Old Bailey Proceedings, 28th October 1818.
Reference Number: 18181028
Reference Number: f18181028-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace Oyer and Terminer, AND Gaol Delivery for the City of London, AND ALSO The Gaol Delivery For the County of Middlesex, HELD AT Justice hall, in the Old Bailey; On WEDNESDAY, 28th of OCTOBER, 1818, and following Days; Being the Eighth Session in the Mayoralty of THE RIGHT HON. CHRISTOPHER SMITH , LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

Taken in Short-Hand by H. BUCKLER, Basinghall Street,(BY AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON.)

London: PRINTED AND PUBLISHED, FOR H. BUCKLER, BY T. BOOTH, 31, St. Andrew's Hill, Doctors' Commons.

1818.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX.

Before the Right Honourable CHRISTOPHER SMITH , Esq. LORD MAYOR of the City of London; Sir Robert Dallas , Knt. one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir William Garrow , Knt. one of the Barons of his Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir Richard Carr Glyn , Bart.; Sir James Shaw , Bart.; Thomas Smith , Esq.; Sir William Leighton, Knt., and Sir William Domville , Bart. Aldermen of the said City; Sir John Silvester , Bart., D.C.L. Recorder of the said City; Samuel Goodbehere , Esq., and Robert Albion Cox , Esq., Aldermen of the said City, and Newman Knowlys , Esq. Common Sergeant of the said City, his Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

London Jury.

Joseph York Hatton ,

Alexander Curling ,

Joseph Carpenter ,

Edmund Marshall ,

Daniel Cole ,

Gregory Jarman ,

Joseph Flower ,

Thomas Duplock ,

Thomas Godwin ,

James Danderidge ,

Richard Knight ,

Thomas Orchard .

First Middlesex Jury.

Henry Day ,

Joseph Gratton ,

David Soutter ,

Edward Mitchell ,

Josiah John Luntley ,

Edward Toplis ,

Thomas Newton ,

John Fisher ,

William Money ,

Thomas Staker ,

Jonathan Dowset ,

John Simmons .

Second Middlesex Jury.

William Chester ,

Thomas Dixon ,

Samuel Evans ,

Thomas Doggett ,

Thomas Waller ,

Richard Tovey ,

Thomas Allen ,

James Gregory ,

William Peek ,

Thomas Dale ,

Samuel Cater ,

Wm. Kirkman Foster .

SESSIONS HOUSE, OLD BAILEY, OCTOBER 28, 1818.

SMITH, MAYOR. EIGHTH SESSION.

Reference Number: t18181028-1

1392. WILLIAM WHITE was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Joseph Ince and Charles Ince , about six o'clock at night on the 30th of September (the said Charles Ince and Hannah Stephens being therein), and stealing therein one bottle, value 3d., one quart of wine, value 5s., their property; one time-piece, value 3l.; two silver salt-spoons, value 2s.; one pair of sugar-tongs, value 5s.; six plated spoons, value 1l., and six plated forks, value 1l., the property of the said Joseph Ince , and two silver tea-spoons, value 5s. , the property of the said Charles Ince .

CHARLES INCE . I live in James-street, Craven-street . On Tuesday, the 29th of September, I came home late in the evening, and went to bed at two o'clock in the morning-every thing was then safe. In the morning I found the windows broken open, and missed the property stated in the indictment. The two tea-spoons belonged to me.

COURT. Q.Who did the time-piece belong to - A. To my brother, Joseph Ince . I saw every thing safe the night before.

HANNAH STEPHENS . I am the prosecutors' servant. I went to bed about two o'clock, the kitchen was then safe; next morning, at eight o'clock, I came down first, found the street - door open, and alarmed Mr. Ince. I then went into the parlour, and found every thing in confusion, every cupboard open, and the property gone. I found the kitchen window open, and the shutter cut. A man could put the time-piece in his pocket.

JANES SHEPPARD. On Wednesday morning, the 30th of September, I was going up Craven-street, and saw the prisoner standing with his back towards mr. Ince's door, a few minutes after six o'clock - I knew him before; he called to me, and said "How are you?" I did not suspect him; he had no bundle with him.

Prisoner. Q. How do you know it was that morning - A. I met the servant next morning, she said they had been robbed.

HANNAH STEPHENS re-examined. I met Sheppard on Thursday morning, the day after the robbery, and told him we had been robbed.

ELIZA CLEMENTS . On Wednesday morning, about a quarter before seven o'clock, I saw a man come from the prosecutor's door, he pulled the door after him, and walked up Craven-street - he had a bottle with him.

JOHN MANSER . I am shopman to Mr. Welby, who is a pawnbroker. On the day after the robbery the prisoner pledged a salt-spoon with me, and redeemed a watch which he had pledged the night before; in the evening he brought another salt-spoon and two tea-spoons. Having received information, I detained him.

JOHN DAVIS . I am an officer. I took the prisoner into custody. He said he received the spoons of a man whom I knew; I fetched the man to him, he then said he was not the man.

CHARLES INCE re-examined. The time-piece was worth 4l. in my judgment.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was passing a marine store dealer's shop, and saw a man, he sold me the spoon, and said if I would meet him in the evening he would sell me some more things. I met him, he sent me to pledge the things, and I was detained.

GUILTY Aged 17.

Of stealing to the value of 39s. only, but not of breaking and entering.

Transported for Seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Dallas.

Reference Number: t18181028-2

1393. PATRICK LEESON was indicted for feloniously assaulting Robert Little , on the King's highway, on the 9th of October , at St. Martin in the Fields , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, one watch, value 10s.; one seal, value 6d.; one watch-key, value 1d., and one ribbon, value 1d., his property .

ROBERT LITTLE . I am one of the money-takers at Covent Garden Theatre , and live in Tothil-street, Westminster. On the 9th of October, a little before one o'clock in the morning, I was returning home with my wife, and saw several people following me; when I got below Charing-cross I told my wife to give her shawl to me, I thought they wanted to take it-she said it was safe, and kept it herself. When I got a little further I came up to several people, there were nine or ten. The prisoner ran against me from a door-way.

Q. How did he run against you - A. Not with any great force; it appeared to be done to put me off my guard. I made way for him, but he still kept coming towards me; I pushed him from me, he took my watch, and went among the people who had been following me. I called out Stop thief! the watchman came to my assistance, I then saw the prisoner run from the people, and turn up Scotland-yard, I followed, but returned to my wife. The watchman brought him back in about two minutes. I knew him to be the man.

Prisoner. Q. Will you positively say I came against you and took your watch - A. He is the man.

Q. When you saw me with two other persons did you not ask the watchman which of the three it was - A. No; I received a very severe injury, which prevented my going before the magistrate the next day, but I went the day after. I never authorized any one to inform the prisoner I would make it up for a 1l.

HENRY BETTS . I am constable of St. John's. I was near Charing-cross, and heard the alarm of stop thief; the prisoner was the first man who ran towards me; I collared him, several others came up, and knocked me down - I let go my hold. Humphreys pursued the prisoner, and brought him back in about five or six minutes. I knew him to be the man I at first collared - I have not the least doubt of it.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not charge me with robbing you - A. No; I lost some money in the crowd, but did not charge the prisoner with it.

JOHN HUMPHREYS . I am a watchman. I heard the alarm, and ran across the street; Little said he had been robbed of his watch, I saw the prisoner run from him, he was about eight yards from him, he ran down Scotland-yard - I lost him-the other watchman said he thought he had concealed himself; I found him in a coach-house in the yard, and charged him with the robbery - He denied it. I found nothing on him. As soon as it got daylight I went to the place where I took him-the other watchman, Brewer, found a watch-case about twenty yards from where I took the prisoner, and in the direction he had ran.

DANIEL BREWER . I am watchman of Great Scotland-yard. I heard the alarm, and saw a man run down the yard from Charing-cross, he found he could not pass me, turned back, and ran into the coach-house. I went in with Humphreys and found the prisoner there. About half-past five o'clock in the morning I found a watch-case within a few yards of the place, in the direction he had ran.

(Watch-case sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. As I was coming from Westminster, I saw a mob at the corner of Scotland-yard, went into the coach-house for a necessary purpose, and was charged with the robbery.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 20.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow .

Reference Number: t18181028-3

1394. JOHN CLEAVER was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of September , in the dwelling-house of Edward Houlditch, John Houlditch, and James Houlditch , ten 1l. bank notes, the property of John Morrice Hatt .

JOHN MORRICE HATT . I am clerk to Messrs. Edward Houlditch , John Houlditch, and James Houlditch , who live in Long-acre ; the prisoner was a carpenter at work in the house. I could not open my box, got him to take the lock off, and put a new one on. I was with him all the while he did it; I missed the notes about a week after, and found four of them at the Bank. Two persons besides myself slept in the room.

SOPHIA BURGESS . I keep a public-house in the Minories. On the 3d of September I received a 1l. note, but I do not know who paid it to me.

RICHARD SMITHERS being called, did not appear, and the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Dallas.

Reference Number: t18181028-4

1395. THOMAS HERBERT was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of September , at St. James, Westminster ; in the dwelling-house of Robert Butler , one 10l., three 5l., and one 1l., bank note, the property of Joseph Grimshaw .

JOSEPH GRIMSHAW. I am a smith , and live in King-street, Golden-square ; the prisoner lodged in the same room with me. I kept my money in my box - He had seen me put it there. On the 23d of September, about two o'clock in the afternoon, I put my money in my box, and locked it after me. I went out to work, returned at nine o'clock, and found my box unlocked, and my property gone. I could not find the prisoner until the 25th, when he was in custody.

WILLIAM HUMPHREYS . I keep the sign of the Cock, in Grafton-street. On the 25th of September, the prisoner was at my house. In consequence of what passed, I gave him in charge of Harvey.

JOSEPH HARVEY. I am a constable. On the 25th of September, the prisoner was given into my charge. I searched him at the watch-house, and found one 10l., two 5l., and four 1l., bank notes on him, which I produce. I asked if he had robbed his master? he said No, it was his fellow workman. Before I searched him he said he took 24l. of the money.

JOSEPH GRIMSHAW. I can swear to the 10l., and one of the 5l. notes - They have the name of Lovegrove on them, which I saw the man write when he paid them to me - I cannot swear to the others.

ROBERT BUTLER . I keep the house, which is in St. James's parish. The prisoner and the prosecutor lived there, and lodged in the same room.

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutor has often shown me his money, and asked if I should like to have it. I was induced to take it out of his box - I did not know what to do with it, and was quite unhappy. I had most all of it when I was taken.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 20.

Recommended to Mercy.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow .

Reference Number: t18181028-5

1396. JOHN BURGESS was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of October , at St. George, Hanover-square , one coat, value 50s., and one waistcoat, value 10s., the goods of Charles Heather , in the dwelling-house of George Gunn .

CHARLES HEATHER . I am a smith , and live at the White Swan, Park-street, Grosvenor-square ; George Gunn keeps the house, which is in the parish of St. George, Hanover-square. On the 13th of October, when I went to bed I missed a coat and waistcoat. They were new, and cost me 4l. 7s., together. The prisoner lodged in the same room with me.

GEORGE GUNN. I keep the house-the prosecutor came down and said he had lost his clothes, we called the prisoner up and charged him with it, he denied it. I got an officer, he was taken into custody, and jumped out of the two pair of stairs window, and escaped-nobody slept in the room the night before but him-nobody else could get into the room.

Prisoner's Defence. I told them that I took the clothes, and promised to redeem them.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 27.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Dallas.

Reference Number: t18181028-6

1397. RALPH HODGSON was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of October , at St. George, Hanover-square , one pocket-book, value 10s.; one map, value 9s., and one memorandum-book, value 1s., the goods of William Houghton , privately in his shop .

WILLIAM HOUGHTON . I am a stationer , and live in Bond-street . On the 5th of October, the prisoner came to my shop with a man in a soldier's dress. They asked the price of some knives in the window? I said they were 1s. 9d. each. I went to the window, took them out, and showed them one with two blades. They said they only wanted one blade. I turned to look for one - They went out of the shop quickly, and said, they were sorry to trouble me-nobody else was in the shop. I missed a pocketbook that laid on the counter between us. I went out in pursuit, ran round several streets, and found them in Grafton-street, they began to walk-they had been running before. I lost sight of them again, and found them in St. James-street, crossing into Park-lane - I there secured the prisoner - he was with the other man. I asked him, if he had not got something that did not belong to him? I found a map of London in his pocket, which I know to be mine. I took him into Mr. Middleton's shop, and found the pocket-book and memorandum-book on him, which I knew to be mine-the pocket-book was manufactured by myself, and has my private mark; it cost me 10s. 6d., and the map 9s.

Prisoner. Q. Did I make any resistance - A. No.

JOHN FEATHERTON. I am servant to Mr. Middleton, the prisoner was searched in our shop, and the things found in his pocket.

Prisoner's Defence. I met a young man in Oxford-street, we went to Bond-street - he wanted to buy a knife. I went into the shop with him. The prosecutor said he had none to suit us. In passing along the street, the man gave me the things to dispose of for him.

GUILTY - DEATH , Aged 25.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow .

Reference Number: t18181028-7

1398. GEORGE BECK was indicted for that he, at the delivery of the King's gaol of Newgate, holden for the county of Middlesex, at Justice Hall, in the Old Bailey, on the 26th of October, in the 55th year of thereign of our Lord the King, was in due form of law tried and convicted of burglary, and was ordered to be hanged by the neck until he should be dead, but was afterwards pardoned, on condition of his being transported to the coast of New South Wales, or some one or other of the islands adjacent, for and during the term of his natural life, and that he the said George Beck afterwards (to wit), on the 28th of September , in the 58th year of the reign of our said Lord the King, feloniously was at large, without any lawful cause, within that part of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland called Great Britain (to wit), at the parish of St. Martin in the Fields , before the expiration of the said term for which he was ordered to be transported, against the statute .

BENJAMIN MORRIS . I apprehended the prisoner on the 28th of September, in Duke's-court, Bow-street, on this charge. I produce the certificate of his conviction-(Certificate read.)

JAMES JOHN SMITH . I know the prisoner to be the man who was convicted on the indictment; I was with Morris when he was apprehended.

Prisoner's Defence. I am the man, but was not guilty of the burglary.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 27.

[After the verdict was returned, the prisoner handed in a written statement, as follows-" George Beck humbly implores your Lordship to take into your humane consideration the hardships he has undergone. He had no intention of deserting when he left the ship, he fell overboard by accident; had it been designedly, there were six sentries on deck, who would have fired at him. He was six hours and a half in the water, and was so exhausted, that it was several days before he was sufficiently recovered to endeavour to regain the vessel. He then went over in a boat to Rio Janeiro, but found the ship had sailed, and he then got over to Buenos Ayres, where he worked for a printer during a period of three years. He has no doubt but that the returns of the ship at the Secretary of State's office suppose him to be drowned, and the captain of the Fanny he believes is not in England. He hopes these circumstances will have some weight towards mitigating his sentence.]

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Dallas.

Reference Number: t18181028-8

1399. JOHN PRESS was indicted for feloniously assaulting David Litchfield , in a certain field and open place near the King's highway, on the 17th of October , at Finchley , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, one canvas bag, value 6d.; one stick, value 6d., and the sum of 1l. 10s. 6d. in monies numbered, his property .

DAVID LITCHFIELD . I live near Stevenage, in Hertfordshire, and am a labourer . On the 17th of October I was coming to town to attend the funeral of my son, and met the prisoner on the other side of Barnet - He was standing in the road, and said he was going to town - I said I was going there also, and we walked together. As we went along he pulled out a handkerchief, and offered it to me for 1s. - I bought it of him out of charity, as he said he was in distress. I pulled out my purse, which had 30s. in it, to pay him - He said I had got some money. On arriving at Barnet we had a pint of beer. When we got

through Whetstone, we came on the road towards Coneyhatch, he said there was a public-house down the road, that he knew the person, and we could have a good bed there-it was then between six and seven o'clock; he said it was the sign of the Orange-tree. I found it was a long way, and said we might as well have gone to Highgate - He said he knew a short road, which would take us to Highgate. When we got on Finchley Common, as I was getting over some rails I fell down and hurt myself, I fell backwards into a ditch - I was quite sober. He came to me - I thought he was going to help me up, but he rolled me over, and said, "Your money, or your life!" He held me down, unbuttoned my breeches-pocket, took out my purse, and ran away - He also took my stick, and left me his. I got up, got into the road as well as I could, and told the patrol what had happened, as well as I could, for I could hardly speak, and he went in search of the prisoner. In about an hour he brought the prisoner in custody to me at a public-house where I waited. They brought my stick to me, I knew it to be mine. They then took me into a room, and told me to shake hands with the man. I went up to him, and said, "Old friend, you did not think of seeing me again so soon." I knew him to be the man. When he was with me he had a smock-frock on, but it was off when he was brought to me. He had told me he was quite broken down.

JOHN RICE . I am a horse-patrol on the Finchley-road. The prosecutor came up the road, he appeared as if he could hardly speak. He gave me this account, and I went in pursuit of the man, who he said had taken 30s. and had taken his stick by mistake. I rode about a mile and a quarter, and met Ford. In consequence of information we went about a quarter of a mile, and overtook the prisoner just by the Wellington public-house, going towards town. I asked him where he came from? he said from St. Alban's. I asked him what he had done with his smock-frock? he said he had had none on. I asked him if he had been near Coney-hatch? he said No. I told him if he put his hand to his pocket I would shoot him. As I was taking him to the public-house he said he had a smock-frock. I asked him what he had under his arm? he said, they were his things-(it was the smock-frock.) I found a canvas bag on him, containing 31s. 6d. in half-crowns, shillings, and sixpences. We fetched the prosecutor to the Wellington, public-house, and showed him a stick which the prisoner had, he claimed it immediately. I then took him into the room where the prosecutor was, with six other men, and told him to shake hands with the man who had robbed him - He immediately went up to the prisoner, and said, "Ah! is that you?"

WILLIAM FORD . I am a horse-patrol. I went in pursuit with Rice, and took the prisoner with a bundle under his arm. Rice has spoken correctly. The prisoner said he had no smock-frock; he afterwards acknowledged he had one - We found it in the bundle. He had a stick, which the prosecutor claimed.

WILLIAM LANCE . I am inspector of the patrol. I met Ford and Rice, and they told me what had happened. About a minute before I had seen a tall man, and told them where he went to. I went back with them, we stopped the prisoner, and took him back-they have spoken correctly.

DAVID LITCHFIELD re-examined. My money consisted of half-crowns, shillings, and sixpences - I do not know how many there were of each. The bag in which the money was found is not mine. I cannot swear to the money-it is about the same sum as that which I lost, The stick is mine, I have had it above a year-there is a notch in it to mark a yard.

Prisoner's Defence. I was returning from St. Alban's to buy some goods-the patrols took me, and I said I was going to town. They asked me if I had not been to Colney-hatch? I said I had not. I told them there was a smock-frock in my bundle - They took my purse and money. I never saw the prosecutor.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 28.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow .

Reference Number: t18181028-9

1400. JAMES HOLT was indicted for feloniously assaulting William Luker on the King's highway, on the 20th of September , at St. Mary le Strand , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, the sum of 14s., in monies numbered, his property .

WILLIAM LUKER . I am a brass-founder . On Sunday, the 20th of September, at seven o'clock in the morning. I was coming up Swan-yard - I had been into the Swan, public-house, where I had a glass of liquor. As I came up the yard I met the prisoner and four others - I had seen one of the others before. I did not know the prisoner before. I had been in the public-house about an hour - I had not been to bed all night - I had drank a great deal. but was neither drunk nor sober. I met the prisoner and five others in the yard.

Q.In that state of intoxication, how can you swear he is the man - A. I had got as far as Brydges-street - they came up, forced me back, and threw me down at the corner of Swan-yard. They took hold of my two arms and legs, and threw me on my back-the prisoner stood before me, with his head in my stomach. When I got up, I found my pocket cut, and my money taken, which amounted to 14s.. In about three weeks the prisoner was taken - I knew him to be the man. I had put my money in my pocket, after paying my reckoning at the public-house.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not say you was so drunk that you did not know who robbed you - A. No; I never doubted the prisoner's being one of the men.

JAMES GOY . I am a tailor. On Sunday morning, about a quarter before seven o'clock, I saw the prisoner in White Horse-yard; there was a crowd - I found it was the prosecutor, who was intoxicated, and a woman was trying to get him home. The prisoner, and five others, went up to him, and asked him for some gin - They told him he had no money. He pulled out three half-crowns and two shillings - They took him back with them into Swanyard. The prisoner then pressed his head against his stomach, and two others caught his arms-the prisoner pulled his legs and threw him down. He had a knife, cut his pocket, and took the money out - I saw the money in his hands-he immediately left; two went one way and three the other. I saw the prisoner about a month after, and knew him again immediately.

COURT. Q. Why did you not stop them, when you saw

them rob him - A. I was afraid - I was going to do it, but a young man told me I should get hurt myself if I did.

JOHN HAWKES. I am a constable of St. Clement's. I took the prisoner at a coffee-shop in Wych-street. Goy fetched me to take him.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not say the prosecutor was very little better than a thief himself - A. Never.

JOHN WILLIAMS . I was with Hawkes. I was at the back-door, the prisoner went out at the front-door, and Hawkes took him. The prosecutor immediately said he was the man.

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutor said he knew me very well, for he had served me with oysters-that he thought I was one of the men, but if I would give him some money he would discharge me. He did not appear before the magistrate until he was summoned.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 20.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Dallas.

Reference Number: t18181028-10

1401. BARNET CHANEY was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of October , at Hillingdon, one gelding, price 8l. , the property of Thomas Mulcock .

THOMAS MULCOCK . I live at Abingdon , and am a butcher . On the 29th of September I saw my gelding safe on the common; I saw it again at Hillingdon, but did not know it was lost.

BENJAMIN MULCOCK . I am brother to the last witness. I saw his gelding safe on the 29th of September, about half-past six o'clock in the evening, on the common.

THOMAS INGRAM . I live at Edgley, in Berkshire. On a Friday, at the beginning of October, I saw the prisoner going through Uxbridge, riding on a gelding; I had received information, and asked him if he was going to Croydon fair, he said he was; the horse appeared very much fatigued. I said, "You have travelled very hard." He said he had come from Oxford. I said no more, but rode on to Hillingdon. The prisoner afterwards came there, and in consequence of what passed he was taken into custody. He told me that his master was coming on to the Ram Inn, in Smithfield, with three more horses. I went and enquired for his master, but could hear nothing of him. I returned to the prisoner, he asked me if I had seen his master? I said, Yes, as much as you expected that I should. He burst into tears, and said he was drawn into it. I said, "What then, did you steal it?" He said, Yes; he stole it that night off Abingdon common.

THOMAS BETTERIDGE . On the 2d of October I was at Hillingdon, and saw the horse standing at a door, the prisoner held the string which was round the horse's neck. I gave him in charge He said the horse was bought at Oxford, by a man who gave it to him to take to the Ram, in Smithfield. Ingram was present.

THOMAS MULCOCK re-examined. On the 4th of October I found my gelding at the Vine Inn, Hillingdon. I am certain it was mine.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. The prisoner lived in the neighbourhood sometime ago, and bore a good character.

WILLIAM MUDDEMAN . I am hostler at the Vine Inn. I showed the prosecutor the gelding which Betteridge gave in my care. I had seen the prisoner riding it before he was taken.

Prisoner. I leave my case to my counsel.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 19.

Recommended to Mercy on account of his former good Character.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow .

Reference Number: t18181028-11

1402. JOHN FRANKS was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of September , at St. Dunstan's, Stepney , in the dwelling-house of John Spice , one chest, value 3s.; two coats, value 10s.; three waistcoats, value 7s.; two jackets, value 8s.; three pair of stockings, value 2s.; two razors, value 1s.; one bag, value 6d.; one pair of trowsers, value 4s.; two pair of shoes, value 2s.; one cap, value 1s.; one hammock, value 1s.; one bed, value 5s., and four 1l. bank notes, the property of Jacob Utack .

JACOB UTACK . I am a mariner , and a native of Russia. About a month ago I came ashore, the prisoner assisted me to take my box to Spice's house, in Queen-street, Ratcliff-cross , it contained the articles stated in the indictment, four 1l. bank notes, and 10s. in silver; I saw every thing safe in the box when I took it there, it was on a Thursday - We left it there. On Sunday I went to Spice's to go to my box, and they said it was gone; the box was afterwards produced to me broken open and empty. The things were worth 2l. 13s., and there was 4l. 10s. in money.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not tell me to get the box, and sell every thing - A. No.

JOHN SPICE . I keep a lodging-house in the parish of Stepney. I live in it myself. The chest was brought to my house when I was out; I found it there when I came home - I neither know who brought it, or who took it away. The prosecutor came for the box on Sunday, and I told him the prisoner had taken it, as I was told so.

ANDREW GALLOWAY . I keep a public-house at Shadwell. The prisoner brought a box to my house, and asked if he might leave it there, which he did.

JAMES FAIR . I am an officer of Shadwell. On the 28th of September I was sent for, and took the prisoner into custody; I found the box at Galloway's, broken open and empty.

(Box sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. He ordered me to take it to Galloway's, and told me to sell his clothes to make money of, as he was with some girls.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 23.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Dallas.

Reference Number: t18181028-12

1403. CHARLES NEWMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of September , three coats, value 40s., and one waistcoat, value 2s., the goods of Jeffery Foot , Esq. , in his dwelling-house .

WILLIAM MAGGS . I live at Knightsbridge. On the 30th of September I saw the prisoner go down the prosecutor's area in Sloane-street , and bring the coats and waistcoat out; I pursued him, lost sight of him for about five minutes, and saw him drop the things. He was secured. I am certain he is the man.

BENJAMIN LUCAS . I was working in a field, heard the cry of Stop thief! and stopped the prisoner. He dodged

me two or three times, and jumped over a ditch. Maggs came up with the things.

THOMAS BASKET . I am footman to Mr. Jeffery Foote. I found the prisoner in custody with my livery clothes, which were taken out of the pantry. I saw them safe an hour before. They are my master's property.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I found them.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Of stealing to the value of 39s. only.

Confined One Year .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow.

Reference Number: t18181028-13

1404. ANN BATES was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of October , at St. George's, 21 yards of cotton, value 20s., the goods of Edward Pike , privately in his shop .

CHARLES CHAPMAN . I am servant to Mr. Edward Pike , who is a linen-draper , and lives in St. George's in the East , On the 21st of October, between one and two o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner came to our shop with another woman, and asked to look at some blue prints, which the boy showed them - They stood both together talking, I was serving another customer; the prisoner left the other woman - I saw her touch the other woman, and go towards the door. I saw she had something under her cloak; I followed her, brought her back, and found the piece of cotton, which was Mr. Pike's property, and cost 20s., under her cloak. She said she never did such a thing before.

Prisoner. Q. Have you not taken money of the other woman, not to prosecute her - A. No.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I took it to the door to look at, I did not conceal it.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 21.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Dallas.

Reference Number: t18181028-14

1405. CHARLES EYLES was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of July , one watch, value 30s., and two keys, value 10s.; one seal, value 10s., and one chain, value 2d., the property of Henry Godman , in his dwelling-house .

HENRY GODMAN . I am a chimney-sweeper , and live on Peter's-hill, Doctors' Commons - I do not know what parish my house is in. On the 22d of July, about half-past ten o'clock in the morning, I missed my watch from my bed-room. I got up at five o'clock in the morning-it was then safe; the prisoner was in my employ. About one o'clock I found the watch in pledge. There was a seal and chain to it when I lost it. It cost me 2l. 15s. five years ago.

WILLIAM MEED . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Bridge-road, Lambeth. On the 22d of July, about one o'clock, the prisoner pledged the watch with me for 1l. 1s.

WILLIAM TANNETT. I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner at the prosecutor's house. He said he took the watch, and pledged it at Needbam's.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Of stealing to the value of 39s. only.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18181028-15

1406. WILLIAM TINGAY, alias CRIPPS , and CHARLES BRITTEN , alias BURTON , were indicted for stealing, on the 25th of September , at St. Sepulchre , three heifers, price 34l. , the property of William Franklin , against the statute.

WILLIAM FRANKLIN . I live at Roydon Hall, in Essex , which is about twenty-two miles from town. On Thursday, the 24th of September I was in possession of twenty heifers-they were all safe at three o'clock in the afternoon, I counted them-next night, about nine o'clock, I missed four of them.

Q. Did you afterwards see the skin of one in the Borough - A. Yes, at Smith's, on the Monday-it was the skin of a black heifer, with a streak of white down its back, and speckled in the face; it was the skin of one which I had lost. I have not the least doubt of it, as it corresponded in size and every thing-it was a very particular one. The four heifers were worth 30l. or 40l. After this I heard the prisoners were in custody.

Q.Had you any conversation with Tingay - A. I saw him at the Compter - I neither threatened nor promised him. I knew him before-he lived in our parish, and went by the name of Cripps. I said I was sorry to see him there. He said he could assure me the beasts were not mine, for mine were larger than those that were in his possession, and that he received them from a man of the name of Grey, at Hoddesdon, who gave him 2s. a head for driving them.

FRANCIS COLLIN . I bought the beasts for myself and Mr. Franklin ten or eleven months ago. I saw the skin of one of them in Leadenhall-market the Friday after they were stolen, and am certain it is the skin of one of them. It was a particular one. I had often seen it. I know both the prisoners; they lived in the prosecutor's neighbourhood. Cripps has worked for me - He lived in the neighbourhood at the time of the robbery. Burton worked for me about three years ago.

JOHN SMITH . I am a butcher, and live in the Borough market. On Friday, the 25th of September, I bought three heifers of Curtis. The prosecutor came to me on the Monday after-my man showed him the skin he has spoken of, it was just taken off the beast-it was black, with a white stripe down the back; I should know it from a hundred.

WILLIAM SMITH . I am servant to John Smith . I showed the skin to the prosecutor - it was black, with a white stripe down the back, and marked in the face. My master bought the heifer to which it belonged of Curtis. I took the hide to Leadenhall-market, and delivered it to George Williams .

GEORGE WILLIAMS. William Smith delivered to me the skin of a black heifer with a white stripe on the back, and speckled in the face - I delivered it to Mr. Challis, my master. I was present when Franklin and Collins saw it, and said they knew it.

JOHN CURTIS . I am a salesman at Smithfield. I received the three heifers to sell for the prisoner, Cripps, on the 24th of September, about six o'clock in the morning, he said he had brought them to me for sale. One of them was a black heifer, with a white stripe down the back. I asked him who they belonged to? he said William Graves , of Hoddesdon, in Hertfordshire. I sold them to Mr.

Smith for 34l. 10s. Almost immediately after I had sold them, the prisoner, Cripps, applied to me for payment. I asked him if he had an order from his master? he said he had not. I told him I could not pay him without an order, unless he referred me to a respectable person, which would satisfy me. He referred me to a man - I was not satisfied, and would not pay him. He went away, saying he would get an order from his master. About nine o'clock that night I saw him in custody.

WILLIAM DRINKWATER . I am an officer. I saw the prisoners in custody at the Compter, a little after eight o'clock of the night they were taken. Cripps said he had a letter, which he must show to Mr. Curtis. I told him he could not go from there that night. He said he could not be locked up until he had seen Mr. Curtis - He said he must produce the letter to him immediately for payment for some beasts. He took a letter from his waistcoat-pocket. Mr. Teague was present, and opened it in the prisoner's presence-the wafer was quite wet. He read it, and told the prisoners he thought it did not come from a gentleman. I locked them up.

(Letter read.)

"London, Sept. 28, 1818.

"To Mr. JOHN CURTIS , No. 4, Hosier-lane, West Smithfield.

"SIR,

"I beg leave to state, that unless you pay my man the money for three bullocks, I shall pursue such steps as the law offers me, but I shall be sorry to go to such steps.

(Signed) "AMBROSE STARK.

"Pro. JAMES GRAY ."

FRANCIS COLLIN re-examined. Hoddesdon is about two miles from my house-there is no person of the name of Gray living in the neighbourhood.

EDWARD HOLMES. I am a porter. On the 25th of September I was at the Coach and Horses, public-house, in Kingsland-road, and saw both the prisoners there. They asked a man named Stark, to write a letter for them - They spoke as if they were in company together - I believe Cripps spoke. Stark wrote the letter for them-this excited my suspicion. I followed them out of the house to the Golden Lion, public-house, in Smithfield-it was between two and three o'clock in the afternoon. Cripps sat in the middle box, and Burton sat in the next. I took them into custody at the house. I heard Stark read over part of the letter to them.

AMBROSE STARK. I am a wine-cooper, and live at the Coach and Horses. I wrote the letter for the prisoners. A man named Cannon first asked me to write it. They said they both came to town with the beasts, and were to take the money back to their master - They were strangers to me. They asked me to write a letter demanding payment, and told me to sign it, "Gray." I should not have wrote it, but Cannon, who was the hostler at the inn, said he knew them, and had lived at Hoddesdon with them. I delivered it to Burton.

TINGAY'S Defence. I was at Hoddesdon - A man inquired for a person to drive some bullocks, and said his name was Gray. He said he would give 2s. a head; that he would deliver them to me next day, and if I was not at Hoddesdon at eight o'clock, he would leave them at the George Inn for me. I was to bring the money to the Sun, at Waltham. I did not think they were the prosecutor's.

BURTON'S Defence. I met the other prisoner, whom I had not seen for four years, and went and had some porter with him. He said he had brought some beasts from Hoddesdon.

TINGAY - GUILTY . - DEATH .

BURTON- NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18181028-16

1407. JOHN NEWTON was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of October , 200 lbs. of iron, value 1l. , the goods of Edward Higgs .

THOMAS JONES . I am foreman to Edward Higgs , who is a farrier , and lives in Thames-street ; the prisoner was in his employ. - he used to sweep the shop out every night, and carry the dung to the Sea Coal Company. On the 16th of October, about half-past six o'clock in the evening, the patrol took me to Rutland-hole. I found the barrow there, with dung at the top and bottom, and in the middle were two bags, containing about two hundred weight of old horse-shoes, several of which had my master's mark on them - They were kept in the back shop-we had lost some before. The barrow was mended on the right leg.

BENJAMIN PHILLIPS . I am a patrol. On the 16th of October I saw the barrow in a dark corner in Rutlandhole. I found some dung on the top, two bags of horse-shoes under, and the parings of hoofs at the bottom.

HANNAH PEARCEY . I was at the shop-door while the prisoner took the dung out - I live there. I took him a candle, he put it out. When he brought the dung out it appeared very heavy - I told him so; he said dung was very heavy-he could hardly get it out of the shop. The barrow was mended at the leg-Jones brought the same barrow back. The prisoner came back in about ten minutes, in a great perspiration. I asked him what made him so hot? he said the dung was heavy.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. It is not the barrow which I had.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18181028-17

1408. THOMAS RILEY and ROBERT HAWTHORN were indicted for stealing, on the 3d of October , four pokers, value 1l. 14s.; four shovels, value 1l. 14s., and four pair of tongs, value 3l. 8s. , the goods of Henry Downer .

MR. HENRY DOWNER . I am an ironmonger , and live in Fleet-street . The prisoner, Riley, lived two years as porter with me-Hawthorn is a stranger. On the 5th of October I gave him leave to go to Gravesend, and to return next day. On Tuesday morning Armstrong brought a shovel, which I knew to be mine. I went to his house, and saw the articles stated in the indictment, which are my property. Riley never returned - He was taken on the Thursday following.

JOHN BEAVAN . I am servant to Mr. Downer. Armstrong brought a shovel, which I knew to be my master's. Riley never bought it.

ROBERT ARMSTRONG . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Baldwin's-gardens. On the 3d of October, the prisoner, Hawthorn, came to my shop with the articles stated in the

indictment, and said he brought them from Mr. George Smith ; that he was occasionally his porter, and used to carry goods home for him. He said he was to pledge the fire-irons for 3l., and was to redeem some clothes pledged before, and to give him the balance. I asked him where Smith gave him the irons? he said, at the Queen's-head, public-house, at the corner of Ormond-street. I asked him where his manufactory was? he, on the other side of Fleet-street. I told him to leave the fire-irons, and send Smith to me, as I did not like his story. In a few minutes the prisoner, Riley, came, whom I had known by the name of Smith. He appeared very much hurt at my detaining the fire-irons, and not sending the money by his porter as he desired. I asked him where he bought the goods, as I was not satisfied? he said he bought them of Mr. Livermore, an ironmonger, in Oxford-street, and he would bring me the bill and receipt on Monday morning, at twelve o'clock-this was on Saturday. He redeemed some clothes which he had pledged with me in the name of Smith. I kept the fire-irons. He did not come on Monday. I went to Mr. Livermore in consequence of what I heard - I went round to several shops, and among others to the prosecutor's, he claimed them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

RILEY - GUILTY . Aged 36.

Transported for Seven Years .

HAWTHORN- NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18181028-18

1409. CHARLES DELL was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of September , 12 pair of stockings, value 50s.; two pair of gloves, value 4s., and one pair of braces, value 5s. , the goods of William Coates Lee .

JEREMIAH KEATS . I am shopman to William Coates Lee , who is a hosier , and lives at Charing-cross . On the 25th of September, about nine o'clock in the morning, I found that a parcel which had been packed up, had been unpacked, and tied up in a different way-the prisoner was our errand-boy . I got a constable, and he was called into the parlour - They called me in likewise. I saw the property there, which had been taken out of different parcels.

WILLIAM CLEMENTS. I am a constable. I was sent for to Mr. Lee's, to search the prisoner. I found nothing on him. I took two keys from him, and brought his box into the parlour-his brother was present. I unlocked the trunk, and found the articles stated in the indictment in it. There was a pair of black silk stockings in his waistcoat pocket, which was in the trunk.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181028-19

1410. CHARLOTTE APPLETON was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of October , 27 yards of cotton, value 28s., the goods of Edward Colls , privately in his shop .

EDWARD COLLS. I am a linen-draper , and live in Mason's-alley, Wellclose-square . On the 1st of October, between four and five o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner came to my shop, and asked for one-eighth of flannel, which my man served her with. He stopped her, and found the cotton on her.

MICHAEL SMITH. I am shopman to the prosecutor. The prisoner applied to the apprentice for some flannel - He is not here. As she left him I saw something hanging below her apron, went up, and asked her what she had there? she said it was nothing of our's. I pulled her apron up, and found the print there.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I took it to look at.

GUILTY Aged 26.

Of stealing, but not privately

Confined One Year .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Dallas.

Reference Number: t18181028-20

1411. PETER FLIGAN and MARY STEPHENS were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Catherine Willer , widow , about seven o'clock in the night of the 6th of October , at All Saints, Poplar , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, one carpet, value 18s., and one gown, value 2s., her property .

CATHERINE WILLER. I am a widow, and live at Poplar; I have two single men lodge with me, nobody else. On Tuesday, the 6th of October, I left home about six o'clock in the evening, and left nobody at home-the door has a spring lock. I left the lock on the spring-the house was made quite fast. One of the lodgers had a key of the door. I returned home about ten minutes after seven o'clock, and found the street - door opened, apparently with a false key. I missed a gown out of the room, and a carpet off the floor-neither of my lodgers had returned. About half-past eight o'clock, the lodger who had the key came home, he is a locker-up at the West India Docks-it was his usual time for coming home.

WILLIAM BELCHER . I am shopman to Mr. Price, who is a pawnbroker, and lives in Wentworth-street, Whitechapel. On Tuesday, the 6th of October, between seven and eight o'clock at night, the prisoner, Stephens, pledged the carpet with me for 16s. I gave her a duplicate.

HOWARD LEWIS . I am a salesman, and live in Cable-street, Whitechapel; I know both the prisoners; Fligan has bought and sold me things. I have seen them about for the last six months. On Tuesday, the 6th of October, between seven and eight o'clock, or rather nearer eight, both the prisoners came to my shop. The man had the carpet under his arm, and asked me to buy it. I refused - They left. I afterwards heard of the robbery at Poplar. On Thursday, the man brought me the duplicate of the carpet, and asked me to buy it. I gave information to Freeman, who took him. Freeman gave me two keys, which I tried with the prosecutrix's door-one of them opened it with ease.

FRANCIS FREEMAN . I am an officer. Lewis gave me information, and I apprehended Fligan at his shop. He said he would shew me where he lived, and took me to a court up one pair of stairs - I found Stephens there. While I was searching the room, Fligan made his escape out of it, Lewis took him again in about ten minutes. I took him to the

office, returned, and found part of a gown in the room, and two keys in the table-drawer. The prisoners cohabited together.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

FLIGANS'S Defence. The woman gave me the duplicate of the carpet to sell.

STEPHEN'S Defence. The man gave me 1s. to pledge the carpet, for him.

FLIGAN - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 56.

Recommended to Mercy.

STEPHENS- NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow.

Reference Number: t18181028-21

1412. WILLIAM KNIGHT and EDWARD EVANS were indicted for feloniously assaulting Joseph Lowe , on the King's highway, on the 20th of September , at St. Mary Matfelon, alias Whitechapel , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, one watch, value 50s.; one ribbon, value 1d., and one key, value 1d., his property .

JOSEPH LOWE. On the 20th of September, about six o'clock in the evening, I was going to Bow with my little boy. There was a crowd of people at a funeral in the road. I was getting out of the crowd, which I did for six or eight yards, and was hustled by several persons, running against me, both on my right and left side-my child was forced from me at the time. I received a blow on my right shoulder, turned round, and at that moment the prisoner, Knight, pulled my watch from my fob, I saw it in his hand. The gang consisted of about twenty persons. I saw Knight pass my watch to Evans, who held his hand out to receive it. In my hurry to secure Knight, I will not swear I saw the watch go into Evans's hand, but immediately as I collared Knight, Evans rushed up, I collared him - He tried to rescue himself from me. The gang kicked me so, that my legs were bruised up to my knees, and I was terribly beat about in my body. The other part of the gang rushed in and said, "D-n your eyes, let him go, you b-g-r!" - They rescued Evans from me. I kept hold of Knight, and called for assistance. Welfare came, and I told him I was robbed. I never let Knight go, Gray also came to my assistance. The gang then became quite desperate, and bricks and stones flew in all directions. I received several blows myself, and the officers had their heads cut. We got him into a public-house with great difficulty, where he was hand-cuffed. The mob surrounded the house, and said they would rescue him if they lost their lives. I went out to look for my child. Next morning, I found Evans at the office. I should know two or three more of the gang if I could see them. My watch was not found. I saw it in Knight's hand, and Evans holding his hand out to receive it. I do not know whether he got it.

Cross-examined by MR. CURWOOD. Q. You never saw them before - A. No. Evans escaped. I can positively swear he is the man, his person is so particular.

GEORGE WELFARE. I am a constable of the Borough. On the 20th of September I was attending an odd-fellows' funeral, in Whitechapel-road. I saw the mob, and heard the alarm - I went up, and found the prosecutor surrounded by a gang. He was beat about most terribly, and so was I. I took Knight from him-the gang followed us with bricks and stones. I took him to the public-house-Evans had escaped, but I took him again the same night. Lowe saw him next morning, and swore to him immediately. He had escaped before I came up - I had not seem him there.

JOHN TAYLOR. I am a porter, and live in Whitechapel. I was at the funeral, and saw the prisoner, Knight, go up to the prosecutor, put his hand on his shoulder, and take his watch out. His companions surrounded him. I was pushed about, and received a cut in my hand with a stone. The prosecutor collared Knight-the gang were using him very violently.

Cross-examined. I did not see Evans, the mob was so great - He might have been there.

DANIEL GRAY . I am constable of Mile End. I came up, being told of the robbery, Welfare had hold of Knight - I laid hold of him; one of the gang collared me, and tried to take him from me - I knocked that man down. We went on; when we got to Baker's-row, a gang, consisting of twenty or thirty persons, surrounded us, and assailed us with sticks and stones. I saw Evans in the crowd.

Cross-examined. I did not see him do any thing.

JOHN DYER. I am a headborough of Mile End. I was attending the funeral. There was an alarm, I went to the spot, and found Knight in the custody of Gray, he endeavoured to get away; the mob followed and assailed us with stones and bricks; opposite the King's Head the officers received several wounds. I was very much beaten. I saw Evans throwing stones, or in the attitude of throwing them; my head was desperately cut, and my body hurt. The mob cried out, "Rescue!" I was obliged to retire into a court.

SAMUEL DOBSON. I am a headborough. I was at my own door, and heard the mob crying out "Rescue, Rescue!" I ran for assistance. I went to the watch-house, and received Evans in charge.

THOMAS LOADER. I was coming from the funeral of a brother, and was assailed with stones, and suffered very much from the violence of the gang.

KNIGHT'S Defence. I am innocent.

EVANS'S Defence. I was not present at the time of the robbery. I saw the crowd, ran up, and went into Baker's-row, and the officers took me.

KNIGHT - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 18.

EVANS - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 17.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Dallas.

Reference Number: t18181028-22

1413. JOHAN STEENWALLER was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of July , at St. Paul, Shadwell, one hat, value 5s.; one watch, value 2l., and three 1l. bank notes, the property of Thomas Newman , in his dwelling-house .

THOMAS NEWMAN. I am a labourer in the London Docks, I live in the parish of St George's in the East . On the 6th of July, an acquaintance brought the prisoner to me, and asked me to let him be with me until he could get a lodging - He slept four nights with me. On Monday, in the morning, I was in the yard cleaning myself, to go to his ship with him, to get his things; I saw him take my watch off the nail - I did not suspect any thing-my wife was there. When I came into the room, he was gone.

ANN NEWMAN . I am the prosecutor's wife. The prisoner

was in the parlour with me. He asked me to change him a 5l., note. I laid three 1l., notes on the table, and went to the public-house to get a pen and ink - I left him in the room. When I returned, I missed him, the notes, and the watch - He never produced the 5l. note. About three weeks ago I met him, and gave him in charge. I have not seen the property since.

ANTHONY BENNET. I am an officer, I apprehended the prisoner, the prosecutrix swore to him, by his fingers being crooked. He said he spent the money, and pledged the watch.

Prisoner's Defence. I was never in his house - They keep a bad house-the prosecutrix fetched me there.

GUILTY . Aged 32.

Of stealing, but not in the dwelling-house.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Dallas.

Reference Number: t18181028-23

1414. THOMAS MORRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of September , in an out-house, belonging to the dwelling-house of James Gunter, Esq. one 40l., bank note, the property of Andrew Hiscock .

ELEANOR HISCOCK . I am the wife of Andrew Hiscock , who is coachman to James Gunter , Esq. at Kensington . We live over the stables, which are some distance from the dwelling-house. The prisoner is a carpenter , and worked on the premises. On Saturday the 12th of September, I found a difficulty in opening my drawer, and got the prisoner to open it. I took 1s. out - I believe the 40l. note was then safe in the purse, which was in the drawer, but I did not look for it. On the 15th I missed it.

BENJAMIN JONES . I am a salesman, and live in Holywell-street. On Sunday morning the 13th of September, the prisoner came to my father's shop, and bought 8l. worth of wearing apparel, offered me a 40l. note, and gave me the name of "Wallis, Fulham." I asked him if he knew any person in town? he said he knew a person at the Angel Inn, but refused to go there with me. I declined taking the note. I wrote the name on it.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. I am sure he is the man. I never doubted it.

JAMES MORRIS . I am the prisoner's brother. On the 13th of September, in the evening, he gave me a 40l. note to get changed. On the Monday I gave it to Mr. Simmons's shopman to get it changed.

PHOEBE SIMMONS . I am a tailor, and live in the Strand. On the 14th of September the last witness paid me a 40l. note; I sent my lad out to see if it was good, he mistook me, and got it changed; I sent him back for the note, he returned it to Morris, who wanted it changed very much. I sent my boy to get it changed at the Bank - He absconded with the change.

WILLIAM HOOLE . I am a clerk at the Bank. I produce the 40l. note, which was brought in and changed in the name of Simmons, Strand.

BENJAMIN JONES re-examined. It is the note the prisoner brought to me-it has my hand-writing on it.

CHARLES CRAIG . I am clerk to Messrs. Barclay and Co., bankers. I paid this note to the order of John Davis, in part of 69l.

ANDREW HISCOCK . I received that note from Messrs. Barclays'-Davis paid me a check on them.

Prisoner. I beg for mercy. GUILTY . Aged 29.

Of stealing, but not in an out-house belonging to a dwelling-house.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow .

Reference Number: t18181028-24

1415. JAMES HICKMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of September , one bed, value 10s.; two blankets, value 6s.; two rugs, value 2s.; one bolster, value 1s.; one hammock, value 1s.; two jackets, value 13s.; four pair of trowsers, value 8s.; three shirts, value 9s.; two pair of stockings, value 4s.; two bags, value 1s.; two tin pots, value 2s., and one spoon, value 6d., the property of John Germain , in the dwelling-house of John Minshaw .

JOHN GERMAIN , I know the prisoner. On the 20th of September he told me he had got a ship at Gravesend, and I could have a birth; he helped me to carry my clothes and bed to the Dundee Arms ; next morning I went there and found they were all gone. I lost the articles stated in the indictment.

GEORGE PERRYMAN . I am a servant at the Dundee Arms; John Minshaw keeps the house. On the 21st of September the prisoner fetched the prosecutor's things away. I am sure he is the man.

THOMAS HARRISON . I am the watch-house-keeper. The prisoner was given into my charge; he said he sold the articles on board a ship at Chatham, and sold the bed to Goldsmith.

MICHAEL GOLDSMITH . I am a salesman, and live in Parson's-street. The prisoner and another man sold me the bed for 10s.; the prisoner said he bought the tick for 15d. a yard. They had some articles in a bag, which they took away.

(Bed produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Of stealing to the value of 39s. only.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Dallas.

Reference Number: t18181028-25

1416. WILLIAM PARSONS was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of September , at St. Andrew's, Holborn, one watch, value 4l., the property of John Simpson , in his dwelling-house .

SARAH CHURCHMAN. I am servant to Mr. John Simpson , who is a jeweller , and lives in Holborn . On the 22d of September, I was in the parlour behind the shop, and saw the prisoner in the shop, in the act of taking his hand out of the window - I ran into the shop - He turned round, saw me, and ran out. I followed, and saw him throw something away, which I picked up-it was a watch - He was stopped near the coffee-house - He was never out of my sight.

THOMAS DAVIS , I am shopman to the prosecutor. Churchman alarmed me - I was on the kitchen stairs; I joined in pursuit, and saw the prisoner throw something from his hand, which Churchman picked up, and delivered to Cooke, who gave it to me. I produce it. It is my master's, and worth 4l. cost price.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 14.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow.

Reference Number: t18181028-26

1417. WILLIAM ADKINS was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of October , at St. George's, Hanover-square, in the dwelling-house of Henry Edward Smith and William Henry Smith , two watches, value 3l.; one spoon, value 1s.; 14 guineas, two half-guineas, nine 7s. pieces; the sum of 10l. in monies numbered; one 5l. and 17 1l. bank notes, the property of the said Henry Edward Smith ; one watch, value 2l., and two brooches, value 8s., the property of the said William Henry Smith .

MR. WILLIAM HENRY SMITH. I live at No. 42, Duke-street, Grosvenor-square , in the parish of St. George's, Hanover-square. I occupy the house generally with my brother, we both live in the house; it was under repair. On the 14th of October the house was robbed. I found the prisoner at the West quay of the London Docks, and took him to the watch-house-Shaw searched him.

JOHN COOPER. I am a carpenter, and was employed to repair the prosecutors' house, the prisoner was employed by me as a journeyman in their house - I discharged him about eleven days before the robbery, he had no business in the house afterwards.

SAMUEL HILL. I am a stone-mason. On the 14th of October I was repairing the prosecutors' door - I went into the yard; I saw the prisoner pass me, and go up stairs, about half-past seven o'clock - He came down in about five minutes, and went out of the door.

Cross-examined by MR. BROADRICK. I had several workmen in the house.

JAMES LEGG. On the 14th of October I saw the prisoner go up one pair of stairs into the drawing-room, and then into the back drawing-room. I told Frederick Cooper to follow him up stairs, which he did.

FREDERICK COOPER. I am the son of John Cooper . I saw the prisoner in the prosecutors' back-room on the two pair of stairs, he was at a drawer. I came down, he followed me-while I was telling my brother he left.

Cross-examined. I saw him in the room - He came down immediately.

JOHN SHAW. I am a constable of Aldgate. I searched the prisoner, and found two watches, four guineas, seven 7s. pieces, a 1l. note, and 34s. in silver on him. Next day I went on board a ship, which was bound for America, and got his chest - He claimed the things in it. I found a silver spoon marked IE, which the prosecutors' claimed. I found a memorandum in his pocket of the money which was lost out of the drawer. The ship was to sail in two days.

Cross-examined. He said the chest was his

WILLIAM HENRY SMITH re-examined. The watch is my brother's, I bought it for him; it has my private mark on it-the spoon is also my brother's. The memorandum of the property which was in my drawer is in my own hand-writing, and was with the property. We hold the lease of the house jointly.

Cross-examined. The money was my brother's private property.

Q. Did you not discharge a man on suspicion of the robbery - A. A man was discharged for stealing lead before the robbery. Nobody had any business in the room; I slept in the room myself. Two drawers were opened, but nine of them had the locks picked-the property was in two drawers. The prisoner had worked a month in the house, but never had any business in that room. I had seen the property about three months before.

MR. HENRY EDWARD SMITH . I can swear to the watch being mine. The memorandum is my brother's writing. I know the spoon. I had seen the property safe seven weeks ago from this time. I know one 7s. piece by its being bent, and there is 1s. I know by its having a hole through it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I left my ehisel behind me, and went after it. I had told Smith that I lost it. I took nothing.

WILLIAM HENRY SMITH. He said on the Saturday before that he had left a chisel, I could not find it, and never gave him leave to go into the bed-room to look for it-he had done no work there.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 25.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow.

Reference Number: t18181028-27

1418. THOMAS LLOYD was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of December , 100 books, value 5l. , the property of William Fox .

WILLIAM FOX. I am proprietor of the Minor Theatre , in Catherine-street, Strand , which I let to man named Watson; he employed the prisoner there; I lost a quantity of books out of a room there.

JOSEPH PORTER. I am a cheesemonger. I bought some books of the prisoner, most of it was loose paper; I bought some of other persons. I cannot say that I bought any of what the prosecutor claims, of the prisoner.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Dallas.

Reference Number: t18181028-28

1419. MARGARET BUCKLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of July , one table-cloth, value 2s.; one shawl, value 5s.; one apron, value 6d., and one petticoat, value 2s. , the property of Michael Sullivan .

MARGARET SULLIVAN . I am the wife of Michael Sullivan; the prisoner came to nurse my husband, who was ill. On the 8th of July I went out to market, and missed the things - She left me about two hours after, and said she knew nothing of them. That is all I know.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow.

Reference Number: t18181028-29

1420. SARAH PEARCE was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of August , one watch. value 30s., one seal, value 2d., and one key, value 2d. , the goods of Eliza Bell , widow .

ELIZA BELL. I am a widow, and live at Bethnal-green . On the 19th of August I left the prisoner in my room. She sent the children up stairs to ask me if she might take them out for a walk? I said No. I went down, and found she was gone out with the children - I missed my watch; nobody else had been in the room. I had her apprehended. The watch was found at Mr. Sowerby's, who is now dead.

THOMAS WALTERS . I took the prisoner into custody-she said she never saw the watch. I found the watch at Sowerby's; he said in her presence that she pledged it-she did not deny it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A woman gave it to me to pledge.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Confined One Year .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Dallas.

Reference Number: t18181028-30

1421. CHARLES PHILIP PRINGLE was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of October , 20 lbs. of lead, the property of Thomas Stringer , and fixed to his dwelling-house .

THOMAS STRINGER . I live at No. 7, Portland-street, Soho , in the parish of St. James, Westminster. On the 11th of October, between twelve and one o'clock at night, my daughter alarmed me - I found 30 lbs. of lead cut off the roof of the top of my house; the next house is empty. The prisoner was in custody.

WILLIAM GURLE. I live at No. 5, in the same street. I was alarmed, and went on the roof of No. 6 - I heard somebody running down the stairs. I got into the back garret, and found four pieces of lead rolled up - They appeared to be fresh cut from the gutters, and a bag. I found the prisoner up the garret chimney. He said he was drunk, and came there for a night's lodging.

JOHN HASSET . I am a watchman. The prisoner was given into my charge.

Prisoner's Defence. I found the door open, and went to sleep there.

GUILTY . Aged 35.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow.

Reference Number: t18181028-31

1422. WILLIAM SMITHERS was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of September , one saddle, value 10s.; one bridle, value 5s., and one collar, value 7s. , the goods of William Walters .

WILLIAM WALTERS. I am a butcher , and live in North-row, North Audley-street . On the 18th of September my stable was broken open, and the things tied up, ready to be taken away, in consequence of which my man sat up in the cart-house to watch.

WILLIAM HAYDON. I live with the last witness. I sat up to watch. About half-past eight o'clock in the evening, the prisoner and another man came into the cart-house, took the saddle, bridle, and halter off the hook, and took it away. I immediately jumped out and seized the prisoner - the other man got away. The harness is my master's.

Prisoner's Defence. The other man took me to sleep there.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Dallas.

Reference Number: t18181028-32

1423. HENRY FISHER was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of October , two pair of stays, value 6s. , the goods of John Mills ; and ELIZA FISHER was indicted for receiving the same, knowing them to have been stolen .

WILLIAM COOKE. I am servant to Mr. John Mills , who is a staymaker , and lives in Holywell-street . The prisoner was our porter . His wife had no means of getting at the property.

RICHARD WALFORD. I am servant to Messrs. Wire and Page, who are pawnbrokers, and live in Long-acre. The prisoner's wife brought two pair of stays to pledge - I sent for an officer. The prisoner came to the shop about some glass which had been pledged - I detained him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

FISHER- GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined One Year .

ELIZA FISHER- NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow.

Reference Number: t18181028-33

1424. JOHN EVANS was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of October , 12 pair of stockings, value 1l. 17s., the goods of Isaac Nicholson , privately in his shop .

ISAAC NICHOLSON . I am a hosier , and live in Cheapside . I was not at home at the time of the robbery.

JAMES KELLY . I am servant to the prosecutor. On the 27th of October, about ten minutes after eight o'clock in the morning, I was alone in the shop-the prisoner came in. Three men had come in before-one of them went out before the prisoner came in, the other two remained till the prisoner came in - They appeared to be acquainted. One of them asked for a pair of gloves - He laid a whip on the counter. I showed him some gloves-the other man had a great-coat hanging on his arm, and stood behind the one who asked for the gloves, the prisoner walked up and down the shop. After I had shown the gloves, the man with the great-coat said he would go and get the cart ready. He took up the other man's whip, and went out-then the prisoner came, spoke to the man, and said the gloves were good ones, and walked about the shop-the stockings were on the other counter, which was behind the men, and near to the prisoner. I showed the man three different pairs of gloves, he paid for one pair, which came to 3s. - all three then went out together. Immediately after they went out, I missed twelve pair of stockings off the counter. i got the boy next door to mind the shop, and went to look for them up the Old Jewry, which is two doors from the shop, and saw the four men turn out of Dove-court into the Old Jewry - I knew them again, I am certain the prisoner is one of them. I stopped at the top of the court. Just as they came up to me, I laid hold of the prisoner's coat, and said, "You have got some stockings of our's." One of the men ran up against me, and pushed me from the prisoner, he got away. I followed him, calling Stop thief! he turned back into Grocer's Hall-court into the Poultry, and was stopped opposite the court. I saw him drop the stockings at the bottom of the court, I picked them up. I never lost sight of him, and am certain he is one of the men. I do not know what became of the other three men. I did not see the stockings taken.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. I am certain he is the man - I took particular notice of him. My master's house is in the parish of St. Mary Colechurch.

SAMUEL JONES. I live in Grocer's Hall-court. I heard the cry of Stop thief! ran out, and saw the prisoner run down Dove-court. As he passed me he dropped the parcel-the last witness picked it up. The prisoner ran into Keats's shop - I never lost sight of him. Kelly brought the bundle into the shop, and said the prisoner was the

man who robbed him, and that three others were with him - He denied it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 38.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18181028-34

1425. FRANCES ROSE was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of July , one shirt, value 7s.6d., and one teaspoon, value 3s. , the goods of Henry Marsh .

HENRY MARSH . I live in Artillery-lane . The prisoner came into my service the latter end of June. About a fortnight after I missed four tea and one table-spoon and a shirt. I found the shirt and one tea-spoon at Soloman's. She absconded without notice, or asking for her wages.

SAMUEL HARMER. I am servant to Mr. Solomon, who is a pawnbroker, and lives in Bishopsgate-street. On the 25th of July the prisoner pledged the shirt and tea-spoon with me at different times.

JAMES GREGORY. I apprehended the prisoner on the 15th of September. I was looking for her a fortnight.

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutrix used to send me for liquor without giving me the money. I pledged them to buy her liquor.

MRS. MARSH. I never sent her out without the money.

GUILTY . Aged 31.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18181028-35

1426. JAMES CALLOW was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of October , one whittle, value 8s. 6d. , the goods of James Daniel and Thomas Spencer Haseland .

WILLIAM ROTHERAM. I am servant to Messrs. James Daniel and Thomas Spencer Haseland, who are linen-drapers , and live in Bishopsgate-street . On the 17th of October, between eight and nine o'clock at night, I saw the prisoner pull the whittle from the door - I ran after him, and stopped him about a hundred yards from the door.

The whittle was picked up.

JAMES HAMBLER . I saw the prisoner running, he dropped something. When he was stopped he said he had nothing about him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I heard the alarm, ran with the people, and was stopped myself - I was not the man.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18181028-36

1427. WILLIAM SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of October , one handkerchief, value 4s., the goods of John Wintel , from the person of James Wintel .

JAMES WINTEL . On the 10th of October. about four o'clock in the afternoon, I was walking along Newgate-street , a shabby-looking man pushed against me - I suspected him, put my hand to my pocket, and missed my handkerchief. I collared him and searched him, but did not find it on him - I let him go. A gentleman pointed the prisoner out to me - I seized him, and saw my handkerchief laying at his feet - I picked it up, and gave him in charge, I live in Kirby-street, Hatton-garden.

EDWARD INSKIP. I am an artificial flower-maker, and live in Addle-street. On the 10th of October I was in Newgate-street - the passage was obstructed by the unloading of a waggon. After the truss was removed, I saw the prosecutor collar a man, and charge him with stealing his handkerchief-the man offered to be searched. I observed a porter pointing toward Cheapside; I looked round, and saw the prisoner standing against a warehouse just by, and saw something yellow under his jacket behind. I turned round, and told the prosecutor, who was there, pointing to the prisoner, and looking at him. He shook himself, and I saw the handkerchief fall on the pavement from him-nobody else was near him. The prosecutor collared him, and picked it up.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. Several persons came by the prosecutor. I saw the handkerchief drop, picked it up, and put it under my jacket. The prosecutor charged a man with the robbery. I thought I had better drop it.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Of stealing, but not from the person.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18181028-37

1428. JOSEPH SMITH was indicted for embezzlement .

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18181028-38

1429. MARK BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of October , one handkerchief, value 10d., the property of Read Parsons , from his person .

READ PARSONS. I live in Red Lion-passage, Fleet-street, and am clerk to Messrs. Shaw and Stevens, attornies. On the 3d of October, between six and seven o'clock in the evening, I was returning from Gray's Inn; I came home through Fetter-lane . Just by the White Horse Inn, two fellows came before me. An officer took the prisoner, who was one of them, took him into a grocer's shop, and found my handkerchief on him - I had not missed it. He was not a yard from me when he was taken.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. It was dark - A. Yes; nobody was with me.

JOHN LINES . I am an officer of Bow-street. I was going up Holborn, and saw the prisoner, with another person, near Middle-row, following the prosecutor. When they came to a window which had a light in it they stopped to let him pass, then made up to him again, and followed him down Fetter-lane. I crossed over on the other side of the way, just as the prosecutor came opposite a grocer's shop. I saw the other man take the handkerchief out of the prosecutor's pocket, and give it to the prisoner, who was close by. I ran over, and seized the prisoner - They were then about a yard before him, the other ran off. I told the prosecutor he had lost his handkerchief. I took the prisoner into the grocer's shop, and found the handkerchief under his coat.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The other man was older than the prosecutor - I did not know him.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18181028-39

1430. JAMES TURNER , JAMES CLOSE , JOHN CARPENTER , WILLIAM JASPER , JOHN EGAN , MARY HARTNELL , GEORGE BAKER , DAVID CRAWLEY , and THOMAS KIRBY were severally and separately indicted for feloniously and knowingly having forged notes in their possession .

To which indictments the prisoners severally pleaded GUILTY .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181028-40

1431. THOMAS WILLIAM BRADEY was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of July , one book of prints, value 2l. 10s. , the property of William Johnston White .

WILLIAM JOHNSTON WHITE. I am an engraver , and live in Brownlow-street, Holborn , the prisoner was my servant . I missed a book called Bowyer's Cabinet of Prints-the pawnbroker produced it to me; the prisoner said he robbed me of it.

HENRY THOMPSON . I am servant to Mr. Brown, who is a pawnbroker, and lives in Fetter-lane. Emma Brady pledged the book with me.

EMMA BRADY . The prisoner's sister brought the book to me, and I pledged it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 16.

Judgment respited .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181028-41

1432. FRANCIS LOSCH was indicted for the wilful murder of Mary Ann, his wife .

ANN DIAMOND . I live in Lawrence-yard, Jew's-row, Chelsea . The prisoner and his wife lodged in the same house with me-they had left the lodging three nights. On Friday, the 9th of October, between seven and eight o'clock at night, I was going out; the deceased came past me, and asked me how I was? I saw a man standing behind her, and asked her if it was her husband? she said Yes. He came forward, and asked her if she would go home? she said, "Go along!" and moved her hand. He walked past us, turned back, and said, "Nance, come home, for you are drunk." She said, "If I am drunk, it is by prostituting myself for an idle fellow like you"-upon which he came forward with great violence, and forced something to her side - I did not see what was in his hand. She staggered a little on her left side, fell on her back, and called to me to take the knife out of her two or three times, but I never moved, I was so alarmed. She pulled her clothes up - I saw her bowels gush out. The prisoner never ran away, but said, "Here I am, to be taken as a prisoner, if you choose to take me." Several persons gathered round - I saw no more.

RICHARD CLARK . I am a tailor, and live in Lawrence-yard. I was standing about a yard behind the deceased, opposite Lawrence-yard - She was talking to Diamond. The prisoner was standing on the right side of the deceased, talking to her in a low tone of voice - I could not hear what he said. I heard her say, "If I am drunk, it is with wh-r-g for you all day." I observed the prisoner put his right hand up to his side, as if to put his hand in his waistcoat-pocket. He walked up to the deceased - I saw something in his right hand - I could not see what it was. He went up to her, and made a violent plunge at her belly - She staggered backward, and screamed out "I am murdered!" She staggered very near to me - She turned very near upon her half-face, and exclaimed, "Oh my G-d! will any body take the knife out of me?" She was then staggering. I observed the blood streaming down her thigh, but saw no weapon. I lifted up my right hand to assist her-she staggered from me, fell on her left side, and rolled on her back, and made use of the same expression as before.

Q.What became of the prisoner - A. I saw him near the wall - He had moved a very little way; he extended his arms out, and said, "Here I am, I am not going to run away, any body may take me." I went for a constable; I could not find him, returned, and met the prisoner in the custody of two men near the spot. I found the deceased where I had left her, lying on her back, and her bowels coming out of her side-she was put on a shutter, and taken away. I saw her afterwards, before the Coroner's inquisition - She was dead.

WILLIAM TREADWAY . I am a coal-merchant, and live in George-street, Sloane-street. I was crossing the road, heard the alarm of the murder, and the deceased say,"Take the knife out of me." I saw her lying on the ground, her bowels were coming out. The prisoner stood just-by, and said, I am the person, take me. I took him to the watch-house. As we were going along, he said, let me go, I will not run away, I have thrown the knife into the road. I had seen them both about ten minutes before in my street - they had been having a few words; he struck her with a bundle which was in his hand, and kicked her; she did nothing but cried-it appeared a casual quarrel. At the watch-house the prisoner said it was through jealousy.

GEORGE CARTER. I saw the deceased on the ground, with her bowels hanging out. I assisted in taking the prisoner to the watch-house.

ELIZA HOLLOWAY. I live near Lawrence-yard, and keep a stand in Jew's-row, about twenty yards from Lawrence-yard; I heard a dreadful scream, went to the spot, saw the deceased lying with her clothes up, and her bowels out-several people were there. The prisoner was standing at a little distance, with his hands out. I said, "Losch, you have murdered your wife, you have stabbed her." He said, "Yes, I have, and you may take me; I do not mean to run away." I got before him to prevent his running away, and called the last witness, who secured him - He did not attempt to get away. About ten minutes after I saw several people going to look for the knife; I found one near the gutter, two or three feet from where the deceased had laid. I gave it to Maybank.

RICHARD MAVBANK. I am the watch-house keeper. The prisoner was brought to me about ten munutes after eight o'clock. He said he had done it, and thrown the knife away, opposite the Three crowns. The deceased was taken to St. George's Hospital. Holloway gave me

the knife, which I produce. The prisoner said, "It is the knife, and now I am happy."

MR. JOHN KITCHEN . I am a surgeon. I was attending St. George's Hospital. The deceased was brought there about half-past eight o'clock at night, and died at five next morning, in consequence of a wound on the right side of the abdomen. There is not the least doubt of its being the cause of her death.

Prisoner. I have no witnesses, and want none.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 44.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Dallas.

Reference Number: t18181028-42

1433. JOHN DALY was indicted for the wilful murder of James Learwood .

CHARLES JOHNSON , I am a prisoner in the Fleet -the prisoner was also a confined there, and so was Learwood, the deceased; he was a tailor , and about fifty years of age. On the 10th of October, about five o'clock, I was walking on the pavement opposite his room, and saw him fall from his shop-board-nobody but him and the prisoner were in the room. There was a cry of murder! I believe it was the deceased that called. I stepped up to the window, and saw the prisoner beating him with the sleeve-board; he was on the ground, on his side. I heard him cry - I immediately drew the sash of the window up; it was shut before - I looked in, and said "In the name of G-d don't kill the man." I turned round, and called the people-they came. The deceased was laying by the fire. I saw blood, or black, on his eye. The prisoner caught him by the shoulder, turned him over on his stomach, and said"D-n your head, you old rogue, I will flog your a-s." He immediately gave him four or five slaps with the flat side of a sleeve-board, not very hard. He immediately put the sleeve-board down, and flew out of the window, which I had opened, and said "D-n your old eyes, I have not half done with you yet." He went four or five yards toward the racket-ground in a terrible passion. I returned, went on the pavement, and talked with one Dougle. He then returned to the window. I told Greaves to go in.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. You went there in consequence of the deceased crying out - A. Yes. I saw blood, or black, on his eye - I cannot say that there was any wound. I saw no blow struck on his head.

WILLIAM GREAVES. I am a prisoner in the Fleet. I saw several persons standing round the deceased's window. The prisoner was addressing himself to the others, telling them how Learwood had used him, by finding two letters, and giving them to Lewis. He said he had wipped his backside with the sleeve-board, had pulled him off the shop-board, and he would not forget that in a hurry - He appeared in a passion. He jumped down into the deceased's room again, and said, "You know pon did give him the letter." I jumped down myself-the deceased was then standing by the fire-place-the discourse was chiefly about the letter - He did not then strike him, but only threatened him. He said, "I have not done with you yet, and I will serve you out again, when I have proved that you did give him the letter." He went out of the room. The deceased put his hand to his thigh, and said, "I don't know, but I believe you have done for me now." The prisoner and I left the room together.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. The deceased complained of his thigh - A. Yes.

THOMAS HUNT . I am a prisoner in the Fleet. I was looking out of my room window, which is above Learwood's, and saw several people there, saying, do not hurt the man. I heard a man crying out, as if he was in pain. I ran out of my room, and lifted the deceased off the floor - He was laying on his side-nobody was with him. I put him in a chair-the prisoner was at the window. I heard what passed, and asked Learwood how he came in that situation; he was a minute and a half before he could answer me. - I saw black coming all round his left eye. He said, Daly had been beating him. I asked, for what-Daly said, for picking up a letter, and giving it to a fellow prisoner. I asked the deceased if it was true? - he said several times, that he knew nothing about any letter whatever, the prisoner then came into the room, through the window, and said, "How can you deny it, when you told me on the shop-board, that you thought it no harm?" The room is below the pavement. The prisoner said he ought to be the last person to serve him so, for he had rendered him a great service about twelve months ago. I left the room.

Q. When you picked the deceased up in what state was he - A. He was on his side. He did not complain of any thing. I put him in a chair - He was insensible for a minute and a half. All he said was, that Daly had been beating him.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. Did not the prisoner say he had been giving him two or three slaps for his ingratitude - A. He did; the deceased did not contradict it. He had been two years in the prison-the prisoner had been there twelve months. I believe they were very friendly before this.

SARAH BERESFORD . My husband is a prisoner in the Fleet. I was washing-my room is near the deceased's - I was washing in the sink. The prisoner came into my room - I saw him go into Learwood's room, he remained there three or four minutes, talking very loud. He came out, and went in again in a few minutes. He appeared in a much greater passion than at first; he came in about five minutes. I heard a great noise, but paid no attention. He came to the sink, and drank some water, returned into the deceased's room, and shut the door-(he always shut the door when he went in). I left the sink, and went into my own room, returned, and saw the deceased sitting in his own room, and crying, "Oh dear! Oh dear!" I saw one or two gentlemen in the room.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Where does the window of his room look to - A. Into the skittle-ground; any person can see into the room-shutting the door does not hinder the people from seeing into his room.

COURT. Q. The noise you heard was loud language, as if they were quarrelling - A. Yes; I saw no blows, nor heard any.

JESSE JAMES BERESFORD. I am a prisoner in the Fleet, and the husband of the last witness. I was in the racketground, on the 10th of October, about five o'clock, and heard somebody say, "Don't go to kill the man, for G-d's sake!" I turned round, looked at Learwood's window, saw the prisoner in the room, and Learwood on the floor. The prisoner had the sleeve-board in one hand, and held

the deceased with the other, either by the collar or arm; he appeared in the act of pulling the deceased. I only saw him strike one blow on the breech. The prisoner afterwards came through the window into the racket-ground, and explained to the persons assembled his reasons for doing it. He said, "he had pulled him off the board, and had given the old scoundrel a good cobbing on the a-s;" and I think he said he had richly deserved it, and in pulling him off the board he had scratched his eye a little.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. At that time nothing serious was thought-A. Nothing.

Q. I believe, as soon as it was discovered that the man was in danger, he used every means he could to do him good - A. Yes, he sent for Mr. Astley Cooper, and gave him every assistance.

WILLIAM PACEY. I am a prisoner in the Fleet. I heard somebody cry out, ran to the window, and saw the deceased lying down, and the prisoner with the sleeve-board in his hands - He struck him on the breech with it, with both hands, as hard as he could. He came out of the window, and said he had smacked his a-s three times with the sleeve-board, and he would not forget that presently. He then swore a bitter oath, and said, "I wish had killed him outright."

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. How many persons were by at the time he made use of that expression - A. A great many. I dare say some of those now present heard it.

COURT. Q. You was examined before the Coroner - A. Yes; the Coroner was very diligent in his inquiry to know every thing that he could about it,

LEWIS WILLIAMS . I am a prisoner in the Fleet. I was walking very near the deceased's room, and heard a noise; I did not know whether they were playing or quarrelling; the deceased was on the board-whether he fell off the board, or the prisoner had pulled him off, I cannot say; he came on the floor, and the prisoner slapped his b-ks-de with the flat side of the sleeve-board. There was a cry of Murder! several persons went into the room. The prisoner came up to me, and said he had been slapping the man on his breech-his shirt was torn. Cobbing is a sea-faring term, and means slapping his posteriors.

JOHN MEAD . I am a prisoner in the Fleet. On the 10th of October, about ten minutes after nine o'clock at night, I saw the prisoner, and told him the poor man was dying. He replied, that it was time the old rascal, or scoundrel, was dead! - I made no reply. I saw him again in about a quarter of an hour. He was then quarrelling with the deceased about the letter.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. You was not examined before the Coroner - A. No; I was present, to be examined if I had been called. The Coroner desired that every person should come forward who knew any thing about the matter. I was anxious to hear the result of the inquiry.

COURT. Q.Why did you not say you knew something about it - A. The Coroner said it was unnecessary to hear more.

Q. Do You swear that - A. Yes.

Q. You was in the room while the witnesses were examined - A. Not all the time.

Q.Did you give the slightest intimation to the Coroner that you could give any information - A. No, I thought I should be called.

Q. How could he know you knew any thing of it if you did not inform him - A. I was told by the crier that I must attend. I remained outside the gate, expecting to be called-after that, I forced myself into the room, and heard two, three or four witnesses examined. It was afterwards discovered that my name was not inserted in the list which was given to the Coroner.

Q. Why did you not request to be examined, as you knew what was so important - A. I did not think it my place to advance my opinion.

JOHN HARCRAVES . I am a prisoner in the Fleet, and a surgeon. A few minutes after nine o'clock at night, on Saturday, the 19th of October, I was called in to see the deceased, who was on his bed, partly undressed. I found he had been sick - He was totally insensible, and in a strong paralysis, and a discolouration of his eye; the museles of his face were much distorted, and his tongue hanging partly out of his mouth. I understood he had received some injury on his head. I had him put on a chair, and examined his head; I could find no depression of the skull, but was still persuaded he had received some injury in his head. I found his pulse at 66, and that on his left wrist much more languid than the other. I bled him freely, upon which he breathed much freer, the paralysis gave way, and he appeared relieved. I ordered a warm bath, which was immediately brought. I attempted to give him medicine, but he could not swallow - I staid with him till ten o'clock. At eleven I visited him again, and found his pulse at 76-at twelve it was at 96. At five o'clock next morning I visited him, and found it at 150. I was so alarmed that I determined upon opening the temporal artery on the side opposite to the injured part, and bled him freely, which materially relieved them - I found him very dangerous. Between eleven and twelve o'clock further advice came. I should have said, that between nine and ten o'clock that morning the prisoner came into the room, and appeared anxious to know how the man was. I told him he could not survive forty-eight hours from the time of the inquiry - He appeared greatly alarmed. I told him I should be very sorry to be in the situation of the person who caused it - He said he was the person, and was very sorry for it, and inquired what he could do. I told him to send for good advice - He asked who I would recommend? I recommended Mr. Astley Cooper, or Mr. Abernethy; he said he would do it, and left the room. Soon after, the friends of the deceased desired I would go and request the prisoner not to come into the room any more. I went, and told him. He said, "What would you have me do?" I again advised him to write to a gentleman to come to his assistance. He immediately took a sheet of paper, and wrote something - I left the room. The man died between seven and eight o'clock on Monday morning. Mr. Delagarde saw him.

Q. In your opinion, what was the cause of his death - A. I saw his body opened, and have no hesitation in saying my opinion is, that he died from an internal injury on the brain, occasioned by external violence. I ought to have said some conversation passed between me and the prisoner about the injury he had received. I told him my

opinion was, that it was in consequnece of the injury he had received on his head. He said he did not strike him on the head, he only struck him on the b-ks-de. He said it could not be from his striking him, it must have been from the fall from the window-seat, which was the shop-board. I said I could not think that, for the room was carpeted very thickly, and he was not seated above three feet six inches from the floor. He said, then it must have been against the bed-post. I said I did not see exactly how that could be, but it must have been from a violent blow. There was a bed within six inches of the window.

Q. What description of external violence do you believe occasioned the injury - A. On dissection I observed a rupture on the dura mater, which must have been from a blow - A blow on the eye in an oblique direction, I think, would have occasioned it. I could discover no external bruise, except on the eye. There were between two and three ounces of extravasated blood, which would depress the brain. This might have arisen from a blow on the eye.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. It is a stone floor-there was a very thick bag under the carpet.

COURT. Q. Had you time to give your examination deliberately before the Coroner - A. No, I had time to give it.

Q. Did you tell the Coroner any thing about any intercourse between you and the prisoner, except about his expressing his great anxiety for the safety of the deceased - A. Yes, I did. Mr. Shelton seemed to wish to cut the matter short, and to come to the essential points.

Q. Did you give any account about the blow, and the probable fall from the shop-board - A. I did. I heard my examination read over before I signed it.

Q. I will read your deposition over to you-(read) - A. That is correct as far as it goes.

The deposition did not state any conversation on the subject.

MR. PHILIP CHILWELL DELAGARDE. I am house-surgeon of St. Bartholomew's Hospital. On Sunday, the 11th of October, at eleven o'clock in the morning, I was called in to see the deceased; he was laying in a state of insensibility, and in such a state as argued that a great injury must have been done to the brain - I considered him in great danger. Several other medical persons were there. We all thought he laboured under symptoms of depression and concussion - He died. I examined the head. The cause of his death was internal injury, arising from external violence, which must have been considerable.

Q.Where did it appear to have been inflicted - A. On the left eye. A blow or a fall would have occasioned it, if they had been inflicted with sufficient force - I am not able to say which. I did not observe the floor.

COURT. Q. Did you find any fracture of the brain under the part where the external violence appeared - A. None.

Q. Suppose the sleeve-board to have been used with both hands, in the violent manner represented, would it not have fractured the bone - A. It might have produced the injury by fracturing the bone. The fall would have caused it as likely.

Prisoner's Defence. The room is only carpeted in the middle, full five feet are left bare. I was standing in the ground, Dougle came to me, and asked if I had not lost a letter, I said I had - He said, he saw the deceased with it, that he read it to him, and he advised the deceased to give it to him; but he said, he would give it to Lewis, as I was at variance with him, and that he saw him give it to Lewis. I said, I did not think it possible, I went into the deceased's room, and asked him how he could treat me so - He said he did not think it any harm. I told him he ought to be punished for it. I called him a scoundrel. He called me a liar. I told him I would go to Lewis, and if he did not return it, I would complain. He was getting off his shop-board, and fell off, on the bare stcnes. I was going out of the room, went to assist him, and put him on a chair - I told him bad as it was, it was what he deserved - We kept talking about the letter for a quarter of an hour. He called me a liar again - I caught hold of him, and beat him on the b-ks-de with the sleeve-board.

MR. JAMES HARMER. I am the prisoner's solictior. I attended the inquisition taken by Mr. Shelton.

Q. Did you see Mead in the room - A. I do not remember it-the room was very much crouded.

Q. Did the Coroner make the declaration, that if anybody present knew any thing of the facts, he was ready to hear them - A. He did repeatedly and loudly. Mr. Shelton had a list of persons supposed to know any thing about it. After examining them, he made this declaration. One or two came forward in consequence of his solicitation; every body could hear him. He called out loudly and repeatedly. I heard Hargraves examined - He has stated more to-day than what he did before the Coroner. He did not say a word about any conversation between him and the prisoner, as to the cause of his death. The Coroner has taken down all that he said. Nothing about the conversation about his falling from the shop-board, or anything else was said. It is untrue that the Coroner wished him to shorten the matter, and did not take every thing down. GUILTY . Aged 42.

Of Manslaughter only. Confined One Year .

London Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow.

Reference Number: t18181028-43

1434. ELEANOR BRYAN was indicted for feloniously killing and slaying Johanna Duggan .

JOHN DUGGAN . I live in Lascelles-court, St. Giles's. The prisoner is a widow , and lives in Charlotte-street. The deceased, Johanna Duggan, was my sister, and was five or six years old. On the 28th of September she was in a very good state of health. On Sunday, the 27th of September, between eleven and twelve o'clock at night, the prisoner came to my mother's house with three baskets-(she attends the markets). She said she was locked out of her lodgings, and had no where to go to. My father said she might go to bed with the children - She said she did not wish to disturb them; she laid on the floor till the morning - She was sober. Between five and six o'clock she got up. My father dressed the child-it was playing about the room. The prisoner fetched a quartern and a half of gin, and gave my father and mother a glass - They went to Covent Garden-market; the prisoner fetched another quartern of gin, and offered my wife a glass, she refused it; I also refused it, and she threw it over me in bed. The child said she was going to Covent Garden, and asked the prisoner if she was going? she said Yes; I will take you to your father and mother-they went out together, between six and seven o'clock; between eight and nine she brought the child home intoxicated-it did not

appear much so then. She got sick afterwards, vomited, and was very ill. She was put to bed, but got up again in a few minutes; the vomiting and purging returned - She went to sleep again, and awoke in about an hour. We sent for the doctor-it died about twenty minutes after eight o'clock that night. The prisoner left the house about an hour after she brought it home; she did not appear very sober. She said the child had taken two glasses of gin, one of rum, and two-pennyworth of peppermint, part of two pots of porter, and a small drop of wine.

Q. Did she say where she had it - A. She mentioned the Rose and Crown, as one public-house. She always appeared very kind to the child.

ELLEN DUGGAN. I am the wife of the last witness, the prisoner went out with the child, and returned about half-past eight o'clock; the child was quite intoxicated-it had a fit in the bed. The prisoner said she gave it two glasses of gin, one of rum, and two-penny worth of peppermint, and some wine. I confirm the statement of my husband.

CATHERINE DUGGAN. The deceased was my sister; the prisoner returned with her between eight and nine o'clock-she was drunk, and very ill, I went out and returned about six o'clock; I told the prisoner, she ought to be ashamed, to give the child so much liquor. She said, she would give it more by and by, when she got better of this.

-WOOD. I keep the Rose and Crown, in Broad-street, St. Giles's. The prisoner came to my house, with the child, about a quarter after eight o'clock, and called for a glass of gin, which she gave to the child-the child asked if she was to drink it off? The prisoner said Yes. I said it would take her breath away-the child however drank it off. She gave it nothing more.

MR. NATHANIEL MORGAN . I attend St. George's Hospital. On the 30th of September, about three o'clock in the afternoon, I examined the body of the deceased-the stomach and the intestines were inflamed. I could discover no appearance of poison having been given to the child. She appeared healthy.

Q. From the inflammation, if she had taken the quantity of liquor it would be likely to produce death - A. The stomach would exhibit the appearances I found; it would cause vomiting and purging before death. One glass of gin taken by such a child, at one draught, would produce these appearances.

Prisoner's Defence. They were in the habit of giving the child liquor. I gave it a glass, and did not think it would hurt.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Confined Six Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Dallas.

Reference Number: t18181028-44

1435. THOMAS JONES was indicted for that he, on the 30th of June, 1814 , feloniously, wilfully, and maliciously did make an assault upon Jane Mitchell , and feloniously and wilfully did cut her on her head, with intent to murder her, or to disable her .

The prosecutrix stating her name to be Mitcheling, and not Mitchell, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow.

Reference Number: t18181028-45

1436. WILLIAM TRAVERS was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of September , six ounces of gold filings, value 12l., and eighteen ounces of gold cuttings, value 4l. 10s, the property of Thomas Dugard , in his dwelling-house .

THOMAS DUGARD. I am a jeweller , and live in Red Lion-street, Clerkenwell ; the prisoner was my servant . On the 12th of September my apprentice gave me information, and I desired him to watch the prisoner; he told me something, I fetched the prisoner into the parlour, and told him I understood he had robbed me; and if he had not, if he would turn his pockets out it would satisfy me. He refused. I observed him shifting gold from one pocket to another. I searched him, and found the property stated in the indictment on him, which is mine, and worth above 40s.

CHARLES ORTON. I am the prosecutor's apprentice. On the 12th of September I saw the prisoner take some gold out of the pan, and put it in his pocket. I informed my master, and afterward watched the prisoner, and saw him put more gold into his pocket. My master brought him into the parlour, and found it on him.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Of stealing to the value of 39s. only.

Confined Two Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Dallas.

Reference Number: t18181028-46

1437. JOHN NICHOLLS was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of October , three shirts, value 9s.; one pair of trowsers, value 8s.; two coats, value 20s.; one pair of shoes, value 3s., and two handkerchiefs, value 1s., the goods of Philip Plummer ; one jacket, value 10s., and 9s. 6d. in monies numbered, the goods and monies of John Potts , in the dwelling-house of Samuel Dakers .

ELIZA DAKERS. I am the wife of Samuel Dakers , who keeps the Camden Head, at Bethnal-green , the prisoner lodged at our house three nights. On the 20th of October he came down with a bag - I told Robert Dakers to follow him; he brought him back with the bag, which contained the articles stated in the indictment.

ROBERT DAKERS. I am the last witness's brother. I followed the prisoner, and told him to return, as he had property which did not belong to him. He said he believed he had a jacket, and offered me a pint of beer to let him go.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was intoxicated.

GUILTY . Aged 45.

Of stealing to the value of 39s. only.

Confined Two Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow .

Reference Number: t18181028-47

1438. WILLIAM VERNON was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of September , one cheese, value 2s. , the property of Thomas Brown .

THOMAS BROWN . I live in Grafton-street . I lost a cheese from my door, ran out, and took the prisoner with one, but will not swear that it was mine.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Dallas.

Reference Number: t18181028-48

1439. MARY DALEY was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of September , one hat, value 5s., and one handkerchief, value 6d., the goods of James Preddex , from his person .

JAMES PREDDEX. I am a carpenter . On the 15th of September, I met the prisoner, who asked me to go home with her, I refused. She snatched off my hat, and refused to give it to me.

JOHN JONES . I am a watchman. I saw the prisoner with the man's hat, he gave her in charge. She was rather drunk.

Prisoner's Defence. I was intoxicated.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow.

Reference Number: t18181028-49

1440. JOHN THOMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of September , one looking-glass, value 15s. , the goods of Robert Middleton .

ELIZA MIDDLETON . I am the wife of Robert Middleton , we keep a broker's-shop in Wardour-street . On the 16th of September, about half-past five o'clock in the evening, I saw somebody leave the shop, and missed the looking-glass off a chest of drawers - I ran out, and found the prisoner with it under his arm, in Chapel-street. He said it was his own.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A man gave it to me to carry.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Confined Three Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Dallas.

Reference Number: t18181028-50

1441. ANN WHITE was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of October , five bonnets, value 17s. 6d., the goods of John Valentine , from the person of Isabella Phillips .

ELIZA VALENTINE . I am the wife of John Valentine ; I am in the straw-hat and child-bed linen business . On the 28th of September a person, whom I believe to be the prisoner, came to the shop, represented herself to be a lady's maid, and said she had recommended them to me; she requested I would send bonnets for three persons. I told her I would send five. I sent them by Isabella Phillips.

ISABELLA PHILLIPS. I am apprentice to Mrs. Valentine-she sent me to take five new bonnets with the prisoner. She took me to Mr. Astley Cooper's, in Spring-gardens , and said she would go down and see if her mistress or the housekeeper were in the way, as the lady would not like to have them brought down while she was there. She came up again, and said the housekeeper was there - She took them from me. I said I did not like to leave them without the money. She said she would go down and hear what they said. She came up again, and said, "You are to go and fetch the bill, and bring two mourning caps." I went back, and returned to the kitchen with the bill. They said they knew nothing about it; but that a woman had left some bonnets. I could neither get the bonnets nor money. I never saw the prisoner again till I saw her at the office.

ANN ODELL. I am cook to Mr. Astley Cooper, who lives in Spring-gardens. The prisoner had no situation in my master's establishment, not was she sent out by any of the servants to buy any thing. A woman, whom I believe to be the prisoner, came to our house on the 5th of October, about four o'clock in the afternoon, and asked for a name that I did not know. She returned in a few minutes with some bonnets, and asked me if she might leave them until she returned from Finsbury-square. She said she came from Brompton. She left them. I went out, returned in a few minutes, and they were gone.

Prisoner. I beg for mercy.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow.

Reference Number: t18181028-51

1442. THOMAS PRESCOTT was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of September , one hat, value 5s., the goods of Margaret Lancaster , widow , from the person of Robert Lancaster .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating it to be the property of the said Robert Lancaster .

ROBERT LANCASTER. I live with my mother, Margaret Lancaster ; she is a widow. On the 29th of September I was coming along Oxford-street , the prisoner came behind me, and took my hat off - A boy held me round the body the while. I called out Stop thief! the boy let me go; I ran after the prisoner, and he dropped my hat. He was stopped near Hanway-yard - I am sure he is the man.

ALEXANDER POVALL . About half-past seven o'clock on Sunday evening, I was in Hanway-yard-there was a cry of Stop thief! the prisoner ran towards me with great force, I stopped him, and took him back to the boy, who said he was the man. He wanted me to let him go.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Six Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Dallas.

Reference Number: t18181028-52

1443. JAMES ROBINSON was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of September , forty-four silk handkerchiefs, value 12l. the goods of Magnus Jackson , from the person of Thomas Roberts .

THOMAS HOPKINS . I am servant to Magnus Jackson, who is a hosier , and lives in Piccadilly . The prisoner has bought several trifling things at our shop. He said he should want some silk handkerchiefs. On the 19th of September he bought some flannel, and said he had no money but would send it in the afternoon, instead of which he sent a note, desiring I would send the flannel with some silk handkerchiefs the next morning, by my boy, which I did, and told the boy not to deliver them without the money.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You do not know his hand-writing - A. No. I have seen the person who brought the note several times with the prisoner.

THOMAS ROBERTS . I am errand-boy to the prosecutor. I know the prisoner; I had seen him at the shop. Hopkins gave me the parcel to take to Manchester-street, to show the gentleman. I met the prisoner at Charing-cross, he asked if I came from Mr. Jackson's, I said Yes. We walked as far as Lancaster-court, Strand. He then said I must give him the handkerchiefs to show to his aunt, who he said lived up the court. He took them, and told me to go to 24, Exeter-street, and inquire for his mother and

wait there till he returned. I went and inquired for Mrs. Williams, as I had known the prisoner by that name. I could find no such person. He never brought either the goods or money. He was taken some time after.

Cross-examined. It was dark. I am certain he is the man. I was told not to give him any thing in the street. I should not have delivered them to him without the money.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow .

Reference Number: t18181028-53

1444. WILLIAM WOODHOUSE was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of September , twenty-four shawls, value 28s. and twelve pounds of thread, value 4s. the goods of Robert Butts , John Langton , and George Austin .

ROBERT BUTTS . I am a haberdasher , in partnership with John Langton and George Austin. We live in Gutter-lane . The prisoner was our porter . He used to come to the warehouse at seven o'clock in the morning, go to breakfast at eight, and return again at nine. On the 10th of September he did not return from breakfast at the usual time. About half-past one Turnpenny called and said he had him in custody. I saw him and my property at the Mansion-house.

HENRY TURNPENNY. I am day patrol of the City. On the 10th of September, about eight o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner coming down Church-court, Basinghall-street, with a bundle under his arm. He appeared to know me. Suspecting him, I stopped him, and asked what he had in the bundle? He said he had nothing. I said I must see what it was, and found twenty-four buff shawls, and twelve pounds of thread. I asked where he brought it from, he made no answer. I told him he had robbed his master. He said he had, and was sorry for it; it was the first time, and he hoped he should be forgiven. I went to his house near Crown-street, Finsbury-square, the lower part is a haberdasher's shop. He told me who his master was. I went and told the prosecutor.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I beg for mercy.

GUILTY . Aged 29.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18181028-54

1445. WILLIAM GREEN was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of October , four bells, value 3s. 9d. , the goods of John Warner and Robert Warner .

JAMES LANG . I am foreman to John and Robert Warner . On the 1st of October, about two o'clock, while the prisoner (who was our servant ), was gone to dinner, I found five bells in his drawer, which had no business there. I marked them and left them there. He returned to work. At eight o'clock as he was leaving work, the clerk called him into the counting-house, I took his hat off, and found four bells, all muffled to prevent their making a noise. They were those I had marked.

CHARLES DARKIN. I am in the prosecutor's service. I was desired to stop the prisoner, and I took the four bells out of his hat. They were muffled. He said he had drilled them, and was afraid his master would be angry, and he was going to throw them away.

GEORGE GLADWELL . I saw the bells in the prisoner's drawer; they were not spoiled.

Prisoner. Q.Did I not show them to you, and ask if they were spoiled. You told me to make away with them, or I should be discharged - A. I told him to put them ready to be melted.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was a stranger to the business, and Gladwell said I should be discharged if the foreman saw the bells.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18181028-55

1446. WILLIAM CASH was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of September , twelve dead fish, called haddocks, value 14s. the goods of Lane Baker .

LANE BAKER. I am a fishmonger , and live at Camberwell. On the 25th of September, at half past six o'clock in the evening, I bought twelve dead haddocks; I called"Basket!" the prisoner applied with his basket, and said,"Mr. Baker, Botolph-lane?" I told him no, my cart stood in Thames-street , opposite Mr. Ling's, and gave them to him to carry to my cart. When I got on the bridge, I found they had not been brought there. This was an hour after. On the following Monday I found him in Leadenhall-market; he denied ever having seen them.

SAMUEL MALENIOR . I saw the prosecutor deliver the haddocks to the prisoner. I am certain he is the man.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing of it.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Whipped, and Discharged .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18181028-56

1447. JOHN LAWRENCE was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of September , three pounds of sugar, value 2s. 6d. the goods of William Towgood , John Danvers , Charles Danvers , and Christopher Ceriackes .

CHRISTOPHER CERIACKES . I am a sugar-refiner , in partnership with William Towgood , John Danvers , and Charles Danvers. We live on Bread-street - hill . The prisoner was employed in our house. On the 28th of September, between six and seven o'clock in the evening, I met him coming down stairs from the men's room; seeing me he went back. I went and stood where he could not see me. He went into the cellar and took a piece of meat down which was his own. I called him to me and asked what was in his hat. I took it off, and found three pounds of sugar in it. He said he was going to give it to a woman.

Prisoner's Defence. I was not going to take it out of the house.

GUILTY . Aged 43.

Whipped, and Discharged .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18181028-57

1448. JOSEPH DOLPHIN was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of October , three reams of paper, value 3l., the goods of John Winter Morgan , George Meadows Morgan , and Robert Morgan , in their dwelling-house .

JOHN MUNROE. I am servant to Messrs. George Meadows Morgan , John Winter Morgan , and Robert Morgan, who are wholesale stationers , and live in Belle Sauvage-yard, Ludgate-hill . On the 16th of October, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, I was called down, and found a young man in the shop, who asked for three sheets of gilt-edge paper. We do not retail goods. I suspected something, looked round, and missed a bundle of paper. I did not see the prisoner in the shop. I ran out, and saw the prisoner going out of the yard, with the bundle of paper on his shoulder. I overtook him about the middle of Ludgate-hill. I stopped him, and asked where he got it? He said I had no business with him, that he was a stranger, and was employed to carry it. I took him back. It cost us above 3l. He was quite alone.

GEORGE HALLOWAY . I am a porter in the Belle Sauvageyard. I saw the prisoner within a few yards of Mr. Morgan's door, with the paper on his shoulder. I am certain he is the man. Nobody was with him.

MR. JOHN WINTER MORGAN. I am one of the partners in the firm. Our servants sleep in the house.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A man gave me the parcel to carry. He went with me. I pointed him out to Munroe.

GUILTY . Aged 31.

Of stealing to the value of 39s. only.

Confined One Year , and Publicly Whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18181028-58

1449. WILLIAM ADAMSON was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of September , seventy-seven pounds of rope, value 5s. the goods of William Jolliff and Edward Banks .

DANIEL MALLETT . I am servant to William Jolliffe and Edward Banks , contractors for building the Southwark bridge . There was a quantity of rope on a pile, on the London side of the bridge, On the 27th of September, about eight o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner under the center of the bridge, in a boat, with a little boy. He passed the place where the rope was. I went up to the boat, which stopped at Cotton's wharf, and found three-quarters of a hundred weight of rope in it, which was alongside a sloop-one part of the rope was in the sloop, and the other in the boat. I took the prisoner. The captain of the vessel jumped out of the boat, or I should have taken him. The rope was fastened to the pile,

Cross-examined by MR. PLATT. Q. The prisoner was fishing - A. No, he was dragging-the rope was under water, on the pile.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was looking for a sail which a bargeman had lost, and found the rope.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined Six Weeks , and Whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18181028-59

1450. HENRY HAWKINS was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of October , one silver watch, value 2l.; one chain, value 2s., two keys, value 6d., and one sixpence, the goods and money of David Tagg , from his person .

DAVID TAGG. I am a labourer just come from the country. On the 27th of October, about three o'clock in the afternoon, I was in Petticoat-lane , and had a silver watch in my fob, with a chain, two keys, and a sixpence hanging to it-there was a great crowd, I had just got through it-my watch was then safe. A cart came round the corner-there were three or four persons just behind me. They caught hold of me with their arms, round my waist, and said, "Stand back, countryman, you are not used to London, mind the cart." At that moment I felt my watch drawn from my fob - I saw it in the prisoner's hand; there were three others with him. I immediately laid hold of him - He got from me, and ran away. They rescued him from me, and knocked me about, to prevent my taking him, he was stopped by a person. I have never found my watch.

THOMAS BOLTON . I am a labourer at the East India warehouse, I was leaving work, and heard the cry of"Stop thief! he has got my watch." I turned round, and saw the prisoner running very fast, he knocked three or four people doen, by running against them. I collared him, he got from me - I collared him again, and held him fast. The prosecutor was pursuing about three yards behind him, and said he was the man who took the watch out of his fob. The prisoner said, he had not got it. The prosecutor said he never lost sight of him, that he saw him put his hand behind him with it. The prisoner replied that he had not got it. I took him to the watch-house.

CHARLES WILLIAM GREEN . I am a painter. I was in Cutler-street, and saw the prisoner in company with three others. I saw two of them keeping the prosecutor in conversation, while the prisoner and another were rifling his pockets. I watched the prisoner, and his companions down an alley. They returned to the prosecutor just as a cart came up, which prevented my seeing them. He gave the alarm, I followed the prisoner, and saw him taken. I am certain he was with the others. I did not see the watch taken.

Prisoner's Defence. The people were hurrying to get out of the way. I ran between the horses to prevent my being run over. I was taken, and charged with the robbery.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18181028-60

1451. WILLIAM TRAVERS was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of September , three pounds of gold solder, value 4s.; 19 gold links, value 4s., and two pennyweights of gold, value 6s. , the property of Thomas Dugard .

CHARLES ORTON. I am an apprentice to Mr. Thomas Dugard, who is a jeweller , and lives in Red Lion-street, Clerkenwell ; the prisoner was my master's servant . On the 8th of September I gave the work people some gold solder to work on, having first scratched on it, "coloured gold solder." I gave the prisoner some of it.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS, The other men might have had some with those words on it, as well as the prisoner.

THOMAS DUGARD. In consequence of a discovery which was made, I told the prisoner that property was missing-he was taken to the watch-house. I saw him next day there, and he begged for mercy; I said I could say nothing to it, as I was afraid the robbery had been carried on to a great length. He said he should never have done it if he had not been persuaded by another person, whose name he said was Horn. We got a warrant, searched Horn's house, and found the property stated in the indictment, there.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

(See No. 1436.)

GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181028-61

1452. JOHN FULLER and WILLIAM RAYNER were indicted for feloniously killing and slaying James Wakeley .

ROBERT THOMPSON BYERS . On the 26th of September I was at the Job's Castle, public-house, in Red Lion-street, Whitechapel ; the prisoners were there. The deceased, Wakeley, was in another box - He was rather drunk; he had a few words with them, then went to their box, stripped off his jacket, and wanted to fight - They were quarrelling for five or six minutes. After that the prisoner, Fuller, came across the settle, and began fighting. I went to Rayner, and said, "Don't put a big good man against a little good man-it is a pity for them to fight." He got up, and wished Fuller to fight-he is his uncle. He said he should beat my brains out after he had done with the deceased-the deceased fell under. Fuller got up, set-to again, and the deceased fell against the edge of the settle - He got up no more. I went to Rayner, and said," You have made a pretty job of it, here is a dead man for you to look at." He said, "Let him die and be d-d!" Fuller appeared very sorry.

Cross-examined by MR. ARABIN. I have heard that Wakeley was a good fighter, and had fought many pitched battles. I was three boxes from them.

JOHN WHITLOCK . I was in the room. The deceased was wrangling with others, and challenging them to fight. I saw them set-to. The deceased fell against the settle - I cannot say whether it was in consequence of the blow, or by accident.

Cross-examined. He was challenging others to fight, and was always quarrelling when he was in liquor.

JOHN RAVEN. I was in the house. Wakeley came into the middle of the room, and said he would fight any Norfolk or Devonshire man of ten stone. He pulled off his clothes, and stood in a fighting attitude for five minutes. Fuller went to him - I left the room.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Dallas.

Reference Number: t18181028-62

1453. JOHN LEONARD was indicted for that he, on the 24th of September , at St.James, Clerknwell, feloniously did dispose of and put away a certain forged and counterfeit bank note (setting it forth, No. 75,121, 1l., dated August 13, 1818, signed C. Tabor,) with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England, he knowing it to be forged and counterfeit, against the statute .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only calling the forged instrument a promissory note for payment of money, instead of a bank note.

TWO OTHER COUNTS, the same, only stating the prisoner's intent to be to defraud Ann MacCann .

ANN MACCANN . I keep a tallow-chandler's shop , in Cable-street, Whitechapel . About the 24th of September the prisoner came to my shop and asked for four pounds of candles, to sell again. They were one shilling and a halfpenny a pound. He gave me a 1l. bank note. I asked his name; he said John Headley , Cornwall-street; which is half a mile from my house. Charlotte Martin was in the shop at the time.

Q. On his giving you the name, what was done - A. I asked a lady in the shop to write it on the note. Martin asked what I wanted wrote. I said, in the prisoner's hearing - He was close to her-Write John Headley, Cornwall-street. She herself then said to him, "What did you say your name was?" He said again, " John Headley , Cornwall-street;" which she wrote on the note, and then gave it to me.

Q. About a fortnight after was a woman taken up at your house, charged with putting off a bad note - A. Yes. The morning after that, the prisoner came to the shop; I asked him what he wanted; he asked if Mr. MacCann was at home, who is my son. I asked what he wanted; he said was there not something of a woman's passing a bad note here yesterday? I said Yes. He asked when she was to have another hearing? I said "I do not know; but do you recollect giving me a bad note, and a boy gave me a bad note before you came." I told him he had got a boy about seventeen years old. He said, "O I have got boys of all ages."

Q. You asked if he did not remember giving you a bad note himself, did he say any thing to that - A. No. I said he gave me a bad note, in the name of John Headley; he said "my name is John Leonard , and that woman is my wife." She had said her name was Smith. He said, "I gave her that note yesterday," which was the day she had passed it. I sent for a constable, who took him (looking at a note.) I cannot say whether it is the same; I did not write on it. When Martin gave it to me, I put it in my pocket-book. I had no other in my pocket.

COURT. Q. Did you immediately recollect him to be the man - A. I knew him to be the man immediately, and charged him with it. I have not the least doubt of him.

CHARLOTTE MARTIN . I am the wife of Charles Martin ; we live in Thomas-street, St. George's. On the 24th of September I came into the prosecutrix's shop, and found the prisoner there. He offered a 1l. note in payment. I offered to write the address on it (looking at onc.) This is it. I wrote the address which the prisoner gave me. He repeated it once to the prosecutrix, and afterwards to me.

Q. Have you any doubt of his being the man - A.Not the least. It is the same face and voice, but he is dressed different.

HAMMOND COUSINS . On the 8th of October last the prisoner lived at No. 1, West-street, Stepney. He took the house of me on the 4th of September last, and lived there from that time till he was apprehended. His name is John Leonard; he and his wife keep a chandler's shop

there. I saw him there two or three times. He had no other residence that I know.

JAMES MAC CANN . I am the son of Mrs. MacCann, and live with her. On the night before the prisoner was apprehended I had stopped a woman for endeavouring to pass a forged note. She gave me the name of Smith, Love-lane; which I wrote on the note. I had stopped no other woman-(looking at a note.) This is the note she offered me. She never said her name was Leonard, before the prisoner was apprehended.

THOMAS GLOVER . I am an inspector of bank notes at the Bank of England-(looking at the two notes). They are both forged in every respect, paper, plate, ink, and signature, and appear to be impressions from the same plate.

(Note put in and read. See Indictment.)

Prisoner's Defence. I never paid them a note. The note my wife paid them she took in the shop.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 65.

Recommended to Mercy by the prosecutrix.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow.

Reference Number: t18181028-63

1454. SUSANNAH LEONARD was indicted for that she, on the 8th of October , at St. James, Clerkenwell, feloniously did dispose of and put away a certain forged and counterfeit bank note (setting it forth, No. 10,701, 1l. dated August 13,1818, signed P. Lister), with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England, she knowing it to be forged and counterfeited, against the statute .

SECOND COUNT. For feloniously offering to one James MacCann a like forged bank note, with the like intent, she knowing it to be forged and counterfeited, against the statute.

THIRD AND FOURTH COUNTS, the same, only calling the forged instrument a promissory note for payment of money, instead of a bank note.

FOUR OTHER COUNTS, the same, only stating the prisoner's intent to be to defrand Ann MacCann .

JAMES MACCANN . I live with my mother, who keeps a chandler's shop in Cable-street, Whitechapel . On the 8th of October, about eight o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came to the shop, and asked for four pounds of candles, which came to 4s. 2d.; she tendered me a 1l. bank note. I observed it was dated the 13th of August, and having taken two forged notes of that date sometime before, I suspected that was one of the same stamp. I asked her where she lived. She said her name was Smith, and she lived at No. 16, Love-lane, which I wrote on the note in her presence-(looking at one). This is it; it has my writing on it.

Q. What passed then - A. I told her I suspected it was a forgery, and I must detain it. I desired her to walk in, and sent for an officer. Gandar came and took her in a few minutes. I told him, in her presence, the circumstance of my having taken two forged notes before, and I suspected that also was a forgery. She said she hoped it was not, and appeared a little embarrassed. I then told him I should not give her in charge, but I would accompany him and her, to see if she lived at the place she had described. We all three went out, and went towards Love-lane. I had given Gandar the note.

Q. As you were going did any conversation pass - A. She was in the officer's custody, I was a few paces behind. The officer turned round to me, and said, in her hearing, that it was of no use to go to the place, as she had told him she did not live there. She was taken into custody, and taken to Shadwell Office.

Prisoner. Q. I gave you the note, but gave you no address till I was at the watch-house - A. She gave me the address, and I wrote it on the note before I sent for the officer.

WILLIAM GANDAR . I am a constable. On the 8th of October I was called to the prosecutrix's house, and found the prisoner there, with the last witness and Mrs. MacCann. Mr. MacCann produced the note, with the name of Smith, No. 16, Love-lane, written on it; it was not dry when I arrived. We went towards Love-lane with the prisoner. When we got about twenty yards from the house, the prisoner said she did not live where she had given the direction to Mr. MacCann. She did not then say where she did live. I took her to the watch-house, searched, and found 7s. or 8s. in silver, and some halfpence, on her, and gave her in charge of the officers. MacCann gave me the note, I marked it-(looking at one). This is it.

WILLIAM COOK. I am a collector of parochial rates, and live at Shadwell. I know Love-lane, one side of it is in my district, there are not sixteen house there. I know nothing of the prisoner.

WILLIAM THOMAS JEMISON . I live at Shadwell, and am a collector of church-rates. Love-lane is in my district, I collect rents there. I know nothing of the prisoner. The houses extend to No. 15, then they are pulled down; the next house is No. 18. There is no No. 16.

HAMMOND COUSINS . Leonard took a house of me, at No. I, West-street, Stepney, on the 7th of September, and lived there till he was taken up. The prisoner lived with him as his wife. I have seen her there two or three times.

THOMAS GLOVER . I am a bank note inspector-(looking at the note). It is forged in every respect. It is not the hand-writing of the signing clerk.

(Note put in and read. See Indictment.)

Prisoner's Defence. I took the note that morning, and paid it away.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 49.

Recommended to Mercy.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Dallas.

Reference Number: t18181028-64

1455. SUSANNAH FARMILLO was indicted for that she, on the 29th of August , at St. James, Clerkenwell, feloniously did dispose of and put away, a certain forged and counterfeit bank note (setting it forth, No. 64,897, dated August 8,1818, 1l. signed A.Consett,) with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England, she knowing it to be forged and counterfeited, against the statute .

SECOND COUNT. For feloniously offering to William Gilbert a like forged bank note with the like intent, she knowing it to be forged and counterfeited, against the statute.

THIRD AND FOURTH COUNTS, the same as the two former, only calling the forged instrument a promissory note for payment of money, instead of a bank note.

FOUR OTHER COUNTS, the same as the four former, only

stating the prisoner's intent to be to defrand Thomas Parker .

WILLIAM GILBERT . I am shopman to Mr. Thomas Parker, who is a grocer , and lives at No.70, Wardour-street, Soho . On the 29th of August, about eleven o'clock at night, the prisoner came to our shop for a quarter of a pound of 7s. tea, one pound of nine-penny sugar, and two ounces of coffee, which came to 2s. 9d. She paid me a 1l. bank note, which I gave to my master, who was in the shop at the time.

THOMAS PARKER . I am a grocer, and live in Wardour-street. On a Saturday night, between ten and eleven o'clock, the prisoner came to the shop, and bought tea and sugar, which came to 2s. 9d. She gave the last witness a 1l., note, which he handed to me. I asked her name and address, she said Jones, No.5, Compton-street. After I had marked it on the note, I said to her, Jones, No.5, Compton-street, she made answer, "close by here." I then told her I did not like the appearance of the note, and she must wait until I sent to No. 5, Compton-street, to see if she lived there. I directed a young man in the shop to go there, she heard it and said she would go herself. I told her she must wait until the young man returned, to know if the address was correct; she said no, she would go herself; I told her she must stay. She immediately ran out of the shop. I called out "Stop thief!" and went to the shop-door. She was running away. The watchman brought her back with a man (looking at a note). This is the note; it has the name and address on it, with my initials.

Cross-examined by MR. ARABIN. Q. When you told her it was a bad note, did not she say that her husband gave it her, and she was sorry for it - A. She said she was sorry it was a bad note; but she did not say it was given to her by her husband.

Q. Did she not say that her husband, who was at the door, gave it to her - A.No, she did not. My street - door was open.

Q. How long was it from the time she left the shop until she was brought back - A. Not three minutes.

Q. A man was taken up with her - A. Yes, and kept in custody till within a few days.

COURT. Q. Did she say anything about her husband, before she ran away - A. No.

WILLIAM DEAKER. I am a watchman. I heard the cry of "Stop thief!" on the 29th of August, as I was coming up Princes-street, towards Wardour-street. I saw a man crying out "Stop thief!-Stop her!" I saw the prisoner and a man running before the rest. I pursued and took the prisoner about the middle of Compton-street - the man immediately knocked me down; I still kept hold of her, and gave the man in charge of another watchman. We took them both to the prosecutor; he said the prisoner was the woman, and gave her in charge. I took her and the man to the watch-house, when they got there, the man said she was his wife. When he was being searched, he said his name was Jones, and she also said her name was Jones. Next day I took them before the magistrate; as we went along the man said, in her hearing, that he gave her the note, and be believed that she never had one penny but what he gave her. He told the magistrate, in her hearing, that her name was Farmillo, and she gave the same name.

Cross-examined Q. They were running close together - A. Yes.

Q.When you first saw them, what distance were they from the prosecutor's house - A.About thirty or forty yards. They were running from the prosecutor's house. The man gave his name as Jones, at first; he was kept in custody for knocking me down. They spoke as man and wife.

CHARLES VANDEIAN. I live at No. 5, Old Compton-street, Soho, on the 29th of August, it is near Wardour-street. The prisoner did not live at my house; I do not know her.

RICHARD FILKINS. On the 29th of August I lived at No. 5, Little Compton-street, Soho, near Wardour-street. The prisoner did not lodge at my house; I do not know her.

MARY PENNER. On the 29th of August I lived at No.5, New Compton-street. The prisoner never lodged with me.

THOMAS GLOVER. I am a bank note inspector-(looking at the note.) It is forged in all its parts, in paper, plate, ink, and signature. It is signed "A.Consett," but it is not his hand-writing.

(The note was then put in and read. See Indiciment.)

Prisoner's Defence. The shopman said it was 7s. tea; it was 8s. black tea. My husband gave me the note, and told me the name and direction that I was to put on it, which I did. He was standing at the shop-door, and told me to go in and buy the tea and sugar. I obeyed him, as by law and duty I am bound to do. I believe his handwriting is on the note.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 22.

Strongly recommended to Mercy.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow.

Reference Number: t18181028-65

1456. GILBERT WARREN was indicted for that he, on the 9th of September , at St. Mary-le-Bow, feloniously did dispose of and put away a certain forged and counterfeit bank note (selling it forth, No. 29,067, 1l. dated 16th June, 1818, signed W.W. Thompson), with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England, he well knowing it to be forged and counterfeited, against the statute .

SECOND COUNT. For feloniously offering to Elizabeth Clark , a like forged and counterfeit bank note, with the like intent, he knowing it to be forged and counterfeited, against the statute.

THIRD AND FOURTH COUNTS, the same, only calling the forged instrument a promissory note for payment of money instead of a bank note.

FOUR OTHER COUNTS, the same as the four former, only stating the prisoner's intent to be to defraud Samuel Tunnicliffe .

ELIZABETH CLARK . I servant to Mr. Samuel Tunnicliffe, who is a wholesale and retail wine and spirit merchant , and lives in Bishopsgate-street . On the 9th of September, about five o'clock in the evening the prisoner came there and asked for half a pint of rum, which came to 10d. He gave me a 1l. bank note, which I put in the till, there were other notes in the till. I put it on the top of the other notes. I gave him the change. My master was not at home. In about half an hour or an hour

after, the prisoner came again and asked for half a pint of rum again; my master was then at home. I served the prisoner, and he gave me another 1l. bank note, which I took to Mr. Tunnicliffe, who was at tea. He came out and asked the prisoner his name and direction, he gave the name of Gilbert Warren , at Mr. Bays's, egg-salesman, Leadenhall-market; which my master wrote on the note.

Q. What did your master then say to the prisoner - A. He said nothing, but sent for Sheppard, the constable.

Q. Did you, after this, in the prisoner's presence, tell Mr. Tunnicliffe that the prisoner had been there before - A. Yes; before the constable came I told him that I had taken another note of him half an hour or an hour before. I took the same note that the prisoner had given to me, out of the till. I had been in the shop from the time the prisoner first came. I am certain nobody else had been to the till. Nobody had been in the bar but myself. I took the same note out, and gave it to my master, who marked that also.

Cross-examined by MR. CURWOOD. Q. You put the first note in the till, among others - A. At the top of the others.

SAMUEL TUNNICLIFFE. I keep a wine-vaults in Bishopsgate-street. The last witness is my servant. She brought me a note which she said she had taken of the prisoner. I knew it to be forged. I immediately went to the bar, and charged him with having passed a forged note, knowing it to be forged, which he denied, saying, that he had taken it for eggs of his master, Mr. Bays, egg-dealer, Leadenhall-market. My servant then said she had taken one of him about half an hour before. He was present. I asked her if she could identify the note. She said Yes; and brought it to me, I knew it to be forged. He denied passing it. I asked his address; he said Gilbert Warren, at Mr. Bays, egg-dealer, Leadenhall-market. I endorsed the notes with the address he gave me-(looking at two.) These are them. I sent for Mr. Bays, he came while the prisoner was there, and said, in the prisoner's presence, that he had not lived with him for four years. He made no reply to it. I had him taken into custody. He was searched in my presence, and some silver found on him.

Cross-examined. Q. He referred you to Mr. Bays to know who he was - A. He said that he then lived with Mr. Bays.

Q. Did Mr. Bays say that he knew where he did live - A. No.

SAMUEL SHEPPARD. I am a constable. I was sent for to take the prisoner. I searched him, and found four good half-crowns on him. I asked how he got the note? He said he took it for the sale of eggs, in Leadenhall-market, and that he lived with Mr. Bays.

ROBERT BAYS . I am an egg-salesman, in Leadenhall-market. The prisoner did not live with me on the 9th of September last. He lived with me three or four years ago.

Q. Since he left you have you had any intercourse with him - A. Not any. I had not seen him from the time he left me till I saw him at the prosecutor's.

MARY PHILLIBROWN. I am a victualler, and live at Aldgate. The latter end of August (it was after the 25th), the prisoner came to my house with two more men; they had a pot of stout between them, which came to 7d. The prisoner paid for it with a 1l. note. I asked him his name; he said Warren. I asked his address. He said, "Say Bays's, Leadenhall-market." (Looking at a note.) This is the one he paid me.

THOMAS GLOVER. I am a bank note inspector. I have been in my situation twenty-five years. (Looking at the three notes.) They are all forged in every respect, paper, plate, ink, and signature. The two nttered to Clarke are both off one plate, and exactly of the same description. That uttered to Phillibrown is also forged in every respect, but off a different plate.

(The notes were here put in and read.)

Prisoner's Defence. About five weeks before I was taken I went to receive some money from the captain of a ship, with my brother; on his being paid, he gave me a 10l. and a 1l. note. I got the 10l. note changed for a 5l. and five 1l. notes. I afterwards changed the 5l. note before I left the house. Since which I have been selling eggs about.

WILLIAM DALE . I am landlord of the Bell, public-house, Rotherhithe. In August one of the East India ship's companies were paid their wages there. The prisoner and his brother were paid there. His brother received the notes. I did not see the prisoner receive any money. I changed him a 10l. note, and gave him a 5l. note, and five 1l. notes. After that I saw him change the 5l. note. I wrote the name of the captain of the ship on the 10l. note. It was in the latter end of July, or the beginning of August.

COURT. Q. The note was his brother's - A. Yes. I did not look at the notes.

DAVID HODGSON. I was at the Bell at the time the prisoner changed a 10l. and a 5l. note.

Q. Who gave him the 1l. notes for the 5l. - A. A gentleman, whom I do not know - I have seen him before, but do not know his name. It was in July or August.

Q. Did anybody mark the note - A. No.

Q. Did you see the landlord change the 10l. note - A. Yes, he went out to get change for it.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 20.

London Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow .

Reference Number: t18181028-66

1457. BALTHAZAR ADAMS was indicted for that he, on the 4th of September , feloniously did forge and counterfeit an acceptance to a certain bill of exchange for payment of 200l., with intent to defraud Philip Hurd and George Johnson .

FOUR OTHER COUNTS, varying the manner of laying the charge.

SIXTH COUNT, stating his intent to be to defraud Robert Snow and John Dean Paul .

MR. GEORGE JOHNSON. I am a solicitor , in partnership with Mr. Philip Hurd, we live in the Temple. I never saw Mr. Adams, the prisoner, but once before the 4th of September, when he came to my chambers, and said he had been asking Mr. Hurd to discount him a bill for 200l. - that he said it was not quite convenient to him to do it out of his private account, but he thought the firm might do it. I gave him a check for 197l. 10s., deducting the discount of the bill. He gave me the bill - I afterwards sent it to Messrs. Snow and Paul's.

CHARLES GUBBINGS being called did not appear.

MR. ALLEY. My Lord, I cannot possibly prove my case without this witness.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow.

Reference Number: t18181028-67

1458. JOHN MARSH was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of October , one lamb, price 25l. , the property of Thomas Hill .

MR. ARABIN stated that there was nothing but the evidence of an accomplice in this case, and declined proceeding.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow .

Reference Number: t18181028-68

1459. HENRY SUMMERSELL was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of George Richard Robinson , about eleven o'clock in the forenoon of the 19th of October , no person being therein, and feloniously stealing therein, one watch, value 30s.; one key, value 3s.; one seal, value 1s., and one key, value 6d., the goods of Richard Riley .

RICHARD RILEY . I am coachman to George Richard Robinson, Esq. I sleep and live in the lodge, which is about twenty yards from my master's house, but within his premises; my wife is also employed in the family - They are my master's premises.

COURT. Q. Have you less wages on account of living in the house - A. Yes. On the 19th of October I left the lodge about ten o'clock, I fastened every thing up. I returned about twelve, and found the window broken open. There were footmarks of somebody in the house. I missed my watch, which was safe when I went out. The prisoner worked on the premises, and knew the house very well. I gave the alarm - He entered the premises. I thought he changed colour, when I said somebody must have been in who knew the premises. I compared his shoes, and thought they fitted the marks on the table-the marks of the nails corresponded with the shoes, which made me suspect him-they tallied exactly; he was then taken into custody, and said the watch was in a shed on his premises.

GEORGE BISHOP . I am a bricklayer, and live near the prosecutor. The prisoner was in my service. In consequence of what he said, I went and found the watch in a shed adjoining his house, where he said it was.

(Properly produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I deny having it.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Of stealing, but not of breaking and entering, nor in the dwelling-house.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow.

Reference Number: t18181028-69

1460. JOHN CLAYTON was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of October , one watch, value 5l., the property of James Leely , in the dwelling-house of Archibald Fowler .

JAMES LEELY . I am a mariner , and lodge at Archibald Fowler's house, in Spencer-street, St. George's in the East . On the 16th of October I was alarmed, and missed my watch off the table in the front room-the window was open.

SARAH DANIEL . I live next door to the prosecutor. I saw the prisoner go up to the window, and take the watch off the table; he was taken immediately.

JOHN HERBERT. I am surveyor of the Thames Police. I saw the prisoner running, and the prosecutor pursuing him; I collared him, he immediately took the watch out of his bosom, and gave it to him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY Aged 36.

Of stealing to the value of 39s. only.

Confined Three Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Dallas.

Reference Number: t18181028-70

1461. JOHN RAY and JAMES EDWARDS were indicted for stealing, on the 13th of October , one watch, value 40l.; one watch-chain, value 4l., two seals, value 5l., and one key, value 4s., the goods of the Rev. Francis William Johnson Vickery , clerk , from his person .

REV. FRANCIS WILLIAM JOHNSON VICKERY . I am a clergyman of the Church of England , and live in Lisle-street, Leicester-square. On Tuesday evening, the 13th of October, about half-past nine o'clock, I was returning home, through Bear-street. Leicester-fields , a man rushed suddenly before me, and attempted to seize the seals of my watch - I resisted the attempt-three others were behind me. They separated me from the man, who ran off with my watch. I called out Stop thief! and kept my eye upon him till he got to the corner of the street. On my getting up to them I found they had been apprehended. I have no knowledge of them.

Prisoner RAY. Q. In what part of the street did you lose your watch - A. Very near Cranbourn-alley, on the right side of Bear-street.

DAVID WHITE . I am a watchman. I was on duty at the corner of Bear-street, heard the cry of Stop thief! turned round, and saw the prisoner, Ray, running, and the prosecutor pursuing him, calling Stop thief! I seized him, we struggled, and both fell - I held him, and gave him in charge. He was the only person that I saw running - He was running exceedingly fast, and tried to rescue himself from me.

FRANCIS RHIND. I am a tailor. I was crossing Bear-street, and heard a cry of Stop thief! I saw Ray running at the end of the street into the square. White seized him both fell in the scuffle. I ran up, and held him down till he was secured. I saw the prisoner, Edwards, and another man, forcing their way through the crowd. Edwards came up to the prisoner, Ray, took off his hat, and said, "Give it to me!" I looked down, heard the watch jingle in his hat, and seized his hand with the watch in it. Somebody said,"Start!" he said, "I cannot." I took him down Bear-street. Taylor came up and held his hands - A scuffle ensued, and in the scuffle he dropped the watch, and I picked it up.

Q. You saw Edwards receive the watch from Ray in his hat-Yes.

JAMES PURSE . I am a mariner. I was coming down Rider's-court, into Cranbourn-street, saw a crowd, and heard them say, "Mind he don't throw it away." I was just before Edwards, nearly opposite the end of the passage. I saw him stop to look back, and throw the watch away. I picked it up, and said, "I have got it." I took it into Mr. Taylor's shop, and gave it to him. After I picked it up it was snatched at twice.

Prisoner EDWARDS. Q. Did you see it in my hands - A. Yes.

JOSEPH GUEST . I am a hair-dresser, and live in Bear-street. I heard the alarm, went out, and saw Edwards in custody. I went and collared him, and saw the watch in his hand, with the chain twisted round his finger. He threw it down-Purse picked it up, and took it to Taylor s.

WILLIAM TAYLOR . I live in Bear-street. Purse brought the watch to me. I had been out, hearing the alarm, and saw the watch in Edwards's hands - I tried to get it from him; he put his hands down. I heard Purse say "I have got it." He gave it to me.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

RAY'S Defence. I heard the alarm, and run to the spot with my fellow-prisoner. We were knocked down, and taken to the watch-house-nothing was found on me. When they were before the magistrate they were confused in their evidence, and altered it four times.

EDWARDS'S Defence. I trust to the integrity of the Jury. I have been in his Majesty's service.

RAY - GUILTY . Aged 21.

EDWARDS - GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow .

Reference Number: t18181028-71

1462. JOHN WARD was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of October , 6lbs. of bristles, value 20s. , the goods of John Matthew .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 20.

Fined One Shilling, and Discharged .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18181028-72

1463. MICHAEL HARRINGTON was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of October , two coats, value 1l.; three waistcoats, value 15s.; one jacket, value 2s.; two shirts, value 4s.; one pair of pantaloons, value 5s.; one handkerchief, value 6d., and two 1l. bank notes , the property of Patrick Ryan .

PATRICK RYAN . I am a labourer , and lodge in Church-lane, St. Giles's , on the second-floor-there are three other persons lodge in the same room-my property was in my box. On the 22d of October, I went to bed between seven and eight o'clock in the evening. I got up at six, and found my box locked as before, but the property was gone-the key was in my pocket, and so were the two 1l. notes. I have known the prisoner ten years, but do not know that he was in the room that night. Next morning, about eleven o'clock, I found him in custody at the George, public-house, in Brick-lane, with my property.

JOHN HENLEY . I lodge in the same room with the prosecutor. On Wednesday night, the 22d of October, between twelve and one o'clock, I came home, opened the door, and found the prisoner in the room. I asked him who and what he was? he made me no answer. I collared him, said he was a thief, and insisted on knowing what he was. He said he knew Ryan, who lived there, and sat down on Ryan's box - A woman brought a light. As soon as he saw the light he started off, leaving his hat behind him. He returned between four and five o'clock for his hat-one of the lodgers gave it out to him-we did not then know that anything had been stolen. When Ryan got up the theft was discovered, We went to look for the prisoner, and found him at the George, public-house, in Chick-lane. He rushed out of the house, I laid hold of him - He resisted very much, the constable secured him. He said, "Let me go, and I will give you every thing, except a waistcoat, which I have sold."

PATRICK CASEY . I keep the George, in Chick-lane. The prisoner came into my house on the 23d of October, about seven o'clock in the morning, with a bundle. I asked him where he had lodged the night before? he said he had just come from Canterbury. Ryan and Henley came in and took him-Ryan claimed the bundle, which the prisoner had given into my care.

THOMAS PIKE. I am a constable. I took the prisoner in charge - He was struggling with the prosecutor.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I could get no bed, and knowing the prosecutor I went there to lay down. I found the bundle down stairs as I went out.

GUILTY . Aged 33.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18181028-73

1464. ELIZABETH WILSON was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of October , 20lbs. of feathers, value 1l. 10s., the property of John Godfrey , in a lodging-room .

SECOND COUNT, the same, but not stating them to be in a lodging-room.

JOHN GODFREY . I keep the Saracen's Head Inn, in the parish of St. Catharine Cree Church . On the 25th of October, about nine o'clock at night, the prisoner took a lodging at my house for the night, and said she was going by one of the coaches. She slept in a single-bedded room, No. 23-the bed was in a proper state the day before. I went into the room immediately after she came down, and found the bed very deficient in feathers as well as the bolster. As the servants said she appeared bulky, I stopped her, told her she had my property, and requested she would give it up. After some time, she gave me two bags of feathers, which were slung round her, before and behind-the feathers weighted 25lbs. The ticking had been ripped up, and sewed up again with different thread.

JAMES HARGRAVE. I am a constable. I took the prisoner into custody, and found forty-seven duplicates, eleven keys, a needle, and some white thread on her.

GUILTY . Aged 46.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18181028-74

1465. ELIZA ROBERTS was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of October , one umbrella, value 2s. 6d., and six pair of stockings, value 11s. , the goods of John James .

JOHN JAMES . I lodge at No. 4, Old Jewry . I had lost several things. On the 23d of October, I was sent for, and found the prisoner in the house. The constable found duplicates on her.

JOHN GODDURN . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Bishopsgate-street. On the 23d of October the prisoner pledged an umbrella with me for 18d., in the name of Moss.

CHARLES BOND. I am a constable. I took the prisoner

in charge on the 24th of October. She was charged with going into the prosecutor's room the day before, and robbing it. I found sixteen duplicates on her, one of which relared to the umbrella.

Prisoner's Defence. The umbrella is mine.

GUILTY . Aged 36.

Confined Three Months .

London Jury, before Mr.Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18181028-75

1466. WILLIAM BULL was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of September , at St. Ethelberga, in the dwelling-house of Thomas Wilmot , one coat, value 2l.; one pair of breeches, value 30s.; one pair of pantaloons, value 1l.; six shirts, value 25s.; four waistcoats, value 19s.; one jacket, value 2l.; eight pair of trowsers, value 3l. 12s.; two printed bound books, value 10s.; one brooch, value 10s.; two pair of stockings, value 5s., two 2l., and three 1l. bank notes, the property of John Creffield .

JOHN CREFFIELD . I am a butcher , and lodge in Thomas Wilmot's house, in Peahen-court, Bishopsgate-street . I lodge on the second floor. The prisoner was a stranger. On the 17th of September I left my box in my room-it was locked and corded, and contained the articles stated in the indictment; they were worth 13l. 1ls. There was also 7l. in bank notes, in a little box, which was in my trunk. I left my room, as I had got a situation. On the 20th I called, and went to my box, every thing was then safe; I locked and corded it again-Tucker used to sleep in the room. On the 27th I went to fetch my box away, found it had been robbed-it was forced open. On the Sunday following I saw one of my shirts, a pair of boot-garters, and one glove, which were with the other things.

ELIZABETH WILMOT . I am the wife of Thomas Wilmot , who rents the house, which is in the parish of St. Ethelberga. On the 20th of September the prisoner came to lodge in my house, and slept in the same room where the prosecutor's box was. Tucker also slept there. The prisoner remained there from the Monday until Sunday morning; on the Friday he came to ask for Tucker, and said he wanted him to go to Seven Oaks with some horses. Tucker went on Saturday morning, the 26th-the prisoner was then the only person sleeping in the room. The next morning the prosecutor came, and discovered the robbery-the prisoner was in the room when Tucker went away, and left that day without giving me notice, or paying me. When he first came he said he was out of a situation. Another man, named Day, slept in the room, he went out at five o'clock in the morning, and returned at night. He left about a fortnight ago. I knew he was going to leave.

JOHN TUCKER. I lodged in the same room, with Day and the prosecutor - the prisoner lodged there after the prosecutor left. On the Saturday he desired me to go to the Leaping Bar, public-house, Blackfriars-road, to take two pair of horses to Seven Oaks, for Mr. Harris; I found there were none to go-when I returned he was gone. I never saw him again until he was taken. Next morning the prosecutor came, and missed his property.

MARY ANN CARY . I live in Peahen-court; my mother is a mangler. On Saturday morning, about half-past six o'clock, I saw the prisoner go out of Mrs. Wilmot's house with a bundle, as I was at our window.

ELEANOR HRATT. I live in Hosier-lane, with my mother. On Saturday three weeks, the day the prisoner was taken, he asked me to wash a shirt and a pair of stockings for him; I only knew him a few days before this. He took a lodging in our front garrel, said he was short of money, and asked me to pledge the shirt for him.

Q. Did you live with him - A. Yes, in Drury-lane, not at my mother's. I pledged the shirt at Turner's, in Catherine-street; they knew me, and put it down in my name; I gave him the duplicate and money, he left the duplicate in the room where we lived - I had not lived a week with him; he was taken up the same day.

CHARLES BOND. I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner in St. Paul's Church-yard, on Saturday night; I said, "Bull, how do you do?'. He said, "Is there anything against me, Bond?" I said, "Yes, you must go with me;" which he did. He said he lodged in Drurylane, and told me to ask for Eleanor Hiatt - I found her there, in bed. I also found a pair of boot-garters, a glove, and the duplicate of the shirt, in a small box. The prisoner told me himself, that he sold all the things to a man, spent the money; and that he lost 4l. in one night.

JOHN CREFFIELD re-examined. The shirt, glove, and garters are mine.

The prisoner made no defence.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 24.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18181028-76

1467. WILLIAM CLARKE was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of October , from the person of John Dean , one pocket-book, value 4d., six 1l. bank notes, and one promissory note for payment of and value 5l., his property .

JOHN DEAN . I am a tinman , and live in Swallow-street. On the 23d of October, about two o'clock in the afternoon, I was in Temple-lane , going towards Lombard-street. My pocket-book was in my pocket when I passed St.Clement's Church- I was walking very fast, Bushell said my pocket-book was gone - I immediately missed it - He told me which way they were gone. I pursued the prisoner and another. They went down a paved court, towards the water side. I pursued, calling out Stop thief! - They turned to the left my pocket-book was dropped at the corner - I picked it up, and the prisoner was stopped. It contained six 1l. bank notes, and a Birmingham 5l. note.

Cross-examined by MR ALLEY. Q. You lost sight of him at the corner - A. I lost sight of them momentarity-nobody was running but them.

WILLIAM BUSHEL. I live on primrose-hill, Salisburysquare, and am a carpenter, I saw the prosecutor and two persons following close by, the prisoner was one of them, I was on the opposite side. When they got about fifteen yards from the Temple-gate, I saw one of them take the pocket-book from his pocket; I told Mr. Dean of it, and that the prisoner had got it - He pursued after them. I went towards the wharfs, and as soon as I got down I saw the prisoner - there was a waggon coming up-one went on side, and the prisoner on the other. I kept my eye on him, as I had seen the pocket-book in his hand. I ran round the waggon, took him, and told him he was the

man who had the pocket-book; he said he had not got it, and asked me to search him. The prosecutor said he had found it.

Cross-examined. I did not see him throw it away.

JURY. Q. Are you positive you saw the pocket-book in his hand - A. Yes, and I saw a hand go into the prosecutor's pocket; nobody was near but him and his companions.

Prisoner's Defence. I neither threw it away nor took it.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18181028-77

1468. EDWARD JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of October , two sheets, value 7s., the property of John Bradfield , in a lodging-room .

JOHN BRADFIELD . I keep the Three Mariners, public-house, in Fore-street, Cripplegate . On the 26th of October the prisoner took a bed for one night at my house, for which he paid a shilling; next morning, about eight o'clock, he left, and I missed two sheets off his bed. I stopped him at the corner of Grub-street, found one of the sheets under his waistcoat, and the other in his hat.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was in great distress, and had just come from Wolverhampton.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Fined One Shilling, and Discharged .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18181028-78

1469. SARAH VAUGH was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of October , two aprons, value 1s.; three table-cloths, value 2s.; one gown, value 2s.; two pillow-cases, value 6d.; one shirt, value 1s.; two handkerchiefs, value 4d.; one shift, value 1s.; one night-gown, value 6d.; two neck-handkerchiefs, value 1s., and one pinafore, value 2d. , the property of Mary Ann Merrett .

MARY ANN MERRETT . I live in Harrow-alley, Houndsditch , and keep a public-house . I had tied the articles stated in the indictment, in a bundle, and put them on a table in the bar. Between four and five o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner came into the tap-room, and had half a pint of beer, she then went into the kitchen-customers sometimes go there; I missed her, and thought she was gone. In about twenty minutes she pushed by me, and went out with the bundle under her arm - She was immediately brought back with them. She did not drink her beer.

ABRAHAM MENDES . I was standing at the prosecutrix's door, saw the prisoner with the bundle, and secured her with it, within a few yards of the house. The prosecutrix claimed the property.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I fell asleep in the tap-room, the bundle laid by me, and the prosecutrix charged me with stealing it.

GUILTY . Aged 32.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18181028-79

1470. JOSEPH DAVIS was indicted for feloniously, knowingly, and wittingly, without lawful excuse, having in his custody and possession a forged and counterfeit bank note, for payment of 1l., he well knowing it to be forged .

THOMAS GRUNDI . I am shopman to Mrs. Eagleton, who is a grocer, and lives in Newgate-street. On the evening of the 19th of September, the prisoner came to me after dark, bought half a pound of tea, and paid me a 1l. bank note. I suspected it was forged, and took it to Mr. Eagleton - He came with it to the prisoner, who was waiting in the shop.

MR. EDWARD EAGLETON . I am a grocer , and live in Newgate-street . On the 12th September, Grundi brought me the note. I took it to the counter, where I found the prisoner. I asked him his address, he said Davis, tailor, Bridgewater-square, Barbican, which I wrote on the note,(looking at one) this is it. I told him it was bad, and asked him who he took it of. He said, of Mr. Silvester, at the blanket warehouse. Goswell-street. I asked him if he had any money to pay for the tea, he said he had only one shilling, I returned him the note, and he left the shop. I afterwards thought he might offer it elsewhere, I followed him down Butcherhall-lane, I there met Honey - He secured him - I never lost sight of him. Nobody had joined him.

HENRY HONEY . I am a constable, I took the prisoner in charge in Butcherhall-lane, by the desire of Mr. Eagleton. I told him I must go and see if he had given a right address to the note, as Mr. Eagleton had said, he said he took it of Silvester. I told him I knew no blanket warehouse, in Aldersgate-street. He, said, "What! you an officer and not know Silvester's". I said there was one in Goswell-street. He said that was it, he supposed. We took him there, and found Mr. Silvester at the Horse-shoe public-house, We enquired of the landlord if Mr. Silvester was there; he said he did not know. On my repeating the name, Mr. Silvester came out, and I asked him, if he had given the prisoner a 1l. note that day - He hesitated and said, he had paid him a great deal of money; but did not say he had paid him any that day. I asked the prisoner to let Mr. Silvester see it. He took it out of his pocketbook, and handed it to Mr. Silvester - He looked at it and said he did not think it was a bad one. The prisoner said, "Do not you know that you paid it to me to day, for a pair of breeches." He made no answer, but seemed a good deal confused, and shewed the note to several people in the room. A person on looking at it, said he would lay me a bottle of wine that it was a good one; another said he wished he had a hundred of them. I said, if he had, he would have reason to be sorry for it - He was holding it up, and told me to look at the water mark. I took it from him, and told the prisoner he must go back with me. He sat down, said he should not, and called for a pint of beer-it was not brought. He got up in a minute or two. I said, "We will go to your lodgings." He took me to a house in Bridgewater-gardens, which is a different place from Bridgewater-square-the square is a

very respectable place. The house he took me to, is an old iron shop, with a curtain across it to separate the bed from the shop. He called to a man, and said, "Mr. Newman you know me very well." I said "does he lodge here?"-the man gave no answer. I asked again, he then said, he is a great deal here. I could not get from him whether the prisoner lodged there or not. I told the prisoner he must go back with me to Mr. Eagleton - He said he would be d-n-d if he would, and he said would have a pint of beer. which he did. He then said he would not go without a coach - I got one. They wanted to persuade him to go - He got up, and attempted to go round a passage - I seized him, he resisted. We did not get into the coach. When we got a little way he was quiet. I took him to Mr. Eagleton, and then to the Compter. As we went along, he said he was taken ill all of a sudden - He gave me a blow as hard as he could, and ran away. I pursued, and secured him immediately (looks at a note). this is it, I marked it,

Prisoner, Q. Did not Mr. Newman say I carried on business there - A. No. - Bridgewater-square and Bridgewater-gardens are separated from each other by a street.

HARRIET LACK. I live at No. 41, Bridgewater-gardens. The last witness brought the prisoner there - He did not live there, nor had he lived there for the last nine months before, as I have lived there that time. Newman lodged there-the prisoner carried on no business there.

MARY BROWN. I have kept the house No. 41, Bridgewater-gardens for eighteen years, Newman and the last witness lodged there-the prisoner did-not carry on any business there. I have seen him there, but not at work.

RICHARD NEWBOLD . I am servant to Isaac Barkwell , who is an optician , and lives in Long-lane . On the 5th of August the prisoner bought a pair of spectacles of me, and paid a 1l. note. I asked his name and address, he gave me, " John Davis , No. 2, Atfield-street, Goswell-street;" which I wrote on it (looks at one). This is it.

JOHN MORRIS . I am shopman to Mr. Underwood , who is a cutler , and lives in Drury-lane . At the latter end of August the prisoner came to our shop, and bought a pair of scissars, he gave me a 1l. note, which I suspected, and went to Mr. Parr's for change, and found it was bad; he had wrote his address on the note before that, it was Davis, tailor, Fetter-lane (looks at one). This is it. I returned it to him, and told him it was bad; he appeared surprised, said he should take more care in future, and would call again for the scissors. In about half an hour afterwards I found him in custody at Mr. Pitt's shop, where he had offered the same note.

JAMES PARR. I keep the Barley Mow, public-house, in Drury-lane. On the 29th of August Morris brought me a 1l. note - I thought it was a bad one, and observed Davis, tailor, Fetter-lane, on it - I returned it to him; I was looking through my window, saw the prisoner come out of his shop, and go into the next public-house; ten minutes after the same note was brought to me again by Mrs. Pitts, who lives in the street; I knew it again, and sent for an officer; I gave him the note, went with him to Mrs. Pitts' shop, and took the prisoner into custody. He threatened to knock me down, and said he lived at the White Horse, Fetter-lane. He was taken to Bow-street. He said there that he took the note at Epsom races, in change for 5l., that he had just come from Portsmouth, and had only been in town three or four days.

SARAH PITTS . My husband is a button-maker, and lives in Drury-lane. On the 29th of August the prisoner came to the shop for two dozen of large gilt buttons. I had none, and he bought some smaller, which came to 5s. 4d., and he paid me a 1l. note; I sent my servant with it to Mr. Parr's, for change - He returned with an officer. The prisoner had told me that his name was on the back of the note (looks at one). This is it.

THOMAS GLOVER. I am an inspector of bank notes (examining the notes). They are all three forged, in every respect, and off the same plate.

(Note put in and read. See Indictment.)

Prisoner's Defence. I took them in my business. I lodged in Fetter-lane, at the White Horse.

GUILTY . Aged 60.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Justice Dallas.

Reference Number: t18181028-80

1471. STEPHEN MORRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of October , at St. Pancras, one coffee-pot, value 20l.; thirty silver spoons, value 7l.; one silver tankard, value 7l.; one silver fish-slice, value 5l.; two silver butter-boats, value 3l.; three silver sauce-ladles, value 3l.; two silver salt-cellars, value 10s., and one shirt, value 5s., the goods of William Clulow , Esq. in his dwelling-house .

MRS. ELIZABETH CLULOW . I am the wife of William Clulow, who lives in Camden-street, Camden-town , in the parish of St. Pancras; we have lived there ten years. My husband went abroad ten weeks ago. I remained at home with Emma Owen , and Joseph Braid , the servants. Braid had lived with me three years, and Owen one year. While my husband was abroad, I went twice to visit my daughters, one lives at Clapham, and the other at Brixton. I remained three days at each place.

Q. When did you pay your first visit - A. On the 14th of September. I left Owen and Braid in care of the house. The prisoner was a private watchman , employed by the gentlemen in our neighbourhood. On Tuesday, the 6th of October, I went to bed at twelve o'clock - I had ordered the two servants to bed before that. At half-past two the prisoner sprang his rattle, which alarmed me - I got up, opened my bed-room window, and rang my bell-Owen came.

Q. What did she say to you - A. I asked what was the matter - She knocked at my door-when I found it was her, I opened it. She said thieves were in the house, that two of them came to her bedside, with their faces blackened, that one of them remained, holding a pistol over her, and threatening that he would blow her brains' out, if she stirred - She said that she remained in that situation half an hour, when the watchman sprang his rattle, and the man who stood over her, cursed himself, and said, he must be off - She said she was alarmed. As I opened my door to let her in, I saw Braid with the poker across his shoulder, and the prisoner with him - They were coming up stairs.

Q. Where was your plate-chest usually kept - A. In the two pair of stairs back room-it is a wooden box. I had seen it two or three days before, it then had no appearance of anything having been done to it.

Q. When you went into the room next morning, did you miss any plate - A. Yes to a considerable amount; I missed a silver coffee-pot, worth 20l., a tankard worth above 2l., and the other things stated in the indictment.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Was the prisoner employed by Mr. Clulow - A. No.

Q. After the plate was missed, did your servant maid make any confession to you - A. Not to me, it was to the officer. I had seen my plate all safe together within the space of two months before. I keep an inventory of it - I occasionally called it over.

MR. REYNOLDS. Q. How lately had you seen the coffee-pot - A. I realy do not know; I saw it when I saw the rest, in the paper that it was wrapped in, which was in the drawing-room, in the morning-it was not there the night before. My spoons are all made to pattern, and have a crest on them.

MR. THOMAS WALLIS . I live at No. 5, Camden-street, next door to Mr. Clulow. On the morning of the 7th of October, I was alarmed about half-past two o'clock, by the springing of the watchman's rattle. I looked out of my back window, and saw a great light launch on the balcony. I called out, what is the matter, the prisoner cried out, very distinctly, come and see what is the matter. I made haste and went to the prosecutor's house. In the drawing-room, I saw a sheet spread upon a blanket, and several knives and forks laid on it, as if they were put there to be packed up. The prisoner looked into the plate-chest, which was open-the nails were drawn, and the lock hanging to it. He unfolded a paper, and found a large marrow-spoon in it. There was some bread, mutton, and a knife on the sideboard, as if the robbers had been regaling themselves. A window was broken, and a ladder put across the wall, which separated my house from the prosecutor's-one foot of the ladder was on the fence wall. The window came down to the floor, and had no fastening. I said there was no necessity for breaking the window to get in, as it could have been pushed up, nor could a hand be got through the hole that was broken-there were candles in the room-the prisoner was in the room, and Braid was on the stones, without his shoes and stockings - He ouly had his shirt on, with the collar undone, and appeared as if he was frightened to death; as if he had been alarmed, and got out of bed. I commended the prisoner for his activity on the occasion, and always respected him, as I thought him a very active watchman.

Cross-examined. Q. You knew him some years - A. Yes, he always bore a good character. He once detected a man breaking into one of my houses, and was rewarded by the gentlemen.

JOHN SMITH. I am conductor of the patrol of Bow-street. On the 7th of October, about seven o'clock in the morning, the prisoner came to my house in Kentish-town, and said there had been a robbery at the prosecutor's house. I went with him to Davis, one of my men, and we all three went to the prosecutor's.

Q. You have heard the account Mr. Wallis gave, of the situation of the room - A. It is correct.

Q. What account did the prisoner give you - A. He said that he saw a light in the kitchen, about half-past two o'clock-he saw a man was there, and he thought they were robbing the house, he knocked at the door, and sprang his rattle-that in two or three minutes the servant, named Joseph, let him in, he went down stairs, with him, and found the back premises open, and a ladder on the wall, which led up to the drawing-room balcony; that he then went up stairs, and saw the things strewed about the room - He said the plate-chest was on the sofa, and a pane of glass broken in the drawing-room window. I examined the house, with Davis, but could find no marks of violence, excepting the one pane broken in the window. The glass was all over the carpet. I went to the plate-chest, and found the nails drawn, and the lock hanging to it-things remained in this situation till that day week.

Q. Was the prisoner apprehended on that day week - A. Yes; I sent him on a message, and then told him I suspected him of the robbery, and must take him into custody. He asked what Joe (meaning the footman), had said? I told him what he had said he would state before the magistrate. I searched him, and found a watch, a gold seal and key, and two 1l. notes, on him. I have kept the seal. He said he knew bl-dy well who had the plate, for it was the old Jew. I then went with Davis to his lodgings, No. 7, Caroline-street, Camden-town; and in a drawer in his bed-room, I found a frilled shirt, marked C, in red-it appeared that another letter had been taken out; it was on the 15th. I found nothing else that day. He was taken to the office. Next day I searched his house again, and found eight silver tea-spoons, three with the crest - A lion; two with the eypher C, and three with the crest erased. I produce them.

Q. You say he said it was an old Jew who had the plate, did he afterwards tell you any more about it - A. Yes; he said, at the office, that it was old Mike and I knew him well, and have known himsome years. I had the seal, which I found on the prisoner - I have seen one like it in the possession of Mike-it has no impression; he often showed me things; he showed me one like it about a fortnight or three weeks before I took the prisoner.

Q. Did you receive an earthen pot from Mr. Clulow - A. Yes, it contained four 1l. notes and three duplicates, made out in the name of Joseph Braid. I took Braid into custody the same day. He took me on the 15th to a court in Petticoat-lane, where Mike lived; he took me into a front room, up one pair of stairs, where I found Mike with his wife and daughter.

Cross-examined. Q. You knew nothing of the robbery until the prisoner informed you, and took you to the house - A. No.

Q. When you saw him a week after, you had before had some conversation with Braid - A. Yes, with both the servants. Braid did not confess in my presence, my man told me what he had said. I had examined both the servants before their master, and told them it must be somebody in the house. Braid then denied any knowledge of it. Since the prisoner has been in custody, Braid has told me part of the story again, not before, he had told me he had received some money of the prisoner.

Q. Did you take him into custody before you took the prisoner - A. Yes, I took him on the Tuesday night. I took Owen and the prisoner the next day. Before I took Morris I had sent him with a letter upon the business.

Q. Did he know the servants were in custody before you took him - A. Yes; I have known him five or six years; he bore a good character.

COURT. Q. You sent him to the prosecutor's son-in-law with a letter, after the others were in custody, and he knew it - A. Yes; he brought an answer back, which he was ordered to do, delivered the message to Mrs. Clulow at her house, and then I took him.

JOSEPH BRAID . I was footman to Mr. Clulow, and had been so for upwards of three years. Owen was my fellow-servant. My master was gone abroad, and my mistress went occasionally from home, leaving us in care of the house.

Q. On Tuesday, the 15th of September, did you and Owen go to the Play - A. Yes, we went to the Play, and left the house in the care of Dennis, who is my uncle.

Q. Sometime after that had you any conversation with the prisoner about what happened that night - A. Yes; a fortnight after, he called me into the Hope and Anchor, public-house, and said he had something to tell me; that it was a very serious thing, and I should be obliged to be taken up when my master came home; and that he was afraid to tell me, lest I should split-which means telling. I promised I would not say anything about it.

Q. Then he told you what had taken place - A. Yes.

Q. Pass over that; the next day did he tell you what was to be done - A. Yes; he said there would be no other way of getting over it, than this, which was-to break open the house. I was to call him in at twelve o'clock at night, and he would do it as if it had been broken open; then at half-past two he would give a false alarm; but that he would have some more plate first.

Q. How long before the false alarm did this conversation take place - A. It was two or three days before.

Q. What else did he tell you - A. He said he would have some more plate first. He sent me up on Sunday morning, before the alarm, to fetch some plate down-it was in a chest in my master's bed-room. I fetched it down in a half-peck measure, and took it to him in the stable-yard. I took a silver tankard, silver coffee-pot, three silver salt-cellars, some spoons and forks-he was in my master's stable-yard ready to receive them. He put all that he could about his person, and I took the rest. He told me to follow him, and said he was going to Angelcourt, Gravel-lane.

Q. Did he say who he was going to - A. Not till he got there. When he got there he said he was going to Old Mike. We went up to the first floor - He was not at home. We staid about half an hour, he then came in. A young woman and a young man left the room, leaving us three together.

Q. Were you afterwards to meet anywhere - A. Yes, we were to meet that day, at two o'clock, at the prisoner's house, in Caroline-street, for the money that the plate fetched. I went there, and met Mike, and the prisoner there. I saw Mike put a handful of notes into the prisoner's hand - We all had some gin Mike then left, and the prisoner gave me six 1l. notes, and told me to be sure to put them where they would never be found. I spent two, and put the other four in an earthen pot, and buried it in my master's garden.

Q. Did your mistress come home on that Sunday - A. No, on the Monday.

Q. Did you see anything of the prisoner, and Mike on the Monday - A. Yes, at the Cock in Somers'-town. I bought a razor, and a small pin of Mike, and the prisoner bought a seal and a key. Those produced are the same,

Q. When you saw Morris, did he inquire if your mistress was come home - A. Yes, I told him she had come home that day, he said it must be done that night for fear my master should come home. The house was to be broken open.

Q. What directions did he give you about it then - A. I was to let him in when he called twelve, and to be sure not to go to sleep. He told me to shut the dog up in the scullery, for fear he should bite him, which I did. I went to bed between ten and eleven o'clock, before my mistress. When the prisoner cried twelve o'clock, I got up and let him in through the area-gate, and through the kitchen. The key of the area gate, hung in the back parlour. We went up stairs. after pulling off our shoes. I went into my master's back bed-room, and brought down the plate-chest from there, and put it on the sofa, in the back drawing-room. I brought down some blankets, sheets, shirts, and handkerchiefs of my master's. We took the plate out of the chest, put them in the blanket, and tied them up as if they were ready to be taken away. We also took down two mirror glasses, and tied them up.

Q. Was anything done with a ladder - A. It was set on a wall at the back of the house, and led up to the balcony. Some bread and meat were brought up and put on the table, with a knife. Two candles were put in the drawing-room, one in master's bed-room, and one in the kitchen; they were all alight.

Q. Did Morris give you any direction to say any thing to Owen - A. Yes; he told me to tell her to say, that two men came up, with their faces blackened, and threatened to blow her brains out if she offered to stir. I told her so immediately as I came home on the Sunday. I had told her what he had told me had happened, while we were at the Play. We went to Astley's.

Q. All this being done, what then happened - A. At half-past one o'clock I let the prisoner out. He told me to be sure and not go to sleep, and that he would give the alarm at half-past two o'clock, and spring his rattle, which he did; I got up and let him in; he went down stairs and undone the back door. I went up stairs, following him with the kitchen poker.

Q. Was any plate left in your care, besides what was in the chest - A. Yes, some tea-spoons. (Looking at those produced.) These are them.

Q. Some time after the alarm was given, did Mr. Clulow, junior, show you an earthen jug - A. Yes, there were duplicates in it, and four 1l. notes, which belonged to me; they were the notes which the prisoner gave me for my share. I was taken up by Smith, and went with him to Mike Levy 's. I went first.

Cross-examined. Q. How long have you lived in town - A. Four years, three of which I have been in the prosecutor's service.

Q. Had your uncle ever been to the house before the

night you went to the Play - A. Yes, he had been to see me. He went no further than the kitchen. He slept in the house the night we went to the Play, and two nights before that, with me in the front parlour.

Q. On this night you went to the Play and let him sleep in the house by himself the while - A. Yes. I never showed him the plate-chest; it was kept up two pair of stairs, in my master's back bed-room. It was not concealed. There were other boxes there and furniture. We set out about four o'clock to go to the Play-went over Westminster-bridge to Astley's-called at No. 1, Upper Harley-street, to see an acquaintance of Owen's. We had tea there. A gentleman named Smith keeps the house. We left there, and went straight to the theatre, and got there before the performance began, which was at half-past six.

Q. What entertainment did you see - A. I cannot remember the name of it. We remained there till it was over, and got home at half past twelve o'clock. We staid no where else.

Q. Who drank tea with you - A. Owen, and her acquaintance, whose name was Sarah Jones.

Q. When you went home you knew nothing of the robbery being committed, or thought of it - A. No; I never had the least notion of anything of the kind, until a fortnight after. My uncle had called to speak to me after-the robbery and left again.

Q. Who was present at the Hope and Anchor, besides you and the prisoner - A. Nobody. I went to get a pint of beer, and the prisoner called me to him. I was then innocent of any robbery.

Q. And the first thing he said was, that you would be hung if you did not do something - A. Yes.

Q. Did you not say."Why, how can that be?" - A. Yes. He said he would tell me, if I promised not to tell; and if he told me, I could get over it. I asked him to be so good as to tell me. He said he would tell me in the morning.

Q. He told you nothing else till the morning - A. No. I told Owen he had said so. He told me afterwards that night. When next morning came, he said nothing could be done but breaking open the house.

Q. What did he tell you over night - A. He said I should be taken up, when my master came home. And would I split if he told me? I said No. After some time, he told me my uncle had been breaking open the plate-chest, and taking some plate out, the night we were at the Play, and to be sure and say nothing about it. I asked what they had taken; he said he did not know, but my uncle would tell me. That was all he said that night.

Q. How often had your mistress been at home in the fortnight - A. She had been at home; she slept in the front room, which communicates with the back room, where the plate-chest was, all the fortnight.

Q. Had you been particularly acquainted with the prisoner before - A. Yes, I have often been to the Hope and Anchor to speak to him. The spoons had been in my care, for common use; they were not kept in the plate-chest.

Q. When he advised you to make this contrivance, did you not say, "What have I to do with all this?" - A. No.

Q. You told me the agreement was made on Sunday to break open the house - A.On the Sunday that the plate was taken to the Jew.

Q. How long before that did the first conversation take place - A.About a week.

Q. You took the second parcel of plate - A. Yes. The prisoner sent me after it. Owen knew nothing but what I told her.

Q. He took you to the Jew on Sunday; you was never there before - A. No.

Q. Did you tell about the seal and key, till it was found on the prisoner - A. I was taken up before I said anything about the business.

Q. Where did you live before you came to the prosecutor - A. With Mr. Childs, a solicitor, in the Borough; before that, at Bethnal-green.

MR. REYNOLDS. Q. You say the prisoner first said he would not tell you what had taken place till the morning; when he told you, did you look at the plate-chest - A. Yes, and found the nails drawn out, and put in as before. If my mistress had opened it, she would have seen what had been done.

EMMA OWEN . I am servant to the prosecutor, and was left in care of the house with Braid.

Q. When your mistress was away, did you go any where with Braid - A. Yes, to Astley's; we returned at half past twelve. We had left Dennis in care of the house.

Q. At any time after that night, did Braid tell you any thing - A. A fortnight afterwards he told me what had taken place that night.

Q. Did he afterwards tell you to do any thing - A. Yes; he said the watchman and his uncle had been plundering the house the night we were at the Play, and it would be very serious, and the way they must get over it would be to lay the house open as if it had been robbed. He told me to say that two sailors had entered my bed-room with black faces.

Q. What did you tell Mrs. Clulow, the night the alarm was given - A. I went to her door, and said thieves had been in the house.

Q. Did you see the prisoner after you had been told what to say - A. Yes, I met him in Gloucester-place, Camden-town; he spoke to me, and I said "Watchman, I had rather that this which you have said to my fellow-servant had not taken place." He said I must be very foolish, for it could be done very easy.

Q. After Braid informed you what the prisoner had told him, did you look at the plate-chest - A. Yes, it appeared as if the nails had been drawn out and put in again.

Cross-examined. Q. Every thing was left in the house when your mistress went out - A. Yes. I am now come from the House of Correction, where I have been confined.

Q. Have you had an opportunity of having any conversation with Braid there - A. No; I have not seen him from the day he went there. I have been in the same room with him to-day, but the officer was with us.

Q. Have you had any conversatin with him about the evidence you were to give here - A. No. He told me to mind and speak the truth, and I told him so too, that was all we said. I knew nothing of the transaction till after it happened.

Q. What night did you go to the Play - A.On a Tuesday.

Q. How many places did you go to before you went

there - A. Nowhere, except to the public-house, which we went to as the doors of the play-house were not open. I am certain we stopped no where else.

Q. Perhaps you had your tea before you went out - A.We did not stop to have ten anywhere.

Q. You have no acquaintance in Harley-street, or near Mary-le-bone-A. I have an acquaintance in Upper Harley-street.

Q. Did you call on her that afternoon - A. Yes, I rang the bell for her, she came out, we went into the hall but did not stop. Her name is Sarah Jones.

Q. If any body has said you went there and drank tea, it would not be true - A. We remained about ten minutes with her, in the house-keeper's room; we had a cup of tea while we were there.

Q. Why not say so before - A. I did not understand you. I thought you asked if we had tea before we left home. Braid paid for us both at the theatre. We remained there till it was over, and got home at half-past twelve o'clock; Braid's uncle was then sitting up. I observed nothing particular for a fortnight after.

Q. Your mistress did not sleep in the room where the plate-chest was - A. No.

Q. Did Braid tell you any thing on the night he had been with the prisoner - A. Yes, he told me the same night that the watchman had told him, at the Hope and Anchor, that he, the prisoner, and his uncle had plundered the house the night we were at the Play, and that the prisoner said it would be a very serious thing when my master came home, and they must lay the house open.

Q. Did you see his uncle after that - A. Not at all. He was gone into the country. I saw him two or three nights after he slept in the house, nothing passed then about this.

Q. How long did Braid tell you about laying the house open before it was done - A. About a week before, I think. My mistress was at home at the time he said the watchman told him not to tell me anything about it.

Q. Did he give you any reason for it - A. He said the watchman had a wife and family, and desired me to say this, on account of his wife and family. Braid said that he should be brought into it, as he was left in care of the house. Braid never told me he had taken plate out of the chest. I knew nothing about the spoons.

BRAID re-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. How long before you was taken up was the money given by the Jew - A.About a week. I did not redeem anything after I received the money.

Q. How came you to pledge for the amount of 4s. on the 3d of October, as appears by one of your duplicates, if you had 6l. - A. I think it was before I received the money. The jug had been buried about a week before my master dug it up.

MR. REYNOLDS. Q. Was it Saturday or Sunday that you received the money - A. On the Sunday before the alarm was given, which was on Tuesday night, the 6th. I received the money on the 4th. I was taken on the 13th, which was the day the alarm was given.

COURT. Q. They were pledged on the day before you received the money - A. Yes.

THOMAS BOWSKILL . I live at No. 7, Caroline-street, Camden-town. The prisoner lodged with me. I have seen a Jew, named Mike, calling on him. I remember the day the alarm of the robbery was given.

Q. On the Sunday before that, was he at home - A. He came home at eleven o'clock in the morning, and went out. I saw him at home again at one o'clock, Mike, the Jew, was with him; Braid came in. It was on Sunday the 4th of October.

MR. JAMES HARMER. I am solicitor to this prosecution. When the prisoner was apprehended, in his way from the watch-house to Bow-street, he said Braid had more money than the 4l. which had been found in the garden. That Braid was concerned in selling the plate to the Jew, and he could prove that Braid had been at the house on the Sunday to meet the Jew.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he not say that Braid committed the robbery, and applied to him to assist in getting rid of the property-A. No.

(Spoons sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I had no hand whatever in robbing the house.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 27.

Recommended to Mercy.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Dallas.

Reference Number: t18181028-81

1472. JOHN RILEY was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of October , 12s. 6d. in monies numbered , the property of William Banks Hudson .

JAMES BATSON. I am servant to W. B. Hudson, who is a druggist , and lives in the Haymarket . On Sunday the 4th of October, about half past eight o'clock at night, the prisoner came and bought a pennyworth of honey. He gave me 6d. I gave him the change, and he went away. In about half an hour Wright called me into the shop; I found the prisoner there. He said he saw him take money out of the till. The prisoner denied it, and said he had been round the counter, to pick up his hat. We took him into the counting-house; he fell on his knees, said he had robbed the till of 8s. which he took out of his pocket. I said he must have taken more, as I knew what was in the till. He shook his clothes, and 4s. 6d. fell out.

RICHARD WRIGHT. I am assistant to the prosecutor. I was returning home, when I came to the shop-door I saw the prisoner behind the counter. Nobody else was in the shop. I waited outside to watch; saw him come round the counter on his hands and knees, get up, and was walking out. I went in and asked what he had been doing. He said nothing; that his hat had fallen over the counter, and he went round to fetch it. I called Batson, who took him into the counting-house. He fell on his knees, begged for mercy, and took 8s. out of his pocket, and said that was what he had taken. We said he had more, he got up, shook himself, and 4s. 6d. fell out.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in distress. The prosecutor said he would forgive me. He told me to call next day, which I did, and he gave me some victuals; told me to call again, which I did, and was taken.

BATSON re-examined. He told the prosecutor such a pitiful story that he let him go, after giving him a supper, and told him to call again. On further inquiry he thought proper to prosecute him.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18181028-82

1473. JOHN BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of October , four candlesticks, value 5s. , the property of John Edzard .

LUCY BECKENHAM . I am the prosecutor's servant. I saw the prisoner in the kitchen, and asked what he wanted, he said he wanted the tap-room, I showed it to him. He asked if a man in a green coat had been there; I said No. I went to get him half a pint of beer. As I was going out of the room, I met him coming out. I went into the room and missed the candlesticks off the table, and told my mistress; she went out and brought him back.

PHOEBE EDZARD . I am the wife of John Edzard , a publican , in Newcastle-street, Strand . On the 4th of October, about six o'clock in the evening, the servant gave me some information. I went out and took the prisoner outside the door. I asked what he had got. He said he had something to sell. I took his bag from him, and found my four candlesticks in it. He ran away, and was secured immediately. I am sure he is the man.

WILLIAM RIDDALL. I ran after the prisoner and brought him back. I saw him go in and run out with the bag. I am certain he is the man.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN BYRNE. I took the prisoner into custody. He said that he took them; and that one-half of the world did not know how the other half lived.

Prisoner's Defence. I was intoxicated.

GUILTY . Aged 45.

Transported for Seven Ye ars.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181028-83

1474. JOHN CAMPBELL was indicted for feloniously assaulting Jeremiah Stephens , on the King's highway, on the 13th of September , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, 19s., his property .

JEREMIAH STEPHENS . I am a carpenter , and live in Cannon-street, St. George's. On Saturday night, the 12th of September, I was returning from my pay-table. I was a little in liquor. I do not know the time. The prisoner came up, pushed me down, and another man picked my pocket of 19s. and ran away. I am certain the prisoner is the man. The watchman came up and took him. It was in Whitechapel .

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. I was not very drunk. The prisoner appeared to remain behind, to help me up. My pay-table was in the City-road.

DANIEL BEVAN. I am a watchman. At half-past one o'clock in the morning, the prosecutor stood at the corner of Black-horse-yard. I saw two men cross to him, one pushed him down. I went over; one got up and walked away before I could get over. The other was helping the prosecutor up, and begging his pardon. He missed his purse. I took the prisoner. The other man made off. The prosecutor said the prisoner held him, while the other man robbed him.

Cross-examined. The prisoner was in liquor.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181028-84

1475. MARY DONOVAN was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of October , nine yards of printed cotton, value 10s. 6d. , the goods of Martin Shepherd and Richard Philpot .

MARTIN SHEPHERD . I am a linen-draper , and live in Aldersgate-street , in partnership with Richard Philpot . On the 21st of October, about eight o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came into the shop for some calico. While the boy was reaching it she went out. He said she has taken a piece of print. I followed her. As she crossed the street I saw her let it fall. I gave her in charge. A pair of stockings were found on her.

JOHN WASE . I was serving in the shop, and saw the prisoner take the print. I told Mr. Shepherd, who went out and took her.

JAMES HERBERT . I was standing at the corner of Longlane, and saw the prisoner come out. I saw her throw the print down.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181028-85

1476. JOHN ROBERTS was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of October , one coat, value 4s. , the goods of James Wicks .

JAMES WICKS . I am hostler to a gentleman in Hertfordshire. On the 20th of October I lost my coat off my waggon, in Smithfield , about nine o'clock.

WILLIAM MARDLING . I was in Smithfield with my waggon, and saw the officer with the coat; I said it was the prosecutor's.

JOHN HARKER . I am an officer. I saw the prisoner walk away with the coat. I asked him what it was? He said "Only my boy's coat." I asked him to show me his boy. He took me to the Ram Inn-yard, and then said it was not the place. He then took me to the Rose, and said I might have the coat, for he found it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I found it between two waggons.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181028-86

1477. HUGH COLLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of September , two pocket-books, value 2s., the goods of Samuel Trent , from his person .

SAMUEL TRENT . I am a Russia mat-dealer . On the 16th September, about eight o'clock at night, I was on Tower-hill . I had been spending the evening with some friends, and was intoxicated.

ELIJAH WILSON . I am a carpenter. On the 16th of September, between eight and nine o'clock in the evening, I was coming over Tower-hill. It rained very hard; I stood under the Excise gateway. The prosecutor was laying down in the wet. The prisoner came by; I asked him to help me to take him under the gateway out of the wet, which he did, and then went away for eight or nine minutes, when he returned and said "What? is he not gone yet?" I told him he wanted a coach to take him home, and sent a boy who stood by me for one, which he did, and the coachman refused to take him. I sent for another, which came, and the prisoner assisted me to the

coach-door with him. After getting him up two of the steps, he fell head-foremost into the coach. The prisoner got in to lift him up. I thought he was a long while about it. I looked round, and saw the prisoner's hand in the prosecutor's left hand inside coat-pocket. I saw him pull the pocket-book out, and put it into his own left hand side-pocket. I told the coachman of it. When the prisoner came down the steps, we secured him, and charged him with it; he denied it. I took a pocket-book and catalogue from him. There was a gas-light over the gateway, opposite the coach.

Prisoner. Q.Where did you find the pocket-book? - A.In his left hand side-pocket. Hearn gave me another pocket-book.

EDWARD HEARN . I am a fishmonger's servant. I was coming past, and saw the pocket-book and catalogue found in the prisoner's left side-pocket. I picked up a red pocket-book under the steps of the coach. It was not the same found on the prisoner.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. They charged me with robbing the man, and found my own pocket-book on me, and nothing else.

ELIZA WILSON . He gave me his own pocket-book. I found the prosecutor's on him.

GUILTY . Aged 49.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181028-87

1478. THOMAS JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of September , two great coats, value 18s., one hat, value 2s., and one pelisse, value 10s. , the goods of James Crowden .

ANN CROWDEN . I am the wife of James Crowden, who is a tailor. On the 26th of September, between ten and eleven o'clock in the morning, I was called down, and missed the articles stated in the indictment out of the shop.

CHARLES FIELD . I saw the prisoner go up to the prosecutor's, and look through the window. He then walked about for ten minutes, then went in, and came out with a bundle under his arm, and a hat on his head. I called the prosecutrix; she missed the property. The prisoner escaped. I am sure he is the man. He was taken the same day.

JOHN LOWRY . On the 26th of September, about eleven o'clock, the prosecutrix informed me of the robbery. A man, named Levy, came to pledge the pelisse. He said he bought it of the prisoner. When the prisoner was taken, he said he found it between two tubs.

JAMES GREGORY . On Saturday the 26th of September, about eleven o'clock, I was sent for the last witness's, and took Levy there, who took me to Blue Anchor-yard, Rosemary-lane, to a house where I found the prisoner. He said he bought it of him. The prisoner said he found it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 16.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181028-88

1479. WILLIAM RICE was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of October , 2lbs. of white lead, value 1s. , the goods of Nicholas Winsland .

ABRAHAM BUTLER . I am servant to Mr. Nicholas Winsland , who is a painter and glazier , and lives in Queen-street, Bloomsbury-the prisoner and I were employed by him to paint Mr. Burwash's house, in Bartholomew-close . In consequence of some suspicious, which I communicated to my master on the 13th of October, I was ordered to watch the prisoner - he came after breakfast, pulled off his coat and waistcoat, and put them in a drawer in the kitchen, and went up stairs to work-the white lead, which the paint was made with, was my master's property, and kept in the kitchen. After he was gone I examined his coat and waistcoat, about eleven o'clock, but found nothing in any of the pockets. I examined them again about half-past eleven o'clock, and found 2lbs. of white lead in his waistcoat pocket. He had been down stairs two or three times after I had examined his pockets. I told my master. When the prisoner came down stairs, after he had put his coat and waistcoat on, and was going out, my master called him back, and said he suspected he had some lead about him-he denied it. He then pulled the lead out of his pocket, and said it was not his master's, but it was a piece he brought from home to do a little job with. I had searched his pockets before, and they were empty. The prosecutor told the prisoner it was not his. The prisoner then said he thought it was no harm to take so small a quantity.

NICHOLAS WINSLAND. I am a painter and glazier-the prisoner was employed by me to paint the house with Butler. I supplied him with white lead every morning to use. Finding my stock deficient, I ordered Butler to watch him. I was afterwards in the kitchen, and charged him with having white lead about him - He denied it. I insisted on having him searched - He then produced the white lead, which I claimed; he said it was mine, and he saw no impropriety in taking so small a quantity-it was worth 1s. I went to his house, and found white lead there in three pots, which had no water over it, which is not the state it ought to be kept in.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. You found 2lbs. on him - A. Yes. I did not allow my men to take it for themselves.

Q. Did you not say he might go away - A. No, he went away. I refused to pay him his wages.

Prisoner's Defence. I worked two months with the prosecutor. I had a job to do in Lombard-street, and told Butler I had brought my basket full of materials for it. I used to leave my things openly there - He agreed to work with me. He began to be jealous, and told my master I was working for myself. I took it to do the job with.

GUILTY . Aged 44.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181028-89

1480. JAMES PURCELL was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of October , one hat, value 5s., the property of William Harris , from his person .

WILLIAM HARRIS . On the 19th of October I was coming home in the evening, and stood looking at the fire in Fleet-market , about eight o'clock-my hat was taken off my head. I looked round, and saw nobody near me but the prisoner. I collared him - He struck me three times

and asked me what I wanted? I said I wanted my hat-he took off his own, and said, "Is this your's?" He tried to get away - I held him fast; a fireman took him. I have never found it.

WILLIAM BECK. I was at the fire, and saw the prisoner take the prosecutor's hat off, and put it on another boy's head. The prosecutor turned round, and took the prisoner-a fireman took him from the prosecutor. He struck the prosecutor three times-the blood ran down his face.

JAMES LINES. I am a beadle. I took the prisoner in charge.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined One Month , and Whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181028-90

1481. DAVID LAZARUS was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of September , one mahogany case, value 12s.; one body of a microscope, value 7s. 6d.; four glasses, value 7s.; four ivory sliders and objects, value 4s.; one concave mirror, value 2s.; one plane mirror, value 2s.; one side illuminator, value 3s. 6d.; one pair of nippers and crutch, value 2s.; one pair of corn-tongs, value 6d., and one brass plate, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of Philip Brock .

PHILIP BROCK. I am an optical instrument-maker , and live in Church-row, Aldgate . On the 28th of September I was at work at the window-the articles stated in the indictment were in a case behind me. The prisoner came in to buy a glass for a show. I said I had nobody to serve him, he said he would call in half an hour-he went round on my left hand, and went out. In about five minutes I missed the microscope and case. I informed the officer. I am certain the prisoner is the boy who came into the shop. The microscope was safe when he came in, and nobody came in after till I missed it.

JOHN FORRESTER . I am an officer. The prosecutor described the prisoner to me. I met him, collared him, and said he must go with me. I took him to the prosecutor, he said he was the boy - He denied it. I sent for his father. He then said he sold it to one Isaacs for 5s. - Isaacs denied it. At last he promised to send it back in five minutes, but he did not.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181028-91

1482. MICHAEL TAYLOR was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of September , one watch, value 7l. 7s., two seals, value 4l, 4s.; one chain, value 1l. 1s., and one key, value 6d., the goods of William Spear , from his person .

WILLIAM SPEAR . I am a stationer , and lodge in Elbow-lane . On the 11th of September, about ten o'clock at night, I was standing at my door, The prisoner came up and asked what it was o'clock, I took out my watch, and he snatched it out of my hand, I ran after him, and was knocked down by another - I there lost sight of the prisoner, and the watchman took him. I have never found my watch. I am sure he is the man.

JOHN FIDLER . I was constable of the night. The prisoner, was brought to the watch-house, and given in charge.

JOSEPH - I keep a public-house in Elbowlane, the prosecutor came up, collared me, and charged me with the robbery. He was intoxicated.

WILLIAM SPEAR re-examined. I do not remember collaring the last witness, I might have done it. I took the first I came to.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181028-92

1483. THOMAS PICARD was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of October , one handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of the Rev. John Russell , clerk , from his person .

REV. JOHN RUSSELL. I am master of the Charter-house School . On Friday, the 8th of October, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, I was in Holborn , near Grays Inn-lane. I neither met or overtook any person. My suspicions were excited by a person endeavouring to keep pace with me. I was going to look round at him, when he started, and ran by me. I immediately put my hand to my pocket, and missed my handkerchief. I ran after the man who had passed me. He turned up Brownlow-street, and as he turned I saw him throw my handkerchief down. Some persons who were coming down the street, put themselves in his way. He endeavoured to turn back again into Holborn - I laid hold of him, and took him to the office. Almost at that instant my handkerchief was put into my hand. I am certain he is the man who threw it away-nobody came between us all the time.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was intoxicated.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181028-93

1484. JAMES TURNER , JAMES CLOSE , JOHN CARPENTER , WILLIAM JASPER , JOHN EGAN , MARY HARTNELL , GEORGE BAKER . DAVID CRAWLEY , and GEORGE VELTON were severally and separately indicted for forgery .

MR. REYNOLDS on the part of the Governor and Company of the Bank of England, declined offering any evidence.

(See No. 1430) NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181028-94

1485. STEPHEN MORRIS and JAMES DENNIS were indicted for stealing, on the 15th of September , at St. Pancras, twelve silver spoons, value 4l.; twelve silver forks, value 4l.; one silver salt-cellar, value 5s., and five silver bottle labels, value 1l., the property of William Clulow , Esq. , in his dwelling-house .

MRS. ELIZABETH CLULOW . I am the wife of William Clulow ; we live in Camden-street, Camden-town , in the parish of St. Pancras. My husband is abroad. I occasionally left my house to visit my children. I left it in care of Emma Owen and Joseph Braid , who were my servants. One of these visits was on the 14th of September.

Q. On the night of the 6th of October you was at home - A. Yes, and was alarmed about half-past two o'clock in the morning, by the prisoner, Morris, who was the watchman, springing his rattle. I got up, rang my bell, Owen came to the door, and said the house had been broken open by thieves, that two men came to her bedroom, with their faces blacked, and each had a pistol in his hand, and threatened to blow her brains out if she stirred.

Q. Presently after did you see Morris and Braid coming up stairs-A. I saw Braid with the poker in his hand; I did not see Morris, but heard his voice. My plate-chest was kept in the back-room up two pair of stairs. I had silver forks, spoons, salt-cellars, and labels in the chest; next morning I found I had lost a considerable quantity of plate, to the value of between 100l. and 200l., among which were the articles stated in the indictment.

JOSEPH BRAID . I was servant ta Mr. Clulow, and had been so for three years. Owen and I were left in the care of the house while my mistress was out. On the 15th of September she and I went to Astley's together, and left the house in the care of the prisoner Dennis, who is my uncle. We both returned at half-past twelve o'clock, and found the house, apparently, as we had left it.

Q. Sometime after that did Morris tell you of anything that had happened on the night you went to the Play - A. Yes, a fortnight after the 15th, he told me, in our absence at the Play, he and my uncle had broken open the plate-chest, and I was to ask my uncle what they had taken out-he said they had taken some out.

Q. I believe some scheme was laid between you and him, about some future robbery of the house - A. Yes; the next morning we agreed that a false alarm should be given that the house had been robbed; he said there would be no other way of getting over it, than pretending that the house had been broken open. I was to let him in at twelve o'clock at night, to put the house as if it had been broken open.

Q. On the night of Tuesday the 6th, at what time did you go to bed - A. Between ten and eleven o'clock. I got up at twelve, and let Morris in, through the area, as he was calling twelve. We went up stairs, brought down the plate-chest, put it on the sofa in the drawing-room, and some blankets, sheets, and a pocket-handkerchief we put some plate into the blanket, and tied it up, to give it the appearance of their being packed up to take away. We also tied up two mirror glasses, put two lights in the drawing-room, one in my master's bed-room, and one in the kitchen. We put a knife, with some bread and cold meat, on the drawing-room table, to appear as if the thieves had been regaling themselves.

Q. You had a dog - A. Yes; Morris told me to shut it in the scullery, for fear it should bite or bark, which I did. The dog had once bit Morris in the hand.

Q. All this being done, did you let Morris out - A. Yes, after he had placed a ladder on the wall, to lead up to the balcony of the back drawing-room window, and broken a pane of glass in the window, to appear as if they had entered at the back of the house-we got the ladder out of the back kitchen. I let him out. He was to give a false alarm at half-past two o'clock, which he did, by knocking at the door and springing his rattle; in two or three minutes I let him in. He ran down stairs, opened the back doors, I followed him, and came up stairs with the kitchen poker in my hand.

Q. Did Morris tell you to say anything to Owen - A. Yes, he told me to tell her to say that two men came to her bedside with black faces, and threatened to blow out her brains if she stirred or moved. I was taken up when some duplicates of mine were found, and told this story.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. You tell it to save yourself from being hung - A. Yes.

Q. You are swearing against your uncle - A. I am telling the truth.

COURT. Q. Had you any conversation with your uncle-A. Not any.

MRS. CLULOW re-examined. I saw the dog loose at the bottom of the stairs that night, but did not see it next morning.

MR. THOMAS WALLIS. I live next door to the prosecutor. I was alarmed by the knocking, and went to the prosecutor's house. I have heard the account Braid has given of the arrangements that were made, and found every thing as he has said, except the plate being tied up, it lay opon on the blanket when I was there-every thing else is correct.

EMMA OWEN. I was servant to the prosecutor. I lived one year there. I went to the Play with Braid; we went out about four o'clock and returned about half-past twelve-we left Dennis in the house, and found him there when we came back. We left no person there but him.

Q. Sometime after that did Braid give you any directions about a sham robbery - A. Yes; he said Morris had been speaking to him about the things which had been taken out of the chest, and that I was to say that two men had entered my bed-room, dressed like sailors, with black faces, and pistols in their hands. I told Mrs. Clulow so the night the alarm was given.

Q. Did you speak to Morris about this - A. Yes; the day before the alarm was given I saw him. He said,"Well, cook," I said, "This thing you have been proposing to my fellow-servant I had much rather should not be done." He said, I must be very foolish, for it might be done very easily. I consented to do it.

Cross-examined. I have now come from the House of Correction.

JOHN DAVIS. I am a patrol of Bow-street. Morris, Braid, and Owen were taken up for this robbery. In consequence of information which I received, on the 15th of October, I went to Chelmsford, and apprehended the prisoner, Dennis. I told him I wanted him for a robbery at Camden-town. I afterwards went with him to the White Hart, public-house, Braid's father was sitting there, and said, to him, "How could you bring my poor boy into such trouble as this?. He then confessed, that he and the watchman, Morris, committed the robbery at Mr. Clulow's, Camden-town, while Joe and his fellow-servant were gone to the Play. He said that he and Morris went all over the house, and opened all the drawers and closets-that at last they came to a box, that Morris got hold of it, found it was very heavy; that Morris drew the nails out of the lock, and said with an oath, "Here is good booty!"-that Morris wanted to take the chest, with the whole of the plate, but he would not agree to that, as he said they would be hung. I said nothing to induce

him to confess. After this conversation with his brother, I asked him what plate he had taken? he said, about a dozen silver table-spoons, about a dozen silver forks, five labels, and three salt-cellars with two handles. I asked him what he did with them? he said that next morning he and the watchman went to look for Old Mike, the Jew - They walked for some considerable time, but could not find him. At last, they got into a narrow passage, leading into Whitechapel, and on making inquiry for Old Mike, the man of whom they inquired asked them if they had got anything to sell? he and the watchman said they had, and showed him what they had got, when the Jew they had shewn them to offered 3l. 15s. for the whole-that the watchman refused to take that, and then he gave them 4l. - that the watchman gave him 1l., and that was all he had. He said no more.

Cross-examined. Q. Are you sure you held him out no inducement - A. I did not. He knew I was an officer.

Q. I suppose he did it from a feeling of contrition - A. When the father said he had brought his boy into trouble, he told this. He did not say he was sorry.

MRS. CLULOW. My salt-cellars had double handles.

JOSEPH BRAID re-examined. Q. The morning after you returned from the Play did anybody call for your uncle-A. Morris called for him next morning. He went away, and told me he was going to take a letter for Morris.

Q. After Morris told you what had been done, did you look at the plate-chest - A. Yes, and found the nails had been drawn.

THOMAS BOWSKILL. I live at No. 7, Caroline-street, Camden-town, the prisoner, Morris, lodged with me. I heard of the reported robbery at Mr. Clulow's on the Wednesday morning. On the Sunday afternoon before that, I saw a Jew, called Old Mike, at Morris's apartments, I afterwards saw the same Jew at Bow-street. Braid came in after him, and was with him there - They were altogether in Morris's apartment.

JOHN SMITH. I am a patrol of Bow-street. I took Morris into custody. I went and examined the premises, and found nothing to induce me to think they had been broken open-the window was broken. I afterwards took Morris, in consequence of what had happened, about a week after. When I took him he asked me what Joe had said? - (he knew Braid was in custody) - I told him what he had said would be stated before the magistrate. He said he knew bl-dy well who had the plate, that it was the old Jew.

MORRIS'S Defence. I never said such words to Smith, nor was I ever in the house with Dennis.

DENNIS'S Defence. I was never up stairs in the house higher than the parlour.

MORRIS - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 27.

DENNIS - GUILTY . - DEATH .

DENNIS recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutrix.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181028-95

1486. COLIN PALLIARD was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of September , three gowns, value 30s.; two petticoats, value 12s.; six pair of stockings, value 9s.; three shifts, value 15s.; three shawls, value 2l., and six caps, value 16s., the goods of Eliza Knight , in the dwelling-house of Thomas Belcher .

ELIZA KNIGHT. I am servant to Thomas Belcher , who keeps the Castle Tavern, in Holborn . On the 28th of October, about half-past four o'clock in the afternoon, I saw my bed-room door move; I went in, and found the prisoner behind the door. I ran down and called the waiter, who secured him before he got to the staircase door. My trunk was taken off the chair, and put on the floor, turned upside down, and every thing taken out, and packed up ready to be taken away-he had no business there.

Prisoner's Defence. I got drunk, and went to meet some companions, mistook the house, and went up. I never touched anything.

NOT GUILTY .

Jury of Half Foreigners, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181028-96

1487. MARY BURNS was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of September , from the person of James White , one pocket-book, value 6d.; one 50l., two 5l., ten 2l., and ninety 1l. bank notes, his property .

JAMES WHITE . I keep a public-house in Leather-lane . On the night of the 4th of September I was sitting up for a lodger, my house was shut up. There was a knock at the door, I asked who was there? a voice answered,"A friend!" I opened it, and the prisoner and another woman came in. I refused serving them it being late. They pressed so hard for a glass of gin, saying they were cold, that I served them, and then the other woman went out. The prisoner took hold of my coat, and made an indecent proposition to me, which I refused, and took her by the arm to turn her out, at which time, I suppose, she must have robbed me - She went out immediately. Just before they came in I was looking over my notes, and marking them. I had 170l. in my pocket-book, in the notes stated in the indictment. I was perfectly sober. I had counted my notes before my family went to bed, and put them altogether into my pocket-book, which I put into my pocket.

Cross-examined by MR. PLATT. Q. Did you not ask the prisoner to stop - A. I positively swear I did not. I never gave her the pocket-book.

WILLIAM READ , JUN. I am an officer of Hatton-garden. I received information, and searched the prisoner's lodgings in Fitzroy-row, Tottenham-court-road, and found 31 1l. notes in a glove in a drawer, which was locked - I had it picked - She was not at home, her husband was. I found a letter there, in consequence of which, information was sent to Liverpool.

Cross-examined. I do not know that she lived there.

JOHN MILLER . I am an officer of Liverpool. I received information and apprehended the prisoner on the 9th of October. I searched her, and found a 20l. and a 5l. bank note upon her. I asked her where she got them? she said she had earned them by washing. I was afterwards present when she saw White, she then said he gave them to her.

JAMES WHITE re-examined. I know one of the 1l. notes. I particularly marked it before I put it in my pocketbook. I also know the 5l. note-it has the name of Stevens on it, I took it of him. There is a black mark on the 20l. note, in the same place-it is mine; I have no doubt of its being mine-it has my wife's writing on it.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181028-97

1488. JAMES EVANS was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of September , one engine-pump, value 5s.; part of an engine-pipe, value 1s.; one gallon of onions, value 1s.; one gallon of apples, value 6d., and one lock, value 3s. , the goods of the Reverend Henry Handley Norris .

THOMAS BUTLER . I am servant to the Rev. Henry Handley Norris, who lives in Grove-street, Hackney . On Saturday night, the 12th of September, I and Rawbone were watching in the grape-house. About ten minutes before one o'clock in the morning, I saw a man go by the grapehouse, and cross the garden to the tool-house - He did not return as we expected. We heard a noise, and directly heard the engine-pump unscrewed. We went out and saw the prisoner run from where the noise was; we pursued him round the garden. I ran across, met and stopped him by presenting a pistol at him - He had an edge-bill, which he held in a threatening attitude. Rawbone came up and we secured him. I asked what he had been doing to the engine. He said he had done nothing to it, we took him towards the engine, and found the pump taken from the carriage, and carried five or six yards from it - A piece of pipe was found five or six yards from the engine in the way he had run. We called the gardener up-he sent for a constable, and locked the door. The prisoner then said I suppose you are not afraid of my running away, now the door is locked - I said we were not. We walked towards the grape-house. I told Rawbone to look at the other door, the prisoner then quickened his pace. I took him by the hand, he struck me a violent blow on the cheek I presented my pistol at him, and said I would shoot him if he ran - He rushed at me, and seized the pistol - We had a violent strnggle together. Rawbone came up, and we secured him again. In taking him through the door near to where he struck me, I found the lock had been taken off - I had locked it myself at eleven o'clock that night. We gave him in charge at the watch-house, the branch of the engine was quite lost. The apples and onions were found near the pump.

THOMAS RAWBONE. I was in the wash-house, and saw the prisoner, he must have got over the wall - He passed the grape-house, and went to the tool-house - We heard the engine-pump unscrewed. We went out, and saw him run from the place - We pursued, and secured him. We found some apples and onions taken from the tool-house, and put into a bag which was not my master's-it was left just by the engine-pump - We locked the door, and went towards another door. While I was trying it the prisoner struck Butler - I ran to his assistance, and found the prisoner had hold of the pistol, trying to get it from him - I rescued him. I found the lock had been broken off the door.

JOHN GARVER . I am constable of Hackney. On the 13th of September the prisoner was given into my charge. I found some tinder in a piece of paper, and in his waistcoat pocket a screw-driver. He would not tell me his name or where he lived.

Prisoner's Defence. I laid down in a field to rest-it rained, and I got over the wall for shelter - I was taken - I was very quiet.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181028-98

1489. MARY HALL was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of September , at St. James, Westminster, in the dwelling-house of Stephen William Young , two 5l. bank notes, his property .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating them to be the property of Harriet Penfold Young .

MRS. HARRIET PENFOLD YOUNG . I am the wife of Stephen William Young. We live in Poland-street , in the parish of St. James, Westminster, and keep the house. I had never seen the prisoner till she applied to me for the place of a cook . She produced a written character to me. I made further application to a man named Fuller, who drove the Waltham coach, to whom she referred me. She came on the 4th of September, and brought no trunk, saying, she came from Waltham, and as soon as she got a little settled, she should send for her clothes. I repeatedly told her to go for her clothes. At the end of a fortnight she went out, at my request, to fetch them. She returned at half-past eleven o'clock at night without them, as she said the person where she had been to fetch them was out. I expressed my disapprobation at it. She said, "Do not say anything to me about it; I am so hurt at the person's being out, that I have cried all the way home." Next day I told her I insisted on her fetching them, as I did not like her to be wearing her fellow-servant's clothes. In the evening I asked why she did not go and fetch them, as I did not like her to come home so late as she did last night. She said"I am going for good then." I asked what she meant by that? She said she had taken it into her head, and she would go that evening. I asked her reasons for going away in that manner? In a short time she went away. I owed her some wages; she did not apply for them. I did not see her afterwards till she was in custody.

Q. While she was in your service, had you in your possession two 5l. notes - A. Yes; they were in a pocketbook in my bed-room drawer. I saw them safe on the 7th and 8th of September. She left me on the 22d. I had not taken them out. It was separate from all other money, as it belonged to some money, I being executrix to my father. I never had any dealings with Griffiths or Dutton. I marked the notes, and should know them again. - (Looking at two.)-These are them. I searched, and missed them the evening she went away. She was taken three or four days after.

MARY DUTTON . I keep a chandler's shop in Crowncourt, Fleet-street. The prisoner owed me 2l. for nine weeks board and lodging, and paid me this 5l. note-(looking at it)-about six weeks ago. My daughter wrote on it.

SUSAN GOODMAN . I am the daughter of Dutton-(Looks at a note.) - I wrote the prisoner's name on the note. It is the same she paid my mother.

EDWARD GRIFFITHS. I am a shoe-maker, and live in Carnaby-street. I was present when my boy changed the prisoner a 5l. note, about the 21st of September. I wrote on it. - (Looks at one.)-This is it. She said her name was Beresford, and she lived at No. 7, Poland-street. It was the evening before she left her place. I gave my boy the note, to get change at Mr. Vipond's. He returned for me to put a name on it. I put the name on it she gave me.

SAMUEL PLANK. I am an officer. I apprehended the

prisoner, and charged her with the robbery. She said she knew nothing of it. I said she had changed a 5l. note. She said she had changed no note whatever since she had been in London, except a 1l. note which she got changed for her master.

MRS. YOUNG. The notes are both mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not take them. I told Dutton I had a 5l. note in my box, and as soon as I could get it I would pay her. I received the notes of Mrs. Parker, for my wages. I left her in August, and paid Dutton before I went to the service of the prosecutrix. I did not rob her.

DUTTON re-examined. She often told me she had a 5l. note in her box, and would pay me. She afterwards brought the 5l. note.

GUILTY - DEATH .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181028-99

1490. JOHN MARRIOT was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of October , two check braces, value 2s. , the goods of Dame Catherine Burgoyne .

WILLIAM TAYLER. I am servant to Lady Catherine Burgoyne. On the 16th of October I was in Piccadilly , between eight and nine o'clock at night, with the coach. A man said my braces were taken. I jumped off the box, and found the prisoner going up the Park with some. I will not swear they were mine.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181028-100

1491. JAMES MORGAN was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of September , in an out-house belonging to the dwelling-house of Charlotte Philips , widow, one box, value 2s.; one coat, value 30s.; two waistcoats, value 10s.; one pair of breeches, value 10s.; one shirt, value 2s.; four handkerchiefs, value 10s.. two sovereigns, value 2l.; eight half-crowns, and two 1l. bank notes, the goods and monies of Charles Tayler .

CHARLES TAYLER . I am porter at the Golden Lion, St. John's-street , On the 30th of October, about ten o'clock at night, I went to bed, and missed the property. Next morning the prisoner's brother came to me, and said my box was at Hatton-Garden. My bed-room is not connected with the dwelling-house. The prisoner lived with me as under-boy .

CHARLES DIXON. I am houseman at Eagle-street watch-house. Between nine and ten o'clock at night I saw the prisoner go by with a box. I suspected it was stolen, and followed him down Holborn, into Baldwin's-Gardens, secured him, and brought him back. He said the box was his brother's. When his brother saw it, he said it was not his. His mother asked him to tell whose it was. He said it was the prosecutor's, who belonged to the Golden Lion.

(Box produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Of stealing, but not in a Dwelling-house.

Confined Six Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181028-101

1492. LAWRENCE BRAZIER , DAVID LOCK , and GEORGE REYNOLDS were indicted for stealing, on the 16th of October , 12lbs. of silk, value 9l. , the goods of Thomas Wilson , Arthur David , Lewis Agassiz , Richard Blanshard , Henry Blanshard , Thomas Harley , John Tebbut , John Tebbut ,jun. Robert Batson , and Peter Mallard .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating it to he the property of Robert Appleby .

RICHARD COLE . I am chief mate of the Taphene, East India ship, which was laden from Bengal. She arrived off her voyage on the 14th, and remained at Blackwall . On the 16th all the men left her, except the prisoners Lock and Reynolds. Brazier left on the 14th. I was informed some raw silk had been thrown overboard. A man, named Tayler, gave me some hanks of silk. I saw some more found behind one of the water-tubs. I asked Reynolds how he could think of throwing the silk overboard? He said he thought the cargo would be seized. We had twenty-three bales on board. I found four bales had been plundered. The seams of two were cut open.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Brazier left the ship on the 14th, and never returned to my knowledge.

Cross-examined by MR. PLATT. Q.Reynolds said he threw it over, lest the ship should be seized - A. Yes. He did not say that it was part of the cargo.

DANIEL BLYTHE. I am a Thames Police surveyor. On the 15th of October, between eight and nine o'clock at night, I went on board the ship, and found Lock and Reynolds there. I found two hanks of raw silk in Lock's mattrass, and fourteen under a water-cask. I asked Reynolds where his chest and bedding were? He said they were at Mr. Webber's, in Cottage-row, Poplar. I found them there. As we went along, he said he had got some silk in his bed, which he had taken ashore, and that a man, named Lewis, gave it to him. I found nine hanks in his bed. Locks said he took the silk out of the bag before it was thrown overboard.

JOHN GATTY . I belong to the Thames Police Office. I apprehended Brazier, in Farmer-street, Shadwell, on the 16th of October. He was standing at his own door. I searched his mattrass, and found one side unripped, and in different parts of it were several hanks of raw silk, and one in his drawers. In the same room I found three quarters of a pound. He said he got it at Calcutta.

JOHN BARRY . I am a cabin-boy. On the night we arrived at Blackwall, I found a bag behind one of the watercasks, in the forecastle. I took it to Lock and Reynolds. I thought it was grass to make mats of. They said it was silk, and desired me to put it there again.

Cross-examined by MR. PLATT. The sailors never buy raw silk.

JOHN WELCH. I am a mariner, and was on board the ship. The day after we arrived at Blackwall, about ten o'clock in the morning, I saw Reynolds with a bag of raw silk. Lock was present. I asked Reynolds where he found it? He said he found it in the forecastle, and was going to throw it overboard, for fear of the officers. Reynolds was below. Lock handed it to him. They threw it over in a basket. I told the mate.

MICHAEL DAVIS . I am a creeper. I work at Blackwall, on the Thames. I fetched up a basket which contained two bags of raw silk.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

HENRY BLANSHARD , ESQ. I am joint-owner of the ship. The owners' names are rightly stated in the indictment.

BRAZIER - GUILTY . Aged 29.

LOCK - GUILTY . Aged 20.

REYNOLDS - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Fined One Shilling, and Discharged .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181028-102

1493. JOHN HORN was indicted for feloniously receiving, on the 8th of September , three pieces of gold solder, value 4s.; nineteen gold links, value 4s., two penny-weights of gold, value 6s. 6d., the goods of Thomas Dugard , of which William Travers was convicted of stealing, he well knowing them to have been stolen .

THOMAS DUGARD. I am a working goldsmith , and live in Red Lion-street, Clerkenwell , William Travers, who was convicted here this Sessions, was my servant. I went with the officer to the prisoner's house, and found the articles stated in the indictment there-the prisoner was not at home. He was afterwards taken, and said he knew Travers, but never received the property of him. I told him he must have known that the property was mine-the prisoner was formerly a journeyman of mine, and knew Travers was my servant. I have seen the prisoner about my door several times, at one o'clock, when my men go to dinner.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You have known the prisoner sometime - A. Yes. we were journeymen together at Mr. Brogden's - I left there six years ago-the prisoner left before me, I think.

Q. Did you leave of your own account - A. My master desired me to leave-the prisoner attended at the office without being summoned.

CHARLES ORTON . I am the prosecutor's apprentice. I delivered out the gold solder to the men. I delivered some to Travers, and marked coloured gold solder on it. That found at the prisoner's house is part of that which was delivered to Travers.

Cross-examined. I know it by the letters.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

EDWARD READ . I am an officer. I went to the prisoner's house and found the gold solder there - He was not at home.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18181028-103

1494. CHARLES TINKLER was indicted for embezzlement .

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18181028-104

1495. JENKIN EVANS was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of October , one screw-driver, value 2s.; one chisel. value 1s., and one trying-square, value 2s. 6d. , the goods of Thomas Turner Thompson .

The prosecutor not identifying the property, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18181028-105

1496. JOHN CARTER was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of October , from the person of Robert Hunt , one pocket-book, value 1s.; 6s., in monies numbered, and one bill of exchange, for payment of and value 95l. 12s., his property .

ROBERT HUNT . I live in Wilson-street, Finsbury-square, and am a traveller and commission agent . On the 29th of October, I had been at the Coach and Horses, in Coleman-street. About eleven o'clock at night I was returning home-my pocket-book was in my outside coat pocket, it contained a bill of exchange for 95l. 12s., drawn by Hooling of Liverpool, on George Oliphant, of Manchester, payable at Lowden's Watling-street - my money was loose in my waistcoat pocket. I was rather intoxicated and lost my pocket-book. I have never found the bill since.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q, You was intoxicated - A. Yes. I do not know when I lost it - I had it safe between nine and ten o'clock at the public-house.

JOHN MARKWELL . I am watchman of Coleman-street , saw the prosecutor coming down on the right hand side of the street, about one hundred yards from the Coach and Horses, very much intoxicated-three persons were leading him along, whom I suspected-the prisoner was one of them; he had hold of his right arm. I crossed over opposite to them, that they might not see me. They got to the Corner of London-wall-Hunt-tried to go towards Fore-street - they dragged him down London-wall. I immediately ran round Fore-street, and met them at the other end. I concealed myself in a doorway, and saw them all three, they were still with the prosecutor - one of them took him by the neck, and pushed him against the wall, the other two rifled his pockets - I heard silver rattle, which they took out of his pockets. They then took him as far as the Castle Inn, Moorgate, and left him-they then came back to where they had robbed him- I heard them with the money - I thought they were dividing it - They were all stooping. Just at that time Acott came up, I told him to wait while I ran round. Before I got half round, Acott fell on them-one of them ran by me. Acott called out Stop thief! I followed him-he knocked me down, and ran away. I saw the other two run towards Moorfields. I pursued and the prisoner was taken - I am sure he was one of them. I picked up the pocket-book within twenty yards of where the robbery was committed.

Q. At the time you saw the three men with the prosecutor was anybody else in sight - A. No; there were nothing but papers in the pocket-book when I found it-it laid open, and the cards and papers were laying loosely by it in the kennel

Cross-examined. Q. Did you know the prisoner before - A. Yes-It was a dark night- I saw them rifling his pockets. The pocket-book was tied round with a piece of tape.

JOHN GIRTON. I am a police officer. The prisoner was brought to the watch-house-the last witness gave me the pocket-book; soon afterwards I found the tape under a lamp, between Moorfields and Coleman-street; it appeared to have been torn off the book.

(Pocket-book sworn to.)

CHRISTOPHER ACOTT. I am a patrol. On the 29th of October, about eleven o'clock at night, I was standing on

the pavement at Moorgate, Markwell came to me-he appeared alarmed, and pointed to the corner of Moorgate, leading to Coleman-street. I went to the corner, and saw the prisoner and two others - I did not see the prosecutor, they must have left him. They were close together, with their heads stooping against the wall, and looking over some papers - I saw what they were after, and thought they had drawn somebody, and were taking stock. I sprung upon them, asked them what they were about, and collared two of them-the prisoner was one of them, I knew him before. The third man drew back, and was in the act of throwing something towards Coleman-street. I thought it was a blow levelled at me, and drew the prisoner round to meet it to save myself - He immediately came closer, and a general scuffle ensued; nobody came to my assistance, and they got away. I called out Stop thief! and followed them to the corner, and finding a blow which I had received on the head affected me, I stopped. In about five minutes the prisoner was brought to me - I am sure he is the man I took before. When I gave up the pursuit I returned to the spot where I saw them together, and picked up some papers, which the prosecutor claimed-the prisoner was taken to the watch-house. I got a light, went out to the spot again, and picked up a piece of red tape, and a pattern of calico, which the prosecutor also claimed.

Cross-examined. Q. You said "they had drawn somebody, and were taking stock" - A. It is a common expression.

ROBERT HUNT re-examined. The papers and pattern were in my pocket-book.

CHARLES JOHNSON . I am a watchman. I heard the cry of Stop thief! the prisoner came by, and jumped over the rails into Moorfields - I pursued and took him.

Prisoner's Defence. I heard the alarm, and ran with the rest.

GUILTY . Aged 32.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18181028-106

1497. MARY OWENS was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of July , one pair of breeches, value 5s., and one table-cloth, value 5s. , the goods of David Williams .

DAVID WILLIAMS . I am a milkman , and live in King's Head-court, Holborn . On the 8th of July I went out, returned at nine o'clock in the morning, and missed the articles stated in the indictment out of my drawers. I received information, and met the prisoner on the 6th of August, and charged her with the robbery. She said she would bring my things back if I would not tell the neighbours of it - She never brought them to me.

JOHN JOHNSON. I am servant to Mr. Briggs, who is a pawnbroker, and lives in St. John-street. On the 8th of July the table-cloth and breeches were pledged with me.

MARY ANN EVANS. I live in the prosecutor's house. The prisoner came into the room, and went out while the prosecutor was out. I did not see her take anything.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I took the table-cloth, but know nothing of the breeches.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Three Months .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18181028-107

1498. JOHN MARTIN was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of October , one pair of lady's boots, value 5s. 6d. , the goods of Joseph Plimpton .

JOHN DAVIS CHALLENER. I am servant to Joseph Plimpton, who is a salesman , and lives in Holborn . On the 8th of October, between ten and eleven o'clock in the morning, I was standing by the window-the prisoner took the boots off the hook by the door, came into the shop, asked me if I would take them in pledge, and then asked me to buy them. I said we were not pawnbrokers. I did not see him take them. Two gentlemen came to the door - I went round to them. The prisoner put the boots into his bosom, buttoned them up, and was going out - I then missed the boots from the door, stopped him, and asked him to let me see them, as I should know them by the private mark at the bottom. He said they were not our's. I gave him in charge. I am certain they hung at the door just before, and have my master's hand-writing on them.

WILLIAM JOHNSON. I took the prisoner in charge. He said he took the boots from the door, went in to ask the price of them, and said that they would fit him very well. They were lady's boots.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I took them down to buy them.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18181028-108

1499. JOHN WARREN and JAMES WARNER were indicted for stealing, on the 11th of October , eight bushels of barley, value 39s. , the goods of John Bloom and James Gardner Bloom .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating it to be the property of John Seel .

JOSEPH POWIS. I am a Thames Police surveyor. On Tuesday, the 11th of October, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I was on the river, passing St. Catherine's, and saw a sack being handed from the ship Union to the Prosperous-the Prosperous laid alongside the Union. I and Gaskin, who was with me, went alongside three Ware barges, which laid by the Union; we then boarded the Union, which was Warner's vessel, he was on board. I asked him what was in the sack which he had been handing over? he said he did not know of anything, and that there was nobody else on board. On searching, I found a man apparently asleep in the forecastle. I then boarded the Prosperous, and found Gullen and Woodyard on deck, the hatches were off. I found three sacks under the hatches, containing eight bushels of barley - They appeared like the sack I saw pass from the Union; the Prosperous was laden with flour. I boarded the Union again, and asked Warner what his cargo consisted of? he said it was barley - I found it was so-it lay in the fore-hold, in bulk, and not in sacks-it appeared as if barley had been taken out. I compared that in the sack with the bulk,

they appeared the same sample. I then went on board the Prosperous, saw Warren there, and asked him if he had any grain there? he said, None. I said there were three sacks down in the fore-hold; he said, If so it was wrong, it had no business there. The vessel was a sloop of ninety tons. I said I was going to take Gullen-Warren said he would pass his word for him. I took Gullen, Warner, and the barley.

Q. Did you afterwards go anywhere to take Warren - A. Yes, on the 20th of October I went to Malden, in Essex, found him at his house, and told him I apprehended him for the barley. He said Warner had asked him to have a few bushels of sweepings, and he did not know it was barley till he saw it at the office. He had attended two examinations at the office. The barley was quite clean, the same as the bulk.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. When you went on board Warren, was at tea with his daughter, below in the cabin - A. Yes, another man was with them. The transaction was at the head of the ship. I desired Warren to attend the examination, and he did.

Q. At any of these hearings was any charge made against him - A. No; I knew his ship was going away.

COURT. Q. Could you see who the persons were that were handing the sack over - A.No, My sight is bad.

JOHN GASKIN. I was with Powis, and saw the prisoner, Warner, hand a sack from the Union to Gullen in the Prosperous, and informed Powis. We went on board, and saw nobody but Warner in the Union-Gullen was in the Prosperous, there were two men and a boy on deck. I saw them when I was in the boat, and never lost sight of them till I got on board. If they had left the vessel I must have seen them. I went on board the Union, and asked Warner who was there, what they had been handing from one vessel to the other in the sack? he said, "Nothing at all - He had no knowledge of any thing" I went on board the Prosperous, and saw Warren, Gullen, Woodyard, and another boy. I found the hatches shut, and asked Gullen what it was he had received from Warner? he said he had received nothing, nor did he know anything of it. Warren then walked down stairs - He said nothing to me. I told Gullen. I knew better, and would see-(he had heard me talk with Warner.) I took up the hatches, and found three sacks - I asked Gullen what they contained? he said he knew nothing about them. Powis went down to Warner. The sacks contained clean barley, which appeared of the same quality as the bulk in the Union. The Prosperous was laden with flour.

Q. Did the Union appear to have discharged part of her cargo - A. It had. There were about sixty quarters left.

Q. Was it possible for Warren to have been on board without seeing these things handed in - A. No, he must have seen it.

COURT. Q. How many persons could you discover on the deck of the Prosperous - A. I am certain there were four; there were two lads, one boy, and the captain-those were all that I saw. The vessels were aground.

Cross-examined. I believe Warren was the only man on deck - He was at the quarters, the others were at the bows. Warren attended the examination voluntarily until his vessel left.

WILLIAM GULLEN . I was a mariner on board the Prosperous-the crew consisted of four hands-Warren as master, Pairman the mate, Woodyard and myself.

Q. On the Sunday you was taken were you on board the vessel in the morning - A. Yes; at one o'clock I went ashore with Woodyard, returned to the vessel at half-past three, and found Warren, the captain, on deck by himself. He asked Woodyard if he had seen the new bridge yet? he said No. and asked me to go with him - I refused, as it was wet. As soon as I came on board, I saw Warren had left the fore-hatch up a little way, and Warner came up the forecastle of the Union with a sack on his back; he reached over to our vessel, and put it on board our ship, I took it of him-Warren saw it; he did not ask what it was, the sack was full. I put it down the fore-hatches; I moved the hatch to put it down, as Warren had not moved it sufficiently - He saw me put it down, but said nothing about it. Warner went below in his own vessel, and Warren sent the boy for half a gallon of beer. When the boy returned, Warner came up with another sack, reached over, and I took that of him also, and put it down the forehatch. Warren was then on deck, but asked no questions. Warner brought up another sack full, I took that of him as before-Warren was still on deck. We drank the beer between the times of putting down the sacks. Master, I, the boy, and Warner drank-master poured it out, and handed it over to Warner in the Union. Warren never asked a question about the sacks. He went down into the cabin as soon as the officers came on board.

Q. How came you to take the sacks in - A. I thought they were for my master. When the officers were coming on board, Warner said to Warren, "There is the police!" I was taken up for this, and examined twice, but I said nothing about Warren.

Q. Did anything pass between you and Warren after you was taken up - A. He sent me 5s. over the vessel before I was taken away, as I had no money.

Cross-examined. Q. Where did you come from to-day - A. From the House of Correction. Woodyard and I have been together there; we have not talked about this only now and then.

Q. You talked about what you should say when you gave evidence - A. No. It was all done after I went on board. I put the sacks down, thinking they were my master's. The sacks were put down before the officers came, it was not long after.

Q. Five shillings were handed to you - A. Yes; more than that was due to me for wages. The mate was in the cabin all the while, he did not come up until the police officers came.

Q. You saw your master before the magistrate, and said nothing about him - A. Yes, twice; I was not asked if I had anything to say.

JOHN GASKIN re-examined. When Warren was present, did you state what you had seen - A. Yes, I said Warren was on board.

Q. Was Gullen asked what he had to say - A. Yes, at the first and second examinations. Warren was not asked about it.

WILLIAM GULLEN (in continuation). Q. How long might it be from the first sack coming down until the officers came on board - A. It might be an hour. Warren

went below now and then, during the time; he was on deck when the sacks were brought on board. I was never asked what I had to say.

Q. Before you went before the magistrate the third time, did you tell anybody that you would swear against Warren - A. There was a sailor in the prison; I told him I might as well clear myself, as I was innocent of it. I was asked if I had anything to say, and told this story.

THOMAS WOODYARD. I was on board the Prosperous. I had been drinking a little with Gullen, I returned about half-past three o'clock with Gullen, at the time Warren was on deck, nobody else. He asked me if I had seen the new bridge? I asked Gullen to go with me - We did not go. Master sent me ashore for half a gallon of beer; when I came back master was in the cabin; he came on deck after that. I saw Warner give Gullen two sacks, one after the other, he put them down the forehold, where the hatches were off; when I came on board we all drank.

Q. Did Warner drink - A. He was not near enough to drink, he was on the deck of his vessel. Master was on deck when the sacks were put down.

Q. You was sent to the same prison with Warren - A. Yes; Gullen was sent to another prison.

Cross-examined. Q. You went ashore with Gullen - A. Yes; I saw no sack put on board before I went out for the beer - I only saw three put on board. I believe Warren was walking about the deck while they were being put down; the greatest part of the beer was drank in the cabin. It was all drank before the sacks came on board. Master was on deck when the officers came. I heard nothing said about the police.

COURT. Q. You say Warren was on deck smoking his pipe when the sacks came on board, did he inquire about them - A. No, we had no barley belonging to our cargo our cargo was in the main-hold.

MR. JOSEPH KING. I am in partnership with John Greenside, the cargo was consigned to us. The owners are John Bloom and James Gardner Bloom ; the captain was John Serls . I have seen the barley found in the sacks, it was clean. Eight bushels are worth 3l. 10s.

WARNER'S Defence. I deny having any beer. It is impossible for me to bring a sack up out of the fore-hold.

WARREN'S Defence. I was in the cabin, and did not see it.

WARNER - GUILTY . Aged 33.

Transported for Seven Years .

WARREN- NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18181028-109

1500. DANIEL LONGHURST was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of October , 90 live tame pigeons, price 10l., and two live tame doves, price 5s. , the property of Valentine Snow , Spinster .

JAMES ARNOLD. I am footman to Miss Valentine Snow, who lives at Sudbury , and keeps a great many pigeons, in a large pigeon house; they were netted in, and could not get out. On the 10th of October we lost upwards of one hundred, which were all safe at half-past six o'clock the night before. I had to gather them every night, and put them in the house. I know them very well, one of them had a bad eye, and another had a mark on his neck with fighting. I applied to Salmon. Two days after, I saw three of them - We have recovered fifty. I can swear they are part of those stolen from my mistress.

PHILIP CASTANG , JUN. My father lives in the Hampstead-road, and deals in pigeons and birds. On Saturday, the 11th of October the prisoner brought a great many pigeons to sell, some were in a hamper, and some in a sack, my mother would not buy them of him. I was afterwards informed that they were stolen, and met the prisoner in the New-road, on the Monday. I went home and told my father, he went and took him.

PHILIP CASTANG, SEN. I went in pursuit of the prisoner, and met him in the New-road, my son pointed him out to me. I went to him, and said I understood he was the man who had been to my house on Saturday with some pigeons; I asked him what he had done with them? he said they were all sold. I said I should like to buy some if he would show me where he had sold them; he hesitated a little. I said I understood they were stolen, and unless he took me to where he had sold them, I would take him to Bow-street. In our way to the house where they where he ran from me, about half-way down Burton-crescent; I overtook him, and took him to the watchhouse; he then said they were at Stevens's, at Battle-bridge. Salmon and I went there, and inquired of Mrs. Stevens - We found fifty in the first-floor back-room; the prisoner afterwards saw them, and said they were those he had sold.

WILLIAM SALMON. I am an officer. On the 11th of October I was informed the pigeons were lost. I left word at Castang's that they were stolen; on the Monday morning he told me some had been offered to his wife. I found the prisoner at the watch-house. I went with him to Stevens's, as he said they were there. I found fifty-nine there in a back room.

JAMES FULLER. On the 9th of October I met the prisoner at Twickenham-common, between four and five o'clock in the afternoon, going towards the prosecutrix's house, which was three miles further; I think he had a basket with him; I have known him many years, and am certain he is the man. I spoke to him.

JOHN GREENHILL. On Saturday, about one o'clock at night, I saw the prisoners about two hundred yards from the prosecutrix's house, with a basket - He wished my master good night.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing about them.

GUILTY . Aged 32.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181028-110

1501. JAMES FLETCHER was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of October , three blankets, value 10s. , the goods of James Penvold Slodden .

JAMES PENVOLD SLODDEN. I live at Harrow . On the 12th of October, in the forenoon, I lost three blankets. I suspected the prisoner, and found him, at ten o'clock at night, about two miles from my house, with them, rolled up in one of my servant's aprons. They were taken from my servant's bed-room. The prisoner had been my hostler . I discharged him on the 10th.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. His groom took them off the bed, and gave them to me.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury. before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181028-111

1502. WILLIAM BINGLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of August , three 5l. bank notes , the property of William Dolan .

WILLIAM DOLAN . I am a drover . On the 12th of August, between ten and eleven o'clock at night, I was lying on the grass, in a field, within two miles of Rumford . The prisoner laid by my side. I had hired him on the road, to assist me to drive my cattle, which were in the field. I had 65l. in my pocket. About one o'clock I awoke, started up, and saw him get up from my side. He was picking up some notes. I found my pocket-book was safe, and thought he had not robbed me. I asked a man who laid on the other side of me, if he had lost anything? He said No. Next morning I found some of my money gone. I gave information to the Police; and, some time after, when I was in Ireland, I heard that he was taken. I came to England and saw him, and am sure he is the man.

SAMUEL BINTON . I am a corn-chandler. On the 12th of August I bought six heifers of the prosecutor, at Rumford market. I paid him 26l. 19s. I paid him the same notes which I received from Joiner and Co.'s bank to that amount.

THOMAS HUNT . On the 16th of August I was informed the prisoner had been laying out a great deal of money, and showing it in his hands. Next day I saw him at a play at Hampstead. About eleven o'clock that night I found him in a shed on Hampstead Heath, and told him I understood he had a great deal of money about him. He said he had not got a farthing about him. I found a watch on him. I found a pocket-book in his breeches, between his thighs, with three 5l. notes in it. I asked him how he got them? He said he found them near Battle-bridge. I took him to Bow-street. He then said he found them within three miles of Rumford.

GEORGE LAURENCE . I am clerk to Joiner and Co., bankers, of Rumford. They are three of the notes I paid for the cheque. They correspond with my book.

WILLIAM DOLAN . The notes I received from Binton were part of what I lost.

Prisoner's Defence. I do not know the prosecutor. I found the notes near Rumford.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181028-112

1503. HENRY ROLLS was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of October , eight books, value 29s.; one pair of scales and weights, value 7s. 6d.; fifteen copper tokens, value 6d.; fifteen medals, value 1s., and one bag, value 1s. , the goods of Thomas Schofield .

THOMAS SCHOFIELD. I am a schoolmaster , and live at Stoke Newington . On the 16th of October, about one o'clock in the morning, I was alarmed by the watchman, and found that a man had broken into my school-room. I went down, and found the side window had been cut, by which means he had entered. I unlocked the school-room door, went in, and ordered the prisoner out. He was in the school-room. He came out and begged pardon for what he had done. I got a light, and found the articles stated in the indictment gathered together. My desk was broken open, to get the coins and scales out.

WILLIAM BROWN. I am a watchman. About one o'clock in the morning I heard a noise, and saw the prisoner in the school-room. I prevented his getting out, and alarmed the prosecutor.

SAMUEL BUTCHER. I am a watchman. I found the prisoner in the school-room.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I do not know how I got there.

GUILTY . Aged 62.

Confined One Year .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181028-113

1504. JOHN DEACON was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of September , one watch, value 50s.; one seal, value 10s.; one ring, value 4s., and one key, value 6s., the goods of David Pullinger , from his person .

DAVID PULLINGER. On the 17th of September, about nine o'clock in the evening, I was coming along, at the end of Tothill-street, Westminster, with a heavy load on my shoulder, and saw the prisoner standing at the corner with two others. He came into the passage leading to the Almonry . I went on and took no notice. I heard somebody following me through the passage. As soon as I came to the end, the prisoner came before me, and drew my watch out of my pocket. He ran back through the passage. I called out "Stop him!" A soldier collared him in the passage. He got from him. I laid down my load, and followed him into Dean-street, but lost him. I took him two days after. I am sure he is the man. I had seen him about before. I never found my watch.

JOHN JONES. I am in the third regiment of Guards. I was standing at the end of the passage, and saw the prosecutor come by with two boxes on his back. The prisoner followed him to the other end of the passage. I heard the cry of "Stop thief!" The prisoner then ran back. I collared him, and asked what he was running for? He asked what that was to me, and got from me. I am sure he is the man. I knew him before.

Prisoner's Defence. I was at Fulham at the time.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181028-114

1505. JOHN ROOK was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of September , two shirts, value 2s.; one jacket, value 5s., and one waistcoat, value 2s. , the goods of Absalom Agar .

ABSALOM AGAR . On the 20th of September I missed my things out of my box, which was in the forecastle of my ship, which laid in the West India Docks .

JOHN ROEBUCK . I am a Thames Police constable. I stopped the prisoner at Blackwall, on the 20th of September, as he appeared bulky. I found the articles stated in the indictment concealed about his body.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Three Months , and Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181028-115

1506. THOMAS PRIMROSE and JOHN MARTIN were indicted for stealing, on the 24th of September , two reins, value 8s.; two pair of harness and traces, value 30s.; the goods of John Walker ; one collar, value 2s., the goods of William Jarman ; and one bridle, value 2s. , the goods of Richard Martin .

JOHN WALKER . I am a butcher , and live at Knightsbridge . On the 24th September I lost the articles stated in the indictment out of my stable, which was broken open. The prisoners lived in the neighbourhood.

WILLIAM SPENDLOVE. I am a dealer in harness, and live in Crawford-street. On the 24th of September, about half-past ten o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoners in Oxford-street. They said they had two chaise-harness and four saddles, for sale. I told them where I lived. They said they would bring them in a coach by ten o'clock. Knowing Primrose, I got two officers from Marlborough-street to attend at my house. About half-past nine o'clock Primrose knocked at the door and said, "We have only got the two chaise-harness, but the four saddles you shall have in the morning." He made use of a bad expression, and said he would make a good thing of it for me and himself too before the winter was out. While he was speaking, Martin came to the door and called the coach up, which was two or three doors off, and pulled the harness out of two flour sacks which were in the coach. They put them at the top of my kitchen stairs. Primrose turned them out, and said he wanted three guineas for them. called the officers down.

JOHN WALES . I am an officer. I attended at Spendlove's house, by his desire. I saw the coach at the door, and found the prisoners down stairs, bargaining for the harness. I asked if it was their's? They denied all knowledge of it. Spendlove said they came to sell it to him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

PRIMROSE'S Defence. I found it on the road at Brompton.

MARTIN'S Defence. I met Primrose, and went to sell it with him.

PRIMROSE- GUILTY . Aged 22.

MARTIN - GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181028-116

1507. AUGUSTIN FREDERICK JULIUS FORBENGER was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of September , one shirt, value 5s.; and one apron, value 1s. , the goods of Major Simpson .

MAJOR SIMPSON. I am clerk to Mr. Goddard, a sugar-refiner. I missed a shirt out of my chest, and an apron, and found them both on the prisoner. He was wearing them.

Cross-examined by MR. ARABIN. He said he put them on by mistake. The same person did not wash for us both.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I took them by mistake. My washerwoman being ill, I employed the prosecutor's, and she brought them to me as mine.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181028-117

1508. MICHAEL LEVY was indicted for feloniously receiving, on the 4th of October , one coffee-pot, value 20l.; thirty silver spoons, value 7l.; one silver tankard, value 7l.; one silver fish-slice, value 5l.; two silver butter-boats, value 3l.; three sauce ladles, value 3l.; two salt-cellars, value 10s., and one shirt, value 5s., the goods of Thomas Clulow , Esq. of which Stephen Morris was convicted of stealing; he well knowing them to have been stolen .

The evidence in this case was precisely the same as that adduced at the trial of the principals, No. 1471, and 1485. pages 468 and 475.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18181028-118

1509. WILLIAM GRAY was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of October , 80lbs. of lead, value 1l., the property of William Bramwell , and fixed to a certain dwelling-house .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating it to be fixed to a certain building of his.

WILLIAM BRAMWELL. I am a wine-merchant , and live at Paddington. On the 16th of October, I was repairing a house in Thatched-place, Camden-town , which was mine. I found the lead-work of the cistern in the front area cut all round, and taken away; part of it was left. I went to Mr. Earley, the plumber, and told him. He said there was a man in custody for stealing it.

JOSEPH EARLEY . I am a plumber. I went to look at the cistern. I saw the lead that was taken away at the watch-house.

FRANCIS DYKE . On the 12th of October, about eight o'clock at night, I saw the prisoner, with another lad. They passed me. There was a boy looking at them. I went home with a sack which I had with me, then returned and followed them. They saw me, and the prisoner threw some lead through a broken railing, in two bundles, and ran away. I pursued them about thirty yards, but finding they got a-head of me, I returned and got the bundles out of the railings. I took one bundle to the watch-house. The watchman was calling past eight o'clock. I got a light and found the other bundle of lead, and took that to the watch-house. Each man had a bundle of lead; they weighed 84lbs. together. I am certain the prisoner was one of them. I have known him three years.

Cross-examined by MR. ARABIN. They were about fifty yards from the house.

JOSEPH EARLEY. The lead belonged to the cistern. I fitted it.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181028-119

1510. MARY ALDER was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of October , from the person of Joseph Johnston , one pocket-book, value 6d.; one purse, value 2d.; 14s. in

monies numbered, and five promissory notes, for payment of and value 1l. each, his property .

JOSEPH JOHNSON. I am a boatman . On the 19th of October, at night, I was in the prisoner's company. I was intoxicated, and know nothing of the circumstances. I afterwards missed my property. I met her with a bundle and went with her to the White Lion, and the landlord told her she had been in my company. She gave her bundle to another woman. She then said she would tell me where the property was if I would give her 1l. and took me to a field where my pocket-book was.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181028-120

1511. THOMAS BUCKHAM was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of October , one watch, value 6l., and two seals, value 2l. , the goods of Thomas Higgs .

THOMAS HIGGS . I am a baker . On the 15th of October I went to the privy of the Nag's Head , and left my watch there, at ten o'clock in the morning. I returned in about ten minutes, but could not find it.

CHARLES MARSHALL. I am hostler at the inn. I was washing a chaise close to the privy when the prosecutor came out, the prisoner went in immediately after him.

WILLIAM TURK. I am a pawnbroker. On the 15th of October, about noon, the prisoner pledged the watch with me.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. Necessity compelled me to do it.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181028-121

1512. JOHN BUTLER was indicted for stealing, on 15th of October , one dressing gown, value 7s. , the goods of Iram Pinner .

ELIZA PINNER . I am the wife of Iram Pinner. I take in washing, and live at Abbey Farm, near Kilburn . About one o'clock I lost the gown out of the garden, where it hung to dry.

WILLIAM TURNER . I live next door to the prosecutor. I saw the prisoner by the drying ground fence, He tried to get some sheets down - He took the dressing gown off the fence, and ran away with it. I took him and he dropped it.

Prisoner's Defence. My father and mother are in the East Indies, and I am destitute.

GUILTY. Aged 14.

Judgement Respited .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181028-122

1513. MARY BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of September , from the person of John Butcher , one pocket-book, value 6d., one 10l., and one 5l. bank note, his property .

JOHN BUTCHER . I am a mariner , On the 19th of September, I met the prisoner and another woman named Riddle, in New Gravel-lane. I took them to the Turk's Head to give them some liquor - I took out my pocketbook to pay for it, and pulled out a 10l.; and a 5l. bank note, besides a 1l. bank note, which I paid away - I then walked up a lane with them. I went up a one pair of stairs into a room with the prisoner - my back was towards her. In a few minutes I turned round and missed her - I also missed my pocket-book and money out of my jacket pocket, which was safe when I entered the room. I afterwards found her in custody in Field-lane-the other girl had given information - I am sure she is the woman. I was quite sober.

JOHN KENSEY. I am an officer. On the 20th of September, I went with the prosecutor, to look for the girl. We took her in Field-lane-the mob rescued her from me. I afterwards found her in custody at Union Hall, on the 1st of October. She said that she had got rid of the whole of the money, and she gave the 10l. note to a jew in Cow-cross, with whom she cohabited, and bought clothes with the rest.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181028-123

1514. WILLIAM DAVIES was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of September , one shawl, value 16s. , the property of Joseph Haines .

JOSEPH HAINES. I am silk-mercer , and live at Ratcliff-highway . On the 19th of September I saw the prisoner come into my shop and take a shawl. I called out, he ran off with it - I pursued and took him with it. I never lost sight of him.

ELIZA HART. I was in the shop, and saw the prisoner take the shawl.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181028-124

1415. RACHAEL MITCHELL was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of September , two blankets, value 10s.; two sheets, value 5s.; two saucepans, value 3s., and one pair of bellows, value 18d., the goods of Edward Wilde , in a lodging-room .

EDWARD WILDE. I live in Featherstone-street, City-road . I let the prisoner and her husband a ready-furnished lodging. On the 28th of September I missed the articles stated in the indictment, which were let with the room. I apprehended the prisoner - She said she pledged the blanket and sold the rest.

GEORGE GILLET . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Oxford-street. On the 28th of September the prisoner pledged a blanket with me.

ELIZA BEETHAM. On the 20th of September the prisoner sold me a sheet for 1s.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 31.

Confined Two Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181028-125

1416. JOSEPH ANDERSON was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of October , 50lbs. of fat, value 30s. , the property of John Bury .

JOHN BURY. I live in Bosier's-court, Tottenham-court-road , the prisoner was my servant . On the 6th of October I sent him to sell a sack of fat-when he returned I asked him what it weighed? he said twenty-four stone-I

said it must have weighed more; he said that was the exact weight. I put some more fat in the sack, and told him to take it to the same place. He returned, and said it weighed five stone. I asked him what the two sacks weighed together? he said, "I made a mistake in the first, it only weighed twenty-three stone four pounds, which makes it twenty-eight stone four pounds together." I said it must have weighed more - He said it did not. I went to Morgan's, where he sold the fat, and asked him, in the prisoner's presence, what the first sack weighed? he said twenty-eight stone four pounds, and that the prisoner had only brought one sack. The prisoner said that nobody was present when he brought the second lot. At last he said the first sack was heavy, and he put it down by the Black Horse, public-house. Rose came out, put it in another sack, and while he took one sack, another person came with the other. I afterwards found it at Wilmot's, at the corner of Great Russell-street, in one of my sacks-it weighed six stone four pounds. The prisoner fell on his knees, and begged for mercy.

JOHN ROSE . I am servant to Mr. Morgan. The prisoner brought us a quanity of fat on the 6th of October-it weighed twenty-eight stone four pounds.

CHARLES NIGHTINGALE . I am servant to Mr. Wilmot, who is a fishmonger, and lives in Great Russell-street. On the 6th of October, between seven and eight o'clock, the prisoner brought a sack of fat, and asked if he might leave it there for ten minutes, while he fetched his book.

Prisoner's Defence. I left it there while I went for my book.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181028-126

1117. SARAH BARRY was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of September , one pair of boots, value 4s. 6d. , the goods of William Cooper .

ISABELLA COOPER. I am the wife of William Cooper , who is a shoemaker , and lives in King-street, Seven Dials . On the 21st of September a boy came to the door with medicine, and pointed to the prisoner, who, he said, had taken a pair of boots from the door. I pursued her, she threw them down, and was stopped. I never lost sight of her.

PETER NEIL . I am a doctor's by. I saw the prisoner take the boots from the door, and told Mrs. Cooper.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Confined Three Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181028-127

1118. JAMES WARD was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of September , one 40l. bank note , the property of Andrew Hiscock .

PHOEBE SIMMONS . I am the wife of John Simmons , we keep a tailor's shop. On the 14th of September James Morris came to the shop, bought goods amounting to 5l., and gave me a 40l. note. The prisoner, who was my servant , was sent to get it changed at the Bank for Morris, and never returned. Morris's brother has been convicted of stealing the note before he brought it to me.

JAMES MORRIS . I received the note from my brother, went to Simmons, and gave it to the prisoner to get it changed at the Bank.

RICHARD SMITHERS . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner on the 19th of October. He said he had spent and lost the money at Brighton and other places. I have not got the note. The Bank clerk refused to attend with it unless he had a guinea.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181028-128

1519. ANN TAYLOR was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of October , one gown, value 13s., and one shawl, value 2s. , the property of James Murphy .

JAMES MURPHY . I am a weaver , and live in Spitalfields , the prisoner was my servant . On the 13th of October she absconded, and I missed the gown and shawl - She had only lived two days with me. I went to her father's house in London-street, she was out. When she came in and saw me she ran down stairs - I brought her back, and charged her with the robbery - She denied it, and then said they were pledged in Houndsditch, and that my apprentice gave them to her to pledge.

JACOB RUSSELL . I am a pawnbroker. The prisoner pledged the gown and shawl with me.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The apprentice gave them to me to pledge.

GUILTY. Aged 15.

Judgment Respited . Sent to the Refuge .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181028-129

1520. JOHN THOMAS was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of October , one feather-bed, value 1l.; two pillows, value 2s.; two blankets, value 2s.; two sheets, value 2s.; four bed curtains, value 3s., and one head-cloth, value 1s. , the goods of Thomas Shillito .

THOMAS SHILLITO . I am a tailor , and live at Kelsal-green . On the 4th of October, I lost the articles stated in the indictment.

GEORGE HULL. On the 4th of October, at half-past seven o'clock in the morning, I was informed that the prisoner had taken the property out of my shed. I found him at Kensington with a bundle - I asked him what it was? he said it was his bedding - He would not say where he brought it from. I secured him. The bundle contained the articles stated in the indictment.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I found it, as if it had fallen out of a cart.

GUILTY . Aged 38.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181028-130

1521. EDWARD WHITTINGTON , SAMUEL SOLOMON , and WILLIAM HAINES were indicted for stealing, on the 25th of September , from the person of Andrew Anderson , one 1l. bank note, his property .

The prosecutor not appearing, the prisoners were ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181028-131

1522. ELIZABETH DAVIES was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of September , four petticoats, value 3s.;

one shift, value 2s.; one gown, value 18d.; one sheet, value 9d.; one spencer, value 1s.; one apron, value 6d., the goods of Ann Hopkins , widow ; two handkerchiefs, value 1s.; one frill, value 2d., and one towel, value 2d. , the goods of Frederick Jupp .

ANN HOPKINS. I am a widow. On the 18th of September I washed the articles stated in the indictment, and hung them in the garden to dry. I was alarmed about five o'clock the next morning by the watchman, and missed the property stated in the indictment.

GEORGE IFGRAY. I am a watchman. On the 19th of September, about half-past four o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner come out of the Vinegar-yard, into Bowling-green-lane, with a bag - I followed her, and asked her what was in the bag? she said they were rags. I found it contained the articles stated in the indictment - She said they were her own, and she had been washing them in a ditch. She then cried, and said she was without father or mother, and had been destitute of a home for two years,

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Fined One Shilling, and Discharged .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181028-132

1523. JAMES PANTEIN was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of October , one bundle of paper, value 11s. , the goods of Joseph Howard .

JOSEPH HOWARD . I am a bookseller and stationer , and live in Gray's Inn-lane . On the 22d of October about twenty-five minutes after eight o'clock in the morning, I left my shop for three minutes, and missed two bundles of paper - I went to the different stationers, and informed them of it.

THOMAS THOMPSON . I am officer. On the 22d of October, about half-past eight o'clock in the morning, I stopped the prisoner in St. John's-lane with a bundle of paper, which the prosecutor claimed.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I found it in Fox-court.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181028-133

1524. JOHN SHADDOCK was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of October , one fixture (i.e.) a copper, value 12s., the goods of Robert Swallow , and fixed to his dwelling-house, the prisoner having no title or claim to it .

SARAH SWALLOW . I am the wife of Robert Swallow , who is a schoolmaster , and lives in East-street, Manchester-square . On the 19th of October we lost the copper, which was fixed in the wash-house.

RICHARD COATES. I am a constable. On the 19th of October, about seven o'clock in the evening, I stopped the prisoner in Marylebone-lane, with the copper on his head. I asked him where he got it; he said a man gave him half a crown to carry it to Berners-street - the man was a stranger. I told him he was going the wrong way to Berners-street - I secured him. He said he did not take it; but he never would tell who the man was that did.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. It was given to me to carry.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181028-134

1525. WILLIAM STANHOPE was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of September , five iron strakes, value 2s. , the goods of William Green, the elder .

WILLIAM GREEN. I am a wheelewright , and live in the Commercial-road . I went down the yard, and found the gate opened for four nights. I then watched, and saw the prisoner come over the fence, which is eight feet high, and take five strakes - I seized him with them in his hand.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I was distressed.

GUILTY . Aged 51.

Confined Six Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181028-135

1526. RICHARD REES was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of October , the sum of 1l. 15s. 6d., in monies numbered , the property of John Faker .

CATHARINE FAKER . I am the wife of John Faker , who is a baker , and lives in Church-lane, Chelsea . On the 5th of October I was working in the parlour, the prisoner, tried the door twice that evening, the third time he managed to open it without the bell ringing-the alarm was given - I saw him in the shop. He had pulled out two tills, which contained a quantity of halfpence, and silver. I ran to the door, and shut him in-my neighbours came to my assistance - He dropped the money on the floor - He had taken the silver, and left the halfpence - He had his shoes off.

JOSEPH ADDY. I was sitting in the parlour about nine o'clock, and heard the prisoner in the shop-he was taken and he said his companions held the bell, while he opened the door-the floor was covered with silver, which he had thrown down.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181028-136

1527. THOMAS MASON , and WILLIAM BEAK were indicted for stealing, on the 27th of September , one set of bed furniture, value 30s.; one bed gown, value 2s. 6d.; one night cap, value 2s., and six neck handkerchiefs, value 9s. , the goods of William Lowther

WILLIAM LOWTHER. I am a laceman , and live on Holloway-terrace, Islington . On the 26th of September the linen hung in my garden to bleach, in the evening it was taken off the lines, and put in a washing tub in the courtyard, at the top of the garden, Next morning it was taken - I found the prisoner, in custody with it.

THOMAS PORTER. I am a watchman at Holloway. I saw the prisoner Mason about half-past four o'clock in the morning, with a bag on his back; I asked him what the bag contained; he said he did not know. I found it was wet linen - He said a man gave it to him to carry, and was to meet him in a brick-field, and was to give him sixpence, and a good breakfast, for his trouble. As I was taking him to the watch-house he said he would tell me the truth, and where I could find the man; but if the man knew it he would kill him - He said that he sent him forward, and said he would go and get a bag of fowls, and another bag of linen. I took the constable to the brick-field, to see the man, and found a man looking to see if anybody

was coming-Beak was with him. The man saw us, and said, "D-n their eyes! here they come, run off my boy." They both ran into the fields-the man escaped. I took Break, and asked him where the other bag was, he said he did not know. I took him back to where they ran from, and found another bag of linen covered over with straw. I have never found the man.

ROBERT BROWN . I was constable of the night. The prisoners were brought to the watch-house; I went with Porter and took Beak; the man jumped off a hill, and ran away. I found the bag covered over with straw-it contained the bed-furniture.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

MASON'S Defence. I met a man, who asked me to carry the bundle. I know nothing of Beak.

MASON - GUILTY . Aged 14.

BEAK - GUILTY . - Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181028-137

1528. ELIZA MARTIN was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of October , the sum of 15s. 6d., in monies numbered, the property of Frederick Flagg , from his person .

FREDERICK FLAGG. I am a carpenter . On the 3d of October, about twelve o'clock at night, I met the prisoner in Tabernacle-walk , she asked me to go home with her - I refused; while this was passing she put her hand into my pocket, and took my money out. I seized her, and took her to the watch-house; the money was found on her.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY, I had been at two public-houses; she charged me with attempting to take her handkerchief. I was quite sober.

NATHANIEL ELLIS. I am a watchman. The prisoner was brought to the watch-house, charged with robbing the prosecutor, she said she had no money about her. I said I must search her-she then gave me 7s. I asked if that was all? she then gave me more, amounting to 15s. 10d.

Prisoner's Defence. I am an unfortunate woman; the prosecutor wanted to take my handkerchief. I told him to go about his business; he then gave me in charge.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181028-138

1529. JAMES FAY was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of September , one handkerchief, value 5s. , the property of William Watts , the younger .

WILLIAM WATTS , JUN. I am a printer . The prisoner was apprentice d to my father. I lost my handkerchief.

GEORGE BENTON . I am a pawnbroker. The prisoner pledged the handkerchief with me on the 28th of September.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Confined Three Months , and Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181028-139

1530. DANIEL MORRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of November, 1817 , one snuff-box, value 25s. , the property of James George Hodgson .

MR. JAMES GEORGE HODGSON. I keep the Piazza Coffee-House, in Covent-Garden . The prisoner came into my service, as waiter , about April, 1817, and left me in November last; after he left me I missed my snuff-box, and found it at Hatton-Garden Office a short time ago.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. He was the chamberlain - A. Yes; my servants sometimes find things and return them to the gentlemen. My snuff-box was occasionally in my room, or in my parlour.

Q. Your partner died while the prisoner was with you - A. Yes, and the prisoner had morning.

CHARLOTTE PHILLIPS . I keep the Golden Lion, in St. John-street. The prisoner was waiter at my house. I had occasion to search his box on the 21st of September last-Read found the snuff-box in his trunk. He came to live with me from the Grotto public-house.

WILLIAM READ. I am an officer of Hatton-Garden Office. I searched the prisoner's box, and found the snuffbox in it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I did not intend to appropriate it to my own use. I found the box, and put it into my pocket, thinking I should receive a present from the gentleman who owned it. I have had things for three or four months before they were owned. Having changed my clothes to go into morning, I did not remember having it until after I left; It certainly would have been better if I had given it to the prosecutor, but I did not.

GUILTY .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181028-140

1531. CHARLES FLEMMING was indicted for stealing and embezzling six 1l. bank notes, which he had received on account of Richard Trevet , his master .

RICHARD TREVET. I am a bedstead-maker , and live in Sack-court, Wilson-street, Finsbury-square . The prisoner was my porter , and entrusted to receive money for me. I sent him to Mr. Rolls's, in Old-street-road, with a bedstead, which came to 7l. I gave him the bill and receipt. He absconded, and never accounted to me for it.

ELIZA ROLLS. I am the wife of William Rolls, who is a broker, and lives in Old-street. On the 21st of September, between two and three o'clock, the prisoner brought the bedstead. I owned his master 7l., with the bedstead. The prisoner presented a receipt for 7l., and said his master wished it settled. I gave him six 1l., bank notes, and told him the other pound belonged to the next week's account. I produce the receipt.

BARNARD GLEED. I apprehended the prisoner on the 22d of September, at the Bell public-house, Shoreditch. I found him asleep in the tap-room. I found a 1l. note in his fob, 14s. in his pocket, and 5s. 9d. in copper.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181028-141

1532. WILLIAM BROWN , THOMAS KIRBY , and JOHN COOTE were indicted for forgery .

MR. BOLLAND, on the part of the Governor and Company of the Bank of England, declined offering any evidence.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18181028-142

1533. WILLIAM PARKER was indicted for unlawfully uttering a counterfeit shilling, knowing it to be false and counterfeit, and at the same time having one other counterfeit shilling in his possession .

THOMAS BRUCE . I keep the Crown and Shears, at Sparrow-corner, Minories . On the 30th of September the prisoner came to my house for three half-quarterns of gin, which came to 6d. He offered me 1s. I returned it to him, saying it was bad. He gave me another, which was bad also. He then offered me a third, which was likewise bad. I sent for an officer, and gave him in charge.

JAMES WISDOM . I am a watchman. I took the prisoner in charge, and found three bad shillings on him.

TOBIAS LOVE. I was constable of the night. Wisdom gave me three bad shillings, and I found three more in the prisoner's pocket.

MR. CALEB EDWARD POWEL . I am assistant to the solicitors of the Mint. The shillings are all counterfeits, from the same die, and are merely washed.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been at a public-house with two men, and was intoxicated. I do not know what occurred.

BRUCE. He was not intoxicated.

GUILTY .

Confined One Year , and to find Sureties for two more .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18181028-143

1534. JOHN THOMPSON was indicted for unlawfully uttering a counterfeit shilling, knowing it to be false and counterfeit .

SLANEY HARROWING. I am the wife of John Harrowing , who keeps the Saracen's Head, in Camomile-street . On the 10th of October the prisoner came for a glass of gin, and gave me 1s. After he was gone, I suspected it, and tied it in a handkerchief. I kept it by itself. On the Wednesday after he came again, had a glass of rum, which came to 31/2d. and gave me another shilling. I told him it was bad, and that I took a bad one of him last Saturday. He appeared frightened. I sent for an officer. He said, "Do not be too hard with me. Here are two halfcrowns, which will compensate you for the money you think you have taken of me."

JOHN FORRESTER . I am an officer. I took the prisoner into custody, and found 15s. in good money on him, and one bad, and 1s. 41/2d. in copper on him. I asked him where he lived? He said at Kensington, but he did not know the house. That he came from Portsmouth, and sometimes lodged in one house and sometimes in another, and that was the first day he came to London. He said "It is of no use taking me anywhere; you will not get much by me. Drive to a house where we can have a good supper, and I will give you my watch and seals, and get you a 5l. note.

MR. CALEB EDWARD POWEL . The shillings are all three counterfeits, and of the same die.

GUILTY .

Confined Six Months , and to find Sureties for Six more .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18181028-144

1535. EDWARD COTTER was indicted for unlawfully procuring ten pieces of counterfeit money, of the likeness and similitude of good shillings, with intent to utter the same .

JOHN FORRESTER . I am an officer. On the 8th of October, between two and three o'clock in the afternoon, I was in Aldgate High-street. I received some information, and told the prisoner I wanted to speak to him. He said he knew what I wanted-it was the first time. I said how many have you got? I had not charged him with anything. He said half a score, I asked the price of them. He said half-a-crown. I said, "Then the market has fallen." He gave them to me out of his pocket. They appeared quite fresh. He said he bought them of a Jew, in Petticoat-lane. He emptied them out of a paper which they were in.

MR. CALEB EDWARD POWEL . The ten shillings are all counterfeits, and of the same die, and appear never to have been uttered.

Prisoner's Defence. The Jew offered me the money. I refused to have them. He sent a boy to follow me. I afterwards found half-a-crown taken out of my pocket, and this money put in.

GUILTY .

Confined One Year .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18181028-145

1536. MARY THOMPSON , EDWARD WILLIAMS and CATHERINE MYERS were indicted for unlawfully procuring five pieces of false and counterfeit money, each counterfeited to be of the likeness and similitude of a good and lawful shilling, with intent to circulate the same .

WILLIAM BACON . I keep a public-house in Mitre-place, Duke's-place . On the 14th of September, in the evening, the prisoners came to my house together, and had gin and cloves to the amount of 8d. They gave my wife 1s. She gave them 4d. In about a minute afterwards a woman came in with shrimps. They paid her 1s. she brought it to me. I said it was bad, and took both the shillings to the prisoners, threw them on the table, and said, "How can you offer me such rubbish as this?" Thompson took them up, began jinking them, and said she did not think them bad, and asked Williams if he had any money? He laid half-a-crown on the table. I took it up, and, I believe, Thompson took up the bad shillings. One of them did. I sent for an officer. They left the house immediately, and I followed them. They all stopped and talked together opposite a chemist's shop. Thompson then crossed over and bought some apples of a woman, the others walked on, and stopped at the corner of Duke-street; she then joined them, and all walked on towards Houndsditch. Davis came up and took them.

EDWARD DAVIS. I am a beadle. I took the prisoners to the watch-house, and found three bad shillings, five good ones, and two half-crowns, on Williams; two half-crowns, eleven good shillings, and one bad one mixed with them, on Myers, and a bad one in a coal-box just behind her; she was within reach of it. Bacon called out, that she was secreting something in her mouth. I found a bad shilling and a good sixpence in her hand, which was up at her mouth. At this moment an apple-woman came in and said, it was the sixpence she had given her in change

for a bad shilling, which she produced. She said she received it from Myers.

MR. CALEB EDWARD POWEL . The three shillings found on Williams, that found on Myers, that found on Thompson, and the one produced by the apple-woman, are all counterfeits, and of the same die.

THOMPSON'S Defence. I was with Myers. We met Williams, and went to the public-house with him. He gave the publican's wife the money, and he gave me the shilling to buy the apples.

WILLIAMS'S Defence. I bought a jacket of a Jew for 6s. and paid him a 1l. note. He gave me change. I did not know it was bad.

MYERS'S Defence. I had lent a man 4s., and he sent it to me by Williams.

WILLIAM RYAN . I live in Buckridge-street, St. Giles's. Myers lent me 4s. I was with Williams at a public-house and gave it to him for her, as I had often seen them together.

WILLIAMS - GUILTY .

Confined Six Months .

THOMPSON- NOT GUILTY .

MYERS- NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18181028-146

1537. THOMAS PARKER was indicted for unlawfully, and by false pretences obtaining from James Parker , servant to Richard Dixon , one blue jacket, one waistcoat, one pair of trowsers, and one cotton shirt, value 1l. 1s. his property, with intent to defraud him thereof .

JAMES PARKER . I am servant to Mr. Dixon, who trades under the firm of Richard Dixon and Co. He is a slop-seller , and lives in Fenchurch-street . On the 25th of September the prisoner came to the shop, and produed this paper (reads),

"Messrs. DIXON and Co.

"Please to give the bearer, William Smith , a blue jacket, a waistcoat and trowsers, and a cotton shirt, and place the same to the house account, and send a bill back by the bearer.

Your's, & c.

25th Sept. 1818. F. BURSLEM.

Oversecr, Christ Church, Surrey."

I delivered these things to him, and charged them to the account of the overseers of Christ Church. I am sure he is the man. I knew him before.

MR. JAMES BURSLEM . I am a overseer of the parish of Christ Church, Surrey. I know the prisoner very well. He presented himself in the name of William Jackson.

Q. Did he ever obtain from you any written order, authorizing him to receive those goods - A. No; the order is not my hand-writing. Mr. Dixon charged me with them, and I discovered it was a forgery.

Prisoner's Defence. I had received an order from Mr. Burslem, and received the goods. After this I met a man who is now capitally convicted at Kingston. He gave me the order, and asked me to receive the goods, and said he would see me in half an hour. I got the things, gave them to him, and have not seen him since.

GUILTY .

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18181028-147

1538. JAMES FIELD was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of October , six barrow pigs, price 15l., and four sow pigs, price 10l. , the property of Abel Sharpe .

ABEL SHARPE. I am a farmer , and live at Maiden Cross, in Hertfordshire , which is thirty-four miles from town. On the 31st of October, about six o'clock in the morning, I lost ten fatted pigs out of my sty. Some of them were fatted barrow pigs, and some sows. They were safe the night before. I traced the footsteps of two men from the sty into the road, and the marks of the pigs' feet in a direction towards London. I found them at Mill-hill. They were half fat, and I should have thought it hardly possible for them to have been driven that distance in so short a time. The prisoner said he had them from Housely, of Becclesway. I could find nosuch person.

STEPHEN WIN . I am the prosecutor's servant. I fastened the pigs up safe in the sty, at six o'clock in the evening. It is enclosed with rails. They could not get out. I have seen them since, and know them to be my master's.

WILLIAM GREENIN . I am a constable. On the 21st of October, between seven and eight o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner and another man driving ten pigs. They passed me by Mill-hill, which is about ten miles from town. I walked by the side of them. I afterwards went on towards Hampstead, and saw them again about ten o'clock. The other man was then gone. I asked the prisoner to drink with me, which he did. I collared him, and said I suspected the pigs were stolen. I took him into a back room, and wrote down what he said. - (Reads.)"He said he bought them of Mr. Housely, of Becclesway, for 22l. 10s., on the 14th of October. That his name was Field, of Blackfriars'-road." I found a dead fowl and a knife in his pocket. The pigs were very much fatigued; they could not stand on their legs for two days.

THOMAS BILLEN . I was with Greenin. He has spoken correctly.

Prisoner's Defence. I overtook a man with the pigs. He gave me 10s. to drive them to Crawford-street.

GUILTY . Aged 38.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18181028-148

1539. SAMUEL TAYLOR was indicted for bigamy .

RICHARD WALLIS . I am messenger of St. Martin's work-house, I have an extract from the register of marriages of St. James, Westminster. It is a true copy. I examined it myself. - (Reads)-"9th February, 1801, Samuel Taylor and Mary Hayter , were married by banns. 1. Murray, curate."

PATIENCE EDWARDS . I was present at the prisoner's marriage with Mary Hayter , at St. James's church; I saw her alive in April or May last. The prisoner is a sailor .

HARRIET LE STURGEON . I was married to the prisoner on the 4th of January last, at St. Ann's, Soho , by banns. I had furniture and other things. The prisoner said he was a widower, and had been so for two years. He lived

with me until the 10th of March, and then left me without giving any reason. He went out one morning, said he was going to look for work, and never returned - I did not know he was going to leave me. I was with child by him at the time; the child was born two months ago in St. Martin's workhouse. The prisoner took a few of my things, and made away with the chief of my clothes to support himself while he was with me.

Prisoner's Defence. I parted with my first wife by mutual consent, and went into the country for a year; I found she had taken a woman into my room to prevent my being with her. I afterwards married my second wife, and left her to look for work; I desired a man to pay her 5l.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18181028-149

1540. DANIEL SHORT and JAMES MARKWELL were indicted for stealing, on the 15th of October , two legs of mutton, value 7s.; twelve quartern loaves, value 13s., and one coat, value 1s., the property of John Bluck ; one pinafore, value 6d., the property of Richard Barber ; one pinafore, value 6d., the property of Richard Lawrie ; one pinafore, value 6d., the property of Phoebe Godsden ; one pinafore, value 6d., the property of John Bayes ; one pinafore, value 6d., the property of Thomas Acres ; one pinafore, value 6d., the property of Philip Carter ; one pair of hose, value 1s., the property of John Lusk , and one trunk, value 1s., the property of Frank Mornard .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating them to be the property of John Bluck.

JOHN BLUCK . I keep an academy , at Enfield . On the night of the 15th of October my premises were broken open.

STEWART JOHNSON . I am the prosecutor's servant, On the 16th of October when I got up, I found the cellar broken open. The school-room door was shut, but it could be opened outside. I missed these things, which were safe in a desk in the school-room the night before.

JOHN WILLIAMS . I live at Enfield; the prisoners also lived there. About a quarter after eight o'clock on the night of the robbery, they passed by my house - I knew them before; I spoke to Markwell; they were going in a direction to the prosecutor's. Next morning, about twenty minutes after seven, I saw them in Mr. Mellish's field, going as if from an hedge, towards a large moat. I came up to them, each of them had a parcel under his arm. They ran when I first saw them, but when I came up to them they walked. I said; "D-n you, you shall not have that, now; so you may put it down." I did not then see who they were, as I was behind them. Short turned round, and said, "D-n you, what I have found I have a right to keep." I said he should not have it. Markwell kept going on. I followed them to a large piece of deep clear water. Short got before Markwell, and threw his parcel into the water; Markwell put his down, and came up and hit me in the face, and said, "D-n your eyes, Jack, I will kill you!" I then knew him, and said I was sorry to see him there; I did not want to know him. I staggered at the blow, but did not fall. To prevent them doing me any harm, I told him Mr. Porser was coming round with his men; he then offered to shake hands with me, and said he was sorry he had hit me, and desired me to say nothing about it. I left them, and met my wife; in consequence of what she said I went to the hedge where I saw them go from, found two boxes broken open, six quartern loaves, and several pieces of bread; a direction was torn off one of the boxes, and thrown into the hedge, with the prosecutor's, Bluck, name upon it. About half an hour after I found nine pin-cloths and a coat, in the water; another man pulled out two legs of mutton. I afterwards found another coat.

SAMUEL SLOWMAN . I am a constable. Williams took me to the water about eight o'clock in the morning. I saw the parcels in the water - They were drawn out. One contained the pin-cloths and the meat

SHORT'S Defence. I found the mutton wrapped in the pin-cloths. Williams told me to put it down, we threw them down and they rolled in the water.

MARKWELL'S Defence. We found them.

MARKWELL - GUILTY . Aged 23.

SHORT - GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18181028-150

1541. GEORGE MUMFORD was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of March , one saw, value 10s.; four augers value 2s.; one plane, value 6d., and one gauge, value 3d. , the goods of John Mould ,

JOHN MOULD . I am a carpenter , and live at Enfield , On Sunday the 8th of March, I missed the tools stated in the indictment out of my workshop-the door was broken open-it had rained all night. I noticed footsteps in the yard, and laid a board over them, to prevent their being disturbed-the prisoner had worked for me two or three days before; next day he came to me for a job; I refused him. As as soon he was gone I compared the footmarks he then made with the others, and they exactly corresponded both in the number and distance of the nails, and the length and breadth of the foot. There were some nails deficient in one of the shoes, it agreed with that also. I traced the footsteps for a mile and a half, which led me very near to his house. I did not prosecute him then, being afraid of the expence, but having been robbed again I was determined to do it. I searched his lodgings last Tuesday week, and found the articles stated in the indictment there - He lived there in March also - I had lost more, I was at Highgate when he was taken at work in a saw-pit-my saw was found just by the pit - He said it was not his, his fellow workman said it was. He then said it was his, and he bought it.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. You lost them in March - A. Yes; he is a sawyer - I can swear to the saw.

RICHARD HUNT. I am servant to the prosecutor. He covered the footmarks. Next day the prisoner came - I compared the footsteps he made that day, with the others - They corresponded exactly.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

SAMUEL SLOWMAN, I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner in the saw-pit-the prosecutor claimed the

saw-the prisoner said it was not his. He afterwards said he bought it with the rest of the things found at his lodgings, of a broken-down sawyer.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18181028-151

1542. JOHN HEANEY was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of September , one jacket, value 4s., and one pair of trowsers, value 3s. , the goods of John Organ .

JOHN ORGAN . I am a coal-porter , and live at Stratford ; the prisoner often slept in the same room with me. On the 17th of September, about five o'clock in the morning, I missed my jacket and trowsers-they must have been taken in the night. He did not then sleep with me-my bed-room door was locked, but I found both my bed-room windows wide open, and a ladder near the window-part of my family slept in the room. I found my things at Shadwell Office three or four days after, in custody with the prisoner. He said he would pay me for them.

JOHN GRIFFITHS. I am a road-keeper. About half-past eleven o'clock on the morning after the robbery, I took the prisoner at Stepney, and asked what time he was at home the night before, he said at eleven o'clock - He was four miles from the prosecutor's. I asked who let him in? he said the door was open, and all in the house must have seen him.

THOMAS PLAYER . I am a patrol of Stratford. I found the jacket in the road.

JAMES BOULCOT . I am private watchman to Mr. Gunn, who lives in the Commercial-road. The prisoner lodged in the same house with me. On the 16th of September, I went to take him some victuals in prison. He said there was a jacket, a pair of trowsers, and a shirt in Mr. Gunn's hay-loft, and asked me to pledge them-the chaff-cutter found them there-he was in Mr. Gunn's service. I went home about three o'clock on the morning of the robbery-the prisoner was not at home then.

JOSEPH TOMLIN. I am chaff-cutter at Mr. Gunn's. I found the jacket and trowsers, under the hay in the loft, on the Thursday after the prisoner was taken.

JAMES SWAN . I am Mr. Gunn's carter. About a quarter after six o'clock on Monday morning, I saw a man sleeping in the loft - I think it was the prisoner. A few minutes after I saw him (the prisoner) near the loft.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. Nobody can trace the robbery to me, other people go to the loft-Boulcot was himself charged with a highway robbery last Session.

JAMES BOULCOT re-examined. I was subpoened in behalf of a prisoner, and the magistrate committed me also - I was bailed and no bill was found against me.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18181028-152

1543. JOHN HARRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of August , one iron axletree, value 20s., and two steel coach-springs, value 20s. , the goods of John Atkinson .

JOHN ATKINSON. I am a plasterer , and live in Chapel-street, Westminster. I lost the articles stated in the indictment from Frederick-street - I missed them at six o'clock in the morning of the 12th of August - They were safe at eight o'clock the night before. I found them at Bow-street on the 15th. I had seen the prisoner lurking about the premises two or three days before.

FRANCIS MURRAY . I am a Bow-street officer. On the 15th of August I found the articles stated in the indictment at No. 19, Old Pye-street, Westminster, in a back yard in the prisoner's possession - He was in the act of selling them to Mr. Odell - I secured him. As soon as we brought him out of the house, a signal was given, and a gang of thirty or forty persons attacked me and Buckeridge, and knocked me down - He was rescued from us. About three weeks ago I found him in custody.

JOSEPH ODELL . I am a dealer in fish, and live in the New Cut. The prisoner came to me at the Marsh-gate, and asked me if I wanted to buy any things. I appointed to meet him at the Bell, public-house, in Pye-street, at five o'clock. He took me to No. 19-while he was showing me the things the officers took him. They were very ill treated by the gang.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN BULL . I was with Murray and Buckeridge, and saw the prisoner selling the things. The officers were attacked, and he was rescued.

HENRY RICHARD BUCKERIDGE. I saw the prisoner with Odell and took him. The gang knocked Murray down, and rescued him.

Prisoner's Defence. They were left there for me to sell.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18181028-153

1544. JOHN EDWARDS was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of October , one jacket, value 2s.; one handkerchief, value 6d., the goods of John Bush ; one jacket, value 3s.; two pair of trowsers, value 4s.; one waistcoat, value 2s.; one shirt, value 1s. 6d., and one handkerchief, value 1s., the goods of Henry Lee ; and one hat, value 3s. , the goods of John Murdock .

JOHN BUSH. I am cook of the ship Mary Ann , which laid in the London Docks . On the 15th of October, between four and five o'clock in the afternoon, I missed the articles stated in the indictment out of the forecastle. Henry Lee, the steward , also missed his property. We found the prisoner and property in custody. He was a stranger.

WILLIAM CLARK. I am constable of the London Docks. On the 15th of October, at half-past twelve o'clock in the morning, I found the prisoner behind a pile of wood, with the property stated in the indictment about him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I bought the things of a man who brought them from the ship.

GUILTY . Aged 29.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181028-154

1545. EDWARD CLEMENTS was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of September , 20 hinges, value 5s.; 20 screw-nails, value 1s., the goods of Samuel Baxter , and

50lbs. of lead, his property, and fixed to a building of his .

WILLIAM ATKINSON . I was in care of a house in Swallow-street , which belonged to Mr. Samuel Baxter , who is a builder ; the lead was fixed on the roof, over the trapdoor, the hinges and screws were on the work-bench on the second floor - I saw them all safe the evening before; the prisoner was a stranger. I compared the lead with the door, it fitted exactly.

THOMAS PIPER . I am a watchman of Oxford-street. On the 29th of September, about eleven o'clock at night. I saw the prisoner with a basket on his shoulder - I followed him about a hundred yards, and then asked him what he had got in his basket? he put it on the pavement, and said it was lead, which he had brought from a house at Kilburn, which was being repaired, and was going to take it to his master, Mr. Wilson, No. 27, Newman-street. I said I thought it was odd he should carry it at that late hour. He said I might go to his master with him - He said, perhaps I thought he stole it. I took him to the watch-house. I then went to No. 27, Newman-street-no such person lived there. Next morning I found they were the prosecutor's nails-the hinges were with them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. Two men gave them to me, and told me to say I was going to Mr. Wilson's.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181028-155

1546. MARY COOK was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of September , the sum of 30s. in copper monies numbered , the monies of John Barnard .

JOHN BARNARD. I am a grocer , and live in Bath-street, Clerkenwell , the prisoner was char-woman to my lodgers. I lost this money out of my bed-room - They were in 5s. papers of halfpence. I suspected her, and had her apprehended. About ten o'clock at night we found her intoxicated, and halfpence in every part of the room, and a bason full in the cupboard.

WILLIAM READ . I am an officer. The prosecutor fetched me to the prisoner's lodgings on Back-hill - We found her in bed intoxicated. We found 10s. in halfpence about the room. We found one paper which was just unpacked, with some halfpence left in it. Next morning, when she was sober, she said she only took four papers, and was very sorry.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in distress, and seeing them about, I was tempted to take them.

GUILTY . Aged 39.

Confined One Month .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181028-156

1547. RICHARD BARTLETT was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of October , five caps, value 10s.; twelve laces, value 1s.; one frill, value 3s.; 100 needles, value 1s., and 30 yards of tape, value 2s. , the goods of William Cox .

ELIZA COX . I am the wife of William Cox , who is a soldier . On the 21st of October, in the evening, I was returning from Hampstead, the prisoner overtook me - He was driving a hackney coach; he asked me if I was going to town? I said Yes; he asked what part? I said to Marylebone; he said he lived in Tottenham-court-road, and was going that way, and asked if I would ride, which I did. He turned round into the Islington road, I told him to let me out, as he was taking me the wrong road, He said he was only going to the next house to bargain for a horse, and was coming back again. He went on, and stopped at the house; he then went to another house, opened the coach-door, and asked if I would get out a bit, as he was going to bargain for a horse again, which I did. He said I might leave; my box in the coach, but I took it with me. He stopped at the house a few minutes. had a pint of beer, and asked me to drink, I refused. I had part of a glass of gin, and some bread and cheese. He got on the box, and I into the coach with my box; he turned the coach round, and by the light of the lamp I saw he had another man on the box. He drove a little way, then the other man opened the door, and told me to get out, for they were at their journeys end; I got out. and wished him a good night. I had got but a little way before the prisoner came and drove his hand into my box. and took out the articles stated in the indictment-it was a bandbox; Mr. Williams was coming by, and took him to the watch-house. One of the caps was found in his hat.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. Is your husband living - A. Yes, we have separated six or seven months. The prisoner was not in the coach with me.

ROBERT WILLIAMS . I am a lighterman. On the 21st of October, at eight o'clock in the evening, I was in the Islington road , and met the prosecutrix, with a man walking by her side, and another man following them at a short distance; I suspected he was going to pick the pocket of the man who was with the prosecutrix. I had not gone three steps before the man advanced and thrust his hand into the prosecutrix's box, which was slung on her left arm - He immediately ran across into the passage at the corner of the Crown and Woolpack, public-house. I pursued, hearing the prosecutrix say she was robbed; the other man left her, and said "He shall not rob you, I will fetch him back;" he followed the other man into the passage. I went over, and found it was a thoroughfare. I returned to the entrance of the court, and found the prosecutrix there. I inquired for the coachman, as I thought, from what she said, he must know something of it; a man belonging to another coach came. She said he was not the man, that she wanted the man belonging to the coach which had put her down-in a minute or two she said the prisoner was the man; he was standing with his back against the wall, with his coat tucked up behind him. I questioned him about the robbery, told him I was convinced he knew something about it, and I would have him taken before a magistrate; I desired the people who were round to send for an officer. He was very abusive, tried to get away, and pushed the prosecutrix before him, as if he was acquainted with her; the moment he dropped the tail of his coat I was convinced, from his dress, that he was the man who had robbed the prosecutrix. A man came, and took him to the watch-house. Brown found a cap in the crown of his hat, which the prosecutrix claimed.

JOHN ALLCOCK . I am a servant. I took the prisoner to the watch-house.

ROBERT BROWN . I was constable of the night. The prisoner was brought to the watch-house. I found the cap in his hat.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. She dropped the cap as she got out of the coach; I put it into her box, and left her to put my horses up, returned, and saw her with a man. She drank seven or eight glasses of gin in my company. The caps were falling about the coach.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181028-157

1548. JOHN BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of September , two silver spoons, value 4s., and one pair of sugar-tongs, value 6s. , the goods of Mary Orton , widow .

MARY ORTON . I am a widow, and live in William-street, Hampstead-road . On the 21st of September, about eight o'clock in the morning, I was at breakfast - I left my front parlour to go into the kitchen. I returned, and saw a man's hand in the window, taking a spoon off the table - I also missed the sugar-tongs. I saw a man running from the house, a gentleman pursued, and brought the prisoner back, who I believe to be the man by his dress and figure.

FORTUNE GUILLOIS. I was in Mary-street, and saw the prisoner and another young man, in a brown coat, at the prosecutrix's door, a gentleman came out, and both ran away, the prisoner turned to the left, and the other man turned to the right. The gentleman called out Stop thief! I pursued - He jumped over a pailing, and then over a ditch. I cried out Stop thief! but could not follow him. About three days after I was attacked by the young man in a brown coat - He struck me several times, and said if I appeared against the prisoner, he would be the death of me - I am certain the prisoner is the man, he was taken about five minutes after the robbery, in the field, by the constable. I had him in sight all the way till he got over the pailings, I then lost sight of him for a minute.

JAMES BIRK. I am a constable. I heard the last witness cry stop thief! and followed the prisoner down the road; he turned up Edward-street, jumped over the pales, and then over a ditch; I went over after him, ran round the ditch, and two men stopped him in the Regency-park. I brought him back, and am positive he is the man. I found nothing on him.

Prisoner's Defence. I saw the people about a pond; I was stopped as I went to see what was the matter. I was not near the door.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181028-158

1549. HENRY FRENCH and JAMES BLANCHARD were indicted for stealing, on 7th of October , 100lbs of lead, value 30s., the property of Francis Adolpho , and fixed to a certain dwelling-house .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating it to be fixed to certain building of his.

FRANCIS ADOLPHO. I have a house building at No. 4 Homer's-place Paddington . On the 6th of October the lead was all safe, next day I found it taken off the cistern, which is fixed to the house, in the area, and a knife at the bottom of the cistern.

ISAAC MONDEY. I am a watchman. About twelve o'clock at night I saw the prisoners, and another boy, getting over the area railing of the house, they went down into the area. I called another watchman, we went down to them in about five minutes, and took them in the area, under the stairs; the one who escaped was in the cistern. I found an empty bag under the stairs. About 1 cwt. of lead was cut from the cistern, and taken away. The prisoners said they went down there to sleep.

FRENCH'S Defence. We went there to sleep.

FRENCH - GUILTY . Aged 14.

BLANCHARD - GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18181028-159

1550. GEORGE BOOK was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of September , one watch, value 5l., one seal, value 6d.; one key, value 6d., and one string, value 6d., the property of Christopher Morris , from his person .

CHRISTOPHER MORRIS. I keep the Upholsterers' Arms, in Little Titchfield-street . On the 26th of September, I was in Shire-lane, between eleven and twelve o'clock at night, going home from Fleet-street - I was quite sober-my watch was safe in my fob. When I got about four doors up Shire-lane , the prisoner and another man ran violently against me, lifted up my arms, pulled my watch out, and ran off - I saw it go from me, and followed them. I seized the prisoner, who is the man that took it - We both fell together. The watchman came up, and assisted in securing him - I am sure he is the man, he was never out of my sight. He said if I would give him 5s., he would get the watch again - I refused. Next day I went to him. He said a man named David Crawford , was with him - I could not find him by his description.

Cross-examined by MR. ARABIN. Q. Are you sure you lost your watch - A. Yes; I had been drinking with a friend; but was quite sober.

Q. Did a woman attack you - A. No, I accused one of stealing my money.

Q. Did You see two men at Marlborough-street, whom you suspected of the robbery - A. No, I saw two men there, I heard one of them say, "Morris's watch went to my uncle's"-the prisoner was then under examination.

JOHN DEA . I am watchman of Shire-lane. I saw two men run from the prosecutor. He said he had been robbed of his watch - I pursued, and took the prisoner - the other man got away. As we were taking the prisoner to the watch-house, he whispered to the prosecutor. I said, "Speak out". Morris then said, that the prisoner said, if he would give him 5s. to drink, he would get his watch-the prisoner did not deny it. He afterwards said if he was let out he would find the watch.

JOHN SIMPKIN, I am a watchman. I heard the prisoner say he knew who had the watch, and if the pro

cutor would go to Fleur-de-lis-court, he would find a man there named Crawford - I went there but could not find him. GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18181028-160

1551. RICHARD FARRELL was indicted for stealing on the 30th of September , from the person of Thomas Wilkins , one 1l. bank note, his property .

THOMAS WILKINS . I am a law writer , and live in George's-row, Chelsea. On the 30th of September, about noon, I was in the Green Park , just come off a journey. I laid down on the grass to sleep; I had a 1l. bank note in my right hand trowsers pocket-Clark awoke me, and I missed it-the prisoner was pointed out. We went up to him, and said he had robbed me - He at first denied it, and then said he did take it out of my pocket, and had thrown it away-it has never been found.

WALTER CLARK. I am a smith, and live in Sherard-street, Golden-square. I was in a room commanding a view of the Park, and saw the prosecutor sleeping on the grass - I saw the prisoner put his hand to the prosecutor's pocket several times, and take a piece of paper out - He then got up and walked away. I ran out, awoke the prosecutor, and told him of it. The prisoner turned round, and saw me; I said he had been robbing the man - He denied it. When I took him to the prosecutor, he said he did take it, and if I would give him time he would find it, as he had dropped it. We gave him half an hour to find it, but he could not.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18181028-161

1552. MARY MAYHEW was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of September , two sheets, value 4s.; one blanket, value 2s.; two counterpanes, value 4s.; one fender, value 6s., and one tea-kettle, value 2s., the property of John Powell , in a lodging-room .

JOHN POWELL. I live in Playhouse-yard . The prisoner had lodged three years with me; the articles stated in the indictment were let to her with the lodging. On the 8th of September she left, and I missed them.

LEONARD MATHEWS . My father is a pawnbroker, and lives in Whitecross-street. A woman pledged a fender with us.

RICHARD FALLSHAW. I am an officer. On the 10th of October I took the prisoner, and found the duplicates of the property on her.

JOHN BARRAT . I am a pawnbroker. The prisoner pledged a kettle and a flat-iron with me on the 17th of July.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. Illness prevented my redeeming them, which I meant to do if they had given me time.

GUILTY . Aged 45.

Fined One Shilling, and Discharged .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18181028-162

1553. THOMAS ELSWORTH was indicted for perjury . NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181028-163

1554. LUCY RICE was indicted for perjury.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181028-164

1555. ROBERT CASMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of September , four planes, value 8s.; one square, value 5s.; three chisels, value 1s.; four gauges, value 18d.; one saw, value 3s.; one hammer, value 1s.; one goudge, value 4d., and one basket, value 2s., the property of John Mason ; one plane, value 2s., the property of James Jones , and one plane, value 2s. , the property of Jeffrey Morgan .

JAMES JONES . I am a carpenter . On the 15th of September, about eight o'clock in the morning, while I was at breakfast, I lost my tools from a house in John-street, Back-road, Islington . I went to look for them, and met the prisoner, with two planes under his arm, in Osborne-street, Whitechapel - I took him to the office. I found a basket at a public-house, containing the rest of my tools.

JEFFREY MORGAN . I lost my tools from the same building, and found the prisoner with them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I bought the planes.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181028-165

1556. JOHN DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of September , four pieces of leather, value 4s.; one brush, value 1s., and one pair of shoes, value 6d. , the property of Henry Smith .

HENRY SMITH . I am a shoemaker , and live in Bennet-street, Fitzroy-square. On the 19th of September, at eight o'clock in the morning, I found my stall at the corner of Goodge-street , broken open, and the things gone.

WILLIAM HOPKINS . I am a watchman. About four o'clock in the morning of the 19th of September, I met the prisoner at the corner of Charlotte-street, with a bundle under his arm, he said it was leather, which he brought from Tottenham-court-road. I had met him at three o'clock without any bundle. He said he had nothing else about him; I found a pair of pincers, three padlocks, and a knife, in his pocket. The bundles contained the articles stated in the indictment.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was employed to carry them.

GUILTY . Aged 42.

Confined One Year .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181028-166

1557. THOMAS STONE was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of October , one coat, value 20s. , the property of Valentine Kingston .

GEORGE GRISEWOOD . I am a stable-keeper, and live in Finsbury-place . On the 22d of October, about two o'clock, I saw the prisoner take the coat out of a chaise in my yard; he saw me, and dropped it. I secured him. He had taken it about twenty yards. It belonged to Valentine Kingston.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181028-167

1558. THOMAS RISLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of September , three loaves of bread, value 2s. 6d.; four pounds of cheese, value 2s.; six pounds of bacon, value 3s.; half a pound of butter, value 6d., and six pounds of meat, value 5s. , the property of Stephen Lowe .

STEPHEN LOWE . I am a cow-dealer , and live at Kingsland . On the 17th of September, about three o'clock in the morning, the watchman alarmed me. I found I had lost the articles stated in the indictment out of my safe-the prisoner had formerly lived with me - He must have got in at the window.

CHARLES WARNER . I am watchman of Kingsland. I stopped the prisoner with the things, about half-past two o'clock in the morning - I asked him where he lived, he said at Mr. Lowe's. and they were his property.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I was in distress.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Sent to the Refuge

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181028-168

1559. JOHN MAXFIELD was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of September , one truck, value 5l. , the goods of John Alder .

JOHN ALDER . I am a publican , and live in East Smithfield . I lost my truck from my cellar.

JOHN PHILLIPS. I am the prosecutor's servant. I took the prisoner driving our truck at the top of Burr-street, about three hundred yards from my master's house. I had not missed it two minutes; he had been watching me in the cellar for three hours. I am certain it is my master's. The prisoner had worked for my master eight years ago.

Prisoner's Defence. A sailor employed me to carry his chest, I went to borrow the prosecutor's truck; nobody being at home, I took the liberty of taking it.

GUILTY . Aged 45.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181028-169

1560. JOHN YOUNG was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of September , one table-cloth, value 10s. , the goods of Allen Williams .

SARAH OLDERSHAW. I am a laundress, and live in Charles-street, New Kent-road . I had Mr. Allen Williams's table-cloth to wash; on the 11th of September, about ten o'clock in the morning, I lost it out of the garden, where it hung to dry.

WILLIAM BLACKBURN. I am a pawnbroker, and live on Saffron-hill, On the 11th of September, between ten and eleven o'clock in the morning, the prisoner brought the table-cloth to pledge. I observed it was rough dried, and noticed his name was different to the initials. He said he lived in New-street, Shoe-lane, and his mother, who was ill in bed, had sent him to pledge it. I said I thought it was stolen - He denied it. I returned it to him, and followed to see if he went to where he said he lived; he put it under his coat as soon as he got out of the shop, and I gave him in charge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181028-170

1561. THOMAS WILLETT was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of September , one coat, value 10s., and one bag, value 1d. , the goods of Robert Enever .

ROBERT ENEVER . I am a labourer . On the 29th of September, between eight and nine o'clock at night, as I was driving my cart to Spitalfields, I lost my coat and bag off my cart.

WILLIAM GAINES . I am a broker. I was in Osborne-street, Whitechapel , and saw four men round the prosecutor's cart; one said, "You draw;" the other said, "You draw;" the prisoner said he would, and took the coat and bag off. I said, "I'll draw you." They all ran off. I called out Stop thief! and the prisoner was stopped, the others got away.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181028-171

1562. LYDIA PEASE was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of October , one carpet, value 3s. , the goods of Thomas Botton .

MARTHA BOTTON. I am the wife of Thomas Botton. Between nine and ten o'clock in the evening, my carpet was safe in the fore-court - I was cleaning my room, and lost it. I found the prisoner at the watch-house, with it.

WILLIAM LLEWELLYN . I am a carpenter - I saw the prisoner go by the prosecutor's house - I afterwards saw her pass me with the carpet. I asked her how she came by it. She said that was not my business - I took her to the watch-house.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I beg for mercy.

GUILTY . Aged 38.

Confined Six Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18181028-172

1563. SARAH STRICKLAND was indicted for steal- on the 9th of August , one watch, value 25s.; one seal, value 12s.; one chain, value 1s., and four keys, value 5s. , the goods of Alexander Brown ; and JOHN FARRANT , and ELIZA FARRANT were indicted for feloniously receiving the same well knowing them to have been stolen .

ALEXANDER BROWN. On the 9th of August, I was in Whitechapel-road . The prisoner and another woman accosted me - I went behind a public-house with herwhile I was talking with her, she took out my watch and ran away with it. I saw her again at the office last week, and I am sure she is the woman-it was about ten o'clock at night - I found my watch and seal at the pawnbroker's.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. I was quite sober. I did not see her again for three months.

JOHN DENNING. I am servant to Mr. Cotton, who is a pawnbroker, and lives at Shoreditch. On the 26th of

October the prisoner, Strickland, presented the duplicate to me of a seal; I had been informed it was stolen, and gave her in charge - She had pledged it on the 12th of August. She brought the prisoner Farrant with her, to buy it - I gave her in charge also.

SARAH FREEMAN . I am a willow-weaver. Strickland offered to sell me the duplicate of a watch - She said a man had died and left it to her. Afterwards she said she found it at Mile-end. I was at Farrant's house on Sunday - She was there, and offered Mr. Farrant the duplicate for 10s. - He said he would give her the money, and pay her next day. Mrs. Farrant said she had got the watch, but not the seal.

JOSHUA CAMPBELL . I am a pawnbroker. On the 27th of October, Sarah Farrant pledged the watch with me, which a man redeemed.

WILLIAM TURNER. I am an officer. I took Strickland at Cotton's. I afterwards went to Farrant's - He gave me the duplicate, and said his wife pledged it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181028-173

1564. WILLIAM ONION and GEORGE BLAKE were indicted for stealing, on the 24th of September , one sheet, value 8s. , the goods of John Bews .

JOHN BEWS . I am clerk to Mr. Carr, a solicitor, who lives in Bloomsbury-square, On the 24th of September, I lost a sheet from behind my house in China-street, Somers-town , about half-past eleven o'clock.

ROBERT LOWDEN . On the 24th of October, I was standing at my door in Globe-street, with Mr. Early; he said he suspected the prisoners, who were standing by the side of the wall of the prosecutor's garden. I turned towards them, and saw a sheet go off the line-one got over the wall and took it, the other waited outside to receive it. I went and informed the prosecutor - we went in pursuit, and took them.

JAMES EARLY . I was with Mr. Lowden, and saw the prisoners lurking about the garden - I suspected they wanted to steal the sheet, which was in the garden. Soon after I saw it being drawn over the wall - They ran through a new building adjoining to the prosecutor's house. I pursued, took Onion, and brought him back. As I was bringing him back, he said the sheet laid by some timber-it was found there in the way they ran. Another person took Blake at the same time - They were both running together.

THOMAS HALES, I am a constable. The prisoners were brought to the watch-house. Onion said he got over the wall, took the sheet, and handed it to Blake.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

ONION'S Defence. I was in want.

BLAKE'S Defence. I know nothing of it.

ONION - GUILTY . Aged 15.

BLAKE - GUILTY . Aged 16,

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181028-174

1565. RICHARD SULLIVAN was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of October , one child's dress, value 9s. , the goods of Thomas Thwaites .

THOMAS THWAITES. I am a tailor , and live in Broad-street, St. Giles's . On the 1st of October, about half-past eight o'clock in the morning, I lost the dress from the door.

SAMUEL FURZEMAN . I am an officer. I saw the prisoner go up to the prosecutor's door several times-at last I saw him put something under his coat, and run off. I followed him, he saw me, and dropped the dress. I took him in Short's-gardens - I never lost sight of him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181028-175

1566. SARAH WARD was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of October , one silver cream jug, value 3l., and one table-spoon, value 10s., the goods of Claudius Chervat , in his dwelling-house .

CATHARINE CHERVAT . I am the wife of Claudius Chervat, and live in Hunter-street, Brunswick-square . On Sunday, the 11th of October, I went into the kitchen, about ten o'clock in the morning, and found the prisoner there. I was informed she was an acquaintance of one of my servants, and was a servant out of place. I did not object to her remaining there all day. She left at ten o'clock at night. On Tuesday I found her in the kitchen again, about ten o'clock in the morning. I was going to speak to her. Seeing me, she said to the servant, "Where is Patience? for I wish to be off." Patience was the servant who knew her. The milk-pot had been used at breakfast that morning; in the evening I missed it and a table-spoon. She might have taken the spoon on the Sunday.

SAMUEL HAMPSTEAD . I am a pawnbroker. On the 13th of October the prisoner pledged the cream-jug and table-spoon with me, for 2l.

WILLIAM READ , SEN. I am an officer. On the 16th of October I apprehended the prisoner. She said she pledged the spoon and milk-pot at Nicholls's, in Tash-street, Gray's Inn-lane.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was in great distress, and could obtain no employ, which urged me to commit this offence.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Of stealing to the value of 39s. only.

Fined One Shilling, and Discharged .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181028-176

1567. JAMES HIGGINS was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of October , two waistcoats, value 4s.; seven d'oyles, value 3s. 6d.; one yard of baize, value 1s.; and one yard of Holland, value 6d. , the goods of William Matchett .

CAPTAIN WILLIAM MATCHETT. I live in Leicester-place, Leicester-square . In the summer I went to France, and left the-prisoner and his wife in care of my house and furniture, which I kept an inventory of. I returned about the latter end of October, and missed the articles stated in the indictment. I went to the prisoner's lodgings and found them.

Cross-examined. I was absent five weeks.

Q.Was any demand made by him for wages-A. Yes; He summoned me, before he left, for wages. When he left he asked me to search his boxes.

ELIZABETH DAVIS. I am char-woman to the prosecutor. The prisoner and his wife were left in care of the house. Before the prosecutor left, they cut off a piece of baize which laid over the carpet, as it was too large. The same piece was found in his trunk.

Q.Did he say anything to you about any furniture - A.Before the prosecutor left, he came into the kitchen when the prisoner's children were there, and asked whose children they were; the prisoner's wife said they were mine. Next morning I asked her, in the prisoner's presence, how she could say so; she said if I would take an empty room, she would furnish it, and supply me with coals and candles, if I would keep her children out of the prosecutor's sight, which I refused.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you ever seen the prisoner before that night - A. No. The next morning he made the proposition to me.

GEORGE ODDY . I am an officer. I found the property in the prisoner's trunk, at his lodgings in Nowel-street.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181028-177

1568. MARY TAYLOR was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of October , one sheet, value 5s., and five pair of stockings, value 2s. , the goods of Thomas Holt .

THOMAS HOLT. I am a labourer , and live in Brownlow-street, Drury-lane . On the 8th of October, about half-past four o'clock in the afternoon, I heard somebody in my passage, and found the prisoner there. She appeared bulky. The landlord asked what she had got there. My wife ran into the yard, and missed the things. I pursued the prisoner and overtook her at the corner of King-street. The sheet dropped from under her clothes.

GEORGE COST . I was in Drury-lane, and saw the sheet and stockings drop from under the prisoner's clothes.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181028-178

1569. JOHN STEPHENS was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of September , two shawls, value 27s.; one sheet, value 1s.; one shift, value 2s.; two pair of stockings, value 1s.; and four handkerchiefs, value 1s. , the goods of Philip Bonathan .

HANNAH BONATHAM . I am the wife of Philip Bonatham. and live in Huntingdon-court, Shoreditch . On the 9th of September, about seven o'clock in the evening, I met the prisoner, who went home with me. He once lodged with us. He began to cry, and said he had been very unhappy ever since he had left us. We made him up a bed in our room. In the morning he was gone, and we missed the articles stated in the indictment. He was afterwards taken, but none of the things were found.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181028-179

1570. JOHN RUSSELL was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of October , one wheelbarrow, value 25s. , the goods of William Harrison .

WILLIAM HARRISON. I am a coal-dealer , and live in Ebenezer Terrace, Whitechapel . On the 6th of October, about five o'clock in the evening, I went into the cellar and came out again in about three minutes, and missed the barrow. I saw the prisoner wheeling it away, about half way up the street. I stopped him, and asked him what he was going to do with it? He said he was a poor man, and begged for mercy.

Prisoner's Defence. I was intoxicated.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Confined Six Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181028-180

1571. THOMAS HOWARD was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of October , 6s. in monies numbered , the monies of William Easton .

WILLIAM EASTON . I keep a chandler's-shop . On the 14th of October, about eight o'clock in the evening, while I was at supper I saw the prisoner in the shop, leaning over the counter, at the till. I ran into the shop, he was then standing upright, and asked if I sold pigtail tobacco? I said No. He then asked for a quarter of an ounce of returns, and threw down 6d. for it. I went to give him change, and found the till was not quite close, and there was only two shillings and two sixpences left. My wife said she had taken none out. I had been to it just before, there was then several shillings and sixpences in it. I sent for an officer, who searched the prisoner, and found four shillings and three sixpences on him.

THOMAS HART. I am an officer. I took the prisoner into custody at the prosecutor's house, and found four shillings and three sixpences in his fob. He said he earned it at work, but could not tell where he worked.

MARY ANN EASTON . I am the prosecutor's wife. There was 9s. in the till, in sixpences and shillings, before the prisoner came in. He left two shillings and two sixpences in one corner of the till. Four shillings and three sixpences were found on him, and sixpence he paid for the tobacco, makes that amount. He had been to the shop two days before. I am certain there was exactly 9s. in the till. I think I know one of the shillings by its being black.

Prisoner's Defence. A man sent me for the tobacco. I earned the money at work.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181028-181

1572. HARRIET GALE was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of September , one gown, value 4s.; one shift, value 2s.; one petticoat, value 1s., and two handkerchiefs, value 8d. , the goods of Israel Otolangay .

MARY OTOLANGAY . I am the wife of Israel Otolangay, who is a confectioner , and lives in Wood-street, Tabernacle-walk . The articles stated in the indictment were hung in the garden to bleach, all night, on the 12th of September-next morning they were taken. The prisoner was my servant , and had lived two days with me - She left that morning. My husband met her about a week afterwards in Whitechapel. She offered to pay 1s. per week for the things.

JURY. Q. Have you female lodgers - A. Yes-they are both married, but their husbands do not live with them.

LEONARD MATHEWS. I am a pawnbroker. A gown was pledged with me by a woman whom I do not know.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I found the prosecutrix wanted me to become a prostitute, and I left her.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181028-182

1573. JOHN LECORE and CATHERINE BRYANT were indicted for feloniously receiving, on the 21st of October , 6lbs. of bristles, value 20s., the property of John Mathews , of which John Ward was convicted of stealing, they well knowing them to have been stolen .

JOHN FORRESTER. I am an officer. On the 24th of October I was at the end of Gracechurch-street, and saw Ward with another man. Ward had a bag - They were together, and walked very fast. I followed, and stopped Ward, the other ran away. I found some bristles in Ward's bag, and took him to the watch-house; in consequence of what he said, I went to Mr. Mathews - We went together to Ward, and in consequence of what he said, we went to the prisoner, Bryant's house, in Brown's-lane, Spitalfields-(she keeps the house)-Lecore lives with her, and carries on the business; they are brushmakers-it was between ten and eleven o'clock at night; Lecore was shutting up the shutters. When he saw me he came into the shop-Bryant was behind the counter. Mr. Mathews asked him if he had received any bristles from his porter? (they must both have heard it.) Lecore said that some came in on Wednesday, and the receipt was on the file to show the delivery of them. He then asked me if I had a search-warrant? I said No, and if he was an honest man there would be no occasion for it. Mathews asked him where he kept his bristles? he pointed to the place. Mathews then asked him if he had any Archangel bristles? he said No. I went to the cupboard in the shop, pulled out four or five bundles of bristles, and showed them to Mr. Mathews. He said he could swear to one bundle, but could say nothing about the others. I asked them who they bought it of? both the prisoners were present. Lecore said, "You must find that out." I took it away.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Both the prisoners attended at the Mansion-house to hear Ward examined. The business belongs to Bryant-Lecore manages it.

WILLIAM BOREN. I live with Mr. Mathews, who is a brush-maker and bristle-merchant; the prisoners are both brush-makers, and have been customers at our house for many years. In consequence of what Ward had said I accompanied Mr. Mathews to the prisoner's house-Lecore was shutting up shop. I went in, Bryant was behind the counter. I asked Lecore if he had had any bristles in on Wednesday? he said he had, and he would produce the receipt - He produced the receipt for a few which I had sold him on the Wednesday night. They were dressed hairs, and these were rough as they are imported, I told him the receipt was correct, and asked him if he had any Archangel bristles in the house? - Bryant heard it. He said, "Not any, nor have I had any for sometime." I then asked him if he had any rough hairs of any description? he said he had a few - I examined them. I found a bundle of Archangel bristles among them. Immediately that I saw them I said I knew them-it is a very particular article. Mr. Mathews had a quantity of them. We sold none of the kind to the prisoners. I asked Lecore where he got them? he said, "There is the thing - You must find that out." Neither of them gave me any account of them.

Q. Did Bryant say anything - A. She said she knew nothing of them-that she knew our porter had been there on Wednesday with some bristles, but she knew nothing of those.

MR. JOHN MATHEWS . The bristles are Archangel bristles, and of a peculiar kind, undressed. On the 21st of October, I had a quantity of them - A great quantity has been sold, but all, I believe, were sold in the country-none were sold to the prisoners - They were worth 3s. per pound. (The record of the conviction of John Ward was then put in and read.)

JOHN WARD. I lived about five months with Mr. Mathews as porter - I went to the prisoners' house one day with some goods from Mr. Mathews, about two months ago. As I was going out Lecore asked me if I wanted a job, this was in the street? I said "No, I have got one." He said "You have been to my house, have not you?" I said Yes. He asked me if I would have a drop of beer? I thanked him, went to a public-house, and had some. He then said, anything that I could get from Mr. Mathews's, bristles, or anything else, he would buy them of me. I said I would not get them, and went home. My master dealt in brushes also. At another time I went to his house with more goods from my master-Bryant was present, and heard what he said. Lecore asked me if I had got any bristles, or any thing else? I told him No. Bryant said nothing. He asked me why I did not? for if I got anything he would take it of me - I refused, and went home. Then another porter, named Thomas, went - He is the man who ran away when I was taken.

Q. In consequence of anything that was said to you by him, did you take anything to Lecore's - A. Yes, on Wednesday, the 21st of October, at dinner-time, I took one bundle. I had nothing to take there from my master. Thomas took one bundle of bristles out of the warehouse, my master had not given it to him, and I took them to Lecore's about one o'clock-both the prisoners were present in the shop-Thomas was with me. I told them we had got some bristles - They took them of us, and gave us 12s. for them; they weighed them, and made them 6lbs. Bryant counted the money, and Lecore handed it to me.

Cross-examined. Q, You was convicted of robbing your master - A. Yes; I told about it directly I was taken. The bristles were tied up as those now produced.

LECORE'S Defence. The bristles are tied up differently to when they were before the magistrate. They do not weigh 6lbs.

JOHN FORRESTER re-examined. They came undone, and I tied them up again as before.

BRYANT'S Defence. I know nothing about it.

LECORE - GUILTY . Aged 56.

BRYANT - GUILTY . Aged 49.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181028-183

1574. WILLIAM BURLINGTON was indicted for embezzlement . NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181028-184

1575. ANN SMALLMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of October , one waistcoat, value 5s. 6d. , the property of William Newby .

SAMUEL SKELTON. I am shopman to William Newby , who is a pawnbroker . The prisoner came to the shop to pay the interest of a pledge - I missed the waistcoat, and asked her if she had got it, which she denied, and dropped it out of her lap.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. It fell off the counter.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181028-185

1576. JAMES KELLY was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of September , 50lbs. of lead, value 20s., the property of Thomas Payne , and fixed in a court-yard belonging to his dwelling-house .

THOMAS PAYNE. I live in Newton-street, Holborn . On the 25th of September, about six o'clock in the evening, I saw my lead pump safe, it was fixed to the wall. Next morning, about eight o'clock, I found it was cut off, and carried away. I found it at the watch-house.

JOHN FURZEMAN . I am a constable. On the 25th of September, about half-past six o'clock in the evening, I stopped the prisoner at the top of Charles-street with the pump in a bag. He said he picked it up - He was one street from the prosecutor's. A person who was with him ran away when I took him.

Prisoner's Defence. My young master asked me to carry it. GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18181028-186

1577. CHARLES TAVERNER was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of September , from the person of John Hiteman , a 1l. bank note, his property .

The prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18181028-187

1578. JOHN GRIFFITHS and SARAH JONES were indicted for stealing, on the 19th of September , from the person of Samuel Small , two 1l. bank notes, his property .

SAMUEL SMALL . I live in Rupert-street, and am a carpenter . On the 19th of September, between eleven and twelve o'clock at night, I was returning from my pay-table, I met the prisoner Jones, in Charles-street, and went with her to her lodgings. In about ten minutes I missed two 1l. notes out of my breeches-pocket, which were there when I went into the room-nobody but us were there. I called the watch, and the prisoner, Griffiths, came to the door, and tried to break it open-he said he was a watchman - I refused to let him in. He got in at the window, and opened the door for the girl to escape - He pulled her from me. We scuffled together, and all three fell. I saw his hand under me, taking something from her - He ran away; I gave the girl in charge. I have never recovered my notes.

WILLIAM PAYNE . I am a constable. I heard a noise, went to the house, and saw Griffiths come out; he said there was a man in the house who had been robbed - I found the prosecutor in the room, he gave Jones in charge, she denied it. I searched the room but found nothing.

JONES'S Defence. The prosecutor ill-treated me. I called the watch, and he gave me in charge.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18181028-188

1579. THOMAS WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of September , two yards of carpet, value 6d., and one fixture (i.e.) one copper, value 7s., the goods of Peter Hazem , and fixed to his dwelling-house .

MARTHA LEPEER. I live in Gee-street, Somers'-town . On the 16th of September, between nine and ten o'clock at night, the copper was safe in an out-house in the yard; next morning, about ten o'clock, I missed the carpet, and found the copper pulled down, and taken away, They must have got over three gardens to get at the out-house. On the 20th of September I saw them at Bow-street.

JOHN DAVIS. I am a patrol of Bow-street. On the 17th of September the prisoner passed me in Great Russell-street with the copper on his head, the carpet was tied round it - I stopped him. He said he brought it from Hampstead; after that he said he bought them of a man in the road, and then that he found them in Harper's-fields. I afterwards fitted the copper to the prosecutrix's place, and it corresponded exactly.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I found them in a pit.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18181028-189

1580. JOHN SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of October , one lamp, value 10s. , the goods of Thomas Ray .

THOMAS RAY . I keep the Artichoke, public-house, in Ratcliff-highway . On the 21st of October, about twelve o'clock, the prisoner came and had half a pint of beer-as he was going out I stopped him with the lamp.

JEREMIAH COLEMAN . I was at the house - I saw the prisoner take the lamp down, and put it in his apron - I told the prosecutor.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 31.

Confined Two Months , and Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18181028-190

1581. THOMAS RUSSELL was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of October , two shirts, value 4s. , the goods of John Moore .

HANNAH MOORE. I am the wife of John Moore, we live at Shadwell . On the 12th of October I hung my clothes out to dry in the garden. About twelve o'clock I found the gates open, and two shirts gone - I found them at the pawnbroker's. I had seen the prisoner loitering about.

JOSEPH TILLEY . I am servant to Mr. Romilla, who is a pawnbroker, and lives at Ratcliff-highway. The prosecutrix informed me she had lost two-shirts-in about a quarter of an hour Shortoffered two in pledge. I stopped her.

MARY SHORT. I live in Spring-gardens, Ratcliff-highway. The prisoner brought me the shirts to pledge for him, he said they were his own.

JOHN BROWN. I apprehended the prisoner at Short's house - He said he bought the shirts.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was at Stepney, met a sailor, and bought them of him for 4s. GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18181028-191

1582. JOHN MURPHY was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of October , 16lbs. of lead, value 3s. , the goods of Michael Callahan .

JOHN BAILEY. I am servant to Michael Callaghan . On the 5th of October we were laying on the gas at Mile End -our tools were in a trunk before the public-house. I missed the lead while we were at dinner. The prisoner came in, he appeared trembling, and said he had been running - He appeared bulky. I sent for an officer, who found the lead in his breeches-it weighed 16lbs.

SAMUEL DOBSON . I am an officer. I took the prisoner in charge, and found two pieces of lead in his trowsers.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Fined One Shilling, and Discharged .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18181028-192

1583. JOSEPH JONES and JOHN CONNER were indicted for stealing, on the 27th of October , one leg of mutton, value 7s. , the goods of George England .

GEORGE ENGLAND. I keep an eating-house in Panton-street, Haymarket . On the 27th of October, about three o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoners came in for a bason of soup. Conner got up, and said to Jones, "You pay for them"-Jones said No. Conner asked the price of some meat, and Jones went out. A person came in and asked me if I had lost a leg of mutton? - I missed one from the door. I went out, got information, and found Jones in the Haymarket with it, Conner was with him.

JOHN PERKINS. I live with the prosecutor. I heard two soldiers had ran off with the mutton, ran down, and saw Jones with it. JONES - GUILTY . Aged 31.

CONNER - GUILTY . Aged 35.

Fined One Shilling, and Discharged .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18181028-193

1584. MARGARET FIELD was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of September , one coat, value 10s. , the goods of James Jones .

JAMES JONES. I am a chair-maker , and live at Stoken Church, Oxfordshire. On the 22th of September I was in town, and left my coat at the Angel Inn, St. Giles - I lost it while I was out.

MARY GILES . I live at the Angel Inn. Between one and two o'clock in the afternoon I was in the bar, and saw the prisoner come down stairs, and secured her at the bottom; she had one hand behind her, and dropped the coat.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 34.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18181028-194

1585. HENRY CAPSOM was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of September , one pair of breeches, value 11s. , the goods of William Jones .

THOMAS PRICE JONES . I am servant to Mr. Jones, who is a pawnbroker , and lives in Tothill-street, Westminster , the breeches hung at the door. About eleven o'clock in the morning, I was alarmed, ran out, and found the prisoner in Thomas's custody.

JAMES THOMAS. I saw the prisoner drag the breeches off the hook - I took him with them,

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Whipped, and Discharged .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18181028-195

1586. WILLIAM BEECH was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of October , 4lbs of tin, value 4s. , the goods of George Allen .

GEORGE ALLEN. I am a plumber , and live in White Lion-street, Norton Falgate -the prisoner worked for me. On the 23d of October, I employed him to make solder , and gave him some ingots of tin to use; while he went to dinner, I missed one ingot, and found it concealed in a tub of sand. Wilson marked it so as to know it, and put it back. When the prisoner left in the evening, I went to the tub, land found it gone - I overtook him about one hundred yards off, took him to the watch-house, and found it on him. (Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY .

Fined One Shilling, and Discharged .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18181028-196

1587. JOHN BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of October , one pair of shoes, value 6s. , the goods of George Bottomley .

GEORGE BOTTOMLEY. I am a coachman , and live in George-street - the prisoner slept in the same room with me - I lost my shoes.

SAMUEL FURZEMAN. I am an officer. I took the prisoner into custody with the shoes on his feet.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Six Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant

Reference Number: t18181028-197

1588. JOHN WALKER was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of October , four woollen table-covers, value 40s., the property of some person unknown .

THOMAS JONES . I am an officer. On the 10th of October. I took the prisoner in Wych-street, with the table-covers - I do not know that they are stolen. NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18181028-198

1589. JAMES BURKE was indicted for stealing, on 30th of September , two pair of shoes, value 6s. , the goods of William Bunny .

WILLIAM THOMAS JAMESON . On the 30th of September, about eight o'clock at night, I was in Shadwell , and saw the prisoner and three others, lurking about the prosecutor's shop, one of them unhooked the shoes, and gave them to the prisoner - I secured him.

WILLIAM BUNNY . I am a shoemaker -the shoes are mine. GUILTY . Aged 16.

Whipped and Discharged

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant

Reference Number: t18181028-199

1590. RICHARD BUSVINE was indicted for stealing on the 28th of October , one saw value 2s. , the goods of William Hughes .

WILLIAM HUGHES. I am a carpenter ,. I lost my saw from some chambers, in Old-square, Lincoln's Inn , and found it at the pawnbroker's.

WILLIAM WAINWRIGHT . I apprehended the prisoner on another charge-he directed me to his lodgings, and I found the duplicate of the saw there.

JOHN GRANT . I am servant to Mr. Lember. On the 28th of October, the prisoner pledged the saw with me.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 39.

Fined One Shilling, and Discharged .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant

Reference Number: t18181028-200

1591. THOMAS SMITH and WILLIAM BROWN were indicted for stealing, on the 30th of October , one coat, value 7s. , the property of Francis Tiler .

FRANCIS TILER. I am a coachman , and live at Poplar. My coat was on the coach-box when I stood at the Royalty Theatre -it was taken off. Next morning it was produced, and the prisoners were in custody.

ADAM LLENCK. I am a watchman. About twenty minutes after twelve o'clock at night, I saw the prisoner Smith, with the coat on his arm - He said it was his own - I detained him.

JOHN PARTRIDGE. I took Brown into custody-I knew nothing about his taking the coat.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

SMITH. - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

BROWN. - NOT - GUILTY

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18181028-201

1592. JOSEPH MANTLE was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of September , one saw, value 3s. 6d., the goods of Richard Smart , and one plane, value 2s. 6d. , the goods of John Potter .

JOHN POTTER. I am a carpenter . About the middle of July, I lost my plane from Mr. Bryant's yard, Little Britain -the prisoner worked there with me - He worked there for five or six weeks after. I afterwards found it at Mr. Burn's, at Battle-bridge, where he then worked.

JOHN LIMBRIC . I took the prisoner into custody, and found the duplicate of the saw on him, pledged at Flemming's. (Property produced and sworn to.)

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18181028-202

2593. GEORGE MATON and JOHN KITE were indicted for stealing, on the 21st of October , twelve yards of printed cotton, value 12s. , the goods of Joseph Hawkins .

WILLIAM DRAKEFIELD . I am servant to Joseph Hawkins , who is a linen-draper , and lives in St. John-street . On the 21st of October, between twelve and one o'clock Thompson alarmed me - I saw Metcalf take Maton, and take the printed cotton out of Kite's apron, which was taken from our door.

JAMES METCALI. I live opposite to the prosecutor's. I saw Maton take the cotton from the door, and put it in Kite's apron - They had been lurking about the shop for two hours - I secured them both, and took the print out of Kite's apron.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

KITE'S Defence. I found it at the door.

MATON - GUILTY . Aged 16.

KITE - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18181028-203

1594. ELORENCE HANDLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of October , one handkerchief, value 3s., the the goods of Joseph Palmer , from his person .

JOSEPH PALMER . I live in Britannia-row, Islington. On the 21st of October, I was coming down Bedford-row with a basket of clothes on my shoulder-the prisoner came behind me, and I felt something at my pocket. A lady said the prisoner had picked my pocket - I pursued, and seized him - He tried to throw the handkerchief down the area, but it lodged on the rails-two others were with him. (Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 12.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18181028-204

1595. THOMAS BRUCE was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of October , one piece of handkerchiefs, value 1l. 11s. , the goods of George Read and John Hitchcock .

JOHN PARTON. I am servant to George Read and John Hitchcock , who are haberdashers in Graces-alley, Wellclose-square . On the 26th of October, about eight o'clock at night, I saw a man's arm put into the shop, and take out a piece of silk handkerchiefs; I ran out, and saw the prisoner run from the door, Bowser took him about 300 yards off; the handkerchiefs were found at his feet.

WILLIAM BOWSER. I saw the prisoner put his hand round the door post, draw the piece of handkerchiefs out, and run off; I pursued and took him - He immediately dropped it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was intoxicated.

GUILTY . Aged 51.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18181028-205

1596. DANIEL DONOVAN was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of September , one shawl, value 2s. 6d., the property of Richard Jennings , from the person of Frances Jennings .

The prosecutor not appearing, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.


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