman named Donelly, who was gone to Ireland. I again asked the prisoner where he got the note, he said he took it of a gentlemen on the water, but mentioned no name.

JOHN HEARN . I am a constable, and was present when the prisoner was searched; the prisoner said he received the note of his master, Mr. Pocock, of Whitefriars; he described himself either as a waterman or lighterman; I was in the watch-house, where he was again asked, and said he received it of a gentleman on the water, or whom he had carried by water.

JURY. Q. Did you go there accidentally, or had you any intimation of bad notes being passed - A. I went accidentally.

JOHN THOMAS POCOCK . I am a coal-merchant, and keep a wharf, and live in Whitefriars. I keep craft of my own, and hire lightermen to work them. I do not know the prisoner - I have no recollection of him. People are frequently employed to bring my barges up whom I do not see.

Q. Did you ever pay him a 1 l. note - A. I am sure I did not myself.

Cross-examined. Q. Who pays your men - A. It is usual to give an order on a public-house; but if they are paid by the week, they have money.

ELIZA ARCHER . I am the wife of Richard Archer , who is a baker, and lives on College-hill. On Saturday night, the 3d of October, the prisoner came to our shop, and bought two quartern loaves, which came to two shillings and a penny. He paid me a 1 l. bank note - I told him I had rather not give change, as I was short of silver. He then said he must go aboard without bread, I borrowed a few shillings of my daughter to make up the change. I asked his name and address, he said it was Taylor, on board a cooper's barge. I gave the note to my daughter, who was at the desk, and she wrote the name on it, in my presence - it was never out of my sight; she returned it to me. I put it in my purse, and paid it away on Monday morning (looks at one). This is it. It has my daughter's writing on it.

Cross-examined. Q. He was a stranger - A. Yes, I saw him again at the House of Correction within a month after. I was taken to him, it might be within a fortnight.

Q. You expected to see the man who imposed on you - A. Yes, two men were with him, I pointed him out. I had no other note marked Taylor - it was returned to me two or three days after.

Q. The Bank will pay you 20 s. for it - A. I do not expect it.

MARY ARCHER . I am the daughter of the last witness, the note has my writing on it. I took it on the 3d of October - I was at the desk in the shop, my mother

gave it to me to endorse, I returned it to her. I did not see the man sufficiently to recollect him - he bought two quartern loaves.

JOHN LEES , I am an inspector of bank notes (looks at the note) it is forged in every respect, it is not Bank paper - the apparent water-mark is put on after the paper is made. The letter N in the ONE is cut through in making the water mark. The letter No. before the number are engraved, also the letters in the date. In a genuine note they are printed. The signature is not Tabor's handwriting; that uttered to Mrs. Archer is also forged in every repect, the same as the other and both off one plate, it purports to be signed R. Clough, he was not a signer of small notes on the 13th of August. He is a cashier, and only signs notes of 5 l. and upwards.

Cross-examined. Q. It might be torn by being rumpled - A. It is cut through exactly in the line.

CHARLES TABOR . I am a signing-clerk at the bank, and have been so for five years. I am positive I never signed this note.

Cross-examined, Q. You mean to swear you never signed forged notes - A. It is not my hand-writing - it is nothing like it.

(The note was then put in, and read.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was going towards the Seven Dials, and fell in with Dent and Kingston. We went into the house. If I had known the note was bad I should have tried to destroy it. As to the other, I know nothing of it.

GUILTY . Aged 21

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

Reference Number: t18181202-161

158. WILLIAM KING was indicted for a like offence .

THOMAS JONES . I am a cheesemonger, and live in Laystall-street, Middlesex . On Saturday the 14th of November , about six o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came to my shop, and bought some things which came to 2 s. 9 d. together, and gave me a 1 l. note. I asked him what address I should put on it? He said he worked for Mr. Rotten, but that he lived at No. 3, Baldwin's-gardens. I knew Mr. Rotten, of Mount Pleasant, he is a large iron-founder, and lives about four hundred yards from me. I told him so, but do not know that he said he lived there. I asked the prisoner his name? He said Smith, No. 3, Baldwin's-gardens, which I wrote on the note in his presence, (looks at one) this is it. I beckoned to my wife, as I intended to have the first man stopped, who came to change a note, as I did not know a good one from a bad one, I did not suspect the note. I sent for an officer, Read came, and found 12 s. 6 d. in silver on him.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he not say his master's name was Robson, not Rotten - A. He did not, I could not be mistaken, as I mentioned the name again to him. The door was open, and he might have ran away.

MR. REYNOLDS. Q. Had you ever intimated to him any doubt of the note - A. None whatever; I am certain he said Rotten. I knew Robson also, he lives in Little Sutton-street.

WILLIAM READ . I am an officer of Hatton-garden. On the 14th of November, I was sent for to the prosecutor's shop, took the prisoner into custody, and found 12 s. 6 d. on him, and 5 1/4 d. In his coat pocket I found a pound of lump-sugar. I inquired at No. 3, Baldwin's-gardens, for a person named Smith, but found no such person there. There is such a parish as St. James, Clerkenwell.

JOHN LOWTHER . I live at No. 3, Baldwin's gardens On the 14th November the prisoner did not live there, I never saw him - I have kept the house ever since last Midsummer.

EDWARD FISHER . I am foreman to Mr. Rotten, of Mount Pleasant. The prisoner did not work for him.

JOHN LEES . I am an inspector of bank notes. (looks at the note) It is forged, it is not Bank paper, the watermark is not made in the fabric of the paper - it is impressed. The numbers are printed as they ought to be, many forged notes are so; the date line is engraved, but it is printed in a genuine note - it is not Whiting's handwriting.

HENRY WHITING . I have been a signing clerk five years - there is no other of my name; I never signed this note, it is not like my hand.

(The note was then put in and read.)

Prisoner's Defence. Mr. Jones must have mistaken me, I said I worked at Mr. Robinson's; I suppose I must have mistook the name that was put on the note.

HENRY ROBINSON . I am a smith, and live in Little Saffron-hill. The prisoner worked for me within a few weeks of his apprehension.

MR. SERGEANT BOSANQUET. Q. Was he working for you at the time - A. No, not for two or three weeks before. I live about five minutes walk from Mount Pleasant; I know Rotten - he is very well known.

Q. What is the prisoner's name - A. William King. I do not know where he lived.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18181202-162

159. JOHN KINGSTON , JEREMIAH HEFFERT , and WILLIAM KING , were again severally and separately indicted for uttering forged bank notes, knowing them to be forged .

No evidence.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18181202-163

160. WILLIAM WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously assaulting Thomas Toomer on the King's highway, on the 14th of April ; putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, one watch, value 1 l.; one piece of ribbon, value 2 d.; two seals, value 2 s.; one key, value 1 d., and one half-crown, his property .

THOMAS TOOMER . I am a shoemaker , and live in Blue Anchor-yard, Westminster. On the 14th of April, about four or five o'clock in the afternoon, I was at a bull-bait; a man was talking with me, and said he had been attacked, and the person wanted to rob him; I said I would forgive anybody who robbed me, he said do not boast; I turned round, and was surrounded by a gang of about fifteen - they pushed me about; the prisoner came up, and asked the man what he was looking at, but he made no reply; the prisoner said he would fetch him a punch of the mouth. They knocked me down, beat me violently, and took my watch and half a crown from me. I am sure he is the man, I knew him before - one of his companions took it. The prisoner was the first that laid hold of me.

THOMAS HAGGER . I had my cart at the bull-bait; the

prosecutor called out murder, and for help; this was after he had lost his watch. I pulled him up into my cart.

JAMES GILLMORE . I was at the bull-bait; I was on the roof of a house, and saw the prisoner with fourteen more, pushing the people about, and knocking them down; the prosecutor soon after informed me he was robbed, and mentioned the names of three of them, the prisoner was one; I took two, but the prisoner, seeing me go into a public-house, got away. I never saw him from that day till last Monday, when I took him, in consequence of an anonymous letter.

JOSEPH COOPER . I was at the bull-bait, and saw the prisoner there with several others, hustling the people, and turning their pockets inside out; I saw him go to the place where the robbery was committed. I afterwards saw him, about 100 yards from me; he saw me, and ran off, and has absconded ever since.

Prisoner's Defence. I was there, but never touched the prosecutor. I have met Gillmore and Hagger, once or twice, but they never took me.

GUILTY.

Of stealing from the person only, not with violence .

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.


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