Old Bailey Proceedings, 18th February 1818.
Reference Number: 18180218
Reference Number: f18180218-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace Oyer and Terminer, AND Gaol Delivery for the City of London, AND ALSO The Gaol Delibery For the County of Middlesex, HELD AT Justice hall, in the Old Bailey; ON WEDNESDAY, 18th of FEBRUARY, 1818, and following Days; Being the Third Session in the Mayoralty of THE RIGHT HON. CHRISTOPHER SMITH , LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

Taken in Short-Hand by H. BUCKLER, Basinghall Street,(BY THE AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON.)

London: PRINTED AND PUBLISHED, FOR H. BUCKLER, BY T. BOOTH, 31, St. Andrew's Hill, Doctors' Commons.

1818.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX.

Before the Right Honourable CHRISTOPHER SMITH , Esq. LORD MAYOR of the City of London; Sir Robert Graham , Knt. one of the Barons of his Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir George Sowley Holroyd , Knt. one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir James Burrough , Knt. one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir William Curtis , Bart; Sir John Perring , Bart.; Sir William Leighton , Knt.; John Ansley , Esq.; Sir Charles Flower , Bart., Aldermen of the said City; Sir John Silvester , Bart. Recorder of the said City; John Atkins , Esq.; Samuel Goodbehere , Esq., and William Heygate , Esq., Aldermen of the said City; and Newman Knowlys , Esq. Common Sergeant of the said City, his Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

London Jury.

James Moody ,

Joseph Terry ,

Samuel Willer ,

George Holding ,

Thomas Sorrel ,

Paul Miller ,

David Weatherspoon ,

John Eddels ,

Joseph Adwin ,

Joseph Aspinal ,

Thomas Geary ,

John Robins .

First Middlesex Jury.

John Joseph Stockdale ,

Anthony Portington ,

John Butt ,

Joseph Green ,

Joseph Flight ,

John Wilson ,

Henry Cleaver ,

John Stubbs ,

William Cribb ,

Robert Tyler ,

John George ,

John Smith .

Second Middlesex Jury.

William Shut ,

John Neathercoat ,

Joseph Sergeant ,

Patrick Broughton ,

William Fry ,

Randolph Payne ,

Christopher Allen ,

William Clarke ,

Edward Wallis ,

James Cooper ,

William Reid ,

Allen Cornfoot .

SESSIONS HOUSE, OLD BAILEY, FEBRUARY 18, 1818.

SMITH, MAYOR. THIRD SESSION.

Reference Number: t18180218-1

363. WILLIAM CHAMBERS was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of December , one knapsack, value 3s.; one jacket, value 4s.; one waistcoat, value 2s.; one pair of trowsers, value 3s.; one pair of gaiters, value 1s.; one shirt, value 5s.; six brushes, value 2s.; and two pair of stockings, value 2s. , the goods of William Wilson .

WILLIAM WILSON. I am a private in the Coldstream Regiment of Foot Guards , the prisoner was in the same regiment. On the 4th of December I left my knapsack, which contained the articles stated in the indictment, at a public-house; I went on guard at nine o'clock, I returned at two, and missed it, Hubbard said a man, whom he described, had been for it; before that I had seen the prisoner come out of the back-door, with a bundle under his arm; I ran out and overtook him in York-street, with the bundle, he saw me and dropped it-it contained my things.

JOHN HUBBARD. I keep the house. On the 4th of December the prisoner came in and asked for Wilson's knapsack, saying, that he was confined for abusing the sergeant; I went up to the room with him - He took the prosecutor's knapsack away.

JAMES GILLMAN . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner, and found a stock on him which the prosecutor claimed.

JOHN PAPPER. I am a sergeant in the regiment. I found the knapsack in the privy of the house.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I did not mean to keep them.

GUILTY . Aged 29.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18180218-2

364. JOHN SCOTT was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of December , fourteen wine glasses, value 7s.; one tumbler, value 6d.; one milk-pot, value 2d., and one piece of glass, value 1s. , the goods of Henry Cowley .

HENRY COWLEY. I keep the King's Arms, public-house , in Haughton-street, Clare-market . On the 20th of December, about eleven o'clock, the prisoner came and had some ale at my house - I went out, leaving him in the parlour; as I returned I met him coming from my house, my servant was following him - I stopped him, and took him back; he fell down, and I heard some glass break; I took the articles stated in the indictment from his breeches, and which were taken out of my cupboard - They are mine. I have no marks on them, except on the piece of glass.

WILLIAM CLARKE. I am a constable. I searched the prisoner, and found the glass on him; I also found a knife by his side, which I compared with the marks on the cupboard door, where the glass was taken from-it fitted them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 31.

Confined Six Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

Reference Number: t18180218-3

365. JOHN BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of December , nine saddle-flaps, value 6l., the goods of Edward Adams ; one jacket, value 1l.; one pair of shoes, value 5s.; one coat, value 15s.; one handkerchief, value 2s., and one whip, value 1s. 6d., the goods of William Brown ; and one pair of boots, value 3s. , the goods of James Hall .

JAMES ADAMS. I am the son of Edward Adams, who keeps the White Hart at Crandford-bridge . On the 10th of December, I and Harvey concealed ourselves in the cart-yard; about two o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner go down the rick-yard, he returned in about ten minutes with a bag on his back, we seized him, and he threw it away-it contained nine saddle-skiris, which had been cut off the saddles.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

THOMAS HARVEY . I was with Adams, and took the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I never touched them.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Confined Six Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18180218-4

366. JOHN FITZMAURICE was indicted for feloniously assaulting John Taylor Vaughan , on the King's highway, on the 6th of February , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, one hat, value 1l. , his property.

MR. JOHN TAYLOR VAUGHAN. I am a merchant , and live in Grafton-street. On the 6th of February, about a quarter after six o'clock, I was on the south side of St. James's-place , going to dine with Mr. Calvert there; I received a violent blow on my forehead, which knocked me down; I got up, and called out, stop him - I had seen nobody - I was knocked down again by the prisoner, and lost my senses; upon recovering myself, I saw Mr. Hobson's door open, and asked permission to go in-the servant was at the door - I was so confused that I did not know whether I had my hat on or not when I went in, it was either in my hand or on my head, but I do not know how I came by it. I was very much bruised and confused, and my nose and mouth bled considerably - I have not yet recovered from the effects of it.

MR. EDMUND SEXTON CALVERT. I was in St. James's-place, coming from my uncle's, about a quarter after six o'clock; I saw two men scuffling at a distance, walked up, and saw the prisoner hit Mr. Vaughan, with his hat, on his head - I am certain he is the man-it was Mr. Vaughan's hat, the prisoner had it - He ran away - I pursued. I saw no other man. When I got up to him he threw the hat behind, and fell down, I picked it up, and gave it to Mr. Vaughan; on turning round again I saw the prisoner getting up - He ran off. I overtook him, and secured him. I took him to the watch-house, with assistance.

Prisoner. Q. Was I not drunk - A. When he was on the ground he appeared dead drunk, I did not perceive it before. I do not think he was drunk, he pretended it. He was not two yards from me. He ran up St. James's-place, towards the Park, the gates were locked, and he could not get out. I lost sight of him, but will swear he is the man.

GEORGE NATHANIEL TENNANT. I am servant to Mr. Hobson, of St. James's-place. I was opening the door, about a quarter after six o'clock, and saw the prisoner strike Mr. Vaughan, with his right hand, in the face, Mr. Vaughan staggered and fell - I heard him faintly call out, stop! the prisoner struck him again with his hat about his head; Mr. Vaughan called out murder several times. I ran after the prisoner towards Lord Spencer's house; he could not get out, the gate being shut.

Q. When he ran up St. James's-place, did you see any person come in from St. James's-street - A. Yes; when murder was called. If the prisoner had ran towards St. James's-street he must have been stopped; he was not intoxicated. When I ran up he had fallen down, and Mr. Calvert stood over him. I saw a hat on the ground about the time that the blows were given, but I do not remember seeing the prisoner pick it up. He struck Mr. Vaughan with his fist.

Jury. Q. You never lost sight of him - A. I did not see him throw the hat away; Mr. Calvert was before me.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been drinking, and got intoxicated; as I was going home a man pretended to assist me, and put his hand into my pocket, I ran after him, mistook Mr. Vaughan for him, and struck him - I found out my mistake, and ran off.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18180218-5

367. ROBERT GREENFIELD was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Davenport , about eight o'clock in the night of the 5th of February , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein three knives, value 3s. , his property.

WILLIAM DAVENPORT. I am a cutler , and live in Queen-street, Westminster . On the 5th of February, between seven and eight o'clock at night, on my coming home my daughter gave me information, I ran out and saw the prisoner at a hatter's window in Tothill-street, about three hundred yards off-there were several others looking at my knives, which the prisoner had in his hand - I seized him and another, and saw him drop the knives out of his hand. I gave him in charge.

ISABELLA DAVENPORT. I am the daughter of the last witness. About seven o'clock I heard a noise at the door, I came down, saw the boys round the window, and a pane of glass broken; I saw the prisoner put his hand in and take out the knives. I did not see the window broken. I am certain the prisoner is the boy. I had seen the glass safe half an hour before.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I did not do it.

GUILTY. Aged 14.

Of Stealing, but not of the Burglary .

Confined Six Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

Reference Number: t18180218-6

368. WILLIAM SAYERS , ANTHONY PARIS , and THOMAS JONES were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Joseph Green , about eight o'clock in the night of the 7th of February , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein six pair of bellows, value 20s. , his property.

JOSEPH GREEN. I live in Cannon-street, St. Georges's in the East . On the 7th of February, about seven o'clock at night, I went out, I returned in about three-quarters of an hour, and missed six pair of bellows off the shelf. I shut the door after me when I went out-nobody can open the door without the bell ringing; next day Lewis brought them to me.

THOMAS GREEN . I am the son of the last witness; he went out, leaving me and two others in the parlour behind the shop. I never heard the bell ring; it might not ring if the door was opened softly. When my father returned he missed the goods. They must have entered at the door.

HOWARD LEWIS. I live in Cable-street, St. George's, and am a salesman. On the 7th of February, about eight o'clock at night, the prisoner, Sayers, brought a pair of bellows to my shop to sell; while I was looking at them the other two prisoners came in with the remainder; suspecting them to have been stolen, I sent for an officer.

JAMES FAIR . I am an officer. I took the prisoners in charge at Lewis's shop.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

SAYERS' Defence. They were given to us to sell.

SAYERS - GUILTY. Aged 15.

PARIS - GUILTY. Aged 14.

JONES - GUILTY. Aged 15.

Of stealing, but not of breaking and entering .

Confined Six Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr.Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18180218-7

369. ROBERT BISHOP was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Byles , about eleven o'clock in the forenoon of the 1st of February , at Ickenham (no person being therein), and stealing therein one coat, value 18s.; one watch, value 2l.; one watch-chain, value 6d., and one key, value 1d , his property; and THOMAS GREGORY was indicted for feloniously receiving on the same day, at the same parish, one watch, value 2l.; one chain, value 6d., and one key, value 1d., part and parcel of the said goods, well-knowing them to have been stolen .

THOMAS BYLES. I am a farmer , and live at Ickenham . On Sunday, the 1st of February, about eleven o'clock in the morning, I took my wife and family to dine with my father; I locked both the front and back doors, and fastened the windows. I returned a little after four in the afternoon, and found the dairy window open, and the iron bar of the casement broken in - A man could then get in-the dairy door was shut; they had broken a hole in the lath and plaster wall, and got through into the back of the house, gone up stairs, broken another hole through a lath and plaster wall, and crept into my childrens' room, and then into mine; I found the drawers open, and the things in great disorder; I missed my coat, my watch, seal, and key, which hung over the bed. I said nothing about it until I had done my work the next day, I then got Weedon to go with me, and look for the prisoner, Bishop, whom I suspected; we found him at Ryeslip, which is about a mile from my house, I collared him, and told him he must come with me, and took him to a public-house-Weeden went and took Gregory, and brought him to us. We took them both to lckenham. I told Bishop I thought he had better confess it, when he said my great coat was up in about the third tree in a hedge of one of my father's fields, which is about a mile from my house; he took us there, to the third tree, and found it himself - He said he gave my watch to Gregory. I asked him if my dog did not bark at him, when he was at my house - He said, yes.

JAMES WEEDEN . I am a farmer, and live at lckenham. I went with the prosecutor, and found Gregory at a public-house, as soon as I went in he walked out - I took him at the door. As soon as he got to the other public-house he put his hand into his pocket, took out the watch, and dropped it; I told him not to throw it away, and I picked it up - He got from me and ran off, but I overtook him; he said he would not go back with me, and that the property was given to him. I dragged him back to the public-house where Byles was, I pulled the watch out, and asked Byles if it was his, he said it was, Bishop said, "D-n" that watch, I thought it was gone" Gregory said Bishop gave it to him, and he knew Bishop stole it from Byles's house.

WILLIAM BALL . I am constable of the parish of Ickenham. The prisoners and property were given into my charge. Bishop's hat was white, as if it was marked with mortar.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

BISHOP'S Defence. They were given to me; I was at church at the time.

WILLIAM BALL re-examined. I saw both the prisoners at the church door, about ten minutes after eleven o'clock, that morning; in about a quarter of an hour after that I saw Gregory come into the church.

BISHOP - GUILTY. - DEATH . Aged 18.

GREGORY-GUILTY. Aged 16.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Both recommended to Mercy .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

Reference Number: t18180218-8

370. MICHAEL KEEFE was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Francis Mills , about eight o'clock in the night of the 11th of February , at St. James, Westminster, with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein one boot, value 1l. , his property.

FRANCIS MILLS . I am a boot and shoemaker , and rent a house in Portland-place, Soho, in the parish of St. James, Westminster . On Wednesday the 11th of February, at eight o'clock at night, I shut up my shop, and left the door latched, but not locked - I tried it myself, and am positive it was fast-it is a glazed door; I went into the back-parlour, and sat opposite the window which looks into the shop, I could see into it-in about half an hour I heard somebody in the shop, I got off my seat, and saw the prisoner through the window, standing on a chair in the shop, the boots hung over the chair, as soon as he heard me he jumped off the chair and ran out. There was a light in the shop. I immediately pursued and secured him. I missed a boot from over the chair, and found it just outside the door, in the way he ran; I am certain it was safe when I fastened the door-nobody had been in the shop before, I must have heard them if they had. Scoball gave me the boot-it is worth 1l. I never lost sight of the prisoner, and am certain he is the man.

ELIZA SCOBALL. I lodge with Mills. On the 11th of February I heard a noise, came down, and found the boot at the private door.

EDMUND PEPPER. I took the prisoner in charge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A man dropped the boot and ran off, when they took me.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 19.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

Reference Number: t18180218-9

371. JOHN CROFTS was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of February , one basket, value 3s.; one cloth, value 1s. and 30lbs. of butter, value 2l. 5s. , the goods of Samuel Stevens .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating them to be the goods of George Rich.

SAMUEL STEVENS. I am a butter-dealer , and live at Great Missenden, in Buckinghamshire; on the 12th of February I delivered a flat of butter to George Rich , directed to William Stevens, Rose-street, Newgate-market.

GEORGE RICH . I am a carrier. I received the flat of butter from Stevens, and brought it safe to town on Friday-it was to be delivered in Rose-street; when I went to look for it I missed it. I had left it safe in the waggon in Newgate-market . Stevens came up and told me I had lost it - I said I had.

WILLIAM STEVENS. I am a poulterer, and live in Rose-

street, Newgate-market. On the 12th of February, Samuel Stevens (my uncle), wrote to inform me he had sent a flat of butter by Rich's waggon; on Friday morning a watchman came and told me there was a flat of butter directed to me, at the watch-house, and that he had stopped a man with it - I went and found it there. I told the constable there was a note inside for me, I opened the flat and found it there.

DANIEL MAHONEY. I am a watchman. I was calling half-past five o'clock in the morning, and met the prisoner in Cow-lane, with the flat of butter on his head, I thought he was going to the George Inn, he passed the gate, I followed him, and asked him what he had got? he said it was an empty hamper that his father gave him to carry to the Bull Inn, Holborn - He threw it down. I found it heavy, and asked him what was in it, he said, butter; I asked him if his father gave him the butter, he said, no. I told him he was going the wrong way to the Bull Inn, and secured him. It was directed to Mr. Stevens.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A hamper was left every morning at a door in Newgate-street, for me to carry to the Bull Inn, I took this thinking it right

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180218-10

372. GEORGE TOMKINS was indicted for stealing' on the 11th of February , three sixpences, value 18d. , the monies of Robert Potts and William Maurice .

ROBERT POTTS . I am a linen-draper , in partnership with William Maurice , we live on Holborn-hill . On the 11th of February we lost three sixpences out of the till.

MITFORD PATRICK. I am shopman to the prosecutors. While I was hanging the things in the window I heard silver rattle, and looking round I saw the prisoner's arm coming from the till; I took hold of him, and shook three sixpences out of his hand. He had no business at the till - He was the porter. He said he did not take them out of the till but off the desk.

Prisoner. I am sorry for it.

GUILTY . Aged 36.

Confined One Month .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180218-11

373. THOMAS WATERMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of January , 96lbs. of pork, value 3l. , the goods of Thomas Taylor and John Lee .

GEORGE LEE . I am a meat-salesman at Newgate-market, in partnership with Thomas Taylor . On the 31st of January I sold the meat to a retail butcher, and put it inside my shop, and left it in the care of Jarman - He delivers the meat; I was outside the shop about eight o'clock, when a person told me to go in, as a man was stealing it - I went in and found the prisoner detained. He said he came from Mr. Wilson, of Blackfriars-road, to fetch his pork. No person of that name had bought any.

JOHN JARMAN. I am servant to the prosecutors. I weighed six sides of pork for Daniel Oakley, a butcher, and hung them on two hooks. At eight o'clock I saw the prisoner going out of the shop with three sides on his shoulder, I asked him where he was going with them, he said, he was going to take them to Mr. Wilson's cart; I told him they belonged to Mr. Oakley; he said it was all right, they were for Mr. Wilson. I told him to hang them up again, as they did not belong to him, and detained him.

Prisoner's Defence. I was employed to fetch it.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180218-12

374. JEREMIAH SHEE was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of February , 13 yards of woollen cloth, value 10l. , the goods of Richard Wells .

HUGH HERON. I am a silk manufacturer. On the 4th of February, between two and three o'clock, I was in Gee-street, and saw the prisoner take a piece of cloth from the stand at Mr. Wells's shop-door - I seized him; when he got about twelve paces from the door he threw it down, and I picked it up.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180218-13

375. MARY SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of February , one watch, value 4l.; one seal, value 35s., and one key, value 5s., the goods of James Webb , from his person .

JAMES WEBB. I am a toll-collector . On the 13th of February, at twelve o'clock at night, I was coming down the Old Bailey , two women passed me, one shoved me on my breast, the other instantly took my watch out of my fob; as I was pursuing I fell down - I do not know who they were, I had not been with them. My watch and the prisoner were brought to me.

GEORGE WOODWARD. I am a Thames Police constable. On the 13th of February, about twelve o'clock at night, I was crossing Ludgate-hill, towards the Old Bailey, and saw the prosecutor come down the Old Bailey, the prisoner, and another girl, met him full in the face, tapped him on the breast, and said, halloo! he told them to be off; the prisoner immediately drew his watch from his pocket, he made a catch at her, but fell in the road, and they ran off; I followed them across Ludgate-hill, through a gateway, up two or three different courts - They parted, and I followed the prisoner into Dolphin-court, which leads into Ludgate-hill; when she got to the dark part of the court she dropped the watch. I still pursued, and took her. I asked her what she had done with the watch - She denied ever seeing it. I told her to come back with me, and see if we could find it; I took her back to the spot, called the watchman to bring a light, and found it down the area. I took it and the prisoner to the prosecutor.

WILLIAM ARLE. I am a watchman. Woodward called to me for a light, and found the watch in the area.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I am not the person.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180218-14

376. JOSEPH KNIPE was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of January , one great coat, value 10s. , the goods of William Hudson .

WILLIAM HUDSON. I am a farrier , and live in Upper Thames-street . On the 26th of January I was in my back shop about ten o'clock, I was alarmed and followed the prisoner along Thames-street, and overtook him about twenty yards off, with my coat on his back - I brought him back and took it from him. I asked him if he had anything else, he said, no. I found a waistcoat in his pocket. I asked him what induced him to go up to my two pair of stairs room, he said that he had an execution in his house, and his wife and family were starving.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I have a wife and three children, and could not get employ.

GUILTY . Aged 58.

Confined Six Months .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180218-15

377. WILLIAM DENCH was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of January , one coat, value 3s. , the goods of John Shearman .

JOHN SHEARMAN . I am carter to Mr. Speechley, of Carter-lane . On the 27th of January, between five and six o'clock in the evening, I was unloading the cart in Carter-lane, and saw the prisoner take my coat from off the back of the horse, and run away; I called out, stop thief! he dropped it, and was stopped. I never lost sight of him.

GEORGE FIEGEHEN. I was passing through Great Carter-lane, on the 27th of January I saw the prisoner lurking about the horse; suspecting him, I watched him, and saw him take the coat off the horse and walk away - I followed. The prosecutor called out, and the prisoner began to run. I took him - He threw the coat away.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 39.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180218-16

378. JOHN SHEFFIELD was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of February , one book, value 4s. , the goods of Edward Simmons .

EDWARD SIMMONS . I am a bookseller , and live in Barbican . On the 12th of February, between eleven and twelve o'clock in the morning, the prisoner came to the window, and looked at the books which stood on the shelf there; he came to the door, I thought he was coming in, instead of which he ran down Princes-street; I followed and gave the alarm, several persons pursued him into Bridgewater-square and Fan-street - I lost sight of him. When I got into the square he was in custody. I missed a book from the window. I am sure he is the boy.

MARY SIMMONS . I am the wife of Edward Simmons. I saw the prisoner with the book in his hand, he came towards the door, and then ran down Princes-street. I am sure he is the man.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I took it up to look at-it dropped out of my hand, they called stop thief; I ran away, being afraid.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined Six Months .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180218-17

379. ANN SEALE was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of November , one tea-caddy, value 9s.; two curtains, value 8s.; one valance, value 4s.; two salt-spoons, value 4s.; one desert-spoon, value 6s., and one pair of sugar-tongs, value 8s. , the goods of Joseph Asbury .

JOSEPH ASBURY . I am a sadler , and live in Whitestreet, Moorfields . I lost the property.

JANE ASBURY. I am the wife of Joseph Asbury. On the 28th of November the prisoner lodged with us, and for four weeks before; on that day we went out and returned in an hour and a half, she said she had been robbed-which I thought was true; about ten o'clock I missed the articles stated in the indictment. She left us, saying, she was going to live with Sir William Blizard. I afterwards found she had my property, and had her apprehended. She gave me two duplicates.

THOMAS WALKER. I am a pawnbroker, and live in Tabernacle-walk. I have a curtain and vallance, a desertspoon, a pair of salt-spoons, and a pair of sugar-tongs, which were pledged with me. The duplicates produced are mine.

THOMAS MOORE . I am a constable. I found the prisoner on the 28th of January, in Bishopsgate-street, concealed in a closet, and found the tea-chest behind her.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. They were given to me.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Confined Six Months .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180218-18

380. FRANCIS BRERETON was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of November , 60 printed bound books, value 10l. , the goods of Thomas Davies , Esq.

THOMAS DAVIES, ESQ. I am a barrister of Lincoln's-Inn , and live in Gray's Inn-square . On my return to town on the 13th of January, I missed about ninety volumes, I applied to Hatton-garden office, and had the prisoner apprehended; he is the son of my laundress, who takes care of my chambers.

WILLIAM WAINWRIGHT . I am an officer. I went to the prisoner's mother's house in Shire-lane, where he lodged, he was not at home-his mother gave me ten duplicates of books belonging to Mr. Davies.

THOMAS HARTLEY . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Drury-lane. I have five books, which the prisoner pledged with me.

JOHN GRANT. I am a pawnbroker, and live in Stanhope-street. I have fifteen books, pledged in two par

cels, on the 1st of October and 7th of November by the prisoner.

WILLIAM HAWKESLY. I am a pawnbroker, and live at Holborn-bars. I have six books pledged by the prisoner on the 6th of September.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180218-19

381. WILLIAMS DICKINS was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Edward Davenport , about one o'clock in the night of the 20th of January , at St. Pancras , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein two sheets, value 28s.; one napkin, value 10s.; one waistcoat, value 10s.; one bag, value 6d.; two aprons, value 1s.; one candlestick, value 6d., and one brass cock, value 6d. , his property.

EDWARD DAVENPORT. I live in Brill-row, St. Pancras. On the 20th of January, I went to bed at twelve o'clock at night, I was the last up, and fastened the doors and windows. I have three lodgers. I got up at half-past seven o'clock the next morning, and found the table-linen, sheets, and other things had been moved, in the room where I slept; in about ten minutes after we found the window open, and the wash-house door had been forced open with a chisel, or something like it-it was then light - I am sure they were fastened when I went to bed. I had not heard any noise. Between eleven and twelve o'clock I saw the property at the office. I sleep in the front room on the ground-floor.

Prisoner. Q. Was there any fastening to the staircase window - A. No, but it was shut down.

JOHN DIMMOCK. I am a watchman in Clerkenwell. On the 21st of January, I was calling two o'clock in the morning, in Hamilton-row, about three-quarters of a mile from the prosecutor's, and saw the prisoner with a bag under his arm; I laid hold of him, and asked him what he had got? he said they were shirts and other things, which he had brought from the country, and he was going to his lodgings in Spafields. The bag contained the articles stated in the indictment.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOSEPH MAY. I lodge in the house. On the 21st of January I observed the staircase window open.

Prisoner's Defence. I did it through the greatest distress.

GUILTY. - DEATH . Aged 17.

Recommended to Mercy .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18180218-20

382. EDWARD JONES was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Matthew Day the elder , about nine o'clock in the forenoon of the 14th of January (he, and others of his family being therein), and stealing therein one salt-holder, value 1l.; one silver fork, value 15s.; and one silver spoon, value 5s. , his property.

MR. MATTHEW DAY , JUN. I am the son of Matthew Day , who lives at Brompton . On the 14th of January, about nine o'clock in the morning, Ann Budd gave me information - I fetched a constable, who took the prisoner into custody.

ANN BUDD. I am servant to Mr. Day. On the 14th of February, about nine o'clock in the morning, I heard the street - door open, ran up, and saw the prisoner coming out at the parlour door - I had seen the street - door fast about five minutes before; I did not hear the door open. I pushed the prisoner back into the parlour, and called for assistance, Buckley came down. Mr. Lee was passing, and took the prisoner, as we could not get a constable.

JOHN LEE . I was passing, and was told a thief was in the house, and that they could not procure a constable. I took him into custody, and was informed that he had an accomplice outside; the prisoner pointed out the accomplice - I took him, and then the prisoner. Mr. Day charged him with entering the house, and moving part of the plate. The articles stated in the indictment laid at one corner of the table; the salt had been emptied out of the cellar on the floor-the things were in great disorder. I found nothing on the prisoner.

ANN BUDD re-examined. I had been in the parlour before. The plate then laid in the usual order-there was no salt on the floor.

THOMAS BUCKLEY . I am servant to Mr. Day. I laid the cloth about nine o'clock for breakfast, put the knives, forks, and salt-cellar as usual, and went up stairs. I heard Budd call, came down, opened the parlour door, and found the prisoner standing by the sideboard-the articles stated in the indictment laid at the corner of the table, and the salt on the carpet. The prisoner said he found the street - door open, and came in to inform us of it. The door opens on the latch.

JOSEPH COOPER . The prisoner was given into my charge. I told him his partner had made a very lucky escape - He said he had. I said he had been successful in getting rid of the key, as it was not found on him, and that it was a bad job for him - He said it was, but he did not care if he got off with six months' imprisonment.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I went in to tell them the door was open.

GUILTY. Aged 16.

Of stealing to the value of 39s., but not of breaking and and entering .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18180218-21

383. JAMES RAM was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Warrener Smart , about eleven o'clock in the forenoon of the 2d of February , at St. Mary, Stoke Newington (Ann, the wife of the said John Warrener Smart, and others of his family, being therein), and stealing therein one pair of sugar-tongs, value 18s., and nine silver spoons, value 4l. , his property.

ANN SMART . I am the wife of John Warrener Smart, who rents a house in Trueman-place , Stoke Newington. On the morning of the 2d of February, about half-past eight o'clock, I remember taking some plate into the kitchen, and leaving it on a table near the window, which was shut and fastened - I missed the articles stated in the

indictment about twelve-the window was still fastened as I had left it. The kitchen door leads into the garden, it was latched, I tried it not two minutes before I left the kitchen. My husband was out from ten until four o'clock, and the servant was up stairs all the while with me.

Cross-examined by MR. MARSHAM. I have only one servant. There is only one kitchen window and one door, which communicates with the passage - You pass through another kitchen into the garden-there is a kitchen on each side of the passage. I have no children. The kitchen door, leading into the garden, was latched, but it could be opened on the outside.

THOMAS ADKINS. I am headborough of Hackney, in the parish of Stoke Newington. On the 2d of February, about eleven o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner coming over a gate, with something coacealed under his coat - He was coming in a direction from the prosecutor's house, and going towards Shacklewell - I followed him, and asked him what he had there? he said, "what do you want?" and ran off; I called out, stop thief! and pursued him. When I first saw him, there was a man waiting at the gate near him-the man said nothing to me; the prisoner ran until he came to Hobson's brick-field, when Newell stopped him. I took him into custody, he had not then got any thing about him.

Cross-examined. Q. How far is the gate from the house - A. About fifty yards, and about 150 or 200 from the brick-field-it is by the road side; the brick-fields are by Shacklewell, there are two or there turnings to them. The prisoner was talking to the man, and they both went away together. I did not pursue the other man.

JOHN NEWELL. I am a brickmaker. I was working in Hobson's brick-field, a little after eleven o'clock, and heard the cry of stop thief, I saw several persons running, the prisoner was the foremost - I was before him, and pursued towards him; when I got within five yards of him I saw him pull his hand from under his coat, and throw several things into the cesspool, they looked like silver they only had two or three feet to fall-there were several different things; I caught him immediately, close to the cesspool, and told Strutton, who came up, what he had done; I held the prisoner while he searched the cesspool, and saw him pull the silver table and other spoons, and sugar-tongs, out. The prosecutor's house is in the parish of St. Mary, Stoke Newington.

Cross-examined. I am sure he is the man. I assisted in taking him to the office; as we went he said, I could not say that he stole the spoons.

THOMAS STRUTTON. I am a brickmaker. I joined in pursuit of the prisoner, and saw Newell take him; I came up just as he took him - He was not in my sight when he threw the spoons away. Newell said, in the prisoner's presence, that he had thrown the spoons into the cesspool; I searched, and found five tea, two table, and two salt-spoons, and a pair of sugar-tongs, all silver, which I gave to Rutterforth.

JAMES TIMMS. I am a brickmaker. I saw Strutton find the things in the cesspool; after he was gone I found a silver tea-spoon in it of the same pattern as the others.

GEORGE RUTTERFORTH. I am a constable. The property was delivered me. The prosecutor's house is in the parish of St. Mary, Stoke Newington.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I ran with the mob, and they took me. I am innocent.

GUILTY. - DEATH . Aged 21.

Of Stealing in the Dwelling-house, but not of breaking and entering .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

Reference Number: t18180218-22

384. MICHAEL SULLIVAN was indicted for feloniously assaulting Henry Frayling on the King's highway, on the 9th of February , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, one watch, value 3l.; one chain, value 1l. 10s.; and one seal, value 12s. , his property.

HENRY FRAYLING . I am a waiter , and live in the Minories. I was in Russell-court, Drury-lane about six o'clock on the 9th of February, and saw the prisoner there selling oranges - I asked the price of one? he said one penny; I took one, threw down a halfpenny, and went on, he said nothing. When I got about 150 yards, he came behind me, seized my ear, said I was a thief, and knocked me down. I got up, he struck me again - A person helped me up, and appeared to take my part. The prisoner knocked me down again, and went across the road back to Russell-court - I missed my watch, I had it safe at four o'clock. I went to Bow-street, got an officer, went back to Russell-court, and took him into custody. I believe two persons struck me.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. I never heard of a reward. Mrs. Goddard fetched the officer, as she said she saw the prisoner take the watch.

Q. On your oath, did not the prisoner ask you for his orange, or the price of it - A. Never. He said I was a thief - I do not think I struck him. I did not quarrel with any other person.

COURT. Q. Did you strike any person that night - A. I do not think I did - I was rather in liquor.

FRANCES GODDARD. My husband is a coach-maker. On the 9th of February I was in Wych-street about six o'clock, passing the Olympic Theatre, and saw the prisoner and prosecutor - the prisoner said he sold him two oranges for three-halfpence-the prosecutor said, "I have given you a halfpenny, and that is enough." The prisoner struck him, and he fell; he got up again-the prisoner went away. A man came up to the prosecutor and lifted him up, he then said he had lost his watch - I had seen it in his hand; he went behind the man who lifted the prosecutor up, and he gave it to him. We went to Bow-street, and got Tribute, the officer. The prosecutor was intoxicated.

Cross-examined. I saw the prosecutor strike the prisoner, it was blow for blow.

WILLIAM CARTER. I live in Hollywell-street. I saw the prisoner strike the prosecutor; another man helped him up, took his watch out, and passed it to the prisoner.

JOHN TRIBUTE. I am an officer, The prosecutor fetched me, and took me to the prisoner. I asked him if he had been quarrelling with the prosecutor about an

orange? he said he was the man. He went willingly with me.

Prisoner's Defence. He took an orange, and threw me down an halfpenny, I asked him for a penny. I ran after him - He struck me several times; I struck him, and went back to the same place I came from.

TIMOTHY BRIANT . I was selling oranges in the same place with the prisoner. The prosecutor took an orange-the prisoner put down his basket and ran after him; he came back, and kept selling his oranges for half an hour, when the officer came, and he said he was the man. Goddard asked if I was the man at first.

JOHN BROWN. I am a sailor. I was going down Drury-lane, the prisoner and prosecutor ran down the street - the prisoner collared him, and asked him for the price of the orange. He struck the prisoner - They fought together for five minutes, the prisoner then walked away. The prosecutor then fought with another man for about two minutes.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18180218-23

385. MICHAEL JONES was indicted for feloniously assaulting George Christian Schlutter on the King's highway, on the 6th of February , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, four half-crowns, value 10s., and 2s. , his property.

GEORGE CHRISTIAN SCHLUTTER . I am a Chelsea pensioner . On the 6th of February, about half-past eleven o'clock, I was going to my lodgings in Tothill-street; I was in Little Pye-street , four or five men came suddenly upon me-the prisoner was one of them; he held my mouth, to prevent my calling out. I am sure he is the man - They rifled my pockets. They ran off - I called Murder! I went up to the watchman; he refused his assistance, saying, the street was full of thieves, and he should be killed. Next morning I complained at Queen-square Office, and went with Gillmor and Cooper to several houses in Old Pye-street - I saw the prisoner by the Crown, public-house, and told them he was one of them - They took him.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. It was twenty minutes after eleven-it was a very foggy night. I told the watchman that I should know the man again.

Q. Did you not say, if the prisoner would give you 14s. you would not appear against him - A. No.

JAMES GILLMOR . I am an officer. Between eight and nine o'clock the next night, the prosecutor applied to me to look after the prisoner. I took him to several houses, and at last to the Crown, public-house, in Pye-street - the prisoner passed us, and went towards the Crown; the prosecutor said he was sure he was one of them. I took him to the watch-house.

Cross-examined. The prisoner's father lives opposite the Crown.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing about it.

JOHN TOLMON. I am a watchman, of Great Peter-street. The prosecutor came to me on the night of the robbery-it was very foggy-if I had seen a stranger, I should not have known him again. The prosecutor asked the way to Perkins's-rents. In about three minutes after I saw him again in Perkins's-rents, calling to a woman to let him in. After that, I heard the cry of Stop thief! ran up, and met him - He said he had been robbed. I asked him if he should know any of them? he said No, they gagged him. It was impossible to see a man's face, it was so foggy.

MARY PATTERSON . I live in Old Pye-street. I was at the Crown, public-house about eleven o'clock, the prisoner lived opposite. I saw him come for a pint of beer, he went home with it, and shut the door.

ELIZA JONES . I am the prisoner's mother. He came home on the night of the robbery at eleven o'clock, went to bed, and could not go out again, as he must have came through my room.

SARAH THOMAS . I am the prisoner's sister. He came home at eleven o'clock, and went to bed immediately - He did not go out again.

JAMES JONES . I am the prisoner's brother. I went to the public-house with my brother; we both came out exactly at eleven o'clock, and he did not go out after - I slept with him.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

Reference Number: t18180218-24

386. ROBERT CLAYTON was indicted for stealing on the 19th of January , at St. Ann, Blackfriars , one great coat, value 6l., the goods of Charles Cradock , in his dwelling-house .

MR. CHARLES CRADOCK . I rent the house, No.6, Chatham-place , in the parish of St. Ann, Blackfriars. On the 19th of January my great coat hung in the hall; about six o'clock in the afternoon my servant brought some biscuits up to me; not having ordered any, I was induced to think something was wrong, I ran down stairs and missed my great coat off the nail. The prisoner was in the hall with a basket; I asked him what he had in it - He hesitated; I ordered the green cloth which was at the top of it, to be moved, and found my great coat under it; I had only worn it three weeks-it cost me 7l. 18s. and must have been worth 6l. The prisoner begged for mercy, and said he would not do so again, and that he had a mother to provide for.

JOSEPH POTTER . I am a constable. Mr. Cradock's female servant fetched me to the house from the watchhouse, which is about 200 yards off; the prisoner stood in the passage by the basket; Mr. Cradock charged him with putting the coat into the basket, I asked him how he came to do it, he said that it tumbled in. I took him into custody.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I went to the house with some biscuits, and the servant took them up to get the money, I put my basket under the coat, when Mr. Cradock came down and found it in the basket; I suppose the wind blew it in, I never touched it.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 34.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180218-25

387. CHARLES BARCLEY PRINGLE was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of February , at St. Botolph, Without Bishopsgate , fifteen brooches, value 5l., the goods of William Mott and John Bellin , in the dwelling-house of the said William Mott .

SECOND COUNT, the same as the first, only stating it to be the dwelling-house of William Mott and John Bellin.

JOHN BELLIN. I am a jeweller , at No. 91, Bishopsgate-street , in the parish of St. Botolph, Without Bishopsgate. I am in partnership with William Mott , he sleeps in the house, I do not, I live at another place in Bishopsgate-street. On Monday the 16th of February, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, I was fetched to the shop, and found the prisoner in the custody of two officers - He was a stranger to me; I found fifteen brooches in a piece of paper, they cost me 5l. I knew them to be ours.

GEORGE EDGE . I am foreman to the prosecutors. On the 16th of February, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, I was showing some brooches to a lady at the counter, at the further end of the shop, the prisoner came in, and asked to look at a bunch of rings which were in the window - I told him to wait until I had done with the the lady; he waited about five minutes, and when I was putting a brooch in a box and paper for the lady, and giving her change (it came to 13s. 6d.), the prisoner ran to the further end of the shop, and made a sudden grasp at the brooches in the tray - I was the only person in the shop; I ran round the counter, he ran out immediately, I pursued, and caught a glimpse of him turning into the next shop but one, which is a jeweller's, I followed him into the passage, and attempted to lay hold of him, he pushed me down and ran away - I pursued, calling, stop thief. I never lost sight of him. Before he got across the road he fell himself, about five yards from me, I came up and secured him, I clenched one of his hands, which I found shut, brought him into the shop, and took him into the counting-house - I kept his hand close till the officer came, who took fifteen brooches out of it, all of which have my mark on them, and are worth 5l.; nine more were found on the floor in the shop.

THOMAS EMERY . I am a weaver. On the 16th of February, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner run out of the shop, and Edge following him-he ran into the next shop but one; he rushed out again, pushed Edge down, and fell himself-Edge took him; I saw fifteen brooches found in his hand.

JOSEPH GREGORY . I am a patrol. I heard the alarm, went into the shop, and found the prisoner secured there. I opened his hand, and found fifteen brooches in it; I also found a quantity of loose snuff in his breeches pocket.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I lost a situation of 115l. per annum in the West India Docks, which I had for twelve years, not for dishonesty, since which I have been greatly distressed.

GUILTY. - DEATH . Aged 25.

Recommended to Mercy .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180218-26

388. WILLIAM MILLETT and JOHN MOULDS, alias PRICE , were indicted for stealing, on the 20th of November , one cruet frame, value 7l.; five knife rests, value 1l. 10s.; one sovereign, value 20s., and one halfsovereign, value 10s. , the goods of William Barrett .

WILLIAM BARRETT . I am a silversmith , and live in Dean's-court, St. Martin's-le-Grand, the prisoner, Millett, is my errand-boy . On the 20th of November, between eight and nine o'clock in the morning, I gave him the articles and money stated in the indictment, in a small dollar-bag, to take to Goldsmiths' Hall to be stamped-the money was to pay the duty. He returned in half an hour; he ought not to have been gone above ten minutes. I afterwards sent him with other silver goods, worth 30l., in a green bag - I have never seen them since. He did not return after he went out the second time. On the 19th of January I had both the prisoners apprehended.

GEORGE MILES. I am employed at Goldsmiths' Hall-Millett never delivered the articles stated in the indictment to me.

ANDREW ONREE . I am fifteen years old. I was employed by Mr. Crook, a blacksmith - I was out of place. The prisoner, Millett, told me to be at the top of St. Martin's-le-Grand, at eight o'clock in the morning of the 20th of November. I went, and saw Moulds at the corner of Angel-street - I did not know him before; soon after, I saw Millett come out of Dean's-court with a canvas bag, which appeared to have something heavy in it, he gave. it to Moulds, who went away with it. Millett then went into a baker's shop; I went and spoke to him. He said,"What have you come? - that is right; stay here till I come again." - I did so. In about half an hour he came to me with a green baize bag; Moulds was standing there at the time. We all three went up Angel-street, and along Holborn. When we came to the Seven Dials, Millett gave Moulds the bag; he told Millett to take it to a public-house in Pulteney-street - Millett and I went there, and had a pint of beer. In about a quarter of an hour Moulds came in-he had plenty of bank notes and some silver in his hand, and a sovereign and a half. He took us to Marylebone, to a public-house at the corner of East-street, and had some rum, which he paid for; we then went to a cook-shop, and had some meat and a pot of beer. He took us to several public-houses, and made us quite drunk. After I recovered, I found myself lying on the floor of a room at Rumsey's, in Marylebone-Millett was likewise there. Moulds gave us none of the money. It was then about half-past eight o'clock at night. Millett had a shilling, which he paid for a lodging for us that night. Next day, we wandered about the streets, without having any thing to eat. At night we met Rumsey on Blenheim steps, and asked him for some money, he said he had none; he gave us two-pence, and left us immediately. We got a penny loaf each - We then said we would go home to our friends, which I did. I was taken before the magistrate in January, and told this story. I am sure Moulds is the man.

HENRY RUMSEY . I live in York-court, Earl-street, Marylebone. I knew the prisoner, Moulds, by seeing him at a public-house at Dorset-street. On the 20th of November, about one o'clock, as I was going to dinner, I met him in Crawford-street, with Millett and Onree. He asked me if I had plenty of work, and sent the two boys on. I asked him how he got on? he said very well-that he had a horse and cart, and would give me something to drink. I went into a public-house with him, the boys waited outside. I saw he had a sovereign and a half, and some silver. I afterwards went with him and the two boys to the York, public-house, and had two or three pots of porter, which he paid for-the boys were drunk. We all walked to Earl-street, and had a glass of rum each at

another public-house, the boys refused to drink any-Moulds persuaded them to drink it. Mr. Addlington, who was there, offered to pay for two of the glasses of rum, the prisoner. Moulds, said he would pay for them himself, and changed a half-sovereign to pay for them, saying that he had plenty of money. He asked me to let the two boys lay down in my room, which I did. He went up with them, it was about three o'clock, and went away about seven o'clock, leaving them asleep and quite sick - They left about half-past ten. Next night they came to my house, looking for Moulds, and wandering about.

MARY RUMSEY. I am the wife of the last witness-he has spoken correctly.

MOULDS'S Defence. I never had the property; I had part of the money lent me, which was 1l.17s.6d.

MILLETT- GUILTY . Aged 16.

MOULDS - GUILTY . Aged 35.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180218-27

389. WILLIAM RUMSEY was indicted for a fraud .

JAMES LAING, JUN. I manage my uncle's ( James Laing ) business, he is a general merchant, and lives in George-street, in the Minories. The prisoner came there on the 2d of January, and asked for Mr. Laing, I told him he was in the country, but I would attend him. He said he understood we had some coal-sacking to sell, and asked the price. I asked him his name, he said Rumsey. I asked him if he was Mr. Rumsey, of Bankside? he said, yes. I said, I was glad at the prospect of doing business with him. There is only one Mr. Rumsey, of Bankside, he is a coal-merchant. He said, "You will often see my name on the coal-waggons." I gave him a list of the prices, he said they were too high. I said, that as his consumption was large, I would take 1s. off, to open an account with him. He asked me what discount we took off for money? I said I would engage in a six months running account with him, which he told me to put on the card - I did so. He appointed to call the next day - I said I should be at Bankside, and would call on him; he said he would call on me, and went away. He was afterwards apprehended, and offered to give up the sacking, if I would not prosecute.

WILLIAM BAILEY. I am clerk to Mr. Laing The prisoner called, and said he was Mr. Rumsey, of Bankside. Next day he called, Mr. Laing was out - He went to the warehouse and looked out twelve pieces of sacking, value 30l. I put them into a cart which he brought with him - He signed a receipt for them-his name was not on the cart - I afterwards went to Bankside where Mr, Rumsey formerly lived, and found he was dead. The prisoner was afterwards taken and 24l. worth of the property found in the stable of the King's Head, Borough.

JAMES BRIAN . I manage the business for Mrs. Rumsey, of Bankside. Mr. Rumsey was a coal merchant, he is dead. On the 21st of January last, there was nobody of his name there-the prisoner had nothing to do with the business.

GUILTY . Aged 36.

Publicly Whipped and Discharged.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180218-28

390. SAMUEL FURLEY was indicted for feloniously and knowingly having a forged bank note in his possession .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

391. WILLIAM GREEN was indicted for a like offence.

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 35.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

392. HENRY SCARESBROOK was indicted for a like offence.

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

393. JOHN STEVENS was indicted for a like offence.

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

394. JOHN HILL was indicted for a like offence.

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 38.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

395. FREDERICK FURLEY was indicted for a like offence.

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

396. JAMES LAW was indicted for a like offence.

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

397. THOMAS PORTER was indicted for a like offence.

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180218-29

398. SAMUEL FURLEY was indicted for forgery .

MR. REYNOLDS, on the part of the Governor and Company of the Bank of England, declined offering any evidence.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180218-30

399. HENRY SCARESBROOK was indicted for forgery .

No evidence. NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180218-31

400. JOHN STEVENS was indicted for forgery .

No evidence. NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180218-32

401. WILLIAM GREEN was indicted for forgery .

No evidence. NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180218-33

402. FREDERICK FURLEY was indicted for forgery .

No evidence. NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180218-34

403. JAMES LAW was indicted for forgery .

No evidence. NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180218-35

404. THOMAS PORTER was indicted for forgery .

No evidence. NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180218-36

405. THOMAS MILLER was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of February , 11lbs, of pork, value 2s. 6d. , the goods of John Christie .

JOHN CHRISTIE. I am a mariner . On the 14th of February, I lost the pork from on board our ship, off King Edward Stairs . The property belonged to the vessel.

THOMAS PIERCEY. I am a Thames Police Officer. On the 14th of February, at seven o'clock in the morning, I met the prisoner coming up king Edward-stairs with the pork. He said He said he was going to take it to the captain of the Alderney. I took him into custody. He told me to take no notice of it, as he took it from another vessel.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 16.

Judgment Respited .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180218-37

406. DAVID EVANS was indicted for the wilful murder of Elizabeth, his wife .

ISAAC DAVIES . I live at No. 4, Falcon-bridgecourt, Crown-street, St. Giles's . I and the prisoner work for Mr, Treacher. on Saturday night the 10th of January, I was in company with the prisoner, drinking at a public-house, next door to his house-that was the last public-house we were at - We left together between twelve and one o'clock-both went home he appeared to me to be in liquor. Next morning between eleven and twelve o'clock, I went to his house and saw him - He was talking to Mr. Jones and Mr. Williams, who were there - I staid about three minutes, went away, and returned again in ten minutes - I asked him why he did not follow us? The first time I was there we wanted him to go with us-he said "I am coming directly."I turned round and asked him where his wife was-he said she was in bed - I went into the bed-room, and said, "Mrs. Evans, it is a fine time of day to be in bed." Receiving no answer, I looked, and saw her lying on the bed with her mouth half open-she was covered with the bed-clothes - I felt her, she was quite cold. I said to the prisoner, "Mrs. Evans is dead" - He said "Good God don't say so."He went and jumped to her, and kissed her; saying, "I hope you are not dead, my dear woman." He kept crying over her, I pulled him away, I asked him what time he spoke to her - He said "between six and seven o'clock in the morning, that she told him her feet were very cold, and that he put a hot brick to them, and that she said, "that is a good boy.'" I asked if he had done any thing to her, he said "No, but I was very much intoxicated - I don't know what I did." I asked if she was drunk? He said, he did not know; that he was aggravated by some of the lodgers-was very drunk, and did not know what he did. He said that one of the women of the house told him, that his wife had had connection with one of the lodgers in the passage; and that the lodger told him, he did not keep a wife but a wh-e; and that the lodger's husband had had connection with his wife two or three days ago, in the passage. I told him not to vex himself, and bid him good by. The floor of the room was not quite dry, it appeared as if it had been cleaned-there was a fire in the room, About ten minutes after I went there again, he asked me to go to his little boy.

Q. How long afterwards did you see him again - A. About two o'clock he came to my room, and asked me to go to a person to lay the corpse out. I went with his little boy to her, she would not come. In about an hour I saw him again at his house - He asked me to go with him to the undertakers. He said, "suppose we take the length of the body." We did so, and went to Mr. White, the undertaker, he told him his dear woman was dead-he said that she was very low, and he could see death in her face for a week past-that she could eat nothing for some time - He gave White the string, and told him if that would do, it would save him the trouble of coming. White said he was much obliged to him, and asked him if she was stout-he said she was wasted away to nothing. We then went to Mrs. Jones; she and her daughter went with us to the prisoner's house - I left the prisoner's house about ten o'clock at night, leaving Jones there. The next morning (Monday), about ten minutes before seven, I went and asked him to come to work with me - He said he did not think he should to day, and asked me to take a few clothes to my wife to wash. He gave me a bundle, which I gave her - She had not been in the habit of washing for him they were tied up in a course cloth like an apron. I saw him again at half-past seven in the evening, and asked if the coffin was come - He said, no, it was past the time-it came while I was there. I heard the women say, that the man down stairs had killed his wife the prisoner could hear them. He said nothing.

Q. Before the coffin was closed did you see the body - A. I saw part of her hand, when the undertaker was taking the cap off her head, I thought I saw somthing like a crust of blood, it appeared to stick to her head. His wife always appeared a weak person - I had seen her on the Wednesday.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. I had known the prisoner seven months-he was a very kind good-hearted man - They were very fond of each other - I have seen

her in liquor once or twice; she appeared in a low state for sometime past, and complained that her stomach was weak and she could eat nothing-the prisoner never absconded; he appeared extremely sorry,

Q. Did it appear to you that he did not know she was dead, when you found her so - A. Yes; he said he had been aggravated by one of the lodgers, and did not know what he was about. He told the undertaker he might come and examine the body if he liked.

JOHN WILLIAMS. I work for Mr. Treacher. On the 10th of January, I was with the prisoner - left him at the public-house, at the corner of Falconbridge-court. at eleven o'clock at night. Next morning, at half-past ten, I went to his room, and knocked at the door with my finger, he asked who was there, and said he could not open the door for me, and asked if I saw the key any where outside, for somebody had locked him in and taken it away - He asked me to go to Davis, to fetch the key to open the door for him - I did so, and came back with Davis's key. I was just putting it into Evans's door, when a woman came up from the street, and said,"I have got the key of that door," and gave it to me - I opened it, and took Davis's key back, and then returned to the prisoner Davis came after me, we found him standing in the front-room; Jones, the landlord, came in-Davis asked the prisoner to come out to drink - He said he did not care - We went out, and waited in the street for him to follow. We went back again after him - I observed the room had been lately washed-there was a little fire in it it was between ten and eleven o'clock I asked him if he knew his wife was dead? he said he did - He was sitting on the bed, crying and kissing her - I staid at the door and did not see her. Between three and four, I saw him again at Davis's - They bot went ouht and drank with me.

Cross-examined. His door was locked outside, and his key taken away - A woman gave me the key, she was pregnant - I don't know who she was.

ANN DESMOND . I lodge in the one-pair back room of the prisoner's house, he lived in the two parlours, on the ground floor. On Saturday night, the 10th of January, after twevle o'clock, my husband was brought home by two men, intoxicated. I went out and met them left them at the door, and went to get a light. When I came back the door was shut, the prisoner opened it - We all three went in. There was a quarrel between the prisoner and my husband, about his coming home late-no blows passed while we were wrangling; the prisoner's wife was there with a candle in her hand; she was sober, and appeared as usual - She went out of the room and came in again. The prisoner appeared to have had a little drop, but not much. My husband was put to bed. I went out to light the two men who brought him home; as I returned up stairs I heard the prisoner challenging his wife about some money - I stood on the third or fourth stair, against his bedroom wainscot - I heard him call her bad names, and ask what she had done with some money. I heard either 2s. 10d. or 2s. 10 1/2d. mentioned. I heard him strike her; I thought it was with his hand-the noise stopped. I went up to my room. About a quarter after one o'clock I was coming down stairs for some water, and heard him beating her dreadfully; I can not tell what he beat her with, it appeared to be with some weapon. I heard her say"Oh! dear me," and "don't;" very low, several times. I stood listening on the stairs for ten minutes, or more; I thought they were going to bed. In the middle of these expressious, I called him a blackguard for beating his wife; he called me several bad names; he heard me through the wainscot. I ran up stairs to my husband, but could not make him understand, he was drunk; I knocked at the door of the next room - I could not make them hear - I could have been heard all over the house. I returned to my own room, and was afraid to go down, to pass his door, or I should have called the watchman. I thought he had done beating her. I heard no more; my bed-room is over his - I did not lock the prisoner in his room at all. Next morning, about ten o'clock, I was in the passage, and picked up the key of his door - I knocked at his door, he opened it, and had a cloth or flannel in his hand, and was wiping something off the floor.

Cross-examined. Q. Are you married - A. I have five children.

Q. Are you a married woman - A. I pass as such. I have lived five months in the house. I never was acquainted with the deceased she lived there six or seven weeks. I never had any dispute with her, or used bad language to her.

Q. Do you remember telling the prisoner about his wife doing any thing with your husband - A. I said nothing about his wife.

Q. Do you mean to swear that you never, on any occasion, spoke unkindly of her - A. Never. I never said she had been improperly connected with my husband. I thought he was beating her with his fist at first. I went up stairs without my water. I never got any assistance. I was afraid to go out.

Q. What time did you see him wiping the floor - A. About ten o'clock. I did not give Williams the key I gave the prisoner the key before he came. I did not see Williams open the door.

Q. You persist in saying you did not give him the key, or see him trying to open the door - A. I do. I never had the key after I gave it to the prisoner.

JURY. Q. Where was the prisoner when you gave him the key - A. In his room. I believe he opened the door with the handle inside.

REBECCA MICKELWHIT . I lodge on the second floor in the house. I went to bed about half-past eleven o'clock, with my husband. I was disturbed a few minutes after twelve, by a great noise in the passage. I heard Mr. and Mrs. Desmond, and the prisoner, talking together. I thought I heard a scuffle - I did not leave my room; the prisoner went into his room. In a few minutes I heard Mrs. Desmond go up stairs, and come down again, and a man came in; she told her husband it was her sister and brother her brother had brought her husband home. I believe he forgot something, and returned for it. After this, I heard Mrs. Desmond quarrelling for an hour and a half at the door of the prisoner's room-some ill language passed. I heard the deceased groan three times. Mrs. Desmond was in her own room at that time she had gone down again. I at first thought it was a dog

growling, but the last groan I knew it was her, I said something wrong was going on - I got out of bed, and told my husband. I heard Mrs. Desmond take a candle and go down stairs. I saw a light under the crevice of my door, she called the prisoner a bad name - He left off beating his wife. Mrs. Desmond asked her why she did not cry out? the prisoner said she could not. Mrs. Desmond said, "I know very well, it is because you have murdered her." The prisoner said, "Yes, I know I have." I was afraid to go down, or to send my husband.

COURT. Q. What is your husband - A. Clerk to a land agent. The noise was like striking a feather-bed. I thought he was beating her in bed. Next morning, about ten o'clock, I heard the prisoner talking to Mrs. Desmond-he was at his door - She was on the landing-place. She said he ought to be ashamed to beat his wife so. He said,"It was through what you said." She said, "That is nonsense, I say anything when I am in a passion." The prisoner said, "Don't say any more to me; I have more trouble in my mind than you are aware of - I don't want to be bothered with you."

Cross-examined. Q. Did not Desmond insinuate that the prisoner's wife had been improperly connected with her husband - A. Yes.

JURY. Q. You heard the prisoner acknowledge that he had murdered his wife - A. He said, "I have murdered her." I think he said so to aggravate Desmond; I do not think he meant it.

MARY CHAPMAN. I lodge in the same house with the prisoner. I knew the deceased by sight; she was a quiet. sober woman; she and the prisoner appeared to live on good terms. On Saturday night, the 10th of January, I met her in the passage, just before twelve o'clock, and spoke to her, she appeared to be sober. I sleep in the two-pair front room. After one o'clock in the morning I heard a quarrelling between the prisoner and Mrs. Desmond; it came from his room, and lasted about half an hour - I heard no blows, I heard the deceased groan, about eight o'clock in the morning - I was ill in bed, and did not get up. I went out about ten o'clock; when I came back, I observed the prisoner's little white curtain had been blown on one side. The window looks into the street. The bed and pillows were put up against the parlour window, which was down, they prevented any person from looking into the room. A person in the parlour could get into the street out of the window.

LEAH MADDEN . I was sent for to the prisoner's house. I asked him if his wife died suddenly? he said, Yes. I said, "Sure, poor thing! did you get any doctor?" he said No. I saw her on the bed; she was cleaned them, and naked. She had a clean shift on, and her mouth was tied up.

ANN DAVIS . I live next door to the prisoner. I saw his wife about one o'clock on the night she died; she came to my house, I was in bed - She was sober. Soon after my husband came home. As I looked out, I saw a man lying on the step of the prisoner's door; I also saw the prisoner and his wife, Mr. and Mrs. Desmond, and two or three other men-Mrs. Evans was holding the candle in the passage. One of the men laid hold of the prisoner's collar on each side, they appeared to be quarrelling - I went home. Next morning, between ten and eleven o'clock, Williams came to me for a key, which he took to the prisoner; be brought it back. I went to the prisoner, between ten and eleven o'clock, he was lying across the bed crying. I said, I hoped his wife was not dead - He said, "Yes, she is." I asked how she had been, and said I hoped he had done nothing to her; he said he could not tell, but he thought he had beat her. I said, "I hope you have not struck her with any thing?" (I believe I mentioned the poker) - He said, he did not think he did; he said he could not tell what he was about. I asked him what he did to her after beating her? he said he left her in that room, and went to bed. I was then standing between the two doors, I was not in the sitting-room. He said, when he got up, between six and seven o'clock in the morning, his wife said to him, "My dear, put me to bed." He said, "You shall not go to bed in that condition, however;" that he took her up, put her on a chair, stripped her, washed her all over, put her on a clean shift, and put her to bed; that she complained that her feet were cold; he said he took a warm brick from behind the fire, wrapped it up, and put it to her feet; that he made her a warm cup of tea, and offered it to her to drink, but she could not swallow it, and that it all came up again. I said, "Why did you not call somebody in, when you found she was so bad? "He said, he did not know what he did; he was locked in, and could not get out. The front-room floor appeared to have been lately washed, it was not quite dry - She was dead, and quite cold. I went and fetched Mrs. Madden. The deceased appeared to have a shalw over her head; when I went in a second time she had a cap on - We both went home. Between twelve and one o'clock the prisoner sent for me - I went; Mrs. Hitchlow was there. He asked me to lay his wife out - We did not. The prisoner came to me the same evening, between seven and eight o'clock. My husband told me I had better go, and help Mrs. Jones and her daughter, to lay the deceased out - I went. I asked the prisoner for a wash-hand bason. Mrs. Jones pulled the cloth down, and held the candle; the prisoner was in the front room. Mrs. Jones wiped her over, she did not appear to want washing, as she was quite clean. The body laid quite straight on its back-the arms were black and blue, and down to her knees. I saw no cuts-the marks appeared to be fresh made. There was a cap on her head. Mrs. Jones took her right ear-ring out, the other was gone. There appeared to be a blow on her temple, and on the side of her head, over the left eye, it looked black. On the Monday morning my husband brought me a bundle, and told me to wash it for the prisoner. I never washed for him before-it smelt very offensively. There were three petticoats, a shift, a pair of stays, a gown, an apron, a cap, and the ribbon which the cap was tied with, an odd stocking of the prisoner's, a half neck handkerchief, and a pocket handkerchief. I did not examine them, but put them all into a pan, and poured a pail of water over them - They remained there three hours. When I took them out, the water looked red like blood, the cap looked more bloody than the others; it being white, made me notice it more than the others. There were two or three holes in the cap, as if it had been cut. They were wrapped up in the wet and dirt just as they were-At night the prisoner himself gave me a bundle, which I

gave to Webb. I went out on Sunday morning, at daybreak, passed the prisoner's window between six and seven o'clock, and saw, through the holes in the shutter, that there was a light there. I saw the deceased intoxicated on Christmas-day, and the day after.

Cross-examined. Q. Did not the prisoner say he would have got medical assistance if he had not been locked in - A. Yes.

MARTHA JONES . I went to the prisoner's house to lay out the body of his wife. Her arms were bruised; there was a cap on her head, I moved it on one side to get her earring out, and noticed the left ear being very muchbruised. It was a clean cap, tied round with a handkerchief, which also tied up her mouth. I told my daughter to ask the prisoner for another cap. When I laid hold of her head, I found some blood in my hand, which came from the back of her head. I asked the prisoner if, when he put the cap on her head, he perceived any cut? He said, No. I said, there must be a cut, or where could the blood come from? he said there must. I have known the deceased fifteen or sixteen years, they lived on very good terms - She was a sober woman.

SUSAN JONES . I was with my mother. I asked the prisoner to give me a cap; he said, the head need not be touched, for he put a clean one on that morning.

CHARLES BOYLE . On Sunday, the 11th of January, I went to the prisoner's house, about half-past one o'clock in the afternoon; he opened the door, I asked him how his wife was? he said she was better, and that the doctor had been, or was coming.

GEORGE WHITE . I am an undertaker, and live in Tufton-street, Westminster. On the 11th of January the prisoner and Davis, came to me between five and six o'clock in the evening; I saw he was in trouble, and asked how mistress was? he said she was very well, and that he had left her at home in bed-Davis gave me to understand that she was dead. When he came into my room, he said his wife was dead, and asked me to bury her; I said, yes. He told me that he had observed death in her face for several days past, that she had latterly taken to drinking; he said she died from excessive drinking, and had a very short illness. Davis gave me a string, with the length of the corpse, and said he brought it to save me the trouble of going. The prisoner asked me if I could get it coffined by Monday, I said, yes. - I fixed to bring it home at seven o'clock in the evening. I went with my man to take it. and got into the court about eight o'clock, the door was opened immediately, before we knocked-the prisoner and Davis were in the front room. On the shroud being put on I observed the forehead looked black. When I put her into the coffin there was blood on the bolster where she had laid. I went to the prisoner, he was trembling, and asked him when he meant to bury her? - he said, on Friday, he believed. I was surprised at seeing the blood, and meant to go to the searchers', but he was apprehended before I could go.

HAMMOND WEBB . I am a constable of Westminster. I received information, and went to the prisoner's house about a quarter after ten o'clock on the Monday evening - He let me in; I asked him if that was the apartment where the corpse laid, he said it was. I told him, from information. I had received, I came to make some enquiry about it, and said I wished to see the corpse. I asked him if he had had any words with his wife? He said he had been out on Saturday night and got very tipsy, and when he came home a women and two or three Irishmen were in the passage, that they had some words about opening the door, and that one of the persons had made a representation to him of some improper connection of his wife's. That he had some words with his wife when he went into his room, and that he struck her a blow on her mouth with his hand. I asked him if he struck her with anything else? he said he was so intoxicated that he did not know what he had done. I asked him if he got any medical assistance, he said, no. I asked why? he said the woman up stairs had locked him in, and he could not get out. I told him he could have opened the window and called out; I believe he made no answer-the window would lift up, I tried it. I observed some blood on the mantle-piece, and took a candle, looked, and saw blood about every part of the wainscot, it appeared as if it had been splashed on the wall. There was a great deal of blood on the handles of the drawers in the front room, and blood on the floor. There was the appearance of blood stains, and three places covered with sand, which appeared to have been washed out. There was some blood on the bed-room, at the foot of the bed, and on the wainscot on both sides-the blood on the wainscot and part of the drawers appeared to have been washed-the highest spot was seven feet and two inches from the ground-there were a great many spots; the room is about seven feet by twelve wide. I asked him why he had washed it off - He said he thought it looked better. The fender, poker and shovel had blood on them-the poker was bent - I produce it. I found a pair of woman's boots on the chair, the bows have something like blood on them. I asked him where the deceased's clothes were; he said he did not know. Mr. Davis gave me some things. I took the prisoner into custody. I returned and examined the body, it was in a dreadful state, the hair was all matted with blood-there were three distinct places where I could see the scull bare, and nearly put the length of my finger in, the cuts were at the back of the head; there was one on the left side of the temple, besides. I should not think they could be occasioned by a fall. I suppose one of them must have been done by falling against the drawer handle. There were no blows in the face. I found a pan in the room, which had blood in it. There were marks of blood visible on the floor so late as Tuesday last.

JURY. Q. Did her hair appear to be washed-No; the blood on the drawer handle appeared to me to have been washed, but it was visible on the mouldings.

MR. WILLIAM JENNINGS. I am an apothecary. I never practised as a surgeon. I live in King-street, Soho, and am employed by the parish. On Wednesday the 14th of January, I examined the body of the deceased. On lifting it out of the coffin I found three cuts on the back of the head, one about two inches long, the others two and a half - They must have been made with some blunt instrument; I put my finger on the length of the orifice, but could not reach the length of it, it was two inches long. I examined the second, I could not reach the end of that with my finger. There was a bruise on the left temple, the skin was taken off, it appeared to have been done with the

same instrument as the others-there was no intentation; the whole of the forehead was discoloured from one temple to the other. There was a blow across the wrist which appeared to have been inflicted with the same instrument. The skin was off the inside of the knee, for about the size of a dollar; I should think the poker a very likely thing to have inflicted the wounds, it would have cut the scull if it had not been for the hair. She had a great quantity of hair. The scull was not fractured.

Q. Were any of these injuries sufficient, of themselves, to have caused death - A. I think the blow on the temple sufficient to have caused death; I am of opinion that the other blows would have helped it, but of themselves I should not think them sufficient to cause death - They might have occasioned a concussion of the brain. I attended the opening of the body, with Mr. Carpuc, that evening, the brains were perfect, the stomach was empty, and there was some inflammation in the intestines.

Q. Is there any thing in these symptoms to induce you to alter the opinion you at first formed of the cause of her death - A. No; I cannot tell what to attribute the inflammation in the intestines to-that could not produce sudden death.

Q. Was the inflammation such as might have been instantly produced by acts of violence - A. I think so; it could be produced by them.

Q. Would the effusion of blood from the wounds be considerable - A. It must. My opinion still is, that the blow on the temple was the cause of her death.

Cross-examined. Q. That opinion you entertain, although the brain was quite sound - A. Yes. Mr. Carpue is a man of great science and celebrity.

JAMES CARPUE, ESQ. I am a surgeon, and live in Dean-street, Soho. On the Wednesday after the death I opened the body; I consider the wound of the integuments of no great consequence; as I have patients who have recovered from wounds apparently as bad. The hair was mostly matted. I examined the scull, there was no fracture on the external part, which induced me to have it opened. I examined the internal, there was no fracture or laceration there, nor any division of the dura mater from the scull, nor any extravasation of blood; which induced me to examine the other coverings of the brain-there was none there, or in any part of the head; a blow on the temple is no more than a blow on any other part of the head, provided no injury is done to the internal parts. Not being perfectly satisfied, I examined the body; I found the stomach empty, and at least one yard of the small intestines in a high state of inflammation. I did not examine any more, being satisfied that she died either from this inflammation, or from the wounds on the head; but I think it was from the inflammation of the intestines. I cannot tell which.

Q. Supposing her to be afflicted with the inflammation of the bowels before she received the blows, are you of opinion that the wounds might have increased the inflammation, or the blood that she lost from them - A. I should think the blood she lost the only method of cure; the inflammation was not likely to cause sudden death, but I should think that half that inflammation would have killed any body; she might have died from the blows, but there was inflammation enough to cause her death.

Q. Would the blows be likely to produce a degree of irritation on the intestines - A. Certainly not; the blows would not increase the inflammation. The inflammation must have been going on for a long time.

Q. May not blows be so violent as not to produce internal appearance, and yet cause death - A. Concussions seldom produce sudden death-it generally produces nausea at the stomach.

JURY. Q. Is it not possible for a person in such a weak habit receiving a blow, to die under it, although they might recover, if a skilful person was called in to attend on them - A. If there was a considerable degree of debility; I should not expect it in a person who was able to be about their ordinary occupations.

Q. Are you of opinion that, from the state of the intestines of the deceased, that she would be able to be about her ordinary occupations - A. Not well; she must be in dreadful pain; if she had been drinking the night before, it might have occasioned the inflammation. The discolouration of the forehead must have been produced by blows, but they were not mortal. There was a great quantity of inflammation.

Prisoner. I leave my case to my counsel.

GUILTY . - DEATH .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18180218-38

407. ROBERT BARNES was indicted for stealing on the 12th of February , one pocket book, value 6s., one pencil-case value 1s. 6d., and one 1l. Bank note the property of John Whale , esq. , from his person .

JOHN WHALE , ESQ. I live in Curson-street, Mayfair. On the 19th of February. between one and two o'clock in the afternoon, I was in Fleet-street, going to the Temple, nearly opposite Peel's coffee-house - I found somebody brushing my coat by my left pocket; I felt and found my handkerchief safe, but my pocket-book gone. The prisoner was brushing close to my pocket at the time - He pressed forward, there was a boy in his company. I seized the prisoner's left hand, and said, you have my property - He said "I have not." I kept hold of him; he opened his hand, and showed me my pocket-book, and said "Take it, don't prosecute me, I am a poor man with a large family."

GEORGE LAMBE. I am a merchant, and reside at Camberwell. I was returning from the Temple, the prosecuter charged the prisoner with having his property; I took the pocket-book from him, the prisoner said he was a poor man. He could not have picked it up.

THOMAS GOODNEY . I took the prisoner in charge, and found 1s. 4d. on him.

Prisoner's Defence. I saw it drop and picked it up.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180218-39

408. ELLEN KELLY was indicted for a misdemeanour .

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180218-40

409. CHARLES JONES was indicted for unlawfully uttering a counterfeit shilling, as a good and lawful one

to Eliza Simmons , and at the same time having counterfeit shillings in his possession, knowing them to be counfeit .

ELIZA SIMMONS. I am the wife of Charles Simmons, we keep a public-house in Clothfair . On the 28th of January, about five o'clock, the prisoner came in and had a glass of gin, which came to 2d.; he gave me a bad shilling; I told him so, he then threw a good one down, I gave him change - I kept the first.

THOMAS HUTCHENCE. I was present at the time the prisoner came and had a glass of gin, and offered the prosecutrix a bad shilling. I went out to watch him, he came out, when he got about 100 yards off, another man joined him - I followed them to the Nag's Head, in Aldersgate-street; they separated there-the other man went in-the prisoner went to the corner of Bull and Mouth-street. I met Goddard, and we secured him at the corner of Bull and Mouth-street, where he was waiting. I charged him with passing bad money - I saw him drop a bag, which a boy picked up and gave to Goddard in my presence, containing ten counterfeit shillings; another bag, containing seven more, was found on him, and 6s. 6d. in good money, separated from the bad.

HOWEL GODDARD. I met Hutchence, and took the prisoner who was waiting at the corner of Bull and Mouth-street. Hutchence said he had passed bad money, and he believed he had the swag. I took him to the Nag's Head; he dropped a bag containing ten counterfeit shillings - I found another bag on him, containing seven more; he had 6s. 6d. in his pocket, of good money.

MR. CALEB EDWARD POWELL. I am assistant to the solicitor of the Mint; the 17s. in the bags, and that uttered to Simmons, are all counterfeit, and off the same die.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing of the 10s. I found the 7s.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Imprisoned for one year , and find sureties for two more .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180218-41

410. WILLIAM HARDWIDGE was indicted for unlawfully, and knowingly uttering, a counterfeit shilling to Catharine Vallance .

CATHARINE VALLANCE . I keep a chandler's-shop in Swan-lane, Thames-street . On the 20th of January , about eleven o'clock in the morning, the prisoner, and another man, came to my shop and asked if I wanted any wood. I said I would take 2s. worth-the man brought it. I gave the prisoner two good shillings, they were dull and had been in circulation - He took them up, gave the other man the basket who went away; the prisoner then put two bad shillings on the counter, and asked me to change them; I refused, and told him they were not what I gave him - They were quite bright and new; he said he would summons me, and asked for a pen to put down my name. I locked the shop door, and told him, I would have him searched - I sent up for Rawlins the constable, who lodged with me; the prisoner put one of the shillings he had offered me into his boot before Rawlins came down, took it out again, and fell on his knees, begging I would not hurt him, as he had a wife and six children, Rawlins searched him and found one bad shilling on him. The good money that I gave him was not found; he had an opportunity of giving them to the other man.

WILLIAM RAWLINS . I am a constable, I came down stairs, and took the prisoner into custody. Mrs. Vallance took a bad shilling out of his hand - He said he would give us any thing to let him go.

MR. POWELL. The shillings are both counterfeits, and off the same die.

Prisoner's Defence. She gave me the shillings for the wood.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Confined Six Month .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180218-42

411. WILLIAM SIMMS was indicted for unlawfully procuring six pieces of false counterfeit money, resembling shillings, with intent to utter them .

JOHN FRANKLIN. I am a cooper, and live in Bottle-alley, Bishopgate-street. On the 10th of January, I was calling oranges in Bishopgate-street - the prisoner came and bought some of me, and offered me a bad shilling - I told him it was bad, and returned it to him - He gave me another bad one, I refused it. A boy came up and told him it was a shame, be threatened the boy, and ran after him; both ran away - He was taken.

JOHN BRADLEY . I am a constable, I was near the place, and heard the alarm; I stopped the prisoner and told him I thought he was a thief - He tried to get away; the prosecutor charged him with passing bad money; the prisoner said he did not know they were bad. I asked if he had any more - He said he had not. I found six counterfeit shillings on him, in four separate pockets, and 6s. and 12d. good; the bad money was quite new; he said it was given to him in change for a half sovereign-he afterwards said, he sold two pair of pantaloons to a jew, who gave them to him.

MR. POWELL. They are all counterfeit, and have never been in circulation - They are all off the same die.

Prisoner's Defence. I sold two pair of pantaloons, and took the shillings for them.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Confined Six Months .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180218-43

412. MICHAEL WILKINS was indicted for stealing on the 7th of February , twenty-four ounces of tobacco, value 6s. , the goods of Samuel Fish , and EDWARD SWAN was indicted for feloniously receiving the same; he well knowing it to have been stolen .

AUGUSTINE CARRITT. I am a clerk to Samuel Fish , who is a Tobacconist , and lives in St. John-street - the prisoner Wilkins was his servant . On the 7th of February, we lost the tobacco, which the prisoner had to dry.

THOMAS THOMPSON. I am an officer. On the 7th of February, about half-past five o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner, Swan, waiting about in St. John-street, for a quarter of an hour - I watched him, and saw Wilkins come

from Mr. Fish's shop - I knew he was a servant there. Swan joined his company immediately as he came out, he beckoned Wilkins down Parson's-court. I there saw Wilkins give him something, they immediately came from the court and repassed Mr. Fish's shop; I saw Swan had something bulky in his pocket, which he had not when he was waiting in the street; I followed them to the Bull in St. John-street, where they had a glass of something to drink. Wilkins said, I shall see you to night. Swan said, I will meet you there - They parted; I followed Swan up Charterhouse-lane, and asked what he had got there - He said, what was that to me. I said I insisted upon knowing what it was - He said, he would see me d-d first; with a great deal of persevance I got him to the watchhouse. I asked him to pull it out of his pocket; he said, he would not. I pulled one pound and a half of tobacco out, and told him I would fetch the man whom he had it from. I went to the shop and brought Wilkins to him.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. I had been watching opposite the shop for a quarter of an hour.

ROBERT BUNN . I was with Thompson; he has spoken correctly.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILKINS'S Defence. It never came out of of my master's shop.

SWAN'S Defence. I bought it of a man for 6s., in the morning.

WILKINS - GUILTY Aged 48.

Transported for seven Years .

SWAN- GUILTY Aged 40.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180218-44

413. WILLIAM TIBBLER was indicted for stealing on the 5th of September , twenty-four ounces of tea, value 9s.; three pounds of sugar, value 3s., and two quarts of gin, value 4s. ; the property of William Smith .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating the goods to be the property of Thomas Blinco .

THOMAS BLINCO . On the 5th of September, I was at Smithfield, unloading my waggon. The prisoner was there; I knew him before. I asked him to shew my man the way to Piccadilly.

DANIEL COCK. I drove the waggon; the prisoner shewed me the way to Burlington-house, where I took the articles stated in the indictment, in the waggon. They were to go to Burlington-house. When we got to Park-lane, the prisoner said, the servant at Burlington-house, told him he was to have two parcels out-he took them and went away.

WILLIAM SMITH. I am porter at Burlington-house, the parcels were put on the waggon. I never told the prisoner to take them out.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined Six Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18180218-45

414. JOHN WARD was indicted for that he, at St. James's, Clerkenwell , on the 17th of January , feloniously did forge and counterfeit a certain bank note for the payment of 5l. (setting it forth), with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England .

SECOND COUNT. For feloniously disposing of, and puting away a like forged bank note, with the like intent, well knowing the same to be forged and counterfeited.

THIRD COUNT. For feloniously offering to one James Marchant , a like forged bank note, with the like intent, well knowing the same to be forged and counterfeited.

FOURTH, FIFTH, and SIX COUNT, the same as the former Counts, only calling the forged instrument a promissory note for payment of money, instead of a bank note.

SIX OTHER COUNTS, the same as the six former, only stating the prisoner's intent to be to defraud Abraham Francis .

JAMES MARCHANT. I am shopman to Abraham Francis , who is a linen-draper , and lives at No. 287, High Holborn. On the 17th of January, about half-past seven o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came to my master's shop - I did not know him before. He asked for some Irish linen, which I shewed him; he had seven yards cut off, which came to 17s. 6d.; he then bought two pocket handkerchiefs, which came to 2s. 4d. - in all 19s. 10d. He gave me a 5l. note, which I took to Mr. Francis, who was sitting in the counting-house - I said nothing to the prisoner. Mr. Francis came out with me into the shop, and said to him, "Will you have the goodness to favour me with your address?" the prisoner said, "Mr. Balduck, Lisson Grove, Paddington." As the prisoner delivered the address, I saw Mr. Francis write it on the back of the note, I also marked it myself (looking at one)-this is it. The constable was sent for.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. The prisoner was taken into custody at the time-there were two customers in the shop. Mr. Francis was standing at the counting-house desk, he was not handling any money. He never put the note out of his hands until he returned to the prisoner.

MR. ABRAHAM FRANCIS. I am a linen-draper, and live in High Holborn. On the 17th of January, Marchant brought me a 5l. note - I was in the counting-house. The moment I took hold of it I perceived it was forged - I had no other note in my hand. I immediately went towards the prisoner - I did not put it out of my hand. Marchant followed me; I had a pen in my hand. I asked the prisoner to favour me with his address; he said, "Balduck, Lisson-grove, Paddington." I immediately wrote it on the note, he saw me write it (looking at it)-this is the same note. I returned into the counting-house, Marchant followed me-the prisoner stood in the front shop, close by. I told Marchant to sent for a constable, who came in about a quarter of an hour after, and took the prisoner into cusa neighbour fetched him.

Q. Had you any conversation with him respecting the note, after you had put his name on it - A. When my neighbour came in I said the note was forged, and I should sent for a constable-the prisoner heard it. I said he must give an account how he came possessed of it; he said he could very easily do that, if I would sent for Mr. Humphreys, of Staples Inn, who was his solicitor.

Cross-examined. Q. Are you sure he spoke of Mr. Humphreys as living in Staples Inn - A. Yes. I did not

send for him. When Marchant brought me the note I had no other bank notes upon the desk, or about me. I never parted with the note till I wrote his name on it. I was behind the counter in the shop, the prisoner was about eight yards from the door; I did not put him under confinement. I came round the counter, and stood with a friend, who came in with my neighbour, between the prisoner and the door. He made no attempt to get away.

Q. Before you wrote on the note, what did you ask him - A. I asked him for his name and address. He did not say he took it of Balduck-it was on a Saturday night. I kept the note in my possession until Monday, in my pocket, separate from any others.

MR. REYNOLDS. Q. How many persons stood between him and the door - A. Two, and the inner door was shut; he could not escape.

JOHN BALDUCK. I am a baker, and live at Lisson-grove, Paddington. I know the prisoner - I do not know whether he knew me. I once bought 12s. worth of biscuits of him. I never gave him a 5l. note, or gave him one to pay away for me. I never authorized him to use my name.

Cross-examined. Q. Does much money go through your hands in the course of a month - A. I pay for ten or twenty sacks of flour at a time.

Q. Did you not see the prisoner in December last - A. I believe I met him in Holborn. He never was at my house, except at the time I bought the biscuits of him, which is above a year ago; I then paid him in halfpence. I believe we always pay for biscuits in halfpence. I will swear that I did not pay him a bank note.

MR. REYNOLDS. Q. Look at the note-was it ever in your possession - A. Never. I always put my name on them when I take them.

GEORGE BALDUCK. I am the last witness's brother. I keep the Nightingale, public-house, at Lisson-grove, Paddington. I have known the prisoner six or seven years - He knew where I lived. I never gave him a 5l. note to my knowledge. I have dealt with him when I kept my brother's shop, which is above two years ago.

Q. Have you had any dealings with him since the 4th of August, 1817 - A. Not any. No bank notes have passed from me to him since that period. I never authorized him to put off any notes in my name (looking at the note)-it has never been in my possession. I always indorse the notes as soon as I take them, just under the amount. I am well acquainted with the inhabitants of Lisson-grove, and am sure there is no other person of the name, except my brother.

Cross-examined. Q. Are the streets about Lissongrove described as such a place, by Lisson-grove - A. Very likely; it is a large neighbourhood. I have lived there ten years, and am certain there are no other persons of that name there. I will not swear there is no such person in the neighbourhood. It may have happened that I have omitted to indorse a note - I am in the habit of indorsing them. I never knew any harm of the prisoner - He was once a respectable master baker.

MR. REYNOLDS. Q. Have you known him lately - A. I have not seen him since the 6th of April, 1816. I have taken no note of him since the 4th of August, 1817.

MICHAEL SMITH . I am tax-collector of Lisson-grove, and have been so for five years. I know the two Balducks, who have been examined. I never heard of any other person of that name there.

Cross-examined. I collect the parish rates. There are several lodgers there - I only collect from housekeepers.

WILLIAM EVERETT POOLE. I am a grocer, and live at No. 18, Golden-lane, Barbican. I know the prisoner. On the 5th or 6th of January he came to my shop, and bought two ounces of tea and a pound of sugar - I served him. He gave me a 1l. note (looking at one)-this is it. I gave him pen and ink, and asked him to write his address. I saw him write it on the back of the note (reads it)-"John North, Warwick-place, Whitecross-street." I put my initials under it, and can swear it is the note I received of him. I gave him 18s. 3d. in change. I have inquired at Warwick-place, and can find no such person.

Cross-examined. His being a stranger made me ask him to write his name and address himself. He was sometime in the shop - I noticed him particularly - I am positive he is the man. It was on a Monday morning, between eleven and twelve o'clock; he had blue pantaloons and a plum-coloured coat on. I am positive he is the man.

COURT. Q. When did you see him again - A. About a week or more after, in Cold Bath Fields.

SARAH HERN. I live at the Servants' Register Office, No. 11, Fetter-lane, which is kept by Mr. Eaton. I know the prisoner very well; his name is John Ward , he lived in Leigh-street, Red Lion-square. In December last he came to Eaton's about three weeks or a fortnight before Christmas, and gave me a 1l. note, to get half a pint of gin at Mr. Smith's; I took the note there, and paid it to Mr. Smith, who put Ward's name on it in my presence. I told him his name and address. I returned, and gave him the change (looks at one)-this is it-it has Mr. Smith's mark on it.

Cross-examined. I do not know that he slept at Leigh-street. He was porter to a person of the name of Good-luck, in Leigh-street - I believe he lived there. I gave Smith the same note I received from the prisoner - I had no other about me. Smith wrote on the note, "Ward, Leigh-street, Red Lion-square," and "Eaton, Fetter-lane." He wrote it at the same time.

JOHN SMITH. I keep the Falcon, public-house, Fetter-lane. I received a 1l. note from the last witness, Hern, in the beginning of December las (looks at one)-this is it; there is "Mr. Ward, Leigh-street, Red Lion-square," and"Eaton, Fetter-lane, December 6th, 1817," on it. I wrote it at the time I received it. I knew she lived at Eaton's - She told me to write it.

Cross-examined. I did not see the prisoner.

MARY WINTER . My husband keeps the Elephant and Castle, in Great Peter-street, Westminster. I have known the prisoner eight years. On Sunday, the 28th of December, at half-past ten o'clock at night, he came to me with Mrs. Skelton. He asked for half a pint of brandy, which came to 2s. 6d.; he asked me to give him change for a 1l. note, which I did, knowing him. When he gave it me I told him it was broken; he said it was broken or torn, I do not know which, but it was all right enough, and that he had taken it at Clapham, in change for a 2l. note, at a public-house. I gave him 17s. 6d.; he drank the brandy, and went away. I observed the name of "Manning, Clif

ford's or Clement's Inn," on it, I do not know which (looks at one)-this is it. Edwards was with me at the time.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you mean to swear that is the note - A. Yes; it is broken at the left-hand corner, "Manning, Clement's Inn," is on it. I swear to it from both these circumstances. I noticed it as I put it into the till. I cannot be mistaken.

THOMAS EDWARDS. I keep a chandler's shop. I was at Winter's, public-house, on the 28th of December, and saw the prisoner there that night. He gave Winter a 1l. note, she said it was torn, but she had no doubt that it was good, as the number was on it. I believe the prisoner said it was a good one.

ROBERT MILTON . I am an inspector of bank notes. I look at the 5l. note-it is forged in every respect, and so are the three 1l. notes; they are off the same plate. I should consider the signatures of them and the 5l. note to have been executed by the same person.

Cross-examined. The name are different.

ABRAHAM FRANCIS. I knew the note to be forged, and took it to Mr. Milton, at the Bank. I did not present it for payment.

(The note was then put in and read, No. 15,077, August 4th, 1817, 5l.

Prisoner's Defence. I have not passed more than one note for these nine months, except what I received from my master, who is now under examination for the same offence. He told me to give that name and address.

MARY WINTER re-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Have you not said you took the note of Randall - A. I did not have it in my hand. When it was brought back to me I said I thought I took it of Randall. I took it out of a gentleman's hand, and said I took it of the prisoner.

Q. Then you first said you took it of Randall - A. No; when I took it in my hand I knew it to be the note I received from the prisoner. I did not look at the indorsement till after I took it to Randall. I told Beech so.

WILLIAM BEECH. The account Mrs. Winter has given is not quite correct. She said positively she took it of Randall in change for a 10l. note, and that this note must be one of them. She had it in her hand more than a minute before she said so, and persisted in saying so all the time. I was with her about five minutes.

MR. SERGEANT BOSANQUET. Q. Was any thing said about Manning, of Clifford's Inn, being on it - A. No.

JURY to MRS. WINTER. After you said you took it of Randall, you observed the name of Manning on it, which brought to your recollection that you took it of the prisoner - A. Yes.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 28.

Of uttering.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

Reference Number: t18180218-46

415. JOHN CLARKE and HANNAH GALE , were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Sarah Piggott , about four o'clock in the night of the 7th of January, with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, one gown, value 6s.; two shirts, value 10s.; 20 yards of flannel, value 1l. 4s.; 35 yards of linen, value 3l.; 105 yards of calico, value 4l. 5s.; 94 yards of gingham, value 5l.; 12 yards of muslin, value 16s., and 131 yards of printed cotton, value 9l. 12s. 2d. , her property.

HARRIET LENOM. I am servant to Sarah Piggot , who lives at Bethnal-green . On the 7th of January, she slept out all night. When I got up in the morning I found a place had been broken through over the kitchen window, and the articles stated in the indictment gone.

SARAH PIGGOT. I keep the house. I returned at eleven o'clock in the morning, and missed the property. On the 13th of January the officer brought some part of it to me.

MATTHEW HEATH MOSS . I am servant to Thomas Sowerby, pawnbroker, who lives in Chiswell-street. On the 16th of January, the prisoner, Gale, brought a remnant of cotton to pledge at our shop. Suspecting her, I asked her what she gave for it? she said, 2s. a yard, and that she bought it at Shoreditch. We said we must know more about it-she appeared agitated. The prisoner, Clarke, came in, and looked significantly at her. He said his name was Dee - We determined to detain him on suspicion of being concerned. He ran out, and went up a court which had no thoroughfare - I secured him there. He said the things were his property.

WILLIAM GLEED . I am an officer. I took the prisoners into custody, and found some duplicates on them relating to the property.

JOHN ASLON . I am servant to Mr. Lincock, pawnbroker, of Whitecross-street. On the 16th of January, the prisoner, Gale, pledged seven yards of cotton with me.

THOMAS MILLER. I am a pawnbroker, and live in Golden-lane. On the 16th of January, the prisoner, Clarke, pledged ten yards of gingham with me.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18180218-47

416. JOHN DUNN was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Margaret Blower , window, about one o'clock in the afternoon of the 2d of February (no person being therein), and stealing, therein, one scarf, value 1l.; two table-spoons, value 1l. 4s.; six tea-spoons, value 12s.; one pair of sugar-tongs, value 5s.; one cream jug, value 1l.; one watch, value 5l.; one seal, value 10s.; and one key, value 2s. , her property.

MARGARET BLOWER . I am a widow , and lodge in the second floor of a house in York-street - Mr. Vincent is the landlord, and lives in the house. On the 2d of February the prisoner came to my lodgings, and left at eleven o'clock in the morning - I knew him before. I asked him to dine with me at one o'clock, he said he would. I told him I should be at home exactly at one o'clock, and shewed him where I would leave the key of my room, for him to let himself in if he came before me. He said he would return at one. I told him to get over the wall, and come to the back door, which was open, and he would find the key at my door. I returned at one o'clock, found my doors burst wide open, and missed the articles stated in the indictment. I got an officer, and we found the prisoner in Clare-market - He denied it.

THOMAS SOUTHCOMBE. I am an umbrella-maker, and live in York-street, opposite the prosecutrix's house. I

saw the prisoner come out of the prosecutrix's house about eleven o'clock, she came out after him. I saw him come out again, about three-quarters of an hour after, in a great hurry - He went towards Clare-market. I went with the prosecutrix to Clare-market-the prisoner ran up against us. He said, "Now, Mrs. Blower, I suppose you suspect me of this robbery." The officer said, "What robbery?" the prisoner said he had been to Queen-square, and had heard of it. The officer took him.

RICHARD SMITHERS. I am a constable, and went with the two witnesses; as we were standing at the corner of Clare-market, the prisoner ran against us. He said, "Mrs. Blower, I suppose you suspect me of this robbery." No person had said any thing about it. He said he heard of it at Queen-square. I got his box from his lodgings in Brook-street. The prisoner asked for two handkerchiefs out of it - He said the box was his; it contained some duplicates, one of which related to the scarf pledged with Hedges, and a purse.

THOMAS HARTLEY. I am shopman to Mr. Hedges, who is a pawnbroker, and lives in Drury-lane. On the 2d of February, the prisoner pledged the scarf with me for 16s.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I beg for mercy.

GUILTY. Aged 31.

Of stealing, but not of breaking and entering .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

Reference Number: t18180218-48

417. JOHN WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of February , one tea-kettle, value 1s.; one apron, value 6d.; one jacket, value 6d.; one sash philister, value 5s., the goods of William East ; one rule, value 6d.; two gimlets, value 2d.; one chisel, value 3d.; one jacket, value 1s., and one gauge, value 1d., the goods of John Morgan ; one umbrella, value 1s.; one chisel, value 6d., and two planes, value 1s., the goods of James East ; and one umbrella, value 1s.; one carpenter's plough, value 6d., and two ganges, value 3d. , the goods of Edward Holdsworth .

GEORGE SCOTT . I am a builder. I have an unfinished building in the Commercial-road . On the 1st of February, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, I saw the prisoner come out of an opening in the wall; he had a bundle. I looked over the wall, and saw another man, who appeared to be in his company, he was pretending to lock the door. East was with me-he took the prisoner, and I took the other man - He made his escape afterwards. There was a bundle of tools laid at his feet when I took him.

WILLIAM EAST. I am a carpenter . I saw the prisoner come out of the hole in the wall - I followed and secured him. I asked him what he had there? he said, it was a tea-kettle. I told him he had stolen it - He said he knew that - I had left it in the one pair of stairs. The bundle contained the articles stated in the indictment. I found a tinder-box and matches in his pocket, and two candles. The staple of the door had been drawn. I found an apron at the door, which contained tools. I found two umbrellas, which had been left in the building, at the prisoner's lodgings.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A man brought the bundle to my lodgings.

GUILTY . Aged 32.

Confined Six Months and Publicly Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180218-49

418. HENRY JONES and GRACE JONES were indicted for stealing, on the 6th of February , one pair of breeches, value 6s. , the goods of James Harwood .

JAMES HARWOOD . I keep a public-house in St. George's in the East . On the 6th of February I lost my breeches - I found them at Lewis's, in Cable-street, hanging for sale.

HOWARD LEWIS . I am a salesman, and live in Cable-street. I bought the duplicate of the breeches of the female prisoner, and took them out of pledge.

MICHAEL MORRIS. I took the prisoner into custody. When he saw me come into his room he jumped out of a two pair of stairs window.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180218-50

419. EMMA ANN CRANFIELD was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of January , two gowns, value 15s.; two silver spoons, value 5s.; one apron, value 1s. 6d.; one umbrella, value 3s.; and one scarf, value 3s. , the goods of James Tothill ; and CHARLES DANIELS and SARAH DANIELS were indicted for feloniously receiving the same, on the same day, they knowing them to have been stolen .

ELIZA TOTHILL. I am the wife of Joseph Tothill, who is a smith , and lives in High-street, St. Giles's - We live in the back room of the first floor, the prisoner, Cranfield, was my servant . On the 13th of January, at four o'clock in the afternoon, I went out-when I returned in the evening she was gone; she had given me no notice. I missed the articles stated in the indictment - She never returned. About three weeks after I saw her at a lodging-house in Buckeridge-street. I asked her where my things were? and told her if I could recover them, I would not prosecute her. She told me I had received them. She said that Daniels and his wife had given them up.

SPENCER SMITH. I am shopman to Mr. Lcighton, who is a pawnbroker, and lives in Wardour-street. On the 15th of January, the prisoner, Sarah Daniels, pledged a gown with me, and on the 16th the prisoner Charles Daniels , pledged two spoons with me.

ALEXANDER TATE. I am a pawnbroker, and live in Cambridge-street, Grosvenor-square. I have two gowns, and a scarf, pledged on the 15th of January, by the prisoner, Charles Daniels.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAM JONES. I am an officer. I took Cranfield into custody; in cousequence of what she said, I went to Daniels's house on the 18th of January, and took him into custody. I told him I took him for some things which Cranfield left in his apartment. He said he knew nothing about them. I found the duplicates of the things on him.

WILLIAM JEFFERSON. I am an officer. I was with

Jones, and went to Daniels's house with Cranfield. He said he knew nothing of it. Cranfield immediately said,"You told me that a lady and gentleman fetched them away, saying, that if you did not give them up they would have you before a magistrate; and that you had given them up." He made no answer. We found the duplicates on him - He said he found them. He lived in Duck-lane, Wardour-street.

CRANFIELD'S Defence. Mr. Daniels pledged them.

CHARLES DANIELS 'S Defence. Cranfield came to me six months ago - We kept her a long time, as she had no lodging. She left us, saying she had got a place. In about two months she returned with the things that are pledged. I thought they were her own.

CRANFIELD - GUILTY. Aged 12.

Judgment Respited. Sent to the Refuge .

CHARLES DANIELS - GUILTY . Aged 34.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

SARAH DANIELS- NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180218-51

420. THOMAS FULLER was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of January , six books, value 6s. , the goods of Hambry Price .

ANN PRICE . I am the wife of Hambry Price. The books were my son's, and not my husband's.

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180218-52

421. JOHN BEDWORTH was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of January , one dead widgeon, value 2s. , the property of William George Howe .

MARY HOWE . I am the wife of William George Howe, who is a poulterer , and lives in Old-street . About twelve o'clock, on the 29th of January, the prisoner came to the window and took the widgeon - I stopped him and took it from him.

EDWARD MANAKY. I am a broker. I saw the prisoner running, with the widgeon.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined One Month .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180218-53

422. JOSEPH CUTLER was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of January , two sacks, value 3s.; four bags, value 1s.; one cloth, value 2s.; one curtain, value 1s.; one dead fowl, value 1s.; one pair of pincers, value 2d.; one knife, value 6d., and one pole, value 1d. , the goods of a certain person unknown.

JEREMIAH SALTER. I am a patrol. I met the prisoner at Kensington, on the 25th of January, at five o'clock in the morning, with the articles stated in the indictment, in a bag - He threw them away. I secured him. I do not know that they were stolen.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180218-54

423. EDWARD SHERWIN was indicted for a rape .

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18180218-55

424. GEORGE MATTHEWS was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of January , at St. Luke, Chelsea , in the dwelling-house of Eulielia O'Hara, widow, one gold ring, value 5l.; one brooch, value 3l.; one handkerchief, value 5s., and three promissory notes for payment of and value 10l. each , the goods and property of William Whaley .

WILLIAM WHALEY. I generally live in Ireland. On the 10th of January I lived at Mrs. Eulielia O'Hara's house - She is a widow; the house is in the parish of St. Luke, Chelsea. I took the prisoner into my service out of compassion, and employed him to brush my clothes; when I go bed I always empty my pockets, and leave my clothes for my servant to brush in the morning, the prisoner had access to my room in the morning. I missed four 10l. Irish bank notes, with my name, " William Whaley , Prince of Wales Hotel, Sackville-street;" on them. I also missed a 1l. Bank of England note. In consequence of suspicion that fell on the prisoner, I got a search-warrant, and Stone went with me to execute it at the prisoner's lodgings: we found him there in bed, apparently asleep, about eight o'clock in the morning. Stone locked the door and told the prisoner what we came for - He found an antique ring, which I had worn for thirty years, in a box near his bed. He took up a coat which the prisoner said was his, after examining it, he expressed his surprise at not finding a pocket in it, and threw it on the bed; I asked the prisoner if there was no pocket in it, he said there was not; on lifting it up I found a small side-pocket-Stone took it and found a brooch which belonged to me. He then examined the room, and took down two very large chests and a trunk, which stood before the fire-place. He searched the grate, which was full of old hats and shoes, under them he found three of my Irish notes.

Cross-examined. I had not missed the ring or the brooch, they were taken from my shaving-case - I had not seen them for a month before. The prisoner and I never had any dispute.

JAMES STONE. I am a constable of St. Ann's, Westminster. On the 17th of January I went with Mr. Whaley to execute the warrant; on going into the prisoner's lodgings we found him in bed, I told him what I came for, and searched a box by his bed-side - He said the things in it were his, but the box was not. I found the ring and a pocket-handkerchief, at the bottom of it. I then asked him whose coat that was that laid on the chair, he said it was his; I examined it but could find no pocket in it - He said there was none; Mr. Whaley took it up, found a small pocket at the side, I took it, and found a brooch at the bottom of it. There were two chests and a trunk on the top of them, which stood before the fire-place, and hid it; I moved them, and got to the fire-place, which was full of old hats and shoes; I pulled them out,

and nearly at the bottom I found three 10l. Irish bank notes, rolled together. I produce them.

MR. WHALEY. They are my notes. I lost the brooch, ring, and handkerchief all out of my shaving-case. The ring is worth thirty guineas; they are mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I never saw them until they were in the officer's hands.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 26.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

Reference Number: t18180218-56

425. SARAH FREELAND was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of January , in the dwelling-house of David Harris , one clock, value 2l.; three sheets, value 30s.; one gown, value 7s.; one tablecloth, value 2s.; twelve handkerchiefs, value 40s., and two 1l. bank notes , his property.

ELIZA HARRIS . I am the wife of David Harris . The prisoner came into my service on the 26th of February, and left me on the 28th. I missed the articles stated in the indictment. I saw them again at Queen-square office.

ANN MITCHAM. On the 28th of January the prisoner took a furnished room at my house, she had a bundle with her, which she left in the room; the next morning I heard she was apprehended, and gave the bundle to the officer.

JAMES BLY . I am an officer. Mitcham gave me the bundle.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. They keep a house of ill-fame. The prosecutrix gave me the things in a bundle, and told me to take the lodging, as the things were smuggled, and she was afraid of the officers.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18180218-57

426. PHILIP ANDREWS was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of November , one table, value 6l., and one bedstead, value 3l., the goods of Samuel Birch , in his dwelling-house ; and JOHN WILLOUGHBY for receiving the same, knowing them to have been stolen .

The prosecutor not appearing, the prisoners were

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

Reference Number: t18180218-58

427. JAMES KEATH was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of February , one bed, value 18s.; two blankets, value 5s.; one trunk, value 10s.; one coat, value 20s.; six waistcoats, value 10s.; seven pairs of pantaloons, value 7s.; four shirts, value 10s.; seven handkerchiefs, value 7s.; six pairs of stockings, value 6s.; one frock, value 1s., and one pair of gaiters, value 1s., the goods of Joseph Stevenson , in the dwelling-house of James Fearon .

MARY FEARON . I am the wife of James Fearon; we live in John-street, St. George's in the East . On the 5th of February, about twelve o'clock, the prisoner came to me with a written order for me to deliver Joseph Stevenson's trunk to him - He said Stevenson sent him for it. I gave the trunk to him. Stevenson lodged with me, and had told me that the prisoner was to take his things on board for him when he went to sea.

JOHN FEARON. I am the son of Mary Fearon . I followed the prisoner, with the trunk, to No. 3, Elizabeth-street.

ELIZA FRANKS. I live at No. 3, Elizabeth-street. On the 5th of February the prisoner brought the trunk to my house, and left it there.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. No person could get at it.

JOSEPH STEVENSON. I am a steward of a ship; the prisoner had been a shipmate of mine; on the 4th of February I told him he should take my trunk to the ship when I went, which would not be for sometime. I gave him no authority to get it. The next day I received information, went to No. 3, Elizabeth-street, and found the prisoner there - He said he would shew me my things, and took me to the third floor, where I found my trunk, broken open, and the things gone. I found a shirt, a Guernsey frock, and a waistcoat, upon him. I never gave him the order to get them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 20.

Of Stealing to the value of 39s. only .

Confined Six Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

Reference Number: t18180218-59

428. GEORGE BIRD was indicted for burgulariously breaking, and entering, the dwelling-house of Sarah Robinson , about four o'clock in the night of the 11th of February ; with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, one fixture, (to wit), one copper, value 40s., her property, and fixed to her dwelling-house; four handkerchiefs, value 20s.; one saucepan, value 1s.; one apron, value 1s.6d., and twelve towels, value 12s. , her property.

SARAH ROBINSON. I live in Great Church-lane, Fulham . On the 12th of February, about six o'clock in the morning, I was alarmed-went down, and found the copper unfixed, and taken away. I also missed the other articles stated in the indictment. My kitchen door was broken open.

EDWARD EPSOM. On Thursday morning, about seven o'clock, I found the prosecutrix's door open, and alarmed her. I took the prisoner into custody next day.

JAMES ADKINS. On the 12th of February, at six o'clock in the morning, the prisoner brought me a handkerchief. I lent him 2s. on it.

JOHN LEONARD. On the 12th of February about four o'clock in the morning, I was going to work; coming down Great Church-lane, about fifteen yards from the prosecutrix's house, I saw two men standing at the prosecutrix's kitchen door; as soon as they saw me, they took up something, and ran away. They ran down Rose and Crown-lane - I followed; they turned into another lane; I waited at the corner. I heard one of them throw something away - I went to the Rose and Crown, in King-street, and heard two men coming behind me, in the same direction as the two men; they came out of the same lane, on the left-hand side. When they got near me one of them crossed over to the right, and came close to me it was the prisoner. His brother was on the other side, with something on his back. I believe them to be the same persons I saw at the door.

(Handkerchief produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. Bought the handkerchief of a hawker. NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18180218-60

429. THOMAS COPE was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Brooks , about eight o'clock, in the night of the 9th of February , at St. Ann, Westminster , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, two reams of paper, value 1l. 18s.; six bottles of India-rubber, value 1l.4s., and twenty-four pencils, value 4s. , his property,

JOHN BROOKS . I am a stationer , and live in Oxford-street , in the parish of St. Ann, Westminster. On the 9th of February, about six o'clock in the evening, a pane of glass was broken in my window, by an intoxicated man. I put a board to it, and some paper, and other things, to keep it up; it could not be moved without pushing them away. About nine o'clock, a boy came from the hole, and told me I had been robbed. I went out, and observed the board had been pushed away, and missed the articles stated in the indictment, out of my window. There were two panes of glass, from which a man by putting in his hand, could reach them; they were worth 3l.3s. The officer brought me the paper next morning, which has my name on it. The boy said, he had not seen any one do it.

SAMUEL FURZEMAN. I am a constable of St Giles's. On the 10th of February, I was at the corner of Short's-gardens, Drury-lane, and saw the prisoner and two others come running up Short's-gardens; it was about ten minutes before one o'clock in the morning. The prisoner had a bundle wrapped up in a blue apron; I followed him to the Black-dog; there, as he was running in, I secured him, and asked, what he had there; he said, "Paper." I asked where he got it; he said, he bought it of a strange man in the street, for 16s. I told him he must go with me; he resisted a little; he then said he would go if I would not choak him-the other two ran away. I took him to the watch-house, and found a latch-key on him. Mr. Brooks's name being on the paper, I took it there; he claimed it. I produce it.

MR. BROOKS. This is mine; I remember the prisoner coming to my shop, about a week before; he asked the way to some street. I missed all the things at the same time - I saw them safe at seven o'clock in the window.

Prisoner's Defence. I met a man in Holborn, who said he found it, and sold it to me.

GUILTY. - DEATH . Aged 23.

Of stealing in a dwelling-house, but not of breaking and entering .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18180218-61

430. HENRY WOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of January , in the dwelling-house of George Swift , one pocket-book, value 6d.; one half-crown; one shilling, and three 1l. bank-notes, his property .

GEORGE SWIFT. I am a boot-maker, and live in St. Clements-lane; the prisoner is my apprentice. On the 26th of January, I marked three 1l. bank-notes, put them in my pocket-book, which I put on a drawer in my frontparlour, between twelve and one o'clock; it was not locked. Next day I missed the pocket-book, and money, I sent for the constable, who searched the prisoner's box, He told the prisoner to unlock it, which he did; the constable found the pocket-book, two 1l. notes, a half-crown, and some receipts.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. I never said I believed the prisoner did not rob me. There are two other persons lodge in the prisoner's room-my brother and another. My brother is in the country; he did not ask my wife to lend him the money. I do not know where my brother is. I was never distressed for money.

Q. Was there not some duplicates in the pocket-book - A. Yes, my wife had pledged the things; she had taken some of them out of the pocket-book; my brother was present at the time-the prisoner was not.

Q. Did the prisoner hesitate to produce the key - A. He hesitated to open the box, and seemed confused.

JANE SWIFT . I am the wife of the last witness. On the 26th of January, I took some silver out of the pocketbook; I left a half-crown, a shilling, and the notes in it. I was present when the box was searched; the pocketbook laid at the top of the box, not under his things; he denied taking it.

Cross-examined. James Swift was at work in the room that morning. My husband never charged any body else with the robbery.

JOHN BURN. I am a constable; I was present when the box was searched; the prisoner shewed me his box - He appeared confused. I did not ask the prisoner for the key; I told him he had robbed his master, and must give up the property; he took the key, and unlocked the box-the pocket-book was at the top.

Cross-examined. I did not compare the prisoner's key with any other box in the room. It was an S key, which is a common one.

GEORGE SWIFT. The notes are mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing of it.

WILLIAM TRIP . I made the prisoner's box; it is a common key.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

Reference Number: t18180218-62

431. WILLIAM DOVEY , and WILLIAM MASCALL , were indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of February , thirtythree panes of glass, value 4ls., the goods of Daniel Sutton ; and one trail, value 4s. , the goods of John Hughes .

GEORGE MORRISON . I am a mason. I was at work in front of a house, in Edward's Place, Kensington ; which belongs to Daniel Sutton . I saw the prisoner, Mascall, go into the house with empty hands, and come out with the frail and a quantity of glass under his arm, on the 2nd of February, about half-past four in the afternoon, they were together; Mascall had it - They went off in company together.

DANIEL SUTTON . The house belongs to me; I was finishing it. I employed the prisoner, Dovey, as a painter there; he brought Mascall over to me that day, as a very honest man-to succeed some men who had robbed me before; he was to come to work the next day, as a plumber. Neither of them had any business in the house. Buckley was my glazier-the prisoner had no authority to take away any glass.

JOHN BUCKLEY . I am a glazier. I was employed by Mr. Sutton, and had the glass in my charge; I had glazed several of the houses. On the 2nd of February, I left at one o'clock. I left forty-eight squares of glass in the house, and went to work several doors off. I was informed they were stolen about five o'clock; I went there and

counted them-there were only fifteen left. I and the foreman, went and found Dovey, quite drunk, at a public-house at six o'clock. I did not take him that night, thinking he would come to work next morning-but he did not. I and Morrison, went with Sutton to the public-house, and found him in charge. I had not hired either of them to take it away-nobody had any business in the house.

JOHN WILKINS. I am a Bow-street officer. Sutton sent for me to take Dovey into custody; I took him to Bow-street. On the 4th of February, I took Mascall, and asked him, what he had done with the glass, he took from Mr. Sutton's premises with Dovey, he said, it was at his own shop, and that he gave 10s. for it. I took him to Bow-street, went to his house in Crawford-street, Marylebone, and found the frail, and thirteen panes of glass.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

DOVEY'S Defence. I bought it of a man in the road, and sold it to Mascall. I lent him the frail to take it home.

MASCALL'S Defence. I bought it of him.

DOVEY - GUILTY . Aged 45.

MASCALL - GUILTY . Aged 42.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180218-63

432. JOHN O'HAGAN was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of January , seventy-two bottles, value 15s., and fourteen gallons of wine, value 15l. , the goods of Thomas Abbotts and Richard Abbotts .

MR. RICHARD ABBOTTS . I am a wine merchant , in partnership with Mr. Thomas Abbotts ; we live in Skinner-street, Snowhill. I know Mr. Giles - He is the keeper of the Abercorn Arms, Stanmore. On the 24th of January, I received a letter, purporting to come from him (reads it)

"To Messrs Abbotts, and Co. wine-merchants, Skinner-street.

"Abercorn Arms, Stanmore, January 24th, 1818.

"Mr. Giles will thank Messrs Abbotts and Co. to send this day, four dozen of Sherry and Two of Maderia, to be left at the Paviour's Arms, Swallow-street. Mr. Fitch's cart will bring it."

I believed this note to come from Mr. Giles; in consequence of it, I ordered the seventy-two bottles of wine, which was about fourteen gallons, to be packed, and sent to the Paviour's Arms. The prisoner dealt with me for wine two years ago, and owes me 100l. now.

SAMUEL LLOYD. On the 24th of January, I packed seventy-two bottles of wine, by Mr. Abbotts' direction, and delivered them to the cart.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. I directed it to Mr. Giles, Abercorn Arms, Stanmore.

JOHN TREVILLIAN. I am the carter. I received the two hampers from Lloyd, and delivered them at the Paviour's Arms, Swallow-street, between three and four o'clock.

JAMES GILES . I keep the Abercorn Arms, in Stanmore; the note produced, was not written by me.

Cross-examined. I understood the prisoner kept the Abercorn Arms two years ago, and dealt with Messrs Abbotts. I have kept it six months.

THOMAS DIMOND . I keep the Paviour's Arms, Swallow-street. On the 24th of January, about ten o'clock, in the morning, the prisoner came to my house, and asked me to do him a favour, to permit two hampers to be pitched on my premises, untill the afternoon, for Mr. Fitch's cart to call for, as it returned from market, to be taken then to Stanmore. I told him I did not know Fitch; he said, he was an old established hay-salesman, in the market; and said, Fitch made use of my name, and knew me. I consented to it. Trevillian brought it about half-past three o'clock in the afternoon. About a quarter of an hour after, the prisoner came, and said, "Is it come." I said, "Yes; it is in the yard,"-where it laid. It was directed to Mr. Giles, Abercorn Arms, Stanmore. He came into the house, and had something to drink, and said he was waiting for Fitch's cart; it did not come. He said, he would go down the Hay-market, to look for it; he went out, and returned, saying, he did not know what he should do, as he was disappointed in his cart. He said he had seen Mr. Fitch, and that the cart was gone. I told him, he must move the wine, as the permit would expire; he said, "By all means; I must have it home to night, for we have a party on Monday." I asked him who kept the Abercorn Arms; he said, Giles, who was his brother. He got a hackney-coach, and took the wine away.

Cross-examined. I told him, it should not stay on my premises; the carter gave me no orders to keeps it; he said he must get it home.

HENRY CALIS. I am a coachman. On the 24th of January, I took two hampers of wine, from the Paviour's Arms, a man was in the coach; I do not know who he was. I drove it to a gin-shop, in Drury-lane.

JOSEPH SCOTT . I keep the Red Lion and Punch-bowl. in Drury-lane. On the 24th of January, I was ill in bed; I came down about half-past seven o'clock, and found two hampers of wine, in my house; they were taken away on the Monday morning. I neither saw them come nor go. I saw the prisoner on Monday.

Q. Did you see him at Elliott's. A. No, the prisoner, and I, drank some wine on Sunday; I do not know what it was; I do not know Maderia from Sherry; I do not know where it came from-the prisoner produced it.

Cross-examined. It was at my house, I do not deal in wine; I never examined the hampers; I have dealt with the prisoner for rum and wine.

JOHN ELLIOTT. I keep a wine vaults. On the 20th of January, the prisoner proposed to sell me some Sherry; I said, I did not want any; he said he would send me a bottle to taste. I bought four dozen of him, at 45s. per dozen. I produce a bottle of it, it has Messrs. Abbotts's seal on it.

THOMAS ELLIOTT. I was with Scott, and the prisoner; and took a glass or two of wine with them.

MR. ABBOTTS. The wine has my seal.

Prisoner's Defence. I never knew any thing about it; I was never at the Paviour's Arms.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180218-64

433. WILLIAM HUDSON and BENJAMIN BALL were indicted for stealing, on the 16th of January , one coat,

value 10s., and one waistcoat, value 2s. , the goods of Walter Yates .

WALTER YATES . I am a gardener . On the 16th of January, I lost my coat and waistcoat. The prisoner lived in the same room with me.

JANE HONOR . I am the landlady of the house. The prisoner Hudson came to my house on the 16th of January, at night, and went up stairs. I saw him folding something up in the wash-house; I did not suspect him; he slept in the house on the Monday. On the Thursday morning, he came and said, we had accused him wrongfully of taking the things with Ball.

RICHARD HIGMAN . I am a pawnbroker; I live in Bishopsgate-street. On the 16th of January, about noon, Ball pledged the coat with me for 8s., in the name of George Massey , Newington.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

HUDSON'S Defence. I gave Ball my own coat to pledge.

BALL'S Defence. Hudson gave it me to pledge.

HUDSON - GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined Six Months .

BALL- NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180218-65

434. HARRIET SKELTON was indicted for that she on the 6th of January , at St. James, Clerkenwell , feloniously did forge and counterfeit a certain bank note for the payment of 5l.(setting it forth), with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England .

SECOND COUNT. For feloniously disposing of and putting away a like forged bank note, with the like intent, well knowing the same to be forged and counterfeited.

THIRD AND FOURTH COUNTS, the same as the first and second, only calling the forged instrument a promissory note for payment of money instead of a bank note.

FOUR OTHER COUNTS, the same, only stating the prisoner's intent to be to defraud Thomas Ragless .

THOMAS RAGLESS . I am a confectioner , and live at No. 198, Piccadilly. On the 6th of January, which was Twelfth Day, about seven o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came to my shop, bought a 10s. 6d. twelfth-cake, and offered me a 5l. note. I asked her what address I was to put on it? she gave me the name of "Moore, No. 29, Bury-street, St. James's." I told her I knew a person of the name of Moore, at No. 5, and asked her if she had not made a mistake? she said, No; she lived at No. 29, Bury-street, and repeated the name and number several times over. I gave her the change, and offered to send the cake home - She said she would take it herself (looking at a note)-this is the note. I have known a person of the name of Richardson to have lived at No. 29, Bury-street, for the last twelve years.

Cross-examined. by MR. ANDREWS. It was a busy day. I only took one 5l. note on that day - I had other 5l. notes in the house. All the notes I take in a day are put into the till, and then into a bag - They are afterwards put with other notes. I know this to be the note by my own handwriting. I have looked over all my other notes, and will swear this is the one she gave me. She said Bury-street, St. James's. I asked her if it was St. James's? she said, yes. I have not been to No. 29 since I received it. There were no other customers in the shop - She was there about ten minutes; I swear she is the woman. I saw her again on the 26th or 27th of January, and knew her immediately I saw her.

MR. REYNOLDS. Q. Had you never taken any 5l. note with "No. 29, Bury-street, St. James's," on it - A. None. I am positive she is the person.

FREDERICK LLOYD . I am servant to Mr. Richardson, who lives at No. 29, Bury-street, St. James's - I have lived a year and nine months with him. I was there on the 6th of January last; the prisoner did not live there, nor any person of the name of Moore.

Cross-examined. Q. Is there any other No. 29 - A. No.

COURT. Q. Did you ever see the prisoner at the house - A. Never.

ROBERT MILTON . I am a bank note inspector (looking at the note)-it is forged in every respect, both the plate, paper, and signature.

Cross-examined. It is a good imitation. There are better.

RICHARD SEWELL . I am a confectioner, and live at No. 6, Titchfield-street. On Twelfth Day, in the afternoon, the prisoner bought a half-guinea twelfth-cake at my shop. I served her; she tendered me a 5l. bank note to pay for it, for which I gave her change. Before I gave her change, I asked her to favour me with her address - She gave me the name of "Wise, No. 11, Golden-square," which I immediately wrote on the note, in her presence (looking at a note)-this is the note she gave me. I have since seen part of the twelfth-cake. I have made inquiry at No. 11, Golden-square, and found no such person lived there, but a Mr. Austin.

Cross-examined. No. 11, Golden-square, is a shop. I had no suspicion of the prisoner. I put the note with others, but know it to be the same by the name and address The prisoner was in the shop five or ten minutes. I had never seen her before.

THOMAS AUSTIN. I live at No. 11, Golden-square. I lived there on the 6th of January. No person of the name of Wise lived there at any time whatever. I do not know the prisoner.

Cross-examined. It is not a public shop-it is used as a shop-the door is in Golden-square.

WILLIAM SALMON. I am an officer. I was present with Edwards, when the house that the prisoner lived in was searched-it is No. 6, Leigh-street, Red Lion-square. I apprehended her there on the 20th of January, and searched the house on the 23d. I found some cake locked in a cupboard on the ground floor.

Cross-examined. I have no reason to know the house belonged to her.

RICHARD SEWELL re-examined. That cake was made by me, and sold to some person on Twelfth Day-it appears to be a half-guinea one.

Cross-examined. It was sold that day, or the day following. I sold the prisoner such a cake.

SARAH MILBOURN . I live with my aunt, Eliza Milbourn - She is a grocer, and lives at No. 127, High Holborn. On the 26th of December the prisoner came there - She had bought a pound of black and green tea there the day before (Christmas-day). On the 29th she bought

some things, and paid a 5l. note for them. I did not ask her name. I saw the note, and gave it to Ralph William Scurrah to go out and get change, which he did - I gave it to her.

Cross-examined. She gave me the note - I did not put it in the till. I had seen her before, and am sure she is the person. She had the same shawl on that she has now, but not the same gown. The note was never out of my hands till I gave it to Scurrah.

RALPH WILLIAM SCURRAH. I am servant to Mrs. Milbourn. The last witness gave me a 5l. note on the 29th of December. I went to Glossip's wine-vaults, got it changed, and gave it to Pilton.

Cross-examined. I never parted with it till I gave it to Pilton. I had no other 5l. note - I took no other 5l. note, nor do I know of any other being sent there. I did not see Pilton write on it.

WILLIAM PILTON . I live at Glossip's wine-vaults, in Holborn. On the 29th of December the last witness brought me a 5l. note. I wrote Mrs. Milbourn's name on it-(looks at one) - I am sure this is it.

Cross-examined. I do not remember his bringing any other 5l. note that day. He freqnently comes for change. I will not swear he gave it to me - I received it from Mrs. Milbourn's people.

SARAH MILBOURN re-examined. There was no other 5l. note sent from our shop on that day. I generally serve. I was not in the shop all day-others might have sent notes there.

JAMES MALLEY. I am shopman to Mr. Swift. who is a clothes-salesman, and lives in Houndsditch. I know the prisoner - She came to our shop on the 15th of December, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, and bought two pelisses, which came to 1l. 13s., and paid me a 5l. note. I asked her name and address, she gave me the name of "Mrs. Jackson, No. 32, London Wall," which I wrote on the note, and gave her change (looks at one)-this it. I have made inquiry, and cannot find any such person or number in London Wall.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you mean to swear she is the person so long ago - A. I am sure of it from her features and manner. I saw her again about a month or five weeks after at Bow-street, and immediately said she was the woman - I knew her perfectly. I observed her when at the shop.

MR. REYNOLDS. Q. When did you go to London Wall - A. The day after the note was returned from the Bank, which was a fortnight after I took it of her, I believe. I made inquiry at London Wall, and that circumstance brought to my recollection the receiving of the note.

SUSANNAH WALLER . I am the wife of John Waller , who is a linen-draper, and lives at No. 30, High-street, Aldgate. In the early part of December, the prisoner came to our shop, and bought flaunel and other goods to the amount of 18s. - she paid me a 5l. note; I asked her for her address - She gave me the note of "Jackson, No.76, Whitechapel." I gave the note to James Grigg to indorse, and saw him indorse it, with "Jackson, 76, Whitechap," before it was put into the till (looks at one)-this is it. I have no doubt of the prisoner's being the person. She was there twenty minutes or half an hour.

Cross-examined. She was a stranger - She was alone; I am sure she is the woman. I believe I went into the parlour while Grigg was indorsing the note - He had began to indorse it before I left him.

JAMES GRIGG. I am shopman to Mr. Waller. I remember the prisoner buying some goods at our shop the beginning of December - She gave my master a 5l. note, my mistress gave it to me to indorse. I asked the prisoner for her address; she said, "Jackson, 76, Whitechapel"-(looks at it)-this is it. I know it by the indorsement.

WILLIAM EVERETT POOLE . I keep a grocer's-shop, at No. 18, Golden-lane, Barbican. On the 7th of January, the prisoner came to my shop, bought some things, which came to 3s. or 4s., and gave me a 1l. note. I asked her for her name and address - She gave me "Mrs. Atkins, No. 12, Mitchell-street, Brick-lane," which I wrote on the note (looking at it)-this is it - I gave her the change. I have tried to find out such a person, but cannot.

Cross-examined. I am sure she is the person.

GEORGE HOWARD . I am a confectioner, and live at No. 36, Princes-street, Soho. The prisoner came to my shop in January last, after Twelfth Day-it might be a fortnight after. She bought a few cakes, and a quarter of a pound of ratifias - She tendered a 1l. note in payment. I asked her for her address - She said, "Mrs. Jones, Windmill-street," which I wrote at the bottom of the note (looks at one)-this is it.

Cross-examined. I saw her at Bow-street afterwards, and knew her immediately. I have no doubt of her being the person.

ROBERT MILTON . I am a bank note inspector (looking at the four 5l. notes offered to Malley, Sewell, Milbourn, and Waller)-they are all forged in every respect; the plate, paper, dates and signatures are the same-the handwriting is the same (looking at the 1l. notes uttered to Howard and Poole) - They are forged in every respect; the paper and plate are the same.

Cross-examined. They are good imitations - I have seen better. Malley said positively he knew the prisoner.

The note, 15,071, for 5l., dated the 4th of August, 1817 was here put in and read.

Prisoner's Defence. I never had any notes but what came from my husband or brother. When they gave them to me, I asked them what names and addresses were to be put on them? I thought the names were those of the persons they took them of. If I had known them to have been forged, I would not have passed them. My brother's name is Burnsley Goodluck - He is now in the house of correction. I was his housekeeper.

GUILTY. - DEATH . Aged 35.

Of uttering .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18180218-66

435. JOHN DOGHERTY was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Francis Pratt , about nine o'clock in the night of the 14th of January , at St. Luke's, Chelsea , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, 1l. shoes, value 30s. , his property.

FRANCIS PRATT. I am a shoemaker , and rent a house in Queen-street , Chelsea. On the 14th of January, at nine o'clock at night, I was up stairs, my wife called me down. I found a pane of glass broken in the shop-window.

HANNAH PRATT . I am the wife of Francis Pratt. I was in the back room, about half-past eight o'clock-there was a knock at the door, I opened it-the prisoner stood about a yard off. I asked him if he knocked at my door? he said, No. I shut it, and heard nothing more till about nine o'clock, I then heard a piece of glass fall, and called my husband down. I had seen the window at eight o'clock-every thing was safe then; there was no glass broken before my husband went out. We missed five pair and an odd shoe (all new) from the window, close by where the glass was broken; they were under it. There was room enough for a person to put his hand in and reach them out.

FRANCIS PRATT re-examined. I missed the shoes, and went out. At the distance of about a quarter of a mile, or less, I took the prisoner into custody with the shoes in his apron - He threw them down; Mitchell, who was with me, picked them up.

JAMES MITCHELL . I went with my master, and overtook the prisoner with the shoes in his apron. I saw him throw them down, I picked them up, and put them on the table in a public-house, in care of my master, while I went to get an officer. I returned in five minutes, and found them again. Two pair are of my manufacturing.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I found them by a dunghill. The prosecutor asked me if I had got them? I said I had, and gave them to him.

GUILTY. - DEATH . Aged 17.

Recommended to mercy on account of his youth .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

Reference Number: t18180218-67

436. MARIA BRAINING was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of February , one apron, value 1s.; one petticoat, value 1s., and 3l. 19s. 6d. in monies numbered, the property of Peter Cassanet , in his dwelling-house .

PETER CASSANET . I keep a public-house in Bunhill-row , the prisoner was my servant , On the 31st of January, about five o'clock, I found a box in my bed-room broken open, and a bag, containing 5l. worth of copper, taken out.

MARY MANDERS . I live next door to Mr. Cassanet-my back-yard communicates with his. On the 31st of January, between four and five o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner came in at my back-door with the bag of copper, and asked me to get somebody to help her to carry it to Hatton-garden, as her mistress sent her to pay it away, and she would pay the porter out of her own pocket, as it was heavy, and she did not wish her mistress to think her lazy - I told her my son should take it. She went back again, and returned with a bundle, which had halfpence in it. I chinked it, and said, there was copper in it. She said she was going to pay the baker, and asked if my son was ready? I did not think all was right, and took the bag in to Mr. Cassanet-when I returned, she had escaped with the bundle.

THOMAS VANN. I am an officer. I examined the box. It appeared to have been forced with some instrument like a poker. She told me she opened the box with the poker, and took the bag of copper out.

RICHARD DAVIS . I apprehended the prisoner, and found an apron and handkerchief on her.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I did not know they were in my bundle.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

Reference Number: t18180218-68

437. MORRIS READY and JAMES GOSSIP were indicted for stealing, on the 17th of February , at St. Marylebone , 22 silver spoons, value 12l., and 30 silver forks, value 20l., the goods of Jonathan Bullock , Esq. , in his dwelling-house .

WILLIAM PICKETT . On the 17th of February, between ten and eleven o'clock in the morning, I was standing opposite the gateway of Mr. Bullock's house, in Cumberland-street, Portman-square , and saw the two prisoners go down the area - I am sure they are the persons - They were down there about three minutes. I saw the prisoner, Ready, come up first, and observed his hands in his pocket - He had a loose coat on. He came into the street, went to the corner of Berkeley-street, stopped there, and looked over the corner of the railing towards the house. In about a minute, or a minute and a half, I saw Gossip come out of the area, and go up to him-his hands were also in his pocket-he had the same kind of coat on. I went over to Mr. Bullock's, went down the area-steps, and met Johnson, the butler, and told him. I lost sight of them. We both went in pursuit of the prisoners, and overtook Ready at the corner of Duke-street, Oxford-street, which is between a quarter and half a mile off. I had seen Gossip run down Somerset-street with him. While we were pursuing, they parted - I overtook Ready, and took him to the watch-house. As we went along, I saw him drop eight table-spoons - I heard them fall close to him - They were silver; Johnson picked up seven of them. I saw Ready searched at the watch-house, and eighteen silver forks, and two gravy-spoons found on him. I also saw twelve silver desert-spoons, and twelve silver forks found on Gossip- they said nothing.

JOSEPH JOHNSON. I am butler to Mr. Jonathan Bullock . Pickett gave me information- I looked in the cupboard, and missed the plate. I ran out, and pursued with him. I saw some person take Gossip- I then ran after Ready, and saw him taken also- we took him to the watch-house. I saw eight table-spoons drop from his person- I am sure they dropped from him; I picked up seven of them. I knew them to be my master's, by the crest. I went to the watch-house, and saw eighteen large forks, and two gravy-spoons, found on him, which were Mr. Bullock's, and had his crest on them.

WILLIAM NEWITT . I am a constable. I searched Gossip, and found twelve desert-spoons in his left-hand pocket.

WILLIAM SELLERS . I found twelve silver desert-spoons on Gossip.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN SYMONDS . I was at the corner of Pullen's Mews, heard the alarm, ran through the mews, and saw the prisoners in Somerset-street. I seized Gossip, took him to the watch-house, and saw the property found on him.

ISAAC SEARCEY . I was coming out of a house in Duke-street, heard the cry of Stop thief! saw Ready running, and observed something in his pocket- I followed and took him. He said,

"Don't take me, I have only broken

a pane of glass"- I secured him. He got one of his hands from me, and tried to throw the eight table-spoons down an area- he threw them down. I picked one up, took him to the watch-house, and took eighteen silver forks and two gravy spoons from his pocket. I gave the one I picked up to Johnson.

READY'S Defence. We saw a butcher down the area, he beckoned to us to come down, gave us the plate out of his apron, and told us to take it to Portman-square, and he would pay us.

GOSSIP'S Defence. I went down with Ready. The butcher gave us the plate, and said he would pay us.

WILLIAM PICKETT . I was opposite the gateway, and saw no butcher.

JOSEPH JOHNSON. The butcher had been there, but had been gone sometime before I heard of the robbery.

READY - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 16.

GOSSIP - GUILTY . DEATH . Aged 15.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18180218-69

438. MARY DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of January , one watch, value 1l.; one seal, value 10s.; five handkerchiefs, value 10s.; two gowns, value 5s.; four boxes, value 6s.; one brooch, value 1s., and one trunk, value 1s., the goods of Charles Newport , in his dwelling-house .

CHARLES NEWPORT. I am a veterinary surgeon , and live in Gray's Inn, Lane ; the prisoner was my servant ; on the 20th of January she left me without notice, at seven o'clock in the morning. When I got up I missed the property. I do not know whether it is worth 2l.

WILLIAM READ . I am an officer. The prosecutor applied to me on the 20th of January. I found the prisoner at No. 2, George-street, Battle-bridge, she opened the door to me; not knowing her then, I fetched the prosecutor - when I returned she was gone- I took her two days after in the same street, she had removed to the other side of the way. I found five handkerchiefs and a pillow-case under her bed. She said she had sold the rest of the things in the Borough, and took me to the shop.

WILLIAM MULLETT . I am a pawnbroker. On the 20th of January the prisoner pledged a watch, a gown, and a scarf with me, early in the morning.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 28.

Of Stealing to the value of 39s. only .

Confined Six Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18180218-70

439. ROBERT RYDER was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of February , three pelisses, value 2l., the goods of George Hopps , privately in his shop .

GEORGE HOPPS. I live in Cranbourn-passage, Leicester-square . On the 13th of February, about half-past ten o'clock in the morning, I was behind my counter, and heard a violent tear at the door; I ran out, looked up the passage, and saw the prisoner about half-way up, and the goods on the pavement close by him. On seeing me he ran out, and I caught him just as he turned the corner of a passage- I brought him back, and gave him in charge; a woman picked up the pelisses. They were hanging on the door post.

HYAM HYAMS. I live in Cranbourn-passage. I saw the prisoner walk up and down the passage several times. About half-past ten o'clock he came again, and snatched the pelisses from Mr. Hopps's door; I ran out, he immediately dropped them. Mr. Hopps secured him.

THOMAS GOOK . I am a constable. I was with the last witness, and saw the prisoner, and another man, pass the shop several times; at last he went up and snatched the pelisses down.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 20.

Of Stealing, but not privately .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18180218-71

440. RICHARD ROBERTS was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of January , one glass, value 10s., the goods of John Isaacs , privately in his shop .

JOHN ISAACS. I live in King-street, Westminster , and am a china and glass dealer . I lost the glass.

SOLOMON ISAACS . I was passing my brother's house on the 19th of January, and saw three persons standing at his window, the prisoner, who was one of them, went into the shop, and took the glass out of the window, and shewed it to the other two. I immediately secured him, and took the glass from him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I beg for mercy.

GUILTY. Aged 15.

Of Stealing, but not privately . Confined Six Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18180218-72

441. JOHN CAMPLING was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Cambridge , on the 23rd of February , and stealing one box, value 2s. 6d. , his property.

THOMAS CAMBRIDGE . I keep the Ship, public-house , at Tottenham. On the 23d of February, about five o'clock in the morning, my house was open for business, I heard a noise at the bar window, I went and found it had been pushed up- it had not been fastened; I lost a box of books out of it, which was directed to Mr. Dove, Oak-lane. I followed the prisoner to the Vulture, public-house, and took him. I found the box in a garden opposite my house.

WILLIAM MALES . I was passing the prosecutor's house, saw the prisoner stop at the window, and push the sash up. I could not see what he took, it was dark.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing about it.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18180218-73

442. HENRY MENDHAM was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Weaver , about seven o'clock in the night of the 13th of February , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein eight yards of floor-clouth, value 30s. , his property.

ANDREW WATSON . I manage the business of Mr. Thomas Weaver's floor cloth manufactory, at Kensington, and live in the house; Mr. Weaver and his family does not; but he pays the rent. On the 13th of February, about

seven o'clock at night, I heard a noise at the latch of the door, and sent my daughter to see who was there; she said, nobody. Two minutes after that I heard it again - I crept on one side of the shop, and saw the prisoner with the roll of cloth on his back in the shop-there was another man with him; I followed him, and secured him about ten yards from the door - He dropped it, and got away from me, but was secured again immediately. He was never out of my sight.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 20.

Of stealing only . Confined Six Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18180218-74

443. JOHN MILLER was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of February , at St. John, Hackney , twenty sheep, price 40l. , the property of William English .

WILLIAM BAKER. I am bailiff to William English, who lives at Edmonton, and has a farm at Rumford, Essex; the sheep were there under my care - I live there. On the 15th of February he had twenty sheep in a field about 200 yards from my house - I penned them all in with a hurdle that night-the field is also enclosed with a hedge and gate; I saw them all safe within hurdles at two o'clock that morning, and missed them about seven the next evening, which was Sunday, the 16th. I found the hurdle open for about two yards. I traced them, by their foot-marks, through two fields belonging to Mr. Hawes-it appeared as if straw had been shook over the foot-marks to hide them. I traced them into a bye-road which leads to London, got a horse, and came to Smithfield, where I heard my sheep were stopped at Hackney; I immediately went there, and found nineteen of them, and the other at Worship-street, where the prisoner was in custody; I knew it to be one of them, it was marked D on the left hip-those at Hackney were also marked so, and two of them had a stripe down the back beside. I have known the prisoner ever since last summer. I saw him in the same field; he is a labourer, and lives at Chattle, within a mile of Rumford.

TIMOTHY READING. I am patrol of Hackney. On the 16th of February, between five and six o'clock in the morning, I was at Lee Bridge turnpike, and saw the prisoner drive sheep up to the gate, the tollman asked how many he had, he said a score; the man demanded 10d.; after a little while he said he had only sixpence; the man said he could not let him through; he then said he had left his master at four o'clock, and he said he would pay the toll, and that his master would pay the four-pence. He appeared in a great hurry and agitated, which made me suspect the sheep were stolen. I followed him over Lee Bridge, which is in Middlesex; he drove them very hard. I asked him where he was going with the sheep, he said, to Smithfield? I asked him where his master was, he said he did not know. I then asked him where he came from, but he would not answer me, and I collared him. In about a quarter of an hour he said he came from Chigwell. I asked him at what time he left there? he said at twelve o'clock. I asked him if he took them out of a pen or a field? he said, out of a field, and that a gentleman and a butcher were with him when he took them. I asked him if he should know them again? he said, no. I took him to Hackney, and gave both him and the sheep in charge to Garva.

JOHN READER . I was with Reading, his account is correct in every particular. I asked the prisoner if there was any other person present but him and his master when he fetched them out of the field? he said, no I told him it was odd that the gentleman who belonged to them was not there. He then said his master and the gentleman brought them out of the field the overnight into a meadow by the road-side.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not say, you saw my master trying, to open the toll-gate before - A. No.

JOHN GARVA . Reading and Reader gave the sheep and the prisoner into my charge; I asked him where he brought them from - He said, from the Chigwell road; that he met a man on Sunday afternoon, who employed him to take them to Smithfield for eight pence. I asked at what time he brought them from there? he said at twelve o'clock at night. I asked him if he was waiting at any public-house until that time? he said his master and him waited in a lane, and that he did not know who his master was, for he never saw him before, but that he was dressed in a pepper-and-saltcoat. Baker saw the sheep in my possession. I found a knife on the prisoner, and some rope yarn, with which the hurdles had been tied.

WILLIAM BAKER re-examined. The hurdles were tied with rope yarn. No one had any orders from me or my master, to take the sheep to Smithfield, or any other place. My master does not do any thing with the farm, I manage every thing.

Prisoner's Defence. I was travelling about, out of work, and met a butcher, who offered me eighteen pence to drive the sheep to Smithfield with him; he said he would pay the gate, the patrol said he saw him come to the gate; he left me, saying, he would fetch seventy-two more, and I never saw him again.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 22.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18180218-75

444. BENJAMIN CURTIS was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Chaplin and Phillip Western Wood , about one o'clock in the night of the 20th of January , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein two bushels of malt, value 20s. , their property.

JOSEPH KEELEY . I sleep on Messrs. Chaplin and Wood's premises, to take care of them; the malt was lost from the mash-tub. On the 20th of January, about one o'clock in the morning, I found it close to the outer gate, in a sack-it was taken from a quantity which had been ground-there was a man close to it; as soon as he saw me he ran farther into the yard.

WILLIAM CHANDLER. I am a watchman. I found the prisoner in a public-house just by the premises.

MATILDA MANSFIELD. I am servant to Mr. Gulston, who keeps a public-house at the corner of the brewery; the prisoner came up to my room door, I called to know who was there - He said, "Hold your noise; for God's sake let me out - I am done for." He said he had been to the privy, fell asleep, and awoke and wanted to be let out. The men came and took him. NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

Reference Number: t18180218-76

445. JAMES HAWES was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of January , one watch, value 2l.; one seal, value 7s.; one key, value 2s., and one ribbon, value 1d, the goods of William Bury , in his dwelling-house ,

WILLIAM BURY. I am a schoolmaster . On the 13th of January, between eight and ten o'clock in the evening, I lost my watch; I believe I lost it, in the upper gallery of Covent Garden Theatre - I did not miss it. I applied at Bow-street, in consequence of an advertisement.

Cross-examined. I do not know where I lost it.

WILLIAM JONES . I am an officer. On the 13th of January, I was going down Bow-street, with Wright, between ten and eleven o'clock, and saw the prisoner with another man; the other man went up to two gentlemen, and felt there pockets. I saw the prisoner shove him against two other gentlemen; he immediately after went under the hackney coaches; I followed and overtook him in Russell-street. I wanted to search him, he resisted, and I threw him down. I found the watch, with the fob; he said, he found it at the Theatre. I advertised it-Mr-Bury claimed it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180218-77

446. THOMAS DAY was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of February , one bedstead, value 10s. the goods of John Hawkins .

JOHN HAWKINS. I am a broker ; I live in Marylebone-lane . On the 12th of February, I lost my bedstead out of my passage.

WILLIAM SAYERS. I am a watchman. I saw the prisoner with the bedstead on his back, at half-past nine o'clock at night. I stopped him; he said, he was going to take it home, to Bedford-street, and that he brought it from his lodgings - I took him to the watch-house.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A man gave it to me to carry.

GUILTY . Aged 39.

Confined Six Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180218-78

447. THOMAS FOX was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of February , five chimney ornaments, value 5s. , the goods of Benjamin Topham .

THOMAS MAHON. I am a porter at Benjamin Topham 's Hotel, in St. James's-street. On the 10th of February, the property was on view, for sale by auction; the prisoner came into the room - I went out; when I returned, I missed the five chimney ornaments off the mantlepiece. I met him coming out of the room, and followed him down the back-staircase, into a dark cellar; when he came out, I collared him until a light was brought, and found the ornaments, broken, in the cellar. I gave him in charge. They were safe when I left the room.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I have a large family. I did it through the greatest distress.

GUILTY. Aged 64.

Recommended to Mercy . Confined one Month .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180218-79

448. WILLIAM GARDINER was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of February , six pounds of copper, value 5s. , the goods of James Frost .

JOHN FROST . I am assistant to my father, James Frost, who is a brass-founder -the prisoner worked for us. On the 3rd of February, about seven o'clock, I watched the prisoner, and saw him put six pounds of copper into his pocket; I stopped him, and told him I suspected him; he said, he had none. I said, I must search him; he then said, he would give it to me-which he did; it was between his shirt and skin.

Prisoner. I beg for mercy.

GUILTY . Aged 41.

Confined Three Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180218-80

449. JOHN HELLIER was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of January , two spades, value 5s. , the goods of James Malcolm .

JAMES MALCOLM . I am a market-gardener , and live at Brentford . On the 27th of January, when I went to work at seven o'clock in the morning, I missed my two spades; suspecting the prisoner, I went to his mother; she said, he had not been at home all night. I traced him out of my ground, and went after him to some labouring men, who were digging gravel, and found my spades.

ALLEN MALCOLM . I am the son of the last witness. On the 27th of January, I missed the spades, and found they had been sold to some labourers.

WILLIAM GORE. I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner, he said, I know what you want me for, it is for stealing the spades, and that he had been a d-d rogue, for robbing a good master.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180218-81

450. THOMAS JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of January , one handkerchief, value 1s. 6d., the goods of a certain man unknown, from his person .

THOMAS THOMPSON . I am an officer. On the 20th of January, about six o'clock, I saw the prisoner, in company with two more, in the Haymarket, attempting several gentlemens' pockets, as they passed. I followed them into Piccadilly; he went about half-way up, and returned, following a gentleman; the other two covered him, while the prisoner took the handkerchief out of his pocket. I was on the opposite side of the road, the prisoner crossed, I laid hold of him; he threw it down. Forbes ran after the gentleman.

JOHN FORBES . I am a patrol. I was with Thompson, and saw the prisoner with two more - They attempted several pockets. I did not see him take the handkerchief; I saw him cross the road, and ran after the man; I saw him throw the handkerchief down. I went after the gentleman, he returned, and promised to come to the office, but did not.

Prisoner's Defence. It is mine, I dropped it.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180218-82

451. WILLIAM LEAF was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of January , four pounds of bacon, value 3s. , the goods of Thomas Brown .

THOMAS BROWN. I am a cheesemonger , and live in Grafton-street, Soho . On the 28th of January, I saw the prisoner take the bacon out of my shop window, at eight o'clock at night. I was behind the counter; I ran out, and secured him; he threw it down.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined Three Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180218-83

452. DANIEL M'CARTHY was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of January , one wooden bowl, value 1d.; 3s., and eight sixpences , the property of Richard Colbourn .

MARY COLBOURN. I am the wife of Richard Colbourn , who is a shoemaker in Cranbourn-alley . On the 18th of January, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, the bowl containing 3s. and eight sixpence's, was in the till. I saw the prisoner come into the shop, reach over the counter, and take it out. I ran out of the back parlour, and called out, "stop thief;" I stopped the prisoner in Cranbourn-street; he dropped the money at his feet.

Confined Six Months . GUILTY . Aged 15.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180218-84

453. ANN PINK , alias SIMPSON , was indicted for stealing, on the 31st. of January , six yards of bombazeen, value 1l. 4s., and five pair of stockings, value 10s. , the property of George Padmore .

GEORGE PADMORE . I am a linen-draper , and live in Fan-street, Manchester-square . On the 31st of January, I missed the bombazeen, and accused the prisoner of it - She was my servant . I got a search-warrant, and found a quantity of duplicates on her, one of which relate to the two pair of stockings. She then said, she hoped I was satisfied; that she had not got the bombazeen. I told her not to deny it, immediately after that, she said, if I would let her go out, she would get it. She went out; we followed her to Barker's the pawnbroker, and then to her sister's, where we found a quantity of duplicates; she then took us to Neat's in Duke-street, where we found the bombazeen, and three pair of stockings; she said, that was all she had taken.

SAMUEL PLANK. I am an officer. I was present when the prosecutor charged the prisoner with the robbery - She denied it. I found two duplicates on her, of the stockings; I accompanied her, and the prosecutor, to Neat's, where we found six yards of bombazeen, and three pair of stockings.

WILLIAM CASLAKE . I am a pawnbroker. I have two pair of stockings, that were pledged, on the 9th of October, by a person whom I do not know; the duplicate found on the prisoner is mine.

JOHN NEATE . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Duke-street. I have six yards of bombazeen, and three pair of stockings, which were pledged with me, in the name of Ann Simpson, 14, Manchester-street.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I only took what has been produced. GUILTY . Aged 35.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180218-85

454. WILLIAM ROSS was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of January , one silver spoon, value 3s. , the goods of Alexander Mills .

JOHN BULLOCK . I am an aprentice to Alexander Mills , who is a wine-merchant , and lives in the New-road . On Tuesday the 20th of January, about half-past five o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came to the door, and asked if Mr. Mills was at home. I told him, yes; I asked him to wait in the counting-house while I went up to him. I asked his name; he said; no matter about my name; I was to tell Mr. Mills, a gentleman wanted him. When I got up about three steps, I remembered that Mr. Mills had told me, when I came up again, to bring some wafers, and returned for them. I had left a silver spoon in a glass on the shelf. When I returned to the counting-house, it dropped from behind the prisoner. I called Mr. Mills down, who asked what his business was, he gave two or three different names; Mr. Mills sent me for a constable. The prisoner said his name was William Ross , and then that it was Webb, a wine-merchant, in St. John-street; he was quite confused when my master came down; he had no business with the prisoner, I picked the spoon up.

WILLIAM DREWETT . I am a constable; I was sent for and took the prisoner into custody; I found a Court Guide upon him.

Prisoner. Q. Was I not in liquor - A. He pretended to be so - I am sure he was not. I found a quantity of cards in his apartments, of several Lieutenants, Captains, and Lords.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 35.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180218-86

455. GEORGE SKINNER was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of February , one barrow-pig, value 50s., the property of Thomas Kier , and one rug, value 2s. the property of William Beeby .

THOMAS KIER. I am a publican at the bottom of Highgate-hill ; the prisoner is a labourer in the neighbourhood. On the 12th of February, I lost my pig out of the sty, in the night; about seven o'clock in the morning, I traced the blood from my premises, up to the prisoners door, about fifteen yards off-the door was shut. I asked his wife where he was. I got a search-warrant, and found my pig concealed under his floor, in the cloth-it weighed eight stone, the head was cut off. I am sure it is mine; the floor takes up, and there is a hole to put things in.

GEORGE WOOD . I am an officer of Hatton-garden; I went and found the pig under the prisoner's floor-under the loose boards, it had not been scalded.

JAMES BRAND . I traced the pigs blood to the prisoner's door. Beeby found his cloth in the prisoner's stable.

(Cloth sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I found the pig at my door.

GUILTY . Aged 43.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180218-87

456. WILLIAM STANLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of February , one pair of boots, value 13s. , the goods of Samuel White .

SAMUEL WHITE . I am a shoe-maker , and live in the Edgware-road . On the 12th of February, as I was passing from my shop door, to the passage, about half-past eight o'clock, I saw the prisoner through the glass door, jump off the railing with a pair of boots in his hand. I called to him he put them under his coat; I ran out and secured him - I took them from him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was looking at them.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180218-88

457. JOHN THOMPSON was indicted for stealing on the 9th of February one coat, value 15s. , the goods of John Chumley .

JOHN CHUMLEY. I am a tailor and live in Marylebone-lane . On the 12th of January, the coat hung at the door for sale.

JOHN HARRISON . I was in Chumley's shop, and saw the prisoner come to the door, take the coat down, and run away with it - I pursued - He fell down about six yards from the door. I came up and took him with it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I was in great distress.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180218-89

458. MARY ALSOP was indicted for stealing on the 21st of January , forty-eight cat-skins, value 7l. , the goods of Elizabeth Poland .

GEORGE POLAND. I am son of Elizabeth Poland, who is a furrier , and lives in Oxford-street; I delivered four hundred and four cat-skins to Schade's man, to be dressed.

FRANCIS SCHADE. I am a dresser-my man brought me the skins on the 17th of December; I lost forty-eight of them out of my house-my door is generally open.

GILBERT MEAPE . I am a furrier, and live in St. Giles's; the prisoner brought forty-eight skins to me to sell - They being unfinished made me suspect her. I saw Mr. Poland's name on them; I detained her, and informed him - He claimed them. She said they were hers.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I found them near Fuller's-rents, and went to sell them.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180218-90

459. WILLIAM ABBOTT was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of February , two pair of shoes, value 15s. , the goods of Richard Bond .

RICHARD BOND. I am a shoe-maker , and live in High-street, St. Giles's . On the 7th of February, the shoes were cut from my door, where they hung. I heard them rattle-ran out, and saw the prisoner putting them under his coat; I secured him, and took them from him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 49.

Confined One Month .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180218-91

460. THOMAS BONTEIN and DAVID CRAFER were indicted for stealing, on the 9th of January , 36 trusses of hay, value 5l. , the goods of James Richard Wood , Esq.

MRS.SARAH MEDLEY. I manage a farm belonging to James Richard Wood , Esq., at Friars-place, Acton , six miles from Tyburn. On the 7th of January, the prisoners came to the farm together. - Bontein said he understood I had some very good hay to dispose of. I went into the rick-yard, and shewed them the stack of hay - They approved of it, and agreed for three loads, at 5l. a load; the three loads were to be delivered on the 9th-every load was to be paid for on delivery. We went into the kitchen - I asked him for his card, he said he had none; I gave him a slip of paper, and Bontein wrote down, " David Crafer , No. 126, Drury-lane" - He gave it to me as his own name; Crafer stood by, and saw him write it. On the 9th of January, I sent Savaway with it. Bontein desired me to sent a receipt with it-my agreement was for ready-money. I gave Savaway orders not to deliver it without the money. He returned about four o'clock without the hay, and brought me a letter, without any money in it. I never saw the prisoners again until I saw them at the office.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. I expected to have the money. The prisoners were both strangers to me - He wrote the direction as his own.

WILLIAM SAVAWAY . I live with Mrs. Medley. On the 9th of January. I took a load of hay for Mr. David Crafer 's, No. 126, Drury-lane. I took a receipt, and was to bring the money back for it. I took it to town-the prisoners overtook me in Drury-lane, before I got to No. 126 - I had seen them at the farm when they bought it. They asked me to stop a few minutes, as they were taking a cup of coffee - They asked me to have something to drink, and I went into a public-house with them, and we drank together. Bontein asked me if I had the receipt for the hay? I said I had. He asked me for it, and I gave it to him - He gave me a sealed letter. I asked him if that was the money? he said, "Give it to your mistress, it is all right." They told me to wait a few minutes - I waited outside the door. They came out and said I was to go with them down the street; I went some distance. Bontein delivered the hay to Crafer, who put it in the loft of the Peacock-yard, Clare-market. I never opened the letter. I thought the prisoners were brothers. I supposed the letter contained the money, or I should not have let them have the hay. Next day I went back, but could not see any of it. Walbank took me, and shewed me some of it. (Looks at a letter)-this is the letter he gave me (read)-

"Mr. Crafer will thank Mrs. Medley to send another load of hay on Monday, and he will then pay for two loads.

"126, Drury-lane. D. CRAFER."

EDWARD WALBANK . I am a potatoe-merchant, and live in Clement's Inn-passage, Clare-market. On the 9th of January, about one o'clock, the prisoners came to me. I knew them before-Crafer is a butcher in Clare-market.

They said they had a load of hay to sell, and asked 5l. for it - I told them I thought it far too much, as I never gave above 4l. I went to the Peacock-yard, saw it, and offered them 4l. for it-they said they could not take it; Crafer said I should have it. I gave them 3l. 15s. for it. They were together at the time. Crafer shewed me a receipt; he said he shewed it to me to convince me that he had given 5l. for it, but it was not so good as he had bought it for. Bontein read the receipt to me, it was for 5l. - he said it came from Action. This was after I paid the money.

SAMUEL LOVE . I am a hair-dresser, and live at No. 126, Drury-lane - I have lived there these twenty years. Crafer never lived there, nor any person of that name. I never saw the prisoners before.

MRS. MEDLEY. The hay is worth 5l.

Cross-examined. I entered it in my books.

MR. ALLEY, on behalf of the prisoners, contended, that this was not a larceny; that the possession of the hay was parted with, and the witness (Mrs. Medley) had entered it in her book, and that it was only a fraud.

MESSRS. CURWOOD, ANDREWS, and ARARIN argued, that from the beginning to end it appeared that it was the prisoners' intent to defrand the prosecutor, and that the possession was never parted with.

The COURT decided in favour of MR. ALLEY'S objection-that it was a fraud but no felony, as the servant voluntarily parted with the hay; the prisoners were accordingly ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180218-92

461. THOMAS BONTEIN was again indicted for stealing, on the 12th of September , 36 trusses of hay, value 6l. , the goods of John Gordon .

This case being of a similar nature with the last, the Court decided as before.

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180218-93

462. JOHN CARRIONS was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Richard Kelsey , about six o'clock in the night of the 31st of January , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, one pair of shoes, value 8s. , his property.

RICHARD KELSEY. I live in Goodge-street, St. Pancras , and am a shoemaker . On the 31st of January, at six o'clock at night, I was in the kitchen; my apprentice called me - I ran up into the shop, found a pane of glass broken in the window, and a pair of shoes gone-the glass had been cracked about three weeks before, and a week after that a piece of glass was broken out of the same window. I had patched a piece of glass over the hole - I saw it safe when I put the lamp in the window. I put a box before it, which hid the hole-it stood against the window; it had been there for a week. Noon came in, and asked me if I had lost any thing? I told him I missed a pair of shoes. He said, if I would come with him, he would shew me who had them. He took me to the other end of the street, on the other side of the way, where the prisoner, another person, and a child were standing-he told me that was the party. I took hold of the prisoner - He took off his hat; one shoe fell down the area, and the other on the pavement, out of his hat. They were safe when I put the lamp in the window.

WILLIAM NOON . I am a thermometer-maker. I saw the prisoner, with two boys, about twelve years of age, walking up Goodge-street. One of the boys stopped at the window, and put his hand against the glass; he went on, and met the prisoner and the other boy. They returned, took a piece of glass out of the window, threw it down, and took something out - He ran and met the prisoner and the other boy. I followed them up the street, and saw them station themselves on the other side of the way. I ran to the prosecutor, and took him with me; we met them. He took the prisoner, who took off his hat, and asked us what we wanted with him? He placed his hat over the area-one of the shoes dropped down the area, and the other on the pavement. The boy broke the glass so suddenly, that I did not know whether it was loose or not. The prisoner could not see him break the window.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. They never were in my possession.

GUILTY. Aged 17.

Of Stealing only , Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180218-94

463. THOMAS EDWARDS was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of February , 28 yards of printed cotton, value 36s., the goods of Bryan Weems , privately in his shop .

ROBERT HOOD . I am servant to Bryan Weems, who is a linen-draper , and lives in St. John street, West Smithfield . On the 19th of February, about three o'clock in the afternoon, my master was in the counting-house, behind the shop - I was writing at the counter. All at once, I heard a person step lightly out of the shop very quick - I immediately ran out - I saw somebody come in or go out; the print was in the window; he must have reached a great way to get it - He could not get it over the rail outside; the shawls hung by the door, which prevented my seeing him. I saw the prisoner running with a large bundle on his arm. I pursued him about a hundred yards caught hold of him round the neck, and asked him what he had got there? He took it from under his coat, threw it in the gutter, and said, "There, take it." He slipped from me, but I took him again-another person picked up the print. My master was in the counting-house; there is a window in it, which looks into the shop.

JOHN BIGNALL . I am a shoemaker - I work opposite the prosecutor's. About three o'clock in the afternoon, three young lads stood before my window, in company together. I saw them making a signal to a person on the opposite side of the way. I looked out again, and saw the prisoner and Hood running down the street - the prisoner had the cotton under his arm; he threw it down, I picked it up, and took it to the watch-house. I saw the prisoner on the step of the door.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 40.

Of Stealing, but not privately .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180218-95

464. ANN TANDY was indicted for stealing on the 28th of January , in the dwelling-house of Robert Akhurst, at St. Pancras , one trunk, value 4s.; one tin box, value 2s., twenty-five guineas, eighteen sovereigns; one 300l., five 50l., four 40l., twenty 20l., nineteen 10l., thirty-eight 5l., and fifty-nine 1l. bank notes , the property of Richard Tandy .

RICHARD TANDY . I was a cheesemonger , I let my shop on the 4th of January, and live at No. 72, Tottenham-court-road , in Mr. Robert Akhurst 's house; the prisoner is my niece ; I took her under my care - She lived two years with me. On the 28th of January, I went into the City; I left home about half-past three o'clock, and returned at half-past ten o'clock at night. My sister asked me about my trunk; I said I had not taken it - I went up to my bedroom closet and missed it-it was an hair trunk, about three-fourths of a yard long. I have recovered the trunk, and all the property-the trunk contained my cash-box, which contained the monies stated in the indictment; the whole amount is 1100l. I received information that the prisoner had been seen at, No. 12, Eaden-street, Hampstead-road The next morning I applied at Marlborough-street, got a search-warrant, and went there, with Foy. The outer door was open; I tried the latch of the left-hand parlour door, on the ground floor, and found it open. The first thing I saw, was the hair trunk under the bed; I told Foy, it was mine - I unlocked it, and found every thing safe, as it was when I left it in my room. Foy lifted up the bed, and found the prisoner concealed under it, close to the wall - I took her to Marlborough-street.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. Are you sure Mr. Akhurst's name is Robert - A. No; the prisoner is an orphan - She is blind with one eye.

MARGARET JONES. I keep the house at No. 12, Eaden-street, where the prisoner was taken. I was going out at half-past four in the afternoon, and saw her standing in the passage, with the trunk. I asked her who she wanted; she said, she was waiting for the young woman in the parlour- Mary Burke lodged there; I asked if she was going to take the trunk in or out; she said, she was going to bring it in - I went out and left her there. Burke's father and daughter live in my house.

THOMAS FOY . I am an officer. I found the prisoner and trunk under the bed-the trunk was not heavy, the prisoner could carry it. She was examined three or four times-the magistrate could get no asylum for her. I returned the trunk and all the money, except a 1l. note, which I produce.

MR. TANDY. It is mine, and has my name on it. I do not know Burke.

GUILTY. Aged 13.

Of stealing 1l. only. Judgment Respited .

Sent to the Refuge.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180218-96

465. CATHARINE COLTIS was indicted for stealing on the 2nd of February five neck handkerchiefs, value 2s. 6d.; three napkins, value 3s.; one waistcoat, value 3s.; two frocks, value 1s. 6d.; two aprons, value 2s.; one iron, value 4d.; one shawl, value 1s., and one cap, value 2s. the goods of Charles Self .

CHARLES SELF . I am a baker , and live in church-street, Mile end ; the prisoner nursed my wife. On the 2nd of February, we missed the property, and charged her with it. I found part of the property at Clark's.

WILLIAM CLARK . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Whitechapel. On the 9th of January, the prisoner pledged two neck handkerchiefs, and on the 27th, an apron with me.

SAMUEL DOBSON . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner - She gave me twenty-three duplicates, and said they were the property of the prosecutor; we recovered part of the things.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was in distress.

GUILTY . Aged 29.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180218-97

466. JOHN ROBINSON was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of January , one lamp, value 12s. , the property of our Lord the King .

SECOND COUNT, The same, only stating it to be the property of Catherine Marchant .

CHARLES VIRGIN . I am messenger to the Police-Office, Hatton-garden. On the 21st of January, about half-past six at night, I missed the lamp out of the office passage; it hung in a large glass. Next morning Joel brought it to me.

COLEMAN JOEL . I live in Long-alley, Crown-street, Finsbury-square, and am a broker. The prisoner brought the lamp to my shop, about ten o'clock, and asked me to buy it. I asked him whose it was, he said, it was his own. I took him to the watch-house; he then said he had it to sell, for a man of the name of Powel, for 15s. - I told him I thought he stole it; he then said he got it from a rum place-that it was stolen out of Hatton-garden office. I took him there.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. Powel gave me the lamp to sell.

GUILTY . Aged 43.

Transported for Seven Years ,

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180218-98

467. WILLIAM BICKERS was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of February , twenty-nine iron bars, value 40s. , the goods of Robert Love and Adam Slater .

ROBERT LOVE . I am a plumber , in partnership with Adam Slater , and live in Draper's-buildings, Burton Crescent. On the 10th of January, I missed the bars from a building in Cobourg-street - they were loose

THOMAS MATTHEWS . I keep a coal-shed. On the 26th of January, I saw the prisoner take two bars to Gray's Inn-lane, and sell them, from No. 18, Cobourg-street. I told Mr. Love; the prisoner worked at the building-next day I saw him take three more.

THOMAS SEGER . I am an ironmonger, and live in Gray's Inn-lane; the prisoner came to me to sell some iron bars, he said, he had a contract job, and that they were some that were bought at the new street, that he had more than he should want. Some days after that, Love, came and told me, if he came again to detain him; next day he came, and I detained him.

WILLIAM NICHOLS . I am a carpenter, I was putting up

the iron railing, and employed the prisoner to put up the chimney-pieces.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not tell me to take them for what you owed me. - A. No.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. Nichols gave me leave to take them instead of money.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180218-99

468. JAMES COLLINS was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of February , one handkerchief, value 5s., the goods of John Morgan , from his person .

JOHN MORGAN. I live in James-street, Bedford-row. On the 10th of February, about a quarter before nine o'clock in the evening, I was going home; as I passed the Sheriff's office, at the top of Bedford-row - I felt a pull at my great-coat pocket; I instantly turned round, the prisoner was at my elbow. I missed my handkerchief, and seized him, took him to a shop door, at the corner of Hand-court, just at that moment, a gentleman said here is what you lost; the gentleman picked up my handkerchief, about a yard and a half from the prisoner. I had not taken him twenty yards from where I missed it; nobody had passed the place but him-it is impossible any body but him, could have taken it - I had felt it safe as I crossed Brownlow-street - I felt him take it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I passed the gentleman, he took hold of me. GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180218-100

469. WILLIAM COLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of February , three pails, value 7s., and one piggin, value 1s. , the goods of James Beal .

JAMES BEAL. I am a cooper , and live in Cow-cross . On the 10th of February, the things were taken from my door.

PHILIP AYRES. On the 10th of February, I was at work, a gentleman called out the pails were gone; I ran out - He pointed to the prisoner, and I saw him cross into Peter-street, with them. I asked him what he had got there - He dropped them into my arms, and ran away. I pursued, calling, stop thief - I never lost sight of him.

THOMAS THOMPSON. I heard the cry, and stopped the prisoner, who was running.

JOSEPH REYNOLDS . I live next door to Beal; I saw the prisoner and another man, walking backwards and forwards, they stopped several times to look; I noticed them - I watched them; the prisoner went down the street, and up again in a minute, the other man came down with the pails - I ran out and gave the alarm. I saw them lurking about for half an hour - I am sure they were together.

CHARLES BELES I was in Cow-cross, and saw the prisoner going down the street, with the pails at his back; I saw him stopped-he dropped them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A man gave them to me to carry.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180218-101

470. MARIA FOX was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of February , one pelisse, value 25s. , the goods of Roger Hutson .

JEMIMA HUTSON. I am the wife of Roger Hutson . who is a broker . On the 15th of February the prisoner came into my room to warm herself, and snatched the pelisse from the fire-side - I have known her near five years. I found her at her mother's about three hours after, quite drunk. NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180218-102

471. JOHN HUTCHINSON was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of February , one umbrella, value 4s. 6d. , the goods of Lars Bergstrom .

SAMUEL FURZEMAN. I am an officer. On the 3rd of February, about six o'clock in the evening, I was in Drury-lane, I saw the prisoner, and followed him to Tottenham-court-road -(he looked at several shops)-to Lars Bergstrom's shop; there he went into the passage, and brought an umbrella out. I took him - He threw it away.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I was in distress.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Fined One Shilling , and Discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180218-103

472. MARY MARTIN was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of January , one gown, value 10s ; the goods of Susannah Dyer .

ELIZA DYER. Susannah Dyer is my sister; I live in Golden-lane , the prisoner lodged with me. I missed my sister's gown out of a basket.

JAMES WALKER . I am servant to William Fothergill , who is a pawnbroker. On the 19th of January, the prisoner pledged the gown with me.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180218-104

473. WILLIAM PUGH was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of February , 14lbs. of Bacon, value 8s. , the goods of William Wilsdon .

WILLIAM WILSDON , I am a cheesemonger , and live in Bedford-street, Bedford-row . I lost the bacon from my shop.

THOMAS SLAUGHTER. I am a tailor. On the 11th of February I was coming up Red Lion-passage, and crossed the street, opposite Mr. Wilsdon's shop, and saw a man in the door-way throw something out to the prisoner, who was on the pavement; the prisoner caught it - They both joined and walked together on the opposite side of the way. I saw the prisoner had a large piece of bacon in his hand; I followed them down Bedford-row - They parted - I stopped the prisoner, and asked him where he got the bacon? he said the man whom I saw at the shop asked him to carry it for him, as he had bought it. I told him I thought it was stolen; he said he would go back to the shop with me. When we got to the step of the door he ran off, and threw the bacon away. I secured him and brought him back.

JAMES TOOKE . I am a watchman. I followed the prisoner, and brought him back.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I thought the young man who gave it to me had bought it.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined One Month .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180218-105

474. EDWARD WESTBROOK was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of January , one umbrella, value 5s. , the goods of William Nicholls .

WILLIAM NICHOLLS . I am a glove-maker , and live at Great Turnstile, Holborn . On Wednesday, the 28th of January, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, I was returning home, and saw the prisoner lurking about my shop - I took particular notice of him; my servant was behind the counter; as soon as he went into the parlour the prisoner went in and took an umbrella out; I turned round, collared him, and took it from him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined Six Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180218-106

475. WILLIAM GUNTER was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of January , twenty-five yards of flannel , the the goods of Samuel Bamston .

The indictment stating no value, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180218-107

476. ANN SPENCER was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of January , from the person of James Read , two 1l. bank notes , his property.

JAMES READ. I am servant to Mr. Colville, who lives in Bury-street, St. James's. On the 31st of January, I went out without my master's leave, and slept with a friend at the Collonade, Russell-square. I got up at four o'clock in the morning, and went home but could not get in; I walked about the street, and met the prisoner in Piccadilly about five o'clock - She asked me to walk with her; she unbuttoned my coat, and put her hand in my pocket, I pushed her away, and charged her with robbing me, as I missed two 1l. notes. I gave her in charge. The notes were never found.

Prisoner. Q. Was you not drunk - A. No; I walked about ten minutes with her. I first met her in Golden-square.

THOMAS COOK. I am a constable. The prisoner was brought into the watch-house - She denied the robbery. At the office she asked after a man, who, she said, was going to give change for one of the notes; she said," he is not going to do me, if I have done the other." A man brought her ten shillings, and said, there is your change.

OWEN DORKIN. I am the watch-house-keeper. The morning being cold, I let the prisoner, and another woman, come to the fire; the prisoner asked me if I would split? I asked what she meant; she said if I would go and get change for a 1l. note, she would give me five shillings, and asked if I would tell. I said I would not. She went down to the cell, and brought me up a 1l. note. I returned it to her, and said I would have nothing to do with it. The man who got the note changed for her was present - She gave it to him.

Prisoner's Defence. I asked him to change the note for another person.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180218-108

477. GEORGE STEVENS was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of January , three loaves of bread, value 6d., and one cake, value 1s. , the goods of Richard Bignall .

ANN PHILLIPS. I am servant to Richard Bignall , who is a baker , and lives at Chiswick . I went out for some cheese, as I returned I saw the prisoner under the window, with the bread and cake, which he had taken from the window.

CHARLES GAMMON . I am an officer. I saw the prisoner running and stopped him with three two-penny loaves, and a cake, upon him. He said he did it through distress.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Fined One Shilling , and Discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180218-109

478. WILLIAM THORNHILL was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of January , 34 quires of paper, value 1l. 8s. , the property of Edward Giles .

EDWARD GILES. I am a stationer , and live in Bedford-street, Covent-garden . On the 14th of January I lost the paper from my shop.

THOMAS COOKE . I am a constable. On the 14th of January, about eight o'clock in the morning, I stopped the prisoner, and another person, with the paper, in Hemming's-row - He resisted very much; his companion ran away. He said he bought it at Charing-cross. As I was taking him to the Office he said a man gave him a shilling to take it to Tottenham-court-road.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I bought it of a man for 24s.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180218-110

479. WILLIAM WINTLE was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of February , one ladder, value 5s. , the goods of John Lanyon .

JOHN LANYON. I am a carpenter . I was building at the bottom of Euston-square . As I was going to work at seven o'clock in the morning, I met the prisoner with my ladder. He said a person gave it to him - He ran away. I secured him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 34.

Confined One Month .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180218-111

480. JAMES AUSTIN and JAMES SLATFORD were indicted for stealing, on the 16th of January , one blunderbuss, value 7s. , the goods of Charles Brayne .

CHARLES BRAYNE . I am a broker , and live in Great Queen-street, Lincoln's Inn Fields. On the 16th of Febru

ary the blunderbuss was taken from behind a chest in my shop.

EDWARD HARTSHORN . I am servant to Mr. Brayne; I saw the prisoners about the door before it was taken. Next day I took them.

JESSE PHILLIPS . I live opposite Mr. Brayne's shop. I was standing at the door, and saw Austin lurking about. I had seen the prisoners lurking about several days before. About three o'clock I saw him go into the shop, take the blunderbuss, bring it out, and give it to another boy - I do not think it was Slatford.

JAMES VAUGHAN . I saw Austin on the steps with the blunderbuss, and two more boys standing by it-Slatford was one of them-Austin gave it to the other boy, who put it under his coat; they all walked away together.

WILLIAM DORRINGTON. On the 16th of January I was at the end of Wild-court. I heard the cry of stop thief, and found the blunderbuss lying there.

WILLIAM SMITH . I took the prisoners into custody the next day.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

AUSTIN - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Three Months , and Whipped .

SLATFORD- NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180218-112

481. MARK BROWN and CHARLES NOSEWORTHY were indicted for stealing, on the 11th of February , one coat, value 2s. , the goods of Sarah Spencer .

SARAH SPENCER. I a ma stationer , and live in Sydney-street, Somers-Town . I went out at eleven o'clock in the morning and returned at four in the afternoon. I missed the coat. The prisoner was taken at five o'clock, and the coat brought back.

GEORGIANA BRAND. I am the grand-daughter of the last witness; the coat hung in the parlour; the prisoners came in to look at some valentines - They looked at my work and gave me a penny; they stopped about ten minutes and then went away. We missed the coat. I saw it in the room while they were there.

WILLIAM LOVE . I live in Sydney-street. I saw the prisoners come out of the shop with something concealed under one of their coats. I pursued and stopped them with the coat; I charged them with stealing it, and took them both.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

BROWN - GUILTY . Aged 18.

NOSEWORTHY - GUILTY . Aged 15.

Confined Six Months , and Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180218-113

482. KELLON BLIGHT was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of February , four pewter pots, value 6s., the goods of John Brown ; one pewter pot, value 1s. 6d., the goods of Henry Birch ; one pewter por, value 1s. 6d., the goods of Richard Gardner ; one pewter pot, value 1s. 6d., the goods of Benjamin Perry ; and one pewter pot, value 1s. , the goods of James Clark .

JOHN BROWN. I keep the Southampton Arms, public-house , Camden Town . On the 18th of February I lost four pots; one from my house, and three from my different customers.

JASPER SMITH. I am a constable of Bow-street. On the 18th of February, about ten o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner at Camden Town, and followed him to Charles-street, Hampstead-road, and asked what was in his bag - He said a bird cage. I followed him to Dyot-street, St. Giles's, where I secured him, and found his bag contained five quart and four pint pots, which were claimed by the several persons stated in the indictment.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. They were given to me to carry.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180218-114

483. JAMES COOK was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of January , one watch, value 30s. , the goods of John Temple Warner .

JOHN TEMPLE WARNER. I am a watchmaker , and live in Goswell-street-road . On the 23rd of January I was up stairs, I was called down, and found a pane of glass, which had been broken, moved aside, and the watch gone-the prisoner was in custody.

SAMUEL SAUNDERS. I am a headborough. On the 23d of February, about one o'clock, I heard the cry of Stop thief! some distance from Mr. Warner's door. I found the prisoner in the costody of a gentleman. The gentleman gave me the watch, and told the prisoner he saw him put his hand through the glass and take it out - He did not deny it.

WILLIAM JOHNSON. I joined in the pursuit, and saw the prisoner throw the watch away. The gentleman picked it up. The prisoner did not deny it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Confined Six Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180218-115

484. MARGARET CROSS was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of January , one hat, value 1s.; one waistcoat, value 4d.; one 3s., and one 1s. 6d. bank token, one half-crown, and 6s. the property of George Cottrell , from his person .

GEORGE COTTRELL. I live in Golden-lane. On the 18th of January, about one o'clock at night, I met the prisoner in Golden-lane; I was with her until three o'clock, at her lodgings, in Swan-court , she then pushed me out of the room, and would not let me get my things. I got a constable, went back, and found my hat and waistcoat in different rooms in the house. I gave her no money. I was sober.

JOHN TWEEDY . I am a constable. I found the prisoner's hat and waistcoat in the house. I took the prisoner to the watch-house.

WILLIAM CRUTE. I went to the house, but they would not let me in. I found the prosecutor's hat in the two pair of stairs room.

Prisoner's Defence. He left the things behind him, as he had no money.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180218-116

485. WILLIAM HILL was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of January , one bedstead, value 1l. 15s. , the goods of William Rivett .

WILLIAM RIVETT . I am an upholsterer , and live in Crown-street, Finsbury square . On the 23rd of January, in the evening, I lost my bedstead; my daughter alarmed me, I ran out after the man-it was thrown down on the alarm being given. I ran after the person, when somebody said," he is gone down the court." I ran to where I supposed he must come out-the prisoner ran out. I called Stop thief! I stopped him and never lost sight of him - He turned round and struck me. I was immediately surrounded by a gang; the officer dispersed them.

ELIZABETH RIVETT . I am the daughter of the last witness. I heard a noise at the door, came out, and saw two men assisting to put the bedstead on the prisoner's shoulder. I am sure he is the man. There were lights in the shop. I called my father, he turned towards Crowncourt. The prisoner went down Crown-court. He was taken in about three minutes.

THOMAS FITZGERALD. I am a headborough. I was in my shop in Long-alley. I ran out on hearing the cry, and saw the prisoner pass, and Mr. Rivett following him - He took him, and gave him in my charge.

JOHN BLACKBURN . I am a linen-draper, and live opposite Mr. Rivett. I saw five men come from the court - They appeared connected together - I watched them to the shop; two stood at the door, and two went in, lifted the bedstead out, and put it on to one of their shoulders. Miss Rivett called out, and they threw it down. Miss Rivett was not above five yards from them. I cannot swear to the prisoner.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was in the court, and Mr. Rivett stopped me.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180218-117

486. WILLIAM ARNOLD was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of January , one silk handkerchief, value 2s. , the goods of Eliza Bird .

ELIZA BIRD . I am servant at the Coach and Horses, publichouse , at Islington . I missed two handkerchiefs out of my box-the prisoner was hostler there.

CHARLES ELLIOTT . I am servant at the Cock, public-house, in Old-street. The prisoner gave me the handkerchief.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180218-118

487. GEORGE THORPE and JOSEPH AGGUS were indicted for stealing, on the 9th of January , 60 lbs. of sugar, value 3l., the goods of James Perry ; three pair of stirrup-leathers, value 9s.; three pair of woollen girths, value 6s.; two bridles, value 10s.; two collar-reins, value 2s.; one suit of horse-cloths, value 10s.; two pair of stirrups, value 10s., the goods of Stanlake Batson , Esq. ; three pair of breeches, value 30s.; one waistcoat, value 1s.; three pair of boots, value 1l.; one gun, value 3l., and one pistol, value 10s. , the goods of John Palmer .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating the goods to be the property of Robert Chalk .

JOHN PALMER. I am servant to William Orton , who trains running-horses for Stanlake Batson, Esq. I packed a box at Windsor, and directed it," John Palmer , at Stanlake Batson's, Esq., Horse Heath, Linton, Cambridgeshire"-it contained the articles stated as mine in the indictment; the box was corded.

WILLIAM DAVIS . The box was delivered to me at Windsor. I left it at the waggon-office, at Windsor, to go by Habberton's waggon.

ANDREW RICH. I am book-keeper at the Vine Inn, in Bishopsgate-street. On the 7th of January, I received a box, directed to John Palmer , to go to Horse Heath - I delivered it to William French.

Cross-examined by MR. MARSHAM. I heard of the robbery four days afterwards.

HENRY CRUTCHLEY . I am shopman to Messrs. Davison and Vincent, wholesale grocers, Dowgate-hill. I entered the sugars to Mr. James Perry , and directed it to Sapswell - They were delivered to the Catherine-wheel Inn.

JOSEPH SAYERS . I am carman to Messrs. Davison and Vincent. On the 6th of January, I delivered twenty-seven loaves of sugar at the Catherine-wheel Inn, in Bishopsgate-street, directed to Mr. James Perry , at Sapswell, to go by Chalk's waggon.

WILLIAM FRENCH. I drive Mr. Robert Chalk 's waggon, which goes from the Catherine-wheel Inn, in Bishopsgate-street. I loaded the waggon. Rich gave me the trunk, directed to John Palmer - I put it in the waggon. I put the twenty-seven loaves in the middle of the waggon. I left town about three o'clock in the afternoon. I had every thing safe at Hoddesdon, in Hertfordshire, at half-past ten o'clock at night. I left that place at one o'clock, got to Sapswell about five o'clock in the morning, and missed ten loaves of sugar and the box. The prisoner, Aggus, formerly drove this waggon - He came into the Catherine-wheel yard on that day, and asked me to send him some things from the country.

Cross-examined. It was a deal box. I cannot read. No person drove the waggon with me.

WILLIAM BRANSCOMBE. I am book-keeper at the King's Arms, Snowhill. On the 27th of December a box, directed to Palmer, at Linton, came by the Windsor waggon. I sent it to the Vine Inn on the 7th of January, by Vaughan.

Cross-examined. Q. It had been sometime at your office - A. Yes, a fortnight.

RALPH VAUGHAN . I carried the box to the Vine Inn, and got a receipt for it, which I produce. It was to go by Chalk's waggon.

JOSHUA ARMSTRONG . I am an officer. I and Gleed were at Bethnal-green. I saw a tilted cart-nothing was in it. We went to Webb-square, to a house kept by Parker. We met the prisoner, Thorpe, coming down stairs

with something under his arm, within two stairs of the door. I told him to go up, as we were officers, which he did. I took him into the garret, where I found Wheeler and Cresswell. I saw four loaves of sugar in this room, on a dresser. I found four more in a basket, and a great number of things strewed about the floor. I left him with Gleed, and went into the one-pair room kept by Dunkley, and met Aggus coming out of her room. I took him to Gleed, returned, went into the bed-room, and found the window open. I went into the cellar, which was under the window, and found a bundle-the cellar-flap was up. The bundle contained a pair of breeches and a waistcoat - We took the prisoners to the office - I took the women there also. I found a pistol with the sugars. I advertised the goods.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you not been informed that Parker's house is frequented by improper persons - A. I have. I met Thorpe at the door. Parker lives in the garret.

BARNARD GLEED . I am an officer. I was with Armstrong - He gave the prisoners into my care. The bundle which Thorpe had contained a loaf of sugar. I found a pair of stockings in his pocket. Thorpe said the things were all his own.

JOSHUA ARMSTRONG, JUN. I am an officer. My father sent me to Parker's house. I found the things in the room.

ELIZABETH WHEELER . I went to Parker's house to wash for him, at nine o'clock in the morning. The prisoner, Aggus, came up, and asked for Parker, Cresswell said he was not within. He went down, came up again in about twenty minutes, and asked for him again. Cresswell said she did not know where he was. He came up again in a few minutes, and threw down a large hamper, a handkerchief hung out of it. He brought up one or two more hampers. In a few minutes he came up again with Thorpe-both of them were carrying a large sack - I looked at them. One of them said, "Mind your washing." The officers immediately came in.

Cross-examined. I never knew Parker before that day. I know nothing of it.

Prisoner AGGUS. Q. Did you not carry part of the property into the room - A. No.

MARY CRESSWELL. I went to work at Parker's at velvet-weaving. Aggus came up first, and asked for Parker - I said he was not at home. He went down, returned in half an hour, and asked again for Parker. He returned in a few minutes with a hamper. He went down twice, and brought up a hamper each time-then Thorpe and him brought up a sack, which they put into a room. Aggus afterwards brought up a portmanteau. We were all taken to the office.

Cross-examined. I do not know the day of the month. I suspected there was something wrong.

REBECCA DUNKLEY. I live in the one-pair-of-stairs room in Parker's house. On the 9th of January, the prisoner, Aggus, came into my room, with a bundle under his arm - He was a stranger to me. I asked him who he wanted? he told me to hold my tongue. I heard footsteps on the stairs - He gave me no answer. He heard the footsteps, ran into my bed-room, and threw the bundle on the other side of the bed. I told him I would have nothing left there. He said, "If you will not let me leave it, throw it out of the window." I gave it to him, and he threw it into the cellar. I pushed him out of the backroom-Armstrong was at the door, and took him - I shewed him where the bundle was dropped.

Cross-examined. The window was open. Parker lives in the room where the sugar was found.

JOHN PARKER . I keep the house. I went out at nine o'clock-the property was not there then. I do not know the prisoners.

Cross-examined. I knew the officers. Wheeler never washed for me before.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

THORPE'S Defence. I was employed to carry the property.

AGGUS'S Defence. I now nothing about it.

THORPE - GUILTY . Aged 57.

AGGUS - GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180218-119

488. WILLIAM HOPKINS was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of January , 29 yards of flannel, value 1l. 18s. , the goods of Samuel Castle .

RICHARD OTTLEY . I am shopman to Samuel Castle , who is a hosier , and lives in Oxford-street . On the 30th of January, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, I saw a young man come into the shop, take up the flannel, and giveit to the prisoner, who ran away with it. I pursued, calling out Stop thief! - He threw it down - I collared him. I am sure he is the man.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180218-120

489. JAMES MATHER was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of January , 6lbs. of lard, value 5s. , the goods of John Webber .

CHARLES KESOLEY. I belong to the Stamp Office. On the 17th of January, between ten and eleven o'clock at night, I was opposite Mr. Webber's shop, and saw the prisoner take the lard from the window. I followed him to Great Pulteney-street, he then threw it down, and I seized him. I am sure he is the man.

JAMES EVANS . I was in the shop, and saw a man walking about. After I was served I went out- I saw the prisoner snatch the lard and run away- the gentleman followed him. I saw him throw it away. I am sure he is the man.

JOHN WEBBER. I am a cheesemonger , and live in Gower-street . The lard is mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked it up.

GUILTY . Aged 39.

Confined One Month .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180218-121

490. WILLIAM SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of January , one coat, value 1l.; one waistcoat, value 6s.; one pair of breeches, value 6s.; one shirt, value 4s.; one pair of stockings, value 2s.; one

handkerchief, value 6d., and one pair of gloves, value 6d. , the goods of James Dunkley .

JAMES DUNKLEY . I am a watch-case springer , and live in George-row, St. Luke's . On the 8th of January, the prisoner took a lodging at my house - He slept in the same bed with me. Next morning, my box was broken open, and the articles stated in the indictment gone. No person but him could take them. I got up at eight o'clock in the morning, and left him there. The asp of my lock was broken off.

WILLIAM WOOD . I keep the house. The prisoner came to lodge with me at eight o'clock in the evening, and left the next morning. I saw no more of him till the 17th of January, when I met him, at eight o'clock at night, and charged him with the robbery - He denied having been in the house. I asked him to go to White Lion-yard, to a person who had also been robbed-the woman said he was the man who robbed her. An officer searched the prisoner, and found the prosecutor's shirt on his back, and a handkerchief in his pocket, The prisoner then said he took the things.

THOMAS VANN . I am an officer. I took the prisoner into custody, and found a shirt, a handkerchief, and a pair of ivory studs on him, which the prosecutor claimed.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was out of employ .

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180218-122

491. WILLIAM SMITH was again indicted for stealing, on the 22d of December , two sheets, value 5s.; and one child's dress, value 5s. , the goods of John Wardrope .

LUCY WARDROPE. I live in White Lion-yard, Whitecross-street. On the 22d of December the prisoner took a lodging at my house. Next morning, I missed the sheets and child's dress. The prisoner said he had sold them.

THOMAS VANN . I am an officer. The prisoner said he had sold them.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180218-123

492. WILLIAM STEPHENS was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of February , two loaves of bread, value 2s. , the goods of George Ulrich .

GEORGE ULRICH . I am a baker , and live in Bowling-street, Westminster.

THOMAS COLLINS . I am a journeyman baker. On the 12th of February, about nine o'clock at night, I saw the prisoner come out of the prosecutor's shop with two loaves. I knew him before. I pursued, and took him at the door.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A boy gave them to me to carry.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180218-124

493. WILLIAM COLESELL was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of January , two turkies, price 18s.; two ducks, price 3s., and two fowls, price 3s. , the goods of Edward Vernon Ufferson , Esq.

JOHN COCKMAN . I am servant to Edward Vernon Ufferson, Esq. On the 9th of January, I missed two turkies, two ducks, and two fowls, from our ground at Northwood .

JOSEPH ADAMS . I live at Sudbury. On the 9th of January, about seven o'clock in the morning, I was driving my master's team, on the Harrow-road, to London; the prisoner asked me to let him ride to London - He had a bag. As he got in, a fowl fell out of it - He jumped out, pulled his coat off, and threw it over it, to prevent my seeing it-it was dead. Timlake came up, and asked me what the prisoner had? he said he had some fowls, rooks, and water-cresses. Timlake said it was a rum time of the year for rooks. He then dropped the bag, and ran away, leaving it behind him - We could not stop him; we divided them between us. I gave my master a turkey, which he sent to the prosecutor.

JAMES TIMLAKE . I am a carter. The last witness has spoken correctly. I never saw these before. I produce the wings of my fowls.

(Wings swore to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing of it.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180218-125

494. WILLIAM WEEDHAM was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of February , one pair of boots, value 9s. , the goods of George Nash .

SARAH NASH . I am the wife of George Nash , who is a shoemaker , and lives in Monmouth-street . On the 2d of February, I saw the prisoner come off the step of the door with the boots under his arm. I told my husband, who ran out and took him.

GEORGE NASH. I ran after the prisoner, and took the boots from him - He knocked me down.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined Six Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180218-126

495. MARIA WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of January , one watch, value 6l.; one seal, value 1s., and two keys, value 6d., the goods of Robert Tipple , from his person .

ROBERT TIPPLE . I am a plumber . On the 17th of January, at ten o'clock at night, I met the prisoner in Whitecross-street, and went home with her to Chequer-alley. She went out of the room and took my watch with her. I am sure she is the woman.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180218-127

496. JOHN GEORGE was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of February , 10 quarts of malt, value 3s. , the goods of John Trueman Villebois , Henry Villebois , Sampson Hanbury , Thomas Fowel Buxton , Thomas Butts Aveling , Thomas Marlborough Prior , and Robert Prior .

WILLIAM MOORE. I loaded Messrs. Hanbury's malt at Stamford-hill-the prisoner drove the cart. I put twentysix sacks of malt in it.

JOHN WILBORN . I am a bargeman. I watched the prisoner, and saw him untie three sacks, take a quantity of

malt out, and put it into an empty sack. I asked him if he was not ashamed of himself for stealing the malt? he said he was not. I walked to Newington with him-he then asked me to have some drink, I refused. I informed Messrs. Hanbury and Co. of it.

THOMAS HOBSON . I am miller to Messrs. Hanbury and Co. I examined the sacks which the prisoner brought, and found there were 6lbs. deficient. Two sacks had been untied, and some malt taken out.

THOMAS DOBBEN . I am clerk to the prosecutors-their names are rightly stated in the indictment.

Prisoner's Defence. I was afraid of the cart being overweight.

NOT GUILTY ,

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180218-128

497. JAMES SILVESTER was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of January , 18s. 6d. in monies numbered , the monies of Robert Hone .

ROBERT HONE. I am an oilman , and live in Goswell-street. On the 6th of January, the prisoner came into the shop, and ordered two quarts of vinegar, and change for a 1l. note, to be sent to Mr. Selby. I gave it to Gilliver.

SAMUEL GILLIVER . I am servant to Mr. Hone. I took the vinegar and 18s. 6d.. When I got to the bottom of Percival-street, the prisoner stood at the door, told me to give him the 18s. 6d., and take the vinegar into the kitchen - I gave him the change. I found no vinegar had been ordered.

GEORGE SELBY . I live in the Islington-road-the prisoner was once my servant, but not at that time. I never sent him for any vinegar.

THOMAS BURRIDGE. I took the prisoner in charge.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Six Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180218-129

498. ANN SPENCER was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of January , from the person of Thomas Davis , seven 1l. bank notes , his property.

THOMAS DAVIS. I am a butcher , and live in Old Belton-street, Long-acre. I was coming up Holborn on the 23d of January, about ten o'clock at night, and met the prisoner in Holborn; she asked me for something to drink, and called me by my name. I told her I did not know her - I gave her something to drink. I took her and another woman into the Punch-bowl, public-house. I pulled my notes out to pay for it-the other woman then left me. The prisoner persuaded me to go down Newton-street. When we got to Charles-street, the prisoner wanted me to go up a passage, I refused. I took her into another public-house; and gave her more liquor. I pulled my notes out again, and let them fall, the prisoner picked them up, and I put them into my pocket. I came out, and asked the patrol to see me out of the street - the prisoner still went with me. She took me down a passage - We talked together for ten minutes. I felt her put her hand to my pocket, and missed my notes. She ran away, I called out, Stop thief!-the watchman stopped her, he found nothing on her.

WILLIAM SMITH . I am a patrol. I was in Newton-street, and saw the prisoner and prosecutor go down Charles-street, a man stood under the wall - I thought he spoke to the prisoner; they went into the Coach and Horses, public-house-the man looked through the window. They came out, and went into Drury-lane, and had half a pint of gin together. In about ten minutes, the prisoner was brought to the watch-house.

DANIEL DUNN . I saw the prisoner running, and stopped her.

PATRICK CRAWLEY. I keep the Coach and Horses, public-house. The prisoner and prosecutor had some rum at my house-the prosecutor threw his notes on the bar, I told him to take them up-the prisoner told him to mind, or he would lose them.

Prisoner's Defence. I never robbed him; I remembered I had to meet a person, and left him, the watchman stopped me.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180218-130

599. HENRY PALMER was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of January , certain iron fencing, (to wit) eighteen yards of iron chain, value 6s., the property of Sarah Browning ; set up and fixed, in a certain place, called Newington-green , he having no title, or claim of title to it .

STEPHEN WILLIS . I am servant to Mrs. Sarah Browning , who lives at Newington-green. On the 31st of January, we missed eighteen yards of iron chain, which was fixed there, from post to post, opposite the house-it was not fixed to any part of the house, the posts were driven into the ground.

JOHN UPTON . I am a Bow-street officer. On the 30th of January, about a quarter after six o'clock at night, I met the prisoner, in the Lower-road, Islington, he was coming from towards Newington-green, with a bag on his shoulder, I stopped him, and asked what was in the bag; he said, it was an iron chain, and threw it down; he said, he bought it of a man at Stamford-hill, for 7s.; he said, he did not know the man. I found the bag contained chain; I took him to the office - He begged for mercy; he then said, he got it from Newington-green, off the posts, with a stick; I took the chain there and fitted it in the posts,

WILLIAM SHIRES. I was with Upton; he has spoken correctly; I found an iron-crow on the spot where the prisoner was stopped.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was in distress.

GUILTY . Aged 59.

Confined Six Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180218-131

500. WILLIAM PRIOR and THOMAS SMITH were indicted for stealing, on the 9th of February , one silk handkerchief, value 5s., the goods of Thomas Isaacs , from his person .

THOMAS ISAACS . I am a shoemaker , and live in Castle-street, City-road. On the 9th of February, about three o'clock in the afternoon, I was going up the City-road , I had my handkerchief safe; a boy came up and told me I had lost it - I then missed it. I went up to the prisoners and charged them with taking it; there was three of them in company, they denied it, and walked away together; I ran after them, they then ran; I called out stop theif;

I overtook them, and saw Prior throw the handkerchief down; I picked it up; when they were stopped, Smith struck me, and tried to trip me up.

ELY WOLSTENHOLM. I live in Trafalgar-street, City-road, I received information, and told Isaacs, he had lost his handkerchief; he asked the prisoners for it, they denied having of it, and said, they were willing to be searched; there was another boy with them; Isaacs said he wanted an officer. Prior said he was in a hurry, and if he did not search him, he should go; he went, Isaacs was going to follow him. Smith struck him several times, and tried to trip him up. I pursued, and at the corner of Bunhill-row, I saw Prior throw the handkerchief down; the officer took him, he tried to get away; Smith tried to rescue him; the other man went away.

AMBROSE BLACKFORD . I am servant to Mr. Pearson, an upholdsterer, in the Strand; I was in the City-road, and saw the prisoners and another, in company together, round Mr. Isaacs, one of them took the handkerchief out of his pocket, I could not see which. I told Wolstenholm, who informed Isaacs.

THOMAS VANN. I am a constable; I was coming from Bunhill-row-heard the cry of, stop thief, and seized Prior, who was running; he tried to get away. Smith was pointed out as the other - I took him; he also tried to escape.

WILLIAM CARTER . I am a watchman; I saw Vann take the prisoners, Smith got away; I secured him; he tried to rescue the other prisoner.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

PRIOR - GUILTY . Aged 17.

SMITH - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180218-132

501. WILLIAM MORTICE was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of February , nineteen pounds of steel, value 14s. , the goods of Hestal Warren .

HESTAL WARREN. I live in Leonard-street, the prisoner was my apprentice - I never lost any steel.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180218-133

502. GEORGE MARSHALL was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of February , one umbrella, value 5s. the goods of George Laight ,

SAMUEL CUBIT . I am servant to George Laight, who is an umbrella maker . On the 2nd of February, Taylor brought the prisoner and an umbrella to me, which was ours; I had seen it in the shop a quarter of an hour before; he charged the prisoner with stealing it; he knelt down and begged pardon. Taylor said, in his presence, that he saw him take it - He has not appeared since.

WILLIAM WAINWRIGHT . I am an officer, the prisoner was given into my charge; I found 2s. 7d. on him. I asked him how he came to steal it; he said, he was going to sea, and took it to buy some clothes.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 20.

Judgment Respited .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180218-134

503. THOMAS EDGINTON was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of January , 150lbs. of iron, value 3s. , the goods of William Bound .

WILLIAM CLAPTON . I am servant to William Bound, who lives in Ray-street , the prisoner formerly lived with him. Having lost a great quantity of iron, I concealed myself in the passage. On the 7th of January, about half-past seven o'clock, a person went into the cellar - I heard the iron rattle, it was the prisoner; I followed him, he had a bag, with about 150lbs. of cannon-shot iron. I seized him with it.

Prisoner. I was in the greatest distress.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Fined One Shilling , and Discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180218-135

504. MARY CULLEN was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of February , 11s. in monies numbered, the property of Henry Osler , from his person .

HENRY OSLER . I am clerk to an auctioneer , and live in Ossulston-street, Somers Town. On the 16th of February, about half-past twelve o'clock at night, I was returning from the Circus, and met the prisoner opposite Smart's-buildings, Holborn , she crossed over to me and asked me for 6d.; I refused - She caught hold of me; I told her I had not got one; she still wished me to go with her; I refused, I at last gave her 6d., to get rid of her, and got myself from her forcibly. I put my hand in my pocket, and missed 11s.; nobody, but her, had been near enough to take it. I caught hold of her, and accused her of it; she denied it; I put my hand against her pocket, and heard money gingle. I called the watchman, he came up and took her; I described the money, before she was searched; there was 5s., and two 18d. pieces, among it; he found it on her, as I had described it.

ANTHONY CHUBNAL . I am a watchman, and heard the prosecutor call; I went up, he accused the prisoner with stealing 11s. from him; he said, there was a half-crown, 6d., two 18d. pieces, and 5s. I took her to the watchhouse, and found exactly that money on her, and 6d. in her mouth, which he said he gave her. She wanted to put her hand into her pocket; I prevented her.

Prisoner's Defence. I had changed half a sovereign, and that was my money.

GUILTY . Aged 34.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180218-136

505. EDWARD SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of November , two fixtures (to wit) two coppers, value 3l., the goods of Thomas Clark , Esq. , and fixed to a certain building of his, the prisoner having no title, or claim of title, to them .

THOMAS AUGUSTINE FINIGAN. I am master of the Irish free-school, George-street, St. Giles's, the buildings belong to Thomas Clark , Esq. On the 15th of November, I left it safe, about five o'clock in the afternoon, and took the key with me; the coppers were fixed to the building, nobody sleeps there. I returned on the 17th of November, and missed them, at nine o'clock in the morning; I told Mr. Clark they were moved from the bricks and mortar. I saw them again in the possession of Furzeman, three days after.

THOMAS CLARK , ESQ. I am a magistrate of Middlesex, and treasurer of the Irish free school-the premises are mine.

JOHN FRENCH. I am a watchman of Crown-street, which is about a quarter of a mile from George-street. On the 17th of November, about half-past six o'clock in the morning, I saw a man come out of Lloyd's-court, into Crown-street, with something on his head, covered with matting, and corded. Kelly, who was with me, asked him what he had there? he said, they were coppers, and went on. I stopped him, and asked where he was going with them; he said, to Mr. Pontifex, in Shoe-lane, who was his master; he had one large, and one small copper. I told him that was not the way, and he must go to the watch-house; as we were taking him there, he threw them on me, in Bowlyard, knocked me down, and made his escape; I took him about ten days after; I believe the prisoner to be the man.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. I will not swear to him.

WILLIAM KELLY. I am a watchman. I was with French, the prisoner is the man; I knew him before; he said, he got them from Oxford-street - he threw the coppers at French, and ran off - I pursued, but lost him.

SAMUEL FURZEMAN . I apprehended the prisoner, on the 4th of February, in consequence of the information which Kelly gave me.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 35.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180218-137

506. JOHN BINKIN was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of January , one pair of trowsers, value 10s. the goods of William Anderton .

WILLIAM ANDERTON . I am a pawnbroker , and live in Cannon-street-road, St. Georg's . On the 22nd of January, about four o'clock in the afternoon, two men came to my door, one of them took hold of my trowsers, and said, are you ready; he then pulled them down. I called out, and saw him throw them away, his companion, who was the prisoner, ran with him. I took him and am sure he is the boy.

GUILTY Aged 17.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180218-138

507. FREDERICK ROLFE was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of January , five tea-spoons, value 10s. and one table-spoon, value 5s. , the goods of Joseph Wallis .

ELIZA WALLIS . I am the wife of Joseph Wallis, Norfolk-street, Blackwall . On the 17th of January, as I was in the kitchen, I saw the prisoner going out of the door, which had been left open. I charged him with stealing something; he asked, if Mr. Montague lived there; I told him no, and that he must have stolen something; he then produced the five tea-spoons, and ran off; he was stopped, and the table-spoon found upon him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was in distress, having a wife and five children.

GUILTY . Aged 47.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180218-139

508. MARY M'CARTHY was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of February , one pelisse, value 5s.; one tippet, value 5s., and one stocking, value 6d. , the goods of Mary Dalley .

MARY DALLEY. I live in John-street, New-road. On the 2nd of February, I slept with the prisoner, at her lodgings, in Orchard-street , when I awoke, I could not find my pelisse, tippet, nor stocking, she was still in bed. I went home without them; in the evening I went back, and found she had my pelisse on; I asked her for it, she said, she would give it to me presently. I took her to the watch-house.

WILLIAM RENNY . I am a constable; the prisoner was brought to the watch-house; she said, she found the pelisse.

Prisoner's Defence. She left them behind her in the room.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180218-140

509. ESTHER KING was indicted for stealing on the 19th of February , one pair of shoes, value 4s. the goods of John Graves .

JOHN GRAVES . I am a shoemaker , and live in the Hay-market . On the 19th of February, at eight o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came to my shop, and asked for a pair of shoes; I shewed her nine pair, none of whioh would suit her; she went out. I saw her look back, which made me suspect her; I went after her, and told her she had stolen a pair of shoes; she denied it - I found them under her gown.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I found them.

GUILTY . Aged 37.

Confined Six Months

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180218-141

510. JOHN SUMNER , WILLIAM MAILE , and JOHN GREEN were indicted for stealing on the 14th of February , ten live tame fowls, price 20s. , the goods of Catherine Harding , and SARAH LLOYD was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing them to have been stolen .

CATHARINE HARDING . I live at Messrs. Poynder and Hobson's wharf, Paddington . On the 14th of February, in the evening, I locked up my ten fowls, in a place by my house; next morning I found it broken open, and ten of them gone. The prisoner Maile, lived at a public-house near me-Lloyd lived in the Edgware-road.

RICHARD GEE. I work at the wharf, which is fenced off from the canal, I found the heads of the fowls, and their blood, lying by the door. I traced them by the blood and feathers, into a boat, in the Grand Junction-wharf, which is a 100 yards off, and found feathers, and blood in the cabin-the prisoner Green worked that boat; I found him at a cook-shop; he said, he knew nothing about it, and that he slept at the White Lion, that night; the landlord told

him he did not; he then said, he laid in the boat, with Meade, Sumner, and Maile; I afterwards took Meade.

Cross-examined. by MR. MARCHAM. The chickens were not found. Green said he did not steal them.

WILLIAM SELLERS. I am a constable. On Sunday the 15th of February, about one o'clock in the afternoon, Coates, and I, went and took Summer, Maile, and Meade, at the Horse and Sacks, public-house; while I was searching them, Meade began to cry, and said, that he, Sumner, and Maile, got into the wharf, between twelve and one o'clock-Sumner broke the lock, and they took the fowls, and cut four of their heads off; they then took them on board Green's boat, and next morning at seven o'clock, he Sumner, and Maile, carried them to Lloyd's; Sumner took them in, and that they staid out; Sumner came out with them, and said she was not up; that they went again in half an hour; Sumner came out, and said he sold them for 10s., and gave him 2s., and Maile and Green, 18d. each; that they then went to the Horse and Sacks, to drink-the other prisoners were present, and did not deny it-they must have heard it. I went and took Lloyd, on Monday at eight o'clock, and told her what Meade said; she said, if she had known, she would have been out of the way - She keeps an old iron shop. I found feathers, and blood, in a tub, in the shop.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Meade said he went to Lloyd's at half-past seven o'clock.

Cross-examined by MR. MARSHAM. The watch-house is a large place-the prisoners must have heard.

RICHARD COATES . I am a constable; I assisted in taking the prisoners, Meade was in the watch-house, and gave this account-the other prisoners were not present, when Meade gave this account; they were locked up. I took Mrs. Lloyd into custody, she said, she knew nothing about it.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. The other prisoners could not hear what Meade said-Lloyd was admitted to bail.

COURT. Q. How long have you known her to live there - A. Eight or ten years, she keeps fowls, there was some live ones in the shop.

JOSEPH MEADE . I work for Mr. Franklin, between twelve and one o'clock in the morning, Sumner, Maile and I, went to Harding's premises, and got over the wall-Sumner broke the lock, and took ten live fowls out; we killed them, and took them to Macintosh's boat, where Green was; he was not with us when we stole them. Next morning between seven and eight o'clock, we took them to Lloyd's-Sumner carried them in; he came out, and said she would be up in half an hour; we took them there again, in half an hour; Sumner came out, and said, he had sold them for 10s., and gave me 2s. 6d. - after that we went to the Horse and Sacks; the officers came and took us. I gave Sellers this account-the prisoners were not present at the time.

Cross-examined by MR.ALLEY. I am sixteen years old, I never went thieving before - I slept in Green's boat.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. It was between seven and eight o'clock, when we took them to Lloyd's.

Cross-examined by MR. MARSHAM. We cut off some of their heads, and twisted the others - I never saw Lloyd.

LLOYD'S Defence. I never saw them.

WILLIAM HILTON. I am the prisoner Lloyd's son-in-law, my wife was laying in, in consequence of which, I slept in Lloyd's house. On the 14th of February, I was the first up; I went out to get a glass of liquor at seven o'clock, and returned immediately, and am positive, no person went out, or came in, before nine o'clock that morning. Lloyd got up at seven o'clock, the fowls were never brought there.

DAVID LLOYD. I am the prisoner Lloyd's son. On Sunday morning, the 14th of February, I got up at eight o'clock; Hilton slept with me - He got up first - He did not go out, that I know of; nobody came in before ten o'clock - They could not come in without my knowing it; I slept in the back parlour, behind the shop-nobody brought any fowls there.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180218-142

511. MICHAEL NAPTHALI was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of February , 101 glass illuminators, value 30l. , the property of Apsley Pellatt , Sen. , James Green , and William Leader .

THOMAS CARTER . I am servant to Messrs. Pellatt and Co. On Saturday evening, about five o'clock, I left my cart standing opposite Trigg Wharf , with four casks of broken illuminators, and five baskets of whole illuminators. I returned in about ten minutes and missed four baskets.

Cross-examined by MR. WALFORD. They weighed about three-quarters of a cwt.

HENRY JACOBS . I live in Artillery-passage, Bishopsgate-street, in the county of Middlesex. On Sunday, the 9th of February, the prisoner came to my private door about nine o'clock, and brought me a piece of broken glass, he asked me if I would buy any, for he had some to sell. I said I did not want them.

SAMUEL SIMONDS. On the 8th of February the prisoner came to my shop, about ten o'clock at night, at Ravenrow, Spitalfields, and asked if I wanted to buy any broken glass - He asked me a guinea a cwt.; he said they were very stout pieces, and that he sold them for chandelier drops. I told him I would give 1l. a cwt.; he said as he wished to get rid of it I should have it. I told him to bring it immediately - He and another man brought it in two baskets. I told him I could not conveniently weigh it then; he said he had weighed forty of them, and they weighed ten pounds; and he calculated that the whole would weigh two hundred and a half. I gave him 2l. on account until I could weigh it, and told him to call next morning for the rest. Next day he came I told him there was a great many small pieces, and I would only give him five shillings more - He took it. About a week or ten days after I was apprehended myself, when I gave this account. I never saw him again until he was taken.

Cross-examined. They charged me with stealing it.

Q. Have you never been charged here as a receiver of stolen goods - A. No.

JUDITH SIMONDS. I am the wife of the last witness. The prisoner is the man that brought the glass, and received the money. I afterwards met the prisoner in Bishopsgate-street, and told him the glass was not weight, and asked him to go to Mr. Mosely's where he would see

it weighed. I told him that to get him apprehended. He said he did not like to be seen, as there was a reward of 5l. offered. He said he could not stop.

WILLIAM ATTFIELD. On the 17th of February I apprehended the prisoner at the Jolly Weavers, public-house, Angel-alley, Long-alley, where the glass was found. I told him I took him on suspicion of stealing glass; he said he knew nothing about it, and would not go with me. He was in the skittle ground, surrounded by twenty persons, whom I knew to be common thieves - They rushed on me and rescued him; they had called to him to know what the charge was for. He was taken that day.

JOSHUA ARMSTRONG . I went to the same house, and found the glass.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

MR. APSLEY PELLATT, JUN. The firm of the house is rightly described in the indictment.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing of it.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180218-143

512. JOHN BENNETT and JOHN LAIRD were indicted for stealing, on the 18th of February , one handkerchief, value 5s., the goods of John Peche , from his person .

JOHN PECHE. I am a clerk in the Ordnance Office . On the 18th of February, I was going home, about five o'clock in the afternoon, when I got to my lodgings in Lamb's Conduit-street, I missed my handkerchief - A friend told me of it.

JOHN BREEZE . I am in the same office with Mr. Peche. I was in Red Lion-square, and saw Bennett take the handkerchief out of the prosecutor's pocket and give it to Laird - They both ran away. I never lost sight of them. A cry was raised and they separated. I took Bennett. Laird was taken immediately. I am sure they are the persons.

WILLIAM MEGGS . I am a bookseller in Lamb's Conduit-passage. I heard the cry of stop thief, and saw the prisoners at the top of Red Lion-street, I followed and secured Laird. I never lost of him. I saw him throw the handkerchief down. I picked it up.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

BENNETT - GUILTY . Aged 18.

LAIRD - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180218-144

513. JAMES IRELAND was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of February , one muff, value 2l. , the goods of Jane Handley .

JANE HANDLEY. I live in Aldersgate-street . On the 9th of February, I lost a muff from my shop about half-past five o'clock in the evening. It laid in the window in the evening.

JOHN TWEEDY . I am a headborough. On the 9th of February, about six o'clock in the evening, I was going by the prosecutor's shop, and saw the prisoner, and three or four more lads lurking about the shop, I heard one of them whistle, I crossed over and saw the prisoner and another boy go up to the door, he stooped under the window and ran away - A girl came and bolted the door; in a minute after two or three customers went into the shop, and while they were being served the door was left open, the prisoner immediately followed in behind one of the customers, and snatched the muff from the window, and handed it to a companion, both went away together. I pursued, and took one of them in Brick-lane, with the muff - He is now ill. I took the prisoner at twelve o'clock at night in Wood's-place, Chequer-alley.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 10.

Judgment Respited .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180218-145

514. THOMAS JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of February , two bags, value 30s , the goods of William Crisp .

RICHARD WARNER . I am shopman to Mr. Crisp, who is a portable writing-desk manufacturer , and lives in Cockspur-street. On the 6th of February, between five and six o'clock in the evening, I was shutting up, and saw the prisoner in the shop, taking two bags off the rails behind the counter. I immediately secured him in the shop.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I did not intend to steal them.

GUILTY . Aged 45.

Confined Six Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180218-146

515. ELIZA DILLON was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of February , one guinea, one sovereign, and one half sovereign, the monies of Joseph Cuthbert , from his person .

JOSEPH CUTHBERT . I am a linen-draper . On Sunday, the 1st of February, I spent the day with a friend-on my return home, at twelve o'clock at night, I met the prisoner in Holborn, and walked to Long-acre with her-when we got there, I thought I felt her hand in my pocket. I charged her with robbing me. I missed a guinea a sovereign and a half from my left-hand waistcoat pocket - She was on my right side. I gave her in charge. I was not sober.

WILLIAM NETTLETON . I am an officer. I searched the prisoner at the watch-house, and found a guinea, a sovereign and a half upon her, with other money. She said it was her own. They were both drunk.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180218-147

516. MARGARET DOWNEY was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of February , one sheet, value 10s.; one shift, value 4s.; one table-cloth, value 2s.; one bed-gown, value 2s.; four pinnafores, value 4s.; one pillow-case, value 1s.; one napkin, value 1s.; one shawl, value 2s., and one towel, value 6d. , the goods of George Sellers .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating them to be the property of Henry Stubbings .

MARY SELLERS . I am the wife of George Sellers ; I am a laundress, and live in Tottenham-court-road. On the 14th of January, the prisoner came down, and asked if Mrs. Stubbings's things were done? I said, Yes, and gave them to her - She paid me 2d. for them. I am sure she is the woman. I have known her two years.

LYDIA STUBBINGS. I live in Tottenham-court-road. I sent the articles stated in the indictment to Mrs. Sellers to mangle. I never sent the prisoner for them - I do not know her. I have never seen them since.

MARY IDLE . I was in Sellers' kitchen with her. The prisoner came and received the bundle. I am sure she is the person.

WILLIAM SHEPHERD. I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I never had them.

NICHOLAS BROWN. I heard the prisoner say she was at the mangler's between seven and eight o'clock on that day.

GUILTY . Aged 64.

Confined One Year .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180218-148

517. PATRICK CONNELL and MICHAEL DONOVAN were indicted for stealing, on the 5th of February , one knife, value 2d.; one comb, value 1d., and 7s. in monies numbered, the goods and monies of James Day , from his person .

JAMES DAY. I am a publican . Between five and six o'clock, on the 5th of February, I went into the Swan, public-house, in Swan-yard, Strand -the prisoners followed me in, and wished me to understand that I knew the father of one of them. One of them struck me, and a scuffle ensued, I found my pockets turned inside out, and my money gone - I was not sober. One of them offered to lay me a wager. I am sure they are the men. They ran away.

CHARLES WILLIAMS . I keep the Swan, public-house. Day came in, the prisoners also came in. They were laying wagers that Day knew the father of one of them. Day took out two half-crowns to lay - A scuffle ensued, and his pockets were turned inside out.

FRANCIS MANNING. On the 16th of February I apprehended the prisoners.

WILLIAM MAY . I was at the Swan, public-house. Day came in-the prisoners came in, and they began scuffling together. Day pulled out two half-crowns, and offered to lay a wager. I heard some money fall on the ground, as if they had turned his pocket out.

CONNELL'S Defence. The prosecutor was in the house with a girl - He began quarrelling with another man.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180218-149

518. PATRICK CONLIN was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of February , 643lbs. of iron, value 6l. , the goods of John Smith .

JOHN SMITH . I am a blacksmith , and live in Little Britain. On the 29th of January, the prisoner came, and ordered some bars of iron at my shop for Mr. Herbert. He took eight bars with him, and afterwards had four more - He said he was to take them to Cavendish-square. On the 12th of February he had more. The foreman came to my shop, and I told him of it - He said, they never had the iron, nor did they want them.

JAMES READ. I delivered the bars of iron to the prisoner - He said they were for Mr. Herbert.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180218-150

519. JOHN BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of January , one pair of trowsers, value 18s. , the goods of Joseph Baylis and John Aickin .

WILLIAM COX. I am shopman to Messrs. Joseph Baylis and John Aickin , who are pawnbrokers , and live in Upper Marylebone-street . On the 27th of January, between four and five o'clock, I was in the shop, and saw a man run away with a pair of trowsers. I ran to the door, and saw the prisoner running with them - He was stopped, and brought back. He knocked us both down.

(Property produced and sworn to.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Confined Six Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180218-151

520. SARAH BENNETT was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of December , one quilt, value 8s.; one sheet, value 3s.; one iron, value 6d.; and one pail, value 3s., the goods of James Martin , in a lodging-room .

The prosecutor not appearing, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180218-152

521. SARAH BEER was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of February , two sheets, value 4s.; one shift, value 2s., and one handkerchief, value 1s. , the goods of Simon Myland .

ELEANOR MYLAND. I am the wife of Simon Myland , who is a sawyer , and lives in Hawkes-street . On the 14th of February, about eleven o'clock, the prisoner came into my kitchen, and asked me to let her sit there, as she was going to Bond-street. She staid an hour and a half, and went away - She came again at six o'clock in the evening; the things hung by the fire. I went up stairs, returned in five minutes, and missed both them and the prisoner. I left my children with her. I never found the property.

DAVID MYLAND . I was left with the prisoner. She took the things in her apron, and went out of the house. I am sure she is the woman.

ANN MYLAND . My mother described the prisoner to me. I met her, and gave her in charge.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not take the things.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Confined Six Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180218-153

522. WILLIAM BINGLEY was indicted for stealing' on the 20th of January , one coat, value 10s. , the goods of a certain person or persons unknown.

CHARLES BOULTON. I am an officer. I was in the New-road, saw the prisoner running with the coat, and hearing the cry of Stop thief, I stopped him. I did not know that it was stolen.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180218-154

523. WILLIAM ARNOLD was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of February , one pair of overalls, value 5s., and one jacket, value 5s. , the goods of John Chevins .

JOHN CHEVINS. I am a gentleman's servant . On the 10th of February, at five o'clock in the evening, I lost my things out of the stable.

JOHN TASKER . I live in Marylebone-lane. On the 10th of February I was looking out of the window, and saw the prisoner go down to the stable with a key, open the door, and come out with the coat and overalls.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined Six Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180218-155

524. JOHN WATKINS was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of February , 28 yards of printed cotton, value 30s. , the goods of John Hughes .

PHILIP PALMER. I am shopman to John Hughes, who is a linen-draper , and lives in St. John-street . On the 19th of February, about one o'clock, the prisoner was brought to the shop with the goods.

WILLIAM EDWARDS . I am an officer. On the 19th of February, about one o'clock, I saw the prisoner and another man lurking about the shop. The prisoner made several attempts to take the print, without success-at last he took it, and ran off. I stopped him, and took it from him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was out of employ .

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Six Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180218-156

525. ANN PERCY was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of February , two pair of stockings, value 2s., and one handkerchief, value 6d. , the goods of John Algiar .

ANN ALGIAR . I am the wife of John Algiar , we keep an eating-house on Saffron-hill ; about Christmas, I took the prisoner into my employ, out of pity. On the 5th of February, my things hung to dry in the bed-room, I missed the stockings and handkerchief - She absconded.

WILLIAM WILLIAMSON. I am a pawnbroker-the prisoner pledged the stockings and handkerchief, with me, on the 6th of February.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 33.

Confined One Year .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180218-157

526. JOHN HILLIARD was indicted for stealing, on the first of February , one pair of boots, value 7s. 6d., the goods of Thomas Bishop ; one shirt, value 3s., the goods of John Blanchard ; one pair of gaiters, value 3s , the goods of Charles Knight .

CHARLES KNIGHT . I am a waiter at the King's Head, Old-change . On the 1st of February, I employed the prisoner to clean shoes-the articles stated in the indictment, where in the place where he was. I went out, and met him with a bundle; I did not suspect him - I returned and missed the things. I met him again, and charged him with stealing them - He ran off, I followed, and secured him.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180218-158

527. GEORGE SPICER * was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of January , four quarts of oil, value 5s. , the goods of Walter Blanchard .

* On the prisoner being arrainged he did not plead to the Indictment, but stated that he was totally deaf. The Jury being impannelled to try whether he stood mute wilfully, maliciously, and obstinately, or by the visitation of God; said he stood mute by the visitation of God. The Court ordered the plea of Not Guilty to be recorded on both Indictments, and the Trial proceeded.

WALTER BLANCHARD. I am a lamplighter ; on the 23rd of January, I left my cann of oil chained to an area gate, of the Duke of York, public-house, Great Marylebone-street - I left it for three-quarters of an hour, to trim my lamps; when I returned, I found four or five quarts had been taken out of it. Perry came and said he had the prisoner in custody.

THOMAS PERRY . I am a lamplighter; on the 23rd of January, about a quarter after nine o'clock, I saw the prisoner run up Wimpole-street, to go towards my cann of oil - He had a cann in his hand - He turned round, saw me coming, and turned back; I secured him - He begged forgiveness, and asked me to let him go; his cann contained above five quarts of oil.

WALTER BLANCHARD . It appeared to be my oil, from the quality and the quantity I lost.

Prisoner's Defence. It is my own.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180218-159

528. GEORGE SPICER was again indicted for stealing on the 15th of October , four quarts of oil, value 5s. the goods of William Bayes .

WILLIAM BAYES . I left my cann of oil, at the top of a building, in Little Portland-street - nobody could get at it without a ladder. On the 15th of October, I lost four quarts of it.

JAMES MARGRAM. I saw the prisoner go up a ladder, to the top of the leads, and come down - He took the cann away, with a great deal of oil in it.

Prisoner's Defence. I was never there.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.


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