Old Bailey Proceedings, 9th September 1818.
Reference Number: 18180909
Reference Number: f18180909-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace Dyer and Terminer, AND Gaol Delivery for the City of London, AND ALSO The Gaol Delibery For the County of Middlesex, HELD AT Justice hall, in the Old Bailey; ON WEDNESDAY, 9th of SEPTEMBER, 1818, and following Days; Being the Seventh Session in the Mayoralty of THE RIGHT HON. CHRISTOPHER SMITH , LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

Taken in Short-Hand by H.BUCKLER, Basinghall Street,(BY THE AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON.)

London: PRINTED AND PUBLISHED, FOR H. BUCKLER, BY T.BOOTH, 31, St. Andrew's Hill, Doctors' Commons.

1818.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX.

Before the Right Honourable CHRISTOPHER SMITH , Esq. LORD MAYOR of the City of London; Sir Robert Graham , Knt. one of the Barons of his Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir John Bayley , Knt. one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir James Burrough , Knt. one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir William curtis, Bart.; Sir John Eamer , Knt.; Sir James Shaw , Bart.; Sir William Leighton , Knt.; Joshua Jonathan Smith , Esq., and George Scholey , Esq., Aldermen of the said City; Sir John Silvester , Bart., D.C.L. Recorder of the said City; John Atkins , Esq., and William Heygate , Esq., Aldermen of the said City; Newman Knowlys, Esq. Common Sergeant of the said City, and John Vaillant , Esq., his Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

London Jury.

William Chapman ,

Benjamin Byles ,

Richard Clay ,

William Ravenscroft ,

George Philpot ,

Isaac Belsham ,

John Worsley ,

Thomas Coster ,

James Stain ,

John Manker ,

Nathaniel Nichols ,

Leonard Eden .

1st Middlesex Jury

William Archer ,

Robert Remel ,

William Emmet ,

Peter Duncan ,

Edward Sheppard ,

Richard Howard ,

Robert Pollard ,

Nathaniel Soames ,

William Prior ,

Richard Clarke ,

Robert Avery ,

James Ford .

2nd Middlesex Jury

William Fletcher ,

Thomas Lund ,

James Hare ,

John Riley ,

James Garry ,

George Branburgh ,

William Smith ,

Alexander M'Mellon,

Thomas Morris ,

Benjamin Watson ,

Josiah Phelps ,

Robert Towers .

3rd Middlesex Jury

John Freeman ,

John Powell ,

Thomas Forgar ,

William Glendinning ,

Wm. Aug. Bartelot ,

Charles Norton ,

William Walker ,

Joseph James Long ,

John Smith Carr ,

Thomas Brant ,

Joseph Bull ,

John Dixon .

4th Middlesex Jury

Joseph Cross ,

Stephen Green ,

John Bradford ,

William Wymer ,

Robert Adams ,

John Moore ,

Thomas Wimsett ,

Job Keen ,

Thomas Newman ,

Thomas Double ,

Mark Canner ,

Richard Moore .

SESSIONS HOUSE, OLD BAILEY,

SEPTEMBER 9, 1818.

SMITH, MAYOR. SEVENTH SESSION.

Reference Number: t18180909-1

1062. JOHN FITZGERALD was indicted for feloniously assaulting George Davis , on the 26th of May , on the King's highway, at St. Giles's in the Fields, putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, one watch, value 7l.; three seals, value 3l., and one key, value 7s. , his property.

GEORGE DAVIS . On the 26th of May, a little after twelve o'clock at night, I was in George-street, Bloomsbury I was going along the street two women were quarrelling, I stopped a moment or two to hear what passed, the prisoner and two other men were standing by, I then went on; the three men followed me very close, I gave way for them to pass me, when the prisoner hustled me off the curb stone, and then knocked my hat off I was rather alarmed - I caught my hat in my hand, while I was catching it one of the men took my watch from me in an instant, I felt it going, they then ran off as fast as possible; I called the watchman, he came up immediately and took the prisoner; the prisoner made a motion with his hand, which made me conclude that he was deaf and dumb. One of the other men, named John Davis , was taken and convicted last Sessions. I heard by their conversation that the prisoner had been fighting. Davis made some motion to the prisoner, and sparred at him. I am certain the prisoner is the man who knocked my hat off.

JAMES SULLIVAN. I am a watchman. On the 26th of May the prosecutor called watch, I went up, I was only thirty yards off, I saw them together; the prosecutor gave the prisoner into my charge, and we took him to the watch-house.

The prisoner being deaf and dumb, had the evidence communicated to him by an interpreter, and made the following

Defence. I am innocent. I was with a woman, the watchman collared me, and I struck the prosecutor.

JAMES DAVIS re-examined. I believe a woman was passing at the time, but she was not with the prisoner. I am sure he was one of the party I never lost sight of him.

GUILTY. Aged 25.

Of stealing from the person, but not with force and violence .

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18180909-2

1063. WILLIAM GUNNELL was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of May , one hat, value 4s.; one razor, value 6d.; one handkerchief, value 1d.; one pair of shoes, value 3s., and 7s. in monies numbered, the property of Nathan Moore , from his person .

The prosecutor not appearing, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18180909-3

1064. JAMES HIGGINS and WILLIAM MITCHELL were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Edward Dawson , about one o'clock in the night of the 21st of July , at St. George, Bloomsbury, with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, five coats, value 7l.; one pair of stockings, value 1s.; one tea-spoon, value 3s.; one sugar-ladle, value 5s.; one key, value 6d.; one pair of knee-buckles, value 2s.; one pair of pantaloons, value 10s.; three razors, value 4s.; one razor-case, value 1s.; two waistcoats, value 4s.; three shirts, value 10s.; one silver wine-strainer, value 2l.; one set of cruets, value 5s.; one cruet-stand, value 2l.; one silver medal, value 2s.6d.; one snuff-box, value 1s.; three neckcloths, value 1s.; one pack of cards, value 6d.; two shells, value 1s. 3d.; one watch, value 2l.; one cruettop, value 6d.; six handkerchiefs, value 6s.; one pair of shoe-buckles, value 10s.; one gold ring, value 10s.; one breast-pin, value 1s., and two salt-spoons, value 3s. , his property; SARAH MITCHELL was indicted for feloniously receiving, on the 22d of July , one watch, value 2l.; one cruet-top, value 6d.; six handkerchiefs, value 6s.; one pair of buckles, value 10s.; one gold ring, value 10s., and one breast-pin, value 1s., part of the above mentioned goods; EDWARD MITCHELL was indicted for feloniously receiving, on the 22d of July, one coat, value 3l., and one shirt, value 3s. 4d., other part of the above-mentioned goods; and ANN HIGGINS was indicted for feloniously receiving, on the 22d of July, two shells, value 1s. 3d., other part of the above mentioned goods, they well knowing them to have been feloniously and burglariously stolen , against the statute.

MARY TAYLOR . I am servant to Mr. Edward Dawson , who lives in Kenton-street . On the 21st of July, I was up last. I went to bed at half-past eleven o'clock, all the doors and windows were fastened. I was alarmed

by the watchman about twenty minutes after three o'clock, and got up; I found the kitchen window cut it was not light the window and shutters were shut, and a tablecloth put in the hole which was cut it was not cut overnight; so that if a person had a candle in the house, it could not be seen outside. The hole was large enough for a person's hand to get through, and they could reach to unfasten the window. I searched about the house, and found every place open, and a great many things taken. About half-past four o'clock we made another search.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. It was not light when I was alarmed. I had a candle to search the house. The watchman was in the house his lanthorn had a light in it.

RICHARD LILLYWHITE . About twenty minutes before three o'clock in the morning, I found a liquor bottle stand, and a pair of trowsers, in which was a note directed to Mr. Dawson's house-it was not light. I immediately went there it had struck three o'clock when I got to the house it was then getting light. I went into the kitchen, and found a hole cut in the shutter, and the table-cloth put into it, which was large enough for an arm to get through. I suppose it had been cut with a chisel.

Cross-examined. Q. If you had met an acquaintance in the street at the time, should you have known him A. The light would not have enabled me to have known his face. I found the things about twelve yards from Mr. Dawson's house.

JAMES SMITH. I am patrol of the Skinners' Estate at St. Pancras. On the 22d of July, about half-past five o'clock in the morning, I took the prisoners, William Higgins and James Mitchell, into custody, in Skinner-street, Somers-town. They each had a bundle under their arms. I found a skeleton key on one of them, and on the other I found some skeleton keys and a chisel there was a key in Higgins's bundle. The prisoners were coming, apparently, from their own house in North-terrace, near Cromer-street.

Cross-examined. Q. How far were they from the prosecutor's A. About a quarter of a mile; it was past five o'clock when I met them. I was told there had been a robbery, and was looking out. They were not walking in a direction from Mr. Dawson's.

WILLIAM LACK. I am a pawnbroker. On the 22d of July, the prisoner, Edward Mitchell, pledged a coat and shirt with me, in the afternoon; he gave his own name, and said he pledged them for Mr. Smith, Kenton-street.

Cross-examined. He said he brought them from Mr. Smith's,

HANNAH HIGGINS. I am the wife of George Higgins. I am no relation of either of the prisoners. On the 22d of July, about half-past eleven o'clock in the morning, the prisoner, Sarah Mitchell, brought me a tea-chest, and asked me to let her leave it in my place, as it contained a few papers belonging to her son William, which is one of the prisoners; I had seen him several times. I put it into my cupboard, and gave it to James Smith , the watchman, the same night.

Cross-examined. It was never opened in my presence. I do not know whether she knew what was in it it was locked.

JAMES SMITH . I received the tea-chest, it was locked, and I broke it open. I went to the prisoner Ann Higgins 's house, the same day, and found two shells there, in a water-butt full of water. I produce all the things.

Cross-examined. How do you know it was her house - A. She said it belonged to her. There were other people there, one of the other prisoners lived there.

MARY TAYLOR . The key is the key of my master's street-door.

MR. EDWARD DAWSON . I live in Kenton-street, in the parish of St. George, Bloomsbury. I know the things to be my property-they are worth above 40s.

The prisoners made no defence.

J. HIGGINS - GUILTY . DEATH . Aged 24.

W. MITCHELL - GUILTY . DEATH . Aged 24.

S. MITCHELL- NOT GUILTY .

E. MITCHELL- NOT GUILTY .

A. HIGGINS- NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18180909-4

1065. LAWRENCE HALLORAN , alias LAWRENCE HYNES HALLORAN , alias WILLIAM CHARLES GREGORY , was indicted for that he, after the 1st of July, 1802, to wit, on the 9th of January, in the 57th year of his Majesty's reign , feloniously did forge and counterfeit the hand-writing of a certain person, to wit, Sir William Garrow , Knt. , the said Sir William Garrow, then being a member of the Commons House of Parliament of the United Kingdom, and being entitled to send letters by the post to places within the said United Kingdom, free from the duty of postage, in the superscription of a letter to be sent, and which was afterwards sent, by the post, to wit, from London to Broseley, in the county of Salop, in order to avoid the payment of the duty of postage upon and in respect of the said letter, against the statute .

ELEVEN OTHER COUNTS, varying the manner of laying the charge.

To which indictment the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 53.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18180909-5

1066. EDWARD KELNER was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Fenwick Bulmer , about twelve o'clock in the night of the 8th of August , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein one silver tea-pot and stand, value 7l.; one silver mustard-pot, value 1l.; two salt-spoons, value 4s.; two table-spoons, value 10s.; one coat, value 1l.; one waistcoat, value 5s.; three cruet tops, value 6s., and one pair of sugar-tongs, value 10s. , his property.

FENWICH BULMER. I live in the Strand . On the 8th of August I came home about a quarter before one o'clock in the morning, with my son, I unlocked the door, and desired my son to lock it. I found a light in the parlour, and missed the articles stated in the indictment from off the sideboard. The servant fetched the watchman and patrol, Mr. Slack came in with them, and the prisoner came into the parlour with them; I asked him how he came there? he said he came in with the gentleman; I asked him which gentleman he came in with? he could not tell. He said he came to help. He at last pointed to Mr. Slack, and said he came in with him.

Cross-examined by MR. BROADRICK. Q.When you got into the house, you called out murder A.No; I opened the back-door and called out murder. I found a coat under the sideboard, and thought it was a man. The prisoner said he came in, hearing the alarm.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You called out at the back window A. Yes; and while I was calling out the street - door was opened, and some persons went out.

SUSAN SCALES . I am Mr. Bulmer's servant. My master called out murder from the back window, I was in bed I came down I heard the cry I sleep in a back room on the third story. I called the watchman at the door, but could make nobody hear. I shut the door immediately after the watchman and patrol came in. I let them in. Mr. Slack came in with them, but nobody else I am certain.

Cross-examined. I was awoke by the alarm, it continued all the while that I was coming down stairs.

Q.Could the cry of murder be heard in the street A. I think it could.

HENRY BULMER . I am the prosecutor's son. When we came home we found every thing in confusion; I went into the shop with a rushlight, and there I saw a man. I immediately went into the parlour, and fastened myself in, and got out of the back window I gave the alarm. I came in again when I heard the watchman knock, and went into the parlour with them and Mr. Slack; the prisoner entered with us and sat down; I said he very much resembled the man I saw in the shop, but appeared rather taller; he said he heard the cry and entered with the gentleman, but he could not point the gentleman out; from the conversation he learnt that Mr. Slack had knocked at the door, he then said he came in with him. I had given the alarm in the yard, and desired the people to come round.

Cross-examined. I made as much noise as I could; there was time for the man to escape out of the shop; my father asked him where he lived, and he gave us a true address.

JOHN DONOHOE. I am a watchman. I heard the alarm. The patrol, Mr. Slack and myself came up to the prosecutor's door together there was no person near us at the time. I am certain nobody but we three went in the servant let us in; the prisoner came into the parlour with us, and was given into custody.

Cross-examined. I saw the patrol shut the door and watch it.

RICHARD SHAW . I am a patrol. I went to the house with the watchman a man and woman were calling murder at the front of the next house. No person but Mr. Slack, the watchman, and myself went in; I shut the door after us, and remained there a few minutes, when Mr. Bulmer's brother knocked at the door, and I let him in. In about ten minutes I went into the parlour, and found the prisoner sitting there I had not seen him on the premises before; I had seen him talking to two girls within forty yards of the house, about half an hour before the alarm was given; he could not have got in after we were in, or with us.

Cross-examined. They must have been sometime in the house, it was in great confusion.

JAMES SLACK. I am a shoemaker, and live at the back of Mr. Bulmer's house. I heard the alarm, came out, and the servant let me in, there was nobody at the door when I first came up. I called the watch and patrol; they came up, and we all went in immediately-nobody but us entered. The prisoner entered the parlour with us, and seated himself. He did not enter the house at the same time as we did.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been with two young women from half-past eleven o'clock I heard the cry of murder, and went in immediately after the gentleman. I believe the watchman and patrol followed me.

MARY CONES . I was walking with the prisoner from half-past eleven o'clock until one o'clock, on Waterloo Bridge I had not left him many minutes before I heard the cry of murder.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. I live in Drury-lane, and have known the prisoner nearly four months.

CATHARINE READ . I was walking with the prisoner from Waterloo Bridge at one o'clock, and I asked him for a glass of gin. We went into the Spotted Dog, and came out together. I heard the cry of murder, and said, "let us go and see what is the matter." I ran, and he followed me. He got to the door first. A person knocked twice at the door, and went in; the prisoner went in after him.

Cross-examined. Q. Where did you meet him A. Near the New Church-he was walking towards Temple-bar. There was a crowd round the door. The prisoner was close to the door when the gentleman was knocking.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18180909-6

1067. DAVID REGHAN was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of August , at St. George, Hanover-square, in the dwelling-house of Francis Laking , two 1l. bank notes , his property.

HENRY LAKING . I am the son of Francis Laking , who is a stationer , and lives in Curzon-street, Mayfair . On the 5th of August, at half-past six o'clock in the evening, I was in the parlour at tea, and saw the prisoner in the shop I heard him came in he went before the counter, and opened the till, I heard the halfpence rattle; I went into the shop and asked him what he wanted? he asked for a pennyworth of pencil; my brother coming into the shop at the time, he turned round, and ran out. My brother immediately followed, and brought him back in about five minutes.

FRANCIS WM. LAKING. I am the son of Francis Laking . My brother called out - I went into the shop, and saw the prisoner run away from the door; I pursued him, and took him about fifty or sixty yards off I brought him back to the shop. Nothing was found on him. I had seen two 1l bank notes in the till about ten minute before he was taken.

THOMAS WYNN . On the 5th of August, I was playing with some boys, at the corner of Sun-court; the prosecutor's shop is at the top of the court. I saw the prisoner run from Mr. Laking's, and throw something away, which I thought was paper. Mr. Laking came out I picked something up that he threw away, and gave it to Tupper. I am sure the prisoner is the man.

HENRY TUPPER . I received two 1l. bank notes from Wynn, and gave them to Mr. Henry Laking .

HENRY LAKING. I received them from Tupper. - I produce them.

FRANCIS WILLIAM LAKING . One of them was taken by my brother, and another by my father. I know them. One has Blackman, Charles-street, on it; the other is marked Dr. Merryman. They were both in the till.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going by, and was stopped. I knew nothing of it.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 19.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18180909-7

1068. EDWARD FLETCHER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of August , at St. Pancras, two table-spoons, value 1l.; three desert-spoons, value 15s.; two tea-spoons, value 4s.; five forks, value 19s.; one cruet-stand, value 1l., and one set of cruets, value 1l., the goods of Harriet Bourchier Bourchier , widow , in her dwelling-house .

HARRIET BOURCHIER BOURCHIER . I am a widow, and live in Carmarthern-street, in the parish of St. Pancras . On the 3d of August, while I was at supper, I was alarmed; I got up, went into the parlour, and found the prisoner in custody. The property that was stolen is worth above 6l.

MARY TURNER . I am servant to Mrs. Bourchier. On the 3d of August, I was going to prepare the tray for supper. I was going into the parlour for some glasses, as soon as I got to the top of the kitchen stairs, opposite the street door, I saw the prisoner in the passage, as if coming out of the parlour, and going out at the street door. The street door was bolted inside at the time. He could not have got in at the door. He had some silver spoons and forks, in one hand, and the cruet stand and cruets in the other. I went quietly up to him, and asked what he was going to do with those things. He told me the house was being robbed, for he saw a man and a boy, get out of the parlour window. I wished him to return to the parlour, until I called the gentleman who was going to sup with my mistress, down. The parlour window was open, it being very hot weather. He gave the things to me, and went into the parlour. I went in with him, and gave the the alarm. The plate was kept in the parlour cupboard. I had not taken it out. A gentleman came down with my mistress immediately that I called out. The gentleman got a watchman, who took the prisoner and property.

THOMAS JENNINGS . I am a watchman. I took the prisoner into custody - He said, he hoped they would forgive him, and he would never do the like again.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 17.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18180909-8

1069. NICHOLAS DAVIES was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of July , one table-cloth, value 5s.; one sheet, value 5s.; one shirt, value 4s.; one blanket, value 5s., and three pistols, value 11l., the goods of Edward Corry , in his dwelling-house .

EDWARD CORRY . I am a wine-merchant , and live at St. James, Westminster ; the prisoner was my porter . He absconded - I searched and missed the property stated in in the indictment.

TIMOTHY PARKINSON . I apprehended the prisoner at Liverpool, on the 3d of August, and found six duplicates on him, referring to Woollatt.

SAMUEL WOOLLATT. I am a pawnbroker, and live in Oxford-street. The prisoner pledged the the articles stated in the indictment with me, at different times, in June and July.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I beg for mercy.

GUILTY. Aged 38.

Of stealing to the value of 39s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18180909-9

1070. JOSEPH MOODY was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of August , one clock, value 5l., the goods of Aaron Clark , in his dwelling-house .

MARTHA CLARK. I am the wife of Aaron Clark , who lives in Lower Grosvenor-place, Pimlico . On the 26th of August, about nine o'clock in the morning, I missed the clock, from the window, which was open.

THOMAS MIDDLETON . About half-past eight o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner in China-walk, Chelsea, with something wrapped up in his apron. I watched him up Manner's-street, it being no thoroughfare, I stopped him at the bottom. He immediately threw the clock down, and ran away, but was secured. He afterwards said' he was employed to carry it to Burton Crescent.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A gentleman gave it to me, to carry for him.

GUILTY. Aged 38.

Of steling to the value of 39s. only .

Confined One Year .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18180909-10

1071. HENRY MEARS was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of July , at St. James, Westminster, in the dwelling-house of Sir Charles Morgan , Bart., one promissory note for the payment of and value 10l.; two 20l., one 10l., and two 5l. bank notes , the property of Thomas Neat .

THOMAS NEAT . I am coachman to Sir. Charles Morgan , Bart, who lives in the parish of St. James, Westminster . The prisoner was his servant . My property was in a drawer, in the servants' hall, which was locked, but the key left in it by accident. On the 24th of July, I lost 70l., out of a little box, which was in the drawer. I had seen it all safe, about half an hour before. I saw the officer find two 20l. bank notes, one 10l. Stroud bank note, one 5l., one 2l. and one 1l. bank notes, upon him - I lost more. I know the Stroud note by the number, which I took particular notice of when I received it.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. I had 470l. in the drawer - I never told any person of it.

GEORGE POPLE. I am a police-officer. I searched the prisoner, and found the money on him; he said that the whole of it belonged to the prosecutor, and he was sorry for it immediately after he had done it.

The prisoner made no defence.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 15.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18180909-11

1072. JOSEPH MAYHEW was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of August , fourteen ounces of tea, value 2s. , the goods of the United Company of Merchants of England trading to the East Indies .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be the property of a certain person unknown.

To which indictment the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Confined Three Months .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180909-12

1073. JOSEPH SAUNDERS was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of July , two coats, value 15s.; two table-spoons, value 20s.; one desert-spoon, value 7s., and four teaspoons, value 8s. , the goods of Peter Wallis .

To which indictment the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 38.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180909-13

1074. THOMAS CASTLE was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of July , one pocket-book, value 2s., the goods of John Austin , clerk, from his person .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be the property of a certain person unknown.

MR. JOHN GOUGH . I am a merchant, and live in Bloomsbury-square. On the 7th of July, about half-past eleven o'clock in the morning, I was on Ludgate-hill , and saw the prisoner, in company with two other men, following the Rev. John Austin, who is curate of Chevelin, near Tunbridge-the prisoner was about a hundred yards behind him, the others were on each side; the prisoner came up, put his hand into Mr. Ausin's pocket, and pulled out a pocket-book; I laid hold of him, and took the pocketbook from him. The other two went away. I never lost sight of the prisoner. The constable took him.

JOSEPH SNOW . I am a constable. I took the prisoner in charge, and saw Mr. Gough take the pocket-book out of his hand.

Prisoner. I beg for mercy.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before, Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180909-14

1075. MARGARET MEREDITH and CORNELIUS SPAIN were indicted for stealing, on the 15th of July , 34lbs. of tea, value 12l. 10s.; 28lbs. of sugar, value 1l.; 12lbs. of other sugar, value 12s. 6d., and 10lbs. of coffee, value 1l. 3s. , the goods of George Roadley Simpkin , Edward Simpkin , and John Simpkin .

MR. EDWARD SIMPKIN. I am in partnership with George Roadley and John Simpkin, we are grocers and tea-dealers , and live in Redcross-street, Cripplegate. On the 14th of July, about half-past seven o'clock in the evening, the prisoner, Meredith, came to the shop, and ordered the goods stated in the indictment, for Mr. George Thompson , No. 10, Grub-street; I was to make the trade allowance for them, as they were to sell again-she said they were for ready money. I sent them about eleven o'clock next morning with a permit in the name of Thompson, by her desire, as it was too late to obtain a permit that night; I agreed to send them at ten o'clock. About half-past ten o'clock Spain called to know why they were not sent; we told him we were too busy, and that they should be sent in half an hour, which was done; Jenkins, our porter, took them, with a strict charge not to leave them without the money, as they were strangers to us. I am certain the prisoners are the persons.

GEORGE JENKINS . I am porter to the prosecutors. I took the articles stated in the indictment about eleven o'clock, to deliver to Mr. Thompson, No. 10, Grub-street. When I got into Grub-street the prisoner, Spain, overtook me, and asked me if I was come from Messrs. Simpkins' with some goods for Mr. Thompson? he said he was coming after me about them, and that he had been there half an hour before. I asked him if he lived with Thompson, he said he lived in the street, and knew him. We went on together untill we got to Chapel-street, Grub-street, he then said, "Thompson lives up here." I went up with him to a door in Chapel-street, he said Thompson was going to open a shop there; I went in and saw a woman, whom I believe to be Meredith; she said, "here is the grocery come, I am very glad of it, as I, or we, very much wanted it." Spain and she helped me down with the goods. Meredith asked me if I had got the permit, bill, and receipt; I gave her the permit and bill, but kept the receipt, and asked her for the money, having been ordered not to leave them without the money. She said,"my husband is not within, he is at a public-house in Fore-street;" and told Splain to take me to him, that he might pay me. I should not have left the goods in the house unless I had been told that I was to receive the money of her husband; I meant to fetch them back if it was not paid. Spain took me to a public-house in Fore-street, kept by Edwards; I asked the landlord if a Mr. Thompson was there, or had been there - He said he knew uo such person. I took the bill out of Splain's hand, as I began to suspect, left him there, and ran back to secure the goods, but found the woman and goods gone - I ran all over the house, but could not find the goods. I returned and told my masters.

Q. When did you next see either of the prisoners - A.About two months after, on a Saturday, I saw the woman, running backward and forward in Wood-street, I thought I knew her, stoppsd her, and asked her if she had not lived in Grub-street; she said she never had, and asked where it was. I let her go, thinking she was not the person; two or three days after I saw her and Spain in custody at the Mansion-house, and knew Spain again very well. The goods have not been found.

JOHN SCULTHORPE . I am a printer, and live at No. 12, Chapel-street, Grub-street. On the 14th of July, in the afternoon, the prisoner, Meredith, came with a man to my house, took two parlours of me, at five shillings per week, and gave me a shilling as earnest - I let it to them for their own private use-it was the house Jenkins came to; the man took them in the name of Spellman. I went out, when I returned the two prisoners came, I delivered them the key, and they took it away. Meredith said they had been disappointed in getting a cart to bring their furniture, but that she expected it in the morning.

MEREDITH. Q. Did you see me - A. You are the woman. I am certain of both of them. They never came again.

MEREDITH'S Defence. They have spoken falsely. I do not know where Mr. Simpkin lives.

MR, SIMPKIN re-examined. I never doubted her being the person.

MEREDITH - GUILTY . Aged 24.

SPAIN - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180909-15

1076. SAMUEL DUKES and JOHN JONES were indicted for stealing, on the 28th of August , one tea spoon, value 4s.; two bottles, value 4d.; one pint of spruce beer, value 6d., and 1lb., of cheese, value 11d. , the goods of Mary Jost .

MARY JOST . I am a widow , and live at the corner of King Edward-street, in Bridewell Precinct . I keep a chandler's shop . On the 28th of August, about seven o'clock in the evening, the prisoners, and another boy, came into my shop for a bottle of spruce beer and some bread, when I was going to draw the beer they said they would not have it, and began to push each other about; Dukes pushed the boy who has escaped into the parlour; my tea-spoons were on the table, he took them off, and while I went into the parlour I saw Jones take the spruce beer and cheese off the counter, and all three ran out; I ran after them, calling out stop thief, but they got away-in a few minutes Mr. Smith brought the prisoners back. I found the cheese in the road.

THOMAS OAK SMITH . I am a glass merchant. I saw the two prisoners in Bridge-street, opposite King Edward-street; Mrs. Jost said her shop had been robbed, I followed the prisoners, and heard one of them say, "which way did he run?" the other said, "what a crowd there is round the door." I seized them, and asked where the third boy was, who had got the spoons? they said they did not know him. I said they were in company with him.

JONES'S Defence. I knocked down the cheese, and ran away.

JONES - GUILTY . Aged 15.

DUKES - GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180909-16

1077. THOMAS JOHNSON was indicted for stealing' on the 22d of August , six handkerchiefs, value 22s. , the goods of Henry Woolrich .

THOMAS ARMSTRONG. I am servant to Mr. Henry Woolrich, who is a Scotch muslin manufacturer , and lives in the Old Change. On the 22d of August, between eleven and twelve o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner, who was a stranger, go out of the warehouse, I had not seen him come in. I missed a piece of handkerchiefs. I ran out, Gimber brought him back, and found the handkerchiefs under his apron.

WILLIAM GIMBER. I am the prosecutor's porter. Armstrong pointed the prisoner out to me, I brought him back immediately, the handkerchiefs were in his breeches; he denied taking them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 45.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180909-17

1078. JAMES FOX was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of September , one acroamatic telescope, value 30s. , the goods of Seth Havel .

SETH HAVEL . I am an auctioneer , in Sweeting's-rents, Cornhill . On the 4th of September, between eleven and twelve o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner in my aucion-room looking over the lots for sale-the telescope was on the counter; I missed it while he was there; I followed him out, stopped him, and found it concealed under his coat. He begged of me to let him go.

GEORGE WOLMAN . I saw the prisoner leave the room, with the telescope under his arm.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I beg for mercy.

GUILTY . Aged 66.

Confined Two Months .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180909-18

1079. LYDIA GREEN was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of August , eight pair of stockings, value 18s. , the goods of William Stephen and James Bernard Dew .

JAMES DAVIS . I am servant to Messrs. William Stephen and James Bernard Dew, who are hosiers , and live in Cheapside . On the 28th of August, about two o'clock in the afternoon, I saw the prisoner come over the threshold of the door, take eight pair of stockings off the bench, and run out; I jumped over the counter; Mr. Dew took her with them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180909-19

1080. LYON LEVY was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of August , one hat, value 10s., and one pair of gloves, value 6d. , the goods of James Balding .

JAMES BALDING . I am an assistant at the Dispensary in Bishopsgate-street ; I put my hat and gloves in a room adjoining the surgery, and lost them between nine and eleven o'clock in the morning, while I was up stairs.

CHARLES CONNELLY . I am errand-boy at the Dispensary. I was outside of the door and saw the prisoner come down the street; suspecting him, I watched him, saw him go into the room and come out. I stopped him with the hat and gloves about three yards from the door.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I beg for mercy.

GUILTY . Aged 13.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180909-20

1081. WILLIAM PETCH was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of August , one coat, value 30s.; one waistcoat, value 5s.; one pair of pantaloons, value 15s.; one purse, value 6d.; one pair of spectacles, value 10s.; three pieces of foreign coin, value 1s., and 7s. in monies num

bered, the goods and monies of John Turner ; one watch, value 3l., the goods of William Taylor ; one watch, value 50s., the goods of Robert Watson , and one coat, value 30s., and one shirt, value 3s. , the goods of Cuthbert Hogg .

THOMAS WALKER. I am a Thames police-officer. On the 25th of August, about two o'clock in the morning, I was in the police-boat, near Rotherhithe church, and heard a man, between the tiers, who was on a float of timber, call sculler. We pulled towards the boat, and found the prisoner in a boat at the Middlesex side of the river, near Wapping-he was brought into my boat; I found a white shirt in his bosom, between his own shirt and waistcoat. I hand cuffed him. He was feeling about his pocket, and made resistance; I heard something drop from him in the boat, I found it was a comb. I took him to the office, when I found he had three coats, two waistcoats, and two pair of pantaloons on; he had a watch in his left-hand fob, and another down his thigh. I found a purse in his waistcoat-pocket, with six shillings, two sixpences, three pieces of foreign silver coin, a took pick, and a purse, in it; in his coat-pocket I found a pair of spectacles and case-the prosecutors claimed them.

WILLIAM TAYLOR . I am mate of the ship James, which was in the tier, next to the Ann, at Rotherlithe; I lost my silver watch, which hung up in the cabin at nine o'clock-it was taken while I was asleep; I missed it about seven o'clock next morning, and found it at the office. The prisoner had no business on board our vessel.

JOHN TURNER. I am mate of the Ann. About half-past six o'clock in the morning. I missed a coat, waistcoat, a pair of pantaloons, a pair of spectacles and case, a comb, and a purse, with seven shillings, and three foreign silver coins, in it.

ROBERT WATSON. I am mate of the Brittania, which laid in the same tier; a person could step off one vessel on to the other. I lost a silver watch from my bed-room, which I put away at nine o'clock at night.

CUTHBERT HOGO . I am master of the James. I lost a coat and shirt that night. I found them at the office.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I got drunk at the fair, went into a man's boat, and went to sleep in his ship; about two o'clock he brought the things down, and told me to take them into the boat - I was to meet him next morning.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180909-21

1082. ROBERT FREEMAN THOMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of August , at St. Pancras, one bridle, value 2s., and one mare, price 15l. , the property of James Wilson and John Wilson .

JOHN WILSON . I am a farmer , and live at Deaton Hall, in the parish of Deaton, near York , and am in partnership with my brother James. On Monday night, the 3d of August, I lost a bay mare out of the paddock before the hall; I saw her that evening at seven o'clock, and the next morning I missed her. On the 22d I received a letter, giving me information where she was; I came to town on the 24th, and saw her in Hart-street, Covent-garden, in possession of Mr. James Dean , a livery-stable keeper, and knew her to be ours. We had had her two years and a half; she had always been in the family, my father bred her. She is eight years old. I have recovered her.

GEORGE CHAPPELL . I am servant to Mr. Edwards, who keeps the Basing House, in Kingsland-road. On Friday the 7th of August, the prisoner came into the stable with a bay mare; he said he had come up with some cows and calves, for Mr. Laycock, of Islington. He said he came to put the horse up there. After he had been there a little time, he said he wanted to part with her, and authorized me to take her to Dixon's Repository, in Barbican, to be sold by auction. I took her there, but could not sell her; I brought her away, and took her to Smithfield the same day; I could not sell her there, and took her back to the stables. The prisoner came next morning, and asked me if I had sold her? I told him I had not. He told me to take something less, and make the best I could of her. He did not come again until the Wednesday following. I bought the mare of him myself for six guineas, I paid him the money, and my master wrote his name and address down for me. He said he came from Deaton Hall, near York, from his brother's - He went away. I sold her the next morning to George Walker , for eight guineas and a half.

JOHN WILSON re-examined. The prisoner did not live near me. In March, 1817, I saw him there, not since. He was born about four miles from York.

JOHN JAMES SMITH . I am a Bow-street officer. On the 14th of August I apprehended the prisoner in consequence of a letter which was brought to me. I took him in York-street, Pentonville; I told him I took him for stealing Mr. Wilson's mare, of Deaton Hall - He denied it. I told him he must go to the office with me; he then said he would show me where the mare was; he said he had sold her to the hostler at the Basing House, Kingsland-road - I went there, leaving him in custody. I found she was sold to Walker, Baker's-row, Clerkenwell. I went there, the mare was out, it was afterwards brought to the office; I put it up at Dean's livery stables-the prosecutor claimed it, and took it back. The hostler gave me the bridle, which, he said, the prisoner delivered to him with the horse.

(Bridle sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I met a man coming to town, riding the mare, and bought her of him, at Doncaster, for 10l.

GUILTY . - DEATH .

Recommended to Mercy.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18180909-22

1083. GEORGE BAYS and ALEXANDER STEWART were indicted for stealing, on the 28th of May , one chaise harness, value 5l., the goods of William Gooding , in the dwelling-house of Charles Tapp ; and MARY STOKES was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing it to have been stolen .

CHARLES TAPP . I am a coach-maker, and live in Margaret-street, Cavendish-square ; Mr. Gooding's harness was in my shop, I missed it on the 28th of May. The prisoner Bays, lights the lamps in Margaret-street. My shop is open until eight o'clock at night.

THOMAS FOV. I am an officer. On the 9th of June I received information went to No. 14, Adam and Eve-court, and found the harness, covered with a sack, under the bed.

WILLIAM SPENDLOVE . I deal in harness, and live in Charles-street, Manchester-square. On the 9th of June, about half-past four o'clock in the afternoon, I was going along Castle-street, Oxford-street, the prisoner, Bays, was trimming lamps, he asked me if I bought harness and hammer-cloths.

Q.Was there any thing particular to induce him to speak to you - A. I had a harness in my hand. I told him I did. He said he had seen me about several times, but was afraid to speak to me; I said he need not be afraid of me, I bought any thing; he then said he had a hammer-cloth and harness to sell, but they were on the cross, which means stolen - I said I would buy them. He put his ladder down, took me over to 14, Adam and Eve-court, which was opposite, he knocked at the door. the prisoner Stokes asked who was there? he said, "it is me," and went into the room, Stokes was there lying on the bed, he pulled the hammer-cloth cut from between the bed and the sacking; he was going to pull the bag which contained the harness, from under the bed, when Stokes said, "don't you touch it, your hands are oily." She pulled two cushions out; I asked for the harness, she said it was in the next room. I said let me see it, if you have got 20l. worth, I will buy them. She unlocked the next room, and Bays pulled out a sack from under a halfteaster bed, which was turned up, in which was the gigharness. I asked him if he had any thing else; he asked me if I bought shiners - I asked what he meant? he said glasses. I said I had a better sale for them than any thing else; he said he wished he had spoken to me before, as he had sold the glasses belonging to the hammer-cloth and cushions, for 16s., and that he had sold between forty and fifty pair within six months. He said the hammer-cloth and cushions belonged to him, but the harness was another man's, but he would sell them both - He asked 5l. for them. We went to where his ladder was, in Castle-street, and agreed that I should have them for 4l. 15s.; he asked me when I would fetch them away, and said that he should be at home to tea in an hour and a half. I said I would call for them then. He said he did not live there, but in Rebecca-court, Well-street. I went to Lord Denbigh's, gave information, and then went to Rebeccacourt, where I found him at tea in the parlour, with a woman; we then went together to Adam and Eve-court for the things, I found them put together in the same room-Stokes was there. While I was putting them into my bag Foy came and took them. The harness was there under the bed.

Cross-examined by MR. DOWLING. Q. You said you would buy it of them - A. Yes; I had heard Lord Denhigh's coachman had lost a hammer-cloth.

Q. You seem well acquainted with technical phrases, how came you to know cross meant stolen - A. I had heard so.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN WYATT. I am a constable. I went with Foy, having received information from Spendlove, and confirm his testimony.

JOHN GRIFFITHS. I am the landlord of No. 14, Adam and Eve-court; I let the apartments to Stewart's wife; Stokes rented the back room of them.

BAYS'S Defence. I found the sack and harness in the road.

STOKES'S Defence. I went out and gave Stewart's wife my key to feed my birds; I returned at one o'clock, went to bed, and found the cushions under the bed; Bays afterwards came into my room with Spendlove; he said he should come up again and remove the things.

WILLIAM SPENDLOVE re-examined. While I was there I remember Bays asking for the key of Stewart's room.

BAYS - GUILTY. Aged 22.

Of stealing to the value of 39s. only .

STEWART- NOT GUILTY .

STOKES- NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18180909-23

1084. GEORGE BAYS and ALEXANDER STEWART were again indicted for stealing, on the 26th of May , one hammer-cloth, value 5l.; two cushions, value 3l.; one carpet, value 1l., and two chariot glasses, with frames and tassels, value 5l. , the goods of William Basil Percy , Earl of Denbigh ; and MARY STOKES was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, she well knowing them to have been stolen .

DAVID RICHARDSON. I am coachman to the Earl of Denbigh. On the 26th of May, about two o'clock in the morning, after bringing his Lordship home, I put the coach and horses up in Pitt's Head mews, Park-lane , and at six o'clock next morning I missed the hammer-cloth and other things, I saw them again on the 9th of June, at No. 14, Adam and Eve-court.

WILLIAM SPENDLOVE . When I went with Bays to No. 14, Adam and Eve-court, Stokes pulled the hammer-cloth from between the bed and the sacking, and the cushions from under the bed.

THOMAS FOY . I apprehended Bays; I found a picklock-key on him, and the property in the room.

JOHN WYATT . I found a bunch of skeleton-keys in Bays's room in Rebecca-court; the strings of the glass frames were with them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

BAYS'S Defence. A young man employed me to sell them.

STOKES'S Defence. I lent Stewart's wife my key, when I returned I found the things in the room; Bays came for them, I told him Stewart was not at home.

BAYS - GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

STEWART- NOT GUILTY .

STOKES - GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18180909-24

1085. ISAAC SAMSON was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of July , at St. Luke, one milk-pot, value 1l.; one wine-strainer, value 1l.; one table-spoon, value 10s.; one pair of sugar-tongs, value 10s.; one frock, value 30s.; two scarfs, value 3l., and one shawl, value 1l., the goods of George Burling , in his dwelling-house .

GEORGE BURLING . I live in Bunhill-row, St. Lukes.

On the 28th of July, the prisoner came to my house, about ten o'clock in the morning, to look at some apartments which I had to let: my servant shewed them to him - He said they suited very well; but if he took them, he must come in that evening. I was to let him know in an hour. I said, if he would give me a proper reference, I would let him know; he referred me to Mr. Nevin, No. 27, Bishopsgate-street. I went there, but could find no such person. I found my house had been robbed. On the 31st I was near Worship-street Office, and saw the prisoner coming with a bundle under his arm. I was going towards him, when he ran away. I think he saw me. I called out Stop thief! and he was taken immediately,

JANE BURLING. I am the wife of the last witness. On the 28th of July, the prisoner came to see about the apartments. I saw him through the door, while my husband was agreeing with him; he called for a pen and ink, to write a reference. He came again in about a quarter of an hour-my husband was not at home at the time - I did not see him, but heard him in conversation with the servant in the passage. I saw him go out of the door, went to look after him, and saw him running very fast. I went up to the room, and missed some plate off the sideboard - I was in the room a few minutes before the prisoner came the first time-it was then safe. I missed the articles stated in the indictment. The silk scarfs, dress, and shawl, were taken from the bookcase drawer.

HANNAH KING. I am servant to Mr. Burling. On the 28th of July, the prisoner came; I shewed him up to the apartments-my master went to him; in about five minutes he went away-my master went to him; in about five minutes he went away-my master went out. The prisoner returned in about a quarter of an hour after, said he had met my master in Finsbury-square, and that he desired him to wait till he returned. I shewed him up into the same room; he asked if I was the mistress of the house. I told him I was the servant-my mistress was engaged. He said when he came to live with us, if I was attentive he would reward me. I thanked him, and went down stairs; I did not quite shut the door; he remained in the room about five minutes. I then heard him coming down stairs, I went and asked him what he wanted; he said he wanted some snuff - I asked him to allow me to get it for him - He said he would go himself. He went out - I held the door in my hand - I saw him run the moment he got out. He ran very fast towards Chiswell-street. I went up stairs, and missed the plate off the sideboard - I saw it there when I shewed him into the room the second time-nobody else had been there. He spoke to me in English - I understood him, and he understood me.

JOSHUA ARMSTRONG. I am an officer. On the 31st of July, I apprehended the prisoner in the Curtain-road, and found several duplicates on him. I asked him to whom the property belonged, that they referred to; he said it was all his own; one was for the wine-strainer, and the other for the sugar-tongs, pledged at Peart's.

WILLIAM CLARK. I am servant to Mr. Peart, pawnbroker, who lives in Whitechapel. On the 28th of July, a woman pledged the wine-strainer, milk-pot, sugar-tongs and table-spoon, in the name of Franks,

GEORGE BURLING re-examined. I did not meet him, nor tell him to wait at the house. The property is worth 5l.

JAMES HOWELL . I am servant to Mr. Flemming, pawnbroker, who lives in Whitechapel. On the 28th of July, a gown and silk dress were pledged with me for 1l.; next day three shawls were pledged with me for 12s. by a woman - They are worth 30s.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence (through an interpreter). I went to take the lodgings for a friend. A man brought me the things to pledge.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 32.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18180909-25

1086. WILLIAM WYNNE was indicted for stealing' on the 28th of July , one watch, value 3l.; one tablespoon, value 7s.; four bed curtains, value 2l., and one rug, value 4s., the goods of Benjamin Hughes , in his dwelling-house .

BENJAMIN HUGHES . I am a broker , and live in Shoreditch , the prisoner was my servant . I missed several things, and on the 28th of July I charged him with stealing my watch, which I had missed near a month before, from the mantle-piece. He said he stole it while he was cleaning the windows on a Saturday, and that he brought it back and put it there again on the Monday, being confident that he had done wrong; but on Tuesday he took it again, and sold it to Reeves - I found it there. I lost the rest of the property stated in the indictment, which he said he had pledged.

HENRY REEVES. I am servant to Mr. Reeves, who is a watch-maker, and lives at Shoreditch. I bought the watch of the prisoner, for 18s. in June last.

JOHN CHANNER . I am foreman to Mr. Scott, who is a pawnbroker. The prisoner pledged five curtains with me at different times. I lent him 2l. 12s. on them, in all.

JOHN TYNE. I am a pawnbroker, and live in Shoreditch. The prisoner pledged a table-spoon and two curtains with me.

THOMAS THWAITES. I am a pawnbroker. A rug was pledged with me in the name of Brown.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. Bad company and evil propensities have induced me to commit this offence, which is great; I have endeavoured to make all the reparation in my power, and beg for mercy.

GUILTY. Aged 17.

Of stealing to the value of 39s. only .

Confined Six Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18180909-26

1087. JANE LAUGHER was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of July , 26 yards of printed cotton, value 1l. 10s., the goods of Matthew Faulkner , privately in his shop .

RICHARD LIMBRIC . I am an officer belonging to the Public-Office, Bow-street. On the 23d of July, about three o'clock in the afternoon, I stopped the prisoner and another woman in Bedford-row, took her to a public-house, and searched her, I saw her drop a piece of cotton, through her pocket-hole, from her left-hand-the other woman was in my sight. I found two remnants of lace in her pocket, she told the magistrate that the other woman gave them to her.

MATTHEW FAULKNER. I am a linen-draper , and live in High Holborn . On the 23d of July, about three o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner and another woman came to my shop, each of them bought a small piece of calico, that found on the prisoner I believe to be the same; the cotton was on the counter when they were there; Limbric brought it back about seven o'clock - I had not missed it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. It did not drop from me. The woman told me to see if any person was coming after her.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18180909-27

1088. RICHARD NICHOLSON was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Lewin , about two o'clock in the afternoon of the 20th of July , (no person being therein), and stealing therein four gowns, value 10s.; one pelisse, value 12s.; one cloak, value 4s.; one spencer, value 2s.; one pair of breeches, value 4s.; one waistcoat, value 3s.; four petticoats, value 8s.; six frocks, value 6s., eight caps, value 7s.; four pincloths, value 2s.; two shirts, value 1s.; one sheet, value 2s.; one pair of shoes, value 1s.; one night-gown, value 1s.; one handkerchief, value 6d., and one basket, value 6d. , his property.

ELIZA LEWIN . I am the wife of John Lewin , we live in Mr. Webb's cottage, he is our master. On the 20th of July, about one o'clock, I went out, locked the door, and left nobody at home; I returned about three, found the door, and my drawers and boxes broken open, and every thing strewed about. I missed the articles stated in the indictment.

WILLIAM HURRY. Lewin informed me of the robbery; I took my horse and overtook the prisoner and another about four miles from Kingsland-the prisoner had a basket, the other man had a bundle; they turned back and went into a public-house, I called out Stop thief! they ran out, I pursued them across the fields towards Wilsden. I did not see them taken. I found the basket and bundle next day, in the way they ran. I am certain the prisoner is the man who had the basket.

OWEN ROOK . I heard the alarm, and saw the prisoner and another man run down Wilsden-lane; the prisoner got into a ditch, and I took him. I found a pocket and a petticoat by him; he then dropped a frock and a petticoat. The basket and bundle contained the articles stated in the indictment.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

HENRY BATES. I was bathing in a field. I saw the prisoner and another man running from the cry of Stop thief; the prisoner got into a ditch.

Prisoner's Defence. A man asked me to assist in carrying the things; when the cry was he told me to run.

GUILTY. Aged 29.

Of stealing to the value of 4s. 6d. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18180909-28

1089. WILLIAM SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of July , one handkerchief, value 5s., the goods of John Barrowcliffe , from his person .

JOHN BARROWCLIFFE . On 12th of July, about eleven o'clock in the morning, I was in Charles-street , looking at the fire, a boy came up, and told me my pocket had been picked - I missed my handkerchief - He pointed the prisoner out to me, who was running; I pursued and took him; my handkerchief was found in his bosom.

EDWARD STEPHENSON. I saw the prisoner take the handkerchief out of the prosecutor's pocket, and told him; he immediately took the prisoner, and found the handkerchief in his bosom.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18180909-29

1090. SAMUEL DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of July , from the person of Thomas Williams , one pocket-book, value 6d.; one 10l., and four 1l. bank notes , his property.

THOMAS WILLIAMS. I am a distiller , and live at Wandsworth. On the 29th of July, about three o'clock in the afternoon, I was coming down Fleet-street, near Bridge-street , and felt a twitch at my pocket, I put my hand down and missed my pocket-book - I turned round, and observed three persons whom I had noticed following me, going in a contrary direction; I was going to speak to them, but Mrs. Newburn pointed to the prisoner, who was running across the street, I pursued, but he was stopped before I overtook him; a person picked my pocket-book up, and gave it to me; it contained one 10l. and four 1l. bank notes. I had not noticed the prisoner before.

HENRIETTA NEWBURN. I live in Brides-passage; my husband is a tailor. I was going towards Temple-bar, and saw a tall man, in a green coat, behind the prosecutor, and another man behind him - I saw the tall man hand the pocket-book to the short man, who went across Fleet-street - I watched him-the prosecutor turned round, I pointed the short man out to him, and went on.

WILLIAM DEVEY. I am a brass-founder, and live in Shoe-lane. I heard a noise, went to the door, and saw the prisoner, and a tall man, in a green coat, running by; I heard the cry of Stop thief! pursued the prisoner, and caught him by his arms - He made an effort to get rid of something, at that moment a man jumped out of a cart, picked up the pocket-book, and called out, "Here it is!" Mr. Williams claimed it; the tall man was stopped, but got away. We took the prisoner to my house - He asked me to intercede with Mr. Williams, saying, he had a wife and two children. Mrs. Newburn came in, and said she pointed out the man. He said it was a hard thing to have his life sworn away.

Cross-examined by MR. WALFORD. My shop is eight doors out of Fleet-street.

WILLIAM HOLLAND. I am a grocer, and live in Shoelane. I heard the alarm, and saw the prisoner and a tall man, in a green coat, running down the lane, the mob were following them; Mr. Devey stopped the prisoner, the other man was stopped, but got away. I saw the prisoner throw the pocket-book from his hand, it fell against a cart wheel; a man jumped out of the cart, picked it up, and gave it to the prosecutor.

THOMAS BIGNAL. I was in a cart in Shoe-lane, heard the cry of Stop thief! and saw the prisoner put his hand

to his pocket, and throw the back away; I jumped down, picked it up, and gave it the prosecutor.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I asked Mr. Devey to intercede on account of the disgrace; I was walking down Shoelane.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180909-30

1091. WILLIAM DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of July , one flute, value 2l., the goods of Robert Birchall , from the person of Robert Smith .

ROBERT SMITH. I am errand-boy to Messrs. Thomas and Co. On the 9th of July, Mr. Robert Birchall, who lived there, sent me to Mr. Potter's, flute-maker, Johnson's-court, Fleet-street, about a quarter before seven o'clock in the evening, for a flute; as I returned with it, I met the prisoner in New-street; he staggered about like a drunken man, he was rubbing lemon over his cheeks, and said "my man you see I have had a drop too much, if you will carry a letter for me, I should not mind giving you two or three shillings." I said if I could do him any service, sooner than he should lose his place, I would, and asked him where it was that I was to go to; he said come to the public-house, while I write it. I said my master would be angry with me, if I waited long; he said he would not be two minutes. He called for a pint of porter, and a pen and ink. I drank some of the porter - He wrote in the paper, and called for a wafer, then asked for a quartern of gin; I told the kind-lady not to bring it. He took the letter to another public-house, and called for a pint of beer. He wrote Harris, on the letter, and would insist on my drinking some gin. He then went to shew me where I was to take the letter; when he was at the top of the court, he said "don't you see that house," and immediately snatched the flute, and ran down another court - I lost my place through it. In about five days after, I saw him in Leadenhall-market. I collared him, and told him he was the man who stole my flute, he said if I did not let him go, he would knock me down - He was secured.

ROBERT BIRCHALL . I sent Smith, for my flute, and have not seen it since. The boy brought me a letter back, which I could not make out.

MARY BERKS. I keep a public-house, in New-street - square. On the 9th of July, the prisoner, and Smith came, the prisoner, wrote a letter, and afterwards called for gin, which I refused, as the boy was so young, and did not seem to wish for it. They went out together.

Prisoner's Defence. I sent the boy, to take a note for me as I was drunk; five days after, he accused me of stealing the flute.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180909-31

1092. HANNAH VIGO was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of August , one handkerchief value 2s., the goods of Richard Postern , from the person of Eleanor Postern .

ELEANOR POSTERN . I am ten years old; my father lives in Bishopsgate-street; he sent me to Redcross-street, with some bonnets; as I returned, the prisoner came up to me, and said, How fast you walk, I saw you go into Mrs. Frost's (where I had left the bonnets). She said she had a beautiful doll for me at home, and she must have the handkerchief off my neck to put it in. She took me up some courts into a dark passage, then took the handkerchief off my neck, and ran away; I pursued, but lost sight of her. I had been walking with her nearly half an hour. Next night I saw her at the corner of Chapel-street, Grubb-street. I pointed her out to my father and mother, who were with me. I am sure she is the woman.

RICHARD POSTERN . I live in Sandy's-street, Bishopsgate. I sent my daughter to Redcross-street about eight o'clock in the evening; she returned at half-past nine, o'clock crying very much, and said a girl had taken her handkerchief. Next night she pointed the prisoner out to me in Grubb-street. I told her, if she did not deliver the handkerchief, I would have her taken into custody. She denied it. I got an officer, and we found her at home.

Prisoner's Defence. I never saw the girl before.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180909-32

1093. JAMES HARDWICKE was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of June , from the person of Robert Grant Shaw , one pocket-book, value 1s.; one 1l. bank note, and one warrant for the payment of and value 51l. 17s. , his property.

MR. ROBERT GRANT SHAW. I am a wine-merchant , and live in St. Helen's-place, Bishopgate. On the 22d of June, about twelve o'clock, I was at Guildhall , at the time of the election, and felt my pocket pulled twice, I put my hand down the second time, and missed my pocket-book, which contained a 1l. note, and a draft for 51l. 17s. I turned round, said I had lost my pocket-book, and Mr. Pike pointed the prisoner out as the man who took it; I stooped down immediately, and picked it up at his feet - He was close to me at the time, pushing me forward; I seized him, and charged him with taking it - He denied it. I think it could not have fallen from any other person. He was on one side of me, rather behind. My pocket was cut in five or six places.

THOMAS MARTIN PIKE. I was in the hall at the time. Mr. Shaw passed me. I had noticed the prisoner feeling several person's pockets - He felt mine; he followed Mr. Shaw. I think there was a gentleman with Mr. Shaw-the prisoner kept close behind him, he took his station before me, and the prisoner behind him; I drew back to watch him, a young man stood by the prisoner's side, the prisoner kept pressing between them, with his hands down, and appeared in the act of cutting Mr. Shaw's pocket; I saw him move his hands up, and collared him: Mr. Shaw said he was robbed, I said, I have got the thief; I saw the prisoner drop the pocket-book at his feet-Mr. Shaw picked it up. I then seized the other man, charged him with being with the prisoner, but let him go, as he denied it. As I was taking him out I felt a knife at my feet-no person claimed it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was behind Mr. Shaw, the people were clapping their hands, the prosecutor's pocketbook fell out of his pocket, he picked it up, and it fell out again, he then said I must be the person.

GUILTY . Aged 60.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180909-33

1094. WILLIAM PRICE was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of July , one live tame drake, price 3s., and six live tane ducks, price 18s. , the property of Sir Francis Desanges , Knight .

JOSEPH JUDD . I am servant to Sir Francis Desanges ; I work at his gardens at the Green-lane near Hornsey . I saw the poultry safe at eight o'clock at night of the 17th of July, there were nineteen in number in a close yard, they could not get out; next morning at six o'clock I found the gate open and missed one drake and six ducks. The patrol came to me between seven and eight o'clock. I saw them in a bag dead - They appeared to be only killed a few hours; I knew them immediately by their plumage.

JOHN HARRIS . I am patrol of Newington-green, my beat extends within two fields of Sir Francis Desanges 's house. On the 18th of July, between four and five o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner in the road, coming in a direct line from Sir Francis Desanges's premises with a bag on his back, about a mile and quarter from the house; I went to him and asked what he had in the bag - He said clothes; I insisted on seeing it, I found seven dead ducks quite warm; he said a farmer at Enfield gave them to him. He could not tell me who it was, though he said he worked for him. He had a reaping-book in his hand. Harris described the ducks before he saw them, the prisoner afterwards said he found them.

Prisoner's Defence. I found them by the river.

GUILTY . Aged 58.

Confined Six Months , and Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180909-34

1095. SARAH CLAPP was charged on the Coroner's Inquisition for the wilful murder of a certain new-born female child .

MARGRET MAYGER. I live in Baltic-street, City Road. The prisoner is married and lodged with me. She was married on Whit Sunday; I thought her pregnant the first time that I saw her.

Q. Relate what occured towards the latter end of August - A. I asked her if she was not in the family way; she said she did not know that she was, nor did she know that she was not. I said, I thought her forward. On the 20th of August, she went to Camberwell fair. On the 21st her husband said she was poorly. I saw her in the afternoon - She said she had caught cold; she then appeared very big. Next night, between ten and eleven o'clock, I saw her go into the privy.

Q. Had she a light with her - A. To the best of my knowledge she had not; she staid there about ten minutes. On her return she stopped at the butt drawing water in a saucepan - I desired her to come off the cold stones as she did not know what injury it might do her. I finished drawing the water, and I carried it up stairs for her; I noticed she was very thin and poorly - I did not go into her room. Next morning, the 23d, her mother told me she thought her daughter had miscarried. A day or two after she came down and asked me to send my boy to the mangler's. I then thought she looked very ill, and told her husband she was lost for want of proper nourishment; he went for some beer. While he was gone, I asked her how far she thought herself advanced in her pregnancy before she miscarried - She said about five months. I advised her to keep her bed; on the Monday following she went out with her mother. On the 1st of September my little boy gave me information - I went to the privy and saw something lying on its right side. Mr. Wyatt afterwards moved it-it was a child; the beadle was fetched. We sent for her husband - He declared he knew nothing of it. The prisoner was then in bed in her clothes; we asked if she knew anything of it - She said no, it was nothing of her's; I said I would get medical assistance to see her whether it was her's or not. She then said it was her's, and that she put it down the privy.

Q. Did she say whether it was alive - A. I asked if it cried - She said no.

Prisoner. Q. Did I not fall down stairs about a week before - A. Yes, she said she had hurt her head, but did not complain of any thing else. She said she felt a beating at her heart in the night.

MR. THOMAS HALE. I was called in to see the child at St. Luke's workhouse, it was in a high state of putrifaction and swelled so that I did not open it, as it would have been be useless. I examined the external parts and could find no marks of violence; it appeared to have arrived at its full period. I cannot take upon myself to say whether it was born alive or not-the mother falling down stairs might probaby have killed it. It would in that case produce premature labour.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18180909-35

1096. JOHN JONES was indicted for the wilful murder of Amey Reader .

THOMAS FISHER . Amey Reader was my daughter-in-law - She had cohabited with the prisoner as her husband for two years. On the 29th of June , they were both working for me in a brickfield at Newington , about seven o'clock in the evening they were both very much in liquor. They had words and quarrelled-the prisoner wanted to get away, she would not let him, she collared him and threw him down, tore his shirt and waistcoat. He then struck her somewhere about the belly, she fell down-how she got down I cannot say. I saw him strike her once after she was down; there was a heap of bricks where she fell, she might have fallen on them and hurt herself. She was lifted up, she was in liquor, and carried to the sand-house and put to bed. Next morning we sent for the doctor, he bled her.

ANNE FISHER. I am the deceased's mother - She went into the field and told the prisoner to bring some money, at half-past twelve o'clock he brought her 1s.; about four o'clock they left off work, he had a can of beer - She asked him for half a pint about seven o'clock, he said she should have no more; they had drank a great deal before and were both drunk, but she was not so far gone as he - He said if she drank any more he would knock her down; they got quarreling, she told him to be off with his barrow - He was going away, and said he would give her a good hiding as soon as he got hold of her; she then

got hold of him by the jacket and shirt - I told her to let go, which she did, he took his barrow. I got between them - I went away, returned in five minutes, and found her on the ground, just by the bricks; he was by her, and striking as hard as he could - I saw him strike her four or five very violent blows about her body. I told him to leave off - He said he would not; we parted them, he left. I took her to the sand-house - She died on the Wednesday.

COURT. Q. Did not she strike him first - A. I told her to get out of his way, she would not.

Q. I ask you if she did not strike him before he struck her - A. I never saw it before she was down.

Q. Did you not say before the Coroner you was quite sure before he struck her she struck him, and tore his waistcoat and shirt - A. I said she got hold of him and tore his waistcoat and shirt.

Q. See that you do not make any mistake - You say that you did not say before the Coroner that before he struck her she struck him - A. Yes, I did not see her strike him.

Mr. JAMES PARKINSON. I am a surgeon. On the 2d of July, I examined the body of the deceased, and could observe no external mark of violence; but on opening the body, I discovered that the bladder had been ruptured and the urine effused through the bowels, which were in a high degree of inflammation, in consequence of it.

Q. Are you able to say what caused the rupture - A. I am not. I believe it was from external violence, either a blow or fall might have produced it. I think it right to say, that when the bladder is so highly extended a much less degree of violence might have occasioned the injury than could be supposed. Her death was in consequence of the rupture of the bladder; her falling on an unequal surface, with her bladder in that state, is very likely of itself to have occasioned the mischief. She was in an unhealthy state at the time. She had applied to me the morning before the injury was received for a complaint in her bowels, which would make the rupture more probable.

THOMAS FISHER. I was there all the while. I did not see him strike her more than once.

JAMES CROCKWELL. I was before the Magistrate when Anne Fisher was examined - I saw her mark her deposition; it was read over to her, (looking at it) this is it(reads). They were both addicted to drinking; I am quite sure before he struck her she struck him, and tore his waistcoat and shirt.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18180909-36

1097. HENRY NASH was charged by the Coroner's Inquisition with feloniously killing and slaying Catharine wife.

ELIZA NASH. I am the prisoner's daughter. On Sunday the 9th of August , between eleven and twelve o'clock at night, I went home with my father, the deceased was his wife and my mother-in-law; we lived in the Tenter-ground, near Shepherd and Shepherdess fields . When I went into the house my mother-in-law was in bed, she got out of bed, called me carroty b-ch, and struck me three times on the head with her fist; my father came to take my part, she caught hold of his shirt, he had done nothing to her, nor said anything to her; he then gave her a slight push to keep her off me, and told her to go to bed; she fell down with her head against the foot of the bedstead.

Q. Are you sure he did not strike her-A. I am; he only slightly pushed her. I desired her to let me help her up into bed - She said she would lay there. She got up at last without assistance, and went to bed-my father went to bed to her, and I went to bed in the next room. About eight o'clock next morning my father came to me, and said she was very ill; I went to her, she complained of her head. I fetched Mrs. Bennett. She died on Tuesday evening about eight o'clock.

Q. Was you with her much - A. Almost all the time; she complained of her head very much, but nothing else. I fetched my father from work on Monday, he came, and an officer took him at the gate.

Cross-examined by MR. REYNOLDS. My father was quite sober. She struck me very violently, three times, and tore my father's shirt all to pieces.

Q. To prevent her hurting you he pushed her away - A. Yes, slightly; the surgeon was sent for on Monday morning. She was addicted to drinking.

WILLIAM BROOKES . I am a surgeon. I was called in to attend the deceased on Monday morning, about ten o'clock. She only complained of her head. I examined, and found a slight mark over her left temple, which did not appear to me of any importance - She appeared scarcely sensible; I saw her again in the evening, her symptoms were aggravated, and continued to increase. On Tuesday morning, about five o'clock, I was called to her, and found her labouring under apoplectic symptoms, which increased until she died that evening at eight o'clock. She died labouring under apoplectic symptoms. I opened the body, and found the right hemisphere of the brain completely covered with coagulated blood; the heart was large and fat, and the liver appeared as if she was addicted to drinking.

Q. From these appearances, of what do you say she died - A. From the bursting of a blood vessel in the brain.

Q.Have you any reason to think she died from any external violence - A. Certainly not; there was no external mark on the side where the vessel was ruptured.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18180909-37

1098. FRANCIS COATES was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of April , one 10l. bank note , the property of the Mayor, Burgesses, and Commonalty of the City of Bristol , against the statute.

THREE OTHER COUNTS, stating it to be the property of different persons.

JOHN HARFORD . I am clerk to Mr. Langley, who is chamberlain of Bristol. On the 10th of April I saw him inclose a 10l. note in a letter to the Rev. Mr. Whitby, Erdsland, near Leominster; I took the number of the note, it was 15,490, October 23, 1817; I marked it(looks at one), this is the note. I gave the letter to the clerk at the post-office, Mr. South, and paid the postage of a double letter.

THOMAS SOUTH . I am clerk at the post-office, Bristol. I was on duty on the 10th of April, and made up the Wor

cester bag; a letter for Erdsland would be put into that bag. I sealed the bag, and forwarded it by the mail.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. There are two persons besides me who take letters in. The mail leaves at seven o'clock - I remain there until then. I might have been out at the door about four o'clock. Worcester is sixty miles from Bristol.

JOHN PARRY. I was assistant to the post-master at Worcester. The Bristol mail arrives about four o'clock in the morning, it arrived on the 11th of April as usual; the bag was regularly delivered. This letter would have been put into the Leominster bag, which was forwarded there by a man on horseback, who leaves the bag-the distance is twenty-six miles.

Q. Who was the person employed to carry the bag on that day from Worcester to Leominster - A. The prisoner's father is the contractor for carrying the mail; in the early part of April the prisoner himself frequently carried it.

Q. Can you remember whether he did or did not carry it on that day - A. I cannot be certain. I made a memorandum of some money that he owed me, and to the best of my belief, he paid it on that day, which was Saturday. He said his father lived at Leominster.

SARAH NICHOLLS. I am the wife of the Post-master at Leominster. I and my daughter always do the business of the office in the evening. On the 11th of April the Worcester bag arrived about eight o'clock - I cannot say who brought it. Mr. Coates frequently brings it himself, though he did not ride that day. The post-rider takes the bag to Coates, he then either brings or sends it to my office. We generally send Mr. Whitby's letters to an inn where he puts up.

Q. Can you say whether any arrived on that day-A. No; We cannot trace any as having arrived. Coates lives about a hundred yards from the office, and keeps a public-house. The prisoner assisted him at that time instead of a hostler.

Cross-examined. Q.When the mail arrived did any thing appear unusual - A. The bag was sealed, and the word "Worcester" on the seal.

MR. BOLLAND. Q. Is that always the case - A.In the hurry of business the impression is not always perfect. I will not swear that there was an impression on the seal that day, as I did not particularly notice it.

REV. GEORGE WHITBY . I live at Burton College , Erdsland, near Leominster. I expected a remittance for a blind man, who is an annuitant of Bristol-it did not arrive.

JOSEPH CLARKE . I am book-keeper at the Worcester heavy coach office. On the 16th of April the prisoner took a place for London, between eleven and twelve o'clock - He paid me a 1l. Leominster note for the fare. He afterwards came with his father, to the best of my knowledge. I gave him two 1l. bank notes for two local ones, as his father said he was going to London, and they would be of no use there. He started about one o'clock.

THOMAS COULSON. I live at the King's Head, public-house, in the Commercial-road. The prisoner arrived from Worcester about the middle of April, and lodged with me till he got a situation. Three days after he came to my house, I gave him change for a 10l. bank note (looking at it)-this is it. I wrote " F. Coates, at Lewis's," on it.

Cross-examined. Q. He was introduced to you by Lewis - A. Yes. The note was traced to me about a fortnight afterwards; the prisoner was taken some weeks after that. I am sure he knew that inquiry had been made about it. He remained in his place, which was at Mr. Templeman's, near me.

Prisoner's Defence. My father gave me 5l., my brothers 3l., and I had saved 3l. myself. I am innocent.

HENRY COATES . I am the prisoner's father. The mail comes from Worcester to me; it is then carried to the office immediately, without coming into my house-it is always sealed with an impression. My son sometimes carries it.

Q. Who carried it on the 11th of April - A. He did not; but I will not swear whether I or my other son did. The prisoner never went out on a Saturday. He left Leominster on the 14th. He had been talking about going to town for three months previous, but I was not able to supply him. His mother gave him 5l., his brother 2l., and he had saved more than 3l. himself.

Cross-examined by MR. GURNEY. Q. Did you see the money in his possession - A. Yes.

Q. Look at this letter-is it your son's hand-writing-(handing it to him) - A. I think it is (reads)

"SIR,

"I received a letter on Sunday about the note I paid to Mr. Coulson. I gave a 5l., one 2l., and three 1l. notes at the Worcester Old Bank for it. I think Mr. Hughes gave it to me.

"F. COATES."

MR. THOMAS HUGHES. I am cashier at the Worcester Old Bank. When persons change notes we always mark them-this note has no mark of its having passed through our hands.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Sometimes, by accident, a note escapes unendorsed - I have known instances of the kind. It is possible I may have given the prisoner a bank note for the value in local notes.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18180909-38

1099. JAMES NOKES and THOMAS WEBB were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Hannah Philip , widow , about twelve o'clock on the night of the 28th of August , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, one pewter plate, value 1s.; one shawl, value 18d., and one cannister, value 2s., her property; and two shirts, value 8s. , the property of John Philip .

HANNAH PHILIP . I am a widow, and live at Harlington . On the 28th of August, between nine and ten o'clock, I fastened my house, and went to bed, got up at six o'clock next morning, and found my window open, and the things stated in the indictment gone. I saw them at Eaton on the Tuesday after the prisoners were in custody.

THOMAS MONTAGUE. I am an officer. On the 29th of August, about nine o'clock in the morning, I took the prisoners into custody at Ditton-green, Bucks., about eight miles from Harlington, and found the property on them - They were in company together. Part of the property was in a basket which one of them had. I asked them

where they got the property from? they both said they bought them the day before for 4s.

THOMAS BUCKLAND. I am a farmer, and live at Langley. I found the prisoners sitting down in a bye-lane, at Ditton-green. Suspecting them, I asked them where they came from? they said they came out of Kent, and were going to Reading. I said that as a robbery had been committed the night before, I should take the liberty of examining their bundles. I got off my horse, and told them I should look into all the bundles, and desired them, if they were going to Reading, to go with me. Nokes made off; while I was securing him Webb ran away, but was stopped about a mile from the place - I sent a boy, who was with me, after him. I am sure he is the man who got away. One of them said they bought the canister at Kingston, the other said they bought it on the road.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

NOKES'S Defence. We bought them.

NOKES - GUILTY. Aged 19.

WEBB - GUILTY. Aged 19.

Of stealing only .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18180909-39

1100. JAMES NOKES and THOMAS WEBB were again indicted for stealing, on the 29th of August , at Cranford, one sheep, price 1l. 5s. , the property of Matthew Newman .

SECOND COUNT, for feloniously killing and slaying the said sheep, with intent to steal part of the carcase, against the statute.

MATTHEW NEWMAN . I live at Cranford, in Middlesex . I had some sheep in a fold there.

JAMES HAINES . I am shepherd to Mr. Newman. I saw the sheep all safe on Friday, the 28th of August, at eight o'clock at night; at six o'clock the next morning, I found one of them killed in the fold-it was alive overnight. One of the shoulders, and the hind-quarters were gone-the rest was left in the fold. I afterwards saw a hind-quarter, which appeared to be the same size; I cannot say whether it was part of my sheep or not.

THOMAS BUCKLAND. I was by when the hind-quarters were found in the basket, it was compared in my presence-Haines was there; from circumstances it appeared evident that it was part of the sheep. In taking the skin off the sheep, part of it was left on the leg; the hole in the skin corresponded exactly with that part. The tail was also cut in a very particular manner, which also corresponded. I have no doubt of it being part of the same sheep; these were the two hind-quarters. When I took them, they were eating mutton, which appeared to be a shoulder. In going from Cranford to Ditton-green, Harlington would be very little out of the way.

THOMAS MONTAGUE. I am a constable. I saw the prisoners eating a shoulder of mutton. I saw the hind-quarters compared with the rest of the sheep, they fitted exactly. The prisoners said they found the mutton.

JAMES HAINES re-examined. I saw both the hind-quarters compared with the sheep; part of the skin was left on the leg; the same part was missing from the corresponding part, and belonged to the other part.

NOKES'S Defence. We found it by the road side.

WEBB'S Defence. We found it.

J. NOKES - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 19.

T. WEBB - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 19.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18180909-40

1101. JAMES PICKERING and ELIZA LOWE were indicted for feloniously assaulting Frances Harvey , on the King's highway, on the 13th of August , putting her in fear, and taking from her person, and against her will, three feathers, value 15s., one ridicule, value 5s., one handkerchief, value 1s., and 15s., in monies numbered , the property of Francis Harvey .

FRANCES HARVEY. I am the wife of Francis Harvey , who lives in Clarendon-street. On the 13th of August, at ten o'clock at night, as I was returning home, I met the prisoners and another woman, in the New-road - They asked me for some liquor, which I refused. The women said they would have something, and dragged the feathers out of my bonnet, and handed them to Pickering. They ran to the end of Charlotte-street, and the man also; I followed, and secured him with my property. He held the feathers under his coat-the women went another way - I told the watchman, but he would not take him. I held him - He knocked me down. I seized and held him for half an hour, until a watchman came. I am sure the prisoners are the persons.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. I have been married six years.

Q. Have you never gone by another name - A. No, Lowe mentioned my mother's name. She said "Here comes mother Brinkle's daughter". She first wanted to put her two-pence to mine to get something to drink.

Q. have you never gone by the name of Mitche - A. No, I knew a person of that name eight years ago-my husband was in prison two years ago.

JOHN CULLIFERD . I am a watchman. I was coming up Charlotte-street, the prosecutrix had hold of the man, I secured him. He told her she might have her feathers again.

Cross-examined. The prosecutrix lives in the neighbourhood; she charged a man with an assault abou three months back.

WILLIAM READ . I am an officer. I apprehended Lowe and told her what she was charged with; she said she was there but did not take the feathers.

Cross-examined. Harvey described her to me.

PICKERING'S Defence. I leave it to my counsel.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18180909-41

1102. THOMAS PERRY was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of July , one pewter water-dish, value 3s.; one pewter plate, value 2s.; one sheet, value 3s.; and one pillow-case, value 1s. , the goods of Thomas Moody .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating them to be the property of Charles Neale , Richard Vigor , and Hezekiah Davis .

THIRD COUNT, the same, only stating them to be the goods of Richard Ogbourne .

THOMAS MOODY . I am master of the Britannia barge ,

which is the property of Charles Neale, Richard Vigor , and Hezekiah Davis. On the 9th of July, it was at Kennett's wharf , with some things in a crate belonging to Mr. Oghourne, of Bath, on board. In consequence of what Fry told me, I found the articles stated in the indictment under the head of the prisoner's bed, on board-it was about thirty feet from the package that they were taken out of. I had him apprehended - He tried to escape.

Cross-examined by MR. ARABIN. There was property to a great amount on board.

GEORGE FRY. I was on board the Britannia, and saw the prisoner go to the crate, take something out, carry it down, and put it under the bed. I told Moody; he found the articles stated in the indictment there, in a pillow-case.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The things nearly fell out of the package, I removed them for safety.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Whipped and Discharged.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180909-42

1103. ROBERT GYMER was indicted for embezzlement .

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180909-43

1104. WILLIAM JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of June , one handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of North Naylor Savery , from his person .

NORTH NAYLOR SAVERY. I am in the East India House. On the 22d of June, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, I was in Redcross-street , the prisoner ran against me as he passed - I felt something at my pocket - He crossed the street, and held a handkerchief on his left side, which I suspected to be mine; he turned into a court, I followed him, he quickened his pace, and turned round another court. I called Stop thief! he was stopped at the end of the court, within a hundred yards of where I lost it; my handkerchief was produced.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. I know it was my handkerchief.

ROBERT WHATLEY . I am a watch-maker, and live in Paul's-alley, Cripplegate. I saw the prisoner running, and Mr. Savery following him, he was the only person running from the cry. I joined in pursuit up Jacob's Well-passage - He was stopped; I came up and secured him; in a moment a person brought the handkerchief, and said he picked it up.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I deny it; the handkerchief which I had was mine.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180909-44

1105. JOHN HEATH was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of August , one pocket-book, value 1s., the goods of William Pigget , from his person .

GEORGE PARRY. I live in Wood-street, Cheapside, and am a cooper. I know Mr. Piggot very well - He is now in France. On the 22d of August, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I was with him, at Holborn-bridge, going into the City - We were walking arm in arm; Thompson came up, and asked if we had lost any thing? we each felt our pockets, and said we had not. Thompson produced a pocket-book, which I knew to he Mr. Piggots, I had seen him put it into his pocket about an hour before-Mr. Piggot claimed it when he saw it. The prisoner was then in custody. I never saw him before.

THOMAS THOMPSON . I am constable of St. Sepulchre's. On the 22d of August, I was going up Holborn, on the opposite side to the prosecutor, and saw the prisoner, in company with two others, on Holborn-hill - I watched them; they all three went and sat on the steps of St. Andrew's church. Mr. Piggot and Mr. Parry passed them arm in arm; they got up immediately. One of them went up, and appeared to be trying their pockets. The prisoner and the other were about two yards behind; the other immediately left and joined them. They whispered together, and went up to the gentlemen again-the prisoner and the other appeared to be covering the first, who put his hand into Mr. Pigot's pocket, took something out, and handed it to the prisoner, who made a motion as if he put it under his waistcoat, and immediately crossed over. I seized him, and said, "You have robbed the gentleman," and asked him what he had got, whether it was a handkerchief, or what? he said he had nothing. I pulled him towards the gentlemen, and asked them if they had lost any thing? They at first said they had not. I requested them to feel again. I found the pocket-book in the prisoner's breeches-it only contained memorandums and a passport.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I picked it up, and asked who it belonged to.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180909-45

1106. EVAN JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of August , 60lbs. of rope, value 30s. , the goods of William Borradaile , John Watson Borradaile , Abraham Borradaile , and George Ravenhill .

MR. ABRAHAM BORRADAILE . I am in partnership with William and John Watson Borradaile, and George Ravenhill , we live in Fenchurch-street. The prisoner lived eight years with us - I never gave him the rope.

HENRY TURNPENNY. I am an officer. On the 20th of August, about seven o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner in Coleman-street, in a direction from Messrs. Borradailes', with a bag. I followed him through a court into Basinghall-street. I stopped him, and asked what he had there? he said some old pieces of rope, which his master had given him. I examined it, and found five or six pounds of old rope, and three or four bundles of new. I asked him if his master gave him that? he said they might have been put in by mistake. I searched further, and found 5lbs. of old, and 60lbs. of new rope. He said he was sorry for what he had done, and hoped I would let him take it back and not go with him, which I refused.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 33.

Confined Two Months .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180909-46

1107. JANE WILLIAMS , MARY PENDLETON , WILLIAM WILKS , MARIA WILKS . WILLIAM CHALKER , CHARLES HANSCOMBE , JOHN ANDERSON , SARAH IRELAND , HANNAH GILBERT , TIMOTHY LANE , JAMES YEOELL , JAMES DALAS , JOHN DUNN , JOHN WATSON , BENJAMIN TATHAN WILLIS , THOMAS OWEN , HENRY WAY , JOSEPH TURNER , THOMAS SEENEY , WILLIAM QUIN , JAMES WOOLE , EDWARD NEW , and JOSEPH LONGWOOD , were severally and separately indicted for feloniously and unlawfully having in their custody and possession forged bank notes, they well knowing them to be forged .

To which indictments they severally pleaded

GUILTY .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180909-47

1108. WILLIAM SAUNDERS was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of August , at St. Mary-le-bone, fourteen silver spoons, value 4l.; one pair of sugar-tongs, value 5s.; one sugar-sifter, value 5s.; and one cream-jug, value 1l., the property of Hugh Stephens , in his dwelling-house .

HUGH STEPHENS , Esq. I live in Dorset-square, in the parish of St. Mary-le-bone . On the 12th of August, between twelve and two o'clock in the day, I was alarmed, went down stairs to the area, and found a quantity of silver plate strewed about the area, and the prisoner at the top of the area-steps in the custody of one of my servants, and another man. I sent for a constable, and gave him in charge; we found the property on him.

EDWARD VINCENT. On Wednesday, the 12th of August, I was in Dorset-square; as I passed the prosecutor's iron railing, I heard a woman scream out, cry Stop thief! and saw the prisoner run along the area, and dropping the spoons - He let several tea and table-spoons fall in the area, and the sugar-tongs and more spoons on the area-steps. The moment he got to the top of the areasteps I collared him, took him into the kitchen, and locked him up while I fetched an officer.

ELIZA TITCOMB. I am servant to Mr. Stephens - I was in the kitchen with my fellow female servant, and heard a spoon fall; I ran to the butler's pantry and found the prisoner coming out of the door; I am sure he is the man. I asked him what he wanted? he produced a sugar-sifter and a tea-spoon. I told him he had got more - He said he had not; I said if he had not got more I would not let him go; he immediately attempted to make his escape - I caught hold of him, and held him several minutes; he struck me and got from me, I run after him and caught him-again he ran from me. I gave the alarm, called out Stop thief! and went up the area steps after him, Vincent came up; as the prisoner ran along the area he dropped several things-the other servant ran and picked them up. I saw her pick up the silver cream-jug in the area near the kitchen-door; I saw him drop the six table-spoons, a large gravy-spoon, and some tea-spoons in the area. I afterwards saw the plate in my master's possession; I had seen it safe in the pantry just before.

SAMUEL LIMEBEER . I am a constable. I was called in and the prisoner was given into my charge; the prosecutor gave me the property, which I produce.

MR. STEPHENS. It is mine. I told the servant to pick it up when I saw it strewed about the area. They have all my initials on them, and are worth above 6l.

Prisoner's Defence. I was passing the prosecutor's house, a man came out and dropped the plate against the door; I went down to pick it up, and knocked at the door-the servant accused me of the robbery.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 20.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18180909-48

1109. JOHN DRISCOLL was indicted, for that he, on the 11th of July , at St. James, Clerkenwell, feloniously did dispose of and put away a certain forged and counterfeit bank note (setting it forth) No. 71,502, June 15, 1818; signed J. Lambert, for the payment of 5l., with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England , he well knowing it to be forged and counterfeited against the statute .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only calling it a promissory note for payment of money, instead of a bank note.

THIRD AND FOURTH COUNTS, the same as the two former, only stating his intent to be to defraud Samuel Sproston .

TWO OTHER COUNTS, the same as the former, only stating his intent to be to defraud Thomas Sproston .

THOMAS SPROSTON . I am shopman to Samuel Sproston , a woollen draper , who lives at No. 2, Bedfordbury, in the country of Middlesex; I know the prisoner. On the 11th of July, he came to the shop and bought some superfine cloth, some kerseymere, and four yards an half of olive velveteen, which came to 4l. 5s. 11d.; he paid me a 5l. bank note. I asked his name and address - He gave the name of Davis, No. 8, Crown-street Soho, he gave no Christian name. I gave him the change (looking at the note). This is it, I wrote on it.

Q. Did you write the whole of this, "Davis, 8, Crown-street, Soho, 11-7;" T. S. - A. Yes; T. S. are my initials. I have no doubt of its being the note he gave me. He took the things away with him.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. He had no acquaintance with him; he came by himself.

Q. Was no person near him - A. None. I am certain he is the man. I gave him 14s. ld., which was all he had to receive. I wrote on the note while he was in the shop. I had no other 5l. note, except one which I took the night before.

Q. Did not he say "my name is Davis, and I am known at No. 8, Crown-street" - A. No; Crown-street is nearer to me than Whitecross-street.

COURT. Q. Have you any reason to doubt its being the note he gave you - A. No; I paid it away, with another 5l. note, the same day, to a Mr. Thomas, of the Strand-the other 5l. note was taken of a person named Jones, and had Jones's name on it.

JOHN SHEPHERD. I am landlord of the house, No. 8,

Crown-street; it was empty on the 11th of July, and a long time before, and is so now.

Cross-examined. Q. Crown-street was formerly called Hog-lane - A. Yes. It is very irregularly numbered; there are two houses of No. 2.

THOMAS MILNER. In July last I lived at the other No. 8, Crown-street, I lived there four years and a half. I never had a lodger of the name of Davis; the prisoner never lodged with me.

Cross-examined. Q. Are there not several new houses at the other end of the street - A. Yes. It is irregularly numbered. My house, No. 8, is in St. Ann's parish, and Shepherd's house, No. 8, is in St. Giles's.

THOMAS CORDELL. I keep a public-house in Fashion-street, Spitalfields. On the 12th of May the prisoner came to my house in company with another man, who I understood to be Lloyd; I do not know that they came in together - They sat together in one box, and had a separate glass of gin and water and a glass of rum and water; they had liquor to the amount of 6s., the other man paid for it all. There was a third person drank with them, he used my house. (Looking at a 5l. note)-this is the note I received; I wrote " D. Clifton's friend" on it(meaning the person who was in company with Clifton) the prisoner was one of them.

Cross-examined. Q. Did the other two come in together - A. I do not know, they might. Clifton paid me the note.

Q. Lloyd came into the bar, and gave you the 5l. note in the absence of the prisoner - A. Yes, the prisoner was in the tap-room at the time - They could not see each other.

JOHN FOY . I am an officer of Marlborough-street, I received information, and went to the prisoner's lodging, in Lamb's-court, between Bunhill-row and Whitecross-street, with Plank and Mr. Christmas, on the 17th of July, a little before nine o'clock in the morning, and found him and his wife in bed-no stranger was there. I searched, and found some velveteen and cotton there. I found a rolling-pin among some rubbish and shoes, under the table. I asked whose it was? the prisoner made no answer, but his wife said it was her's - He heard it. I laid it down till the prisoner dressed himself. I then found that the top unscrewed, and in the cavity I found five 5l. notes, which I marked and gave to Mr. Christmas(looking at them) these are them; I marked them before I parted with them. I produce the velveteen and cotton.

Q. Did you afterwards hear the prisoner say any thing about the velveteen - A. He said his brother had left it with him about a month before.

SAMUEL PLANK . I accompanied Foy at the time he stated. I saw the rolling-pin found, and the notes found in it. I found the velveteen and cotton at the top of the bedstead; the moment I took it off the prisoner said what do you want with that, it is my property. A few minutes before we took him away, he said, it is not mine, it is my brother-in-law's, he left it with me a short time ago to take care of; his wife contradicted him, and said she bought it of a hawker in the street, he made no reply.

THOMAS SPROSTON . I will not say whether it is the velveteen he bought of me or not; I have the piece which it was cut off, it is similar to it, and very near the same quality with that which I sold him.

Q. Do you believe one to be part of the other - A. It may; it is the same colour, with some little variation. I think one is not so stout as the other; it is the same quantity as that I sold him-the cotton is not so long.

Cross-examined. The velveteen is not an uncommon quantity to cut; it is the most common colour, it appeared not so stout.

Q. Does that induce you to think they came off different pieces - A. I should think it did.

CHARLES CHRISTMAS. I am inspector of bank notes. I have been so for fourteen years (looks at the notes uttered to the prosecutor), it is forged, the paper is not bank paper, it is not struck from the Bank plate, the signature is not the hand-writing of the signing clerk, but it is his name. That uttered to Coulson is also forged in every respect, the paper, plate and signature are the same; but one is dated the 4th of August, 1817, the other the 5th of June, 1818; the plate has been altered in order to vary the date. The five 5l. notes found in the rolling-pin are also all forged in every respect-two are of different signatures; they are all off the same plate, and dated the 15th of June, 1818; the first note is also dated so; the hand-writing is the same, although the name is different. The signature is C. Phillips on one, and J. Lambert on the others.

JAMES LAMBERT. I am signing clerk at the Bank, and have been so more than four years-there is no other clerk of my name. The signature on the note is not my writing(looks at the five 5l. notes), they have not my handwriting on them.

(Note read. See Indictment.)

Prisoner. I leave it to my counsel.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 39.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18180909-49

1110. WILLIAM WELLER and GEORGE CASHMAN were indicted, for that they, on the 18th of July , at St. James, Clerkenwell, feloniously did dispose of and put away a certain forged and counterfeit bank note, as follows-(setting it forth, No. 53,926, 1l., May 13, 1818, signed J. Pearson)-with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England , they well knowing it to be forged and counterfeited, against the statute .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only calling it a promissory note for payment of money, instead of a bank note.

ANN FEAR. I am a maried woman, and know the prisoners. I have known Weller since the 11th of July; on that day I saw him at the Cooper's Arms, Atfield-street, Golden-lane. I went there to purchase a forged 1l. note - I had received instructions for that purpose from the Solicitor of the Bank. I saw a boy there and inquired for Weller, he came to the bar to me-nobody else was present. I told him I had a watch to sell, and asked 18s. for it.

Q. Had you introduced yourself to him by any name - A. I said my name was Fear; he said he recollected the name. I then said, I understood he could let me have some queer notes (meaning forged) - He said he could. I

asked him if he would let me have two for the watch? he said he would, and told me to sit down, and he would go and fetch them and bring them to me. He went backwards, and was absent nearly half an hour. I sent the boy belonging to the house for him; he came, and I asked him if he had not forgot me? He said No; but the woman was out, and he could not get them directly, but she would not be long. He went away, and I went out to my friend, Joseph Guy , who was in the street (he married my husband's sister). I found him at the top of Atfield-street, which leads into Goswell-street; he had come as far as that with me, and I had left him waiting there while I went to the Cooper's Arms. I then returned to the Cooper's Arms, leaving Guy at the top of the street. In about five minutes, I saw Weller; he gave me two 1l. notes, and I gave him the watch.

Q. Had you any conversation with him besides - A. I asked him what was his usual price for the notes? he said 8s. each. I asked him if I could be supplied at any time? he said Yes; I should find him there, and if not, the landlord would send for him. We parted, and I found Guy where I had left him. We went to the Bank together, and gave Mr. Christmas the two notes.

Q. When did you next see Weller - A. On the 14th of July; Guy went with me. I left him at the top of the street - we could see each other from the door of the house. I went to the Cooper's Arms, saw Weller, and asked him if he would let me have two more? he said he would in about half an hour, and asked me if I would wait? I said I had further to go, and would call again. I left him, found Guy where I had left him, and returned in about half an hour, leaving Guy as before. I looked into the skittle-ground, which is at the back of the house, and saw Weller there - I went into the back-parlour with him; there was a man asleep on the bench. I asked him who he was? he told me not to mind, it was all right. He then put two 1l. notes on the table, which he took out of his breeches-pocket; I gave him 16s. in silver for them, folded them up, and put them into my pocket. He asked me when I thought I should want some more? I said I thought I should be able to take half a score on the Saturday following, and asked him if he would let me have them for less? he said he would let me have them for 7s. 6d. each. I appointed to be there at ten o'clock for them. I then went to the Bank, but not finding Mr. Christmas, I kept them in my pocket till the next morning, when I gave them to Mr. Christmas, at a public-house in the Old Bailey. I had been to the Bank for him, but could not find him.

Q. Did you go to Weller on the Saturday following - A. Yes, at ten o'clock, as nearly as possible; Guy went with me, and I left him as before. I saw Weller in the skittle-ground - He came to me in the passage. I asked him if he had got them ready? he made no answer, but went into the skittle-ground; he returned into the passage in about two minutes, followed by the prisoner, Cashman; we all three went into the back-parlour, and sat down - They rang the bell, and called for sixpennyworth of shrub and water. Cashman then asked me how many I wanted? Weller was present - I told him half a score. He then asked for the money; I told him I had got it all right, and when he brought the notes I would give it to him; he said I must give him the money first, as it was a rule among them to have the money first, in case it should be marked, that they might put it away before they fetched the notes. I said they were both strangers to me, that it was all the money I had, and did not like to give them the money till I had the notes. Cashman said I need not be afraid, for it was Weller I was dealing with, and he would wait in the room while Weller went for the notes. I said I did not like to deliver the money till I had the notes. He said, if I was afraid I should have them, as they were then in the room. He put his hand into his breeches-pocket, and pulled something out, which I thought were the notes; it looked like paper. I then put two 1l. notes, and 1l. 15s. in silver on the table; Cashman took it up, looked at it, put it into his pocket, and said I must wait while he fetched them, and that he should not be gone above five minutes. Weller was present the whole of the time. Cashman went out, leaving me with Weller - He was gone nearly half an hour.

Q. While he was gone, had you any conversation with Weller - A. Yes; he asked me if I wanted any 5l. notes! I said I knew a man who had asked about some. He said he would let me have some at 30s. each, and I might charge 50s. I said I should see him on Sunday-nothing more passed. I told him it was a long way to come, and asked if he could bring them nearer? he said he could not bring them any where but there, as a young man, whom he had served nearly seven months, asked him to bring three to a certain house, and when he came there two officers were ready for him; that he was detected, and tried last Sessions, and since that he had been more careful, and would not deliver them any where else. I do not know that any thing else passed till Cashman returned.

Q. What passed then - A. He came in, took off his hat, and took the notes out of it - They were, done up carelessly in a piece of brown paper. He threw the paper on the ground, and gave Weller the notes, Weller then gave them to me. They both said, if I came on Sunday I could see them there - I appointed Monday morning, at ten o'clock. I left them, and found Guy where I had left him. We went to the Bank, and gave Mr. Christmas the notes. I saw him open them, count and mark them.

Q. On Monday morning did you go according to appointment - A. Yes; I went alone, and saw the prisoners together at the Cooper's Arms, public-house, and told them I had seen the man who wanted the notes, and asked them if they would see him and deal with him themselves, for I had told him where to come to them, and asked if they would charge him 2l. each for the 5l. notes, as he would not give more, and they must give me 2s. out of it. They both heard this, and asked me if the man would trust me with the money? I said it was probable that he would, but I had much rather they would deal with him themselves. They both told me to bring the man to any house in Goswell-street, and they would see him. I left them.

Q. Do you know a man named Sellers - A. Yes, I believe he is an officer. I met him at the Cart and Horse, public-house, at the corner of Sutton-street, Goswell-street, next morning; the Bank Solicitor introduced him to me; he was dressed in a brown coat and top-boots. I left him there, and went to the Cooper's Arms, which is about two minutes walk. I saw Weller first, told him I

had left the man in Goswell-street, and asked him if he would go with me to see him? Cashman then came in, and asked me how many I wanted? I told him Weller was going to see the man himself. Cashman asked me how many I thought he wanted? I said, I believed he wanted six 5l. notes, but Weller was going to him. Cashman asked Weller if he was going? he said, Yes. Cashman said, "Make haste. and I will get them ready." I took Weller to the Cart and Horse, public-house, and introduced him to Sellers. I said to Sellers, "Here is the young man, will you speak to him? Sellers said, "I suppose you know what I want?" Weller said Yes. Sellers asked him how much the 5l. notes were a piece? he said 2l. Sellers said it was a long price, as he had never given more than 35s., but he did not mind, if they were good ones. He looked towards me, to know what sort they were. I said I could say nothing of the 5l. notes, as I had never seen any of then, but the 1l. notes he had seen. Sellers than said, if they were as good as the 1l. he did not care. He then asked him what he should give him for half a score of 1l. notes? he said 9s. each, which was agreed to.

Q. Was any thing said about the money being paid - A.Sellers agreed to take four 5l. notes at 2l. each, and ten 1l. notes at 9s. each. Weller said he must have the money first. Sellers said, he thought it was time enough when he brought the notes-Wellers said he must have the money first, and that he would not bring them there, but I must fetch them as usual. Sellers gave Weller twelve 1l. notes. He looked at them, and asked Sellers if he should know any of them again if they were not all right? He said he should not, but that he would change any he disliked. Weller said he always had my money first, and that Sellers need not he afraid - I then said it was so. Weller took the notes from Sellers, doubled them up, and gave them to me, telling me to come with him - He told Sellers he should not be gone long, and that he should have the notes within half an hour. I went with him to near the top of Atfield-street, he then asked me if I knew the way to the Cooper's Arms? I said Yes. He left me and went to the left, which would lead to the back of the Cooper's Arms. When I got there, I met Cashman in the passage - He asked me how many the man wanted? I told him four 5l. and ten 1l. notes. He asked me for the money, I gave it to him. He asked me if I had taken my difference out of it? I said I had not had time to reckon it. Weller came in at that moment from the back of the house. Cashman asked him how many the man wanted, he told him. He asked Weller where I was going to wait for them? he said there. Cashman said I had better not, as the house was so full. Weller told me to go back to Sellers, and when he had got them he would come and tell me. I asked him for my difference. Weller said he would reckon it, and bring it with the other notes. I returned to Sellers, and remained with him nearly an hour, but Weller did not come. I returned to the Cooper's Arms, and saw him in company with another man, whom I did not know. I asked him how much longer we were to wait? he said Cashman would not be at the Cooper's Arms for a quarter of an hour, but as soon as he came he(Weller) would come, and let me know. I returned and waited nearly another hour - He did not come. I went again to the Cooper's Arms, and saw Cashman; he asked me if I had seen Weller? I said I had not. He said he did not know what he meant to do, for he had got the money, and, he believed, was looking after me. I then saw Weller in the skittle-ground, and told Cashman he was there, he went to him. Weller came to me, and asked me if I would take them? I said, "As you like." He then went to Cashman, in the skittle-ground - They both stood talking to another man for three or four minutes. Weller then came to me, and told me to tell the man to come for them himself, as he should not deliver them unless he did. I said I did not think he would come, but I would tell him. I went and informed Sellers - He sent me back. I told Weller to give me either the money or the notes, for the man would not come there for them, and would look to me for his money. Weller said he might for what he cared, for he did not take the money of me, I had given it to Cashman - He said he should not have either unless he came for them himself, and he must not come there to catch flats, and that I myself ought to have known better. He told me to ask Sellers if he did not know one Flecknoe. I returned, and informed Sellers.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. You are a married woman - A. Yes; my husband was transported for passing had notes.

Q. Has nothing been said to induce you to belive that he would be pardoned if you convicted the prisoners - A. Nothing of the kind ever passed. I do it to detest those who would lead others into it.

Q. On your oath, is Guy married to your sister-in-law - A. I cannot say - I have heard him say his wife lives at Wandsworth, and keeps a butcher's-shop; he and my sister-in-law pass as man and wife, and have done so for four years or more. He lives in Prince's-row, Lambeth - I live in Oakley-street, Westminster-road, and go out ironing.

Q. Do you not expect to be paid for this - A. I expect to he paid for my loss of time, nothing else.

Q. Where did you get the money to buy the notes - A. From Mr. Christmas. Guy gave me the notes to buy the ten 1l. notes; Sellers furnished the 12l.

Q. The notes, at the price you mention, would come to 12l. 10s. - A. We afterwards found we had reckoned it short.

Q. Were you not examined in private - A. I gave my deposition at the Bank, it was afterwards read over to the prisoner at the office.

Cross-examined by MR. REYNOLDS. Q. Was it your money or Sellers's - A. Sellers's. I was afterwards examined before the magistrate, the prisoners were not present, but their attorneys and counsel were. What I said at the Bank was read over to the prisoners.

JOSEPH GUY. I was formerly a butcher at Chelsea, and after that I was an occasional constable of Queen-square; I am now living with a woman at Princes-row, Kenington-cross. On the 11th of July, I was sent with Fear to Atfield-street, she went into the Cooper's Arms, and returned to me in a few minutes - She went back again there. She came out, we then went to the Bank, where she produced the two 1l. notes and gave them to Mr. Christmas. On the 14th we went there again, I re

mained outside; she then came out and we walked about for near half an hour - She then went in again, came out and went to the Bank with me. On the 16th we went to the Bank and enquired for Mr. Christmas, we found him in the Old Bailey; she gave him two 1l. notes.

Q. Did you go with her to the Cooper's Arms again - A. No; I went into the other house on the 18th, remained there about an hour when she came in; I knew the prisoners, I did not see her with them there - I believe she went into the parlour, I heard her voice there. I saw Cashman go to the bar-door and tell the landlord if he should be wanted he should return in half an hour, which he did, and went down the passage leading to the parlour. I remained and saw her go out, and joined her in about ten minutes - We went to the Bank, she gave Mr. Christmas ten 1l. notes. I went on the 21st with her to the Cart and Horse; Sellers was there first, dressed in a brown coat, top-boots and spurs, and had a horse. I remained in the house exactly opposite so as to see the entrance. I saw Fear go out towards Atfield-street, and return with Weller he stopped and looked at the horse and then went in; they came out together in about a quarter of an hour, and went towards Atfield-street; I saw Fear go in again.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Was not your business at Queen-square Office as an informer against hawkers and pedlers - A. No; I was constable there.

Q. Was you ever in custody - A. I was put in Tothillfields one night and came out next morning. Fear is no relative of mine, her sister lives with me; my wife is at Wandsworth-Fear might know that, I think she did.

Q. When did you see your wife last - A. About four years ago. I told the Bank solicitors what I had found out; they said if I could bring such things to bear as what I told them, to bring the persons.

Q. Is money an object to you - A. Sometimes - I am not short now. The father of the woman I live with has supplied me.

Q. Have you not received money from the agents of the Bank - A. I have not, nor the promise of any.

WILLIAM SELLERS . I am constable of Mary-le-bone - I live in Bell-street. In July last, I was employed by the Bank; I went to the Cart and Horse, Goswell-street, in consequence of an arrangeement between me and Mrs. Fear. I went there on horse-back, and had on boots and a great coat, dressed like a horse dealer. She came to me in five minutes; after that the prisoner Weller came in - I asked him to drink, and then asked Fear if that was the young man? she said, Yes. I said to Weller, "I suppose you know what I want?" he said, Yes. I asked him if he had got any with him? he said, No, he always had the money first. I asked what I was to give him a piece for the 5l. notes? he said 40s., and 9s. for the 1l. notes. I said it was a great price, for I had never given above 35s. He said he would not take less, and he always had the money first. I looked at Mrs. Fear and said, I did not mind the price if they were good. She said she never saw the 5l. notes, but I had seen the 1l. notes. I said if they were as good as the ones, I did not mind the price. I looked at Weller, and said, I hoped all was right? He said,"It was all right, for he always had Mrs. Fear's money first." He then asked me how many I wanted of each sort? I told him four 5l. and ten 1l. notes; I gave him twelve 1l. bank notes. He said, "I suppose you will know these notes again?" I said I should not, but if he disputed any, I would change them, and give him silver.

Q. How came you to give him 12l. - A. They came to 12l. 10s. He took up the 12l. and did not ask for the 10s.; he gave Fear the money, and said, "Come with me and fetch them, as you have done before." He looked at me as he went out of the room, and said, "You will have them in half an hour." Fear went with him; I saw her again in a quarter of an hour. She went again to Weller, returned and staid near an hour with me. She went out again, and came back and staid about a quarter of an hour. I saw nothing more of the prisoners till they were taken.

Q. Did you know Flecknoe - A. I bought some notes of him by direction of the Bank solicitor; and should have been witnees against him, but he pleaded guilty.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. I know nothing of the notes in the indictment.

CHARLES CHRISTMAS. I am inspector to the Bank. I first knew Fear in the early part of July, she came to me on the 11th and gave me two 1l. forged notes, (looking at them) these are them - They are forged in every respect, and both off one plate, On the 15th, she gave me two more (these are them,) they are forged in every respect, and both off one plate, but of a different plate to the first two. She gave them to me at a public-house in the Old Bailey; I had given her 1l. twice to buy them. On the 11th, 13th, and 18th, she gave me ten 1l. notes (these are them), they are forged in every respect, and all from the same plate as the two last.

Q. At the time she brought them to you, in what state were they - A. Quite new.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. I am certain they are the notes. I did not mark the notes I gave her - I thought it unnecessary.

JOSEPH PEARSON. I am signing clerk to the Bank,(looking at the note charged in the indictment) the signature is not my hand writing, there is no other clerk of my name; here is another note with my name to it, but is not my writing.

(The note was then put in and read.)

WELLER'S Defence. I leave it to my Counsel.

CASHMAN'S Defence. I never saw Fear except at the office; when she came out, she said, "My husband was transported by a Jew last Sessions, and I will hang every Jew I can."

WELLER - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 20.

CASHMAN - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 26.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18180909-50

1111. JOSEPH BLAKE and DAVID STONE were indicted for stealing on the 26th of June , 170 fish, called flounders, value 5s. , the property of John Timothy .

JOHN TIMOTHY. I live at Lambeth; I had 170 flounders in a coff in a vessel on the river. I missed the coff about half-past three o'clock in the morning of the 26th of July, the prisoners lived near me I went to look for them, and found them about four o'clock trying to get through

London-bridge-their boat was fastened to the starlings. I found 170 flounders concealed under the bottom boards of the boat, which is not a place where fishermen would put them. I asked them to go to the Thames-police Office with me - They refused; they challenged me to prove the fish to be mine. I charged them with stealing them, they said, "Rather than be accused wrongfully they would pay for them." I said they ought to have known my boat - They said they did not. I believe the fish were mine, because one had been wounded in the water; and so had one of them.

ALEXANDER MITCHEL. The prisoners were given into my charge. They said they got the fish in Greenwich.

BLAKE'S Defence. Flounders are often speared, which would bruise them.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180909-51

1112. JAMES ELLIS and ELIZA ELLIS were indicted for stealing on the 24th of July , one piece of Irish linen, containing 25 yards, value 28s.; and twenty-nine pieces of printed calico, containing 776 yards, value 38l. , the goods of Peter Halliday Turner , Charles Johnson , and Thomas Aspinal .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating it to be the goods of Peter Halliday Turner and Charles Johnson .

CHARLES JOHNSON . I am in partnership with Peter Halliday Turner; since the 19th of June, Mr. Aspinal has been our partner-we are carriers to and from Manchester. These goods were brought to our warehouse in London-wall, by our conveyance. I received information and went to the pawnbroker's, where I found two pieces of printed calico. Brand went with me to the prisoner's house in Baltic-street, near Old-street, where I found the male prisoner. Brand told him we were come to search again - We had searched before but found nothing. He said"I will not have it yet." While Brand was searching his wife, he desired to speak to me privately. I went into the passage to him, he said he had taken part of one piece, which was missing; on the 24th, the day on which we had searched before. He begged I would show him mercy. I said I should do no more than I was compelled. We returned to the parlour - I told Brand he had confessed to taking half a piece. Brand asked him when he took it, he said in the morning of the day we searched before; he said he took it from above. Brande asked how he got it, he said by letting down the ladder.

Q. Did you miss all the things at the same time. - A. No; at different times. The male prisoner was a watchman, and employed to protect our property inside the warehouse. The prisoner, Eliza, used often to bring his supper.

WILLIAM BRAND. I am marshalman of the city of London. On the 12th of August I found the prisoners at home and took them into custody. I found several pawnbroker's duplicates on the woman, and several about the house; the man said he took one piece. The prisoner, Eliza Ellis, came in, I told her her father had acknowledged taking one piece; she said she pledged it after dividing it.

MARY RILEY . I am a dress-maker. About the latter end of January the male prisoner's wife sold me the duplicate of a piece of print, which I took out of pledge.

JOHN AARON. I am apprentice to Mr. Cassel, pawnbroker, Old-street. I have two gowns pledged with me on the 28th of January, and a gown-piece on the 7th of July.

JOHN ASTON. I am servant to Messrs. Lucock and Fryet, pawnbrokers, Whitecross-street. I have two pieces of cotton pledged with me on the 22d of November and the 24th January; they were pledged in the name of Betsey Ellis.

WILLIAM SOWERBY. I am a pawnbroker, in Castle-street. I have four lengths of cotton, pledged on the 29th of April, 16th and 25th of May, and 24th of July, by the female prisoner.

WILLIAM BENHAM TOMLINS . I am servant to Joseph Harris, a pawn-broker. On the 14th of July a remnant of linen was pledged with me, I believe, by the female prisoner.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JAMES ELLIS'S Defence. I never said I took any of it.

JAMES ELLIS - GUILTY . Aged 67.

Confined Two Years .

ELIZA ELLIS- NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180909-52

1113. GEORGE LITTLE was indicted for stealing on the 4th of July , two ounces of twist, value 6s. the property of John James .

JOSEPH WILD . I am servant to John James , of Holborn-bridge . On the 14th of July, between six and seven o'clock in the morning, the prisoner came in and asked for a skein of sewingsilk, which came to 3d. and one yard of twist; he paid for them, and took a piece of twist out of the drawer, and kept it in his hand. He had a piece of cloth in which I saw him attempt to wrap it up; he put both into his pocket. He pulled the cloth out again, and put it on the counter, leaving the twist in his pocket. I went round the counter and charged him with having put a piece of twist in his pocket. He said he had not, and almost pushed me down. I went up to him again, he then took the twist out, which I caught in his hand. He begged me to let him go, saying he had a wife and four children, one of whom was dying, which induced him to do it.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. You know he was a respectable master taylor - A. No, he said he lived in Red Lion-street.

Prisoner's Defence. I put it into my pocket by mistake, with the patterns.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180909-53

1114. THOMAS BILLINGTON was indicted for stealing, on the 4th July , from the person of William Summers , one watch, value 2l.; one ring, value 3s.; one key, value 3s., and one ribbon, value 2d. his property.

WILLIAM SUMMERS. I am an ironmonger , and live in Bond-street. On the 4th of July, about five in the afternoon, I was in St. James's-street ; there was a great crowd,

it was the chairing of Sir Samuel Romilly. I found a great pressure against me, and felt my watch go from me, I turned round and saw the prisoner pass it from his left to his right hand. I collared him, and accused him with having my watch. He immediately put it into his right hand and dropped it, it was immediately picked up. Pace had collared him.

THOMAS PACE . I am an officer. I was on duty and saw the prosecutor collar the prisoner and charge him with stealing his watch. The moment I collared him I saw him drop it from his right hand.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing of it.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180909-54

1115. JAMES HOLMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of July , 33lbs. of lead, value 3s. ; the property of Joseph Huddart , Esq. Charles Hampden Turner , Esq. John Woolmer , Esq. Sir Robert Wigram , Bart. and William Cotton , Esq.

THOMAS WALKER . I am a Thames Police Officer. On the 30th of July, about six o'clock in the evening, I met the prisoner at Limehouse, with a bundle; I told him I was an officer; he said it was old iron, I found it was lead; he said he worked at Mr. Cotton's, close to the river. I took him to the gate-keeper, who said he was one of their workmen. Prisoner said he took the lead to put over his door, and was sorry for it.

JAMES HUGHES . I am servant to the prosecutors, whose names are rightly stated in the indictment. We have a great deal of old lead. The prisoner was brought back to the premises with some in his possession.

GUILTY . Aged 34.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18180909-55

1116. JOHN FLOOD was indicted for that he, on the 9th of May , at St. James, Clerkenwell, feloniously did dispose of and put away a certain forged and counterfeit bank note as follows, (setting it forth, No. 12,570, 1l.; 6th of March, 1818, signed C. Tabor,) with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England , he well knowing it to be forged and counterfeit, against the statute .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only calling it a promissory note for payment of money, instead of a bank note.

TWO OTHER COUNTS, the same, only stating his intent to be to defraud John King .

JOHN KING . I am a cheesemonger , and live in Wellington-street, Goswell-street . On the 9th of May the prisoner came to my shop; I only saw him once, but am certain he is the man. He bought goods to the amount of 3s. 8d. or 4s. and paid me a 1l. bank note, for which I gave him change, and asked his name and address, he said Haynes, 24, Helmet-row (looking at a 1l. note), this is that which he gave me, it has that address upon it, in my hand-writing. I wrote it in his presence. I had only opened this shop on that day, but had been in business seven years.

Q. Have you made inquiry if such a person lived there - A. Yes; the note was returned about a week after I took it. I then went there and found only eighteen houses in the row; I inquired for Haynes, but could find no such person.

JOHN EDWARDS . I am a shoemaker, and live in Bath-street, City-road, I have lived there six years. About the beginning of May the prisoner bought a pair of shoes at my shop, which came to 7s. or 7s. 6d.; he ordered a pair of dancing pumps; I measured him; they were to be done in about a week, and sent to 25, Seward-street, which is a short distance from my house. He paid for the shoes with a 1l. note, I asked his name, he said Pask, which I put on the note, and put my initials to it, I did not write his address on it. I sent out for change, while he was there, and gave him the difference, and wrote his address on the measure. This is the note (looking at it).

Q. There is 25, Seward-street, on the note - A. I do not know who put it there; it might have been put there before or after. I am quite sure it is the note he paid me.

Q. When the pumps were finished, what did you do with them - A. I sent William Porter, my errand-boy, with them. The note was returned about a fortnight after.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not tell the magistrate that you did not write the name on the note - A. No; I might have said I did not write the address.

WILLIAM PORTER . I am servant to Mr. Edwards. I remember the prisoner coming to my master's for a pair of shoes. he was served with them, and ordered a pair of pumps. My master put his name on the note and on the measure. The pumps were made in about a week. I took them to Seward-street, but could find no such number as 25. There are above twenty-five houses, but no No. 25. I inquired for Pask, at almost every house. but could find no such person. The prisoner never called for the pumps; he paid a 1l. note for the shoes.

HENRY WILLIAM FACEY . I am collector of King's taxes. Seward-street and Helmet-row are both in my district; there is no house-keeper in Helmet-row of the name of Haynes, nor no No. 24; I do not know any lodger of that name. There is no No. 25 in Seward-street, nor any such person as Pask.

THOMAS VANN. I am constable of St. Luke's, On Monday the 29th of June I apprehended the prisoner, and took him to a public-house. Before I searched him, I asked what money he had about him, he said he had only 18d. and a few browns, meaning halfpence. I searched, and found 18d. and a few halfpence on him, and in his fob I found a bank note. I inquired where he got it, he said he should not tell me, but he would satisfy the magistrate. I had said nothing to him about the magistrate. I had told him I thought it was a bad one, as we went along in the coach, he said he found it in the City-road, a week ago, with 2s.; I put my name on it in his presence (looking at one), this is it. I believe I gave him the number.

CHARLES CHRISTMAS . I am an inspector of bank notes.(looking at the notes) The one uttered to King is forged in every respect, paper, plate, ink, and signatere, it has the imitation of a watermark; that uttered to Edwards is forged in all parts, and is the same description of forgery, but not the same plate.

Q. What do you mean by the same description of forgery - A. The engraving is by the same hand, only not on the same plate. The note found on the prisoner is also

forged in every respect, and in off the same plate as the first note.

CHARLES TAROR . I am a signing clerk at the Bank; the note has my name to it; but it is not my hand-writing. I never saw it before.

(Note put in and read.)

Prisoner's Defence. I found the note which was found on me, and did not offer it to any person; but kept it by me to get it taken to the Bank.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 23.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

Reference Number: t18180909-56

1117. THOMAS WILLIAM SMITH was indicted for that he, on the 17th of August , at the parish of St. James, Clerkenwell, feloniously did dispose of and put away a certain forged and counterfeited bank note (setting it forth. No. 50,217, 1l. 16th of June, 1818, signed C. Tabor), with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England , knowing it to be forged, against the statute .

SECOND COUNT, for feloniously offering to William Haynes a like forged bank note with the like intent, he knowing it to be forged and counterfeited.

THIRD AND FOURTH COUNTS, the same, only calling the forged instrument a promissory note for payment of money, instead of a bank note.

FOUR OTHER COUNTS, the same, only stating the prisoner's intent to be to defraud the said William Haynes .

WILLIAM HAYNES. I am a linendraper , and live in the Edgware-road . On the 17th of August, about nine o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came to my shop and bought a handkerchief which came to 2s.; he tended to me a 1l. bank note, I looked at it and told him it was a bad one - He said, "here is another," which I took and requested his address - He said, " Thomas Williams , No.5, Queen Anne-street." I had the first note by itself - I wrote the address on the good one; I wrapped the bad one in it, and put both in my pocket (looking at the notes), this is the first he gave me. I put his name on it at the watch-house before I parted with it. This is the second note he gave me.

Q. Did you say any thing to him - A. I told him that having had so many forged notes, I should see if he had given me a right address; he made no objection to it, but went out of the shop towards Queen Anne-street. When we got into Crawford-street, Montague-square, I had not got hold of him, he said he had taken the note at the Green Man and Still, and wished me to go there with him; I said I should go to the first address. He then said he lived in Castle-street, and I must go there with him; I said I would go nowhere till I had been to the first address; but that I thought it very strange that he should prevaricate in that manner, and if he did not choose to go to the first address he had better surrender himself; upon which he ran from me; we were then at the end of Crawford-street - he ran as fast as he could. I attempted to pursue him, but a man ran against me.

Q. Did that appear by accident or design - A. It was designedly, he crossed directly in front of me, saying-"Which is the thief;" he must have seen the prisoner runing before me. I had called out "Stop thief! stop that man."

Q. Did the man who ran against you knock you down - A. No; I stumbled, and then pursued the prisoner; he was stopped by a soldier and taken to the watch-house, I never lost sight of him. The watch-house-keeper asked him his name-he said it was Thomas William Smith , he was a shoemaker, and lived in Castle-street.

MARY WALKER . I am servant to Mr. Thomas Nixon . On the 17th of August, he lived at No.5, Queen Anne-street, West; the prisoner did not live there. I do no know him-there was no body but me at the house on the 17th of August; my master was out of town.

WILLIAM HAYNES. I do not know any Queen Anne-street, East; he was going towards Queen Anne-street, West.

JOHN FOY . I am an officer. Queen Anne-street, West, is now called Foley-place, and has been so for six years. There is no Queen Anne-street, East, now.

JOHN BURGER . I belong to the 2d rigiment of Life Guards. On the 17th of August, I saw Mr. Haynes pursuing the prisoner. I heard the cry of Stop thief! stop the man who is runing - I stopped him.

CHARLES CHRISTMAS . I am an inspector of bank notes, the note is forged in every respect-it is not the Bank plate; the paper and signature are also forged.

CHARLES TABOR . I am a signing clerk to the Bank, the note is not signed by me; there is no other clerk of my name.

(The note produced and read.)

Prisoner's Defence. The note belonged to a young woman, who gave it to me to take care off; I did not know whether I gave him my note or hers. He said it was bad - They were both folded up together in my pocket; I gave him the other saying, "They might be bad for what I knew." He said he did not think that was good. I was so terrified I did not know what address I had given, but soon after I recollected. He said I must surrender myself. I was frightened, and ran away.

WILLIAM HAYNES. I remember his giving me the second note - He took the good one out of his left hand breeches-pocket, and the bad one from his right. I have a distinct recollection of it.

MARY ANN DAVIS . I am an unfortunate girl, and live in Cherles-street, Drury-lane. I have known the prisoner above a year and half; he used to come backwards and forwards to me. I do not know where he lived; I can neither read nor write.

Q. Did you give him a note at any time - A. Yes, on this day month; he lent me 4s. till he got it changed. It was a 1l. note.

Q. How do you know that - A. He said so. I received it on Sunday night.

Q. Which of these was it (producing both of them) - A. I cannot tell.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 18.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18180909-57

1118. WILLIAM BYRNE was indicted for that he, on the 16th of August , at the parish of St. James, Clerkenwell, feloniously did dispose of and put away a certain forged and counterfeit bank note (setting it forth, No. 21,570, 1l.; 16th of June, 1818, signed R. Clough,) with in

tent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England , he knowing it to be forged and counterfeited, against the statute .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only calling it a promissory note for payment of money, instead of a bank note.

TWO OTHER COUNTS, the same, only stating his intent to be to defraud Edward Spreekley .

EDWARD SPRECKLEY. I am a butcher , and live in Pulteney-court, St. James's-street, Westminister . On Sunday, the 16th of August, about half-past nine o'clock in the morning. The prisoner came to my shop, and bought a leg of mutton, which came to 5s. 6d.; he tendered a 1l. note, which my housekeeper took from him in my presence. I asked him for his address - He said his name was Brown, and that he lived at No.6, Green's-court, which is about two hundred yards from my house. I wrote it on the note immediately (looking at it)-this is it. On Tuesday morning I found it was a bad one. I went to No.6, Green's-court-there was no person of that name there.

Q. When did you see him again - A. On the Sunday following he came about the same time, bought a leg of lamb, and tendered me another 1l. note. I knew him again immediately, and asked his address. He said his name was Childs, and he lived at No. 6, Green's-Court. I said, "How is that? why, you have changed your name since last Sunday!" he said he had not; I told him he had, for he bought a leg of mutton of me last Sunday, and paid me with a bad note, He at first denied it, but afterwards said he did. I told him I thought the second note was also bad. He asked to look at it - I returned it to him, and he paid me for the lamb. He asked me to let him see the first note, which I gave him - He then had both notes, and held them in his hand. I drew the first note out of his hand, and said I must have it. He said he would give me the money for it if I would go with him. I refused to let him have the lamb, as he seemed confused. I went to Green's-court with him. As we went along, he offered to go into a public-house and treat me - I refused. When we got to Green's-court, he at first looked on one side and then on the other. I asked him what he was looking for? he said he did not exactly know where No. 6 was. We got almost to the end of the court. I said I thought it very strange that he should give his address at No. 6, and not know where it was. He then said that his brother once lived there, and that if I would go home with him he would give me the money for the note. I asked him where? he said he lived in Crown-street. We turned to go there, but I took him to Crown-court, as I knew a butcher who lived there. I told him I should go no farthnr, took him into custody, and sent for a constable, who searched him. The note which he offered me for the lamb was not found on him.

Q. Was any thing said to him about the note not being found - A. He said I had not returned it to him - I am certain that I did, and he did not give it back to me. He was stripped at the watch-house.

Prisoner. Q. Did I not return silver for one of them - A. He had but 18d. in his pocket, which he took out of the note, and said he had no more silver. He gave me none.

EDMUND PEPPER , I am a constable. I searched the prisoner at the butcher's shop, and at the watch-house, thoroughly. I found no note whatever on him, and only 1s. 9d. in money. He said Mr. Spreckley had got the note.

GEORGE PARSONS . I live at No. 6, Green's-court, and have lived there ever since the 22d of June. I know nothing of the prisoner; he never lived there while I did. I never saw him before.

CHARLES CHRISTMAS . I am an inspector of bank notes. The note is forged in every respect, both paper, plate, and ink. It is not the signature of Mr. Clough. It has no water-mark.

(The note was then put in and read.)

ROGER CLOUGH . I am a signing clerk at the Bank; there is no other of my name. This is not my signature.

Prisoner's Defence. I received the note from one Johnston, of Plymouth, who I empowered to receive my prize-money. I cannot find him out. I never gave the name of Brown. GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 23.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18180909-58

1119. SARAH WARD was indicted for that she, on the 5th of June , at St. James, Clerkenwell, feloniously did dispose of and put away, a certain forged and counterfeit bank note (setting it forth, No. 12,075, 1l., March 6, 1818, signed R. Clough), with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England , she knowing it to be forged and counterfeited, against the statute .

SECOND COUNT, for feloniously offering to John Terry a like forged note, with the like intent.

THIRD and FOURTH COUNTS, the same only, calling the forged instrument a promisory note for the payment of money, instead of a bank note.

FOUR OTHER COUNTS, the same only stating the prisoner's intent to be to defraud the said John Terry.

JOHN TERRY. I keep the Plough public-house, at Hoxton . On the 5th of June, the prisoner came into my house about twelve o'clock in the morning, and had a quartern of gin, which came to four-pence. She tendered me a 1l. bank note; I took it. Mr. Lewis who was sitting near me, told me to be cautious as I had only been in the house three days; he requested to look at the note, which he did, and said it was a bad one - She heard it. She had a child in her arms. I asked her by what means she got the note? she said a man at the corner, had given her the bottle, and the note to get changed. I, Lewis, and the prisoner all went out to look for him - She led us to the corner, which was twenty or thirty yards off - We saw no one there. She said she did not know the man. We told her we must detain her - She said she hoped we would not, for we might keep the note if we liked. I went for a constable. Lewis had the note; he did not return it to me.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. How long was it from the time she came until she went out - A. The whole did not last above ten minutes-it took up no more time than merely helping her to the gin and giving change, which would not take a minute. I detained her long enough to alarm a person who was waiting outside.

MR. REYNOLDS. Q. How long was she in the house before you went to look for the man - A. Not more than five or six minutes.

WILLIAM LEWIS . I am clerk to Mr. Davis, who is a

distiller, and lives in Old-street - I live in Bartholomew-square. On the 5th of June I was at Terry's house, saw the prisoner come in with a bottle for some gin, and tender a 1l. note. Mr. Terry handed it to me; I looked at it, and immediately said, in her hearing, it was a bad one.

Q. Did you ask her how she came by it - A. Terry asked her. She said a man gave her the bottle and note at the corner of the street to get some gin-he was a stranger. We all three went out to look for him. We went to the corner but found no person there - She said he was gone.

Q. During this time what was done with the note. - A. I put it in my breeches-pocket, and held it in my hand. The prisoner requested me to let her go, and seemed a great deal agitated - I took her into custody. While Terry was gone for an officer a crowd came round. I walked through Hoxton with her, put her into a coach, and took her to the office. I asked her in the coach what her real name was? she said it was Sarah Ward , and that she lived at No. 5, John's-row, City-road. I kept the note in my pocket, holding it in my hand. When I got to Worship-street I gave the note into the hands of Mr. Yardley, the clerk of the office. I took it from him again before he left my presence, and took it to the Investigator's Office at the Bank, and put my name on it before I parted with it-(looking at it)-this is it.

Q. Did you make inquiry at John's-row - A. The day after she was taken, I went and made a diligent inquiry in John's-row. I found two houses of No. 5 - I inquired at both of them, and all the houses of that number in the neighbourhood, leading from John's-row, but could hear no account of her.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Where did she give her address - A. Turner asked her address at Worship-street - I took down what she said.

Q. Did she not say it was Little West-place, John's-row - A. She did not; two persons attended at her third examination, by her desire. I do not remember Westplace, John's-row. I went to all the streets about there.

EDWARD BISHOP. I live at No. 5, John's-row, in the parish of St. Luke. I have lived there fifteen years. The prisoner never lived there. I never had any lodgers.

Cross-examined. Q. Is there such a place as Little West-place, leading into John's-row - A. There is a place they call West-place, leading into John's-row-John's-row is a public-place.

ELIZA RAWLINGS . I live at No. 5, John's-row, City-road-there are two Nos. 5, on the same side of the way. I have lived there eighteen months-the prisoner did not live there - I do not know her.

THOMAS SMITH . I am a feather manufacturer, and live in Union-street, Hackney-road. On the 11th of February the prisoner came to my shop, and bought a feather, which came to 1s. 4d. - she gave me a 1l. note; I asked her name and address? she said her name was Sharp, residing in Bell-alley, Whitecross-street, which I wrote on the note, with my own name (looks at a note), this is it.

Cross-examined. I never saw her before, until the 9th of June.

Q. Do you remember any thing particular of her - A. I had an opportunity of taking particular notice of her, and am not afraid to swear to her; she appeared very much swollen, as if she had a cold. She did not appear pregnant. The note is not signed, which I did not notice at the time. She was five or ten minutes with me.

CHARLES CHRISTMAS . I am an inspector of bank notes(looks at the notes), that nttered to Terry is forged in paper, plate and signature. The other is also forged, and has no signature. They are both off one plate.

Cross-examined. Q. Is it not a note that a woman might take without noticing it - A. It would impose on many persons.

ROGER CLOUGH . I am a signing clerk at the bank; the note has not my signature.

(Note read.)

Prisoner's Defence. I solemnly declare I did not know it was forged. I was going to Hoxton to seek for lodgings, a decent man gave it to me, with a bottle, and asked me to fetch half a pint of gin; I asked him his name, he said he lived in Turner-square. I told them my name was Ward, and I lived in West-place, John's-row. I have four small children.

GUILTY . DEATH . Aged 27.

Recommended to Mercy.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

Reference Number: t18180909-59

1120. JEREMIAH BRYAN was indicted, for that he on the 25th of July , at St. James, Clerkenwell, feloniously did dispose of and put away, a certain forged and counterfeit bank note (setting it forth, 62,107, 1l. March 6,1818, signed A.Consett), with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England , he knowing it to be forged and counterfeited .

SECOND COUNT, for feloniously offering to Robert Curtis a like forged bank note, with the like intent, he knowing it to be forged.

THIRD AND FOURTH COUNTS, the same, only calling the forged instrument a promissory note for payment of money, instead of a bank note.

FOUR OTHER COUNTS, the same, only stating the prisoner's intent to be to defraud the said Robert Curtis .

ROBERT CURTIS . I am a butcher , and live in Old Gravel-lane, Middlesex . On Saturday evening, the 25th of July, about eleven o'clock, the prisoner came to my shop, and bought a shoulder of lamb, which came to 3s. 1d. He tendered me a 1l. bank note, I asked him his name and address, he said, "John Sergeant, 15, Ratcliff-highway." I told him I supposed it was a bad one, and questioned him farther where No. 15, Ratcliff-high way was; he then said he lived up a little street, near the Black Dog, public-house, but the name of the street he did not know, as he had not been there long. I asked him where he took the note? he said he took it of a gentleman on Tower-hill, for work; and that he had worked very hard for it. I rubbed the word London, and told him again I thought it a bad note; he told me not to deface it, but to give it him again. I told him I did not think it prudent to return it to him, as it was bad. I sent my boy for an officer. I took him myself to the watch-house.

Q. Did he attempt to run away - A. No; he went out of the shop, but did not attempt to go away - He knew I had sent for an officer. I was near enough to prevent it,

if he had attempted. I left him at the watch-house. As I returned I met Jackson, the officer, and returned with him to the watch-house, and put my name on the note. I had kept it in my pocket all the while. I then told him I should send an officer to see if it was his right address; he then said I had bullied him at the shop, and therefore he was terrified, and that his name was Jeremiah Bryan, and that he lived at No. I, Little Prescott-street. He said he had found the note on Tower-hill, about thirty or forty yards from the pump (looking at the note), this is it; the prisoner put his mark on it, and I and Jackson signed it. Jackson told the prisoner he had better mark it.

Prisoner. Q. Did I not stop in your shop twenty minutes and outside, when you sent for the watchman - A. I sent to a person at the top of Old Gravel-lane, to come and see if he knew the prisoner - He came, and said he did not know him. I do not know whether the prisoner was outside or not.

COURT. Q. From the time you intimated to him that you thought it bad, was you near enough to see him if he ran away - A. I think I was. He told me I had better go to his address; I thought proper to go to the watch-house first. He offered to go any where with me. I never parted with the note till I had marked it.

Q. At the time he gave you the address had you told him you suspected it was bad - A. No. I had said nothing to intimidate him before he gave me his address.

FRANCIS JACKSON . I am constable of St. George's in the East, the prisoner was brought to the watch-house. I saw Curtis sign the note, and requested the prisoner to mark it-(looking at it)-this is it. I asked the prisoner where he took it? he said he took it of a gentleman on Tower-hill for work. I asked him what part of Tower-hill the gentleman lived at? He gave me no answer. I asked him the gentleman's name? he said he did not know it, and then told me he did not get it of a gentleman, but found it on Tower-hill. I asked him why he said he received it of a gentleman if he found it? he said he thought it better to say he worked for it than that he found it. I took it to the Bank Inspector.

CHARLES CHRISTMAS. I am a bank note inspector. I look at the note-it is forged both in paper, plate, ink, and signature. It is not Consett's signing.

ALEXANDER CONSETT. I am a signing clerk of the Bank. The note is note signed by me.

(The note put in and read.)

Prisoner's Defence. I found it on Tower-hill on the 25th of July, as I returned from work. Not being a scholar, I did not know the amount, but thought it was a note, and took it to Curtis, who said it was forged, and that I had been there before with forged note. I was confused at the charge, but did not attempt to run away.

ROBERT CURTIS . I did not tell him I thought he had been to my shop before.

FRANCIS JACKSON . I searched his lodging on Monday. His wife had been to him on Sunday, but returned. They were at No. 1, Woolmer's place, Little Prescott-street. He told me he lived at No. 1, Little Prescott-street. I tried to find them out on the Sunday, but could not hear of any such persons there.

GUILTY . DEATH . Aged 35.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18180909-60

1121. GEORGE BONFIELD was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of July , one shawl, value 16s. , the goods of Joseph Morris .

JOSEPH MORRIS . I am a linen-draper , and live at the south end of Fleet-market , opposite Fleet-street. On the 22d of July, between four and five o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner came into the shop with two other soldiers, and asked for some silk handkerchiefs, I told my man to serve him. He sat on a stool, and put his cap on the counter. I saw him take something off the counter, put it in his cap, and put his handkerchief over it, he then put his cap on his head. In a few minutes I said, "Is not your cap very heavy this warm weather?" and asked him to let me feel the weight of it. One of his comrades presented his cap to me to feel - I pretended not to see it, but took the prisoner's off his head, lifted his handkerchief out, and found the shawl under it - He attempted to escape, but I gave him in charge. He wanted to compromise the business; I refused.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I took it up with my handkerchief, and did not know it.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined Six Months .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180909-61

1122. MARY LEWES was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of August , one piece of handkerchiefs, containing seven handkerchiefs, value 37s. 6d. , the goods of Thomas Stephens .

WILLIAM MASON. I am servant to Mr. Stephens, who is a linen-draper , and lives at Aldgate . On the 6th of August the prisoner came into the shop to match a handkerchief - I shewed her some, and saw her pull a piece towards her bundle, which laid on the counter with a basket. Soon afterwards, I saw her put her own handkerchief over the piece, and her bundle covering both. She put them under her arm, and made towards the door. I stopped her; she trembled, and begged I would forgive her. She dropped it from under her arm.

Cross-examined by MR. ARABIN. I am certain I saw her drop it.

JEREMIAH BEWLEY. I am servant to Mr. Stephens. I saw the prisoner in the shop.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I have been in town but three weeks. The piece of handkerchief got entangled with my bundle.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180909-62

1123. JOHN HUET was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of July , two pigs, price 4l. , the property of Charles Cowdroey .

CHARLES COWDROEY. I am a butcher , and live in Brook-street, Ratcliff . On the 29th of July I missed two pigs from my yard. On the 3d of August I found them at the office - They used to go about the fields.

THOMAS WHITTINGTON . I live in Long-alley, Moorfields. On the 29th of July, about eleven o'clock in the morning,

the prisoner offered me two pigs for 3l. 10s. - he said he had them from the other side of Bow. I told him to wait while I got the money, instead of which I got an officer.

JOSEPH BURNUAM . I am a butcher, and live ten doors from Whittington. The prisoner came, and asked me to buy the pigs-he shewed them to me in an alley just by. I was present when the officer came there - He said he had them to sell.

JOSHUA ARMSTRONG . I am an officer. I took the prisoner into custody - He knew me. I asked him if he had two pigs to sell? he said No; Whittington shewed them to me. The prisoner then said he bought them of a man by Bow-bridge for 50s.

Prisner's Defence. I bought them beyond Bowbridge for 50s.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180909-63

1124. EDWARD WELCH and JAMES WILMOT were indicted for stealing, on the 1st of August , one handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of a certain person unknown, from his person .

JOHN CARLISLE. I am a City patrol. On the 1st of August, about nine o'clock in the evening, I followed the prisoners and another man up Ludgate-hill and the Old Bailey, with a, mob, who were following two drunken men, and saw them attempt several persons pockets. I saw them behind two gentlemen; one of them gave Wilmot a handkerchief, which he put into his waistcoat pocket. I secured them, and found the handkerchief in Wilmot's pocket. I did not see it taken from any one.

COURT. There is no proof of its being stolen.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180909-64

1125. ANTHONY LEWIS was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of July , thirteen yards of gingham, value 12s. , the goods of John Bickers .

ISAAC SIMPSON. I was at Aldgate on the 1st of July, about three o'clock in the afternoon, and saw the prisoner take the gingham off the prosecutor's iron-rod, at the door. I ramain and alarmed the shopman; when I came out I saw him and another man folding it up. I pursued him, he turned up a gateway, and was stopped in my presence with the gingham in his apron.

ROBERT NASH. I am servant to Mr. John Bickers . Mr. Simpson alarmed me, the prisoner was brought to me with the gingham.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A man told me to wrap it up in my apron.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Confined one Year , and publicly Whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180909-65

1126. STEPHEN JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of July , four yards and a half of patent worstedcord, value 30s., the goods of Thomas Kelly , privately in his shop .

THOMAS KELLY . I am a tailor and draper , and live in Houndsditch . On the 28th of July, about nine o'clock in he morning, I was in the street coming towards my house. I saw the prisoner and a boy turnoat of my shop; the prisoner had a large great-coat on, with his arm down by his side. I saw the cord under his coat - I stopped him and said he had something belonging to me, his cempanion ran away. The cord was taken from my window; my wife was in the shop.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I saw a man throw it down, I picked it up.

GUILTY. Aged 18.

Of Stealing, but not privately ,

Confined One Year , and Whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180909-66

1127. DANIEL SUTHERLAND was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of July , one pair of trowsers, value 13s. , the goods of John Haigh .

JOHN HAIGH . I keep the Blackmoor's Head, Cartwright-yard, Rosemary-lane . On the 29th of July, the prisoner came to my house and asked to go backwards, after having some gin-my trowsers were in the yard. He returned and asked for the newspaper, he gave it to another person without reading it, and went out. I missed my trowsers, and found them at the office that day.

JOHN FORRESTER . I am a constable. On the 29th of July, about a quarter before eight o'clock, I saw the prisoner offering the trowsers for sale; a man said they were Mr. Haigh's. I asked him where he had got them, he said he bought them of a man at the Ship and Sun; I took him there, he could not point the man out.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I bought them.

GUILTY . Aged 60.

Confined Three Months .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180909-67

1128. SARAH GOTTS was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of August , one gown, value 10s., and one pair of breeches, value 6s. , the goods of John Harris .

JOHN HARRIS . I live in Angel-square, Bishopsgate . On 19th of August, my wife went to market about half-past four o'clock in the morning, leaving me in bed, and the door on the latch. I heard the yard-door shut; afterwards I found my room-door open, and the gown and breeches gone.

HOWARD LEWIS . I am a salesman. On the 19th of August, about eight o'clock in the morning, the prisoner offered the breeches to me for sale; she said they were her husband's. As she was going out, I observed the tail of the gown hanging out of her apron. She said she would sell them for 10s. I thought she had not got them honestly; I took her to the office.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A man got me to sell them.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant

Reference Number: t18180909-68

1129. MARY WARMAN and THOMAS BOREHAM were indicted for that they, on the 14th of November , did falsely make, forge, and counterfeit a certain last will and testament of one John Reynolds , deceased, with intent to defraud George Reynolds .

SECOND COUNT, for feloniously uttering and publishing, as true, a like will with the like intent, knowing it to be forged.

JOHN GIRURN . I knew John Reynolds , he was driver of a Black wall coach; he was killed on the 6th of November.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. Was it not proposed by you from Mr. Reynolds that 10004 should be received in consideration of the will - A. It was proposed by the deceased's son-in-law.

MR. GRUNEY on the part of the prosecutor, declined further proceedings.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18180909-69

1130. MICHAEL HAYES , BRIDGET CAREY , and JOHANNA BARRY were indicted for feloniously assaulting Ann Carr , on the King's highway, on the 6th of July , putting her in fear, and taking, from her person, and against her will, one silk handkerchief, value 3s. 6d. , her property.

ANN CARR . I am servant to Dr. Bryant, who lives in Spring Gardens. On the 6th of September, about nine o'clock in the evening, I was going through St. Martin's-court, with Kiley - I saw the three prisoners; I knew Hayes and Carey before. Carey called after me, I looked round and said I wanted nothing further to say to her; Carey then ran after me and struck me. I ran from her, they all followed me into Leicester-fields , Carey knocked me down, took my handkerchief from my neck, and gave it to Barry; Hayes took it out of her hand and ran away with it. It was about half-past nine o'clock. I had formerly lived with Carey, at No. 3, Castle-street, St. Martin's-lane; she was owner of the house, and lived with Hayes. When I found out that they were not married I left.

Cross-examined by MR. DOWLING. I lodged eleven months with them, and parted with them on good terms.

Q. Then you never said you would hang Hayes - A.No; I went to their lodgings next morning for the handkerchief. I did not call for assistance.

SARAH KILEY . I was with the prosecutrix, she was going to sleep at my house, as she was to go to her situation next morning. As we went through St. Martin's-court, the prisoners called after her-Carr said she would have nothing to do with them, they followed her and knocked her down; when she recovered herself, she missed her handkerchief. The prisoners said they had not got it.

Q.Why did you not call the people to help you-A. They only laughed at it, and went away.

Cross-examined. The people laughed at the row, there was a great deal of laughing between them.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18180909-70

1131. GEORGE KAYLOCK and ROBERT M'BRIDE were indicted for stealing, on the 5th of September , one silver waiter, value 2l.; one tea-pot and stand, value 20s.; and one coffee-pot, value 40s., the goods of John Baker , Esq. in his dwelling-house .

FRANCIS QUIN . I am servant to John Baker , Esq. who lives in James-street, Buckingham-gate . On the 5th of September, about eleven o'clock in the morning, I brought the breakfast things down and put them on the dresser. I missed the articles, stated in the indictment, about a quarter of an hour afterwards, the window was open-there are iron-bars before it, but if a person put their hands between them, they might reach it. The window is six feet from the street; there is no area-gate, or steps. The property has never been found.

Cross-examined by MR. PLATT. The thieves must have got over the railing.

WILLIAM SACK . I am servant to Mr. Haynes, a butcher in Chapel-street. On the 5th of September, I saw the prisoner Kaylock, get over the prosecutor's area-railing into the street, he ran as fast as he was able; he had a great coat on. I rang the bell, and told Quin, he ran towards Westminster.

Cross-examined. I am sure he is the boy, I saw him again four days after.

GEORGE PAV . I am servant to Mr. Ayston, in James-street. I saw M'Bride running down James-street, about twelve doors from the prosecutor's house, he held his hat in his hand as if something was in it, and looking back all the time. The other prisoner was running on the other side of the way nearly on a level with him.

JOHN KING . I saw M'Bride running from James-street, into York-street, watched him down to Horseshoe-alley, and there lost sight of him. His coat looked bulky.

JOSEPH COOPER . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoners about twelve o'clock that day, in Old Pye-street; Kaylock said he had just seen M'Bride.

NOT GUILTY

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18180909-71

1132. BARNEY BENJAMIN was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of June , two seals, value 4l. the goods of John Warwick , in his dwelling-house .

JOHN WARWICK . I am a seal engraver , and live in the Strand . On Sunday the 7th of June, I came home about eleven o'clock at night, and missed 1200l. worth of property, chiefly in gold seals and chains; I advertised it. Mr. Bradbury produced two seals to me, which I knew to be mine; he said he bought them of a person who sold old clothes, and that he thought he lived in Barbican. We went to Play house-yard; and found the prisoner at a house there. He appeared to be a general dealer in old clothes. Mr. Bradbury immediately said he was the man. I asked him if he had any more of the seals which he had sold to Bradbury, he said he had not; I immediately beckoned to Humphreys to come in, he began to search, the priosner's wife, a girl, and a boy were in the room; the prisoner pretended to faint, and wanted a little vinegar, his wife also expressed the same inclination, and was apparently fainting; I thought it a trick, and sat against the door to prevent any body going out; I heard a noise in the passage and thought they might be moving some of my property, and opened the door a little way to see what was going on, at that instant his wife passed her hand through the aper

ture, and gave something to a person outside; I pulled the door to; Twenty or thirty Jews came round the door, and made a great noise, we were literally beat out of the house. Humphreys brought the prisoner away. We found nothing.

JOSEPH DAVIS . I am Mr. Warwick's apprentice. I came home about twenty minutes after ten o'clock at night, and found the lock had been picked, and missed the property out of the drawer and frames.

RICHARD BRADBURY . I live in Broad-street, Bloomsbury, and am a dealer in lace. I have known the prisoner three or four years, he passed my house once or twice every week. On Monday the 8th of June, about ten o'clock, I gave him 10s. and an old seal for the two seals. I afterwards saw Mr. Warwick's advertisement, and showed him the seals; he recognized them. I had sold the prisoner old clothes before. We went to his house, and had great difficulty in searching.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. I believe the prisoner gave his address; he had two or three more seals.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I bought the seals of a man in Holborn.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18180909-72

1133. JOSEPH YATES was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of August , one watch, value 3l. the goods of Henry Potten , in his dwelling-house .

HENRY POTTEN. I live at Westminster . On the 19th of August, about two o'clock, I was down stairs at dinner in the kitchen, and heard footsteps overhead; I sent Bailey up. I am a smith, my shop is open to the street, the parlour opens into the shop. My watch was taken from the mantle-piece.

WILLIAM BAILEY . I am apprentice to Mr. Potten. On the 19th of August I stood on the ladder leading to the shop, and saw the prisoner run out of the parlour; I went in and missed the watch. We took him about ten o'clock at night. The watch has never been found.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18180909-73

1134. JOHN TAYLOR and WILLIAM ELLIS were indicted for stealing, on the 15th of August , 117lbs. of beef, value 3l., the goods of William Curtis , in his dwelling-house .

WILLIAM CURTIS. I am a butcher , and live in North-street, Spitalfields . On the 15th of August I went out, between four and five o'clock in the morning, and left some meat in my shop; I returned just before six o'clock; Mr. Miller showed me a rib, sirloin, and piece of ribs of beef, weighing 117lbs. it was worth 8d. a pound; it was mine; I had left it in my shop. I knew it to be mine by a particular cut of my own.

THOMAS MILLER . I live four doors from Mr. Curtis. On the 15th of August, between five and six o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoners against his door. I saw Taylor open the door, and take a sirloin of beef and bring it out. Ellis then went in and took off a piece of the ribs. Ellis must have seen Taylor go out, as he waited at the door. I pursued Ellis, and brought him back with the meat on his back. Taylor was about 100 yards before him. He was never out of my sight.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Ellis could see what Taylor brought out.

Taylor's Defence. I was only passing the shop.

TAYLOR - GUILTY. Aged 25.

ELLIS - GUILTY. Aged 22.

Of Stealing to the value of 39s. only .

Confined One Year .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18180909-74

1135. WILLIAM SHORE was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of August , two printed bound books, value 10s., the goods of Mary Priestly , widow , privately in her shop .

JOHN WEAL. I am shopman to Mary Priestley , a widow, who lives in St. Giles's . On the 1st of August, about seven o'clock in the evening, I was sent for into the shop, and found the prisoner there, he asked for Campbell's Lives of the Admirals. I saw a space in the shelf. I put my hand to his pocket and felt a book in it. I told him I must search him. He took the books out and said,

"these are my books, you cannot swear to them." I gave him in charge. He made a great resistance.

THOMAS SPENCER. I am shopman to Mrs. Priestley. The prisoner came and asked for the Lives of the Admirals; I showed him the first volume. He asked for the edition of 1815. Weal came and took the books out of his pocket.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I do not know how they came there GUILTY. Aged 20

Of stealing, but not privately

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18180909-75

1136. JAMES WHITE was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Sutcliffe , about eleven o'clock in the forenoon of the 19th of August , at St. Andrew, Holborn (Elizabeth, his wife, and others, being therein), and stealing one watch, value 30s. one watch-chain, value 1s.; two seals, value 6d.; and two watch-keys, value 2d. his property.

ELIZABETH SUTCLIFFE . I am the wife of William Sutcliffe , who lives in the parish of St. Andrew, Holborn ; he keeps the house. On the 19th of August I was at home by myself, I fastened the outer door and my room-door. My husband is a labourer at the East India House. The outer door could be opened outside by pulling a string. I am sure it was fast; the room-door was fast and the key in it. I was up stairs; my watch hung over the fire-place in the room. I heard the street - door open, ran down as fast as possible, and saw a man go out of the outer door and pull it after him. I looked into the room and missed my watch. I immediately ran after him; I did not see the prisoner stopped. The prisoner was brought back in less than a quarter of an hour, by Daily. I do not know whether he is the same person that I saw in the house. I had had the watch eight years, it is worth 30s. A person could see the watch hang up through the window. I tried the door before I went up stairs.

JAMES DAILY. I am a silk-dyer. I saw the prisoner running, a person was pursuing him. I stopped him; he took the watch out of his bosom and threw it away. I picked it up, and took him back to Sutcliffe.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 33.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18180909-76

1137. WILLIAM ONION was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of July , one watch value 6l.; one chain, value 1l.; and one seal, value 1l. the goods of Thomas Osborne , in his dwelling-house .

THOMAS OSBORNE. I am a baker , and live in York-street, Foley-street . On the 25th of July I went out; I returned about two o'clock, and missed the property off the mantle-shelf.

WILLIAM COX . I am a pawnbroker. A boy pledged the watch with me in the name of John Lavie . He has absconded.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18180909-77

1138. ELIZA JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of September , at St. Andrew, Holborn, one bag, value 6d.; and the sum of 3l. 5s. the goods of Daniel Kelly , in his dwelling-house .

MARGARET KELLY . I am the wife of Daniel Kelly . We rent a house in Field-lane, Holborn, parish of St. Andrew . We keep a chandler's shop . On the 7th of September, about two o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner came to my shop. She had been there before that morning. I was at dinner, and saw her in the shop. I did not see her come in. I saw her reach her hand over the counter, open the till, and run out. I saw nothing in her hand. Before I went to dinner there was a silk bag, with 3l. 5s. 6d. in it, all in silver; I had counted it about an hour before she came in. I ran out after her as fast as possible; when I got to the door I saw her going down the lane towards Holborn. My girl went after her.

Q. Between the time of your counting the money and her coming in, had any body else been in - A. Nobody at all; the money was in a red and white striped silk bag.

ELLEN KELLY . I am the daughter of last witness. My mother sent me in pursuit of the prisoner. When I got into Holborn I saw her crossing towards Shoe-lane. I went up to her, and asked if she had not been to my mother's just now; she said who is your mother? I told her; she refused to return with me, and said she had not been there. I took her back; she went quietly with me. As I crossed Holborn I observed her throw something away. I do not know what it was. I took her to my mother. My father gave her in charge. She had been to the shop before that morning, for half an ounce of tobacco. The silk bag belonged to me; my sister gave it to me. There was some silver in it which belonged to my father.

JOSEPH EASTERBROOK . On the 7th of September I saw the prisoner with the last witness; she held her. I saw the prisoner throw away a bag in the middle of the street, I picked it up; it was empty; it was a striped bag; I was going to give it to the person, and saw the prisoner throw something more away, under the door of the wine-vaults. at the corner of Field-lane; I picked it up, it was a piece of paper; which contained counterfeit shillings. I followed them to the prosecutor's shop, and gave it to Egan.

CHARLES EGAN. I live next door to Mr. KellyEasterbrook gave me the bag, and I gave it to Edwards.

WILLIAM BROWN EDWARDS . On the 7th of April, I took the prisoner into custody, and found 30s in good money, in her pockets, and four bad shillings on her person-the paper contained forty-eight counterfeit shillings.

(Bag sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. They have sworn falsely against me.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 22.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

Reference Number: t18180909-78

1139. SARAH BUTCHER was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of July , at St. Pauls, Covent-garden, in the dwelling-house of Thomas Jones ; one 5l., bank note , his property.

THOMAS JONES . I keep a house in the parish of St. Pauls, Covent-garden ; the prisoner was my servant . On the 21st of July, between eight and nine o'clock in the morning, I missed a 5l. note out of my cash-box in the bedroom - I had put it there the evening before, when I went to bed. I got up at seven o'clock next morning; I had left my wife in the room - She came down about eight o'clock. I sent for an officer, without saying any thing to the prisoner - nobody else had access to my bed-room. The constable came, I called the prisoner down to the kitchen, told her I missed a 5l. note, and I suspeeted her - She denied it. The constable searched her box; while he was searching the prisoner went to some small drawers, where some other things were kept, took something out, and endeavoured to put it in her pocket! I caught her hand, found a very small box in it, and the 5l. note in the box; I knew it to be the same, by four figures at the back of it, which I had particularly noticed the night before - They were 1797. I had a particular reason for noticing what I put into my box. I found my box locked as I had left it. There are two keys to it, my wife keeps one, and I keep the other; my wife had lost her key for two or three days; we found it in the prisoner's box after she was taken to the office-it was not there when the constable searched the first time; we had left the prisoner in the kitchen for half an hour, to pack up her things, While the officer went to Bow-street on the business, she had an opportunity of putting the key there (looking at the note), this is it, I know it by the figures.

JAMES BARTLETT . I am a constable. I was sent for, and took the note out of the little box; I was not present when it was found. Mr. Jones has spoken correctly.

Prisoner's Defence. I have been only thirteen months in London.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 18.

Recommended to Mercy.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18180909-79

1140. WILLIAM WALKER was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of June , four table-covers, value 1l. 13s., and one rug, value 5s. , the goods of James Thomas ; and THOMAS ROBERTS was indicted for feloniously re

ceiving the same, he well knowing them to have been stolen .

JOSEPH ROWLEY . I am servant to Mr. James Thomas , who is a warehouseman , and lives in Mumford-court, Milk-street, Cheapside . The prisoner was his porter .

HENRY TURNPENNY . I am an officer. On the 27th of June, I and Smith were employed to watch the prosecutor's premises; we had been watching two or three days before - We had been there from seven o'clock, I was in Lawrence-lane, and Smith was at the end of Milk-street, to watch both doors; a little after eight o'clock I saw the prisoner come out of the court into Lawrence-lane, he appeared confused when he saw me; we followed him down Aldermanbury, and lost sight of him in Force-street. He appeared very bulky, and much larger than when I saw him go into the warehouse. He had seen us, and started off. We lost him. We immediately went to No. 13, Newcourt, Moor-lane, where the prisoner Roberts lived. I looked through the window, and saw the prisoner, Walker, there - We waited about two minutes, and then saw him come out, tying his apron on, and go down the court, he did not appear so bulky as before; he saw us at the bottom of the court, and went into a public-house - He appeared very confused. I went in, took him, and found 5s. 6d. on him; we took him back to Roberts's, we found Roberts and his wife at breakfast in the room where I had seen Walker, I asked them both to produce the property which Walker had brought in - They denied his having brought any. I said it was all nonsence, for I knew better, and was sure something had been brought in. His wife immediately went to the drawers in the same room, and produced two table-covers. I asked them if they had any thing more there? they both said, No. I found two more in the same drawer, and under a turn-up bedstead I found a rug. I secured the prisoners.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. When you saw Walker in the room was any other person there - A. No; I went to the bottom of the court, which is a thoroughfare. I could not see the house. When I returned I found Roberts there-his wife was the principal person who answered me.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did Roberts appear as if he had been out - A. No; they both answered, almost together, that nothing had been left.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

ROBERTS'S Defence. When I married my wife, I found her house furnished, and I did not know what was there. I never opened the drawers.

WALKER - GUILTY . Aged 51.

Transported for Seven Years .

ROBERTS- NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180909-80

1141. STEPHEN GRANT was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of August , 2lbs. of tea, value 5s. , the goods of the United Company of Merchants of England , trading to the East Indies.

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating it to be the property of the East India Dock Company .

THIRD COUNT, the same only stating it to be the property of Alexander Nairne .

FOURTH COUNT, the same only stating it to be the property of Eglinton Maxwell .

FIFTH COUNT, the same only stating it to be the property of a person or persons unknown.

JEREMIAH WATSON . I am third officer of the East India Company's ship, the General Kin, which was in the East India Import Dock; the prisoner was one of the excise officer on board. About two o'clock, I saw him in the hold, buttoning up his clothes, which excited my suspicion-the tea chests were there. I asked him, what he had been doing? he said nothing. I observed a chest of tea broken, and a great deal scattered about; I told him, I was sure he had been stealing the tea, and he should not leave without being examined. I called four men. who were discharging the tea, to see him searched, He then unbuttoned his clothes, and took a white handkerchief from his back, which contained the tea - He said nothing. Mr. Maxwell came afterward, the prisoner then said he knew nothing of it.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q.Had you any quarrel with the officers - A. No, not with the revenue officers on board. I was rather displeased with some officers as we came up they pulled me about.

Q.In your passion, you swore you would be revenged on the revenue officers - A. I said I would not mind being revenged on that officer-it was not the prisoner. Our captain's name is Alexander Nairne .

CHARLES NESTRAM . I am a labourer on board the ship. I was in the hold Watson called to me, and said "you are witness I took the tea from this man;" the prisoner heard it, but said nothing.

MICHAEL MORRIS . I am a Thames Police officer. I took the prisoner in charge. Brooks, the superintendent, said he was sorry to see a man of his appearance charged with such an offence; he said, I took it for our breakfast, He afterwards said the handkerchief did not belong to him, and he knew nothing of the tea.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he not say he never took any tea, except for breakfast - A. He might; the tea was found when he spoke.

COURT. Q. At the time he was given into charge, did he deny it - A. No.

THOMAS BROOKS. I am superintendent of that part of the docks, On the 27th of August the prisoner was brought to me; I told him I was very sorry to see him commit himself for so small a quantity of tea - He made no reply. He said at last he did not mean to hurt me or the Revenue, for it was only a little he took for his breakfast. The chest appeared recently broken.

Prisoner's Defence. I never had the tea in my possession.

GUILTY . Aged 41.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180909-81

1142. WILLIAM GRACEY was indicted, for that he, on the 7th of August , at Allhallows, Lombard-street, feloniously did falsely make, forge, and counterfeit, and cause and procure to be falsely made, forged, and coun

terfeited, and willingly act and assist in the false making, forging, and counterfeiting a certain promissory note for payment of money , the tenor of which is as follows:-

"Bury and Suffolk Bank, No. 864.

"I promise to pay the bearer Five Pounds, on demand, here or at Messrs. Lees, Satterthwaite, and Brassey, Bankers, London. Bury, 10th November, 1817. For James Oakes and Son.

"£5. Entered M. Collins. JOHN MARTIN ." with intent to defraud Edward Walmsley .

SECOND COUNT, for feloniously uttering and publishing as true, a like forged promissory note, with the like intent, he knowing it to be forged and counterfeited.

THIRD AND FOURTH COUNTS, the same, only stating his intent to be to defraud James Oakes and Orbell Ray Oakes .

TWO OTHER COUNTS. the same, only stating his intent to be to defraud George Lee , Richard Lee , Richard John Brassey , Fuller Farr , and George Lee , the younger.

WILLIAM MORPHEW . I am servant to Mr. Edward Walmsley, who is a linen-draper , and lives in Grace-church-street. On the 7th of August, about seven o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came to the shop, and bought a piece of Irish linen, which came to 3l. 2s. 10d., and paid me a 5l. Bury and Suffolk bank note - I did not ask his name; he gave me the name of Jones, Deptford; which I wrote on the note in his presence. This is the note he gave me (looking at it)-it was after banking hours. Next morning I presented it at Lee and Co.'s Lombard-street, for payment, and found it was forged. In consequence of which Mr. Hine, one of the clerks of the Bury bank, came to town on the Monday following, the 10th. We went together to Deptford, and were there nearly all day, searching for every person of the name of Jones, that we could find. We found four or five of that name, but not the person who gave me the note.

Q. In consequence of information did you go into St. George's-fields - A. Yes; on the following Friday, the 14th, I went to Joiner's-place, near Westminster-road, about a quarter before six o'clock in the morning. Mr. Hine and Walton, the officer, were with me. Walton knocked at the door, a boy opened it, he asked if Gracey was within? the boy said he did not live there. We went in through a room, which was the shop, it was shut up-this led us to a bed-room, Walton said, "Good morning to you, Gracey." I did not hear him answer. I said,"Good morning, Mr. Jones." He said his name was not Jones. I told him I understood it was not, but I wished him to go with us - He dressed himself, and went with us.

Q. Did he say anything more - A.He asked what I wanted with him. I told him he was the person who purchased a piece of linen of Mr. Walmsley, in Gracechurch-street, and I had given him change for a note; he then said he did not know Mr. Walmsley, that he had not been in Gracechurch-street, nor purchased any Irish linen, nor had he given a 5l. note to any person. We took him to the watch-house. As we were going along I asked him what he had done with the cloth he bought, he said he had not had any. We went to the watch-house to him at eleven o'clock - He wished to see his mother; Walton went for her, leaving me with the prisoner. He returned with his sister.

Q. While Walton was absent, had you any conversation with him - A. I told him I thought he was wrong in denying it, as I was sure he was the person who gave me the note; I said I did not wish to hurt him, I only wanted to recover my 5l. He was searched, and this pocket-book found on him; here is a memorandum, against the 7th of August (reads) "Jones, 2l." I had given him a 1l. note, and 17s. 2d. for his change. He was taken before the magistrate; I heard him make a statement there, which was taken down.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Look at him again, and see if you are positive he is the man who paid you the note - A. I have not the least doubt of it; he gave me the name of Jones voluntarily.

Q. Did he say his name was Jones, of Deptford, or that he received it of Jones, of Deptford - A. He only said, Jones, Deptford.

ROBERT BEVILL , ESQ. I am a magistrate of Worship-street. The prisoner was brought before me two or three times.

Q. Did he state to you how he came possessed of the note - A. I think it was at his second examination, I said nothing whatever to him - I took very short minutes of what he said - He spoke too fast for my clerk to take it down, but my minutes will enable me to state what he said; he said he would not sign any examination (reads),"I did live at No. 12, Kent-road, am a carver and gilder; I lodge now in Joiner's-place. I cannot say what is the person's name who keeps the house. I received this note when I lived in the Kent-road, about three weeks ago, for two dressing-boxes, which came to 2l. 14s., and put the man's name on the back of the note-he said he lived at Greenwich; he drove up with a horse and cart. I will not say whether he did not write the name himself. I did not take it to the banking-house. I left the shop in the Kent-road last Monday, and took my goods with me." He had seen the note; there is the name of "Howard, Stratford," on it.

WILLIAM HERITAGE . I am clerk to the magistrates. I was preparing a statement of the prisoner's examination; he said he would not sign it, and would rather not have it taken down-I tore it up.

THOMAS HINE . I am clerk to Messrs. James Oakes and Orbell Ray Oakes, who are bankers at Bury; they are the only partners, and were so in 1817. We have no entering clerk of the name of Collins, nor any signing clerk named John Martin . Our notes are signed by James Oakes -our clerks never sign cash notes. We have no clerks of those names. I assisted in inquiring for Jones at Deptford, but could not find the prisoner there. The note is endorsed"Howard, Stratford." I went there, and found two persons of that name.

JOSEPH WALTON . I am an officer. I went to St. George's-fields to seek for the prisoner - I knew him before; he came to my house on the Wednesday previous to see his brother, who I had in custody. I addressed him in the name of Gracey, and he answered to it. His mother's name is over the shop.

Cross-examined. His mother is a carver and gilder; I believe she sells dressing-cases. The shop is in Crown-street, Finsbury-square.

SIMEON MURRAY. I am clerk to Messrs. George Lee,

Richard Lee , Richard John Brassey , Fuller Farr, and George Lee , jun., they carry on business in the name of Lees, Satterthwaite, and Brassey, who are bankers - I have lived with them two months.

(Note put in and read. See indictment.)

Prisoner's Defence. I kept a carver and gilder's shop in the Kent-road. About the 27th of July a man drove up in a chaise, bought two boxes, and paid me the note. On the 7th of August, as I came home, I bought the linen at Walmsley's, and paid him the note, after having looked at the Directory, and saw there was such a bank. They did not ask me for my name, nor did I give any. I moved to Joiner's-place - They took me there. I did not know the note was bad.

EDWARD NEATE . The prisoner took a house of me, No. 12, Kent-road; it is three or four miles from Deptford - He kept a carver and gilder's shop in the name of Gracey, and was there in July last.

MR. BOLLAND. Q. When did he leave - A. On Monday, the 10th of August, about five o'clock in the morning. The landlord had agreed that he should leave if he left the fixtures; he was to go that day.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 25.

Recommended to Mercy.

London Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18180909-82

1143. GEORGE GRACEY was indicted for that he, on the 10th of August , at Allhallows, London-wall , feloniously did falsely make, forge, and counterfeit, and cause and procure to be falsely made, forged, and counterfeited, and willingly act and assist in falsely making, forging, and counterfeiting, a certain promissory note for payment of money , the tenor of which is as follows:-

"I promise to pay the bearer, on demand, Two Guineas, at Grantham, or at 56, Lombard-street, London. Grantham Bank, 16th April, 1817. For Joseph Lawrence and Thomas Earle Welby. 343

"Two Guineas. Entered Ed. May . WM. WILSON" with intent to defraud Thomas Archer .

SECOND COUNT. For feloniously uttering, and publishing as true, a like forged note for payment of money, with the like intent, he knowing it to be forged and counterfeited.

TWO OTHER COUNTS, the same, only stating the prisoner's intent to be to defraud Joseph Lawrence and Thomas Early Welby .

THOMAS ARCHER. I am a boot and shoemaker , and live in Great Winchester-street. On Monday, the 10th of August, at eight o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came into my shop, and bought a pair of Wellington boots of me, which came to 1l. 12s., and gave me a two-guinea Grantham bank note, payable at No.56, Lombard-street. I asked him to favour me with his address; he said his name was Smith. I gave him a pen to write it on the note - He said his name was on it. I asked him where he lived? he said, in Paul-street, which is not far from my house. I saw the name was on the back of the note. While the boy was gone home with the boots I forgot the number of the house, and omitted writing the address till he returned to tell me the number. I gave the note to Amelia Lownds, whom I saw write "Smith, T.A." on it. I had no other two-guinea note at that time or before. I sent my boy with the boots, and to bring back a pair of shoes, which the prisoner said he had, to sole and heel. This is the note-(looking at it).

Q. Did you go next day to Lombard-street - A. Yes, and found the note was bad. I went to Paul-street that morning, inquired for Smith at two or three houses, and was informed that if I had not got the number it was useless searching, as there might be many Smiths.

Q. From information which you received, was your attention called to Crown-street - A. Yes. On Tuesday, the 11th of August, which was the same night, I watched a house there belonging to Mrs. Gracey, and waited there till almost twelve o'clock, I then saw the prisoner in Crown-street, coming towards the house. I went up to him, saw he was the person I wanted by the light of the lamp, collared him, and said, "How do you do, Mr. Smith? I have been looking for you sometime." He said,"My name is not Smith, but Gracey, and what do you collar me for? I bought a pair of boots of you, and paid you. - (I had said nothing about the boots, nor told him who I was, or where I lived). I said, "Yes, you paid me, but you know in what manner." - He made no reply. I took him to the watch-house - He resisted. When he came to his own door he said his name was Gracey, and he would go no further, as he could be found there at any time. I succeeded in getting him to the watch-house, and gave him in charge to Walton. He said there that he took the note of a friend in the shop, and he knew who it was.

Cross-examined by MR. WALFORD. He was a stranger to me. I had no particular reason for attending to his conversation at the time he bought the boots.

Q. Are you sure he did not say that the person's name who endorsed the note was on it - A. No; he said my name is Smith, the name is on the back; Paul-street, is a few yards from Crown-street. I asked him the name of the street twice, and could not mistake him-my attention was called to what passed when my boy came back.

CHARLES FARQUHAR. I am servant to Mr. Archer, I remember the prisoner buying the boots - I was to take them home with him, and bring a pair of shoes back to sole and heel. We went across Moorfields, just as far as Lackington's; he walked first, and looked back three or four times. When we got to Lackington's, he said,"My lad, I will not take you any farther." He felt in his pocket for some halfpence, and said he had none; but he would bring the shoes next morning, and give me some - He did not call next morning. I had seen him before at his father's in Crown-street, Finsbury-square-his father was alive when I knew him. I did not recollect him when he first came, but I knew him better when he spoke to me at Lockington's. When his father was living my mother lived close by, and used to go charing for his mother - I knew all the family; I used to see him working. I often told my master that I knew him.

Cross-examined. Q. I had spoken to him before, we knew one another - He did not call me by name.

MR. ALLEY. Q. How long ago have you known him - A.Between three and four years ago. I have no reason to suppose he knew me.

COURT. Q. Did you hear him give your master the

name of Smith - A. Yes. When I saw him at Lackington's I thought it was Gracey.

CHRISTUS SEWARD. I am town-clerk of Grantham. I was clerk to Messrs. Joseph Lawrence and Thomas Earle Welby, bankers, from 1811 till the concern closed in 1816, they then gave up business; they are now living; they do not carry on any banking business at Grautham, nor did they in 1817. When they were in business they always signed the notes themselves, and had no signing clerk, nor any clerks of the names William Wilson or Edward May . Their is no banking business carried on now in their names at Grantham-the only banking-house is Holt, King and Co. - (looking at the note)-it is the same sort of note they used to issue, it is like the plate. This is not their hand-writing on the note. I do not know any of the writing.

EDWARD NEATE . On the 10th of August the prisoner moved from the house in the Kent-road. He lived there with his brother, the last prisoner - They left it about five o'clock in the morning.

Cross-examined. Q. You mean you saw him often at his brother's house - A. Yes; I do not know that he lived with his mother. I saw him in Kent-road as often as I saw his brother. I saw him there at five o'clock in the morning when they moved. I do not know that he slept there.

(The note was here put in and read.)

Prisoner's Defence. I received the note from my mother. I gave the man the name of Gracey, and told him I believed it was on the back of the note. I asked him to let the lad go with me. When I got to Finsbury-square, I recollected I had to call on a person. I took the boots from the lad, and told him that if I came that way in the morning I would call and leave the shoes. I had to go another way, and did not leave them. It is very unlikely that I should have gone into a neighbourhood where I had been known for fourteen years, if I knew the note to be forged. I entered into conversation with the prosecutor at his house, about the neighbours who knew me.

THOMAS ARCHER re-examined. Q. Are you sure he did not say his name was Gracey, and that he believed it was on the back of the note - A. I am sure he did not. The boy went with the prisoner by my desire, as I wished to know where he lived. He did not ask me to let the boy go. I never saw him before to my knowledge.

Q. When he left you did he go in the way to Crown-street - A. Yes, and in the way of Paul-street also. He talked about the neighbourhood, and said he knew Donaldson, Scott, and Williams.

CHARLES FARQUHAR. I was within hearing at the time, and am certain he did not mention the name of Gracey.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 22.

London Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18180909-83

1144. JOHN JONES was indicted for that he, on the 9th of July , at St. Mary-le-Bow, feloniously did dispose of and put away a certain forged and counterfeit bank-note (setting it forth, No. 70,751, 1l., March 6, 1818, signed E. Staples) with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England , he knowing it to be forged and counterfeited .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only calling the forged instrument a promissory note for payment of money instead of a bank note.

THIRD AND FOURTH COUNTS, the same, only stating his intent to be to defraud Sarah Taylor .

SARAH TAYLOR . I keep the Bunch of Grapes, public-house, Jewin-street, Aldersgate-street . On the 9th of July about eleven o'clock in the morning, the prisoner came to my house, and asked for a quartern and a half of gin, which came to 6d; he gave me a 1l. bank note, I asked him his name and address? he said his name was Johnson, and that he lived in Hare-court, Aldersgate-street. It struck me that the note was bad, by his coming so far, and passing several other public-houses before he came to mine; there are several between mine and Hare-court. I wrote his name and address on the note in his presence(looking at it)-this is the note he gave me. I gave him 19s. 6d. in silver. Mr. Cornish was in the next room. Before the prisoner went out I communicated my suspicions to him, leaving the prisoner in the shop. I showed Mr. Cornish the note, I was five or ten minutes before I returned to him, I put the name on the note before I left him; I gave him the change after I returned from Cornish. I requested Cornish to follow him, which he did, and brought him back about a quarter of an hour afterwards. I asked him what he had done with the silver, he said it did not matter to me what he had done with it. I told him it did matter, as it was my money.

Prisoner. Q. When you took the note to Cornish he returned it to you, you came and said you could not give change. When I said I could not have the gin, you returned to Cornish, and then sent your daughter out for change - A. I only went into the room to Cornish once, and returned in five minutes, I sent my daughter out for change while I was with Cornish, I returned and gave the prisoner the change; I never said I could not give change; when I first took it, I said, "I was afraid I could not," and then showed the note to Cornish - He said he thought it a good one, I said I thought it was not; he advised me to take it. I sent my daughter for change, I went out of the private door myself, and gave her the change to bring in. The note was never out of my possession. I did not want change.

Q. What was your reason for doing that - A. I thought it was a bad one.

JOHN CORNISH. I am a butcher, and live in St. George's-market. While I was in Mrs. Taylor's house, the prisoner came in-Mrs. Taylor requested me to look at the note; I said I would follow him - I went out and saw him - I did not see the bottle with him. He went into Aldersgate-street, and went up to a man who stood at the corner of Hare-court; both went down the court together. I followed him; when they got to about the middle of the court, his companion looked round at me-they then quickened their pace. I was within ten yards of them, and asked a woman if that was Hare-court, his companion again looked round. They went out of the court into another alley on the right, and there I saw the prisoner give some silver out of his hand into the man's hand, it appeared about 16s. I went up to the prisoner and told him I wished to know something about the note that he had

passed; his companion walked a little way, and then ran. The prisoner said, "Search me." I then repeated my question; he again said, "Search me." I told him he should go back with me, he refused. I took hold of him, we had a scuffle and I tore his coat. He then said, "You have torn my coat, I will go back with you; but do not handle me." When we got to Mrs. Taylor's, I said here is the man; I gave him in charge of a man while I went to look for the other man. I returned and searched him, but found nothing particular on him.

HENRY PIPER . I am a tax-gatherer, Hare-court, Aldersgate-street, is within my district. I know the names of the housekeepers living there; there is no person of the name of Johnson living there, nor was there on the 9th of July. I know no person of that name. I do not know the prisoner.

JOHN KING . I am a cheesemonger, and live in Wellington-street, Goswell-street. On the 11th of May, the prisoner came to my shop and bought a piece of cheese, which came to 2s. 8d. or 3s. 8d.; he paid me a 1l. bank note. I asked his name and address, he said, "Chapel, No.22, Mitchel-street, Brick-lane;" which I wrote on the back of the note in his presence (looking at it), this is the note. I have no doubt of his being the person. I did not know him before.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not say at the office that it was Whit Monday - A. Yes; he had a large brown great-coat on.

JURY. Q. Sometime had elapsed between that and when the prisoner was apprehended, how came you to so particularly notice him - A. I knew him directly; I had paid the note away, it was traced back to me from the Bank; when I saw him before the magistrate I had not the least doubt of his being the man, nor have I now - He was full five minutes in my shop. The day that I took the note, I went to the address and saw the name of Chapel on the door, and was satisfied.

Q. Was there any thing particular that makes you remember the prisoner - A. I talked to him about going to Greenwich fair.

MR. WILLIAM PAYNE . I am clerk to the magistrates at Guildhall. I was present when the prisoner was examined about the note uttered to Mrs. Taylor. I wrote his examination down, he did not sign it - He was told he need not say any thing to commit himself. I read what passed over to him at the second examination. I cannot say whether the first examination was read over to him on the first day (reads). "1st examination, Thursday, 9th of June. The prisoner admitted that he went to buy the gin, and said he took the note last Friday of a man named Johnson; he did not known him, but he said he lived in Hare-court. He denied speaking to any body after he left Taylor's. On being asked where he lived, he said he lived no where at present, but slept last night in Drury-lane." On the 13th of July, he was examined again, Taylor and Cornish were examined (reads)."Prisoner admits that he had the bottle, and it was in his bosom at the time he was taken. He does not deny having the note, but did not know it was bad. He does not know Johnson, but he took it of him in Smithfield-market." King was then examined on that day (reads)."Prisoner said he does not know him at all, he is mistaken; he never wore a frock-coat in his life; that he was at work mending harness on Whit Monday, and then lived with his father, who is an aged man, but he did not wish to tell where, lest it should come to his ears."

CHARLES CHRISTMAS . I am a bank note inspector I examine the notes; that uttered to Taylor is forged in all its parts-paper, ink, plate, and signature. The other note is forged in all its parts, and off the same plate; and bears the same signature as the first.

EDWARD STAPLE . I am a signing clerk of the Bank; there is no other clerk of my name; neither of the notes are signed by me.

(The note was here put in and read.)

Prisoner's Defence. I met a man named Johnson at a public-house in Carnaby-market, he pressed me to go into the City with him. I went into two wine-vaults with him, when he tendered the note; he went into another in Aldersgate-street, and came out laughing and said it was droll that he could not get change. He sent me to get change at the prosecutrix's; he said he did not like to go in as he owed her a score, gave me the bottle and told me to get a quartern and half of gin, and put my own address on it, I refused - He told me to put his, which I did. The prosecutrix took the note to the gentleman, I observed him hold it up to look at it; she brought it to me and said she could not change it. I said I could not have the gin, she returned to the gentleman, and sent her daughter for change-who returned without it; her mother sent her again, she brought it. When I came out I observed Johnson on the opposite side, he beckoned to me, I went to the corner and offered him the buttle and change - He told me to wait there till he returned; the man came and took me. I did not know it was forged.

THOMAS HOLTS. I am a shipwright, and live in Love-lane, Rotherithe, and have known the prisoner from his infancy, but did not know where he lived. On Whit Monday, I believe it was the 12th or 13th day of May, between nine and ten o'clock in the morning, I saw him at the Welch Harp , public-house, Peter-street, Westminster; he was there when I went in, I remained with him till between twelve and one. We then went to the Jew's Harp, Regency Park, and remained there till dusk. He was not out of my company all day.

Q. Did any body else drink with you - A.Not in particular-there was a gentleman, who is here, drank once or so.

Q. Are you sure it was the 12th or 13th of May - A. I think so.

MR. SERGEANT BOSANQUET. Q. Did you ever meet him there before - A. No; we drank all the while we were there.

RICHARD DEVERIDGE. I lived at the Welch Harp, Peter-street, and was there on Whit Monday; I had lived there four months. The prisoner came in a little before ten o'clock in the morning on Whit Monday, and remained there till I went out, which was about half-past twelve o'clock; I left him there in the tap-room - He was in the house all the while, except going into the yard. He had on a black coat, white apron, and crape round his hat. I knew the prisoner before.

MR. REYNOLDS. Q.What did you do there - A. I helped there; the landlord and landlady were both there. The house was full of people.

Q. How do you know whether it was Monday or Tuesday - A. There was a dog-fight, which is aways on a

Monday; I never saw the prisoner there before or after. There was no harness making going on, they were making holyday.

RACHAEL RILEY. I am the wife of John Riley, we live in King-street, Drury-lane; I did not know the prisoner. On Whit Monday, about nine o'clock in the morning, I went to fetch my husband from the Welch Harp, the prisoner came in in a few minutes, dressed in black - He had a batband and white apron on; he remained there till half-past twelve. I left him there - He was there all the while.

Q. Did you go there as early as nine o'clock - A. Yes; my husband went out to work at six o'clock in the morning, he is a coach-smith, and works at Holmes's in Long-acre.

Q. How came you to remain there so long - A. I would not go away without my husband.

Q. When was you first applied to about this - A.Last week. I do not know how they found me out.

JOHN KING re-examined. The prisoner was at my house between eleven and twelve o'clock, I believe; I cannot speak exactly to the time.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 23.

London Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18180909-84

1145. RICHARD BENNETT was indicted for that he on the 25th of August , at St. Mary-le-Bow, feloniously did dispose of and put away a certain forged and counterfeit bank note (setting it forth No. 57,920, 1l. August 5, 1818, signed W. W. Thomson), with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England , he knowing it to be forged and counterfeit .

SECOND COUNT. For feloniously offering to Henry Rickett a like forged bank note, with the like intent, he knowing it to be forged.

THIRD AND FOURTH COUNTS, the same, only calling the forged instrument a promissory note for payment of money, instead of a bank note.

FOUR OTHER COUNTS, the same, only stating the prisoner's intent to be to defraud the said Henry Rickett .

HENRY RICKETT . I am a grocer , and live in West Smithfield . On the 25th of August, between twelve and one o'clock, the prisoner came to my shop and bought two ounces of tea and a pound and a half of sugar, which came to 2s. 6d.; he took a dirty linen bag out of his pocket, and took a 1l. note out. He asked for the change; I told him I thought I had not got it. I suspected it was a bad one, but did not tell him so. I gave the note to Jones, my shopman, to go out and get change. The prisoner heard me sent him. I had observed the name of"Hoares and Co." on the right side of the face of the note.

Q.Had you asked the prisoner any questions about it - A. Not any. My young man was gone ten or fifteen minutes. I kept the prisoner in conversation, by talking about the country, as he appeared a countryman. He said my young my man was a long while gone. I said I was obliged to send across Smithfield for the change, and it took some time. He went towards the door, I followed him to see if my man was coming, not seeing him, he said he would walk round Smithfield, and come back for the change and goods, then left. Jones afterwards returned with the note, and gave me information about it. I locked it up by itself, but did not mark it. I took it to the Bank that afternoon, where I ascertained it to be a forgery. I then marked it at the Investigator's office (looks at in), I am sure this is the note the prisoner gave me.

Q. Did the prisoner ever return - A. Never.

JOHN JONES . I am servant to Mr. Rickett. The prisoner came into the shop. my master gave me the note to get changed (looking at it), this is it. I had observed" Hoares and Co." on the face of it, and "Willian and Co., Bull and Mouth-street," on the back, before I took it out of the shop. I could not get it changed; it being a bad note.

JOHN MASTERS. I am a bookbinder. On the 28th of August I heard Mr.Rickett had taken a bad note, and the description of the man who uttered it led me to suspect the prisoner, whom I had formerly known, by his going about with earthenware. I went round to where he resorted, and saw him in a coart in West-street, on the right hand going out of Smithfield; he was with another man; I heard that man say to him.

"The note is up yet in the grocer's window, and I thought you was out of the way." The note was then up in Mr. Rickett's window. This led me to suspect he was the man. The prisoner said he was going out of the way that evening, he then pulle a bag out of his right hand pocket, opened it, and took a 1l. bank note out, and put the bag in again, doubled up the note and put it into his fob. The other man walked away. I said to the prisoner,

"I presume you are the man that passed the note to Mr. Rickett," he said he was the man, and told me if I wanted any, to appoint any public-house, and kept him in conversation for about an hour. We walked to the corner of Jewin-street, Aldersgate-street; he said he would not walk any further diwn Aldersgate-stree, for he knew Aldersgate-street very well. He wanted to go down Jewin-street. I immediately called a coach which stood in the road oppsite to Jewin-street, and told him I apprehended him for uttering the note to Mr. Rickett, and having one then in his possession.

COURT. Q.How came you to know that the note in his possession was a bad one - A. He told me that the note he had in his bag cost him 8s. and the man whom he had it of paid 7s. 6d. for it. I forced him into the coach; he resisted a good deal, at last when he saw a mob) coming round, he went quietly into the coach. I got in with him. He threw the dirty bag out at the door; Payne picked it up, and gave it into the coach to me. I found the note in it, which I afterwards put my name on (looking at it).

MR. RICKETT. (looking at the bay.) it is the same sort of bag that he liad at my shop. I believe it to be the same-this is it. I had never spoke to him before. I do not know how he came to be so free with me.

ROBERT PAYNE. I work at a glass-house in Aldersgate-street. On the 28th of August I was selling fish about the street and saw the prisoner and the las witness hustling together. I put down my tray to see what was the matter. Masters asked him to go back to the man where he passed the note, if he was innocent. I tried to peersuade him to go back, and so did a gentleman who got out of a gig, and others, but he would not. I saw him put into the coach. Masters and another amn got in with him.

I saw the prisoner, with his left hand, throw a dirty bag out of the coach, I picked it up and gave it to Masters at the coach-door, in the same state as I picked it up.

Prisoner. Q. Did I not drop it - A. No; he threw it out under the hind wheel, while Masters was getting in. It must have come from his hand, as neither Masters nor the other had got in.

CHARLES CHRISTMAS. I am Inspector of bank notes.(Looking at the notes.) That uttered to Rickett is forged in all its parts, paper, plate, and signature. That found on the prisoner is of a different plate, and is forged in every respect, and is not the signature of the signing clerk.

WILLIAM WALKER THOMSON . I am signing clerk to the Bank. There is no other of my name. The note is not my signature.

(Note read. See Indictment.)

Prisoner's Defence. I work very hard for my living. A man bought several articles of earthenware of me in Hatton-Garden. I could not give him change. He sent a boy with me to the grocer's shop to get change. I went out to look for the boy, he was gone; I caught sight of him, followed, and lost him. I have learnt since I have been in prison, and that his name is Edward Powell . I took the other note of a man instead of a bad one. He had paid me before.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 23.

London Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18180909-85

1146. GEORGE ASTON was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of June , one pocket-book, value 5s. the goods of Benjamin Currey .

MR. BENJAMIN CURREY. I am a solicitor , and live in Great George-street, Westminster. On the 24th of June, I was going along the Strand, towards the City; when I was by Exeter Change I took my pocket-book out of my coat pocket, and replaced it there. When I got near Norfolk-street Mr. Lintott called to me, in consequence of what he said, I pursued the prisoner and another man who was in company with him. I took the other man, and Mr. Lintott took the prisoner. When we got to the watch-house the prisoner took my pocket-book from his pocket, put it on a table, fell on his knees, and begged for mercy. Mr. Lintott had told him it was useless denying it, as he saw him take it out of my pocket. He escaped in going to the office, but was taken again.

STEPHEN LINTOTT . I am cashier in Messrs. Spooners' hanking-house. I was standing at Messrs. Coutt's door, in the Strand about half past twelve o'clock; I saw the prisoner pass and repass two or three times. I then saw Mr. Currey come by and the prisoner close upon him, and a young man behind the prisoner. Just as the prosecutor came to Norfolk-street the prisoner quickened his pace, got close up to him, and got the pocket-book out of his pocket; his companion joined him in Norfolk-street, and they turned into Howard-street. I informed Mr. Currey, we pursued and overtook them in Howard-street. I collared the prisoner, and told him he had something that did not belong to him, he strongly denied it, I said it was useless, for I would swear that I saw him do it. I took him to the watch-house, and sent for a constable, he then took the pocket-book from under his waistcoat, put it on a table, fell on his knees, and begged for mercy.

JAMES FLETCHER. I had the prisoner in custody; he escaped from me, and ran down Swan-yard, while I was pursuing him somebody got the pocket-book out of my pocket.

MR. CURREY re-examined. The pocket-book produced by the prisoner at the watch-house, I am certain, was that which I had lost.

Prisoner's Defence. I never had it.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180909-86

1147. JOHN WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of June , from the person of Benjamin Sackley , one hat, value 7s.; one pair of shoes, value 3s.; two boxes, value 1s., and 18s.6d. in monies numbered , his goods and monies.

BENJAMIN SACKLEY. I live in Hampshire. On the 25th of June, between eight and nine o'clock at night. I was at the Red Lion, at Ealing . The prisoner was in the tap-room. I fell asleep and awoke in the night, and missed my shoes off my feet, and the other articles mentioned in the indictment. On the 27th prisoner was taken with my shoes on his feet.

GEORGE CARVER. I am a constable. I took the prisoner on the 27th of June, about eleven o'clock in the forenoon. The prosecutor claimed the shoes which the prisoner had on his feet. The prisoner said he had bought them.

(Shoes sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defenc. I bought them that morning.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180909-87

1148. JAMES LAWRENCE and JOHN BURGESS were indicted for stealing, on the 2d of August , at Enfield, one mare, price 10l. the property or William Field .

WILLIAM FIELD. I am a farmer , and live at Ponders End, in the parish of Enfield . I had had my mare seven or eight years. On Saturday the 1st of August I saw her in the field, between two and three o'clock in the afternoon. She could not get out of the field, it is not likely, the gate was fast. Next morning, between six and seven o'clock, I missed her. I saw her again on the Tuesday following, the 4th of August, at Hackeny, in the custody of Garva, and am certain she is mine. She is worth 10l. I know the prisoner Lawrence, he lived about a mile from me. Burgess lived about the same distance. I never saw them in company together.

JURY. Q. Are not these marshes common - A. No; they are inclosed.

THOMAS BOWLES . I am a patrol. On Sunday the 2d of August, about four o'clock in the morning, I took the prisoners into custody. I saw them come over Lcc Bridge, they took the towing-path; they were both riging on one mare, with a sack on its back. I asked where they were going, they said they were going home to Shadwell. I asked what was in the sack, they said it was corn for the horse; I found it was poultry. I took them immediately to the watch-house.

Q. Did not they say anything about the horse - A.Lawrence said they found the horse grazing as they came along, and took it to carry the fowls on-both agreed in this story; at the watch-house they said they took the fowls from Mr. Walker's.

JOHN SWANSBORNE . I was in company with Bowles; he has spoken correctly.

JOHN GARVA . I am constable of Hackney. The prisoners were brought to me at the watch-house, with the mare and the sack, which contained the poultry. I asked where they got the mare? they said they saw two bargemen riding her; that they drove her away, and then they took her to ride. I shewed the mare to Mr. Field, he recognized her immediately.

WILLIAM FIELD . Garva showed me the mare, it was the one I had lost. The field is three-quarters of a mile from the road-the gate was chained. Lee-bridge is seven miles from where the mare was taken from.

LAWRENCE'S Defence. I saw the bargemen hunting the mare, when we came to it by the side of the barge-river, we got on it, and rode a little way; we did not intend to steal it.

BURGESS'S Defence. Lawrence has spoken the truth.

LAWRENCE - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 20.

BURGESS - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 17.

Recommended to Mercy.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180909-88

1149. DUGAN DANIELS was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of August , one trunk, value 2s.; one coat, value 1l.; one pair of breeches, value 10s.; one pair of trowsers, value 4s.; two waistcoats, value 7s.; one hat, value 3s.; two handkerchiefs, value 2s.; two pair of stockings, value 1s.; and one bible, value 3s., the goods of George Green , in the dwelling-house of William Fountain .

GEORGE GREEN . I am waiter at the public-house kept by Mr. Fountain, in Percy-street, Rathbone-place . My trunk was in the three-pair front room; about half-past six o'clock in the evening, on the 27th of August, I heard a talking in the passage, I ran up, and found the prisoner in custody of my master. He was a stranger. My trunk, which contained the articles stated in the indictment, was just by him.

WILLIAM SHEPHERD. I am a constable. I was sent for, and found the prisoner in Mr. Fountain's custody-the box stood between them - He charged the prisoner with bringing it down from the garnet, the prisoner said he was told to fetch it; he said he went up, found the garret door open, and took the box.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A person said he lodged at the Marquis of Granby, and asked me to go and fetch a box. I saw a woman on the stairs, and told her what I came for, she said I should find it in the room. I was stopped in the passage.

WILLIAM SHEPHERD re-examined. The prisoner at first said he was sent to the Dog and Duck; afterwards he said it was the Black Horse.

GUILTY. Aged 26.

Of stealing, but not in the dwelling-house .

Confined One Year , and Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180909-89

1150. MARY GREEN was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of June , nine gowns, value 3l.; five petticoats, value 10s.; four shifts, value 1l.; ten handkerchiefs, value 15s.; two sheets, value 10s., and one table-cloth, value 5s., the goods of Frances Smith , widow , in her dwelling-house .

FRANCES SMITH . I live in St. Catherine's-lane, Aldgate . On the 24th of June I went out, locked my room door, and left the key of the street-door with the prisoner - She lodged with me. I returned at half-past ten o'clock at night, found her gone, and the door locked. I got a neighbour to get in at the back of the house, and let me in. I missed the articles stated in the indictment. On the Saturday following I found the prisoner in custody.

Prisoner. Q. Do you not let your house out to prostitntes - A. If I do they pay me 18d. a night.

JOHN SPENCER. I am servant to Mr. Watts, who is a pawnbroker, and lives in East Smithfield. On the 25th of June two gowns and a petticoat, were pledged with me. I do not know who pledged them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutrix robbed a gentleman, he charged me with it, and I ran away.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180909-90

1151. MARGARET READING , REBECCA GOULD , and MARY SANDERS were indicted for stealing, on the 14th of July , one scarf, value 12s., the goods of Samuel Cater , privately in his shop .

SAMUEL CATER . I am a linen-draper , and live in Finsbury-place . On the 14th of July, between two and three o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoners, Sanders and Reading, came into my shop to match a piece of print like a gown one had on, another girl was with them-it was not Gould; I had not got the pattern, they asked to see some others; I showed them several, they said none would suit, as they wanted the exact pattern - They all three went out together; in about five minutes I missed a scarf, which I was marking when they came in, I told Wood to follow them; he returned, and said they were in the next linen-draper's shop - I sent him to fetch them. Gould was brought in immediately; as she came in I saw the scarf lying on the floor where she had passed.

JAMES HODGETTS. I am a linen-draper, and live in Crown-street, Finsbury-square, near the prosecutor. On the 14th of July, Reading and Sanders came into my shop with another girl, not in custody. I afterwards saw the scarf on the ground in Mr. Cater's shop. Gould had been in my shop, but did not come in with them.

THOMAS WOOD. I am shopman to Mr. Cater. I saw the women come in, we afterwards missed a scarf, my master sent me after them; I saw them coming out of another shop a few doors lower, I took either Reading or Sanders-the other two ran away. I went and took Gould in Moorfields, about ten minutes after, with the calico; I brought her back to the shop, the scarf dropped from her.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GOULD'S Defence. A girl gave them to me to hold for her.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180909-91

1152. JAMES LOWE was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of July , one pair of breeches, value 10s.; two yards of flannel, value 2s.; one yard of muslin, value 5s.; three yards of cotton, value 4s.; three yards of calico, value 2s.; two shirts, value 1s., and one handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of James Taylor , from his person .

JAMES TAYLOR . I live in Shropshire. On the 24th of July, about five o'clock in the morning, I went to the side of the Paddington Canal , to take my passage home by the barge-Bauld was with me. We sat down to wait for the boat-my bundle was under my head; we were in the canal-yard. The prisoner came round us two or three times; in about a quarter of an hour, he came and snatched the bundle from under my head, and ran away, I pursued, he was stopped in a few minutes; he had got out of my sight. I am certain he is the man. I have never found my bundle.

JOHN BAULD . I was with the prosecutor; we laid down on some straw - I saw the prisoner take the bundle from under his head. I am sure he is the man. We pursued, and took him; he had got rid of the bundle.

CHARLOTTE TAYLOR . I am the prosecutor's wife; I was with him, and saw the prisoner come round the rick three times. I am certain he is the man. I was asleep when he took the bundle.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing of it.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180909-92

1153. WILLIAM SADLER was indicted for feloniously having in his custody and possession, one forged and counterfeit bank note, he knowing it to be forged, against the statute .

THOMAS DINHAM. I live with my father who is a shoemaker, and lives in Dean-street, Westminster. On the 10th of July, about three o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner bought a pair of shoes of me, which came to 4s., he paid me a 1l. note. I asked his name and address, he said" William Sadler , at Smith's, St. George's-row, Chelsea;" which I wrote on the note in his presence. I gave him the change, and he left (looks at the note), this is the note.

GEORGE CROSBY. I work for an army-accoutrement maker, at Westminster. On the 20th of July I agreed to sell the prisoner an old coat for 7s. - he gave me 3s. as earnest; I knew him before by sight; he did not pay for it for two or three days. I asked him when he meant to fetch it away? He called at my lodgings a few days after, gave me a 1l. bank note, and told me to take the price of my coat out of it; he asked me to get it changed. I went to a publican, whom I knew, he said it was forged. I took it back to the prisoner, who remained at my lodgings. I called him at the door, but he did not come down; I went up, gave the note to him, and said, "How came you to send me with a bad note?" He said he did not know that it was bad, having just taken it of a Jew, and that a person was present who saw him take it. An officer came in, and took the note out of his hand.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not tell the officer that you knew there was an officer following you - A. I said I thought so, and called the prisoner to the door to give him the note before the officer - He followed me from the public-house.

JOHN SILVESTER . I am a constable. On the 20th of July, I was at a public-house, in Tothil-street, Westminster; Crosby came and offered a note in payment for a glass of gin. Jones returned it to him, he went out with it - I and Betts followed him to his house, in New Pye-street - Betts was before me. I saw Betts take the note out of the prisoner's hand; we both marked it, this is it (looking at it).

HENRY BETTS . I was with Silvester. When Crosby got to the door he called somebody, no person came. He went up, I followed, and heard him say it was a bad one; I found the prisoner in the room, and took the note out of his hand. I took both of them into custody. I went to No. 10, St. George's-place, St. George's-row, Chelsea; but could find nobody of the name of Smith there.

CHARLES CHRISTMAS . I am a bank note inspector. The notes are both forged in every respect; both are off the same plate, paper, date and hand-writing, and purport to be signed by Tabor.

CHARLES TABOR . I am a signing clerk at the Bank. Neither of the notes are signed by me.

Prisoner's Defence. I took the note of a Jew that I gave to Crosby; the other I took of a man for a pair of shoes.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18180909-93

1154. MARGARTET READING , REBECCA GOULD , and MARY SANDERS were again indicted for stealing, on the 14th of July , at St. Leonard, Shoreditch, 13 yards of cotton, value 1l. 6s., the goods of James Hodgetts , privately in his shop .

JAMES HODGETTS. I am a linen-draper , and live in Crown-street, Finsbury-square, in the parish of St. Leonard, Shoreditch . On the 14th of July, the prisoners, Reading and Sanders, and another person, came into my shop a little after two o'clock in the afternoon - They both asked to look at some blue prints; I showed them some - They objected to the pattern, and asked me if I had any more? I showed them others; they objected to them also, and asked me if I had any like a gown which Sanders had on? I said I had not. They said they were sorry they had given me so much trouble, and went out. I turned round to put some things in the window, and saw them standing before the window; they then came in again with another person, who is not in custody, and asked me if I sold stockings? I showed them some white cotton; they then asked for some black worsted. While I was doing that Gould came in, and asked me for a 3s. 6d. shawl, I showed her one - She objected to the pattern. I pointed to one in the window, she said she did not like it, and went away. I showed the other three some more black stockings - They bought none, and went away. In about ten minutes after, I missed thirteen yards of printed cotton, and went in pursuit of them across Finsbury-square. When I got to Mr. Cater's, his young man ran out - I went with him, and saw Reading and Sanders about one hundred and fifty yards off, with one or two others; when they saw us, they began to run, and dispersed in different directions.

Wood took Sanders and Gould, and I took Reading. Mr. Cater took the print out of Gould's apron - I said it was mine; it has my private mark on it. I saw it in the window while they were looking in.

Q. Did Gould go near enough to take it herself - A. No, Reading and Sanders were both near enough to take it-Reading was nearest to it. No person was serving in the shop but me. I did not see it taken; it is worth 26s. - it was some distance from the door. They must have been in the shop when they took it.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. The prisoners were strangers to me. It was impossible to take it outside the shop. The window is inclosed in front about four or five feet high; they could not see it except through the window - They must have put their hands through the things which hung before it to get it. I went from behind the counter to get the stockings.

Q. Was any of your family in the shop - A. No, my wife was in the back-parlour, but she could not see what was passing in the shop without standing up - She gave no alarm.

SAMUEL CATER . I am a linen-draper, and live in Finsbury-place, at the corner of Chiswell-street, my shop is about five minutes' walk from Mr. Hodgett's. On the 14th of July Sanders and Reading came to my shop with another woman, and wanted to match a print which one of them had on; they staid there about five or ten minutes, and left without buying any thing. In consequence of what passed my shopman pursued them. In a few minutes after, I saw Reading pass the shop, and ran out and took her. I found the print in Gould's apron, my man had stopped her. I delivered it to Mr. Hodgetts. He and I both assisted in taking Reading.

THOMAS WOOD . I am shopman to Mr. Cater. The prisoners, Reading and Sanders, came into the shop with another girl. In consequence of what had happened, I pursued them about five minutes after they left the shop. As soon as I got out I saw them coming out of the next linen-draper's in Chiswell-street, which belongs to Mr. Spurrier, and is about twenty doors from ours. When they got about ten doors farther they saw me; Gould and another woman was with them talking together. I got up to them, tapped Sanders on the shoulder, and told her I wanted her-the others immediately ran away. I gave her into Mr. Spurrier's charge, pursued and took Reading, and gave her in charge to Mr. Hodgett's; I then pursued Gould, and found her behind a watch-box in Moorfields, where she had concealed herself; she had something in her apron - I asked her what it was? I pulled her apron on one side, and saw it was a piece of print; she said it was given to her. I took her to Mr. Cater - She dropped his property in the shop. The prisoners were all searched in my presence. No money was found on either of them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAM DRINKWATER . I am an officer. On the 14th of July I was called in and searched the prisoners - I found neither property nor money on any of them.

READING'S Defence. They have sworn falsely.

READING - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 17.

GOULD - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 15.

SANDERS - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 16.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18180909-94

1155. MARY LLOYD was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of August , 28 yards of calico, value 1l. 17s., the goods of Joseph Purser , privately in his shop .

JOHN COOPER . I am servant to Joseph Purser . On the 3d of August, about three o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner came to the shop - We were very busy. I watched her, knowing her before. I saw her make several attempts to cover the things on the counter with her cloak. While my master was reaching for a piece of linen, I saw her put something under her cloak. She then said the linen she first looked at would not do. She went out, I followed her, and brought her back to the door - She let the print fall, and I picked it up.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 33.

Of Stealing, but not privately . Confined One Year .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18180909-95

1156. WILLIAM HENRY FORBES was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Ambrose Carey , about nine o'clock in the night of the 9th of July (he and others being therein) and feloniously stealing therein four candlesticks, value 4s. , his property.

AMBROSE CAREY . I keep the Harlequin, public-house; in Drury-lane . On the 9th of July, about half-past eight o'clock at night, the prisoner and two others came to my house, and had some bacon and eggs. As they went out Hixon alarmed me - I went out and took the prisoner, his companions escaped. I found four candlesticks on the prisoner - two in his breeches, one under his waistcoat, and one under the back of his coat, which were taken from my club-room. I do not know that the door was locked.

JOHN COLLIER. I saw the prisoner running and stopped him-the candlesticks were found on him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 28.

Of stealing only . Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18180909-96

1157. MARY ELIZA LATHAM was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of July , five shirts, value 3l., the goods of Jane Allwright , in the dwelling-house of Daniel Cook .

JANE ALLWRIGHT. I lodge in Charles-street, Longacre , in Daniel Cook 's house. On the 11th of July I employed the prisoner to clean my room - She slept with me the night before, and left me about three o'clock on Sunday afternoon. I was ironing all day. I put all my shirts in a drawer - She particularly noticed my putting them in. I left her in the room twice while I went down stairs. I missed the shirts next day, and have never seen them since.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

Reference Number: t18180909-97

1158. RICHARD HARTOP was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of James Branch , about four o'clock in the afternoon of the 27th of June , at St. Luke ( Mary Tiplady and others being therein), and feloniously stealing therein, one box, value 10s.; two blankets, value 2l.; two sheets, value 30s.; three

books, value 3s.; eight knives, value 5s.; eight forks, value 5s.; four sovereigns, two half sovereigns, and 40 1l. bank notes , the property of Thomas Branch .

THOMAS BRANCH . I live with my father, James Branch, who keeps a house in Tabernacle-walk, which is in the parish of St. Luke . I had a box in my father's bed-room, which contained the articles stated in the indictment.

ANN BRANCH . I am the prosecutor's mother. On the 27th of June, between four and five o'clock in the afternoon, my son's box was in my bed-room - I had locked the door, and had got the key in my pocket. I was in the kitchen; Mary Tiplady , who is my daughter, alarmed me, she was at home. I went up stairs, found the door unlocked and open, and the box gone. I am certain I had locked it.

MARY TIPLADY . I am Mr. Branch's daughter. On the 27th of June I was in the kitchen with my mother; I heard footsteps going up stairs, and some person come down. I looked up, and saw a man pass with a box on his shoulder. I called my mother, ran up, and found the door open. I immediately ran out, and saw the prisoner in the street with the box on his shoulder. I called out, "Stop that man with the box!" - He was stopped in Featherstone-street, and brought back by Hall and Billings - He was never out of my sight. I knew the box to be my brother's.

Cross-examined by MR. PLATT. He is the man I saw going out with the box.

THOMAS HALL . I heard the alarm-the prisoner passed me with the box on his shoulder. A man went up and tapped him on the shoulder - He immediately dropped it and ran away. I picked it up. A great many persons were pursuing him. I delivered the box to Garton.

JOHN BILLINGS . I keep a coffee-shop in the City-road. On the 27th of June I stopped the prisoner; he was running, and a great many pursuing him. I took him to the prosecutor's, and from thence to the office.

THOMAS GARTON . I am an officer of Worship-street. The prisoner and box were given into my charge. I found five skeleton keys in his right-hand jacket pocket, and tried them to Mr. Branch's room-door-one of them opened it. The keys would open every door in the house.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was hired to carry it to Old-street - road for 5s. The woman said she would swear my life away if possible.

MRS. BRANCH. I never saw him before.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 29.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18180909-98

1159. GEORGE LAYTON and MARY ANN LAYTON were indicted for stealing, on the 3d of July , one ticket, No. 3,824, made and issued under the authority of a certain Act of Parliament made and passed in the 55th year of our Lord the King, intituled, "An Act for granting to his Majesty a sum of money, to be raised by Lotteries," value 10l., the property of Robert Hazard , Thomas Burne , and John Rowland Durant , in the dwelling-house of our said Lord the King, against the statute .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating it to be in the dwelling-house of Legrew Hesse.

DAVID SIMPSON. I am a clerk in the Lottery-office at Somerset House . Mr. Legrew Hesse lives in the place where the tickets are kept-it is the property of the Crown; I know the prisoners. On the 3d of July they came together to the office-the woman presented a share of a ticket which was drawn in the last lottery - She handed it across to me; I had at that time a number of whole tickets, which were arranged for entry for payment-No.3,824, was one of them; it was the uppermost of the pile.

Q. Was the woman near enough to have taken it - A. She was. After examining her share I returned it to her. She asked a question which I did not understand-her husband said it was of no consequence, as it was a blank. Almost immediately after they left the office I missed the ticket-no other person had been there. Six days afterwards, the male prisoner came to the office to inquire the fate of a ticket, and presented me with a piece of paper, with No. 3,824 of the 2nd Lottery for 1815. I told him the examination would be attended with an office-fee. He said he knew that, for he had been there before. On looking at the number I immediately recognized as like the number I had lost. I asked him if he had the ticket of that number? he said No. I communicated it to another clerk, and he fetched the secretary, who came out, and asked the prisoner if he had a ticket of that number? he said No; he had a sixteenth of it. We sent for an officer, who took him into custody - He said he was innocent. When he was going to be searched at the office, he said, to prevent trouble, he had got the ticket, and immediately produced it from his pocket. He said his wife found it in St. Martin's-lane. His wife was sent for - She came and said she did not know how she came by it; that she found it accidentally in her pocket as a piece of waste paper-that she picked up a piece of paper in St. Martin's-lane about a fortnight ago, and supposed that was it. I produce the ticket, and am certain it is that I lost-it tallies exactly with the cheque. I refer to the Benefit Book, by which it appears that it is a prize of 10l.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. They were a very short time there. The man was not near enough to take it.

Q. This being the uppermost ticket it might have slipped from the pile - A. It is possible. I returned him the paper she gave me-that would not resemble a whole ticket; it is the same size, but different ink. He could have learnt the fate of the ticket at any office in town, without coming to me, and they would have paid him the money for it. I do not know whether the woman can read or not.

WILLIAM BLACKBURNE. I am a clerk to Messrs. Robert Hazard , Thomas Burne , and John Rowland Durant, they are lottery-office keepers. The ticket is their property; they paid 9l. 18s. for it.

JOHN PARISH. I am a collector of taxes in the parish of St. Mary-le-Strand. Somerset-House is in that parish.

GEORGE LAYTON 'S Defence. We are innocent of knowing it was stolen. It came into our possession accidentally.

MARY ANN LAYTON 'S Defence. My little girl brought it to me, and I showed it to my husband.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18180909-99

1160 ELIZA JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of June , one table-cloth, value 2s. 6d.; two sheets, value 12s.; two pillow-cases, value 4s.; twelve yards of cotton, value 8s.; one coverlid, value 3s.; thirty yards of binding, value 2s.; six glasses, value 4s.; and two curtains, value 20s. , the goods of John Mair .

CHARLES FREDERICK FLENLEY . I am footman to Mr. John Mair , who lives in Friday-street . The prisoner was his servant , she came there on the 16th of May, soon after which he went to Scotland; while he was gone, I examined under the prisoner's bed and found a sheet there, in consequence of which she was discharged. On the 15th of July, my master returned, and in consequence of information, I accompanied the officer to search her lodgings, No. 5, Mulberry-court, Bell-alley, and found her there; she said they were her lodgings. I found the articles stated in the indictment, some in her boxes, and the rest on the floor.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. The sheet was between the bed and sacking - A. There was no other servant in the house.

Q. Was you present when she was discharged - A. The prosecutor's partner discharged her; she offered her boxes to be examined-which was not done.

JAMES COLLINS . I am an officer. I searched prisoner's lodgings, and found the property; part in her boxes, and part in the room.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. It is not the prosecutor's property.

GUILTY . Aged 38.

Confined One Year .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180909-100

1161. JAMES IRWIN was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of August , one basket, value 3s.; one cloth, value 1s., and 42 lbs. of butter, value 3l. 3s. , the goods of George Bowles .

GEORGE BOWLES . I am a salesman in Newgate-street . On the 29th of August, about ten o'clock in the morning, I lost a flat containing 42 lbs. of butter; I belive it was at the door. A person came in and gave me information, I ran out and passed the prisoner as he turned up a court; my father took him and brought him back.

JOSEPH BOWLES . I was in my son's shop, a person came in and said the butter was stolen - We both run out and saw the prisoner with the flat on his shoulder, he came out of Salutation-passage. I took him in the Bell Inn-yard, with the flat on his shoulder. He said a gentleman gave it to him to carry.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Three Months , and Whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180909-101

1162. ROBERT CALOW was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of July , one handkerchief, value 2s., the property of James Vickridge , from his person .

JAMES VICKRIDGE . I am a tea-dealer , and live in Charles-street, Islington. On the 1st of July, about three o'clock in the afternoon, I was on Holborn-hill , I was in a crowd and felt a crush behind me-the officer produced my handkerchief, which was safe just before. I had a gentleman with me.

JOHN FORBES . I am an officer of St. Sepulchre's. On 1st of July, I saw a crowd of people at Epps's shop on Holborn-bridge, the prosecutor and a gentleman came towards the crowd, the prisoner and another man followed them. The moment Mr. Vickridge came to the crowd and looked in at the window, the prisoner closed behind him, put his hand into his pocket, and pulled out a silk handkerchief, put it under his coat, and turned to go away. I collared him and said, "What have you got," he trembled very much, opened his coat, and the handkerchief fell out. I picked it up and alarmed the prosecutor, he claimed it; the prisoner begged of him not to prosecute him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. Q. There was nobody with me - A. There was, I saw that person in Guildhall-yard when the prisoner was examined-and have seen him in the pressyard to day.

Prisoner's Defence. I am inocent.

GUILTY . Aged 18

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180909-102

1163. JONAS SKINNER was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of May , one 5l. and two 1l. bank notes , the property of Charles Harland .

CHARLES HARLAND . I am an engine-maker , and live in Fenchchurch-street, the prisoner was my servant . On the 14th of May, he had only been in my employ three hours; I gave him one 5l. and two 1l. notes to pay Mr. Knight for some goods. I showed him the house; he never returned. On the 26th of June, I found him.

JOSEPH HARLAND. I am the prosecutor's brother. I afterwards paid the money which the prisoner was sent to pay. I produce the receipt.

RICHARD BLANCHARD. I am servant to Mr. Knight, timber-merchant; the prisoner never paid me the money, Mr. Harland paid me.

WILLIAM JOHNSON. I apprehended the prisoner. He said he had lost 2l. of the money, and spent the rest.

Prisoner's Defence. I lost it, and was afraid to return.

Confined Six Months .

GUILTY . Aged 18.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180909-103

1164. JOHN WARD was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of September , one pair of shoes, value 11s. 6d. , the property of Michael Ulmer .

MICHAEL ULMER . On the 8th of September, I had a stall at Bartholemew fair -it was the day after the fair. I was pulling my stall down, and saw the prisoner take the shoes off the counter; I collared him, and took them from him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A man gave them to me to clean.

GUILTY . Aged 38.

Whipped and Discharged.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180909-104

1165. JOHN MEALL was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of July , thirteen waistcoats, value 2l. 15s.; and two jackets, value 20s., the goods of James Hoppe , privately in his shop .

DANIEL HOLLAND. I am servant to James Hoppe , who is a salesman , and lives at Sparrow-corner . On the 14th of July, about one o'clock, the prisoner came into the shop, and sold me an old coat for 2s. 6d., he sent me for a pot of beer; he sat in the shop by himself while I was gone. I returned in about two minutes, and found him gone with the property; he had been stopped with it while I was gone.

JOHN BARRON. I live next door to the prosecutor. I saw the prisoner sitting by himself in the shop, and saw Hollard go to the public-house. He was hardly out of sight before the prisoner came out with some clothes. I followed the prisoner, and secured him with them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was intoxicated.

GUILTY . Aged 35.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180909-105

1166. JOSEPH KNOX was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of July , six quires of large thin post-paper, value 9s.; and four quires of other paper, called large thin post, value 8s. , the property of John Williams .

HENRY CRUTTENDEN . I am servant to Mr. John Williams; the prisoner was his clerk . On the 30th of July, I saw him take two parcels of paper, put one on each side of his bosom and come down from the desk. I stopped him at the door, called the shopman and apprentice-and took the property from his bosom. He was agitated, and said it was the first he had taken. He was the collecting clerk.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

MR. JOHN WILLIAMS. I was called, and found the prisoner in custody. I had lost paper before.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Recommended to Mercy.

Confined Three Months .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180909-106

1167. HENRY SMART was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of July , one jacket, value 6s. , the property of John Redhead .

MARY REDHEAD . I am the wife of John Redhead, we live at Wilsden-green , my husband's jacket was hanging in the orchard to dry. On the 9th of July, between ten and eleven o'clock, I saw the prisoner go out of the orchard; I missed it, and found it in a wheat-field.

SARAH DAY. I work for Mrs. Redhead. I saw the prisoner crawling along the orchard and take hold of a counterpane, I called out; he ran off through the hedge.

THOMAS WHITE. I heard the alarm, and saw the prisoner jump out of the orchard with something under his arm, I pursued, he dropped the jacket; I picked it up.

GEORGE EARL. I heard the cry, and stopped the prisoner. (Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I did not drop it.

GUILTY . Aged 31.

Confined Two Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180909-107

1168. ELIZABETH BROOKS was indicted for that she, on the 21st of July , at St. James, Clerkenwell, feloniously did dispose of and put away a certain forged and counterfeit bank note (setting it forth, No. 46,023, 1l. 9th of June, 1818, signed C. Tabor), with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England , she knowing the same to be forged and counterfeited .

SECOND COUNT. The same, only calling the forged instrument a promissory note for payment of money, instead of a bank note.

TWO OTHER COUNTS. The same, only stating the prisoner's intent to be to defraud John White .

JOHN WHITE. I am a grocer , and live at No. 23. Alsop's-buildings, New-road . On Tuesday, the 21st of July, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner came to my shop; my son served her. I was in the parlour behind the shop. She asked him how I was, upon which I went into the shop; she gave me a 1l. bank note, I asked her name, she said it was Brooks, and she lived in Mary-street, Fitzroy-square; my son immediately said that he had taken a bad note in December last, and he believed she was the person who gave it to him. She seemed very much agitated at the time, and said she did not live in Mary-street, but in Mary's-place, and then afterwards said that she had left Mary's-place, and had gone to live at No. 11, George's-street, Fitzroy-square. We asked how long she had left Mary's-place, she said about twelve-months; that her husband was a painter and glazier, and had taken a little shop there. This was after she had said she lived in George-street. I gave her 12s. 11/4d. which was her change; she had bought tea, sugar, and soap. I marked the note before she left the shop (looking at one), this is it. I wrote Mrs. Brooks, No. 11, George-street, Fitzroy-square, on it. I desired my son to follow her. My house is rather more than half a mile from Fitzroy-square; it is at the corner of Upper Baker-street.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. I put the note in my silver till; there was no other note there; I kept it by itself; I marked it as soon as I received it.

Q. Your son told her she had passed a bad note before - A. Yes; she was agitated; it would have alarmed me to have been told so.

MR. REYNOLDS. Q. When first she mentioned Mary-street, did she say she lived there, or had lived there-A. She gave it as her address.

GEORGE WHITE . I am the son of the last witness. On the 21st of July, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner came to our shop. I served her with one pound of sugar, a quarter of a pound of tea, and two ounces of pearl ashes. She then asked how my father was; he had not been ill. He came out of the parlour, hearing her ask for him. She offered him a 1l. bank note; he gave her the change before she gave him the note. She then handed it to him at the desk, he asked her name, she said it was Brooks, and that she lived in Mary-street, Fitzroy-square. I remembered taking a bad note some months before, of the same address, and told her I had taken a bad note of a woman so much like her, that I thought she was the woman. She changed colour, and appeared greatly agitated, and said she had formerly lived in Mary's-place, but now at No. 11, George-street, Fitzroy-square; that her husband was a painter, and kept

a shop there. She faultered in her speech very much, and said if my father did not like the note she would give him another; he said it was quite a new one, and declined returning it, saying he dare say it was as good as any other. She asked me to cut the soap, as it was too large to go into her basket. She broke it herself and put it in.

Q. After she left, did you, by your father's desire, follow her - A. Yes. When she got out of the New-road, I lost sight of her; I ran as far as the New Church, but could not see her. I returned and saw her go down Alsop's-place. She kept looking back, to see if any one followed her. She then crossed the top of Upper Baker-street, which is on the other side of the New-road, looked up the street towards our house, and went down Park-place to Park-street. I do not think she saw me. She came into Gloucester-place and the New-road again, and looked down towards our house. After crossing the road she ran all the way to York-street, Gloucester-place, I there met Slade, he joined in the pursuit; he kept behind her, and I kept at a distance, fearing she would know me. We followed her into Crawford-street, and through different streets into Marylebone-lane; she went into the Cross Keys there, Slade followed her in; she came out in about five minutes.

Q.When she went in, had she her basket - A. Yes; she brought it out again. We followed her into Oxford-street, where she went into a chemist's shop by the Green Man and Still, came out in about five minutes, and we followed her through several streets to the Seven Dials up Longacre. I left Slade to watch her, and ran to Bow-street, got an officer, and found her in Lincoln's-Inn-Fields. The officer apprehended her there.

Q. At what time did you leave your father's house - A. A quarter before four, it wanted about ten minutes to five when we took her. Her basket would weigh about six pounds and a quarter.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Your object was to see if she lived where she said - A. Yes. She became agitated when I said she was like the woman who had passed a bad note to me.

COURT. Q. While she was going through the different streets, did she look back - A. Yes, as she ran down from the New-road to York-street, not after.

STEPHEN SLADE . I met White in Gloucester-place, and followed the prisoner through the different streets he has mentioned. I followed her into the Cross Keys, in Marylebone-lane; she had half a pint of beer there. She did not know me; she paid for it out of some silver and halfpence which were in her hand, and came out.

JOHN TOWNSEND. I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner in Lincoln's-Inn-Fields. I took her to the office. While we were waiting for the magistrate she appeared agitated. I asked what made her uneasy, and told her if she had given her right name and address she had no occasion to be afraid. She said she had given her right name, as she had given her maiden name. I said I suppose then you have been married. She said she had. Whether she mentioned her husband's name or not, I cannot say. She mentioned some name which I do not remember. She said she had been an unfortunate woman, and had received the note from a gentleman; that the gentleman walked that way with her towards Marylebone, where he left her. She saw the shop and bought the things. I found a good 1l. note on her, 11s. 6d. in silver, and 4d. in copper.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. You did not find silver on her sufficient to buy the things without changing - A. No.

BENJAMIN BROWN . I am a tax-gatherer in the district of Fitzroy-square and the west side of Tottenham-court-road. There is no George-street, Fitzroy-square. There is George-street, Portland Chapel and Hampstead-road.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Is there not a George-street very near Fitzroy-square - A. It is half a mile from it; it is out of my district.

MARY TUBERFIELD. I live at No. 11, George-street, Portland Chapel. I do not know the prisoner; she never lodged with me; I have no lodgers.

JAMES EDWARD JAMES . I live at the corner of Foley-place and George-street, Portland Chapel; I have a door in George-street, which is No. 11, but have no lodgers. The prisoner did not lodge with me. I do not know her.

BENJAMIN MORRIS . I live at No. 11, George-street, Hampstead-road; I let lodgings; the prisoner never lodged with me. I never saw her before, except at the office.

CHARLES CHRISTMAS . I am an inspector of bank notes. I look at the note, it is forged in every respect, plate, paper, ink, and signature; it is signed C. Tabor, but not in his hand-writing. It has the imitation of a water-mark.

CHARLES TABOR . I am a signing clerk at the Bank. There is no other of my name. The note is not my signature.

(The note was here put in and read.)

Prisoner's Defence. I met a gentleman in Leicesterfields, who took me to a house, asked me to meet him again on Saturday, and gave me the note. I was going to the Edgeware-road, and went into the prosecutor's shop, where I had frequently been before. for grocery to take to my daughter. I turned towards the Edgeware-road, but thought it was too late to go, when I returned, and was making the best of my way to Blackfriars-road, where my daughter was apprenticed, and the officer took me. I told the prosecutor I had lived in Mary's-place, but now lived in George-street, Fitzroy-square. I did not give the right address, not wishing to disgrace my family, as I knew how I got the note. I did not know that I was being followed.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 48.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

Reference Number: t18180909-108

1169. MARY SMITH was indicted for that she, on the 12th of July , feloniously did dispose of and put away a certain forged and counterfeit bank note (setting it forth, No. 1, 575, 1l. 6th of March, 1818), with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England , sh well knowing the same to be forged .

SECOND COUNT. The same, only calling the forged instrument a promissory note for payment of money, instead of a bank note.

THIRD AND FOURTH COUNTS. The same, only stating her intent to be to defraud John Farrow .

JOHN FARROW. I am a clothes salesman , and live in Whitecross-street . On Sunday the 12th of July, between ten and eleven o'clock in the forenoon, the prisoner came

to my shop in company with another woman, and bought a boy's corderoy dress, and a pair of shoes and stockings, which came to 1l. She gave me a 1l. note. I asked her name, she told me to put her husband's name on it, Conger, Golden-lane, but she did not know the number. She said her husband took the note for his pension. I wrote the name and address on it in her presence. She said it would not be long before she might return again, which she did in ten minutes, and bought a gown for 4s. 6d. and two pelisses which were to be 16s.; she paid 1s. deposit on them. She said she should prevail upon her husband to give her more money, or else he would spend all his pension, as she had left him at the public-house. She returned in a short time, inquired for the pelisses, and bought a man's blue jacket for 9s., she said it was for her husband. She owed me 15s., for the pelisse, she paid me a 1l. note and 4s.; I again asked the name and address, she said she had told me before; I wrote Conger, Golden-lane, on it. She was about a quarter of an hour each time with me, and tried one of the pelisses on. I have not the least doubt of her identity. (Looking at the two notes), They are the same she paid me.

Q. When did you see her again - A.Thirteen days after. I was cleaning the window, and my girl pointed her out to me. I followed her to the corner of Whitecross-street, and then lost her. Next day I saw her at the watch-house, and knew her to be the woman.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. There was no other customer in the shop. She came in three times, all before twelve o'clock. I did not see her again till thirteen days after, when Hudson pointed her out.

Q. When you returned from following her, did you not ask Hudson if she was sure she was the woman - A. I did not. I have not the least doubt of her being the person. I followed her and looked in her face, and knew her; I did not take her, as I wanted to see where she lived. I lost her.

Q. On Sunday you were told she was taken - A. Yes; Vann and Hudson came together. I wished to look at her again. I do not recollect saying I was not sure she was the person. She had a blue gown on, and a black bonnet with red ribbons.

MARY ANN HUDSON . I am servant to Mr. Farrow. I remember the prisoner coming to his shop and buying the things; she came three times, I saw her each time. She gave the name of Conger, Golden-lane. Thirteen days after, I saw her passing the door, and pointed her out to my master as the woman who had laid out so much money. I did not know the notes were forged then. She was taken the next day.

Cross-examined. I am fifteen years old. I was in the shop.

Q. When your master returned from following her, did he not say, are you sure she is the woman - A. He did. She was taken next day.

Q. Before he went to see her at the watch-house, did he not say he should go and see if he knew her again - A. Yes; he asked me again when he returned, if I was certain of her.

Q. Did he not say before he went to the magistrate, "I am not certain of her, and I wish you to be certain before you speak to her" - A. Yes; I am certain myself that she is the woman; she had a bonnet on. I pointed her out to Vann, in Crown-court, Grubb-street. He took her.

COURT. Q. Did you tell your master that the same woman was taken who had passed the door - A. Yes.

MARY FARROW. On the 12th of July I saw the prisoner in my husband's shop twice; I was not there the third time. I am certain she is the woman.

Cross-examined. Q. You did not see her for a fortnight after - A. No. I never remember my husband saying he was not certain of her. We only had the door-shutter down on Sunday; the house is not very light.

THOMAS VANN. I am a constable. I went with Hudson to look for the prisoner. She pointed her out to me in Crown-court, Grubb-street, I took her, and found she lived in Little Crown-court, which leads out of Crown-street. I went to her house and found a bonnet there. She was dressed in a blue gown.

Cross-examined. I know a woman of the name of Driscol, she has been in custody, but is now at large. She lives in Farrow's neighbourhood.

Q. Is she in size and figure something like the prisoner - A. I think her a little taller and more bulky.

COURT. Q. Did you find at the prisoner's lodging any of the things which Farrow sold her - A. No; I examined particularly for them, and found twenty-five duplicates, none of which related to them. I believe the prisoner has no son.

MARY FARROW re-examined. The bonnet and gown produced are those she had on.

Cross-examined. I will swear to the pattern, it is very common.

JOHN FARROW re-examined. It looks like the bonnet and gown she had on.

Cross-examined. I know Driscol, she is like the prisoner. I could not mistake one for the other.

MARY ANN HUDSON , re-examined. I am certain they are the bonnet and gown the prisoner had on.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you mean to swear to it by the pattern - A. Yes; I never noticed a person's dress so much as her's, and swear to the gown by the pattern; and that the bonnet is the same, by the pattern.

CHARLES CHRISTMAS . I am an inspector of bank notes. The notes are both forged in every respect; both are from one plate.

CHARLES TABOR . I am a signing clerk at the Bank. The signature is not my writing.

(The notes were here put in and read.)

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing of it, and have witnesses to call.

RICHARD NEVILL . On the 12th of July, I lived in Little Crown-court, Type-street, and am a cabinet-maker; I lodged with the prisoner.

Q. Can you tell whether she was at home on the Sunday fortnight before she was taken - A. Yes, I can; it was on the 12th of July. I got up between six and seven o'clock in the morning, went and took a walk with Harvey - We returned about ten o'clock and breakfasted with her, and did not go out again till after dinner, we dined at two o'clock; the prisoner was never out of my sight all that while. Crown-court is near half a mile from Farrow's.

Cross-examined by MR. SERGEANT BOSANQUET. Q.Do

you sleep there - A. Yes; the prisoner's husband keeps the house-the prisoner's daughter called on that day.

Q. When you went out in the morning, where did you go to - A. To St. Pauls, from thence to London-bridge and the Borough, it rained about nine o'clock; when we were in the Borough, Harvey met an acquaintance there - He walked out of the Borough with us. When we got home we found the prisoner, her brother and his wife there, we all breakfasted together; we had some bacon.

Q. When you were out, where did you shelter for the rain - A. In the Borough. I had only been a fortnight in town, and wanted to see it.

Q. Why did you not go out after breakfast - A. I had a letter to write, I did not write it till after dinner; I was reading the History of England before dinner, The prisoner's daughter came in about half-past ten o'clock, we had done breakfast.

Q. Did Avery breakfast with you - A. Yes; and the prisoner's husband.

COURT. Q. How was the prisoner employed after breakfast - A. In getting dinner ready.

JAMES HARVEY . I live in Crown-court, where the prisoner lived. On the 12th of July, I went out with Nevill and returned about ten o'clock, and breakfasted with the prisoner; we went straight to the Borough.

Q. Did you stop at any place there - A. Yes, at a public-house; and I called at woman's house, she sent an old shipmate to me at the public-house, he went as far as the bridge with us; we got home about ten o'clock.

Q. Did the prisoner's daughter breakfast with you - A. I I do not think she did. The prisoner was not out of my sight all the morning.

Q. What became of Nevill - A. He went up stairs in the morning to write a letter.

MR. REYNOLDS. Q. Did you go by St. Pauls - A. No; we were about two streets from St. Pauls, we could see it, it rained; the prisoner's husband and brother went out to mass, after their own breakfast. They had done breakfast when we came home, and made it again for us.

COURT. Q. Where did you go after dinner - A. I and the prisoner walked round Moorfields; we left Nevill at home, he had not finished his letter.

RICHARD MULLINS. I live in Spitalfields. On the Sunday fortnight before the prisoner was taken up, I called at the prisoner's house about eleven o'clock, and found her at home. Nevill and Harvey were there all the while I was there, which was till one o'clock.

BRIDGET SMITH . I am the prisoner's daughter. On the Sunday in question, about a quarter after ten o'clock, I went to her house and staid there till one o'clock; my mother was never out of my sight.

MR. BOLLAND. Q. Had they done breakfast while you was there - A. Yes; Nevill and Harvey were there, they did not go out-Nevill was reading.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18180909-109

1170. WILLIAM PLOMER DANIELS was indicted for unlawfully obtaining goods under false pretences .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY .

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180909-110

1171. SAMUEL SANDWELL was indicted for a like offence .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY .

Confined One Year , and Whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180909-111

1172. MOSES JOSEPH , alias COHEN , was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of May , one 10l., one 5l., and one 1l. bank-notes , the property of Abraham Carcous .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating it to be the property of Jonah Levy .

ABRAHAM CARCOUS. I am a spice-merchant , and live in Bevis Marks. I took the prisoner with me to Hull as a witness in a lawsuit I had there; I used to give him watches to sell. On the 22d of May, I put this money in a letter, and directed it to Mr. Levy. I never authorised him to receive the money back.

JONAH LEVY . I am a watch-maker . On the 24th of May I received a letter from the prisoner enclosing a one 10l., one 5l., and one 1l. notes, it was in prisoner's handwriting, requesting me to send nine watches; after receiving the letter, the prisoner came to town, called on me, and asked how I came not to send the watches. I told him they were ready. He said he should feel obliged by my returning the money, as he was going out of business; I returned to him the same notes I had received. I thought it was his as he signed the letter-he gave me a receipt for it.

Prisoner's Defence. I and the prosecutor were in partnership together. I received the money from Levy; the money was my own. Articles of partnership were drawn up between us.

ABRAHAM CARCOUS re-examined. No such writing ever existed. He wrote the letter for me, and read it as though it directed the watches to be sent to me.

PROSPER ABOTT. I live in St. Mary Axe. I knew the prisoner and prosecutor were in partnership. Carcous shewed me the agreement; it stated, that the prisoner was to have a share in watches only.

MOSES JOSEPH . I was with the prosecutor, he told me the prisoner shared profits with him in watches.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180909-112

1173. THOMAS BROOKS and ELIZA ROBINSON were indicted for stealing, on the 27th of July , one counterpane, value 5s.; twenty-seven yards of printed cotton, value 10s.; one pelisse, value 2s.; one gown, value 1s.; one coat, value 4s., and one sheet, value 2s. , the goods of James White .

JAMES WHITE. I am a painter and glazier , and live in Fann-street, Aldersgate-street . On the 27th of July, about twelve o'clock, I went out, leaving my things in the two pair front-room; I have lodgers. I returned in the evening, about half-past nine o'clock, and missed the articles stated in the indictment. The prisoner, Robinson, is my wife's sister, and had access to my rooms; the man is a stranger. The next day I appehended the man at Holloway-mount, in consequence of information. While he was before the Alderman, Robinson gave herself up, and told where the property was.

MARTHA SPENCER . I live in Turnmill-street, my husband is a carpenter. The prisoner, Robinson, sold me the duplicate of a counterpane and some bed-furniture.

JOHN BOTELAR. I am servant to Mr. Hill, a pawnbroker, who lives in Turnmill-street. On the 28th of May, Robinson pledged a pelisse with me for 2s. 6d.; and Brooks pledged the bed-furniture in the name of Watson.

WILLIAM ROBERTS . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Turnmill-street. I have a man's coat, pledged on the 27th of July, by the prisoner Brooks, in the name of Watson, Grubb-street, for 3s.

EDWARD BURCHILL . I am a headborough. I took Brooks into custody; I asked him when he had seen Robinson last? he said he had not seen her for four months.

RICHARD DANIEL FALLSHAW. I am an officer of St. Lukes. I was with Burchill; he has spoken correctly.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

BROOKS - GUILTY . Aged 40.

Transported for Seven Years .

ROBINSON - GUILTY . Aged 35.

Confined Two Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180909-113

1174. SUSAN SCREEN was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of August , one shift, value 3s.; one tea-spoon, value 2s.; two pillow-cases, value 1s.; three frocks, value 2s.; one handkerchief, value 6d.; one shawl, value 6d.; one apron, value 4d.; one petticoat, value 4d.; one jacket, value 1s. 6d.; and one pair of stockings, value 1s. , the goods of William Dunton .

WILLIAM DUNTON . I live in Middlesex-passage, Saint Bartholemew ; the prisoner was my servant . On the 13th of August, my wife was putting her to bed, as she was intoxicated, and found duplicats of the things on her.

WILLIAM RAYER . I am a pawnbroker; the prisoner pledged the articles stated in the indictment with me.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I never pledged them.

GUILTY . Aged 38.

Confined Six Months .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180909-114

1175. JOHN RILEY was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of June , one pocket-book, value 1s., the property of John Lee Moore , from his person .

The prosecutor not appearing, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180909-115

1176. ALBERT JAMES AVERY and JOHN OLIVER were indicted for stealing, on the 9th of August , one handkerchief value 3s., the property of Thomas Prendergast , from his person .

MR. THOMAS PRENDERGAST . I live in St. James-street. On the 6th of August, I was on this side Temple-bar , going home about two clock in the afternoon, and was informed my handkerchief was gone; I immediately missed it.

JOHN CARLISLE . I am an officer. On the 6th of August, between one and two o'clock, I saw the prosecutor in Fleet-street, going towards Temple-bar, and saw the prisoners, standing together, leaning over a post at the corner of Salisbury-court; I had been following them before. They followed the prosecutor, when he passed them. Avery went behind him just at Water-lane, he put his hand into the prosecutor's pocket-Oliver was close behind him; Avery pulled the prosecutor's handkerchief about half way out, the prosecutor still went on; Oliver went up and took it quite out. I laid hold of Avery, and told the prosecutor to hold him while I fetched the other; I followed him through several courts with the handkerchief in his hand, it was red with white spots. He turned to the right into Bouverie-street, and Fleet-street again; crossed Fleet-street into another court and went into a house there, he shut the door, I opened it, but lost sight of him. I returned to Fleet-street, took Avery from the prosecutor and took him to the Compter. I returned, and saw Crouch in Fleet-street with Oliver, I had informed him of the circumstance; the handkerchief has never been found. I was on the opposite side to the prosecutor.

EDWARD CROUCH . I am a constable. I was in Fleet-street and saw Avery in custody of last witness; he gave me information about Oliver. I went to look for him, and found him in the house he had ran into, which his father keeps. I found him on the roof.

MR. PRENDERGAST. My handkerchief was red silk with white spots.

Prisoner's Defence. The officer said he would get us transported right or wrong.

AVERY - GUILTY . Aged 17.

OLIVER - GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180909-116

1177. JOHN WATSON , BENJAMIN TATHAN WILLIS , THOMAS OWEN , WILLIAM QUIN , THOMAS SEENEY , JAMES WOOLF , JOSEPH TURNER , JAMES DALAS , SARAH IRELAND , WILLIAM CHALKER , JAMES YEOELL , JANE WILLIAMS , WILLIAM WILKS , MARIA WILKS , CHARLES HANSCOMBE , JOHN ANDERSON , JOHN DUNN , HENRY WEY , and WILLIAM SADLER , were severally and separately indicted for disposing of and puting away certain forged and counterfeit bank notes, they knowing them to be forged and counterfeited .

MR. REYNOLDS, in behalf of the Governor and Company of the Bank of England , declined offering any evidence.

(See No. 1107.) NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180909-117

1178. PHILIP ADAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of August , three sheets, value 10s.; one pillow-case, value 2s., and two table-cloths, value 8s. , the goods of John Unwin , Esq.

ANN NASH . I am servant to John Unwin , Esq., who lives in Harley-street . On the 15th of August the arti

cles stated in the indictment were lost out of the housekeeper's room.

DRUSELL ATKINS . I am a servant, and live at No. 35, Montague-square. On the 15th of August I was looking out of window, and saw the prisoner go down the area of No. 30, and come out with some linen under his arm - I sent a man after him.

JAMES SHELL . I am servant to General Wynne. I went after the prisoner; he threw the things away while I was pursuing him. I stopped him - I picked up the articles stated in the indictment, which he threw away.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I heard the alarm, ran after the boy, and they took me.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180909-118

1179. JAMES STREATER was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of July , five silver spoons, value 5l.; two silver forks, value 2l., and one tin funnel, value 3d. , the goods of John Lamb .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating them to be the property of John Glover .

MR. JOHN LAMB . I am captain of the Baring, East India ship. On the 25th of July she was in the East India Docks . I left all my plate on board the day before, in care of John Glover , the steward .

JOHN GLOVER . I was captain's steward of the ship. On the 24th I locked Capt. Lamb's plate up in the cabin, part in a chest, and the remainder in a box, which I did not lock. Next day, about eleven o'clock, I took it down to the gun-room the two mates, Capt. Johnson, and a boy were on board, and about twelve revenue officers. The prisoner was there as a custom-house officer. I was going to put the plate under the batches, which had an excise and custom-house lock and our own lock. I put it in the steerage while the officers unlocked the hatches; they then called me down to open the store-room door; I left the box close by the hatch, and went down-it had a canwas cover three times round it. The prisoner staid near it, and an excise officer named Cass. In about three minutes I heard the plate rattle; I ran up the ladder immediately, and found the box moved on to a chest in a darker place; the canvas was forced in on one side to make room for a hand. I saw the prisoner's hand in, and drawing it out as fast as he could no person was near him. I asked him if he put his hand in that box? he said Yes. I took the tin funnel out of his hand, and said it belonged to the box he said, "Does it?" He being an officer, I did not like to take him. I took the box into the cabin, missed five table spoons and two forks, and told Capt. Johnson. I missed the prisoner in about ten minutes he returned on board in about twenty minutes. Capt. Johnson then asked him how he came by the funnel? he said at first that he did not know, then that he found it in his hand, and afterwards that he took it out of the box. He said he had taken no silver.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Will you swear that the prisoner went ashore - A. No; he said he had been ashore. He told Capt. Johnson that he put his hand in the box, as he had a right to search.

Q. Did you not tell Arnold that you thought the prisoner was innocent - A. No; I said I hoped he would be found innocent, as he said he was.

MR. WILLIAM JOHNSON . I am the ship's husband. Glover gave me information of the prisoner; in about ten minutes afterwards I saw him come on deck from the shore. I asked him how he came to have the funnel in his hand? he said he did not know. I told him that Glover had said that he caught his hand in the plate-box, and saw him take the funnel out - He said it was so, but he took nothing else. I took him into the cuddy, and told him in private that it was a very serious thing, and that I should be under the necessity of giving him in charge, but I would first give him an hour to produce the plate he said he was innocent. He was taken into custody, as he did not produce it.

Cross-examined. Q. Can you say he ever left the ship - A. He told me he had been ashore to get something to eat. I saw him with two plates.

Prisoner's Defence. I never saw the plate. I thought it my duty to examine the box. I took out the funnel, the witness came up, and I gave it to him.

JOHN CASS . I am a tide-waiter of Excise. I saw Glover go below, and bring the box to the foot of the hatch. In about a quarter of an hour he came up, and charged the prisoner with stealing the plate. I did not see him near the box.

MR. BOLLAND. Q. Was you present all the while - A. No; I left the prisoner for ten minutes. I was in the cabin when Glover came up. I did not see the prisoner go ashore - I do not say that he did not.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180909-119

1180. JOHN THOMAS LITTLETON BURTON WILLIAMS was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of James Deboos , about two o'clock in the night of the 9th of June , at Edmonton, with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, one liquor-stand, value 1s.; three bottles, value 20s.; two silver mugs, value 40s.; eleven spoons, value 20s.; one great-coat, value 5s., and one pair of boots, value 5s. , his property.

MARY FRESHWATER . I am servant to Mr. James Deboos , who lives in the parish of Edmonton , on the opposite side to the Angel Inn. On the 9th of June, about three o'clock in the afternoon, my master left the house, I remained there with two of his children. About eight o'clock in the afternoon, my master left the house, I remained there with two of his children. About eight o'clock in the evening the servant, Barker, came down by the coach, with my master's trunk, and slept in the house that night. We all went to bed about eleven o'clock. I saw the house fastened the left-hand parlour window was quite secure. At six o'clock next morning Broomham, the gardener, called me up. I found the shutters forced open, and the bolts were wrenched off. I had been washing the day before, and left the things for the mangle in the next parlour, a great many of them were gone. I lost a liquor-stand, which was locked up in the cellaret, and the rest of the articles stated in the indictment.

Q. Did you find that any light had been used in the house - A. A candle had been lit; there was a great deal

of tallow-grease dropped about the linen that was left-it was not so when we went to bed.

MR. JAMES DEBOOS . I left my house about three o'clock in the afternoon of the 9th of June-the house is my own, I occupy it. I had seen my boots about twelve or one o'clock in the left-hand parlour cupboard, where they are always kept. I returned two days after, and found the house had been robbed of 60l. or 70l. worth of property. I lost the articles stated in the indictment, which were worth above 6l. 10s. I received information, and went to Mr. Moser, the magistrate of Edmonton, about twelve or fourteen days after the robbery-the prisoner was there in custody. In consequence of what I heard, I looked at his feet, and found a pair of boots on him, which I knew to be mine; they were the same that were taken from my house - I examined them, and claimed them as mine. He said he had bought them, and had had them soled since. I sent for the man who made them; he said, in the prisoner's presence, that they were the boots he had made for me, and that they had never been soled.

EDWARD CHATHAM. I had the prisoner in custody - He had the boots on when I took him. I took them off his feet, and produce them.

THOMAS IFFWOOD . I am a boot-maker at Edmouton-these boots were made in my shop, under my direction, for the prosecutor. They have never been soled or mended, and are worth 5s. I know them by the make.

MR. DEBOOS. They are mine, and those I left in the parlour-cupboard - I have not the least doubt of it; they have never been soled.

WILLIAM TAYLOR . I am a plough-boy, and work for Mr. Deboos. On the night that his house was robbed, I saw the Edmonton stage come in between eight and nine o'clock I saw the prisoner on the coach-top-two others got down with him; they stood at the corner, all three went across the bridge together. I heard one of the men say to the other that the thought that must be the house(pointing to Mr. Deboos's). The prisoner said, "Come along, you d-d fools!" He was dressed as he is now, except that he had a coloured handkerchief. I am sure he is the man I saw him at the magistrate's eight or ten days after, and knew him to be the same - I said so at the time. I told my father at the time, but did not tell the prosecutor; I was not in his employ then.

Prisoner's Defence. I have witness to prove that I bought the boots. I had business at Edmonton.

GEORGE HILLIARD . I am a shoemaker, and live in Tash-street. Gray's Inn-lane. On Thursday, about the 28th of May, the prisoner called at my lodgings with a pair of top-boots on. He called to see my wife, who was lying-in. We had worked together in one room in April.

Q. Did he ask you to look at them - A. No; I noticed them, and said he had a new pair on. I should not know them again. I do not know them again.

Cross-examined by MR. ARABIN. Q. He was often in the habit of visiting you - A. No, he only called that once. I saw him again on Monday; he had cord trowsers on he had knee-breeches on Thursday when I saw him with the boots.

LITTLETON BURTON WILLIAMS . I am the prisoner's father, and live in Betty's-court, Hanway-yard.

Q. Do you know any thing of his wearing a pair of hoots shortly before he was taken up - A. I think I have seen him wearing them; he bought the stuff and made them himself. I am a ladies' shoemaker. I could not swear to my own work.

MR. ARABIN. Q. Most of the trade make their own boots - A. Yes; I never knew him buy them I cut them out for him. He lived in Tash-street, Gray's Inn-lane. I think it was about the middle of June that I saw him wearing them.

Q. Perhaps it was a week before he was taken up - A. I think it was full a week before.

GUILTY . DEATH . Aged 20.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180909-120

1181. JOHN THOMAS LITTLETON BURTON WILLIAMS was again indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Catchpole , about two o'clock in the night of the 25th of June , at Edmonton , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, thirteen table-cloths, value 20s.; eleven napkins, value 5s.; seven shirts, value 14s.; one pair of gaiters, value 2s.; six pieces of diaper, value 4s.; one gown, value 15s.; one piece of calico, value 6d.; two handkerchiefs, value 1s.; one watch, value 4l.; ten silver spoons, value 6l.; one instrument case, value 5s.; three knives, value 7s.; one pair of knee-buckles, value 1s.; one stock-buckle, value 1s.; two silver buttons, value 1s.; two pair of scissars, value 1s.; one silver thimble, value 1s., and one caddy-spoon, value 1s. , his property.

PARTHENIA CRESSE . I am servant to Mr. John Catchpool . On the 25th of June, I was up last at night, when I went to bed, the windows in front of the house were fast, and the shutters also; next morning I was called up between three and four o'clock, found the shutter open, and a pane of glass taken out, which would enable a person to put their hand in, and unfasten the window - I do not think any body could get in when it was opened-it is a casement window, there is no bar across. We missed the articles stated in the indictment.

COURT. Q. If they could not get in at the window, how could they get the property - A. The door had been unbolted inside, which I had left bolted the night before; they could not have got in any where else but at the window. It was daylight when I got up.

WILLIAM MAIN . I am a labourer, and live opposite to the prosecutor's I can see his house from my window; on the morning in question, about three o'clock, it was daylight, I saw two men walking backwards and forwards, and looking over into the prosecutor's premises; I came down stairs, and saw the prisoner attempting to hide a bundle in the shrubbery he came in a direction from the prosecuter's house. I did not see him come out of the house - I am sure he is the man, he was not ten yards from me; there was light enough to distinguish him. He returned towards the prosecutor's. I asked him what o'clock it was? he said it had just gone three. I went into my house to fetch my victuals, and when I came out I met him again in the road, about twenty yards from the prosecutor's, going to the same place where I had before seen him carrying the bundle. As I passed the prosecu

tor's house I heard a noise, as if they were breaking doors or locks; I went on further, met Butterfield, and asked his assistance, we went down to where the prisoner had put the bundle - I took it out. As we returned towards the prosecutor's house I saw a man coming in a direction from the house, it is a corner house, there is a lane runs down by the side of it; the man went towards the village, we went in pursuit of him, and found two others in his company-the man who came out of the house was putting his shoes on-as soon as they saw us they all ran away as fast as they possibly could; one of them threw away a bundle. We took the prisoner nearly a mile from the house, he was one of the men - We had been pursuing him all the while, and had them in sight all the way after they came together - We took him in the middle of a field; he struck at me with a stick, and called to the other two for help, but they did not come to his assistance - He struck at us once or twice, and hit me on my neck. We took him back, and gave him in charge. We told him he had got the bundle at Catchpole's. He said he was not the person, but that he had been at Waltham-cross to seek for work. I left the bundle that I found in the shrubbery, and the one they threw away, with Mrs. Catchpole, in the presence of Cresse.

MATTHEW BUTTERFIELD . I am a labourer. I saw Main. As we passed the house I heard a noise as if somebody was breaking locks. We went to the shrubbery, took the bundle out, and returned towards the house; I saw a man come out of the door, turn to the right, and go towards Winchmore-hill - We pursued him - He saw us coming, and turned back, I saw an iron hook in his hand. As we ran in the pursuit we saw three men, the man who came out of the house was one of them - They ran as fast as they could; one of them threw a bundle away; I saw a man named Tootey pick it up. We followed the men about a mile, and then the prisoner was taken; he defended himself with a stick, and called to the other men by name to help him - They ran away, and one of them shook the iron hook at us. The bundle was delivered to Mrs. Catchpole in the presence of Cresse.

EDWARD CHATHAM . I am constable of Edmonton. I know the prosecutor's house, it is in that parish. I produce the bundle which Mr. Catchpole delivered to me. When the prisoner was taken, he denied the charge, said he was a shoemaker, and was coming from the country to look for work.

PARTHENIA CRESSE re-examined. I saw the bundles delivered to my mistress. Here are three shirts, we lost seven, a table-cloth, a poplin gown, five napkins, and a piece of silk, all of which I know to be my master's property. We lost thirteen table-cloths. There was a great deal more property in the bundles than what is now produced.

Prisoner's Defence. I was returning from the country, where I had been looking for work, and met two men, who offered me 2s. 6d. to carry the bundles (which were as large again as those produced), to town; they told me to put one in the shrubbery and return, which I did; as I returned I saw two men outside the prosecutor's gate. I went away, and afterwards met the men again at the door - I thought it was not right, and went away; shortly after they overtook me, and we walked together. I was afterwards taken.

GUILTY. DEATH . Aged 20.

Of stealing, but not of breaking and entering .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180909-121

1182. THOMAS DOVER was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of July , one purse, value 7s. , the goods of William Fox .

WILLIAM FOX. I live in the Haymarket . On the 25th of July, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I saw the prisoner at my shop window, watched him, and saw him go to the front of the window - I thought he was going to break it, I ran out and caught him with a wire through the hole which had been made in the glass, and the purse half through the hole; he had reached it forward with the wire, and had his hand upon it. I secured him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I never touched it. I was looking in at the window.

GUILTY. Aged 12.

Judgment Respited .

Second Middlesex Jury, before J.Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18180909-122

1183. THOMAS WINKS was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of August , from the person of Matthew Brady , eleven 1l. bank notes , his property.

MATTHEW BRADY. I am servant to Mr. Spencer, who lives at Drayton-green. On the 27th of August, about half-past eight o'clock in the evening. I hired the prisoner's coach in Oxford-street, to take me home - He drove it - I was rather forward in liquor, but not drunk. I am certain I had eleven 1l. notes in my pocket when I got into the coach; I felt them safe when I got in; he drove me to the Green Man, at Ealing. I got out, and sat on the box with him at Notting-hill, as he did not know the way. We had a dispute with the turnpike man. I emptied my pockets to find the ticket, and my notes were then safe; the prisoner held a light while I shook the ticket out of the notes, I was then in the coach; when we got about a mile from there I got out, and sat on the box; he then drove to Ealing. We went into the Green Man, he demanded 1l. for his fare, I said it was too much. I put my hand into my pocket to pay him, I missed my money-this was before I sat down. I told him he had robbed me, he denied it. My brother was with me in the coach all the time; he insisted on being searched, and having the prisoner searched also, but the prisoner refused; there was a piece of work in the house, he then took two notes out and threw them on the table, the publican took them up, and asked if there were any marks on my notes. I said if they were mine Mr. Spencer's name was on them, in my hand-writing. They were produced, and they had that name on them; the people crowded round, he then threw another note on the table. The constable came and took him to the watch-house, without searching him-it was about eleven o'clock. Two notes were left in my pocket - He only took nine. The prisoner said he had had them in his possession for a fortnight.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. I have never seen my brother since. I have not enquired after him. We stopped at Acton.

Q. You accused a man with an unnatural crime at Clerkenwell, a few days ago-A. Yes; he was acquitted. My brother did not know that I had the money.

Q. Did not the prisoner say he found the notes in the coach, and kept them till you could describe them - A. No. he did not.

SAMUEL TOMLINS . I keep the Green Man, at Ealing. On the 27th of August the prosecutor and his brother came to my house in a coach, the prisoner drove the coach; they disputed about the fare, and referred it to me; I said I thought it was right. Brady put his hand into his pocket to pay for it, and immediately charged the prisoner with robbing him. Brady's brother went into the backparlour to be searched, we found nothing on him. The prisoner refused to be searched, said he would shew all his money, and pulled out two 1l. notes and some silver, and put them on the table; Brady said, if they were his they had "H. Spencer, Drayton-green;" on them-which I found on both of them. I told the prisoner if he had any more, he had better give them up, or I must send for the constable; he threw another note on the table, which had the same name on it. I sent for a constable, who took him to the watch-house.

Q. In what state was the prosecutor - A. He was rather intoxicated, but he knew what he was about.

Cross-examined. Q. Did not the prisoner say he found them on the floor of the coach - A. Yes.

MATTHEW BRADY . The notes are mine, and the same that I lost.

Prisoner's Defence. I got a light to look in the coach for the turnpike ticket, and found the notes among the straw; I thought it was my duty to keep them; when he went to pay me he missed his money. I said if he would describe his notes I would give them up.

SAMUEL TOMLINS re-examined. He did not say he found them until be got before the magistrate.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Recommended to Mercy.

Confined Three Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq,

Reference Number: t18180909-123

1184. JAMES NEWMAN and JAMES BRITTON were indicted for stealing, on the 2d of July , two live pigs, price 50s. , the property of James Turner .

JAMES TURNER . I am a cowkeeper , and live in Webber-row, Blackfriars-road . On the 1st of July, about eight o'clock in the evening, my pigs were safe in the sty in the yard, at the back of my house, I missed them next morning at four, and found them at Marlborough-street Office, at two o'clock that afternoon. They are worth 50s.

HENRY STONE . I keep the toll-gate, Duke-street, Westminster. On the 2d of July, between ten and eleven o'clock in the morning, the prisoner, Britton, drove two pigs through my gate, the prisoner, Newman, stood on the other side of the road; I knew they belonged to the prosecutor, but thought he might have sold them. In about a quarter of an hour I was asked about them, and went in pursuit; I overtook the prisoners in Charles-street, Westminster, and found Britton had got on a smock-frock, which Newman was wearing when I first saw them. I followed them to Whitehall chapel, Newman left Britton, and then joined him again. I took Newman in St. Martin's lane, and gave him in charge. I followed Britton, with the pigs, to Golden-square, asked him where he was driving them to, and told him they were not his. He said, "if they are your's, take the whip and drive them while I fetch the person who owns them." I took him to the office. Turner claimed the pigs.

JAMES ELLAMS . I am a butcher, and live in Duke-street, Westminster. Between ten and eleven o'clock in the morning of the 1st of July, I saw two men drive the pigs by my door. I did not know the men who drove them. I told Turner.

NEWMAN'S Defence. I never saw them.

BRITTON'S Defence. I saw the pigs in Blackfriars-road; a man asked me if I knew who they belonged to? he said he was the street - keeper, and asked me to drive them over Westminster-bridge.

NEWMAN GUILTY . Aged 28.

BRITTON GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18180909-124

1185. JOHN CHRISTOPER PYWELL was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of September , one warrant for payment of 60 guineas , the property of George Ward Clark .

HENRY SHARP . I am groom to Mr. Thring, On the 5th of September Captain Clark sent me to the Angel Inn, Fleet-market , to pay for a horse; I saw the prisoner in the yard, and asked him if he was the master? he said, Yes. I told him I was commissioned to give him sixty guineas from Captain Clark for a horse of William Jones . I gave him a check for the money. and asked him for a receipt. He sent Giblet for a stamp, and Giblet gave me a receipt for the money-the prisoner never saw it.

The Court ruled that this was no felony.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180909-125

1186. ABRAHAM MYERS was indicted for feloniously assaulting William Moore , on the King's highway, on the 11th of August , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, one watch, value 5l.; two seals, value 10s., and one key, value 1s. , his property.

WILLIAM MOORE . I live in George-street, Mile-end, On the 11th of August, about eleven o'clock at night, I was in Jewry-street , three men and a woman pushed against me, put their hands to my fob, and took my watch. I gave the alarm, and the prisoner was taken into custody. I do not know that he was one of them.

JOHN NOON. I am a watchman. I saw three men running from the prosecutor - I lost them. I found the prisoner in custody of the prosecutor he denied the charge.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180909-126

1186. WILLIAM HARRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of July , one carcase of a sheep, value 30s. , the goods of Charles Andrew Carter .

GEORGE CARTER . I am brother to Charles Andrew Carter , who is a butcher , and lives in Gray's Inn-lane. On the 30th of July I sent my brother John to Newgate-market at eight o'clock with some sheep he lost one. I

saw it again at Guildhall about one o'clock, and knew it to be one of the sheep I had lost.

JOHN CARTER . I went with some sheep to Newgate-market - I left my cart in Ivy-lane , and carried two sheep up the market. On my return I missed one. I met Richards, and told him to look after it. I saw it again in a quarter of an hour, and knew it to be ours.

JAMES RICHARDS . I am servant to Mr. Hales. I was helping Carter with the sheep, and saw the prisoner come out of Ivy-lane with the sheep on his back, walking as hard as he could. I met Carter - He missed one. I went after him, and took him at the bottom of Chick-lane with it. He said he took it out of the cart.

Prisoner's Defence. I am a porter , and was employed to carry it to Saffron-hill.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Three Months , and Publicly Whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180909-127

1187. KREWIN BURKE was indicted for that he, on the 12th of July , upon James Fogg unlawfuly, maliciously, and feloniously did make an assault, and in a forcible and violent manner did demand his monies, with intent to rob him, and his monies from his person feloniously and violently from his person to steal .

JAMES FOGG . I am a Thames Police-officer . On the 12th of July, about half-past one o'clock in the morning, I was walking along the Poultry , the prisoner crossed over, collared me, and said, "I want your money!" I said "Is it money you want?" he said "Yes, and I will have it." I collared him, and called the watchman, who secured him. I gave him no money.

JAMES FRUMMET . I am a watchman. I heard the last witness call, went up, and heard the prisoners say money. I found the witness and the prisoner collaring each other. Fogg said he had attempted to rob him, and gave him in charge - I took him to the watch-house. He said, "Don't keep me too long here-let me go and try my luck again."

CHARLES BOND . I was constable of the night. The prisoner was brought to the watch-house. He said he he meant to rob the prosecutor, and if we let him go he would have satisfaction before night. He made a great resistance on being taken to the Compter. It was as much as three men could do to handcuff him.

Prisoner's Defence. I have lived as a porter in some respectable houses, since which I have experienced great distress, and got so ragged I was ashamed to be seen. On this night I determined to drown myself, but afterwards thought it was very wrong, and determined to get into a watch-house that I might not be seen in such a deplorable situation in the streets. I got put into two watchhouses before this, but upon my telling them what I did it for they descharged me I attacked the prosecutor, but did not mean to do him any harm. I would not tell them at the watch-house why I did it, fearing they would turn me out.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180909-128

1188. MARY MARSH was indicted for that she, on the 2d of September , did unlawfully procure five counterfeit shillings, with intent to utter them .

JOHN FORRESTER . On the 2d of September I was in Petticoat-lane. From information which I received I took the prisoner into custody. She put her hand to her pocket, and said, "You may feel all I have got is good money." I found a stocking in her hand, which contained five counterfeit shillings she said she gave 18d. for them. I also found two in her pocket.

MR. CALEB EDWARD POWELL . I am an assistant to the Solicitor of the Mint. The seven shillings are all counterfeit, of the same die, and merely washed.

Prisoner's Defence. I took them in change.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Confined Six Months .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180909-129

1189. BARTHOLOMEW CURTIS was indicted for a like offence .

JOHN FORRESTER. I was in Church-row, Aldgate, met the prisoner, and asked him to walk with me. When we got to the watch-house I asked him to walk in, he refused, and called out Murder! he threw something out of his hand which appeared like silver they fell in the street. The mob picked up seven counterfeit shillings. Some others fell on Mr. Death's leads.

MR. THOMAS EDWARD DEATH . I am a linen-draper, and live at Aldgate. I picked up two shillings off my leads, which I marked (looks at them) these are them.

MR. CALEB EDWARD POWELL . They are all counterfeit, and of the same die.

Prisoner's Defence. I took three of them of a gentleman for some hare-skins; while I was examining them the officer took me.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Confined One Year .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180909-130

1190. MARY SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of June , one sheet, value 4s. the goods of Christopher Hicks , in a lodging room .

CHRISTOPHER HICKS . I keep the Waggon and Horses, public-house, at South Mims . On the 26th of June the prisoner took a bed at my house for the night. There were two sheets on the bed. Next morning she left. About ten o'clock we missed a sheet off her bed. I followed and overtook her about half a mile off, and found the sheet in her bundle.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Fined One Shilling , and Discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180909-131

1191. JAMES MARTIN was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of August , eleven quarts of plumbs, value 9s. and one basket, value 1s. 6d. the goods of Aaron Emmet .

AARON EMMET . I am a salesman in Covent-Garden Market . On the 10th of August I unloaded my cart about one o'clock in the morning; about three I missed half a sieve of plumbs.

JAMES FURZEMAN . I am a constable. About three o'clock in the morning I saw the prisoner run into a cook-shop in George-street, with half a sieve of plumbs, he threw it on the table. I asked him how he got it; he said he had had it two or three days for sale. Emmet claimed it.

(Basket sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I bought them.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Whipped and Discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180909-132

1192. JAMES ROWLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of July , in a ship called the Isabella, in the port of London (the same being a port of entry and discharge), 350 yards of printed cotton, value 25l. the goods of John Christian Beile ; and JAMES CHAMBERS and WILLIAM BURTON were indicted for feloniously receiving 168 yards, part of the said cotton, they well knowing it to have been stolen .

SECOND COUNT. The same, only stating it to be the property of Neil M'Neil .

CHARLES PERROTT . I am servant to Mr. Milner, a packer. On the 9th of July I packed printed cottons in a trunk, which were shipped on board the Isabella, in the London Docks . I should know the trunk again (looking at it), that is it. I have patterns of the goods.

JOHN HAND . I am servant to Mr. Milner. I delivered the box at the London Docks, on the 20th of July.

WILLIAM MILLER . I am a labourer in the Docks. I attended the shipping of the trunk on board the Isabella, for Charlestown, Captain M'Neil.

SAMUEL MEIN . I am a clerk to Messrs. Bainbridge and Brown, who are agents to John Christian Beile, of Charlestown; he bought some cottons which were sent to Mr. Milner to pack, to go by the Isabella, Captain M 'Neil. I have patterns of the goods.

SAMUEL GYLES . I am a clerk at the West India Docks. My brother was mate of the Isabella, which laid in the London Docks. On the 24th of July, I was on board, on a visit to my brother. The prisoner, Rowley, was a mariner on board. Between eleven and twelve o'clock I saw him coming on board from the quay, dressed in a smock frock, which he usually worked in. He went down to the forecastle, and came up again in about a quarter of an hour. He had changed his trowsers, and pulled off his smockfrock. He appeared very bulky. There was a ship between us and the shore. My brother stopped him as he was making his way towards the bows to get ashore, to avoid us; we took him into the cabin; my brother told him to strip; he appeared unwilling to do so. My brother stripped him, and took two pieces of printed cotton from him, and gave him in charge.

Q. Before the officer came did he say any thing - A. He said he hoped my brother would look over it, and offered him all the money he had in his pocket, and said he would tell where the remaining pieces were, that they might be recovered. My brother refused, in consequence of a circumstance which happened before. The second mate brought in four pieces of cotton, which he said, in the prisoner's presence, that he found them under his bed.

Q. Did the prisoner tell where the goods were - A. He said as my brother would not forgive him, he would not tell; he knew the worst of it, that he should be transported, and he did not care for that, for he would not stop long.

ROWLEY. Q. Did you see your brother take the cotton from me - A. I did. The Isabella has sailed, and my brother with her.

JOHN MAIDMENT . I am a Thames Police constable. On the 24th of July I was fetched on board the Isabella. I took Rowley in charge, and the cotton and the trunk, which contained only thirty-seven pieces. As I was taking Rowley to the office he asked me to let him go. After the examination, as I was taking him to the New Prison, he asked if it would do him any good to say where the prints were. I told him it would not, but he might do as he pleased about it. He asked me to order the coach (which we were in) to go up Rosemary-lane. I did so, and he pointed to the prisoner Chambers's door, and said, "there is where I have sold them," and that he had got 1l. a piece for them. He said he took the first piece into the parlour. Next day I went to Chambers's and found Burton at the door, he appeared to be the servant. I asked for Chambers, he came out of the back parlour; I told him I wished to speak with him; he appeared reluctant to speak to me, and wished to go to the side door; I told him I must go into the parlour, as I had a warrant to search his house. I opened the parlour door, and immediately saw nine pieces of printed cotton in a trunk. I found a piece in a drawer which appeared to have been cut off the other pieces. He said he did not buy them, but that his man, Burton, did. I brought Burton in, he said that his master's money had paid for them, and they were both present. I took them and the goods to the office. I found some gown pieces had been cut off the cotton, and told them of it; they said some had been sold, but they should be recovered again. They were recovered again.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. Did not Rowley say that the man who stole them had not been paid his wages - A. Yes; he said he carried them out of the Dock. He said he got at the trunk through the ballast port, which was left open at night.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Whether the goods were taken at once or twenty different times, you cannot say - A. No.

JOHN HAINES . I was with Maidmant and searched. I went to Chambers's brother's wife and got two pieces of cotton, which correspond with the others. Maidment has spoken correctly. There was no linen in the shop. It is a clothes shop.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Was there any women's apparel in the shop - A. I did not particularly notice.

EDWARD WILLIAM SOMERS. I am a clerk at the Thames Police Office. I took down what the prisoners Chambers and Burton said on their examination. (reads)."Chambers said, the man brought six pieces to sell. I did not like to buy them, but Burton came in and said, he dare say they were got honestly, and agreed to give 1l. a piece for them. I paid him. We cut off pieces and sold them to different people." Burton said he was shopman to Chambers. He saw the man with him, and bought them for 1l. a piece, which Chambers agreed to give; he

said it was agreed; that he should have a third of the profits of what was sold, instead of his wages.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

ROWLEY'S Defence. My shipmate, Herrington, delivered me six pieces of printed cotton to sell, I sold them in Rosemary-lane, and gave him the money; as I was going to sell more for him I was taken.

CHAMBERS'S Defence. I did not know they were stolen.

BURTON'S Defence. I am Chambers's servant. I was to have a third of what I got and sold myself. I bought them of the man, not knowing they were stolen.

ROWLEY-GUILTY. Aged 26.

Of stealing to the value of 39s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

CHAMBERS- NOT GUILTY .

BURTON- NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180909-133

1193. HENRY BARTLETT was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of July , 13 yards of carpet, value 1l. 19s. , the goods of Allen Blizard .

ALLEN BLIZARD . I am an upholsterer , and live in Judd-street, St. Pancras . On the 16th of August, about five o'clock in the afternoon, I lost my carpet.

JAMES MARTIN . I live next door to the prosecutor. I saw the prisoner run out of his shop with the carpet on his shoulder. I ran after him, and called out Stop thief! he threw it down and was taken. I am sure he is the man.

JOHN PIGGOT. I live opposite to the prosecutor. I saw the prisoner drop the carpet-Mr. Martin was pursuing him. I pursued the prisoner into the New-road, across the fields; two men stopped him. I never lost sight of him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I understand the prosecutor lays things there to tempt people to take them.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180909-134

1194. GEORGE GRUBB and WILLIAM CLARK were indicted for stealing, on the 3d of August , one printed bound book, value 6l., the goods of Joseph Booker , in his dwelling-house .

MR. JOSEPH BOOKER. I am a bookseller , and live in New Bond-street . On the 31st of July, I missed a book, entitled Stukeley's Itrearum Curiosum, out of my shop.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Clark was my bookbinder's boy, and used to come to my shop for work.

THOMAS THORP . I am a bookseller, and live in Bedford-street, Strand. On the 31st of July, the prisoner, Grubb, came to my shop with a paper, which had the title of the book written on it, and asked me if I would buy it. From his manner I suspected it was stolen. In order to get it into my hands, I said if it was cheap I would. He went away, and joined the prisoner, Clark, at the corner of the street. After some conversation, he left him for about ten minutes, and then returned to him again, with the book under his arm. After some conversation with him he came over to me, and asked 3l. for the book. He said a gentleman had left it him for a debt of 3l. I told him if he would give me his address, and I found it was right I would buy it. He took me then to Of-alley, and recommended me to a woman there for his character. She said she had known him a long time-Grubb was present. I asked her if she knew any thing of him that would induce me to buy a book which I thought came out of a nobleman's library? she said it was all right, which strengthened my suspicions. Not knowing that I had authority to detain him, I told him to call next day, and I would give him the money-Clark was at the corner of the street all the time. Grubb called next day, and was taken into custody. While he was in the officer's custody Clark passed him. When he saw Grubb in custody he ran away. The book is worth seven or eight guineas.

Cross-examined. Grubb said he had it to sell for Clark.

JAMES BARTLETT . I am a constable. I was sent for. I asked Grubb where he got the book from? he said from a friend named Clark, who was waiting at his house. I went there and saw him pass the door and took him. He said the book belonged to Mr. Booker.

JOHN WALLER . I am a constable. I went and took Clark. He said he took the book while Mr. Booker was backwards putting books away, and put it into his bag.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GRUBB's Defence. Clark gave it to me to sell.

GRUBB- NOT GUILTY .

CLARK - GUILTY. Aged 18.

Of stealing to the value of 39s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180909-135

1195. JOHN MARTIN was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of July , one watch, value 2l.; one seal, value 5s., and one ring, value 3s., the goods of James Baldwin , in the dwelling-house of Sir James Graham, Bart.

JAMES BALDWIN. I am under-butler to Sir James Graham, who lives in Portland-place . On the 20th of July, between nine and one o'clock in the day, I lost my watch off the shelf in the butler's pantry, and found it again at the pawnbroker's. There is no area to the house.

JOSIAH PEARCE . I am servant to Mr. Harrison, who is a pawnbroker, and lives in Tottenham-court-road. On the 20th of July the prisoner pledged the watch, ring, and seal with me for 25s. On the Saturday following a man came to redeem it. I gave him in charge, and he took us to the prisoner.

WILLIAM SHEPPARD . I am a constable. I was sent for to Harrison's to take a man into custody, who came to redeem the watch. He said he knew nothing of its having been stolen, he was only going to buy the duplicate. He took us to the Maidenhead, public-house, Hopkins-street - Eddington keeps the house. The man pointed the prisoner out, and said he had offered to sell him the duplicate. The prisoner said, if I would get the prosecutor to make it up, he would give me 1l. for my trouble - I refused.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. It is mine. I bought it at the Maidenhead.

RICHARD EDDINGTON . I keep the Maidenhead, public-house, in Hopkins-street, St. James's. A man came to my house some day about the 1st of August, and sold the prisoner the watch.

GUILTY. Aged 33.

Of stealing to the value of 39s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180909-136

1196. RICHARD DAVIES was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of June , eight yards of taffety, value 50s.; one scarf, value 30s.; one shawl, value 20s., and one curtain, value 30s., the goods of Charles Earith , in his dwelling-house .

CHARLES EARITH . I am a dyer , and live in Goswell-street . On or about: the 22d of July I lost the articles stated in the indictment-the prisoner worked in my dye-house. I got an officer, and called all my men together; the prisoner was the first man that was searched - We found eight duplicates on him, six of which related to the property.

JOHN M'DONALD. I am shopman to Mr. Baylis, who is a pawnbroker, and lives in Portland-street. On the 3d of July the taffety was pledged for 15s.; on the 19th the searf for 7s.; and on the 28th a curtain for 9s. The prisoner pledged the silk.

WILLIAM BROWN EDWARDS . I am an officer. On the 22d of July I searched the prisoner at Mr. Earith's, and found the duplicates of the property on him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I intended to redeem them.

GUILTY. Aged 32.

Of stealing to the value of 39s. only .

Confined Three Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180909-137

1197. JAMES BANBURY was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of July , one time-piece, value 3l., the goods of William Smith , in his dwelling-house .

JOHN HAINES . I am servant to Mr. Smith, who is a wholesale confectioner , and lives at Islington . On the 22d of July, about eight o'clock in the morning, I missed the time-piece out of the hall.

JOSEPH CADBY . I am a constable. On the 22d of July I saw the prisoner in Baines's-row, Clerkenwell, with three or four others-the others made off. I asked the prisoner what he had under his arm? he said it was a time-piece, and that it came from the prosector's.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180909-138

1198. MARIA DARWELL was indicted for that she, on the 15th of July , upon James Harrison feloniously wilfully, and unlawfully, did make an assault, and with a certain sharp instrument did stab him in and upon his neck, with intent to kill and murder him .

The prosecutor not appearing, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180909-139

1199. HUGH LYNCH was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Phillimore , Esq. , about two o'clock in the night of the 4th of September , at St. Mary Abbot, Kensington, with intent the goods and chattels in the said dwelling-house, feloniously and burglariously to steal .

JOHN SEALE . I am a watchman of St. Mary Abbot, Kensington -the prosecutor's house is in that parish. On the 4th of September, between eleven and twelve o'clock at night, I was on duty, and observed three men loitering about, which excited my suspicion; I cannot say whether the prisoner was one of them or not. I omitted calling the hour in consequence of it. About two o'clock I went towards the prosecutor's house, and heard a crack like the wrenching of a shutter or pane of glass. I went closer, to hear more distinctly. When I came to No. 12, which is opposite the prosecutor's, I heard glass breaking. I attempted to get over the rails into the area-my foot slipped, which made an alarm. The prisoner came up out of the area, up to the iron gate where I stood, and attempted to get over. I struck at him with my stick - He fell back into the fore-court; I attempted to get over after him, but found he was clambering over the next wall. I returned back, and kept in front of the area outside, on the footpath. He got over the wall from No. 12 to No. 18. He told me if I got over the railings he would murder me - I told him I would take the chance of that; I secured him. He struck at me with an iron crow. He at first made a stab at me with the sharp end, then turned it, and made two blows at me with the other end - I caught it in my hand, and took it from him. I found a dark lanthorn, a piece of wax candle, six skeleton keys, a phosphorus-box, and an open knife on him.

Q. Did you afterwards go back to examine Mr. Phillimore's house - A. Yes. I found the servants up, and a tub (with the bottom uppermost) against the window, for a person to stand on. A pane of glass was broken, and the sash of the window down. The inside shutter was partly open.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not tell the magistrate that you would have shot me if you had had a pistol - A. Yes.

CHARLES DORRINGTON . I am servant to Mr. Phillimore, he keeps the house. I went to bed about half-past ten o'clock on the night stated in the indictment, after fastening the house. I left the window-sash fastened down with a catch, and the inside shutter closed, and secured with an iron bar across (the shutters fold). After the alarm was given, I found one of the leaves of the shutter broken, and falling down, it hung by one hinge; the glass of the window was broken sufficient for a man to put his hand through-it was in the middle of the bottom frame.

Q. When a man got his arm in, could he get at the fastenings, so as to get the window down - A. Yes; he could not have got the window down without putting his hand in; he could then undo the fastening, and pull the window down; the shutter was then forced open, the top hinge broken, and the shutter hanging by the bottom hinge.

Prisoner. Q. Could not the fastening be undone with an instrument as well as with a man's hand - A. No, it could not.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in a public-house in Lei

cester-fields. Two men asked me why I was so low in spirits? I told them that I was poor and had no friends. They said they were servants to a gentleman at Kensington. One of them said he would give me some clothes-and proposed that I should go with them, and have them in the morning - I went. One of them asked me to let down the window and let him in. I went over with them, they began opening the window. I began to think I had done wrong, and atttempted to escape. The shutter would not open, and they left it. I picked up the crow, as I was determined to fight to get away. I did not go there to commit any offence.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 21.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180909-140

1200. JOHN KIBELL was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of August , one watch, value 20s.; one chain, value 5s.; one seal, value 2s., and one tea-spoon, value 6d. , the goods of David Crozier .

MARY CROZIER . I am the wife of David Crozier . We live in Martha-street, St. George's in the East . On the 15th of August, about ten o'clock in the morning, the prisoner asked me to let him go into the yard to look at the water-pipe, which he did; he then went into the kitchen, and asked me for a piece of string, to measure the pipe under the fire-place - I gave him some. He said he was going to take up that, and put a new one down - He pretended to be a plumber. He left, and said he would come at one o'clock to do it. He went into the kitchen, and took a brick from the fire-place with a hammer which I lent him. I said he should have brought his tools with him; he said he would fetch his mate, who was just round the corner. He returned after that, and told me to move a chest; while I was doing it, I turned towards the fire-place; the young man whom he brought in, was assisting me - He let go, and told me to move it farther round-both ran up stairs. I immediately missed the watch from the fire-place, and have never seen it since. I saw the prisoner on the Friday following - I am sure he is the man. I gave him in charge.

SARAH BROWN . I saw the prisoner go to the prosecutor's house about ten o'clock, and come out with a string in his hand; about one o'clock I saw him go again, and come out immediately with the young man - They ran very fast. I am sure the prisoner is the man.

ANN COULSON . I saw the prisoner knock at the prosecutor's door, and go in about one o'clock. I am sure he is the man.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180909-141

1201. JOHN CROW was indicted for a misdemeanor .

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180909-142

1202. LYON ALEXANDER and JOHN ROSE were indicted for misdemeanors .

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180909-143

1203. JOHN WILSON was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of July , one coat, value 5l. , the goods of Mary Hodgson , widow .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating it to be the property of Jonas Taylor .

JONAS TAYLOR. I am coachman to Mrs. Mary Hodgson , widow. On the 3d of July, about seven o'clock in the evening, I put my coat in the carriage box, in the stable-yard, next morning at seven I missed it. There is no door to the coach-house.

SAMUEL WALTERS . I am watchman of Piccadilly. On the 6th of July I saw the prisoner offering the coat for sale for four guineas, in the street; I asked him how he got it? he said his uncle sent it to him from Lincolnshire. I took him into custody.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JAMES BLAND . The livery stables belong to me. The prisoner was a helper, and used to sweep the stables; he was out all night the night the coat was lost.

Prisoner's Defence. Another man who worked in the stables took it.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined Six Months , and Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180909-144

1204. WILLIAM FUELL and ROBERT WYNN were indicted for stealing, on the 20th of June , one salt-spoon, value 5s.; one salt-cellar, value 1s.; one dish, value 1s.; and one wine-strainer, value 10s.; the property of Thomas Ludford Bellamy , in his dwelling-house .

MARY BUTLER . On the 20th of June I was in Mr. Bellamy's kitchen, between one and two o'clock, and heard a noise in the dining-room, I ran up stairs, the prisoner Fuell, ran out of the dining-room door, and then out of the street door; I pursued, and called Mercer, who stopped him. I missed the articles stated in the indictment out of the room.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. I am servant to Mr. Bellamy. Butler called me, I ran out and saw the prisoners running together about sixty yards from the house. We called "Stop thief!" Welch stopped Fuell. Wynn was taken in the timber-yard.

GEORGE WELCH . I am toll-man at Battersea-bridge. I heard the cry, and saw Fuell running very fast; Wynn was behind him. I made a catch at Fuell but missed him. I took Wynn; by the motion of his hands I thought he threw something over the hedge. I charged him with throwing something over, he denied it.

JOHN PIPER . I am a foreman to a ship-breaker at Battersea. I saw Fuell run into the yard. I saw him throw something white down; he stooped as if to conceal himself behind the timber; the mob were pursuing him. I collared him, and asked him what he threw away; he made no answer. I found there was a strainer, a salt-cellar, and dish, behind the timber; I also found the salt-spoon where I saw him throw something down. Mercer came up and claimed them.

ROBERT LEGATE . I am a bricklayer. I was working opposite the prosecutor's; I saw Fuell open his door and go into the house. Wynn was about fifty yards off, but was within sight. Fuell came out, joined Wynn, and gave him something. I heard the cry, and they both immediately ran off together. Fuell appeared to me to open the door with a key. He could not open it without a drop latch-key. I saw one found in the boat by the river-side, where he was stopped, and suspected to have thrown something over. I tried it to the door, it opened it. I saw them both together before Fuell went in.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

FUELL'S Defence. I went into the yard for a necessary purpose.

WYNN'S Defence. I ran with the mob and was taken.

FUELL - GUILTY . Aged 20.

WYNN - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180909-145

1205. ROBERT WOODFORD , SEN. and ROBERT WOODFORD , JUN. were indicted for feloniously receiving, on the 4th of June , 100lbs. of fat, the goods of John Hinxman , of which John Russell was convicted of stealing, they knowing it to be stolen .

No evidence.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180909-146

1206. WILLIAM DAVEY was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of August , one watch, value 30s. the goods of Thomas Spicer .

THOMAS SPICER. I am a horse-keeper , and live at South Mimms . On the 2d of August I put my watch in my box, which was in my bed-room. The prisoner slept in the same room. I missed it about a fortnight after. He absconded, which made me suspect him. The constable took him. I found my watch at the pawnbroker's.

SAMUEL LANE. I am a constable. I took the prisoner on the 13th of August, at Baldock, which is thirty miles from South Mimms. He gave me the duplicate of the watch.

WILLIAM BROCKWELL . I am servant to Mr. Tillen, pawnbroker. On the 4th of August the prisoner pledged the watch for 8s. in the name of Bailey.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Six Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180909-147

1207. JANE MOORE was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Hunter , about two o'clock in the afternoon, on the 1st of August (he and others being therein), and stealing 30 yards of ribbon, value 30s., and one yard of leno, value 15s. , his property.

WILLIAM HUNTER . I am a draper , and live at Poplar . On the 1st of August, about two o'clock in the afternoon, my window was cut, and the ribbon and leno taken out. Windall alarmed me; I ran out of the back parlour, and overtook the prisoner and another woman, who had a basket, the prisoner had a bundle under her shawl, I insisted on seeing what was in it, she gave it to me, saying she had just found it. I found the articles stated in the indictment in it.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. She was not walking fast - A. No; she did not resist my seeing her bundle.

RICHARD WINDALL . On the 1st of August I was at my window, which is opposite to the prosecutor's, and saw the prisoner, and a man, at his window. The man drew his righ thand from the window, and gave the prisoner something white - They went away together. I went over and told Mr. Hunter. I am sure she is the woman.

Cross-examined. I did not know her before. I did not see her face, but am positive she is the woman.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I picked the bundle up.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180909-148

1208. WILLIAM WRIGHT was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of May , one cow, price 13l. , the property of Hugh M'Intosh .

GARRET DALTON . I am servant to Hugh M'Intosh. He lost a cow from Bromley Marsh , on the 8th of May. On the 18th of August the prisoner came to me and asked the amount of the reward which was offered for her recovery, and said he would make her out if he got the reward. He took me to Nixon's, who apprehended him.

ROBERT NIXON , I am a cow-keeper, and live in Haggeston-lane. I bought the cow of John Marsh.

There being no witness who could trace the cow to have been in the possession of the prisoner, he was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180909-149

1209. JOSEPH COOK was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of July , one stiffener, value 1s.; one pair of stockings, value 2s. 6d.; one pair of drawers, value 3s.; four handkerchiefs, value 12s., and five pair of gloves, value 7s. 6d., the goods of Thomas Gardener , privately, in his shop .

THOMAS GARDENER. I am a hosier , and live in Whitechapel . On the 18th of July, about eleven o'clock in the morning, I served the prisoner with a number of articles. While I was calling them over, to see if they were right, I missed a silk handkerchief, and told him perhaps he had put it in his pocket by mistake; he said he had not; my son took off his hat, and found a pair of drawers in it, which I had not missed. We found the rest of the articles stated in the indictment concealed on different parts of his body.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I beg for mercy.

GUILTY. Aged 18.

Of stealing to the value of 4s. 6d. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180909-150

1210. JAMES MALONEY was indicted for that he, on the 31st of August , in and upon John Black , a subject of our Lord the King, feloniously, wilfully, and maliciously, did make an assault, and with a certain sharp in

strument feloniously did stab and cut the said John Black, in and upon his left thigh, with intent to murder him .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating his intent to be to disable the said John Black .

THIRD COUNT, the same, only stating his intent to be to do him some grievous bodily harm.

JOHN BLACK . I am a sawyer , and live in Queen Catherine-court, Stepney . On the 31st of August, between ten and eleven o'clock at night, I was going up the court; there was a crowd at the bottom of the court; I asked what was the matter; the people said the prisoner was beating his daughter. I said he ought to be ashamed of himself, and returned to my own door. Soon after I heard the women say, he would murder her. I went and stood there some time. The prisoner came out. I was standing in the next yard, which is separated by open palings. He did not speak. I stood there, talking to the women, and saying he ought to be ashamed of himself for using his daughter so, as she had got a young child with her. He said I had no business to trouble my head about it. He went to his gate, held it in his hand, and said to me, 'Come here; I am your man; I will do your business for you." I remained in the next yard. Several words passed between us. I stood within two feet and a half of the rails, in the next yard. He got a cutlass, and made a stab at me through the rails, which entered my thigh about three-quarters of an inch.

COURT. Q. Did you strike at him - A. No; I immediately jumped over the rails, he then made another cut at me.

Q. Did he say any thing when he stabbed you - A. Only that he would do my business for me; a man behind prevented the second stab from touching me, by striking his hand with a stick, I caught hold of the cutlass, we struggled together and both fell down. I got it from him, went into the yard, and the watchman took me into custody, seeing the cutlass in my hand.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. The prisoner was in his own house - A. Yes; I was in the next garden, several people were round. I was sober enough to know what I was about.

Q. Did you not say let us go and pull the old fellow's tongue out - A. No; I never attempted to go into his yard before he stabbed me.

Q. You went to the magistrate and complained of an assault - A. Yes; I did not feel the stab at the moment.

JACOB ATHEL . I am a horsekeeper, and live in Queen Catherine-court. I came home about ten o'clock, and heard a great noise down the court, I went out and saw the prisoner standing in his own yard, and the prosecutor in the next; the rails separated them. I saw the prisoner strike the prosecutor with a cutlass - He made a thrust at him, Black got over the fence; as he was getting over, the prisoner made another blow at him, I hit him over the hand with a clothes-prop which was in the yard, which prevented the blow; the prosecutor caught hold of him, they both fell together. I went home. I saw no more.

ELIZA GREEN . I live in the court, my husband is a coal-porter; the prisoner and his daughter were quarreling, he threatened her with violence; the neighbours said he was a villain for illusuing his daughter. Black came up and asked what was the matter, they told him - He said he was a villain, and no man, for useing his daughter so. The prisoner and his son same down and stood at the door, Black said again that he was a villain; the prisoner's son jumped on a bench in the yard, and said it was no business of his-and his father was man enough for Black; and if net, he himself was. The prisoner made use of a bad word, and said come here and I will do your business. Black went into the next yard, the prisoner thrust at him with the sword, through the rails; Black was getting over the rails, and the prisoner thrust at him again. Athel struck him, which prevented its touching him.

Cross-examined. Q.Will you undertake to swear that the sword struck him - A. Yes; I stood in the yard close to him.

SARAH CHILD . I live in the court, went out and heard Black say the prisoner must be a villain; several words occurred; the prisoner made use of very bad language, and said if you will come here I will do your business for you; the prosecutor went towards him-somebody said he was stabbed. I went for the watchman.

JAMES WATKINS . I am a watchman. I was fetched, and saw the prisoner, who said he was a ruined man; the prosecutor had the sword in his hand. I asked him to deliver it up, he said he would keep it to protect himself; I took him to the watch-house - He shewed me where he was stabbed.

Prisoner's Defence. My daughter and I had words-the people came round the door. Black came close to the yard and said pull the old fellow's tongue out; I came down and asked what he wanted-my cutlass hung behind the door; I took it and said if any man came on my premises I would cut him down. Black tore out of the womens hands and jumped over into my yard and knocked me down - I did not wound him, and do not know how he got it.

ELIZA COX . I am the prisoner's daughter, my husband is at sea, my father was scolding me - He used no violence to me; Black's bad language disturbed us, he called my father several bad names; I had not called for any assistance or made my father any answer. I passed my father, who was on the threshold of his own door, and went to Black and begged of him to have nothing to do with the family concerns, but to go home; he was in liquor. He said he would go and get half a pint of beer, and forced himself from me and his wife who were holding him. He went into the next yard and said he was determined to pull my father out of his house, and called him bad names. My brother begged of him to go home; my father said if any man entered his premises he would knock him down. Black immediately jumped over the pails and collared my father, my father had not made a blow at him till then; he then made two blows at him with the cutlass, which struck the stones, and pushed him off. Black ran up and struggled with him again, Athel knocked my father down. Black got the sword from him; in the struggle, I got cut, I felt it immediately.

Q. How was your father after this - A.In a dreadful situation, he was in the hospital eight days; he heard there was a warrant out against him, and gave himself up.

COURT. Q. What prevented your father from going in-doors - A. I ran in and shut the door, Black forced it open.

JAMES MALONEY . I am the prisoner's son. I was at home, my father and sister had words, the people gathered round the house-Black came into the next yard; my father had the cutlass, and said if he came out he would cut him down. Black told him to come out as the cutlass did not daunt him, he jumped over the pails. Athel came and said, drag him out, and hit him with the prop; at that time my father had not struck him. I told the prosecutor to go home, my father went in; Black or Athel forced the door open.

JAMES BENNETT . I am a horsekeeper. I heard a noise, and saw the prisoner and Black in the yard fighting.

ELIZA CHASE . I live in the court, the prisoner and his daughter were quarreling, Black was intoxicated and interfered, the prisoner came down, they had words. The people wished him to go home, he jumped over into the prisoner's yard. I saw the sword strike fire against the stones-which alarmed me. I went away.

FRANCIS CHASE. I am the son of the last witness. I heard the quarrel; Black would not be persuaded to go home, but went into the prisoner's yard; the prisoner struck his sword against the stones. When the prosecutor entered the yard, the prisoner went in and got the cutlass; he did not have it before.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180909-151

1211. CHARLES DIAMOND was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Robert Long , about three o'clock in the evening of the 12th of August , (no person being therein), and stealing therein one watch, value 50s.; one seal, value 6d., and one key, value 2d. , his property.

ELIZA LONG . I am the wife of Robert Long , who is a smith , and lives in Meeting-house-walk, Shoreditch ; I do not know the parish. I went out about two o'clock, latched the door, and took the key with me, I thought I had locked it - I left nobody there. When I returned, I found the prisoner coming out; I missed the watch from the fire-place. I ran after him-the constable stopped him, and found the watch. The latch was fast.

JAMES BIRCH . I am a sawyer. I heard the cry of stop thief, and saw the prisoner running, I followed him; he ran into a house and concealed himself in a corner behind the stairs, I took him to the prosecrutrix, she had missed her watch. I asked the prisoner where it was, he took me to the stairs and returned it to me.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Of stealing only.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180909-152

1212. THOMAS LAWRENCE was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of June , 3l. in monies, numbered, the property of Martin Heins , in his dwelling-house .

MARTIN HEINS . I keep a coalshed in Well-street , and rent the house. On the 25th of June, about half-past nine o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came in with a bundle of writing-paper, and asked me to buy it; I refused. A little boy came in and paid me some money, the prisoner watched to see where I put it, which made me suspect him. I turned my back to get a customer some herbs, the prisoner said he should wait till my wife came down. I went to the till and found the drawer out, he was off immediately; I went after him, there was 3l. in notes and 4l. of silver in it - I could not find him. Next day I got an officer, who took me to a skeale-ground, and told me to point him out, he saw me and staried off, and said, Nose, and Jackson is behind; he pulled some silver out of his pocket and gave it to another man. I called the officer, he came and took him.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. I never counted the money. I am certain the prisoner is the man.

FRANCIS JACKSON . I am an officer, I apprehended the prisoner at the skettle-ground of the Golden Ancher. As soon as he saw the prosecutor he called out, Nose and Jackson is behind; I came forward; the prosecutor pointed him out; he went into the next ground - I took him.

GUILTY. Aged 17.

Of stealing to the value of 39s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180909-153

1213. FRANCIS JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of August , sixty skins of parchment, value 3l. 12s.; and one coat, value 6d., the property of Charles Beddow , in the dwelling-house of James Thomas Paling .

CHARLES BEDDOW . I am a law-writer , and live in Mr. Paling's house, Chichester-rents, Chancery-lane . On the 24th of August, about eleven o'clock at night, the prisoner called me up, I found him standing in the street without his coat - He occasionally worked for me; he said he had been robbed of his coat, and treated very bad, at a public-house. I let him in to sleep in my shop, and lent him my coat to cover himself. In the morning, between six and seven o'clock, I heard him unlock the door, and go back again; I heard the parchments rattle; he went down stairs gently and did not return. I got up, and missed sixty skins of parchment, and my coat. About eight o'clock, I saw him playing at skettles at the Coach and Horses; I told him I would take him before a magistrate if he did not say what he had done with the parchment. He said he had left it with a friend in Smithfield; as we were going there, he attempted to escape. He then took me to his mother's, at Stepney, and asked her to lend him 10s. to get it from where he had left it; he tried again to escape. I gave him in charge.

ROBERT MATHER . I am a law-writer. The prisoner came to me and said he took the parchment, but meant to return it.

GEORGE HUGHES. I heard the prisoner say he took it.

Prisoner. Q. Was you ever tried here - A. Yes.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing of the parchment, the coat was lent to me. I now produced the remnants of it (holding them up).

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180909-154

1214. EDWARD JACKSON was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of August , at St. Mary-le-Strand, one shawl, value 30s., the property of John Williams , privately in his shop .

ELI READ . I am shopman to John Williams , a linendraper , in the Strand . On the 19th of August, about ten o'clock in the morning, the prisoner came to our shop, and asked for unlf a yard of cotton, at 1s. 6d. a yard, I served him. He then asked to see some silk handkerchiefs. I went to the window to get some, when I returned I observed the corner of the shawl between his coat and waistcoat, I went to the back-shop, and told Mr. Williams, I then went back and told the prisoner I had no handkerchiefs that would suit him. He was going to leave the shop, I followed him to the door, stopped him, and took the shawl from him. It was on the counter, close to him. I did not see him take it; this is it (producing it). I know it to be my master's.

Prisoner's Defence. I put it under my coat, and gave it to the gentleman when he asked for it.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 16.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180909-155

1215. HARRIET HOLLAND was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of August , from the person of John Fletcher , one 5l. bank note , his property.

JOHN FLETCHER . I am a stone-mason . On the 27th of August, I was at public-house opposite Shadwell office; the prisoner came and sat by me, and asked me for some beer, I told her to take some; I asked her where there was a cookshop? she said abe would fetch me any thing I wanted. I pulled out my bag, and took out half a crown, on putting it into my pocket she drew my hand out of my pocket, and ran away with the note. I followed, and asked her to return it; she ran into a house - I lost her. Next day the officer took her. I am certain she is the woman.

Prisoner's Defence. I never saw his money.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Confined Six Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180909-156

1216. JOHN MATHEW was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of July , one watch, value 30s. one chain, value 3d., and two keys, value 3d. , the goods of David Grafton .

DAVID GRAFTON. I live in Eden-street, Swallow-street . The prisoner used to come to see one of my lodgers. On the 9th of July, about one o'clock, I missed my watch from the parlour mantle-piece. I had been out, and left my wife in the room.

JAMES WILLIAMS . I am a servant. I was in Leicester-square, and heard the cry of stop thief; the prisoner ran by me - He was stopped, and let the watch fall at my feet.

ELIZA GRAFTON . I am the prosecutor's wife. I heard the parlour door open, ran up, and saw the prisoner come out of the parlour; he said he wanted Mr. Gifford, and went out. I missed the watch, gave the alarm, and he was stopped.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was distressed.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined Six Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180909-157

1217. JOSEPH HAMBLETON was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of July , one pocket-book, value 1d., and two 5l. and two 1l. bank notes , the property of Even Evans .

EVAN EVANS. I am a carpenter . On the 1st of July, between seven and eight o'clock in the morning, I was in my shop in Bird-in-Hand-court, Long-acre ; I took my pocket-book out, and put it on a bench close by me-the window was open. I was looking over some papers, some person knocked at the door, I went to open it, leaving the pocket-book on the bench; a little boy asked for a halfpenny worth of shavings - I told him to take them. I went back to the window, Pellett asked me if I had lost any thing? I immediately missed my pocket-book, which had two 5l. and two 1l. notes in it. I had seen the prisoner in the court just before.

WILLIAM PELLETT . I live opposite to the prosecutor. I saw the prisoner about a quarter after seven o'clock in the morning, with his back against my shutters; while I was opening a shop at the corner of the court, I saw him attempt to reach over the prosecutor's shop window three times; I saw him speak to a little boy, and give him something. I afterwards saw him reach over, and take a black pocket-book out of Evans's shop. I told Evans, and pursued after him, but lost him. I saw him in Charles-street, Drury-lane, two days after, and gave him in charge. I knew him very well before, and am sure he is the man.

THOMAS BEAUCHAMP . I saw the prisoner against Mr. Pellett's window; he gave me a halfpenny to go to the prosecutor's shop to get a halfpenny worth of shavings. I knocked at the door, and asked for them; Mr. Evans came to the door, while I was getting them the prisoner went away.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180909-158

1218. GEORGE STREATER and CHARLES CARPENTER were indicted for stealing, on the 27th of August , 100 lbs. of lead, value 30s., the property of Thomas Wallis , Charles Wallis , and George Wallis , and fixed to a certain building of their's .

THOMAS WALLIS . I am in partnership with my sons, Charles and George Wallis. We have three houses in Maiden-lane, Islington .

WILLIAM WALKER . I am servant to Mr. Meredith, who is a cow-keeper, and lives in the New-road. On the 27th of August, between six and seven o'clock, in the morning, I stopped the prisoners in the Hampstead-road, each had a bundle of lead, I told them I took them on suspicion of stealing it; they made no answer.

WILLIAM SHORT . I am servant to Mr. Meredith. I saw the prisoners about half-past six o'clock in the morning, going through a field opposite my house, which is about half a mile from the prosecutor's-one had an empty bag and the other a cloth; in about ten minutes I saw them again in the field, they were then loaded. I desired Walker to follow them. They had not time to go to the prosecutor's house.

WILLIAM MARSHALL . I am a plumber. I saw the lead at the watch-house; some pieces had been left in the. gutters of the house, I compared them - They fitted exactly

Cross-examined by MR. ARABIN. It did not appear fresh cut; it had then been in the watch-house a week.

MICHAEL GRAY . I am a varnish-maker, and live in one of the prosecutor's houses; the house the lead was taken from is next but one to mine. I went on the roof, and found the two front short gutters cut away-two pieces were left. I saw the lead at the watch-house, applied it to the gutters - They fitted exactly - They weighed about I cwt. It was safe the day before.

GEORGE SQUIB . I am watch-house-keeper. On the 27th of August Walker brought the prisoners, and the lead, to the watch-house. I saw it compared, it fitted exactly, and appeared to be the same.

STREATER'S Defence. We saw the lead lying in the bag and cloth, and picked it up.

STREATER - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

CARPENTER - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Three Months , and Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180909-159

1219. GEORGE LAYTON was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of July , four curtains, value 20s., and two sheets, value 10s., the property of Mary Williams , widow , in a lodging-room .

MARY WILLIAMS . I keep the Holyland coffee-house, in the Strand . On the 30th of July, the prisoner took a bed for one night at my house - He slept in the three pair back-room; he paid 3s. for the bed when he ordered it. He left about eight o'clock next morning, I ran up, and missed the sheets and curtains off his bed.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. I am certain he is the man.

JOHN ESTRICK . I am porter at the coffee-house. On the 30th of July the prisoner brought a bundle in with him, and went to bed; the chambermaid offered to carry it up-he said he would take it up himself. Next morning, between seven and eight o'clock, I knocked at his door, and asked if he wanted his things cleaned-he declined it; about an hour after I heard the sheets were stolen - I ran out, and found him about ten doors from the house, he turned the corner to go over Waterloo-bridge, the tollman stopped him. The property was delivered into my hands. He pleaded distress, and offered me a shilling to let him go. He was searched, and 1l. 9s. 6d. found in his neckcloth.

WILLIAM WESTWOOD . I am tollmon at Waterloo-bridge. The prisoner ran through the gate without paying the toll; I seized him, and he attempted to throw the bundle over the balustrade.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The things are mine.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined Six Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180909-160

1220. JOHN ROBINSON was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of September , 40lbs. of lead, value 5s., the property of John Knight , and fixed to a certain building of his .

JOHN KNIGHT . I have a house building in White Horse fields, Stepney . On the 31st of August, about eight o'clock at night, I saw the lead safe in the gutters-next morning I missed it; I saw it afterwards, and compared it with the building-it fitted exactly.

JAMES STONE . I was constable of the night. On the 1st of September, about two o'clock in the morning, I stopped the prisoner about two hundred yards from the house, with a hag; I asked what was in it? he said it was old iron. I found it was 40lbs. of lead. It was afterwards compared with the gutters, and it fitted exactly.

Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A man gave it to me to sell for him.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180909-161

1221. FRANCIS PARKER and JOHN PICTON were indicted for stealing, on the 7th of June , 10 live tame fowls, price 26s.; four live tame chickens, price 6s.; 11 live tame ducks, value 22s., and one clothes-line, value 5s. , the property of Richard James Blackford .

RICHARD JAMES BLACKFORD. I live in Wick-lane, Hackney . On the 26th of June, about half-past nine o'clock at night, I locked up all my poultry in the stable, About twelve o'clock I heard a noise, but did not get up. Between seven and eight o'clock the next morning, I found the stable-door broken open, and missed the poultry stated in the indictment. About nine o'clock I found it all at the watch-house-it had been killed. I knew it to be mine.

CHARLES BLACKFORD . I was at my brother's, and saw him lock up the poultry-next morning it was gone.

ALLEN ADAMS . I was constable of the night at Stepney. On the 26th of June, about three o'clock in the morning, the prisoners crossed the road, about a mile from the prosecutor's house. One had a bag, with part of the poultry in it, and the other had the remainder in his hands, tied together, and all killed. When they saw me they threw it down. and ran through a hedge into a wheat-field. I pursued, and took Parker in the middle of the field. I found Picton about one o'clock on Monday morning, at Bethnal-green. I am certain he is the man - I knew him before.

JAMES STONE . I was with Adams, and pursued Parker. I am certain Picton is the man who was with him, I knew him before.

PICTON'S Defence. I was in bed at the time.

CATHARINE BELLAMY . I live in Russell-street, Dogrow; Picton lodged with me. He was taken up on Sunday night. He was at home before ten o'clock on Friday night, went to bed, and got up at half-past five the next morning. I keep the key in the street - door.

PARKER - GUILTY . Aged 18.

PICTON - GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180909-162

1222. SARAH BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of June , one shirt, value 6s.; one waistcoat, value 6d.; one gown, value 5s.; one shawl, value 4s., and one frock, value 6d. , the property of Benjamin Bartlett .

MARY BARTLETT . I am the wife of Benjamin Bartlett, we live at Chapel-house, near the East India Docks . On the 30th of June, about one o'clock in the afternoon, I went out, and left the prisoner to mind my room. As I returned, I met her with my shawl on, and asked how she came to rob me? she made no reply. She had the rest of the things in a bundle.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I am sorry for it.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Fined One Shilling , and Discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180909-163

1223. ROBERT WEBSTER and JAMES LANE were indicted for stealing, on the 8th of July , one watch, value 30s. , the goods of James Wren .

JAMES WREN. I live at Walthamstow , and am a labourer . On the 8th of July, I went to work, leaving my watch hanging over the mantle-piece; when I returned it was gone.

WILLIAM GIBSON . I live next door to the prosecutor. I heard Hagar call Stop thief! I came out and saw the prisoners running down the lane; I followed them to Tottenham, and took them, which is about two miles and a half from the prosecutor's. I saw Lane drop the watch, and picked it up.

CLARISSA HAGAR . I live two doors from the prosecutor's. On the 8th of July, about three o'clock, I saw the prisoner, Lane, walking up and down by the prosecutor's house-in a few minutes I saw Webster come out of the window with the watch in his hand. I called out Stop thief! Gibson pursued and brought him back. I am certain they are the men - They were in company.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

WEBSTER'S Defence. I never had the watch.

WEBSTER - GUILTY . Aged 18.

LANE - GUILTY . Aged l7.

Confined One Year , and Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180909-164

1224. MARY POUND was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of August , six yards of printed cotton, value 7s.; one bed-gown, value 2s, and one saw, value 1s. , the goods of George Hawkins .

ELIZA HAWKINS . I am the wife of George Hawkins , who is a labourer , and lives in Cooper's-gardens, Hackney-road , the prisoner lodged in the next room to us - We were moving to another house. About twelve o'clock she came into my room, and gave my child a few gooseberries. I immediately missed her and the property. I got an officer. We found the saw under her bed, and the other things at the pawnbroker's.

WILLIAM SMITH. I am servant to Mr. Jones, who is a pawnbroker, and lives in Kingsland-road. On the 4th of August the prisoner pledged the gown and cotton with me.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 33.

Confined Two Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180909-165

1235. JAMES HANSOM was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of August , eight pair of stockings, value 10s. , the goods of Thomas Good .

MARY CRAWLEY . I am servant to Thomas Good , who is a hosier and lives at Ratcliff-highway . On the 18th of August, about one o'clock, I was at the back of the shop, and saw the shadow of a man in the shop, I turned round, and saw the prisoner's hand on the shelf, he reached a pair of stockings down, and put them under his jacket. I collared him, called my master down, and he gave him charge. I took eight pair of stockings from him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I did not take them.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Confined Six Months , and publicly Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180909-166

1226. ROBERT JONES and ROBERT MASON were indicted for stealing, on the 22d of July , one watch, value 15s. , the goods of Moss Jewell .

MOSS JEWELL. I am a watch-maker , and live in Star-street, Shadwell . On the 26th of July, between five and six o'clock, I left my shop, returned in about five minutes, and found the prisoners in the shop. I asked them what they wanted? Mason asked for a dial-plate. I missed a watch from the window where I worked, and asked Jones what he had done with the watch? he said, "Search me; I know nothing of it." Mason said "I know nothing of Jones; he was in the shop before I came in, and if he has got it he must have taken it." The officer came to the door, I called him in-Jones told him to search him, which he did, and found the watch on him. He did not then deny taking it. He must have reached over the counter to get it.

SAMUEL CROMARTY . I am a constable. I was called in, and found the watch on Jones. I found nothing on Mason.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JONES'S Defence. Mason knew nothing of it.

MASON'S Defence. I went to buy a dial.

JONES - GUILTY . Aged 13.

Transported for Seven Years .

MASON- NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180909-167

1227. CAROLINE LAMB was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of June , one counterpane, value 10s.; one sheet, value 8s., and three tea-spoons, value 10s. , the goods of Ann Maria Wilkinson , spinster.

ANN MARIA WILKINSON . I am a single woman, and rent a house in Upper Thornhaugh-street ; the prisoner was my servant , and had lived four months with me. I had missed the conterpane for a fortnight, she said she had

taken it to wash. I afterwards missed other things, and found them in pawn.

THOMAS WADMORE . I am a pawbroker, and live in Tottenham-court-road. On the 22d of June the counterpane was pledged with me by the prisoner for 8s. 6d.; on the 4th of July she pledged three spoons; and on the 5th of July a sheet. She said she pledged them for the prosecutrix.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I could not get my wages-the prosecutrix told me to pledge them. She keeps a house of ill fame.

ANN MARIA WILKINSON. I never gave her authority to pledge them - She never pledged any thing for me.

GUILTY . Aged 36.

Confined One Year .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180909-168

1228. MICHAEL RILEY was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of July , one pair of trowsers, value 12s. , the goods of William Wise and John Page .

ROBERT WREFORD. I am shopman to William Wise and John Page , pawnbrokers , Long-acre. On the 20th of July, about eleven o'clock, a man alarmed me, and I missed a pair of trowsers from the door, ran out, and found the prisoner about ten doors off, with the trowsers under his arm.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A woman dropped them, and I picked them up at the prosecutor's door.

GUILTY . Aged 58.

Confined Two Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180909-169

1229. WILLIAM SMITH and JAMES SMITH were indicted for stealing, on the 16th of July , one time-piece, value 15s. , the goods of William Digsby .

WILLIAM DIGSBY. I am a miller , and live at Bromley. On the 16th of July, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I missed my time-piece.

ABRAHAM FOWLER. I am a constable. I stopped the prisoners with the time-piece. They said they found it at Old Ford, and showed me the place, which I believe to be true.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180909-170

1230. SARAH SPENCER was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of July , from the person of John Curran , one tobacco-pouch, value 2d.; 1s. 9d. in monies numbered, and fourteen 1l. bank notes , his property.

JOHN CURRAN . I am a labourer , and live in Collwell-buildings. On the 26th of July, between ten and eleven o'clock at night, I met the prisoner in Broad-street, St. Giles's. I had fourteen 1l. notes in my pocket, which I was going to send to my father in Ireland. I enquired of another woman if she knew of a lodging? the prisoner came up, and said she would show me one. She took me to a house in Charles-street, Drury-lane , to the front room on the ground floor - I was quite sober. I laid on the bed-nobody else was there; she was not to stay with me. I only pulled my coat and shoes off. She said she had other lodgers to come in, and sat down by me. I felt her hand in my pocket where my notes were. I seized her - She got from me; I missed my money, and called out Watch! several persons came in and went out before the watchman came. I told them the prisoner had robbed me. I had been five years saving up the money.

PATRICK CRAWLEY . I am a watchman. Between eleven and twelve o'clock, I heard the call of Watch! and went to No. 45, Charles-street - one Wallis keeps the house. I found the prosecutor in the parlour; he said he had been robbed of fourteen 1l. notes by the prosecutor. I searched her, but found none on her. I found a tobacco-pouch, 1s. in silver, and 7d. in copper in her pocket. She said the pouch was her own. The landlord of the house was in the room.

(Pouch sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The prisoner took me and another girl to a public-house to drink, and said he must go home with me, which he did - He behaved very rude to me. I called the watchman and he came. No other person was in the room.

JOHN CURRAN . I never drank with her, nor was any other person with me.

GUILTY . Aged 39.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180909-171

1231. THOMAS DAVIES was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of June , one waistcoat, value 4s. , the goods of Thomas Thompson .

HENRY THOMPSON . I am son of Thomas Thompson , who is a linen-draper , and lives in St. Martin's-lane . On the 20th of June the prisoner applied to my father, who is an overseer , for relief - He was waiting in the shop. I saw a worsted waistcoat lying under the stool on which he sat. I asked him what he was doing with it? he made no reply. I saw the corner of a flannel waistcoat under his arm. I took it from him, and gave him in charge.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in distress.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 50.

Fined One Shilling , and Discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180909-172

1232. MARY GRANFORD was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of August , one coat, value 4s. , the goods of Morris Welch .

MARGARET COLLINS . I am servant to Morris Welch . I went out; when I returned, I met the prisoner coming out of the door with the coat, which hung in the passage, and took it from her.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I went to see a person in the first floor, and found the coat in the dust-hole. I thought it was thrown away.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180909-173

1233. ANTHONY MURPHY and JOHN CLARK were indicted for stealing, on the 13th of July , from the person of George Ashton , one seal, value 10s., and one key, value 3s. , his property.

GEORGE ASHTON . I am a clerk . On the 13th of July, about two o'clock in the afternoon, I was walking up Piccadilly with my son, and stopped a moment to view the new street. My son said a boy had stolen my watch. I felt my fob, and found it drawn up to the top, but not gone, the seal and key were both gone. I immediately turned round, saw Higgins scuffling with one of the prisoners, and pick up a pair of small scissars which fell from him. Ivery was scuffling with the other prisoner. My ribbon was cut.

JOSHUA IVERY. I am beadle of St. Ann's, Westminster. I was in Piccadilly, opposite the new street, and heard the lad say a boy had taken his father's watch. I turned round, and saw Higgins holding Murphy-another boy came towards me; I seized him, he said he had done nothing. I immediately saw Clark stopping with his hat - He dropped two small baskets and the seal and key out of his hat. I let the boy go and seized him. I asked him how he came by them? he said he sold them.

JOHN HIGGINS . I am a tide-waiter at the custom-house. I saw the prisoners and another boy surround the prosecutor. I thought they took his watch. I saw Murphy give something to Clark. I ran up and took him, and found a pair of scissars in his right hand. Ivery took Clark. The seal, key and baskets dropped out of his hat.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

MURPHY'S Defence. I saw a boy drop the seal, and I picked it up.

CLARK'S Defence. I saw the boy drop them.

MURPHY - GUILTY . Aged 15.

CLARK - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180909-174

1234. WILLIAM HARVEY was indicted for embezzlement .

The prosecutor not appearing, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180909-175

1235. JONATHAN WINCH was indicted for stealing' on the 12th of September , one sack, value 1s., two bushels of beans, value 10s. and two bushels of bran, value 2s. , the goods of William Mellish .

THOMAS SIBLEY . I am servant to William Mellish , Esq. On Friday the 12th of September, at six o'clock, I locked up the binn, at which time there was a bushel and a half of bran and beans in it for the horses. The stable door was fast, but not locked. The prisoner was dismissed from Mr. Mellish's service about a year before. Next morning, between four and five o'clock, I found the binn had been broken open, and the beans, bran, a new rope, and a sack gone.

WILLIAM CUFFLEY . I am beadle of Enfield. On the 13th of September, about three o'clock in the morning, I stopped the prisoner with a sack, nearly full of beans and bran mixed. I said Halloo! He immediately threw the sack down and attempted to run away. I asked what was in it, he said he did not know. He said, "I hope you will let me go, and I will leave the country quite."

JOHN HERDSFIELD . I was with Cuffley. He has spoken correctly. The prisoner said he found the sack.

(Sack sworn to.)

JOHN HEWISON. I am bailiff to Mr. Mellish. I have compared the beans with the bulk; they correspond. I saw the prisoner in the field the day before.

Prisoner's Defence. I found the sack in a ditch.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180909-176

1236. GEORGE BOWYER was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of July , five tea-spoons, value 5s.; and one pair of sugar-tongs, value 3s. , the goods of John Fortescue .

ANN WHITE . I am servant to Mr. John Fortescue , who lives in Montague-square . On the 6th of July, about nine o'clock in the morning, the prisoner came down the area into the front room on the ground floor. I found him in the room, and asked what he did there; he said he came to beg some dust. I missed the spoons off the table, and charged him with stealing them, he denied it. I found them in his pocket.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180909-177

1237. JOHN SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of August , one coat, value 10s. the goods of Henry Smith .

HENRY SMITH. I keep a tripe-shop , at Hoxton. On the 1st of August I missed my coat, and found it pledged at Walker's.

THOMAS WALKER. I am a pawnbroker, and live in Tabernacle-walk. On the 1st of August the prisoner pledged the coat with me for 10s. He said it belonged to his brother. On that day fortnight he came with another bundle. I stopped him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was sent to pledge it.

GUILTY . Aged 13.

Confined Two Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180909-178

1238. JOHN SULLIVAN and MARY SHELLON were indicted for stealing, on the 26th of August , one pair of shoes, value 10s.; one pair of stockings, value 2s.; one waistcoat, value 16s.; one handkerchief, value 2s. 6d. and 1l. 8s. in monies numbered, the property of William Hopper , from his person .

WILLIAM HOPPER . I am a carpenter . On the 25th of August, about twelve o'clock at night, I was locked out of my lodgings. I met the prisoner Shellon in Holborn, and went to Charles-street, Drury-lane with her. Next morning when I got up I missed the articles stated in the indictment. Just as I awoke I saw her and a man leaving the room, I ran out and overtook the prisoners together. I took the bundle from Shellon. I found Sullivan had got my shoes and stockings on.

SAMUEL FURZEMAN . I am a constable. The prosecutor brought the prisoners to the watch-house. I found his shoes and stockings on Sullivan. He was wearing them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

SULLIVAN'S Defence. I was in liquor, and put the things on by mistake.

SULLIVAN - GUILTY . Aged 24.

SHELLON - GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180909-179

1239. ROBERT PONSONBY was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of July , one yard of cloth, value 9s. and one yard of linen, value 1s. the goods of Thomas Thwaites .

THOMAS THWAITES. I am a tailor , and live in Broad-street, St. Giles's . The witness Chapman was living with me on approbation for an apprentice. The prisoner was my journeyman , and worked up stairs.

MARY ANN THWAITES . I am the daughter of the last witness. About nine o'clock in the evening, I was at the two pair front window, and saw Chapman go out and join a man about the same size as himself; they walked away together, and returned in about a quarter of an hour. Chapman went in, and came out and gave him something, he then returned to the shop, and the prisoner walked away. About eleven o'clock there was a gentle knock at the door, my father went down, I looked out of the window and saw the prisoner go from the door, with a roll of cloth under his arm.

SAMUEL FURZEMAN . I am an officer. I went with the prosecutor to the prisoner's lodgings on the 25th of July, and found him in bed. Mr. Thwaites asked him if he had any of his property there; he turned up the bed and pulled out a yard of cloth and a piece of linen. He said the boy gave it to him to make a jacket.

WILLIAM HENRY CHAPMAN . I was with Mr. Thwaites on approbation. The prisoner asked me to give him two yards and a half of cloth, and a boy's dress, and a pair of men's trowsers, and he would give me a 2l. note. I refused. He afterwards came to me at the door, and asked me for half a yard of velveteen and some cloth. I gave him the cloth and linen.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I have two journeymen to prove the boy gave it to me to make him a jacket.

WALTER THOMPSON. I work for Mr. Thwaites. Chapman came into the workshop, and told the prisoner he wanted him to make a jacket, and asked what it would take; he said he would get it.

JOHN OLIVER . I work for Mr. Thwaites. I was present when the boy came and asked the prisoner to make him a jacket.

WILLIAM HENRY CHAPMAN re-examined. I did not ask him to make me a jacket; if I had, I could not have worn it, as Mr. Thwaites would have known the cloth.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180909-180

1240. SAMUEL MARTIN was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of August , two yards and three quarters of satin, value 8s. , the property of Samuel Lines .

SAMUEL LINES . I am the carrier from Rickmansworth to London. On the 4th of August I met the prisoner on Holborn-hill; he asked me to take three boxes in my waggon for him. He asked if he might get up and ride as far as St. Giles's, I told him he might; when he had rode about twenty yards he got off and ran away with a parcel. I took him in Lincoln's-Inn-Fields, and gave him in charge. I found the parcel under the waistband of his breeches.

THOMAS GOULDING . About two o'clock I saw Lines stop the prisoner. I found the parcel in his breeches.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I found it.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180909-181

1241. JAMES LOWREY was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of June , one-shirt, value 10s., and one shift, value 1s. , the property of Mary Eliza Taylor , widow .

MARY ELIZA TAYLOR . I am a widow, and live at Hoxton. On the 22d of June, about ten o'clock, the prisoner went with me to fetch some linen. I got a bag of clothes from Mr. Cotton, in Basinghall-street, and put it on his back. I had another parcel, which I got from Cheapside, he walked on very quick before me; I thought he was making haste home to return and assist me with my bundle. When I got home, I found he was not returned; I suspected all my things were gone. I went to several houses for him, I returned and found he was at home. I examined the linen, and missed the shirt and shift; I have never found them.

MARY EDMONDS . I put the linen in the bag, and am certain the shirt and shift were there.

MARY ELIZA TAYLOR . I am the prosecutrix's daughter. I was at home when the prisoner brought the linen. I told him my mother was gone to look for him; he went out. About nine o'clock at night, I met him in the Kingsland-road, and told him my mother wanted him; he said he knew very well what it was for, and would not come. I followed him to Mr. Tipple's workhouse, where he was taken.

GEORGE GOODLUCK . I am a constable. I took the prisoner into custody at the City Farm-house, Hoxton, where he is a pauper. He said he would knock the first person down that attempted to touch him; he said he bought the shirt of a Jew, and denied having the shift.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Confined One Year .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180909-182

1242. THOMAS KING and JOHN HILL were indicted for stealing, on the 26th of June , one table-cloth, value 10s., and one coverlid, value 5s. , the property of Harriet Hodson , widow .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating them to be the property of Aaron Aldous .

ELIZA ALDOUS . I am the wife of Aaron Aldous , who is a labourer . On the 26th of June, I lost the coverlid and table-cloth off the table of the front-room, in Copenhaghen-place, Limehouse . At half-past eleven o'clock, I was alarmed, and missed it.

ELIZA BELCHER . I saw the prisoner, Hill, standing at the prosecutrix's window, inside the rails; I thought he was talking to somebody inside. He put his hand into the window, and took some linen out and put it into his apron; King stood at a distance in the room - They both ran away.

I alarmed the prosecutrix, and ran after them; I saw them stopped. I never lost sight of them.

ROBERT SELP . I am an officer. The prisoners were given into my charge. I found nothing on them.

RICHARD BUST . I was going to work, and heard the alarm. I took the prisoners in a stable, and found the property there.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

KING'S Defence. I went to the stable to ask the way to Limehouse.

KING - GUILTY . Aged 19.

HILL - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined One Year .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180909-183

1243. HENRY JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of July , two jackets, value 20s. , the property of Robert Peart .

WILLIAM CLARK. I am servant to Robert Peart , who is a pawnbroker , and lives in Whitechapel. On the 8th of July, between twelve and one o'clock, I was informed that a black man had run away with two jackets from the door. I ran after him, and saw the prisoner turn up White Lion-street, with the two jackets under his arm. I stopped him; he resisted very much, and refused to go back with me - He attempted to strike me. I gave him in charge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180909-184

1244. THOMAS HOPKINS and MARY HOPKINS were indicted for stealing, on the 25th of June , two blankets, value 16s.; two pillows, value 6s.; two pillow-cases, value 2d.; two sheets, value 4s., and one quilt, value 4s., the goods of Ann Billington , widow , in a lodging-room .

ANN BILLINGTON . I am a widow, and live in Essex-street, Hoxton . I let the prisoners a room on my first floor, furnished, in August, 1817. About the 25th of June, they left; I missed the articles stated in the indictment. The woman gave me the duplicates.

WILLIAM POPE . I am a pawnbroker; the female prisoner pledged all the things with me, between the 7th of February and the 3d of June. She frequently pledged the things and redeemed them again.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

MARY HOPKINS 'S Defence. I meant to redeem them.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180909-185

1245. WILLIAM ELLIS was indicted for embezzlement .

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180909-186

1246. MARY BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of August , one pail, value 3s., the property of Giles Hemens ; and two loaves of bread, value 1s. , the property of James Clark .

ELIZA HEMENS . I am the wife of Giles Hemens , who is an auctioneer , and lives in Denmark-street, St. Giles's ; my street - door was open. My lodger called me, and I found the prisoner with the pail and loaves under her gown.

MARY CLARK . I saw the prisoner come out of the area with the pail, and stopped her.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 55.

Confined Three Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180909-187

1247. THOMAS THORP was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of August , one coat, value 10s., and one waistcoat, value 5s. , the property of Barnaby Connelly .

BARNABY CONNELLY . I am a labourer . On the 20th of June, I put my box in the prisoner's room, at the Black Bull, Chapel-street Westminster . On the 13th, it was broken open and the things gone; he is a soldier.

EDWARD GREEN . I am an officer, and live in Queen-square. On the 13th of August, the prisoner was brought into the Coach and Horses, public-house, as a deserter. I went to the guard-room, searched him, and found the clothes on him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I did not know they were his.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Fined One Shilling , and Discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180909-188

1248. JOHN BURTON was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of August , one handkerchief, value 2s. , the property of Barnaby Connelly .

BARNABY CONNELLY . On the 13th of August, about twelve o'clock, the prisoner came into the room. I went up stairs and left him there; I missed the handkerchief out of my box - He was then gone. I followed him, and saw him put it in his cap; the landlord took it out.

JAMES WILLIAMSON . I keep the house. I found the handkerchief in the prisoner's cap.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180909-189

1249. FRANCIS ROBINSON was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of July , two sheets, value 6s.; one bolster, value 6s.; one pillow, value 3s.; one rug, value 1s.; and one blanket, value 5s., the goods of John Francis , in a lodging-room; and one table-cloth, value 3s.; one apron, value 2s.; one shirt, value 2s., and one cap, value 2s. , his property.

JOHN FRANCIS. I live in East-street, Hoxton, in the parish of St. Leonard, Shoreditch . On the 8th of July, the prisoner and her husband lodged with me, in the back-room on the first floor, it was furnished. On the 28th, I saw the prisoner go out with a large bundle, between five and six o'clock in the morning, her husband did not sleep at home that night. I watched her into a public-house - I returned home and found her room door open, and missed the articles stated in the indictment. She returned in about two hours - I gave her in charge; the constable found the duplicates of the property on her.

GEORGE GOODLUCK . I am a constable. I took the

prisoner in charge, I found the duplicates of the property on her. She was intoxicated.

WILLIAM KNIGHT DURHAM . I am a pawnbroker, and live at Holywell-lane, Shoreditch. On the 28th of July, the prisoner pledged a blanket and pillow with me, for 3s. 6d.

WILLIAM POPE . On the 27th of July, the prisoner pledged an apron with me.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I told the prosecutor I had pledged them, and would make them good on Saturday.

GUILTY . Aged 32.

Confined Three Months .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180909-190

1250. ELIZA RAWLINGS was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of July , one gown, value 6s. , the property of Joseph Jones .

HANNAH JONES . I am the wife of Joseph Jones , we live in Gee-street, St. Lukes . On the 27th of July, about eight o'clock in the evening, I lost my gown from the back room on the first floor, the prisoner was brought back with it. The street - door was left open.

SARAH SHIPTON . I am landlady of the house. I heard a noise on the stairs, and saw the prisoner peeping over the banisters; she asked if Mrs. Lucas lodged there? I said, No. Soon after the prosecutrix missed her gown. I ran out and brought her back; the gown was found in her pocket.

WILLIAM VANLINT . I am a constable. I took the prisoner in charge, and found the gown in her pocket.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Three Months .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180909-191

1251. SARAH LENS , SYDNEY WILLIAMS , and MARY MURPHY were indicted for stealing, on the 15th of August , one basket, value 3d., the property of Samuel Harley ; one shirt, value 2s., the property of Richard Wiggins ; one shirt, value 2s., the property of Paul Horton ; one shirt, value 2s., the property of James Smith , and one shirt, value 2s. , the property of Robert Scott .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating them to be the property of the said Samuel Harley.

EDWARD GREEN . I am an officer of Queen-square. On the 15th of August, at about twelve o'clock, I apprehended the prisoners at No. 8, Gardeners-lane, York-street, Westminster, I went there and found a basket in the room, and some shirts torn up into rags; they lodged there.

ANN HARLEY . I am the wife of Samuel Harley, and am a laundress. I sent my little girl to Knightsbridge barracks with a basket, to fetch the soldiers clothes to wash; the clothes were taken from her. She is not seven years old.

LUCY BEADLE . I was coming out of the Park and saw Harley's child by Lady Dacre's almshouses, at the top of York-street, with the a basket in her hand. I saw the prisoners, Williams and Murphy, go up and speak to her, they took the basket from her, and went down York-street, it was between ten and eleven o'clock. I came up again and saw her crying; she said the basket of linen was taken from her; I took her home to her mother's. We then went to the prisoners lodgings and found them there, and the basket. I said they were the persons that I saw take the basket from the girl, they said nothing. I am certain it was the same basket, as I noticed it being sewed with white thread.

ANN HARLEY re-examined. Lucy Beadle brought my child home, and told me the same as what she has now said. I went to the prisoners lodgings and found the basket under Williams's petticoats. I asked them how they could rob a little child. Williams said it was not her but Murphy; the basket was sewed with white thread. I went to the next house and found the remains of two shirts, one had Smith's name on it, the other had R. on it. I knew them, having washed them before.

ELIZA NORTH. I keep an old clothes shop. On the 15th of August, about ten o'clock in the morning, Lens sold me the remains of two shirts as old rags. Mrs. Harley claimed them.

RICHARD WIGGINS. I am a private in the Guards. I gave Harley's child four shirts, which she put into a basket; one of them belonged to Paul Horton , one to Robert Scott , and one to James Smith . She left the barracks about nine o'clock in the morning.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

LENS- NOT GUILTY .

WILLIAMS - GUILTY . Aged 16.

MURPHY - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Six Months .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180909-192

1252. THOMAS BEASMORE was indicted for stealing, on the 1st July , one coat, value 1s. 6d., and one handkerchief, value 6d. , the goods of William Biggins .

WILLIAM BIGGINS . I am an apprentice to Mr. Sawyer, an engraver, who lives in Dean-street, Soho . On the 1st, of July, I lost a coat from the shop, the handkerchief was in the pocket. I found it at Marlborough-street, about two hours after.

RICHARD SAWYER . I am Biggins's master. I saw the prisoner run out of the shop - I followed, and took him; he immediately dropped the coat from under his jacket.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 14.

Judgment respited . Sent to the Refuge .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180909-193

1253. MARY WALLIS was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of August , one gown, value 10s. , the property of John Chennery .

ESTHER CHENNERY . I am the wife of John Chennery, who keep a clothes shop . On the 24th of August, I lost the gown. About three weeks after the prisoner came to a neighbour's house with it on. I know it again, and claimed it. She said she bought it in Monmouth-street, and afterwards that she bought it in Mount-street.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I bought it of a Jew.

NOT GUILTY .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180909-194

1254. ESTHER TODD was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of June , two gowns, value 18s.; one petticoat, value 3s.; one pair of boots, value 4s., and one pair of shoes, value 3s. , the property of Edward Mitchell .

MARY MITCHELL . I am the wife of Edward Mitchell , and live in Gray's-buildings . My box was in the kitchen-the prisoner came to assist me in making some shirts; on the 20th of June I missed a pair of shoes, and the duplicates of the other articles stated in the indictment.

ANN FORRESTER . My husband is a labourer; the prisoner lodged with me. She sold me the duplicates of a gown and a petticoat, which I redeemed. I also bought a pair of shoes of her.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner Defence. She gave me the shoes.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Confined Six Months .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180909-195

1255. ANN HOLDEN was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of August , one brooch, value 5s., and one tablespoon, value 6s. , the goods of Eliza Vince .

ELIZA VINCE. I live in John-street, Spitalfields , the prisoner lodged in my front room. On the 25th of August, I lost my brooch out of my bed-room-the spoon was let to her with the lodging.

CHARLES POPE . I am apprentice to Mr. Chautres, who is a pawnbroker. On the 20th of August, the prisoner pledged a a brooch with me.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I picked it up outside the door.

NOT GUILTY .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180909-196

1256. ELIZA HOLT was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of July , one shirt, value 2s. 6d. , the goods of Thomas Pain .

MARY PAIN . I am the wife of Thomas Pain , who is a butcher , and lives in Brook's-market . On the 30th of July, about twelve o'clock, I lost the shirt out of the top drawer in the parlour.

JAMES READ . I lodge with the prosecutor. I came down, and saw Lloyd asleep in the shop, I turned my head, and saw the prisoner close to the parlour door, and asked what she wanted-Lloyd awoke; she then said she came into see what time it was; I stopped her, but she got away. Mrs. Pain came and said she missed the shirt; Lloyd brought her back without the shirt; she said if we would forgive her, she would return the shirt. It has never been found.

JOHN LLOYD. I awoke, and found the prisoner in the shop. I went out, overtook her in Leather-lane, and charged her with stealing the shirt; she said if I would forgive her, she would deliver it up; she never did.

CHARLES BROWN . I am an officer. I took the prisoner in charge. She took me up Brook's-market to shew me where she had thrown the shirt; I could not find it.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing of it.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Confined Two Months .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180909-197

1257. JOHN PEVERLY was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of August , three cases of drawing instruments, value 20s.; one compass, value 10s.; one pair of pantaloons, value 10s.; one pair of breeches, value 7s.; one waistcoat, value 2s.; one pair of stockings, value 1s.; one pair of drawers. value 3s.; two decanter stands, value 15s.; two knee-buckles, value 3s., and one book, value 5s., the property of Eleanor Williams , widow ; two pair of pistols and one prayer-book, value 15s. , the property of Edward Frisby Howis .

EDWARD FRISBY HOWIS. I am an oilman , and live in Piccadilly; Mrs. Williams is my sister. I lost a pair of pistols out of her house.

MRS. ELEANOR WILLIAMS . I live in Jermyn-street, St. James's ; the prisoner was my cook's son. I went out of town on the 23d of July, returned again on the 26th of August, and missed the articles stated in the indictment. I have seen the prisoner at my house.

JAMES BENDALL . I am servant to Mr. Sherrynoe, who is a pawnbroker, and lives in Marylebone-street. On the 24th of June the prisoner pledged a prayer-book with me, and on the 24th of August, two decanter stands.

WILLIAM HODGKINSON . I bought the duplicate of a pair of pantaloons, and a pair of drawers of the prisoner. I redeemed them.

HENRY CLAXTON . I am a tailor, and live in Stretton-ground, Westminster. I bought the duplicate of a pair of breeches of the prisoner, and redeemed them.

JAMES TURELL . I am servant to Mr. Wise, who lives in St. Giles's. I bought a pair of pistols of the prisoner, for 10s.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was led away by bad company.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Six Months .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180909-198

1258. WILLIAM WHITTY was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of August , one waistcoat, value 1s. 6d. , the property of Michael M'Laughlin ; and ELIZA HIBBARD was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, she knowing it to be stolen .

MICHAEL M'LAUGHLIN. I live in Jew's-row, Chelsea . On the 16th of August, about nine o'clock in the morning, I went to work, and left the prisoner Whitty, and Shoales, in my room; I had taken Whitty in the night before to sleep with me, out of compassion, I returned about eleven and the waistcoat was then gone; next morning I saw the waistcoat in the prisoner, Hibbard's window - She keeps a clothes shop in Turk's-row. I went in, told her it was mine, and that it had been stolen the morning before. She told me to go about my business, for I should not have it; she said she had bought it on Saturday, for sixpence-it was not stolen until Sunday. I offered her sixpence to return it - She refused. About half an hour after I saw the prisoner Whitty, and gave him in charge. I asked him where he sold it? he took me to Hibbard's. I again claimed it, but she would not return it. It is worth 2s.

Cross-examined by MR. WALFORD. Q. Did she not tell you, if you would go to Queen-square Office, and swear to it, you should have it - A. No, not until she attended there herself. The constable told her to attend, she called him an impudent puppy, and refused. She was afterwards summoned, and appeared.

JOHN SHOALES . I lodged in the prosecutor's room, he left me and the prisoner, Whitty. there. I saw Whitty take the waistcoat out of the box, and go out with it. I was afraid to stop him.

JOHN BOSBURY . I took Whitty into custody; and on Monday morning I took him to Hibbard's, and asked her for the waistcoat he had sold to her? she said she would not give it up. I told her to attend at Queen-square at twelve o'clock; she used very bad expressions, and refused. I summoned her - She then came and brought it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

HIBBARD'S Defence. It laid in my window. I said if he would swear to it, he should have it.

MARTHA DEAN . I was at Hibbard's when the constable and prosecutor were there; she told the prosecutor if he would go to Queen-square and swear to it, he should have it. The constable was outside the door.

ELIZA SAVAGE . I live next door to Hibbard. I heard her tell the prosecutor, if he would swear to the waistcoat he should have it.

ANDREW LEWARD . I deal in old clothes. I do not believe the waistcoat to be worth above sixpence.

Q.Will you swear it is not worth more than 1s. - A. I will. I would not give 4d. for it.

WHITTY- GUILTY . Aged 18.

Whipped , and Discharged.

HIBBARD- NOT GUILTY .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180909-199

1259. NATHAN DIAS was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of August , one jacket, value 6s., and one pair of shoes, value 6s. , the property of Stephen Alleson .

There being no proof of the prisoner's having possession of the goods, he was

ACQUITTED .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180909-200

1260. RICHARD WHEELER was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of September , one hog, price 4l. , the property of Mary Ann Goodchild .

MRS. MARY ANN GOODCHILD . I am a single woman, and live in Park-place, Chelsea . I had a hog, which was kept in my back yard.

SARAH WILKIE . I am servant to the prosecutrix. I put the hog in the stable at eight o'clock at night, and bolted the door inside, next morning at six I found the bolt forced, and the hog gone; in the afternoon it was brought home.

JOHN WHITLEY . I am watchman of Marylebone. On the 3d of September, about eight o'clock in the morning, I stopped the prisoner in the Bayswater-road, about a mile and a half from Tyburn turnpike, with three other persons; I followed them all the way to Tyburn, and then asked the prisoner if the hog was for sale? he said, No; and that he was going to take it to his master's, who was a cowkeeper, at Islington - He would not tell his name; he said he brought it from Acton, but he could not tell who from. I followed him to St. George's-market; he was driving the hog, the others were with him. I ran towards the watch-house to get assistance, and saw him turn down Wigmore-street. I met two watchmen, and asked them to assist, which they refused. The serjeant of the watch-house went with me, and took the prisoner and hog, the others ran away. The prisoner said none of them were with him when he got the hog.

JOHN LIMECROFT . I am sergeant of the watch-house. Whitley pointed the prisoner out to me, he was driving the hog - I secured him, he resisted very much.

Prisoner's-Defence. I overtook two men, who asked me to drive it to Islington.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180909-201

1261. GEORGE TAYLOR was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of July , one handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of James Joseph Brett , from his person .

CAPTAIN JAMES JOSEPH BRETT . On the 9th of July I was walking in St. James's Park , by the Horse Guards - I stopped to see the guard relieved. In about five minutes, the officer told me that I had had my pocket picked, and produced my handkerchief.

THOMAS THOMPSON . I am an officer. I was at the Horse Guards, and saw the prisoner, in company with two or three others. Mr. Brett came up, he immediately followed him, went behind him close to the people, took his handkerchief out, and put it into his breeches - I seized him, took it out, and told the prosecutor.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180909-202

1262. ELIZA BARNETT and OLIVIA STEVENSON , were indicted for stealing, on the 9th of July , one gown, value 3s.; four shifts, value 6s.; three petticoats, value 8s., and four pair of stockings, value 8s. , the goods of George Beetham .

GEORGE BEETHAM . I am captain of a ship , and live in Manchester-street , the prisoners were both my servants ; the articles stated in the indictment were taken from my garret. We had been out of town for a few days; when I returned, my boy gave me information - I searched Stevenson's box, and found a piece of cloth, and the remainder of the things I found between the sacking and the mattress of Eliza Barnett 's bed, except the stockings. The prisoners slept together.

Cross-examined by MR. ARABIN. My wife is not here. I know the things are her's. I will not swear my wife had not given them to her.

HARRIET PORTER . I live in Adam-street. The prisoners came to my house; I bought some rags of them. Stevenson asked me if I bought stockings? I bought a pair of each of the prisoners.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

NOT GUILTY .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180909-203

1263. JOHN BISHOP was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of August , from the person of Eliza Rose , one pocket-book, value 6d.; one brooch, value 1s., and four 1l. bank notes , the property of Joseph Rose .

ELIZA ROSE. I am wife of Joseph Rose , and have been married four years. I lived in the service of Mrs. Daniels, Devonshire-place, Portland-place. I left her service on the morning of the 8th of August - I left my clothes in the coachman's loft until I could remove them. I left the coachman's wife about nine o'clock in the evening, to go to Marylebone-street for some things I had bought. I had a large bundle of clothes, and some potatoes in my cloak. When I got into Upper Wimpole-street, the prisoner came up to me, and said, "It is a pity so slender a figure as you should be so heavily loaded." I made no reply. I had no acquaintance with him. He then said, "Madam, allow me to treat you with a coach?" I said, "I do not want you nor your coach either." He then said, "Don't be frightened - I am a gentleman of unlimited fortune, and do not wish to set a foot in the coach with you." I told him I would take care that he did not. I had then got to the end of Weymouth-street. I was afraid to cross the end of Portland-place, it being so wide, and he kept so close to me. I had 16s. in my pocket, and a pocketbook, which contained four 1l. notes, a brooch, and some memorandums.

Q. When you got to Portland-place, what did you do - A. I turned back, and wanted to cross over to No 38, Weymouth-street, where I was going to sleep, but the prisoner took hold of my arm, and pulled me down as far as Weymouth-mews; he then forced a purse into my hand, and told me there was a 20l. note and a sovereign in it, if I would go into the mews with him for a few minutes, which I peremptorily refused.

Q. Did he, upon that, put a very indecent question to you - A. He did. I gave him an answer which led him to suppose that all proposals to me were useless. He then took hold of me in a very indelicate manner, and I left his other hand take up my gown, and feel about my right-hand pocket. He saw somebody coming up, let me go, and ran away. I felt in my right-hand pocket, and missed my pocket-book. I was much alarmed - I called out the moment he left me; I was afraid to call out before. He was stopped immediately, and never was out of my sight. I am certain he is the man. When he got to the watchhouse he wanted to make it up, which I refused. I saw my pocket-book and money at the office. My husband is in Mr. Cooper's service.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. Was it a dark night - A. Yes. I was going to fetch some things which I had bought in the morning.

Q. Why not take the things then - A. Business prevented me. I had to call about a situation.

Q. How far did you walk together arm-in-arm - A. Not far; I could see no watchman, and was afraid to call out.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. While he was walking with you, was his manner decent and eivil - A. Yes. When we got to the mews he was indecent.

STEPHEN LIDDARD . I am a stable-keeper at Beaumont's-mews, Marylebone. I was coming up Wimpole-street, and heard the cry of "Stop thief!" in Weymouth-street. I looked round, and saw the prisoner coming across Wimpole-street, towards the same side where I was. He ran towards me as fast as he could. I turned round to stop him; he crossed over again. I ran after him, and pushed him against the rails of No. 57, and stopped him. He turned round and asked me what I stopped him for, putting his hands behind him, near the iron rails. I told him there was an alarm, and seeing him run I stopped him. In a moment the prosecutrix came up, and said the prisoner had robbed her of her pocket-book. I gave him in charge of two watchmen, who took him to the watch-house. I went to No. 57, and asked the footman to look in the area, he went down, and I saw him pick up a purse. I desired him to see what was in it. He opened it, and found some pieces of blank paper, like bank notes, and a piece of coin. I went to the watch-house and asked the prosecutrix to describe her pocket-book. She said there was four 1l. notes, and a brooch in it. The prisoner claimed the purse, and said he would pay her any compliment to make it up.

Cross-examined. There are very few shops in the neighbourhood. It is a very dull place. He crossed over just by No. 48.

SAMUEL BRITTAIN . I am a watchman. I saw the prisoner and prosecutrix at the corner of the mews. I saw him leave her very quick. She called out "Stop thief!" He ran down Wimpole-street. I sprung my rattle. Liddard stopped him. I took him to the watch-house. The prosecutrix said he had robbed her of her pocket-book. He said he had not got it, and desired me to search him.

Cross-examined. They separated quickly. As soon as he got into the middle of the street, she cried out. He had not left her half a minute, he then ran very fast.

WILLIAM SELLERS . I was constable of the night. The prisoner was brought to the watch-house. I went out to look for the pocket-book, but could not find it. I told the watchman to look for it.

CHARLES WILD . I am a serjeant of the first regiment of foot guards. I found the pocket-book, with 4l. and a brooch in it, down the area of No. 48, Wimpole-street, about four o'clock in the morning. The prisoner passed by there before he got to No. 57.

ELIZA ROSE . The pocket-book, brooch, and memorandums in it are mine.

SARAH MOUNTNER . I gave Rose the four 1l. notes in change for a 5l. note, they have my writing upon them.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent.

GUILTY . Aged 31.

Transported for Life .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180909-204

1264. JAMES NEIL and WILLIAM BRUCE were indicted for stealing, on the 6th of August , from the person of Thomas Sawyer , one pocket-book, value 1s.; one 30l., one 25l., and five 10l. bank notes , his property.

THOMAS SAWYER . I live at Hammersmith. On the 6th of August, I returned home on the stage. I got on the stage at Hemming's-row ; the prisoners and another man, who is not here, were on the coach-top, Mr. Ross sat on the box. I had my pocket-book, containing a 30l., a 25l., and five 10l., and some smaller notes. I sat between the prisoners, four in a row; we rode as far as the White Horse Cellar, in Piccadilly ; the prisoners and the other man got off and went

away as the coach pulled up, before it stopped. They had not been gone five minutes before I missed my pocketbook and its contents. The five 10l. notes are particularly marked. I gave information at Bow-street. Three of the 10l. notes were produced at the Bank about a week after.

JOSEPH ROSE . I was on the coach-box. The prisoners were on the roof; the prosecutor sat between them.

WILLIAM HERLE . I am a clerk at the Bank. I produce the three 10l. notes which were paid in there.

Mr. SAWYER, re-examined. These are three of the notes I lost.

JOSHUA COLE . I live in Bridge-street, Westminster. On the 15th of August I sold two young men a hat each. Bruce was one of them; he paid me a 10l. note; one of these produced is it (looking at a hat). This is the hat I sold Bruce. He wrote William Bruce, William-street, Lambeth-street, on the note.

JOHN TAPSCOTT . I keep a public-house in the Almonry, at Westminster. On the 6th of August I changed a 10l. note for a woman who cohabits with Neil. One of those produced from the Bank is it.

Cross-examined. I know he lives with the woman; she is now in Court.

THOMAS SCARNELL . I am a hatter, and live in Tothill-street, Westminster. On the 10th of August I sold a woman a hat, she paid me a 10l. note, and gave me the name of Neil. One of these produced is the one she gave me.

JAMES GILLMORE . I am an officer of Queen-square. On the 29th of August I and Cooper went to No. 23, Carlisle-place, Lambeth, and inquired for Neil and Bruce; we were told they were not at home; we said we would call at nine o'clock. We went round another way, and came into the Carlisle Arms, where we could see the door; in about an hour the two prisoners passed us and knocked at the door; they were answered from the window by Bruce's wife, and both immediately left the house, and came down towards us, as soon as they saw us they ran in different directions. Cooper took Bruce, and I took Neil. We took them to the public-house; and then went back to No. 23, Carlisle-place, and found a hat in the back parlour, with Cole's name in it. We found a parcel of matches in Neil's pocket.

JOSEPH COOPER . I am an officer. I took Bruce, and found a hat in the back room, upon the second floor, with James and Co.'s name in it.

BRUCE'S Defence. I took the note of a Jew for some jewellery.

NEIL'S Defence. I was not in London at the time of the robbery; I was at Gravesend.

JAMES HUTCHINSON . I live at Stangate, and am apprenticed to my father, who is a waterman. On the 6th of August, about two o'clock in the morning, I returned from Vauxhall. Neil hired me on the Surry side of Westminster-bridge to take him to the Gravesend boat, which I did, and put him on board the King George packet at half-past four o'clock in the morning. I saw him sail.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. Did you hear Neil, at his examination, say, he went to Gravesend by the coach - A. No.

GILLMORE re-examined. The prisoner said he went to Gravesend by the coach.

COOPER re-examined. I heard him say so.

NEIL - GUILTY . Aged 19.

BRUCE - GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Life .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180909-205

1265. DAVID MACKEY was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of August , one coat, value 10s.; one pair of trowsers, value 8s., one waistcoat, value 1s., the goods of Henry Harris Browning ; and one pair of gaiters, value 3s. and ninety-six buttons, value 3s. , the property of Thomas Crane .

HENRY HARRIS BROWNING. I am apprenticed to Thomas Crane, who is a tailor , and lives in Joseph-street, Brunswick-square . On the 27th of August, about four o'clock in the afternoon, the articles stated in the indictment were stolen. The prisoner worked at our house. The next day I gave him in charge at Hunt's.

WILLIAM READ . I am an officer. I took the prisoner into custody at Hunt's. I found the duplicates of the gaiters and coat upon him. The other things were found at Hunt's.

JOHN HUNT . I am a tailor. On the 28th of August the prisoner came to work for me. I bought eight dozen of buttons and a pair of trowsers of him.

JOHN BOTELER . I am a pawnbroker. On the 27th of August the prisoner pledged the coat and gaiters with me.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Three Months .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180909-206

1266. JOHN M'CAN was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of June , from the person of Robert Potts , one pocketbook, value 3s., and two 1l. bank notes , his property.

THOMAS POTTS . I am a dyer. On the 19th of June, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I met the prisoner at a public-house in Chelsea ; he began feeling about me; I did not suspect him; I was intoxicated. He said he would see me home, which he did, and helped me up stairs. He put his arms round me as he went up. I missed my pocket-book as soon as I got up stairs. He said the landlord had got it.

ELIZA PERKINS . I found the pocket-book in the privy. The prisoner had been there.

MARY BIGGS . The prosecutor lodged with me. The prisoner brought him home, and put his hands round him to help him up. The prosecutor missed his pocket-book. The prisoner said the landlord had it to take care of. I ran to the public-house, returned, and found the prisoner was gone.

Prisoner's Defence. I never touched it.

NOT GUILTY .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180909-207

1267. WILLIAM JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of July , two sheets, value 6s., and two blankets, value 4s. , the goods of John Mason .

SARAH GRANT . I am a servant to John Mason, who is a glazier , and lives in Crown-court, Soho . On the 6th of July I was in the back parlour, between five and six

o'clock, and heard a strange footstep on the stairs. I ran to the window, and saw the prisoner going out of the door, with a bundle on his shoulder. I followed him, calling out, "Stop thief!" He dropped the bundle, and turned into Titchfield-street, where he was stopped. I never lost sight of him. I picked the bundle up, it contained two sheets and two blankets, which were taken from the first floor.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was hired to fetch them.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Confined Six Months , and Whipped .

Fourth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180909-208

1268. EMMA HILLIER was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of August , at St. Margaret's, Westminster , two sheets, value 5s., the goods of Frederic Summerfield , in a lodging-room .

FREDERIC SUMMERFIELD. My house is in the parish of St. John.

NOT GUILTY .

Fourth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180909-209

1269. SARAH HEWITT and JAMES WILKS were indicted for stealing, on the 2d of July , one sheet, value 4s. , the goods of Sarah West .

SARAH WEST . I live in Whitecross-street . On the 2d of July I lost the sheet.

ANN WEST . The sheet hung in the yard to dry. The prisoners used to visit, being next door neighbours. There is only one yard to the two houses. I saw the prisoners in the yard, and missed the sheet soon after.

JOHN WALKER . I am servant to Mr. Mathews, a pawnbroker. On the 2d of July, between twelve and one o'clock, the prisoner, Hewitt, pledged the sheet with me.

JOHN GARVA . I took the prisoners into custody. Hewitt said she had destroyed the duplicate.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

HEWITT - GUILTY . Aged 15.

Fined One Shilling , and Discharged.

WILKS- NOT GUILTY .

Fourth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180909-210

1270. JOHN GALLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of June , two collars, value 5s.; four traces, value 20s.; four hames and tugs, value 15s.; two pads, value 10s.; two cruppers, value 3s.; one pair of reins, value 4s., and two belly-bands, value 2s. , the goods of Edward Calvert .

JOHN HILL . I am coachman to Mr. Edward Calvert , who lives in James-street . On the 30th of May I went out of town, and left these things safe in the coach-house. I returned on the 27th of June, and missed them. The stable window had been broken open; I found them at Hatton-garden. The prisoner was employed in the yard , but had nothing to do with the stable.

GEORGE DAVIS . I am a collar and harness-maker, and live in Ray-street, Clerkenwell. On the 27th of June, about half past six in the morning, the prisoner came and asked if I bought harness; I said I did; he produced the articles stated in the indictment. I asked him where he brought them from; he said his master was at the Bull and Mouth, and had sent him to sell them, as he was going out of town, and he was to take him the money. He wanted 2l. for them, and said he had lived nearly three years with his master. I told him to call again. I got a constable ready, who took him when he came. He left the things with me.

WILLIAM JOHNSON . I am a constable. I waited at Davis's house; the prisoner came, and I took him. He said he got the harness from the Bull and Mouth, and made a rush out of the shop, I collared him in the middle of the street. He made a great resistance, and knocked me down - He was secured. I found two keys on him, which opened the stables in the yard. Two iron bars were wrenched from the stable window.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was out of employ.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

Fourth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180909-211

1271. JONATHAN ELSOM was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of June , one pocket handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of William Lewis , from his person .

WILLIAM LEWIS . I live in Greek-street, Golden-square. On the 20th of June, about five o'clock in the afternoon, I was in Brydges-street, Covent-garden , and felt something at my pocket; I turned round, and saw the prisoner putting my handkerchief under his coat. There were two other men with him, who went away immediately. I seized the prisoner - He made a great resistance. I endeavoured to take him to Bow-street. - an officer came and took him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I found it.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Life .

Fourth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180909-212

1272. THOMAS EATON was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of August , one pair of shoes, value 7s. , the goods of Moses Morgan .

WILLIAM PARDY . I am shopman to Moses Morgan , who is a shoemaker , and lives in Oxford-street. On the 5th of August I saw the prisoner take a pair of shoes, which hung at the door, and run away; I followed him, he threw them down, and I picked them up. Williams stopped him.

EDWARD WILLIAMS . I heard the alarm, and saw the prisoner throw the shoes down - I stopped him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Confined Three Months , and Whipped .

Fourth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180909-213

1273. ANN BAILEY was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of July , one table-cloth, value 5s., and two gowns, value 10s. , the goods of John Kinsley .

ELIZA KINSLEY . I am the wife of John Kinsley , who lives in Kirby-street, Hatton-garden ; the prisoner used to wash for me. I went out of town, and left the articles stated in the indictment in a box, when I returned I missed them. The prisoner lived in the next room to me.

SARAH BEW . I live in Eagle-court, Eagle-street. The prisoner left the duplicate of a table-cloth with me for

a sum of money which she owed me. I redeemed it at Mr. Lee's, and pledged it again at Mr. Penton's.

JAMES WOOD . I am servant to Mr. Penton, pawnbroker. I produce the table-cloth.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing about the gowns.

GUILTY . Aged 49.

Confined Six Months .

Fourth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180909-214

1274. SARAH BEAVEN was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of July , one table-cloth, value 10s.; one sheet, value 8s.; two shirts, value 16s.; one pair of stockings, value 3s.; one waistcoat, value 2s. 6d.; one shift, value 5s., and one napkin, value 2s. , the goods of Ann Dubois , widow .

ANN DUROIS . I am a widow, and live in Hospital-row, Chelsea , the prisoner was my servant , she lived six weeks with me-the things were in a drawer in my bed-room. On the 20th of July, I found eight duplicates concealed between the bed and the sacking. There was no person in the house but her. I redeemed the table-cloth, two sheets, and a shirt, they were pledged at Thompson's. I got an officer, and charged her with the robbery - She begged for mercy.

ELIZA HAMBLING . I live at Chelsea. The prisoner brought the table-cloth to me to pledge for her at Thompson's. She said her mistress told her to pledge it, as she was short of money. I afterwards pledged two sheets and a pair of stockings for her.

CHARLES LOVEDAY . I am servant to Mr. Thompson, pawnbroker-the things were pledged with me.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Fourth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180909-215

1275. JOHN BARTHOLOMEW and RICHARD KELSEL were indicted for stealing, on the 7th of July , one pair of breeches, value 10s. , the goods of Ephraim Wilton .

EPHRAIM WILTON. I live in the New-way, Westminster . My breeches hung at the door, in the passage. On the 7th of August they were stolen.

CATHERINE WILTON . I am the wife of the last witness. I was alarmed, went out, and saw the prisoner, Kelsel, about sixty yards off, and took the breeches from him.

GEORGE GERROD . I am a watchman. I live opposite the prosecutor's. I was at my window, and saw the prisoners together. Bartholomew took the breeches, and gave them to Kelsel. I pursued, and took Bartholomew.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

BARTHOLOMEW'S Defence. I know nothing of it.

KELSEL'S Defence. I found them.

BARTHOLOMEW- NOT GUILTY .

KELSEL - GUILTY . Aged 30.

Confined Two Months .

Fourth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180909-216

1276. JOHN WHITE was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of August , one keg, value 6d., and 30 lbs. of butter, value 30s. , the property of James Butler .

JAMES BUTLER . I am a cheesemonger , and live in High-street, Shadwell . On the 12th of August, about five o'clock in the afternoon, I was writing in my counting-house, and heard something move in the shop. I went to the door, missed a keg of butter, and saw the prisoner cross the street with something in a bag. I followed, and seized him. I found it was a keg of butter, and brought him back with it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was employed to carry it.

GUILTY . Aged 37.

Confined Two Months .

Fourth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180909-217

1277. ANN JACKSON was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of August , from the person of John Powell , one pocket-book, value 6d.; one 5l. and seven 1l. bank notes , his property.

JOHN POWELL . I am a tailor , and live in Cumberland street, Shoreditch. On the 4th of August, between five and six o'clock in the afternoon, I was in Brick-lane . I was pushed up a court by several men and women. I had been drinking, but was not drunk. The prisoner pushed me up the passage - I got away as quick as I could. I had been at a public-house close by, and pulled my pocketbook out, which had one 5l. and seven 1l. bank notes in it-the prisoner was there.

JOHN BRUNNINGS . I am a butcher, and live in Union court, Chicksand-street. On the 4th of August, I saw the prosecutor coming along Brick-lane, he appeared to be intoxicated. The prisoner had hold of one arm, and another woman the other. I saw the other woman lean over the prosecutor's shoulder, and whisper to the prisoner, which excited my suspicion. I saw the other woman put her hand into his pocket-nothing was taken at that time. They forced him down Hanover-court; I went to the end of the court, and saw the prisoner pull his pocketbook out. I said, "You shall not rob the man while I am here." Two men came up immediately, and wanted to know what business it was of mine? and asked me why I wanted to hinder the girls from getting a shilling? They kept before me. The prisoner and the other woman rushed out-the men prevented my following her. I told Hardy, and we both followed her - She got away. One of the gang threw half a brick at me. Next day the prisoner was taken. I am sure she is the woman - I knew her before.

MARY GREEN . I live in Hanover-court. I saw the prosecutor in the court with two women, he appeared rather intoxicated. I saw the prisoner attempt to take something out of his pocket. I turned round, and called for assistance. I looked again, and saw the pocket-book in her hand - She handed it to the other woman; they ran out of the court. I am positive she is the woman.

THOMAS HARDY . I live at the corner of Hanover-court. I heard the alarm, saw the prisoner run out of the court, and went after her. I overtook her in Flower and Dean-street, searched her, but found nothing on her, and let her go, as I did not know what had happened. I afterwards heard that she was seen to commit the robbery, and took her next morning.

Prisoner's Defence. I left the prosecutor at the public-house in company with two women; I afterwards saw a mob in the street, and was taken-nothing was found on me. I know nothing of it.

HENRY THORNGATE . I live in George-street, Spitalfields. I was present when Hardy brought the prisoner into the Virginia Planter, public-house. The prosecutor said he was certain she was not the woman who robbed him, for she had a black gown on. Hardy was present. The prosecutor was drunk.

THOMAS HARDY re-examined. I took the prisoner to the Virginia Planter; the prosecutor was not there.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Life .

Fourth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180909-218

1278. ROBERT MARTIN was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of August , 5lbs. of soap, value 4s., and 6lbs of pepper, value 16s. , the property of Thomas Ruddy .

THOMAS RUDDY. I am an oilman , and live in Butcher-row, East Smithfield. The prisoner was my porter ; the articles found on him were mine. The soap is of a particular sort-it was a misboil.

MOSES FORTUNE . I am an officer. On the 3d of August, about ten o'clock at night, I saw the prisoner in White Lion-street, with a bundle on his shoulder; I followed him to Great Prescot-street, and stopped him-the parcel was tied up very carelessly; I asked him what he had there? he said what was that to me; I said I was an officer, and insisted on knowing; he hesitated, and then said he bought it of a poor man, coming along; that he himself was out of employ, and he bought it to make a few shillings of. I found it was soap and pepper, and took him to the watch-house. Next morning he said he found it under the wall of the London Docks.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Confined Six Months .

Fourth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180909-219

1279. JAMES ORMESTON was indicted for embezzling, on the 11th of August , the sum of 16s. 6d. , the monies of William Foot , his master.

WILLIAM FOOT . I am a brewer , and live in Chandler-street, Grosvenor-square; the prisoner was my servant , and employed to take out beer, and receive money for me, and always accounted to me every evening. On the 26th of February he took a firkin of table-beer, and a pin of ale, to Mr. Sidney, No. 5, Mortimer-street; he never accounted to me for it.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not owe me my wages - A. I sent him on Saturday night to receive the money, and told him when he returned I would pay him; he never returned, so that I could not pay him. On Monday when he came, he said Mr. Sidney said the bill was right, but did not pay him.

SUSAN ALLEN . I am servant to Mr. Sidney, who is a dancing-master. On the 11th of August I paid the prisoner 16s. 6d. for Mr. Foot - He gave me a receipt.

MR. FOOT. The receipt is his hand-writing.

GUILTY . Aged 38.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Fourth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180909-220

1280. JOHN HOOPER was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of August , two seals, value 2l.; one watch-chain, value 1l., and one key, value 1d., the property of William Cross , from his person .

WILLIAM CROSS . I am a painter and glazier . On the 22d of August, I was in Dean-street, Westminster, going home; when I got to the corner of Orchard-street , the prisoner snatched my chain and seals, and ran on-the chain broke. I pursued and collared him in St. Ann's-lane, and asked him for my property, he denied having it. I said he must, or else he had thrown it away. A watchman came up, and took him; another watchman brought my chain and seals. I am certain he is the man; he was never out of my sight. Nobody else was in the street.

BENJAMIN TIMBRELL . I am a constable. I heard the cry of stop thief, ran out, and met the prisoner as he was running with the people.

JAMES M'CULLOUGH. I am a watchman. I heard the alarm. I found the chain and seals on the ground.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I saw a man pass me. The prosecutor took me. GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Life .

Fourth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180909-221

1281. WILLIAM BARR was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of September , one time-piece, value 30s. , the property of John Farrand Clarke .

JOHN FARRAND CLARKE. I am a watch-maker , and live in Bethnal-green-road . On the 2d of September, about one o'clock, I was down stairs in the kitchen, I called my brother down to dinner - He left the shop door open. When he went up he gave the alarm; I missed the time-piece, ran out, and saw the prisoner running across the fields. Pitt took him.

JAMES BASHAM . I live near the prosecutor's house. I met the prisoner running in the field with another man; he had something under his coat; he said to his companion, "Here it is." The other said, "Come along." He was taken in a few minutes, and said that he found it in the field-that a man in a fustian jacket had dropped it-his companion had a fustian jacket on. There was no other person in the field.

JOHN WRIGHT . I pursued the prisoner, and took him. In the pursuit I saw one of them drop the time-piece. I picked it up.

CHARLES PITT . I saw the prisoner running, stopped him, and charged him with stealing the time-piece - He denied it.

JOHN HAGGERS . I saw the prisoner running with the time-piece under his coat.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

Fourth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180909-222

1282. ELIZA BAKER was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of July , one pepper-box, value 1l.; one tea-spoon, value 2s., five yards of linen, value 10s., and one gown, value 1s. , the property of William Peter Audsley .

WILLIAM PETER AUDSLEY. I am clerk to a solicitor. The prisoner was employed at my house, in Little Sutton-street, Clerkenwell . On the 4th of July she absconded, and I missed this property.

JOHN RICHMOND . I am servant to Mr. William Sadler , who is a pawnbroker, and lives in Aldersgate-street. On the 4th of July the prisoner pledged five yards of linen with me, for 5s.

ROBERT SALMON . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Bath-street, City-road. On the 4th of July, a woman pledged a tea-spoon with me.

THOMAS MILLER . I am a pawnbroker. On the 4th of July, the prisoner pledged a gown with me.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I beg for mercy.

GUILTY . Aged 38.

Confined Three Months .

Fourth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180909-223

1283. ANN AUSTIN was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of July , one silver medal, value 11s., the property of Josiah Frisk , from his person .

The prosecutor not appearing, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Fourth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180909-224

1284. WILLIAM PENNY was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of July , one shawl, value 5s., the property of Maria Spong , from her person .

The prosecutrix not appearing, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Fourth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180909-225

1285. WILLIAM PRUSSIA was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of July , one watch, value 20s.; one chain, value 3s. 6d., and one seal, value 1s. 6d., the property of Thomas Lear , from his person .

THOMAS LEAR . I am a carpenter . On the 14th of July, about eleven o'clock at night, I was sitting on the steps of my own door, No. 67, York-street , waiting for my wife, who had the key; I fell asleep-my wife awoke me, and I missed my watch. I found my clothes unbuttoned.

ELIZA LEAR . I am the prosecutor's wife. I returned from work about half-past eleven o'clock, and found my husband asleep on the step; I went up stairs, made my bed, and then went down to wake him; I found his clothes unbuttoned, and the prisoner sitting by his side. I told him he had got my husband's watch - He denied it. I gave him in charge. The watch has never been found.

JOSEPH JACKSON. I am a watchman. At half-past eleven o'clock on the night of the 14th of July, I saw the prisoner and another man (not the prosecutor) on the steps, of No. 36, opposite the prosecutor's door, pretending to be asleep. As I came down the other side I met the other man running from the prosecutor. I found the prosecutor's breeches unbuttoned, he missed his watch. I took the prisoner to the watch-house; I found nothing on him.

NOT GUILTY .

Fourth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180909-226

1286. THOMAS JUDD was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of July , from the person of Charles Broadgate , three 1l. bank notes , his property.

CHARLES BROADGATE. I work at a stable . On the 15th of July, I was at the Bull's Head, public-house, in York-street, Westminster ; about ten o'clock at night, I was talking about my servitude, and offered to lay 5s. that I had seen as much service as any man in the place. The prisoner said I was not worth 5s. - I took my three 1l. bank notes out of my pocket, and said, "Will that pay 5s.?" and put them back into my right-hand waistcoat-pocket. I left the company, and went and sat on the other side of the tap-room. I had not sat there above a minute, before the prisoner came over and sat on my left side, then shifted to my right-and said, "Well old man, will you give me a drop of beer;" I said, "I have none to give away." He took up the pot and drank, and then knocked my pipe out of my mouth; as I stooped down to look for it, I found his hand in my pocket - He said he would light me to find my pipe. While he was looking down, the notes fell out of his hand-he picked them up, and went out immediately. I could not stop him; I am sure his hand was in my pocket. I saw no more of him till the 17th of August, when he was taken.

Cross-examined by MR. ARABIN. I believe I was quite sober.

Q. You was sitting with some women - A.No; nobody was with me.

WILLIAM HODGELL . I am a tailor, and lodge at the Bull's-head, public-house. The prisoner and another man were quarrelling about their servitude, and were going to make a bet of 5s.; the prosecutor pulled out three 1l. bank notes - He got up and sat on the same side as I was. The prisoner followed him, and sat on his left side, then shifted to the right. He struck the prosecutor's pipe out of his mouth with one hand, and put the other into his pocket-and said, "I beg your pardon," and took the light to look for his pipe; he let the notes fall, picked them up again, and immediately left the house.

Cross-examined. I did not assist in looking for the pipe.

JOHN BLISSALL . I am a cordwainer. I was in the house, the prosecutor and a soldier were talking about who had seen the most service, and were going to lay 5s.; the prosecutor pulled out three 1l. bank notes, put them into his waistcoat-pocket, and moved to another box-the prisoner followed him. The prisoner broke his pipe; and as he stooped to pick it up, I saw the notes in the prisoner's hand. He immediately left the house without saying a word. The prosecutor said he had lost his money.

Cross-examined. I saw the notes in the prisoner's hand. I thought he meant to come back and return them.

Prisoner. Q. Did I not stop and pay my reckoning - A. The reckoning was paid on the delivery of the beer.

WILLIAM MILLS . I am a constable. On the 17th of August, I apprehended the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutor was very much intoxicated. He said two women robbed him, and was desired not to disturb the company. I went out.

THOMAS BAILEY . I am a basket-maker. I was at the Bull's Head with the prisoner; the prosecutor sat in a box,

apparently asleep, with two women; I awoke him - He accused the women with robbing him; he left the house. I heard nothing about any wager, no notes were produced, the prisoner sat with me all the time.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Transported for Life .

Fourth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180909-227

1287. DANIEL DALE was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of August , two corkscrews, value 5s. , the goods of George Brooks .

JAMES HAZELL . I am servant to Mr. Brooks, an ironmonger , who lives in Mount-street, Grosvenor-square . On the 17th of August, the prisoner came and asked for a pennyworth of nails; while I was counting them, I saw him take the two corkscrews off the counter. I called Staple, he then gave them up.

THOMAS STAPLE . Hazell called me, and said the prisoner had put something into his pocket; he denied it, pulled out a box-lock, and said that was all he had got. He afterwards gave me the corkscrews.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I took them up to look at.

GUILTY . Aged 50.

Fined One Shilling , and Discharged.

Fourth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180909-228

1288. JAMES CROWLAND and JOHN MARONEY were indicted for stealing, on the 21st of July , four live tame fowls, price 6s. , the property of Thomas Underwood .

THOMAS UNDERWOOD . I am a carpenter , and live in Johnson's-street Somers'-town . On the 21st of July, I lost my fowls out of the hen-house in my stable, they were all safe the night before.

THOMAS DALE . I am a watchman. About four o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoners cross Johnson's-street, Somers'-town, without their hats. I followed them, and sprung my rattle-each of them threw away a live fowl, they were stopped; another person caught the fowls. I am sure the prisoners are the boys; Maroney was never out of my sight; another boy was with them, who got away.

HENRY DEMOCK. I am a watchman. I saw the prisoner, Crowland, running up the road with a handkerchief in his hand; he saw me, and threw it away - He was stopped. I took Maroney; there were two fowls in the handkerchief. Crowland claimed the handkerchief.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

CROWLAND - GUILTY . Aged 12.

MARONEY - GUILTY . Aged 10.

Confined Three Months , and Whipped .

Fourth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180909-229

1289. THOMAS BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of July , 70lbs. of lead, value 6s., the property of Alexander, Earl of Norwich, Duke of Gordon , in that part of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, called Scotland, and fixed to his dwelling-house, against the statute .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only for cutting the said lead with intent to steal it.

MARY ANN JOHNSON. I am servant to his Grace the Duke of Gordon. On the 3d of July, I found the lead cut off the roof of the water-closet adjoining Park-lane , it was wrapped up in an apron, and put in the water-closet.

JAMES SALE . I am a watchman. About a quarter after four o'clock in the morning, I was in Park-lane, under the Duke of Gordon's wall, and heard somebody moving; I looked up and saw the prisoner - I asked who was there? he made no reply, but went away whistling in a low tone. I sprung my rattle, the patrol came to my assistance; he got into Green-street, and concealed himself behind a doorpost. I took the prisoner and put him in the watch-house. I returned to the premises, and saw the lead cut off, but could not find it; it was taken off the roof of the water-closet, and put inside, rolled up in an apron. The prisoner was just by the water-closet-door, and looking over the wall when I saw him. I am sure he is the man.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was returning from Chelsea, stopped to tie my shoe up, and was taken.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Fourth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180909-230

1290. ANN THOMAS was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of September , one bonnet, value 10s., and one handkerchief, value 6d. , the goods of John Thomas .

ELIZA THOMAS . I live in Clare-court, Drury-lane . On the 3d of September, I went up stairs and found the prisoner in my room with my bonnet and handkerchief in her hand. She said she came for Mr. Andrews-no such person lived there.

JOHN THOMAS . I am a butcher; my wife called me, I took the bonnet from the prisoner - and reprimanded her for her conduct. She said, unless she was taken into custody she should do something that would hang her, she was quite sober. I know nothing of her.

JOHN MEARS . The prisoner was given into my charge. She said she did it either to be hung or transported.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 22.

Judgment Respited . Sent to the Refuge .

Fourth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180909-231

1291. GEORGE VIRGO was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of June , one saw, value 1s. 6d., and one plane, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of Thomas Shuttleworth .

THOMAS SHUTTLEWORTH . I am a carpenter . On the 28th of June, I was working at Mr. Banes's, in Whitechapel . I was informed that the shop was robbed, and found my saw and plane at Lambeth-street Office, which I left in the shop.

JOHN TILLEY . I am a watchman of Whitechapel. On the 28th of June, at three o'clock in the morning, Mrs. Kew informed me that she saw the prisoner hide a plane under some dung. I went, overtook him, and found the saw under his coat - I asked him how he came by it? he said he saw a poor man put it down in Castle-street, and he picked it up. I took him back to Mrs. Kew; she said he was the man, and gave him in charge.

ANN KEW . I live in Castle-street, Whitechapel. Between two and three o'clock in the morning, my child fell out of bed; I went to the window, and saw the prisoner hide something under the dung-hill - I told the watchman; he found the plane there,

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I found the saw, but know nothing of the plane.

GUILTY . Aged 52.

Transported for Seven Years .

Fourth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180909-232

1292. CHARLES RAY was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of August , three shirts, value 30s.; three waistcoats, value 12s.; six pair of stockings, value 6s., and ten handkerchiefs, value 8s., the goods of Joseph Benjamin Neale , from the person of Robert John Neale .

ROBERT JOHN NEALE . Joseph Benjamin Neale is my brother. On the 15th of August, about ten o'clock at night, I was going with his clothes, somebody shoved me at the corner of Red Lion-street, Whitechapel , and pushed my bundle from under my arm - I fell with it. I saw the prisoner pick it up, and run away with it. I got up, another man held me and threw me in the mud, and said it was no use running as he was gone before now. I got up, and called"Stop thief!" the watchman took the prisoner. I am sure he is the man; the articles, stated in the indictment were in the bundle.

JAMES CECIL . I was coming out of my house and heard the prosecutor say there he goes with my bundle. The prisoner was running, he passed me, I followed him through a passage into a little court, where he dropped the bundle. I took him. I am sure he is the man.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I heard the alarm, and was taken.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Three Months .

Fourth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180909-233

1293. RICHARD PRINCE , WILLIAM ROSSITER , and EDWARD STEVENSON were indicted for stealing, on the 24th of August , six quarts of brandy, value 18s.; one bottle, value 1s.; one pint of ginger beer, value 2d., and one other bottle, value 2d. , the property of John Owen .

JOHN OWEN . I keep the Black Lion, public-house, in Vinegar-yard, Drury-lane ; the prisoners are soldiers , and had been quartered at my house for six months. On the 24th of August, about four o'clock in the morning, I heard them up. I got up myself, and at seven o'clock, I found the cellar broken open and the prisoners quite drunk in the tap-room; both the cellar-doors were broken open, and a three gallon bottle of brandy was gone-it was half full the night before. I sent for an officer, he found a bottle of brandy under Prince, who was gone to bed. I found the brandy bottle thrown up into the loft quite empty. Stevenson was so drunk that it took four men to carry him to the office.

GEORGE ODDY . I am an officer. I found the brandy bottle in the bed; Rossiter siad it was Scotch ale. I found another bottle in the bed, under Prince.

NATHANIEL GREAVES . I am a publican. I have compared the brandy with that in the prosecutor's bar, it is the same sort.

(Bottles produced and sworn to.)

PRINCE'S Defence. I got up to clean my clothes; when I returned up stairs, I found the liquor there.

ROSSITER'S Defence. Several people slept in the room.

STEVENSON'S Defence. We found the liquor there.

JOHN OWEN . Nobody else slept in the room.

PRINCE - GUILTY . Aged 41.

ROSSITER - GUILTY . Aged 25.

STEVENSON - GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined Three Months .

Fourth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180909-234

1294. WILLIAM LESTER and JOHN WILLIAMS were indicted for stealing, on the 17th of August , two spoons, value 17s. , the goods of Henry William Smith .

CHARLOTTE SMITH . I am the wife of Henry William Smith , who lives in Orton-street, Islington . On the 17th of August, about one o'clock in the forenoon, the prisoners came to offer some wood for sale - They offered thirty bundles for 1s., the agreed to take them. When I counted them I found only twenty-five, and refused to have them; they threw them down the area two or three times and kept knocking at the door-my servant put the wood up again. I heard somebody go across the parlour, and sent the servant up.

MARY THOMAS. I am Mr. Smith's servant. I saw the prisoner, Williams, go out of the parlour-door with his hand under his coat; he got away. Mr. Benham stopped them.

JOHN ASPLEY . I am a constable. I took the prisoners in charge, but found nothing on them.

NOT GUILTY .

Fourth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180909-235

1295. JAMES LEWIS was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of June , two table-cloths, value 5s. , the goods of Richard Mee Raikes .

BENJAMIN DAVIS . I am butler to Richard Mee Raikes , Esq. who lives in Burlington-gardens . On the 22d of June, about eight o'clock in the morning, I heard somebody in the area, I came out and saw the prisoner running with a bundle under his arm about 16 yards from the gate. I followed, and overtook him; I saw him throw the tablecloths down. I gave him in charge. He said if I would let him go he would never do the like again. I never lost sight of him after I saw him throw it away.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing of them.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined One Month , and Publicly Whipped .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180909-236

1296. THOMAS JONES and JAMES HUNTER were indicted for stealing, on the 23d of July , one telescope, value 16s. , the property of Charles Thomas Nicholas .

GEORGE JOHNSON . I am servant to Charles Thomas Nicholas , who is a broker , and lives at Battle-bridge . On the 23d of July, about five o'clock, I was in the shop, and

observed the prisoner Hunter looking at some old books. I desired him to go away; he put his hand to his hat, as if he wished to speak; I went to him; he asked if I had a spelling-book; I told him I had not; he asked if I should have one by Saturday; I said we might, and he went away. About five minutes afterwards, a boy came and asked if I had lost a telescope; I missed one from the bench in the fore-court, close to the books. I went to the public-house and found the prisoners in custody. The constable produced the telescope. There is no railing to the fore-court.

JOHN HUTT . I am constable of Pancras. I saw the prisoners at Battle-bridge, about half past four o'clock. I observed Jones point to the prosecutor's fore-court to Hunter, who immediately went up. Jones stood at the corner of the wall; Hunter returned, and slipped something under Jones's apron. They separated. I told Goodhall to follow Jones. I followed Hunter, took him about thirty yards off, and asked what business he had up the yard; he made no answer. Goodhall brought Jones back. I searched him, and found the telescope in his breeches. Jones could not be seen in the shop.

JAMES GOODHALL . I am a shoemaker. I was with Hutt, and saw the prisoners go towards the prosecutor's shop. Jones pointed to where the goods were. Hunter went to them, returned, and gave Jones something. I followed Jones, and saw him put something down his right thing. We took him, and found the telescope in his breeches.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JONES - GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

HUNTER - GUILTY . Aged 13.

Confined Two Months .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180909-237

1298. ANN JUTSHAM was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of July , one gown, value 5s. , the goods of William White .

ANN WHITE . I am the wife of William White. We lodge in Dorrington-street, Brooks-market . On the 16th of July the prisoner came to me, and said she was in distress. I gave her leave to sleep with me. She went out about nine o'clock, and never returned. I missed the gown out of a box which she sat on, and found it at Lee's.

WILLIAM SHARP. I am servant to Mr. Lee, who is a pawnbroker. On the 17th of July the prisoner pledged the gown with me for 2s. 6d. I am certain it was the prisoner.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 60.

Confined Six Months .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180909-239

1299. WILLIAM HAWKINS was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of August , two shirts, value 6s. , the goods of Ephraim Benjamin .

PHOEBE BENJAMIN . I am the wife of Ephraim Benjamin, who lives in Playhouse-yard, Golden-lane , and keeps a clothes shop . On the 11th of August, about two o'clock, the prisoner and two other men came to the shop; one of them bought a shirt which came to 11s., he asked leave to go backward, the prisoner went with him. He came back, holding his hands behind him. As soon as he got out, I missed two shirts, which he could reach off the shelf as he went backwards. I ran out, and saw him about twenty yards off, with one under his coat. I took it from him. The officer found the other in his breeches.

RICHARD FALLSHAW. I am a constable. Benjamin gave the prisoner in my charge. I found the shirt in his breeches.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The other man gave it to me.

GUILTY . Aged 38.

Confined Six Months , and publicly Whipped .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180909-240

1300. MICHAEL DONOVAN was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of July , one coat, value 5s. the goods of James Parsons .

JAMES PARSONS. I am a coach-lace-maker , and live in Long-acre . On the 16th of July I was at dinner in the back parlour, when I saw the prisoner come in, take my coat off the counter, and go out. I followed and took him. he dropped it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Whipped , and Discharged.

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180909-241

1301. HENRY BLYGHTON and HENRY HART were indicted for stealing, on the 28th of August , two half-crowns and one penny, the monies of John Spencer , from his person .

JOHN SPENCER . I live at the King's Arms, in the Kent-road. On the 28th of August I was at the lock-up house in Worship-street , charged with not paying the turnpike toll. I had two half-crowns, three shillings, and a penny-piece in my waistcoat-pocket. I had sent home for some money to pay the fine. The prisoners were confined in the same place with me. I was sober. I went to sleep about two o'clock in the afternoon, as I had been out all night with my master's chaise. I felt somebody touch my waistcoat while I was asleep, and asked what it was; Blyghton, who was next to me, said it was a dog. I went to sleep again; when I awoke I found my pocket turned inside out, and missed my money. There was another man in the watch-house. I said I had lost two half-crowns and a penny, and one of the three must have them. The man produced his money. The officer found a half-crown in each of the prisoner's mouths.

THOMAS GARTON. I am an officer of Worship-street. I searched the prisoners, and found each of them had a half-crown in his mouth. I had searched them before, and they had no money.

BLYGHTON'S Defence. I found it.

BLYGHTON- GUILTY . Aged 13.

HART - GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180909-242

1302. GEORGE WALTON was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of August , one hat, value 8s., the goods of William Croxford , from his person .

WILLIAM CROXFORD. I am a sawyer , and live in Somers'-crescent, Somers'-town. On the 18th of August, about eleven o'clock at night, I was returning home, felt myself very ill, and leant against a railing in Tottenham-court-road . I was quite sober. The prisoner came up, snatched my hat off, and ran away. I pursued, calling out "Stop thief!" He was stopped in Windmill-street. I am certain he is the man. I saw him throw my hat under the coaches on the stand. I returned to look for it, but have never found it.

CHARLES DE VERGOULD. I was at the corner of Store-street, heard the alarm, and saw the prisoner and prosecutor running. I stopped the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Publicly Whipped , and Discharged.

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180909-243

1303. SARAH WOODMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of July , one ring, value 15s. the property of Abraham Smith .

ABRAHAM SMITH. I am a timber merchant , and live in Beech-street. I have a house at Edmonton ; the prisoner was my cook there. I lost the ring out of my waistcoat-pocket. She left my service.

JOSHUA ARMSTRONG. I am an officer. On the 1st of September I went with a search-warrant to the prisoner's lodgings, and found several duplicates on her, one of which related to the ring. She said it fell out of her master's pocket while she was brushing his waistcoat.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Fined One Shilling , and Discharged.

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180909-244

1304. DAVID MULKINS was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of August , one sheet, value 5s. the goods of Barney Lopez .

BARNEY LOPEZ. I live in Nightingale-lane . The prisoner took a bed at my house for one night. There were five beds in the room; four other persons slept there. At eight o'clock next morning he went away, and appeared rather bulky. I missed a sheet off the next bed to his. I followed and caught sight of him in half an hour, and found the sheet at the pawnbroker's.

WILLIAM SAVAGE . I am servant to Murray and Co. pawnbrokers. On the 17th of August, about ten o'clock, Lazarus pledged the sheet with me.

LEVY LAZARUS . I live in Crown-street, East Smithfield. I bought the sheet of a man whom I do not know.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

NOT GUILTY .

Fourth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180909-245

1305. JOHN MASON and JAMES CLUFF were indicted for stealing, on the 31st of July , one umbrella, value 5s. , the goods of Charles Andrew Carter .

GEORGE CARTER . I am George Andrew Carter's brother; he is a butcher , and lives in Gray's-inn-lane-road. On the 31st of July I was coming up stairs when the officer brought the prisoners and the umbrella in, which was safe in the shop just before.

JOSEPH CADBY . I am a constable. I watched the prisoners through Pentonville and Somers'-town and back again. Their conduct excited my suspicion. I saw Mason go into Carter's shop. Cluff stood close by. He came out in about three minutes with the umbrella, and went up to Cluff. Taylor and I secured them.

GEORGE TAYLOR . I was with Cadby. We watched the prisoners in company together for an hour. Mason went in and brought the umbrella out. We took them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

MASON - GUILTY . Aged 20.

CLUFF - GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180909-246

1306. ANN M'DERMOT was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of July , one watch, value 30s.; one seal, value 1d., and one foreign coin, value 3d., the goods of William Harvey , from his person .

WILLIAM HARVEY. I am a shoemaker , and live in Fell-street, Wood-street. On the 6th of July, between twelve and one o'clock at night, I met the prisoner in Old-street , she fell into conversation with me. I missed my watch, and gave her in charge. The watchman found it on her. I did not give it to her. I had left Oxford-street at five o'clock.

Q. Where had you been from five to twelve o'clock - A. I had been to two or three public-houses.

WILLIAM BROWN . I am a watchman. I saw the prisoner and the prosecutor in Anchor-court, Old-street, quarrelling together. He said she had taken his watch. She denied it. I found it on her. The prosecutor appeared intoxicated.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. He gave it to me.

NOT GUILTY .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180909-247

1307. MARY JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of July , two shirts, value 2s.; one handkerchief, value 5d.; five yards of linen, value 4s., the goods of Thomas Norris ; one gown, value 2s., and one habit-shirt, value 6d. , the goods of James Warren .

MARY NORRIS. I am the wife of Thomas Norris, who lives in White-hart-yard, Drury-lane . James Warren's wife was my servant. On the 10th of July, about twelve o'clock at noon, I met the prisoner on the stairs, with something in her apron; I asked her what she wanted? she said she went up to see where Mrs. Smith was-(we had no lodgers). I found the articles stated in the indictment in her apron, which were in a room on the first floor.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 32.

Confined Six Months .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180909-248

1308. GEORGE HAY was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of July , one pair of boots, value 5s. , the goods of Andrew Wright .

ANDREW WRIGHT. I lodge in Fetter-lane -the prisoner had been servant to Messrs. Mount and Co., of Seething-lane, in which house I am a partner; I used to send him

occasionally to my lodgings. On the 19th of July I missed a pair boots.

Prisoner. Q. Did you allow me any wages - A. He was to live with us till he got a situation - We paid his lodging.

MOSES FORTUNE. I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner on the 19th of July. When I took him, the prosecutor claimed the boots which he wore.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. They used to supply me with wearing apparel. I borrowed the boots of him, intending to return them. The friendship subsisting between us induced me to make so free.

NOT GUILTY .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180909-249

1309. JANE GRAHAM and ELIZA ALLEN were indicted for stealing, on the 27th of July , from the person of William Tournay , one watch, value 5s.; one chain, value 2s.; five promissory notes for payment of and value 1l. each, and one 1l. bank note , his property.

WILLIAM TOURNAY. I live at Margate. On the 27th of July, I was in town, about eleven o'clock at night. I and Rooks were near St. Clement's church ; I had been drinking, but was not intoxicated. We met the prisoners - I went to some stones by the church-yard for a necessary purpose. I fell over one of the stones; while I was down, the prisoners picked my pocket of my watch and money. I called out for help. Rooks came and asked me what was the matter? the prisoners said that two men had just left me. I am certain no person was near me but the prisoners. I had not been in company with any person before, and am certain my watch and purse were in my pocket. The prisoners were taken to the Temple-tap. Allen pretended to be tying up her stocking, and put the watch under the seat.

WILLIAM ROOKS . I am Tournay's shipmate. I was in his company from six o'clock; we were at two public-houses - He was rather intoxicated, I was quite sober. When we got by the Temple-tap, we met four women; one of our shipmates, who was with us, went in with one of them, but not with the prisoners; Tournay and I waited at the door for him-the prisoners asked us to treat them. I went in and treated them, Tournay did not go in. When I came out Tournay went over to the stones - He was gone sometime. The prisoners asked me what I was waiting for? I said I was waiting for him, and told them where he was; they went over to him. In a few minutes he called for help, and I went over. They told me two men had just run away from him. I am certain no other person went to him - I had him in sight all the while - He missed his watch and purse. I took the prisoners into a public-house, under the pretence of treating them. I saw a watchman, and told him to come in, which he did. I then told them they must be searched. Allen pretended to tie up her stocking - I saw her take the watch, and put it under the seat - I gave her in charge. The purse was not found.

JOHN HAWKES . I am constable of the night. I searched the prisoners, but found nothing on them. There was no woman to search them.

(Watch produced and sworn to.)

ALLEN'S Defence. I never saw the man.

ALLEN - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

GRAHAM- NOT GUILTY .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180909-250

1310. JOHN PORTER was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of July , one handkerchief, value 1s., the goods of William Mason , from his person .

WILLIAM MASON. I am a clerk in the Adjutant-General's Office. On the 6th of July, at eight o'clock at night, I was in Crawford's-passage, Clerkenwell - I felt a jerk at my pocket, turned round, and seized the prisoner. No other person was with him. A gentleman came up, and said he saw him throw my handkerchief on the ground - I then saw it lying about a yard from him - He begged forgiveness. As I was taking him to the office, he made a great resistance. I was obliged to put him in the watch-house.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A boy was between me and the gentleman.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Life .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180909-251

1311. JOHN BOOTE was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of March , one jacket, value 10s. , the goods of Henry Norris .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating it to be the property of James Martin .

JAMES MARTIN . I am a riding-master , and live in Mambleton-place, Burton-crescent , the prisoner was my hostler . On the 25th of March I missed the jacket.

JOHN COLLINS . I am a constable of Marylebone. I took the prisoner into custody. I found several duplicates on him, one of which referred to the jacket, and flash notes to the amount of 30l. on the Devon Bank; some filled up, and some blank.

WILLIAM CREE . I am servant to Mr. Dunball, who is a pawnbroker, and lives in Skinner's-street, Somers'-town. On the 25th of March the prisoner pledged the jacket with me.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. It was given to me to take care of.

GUILTY . Aged 34.

Transported for Seven Years .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180909-252

1312. THOMAS GARDNER was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of June , from the person of William Ellis Gosling , one pocket-book, value 3s.; one half-sovereign, and one 1l. bank note his property.

WILLIAM ELLIS GOSLING, ESQ. I am a banker , and live in the Strand. On the 25th of June I was in Bear-street, Leicester-fields , at the time of the election, about half-past four o'clock, looking at the state of the poll, which was up in a shop-window, and felt somebody touching my right-

hand coat-pocket. I turned round, and saw the prisoner with my pocket-book in his hand. I charged him with taking it, which he denied. I took him into a shop, and sent for a constable. I am certain he is the man. When I was in the shop I said I saw it in his hand - He then took another pocket-book out of his pocket, quite different from mine, and said that was the one I had seen, but it was not. While we were in the shop a footman brought my pocket-book in, and said he picked it up. There was a 1l. note in it.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. It was at the close of the poll. There was not half a dozen persons at the window. I am certain it was my book that I saw in the prisoner's hand. Mine was red morocco-the one he produced was brown russia.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Life .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180909-253

1313. THOMAS CHAPMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of August , three beds, value 16l.; six pillows value 2l.; three bolsters, value 2l.; 12 blankets, value 4l.; two rugs, value 7s.; one carpet, value 30s.; one table, value 1l.; one fender, value 3s.; one set of fire-irons, value 4s., and three kettles, value 10s. , the goods of John Rolls .

JOHN ROLLS. I am in the employ of Benjamin Hodges and Sons, who are distillers. On the death of my wife I gave up house-keeping, and took a house, No. 6, Lisson-street, Lisson-grove -the articles stated in the indictment were among the property there; the person whom he took the house of is dead. The prisoner came into possession of it at the latter end of last year, and lived in it-my property remained there, locked up in two rooms; I had the keys. I had agreed to pay him 4s. per week for the rooms. I lived at Westminster. In consequence of information, I applied at Marlborough-street office on the 13th of August, got an officer, and went and found the house empty, no person was there, nor any furniture.

Q. In what state did you find your two rooms - A. The door of the outer room was opened, and the articles stated in the indictment gone - They were all safe on the 14th of June, when I saw the prisoner, and paid him the rent; I have never found any of it. About the 17th of August the prisoner was apprehended. My property was worth above 50l.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Between the 14th of June and the 13th of August, you do not know how the property might have gone away - A. No; I belive he let part of the house out.

FRANCIS KNIGHT . I am a shoemaker. The prisoner gave me leave to work in the house; I went there on the 15th of June, there was nothing but five chairs in his apartments-the prosecutors doors were shut. I left on the 21st of June. While I was there the prisoner carried two chairs away.

JAMES GREENOP . I am a milkman. Between five and six o'clock in the morning, from the 15th of July to the 21st, I met the prisoner on different mornings going down the New-road, one morning he had a green fender and a set of fire irons; another morning I met him with a bed tied up in a blanket; at another time with a basket. He came in a direction from Lisson-street.

Cross-examined. Q. What part of the New-road did you meet him in - A. Between Gloucester-place and John-street.

Q. What business was he - A. I believe he was a broker. I knew he once lived in Lisson-street, but had left the house, which made me suspect him.

JOHN BLACK . I am a baker, and live opposite to No. 6, Lisson-street. The prisoner removed his own furniture before Midsummer day. On the 10th of August, about nine o'clock at night, my wife called me, I saw the prisoner come out of the house with a large bundle under his arm; I went to him, and said, "You d-d rascal, you have been robbing the house, I will charge the watch with you." He immediately ran away as fast as he could. I called the watch, but he escaped. The prisoner knew me very well.

THOMAS COOK . I lived with the prisoner, he left the house before quarter-day, and took his furniture with him.

Cross-examined. I have not been in the house since February.

Q. Was you not his partner - A. No; cards were printed in our joint names, without my leave. I had a key of the house; nobody could get at it.

JOHN COLLINS . I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner on the 17th of August. He said he would go quietly, if I would let him walk without holding him. When I took him he said he knew it was about some furniture; he afterwards said, "This can be made up, let us go to a public-house and have some beer." I refused.

Prisoner's Defence. It is a spiteful prosecution. I am innocent.

GUILTY . Aged 48.

Transported for Seven Years .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180909-254

1314. JAMES JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of September , one pair of shoes, value 2s.; one gown, value 7s.; one apron, value 6d.; one shawl, value 5s., the property of Abraham Burrows ; and one jacket, value 10s., and four knives, value 2s. , the property of Thomas West .

MARY BURROWS . I am the wife of Abraham Burrows. On the 12th of September I was at Shadwell, and met an acquaintance with the prisoner; I took him to my room to keep him out of the street, as he said he had no where to sleep; in the morning he left with my things.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. You are a common woman of the town - A. Yes; my husband is living, my acquaintance went home with me.

THOMAS WEST. I am a mariner . I went home with Burrows; the prisoner slept in the room. I awoke about eight o'clock in the morning, and missed my jacket.

JOHN SWINGLAND . I am a patrol. On the 2d of September, about half-past four o'clock in the morning, the prisoner passed me in Cannon-street - road, with something concealed under his jacket. I stopped him, and asked him what it was? he said it was a gown, and that a girl gave it to him instead of some money she had robbed him of. I found a pair of shoes in his pocket.

WILLIAM SUMMERS. I am a headborough. I found the prosecutor's jacket on the prisoner's back.

FRANCIS JACKSON. I searched the prisoner at the watch-house, and found a shawl in his hat, and five knives. He said they were his own.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I found myself alone in the night and missed my waistcoat, which had 10s. in the pocket.

GUILTY . Aged 42.

Fined One Shilling , and Discharged.

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180909-255

1315. CATHERINE ADAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of August , two copper medals, value 1d.; five shillings, two sixpences, and 81/2d. in copper money, the property of Thomas Gordon , from his person .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating them to be the property of Lewis Levi .

THOMAS GORDON . I am the toll-collecter at Nine Elms . On the 12th of August, between twelve and one o'clock at night, I was asleep in a chair in the toll-house; I was awoke, found the prisoner in custody, and my money gone out of my apron pocket. I knew nothing of her.

HENRY RICHARD BUCKERIDGE . I am a patrol, and belong to Bow-street. On the 12th of August, between twelve and one o'clock in the morning, I was returning home to Little Chelsea, I saw the prisoner in company with a man, and listened to their conversation; she went towards the turnpike, before she got there she tried the gate of a house, but could not open it. She went to the toll-house, and said, "Halloo, tollman, have you got any porter?" He made no answer; she then went on. I passed her, stood at the corner, and heard her say, if you will give me two-pence I will get some porter, I have got the rest; they are up at the Princess of Wales, which is about two hundred yards off. Hearing no answer, I came back, and stood where I could see her and the prosecutor; she put her hand into his apron pocket, and took something out; she made use of a very indecent expression, and said, I shall go and get the porter, and immediately come to the door. I took her, and said she had been robbing the man; she said she had not. He awoke while I was struggling with her. I found five shillings, two sixpences, and 81/2d. in copper, an old halfpenny, and a pocket piece, in her hand. The man said he could swear to the old halfpenny, the pocket-piece, and a crooked halfpenny.

THOMAS GORDON re-examined. I never saw the prisoner before. I can swear to three of the copper pieces, having had them sometime. I lost the monies stated in the indictment.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going to Fulham to receive 8s., I saw Gordon at eight o'clock, very drunk, he gave me the crooked halfpence to get some porter, the publican would not take them; as I returned I went to the tollhouse, and tried to awoke him, as I came out I was taken.

JOHN MANSHIP. I am toll-collector at Kensington, and lodge opposite the turnpike-gate. I was standing at my door, and saw several things go by without paying; I also saw a man go into the toll-house afterwards; I told a gentleman I would go and see if there was any money, as the man might take it. I went in and awoke the prosecutor, I could only hear halfpence rattle in his apron, I could hear no silver rattle-this was at ten o'clock at night; he could not have taken 5s. from that time until one o'clock. Next morning he told me he had lost 5s. in copper; I said I had taken it over to my lodgings to take care of - He was very drunk.

NOT GUILTY .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180909-256

1316. ROBERT WHEELHOUSE was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of August , four casks, value 4s.; 250lbs. of butter, value 10l.; 53lbs. of honey, 2l.; and 26 hams, value 8l. the property of Claus Frederick Huttman .

CLAUS FREDERICK HUTTMAN. I am a dealer in provisions , and live in Great Prescot-street, Goodman's-fields. On the 31st of August, at night, my warehouse in the Tenter-ground was broken open, and the articles stated in the indictment taken out.

RICHARD PLUNKETT . I am beadle of Whitechapel. On the 31st of August, about eleven o'clock at night the prosecutor came to the watch-house, I went with him to Chamber-street, Goodman's-fields; as soon as we got to the corner we heard the cry of watch; I immediately ran down the street, and saw the prisoner in custody of another man, who charged him with stealing the butter. I took him into the Red Lion, public-house, searched him, and found the key of a street-door on him, which the prosecutor said would open his warehouse. I took him to Lemon-street. I asked him where he lived, he said over the water, but he could not exactly say where; I asked where he slept the night before? he said on this side of the water. I put him in the watch-house. I got information of the property, and went to Duke's Head-court, Chamber-street, knocked at the door twice, a female asked who was there? I asked who lived there, she said Wheelhouse. I said I wanted to speak to her, as her brother was in trouble; she refused, saying she was in bed. I tried the key, it opened the door; I found his mother there, also two casks of butter, one of honey, and two sacks of hams, containing twenty-six, which I took to the watch-house.

WILLIAM HOLMES. I am a bootmaker, and live at No. 28, Chamber-street. I was standing at my door, and saw the prisoner coming towards me on the left-hand side, and three or four others on the right. I saw the prisoner speak to one man, who was loaded; one of them said to the prisoner go on; the prisoner crossed the street, and ran-each of them went on; the last man let a tub of butter fall, it struck me on my right arm. He went away, leaving it in the kennel. They were all loaded, except the prisoner. The landlord took the butter into my lodgings, and the prosecutor claimed it. I said I knew one of the party; the prisoner passed the door at the time, I said here is the man that I saw speak to the persons who were loaded. My landlord asked him if he knew any thing of the butter? he said No. I went for Plunkett, returned, and found the prisoner in the custody of my landlord. When I saw the prisoner run he went down Duke's Headcourt; I did not see the others go down the court. About an hour after I found the property there.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence When I went home my mother informed me a man had left the things there, and I was to meet him at a public-house; as I was going, I was taken.

GUILTY . Aged 37.

Transported for Seven Years .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180909-257

1317. SAMUEL WILLIAMS and WILLIAM SAWYER were indicted for stealing, on the 3d of September , one basket, value 1d., fourteen penny-pieces, and sixtyone halfpence , the monies of George Sharpley .

MARTHA SHARPLEY . I am the wife of George Sharpley, we keep the White Horse, public-house, at Old Ford . On the 3d of September, about half-past ten o'clock in the morning, the prisoner, Williams, came and asked me where Mr. Gordon lived; I said I did not know. Soon-after, I missed a basket containing 3s. and 81/2d. in copper, out of the drawer.

THOMAS ARNOLD. I am a cloth dresser. I saw the prisoners sitting against a wall, another boy came out of the White Horse with something in his blue apron; the prisoners got up and walked away with him. I went in to inform Mrs. Sharpley, she missed her halfpence, and I sent some men after the prisoners; they took them.

RICHARD DAVIS . I pursued, and took Sawyer with a blue apron in his hand, which had the basket of copper in it.

BENJAMIN GOWER . I took Williams.

SAWYEY'S Defence. I found the bundle in the road.

NOT GUILTY .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180909-258

1218. SAMUEL WEBB was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of August , one shirt, value 6s., and one pair of shoes, value 3s. , the goods of Thomas State .

THOMAS STATE. I am a hair-dresser , and live in Golden-lane, the prisoner was my servant . On the 15th of August, I saw him come out of my bed-room; I found my drawer open, and a shirt gone. He said he had not got it; I gave him in charge. The prisoner opened his tobacco-box, and asked me to take some; I found the duplicate of the shirt in it.

EDWARD FULLER. I am a pawnbroker. I took the shirt in pledge of the prisoner on the 15th of August.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 53.

Confined One Month , and Whipped .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180909-259

1319. ELIZA WIGGETT was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of July , one umbrella, value 5s.; one shawl, value 2s.; one pair of bellows, value 3s., and one handkerchief, value 2s. , the property of Mary Johnson , widow .

MARY JOHNSON. I keep a chandler's-shop at Somers'-town . I took the prisoner into my service till the 10th of July, during which time I missed the articles stated in the indictment. She said she was engaged in Lord Brownlow's family.

WILLIAM NORRIS. I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner at Hoxton, and found three duplicates of the property in her tea-chest, and the handkerchief on the shelf.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. She lent me the handkerchief.

GUILTY . Aged 51.

Confined Three Months .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180909-260

1320. WILLIAM WATERS and JOHN HURLOCK were indicted for stealing, on the 19th of July , one saw, value 2s., the goods of John Davis ; four saws, value 5s.; one chisel, value 6d.; one screw-driver, value 1s.; one hammer, value 2d., and one coat, value 6d. , the goods of James Braine .

JOHN DAVIS. I am a bedstead-maker , and lives at Leipzic Cottage, City-road . On the 19th of July, about nine o'clock in the morning, I found my shop broken open, and the articles stated in the indictment gone.

GEORGE JAMES BRAINE . I am Mr. Davis's journeyman . I missed the things out of the shop.

THOMAS MAYHEW. I am a patrol of Bow-street. On the 19th of July, about a quarter after three o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoners come from Leipzic Cottage, and walk down the City-road; one of them appeared bulky round the body. I secured Hurlock; the things fell from under his coat. Williams run away.

JOHN AVERY. I am a Bow-street officer., I was with Mayhew, and saw the prisoners come from the back of Leipzic Cottage, each had a great-coat on, and appeared bulky; Mayhew took Hurlock, and I took Waters-the saw fell from his back; he slipped his arms out of his coat, and ran off. I followed, and took him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

WATERS'S Defence. I saw Hurlock looking at the things; he asked me to carry the coat and saw for him.

HURLOCKS'S Defence. I found them among some rubbish.

WATERS - GUILTY . Aged 20.

HURLOCK - GUILTY . Aged 52.

Transported for Seven Years .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180909-261

1321. JOHN WILSON was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of July , one copper boiler, value 5s. , the goods of William Allen .

WILLIAM ALLEN. I keep the Portland Arms, public-house, in Upper Berkley-street . On the 30th of July, about a quarter before ten o'clock at night, I missed the copper boiler out of my kitchen.

WILLIAM RUSSELL . I am a watchman. I was at the corner of Upper Berkley-street, about a quarter before ten o'clock at night, the prisoner passed me with a basket. I heard the alarm, and ran after him; he threw the basket down. I picked it up, and found the boiler in it.

BENJAMIN RUSSEL . I am a watchman. I saw the prisoner come out of the prosecutor's house with the basket in his hand; I ran after him, he threw it down. I secured him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing of it.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180909-262

1322. JOHN VICKERS was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of July , fifty-one knives, value 6s., and one spoon, value 6d. , the goods of Thomas Alto .

THOMAS ALTO . I keep the Rose, public-house, in Frog-lane, Islington . On the 15th of July, the prisoner came and had a pint of beer at my house; he left, and returned in about a quarter of an hour with a woman, he had some more and went away. In about half an hour I missed the knives. I went out, and overtook him with two women; he had the knives tied up in his neck-handkerchief. I gave him in charge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The women gave them to me to carry.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined Three Months .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180909-263

1323. SOPHIA STANLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of September , one tea-caddy, value 5s., and one tabacco-box, value 6d. , the goods of Thomas Beeley .

THOMAS BEELEY. I am a cutler , and live in Red Lion-street, Holborn . On the 1st of September, my servant called me up; I missed the tea-caddy. I sent my boy out, he brought the prisoner back with it; my tobacco-box was in it.

WILLIAM MILLER. I am the prosecutor's servant. I went after the prisoner, and overto